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Sample records for materials compatibility testing

  1. Materials Compatibility in High Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    1999-01-01

    Previous ratings of the compatibility of high test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials are not adequate for current needs. The goal of this work was to develop a new scheme of evaluation of compatibility of HTP with various materials. Procedures were developed to enrich commercially available hydrogen peroxide to 90% concentration and to assay the product. Reactivity testing, accelerated aging of materials and calorimetry studies were done on HTP with representative metallic and non-metallic materials. It was found that accelerated aging followed by concentration determination using refractive index effectively discriminated between different Class 2 metallic materials. Preliminary experiments using Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC) suggest that a calorimetry experiment is the most sensitive means to assay the compatibility of HTP with materials.

  2. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graf, Neil A.; Hudgins, Richard J.; McBain, Michael

    2000-01-01

    The development of polymer composite liquid oxygen LO2 tanks is a critical step in creating the next generation of launch vehicles. Future launch vehicles need to minimize the gross liftoff weight (GLOW), which is possible due to the 25%-40% reduction in weight that composite materials could provide over current aluminum technology. Although a composite LO2 tank makes these weight savings feasible, composite materials have not historically been viewed as "LO2 compatible." To be considered LO2 compatible, materials must be selected that will resist any type of detrimental, combustible reaction when exposed to usage environments. This is traditionally evaluated using a standard set of tests. However, materials that do not pass the standard tests can be shown to be safe for a particular application. This paper documents the approach and results of a joint NASA/Lockheed Martin program to select and verify LO2 compatible composite materials for liquid oxygen fuel tanks. The test approach developed included tests such as mechanical impact, particle impact, puncture, electrostatic discharge, friction, and pyrotechnic shock. These tests showed that composite liquid oxygen tanks are indeed feasible for future launch vehicles.

  3. Double Retort System for Materials Compatibility Testing

    SciTech Connect

    V. Munne; EV Carelli

    2006-02-23

    With Naval Reactors (NR) approval of the Naval Reactors Prime Contractor Team (NRPCT) recommendation to develop a gas cooled reactor directly coupled to a Brayton power conversion system as the Space Nuclear Power Plant (SNPP) for Project Prometheus (References a and b) there was a need to investigate compatibility between the various materials to be used throughout the SNPP. Of particular interest was the transport of interstitial impurities from the nickel-base superalloys, which were leading candidates for most of the piping and turbine components to the refractory metal alloys planned for use in the reactor core. This kind of contamination has the potential to affect the lifetime of the core materials. This letter provides technical information regarding the assembly and operation of a double retort materials compatibility testing system and initial experimental results. The use of a double retort system to test materials compatibility through the transfer of impurities from a source to a sink material is described here. The system has independent temperature control for both materials and is far less complex than closed loops. The system is described in detail and the results of three experiments are presented.

  4. Oxygen Compatibility Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Watkins, Casey N.

    2006-01-01

    Composite materials offer significant weight-saving potential for aerospace applications in propellant and oxidizer tanks. This application for oxygen tanks presents the challenge of being oxygen compatible in addition to complying with the other required material characteristics. This effort reports on the testing procedures and data obtained in examining and selecting potential composite materials for oxygen tank usage. Impact testing of composites has shown that most of these materials initiate a combustion event when impacted at 72 ft-lbf in the presence of liquid oxygen, though testing has also shown substantial variability in reaction sensitivities to impact. Data for screening of 14 potential composites using the Bruceton method is given herein and shows that the 50-percent reaction frequencies range from 17 to 67 ft-lbf. The pressure and temperature rises for several composite materials were recorded to compare the energy releases as functions of the combustion reactions with their respective reaction probabilities. The test data presented are primarily for a test pressure of 300 psia in liquid oxygen. The impact screening process is compared with oxygen index and autogenous ignition test data for both the composite and the basic resin. The usefulness of these supplemental tests in helping select the most oxygen compatible materials is explored. The propensity for mechanical impact ignition of the composite compared with the resin alone is also examined. Since an ignition-free composite material at the peak impact energy of 72 ft-lbf has not been identified, composite reactivity must be characterized over the impact energy level and operating pressure ranges to provide data for hazard analyses in selecting the best potential material for liquid tank usage.

  5. Materials Compatibility Testing in Concentrated Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boxwell, R.; Bromley, G.; Mason, D.; Crockett, D.; Martinez, L.; McNeal, C.; Lyles, G. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    Materials test methods from the 1960's have been used as a starting point in evaluating materials for today's space launch vehicles. These established test methods have been modified to incorporate today's analytical laboratory equipment. The Orbital test objective was to test a wide range of materials to incorporate the revolution in polymer and composite materials that has occurred since the 1960's. Testing is accomplished in 3 stages from rough screening to detailed analytical tests. Several interesting test observations have been made during this testing and are included in the paper. A summary of the set-up, test and evaluation of long-term storage sub-scale tanks is also included. This sub-scale tank test lasted for a 7-month duration prior to being stopped due to a polar boss material breakdown. Chemical evaluations of the hydrogen peroxide and residue left on the polar boss surface identify the material breakdown quite clearly. The paper concludes with recommendations for future testing and a specific effort underway within the industry to standardize the test methods used in evaluating materials.

  6. Materials Compatibility Testing in RSRM ODC: Free Cleaner Selection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keen, Jill M.; Sagers, Neil W.; McCool, Alex (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Government regulations have mandated production phase-outs of a number of solvents, including 1,1,1-trichloroethane, an ozone-depleting chemical (ODC). This solvent was used extensively in the production of the Reusable Solid Rocket Motors (RSRMs) for the Space Shuttle. Many tests have been performed to identify replacement cleaners. One major area of concern in the selection of a new cleaner has been compatibility. Some specific areas considered included cleaner compatibility with non-metallic surfaces, painted surfaces, support materials such as gloves and wipers as well as corrosive properties of the cleaners on the alloys used on these motors. The intent of this paper is to summarize the test logic, methodology, and results acquired from testing the many cleaner and material combinations.

  7. Orbit transfer rocket engine technology program: Oxygen materials compatibility testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoenman, Leonard

    1989-01-01

    Particle impact and frictional heating tests of metals in high pressure oxygen, are conducted in support of the design of an advanced rocket engine oxygen turbopump. Materials having a wide range of thermodynamic properties including heat of combustion and thermal diffusivity were compared in their resistance to ignition and sustained burning. Copper, nickel and their alloys were found superior to iron based and stainless steel alloys. Some materials became more difficult to ignite as oxygen pressure was increased from 7 to 21 MPa (1000 to 3000 psia).

  8. Using Isothermal Microcalorimetry to Determine Compatibility of Structural Materials with High Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Villegas, Yvonne; Nwosisi, Genne

    2003-01-01

    High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) propellant (greater than or equal to 70%) offers many advantages in space launch applications; however, materials used in construction of propulsion systems must be shown to be compatible with HTP. Isothermal Microcalorimetry (IMC) was used to determine the compatibility of several metallic and non-metallic materials with 90% HTP. The results of these experiments agreed with those from immersion bath tests when the values were converted to %Active Oxygen Loss per week (%AOL/wk).

  9. Isothermal Microcalorimetric Evaluation of Compatibility of Proposed Injector Materials with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    2003-01-01

    High-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) is receiving renewed interest as a monopropellant and as the oxidizer for bipropellant systems. HTP is hydrogen peroxide in concentrations ranging from 70 to 98%. All surfaces wetted by HTP must be evaluated for compatibility with the fluid. In the case of tanks, lines and valves compatibility is required to preserve the HTP oxygen and energy content and to avoid overpressurization due to decomposition. With injectors and regenerative cooling passages shorter exposure time reduces these concerns. However, phase changes from fluid to gas impact heat transfer and become the dominant compatibility concern. Isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC) provides a convenient and reproducible means to observe the decomposition of HTP when exposed to structural materials and therefore the compatibility of those materials'. The instrument provides heat flow values in terms of watts that may be converted to a reaction rate given the heat of reaction for the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide. These values are then converted to percent active oxygen loss per week (%AOL/wk) to preserve an earlier convention for quantifying HTP compatibility. Additionally, qualitative designations of compatibility have been assigned to these values. This scheme consists of four classes with Class 1 being the most compatible. While historical compatibility data is available its current applicability is in question due to subtle changes in the compositions of both HTP and structural materials. Trace levels of molecules can have significant influence on compatibility. Therefore representative samples of materials must be evaluated with current HTP formulations. In this work seven materials were selected for their strength characteristics at high temperature as expected in a HTP injector. The materials were then evaluated by IMC for HTP compatibility.

  10. Test of LOX compatibility for asphalt and concrete runway materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moyers, C. V.; Bryan, C. J.; Lockhart, B. J.

    1973-01-01

    A literature survey and a telephone canvass of producers and users of LOX is reported which yielded one report of an accident resulting from a LOX spill on asphalt, one discussion of hazardous conditions, and an unreferenced mention of an incident. Laboratory tests using standard LOX impact apparatus yielded reactions with both old and new alphalt, but none with concrete. In the final test, using a larger sample of asphalt, the reaction caused extensive damage to equipment. Initial field experiments using 2-meter square asphalt slabs covered with LOX, conducted during rainy weather, achieved no reaction with plummets, and limited reaction with a blasting cap as a reaction initiator. In a final plummet-initiated test on a dry slab, a violent reaction, which appeared to have propagated over the entire slab surface, destroyed the plummet fixture and threw fragments as far as 48 meters.

  11. Assessment of The Compatibility of Composite Materials With High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Griffin, Dennis E. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The compatibility of composite materials with high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) was assessed using various chemical and mechanical techniques. Methods included classical schemes combining concentration assay with accelerated aging by means of a heated water bath. Exothermic reactivity was observed using Isothermal Microcalorimetry. Mechanical Properties testing determined degradation of the composite material. Photoacoustic Infrared Spectroscopy was used to monitor chemical alteration of the resin matrix. Other materials were examined including some polymers and metals.

  12. Further Studies of Materials Compatibility in High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, R.; Owens, T.

    2001-01-01

    Assessment of the compatibility of high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) with materials, in particular new materials such as composites, is critical to the development of new propulsion systems meeting requirements of reduced cost and environmental impact. While compatibility with HTP has been addressed previously, newer materials were not considered. The focus of this project was to develop a scheme for evaluation of HTP with all materials. In the previous summer, methods were developed for production of HTP on site, and preliminary steps were taken to evaluate materials. Methods investigated this summer have included accelerated aging by heating, coupled with assay of concentration and stabilization loss, observation of reactivity by means of Isothermal Microcalorimetry, and evaluation of changes to the materials by Short Beam Shear testing and by Photoacoustic-Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy. Various metals, polymers, and composites were examined in this study.

  13. Compatibility tests of materials for a lithium-cooled space power reactor concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.

    1973-01-01

    Materials for a lithium-cooled space power reactor concept must be chemically compatible for up to 50,000 hr at high temperature. Capsule tests at 1040 C (1900 F) were made of material combinations of prime interest: T-111 in direct contact with uranium mononitride (UN), Un in vacuum separated from T-111 by tungsten wire, UN with various oxygen impurity levels enclosed in tungsten wire lithium-filled T-111 capsules, and TZM and lithium together in T-111 capsules. All combinations were compatible for over 2800 hr except for T-111 in direct contact with UN.

  14. Flammability, Odor, Offgassing, and Compatibility Requirements and Test Procedures for Materials in Environments that Support Combustion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This handbook establishes NASA program requirements for evaluation, testing, and selection of materials to preclude unsafe conditions related to flammability, odor, offgassing, and fluid compatibility. Materials intended for use in space vehicles, specified test facilities, and specified ground support equipment (GSE) must meet the requirements of this document. Additional materials performance requirements may be specified in other program or NASA center specific documentation. Responsible NASA centers materials organizations must include applicable requirements of this document in their materials control programs. Materials used in habitable areas of spacecraft, including the materials of the spacecraft, stowed equipment, and experiments, must be evaluated for flammability, odor, and offgassing characteristics. All materials used in other areas must be evaluated for flammability characteristics. In addition, materials that are exposed to liquid oxygen (LOX), gaseous oxygen (GOX), and other reactive fluids' must be evaluated for compatibility with the fluid in their use application. Materials exposed to pressurized breathing gases also must be evaluated for odor and offgassing characteristics. The worst-case anticipated use environment (most hazardous pressure, temperature, material thickness, and fluid exposure conditions) must be used in the evaluation process. Materials that have been shown to meet the criteria of the required tests are acceptable for further consideration in design. Whenever possible, materials should be selected that have already been shown to meet the test criteria in the use environment. Existing test data are compiled in the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) and published periodically as the latest revision of a joint document with Johnson Space Center (JSC), MSFC-HDBK-527/JSC 09604. MAPTIS can be accessed by computer datalink. Systems containing materials that have not

  15. Compatibility tests between Jarytherm DBT synthetic oil and solid materials from wastes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fasquelle, Thomas; Falcoz, Quentin; Neveu, Pierre; Flamant, Gilles; Walker, Jérémie

    2016-05-01

    Direct thermocline thermal energy storage is the cheapest sensible thermal energy storage configuration. Indeed, a thermocline tank consists in one tank instead of two and reduces costs. Thermocline thermal energy storages are often filled with cheap solid materials which could react with the heat transfer fluid in the case of incompatibility. PROMES laboratory is building a pilot-scale parabolic trough solar loop including a direct thermocline thermal energy storage system. The working fluid will be a synthetic oil, the Jarytherm® DBT, and the thermal energy storage tank will be filled with stabilized solid materials elaborated from vitrified wastes. Compatibility tests have been conducted in order to check on one hand if the thermo-mechanical properties and life time of the energy storage medium are not affected by the contact with oil and, on the other hand, if the thermal oil performances are not degraded by the solid filler. These experiments consisted in putting in contact the oil and the solid materials in small tanks. In order to discriminate the solid materials tested in the shortest time, accelerating aging conditions at 330 °C for 500 hours were used. The measurements consisted in X-Ray Diffraction and Scanning Electron Microscopy for the solids, and thermo-physical and chemical properties measurements for the oil. Regarding the solid samples, their crystalline structure did not change during the test, but it is difficult to conclude about their elementary composition and they seem to absorb oil. While thermal properties still makes Jarytherm® DBT a good heat transfer fluid after the accelerated aging tests, this study results in differentiating most compatible materials. Thus according to our study, Jarytherm® DBT can be used in direct thermocline thermal energy storage applications when compatibility of the solid material has been demonstrated.

  16. Compatibility Testing of Polymeric Materials for the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) of International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles D.

    2003-01-01

    In the International Space Station (ISS), astronauts will convert urine into potable water with the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) by a distillation process. The urine is pre-treated, containing flush water and stabilizers. About 2.5% solids in the urine are concentrated up to 16% brine through distillation. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) in the stress relaxation mode was primarily used to test 15 polymeric UPA materials for compatibility with the pre-treated and brine solutions. There were concerns that chromium trioxide (CrO3), a stabilizer not in the original pre-treat formulation for similar compatibility testing in 2000, could have an adverse effect on these polymers. DMA testing is partially complete for polymeric material samples immersed in the two solutions at room temperature for as long as 200 days. By comparing each material (conditioned and virgin), the stress relaxation modulus (E) was determined for short-term use and predicted for as long as a 10-year use in space. Such a delta E showed a decrease of as much as 79% for a Nylon material, but an increase as much as 454% for a polysulfone material, with increasing immersion time.

  17. The oxygen sensitivity/compatibility ranking of several materials by different test methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lockhart, Billy J.; Bryan, Coleman J.; Hampton, Michael D.

    1989-01-01

    Eleven materials were evaluated for oxygen compatibility using the following test methods: heat of combustion (ASTM D 2015), liquid oxygen impact (ASTM D 2512), pneumatic impact (ASTM G 74), gaseous mechanical impact (ASTM G 86), autogenous ignition temperature by pressurized differential scanning calorimeter, and the determination of the 50 percent reaction level in liquid oxygen using silicon carbide as a reaction enhancer. The eleven materials evaluated were: Teflon TFE, Vespel SP-21, Krytox 240AC, Viton PLV5010B, Fluorel E2160, Kel F 81, Fluorogold, Fluorogreen E-600, Rulon A, Garlock 8573, nylon 6/6.

  18. Alkali metal compatibility testing of candidate heater head materials for a Stirling engine heat transport system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Jack E.; Hickman, Gary L.; Grobstein, Toni

    1991-01-01

    The authors describe work performed as part of the 25-kWe advanced Stirling conversion system project. Liquid alkali metal compatibility is being assessed in an ongoing test program to evaluate candidate heater head materials and fabrication processes at the temperatures and operating conditions required for Stirling engines. Specific materials under evaluation are alloy 713LC, alloy 713LC coated with nickel aluminide, and Udimet 720, each in combination with Waspaloy. The tests were run at a constant 700 C. A eutectic alloy of sodium and potassium (NaK) was the working fluid. Titanium sheet in the system was shown to be an effective oxygen getter. Metallographic and microchemical examination of material surfaces, joints, and their interfaces revealed little or no corrosion after 1000 h. Tests are in progress, with up to 10,000 h exposure.

  19. Using Isothermal Microcalorimetry to Determine Compatibility of Structural Materials with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy; Villegas, Yvonne; Nwosisi, Genne; Rodgers, Stephen L. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) propellant (equal to or greater than 70%) offers many advantages in space launch applications. However, materials used in construction of propulsion systems must be shown to be compatible with HTP. Isothermal Microcalorimetry (IMC) was used to determine the compatibility of several metallic and non-metallic materials with 90% HTP. The results of these experiments agreed with those from immersion bath tests when the values were converted to % Active Oxygen Loss per week (%AOL/wk).

  20. Cleaning and materials compatibility test results for elimination of flammable solvents in wipe applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Lopez, Edwin Paul

    2005-06-01

    In recent years, efforts have been made within the nuclear weapons complex (National Nuclear Security Administration) of the Department of Energy (DOE) to replace Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) regulated solvents (i.e., flammable, toxic, corrosive, and reactive) and ozone-depleting chemicals (ODC) with more benign alternatives. Within the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) and the Department of Defense (DoD) sectors, these solvents are used for cleaning hardware during routine maintenance operations. A primary goal of this study is to replace flammable solvents used in wiping applications. Two cleaners, including a hydrofluoroether (HFE) and an azeotrope of the HFE and isopropyl alcohol (IPA), have been studied as potential replacements for flammable solvents. Cleaning efficacy, short-term and long-term materials compatibility, corrosion, drying times, flammability, environment, safety and health (ES&H) and accelerated aging issues were among the experiments used to screen candidate solvents by the interagency team performing this work. This report presents cleaning efficacy results as determined by the contact angle Goniometer as well as materials compatibility results of various metal alloys and polymers. The results indicate that IPA (baseline cleaner) and the HFE/IPA azeotrope are roughly equivalent in their ability to remove fluorinated grease, silicone grease, and a simulated finger print contaminant from various metal alloys. All of the ASTM sandwich and immersion corrosion tests with IPA, HFE or the HFE/IPA azeotrope on metal alloys showed no signs of corrosion. Furthermore, no deleterious effects were noted for polymeric materials immersed in IPA, HFE, or the HFE/IPA azeotrope.

  1. Irradiation and compatibility testing of Li/sub 2/O materials at EBR-II

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, D.L.; Krsul, J.R.; Laug, M.T.; Tetenbaum, M.; Walters, L.C.

    1982-12-01

    A study was made of the neutron-irradiation behavior of /sup 6/Li-enriched Li/sub 2/O material in EBR-II. In addition, a stress corrosion study was performed ex-reactor to test compatibility of Li/sub 2/O materials with a variety of stainless steels. Results of the irradiation testing showed that tritium and helium retention in the Li/sub 2/O (approx. 89% dense) lessened with neutron exposure. Helium tritium retention appeared to approach steady-state after approx. 1% /sup 6/Li burnup. The effect was likely caused by the formation of open porosity in the pellets. The stress corrosion studies, using a 316 stainless steel (Ti-modified) and a 35% Ni alloy, showed that stress does not enhance the corrosion, and that dry Li/sub 2/O is not significantly corrosive, the LiOH content producing the corrosive effects. Corrosion, in general, was not severe as a passivation in sealed capsules seemed to occur after a time greatly reducing corrosion rates.

  2. Compatibility testing of spacecraft materials and spacestorable liquid propellants. [liquid and vapor fluorine and FLOX

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Denson, J. R.; Toy, A.

    1974-01-01

    Compatibility data for aluminum alloy 2219-T87 and titanium alloy Ti-6Al-4V were obtained while these alloys were exposed to both liquid and vapor fluorine and FLOX at -320 F + or -10 F. These data were obtained using a new low cost compatibility method which incorporates totally sealed containers and double dogbone test specimens and propellants in the simultaneous exposure to vapor and liquid phases. The compatibility investigation covered a storage period in excess of one year. Pitting was more severe in the 2219-T87 aluminum alloy than in the Ti-6Al-4V titanium alloy for both fluorine and FLOX exposure. The degree of chemical attack is more severe in the presence of FLOX than in fluorine and phase. The mechanical properties of the two alloys were not affected by storage in either of the two propellants.

  3. Compatibility Testing of Non-Metallic Materials for the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) of International Space Station (ISS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles Doug; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    In the International Space Station (ISS), astronauts will convert urine into potable water with the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA). The urine is distilled, with the concentrated form containing about 15% brine solids, and the dilute form as a blend of pre-treated urine/wastewater. Eighteen candidate non-metallic materials for use with the UPA were tested in 2000 for compatibility with the concentrated and dilute urine solutions for continuous times of at least 30 days, and at conditions of 0.5 psia pressure and 100 F, to simulate the working UPA environment. A primary screening test for each material (virgin and conditioned) was dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) in the stress relaxation mode, with the test data used to predict material performance for a 10-year use in space. Data showed that most of the candidate materials passed the compatibility testing, although a few significant changes in stress relaxation modulus were observed.

  4. Chemical compatibility of cartridge materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilcox, Roy C.; Zee, R. H.

    1991-01-01

    This twelve month progress report deals with the chemical compatibility of semiconductor crystals grown in zero gravity. Specifically, it studies the chemical compatibility between TZM, a molybdenum alloy containing titanium and zirconium, and WC 103, a titanium alloy containing Niobium and Hafnium, and Gallium arsenide (GaAs) and Cadmium Zinc Tellurite (CdZnTe). Due to the health hazards involved, three approaches were used to study the chemical compatibility between the semiconductor and cartridge materials: reaction retort, thermogravimetric analysis, and bulk cylindrical cartridge containers. A scanning electron microscope with an energy dispersive X-ray analyzer was used to examine all samples after testing. The first conclusion drawn is that reaction rates with TZM were not nearly as great as they were with WC 103. Second, the total reaction between GaAs and WC 103 was almost twice that with TZM. Therefore, even though WC 103 is easier to fabricate, at least half of the cartridge thickness will be degraded if contact is made with one of the semiconductor materials leading to a loss of strength properties.

  5. Heat Pipe Materials Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eninger, J. E.; Fleischman, G. L.; Luedke, E. E.

    1976-01-01

    An experimental program to evaluate noncondensable gas generation in ammonia heat pipes was completed. A total of 37 heat pipes made of aluminum, stainless steel and combinations of these materials were processed by various techniques, operated at different temperatures and tested at low temperature to quantitatively determine gas generation rates. In order of increasing stability are aluminum/stainless combination, all aluminum and all stainless heat pipes. One interesting result is the identification of intentionally introduced water in the ammonia during a reflux step as a means of surface passivation to reduce gas generation in stainless-steel/aluminum heat pipes.

  6. ECLSS Sustaining Compatibility Testing on Urine Processor Assembly Nonmetallic Materials for Reformulation of Pretreated Urine Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, C. D.

    2015-01-01

    On International Space Station (ISS), the Urine Processor Assembly (UPA) converts human urine and flush water into potable water. The urine is acid-pretreated primarily to control microbial growth. In recent years, the sulfuric acid (H2SO4) pretreatment was believed to be largely responsible for producing salt crystals capable of plugging filters in UPA components and significantly reducing the percentage of water recovery from urine. In 2012, ISS management decided to change the acid pretreatment for urine from sulfuric to phosphoric with the goal of eliminating or minimizing formation of salt crystals. In 2013-2014, as part of the qualification of the phosphoric acid (H3PO4) formulation, samples of 12 nonmetallic materials used in UPA components were immersed for up to one year in pretreated urine and brine solutions made with the new H3PO4 formulation. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) was used to measure modulus (stiffness) of the immersed samples compared to virgin control samples. Such compatibility data obtained by DMA for the H3PO4-based solutions were compared to DMA data obtained for the H2SO4-based solutions in 2002-2003.

  7. Chemical compatibility of cartridge materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, Bryan; Wilcox, R. C.; Zee, R. H.

    1992-01-01

    The objectives were to determine the chemical compatibility of titanium-zirconium-molybdenum (TZM) with GaAs and CdZnTe, and Inconel with HgCdTe and HgZnTe. At the present time, no other studies regarding the compatibility of these crystal components and their respective cartridge materials have been performed. This study was to identify any possible problems between these materials to insure proper containment of possibly hazardous fumes during crystal growth experiments. In this study, the reaction zone between the materials was studied and the amount of degradation to the system was measured. Detailed results are presented.

  8. ITP Materials Compatibility Issues

    SciTech Connect

    Skidmore, T.E.

    1998-09-01

    Based on information provided by ITP, normal operation will consist of controlled exposure to benzene and TBP concentrations of 300 and 100 ppm, respectively, in an approximate 5M NaOH solution at temperatures as high as 50 degrees C. Other compounds present in the filtrate solution were much lower in concentration and were not tested. In addition, levels as high as 1000 ppm benzene or TBP may be reached. It is assumed that the TBP will be maintained at a constant concentration to control foaming behavior.

  9. Materials investigation and tests for the development of space compatible electrical connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pomeroy, C.; Mccabe, T.

    1971-01-01

    A molding study of compounds based on copolymers of highly fluorinated olefins and of flame retardant silicone is reported. Both single cavity and four cavity molds having size 22 and 24 holes with three webs in each hole were used. Also covered are dielectric strength, arc resistance, Bashore rebound, and maintenance aging tests on the various materials that have been successfully molded.

  10. Development of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle: Improving VHTR Efficiency and Testing Material Compatibility - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Chang H. Oh

    2006-06-01

    Generation IV reactors will need to be intrinsically safe, having a proliferation-resistant fuel cycle and several advantages relative to existing light water reactor (LWR). They, however, must still overcome certain technical issues and the cost barrier before it can be built in the U.S. The establishment of a nuclear power cost goal of 3.3 cents/kWh is desirable in order to compete with fossil combined-cycle, gas turbine power generation. This goal requires approximately a 30 percent reduction in power cost for stateof-the-art nuclear plants. It has been demonstrated that this large cost differential can be overcome only by technology improvements that lead to a combination of better efficiency and more compatible reactor materials. The objectives of this research are (1) to develop a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle in the secondary power conversion side that can be applied to the Very-High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR), (2) to improve the plant net efficiency by using the carbon dioxide Brayton cycle, and (3) to test material compatibility at high temperatures and pressures. The reduced volumetric flow rate of carbon dioxide due to higher density compared to helium will reduce compression work, which eventually increase plant net efficiency.

  11. Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trost, Thomas F.; Mitra, Atindra K.

    1996-01-01

    This report discusses the results on analytical models and measurement and simulation of statistical properties from a study of microwave reverberation (mode-stirred) chambers performed at Texas Tech University. Two analytical models of power transfer vs. frequency in a chamber, one for antenna-to-antenna transfer and the other for antenna to D-dot sensor, were experimentally validated in our chamber. Two examples are presented of the measurement and calculation of chamber Q, one for each of the models. Measurements of EM power density validate a theoretical probability distribution on and away from the chamber walls and also yield a distribution with larger standard deviation at frequencies below the range of validity of the theory. Measurements of EM power density at pairs of points which validate a theoretical spatial correlation function on the chamber walls and also yield a correlation function with larger correlation length, R(sub corr), at frequencies below the range of validity of the theory. A numerical simulation, employing a rectangular cavity with a moving wall shows agreement with the measurements. The determination that the lowest frequency at which the theoretical spatial correlation function is valid in our chamber is considerably higher than the lowest frequency recommended by current guidelines for utilizing reverberation chambers in EMC testing. Two suggestions have been made for future studies related to EMC testing.

  12. ECLSS Sustaining Metal Materials Compatibility Final Report, Electrochemical and Crevice Corrosion Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. E.

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical test results are presented for six noble metals evaluated in two acidic test solutions which are representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The two test solutions consisted of fresh waste liquid which had been modified with a proposed or alternate pretreatment formulation and its associated brine concentrate. The six test metals included three titanium grades, (Commercially Pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V Low Interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel® 625 and Hastelloy® C276), and one high tier stainless steel (Cronidur® 30).

  13. Electrochemical Test Method for Evaluating Long-Term Propellant-Material Compatibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-12-01

    INSTRUCTIONS BEFORE COMPLETING FORM 2.GV CESSION NO.,. ftECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMMEPI COVERED ý ,LECTROCHEMICALJEST METHOD FOR EVALUATING Fnl~pt LoNG -TERN...effects of each of these configurations were evaluated with respect to baseline tests where the metal was in the form of either a slug or a strip. The...system components beyond the limitations of real-time testing and evaluation. In the case of unmanned satellites, components which are in contact with

  14. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi[sub 5-x]Al[sub x] (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  15. Materials compatibility of hydride storage materials with austenitic stainless steels

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, E.A.

    1992-09-21

    This task evaluated the materials compatibility of LaNi{sub 5-x}Al{sub x} (x= 0.3, 0.75) hydrides and palladium coated kieselguhr with austenitic stainless steel in hydrogen and tritium process environments. Based on observations of retired prototype hydride storage beds and materials exposure testing samples designed for this study, no materials compatibility problem was indicated. Scanning electron microscopy observations of features on stainless steel surfaces after exposure to hydrides are also commonly found on as-received materials before hydriding. These features are caused by either normal heat treating and acid cleaning of stainless steel or reflect the final machining operation.

  16. Material Compatibility for Historic Items Decontaminated with ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Report This project continued research of the effects of decontamination methods for biological agents on materials identified as representative of types of irreplaceable objects or works of art found in museums and/or archive settings. In the previous research, surrogate materials were checked for compatibility with four decontamination methods: chlorine dioxide, hydrogen peroxide vapor, methyl bromide, and ethylene oxide gas. This project investigated the effects of gamma irradiation, which has also been shown to be an effective decontamination method for biological agents, on the surrogate test materials.

  17. Propellant material compatibility program and results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Toth, L. R.; Cannon, W. A.; Coulbert, C. D.; Long, H. R.

    1976-01-01

    The effects of long-term (up to 10 years) contact of inert materials with earth-storable propellants were studied for the purpose of designing chemical propulsion system components that can be used for current as well as future planetary spacecraft. The primary experimental work, and results to date are reported. Investigations include the following propellants: hydrazine, hydrazine-hydrazine nitrate blends, monomethyl-hydrazine, and nitrogen tetroxide. Materials include: aluminum alloys, corrosion-resistant steels, and titanium alloys. More than 700 test specimen capsules were placed in long-term storage testing at 43 C in the special material compatibility facility. Material ratings relative to the 10-year requirement have been assigned.

  18. Chemical compatibility screening test results

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Dickens, T.G.

    1997-12-01

    A program for evaluating packaging components that may be used in transporting mixed-waste forms has been developed and the first phase has been completed. This effort involved the screening of ten plastic materials in four simulant mixed-waste types. These plastics were butadiene-acrylonitrile copolymer rubber, cross-linked polyethylene (XLPE), epichlorohydrin rubber, ethylene-propylene rubber (EPDM), fluorocarbon (Viton or Kel-F), polytetrafluoroethylene, high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isobutylene-isoprene copolymer rubber (butyl), polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber (SBR). The selected simulant mixed wastes were (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. The testing protocol involved exposing the respective materials to 286,000 rads of gamma radiation followed by 14-day exposures to the waste types at 60{degrees}C. The seal materials were tested using vapor transport rate (VTR) measurements while the liner materials were tested using specific gravity as a metric. For these tests, a screening criterion of 0.9 g/hr/m{sup 2} for VTR and a specific gravity change of 10% was used. Based on this work, it was concluded that while all seal materials passed exposure to the aqueous simulant mixed waste, EPDM and SBR had the lowest VTRs. In the chlorinated hydrocarbon simulant mixed waste, only Viton passed the screening tests. In both the simulant scintillation fluid mixed waste and the ketone mixture simulant mixed waste, none of the seal materials met the screening criteria. For specific gravity testing of liner materials, the data showed that while all materials with the exception of polypropylene passed the screening criteria, Kel-F, HDPE, and XLPE offered the greatest resistance to the combination of radiation and chemicals.

  19. Electrochemical, Polarization, and Crevice Corrosion Testing of Nitinol 60, A Supplement to the ECLSS Sustaining Materials Compatibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, R. E.

    2016-01-01

    In earlier trials, electrochemical test results were presented for six noble metals evaluated in test solutions representative of waste liquids processed in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) aboard the International Space Station (ISS). Subsequently, a seventh metal, Nitinol 60, was added for evaluation and subjected to the same test routines, data analysis, and theoretical methodologies. The previous six test metals included three titanium grades, (commercially pure, 6Al-4V alloy and 6Al-4V low interstitial alloy), two nickel-chromium alloys (Inconel(RegisteredTrademark) 625 and Hastelloy(RegisteredTrademark) C276), and one high-tier stainless steel (Cronidur(RegisteredTrademark) 30). The three titanium alloys gave the best results of all the metals, indicating superior corrosive nobility and galvanic protection properties. For this current effort, the results have clearly shown that Nitinol 60 is almost as noble as titanium, being very corrosion-resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals electrochemically and during long-term exposure. is also quite noble as it is very corrosion resistant and galvanically compatible with the other six metals from both an electrochemical perspective and long-term crevice corrosion scenario. This was clearly demonstrated utilizing the same techniques for linear, Tafel and cyclic polarization, and galvanic coupling of the metal candidate as was done for the previous study. The high nobility and low corrosion susceptibility for Nitinol 60 appear to be intermediate to the nickel/chromium alloys and the titanium metals with indications that are more reflective of the titanium metals in terms of general corrosion and pitting behavior.

  20. Chemical Compatibility of Polymeric Materials.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solen, Kenneth A.; Kuchar, Marvin C.

    1990-01-01

    Presents some principles for specifying general classes of polymers for predicting relative chemical attack from acids, bases, oxidants, and certain common antagonists. Also discusses predicting relative solvent effects. Suggests uses of this information in two or three lectures in a chemical engineering materials course. (YP)

  1. Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gage, Mark L.

    1990-01-01

    Results of material compatibility experiments using hydrocarbon fuels in contact with copper-based combustion chamber liner materials are presented. Mil-Spec RP-1, n- dodecane, propane, and methane fuels were tested in contact with OFHC, NASA-Z, and ZrCu coppers. Two distinct test methods were employed. Static tests, in which copper coupons were exposed to fuel for long durations at constant temperature and pressure, provided compatibility data in a precisely controlled environment. Dynamic tests, using the Aerojet Carbothermal Test Facility, provided fuel and copper compatibility data under realistic booster engine service conditions. Tests were conducted using very pure grades of each fuel and fuels to which a contaminant, e.g., ethylene or methyl mercaptan, was added to define the role played by fuel impurities. Conclusions are reached as to degradation mechanisms and effects, methods for the elimination of these mechanisms, selection of copper alloy combustion chamber liners, and hydrocarbon fuel purchase specifications.

  2. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.; Kujak, S.

    1992-10-01

    During the compatibility study of 10 pure refrigerants with 24 motor materials, it was observed that the greatest damage to the insulation system was caused by absorption of refrigerant followed by rapid desorption. The observed effects were blisters, cracking, internal bubbles and delamination. Measured results includes decreased bond strength, dielectric strength and overall integrity of the material. Refrigerants HCFC-22, HFC-32, HFC-134 and HFC-152a exhibited this phenomena. The effect of HCFC-22 was most severe of the tested refrigerants. Since HCFC-22 has an excellent reliability history with many of the materials tested, compatibility with the new refrigerants is expected.

  3. Characterization of materials for waste-canister compatibility studies

    SciTech Connect

    McCoy, H.E.; Mack, J.E.

    1981-10-01

    Sample materials of 7 waste forms and 15 potential canister materials were procured for compatibility tests. These materials were characterized before being placed in test, and the results are the main topic of this report. A test capsule was designed for the tests in which disks of a single waste form were contacted with duplicate samples of canister materials. The capsules are undergoing short-term tests at 800/sup 0/C and long-term tests at 100 and 300/sup 0/C.

  4. Nonmetals Test and Evaluation. Delivery Order 0003: Fuel System Materials Compatibility Testing of Fuel Additives for Reducing the Amount of Small Particulate in Turbine Engine Exhaust

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-10-01

    JAMES J. MAZZA MARY ANN PHILLIPS Team Lead Chief Adhesives, Composites, and Elastomers Team Materials Integrity Branch Materials...P-24441 (Epoxy Polyamide ) Pencil Hardness Unaged 7d/200°F/JP-8+100 (Control) 7d/200°F/Control + #1 (RXP) 7d/200°F/Control + #2...Description Test Conditioning Results MIL-P-24441 (Epoxy Polyamide ) Taber Test (Wear Index) Unaged 7d/200°F/JP-8+100

  5. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, D.A.; Hourahan, G.C.; Szymurski, S.R.

    1993-04-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC-refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. Under the current MCLR program the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) is contracting and managing multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each researcher.

  6. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes

    SciTech Connect

    Hourahan, G.C.; Szymurski, S.R.

    1992-10-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC-refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. Under the current MCLR pregrain the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) is contracting and managing several research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Preliminary results is from these projects are reported in technical progress reports prepared by each researcher.

  7. Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes

    SciTech Connect

    Hourahan, G.C.; Szymurski, S.R.

    1993-01-01

    The materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC-refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. Under the current MCLR program the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) is contracting and managing multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Preliminary results from these projects are reported in technical progress reports prepared by each researcher.

  8. Automatically produced FRP beams with embedded FOS in complex geometry: process, material compatibility, micromechanical analysis, and performance tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabler, Markus; Tkachenko, Viktoriya; Küppers, Simon; Kuka, Georg G.; Habel, Wolfgang R.; Milwich, Markus; Knippers, Jan

    2012-04-01

    The main goal of the presented work was to evolve a multifunctional beam composed out of fiber reinforced plastics (FRP) and an embedded optical fiber with various fiber Bragg grating sensors (FBG). These beams are developed for the use as structural member for bridges or industrial applications. It is now possible to realize large scale cross sections, the embedding is part of a fully automated process and jumpers can be omitted in order to not negatively influence the laminate. The development includes the smart placement and layout of the optical fibers in the cross section, reliable strain transfer, and finally the coupling of the embedded fibers after production. Micromechanical tests and analysis were carried out to evaluate the performance of the sensor. The work was funded by the German ministry of economics and technology (funding scheme ZIM). Next to the authors of this contribution, Melanie Book with Röchling Engineering Plastics KG (Haren/Germany; Katharina Frey with SAERTEX GmbH & Co. KG (Saerbeck/Germany) were part of the research group.

  9. Engine Materials Compatability with Alternative Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steve; Moore, D.

    2013-04-05

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  10. Engine Materials Compatibility with Alternate Fuels

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Jeffery K; Pawel, Steven J; Wilson, Dane F

    2013-05-01

    The compatibility of aluminum and aluminum alloys with synthetic fuel blends comprised of ethanol and reference fuel C (a 50/50 mix of toluene and iso-octane) was examined as a function of water content and temperature. Commercially pure wrought aluminum and several cast aluminum alloys were observed to be similarly susceptible to substantial corrosion in dry (< 50 ppm water) ethanol. Corrosion rates of all the aluminum materials examined were accelerated by increased temperature and ethanol content in the fuel mixture, but inhibited by increased water content. Pretreatments designed to stabilize passive films on aluminum increased the incubation time for onset of corrosion, suggesting film stability is a significant factor in the mechanism of corrosion.

  11. Effect of Time on Gypsum-Impression Material Compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Won, John Boram

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of dental gypsum with three recently introduced irreversible hydrocolloid (alginate) alternatives. The test materials were Alginot® (Kerr™), Position Penta Quick® (3M ESPE™) and Silgimix ® (Sultan Dental™). The irreversible hydrocolloid impression material, Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial® (Dentsply Caulk™) served as the control. Materials and Methods: Testing of materials was conducted in accordance with ANSI/ADA Specification No. 18 for Alginate Impression Materials. Statistical Analysis: The 3-Way ANOVA test was used to analyze measurements between different time points at a significance level of (p < 0.05). Outcome: It was found that there was greater compatibility between gypsum and the alternative materials over time than the traditional irreversible hydrocolloid material that was tested. A statistically significant amount of surface change/incompatibility was found over time with the combination of the dental gypsum products and the control impression material (Jeltrate Plus antimicrobial®).

  12. Compatibility experiments of facilities, materials, and propellants for electrothermal thrusters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, M. V.; Grisnik, S. P.; Sovey, J. S.

    1985-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the compatibility of materials and propellants for electro-thermal thrusters. Candidate propellants for resistojet propulsion include carbon dioxide, methane, hydrogen, ammonia, and hydrazine. The materials being examined are grain stabilized platinum for resistojets for Space station and rhenium for high performance resistojets for satellites. Heater mass loss and deterioration of materials were evaluated. A coiled tube of platinum, with yttria dispersed throughout the base material to inhibit grain growth, was tested in carbon dioxide at 1300 C for 2000 hr. Post-test examination indicated the platinum-yttria heater would last over 100 000 hr with less than 10 percent mass loss. Short-term compatibility tests were conducted to test the integrity of the platinum-yttria in hydrogen, methane, carbon dioxide/methane mixtures and ammonia environments. In each of these 100 hr tests, the platinum-yttria mass change indicated a minimum coil life of 100 000 hr. Facility related effects were investigated in materials tests using rhenium heated to high tempertures. Vacuum facility water reduction was monitored using a mass spectrometer. In vacuum environments obtained using only diffusion pumping and those obtained with the assistance of cryogenic equipment there were mass gains in the rhenium heaters. These mass gains were the result of the high amount of oxygen and water contained in the gas. Propellant purity and preferred test facility environments are discussed.

  13. Polymer Matrix Composite Material Oxygen Compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Owens, Tom

    2001-01-01

    Carbon fiber/polymer matrix composite materials look promising as a material to construct liquid oxygen (LOX) tanks. Based on mechanical impact tests the risk will be greater than aluminum, however, the risk can probably be managed to an acceptable level. Proper tank design and operation can minimize risk. A risk assessment (hazard analysis) will be used to determine the overall acceptability for using polymer matrix composite materials.

  14. Compatibility of refractory materials for nuclear reactor poison control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinclair, J. H.

    1974-01-01

    Metal-clad poison rods have been considered for the control system of an advanced space power reactor concept studied at the NASA Lewis Research Center. Such control rods may be required to operate at temperatures of about 140O C. Selected poison materials (including boron carbide and the diborides of zirconium, hafnium, and tantalum) were subjected to 1000-hour screening tests in contact with candidate refractory metal cladding materials (including tungsten and alloys of tantalum, niobium, and molybdenum) to assess the compatibility of these materials combinations at the temperatures of interest. Zirconium and hafnium diborides were compatible with refractory metals at 1400 C, but boron carbide and tantalum diboride reacted with the refractory metals at this temperature. Zirconium diboride also showed promise as a reaction barrier between boron carbide and tungsten.

  15. Material Compatibility of Medical Sterilizer Using Oxygen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Hiroshi; Ono, Reoto; Hayashi, Nobuya; Hanada, Yasushi; Noda, Minoru; Goto, Masaaki

    2015-09-01

    Material compatibility of oxygen plasma sterilizer is investigated comparing with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) sterilizers and a gaseous H2O2 sterilizer. Organic materials such as ABS, PE, PP, and PET are used as sample materials, and are irradiated by active oxygen species produced in oxygen plasma. After plasma irradiation, surface of the sample materials is observed using a scanning electron microscope and FTIR spectroscopy. Strengths of the organic materials are evaluated by the tension test. Also, H2O2 plasma sterilizer and a gaseous H2O2 sterilizer those are commercially available are utilized to compare the material compatibility, especially organic compounds. The ABS resin becomes slightly soft after irradiation by both plasmas and gaseous H2O2. Also, PET material becomes soften by each sterilization treatment. Decrease of peak heights of CH around 1200 and 1730 cm-1 and increase of that of OH at 3300 cm-1 in FTIR spectra indicates the oxidation of ABS resin by both plasma and gaseous H2O2. In the case of PET material, treatment by the plasma has not modified chemical composition but changed the crystal structure. The gaseous H2O2 is completely friendly for the PET material.

  16. The resupply interface mechanism RMS compatibility test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Stewart W.; Gallo, Frank G.

    1990-01-01

    Spacecraft on-orbit servicing consists of exchanging components such as payloads, orbital replacement units (ORUs), and consumables. To accomplish the exchange of consumables, the receiving vehicle must mate to the supplier vehicle. Mating can be accomplished by a variety of docking procedures. However, these docking schemes are mission dependent and can vary from shuttle bay berthing to autonomous rendezvous and docking. Satisfying the many docking conditions will require use of an innovative docking device. The device must provide fluid, electrical, pneumatic and data transfer between vehicles. Also, the proper stiffness must be obtained and sustained between the vehicles. A device to accomplish this, the resupply interface mechanism (RIM), was developed. The RIM is a unique device because it grasps the mating vehicle, draws the two vehicles together, simultaneously mates all connectors, and rigidizes the mating devices. The NASA-Johnson Manipulator Development Facility was used to study how compatible the RIM is to on orbit docking and berthing. The facility contains a shuttle cargo bay mockup with a remote manipulator system (RMS). This RMS is used to prepare crew members for shuttle missions involving spacecraft berthing operations. The MDF proved to be an excellant system for testing the RIM/RMS compatibility. The elements examined during the RIM JSC test were: RIM gross and fine alignment; berthing method sequence; visual cuing aids; utility connections; and RIM overall performance. The results showed that the RIM is a good device for spacecraft berthing operations. Mating was accomplished during every test run and all test operators (crew members) felt that the RIM is an effective device. The purpose of the JSC RIM test and its results are discussed.

  17. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.; Kujak, S.; Waite, T. )

    1993-01-01

    Equipment manufacturers are challenged to replace CFC-based refrigerants and their lubricants with environmentally acceptable alternatives. Information on the compatibility of motor materials with these alternative refrigerants and lubricants is a basic requirement for reliable performance. This report presents compatibility data for 24 commercially used motor materials exposed to 17 refrigerant/lubricant combinations. This compatibility data will enable the phase out of CFC's to continue at its current fast pace and insure the continued reliable performance of refrigerant-based equipment.

  18. Hydrogen Peroxide - Material Compatibility Studied by Microcalorimetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homung, Steven D.; Davis, Dennis D.; Baker, David; Popp, Christopher G.

    2003-01-01

    Environmental and toxicity concerns with current hypergolic propellants have led to a renewed interest in propellant grade hydrogen peroxide (HP) for propellant applications. Storability and stability has always been an issue with HP. Contamination or contact of HP with metallic surfaces may cause decomposition, which can result in the evolution of heat and gas leading to increased pressure or thermal hazards. The NASA Johnson Space Center White Sands Test Facility has developed a technique to monitor the decompositions of hydrogen peroxide at temperatures ranging from 25 to 60 C. Using isothermal microcalorimetry we have measured decomposition rates at the picomole/s/g level showing the catalytic effects of materials of construction. In this paper we will present the results of testing with Class 1 and 2 materials in 90 percent hydrogen peroxide.

  19. Compatibility of Fluorinert, FC-72, with selected materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, James Henry; Sawyer, Patricia Sue

    2006-02-01

    Removable encapsulants have been developed as replacement materials for electronic encapsulation. They can be removed from an electronic assembly in a fairly benign manner. Encapsulants must satisfy a limited number of criteria to be useful. These include processing ease, certain mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties, adhesion to common clean surfaces, good aging characteristics, and compatibility. This report discusses one aspect of the compatibility of removable blown epoxy foams with electronic components. Of interest is the compatibility of the blowing agent, Fluorinert{trademark} (FC-72) electronic fluid with electronic parts, components, and select materials. Excellent compatibility is found with most of the investigated materials. A few materials, such as Teflon{reg_sign} that are comprised of chemicals very similar to FC-72 show substantial absorption of FC-72. No compatibility issues have yet been identified even for the few materials that show substantial absorption.

  20. Survey - Monomethylhydrazine Propellant/Material Compatibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-07-01

    Alloys Martin Marietta (Refs.l0, 20) rated 1100-0, 2014- T6 , and 2219 -T87 compatible with MMH for 300 hours at 135’C, no corrosion or MMH decomposition...Ti, 6061- T6 Al. The aluminum alloys show no susceptibility. The order of decreasing stress corrosion cracking promotion for the fuels is hydrazine...decomposition of propellant and no noticeable corrosion of the metal surfaces. The metals were aluminum alloys 1100, 2014, 6061; corrosion -resistant steels

  1. Dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate, USP material compatibility with gamma radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Quiles, Maritza

    Gamma radiation is a commonly used method to reduce the microbial bioburden in compatible materials when it is applied at appropriate dose levels. Gamma irradiation kills bacteria and mold by breaking down the organism’s DNA and inhibiting cell division. The purpose of this study is to determine the radiation dosage to be used to treat Dibasic Calcium Phosphate Dihydrate, USP (DCPD) and to evaluate its physicochemical effects if any, on this material. This material will be submitted to various doses of gamma radiation that were selected based on literature review and existing regulations that demonstrate that this method is effective to reduce or eliminate microbial bioburden in natural source and synthetic materials. Analytical testing was conducted to the DCPD exposed material in order to demonstrate that gamma radiation does not alter the physicochemical properties and material still acceptable for use in the manufacture of pharmaceutical products. The results obtained through this study were satisfactory and demonstrated that the gamma irradiation dosages from 5 to 30 kGy can be applied to DCPD without altering its physicochemical properties. These are supported by the Assay test data evaluation of lots tested before and after gamma irradiation implementation that show no significant statistical difference between irradiated and non irradiated assay results. The results of this study represent an achievement for the industry since they provide as an alternative the use of Gamma irradiation technology to control the microbial growth in DCPD.

  2. RP-1 Thermal Stability and Copper Based Materials Compatibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stiegemeier, B. R.; Meyer, M. L.; Driscoll, E.

    2005-01-01

    A series of electrically heated tube tests was performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Heated Tube Facility to investigate the effect that sulfur content, test duration, and tube material play in the overall thermal stability and materials compatibility characteristics of RP-1. Scanning-electron microscopic (SEM) analysis in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) were used to characterize the condition of the tube inner wall surface and any carbon deposition or corrosion formed during these runs. Results of the parametric study indicate that tests with standard RP-1 (total sulfur -23 ppm) and pure copper tubing are characterized by a depostion/deposit shedding process producing local wall temperature swings as high as 500 F. The effect of this shedding is to keep total carbon deposition levels relatively constant for run times from 20 minutes up to 5 hours, though increasing tube pressure drops were observed in all runs. Reduction in the total sulfur content of the fuel from 23 ppm to less than 0.1 ppm resulted in the elimination of deposit shedding, local wall temperature variation, and the tube pressure drop increases that were observed in standard sulfur level RP-1 tests. The copper alloy GRCop-84, a copper alloy developed specifically for high heat flux applications, was found to exhibit higher carbon deposition levels compared to identical tests performed in pure copper tubes. Results of the study are consistent with previously published heated tube data which indicates that small changes in fuel total sulfur content can lead to significant differences in the thermal stability of kerosene type fuels and their compatibility with copper based materials. In conjunction with the existing thermal stability database, these findings give insight into the feasibility of cooling a long life, high performance, high-pressure liquid rocket combustor and nozzle with RP-1.

  3. Material Compatibility with Space Storable Propellants. Design Guidebook

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uney, P. E.; Fester, D. A.

    1972-01-01

    An important consideration in the design of spacecraft for interplanetary missions is the compatibility of storage materials with the propellants. Serious problems can arise because many propellants are either extremely reactive or subject to catalytic decomposition, making the selection of proper materials of construction for propellant containment and control a critical requirement for the long-life applications. To aid in selecting materials and designing and evaluating various propulsion subsystems, available information on the compatibility of spacecraft materials with propellants of interest was compiled from literature searches and personal contacts. The compatibility of both metals and nonmetals with hydrazine, monomethyl hydrazine, nitrated hydrazine, and diborance fuels and nitrogen tetroxide, fluorine, oxygen difluoride, and Flox oxidizers was surveyed. These fuels and oxidizers encompass the wide variety of problems encountered in propellant storage. As such, they present worst case situations of the propellant affecting the material and the material affecting the propellant. This includes material attack, propellant decomposition, and the formation of clogging materials.

  4. Material compatibility and thermal aging of thermoelectric materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Gardea, Andrew D.; Nishimoto, Ryan; Yang, Nancy Y. C.; Morales, Alfredo Martin; Whalen, Scott A.; Chames, Jeffrey M.; Clift, W. Miles

    2009-09-01

    In order to design a thermoelectric (TE) module suitable for long-term elevated temperature use, the Department 8651 has conducted parametric experiments to study material compatibility and thermal aging of TE materials. In addition, a comprehensive material characterization has been preformed to examine thermal stability of P- and N-based alloys and their interaction with interconnect diffusion barrier(s) and solder. At present, we have completed the 7-days aging experiments for 36 tiles, from ambient to 250 C. The thermal behavior of P- and N-based alloys and their thermal interaction with both Ni and Co diffusion barriers and Au-Sn solder were examined. The preliminary results show the microstructure, texture, alloy composition, and hardness of P-(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} and N-Bi{sub 2}(Te,Se){sub 3} alloys are thermally stable up to 7 days annealing at 250 C. However, metallurgical reactions between the Ni-phosphor barriers and P-type base alloy were evident at temperatures {ge} 175 C. At 250 C, the depth (or distance) of the metallurgical reaction and/or Ni diffusion into P-(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} is approximately 10-15 {micro}m. This thermal instability makes the Ni-phosphor barrier unsuitable for use at temperatures {ge} 175 C. The Co barrier appeared to be thermally stable and compatible with P(Bi,Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} at all annealing temperatures, with the exception of a minor Co diffusion into Au-Sn solder at {ge} 175 C. The effects of Co diffusion on long-term system reliability and/or the thermal stability of the Co barrier are yet to be determined. Te evaporation and its subsequent reaction with Au-Sn solder and Ni and Co barriers on the ends of the tiles at temperatures {ge} 175 C were evident. The Te loss and its effect on the long-term required stoichiometry of P-(Bi, Sb){sub 2}Te{sub 3} are yet to be understood. The aging experiments of 90 days and 180 days are ongoing and scheduled to be completed in 30 days and 150 days, respectively. Material

  5. Environmentally compatible next generation green energetic materials (GEMs).

    PubMed

    Talawar, M B; Sivabalan, R; Mukundan, T; Muthurajan, H; Sikder, A K; Gandhe, B R; Rao, A Subhananda

    2009-01-30

    This paper briefly reviews the literature work reported on the environmentally compatible green energetic materials (GEMs) for defence and space applications. Currently, great emphasis is laid in the field of high-energy materials (HEMs) to increase the environmental stewardship along with the deliverance of improved performance. This emphasis is especially strong in the areas of energetic materials, weapon development, processing, and disposal operations. Therefore, efforts are on to develop energetic materials systems under the broad concept of green energetic materials (GEMs) in different schools all over the globe. The GEMs program initiated globally by different schools addresses these challenges and establishes the framework for advances in energetic materials processing and production that promote compliance with environmental regulations. This review also briefs the principles of green chemistry pertaining to HEMs, followed by the work carried out globally on environmentally compatible green energetic materials and allied ingredients.

  6. Asphalt compatibility testing using the automated Heithaus titration test

    SciTech Connect

    Pauli, A.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Heithaus titration test or variations of the test have been used for over 35 years to predict compatibilities of blends of asphalts from different crude sources. Asphalt compatibility is determined from three calculated parameters that measure the state of peptization of an asphalt or asphalt blend. The parameter p{sub a} is a measure of the peptizability of the asphaltenes. The parameter p{sub a} is a measure of the peptizing power of the maltenes, and the parameter P, derived from p{sub a} and p{sub o} values, is a measure of the overall state of peptization of the asphalt or asphalt blend. In Heithaus original procedure, samples of asphalt were dissolved in toluene and titrated with n-heptane in order to initiate flocculation. The onset of flocculation was detected either by photography or by spotting a filter paper with a small amount of the titrated solution. Recently, an {open_quotes}automated{close_quotes} procedure, after Hotier and Robin, has been developed for use with asphalt. In the automated method UV-visible spectrophotometric detection measures the onset of flocculation as a peak with the percent transmittance plotted as a function of the volume of titrating solvent added to a solution of asphalt. The automated procedure has proven to be less operator dependent and much faster than the original Heithaus procedure. Results from the automated procedure show the data to be consistent with results from the original, {open_quotes}classical{close_quotes} Heithaus procedure.

  7. Flammability, Offgassing, and Compatibility Requirements and Test Procedures. Interim NASA Technical Standard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    This Interim Standard establishes requirements for evaluation, testing, and selection of materials that are intended for use in space vehicles, associated Ground Support Equipment (GSE), and facilities used during assembly, test, and flight operations. Included are requirements, criteria, and test methods for evaluating the flammability, offgassing, and compatibility of materials.

  8. FY-05 Second Quarter Report On Development of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle: Improving PBR Efficiency and Testing Material Compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh

    2005-04-01

    The objective of this research is to improve a helium Brayton cycle and to develop a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle for the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) that can also be applied to the Fast Gas-Cooled Reactor (FGR) and the Very-High-Temperature Gas- Cooled Reactor (VHTR). The proposed supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle will be used to improve the PBR, FGR, and VHTR net plant efficiency. Another objective of this research is to test materials to be used in the power conversion side at supercritical carbon dioxide conditions. Generally, the optimized Brayton cycle and balance of plant (BOP) to be developed from this study can be applied to Generation-IV reactor concepts. Particularly, we are interested in VHTR because it has a good chance of being built in the near future.

  9. NERI Quarterly Progress Report -- April 1 - June 30, 2005 -- Development of a Supercritical Carbon Dioxide Brayton Cycle: Improving PBR Efficiency and Testing Material Compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Chang Oh

    2005-07-01

    The objective of this research is to improve a helium Brayton cycle and to develop a supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle for the Pebble Bed Reactor (PBR) that can also be applied to the Fast Gas-Cooled Reactor (FGR) and the Very-High-Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor (VHTR). The proposed supercritical carbon dioxide Brayton cycle will be used to improve the PBR, FGR, and VHTR net plant efficiency. Another objective of this research is to test materials to be used in the power conversion side at supercritical carbon dioxide conditions. Generally, the optimized Brayton cycle and balance of plant (BOP) to be developed from this study can be applied to Generation-IV reactor concepts. Particularly, we are interested in VHTR because it has a good chance of being built in the near future.

  10. Materials compatibility studies for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; Manneschmidt, E.T.

    1998-11-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high power facility for producing neutrons that utilizes flowing liquid mercury inside an austenitic stainless steel container as the target for a 1.0 GeV proton beam. Type 316 SS has been selected as the container material for the mercury and consequences of exposure of 316 SS to radiation, thermal shock, thermal stress, cavitation and hot, flowing mercury are all being addressed by R and D programs. In addition, corrosion studies also include evaluation of Inconel 718 because it has been successfully used in previous spallation neutron systems as a window material. Two types of compatibility issues relative to 316 SS/mercury and Inconel 718/mercury are being examined: (1) liquid metal embrittlement (LME) and (2) temperature gradient mass transfer. Studies have shown that mercury does not easily wet type 316 SS below 275 C. In the LME experiments, attempts were made to promote wetting of the steel by mercury either by adding gallium to the mercury or coating the specimen with a tin-silver solder that the mercury easily wets. The latter proved more reliable in establishing wetting, but there was no evidence of LME in any of the constant extension rate tensile tests either at 23 or 100 C. Inconel 718 also showed no change in room temperature properties when tested in mercury or mercury-gallium. However, there was evidence that the fracture was less ductile. Preliminary evaluation of mass transfer of either type 316 SS or Inconel 718 in mercury or mercury-gallium at 350 C (maximum temperature) did not reveal significant effects. Two 5,000 h thermal convection loop tests of type 316 SS are in progress, with specimens in both hot and cold test regions, at 300 and 240 C, respectively.

  11. Compatibility of molten salts with advanced solar dynamic receiver materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Perry, W. D.

    1989-01-01

    Metal-coated graphite fibers are being considered as a thermal conductivity enhancement filler material for molten salts in solar dynamic thermal energy storage systems. The successful metal coating chosen for this application must exhibit acceptable wettability and must be compatible with the molten salt environment. Contact angle values between molten lithium fluoride and several metal, metal fluoride, and metal oxide substrates have been determined at 892 C using a modification of the Wilhelmy plate technique. Reproducible contact angles with repeated exposure to the molten LiF indicated compatibility.

  12. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume 1

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours. The original refrigerants and the Alternatives tested for retrofit were as follows: Most motor materials exposed to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant (after an initial exposure to the original refrigerant and mineral oil) were compatible with the alternative refrigerant and lubricant. The only concern was delamination and blistering of the sheet insulation containing Nomex, especially after removal of absorbed refrigerant. This was attributed to solution of the adhesive and not to the Nomex itself. Embrittlement of the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) found in Mylar and Melinex sheet and sleeving insulations was initially observed, but subsequent tests under dry conditions showed that embrittlement of the PET materials was caused by moisture present during the exposure. Compatibility tests of elastomers with R-245ca, retrofitted from R-11 and R-123, showed that the nitrile was compatible with both R-11 and R-245ca, but not with R-123. The neoprene was unsatisfactory because of shrinkage in the R-245ca.

  13. Compatibility of structural materials with liquid bismuth, lead, and mercury

    SciTech Connect

    Weeks, J.R.

    1996-06-01

    During the 1950s and 1960s, a substantial program existed at Brookhaven National Laboratory as part of the Liquid Metal Fuel reactor program on the compatibility of bismuth, lead, and their alloys with structural materials. Subsequently, compatibility investigations of mercury with structural materials were performed in support of development of Rankine cycle mercury turbines for nuclear applications. The present talk will review present understanding of the corrosion/mass-transfer reactions of structural materials with these liquid metal coolants. Topics to be discussed include the basic solubility relationships of iron, chromium, nickel, and refractory metals in these liquid metals, the results of inhibition studies, the role of oxygen on the corrosion processes, and specialized topics such as cavitation-corrosion and liquid metal embrittlement. Emphasis will be placed on utilizing the understanding gained in this earlier work on the development of heavy liquid metal targets in spallation neutron sources.

  14. Communications, Navigation, and Network Reconfigurable Test-bed Flight Hardware Compatibility Test S

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Communications, Navigation, and Network Reconfigurable Test-bed Flight Hardware Compatibility Test Sets and Networks Integration Management Office Testing for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System

  15. Materials compatibility issues related to thermal energy storage for a space solar dynamic power system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faget, N. M.

    1986-01-01

    Attention is given to results obtained to date in developmental investigations of a thermal energy storage (TES) system for the projected NASA Space Station's solar dynamic power system; these tests have concentrated on issues related to materials compatibility for phase change materials (PCMs) and their containment vessels' materials. The five PCMs tested have melting temperatures that correspond to the operating temperatures of either the Brayton or Rankine heat engines, which were independently chosen for their high energy densities.

  16. Materials compatibility issues related to thermal energy storage for a space solar dynamic power system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faget, N. M.

    Attention is given to results obtained to date in developmental investigations of a thermal energy storage (TES) system for the projected NASA Space Station's solar dynamic power system; these tests have concentrated on issues related to materials compatibility for phase change materials (PCMs) and their containment vessels' materials. The five PCMs tested have melting temperatures that correspond to the operating temperatures of either the Brayton or Rankine heat engines, which were independently chosen for their high energy densities.

  17. Compatibility of ITER candidate structural materials with static gallium

    SciTech Connect

    Luebbers, P.R.; Michaud, W.F.; Chopra, O.K.

    1993-12-01

    Tests were conducted on the compatibility of gallium with candidate structural materials for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor, e.g., Type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy, as well as Armco iron, Nickel 270, and pure chromium. Type 316 stainless steel is least resistant to corrosion in static gallium and Nb-5 Mo-1 Zr alloy is most resistant. At 400{degrees}C, corrosion rates are {approx}4.0, 0.5, and 0.03 mm/yr for type 316 SS, Inconel 625, and Nb-5 Mo- 1 Zr alloy, respectively. The pure metals react rapidly with gallium. In contrast to findings in earlier studies, pure iron shows greater corrosion than nickel. The corrosion rates at 400{degrees}C are {ge}88 and 18 mm/yr, respectively, for Armco iron and Nickel 270. The results indicate that at temperatures up to 400{degrees}C, corrosion occurs primarily by dissolution and is accompanied by formation of metal/gallium intermetallic compounds. The solubility data for pure metals and oxygen in gallium are reviewed. The physical, chemical, and radioactive properties of gallium are also presented. The supply and availability of gallium, as well as price predictions through the year 2020, are summarized.

  18. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume IV - pictures

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours.

  19. Integrated Data Collection Analysis (IDCA) Program - Mixing Procedures and Materials Compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    Olinger, Becky D.; Sandstrom, Mary M.; Warner, Kirstin F.; Sorensen, Daniel N.; Remmers, Daniel L.; Moran, Jesse S.; Shelley, Timothy J.; Whinnery, LeRoy L.; Hsu, Peter C.; Whipple, Richard E.; Kashgarian, Michaele; Reynolds, John G.

    2011-01-14

    Three mixing procedures have been standardized for the IDCA proficiency test—solid-solid, solid-liquid, and liquid-liquid. Due to the variety of precursors used in formulating the materials for the test, these three mixing methods have been designed to address all combinations of materials. Hand mixing is recommended for quantities less than 10 grams and Jar Mill mixing is recommended for quantities over 10 grams. Consideration must also be given to the type of container used for the mixing due to the wide range of chemical reactivity of the precursors and mixtures. Eight web site sources from container and chemical manufacturers have been consulted. Compatible materials have been compiled as a resource for selecting containers made of materials stable to the mixtures. In addition, container materials used in practice by the participating laboratories are discussed. Consulting chemical compatibility tables is highly recommended for each operation by each individual engaged in testing the materials in this proficiency test.

  20. Space hardware compatibility tests with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma sterilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faye, Delphine; Aguila, Alexandre; Debus, Andre; Remaury, Stephanie; Nabarra, Pascale; Darbord, Jacques C.; Soufflet, Caroline; Destrez, Philippe; Coll, Patrice; Coscia, David

    The exploration of the Solar System shall comply with planetary protection requirements handled presently by the Committee of Space Research (COSPAR). The goal of planetary protection is to protect celestial bodies from terrestrial contamination and also to protect the Earth environment from an eventual contamination carried by return samples or by space systems. For project teams, avoiding the biological contamination of other Solar System bodies such as Mars imposes to perform unusual tasks at technical and operational constraints point of view. The main are the reduction of bioburden on space hardware, the sterile integration of landers, the control of the biological cleanliness and the limitation of crash probability. In order to reduce the bioburden on spacecraft, the use of qualified sterilization processes may be envisaged. Since 1992 now, with the Mars96 mission, one of the most often used is the Sterrad(R) process working with hydrogen peroxide gas plasma. In the view of future Mars exploration programs, after tests performed in the frame of previous missions, a new test campaign has been performed on thermal coatings and miscellaneous materials coming from an experiment in order to assess the compatibility of space hardware and material with this sterilization process.

  1. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.; Kujak, S.

    1993-05-01

    This volume contains the abstract, scope, discussion of results, charts of motor material compatibility, test procedures, material identifications, and 84 pages of data summary tables. Compatibility test results for 11 pure refrigerants and 17 refrigerant-lubricant combinations with 24 motor materials are included. The greatest effect on the motor materials was caused by adsorption followed by desorption of refrigerants at higher temperatures. High internal pressure of the adsorbed refrigerants and their tendency to evolve from the materials resulted in blisters, cracks, internal bubbles in the varnish, and delamination or bubbles in the sheet insulations. The second effect was extraction or dissolution of materials that lead to embrittlement of some sheet insulations. HCFC-22 and HCFC- 22/mineral oil had the most deleterious effects; the materials are expected to be reliable when used with most of the new refrigerants and lubricants. Tables.

  2. Materials compatibility with the volcanic environment. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Htun, K.M.

    1984-03-08

    Attempts were made to run materials compatibility, volcanic gas collection, and heat transfer experiments during the 1977 Kilauea eruption. Preliminary results from the recovered samples showed that Fe, Ni, and Fe-Ni alloys were the most heavily oxidized. The Mo and W alloys showed some attack and only neglible reaction was seen on 310 stainless, Hastelloy C, Inconel 600, Inconel 718, Rene 41, and Nichrome. Results are qualitative only. (DLC)

  3. Preparation of refractory cermet structures for lithium compatibility testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heestand, R. L.; Jones, R. A.; Wright, T. R.; Kizer, D. E.

    1973-01-01

    High-purity nitride and carbide cermets were synthesized for compatability testing in liquid lithium. A process was developed for the preparation of high-purity hafnium nitride powder, which was subsequently blended with tungsten powder or tantalum nitride and tungsten powders and fabricated into 3 in diameter billets by uniaxial hot pressing. Specimens were then cut from the billets for compatability testing. Similar processing techniques were applied to produce hafnium carbide and zirconium carbide cermets for use in the testing program. All billets produced were characterized with respect to chemistry, structure, density, and strength properties.

  4. [The compatibility between packing material and ipratropium bromide aerosol].

    PubMed

    Yue, Zhi-hua; Shen, Dian-dian; Hu, Chang-qin

    2010-08-01

    With the establishment of HPLC and LC-MS methods to determine the related substances and the content of active pharmaceutical ingredient (API) in ipratropium bromide aerosol products, several packing material-related impurities were identified, including antioxygen BHT and antioxygen 2246. Results showed that these leachable additives from the packing materials may present at a relative high level in the drug solution, and the low content of API in the drug products is usually due to the adsorption of the packing material as well as the leaking of contents. The current available assay methods for the control of ipratropium bromide aerosol products are often lack of specificity and unable to assure the drug quality effectively. To meet the increasing attention on the regulations of drug packing materials, our research would be a pilot study, indicating that the inappropriate packing materials could cause the migration and adsorption of the active ingredients, and the importance to have compatibility studies between packing materials and drugs.

  5. Materials Compatibility Studies for the Spallation Neutron Source

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Manneschmidt, E.T.; Pawel, S.J.

    1998-09-01

    The Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) is a high power facility for producing neutrons that utilizes flowing liquid mercury inside an austenitic stainless steel container as the target for a 1.0 GeV proton beam. The energy deposited in the target is transported by two separate mercury flow streams: one to transport heat in the interior target region and one to cool the stainless steel container. Three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics simulations have been performed to predict temperature, velocity, and pressure distributions in the target. Results have generally shown that the power deposited in the bulk mercury can be effectively transported with reasonable flow rates and the bulk mercury temperature should not exceed 160{deg}C. Assuming good thermal contact, the maximum stainless steel wall temperature should be 130 {deg}C. Type 316 SS has been selected as the container material for the mercury and consequences of exposure of 316 SS to radiation, thermal shock, thermal stress, cavitation and hot, flowing mercury are all being addressed by R&D programs. In addition, corrosion studies include evaluation of Inconel 718 because it has been successfully used in previous water cooled spallation neutron systems as a window material. With type 316 SS selected to contain the mercury target of the SNS, two types of compatibility issues have been examined: LME and temperature gradient mass transfer. Studies have shown that mercury does not easily wet type 316 SS below 275{deg}C. In the LME experiments, attempts were made to promote wetting of the steel by mercury either by adding gallium to the mercury or coating the specimen with a tin-silver solder that the mercury easily wets. The latter proved more reliable in establishing wetting, but there was no evidence of LME in any of the constant extension rate tensile tests either at 23 or 100 {deg}C. Inconel 718 also showed no change in room temperature properties when tested in mercwy or mercury-gallium. However, there

  6. Compatibility of elastomeric impression materials for use as soft tissue casts.

    PubMed

    Beyak, B L; Chee, W W

    1996-11-01

    The communication of soft tissue contours from the clinical situation to the laboratory technician through the laboratory phases of the dental implant restoration is enhanced with the use of soft tissue casts. Modern elastomeric impression materials can function well as both the master impression and soft tissue cast materials. The purpose of this study was to test the compatibility of a variety of elastomeric impression materials and commercially available soft tissue cast materials with various matrix impression materials. Chemical interaction between the materials may result in adhesion or inhibition of the set of the soft tissue cast material. The results of this study indicated that consideration must be given to material compatibility if predictably successful results are to be achieved in soft tissue cast fabrication.

  7. Chemical compatibility of structural materials in alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.

    1995-04-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures in the range that are of interest for International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal-environments.

  8. Mixed waste chemical compatibility: A testing program for plastic packaging components

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.

    1995-12-01

    The purpose of hazardous and radioactive materials packaging is to enable these materials to be transported without posing a threat to the health or property of the general public. To achieve this aim, regulations in the United States have been written establishing general design requirements for such packagings. While no regulations have been written specifically for mixed waste packaging, regulations for the constituents of mixed wastes, i.e., hazardous and radioactive substances, have been codified by the US Department of Transportation (DOT, 49 CFR 173) and the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, 10 CFR 71). The design requirements for both hazardous [49 CFR 173.24 (e)(1)] and radioactive [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] materials packaging specify packaging compatibility, i.e., that the materials of the packaging @d any contents be chemically compatible with each other. Furthermore, Type A [49 CFR 173.412 (g)] and Type B (10 CFR 71.43) packaging design requirements stipulate that there be no significant chemical, galvanic, or other reaction between the materials and contents of the package. Based on these requirements, a Chemical Compatibility Testing Program was developed in the Transportation Systems Department at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The program attempts to assure any regulatory body that the issue of packaging material compatibility towards hazardous and radioactive materials has been addressed. This program has been described in considerable detail in an internal SNL document, the Chemical Compatibility Test Plan & Procedure Report (Nigrey 1993).

  9. Advanced techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. L.; Stebbins, J. P.; Smith, A. W.; Pullen, K. E.

    1973-01-01

    A method for the prediction of propellant-material compatibility for periods of time up to ten years is presented. Advanced sensitive measurement techniques used in the prediction method are described. These include: neutron activation analysis, radioactive tracer technique, and atomic absorption spectroscopy with a graphite tube furnace sampler. The results of laboratory tests performed to verify the prediction method are presented.

  10. Compatibility of Space Nuclear Power Plant Materials in an Inert He/Xe Working Gas Containing Reactive Impurities

    SciTech Connect

    MM Hall

    2006-01-31

    A major materials selection and qualification issue identified in the Space Materials Plan is the potential for creating materials compatibility problems by combining dissimilar reactor core, Brayton Unit and other power conversion plant materials in a recirculating, inert He/Xe gas loop containing reactive impurity gases. Reported here are results of equilibrium thermochemical analyses that address the compatibility of space nuclear power plant (SNPP) materials in high temperature impure He gas environments. These studies provide early information regarding the constraints that exist for SNPP materials selection and provide guidance for establishing test objectives and environments for SNPP materials qualification testing.

  11. Compatibility of materials with liquid metal targets for SNS

    SciTech Connect

    DiStefano, J.R.; Pawel, S.J.; DeVan, J.H.

    1996-06-01

    Several heavy liquid metals are candidates as the target in a spallation neutron source: Hg, Pb, Bi, and Pb-Bi eutectic. Systems with these liquid metals have been used in the past and a data-base on compatibility already exists. Two major compatibility issues have been identified when selecting a container material for these liquid metals: temperature gradient mass transfer and liquid metal embrittlement or LME. Temperature gradient mass transfer refers to dissolution of material from the high temperature portions of a system and its deposition in the lower temperature areas. Solution and deposition rate constants along with temperature, {Delta}T, and velocity are usually the most important parameters. For most candidate materials mass transfer corrosion has been found to be proportionately worse in Bi compared with Hg and Pb. For temperatures to {approx}550{degrees}C, ferritic/martensitic steels have been satisfactory in Pb or Hg systems and the maximum temperature can be extended to {approx}650{degrees}C with additions of inhibitors to the liquid metal, e.g. Mg, Ti, Zr. Above {approx}600{degrees}C, austenitic stainless steels have been reported to be unsatisfactory, largely because of the mass transfer of nickel. Blockage of flow from deposition of material is usually the life-limiting effect of this type of corrosion. However, mass transfer corrosion at lower temperatures has not been studied. At low temperatures (usually < 150{degrees}C), LME has been reported for some liquid metal/container alloy combinations. Liquid metal embrittlement, like hydrogen embrittlement, results in brittle fracture of a normally ductile material.

  12. Report on sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, M.; Natesan, K.; Momozaki, Y.; Rink, D.L.; Soppet, W.K.; Listwan, J.T.

    2012-07-09

    This report provides an update on the evaluation of sodium compatibility of advanced structural materials. The report is a deliverable (level 3) in FY11 (M3A11AN04030403), under the Work Package A-11AN040304, 'Sodium Compatibility of Advanced Structural Materials' performed by Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), as part of Advanced Structural Materials Program for the Advanced Reactor Concepts. This work package supports the advanced structural materials development by providing corrosion and tensile data from the standpoint of sodium compatibility of advanced structural alloys. The scope of work involves exposure of advanced structural alloys such as G92, mod.9Cr-1Mo (G91) ferritic-martensitic steels and HT-UPS austenitic stainless steels to a flowing sodium environment with controlled impurity concentrations. The exposed specimens are analyzed for their corrosion performance, microstructural changes, and tensile behavior. Previous reports examined the thermodynamic and kinetic factors involved in the purity of liquid sodium coolant for sodium reactor applications as well as the design, fabrication, and construction of a forced convection sodium loop for sodium compatibility studies of advanced materials. This report presents the results on corrosion performance, microstructure, and tensile properties of advanced ferritic-martensitic and austenitic alloys exposed to liquid sodium at 550 C for up to 2700 h and at 650 C for up to 5064 h in the forced convection sodium loop. The oxygen content of sodium was controlled by the cold-trapping method to achieve {approx}1 wppm oxygen level. Four alloys were examined, G92 in the normalized and tempered condition (H1 G92), G92 in the cold-rolled condition (H2 G92), G91 in the normalized and tempered condition, and hot-rolled HT-UPS. G91 was included as a reference to compare with advanced alloy, G92. It was found that all four alloys showed weight loss after sodium exposures at 550 and 650 C. The weight loss of the four

  13. Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Technical progress report, 1 April 1995--30 June 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Szymurski, S.R.; Hourahan, G.C.; Godwin, D.S.; Amrane, K.

    1995-08-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. The AirConditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) manages and contracts multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each subcontractor.

  14. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1995-12-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine whether exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials with the alternative refrigerant/lubricant after retrofit. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Motor materials exposed to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant (after an initial exposure to the original refrigerant and mineral oil) appeared to be compatible with the alternative refrigerant and lubricant. The only concern was delamination and blistering of the sheet insulation containing Nomex, especially after removal of absorbed refrigerant at high temperature. This was attributed to incompatibility of the adhesive and not to the Nomex itself. Embrittlement of the polyethylene terephthalate (PET) sheet and sleeving insulations was initially observed, but subsequent tests under extremely dry conditions showed that embrittlement of the PET materials was attributed to moisture present during the exposure.

  15. Compatibility Study of DNTF with Some Insensitive Energetic Materials and Inert Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xi; Wang, Bo-Liang; Lin, Qiu-Han; Chen, Li-Ping

    2016-10-01

    The compatibility of 3,4-dinitrofurazanfuroxan (DNTF) with insensitive energetic materials and inert materials was studied in detail using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). 2,4,6-Trinitrotoluene (TNT), 2,4,6-triamino-1,3,5-trinitrobenzene (TATB), 3-nitro-1,2,4-triazol-5-one (NTO), 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyrazine-1-oxide (LLM-105), 2,6-diamino-3,5-dinitropyridine-1-oxide (ANPyO), and 5-amino-1H-tetrazole nitrate (5-ATEZN) are used as insensitive energetic materials, and polymer(vinyl acetate) (PVAC), hydroxyl-terminated polybutadiene (HTPB), dinoctylsebacate (DOS), 2,4-dinitrotoluene (DNT), and wax are used as inert materials. The results show that DNTF/TNT and DNTF/5-ATEZN possess good compatibility, DNTF/NTO and DNTF/TATB have moderate compatibility, and the compatibility of DNTF/LLM-105 and DNTF/PVAC is poor; in addition, DNTF/ANPyO, DNTF/HTPB, DNTF/DNT, DNTF/DOS, and DNTF/wax have bad compatibility.

  16. Solid phase microextraction analysis of B83 SLTS and Core B compatibility test units

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, D M; Ithaca, J; King, H A; Malcolm, S

    1999-03-26

    Solid phase microextraction has permitted the efficient collection and analysis of a broad range of volatile and semivolatile compounds outgassed from materials. In 1998, we implemented a microextraction protocol at Mason and Hanger, Pantex Plant, for the analysis of weapons and compatibility test units. The chemical information that was obtained from this work is interpreted by determining the source and outgas mechanism for each compound in the weapon signature, which is a task only accomplished by analysis of material standards.

  17. Compatibility of gas turbine materials with steam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, V.; Tamboli, D.; Patel, Y.

    1995-10-01

    Gas turbines had been traditionally used for peak load plants and remote locations as they offer advantage of low installation costs and quick start up time. Their use as a base load generator had not been feasible owing to their poor efficiency. However, with the advent of gas turbines based combined cycle plants (CCPs), continued advances in efficiency are being made. Coupled with ultra low NO{sub x} emissions, coal compatibility and higher unit output, gas turbines are now competing with conventional power plants for base load power generation. Currently, the turbines are designed with TIT of 2300{degrees}F and metal temperatures are maintained around 1700{degrees}F by using air cooling. New higher efficiency ATS turbines will have TIT as high as 2700{degrees}F. To withstand this high temperature improved materials, coatings, and advances in cooling system and design are warranted. Development of advanced materials with better capabilities specifically for land base applications are time consuming and may not be available by ATS time frame or may prove costly for the first generation ATS gas turbines. Therefore improvement in the cooling system of hot components, which can take place in a relatively shorter time frame, is important. One way to improve cooling efficiency is to use better cooling agent. Steam as an alternate cooling agent offers attractive advantages because of its higher specific heat (almost twice that of air) and lower viscosity.

  18. Physical properties and compatibility with dental stones of current alginate impression materials.

    PubMed

    Murata, H; Kawamura, M; Hamada, T; Chimori, H; Nikawa, H

    2004-11-01

    This study examined physical properties and compatibility with dental stones of two types of alginate impression materials. Five powder-type alginate impression materials (Alginoplast EM, Aroma Fine, Algiace Z, Coe Alginate, Jeltrate Plus) and a paste-type alginate impression material (Tokuso AP-1) were used. The dynamic viscosity immediately after mixing was measured by means of a controlled-stress rheometer. The gelation times were determined according to Japanese Industrial Standards (JIS) T6505, and recovery from deformation, strain in compression and compressive strength were determined according to the International Organization for Standardization (ISO) specification 1563. Detail reproduction and surface roughness of type III dental stones (New Plastone, New Sunstone) and a type IV dental stone (Die Stone) were evaluated using a ruled test block as specified in the ISO specification 1563 and a profilometer, respectively. The alginate impression materials evaluated in this study were all in compliance with the ISO specification 1563 and JIS T6505. The alginate impression materials had similar mechanical properties after gelation, whilst a wide range of dynamic viscosity immediately after being mixed, gelation times and compatibility with dental stones were found among the materials. The paste-type material had a higher dynamic viscosity and a shorter gelation time than the powder-type materials. The best surface quality was obtained with the paste-type material/type III dental stone cast combinations. The materials should be selected in consideration of initial flow, setting characteristics and compatibility with dental stones. The results suggested that a paste-type material would better meet the requirements of an alginate impression material.

  19. Long-time dynamic compatibility of elastomeric materials with hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coulbert, C. D.; Cuddihy, E. F.; Fedors, R. F.

    1973-01-01

    The tensile property surfaces for two elastomeric materials, EPT-10 and AF-E-332, were generated in air and in liquid hydrazine environments using constant strain rate tensile tests over a range of temperatures and elongation rates. These results were used to predict the time-to-rupture for these materials in hydrazine as a function of temperature and amount of strain covering a span of operating times from less than a minute to twenty years. The results of limited sheet-folding tests and their relationship to the tensile failure boundary are presented and discussed.

  20. 49 CFR 176.184 - Class 1 (explosive) materials of Compatibility Group L.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Group L. 176.184 Section 176.184 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE... (explosive) Materials in Port § 176.184 Class 1 (explosive) materials of Compatibility Group L. Class 1 (explosive) materials in compatibility group L may not be handled in a port area without the...

  1. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 July 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.; Kujak, S.

    1992-10-01

    During the compatibility study of 10 pure refrigerants with 24 motor materials, it was observed that the greatest damage to the insulation system was caused by absorption of refrigerant followed by rapid desorption. The observed effects were blisters, cracking, internal bubbles and delamination. Measured results includes decreased bond strength, dielectric strength and overall integrity of the material. Refrigerants HCFC-22, HFC-32, HFC-134 and HFC-152a exhibited this phenomena. The effect of HCFC-22 was most severe of the tested refrigerants. Since HCFC-22 has an excellent reliability history with many of the materials tested, compatibility with the new refrigerants is expected.

  2. Cost-Effective Cementitious Material Compatible with Yucca Mountain Repository Geochemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Dole, LR

    2004-12-17

    The current plans for the Yucca Mountain (YM) repository project (YMP) use steel structures to stabilize the disposal drifts and connecting tunnels that are collectively over 100 kilometers in length. The potential exist to reduce the underground construction cost by 100s of millions of dollars and improve the repository's performance. These economic and engineering goals can be achieved by using the appropriate cementitious materials to build out these tunnels. This report describes the required properties of YM compatible cements and reviews the literature that proves the efficacy of this approach. This report also describes a comprehensive program to develop and test materials for a suite of underground construction technologies.

  3. The Astrometric Model Implementation. Simulations and Data Reduction Compatibility Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anglada-Escudé, G.; Torra, J.; Masana, E.; Luri, X.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to give a brief description of the astrometric model accuracy at the current stage of the implementation in GASS (simulator) and GDAAS2 (Data Reduction study). The astrometric model described is a set of algorithms which relate the astrometric parameters with the observed directions on the satellite quasi-intertial reference frame. This includes the kinematics of point sources, the relativistic light deflection due to Solar System gravitational field and the aberration. The description of this model was given by Klioner (2002), The form of these algorithms is slightly different in the telemetry simulations (S.A. Klioner, ANSI-C code) and in the data reduction scheme (Lindegren 2002, Fortran90). Both versions make use of the ephemeris for the Solar System by Observatoire de la Côte d'Azur (Mignard 2003, Fortran 90). All these algorithms have been wrapped or recoded since the simulations and data reduction both run in a Java environment. All these manipulations required a strict verification since these algorithms constitute the core of the GIS (Global Iterative Solution). We present the compatibility tests performed during last year that helped us to make fully compatible the simulated data with the data reduction scheme.

  4. Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing of Implantable Neurostimulators Exposed to Metal Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Seidman, Seth J; Kainz, Wolfgang; Casamento, Jon; Witters, Donald

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents results of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) testing of three implantable neurostimulators exposed to the magnetic fields emitted from several walk-through and hand-held metal detectors. The motivation behind this testing comes from numerous adverse event reports involving active implantable medical devices (AIMDs) and security systems that have been received by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). EMC testing was performed using three neurostimulators exposed to the emissions from 12 walk-through metal detectors (WTMDs) and 32 hand-held metal detectors (HHMDs). Emission measurements were performed on all HHMDs and WTMDs and summary data is presented. Results from the EMC testing indicate possible electromagnetic interference (EMI) between one of the neurostimulators and one WTMD and indicate that EMI between the three neurostimulators and HHMDs is unlikely. The results suggest that worst case situations for EMC testing are hard to predict and testing all major medical device modes and setting parameters are necessary to understand and characterize the EMC of AIMDs. PMID:20448818

  5. Materials Test Branch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Gail

    2012-01-01

    The Materials Test Branch resides at Marshall Space Flight Center's Materials and Processing laboratory and has a long history of supporting NASA programs from Mercury to the recently retired Space Shuttle. The Materials Test Branch supports its customers by supplying materials testing expertise in a wide range of applications. The Materials Test Branch is divided into three Teams, The Chemistry Team, The Tribology Team and the Mechanical Test Team. Our mission and goal is to provide world-class engineering excellence in materials testing with a special emphasis on customer service.

  6. Simulated coal-gas-fueled molten carbonate fuel cell development program. Topical report: Cathode compatibility tests

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.H.

    1992-07-01

    In previous work, International Fuel Cells Corporation (EFC) found interactions between molten carbonate fuel cell cathode materials being considered as replacements for the presently used nickel oxide and matrix materials. Consequently, this work was conducted to screen additional new materials for mutual compatibility. As part of this program, experiments were performed to examine the compatibility of several candidate, alternative cathode materials with the standard lithium aluminate matrix material in the presence of electrolyte at cell potentials. Initial cathode candidates were materials lithium ferrite, yttrium iron garnet, lithium manganite and doped ceria which were developed by universities, national laboratories, or contractors to DOE, EPRI, or GRI. These investigations were conducted in laboratory scale experiments. None of the materials tested can directly replace nickel oxide or indicate greater stability of cell performance than afforded by nickel oxide. Specifically: (1) no further work on niobium doped ceria is warranted; (2) cobalt migration was found in the lithium ferrite cathode tested. This could possibly lead to shorting problems similiar to those encountered with nickel oxide; (3) Possible shorting problems may also exist with the proprietary dopant in YIG; (4) lithium ferrite and YIG cathode were not single phase materials. Assessment of the chemical stability, i.e., dopant loss, was severely impeded by dissolution of these second phases in the electrolyte; and (5) Magnesium doped lithium manganite warrants further work. Electrolytes should contain Mg ions to suppress dopant loss.

  7. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume II - data tables, high pressure refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours.

  8. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials under retrofit conditions. Final report, Volume III - data tables, low pressure refrigerants

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1996-10-01

    Compatibility tests were conducted on motor materials to determine if exposure to the original refrigerant/mineral oil would affect compatibility of the motor materials after retrofit to the alternative refrigerant/lubricant. The motor materials were exposed at elevated temperature to the original refrigerant and mineral oil for 500 hours, followed by exposure to the alternative refrigerant and lubricant for 500 hours. Measurements were also taken after 168 and 336 hours. As a control, some samples were exposed to the original refrigerant/mineral oil for a total of 1000 hours.

  9. Preliminary investigation of steel compatibility with potential materials of construction for UF6 cylinder chocks

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, S.J.; Ziehlke, K.T.; Swindeman, C.J.

    1992-12-01

    A set of compatibility experiments was performed to assess corrosion susceptibility of mild steel in long term contact with UF{sub 6} cylinder chocking materials and the atmosphere. Chock materials considered included concrete, pressure-treated wood, and creosote-treated wood. Immersion tests (panels partially submerged, 1000 h, 38 C), resistance probe measurements (600 h, ambient), and cyclic polarization tests on steel in leachate solutions generated from each chock material were performed. Results indicate that the long term corrosion susceptibility of mild steel in contact with concrete and the atmosphere is at least the equivalent of -- and under some conditions superior to -- that for steel in contact with pressure-treated or creosote-treated wood. No corrosion-related limitation for concrete chocks for long term support of mild steel UF{sub 6} cylinders was identified.

  10. Cesium chloride compatibility testing program. Annual report, fiscal year 1983

    SciTech Connect

    Bryan, G.H.

    1984-03-01

    A program was started in FY 1982 to evaluate the compatibility of WESF-produced CsCl with 316L stainless steel under the thermal conditions that would be encountered in a geologic repository. The major part of the program involves compatibility testing of six standard WESF CsCl capsules at a maximum CsCl/metal interface temperature of 450/sup 0/C. The capsules are allowed to self heat to the test temperature in insulated containers and then held at temperature for 2200 to 32,000 h. After thermal aging, the capsules are destructively examined to determine the extent of the metal attack by the CsCl. This report describes the test procedure and summarizes the results obtained during the second year of the program. Metallographic examination was completed of the two zero-time capsules. The photomicrographs obtained of the metal samples indicate the maximum metal attack resulting from the capsule-filling operation was about 25 ..mu..m. Metallographic examination of the WESF CsCl capsules held at temperature for 2208 and 4392 h was completed. Both capsules exhibited substantial attack by the CsCl. Maximum attack observed in the 2208-hour capsule was estimated to be about 60 ..mu..m, while maximum attack in the 4392-h capsule was estimated at 110 ..mu..m. The data indicate the corrosion rate is linear with time for the first 4392 h. When the 4392-h capsule was opened for metallographic examination, it was found that the outer surface of the inner capsule was discolored and pitted at several locations. Metallographic examination of the affected areas showed pits up to 300-..mu..m deep in some areas. The maximum depth observed corresponded to about 9% of the initial capsule wall thickness. No similar pitting conditions observed on the outer surface of the 2208-h inner capsule; but was observed, although apparently to a lesser degree, on the outer surface of the 8784-h inner capsule. 2 references, 31 figures, 5 tables.

  11. Thermodynamic analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with beta phase NiAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with beta phase NiAl alloys within the concentration range 40 to 50 at. percent Al have been analyzed from thermodynamic considerations at 1373 and 1573 K. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, oxides, nitrides, beryllides, and silicides. Thermodynamic data for NiAl alloys have been reviewed and activity of Ni and Al in the beta phase have been derived at 1373 and 1573 K. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and the matrix have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been defined.

  12. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of ceramic reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1990-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  13. Thermodynamic analysis of chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with niobium aluminides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with three niobium aluminides, Nb3Al, Nb2Al, and NbAl3, were examined from thermodynamic considerations. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, nitrides, oxides, silicides, and Engel-Brewer compounds. Thermodynamics of the Nb-Al system were reviewed and activities of Nb and Al were derived at desired calculation temperatures. Criteria for chemical compatibility between the reinforcement material and Nb-Al compounds have been defined and several chemically compatible reinforcement materials have been identified.

  14. Compatibility of strontium-90 fluoride with containment materials at elevated temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1981-08-01

    The use of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ as a heat-source fuel requires that the /sup 90/Sr be adequately contained during heat-source service. A program for determining the compatibility of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ with containment materials at heat-source operating temperatures is described. These compatibility studies included: initial and supplemental screening tests; WESF /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ capsule demonstration tests; thermal gradient test; and long-term tests. TZM, Haynes Alloy 25, and Hastelloy C-276 were the three materitals selected for evaluation at 600/sup 0/, 800/sup 0/ and 1000/sup 0/C for periods up to 30,000 h. Results showed that all three alloys suffered substantial attack when exposed to the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/, although the TZM was more resistant to attack than the Hastelloy C-276 and Haynes Alloy 25. The latter two alloys appeared to provide about equal resistance to fluoride attack for exposures longer than about 12,000 h. Attack of the alloys tested by the /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ was due primarily to impurities.

  15. Sealing of boreholes using natural, compatible materials: Granular salt

    SciTech Connect

    Finley, R.E.; Zeuch, D.H.; Stormont, J.C.; Daemen, J.J.K.

    1994-05-01

    Granular salt can be used to construct high performance permanent seals in boreholes which penetrate rock salt formations. These seals are described as seal systems comprised of the host rock, the seal material, and the seal rock interface. The performance of these seal systems is defined by the complex interactions between these seal system components through time. The interactions are largely driven by the creep of the host formation applying boundary stress on the seal forcing host rock permeability with time. The immediate permeability of these seals is dependent on the emplaced density. Laboratory test results suggest that careful emplacement techniques could results in immediate seal system permeability on the order of 10{sup {minus}16} m{sup 2} to 10{sup {minus}18} m{sup 2} (10{sup {minus}4} darcy to 10{sup {minus}6}). The visco-plastic behavior of the host rock coupled with the granular salts ability to ``heal`` or consolidate make granular salt an ideal sealing material for boreholes whose permanent sealing is required.

  16. GROUND WATER ISSUE: NONAQUEOUS PHASE LIQUIDS COMPATIBILITY WITH MATERIALS USED IN WELL CONSTRUCTION, SAMPLING, AND REMEDIATION.

    EPA Science Inventory

    This issue paper provides a comprehensive literature review regarding the compatibility of NAPLs with a wide variety of materials used at hazardous waste sites. A condensed reference table of compatibility data for 207 chemicals and 28 commonly used well construction and sampling...

  17. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly progress report, 1 July 1992--30 September 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hourahan, G.C.; Szymurski, S.R.

    1992-10-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC-refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. Under the current MCLR pregrain the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) is contracting and managing several research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Preliminary results is from these projects are reported in technical progress reports prepared by each researcher.

  18. Gallium-cladding compatibility testing plan: Phase 3 -- Test plan for centrally heated surrogate rodlet test. Revision 2

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, R.N.; Baldwin, C.A.; Wilson, D.F.

    1998-07-01

    The Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) is investigating the use of weapons grade plutonium in mixed oxide (MOX) fuel for light-water reactors (LWR). Commercial MOX fuel has been successfully used in overseas reactors for many years; however, weapons derived fuel may differ from the previous commercial fuels because of small amounts of gallium impurities. A concern presently exists that the gallium may migrate out of the fuel, react with and weaken the clad, and thereby promote loss of fuel pin integrity. Phases 1 and 2 of the gallium task are presently underway to investigate the types of reactions that occur between gallium and clad materials. This is a Level-2 document as defined in the Fissile Materials Disposition Program Light-Water Reactor Mixed-Oxide Fuel Irradiation Test Project Plan. This Plan summarizes the projected Phase 3 Gallium-Cladding compatibility heating test and the follow-on post test examination (PTE). This work will be performed using centrally-heated surrogate pellets, to avoid unnecessary complexities and costs associated with working with plutonium and an irradiation environment. Two sets of rodlets containing pellets prepared by two different methods will be heated. Both sets will have an initial bulk gallium content of approximately 10 ppm. The major emphasis of the PTE task will be to examine the material interactions, particularly indications of gallium transport from the pellets to the clad.

  19. Safer Aviation Materials Tested

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palaszewski, Bryan A.

    2001-01-01

    A series of thermally stable polymer samples were tested. These materials are called low heat release materials and are designed for aircraft interior decorative materials. The materials are designed to give off a minimum amount of noxious gases when heated, which increases the possibility that people can escape from a burning aircraft. New cabin materials have suitably low heat release so that fire does not spread, toxic chemicals are not given off, and the fire-emergency escape time for crew and passengers is lengthened. These low heat-release materials have a variety of advantages and applications: interiors for ground-based facilities, interiors of space vehicles, and many commercial fire-protection environments. A microscale combustion calorimeter at the Federal Aviation Administration's (FAA) Technical Center tested NASA Langley Research Center materials samples. The calorimeter is shown. A sharp, quantitative, and reproducible heat-release-rate peak is obtained in the microscale heat-release-rate test. The newly tested NASA materials significantly reduced the heat release capacity and total heat release. The thermal stability and flammability behavior of the samples was very good. The new materials demonstrated a factor of 4 reduction in total heat release over ULTEM (a currently used material). This information is provided in the following barchart. In other tests, the materials showed greater than a factor 9 reduction in heat-release capacity over ULTEM. The newly tested materials were developed for low dielectric constant, low color, and good solubility. A scale up of the material samples is needed to determine the repeatability of the performance in larger samples. Larger panels composed of the best candidate materials will be tested in a larger scale FAA Technical Center fire facility. The NASA Glenn Research Center, Langley (Jeff Hinkley), and the FAA Technical Center (Richard Lyon) cooperatively tested these materials for the Accident Mitigation

  20. A materials compatibility study in FM-1, a liquid component of a paste extrudable explosive

    SciTech Connect

    Goods, S.H.; Shepodd, T.J.; Mills, B.E.; Foster, P.

    1993-09-01

    The chemical compatibility of various metallic and organic containment materials with a constituent of a paste extrudable explosive (PEX) has been examined through a series of long-term exposures. Corrosion coupons and mechanical test specimens (polymers only) were exposed to FM-1, a principal liquid component of PEX, at 74{degree}C. RX-08-FK is the LLNL designator for this formulation. Compatibility was determined by measuring changes in weight, physical dimensions, and mechanical properties, by examining the coupons for discoloration, surface attack, and corrosion products, and by analyzing for dissolved metals in the FM-1. Of the metals and alloys examined, none of the 300 series stainless steels exhibited adequate corrosion resistance after 74 days of exposure. Copper showed evidence of severe uniform surface attack. Monel 400 also exhibited signs of chemical attack. Nickel and tantalum showed less evidence of attack, although neither, was immune to the liquid. Gold coupons developed a ``tarnish`` film. The gold along with an aluminum alloy, 6061 (in the T6 condition) performed the most satisfactorily. A wide range of polymers were tested for 61 days at 74{degree}C. The materials that exhibited the most favorable response in terms of weight change, dimensional stability, and mechanical properties were Kalrez, PTFE Teflon, and polyethylene.

  1. COMPATIBILITY OF NAPLS AND OTHER ORGANIC COMPOUNDS WITH MATERIALS UED IN WELL CONSTRUCTION, SAMPLING, AND REMEDIATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Structural integrity of well construction, sampling, and remediation materials may be compromised at many hazardous sites by nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) and their dissolved constituents. A literature review of compatibility theory and qualitative field experiences are provid...

  2. Advanced techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    The search for advanced measurement techniques for determining long term compatibility of materials with propellants was conducted in several parts. A comprehensive survey of the existing measurement and testing technology for determining material-propellant interactions was performed. Selections were made from those existing techniques which were determined could meet or be made to meet the requirements. Areas of refinement or changes were recommended for improvement of others. Investigations were also performed to determine the feasibility and advantages of developing and using new techniques to achieve significant improvements over existing ones. The most interesting demonstration was that of the new technique, the volatile metal chelate analysis. Rivaling the neutron activation analysis in terms of sensitivity and specificity, the volatile metal chelate technique was fully demonstrated.

  3. Materials compatibility and aging for flux and cleaner combinations

    SciTech Connect

    Archuleta, Kim M.; Piatt, Rochelle

    2015-01-01

    A materials study of high reliability electronics cleaning is presented here. In Phase 1, mixed type substrates underwent a condensed contaminants application to view a worst- case scenario for unremoved flux with cleaning agent residue for parts in a silicone oil filled environment. In Phase 2, fluxes applied to copper coupons and to printed wiring boards underwent gentle cleaning then accelerated aging in air at 65% humidity and 30 O C. Both sets were aged for 4 weeks. Contaminants were no-clean (ORL0), water soluble (ORH1 liquid and ORH0 paste), and rosin (RMA; ROL0) fluxes. Defluxing agents were water, solvents, and engineered aqueous defluxers. In the first phase, coupons had flux applied and heated, then were placed in vials of oil with a small amount of cleaning agent and additional coupons. In the second phase, pairs of copper coupons and PWB were hand soldered by application of each flux, using tin-lead solder in a strip across the coupon or a set of test components on the PWB. One of each pair was cleaned in each cleaning agent, the first with a typical clean, and the second with a brief clean. Ionic contamination residue was measured before accelerated aging. After aging, substrates were removed and a visual record of coupon damage made, from which a subjective rank was applied for comparison between the various flux and defluxer combinations; more corrosion equated to higher rank. The ORH1 water soluble flux resulted in the highest ranking in both phases, the RMA flux the least. For the first phase, in which flux and defluxer remained on coupons, the aqueous defluxers led to worse corrosion. The vapor phase cleaning agents resulted in the highest ranking in the second phase, in which there was no physical cleaning. Further study of cleaning and rinsing parameters will be required.

  4. 49 CFR 176.184 - Class 1 (explosive) materials of Compatibility Group L.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... REGULATIONS CARRIAGE BY VESSEL Detailed Requirements for Class 1 (Explosive) Materials Handling Class 1... (explosive) materials in compatibility group L may not be handled in a port area without the special... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 1 (explosive) materials of...

  5. Doppler ultrasound compatible plastic material for use in rigid flow models.

    PubMed

    Wong, Emily Y; Thorne, Meghan L; Nikolov, Hristo N; Poepping, Tamie L; Holdsworth, David W

    2008-11-01

    A technique for the rapid but accurate fabrication of multiple flow phantoms with variations in vascular geometry would be desirable in the investigation of carotid atherosclerosis. This study demonstrates the feasibility and efficacy of implementing numerically controlled direct-machining of vascular geometries into Doppler ultrasound (DUS)-compatible plastic for the easy fabrication of DUS flow phantoms. Candidate plastics were tested for longitudinal speed of sound (SoS) and acoustic attenuation at the diagnostic frequency of 5 MHz. Teflon was found to have the most appropriate SoS (1376 +/- 40 m s(-1) compared with 1540 m s(-1) in soft tissue) and thus was selected to construct a carotid bifurcation flow model with moderate eccentric stenosis. The vessel geometry was machined directly into Teflon using a numerically controlled milling technique. Geometric accuracy of the phantom lumen was verified using nondestructive micro-computed tomography. Although Teflon displayed a higher attenuation coefficient than other tested materials, Doppler data acquired in the Teflon flow model indicated that sufficient signal power was delivered throughout the depth of the vessel and provided comparable velocity profiles to that obtained in the tissue-mimicking phantom. Our results indicate that Teflon provides the best combination of machinability and DUS compatibility, making it an appropriate choice for the fabrication of rigid DUS flow models using a direct-machining method.

  6. Flexible Material Systems Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lin, John K.; Shook, Lauren S.; Ware, Joanne S.; Welch, Joseph V.

    2010-01-01

    An experimental program has been undertaken to better characterize the stress-strain characteristics of flexible material systems to support a NASA ground test program for inflatable decelerator material technology. A goal of the current study is to investigate experimental methods for the characterization of coated woven material stiffness. This type of experimental mechanics data would eventually be used to define the material inputs of fluid-structure interaction simulation models. The test methodologies chosen for this stress-strain characterization are presented along with the experimental results.

  7. Thermodynamic analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with FeAl alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1988-01-01

    Chemical compatibility of several reinforcement materials with FeAl alloys within the concentration range 40 to 50 at pct Al have been analyzed from thermodynamic considerations at 1173 and 1273 K. The reinforcement materials considered in this study include carbides, borides, oxides, nitrides, and silicides. Although several chemically compatible reinforcement materials are identified, the coefficients of thermal expansion for none of these materials match closely with that of FeAl alloys and this might pose serious problems in the design of composite systems based on FeAl alloys.

  8. ISO 14624 Series - Space Systems - Safety and Compatibility of Materials Flammability Assessment of Spacecraft Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2007-01-01

    A viewgraph presentation on the flammability of spacecraft materials is shown. The topics include: 1) Spacecraft Fire Safety; 2) Materials Flammability Test; 3) Impetus for enhanced materials flammability characterization; 4) Exploration Atmosphere Working Group Recommendations; 5) Approach; and 6) Status of implementation

  9. Design and development of a high-temperature sodium compatibility testing facility

    SciTech Connect

    Hvasta, M. G.; Nolet, B. K.; Anderson, M. H.

    2012-07-01

    The use of advanced alloys within sodium-cooled fast reactors (SFRs) has been identified as a means of increasing plant efficiency and reducing construction costs. In particular, alloys such as NF-616, NF-709 and HT-UPS are promising because they exhibit greater strength than traditional structural materials such as 316-SS. However, almost nothing is known about the sodium compatibility of these new alloys. Therefore, research taking place at the Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison is focused on studying the effects of sodium corrosion on these materials under prototypic SFR operating conditions (600 [ deg. C], V Na=10 [m/s], C 0{approx} 1 [wppm]). This paper focuses on the design and construction of the testing facility with an emphasis on moving magnet pumps (MMPs). Corrosion data from a preliminary 500 [hr] natural convection test will also be presented. (authors)

  10. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.; Kujak, S.

    1992-07-23

    During this last quarter, evaluations were complete on the motor materials after 500-hr exposures to refrigerants CFC-123, HFC-134a and HCFC-22 at 90{degrees}C. Materials were also evaluated after exposure to nitrogen at 127{degrees}C to determine effect of the thermal exposure. Other exposures were started during this quarter with refrigerants HCFC-124, HFC-125, HFC-143a, HFC-32 and HFC-152a. One 500 hr exposure is set up per week and one is analyzed the same week. This will enable Trane to complete the 500 hour exposures by the end of the year.

  11. Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly MCLR program technical progress report, January 1, 1995--March 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Szymurski, S.R.; Hourahan, G.C.; Godwin, D.S.

    1995-04-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. The Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) manages and contracts multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each subcontractor.

  12. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes; Quarterly MCLR program technical progress report, 1 October 1993--31 December 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Szymurski, S.R.; Hourahan, G.C.; Godwin, D.S.

    1994-01-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. The AirConditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) manages and contracts multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each subcontractor.

  13. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 July 1993--30 September 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Szymurski, S.R.; Hourahan, G.C.; Godwin, D.S.

    1993-10-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. The Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) manages and contracts multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each subcontractor.

  14. Hydrocarbon Fuel/Combustion-Chamber-Liner Materials Compatibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-04-01

    these fuels. Cuprous sulfide is the corrosion product. H3 I I I I I £ U i3 Rt~’J / D);,6,.4 .T 2.0, Summary (cont.) Task 1 tests with RP-1 and n...dodecanethiol. The copper cooling channels reacted with the sulfur impurity to form cuprous sulfide (Cu 2S). This corrosive process roughened the copper...1 in the ampules showed a change of color in the liquid phase. The RP-1 loaded into the ampules was a dark pink. After heating during the test, the RP

  15. Instrumented Materials Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackin, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    This presentation starts with an introduction to the need for materials testing. Classic failures (such as brittle ship hull fractures) are discussed before fundamental discoveries in fracture analysis (Griffith, Westergaard, and Irwin). Next standard tests are identified, followed by a look at brittle versus ductile failure. Griffith's result (the composite paradigm) that smaller composite specimens are stronger because they have smaller flaws, is covered. This leads into composite tests. And finally, stress waves are shown as an example that will initiate damage.

  16. Evaluation of four methods for platelet compatibility testing

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, J.G.; Aster, R.H.

    1987-05-01

    Four platelet compatibility assays were performed on serum and platelet or lymphocyte samples from 38 closely HLA-matched donor/recipient pairs involved in 55 single-donor platelet transfusions. The 22 patients studied were refractory to transfusions of pooled random-donor platelets. Of the four assays (platelet suspension immunofluorescence, PSIFT; /sup 51/Cr release; microlymphocytotoxicity; and a monoclonal anti-IgG assay, MAIA), the MAIA was most predictive of platelet transfusion outcome (predictability, 74% for one-hour posttransfusion platelet recovery and 76% for 24-hour recovery). The only other assay to reach statistical significance was the PSIFT (63% predictability for one-hour posttransfusion recovery). The degree of HLA compatibility between donor and recipient (exact matches v those utilizing cross-reactive associations) was unrelated to the ability of the MAIA to predict transfusion results. The MAIA may be capable of differentiating HLA antibodies, ABO antibodies, and platelet-specific antibodies responsible for failure of HLA-matched and selectively mismatched single-donor platelet transfusions.

  17. Test plan/procedure for the checkout of the USA cable communications test configuration for the electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perry, J. C.

    1975-01-01

    A series of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) tests were conducted in May, 1975 in the Soviet Union. The purpose of the EMC tests was to determine the effects of the operating environment of the Soviet aircraft, Soyuz, upon the electrical performance of the USA's cable communications equipment located in Soyuz. The test procedures necessary to check out the cable communications test configuration in preparation for the EMC tests are presented.

  18. A Materials Compatibility and Thermal Stability Analysis of Common Hydrocarbon Fuels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meyer, M. L.; Stiegemeier, B. R.

    2005-01-01

    A materials compatibility and thermal stability investigation was conducted using five common liquid hydrocarbon fuels and two structural materials. The tests were performed at the NASA Glenn Research Center Heated Tube Facility under environmental conditions similar to those encountered in regeneratively cooled rocket engines. Scanning-electron microscopic analysis in conjunction with energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) was utilized to characterize the condition of the tube inner wall surface and any carbon deposition or corrosion that was formed during selected runs. Results show that the carbon deposition process in stainless steel tubes was relatively insensitive to fuel type or test condition. The deposition rates were comparable for all fuels and none of the stainless steel test pieces showed any signs of corrosion. For tests conducted with copper tubing, the sulfur content of the fuel had a significant impact on both the condition of the tube wall and carbon deposition rates. Carbon deposition rates for the lowest sulfur fuels (2 ppm) were slightly higher than those recorded in the stainless steel tubes with no corrosion observed on the inner wall surface. For slightly higher sulfur content (25 ppm) fuels, nodules that intruded into the flow area were observed to form on the inner wall surface. These nodules induced moderate tube pressure drop increases. The highest sulfur content fuels (400 ppm) produced extensive wall pitting and dendritic copper sulfide growth that was continuous along the entire tube wall surface. The result of this tube degradation was the inability to maintain flow rate due to rapidly increasing test section pressure drops. Accompanying this corrosion were carbon deposition rates an order of magnitude greater than those observed in comparable stainless steel tests. The results of this investigation indicate that trace impurities in fuels (i.e. sulfur) can significantly impact the carbon deposition process and produce unacceptable

  19. Compatibility of gas turbine materials with steam cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, V.; Tamboli, D.; Patel, Y.

    1995-12-31

    Objective is to investigate performance of gas turbine materials in steam environment and evaluate remedial measures for alleviating the severity of the problem. Three superalloys commonly used in gas turbines were exposed to 3 steam environments containing different impurity levels for 2 to 6 months. Results: Cr2O3-forming alloys containing 1-4% Al such as IN 738 are susceptible to heavy internal oxidation of Al. High Al (>5%) alloys in which continuous Al2O3 scale can be formed, may not be susceptible to such attack. Deposition of salts from steam will accentuate hot corrosion problems. Alloys with higher Cr content such as X-45 are generally less prone to hot corrosion. The greater damage observed in IN 617 make this alloy less attractive for gas turbines with steam cooling. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is a good nondestructive method to evaluate microstructural damage.

  20. Hydrocarbon-fuel/combustion-chamber-liner materials compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, G. David

    1991-01-01

    The results of dynamic tests using methane and NASA-Z copper test specimen under conditions that simulate those expected in the cooling channels of a regeneratively cooled LOX/hydrocarbon booster engine operating at chamber pressures up to 3000 psi are presented. Methane with less than 0.5 ppm sulfur contamination has little or no effect on cooling channel performance. At higher sulfur concentrations, severe corrosion of the NASA-Z copper alloy occurs and the cuprous sulfide Cu2S, thus formed impedes mass flow rate and heat transfer efficiency. Therefore, it is recommended that the methane specification for this end use set the allowable sulfur content at 0.5 ppm (max). Bulk high purity liquid methane that meets this low sulfur requirement is currently available from only one producer. Pricing, availability, and quality assurance are discussed in detail. Additionally, it was found that dilute sodium cyanide solutions effectively refurbish sulfur corroded cooling channels in only 2 to 5 minutes by completely dissolving all the Cu2S. Sulfur corroded/sodium cyanide refurbished channels are highly roughened and the increased surface roughness leads to significant improvements in heat transfer efficiency with an attendant loss in mass flow rate. Both the sulfur corrosion and refurbishment effects are discussed in detail.

  1. Preliminary Compatibility Assessment of Metallic Dispenser Materials for Service in Ethanol Fuel Blends

    SciTech Connect

    Pawel, Steven J; Kass, Michael D; Janke, Christopher James

    2009-11-01

    The compatibility of selected metals representative of those commonly used in dispensing systems was evaluated in an aggressive E20 formulation (CE20a) and in synthetic gasoline (Reference Fuel C) in identical testing to facilitate comparison of results. The testing was performed at modestly elevated temperature (nominally 60 C) and with constant fluid flow in an effort to accelerate potential interactions in the screening test. Based on weight change, the general corrosion of all individual coupons exposed in the vapor phase above Reference Fuel C and CE20a as well as all coupons immersed in Reference Fuel C was essentially nil (<0.3 {micro}m/y), with no evidence of localized corrosion such as pitting/crevice corrosion or selective leaching at any location. Modest discoloration was observed on the copper-based alloys (cartridge brass and phosphor bronze), but the associated corrosion films were quite thin and apparently protective. For coupons immersed in CE20a, four different materials exhibited net weight loss over the entire course of the experiment: cartridge brass, phosphor bronze, galvanized steel, and terne-plated steel. None of these exhibited substantial incompatibility with the test fluid, with the largest general corrosion rate calculated from coupon weight loss to be approximately 4 {micro}m/y for the cartridge brass specimens. Selective leaching of zinc (from brass) and tin (from bronze) was observed, as well as the presence of sulfide surface films rich in these elements, suggesting the importance of the role of sulfuric acid in the CE20a formulation. Analysis of weight loss data for the slightly corroded metals indicated that the corrosivity of the test environment decreased with exposure time for brass and bronze and increased for galvanized and terne-plated steel. Other materials immersed in CE20a - type 1020 mild steel, type 1100 aluminum, type 201 nickel, and type 304 stainless steel - each appeared essentially immune to corrosion at the test

  2. Trie representation for expressing the compatibility between items in a logical bill of material structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wongvasu, Naken; Pittner, Stefan; Kamarthi, Sagar V.; Zeid, Ibrahim

    2001-10-01

    This paper presents a new technique which uses a tree for constraining the compatibility among components in a logical bill of material (BOM) structure. The new representation for restricting possible combinations of components is designed to address the limitations of matrix representations that were used for the same purpose in earlier work. These matrix representations, which assume that the compatibility in a BOM can always be described for pairs of components, cannot be used for products in which the compatibility among three or more components is an issue. Thus, it is proposed to use a standard tree with a special representation, which is called a trie, to represent the compatibility between the components in a product configuration. Similar to the inter-component compatibility matrix, the trie can be used to validate and/or complete an arbitrary product configuration during the configuration process without having to spell out product configuration rules. The new representation provides the user with a means to describe all possible compatibility relationships with a limited amount of data. This trie representation is comprehensive, easy to maintain, and easy to understand.

  3. Space Systems - Safety and Compatibility of Materials - Method to Determine the Flammability Thresholds of Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David

    2009-01-01

    Spacecraft fire safety emphasizes fire prevention, which is achieved primarily through the use of fire-resistant materials. Materials selection for spacecraft is based on conventional flammability acceptance tests, along with prescribed quantity limitations and configuration control for items that are non-pass or questionable. ISO 14624-1 and -2 are the major methods used to evaluate flammability of polymeric materials intended for use in the habitable environments of spacecraft. The methods are upward flame-propagation tests initiated in static environments and using a well-defined igniter flame at the bottom of the sample. The tests are conducted in the most severe flaming combustion environment expected in the spacecraft. The pass/fail test logic of ISO 14624-1 and -2 does not allow a quantitative comparison with reduced gravity or microgravity test results; therefore their use is limited, and possibilities for in-depth theoretical analyses and realistic estimates of spacecraft fire extinguishment requirements are practically eliminated. To better understand the applicability of laboratory test data to actual spacecraft environments, a modified ISO 14624 protocol has been proposed that, as an alternative to qualifying materials as pass/fail in the worst-expected environments, measures the actual upward flammability limit for the material. A working group established by NASA to provide recommendations for exploration spacecraft internal atmospheres realized the importance of correlating laboratory data with real-life environments and recommended NASA to develop a flammability threshold test method. The working group indicated that for the Constellation Program, the flammability threshold information will allow NASA to identify materials with increased flammability risk from oxygen concentration and total pressure changes, minimize potential impacts, and allow for development of sound requirements for new spacecraft and extravehicular landers and habitats

  4. [Discussion on the electromagnetic compatibility testing and evaluation of radio frequency ablation catheter].

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuji; Yang, Jiangang

    2014-11-01

    With the enforcement of YY 0505-2012, the testing items and evaluation points of radio frequency ablation catheter in electromagnetic compatibility field should be studied and discussed. Based on the requirements of relevant standards, this paper discusses on the testing items that should be applied and the evaluation points that should be focused on by analyzing the intended use and the structure of radio frequency ablation catheter, when it intends to apply registration individually with the basic knowledge of electromagnetic compatibility field.

  5. Frictional Ignition Testing of Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peralta, Steve; Rosales, Keisa; Robinson, Michael J.; Stoltzfus, Joel

    2006-01-01

    The space flight community has been investigating lightweight composite materials for use in propellant tanks for both liquid and gaseous oxygen for space flight vehicles. The use of these materials presents some risks pertaining to ignition and burning hazards in the presence of oxygen. Through hazard analysis process, some ignition mechanisms have been identified as being potentially credible. One of the ignition mechanisms was reciprocal friction; however, test data do not exist that could be used to clear or fail these types of materials as "oxygen compatible" for the reciprocal friction ignition mechanism. Therefore, testing was performed at White Sands Test Facility (WSTF) to provide data to evaluate this ignition mechanism. This paper presents the test system, approach, data results, and findings of the reciprocal friction testing performed on composite sample materials being considered for propellant tanks.

  6. Could We Make Diverse Learning Materials Compatible with E-Readers Used in Classroom Learning Settings?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Young, Shelley Shwu-Ching; Lin, Wei-Lin

    2012-01-01

    This study explores how to make diverse learning/instructional materials compatible with e-readers when the instructor pioneered to adopt e-readers into a course of the graduate level. What problems did the instructor encounter when she used the e-readers as a major tool to deliver learning contents, such as the process of converting the…

  7. Material Testing Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts led to two commercial instruments and a new subsidiary for Physical Sciences, Inc. (PSI). The FAST system, originally developed for testing the effect of space environment on materials, is now sold commercially for use in aging certification of materials intended for orbital operation. The Optical Temperature Monitor was designed for precise measurement of high temperatures on certain materials to be manufactured in space. The original research was extended to the development of a commercial instrument that measures and controls fuel gas temperatures in industrial boilers. PSI created PSI Environmental Instruments to market the system. The company also offers an Aerospace Measurement Service that has evolved from other SBIR contracts.

  8. Elastomer compatibility with gear lubricants. Part I: Immersion testing

    SciTech Connect

    MacPherson, I.; Conary, G.S.

    1994-11-01

    This study examines the effect of various gear oil chemistry on elastomer degradation and demonstrates the advantage of some elastomer chemistry over others. Repeatability and reproducibility of the immersion test is discussed.

  9. Alternative Fuels Compatibility with Army Equipment Testing - Existent Gum

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    Nitrile synthetic rubber RMA Class A (High Oil Resistance) CONSTRUCTION: COVER: Red Chemivic™ (white spiral stripe) synthetic rubber (oil resistant...the widest swings in physical properties after exposure to fuel blends ; see polyurethane % change in volume (Figure 3) versus nitrile (Figure 4...various aspects of the ASTM D381 method as a means to determine gum contamination of fuel in contact elastomeric and rubber materials. 15. SUBJECT TERMS

  10. NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2011-09-29

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign}, Tefzel{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign}) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of the guanidine suppressor and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that guanidine (LIX{reg_sign}79) selectively affected Tefzel{reg_sign} (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel{reg_sign} and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of guanidine. Tefzel{reg_sign} is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to guanidine, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel{reg_sign}) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel{reg_sign} in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel{reg_sign} seating material. PEEK, Grafoil{reg_sign} and Isolast{reg_sign} were not affected by guanidine and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging compatibility test of a cranial prosthesis with titanium screws

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jimenez, R.; Benavides, A.; Flores, D.; Hidalgo, S. S.; Solis, S. E.; Uribe, E.; Rodriguez, A. O.

    2012-10-01

    The follow-up of patients with skull prosthesis is necessary to provide adequate medical care. Skull prostheses for cranioplasty have been developed at the Faculty of Odontology of Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico. We built a skull prosthesis phantom and tested for compatibility with standard magnetic resonance imaging procedures. Results showed full compatibility but susceptibility artefacts occurred due to titanium used to fix the prosthesis to the skull.

  12. EMC (Electromagnetic Compatibility) System Test and Analysis Interface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    complex situations in an accurate and expedient manner. From this need for improved analytical methods a number of digital computer codes have evolved...relationship ,. . to present digital technology. For example, the power line worst case transient test : - specified by MIL-STD-461 is 0 to 100 volts in 2.5...theory can be used to illustrate the nature of transient problems associated with high speed digital circuit signal lines. Figure 2.4 illustrates

  13. Compatibility Study for Plastic, Elastomeric, and Metallic Fueling Infrastructure Materials Exposed to Aggressive Formulations of Ethanol-blended Gasoline

    SciTech Connect

    Kass, Michael D; Pawel, Steven J; Theiss, Timothy J; Janke, Christopher James

    2012-07-01

    In 2008 Oak Ridge National Laboratory began a series of experiments to evaluate the compatibility of fueling infrastructure materials with intermediate levels of ethanol-blended gasoline. Initially, the focus was elastomers, metals, and sealants, and the test fuels were Fuel C, CE10a, CE17a and CE25a. The results of these studies were published in 2010. Follow-on studies were performed with an emphasis on plastic (thermoplastic and thermoset) materials used in underground storage and dispenser systems. These materials were exposed to test fuels of Fuel C and CE25a. Upon completion of this effort, it was felt that additional compatibility data with higher ethanol blends was needed and another round of experimentation was performed on elastomers, metals, and plastics with CE50a and CE85a test fuels. Compatibility of polymers typically relates to the solubility of the solid polymer with a solvent. It can also mean susceptibility to chemical attack, but the polymers and test fuels evaluated in this study are not considered to be chemically reactive with each other. Solubility in polymers is typically assessed by measuring the volume swell of the polymer exposed to the solvent of interest. Elastomers are a class of polymers that are predominantly used as seals, and most o-ring and seal manufacturers provide compatibility tables of their products with various solvents including ethanol, toluene, and isooctane, which are components of aggressive oxygenated gasoline as described by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) J1681. These tables include a ranking based on the level of volume swell in the elastomer associated with exposure to a particular solvent. Swell is usually accompanied by a decrease in hardness (softening) that also affects performance. For seal applications, shrinkage of the elastomer upon drying is also a critical parameter since a contraction of volume can conceivably enable leakage to occur. Shrinkage is also indicative of the removal of one or more

  14. Initial tests of a prototype MRI-compatible PET imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raylman, Raymond R.; Majewski, Stan; Lemieux, Susan; Velan, S. Sendhil; Kross, Brain; Popov, Vladimir; Smith, Mark F.; Weisenberger, Andrew G.; Wojcik, Randy

    2006-12-01

    Multi-modality imaging is rapidly becoming a valuable tool in the diagnosis of disease and in the development of new drugs. Functional images produced with PET fused with anatomical structure images created by MRI, will allow the correlation of form with function. Our group (a collaboration of West Virginia University and Jefferson Lab) is developing a system to acquire MRI and PET images contemporaneously. The prototype device consists of two opposed detector heads, operating in coincidence mode with an active FOV of 5×5×4 cm 3. Each MRI-PET detector module consists of an array of LSO detector elements (2.5×2.5×15 mm 3) coupled through a long fiber optic light guide to a single Hamamatsu flat panel PSPMT. The fiber optic light guide is made of a glued assembly of 2 mm diameter acrylic fibers with a total length of 2.5 m. The use of a light guides allows the PSPMTs to be positioned outside the bore of the 3 T General Electric MRI scanner used in the tests. Photon attenuation in the light guides resulted in an energy resolution of ˜60% FWHM, interaction of the magnetic field with PSPMT further reduced energy resolution to ˜85% FWHM. Despite this effect, excellent multi-plane PET and MRI images of a simple disk phantom were acquired simultaneously. Future work includes improved light guides, optimized magnetic shielding for the PSPMTs, construction of specialized coils to permit high-resolution MRI imaging, and use of the system to perform simultaneous PET and MRI or MR-spectroscopy .

  15. Materials compatibility considerations for a fusion-fission hybrid reactor design

    SciTech Connect

    DeVan, J.H.; Tortorelli, P.F.

    1983-01-01

    The Tandem Mirror Hybrid Reactor is a fusion reactor concept that incorporates a fission-suppressed breeding blanket for the production of /sup 233/U to be used in conventional fission power reactors. The present paper reports on compatibility considerations related to the blanket design. These considerations include solid-solid interactions and liquid metal corrosion. Potential problems are discussed relative to the reference blanket operating temperature (490/sup 0/C) and the recycling time of breeding materials (<1 year).

  16. A survey of compatibility of materials with high pressure oxygen service

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hust, J. G.; Clark, A. F.

    1972-01-01

    The available information on the compatibility of materials with oxygen as applied to the production, transport, and applications experience of high pressure liquid and gaseous oxygen is compiled. High pressure is defined as about 2000 to 3000 psia. Since high pressure projections sometimes can be made from lower pressure data, some low pressure data are also included. Low pressure data are included if they are considered helpful to a better understanding of the behavior at high pressures.

  17. Fuel and Fuel System Materials Compatibility Test Program for A JP-8+100 Fuel Additive. Volume 1: Thermal Stability Additive Package BetzDearborn Spec Aid(Registered) 8Q462

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-01

    W W W II.G.2 Gasket “O” Ring MIL-R-25988 Fluorosi l icone OT W W II.G.3 Gasket “O” Ring MIL-R-83485 Fluorosi l icone...O W W II.G.7 Gasket “O” Ring MIL-R-25988 Fluorosi l icone OT OT W ¹ Tested as a coating (tape adhesion and pencil) 73

  18. Electromagnetic Interference/Compatibility (EMI/EMC) Control Test and Measurement Facility: User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scully, Robert C.

    2011-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the EMI/EMC Test Facility. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  19. Compatibility of R-245ca with motor materials under retrofit conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.G.; Waite, T.D.

    1995-07-01

    This document, which is a reproduction of slides from a presentation at the June 1995 ASHRAE conference, evaluates and provides data on a number of motor parameters after the motor materials have been exposed to the refrigerant R-245ca. Data on conditions of the insulating varnish, the magnet wire, the insulations, and the elastomers are presented, as well as a note on work in progress. While it was concluded that most materials are compatible with R-245ca under retrofit conditions, it was also noted that the flammability, toxicity, efficiency, and cost of R-245ca and/or Blends are unresolved.

  20. Experimental study of compatibility of reduced metal oxides with thermal energy storage lining materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Leathy, Abdelrahman; Danish, Syed Noman; Al-Ansary, Hany; Jeter, Sheldon; Al-Suhaibani, Zeyad

    2016-05-01

    Solid particles have been shown to be able to operate at temperatures higher than 1000 °C in concentrated solar power (CSP) systems with thermal energy storage (TES). Thermochemical energy storage (TCES) using metal oxides have also found to be advantageous over sensible and latent heat storage concepts. This paper investigates the compatibility of the inner lining material of a TES tank with the reduced metal oxide. Two candidate metal oxides are investigated against six candidate lining materials. XRD results for both the materials are investigated and compared before and after the reduction of metal oxide at 1000°C in the presence of lining material. It is found that the lining material rich in zirconia is suitable for such application. Silicon Carbide is also found non-reacting with one of the metal oxides so it needs to be further investigated with other candidate metal oxides.

  1. Assessing a Couple's Relationship and Compatibility Using the MARI[R] Card Test and Mandala Drawings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frame, Phyllis G.

    2006-01-01

    This paper illustrates the use of the MARI[R] Card Test, a transpersonal assessment tool which includes archetypal designs and color choices, as well as the drawing of a white and black mandala, or circle picture, for assessing the compatibility of two people in a committed relationship. In an informal pilot research study, 22 couples were given…

  2. A Laboratory Exercise for Compatibility Testing of Hazardous Wastes in an Environmental Analysis Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chang, J. C.; And Others

    1986-01-01

    Discusses a new program at the University of Michigan in hazardous waste management. Describes a laboratory demonstration that deals with the reactivity and potential violence of several reactions that may be encountered on a hazardous waste site. Provides criteria for selecting particular compatibility testing methods. (TW)

  3. Test results of chemical reactivity test (CRT) analysis of structural materials and explosives

    SciTech Connect

    Back, P.S.; Barnhart, B.V.; Walters, R.R.; Haws, L.D.; Collins, L.W.

    1980-03-21

    The chemical reactivity test, CRT, is a procedure used to screen the compatibility of component structure materials with explosives. This report contains the results of CRT materials evaluations conducted at Mound Facility. Data about materials combinations are catalogued both under the name of the explosive and the nonexplosive.

  4. Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October 1992--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Hourahan, G.C.; Szymurski, S.R.

    1993-01-01

    The materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC-refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. Under the current MCLR program the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) is contracting and managing multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Preliminary results from these projects are reported in technical progress reports prepared by each researcher.

  5. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 January 1993--31 March 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, D.A.; Hourahan, G.C.; Szymurski, S.R.

    1993-04-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC-refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. Under the current MCLR program the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) is contracting and managing multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each researcher.

  6. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research of CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 April 1993--30 June 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Godwin, D.S.; Hourahan, G.C.; Szymurski, S.R.

    1993-07-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The DCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. The work is guided by an Advisory Committee consisting of technical experts from the refrigeration and air-conditioning industry and government agencies. Under the current MCLR program the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute, Inc., (ARTI) is contracting and managing multiple research projects and a data collection and dissemination effort. Detailed results from these projects are reported in technical reports prepared by each researcher.

  7. Compatibility testing of the WESF /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ storage capsule at 800/sup 0/C

    SciTech Connect

    Fullam, H.T.

    1980-06-01

    A program is currently under way at Pacific Northwest Laboratory to develop the information needed to permit the licensing of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ as a radioisotope heat-source fuel for terrestrial application. A major portion of the effort is directed at determining the compatibility of /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ with containment materials at anticipated heat-source operating temperatures. One phase of the compatibility studies involved the testing of two WESF /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ storage capsules at approximately 800/sup 0/C. The first capsule was tested for 5000 h and the second for 26,200 h. The capsules were placed in individual insulated containers and allowed to self-heat to the test temperature. The tests were conducted in a hot cell at WESF. Heat losses from the insulated containers were uneven, and as a result a temperature gradient existed between the center and ends of each capsule. In the 5000-h test the metal//sup 90/SrF/sub 2/ interface temperature varied from about 730 to 821/sup 0/C; in the 26,200-h test the temperature varied from about 750 to 831/sup 0/C. Metallographic examination of sections of metal taken from the Hastelloy C-276 capsules showed that chemical attack of the metal was not significantly greater in the 26,200-h test than in the 5000-h test. Similar results have been observed in other compatibility tests involving Hastelloy C-276 and /sup 90/SrF/sub 2/. The data indicate that chemical attack of the Hastelloy C-276 is due to impurities in the strontium fluoride, and that once the impurities are consumed the rate of attack drops to a very low level.

  8. An MR-compatible bicycle ergometer for in-magnet whole-body human exercise testing.

    PubMed

    Jeneson, Jeroen A L; Schmitz, Joep P J; Hilbers, Peter A J; Nicolay, Klaas

    2010-01-01

    An MR-compatible ergometer was developed for in-magnet whole-body human exercise testing. Designed on the basis of conventional mechanically braked bicycle ergometers and constructed from nonferrous materials, the ergometer was implemented on a 1.5-T whole-body MR scanner. A spectrometer interface was constructed using standard scanner hardware, complemented with custom-built parts and software to enable gated data acquisition during exercise. High-quality 31P NMR spectra were reproducibly obtained from the medial head of the quadriceps muscle of the right leg of eight healthy subjects during two-legged high-frequency pedaling (80 revolutions per minute) at three incremental workloads, including maximal. Muscle phosphocreatine content dropped 82%, from 32.2+/-1.0 mM at rest to 5.7+/-1.1 mM at maximal workload (mean+/-standard error; n=8), indicating that the majority of quadriceps motor units were recruited. The cardiovascular load of the exercise was likewise significant, as evidenced by heart rates of 150 (+/-10%) beats per minute, measured immediately afterward. As such, the newly developed MR bicycling exercise equipment offers a powerful new tool for clinical musculoskeletal and cardiovascular MR investigation. The basic design of the ergometer is highly generic and adaptable for application on a wide selection of whole-body MR scanners.

  9. Subtask 12E1: Compatibility of structural materials in liquid alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Natesan, K.; Rink, D.L.; Haglund, R.; Clark, R.W.

    1995-03-01

    The objectives of this task are to (a) evaluate the chemical compatibility of structural alloys such as V-5 wt.%Cr-5 wt.%Ti alloy and Type 316 stainless steel for application in liquid alkali metals such as lithium and sodium-78 wt.% potassium (NaK) at temperatures that are in the range of interest for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER); (b) evaluate the transfer of nonmetallic elements such as oxygen, nitrogen, carbon, and hydrogen between structural materials and liquid metals; and (c) evaluate the effects of such transfers on the mechanical and microstructural characteristics of the materials for long-term service in liquid-metal environments. Candidate structural materials are being evaluated for their compatibility, interstitial-element transfer, and corrosion in liquid alkali-metal systems such as lithium and NaK. Type 316 stainless steel and V-5Cr-5Ti coupon specimens with and without prealuminizing treatment have been exposed to NaK and lithium environments of commercial purity for times up to 3768 h at temperatures between 300 and 400{degrees}C. 13 refs., 8 figs., 3 tabs.

  10. Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly MCLR Program technical progress report, July 1--September 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Szymurski, S.R.; Hourahan, G.C.; Godwin, D.S.; Amrane, K.

    1995-10-01

    The Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research (MCLR) program supports critical research to accelerate the introduction of CFC and HCFC refrigerant substitutes. The MCLR program addresses refrigerant and lubricant properties and materials compatibility. The primary elements of the work include data collection and dissemination, materials compatibility testing, and methods development. This report summarizes the research conducted during the third quarter of calendar year 1995 on the following projects: Thermophysical properties of HCFC alternatives; Compatibility of manufacturing process fluids with HFC refrigerants and ester lubricants; Compatibility of motor materials used in air-conditioning for retrofits with alternative refrigerants and lubricants; Compatibility of lubricant additives with HFC refrigerants and synthetic lubricants; Products of motor burnouts; Accelerated test methods for predicting the life of motor materials exposed to refrigerant-lubricant mixtures; Investigation of flushing and clean-out methods; Investigation into the fractionation of refrigerant blends; Lean flammability limits as a fundamental refrigerant property; Effect of selected contaminants in AC and R equipment; Study of foaming characteristics; Study of lubricant circulation in systems; Evaluation of HFC-245ca for commercial use in low pressure chillers; Infrared analysis of refrigerant mixtures; Refrigerant database; Refrigerant toxicity survey; Thermophysical properties of HFC-32, HFC-123, HCFC-124 and HFC-125; Thermophysical properties of HFC-143a and HFC-152a; Theoretical evaluations of R-22 alternative fluids; Chemical and thermal stability of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures with metals; Miscibility of lubricants with refrigerants; Viscosity, solubility and density measurements of refrigerant-lubricant mixtures; Electrohydrodynamic enhancement of pool and in-tube boiling of alternative refrigerants; Accelerated screening methods; and more.

  11. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials. Quarterly technical progress report, 1 October 1992--31 December 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.; Kujak, S.; Waite, T.

    1993-01-01

    Equipment manufacturers are challenged to replace CFC-based refrigerants and their lubricants with environmentally acceptable alternatives. Information on the compatibility of motor materials with these alternative refrigerants and lubricants is a basic requirement for reliable performance. This report presents compatibility data for 24 commercially used motor materials exposed to 17 refrigerant/lubricant combinations. This compatibility data will enable the phase out of CFC`s to continue at its current fast pace and insure the continued reliable performance of refrigerant-based equipment.

  12. Long-Term Materials Test Program: materials exposure test plan

    SciTech Connect

    1981-12-01

    The Long Term Materials Test Program is designed to identify promising corrosion resistant materials for coal-fired gas turbine applications. Resistance of materials to long term accelerated corrosion will be determined through realistic PFB environmental exposure of candidate turbine materials for up to 14,000 hours. Selected materials also will be evaluated for their ability to withstand the combined erosive and corrosive aspects of the PFB effluent. A pressurized fluidized bed combustor facility has been constructed at the General Electric Coal Utilization Research Laboratory at Malta, New York. The 12-inch diameter combustor will burn high sulfur coal with moderate-to-high chlorine and alkali levels and utilize dolomite as the sulfur sorbent. Hot gas cleanup is achieved using three stages of cyclone separators. Downstream of the cylone separators, a low velocity test section (approx. 30 ft/s) capable of housing 180 pin specimens 1/4'' diameter has been installed to assess the corrosion resistance of the various materials at three different temperatures ranging from 1300 to 1600/sup 0/F. Following the low velocity test section is a high velocity test section consisting of four cascades of airfoil shaped specimens, six specimens per cascade. This high velocity test section is being used to evaluate the combined effects of erosion and corrosion on the degradation of gas turbine materials at gas velocities of 800 to 1400 ft/s. This report summarizes the materials selection and materials exposure test plan for the Long Term Materials Test.

  13. CPL Materials Life Cycle Test Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchko, Matthew T.

    1992-07-01

    The Capillary Pumped Loop (CPL) Materials Life Cycle Test Facility at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) will identify the operational parameters controlling the performance of a CPL over an extended period of time. The primary purpose of the facility is to investigate the long-term chemical compatibility between the anhydrous ammonia working fluid and the CPL materials of construction. Chemical reactions occurring within the system may produce non-condensable gases or particulate debris that can lead to a degradation in system performance. Small liquid samples will be drawn from the system at specific time intervals and analyzed to check for the presence of non-condensable gases. Periodic maximum and minimum heat load tests will be performed on the CPL to monitor trends in the overall system performance.

  14. Diffusion, Thermal Properties and Chemical Compatibilities of Select MAX Phases with Materials For Advanced Nuclear Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Barsoum, Michel; Bentzel, Grady; Tallman, Darin J.; Sindelar, Robert; Garcia-Diaz, Brenda; Hoffman, Elizabeth

    2016-04-04

    The demands of Gen IV nuclear power plants for long service life under neutron irradiation at high temperature are severe. Advanced materials that would withstand high temperatures (up to 1000+ ºC) to high doses in a neutron field would be ideal for reactor internal structures and would add to the long service life and reliability of the reactors. The objective of this work is to investigate the chemical compatibility of select MAX with potential materials that are important for nuclear energy, as well as to measure the thermal transport properties as a function of neutron irradiation. The chemical counterparts chosen for this work are: pyrolytic carbon, SiC, U, Pd, FLiBe, Pb-Bi and Na, the latter 3 in the molten state. The thermal conductivities and heat capacities of non-irradiated MAX phases will be measured.

  15. MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY OF SNAP FUEL COMPONENTS DURING SHIPMENT IN 9975 PACKAGING

    SciTech Connect

    Vormelker, P

    2006-11-14

    Materials Science and Technology has evaluated materials compatibility for the SNAP (Systems for Nuclear Auxiliary Power) fuel for containment within a 9975 packaging assembly for a shipping period of one year. The evaluation included consideration for potential for water within the convenience can, corrosion from water, galvanic corrosion, tape degradation, and thermal expansion risk. Based on a review of existing literature and assumed conditions, corrosion and/or degradation of the 304 stainless steel (SS) Primary Containment Vessel (PCV) and the 304 stainless steel convenience cans containing the SNAP fuel is not significant to cause failure during the 1 year time shipping period in the 9975 packaging assembly. However, storage beyond the 1 year shipping period has not been validated.

  16. Fan Performance Testing and Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Results for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, Mallory A.; Paul, Heather L.; Vogel, Matthew

    2008-01-01

    An advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for the space suit will require a small, robust, and energy-efficient system to transport the ventilation gas through the space suit for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations. A trade study identified and compared ventilation transport technologies in commercial, military, and space applications to determine which technologies could be adapted for EVA use. Based on the trade study results, five commercially available, 24volt fans were selected for performance testing at various pressures and flow rates. Measured fan parameters included fan delta-pressures, input voltages, input electrical currents, and in some cases motor windings electrical voltages and currents. In addition, a follow-on trade study was performed to identify oxygen compatibility issues and assess their impact on fan design. This paper outlines the results of the fan performance characterization testing, as well as the results from the oxygen compatibility assessment.

  17. Fan Performance Testing and Oxygen Compatibility Assessment Results for Future Space Suit Life Support Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Paul, Heather L.; Jennings, Mallory A.; Vogel, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    An advanced portable life support system (PLSS) for the space suit will require a small, robust, and energyefficient system to transport the ventilation gas through the space suit for lunar Extravehicular Activity (EVA) operations. A trade study identified and compared ventilation transport technologies in commercial, military, and space applications to determine which technologies could be adapted for EVA use. Based on the trade study results, five commercially available, 24-volt fans were selected for performance testing at various pressures and flow rates. Measured fan parameters included fan delta-pressures, input voltages, input electrical currents, and in some cases motor windings electrical voltages and currents. In addition, a follow-on trade study was performed to identify oxygen compatibility issues and assess their impact on fan design. This paper outlines the results of the fan performance characterization testing, as well as the results from the oxygen compatibility assessment.

  18. The Market Gate of Miletus: damages, material characteristics and the development of a compatible mortar for restoration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegesmund, Siegfried; Middendorf, Bernhard

    2008-12-01

    The indoor exhibit of the Market Gate of Miletus is unique for an archaeological monument. The reconstruction of the gate was done in such a way that most marble fragments were removed leaving cored marble columns 3-4 cm in thickness. These cored columns were mounted on a steel construction and filled with different mortars or filled with specially shaped blocks of brick combined with mortar. All the missing marble elements were replaced by copies made of a Portland cement based concrete, which is compositionally similar to the original building materials. During the Second World War the monument was heavily damaged by aerial bombardment. For 2 years the Market Gate of Miletus was exposed to weathering, because a brick wall protecting the gate was also destroyed. The deterioration phenomena observed are microcracks, macroscopic fractures, flaking, sugaring, greying, salt efflorescence, calcitic-sinter layers and iron oxide formation etc. The rapid deterioration seems to be due to indoor atmospheric effects, and also by a combination of incompatible materials (e.g. marble, steel, mortar, concrete, bricks etc.). Compatible building materials like mortars or stone replacing materials have to be developed for the planned restoration. The requirements for restoration mortars are chemical-mineralogical and physical-mechanical compatibilities with the existing building materials. In detail this means that the mortar should ensure good bonding properties, adapted strength development and not stain the marble when in direct contact. The favoured mortar was developed with a hydraulic binder based on iron-free white cement and pozzolana based on activated clay. A special limestone and quartz sand mixture was used as an aggregate. The cement was adjusted using chemical additives. Specially designed tests were applied extensively to prove whether the developed mortar is suitable for the restoration of this precious monument.

  19. Clinical evaluation of a /sup 51/Cr-labeled red blood cell survival test for in vivo blood compatibility testing

    SciTech Connect

    Pineda, A.A.; Dharkar, D.D.; Wahner, H.W.

    1984-01-01

    Modified red blood cell survival studies with use of 51Cr were performed in three groups of subjects. Group 1 consisted of normal subjects who were given labeled autologous blood, group 2 were subjects in need of blood transfusions and given labeled ABO and Rh crossmatch-compatible blood, and group 3 were patients in need of blood transfusion but in whom problems arose in finding compatible blood. The results of the studies suggest that for patients with blood compatibility problems, normal red blood cell survival values at 1 hour do not exclude the possibility of severe hemolysis 24 hours later. Thus, if a 1-hour test result is normal, the procedure should be extended routinely to 24 hours. Moreover, the test can be used to evaluate the clinical importance of antibodies. We showed that anti-Yka and anti-Lan were clinically significant, but high-titer, low-avidity antibodies, anti-Kna, anti-I, and anti-HI were clinically insignificant in the cases studied. This finding emphasizes the importance of an in vivo test for the final compatibility evaluation in complicated blood replacement problems.

  20. An Improved Approach for Analyzing the Oxygen Compatibility of Solvents and other Oxygen-Flammable Materials for Use in Oxygen Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harper, Susan A.; Juarez, Alfredo; Peralta, Stephen F.; Stoltzfus, Joel; Arpin, Christina Pina; Beeson, Harold D.

    2016-01-01

    Solvents used to clean oxygen system components must be assessed for oxygen compatibility, as incompatible residue or fluid inadvertently left behind within an oxygen system can pose a flammability risk. The most recent approach focused on solvent ignition susceptibility to assess the flammability risk associated with these materials. Previous evaluations included Ambient Pressure Liquid Oxygen (LOX) Mechanical Impact Testing (ASTM G86) and Autogenous Ignition Temperature (AIT) Testing (ASTM G72). The goal in this approach was to identify a solvent material that was not flammable in oxygen. As environmental policies restrict the available options of acceptable solvents, it has proven difficult to identify one that is not flammable in oxygen. A more rigorous oxygen compatibility approach is needed in an effort to select a new solvent for NASA applications. NASA White Sands Test Facility proposed an approach that acknowledges oxygen flammability, yet selects solvent materials based on their relative oxygen compatibility ranking, similar to that described in ASTM G63-99. Solvents are selected based on their ranking with respect to minimal ignition susceptibility, damage and propagation potential, as well as their relative ranking when compared with other solvent materials that are successfully used in oxygen systems. Test methods used in this approach included ASTM G86 (Ambient Pressure LOX Mechanical Impact Testing and Pressurized Gaseous Oxygen (GOX) Mechanical Impact Testing), ASTM G72 (AIT Testing), and ASTM D240 (Heat of Combustion (HOC) Testing). Only four solvents were tested through the full battery of tests for evaluation of oxygen compatibility: AK-225G as a baseline comparison, Solstice PF, L-14780, and Vertrel MCA. Baseline solvent AK-225G exhibited the lowest HOC and highest AIT of solvents tested. Nonetheless, Solstice PF, L-14780, and Vertrel MCA HOCs all fell well within the range of properties that are associated with proven oxygen system materials

  1. Design and development of a space station hazardous material system for assessing chemical compatibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Congo, Richard T.

    1990-01-01

    As the Space Station nears reality in funding support from Congress, NASA plans to perform over a hundred different missions in the coming decade. Incrementally deployed, the Space Station will evolve into modules linked to an integral structure. Each module will have characteristic functions, such as logistics, habitation, and materials processing. Because the Space Station is to be user friendly for experimenters, NASA is anticipating that a variety of different chemicals will be taken on-board. Accidental release of these potentially toxic chemicals and their chemical compatibility is the focus of this discourse. The Microgravity Manufacturing Processing Facility (MMPF) will contain the various facilities within the U.S. Laboratory (USL). Each facility will have a characteristic purpose, such as alloy solidification or vapor crystal growth. By examining the proposed experiments for each facility, identifying the chemical constituents, their physical state and/or changes, byproducts and effluents, those payloads can be identified which may contain toxic, explosive, or reactive compounds that require processing or containment in mission peculiar waste management systems. Synergistic reactions from mixed effluent streams is of major concern. Each experiment will have it own data file, complete with schematic, chemical listing, physical data, etc. Chemical compatibility information from various databases will provide assistance in the analysis of alternate disposal techniques (pretreatment, separate storage, etc.). Along with data from the Risk Analysis of the Proposed USL Waste Management System, accidental release of potentially toxic and catastrophic chemicals would be eliminated or reduced.

  2. Performance Assessment of Internal Quality Control (IQC) Products in Blood Transfusion Compatibility Testing in China

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jing-Jing; Gao, Qi; Liu, Zhi-Dong; Kang, Qiong-Hua; Hou, Yi-Jun; Zhang, Luo-Chuan; Hu, Xiao-Mei; Li, Jie; Zhang, Juan

    2015-01-01

    Internal quality control (IQC) is a critical component of laboratory quality management, and IQC products can determine the reliability of testing results. In China, given the fact that most blood transfusion compatibility laboratories do not employ IQC products or do so minimally, there is a lack of uniform and standardized IQC methods. To explore the reliability of IQC products and methods, we studied 697 results from IQC samples in our laboratory from 2012 to 2014. The results showed that the sensitivity and specificity of the IQCs in anti-B testing were 100% and 99.7%, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the IQCs in forward blood typing, anti-A testing, irregular antibody screening, and cross-matching were all 100%. The reliability analysis indicated that 97% of anti-B testing results were at a 99% confidence level, and 99.9% of forward blood typing, anti-A testing, irregular antibody screening, and cross-matching results were at a 99% confidence level. Therefore, our IQC products and methods are highly sensitive, specific, and reliable. Our study paves the way for the establishment of a uniform and standardized IQC method for pre-transfusion compatibility testing in China and other parts of the world. PMID:26488582

  3. Effect of a laboratory surfactant on compatibility of type IV dental stones with addition-cured silicone impression materials.

    PubMed

    Tredwin, Christopher Jeremy; Nesbit, Michael; Butta, Rajeev; Moles, David R

    2008-06-01

    This study compared the effect of a surfactant on surface detail reproduction between combinations of addition-cured silicone impression materials and type IV stones. Six hundred impressions were made of a ruled test block using; Examix-NDS, Doric-Es Flo-Light, Panasil Contact Plus, Extrude Wash and President Plus Jet. Half of the impressions were treated with a surfactant (Aurofilm). Impressions were poured with type IV dental stones; Silky Rock, Fuji Rock, Suprastone and Vel-Mix and the 20 mu line was scored. A laboratory surfactant (Aurofilm) significantly reduced (P<0.01) compatibility with; (i) Examix-NDS and Suprastone, (ii) Examix-NDS and Velmix, (iii) Extrude Wash and Fuji Rock.

  4. European tests on materials outgassing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zwaal, A.

    1977-01-01

    With a view to international coordination of spacecraft materials, a number of European firms and institutes performed outgassing tests on identical materials at 125 C in high vacuum. The outgassing data obtained with the different types of equipment is presented and both the results and the critical parameters are discussed.

  5. Thermal compatibility studies of unirradiated uranium silicide dispersed in aluminum. [Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Wiencek, T.C.; Domagala, R.F.; Thresh, H.R.

    1984-09-01

    Powder metallurgy dispersions of uranium silicides in an aluminum matrix have been developed by the international Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors program as a new generation of proliferation-resistant fuels. A major issue of concern is the compatibility of the fuel with the matrix material and the dimensional stability of this fuel type. A total of 45 miniplate-type fuel plates were annealed at 400/sup 0/C for up to 1981 hours. A data base for the thermal compatibility of unirradiated uranium silicide dispersed in aluminum was established. No modification tested of a standard fuel plate showed any significant reduction of the plate swelling. The cause of the thermal growth of silicide fuel plates was determined to be a two-step process: (1) the reaction of the uranium silicide with aluminum to form U(AlSi)/sub 3/ and (2) the release of hydrogen and subsequent creep and pillowing of the fuel plate. 9 references, 4 figures, 6 tables.

  6. Drug-excipient compatibility testing using a high-throughput approach and statistical design.

    PubMed

    Wyttenbach, Nicole; Birringer, Christian; Alsenz, Jochem; Kuentz, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The aim of our research was to develop a miniaturized high throughput drug-excipient compatibility test. Experiments were planned and evaluated using statistical experimental design. Binary mixtures of a drug, acetylsalicylic acid, or fluoxetine hydrochloride, and of excipients commonly used in solid dosage forms were prepared at a ratio of approximately 1:100 in 96-well microtiter plates. Samples were exposed to different temperature (40 degrees C/ 50 degrees C) and humidity (10%/75%) for different time (1 week/4 weeks), and chemical drug degradation was analyzed using a fast gradient high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Categorical statistical design was applied to identify the effects and interactions of time, temperature, humidity, and excipient on drug degradation. Acetylsalicylic acid was least stable in the presence of magnesium stearate, dibasic calcium phosphate, or sodium starch glycolate. Fluoxetine hydrochloride exhibited a marked degradation only with lactose. Factor-interaction plots revealed that the relative humidity had the strongest effect on the drug excipient blends tested. In conclusion, the developed technique enables fast drug-excipient compatibility testing and identification of interactions. Since only 0.1 mg of drug is needed per data point, fast rational preselection of the pharmaceutical additives can be performed early in solid dosage form development.

  7. Testing Requirements for Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Montgomery, Eliza M.

    2010-01-01

    Launch Pads 39A and 39B currently use refractory material (Fondu Fyre) in the flame trenches. This material was initially approved for the Saturn program. This material had a lifetime of 10 years according to the manufacturer, and it has been used for over 40 years. As a consequence, the Fondu Fyre at Launch Complex 39 requires repair subsequent to almost every launch. A review of the literature indicates that the gunned Fondu Fyre refractory product (WA-1G) was never tested prior to use. With the recent severe damage to the flame trenches, a new refractory material is sought to replace Fondu Fyre. In order to replace Fondu Fyre, a methodology to test and evaluate refractory products was developed. This paper outlines this methodology and discusses current testing requirements, as well as the laboratory testing that might be required. Furthermore, this report points out the necessity for subscale testing, the locations where this testing can be performed, and the parameters that will be necessary to qualify a product. The goal is to identify a more durable refractory material that has physical, chemical, and thermal properties suitable to withstand the harsh environment of the launch pads at KSC.

  8. Testing Requirements for Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W.; Montgomery, Eliza M.

    2011-01-01

    Launch Pads 39A and 39B currently use refractory material (Fondu Fyre) in the flame trenches. This material was initially approved for the Saturn program. This material had a lifetime of 10 years according to the manufacturer, and it has been used for over 40 years. As a consequence, the Fondu Fyre at Launch Complex 39 requires repair subsequent to almost every launch. A review of the literature indicates that the gunned Fondu Fyre refractory product (WA-1G) was never tested prior to use. With the recent severe damage to the flame trenches, a new refractory material is sought to replace Fondu Fyre. In order to replace Fondu Fyre, a methodology to test and evaluate refractory products was developed. This paper outlines this methodology and discusses current testing requirements, as well as the laboratory testing that might be required. Furthermore, this report points out the necessity for subscale testing, the locations where this testing can be performed, and the parameters that will be necessary to qualify a product. The goal is to identify a more durable refractory material that has physical, chemical, and thermal properties suitable to withstand the harsh environment of the launch pads at KSC.

  9. Testing Requirements for Refractory Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calle, Luz Marina; Hintze, Paul E.; Parlier, Christopher R.; Curran, Jerome P.; Kolody, Mark R.; Sampson, Jeffrey W,; Montgomery, Eliza M.

    2012-01-01

    Launch Pads 39A and 39B currently use refractory material (Fondu Fyre) in the flame trenches. This material was initially approved for the Saturn program. This material had a lifetime of 10years according to the manufacturer, and it has been used for over 40 years. As a consequence, the Fondu Fyre at Launch Complex 39 requires repair subsequent to almost every launch. A review of the literature indicates that the gunned Fondu Fyre refractory product (WA-1 G) was never tested prior to use. With the recent severe damage to the flame trenches, a new refractory material is sought to replace Fondu Fyre. In order to replace Fondu Fyre, a methodology to test and evaluate refractory products was developed. This paper outlines this methodology and discusses current testing requirements, as well as the laboratory testing that might be required. Furthermore, this report points out the necessity for subscale testing, the locations where this testing can be performed, and the parameters that will be necessary to qualify a product. The goal is to identify a more durable refractory material that has physical, chemical, and thermal properties suitable to withstand the harsh environment of the launch pads at KSC.

  10. Propellant/material compatibility program and results: Ten-year milestones

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moran, C.; Bjorkland, R.

    1982-01-01

    The analyses and results of a test program to establish the effects of long term (10 years or more) contact of materials with earth-storable propellants for the purpose of designing chemical propulsion system components which are used for current as well as future planetary spacecraft are described. The period from the publication of JPL TM 33-779 IN 1976 through the testing accomplished in 1981 is covered. The following propellants are reported herein: hydrazine, monomethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide. Materials included the following: aluminum alloys, corrosion resistant steels and a titanium alloy. The results of the testing of more than 80 specimens are included. Material ratings relative to the ten year milepost were assigned. Some evidence of propellant decomposition was found. Titanium is rated as acceptable for ten year applications. Aluminum and stainless steel alloys are also rated as acceptable with few restrictions.

  11. Sterilization Performance and Material Compatibility of Sterilizer for Dental Instruments using RF Oxygen Plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakai, Yasuhiro; Liu, Zhen; Hayashi, Nobuya; Goto, Masaaki

    2015-09-01

    The sterilization performance and material compatibility of low-pressure RF plasma sterilization method for dental instruments were investigated. RF electrode used in this experiment has been optimized for sterilization of dental instruments. The vial-type biological indicator (BI) simulating tiny space of dental instrument was used for evaluation of the sterilization performance. The pressure in the stainless chamber was fixed at 60 Pa. Sterilization of BI was achieved in shortest time 40 min at 80 W, and the sterilization effect was confirmed using three BIs. Light emission spectra of oxygen plasma indicated that production of atomic oxygen and excited oxygen molecule are maximum at pressure of 20 Pa and 200 Pa, respectively. Sterilization results of BIs indicated that successful rate increases with the oxygen pressure towards 200 Pa. Therefore, the excited oxygen molecule is deduced to be a major factor of the sterilization of BI. Surface morphology of dental instruments such as diamond bar was evaluated using scanning electron microscope (SEM). The deterioration of fine crystals of diamond bar has not observed after the plasma irradiation for 120 min with RF input power was 60W and pressure was 200 Pa.

  12. A Large Hemi-Anechoic Enclosure for Community-Compatible Aeroacoustic Testing of Aircraft Propulsion Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cooper, Beth A.

    1993-01-01

    A large hemi-anechoic (absorptive walls and acoustically hard floor) noise control enclosure has been erected around a complex of test stands at the NASA Lewis Research Center in Cleveland, Ohio. This new state-of-the-art Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory (APL) provides an all-weather, semisecure test environment while limiting noise to acceptable levels in surrounding residential neighborhoods. The 39.6 m (130 ft) diameter geodesic dome structure houses the new Nozzle Aeroacoustic Test Rig (NATR), an ejector-powered M = 0.3 free jet facility for acoustic testing of supersonic aircraft exhaust nozzles and turbomachinery. A multi-axis, force-measuring Powered Lift Facility (PLF) stand for testing of Short Takeoff Vertical Landing (STOVL) vehicles is also located within the dome. The design of the Aeroacoustic Propulsion Laboratory efficiently accomodates the research functions of two separate test rigs, one of which (NATR) requires a specialized environment for taking acoustic measurements. Absorptive fiberglass wedge treatment on the interior surface of the dome provides a hemi-anechoic interior environment for obtaining the accurate acoustic measurements required to meet research program goals. The APL is the first known geodesic dome structure to incorporate transmission-loss properties as well as interior absorption into a free-standing, community-compatible, hemi-anechoic test facility.

  13. Radioactive material package seal tests

    SciTech Connect

    Madsen, M.M.; Humphreys, D.L.; Edwards, K.R.

    1990-01-01

    General design or test performance requirements for radioactive materials (RAM) packages are specified in Title 10 of the US Code of Federal Regulations Part 71 (US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, 1983). The requirements for Type B packages provide a broad range of environments under which the system must contain the RAM without posing a threat to health or property. Seals that provide the containment system interface between the packaging body and the closure must function in both high- and low-temperature environments under dynamic and static conditions. A seal technology program, jointly funded by the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (EM) and the Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management (OCRWM), was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories. Experiments were performed in this program to characterize the behavior of several static seal materials at low temperatures. Helium leak tests on face seals were used to compare the materials. Materials tested include butyl, neoprene, ethylene propylene, fluorosilicone, silicone, Eypel, Kalrez, Teflon, fluorocarbon, and Teflon/silicone composites. Because most elastomer O-ring applications are for hydraulic systems, manufacturer low-temperature ratings are based on methods that simulate this use. The seal materials tested in this program with a fixture similar to a RAM cask closure, with the exception of silicone S613-60, are not leak tight (1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}7} std cm{sup 3}/s) at manufacturer low-temperature ratings. 8 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Docmentation of newly developed methods to assess material compatibility in refrigeration and air-conditioning applications. Final report, 1 October 1993--31 August 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, M.

    1994-08-01

    This document summarizes the experimental methods used during the materials compatibility and lubricants research program (MCLR). The MCLR program was jointly sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy and the air-conditioning and refrigeration industry. The individual projects were managed by the Air-Conditioning and Refrigeration Technology Institute. The projects presented in this report are: Chemical and Thermal Stability of Refrigerant/Lubricant Mixtures with Metals, Miscibility of Lubricants with Refrigerants, Compatibility of Refrigerants and Lubricants with Motor Materials, Compatibility of Refrigerants and Lubricants with Elastomers, Compatibility of Refrigerants and Lubricants with Engineering Plastics and Sealed Tube Comparisons of the Compatibility of Desiccants with Refrigerants and Lubricants.

  15. Materials compatibility and lubricants research on CFC-refrigerant substitutes. Quarterly report, October 1, 1995--December 31, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Szymurski, S.R.

    1996-02-01

    The quarterly status report for the Materials Compatibility and Lubricants Research Program is presented. Objectives for 1 October 1995--31 December 1995 include completion of contract negotiations for Study of Foaming Characteristics project, and finalizing Phase IV and Phase V projects.

  16. Compatibility analysis of material and energy recovery in a regional solid waste management system.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ying-Hsi; Chang, Ni-Bin

    2003-01-01

    The rising prices of raw materials and concerns about energy conservation have resulted in an increasing interest in the simultaneous recovery of materials and energy from waste streams. Compatibility exists for several economic, environmental, and managerial reasons. Installing an on-site or off-site presorting facility before an incinerator could be a feasible alternative to achieve both goals if household recycling programs cannot succeed in local communities. However, the regional impacts of presorting solid waste on a waste-to-energy facility remain unclear because of the inherent complexity of solid waste compositions and properties over different areas. This paper applies a system-based approach to assess the impact of installing a refuse-derived fuel (RDF) process before an incinerator. Such an RDF process, consisting of standard unit operations of shredding, magnetic separation, trommel screening, and air classification, might be useful for integrating the recycling and presorting efforts for a large-scale municipal incinerator from a regional sense. An optimization modeling analysis is performed to characterize such integration potential so that the optimal size of the RDF process and associated shipping patterns for flow control can be foreseen. It aims at exploring how the waste inflows with different rates of generation, physical and chemical compositions, and heating values collected from differing administrative districts can be processed by either a centralized presorting facility or an incinerator to meet both the energy recovery and throughput requirements. A case study conducted in Taipei County, which is one of the most densely populated metropolitan areas in Taiwan, further confirms the application potential of such a cost-benefit analysis.

  17. Spallation source materials test program

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, S.A.; Sommer, W.F.

    1997-12-01

    A spallation source materials program has been developed to irradiate and test candidate materials (Inconel 718, 316L and 304L stainless steel, modified 9Cr-1Mo(T91), Al6061-T6, Al5052-O) for use in the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) target and blanket in prototypic proton and neutron fluxes at prototypic temperatures. The study uses the 800 MeV, 1mA proton accelerator at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) which produces a Gaussian beam with 2 sigma = 3 cm. The experimental set-up contains prototypic modules of the tungsten neutron source and the lead/aluminum blanket with mechanical testing specimens of candidate APT materials placed in specific locations in the irradiation area. These specimens have been irradiated for greater than 3,600 hours with a maximum proton fluence of 4--5 {times} 10{sup 21} p/cm{sup 2} in the center of the proton beam. Specimens will yield some of the first data on the effect of proton irradiation to high dose on the materials` properties from tensile tests, 3 pt. bend tests, fracture toughness tests, pressurized tubes, U-bend stress corrosion cracking specimens, corrosion measurements and microstructural characterization of transmission electron microscopy specimens.

  18. NEXT GENERATION SOLVENT-MATERIALS COMPATIBILITY WITH POLYMER COMPONENTS WITHIN MODULAR CAUSTIC-SIDE SOLVENT EXTRACTION UNIT (FINAL REPORT)

    SciTech Connect

    Fondeur, F.; Peters, T.; Fink, S.

    2012-01-17

    The Office of Waste Processing, within the Office of Technology Innovation and Development, is funding the development of an enhanced solvent for deployment at the Savannah River Site for removal of cesium from High Level Waste. The technical effort is collaboration between Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL), and Argonne National Laboratory. The first deployment target for the technology is within the Modular Caustic-Side Solvent Extraction Unit (MCU). Deployment of a new chemical within an existing facility requires verification that the chemical components are compatible with the installed equipment. In the instance of a new organic solvent, the primary focus is on compatibility of the solvent with organic polymers used in the facility. This report provides the data from exposing these polymers to the Next Generation Solvent (NGS). The test was conducted over six months. An assessment of the dimensional stability of polymers present in MCU (i.e., PEEK, Grafoil, Tefzel and Isolast) in the modified NGS (where the concentration of LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix was varied systematically) showed that LIX{reg_sign}79 selectively affected Tefzel and its different grades (by an increase in size and lowering its density). The copolymer structure of Tefzel and possibly its porosity allows for the easier diffusion of LIX{reg_sign}79. Tefzel is used as the seat material in some of the valves at MCU. Long term exposure to LIX{reg_sign}79, may make the valves hard to operate over time due to the seat material (Tefzel) increasing in size. However, since the physical changes of Tefzel in the improved solvent are comparable to the changes in the CSSX baseline solvent, no design changes are needed with respect to the Tefzel seating material. PEEK, Grafoil and Isolast were not affected by LIX{reg_sign}79 and MaxCalix within six months of exposure. The initial rapid weight gain observed in every polymer is assigned to the finite and

  19. Compatibility of meteorological rocketsonde data as indicated by international comparison tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finger, F. G.; Gelman, M. E.; Schmidlin, F. J.; Leviton, R.; Kennedy, B. W.

    1975-01-01

    Results of two experiments involving intercomparisons of rocketsonde measurements of temperature and wind data in the 25 to 80 km altitude region in the CIMO (Commission for Instruments and Methods of Observations) program during September 1973 are reported. Rocketsonde systems used by France, the USSR, the UK, the U.S., and Japan in the two parts of the program (one series of tests at Wallops Island, Va., the other in French Guiana) are described. Wind data were derived from radar tracking of retardation devices and payloads in descent. Day and night temperature differences were examined. The intercomparisons revealed excellent compatibility of the rocketsonde data up to 60 km in wind observations. Some outstanding problems are pointed out.

  20. Alternative Fuels Compatibility with Army Equipment Testing - Aged Niedner Rifts Conduit Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-02-01

    ends of the conduit using IPDS couplings to attach them to the conduit end fittings. 2 Setup the plumbing for the pump to pressurize the conduit. 3...Cyclic Testing Procedure Step No. Description 1 End Plugs should be installed on both ends of the conduit using IPDS couplings to attach them to the...testing site. Pressurization Cycles 12 End Plugs should be installed on both ends of the conduit using IPDS couplings to attach them to the conduit

  1. Electromagnetic Compatibility Testing for Conducted Susceptibility Along Interconnecting Signal Lines. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ewing, P. D.; Wood, R. T.; Korsah, K.; Shourbaji, A. A.; Wilson, T. L.; Beets, B. M.

    2002-07-31

    This document presents recommendations and the associated technical basis for addressing the effects of conducted electromagnetic interference (EMI) and radio-frequency interference (RFI) along interconnecting signal lines in safety-related instrumentation and control (I&C) systems. Oak Ridge National Laboratory has been engaged in assisting the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research in developing the technical basis for regulatory guidance on EMIIRFI immunity and power surge withstand capability (SWC). Previous research efforts have provided recommendations on (1) electromagnetic compatibility design and installation practices, (2) the endorsement of EMI/RFI and SWC test criteria and test methods, (3) the determination of ambient electromagnetic conditions at nuclear power plants, and (4) the development of recommended electromagnetic operating envelopes applicable to locations where safety-related I&C systems will be installed. The current research focuses on the susceptibility of l&C systems to conducted EMIIRFI along interconnecting signal lines. Coverage of signal line susceptibility was identified as an open issue in previous research on establishing the technical basis for EMIIRFI and SWC in safety-related I&C systems. Research results provided in this report will be used to establish the technical basis for endorsing U.S. Department of Defense and European Committee for Electrotechnical Standardization test criteria and test methods that address signal-line susceptibility. In addition, recommendations on operating envelopes are presented based on available technical information.

  2. Physical and chemical test results of electrostatic safe flooring materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gompf, R. H.

    1988-01-01

    This test program was initiated because a need existed at the Kennedy Space Center (KSC) to have this information readily available to the engineer who must make the choice of which electrostatic safe floor to use in a specific application. The information, however, should be of value throughout both the government and private industry in the selection of a floor covering material. Included are the test results of 18 floor covering materials which by test evaluation at KSC are considered electrostatically safe. Tests were done and/or the data compiled in the following areas: electrostatics, flammability, hypergolic compatibility, outgassing, floor type, material thickness, and available colors. Each section contains the test method used to gather the data and the test results.

  3. Development of Design Standards and Guidelines for Electromagnetic Compatibility and Lightning Protection for Spacecraft Utilizing Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Preliminary design guidelines necessary to assure electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) of spacecraft using composite materials, are presented. A database of electrical properties of composite materials which may have an effect on EMC is established. The guidelines concentrate on the composites that are conductive but may require enhancement to be adequate for EMC purposes. These composites are represented by graphite reinforced polymers. Methods for determining adequate conductivity levels for various EMC purposes are defined, along with the methods of design which increase conductivity of composite materials and joints to adequate levels.

  4. Mechanisms of immune red cell destruction, and red cell compatibility testing

    SciTech Connect

    Garratty, G.

    1983-03-01

    The immune destruction of red cells can occur as a complement-mediated intravascular process, or extravascularly, where the red cells are destroyed by macrophages following interaction with cell-bound IgG1, IgG3, and/or C3b. Many of the factors that affect this in vivo destruction are not taken into account during in vitro pretransfusion compatibility testing. At present, even by use of more elaborate tests, it is difficult to accurately predict the fate of a transfused unit of blood. By using some simple information, such as antibody specificity and thermal range, it is sometimes possible to predict the outcome of transfusing a unit of blood that is incompatible in vitro. At other times it may be necessary to utilize /sup 51/Cr-labeled red cells to determine the risk of transfusing such units. Because of the paucity of reported clinical correlations, macrophage/monocyte monolayer assays are of little practical value at present.

  5. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  6. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  7. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  8. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  9. 49 CFR Appendix B to Part 173 - Procedure for Testing Chemical Compatibility and Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Rate of Permeation in Plastic Packaging and Receptacles B Appendix B to Part 173 Transportation Other... Plastic Packaging and Receptacles 1. The purpose of this procedure is to determine the chemical compatibility and permeability of liquid hazardous materials packaged in plastic packaging and...

  10. Development, Testing and Evaluation of a Night Vision Goggle Compatible BO-105 for Night Low Level Operation,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Stability Augmentation System ), a Doppler Navigation System with Mapreader, a TACAN and recording equipment were installed in the test helicopter. In a pre-evaluation program, two types of helmet mounted Night Vision Goggles (NVG’s) were selected for further evaluation. After the 2 axis SAS had been replaced by a 3 axis CSAS and NVG compatible cockpit lighting had been installed in the test helicopter, night low level operational flight trials were carried out. This paper describes the selection of the NVG’s the NVG compatible lighting and presents the

  11. Material compatibility evaluation for DWPF nitric-glycolic acid-literature review

    SciTech Connect

    Mickalonis, J.; Skidmore, E.

    2013-06-01

    Glycolic acid is being evaluated as an alternative for formic and nitric acid in the DWPF flowsheet. Demonstration testing and modeling for this new flowsheet has shown that glycolic acid and glycolate has a potential to remain in certain streams generated during the production of the nuclear waste glass. A literature review was conducted to assess the impact of glycolic acid on the corrosion of the materials of construction for the DWPF facility as well as facilities downstream which may have residual glycolic acid and glycolates present. The literature data was limited to solutions containing principally glycolic acid.

  12. Cryostat system for spacecraft materials testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dekany, Justin

    The main cause of spacecraft failures is due to the harsh space environment; therefore, rigorous testing of materials used in modern spacecraft is imperative to ensure proper operation during the life span of the mission. Enhancing the capabilities of ground-based test facilities allows for more accurate measurements to be taken as it better simulates the environment to which spacecraft will be exposed. The range of temperature measurements has been significantly extended for an existing space environment simulation test chamber used in the study of electron emission, sample charging and discharge, electrostatic discharge and arcing, electron transport, and luminescence of spacecraft materials. This was accomplished by incorporating a new two-stage, closed-cycle helium cryostat, which has an extended sample temperature range from 450 K, with long-term controlled stability of <0.5 K. The system was designed to maintain compatibility with an existing ultrahigh vacuum chamber (base pressure <10-7 Pa) that can simulate diverse space environments. These existing capabilities include controllable vacuum and ambient neutral gases conditions (<10-7 to 10 -1 Pa), electron fluxes (5 eV to 30 keV monoenergetic, focused, pulsed sources ranging from 10-4 to 1010 nA-cm -2), ion fluxes (<0.1 to 5 keV monoenergetic sources for inert and reactive gases with pulsing capabilities), and photon irradiation (numerous continuous and pulsed monochromatic and broadband IR/VIS/UV [0.5 to 7 eV] sources). The original sample mount accommodates one to four samples of 1 cm to 2.5 cm diameter in a low- temperature carousel, which allows rapid sample exchange and controlled exposure of the individual samples. Multiple additional sample mounts have been added to allow for standalone use for constant voltage measurements, radiation induced and conductivity tests, as well as extended capabilities for electron-induced luminescent measurements to be conducted using various material sample thicknesses

  13. Selection of solid dosage form composition through drug-excipient compatibility testing.

    PubMed

    Serajuddin, A T; Thakur, A B; Ghoshal, R N; Fakes, M G; Ranadive, S A; Morris, K R; Varia, S A

    1999-07-01

    A drug-excipient compatibility screening model was developed by which potential stability problems due to interactions of drug substances with excipients in solid dosage forms can be predicted. The model involved storing drug-excipient blends with 20% added water in closed glass vials at 50 degrees C and analyzing them after 1 and 3 weeks for chemical and physical stability. The total weight of drug-excipient blend in a vial was usually kept at about 200 mg. The amount of drug substance in a blend was determined on the basis of the expected drug-to-excipient ratio in the final formulation. Potential roles of several key factors, such as the chemical nature of the excipient, drug-to-excipient ratio, moisture, microenvironmental pH of the drug-excipient mixture, temperature, and light, on dosage form stability could be identified by using the model. Certain physical changes, such as polymorphic conversion or change from crystalline to amorphous form, that could occur in drug-excipient mixtures were also studied. Selection of dosage form composition by using this model at the outset of a drug development program would lead to reduction of "surprise" problems during long-term stability testing of drug products.

  14. Development of reactive artificial liner using recycled materials. 1. Mechanical properties and chemical compatibility.

    PubMed

    Chin, Johnnie Y; Moon, Kyong-Whan; Park, Jae K; Park, Daniel J

    2013-07-01

    There have been several studies showing that volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can diffuse a geomembrane within days and migrate to groundwater and the surrounding environment. To ease the concern of potential pollution of the surrounding environment, an alternative artificial liner consisting of recycled materials is proposed. This composite liner consisted of recycled crumb rubber, organo-clay, silica fume, and epoxy binder. Dimethyl sulfoxide, an environmentally-friendly solvent recycled from paper pulp, was used as a plasticizer. The objective of this study was to determine the best combination of ingredients used at the initial stage and to develop artificial liners suitable for containing VOCs in leachate by comparing various physical properties. A series of screening tests including bending, tearing and elongating was performed to determine the most suitable mixture ratios. Then, more intensive tests were performed with the specimens that had the best physical properties. The new artificial liner demonstrated satisfactory mechanical properties with the minimum elongation and maximum strength after 40 years. Both artificial liners and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) specimens had ~136 kg cm(-2) after 4 months of thermal stress while the artificial liner had 40% less elongation at break than HDPE. The artificial liner's fully developed strength was about ten times stronger than HDPE. This new type of composite material that can be applied on site may provide a new perspective in liner design and alleviate the issue of potential groundwater pollution caused by landfill leachate and highly mobile VOCs which is a matter of much concern.

  15. Evaluation of surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability and gypsum compatibility of monophase polyvinyl-siloxane and polyether elastomeric impression materials under dry and moist conditions

    PubMed Central

    Vadapalli, Sriharsha Babu; Atluri, Kaleswararao; Putcha, Madhu Sudhan; Kondreddi, Sirisha; Kumar, N. Suman; Tadi, Durga Prasad

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: This in vitro study was designed to compare polyvinyl-siloxane (PVS) monophase and polyether (PE) monophase materials under dry and moist conditions for properties such as surface detail reproduction, dimensional stability, and gypsum compatibility. Materials and Methods: Surface detail reproduction was evaluated using two criteria. Dimensional stability was evaluated according to American Dental Association (ADA) specification no. 19. Gypsum compatibility was assessed by two criteria. All the samples were evaluated, and the data obtained were analyzed by a two-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) and Pearson's Chi-square tests. Results: When surface detail reproduction was evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19, both the groups under the two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. When evaluated macroscopically both the groups showed statistically significant difference. Results for dimensional stability showed that the deviation from standard was significant among the two groups, where Aquasil group showed significantly more deviation compared to Impregum group (P < 0.001). Two conditions also showed significant difference, with moist conditions showing significantly more deviation compared to dry condition (P < 0.001). The results of gypsum compatibility when evaluated with modification of ADA specification no. 19 and by giving grades to the casts for both the groups and under two conditions showed no significant difference statistically. Conclusion: Regarding dimensional stability, both impregum and aquasil performed better in dry condition than in moist; impregum performed better than aquasil in both the conditions. When tested for surface detail reproduction according to ADA specification, under dry and moist conditions both of them performed almost equally. When tested according to macroscopic evaluation, impregum and aquasil performed significantly better in dry condition compared to moist condition. In dry

  16. Mast material test program (MAMATEP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ciancone, Michael L.; Rutledge, Sharon K.

    1988-01-01

    The Mast Material Test Program (MAMATEP) at NASA Lewis is discussed. Objectives include verifying the need for, and evaluating the performance of, various protection techniques for the Solar Array Assembly mast of the Space Station Photovoltaic Power Module. Mast material samples were evaluated in terms of mass and bending modulus, measured before and after environmental exposure. Test environments included atomic oxygen exposure (RF plasma asher), thermal cycling, and mechanical flexing. Protective coatings included CV-1144 silicon, a Ni/Au/InSn eutectic, and an open weave, Al braid. Results indicate that unprotected samples degrade in an atomic oxygen environment at a steady rate. Open weave, Al braid offers little protection for the fiberglass-epoxy sample in an asher environment. Ni/Au/InSn eutectic offers excellent protection in an asher environment prior to thermal cycling and mechanical flexing. Long duration asher results from unprotected samples indicate that, even though the fiberglass-epoxy degrades, a protection technique may not be necessary to ensure structural integrity. However, a protection technique may be desirable to limit or contain the amount of debris generated by the degradation of the fiberglass-epoxy.

  17. Nondestructive Material Testing Using OCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stifter, D.

    The fact that optical coherence tomography (OCT) provides information on internal structures of scattering tissue in a noninvasive way has led to a broad acceptance of OCT for dedicated biomedical imaging and diagnostics applications. Outside the biomedical field, an irreversible alteration of an object under investigation by the characterization method itself is likewise undesirable, especially in the case that such an object has to be further used with its original state maintained. For this purpose, a variety of so-called nondestructive testing (NDT) methods is nowadays at hand,with OCT as novel technique exhibiting a huge potential to add valuable contributions to nondestructive testing and evaluation of semitransparent, scattering materials with structural features on the micron scale. Therefore, within this chapter, a broad range of applications for OCT in NDT is presented, ranging from examples of industrial quality control over classification and authentication tasks to the evaluation of materials in research and development.The individual applications are listed according to the category of information obtained from the individual measurements, starting with the evaluation of the pure surface structure, proceeding to thickness measurements of layered systems, to imaging of internal 3D structures and finally leading to the determination of functional information.

  18. Polymer-Oxygen Compatibility Testing: Effect of Oxygen Aging on Ignition and Combustion Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waller, Jess M.; Haas, Jon P.; Wilson, D. Bruce; Fries, Joseph (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The oxygen compatibility of six polymers used in oxygen service was evaluated after exposure for 48 hours to oxygen pressures ranging from 350 to 6200 kPa (50 to 900 psia), and temperatures ranging from 50 to 250 C (122 to 302 F). Three elastomers were tested: CR rubber (C873-70), FKM fluorocarbon rubber (Viton A), and MPQ silicone rubber (MIL-ZZ-765, Class 2); and three thermoplastics were tested: polyhexamethylene adipamide (Zytel 42), polytetrafluoroethylene (Teflon TFE), and polychlorotrifluoroethylene (Neoflon CTFE M400H). Post-aging changes in mass, dimensions, tensile strength, elongation at break, and durometer hardness were determined. Also, the compression set was determined for the three elastomers. Results show that the properties under investigation were more sensitive to oxygen pressure at low to moderate temperatures, and more sensitive to temperature at low to moderate oxygen pressures. Inspection of the results also suggested that both chain scissioning and cross-linking processes were operative, consistent with heterogeneous oxidation. Attempts are underway to verify conclusively the occurrence of heterogeneous oxidation using a simple modulus profiling technique. Finally, the effect of aging at 620 kpa (90 psia) and 121 C (250 F) on ignition and combustion resistance was determined. As expected, aged polymers were less ignitable and combustible (had higher AlTs and lower heats of combustion). Special attention was given to Neoflon CTFE. More specifically, the effect of process history (compression versus extrusion molding) and percent crystallinity (quick- versus slow-quenched) on the AIT, heat of combustion, and impact sensitivity of Neoflon CTFE was investigated. Results show the AIT, heat of combustion, and impact sensitivity to be essentially independent of Neoflon CTFE process history and structure.

  19. Water-compatible polymer concrete materials for use in rapid repair systems for airport runways. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Sugama, T.; Kukacka, L.E.; Horn, W.

    1981-03-01

    Water-compatible polymer concrete (PC) formulations have been developed which appear to have potential for use in all-weather rapid repair procedures for bomb-damaged runways. Formulations consisting of furfuryl alcohol, water-saturated aggregate, dry silica flour, promoters, and catalysts produced composites with properties suitable for repair purposes when mixed and polymerized at temperatures from -20/sup 0/ to 30/sup 0/C. Calcium-unsaturated polyester complexed PC also produced excellent properties. However, the early strength criteria (2000 psi (13.78 MPa) at 1 h) and other requirements such as compatibility of the formulation with water and practical working times could be attained only at temperatures >20/sup 0/C. This system can be polymerized under water. Studies of the polymerization reaction mechanisms, materials properties, costs, and potential placement methods were performed.

  20. Theoretical analysis of compatibility of several reinforcement materials with NiAl and FeAl matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misra, Ajay K.

    1989-01-01

    Several potential reinforcement materials were assessed for their chemical, coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE), and mechanical compatibility with the intermetallic matrices based on NiAl and FeAl. Among the ceramic reinforcement materials, Al2O3, TiC, and TiB2, appear to be the optimum choices for NiAl and FeAl matrices. However, the problem of CTE mismatch with the matrix needs to be solved for these three reinforcement materials. Beryllium-rich intermetallic compounds can be considered as potential reinforcement materials provided suitable reaction barrier coatings can be developed for these. Based on preliminary thermodynamic calculations, Sc2O3 and TiC appear to be suitable as reaction barrier coatings for the beryllides. Several reaction barrier coatings are also suggested for the currently available SiC fibers.

  1. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Souce for System-Level Testing of Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    This work describes the development of an improved vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source used for characterizing and calibrating remote optical sensors, in situ, throughout their testing period. The original flat plate radiometric source was developed for use by the VIIRS instrument during the NPOESS Preparatory Project (NPP). Following this effort, the FPI has had significant upgrades in order to improve both the radiometric throughput and uniformity. Results of the VIIRS testing with the reconfigured FPI are reported and discussed.

  2. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes >1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa (“displacement-per-atom”, the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  3. Accelerators for Fusion Materials Testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knaster, Juan; Okumura, Yoshikazu

    Fusion materials research is a worldwide endeavor as old as the parallel one working toward the long term stable confinement of ignited plasma. In a fusion reactor, the preservation of the required minimum thermomechanical properties of the in-vessel components exposed to the severe irradiation and heat flux conditions is an indispensable factor for safe operation; it is also an essential goal for the economic viability of fusion. Energy from fusion power will be extracted from the 14 MeV neutron freed as a product of the deuterium-tritium fusion reactions; thus, this kinetic energy must be absorbed and efficiently evacuated and electricity eventually generated by the conventional methods of a thermal power plant. Worldwide technological efforts to understand the degradation of materials exposed to 14 MeV neutron fluxes > 1018 m-2s-1, as expected in future fusion power plants, have been intense over the last four decades. Existing neutron sources can reach suitable dpa ("displacement-per-atom", the figure of merit to assess materials degradation from being exposed to neutron irradiation), but the differences in the neutron spectrum of fission reactors and spallation sources do not allow one to unravel the physics and to anticipate the degradation of materials exposed to fusion neutrons. Fusion irradiation conditions can be achieved through Li (d, xn) nuclear reactions with suitable deuteron beam current and energy, and an adequate flowing lithium screen. This idea triggered in the late 1970s at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) a campaign working toward the feasibility of continuous wave (CW) high current linacs framed by the Fusion Materials Irradiation Test (FMIT) project. These efforts continued with the Low Energy Demonstrating Accelerator (LEDA) (a validating prototype of the canceled Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) project), which was proposed in 2002 to the fusion community as a 6.7MeV, 100mA CW beam injector for a Li (d, xn) source to bridge

  4. DMA Modulus as a Screening Parameter for Compatibility of Polymeric Containment Materials with Various Solutions for use in Space Shuttle Microgravity Protein Crystal Growth (PCG) Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wingard, Charles Doug; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Protein crystals are grown in microgravity experiments inside the Space Shuttle during orbit. Such crystals are basically grown in a five-component system containing a salt, buffer, polymer, organic and water. During these experiments, a number of different polymeric containment materials must be compatible with up to hundreds of different PCG solutions in various concentrations for durations up to 180 days. When such compatibility experiments are performed at NASA/MSFC (Marshall Space Flight Center) simultaneously on containment material samples immersed in various solutions in vials, the samples are rather small out of necessity. DMA4 modulus was often used as the primary screening parameter for such small samples as a pass/fail criterion for incompatibility issues. In particular, the TA Instruments DMA 2980 film tension clamp was used to test rubber O-rings as small in I.D. as 0.091 in. by cutting through the cross-section at one place, then clamping the stretched linear cord stock at each end. The film tension clamp was also used to successfully test short length samples of medical/surgical grade tubing with an O.D. of 0.125 in.

  5. 76 FR 50331 - Hazardous Materials Regulations; Compatibility With the Regulations of the International Atomic...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-12

    ...) material. Paragraph (d)(2) requires the inclusion of the physical and chemical form of the material, if the.... Throughout this section, PHMSA proposes to make editorial revisions to improve consistency with...

  6. Unmanned Vehicle Material Flammability Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David; Ruff, Gary A.; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; T’ien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam; Rouvreau, Sebastian; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Jomaas, Grande

    2013-01-01

    Microgravity combustion phenomena have been an active area of research for the past 3 decades however, there have been very few experiments directly studying spacecraft fire safety under low-gravity conditions. Furthermore, none of these experiments have studied sample and environment sizes typical of those expected in a spacecraft fire. All previous experiments have been limited to samples of the order of 10 cm in length and width or smaller. Terrestrial fire safety standards for all other habitable volumes on earth, e.g. mines, buildings, airplanes, ships, etc., are based upon testing conducted with full-scale fires. Given the large differences between fire behavior in normal and reduced gravity, this lack of an experimental data base at relevant length scales forces spacecraft designers to base their designs using 1-g understanding. To address this question a large scale spacecraft fire experiment has been proposed by an international team of investigators. This poster presents the objectives, status and concept of this collaborative international project to examine spacecraft material flammability at realistic scales. The concept behind this project is to utilize an unmanned spacecraft such as Orbital Cygnus vehicle after it has completed its delivery of cargo to the ISS and it has begun its return journey to earth. This experiment will consist of a flame spread test involving a meter scale sample ignited in the pressurized volume of the spacecraft and allowed to burn to completion while measurements are made. A computer modeling effort will complement the experimental effort. Although the experiment will need to meet rigorous safety requirements to ensure the carrier vehicle does not sustain damage, the absence of a crew removes the need for strict containment of combustion products. This will facilitate the examination of fire behavior on a scale that is relevant to spacecraft fire safety and will provide unique data for fire model validation. This will be

  7. Thermal Systems and Materials Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aguirre, Nathan

    2010-01-01

    During my internship, I was involved in Boeing Thermal System/M&P, which handles maintenance and repairs of shuttle tiles, blankets, gap fillers, etc. One project I took part in was the revision of TPS-227, a repair process to tiles that entailed drilling out tile damage and using a cylindrical insert to fill the hole. The previous specification used minimal adhesive for application and when the adhesive cured, there would be several voids in the adhered material, causing an unsatisfactory bond. The testing compared several new methods and I analyzed the number of voids produced by each method to determine which one was most effective at eliminating void space. We revised the original process to apply a light adhesive coat to the top 25% of the borehole and a heavy coat to 100% of the insert. I was also responsible for maintaining the subnominal bond database, which records all unsatisfactory SIP (Strain Isolator Pad) bonds. I then archived each SIP physically for future referral data and statistics. In addition, I performed post-flight tile inspections for damages and wrote dispositions to have these tiles repaired. This also included writing a post-flight damage report for a section of Atlantis and creating summarized repair process guidelines for orbiter technicians.

  8. Towards a four technique GGOS site: VLBI - DORIS compatibility tests at Wettzell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klügel, Thomas; Didelot, Francois; Kodet, Jan; Kronschnabl, Gerhard; Mähler, Swetlana; Neidhardt, Alexander; Plötz, Christian; Saunier, Jérôme; Schüler, Torben; Walter, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    Within the framework of a Global Geodetic Observing System (GGOS), co-location sites are of special importance for the evaluation and mutual control of the individual geodetic space techniques. At the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell a DORIS (Doppler Orbitography and Radiopositioning Integrated by Satellite) beacon could complete the geodetic instrumentation consisting of three Very Long Baseline Interferometry (VLBI) telescopes, two Laser Ranging (LR) systems and a number of multi- Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) stations. Integrating all fourth geodetic instrumentation into one site generates new problems with Electromagnetic Compatibility (EMC). While the VLBI system is designed to receive very weak signals from quasars, the DORIS beacon emits strong signals in the UHF frequency band at 401.25 MHz and in the S band at 2036.25 MHz. During the observation of quasars with VLBI there is a high risk of coupling DORIS S band signals into the VLBI receiving chain generating spurious signal and, in the worst case, overloading receiving chain electronics and risking its damage. Before a DORIS beacon is operated at the Geodetic Observatory Wettzell, it must be ensured that it can be operated alongside the VLBI system without any risk of damage or degradation of the measurement. Field tests under different setups were performed to assess the impact of the DORIS signal on the classical geodetic VLBI 20-m and the VGOS 13-m radio telescopes. Different locations on the observatory each at a distance of more than 100 m were occupied by the DORIS antenna. It has been shown that obstacles like buildings or earth mounds attenuate the signal up to 20 dB. However the power received at the input of the Low Noise Amplifiers (LNA) is still at a critical level when the radio telescope points towards the DORIS beacon. The quality of the correlated signals is not or barely affected at long baselines. At local baselines however, the DORIS emission as a common mode signal degrades

  9. Aluminum-Scandium Alloys: Material Characterization, Friction Stir Welding, and Compatibility With Hydrogen Peroxide (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund Final Report, Proj. No. 04-14)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, J. A.; Chen, P. S.

    2004-01-01

    This Technical Memorandum describes the development of several high-strength aluminum (Al) alloys that are compatible with hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) propellant for NASA Hypersonic-X (Hyper-X) vehicles fuel tanks and structures. The yield strengths for some of these Al-magnesium-based alloys are more than 3 times stronger than the conventional 5254-H112 Al alloy, while maintaining excellent H2O2 compatibility similar to class 1 5254 alloy. The alloy development strategy is to add scandium, zirconium, and other transitional metals with unique electrochemical properties, which will not act as catalysts, to decompose the highly concentrated 90 percent H2O2. Test coupons are machined from sheet metals for H2O2 long-term exposure testing and mechanical properties testing. In addition, the ability to weld the new alloys using friction stir welding has also been explored. The new high-strength alloys could represent an enabling material technology for Hyper-X vehicles, where flight weight reduction is a critical requirement.

  10. Nuclear waste package materials testing report: basaltic and tuffaceous environments

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, D.J.; Coles, D.G.; Hodges, F.N.; McVay, G.L.; Westerman, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The disposal of high-level nuclear wastes in underground repositories in the continental United States requires the development of a waste package that will contain radionuclides for a time period commensurate with performance criteria, which may be up to 1000 years. This report addresses materials testing in support of a waste package for a basalt (Hanford, Washington) or a tuff (Nevada Test Site) repository. The materials investigated in this testing effort were: sodium and calcium bentonites and mixtures with sand or basalt as a backfill; iron and titanium-based alloys as structural barriers; and borosilicate waste glass PNL 76-68 as a waste form. The testing also incorporated site-specific rock media and ground waters: Reference Umtanum Entablature-1 basalt and reference basalt ground water, Bullfrog tuff and NTS J-13 well water. The results of the testing are discussed in four major categories: Backfill Materials: emphasizing water migration, radionuclide migration, physical property and long-term stability studies. Structural Barriers: emphasizing uniform corrosion, irradiation-corrosion, and environmental-mechanical testing. Waste Form Release Characteristics: emphasizing ground water, sample surface area/solution volume ratio, and gamma radiolysis effects. Component Compatibility: emphasizing solution/rock, glass/rock, glass/structural barrier, and glass/backfill interaction tests. This area also includes sensitivity testing to determine primary parameters to be studied, and the results of systems tests where more than two waste package components were combined during a single test.

  11. Fire tests for airplane interior materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tustin, E. A.

    1980-01-01

    Large scale, simulated fire tests of aircraft interior materials were carried out in salvaged airliner fuselage. Two "design" fire sources were selected: Jet A fuel ignited in fuselage midsection and trash bag fire. Comparison with six established laboratory fire tests show that some laboratory tests can rank materials according to heat and smoke production, but existing tests do not characterize toxic gas emissions accurately. Report includes test parameters and test details.

  12. Nondestructive ultrasonic testing of materials

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrand, B.P.

    1994-08-02

    Reflection wave forms obtained from aged and unaged material samples can be compared in order to indicate trends toward age-related flaws. Statistical comparison of a large number of data points from such wave forms can indicate changes in the microstructure of the material due to aging. The process is useful for predicting when flaws may occur in structural elements of high risk structures such as nuclear power plants, airplanes, and bridges. 4 figs.

  13. Nondestructive ultrasonic testing of materials

    DOEpatents

    Hildebrand, Bernard P.

    1994-01-01

    Reflection wave forms obtained from aged and unaged material samples can be compared in order to indicate trends toward age-related flaws. Statistical comparison of a large number of data points from such wave forms can indicate changes in the microstructure of the material due to aging. The process is useful for predicting when flaws may occur in structural elements of high risk structures such as nuclear power plants, airplanes, and bridges.

  14. 46 CFR 154.430 - Material test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Material test. 154.430 Section 154.430 Shipping COAST... § 154.430 Material test. (a) The membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be made of materials that withstand the combined strains calculated under § 154.429(c). (b) Analyzed data of a...

  15. 46 CFR 154.430 - Material test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Material test. 154.430 Section 154.430 Shipping COAST... § 154.430 Material test. (a) The membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be made of materials that withstand the combined strains calculated under § 154.429(c). (b) Analyzed data of a...

  16. 46 CFR 154.430 - Material test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Material test. 154.430 Section 154.430 Shipping COAST... § 154.430 Material test. (a) The membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be made of materials that withstand the combined strains calculated under § 154.429(c). (b) Analyzed data of a...

  17. 46 CFR 154.430 - Material test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Material test. 154.430 Section 154.430 Shipping COAST... § 154.430 Material test. (a) The membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be made of materials that withstand the combined strains calculated under § 154.429(c). (b) Analyzed data of a...

  18. 46 CFR 154.430 - Material test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Material test. 154.430 Section 154.430 Shipping COAST... § 154.430 Material test. (a) The membrane and the membrane supporting insulation must be made of materials that withstand the combined strains calculated under § 154.429(c). (b) Analyzed data of a...

  19. Design and testing of an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer for non-invasive cardiac assessments during exercise

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is an important tool for cardiac research, and it is frequently used for resting cardiac assessments. However, research into non-pharmacological stress cardiac evaluation is limited. Methods We aimed to design a portable and relatively inexpensive MRI cycle ergometer capable of continuously measuring pedalling workload while patients exercise to maintain target heart rates. Results We constructed and tested an MRI-compatible cycle ergometer for a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Resting and sub-maximal exercise images (at 110 beats per minute) were successfully obtained in 8 healthy adults. Conclusions The MRI-compatible cycle ergometer constructed by our research group enabled cardiac assessments at fixed heart rates, while continuously recording power output by directly measuring pedal force and crank rotation. PMID:22423637

  20. Nonflammable coolants for space vehicle environmental control systems Compatibility of component materials with selected dielectric fluids.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howard, R. T.; Korpolinski, T. S.; Mace, E. W.

    1971-01-01

    This paper summarizes a 4-year effort to evaluate and implement a nonflammable substitute coolant for application in the Saturn instrument unit (IU) environmental control system (ECS). Discussed are candidate material evaluations, detailed investigations of the properties of the coolant selected, and a summary of the implementation into a flight vehicle.

  1. Compatibility Studies of Various Refractory Materials in Contact with Molten Silicon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Odonnell, T.; Leipold, M. H.; Hagan, M.

    1978-01-01

    The production of low cost, efficient solar cells for terrestrial electric power generation involves the manipulation of molten silicon with a present need for noncontaminating, high temperature refractories to be used as containment vessels, ribbon-production dies, and dip-coated substrates. Studies were conducted on the wetting behavior and chemical/physical interactions between molten silicon and various refractory materials.

  2. Determination of Long Term Compatibility of Hydrazine with Selected Materials of Construction. Design Criteria and Guidance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1976-06-01

    The results of. a series of tests incorporating variables such as ~metal, metal pretreatment, bydxazixie impurities, temperature and time ar’e presented...of a series of 128 tests are presented in which the * relative effects of temperature (50, 80, 110, and 160 F) time (n.5, 1.0, 4.0 and 10.0 years...percent in some cases. The remainder of the alloys tested (AM355, 17-7PH, 430 SS, 316L SS, 304L SS and Ti6Al4V ) indicated much higher hydrazine

  3. Solid oxide materials research accelerated electrochemical testing

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.; Arey, B.

    1995-08-01

    The objectives of this work were to develop methods for accelerated testing of cathode materials for solid oxide fuel cells under selected operating conditions. The methods would be used to evaluate the performance of LSM cathode material.

  4. Chemical, Biological, and Radiological Contamination Survivability: Material Effects Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-22

    compatibility X 23 Lubricity X 24 Solubility X 25 Melting point/boiling point X 26 Viscosity X Ph...MATERIAL PROPERTIES MATRIX AND DATA TEMPLATE. TABLE 2. CONTINUED Petroleum, Oils , and Lubricants Properties (cite method, SOP, ASTM, etc...used) Sample Name/Product Number Thermal Stability Chemical Compatibility Lubricity Solubility Melting Point/Boiling Point Viscosity

  5. Test plan for buried waste containment system materials

    SciTech Connect

    Weidner, J.; Shaw, P.

    1997-03-01

    The objectives of the FY 1997 barrier material work at the Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory are to (1) select a waste barrier material and verify that it is compatible with the Buried Waste Containment System Process, and (2) determine if, and how, the Buried Waste Containment System emplacement process affects the material properties and performance (on proof of principle scale). This test plan describes a set of measurements and procedures used to validate a waste barrier material for the Buried Waste Containment System. A latex modified proprietary cement manufactured by CTS Cement Manufacturing Company will be tested. Emplacement properties required for the Buried Waste Containment System process are: slump between 8 and 10 in., set time between 15 and 30 minutes, compressive strength at set of 20 psi minimum, and set temperature less than 100{degrees}C. Durability properties include resistance to degradation from carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates. A set of baseline barrier material properties will be determined to provide a data base for comparison with the barrier materials when tested in the field. The measurements include permeability, petrographic analysis to determine separation and/or segregation of mix components, and a set of mechanical properties. The measurements will be repeated on specimens from the field test material. The data will be used to determine if the Buried Waste Containment System equipment changes the material. The emplacement properties will be determined using standard laboratory procedures and instruments. Durability of the barrier material will be evaluated by determining the effect of carbonate, sulfate, and waste-site soil leachates on the compressive strength of the barrier material. The baseline properties will be determined using standard ASTM procedures. 9 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  6. The Blood Compatibilities of Blood Purification Membranes and Other Materials Developed in Japan

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Takaya; Kato, Karen; Fujioka, Tomoaki; Akizawa, Tadao

    2011-01-01

    The biocompatibilities in blood purification therapy are defined as “a concept to stipulate safety of blood purification therapy by an index based on interaction in the body arising from blood purification therapy itself.” The biocompatibilities are associated with not only materials to be used but also many factors such as sterilization method and eluted substance. It is often evaluated based on impacts on cellular pathways and on humoral pathways. Since the biocompatibilities of blood purification therapy in particular hemodialysis are not just a prognostic factor for dialysis patients but a contributory factor for long-term complications, it should be considered with adequate attention. It is important that blood purification therapy should be performed by consistently evaluating not only risks associated with these biocompatibilities but also the other advantages obtained from treatments. In this paper, the biocompatibilities of membrane and adsorption material based on Japanese original which are used for blood purification therapy are described. PMID:21969830

  7. R&D for Safety Codes and Standards: Materials and Components Compatibility

    SciTech Connect

    San Marchi, Christopher W.

    2014-08-01

    A principal challenge to the widespread adoption of hydrogen infrastructure is the lack of quantifiable data on its safety envelope and concerns about additional risk from hydrogen. To convince regulatory officials, local fire marshals, fuel suppliers, and the public at large that hydrogen refueling is safe for consumer use, the risk to personnel and bystanders must be quantified and minimized to an acceptable level. Such a task requires strong confidence in the safety performance of high pressure hydrogen systems. Developing meaningful materials characterization and qualification methodologies in addition to enhancing understanding of performance of materials is critical to eliminating barriers to the development of safe, low-cost, high-performance high-pressure hydrogen systems for the consumer environment.

  8. Advanced Valve Technology. Volume 2. Materials Compatibility and Liquid Propellant Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1967-11-01

    propellant. It exhibits excellent thermal stability and resistance to catalytic breakdown. It has a lower freezing point and higher boiling point than...general, aluminum alloys and stainless steels are most suitable for use as materials in contact with dry nitrogen tetroxide. The resistance to...their poor corrosive resistance to nitric acid. The chloride content of NTO may also give rise to pitting corrosion, which is a particularly serious

  9. Unmanned Vehicle Material Flammability Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Urban, David L.; Ruff, Gary A.; Minster, Olivier; Toth, Balazs; Fernandez-Pello, A. Carlos; Tien, James S.; Torero, Jose L.; Cowlard, Adam J.; Legros, Guillaume; Eigenbrod, Christian; Smirnov, Nickolay; Fujita, Osamu; Rouvreau, Sebastien; Jomaas, Grunde

    2012-01-01

    Microgravity fire behaviour remains poorly understood and a significant risk for spaceflight An experiment is under development that will provide the first real opportunity to examine this issue focussing on two objectives: a) Flame Spread. b) Material Flammability. This experiment has been shown to be feasible on both ESA's ATV and Orbital Science's Cygnus vehicles with the Cygnus as the current base-line carrier. An international topical team has been formed to develop concepts for that experiment and support its implementation: a) Pressure Rise prediction. b) Sample Material Selection. This experiment would be a landmark for spacecraft fire safety with the data and subsequent analysis providing much needed verification of spacecraft fire safety protocols for the crews of future exploration vehicles and habitats.

  10. Space Systems - Safety and Compatibility of Materials - Method to Determine the Ignition Susceptibility of Materials or Components to Particle Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this International Technical Specification is to provide a method to determine the ignition susceptibility of materials and components to particle impact. The method can be used to determine the conditions at which ignition and consumption of a specimen material occurs when impacted by single or multiple particles entrained in a flow of gaseous oxygen (GOX). Alternatively, the method can be used to determine if a specific material or component is subject to ignition and sustained combustion in a given flow environment when impacted by single or multiple particles entrained in a flow of GOX.

  11. Cibachrome testing. [photographic processing and printing materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weinstein, M. S.

    1974-01-01

    The use of Cibachrome products as a solution to problems encountered when contact printing Kodak film type SO-397 onto Kodak Ektrachrome color reversal paper type 1993 is investigated. A roll of aerial imagery consisting of Kodak film types SO-397 and 2443 was contact printed onto Cibachrome and Kodak materials and compared in terms of color quality, resolution, cost, and compatibility with existing equipment and techniques. Objective measurements are given in terms of resolution and sensitometric response. Comparison prints and transparencies were viewed and ranked according to overall quality and aesthetic appeal. It is recommended that Cibachrome Print material be used in place of Kodak Ektachrome paper because it is more easily processed, the cost is equivalent, and it provides improved resolution, color quality, and image fade resistance.

  12. Usability testing and requirements derivation for EMU-compatible electrical connectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reaux, Ray A.; Griffin, Thomas J.; Lewis, Ruthan

    1989-01-01

    On-orbit servicing of payloads is simplified when a spacecraft has been designed for serviceability. A key design criterion for a serviceable spaceraft is standardization of electrical connectors. This paper investigates the effects of extravehicular mobility unit (EMU) glove size, connector size, and connector type on usability of electrical connectors. An experiment was conducted exploring participants' ability to mate and demate connectors in an evacuated glovebox. Independent variables were two EMU glove-sizes, five connector size groups, and seven connector types. Significant differences in performance times and heart rate changes during mate and demate operations were found. Subjective assessments of connectors were collected from participants with a usability questionnaire. The data were used to derive design recommendations for a NASA-recommended EMU-compatible electrical connector.

  13. Aircraft Material Fire Test Handbook

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    or inconel tubes, or equivalent shall be provided. The thermocou- pies shall be aligned in a row 1.0 ± 0.1 in (25 ± 3 mm) apart. 11.3.3 Heat Flux...152 mm) m 1. l2 3 4 5 Material: 0.031 in inconel - -sA - - -111 2 3 A = Burner extension tube O D (127 mm) Figure 11-1. Burner Extension Funnel 11-10...or inconel tubes or equivalent shall be provided.3 The thermocou- ples shall be aligned in a row 1.0 +/0.1 in (25 +/2 mm) apart. 12.3.3 Heating Rate

  14. Investigation of Polymer Resin/Fiber Compatibility in Natural Fiber Reinforced Composite Automotive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Huang, Cheng; Simmons, Kevin L.

    2010-01-01

    Natural fibers represent a lower density and potentially lower cost alternative to glass fibers for reinforcement of polymers in automotive composites. The high specific modulus and strength of bast fibers make them an attractive option to replace glass not only in non-structural automotive components, but also in semi-structural and structural components. Significant barriers to insertion of bast fibers in the fiber reinforced automotive composite market include the high moisture uptake of this lignocellulosic material relative to glass and the weak inherent interface between natural fibers and automotive resins. This work seeks to improve the moisture uptake and resin interfacing properties of natural fibers through improved fundamental understanding of fiber physiochemical architecture and development of tailored fiber surface modification strategies.

  15. Physical properties of nano-HAs/ZrO2 coating on surface of titanium materials used in dental-implants and its biological compatibility.

    PubMed

    Pang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Yong

    2012-02-01

    A gradient composite coating on the surface of titanium materials, which are used in dental implants, is prepared using an electric-chemical method. The physical properties of the composite coating and its strength of combining with titanium material are studied by the scanning electron microscope, energy dispersive spectrum and X-ray diffraction analysis, etc. The results show that the nanohydroxyapatite/ZrO2 composite coating is uniformly deposited and formed on the surface of titanium materials, its strength of combining with titanium surface reaches 16.3 MPa, which is determined by the tensile test. The immersion experiment shows that a new matter of carbonate-apatite is distributed uniformly on the surface of the composite coating of nanohydroxyapatite/ZrO2. The cell experiment of cultivate exhibits that the osteoblasts MG-63 is also grown well on the surface of the composite coating. These results indicate that the nanohydroxyapatite/ZrO2 composite coating on the surface of titanium materials has a good biological activity and compatibility and could be used in the dental-implants.

  16. An Overview of Demise Calculations, Conceptual Design Studies, and Hydrazine Compatibility Testing for the GPM Core Spacecraft Propellant Tank

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Estes, Robert H.; Moore, N. R.

    2007-01-01

    NASA's Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) mission is an ongoing Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) project whose basic objective is to improve global precipitation measurements. It has been decided that the GPM spacecraft is to be a "design for demise" spacecraft. This requirement resulted in the need for a propellant tank that would also demise or ablate to an appropriate degree upon re-entry. This paper will describe GSFC-performed spacecraft and tankage demise analyses, vendor conceptual design studies, and vendor performed hydrazine compatibility and wettability tests performed on 6061 and 2219 aluminum alloys.

  17. Isothermal Calorimetric Observations of the Effect of Welding on Compatibility of Stainless Steels with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy

    2003-01-01

    High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide (HTP) is receiving renewed interest as a monopropellant and as the oxidizer for bipropellant systems. HTP is hydrogen peroxide having concentrations ranging from 70 to 98%. In these applications the energy and oxygen released during decomposition of HTP is used for propulsion. In propulsion systems components must be fabricated and connected using available joining processes. Welding is a common joining method for metallic components. The goal of this study was to compare the HTP compatibility of welded vs. unwelded stainless steel.

  18. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Materials

    SciTech Connect

    R. K. Blandford; D. K. Morton; T. E. Rahl; S. D. Snow

    2005-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates (10 to 200 per second) during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these materials under dynamic (impact) loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. The goal of the work presented in this paper was to improve understanding of moderate strain rate phenomena on these materials. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and relatively large test specimens (1/2-inch thick), initial test efforts focused on the tensile behavior of specific stainless steel materials during impact loading. Impact tests of 304L and 316L stainless steel test specimens at two different strain rates, 25 per second (304L and 316L material) and 50 per second (304L material) were performed for comparison to their quasi-static tensile test properties. Elevated strain rate stress-strain curves for the two materials were determined using the impact test machine and a “total impact energy” approach. This approach considered the deformation energy required to strain the specimens at a given strain rate. The material data developed was then utilized in analytical simulations to validate the final elevated stress-strain curves. The procedures used during testing and the results obtained are described in this paper.

  19. Recent advances in X-ray compatible microfluidics for applications in soft materials and life sciences.

    PubMed

    Ghazal, Aghiad; Lafleur, Josiane P; Mortensen, Kell; Kutter, Jörg P; Arleth, Lise; Jensen, Grethe V

    2016-11-01

    The increasingly narrow and brilliant beams at X-ray facilities reduce the requirements for both sample volume and data acquisition time. This creates new possibilities for the types and number of sample conditions that can be examined but simultaneously increases the demands in terms of sample preparation. Microfluidic-based sample preparation techniques have emerged as elegant alternatives that can be integrated directly into the experimental X-ray setup remedying several shortcomings of more traditional methods. We review the use of microfluidic devices in conjunction with X-ray measurements at synchrotron facilities in the context of 1) mapping large parameter spaces, 2) performing time resolved studies of mixing-induced kinetics, and 3) manipulating/processing samples in ways which are more demanding or not accessible on the macroscale. The review covers the past 15 years and focuses on applications where synchrotron data collection is performed in situ, i.e. directly on the microfluidic platform or on a sample jet from the microfluidic device. Considerations such as the choice of materials and microfluidic designs are addressed. The combination of microfluidic devices and measurements at large scale X-ray facilities is still emerging and far from mature, but it definitely offers an exciting array of new possibilities.

  20. Compatibility of plastics with cytotoxic drug solutions-comparison of polyethylene with other container materials.

    PubMed

    Beitz, C; Bertsch, T; Hannak, D; Schrammel, W; Einberger, C; Wehling, M

    1999-08-05

    In this study low density polyethylene (LDPE)-containers were compared to glass bottles and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) bags in view of adsorption effects with antineoplastic drugs. The infusion containers were supplemented with therapeutic doses of the nine common cytotoxic drugs carboplatin, carmustine, cytarabine, dacarbazine, fluorouracil, gemcitabine, melphalan, methotrexate and vinorelbine. 0.9% isotonic sodium chloride solution and 5% dextrose served as infusion solutions. The containers were stored at room temperature or at 4 degrees C, protected from light, for periods of up to 168 h. Turbidity, change of colour and visible crystallization were not observed. Samples were collected at different time intervals and drug contents were determined with high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Preparations of carmustine showed no adsorption phenomena when stored in LDPE or in glass at 4 degrees C. At room temperature in LDPE, a slight decrease in concentration due to adsorption was monitored. However the drug loss in PVC bags was greater. Dacarbazine and melphalan showed decreases in concentration, which were independent on the type of container material. The remaining analyzed agents showed no drug loss at all. In conclusion, investigated drugs were stable in all three container types, with the best stability in glass bottles, followed by LDPE and PVC.

  1. Advanced Compatibility Characterization Of AF-M315E With Spacecraft Propulsion System Materials Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McClure, Mark B.; Greene, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    All spacecraft require propulsion systems for thrust and maneuvering. Propulsion systems can be chemical, nuclear, electrical, cold gas or combinations thereof. Chemical propulsion has proven to be the most reliable technology since the deployment of launch vehicles. Performance, storability, and handling are three important aspects of liquid chemical propulsion. Bipropellant systems require a fuel and an oxidizer for propulsion, but monopropellants only require a fuel and a catalyst for propulsion and are therefore simpler and lighter. Hydrazine is the state of the art propellant for monopropellant systems, but has drawbacks because it is highly hazardous to human health, which requires extensive care in handling, complex ground ops due to safety and environmental considerations, and lengthy turnaround times for reusable spacecraft. All users of hydrazine monopropellant must contend with these issues and their associated costs. The development of a new monopropellant, intended to replace hydrazine, has been in progress for years. This project will apply advanced techniques to characterize the engineering properties of materials used in AF-M315E propulsion systems after propellant exposure. AF-M315E monopropellant has been selected HQ's Green Propellant Infusion Mission (GPIM) to replace toxic hydrazine for improved performance and reduce safety and health issues that will shorten reusable spacecraft turn-around time. In addition, this project will fundamentally strengthen JSC's core competency to evaluate, use and infuse liquid propellant systems.

  2. Evaluation of Students' Views about the Use of SCORM (Sharable Content Object Reference Model)-Compatible Materials in Physics Teaching

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonen, Selahattin; Basaran, Bulent

    2013-01-01

    In the present study, a web site including instructional materials such as Whiteboard Movies (WBM), simulations and animations and testing materials such as true-false, fill-in-the-blanks, puzzles, open-ended questions and multiple-choice questions was designed. The study was carried out with 76 students attending Dicle College (DC), Diyarbakir…

  3. Quarantine testing and biocharacterization of lunar materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, G. R.; Mieszkuc, B. J.; Simmonds, R. C.; Walkinshaw, C. H.

    1975-01-01

    Quarantine testing was conducted to ensure the safety of all life on earth. The plants and animals which were exposed to lunar material were carefully observed for prolonged periods to determine if any mutation or changes in growing characteristics and behavior occurred. The quarantine testing was terminated after the Apollo 14 flight when it became apparent that previously returned lunar material contained no potentially harmful agents. Further biological experimentation with the lunar material was conducted to determine its chemical, physical, and nutritional qualities.

  4. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800{degree}C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280{degree}F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

  5. Thermal testing of solid neutron shielding materials

    SciTech Connect

    Boonstra, R.H.

    1992-09-01

    Two legal-weight truck casks the GA-4 and GA-9, will carry four PWR and nine BWR spent fuel assemblies, respectively. Each cask has a solid neutron shielding material separating the steel body and the outer steel skin. In the thermal accident specified by NRC regulations in 10CFR Part 71, the cask is subjected to an 800[degree]C environment for 30 minutes. The neutron shield need not perform any shielding function during or after the thermal accident, but its behavior must not compromise the ability of the cask to contain the radioactive contents. In May-June 1989 the first series of full-scale thermal tests was performed on three shielding materials: Bisco Products NS-4-FR, and Reactor Experiments RX-201 and RX-207. The tests are described in Thermal Testing of Solid Neutron Shielding Materials, GA-AL 9897, R. H. Boonstra, General Atomics (1990), and demonstrated the acceptability of these materials in a thermal accident. Subsequent design changes to the cask rendered these materials unattractive in terms of weight or adequate service temperature margin. For the second test series, a material specification was developed for a polypropylene based neutron shield with a softening point of at least 280[degree]F. The neutron shield materials tested were boronated (0.8--4.5%) polymers (polypropylene, HDPE, NS-4). The Envirotech and Bisco materials are not polypropylene, but were tested as potential backup materials in the event that a satisfactory polypropylene could not be found.

  6. National Tests and Education Reform: Are They Compatible? William H. Angoff Memorial Lecture Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lyle V.

    The President and the Department of Education have advocated national testing, but they have not really justified their use. Most educators argue for the importance of multiple assessments, rather than a single test of achievement with great impact on the future of a student and an educational system. Misuses of test results would plague national…

  7. Antibacterial properties and human gingival fibroblast cell compatibility of TiO2/Ag compound coatings and ZnO films on titanium-based material.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yin-Yu; Lai, Chih-Ho; Hsu, Jui-Ting; Tang, Chih-Hsin; Liao, Wan-Chuen; Huang, Heng-Li

    2012-02-01

    Titanium (Ti)-based materials are widely used in biomedical implant components and are applied successfully in various types of bone-anchored reconstructions. However, in dental implants the Ti materials contact not only bone but also gingival tissues, and are partially exposed to the oral cavity that includes bacteria. This study used titania and silver (TiO(2)/Ag) compound coatings and zinc oxide (ZnO) films to enhance the antibacterial activity of the Ti-based implant. The hydrophobicity of each sample was examined by measuring the contact angle. Streptococcus mutans and human gingival fibroblast (HGF) was cultured on the coated samples, and the antibacterial effects and cell compatibility were determined using a Syto9 fluorescence staining and MTT methods. For the TiO(2)/Ag samples, depositing Ag on the plate at a higher power (which increased the proportion of Ag) increased the contact angle and the hydrophobicity. The bacterial count was lowest for the 50 W TiO(2)/Ag sample, which contained 5.9% Ag. The contact angles of the ZnO samples did not show the same tendency. The antibacterial effect was higher on ZnO-coated samples since bacterial count was threefold lower on ZnO samples as compared to control samples (Ti plate). From the MTT assay test, the mean optical density values for TiO(2)/Ag-coated samples after 72 h of HGF adhesion were similar to the value obtained from the uncoated Ti. However, biocompatibility was lower on ZnO films than in control samples. Conclusively, the antibacterial activity was higher but the cell compatibility was lower on ZnO films than on TiO(2)/Ag coatings.

  8. Chemical Retraction Agents - in vivo and in vitro Studies into their Physico-Chemical Properties, Biocompatibility with Gingival Margin Tissues and Compatibility with Elastomer Impression Materials.

    PubMed

    Nowakowska, Danuta; Saczko, Jolanta; Kulbacka, Julita; Więckiewicz, Włodzimierz

    2016-04-18

    Gingival margin retraction/displacement (GMR/D) is a commonly accepted procedure in restorative dentistry. Of the various retraction methods, the chemo-mechanical approach with retraction media and chemical retraction agents (ChRAs) is the most used. Different local and/or systemic side effects were observed after "chemical attacks" from these retraction agents. Moreover, no consensus exists as to the compatibility of chemical agents with different impression materials. This paper reports the findings of in vivo and in vitro studies and we discuss the physico-chemical properties of chemical retraction agents, their undesirable clinical side effects, biological activity and compatibility with selected groups of elastomer impression materials.

  9. Methods and instruments for materials testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansma, Paul (Inventor); Drake, Barney (Inventor); Rehn, Douglas (Inventor); Adams, Jonathan (Inventor); Lulejian, Jason (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    Methods and instruments for characterizing a material, such as the properties of bone in a living human subject, using a test probe constructed for insertion into the material and a reference probe aligned with the test probe in a housing. The housing is hand held or placed so that the reference probe contacts the surface of the material under pressure applied either by hand or by the weight of the housing. The test probe is inserted into the material to indent the material while maintaining the reference probe substantially under the hand pressure or weight of the housing allowing evaluation of a property of the material related to indentation of the material by the probe. Force can be generated by a voice coil in a magnet structure to the end of which the test probe is connected and supported in the magnet structure by a flexure, opposing flexures, a linear translation stage, or a linear bearing. Optionally, a measurement unit containing the test probe and reference probe is connected to a base unit with a wireless connection, allowing in the field material testing.

  10. Material testing of silicon carbide mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witkin, David B.; Palusinski, Iwona A.

    2009-08-01

    The Aerospace Corporation is developing a space qualification method for silicon carbide optical systems that covers material verification through system development. One of the initial efforts has been to establish testing protocols for material properties. Three different tests have been performed to determine mechanical properties of SiC: modulus of rupture, equibiaxial flexural strength and fracture toughness. Testing materials and methods have been in accordance with the respective ASTM standards. Material from four vendors has been tested to date, as part of the MISSE flight program and other programs. Data analysis has focused on the types of issues that are important when building actual components- statistical modeling of test results, understanding batch-to-batch or other source material variations, and relating mechanical properties to microstructures. Mechanical properties are needed as inputs to design trade studies and development and analysis of proof tests, and to confirm or understand the results of non-destructive evaluations of the source materials. Measuring these properties using standardized tests on a statistically valid number of samples is intended to increase confidence for purchasers of SiC spacecraft components that materials and structures will perform as intended at the highest level of reliability.

  11. Space simulation test for thermal control materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hardgrove, W. R.

    1990-01-01

    Tests were run in TRW's Combined Environment Facility to examine the degradation of thermal control materials in a simulated space environment. Thermal control materials selected for the test were those presently being used on spacecraft or predicted to be used within the next few years. The geosynchronous orbit environment was selected as the most interesting. One of the goals was to match degradation of those materials with available flight data. Another aim was to determine if degradation can adequately be determined with accelerated or short term ground tests.

  12. Improved Thermal-Vacuum Compatible Flat Plate Radiometric Source For System-Level Testing Of Optical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-01-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance.

  13. The UK national external quality assessment scheme in blood group serology. Compatibility testing 1981-1982: performance and practice.

    PubMed

    Holburn, A M; Prior, D

    1984-01-01

    The design of exercises of compatibility testing was modified in 1981 in order better to accommodate participants' serological practices. Ten reference laboratories were also enrolled in order to determine the 'correct' results for each exercise. In 1981-1982 3.5 to 36% of participants missed incompatibilities in exercises in which undiluted antibodies were issued and this did not represent an improvement over performance obtained in 1979-1980. Surveys were undertaken of antiglobulin test procedures and revealed that serological practices continue to change, old techniques are being modified, new techniques are being employed but standardization shows little overall improvement. Surveys of quality control procedures and of cross-match procedures for agglutination in albumin and for agglutination of enzyme treated cells show equal lack of standardization.

  14. Improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source for system-level testing of remote optical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwarz, Mark A.; Kent, Craig J.; Bousquet, Robert; Brown, Steven W.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we describe an improved thermal-vacuum compatible flat plate radiometric source which has been developed and utilized for the characterization and calibration of remote optical sensors. This source is unique in that it can be used in situ, in both ambient and thermal-vacuum environments, allowing it to follow the sensor throughout its testing cycle. The performance of the original flat plate radiometric source was presented at the 2009 SPIE1. Following the original efforts, design upgrades were incorporated into the source to improve both radiometric throughput and uniformity. The pre-thermal-vacuum (pre-TVAC) testing results of a spacecraft-level optical sensor with the improved flat plate illumination source, both in ambient and vacuum environments, are presented. We also briefly discuss potential FPI configuration changes in order to improve its radiometric performance. Keywords: Calibration, radiometry, remote sensing, source.

  15. Analytical Ultrasonics in Materials Research and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vary, A.

    1986-01-01

    Research results in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing structural materials from metals and ceramics to composites are presented. General topics covered by the conference included: status and advances in analytical ultrasonics for characterizing material microstructures and mechanical properties; status and prospects for ultrasonic measurements of microdamage, degradation, and underlying morphological factors; status and problems in precision measurements of frequency-dependent velocity and attenuation for materials analysis; procedures and requirements for automated, digital signal acquisition, processing, analysis, and interpretation; incentives for analytical ultrasonics in materials research and materials processing, testing, and inspection; and examples of progress in ultrasonics for interrelating microstructure, mechanical properites, and dynamic response.

  16. Compression Testing of Textile Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masters, John E.

    1996-01-01

    The applicability of existing test methods, which were developed primarily for laminates made of unidirectional prepreg tape, to textile composites is an area of concern. The issue is whether the values measured for the 2-D and 3-D braided, woven, stitched, and knit materials are accurate representations of the true material response. This report provides a review of efforts to establish a compression test method for textile reinforced composite materials. Experimental data have been gathered from several sources and evaluated to assess the effectiveness of a variety of test methods. The effectiveness of the individual test methods to measure the material's modulus and strength is determined. Data are presented for 2-D triaxial braided, 3-D woven, and stitched graphite/epoxy material. However, the determination of a recommended test method and specimen dimensions is based, primarily, on experimental results obtained by the Boeing Defense and Space Group for 2-D triaxially braided materials. They evaluated seven test methods: NASA Short Block, Modified IITRI, Boeing Open Hole Compression, Zabora Compression, Boeing Compression after Impact, NASA ST-4, and a Sandwich Column Test.

  17. U.S. Contribution 1994 Summary Report Task T12: Compatibility and irradiation testing of vanadium alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, D.L.

    1995-03-01

    Vanadium alloys exhibit important advantages as a candidate structural material for fusion first wall/blanket applications. These advantages include fabricability, favorable safety and environmental features, high temperature and high wall load capability, and long lifetime under irradiation. Vanadium alloys with (3-5)% chromium and (3-5)% titanium appear to offer the best combination of properties for first wall/blanket applications. A V-4Cr-4Ti alloy is recommended as the reference composition for the ITER application. This report provides a summary of the R&D conducted during 1994 in support of the ITER Engineering Design Activity. Progress is reported for Vanadium Alloy Production, Welding, Physical Properties, Baseline Mechanical Properties, Corrosion/Compatibility, Neutron Irradiation Effects, Helium Transmutation Effects on Irradiated Alloys, and the Status of Irradiation Experiments. Separate abstracts have been prepared for individual reports from this publication.

  18. Sludge stabilization boat material test plan

    SciTech Connect

    De Vries, M.L.

    1995-04-05

    This document provides instructions for testing different types of potential boat materials in the HC-21C muffle furnace process. The boats must withstand corrosive environments at up to 1000 degrees C.

  19. Ares I-X USS Material Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dawicke, David S.; Smith, Stephen W.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2008-01-01

    An independent assessment was conducted to determine the critical initial flaw size (CIFS) for the flange-to-skin weld in the Ares I-X Upper Stage Simulator (USS). Material characterization tests were conducted to quantify the material behavior for use in the CIFS analyses. Fatigue crack growth rate, Charpy impact, and fracture tests were conducted on the parent and welded A516 Grade 70 steel. The crack growth rate tests confirmed that the material behaved in agreement with literature data and that a salt water environment would not significantly degrade the fatigue resistance. The Charpy impact tests confirmed that the fracture resistance of the material did not have a significant reduction for the expected operational temperatures of the vehicle.

  20. Compatibility evaluation between La 2Mo 2O 9 fast oxide-ion conductor and Ni-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbel, Gwenaël; Lacorre, Philippe

    2006-05-01

    The chemical reactivity of La 2NiO 4+δ and nickel metal or nickel oxide with fast oxide-ion conductor La 2Mo 2O 9 is investigated in the annealing temperature range between 600 and 1000 °C, using room temperature X-ray powder diffraction. Within the La 2NiO 4+δ/La 2Mo 2O 9 system, subsequent reaction is evidenced at relatively low annealing temperature (600 °C), with formation of La 2MoO 6 and NiO. The reaction is complete at 1000 °C. At reverse, no reaction occurs between Ni or NiO and La 2Mo 2O 9 up to 1000 °C. Together with a previous work [G. Corbel, S. Mestiri, P. Lacorre, Solid State Sci. 7 (2005) 1216], the current study shows that Ni-CGO cermets might be chemically and mechanically compatible anode materials to work with LAMOX electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells.

  1. Vacuum-compatible, ultra-low material budget Micro-Vertex Detector of the compressed baryonic matter experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koziel, Michal; Amar-Youcef, Samir; Bialas, Norbert; Deveaux, Michael; Fröhlich, Ingo; Klaus, Philipp; Michel, Jan; Milanović, Borislav; Müntz, Christian; Stroth, Joachim; Tischler, Tobias; Weirich, Roland; Wiebusch, Michael

    2017-02-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) Experiment is one of the core experiments of the future FAIR facility near Darmstadt (Germany). The fixed-target experiment will explore the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter in the regime of high net baryon densities with numerous probes, among them open charm mesons. The Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) will provide the secondary vertex resolution of ∼ 50 μm along the beam axis, contribute to the background rejection in dielectron spectroscopy, and to the reconstruction of weak decays. The detector comprises four stations placed at 5, 10, 15, and 20 cm downstream the target and inside the target vacuum. The stations will be populated with highly granular CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors, which will feature a spatial resolution of < 5 μm, a non-ionizing radiation tolerance of >1013neq /cm2, an ionizing radiation tolerance of ∼ 3 Mrad, and a readout speed of a few 10 μs/frame. This work introduces the MVD-PRESTO project, which aims at integrating a precursor of the second station of the CBM-MVD meeting the following requirements: material budget of x /X0 < 0.5 %, vacuum compatibility, double-sided sensor integration on a Thermal Pyrolytic Graphite (TPG) carrier, and heat evacuation of about 350 mW/cm2/sensor with a temperature gradient of a few K/cm.

  2. Electronic materials testing in commercial aircraft engines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brand, Dieter

    A device for the electronic testing of materials used in commercial aircraft engines is described. The instrument can be used for ferromagnetic, ferrimagnetic, and nonferromagnetic metallic materials, and it functions either optically or acoustically. The design of the device is described and technical data are given. The device operates under the principle of controlled self-inductivity. Its mode of operation is described.

  3. Advanced Materials Laboratory User Test Planning Guide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orndoff, Evelyne

    2012-01-01

    Test process, milestones and inputs are unknowns to first-time users of the Advanced Materials Laboratory. The User Test Planning Guide aids in establishing expectations for both NASA and non-NASA facility customers. The potential audience for this guide includes both internal and commercial spaceflight hardware/software developers. It is intended to assist their test engineering personnel in test planning and execution. Material covered includes a roadmap of the test process, roles and responsibilities of facility and user, major milestones, facility capabilities, and inputs required by the facility. Samples of deliverables, test article interfaces, and inputs necessary to define test scope, cost, and schedule are included as an appendix to the guide.

  4. Local realistic photon model compatible with Malus' law for experiments testing Bell's inequalities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrero, M.; Santos, E.

    1985-04-01

    A local realistic model is proposed that agrees approximately with quantum mechanics in the predictions about experiments testing Bell's inequalities by measuring polarization correlations of photon pairs emitted in atomic cascades. No free parameters exist, except polarizer efficiencies, which may be measured independently using Malus' law.

  5. CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Report

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Dave Grimmett; Bryan McEnerney

    2007-01-31

    This report provides detailed test results consisting of test data and post-test inspections from Task 1 ''Cooled Liner Coupon Development and Test'' of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources--Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The primary objective of this development and test program is to verify that ceramic matrix composite (CMC) liner materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will successfully withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) designed and fabricated the cooled liner test assembly article that was tested in a slagging gasifier at CANMET Energy Technology Center (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada. The test program conducted in 2006 met the objective of operating the cooled liner test article at slagging conditions in a small scale coal gasifier at CETC-O for over the planned 100 hours. The test hardware was exposed to at least 30 high temperature excursions (including start-up and shut-down cycles) during the test program. The results of the testing has provided valuable information on gasifier startup and required cooling controls in steady state operation of future advanced gasifiers using similar liners. The test program also provided a significant amount of information in the areas of CMC materials and processing for improved capability in a gasifier environment and insight into CMC liner fabrication that will be essential for near-term advanced gasifier projects.

  6. Electrostatic testing of thin plastic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skinner, S. Ballou

    1988-01-01

    Ten thin plastic materials (Velostat, RCAS 1200, Llumalloy, Herculite 80, RCAS 2400, Wrightlon 7000, PVC, Aclar 22A, Mylar, and Polyethylene) were tested for electrostatic properties by four different devices: (1) The static decay meter, (2) the manual triboelectric testing device, (3) the robotic triboelectric testing device, and (4) the resistivity measurement adapter device. The static decay meter measured the electrostatic decay rates in accordance with the Federal Test Method Standard 101B, Method 4046. The manual and the robotic triboelectric devices measured the triboelectric generated peak voltages and the five-second decay voltages in accordance with the criteria for acceptance standards at Kennedy Space Center. The resistivity measurement adapter measured the surface resistivity of each material. An analysis was made to correlate the data among the four testing devices. For the material tested the pass/fail results were compared for the 4046 method and the triboelectric testing devices. For the limited number of materials tested, the relationship between decay rate and surface resistivity was investigated as well as the relationship between triboelectric peak voltage and surface resistivity.

  7. IHE material qualification tests description and criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Slape, R J

    1984-06-01

    This report describes the qualification tests presently being used at Pantex Plant, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, and Los Alamos National Laboratory that are required by the Department of Energy prior to the approval for an explosive as an Insensitive High Explosive (IHE) material. The acceptance criteria of each test for IHE qualification is also discussed. 5 references, 10 figures.

  8. CANMET Gasifier Liner Coupon Material Test Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mark Fitzsimmons; Alan Darby; Fred Widman

    2005-10-30

    The test plan detailed in this topical report supports Task 1 of the project titled ''Development of Technologies and Capabilities for Coal Energy Resources - Advanced Gasification Systems Development (AGSD)''. The purpose of these tests is to verify that materials planned for use in an advanced gasifier pilot plant will withstand the environments in a commercial gasifier. Pratt & Whitney Rocketdyne (PWR) has developed and designed the cooled liner test assembly article that will be tested at CANMET Energy Technology Centre (CETC-O) in Ottawa, Ontario, Canada (CETC-O). The Test Plan TP-00364 is duplicated in its entirety, with formatting changes to comply with the format required for this Topical Report. The table of contents has been modified to include the additional material required by this topical report. Test Request example and drawings of non-proprietary nature are also included as appendices.

  9. Small crack test program for helicopter materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Annigeri, Bal; Schneider, George

    1994-01-01

    Crack propagation tests were conducted to determine crack growth behavior in five helicopter materials for surface cracks between 0.005 to 0.020 inches in depth. Constant amplitude tests were conducted at stress ratios R equals 0.1 and 0.5, and emphasis was placed on near threshold data (i.e., 10-8 to 10-6 inches/cycle). Spectrum tests were conducted using a helicopter spectrum. The test specimen was an unnotched tension specimen, and cracks were initiated from a small EDM notch. An optical/video system was used to monitor crack growth. The material for the test specimens was obtained from helicopter part forgings. Testing was conducted at stresses below yield to reflect actual stresses in helicopter parts.

  10. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2003-08-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a reasonably high alkali content, thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was well within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that the aggressive alkali-iron-trisulfate constituent was present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. This report provides the results of the evaluation of Test Section C, including the samples that remained in the Test Section for the full exposure period as well as those that were removed early. The analysis of Test Section C followed much the same protocol that was employed in the assessment of Test Section A. Again, the focus was on determining and documenting the relative corrosion rates of the candidate materials. The detailed results of the investigation are included in this report as a series of twelve appendices. Each appendix is devoted to the performance of one of the candidate alloys. The table below summarizes metal loss rate for the worst case sample of each of the candidate materials for both Test Sections A and C

  11. The "edge effect" with patch test materials.

    PubMed

    Fyad, A; Masmoudi, M L; Lachapelle, J M

    1987-03-01

    A positive "edge effect", i.e., the accumulation on the skin of a chemical solution (such as fluorescein 0.01% in a 50/50 water-ethanol solution) at the periphery of the patch test sites has been demonstrated. It occurs with different test materials (Finn Chamber; Silver Patch Test; Patch Test Chamber). Practical implications are discussed: this observation could be important when discussing results of laboratory investigations. In clinical practice, it could explain the occurrence of "ring-shaped" positive allergic patch test reactions to chemicals used in solution, i.e., Kathon CG or hydrocortisone.

  12. Penetrometer compatible, fiber-optic sensor for continuous monitoring of chlorinated hydrocarbons -- field test results

    SciTech Connect

    Milanovich, F.P.; Brown, S.B.; Colston, B.W. Jr.

    1993-04-01

    We have developed and field tested a fiber optic chemical sensor for use in environmental monitoring and remediation. The principle of detection is colorimetric and is based on an irreversible chemical reaction between a specific reagent and the target compound. The formation of reaction products are monitored remotely with optical fibers. Successive or on-demand measurements are made possible with a reagent reservoir and a miniature pumping system. The sensor has been evaluated against gas chromatography standards and has demonstrated accuracy and sensitivity (>5ppb w/w) sufficient for the environmental monitoring of the contaminants triceoroethlyene (TCE) and chloroform. The sensor system can be used for bench-top analyses or for in-situ measurements such as groundwater and vadose monitoring wells or in Penetrometry mediated placements.

  13. Isothermal Calorimetric Observations of the Affect of Welding on Compatibility of Stainless Steels with High-Test Hydrogen Peroxide Propellant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gostowski, Rudy C.

    2002-01-01

    Compatibility is determined by the surface area, the chemical constituency and the surface finish of a material. In this investigation exposed area is obviously not a factor as the welded samples had a slightly smaller surface than the unwelded, but were more reactive. The chemical makeup of welded CRES 316L and welded CRES 304L have been observed in the literature to change from the parent material as chromium and iron are segregated in zones. In particular, the ratio of chromium to iron in CRES 316L increased from 0.260 to 0.79 in the heat affected zone (HAZ) of the weld and to 1.52 in the weld bead itself. In CRES 304L the ratio of chromium to iron increased from 0.280 to 0.44 in the HAZ and to 0.33 in the weld bead. It is possible that the increased reactivity of the welded samples and of those welded without purge gas is due to this segregation phenomenon. Likewise the reactivity increased in keeping with the greater roughness of the welded and welded without purge gas samples. Therefore enhanced roughness may also be responsible for the increased reactivity.

  14. Materials compatibility in Dish-Stirling solar generators using Cu-Si-Mg eutectic for latent heat storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruizenga, A. M.; Withey, E. A.; Andraka, C. E.; Gibbs, P. J.

    2016-05-01

    Dish-Stirling systems are a strong candidate to meet cost production goals for solar thermal power production. Thermal energy storage improves the capacity factor of thermal power systems; copper-silicon-magnesium eutectic alloys have been investigated as potential latent heat storage materials. This work examines the ability of commercially available plasma spray coatings to serve as protective barriers with these alloys, while highlighting mechanistic insights into materials for latent heat storage systems. Computed tomography was leveraged as a rapid screening tool to assess the presence of localized attack in tested coatings.

  15. Erosion testing of hard materials and coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hawk, Jeffrey A.

    2005-04-29

    Erosion is the process by which unconstrained particles, usually hard, impact a surface, creating damage that leads to material removal and component failure. These particles are usually very small and entrained in fluid of some type, typically air. The damage that occurs as a result of erosion depends on the size of the particles, their physical characteristics, the velocity of the particle/fluid stream, and their angle of impact on the surface of interest. This talk will discuss the basics of jet erosion testing of hard materials, composites and coatings. The standard test methods will be discussed as well as alternative approaches to determining the erosion rate of materials. The damage that occurs will be characterized in genera1 terms, and examples will be presented for the erosion behavior of hard materials and coatings (both thick and thin).

  16. Comparison of Environmentally Friendly Space Compatible Grease to its Predecessor in a Space Mechanism Bearing Test Rig

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jett, T. R.; Baker, M. A.; Thom, R. L.

    1997-01-01

    Perfluoroakylpolyether (PFPE) greases are used extensively in critical flight hardware in a space environment. In the past, these greases have been processed using chlorofluorocarbon (CFC) based solvents. In response to the recent ban of CFC's, new formulations of environmentally friendly PFPE greases that are not processed with CFC based solvents were developed. The purpose of this study was to compare the performance of a new environmentally friendly formulation PFPE grease to a previously proven space compatible formulation PFPE grease. A one year test using 20 small electrical motors (two bearings per motor) was conducted in a high vacuum environment(2.0 x 10(exp 4)) Torr at a temperature of 90 C. Twenty bearings were lubricated with a new environmentally friendly formulation, and twenty bearings were lubricated with an old formulation. The mass of each lubricated bearing was measured both pre and post test. Along with mass loss measurements a profilometer trace was taken to measure post test wear of the bearings. In addition the bearings were visually examined and analyzed using an optical microscope.

  17. Principles for supplying virus-tested material.

    PubMed

    Varveri, Christina; Maliogka, Varvara I; Kapari-Isaia, Theodora

    2015-01-01

    Production of virus-tested material of vegetatively propagated crops through national certification schemes has been implemented in many developed countries for more than 60 years and its importance for being the best virus control means is well acknowledged by growers worldwide. The two most important elements of certification schemes are the use of sensitive, reliable, and rapid detection techniques to check the health status of the material produced and effective and simple sanitation procedures for the elimination of viruses if present in candidate material before it enters the scheme. New technologies such as next-generation sequencing platforms are expected to further enhance the efficiency of certification and production of virus-tested material, through the clarification of the unknown etiology of several graft-transmissible diseases. The successful production of virus-tested material is a demanding procedure relying on the close collaboration of researchers, official services, and the private sector. Moreover, considerable efforts have been made by regional plant protection organizations such as the European and Mediterranean Plant Protection Organization (EPPO), the North American Plant Protection Organization (NAPPO), and the European Union and the USA to harmonize procedures, methodologies, and techniques in order to assure the quality, safety, and movement of the vegetatively propagated material produced around the world.

  18. Shock Tube Test for Energy Absorbing Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-13

    Compressed  Air  Cylinder Driver  Section Driven  Section Max Driver  Pressure: 200 PSI Diaphragm Striker Material Nylon Striker Face Diameter...part of a study of materials for an impact attenuating helmet liner project (3). Table 2. Foam materials for testing (7) (8) (9) Manufacturer...including application in helmet liners (8). Zorbium™ is the viscoelastic polyurethane foam used in military helmet suspension system pads (9). 8

  19. Testing of Space Suit Materials for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine

    2016-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may require radical changes in our approach to EVA suit design. A major challenge is the balance of building a suit robust enough to complete 50 EVAs in the dirt under intense UV exposure without losing mechanical strength or compromising its mobility. We conducted ground testing on both current and new space suit materials to determine performance degradation after exposure to 2500 hours of Mars mission equivalent UV. This testing will help mature the material technologies and provide performance data that can be used by not only the space suit development teams but for all Mars inflatable and soft goods derived structures from airlocks to habitats.

  20. Durability Testing of Commercial Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schienle, J. L.

    1996-01-01

    Technical efforts by AlliedSignal Engines in DOE/NASA-funded project from February, 1978 through December, 1995 are reported in the fields ceramic materials for gas turbine engines and cyclic thermal durability testing. A total of 29 materials were evaluated in 40 cyclic oxidation exposure durability tests. Ceramic test bars were cyclically thermally exposed to a hot combustion environment at temperatures up to 1371 C (2500 F) for periods of up to 3500 hours, simulating conditions typically encountered by hot flowpath components in an automotive gas turbine engine. Before and after exposure, quarter-point flexure strength tests were performed on the specimens, and fractography examinations including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) were performed to determine failure origins.

  1. Polymeric Materials for Electro-Optic Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-07-01

    what Langmuir Blodgett films are, how they are grown and deposited on a material, and the electro - optic effects in Langmuir/Blodgett films. Stephen...Kowel has experimented with several different types of organic dyes mixed in the films to increase the electro - optic effect in the films. The bulk of his...test integrated circuits. Keywords: Langmuir Blodgett films, Electro - optic testing, Integrated circuits, Linear electro - optic effect.

  2. Impact testing of textile composite materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portanova, Marc

    1995-01-01

    The objectives of this report were to evaluate the impact damage resistance and damage tolerance of a variety of textile composite materials. Static indentation and impact tests were performed on the stitched and unstitched uniweave composites constructed from AS4/3501-6 Carbon/Epoxy with a fiberglass yarn woven in to hold the fibers together while being stitched. Compression and tension were measured after the tests to determine the damage resistance, residual strength and the damage tolerance of the specimens.

  3. Short and long-term tests of elastomers with hot hostile fluids. Environmental Compatibility Test Program final report

    SciTech Connect

    Friese, G.J.

    1982-12-30

    Equipment manufacturers and elastomer houses were called to find the best currently available high-temperature elastomers. Tensile specimens of 46 such compounds were immersion tested for five days in six 190C fluids of interest: isobutane, brine, ASTM No. 1 oil, ASTM No. 3 oil, Pacer DHT-185M synthetic oil, and Chevron Cylinder Grade 460X oil. The best eight were selected based upon the least change in mechanical properties. These eight were then simultaneously tested (a) by immersion in five 190C fluids for six months and (b) as 0-rings for 46 hours at 190C, 230C, and 265C (accelerated ageing) in three fluids and at a differential pressure of 21 MPa. Based upon these 0-ring tests, four compounds were selected for testing as 0-rings in three 204C fluids at 21 MPa differential pressure. The data were evaluated and conclusions were drawn. Conclusions and recommendations are provided. There was immersion testing of primarily L'Garde compounds in brine and CL3 mineral oil for 6 months at 190C. L'Garde had formulated several compounds specifically for 260C brine, and their applicability to a specific problem was assessed early in the program.

  4. Machine tests crease durability of sheet materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, L. K.; Stanford, H. B.

    1964-01-01

    To test the crease resistance of sheet materials, the mid-section is folded over crease-control blades. One end is clamped to a motor-driven eccentric, the other to a spring, and durability is measured by the cycles required to produce failure.

  5. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat, Amos; Seidt, Jeremy D.

    2015-09-01

    New techniques for dynamic characterization of materials that have been developed in the last three years (since the last DYMAT conference in 2012), and results from recent dynamic testing of Inconel 718 are presented. The first development is a dynamic punch test in which three dimensional Digital Image Correlation (DIC) is used to measure the deformation of the rear surface of a specimen as it being penetrated. The second experimental technique that is under development is a dynamic tension experiment in which full-field strain measurement with DIC and full-field temperature measurement are done simultaneously during the test.

  6. MISSE 6-Testing Materials in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S; Kinard, William H.

    2008-01-01

    The objective of the Materials International Space Station Experiment (MISSE) is to study the performance of novel materials when subjected to the synergistic effects of the harsh space environment by placing them in space environment for several months. In this paper, a few materials and components from NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) that have been flown on MISSE 6 mission will be discussed. These include laser and optical elements for photonic devices. The pre-characterized MISSE 6 materials were packed inside a ruggedized Passive Experiment Container (PEC) that resembles a suitcase. The PEC was tested for survivability due to launch conditions. Subsequently, the MISSE 6 PEC was transported by the STS-123 mission to International Space Station (ISS) on March 11, 2008. The astronauts successfully attached the PEC to external handrails and opened the PEC for long term exposure to the space environment.

  7. Environmentally compatible hand wipe cleaning solvents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clayton, Catherine P.; Kovach, Michael P.

    1995-01-01

    Several solvents of environmental concern have previously been used for hand wipe cleaning of SRB surfaces, including 1,1,1-trichloroethane, perchloroethylene, toluene, xylene, and MEK. USBI determined the major types of surfaces involved, and qualification requirements of replacement cleaning agents. Nineteen environmentally compatible candidates were tested on 33 material substrates with 26 types of potential surface contaminants, involving over 7,000 individual evaluations. In addition to the cleaning performance evaluation, bonding, compatibility, and corrosion tests were conducted. Results showed that one cleaner was not optimum for all surfaces. In most instances, some of the candidates cleaned better than the 1,1,1-trichloroethane baseline control. Aqueous cleaners generally cleaned better, and were more compatible with nonmetallic materials, such as paints, plastics, and elastomers. Organic base cleaners were better on metal surfaces. Five cleaners have been qualified and are now being implemented in SRB hand wipe cleaning operations.

  8. Coal Ash Corrosion Resistant Materials Testing

    SciTech Connect

    D. K. McDonald; P. L. Daniel; D. J. DeVault

    2007-12-31

    In April 1999, three identical superheater test sections were installed into the Niles Unit No.1 for the purpose of testing and ranking the coal ash corrosion resistance of candidate superheater alloys. The Niles boiler burns high sulfur coal (3% to 3.5%) that has a moderate alkali content (0.2% sodium equivalents), thus the constituents necessary for coal ash corrosion are present in the ash. The test sections were controlled to operate with an average surface metal temperature from approximately 1060 F to 1210 F which was within the temperature range over which coal ash corrosion occurs. Thus, this combination of aggressive environment and high temperature was appropriate for testing the performance of candidate corrosion-resistant tube materials. Analyses of the deposit and scale confirmed that aggressive alkali sulfate constituents were present at the metal surface and active in tube metal wastage. The test sections were constructed so that the response of twelve different candidate tube and/or coating materials could be studied. The plan was to remove and evaluate one of the three test sections at time intervals of 1 year, 3 years, and 5 years. This would permit an assessment of performance of the candidate materials as a function of time. Test Section A was removed in November 2001 after about 24 months of service at the desired steam temperature set point, with about 15.5 months of exposure at full temperature. A progress report, issued in October 2002, was written to document the performance of the candidate alloys in that test section. The evaluation described the condition of each tube sample after exposure. It involved a determination of the rate of wall thickness loss for these samples. In cases where there was more than one sample of a candidate material in the test section, an assessment was made of the performance of the alloy as a function of temperature. Test Sections B and C were examined during the November 2001 outage, and it was decided that

  9. ESTEC wiring test programme materials related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judd, M. D.

    1994-01-01

    Electrical wires are considered as EEE parts and are covered within the ESA SCC specification series (ESA SCC 3901/XXX). This specification defines the principal properties of the wires including insulation/lay-up and electrical properties. Some additional space related materials requirements are also included, requirements such as outgassing and silver plating thickness. If a project has additional materials requirements over and above those covered by the relevant SCC specification, then additional testing is required. This is especially true for crewed spacecraft. The following topics are discussed in this context: additional requirements for manned spacecraft; flammability; arc tracking; thermal decomposition; microbial surface growth; and ageing.

  10. The compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with simulated double-shell slurry feed at 90/degree/C: Hanford Grout Technology Program

    SciTech Connect

    Farnsworth, R.K.; Hymas, C.R.

    1989-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the compatibility of various polymeric liner and pipe materials with a low-level radioactive waste slurry called double-shell slurry feed (DSSF). The evaluation was necessary as part of the permitting process authorized by the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA), PL-94-580. Materials that were examined included five flexible membrane liners (Hytrel/reg sign/ polyester, polyurethane, 8130 XR5/reg sign/, polypropylene, and high-density polyethylene) and high-density polyethylene (HDPE) pipe. The liner and pipe samples were immersed for 120 days in the synthetic DSSE at 90/degree/C, the maximum expected temperature in the waste disposal scenario. Physical properties of the liner and pipe samples were measured before immersion and every 30 days after immersion, in accordance with EPA Method 9090. In addition, some of the materials were exposed to four different radiation doses after 30 days of immersion. Physical properties of these materials were measured immediately after exposure and after an additional 90 days of immersion to determine each material's response to radiation, and whether radiation exposure affected the chemical compatibility of the material. 20 refs., 41 figs., 13 tabs.

  11. Apparatus Tests Peeling Of Bonded Rubbery Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crook, Russell A.; Graham, Robert

    1996-01-01

    Instrumented hydraulic constrained blister-peel apparatus obtains data on degree of bonding between specimen of rubbery material and rigid plate. Growth of blister tracked by video camera, digital clock, pressure transducer, and piston-displacement sensor. Cylinder pressure controlled by hydraulic actuator system. Linear variable-differential transformer (LVDT) and float provide second, independent measure of change in blister volume used as more precise volume feedback in low-growth-rate test.

  12. Test Methods: Cast Plastic Tooling Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1957-04-01

    The physical and working properties of room temperature curing tooling resin systems are affected by the factors listed below: (a) Temperature of...Hardeners stored exposed to moisture. (h) Presence of moisture in plasters against which the tool surfaces will be made. (i) Types of fillers used in...developed for the plastics industry and its suppliers to facilitate the exchange of test data and to promote the development of materials and techniques which will advance the use of plastics in tooling applications.

  13. Test System for Thermoelectric Modules and Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hejtmánek, J.; Knížek, K.; Švejda, V.; Horna, P.; Sikora, M.

    2014-10-01

    We present a design for a complex measuring device that enables its user to assess the parameters of power-generating thermoelectric modules (TEMs) (or bulk thermoelectric materials) under a wide range of temperatures ( T cold = 25°C to 90°C, T hot < 450°C) and mechanical loading ( P = 0 N to 104 N). The proposed instrument is able to monitor the temperature and electrical output of the TEM, the actual heat flow through the module, and its mechanical load, which can be varied during the measurement. Key components of our testing setup are (i) a measuring chamber where the TEM/material is compressed between thermally shielded heating blocks equipped with a mechanical loading system and water-cooled copper-based cooler, (ii) an electrical load system, (iii) a type K thermocouple array connected to a data acquisition computer, and (iv) a thermostatic water-based cooling system with electronically controlled flow rate and temperature of cooling water. Our testing setup represents a useful tool able to assess, e.g., the thermoelectric parameters of newly developed TEMs and materials or to evaluate the thermoelectric parameters of commercially available modules and materials for comparison with values declared by the manufacturer.

  14. Irradiation Environment of the Materials Test Station

    SciTech Connect

    Pitcher, Eric John

    2012-06-21

    Conceptual design of the proposed Materials Test Station (MTS) at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) is now complete. The principal mission is the irradiation testing of advanced fuels and materials for fast-spectrum nuclear reactor applications. The neutron spectrum in the fuel irradiation region of MTS is sufficiently close to that of fast reactor that MTS can match the fast reactor fuel centerline temperature and temperature profile across a fuel pellet. This is an important characteristic since temperature and temperature gradients drive many phenomena related to fuel performance, such as phase stability, stoichiometry, and fission product transport. The MTS irradiation environment is also suitable in many respects for fusion materials testing. In particular, the rate of helium production relative to atomic displacements at the peak flux position in MTS matches well that of fusion reactor first wall. Nuclear transmutation of the elemental composition of the fusion alloy EUROFER97 in MTS is similar to that expected in the first wall of a fusion reactor.

  15. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested for long-term storage with water in the system as plarned for STS-107. This view shows the compressed sand column with the protective water jacket removed. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  16. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is tested for long-term storage with water in the system as plarned for STS-107. This view shows the top of the sand column with the metal platten removed. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that cannot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: University of Colorado at Boulder

  17. Application of Nondestructive Testing Techniques to Materials Testing.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-02-01

    7D-Al?2 605 APPLICATION OF NONDESTRUCTIVE TESTING TECHNIQUES To / MATERIALS TESTING(U) STANFORD UNIV CA EDWARD L GINZTON LAB OF PHYSICS G S KIND FEB...U EDWARD L. GINTZON LAB, W.W. HANSEN LAB OF PHYSIC ! 2306/A2 (%J STANFORD CA 94305’ 11 ,. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS 12. REPORT DATE Feb 1986...we could improve optical systems by employing modern electronic techniques within the optical system. Our purpose has been to make accurate profile

  18. The interim test effect: testing prior material can facilitate the learning of new material.

    PubMed

    Wissman, Kathryn T; Rawson, Katherine A; Pyc, Mary A

    2011-12-01

    A wealth of prior research has shown that testing can improve subsequent learning of the initially tested material. In contrast, only one recent study has shown that an interim test over prior material can improve learning of subsequent new material (i.e., an interim-test effect). Five experiments replicated and extended this initial work by exploring the extent to which interim test effects generalize to complex text material. Participants were prompted to recall each section of an expository text before moving on to study the next section, or were only prompted to recall after the final section. In all experiments, recall of the final, target section was greater when prior sections had received interim tests versus no interim tests. Experiment 3 established that the effect was due to interim testing in particular rather than to intervening activity in general. Experiment 4 established that the effect was not due to test expectancy differences. In contrast to prior research, Experiment 4 also provided evidence that the effect is not due to release from proactive interference. We discuss other possible mechanisms underlying interim-test effects with text, including shifting to more effective encoding strategies.

  19. A Rapid Survey of the Compatibility of Selected Seal Materials with Conventional and Semi-Synthetic JP-8

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Graham, John L.; Striebich, Richard C.; Minus, Donald K.; Harrison, William E., III

    2007-01-01

    Since the synthesis of a liquid hydrocarbon fuel from coal by Franz Fischer and Hans Tropsch in 1923, there has been cyclic interest in developing this fuel for military and commercial applications. In recent years the U.S. Department of Defense has taken interest in producing a unified battlespace fuel using the Fischer Tropsch (FT) process for a variety of reasons including cost, quality, and logistics. In the past year there has been a particular emphasis on moving quickly to demonstrate that an FT fuel can be used in the form of a blend with conventional petroleum-derived jet fuel. The initial objective is to employ this semi-synthetic fuel with blend ratios as high as 50 percent FT with longer range goals to use even high blend ratios and ultimately a fully synthetic jet fuel. A significant concern associated with the use of a semi-synthetic jet fuel with high FT blend ratios is the effect these low aromatic fuels will have on fuel-wetted polymeric materials, most notably seals and sealants. These materials typically swell and soften to some degree when exposed to jet fuel and the aromatic content of these fuels contribute to this effect. Semi-synthetic jet fuels with very low aromatic contents may cause seals and sealants to shrink and harden leading to acute or chronic failure. Unfortunately, most of the material qualification tests are more concerned with excessive swelling than shrinkage and there is little guidance offered as to an acceptable level of shrinkage or other changes in physical properties related to low aromatic content. Given the pressing need for guidance data, a program was developed to rapidly survey the volume swell of selected fuel-wetted materials in a range of conventional and semi-synthetic jet fuels and through a statistical analysis to make a determination as to whether there was a basis to be concerned about using fuels with FT blend ratios as high as 50 percent. Concurrent with this analysis data was obtained as to the composition

  20. Material Testing for Robotic Omnidirectional Anchor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Witkoe, Kevin S.

    2012-01-01

    To successfully explore near-Earth Asteroids the question of mobility emerges as the key issue for any robotic mission. When small bodies have extremely low escape velocities, traditional methods, such as wheels, would send the robot hurtling off of the asteroid's surface. To solve this problem, JPL has developed an omni-directional anchoring mechanism for use in microgravity that utilizes microspine technology. These microspines are placed in circular arrays with 16 independent carriages biasing the surface of the rock. The asperities in the surface allow the gripper to hold nearly 150N in all directions. While the gripper has been proven successful on consolidated rocks, it had yet to be tested on a variety of other surfaces that are suspected to separate the large boulders on an asteroid. Since asteroid surfaces vary widely, from friable rocks to lose ponds of regolith, the gripper was tested in a large variety of materials such as, bonded pumice, sand, gravel, and loose rocks. The forces are applied tangent, at 45 degrees, and normal to the surface of the material. The immediate results from this experiment will give insight into the gripper's effectiveness across the wide spectrum of materials found on asteroids.

  1. Mechanics of Granular Materials Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown from all three sides by its video camera during STS-89. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  2. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    A test cell for Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiment is shown approximately 20 and 60 minutes after the start of an experiment on STS-89. Sand and soil grains have faces that can cause friction as they roll and slide against each other, or even cause sticking and form small voids between grains. This complex behavior can cause soil to behave like a liquid under certain conditions such as earthquakes or when powders are handled in industrial processes. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) experiments aboard the Space Shuttle use the microgravity of space to simulate this behavior under conditons that carnot be achieved in laboratory tests on Earth. MGM is shedding light on the behavior of fine-grain materials under low effective stresses. Applications include earthquake engineering, granular flow technologies (such as powder feed systems for pharmaceuticals and fertilizers), and terrestrial and planetary geology. Nine MGM specimens have flown on two Space Shuttle flights. Another three are scheduled to fly on STS-107. The principal investigator is Stein Sture of the University of Colorado at Boulder. Credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC)

  3. Testing of a palatable bait and compatible vaccine carrier for the oral vaccination of European badgers (Meles meles) against tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Gowtage, Sonya; Williams, Gareth A; Henderson, Ray; Aylett, Paul; MacMorran, Duncan; Palmer, Si; Robertson, Andy; Lesellier, Sandrine; Carter, Stephen P; Chambers, Mark A

    2017-02-07

    The oral vaccination of wild badgers (Meles meles) with live Bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG) is one of the tools being considered for the control of bovine tuberculosis (caused by Mycobacterium bovis) in the UK. The design of a product for oral vaccination requires that numerous, and often competing, conditions are met. These include the need for a highly palatable, but physically stable bait that will meet regulatory requirements, and one which is also compatible with the vaccine formulation; in this case live BCG. In collaboration with two commercial bait companies we have developed a highly attractive and palatable bait recipe designed specifically for European badgers (Meles meles) that meets these requirements. The palatability of different batches of bait was evaluated against a standardised palatable control bait using captive badgers. The physical properties of the bait are described e.g. firmness and colour. The microbial load in the bait was assessed against European and US Pharmacopoeias. The bait was combined with an edible vaccine carrier made of hydrogenated peanut oil in which BCG vaccine was stable during bait manufacture and cold storage, demonstrating <0.5 log10 reduction in titre after 117weeks' storage at -20°C. BCG stability in bait was also evaluated at +4°C and under simulated environmental conditions (20°C, 98% Relative Humidity; RH). Finally, iophenoxic acid biomarkers were utilised as a surrogate for the BCG vaccine, to test variants of the vaccine-bait design for their ability to deliver biomarker to the gastrointestinal tract of individual animals. These data provide the first detailed description of a bait-vaccine delivery system developed specifically for the oral vaccination of badgers against Mycobacterium bovis using live BCG.

  4. Compatibility of segmented thermoelectric generators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J.; Ursell, T.

    2002-01-01

    It is well known that power generation efficiency improves when materials with appropriate properties are combined either in a cascaded or segmented fashion across a temperature gradient. Past methods for determining materials used in segmentation weremainly concerned with materials that have the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. However, the example of SiGe segmented with Bi2Te3 and/or various skutterudites shows a marked decline in device efficiency even though SiGe has the highest figure of merit in the temperature range. The origin of the incompatibility of SiGe with other thermoelectric materials leads to a general definition of compatibility and intrinsic efficiency. The compatibility factor derived as = (Jl+zr - 1) a is a function of only intrinsic material properties and temperature, which is represented by a ratio of current to conduction heat. For maximum efficiency the compatibility factor should not change with temperature both within a single material, and in the segmented leg as a whole. This leads to a measure of compatibility not only between segments, but also within a segment. General temperature trends show that materials are more self compatible at higher temperatures, and segmentation is more difficult across a larger -T. The compatibility factor can be used as a quantitative guide for deciding whether a material is better suited for segmentation orcascading. Analysis of compatibility factors and intrinsic efficiency for optimal segmentation are discussed, with intent to predict optimal material properties, temperature interfaces, and/or currentheat ratios.

  5. 33 CFR 183.114 - Test of flotation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test of flotation materials. 183.../Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.114 Test of flotation materials. (a) Vapor test. The flotation material... gasoline test. The flotation material must not reduce in buoyant force more than 5 percent after...

  6. 33 CFR 183.114 - Test of flotation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test of flotation materials. 183.../Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.114 Test of flotation materials. (a) Vapor test. The flotation material... gasoline test. The flotation material must not reduce in buoyant force more than 5 percent after...

  7. 33 CFR 183.114 - Test of flotation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Test of flotation materials. 183.../Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.114 Test of flotation materials. (a) Vapor test. The flotation material... gasoline test. The flotation material must not reduce in buoyant force more than 5 percent after...

  8. 33 CFR 183.114 - Test of flotation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test of flotation materials. 183.../Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.114 Test of flotation materials. (a) Vapor test. The flotation material... gasoline test. The flotation material must not reduce in buoyant force more than 5 percent after...

  9. 33 CFR 183.114 - Test of flotation materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test of flotation materials. 183.../Outdrive Boats, and Airboats § 183.114 Test of flotation materials. (a) Vapor test. The flotation material... gasoline test. The flotation material must not reduce in buoyant force more than 5 percent after...

  10. Integrated Performance Testing Workshop - Supplemental Materials (Scripts and Procedures)

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, Gregory A.

    2014-02-01

    A variety of performance tests are described relating to: Material Transfers; Emergency Evacuation; Alarm Response Assessment; and an Enhanced Limited Scope Performance Test (ELSPT). Procedures are given for: nuclear material physical inventory and discrepancy; material transfers; and emergency evacuation.

  11. Materials screening chamber for testing materials resistance to atomic oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pippin, H. G.; Carruth, Ralph

    1989-01-01

    A unique test chamber for exposing material to a known flux of oxygen atoms is described. The capabilities and operating parameters of the apparatus include production of an oxygen atom flux in excess of 5 x 10 to the 16th atoms/sq cm-sec, controlled heating of the sample specimen, RF circuitry to contain the plasma within a small volume, and long exposure times. Flux measurement capabilities include a calorimetric probe and a light titration system. Accuracy and limitations of these techniques are discussed. An extension to the main chamber to allow simultaneous ultraviolet and atomic oxygen exposure is discussed. The oxygen atoms produced are at thermal energies. Sample specimens are maintained at any selected temperature between ambient and 200 C, to within + or - 2 C. A representative example of measurements made using the chamber is presented.

  12. Asbestos penetration test system for clothing materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bradley, O.D.; Stampfer, J.F.; Sandoval, A.N.; Heath, C.A.; Cooper, M.H.

    1997-04-01

    For hazardous work such as asbestos abatement, there is a need to assess protective clothing fabrics and seam constructions to assure an adequate barrier against hazardous material. The penetration of aerosols through fabrics usually is measured by challenging fabric samples with an aerosol stream at a constant specified airflow. To produce the specified airflow, pressure differentials across the samples often are higher than exist in a work environment. This higher airflow results in higher aerosol velocities through the fabric and, possibly, measured penetration values not representative of those actually experienced in the field. The objective of the reported work was to develop a test method that does not require these higher airflows. The authors have designed and fabricated a new system that tests fabric samples under a low, constant, specified pressure differential across the samples. This differential is adjustable from tenths of a mm Water Gauge (hundredths of an in WG) to over 25-mm WG (1-in WG). The system operates at a pressure slightly lower than its surroundings. Although designed primarily for asbestos, the system is equally applicable to the testing of other aerosols by changing the aerosol generator and detector. Through simple modification of the sample holders, the test apparatus would be capable of evaluating seam and closure constructions.

  13. Aerothermal Testing of Woven TPS Ablative Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stackpoole, Mairead; Feldman, Jay; Olson, Michael; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2012-01-01

    Woven Thermal Protection Systems (WTPS) is a new TPS concept that is funded by NASAs Office of the Chief Technologist (OCT) Game Changing Division. The WTPS project demonstrates the potential for manufacturing a variety of TPS materials capable of wide ranging performances demanded by a spectrum of solar system exploration missions. Currently, missions anticipated to encounter heat fluxes in the range of 1500 4000 Watts per square centimeter are limited to using one proven material fully dense Carbon Phenolic. However, fully dense carbon phenolic is only mass efficient at heat fluxes greater than 4000 Watts per square centimeter, and current mission designs suffer this mass inefficiency for lack of an alternative mid-density TPS. WTPS not only bridges this gap but also offers a replacement for carbon phenolic, which itself requires a significant and costly redevelopment effort to re-establish its capability for use in the high heat flux missions recently prioritized in the NRC Decadal survey, including probe missions to Venus, Saturn and Neptune. This poster will summarize some recent arc jet testing to evaluate the performance of WTPS. Both mid density and fully dense WTPS test results will be presented and results compared to heritage carbon phenolic where applicable.

  14. Thermal-Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Teate, Anthony A.

    1997-01-01

    Since its inception and successful implementation in 1997 at James Madison University, the Thermal Structures and Materials Testing Laboratory (T-SaMTL) funded by the NASA Langley Research Center is evolving into one of the University's premier and exemplary efforts to increase minority representation in the sciences and mathematics. Serving ten (10) students and faculty directly and almost fifty (50) students indirectly, T-SAMTL, through its recruitment efforts, workshops, mentoring program, tutorial services and its research and computational laboratories has marked the completion of the first year with support from NASA totaling $ 100,000. Beginning as an innovative academic research and mentoring program for underrepresented minority science and mathematics students, the program now boasts a constituency which consists of 50% graduating seniors in the spring of 1998 with 50% planning to go to graduate school. The program's intent is to increase the number of underrepresented minorities who receive doctoral degrees in the sciences by initiating an academically enriched research program aimed at strengthening the academic and self actualization skills of undergraduate students with the potential to pursue doctoral study in the sciences. The program provides financial assistance, academic enrichment, and professional and personal development support for minority students who demonstrate the potential and strong desire to pursue careers in the sciences and mathematics. James Madison University was awarded the first $100,000, in April 1997, by The NASA Langley Research Center for establishment and support of its Thermal Structures and Materials Testing

  15. Proficiency Testing for Evaluating Aerospace Materials Test Anomalies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, D.; Motto, S.; Peyton, S.; Beeson, H.

    2006-01-01

    ASTM G 86 and ASTM G 74 are commonly used to evaluate materials susceptibility to ignition in liquid and gaseous oxygen systems. However, the methods have been known for their lack of repeatability. The inherent problems identified with the test logic would either not allow precise identification or the magnitude of problems related to running the tests, such as lack of consistency of systems performance, lack of adherence to procedures, etc. Excessive variability leads to increasing instances of accepting the null hypothesis erroneously, and so to the false logical deduction that problems are nonexistent when they really do exist. This paper attempts to develop and recommend an approach that could lead to increased accuracy in problem diagnostics by using the 50% reactivity point, which has been shown to be more repeatable. The initial tests conducted indicate that PTFE and Viton A (for pneumatic impact) and Buna S (for mechanical impact) would be good choices for additional testing and consideration for inter-laboratory evaluations. The approach presented could also be used to evaluate variable effects with increased confidence and tolerance optimization.

  16. Solid state cathode materials for secondary magnesium-ion batteries that are compatible with magnesium metal anodes in water-free electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crowe, Adam J.; Bartlett, Bart M.

    2016-10-01

    With high elemental abundance, large volumetric capacity, and dendrite-free metal deposition, magnesium metal anodes offer promise in beyond-lithium-ion batteries. However, the increased charge density associated with the divalent magnesium-ion (Mg2+), relative to lithium-ion (Li+) hinders the ion-insertion and extraction processes within many materials and structures known for lithium-ion cathodes. As a result, many recent investigations incorporate known amounts of water within the electrolyte to provide temporary solvation of the Mg2+, improving diffusion kinetics. Unfortunately with the addition of water, compatibility with magnesium metal anodes disappears due to forming an ion-insulating passivating layer. In this short review, recent advances in solid state cathode materials for rechargeable magnesium-ion batteries are highlighted, with a focus on cathode materials that do not require water contaminated electrolyte solutions for ion insertion and extraction processes.

  17. Wiring test program insulation material related properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reher, Heinz-Josef

    1995-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation provides an overview of activities at DASA-RI concerning the testing of wires for manned spacecraft, including test facilities, arc-tracking tests, flammability tests, microgravity tests, and standardization, and outlines future activities.

  18. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan; Lee, Steve; He, Hung

    2008-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The emitted infrared (IR) heat flux from the lunar surface varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. Due to the extremely high incident IR flux, especially at low beta angles, a radiator is oftentimes unable to reject the vehicle heat load throughout the entire lunar orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when the radiator is unable to reject the required heat load. The stored energy is then removed from the PCM heat exchanger when the environment is more benign. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration Low Lunar Orbit missions. The Advanced Thermal Control project at JSC is completing a PCM heat exchanger life test to determine whether further technology development is warranted. The life test is being conducted on four nPentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed and reported in the current document.

  19. 46 CFR 151.03-17 - Compatible.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... LIQUID HAZARDOUS MATERIAL CARGOES Definitions § 151.03-17 Compatible. Compatible means that a cargo will... prime considerations are the chemical, physical, or thermal properties of the reaction including...

  20. MMA/MPEOMA/VSA copolymer as a novel blood-compatible material: ex vivo platelet adhesion study.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jin Ho; Oh, Se Heang; Kim, Won Gon

    2004-02-01

    MMA/MPEOMA/VSA copolymers with both pendant polyethylene oxide (PEO) side chains and negatively chargeable side groups were synthesized by random copolymerization of methyl methacrylate (MMA), methoxy PEO monomethacrylate (MPEOMA; PEO mol. wt, 1000), and vinyl sulfonic acid sodium salt (VSA) monomers with different monomer composition to evaluate their blood compatibility. MMA/MPEOMA copolymer (with PEO side chains) and MMA/VSA copolymer (with negatively chargeable side groups) were also synthesized for the comparison purpose. The synthesized copolymers were coated onto polyurethane (PU) tubes (inner diameter, 4.6 mm) by a spin coating. The platelet adhesion of the MMA/MPEOMA/VSA copolymer-coated tube surfaces was compared with that of tube surface coated with MMA/MPEOMA or MMA/VSA copolymer with similar MPEOMA or VSA composition, using an ex vivo canine arterio-artery shunt method. The platelet adhesion was evaluated by radioactivity counting of technetium (99mTc)-labeled platelets adhered on the surfaces after 30 and 120 min of blood circulation. The MMA/MPEOMA/VSA copolymer (monomer molar ratio 9/0.5/0.5 or 8/1/1) was better in preventing platelet adhesion on the surface than the MMA/MPEOMA or MMA/VSA copolymer with similar MPEOMA or VSA composition, probably owing to the combined effects of highly mobile, hydrophilic PEO side chains and negatively charged VSA side groups.

  1. Test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material

    DOEpatents

    Reese, Matthew; Dameron, Arrelaine; Kempe, Michael

    2014-03-04

    A test device for measuring permeability of a barrier material. An exemplary device comprises a test card having a thin-film conductor-pattern formed thereon and an edge seal which seals the test card to the barrier material. Another exemplary embodiment is an electrical calcium test device comprising: a test card an impermeable spacer, an edge seal which seals the test card to the spacer and an edge seal which seals the spacer to the barrier material.

  2. Hardness testing of some fissure-sealing materials.

    PubMed

    Ulvestad, H

    1977-11-01

    The mechanical properties of fissure-sealing materials are of significant importance for their durability, i.e. their wear resistance. One of the methods of evaluating a material's resistance to attrition is to apply a hardness test. In the present investigation, the surface hardness of some fissure-sealing materials was tested. Sealants made from diluted composite materials and with inclusion of inorganic filler particles appeared to have a considerable higher surface hardness than the other sealing materials tested.

  3. Compatibility Studies of Hydrogen Peroxide and a New Hypergolic Fuel Blend

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baldridge, Jennifer; Villegas, Yvonne

    2002-01-01

    Several preliminary materials compatibility studies have been conducted to determine the practicality of a new hypergolic fuel system. Hypergolic fuel ignites spontaneously as the oxidizer decomposes and releases energy in the presence of the fuel. The bipropellant system tested consists of high-test hydrogen peroxide (HTP) and a liquid fuel blend consisting of a hydrocarbon fuel, an ignition enhancer and a transition metal catalyst. In order for further testing of the new fuel blend to take place, some basic materials compatibility and HTP decomposition studies must be accomplished. The thermal decomposition rate of HTP was tested using gas evolution and isothermal microcalorimetry (IMC). Materials were analyzed for compatibility with hydrogen peroxide including a study of the affect welding has on stainless steel elemental composition and its relation to HTP decomposition. Compatibility studies of valve materials in the fuel blend were performed to determine the corrosion resistance of the materials.

  4. Materials Tested on the International Space Station

    NASA Video Gallery

    Miria Finckenor, a materials engineer, analyzes samples in her laboratory at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala. The materials spent several years exposed to the harsh space env...

  5. Phase Change Material Heat Exchanger Life Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lillibridge, Sean; Stephan, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    Low Lunar Orbit (LLO) poses unique thermal challenges for the orbiting space craft, particularly regarding the performance of the radiators. The IR environment of the space craft varies drastically from the light side to the dark side of the moon. The result is a situation where a radiator sized for the maximal heat load in the most adverse situation is subject to freezing on the dark side of the orbit. One solution to this problem is to implement Phase Change Material (PCM) Heat Exchangers. PCM Heat Exchangers act as a "thermal capacitor," storing thermal energy when there is too much being produced by the space craft to reject to space, and then feeding that energy back into the thermal loop when conditions are more favorable. Because they do not use an expendable resource, such as the feed water used by sublimators and evaporators, PCM Heat Exchangers are ideal for long duration LLO missions. In order to validate the performance of PCM Heat Exchangers, a life test is being conducted on four n-Pentadecane, carbon filament heat exchangers. Fluid loop performance, repeatability, and measurement of performance degradation over 2500 melt-freeze cycles will be performed.

  6. Trusted materials using orthogonal testing. 2015 Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Van Benthem, Mark

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this project is to prove (or disprove) that a reasonable number of simple tests can be used to provide a unique data signature for materials, changes in which could serve as a harbinger of material deviation, prompting further evaluations. The routine tests are mutually orthogonal to any currently required materials specification tests.

  7. Compatibility of alternative refrigerants with varnished magnet wire

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.; Kujak, S.

    1993-10-01

    The compatibility of 24 motor materials with 11 pure refrigerators and 17 refrigerant-lubricant combinations was determined. This is summary of the effect of refrigerants on varnished magnet wire. Of the refrigerants tested, exposure to HCFC-22 produced the most deleterious effects on the magnet wire insulation and varnishes. Since many of the materials tested have excellent reliability with HCFC-22 in current applications, these materials are expected to be reliable when used with new refrigerants.

  8. Relative toxicity testing of spacecraft materials. 2: Aircraft materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawrence, W. H.

    1980-01-01

    The relative toxicity of thermodegradation (pyrolysis/combustion) products of aircraft materials was studied. Two approaches were taken to assess the biological activity of the pyrolysis/combustion products of these materials: (1) determine the acute lethality to rats from inhalation of these pyrolysates and (2) examine the tendency for sublethal exposure to the pyrolysates to disrupt behavioral (shock avoidance) performance of exposed rats. The ralative importance of lethality vs. behavioral effects in selection of a material may be dictated by whether or not individuals potentially exposed to such products, would have an opportunity to escape if they were behaviorally capable of doing so. If so, the second parameter would assume greater importance, but if not the first parameter may be of much greater importance in selecting materials.

  9. Compatibility of refrigerants and lubricants with motor materials. Quarterly technical progress report, April 1, 1992--June 30, 1992

    SciTech Connect

    Doerr, R.; Kujak, S.

    1992-07-23

    During this last quarter, evaluations were complete on the motor materials after 500-hr exposures to refrigerants CFC-123, HFC-134a and HCFC-22 at 90{degrees}C. Materials were also evaluated after exposure to nitrogen at 127{degrees}C to determine effect of the thermal exposure. Other exposures were started during this quarter with refrigerants HCFC-124, HFC-125, HFC-143a, HFC-32 and HFC-152a. One 500 hr exposure is set up per week and one is analyzed the same week. This will enable Trane to complete the 500 hour exposures by the end of the year.

  10. SU-E-T-523: Investigation of Various MR-Compatible Shielding Materials for Direction Modulated Brachytherapy (DMBT) Tandem Applicator for Cervical Cancer Treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Safigholi, H; Soliman, A; Song, W; Han, D; Meigooni, A Soleimani; Scanderbeg, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate various shielding materials such as Gold (Au), Osmium (Os), Tantalum (Ta), and Tungsten (W) based alloys for use with a novel intensity modulation capable direction modulated brachytherapy (DMBT) tandem applicator for image guided cervical cancer HDR brachytherapy. Methods: The novel MRI-compatible DMBT tandem, made from nonmagnetic tungsten-alloy rod with diameter of 5.4 mm, has 6 symmetric peripheral holes of 1.3 mm diameter with 2.05 mm distance from the center for a high degree intensity modulation capacity. The 0.3 mm thickness of bio-compatible plastic tubing wraps the tandem. MCNPX was used for Monte Carlo simulations of the shields and the mHDR Ir-192 V2 source. MC-generated 3D dose matrices of different shielding materials of Au, Os, Ta, and W with 1 mm3 resolution were imported into an in-house-coded inverse optimization planning system to evaluate 19 clinical patient plans. Prescription dose was 15Gy. All plans were normalized to receive the same HRCTV D90. Results: In general, the plan qualities for various shielding materials were similar. The OAR D2cc for bladder was very similar for Au, Os, and Ta with 11.64±2.30Gy. For W, it was very close 11.65±2.30Gy. The sigmoid D2cc was 9.82±2.46Gy for Au and Os while it was 9.84±2.48Gy for Ta and W. The rectum D2cc was 7.44±3.06Gy for Au, 7.43±3.07Gy for Os, 7.48±3.05Gy for Ta, and 7.47±3.05Gy for W. The HRCTV D98 and V100 were very close with 16.37±1.87 Gy and 97.37±1.93 Gy, on average, respectively. Conclusion: Various MRI-compatible shielding alloys were investigated for the DMBT tandem applicator. The clinical plan qualities were not significantly different among these various alloys, however. Therefore, the candidate metals (or in combination) can be used to select best alloys for MRI image guided cervical cancer brachytherapy using the novel DMBT applicator that is capable of unprecedented level of intensity modulation.

  11. National Transonic Facility Fan Blade prepreg material characterization tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klich, P. J.; Richards, W. H.; Ahl, E. L., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    The test program for the basic prepreg materials used in process development work and planned fabrication of the national transonic facility fan blade is presented. The basic prepreg materials and the design laminate are characterized at 89 K, room temperature, and 366 K. Characterization tests, test equipment, and test data are discussed. Material tests results in the warp direction are given for tensile, compressive, fatigue (tension-tension), interlaminar shear and thermal expansion.

  12. SRM propellant and polymer materials structural test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Carleton J.

    1988-01-01

    The SRM propellant and polymer materials structural test program has potentially wide application to the testing and structural analysis of polymer materials and other materials generally characterized as being made of viscoelastic materials. The test program will provide a basis for characterization of the dynamic failure criteria for Solid Rocket Motor (SRM) propellant, insulation, inhibitor and liners. This experimental investigation will also endeavor to obtain a consistent complete set of materials test data. This test will be used to improve and revise the presently used theoretical math models for SRM propellant, insulators, inhibitor, liners, and O-ring seals.

  13. Method and apparatus for testing surface characteristics of a material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, David L. (Inventor); Kersker, Karl D. (Inventor); Richardson, David E. (Inventor); Stratton, Troy C. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    A method, apparatus and system for testing characteristics of a material sample is provided. The system includes an apparatus configured to house the material test sample while defining a sealed volume against a surface of the material test sample. A source of pressurized fluid is in communication with, and configured to pressurize, the sealed volume. A load applying apparatus is configured to apply a defined load to the material sample while the sealed volume is monitored for leakage of the pressurized fluid. Thus, the inducement of surface defects such as microcracking and crazing may be detected and their effects analyzed for a given material. The material test samples may include laminar structures formed of, for example, carbon cloth phenolic, glass cloth phenolic, silica cloth phenolic materials or carbon-carbon materials. In one embodiment the system may be configured to analyze the material test sample while an across-ply loading is applied thereto.

  14. 1.2 kV GaN Schottky barrier diodes on free-standing GaN wafer using a CMOS-compatible contact material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xinke; Liu, Qiang; Li, Chao; Wang, Jianfeng; Yu, Wenjie; Xu, Ke; Ao, Jin-Ping

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, we report the formation of vertical GaN Schottky barrier diodes (SBDs) on a 2-in. free-standing (FS) GaN wafer, using CMOS-compatible contact material. By realizing an off-state breakdown voltage V BR of 1200 V and an on-state resistance R on of 7 mΩ·cm2, the FS-GaN SBDs fabricated in this work achieve a power device figure-of-merit V\\text{BR}2/R\\text{on} of 2.1 × 108 V2·Ω-1·cm-2 on a high quality GaN wafer. In addition, the fabricated FS-GaN SBDs show the highest I on/I off current ratio of ˜2.3 × 1010 among the GaN SBDs reported in the literature.

  15. In vivo red blood cell compatibility testing using indium-113m tropolone-labeled red blood cells

    SciTech Connect

    Morrissey, G.J.; Gravelle, D.; Dietz, G.; Driedger, A.A.; King, M.; Cradduck, T.D.

    1988-05-01

    In vivo radionuclide crossmatch is a method for identifying compatible blood for transfusion when allo- or autoantibodies preclude the use of conventional crossmatching techniques. A technique for labeling small volumes of donor red blood cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is reported. The use of /sup 113m/In minimizes the accumulation of background radioactivity and the radiation dose especially so when multiple crossmatches are performed. Labeling red cells with (/sup 113m/In)tropolone is faster and easier to perform than with other radionuclides. Consistently high labeling efficiencies are obtained and minimal /sup 113m/In activity elutes from the labeled red blood cells. A case study involving 22 crossmatches is presented to demonstrate the technique. The radiation dose equivalent from /sup 113m/In is significantly less than with other radionuclides that may be used to label red cells.

  16. Pathogen-tested, or certified planting material

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Certification programs have been developed to provide plant material that meets a predetermined level of plant health. The primary objective of these programs is to limit pathogen incidence in plant material in order to minimize losses by growers. For many fruit and nut crops plantings are expecte...

  17. Survey of hazardous materials used in nuclear testing

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, E.A.; Fabryka-Martin, J.

    1991-02-01

    The use of hazardous'' materials in routine underground nuclear tests at the Nevada Test Site has been reviewed. In addition the inventory of test yields, originally reported in 1976 has been updated. A trail down-hole inventory'' has been conducted for a selected test. The inorganic hazardous materials introduced during testing (with the exception of lead and the fissionable materials) produce an incremental change in the quantity of such materials already present in the geologic media surrounding the test points. 1 ref., 3 tabs.

  18. Status of the irradiation test vehicle for testing fusion materials in the Advanced Test Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Tsai, H.; Gomes, I.C.; Smith, D.L.; Palmer, A.J.; Ingram, F.W.; Wiffen, F.W.

    1998-09-01

    The design of the irradiation test vehicle (ITV) for the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) has been completed. The main application for the ITV is irradiation testing of candidate fusion structural materials, including vanadium-base alloys, silicon carbide composites, and low-activation steels. Construction of the vehicle is underway at the Lockheed Martin Idaho Technology Company (LMITCO). Dummy test trains are being built for system checkout and fine-tuning. Reactor insertion of the ITV with the dummy test trains is scheduled for fall 1998. Barring unexpected difficulties, the ITV will be available for experiments in early 1999.

  19. Europa Missions: Generic Materials Test Methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Willis, Paul B.

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation discusses: radiation fundamentals, radiation damage, how radiation dosage is determined, fluence testing approaches, ionization damage exposure, displacement damage exposure, Europa energy "bins", rationale for group flux (energy bins), electron/proton group fluences, electron beam exposure testing, proton sources, reactor exposures, gamma exposures, preliminary exposure findings, testing caveats, preliminary conclusions, internal discharge, and electron dose depth curves.

  20. Compatibility, Electromagnetic

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-10-12

    maicatons-el.ectronaas *C-E) equipment. It describes procedures zo dcr=Lne that C--c. *qtu~ent and symceo.s Incorporaz.s the basr availible technologyi ior...numerous locatio)ns for mobile testing, a mobile electronic countermeasures envir=nmeat genorator installation, a mobile and seaiLwbila onvironaftnt

  1. Double Cantilever Beam Fracture Toughness Testing of Several Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kessler, Jeff A.; Adams, Donald F.

    1992-01-01

    Double-cantilever beam fracture toughness tests were performed by the Composite Materials Research Group on several different unidirectional composite materials provided by NASA Langley Research Center. The composite materials consisted of Hercules IM-7 carbon fiber and various matrix resin formulations. Multiple formulations of four different families of matrix resins were tested: LaRC - ITPI, LaRC - IA, RPT46T, and RP67/RP55. Report presents the materials tested and pertinent details supplied by NASA. For each material, three replicate specimens were tested. Multiple crack extensions were performed on each replicate.

  2. Ballistic Testing of Personnel Armor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1975-01-06

    Identity by block number) 7e)scribes methods for evaluating the resistance of personnel armor material. to perforation by attacking projectile fragments... armor vests, face shields , torso shield , leg armor , and protective suits. It is relatively light in weight, usually between 1/4 and 4 pounds per square...quantitative measures of the ability of body armor materials to completely stop or reduce the velocity (therefore lethality) of attacking fragments of various

  3. High throughput analysis of drugs of abuse in hair by combining purposely designed sample extraction compatible with immunometric methods used for drug testing in urine.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, R; Civit, E; Svaizer, F; Lotti, A; Gottardi, M; Miozzo, M

    2010-03-20

    Drug testing in hair usually requires a rather complex sample treatment before drugs are amenable to analysis by either immunological and/or chromatographic coupled to mass spectrometry methods. Immunological methods applied are usually dedicated to hair analysis as analytes present in this matrix are not always the same present in urine. Comedical s.a.s. laboratories recently commercialized reagents (VMA-T) purposely designed for hair sample treatment which are compatible with current immunometric methods used for urine drug testing. This is possible as some analytes (6-MAM and cocaine) present in hair after sample treatment are converted to those detected in urine (morphine and benzoylecgonine). A correlation study for several drug classes performed in two laboratories with 32 clinical and 12 spiked drug free (controls) hair samples shows that implementation of the method on clinical chemistry analyzers is easy and that results obtained by different operators and instruments are comparable and reproducible. The main advantage of VMA-T method is the possibility to simultaneously extract from hair main drug classes, in a period of time lower than 2h and its compatibility with immunological methods applied in urine drug testing.

  4. NaK pool-boiler bench-scale receiver durability test: Test results and materials analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Andraka, C.E.; Goods, S.H.; Bradshaw, R.W.; Moreno, J.B.; Moss, T.A.; Jones, S.A.

    1994-06-01

    Pool-boiler reflux receivers have been considered as an alternative to heat pipes for the input of concentrated solar energy to Stirling-cycle engines in dish-Stirling electric generation systems. Pool boilers offer simplicity in design and fabrication. The operation of a full-scale pool-boiler receiver has been demonstrated for short periods of time. However, to generate cost-effective electricity, the receiver must operate Without significant maintenance for the entire system life, as much as 20 to 30 years. Long-term liquid-metal boiling stability and materials compatibility with refluxing NaK-78 is not known and must be determined for the pool boiler receiver. No boiling system has been demonstrated for a significant duration with the current porous boiling enhancement surface and materials. Therefore, it is necessary to simulate the full-scale pool boiler design as much as possible, including flux levels, materials, and operating cycles. On-sun testing is impractical because of the limited test time available. A test vessel was constructed with a porous boiling enhancement surface. The boiling surface consisted of a brazed stainless steel powder with about 50% porosity. The vessel was heated with a quartz lamp array providing about go W/CM2 peak incident thermal flux. The vessel was charged with NaK-78. This allows the elimination of costly electric preheating, both on this test and on fullscale receivers. The vessel was fabricated from Haynes 230 alloy. The vessel operated at 750{degrees}C around the clock, with a 1/2-hour shutdown cycle to ambient every 8 hours. The test completed 7500 hours of lamp-on operation time, and over 1000 startups from ambient. The test was terminated when a small leak in an Inconel 600 thermowell was detected. The test design and data are presented here. Metallurgical analysis of virgin and tested materials has begun, and initial results are also presented.

  5. VIBRATION TESTING OF RESILIENT PACKAGE CUSHIONING MATERIALS

    DTIC Science & Technology

    government and industry. Testing equipment which meets tentative ASTM requirements was developed. Preliminary tests were conducted on a resilient expanded ... polystyrene foam (in 3 densities) and a polyether urethane foam (in one density). When vibrated under static loads known to provide optimum shock

  6. TESTING ANTIMICROBIAL EFFICACY ON POROUS MATERIALS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The efficacy of antimicrobial treatments to eliminate or control biological growth in the indoor environment can easily be tested on nonporous surfaces. However, the testing of antimicrobial efficacy on porous surfaces, such as those found in the indoor environment [i.e., gypsum ...

  7. 16 CFR 1610.5 - Test apparatus and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Test apparatus and materials. 1610.5 Section... STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.5 Test apparatus and materials. (a) Flammability apparatus. The flammability test apparatus consists of a draft-proof ventilated chamber...

  8. 16 CFR 1610.5 - Test apparatus and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Test apparatus and materials. 1610.5 Section... STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.5 Test apparatus and materials. (a) Flammability apparatus. The flammability test apparatus consists of a draft-proof ventilated chamber...

  9. 16 CFR 1610.5 - Test apparatus and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Test apparatus and materials. 1610.5 Section... STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.5 Test apparatus and materials. (a) Flammability apparatus. The flammability test apparatus consists of a draft-proof ventilated chamber...

  10. 16 CFR 1610.5 - Test apparatus and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Test apparatus and materials. 1610.5 Section... STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.5 Test apparatus and materials. (a) Flammability apparatus. The flammability test apparatus consists of a draft-proof ventilated chamber...

  11. 16 CFR 1610.5 - Test apparatus and materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Test apparatus and materials. 1610.5 Section... STANDARD FOR THE FLAMMABILITY OF CLOTHING TEXTILES The Standard § 1610.5 Test apparatus and materials. (a) Flammability apparatus. The flammability test apparatus consists of a draft-proof ventilated chamber...

  12. MISSE-X Tests the Materials of Tomorrow's Missions

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA's Technology Demonstration Missions (TDM) focus on maturing technology for use in future missions. The Materials on International Space Station Experiment-X, MISSE-X, will test numerous materi...

  13. About the Compatibility between High Voltage Spinel Cathode Materials and Solid Oxide Electrolytes as a Function of Temperature.

    PubMed

    Miara, Lincoln; Windmüller, Anna; Tsai, Chih-Long; Richards, William D; Ma, Qianli; Uhlenbruck, Sven; Guillon, Olivier; Ceder, Gerbrand

    2016-10-12

    The reactivity of mixtures of high voltage spinel cathode materials Li2NiMn3O8, Li2FeMn3O8, and LiCoMnO4 cosintered with Li1.5Al0.5Ti1.5(PO4)3 and Li6.6La3Zr1.6Ta0.4O12 electrolytes is studied by thermal analysis using X-ray-diffraction and differential thermoanalysis and thermogravimetry coupled with mass spectrometry. The results are compared with predicted decomposition reactions from first-principles calculations. Decomposition of the mixtures begins at 600 °C, significantly lower than the decomposition temperature of any component, especially the electrolytes. For the cathode + Li6.6La3Zr1.6Ta0.4O12 mixtures, lithium and oxygen from the electrolyte react with the cathodes to form highly stable Li2MnO3 and then decompose to form stable and often insulating phases such as La2Zr2O7, La2O3, La3TaO7, TiO2, and LaMnO3 which are likely to increase the interfacial impedance of a cathode composite. The decomposition reactions are identified with high fidelity by first-principles calculations. For the cathode + Li1.5Al0.5Ti1.5(PO4)3 mixtures, the Mn tends to oxidize to MnO2 or Mn2O3, supplying lithium to the electrolyte for the formation of Li3PO4 and metal phosphates such as AlPO4 and LiMPO4 (M = Mn, Ni). The results indicate that high temperature cosintering to form dense cathode composites between spinel cathodes and oxide electrolytes will produce high impedance interfacial products, complicating solid state battery manufacturing.

  14. Inoculation testing of Apollo 12 materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    E. Landrum Young, Brown and Root Northrop, injects a young Japanese quail with a suspension of pulvarized Apollo 12 lunar material within a quarantine cabinet in the Invertebrate, Aves and Fish Laboratory of the Lunar Receiving Laboratory, bldg 37, Manned Spacecraft Center. The bird is being inoculated in the abdominal cavity.

  15. Materials Testing in the 21st Century

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    Army (RDA), Wash ington, DC 20310 ATTN: Or . J. G. Prather, Dep far Sci & Tec h Dr. J . R. Sculley , SARD Deputy Chief of Staff , Resear ch, De ve...The John Hopkins Univers i ty, Department of Ci vil Engineer ing/ Materials Sc ience and Eng ineer ing, Ba l t imore, MD 28218 ATTN: Or. R. E

  16. Automation software for a materials testing laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgaw, Michael A.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    1986-01-01

    A comprehensive software system for automating much of the experimental process has recently been completed at the Lewis Research Center's high-temperature fatigue and structures laboratory. The system was designed to support experiment definition and conduct, results analysis and archiving, and report generation activities. This was accomplished through the design and construction of several software systems, as well as through the use of several commercially available software products, all operating on a local, distributed minicomputer system. Experimental capabilities currently supported in an automated fashion include both isothermal and thermomechanical fatigue and deformation testing capabilities. The future growth and expansion of this system will be directed toward providing multiaxial test control, enhanced thermomechanical test control, and higher test frequency (hundreds of hertz).

  17. Material Damage Test for ILC Collimators

    SciTech Connect

    Fernandez Hernando, J.L.; Blair, G.A.; Boogert, S.T.; Ellwood, G.E.; Greenhalgh, J.; Keller, L.; Watson, N.K.; /Birmingham U.

    2007-08-14

    Simulations were completed to determine the energy deposition of an ILC bunch using FLUKA, Geant4 and EGS4 to a set of different spoiler designs. These shower simulations were used as inputs to thermal and mechanical studies using ANSYS. This paper presents a proposal to optimize the material choice and mechanical design of ILC spoilers jaws using ATF and benchmark the energy deposition simulations and the ANSYS studies giving the researchers valuable data which will help achieve a definitive ILC spoiler design.

  18. Acoustic emission from composite materials. [nondestructive tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Visconti, I. C.; Teti, R.

    1979-01-01

    The two basic areas where the acoustic emission (AE) technique can be applied are materials research and the evaluation of structural reliability. This experimental method leads to a better understanding of fracture mechanisms and is an NDT technique particularly well suited for the study of propagating cracks. Experiments are described in which acoustic emissions were unambiguously correlated with microstructural fracture mechanisms. The advantages and limitations of the AE technique are noted.

  19. Partial Testing Can Potentiate Learning of Tested and Untested Material from Multimedia Lessons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yue, Carole L.; Soderstrom, Nicholas C.; Bjork, Elizabeth Ligon

    2015-01-01

    Test-potentiated learning occurs when testing renders a subsequent study period more effective than it would have been without an intervening test. We examined whether testing only a subset of material from a multimedia lesson would potentiate the restudy of both tested and untested material. In Experiments 1a and 1b, participants studied a…

  20. Elastomers Compatible With High-Pressure Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Compatibility increased by fluorination. Report describes experiments aimed at improving compatibility of some fluorinated elastomers with high-pressure oxygen. Such elastomers needed for seals, gaskets, and positive-expulsion devices used with high-pressure oxygen. Oxygen - compatibility tests carried out on five elastomers chosen on the basis of literature survey.

  1. Recent developments in dynamic testing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilat, A.; Seidt, J. D.

    2012-08-01

    Three new testing configurations that have been developed since the last DYMAT conference in 2009 are presented. The first is high strain rate testing of Kevlar cloth and Kevlar yarn in a tensile Split Hopkinson Bar (SHB) apparatus. The Kevlar cloth/yarn is attached to the bars by specially designed adaptors that keep the impedance constant. In addition to determining the specimen's stress and strain from the recorded waves in the bars the deformations are also measured with Digital Image Correlation (DIC). The second testing configuration is a high strain rate shear test for sheet metal. The experiment is done by using a flat notched specimen in a tensile SHB apparatus. The shear strain is measured using DIC within the notch and on the boundary. The third development is a compression apparatus for testing at intermediate strain rates ranging from 20 s-1 to 200 s-1. The apparatus is a combination of a hydraulic actuator and a compression SHB. The stress in the specimen is determined from the stress wave in a very long transmitter bar and the strain and strain rate is determined by using DIC. The results show clean stress strain curves (no ringing).

  2. Bin-scale tests dry test bin assembly [Engineering Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-10-01

    This report consists of engineering drawings of the following areas of the WIPP facility: dry test bin assembly; internal bin manifold modified design; dry test bin details; humid bin RCB lid; SWB lid modification for RCB lid assembly and details; TRUPACT II standard waste box assembly; waste handling building 411 ground floor slab-sump plans and sections; and waste handling floor building 411 ground floor slab plan.

  3. Electrochemical Corrosion Testing of Neutron Absorber Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Tedd Lister; Ron Mizia; Arnold Erickson; Tammy Trowbridge

    2007-05-01

    This report summarizes the results of crevice-corrosion tests for six alloys in solutions representative of ionic compositions inside the Yucca Mountain waste package should a breech occur. The alloys in these tests are Neutronit A978a (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B4 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B5 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Neutrosorb Plus 304B6 Grade Ab (powder metallurgy, hot rolled), Ni-Cr-Mo-Gd alloy2 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled), and Alloy 22 (ingot metallurgy, hot rolled).

  4. Elastomer Compatible With Oxygen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Jon W.

    1987-01-01

    Artificial rubber resists ignition on impact and seals at low temperatures. Filled fluoroelastomer called "Katiflex" developed for use in seals of vessels holding cold liquid and gaseous oxygen. New material more compatible with liquid oxygen than polytetrafluoroethylene. Provides dynamic seal at -196 degrees C with only 4 times seal stress required at room temperature. In contrast, conventional rubber seals burn or explode on impact in high-pressure oxygen, and turn hard or even brittle at liquid-oxygen temperatures, do not seal reliably, also see (MFS-28124).

  5. Mechanics of Granular Materials (MGM) Test Cell

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    Test cells comprise specimen sand contained in a latex membrane (with a grid pattern for CCD cameras) between metal end plates and housed in a water-filled Lexan jacket. Experiment flown on STS-79 and STS-89. Principal Investigator: Dr. Stein Sture.

  6. Means for ultrasonic testing when material properties vary

    DOEpatents

    Beller, Laurence S.

    1979-01-01

    A device is provided for maintaining constant sensitivity in an ultrasonic testing device, despite varying attenuation due to the properties of the material being tested. The device includes a sensor transducer for transmitting and receiving a test signal and a monitor transducer positioned so as to receive ultrasonic energy transmitted through the material to be tested. The received signal of the monitor transducer is utilized in analyzing data obtained from the sensor transducer.

  7. Strain compatibility assessment for SRB sprayable ablator MSA-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, W. J.

    1979-01-01

    Tensile and compressive strain compatibility testing was performed on as-sprayed samples of the Shuttle Solid Rocket Booster external ablator material, MSA-1. Strain gages on the aluminum substrate were used to monitor strain. Strain compatibility was determined as the percent strain in the substrate at first visual evidence of MSA-1 failure. The 1/8-in. MSA-1, baselined for large areas of the SRB external skin, was characterized by a strain compatibility of 1.5 to 1.8 percent, which far exceeded the yield range of the metal substrate. Thicker MSA-1 applications (1.4 to 3/8 in.) were characterized by a lower level of strain compatibility, which appeared to be a manifestation of application limitations.

  8. Full-scale aircraft cabin flammability tests of improved fire-resistant materials, test series 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, R. N.; Bricker, R. W.; Kuminecz, J. F.; Supkis, D. E.

    1976-01-01

    Full-scale aircraft flammability tests in which the effectiveness of new fire-resistant materials was evaluated by comparing their burning characteristics with those of other fire-resistant aircraft materials were described. New-fire-resistant materials that are more economical and better suited for aircraft use than the previously tested fire-resistant materials were tested. The fuel ignition source for one test was JP-4; a smokeless fuel was used for the other test. Test objectives, methods, materials, and results are presented and discussed. The results indicate that, similar to the fire-resistant materials tested previously, the new materials decompose rather than ignite and do not support fire propagation. Furthermore, the new materials did not produce a flash fire.

  9. Rolling element fatigue testing of gear materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Rolling element fatigue lives of eleven alloys were evaluated. The eleven alloys studied were three nitriding alloys (Super Nitralloy, Nitralloy 135, and Nitralloy N), four case carburizing alloys (AISI 9310, CBS 600, CBS 1000M and Vasco X-2), and four throughhardening alloys (Vasco Matrix II,AISI W-1, AISI S-2 and AISI O-2). Several different heat treatments and/or melting processes were studied on the three carburizing alloy steels. Metallurgical analyses were made before and after the RC rig tests. Test data were statistically analyzed using the Weibull distribution function. B-10 lives were compared versus VIM-VAR AISI M-50 and carburized VAR AISI 9310, as reference alloys.

  10. Microscale material testing of single crystalline silicon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yi, Taechung

    The mechanical properties of single crystalline silicon (SCS) in microscale are characterized using a uniaxial tension test. The samples are prepared using, various micromachining techniques. The dimensions of the tension specimen at the maximum stress region are 5 to 10 mum in thickness and 20 to 100 mum in width. The sample has two illumination marks on the top surface for strain measurement. The uniaxial tension test setup has been built to accommodate requirements such as sample handling, sample alignment, and friction elimination. Stress is measured using a commercial load cell. Strain is measured by laser interferometry. All the components are connected to a data acquisition board and controlled by a personal computer. Measured Young's moduli in three directions agree well with the reference values and verify the reliability of the setup and measurement procedure. The measured fracture strength is 0.6 GPa to 1.2 GPa, depending on sample preparation methods and loading directions. Preliminary work for fracture toughness measurements using a sharp initial crack is also presented. Future works include further investigation of fracture surfaces, fracture toughness measurement using crack opening criteria, and improvement of the testing apparatus.

  11. Preparation and Use of Polish Mushroom Proficiency Testing Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Polkowska-Motrenko, Halina

    2008-08-14

    Mushroom reference materials have been prepared and characterized for the use in proficiency tests according to a procedure established within the frame of an IAEA Interregional Technical Cooperation Project. The materials were used for conducting the proficiency tests in Poland in 2005-2007. The results obtained by participating laboratories are presented and discussed.

  12. High temperature ultrasonic testing of materials for internal flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Linzer, M.

    1988-08-23

    An apparatus is disclosed for nondestructive evaluation of defects in hot materials, such as metals and ceramics, by sonic signals, which includes a zirconia buffer in contact with a hot material being tested, a liquid couplant of borax in contact with the zirconia buffer and the hot material to be tested, transmitting means mounted on the zirconia buffer sending sonic signals through the buffer and couplant into the hot material, and receiving means mounted on the zirconia buffer receiving sonic signals reflected from within the hot material through the couplant and the buffer. 2 figs.

  13. High temperature ultrasonic testing of materials for internal flaws

    SciTech Connect

    Kupperman, D.S.; Linzer, M.

    1990-02-06

    This patent describes an apparatus disclosed for nondestructive evaluation of defects in hot materials, such as metals and ceramics, by sonic signals. It comprises: a zirconia buffer in contact with a hot material being tested, a liquid couplant of borax in contact with the zirconia buffer and the hot material to be tested, a transmitter mounted on the zirconia buffer sending sonic signals through the buffer and couplant into the hot material, and a receiver mounted on the zirconia buffer receiving sonic signals reflected from within the hot material through the couplant and the buffer.

  14. Microwave sensors for nondestructive testing of materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lasri, Tuami; Glay, David; Mamouni, Ahmed; Leroy, Yves

    1999-10-01

    Much of today's applications in nondestructive testing by microwaves use an automatic network analyzer. As a result, there is a need for systems to reduce the cost of this kind of techniques. Fortunately, now we can benefit from the cost reduction of the microwave components, induced by the considerable development of the communication market, around 2 and 10 GHz. So, it seems reasonable to think that microwaves will take advantage of this new situation to assert themselves in this application field. In this context we conceive and develop original equipment competitive in term of price and reliability.

  15. Rolling element fatigue testing of gear materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nahm, A. H.

    1978-01-01

    Rolling element fatigue lives of nine alloys were evaluated in Rolling Contact (RC) rigs. Test conditions included a Hertzian stress at 4,826 MPa (700 ksi), a rolling speed of 6.23 m/sec (245 in/sec.). Tests were run with a Type I oil (MIL-L-7808G) at room temperature. B-10 lives (10% failure rate) of alloys were compared versus reference alloys, VIM-VAR AISI M-50 and VAR AISI 9310. Six case carburizing alloys (AISI 9310, CBS600, CBS1000M, EX00014, Vasco X-2 and EX00053) and three through-hardening alloys (AISI M-50, VascoMax 350 and Vasco Matrix 2 evaluated, showed RCF performance inferior or equivalent to that of AISI 9310 and AISI M-50. It was also found that the effects of vacuum melting processes, different tempering temperatures, freezing cycle during heat treating, shot peening, gold plating and chrome plating employed in the present investigation did not significantly affect RCF life.

  16. Prototype testing of a solar dryer of granular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Murdock, J.D.

    1982-01-01

    The results of testing a two module prototype solar convection dryer are presented. Collected data showed that the 540 square foot dryer can evaporate up to 900 pounds of water from a wet granular material over a 24 hour period in the Philadelphia climate. Testing included experimentation with different materials handling systems to determine the best method of moving each wet material through the dryer.

  17. Handbook of photothermal test data on encapsulant materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liang, R. H.; Oda, K. L.; Chung, S. Y.; Smith, M. V.; Gupta, A.

    1983-01-01

    Laboratory tests performed to characterize candidate encapsulation materials with respect to changes in their physical and chemical properties caused by photothermal aging are described. Several key material properties relating directly to material degradation and deterioration of performance were identified and were monitored as functions of aging conditions and time. A status report on accelerated testing activities is provided and experimental data are presented. It will be updated periodically as more data become available.

  18. Mixed waste chemical compatibility with packaging components

    SciTech Connect

    Nigrey, P.J.; Conroy, M.; Blalock, L.B.

    1994-05-01

    In this paper, a chemical compatibility testing program for packaging of mixed wastes at will be described. We will discuss the choice of four y-radiation doses, four time durations, four temperatures and four waste solutions to simulate the hazardous waste components of mixed wastes for testing materials compatibility of polymers. The selected simulant wastes are (1) an aqueous alkaline mixture of sodium nitrate and sodium nitrite; (2) a chlorinated hydrocarbon mixture; (3) a simulant liquid scintillation fluid; and (4) a mixture of ketones. A selection of 10 polymers with anticipated high resistance to one or more of these types of environments are proposed for testing as potential liner or seal materials. These polymers are butadiene acrylonitrile copolymer, cross-linked polyethylene, epichlorhyarin, ethylene-propylene rubber, fluorocarbon, glass-filled tetrafluoroethylene, high-density poly-ethylene, isobutylene-isoprene copolymer, polypropylene, and styrene-butadiene rubber. We will describe the elements of the testing plan along with a metric for establishing time resistance of the packaging materials to radiation and chemicals.

  19. Compatibility evaluation between La{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} fast oxide-ion conductor and Ni-based materials

    SciTech Connect

    Corbel, Gwenael . E-mail: gwenael.corbel@univ-lemans.fr; Lacorre, Philippe

    2006-05-15

    The chemical reactivity of La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+} {sub {delta}} and nickel metal or nickel oxide with fast oxide-ion conductor La{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} is investigated in the annealing temperature range between 600 and 1000 deg. C, using room temperature X-ray powder diffraction. Within the La{sub 2}NiO{sub 4+} {sub {delta}} /La{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} system, subsequent reaction is evidenced at relatively low annealing temperature (600 deg. C), with formation of La{sub 2}MoO{sub 6} and NiO. The reaction is complete at 1000 deg. C. At reverse, no reaction occurs between Ni or NiO and La{sub 2}Mo{sub 2}O{sub 9} up to 1000 deg. C. Together with a previous work [G. Corbel, S. Mestiri, P. Lacorre, Solid State Sci. 7 (2005) 1216], the current study shows that Ni-CGO cermets might be chemically and mechanically compatible anode materials to work with LAMOX electrolytes in solid oxide fuel cells.

  20. VAMAS tests of structural materials on aluminum alloy and composite material at cryogenic temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Ogata, T.; Evans, D.

    1997-06-01

    A Technical Working Area 17, cryogenic structural materials, has been organized in the Versailles Project on Advanced Materials and Standards (VAMAS) to promote the prestandardization program on material properties tests of glass fiber reinforced polymer (GFRP) composite materials and alloys at liquid helium temperature. A series of international interlaboratory comparisons of both tensile and fracture toughness tests for aluminum alloy 2219 and compression and shear tests for composite material G-10CR were performed. Nine research institutes from seven nations have participated in this project. The results prove that there are few problems in cryogenic tensile tests for alloy materials. In compression and shear tests, the amount of data scatter was identified and further experiments are planned. This paper presents the program details and interim results of round robin tests.

  1. Results of Materials Testing for ElectroSpark Deposition

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-01-01

    Results of materials testing for ElectroSpark Deposition Norma Price Advanced Surfaces and Processes, Inc. HCAT Program Review Meeting Hilton San...Results of materials testing for ElectroSpark Deposition 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT... ElectroSpark Deposition (ESD) as technically feasible and commercially viable for a production-scale process, and to perform the tests necessary to

  2. Correlating Flammability of Materials with FTIR Analysis Test Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Robin; Whitfield, Steve

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this experiment was to correlate flammability data with FTIR test results. Kydex 100 is a blend of chlorinated polyvinyl chloride and polymethylmethacrylate, with some filler materials. Samples supplied were 0.125 in. thick. 10 samples were taken from a sheet of Kydex and analyzed for flammability and by FTIR spectroscopy. This material was utilized as a round robin sample for flammability testing. The flammability test results were found to vary across the same sheet.

  3. Characterization and wall compatibility testing of a 40K pound thrust class swirl-coaxial injector and calorimeter combustion chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, E. L.; Rozelle, R.; Borgel, P. J.

    1991-01-01

    Subscale injector-combustor tests under the NASA Space Transportation Engine Thrust Chamber Technology program measured characteristic velocity (c-asterisk) efficiencies and wall heat fluxes for the pressure range 1710 psia to 2360 psia and for the overall O2/H2 mixture ratio range 5.5 to 6.4. Tests involving radially-uniform mixture ratio profiles produced c-asterisk efficiencies above 99 percent; nonuniform profiles associated with wall durability-enhancement schemes resulted in lower efficiencies. Though all three wall protection methods proved successful at reducing wall heat flux, scarfing of the outer-row, swirl-coaxial injection elements was the technique which resulted in the least debit in c-asterisk per unit reduction in heat flux.

  4. A New Tribological Test for Candidate Brush Seal Materials Evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fellenstein, James A.; Dellacorte, Christopher

    1994-01-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700 C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  5. A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Fellenstein, J.A.; DellaCorte, C.

    1994-10-01

    A new tribological test for candidate brush seal materials evaluation has been developed. The sliding contact between the brush seal wires and their mating counterface journal is simulated by testing a small tuft of wire against the outside diameter of a high speed rotating shaft. The test configuration is similar to a standard block on ring geometry. The new tester provides the capability to measure both the friction and wear of candidate wire and counterface materials under controlled loading conditions in the gram to kilogram range. A wide test condition latitude of speeds (1 to 27 m/s), temperatures (25 to 700C), and loads (0.5 to 10 N) enables the simulation of many of the important tribological parameters found in turbine engine brush seals. This paper describes the new test rig and specimen configuration and presents initial data for candidate seal materials comparing tuft test results and wear surface morphology to field tested seal components.

  6. Cryogenic Chamber for Servo-Hydraulic Materials Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Francis, John J.; Tuttle, James

    2009-01-01

    A compact cryogenic test chamber can be cooled to approximately 5 to 6 Kelvin for materials testing. The system includes a temperature controller and multiple sensors to measure specimen temperature at different locations. The testing chamber provides a fast and easy method to perform materials testing at lower than liquid nitrogen temperature (77 K). The purpose of the chamber is to cool a composite lap shear specimen to approximately 20 K so that tensile test force and displacement data may be acquired at this cryogenic temperature range.

  7. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Gelbard, Fred; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-03-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford Tank Farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  8. Test plan for the irradiation of nonmetallic materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Brush, Laurence H.; Farnum, Cathy Ottinger; Dahl, M.; Joslyn, C. C.; Venetz, T. J.

    2013-05-01

    A comprehensive test program to evaluate nonmetallic materials use in the Hanford tank farms is described in detail. This test program determines the effects of simultaneous multiple stressors at reasonable conditions on in-service configuration components by engineering performance testing.

  9. Arc Jet Testing of Thermal Protection Materials: 3 Case Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Conley, Joe

    2015-01-01

    Arc jet testing is used to simulate entry to test thermal protection materials. This paper discusses the usefulness of arc jet testing for 3 cases. Case 1 is MSL and PICA, Case 2 is Advanced TUFROC, and Case 3 is conformable ablators.

  10. High temperature ultrasonic testing of materials for internal flaws

    DOEpatents

    Kupperman, David S.; Linzer, Melvin

    1990-01-01

    An apparatus is disclosed for nondestructive evaluation of defects in hot terials, such as metals and ceramics, by sonic signals, which includes a zirconia buffer in contact with a hot material being tested, a liquid couplant of borax in contact with the zirconia buffer and the hot material to be tested, a transmitter mounted on the zirconia buffer sending sonic signals through the buffer and couplant into the hot material, and a receiver mounted on the zirconia buffer receiving sonic signals reflected from within the hot material through the couplant and the buffer.

  11. Thermal cyclic durability testing of ceramic materials for turbine engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lindberg, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    The thermal cyclic durability of commercial ceramic materials for turbine engines was under evaluation since 1978. Ceramic materials are exposed to cyclic diesel-fired burner exhaust at either 1204 or 1371 C (2200 or 2500 F) for up to 3500 hours. The test conditions are selected to simulate the environment experienced by the hot flow path components in an automotive gas turbine engine. The silicon nitride and silicon carbide materials tested are the same ceramic materials currently used on the AGT100 and AGT101 ceramic turbine engine program.

  12. Indentation testing and optimized property identification for viscoelastic materials using the finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Resapu, Rajeswara Reddy

    The most common approaches to determining mechanical material properties of materials are tension and compression tests. However, tension and compression testing cannot be implemented under certain loading conditions (immovable object, not enough space to hold object for testing, etc). Similarly, tensile and compression testing cannot be performed on certain types of materials (delicate, bulk, non-machinable, those that cannot be separated from a larger structure, etc). For such cases, other material testing methods need to be implemented. Indentation testing is one such method; this approach is often non-destructive and can be used to characterize regions that are not compatible with other testing methods. However, indentation testing typically leads to force-displacement data as opposed to the direct stress-strain data normally used for the mechanical characterization of materials; this data needs to be analyzed using a suitable approach to determine the associated material properties. As such, methods to establish material properties from force-displacement indentation data need to be identified. In this work, a finite element approach using parameter optimization is developed to determine the mechanical properties from the experimental indentation data. Polymers and tissues tend to have time-dependent mechanical behavior; this means that their mechanical response under load changes with time. This dissertation seeks to characterize the properties of these materials using indentation testing under the assumption that they are linear viscoelastic. An example of a material of interest is the polymer poly vinyl chloride (PVC) that is used as the insulation of some aircraft wiring. Changes in the mechanical properties of this material over years of service can indicate degradation and a potential hazard to continued use. To investigate the validity of using indentation testing to monitor polymer insulation degradation, PVC film and PVC-insulated aircraft wiring are

  13. Correlation of elastomer material properties from small specimen tests and scale-size bearing tests

    SciTech Connect

    Kulak, R.F.; Hughes, T.H.

    1994-06-01

    Tests were performed on small-size elastomer specimens and scale-size laminated elastomeric bearings to correlate the material properties in shear between the two types of tests. An objective of the tests was to see how well the material properties that were determined from specimen tests could predict the response of scale-size laminated elastomeric bearings. Another objective was to compare the results of specimen test and scale-size bearing test conducted by different testing organizations. A comparison between the test results from different organizations on small specimens showed very good agreement. In contrast, the correlation of scale-size bearing tests showed differences in bearing stiffness.

  14. Testing techniques for mechanical characterization of rapidly solidified materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koch, C. C.

    1986-01-01

    Mechanical property testing techniques are reviewed for rapidly solidified materials. Mechanical testing of rapidly solidified materials is complicated by the fact that in most cases at least one dimension of the material is very small (less than 100 microns). For some geometries, i.e., powder or thin surface layers, microhardness is the only feasible mechanical test. The ribbon geometry which is obtained by the melt-spinning method, however, has been used for a variety of mechanical property measurements including elastic properties, tensile properties, fracture toughness, creep, and fatigue. These techniques are described with emphasis placed on the precautions required by the restricted geometry of rapidly solidified specimens.

  15. Aluminum Alloys for Cryogenic Tanks: Oxygen Compatibility. Volume 1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-09-01

    NASA NHB 8060.lB’ (Paragraph 413, Test 13), the NASA qualification standard for mechanical-impact testing to assesS-oxygen compatibility of materials ...Modulus 19. 1.3.4.2. Specific Heat 19. 1.3.4.3. Thermal Conductivity 26. 1.3.5. Microstructure of the As-Received Materials 26. 1.4. Experimental...Cup Mechanical Impact Testing at WSTF 39. 1.4.2.1. Equipment and Procedures 39. 1.4.2.2. Materials 40. 1.4.2.3. Conditions 40. 1.4.3. Pressurized LOX

  16. Impact Testing of Stainless Steel Material at Cold Temperatures

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer D. Snow; D. Keith Morton; Robert K. Blandford

    2008-07-01

    Stainless steels are used for the construction of numerous spent nuclear fuel or radioactive material containers that may be subjected to high strains and moderate strain rates during accidental drop events. Mechanical characteristics of these base materials and their welds under dynamic loads in the strain rate range of concern are not well documented. However, a previous paper [1] reported on impact testing and analysis results performed at the Idaho National Laboratory using 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel base material specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The goal of the work presented herein is to add recently completed impact tensile testing results at -20 degrees F conditions for dual-marked 304/304L and 316/316L stainless steel material specimens (hereafter referred to as 304L and 316L, respectively). Recently completed welded material impact testing at -20 degrees F, room, 300 degrees F, and 600 degrees F is also reported. Utilizing a drop-weight impact test machine and 1/4-inch to 1/2-inch thick dog-bone shaped test specimens, the impact tests achieved strain rates in the 4 to 40 per second range, depending upon the material temperature. Elevated true stress-strain curves for these materials reflecting varying strain rates and temperatures are presented herein.

  17. Round-Robin Test of Paraffin Phase-Change Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidi, S.; Mehling, H.; Hemberger, F.; Haussmann, Th.; Laube, A.

    2015-11-01

    A round-robin test between three institutes was performed on a paraffin phase-change material (PCM) in the context of the German quality association for phase-change materials. The aim of the quality association is to define quality and test specifications for PCMs and to award certificates for successfully tested materials. To ensure the reproducibility and comparability of the measurements performed at different institutes using different measuring methods, a round-robin test was performed. The sample was unknown. The four methods used by the three participating institutes in the round-robin test were differential scanning calorimetry, Calvet calorimetry and three-layer calorimetry. Additionally, T-history measurements were made. The aim of the measurements was the determination of the enthalpy as a function of temperature. The results achieved following defined test specifications are in excellent agreement.

  18. TRIAXIAL AND SHEAR TESTING OF SELECTED BACKFILL MATERIALS

    SciTech Connect

    N. E. Kramer

    2000-08-07

    The Subsurface Performance Testing Section is performing tests in the Department of Energy's Atlas Facility to evaluate the performance of various backfill materials. Triaxial and shear tests were conducted on select backfill materials. The specific materials tested were: crushed tuff, overton sand, 4- 10 silica sand, 1/4'' dolostone/marble, and limestone. The objective of this report is to provide an estimated value for Poisson's ratio, determine internal friction angle, and stress-strain modulus of the backfill materials that were tested. These basic parameters are necessary for the selection of a backfill material to be included in the repository. This report transmits the results in both hardcopy and electronic formats plus describes the methodology and interpretation of the results. No conclusions will be drawn about the test results, as this will be the purview of other reports. The scope of this report is to use the triaxial and shear testing information and calculate, the internal friction angle, stress-strain modulus, and provide an estimate of Poisson's ratio (Sowers 1979, p. 199) of the selected backfill materials. Standard laboratory procedures, mentioned in Section 2 of this report, were used.

  19. Special Nuclear Material Portal Monitoring at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    DeAnn Long; Michael Murphy

    2008-07-01

    Prior to April 2007, acceptance and performance testing of the various Special Nuclear Material (SNM) monitoring devices at the Nevada Test Site (NTS) was performed by the Radiological Health Instrumentation department. Calibration and performance testing on the PM-700 personnel portal monitor was performed, but there was no test program for the VM-250 vehicle portal monitor. The handheld SNM monitors, the TSA model 470B, were being calibrated annually, but there was no performance test program. In April of 2007, the Material Control and Accountability Manager volunteered to take over performance testing of all SNM portal monitors at NTS in order to strengthen the program and meet U.S. Department of Energy Order requirements. This paper will discuss the following activities associated with developing a performance testing program: changing the culture, learning the systems, developing and implementing procedures, troubleshooting and repair, validating the process, physical control of equipment, acquisition of new systems, and implementing the performance test program.

  20. Test Report: Direct and Indirect Lightning Effects on Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Lightning tests were performed on composite materials as a part of an investigation of electromagnetic effects on the materials. Samples were subjected to direct and remote simulated lightning strikes. Samples included various thicknesses of graphite filament reinforced plastic (GFRP), material enhanced by expanded aluminum foil layers, and material with an aluminum honeycomb core. Shielding properties of the material and damage to the sample surfaces and joints were investigated. Adding expanded aluminum foil layers and increasing the thickness of GFRP improves the shielding effectiveness against lightning induced fields and the ability to withstand lightning strikes. A report describing the lightning strike tests performed by the U.S. Army Redstone Technical Test Center, Redstone Arsenal, AL, STERT-TE-E-EM, is included as an appendix.

  1. Salt materials testing for a spacecraft adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Savage, M. L.; Kittel, P.; Roellig, T.

    As part of a technology development effort to qualify adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for use in a NASA spacecraft, such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, a study of low temperature characteristics, heat capacity and resistance to dehydration was conducted for different salt materials. This report includes results of testing with cerrous metaphosphate, several synthetic rubies, and chromic potassium alum (CPA). Preliminary results show that CPA may be suitable for long-term spacecraft use, provided that the salt is property encapsulated. Methods of salt pill construction and testing for all materials are discussed, as well as reliability tests. Also, the temperature regulation scheme and the test cryostat design are briefly discussed.

  2. Salt materials testing for a spacecraft adiabatic demagnetization refrigerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, M. L.; Kittel, P.; Roellig, T.

    1990-01-01

    As part of a technology development effort to qualify adiabatic demagnetization refrigerators for use in a NASA spacecraft, such as the Space Infrared Telescope Facility, a study of low temperature characteristics, heat capacity and resistance to dehydration was conducted for different salt materials. This report includes results of testing with cerrous metaphosphate, several synthetic rubies, and chromic potassium alum (CPA). Preliminary results show that CPA may be suitable for long-term spacecraft use, provided that the salt is property encapsulated. Methods of salt pill construction and testing for all materials are discussed, as well as reliability tests. Also, the temperature regulation scheme and the test cryostat design are briefly discussed.

  3. Dredged Material Testing and Evaluation for Ocean Disposal

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Evaluation and testing of dredged material proposed for ocean dumping is conducted to help protect human health and the marine environment. National guidance is provided by the Green Book. Regional Implementation Manuals are provided.

  4. Damage testing of sapphire and Ti: sapphire laser materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    Diffusion bonded sapphire and Ti (Titanium). Sapphire laser materials that will be damage tested to determine if there is an increase in damage threshold. Photographed in building 1145, photographic studio.

  5. Rubber composition compatible with hydrazine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Repar, J.

    1973-01-01

    Formulation improves compatibility of butyl rubbers with hydrazine while reducing permeation to low levels necessary for prolonged storage in space. This is accomplished by replacing carbon-black filler with inert materials such as hydrated silica or clay. Pressure increases suggest that hydrazine is decomposed only slightly by new type of rubber.

  6. FMIT test cell diagnostics3- A unique materials challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannon, C. P.; Fuller, J. L.

    Basic materials problems are discussed in instrumenting the FMIT test cell, which are applicable to fusion devices in general. Recent data on ceramic-to-metal seals, mineral insulated instrument cables, thermocouples, and optical components are reviewed. The data makes it clear that materials and instruments cannot be expected to behave in the FMIT test cell environment as they do in more familiar fission reactors and low power accelerators.

  7. Lining material tests for the AUGER PROJECT surface detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escobar, C. O.; Fauth, A. C.; Guzzo, M. M.; Shibuya, E. H.

    1999-03-01

    We are trying to obtain a suitable material to compose the lining of a water Cerenkov tank for the surface detector. part of a hybrid detector of the Auger Project. Results of tests were compared with DuPont 1073Tyvek TM and obtained a reasonable performance for (PVC+BaSO 4) material.

  8. Using Virtual Testing for Characterization of Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrington, Joseph

    Composite materials are finally providing uses hitherto reserved for metals in structural systems applications -- airframes and engine containment systems, wraps for repair and rehabilitation, and ballistic/blast mitigation systems. They have high strength-to-weight ratios, are durable and resistant to environmental effects, have high impact strength, and can be manufactured in a variety of shapes. Generalized constitutive models are being developed to accurately model composite systems so they can be used in implicit and explicit finite element analysis. These models require extensive characterization of the composite material as input. The particular constitutive model of interest for this research is a three-dimensional orthotropic elasto-plastic composite material model that requires a total of 12 experimental stress-strain curves, yield stresses, and Young's Modulus and Poisson's ratio in the material directions as input. Sometimes it is not possible to carry out reliable experimental tests needed to characterize the composite material. One solution is using virtual testing to fill the gaps in available experimental data. A Virtual Testing Software System (VTSS) has been developed to address the need for a less restrictive method to characterize a three-dimensional orthotropic composite material. The system takes in the material properties of the constituents and completes all 12 of the necessary characterization tests using finite element (FE) models. Verification and validation test cases demonstrate the capabilities of the VTSS.

  9. Electro-magnetic compatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maidment, H.

    1980-05-01

    The historical background to the growth in problems of electromagnetic compatibility (EMC) in UK Military aircraft is reviewed and the present approach for minimizing these problems during development is discussed. The importance of using representative aircraft for final EMC assessments is stressed, and the methods of approach in planning and executing such tests are also outlined. The present equipment qualification procedures are based on assumptions regarding the electromagnetic fields present within the airframe, and the nature of the coupling mechanisms. These cannot be measured with any certainty in representative aircraft. Thus EMC assessments rely on practical tests. Avionics systems critical to flight safety, and systems vital to mission effectiveness require test methods that provide a measure of the safety and performance margins available to account for variations that occur in production and service use. Some proven methods are available, notably for detonator circuits, but in most other areas further work is required. Encouraging process has been made in the use of current probes for the measurement of interfering signals on critical signal lines, in conjunction with complementary test house procedures, as a means for obtaining the safety margins required in flight and engine control systems. Performance margins for mission systems using digital techniques are difficult to determine, and there is a need for improved test techniques. The present EMC qualification tests for equipment in the laboratory do not guarantee freedom from interference when installed, and the results are limited in value for correlating with aircraft tests.

  10. The concept verification testing of materials science payloads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Griner, C. S.; Johnston, M. H.; Whitaker, A.

    1976-01-01

    The concept Verification Testing (CVT) project at the Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama, is a developmental activity that supports Shuttle Payload Projects such as Spacelab. It provides an operational 1-g environment for testing NASA and other agency experiment and support systems concepts that may be used in shuttle. A dedicated Materials Science Payload was tested in the General Purpose Laboratory to assess the requirements of a space processing payload on a Spacelab type facility. Physical and functional integration of the experiments into the facility was studied, and the impact of the experiments on the facility (and vice versa) was evaluated. A follow-up test designated CVT Test IVA was also held. The purpose of this test was to repeat Test IV experiments with a crew composed of selected and trained scientists. These personnel were not required to have prior knowledge of the materials science disciplines, but were required to have a basic knowledge of science and the scientific method.

  11. BMDO materials testing in the EOIM-3 experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chung, Shirley Y.; Brinza, David E.; Minton, Timothy K.; Liang, Ranty H.

    1995-01-01

    The NASA Evaluation of Oxygen Interactions with Materials-3 (EOIM-3) experiment served as a testbed for a variety of materials that are candidates for Ballistic Missile Defense Organization (BMDO) space assets. The materials evaluated on this flight experiment were provided by BMDO contractors and technology laboratories. A parallel ground-based exposure evaluation was conducted using the Fast Atom Sample Tester (FAST) atomic-oxygen simulation facility at Physical Sciences, Inc. The EOIM-3 flight materials were exposed to an atomic oxygen fluence of approximately 2.3 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm. The ground-based exposure fluence of 2.0 - 2.5 x 10(exp 20) atoms/sq cm permits direct comparison with that of the flight-exposed specimens. The results from the flight test conducted aboard STS-46 and the correlative ground-based exposure are summarized here. A more detailed correlation study is presented in the JPL Publication 93-31 entitled 'Flight-and Ground-Test Correlation Study of BMDO SDS Materials: Phase 1 Report'. In general, the majority of the materials survived the AO environment with their performance tolerances maintained for the duration of the exposure. Optical materials, baffles, and coatings performed extremely well as did most of the thermal coatings and tribological materials. A few of the candidate radiator, threat shielding, and structural materials showed significant degradation. Many of the coatings designed to protect against AO erosion of sensitive materials performed this function well.

  12. A Computer Compatible System for the Categorization, Enumeration, and Retrieval of Nineteenth and Early Twentieth Century Archaeological Material Culture. Part 2. Manual for Identification and Classification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-12-01

    Acknowledgements Recognizing that the excavation at the extinct nineteenth century tovnsites of Colbert, Barton and Vinton, Mississippi would result in...the codebook and softeware. The second was a test of the system by coding the artifacts recovered from Colbert, Barton , and Vinton. The third, in part...Since the Colbert, Barton and Vinton material was coded under the first and second versions, artifacts coded from these sites are not in conformity

  13. Testing device subjects elastic materials to biaxial deformations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Becker, G. W.

    1965-01-01

    Testing device stretches elastic materials biaxially over large deformation ranges and varies strain ratios in two perpendicular directions. The device is used in conjunction with a tensile testing machine, which holds the specimen and permits control over the direction and magnitude of the stresses applied.

  14. High Temperature Ultrasonic Transducers : Material Selection and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bruno, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    The task of my two-months internship was to test different materials to be used to build an high temperature transducer, to develop some prototypes and to test their performance, to assess the reliability of commercial product rated for such a temperature, as well as to collaborate in developing the signal processing code to measure the condensed water levels.

  15. ADVANCED HOT SECTION MATERIALS AND COATINGS TEST RIG

    SciTech Connect

    Scott Reome; Dan Davies

    2004-04-30

    The Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig program provides design and implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal-gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. The principal activity during this reporting period were the evaluation of syngas combustor concepts, the evaluation of test section concepts and the selection of the preferred rig configuration.

  16. Arcjet Testing of Micro-Meteoroid Impacted Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agrawal, Parul; Munk, Michelle M.; Glaab, Louis J.

    2013-01-01

    There are several harsh space environments that could affect thermal protection systems and in turn pose risks to the atmospheric entry vehicles. These environments include micrometeoroid impact, extreme cold temperatures, and ionizing radiation during deep space cruise, all followed by atmospheric entry heating. To mitigate these risks, different thermal protection material samples were subjected to multiple tests, including hyper velocity impact, cold soak, irradiation, and arcjet testing, at various NASA facilities that simulated these environments. The materials included a variety of honeycomb packed ablative materials as well as carbon-based non-ablative thermal protection systems. The present paper describes the results of the multiple test campaign with a focus on arcjet testing of thermal protection materials. The tests showed promising results for ablative materials. However, the carbon-based non-ablative system presented some concerns regarding the potential risks to an entry vehicle. This study provides valuable information regarding the capability of various thermal protection materials to withstand harsh space environments, which is critical to sample return and planetary entry missions.

  17. Moist bacterial strike-through of surgical materials: confirmatory tests.

    PubMed Central

    Laufman, H; Siegal, J D; Edberg, S C

    1979-01-01

    New tests consisting of modifications of the inverted Mason jar test confirm our previously reported studies which showed that woven and nonwoven surgical materials vary greatly in their ability to serve as barriers against moist bacterial strike-through. Among the woven materials, only tightly woven Pima cloth or materials treated with Quarpel waterproofing process or with polythene layer lamination was invariably resistant. However, tight-woven Pima cloth, which had been treated with Quarpel became permeable after 100 washing-sterilizing cycles. Of the nonwoven materials, single-layer nonwoven materials tended to unevenly permeable to moist bacterial strike-through. Only the front and sleeves of nonwoven gowns reinforced with polyethelene layer were invariably resistant to moist contamination. PMID:758867

  18. Determination of contamination character of materials in space technology testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haynes, D. L.; Coulson, D. M.

    1972-01-01

    The contamination character of selected materials used in space technology testing is presented. Many of these materials contain components that become volatile in a space environment. Most previous data were limited to weight loss or vapor pressure. However, these parameters are not necessarily a direct measure of the contamination character of these materials. Selected materials were exposed to a thermal-vacuum environment, and the degree of contamination was measured by collecting the outgases from these materials on a cold test mirror surface. The degradation of reflectivity of the mirror was measured over a spectral range from 1100 A to 2.5 microns. Half the mirror's surface was also exposed to UV irradiation to determine its effects on the contaminative character of the depositing outgases. The amount of deposit per unit area was measured by microbalances mounted near the mirror; the sensor of one microbalance was UV irradiated. A quadrupole mass spectrometer was used to determine the composition of the outgases.

  19. Investigation of contact allergy to dental materials by patch testing

    PubMed Central

    Rai, Reena; Dinakar, Devina; Kurian, Swetha S.; Bindoo, Y. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Dental products are widely used by patients and dental personnel alike and may cause problems for both. Dental materials could cause contact allergy with varying manifestations such as burning, pain, stomatitis, cheilitis, ulcers, lichenoid reactions localized to the oral mucosa in patients, and hand dermatitis in dental personnel. Patch testing with the dental series comprising commonly used materials can be used to detect contact allergies to dental materials. Aim: This study aimed to identify contact allergy among patients who have oral mucosal lesions after dental treatment and among dental personnel who came in contact with these materials. Materials and Methods: Twenty patients who had undergone dental procedures with symptoms of oral lichen planus, oral stomatitis, burning mouth, and recurrent aphthosis, were included in the study. Dental personnel with history of hand dermatitis were also included in the study. Patch testing was performed using Chemotechnique Dental Series and results interpreted as recommended by the International Contact Dermatitis Research Group (ICDRG). Results: Out of 13 patients who had undergone dental treatment/with oral symptoms, six patients with stomatitis, lichenoid lesions, and oral ulcers showed positive patch tests to a variety of dental materials, seven patients with ulcers had negative patch tests, seven dental personnel with hand dermatitis showed multiple allergies to various dental materials, and most had multiple positivities. Conclusion: The patch test is a useful, simple, noninvasive method to detect contact allergies among patients and among dental personnel dealing with these products. Long term studies are necessary to establish the relevance of these positive patch tests by eliminating the allergic substances, identifying clinical improvement, and substituting with nonallergenic materials. PMID:25165644

  20. Development of fire test methods for airplane interior materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tustin, E. A.

    1978-01-01

    Fire tests were conducted in a 737 airplane fuselage at NASA-JSC to characterize jet fuel fires in open steel pans (simulating post-crash fire sources and a ruptured airplane fuselage) and to characterize fires in some common combustibles (simulating in-flight fire sources). Design post-crash and in-flight fire source selections were based on these data. Large panels of airplane interior materials were exposed to closely-controlled large scale heating simulations of the two design fire sources in a Boeing fire test facility utilizing a surplused 707 fuselage section. Small samples of the same airplane materials were tested by several laboratory fire test methods. Large scale and laboratory scale data were examined for correlative factors. Published data for dangerous hazard levels in a fire environment were used as the basis for developing a method to select the most desirable material where trade-offs in heat, smoke and gaseous toxicant evolution must be considered.

  1. Plastometric tests for plasticine as physical modelling material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wójcik, Łukasz; Lis, Konrad; Pater, Zbigniew

    2016-12-01

    This paper presents results of plastometric tests for plasticine, used as material for physical modelling of metal forming processes. The test was conducted by means of compressing by flat dies of cylindrical billets at various temperatures. The aim of the conducted research was comparison of yield stresses and course of material flow curves. Tests were made for plasticine in black and white colour. On the basis of the obtained experimental results, the influence of forming parameters change on flow curves course was determined. Sensitivity of yield stresses change in function of material deformation, caused by forging temperature change within the scope of 0&C ÷ 20&C and differentiation of strain rate for ˙ɛ = 0.563; ˙ɛ = 0.0563; ˙ɛ = 0.0056s-1,was evaluated. Experimental curves obtained in compression test were described by constitutive equations. On the basis of the obtained results the function which most favourably describes flow curves was chosen.

  2. Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keith, Theo G.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to provide a final report for the period of 12/1/03 through 11/30/04 for NASA Cooperative Agreement NCC3-776, entitled "Elevated Temperature Testing and Modeling of Advanced Toughened Ceramic Materials." During this final period, major efforts were focused on both the determination of mechanical properties of advanced ceramic materials and the development of mechanical test methodologies under several different programs of the NASA-Glenn. The important research activities made during this period are: 1. Mechanical properties evaluation of two gas-turbine grade silicon nitrides. 2) Mechanical testing for fuel-cell seal materials. 3) Mechanical properties evaluation of thermal barrier coatings and CFCCs and 4) Foreign object damage (FOD) testing.

  3. A Cryogenic RF Material Testing Facility at SLAC

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Jiquan; Martin, David; Tantawi, Sami; Yoneda, Charles; /SLAC

    2012-06-22

    The authors have developed an X-band SRF testing system using a high-Q copper cavity with an interchangeable flat bottom for the testing of different materials. By measuring the Q of the cavity, the system is capable to characterize the quenching magnetic field of the superconducting samples at different power level and temperature, as well as the surface resistivity. This paper presents the most recent development of the system and testing results.

  4. Development of Standardized Material Testing Protocols for Prosthetic Liners.

    PubMed

    Cagle, John C; Reinhall, Per G; Hafner, Brian J; Sanders, Joan E

    2017-04-01

    A set of protocols was created to characterize prosthetic liners across six clinically relevant material properties. Properties included compressive elasticity, shear elasticity, tensile elasticity, volumetric elasticity, coefficient of friction (CoF), and thermal conductivity. Eighteen prosthetic liners representing the diverse range of commercial products were evaluated to create test procedures that maximized repeatability, minimized error, and provided clinically meaningful results. Shear and tensile elasticity test designs were augmented with finite element analysis (FEA) to optimize specimen geometries. Results showed that because of the wide range of available liner products, the compressive elasticity and tensile elasticity tests required two test maxima; samples were tested until they met either a strain-based or a stress-based maximum, whichever was reached first. The shear and tensile elasticity tests required that no cyclic conditioning be conducted because of limited endurance of the mounting adhesive with some liner materials. The coefficient of friction test was based on dynamic coefficient of friction, as it proved to be a more reliable measurement than static coefficient of friction. The volumetric elasticity test required that air be released beneath samples in the test chamber before testing. The thermal conductivity test best reflected the clinical environment when thermal grease was omitted and when liner samples were placed under pressure consistent with load bearing conditions. The developed procedures provide a standardized approach for evaluating liner products in the prosthetics industry. Test results can be used to improve clinical selection of liners for individual patients and guide development of new liner products.

  5. Fuel System Compatibility Issues for Prometheus-1

    SciTech Connect

    DC Noe; KB Gibbard; MH Krohn

    2006-01-20

    Compatibility issues for the Prometheus-1 fuel system have been reviewed based upon the selection of UO{sub 2} as the reference fuel material. In particular, the potential for limiting effects due to fuel- or fission product-component (cladding, liner, spring, etc) chemical interactions and clad-liner interactions have been evaluated. For UO{sub 2}-based fuels, fuel-component interactions are not expected to significantly limit performance. However, based upon the selection of component materials, there is a potential for degradation due to fission products. In particular, a chemical liner may be necessary for niobium, tantalum, zirconium, or silicon carbide-based systems. Multiple choices exist for the configuration of a chemical liner within the cladding; there is no clear solution that eliminates all concerns over the mechanical performance of a clad/liner system. A series of tests to evaluate the performance of candidate materials in contact with real and simulated fission products is outlined.

  6. Temperature controlled material irradiation in the advanced test reactor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ingram, F. W.; Palmer, A. J.; Stites, D. J.

    1998-10-01

    The United States Department of Energy (US DOE) has initiated the development of an Irradiation Test Vehicle (ITV) for fusion materials irradiation at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) in Idaho Falls, Idaho, USA. The ITV is capable of providing neutron spectral tailoring and individual temperature control for up to 15 experiment capsules simultaneously. The test vehicle consists of three In-Pile Tubes (IPTs) running the length of the reactor vessel. These IPTs are kept dry and test trains with integral instrumentation are inserted and removed through a transfer shield plate above the reactor vessel head. The test vehicle is designed to irradiate specimens as large as 2.2 cm in diameter, at temperatures of 250-800°C, achieving neutron damage rates as high as 10 displacements per atom per year. The high fast to thermal neutron flux ratio required for fusion materials testing is accomplished by using an aluminum filler to displace as much water as possible from the flux trap and surrounding the filler piece with a ring of replaceable neutron absorbing material. The gas blend temperature control system remains in place from test to test, thus hardware costs for new tests are limited to the experiment capsule train and integral instrumentation.

  7. NASA Lewis Research Center's Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemets, Steve A.; Ehlers, Robert C.; Parrott, Edith

    1995-01-01

    The Preheated Combustor and Materials Test Facility (PCMTF) in the Engine Research Building (ERB) at the NASA Lewis Research Center is one of two unique combustor facilities that provide a nonvitiated air supply to two test stands, where the air can be used for research combustor testing and high-temperature materials testing. Stand A is used as a research combustor stand, whereas stand B is used for cyclic and survivability tests of aerospace materials at high temperatures. Both stands can accommodate in-house and private industry research programs. The PCMTF is capable of providing up to 30 lb/s (pps) of nonvitiated, 450 psig combustion air at temperatures ranging from 850 to 1150 g F. A 5000 gal tank located outdoors adjacent to the test facility can provide jet fuel at a pressure of 900 psig and a flow rate of 11 gal/min (gpm). Gaseous hydrogen from a 70,000 cu ft (CF) tuber is also available as a fuel. Approximately 500 gpm of cooling water cools the research hardware and exhaust gases. Such cooling is necessary because the air stream reaches temperatures as high as 3000 deg F. The PCMTF provides industry and Government with a facility for studying the combustion process and for obtaining valuable test information on advanced materials. This report describes the facility's support systems and unique capabilities.

  8. FFTF (Fast Flux Test Facility) as an irradiation test bed for fusion materials and components

    SciTech Connect

    Greenslade, D.L.; Puigh, R.J.; Hollenberg, G.W.; Grover, J.M.

    1986-03-01

    The relatively large irradiation volume, instrumentation capabilities, and fast neutron flux associated with the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) make this reactor an ideal test bed for fusion materials and components irradiations. Significant fusion materials irradiations are presently being performed in the Materials Open Test Assembly (MOTA) in FFTF. The MOTA is providing a controlled temperature and high neutron flux environment for such materials as the low activation alloys, copper alloys, ceramic insulators, and high heat flux materials. Conceptual designs utilizing the versatile MOTA irradiation vehicle have been developed to investigate irradiation effects on the mechanical and tritium breeding behaviors of solid breeder materials. More aggressive conceptual designs have also been developed to irradiate solid breeder blanket submodules in the FFTF. These specific component test designs will be presented and their potential roles in the development of fusion technology discussed.

  9. Estimation of uncertain material parameters using modal test data

    SciTech Connect

    Veers, P.S.; Laird, D.L.; Carne, T.G.; Sagartz, M.J.

    1997-11-01

    Analytical models of wind turbine blades have many uncertainties, particularly with composite construction where material properties and cross-sectional dimension may not be known or precisely controllable. In this paper the authors demonstrate how modal testing can be used to estimate important material parameters and to update and improve a finite-element (FE) model of a prototype wind turbine blade. An example of prototype blade is used here to demonstrate how model parameters can be identified. The starting point is an FE model of the blade, using best estimates for the material constants. Frequencies of the lowest fourteen modes are used as the basis for comparisons between model predictions and test data. Natural frequencies and mode shapes calculated with the FE model are used in an optimal test design code to select instrumentation (accelerometer) and excitation locations that capture all the desired mode shapes. The FE model is also used to calculate sensitivities of the modal frequencies to each of the uncertain material parameters. These parameters are estimated, or updated, using a weighted least-squares technique to minimize the difference between test frequencies and predicted results. Updated material properties are determined for axial, transverse, and shear moduli in two separate regions of the blade cross section: in the central box, and in the leading and trailing panels. Static FE analyses are then conducted with the updated material parameters to determine changes in effective beam stiffness and buckling loads.

  10. Ultraviolet Testing of Space Suit Materials for Mars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Kristine; Fries, Marc

    2017-01-01

    Human missions to Mars may require radical changes in the approach to extra-vehicular (EVA) suit design. A major challenge is the balance of building a suit robust enough to complete multiple EVAs under intense ultraviolet (UV) light exposure without losing mechanical strength or compromising the suit's mobility. To study how the materials degrade on Mars in-situ, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) invited the Advanced Space Suit team at NASA's Johnson Space Center (JSC) to place space suit materials on the Scanning Habitable Environments with Raman & Luminescence for Organics and Chemicals (SHERLOC) instrument's calibration target of the Mars 2020 rover. In order to select materials for the rover and understand the effects from Mars equivalent UV exposure, JSC conducted ground testing on both current and new space suit materials when exposed to 2500 hours of Mars mission equivalent UV. To complete this testing, JSC partnered with NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center to utilize their UV vacuum chambers. Materials tested were Orthofabric, polycarbonate, Teflon, Dacron, Vectran, spectra, bladder, nGimat coated Teflon, and nGimat coated Orthofabric. All samples were measured for mass, tensile strength, and chemical composition before and after radiation. Mass loss was insignificant (less than 0.5%) among the materials. Most materials loss tensile strength after radiation and became more brittle with a loss of elongation. Changes in chemical composition were seen in all radiated materials through Spectral Analysis. Results from this testing helped select the materials that will fly on the Mars 2020 rover. In addition, JSC can use this data to create a correlation to the chemical changes after radiation-which is what the rover will send back while on Mars-to the mechanical changes, such as tensile strength.

  11. Radioactive material package testing capabilities at Sandia National Laboratories

    SciTech Connect

    Uncapher, W.L.; Hohnstreiter, G.F.

    1995-12-31

    Evaluation and certification of radioactive and hazardous material transport packages can be accomplished by subjecting these packages to normal transport and hypothetical accident test conditions. The regulations allow package designers to certify packages using analysis, testing, or a combination of analysis and testing. Testing can be used to substantiate assumptions used in analytical models and to demonstrate package structural and thermal response. Regulatory test conditions include impact, puncture, crush, penetration, water spray, immersion, and thermal environments. Testing facilities are used to simulate the required test conditions and provide measurement response data. Over the past four decades, comprehensive testing facilities have been developed at Sandia National Laboratories to perform a broad range of verification and certification tests on hazardous and radioactive material packages or component sections. Sandia`s facilities provide an experience base that has been established during the development and certification of many package designs. These unique facilities, along with innovative instrumentation data collection capabilities and techniques, simulate a broad range of testing environments. In certain package designs, package testing can be an economical alternative to complex analysis to resolve regulatory questions or concerns.

  12. Compatible Lie Bialgebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ming-Zhong; Bai, Cheng-Ming

    2015-06-01

    A compatible Lie algebra is a pair of Lie algebras such that any linear combination of the two Lie brackets is a Lie bracket. We construct a bialgebra theory of compatible Lie algebras as an analogue of a Lie bialgebra. They can also be regarded as a “compatible version” of Lie bialgebras, that is, a pair of Lie bialgebras such that any linear combination of the two Lie bialgebras is still a Lie bialgebra. Many properties of compatible Lie bialgebras as the “compatible version” of the corresponding properties of Lie bialgebras are presented. In particular, there is a coboundary compatible Lie bialgebra theory with a construction from the classical Yang-Baxter equation in compatible Lie algebras as a combination of two classical Yang-Baxter equations in Lie algebras. Furthermore, a notion of compatible pre-Lie algebra is introduced with an interpretation of its close relation with the classical Yang-Baxter equation in compatible Lie algebras which leads to a construction of the solutions of the latter. As a byproduct, the compatible Lie bialgebras fit into the framework to construct non-constant solutions of the classical Yang-Baxter equation given by Golubchik and Sokolov. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China under Grant Nos. 11271202, 11221091, 11425104 and Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education under Grant No. 20120031110022

  13. Environmental test program for superconducting materials and devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haertling, Gene; Randolph, Henry; Hsi, Chi-Shiung; Verbelyi, Darren

    1992-01-01

    A systematic approach to obtaining real time, superconducting YBa2Cu30(7-x) materials is presented. The work was carried out under the overall direction of Clemson University with tasks being performed at both Clemson and Westinghouse (Aiken, SC). Clemson prepared the tapecast superconducting 123 material and fabricated in into substrate-supported, environmentally-protected conducting links. Following this, all of the elements were individually tested for resistance vs. temperature and Tc; and then a portion of them were kept at Clemson for further testing while a randomly selected group was delivered to Westinghouse for specialized testing and evaluation in their low temperature/high vacuum and radiation facilities. In addition, a number of control samples (12 ea.) were put on the shelf at Clemson for further reference at the end of the testing period. The specific tests conducted at Clemson and Westinghouse/SRC are presented with a summary of the results.

  14. Reference Material Kydex(registered trademark)-100 Test Data Message for Flammability Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Engel, Carl D.; Richardson, Erin; Davis, Eddie

    2003-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) Materials and Processes Technical Information System (MAPTIS) database contains, as an engineering resource, a large amount of material test data carefully obtained and recorded over a number of years. Flammability test data obtained using Test 1 of NASA-STD-6001 is a significant component of this database. NASA-STD-6001 recommends that Kydex 100 be used as a reference material for testing certification and for comparison between test facilities in the round-robin certification testing that occurs every 2 years. As a result of these regular activities, a large volume of test data is recorded within the MAPTIS database. The activity described in this technical report was undertaken to mine the database, recover flammability (Test 1) Kydex 100 data, and review the lessons learned from analysis of these data.

  15. Compatibility and Outgassing Studies for Directed Stockpile Work (FY05)

    SciTech Connect

    Alviso, C; Harvey, C; Vance, A

    2005-11-23

    Compatibility and outgassing studies of non-nuclear materials were carried out in support of the W80 Life Extension Program. These studies included small-scale laboratory experiments as well as participation in Sandia's Materials Aging and Compatibility test (MAC-1). Analysis of the outgassing signature of removable epoxy foam (REF) revealed unusually high levels of volatile organic compounds in the material. REF was replaced with the polyurethane PMDI. Laboratory compatibility tests of high priority materials were performed and revealed incompatibilities between Viton A (LX-07 binder) and syntactic polysulfide as well as Viton A and REF. With the removal of REF from the system, the incompatibility with Viton A is not an issue. In the case of the viton/polysulfide, both of these materials have a history of reliability in the stockpile, and the observed results, while scientifically interesting, appear to be a laboratory anomaly. Participation in the MAC-1 test led to a detailed study of Viton A degradation. At elevated temperatures up to 70 C, the Viton A samples darkened and exhibited increased crosslinking. Laboratory experiments were pursued to correlate the observed changes to exposure to specific compounds that were present in the MAC-1 canister atmospheres. Exposure to siloxanes resulted in changes similar to those seen in the MAC-1 samples. Knowledge gained from the MAC-1 test will be applied to the upcoming MAC-2 test planned for FY06. Finally, the suitability of isotopically labeled nitrogen fill gas ({sup 15}N{sub 2}) was addressed. This gas will behave as standard nitrogen with no compatibility concerns expected.

  16. METHOD OF TESTING THERMAL NEUTRON FISSIONABLE MATERIAL FOR PURITY

    DOEpatents

    Fermi, E.; Anderson, H.L.

    1961-01-24

    A process is given for determining the neutronic purity of fissionable material by the so-called shotgun test. The effect of a standard neutron absorber of known characteristics and amounts on a neutronic field also of known characteristics is measured and compared with the effect which the impurities derived from a known quantity of fissionable material has on the same neutronic field. The two readings are then made the basis of calculation from which the amount of impurities can be computed.

  17. Validation Testing and Numerical Modeling of Advanced Armor Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    constitutive material strength response with an appropriate yield surface model. The research is sub-divided into three areas: engineering design...and specimen preparation for Taylor impact testing, analytical solution for the dynamic yield strength of the materials used, and numerical modeling...aluminum alloy only. We perform a detailed analysis of the deformed specimen shapes to determine the dynamic yield strength . Additionally, hydrocode

  18. Device and method for frictionally testing materials for ignitability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benz, F. J.; Shaw, R. C.; Dixon, D. S. (Inventor)

    1985-01-01

    Test apparatus for determining ignition characteristics of various metal in oxidizer environments simulating operating conditions for materials is invented. The test apparatus has a chamber through which the oxidizing agent flows, and means for mounting a stationary test sample therein, a powered, rotating shaft in the chamber rigidly mounts a second test sample. The shaft is axially movable to bring the samples into frictional engagement and heated to the ignition point. Instrumentation connected to the apparatus provides for observation of temperatures, pressures, loads on and speeds of the rotating shaft, and torques whereby components of stressed oxygen systems can be selected which will avoid accidental fires under working conditions.

  19. Correlation of composite material test results with finite element analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guƫu, M.

    2016-08-01

    In this paper are presented some aspects regarding the method of simulation of composite materials testing with finite element analysis software. There were simulated tensile and shear tests of specimens manufactured from glass fiber reinforced polyester. For specimens manufacturing two types of fabrics were used: unidirectional and bidirectional. Experimentally determined elastic properties of composite material were used as input data. Modeling of composite architecture of the specimens was performed with ANSYS Composite PrepPost software. Finite element analysis stresses and strains on strain gauges bonding area were considered and compared with the real values in a diagram. After results comparison, potential causes of deviations were identified.

  20. DOE/MSU composite material fatigue database: Test methods, materials, and analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Mandell, J.F.; Samborsky, D.D.

    1997-12-01

    This report presents a detailed analysis of the results from fatigue studies of wind turbine blade composite materials carried out at Montana State University (MSU) over the last seven years. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the DOE/MSU composite Materials Fatigue Database. The fatigue testing of composite materials requires the adaptation of standard test methods to the particular composite structure of concern. The stranded fabric E-glass reinforcement used by many blade manufacturers has required the development of several test modifications to obtain valid test data for materials with particular reinforcement details, over the required range of tensile and compressive loadings. Additionally, a novel testing approach to high frequency (100 Hz) testing for high cycle fatigue using minicoupons has been developed and validated. The database for standard coupon tests now includes over 4,100 data points for over 110 materials systems. The report analyzes the database for trends and transitions in static and fatigue behavior with various materials parameters. Parameters explored are reinforcement fabric architecture, fiber content, content of fibers oriented in the load direction, matrix material, and loading parameters (tension, compression, and reversed loading). Significant transitions from good fatigue resistance to poor fatigue resistance are evident in the range of materials currently used in many blades. A preliminary evaluation of knockdowns for selected structural details is also presented. The high frequency database provides a significant set of data for various loading conditions in the longitudinal and transverse directions of unidirectional composites out to 10{sup 8} cycles. The results are expressed in stress and strain based Goodman Diagrams suitable for design. A discussion is provided to guide the user of the database in its application to blade design.

  1. On Software Compatibility.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ershov, Andrei P.

    The problem of compatibility of software hampers the development of computer application. One solution lies in standardization of languages, terms, peripherais, operating systems and computer characteristics. (AB)

  2. Permeation Testing of Materials With Chemical Agents or Simulants (Swatch Testing)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-05

    clothing or equipment that is new, with or without pretreatment (s), and/or material that was previously subjected to periods of wear under varying...V; liquid challenge/liquid permeation; L/L; swatch test; pretreatments ; static diffusion test; aerosol test; rain cabinet; mandrel 16. SECURITY...Simulants. ................................................................................. 18 4.6 Swatch Pretreatment

  3. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol intravenous infusion formulation optimization, stability and compatibility testing: A case study to overcome polysorbate 80 interference in chromatographic analysis.

    PubMed

    Abdallah, Inas A; Hammell, Dana C; Hassan, Hazem E; Stinchcomb, Audra L

    2016-06-05

    Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol is a progestin/estrogen combination hormonal contraceptive indicated for the prevention of pregnancy in women. The very poor solubility and wettability of these drugs, along with their high potency (adsorption issues), give rise to difficulties in designing intravenous (IV) formulations to assess absolute bioavailability of products containing both drugs. The purpose of this study was to develop an IV formulation, evaluate its stability under different conditions and evaluate its compatibility with IV sets for potential use in absolute bioavailability studies in humans. Also, a selective high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method for quantification of ethinyl estradiol and norelgestromin in polysorbate 80 matrix was developed and validated. Norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV solution was prepared using sterile water for injection with 2.5% ethanol and 2.5% polysorbate 80 as a cosolvent/surfactant system to obtain a final drug solution of 25μg ethinyl estradiol and 252μg norelgestromin from a concentrated stock drug solution. The stabilities of the concentrated stock and IV solutions were assessed after storing them in the refrigerator (3.7±0.6°C) and at room temperature (19.5±0.5°C), respectively. Additional studies were conducted to examine the stability of the IV solution using an Alarias(®) low sorbing IV administration set with and without an inline filter. The solution was allowed to drip at 1mL/min over a 60min period. Samples were obtained at the beginning, middle and end of the 60min duration. The chemical stability was evaluated for up to 10 days. Norelgestromin and ethinyl estradiol concentration, purity, and degradant levels were determined using the HPLC method. The norelgestromin/ethinyl estradiol IV formulation met the chemical stability criteria when tested on day 1 through day 9 (216h). Norelgestromin concentrations assayed in stock and IV solutions were in the range of 90.0-98.5% and 90

  4. Fire tests on loose-fill insulation materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kokkala, M.

    1987-06-01

    A short review of the physical and chemical processes involved in smouldering fires of loose-fill insulation materials is presented. Various official and inofficial fire test methods are described and evaluated. Results of a series of tests made to evaluate the British Standard BS 5803:Part 4:1985 are presented. A proposal for a Nordtest method based on this standard is given as an appendix.

  5. Environmental Variation in Contamination Outgas Testing of a Composite Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-15

    not the same as the ex-situ TML and CVCM measurements determined through ASTM E595 testing.3 The QCM-to-effusion cell orifice view factor (cm2) is...International, West Conshohocken, PA, www.astm.org. 3. ASTM Standard E595 , 2007, "Standard Test Method for Total Mass Loss and Collected Volatile Condensable...can provide a valuable array of outgassing information. 15. SUBJECT TERMS Outgassing, Molecular contamination, Spacecraft materials, Composite, ASTM

  6. Impact Testing of Orbiter Thermal Protection System Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerr, Justin

    2006-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews the impact testing of the materials used in designing the shuttle orbiter thermal protection system (TPS). Pursuant to the Columbia Accident Investigation Board recommendations a testing program of the TPS system was instituted. This involved using various types of impactors in different sizes shot from various sizes and strengths guns to impact the TPS tiles and the Leading Edge Structural Subsystem (LESS). The observed damage is shown, and the resultant lessons learned are reviewed.

  7. Materials sciences research. [research facilities, research projects, and technical reports of materials tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1973-01-01

    Research projects involving materials research conducted by various international test facilities are reported. Much of the materials research is classified in the following areas: (1) acousto-optic, acousto-electric, and ultrasonic research, (2) research for elucidating transport phenomena in well characterized oxides, (3) research in semiconductor materials and semiconductor devices, (4) the study of interfaces and interfacial phenomena, and (5) materials research relevant to natural resources. Descriptions of the individual research programs are listed alphabetically by the name of the author and show all personnel involved, resulting publications, and associated meeting speeches.

  8. Ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite materials using disturbed coincidence conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bause, F.; Olfert, S.; Schröder, A.; Rautenberg, J.; Henning, B.; Moritzer, E.

    2012-05-01

    In this contribution we present a new method detecting changes in the composite material's acoustic behavior by analyzing disturbed coincidence conditions on plate-like test samples. The coincidence condition for an undamaged GFRP test sample has been experimentally identified using Schlieren measurements. Disturbances of this condition follow from a disturbed acoustic behavior of the test sample which is an indicator for local damages in the region inspected. An experimental probe has been realized consisting of two piezoceramic elements adhered to the nonparallel sides of an isosceles trapezoidal body made of silicone. The base angles of the trapezoidal body have been chosen such that the incident wave meets pre-measured condition of coincidence. The receiving element receives the geometric reflection of the acoustic wave scattered at the test sample's surface which corresponds to the non-coupled part of the incident wave as send by the sending element. Analyzing the transfer function or impulse response of the electro-acoustic system (transmitter, scattering at test sample, receiver), it is possible to detect local disturbances with respect to Cramer's coincidence rule. Thus, it is possible to realize a very simple probe for local ultrasonic nondestructive testing of composite materials (as well as non-composite material) which can be integrated in a small practical device and is good for small size inspection areas.

  9. Static slot testing of conventional lost circulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Behr, V.L.; Wilde, S.L.

    1983-01-01

    A study of the utility of conventional lost circulation materials and testing methods was performed using a modified API slot tester. Five lost circulation materials were evaluated in 266 tests at both room temperature and temperature-aged conditions simulating expected geothermal environments. A large variation in the maximum pressure (or sealing pressure) the plug could withstand was attributed to nonrepeatability in plug strengths. Plugs were composed to multiple or single particle bridges, with the latter providing stronger, better sealing plugs. Seals occurred on the upstream surface of the slots in all cases. Sealing pressures generally decreased with increasing slot widths and decreasing solids concentration. When the slot width was less than the size of the largest rigid particle in the lost circulation slurry, sealing pressure was maximized. When the slot width was greater than three times the maximum rigid particle size, no significant sealing ability was observed with the conventional materials tested. Additionally, cellulosic lost circulation materials are severely degraded by temperature aging. Mud gellation provided no significant improvement in lost circulation material sealing ability.

  10. Thermostructural test facilities for reentry vehicle nose tip materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Budde, C. L.

    1975-01-01

    To provide a cost effective means of assessing the thermostructural performance of nosetip materials, the Air Force has developed and utilized two types of thermostructural facilities: ground simulation facilities and laboratory facilities. The capabilities of the currently available test facilities are summarized and compared.

  11. The Testing Effect Is Alive and Well with Complex Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karpicke, Jeffrey D.; Aue, William R.

    2015-01-01

    Van Gog and Sweller (2015) claim that there is no testing effect--no benefit of practicing retrieval--for complex materials. We show that this claim is incorrect on several grounds. First, Van Gog and Sweller's idea of "element interactivity" is not defined in a quantitative, measurable way. As a consequence, the idea is applied…

  12. Design of a Compact Fatigue Tester for Testing Irradiated Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hartsell, Brian; Campbell, Michael; Fitton, Michael; Hurh, Patrick; Ishida, Taku; Nakadaira, Takeshi

    2015-06-01

    A compact fatigue testing machine that can be easily inserted into a hot cell for characterization of irradiated materials is beneficial to help determine relative fatigue performance differences between new and irradiated material. Hot cell use has been carefully considered by limiting the size and weight of the machine, simplifying sample loading and test setup for operation via master-slave manipulator, and utilizing an efficient design to minimize maintenance. Funded from a US-Japan collaborative effort, the machine has been specifically designed to help characterize titanium material specimens. These specimens are flat cantilevered beams for initial studies, possibly utilizing samples irradiated at other sources of beam. The option to test spherically shaped samples cut from the T2K vacuum window is also available. The machine is able to test a sample to $10^7$ cycles in under a week, with options to count cycles and sense material failure. The design of this machine will be presented along with current status.

  13. Hypervelocity impact tests on Space Shuttle Orbiter thermal protection material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humes, D. H.

    1977-01-01

    Hypervelocity impact tests were conducted to simulate the damage that meteoroids will produce in the Shuttle Orbiter leading edge structural subsystem material. The nature and extent of the damage is reported and the probability of encountering meteoroids with sufficient energy to produce such damage is discussed.

  14. Testing of Alternative Materials for Advanced Suit Bladders

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bue, Grant; Orndoff, Evelyne; Makinen, Janice; Tang, Henry

    2011-01-01

    Several candidate advanced pressure bladder membrane materials have been developed for NASA Johnson Space Center by DSM Biomedical for selective permeability of carbon dioxide and water vapor. These materials were elasthane and two other formulations of thermoplastic polyether polyurethane. Each material was tested in two thicknesses for permeability to carbon dioxide, oxygen and water vapor. Although oxygen leaks through the suit bladder would amount to only about 60 cc/hr in a full size suit, significant amounts of carbon dioxide would not be rejected by the system to justify its use. While the ratio of carbon dioxide to oxygen permeability is about 48 to 1, this is offset by the small partial pressure of carbon dioxide in acceptable breathing atmospheres of the suit. Humidity management remains a possible use of the membranes depending on the degree to which the water permeability is inhibited by cations in the sweat. Tests are underway to explore cation fouling from sweat.

  15. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis. Phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cardinal, Joseph W.; Popelar, Carl F.; Page, Richard A.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA a comprehensive suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for aging multilayer pressure vessels, Southwest Research Institute (R) (SwRI) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. This report describes Phase 1 of this effort which includes a preliminary material property assessment as well as a fractographic, fracture mechanics and fatigue crack growth analyses of an induced flaw in the outer shell of a representative multilayer vessel that was subjected to cyclic pressure test. SwRI performed this Phase 1 effort under contract to the Digital Wave Corporation in support of their contract to Jacobs ATOM for the NASA Ames Research Center.

  16. Thermocouple Calibration and Accuracy in a Materials Testing Laboratory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, B. A.; Nathal, M. V.; Keller, D. J.

    2002-01-01

    A consolidation of information has been provided that can be used to define procedures for enhancing and maintaining accuracy in temperature measurements in materials testing laboratories. These studies were restricted to type R and K thermocouples (TCs) tested in air. Thermocouple accuracies, as influenced by calibration methods, thermocouple stability, and manufacturer's tolerances were all quantified in terms of statistical confidence intervals. By calibrating specific TCs the benefits in accuracy can be as great as 6 C or 5X better compared to relying on manufacturer's tolerances. The results emphasize strict reliance on the defined testing protocol and on the need to establish recalibration frequencies in order to maintain these levels of accuracy.

  17. Multilayer Pressure Vessel Materials Testing and Analysis Phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Popelar, Carl F.; Cardinal, Joseph W.

    2014-01-01

    To provide NASA with a suite of materials strength, fracture toughness and crack growth rate test results for use in remaining life calculations for the vessels described above, Southwest Research Institute® (SwRI®) was contracted in two phases to obtain relevant material property data from a representative vessel. An initial characterization of the strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth properties was performed in Phase 1. Based on the results and recommendations of Phase 1, a more extensive material property characterization effort was developed in this Phase 2 effort. This Phase 2 characterization included additional strength, fracture and fatigue crack growth of the multilayer vessel and head materials. In addition, some more limited characterization of the welds and heat affected zones (HAZs) were performed. This report

  18. Materials characterization of cermet anodes tested in a pilot cell

    SciTech Connect

    Windisch, C.F. Jr.; Strachan, D.M.; Henager, C.H. Jr. ); Alcorn, T.R.; Tabereaux, A.T.; Richards, N.E. . Mfg. Technology Lab.)

    1993-02-01

    Cermet anodes were evaluated as nonconsumable substitutes for carbon anodes using a pilot-scale reduction cell at the Reynolds Manufacturing Technology Laboratory. After pilot cell testing, tile anodes were subjected to extensive materials characterization and physical properties measurements at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Significant changes in the composition of the cermet anodes were observed including the growth of a reaction layer and penetration of electrolyte deep into the cermet matrix. Fracture strength and toughness were measured as a function of temperature and the ductile-brittle transition wasreduced by 500C following pilot cell testing. These results imply difficulties with anode material and control of operating conditions in the pilot cell, and suggest that additional development work be performed before the cermet anodes are used in commercial reduction cells. The results also highlight specific fabrication and operational considerations that should be addressed in future testing.

  19. Advanced Hot Section Materials and Coatings Test Rig

    SciTech Connect

    Dan Davis

    2006-09-30

    Phase I of the Hyperbaric Advanced Hot Section Materials & Coating Test Rig Program has been successfully completed. Florida Turbine Technologies has designed and planned the implementation of a laboratory rig capable of simulating the hot gas path conditions of coal gas fired industrial gas turbine engines. Potential uses of this rig include investigations into environmental attack of turbine materials and coatings exposed to syngas, erosion, and thermal-mechanical fatigue. The principle activities during Phase 1 of this project included providing several conceptual designs for the test section, evaluating various syngas-fueled rig combustor concepts, comparing the various test section concepts and then selecting a configuration for detail design. Conceptual definition and requirements of auxiliary systems and facilities were also prepared. Implementation planning also progressed, with schedules prepared and future project milestones defined. The results of these tasks continue to show rig feasibility, both technically and economically.

  20. Mechanical Testing of Carbon Based Woven Thermal Protection Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pham, John; Agrawal, Parul; Arnold, James O.; Peterson, Keith; Venkatapathy, Ethiraj

    2013-01-01

    Three Dimensional Woven thermal protection system (TPS) materials are one of the enabling technologies for mechanically deployable hypersonic decelerator systems. These materials have been shown capable of serving a dual purpose as TPS and as structural load bearing members during entry and descent operations. In order to ensure successful structural performance, it is important to characterize the mechanical properties of these materials prior to and post exposure to entry-like heating conditions. This research focuses on the changes in load bearing capacity of woven TPS materials after being subjected to arcjet simulations of entry heating. Preliminary testing of arcjet tested materials [1] has shown a mechanical degradation. However, their residual strength is significantly more than the requirements for a mission to Venus [2]. A systematic investigation at the macro and microstructural scales is reported here to explore the potential causes of this degradation. The effects of heating on the sizing (an epoxy resin coating used to reduce friction and wear during fiber handling) are discussed as one of the possible causes for the decrease in mechanical properties. This investigation also provides valuable guidelines for margin policies for future mechanically deployable entry systems.

  1. Test Methods for Measuring Material Properties of Composite Materials in all Three Material Axes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-24

    materials. Hara et al. [4] studied the out-of-plane tensile strength of CFRP laminates using the direct tensile method with specimens of various size...Composite Structures (35) (1996): 5-20. 3. Nielsen, A., Ibsen, J., & Thomsen, O. “Through-Thickness Tensile and Compressive Properties of Stitched CFRP ...Strength of Aligned CFRP Determined by Direct Tensile Method”. Composites Part A: Applied Science and Manufacturing (41) (10) (2010): 1425-1433. 6

  2. Test model designs for advanced refractory ceramic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Huy Kim

    1993-01-01

    The next generation of space vehicles will be subjected to severe aerothermal loads and will require an improved thermal protection system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle components. In order to ensure the satisfactory performance system (TPS) and other advanced vehicle materials and components, testing is to be performed in environments similar to space flight. The design and fabrication of the test models should be fairly simple but still accomplish test objectives. In the Advanced Refractory Ceramic Materials test series, the models and model holders will need to withstand the required heat fluxes of 340 to 817 W/sq cm or surface temperatures in the range of 2700 K to 3000 K. The model holders should provide one dimensional (1-D) heat transfer to the samples and the appropriate flow field without compromising the primary test objectives. The optical properties such as the effective emissivity, catalytic efficiency coefficients, thermal properties, and mass loss measurements are also taken into consideration in the design process. Therefore, it is the intent of this paper to demonstrate the design schemes for different models and model holders that would accommodate these test requirements and ensure the safe operation in a typical arc jet facility.

  3. The development and testing of asbestos-free gasket materials

    SciTech Connect

    Mallow, W.A. )

    1992-01-01

    Of the 27 vendors contacted, 11 submitted asbestos-free gasket materials for thermal analysis followed by hydrostatic pressure testing, steam pressure testing, and fire testing. Virtually all were acceptable up to 400 C (air-free), and most were stable to 700 C. Several can be used to over 900 C in air or gases, since they are ceramic. Several graphitic gaskets are serviceable to 900 C in absence of air. Several performed well in steam pressure testing to 315 C, requiring a single adjustment in bolt/flange pressure after pressurization. Many acquired a compression set and consequent slight pressure loss, but responded well to bolt tightening. All except one are made of compressed ceramic or graphite fiber with 0-35 wt% binder, hence was inelastic but malleable/compressible. The large number of ceramic-and graphitic-based gasket materials obviated the need for further development; efforts were concentrated on critical evaluation of the off-the-shelf available materials, in comparison with asbestos.

  4. The Accelerator Production of Tritium Materials Test Program

    SciTech Connect

    Maloy, Stuart A.; Sommer, Walter F.; James, Michael R.; Romero, Tobias J.; Lopez, Manuel R.; Zimmermann, Eugene; Ledbetter, James M.

    2000-10-15

    A materials qualification program has been developed to irradiate and test candidate materials (alloy 718, Type 316L, and Type 304L stainless steel, modified Fe9Cr-1Mo(T91), Al-6061-T6, and Al-5052-O) for use in the Accelerator Production of Tritium (APT) target and blanket. The irradiations were performed in prototypic proton and neutron spectra at prototypic temperatures (50 to 160 deg. C). The study used the 800-MeV, 1.0-mA proton accelerator at the Los Alamos Neutron Science Center, which produces a Gaussian beam with 2 sigma = 3 cm. The experiment geometry is arranged to contain near-prototypic modules of the tungsten neutron source and the lead and aluminum blanket as well as mechanical test specimens of candidate APT materials. The particle spectrum varies throughout the irradiation volume; specimens are exposed to protons and a variety of mixed proton and neutron spectra, depending on the specimen's position relative to the beam center. These specimens have been irradiated for >3600 h to a maximum proton fluence of 4 x 10{sup 21} p/cm{sup 2} in the center of the proton beam. Specimens will yield data on the effect of proton irradiation, to high dose, on material properties from tensile tests, three-point bend tests, fracture toughness tests, pressurized tubes, U-bend stress corrosion cracking specimens, corrosion measurements, and microstructural characterization using transmission electron microscopy specimens. Results from these studies are applicable to all spallation neutron sources now in operation and under consideration, including the Spallation Neutron Source, the European Spallation Source, and The Accelerator Transmutation of Waste project.

  5. Type of Speech Material Affects Acceptable Noise Level Test Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Koch, Xaver; Dingemanse, Gertjan; Goedegebure, André; Janse, Esther

    2016-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) test, in which individuals indicate what level of noise they are willing to put up with while following speech, has been used to guide hearing aid fitting decisions and has been found to relate to prospective hearing aid use. Unlike objective measures of speech perception ability, ANL outcome is not related to individual hearing loss or age, but rather reflects an individual’s inherent acceptance of competing noise while listening to speech. As such, the measure may predict aspects of hearing aid success. Crucially, however, recent studies have questioned its repeatability (test–retest reliability). The first question for this study was whether the inconsistent results regarding the repeatability of the ANL test may be due to differences in speech material types used in previous studies. Second, it is unclear whether meaningfulness and semantic coherence of the speech modify ANL outcome. To investigate these questions, we compared ANLs obtained with three types of materials: the International Speech Test Signal (ISTS), which is non-meaningful and semantically non-coherent by definition, passages consisting of concatenated meaningful standard audiology sentences, and longer fragments taken from conversational speech. We included conversational speech as this type of speech material is most representative of everyday listening. Additionally, we investigated whether ANL outcomes, obtained with these three different speech materials, were associated with self-reported limitations due to hearing problems and listening effort in everyday life, as assessed by a questionnaire. ANL data were collected for 57 relatively good-hearing adult participants with an age range representative for hearing aid users. Results showed that meaningfulness, but not semantic coherence of the speech material affected ANL. Less noise was accepted for the non-meaningful ISTS signal than for the meaningful speech materials. ANL repeatability was comparable

  6. Development of a multi-VOC reference material for quality assurance in materials emission testing.

    PubMed

    Nohr, Michael; Horn, Wolfgang; Jann, Oliver; Richter, Matthias; Lorenz, Wilhelm

    2015-04-01

    Emission test chamber measurement is necessary to proof building materials as sources of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). The results of such measurements are used to evaluate materials and label them according to their potential to emit harmful substances, polluting indoor air. If only labelled materials were installed indoors, this would improve indoor air quality and prevent negative impacts on human health. Because of the complex testing procedure, reference materials for the quality assurance are mandatory. Currently, there is a lack of such materials because most building products show a broad variation of emissions even within one batch. A previous study indicates lacquers, mixed with volatile organic pollutants, as reproducible emission source for a wide range of substances. In the present study, the curing of the lacquer-VOC mixture inside micro-chambers was optimised. Therefore, the humidity and the chamber flow were varied. Typical indoor air pollutants with a wide range of volatilities, for example, styrene, n-hexadecane, dimethyl and dibutyl phthalate were selected. It turned out that, under optimised curing parameters inside the micro-chamber, their emission can be reproduced with variations of less than 10 %. With this, a next important step towards a reference material for emission testing was achieved.

  7. Measurement uncertainty of adsorption testing of desiccant materials

    SciTech Connect

    Bingham, C E; Pesaran, A A

    1988-12-01

    The technique of measurement uncertainty analysis as described in the current ANSI/ASME standard is applied to the testing of desiccant materials in SERI`s Sorption Test Facility. This paper estimates the elemental precision and systematic errors in these tests and propagates them separately to obtain the resulting uncertainty of the test parameters, including relative humidity ({plus_minus}.03) and sorption capacity ({plus_minus}.002 g/g). Errors generated by instrument calibration, data acquisition, and data reduction are considered. Measurement parameters that would improve the uncertainty of the results are identified. Using the uncertainty in the moisture capacity of a desiccant, the design engineer can estimate the uncertainty in performance of a dehumidifier for desiccant cooling systems with confidence. 6 refs., 2 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Controlled Chemistry Helium High Temperature Materials Test Loop

    SciTech Connect

    Richard N. WRight

    2005-08-01

    A system to test aging and environmental effects in flowing helium with impurity content representative of the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) has been designed and assembled. The system will be used to expose microstructure analysis coupons and mechanical test specimens for up to 5,000 hours in helium containing potentially oxidizing or carburizing impurities controlled to parts per million levels. Impurity levels in the flowing helium are controlled through a feedback mechanism based on gas chromatography measurements of the gas chemistry at the inlet and exit from a high temperature retort containing the test materials. Initial testing will focus on determining the nature and extent of combined aging and environmental effects on microstructure and elevated temperature mechanical properties of alloys proposed for structural applications in the NGNP, including Inconel 617 and Haynes 230.

  9. Photonic circuits integrated with CMOS compatible photodetectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristea, Dana; Craciunoiu, F.; Modreanu, M.; Caldararu, M.; Cernica, I.

    2001-06-01

    This paper presents the integration of photodetectors and photonic circuits (waveguides and interferometers, coupling elements and chemo-optical transducing layer) on one silicon chip. Different materials: silicon, doped or undoped silica, SiO xN y, polymers, and different technologies: LPCVD, APCVD, sol-gel, spinning, micromachining have been used to realize the photonic and micromechanical components and the transducers. Also, MOS compatible processes have been used for optoelectronic circuits. The attention was focused on the matching of all the involved technologies, to allow the monolithic integration of all components, and also on the design and fabrication of special structures of photodetectors. Two types of high responsivity photodetectors, a photo-FET and a bipolar NPN phototransistor, with modified structures that allow the optical coupling to the waveguides have been designed and experimented. An original 3-D model was developed for the system: opto-FET-coupler-waveguide. A test circuit for sensor applications was experimented. All the components of the test circuits, photodetectors, waveguides, couplers, were obtained using CMOS-compatible processes. The aim of our research activity was to obtain microsensors with optical read-out.

  10. Tests with ceramic waste form materials made by pressureless consolidation.

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, M. A.; Hash, M. C.; Hebden, A. S.; Ebert, W. L.

    2002-12-02

    A multiphase waste form referred to as the ceramic waste form (CWF) will be used to immobilize radioactively contaminated salt wastes recovered after the electrometallurgical treatment of spent sodium-bonded nuclear fuel. The CWF is made by first occluding salt in zeolite and then encapsulating the zeolite in a borosilicate binder glass. A variety of surrogate CWF materials were made using pressureless consolidation (PC) methods for comparison with CWF consolidated using a hot isostatic press (HIP) method and to study the effects of glass/zeolite batching ratio and processing conditions on the physical and chemical properties of the resulting materials. The data summarized in this report will also be used to support qualification of the PC CWF for disposal in the proposed federal high-level radioactive waste repository at Yucca Mountain. The phase composition and microstructure of HIP CWF and PC CWF are essentially identical: both are composed of about 70% sodalite, 25% binder glass, and a 5% total of inclusion phases (halite, nepheline, and various oxides and silicates). The primary difference is that PC CWF materials have higher porosities than HIP CWFs. The product consistency test (PCT) that was initially developed to monitor homogeneous glass waste forms was used to measure the chemical durabilities of the CWF materials. Series of replicate tests with several PC CWF materials indicate that the PCT can be conducted with the same precision with CWF materials as with borosilicate glasses. Short-term (7-day) PCTs were used to evaluate the repeatability of making the PC CWF and the effects of the glass/zeolite mass ratio, process temperature, and processing time on the chemical durability. Long-term (up to 1 year) PCTs were used to compare the durabilities of HIP and PC CWFs and to estimate the apparent solubility limit for the PC CWF that is needed for modeling. The PC and HIP CWF materials had similar disabilities, based on the release of silicon in long

  11. Tensile tests of ITER TF conductors jacket materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anashkin, O. P.; Kеilin, V. E.; Krivykh, A. V.; Diev, D. N.; Dinisilov, A. S.; Shcherbakov, V. I.; Tronza, V. I.

    2012-06-01

    The set of very tough requirements has been formulated for TF jacket materials with extremely high plasticity at liquid helium temperature. The stainless steel 316LN-IG is recommended to be used for TF jacket tubes. Samples of 316LN-IG tubes (whole tubes and sub-size samples) made of the material from the same electro slag remelt have been tested in different conditions - as received tubes and tubes after prescribed compaction, 2.5% deformation at room temperature and heat treatment at 650 0C, 200 hours. The tensile tests were carried out at room, liquid nitrogen and liquid helium temperatures down to 4.2 K, meeting corresponding ASME and ASTM requirements. The low temperature testing devices are described. The tests results for sub-size samples and whole tubes show that the latter tests are considerably more representative and important for butt weld qualification at LHe temperature. It was observed that the ferromagnetic properties of all samples and especially of butt welds increase with lowering the temperature and increasing the degree of deformation. At LHe temperature a non-uniform and highly localized serrated deformations were observed.

  12. DIGITAL RADIOGRAPHY OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL TEST PACKAGES

    SciTech Connect

    HOWARD, BOYD

    2006-02-02

    The purpose of this document is to provide a brief introduction to digital radiography (DR), and a description of the DR configuration that was used to radiographically image the Special Nuclear Material (SNM) Test Packages before and after function tests that have been conducted. Also included are (1) Attachment 1, a comprehensive index that describes at which phase of the certification process that digital radiographic images were acquired, (2) digital radiographic images of each of the six packages at various stages of the certification process, and (3) Attachment 2, imaging instructions, that specify the setup procedures and detailed parameters of the DR imaging methodology that were used.

  13. Prediction of ground motion from underground nuclear weapons tests as it relates to siting of a nuclear waste storage facility at NTS and compatibility with the weapons test program

    SciTech Connect

    Vortman, L.J. III

    1980-04-01

    This report assumes reasonable criteria for NRC licensing of a nuclear waste storage facility at the Nevada Test Site where it would be exposed to ground motion from underground nuclear weapons tests. Prediction equations and their standard deviations have been determined from measurements on a number of nuclear weapons tests. The effect of various independent parameters on standard deviation is discussed. That the data sample is sufficiently large is shown by the fact that additional data have little effect on the standard deviation. It is also shown that coupling effects can be separated out of the other contributions to the standard deviation. An example, based on certain licensing assumptions, shows that it should be possible to have a nuclear waste storage facility in the vicinity of Timber Mountain which would be compatible with a 700 kt weapons test in the Buckboard Area if the facility were designed to withstand a peak vector acceleration of 0.75 g. The prediction equation is a log-log linear equation which predicts acceleration as a function of yield of an explosion and the distance from it.

  14. Testing and design life analysis of polyurea liner materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghasemi Motlagh, Siavash

    Certainly, water pipes, as part of an underground infrastructure system, play a key role in maintaining quality of life, health, and wellbeing of human kind. As these potable water pipes reach the end of their useful life, they create high maintenance costs, loss of flow capacity, decreased water quality, and increased dissatisfaction. There are several different pipeline renewal techniques available for different applications, among which linings are most commonly used for the renewal of water pipes. Polyurea is a lining material applied to the interior surface of the deteriorated host pipe using spray-on technique. It is applied to structurally enhance the host pipe and provide a barrier coating against further corrosion or deterioration. The purpose of this study was to establish a relationship between stress, strain and time. The results obtained from these tests were used in predicting the strength of the polyurea material during its planned 50-year design life. In addition to this, based on the 10,000 hours experimental data, curve fitting and Findley power law models were employed to predict long-term behavior of the material. Experimental results indicated that the tested polyurea material offers a good balance of strength and stiffness and can be utilized in structural enhancement applications of potable water pipes.

  15. Electrical test structures replicated in silicon-on-insulator material

    SciTech Connect

    Cresswell, M.W.; Ghoshtagore, R.N.; Allen, R.A.; Linholm, L.W.; Villarrubia, J.S.; Sniegowski, J.J.

    1996-02-27

    Measurements of the linewidths of submicrometer features made by different metrology techniques have frequently been characterized by differences of up to 90 nm. The purpose of the work reported here is to address the special difficulties that this phenomenon presents to the certification of reference materials for the calibration of linewidth-measurement instruments. Accordingly, a new test structure has been designed, fabricated, and undergone preliminary tests. Its distinguishing characteristics are assured cross-sectional profile geometries with known side-wall slopes, surface planarity, and compositional uniformity when it is formed in mono-crystalline material at selected orientations to the crystal lattice. To allow the extraction of electrical linewidth, the structure is replicated in a silicon film of uniform conductivity which is separated from the silicon substrate by a buried oxide layer. The utilization of a Silicon-On-Insulator (SKI) substrate further allows the selective removal of substrate material from local regions below the reference features, thus facilitating measurements by optical and electron-beam transmission microscopy. The combination of planar feature surfaces having known side-wall slopes is anticipated to eliminate factors which are believed to be responsible for methods divergence in linewidth measurements, a capability which is a prerequisite for reliable certification of the linewidths of features on reference materials.

  16. A 360-deg Digital Image Correlation system for materials testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genovese, K.; Cortese, L.; Rossi, M.; Amodio, D.

    2016-07-01

    The increasing research interest toward natural and advanced engineered materials demands new experimental protocols capable of retrieving highly dense sets of experimental data on the full-surface of samples under multiple loading conditions. Such information, in fact, would allow to capture the possible heterogeneity and anisotropy of the material by using up-to-date inverse characterization methods. Although the development of object-specific test protocols could represent the optimal choice to address this need, it is unquestionable that universal testing machines (UTM) remain the most widespread and versatile option to test materials and components in both academic and industrial contexts. A major limitation of performing standard material tests with UTM, however, consists in the scarce information obtainable with the commonly associated sensors since they provide only global (LVDTs, extensometers, 2D-video analyzers) or local (strain gages) measures of displacement and strain. This paper presents a 3D Digital Image Correlation (DIC) system developed to perform highly accurate full-surface 360-deg measurements on either standard or custom-shaped samples under complex loading within universal testing machines. To this aim, a low cost and easy to setup video rig was specifically designed to overcome the practical limitations entailed with the integration of a multi-camera system within an already existing loading frame. In particular, the proposed system features a single SLR digital camera moved through multiple positions around the specimen by means of a large rotation stage. A proper calibration and data-processing procedure allows to automatically merge the experimental data obtained from the multiple views with an accuracy of 10-2 m m . The results of a full benchmarking of the metrological performances of the system are here reported and discussed together with illustrative examples of full-360-deg shape and deformation measurements on a Grade X65 steel

  17. Material Testing in Support of the ISS Electrochemical Disinfection Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clements, Anna; Shindo, David; Modica, Cathy

    2011-01-01

    The International Space Station Program recognizes the risk of microbial contamination in their potable and non-potable water sources. With the end of the Space Shuttle Program, the ability to send up shock-kits of biocides in the event of an outbreak becomes even more difficult. Currently, the US Segment water system relies primarily on iodine to mitigate contamination concerns. To date, several small cases of contamination have occurred which have been remediated. NASA, however, realizes that having a secondary method of combating a microbial outbreak is a prudent investment. NASA is looking into developing hardware that can generate biocides electrochemically, and potentially deploying that hardware. The specific biocides that the technology could generate include: hydrogen peroxide, oxone, hypochlorite and peracetic acid. In order to use these biocides on deployed water systems, the project must determine that all the materials in the potential application are compatible with the biocides at their anticipated administered concentrations. This paper will detail the materials test portion of the feasibility assessment including the plan for both metals and non-metals along with results to date.

  18. Testing of aircraft passenger seat cushion materials. Full scale, test description and results, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schutter, K. J.; Gaume, J. G.; Duskin, F. E.

    1981-01-01

    Eight different seat cushion configurations were subjected to full-scale burn tests. Each cushion configuration was tested twice for a total of sixteen tests. Two different fire sources were used. They consisted of one liter of Jet A fuel for eight tests and a radiant energy source with propane flame for eight tests. Both fire sources were ignited by a propane flame. During each test, data were recorded for smoke density, cushion temperatures, radiant heat flux, animal response to combustion products, rate of weight loss of test specimens, cabin temperature, and for the type and content of gas within the cabin atmosphere. When compared to existing passenger aircraft seat cushions, the test specimens incorporating a fire barrier and those fabricated from advanced materials, using improved construction methods, exhibited significantly greater fire resistance.

  19. Low velocity impact testing and nondestructive evaluation of transparent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brennan, R. E.; Green, W. H.

    2011-06-23

    Advanced transparent materials are used in protective systems for enhancing the survivability of ground vehicles, air vehicles, and personnel in applications such as face shields, riot gear, and vehicle windows. Low velocity impact damage can limit visibility and compromise the structural integrity of a transparent system, increasing the likelihood of further damage or penetration from a high velocity impact strike. For this reason, it is critical to determine damage tolerance levels of transparent systems to indicate whether or not a component should be replaced. In this study, transparent laminate systems will be tested by comparing baseline conditions to experimentally controlled damage states. Destructive testing including air gun and sphere impact testing will be used to replicate low velocity impacts in the field. Characterization of the damaged state will include basic visual inspection as well as nondestructive techniques including cross-polarization, x-ray, and ultrasound. The combination of destructive testing and characterization of the resulting damage can help to establish a damage acceptance criterion for materials used in protective systems.

  20. Examination of an optical transmittance test for photovoltaic encapsulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, David C.; Bengoechea, Jaione; Bokria, Jayesh G.; Köhl, Michael; Powell, Nick E.; Smith, Michael E.; White, Michael D.; Wilson, Helen Rose; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Dhere, Neelkanth G.; Wohlgemuth, John H.; Lynn, Kevin W.

    2013-09-24

    The optical transmittance of encapsulation materials is a key characteristic for their use in photovoltaic (PV) modules. Changes in transmittance with time in the field affect module performance, which may impact product warranties. Transmittance is important in product development, module manufacturing, and field power production (both immediate and long-term). Therefore, an international standard (IEC 62788-1-4) has recently been proposed by the Encapsulation Task-Group within the Working Group 2 (WG2) of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC) Technical Committee 82 (TC82) for the quantification of the optical performance of PV encapsulation materials. Existing standards, such as ASTM E903, are general and more appropriately applied to concentrated solar power than to PV. Starting from the optical transmittance measurement, the solar-weighted transmittance of photon irradiance, yellowness index (which may be used in aging studies to assess durability), and ultraviolet (UV) cut-off wavelength may all be determined using the proposed standard. The details of the proposed test are described. The results of a round-robin experiment (for five materials) conducted at seven laboratories to validate the test procedure using representative materials are also presented. For example, the Encapsulation Group actively explored the measurement requirements (wavelength range and resolution), the requirements for the spectrophotometer (including the integrating sphere and instrument accessories, such as a depolarizer), specimen requirements (choice of glass-superstrate and -substrate), and data analysis (relative to the light that may be used in the PV application). The round-robin experiment identified both intra- and inter-laboratory instrument precision and bias for five encapsulation materials (encompassing a range of transmittance and haze-formation characteristics).