Science.gov

Sample records for materials transport optimizing

  1. Hierarchical transport networks optimizing dynamic response of permeable energy-storage materials.

    PubMed

    Nilson, Robert H; Griffiths, Stewart K

    2009-07-01

    Channel widths and spacing in latticelike hierarchical transport networks are optimized to achieve maximum extraction of gas or electrical charge from nanoporous energy-storage materials during charge and discharge cycles of specified duration. To address a range of physics, the effective transport diffusivity is taken to vary as a power, m , of channel width. Optimal channel widths and spacing in all levels of the hierarchy are found to increase in a power-law manner with normalized system size, facilitating the derivation of closed-form approximations for the optimal dimensions. Characteristic response times and ratios of channel width to spacing are both shown to vary by the factor 2/m between successive levels of any optimal hierarchy. This leads to fractal-like self-similar geometry, but only for m=2 . For this case of quadratic dependence of diffusivity on channel width, the introduction of transport channels permits increases in system size on the order of 10;{4} , 10;{8} , and 10;{10} , without any reduction in extraction efficiency, for hierarchies having 1, 2 and, 8 levels, respectively. However, we also find that for a given system size there is an optimum number of hierarchical levels that maximizes extraction efficiency.

  2. ``Phantom'' Modes in Ab Initio Tunneling Calculations: Implications for Theoretical Materials Optimization, Tunneling, and Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barabash, Sergey V.; Pramanik, Dipankar

    2015-03-01

    Development of low-leakage dielectrics for semiconductor industry, together with many other areas of academic and industrial research, increasingly rely upon ab initio tunneling and transport calculations. Complex band structure (CBS) is a powerful formalism to establish the nature of tunneling modes, providing both a deeper understanding and a guided optimization of materials, with practical applications ranging from screening candidate dielectrics for lowest ``ultimate leakage'' to identifying charge-neutrality levels and Fermi level pinning. We demonstrate that CBS is prone to a particular type of spurious ``phantom'' solution, previously deemed true but irrelevant because of a very fast decay. We demonstrate that (i) in complex materials, phantom modes may exhibit very slow decay (appearing as leading tunneling terms implying qualitative and huge quantitative errors), (ii) the phantom modes are spurious, (iii) unlike the pseudopotential ``ghost'' states, phantoms are an apparently unavoidable artifact of large numerical basis sets, (iv) a presumed increase in computational accuracy increases the number of phantoms, effectively corrupting the CBS results despite the higher accuracy achieved in resolving the true CBS modes and the real band structure, and (v) the phantom modes cannot be easily separated from the true CBS modes. We discuss implications for direct transport calculations. The strategy for dealing with the phantom states is discussed in the context of optimizing high-quality high- κ dielectric materials for decreased tunneling leakage.

  3. Transporting particulate material

    DOEpatents

    Aldred, Derek Leslie [North Hollywood, CA; Rader, Jeffrey A [North Hollywood, CA; Saunders, Timothy W [North Hollywood, CA

    2011-08-30

    A material transporting system comprises a material transporting apparatus (100) including a material transporting apparatus hopper structure (200, 202), which comprises at least one rotary transporting apparatus; a stationary hub structure (900) constraining and assisting the at least one rotary transporting apparatus; an outlet duct configuration (700) configured to permit material to exit therefrom and comprising at least one diverging portion (702, 702'); an outlet abutment configuration (800) configured to direct material to the outlet duct configuration; an outlet valve assembly from the material transporting system venting the material transporting system; and a moving wall configuration in the material transporting apparatus capable of assisting the material transporting apparatus in transporting material in the material transporting system. Material can be moved from the material transporting apparatus hopper structure to the outlet duct configuration through the at least one rotary transporting apparatus, the outlet abutment configuration, and the outlet valve assembly.

  4. Generalized railway tank car safety design optimization for hazardous materials transport: addressing the trade-off between transportation efficiency and safety.

    PubMed

    Saat, Mohd Rapik; Barkan, Christopher P L

    2011-05-15

    North America railways offer safe and generally the most economical means of long distance transport of hazardous materials. Nevertheless, in the event of a train accident releases of these materials can pose substantial risk to human health, property or the environment. The majority of railway shipments of hazardous materials are in tank cars. Improving the safety design of these cars to make them more robust in accidents generally increases their weight thereby reducing their capacity and consequent transportation efficiency. This paper presents a generalized tank car safety design optimization model that addresses this tradeoff. The optimization model enables evaluation of each element of tank car safety design, independently and in combination with one another. We present the optimization model by identifying a set of Pareto-optimal solutions for a baseline tank car design in a bicriteria decision problem. This model provides a quantitative framework for a rational decision-making process involving tank car safety design enhancements to reduce the risk of transporting hazardous materials. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Optimized nanoporous materials.

    SciTech Connect

    Braun, Paul V.; Langham, Mary Elizabeth; Jacobs, Benjamin W.; Ong, Markus D.; Narayan, Roger J.; Pierson, Bonnie E.; Gittard, Shaun D.; Robinson, David B.; Ham, Sung-Kyoung; Chae, Weon-Sik; Gough, Dara V.; Wu, Chung-An Max; Ha, Cindy M.; Tran, Kim L.

    2009-09-01

    Nanoporous materials have maximum practical surface areas for electrical charge storage; every point in an electrode is within a few atoms of an interface at which charge can be stored. Metal-electrolyte interfaces make best use of surface area in porous materials. However, ion transport through long, narrow pores is slow. We seek to understand and optimize the tradeoff between capacity and transport. Modeling and measurements of nanoporous gold electrodes has allowed us to determine design principles, including the fact that these materials can deplete salt from the electrolyte, increasing resistance. We have developed fabrication techniques to demonstrate architectures inspired by these principles that may overcome identified obstacles. A key concept is that electrodes should be as close together as possible; this is likely to involve an interpenetrating pore structure. However, this may prove extremely challenging to fabricate at the finest scales; a hierarchically porous structure can be a worthy compromise.

  6. Optimization of electron transport and cathode materials for efficient organic solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colsmann, Alexander; Junge, Johannes; Wellinger, Thomas; Kayser, Christian; Lemmer, Uli

    2006-04-01

    In this work we discuss improvements of organic solar cells based on poly(3-hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) : C 61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) blends. The polymer layer is combined with various electron transport materials and different cathodes. We were able to utilize the good charge carrier separation and transport properties of the P3HT:PCBM blend together with the flexibility of evaporated heterostructures. The systematic use of different cathodes such as calcium, aluminium/lithiumfluoride and organic intermediate layers resulted in higher fill factors and open circuit voltages compared to simple aluminium cathodes. In particular we studied the influence of additional layers of electron transport layer consisting of C 60, lithium doped bathophenanthroline (BPhen:Li) 2-(4-tert-butylphenyl)-5-(4-biphenylyl)-1,3,4-oxadiazole (PBD) and 2,9- dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenantrolene (BCP) on the cell properties. Solar cells with power conversion efficiencies well above 3% have been fabricated.

  7. Optimizing Railroad Tank Car Safety Design to Reduce Hazardous Materials Transportation Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saat, Mohd Rapik

    2009-01-01

    The design of railroad tank cars is subject to structural and performance requirements and constrained by weight. They can be made safer by increasing tank thickness and adding various protective features, but these increase the weight and cost of the car and reduce its capacity and consequent transportation efficiency. Aircraft, automobiles and…

  8. Optimizing Railroad Tank Car Safety Design to Reduce Hazardous Materials Transportation Risk

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saat, Mohd Rapik

    2009-01-01

    The design of railroad tank cars is subject to structural and performance requirements and constrained by weight. They can be made safer by increasing tank thickness and adding various protective features, but these increase the weight and cost of the car and reduce its capacity and consequent transportation efficiency. Aircraft, automobiles and…

  9. Toward Optimal Transport Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Alexandrov, Natalia; Kincaid, Rex K.; Vargo, Erik P.

    2008-01-01

    Strictly evolutionary approaches to improving the air transport system a highly complex network of interacting systems no longer suffice in the face of demand that is projected to double or triple in the near future. Thus evolutionary approaches should be augmented with active design methods. The ability to actively design, optimize and control a system presupposes the existence of predictive modeling and reasonably well-defined functional dependences between the controllable variables of the system and objective and constraint functions for optimization. Following recent advances in the studies of the effects of network topology structure on dynamics, we investigate the performance of dynamic processes on transport networks as a function of the first nontrivial eigenvalue of the network's Laplacian, which, in turn, is a function of the network s connectivity and modularity. The last two characteristics can be controlled and tuned via optimization. We consider design optimization problem formulations. We have developed a flexible simulation of network topology coupled with flows on the network for use as a platform for computational experiments.

  10. Transportation of hazardous materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Max

    1994-03-01

    The transportation of hazardous materials has steadily increased through out the past thirty years and will continue to grow through the end of the century. The development of advanced technology to track extremely dangerous shipments and provide immediate electronic load information is essential to both transportation and public safety agencies. Federal, state and local transportation and public safety agencies must have hazardous material transportation information in order to plan, train and equip responders to meet the identified threat. Tracking and identification technology must be consistent within and across state and international borders. The development and implementation of a strategy and technology will require federal, state and private industry coordination and financing.

  11. WaterTransport in PEM Fuel Cells: Advanced Modeling, Material Selection, Testing and Design Optimization

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vernon Cole; Abhra Roy; Ashok Damle; Hari Dahr; Sanjiv Kumar; Kunal Jain; Ned Djilai

    2012-10-02

    Water management in Proton Exchange Membrane, PEM, Fuel Cells is challenging because of the inherent conflicts between the requirements for efficient low and high power operation. Particularly at low powers, adequate water must be supplied to sufficiently humidify the membrane or protons will not move through it adequately and resistance losses will decrease the cell efficiency. At high power density operation, more water is produced at the cathode than is necessary for membrane hydration. This excess water must be removed effectively or it will accumulate in the Gas Diffusion Layers, GDLs, between the gas channels and catalysts, blocking diffusion paths for reactants to reach the catalysts and potentially flooding the electrode. As power density of the cells is increased, the challenges arising from water management are expected to become more difficult to overcome simply due to the increased rate of liquid water generation relative to fuel cell volume. Thus, effectively addressing water management based issues is a key challenge in successful application of PEMFC systems. In this project, CFDRC and our partners used a combination of experimental characterization, controlled experimental studies of important processes governing how water moves through the fuel cell materials, and detailed models and simulations to improve understanding of water management in operating hydrogen PEM fuel cells. The characterization studies provided key data that is used as inputs to all state-of-the-art models for commercially important GDL materials. Experimental studies and microscopic scale models of how water moves through the GDLs showed that the water follows preferential paths, not branching like a river, as it moves toward the surface of the material. Experimental studies and detailed models of water and airflow in fuel cells channels demonstrated that such models can be used as an effective design tool to reduce operating pressure drop in the channels and the associated

  12. Optimizing Transportation of Disaster Relief Material to Support U.S. Pacific Command Foreign Humanitarian Assistance Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Excel ( VBA ) program of the Microsoft Office suite. 3. Transportation Costs DRAP calculates the costs of transporting the HA/DR material to the...Dantzig, G. B., D. R. Fulkerson. 1954. “Minimizing the number of tankers to meet a fixed schedule,” Naval Research Logistics Quarterly 3, pp. 217–222

  13. Optimal concentrations in transport systems.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kaare H; Kim, Wonjung; Holbrook, N Michele; Bush, John W M

    2013-06-06

    Many biological and man-made systems rely on transport systems for the distribution of material, for example matter and energy. Material transfer in these systems is determined by the flow rate and the concentration of material. While the most concentrated solutions offer the greatest potential in terms of material transfer, impedance typically increases with concentration, thus making them the most difficult to transport. We develop a general framework for describing systems for which impedance increases with concentration, and consider material flow in four different natural systems: blood flow in vertebrates, sugar transport in vascular plants and two modes of nectar drinking in birds and insects. The model provides a simple method for determining the optimum concentration copt in these systems. The model further suggests that the impedance at the optimum concentration μopt may be expressed in terms of the impedance of the pure (c = 0) carrier medium μ0 as μopt 2(α)μ0, where the power α is prescribed by the specific flow constraints, for example constant pressure for blood flow (α = 1) or constant work rate for certain nectar-drinking insects (α = 6). Comparing the model predictions with experimental data from more than 100 animal and plant species, we find that the simple model rationalizes the observed concentrations and impedances. The model provides a universal framework for studying flows impeded by concentration, and yields insight into optimization in engineered systems, such as traffic flow.

  14. Optimal concentrations in transport systems

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kaare H.; Kim, Wonjung; Holbrook, N. Michele; Bush, John W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Many biological and man-made systems rely on transport systems for the distribution of material, for example matter and energy. Material transfer in these systems is determined by the flow rate and the concentration of material. While the most concentrated solutions offer the greatest potential in terms of material transfer, impedance typically increases with concentration, thus making them the most difficult to transport. We develop a general framework for describing systems for which impedance increases with concentration, and consider material flow in four different natural systems: blood flow in vertebrates, sugar transport in vascular plants and two modes of nectar drinking in birds and insects. The model provides a simple method for determining the optimum concentration copt in these systems. The model further suggests that the impedance at the optimum concentration μopt may be expressed in terms of the impedance of the pure (c = 0) carrier medium μ0 as μopt∼2αμ0, where the power α is prescribed by the specific flow constraints, for example constant pressure for blood flow (α = 1) or constant work rate for certain nectar-drinking insects (α = 6). Comparing the model predictions with experimental data from more than 100 animal and plant species, we find that the simple model rationalizes the observed concentrations and impedances. The model provides a universal framework for studying flows impeded by concentration, and yields insight into optimization in engineered systems, such as traffic flow. PMID:23594815

  15. Lunar material transport vehicle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, Charles D.; Lyons, Douglas; Wilkins, W. Allen, Jr.; Whitehead, Harry C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    The proposed vehicle, the Lunar Material Transport Vehicle (LMTV), has a mission objective of efficient lunar soil material transport. The LMTV was designed to meet a required set of performance specifications while operating under a given set of constraints. The LMTV is essentially an articulated steering, double-ended dump truck. The vehicle moves on four wheels and has two identical chassis halves. Each half consists of a chassis frame, a material bucket, two wheels with integral curvilinear synchronous motors, a fuel cell and battery arrangement, an electromechanically actuated dumping mechanism, and a powerful microprocessor. The vehicle, as designed, is capable of transporting up to 200 cu ft of material over a one mile round trip per hour. The LMTV is capable of being operated from a variety of sources. The vehicle has been designed as simply as possible with attention also given to secondary usage of components.

  16. Optimizing Stellarators for Turbulent Transport

    SciTech Connect

    H.E. Mynick, N.Pomphrey, and P. Xanthopoulos

    2010-05-27

    Up to now, the term "transport-optimized" stellarators has meant optimized to minimize neoclassical transport, while the task of also mitigating turbulent transport, usually the dominant transport channel in such designs, has not been addressed, due to the complexity of plasma turbulence in stellarators. Here, we demonstrate that stellarators can also be designed to mitigate their turbulent transport, by making use of two powerful numerical tools not available until recently, namely gyrokinetic codes valid for 3D nonlinear simulations, and stellarator optimization codes. A first proof-of-principle configuration is obtained, reducing the level of ion temperature gradient turbulent transport from the NCSX baseline design by a factor of about 2.5.

  17. A Problem on Optimal Transportation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cechlarova, Katarina

    2005-01-01

    Mathematical optimization problems are not typical in the classical curriculum of mathematics. In this paper we show how several generalizations of an easy problem on optimal transportation were solved by gifted secondary school pupils in a correspondence mathematical seminar, how they can be used in university courses of linear programming and…

  18. Improving the design of higher-capacity railway tank cars for hazardous materials transport: optimizing the trade-off between weight and safety.

    PubMed

    Barkan, Christopher P L

    2008-12-15

    As with many aspects of modern industrial society, decision-makers face trade-offs in considering hazardous materials transportation equipment and practices. Tank cars used for transport of hazardous materials can be made more resistant to damage in accidents through use of a thicker steel tank and other protective features. However, the additional weight of these features reduces the car's capacity and thus its efficiency as a transportation vehicle. In this paper the problem of tank car safety versus weight is developed as a multi-attribute decision problem. North American railroads recently developed specifications for higher capacity tank cars for transportation of hazardous materials including enhanced safety design features. A group of tank car safety design features or "risk reduction options" (RROs) were analyzed with regard to their effect on the conditional probability of release in an accident, and their incremental effect on tank car weight. All possible combinations of these RROs were then analyzed in terms of the reduced release probability per unit of weight increase and the Pareto optimal set of options identified. This set included the combinations of RROs that provided the greatest improvement in safety with the least amount of additional weight for any desired level of tank car weight increase. The analysis was conducted for both non-insulated and insulated tank cars and used two objective functions, minimization of conditional probability of release, and minimization of expected quantity lost, given that a car was derailed in an accident. Sensitivity analyses of the effect of tank car size and use of different objective functions were conducted and the optimality results were found to be robust. The results of this analysis were used by the Association of American Railroads Tank Car Committee to develop new specifications for higher capacity non-insulated and insulated, non-pressure tank cars resulting in an estimated 32% and 24% respective

  19. Optimal transport and the placenta

    SciTech Connect

    Morgan, Simon; Xia, Qinglan; Salafia, Carolym

    2010-01-01

    The goal of this paper is to investigate the expected effects of (i) placental size, (ii) placental shape and (iii) the position of insertion of the umbilical cord on the work done by the foetus heart in pumping blood across the placenta. We use optimal transport theory and modeling to quantify the expected effects of these factors . Total transport cost and the shape factor contribution to cost are given by the optimal transport model. Total placental transport cost is highly correlated with birth weight, placenta weight, FPR and the metabolic scaling factor beta. The shape factor is also highly correlated with birth weight, and after adjustment for placental weight, is highly correlated with the metabolic scaling factor beta.

  20. The Optimal Partial Transport Problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figalli, Alessio

    2010-02-01

    Given two densities f and g, we consider the problem of transporting a fraction {m in [0,min\\{\\|f\\|_{L^1},\\|g\\|_{L^1}\\}]} of the mass of f onto g minimizing a transportation cost. If the cost per unit of mass is given by | x - y|2, we will see that uniqueness of solutions holds for {m in [\\|fwedge g\\|_{L^1},min\\{\\|f\\|_{L^1},\\|g\\|_{L^1}\\}]} . This extends the result of C affarelli and M cCann in Ann Math (in print), where the authors consider two densities with disjoint supports. The free boundaries of the active regions are shown to be ( n - 1)-rectifiable (provided the supports of f and g have Lipschitz boundaries), and under some weak regularity assumptions on the geometry of the supports they are also locally semiconvex. Moreover, assuming f and g supported on two bounded strictly convex sets {{Ω,Λ subset mathbb {R}^n}} , and bounded away from zero and infinity on their respective supports, {C^{0,α}_loc} regularity of the optimal transport map and local C 1 regularity of the free boundaries away from {{Ω\\cap Λ}} are shown. Finally, the optimal transport map extends to a global homeomorphism between the active regions.

  1. HMPT: Basic Radioactive Material Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Hypes, Philip A.

    2016-02-29

    Hazardous Materials and Packaging and Transportation (HMPT): Basic Radioactive Material Transportation Live (#30462, suggested one time) and Test (#30463, required initially and every 36 months) address the Department of Transportation’s (DOT’s) function-specific [required for hazardous material (HAZMAT) handlers, packagers, and shippers] training requirements of the HMPT Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) Labwide training. This course meets the requirements of 49 CFR 172, Subpart H, Section 172.704(a)(ii), Function-Specific Training.

  2. Transportation of Radioactive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1955-07-01

    measurements of radiation must be made with a Landsverk- Wollan Electrometer Model L-100 or equally efficient standardized meter. Acceptable instruments... Wollan Electrometer Model L-100, or equally efficient standardized meter. 40 146.25-25. Exemptions for radioactive materials: (a) Radioactive materials

  3. Optimal Super Dielectric Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-01

    lithium bis [(trifluoromethyl) sulfonyl] imide and N- methylacetamide as superionic suitable electrolyte for lithium ion batteries and electric double... electrically insulating materials filled to the point of incipient wetness (paste consistency) with liquids containing dissolved ions. This work...109. This strongly supports the fundamental hypothesis of SDM: In the presence of an electric field any electrically insulating, porous material

  4. Transport Phenomena and Materials Processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kou, Sindo

    1996-10-01

    An extremely useful guide to the theory and applications of transport phenomena in materials processing This book defines the unique role that transport phenomena play in materials processing and offers a graphic, comprehensive treatment unlike any other book on the subject. The two parts of the text are, in fact, two useful books. Part I is a very readable introduction to fluid flow, heat transfer, and mass transfer for materials engineers and anyone not yet thoroughly familiar with the subject. It includes governing equations and boundary conditions particularly useful for studying materials processing. For mechanical and chemical engineers, and anyone already familiar with transport phenomena, Part II covers the many specific applications to materials processing, including a brief description of various materials processing technologies. Readable and unencumbered by mathematical manipulations (most of which are allocated to the appendixes), this book is also a useful text for upper-level undergraduate and graduate-level courses in materials, mechanical, and chemical engineering. It includes hundreds of photographs of materials processing in action, single and composite figures of computer simulation, handy charts for problem solving, and more. Transport Phenomena and Materials Processing: * Describes eight key materials processing technologies, including crystal growth, casting, welding, powder and fiber processing, bulk and surface heat treating, and semiconductor device fabrication * Covers the latest advances in the field, including recent results of computer simulation and flow visualization * Presents special boundary conditions for transport phenomena in materials processing * Includes charts that summarize commonly encountered boundary conditions and step-by-step procedures for problem solving * Offers a unique derivation of governing equations that leads to both overall and differential balance equations * Provides a list of publicly available computer

  5. Optimal Transport for Domain Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Courty, Nicolas; Flamary, Remi; Tuia, Devis; Rakotomamonjy, Alain

    2017-09-01

    Domain adaptation is one of the most challenging tasks of modern data analytics. If the adaptation is done correctly, models built on a specific data representation become more robust when confronted to data depicting the same classes, but described by another observation system. Among the many strategies proposed, finding domain-invariant representations has shown excellent properties, in particular since it allows to train a unique classifier effective in all domains. In this paper, we propose a regularized unsupervised optimal transportation model to perform the alignment of the representations in the source and target domains. We learn a transportation plan matching both PDFs, which constrains labeled samples of the same class in the source domain to remain close during transport. This way, we exploit at the same time the labeled samples in the source and the distributions observed in both domains. Experiments on toy and challenging real visual adaptation examples show the interest of the method, that consistently outperforms state of the art approaches. In addition, numerical experiments show that our approach leads to better performances on domain invariant deep learning features and can be easily adapted to the semi-supervised case where few labeled samples are available in the target domain.

  6. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    DOE PAGES

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describingmore » the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.« less

  7. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  8. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    SciTech Connect

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-07-09

    This paper describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  9. Optimal lattice-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Messner, Mark C.

    2016-11-01

    This work describes a method for optimizing the mesostructure of lattice-structured materials. These materials are periodic arrays of slender members resembling efficient, lightweight macroscale structures like bridges and frame buildings. Current additive manufacturing technologies can assemble lattice structures with length scales ranging from nanometers to millimeters. Previous work demonstrates that lattice materials have excellent stiffness- and strength-to-weight scaling, outperforming natural materials. However, there are currently no methods for producing optimal mesostructures that consider the full space of possible 3D lattice topologies. The inverse homogenization approach for optimizing the periodic structure of lattice materials requires a parameterized, homogenized material model describing the response of an arbitrary structure. This work develops such a model, starting with a method for describing the long-wavelength, macroscale deformation of an arbitrary lattice. The work combines the homogenized model with a parameterized description of the total design space to generate a parameterized model. Finally, the work describes an optimization method capable of producing optimal mesostructures. Several examples demonstrate the optimization method. One of these examples produces an elastically isotropic, maximally stiff structure, here called the isotruss, that arguably outperforms the anisotropic octet truss topology.

  10. Hazardous Material Packaging and Transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Hypes, Philip A.

    2016-02-04

    This is a student training course. Some course objectives are to: recognize and use standard international and US customary units to describe activities and exposure rates associated with radioactive material; determine whether a quantity of a single radionuclide meets the definition of a class 7 (radioactive) material; determine, for a given single radionuclide, the shipping quantity activity limits per 49 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 173.435; determine the appropriate radioactive material hazard class proper shipping name for a given material; determine when a single radionuclide meets the DOT definition of a hazardous substance; determine the appropriate packaging required for a given radioactive material; identify the markings to be placed on a package of radioactive material; determine the label(s) to apply to a given radioactive material package; identify the entry requirements for radioactive material labels; determine the proper placement for radioactive material label(s); identify the shipping paper entry requirements for radioactive material; select the appropriate placards for a given radioactive material shipment or vehicle load; and identify allowable transport limits and unacceptable transport conditions for radioactive material.

  11. Wall to Wall Optimal Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chini, Gregory P.; Hassanzadeh, Pedram; Doering, Charles R.

    2013-11-01

    How much heat can be transported between impermeable fixed-temperature walls by incompressible flows with a given amount of kinetic energy or enstrophy? What do the optimal velocity fields look like? We employ variational calculus to address these questions in the context of steady 2D flows. The resulting nonlinear Euler-Lagrange equations are solved numerically, and in some cases analytically, to find the maximum possible Nusselt number Nu as a function of the Péclect number Pe , a measure of the flow's energy or enstrophy. We find that in the fixed-energy problem Nu ~ Pe , while in the fixed-enstrophy problem Nu ~ Pe 10 / 17 . In both cases, the optimal flow consists of an array of convection cells with aspect ratio Γ (Pe) . Interpreting our results in terms of the Rayleigh number Ra for relevant buoyancy-driven problems, we find Nu <= 1 + 0 . 035 Ra and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 2 for porous medium convection (which occurs with fixed energy), and Nu <= 1 + 0 . 115 Ra 5 / 12 and Γ ~ Ra - 1 / 4 for Rayleigh-Bénard convection (which occurs with fixed enstrophy and for free-slip walls). This work was supported by NSF awards PHY-0855335, DMS-0927587, and PHY-1205219 (CRD) and DMS-0928098 (GPC). Much of this work was completed at the 2012 Geophysical Fluid Dynamics (GFD) Program at Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution.

  12. Transportation of Hazardous Evidentiary Material.

    SciTech Connect

    Osborn, Douglas.

    2005-06-01

    This document describes the specimen and transportation containers currently available for use with hazardous and infectious materials. A detailed comparison of advantages, disadvantages, and costs of the different technologies is included. Short- and long-term recommendations are also provided.3 DraftDraftDraftExecutive SummaryThe Federal Bureau of Investigation's Hazardous Materials Response Unit currently has hazardous material transport containers for shipping 1-quart paint cans and small amounts of contaminated forensic evidence, but the containers may not be able to maintain their integrity under accident conditions or for some types of hazardous materials. This report provides guidance and recommendations on the availability of packages for the safe and secure transport of evidence consisting of or contaminated with hazardous chemicals or infectious materials. Only non-bulk containers were considered because these are appropriate for transport on small aircraft. This report will addresses packaging and transportation concerns for Hazardous Classes 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, and 9 materials. If the evidence is known or suspected of belonging to one of these Hazardous Classes, it must be packaged in accordance with the provisions of 49 CFR Part 173. The anthrax scare of several years ago, and less well publicized incidents involving unknown and uncharacterized substances, has required that suspicious substances be sent to appropriate analytical laboratories for analysis and characterization. Transportation of potentially hazardous or infectious material to an appropriate analytical laboratory requires transport containers that maintain both the biological and chemical integrity of the substance in question. As a rule, only relatively small quantities will be available for analysis. Appropriate transportation packaging is needed that will maintain the integrity of the substance, will not allow biological alteration, will not react chemically with the substance being

  13. Metal oxide charge transport material doped with organic molecules

    DOEpatents

    Forrest, Stephen R.; Lassiter, Brian E.

    2016-08-30

    Doping metal oxide charge transport material with an organic molecule lowers electrical resistance while maintaining transparency and thus is optimal for use as charge transport materials in various organic optoelectronic devices such as organic photovoltaic devices and organic light emitting devices.

  14. Manufacturing optimal nanocrystalline microtruss materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lausic, Ante Tony

    Fabrication of optimal ultra-lightweight hybrid cellular materials via a two-step synthesis method of rapid prototyping followed by electrodeposition was accomplished in three distinct stages: modelling, fabrication, and validation. For the first stage, a baseline microtruss architecture with multiple geometric and material degrees of freedom was optimized with relation to the expected failure mechanisms. An intrinsic link between material selection and architectural variables was discovered and quantified. For a given electrodeposited polycrystalline Ni/polymer microtruss that has already been optimized for maximum load carrying capacity with minimal mass, substituting a nanocrystalline coating shifts the location of optimal design. It is possible through the redistribution of metal and polymer in this nanocrystalline microtruss to further decrease the total beam mass by a factor of three, showcasing this material-geometry dependency. The second stage hinged on developing a novel processing technique to deposit metal coatings on the as-printed polymer parts. The critical step of adhesion was solved using an 18~M sulphuric acid wash to preferentially smoothen the inherent 0.6~mm roughness on the samples. Finally, the models were validated through the testing of as-printed and coated rods and microtrusses. Nanocrystalline microtrusses showed a 60x increase in peak flexural strength with only a 6x increase in density. Further optimization can more than halve the final density while maintaining the same load carrying capacity by removing the sacrificial polymer core using the same sulphuric acid wash. The experimental values fit very well to those predicted in stage one for varying slenderness ratios, scales, and material systems.

  15. Optimizing Nutrient Uptake in Biological Transport Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ronellenfitsch, Henrik; Katifori, Eleni

    2013-03-01

    Many biological systems employ complex networks of vascular tubes to facilitate transport of solute nutrients, examples include the vascular system of plants (phloem), some fungi, and the slime-mold Physarum. It is believed that such networks are optimized through evolution for carrying out their designated task. We propose a set of hydrodynamic governing equations for solute transport in a complex network, and obtain the optimal network architecture for various classes of optimizing functionals. We finally discuss the topological properties and statistical mechanics of the resulting complex networks, and examine correspondence of the obtained networks to those found in actual biological systems.

  16. Texture mapping via optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the "earth-mover's metric"). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations.

  17. Texture Mapping via Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we present a novel method for texture mapping of closed surfaces. Our method is based on the technique of optimal mass transport (also known as the “earth-mover’s metric”). This is a classical problem that concerns determining the optimal way, in the sense of minimal transportation cost, of moving a pile of soil from one site to another. In our context, the resulting mapping is area preserving and minimizes angle distortion in the optimal mass sense. Indeed, we first begin with an angle-preserving mapping (which may greatly distort area) and then correct it using the mass transport procedure derived via a certain gradient flow. In order to obtain fast convergence to the optimal mapping, we incorporate a multiresolution scheme into our flow. We also use ideas from discrete exterior calculus in our computations. PMID:20224137

  18. Architecture of optimal transport networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durand, Marc

    2006-01-01

    We analyze the structure of networks minimizing the global resistance to flow (or dissipative energy) with respect to two different constraints: fixed total channel volume and fixed total channel surface area. First, we show that channels must be straight and have uniform cross-sectional areas in such optimal networks. We then establish a relation between the cross-sectional areas of adjoining channels at each junction. Indeed, this relation is a generalization of Murray’s law, originally established in the context of local optimization. We establish a relation too between angles and cross-sectional areas of adjoining channels at each junction, which can be represented as a vectorial force balance equation, where the force weight depends on the channel cross-sectional area. A scaling law between the minimal resistance value and the total volume or surface area value is also derived from the analysis. Furthermore, we show that no more than three or four channels meet at each junction of optimal bidimensional networks, depending on the flow profile (e.g., Poiseuille-like or pluglike) and the considered constraint (fixed volume or surface area). In particular, we show that sources are directly connected to wells, without intermediate junctions, for minimal resistance networks preserving the total channel volume in case of plug flow regime. Finally, all these results are compared with the structure of natural networks.

  19. Optimal Protocols and Optimal Transport in Stochastic Thermodynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aurell, Erik; Mejía-Monasterio, Carlos; Muratore-Ginanneschi, Paolo

    2011-06-01

    Thermodynamics of small systems has become an important field of statistical physics. Such systems are driven out of equilibrium by a control, and the question is naturally posed how such a control can be optimized. We show that optimization problems in small system thermodynamics are solved by (deterministic) optimal transport, for which very efficient numerical methods have been developed, and of which there are applications in cosmology, fluid mechanics, logistics, and many other fields. We show, in particular, that minimizing expected heat released or work done during a nonequilibrium transition in finite time is solved by the Burgers equation and mass transport by the Burgers velocity field. Our contribution hence considerably extends the range of solvable optimization problems in small system thermodynamics.

  20. Optimizing pneumatic conveying of biomass materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DiCianni, Matthew Edward Michael

    2011-12-01

    Biomass is a readily available but underutilized energy resource. One of the main challenges is the inability of biomass feed stocks like corn stover or wood chips to flow freely without intermittent jamming. This research integrated an automated pneumatic conveying system to efficiently transport biomass into a biomass reactor. Material was held in a storage container until an end effector attached to a 3-axis controller engaged the material to flow through pneumatic vacuum in the carrier fluid of air. The material was disengaged from the carrier fluid through centripetal forces induced by a cyclone separator. As the air was pulled out of the cyclone, the biomass drops out the bottom due to gravitational forces and fell into a secondary storage hopper. The second storage container was for testing purposes only, where the actual apparatus would use a vertically oriented lock hopper to feed material into the biomass reactor. In the experimental test apparatus, sensors measured the storage hopper weight (mass-flow rate), pressure drop from the blower, and input power consumption of the motor. Parameters that were adjusted during testing include pipe diameter, material type, and motor speed. Testing indicated that decreasing the motor speed below its maximum still allows for conveyance of the material without blockage forming in the piping. The data shows that the power consumption of the system can be reduced based on the size and weight of the material introduced to the conveying pipe. Also, conveying certain materials proved to be problematic with particular duct diameters. Ultimately, an optimal duct diameter that can perform efficiently for a broad range of materials was chosen for the given system. Through these improvements, the energy return on investment will be improved for biomass feed stocks, which is taking a step in the right direction to secure the nation's energy independence.

  1. Supersonic transport grid generation, validation, and optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aaronson, Philip G.

    1995-01-01

    The ever present demand for reduced flight times has renewed interest in High Speed Civil Transports (HSCT). The need for an HSCT becomes especially apparent when the long distance, over-sea, high growth Pacific rim routes are considered. Crucial to any successful HSCT design are minimal environmental impact and economic viability. Vital is the transport's aerodynamic efficiency, ultimately effecting both the environmental impact and the operating cost. Optimization, including numerical optimization, coupled with the use of computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technology, has and will offer a significant improvement beyond traditional methods.

  2. Transport phenomena in nanoporous materials.

    PubMed

    Kärger, Jörg

    2015-01-12

    Diffusion, that is, the irregular movement of atoms and molecules, is a universal phenomenon of mass transfer occurring in all states of matter. It is of equal importance for fundamental research and technological applications. The present review deals with the challenges of the reliable observation of these phenomena in nanoporous materials. Starting with a survey of the different variants of diffusion measurement, it highlights the potentials of "microscopic" techniques, notably the pulsed field gradient (PFG) technique of NMR and the techniques of microimaging by interference microscopy (IFM) and IR microscopy (IRM). Considering ensembles of guest molecules, these techniques are able to directly record mass transfer phenomena over distances of typically micrometers. Their concerted application has given rise to the clarification of long-standing discrepancies, notably between microscopic equilibrium and macroscopic non-equilibrium measurements, and to a wealth of new information about molecular transport under confinement, hitherto often inaccessible and sometimes even unimaginable. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. Optimal concentration for sugar transport in plants

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Kaare H.; Savage, Jessica A.; Holbrook, N. Michele

    2013-01-01

    Vascular plants transport energy in the form of sugars from the leaves where they are produced to sites of active growth. The mass flow of sugars through the phloem vascular system is determined by the sap flow rate and the sugar concentration. If the concentration is low, little energy is transferred from source to sink. If it is too high, sap viscosity impedes flow. An interesting question is therefore at which concentration is the sugar flow optimal. Optimization of sugar flow and transport efficiency predicts optimal concentrations of 23.5 per cent (if the pressure differential driving the flow is independent of concentration) and 34.5 per cent (if the pressure is proportional to concentration). Data from more than 50 experiments (41 species) collected from the literature show an average concentration in the range from 18.2 per cent (all species) to 21.1 per cent (active loaders), suggesting that the phloem vasculature is optimized for efficient transport at constant pressure and that active phloem loading may have developed to increase transport efficiency. PMID:23516065

  4. Optimal concentration for sugar transport in plants.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kaare H; Savage, Jessica A; Holbrook, N Michele

    2013-06-06

    Vascular plants transport energy in the form of sugars from the leaves where they are produced to sites of active growth. The mass flow of sugars through the phloem vascular system is determined by the sap flow rate and the sugar concentration. If the concentration is low, little energy is transferred from source to sink. If it is too high, sap viscosity impedes flow. An interesting question is therefore at which concentration is the sugar flow optimal. Optimization of sugar flow and transport efficiency predicts optimal concentrations of 23.5 per cent (if the pressure differential driving the flow is independent of concentration) and 34.5 per cent (if the pressure is proportional to concentration). Data from more than 50 experiments (41 species) collected from the literature show an average concentration in the range from 18.2 per cent (all species) to 21.1 per cent (active loaders), suggesting that the phloem vasculature is optimized for efficient transport at constant pressure and that active phloem loading may have developed to increase transport efficiency.

  5. Optimal transport on supply-demand networks.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Han; Wang, Bing-Hong; Zhao, Li-Chao; Zhou, Changsong; Zhou, Tao

    2010-06-01

    In the literature, transport networks are usually treated as homogeneous networks, that is, every node has the same function, simultaneously providing and requiring resources. However, some real networks, such as power grids and supply chain networks, show a far different scenario in which nodes are classified into two categories: supply nodes provide some kinds of services, while demand nodes require them. In this paper, we propose a general transport model for these supply-demand networks, associated with a criterion to quantify their transport capacities. In a supply-demand network with heterogeneous degree distribution, its transport capacity strongly depends on the locations of supply nodes. We therefore design a simulated annealing algorithm to find the near optimal configuration of supply nodes, which remarkably enhances the transport capacity compared with a random configuration and outperforms the degree target algorithm, the betweenness target algorithm, and the greedy method. This work provides a start point for systematically analyzing and optimizing transport dynamics on supply-demand networks.

  6. Topology Optimization for Architected Materials Design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osanov, Mikhail; Guest, James K.

    2016-07-01

    Advanced manufacturing processes provide a tremendous opportunity to fabricate materials with precisely defined architectures. To fully leverage these capabilities, however, materials architectures must be optimally designed according to the target application, base material used, and specifics of the fabrication process. Computational topology optimization offers a systematic, mathematically driven framework for navigating this new design challenge. The design problem is posed and solved formally as an optimization problem with unit cell and upscaling mechanics embedded within this formulation. This article briefly reviews the key requirements to apply topology optimization to materials architecture design and discusses several fundamental findings related to optimization of elastic, thermal, and fluidic properties in periodic materials. Emerging areas related to topology optimization for manufacturability and manufacturing variations, nonlinear mechanics, and multiscale design are also discussed.

  7. Adaptation and optimization of biological transport networks.

    PubMed

    Hu, Dan; Cai, David

    2013-09-27

    It has been hypothesized that topological structures of biological transport networks are consequences of energy optimization. Motivated by experimental observation, we propose that adaptation dynamics may underlie this optimization. In contrast to the global nature of optimization, our adaptation dynamics responds only to local information and can naturally incorporate fluctuations in flow distributions. The adaptation dynamics minimizes the global energy consumption to produce optimal networks, which may possess hierarchical loop structures in the presence of strong fluctuations in flow distribution. We further show that there may exist a new phase transition as there is a critical open probability of sinks, above which there are only trees for network structures whereas below which loops begin to emerge.

  8. Apparatus for transporting hazardous materials

    DOEpatents

    Osterman, Robert A.; Cox, Robert

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method are provided for selectively receiving, transporting, and releasing one or more radioactive or other hazardous samples for analysis on a differential thermal analysis (DTA) apparatus. The apparatus includes a portable sample transporting apparatus for storing and transporting the samples and includes a support assembly for supporting the transporting apparatus when a sample is transferred to the DTA apparatus. The transporting apparatus includes a storage member which includes a plurality of storage chambers arrayed circumferentially with respect to a central axis. An adjustable top door is located on the top side of the storage member, and the top door includes a channel capable of being selectively placed in registration with the respective storage chambers thereby permitting the samples to selectively enter the respective storage chambers. The top door, when closed, isolates the respective samples within the storage chambers. A plurality of spring-biased bottom doors are located on the bottom sides of the respective storage chambers. The bottom doors isolate the samples in the respective storage chambers when the bottom doors are in the closed position. The bottom doors permit the samples to leave the respective storage chambers from the bottom side when the respective bottom doors are in respective open positions. The bottom doors permit the samples to be loaded into the respective storage chambers after the analysis for storage and transport to a permanent storage location.

  9. Insights into capacity-constrained optimal transport.

    PubMed

    Korman, Jonathan; McCann, Robert J

    2013-06-18

    A variant of the classical optimal transportation problem is the following: among all joint measures with fixed marginals and that are dominated by a given density, find the optimal one. Existence and uniqueness of solutions to this variant were established by Korman and McCann. In the present article, we expose an unexpected symmetry leading to explicit examples in two and more dimensions. These are inspired in part by simulations in one dimension that display singularities and topology and in part by two further developments: the identification of all extreme points in the feasible set and an approach to uniqueness based on constructing feasible perturbations.

  10. Thermoelectric transport in nanoscale materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Small, Joshua P.

    Measurements of thermoelectric transport coefficients yield important information regarding fundamental properties of a system in addition to the information supplied from the electronic transport measurements. In this thesis we re port gate dependent and temperature dependent conductance ( G) and thermo-electric power (TEP) measurements made in three different basic nanomaterials: single-walled nanotubes (SWNTs), multi-walled nanotubes (MWNTs), and silicon nanowires (SiNWs). There are two means of generating a thermoelectric voltage: carrier diffusion and phonon drag. Gate dependent measurements of metallic SWNTs verified the use of the mesoscopic Mott formula, the equation governing diffusive thermoelectric voltage, used to relate TEP with the conductance. We find phonon drag negligible in graphene based systems. In the semi-conducting SWNT we observed high valued and variable TEP. In addition, the TEP behaves according to a simple Schottky barrier (SB) controlled transport model where transport takes place by quantum mechanical tunneling through the barrier, or thermal activation over it, depending on the value of the gate electric field. We also observe saw-tooth oscillations of the TEP in weakly contacted SWNTs at temperatures below the charging energy, indicative of Coulomb blockade transport. Importantly, we made quantitative measurements of the TEP oscillation amplitude, agreeing well with theory. In the MWNT, the Mott formula describes well the TEP within a framework of multiple parallel channels. We observe TEP weighting in this parallel system. In conjunction with conductance measurements, by probing the TEP in SWNTs we are able to extract the number of shells participating in electrical transport. These results agree well with figures obtained independently in controlled breakdown experiments, and the temperature dependent results may prove useful for investigation of the intershell interaction energy. We also investigate TEP in the SiNW, where TEP

  11. Transporting Radioactive Material | Radiation Protection | US ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2017-08-07

    Radioactive material can be transported by truck, train, plane or ship. The shipment of radioactive material has been regulated since 1939. Shipping routes for radioactive materials are picked very carefully and shipments are tracked. Markings on containers and vehicles explain the contents of each package using standard terms and codes.

  12. Energetic Materials Optimization via Constrained Search

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    ARL-TR-7304• JUN 2015 US Army Research Laboratory Energetic Materials Optimization via Constrained Search by Berend Christopher Rinderspacher...Army Research Laboratory Energetic Materials Optimization via Constrained Search by Berend Christopher Rinderspacher Weapons and Materials Research...burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing instructions,  searching

  13. High speed civil transport aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ryan, James S.

    1994-01-01

    This is a report of work in support of the Computational Aerosciences (CAS) element of the Federal HPCC program. Specifically, CFD and aerodynamic optimization are being performed on parallel computers. The long-range goal of this work is to facilitate teraflops-rate multidisciplinary optimization of aerospace vehicles. This year's work is targeted for application to the High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT), one of four CAS grand challenges identified in the HPCC FY 1995 Blue Book. This vehicle is to be a passenger aircraft, with the promise of cutting overseas flight time by more than half. To meet fuel economy, operational costs, environmental impact, noise production, and range requirements, improved design tools are required, and these tools must eventually integrate optimization, external aerodynamics, propulsion, structures, heat transfer, controls, and perhaps other disciplines. The fundamental goal of this project is to contribute to improved design tools for U.S. industry, and thus to the nation's economic competitiveness.

  14. Fluctuations and Redundancy in Optimal Transport Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corson, Francis

    2010-01-01

    The structure of networks that provide optimal transport properties has been investigated in a variety of contexts. While many different formulations of this problem have been considered, it is recurrently found that optimal networks are trees. It is shown here that this result is contingent on the assumption of a stationary flow through the network. When time variations or fluctuations are allowed for, a different class of optimal structures is found, which share the hierarchical organization of trees yet contain loops. The transitions between different network topologies as the parameters of the problem vary are examined. These results may have strong implications for the structure and formation of natural networks, as is illustrated by the example of leaf venation networks.

  15. Security in the Transport of Radioactive Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pope, Ron; Rawl, Richard R

    2010-01-01

    The United States Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration's (DOE/NNSA)Global Threat Reduction Initiative (GTRI), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) and active IAEA Donor States are working together to strengthen the security of nuclear and radioactive materials during transport to mitigate the risks of theft, diversion, or sabotage. International activities have included preparing and publishing the new IAEA guidance document Security in the Transport of Radioactive Material while ensuring that security recommendations do not conflict with requirements for safety during transport, and developing and providing training programs to assist other countries in implementing radioactive material transport security programs. This paper provides a brief update on the status of these transportation security efforts.

  16. Optimized Simulation of Granular Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holladay, Seth

    Visual effects for film and animation often require simulated granular materials, such as sand, wheat, or dirt, to meet a director's needs. Simulating granular materials can be time consuming, in both computation and labor, as these particulate materials have complex behavior and an enormous amount of small-scale detail. Furthermore, a single cubic meter of granular material, where each grain is a cubic millimeter, would contain a billion granules, and simulating all such interacting granules would take an impractical amount of time for productions. This calls for a simplified model for granular materials that retains high surface detail and granular behavior yet requires significantly less computational time. Our proposed method simulates a minimal number of individual granules while retaining particulate detail on the surface by supporting surface particles with simplified interior granular models. We introduce a multi-state model where, depending on the material state of the interior granules, we replace interior granules with a simplified simulation model for the state they are in and automate the transitions between those states. The majority of simulation time can thus be focused on visible portions of the material, reducing the time spent on non-visible portions, while maintaining the appearance and behavior of the mass as a whole.

  17. Plasma transport near material boundaries

    SciTech Connect

    Singer, C.E.

    1985-06-01

    The fluid theory of two-dimensional (2-d) plasma transport in axisymmetric devices is reviewed. The forces which produce flow across the magnetic field in a collisional plasma are described. These flows may lead to up-down asymmetries in the poloidal rotation and radial fluxes. Emphasis is placed on understanding the conditions under which the known 2-d plasma fluid equations provide a valid description of these processes. Attempts to extend the fluid treatment to less collisional, turbulent plasmas are discussed. A reduction to the 1-d fluid equations used in many computer simulations is possible when sources or boundary conditions provide a large enough radial scale length. The complete 1-d fluid equations are given in the text, and 2-d fluid equations are given in the Appendix.

  18. Multidisciplinary optimization applied to a transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giles, G. L.; Wrenn, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    Decomposition of a large optimization problem into several smaller subproblems has been proposed as an approach to making large-scale optimization problems tractable. To date, the characteristics of this approach have been tested on problems of limited complexity. The objective of the effort is to demonstrate the application of this multilevel optimization method on a large-scale design study using analytical models comparable to those currently being used in the aircraft industry. The purpose of the design study which is underway to provide this demonstration is to generate a wing design for a transport aircraft which will perform a specified mission with minimum block fuel. A definition of the problem; a discussion of the multilevel composition which is used for an aircraft wing; descriptions of analysis and optimization procedures used at each level; and numerical results obtained to date are included. Computational times required to perform various steps in the process are also given. Finally, a summary of the current status and plans for continuation of this development effort are given.

  19. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, Donald L.

    1987-01-01

    A heat transport system, method and composite material in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure.

  20. Thermal transport in amorphous materials: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wingert, Matthew C.; Zheng, Jianlin; Kwon, Soonshin; Chen, Renkun

    2016-11-01

    Thermal transport plays a crucial role in performance and reliability of semiconductor electronic devices, where heat is mainly carried by phonons. Phonon transport in crystalline semiconductor materials, such as Si, Ge, GaAs, GaN, etc, has been extensively studied over the past two decades. In fact, study of phonon physics in crystalline semiconductor materials in both bulk and nanostructure forms has been the cornerstone of the emerging field of ‘nanoscale heat transfer’. On the contrary, thermal properties of amorphous materials have been relatively less explored. Recently, however, a growing number of studies have re-examined the thermal properties of amorphous semiconductors, such as amorphous Si. These studies, which included both computational and experimental work, have revealed that phonon transport in amorphous materials is perhaps more complicated than previously thought. For instance, depending on the type of amorphous materials, thermal transport occurs via three types of vibrations: propagons, diffusons, and locons, corresponding to the propagating, diffusion, and localized modes, respectively. The relative contribution of each of these modes dictates the thermal conductivity of the material, including its magnitude and its dependence on sample size and temperature. In this article, we will review the fundamental principles and recent development regarding thermal transport in amorphous semiconductors.

  1. Charge transport in disordered materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagorik, Adam Gerald

    This thesis is focused on on using Monte Carlo simulation to extract device relevant properties, such as the current voltage behavior of transistors and the efficiency of photovoltaics, from the hopping transport of molecules. Specifically, simulation is used to study organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) and organic photo-voltaics (OPVs). For OFETs, the current was found to decrease with increasing concentration of traps and barriers in the system. As the barrier/trap concentration approaches 100%, the current recovers as carrier begin to travel through the manifold of connected trap states. Coulomb interactions between like charges are found to play a role in removing carriers from trap states. The equilibrium current in OFETs was found to be independent of charge injection method, however, the finite size of devices leads to an oscillatory current. Fourier transforms of the electrical current show peaks that vary non-linearly with device length, while being independent of device width. This has implications for the mobility of carriers in finite sized devices. Lastly, the presence of defects and high barriers (> 0.4 eV) was found to produce negative differential resistance in the saturation region of OFET curves, unlike traps. While defects and barriers prohibit carriers from reaching the drain at high voltages, the repulsive interaction between like charged carriers pushes charges around the defects. For OPVs, the effects of device morphology and charge delocalization were studied. Fill factors increased with domain size in monolayer isotropic morphologies, but decreased for band morphologies. In single-phase systems without Coulomb interactions, astonishingly high fill factors (. 70%) were found. In multilayer OPVs,a complex interplay of domain size, connectivity, tortuosity, interface trapping, and delocalization determined efficiency.

  2. Optimal transport exponent in spatially embedded networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, G.; Reis, S. D. S.; Moreira, A. A.; Havlin, S.; Stanley, H. E.; Andrade, J. S., Jr.

    2013-04-01

    The imposition of a cost constraint for constructing the optimal navigation structure surely represents a crucial ingredient in the design and development of any realistic navigation network. Previous works have focused on optimal transport in small-world networks built from two-dimensional lattices by adding long-range connections with Manhattan length rij taken from the distribution Pij˜rij-α, where α is a variable exponent. It has been shown that, by introducing a cost constraint on the total length of the additional links, regardless of the strategy used by the traveler (independent of whether it is based on local or global knowledge of the network structure), the best transportation condition is obtained with an exponent α=d+1, where d is the dimension of the underlying lattice. Here we present further support, through a high-performance real-time algorithm, on the validity of this conjecture in three-dimensional regular as well as in two-dimensional critical percolation clusters. Our results clearly indicate that cost constraint in the navigation problem provides a proper theoretical framework to justify the evolving topologies of real complex network structures, as recently demonstrated for the networks of the US airports and the human brain activity.

  3. BV Estimates in Optimal Transportation and Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Philippis, Guido; Mészáros, Alpár Richárd; Santambrogio, Filippo; Velichkov, Bozhidar

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we study the BV regularity for solutions of certain variational problems in Optimal Transportation. We prove that the Wasserstein projection of a measure with BV density on the set of measures with density bounded by a given BV function f is of bounded variation as well and we also provide a precise estimate of its BV norm. Of particular interest is the case f = 1, corresponding to a projection onto a set of densities with an L ∞ bound, where we prove that the total variation decreases by projection. This estimate and, in particular, its iterations have a natural application to some evolutionary PDEs as, for example, the ones describing a crowd motion. In fact, as an application of our results, we obtain BV estimates for solutions of some non-linear parabolic PDE by means of optimal transportation techniques. We also establish some properties of the Wasserstein projection which are interesting in their own right, and allow, for instance, for the proof of the uniqueness of such a projection in a very general framework.

  4. 78 FR 42998 - Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-18

    ... TRANSPORTATION Federal Railroad Administration Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials, Safety Administration (PHMSA... participate in a public meeting addressing the transportation of hazardous materials by rail. FRA and......

  5. Optimizing a reconfigurable material via evolutionary computation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilken, Sam; Miskin, Marc Z.; Jaeger, Heinrich M.

    2015-08-01

    Rapid prototyping by combining evolutionary computation with simulations is becoming a powerful tool for solving complex design problems in materials science. This method of optimization operates in a virtual design space that simulates potential material behaviors and after completion needs to be validated by experiment. However, in principle an evolutionary optimizer can also operate on an actual physical structure or laboratory experiment directly, provided the relevant material parameters can be accessed by the optimizer and information about the material's performance can be updated by direct measurements. Here we provide a proof of concept of such direct, physical optimization by showing how a reconfigurable, highly nonlinear material can be tuned to respond to impact. We report on an entirely computer controlled laboratory experiment in which a 6 ×6 grid of electromagnets creates a magnetic field pattern that tunes the local rigidity of a concentrated suspension of ferrofluid and iron filings. A genetic algorithm is implemented and tasked to find field patterns that minimize the force transmitted through the suspension. Searching within a space of roughly 1010 possible configurations, after testing only 1500 independent trials the algorithm identifies an optimized configuration of layered rigid and compliant regions.

  6. Optimal design of nanoporous materials for electrochemical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2017-04-01

    Unique macroscopic properties of nanoporous metamaterials stem from their microscopic structure. Optimal design of such materials is facilitated by mapping a material's pore-network topology onto its macroscopic characteristics. This is in contrast to both trial-and-error experimental design and design based on empirical relations between macroscopic properties, such as the often-used Bruggeman formula that relates a material's effective diffusion coefficient to its porosity. We use homogenization to construct such a map in the context of materials design that maximizes energy/power density performance in electrochemical devices. For example, effective diffusion coefficients and specific surface area, key macroscopic characteristics of ion transport in a hierarchical nanoporous material, are expressed in terms of the material's pore structure and, equally important, ion concentrations in the electrolyte and externally applied electric potential. Using these microscopic characteristics as decision variables, we optimize the macroscopic properties for two two-dimensional material-assembly templates and several operating conditions. The latter affect the material's performance through formation of an electrical double layer at the fluid-solid interfaces, which restricts the pore space available for ion transport.

  7. 78 FR 1119 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-07

    ... and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, and 175 RIN 2137-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR) on the transportation of lithium cells and batteries,...

  8. 77 FR 33793 - Optimized Transportation Management, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-07

    ... COMMISSION Optimized Transportation Management, Inc.; Order of Suspension of Trading June 5, 2012. It appears... concerning the securities of Optimized Transportation Management, Inc. (``Optimized Transportation Management... protection of investors require a suspension of trading in the securities of Optimized Transportation...

  9. Advanced transport design using multidisciplinary design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnum, Jennifer; Bathras, Curt; Beene, Kirk; Bush, Michael; Kaupin, Glenn; Lowe, Steve; Sobieski, Ian; Tingen, Kelly; Wells, Douglas

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes the results of the first implementation of multidisciplinary design optimisation (MDO) techniques by undergraduates ina design course. The objective of the work was to design a civilian transport aircraft of the Boeing 777 class. The first half of the two semester design course consisted of application of traditional sizing methods and techniques to form a baseline aircraft. MDO techniques were then applied to this baseline design. This paper describes the evolution of the design with special emphasis on the application of MDO techniques, and presents the results of four iterations through the design space. Minimization of take-off gross weight was the goal of the optimization process. The resultant aircraft derived from the MDO procedure weighed approximately 13,382 lbs (2.57 percent) less than the baseline aircraft.

  10. Heat transport system, method and material

    DOEpatents

    Musinski, D.L.

    1987-04-28

    A heat transport system, method and composite material are disclosed in which a plurality of hollow spherical shells or microspheres having an outside diameter of less than or equal to 500 microns are encapsulated or embedded within a bulk material. Each shell has captured therein a volatile working fluid, such that each shell operates as a microsized heat pipe for conducting heat through the composite structure. 1 fig.

  11. Computational design and optimization of energy materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Maria

    The use of density functional theory (DFT) to understand and improve energy materials for diverse applications - including energy storage, thermal management, catalysis, and photovoltaics - is widespread. The further step of using high throughput DFT calculations to design materials and has led to an acceleration in materials discovery and development. Due to various limitations in DFT, including accuracy and computational cost, however, it is important to leverage effective models and, in some cases, experimental information to aid the design process. In this talk, I will discuss efforts in design and optimization of energy materials using a combination of effective models, DFT, machine learning, and experimental information.

  12. Fire and materials modeling for transportation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Skocypec, R.D.; Gritzo, L.A.; Moya, J.L.; Nicolette, V.F.; Tieszen, S.R.; Thomas, R.

    1994-10-01

    Fire is an important threat to the safety of transportation systems. Therefore, understanding the effects of fire (and its interaction with materials) on transportation systems is crucial to quantifying and mitigating the impact of fire on the safety of those systems. Research and development directed toward improving the fire safety of transportation systems must address a broad range of phenomena and technologies, including: crash dynamics, fuel dispersion, fire environment characterization, material characterization, and system/cargo thermal response modeling. In addition, if the goal of the work is an assessment and/or reduction of risk due to fires, probabilistic risk assessment technology is also required. The research currently underway at Sandia National Laboratories in each of these areas is summarized in this paper.

  13. Atoms on the Move: Transporting Nuclear Material.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dukert, Joseph M.

    This is an Energy Research and Development Administration pamphlet outlining in detail the many aspects involved in safe transportation of all types of nuclear materials. The detailed safety regulations and designs of various shipping packages and containers are emphasized. Included are maps of waste burial sites and fuel production facilities, an…

  14. Optimizing nanoporous materials for gas storage.

    PubMed

    Simon, Cory M; Kim, Jihan; Lin, Li-Chiang; Martin, Richard L; Haranczyk, Maciej; Smit, Berend

    2014-03-28

    In this work, we address the question of which thermodynamic factors determine the deliverable capacity of methane in nanoporous materials. The deliverable capacity is one of the key factors that determines the performance of a material for methane storage in automotive fuel tanks. To obtain insights into how the molecular characteristics of a material are related to the deliverable capacity, we developed several statistical thermodynamic models. The predictions of these models are compared with the classical thermodynamics approach of Bhatia and Myers [Bhatia and Myers, Langmuir, 2005, 22, 1688] and with the results of molecular simulations in which we screen the International Zeolite Association (IZA) structure database and a hypothetical zeolite database of over 100,000 structures. Both the simulations and our models do not support the rule of thumb that, for methane storage, one should aim for an optimal heat of adsorption of 18.8 kJ mol(-1). Instead, our models show that one can identify an optimal heat of adsorption, but that this optimal heat of adsorption depends on the structure of the material and can range from 8 to 23 kJ mol(-1). The different models we have developed are aimed to determine how this optimal heat of adsorption is related to the molecular structure of the material.

  15. TORAC. Tornado-Induced Flow Material Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Andrae, R.W.; Gregory, W.S.; Martin, R.A.; Tang, P.K.

    1992-01-13

    TORAC models tornado-induced flows, pressures, and material transport within structures. Its use is directed toward nuclear fuel cycle facilities and their primary release pathway, the ventilation system. However, it is applicable to other structures and can model other airflow pathways within a facility. In a nuclear facility, this network system could include process cells, canyons, laboratory offices, corridors, and offgas systems. TORAC predicts flow through a network system that also includes ventilation system components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These ventilation system components are connected to the rooms and corridors of the facility to form a complete network for moving air through the structure and, perhaps, maintaining pressure levels in certain areas. The material transport capability in TORAC is very basic and includes convection, depletion, entrainment, and filtration of material.

  16. Designing Nanostructures for Phonon Transport via Bayesian Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ju, Shenghong; Shiga, Takuma; Feng, Lei; Hou, Zhufeng; Tsuda, Koji; Shiomi, Junichiro

    2017-04-01

    We demonstrate optimization of thermal conductance across nanostructures by developing a method combining atomistic Green's function and Bayesian optimization. With an aim to minimize and maximize the interfacial thermal conductance (ITC) across Si-Si and Si-Ge interfaces by means of the Si /Ge composite interfacial structure, the method identifies the optimal structures from calculations of only a few percent of the entire candidates (over 60 000 structures). The obtained optimal interfacial structures are nonintuitive and impacting: the minimum ITC structure is an aperiodic superlattice that realizes 50% reduction from the best periodic superlattice. The physical mechanism of the minimum ITC can be understood in terms of the crossover of the two effects on phonon transport: as the layer thickness in the superlattice increases, the impact of Fabry-Pérot interference increases, and the rate of reflection at the layer interfaces decreases. An aperiodic superlattice with spatial variation in the layer thickness has a degree of freedom to realize optimal balance between the above two competing mechanisms. Furthermore, the spatial variation enables weakening the impact of constructive phonon interference relative to that of destructive interference. The present work shows the effectiveness and advantage of material informatics in designing nanostructures to control heat conduction, which can be extended to other nanostructures and properties.

  17. Levitation, coating, and transport of particulate materials

    SciTech Connect

    Hendricks, C.D.

    1981-10-12

    Several processes in various fields require uniformly thick coatings and layers on small particles. The particles may be used as carriers of catalytic materials (platinum or other coatings), as laser fusion targets (various polymer or metallic coatings), or for biological or other tracer or interactive processes. We have devised both molecular beam and electro-dynamic techniques for levitation of the particles during coating and electrodynamic methods of controlling and transporting the particles between coating steps and to final use locations. Both molecular beam and electrodynamic techniques are described and several advantages and limitations of each will be discussed. A short movie of an operating electrodynamic levitation and transport apparatus will be shown.

  18. Transport suction apparatus and absorption materials evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krupa, Debra T.; Gosbee, John

    1991-01-01

    The specific objectives were as follows. The effectiveness and function was evaluated of the hand held, manually powered v-vac for suction during microgravity. The function was evaluated of the battery powered laerdal suction unit in microgravity. The two units in control of various types of simulated bodily fluids were compared. Various types of tubing and attachments were evaluated which are required to control the collection of bodily fluids during transport. Various materials were evaluated for absorption of simulated bodily fluids. And potential problems were identified for waste management and containment of secretions and fluids during transport. Test procedures, results, and conclusions are briefly discussed.

  19. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation of hazardous materials. The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous materials... below, an agency official, prior to the transportation of hazardous materials, shall certify on the...

  20. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation of hazardous materials. The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous materials... below, an agency official, prior to the transportation of hazardous materials, shall certify on the...

  1. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation of hazardous materials. The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous materials... below, an agency official, prior to the transportation of hazardous materials, shall certify on the...

  2. Particle swarm optimization - Genetic algorithm (PSOGA) on linear transportation problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahmalia, Dinita

    2017-08-01

    Linear Transportation Problem (LTP) is the case of constrained optimization where we want to minimize cost subject to the balance of the number of supply and the number of demand. The exact method such as northwest corner, vogel, russel, minimal cost have been applied at approaching optimal solution. In this paper, we use heurisitic like Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) for solving linear transportation problem at any size of decision variable. In addition, we combine mutation operator of Genetic Algorithm (GA) at PSO to improve optimal solution. This method is called Particle Swarm Optimization - Genetic Algorithm (PSOGA). The simulations show that PSOGA can improve optimal solution resulted by PSO.

  3. Heuristic Optimization Approach to Selecting a Transport Connection in City Public Transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kul'ka, Jozef; Mantič, Martin; Kopas, Melichar; Faltinová, Eva; Kachman, Daniel

    2017-02-01

    The article presents a heuristic optimization approach to select a suitable transport connection in the framework of a city public transport. This methodology was applied on a part of the public transport in Košice, because it is the second largest city in the Slovak Republic and its network of the public transport creates a complex transport system, which consists of three different transport modes, namely from the bus transport, tram transport and trolley-bus transport. This solution focused on examining the individual transport services and their interconnection in relevant interchange points.

  4. Wear and interfacial transport of material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buckley, D. H.

    1975-01-01

    Bonding across the interface for two solids in contact and the subsequent transfer of material from one surface to another is a direct result of the interfacial bonds being stronger than the cohesive bonds in either of the two solids. Surface tools such as LEED, Auger emission spectroscopy, field ion microscopy, and the atom probe are used to examine adhesive contacts and to determine the direction, nature, quantity of material transfer and properties of the solids which effect transfer and wear. The electronic nature, cohesive binding energies, surface structure, lattice disregistry and distribution of species in surface layers are all found to effect adhesion and transfer or transport for clean surfaces in solid state contact. The influence of adsorbed and reacted surface films from fractions of a monolayer to multilayer reactive films are considered. It is shown that even fractions of a monolayer of surface active species such as oxygen and sulfur can markedly inhibit adhesion and transport.

  5. 10 CFR 71.5 - Transportation of licensed material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transportation of licensed material. 71.5 Section 71.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General Provisions § 71.5 Transportation of licensed material. (a) Each licensee who transports licensed...

  6. 10 CFR 71.5 - Transportation of licensed material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transportation of licensed material. 71.5 Section 71.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General Provisions § 71.5 Transportation of licensed material. (a) Each licensee who transports licensed...

  7. 10 CFR 71.5 - Transportation of licensed material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transportation of licensed material. 71.5 Section 71.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General Provisions § 71.5 Transportation of licensed material. (a) Each licensee who transports licensed...

  8. 10 CFR 71.5 - Transportation of licensed material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Transportation of licensed material. 71.5 Section 71.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General Provisions § 71.5 Transportation of licensed material. (a) Each licensee who transports licensed...

  9. 10 CFR 71.5 - Transportation of licensed material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Transportation of licensed material. 71.5 Section 71.5 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) PACKAGING AND TRANSPORTATION OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL General Provisions § 71.5 Transportation of licensed material. (a) Each licensee who transports licensed...

  10. Optimization of municipal solid waste collection and transportation routes

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Swapan Bhattacharyya, Bidyut Kr.

    2015-09-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted - Highlights: • Profitable integrated solid waste management system. • Optimal municipal waste collection scheme between the sources and waste collection centres. • Optimal path calculation between waste collection centres and transfer stations. • Optimal waste routing between the transfer stations and processing plants. - Abstract: Optimization of municipal solid waste (MSW) collection and transportation through source separation becomes one of the major concerns in the MSW management system design, due to the fact that the existing MSW management systems suffer by the high collection and transportation cost. Generally, in a city different waste sources scatter throughout the city in heterogeneous way that increase waste collection and transportation cost in the waste management system. Therefore, a shortest waste collection and transportation strategy can effectively reduce waste collection and transportation cost. In this paper, we propose an optimal MSW collection and transportation scheme that focus on the problem of minimizing the length of each waste collection and transportation route. We first formulize the MSW collection and transportation problem into a mixed integer program. Moreover, we propose a heuristic solution for the waste collection and transportation problem that can provide an optimal way for waste collection and transportation. Extensive simulations and real testbed results show that the proposed solution can significantly improve the MSW performance. Results show that the proposed scheme is able to reduce more than 30% of the total waste collection path length.

  11. A multi-resolution approach for optimal mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominitz, Ayelet; Angenent, Sigurd; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-09-01

    Optimal mass transport is an important technique with numerous applications in econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology. Motivated by certain problems in image registration and medical image visualization, in this note, we describe a simple gradient descent methodology for computing the optimal L2 transport mapping which may be easily implemented using a multiresolution scheme. We also indicate how the optimal transport map may be computed on the sphere. A numerical example is presented illustrating our ideas.

  12. A Planning Problem Combining Calculus of Variations and Optimal Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Carlier, G. Lachapelle, A.

    2011-02-15

    We consider some variants of the classical optimal transport where not only one optimizes over couplings between some variables x and y but also over some control variables governing the evolutions of these variables with time. Such a situation is motivated by an assignment problem of tasks with workers whose characteristics can evolve with time (and be controlled). We distinguish between the coupled and decoupled case. The coupled case is a standard optimal transport with the value of some optimal control problem as cost. The decoupled case is more involved since it is nonlinear in the transport plan.

  13. Local design optimization for composite transport fuselage crown panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Swanson, G. D.; Ilcewicz, L. B.; Walker, T. H.; Graesser, D.; Tuttle, M.; Zabinsky, Z.

    1992-01-01

    Composite transport fuselage crown panel design and manufacturing plans were optimized to have projected cost and weight savings of 18 percent and 45 percent, respectively. These savings are close to those quoted as overall NASA ACT program goals. Three local optimization tasks were found to influence the cost and weight of fuselage crown panels. This paper summarizes the effect of each task and describes in detail the task associated with a design cost model. Studies were performed to evaluate the relationship between manufacturing cost and design details. A design tool was developed to aid in these investigations. The development of the design tool included combining cost and performance constraints with a random search optimization algorithm. The resulting software was used in a series of optimization studies that evaluated the sensitivity of design variables, guidelines, criteria, and material selection on cost. The effect of blending adjacent design points in a full scale panel subjected to changing load distributions and local variations was shown to be important. Technical issues and directions for future work were identified.

  14. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Transportation of... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation of hazardous materials. The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous materials...

  15. 41 CFR 101-42.405 - Transportation of hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 41 Public Contracts and Property Management 2 2011-07-01 2007-07-01 true Transportation of... Destruction of Surplus Hazardous Materials and Certain Categories of Property § 101-42.405 Transportation of hazardous materials. The transportation of hazardous materials is governed by the hazardous materials...

  16. Transport in Old and New Thermoelectric Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, David

    2012-02-01

    There is increasing interest in thermoelectric materials motivated in part by recent progress and in part by the potential of these materials in various energy technologies. Thermoelectric performance is a multiply contra-indicated property of matter. For example, it requires (1) high thermopower and high electrical conductivity, (2) high electrical conductivity and low thermal conductivity and (3) low thermal conductivity and high melting point. The key is finding an optimal balance. In this talk, I discuss some of the issues involved in the context of recent results. These include the surprising doping dependence of the thermopower in PbTe and PbSe, and the interplay between acoustic and optical phonons in PbTe. The potential of some new materials is discussed. This work was done in collaboration with David Parker, Olivier Delaire and Mao-Hua Du.

  17. Colloid transport in model fracture filling materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wold, S.; Garcia-Garcia, S.; Jonsson, M.

    2010-12-01

    Colloid transport in model fracture filling materials Susanna Wold*, Sandra García-García and Mats Jonsson KTH Chemical Science and Engineering Royal Institute of Technology, SE-100 44 Stockholm, Sweden *Corresponding author: E-mail: wold@kth.se Phone: +46 8 790 6295 In colloid transport in water-bearing fractures, the retardation depends on interactions with the fracture surface by sorption or filtration. These mechanisms are difficult to separate. A rougher surface will give a larger area available for sorption, and also when a particle is physically hindered, it approaches the surface and enables further sorption. Sorption can be explained by electrostatics were the strongest sorption on minerals always is observed at pH below pHpzc (Filby et al., 2008). The adhesion of colloids to mineral surfaces is related to the surface roughness according to a recent study (Darbha et al., 2010). There is a large variation in the characteristics of water-bearing fractures in bedrock in terms of aperture distribution, flow velocity, surface roughness, mineral distributions, presence of fracture filling material, and biological and organic material, which is hard to implement in modeling. The aim of this work was to study the transport of negatively charged colloids in model fracture filling material in relation to flow, porosity, mineral type, colloid size, and surface charge distribution. In addition, the impact on transport of colloids of mixing model fracture filling materials with different retention and immobilization capacities, determined by batch sorption experiments, was investigated. The transport of Na-montmorillonite colloids and well-defined negatively charged latex microspheres of 50, 100, and 200 nm diameter were studied in either columns containing quartz or quartz mixed with biotite. The ionic strength in the solution was exclusively 0.001 and pH 6 or 8.5. The flow rates used were 0.002, 0.03, and 0.6 mL min-1. Sorption of the colloids on the model fracture

  18. Fabrication of Semi-quasi Solid DSSC using Spiro Material as Hole Transport Material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safriani, L.; Primawati, W. P.; Mulyana, C.; Susilawati, T.; Aprilia, A.

    2017-05-01

    Dye Sensitized Solar Cells (DSSC) has been emerging a promising development in recent years. DSSC is a low-cost solar cell belonging to the third generation of solar cells. However, the conversion efficiency of DSSC is still far behind compared to silicon based solar cells. To produce long stability of DSSC, the used of solid state electrolyte is recommended instead of liquid electrolyte, though solid state DSSC also has problem relating to a lack of pore-filling hole transport material into mesoporous TiO2. In this work an attempt to improve performance of DSSC has been done by adding hole transport material into mesoporous TiO2 layer and optimizing fabrication method. In the first part of the work, we used low Tg material spiro-TAD and spiro-TPD as hole transport material with mosalyte and hybrid polymer as gel electrolyte to obtain a semi-quasi solid DSSC. In the second part, we modified fabrication method by annealing process before spin-coated spiro material into dye-coated TiO2 substrate. Current-voltage measurement of semi-quasi solid DSSC was performed using halogen lamp. We found that the used of spiro-TPD as hole transport give the best power conversion efficiency η = 2.03% of semi-quasi solid DSSC.

  19. 77 FR 21714 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-04-11

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, and 175 RIN 2137-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... A. Leary, Standards and Rulemaking Division, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...

  20. HZE beam transport in multilayered materials

    SciTech Connect

    Shinn, J.L.; Wilson, J.W.; Badavi, F.F.; Benton, E.V.; Csige, I.; Frank, A.L.; Benton, E.R. ||

    1995-03-01

    A nonperturbative analytic solution of the high charge and energy (HZE) Green`s function is used to implement a computer code for laboratory ion beam transport in multiple-layered materials. The code is established to operate on the Langley nuclear fragmentation model used in space engineering applications. Computational procedures are established to generate linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for a specified ion beam and target for comparison with experimental measurement. Comparison with Fe-56 ion with Pb-Al and Pb-(CH2)(x) targets shows reasonable agreement.

  1. HZE beam transport in multilayered materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shinn, J. L.; Wilson, J. W.; Badavi, F. F.; Benton, E. V.; Csige, I.; Frank, A. L.; Benton, E. R.

    1995-01-01

    A nonperturbative analytic solution of the high charge and energy (HZE) Green's function is used to implement a computer code for laboratory ion beam transport in multiple-layered materials. The code is established to operate on the Langley nuclear fragmentation model used in space engineering applications. Computational procedures are established to generate linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for a specified ion beam and target for comparison with experimental measurement. Comparison with Fe-56 ion with Pb-Al and Pb-(CH2)(x) targets shows reasonable agreement.

  2. 30 CFR 57.6201 - Separation of transported explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Separation of transported explosive material... MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6201 Separation of transported explosive material. Detonators shall not be transported on the same vehicle or conveyance with other explosives...

  3. Charge Transport Characterization of Novel Electronic Materials.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marcy, Henry Orlando, 5th.

    1990-01-01

    The work presented includes analysis of electronic transport data and related measurements for the following types of materials: molecular metals and conducting polymers based upon phthalocyanine (Pc) building blocks, new composites of conducting polymers with inorganic polymeric and layered materials, and both bulk and thin film samples of the high -T_{rm c} ceramic superconductors. To successfully study such a wide spectrum of materials, the charge transport instrumentation has evolved into multiple computer-controlled experimental arrangements which process data for temperature dependent ac and dc conductivity, thermoelectric power, critical current density, and other measurements, over the temperature range of 1.5 K to 400 K. The phthalocyanine-based molecular metals and conducting polymers exhibit some of the highest reported conductivities for environmentally stable organic conductors, and possess a unique structure which is inherently resistant to large structural transformations upon donor/acceptor doping. These properties are demonstrated primarily by results for Ni(Pc)(ClO_4) _{rm y} and { (Si(Pc)O) X_{rm y}}_{rm n}. The rigidly-enforced structure of the latter system of materials allows for controllable tuning of the band-filling and hence, the charge transport properties of an organic conductor, from insulating to metal-like behavior, without any major structural alterations of the polymeric backbone. Other types of polymeric samples for which results are presented consist of composite fibers formed from the rigid rod polymers, Kevlar and PBT, "alloyed" with the (Pc)-based conducting polymers, and new microlaminates formed by intercalating various conducting polymers into the van der Waals gap of inorganic, layered host materials. Significant success has been achieved in the fabrication of superconducting films of Y-Ba-Cu-O, Bi-Sr(Pb)-Ca-Cu -O, and Tl-Ba-Ca-Cu-O by organometallic chemical vapor deposition. Results are also presented for films prepared

  4. Optimal trajectories for efficient atomic transport without final excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Xi; Torrontegui, E.; Muga, J. G.; Stefanatos, Dionisis; Li, Jr-Shin

    2011-10-15

    We design optimal harmonic-trap trajectories to transport cold atoms without final excitation, combining an inverse engineering technique based on Lewis-Riesenfeld invariants with optimal control theory. Since actual traps are not really harmonic, we keep the relative displacement between the center of mass of the transport modes and the trap center bounded. Under this constraint, optimal protocols are found according to different physical criteria. The minimum time solution has a ''bang-bang'' form, and the minimum displacement solution is of ''bang-off-bang'' form. The optimal trajectories for minimizing the transient energy are also discussed.

  5. Lightweight materials for transportation: Program plan

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-07-01

    This Program Plan has been prepared by the Office of Transportation Materials in response to a request by the House Committee on Appropriations. It recognizes that a significant commitment to long-term, stable materials research and development (R&D) is required to realize the benefits of lighter weight vehicles, including economic, environmental and energy related benefits. Extensive input was obtained from the major US automakers and from representative materials and component suppliers. Considerable interaction with the key members of the US Automotive Materials Partnership (USAMP) has ensured consistency of technical direction. The program will support R&D activity at industrial sites through competitively bid subcontracts with cost sharing anticipated at 30--50%, with the higher amounts in process scale-up and manufacturing technology development. The recommended LWM Program will enable industry to develop pecessary technology by utilizing their capabilities as well as accessing supporting technology at national laboratories, universities, ongoing program activity at NASA, DoD, DOT, NIST, etc., and thereby leverage industry resources through integrated team approaches. Many individual program efforts are currently in place that address small portions of the overall needs of the LWM Program, both within DOE and in other agencies. Cognizance of these and overall integration of research activities are planned as significant program management tasks. Because of the international nature of the automobile business, benchmarking of foreign technology and tracking of worldwide developments are also key program elements.

  6. Optimal shortcuts for atomic transport in anharmonic traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Qi; Muga, J. G.; Guéry-Odelin, D.; Chen, Xi

    2016-06-01

    We design fast trap trajectories to transport cold atoms in anharmonic traps, combining invariant-based inverse engineering, perturbation theory, and optimal control theory. Among the ideal trajectories for harmonic traps, we choose the ones that minimize the anharmonic energy.

  7. Complex quantum networks: From universal breakdown to optimal transport.

    PubMed

    Mülken, Oliver; Dolgushev, Maxim; Galiceanu, Mircea

    2016-02-01

    We study the transport efficiency of excitations on complex quantum networks with loops. For this we consider sequentially growing networks with different topologies of the sequential subgraphs. This can lead either to a universal complete breakdown of transport for complete-graph-like sequential subgraphs or to optimal transport for ringlike sequential subgraphs. The transition to optimal transport can be triggered by systematically reducing the number of loops of complete-graph-like sequential subgraphs in a small-world procedure. These effects are explained on the basis of the spectral properties of the network's Hamiltonian. Our theoretical considerations are supported by numerical Monte Carlo simulations for complex quantum networks with a scale-free size distribution of sequential subgraphs and a small-world-type transition to optimal transport.

  8. Complex quantum networks: From universal breakdown to optimal transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mülken, Oliver; Dolgushev, Maxim; Galiceanu, Mircea

    2016-02-01

    We study the transport efficiency of excitations on complex quantum networks with loops. For this we consider sequentially growing networks with different topologies of the sequential subgraphs. This can lead either to a universal complete breakdown of transport for complete-graph-like sequential subgraphs or to optimal transport for ringlike sequential subgraphs. The transition to optimal transport can be triggered by systematically reducing the number of loops of complete-graph-like sequential subgraphs in a small-world procedure. These effects are explained on the basis of the spectral properties of the network's Hamiltonian. Our theoretical considerations are supported by numerical Monte Carlo simulations for complex quantum networks with a scale-free size distribution of sequential subgraphs and a small-world-type transition to optimal transport.

  9. Optimization Shield Materials Trade Study for Lunar/Gateway Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripathi, R. K.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F. A.; Anderson, B. M.; Simonsen, L. C.

    2002-01-01

    The great cost of added radiation shielding is a potential limiting factor in many deep space missions. For this enabling technology, we are developing tools for optimized shield design over multi-segmented missions involving multiple work and living areas in the transport and duty phase of various space missions. The total shield mass over all pieces of equipment and habitats is optimized subject to career dose and dose rate constraints. Preliminary studies of deep space missions indicate that for long duration space missions, improved shield materials will be required. The details of this new method and its impact on space missions and other technologies will be discussed. This study will provide a vital tool for evaluating Gateway designs in their usage context. Providing protection against the hazards of space radiation is one of the challenges to the Gateway infrastructure designs. We will use the mission optimization software to scope the impact of Gateway operations on human exposures and the effectiveness of alternate shielding materials on Gateway infrastructure designs. It is being proposed to use Moon and the Lagrange points as the hub for deep space missions. This study will provide a guide to the effectiveness of multifunctional materials in preparation to more detailed geometry studies in progress.

  10. Optimization of municipal solid waste collection and transportation routes.

    PubMed

    Das, Swapan; Bhattacharyya, Bidyut Kr

    2015-09-01

    Optimization of municipal solid waste (MSW) collection and transportation through source separation becomes one of the major concerns in the MSW management system design, due to the fact that the existing MSW management systems suffer by the high collection and transportation cost. Generally, in a city different waste sources scatter throughout the city in heterogeneous way that increase waste collection and transportation cost in the waste management system. Therefore, a shortest waste collection and transportation strategy can effectively reduce waste collection and transportation cost. In this paper, we propose an optimal MSW collection and transportation scheme that focus on the problem of minimizing the length of each waste collection and transportation route. We first formulize the MSW collection and transportation problem into a mixed integer program. Moreover, we propose a heuristic solution for the waste collection and transportation problem that can provide an optimal way for waste collection and transportation. Extensive simulations and real testbed results show that the proposed solution can significantly improve the MSW performance. Results show that the proposed scheme is able to reduce more than 30% of the total waste collection path length. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Quantum transport through 3D Dirac materials

    SciTech Connect

    Salehi, M.; Jafari, S.A.

    2015-08-15

    Bismuth and its alloys provide a paradigm to realize three dimensional materials whose low-energy effective theory is given by Dirac equation in 3+1 dimensions. We study the quantum transport properties of three dimensional Dirac materials within the framework of Landauer–Büttiker formalism. Charge carriers in normal metal satisfying the Schrödinger equation, can be split into four-component with appropriate matching conditions at the boundary with the three dimensional Dirac material (3DDM). We calculate the conductance and the Fano factor of an interface separating 3DDM from a normal metal, as well as the conductance through a slab of 3DDM. Under certain circumstances the 3DDM appears transparent to electrons hitting the 3DDM. We find that electrons hitting the metal-3DDM interface from metallic side can enter 3DDM in a reversed spin state as soon as their angle of incidence deviates from the direction perpendicular to interface. However the presence of a second interface completely cancels this effect.

  12. Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction

    PubMed Central

    Ni, Rui; Michalski, Mark H.; Brown, Elliott; Doan, Ngoc; Zinter, Joseph; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Shepherd, Gordon M.

    2015-01-01

    The ability of humans to distinguish the delicate differences in food flavors depends mostly on retronasal smell, in which food volatiles entrained into the airway at the back of the oral cavity are transported by exhaled air through the nasal cavity to stimulate the olfactory receptor neurons. Little is known whether food volatiles are preferentially carried by retronasal flow toward the nasal cavity rather than by orthonasal flow into the lung. To study the differences between retronasal and orthonasal flow, we obtained computed tomography (CT) images of the orthonasal airway from a healthy human subject, printed an experimental model using a 3D printer, and analyzed the flow field inside the airway. The results show that, during inhalation, the anatomical structure of the oropharynx creates an air curtain outside a virtual cavity connecting the oropharynx and the back of the mouth, which prevents food volatiles from being transported into the main stream toward the lung. In contrast, during exhalation, the flow preferentially sweeps through this virtual cavity and effectively enhances the entrainment of food volatiles into the main retronasal flow. This asymmetrical transport efficiency is also found to have a nonmonotonic Reynolds number dependence: The asymmetry peaks at a range of an intermediate Reynolds number close to 800, because the air curtain effect during inhalation becomes strongest in this range. This study provides the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, for adaptations of the geometry of the human oropharynx for efficient transport of food volatiles toward the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity. PMID:26553982

  13. Optimally designed quantum transport across disordered networks.

    PubMed

    Walschaers, Mattia; Diaz, Jorge Fernandez-de-Cossio; Mulet, Roberto; Buchleitner, Andreas

    2013-11-01

    We establish a general mechanism for highly efficient quantum transport through finite, disordered 3D networks. It relies on the interplay of disorder with centrosymmetry and a dominant doublet spectral structure and can be controlled by the proper tuning of only coarse-grained quantities. Photosynthetic light harvesting complexes are discussed as potential biological incarnations of this design principle.

  14. Optimal directional volatile transport in retronasal olfaction.

    PubMed

    Ni, Rui; Michalski, Mark H; Brown, Elliott; Doan, Ngoc; Zinter, Joseph; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Shepherd, Gordon M

    2015-11-24

    The ability of humans to distinguish the delicate differences in food flavors depends mostly on retronasal smell, in which food volatiles entrained into the airway at the back of the oral cavity are transported by exhaled air through the nasal cavity to stimulate the olfactory receptor neurons. Little is known whether food volatiles are preferentially carried by retronasal flow toward the nasal cavity rather than by orthonasal flow into the lung. To study the differences between retronasal and orthonasal flow, we obtained computed tomography (CT) images of the orthonasal airway from a healthy human subject, printed an experimental model using a 3D printer, and analyzed the flow field inside the airway. The results show that, during inhalation, the anatomical structure of the oropharynx creates an air curtain outside a virtual cavity connecting the oropharynx and the back of the mouth, which prevents food volatiles from being transported into the main stream toward the lung. In contrast, during exhalation, the flow preferentially sweeps through this virtual cavity and effectively enhances the entrainment of food volatiles into the main retronasal flow. This asymmetrical transport efficiency is also found to have a nonmonotonic Reynolds number dependence: The asymmetry peaks at a range of an intermediate Reynolds number close to 800, because the air curtain effect during inhalation becomes strongest in this range. This study provides the first experimental evidence, to our knowledge, for adaptations of the geometry of the human oropharynx for efficient transport of food volatiles toward the olfactory receptors in the nasal cavity.

  15. 75 FR 38168 - Hazardous Materials: International Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-01

    ... the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material (TS-R-1); Draft Revision Available for Comment AGENCY... International Atomic Energy Agency's (IAEA) ``Regulations for the Safe Transport of Radioactive Material'' (TS-R... Radioactive Material (TS-R-1), to promote the safe and secure transportation of radioactive material. The IAEA...

  16. Hole-Transport Materials for Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Calió, Laura; Kazim, Samrana; Grätzel, Michael; Ahmad, Shahzada

    2016-11-14

    The pressure to move towards renewable energy has inspired researchers to look for ideas in photovoltaics that may lead to a major breakthrough. Recently the use of perovskites as a light harvester has lead to stunning progress. The power conversion efficiency of perovskite solar cells is now approaching parity (>22 %) with that of the established technology which took decades to reach this level of performance. The use of a hole transport material (HTM) remains indispensable in perovskite solar cells. Perovskites can conduct holes, but they are present at low levels, and for efficient charge extraction a HTM layer is a prerequisite. Herein we provide an overview of the diverse types of HTM available, from organic to inorganic, in the hope of encouraging further research and the optimization of these materials.

  17. 30 CFR 56.6201 - Separation of transported explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Separation of transported explosive material. 56.6201 Section 56.6201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Explosives Transportation § 56.6201 Separation of transported explosive material. Detonators shall not...

  18. 30 CFR 56.6201 - Separation of transported explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Separation of transported explosive material. 56.6201 Section 56.6201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Explosives Transportation § 56.6201 Separation of transported explosive material. Detonators shall not...

  19. 30 CFR 56.6201 - Separation of transported explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Separation of transported explosive material. 56.6201 Section 56.6201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Explosives Transportation § 56.6201 Separation of transported explosive material. Detonators shall not...

  20. 30 CFR 56.6201 - Separation of transported explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Separation of transported explosive material. 56.6201 Section 56.6201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Explosives Transportation § 56.6201 Separation of transported explosive material. Detonators shall not...

  1. 30 CFR 56.6201 - Separation of transported explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Separation of transported explosive material. 56.6201 Section 56.6201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... Explosives Transportation § 56.6201 Separation of transported explosive material. Detonators shall not...

  2. Charge transport through inhomogeneous polymeric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakhshouri, Kiarash

    The generation of unique properties through mixing of organic semiconductors has enabled improved performance and novel functionalities in organic electronic devices. In organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), isolated phases of a second material within the photoactive layer can act as recombination centers, enhancing the overall device performance. Mixing of flexible polymer semiconductors with high-mobility small organic molecules can yield high-performance flexible thin film transistors. Solution-processed, bulk-heterojunction (BHJ), thin-film organic solar cells rely on the self-assembly of polymer/fullerene donor/acceptor mixtures to create the necessary morphology with a high interfacial area for efficient photocurrent generation. Efficient conversion of absorbed photons into photocurrent requires sufficiently intimate mixing of the donor and acceptor phases such that photogenerated excitons can easily find an interface, as well as a sufficiently large thermodynamic driving force for charge separation at the interface. At the same time, efficient transport of separated charges towards the electrodes requires a certain degree of phase segregation between the two materials, to enable ordered molecular packing within each phase and also minimize interfacial recombination. Despite the importance of creating inhomogeneous mixtures of organic semiconductors and the tremendous recent advances in the performance of the aforementioned devices, it remains a challenge to fully describe the optoelectronic properties of organic semiconductor mixtures and understand the effects of structural and morphological parameters on charge transport. Recently, it has been shown that highly regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene) (RR-P3HT) and poly[2,5-bis(3-hexadecylthiophen-2-yl)thieno(3,2-b)thiophene] (PBTTT) are promising materials for organic electronic applications due to the relatively high charge carrier mobility, high solubility in different organic solvents and acceptable film

  3. Probabilistic Swarm Guidance using Optimal Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-10

    y ) 0 0.005 0.01 0.015 0.02 ( a ) ( b ) Figure 1. ( a ) The initial probability mass function (pmf) µ(x) (in blue) is transported to the desired pmf ν...first making a localized guess and then reaching an agreement across the network using the consensus algorithm [24]. Step 2 is elucidated in Section II- B ...Section VI. B . Notation The time index is denoted by a right subscript and the agent index is denoted by a lower-case right superscript. Let N, R, R

  4. Materials with engineered mesoporosity for programmed mass transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gough, Dara V.

    relative to the unswollen template. Electroless plating and cation exchange were explored as methods to vary the shell material of MHS. Mesoporous Ni MHS were obtained by the reduction of Ni2+ with dimethylamine borane onto a CML latex core. However, the resultant MHS were damaged due to core swelling during etch. To successfully obtain undeformed MHS, a silica core must be utilized; one possible route to explore, in order to reach this goal, is the surface chemistry/ligand effects on Ni2+. Cation exchange was performed in order to obtain CuS MHS; however, it proved an unsuccessful route to PbS, S and HgS. CdS-ZnS, Bi2S3 and Ag2S MHS were obtained only with significant defects. A novel hierarchically structured material, porous opal, was prepared using a colloidal crystal template and the dealloying of silver from gold and possed porosity on length scales range from 10s of nanometers (due to the colloidal crystal template) down to ca. 10 nm (due to dealloying). The transport properties of the material were studied using cyclic voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The porous opal was found to posses enhanced charge transport properties relative to a unimodal porous gold film and a higher surface area than a gold opal. An equivalent circuit model was presented to explain the enhanced charge transport properties. A biomimetic system for studying the translocation of polymers through a channel and into a spherical cavity was developed based on inspiration from the gamma-bacteriophage. The nanocavity system was synthesized using two template length scales: 250 nm and 1.2 mum. Fabrication challenges that arose when using 1.2 mum colloidal templates were addressed, and the system was optimized for confinement studies of plasmid dsDNA.

  5. Transport optimization of coupled flashing ratchets in viscoelastic media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai-Yan; Bao, Jing-Dong

    2017-08-01

    In the paper, we investigate the transport properties of coupled flashing ratchets in viscoelastic media. Using generalized Langevin equation, subvelocity Vα, subdiffusive coefficient Dα and generalized Peclet number Peα are calculated as functions of the temperature T and the flashing period τ with different subdiffusive exponents α. The results show that the transport of coupled flashing ratchets can be optimized in viscoelastic media.

  6. Optimization of Nonlinear Transport-Production Task of Medical Waste

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michlowicz, Edward

    2012-09-01

    The paper reflects on optimization of transportation - production tasks for the processing of medical waste. For the existing network of collection points and processing plants, according to its algorithm, the optimal allocation of tasks to the cost of transport to the respective plants has to be determined. It was assumed that the functions determining the processing costs are polynomials of the second degree. To solve the problem, a program written in MatLab environment equalization algorithm based on a marginal cost JCC was used.

  7. Transport optimization considering the node aggregation ability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Gang; Li, Lian; Guo, Jiawei; Li, Zheng

    2015-10-01

    Using the theories of complex networks and gravitational field, we study the dynamic routing process under the framework of node gravitational field, define the equation of gravitation of travel path to data package and introduce two parameters α and γ for adjusting the dependences of transmission data on the unblocked degree of node, the transmission capacity of node and the path length. Based on the path's attraction, a gravitational field routing strategy under node connection ability constraint is proposed with considering the affect of node aggregation ability to transport process, and a parameter is used to adjust the control strength of routing process to node aggregation ability. In order to clarify the efficiency of suggested method, we introduce an order parameter η to measure the throughput of the network by the critical value of phase transition from free state to congestion state, and analyze the distribution of betweenness centrality and traffic jam. Simulation results show that, compared with the traditional shortest path routing strategy, our method greatly improve the throughput of a network, balance the network traffic load and most of the network nodes are used efficiently. Moreover, the network throughput is maximized under μ = -1, and the transmission performance of the algorithm is independent of the values of α and γ, which indicate the routing strategy is stable and reliable.

  8. Area-preservation mapping using optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xin; Su, Zhengyu; Gu, Xianfeng David; Kaufman, Arie; Sun, Jian; Gao, Jie; Luo, Feng

    2013-12-01

    We present a novel area-preservation mapping/flattening method using the optimal mass transport technique, based on the Monge-Brenier theory. Our optimal transport map approach is rigorous and solid in theory, efficient and parallel in computation, yet general for various applications. By comparison with the conventional Monge-Kantorovich approach, our method reduces the number of variables from O(n2) to O(n), and converts the optimal mass transport problem to a convex optimization problem, which can now be efficiently carried out by Newton's method. Furthermore, our framework includes the area weighting strategy that enables users to completely control and adjust the size of areas everywhere in an accurate and quantitative way. Our method significantly reduces the complexity of the problem, and improves the efficiency, flexibility and scalability during visualization. Our framework, by combining conformal mapping and optimal mass transport mapping, serves as a powerful tool for a broad range of applications in visualization and graphics, especially for medical imaging. We provide a variety of experimental results to demonstrate the efficiency, robustness and efficacy of our novel framework.

  9. HITEMP Material and Structural Optimization Technology Transfer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collier, Craig S.; Arnold, Steve (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of adding viscoelasticity and the Generalized Method of Cells (GMC) for micromechanical viscoelastic behavior into the commercial HyperSizer structural analysis and optimization code was investigated. The viscoelasticity methodology was developed in four steps. First, a simplified algorithm was devised to test the iterative time stepping method for simple one-dimensional multiple ply structures. Second, GMC code was made into a callable subroutine and incorporated into the one-dimensional code to test the accuracy and usability of the code. Third, the viscoelastic time-stepping and iterative scheme was incorporated into HyperSizer for homogeneous, isotropic viscoelastic materials. Finally, the GMC was included in a version of HyperSizer. MS Windows executable files implementing each of these steps is delivered with this report, as well as source code. The findings of this research are that both viscoelasticity and GMC are feasible and valuable additions to HyperSizer and that the door is open for more advanced nonlinear capability, such as viscoplasticity.

  10. A MILP-Model for the Optimization of Transports

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Björk, Kaj-Mikael

    2010-09-01

    This paper presents a work in developing a mathematical model for the optimization of transports. The decisions to be made are routing decisions, truck assignment and the determination of the pickup order for a set of loads and available trucks. The model presented takes these aspects into account simultaneously. The MILP model is implemented in the Microsoft Excel environment, utilizing the LP-solve freeware as the optimization engine and Visual Basic for Applications as the modeling interface.

  11. An ab initio electronic transport database for inorganic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ricci, Francesco; Chen, Wei; Aydemir, Umut; Snyder, G. Jeffrey; Rignanese, Gian-Marco; Jain, Anubhav; Hautier, Geoffroy

    2017-07-01

    Electronic transport in materials is governed by a series of tensorial properties such as conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, and effective mass. These quantities are paramount to the understanding of materials in many fields from thermoelectrics to electronics and photovoltaics. Transport properties can be calculated from a material's band structure using the Boltzmann transport theory framework. We present here the largest computational database of electronic transport properties based on a large set of 48,000 materials originating from the Materials Project database. Our results were obtained through the interpolation approach developed in the BoltzTraP software, assuming a constant relaxation time. We present the workflow to generate the data, the data validation procedure, and the database structure. Our aim is to target the large community of scientists developing materials selection strategies and performing studies involving transport properties.

  12. Transport and magnetic properties in topological materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Tian

    The notion of topology has been the central topic of the condensed matter physics in recent years, ranging from 2D quantum hall (QH) and quantum spin hall (QSH) states, 3D topological insulators (TIs), topological crystalline insulators (TCIs), 3D Dirac/Weyl semimetals, and topological superconductors (TSCs) etc. The key notion of the topological materials is the bulk edge correspondence, i.e., in order to preserve the symmetry of the whole system (bulk+edge), edge states must exist to counter-compensate the broken symmetry of the bulk. Combined with the fact that the bulk is topologically protected, the edge states are robust due to the bulk edge correspondence. This leads to interesting phenomena of chiral edge states in 2D QH, helical edge states in 2D QSH, "parity anomaly'' (time reversal anomaly) in 3D TI, helical edge states in the mirror plane of TCI, chiral anomaly in Dirac/Weyl semimetals, Majorana fermions in the TSCs. Transport and magnetic properties of topological materials are investigated to yield intriguing phenomena. For 3D TI Bi1.1Sb0.9Te 2S, anomalous Hall effect (AHE) is observed, and for TCI Pb1-x SnxSe, Seebeck/Nernst measurements reveal the anomalous sign change of Nernst signals as well as the massive Dirac fermions. Ferroelectricity and pressure measurements show that TCI Pb1-xSnxTe undergoes quantum phase transition (QPT) from trivial insulator through Weyl semimetal to anomalous insulator. Dirac semimetals Cd3As2, Na 3Bi show interesting results such as the ultrahigh mobility 10 7cm2V-1s-1 protected from backscattering at zero magnetic field, as well as anomalous Nernst effect (ANE) for Cd3As2, and the negative longitudinal magnetoresistance (MR) due to chiral anomaly for Na3Bi. In-plane and out-of-plane AHE are observed for semimetal ZrTe5 by in-situ double-axes rotation measurements. For interacting system Eu2Ir2O7, full angle torque magnetometry measurements reveal the existence of orthogonal magnetization breaking the symmetry of

  13. 30 CFR 57.6201 - Separation of transported explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Separation of transported explosive material. 57.6201 Section 57.6201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6201 Separation of transported...

  14. 30 CFR 57.6201 - Separation of transported explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Separation of transported explosive material. 57.6201 Section 57.6201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6201 Separation of transported...

  15. 30 CFR 57.6201 - Separation of transported explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Separation of transported explosive material. 57.6201 Section 57.6201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6201 Separation of transported...

  16. 30 CFR 57.6201 - Separation of transported explosive material.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Separation of transported explosive material. 57.6201 Section 57.6201 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR... MINES Explosives Transportation-Surface and Underground § 57.6201 Separation of transported...

  17. Onsite transportation of radioactive materials at the Savannah River Site

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, R.

    2015-03-03

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) Transportation Safety Document (TSD) defines the onsite packaging and transportation safety program at SRS and demonstrates its compliance with Department of Energy (DOE) transportation safety requirements, to include DOE Order 460.1C, DOE Order 461.2, Onsite Packaging and Transfer of Materials of National Security Interest, and 10 CFR 830, Nuclear Safety Management (Subpart B).

  18. Optimization of the Transport Shield for Neutrinoless Double Beta-decay Enriched Germanium

    SciTech Connect

    Aguayo Navarrete, Estanislao; Kouzes, Richard T.; Orrell, John L.; Reid, Douglas J.; Fast, James E.

    2012-04-15

    This document presents results of an investigation of the material and geometry choice for the transport shield of germanium, the active detector material used in 76Ge neutrinoless double beta decay searches. The objective of this work is to select the optimal material and geometry to minimize cosmogenic production of radioactive isotopes in the germanium material. The design of such a shield is based on the calculation of the cosmogenic production rate of isotopes that are known to cause interfering backgrounds in 76Ge neutrinoless double beta decay searches.

  19. Hazardous material transportation risks in the Puget Sound Region

    SciTech Connect

    Andrews, W.B.; Rhoads, R.E.; Franklin, A.L.; Cole, B.M.; Rau, R.G.

    1981-01-01

    This paper summarizes results of a study performed for the Transportation Systems Center (TSC) of the US Department of Transportation (DOT), to determine public safety risks of transporting hazardous material (HM) in the Central Puget Sound Region (CPSR) of Washington State. Results of this study were used in a regional assessment of hazardous material transportation conducted for the Materials Transportation Bureau (MTB) of DOT by the Puget Sound Council of Governments (PSCOG) and the DOT Transportation Systems Center (TSC). Additional hazardous material studies have also been conducted by the DOT in New Orleans, Louisiana, San Francisco, California, Niagara County, New York, Indianapolis, Indiana, Memphis, Tennessee, and the State of Massachusetts. 15 refs., 2 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. 75 FR 9147 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-01

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA), DOT 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, 175 RIN 2137-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration (PHMSA) in coordination with the Federal...

  1. 75 FR 1302 - Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-11

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 172, 173, 175 RIN 2137-AE44 Hazardous Materials: Transportation of Lithium Batteries AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... Federal Aviation Administration (FAA), is proposing to amend requirements in the Hazardous Materials...

  2. Optimizing velocities and transports for complex coastal regions and archipelagos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haley, Patrick J.; Agarwal, Arpit; Lermusiaux, Pierre F. J.

    2015-05-01

    We derive and apply a methodology for the initialization of velocity and transport fields in complex multiply-connected regions with multiscale dynamics. The result is initial fields that are consistent with observations, complex geometry and dynamics, and that can simulate the evolution of ocean processes without large spurious initial transients. A class of constrained weighted least squares optimizations is defined to best fit first-guess velocities while satisfying the complex bathymetry, coastline and divergence strong constraints. A weak constraint towards the minimum inter-island transports that are in accord with the first-guess velocities provides important velocity corrections in complex archipelagos. In the optimization weights, the minimum distance and vertical area between pairs of coasts are computed using a Fast Marching Method. Additional information on velocity and transports are included as strong or weak constraints. We apply our methodology around the Hawaiian islands of Kauai/Niihau, in the Taiwan/Kuroshio region and in the Philippines Archipelago. Comparisons with other common initialization strategies, among hindcasts from these initial conditions (ICs), and with independent in situ observations show that our optimization corrects transports, satisfies boundary conditions and redirects currents. Differences between the hindcasts from these different ICs are found to grow for at least 2-3 weeks. When compared to independent in situ observations, simulations from our optimized ICs are shown to have the smallest errors.

  3. On Matrix-Valued Monge–Kantorovich Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Lipeng; Georgiou, Tryphon T.; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2016-01-01

    We present a particular formulation of optimal transport for matrix-valued density functions. Our aim is to devise a geometry which is suitable for comparing power spectral densities of multivariable time series. More specifically, the value of a power spectral density at a given frequency, which in the matricial case encodes power as well as directionality, is thought of as a proxy for a “matrix-valued mass density.” Optimal transport aims at establishing a natural metric in the space of such matrix-valued densities which takes into account differences between power across frequencies as well as misalignment of the corresponding principle axes. Thus, our transportation cost includes a cost of transference of power between frequencies together with a cost of rotating the principle directions of matrix densities. The two endpoint matrix-valued densities can be thought of as marginals of a joint matrix-valued density on a tensor product space. This joint density, very much as in the classical Monge–Kantorovich setting, can be thought to specify the transportation plan. Contrary to the classical setting, the optimal transport plan for matrices is no longer supported on a thin zero-measure set. PMID:26997667

  4. Reducing long-term remedial costs by transport modeling optimization.

    PubMed

    Becker, David; Minsker, Barbara; Greenwald, Robert; Zhang, Yan; Harre, Karla; Yager, Kathleen; Zheng, Chunmiao; Peralta, Richard

    2006-01-01

    The Department of Defense (DoD) Environmental Security Technology Certification Program and the Environmental Protection Agency sponsored a project to evaluate the benefits and utility of contaminant transport simulation-optimization algorithms against traditional (trial and error) modeling approaches. Three pump-and-treat facilities operated by the DoD were selected for inclusion in the project. Three optimization formulations were developed for each facility and solved independently by three modeling teams (two using simulation-optimization algorithms and one applying trial-and-error methods). The results clearly indicate that simulation-optimization methods are able to search a wider range of well locations and flow rates and identify better solutions than current trial-and-error approaches. The solutions found were 5% to 50% better than those obtained using trial-and-error (measured using optimal objective function values), with an average improvement of approximately 20%. This translated into potential savings ranging from 600,000 dollars to 10,000,000 dollars for the three sites. In nearly all cases, the cost savings easily outweighed the costs of the optimization. To reduce computational requirements, in some cases the simulation-optimization groups applied multiple mathematical algorithms, solved a series of modified subproblems, and/or fit "meta-models" such as neural networks or regression models to replace time-consuming simulation models in the optimization algorithm. The optimal solutions did not account for the uncertainties inherent in the modeling process. This project illustrates that transport simulation-optimization techniques are practical for real problems. However, applying the techniques in an efficient manner requires expertise and should involve iterative modification to the formulations based on interim results.

  5. Transport path optimization algorithm based on fuzzy integrated weights

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Yuan-Da; Xu, Xiao-Hao

    2014-11-01

    Natural disasters cause significant damage to roads, making route selection a complicated logistical problem. To overcome this complexity, we present a method of using a trapezoidal fuzzy number to select the optimal transport path. Using the given trapezoidal fuzzy edge coefficients, we calculate a fuzzy integrated matrix, and incorporate the fuzzy multi-weights into fuzzy integrated weights. The optimal path is determined by taking two sets of vertices and transforming undiscovered vertices into discoverable ones. Our experimental results show that the model is highly accurate, and requires only a few measurement data to confirm the optimal path. The model provides an effective, feasible, and convenient method to obtain weights for different road sections, and can be applied to road planning in intelligent transportation systems.

  6. Optimization of magnetic switches for single particle and cell transport

    SciTech Connect

    Abedini-Nassab, Roozbeh; Yellen, Benjamin B.; Murdoch, David M.; Kim, CheolGi

    2014-06-28

    The ability to manipulate an ensemble of single particles and cells is a key aim of lab-on-a-chip research; however, the control mechanisms must be optimized for minimal power consumption to enable future large-scale implementation. Recently, we demonstrated a matter transport platform, which uses overlaid patterns of magnetic films and metallic current lines to control magnetic particles and magnetic-nanoparticle-labeled cells; however, we have made no prior attempts to optimize the device geometry and power consumption. Here, we provide an optimization analysis of particle-switching devices based on stochastic variation in the particle's size and magnetic content. These results are immediately applicable to the design of robust, multiplexed platforms capable of transporting, sorting, and storing single cells in large arrays with low power and high efficiency.

  7. Optimal mass transport for shape matching and comparison.

    PubMed

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-11-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n(2)) to O(n) . For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach.

  8. Optimal Mass Transport for Shape Matching and Comparison

    PubMed Central

    Su, Zhengyu; Wang, Yalin; Shi, Rui; Zeng, Wei; Sun, Jian; Luo, Feng; Gu, Xianfeng

    2015-01-01

    Surface based 3D shape analysis plays a fundamental role in computer vision and medical imaging. This work proposes to use optimal mass transport map for shape matching and comparison, focusing on two important applications including surface registration and shape space. The computation of the optimal mass transport map is based on Monge-Brenier theory, in comparison to the conventional method based on Monge-Kantorovich theory, this method significantly improves the efficiency by reducing computational complexity from O(n2) to O(n). For surface registration problem, one commonly used approach is to use conformal map to convert the shapes into some canonical space. Although conformal mappings have small angle distortions, they may introduce large area distortions which are likely to cause numerical instability thus resulting failures of shape analysis. This work proposes to compose the conformal map with the optimal mass transport map to get the unique area-preserving map, which is intrinsic to the Riemannian metric, unique, and diffeomorphic. For shape space study, this work introduces a novel Riemannian framework, Conformal Wasserstein Shape Space, by combing conformal geometry and optimal mass transport theory. In our work, all metric surfaces with the disk topology are mapped to the unit planar disk by a conformal mapping, which pushes the area element on the surface to a probability measure on the disk. The optimal mass transport provides a map from the shape space of all topological disks with metrics to the Wasserstein space of the disk and the pullback Wasserstein metric equips the shape space with a Riemannian metric. We validate our work by numerous experiments and comparisons with prior approaches and the experimental results demonstrate the efficiency and efficacy of our proposed approach. PMID:26440265

  9. Simulation Tool for Optimizing Non-Combatant Evacuation (STONE): Optimization of Evacuation Time and Transportation Resource Utilization

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    STONE ) Optimization of evacuation time and transportation resource utilization Jean-Denis Caron Bohdan L. Kaluzny Canadian Joint Operations Command OR...Simulation Tool for Optimizing Non-Combatant Evacuation ( STONE ) Optimization of evacuation time and transportation resource utilization Jean-Denis Caron...Combatant Evacuation ( STONE ) analysis toolset to support NEO planning. This Scientific Report documents the STONE optimization component, STONE (Opt

  10. Transportation accidents/incidents involving radioactive materials (1971--1991)

    SciTech Connect

    Cashwell, C. E.; McClure, J. D.

    1992-01-01

    The Radioactive Materials Incident Report (RMIR) database contains information on transportation-related accidents and incidents involving radioactive materials that have occurred in the United States. The RMIR was developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to support its research and development program efforts for the US Department of Energy (DOE). This paper will address the following topics: background information on the regulations and process for reporting a hazardous materials transportation incident, overview data of radioactive materials transportation accidents and incidents, and additional information and summary data on how packagings have performed in accident conditions.

  11. Preliminary Materials Transport Plan for the Plutonium Immobilization Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Gilkison, J.M.; Dyches, G.M.; Randall, W.J.; Steed, J.H.

    2000-01-26

    This Materials Transport Plan defines the methodology for moving process and non-process materials within the Plutonium Immobilization Plant (PIP) operations. The scope of the plan includes the movement of materials between plant operational units (gloveboxes or operational areas/rooms within the plant). The movements of materials within the various plant operational units are described in the System Design Description prepared for the individual units. The plan provides a design concept for transporting each type of material including the containerization used during the movements. Further, the plan identifies the high-level functions and requirements for movements of the materials.

  12. Control of Heat and Charge Transport in Nanostructured Hybrid Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-21

    Lee, Joo-Hyoung, Galli, Giulia A., and Grossman, Jeffrey C., Nanoporous Si as an Efficient Thermoelectric Material . Nano Letters 8 (11), 3750 (2008...AFRL-OSR-VA-TR-2015-0204 CONTROL OF HEAT AND CHARGE TRANSPORT IN NANOSTRUCTURED HYBRID MATERIALS Akram Boukai UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN Final Report 07...SUBTITLE Control of Heat and Charge Transport in Nanostructured Hybrid Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0058 5c. PROGRAM

  13. Optimization of Profile and Material of Abrasive Water Jet Nozzle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anand Bala Selwin, K. P.; Ramachandran, S.

    2017-05-01

    The objective of this work is to study the behaviour of the abrasive water jet nozzle with different profiles and materials. Taguchi-Grey relational analysis optimization technique is used to optimize the value with different material and different profiles. Initially the 3D models of the nozzle are modelled with different profiles by changing the tapered inlet angle of the nozzle. The different profile models are analysed with different materials and the results are optimized. The optimized results would give the better result taking wear and machining behaviour of the nozzle.

  14. Producing and optimizing novel materials and structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashrafi, Mahdi

    2011-12-01

    A series of detailed experimental and finite element investigations were carried out to study the response of selected objects which are currently utilized for load carrying. These investigations were later applied to optimize the mechanical performance of the studied structures and materials. First, a number of experiments and detailed finite element simulations were carried out to study the response and failure of single lap joints with non-flat interface under uniaxial tension. The adherents were made from fiber reinforced epoxy composite and the custom-made mold allowed the fibers to follow the profile of the bonded joint interface. The experiments showed that the interface shape has significant effect on the mechanical behavior and strength of the bonded joints. Finite element simulations were performed to estimate the distribution of shear and peeling stresses along the bonded joints and the results were linked to the experimental investigations. Additional parametric calculations were also carried out to highlight the role of interface shape on the distribution of stresses, and inherently the overall strength and behavior of the bonded joints. In addition, the role of a central void on the distribution of the stresses in a bonded joint with flat and non-flat sinusoidal interfaces was investigated. The second topic concerns Wood Plastic Composites (WPC) which are widely used in the industry due to its durability, low cost, and anti-moisture properties in comparison with the natural wood. In this research, we have produced flout shaped WPC samples using African black wood powder and Phenolic resin in a hot compression molding set-up. Initial WPC composites were produced by systematically changing the wood volume fraction. Based on these results the optimum temperature, pressure and wood volume fraction for developing WPC in a form of a flute is developed. A series of experimental procedures were performed to improve mechanical properties of WPC samples by

  15. Optimal transport in time-varying small-world networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Qu; Qian, Jiang-Hai; Zhu, Liang; Han, Ding-Ding

    2016-03-01

    The time-order of interactions, which is regulated by some intrinsic activity, surely plays a crucial role regarding the transport efficiency of transportation systems. Here we study the optimal transport structure by measure of the length of time-respecting paths. Our network is built from a two-dimensional regular lattice, and long-range connections are allocated with probability Pi j˜rij -α , where ri j is the Manhattan distance. By assigning each shortcut an activity rate subjected to its geometric distance τi j˜rij -C , long-range links become active intermittently, leading to the time-varying dynamics. We show that for 0 optimal structural exponent αopt that slightly grows with C as αopt˜log(C ) , while for C ≫2 the αopt→∞ . The unique restriction between C and α unveils an optimization principle in time-varying transportation networks. Empirical studies on British Airways and Austrian Airlines provide consistent evidence with our conclusion.

  16. Center for Shape Optimization and Material Layout

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-01

    that eventually participate in the optimal layout for non -self-adjoint problems . Currently, these microstructures are worked out numerically [6...the fourth order problem arising in the theory of plates. 1.2 The Fourth Order Problems Direct Approach in the Optimal Design of Plates. The state of... constraint set. In fact, the constraint set is not only nonlinear, its also non -smooth, and even non - convex . Worst of all, we do not even have an analytic

  17. 76 FR 4276 - Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-25

    ... Federal Railroad Administration 49 CFR Part 174 Hazardous Materials: Improving the Safety of Railroad Transportation of Hazardous Materials AGENCY: Federal Railroad Administration (FRA), Department of Transportation... in this aspect of FRA's hazardous materials program. DATES: The public meeting will be held...

  18. Optimizing Interacting Potentials to Form Targeted Materials Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Torquato, Salvatore

    2015-09-28

    Conventional applications of the principles of statistical mechanics (the "forward" problems), start with particle interaction potentials, and proceed to deduce local structure and macroscopic properties. Other applications (that may be classified as "inverse" problems), begin with targeted configurational information, such as low-order correlation functions that characterize local particle order, and attempt to back out full-system configurations and/or interaction potentials. To supplement these successful experimental and numerical "forward" approaches, we have focused on inverse approaches that make use of analytical and computational tools to optimize interactions for targeted self-assembly of nanosystems. The most original aspect of our work is its inherently inverse approach: instead of predicting structures that result from given interaction potentials among particles, we determine the optimal potential that most robustly stabilizes a given target structure subject to certain constraints. Our inverse approach could revolutionize the manner in which materials are designed and fabricated. There are a number of very tangible properties (e.g. zero thermal expansion behavior), elastic constants, optical properties for photonic applications, and transport properties.

  19. Transport Across Chloroplast Membranes: Optimizing Photosynthesis for Adverse Environmental Conditions.

    PubMed

    Pottosin, Igor; Shabala, Sergey

    2016-03-07

    Chloroplasts are central to solar light harvesting and photosynthesis. Optimal chloroplast functioning is vitally dependent on a very intensive traffic of metabolites and ions between the cytosol and stroma, and should be attuned for adverse environmental conditions. This is achieved by an orchestrated regulation of a variety of transport systems located at chloroplast membranes such as porines, solute channels, ion-specific cation and anion channels, and various primary and secondary active transport systems. In this review we describe the molecular nature and functional properties of the inner and outer envelope and thylakoid membrane channels and transporters. We then discuss how their orchestrated regulation affects thylakoid structure, electron transport and excitation energy transfer, proton-motive force partition, ion homeostasis, stromal pH regulation, and volume regulation. We link the activity of key cation and anion transport systems with stress-specific signaling processes in chloroplasts, and discuss how these signals interact with the signals generated in other organelles to optimize the cell performance, with a special emphasis on Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species signaling. Copyright © 2016 The Author. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Optimizing the patient transport function at Mayo Clinic.

    PubMed

    Kuchera, Dustin; Rohleder, Thomas R

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we report on the implementation of a computerized scheduling tool to optimize staffing for patient transport at the Mayo Clinic. The tool was developed and implemented in Microsoft Excel and Visual Basic for Applications and includes an easy-to-use interface. The tool allows transport management to consider the trade-offs between patient waiting time and staffing levels. While improved staffing efficiency was a desire of the project, it was important that patient service quality was also maintained. The results show that staffing could be reduced while maintaining historical patient service levels.

  1. Optimizing the National TRU waste system transportation program.

    SciTech Connect

    Lott, S. A.; Countiss, S.

    2002-01-01

    The goal of the National TRU Waste Program (NTP) is to operate the system safely and cost-effectively, in compliance with applicable regulations and agreements, and at full capacity in a fully integrated mode. One of the objectives of the Department of Energy's Carlsbad Field Office (DOE/CBFO) is to complete the current Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) mission for the disposal of the nation's legacy transuranic (TRU) waste at least IO years earlier thus saving approximately %7B. The National TRU Waste Optimization Plan (1) recommends changes to accomplish this. This paper discusses the optimization of the National TRU Waste System Transportation Program.

  2. Long range view of materials research for civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.; Waters, M. H.

    1973-01-01

    The impact of various material technology advancements on the economics of civil transport aircraft is investigated. Benefits of advances in both airframe and engine materials are considered. Benefits are measured primarily by improvements in return on investment for an operator. Materials research and development programs which lead to the greatest benefits are assessed with regards to cost, risk, and commonality with other programs. Emphasis of the paper is on advanced technology subsonic/transonic transports (ATT type aircraft) since these are likely to be the next generation of commercial transports.

  3. Long range view of materials research for civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ardema, M. D.; Waters, M. H.

    1974-01-01

    The impact of various material technology advancements on the economics of civil transport aircraft is investigated. Benefits of advances in both airframe and engine materials are considered. Benefits are measured primarily by improvements in return on investment for an operator. Materials research and development programs which lead to the greatest benefits are assessed with regards to cost, risk, and commonality with other programs. Emphasis of the paper is on advanced technology subsonic/transonic transports (ATT type aircraft) since these are likely to be the next generation of commercial transports.

  4. Hole-Transporting Materials for Printable Perovskite Solar Cells

    PubMed Central

    Salunke, Jagadish K.; Priimagi, Arri

    2017-01-01

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) represent undoubtedly the most significant breakthrough in photovoltaic technology since the 1970s, with an increase in their power conversion efficiency from less than 5% to over 22% in just a few years. Hole-transporting materials (HTMs) are an essential building block of PSC architectures. Currently, 2,2’,7,7’-tetrakis-(N,N’-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)-9,9’-spirobifluorene), better known as spiro-OMeTAD, is the most widely-used HTM to obtain high-efficiency devices. However, it is a tremendously expensive material with mediocre hole carrier mobility. To ensure wide-scale application of PSC-based technologies, alternative HTMs are being proposed. Solution-processable HTMs are crucial to develop inexpensive, high-throughput and printable large-area PSCs. In this review, we present the most recent advances in the design and development of different types of HTMs, with a particular focus on mesoscopic PSCs. Finally, we outline possible future research directions for further optimization of the HTMs to achieve low-cost, stable and large-area PSCs. PMID:28914823

  5. Optimal design of electromagnetic cloaks with multiple dielectric materials by topology optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kishimoto, Naoki; Izui, Kazuhiro; Nishiwaki, Shinji; Yamada, Takayuki

    2017-05-01

    This paper presents an optimal design method for electromagnetic cloaks composed of multiple dielectric materials based on a topology optimization. To obtain optimal configurations that are perfectly free from intermediate materials, so-called grayscales, we apply a Multi-Material Level Set topology description model. The level set functions that are design variables are updated using topological derivatives that also function as design sensitivities, and we derive the topological derivatives for multiple materials. Three numerical examples demonstrate the validity of the proposed method and the advantage of using multiple materials.

  6. Hazardous materials transportation and emergency response programs

    SciTech Connect

    Joy, D.S.; Fore, C.S.

    1983-01-01

    This presentation consists of the following visual aids; (1) detailed routing capabilities of truck, rail, barge; (2) legislative data base for hazardous materials; and (3) emergency response of accident site Eddyville, Kentucky (airports in vicinity of Eddyville, KY).

  7. Transportation of Hazardous Materials Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    Blanchard, A.

    2000-02-28

    This report documents the Emergency Preparedness Hazards Assessment (EPHA) for the Transportation of Hazardous Materials (THM) at the Department of Energy (DOE) Savannah River Site (SRS). This hazards assessment is intended to identify and analyze those transportation hazards significant enough to warrant consideration in the SRS Emergency Management Program.

  8. Hazardous Materials in Marine Transportation: A Practical Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Thomas J.; Kichner, Jerzy J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a course offered at the United States Coast Guard Academy that deals with the marine transportation of hazardous materials. Outlines the major topics covered in the course, including marine transportation regulations. Discusses the use of lectures, laboratory demonstrations, and "hands-on" activities in the instructional…

  9. Hazardous Materials in Marine Transportation: A Practical Course.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haas, Thomas J.; Kichner, Jerzy J.

    1987-01-01

    Describes a course offered at the United States Coast Guard Academy that deals with the marine transportation of hazardous materials. Outlines the major topics covered in the course, including marine transportation regulations. Discusses the use of lectures, laboratory demonstrations, and "hands-on" activities in the instructional…

  10. The role of optimal vortex formation in biological fluid transport.

    PubMed

    Dabiri, John O; Gharib, Morteza

    2005-08-07

    Animal phyla that require macro-scale fluid transport for functioning have repeatedly and often independently converged on the use of jet flows. During flow initiation these jets form fluid vortex rings, which facilitate mass transfer by stationary pumps (e.g. cardiac chambers) and momentum transfer by mobile systems (e.g. jet-propelled swimmers). Previous research has shown that vortex rings generated in the laboratory can be optimized for efficiency or thrust, based on the jet length-to-diameter ratio (L/D), with peak performance occurring at 3.5optimization have been inconclusive, due to the inability to properly account for the diversity of jet kinematics found across animal phyla. We combine laboratory experiments, in situ observations and a framework that reduces the kinematics to a single parameter in order to quantitatively show that individual animal kinematics can be tuned in correlation with optimal vortex ring formation. This new approach identifies simple rules for effective fluid transport, facilitates comparative biological studies of jet flows across animal phyla irrespective of their specific functions and can be extended to unify theories of optimal jet-based and flapping-based vortex ring formation.

  11. The role of optimal vortex formation in biological fluid transport

    PubMed Central

    Dabiri, John O; Gharib, Morteza

    2005-01-01

    Animal phyla that require macro-scale fluid transport for functioning have repeatedly and often independently converged on the use of jet flows. During flow initiation these jets form fluid vortex rings, which facilitate mass transfer by stationary pumps (e.g. cardiac chambers) and momentum transfer by mobile systems (e.g. jet-propelled swimmers). Previous research has shown that vortex rings generated in the laboratory can be optimized for efficiency or thrust, based on the jet length-to-diameter ratio (L/D), with peak performance occurring at 3.5optimization have been inconclusive, due to the inability to properly account for the diversity of jet kinematics found across animal phyla. We combine laboratory experiments, in situ observations and a framework that reduces the kinematics to a single parameter in order to quantitatively show that individual animal kinematics can be tuned in correlation with optimal vortex ring formation. This new approach identifies simple rules for effective fluid transport, facilitates comparative biological studies of jet flows across animal phyla irrespective of their specific functions and can be extended to unify theories of optimal jet-based and flapping-based vortex ring formation. PMID:16048770

  12. ECUT energy data reference series: lightweight materials for ground transportation

    SciTech Connect

    Abarcar, R.B.; Hane, G.J.; Johnson, D.R.

    1984-07-01

    This report summarizes information that describes the use of lightweight materials in automobiles. The information on this mode of transportation represents the largest potential energy savings for substitution of lightweight materials in the transportation sector. Included are data on energy conversion efficiency of the engine and its relationship to vehicle weight, the capital stock, the amount of energy used, and the service activity level as measured in ton-miles.

  13. Transportation of radioactive materials: the legislative and regulatory information system

    SciTech Connect

    Fore, C.S.

    1982-03-01

    The US Department of Energy is carrying out a national program to assure the safe shipment of radioactive materials. As part of this overall effort, the Hazardous Materials Information Center of Oak Ridge National Laboratory has developed the comprehensive Legislative and Regulatory Information System, which contains information on federal-, state-, and local-level legislative and regulatory actions pertaining primarily to the shipment of radioactive materials. Specific subject areas chosen to highlight particular transportation restrictions include: (1) identification of state agency responsible for regulating transportation, (2) type of escorts required, (3) areas requiring prior notification, (4) areas requiring permits or licenses, and (5) areas totally banning transportation of all radioactive materials. Other legislative information being categorized and of immediate relevance to the transportation issues is covered under the areas of disposal, storage, and management of radioactive materials; establishment of additional regulations; emergency response regulations; moratoriums on power plant construction and siting; radiation safety and control studies; and remedial action studies. The collected information is abstracted, indexed, and input into one of the two data bases developed under this information system - Current Legislation Data Base and Historical Legislation Data Base. An appendix is included which provides a summary of the state and local laws affecting the transportation of radioactive materials throughout the United States. The Legislative and Regulatory Information System is supported by the Transportation Technology Center located at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico.

  14. Enhanced heat transport in environmental systems using microencapsulated phase change materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colvin, D. P.; Mulligan, J. C.; Bryant, Y. G.

    1992-01-01

    A methodology for enhanced heat transport and storage that uses a new two-component fluid mixture consisting of a microencapsulated phase change material (microPCM) for enhanced latent heat transport is outlined. SBIR investigations for NASA, USAF, SDIO, and NSF since 1983 have demonstrated the ability of the two-component microPCM coolants to provide enhancements in heat transport up to 40 times over that of the carrier fluid alone, enhancements of 50 to 100 percent in the heat transfer coefficient, practically isothermal operation when the coolant flow is circulated in an optimal manner, and significant reductions in pump work.

  15. Wear materials; 2: Optimizing liner alloy choice

    SciTech Connect

    Stefanovic, T. )

    1993-12-01

    This paper describes a new liner designed for a copper ore crusher in Yugoslavia. The experience gained over the past ten years of operation at the Bor copper mines has shown that correct selection of wear material for crusher liners is critical to successful plant performance. With the new wear resistant liners, the crusher development program has increased the concentrator throughput from 8.0 to 9.6 million tons/year. The ultimate goal of the project is to identify the proper liner material that will extend liner life, reduce cyclic stress on major crusher components, and simplify crusher control and adjustment. This paper describes the various liners materials and the mechanisms of wear.

  16. Vulnerability Analysis Considerations for the Transportation of Special Nuclear Material

    SciTech Connect

    Nicholson, Lary G.; Purvis, James W.

    1999-07-21

    The vulnerability analysis methodology developed for fixed nuclear material sites has proven to be extremely effective in assessing associated transportation issues. The basic methods and techniques used are directly applicable to conducting a transportation vulnerability analysis. The purpose of this paper is to illustrate that the same physical protection elements (detection, delay, and response) are present, although the response force plays a dominant role in preventing the theft or sabotage of material. Transportation systems are continuously exposed to the general public whereas the fixed site location by its very nature restricts general public access.

  17. Toxic heavy metals: materials cycle optimization.

    PubMed Central

    Ayres, R U

    1992-01-01

    Long-term ecological sustainability is incompatible with an open materials cycle. The toxic heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, silver, uranium/plutonium, zinc) exemplify the problem. These metals are being mobilized and dispersed into the environment by industrial activity at a rate far higher than by natural processes. Apart from losses to the environment resulting from mine wastes and primary processing, many of these metals are utilized in products that are inherently dissipative. Examples of such uses include fuels, lubricants, solvents, fire retardants, stabilizers, flocculants, pigments, biocides, and preservatives. To close the materials cycle, it will be necessary to accomplish two things. The first is to ban or otherwise discourage (e.g., by means of high severance taxes on virgin materials) dissipative uses of the above type. The second is to increase the efficiency of recycling of those materials that are not replaceable in principle. Here, also, economic instruments (such as returnable deposits) can be effective in some cases. A systems view of the problem is essential to assess the cost and effectiveness of alternative strategies. PMID:11607259

  18. Toxic Heavy Metals: Materials Cycle Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayres, Robert U.

    1992-02-01

    Long-term ecological sustainability is incompatible with an open materials cycle. The toxic heavy metals (arsenic, cadmium, chromium, copper, lead, mercury, silver, uranium/plutonium, zinc) exemplify the problem. These metals are being mobilized and dispersed into the environment by industrial activity at a rate far higher than by natural processes. Apart from losses to the environment resulting from mine wastes and primary processing, many of these metals are utilized in products that are inherently dissipative. Examples of such uses include fuels, lubricants, solvents, fire retardants, stabilizers, flocculants, pigments, biocides, and preservatives. To close the materials cycle, it will be necessary to accomplish two things. The first is to ban or otherwise discourage (e.g., by means of high severance taxes on virgin materials) dissipative uses of the above type. The second is to increase the efficiency of recycling of those materials that are not replaceable in principle. Here, also, economic instruments (such as returnable deposits) can be effective in some cases. A systems view of the problem is essential to assess the cost and effectiveness of alternative strategies.

  19. Development of an Anisotropic Thermal Transport Material

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-13

    interfacial trapping method . Boron nitride was exfoliated for the first time in large quantities. Boron nitride, unlike graphite , is electrically...composites and include the use of a self-assembling solvent mixture and an interfacial trapping method . Boron nitride was exfoliated for the first time in...the material. The methods developed in the work supported by this grant allow for the use of un-oxidized and un-damaged graphene for thermal

  20. Integration of numerical analysis tools for automated numerical optimization of a transportation package design

    SciTech Connect

    Witkowski, W.R.; Eldred, M.S.; Harding, D.C.

    1994-09-01

    The use of state-of-the-art numerical analysis tools to determine the optimal design of a radioactive material (RAM) transportation container is investigated. The design of a RAM package`s components involves a complex coupling of structural, thermal, and radioactive shielding analyses. The final design must adhere to very strict design constraints. The current technique used by cask designers is uncoupled and involves designing each component separately with respect to its driving constraint. With the use of numerical optimization schemes, the complex couplings can be considered directly, and the performance of the integrated package can be maximized with respect to the analysis conditions. This can lead to more efficient package designs. Thermal and structural accident conditions are analyzed in the shape optimization of a simplified cask design. In this paper, details of the integration of numerical analysis tools, development of a process model, nonsmoothness difficulties with the optimization of the cask, and preliminary results are discussed.

  1. A Comparison of Metallic, Composite and Nanocomposite Optimal Transonic Transport Wings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Graeme J.; Kenway, Gaetan K. W.; Martins, Joaquim R. R.

    2014-01-01

    Current and future composite material technologies have the potential to greatly improve the performance of large transport aircraft. However, the coupling between aerodynamics and structures makes it challenging to design optimal flexible wings, and the transonic flight regime requires high fidelity computational models. We address these challenges by solving a series of high-fidelity aerostructural optimization problems that explore the design space for the wing of a large transport aircraft. We consider three different materials: aluminum, carbon-fiber reinforced composites and an hypothetical composite based on carbon nanotubes. The design variables consist of both aerodynamic shape (including span), structural sizing, and ply angle fractions in the case of composites. Pareto fronts with respect to structural weight and fuel burn are generated. The wing performance in each case is optimized subject to stress and buckling constraints. We found that composite wings consistently resulted in lower fuel burn and lower structural weight, and that the carbon nanotube composite did not yield the increase in performance one would expect from a material with such outstanding properties. This indicates that there might be diminishing returns when it comes to the application of advanced materials to wing design, requiring further investigation.

  2. Microvascular Materials for Mass and Energy Transport

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    2D vs. 3D : Visualizing Reacivity! 2D 3D Nguyen, Leho, Esser-Kahn Lab Chip 2012 2.96 ± .35 mol/m2 hr 1.66 ± .17 mol/m2 hr Mass...Celery! Lithography Big Mac Assembly Celery Assembly 3D Techniques HRL AMS Fibers Can be Woven Into Composite Materials! Channel extends over...Structures Mammal Fish 3D Gas Exchange Unit Just how efficient are natural structures?! Merck – Lung Guide! Breathing Capacity of Lung 3 million

  3. 78 FR 60755 - Hazardous Materials: Enhanced Enforcement Procedures-Resumption of Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-02

    ...: Enhanced Enforcement Procedures--Resumption of Transportation AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials... identified in the Hazardous Materials Transportation Safety Improvement Act of 2012 related to the Department... hazardous material transportation matters identified by Congress. This final rule is required to...

  4. 76 FR 32867 - Hazardous Materials: Requirements for Storage of Explosives During Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... Materials: Requirements for Storage of Explosives During Transportation AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous...-8553, Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200... Requirements Applicable to Explosives Stored During Transportation A. Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR; 49...

  5. Discovery and Optimization of Materials Using Evolutionary Approaches.

    PubMed

    Le, Tu C; Winkler, David A

    2016-05-25

    Materials science is undergoing a revolution, generating valuable new materials such as flexible solar panels, biomaterials and printable tissues, new catalysts, polymers, and porous materials with unprecedented properties. However, the number of potentially accessible materials is immense. Artificial evolutionary methods such as genetic algorithms, which explore large, complex search spaces very efficiently, can be applied to the identification and optimization of novel materials more rapidly than by physical experiments alone. Machine learning models can augment experimental measurements of materials fitness to accelerate identification of useful and novel materials in vast materials composition or property spaces. This review discusses the problems of large materials spaces, the types of evolutionary algorithms employed to identify or optimize materials, and how materials can be represented mathematically as genomes, describes fitness landscapes and mutation operators commonly employed in materials evolution, and provides a comprehensive summary of published research on the use of evolutionary methods to generate new catalysts, phosphors, and a range of other materials. The review identifies the potential for evolutionary methods to revolutionize a wide range of manufacturing, medical, and materials based industries.

  6. Optimizing materials for better gravel packs

    SciTech Connect

    Cocales, B. )

    1992-12-01

    This paper reports on the permeability of crystalline silica (commercial) gravel used for gravel packs. Many gravel properties are tested and monitored frequently, but an industry permeability standard has not been established. To standardize permeability numbers, experiments were conducted on crystalline silica and aluminum silicate (Carbo-Prop) using a constant-head permeameter. Equations developed from lab results show permeability as a function of porosity. These equations were developed for each material size and type, and can be used to determine permeability for any porosity.

  7. Shield weight optimization using Monte Carlo transport calculations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, T. M.; Wohl, M. L.

    1972-01-01

    Outlines are given of the theory used in FASTER-3 Monte Carlo computer program for the transport of neutrons and gamma rays in complex geometries. The code has the additional capability of calculating the minimum weight layered unit shield configuration which will meet a specified dose rate constraint. It includes the treatment of geometric regions bounded by quadratic and quardric surfaces with multiple radiation sources which have a specified space, angle, and energy dependence. The program calculates, using importance sampling, the resulting number and energy fluxes at specified point, surface, and volume detectors. Results are presented for sample problems involving primary neutron and both primary and secondary photon transport in a spherical reactor shield configuration. These results include the optimization of the shield configuration.

  8. Optimal Filtering in Mass Transport Modeling From Satellite Gravimetry Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ditmar, P.; Hashemi Farahani, H.; Klees, R.

    2011-12-01

    Monitoring natural mass transport in the Earth's system, which has marked a new era in Earth observation, is largely based on the data collected by the GRACE satellite mission. Unfortunately, this mission is not free from certain limitations, two of which are especially critical. Firstly, its sensitivity is strongly anisotropic: it senses the north-south component of the mass re-distribution gradient much better than the east-west component. Secondly, it suffers from a trade-off between temporal and spatial resolution: a high (e.g., daily) temporal resolution is only possible if the spatial resolution is sacrificed. To make things even worse, the GRACE satellites enter occasionally a phase when their orbit is characterized by a short repeat period, which makes it impossible to reach a high spatial resolution at all. A way to mitigate limitations of GRACE measurements is to design optimal data processing procedures, so that all available information is fully exploited when modeling mass transport. This implies, in particular, that an unconstrained model directly derived from satellite gravimetry data needs to be optimally filtered. In principle, this can be realized with a Wiener filter, which is built on the basis of covariance matrices of noise and signal. In practice, however, a compilation of both matrices (and, therefore, of the filter itself) is not a trivial task. To build the covariance matrix of noise in a mass transport model, it is necessary to start from a realistic model of noise in the level-1B data. Furthermore, a routine satellite gravimetry data processing includes, in particular, the subtraction of nuisance signals (for instance, associated with atmosphere and ocean), for which appropriate background models are used. Such models are not error-free, which has to be taken into account when the noise covariance matrix is constructed. In addition, both signal and noise covariance matrices depend on the type of mass transport processes under

  9. A revised model of fluid transport optimization in Physarum polycephalum.

    PubMed

    Bonifaci, Vincenzo

    2017-02-01

    Optimization of fluid transport in the slime mold Physarum polycephalum has been the subject of several modeling efforts in recent literature. Existing models assume that the tube adaptation mechanism in P. polycephalum's tubular network is controlled by the sheer amount of fluid flow through the tubes. We put forward the hypothesis that the controlling variable may instead be the flow's pressure gradient along the tube. We carry out the stability analysis of such a revised mathematical model for a parallel-edge network, proving that the revised model supports the global flow-optimizing behavior of the slime mold for a substantially wider class of response functions compared to previous models. Simulations also suggest that the same conclusion may be valid for arbitrary network topologies.

  10. Optimal device and method for transportation of isolated porcine islet.

    PubMed

    Kim, T-S; Lee, H-S; Oh, S-H; Moon, H; Lee, S; Song, S; Shin, M; Park, J B; Kim, S-J; Joh, J-W; Lee, S-K

    2013-10-01

    We investigated the optimal method for transportation of isolated porcine islets from an isolation facility to a transplant hospital or research center in terms of temperature, oxygen supply, and shaking effect. Commercially available insulator boxes with thermoregulators exposed for 5 hours under two external temperatures (4°C and 37°C) were monitored using HOBO temperature loggers. To find the optimal transport device, we compared islet counts, viability, quality, and function in conical tubes, gas-permeable bags (GPB) and gas-permeable flasks (GPF) after 1, 3 and 5 hours. To evaluate the effects of shaking on islets, we also analyzed the difference between a control and a shaking group in each device with time. Commercially available Styrofoam insulators with thermoregulators maintained the internal temperature near the target. Islet recovery rate for GPF, which was higher than other devices, was maintained, while those decreased with time for conical tube and GPB containers adenosine diphosphate/adenosine triphosphate (ADP/ATP) ratio for GPF was lower than other devices, albeit not significantly fluoroscein acrimide/propidium iodide (AO/PI) ratio for GPF was higher than other devices after 5 hours. Glucose stimulated index was not different among the devices. In comparison with the control group, shaking yielded comparable islet survival, viability and function. Our study demonstrated that the use of commercially available insulator boxes with thermoregulators maintained internal temperature close to the target value and that GPF was more favorable for islet oxygenation during transportation. This study also suggested negligible impact of shaking on isolated porcine islets during transportation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    DOE PAGES

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very smallmore » changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.« less

  12. Optimal shielding design for minimum materials cost or mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2015-12-02

    The mathematical underpinnings of cost optimal radiation shielding designs based on an extension of optimal control theory are presented, a heuristic algorithm to iteratively solve the resulting optimal design equations is suggested, and computational results for a simple test case are discussed. A typical radiation shielding design problem can have infinitely many solutions, all satisfying the problem's specified set of radiation attenuation requirements. Each such design has its own total materials cost. For a design to be optimal, no admissible change in its deployment of shielding materials can result in a lower cost. This applies in particular to very small changes, which can be restated using the calculus of variations as the Euler-Lagrange equations. Furthermore, the associated Hamiltonian function and application of Pontryagin's theorem lead to conditions for a shield to be optimal.

  13. Optimizing Energy Conversion: Magnetic Nano-materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McIntyre, Dylan; Dann, Martin; Ilie, Carolina C.

    2015-03-01

    We present herein the work started at SUNY Oswego as a part of a SUNY 4E grant. The SUNY 4E Network of Excellence has awarded SUNY Oswego and collaborators a grant to carry out extensive studies on magnetic nanoparticles. The focus of the study is to develop cost effective rare-earth-free magnetic materials that will enhance energy transmission performance of various electrical devices (solar cells, electric cars, hard drives, etc.). The SUNY Oswego team has started the preliminary work for the project and graduate students from the rest of the SUNY 4E team (UB, Alfred College, Albany) will continue the project. The preliminary work concentrates on analyzing the properties of magnetic nanoparticle candidates, calculating molecular orbitals and band gap, and the fabrication of thin films. SUNY 4E Network of Excellence Grant.

  14. Optimal rigid and porous material distributions for noise barrier by acoustic topology optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Hyun; Yoon, Gil Ho

    2015-03-01

    This research applies acoustic topology optimization (ATO) for noise barrier design with rigid and porous materials. Many researchers have investigated the pressure attenuation phenomena of noise barriers under various geometric, material, and boundary conditions. To improve the pressure attenuation performance of noise barriers, size and shape optimization have been applied, and ATO methods have been proposed that allow concurrent size, shape, and topological changes of rigid walls and cavities. Nevertheless, it is unusual to optimize the topologies of noise barriers by considering the pressure attenuation effect of a porous material. The present research develops a new ATO considering both porous and rigid materials and applies it to the discovery of optimal topologies of noise barriers composed of both materials. In the present approach, the noise absorption characteristics of porous materials are numerically modeled using the Delany-Bazley empirical material model, and we also investigate the effects of some interpolation functions on optimal material distributions. Applying the present ATO approach, we found some novel noise barriers optimized for various geometric and environmental conditions.

  15. Surrogate-Based Optimization of Biogeochemical Transport Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieß, Malte; Slawig, Thomas

    2010-09-01

    First approaches towards a surrogate-based optimization method for a one-dimensional marine biogeochemical model of NPZD type are presented. The model, developed by Oschlies and Garcon [1], simulates the distribution of nitrogen, phytoplankton, zooplankton and detritus in a water column and is driven by ocean circulation data. A key issue is to minimize the misfit between the model output and given observational data. Our aim is to reduce the overall optimization cost avoiding expensive function and derivative evaluations by using a surrogate model replacing the high-fidelity model in focus. This in particular becomes important for more complex three-dimensional models. We analyse a coarsening in the discretization of the model equations as one way to create such a surrogate. Here the numerical stability crucially depends upon the discrete stepsize in time and space and the biochemical terms. We show that for given model parameters the level of grid coarsening can be choosen accordingly yielding a stable and satisfactory surrogate. As one example of a surrogate-based optimization method we present results of the Aggressive Space Mapping technique (developed by John W. Bandler [2, 3]) applied to the optimization of this one-dimensional biogeochemical transport model.

  16. ETRANS: an energy transport system optimization code for distributed networks of solar collectors

    SciTech Connect

    Barnhart, J.S.

    1980-09-01

    The optimization code ETRANS was developed at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory to design and estimate the costs associated with energy transport systems for distributed fields of solar collectors. The code uses frequently cited layouts for dish and trough collectors and optimizes them on a section-by-section basis. The optimal section design is that combination of pipe diameter and insulation thickness that yields the minimum annualized system-resultant cost. Among the quantities included in the costing algorithm are (1) labor and materials costs associated with initial plant construction, (2) operating expenses due to daytime and nighttime heat losses, and (3) operating expenses due to pumping power requirements. Two preliminary series of simulations were conducted to exercise the code. The results indicate that transport system costs for both dish and trough collector fields increase with field size and receiver exit temperature. Furthermore, dish collector transport systems were found to be much more expensive to build and operate than trough transport systems. ETRANS itself is stable and fast-running and shows promise of being a highly effective tool for the analysis of distributed solar thermal systems.

  17. Optimization of the materials distribution in composite systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poteralski, A.; Szczepanik, M.

    2016-11-01

    The optimization of structures in macro scale is widely used nowadays. The goal of the paper is to apply optimization techniques to obtain better performance on the micro level. The presented methods open new possibilities. The structures build with the use of materials with optimal microstructure can obtain the best performance. The microstructure can be optimized taking into account loads of the macro structure. The optimization of microstructure is not easy currently, but in future, in applications where performance of the structure is very important, the presented approach may be used with success. A bio-inspired method based on the artificial immune system (AIS) is used to solve the optimization problem. Immune computing provides a great probability of finding the global optimum. The optimal topology is generated by the level set approach. Optimization (identification) of the topology and the distribution of the mass density of microstructure considered to two materials by the minimization of the fitness function which depended on the coefficients of stiffness matrices. The paper presents methodology, algorithm of optimization and numerical examples.

  18. Concurrent Monte Carlo transport and fluence optimization with fluence adjusting scalable transport Monte Carlo

    PubMed Central

    Svatos, M.; Zankowski, C.; Bednarz, B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The future of radiation therapy will require advanced inverse planning solutions to support single-arc, multiple-arc, and “4π” delivery modes, which present unique challenges in finding an optimal treatment plan over a vast search space, while still preserving dosimetric accuracy. The successful clinical implementation of such methods would benefit from Monte Carlo (MC) based dose calculation methods, which can offer improvements in dosimetric accuracy when compared to deterministic methods. The standard method for MC based treatment planning optimization leverages the accuracy of the MC dose calculation and efficiency of well-developed optimization methods, by precalculating the fluence to dose relationship within a patient with MC methods and subsequently optimizing the fluence weights. However, the sequential nature of this implementation is computationally time consuming and memory intensive. Methods to reduce the overhead of the MC precalculation have been explored in the past, demonstrating promising reductions of computational time overhead, but with limited impact on the memory overhead due to the sequential nature of the dose calculation and fluence optimization. The authors propose an entirely new form of “concurrent” Monte Carlo treat plan optimization: a platform which optimizes the fluence during the dose calculation, reduces wasted computation time being spent on beamlets that weakly contribute to the final dose distribution, and requires only a low memory footprint to function. In this initial investigation, the authors explore the key theoretical and practical considerations of optimizing fluence in such a manner. Methods: The authors present a novel derivation and implementation of a gradient descent algorithm that allows for optimization during MC particle transport, based on highly stochastic information generated through particle transport of very few histories. A gradient rescaling and renormalization algorithm, and the

  19. Magnetocaloric Materials and the Optimization of Cooling Power Density

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wikus, Patrick; Canavan, Edgar; Heine, Sarah Trowbridge; Matsumoto, Koichi; Numazawa, Takenori

    2014-01-01

    The magnetocaloric effect is the thermal response of a material to an external magnetic field. This manuscript focuses on the physics and the properties of materials which are commonly used for magnetic refrigeration at cryogenic temperatures. After a brief overview of the magnetocaloric effect and associated thermodynamics, typical requirements on refrigerants are discussed from a standpoint of cooling power density optimization. Finally, a compilation of the most important properties of several common magnetocaloric materials is presented.

  20. Optimization of Organic Solar Cells: Materials, Devices and Interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Nanjia

    Due to the increasing demand for sustainable clean energy, photovoltaic cells have received intensified attention in the past decade in both academia and industry. Among the types of cells, organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells offer promise as alternatives to conventional inorganic-type solar cells owning to several unique advantages such as low material and fabrication cost. To maximize power conversion efficiencies (PCEs), extensive research efforts focus on frontier molecular orbital (FMO) energy engineering of photoactive materials. Towards this objective, a series of novel donor polymers incorporating a new building block, bithiophene imide (BTI) group are developed, with narrow bandgap and low-lying highest occupied molecular orbital (HOMO) energies to increase short circuit current density, Jsc, and open circuit voltage, Voc.. Compared to other PV technologies, OPVs often suffer from large internal recombination loss and relatively low fill factors (FFs) <70%. Through a combination of materials design and device architecture optimization strategies to improve both microscopic and macroscopic thin film morphology, OPVs with PCEs up to 8.7% and unprecedented FF approaching 80% are obtained. Such high FF are close to those typically achieved in amorphous Si solar cells. Systematic variations of polymer chemical structures lead to understanding of structure-property relationships between polymer geometry and the resulting blend film morphology characteristics which are crucial for achieving high local mobilities and long carrier lifetimes. Instead of using fullerene as the acceptors, an alternative type of OPV is developed employing a high electron mobility polymer, P(NDI2OD-T2), as the acceptor. To improve the all-polymer blend film morphology, the influence of basic solvent properties such as solvent boiling point and solubility on polymer phase separation and charge transport properties is investigated, yielding to a high PCE of 2.7% for all-polymer solar cells

  1. Integrated risk reduction framework to improve railway hazardous materials transportation safety.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiang; Saat, M Rapik; Barkan, Christopher P L

    2013-09-15

    Rail transportation plays a critical role to safely and efficiently transport hazardous materials. A number of strategies have been implemented or are being developed to reduce the risk of hazardous materials release from train accidents. Each of these risk reduction strategies has its safety benefit and corresponding implementation cost. However, the cost effectiveness of the integration of different risk reduction strategies is not well understood. Meanwhile, there has been growing interest in the U.S. rail industry and government to best allocate resources for improving hazardous materials transportation safety. This paper presents an optimization model that considers the combination of two types of risk reduction strategies, broken rail prevention and tank car safety design enhancement. A Pareto-optimality technique is used to maximize risk reduction at a given level of investment. The framework presented in this paper can be adapted to address a broader set of risk reduction strategies and is intended to assist decision makers for local, regional and system-wide risk management of rail hazardous materials transportation.

  2. THERMAL PERFORMANCE OF RADIOACTIVE MATERIAL PACKAGES IN TRANSPORT CONFIGURATION

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, N.

    2010-03-04

    Drum type packages are routinely used to transport radioactive material (RAM) in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) complex. These packages are designed to meet the federal regulations described in 10 CFR Part 71. The packages are transported in specially designed vehicles like Safe Secure Transport (SST) for safety and security. In the transport vehicles, the packages are placed close to each other to maximize the number of units in the vehicle. Since the RAM contents in the packagings produce decay heat, it is important that they are spaced sufficiently apart to prevent overheating of the containment vessel (CV) seals and the impact limiter to ensure the structural integrity of the package. This paper presents a simple methodology to assess thermal performance of a typical 9975 packaging in a transport configuration.

  3. Experiences performing conceptual design optimization of transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. D.; Sliwa, S. M.

    1984-01-01

    Optimum Preliminary Design of Transports (OPDOT) is a computer program developed at NASA Langley Research Center for evaluating the impact of new technologies upon transport aircraft. For example, it provides the capability to look at configurations which have been resized to take advantage of active controls and provide and indication of economic sensitivity to its use. Although this tool returns a conceptual design configuration as its output, it does not have the accuracy, in absolute terms, to yield satisfactory point designs for immediate use by aircraft manufacturers. However, the relative accuracy of comparing OPDOT-generated configurations while varying technological assumptions has been demonstrated to be highly reliable. Hence, OPDOT is a useful tool for ascertaining the synergistic benefits of active controls, composite structures, improved engine efficiencies and other advanced technological developments. The approach used by OPDOT is a direct numerical optimization of an economic performance index. A set of independent design variables is iterated, given a set of design constants and data. The design variables include wing geometry, tail geometry, fuselage size, and engine size. This iteration continues until the optimum performance index is found which satisfies all the constraint functions. The analyst interacts with OPDOT by varying the input parameters to either the constraint functions or the design constants. Note that the optimization of aircraft geometry parameters is equivalent to finding the ideal aircraft size, but with more degrees of freedom than classical design procedures will allow.

  4. An optimal transportation approach for nuclear structure-based pathology

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Ozolek, John A.; Slepčev, Dejan; Lee, Ann B.; Chen, Cheng; Rohde, Gustavo K.

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear morphology and structure as visualized from histopathology microscopy images can yield important diagnostic clues in some benign and malignant tissue lesions. Precise quantitative information about nuclear structure and morphology, however, is currently not available for many diagnostic challenges. This is due, in part, to the lack of methods to quantify these differences from image data. We describe a method to characterize and contrast the distribution of nuclear structure in different tissue classes (normal, benign, cancer, etc.). The approach is based on quantifying chromatin morphology in different groups of cells using the optimal transportation (Kantorovich-Wasserstein) metric in combination with the Fisher discriminant analysis and multidimensional scaling techniques. We show that the optimal transportation metric is able to measure relevant biological information as it enables automatic determination of the class (e.g. normal vs. cancer) of a set of nuclei. We show that the classification accuracies obtained using this metric are, on average, as good or better than those obtained utilizing a set of previously described numerical features. We apply our methods to two diagnostic challenges for surgical pathology: one in the liver and one in the thyroid. Results automatically computed using this technique show potentially biologically relevant differences in nuclear structure in liver and thyroid cancers. PMID:20977984

  5. Optimization of atmospheric transport models on HPC platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Cruz, Raúl; Folch, Arnau; Farré, Pau; Cabezas, Javier; Navarro, Nacho; Cela, José María

    2016-12-01

    The performance and scalability of atmospheric transport models on high performance computing environments is often far from optimal for multiple reasons including, for example, sequential input and output, synchronous communications, work unbalance, memory access latency or lack of task overlapping. We investigate how different software optimizations and porting to non general-purpose hardware architectures improve code scalability and execution times considering, as an example, the FALL3D volcanic ash transport model. To this purpose, we implement the FALL3D model equations in the WARIS framework, a software designed from scratch to solve in a parallel and efficient way different geoscience problems on a wide variety of architectures. In addition, we consider further improvements in WARIS such as hybrid MPI-OMP parallelization, spatial blocking, auto-tuning and thread affinity. Considering all these aspects together, the FALL3D execution times for a realistic test case running on general-purpose cluster architectures (Intel Sandy Bridge) decrease by a factor between 7 and 40 depending on the grid resolution. Finally, we port the application to Intel Xeon Phi (MIC) and NVIDIA GPUs (CUDA) accelerator-based architectures and compare performance, cost and power consumption on all the architectures. Implications on time-constrained operational model configurations are discussed.

  6. Environmental risk analysis of hazardous material rail transportation.

    PubMed

    Saat, Mohd Rapik; Werth, Charles J; Schaeffer, David; Yoon, Hongkyu; Barkan, Christopher P L

    2014-01-15

    An important aspect of railroad environmental risk management involves tank car transportation of hazardous materials. This paper describes a quantitative, environmental risk analysis of rail transportation of a group of light, non-aqueous-phase liquid (LNAPL) chemicals commonly transported by rail in North America. The Hazardous Materials Transportation Environmental Consequence Model (HMTECM) was used in conjunction with a geographic information system (GIS) analysis of environmental characteristics to develop probabilistic estimates of exposure to different spill scenarios along the North American rail network. The risk analysis incorporated the estimated clean-up cost developed using the HMTECM, route-specific probability distributions of soil type and depth to groundwater, annual traffic volume, railcar accident rate, and tank car safety features, to estimate the nationwide annual risk of transporting each product. The annual risk per car-mile (car-km) and per ton-mile (ton-km) was also calculated to enable comparison between chemicals and to provide information on the risk cost associated with shipments of these products. The analysis and the methodology provide a quantitative approach that will enable more effective management of the environmental risk of transporting hazardous materials. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Analysis regarding the transport network models. Case study on finding the optimal transport route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stîngă, V.-G.

    2017-08-01

    Transport networks are studied most of the time from a graph theory perspective, mostly studied in a static way, in order to emphasize their characteristics like: topology, morphology, costs, traffic flows etc. There are many methods used to describe these characteristics at local and global level. Usually when analysing the transport network models, the aim is to achieve minimum capacity transit or minimum cost of operating or investment. Throughout this paper we will get an insight into the many models of the transport network that were presented over the years and we will try to make a short analysis regarding the most important ones. We will make a case study on finding the optimal route by using one of the models presented within this paper.

  8. Powder Materials and Energy Efficiency in Transportation: Opportunities and Challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marquis, Fernand D. S.

    2012-03-01

    The transportation industry accounts for one quarter of global energy use and has by far the largest share of global oil consumption. It used 51.5% of the oil worldwide in 2003. Mobility projections show that it is expected to triple by 2050 with associated energy use. Considerable achievements recently have been obtained in the development of powder and powder-processed metallic alloys, metal matrix composites, intermetallics, and carbon fiber composites. These achievements have resulted in their introduction to the transportation industry in a wide variety of transportation components with significant impact on energy efficiency. A significant number of nano, nanostructured, and nanohybrid materials systems have been deployed. Others, some of them incorporating carbon nanotubes and graphene, are under research and development and exhibit considerable potential. Airplane redesign using a materials and functional systems integration approach was used resulting in considerable system improvements and energy efficiency. It is expected that this materials and functional systems integration soon will be adopted in the design and manufacture of other advanced aircrafts and extended to the automotive industry and then to the marine transportation industry. The opportunities for the development and application of new powder materials in the transportation industry are extensive, with considerable potential to impact energy utilization. However, significant challenges need to be overcome in several critical areas.

  9. An update on Lab Rover: A hospital material transporter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattaboni, Paul

    1994-01-01

    The development of a hospital material transporter, 'Lab Rover', is described. Conventional material transport now utilizes people power, push carts, pneumatic tubes and tracked vehicles. Hospitals are faced with enormous pressure to reduce operating costs. Cyberotics, Inc. developed an Autonomous Intelligent Vehicle (AIV). This battery operated service robot was designed specifically for health care institutions. Applications for the AIV include distribution of clinical lab samples, pharmacy drugs, administrative records, x-ray distribution, meal tray delivery, and certain emergency room applications. The first AIV was installed at Lahey Clinic in Burlington, Mass. Lab Rover was beta tested for one year and has been 'on line' for an additional 2 years.

  10. Isotopic tracing of hydrogen transport and trapping in nuclear materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chêne, Jacques; Martin, Frantz

    2017-06-01

    Some illustrations of the use of deuterium or tritium for isotopic tracing of hydrogen absorption, transport and trapping in nuclear materials are presented. Isotopic tracing of hydrogen has been shown to be successful for the determination of the boundaries conditions for hydrogen desorption or absorption in a material exposed to a hydrogen source. Also, the unique capabilities of isotopic tracing and related techniques to characterize H interactions with point defects and dislocations acting as moving traps has been demonstrated. Such transport mechanisms are considered to play a major role in some stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms. This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'.

  11. High Temperature Polymeric Materials for Space Transportation Propulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.; Campbell, Sandi G.; Chuang, Kathy C.; Scheimann, Daniel A.; Mintz, Eric; Hylton, Donald; Veazie, David; Criss, James; Kollmansberg, Ron; Tsotsis, Tom

    2003-01-01

    High temperature polymer matrix composites are attractive materials for space transporation propulsion systems because of their low density and high specific strength. However, the relatively poor stability and processability of these materials can render them unsuitable for many of these applications. New polymeric materials have been developed under the Propulsion Research and Technology Program through the use of novel resin chemistry and nanotechnology. These new materials can significantly enhance the durability and weight and improve the processability and affordability of propulsion components for advanced space transportation systems.

  12. Bed material transport in the Virgin River, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Andrews, E.D.

    2000-01-01

    Detailed information concerning the rate and particle size distribution of bed material transport by streamflows can be very difficult and expensive to obtain, especially where peak streamflows are brief and bed material is poorly sorted, including some very large boulders. Such streams, however, are common in steep, arid watersheds. Any computational approach must consider that (1) only the smaller particle sizes present on the streambed move even during large floods and (2) the largest bed particles exert a significant form drag on the flow. Conventional methods that rely on a single particle size to estimate the skin friction shear stress acting on the mobile fraction of the bed material perform poorly. Instead, for this study, the skin friction shear stress was calculated for the observed range of streamflows by calculating the form drag exerted on the reach-averaged flow field by all particle sizes. Suspended and bed load transported rates computed from reach-averaged skin friction shear stress are in excellent agreement with measured transport rates. The computed mean annual bed material load, including both bed load and suspended load, of the East Fork Virgin River for the water years 1992-1996 was approximately 1.3 x 105 t. A large portion of the bed material load consists of sand-sized particles, 0.062-1.0 mm in diameter, that are transported in suspension. Such particles, however, constituted only 10% of the surface bed material and less than 25% of the subsurface bed material. The mean annual quantity of bed load transported was 1060 t/yr with a median size of 15 mm.

  13. Coupled transport/hyperelastic model for nastic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homison, Chris; Weiland, Lisa M.

    2006-03-01

    Nastic materials are high energy density active materials that mimic processes used in the plant kingdom to produce large deformations through the conversion of chemical energy. These materials utilize the controlled transport of charge and fluid across a selectively-permeable membrane to achieve bulk deformation in a process referred to in the plant kingdom as nastic movements. The nastic material being developed consists of synthetic membranes containing biological ion pumps, ion channels, and ion exchangers surrounding fluid-filled cavities embedded within a polymer matrix. In this paper the formulation of a biological transport model and its coupling with a hyperelastic finite element model of the polymer matrix is discussed. The transport model includes contributions from ion pumps, ion exchangers, and solvent flux. This work will form the basis for a feedback loop in material synthesis efforts. The goal of these studies is to determine the relative importance of the various parameters associated with both the polymer matrix and the biological transport components.

  14. TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS THROUGH NATURAL AQUIFER MATERIAL: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stability and transport of radiolabeled Fe2O3 particles were studied using laboratory batch and column techniques. Core material collected from a shallow sand and gravel aquifer was used as the immobile column matrix material. Variables in the study incl...

  15. TRANSPORT OF INORGANIC COLLOIDS THROUGH NATURAL AQUIFER MATERIAL: IMPLICATIONS FOR CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The stability and transport of radiolabeled Fe2O3 particles were studied using laboratory batch and column techniques. Core material collected from a shallow sand and gravel aquifer was used as the immobile column matrix material. Variables in the study incl...

  16. COMBINATORIAL MATERIALS SYNTHESIS AND SCREENING: An Integrated Materials Chip Approach to Discovery and Optimization of Functional Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiang, X.-D.

    1999-08-01

    Combinatorial materials synthesis methods and high throughput evaluation techniques have been developed to accelerate the process of materials discovery and optimization. Analogous to integrated circuit chips, integrated materials chips containing thousands, possibly millions, of different compounds/materials, often in the form of high-quality epitaxial thin film can be fabricated and screened for interesting physical or chemical properties. Microspot X-ray methods, various optical measurement techniques, and a novel evanescent microwave microscope have been used to characterize the structural, optical, magnetic, and electrical properties of samples on materials chips. These techniques are routinely used to discover and optimize luminescent, ferroelectric, dielectric, and magnetic materials.

  17. Towards CFD modeling of turbulent pipeline material transportation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shahirpour, Amir; Herzog, Nicoleta; Egbers, Cristoph

    2013-04-01

    Safe and financially efficient pipeline transportation of carbon dioxide is a critical issue in the developing field of the CCS Technology. In this part of the process, carbon dioxide is transported via pipes with diameter of 1.5 m and entry pressure of 150 bar, with Reynolds number of 107 and viscosity of 8×10(-5) Pa.s as dense fluid [1]. Presence of large and small scale structures in the pipeline, high Reynolds numbers at which CO2 should be transferred, and 3 dimensional turbulence caused by local geometrical modifications, increase the importance of simulation of turbulent material transport through the individual components of the CO2 chain process. In this study, incompressible turbulent channel flow and pipe flow have been modeled using OpenFoam, an open source CFD software. In the first step, simulation of a turbulent channel flow has been considered using LES for shear Reynolds number of 395. A simple geometry has been chosen with cyclic fluid inlet and outlet boundary conditions to simulate a fully developed flow. The mesh is gradually refined towards the wall to provide values close enough to the wall for the wall coordinate (y+). Grid resolution study has been conducted for One-Equation model. The accuracy of the results is analyzed with respect to the grid smoothness in order to reach an optimized resolution for carrying out the next simulations. Furthermore, three LES models, One-Equation, Smagorinsky and Dynamic Smagorinsky are applied for the grid resolution of (60 × 100 × 80) in (x, y, z) directions. The results are then validated with reference to the DNS carried out by Moser et al.[2] for the similar geometry using logarithmic velocity profile (U+) and Reynolds stress tensor components. In the second step the similar flow is modeled using Reynolds averaged method. Several RANS models, like K-epsilon and Launder-Reece-Rodi are applied and validated against DNS and LES results in a similar fashion. In the most recent step, it has been intended

  18. Urban risks of truck transport of radioactive material

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, G.S.; Neuhauser, K.S.

    1998-12-01

    Truck transport of radioactive material (RAM), e.g., spent nuclear fuel (SNF), normally maximizes use of Interstate highways, which are safer and more efficient for truck transport in general. In the estimation of transportation risks, population bordering a route is a direct factor in determining consequences and an indirect factor in determining exposure times, accident probabilities and severities, and other parameters. Proposals to transport RAM may draw intense resistance from stakeholders based on concern for population concentrations along urban segments but the length of a route segment is also a determinative factor in estimating the transport risks. To quantify the relative importance of these two factors, a potential route for transport of SNF (strict use of Interstate highways) was selected and compared with a modified version that bypassed urban areas. The RADTRAN 4 code for transportation risk assessment, which was developed at Sandia National Laboratories, was used in the present study to assess the relative risks of SNF transportation for alternative routes. The results suggest that emphasis on Interstate highways minimizes total route and urban segment risks.

  19. Optimal purchasing of raw materials: A data-driven approach

    SciTech Connect

    Muteki, K.; MacGregor, J.F.

    2008-06-15

    An approach to the optimal purchasing of raw materials that will achieve a desired product quality at a minimum cost is presented. A PLS (Partial Least Squares) approach to formulation modeling is used to combine databases on raw material properties and on past process operations and to relate these to final product quality. These PLS latent variable models are then used in a sequential quadratic programming (SQP) or mixed integer nonlinear programming (MINLP) optimization to select those raw-materials, among all those available on the market, the ratios in which to combine them and the process conditions under which they should be processed. The approach is illustrated for the optimal purchasing of metallurgical coals for coke making in the steel industry.

  20. Viscoelastic properties of actin networks influence material transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stam, Samantha; Weirich, Kimberly; Gardel, Margaret

    2015-03-01

    Directed flows of cytoplasmic material are important in a variety of biological processes including assembly of a mitotic spindle, retraction of the cell rear during migration, and asymmetric cell division. Networks of cytoskeletal polymers and molecular motors are known to be involved in these events, but how the network mechanical properties are tuned to perform such functions is not understood. Here, we construct networks of either semiflexible actin filaments or rigid bundles with varying connectivity. We find that solutions of rigid rods, where unimpeded sliding of filaments may enhance transport in comparison to unmoving tracks, are the fastest at transporting network components. Entangled solutions of semiflexible actin filaments also transport material, but the entanglements provide resistance. Increasing the elasticity of the actin networks with crosslinking proteins slows network deformation further. However, the length scale of correlated transport in these networks is increased. Our results reveal how the rigidity and connectivity of biopolymers allows material transport to occur over time and length scales required for physiological processes. This work was supported by the U. Chicago MRSEC

  1. Thermally stable carbazole-diimides as hole transport materials for organic light-emitting devices.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chi-Wan; Choi, Myeon-Chen; Hwang, Jae-Chul; Ha, Chang-Sik

    2012-05-01

    We synthesized new carbazole-diimide hole-transporting materials with different dianhydride groups by thermal imidization. The imide moieties were introduced to improve thermal stability of a carbazole hole transport molecule. Result showed that the carbazole-diimdes exhibit good thermal stability with glass transition temperature of 142-182 degrees C and degradation temperature of approximately 450 degrees C as well as good optical transparency in the visible region. The organic light-emitting device (OLED) using alicyclic diimide (CBCZ) shows maximum luminance approximately 8,600 cd/m2 at 12 V and current efficiency of 2.1 cd/A. With optimization of fabricating conditions, the thermally stable CBCZ is expected to be used as a promising hole-transporting material with higher efficiency and durability.

  2. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Ralph G.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.

    2006-10-31

    Computational modeling of radiation transport problems including homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety all depend upon material definitions. This document has been created to serve two purposes: 1) to provide a quick reference of material compositions for analysts and 2) a standardized reference to reduce the differences between results from two independent analysts. Analysts are always encountering a variety of materials for which elemental definitions are not readily available or densities are not defined. This document provides a location where unique or hard to define materials will be located to reduce duplication in research for modeling purposes. Additionally, having a common set of material definitions helps to standardize modeling across PNNL and provide two separate researchers the ability to compare different modeling results from a common materials basis.

  3. 75 FR 5258 - Hazardous Materials Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-02

    ... Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... for transportation, certain categories and quantities of hazardous materials. PHMSA's proposal would... of the registration program are to gather information about the transportation of hazardous...

  4. Universal scaling of optimal current distribution in transportation networks.

    PubMed

    Simini, Filippo; Rinaldo, Andrea; Maritan, Amos

    2009-04-01

    Transportation networks are inevitably selected with reference to their global cost which depends on the strengths and the distribution of the embedded currents. We prove that optimal current distributions for a uniformly injected d -dimensional network exhibit robust scale-invariance properties, independently of the particular cost function considered, as long as it is convex. We find that, in the limit of large currents, the distribution decays as a power law with an exponent equal to (2d-1)/(d-1). The current distribution can be exactly calculated in d=2 for all values of the current. Numerical simulations further suggest that the scaling properties remain unchanged for both random injections and by randomizing the convex cost functions.

  5. Optimal Transport, Convection, Magnetic Relaxation and Generalized Boussinesq Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brenier, Yann

    2009-10-01

    We establish a connection between optimal transport theory (see Villani in Topics in optimal transportation. Graduate studies in mathematics, vol. 58, AMS, Providence, 2003, for instance) and classical convection theory for geophysical flows (Pedlosky, in Geophysical fluid dynamics, Springer, New York, 1979). Our starting point is the model designed few years ago by Angenent, Haker, and Tannenbaum (SIAM J. Math. Anal. 35:61-97, 2003) to solve some optimal transport problems. This model can be seen as a generalization of the Darcy-Boussinesq equations, which is a degenerate version of the Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq (NSB) equations. In a unified framework, we relate different variants of the NSB equations (in particular what we call the generalized hydrostatic-Boussinesq equations) to various models involving optimal transport (and the related Monge-Ampère equation, Brenier in Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 64:375-417, 1991; Caffarelli in Commun. Pure Appl. Math. 45:1141-1151, 1992). This includes the 2D semi-geostrophic equations (Hoskins in Annual review of fluid mechanics, vol. 14, pp. 131-151, Palo Alto, 1982; Cullen et al. in SIAM J. Appl. Math. 51:20-31, 1991, Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 185:341-363, 2007; Benamou and Brenier in SIAM J. Appl. Math. 58:1450-1461, 1998; Loeper in SIAM J. Math. Anal. 38:795-823, 2006) and some fully nonlinear versions of the so-called high-field limit of the Vlasov-Poisson system (Nieto et al. in Arch. Ration. Mech. Anal. 158:29-59, 2001) and of the Keller-Segel for Chemotaxis (Keller and Segel in J. Theor. Biol. 30:225-234, 1971; Jäger and Luckhaus in Trans. Am. Math. Soc. 329:819-824, 1992; Chalub et al. in Mon. Math. 142:123-141, 2004). Mathematically speaking, we establish some existence theorems for local smooth, global smooth or global weak solutions of the different models. We also justify that the inertia terms can be rigorously neglected under appropriate scaling assumptions in the generalized Navier-Stokes-Boussinesq equations

  6. Space Transportation Materials and Structures Technology Workshop. Volume 2; Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cazier, Frank W., Jr. (Compiler); Gardner, James E. (Compiler)

    1993-01-01

    The Space Transportation Materials and Structures Technology Workshop was held on September 23-26, 1991, in Newport News, Virginia. The workshop, sponsored by the NASA Office of Space Flight and the NASA Office of Aeronautics and Space Technology, was held to provide a forum for communication within the space materials and structures technology developer and user communities. Workshop participants were organized into a Vehicle Technology Requirements session and three working panels: Materials and Structures Technologies for Vehicle Systems, Propulsion Systems, and Entry Systems.

  7. Compendium of federal and state radioactive materials transportation laws and regulations: Transportation Legislative Database (TLDB)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-10-01

    The Transportation Legislative Database (TLDB) is an on-line information service containing detailed information on legislation and regulations regarding the transportation of radioactive materials in the United States. The system is dedicated to serving the legislative and regulatory information needs of the US Department of Energy and other federal agencies; state, tribal, and local governments; the hazardous materials transportation industry; and interested members of the general public. In addition to the on-line information service, quarterly and annual Legal Developments Reports are produced using information from the TLDB. These reports summarize important changes in federal and state legislation, regulations, administrative agency rulings, and judicial decisions over the reporting period. Information on significant legal developments at the tribal and local levels is also included on an as-available basis. Battelle's Office of Transportation Systems and Planning (OTSP) will also perform customized searches of the TLDB and produce formatted printouts in response to specific information requests.

  8. Expert systems for the transportation of hazardous and radioactive materials

    SciTech Connect

    Luce, C.E.; Clover, J.C.; Ferrada, J.J.

    1994-10-01

    Under the supervision of the Transportation Technologies Group which is in the Chemical Technology Division at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, an expert system prototype for the transportation and packaging of hazardous and radioactive materials has been designed and developed. The development of the expert system prototype focused on using the combination of hypermedia elements and the Visual Basic{trademark} programming language. Hypermedia technology uses software that allows the user to interact with the computing environment through many formats: text, graphics, audio, and full-motion video. With the use of hypermedia, a user-friendly prototype has been developed to sort through numerous transportation regulations, thereby leading to the proper packaging for the materials. The expert system performs the analysis of regulations that an expert in shipping information would do; only the expert system performs the work more quickly. Currently, enhancements in a variety of categories are being made to the prototype. These include further expansion of non-radioactive materials, which includes any material that is hazardous but not radioactive; and the addition of full-motion video, which will depict regulations in terms that are easy to understand and which will show examples of how to handle the materials when packaging them.

  9. Use of inelastic design for radioactive material transportation packages

    SciTech Connect

    Heinstein, M.W.; Ammerman, D.J.

    1993-12-01

    There is much interest within the radioactive material transportation container design community in the use of inelastic analysis. In other industries where inelastic analysis is used in design there is typically an improved knowledge of the capacity of the structure and a more efficient use of material. This report describes the results of a program in which the incentives for inelastic analysis for radioactive material transport container design were investigated to determine if there are similar benefits. Detailed are the elastic and inelastic analyses of two containers subjected to impacts onto a rigid target following a thirty-foot free fall in end-on, side-on, and center-of-gravity- over-corner orientations.

  10. Code System to Calculate Tornado-Induced Flow Material Transport.

    SciTech Connect

    ANDRAE, R. W.

    1999-11-18

    Version: 00 TORAC models tornado-induced flows, pressures, and material transport within structures. Its use is directed toward nuclear fuel cycle facilities and their primary release pathway, the ventilation system. However, it is applicable to other structures and can model other airflow pathways within a facility. In a nuclear facility, this network system could include process cells, canyons, laboratory offices, corridors, and offgas systems. TORAC predicts flow through a network system that also includes ventilation system components such as filters, dampers, ducts, and blowers. These ventilation system components are connected to the rooms and corridors of the facility to form a complete network for moving air through the structure and, perhaps, maintaining pressure levels in certain areas. The material transport capability in TORAC is very basic and includes convection, depletion, entrainment, and filtration of material.

  11. Optimization of microfluidic fuel cells using transport principles.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jinkee; Lim, Keng Guan; Palmore, G Tayhas R; Tripathi, Anubhav

    2007-10-01

    Microfluidic fuel cells exploit the lack of convective mixing at low Reynolds number to eliminate the need for a physical membrane to separate the fuel from the oxidant. Slow transport of reactants in combination with high catalytic surface-to-volume ratios often inhibit the efficiency of a microfluidic fuel cell. The performance of microfluidic devices that rely on surface electrochemical reactions is controlled by the interplay between reaction kinetics and the rate of mass transfer to the reactive surfaces. This paper presents theoretical and experimental work to describe the role of flow rate, microchannel geometry, and location of electrodes within a microfluidic fuel cell on its performance. A transport model, based on the convective-diffusive flux of reactants, is developed that describes the optimal conditions for maximizing both the average current density and the percentage of fuel utilized. The results show that the performance can be improved when the design of the device includes electrodes smaller than a critical length. The results of this study advance current approaches to the design of microfluidic fuel cells and other electrochemically-coupled microfluidic devices.

  12. Development of a real-time transport performance optimization methodology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gilyard, Glenn

    1996-01-01

    The practical application of real-time performance optimization is addressed (using a wide-body transport simulation) based on real-time measurements and calculation of incremental drag from forced response maneuvers. Various controller combinations can be envisioned although this study used symmetric outboard aileron and stabilizer. The approach is based on navigation instrumentation and other measurements found on state-of-the-art transports. This information is used to calculate winds and angle of attack. Thrust is estimated from a representative engine model as a function of measured variables. The lift and drag equations are then used to calculate lift and drag coefficients. An expression for drag coefficient, which is a function of parasite drag, induced drag, and aileron drag, is solved from forced excitation response data. Estimates of the parasite drag, curvature of the aileron drag variation, and minimum drag aileron position are produced. Minimum drag is then obtained by repositioning the symmetric aileron. Simulation results are also presented which evaluate the affects of measurement bias and resolution.

  13. Cerebrospinal and Interstitial Fluid Transport via the Glymphatic Pathway Modeled by Optimal Mass Transport

    PubMed Central

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-01-01

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4 min over ∼3 hrs in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins. PMID:28323163

  14. Cerebrospinal and interstitial fluid transport via the glymphatic pathway modeled by optimal mass transport.

    PubMed

    Ratner, Vadim; Gao, Yi; Lee, Hedok; Elkin, Rena; Nedergaard, Maiken; Benveniste, Helene; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2017-03-18

    The glymphatic pathway is a system which facilitates continuous cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and interstitial fluid (ISF) exchange and plays a key role in removing waste products from the rodent brain. Dysfunction of the glymphatic pathway may be implicated in the pathophysiology of Alzheimer's disease. Intriguingly, the glymphatic system is most active during deep wave sleep general anesthesia. By using paramagnetic tracers administered into CSF of rodents, we previously showed the utility of MRI in characterizing a macroscopic whole brain view of glymphatic transport but we have yet to define and visualize the specific flow patterns. Here we have applied an alternative mathematical analysis approach to a dynamic time series of MRI images acquired every 4min over ∼3h in anesthetized rats, following administration of a small molecular weight paramagnetic tracer into the CSF reservoir of the cisterna magna. We use Optimal Mass Transport (OMT) to model the glymphatic flow vector field, and then analyze the flow to find the network of CSF-ISF flow channels. We use 3D visualization computational tools to visualize the OMT defined network of CSF-ISF flow channels in relation to anatomical and vascular key landmarks from the live rodent brain. The resulting OMT model of the glymphatic transport network agrees largely with the current understanding of the glymphatic transport patterns defined by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI revealing key CSF transport pathways along the ventral surface of the brain with a trajectory towards the pineal gland, cerebellum, hypothalamus and olfactory bulb. In addition, the OMT analysis also revealed some interesting previously unnoticed behaviors regarding CSF transport involving parenchymal streamlines moving from ventral reservoirs towards the surface of the brain, olfactory bulb and large central veins.

  15. A concept for adaptive performance optimization on commercial transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Michael R.; Enns, Dale F.

    1995-01-01

    An adaptive control method is presented for the minimization of drag during flight for transport aircraft. The minimization of drag is achieved by taking advantage of the redundant control capability available in the pitch axis, with the horizontal tail used as the primary surface and symmetric deflection of the ailerons and cruise flaps used as additional controls. The additional control surfaces are excited with sinusoidal signals, while the altitude and velocity loops are closed with guidance and control laws. A model of the throttle response as a function of the additional control surfaces is formulated and the parameters in the model are estimated from the sensor measurements using a least squares estimation method. The estimated model is used to determine the minimum drag positions of the control surfaces. The method is presented for the optimization of one and two additional control surfaces. The adaptive control method is extended to optimize rate of climb with the throttle fixed. Simulations that include realistic disturbances are presented, as well as the results of a Monte Carlo simulation analysis that shows the effects of changing the disturbance environment and the excitation signal parameters.

  16. Modeling marine surface microplastic transport to assess optimal removal locations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherman, Peter; van Sebille, Erik

    2016-01-01

    Marine plastic pollution is an ever-increasing problem that demands immediate mitigation and reduction plans. Here, a model based on satellite-tracked buoy observations and scaled to a large data set of observations on microplastic from surface trawls was used to simulate the transport of plastics floating on the ocean surface from 2015 to 2025, with the goal to assess the optimal marine microplastic removal locations for two scenarios: removing the most surface microplastic and reducing the impact on ecosystems, using plankton growth as a proxy. The simulations show that the optimal removal locations are primarily located off the coast of China and in the Indonesian Archipelago for both scenarios. Our estimates show that 31% of the modeled microplastic mass can be removed by 2025 using 29 plastic collectors operating at a 45% capture efficiency from these locations, compared to only 17% when the 29 plastic collectors are moored in the North Pacific garbage patch, between Hawaii and California. The overlap of ocean surface microplastics and phytoplankton growth can be reduced by 46% at our proposed locations, while sinks in the North Pacific can only reduce the overlap by 14%. These results are an indication that oceanic plastic removal might be more effective in removing a greater microplastic mass and in reducing potential harm to marine life when closer to shore than inside the plastic accumulation zones in the centers of the gyres.

  17. Trim and Structural Optimization of Subsonic Transport Wings Using Nonconventional Aeroelastic Tailoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanford, Bret K.; Jutte, Christine V.

    2014-01-01

    Several minimum-mass aeroelastic optimization problems are solved to evaluate the effectiveness of a variety of novel tailoring schemes for subsonic transport wings. Aeroelastic strength and panel buckling constraints are imposed across a variety of trimmed maneuver loads. Tailoring with metallic thickness variations, functionally graded materials, composite laminates, tow steering, and distributed trailing edge control effectors are all found to provide reductions in structural wing mass with varying degrees of success. The question as to whether this wing mass reduction will offset the increased manufacturing cost is left unresolved for each case.

  18. Data-driven design optimization for composite material characterization

    Treesearch

    John G. Michopoulos; John C. Hermanson; Athanasios Iliopoulos; Samuel G. Lambrakos; Tomonari Furukawa

    2011-06-01

    The main goal of the present paper is to demonstrate the value of design optimization beyond its use for structural shape determination in the realm of the constitutive characterization of anisotropic material systems such as polymer matrix composites with or without damage. The approaches discussed are based on the availability of massive experimental data...

  19. Near-field transport imaging applied to photovoltaic materials

    DOE PAGES

    Xiao, Chuanxiao; Jiang, Chun -Sheng; Moseley, John; ...

    2017-05-26

    We developed and applied a new analytical technique - near-field transport imaging (NF-TI or simply TI) - to photovoltaic materials. Charge-carrier transport is an important factor in solar cell performance, and TI is an innovative approach that integrates a scanning electron microscope with a near-field scanning optical microscope, providing the possibility to study luminescence associated with recombination and transport with high spatial resolution. In this paper, we describe in detail the technical barriers we had to overcome to develop the technique for routine application and the data-fitting procedure used to calculate minority-carrier diffusion length values. The diffusion length measured bymore » TI agrees well with the results calculated by time-resolved photoluminescence on well-controlled gallium arsenide (GaAs) thin-film samples. We report for the first time on measurements on thin-film cadmium telluride using this technique, including the determination of effective carrier diffusion length, as well as the first near-field imaging of the effect of a single localized defect on carrier transport and recombination in a GaAs heterostructure. Furthermore, by changing the scanning setup, we were able to demonstrate near-field cathodoluminescence (CL), and correlated the results with standard CL measurements. In conclusion, the TI technique shows great potential for mapping transport properties in solar cell materials with high spatial resolution.« less

  20. 1995 national heat transfer conference: Proceedings. Volume 4: Transport phenomena in manufacturing and materials processing; Transport phenomena in materials joining processes; Transport phenomena in net shape manufacturing; HTD-Volume 306

    SciTech Connect

    Mahajan, R.L.

    1995-12-31

    This book is divided into three sections: (1) transport phenomena in manufacturing and materials processing; (2) transport phenomena in net shape manufacturing: and (3) transport phenomena in materials joining processes. Separate abstracts were prepared for most papers in this volume.

  1. Transport of cosmic ray nuclei in various materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Silberberg, R.; Tsao, C. H.; Letaw, J. R.

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic-ray heavy ions have become a concern in space radiation effects analyses. Heavy ions rapidly deposit energy and create dense ionization trails as they traverse materials. Collection of the free charge disrupts the operation of microelectronic circuits. This effect, called the single-event upset, can cause a loss of digital data. Passage of high linear energy transfer particles through the eyes has been observed by Apollo astronauts. These heavy ions have great radiobiological effectiveness and are the primary risk factor for leukemia induction on a manned Mars mission. Models of the transport of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei through materials depend heavily on our understanding of the cosmic-ray environment, nuclear spallation cross sections, and computer transport codes. Our group has initiated and pursued the development of a full capability for modeling these transport processes. A recent review of this ongoing effort is presented in Ref. 5. In this paper, we discuss transport methods and present new results comparing the attenuation of cosmic rays in various materials.

  2. Transport of cosmic ray nuclei in various materials.

    PubMed

    Silberberg, R; Tsao, C H; Letaw, J R

    1988-01-01

    Cosmic-ray heavy ions have become a concern in space radiation effects analyses. Heavy ions rapidly deposit energy and create dense ionization trails as they traverse materials. Collection of the free charge disrupts the operation of microelectronic circuits. This effect, called the single-event upset, can cause a loss of digital data. Passage of high linear energy transfer particles through the eyes has been observed by Apollo astronauts. These heavy ions have great radiobiological effectiveness and are the primary risk factor for leukemia induction on a manned Mars mission. Models of the transport of heavy cosmic-ray nuclei through materials depend heavily on our understanding of the cosmic-ray environment, nuclear spallation cross sections, and computer transport codes. Our group has initiated and pursued the development of a full capability for modeling these transport processes. A recent review of this ongoing effort is presented in Ref. 5. In this paper, we discuss transport methods and present new results comparing the attenuation of cosmic rays in various materials.

  3. Perspective: Codesign for materials science: An optimal learning approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lookman, Turab; Alexander, Francis J.; Bishop, Alan R.

    2016-05-01

    A key element of materials discovery and design is to learn from available data and prior knowledge to guide the next experiments or calculations in order to focus in on materials with targeted properties. We suggest that the tight coupling and feedback between experiments, theory and informatics demands a codesign approach, very reminiscent of computational codesign involving software and hardware in computer science. This requires dealing with a constrained optimization problem in which uncertainties are used to adaptively explore and exploit the predictions of a surrogate model to search the vast high dimensional space where the desired material may be found.

  4. A comprehensive multiscale moisture transport analysis: From porous reference silicates to cement-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chemmi, H.; Petit, D.; Tariel, V.; Korb, J.-P.; Denoyel, R.; Bouchet, R.; Levitz, P.

    2015-07-01

    Natural and manufactured disordered systems are ubiquitous and often involve hierarchical structures. This structural organization optimizes defined physical properties at several scales from molecular to representative volumes where the usual homogenization approach becomes efficient. For studying a particular physical property on these systems it is thus required to use a general method of analysis based on the joint application of complementary techniques covering the whole set of time-and length-scales. Here we review a comprehensive multiscale method presented for analyzing the three-dimensional moisture transport in hierarchical porous media such as synthesized reference silicates and cement-based materials. Several techniques (NMR spectroscopy, relaxometry, diffusometry, X-ray micro-tomography, conductivity…) have been used to evidence the interplay between the different scales involved in this transport process. This method allows answering the general opened questions concerning the scale dependence of such a moisture transport in cement-based materials. We outline the main results of the multiscale techniques applied on reference porous silicates allowing separating the impact of geometry, hydric state and wettability on the moisture transport. Based on this approach, we prove that this transport at micro- and meso-scale is determinant to modify the moisture at macro-scale during setting or for hardened cement-based materials.

  5. Temperature-dependent thermal conductivity in silicon nanostructured materials studied by the Boltzmann transport equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Giuseppe; Esfarjani, Keivan; Strubbe, David A.; Broido, David; Kolpak, Alexie M.

    2016-01-01

    Nanostructured materials exhibit low thermal conductivity because of the additional scattering due to phonon-boundary interactions. As these interactions are highly sensitive to the mean free path (MFP) of phonons, MFP distributions in nanostructures can be dramatically distorted relative to bulk. Here we calculate the MFP distribution in periodic nanoporous Si for different temperatures, using the recently developed MFP-dependent Boltzmann transport equation. After analyzing the relative contribution of each phonon branch to thermal transport in nanoporous Si, we find that at room temperature optical phonons contribute 17 % to heat transport, compared to 5 % in bulk Si. Interestingly, we observe a constant thermal conductivity over the range 200 K transport of acoustic phonons with long intrinsic MFP and the temperature dependence of the heat capacity. Our findings, which are in qualitative agreement with the temperature trend of thermal conductivities measured in nanoporous Si-based systems, shed light on the origin of the reduction of thermal conductivity in nanostructured materials and demonstrate the necessity of multiscale heat transport engineering, in which the bulk material and geometry are optimized concurrently.

  6. Optimizing spectral CT parameters for material classification tasks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigie, D. S.; La Rivière, P. J.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, we propose a framework for optimizing spectral CT imaging parameters and hardware design with regard to material classification tasks. Compared with conventional CT, many more parameters must be considered when designing spectral CT systems and protocols. These choices will impact material classification performance in a non-obvious, task-dependent way with direct implications for radiation dose reduction. In light of this, we adapt Hotelling Observer formalisms typically applied to signal detection tasks to the spectral CT, material-classification problem. The result is a rapidly computable metric that makes it possible to sweep out many system configurations, generating parameter optimization curves (POC’s) that can be used to select optimal settings. The proposed model avoids restrictive assumptions about the basis-material decomposition (e.g. linearity) and incorporates signal uncertainty with a stochastic object model. This technique is demonstrated on dual-kVp and photon-counting systems for two different, clinically motivated material classification tasks (kidney stone classification and plaque removal). We show that the POC’s predicted with the proposed analytic model agree well with those derived from computationally intensive numerical simulation studies.

  7. Optimal Experiment Design for Thermal Characterization of Functionally Graded Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, Kevin D.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the project was to investigate methods to accurately verify that designed , materials meet thermal specifications. The project involved heat transfer calculations and optimization studies, and no laboratory experiments were performed. One part of the research involved study of materials in which conduction heat transfer predominates. Results include techniques to choose among several experimental designs, and protocols for determining the optimum experimental conditions for determination of thermal properties. Metal foam materials were also studied in which both conduction and radiation heat transfer are present. Results of this work include procedures to optimize the design of experiments to accurately measure both conductive and radiative thermal properties. Detailed results in the form of three journal papers have been appended to this report.

  8. Transport of the Pathogenic Prion Protein through Landfill Materials

    PubMed Central

    Jacobson, Kurt H.; Lee, Seunghak; McKenzie, Debbie; Benson, Craig H.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2009-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs, prion diseases) are a class of fatal neurodegenerative diseases affecting a variety of mammalian species including humans. A misfolded form of the prion protein (PrPTSE) is the major, if not sole, component of the infectious agent. Recent TSE outbreaks in domesticated and wild animal populations has created the need for safe and effective disposal of large quantities of potentially infected materials. Here, we report the results of a study to evaluate the potential for transport of PrPTSE derived from carcasses and associated wastes in a municipal solid waste (MSW) landfill. Column experiments were conducted to evaluate PrPTSE transport in quartz sand, two fine-textured burial soils currently used in landfill practice, a green waste residual material (a potential burial material), and fresh and aged MSW. PrPTSE was retained by quartz sand and the fine-textured burial soils, with no detectable PrPTSE eluted over more than 40 pore volumes. In contrast, PrPTSE was more mobile in MSW and green waste residual. Transport parameters were estimated from the experimental data and used to model PrPTSE migration in a MSW landfill. To the extent that the PrPTSE used mimics that released from decomposing carcasses, burial of CWD-infected materials at MSW landfills could provide secure containment of PrPTSE provided reasonable burial strategies (e.g., encasement in soil) are used. PMID:19368208

  9. Transient infrared spectroscopy of charge transport in emerging photovoltaic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Kwang Seob

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaic and organic photovoltaic (OPV) materials are promising alternative light absorbers for solar cells. Both CQD photovoltaics and OPVs can be fabricated on flexible substrates using low-cost solution cast fabrication methods at room temperature. Although intense research has been done for the last two decades in both materials, photophysical events underlying the device performance remain unclear. Here, the origin of the charge transport state in PbS CQD solids was explored and identified. The charge transport state was investigated using various optical and electrical methods: ultrafast transient infrared spectroscopy (UFIR), microsecond transient infrared spectroscopy (TRIR), steady state absorption spectroscopy, steady state photoluminescence emission spectroscopy, temperature dependent TRIR, temperature dependent transient photoconductivity and temperature dependent transient short-circuit current measurements. Furthermore, it was found that the mobility-lifetime product, which is dependent on the surface passivation strategy, significantly influences the device performance in CQD solar cells. Additionally, it was examined how the dielectric permittivity influences the photophysics in organic photovoltaic materials in conjunction with device performance. The experiments revealed that the increase of dielectric permittivity leads to enhancement of the mobility-lifetime product. For efficient conversion of excitons into charge carriers, it was suggested that high surface area between electron donor and acceptor materials is necessary. The findings provide better understanding of the fundamental properties of CQD and OPV materials and suggest pathways to improve the efficiency of solar cell based on these materials.

  10. Transporting radioactive materials: Q & A to your questions

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1993-04-01

    Over 2 million packages of radioactive materials are shipped each year in the United States. These shipments are carried by trucks, trains, ships, and airplanes every day just like other commodities. Compliance with Federal regulations ensures that radioactive materials are transported safely. Proper packaging is the key to safe shipment. Package designs for radioactive materials must protect the public and the environment even in case of an accident. As the level of radioactivity increases, packaging design requirements become more stringent. Radioactive materials have been shipped in this country for more than 40 years. As with other commodities, vehicles carrying these materials have been involved in accidents. However, no deaths or serious injuries have resulted from exposure to the radioactive contents of these shipments. People are concerned about how radioactive shipments might affect them and the environment. This booklet briefly answers some of the commonly asked questions about the transport of radioactive materials. More detailed information is available from the sources listed at the end of this booklet.

  11. Theory based design and optimization of materials for spintronics applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tianyi

    The Spintronics industry has developed rapidly in the past decade. Finding the right material is very important for Spintronics applications, which requires good understanding of the physics behind specific phenomena. In this dissertation, we will focus on two types of perpendicular transport phenomena, the current-perpendicular-to-plane giant-magneto-resistance (CPP-GMR) phenomenon and the tunneling phenomenon in the magnetic tunnel junctions. The Valet-Fert model is a very useful semi-classical approach for understanding the transport and spin-flip process in CPP-GMR. We will present a finite element based implementation for the Valet-Fert model which enables a practical way to calculate the electron transport in real CPP-GMR spin valves. It is very important to find high spin polarized materials for CPP-GMR spin valves. The half-metal, due to its full spin polarization, is of interest. We will propose a rational way to find half-metals based on the gap theorem. Then we will focus on the high-MR TMR phenomenon. The tunneling theory of electron transport in mesoscopic systems will be covered. Then we will calculate the transport properties of certain junctions with the help of Green's function under the Landauer-Buttiker formalism, also known as the scattering formalism. The damping constant determines the switching rate of a device. We can calculate it using a method based on the Extended Huckel Tight-Binding theory (EHTB). The symmetry filtering effect is very helpful for finding materials for TMR junctions. Based upon which, we find a good candidate material, MnAl, for TMR applications.

  12. Optimizing material properties of composite plates for sound transmission problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Yu-Ting; Pawar, S. J.; Huang, Jin H.

    2015-01-01

    To calculate the specific transmission loss (TL) of a composite plate, the conjugate gradient optimization method is utilized to estimate and optimize material properties of the composite plate in this study. For an n-layer composite plate, a nonlinear dynamic stiffness matrix based on the thick plate theory is formulated. To avoid huge computational efforts due to the combination of different composite material plates, a transfer matrix approach is proposed to restrict the dynamic stiffness matrix of the composite plate to a 4×4 matrix. Moreover, the transfer matrix approach has also been used to simplify the complexity of the objective function gradient for the optimization method. Numerical simulations are performed to validate the present algorithm by comparing the TL of the optimal composite plate with that of the original plate. Small number of iterations required during convergence tests illustrates the efficiency of the optimization method. The results indicate that an excellent estimation for the composite plate can be obtained for the desired sound transmission.

  13. Charge transport in metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Runnerstrom, Evan Lars

    There is probably no class of materials more varied, more widely used, or more ubiquitous than metal oxides. Depending on their composition, metal oxides can exhibit almost any number of properties. Of particular interest are the ways in which charge is transported in metal oxides: devices such as displays, touch screens, and smart windows rely on the ability of certain metal oxides to conduct electricity while maintaining visible transparency. Smart windows, fuel cells, and other electrochemical devices additionally rely on efficient transport of ionic charge in and around metal oxides. Colloidal synthesis has enabled metal oxide nanocrystals to emerge as a relatively new but highly tunable class of materials. Certain metal oxide nanocrystals, particularly highly doped metal oxides, have been enjoying rapid development in the last decade. As in myriad other materials systems, structure dictates the properties of metal oxide nanocrystals, but a full understanding of how nanocrystal synthesis, the processing of nanocrystal-based materials, and the structure of nanocrystals relate to the resulting properties of nanocrystal-based materials is still nascent. Gaining a fundamental understanding of and control over these structure-property relationships is crucial to developing a holistic understanding of metal oxide nanocrystals. The unique ability to tune metal oxide nanocrystals by changing composition through the introduction of dopants or by changing size and shape affords a way to study the interplay between structure, processing, and properties. This overall goal of this work is to chemically synthesize colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, process them into useful materials, characterize charge transport in materials based on colloidal metal oxide nanocrystals, and develop ways to manipulate charge transport. In particular, this dissertation characterizes how the charge transport properties of metal oxide nanocrystal-based materials depend on their processing and

  14. Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    McConn, Ronald J.; Gesh, Christopher J.; Pagh, Richard T.; Rucker, Robert A.; Williams III, Robert

    2011-03-04

    Introduction Meaningful simulations of radiation transport applications require realistic definitions of material composition and densities. When seeking that information for applications in fields such as homeland security, radiation shielding and protection, and criticality safety, researchers usually encounter a variety of materials for which elemental compositions are not readily available or densities are not defined. Publication of the Compendium of Material Composition Data for Radiation Transport Modeling, Revision 0, in 2006 was the first step toward mitigating this problem. Revision 0 of this document listed 121 materials, selected mostly from the combined personal libraries of staff at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), and thus had a scope that was recognized at the time to be limited. Nevertheless, its creation did provide a well-referenced source of some unique or hard-to-define material data in a format that could be used directly in radiation transport calculations being performed at PNNL. Moreover, having a single common set of material definitions also helped to standardize at least one aspect of the various modeling efforts across the laboratory by providing separate researchers the ability to compare different model results using a common basis of materials. The authors of the 2006 compendium understood that, depending on its use and feedback, the compendium would need to be revised to correct errors or inconsistencies in the data for the original 121 materials, as well as to increase (per users suggestions) the number of materials listed. This 2010 revision of the compendium has accomplished both of those objectives. The most obvious change is the increased number of materials from 121 to 372. The not-so-obvious change is the mechanism used to produce the data listed here. The data listed in the 2006 document were compiled, evaluated, entered, and error-checked by a group of individuals essentially by hand, providing no library

  15. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells.

  16. Nano-structured electron transporting materials for perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hefei; Huang, Ziru; Wei, Shiyuan; Zheng, Lingling; Xiao, Lixin; Gong, Qihuang

    2016-03-28

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite solar cells have been developing rapidly in the past several years, and their power conversion efficiency has reached over 20%, nearing that of polycrystalline silicon solar cells. Because the diffusion length of the hole in perovskites is longer than that of the electron, the performance of the device can be improved by using an electron transporting layer, e.g., TiO2, ZnO and TiO2/Al2O3. Nano-structured electron transporting materials facilitate not only electron collection but also morphology control of the perovskites. The properties, morphology and preparation methods of perovskites are reviewed in the present article. A comprehensive understanding of the relationship between the structure and property will benefit the precise control of the electron transporting process and thus further improve the performance of perovskite solar cells.

  17. Contaminant Transport Through Subsurface Material from the DOE Hanford Reservation

    SciTech Connect

    Pace, M.N.; Mayes, M.A.; Jardine, P.M.; Fendorf, S.E.; Nehlhorn, T.L.; Yin, X.P.; Ladd, J.; Teerlink, J.; Zachara, J.M.

    2003-03-26

    Accelerated migration of contaminants in the vadose zone has been observed beneath tank farms at the U.S. Department of Energy's Hanford Reservation. This paper focuses on the geochemical processes controlling the fate and transport of contaminants in the sediments beneath the Hanford tank farms. Laboratory scale batch sorption experiments and saturated transport experiments were conducted using reactive tracers U(VI), Sr, Cs, Co and Cr(VI) to investigate geochemical processes controlling the rates and mechanisms of sorption to Hanford subsurface material. Results indicate that the rate of sorption is influenced by changes in solution chemistry such as ionic strength, pH and presence of competing cations. Sediment characteristics such as mineralogy, iron content and cation/anion exchange capacity coupled with the dynamics of flow impact the number of sites available for sorption. Investigative approaches using a combination of batch and transport experiments will contribute to the conceptual and Hanford vadose zone.

  18. Transportation of reagents, reference materials and samples: the international perspective.

    PubMed

    Pearson, J E; Edwards, S

    2006-01-01

    The International Regulations for the transport of infectious substances, which could include reagents, reference material and samples, are based on the 13th revision of the United Nations Model Regulations and are the standard for transport of infectious substances by all means of transportation. The 13th revision, effective January 2005 and further amended in March and July 2005, made major improvements in these shipping regulations. They specifically exempt certain substances, including those that have been neutralized or inactivated to destroy any pathogens and samples from "normal" animals. Infectious substances are divided into Category A, which includes primarily cultures of the more pathogenic agents and Category B, which includes all other substances that do not meet the Category A criteria. Tissue specimens, submitted for diagnosis, are included in Category B. Category A shipments must have a Dangerous Goods Certificate and meet other requirements; Category B shipments do not. The National requirements, such as import permits, and certain airline restrictions must also be met.

  19. Multi-material size optimization of a ladder frame chassis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Michael

    The Corporate Average Fuel Economy (CAFE) is an American fuel standard that sets regulations on fuel economy in vehicles. This law ultimately shapes the development and design research for automakers. Reducing the weight of conventional cars offers a way to improve fuel efficiency. This research investigated the optimality of an automobile's ladder frame chassis (LFC) by conducting multi-objective optimization on the LFC in order to reduce the weight of the chassis. The focus of the design and optimization was a ladder frame chassis commonly used for mass production light motor vehicles with an open-top rear cargo area. This thesis is comprised of two major sections. The first looked to perform thickness optimization in the outer walls of the ladder frame. In the second section, many multi-material distributions, including steel and aluminium varieties, were investigated. A simplified model was used to do an initial hand calculation analysis of the problem. This was used to create a baseline validation to compare the theory with the modeling. A CAD model of the LFC was designed. From the CAD model, a finite element model was extracted and joined using weld and bolt connectors. Following this, a linear static analysis was performed to look at displacement and stresses when subjected to loading conditions that simulate harsh driving conditions. The analysis showed significant values of stress and displacement on the ends of the rails, suggesting improvements could be made elsewhere. An optimization scheme was used to find the values of an all steel frame an optimal thickness distribution was found. This provided a 13% weight reduction over the initial model. To advance the analysis a multi-material approach was used to push the weight savings even further. Several material distributions were analyzed and the lightest utilized aluminium in all but the most strenuous subjected components. This enabled a reduction in weight of 15% over the initial model, equivalent to

  20. Optimized adhesives for strong, lightweight, damage-resistant, nanocomposite materials: new insights from natural materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hansma, P. K.; Turner, P. J.; Ruoff, R. S.

    2007-01-01

    From our investigations of natural composite materials such as abalone shell and bone we have learned the following. (1) Nature is frugal with resources: it uses just a few per cent glue, by weight, to glue together composite materials. (2) Nature does not avoid voids. (3) Nature makes optimized glues with sacrificial bonds and hidden length. We discuss how optimized adhesives combined with high specific stiffness/strength structures such as carbon nanotubes or graphene sheets could yield remarkably strong, lightweight, and damage-resistant materials.

  1. 49 CFR 176.170 - Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in freight containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in freight containers. 176.170 Section 176.170 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS...

  2. 49 CFR 176.170 - Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in freight containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in freight containers. 176.170 Section 176.170 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS...

  3. 49 CFR 176.174 - Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in shipborne barges.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in shipborne barges. 176.174 Section 176.174 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS...

  4. Plasma Interactions with Mixed Materials and Impurity Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Rognlien, T. D.; Beiersdorfer, Peter; Chernov, A.; Frolov, T.; Magee, E.; Rudd, R.; Umansky, M.

    2016-10-28

    The project brings together three discipline areas at LLNL to develop advanced capability to predict the impact of plasma/material interactions (PMI) on metallic surfaces in magnetic fusion energy (MFE) devices. These areas are (1) modeling transport of wall impurity ions through the edge plasma to the core plasma, (2) construction of a laser blow-off (LBO) system for injecting precise amounts of metallic atoms into a tokamak plasma, and (3) material science analysis of fundamental processes that modify metallic surfaces during plasma bombardment. The focus is on tungsten (W), which is being used for the ITER divertor and in designs of future MFE devices. In area (1), we have worked with the University of California, San Diego (UCSD) on applications of the UEDGE/DUSTT coupled codes to predict the influx of impurity ions from W dust through the edge plasma, including periodic edge-plasma oscillations, and revived a parallel version of UEDGE to speed up these simulations. In addition, the impurity transport model in the 2D UEDGE code has been implemented into the 3D BOUT++ turbulence/transport code to allow fundamental analysis of the impact of strong plasma turbulence on the impurity transport. In area (2), construction and testing of the LBO injection system has been completed. The original plan to install the LBO on the National Spherical Torus Experiment Upgrade (NSTX-U) at Princeton and its use to validate the impurity transport simulations is delayed owing to NSTX-U being offline for substantial magnetic coil repair period. In area (3), an analytic model has been developed to explain the growth of W tendrils (or fuzz) observed for helium-containing plasmas. Molecular dynamics calculations of W sputtering by W and deuterium (D) ions shows that a spatial blending of interatomic potentials is needed to describe the near-surface and deeper regions of the material.

  5. Quantum transport in Rashba spin-orbit materials: a review.

    PubMed

    Bercioux, Dario; Lucignano, Procolo

    2015-10-01

    In this review article we describe spin-dependent transport in materials with spin-orbit interaction of Rashba type. We mainly focus on semiconductor heterostructures, however we consider topological insulators, graphene and hybrid structures involving superconductors as well. We start from the Rashba Hamiltonian in a two dimensional electron gas and then describe transport properties of two- and quasi-one-dimensional systems. The problem of spin current generation and interference effects in mesoscopic devices is described in detail. We address also the role of Rashba interaction on localisation effects in lattices with nontrivial topology, as well as on the Ahronov-Casher effect in ring structures. A brief section, in the end, describes also some related topics including the spin-Hall effect, the transition from weak localisation to weak anti localisation and the physics of Majorana fermions in hybrid heterostructures involving Rashba materials in the presence of superconductivity.

  6. Isotopic tracing of hydrogen transport and trapping in nuclear materials.

    PubMed

    Chêne, Jacques; Martin, Frantz

    2017-07-28

    Some illustrations of the use of deuterium or tritium for isotopic tracing of hydrogen absorption, transport and trapping in nuclear materials are presented. Isotopic tracing of hydrogen has been shown to be successful for the determination of the boundaries conditions for hydrogen desorption or absorption in a material exposed to a hydrogen source. Also, the unique capabilities of isotopic tracing and related techniques to characterize H interactions with point defects and dislocations acting as moving traps has been demonstrated. Such transport mechanisms are considered to play a major role in some stress corrosion cracking and hydrogen embrittlement mechanisms.This article is part of the themed issue 'The challenges of hydrogen and metals'. © 2017 The Author(s).

  7. IUPAP Award: Ion transport in 2D materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Wenzhong

    Intercalation in 2D materials drastically influences both physical and chemical properties, which leads to a new degree of freedom for fundamental studies and expands the potential applications of 2D materials. In this talk, I will discuss our work in the past two years related to ion intercalation of 2D materials, including insertion of Li and Na ions in graphene and MoS2. We focused on both fundamental mechanism and potential application, e.g. we measured in-situ optical transmittance spectra and electrical transport properties of few-layer graphene (FLG) nanostructures upon electrochemical lithiation/delithiation. By observing a simultaneous increase of both optical transmittance and DC conductivity, strikingly different from other materials, we proposed its application as a next generation transparent electrode.

  8. The Optimal Pad Material for Fat Suppression of Breast MRI.

    PubMed

    Teshigawara, Mai; Ogura, Akio; Uchiyama, Naoko; Koganezawa, Takumi

    Although fat suppression technique is used in breast MRI, artifacts often appear owing to susceptibility and defective fat suppression effect after breast surgery. This is due to the abundance of adipose tissue in the breast as well as the region of air around the circumference of the excision site. Therefore, we have evaluated the optimal pad material for achieving fat suppression in breast MRI to reduce image artifacts and patient discomfort while maintaining breast shape. Oil of the solidity was used as the breast phantom material after segmental resection surgery. Five pad materials, including rice, ball bullets, glass beads, acrylic beads, and bath salts were used to fill the defects. Fat-suppressed, T1-weighted, three-dimensional imaging was performed using a breast array coil. Images with and without the five pad materials, were evaluated physically, visually, and by contact. Physical evaluation consisted of measuring the maximum signal and standard deviation in the regions of interest (ROIs). Discomfort and the amount of perceived resistance were evaluated during contact evaluation by inserting a finger into each pad material. In results, glass beads and bath salts produced a significantly larger fat suppression effect in the ROIs. Visual and contact evaluation also highlighted the benefits of glass beads, the latter demonstrating a significant decrease in discomfort and perceived resistance. In conclusion, we consider glass beads as the optimal pad material for fat suppression in breast MRI after surgery.

  9. 77 FR 17394 - Hazardous Materials: Approval and Communication Requirements for the Safe Transportation of Air...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-26

    ... transportation of hazardous materials by highway, rail, vessel, and air. The scope of the HMR includes hazardous.... Congress expressly authorized DOT to issue variances in the Hazardous Materials Transportation Act of 1975... include: The safety record for hazardous materials transported; transportation operations......

  10. 49 CFR 176.166 - Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials on passenger vessels.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials on....166 Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials on passenger vessels. (a) Only the following Class 1 (explosive) materials may be transported as cargo on passenger vessels: (1) Division 1.4...

  11. Polaron formation and transport in olivine cathode materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johannes, Michelle; Hoang, Khang

    2011-03-01

    One of the critical factors limiting Li ion battery performance is electronic conduction through the cathode material. In the olivine structure type materials, such as LiFe PO4 , the parent materials are insulators with a gap of approximately 4 (or more) eV. The withdrawal of an electron results not in a band-type hole state, but rather a localized polaronic state. Transport then occurs via hopping of the polaron through the crystal. The measured electronic conduction in olivine materials depends on the transition metal cation type. In this study, we use density functional theory to compare formation of polarons in olivine materials with different transition metal cations: Mn, Fe, Co, and Ni. We show that the underlying electronic structure of the fully lithiated material (or fully delithiated material) essentially determines whether or not polaron formation is possible in localized d -states or whether the holes that result from adding or removing an electron reside in oxygen-derived states. We also investigate the facility of polaronic hopping by calculating the barrier between adjacent polaron sites in each of the four materials.

  12. Outgassing study of spacecraft materials and contaminant transport simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wong, Chung M.; Labatete-Goeppinger, Aura C.; Fowler, Jesse D.; Easton, Myriam P.; Liu, De-Ling

    2016-09-01

    Contamination control plays an important role in sustaining spacecraft performance. One spacecraft degradation mechanism involves long-term on-orbit molecular outgassing from spacecraft materials. The outgassed molecules may accumulate on thermal control surfaces and/or optics, causing degradation. In this study, we performed outgassing measurements of multiple spacecraft materials, including adhesives, Nylon Velcro, and other assembly materials through a modified ASTM E595 test method. The modified ASTM E595 test had the source and receiver temperature remained at 125°C and 25°C, respectively, but with prolonged outgassing periods of two weeks. The condensable contaminants were analyzed by Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS) to determine their spectral transmission and chemical composition. The FTIR spectra showed several spacecraft materials, primarily adhesives and potting materials, exhibiting slight absorption from contaminants consisting of hydroxyl groups and carboxylic acids. To gain insight into molecular contaminant transport, simulations were conducted to characterize contaminant accumulation inside a hypothetical space system cavity. The simulation indicated that contaminant molecules bouncing inside the hypothetical payload cavity can lead to deposition on colder surfaces, even though large openings are available to provide venting pathways for escaping to space. The newly established molecular contaminant transport simulation capability holds the promise of providing quantitative guidance for future spacecraft and its venting design.

  13. Approximate Green's function methods for HZE transport in multilayered materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, John W.; Badavi, Francis F.; Shinn, Judy L.; Costen, Robert C.

    1993-01-01

    A nonperturbative analytic solution of the high charge and energy (HZE) Green's function is used to implement a computer code for laboratory ion beam transport in multilayered materials. The code is established to operate on the Langley nuclear fragmentation model used in engineering applications. Computational procedures are established to generate linear energy transfer (LET) distributions for a specified ion beam and target for comparison with experimental measurements. The code was found to be highly efficient and compared well with the perturbation approximation.

  14. Protective action guide for radioactive material transportation accidents.

    PubMed

    Dodd, B; Humphries, L L

    1988-12-01

    This paper briefly describes a report which has been developed to enable protective action guidance to be determined for transportation accidents involving radioactive material. The protective action guide uses data from on-scene observations as input to a series of simple flow charts leading to protective action recommendations. Where the necessary data is unavailable or unknown, the guide uses the assumptions and results found in the authors' worst case hazards analysis report.

  15. Enhanced transport of materials into enamel nanopores via electrokinetic flow.

    PubMed

    Gan, H Y; Sousa, F B; Carlo, H L; Maciel, P P; Macena, M S; Han, J

    2015-04-01

    The ability to infiltrate various molecules and resins into dental enamel is highly desirable in dentistry, yet transporting materials into dental enamel is limited by the nanometric scale of their pores. Materials that cannot be infiltrated into enamel by diffusion/capillarity are often considered molecules with sizes above a critical threshold, which are often considered to be larger than the pores of enamel. We challenge this notion by reporting the use of electrokinetic flow to transport solutions with molecules with sizes above a critical threshold-namely, an aqueous solution with a high refractive index (Thoulet's solution) and a curable fluid resin infiltrant (without acid etching)-deep into the normal enamel layer. Volume infiltration by Thoulet's solution is increased by 5- to 6-fold, and resin infiltration depths as large as 600 to 2,000 µm were achieved, in contrast to ~10 µm resulting from diffusion/capillarity. Incubation with demineralization solution for 192 h resulted in significant demineralization at noninfiltrated histologic points but not at resin infiltrated. These results open new avenues for the transport of materials in dental enamel.

  16. Risks of radioactive material transportation accidents in Oregon.

    PubMed

    Humphries, L L; Dodd, B

    1989-07-01

    As a continuation of previous research on worst case transportation accidents involving radioactive material (Dodd and Humphries 1988a), and protective action guidance for radioactive material transportation accidents (Dodd and Humphries 1988b), this paper describes the risks from such accidents in Oregon. Radioactive material transportation risks are defined in terms of accident consequences multiplied by the accident probabilities and are expressed as latent cancer fatalities (LCFs). For each of 17 different shipment types, five dose contributions are summed and multiplied by the population density and accident probability. The five dose contributors considered are: inhalation, resuspension, cloudshine, groundshine and direct exposure. The variables over which each of these dose contributors are integrated include seven accident severity categories, three population density zones, five regions of the state, as well as many isopleth areas and radionuclides. Allowance is also made for the possible distribution of meteorological conditions in each area. The dose to the public, emergency responders, pedestrians and personnel in other traffic are all considered. It is concluded that the current level of risk is 1.2 X 10(-5) latent cancer fatalities per year in Oregon. This is equivalent to one LCF every 83,000 y. This compares to 1.2 non-radiological fatalities associated from the same shipments.

  17. Multigrid optimal mass transport for image registration and morphing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rehman, Tauseef ur; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2007-02-01

    In this paper we present a computationally efficient Optimal Mass Transport algorithm. This method is based on the Monge-Kantorovich theory and is used for computing elastic registration and warping maps in image registration and morphing applications. This is a parameter free method which utilizes all of the grayscale data in an image pair in a symmetric fashion. No landmarks need to be specified for correspondence. In our work, we demonstrate significant improvement in computation time when our algorithm is applied as compared to the originally proposed method by Haker et al [1]. The original algorithm was based on a gradient descent method for removing the curl from an initial mass preserving map regarded as 2D vector field. This involves inverting the Laplacian in each iteration which is now computed using full multigrid technique resulting in an improvement in computational time by a factor of two. Greater improvement is achieved by decimating the curl in a multi-resolutional framework. The algorithm was applied to 2D short axis cardiac MRI images and brain MRI images for testing and comparison.

  18. Material-Device-Circuit Co-optimization of 2D Material based FETs for Ultra-Scaled Technology Nodes.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Tarun Kumar; Soree, Bart; Radu, Iuliana; Raghavan, Praveen; Iannaccone, Giuseppe; Fiori, Gianluca; Dehaene, Wim; Heyns, Marc

    2017-07-10

    Two-dimensional (2D) material based FETs are being considered for future technology nodes and high performance logic applications. However, a comprehensive assessment of 2D material based FETs has been lacking for high performance logic applications considering appropriate system level figure-of-merits (FOMs) e.g. delay, and energy-delay product. In this paper, we present guidelines for 2D material based FETs to meet sub-10 nm high performance logic requirements focusing on material requirement, device design, energy-delay optimization for the first time. We show the need for 2D materials with smaller effective mass in the transport direction and anisotropicity to meet the performance requirement for future technology nodes. We present novel device designs with one such 2D material (monolayer black-phosphorus) to keep Moore's alive for the HP logic in sub-5 nm gate length regime. With these device proposals we show that below 5 nm gate lengths 2D electrostatistics arising from gate stack design becomes more of a challenge than direct source-to-drain tunneling for 2D material-based FETs. Therefore, it is challenging to meet both delay and energy-delay requirement in sub-5 nm gate length regime without scaling both supply voltage (V DD ) and effective-oxide-thickness (EOT) below 0.5 V and 0.5 nm respectively.

  19. Optimal Shielding for Minimum Materials Cost of Mass

    SciTech Connect

    Woolley, Robert D.

    2014-08-01

    Material costs dominate some shielding design problems. This is certainly the case for manned nuclear power space applications for which shielding is essential and the cost of launching by rocket from earth is high. In such situations or in those where shielding volume or mass is constrained, it is important to optimize the design. Although trial and error synthesis methods may succeed a more systematic approach is warranted. Design automation may also potentially reduce engineering costs.

  20. Process optimization electrospinning fibrous material based on polyhydroxybutyrate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olkhov, A. A.; Tyubaeva, P. M.; Staroverova, O. V.; Mastalygina, E. E.; Popov, A. A.; Ischenko, A. A.; Iordanskii, A. L.

    2016-05-01

    The article analyzes the influence of the main technological parameters of electrostatic spinning on the morphology and properties of ultrathin fibers on the basis of polyhydroxybutyrate. It is found that the electric conductivity and viscosity of the spinning solution affects the process of forming fibers macrostructure. The fiber-based materials PHB lets control geometry and optimize the viscosity and conductivity of a spinning solution. The resulting fibers have found use in medicine, particularly in the construction elements musculoskeletal.

  1. Oxasmaragdyrins as New and Efficient Hole-Transporting Materials for High-Performance Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Mane, Sandeep B; Sutanto, Albertus Adrian; Cheng, Chih-Fu; Xie, Meng-Yu; Chen, Chieh-I; Leonardus, Mario; Yeh, Shih-Chieh; Beyene, Belete Bedemo; Diau, Eric Wei-Guang; Chen, Chin-Ti; Hung, Chen-Hsiung

    2017-09-06

    The high performance of the perovskite solar cells (PSCs) cannot be achieved without a layer of efficient hole-transporting materials (HTMs) to retard the charge recombination and transport the photogenerated hole to the counterelectrode. Herein, we report the use of boryl oxasmaragdyrins (SM01, SM09, and SM13), a family of aromatic core-modified expanded porphyrins, as efficient hole-transporting materials (HTMs) for perovskite solar cells (PSCs). These oxasmaragdyrins demonstrated complementary absorption spectra in the low-energy region, good redox reversibility, good thermal stability, suitable energy levels with CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite, and high hole mobility. A remarkable power conversion efficiency of 16.5% (Voc = 1.09 V, Jsc = 20.9 mA cm(-2), fill factor (FF) = 72%) is achieved using SM09 on the optimized PSCs device employing a planar structure, which is close to that of the state-of-the-art hole-transporting materials (HTMs), spiro-OMeTAD of 18.2% (Voc = 1.07 V, Jsc = 22.9 mA cm(-2), FF = 74%). In contrast, a poor photovoltaic performance of PSCs using SM01 is observed due to the interactions of terminal carboxylic acid functional group with CH3NH3PbI3.

  2. Synergetic material and structure optimization yields robust spider web anchorages.

    PubMed

    Pugno, Nicola M; Cranford, Steven W; Buehler, Markus J

    2013-08-26

    Millions of years of evolution have adapted spider webs to achieve a range of properties, including the well-known capture of prey, with efficient use of materials. One feature that remains poorly understood is the attachment disc, a network of silk fibers that mechanically anchors a web to its environment. Experimental observations suggest that one possible attachment disc adheres to a substrate through multiple symmetrically branched structures composed of sub-micrometer scale silk fibers. Here, a theoretical model is used to explore the adaptation of the strength of attachment of such an anchorage, and complementary mesoscale simulations are applied to demonstrate a novel mechanism of synergetic material and structural optimization, such that the maximum anchorage strength can be achieved regardless of the initial anchor placement or material type. The optimal delamination (peeling) angle is facilitated by the inherent extensibility of silk, and is attained automatically during the process of delamination. This concept of self-optimizing peeling angle suggests that attachment discs do not require precise placement by the spider, irrespective of adhesion strength. Additional hierarchical branching of the anchorage increases efficiency, where both the delamination force and toughness modulus increase with a splitting of the cross-sectional area.

  3. Transportation optimization with fuzzy trapezoidal numbers based on possibility theory.

    PubMed

    He, Dayi; Li, Ran; Huang, Qi; Lei, Ping

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, a parametric method is introduced to solve fuzzy transportation problem. Considering that parameters of transportation problem have uncertainties, this paper develops a generalized fuzzy transportation problem with fuzzy supply, demand and cost. For simplicity, these parameters are assumed to be fuzzy trapezoidal numbers. Based on possibility theory and consistent with decision-makers' subjectiveness and practical requirements, the fuzzy transportation problem is transformed to a crisp linear transportation problem by defuzzifying fuzzy constraints and objectives with application of fractile and modality approach. Finally, a numerical example is provided to exemplify the application of fuzzy transportation programming and to verify the validity of the proposed methods.

  4. NASA's Advanced Space Transportation Program: A Materials Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clinton, R. G., Jr.

    1999-01-01

    The realization of low-cost assess to space is one of NASA's three principal goals or "pillars" under the Office of Aero-Space Technology. In accordance with the goals of this pillar, NASA's primary space transportation technology role is to develop and demonstrate next-generation technologies to enable the commercial launch industry to develop full-scale, low cost, highly reliable space launchers. The approach involves both ground-based technology demonstrations and flight demonstrators, including the X-33, X-34, Bantam, Reusable Launch Vehicle (RLV), and future experimental vehicles. Next generation space transportation vehicles and propulsion systems will require the development and implementation of advanced materials and processes. This presentation will provide an overview of advanced materials efforts which are focused on the needs of next generation space transportation systems. Applications described will include ceramic matrix composite (CMC) integrally bladed turbine disk (blisk); actively cooled CMC nozzle ramp for the aerospike engine; ablative thrust chamber/nozzle; and metal matrix composite turbomachinery housings.

  5. Transport and screen blockage characteristics of reflective metallic insulation materials

    SciTech Connect

    Brocard, D.N.

    1984-01-01

    In the event of a LOCA within a nuclear power plant, it is possible for insulation debris to be generated by the break jet. Such debris has the potential for PWR sump screen (or BWR RHR suction inlet) blockage and thus can affect the long-term recirculation capability. In addition to the variables of break jet location and orientation, the types and quantities of debris which could be generated are dependent on the insulation materials employed. This experimental investigation was limited to reflective metallic insulation and components thereof. The study was aimed at determining the flow velocities needed to transport the insulation debris to the sump screens and the resulting modes of screen blockage. The tests revealed that thin metallic foils (0.0025 in. and 0.004 in.) could transport at low flow velocities, 0.2 to 0.5 ft/sec. Thicker foils (0.008 in.) transported at higher velocities, 0.4 to 0.8 ft/sec, and as fabricated half cylinder insulation units required velocities in excess of 1.0 ft/sec for transport. The tests also provided information on screen blockage patterns that showed blockage could occur at the lower portion of the screen as foils readily flipped on the screen when reaching it.

  6. Nonlinear Ballistic Transport in an Atomically Thin Material.

    PubMed

    Boland, Mathias J; Sundararajan, Abhishek; Farrokhi, M Javad; Strachan, Douglas R

    2016-01-26

    Ultrashort devices that incorporate atomically thin components have the potential to be the smallest electronics. Such extremely scaled atomically thin devices are expected to show ballistic nonlinear behavior that could make them tremendously useful for ultrafast applications. While nonlinear diffusive electron transport has been widely reported, clear evidence for intrinsic nonlinear ballistic transport in the growing array of atomically thin conductors has so far been elusive. Here we report nonlinear electron transport of an ultrashort single-layer graphene channel that shows quantitative agreement with intrinsic ballistic transport. This behavior is shown to be distinctly different than that observed in similarly prepared ultrashort devices consisting, instead, of bilayer graphene channels. These results suggest that the addition of only one extra layer of an atomically thin material can make a significant impact on the nonlinear ballistic behavior of ultrashort devices, which is possibly due to the very different chiral tunneling of their charge carriers. The fact that we observe the nonlinear ballistic response at room temperature, with zero applied magnetic field, in non-ultrahigh vacuum conditions and directly on a readily accessible oxide substrate makes the nanogap technology we utilize of great potential for achieving extremely scaled high-speed atomically thin devices.

  7. Carbon Material Optimized Biocathode for Improving Microbial Fuel Cell Performance

    PubMed Central

    Tursun, Hairti; Liu, Rui; Li, Jing; Abro, Rashid; Wang, Xiaohui; Gao, Yanmei; Li, Yuan

    2016-01-01

    To improve the performance of microbial fuel cells (MFCs), the biocathode electrode material of double-chamber was optimized. Alongside the basic carbon fiber brush, three carbon materials namely graphite granules, activated carbon granules (ACG) and activated carbon powder, were added to the cathode-chambers to improve power generation. The result shows that the addition of carbon materials increased the amount of available electroactive microbes on the electrode surface and thus promote oxygen reduction rate, which improved the generation performance of the MFCs. The Output current (external resistance = 1000 Ω) greatly increased after addition of the three carbon materials and maximum power densities in current stable phase increased by 47.4, 166.1, and 33.5%, respectively. Additionally, coulombic efficiencies of the MFC increased by 16.3, 64.3, and 20.1%, respectively. These results show that MFC when optimized with ACG show better power generation, higher chemical oxygen demands removal rate and coulombic efficiency. PMID:26858695

  8. Acoustic topology optimization of fibrous material with Delany-Bazley empirical material formulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Gil Ho

    2013-03-01

    This research details a new acoustic topology optimization (ATO) framework with an empirical material formulation for fibrous material. Despite the importance of considering pressure attenuation not only by internal solid structures but also by fibrous (porous) structures in acoustic design, a systematic ATO approach with an empirical material formulation has not yet been proposed. Thus, in this paper, an empirical material formulation called the Delany-Bazley model is implemented for the development of an ATO framework for fibrous material with porosity close to 1. By means of the SIMP (solid isotropic material with penalization) interpolation functions developed for multiple structural materials, ATO processes for fibrous structures as well as internal solid structures are carried out. In addition, a heuristic filter method that allows fibrous material to emerge only at the boundaries or rims of an internal solid structure is presented. Finally, the effect of the pressure attenuation on the topological layout for fibrous materials is investigated by solving several illustrative topology optimization examples.

  9. Finger-gate manipulated quantum transport in Dirac materials.

    PubMed

    Kleftogiannis, Ioannis; Tang, Chi-Shung; Cheng, Shun-Jen

    2015-05-27

    We investigate the quantum transport properties of multichannel nanoribbons made of materials described by the Dirac equation, under an in-plane magnetic field. In the low energy regime, positive and negative finger-gate potentials allow the electrons to make intra-subband transitions via hole-like or electron-like quasibound states (QBS), respectively, resulting in dips in the conductance. In the high energy regime, double dip structures in the conductance are found, attributed to spin-flip or spin-nonflip inter-subband transitions through the QBSs. Inverting the finger-gate polarity offers the possibility to manipulate the spin polarized electronic transport to achieve a controlled spin-switch.

  10. Material requirements for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Hecht, Ralph J.; Johnson, Andrew M.

    1993-01-01

    Under NASA-sponsored High Speed Research (HSR) programs, the materials and processing requirements have been identified for overcoming the environmental and economic barriers of the next generation High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) propulsion system. The long (2 to 5 hours) supersonic cruise portion of the HSCT cycle will place additional durability requirements on all hot section engine components. Low emissions combustor designs will require high temperature ceramic matrix composite liners to meet an emission goal of less than 5g NO(x) per Kg fuel burned. Large axisymmetric and two-dimensional exhaust nozzle designs are now under development to meet or exceed FAR 36 Stage III noise requirements, and will require lightweight, high temperature metallic, intermetallic, and ceramic matrix composites to reduce nozzle weight and meet structural and acoustic component performance goals. This paper describes and discusses the turbomachinery, combustor, and exhaust nozzle requirements of the High Speed Civil Transport propulsion system.

  11. Material requirements for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Hecht, Ralph J.; Johnson, Andrew M.

    1993-01-01

    Under NASA-sponsored High Speed Research (HSR) programs, the materials and processing requirements have been identified for overcoming the environmental and economic barriers of the next generation High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) propulsion system. The long (2 to 5 hours) supersonic cruise portion of the HSCT cycle will place additional durability requirements on all hot section engine components. Low emissions combustor designs will require high temperature ceramic matrix composite liners to meet an emission goal of less than 5g NO(x) per Kg fuel burned. Large axisymmetric and two-dimensional exhaust nozzle designs are now under development to meet or exceed FAR 36 Stage III noise requirements, and will require lightweight, high temperature metallic, intermetallic, and ceramic matrix composites to reduce nozzle weight and meet structural and acoustic component performance goals. This paper describes and discusses the turbomachinery, combustor, and exhaust nozzle requirements of the High Speed Civil Transport propulsion system.

  12. Defense Transportation: DOD Needs to Improve the Evaluation of Safety and Performance Information for Carriers Transporting Security-Sensitive Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    violations related to a driver’s use of controlled substances while transporting hazardous materials . Absent an approach to review available violation...BASIC), Including Those Incurred While Transporting Hazardous Materials (November 2012-October 2014) 26 Figure 8: TPS Carrier Incident Data in the...Administration HAZMAT Hazardous Materials MFTURP-1 Military Freight Traffic Unified Rules Publication-1 TRANSCOM U.S. Transportation Command SRC

  13. Magnetic Alignment and Charge Transport Improvement in Functional Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Majewski, Pawel W.

    The realization of nanostructured functional materials by self-assembly in polymers and polymer nanocomposites is adversely affected by persisting structural defects which greatly diminish the performance of the material. The use of magnetic fields to impose long-range order is investigated in three distinct systems - ion-conducting block copolymers, semiconducting nanowire-polymer composites and lyotropic surfactant mesophases. The alignment process is quantitatively studied with X-ray scattering and microscopic methods. Time and temperature resolved data collected in situ during the magnetic experiments provide an insight into the thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the process. These data together with simultaneous electrical conductivity measurements allow relating fundamental structural properties (e.g., morphology and long-range order) to transport properties (i.e., conductivity). In particular, it is demonstrated that magnetic fields offer a viable route for improvement of electric conductivity in these systems. More than an order of magnitude increase in conductivity is recorded in magnetically-annealed materials. The resulting aligned nanostructured systems are attractive for ordered solid polymer electrolyte membranes, heterojunction photovoltaic devices and generally help to understand charge transport mechanisms in anisotropic heterogeneous systems.

  14. Optimization of a neutron detector design using adjoint transport simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Yi, C.; Manalo, K.; Huang, M.; Chin, M.; Edgar, C.; Applegate, S.; Sjoden, G.

    2012-07-01

    A synthetic aperture approach has been developed and investigated for Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) detection in vehicles passing a checkpoint at highway speeds. SNM is postulated to be stored in a moving vehicle and detector assemblies are placed on the road-side or in chambers embedded below the road surface. Neutron and gamma spectral awareness is important for the detector assembly design besides high efficiencies, so that different SNMs can be detected and identified with various possible shielding settings. The detector assembly design is composed of a CsI gamma-ray detector block and five neutron detector blocks, with peak efficiencies targeting different energy ranges determined by adjoint simulations. In this study, formulations are derived using adjoint transport simulations to estimate detector efficiencies. The formulations is applied to investigate several neutron detector designs for Block IV, which has its peak efficiency in the thermal range, and Block V, designed to maximize the total neutron counts over the entire energy spectrum. Other Blocks detect different neutron energies. All five neutron detector blocks and the gamma-ray block are assembled in both MCNP and deterministic simulation models, with detector responses calculated to validate the fully assembled design using a 30-group library. The simulation results show that the 30-group library, collapsed from an 80-group library using an adjoint-weighting approach with the YGROUP code, significantly reduced the computational cost while maintaining accuracy. (authors)

  15. Calculations of Bed-Material Transport, Chetco River, Oregon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, S.; Wallick, R.; Cannon, C.; O'Connor, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    The Chetco River drains 914 square kilometers of the Klamath Mountains in far southwestern Oregon. The lower 18 kilometers of the river are flanked by large and abundant gravel bars, which have been commercially mined for aggregate during most of the last century. Increasing concern regarding the impact of this mining on aquatic habitats motivated an assessment of historical channel change and sediment transport rates along this lower reach. A key component of this research was estimating bed-material transport through the application of sediment transport equations at multiple locations along the study reach. Flow hydraulics were estimated with a 1-D hydraulic model constructed in HEC-RAS, using a combination of LiDAR and bathymetric surveys to characterize the valley morphology. Once calibrated to USGS rating curves, low flow water surfaces, and several high flow photos, this model allowed us to calculate energy slopes for a given cross section at a variety of flows. These flow-energy slope pairs, along with cross sections and sediment data collected from surface pebble counts, were then applied to a number of different modern bedload transport equations. This process was facilitated by the Bedload Assessment in Gravel-bedded Streams Excel macro, or BAGS, which allows users to quickly apply multiple transport equations using a single set of inputs (Pitlick et al., 2009). A review of the literature, along with tests of internal consistency and comparisons to direct bedload measurements taken in the winter of 2008-09, led us to choose the Parker (1991) and Wilcock-Crowe (2003) equations as the two most applicable to the Chetco River. Sediment transport-flow curves for both equations were calculated for seven cross sections spanning the study area. For each of these cross sections, we estimated annual transport fluxes using derived transport rating curves in conjunction with unit flow data from a USGS gage at the upstream end of study reach, with data extending back

  16. Material Distribution Optimization for the Shell Aircraft Composite Structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shevtsov, S.; Zhilyaev, I.; Oganesyan, P.; Axenov, V.

    2016-09-01

    One of the main goal in aircraft structures designing isweight decreasing and stiffness increasing. Composite structures recently became popular in aircraft because of their mechanical properties and wide range of optimization possibilities.Weight distribution and lay-up are keys to creating lightweight stiff strictures. In this paperwe discuss optimization of specific structure that undergoes the non-uniform air pressure at the different flight conditions and reduce a level of noise caused by the airflowinduced vibrations at the constrained weight of the part. Initial model was created with CAD tool Siemens NX, finite element analysis and post processing were performed with COMSOL Multiphysicsr and MATLABr. Numerical solutions of the Reynolds averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS) equations supplemented by k-w turbulence model provide the spatial distributions of air pressure applied to the shell surface. At the formulation of optimization problem the global strain energy calculated within the optimized shell was assumed as the objective. Wall thickness has been changed using parametric approach by an initiation of auxiliary sphere with varied radius and coordinates of the center, which were the design variables. To avoid a local stress concentration, wall thickness increment was defined as smooth function on the shell surface dependent of auxiliary sphere position and size. Our study consists of multiple steps: CAD/CAE transformation of the model, determining wind pressure for different flow angles, optimizing wall thickness distribution for specific flow angles, designing a lay-up for optimal material distribution. The studied structure was improved in terms of maximum and average strain energy at the constrained expense ofweight growth. Developed methods and tools can be applied to wide range of shell-like structures made of multilayered quasi-isotropic laminates.

  17. Growth, Optical Properties, and Optimization of Infrared Optoelectronic Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Preston Thomas

    High-performance III-V semiconductors based on ternary alloys and superlattice systems are fabricated, studied, and compared for infrared optoelectronic applications. InAsBi is a ternary alloy near the GaSb lattice constant that is not as thoroughly investigated as other III-V alloys and that is challenging to produce as Bi has a tendency to surface segregate and form droplets during growth rather than incorporate. A growth window is identified within which high-quality droplet-free bulk InAsBi is produced and Bi mole fractions up to 6.4% are obtained. Photoluminescence with high internal quantum efficiency is observed from InAs/InAsBi quantum wells. The high structural and optical quality of the InAsBi materials examined demonstrates that bulk, quantum well, and superlattice structures utilizing InAsBi are an important design option for efficient infrared coverage. Another important infrared material system is InAsSb and the strain-balanced InAs/InAsSb superlattice on GaSb. Detailed examination of X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence, and spectroscopic ellipsometry data provides the temperature and composition dependent bandgap of bulk InAsSb. The unintentional incorporation of approximately 1% Sb into the InAs layers of the superlattice is measured and found to significantly impact the analysis of the InAs/InAsSb band alignment. In the analysis of the absorption spectra, the ground state absorption coefficient and transition strength of the superlattice are proportional to the square of the electron-hole wavefunction overlap; wavefunction overlap is therefore a major design parameter in terms of optimizing absorption in these materials. Furthermore in addition to improvements through design optimization, the optical quality of the materials studied is found to be positively enhanced with the use of Bi as a surfactant during molecular beam epitaxy growth. A software tool is developed that calculates and optimizes the miniband structure of semiconductor

  18. Enabling propulsion materials for high-speed civil transport engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephens, Joseph R.; Herbell, Thomas P.

    1992-01-01

    NASA Headquarters and LeRC have advocated an Enabling Propulsion Materials Program (EPM) to begin in FY-92. The High Speed Research Phase 1 program which began in FY-90 has focused on the environmental acceptability of a High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT). Studies by industry, including Boeing, McDonnell Douglas, GE Aircraft Engines, and Pratt & Whitney Aircraft, and in-house studies by NASA concluded that NO(x) emissions and airport noise reduction can only be economically achieved by revolutionary advancements in materials technologies. This is especially true of materials for the propulsion system where the combustor is the key to maintaining low emissions, and the exhaust nozzle is the key to reducing airport noise to an acceptable level. Both of these components will rely on high temperature composite materials that can withstand the conditions imposed by commercial aircraft operations. The proposed EPM program will operate in conjunction with the HSR Phase 1 Program and the planned HSR Phase 2 program slated to start in FY-93. Components and subcomponents developed from advanced materials will be evaluated in the HSR Phase 2 Program.

  19. Recent developments of certified reference materials for road transportation.

    PubMed

    Chauhan, Sippy K; Gupta, Prabhat K; Shukla, Anuradha; Gangopadhyay, S

    2009-09-01

    Chemical measurements often constitute the basis for informed decision-making at different levels in society; sound decision-making is possible only if the quality of the data used is uncompromised. To guarantee the reliability and comparability of analytical data an intricate system of quality-assurance measures has to be put into effect in a laboratory. Reference materials and, in particular, certified reference materials (CRMs) are essential for achieving traceability and comparability of measurement results between laboratories and over time. As in any other domain of analytical chemistry, techniques used to monitor the levels and fate of contaminants in the environment must be calibrated using appropriate calibration materials, and the methods must be properly validated using fit-for purpose matrix-matched CRMs, to ensure confidence in the data produced. A sufficiently large number of matrix CRMs are available for analysis of most elements, and the group of chemicals known as persistent organic pollutants, in environmental compartments and biota. The wide variety of analyte/level/matrix/matrix property combinations available from several suppliers enables analysts to select CRMs which sufficiently match the properties of the samples they analyse routinely. Certified reference materials are playing an increasing role in the monitoring of environmental pollution. This paper is an attempt for describing the recent development of certified reference materials for road transportation, which mainly covers the combustion of fossil fuel, road side dust etc.

  20. Radiation Transport in 3D Heterogeneous Materials: DNS

    SciTech Connect

    Graziani, F

    2003-07-09

    In order to develop a phenomenological approach to transport in 3D heterogeneous media, we have performed direct numerical simulation studies. Using an algorithm based on the lattice random walk to generate random media, we have performed radiographic shots of the sample and digitized both the chord length and optical depth distributions. The optical depth distribution is then used to compute an effective mean free path. As theory predicts, the atomically averaged mean free path is always a minimum value. We have also demonstrated a dependency of mean free path on the distribution of random material.

  1. Charge transport studies of proton and ion conducting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Versek, Craig Wm

    The development of a high-throughput impedance spectroscopy instrumentation platform for conductivity characterization of ion transport materials is outlined. Collaborative studies using this system are summarized. Charge conduction mechanisms and conductivity data for small molecule proton conducting liquids, pyrazole, imidazole, 1,2,3-triazole, 1,2,4-triazole, and select mixtures of these compounds are documented. Furthermore, proton diffusivity measurements using a Pulse Field Gradient Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (PFG NMR) technique for imidazole and 1,2,3-triazole binary mixtures are compared. Studies of azole functionalized discotic and linear mesogens with conductivity, structural, and thermal characterizations are detailed.

  2. 49 CFR 176.76 - Transport vehicles, freight containers, and portable tanks containing hazardous materials.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... hazardous materials may be carried only on board a trailership, trainship, ferry vessel or car float. (c...

  3. Design of piezocomposite materials and piezoelectric transducers using topology optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Emilio Carlos Nelli

    Piezoelectric materials are widely used in electromechanical sensors and actuators, in electronic equipment as resonators, and in acoustic applications as ultrasonic transducers and hydrophones for generating and detecting sound waves. Their development has been based on the use of simple analytical models, test of prototypes, and analysis by the finite element method (FEM), usually limiting their design to a parametric optimization. By changing the topology of these devices or their components, we may obtain new kinds of piezocomposites and transducers with better performance characteristics. This dissertation describes the application of topology optimization combined with the homogenization method and FEM for designing piezocomposite materials and piezoelectric transducers. The optimized solution is obtained using Sequential Linear Programming. Three problems are discussed: design of piezocomposite materials, design of resonators and ultrasonic transducers, and design of piezoelectric actuators. The performance characteristics of piezocomposite materials can be improved by designing new topologies of microstructures (or unit cells) for these materials. The topology of the unit cell (and the properties of its constituents) determines the effective properties of the piezocomposite. By changing the unit cell topology, performance characteristics can be vastly improved in the piezocomposite. Hydrophone (low-frequency) and ultrasonic transducer (high-frequency) applications are considered. A general homogenization method applied to piezoelectricity was implemented using FEM to calculate the effective properties of a unit cell with complex topology. This method has no limitations regarding volume fraction or shape of the composite constituents. The main assumption is the periodicity of the unit cell. The performance characteristics are improved by orders of magnitude comparing with common configurations of piezocomposite unit cells, as confirmed by results of

  4. The analytical representation of viscoelastic material properties using optimization techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, S. A.

    1993-01-01

    This report presents a technique to model viscoelastic material properties with a function of the form of the Prony series. Generally, the method employed to determine the function constants requires assuming values for the exponential constants of the function and then resolving the remaining constants through linear least-squares techniques. The technique presented here allows all the constants to be analytically determined through optimization techniques. This technique is employed in a computer program named PRONY and makes use of commercially available optimization tool developed by VMA Engineering, Inc. The PRONY program was utilized to compare the technique against previously determined models for solid rocket motor TP-H1148 propellant and V747-75 Viton fluoroelastomer. In both cases, the optimization technique generated functions that modeled the test data with at least an order of magnitude better correlation. This technique has demonstrated the capability to use small or large data sets and to use data sets that have uniformly or nonuniformly spaced data pairs. The reduction of experimental data to accurate mathematical models is a vital part of most scientific and engineering research. This technique of regression through optimization can be applied to other mathematical models that are difficult to fit to experimental data through traditional regression techniques.

  5. Charge transport and injection in amorphous organic electronic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tse, Shing Chi

    This thesis presents how we use various measuring techniques to study the charge transport and injection in organic electronic materials. Understanding charge transport and injection properties in organic solids is of vital importance for improving performance characteristics of organic electronic devices, including organic-light-emitting diodes (OLEDs), photovoltaic cells (OPVs), and field effect transistors (OFETs). The charge transport properties of amorphous organic materials, commonly used in organic electronic devices, are investigated by the means of carrier mobility measurements. Transient electroluminescence (EL) technique was used to evaluate the electron mobility of an electron transporting material--- tris(8-hydroxyquinoline) aluminum (Alq3). The results are in excellent agreement with independent time-of-flight (TOF) measurements. Then, the effect of dopants on electron transport was also examined. TOF technique was also used to examine the effects of tertiary-butyl (t-Bu) substitutions on anthracene derivatives (ADN). All ADN compounds were found to be ambipolar. As the degree of t-Bu substitution increases, the carrier mobilities decrease progressively. The reduction of carrier mobilities with increasing t-butylation can be attributed to a decrease in the charge-transfer integral or the wavefunction overlap. In addition, from TOF measurements, two naphthylamine-based hole transporters, namely, N,N'-diphenyl-N,N'-bis(1-naphthyl)(1,1'-biphenyl)-4,4'diamine (NPB) and 4,4',4"-tris(n-(2-naphthyl)-n-phenyl-amino)-triphenylamine (2TNATA) were found to possess electron-transporting (ET) abilities. An organic light-emitting diode that employed NPB as the ET material was demonstrated. The electron conducting mechanism of NPB and 2TNATA in relation to the hopping model will be discussed. Furthermore, the ET property of NPB applied in OLEDs will also be examined. Besides transient EL and TOF techniques, we also use dark-injection space-charge-limited current

  6. Mass transport in morphogenetic processes: A second gradient theory for volumetric growth and material remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciarletta, P.; Ambrosi, D.; Maugin, G. A.

    2012-03-01

    In this work, we derive a novel thermo-mechanical theory for growth and remodeling of biological materials in morphogenetic processes. This second gradient hyperelastic theory is the first attempt to describe both volumetric growth and mass transport phenomena in a single-phase continuum model, where both stress- and shape-dependent growth regulations can be investigated. The diffusion of biochemical species (e.g. morphogens, growth factors, migration signals) inside the material is driven by configurational forces, enforced in the balance equations and in the set of constitutive relations. Mass transport is found to depend both on first- and on second-order material connections, possibly withstanding a chemotactic behavior with respect to diffusing molecules. We find that the driving forces of mass diffusion can be written in terms of covariant material derivatives reflecting, in a purely geometrical manner, the presence of a (first-order) torsion and a (second-order) curvature. Thermodynamical arguments show that the Eshelby stress and hyperstress tensors drive the rearrangement of the first- and second-order material inhomogeneities, respectively. In particular, an evolution law is proposed for the first-order transplant, extending a well-known result for inelastic materials. Moreover, we define the first stress-driven evolution law of the second-order transplant in function of the completely material Eshelby hyperstress. The theory is applied to two biomechanical examples, showing how an Eshelbian coupling can coordinate volumetric growth, mass transport and internal stress state, both in physiological and pathological conditions. Finally, possible applications of the proposed model are discussed for studying the unknown regulation mechanisms in morphogenetic processes, as well as for optimizing scaffold architecture in regenerative medicine and tissue engineering.

  7. 2014 International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lumban Gaol, Ford; Webb, Jeff; Ding, Jun

    2014-06-01

    The 2nd International Conference on Manufacturing, Optimization, Industrial and Material Engineering 2014 (MOIME 2014), was held at the Grand Mercure Harmoni, Opal Room 3rd Floor, Jakarta, Indonesia, during 29-30 March 2014. The MOIME 2014 conference is designed to bring together researchers, engineers and scientists in the domain of interest from around the world. MOIME 2014 is placed on promoting interaction between the theoretical, experimental, and applied communities, so that a high level exchange is achieved in new and emerging areas within Material Engineering, Industrial Engineering and all areas that relate to Optimization. We would like to express our sincere gratitude to all in the Technical Program Committee who have reviewed the papers and developed a very interesting Conference Program as well as the invited and plenary speakers. This year, we received 97 papers and after rigorous review, 24 papers were accepted. The participants come from 7 countries. There are 4 (four) parallel session and 2 Invited Speakers and one workshop. It is an honour to present this volume of IOP Conference Series: Materials Science and Engineering (MSE) and we deeply thank the authors for their enthusiastic and high-grade contributions. Finally, we would like to thank the conference chairmen, the members of the steering committee, the organizing committee, the organizing secretariat and the financial support from the conference sponsors that allowed the success of MOIME 2014. The Editors of the MOIME 2014 Proceedings Editors Dr Ford Lumban Gaol Jeff Webb, PhD Professor Jun Ding, PhD

  8. Basic materials and structures aspects for hypersonic transport vehicles (HTV)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinheil, E.; Uhse, W.

    A Mach 5 transport design is used to illustrate structural concepts and criteria for materials selections and also key technologies that must be followed in the areas of computational methods, materials and construction methods. Aside from the primary criteria of low weight, low costs, and conceivable risks, a number of additional requirements must be met, including stiffness and strength, corrosion resistance, durability, and a construction adequate for inspection, maintenance and repair. Current aircraft construction requirements are significantly extended for hypersonic vehicles. Additional consideration is given to long-duration temperature resistance of the airframe structure, the integration of large-volume cryogenic fuel tanks, computational tools, structural design, polymer matrix composites, and advanced manufacturing technologies.

  9. Transport of lunar material to the sites of the colonies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heppenheimer, T. A.

    1977-01-01

    An 'existence proof' is attempted for the feasibility of transport of lunar material to colonies in space. Masses of lunar material are accelerated to lunar escape by a tracked magnetically levitated mass driver; aim precision is to 1 km miss distance at L5 per mm/sec velocity error at the lunar surface. Mass driver design and linear synchronous motor drive design are discussed; laser-sensed checkpoints aid in velocity and directional precision. Moon-L5 trajectories are calculated. The design of the L5 construction station, or 'catcher vehicle,' is described; loads are received by chambers operating in a 'Venus flytrap' mode. Further research studies needed to round out the concept are listed explicitly.

  10. Combinatorial materials approach to accelerate materials discovery for transportation (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tong, Wei

    2017-04-01

    Combinatorial material research offers fast and efficient solutions to identify promising and advanced materials. It has revolutionized the pharmaceutical industry and now is being applied to accelerate the discovery of other new compounds, e.g. superconductors, luminescent materials, catalysts etc. Differing from the traditional trial-and-error process, this approach allows for the synthesis of a large number of compositionally diverse compounds by varying the combinations of the components and adjusting the ratios. It largely reduces the cost of single-sample synthesis/characterization, along with the turnaround time in the material discovery process, therefore, could dramatically change the existing paradigm for discovering and commercializing new materials. This talk outlines the use of combinatorial materials approach in the material discovery in transportation sector. It covers the general introduction to the combinatorial material concept, state of art for its application in energy-related research. At the end, LBNL capabilities in combinatorial materials synthesis and high throughput characterization that are applicable for material discovery research will be highlighted.

  11. Design of nanoporous materials with optimal sorption capacity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuan; Urita, Koki; Moriguchi, Isamu; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2015-06-01

    Modern technological advances have enabled one to manufacture nanoporous materials with a prescribed pore structure. This raises a possibility of using controllable pore-scale parameters (e.g., pore size and connectivity) to design materials with desired macroscopic properties (e.g., diffusion coefficient and adsorption capacity). By relating these two scales, the homogenization theory (or other upscaling techniques) provides a means of guiding the experimental design. To demonstrate this approach, we consider a class of nanoporous materials whose pore space consists of nanotunnels interconnected by nanotube bridges. Such hierarchical nanoporous carbons with mesopores and micropores have shown high specific electric double layer capacitances and high rate capability in an organic electrolyte. We express the anisotropic diffusion coefficient and adsorption coefficient of such materials in terms of the tunnels' properties (pore radius and inter-pore throat width) and their connectivity (spacing between the adjacent tunnels and nanotube-bridge density). Our analysis is applicable for solutes that undergo a non-equilibrium Langmuir adsorption reaction on the surfaces of fluid-filled pores, but other homogeneous and heterogeneous reactions can be handled in a similar fashion. The presented results can be used to guide the design of nanoporous materials with optimal permeability and sorption capacity.

  12. 75 FR 15613 - Hazardous Materials Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-30

    ... Transportation; Registration and Fee Assessment Program AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety... registration program are to gather information about the transportation of hazardous materials, and to fund the... transportation system each day. It is impossible to predict when and where a hazardous materials incident......

  13. 75 FR 43906 - Hazardous Materials: Requirements for the Storage of Explosives During Transportation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Materials: Requirements for the Storage of Explosives During Transportation AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous... Hazardous Materials Safety Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 1200 New Jersey Avenue, SE... Explosives Stored During Transportation A. Hazardous Materials Regulations (HMR), 49 CFR Parts 171-180...

  14. 75 FR 43898 - Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The Federal hazardous material transportation law (Federal hazmat law... transportation of hazardous material in commerce. (49 U.S.C. 5103) Federal hazmat law authorizes the Secretary to...

  15. 76 FR 44496 - Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures; Response to Appeals...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-07-26

    ...) identifier; an estimated quantity of the hazardous material planned for transportation; an estimate of the... CEO be aware of the hazardous materials transportation functions executed by that company, and... transportation of hazardous materials under the guidelines of a special permit. For clarification, applicants are...

  16. 76 FR 454 - Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... Hazardous Materials Transportation: Revisions of Special Permits Procedures AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous.... SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background The Federal hazardous material transportation law (Federal hazmat law... transportation of hazardous material in commerce. (49 U.S.C. 5103) Section 5117(a) authorizes the Secretary of...

  17. 41 CFR 101-26.803-3 - Reporting of discrepancies in transportation, shipments, material, or billings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... discrepancies in transportation, shipments, material, or billings. 101-26.803-3 Section 101-26.803-3 Public... GSA or DOD Shipments, Material, or Billings § 101-26.803-3 Reporting of discrepancies in transportation, shipments, material, or billings. (a) Transportation-type discrepancies shall be processed...

  18. 41 CFR 101-26.803-3 - Reporting of discrepancies in transportation, shipments, material, or billings.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... discrepancies in transportation, shipments, material, or billings. 101-26.803-3 Section 101-26.803-3 Public... GSA or DOD Shipments, Material, or Billings § 101-26.803-3 Reporting of discrepancies in transportation, shipments, material, or billings. (a) Transportation-type discrepancies shall be processed...

  19. 78 FR 29016 - Establishing Quality Assurance Programs for Packaging Used in Transport of Radioactive Material

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-16

    ... regulations for the packaging and transportation of radioactive material. The NRC is issuing for public...), that would amend its regulations for the packaging and transportation of radioactive material in Part... requirements for the packaging and transportation of radioactive material. III. Draft Regulatory Guide The NRC...

  20. Surface Diffusion Effect on Gas Transport in Nanoporous Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Takuma; Yoshimoto, Yuta; Takagi, Shu; Kinefuchi, Ikuya

    2016-11-01

    Polymer electrolyte fuel cells are one of the promising candidates for power sources of electric vehicles. For further improvement of their efficiency in high current density operation, a better understanding of oxygen flow inside the cells, which have micro- or nanoporous structures, is necessary. Molecular simulations such as the direct simulation of Monte Carlo (DSMC) are necessary to elucidate flow phenomena in micro- or nanostructures since the Knudsen number is close to unity. Our previous report showed that the oxygen diffusion resistance in porous structures with a characteristic pore size of 100 nm calculated by DSMC agrees well with that measured experimentally. On the other hand, when it comes to the transport in structures with much smaller pore sizes, it is expected that the surface diffusion has a significant impact on gas transport because of their higher specific surface area. Here we present the calculation of gas transport in porous structures with considering surface diffusion. The numerical porous structure models utilized in our simulations are constructed from three-dimensional imaging of materials. The effect of the distance of random walk on the total diffusion resistance in the structures is discussed. This paper is based on results obtained from a project commissioned by the New Energy and Industrial Development Organization (NEDO).

  1. Chemical vapour transport of III-V semiconductor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Mervyn Howard

    Over the temperature range 770 to 1310 K, however, two bromides compete for prominence, dependent upon temperature. In both instances, it is shown that vapour transport becomes rate limited at low temperature. Further to the chemical vapour transport of indium phosphide, the dissociative sublimation of the compound has also been investigated. Raman spectroscopy has been used to identify high temperature molecular species involved in vapour transport of III-V semiconductor materials. Supplementary work has been performed on the thermochemistry of indium monobromide. The heat of formation of indium bromide crystals has been determined using a solution calormetric technique. Differential scanning calorimetry was used to measure the heat capacity and heat of fusion, of the salt. An entrainment study of the evaporation of liquid indium monobromide was undertaken to yield a value for its heat of vaporisation. Using a statistical thermodynamic approach, the heat capacity of the vapour was calculated. Collating the information, a value for the heat of formation of indium monobromide gas at 1000 K has been calculated for use in other thermodynamic calculations.

  2. Photothermal heating in metal-embedded microtools for material transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villangca, Mark; Palima, Darwin; Bañas, Andrew; Glückstad, Jesper

    2016-03-01

    Material transport is an important mechanism in microfluidics and drug delivery. The methods and solutions found in literature involve passively diffusing structures, microneedles and chemically fueled structures. In this work, we make use of optically actuated microtools with embedded metal layer as heating element for controlled loading and release. The new microtools take advantage of the photothermal-induced convection current to load and unload cargo. We also discuss some challenges encountered in realizing a self-contained polymerized microtool. Microfluidic mixing, fluid flow control and convection currents have been demonstrated both experimentally and numerically for static metal thin films or passively floating nanoparticles. Here we show an integration of aforementioned functionalities in an optically fabricated and actuated microtool. As proof of concept, we demonstrate loading and unloading of beads. This can be extended to controlled transport and release of genetic material, bio-molecules, fluorescent dyes. We envisioned these microtools to be an important addition to the portfolio of structure-mediated contemporary biophotonics.

  3. Thermoelectric and thermospintronic transport in Dirac material-based nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Po-Hao

    The growing need for power due to the rapid developments of the technologies has urged both engineers and scientists to study more sustainable types of energy. On the other hand, the improvement of our abilities although enable us, for example, to double the number of transistors in a dense integrated circuit approximately every two years (Moore's law), comes with side effect due to overheating. Taking advantage of thermoelectric effect has thus become one of the obvious solutions for the problems. But due to the poor efficiency of electricity-heat conversion, there are still challenges to be overcome in order to fully utilize the idea. In the past few years, the realization of graphene along with the discoveries of topological insulators (TI) which are both considered as Dirac material (DM) have offer alternative routs for improving the energy conversion efficiency through different approaches as well as novel quantum effects of materials themselves for investigation. The aim of this thesis is to present contributions to improving the efficiency of thermoelectric conversion as well as analyzing spin transport phenomena that occur in nano-devices. This thesis spans the areas of thermoelectric (TE) effect, spin-Seebeck effect (SSE) and the spin transport on the 3D topological insulator (TI). The different methods have been applied ranging from tight-binding (TB) approximation to density function theory (DFT) combined with non-equilibrium function (NEGF) techniques.

  4. Hole-transport material variation in fully vacuum deposited perovskite solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Polander, Lauren E.; Pahner, Paul; Schwarze, Martin; Saalfrank, Matthias; Koerner, Christian; Leo, Karl

    2014-08-01

    This work addresses the effect of energy level alignment between the hole-transporting material and the active layer in vacuum deposited, planar-heterojunction CH{sub 3}NH{sub 3}PbI{sub x−3}Cl{sub x} perovskite solar cells. Through a series of hole-transport materials, with conductivity values set using controlled p-doping of the layer, we correlate their ionization potentials with the open-circuit voltage of the device. With ionization potentials beyond 5.3 eV, a substantial decrease in both current density and voltage is observed, which highlights the delicate energetic balance between driving force for hole-extraction and maximizing the photovoltage. In contrast, when an optimal ionization potential match is found, the open-circuit voltage can be maximized, leading to power conversion efficiencies of up to 10.9%. These values are obtained with hole-transport materials that differ from the commonly used Spiro-MeO-TAD and correspond to a 40% performance increase versus this reference.

  5. Selection of optimal composition-control parameters for friable materials

    SciTech Connect

    Pak, Yu.N.; Vdovkin, A.V.

    1988-05-01

    A method for composition analysis of coal and minerals is proposed which uses scattered gamma radiation and does away with preliminary sample preparation to ensure homogeneous particle density, surface area, and size. Reduction of the error induced by material heterogeneity has previously been achieved by rotation of the control object during analysis. A further refinement is proposed which addresses the necessity that the contribution of the radiation scattered from each individual surface to the total intensity be the same. This is achieved by providing a constant linear rate of travel for the irradiated spot through back-and-forth motion of the sensor. An analytical expression is given for the laws of motion for the sensor and test tube which provides for uniform irradiated area movement along a path analogous to the Archimedes spiral. The relationships obtained permit optimization of measurement parameters in analyzing friable materials which are not uniform in grain size.

  6. Transport properties of damaged materials. Cementitious barriers partnership

    SciTech Connect

    Langton, C.

    2014-11-01

    The objective of the Cementitious Barriers Partnership (CBP) project is to develop tools to improve understanding and prediction of the long-term structural, hydraulic, and chemical performance of cementitious barriers used in low-level waste storage applications. One key concern for the long-term durability of concrete is the degradation of the cementitious matrix, which occurs as a result of aggressive chemical species entering the material or leaching out in the environment, depending on the exposure conditions. The objective of the experimental study described in this report is to provide experimental data relating damage in cementitious materials to changes in transport properties, which can eventually be used to support predictive model development. In order to get results within a reasonable timeframe and to induce as much as possible uniform damage level in materials, concrete samples were exposed to freezing and thawing (F/T) cycles. The methodology consisted in exposing samples to F/T cycles and monitoring damage level with ultrasonic pulse velocity measurements. Upon reaching pre-selected damage levels, samples were tested to evaluate changes in transport properties. Material selection for the study was motivated by the need to get results rapidly, in order to assess the relevance of the methodology. Consequently, samples already available at SIMCO from past studies were used. They consisted in three different concrete mixtures cured for five years in wet conditions. The mixtures had water-to-cement ratios of 0.5, 0.65 and 0.75 and were prepared with ASTM Type I cement only. The results showed that porosity is not a good indicator for damage caused by the formation of microcracks. Some materials exhibited little variations in porosity even for high damage levels. On the other hand, significant variations in tortuosity were measured in all materials. This implies that damage caused by internal pressure does not necessarily create additional pore space in

  7. The optimization of mechanical properties for nuclear transportation casks in ASTM A350 LF5

    SciTech Connect

    Price, S.; Honeyman, G.A.

    1997-12-31

    Transport flasks are required for the movement of spent nuclear fuel. Due to their nature of operation, it is necessary that these flasks are produced from forged steels with exceptional toughness properties. The material specification generally cited for flask manufacture is ASTM A350 Grade LF5 Class 1, a carbon-manganese-nickel alloy. The range of chemical analysis permitted by this specification is very broad and it is the responsibility of the material manufacturer to select a composition within this range which will satisfy all the mechanical properties requirements, and to ensure safe and reliable performance. Forgemasters Steel and Engineering Limited have experience in the manufacture of large high integrity fuel element flask forgings which extend over several decades. This experience and involvement in international standards in US, Europe and Japan has facilitated the development of an optimized analysis with a low carbon content, nickel levels towards the top end of the allowed range, a deliberate aluminum addition to control grain size and strictly controlled residual element levels. The resultant steel has excellent low temperature impact properties which greatly exceed the requirements of the specification. This analysis is now being adopted for the manufacture of all current transport flasks.

  8. Extraction design and low energy beam transport optimization of space charge dominated multispecies ion beam sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delferrière, O.; De Menezes, D.

    2004-05-01

    In all accelerator projects, the low energy part of the accelerator has to be carefully optimized to match the beam characteristic requirements of the higher energy parts. Since 1994 with the beginning of the Injector of Protons for High Intensity (IPHI) project and Source of Light Ions with High Intensities (SILHI) electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source development at CEA/Saclay, we are using a set of two-dimensional (2D) codes for extraction system optimization (AXCEL, OPERA-2D) and beam transport (MULTIPART). The 95 keV SILHI extraction system optimization has largely increased the extracted current, and improved the beam line transmission. From these good results, a 130 mA D+ extraction system for the International Fusion Material Irradiation Facility project has been designed in the same way as SILHI one. We are also now involved in the SPIRAL 2 project for the building of a 40 keV D+ ECR ion source, continuously tunable from 0.1 to 5 mA, for which a special four-electrode extraction system has been studied. In this article we will describe the 2D design process and present the different extraction geometries and beam characteristics. Simulation results of SILHI H+ beam emittance will be compared with experimental measurements.

  9. Optimal placement of active material actuators using genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Terrence; Frecker, Mary I.

    2004-07-01

    Actuators based on smart materials generally exhibit a tradeoff between force and stroke. Researchers have surrounded piezoelectric materials (PZT"s) with complaint structures to magnify either their geometric or mechanical advantage. Most of these designs are literally built around a particular piezoelectric device, so the design space consists of only the compliant mechanism. Materials scientists researchers have demonstrated the ability to pole a PZT in an arbitrary direction, and some engineers have taken advantage of this to build "shear mode" actuators. The goal of this work is to determine if the performance of compliant mechanisms improves by the inclusion of the piezoelectric polarization as a design variable. The polarization vector is varied via transformation matrixes, and the compliant actuator is modeled using the SIMP (Solid Isotropic Material with Penalization) or "power-law method." The concept of mutual potential energy is used to form an objective function to measure the piezoelectric actuator"s performance. The optimal topology of the compliant mechanism and orientation of the polarization method are determined using a sequential linear programming algorithm. This paper presents a demonstration problem that shows small changes in the polarization vector have a marginal effect on the optimum topology of the mechanism, but improves actuation.

  10. Optimal reconstruction of material properties in complex multiphysics phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bukshtynov, Vladislav; Protas, Bartosz

    2013-06-01

    We develop an optimization-based approach to the problem of reconstructing temperature-dependent material properties in complex thermo-fluid systems described by the equations for the conservation of mass, momentum and energy. Our goal is to estimate the temperature dependence of the viscosity coefficient in the momentum equation based on some noisy temperature measurements, where the temperature is governed by a separate energy equation. We show that an elegant and computationally efficient solution of this inverse problem is obtained by formulating it as a PDE-constrained optimization problem which can be solved with a gradient-based descent method. A key element of the proposed approach, the cost functional gradients are characterized by mathematical structure quite different than in typical problems of PDE-constrained optimization and are expressed in terms of integrals defined over the level sets of the temperature field. Advanced techniques of integration on manifolds are required to evaluate numerically such gradients, and we systematically compare three different methods. As a model system we consider a two-dimensional unsteady flow in a lid-driven cavity with heat transfer, and present a number of computational tests to validate our approach and illustrate its performance.

  11. Integration of finite element analysis and numerical optimization techniques for RAM transport package design

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, D.C.; Eldred, M.S.; Witkowski, W.R.

    1995-12-31

    Type B radioactive material transport packages must meet strict Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) regulations specified in 10 CFR 71. Type B containers include impact limiters, radiation or thermal shielding layers, and one or more containment vessels. In the past, each component was typically designed separately based on its driving constraint and the expertise of the designer. The components were subsequently assembled and the design modified iteratively until all of the design criteria were met. This approach neglects the fact that components may serve secondary purposes as well as primary ones. For example, an impact limiter`s primary purpose is to act as an energy absorber and protect the contents of the package, but can also act as a heat dissipater or insulator. Designing the component to maximize its performance with respect to both objectives can be accomplished using numerical optimization techniques.

  12. Materials Science and Materials Chemistry for Large Scale Electrochemical Energy Storage: From Transportation to Electrical Grid

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jun; Zhang, Jiguang; Yang, Zhenguo; Lemmon, John P.; Imhoff, Carl H.; Graff, Gordon L.; Li, Liyu; Hu, Jian Z.; Wang, Chong M.; Xiao, Jie; Xia, Guanguang; Viswanathan, Vilayanur V.; Baskaran, Suresh; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Li, Xiaolin; Shao, Yuyan; Schwenzer, Birgit

    2013-02-15

    Large-scale electrical energy storage has become more important than ever for reducing fossil energy consumption in transportation and for the widespread deployment of intermittent renewable energy in electric grid. However, significant challenges exist for its applications. Here, the status and challenges are reviewed from the perspective of materials science and materials chemistry in electrochemical energy storage technologies, such as Li-ion batteries, sodium (sulfur and metal halide) batteries, Pb-acid battery, redox flow batteries, and supercapacitors. Perspectives and approaches are introduced for emerging battery designs and new chemistry combinations to reduce the cost of energy storage devices.

  13. First-Principles Calculations of Electronic, Optical, and Transport Properties of Materials for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guangsha

    Solar electricity is a reliable and environmentally friendly method of sustainable energy production and a realistic alternative to conventional fossil fuels. Moreover, thermoelectric energy conversion is a promising technology for solid-state refrigeration and efficient waste-heat recovery. Predicting and optimizing new photovoltaic and thermoelectric materials composed of Earth-abundant elements that exceed the current state of the art, and understanding how nanoscale structuring and ordering improves their energy conversion efficiency pose a challenge for materials scientists. I approach this challenge by developing and applying predictive high-performance computing methods to guide research and development of new materials for energy-conversion applications. Advances in computer-simulation algorithms and high-performance computing resources promise to speed up the development of new compounds with desirable properties and significantly shorten the time delay between the discovery of new materials and their commercial deployment. I present my calculated results on the extraordinary properties of nanostructured semiconductor materials, including strong visible-light absorbance in nanoporous silicon and few-layer SnSe and GeSe. These findings highlight the capability of nanoscale structuring and ordering to improve the performance of Earth-abundant materials compared to their bulk counterparts for solar-cell applications. I also successfully identified the dominant mechanisms contributing to free-carrier absorption in n-type silicon. My findings help evaluate the impact of the energy loss from this absorption mechanism in doped silicon and are thus important for the design of silicon solar cells. In addition, I calculated the thermoelectric transport properties of p-type SnSe, a bulk material with a record thermoelectric figure of merit. I predicted the optimal temperatures and free-carrier concentrations for thermoelectric energy conversion, as well the

  14. Exhaust Nozzle Materials Development for the High Speed Civil Transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grady, J. E.

    1999-01-01

    The United States has embarked on a national effort to develop the technology necessary to produce a Mach 2.4 High Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) for entry into service by the year 2005. The viability of this aircraft is contingent upon its meeting both economic and environmental requirements. Two engine components have been identified as critical to the environmental acceptability of the HSCT. These include a combustor with significantly lower emissions than are feasible with current technology, and a lightweight exhaust nozzle that meets community noise standards. The Enabling Propulsion Materials (EPM) program will develop the advanced structural materials, materials fabrication processes, structural analysis and life prediction tools for the HSCT combustor and low noise exhaust nozzle. This is being accomplished through the coordinated efforts of the NASA Lewis Research Center, General Electric Aircraft Engines and Pratt & Whitney. The mission of the EPM Exhaust Nozzle Team is to develop and demonstrate this technology by the year 1999 to enable its timely incorporation into HSCT propulsion systems.

  15. Emerging of Inorganic Hole Transporting Materials For Perovskite Solar Cells.

    PubMed

    Rajeswari, Ramireddy; Mrinalini, Madoori; Prasanthkumar, Seelam; Giribabu, Lingamallu

    2017-07-01

    Hole transporting material (HTM) is a significant component to achieve the high performance perovskite solar cells (PSCs). Over the years, inorganic, organic and hybrid (organic-inorganic) material based HTMs have been developed and investigated successfully. Today, perovskite solar cells achieved the efficiency of 22.1 % with with 2,2',7,7'-tetrakis(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenyl-amine) 9,9-spirobifluorene (spiro-OMeTAD) as HTM. Nevertheless, synthesis and cost of organic HTMs is a major challenging issue and therefore alternative materials are required. From the past few years, inorganic HTMs showed large improvement in power conversion efficiency (PCE) and stability. Recently CuOx reached the PCE of 19.0% with better stability. These developments affirms that inorganic HTMs are better alternativesto the organic HTMs for next generation PSCs. In this report, we mainly focussed on the recent advances of inorganic and hybrid HTMs for PSCs and highlighted the efficiency and stability of PSCs improved by changing metal oxides as HTMs. Consequently, we expect that energy levels of these inorganic HTMs matches very well with the valence band of perovskites and improved efficiency helps in future practical deployment of low cost PSCs. © 2017 The Chemical Society of Japan & Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Magnetoelectric interaction and transport behaviours in magnetic nanocomposite thermoelectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Wenyu; Liu, Zhiyuan; Wei, Ping; Zhang, Qingjie; Zhu, Wanting; Su, Xianli; Tang, Xinfeng; Yang, Jihui; Liu, Yong; Shi, Jing; Chao, Yimin; Lin, Siqi; Pei, Yanzhong

    2017-01-01

    How to suppress the performance deterioration of thermoelectric materials in the intrinsic excitation region remains a key challenge. The magnetic transition of permanent magnet nanoparticles from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism provides an effective approach to finding the solution to this challenge. Here, we have designed and prepared magnetic nanocomposite thermoelectric materials consisting of BaFe12O19 nanoparticles and Ba0.3In0.3Co4Sb12 matrix. It was found that the electrical transport behaviours of the nanocomposites are controlled by the magnetic transition of BaFe12O19 nanoparticles from ferromagnetism to paramagnetism. BaFe12O19 nanoparticles trap electrons below the Curie temperature (TC) and release the trapped electrons above the TC, playing an 'electron repository' role in maintaining high figure of merit ZT. BaFe12O19 nanoparticles produce two types of magnetoelectric effect—electron spiral motion and magnon-drag thermopower—as well as enhancing phonon scattering. Our work demonstrates that the performance deterioration of thermoelectric materials in the intrinsic excitation region can be suppressed through the magnetic transition of permanent magnet nanoparticles.

  17. Degradation of Hole Transport Materials via Exciton-Driven Cyclization.

    PubMed

    Bell, Bruce M; Clark, Michael B; Devore, David D; De Vries, Timothy S; Froese, Robert D; Gray, Kaitlyn C; Jackson, David H K; Kuech, T F; Na, Hong-Yeop; Kearns, Kenneth L; Lee, Kyung-Joo; Mukhopadhyay, Sukrit; Rachford, Aaron A; Spencer, Liam P; Woodward, W H Hunter

    2017-04-19

    Organic light-emitting diode (OLED) displays have been an active and intense area of research for well over a decade and have now reached commercial success for displays from cell phones to large format televisions. A more thorough understanding of the many different potential degradation modes which cause OLED device failure will be necessary to develop the next generation of OLED materials, improve device lifetime, and to ultimately improve the cost vs performance ratio. Each of the different organic layers in an OLED device can be susceptible to unique decomposition pathways, however stability toward excitons is critical for emissive layer (EML) materials as well as any layer near the recombination zone. This study will specifically focus on degradation modes within the hole transport layer (HTL) with the goal being to identify the general decomposition paths occurring in an operating device and use this information to design new derivatives which can block these pathways. Through post-mortem analyses of several aged OLED devices, an apparently common intramolecular cyclization pathway has been identified that was not previously reported for arylamine-containing HTL materials and that operates parallel to but faster than the previously described fragmentation pathways.

  18. 75 FR 27273 - Hazardous Materials; Packages Intended for Transport by Aircraft

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-14

    ... Materials, Federal Aviation Administration, U.S. Department of Transportation, 490 L'Enfant Plaza, SW., Room... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration 49 CFR Parts 171 and 173 RIN 2137-AE32 Hazardous Materials; Packages Intended for Transport by Aircraft AGENCY: Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety...

  19. Compliance testing of reusable containers for transport of type A packages of radioactive material.

    PubMed

    Landsworth, R; Gross, G

    1991-05-01

    Transporting radioactive materials within a medical complex comes under jurisdiction of the U.S. Department of Transportation when public highways are used. A strong, reusable container to safely transport radioactive material was developed and tested at Mayo Medical Center to satisfy the requirements of the U.S. Department of Transportation and Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The container successfully completed water spray, free drop, compression, and penetration tests. It has been in use for 3 y without any loss of radioactive materials.

  20. Cellular water distribution, transport, and its investigation methods for plant-based food material.

    PubMed

    Khan, Md Imran H; Karim, M A

    2017-09-01

    Heterogeneous and hygroscopic characteristics of plant-based food material make it complex in structure, and therefore water distribution in its different cellular environments is very complex. There are three different cellular environments, namely the intercellular environment, the intracellular environment, and the cell wall environment inside the food structure. According to the bonding strength, intracellular water is defined as loosely bound water, cell wall water is categorized as strongly bound water, and intercellular water is known as free water (FW). During food drying, optimization of the heat and mass transfer process is crucial for the energy efficiency of the process and the quality of the product. For optimizing heat and mass transfer during food processing, understanding these three types of waters (strongly bound, loosely bound, and free water) in plant-based food material is essential. However, there are few studies that investigate cellular level water distribution and transport. As there is no direct method for determining the cellular level water distributions, various indirect methods have been applied to investigate the cellular level water distribution, and there is, as yet, no consensus on the appropriate method for measuring cellular level water in plant-based food material. Therefore, the main aim of this paper is to present a comprehensive review on the available methods to investigate the cellular level water, the characteristics of water at different cellular levels and its transport mechanism during drying. The effect of bound water transport on quality of food product is also discussed. This review article presents a comparative study of different methods that can be applied to investigate cellular water such as nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR), bioelectric impedance analysis (BIA), differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), and dilatometry. The article closes with a discussion of current challenges to investigating cellular water

  1. Electron injection and transport mechanism in organic devices based on electron transport materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, M. A.; Xu, Wei; Khizar-ul-Haq; Zhang, Xiao Wen; Bai, Yu; Jiang, X. Y.; Zhang, Z. L.; Zhu, W. Q.

    2008-11-01

    Electron injection and transport in organic devices based on electron transport (ET) materials, such as 4,7- diphyenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bathophenanthroline BPhen), 2,9-dimethyl-4,7-diphenyl-1,10-phenanthroline (Bathocuproine BCP) and bipyridyl oxadiazole compound 1,3-bis [2-(2,2'-bipyridin-6-yl)-1,3,4-oxadiazol-5-yl]benzene (Bpy-OXD), have been reported. The devices are composed of ITO/ET materials (BPhen, BCP Bpy-OXD)/cathodes, where cathodes = Au, Al and Ca. Current-voltage characteristics of each ET material are performed as a function of cathodes. We have found that Ca and Al exhibit quite different J-V characteristics compared with the gold (Au) cathode. The current is more than one order of magnitude higher for the Al cathode and more than three orders of magnitude higher for Ca compared with that of the Au cathode at ~8 V for all ET materials. This is because of the relatively low energy barrier at the organic/metal interface for Ca and Al cathodes. Electron-only devices with the Au cathode show that the electron transfer limitation is located at the organic/cathode interface and the Fowler-Nordheim mechanism is qualitatively consistent with experimental data at high voltages. With Ca and Al cathodes, electron conduction is preponderant and is bulk limited. A power law dependence J ~ Vm with m > 2 is consistent with the model of trap-charge limited conduction. The total electron trap density is estimated to be ~5 × 1018 cm-3. The critical voltage (Vc) is found to be ~45 V and is almost independent of the materials.

  2. A continuous linear optimal transport approach for pattern analysis in image datasets

    PubMed Central

    Kolouri, Soheil; Tosun, Akif B.; Ozolek, John A.; Rohde, Gustavo K.

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to facilitate the application of the optimal transport metric to pattern recognition on image databases. The method is based on a linearized version of the optimal transport metric, which provides a linear embedding for the images. Hence, it enables shape and appearance modeling using linear geometric analysis techniques in the embedded space. In contrast to previous work, we use Monge's formulation of the optimal transport problem, which allows for reasonably fast computation of the linearized optimal transport embedding for large images. We demonstrate the application of the method to recover and visualize meaningful variations in a supervised-learning setting on several image datasets, including chromatin distribution in the nuclei of cells, galaxy morphologies, facial expressions, and bird species identification. We show that the new approach allows for high-resolution construction of modes of variations and discrimination and can enhance classification accuracy in a variety of image discrimination problems. PMID:26858466

  3. Statistical thermodynamics of material transport in nonisothermal suspensions.

    PubMed

    Semenov, Semen; Schimpf, Martin

    2015-02-26

    An approach to the transport of material in a temperature gradient is outlined using nonequilibrium thermodynamics theory. The model is applicable to the thermophoresis of colloids and nanoparticles in systems with limited miscibility. Component chemical potentials in binary systems are calculated using statistical mechanics. The local pressure distribution is obtained using the condition of local thermodynamic equilibrium around the suspended particle. The Laplace contribution of the local pressure distribution within the layer of liquid surrounding the particle leads to a size dependence that is consistent with empirical data. The contribution of Keezom interaction to the thermodiffusion coefficient is calculated using empirical values of the thermodiffusion coefficient for silica particles in water and acetonitrile. The resulting interaction energies are consistent with those found in the literature.

  4. Characterization of new materials for Ultracold Neutron transport and storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pierre, Edgard; Christopher, Nicholas; Kawasaki, Shinsuke; Mammei, Russell; Marcellin, James; Matsumiya, Ryohei; Picker, Ruediger

    2016-09-01

    At TRIUMF, we are currently developing a super-thermal UltraCold Neutron (UCN) source using phonon exchange in super-fluid helium. To take full advantage of the high density of UCN from the TRIUMF source we are developing high UCN transmission guides and long storage time volumes for polarized UCN. These guides and storage volumes are important for experiments requiring a high density of polarized UCN, such as the neutron Electric Dipole Moment (EDM) measurement. The transportation efficiency depends on the capacity of the guide's walls to contain the UCN. The mean potential experienced by a UCN on wall collisions is called the Fermi potential and depends on the material. We have determined a set of potential candidates for our next generation UCN guides and EDM storage chamber. Their Fermi potential was measured using the SOFIA apparatus at MLF, J-PARC, Japan. Results of this measurement are presented in this talk.

  5. Parametric study of a canard-configured transport using conceptual design optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbuckle, P. D.; Sliwa, S. M.

    1985-01-01

    Constrained-parameter optimization is used to perform optimal conceptual design of both canard and conventional configurations of a medium-range transport. A number of design constants and design constraints are systematically varied to compare the sensitivities of canard and conventional configurations to a variety of technology assumptions. Main-landing-gear location and canard surface high-lift performance are identified as critical design parameters for a statically stable, subsonic, canard-configured transport.

  6. Optimal thermographic procedures for moisture analysis in building materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosina, Elisabetta; Ludwig, Nicola

    1999-09-01

    The presence of moisture in building materials causes damage second only to structural one. NDT are successfully applied to map moisture distribution, to localize the source of water and to determine microclimatic conditions. IR Thermography has the advantage of non-destructive testing while it allows to investigate large surfaces. The measures can be repeated in time to monitor the phenomenon of raising water. Nevertheless the investigation of moisture in walls is one of the less reliable application of Thermography IR applied to cultural heritage preservation. The temperature of the damp areas can be colder than dry ones, because of surface evaporation, or can be warmer, because of the higher thermal inertia of water content versus building materials. The apparent discrepancies between the two results are due to the different microclimatic conditions of the scanning. Aim of the paper is to describe optimal procedures to obtain reliable maps of moisture in building materials, at different environmental and microclimatic conditions. Another goal is the description of the related energetic phenomena, which cause temperature discontinuities, and that are detected by thermography. Active and passive procedures are presented and compared. Case studies show some examples of procedures application.

  7. Optimal Design of Honeycomb Material Used to Mitigate Head Impact

    PubMed Central

    Caccese, Vincent; Ferguson, James R.; Edgecomb, Michael

    2013-01-01

    This paper presents a study of the impact resistance of honeycomb structure with the purpose to mitigate impact forces. The objective is to aid in the choice of optimal parameters to minimize the thickness of the honeycomb structure while providing adequate protection to prevent injury due to head impact. Studies are presented using explicit finite element analysis representing the case of an unprotected drop of a rigid impactor onto a simulated floor consisting of vinyl composition tile and concrete. Analysis of honeycomb material to reduce resulting accelerations is also presented where parameters such as honeycomb material modulus, wall thickness, cell geometry and structure depth are compared to the unprotected case. A simplified analysis technique using a genetic algorithm is presented to demonstrate the use of this method to select a minimum honeycomb depth to achieve a desired acceleration level at a given level of input energy. It is important to select a minimum material depth in that smaller dimensions lead toward more aesthetic design that increase the likelihood of that the device is used. PMID:23976812

  8. Capture of Asteroids and Transport of Asteroid Materials to Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hong-Yee; no Team

    2014-01-01

    Recently there has been much discussion on the capture of asteroids or mining the asteroids. While the technology might be years away, in this paper we will discuss an energy efficient method to transport either a small asteroid or materials gathered from asteroids to the Earth. In particular, I will concentrate on a large and nearby asteroid, 8 Flora in the Flora Family. Generally, asteroids are located between 2 to 3 AU (astronomical unit) from the Earth, and in transporting materials from asteroids to the Earth, an energy equivalent of the gravitational potential energy difference between the Earth and the asteroids to the Sun. This amount of potential energy is a sizable fraction of the orbital kinetic energy of the Earth around the Sun. This amount of energy is considerable. In this paper I propose to use the planet Mars as a medium to remove much of the gravitational energy difference. In the case of the asteroid 8 Flora, it is only necessary to decelerate the asteroid mate- rials by a small decrement, of the order of 3 km/sec. This decrement could even be achieved (pending on the availability of technology) by mechanical devices such as catapults on 8 Flora. It is also proposed to separate a pair of contact asteroid binaries by using impulse propulsion, and to propel one component of the separated asteroids to pass by Mars to be decelerated to reach the Earth orbit and captured by the Earth or the Moon. The plausibility of this ambitious project will be discussed. The author is NASA-GSFC Astrophysicist, Retired.

  9. Methanotrophic bacteria and facilitated transport of pollutants in aquifer material

    SciTech Connect

    Jenkins, M.B.; Chen, Jyh-Herng; Kadner, D.J.; Lion, L.W. )

    1994-10-01

    In-situ stimulation of methanotrophic bacteria has been considered for aquifer remediation. Experimental results indicate that both colloidal suspensions containing methanotrophic cells and the soluble extracellular polymers produced by methanotrophic cells have the potential to enhance the transport and removal of other environmental contaminants such as polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons and transition metals in aquifer material. Three methanotrophic bacteria were used in the experiments: Methylomonas albus BG8, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b, and Methylocystis parvus OBBP. The distribution coefficients for Cd with extraceullular polymers were of the same order as that obtained with the aquifer sand, indicating polymers from the methanotrophic bacteria could act to increase the transport of Cd in a porous medium. Polymer from BG8 significantly reduced the apparent distribution coefficient for Cd with an aquifer sand. [[sup 14]C]phenanthrene also sorbed to extracellular polymer and to washed, suspended methanotrophic cells. The exopolymer of BG8 and OBBP significantly reduced the apparent distribution coefficient (K[sub d]) for phenanthrene with aquifer sand. The distribution coefficients for phenanthrene with the methanotrophic cells were an order of magnitude greater than those previously reported for other heterotrophic bacteria. Cells of the methanotrophs also significantly reduced the apparent K[sub d] for phenanthrene with an aquifer sand. The three strains of methanotrophs displayed mobility in a column of packed sand, and strain OBBP reduced the retardation coefficient of phenanthrene with an aquifer sand by 27%. These data indicate that both extracellular polymer and mobile cells of methanotrophic bacteria display a capacity to facilitate the mobility of pollutant metals and polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons in aquifer material. 48 refs., 3 figs., 4 tabs.

  10. On a global aerodynamic optimization of a civil transport aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savu, G.; Trifu, O.

    1991-01-01

    An aerodynamic optimization procedure developed to minimize the drag to lift ratio of an aircraft configuration: wing - body - tail, in accordance with engineering restrictions, is described. An algorithm developed to search a hypersurface with 18 dimensions, which define an aircraft configuration, is discussed. The results, when considered from the aerodynamic point of view, indicate the optimal configuration is one that combines a lifting fuselage with a canard.

  11. OPTIMIZING COLLAGEN TRANSPORT THROUGH TRACK-ETCHED NANOPORES

    PubMed Central

    Bueno, Ericka M.; Ruberti, Jeffrey W.

    2008-01-01

    Polymer transport through nanopores is a potentially powerful tool for separation and organization of molecules in biotechnology applications. Our goal is to produce aligned collagen fibrils by mimicking cell-mediated collagen assembly: driving collagen monomers in solution through the aligned nanopores in track-etched membranes followed by fibrillogenesis at the pore exit. We examined type I atelo-collagen monomer transport in neutral, cold solution through polycarbonate track-etched membranes comprising 80-nm-diameter, 6-μm-long pores at 2% areal fraction. Source concentrations of 1.0, 2.8 and 7.0 mg/ml and pressure differentials of 0, 10 and 20 inH2O were used. Membrane surfaces were hydrophilized via covalent poly(ethylene-glycol) binding to limit solute-membrane interaction. Collagen transport through the nanopores was a non-intuitive process due to the complex behavior of this associating molecule in semi-dilute solution. Nonetheless, a modified open pore model provided reasonable predictions of transport parameters. Transport rates were concentration- and pressure-dependent, with diffusivities across the membrane in semi-dilute solution two-fold those in dilute solution, possibly via cooperative diffusion or polymer entrainment. The most significant enhancement of collagen transport was accomplished by membrane hydrophilization. The highest concentration transported (5.99±2.58 mg/ml) with the highest monomer flux (2.60±0.49 ×103 molecules s-1 pore-1) was observed using 2.8 mg collagen/ml, 10 inH2O and hydrophilic membranes. PMID:21394216

  12. Thermoelectric transport properties of BaBiTe3-based materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yiming; Zhao, Li-Dong

    2017-05-01

    BaBiTe3, a material with low thermal conductivity, is an inferior thermoelectric material due to the poor electrical properties originated from its narrow band gap. We choose two types of dopants, K and La, trying to optimize its electrical transport properties. The minority carriers, which harm the Seebeck coefficient in this system, are suppressed by La doping. With the increase of both electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient, the power factor of 3% La doped BaBiTe3 reaches 3.7 μW cm-1 K-2 which increased by 40% from undoped BaBiTe3. Besides high power factor, the thermal conductivity is also reduced in it. Eventually, a high ZT value, 0.25 at 473 K, for n-type BaBiTe3 is achieved in 3% La doped BaBiTe3.

  13. Pareto optimal calibration of highly nonlinear reactive transport groundwater models using particle swarm optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siade, A. J.; Prommer, H.; Welter, D.

    2014-12-01

    Groundwater management and remediation requires the implementation of numerical models in order to evaluate the potential anthropogenic impacts on aquifer systems. In many situations, the numerical model must, not only be able to simulate groundwater flow and transport, but also geochemical and biological processes. Each process being simulated carries with it a set of parameters that must be identified, along with differing potential sources of model-structure error. Various data types are often collected in the field and then used to calibrate the numerical model; however, these data types can represent very different processes and can subsequently be sensitive to the model parameters in extremely complex ways. Therefore, developing an appropriate weighting strategy to address the contributions of each data type to the overall least-squares objective function is not straightforward. This is further compounded by the presence of potential sources of model-structure errors that manifest themselves differently for each observation data type. Finally, reactive transport models are highly nonlinear, which can lead to convergence failure for algorithms operating on the assumption of local linearity. In this study, we propose a variation of the popular, particle swarm optimization algorithm to address trade-offs associated with the calibration of one data type over another. This method removes the need to specify weights between observation groups and instead, produces a multi-dimensional Pareto front that illustrates the trade-offs between data types. We use the PEST++ run manager, along with the standard PEST input/output structure, to implement parallel programming across multiple desktop computers using TCP/IP communications. This allows for very large swarms of particles without the need of a supercomputing facility. The method was applied to a case study in which modeling was used to gain insight into the mobilization of arsenic at a deepwell injection site

  14. Electrical and thermal transport measurements on nano-structured materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chih-Wei

    This thesis discusses electrical and thermal transport measurements on C60, carbon nanotubes, and boron-nitride nanotubes. Chapter 1 describes the anomalous resistivity behavior of Ag films on C60 crystals. The correlation of the resistivity anomaly and the structural phase transition is established. Chapter 2 gives an introduction to the physical properties and the synthesis methods of carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. Chapter 3 shows two different approaches on chemical functionalization of boron-nitride nanotubes. Chapter 4 gives the theoretical background of thermal conductivity, especially for nano-structured materials. A summary of theoretical and experimental works on the thermal conductivity of nanotubes is given. Chapter 5 discusses the experimental results of thermal conductivity of nanotube mats. An absolute value of the thermal conductivity of boron nitride nanotubes is bracketed and can be compared to the results of the following chapters on individual nanotubes. Chapter 6 describes the experimental methods of measuring thermal conductivity of individual nanotubes. Chapter 7 shows the 2 temperature dependent thermal conductivity and thermopower of individual nanotubes. Chapter 8 discusses the isotope effect and the diameter dependence of the thermal conductivity of nanotubes. In chapter 9, it is shown that the thermal conductivity of nanotubes is robust against electron irradiation and structural deformation. Importantly, the observation challenges current understandings on the thermal transport of nano-structured materials. In chapter 10, it is shown that it is possible to reversibly tune the thermal conductivity of a multiwalled nanotube by controllably sliding the outer-shells against inner cores. Chapter 11 describes a thermal rectifier by engineering the mass distribution along a nanotube. The observed non-zero thermal rectification effect provides strong evidence for solitons in nanotubes. The soliton model also coherently explains many

  15. 30 CFR 57.9261 - Transporting tools and materials on locomotives.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Transporting tools and materials on locomotives... MINES Loading, Hauling, and Dumping Transportation of Persons and Materials § 57.9261 Transporting tools.... Safety Devices, Provisions, and Procedures for Roadways, Railroads, and Loading and Dumping Sites...

  16. Transportation legislative data base: State radioactive materials transportation statute compilation, 1989--1993

    SciTech Connect

    1994-04-01

    The Transportation Legislative Data Base (TLDB) is a computer-based information service containing summaries of federal, state and certain local government statutes and regulations relating to the transportation of radioactive materials in the United States. The TLDB has been operated by the National Conference of State Legislatures (NCSL) under cooperative agreement with the US Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management since 1992. The data base system serves the legislative and regulatory information needs of federal, state, tribal and local governments, the affected private sector and interested members of the general public. Users must be approved by DOE and NCSL. This report is a state statute compilation that updates the 1989 compilation produced by Battelle Memorial Institute, the previous manager of the data base. This compilation includes statutes not included in the prior compilation, as well as newly enacted laws. Statutes not included in the prior compilation show an enactment date prior to 1989. Statutes that deal with low-level radioactive waste transportation are included in the data base as are statutes from the states of Alaska and Hawaii. Over 155 new entries to the data base are summarized in this compilation.

  17. Graphene oxide as an optimal candidate material for methane storage.

    PubMed

    Chouhan, Rajiv K; Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-07-28

    Methane, the primary constituent of natural gas, binds too weakly to nanostructured carbons to meet the targets set for on-board vehicular storage to be viable. We show, using density functional theory calculations, that replacing graphene by graphene oxide increases the adsorption energy of methane by 50%. This enhancement is sufficient to achieve the optimal binding strength. In order to gain insight into the sources of this increased binding, that could also be used to formulate design principles for novel storage materials, we consider a sequence of model systems that progressively take us from graphene to graphene oxide. A careful analysis of the various contributions to the weak binding between the methane molecule and the graphene oxide shows that the enhancement has important contributions from London dispersion interactions as well as electrostatic interactions such as Debye interactions, aided by geometric curvature induced primarily by the presence of epoxy groups.

  18. Graphene oxide as an optimal candidate material for methane storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chouhan, Rajiv K.; Ulman, Kanchan; Narasimhan, Shobhana

    2015-07-01

    Methane, the primary constituent of natural gas, binds too weakly to nanostructured carbons to meet the targets set for on-board vehicular storage to be viable. We show, using density functional theory calculations, that replacing graphene by graphene oxide increases the adsorption energy of methane by 50%. This enhancement is sufficient to achieve the optimal binding strength. In order to gain insight into the sources of this increased binding, that could also be used to formulate design principles for novel storage materials, we consider a sequence of model systems that progressively take us from graphene to graphene oxide. A careful analysis of the various contributions to the weak binding between the methane molecule and the graphene oxide shows that the enhancement has important contributions from London dispersion interactions as well as electrostatic interactions such as Debye interactions, aided by geometric curvature induced primarily by the presence of epoxy groups.

  19. Optimal Control of Magnetization Dynamics in Ferromagnetic Materials using TDDFT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Peter; Krieger, Kevin; Gross, E. K. U.

    2015-03-01

    Recently intense laser-field induced ultrafast demagnetization was observed in ab-initio simulations using Time-Dependent Density Functional Theory (TDDFT) for various ferromagnetic materials (Fe,Co,Ni). From a practical and technological viewpoint, it is useful if the induced dynamics (e.g. of the total magnetic moment) are controllable. In this talk we apply optimal control theory together with TDDFT calculations to tailor the intense laser pulses so as to achieve a particular outcome (e.g. maximize the total moment lost) while also including any required constraints (e.g pulse duration, pulse frequencies, maximum fluence, etc). Support from European Communities FP7, through the CRONOS project Grant No. 280879.

  20. Cost and fuel consumption per nautical mile for two engine jet transports using OPTIM and TRAGEN

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiggs, J. F.

    1982-01-01

    The cost and fuel consumption per nautical mile for two engine jet transports are computed using OPTIM and TRAGEN. The savings in fuel and direct operating costs per nautical mile for each of the different types of optimal trajectories over a standard profile are shown.

  1. Thermal Transport in Nanoporous Materials for Energy Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Jin

    The present study investigates the complex relationship between nanostructures and microscale thermal transport in nanoporous thin films for energy applications. It experimentally and numerically demonstrates that the effective thermal conductivity of nanoporous materials can be tuned by controlling their nanoscale architectures including porosity, pore diameter, wall thickness, nanocrystal size, and crystallinity as well as surface passivation. This study reports measurements of the cross-plane thermal conductivity of nanoporous thin films with various architectures between 25 and 315 K. Physics-based models combining phonon transport theory and effective medium approximations were developed to interpret the experimental data. Ordered mesoporous titania and silicon thin films were prepared based on evaporation-induced self-assembly method. Pure silica zeolite films were produced by either in-situ growth or by spin coating a zeolite nanoparticle suspension followed by crystal growth upon heating. These synthesized thin films were systematically and fully characterized. They featured ordered nanopores with porosity, pore diameter, and film thickness ranging from 30% to 59%, 0.5 to 25 nm, and 120 to 370 nm, respectively. Their dense matrix was amorphous, polycrystalline, or consisted of an aggregate of nanocrystals. The thermal conductivity of all synthesized nanoporous films increased monotonically with temperature within the temperature range considered. At low temperatures, the nanoporous films behaved like amorphous or strongly disordered materials and their thermal conductivity was proportional to Tn with n varied between 1 and 2.3. At high temperatures, the thermal conductivity increased slowly with temperature or reached a plateau due to strong phonon Umklapp scattering and the saturation of phonon modes. The presence of pores in amorphous mesoporous thin films had a purely geometrical effect by reducing the cross-sectional area through which heat can diffuse

  2. Optimal efficiency of quantum transport in a disordered trimer.

    PubMed

    Giusteri, Giulio G; Celardo, G Luca; Borgonovi, Fausto

    2016-03-01

    Disordered quantum networks, such as those describing light-harvesting complexes, are often characterized by the presence of peripheral ringlike structures, where the excitation is initialized, and inner structures and reaction centers (RCs), where the excitation is trapped and transferred. The peripheral rings often display distinguished coherent features: Their eigenstates can be separated, with respect to the transfer of excitation, into two classes of superradiant and subradiant states. Both are important to optimize transfer efficiency. In the absence of disorder, superradiant states have an enhanced coupling strength to the RC, while the subradiant ones are basically decoupled from it. Static on-site disorder induces a coupling between subradiant and superradiant states, thus creating an indirect coupling to the RC. The problem of finding the optimal transfer conditions, as a function of both the RC energy and the disorder strength, is very complex even in the simplest network, namely, a three-level system. In this paper we analyze such trimeric structure, choosing as the initial condition an excitation on a subradiant state, rather than the more common choice of an excitation localized on a single site. We show that, while the optimal disorder is of the order of the superradiant coupling, the optimal detuning between the initial state and the RC energy strongly depends on system parameters: When the superradiant coupling is much larger than the energy gap between the superradiant and the subradiant levels, optimal transfer occurs if the RC energy is at resonance with the subradiant initial state, whereas we find an optimal RC energy at resonance with a virtual dressed state when the superradiant coupling is smaller than or comparable to the gap. The presence of dynamical noise, which induces dephasing and decoherence, affects the resonance structure of energy transfer producing an additional incoherent resonance peak, which corresponds to the RC energy being

  3. Optimal efficiency of quantum transport in a disordered trimer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giusteri, Giulio G.; Celardo, G. Luca; Borgonovi, Fausto

    2016-03-01

    Disordered quantum networks, such as those describing light-harvesting complexes, are often characterized by the presence of peripheral ringlike structures, where the excitation is initialized, and inner structures and reaction centers (RCs), where the excitation is trapped and transferred. The peripheral rings often display distinguished coherent features: Their eigenstates can be separated, with respect to the transfer of excitation, into two classes of superradiant and subradiant states. Both are important to optimize transfer efficiency. In the absence of disorder, superradiant states have an enhanced coupling strength to the RC, while the subradiant ones are basically decoupled from it. Static on-site disorder induces a coupling between subradiant and superradiant states, thus creating an indirect coupling to the RC. The problem of finding the optimal transfer conditions, as a function of both the RC energy and the disorder strength, is very complex even in the simplest network, namely, a three-level system. In this paper we analyze such trimeric structure, choosing as the initial condition an excitation on a subradiant state, rather than the more common choice of an excitation localized on a single site. We show that, while the optimal disorder is of the order of the superradiant coupling, the optimal detuning between the initial state and the RC energy strongly depends on system parameters: When the superradiant coupling is much larger than the energy gap between the superradiant and the subradiant levels, optimal transfer occurs if the RC energy is at resonance with the subradiant initial state, whereas we find an optimal RC energy at resonance with a virtual dressed state when the superradiant coupling is smaller than or comparable to the gap. The presence of dynamical noise, which induces dephasing and decoherence, affects the resonance structure of energy transfer producing an additional incoherent resonance peak, which corresponds to the RC energy being

  4. Materials Testing and Performance Optimization for the SAMURAI-TPC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, K. D.; Lynch, W. G.; Barney, J.; Chajecki, Z.; Estee, J.; Shane, R.; Tangwanchareon, S.; Tsang, M. B.; Yurkon, J.

    2012-10-01

    The SAMURAI time-projection chamber (TPC) will be used to make measurements of pion spectra from heavy ion collisions at RIBF in Japan. Such research provides an opportunity to study supra-saturation density neutron-rich matter in the laboratory, and is critical to understanding the structure of neutron stars. It will provide a complete, 3D picture of the ionization deposited in a gas volume, from which particle types and momenta can be determined. The gas-containment volume is composed of surfaces of aluminum and plastic, as well as halogen-free printed circuit board. During multiplication of the ionized electrons at the anode wire plane of the TPC, UV photons are produced. These cause unwanted discharges when they interact with oxidized aluminum surfaces, which have low work functions. This problem can be addressed by application of a suitable conductive paint or epoxy. Paints were investigated to insure they did not contain any materials capable of inhibiting the performance of the detector gas. These investigations were cross-checked by tests carried out using an existing BRAHMS-TPC. Details on these tests and the materials chosen will be shown. The design and optimization of the gating grid, used to limit data collection to triggered events, will also be discussed.

  5. Optimization of low gravity materials processing experiments using expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Choudry, Amar

    1988-01-01

    The use of an expert system for the control of materials processing experiments in a facility such as the Space Station provides a number of attractive features for insuring that certain critical process parameters can be used to optimize the productivity of the materials processing experiments. The proposed approach to implementation of an expert system utilizes a knowledge base of desired process characteristics which will provide the desired results. The knowledge base for each experiment will be created in conjunction with the scientific investigator in charge of the experiment. Improvements to the knowledge base will be expanded to include self learning sessions in ground based experiments in order to teach the expert system how to respond to perturbations in the process and update the knowledge base on what process change should be implemented in order to reach the desired end product. Design considerations using an on-line real time expert system such as PICON is studied. The types of experiments evaluated include several types of solidification experiments which will be performed on the Space Station.

  6. Optimal policy for mitigating emissions in the European transport sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leduc, Sylvain; Piera, Patrizio; Sennai, Mesfun; Igor, Staritsky; Berien, Elbersen; Tijs, Lammens; Florian, Kraxner

    2017-04-01

    A geographic explicit techno-economic model, BeWhere (www.iiasa.ac.at/bewhere), has been developed at the European scale (Europe 28, the Balkans countries, Turkey, Moldavia and Ukraine) at a 40km grid size, to assess the potential of bioenergy from non-food feedstock. Based on the minimization of the supply chain from feedstock collection to the final energy product distribution, the model identifies the optimal bioenergy production plants in terms of spatial location, technology and capacity. The feedstock of interests are woody biomass (divided into eight types from conifers and non-conifers) and five different crop residuals. For each type of feedstock, one or multiple technologies can be applied for either heat, electricity or biofuel production. The model is run for different policy tools such as carbon cost, biofuel support, or subsidies, and the optimal mix of technologies and biomass needed is optimized to reach a production cost competitive against the actual reference system which is fossil fuel based. From this approach, the optimal mix of policy tools that can be applied country wide in Europe will be identified. The preliminary results show that high carbon tax and biofuel support contribute to the development of large scale biofuel production based on woody biomass plants mainly located in the northern part of Europe. Finally the highest emission reduction is reached with low biofuel support and high carbon tax evenly distributed in Europe.

  7. Multiple-filled skutterudites: high thermoelectric figure of merit through separately optimizing electrical and thermal transports.

    PubMed

    Shi, Xun; Yang, Jiong; Salvador, James R; Chi, Miaofang; Cho, Jung Y; Wang, Hsin; Bai, Shengqiang; Yang, Jihui; Zhang, Wenqing; Chen, Lidong

    2011-05-25

    Skutterudites CoSb(3) with multiple cofillers Ba, La, and Yb were synthesized and very high thermoelectric figure of merit ZT = 1.7 at 850 K was realized. X-ray diffraction of the densified multiple-filled bulk samples reveals all samples are phase pure. High-resolution scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) analysis confirm that multiple guest fillers occupy the nanoscale-cages in the skutterudites. The fillers are further shown to be uniformly distributed and the Co-Sb skutterudite framework is virtually unperturbed from atomic scale to a few micrometers. Our results firmly show that high power factors can be realized by adjusting the total filling fraction of fillers with different charge states to reach the optimum carrier density, at the same time, lattice thermal conductivity can also be significantly reduced, to values near the glass limit of these materials, through combining filler species of different rattling frequencies to achieve broad-frequency phonon scattering. Therefore, partially filled skutterudites with multiple fillers of different chemical nature render unique structural characteristics for optimizing electrical and thermal transports in a relatively independent way, leading to continually enhanced ZT values from single- to double-, and finally to multiple-filled skutterudites. The idea of combining multiple fillers with different charge states and rattling frequencies for performance optimization is also expected to be valid for other caged TE compounds.

  8. Materials Processing Technology Initiatives. Delivery Order 0019-08: Material Behavior Modeling for Optimization of Thermomechanical Processes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-11-01

    AFRL-RX-WP-TM-2008-4056 MATERIALS PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVES Delivery Order 0019-08: Material Behavior Modeling for Optimization of...5835-0019 5b. GRANT NUMBER 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE MATERIALS PROCESSING TECHNOLOGY INITIATIVES Delivery Order 0019-08: Material Behavior Modeling

  9. Transportation of radioactive materials is environmentally benign-let`s quit analyzing it to death

    SciTech Connect

    Blalock, L.G.; Harmon, L.H.

    1996-07-01

    This article reviews the excellent safety record of transportation of radioactive materials and the extensive analyses of the safety of this transportation, concluding that further NEPA analysis is unwarranted.

  10. 49 CFR 173.457 - Transportation of fissile material packages-specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... with their definitions in § 173.403, a criticality safety index (CSI) and a transport index (TI). (b... PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS...

  11. 49 CFR 173.457 - Transportation of fissile material packages-specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... with their definitions in § 173.403, a criticality safety index (CSI) and a transport index (TI). (b... PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS...

  12. 49 CFR 173.457 - Transportation of fissile material packages-specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... with their definitions in § 173.403, a criticality safety index (CSI) and a transport index (TI). (b... PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS...

  13. 49 CFR 173.457 - Transportation of fissile material packages-specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... with their definitions in § 173.403, a criticality safety index (CSI) and a transport index (TI). (b... PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION HAZARDOUS...

  14. Optimizing non-Pb radiation shielding materials using bilayers

    SciTech Connect

    McCaffrey, J. P.; Mainegra-Hing, E.; Shen, H.

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: The objective of this study was to demonstrate that the weight of non-Pb radiation shielding materials can be minimized by structuring the material as a bilayer composed of different metal-powder-embedded elastomer layers. Methods: Measurements and Monte Carlo (MC) calculations were performed to study the attenuation properties of several non-Pb metal bilayers over the x-ray energy range 30-150 keV. Metals for the layers were chosen on the basis of low cost, nontoxicity, and complementary photoelectric absorption characteristics. The EGSnrc user code cavity.cpp was used to calculate the resultant x-ray fluence spectra after attenuation by these metal layers. Air kerma attenuation was measured using commercially manufactured metal/elastomer test layers. These layers were irradiated using the primary standard calibration beams at the Institute for National Measurement Standards in Ottawa, Canada utilizing the six x-ray beam qualities recommended in the German Standard DIN 6857. Both the measurements and the calculations were designed to approximate surface irradiation as well as penetrating radiation at 10 mm depth in soft tissue. The MC modeling point and the position of the measurement detector for surface irradiation were both directly against the downstream face of the attenuating material, as recommended in DIN 6857. Results: The low-Z upstream/high-Z downstream ordering of the metal bilayers provided substantially more attenuation than the reverse order. Optimal percentages of each metal in each bilayer were determined for each x-ray radiation beam quality. Conclusions: Depending on the x-ray quality, appropriate choices of two complementary metal-embedded elastomer layers can decrease the weight of radiation shielding garments by up to 25% compared to Pb-based elastomer garments while providing equivalent attenuation.

  15. Multi-Scale Microstructural Thermoelectric Materials: Transport Behavior, Non-Equilibrium Preparation, and Applications.

    PubMed

    Su, Xianli; Wei, Ping; Li, Han; Liu, Wei; Yan, Yonggao; Li, Peng; Su, Chuqi; Xie, Changjun; Zhao, Wenyu; Zhai, Pengcheng; Zhang, Qingjie; Tang, Xinfeng; Uher, Ctirad

    2017-01-23

    Considering only about one third of the world's energy consumption is effectively utilized for functional uses, and the remaining is dissipated as waste heat, thermoelectric (TE) materials, which offer a direct and clean thermal-to-electric conversion pathway, have generated a tremendous worldwide interest. The last two decades have witnessed a remarkable development in TE materials. This Review summarizes the efforts devoted to the study of non-equilibrium synthesis of TE materials with multi-scale structures, their transport behavior, and areas of applications. Studies that work towards the ultimate goal of developing highly efficient TE materials possessing multi-scale architectures are highlighted, encompassing the optimization of TE performance via engineering the structures with different dimensional aspects spanning from the atomic and molecular scales, to nanometer sizes, and to the mesoscale. In consideration of the practical applications of high-performance TE materials, the non-equilibrium approaches offer a fast and controllable fabrication of multi-scale microstructures, and their scale up to industrial-size manufacturing is emphasized here. Finally, the design of two integrated power generating TE systems are described-a solar thermoelectric-photovoltaic hybrid system and a vehicle waste heat harvesting system-that represent perhaps the most important applications of thermoelectricity in the energy conversion area.

  16. 49 CFR 176.168 - Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... and Shipborne Barges § 176.168 Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in vehicle spaces. (a) All...) Vehicles used to transport Class 1 (explosive) materials must conform to the requirements in §§ 177.834 and...) materials of different compatibility groups may not be stowed in the same vehicle except as allowed in §...

  17. Inverse transport calculations in optical imaging with subspace optimization algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Tian Ren, Kui

    2014-09-15

    Inverse boundary value problems for the radiative transport equation play an important role in optics-based medical imaging techniques such as diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and fluorescence optical tomography (FOT). Despite the rapid progress in the mathematical theory and numerical computation of these inverse problems in recent years, developing robust and efficient reconstruction algorithms remains a challenging task and an active research topic. We propose here a robust reconstruction method that is based on subspace minimization techniques. The method splits the unknown transport solution (or a functional of it) into low-frequency and high-frequency components, and uses singular value decomposition to analytically recover part of low-frequency information. Minimization is then applied to recover part of the high-frequency components of the unknowns. We present some numerical simulations with synthetic data to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  18. Inverse transport calculations in optical imaging with subspace optimization algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Tian; Ren, Kui

    2014-09-01

    Inverse boundary value problems for the radiative transport equation play an important role in optics-based medical imaging techniques such as diffuse optical tomography (DOT) and fluorescence optical tomography (FOT). Despite the rapid progress in the mathematical theory and numerical computation of these inverse problems in recent years, developing robust and efficient reconstruction algorithms remains a challenging task and an active research topic. We propose here a robust reconstruction method that is based on subspace minimization techniques. The method splits the unknown transport solution (or a functional of it) into low-frequency and high-frequency components, and uses singular value decomposition to analytically recover part of low-frequency information. Minimization is then applied to recover part of the high-frequency components of the unknowns. We present some numerical simulations with synthetic data to demonstrate the performance of the proposed algorithm.

  19. Characterization of ionic transport in polymer and electronic transport in disordered selenium and ceramic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandyopadhyay, Subhasish

    In this thesis, the properties of electronic conduction in vanadium (donor) and scandium (acceptor) doped Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3 ceramics, amorphous Selenium and ionic conduction in polyester polyol based polyurethane have been investigated. The leakage current of bulk vanadium (donor) and scandium (acceptor) doped Ba0.7Sr0.3TiO3 ceramics structures measured using gold electrical contacts have been characterized and analyzed. Vanadium doping reduces the ohmic leakage current that dominates the transport characteristics up to 5 kV/cm. The Arrhenius activation energy is 0.18, 0.20 and 0.23 eV for 1, 2 and 4 at % V-doped samples, respectively. Above this field, the current-voltage characteristics exhibit discontinuous current transitions associated with trap filling by electronic carriers. At higher fields, trap controlled space charge limited conduction (SCLC) is observed with an effective mobility of 4+/-1x10-7 cm2/V s, characteristic of electronic transport process that involves quasi equilibrium between conduction in the band and trapping. In contrast, the leakage current of Sc-doped samples increases with impurity concentration and exhibits a 0.60 eV activation energy. In this case, the limiting current conduction mechanism is the transport of holes over the electrostatic barrier at grain boundaries. Comparison of these results to those on similarly-doped homoepitaxial SrTiO3 thin-films deposited on single-crystal and bicrystal substrates helped to identify the characteristics of transport in the bulk and across grain boundaries for this class of materials. Electrical, thermal and Li transport properties have been measured for polyester polyol and isocyanate-based polyurethanes doped with Lithium trifluoromethanesulfonimide (LiTFSI) and Lithium perchlorate (LiClO4) Electrical conductivities are estimated at 10-5--10-6 S/cm near 300 K. The conductivities show Vogel-Tammann-Fulcher (VTF) behavior over a wide temperature ranges. Differential scanning calorimetry (DSC) shows

  20. High speed civil transport: Sonic boom softening and aerodynamic optimization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheung, Samson

    1994-01-01

    An improvement in sonic boom extrapolation techniques has been the desire of aerospace designers for years. This is because the linear acoustic theory developed in the 60's is incapable of predicting the nonlinear phenomenon of shock wave propagation. On the other hand, CFD techniques are too computationally expensive to employ on sonic boom problems. Therefore, this research focused on the development of a fast and accurate sonic boom extrapolation method that solves the Euler equations for axisymmetric flow. This new technique has brought the sonic boom extrapolation techniques up to the standards of the 90's. Parallel computing is a fast growing subject in the field of computer science because of its promising speed. A new optimizer (IIOWA) for the parallel computing environment has been developed and tested for aerodynamic drag minimization. This is a promising method for CFD optimization making use of the computational resources of workstations, which unlike supercomputers can spend most of their time idle. Finally, the OAW concept is attractive because of its overall theoretical performance. In order to fully understand the concept, a wind-tunnel model was built and is currently being tested at NASA Ames Research Center. The CFD calculations performed under this cooperative agreement helped to identify the problem of the flow separation, and also aided the design by optimizing the wing deflection for roll trim.

  1. Automating Risk Assessments of Hazardous Material Shipments for Transportation Routes and Mode Selection

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara H. Dolphin; William D. RIchins; Stephen R. Novascone

    2010-10-01

    The METEOR project at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) successfully addresses the difficult problem in risk assessment analyses of combining the results from bounding deterministic simulation results with probabilistic (Monte Carlo) risk assessment techniques. This paper describes a software suite designed to perform sensitivity and cost/benefit analyses on selected transportation routes and vehicles to minimize risk associated with the shipment of hazardous materials. METEOR uses Monte Carlo techniques to estimate the probability of an accidental release of a hazardous substance along a proposed transportation route. A METEOR user selects the mode of transportation, origin and destination points, and charts the route using interactive graphics. Inputs to METEOR (many selections built in) include crash rates for the specific aircraft, soil/rock type and population densities over the proposed route, and bounding limits for potential accident types (velocity, temperature, etc.). New vehicle, materials, and location data are added when available. If the risk estimates are unacceptable, the risks associated with alternate transportation modes or routes can be quickly evaluated and compared. Systematic optimizing methods will provide the user with the route and vehicle selection identified with the lowest risk of hazardous material release. The effects of a selected range of potential accidents such as vehicle impact, fire, fuel explosions, excessive containment pressure, flooding, etc. are evaluated primarily using hydrocodes capable of accurately simulating the material response of critical containment components. Bounding conditions that represent credible accidents (i.e; for an impact event, velocity, orientations, and soil conditions) are used as input parameters to the hydrocode models yielding correlation functions relating accident parameters to component damage. The Monte Carlo algorithms use random number generators to make selections at the various decision

  2. Technology maturation project on optimization of sheet metal forming of aluminum for use in transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Ken I.; Smith, Mark T.; Lavender, Curt A.; Khalell, Mohammad A.

    1994-10-01

    Using aluminum instead of steel in transportation systems could dramatically reduce the weight of vehicles, an effective way of decreasing energy consumption and emissions. The current cost of sheet metal formed (SMF) aluminum alloys (about $4 per pound) and the relatively long forming times of current materials are serious drawbacks to the widespread use of SMF in industry. The interdependence of materials testing and model development is critical to optimizing SMF since the current process is conducted in a heated, pressurized die where direct measurement of critical SMF parameters is extremely difficult. Numerical models provide a means of tracking the forming process, allowing the applied gas pressure to be adjusted to maintain the optimum SMF behavior throughout the forming process. Thus, models can help produce the optimum SMF component in the least amount of time. The Pacific Northwest Laboratory is integrating SMF model development with research in improved aluminum alloys for SMF. The objectives of this research are: develop and characterize competitively priced aluminum alloys for SMF applications in industry; improve numerical models to accurately predict the optimum forming cycle for reduced forming time and improved quality; and verify alloy performance and model accuracy with forming tests conducted in PNL's Superplastic Forming User Facility. The activities performed in this technology maturation project represent a critical first step in achieving these objectives through cooperative research among industry, PNL, and universities.

  3. FEMA: a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers

    SciTech Connect

    Yeh, G.T.; Huff, D.D.

    1985-01-01

    This report documents the construction, verification, and demonstration of a Finite Element Model of Material Transport through Aquifers (FEMA). The particular features of FEMA are its versatility and flexibility to deal with as many real-world problems as possible. Mechanisms included in FEMA are: carrier fluid advection, hydrodynamic dispersion and molecular diffusion, radioactive decay, sorption, source/sinks, and degradation due to biological, chemical as well as physical processes. Three optional sorption models are embodied in FEMA. These are linear isotherm and Freundlich and Langmuir nonlinear isotherms. Point as well as distributed source/sinks are included to represent artificial injection/withdrawals and natural infiltration of precipitation. All source/sinks can be transient or steady state. Prescribed concentration on the Dirichlet boundary, given gradient on the Neumann boundary segment, and flux at each Cauchy boundary segment can vary independently of each other. The aquifer may consist of as many formations as desired. Either completely confined or completely unconfined or partially confined and partially unconfined aquifers can be dealt with effectively. FEMA also includes transient leakage to or from the aquifer of interest through confining beds from or to aquifers lying below and/or above.

  4. Optimal resource allocation in random networks with transportation bandwidths

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeung, C. H.; Wong, K. Y. Michael

    2009-03-01

    We apply statistical physics to study the task of resource allocation in random sparse networks with limited bandwidths for the transportation of resources along the links. Recursive relations from the Bethe approximation are converted into useful algorithms. Bottlenecks emerge when the bandwidths are small, causing an increase in the fraction of idle links. For a given total bandwidth per node, the efficiency of allocation increases with the network connectivity. In the high connectivity limit, we find a phase transition at a critical bandwidth, above which clusters of balanced nodes appear, characterized by a profile of homogenized resource allocation similar to the Maxwell construction.

  5. Methoxydiphenylamine-substituted fluorene derivatives as hole transporting materials: role of molecular interaction on device photovoltaic performance.

    PubMed

    Tiazkis, Robertas; Paek, Sanghyun; Daskeviciene, Maryte; Malinauskas, Tadas; Saliba, Michael; Nekrasovas, Jonas; Jankauskas, Vygintas; Ahmad, Shahzada; Getautis, Vytautas; Khaja Nazeeruddin, Mohammad

    2017-12-01

    The molecular structure of the hole transporting material (HTM) play an important role in hole extraction in a perovskite solar cells. It has a significant influence on the molecular planarity, energy level, and charge transport properties. Understanding the relationship between the chemical structure of the HTM's and perovskite solar cells (PSCs) performance is crucial for the continued development of the efficient organic charge transporting materials. Using molecular engineering approach we have constructed a series of the hole transporting materials with strategically placed aliphatic substituents to investigate the relationship between the chemical structure of the HTMs and the photovoltaic performance. PSCs employing the investigated HTMs demonstrate power conversion efficiency values in the range of 9% to 16.8% highlighting the importance of the optimal molecular structure. An inappropriately placed side group could compromise the device performance. Due to the ease of synthesis and moieties employed in its construction, it offers a wide range of possible structural modifications. This class of molecules has a great potential for structural optimization in order to realize simple and efficient small molecule based HTMs for perovskite solar cells application.

  6. Sensitivity of the optimal preliminary design of a transport to operational constraints and performance index

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Constrained parameter optimization was used to perform the optimal preliminary design of a medium range transport configuration. The impact of choosing a performance index was studied and the required fare for a 15 percent return-on-investment was proposed as a figure-of-merit. A number of design constants and constraint functions were systematically varied to document the sensitivities of the optimal design to a variety of economic and technological assumptions. Additionally, a comparison is made for each of the parameter variations between the baseline configuration and the optimally redesigned configuration.

  7. Use of constrained optimization in the conceptual design of a medium-range subsonic transport

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sliwa, S. M.

    1980-01-01

    Constrained parameter optimization was used to perform the optimal conceptual design of a medium range transport configuration. The impact of choosing a given performance index was studied, and the required income for a 15 percent return on investment was proposed as a figure of merit. A number of design constants and constraint functions were systematically varied to document the sensitivities of the optimal design to a variety of economic and technological assumptions. A comparison was made for each of the parameter variations between the baseline configuration and the optimally redesigned configuration.

  8. Price of anarchy in transportation networks: efficiency and optimality control.

    PubMed

    Youn, Hyejin; Gastner, Michael T; Jeong, Hawoong

    2008-09-19

    Uncoordinated individuals in human society pursuing their personally optimal strategies do not always achieve the social optimum, the most beneficial state to the society as a whole. Instead, strategies form Nash equilibria which are often socially suboptimal. Society, therefore, has to pay a price of anarchy for the lack of coordination among its members. Here we assess this price of anarchy by analyzing the travel times in road networks of several major cities. Our simulation shows that uncoordinated drivers possibly waste a considerable amount of their travel time. Counterintuitively, simply blocking certain streets can partially improve the traffic conditions. We analyze various complex networks and discuss the possibility of similar paradoxes in physics.

  9. Optimized Superconducting Quadrupole Arrays for Multiple Beam Transport

    SciTech Connect

    Meinke, Rainer, B.; Goodzeit, Carl, L.; Ball, Millicent, J.

    2005-09-20

    This research project advanced the development of reliable, cost-effective arrays of superconducting quadrupole magnets for use in multi-beam inertial fusion accelerators. The field in each array cell must be identical and meet stringent requirements for field quality and strength. An optimized compact array design using flat double-layer pancake coils was developed. Analytical studies of edge termination methods showed that it is feasible to meet the requirements for field uniformity in all cells and elimination of stray external field in several ways: active methods that involve placement of field compensating coils on the periphery of the array or a passive method that involves use of iron shielding.

  10. Characterization and Optimization of Hg sub 1-x Cd sub x Te Infrared Detector Materials.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    MERCURY , *INFRARED DETECTORS, *CADMIUM, *TELLURIUM, *INFRARED PHOTOCONDUCTORS, PROCESSING, SEMICONDUCTORS, TRANSPORT PROPERTIES, SURFACE PROPERTIES, NOISE, INFRARED OPTICAL MATERIALS, LOW FREQUENCY, ABSORPTION COEFFICIENTS.

  11. Truck transportation of hazardous materials: a national overview. Final report, October 1983-October 1986

    SciTech Connect

    Maio, D.J.; Liu, T.K.

    1987-12-01

    The primary objective of the effort has been to provide government regulators and policymakers with (a) an estimate of the aggregate national volume of hazardous chemical and petroleum products transportation in trucks, (b) a profile of the truck fleet involved in hazardous-materials transport, and (c) the geographical distribution of the transport activity. After defining data sources and methods, hazardous chemical and petroleum products transport is quantified in terms of total tons, ton-miles, and haul distances. Truck-transport categories include domestic production from U.S. plants, imports from ports of entry, and distribution from regional storage facilities. Next, the report characterizes the truck fleet involved in hazardous-materials transport in terms of truck size, type, and placarded operations. Geographical distribution of truck transport of hazardous materials is then presented graphically, with traffic patterns mapped in terms of major highway corridors. Finally, trends in truck transport of hazardous chemical and petroleum products since 1977 are analyzed.

  12. Quantifying the Material Processing Conditions for an Optimized FSW Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edgs of the seam together. This environmentally friendly, solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path and velocity is required. In this study the metal flow fields are marked by the use of thin (0.001 in. tungsten) wires embedded in the weld seam at various locations. X-ray radiographs record the position and segmentation of the wire and are used to elucidate the flow field. Microstructures observed in a FSW cross-section in an aluminum alloy are related to their respective strain-strain rate-temperature histones along their respective flow trajectories. Two kinds of trajectories, each subjecting the weld metal to a distinct thermomechanical process and imparting a distinct microstructure, can be differentiated within the weld structure.

  13. Unraveling the Material Processing Conditions for Optimizing FSW Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This environmentally friendly, solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path and velocity is required. In this study the metal flow fields are marked by the use of thin (0.001? tungsten) wires embedded in the weld seam at various locations. X-ray radiographs record the position and segmentation of the wire and are used to elucidate the flow field. Microstructures observed in a FSW cross-section in an aluminum alloy are related to their respective strain-strain rate-temperature histories along their respective flow trajectories. Two kinds of trajectories, each subjecting the weld metal to a distinct thermomechanical process and imparting a distinct microstructure, can be differentiated within the weld structure.

  14. Quantifying the Material Processing Conditions for an Optimized FSW Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edgs of the seam together. This environmentally friendly, solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld, a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path and velocity is required. In this study the metal flow fields are marked by the use of thin (0.001 in. tungsten) wires embedded in the weld seam at various locations. X-ray radiographs record the position and segmentation of the wire and are used to elucidate the flow field. Microstructures observed in a FSW cross-section in an aluminum alloy are related to their respective strain-strain rate-temperature histones along their respective flow trajectories. Two kinds of trajectories, each subjecting the weld metal to a distinct thermomechanical process and imparting a distinct microstructure, can be differentiated within the weld structure.

  15. Unraveling the Material Processing Conditions for Optimizing FSW Process

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Judy; Nunes, Arthur C., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    In friction stir welding (FSW), a rotating threaded pin tool is inserted into a weld seam and literally stirs the edges of the seam together. This environmentally friendly, solid-state technique has been successfully used in the joining of materials that are difficult to fusion weld. To determine optimal processing parameters for producing a defect free weld a better understanding of the resulting metal deformation flow path and velocity is required. In this study the metal flow fields are marked by the use of thin (0.001? tungsten) wires embedded in the weld seam at various locations. X-ray radiographs record the position and segmentation of the wire and are used to elucidate the flow field. Microstructures observed in a FSW cross-section in an aluminum alloy are related to their respective strain-strain rate-temperature histories along their respective flow trajectories. Two kinds of trajectories, each subjecting the weld metal to a distinct thermomechanical process and imparting a distinct microstructure, can be differentiated within the weld structure.

  16. The latent fingerprint in mass transport of polycrystalline materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirunavukarasu, Gopinath; Kundu, Sukumar; Chatterjee, Subrata

    2016-02-01

    Herein, a systematic investigation was carried out to reach a rational understanding and to provide information concerning the possible causes for a significant influence of pressure variation in the underlying processes of mass transport in polycrystalline materials. The authors focused their research in solid-state diffusion, a part of the subject "Mass Transport in Solids". Theories on diffusion are the subject by itself which exists as a latent fingerprint in every text of higher learning in interdisciplinary science. In this research, authors prepared sandwich samples of titanium alloy and stainless steel using nickel as an intermediate metal. The samples were processed at three different levels of bonding pressure (3, 4 and 5 MPa) while bonding temperature and bonding time was maintained at 750 °C and 1 h, respectively, throughout the experiments. It was observed that the net flux of atomic diffusion of nickel atoms into Ti-alloy at TiA/Ni interface increased by ~63 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 3 to 4 MPa, but decreased by ~40 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 4 to 5 MPa. At the same time, the net flux of atomic diffusion of nickel atoms into stainless steel at Ni/SS interface increased by ~19 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 3 to 4 MPa, but increased by ~17 % with the rise in the bonding pressure from 4 to 5 MPa. Here authors showed that the pressure variations have different effects at the TiA/Ni interface and Ni/SS interface, and tried to explain the explicit mechanisms operating behind them. In general for sandwich samples processed irrespective of bonding pressure chosen, the net flux of Ni-atoms diffused into SS is greater than that of the net flux of Ni-atoms diffused in Ti-alloy matrix by four orders of magnitude. The calculated diffusivity of Ni-atoms into Ti-alloy reaches its highest value of ~5.083 × 10-19 m2/s for the sandwich sample processed using 4-MPa bonding-pressure, whereas the diffusivity of Ni

  17. Ultrathin Cu2O as an efficient inorganic hole transporting material for perovskite solar cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weili; Li, Feng; Wang, Hong; Alarousu, Erkki; Chen, Yin; Lin, Bin; Wang, Lingfei; Hedhili, Mohamed Nejib; Li, Yangyang; Wu, Kewei; Wang, Xianbin; Mohammed, Omar F; Wu, Tom

    2016-03-21

    We demonstrate that ultrathin P-type Cu2O thin films fabricated by a facile thermal oxidation method can serve as a promising hole-transporting material in perovskite solar cells. Following a two-step method, inorganic-organic hybrid perovskite solar cells were fabricated and a power conversion efficiency of 11.0% was achieved. We found that the thickness and properties of Cu2O layers must be precisely tuned in order to achieve the optimal solar cell performance. The good performance of such perovskite solar cells can be attributed to the unique properties of ultrathin Cu2O, including high hole mobility, good energy level alignment with CH3NH3PbI3, and longer lifetime of photo-excited carriers. Combining the merits of low cost, facile synthesis, and high device performance, ultrathin Cu2O films fabricated via thermal oxidation hold promise for facilitating the developments of industrial-scale perovskite solar cells.

  18. Regulation of the transportation of hazardous materials: a critique and a proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Marten, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    This article is a description and analysis of the system of regulation of hazardous-materials transportation and a proposal for reform. It has four parts. Part I surveys the present scheme of federal, state, and local safety regulation of hazardous-materials transportation. Part II describes the failures of the present regulatory system and presents a framework for analyzing alternative approaches to preventing hazardous-materials-transportation accidents. Part III compares the present system with one such alternative, a system of strict liability. Part IV is a proposal for reforming hazardous-materials-transportation regulation by deregulating materials that are not extremely hazardous, and imposing strict liability on all transporters of hazardous materials.

  19. Heat transport by phonons in crystalline materials and nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koh, Yee Kan

    This dissertation presents experimental studies of heat transport by phonons in crystalline materials and nanostructures, and across solid-solid interfaces. Particularly, this dissertation emphasizes advancing understanding of the mean-free-paths (i.e., the distance phonons propagate without being scattered) of acoustic phonons, which are the dominant heat carriers in most crystalline semiconductor nanostructures. Two primary tools for the studies presented in this dissertation are time-domain thermoreflectance (TDTR) for measurements of thermal conductivity of nanostructures and thermal conductance of interfaces; and frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR), which I developed as a direct probe of the mean-free-paths of dominant heat-carrying phonons in crystalline solids. The foundation of FDTR is the dependence of the apparent thermal conductivity on the frequency of periodic heat sources. I find that the thermal conductivity of semiconductor alloys (InGaP, InGaAs, and SiGe) measured by TDTR depends on the modulation frequency, 0.1 ≤ f ≤ 10 MHz, used in TDTR measurements. Reduction in the thermal conductivity of the semiconductor alloys at high f compares well to the reduction in the thermal conductivity of epitaxial thin films, indicating that frequency dependence and thickness dependence of thermal conductivity are fundamentally equivalent. I developed the frequency dependence of thermal conductivity into a convenient probe of phonon mean-free-paths, a technique which I call frequency-domain thermoreflectance (FDTR). In FDTR, I monitor the changes in the intensity of the reflected probe beam as a function of the modulation frequency. To facilitate the analysis of FDTR measurements, I developed a nonlocal theory for heat conduction by phonons at high heating frequencies. Calculations of the nonlocal theory confirm my experimental findings that phonons with mean-free-paths longer than two times the penetration depth do not contribute to the apparent thermal

  20. An optimal transport approach for seismic tomography: application to 3D full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Mérigot, Q.; Oudet, E.; Virieux, J.

    2016-11-01

    The use of optimal transport distance has recently yielded significant progress in image processing for pattern recognition, shape identification, and histograms matching. In this study, the use of this distance is investigated for a seismic tomography problem exploiting the complete waveform; the full waveform inversion. In its conventional formulation, this high resolution seismic imaging method is based on the minimization of the L 2 distance between predicted and observed data. Application of this method is generally hampered by the local minima of the associated L 2 misfit function, which correspond to velocity models matching the data up to one or several phase shifts. Conversely, the optimal transport distance appears as a more suitable tool to compare the misfit between oscillatory signals, for its ability to detect shifted patterns. However, its application to the full waveform inversion is not straightforward, as the mass conservation between the compared data cannot be guaranteed, a crucial assumption for optimal transport. In this study, the use of a distance based on the Kantorovich-Rubinstein norm is introduced to overcome this difficulty. Its mathematical link with the optimal transport distance is made clear. An efficient numerical strategy for its computation, based on a proximal splitting technique, is introduced. We demonstrate that each iteration of the corresponding algorithm requires solving the Poisson equation, for which fast solvers can be used, relying either on the fast Fourier transform or on multigrid techniques. The development of this numerical method make possible applications to industrial scale data, involving tenths of millions of discrete unknowns. The results we obtain on such large scale synthetic data illustrate the potentialities of the optimal transport for seismic imaging. Starting from crude initial velocity models, optimal transport based inversion yields significantly better velocity reconstructions than those based on

  1. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false What standards govern transportation of radioactive and... Transportation § 170.901 What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials? DOT, the... Protection Agency have established standards and regulations for the shipment of radioactive and hazardous...

  2. 25 CFR 170.901 - What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false What standards govern transportation of radioactive and... Transportation § 170.901 What standards govern transportation of radioactive and hazardous materials? DOT, the... Protection Agency have established standards and regulations for the shipment of radioactive and hazardous...

  3. 49 CFR 173.457 - Transportation of fissile material packages-specific requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ...-specific requirements. 173.457 Section 173.457 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation....457 Transportation of fissile material packages—specific requirements. (a) Packages containing fissile... area must be so limited that the total sum of the CSI's in any group of packages, overpacks or freight...

  4. Optimal transportation network with concave cost functions: loop analysis and algorithms.

    PubMed

    Shao, Zhen; Zhou, Haijun

    2007-06-01

    Transportation networks play a vital role in modern societies. Structural optimization of a transportation system under a given set of constraints is an issue of great practical importance. For a general transportation system whose total cost C is determined by C = Sigma(ioptimal network topology is a tree if C(ij) proportional |I(ij)|(gamma) with 0 < gamma < 1. The same conclusion also holds in the more general case where all the flow costs are strictly concave functions of the flow I(ij). To further understand the qualitative difference between systems with concave and convex cost functions, a loop analysis of transportation cost is performed in the present paper, and an alternative mathematical proof of the optimality of tree-formed networks is given. The simple intuitive picture of this proof then leads to an efficient global algorithm for the searching of optimal structures for a given transportation system with concave cost functions.

  5. Phase transitions and optimal transport in stochastic roundabout traffic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foulaadvand, M. Ebrahim; Maass, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    We study traffic in a roundabout model, where the dynamics along the interior lane of the roundabout are described by the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP). Vehicles can enter the interior lane or exit from it via S intersecting streets with given rates, and locally modified dynamics at the junctions take into account that collisions of entering vehicles with vehicles approaching the entrance point from the interior lane should be avoided. A route matrix specifies the probabilities for vehicles to arrive from and to exit to certain intersecting streets. By subdividing the interior lane into segments between consecutive intersecting streets with effective entrance and exit rates, a classification of the stationary roundabout traffic in terms of TASEP multiphases is given, where each segment can be in either the low-density, high-density, or maximum current TASEP phase. A general methodology is developed, which allows one to calculate the multiphases and optimal throughput conditions based on a mean-field treatment. Explicit analytical results from this treatment are derived for equivalent interesting streets. The results are shown to be in good agreement with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  6. Phase transitions and optimal transport in stochastic roundabout traffic.

    PubMed

    Foulaadvand, M Ebrahim; Maass, Philipp

    2016-07-01

    We study traffic in a roundabout model, where the dynamics along the interior lane of the roundabout are described by the totally asymmetric simple exclusion process (TASEP). Vehicles can enter the interior lane or exit from it via S intersecting streets with given rates, and locally modified dynamics at the junctions take into account that collisions of entering vehicles with vehicles approaching the entrance point from the interior lane should be avoided. A route matrix specifies the probabilities for vehicles to arrive from and to exit to certain intersecting streets. By subdividing the interior lane into segments between consecutive intersecting streets with effective entrance and exit rates, a classification of the stationary roundabout traffic in terms of TASEP multiphases is given, where each segment can be in either the low-density, high-density, or maximum current TASEP phase. A general methodology is developed, which allows one to calculate the multiphases and optimal throughput conditions based on a mean-field treatment. Explicit analytical results from this treatment are derived for equivalent interesting streets. The results are shown to be in good agreement with kinetic Monte Carlo simulations.

  7. A multiobjective optimization approach to the operation and investment of the national energy and transportation systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ibanez, Eduardo

    Most U.S. energy usage is for electricity production and vehicle transportation, two interdependent infrastructures. The strength and number of the interdependencies will increase rapidly as hybrid electric transportation systems, including plug-in hybrid electric vehicles and hybrid electric trains, become more prominent. There are several new energy supply technologies reaching maturity, accelerated by public concern over global warming. The National Energy and Transportation Planning Tool (NETPLAN) is the implementation of the long-term investment and operation model for the transportation and energy networks. An evolutionary approach with underlying fast linear optimization are in place to determine the solutions with the best investment portfolios in terms of cost, resiliency and sustainability, i.e., the solutions that form the Pareto front. The popular NSGA-II algorithm is used as the base for the multiobjective optimization and metrics are developed for to evaluate the energy and transportation portfolios. An integrating approach to resiliency is presented, allowing the evaluation of high-consequence events, like hurricanes or widespread blackouts. A scheme to parallelize the multiobjective solver is presented, along with a decomposition method for the cost minimization program. The modular and data-driven design of the software is presented. The modeling tool is applied in a numerical example to optimize the national investment in energy and transportation in the next 40 years.

  8. Thermal transport in silicon nitride membranes and far infrared studies of novel materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Warren Albert

    The central theme of this thesis is the design and use of bolometers for detection of far infrared and submillimeter wavelength radiation. A new material, micrometer thick membranes of silicon nitride, is used in modern bolometer designs. An understanding of thermal transport in silicon nitride is critical to evaluate and optimize detector performance. We have measured the thermal conductance, G, of {≈}1μm thick low-stress silicon nitride membranes over the temperature range, 0.06 4K,\\ G is independent of surface morphology indicating that the thermal transport is determined by bulk scattering. For T < 4K, scattering from membrane surfaces becomes significant. We find that G is reduced by a factor as large as 5 for membranes which have sub-micron sized Ag particles glued to the surface or are micromachined into narrow strips as are required in many applications when compared with that of clean, solid membranes with the same ratio of cross section to length. We have used optimized bolometers for the study of two novel materials, single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) and single crystals of high temperature superconductors. We have measured the transmittance of several samples of bundles of SWNT over the frequency range 10 < nu < 300cmsp{-1} at temperatures 1.2 < T < 300K. The broadband shape of the transmittance has a temperature dependence similar to the DC transport measurements. We find a temperature dependent feature near nu≈ 30cmsp{-1} that is consistent with the prediction of a small energy gap Esb{g}≈ 4meV and also with a soft librational mode in SWNT bundles. We have directly measured the absorptivity of high quality single crystals of YBasb2Cusb3Osb{6.5} and Tlsb2Basb2Casb2Cusb3Osb{10-delta} over the frequency range 50 < nu < 800cmsp{-1} at a temperature of 1.2K. Direct absorptivity measurements are powerful for studying materials in the superconducting state since in conventional superconductors the loss at frequencies below the energy gap is zero

  9. 10 CFR 150.21 - Transportation of special nuclear material by aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Transportation of special nuclear material by aircraft. 150.21 Section 150.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXEMPTIONS AND CONTINUED... Transportation of special nuclear material by aircraft. Except as specifically approved by the Commission no...

  10. 10 CFR 150.21 - Transportation of special nuclear material by aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Transportation of special nuclear material by aircraft. 150.21 Section 150.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXEMPTIONS AND CONTINUED... Transportation of special nuclear material by aircraft. Except as specifically approved by the Commission no...

  11. 10 CFR 150.21 - Transportation of special nuclear material by aircraft.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Transportation of special nuclear material by aircraft. 150.21 Section 150.21 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) EXEMPTIONS AND CONTINUED... Transportation of special nuclear material by aircraft. Except as specifically approved by the Commission no...

  12. 49 CFR 171.23 - Requirements for specific materials and packagings transported under the ICAO Technical...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Requirements for specific materials and packagings... International Transport Standards and Regulations § 171.23 Requirements for specific materials and packagings... self-closing release device (see § 171.8). In addition, an aerosol must be in a metal packaging...

  13. 30 CFR 75.1403-2 - Criteria-Hoists transporting materials; brakes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Criteria-Hoists transporting materials; brakes. 75.1403-2 Section 75.1403-2 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... Mantrips § 75.1403-2 Criteria—Hoists transporting materials; brakes. Hoists and elevators used to...

  14. Molecular bridge enables anomalous enhancement in thermal transport across hard-soft material interfaces.

    PubMed

    Sun, Fangyuan; Zhang, Teng; Jobbins, Matthew M; Guo, Zhi; Zhang, Xueqiang; Zheng, Zhongli; Tang, Dawei; Ptasinska, Sylwia; Luo, Tengfei

    2014-09-17

    Conventional wisdom tells us that interfacial thermal transport is more efficient when the interface adhesion energy is enhanced. In this study, it is demonstrated that molecular bridges consisting of small molecules chemically absorbed on solid surfaces can enhance the thermal transport across hard-soft material interfaces by as much as 7-fold despite a significant decrease in the interface adhesion energy. This work provides an unconventional strategy to improve thermal transport across material interfaces.

  15. Defense Transportation: DOD Needs to Take Actions to Improve the Transportation of Hazardous Material Shipments

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    guidance, which can adversely affect the safe, timely, and cost- effective transportation of HAZMAT. For example, GAO found the following: • Improper...Adversely Affect the Safe, Timely, and Cost-Effective Transportation of HAZMAT 17 Conclusions 30 Recommendations for Executive Action 31 Agency...of Improperly Packaged, Rusted Acetylene Gas Cylinders Delayed in Transport 19 Contents Page ii GAO-14-375 Defense

  16. Interfacial and transport properties of nanoconstrained inorganic and organic materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kocherlakota, Lakshmi Suhasini

    Nanoscale constraints impact the material properties of both organic and inorganic systems. The systems specifically studied here are (i) nanoconstrained polymeric systems, poly(l-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) and poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO) relevant to gas separation membranes (ii) Zwitterionic polymers poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate)(pSBMA), poly(carboxybetaine acrylamide) (pCBAA), and poly(oligo(ethylene glycol) methyl methacrylate) (PEGMA) brushes critical for reducing bio-fouling (iii) Surface properties of N-layer graphene sheets. Interfacial constraints in ultrathin poly(l-trimethylsilyl-1-propyne) (PTMSP) membranes yielded gas permeabilities and CO2/helium selectivities that exceed bulk PTMSP membrane transport properties by up to three-fold for membranes of submicrometer thickness. Indicative of a free volume increase, a molecular energetic mobility analysis (involving intrinsic friction analysis) revealed enhanced methyl side group mobilities in thin PTMSP membranes with maximum permeation, compared to bulk films. Aging studies conducted over the timescales relevant to the conducted experiments signify that the free volume states in the thin film membranes are highly unstable in the presence of sorbing gases such as CO2. To maintain this high free volume configuration of polymer while improving the temporal stability an "inverse" architecture to conventional polymer nanocomposites was investigated, in which the polymer phase of PTMSP and PEO were interfacially and dimensionally constrained in nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) membranes. While with this architecture the benefits of nanocomposite and ultrathin film membranes of PTMSP could be reproduced and improved upon, also the temporal stability could be enhanced substantially. The PEO-AAO nanocomposite membranes also revealed improved gas selectivity properties of CO2 over helium. In the thermal transition studies of zwitterionic pSBMA brushes a reversible critical transition temperature of 60

  17. Optimization of TCR and heat transport in group-IV multiple-quantum-well microbolometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morea, Matthew; Gu, Kevin; Savikhin, Victoria; Fenrich, Colleen S.; Pop, Eric; Harris, James S.

    2016-09-01

    Group-IV semiconductors have the opportunity to have an equivalent or better temperature coefficient of resistance (TCR) than other microbolometer thermistor materials. By using multiple-quantum-well (MQW) structures, their TCR values can be optimized due to a confinement of carriers. Through two approaches - an activation energy approximation and a custom Monte Carlo transfer matrix method - we simulated this effect for a combination of Group-IV semiconductors and their alloys (e.g., SiGe and GeSn) to find the highest possible TCR, while keeping in mind the critical thicknesses of such layers in a MQW epitaxial stack. We calculated the TCR for a critical-thickness-limited Ge0.8Sn0.2/Ge MQW device to be about -1.9 %/K. Although this TCR is lower than similar SiGe/Si MQW thermistors, GeSn offers possible advantages in terms of fabricating suspended devices with its interesting etch-stop properties shown in previous literature. Furthermore, using finite element modeling of heat transport, we looked at another key bolometer parameter: the thermal time constant. The dimensions of a suspended Ge microbolometer's supporting legs were fine-tuned for a target response time of 5 ms, incorporating estimations for the size effects of the nanowire-like legs on thermal conductivity.

  18. Insight into lithium transport in lithium nitridometallate battery materials from muon spin relaxation.

    PubMed

    Powell, Andrew S; Stoeva, Zlatka; Lord, James S; Smith, Ronald I; Gregory, Duncan H; Titman, Jeremy J

    2013-01-21

    Muon spin relaxation and powder neutron diffraction have been combined to study three lithium cobalt nitride battery materials. Neutron diffraction shows that these retain the P6/mmm space group of Li(3)N with Co located only on Li(1) sites. The lattice parameters vary smoothly with the degree of metal substitution, such that the [Li(2)N] layers expand while the layer separation contracts, as observed previously for similar series of Cu- and Ni-substituted materials. However, in contrast to the latter, the Li(3-x-y)Co(x)N phases exhibit Curie-Weiss paramagnetism and this prevents the use of nuclear magnetic resonance to measure Li(+) transport parameters. Therefore, muon spin relaxation has been employed here as an alternative technique to obtain quantitative information about Li(+) diffusion. Muon spin relaxation shows that Li(+) diffusion in Li(3-x-y)Co(x)N is anisotropic with transport confined to the [Li(2)N] plane at low temperature and exchange between Li(1) and Li(2) sites dominant at high temperature. By a comparison with previous studies some general trends have been established across a range of Cu-, Ni- and Co-substituted materials. For intra-layer diffusion E(a) decreases as metal substitution increases and the corresponding expansion of the layers results in a more open pathway for Li(+) diffusion. However, an optimal value of x is found with a ≈ 3.69 Å after which the concomitant contraction in layer spacing reduces the polarizability of the lattice framework.

  19. NMR imaging of anomalous solvent transport in macromolecular materials

    SciTech Connect

    Cody, G.D.; Botto, R.E.

    1993-08-01

    Systems in which a change in state accompanies solvent transport, exhibits a sharp solvent front that penetrates the sample like a shock wave; such behavior is called case II transport to distinguish it from Fickian transport. This occurs in macromolecule/solvent systems such as bituminous coals swollen in pyridine; the only requirement for case II behavior is a glassy state in the dry state, crossing over to a rubbery state during solvent uptake. A sharply defined solvent front and a constant front velocity are present. Case II behavior are related to relative magnitudes of characteristic diffusion times and molecular relaxation times. An experimental study of case II transport of methanol in polyethylmethacrylate and pyridine in coal using optical and NMR imaging techniques is reported in this paper.

  20. Transporting mouse embryos and germplasm as frozen or unfrozen materials.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Janet; Guan, Mo; Bogani, Debora; Marschall, Susan; Raspa, Marcello; Pickard, Amanda; Takeo, Toru; Nakagata, Naomi; Fray, Martin

    2014-06-16

    The 21st century has seen a huge proliferation in the availability of genetically altered mice. The availability of these resources has been accompanied by ever greater opportunities for international collaborations between laboratories involving the exchange of mouse strains. This exchange can involve significant costs in terms of animal welfare and transportation expenses. In an attempt to mitigate some of these costs, the mouse community has developed a battery of techniques that can be used to avoid transporting live mice. Transporting frozen embryos and sperm at liquid nitrogen (LN2 ) temperatures using dry shippers has been common practice for some time. However, current advances in this field have refined transportation procedures and introduced new techniques for disseminating embryos and sperm: for example, shipping frozen sperm on dry ice, exchanging unfrozen epididymides from which sperm can be extracted, and transporting frozen/thawed embryos in isotonic media. This article discusses some of the current practices used by laboratories to transport mouse strains around the world without having to exchange live mice.

  1. Optimal Mass Transport for Statistical Estimation, Image Analysis, Information Geometry, and Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2017-01-10

    years has increasingly impacted a large number of other fields (probability theory, partial differential equations, physics, meteorology ). We have...in recent years has increasingly impacted a large number of other fields (probability theory, partial differential equations, physics, meteorology ...econometrics, fluid dynamics, automatic control, transportation, statistical physics, shape optimization, expert systems, and meteorology [52, 68]. The problem

  2. High Speed Civil Transport Design Using Collaborative Optimization and Approximate Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manning, Valerie Michelle

    1999-01-01

    The design of supersonic aircraft requires complex analysis in multiple disciplines, posing, a challenge for optimization methods. In this thesis, collaborative optimization, a design architecture developed to solve large-scale multidisciplinary design problems, is applied to the design of supersonic transport concepts. Collaborative optimization takes advantage of natural disciplinary segmentation to facilitate parallel execution of design tasks. Discipline-specific design optimization proceeds while a coordinating mechanism ensures progress toward an optimum and compatibility between disciplinary designs. Two concepts for supersonic aircraft are investigated: a conventional delta-wing design and a natural laminar flow concept that achieves improved performance by exploiting properties of supersonic flow to delay boundary layer transition. The work involves the development of aerodynamics and structural analyses, and integration within a collaborative optimization framework. It represents the most extensive application of the method to date.

  3. FinFET Doping; Material Science, Metrology, and Process Modeling Studies for Optimized Device Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Duffy, R.; Shayesteh, M.

    2011-01-07

    In this review paper the challenges that face doping optimization in 3-dimensional (3D) thin-body silicon devices will be discussed, within the context of material science studies, metrology methodologies, process modeling insight, ultimately leading to optimized device performance. The focus will be on ion implantation at the method to introduce the dopants to the target material.

  4. Systematic Optimization of Second Order Nonlinear Optical Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-14

    nonlinear optical materials and 2) to develop advanced electrooptic and photonic materials for enhanced...Nonlinear Optics, Val Thorens, (France), January 9-13, 1994. 7. Marder. S.R." A Chemists View of the Science and Technology of Organic Nonlinear Optical Materials ." Presented...DC, August 22-26, 1994. (Invited Lecture). 5. Marder. S. R." Nonlinear Optical Materials Design Criteria" To be presented at American Chemical

  5. Design of Meta-Materials Outside the Homogenization Limit Using Multiscale Analysis and Topology Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Czech, Christopher

    The field of meta-materials engineering has largely expanded mechanical design possibilities over the last two decades; some notable design advances include the systematic engineering of negative Poisson's ratio materials and functionally graded materials, materials designed for optimal electronic and thermo-mechanical performances, and the design of materials under uncertainty. With these innovations, the systematic engineering of materials for design-specific uses is becoming more common in industrial and military uses. The motivation for this body of research is the design of the shear beam for a non-pneumatic wheel. Previously, a design optimization of a finite element model of the non-pneumatic wheel was completed, where a linear elastic material was simulated in the shear beam to reduce hysteretic energy losses. As part of the optimization, a set of optimal orthotropic material properties and other geometric properties were identified for the shear beam. Given that no such natural linear elastic material exists, a meta-material can be engineered that meets these properties using the aforementioned tools. However, manufacturing constraints prevent the use of standard homogenization analysis and optimization tools in the engineering of the shear beam due to limitations in the accuracy of the homogenization process for thin materials. In this research, the more general volume averaging analysis is shown to be an accurate tool for meta-material analysis for engineering thin-layered materials. Given an accurate analysis method, several optimization formulations are proposed, and optimality conditions are derived to determine the most mathematically feasible and numerically reliable formulation for topology optimization of a material design problem using a continuous material interpolation over the design domain. This formulation is implemented to engineer meta-materials for problems using the volume averaging analysis, which includes the use of variable linking

  6. Development of a re-brazeable containment system for special nuclear material storage and transport

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, J.D.; Stephens, J.J.; Walker, C.A.; Hosking, F.M.; Curlee, R.M.

    1995-12-31

    This report describes a novel means of closing and sealing small type B radioactive material transport packages for surface or air transport as governed by 10CFR71 or NUREG-0360 has been developed at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). This method is a controlled brazing process that may be used to attach and seal a closure lid to a containment vessel and then remove it at a later time. The process may be performed multiple times without the need for special preparations of the braze joint. A number of advantages for utilization of this technique have been determined. A brazed seal has integrity at high temperatures for better protection in accident or abnormal environments. A properly designed joint has essentially the same strength as the parent metal. A closure that is brazed, therefore, will no longer be the anticipated point of failure for a broad range of accident environments. This technique will allow the containment vessel design to be optimized with a lighter, more uniform wall thickness throughout. Finally, with a well defined process for sealing, mechanical inspection, leak testing, and then reopening at a later time, automation of the process is relatively straightforward and the overall system should be as easy to use as one that utilizes elastomeric seals for containment.

  7. Using a derivative-free optimization method for multiple solutions of inverse transport problems

    DOE PAGES

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-14

    Identifying unknown components of an object that emits radiation is an important problem for national and global security. Radiation signatures measured from an object of interest can be used to infer object parameter values that are not known. This problem is called an inverse transport problem. An inverse transport problem may have multiple solutions and the most widely used approach for its solution is an iterative optimization method. This paper proposes a stochastic derivative-free global optimization algorithm to find multiple solutions of inverse transport problems. The algorithm is an extension of a multilevel single linkage (MLSL) method where a meshmore » adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm is incorporated into the local phase. Furthermore, numerical test cases using uncollided fluxes of discrete gamma-ray lines are presented to show the performance of this new algorithm.« less

  8. Using a derivative-free optimization method for multiple solutions of inverse transport problems

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, Jerawan C.; Favorite, Jeffrey A.

    2016-01-14

    Identifying unknown components of an object that emits radiation is an important problem for national and global security. Radiation signatures measured from an object of interest can be used to infer object parameter values that are not known. This problem is called an inverse transport problem. An inverse transport problem may have multiple solutions and the most widely used approach for its solution is an iterative optimization method. This paper proposes a stochastic derivative-free global optimization algorithm to find multiple solutions of inverse transport problems. The algorithm is an extension of a multilevel single linkage (MLSL) method where a mesh adaptive direct search (MADS) algorithm is incorporated into the local phase. Furthermore, numerical test cases using uncollided fluxes of discrete gamma-ray lines are presented to show the performance of this new algorithm.

  9. Designing a system for measuring the flow of material transported on belts using ultrasonic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mihuţ, N. M.

    2015-11-01

    Excavation tailings (scraping) and extracting the useful (lignite) in surface mine pits in Mining Basin Oltenia is achieved with technological lines of excavation - transport - dump of high productivity. A correlation of working capacity of the main components of technological lines (motor rotor, high capacity transport, car dumps) is necessary for economic reasons on electricity consumption. To achieve experience in the process was chosen excavator SRS 1400 from South Jilt career in the CET Turceni. The question of coal excavated volume has a great importance in the mine pits. At the excavation is desired a density estimate for each machine production tracking, cost estimation and tracking product unit profitability of each band on various sections zones. Permanent display size excavated volume snapshots in the excavator's cabin permits to track tape loading, eliminating unproductive times and information management to determine profitability. Another important requirement is closing the loop of the machine drive system of an excavator for a uniform deposition of carbon on the strip, thus achieving automatic control of the loading belt. Such equipment is important for the system dispatching in surface mine pits. Through a system of three ultrasound transducers to determine the smart instant of coal excavated section which, coupled with the tape speed, integrated over time will determine the amount of excavated coal. The basis of the system developed is a device for determining the volume and quantity of coal excavated acting on the march and optimize the system speed excavator working order. The device is designed primarily following the careers of lignite production: rotor excavators, rubber conveyor belts and dump facilities. Newly developed system aims to achieve the following determines: the optimum energy excavation depending on the nature of excavated material - lignite, shale, clay, etc., economic times to use the excavator bucket teeth rotor, energy

  10. Multi-walled carbon nanotubes act as charge transport channel to boost the efficiency of hole transport material free perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Nian; Liu, Pei; Qi, Fei; Xiao, Yuqin; Yu, Wenjing; Yu, Zhenhua; Liu, Wei; Guo, Shi-Shang; Zhao, Xing-Zhong

    2016-11-01

    The two-step spin coating process produces rough perovskite surfaces in ambient condition with high humidity, which are unfavorable for the contact between the perovskite film and the low temperature carbon electrode. To tackle this problem, multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) are embedded into the perovskite layer. The MWCNTs can act as charge transport high way between individual perovskite nanoparticles and facilitate the collection of the photo-generated holes by the carbon electrode. Longer carrier lifetime is confirmed in the perovskite solar cells with addition of MWCNTs using open circuit voltage decay measurement. Under optimized concentration of MWCNT, average power conversion efficiency of 11.6% is obtained in hole transport material free perovskite solar cells, which is boosted by ∼15% compared to solar cells without MWCNT.

  11. Determination of Optimal Subsidy for Materials Saving Investment through Recycle/Recovery at Industrial Level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batzias, Dimitris F.

    2009-08-01

    This work deals with a methodological framework under the form of a simple/short algorithmic procedure (including 11 activity steps and 3 decision nodes) designed/developed for the determination of optimal subsidy for materials saving investment through recycle/recovery (RR) at industrial level. Two case examples are presented, covering both aspects, without and with recycling. The expected Relative Cost Decrease (RCD) because of recycling, which forms a critical index for decision making on subsidizing, is estimated. The developed procedure can be extended outside the industrial unit to include collection/transportation/processing of recyclable wasted products. Since, in such a case, transportation cost and processing cost are conflict depended variables (when the quantity collected/processed Q is the independent/explanatory variable), the determination of Qopt is examined under energy crises conditions, when corresponding subsidies might be granted to re-set the original equilibrium and avoid putting the recycling enterprise in jeopardize due to dangerous lowering of the first break-even point.

  12. Optimality criteria-based topology optimization of a bi-material model for acoustic-structural coupled systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shang, Linyuan; Zhao, Guozhong

    2016-06-01

    This article investigates topology optimization of a bi-material model for acoustic-structural coupled systems. The design variables are volume fractions of inclusion material in a bi-material model constructed by the microstructure-based design domain method (MDDM). The design objective is the minimization of sound pressure level (SPL) in an interior acoustic medium. Sensitivities of SPL with respect to topological design variables are derived concretely by the adjoint method. A relaxed form of optimality criteria (OC) is developed for solving the acoustic-structural coupled optimization problem to find the optimum bi-material distribution. Based on OC and the adjoint method, a topology optimization method to deal with large calculations in acoustic-structural coupled problems is proposed. Numerical examples are given to illustrate the applications of topology optimization for a bi-material plate under a low single-frequency excitation and an aerospace structure under a low frequency-band excitation, and to prove the efficiency of the adjoint method and the relaxed form of OC.

  13. Measuring the misfit between seismograms using an optimal transport distance: application to full waveform inversion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Métivier, L.; Brossier, R.; Mérigot, Q.; Oudet, E.; Virieux, J.

    2016-04-01

    Full waveform inversion using the conventional L2 distance to measure the misfit between seismograms is known to suffer from cycle skipping. An alternative strategy is proposed in this study, based on a measure of the misfit computed with an optimal transport distance. This measure allows to account for the lateral coherency of events within the seismograms, instead of considering each seismic trace independently, as is done generally in full waveform inversion. The computation of this optimal transport distance relies on a particular mathematical formulation allowing for the non-conservation of the total energy between seismograms. The numerical solution of the optimal transport problem is performed using proximal splitting techniques. Three synthetic case studies are investigated using this strategy: the Marmousi 2 model, the BP 2004 salt model, and the Chevron 2014 benchmark data. The results emphasize interesting properties of the optimal transport distance. The associated misfit function is less prone to cycle skipping. A workflow is designed to reconstruct accurately the salt structures in the BP 2004 model, starting from an initial model containing no information about these structures. A high-resolution P-wave velocity estimation is built from the Chevron 2014 benchmark data, following a frequency continuation strategy. This estimation explains accurately the data. Using the same workflow, full waveform inversion based on the L2 distance converges towards a local minimum. These results yield encouraging perspectives regarding the use of the optimal transport distance for full waveform inversion: the sensitivity to the accuracy of the initial model is reduced, the reconstruction of complex salt structure is made possible, the method is robust to noise, and the interpretation of seismic data dominated by reflections is enhanced.

  14. Optimal Transport Destination for Ischemic Stroke Patients With Unknown Vessel Status: Use of Prehospital Triage Scores.

    PubMed

    Schlemm, Eckhard; Ebinger, Martin; Nolte, Christian H; Endres, Matthias; Schlemm, Ludwig

    2017-08-01

    Patients with acute ischemic stroke (AIS) and large vessel occlusion may benefit from direct transportation to an endovascular capable comprehensive stroke center (mothership approach) as opposed to direct transportation to the nearest stroke unit without endovascular therapy (drip and ship approach). The optimal transport strategy for patients with AIS and unknown vessel status is uncertain. The rapid arterial occlusion evaluation scale (RACE, scores ranging from 0 to 9, with higher scores indicating higher stroke severity) correlates with the National Institutes of Health Stroke Scale and was developed to identify patients with large vessel occlusion in a prehospital setting. We evaluate how the RACE scale can help to inform prehospital triage decisions for AIS patients. In a model-based approach, we estimate probabilities of good outcome (modified Rankin Scale score of ≤2 at 3 months) as a function of severity of stroke symptoms and transport times for the mothership approach and the drip and ship approach. We use these probabilities to obtain optimal RACE cutoff scores for different transfer time settings and combinations of treatment options (time-based eligibility for secondary transfer under the drip and ship approach, time-based eligibility for thrombolysis at the comprehensive stroke center under the mothership approach). In our model, patients with AIS are more likely to benefit from direct transportation to the comprehensive stroke center if they have more severe strokes. Values of the optimal RACE cutoff scores range from 0 (mothership for all patients) to >9 (drip and ship for all patients). Shorter transfer times and longer door-to-needle and needle-to-transfer (door out) times are associated with lower optimal RACE cutoff scores. Use of RACE cutoff scores that take into account transport times to triage AIS patients to the nearest appropriate hospital may lead to improved outcomes. Further studies should examine the feasibility of translation into

  15. Summary report on transportation of nuclear fuel materials in Japan : transportation infrastructure, threats identified in open literature, and physical protection regulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, John Russell; Ouchi, Yuichiro; Furaus, James Phillip; Marincel, Michelle K.

    2008-03-01

    This report summarizes the results of three detailed studies of the physical protection systems for the protection of nuclear materials transport in Japan, with an emphasis on the transportation of mixed oxide fuel materials1. The Japanese infrastructure for transporting nuclear fuel materials is addressed in the first section. The second section of this report presents a summary of baseline data from the open literature on the threats of sabotage and theft during the transport of nuclear fuel materials in Japan. The third section summarizes a review of current International Atomic Energy Agency, Japanese and United States guidelines and regulations concerning the physical protection for the transportation of nuclear fuel materials.

  16. Effects of optimal initial errors on predicting the seasonal reduction of the upstream Kuroshio transport

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Kun; Wang, Qiang; Mu, Mu; Liang, Peng

    2016-10-01

    With the Regional Ocean Modeling System (ROMS), we realistically simulated the transport variations of the upstream Kuroshio (referring to the Kuroshio from its origin to the south of Taiwan), particularly for the seasonal transport reduction. Then, we investigated the effects of the optimal initial errors estimated by the conditional nonlinear optimal perturbation (CNOP) approach on predicting the seasonal transport reduction. Two transport reduction events (denoted as Event 1 and Event 2) were chosen, and CNOP1 and CNOP2 were obtained for each event. By examining the spatial structures of the two types of CNOPs, we found that the dominant amplitudes are located around (128°E, 17°N) horizontally and in the upper 1000 m vertically. For each event, the two CNOPs caused large prediction errors. Specifically, at the prediction time, CNOP1 (CNOP2) develops into an anticyclonic (cyclonic) eddy-like structure centered around 124°E, leading to the increase (decrease) of the upstream Kuroshio transport. By investigating the time evolution of the CNOPs in Event 1, we found that the eddy-like structures originating from east of Luzon gradually grow and simultaneously propagate westward. The eddy-energetic analysis indicated that the errors obtain energy from the background state through barotropic and baroclinic instabilities and that the latter plays a more important role. These results suggest that improving the initial conditions in east of Luzon could lead to better prediction of the upstream Kuroshio transport variation.

  17. A linear optimal transportation framework for quantifying and visualizing variations in sets of images

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Slepčev, Dejan; Basu, Saurav; Ozolek, John A.

    2012-01-01

    Transportation-based metrics for comparing images have long been applied to analyze images, especially where one can interpret the pixel intensities (or derived quantities) as a distribution of ‘mass’ that can be transported without strict geometric constraints. Here we describe a new transportation-based framework for analyzing sets of images. More specifically, we describe a new transportation-related distance between pairs of images, which we denote as linear optimal transportation (LOT). The LOT can be used directly on pixel intensities, and is based on a linearized version of the Kantorovich-Wasserstein metric (an optimal transportation distance, as is the earth mover’s distance). The new framework is especially well suited for computing all pairwise distances for a large database of images efficiently, and thus it can be used for pattern recognition in sets of images. In addition, the new LOT framework also allows for an isometric linear embedding, greatly facilitating the ability to visualize discriminant information in different classes of images. We demonstrate the application of the framework to several tasks such as discriminating nuclear chromatin patterns in cancer cells, decoding differences in facial expressions, galaxy morphologies, as well as sub cellular protein distributions. PMID:23729991

  18. Bacteria transport through porous material: Final technical report

    SciTech Connect

    Yen, T.F.

    1989-02-13

    The injection and penetration of bacteria into a reservoir is the most problematic and crucial of the steps in microbial enhanced recovery (MEOR). In the last phase of our work valuable information on bacterial transport in porous media was obtained. A great deal of progress was made to determine chemical bonding characteristics between adsorbed bacteria and the rock surfaces. In order to further enhance our knowledge of the effects of surface tensions on bacteria transport through porous media, a new approach was taken to illustrate the effect of liquid surface tension on bacterial transport through a sandpack column. Work in surface charge characterization of reservoir rock as a composite oxide system was also accomplished. In the last section of this report a mathematical model to simulate the simultaneous diffusion and growth of bacteria cells in a nutrient-enriched porous media is proposed.

  19. Particle Swarm Optimization for inverse modeling of solute transport in fractured gneiss aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Zambrano-Bigiarini, Mauricio

    2014-08-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) has received considerable attention as a global optimization technique from scientists of different disciplines around the world. In this article, we illustrate how to use PSO for inverse modeling of a coupled flow and transport groundwater model (MODFLOW2005-MT3DMS) in a fractured gneiss aquifer. In particular, the hydroPSO R package is used as optimization engine, because it has been specifically designed to calibrate environmental, hydrological and hydrogeological models. In addition, hydroPSO implements the latest Standard Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (SPSO-2011), with an adaptive random topology and rotational invariance constituting the main advancements over previous PSO versions. A tracer test conducted in the experimental field at TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany) is used as case study. A double-porosity approach is used to simulate the solute transport in the fractured Gneiss aquifer. Tracer concentrations obtained with hydroPSO were in good agreement with its corresponding observations, as measured by a high value of the coefficient of determination and a low sum of squared residuals. Several graphical outputs automatically generated by hydroPSO provided useful insights to assess the quality of the calibration results. It was found that hydroPSO required a small number of model runs to reach the region of the global optimum, and it proved to be both an effective and efficient optimization technique to calibrate the movement of solute transport over time in a fractured aquifer. In addition, the parallel feature of hydroPSO allowed to reduce the total computation time used in the inverse modeling process up to an eighth of the total time required without using that feature. This work provides a first attempt to demonstrate the capability and versatility of hydroPSO to work as an optimizer of a coupled flow and transport model for contaminant migration.

  20. Particle Swarm Optimization for inverse modeling of solute transport in fractured gneiss aquifer.

    PubMed

    Abdelaziz, Ramadan; Zambrano-Bigiarini, Mauricio

    2014-08-01

    Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) has received considerable attention as a global optimization technique from scientists of different disciplines around the world. In this article, we illustrate how to use PSO for inverse modeling of a coupled flow and transport groundwater model (MODFLOW2005-MT3DMS) in a fractured gneiss aquifer. In particular, the hydroPSO R package is used as optimization engine, because it has been specifically designed to calibrate environmental, hydrological and hydrogeological models. In addition, hydroPSO implements the latest Standard Particle Swarm Optimization algorithm (SPSO-2011), with an adaptive random topology and rotational invariance constituting the main advancements over previous PSO versions. A tracer test conducted in the experimental field at TU Bergakademie Freiberg (Germany) is used as case study. A double-porosity approach is used to simulate the solute transport in the fractured Gneiss aquifer. Tracer concentrations obtained with hydroPSO were in good agreement with its corresponding observations, as measured by a high value of the coefficient of determination and a low sum of squared residuals. Several graphical outputs automatically generated by hydroPSO provided useful insights to assess the quality of the calibration results. It was found that hydroPSO required a small number of model runs to reach the region of the global optimum, and it proved to be both an effective and efficient optimization technique to calibrate the movement of solute transport over time in a fractured aquifer. In addition, the parallel feature of hydroPSO allowed to reduce the total computation time used in the inverse modeling process up to an eighth of the total time required without using that feature. This work provides a first attempt to demonstrate the capability and versatility of hydroPSO to work as an optimizer of a coupled flow and transport model for contaminant migration. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Hydrogen isotopes transport parameters in fusion reactor materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serra, E.; Benamati, G.; Ogorodnikova, O. V.

    1998-06-01

    This work presents a review of hydrogen isotopes-materials interactions in various materials of interest for fusion reactors. The relevant parameters cover mainly diffusivity, solubility, trap concentration and energy difference between trap and solution sites. The list of materials includes the martensitic steels (MANET, Batman and F82H-mod.), beryllium, aluminium, beryllium oxide, aluminium oxide, copper, tungsten and molybdenum. Some experimental work on the parameters that describe the surface effects is also mentioned.

  2. Optical Field-Induced Mass Transport in Soft Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teteris, J.; Reinfelde, M.; Aleksejeva, J.; Gertners, U.

    The dependence of the surface relief formation in amorphous chalcogenide (As2S3 and As-S-Se) and Disperse Red 1 dye grafted polyurethane polymer films on the polarization state of holographic recording light beams was studied. It is shown that the direction of lateral mass transport on the film surface is determined by the direction of light electric vector and photoinduced anisotropy in the film. We propose a photoinduced dielectropfhoretic model to explain the photoinduced mass transport in amorphous films. Model is based on the photoinduced softening of the matrix, formation of defects with enhanced or decreased polarizability, and their drift under the electrical field gradient of light.

  3. Anderson Transition for Classical Transport in Composite Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murphy, N. Benjamin; Cherkaev, Elena; Golden, Kenneth M.

    2017-01-01

    The Anderson transition in solids and optics is a wave phenomenon where disorder induces localization of the wave functions. We find here that the hallmarks of the Anderson transition are exhibited by classical transport at a percolation threshold—without wave interference or scattering effects. As long range order or connectedness develops, the eigenvalue statistics of a key random matrix governing transport cross over toward universal statistics of the Gaussian orthogonal ensemble, and the field eigenvectors delocalize. The transition is examined in resistor networks, human bone, and sea ice structures.

  4. Outward transport of high-temperature materials around the midplane of the solar nebula.

    PubMed

    Ciesla, Fred J

    2007-10-26

    The Stardust samples collected from Comet 81P/Wild 2 indicate that large-scale mixing occurred in the solar nebula, carrying materials from the hot inner regions to cooler environments far from the Sun. Similar transport has been inferred from telescopic observations of protoplanetary disks around young stars. Models for protoplanetary disks, however, have difficulty explaining the observed levels of transport. Here I report the results of a new two-dimensional model that shows that outward transport of high-temperature materials in protoplanetary disks is a natural outcome of disk formation and evolution. This outward transport occurs around the midplane of the disk.

  5. Optimizing Air Transportation Service to Metroplex Airports. Par 2; Analysis Using the Airline Schedule Optimization Model (ASOM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Donoue, George; Hoffman, Karla; Sherry, Lance; Ferguson, John; Kara, Abdul Qadar

    2010-01-01

    The air transportation system is a significant driver of the U.S. economy, providing safe, affordable, and rapid transportation. During the past three decades airspace and airport capacity has not grown in step with demand for air transportation; the failure to increase capacity at the same rate as the growth in demand results in unreliable service and systemic delay. This report describes the results of an analysis of airline strategic decision-making that affects geographic access, economic access, and airline finances, extending the analysis of these factors using historic data (from Part 1 of the report). The Airline Schedule Optimization Model (ASOM) was used to evaluate how exogenous factors (passenger demand, airline operating costs, and airport capacity limits) affect geographic access (markets-served, scheduled flights, aircraft size), economic access (airfares), airline finances (profit), and air transportation efficiency (aircraft size). This analysis captures the impact of the implementation of airport capacity limits, as well as the effect of increased hedged fuel prices, which serve as a proxy for increased costs per flight that might occur if auctions or congestion pricing are imposed; also incorporated are demand elasticity curves based on historical data that provide information about how passenger demand is affected by airfare changes.

  6. Neutron interaction and their transport with bulk materials

    SciTech Connect

    Rani, Esther Kalpana; Radhika, K.

    2015-05-15

    In the current paper an attempt was made to study and provide fundamental information about neutron interactions that are important to nuclear material measurements. The application of this study is explained about macroscopic interactions with bulk compound materials through a program in DEV C++ language which is done by enabling interaction of neutrons in nature. The output of the entire process depends upon the random number (i.e., incident neutron number), thickness of the material and mean free path as input parameters. Further the current study emphasizes on the usage of materials in shielding.

  7. High-Field Transport in Semiconducting Material and Devices.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Nisar

    1990-01-01

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Considering the developments and most recent technological innovations of semiconductor devices, it is important to investigate the ramifications of charge carrier transport in high electric field in modern semiconductor microstructures, where the electric fields are found to be necessarily high. The fundamental ideas of transport theory including the mobility -limiting scattering mechanisms are reviewed. The ideas of linear transport are extended and the derivation of the high-field distribution is described in a single-valley model appropriate for the band structures of silicon and germanium. The velocity-field profile obtained from this distribution function is compared with the experimental results on bulk (3-dimensional) samples of silicon and germanium. The two-band model of intrinsic transport in a high electric field is also included. The single valley distribution is applied to the multi-valley structures of CaAs and (InGa)As to explain the experimentally observed negative differential resistivity in bulk samples. The calculations are further extended to two dimensional quantum -well microstructures of GaAs and (InGa)As. The conditions necessary for negative differential resistivity in these microstructures to be observable is also discussed. The applications of the above ideas in modelling submicron -length channel field effect transistors (MOSFET's and MODFET's) is discussed. Suggestions for further future applications of the analysis are offered.

  8. Hydrogen transport in non-ideal crystalline materials.

    PubMed

    Auinger, Michael

    2014-10-06

    Hydrogen-transport behaviour under (non-)isothermal conditions is discussed. An extended modelling approach based on the effective diffusion coefficient is outlined for arbitrary temperature programmes, defect properties and hydrogen-loading pressures. The influence of mathematical terms, such as the trap equilibrium reaction or microstructural changes, is critically discussed and examples of thermal desorption spectra and isothermal diffusion behaviour are given.

  9. 10 CFR 70.20a - General license to possess special nuclear material for transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false General license to possess special nuclear material for transport. 70.20a Section 70.20a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL General Licenses § 70.20a General license to possess special nuclear material for...

  10. 10 CFR 70.20a - General license to possess special nuclear material for transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false General license to possess special nuclear material for transport. 70.20a Section 70.20a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL General Licenses § 70.20a General license to possess special nuclear material for...

  11. 10 CFR 70.20a - General license to possess special nuclear material for transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false General license to possess special nuclear material for transport. 70.20a Section 70.20a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL General Licenses § 70.20a General license to possess special nuclear material for...

  12. 10 CFR 70.20a - General license to possess special nuclear material for transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false General license to possess special nuclear material for transport. 70.20a Section 70.20a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL General Licenses § 70.20a General license to possess special nuclear material for...

  13. 10 CFR 70.20a - General license to possess special nuclear material for transport.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General license to possess special nuclear material for transport. 70.20a Section 70.20a Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION (CONTINUED) DOMESTIC LICENSING OF SPECIAL NUCLEAR MATERIAL General Licenses § 70.20a General license to possess special nuclear material...

  14. Variation in material transport and water chemistry along a large ephemeral river in the Namib Desert

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jacobson, P.J.; Jacobson, K.M.; Angermeier, P.L.; Cherry, D.S.

    2000-01-01

    1. The chemical characteristics of floodwaters in ephemeral rivers are little known, particularly with regard to their organic loads. These rivers typically exhibit a pronounced downstream hydrological decay but few studies have documented its effect on chemical characteristics and material transport. To develop a better understanding of the dynamics of floods and associated material transport in large ephemeral rivers, floods of the ephemeral Kuiseb River in south-western Africa were tracked and repeatedly sampled at multiple points along the river's lower 220 km. 2. We quantified the composition and transport of solute and sediment loads in relation to longitudinal hydrological patterns associated with downstream hydrological decay. Source and sink areas for transported materials were identified, and the composition and transport dynamics of the organic matter load were compared to those described from more mesic systems. 3. Concentrations of sediments and solutes transported by floods in the Kuiseb River tended to increase downstream in association with pronounced hydrological decay. The contribution of particulate organic matter to total organic load is among the highest recorded, despite our observation of unusually high levels of dissolved organic matter. Hydrological decay resulted in deposition of all transported material within the lower Kuiseb River, with no discharge of water or materials to the Atlantic Ocean. 4. Our results suggest that longitudinal variation in surface flow and associated patterns of material transport renders the lower Kuiseb River a sink for materials transported from upstream. The downstream transport and deposition of large amounts of labile organic matter provides an important carbon supplement to heterotrophic communities within the river's lower reaches.

  15. Fate and transport of fragrance materials in principal environmental sinks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaolei; Brar, Satinder Kaur; Yan, Song; Tyagi, Rajeshwar Dayal; Surampalli, Rao Y

    2013-10-01

    Fragrance materials are widely present in the environment, such as air, water, and soil. Concerns have been raised due to the increasing utilization and suspected impact on human health. The bioaccumulating property is considered as one of the causes of the toxicity to human beings. The removal of fragrance materials from environmental sinks has not been paid enough attention due to the lack of regulation and research on their toxicity. This paper provides systematic information on how fragrance materials are transferred to the environment, how do they affect human lives, and what is their fate in water, wastewater, wastewater sludge, and soil. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of responses of concrete damage material models with respect to optimization-based material parameter identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Král, Petr; Hradil, Petr; Hušek, Martin; Hokeš, Filip

    2017-07-01

    Today, the inverse identification or optimization of material model parameters is very often used to find input parameter values for use in relevant nonlinear material models. These parameter values should enable the responses of structures obtained from numerical simulations to very closely approximate the real responses of such structures obtained from experiments. Due to the popularity of concrete as a construction material, much attention is paid to nonlinear material models that aim to describe its behavior. This paper is focused on the optimization-based inverse identification of the parameters of two related nonlinear concrete material models which are known as the Karagozian & Case Concrete model and the Karagozian & Case Concrete model - Release III. Within this paper, the identification of the material model parameters is performed on the basis of interaction between nonlinear numerical simulations, optimization algorithms and experimental data, the latter of which take the form of a loading curve measured during a triaxial compression test. A comparison of the responses of both of the used material models when the optimized parameters are employed is, of course, part of this paper.

  17. Free Volume Theory of Hydrocarbon Mixture Transport in Nanoporous Materials.

    PubMed

    Obliger, Amaël; Pellenq, Roland; Ulm, Franz-Josef; Coasne, Benoit

    2016-10-06

    Despite recent focus on shale gas, hydrocarbon recovery from the ultraconfining and disordered porosity of organic matter in shales (kerogen) remains poorly understood. Key aspects such as the breakdown of hydrodynamics at the nanoscale and strong adsorption effects lead to unexplained non-Darcy behaviors. Here, molecular dynamics and statistical mechanics are used to elucidate hydrocarbon mixture transport through a realistic molecular model of kerogen [ Bousige, C.; et al. Nat. Mater. 2016 , 15 , 576 ]. Owing to strong adsorption effects, velocity cross-correlations between the mixture components and between molecules of the same species are shown to be negligible. This allows estimation of each component permeance from its self-diffusivity, which can be obtained from single-component data. These permeances are found to scale with the reciprocal of the alkane length and decrease with the number of adsorbed molecules following a simple free volume theory, therefore allowing mixture transport prediction as a function of the amount of trapped fluid.

  18. A System-Level Approach to Thermoelectric Material Property Optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crane, D. T.; Lorimer, A.; Hannemann, C.; Reifenberg, J.; Miller, L.; Scullin, M.

    2015-06-01

    The opportunities for creating the most effective thermoelectric (TE) material can be maximized by considering the full system for a given application when developing the material. If conversion efficiency is the only consideration in the design of a TE material, then maximizing average ZT over the largest temperature range may be the best choice. If the system or end application is unknown or not well defined, this design path may also be the best choice. However, there are more factors that should affect TE material design choice than just maximizing average ZT when considering the system-level attributes of an application. The following paper demonstrates how other aspects of the design affect how TE material properties (Seebeck coefficient, electrical resistivity, and thermal conductivity) can be tuned to get maximum performance for a given application. These other aspects include device and system level parasitic losses, constraints, and design objectives. Simulation results are provided that demonstrate how a TE material with a lower average ZT can be more effective depending on the design objective than a TE material with a higher average ZT.

  19. Safe Transportation of Hazardous Materials Act of 2009

    THOMAS, 111th Congress

    Rep. Gonzalez, Charles A. [D-TX-20

    2009-12-16

    House - 12/17/2009 Referred to the Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  20. Safe Transportation of Hazardous Materials Act of 2011

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Gonzalez, Charles A. [D-TX-20

    2011-11-04

    House - 11/07/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Railroads, Pipelines, and Hazardous Materials. (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  1. Predicting Carbonate Ion Transport in Alkaline Anion Exchange Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Schematic of the permeation cell experiment used to measure transient CO2 flux across the polymer electrolyte membrane. Experimental result vs. model trend...Microstructure on Charge Transfer, Mass Transfer, and Electrochemical Reactions in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells ; Part 2. Ion and Water Transport in Alkaline Anion...through the use of the Fuel Cell Technologies Test Station such as the relative humidity and flow rate of the feed gases, the cell temperature, and the

  2. Engineering Near-Field Transport of Energy using Nanostructured Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-12

    SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: The transport of heat at the nanometer scale is becoming increasingly important for a wide range of nanotechnology ...increasingly important for a wide range of nanotechnology applications. Recent computational studies on near-field radiative heat transfer (NFRHT) suggest...Nature Nanotechnology , (02 2015): 253. doi: 10.1038/nnano.2015.6 Kyeongtae Kim, Bai Song, Víctor Fernández-Hurtado, Woochul Lee, Wonho Jeong, Longji Cui

  3. Use of concrete polymer materials in the transportation industry

    SciTech Connect

    Fontana, J J; Bartholomew, J

    1980-01-01

    Under contract to the FHWA, Brookhaven National Laboratory has developed a polymer concrete patching material that combines the premix characteristics of PCC with strength and durability properties that are higher than PCC. PC overlays have been shown to be highly impermeable to water and chlorides. Laydown techniques have been developed to allow bridge maintenance crews to place the overlays with little or no problems. Today several manufacturers are marketing PC materials, and their acceptance is becoming widespread.

  4. REGRESSION APPROXIMATIONS FOR TRANSPORT MODEL CONSTRAINT SETS IN COMBINED AQUIFER SIMULATION-OPTIMIZATION STUDIES.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Alley, William M.

    1986-01-01

    Problems involving the combined use of contaminant transport models and nonlinear optimization schemes can be very expensive to solve. This paper explores the use of transport models with ordinary regression and regression on ranks to develop approximate response functions of concentrations at critical locations as a function of pumping and recharge at decision wells. These response functions combined with other constraints can often be solved very easily and may suggest reasonable starting points for combined simulation-management modeling or even relatively efficient operating schemes in themselves.

  5. 49 CFR 178.1020 - Period of use for transportation of hazardous materials in Flexible Bulk Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... use for transportation of hazardous materials in Flexible Bulk Containers. The use of Flexible Bulk... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Period of use for transportation of hazardous...

  6. 49 CFR 385.415 - What operational requirements apply to the transportation of a hazardous material for which a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... transportation of a hazardous material for which a permit is required? 385.415 Section 385.415 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Safety Permits § 385.415 What operational requirements apply to the transportation of a hazardous...

  7. 49 CFR 178.1020 - Period of use for transportation of hazardous materials in Flexible Bulk Containers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF... use for transportation of hazardous materials in Flexible Bulk Containers. The use of Flexible Bulk... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Period of use for transportation of hazardous...

  8. 49 CFR 385.415 - What operational requirements apply to the transportation of a hazardous material for which a...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... transportation of a hazardous material for which a permit is required? 385.415 Section 385.415 Transportation..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION FEDERAL MOTOR CARRIER SAFETY REGULATIONS SAFETY FITNESS PROCEDURES Hazardous Materials Safety Permits § 385.415 What operational requirements apply to the transportation of a hazardous...

  9. Optimizations of the energy grid search algorithm in continuous-energy Monte Carlo particle transport codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walsh, Jonathan A.; Romano, Paul K.; Forget, Benoit; Smith, Kord S.

    2015-11-01

    In this work we propose, implement, and test various optimizations of the typical energy grid-cross section pair lookup algorithm in Monte Carlo particle transport codes. The key feature common to all of the optimizations is a reduction in the length of the vector of energies that must be searched when locating the index of a particle's current energy. Other factors held constant, a reduction in energy vector length yields a reduction in CPU time. The computational methods we present here are physics-informed. That is, they are designed to utilize the physical information embedded in a simulation in order to reduce the length of the vector to be searched. More specifically, the optimizations take advantage of information about scattering kinematics, neutron cross section structure and data representation, and also the expected characteristics of a system's spatial flux distribution and energy spectrum. The methods that we present are implemented in the OpenMC Monte Carlo neutron transport code as part of this work. The gains in computational efficiency, as measured by overall code speedup, associated with each of the optimizations are demonstrated in both serial and multithreaded simulations of realistic systems. Depending on the system, simulation parameters, and optimization method employed, overall code speedup factors of 1.2-1.5, relative to the typical single-nuclide binary search algorithm, are routinely observed.

  10. 3D nonrigid registration via optimal mass transport on the GPU.

    PubMed

    Ur Rehman, Tauseef; Haber, Eldad; Pryor, Gallagher; Melonakos, John; Tannenbaum, Allen

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a new computationally efficient numerical scheme for the minimizing flow approach for optimal mass transport (OMT) with applications to non-rigid 3D image registration. The approach utilizes all of the gray-scale data in both images, and the optimal mapping from image A to image B is the inverse of the optimal mapping from B to A. Further, no landmarks need to be specified, and the minimizer of the distance functional involved is unique. Our implementation also employs multigrid, and parallel methodologies on a consumer graphics processing unit (GPU) for fast computation. Although computing the optimal map has been shown to be computationally expensive in the past, we show that our approach is orders of magnitude faster then previous work and is capable of finding transport maps with optimality measures (mean curl) previously unattainable by other works (which directly influences the accuracy of registration). We give results where the algorithm was used to compute non-rigid registrations of 3D synthetic data as well as intra-patient pre-operative and post-operative 3D brain MRI datasets.

  11. Rate-distortion optimal video transport over IP allowing packets with bit errors.

    PubMed

    Harmanci, Oztan; Tekalp, A Murat

    2007-05-01

    We propose new models and methods for rate-distortion (RD) optimal video delivery over IP, when packets with bit errors are also delivered. In particular, we propose RD optimal methods for slicing and unequal error protection (UEP) of packets over IP allowing transmission of packets with bit errors. The proposed framework can be employed in a classical independent-layer transport model for optimal slicing, as well as in a cross-layer transport model for optimal slicing and UEP, where the forward error correction (FEC) coding is performed at the link layer, but the application controls the FEC code rate with the constraint that a given IP packet is subject to constant channel protection. The proposed method uses a novel dynamic programming approach to determine the optimal slicing and UEP configuration for each video frame in a practical manner, that is compliant with the AVC/H.264 standard. We also propose new rate and distortion estimation techniques at the encoder side in order to efficiently evaluate the objective function for a slice configuration. The cross-layer formulation option effectively determines which regions of a frame should be protected better; hence, it can be considered as a spatial UEP scheme. We successfully demonstrate, by means of experimental results, that each component of the proposed system provides significant gains, up to 2.0 dB, compared to competitive methods.

  12. Application of the Modified Method of Transporting Trajectory to Optimize Interplanetary Transfers Combining Low and High Thrust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kharitonov, A. M.

    2013-09-01

    An approach to optimize trajectories of interplanetary transfers combining low and high trust is proposed. The approach employs the modified method of transporting trajectory to optimize the heliocentric section of the trajectory. An Earth-Mars transfer in 180 astronomical days is used as an example to compare the optimal trajectories and parameters of spacecraft predicted by the classical and modified methods of transporting trajectory

  13. Optimizing resource and energy recovery for materials and waste management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Decisions affecting materials management today are generally based on cost and a presumption of favorable outcomes without an understanding of the environmental tradeoffs. However, there is a growing demand to better understand and quantify the net environmental and energy trade-...

  14. Optimizing resource and energy recovery for materials and waste management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Decisions affecting materials management today are generally based on cost and a presumption of favorable outcomes without an understanding of the environmental tradeoffs. However, there is a growing demand to better understand and quantify the net environmental and energy trade-...

  15. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1996-04-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transportation of hazardous chemicals, gases, explosives, and spent nuclear fuel. Liquefied natural gas transportation is emphasized. Tanker ships, containers, and pipelines for these materials are discussed along with truck, rail, air, and submarine transportation. Safety programs and routing information are presented. Hazards specific to arctic shipping are included. (Contains 50-250 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.) (Copyright NERAC, Inc. 1995)

  16. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transportation of hazardous chemicals, gases, explosives, and spent nuclear fuel. Liquefied natural gas transportation is emphasized. Tanker ships, containers, and pipelines for these materials are discussed along with truck, rail, air, and submarine transportation. Safety programs and routing information are presented. Hazards specific to arctic shipping are included. (Contains a minimum of 132 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  17. Hazardous materials transportation. (Latest citations from the EI Compendex*plus database). Published Search

    SciTech Connect

    1995-01-01

    The bibliography contains citations concerning the transportation of hazardous chemicals, gases, explosives, and spent nuclear fuel. Liquefied natural gas transportation is emphasized. Tanker ships, containers, and pipelines for these materials are discussed along with truck, rail, air, and submarine transportation. Safety programs and routing information are presented. Hazards specific to arctic shipping are included. (Contains a minimum of 137 citations and includes a subject term index and title list.)

  18. Illuminating a black box - determination of rates of reactive transport by combining numerical tools with optimized experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wehrer, Dr; Totsche, Dr

    2009-04-01

    Only the combination of physical models and experiments can elucidate the processes of reactive transport in porous media. Column scale experiments offer a great opportunity to identify and quantify processes of reactive transport. In contrast to batch experiments, approximately natural flow dynamics can be realized. However, due to the complexity of interactions and wide range of parameters the experiment can be insensitive to the wanted process and misinterpretation of the results is likely. In the proposed talk we want to give examples how numerical tools can be applied for thorough planning and evaluation of experiments. In a first phase, we performed systematical numerical experiments to optimize the experimental conditions, which allow the quantification of (de-)sorption kinetics under percolation conditions. For short term column experiments we found, that the application of flow interruptions along with two different flow velocities can be applied to avoid uniqueness problems with respect to identification of partitioning coefficient and mass transfer rate. By a sensitivity analysis the parameter space was divided into regions where physical reasonable parameter estimates can be expected and where equifinal solutions are likely. In a second phase we conducted column experiments to test this optimized experimental design for its suitability for the identification and quantification of rate-limited contaminant release. We used materials polluted with organic and inorganic contaminants originating from different soils, sites and materials (Coke oven sites, abandoned industrial sites, destruction debris, municipal waste incineration ash). Repacked soil columns were percolated under saturated and unsaturated conditions and were subjected to multiple flow interruptions and different flow velocities. The third phase consisted of data evaluation and process quantification applying numerical inversion of a physical transport model. The parameter sets were evaluated

  19. Process optimization for developer soluble immersion topcoat material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakagawa, Hiroki; Goto, Kentarou; Shima, Motoyuki; Takahashi, Junichi; Shimokawa, Tsutomu; Ichino, Katsunori; Nagatani, Naohiko; Kyoda, Hideharu; Yoshihara, Kosuke

    2007-03-01

    The 193 nm immersion lithography has been increasingly applied to the semiconductor device mass production. Topcoat material would be used in many such cases. Topcoat film can maximize the scan speed during immersion exposure step and also prevent small molecules from leaching out of resist film. However, the use of the topcoat material in the mass production affects productivity including throughput and chemical cost. To manage this problem, we attempted to improve topcoat coating process to reduce the topcoat material consumption. Using JSR NFC TCX041, the developersoluble type topcoat material, as a model material, we examined a new coating process which introduces a pre-wet treatment using a solvent which was chosen to be appropriate for this purpose. With this new coating process, we achieved 65 percent (or more) reduction of the topcoat material consumption compared with the current standard coating process (dynamic coating). From the result of film surface observations and leaching tests, it was learned that the topcoat film properties by the new coating process are equivalent to those by the standard coating process. The process performance after development also indicated good results.

  20. 49 CFR 176.168 - Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... (explosive) materials in compatibility group G or H may be carried in steel portable magazines or freight containers. Closed transport vehicles may be used as magazines; transport vehicles of other types may be used... during the sea passage. (h) Where a portable magazine or closed freight container is carried on a...

  1. 49 CFR 176.168 - Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... (explosive) materials in compatibility group G or H may be carried in steel portable magazines or freight containers. Closed transport vehicles may be used as magazines; transport vehicles of other types may be used... during the sea passage. (h) Where a portable magazine or closed freight container is carried on a...

  2. 49 CFR 176.168 - Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... (explosive) materials in compatibility group G or H may be carried in steel portable magazines or freight containers. Closed transport vehicles may be used as magazines; transport vehicles of other types may be used... during the sea passage. (h) Where a portable magazine or closed freight container is carried on a...

  3. 49 CFR 176.168 - Transport of Class 1 (explosive) materials in vehicle spaces.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... (explosive) materials in compatibility group G or H may be carried in steel portable magazines or freight containers. Closed transport vehicles may be used as magazines; transport vehicles of other types may be used... during the sea passage. (h) Where a portable magazine or closed freight container is carried on a chassis...

  4. Charge transport model to predict intrinsic reliability for dielectric materials

    SciTech Connect

    Ogden, Sean P.; Borja, Juan; Plawsky, Joel L. Gill, William N.; Lu, T.-M.; Yeap, Kong Boon

    2015-09-28

    Several lifetime models, mostly empirical in nature, are used to predict reliability for low-k dielectrics used in integrated circuits. There is a dispute over which model provides the most accurate prediction for device lifetime at operating conditions. As a result, there is a need to transition from the use of these largely empirical models to one built entirely on theory. Therefore, a charge transport model was developed to predict the device lifetime of low-k interconnect systems. The model is based on electron transport and donor-type defect formation. Breakdown occurs when a critical defect concentration accumulates, resulting in electron tunneling and the emptying of positively charged traps. The enhanced local electric field lowers the barrier for electron injection into the dielectric, causing a positive feedforward failure. The charge transport model is able to replicate experimental I-V and I-t curves, capturing the current decay at early stress times and the rapid current increase at failure. The model is based on field-driven and current-driven failure mechanisms and uses a minimal number of parameters. All the parameters have some theoretical basis or have been measured experimentally and are not directly used to fit the slope of the time-to-failure versus applied field curve. Despite this simplicity, the model is able to accurately predict device lifetime for three different sources of experimental data. The simulation's predictions at low fields and very long lifetimes show that the use of a single empirical model can lead to inaccuracies in device reliability.

  5. Charge transport model to predict intrinsic reliability for dielectric materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogden, Sean P.; Borja, Juan; Plawsky, Joel L.; Lu, T.-M.; Yeap, Kong Boon; Gill, William N.

    2015-09-01

    Several lifetime models, mostly empirical in nature, are used to predict reliability for low-k dielectrics used in integrated circuits. There is a dispute over which model provides the most accurate prediction for device lifetime at operating conditions. As a result, there is a need to transition from the use of these largely empirical models to one built entirely on theory. Therefore, a charge transport model was developed to predict the device lifetime of low-k interconnect systems. The model is based on electron transport and donor-type defect formation. Breakdown occurs when a critical defect concentration accumulates, resulting in electron tunneling and the emptying of positively charged traps. The enhanced local electric field lowers the barrier for electron injection into the dielectric, causing a positive feedforward failure. The charge transport model is able to replicate experimental I-V and I-t curves, capturing the current decay at early stress times and the rapid current increase at failure. The model is based on field-driven and current-driven failure mechanisms and uses a minimal number of parameters. All the parameters have some theoretical basis or have been measured experimentally and are not directly used to fit the slope of the time-to-failure versus applied field curve. Despite this simplicity, the model is able to accurately predict device lifetime for three different sources of experimental data. The simulation's predictions at low fields and very long lifetimes show that the use of a single empirical model can lead to inaccuracies in device reliability.

  6. Calculations of cosmic-ray helium transport in shielding materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, Francis A.

    1993-01-01

    The transport of galactic cosmic-ray helium nuclei and their secondaries through bulk shielding is considered using the straight-ahead approximation to the Boltzmann equation. A data base for nuclear interaction cross sections and secondary particle energy spectra for high-energy light-ion breakup is presented. The importance of the light ions H-2, H-3, and He-3 for cosmic-ray risk estimation is discussed, and the estimates of the fractional contribution to the neutron flux from helium interactions compared with other particle interactions are presented using a 1977 solar minimum cosmic-ray spectrum.

  7. PEM fuel cell bipolar plate material requirements for transportation applications

    SciTech Connect

    Borup, R.L.; Stroh, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E.

    1996-04-01

    Cost effective bipolar plates are currently under development to help make proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells commercially viable. Bipolar plates separate individual cells of the fuel cell stack, and thus must supply strength, be electrically conductive, provide for thermal control of the fuel stack, be a non-porous materials separating hydrogen and oxygen feed streams, be corrosion resistant, provide gas distribution for the feed streams and meet fuel stack cost targets. Candidate materials include conductive polymers and metal plates with corrosion resistant coatings. Possible metals include aluminium, titanium, iron/stainless steel and nickel.

  8. Fast Algorithms for Earth Mover Distance Based on Optimal Transport and L1 Regularization II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-09-01

    FAST ALGORITHMS FOR EARTH MOVER DISTANCE BASED ON OPTIMAL TRANSPORT AND L1 REGULARIZATION II WUCHEN LI, STANLEY OSHER, AND WILFRID GANGBO Abstract...We modify a fast algorithm which we designed in [15] for computing the Earth mover’s distance (EMD), whose cost is a Manhattan metric. From the theory...and converges very rapidly. Several numerical examples are presented. 1. Introduction The Earth Mover’s distance (EMD), also named the Monge problem

  9. Optimization and Domestic Sourcing of Lithium Ion Battery Anode Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, III, D. L.; Yoon, S.

    2012-10-25

    The purpose of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement (CRADA) between ORNL and A123Systems, Inc. was to develop a low-temperature heat treatment process for natural graphite based anode materials for high-capacity and long-cycle-life lithium ion batteries. Three major problems currently plague state-of-the-art lithium ion battery anode materials. The first is the cost of the artificial graphite, which is heat-treated well in excess of 2000°C. Because of this high-temperature heat treatment, the anode active material significantly contributes to the cost of a lithium ion battery. The second problem is the limited specific capacity of state-of-the-art anodes based on artificial graphites, which is only about 200-350 mAh/g. This value needs to be increased to achieve high energy density when used with the low cell-voltage nanoparticle LiFePO4 cathode. Thirdly, the rate capability under cycling conditions of natural graphite based materials must be improved to match that of the nanoparticle LiFePO4. Natural graphite materials contain inherent crystallinity and lithium intercalation activity. They hold particular appeal, as they offer huge potential for industrial energy savings with the energy costs essentially subsidized by geological processes. Natural graphites have been heat-treated to a substantially lower temperature (as low as 1000-1500°C) and used as anode active materials to address the problems described above. Finally, corresponding graphitization and post-treatment processes were developed that are amenable to scaling to automotive quantities.

  10. Hazardous material/waste transportation safety -- its effect on the environment

    SciTech Connect

    Bonanti, C.J.

    1998-12-31

    The purpose of hazardous material/waste transportation accident investigations are to identify technical, operational, and human factor issues of safety that contributed to an accident. The National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) is tasked with accident investigations in the following modes of transportation: aviation, highway, railroad, marine, and pipeline. Hazardous materials and wastes are transported in every mode within the US Transportation system, and account for more than 500,000 shipments per year. The NTSB selects specific accidents to investigate based on the release of hazardous material and its threat to public safety, if fatalities occurred, or if the accident caused a major disruption to the surrounding community. The NTSB also investigates accidents involving hazardous materials that could provide further evidence of a need for safety improvements. The NTSB makes safety recommendations for improving the safe transport of hazardous materials to several agencies of the US Department of Transportation, including the Research and Special Programs Administration, the Federal Aviation Administration, the Federal Railroad Administration, the Federal Highway Administration, and the US Coast Guard. In addition, the NTSB makes safety recommendations to industry and other private organizations. Safety recommendations are made as the result of accident investigations and are the most important product of the NTSB. Safety recommendations, when implemented, can reduce accidents and improve the US transportation system. The discussion of the investigations, research, container designs, and safety recommendations described in this paper, is to provide the reader with a basic understanding of issues related to the current transportation of hazardous materials in the United States, and what the possibilities will be in the future when dealing with issues that can have a detrimental effect on the environment.

  11. Single-Molecule Investigations of Morphology and Mass Transport Dynamics in Nanostructured Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Daniel A.; Park, Seok Chan; Tran-Ba, Khanh-Hoa; Ito, Takashi

    2015-07-01

    Nanostructured materials such as mesoporous metal oxides and phase-separated block copolymers form the basis for new monolith, membrane, and thin film technologies having applications in energy storage, chemical catalysis, and separations. Mass transport plays an integral role in governing the application-specific performance characteristics of many such materials. The majority of methods employed in their characterization provide only ensemble data, often masking the nanoscale, molecular-level details of materials morphology and mass transport. Single-molecule fluorescence methods offer direct routes to probing these characteristics on a single-molecule/single-nanostructure basis. This article provides a review of single-molecule studies focused on measurements of anisotropic diffusion, adsorption, partitioning, and confinement in nanostructured materials. Experimental methods covered include confocal and wide-field fluorescence microscopy. The results obtained promise to deepen our understanding of mass transport mechanisms in nanostructures, thus aiding in the realization of advanced materials systems.

  12. Shape optimization and material gradient design of the sharp hot structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Yinji; Yao, Xuefeng; Su, Yunquan

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, the shape and material gradient of the sharp hot structure are designed and optimized to meet the hypersonic flight conditions. First, based on the single-objective optimization for the volume, the aerodynamic loading and the heat flow, respectively, the genetic algorithm (GA) is employed for optimizing the shape of the sharp hot structure. Second, the shape of the sharp hot structure is optimized using multi-objective GA by means of the objectives of the volume, the aerodynamic loading and the heat flow. Finally, the ABAQUS software is used to simulate both the temperature and the stress distribution with different material gradient distributions for the sharp hot structure. The optimal distributions of gradient materials for the sharp hot structure are proposed. The results will provide an important guidance for the design of the sharp hot structure.

  13. Problems of optimal transportation on the circle and their mechanical applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plakhov, Alexander; Tchemisova, Tatiana

    2017-02-01

    We consider a mechanical problem concerning a 2D axisymmetric body moving forward on the plane and making slow turns of fixed magnitude about its axis of symmetry. The body moves through a medium of non-interacting particles at rest, and collisions of particles with the body's boundary are perfectly elastic (billiard-like). The body has a blunt nose: a line segment orthogonal to the symmetry axis. It is required to make small cavities with special shape on the nose so as to minimize its aerodynamic resistance. This problem of optimizing the shape of the cavities amounts to a special case of the optimal mass transportation problem on the circle with the transportation cost being the squared Euclidean distance. We find the explicit solution for this problem when the amplitude of rotation is smaller than a fixed critical value, and give a numerical solution otherwise. As a by-product, we get explicit description of the solution for a class of optimal transportation problems on the circle.

  14. Estimation of river based transportable volcanic material distribution using satellite DEM and precipitation data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisoyo, A.; Putra, S. S.

    2017-01-01

    The transportable volcanic materials of Mt. Marapi, which are deposited around the caldera, as a result from last eruption in November 2015, must be estimated as a first step to handle the lahar/ debris flow disaster. In this research, the method used to determine the amount of river-based transportable volcanic material distribution was offered. The LIDAR Satellite DEM and TRMM data from Global Precipitation Climatology Project (GPCP) have been used to estimate the deposited volcanic materials. Based on the GPCP data analysis, it was found that the rainfall pattern distribute into two area, which are 0.52 mm/ hr on west side and 0.61 mm/ hr on east side relative to the mountain summit. The deposited materials from Mt. Marapi 14 November 2015 eruption (volcanic boulders and lava) were located in the upstream of six prioritized watershed. The transportable volcanic material will predominantly flows to the South and North West direction. The potentially transported boulder and lava are around 80.33 % of the total erupted material that are deposited in the river upstream. Batang Kadurang Watershed has the highest transportable material of 1,905.18 m3. The results of study can be used as a rapid disaster countermeasure for lahar disaster mitigation.

  15. Carbon materials for enhancing charge transport in the advancements of perovskite solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ruiyuan; Chu, Liang; Zhang, Jian; Li, Xing'ao; Huang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Organic-inorganic halide perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have become a new favorite in the photovoltaic field, due to the boosted efficiency up to 22.1%. Despite a flow of achievements, there are certain challenges to simultaneously meet high efficiency, large scale, low cost and high stability. Due to the low cost, extensive sources, high electrical conductivity and chemical stability, carbon materials have made undeniable contributions to play positive roles in developing PSCs. Carbon materials not only have the favorable conductivity but also bipolar advantage, which can transfer both electrons and holes. In this review, we will discuss how the carbon materials transfer charge or accelerate charge transport by incorporation in PSCs. Carbon materials can replace transparent conductive oxide layers, and enhance electron transport in electron transport layers. Moreover, carbon materials with continuous structure, especially carbon nanotubes and graphene, can provide direct charge transport channel that make them suitable additives or even substitutes in hole transport layers. Especially, the successful application of carbon materials as counter electrodes makes the devices full-printable, low temperature and high stability. Finally, a brief outlook is provided on the future development of carbon materials for PSCs, which are expected to devote more contributions in the future photovoltaic market.

  16. Aeroservoelastic Tailoring with Piezoelectric Materials: Actuator Optimization Studies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-09

    0. 2. "e parn of this report that provides the mrost NTdl- Leave W~ ank - meaningful and complete Information. When a repoa is prepared in more than one...References [1] Weissb-ar, T.A. and Ehlers , S.M., Adaptive Aeroelastic Composite Wings-Control and Optimization Issues. Composites, Vol. 2, Nos. 5-7...well understood. At Purdue University, Ehlers and Weisshau 4 ,5 ,6 formulated a simple aeroelastic model for a beam-like laminated composite wing with

  17. Cascade Optimization Strategy Maximizes Thrust for High-Speed Civil Transport Propulsion System Concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The design of a High-Speed Civil Transport (HSCT) air-breathing propulsion system for multimission, variable-cycle operations was successfully optimized through a soft coupling of the engine performance analyzer NASA Engine Performance Program (NEPP) to a multidisciplinary optimization tool COMETBOARDS that was developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The design optimization of this engine was cast as a nonlinear optimization problem, with engine thrust as the merit function and the bypass ratios, r-values of fans, fuel flow, and other factors as important active design variables. Constraints were specified on factors including the maximum speed of the compressors, the positive surge margins for the compressors with specified safety factors, the discharge temperature, the pressure ratios, and the mixer extreme Mach number. Solving the problem by using the most reliable optimization algorithm available in COMETBOARDS would provide feasible optimum results only for a portion of the aircraft flight regime because of the large number of mission points (defined by altitudes, Mach numbers, flow rates, and other factors), diverse constraint types, and overall poor conditioning of the design space. Only the cascade optimization strategy of COMETBOARDS, which was devised especially for difficult multidisciplinary applications, could successfully solve a number of engine design problems for their flight regimes. Furthermore, the cascade strategy converged to the same global optimum solution even when it was initiated from different design points. Multiple optimizers in a specified sequence, pseudorandom damping, and reduction of the design space distortion via a global scaling scheme are some of the key features of the cascade strategy. HSCT engine concept, optimized solution for HSCT engine concept. A COMETBOARDS solution for an HSCT engine (Mach-2.4 mixed-flow turbofan) along with its configuration is shown. The optimum thrust is normalized with respect to NEPP results

  18. Band structure and transport studies of copper selenide: An efficient thermoelectric material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyagi, Kriti; Gahtori, Bhasker; Bathula, Sivaiah; Auluck, S.; Dhar, Ajay

    2014-10-01

    We report the band structure calculations for high temperature cubic phase of copper selenide (Cu2Se) employing Hartree-Fock approximation using density functional theory within the generalized gradient approximation. These calculations were further extended to theoretically estimate the electrical transport coefficients of Cu2Se employing Boltzmann transport theory, which show a reasonable agreement with the corresponding experimentally measured values. The calculated transport coefficients are discussed in terms of the thermoelectric (TE) performance of this material, which suggests that Cu2Se can be a potential p-type TE material with an optimum TE performance at a carrier concentration of ˜ 4 - 6 × 10 21 cm - 3 .

  19. Cost minimization through optimized raw material quality composition

    Treesearch

    Urs Buehlmann; R. Edward Thomas; Xiaoqui. Zuo

    2011-01-01

    Lumber, a heterogeneous, anisotropic material produced from sawing logs, contains a varying number of randomly dispersed, unusable areas (defects) distributed over each boards’ surface area. Each board's quality is determined by the frequency and distribution of these defects and the board's dimension. Typically, the industry classifies lumber into five...

  20. Optimization of the Conditions of Convective Drying of Thermosensitive Materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alyzhanov, M. K.; Sikhimbayev, M. R.; Kuzembayev, S. B.; Sherov, K. T.; Sikhimbayeva, D. R.; Khanov, T. A.; Kurmangaliyev, T. B.; Elemes, D. E.; Donenbayev, B. S.; Musaev, M. M.; Buzauova, T. M.

    2016-12-01

    The article proposes the solution of the problem with the application of thermal vibrations of heat-carrier flow in processes of convective drying, for the purpose of theoretical determination of optimum conditions of short-term excess of handling temperature, that do not influence the decrease of technological characteristics of the thermosensitive materials.