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Sample records for matrix composites reinforced

  1. Sapphire reinforced alumina matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Setlock, John A.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectionally reinforced A1203 matrix composites have been fabricated by hot pressing. Approximately 30 volume % of either coated or uncoated sapphire fiber was used as reinforcement. Unstabilized ZrO2 was applied as the fiber coating. Composite mechanical behavior was analyzed both after fabrication and after additional heat treatment. The results of composite tensile tests were correlated with fiber-matrix interfacial shear strengths determined from fiber push-out tests. Substantially higher strength and greater fiber pull-out were observed for the coated fiber composites for all processing conditions studied. The coated fiber composites retained up to 95% and 87% of their as-fabricated strength when heat treated at 14000C for 8 or 24 hours, respectively. Electron microscopy analysis of the fracture surfaces revealed extensive fiber pull-out both before and after heat treatment.

  2. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    The results of research for the origination of graphite-fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are presented. The method selected to form the composites consisted of pulling the graphite fiber through a slurry containing powdered glass, winding up the graphite fiber and the glass it picks up on a drum, drying, cutting into segments, loading the tape segment into a graphite die, and hot pressing. During the course of the work, composites were made with a variety of graphite fibers in a glass matrix.

  3. Diamond-Reinforced Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-05-10

    stainless steel retorts and evacuated to a level 17 of -40 mTorr. Samples were HIPped to full density at 600"C at 18 30 Ksi for 30 minutes. These...composite bulk 12 materials and composite coatings) having high strength and 13 stiffness. These articles can be used, for example, in dental 14 materials...fabricated using standard powder metallurgy 8 techniques. The materials used to synthesize the DRCs were -230 9 mesh , 1100 aluminum powder and 30 jim

  4. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1980-01-01

    High levels of mechanical performance in tension, flexure, fatigue, and creep loading situations of graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are discussed. At test temperatures of up to 813 K it was found that the major limiting factor was the oxidative instability of the reinforcing graphite fibers. Particular points to note include the following: (1) a wide variety of graphite fibers were found to be comparable with the glass matrix composite fabrication process; (2) choice of fiber, to a large extent, controlled resultant composite performance; (3) composite fatigue performance was found to be excellent at both 300 K and 703 K; (4) composite creep and stress rupture at temperatures of up to 813 K was limited by the oxidative stability of the fiber; (5) exceptionally low values of composite thermal expansion coefficient were attributable to the dimensional stability of both matrix and fiber; and (6) component fabricability was demonstrated through the hot pressing of hot sections and brazing using glass and metal joining phases.

  5. Fiber reinforced thermoplastic resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert J. (Inventor); Chang, Glenn E. C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Polyimide polymer composites having a combination of enhanced thermal and mechanical properties even when subjected to service temperatures as high as 700.degree. F. are described. They comprise (a) from 10 to 50 parts by weight of a thermoplastic polyimide resin prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and (b) from 90 to 50 parts by weight of continuous reinforcing fibers, the total of (a) and (b) being 100 parts by weight. Composites based on polyimide resin formed from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane and pyromellitic dianhydride and continuous carbon fibers retained at least about 50% of their room temperature shear strength after exposure to 700.degree. F. for a period of 16 hours in flowing air. Preferably, the thermoplastic polyimide resin is formed in situ in the composite material by thermal imidization of a corresponding amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. It is also preferred to initially size the continuous reinforcing fibers with up to about one percent by weight of an amide-acid polymer prepared from 2,2-bis[4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl]hexafluoropropane. In this way imidization at a suitable elevated temperature results in the in-situ formation of a substantially homogeneous thermoplastic matrix of the polyimide resin tightly and intimately bonded to the continuous fibers. The resultant composites tend to have optimum thermo-mechanical properties.

  6. Aluminum-Alloy-Matrix/Alumina-Reinforcement Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kashalikar, Uday; Rozenoyer, Boris

    2004-01-01

    Isotropic composites of aluminum-alloy matrices reinforced with particulate alumina have been developed as lightweight, high-specific-strength, less-expensive alternatives to nickel-base and ferrous superalloys. These composites feature a specific gravity of about 3.45 grams per cubic centimeter and specific strengths of about 200 MPa/(grams per cubic centimeter). The room-temperature tensile strength is 100 ksi (689 MPa) and stiffness is 30 Msi (206 GPa). At 500 F (260 C), these composites have shown 80 percent retention in strength and 95 percent retention in stiffness. These materials also have excellent fatigue tolerance and tribological properties. They can be fabricated in net (or nearly net) sizes and shapes to make housings, pistons, valves, and ducts in turbomachinery, and to make structural components of such diverse systems as diesel engines, automotive brake systems, and power-generation, mining, and oil-drilling equipment. Separately, incorporation of these metal matrix composites within aluminum gravity castings for localized reinforcement has been demonstrated. A composite part of this type can be fabricated in a pressure infiltration casting process. The process begins with the placement of a mold with alumina particulate preform of net or nearly net size and shape in a crucible in a vacuum furnace. A charge of the alloy is placed in the crucible with the preform. The interior of the furnace is evacuated, then the furnace heaters are turned on to heat the alloy above its liquidus temperature. Next, the interior of the furnace is filled with argon gas at a pressure about 900 psi (approximately equal to 6.2 MPa) to force the molten alloy to infiltrate the preform. Once infiltrated, the entire contents of the crucible can be allowed to cool in place, and the composite part recovered from the mold.

  7. Graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system is described. Although this composite is not yet a mature material, it possesses low density, attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, and good environmental stability. Properties are reported for a borosilicate glass matrix unidirectionally reinforced with 60 volume percent HMS graphite fiber. The flexural strength and fatigue characteristics at room and elevated temperature, resistance to thermal cycling and continuous high temperature oxidation, and thermal expansion characteristics of the composite are reported. The properties of this new composite are compared to those of advanced resin and metal matrix composites showing that graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are attractive for aerospace applications.

  8. Graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites for aerospace applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.; Dicus, D. L.

    1979-01-01

    The graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system is described. Although this composite is not yet a mature material, it possesses low density, attractive mechanical properties at elevated temperatures, and good environmental stability. Properties are reported for a borosilicate glass matrix unidirectionally reinforced with 60 volume percent HMS graphite fiber. The flexural strength and fatigue characteristics at room and elevated temperature, resistance to thermal cycling and continuous high temperature oxidation, and thermal expansion characteristics of the composite are reported. The properties of this new composite are compared to those of advanced resin and metal matrix composites showing that graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composites are attractive for aerospace applications.

  9. Research on Graphite Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.

    1977-01-01

    This report contains the results obtained in the first twelve months of research under NASA Langley Contract NAS1-14346 for the origination of graphite-fiber reinforced glass matrix composites. Included in the report is a summary of the research by other investigators in this area. The method selected to form the composites consisted of pulling the graphite fiber through a slurry containing powdered glass, winding up the graphite fiber and the glass it picks up on a drum, drying, cutting into segments, loading the tape segment into a graphite die, and hot pressing. During the course of the work, composites were made with a variety of graphite fibers in a C.G.W. 7740 (Pyrex) glass matrix. The graphite fibers used included Hercules HMS, Hercules HTS, Thornel 300S, and Celanese DG-102 and, of these, the Hercules HMS and Celanese DG-102 graphite fibers in C.G.W. 7740 gave the most interesting but widely different results. Hercules HMS fiber in C.G.W. 7740 glass (Pyrex) showed an average four-point flexural strength of 848 MPa or 127,300 psi. As the test temperature was raised from room temperature to 560 C in argon or vacuum, the strength was higher by 50 percent. However, in air, similar tests at 560 C gave a severe loss in strength. These composites also have good thermal cycle properties in argon or vacuum, greatly increased toughness compared to glass, and no loss in strength in a 100 cycle fatigue test. Celanese DG-102 fiber in C.G.W. 7740 glass (Pyrex) had a much lower flexural strength but did not suffer any loss in this strength when samples were heated to 560 C in air for 4 hrs.

  10. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bacon, J. F.; Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1978-01-01

    A composite that can be used at temperatures up to 875 K with mechanical properties equal or superior to graphite fiber reinforced epoxy composites is presented. The composite system consist of graphite fiber, uniaxially or biaxially, reinforced borosilicate glass. The mechanical and thermal properties of such a graphite fiber reinforced glass composite are described, and the system is shown to offer promise as a high performance structural material. Specific properties that were measured were: a modified borosilicate glass uniaxially reinforced by Hercules HMS graphite fiber has a three-point flexural strength of 1030 MPa, a four-point flexural strength of 964 MPa, an elastic modulus of 199 GPa and a failure strain of 0.0052. The preparation and properties of similar composites with Hercules HTS, Celanese DG-102, Thornel 300 and Thornel Pitch graphite fibers are also described.

  11. Damage tolerance in discontinuously reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Rack, H.J.; Ratnaparkhi, P.

    1988-11-01

    Properly designed discontinuously-reinforced MMCs have been projected by linear-elastic fracture mechanics to be competitive, on both cost and performance bases, with cross-plied graphite-reinforced polymer-matrix composites and continuously-reinforced MMCs. With respect to the latter, discontinuously-reinforced MMCs achieve considerable advantages in virtue of their lower-cost reinforcements and their fabricability by standard metal-working practices. Discontinuously reinforced MMC billets can also be produced through powder-blending and direct-spraying techniques. SiC short fibers, whiskers, and particulates are typical of the discontinuous reinforcements used in 2124 and 6061 aluminum matrices. 18 references.

  12. Research on graphite reinforced glass matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Thompson, E. R.

    1981-01-01

    A broad group of fibers and matrices were combined to create a wide range of composite properties. Primary material fabrication procedures were developed which readily permit the fabrication of flat plate and shaped composites. Composite mechanical properties were measured under a wide range of test conditions. Tensile, flexure mechanical fatigue, thermal fatigue, fracture toughness, and fatigue crack growth resistance were evaluated. Selected fiber-matrix combinations were shown to maintain their strength at up to 1300 K when tested in an inert atmosphere. Composite high temperature mechanical properties were shown to be limited primarily by the oxidation resistance of the graphite fibers. Composite thermal dimensional stability was measured and found to be excellent.

  13. Plastic matrix composites with continuous fiber reinforcement

    SciTech Connect

    1991-09-19

    Most plastic resins are not suitable for structural applications. Although many resins are extremely tough, most lack strength, stiffness, and deform under load with time. By mixing strong, stiff, fibrous materials into the plastic matrix, a variety of structural composite materials can be formed. The properties of these composites can be tailored by fiber selection, orientation, and other factors to suit specific applications. The advantages and disadvantages of fiberglass, carbon-graphite, aramid (Kevlar 49), and boron fibers are summarized.

  14. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-08-31

    Nardone , "Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications", Office of Naval Research Contract N00014-85-C-0332, Report R86... Nardone and K M. Prewo, "Tensile Performance of Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass", J. Mater. Sci. accepted for publication, 1987. 27. R. F. Cooper and K

  15. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sayuti, M.; Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A.; Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-17

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  16. Mechanical Properties of Particulate Reinforced Aluminium Alloy Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sayuti, M.; Sulaiman, S.; Baharudin, B. T. H. T.; Arifin, M. K. A.; Suraya, S.; Vijayaram, T. R.

    2011-01-01

    This paper discusses the mechanical properties of Titanium Carbide (TiC) particulate reinforced aluminium-silicon alloy matrix composite. TiC particulate reinforced LM6 alloy matrix composites were fabricated by carbon dioxide sand molding process with different particulate weight fraction. Tensile strength, hardness and microstructure studies were conducted to determine the maximum load, tensile strength, modulus of elasticity and fracture surface analysis have been performed to characterize the morphological aspects of the test samples after tensile testing. Hardness values are measured for the TiC reinforced LM6 alloy composites and it has been found that it gradually increases with increased addition of the reinforcement phase. The tensile strength of the composites increased with the increase percentage of TiC particulate.

  17. Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composites: A review

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix (W/Cu) composites have served as an ideal model system with which to analyze the properties of metal matrix composites. A series of research programs were conducted to investigate the stress-strain behavior of W/Cu composites; the effect of fiber content on the strength, modulus, and conductivity of W/Cu composites; and the effect of alloying elements on the behavior of tungsten wire and of W/Cu composites. Later programs investigated the stress-rupture, creep, and impact behavior of these composites at elevated temperatures. Analysis of the results of these programs as allows prediction of the effects of fiber properties, matrix properties, and fiber content on the properties of W/Cu composites. These analyses form the basis for the rule-of-mixtures prediction of composite properties which was universally adopted as the criteria for measuring composite efficiency. In addition, the analyses allows extrapolation of potential properties of other metal matrix composites and are used to select candidate fibers and matrices for development of tungsten fiber reinforced superalloy composite materials for high temperature aircraft and rocket engine turbine applications. The W/Cu composite efforts are summarized, some of the results obtained are described, and an update is provided on more recent work using W/Cu composites as high strength, high thermal conductivity composite materials for high heat flux, elevated temperature applications.

  18. Mechanical Properties of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Zirconium Diboride Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuffle, Kevin; Creegan, Peter; Nowell, Steven; Bull, Jeffrey D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced zirconium diboride matrix composites, SCS-9a-(RBSiCZrB2)matrix, are being developed for leading edge, rocket nozzle and turbine engine applications. Recently, the composite materials have been characterized for tensile properties to 1250 C, the highest temperature tested. The tensile properties are fiber dominated as the matrix is microcracked on fabrication, but favorable failure characteristic are observed. Compression and shear mechanical testing results will be reported if completed. The effects of fiber volume fraction and matrix density on mechanical properties will be discussed. The target applications of the materials will be discussed. Specific testing being performed towards qualification for these applications will be included.

  19. Mechanical Properties of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Zirconium Diboride Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuffle, Kevin; Creegan, Peter; Nowell, Steven; Bull, Jeffrey D.; Rasky, Daniel J. (Technical Monitor)

    1995-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced zirconium diboride matrix composites, SCS-9a-(RBSiCZrB2)matrix, are being developed for leading edge, rocket nozzle and turbine engine applications. Recently, the composite materials have been characterized for tensile properties to 1250 C, the highest temperature tested. The tensile properties are fiber dominated as the matrix is microcracked on fabrication, but favorable failure characteristic are observed. Compression and shear mechanical testing results will be reported if completed. The effects of fiber volume fraction and matrix density on mechanical properties will be discussed. The target applications of the materials will be discussed. Specific testing being performed towards qualification for these applications will be included.

  20. Fatigue in selectively fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamurty, U.

    1999-08-01

    Many applications of the Ti alloy matrix composites (TMCs) reinforced with SiC fibers are expected to use the selective reinforcement concept in order to optimize the processing and increase the cost-effectiveness. In this work, unnotched fatigue behavior of a Ti-6Al-4V matrix selectively reinforced with SCS-6 SiC fibers has been examined. Experiments have been conducted on two different model panels. Results show that the fatigue life of the selectively reinforced composites is far inferior to that of the all-TMC panel. The fatigue life decreases with the decreasing effective fiber volume fraction. Suppression of multiple matrix cracking in the selectively reinforced panels was identified as the reason for their lack of fatigue resistance. Fatigue endurance limit as a function of the clad thickness was calculated using the modified Smith-Watson-Topper (SWT) parameter and the effective fiber volume fraction approach. The regime over which multiple matrix cracking occurs is identified using the bridging fiber fracture criterion. A fatigue failure map for the selectively reinforced TMCs is constructed on the basis of the observed damage mechanisms. Possible applications of such maps are discussed.

  1. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnaparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    Summarized is the progress achieved during the period September 16, 1987 to August 15, l988 on NASA Grant NAG1-724, Fracture Criteria for Discontinuously Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites. Appended are copies of three manuscripts prepared under NASA funding during the performance period.

  2. Fracture criteria for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rack, H. J.; Goree, J. G.; Albritton, J.; Ratnarparkhi, P.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of sample configuration on the details of initial crack propagation in discontinuously whisker reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites was investigated. Care was taken to allow direct comparison of fracture toughness values utilizing differing sample configurations and orientations, holding all materials variables constant, e.g., extrusion ration, heat treatment, and chemistry.

  3. Fabrication of Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Setlock, John A.

    2000-01-01

    A method has been developed for the fabrication of small diameter, multifilament tow fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites. Its application has been successfully demonstrated for the Hi-Nicalon/celsian system. Strong and tough celsian matrix composites, reinforced with BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers, have been fabricated by infiltrating the fiber tows with the matrix slurry, winding the tows on a drum, cutting and stacking of the prepreg tapes in the desired orientation, and hot pressing. The monoclinic celsian phase in the matrix was produced in situ, during hot pressing, from the 0.75BaO-0.25SrO-Al2O3-2SiO2 mixed precursor synthesized by solid state reaction from metal oxides. Hot pressing resulted in almost fully dense fiber-reinforced composites. The unidirectional composites having approx. 42 vol% of fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout in three-point bend tests at room temperature. Values of yield stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 percent, respectively, and ultimate strengths of 900 +/- 60 MPa were observed. The Young's modulus of the composites was measured to be 165 +/- 5 GPa.

  4. Glass matrix composites. I - Graphite fiber reinforced glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Bacon, J. F.

    1978-01-01

    An experimental program is described in which graphite fibers of Hercules HMS and HTS, Thornel 300, and Celanese DG-12 were used to reinforce, both uniaxially and biaxially, borosilicate pyrex glass. Composite flexural strength distribution, strength as a function of test temperature, fracture toughness and oxidative stability were determined and shown to be primarily a function of fiber type and the quality of fiber-matrix bond formed during composite fabrication. It is demonstrated that the graphite fiber reinforced glass system offers unique possibilities as a high performance structural material.

  5. Reinforcement stresses during deformation of sphere- and particulate-reinforced Al-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Justice, I.; Poza, P.; Martinez, J.L.; Llorca, J.

    1996-02-01

    Recent experimental results showed that reinforcement fracture is very often the dominant damage mechanism during ambient temperature deformation of discontinuously reinforced Al-matrix composites (DRAC). The reinforcements are broken by cracks perpendicular to the loading axis, and the fraction of broken reinforcements increases during plastic deformation as the load transferred from the matrix to the ceramic particulates increases. This process continues until a criteria fraction of broken reinforcements is reached, and then fracture takes place suddenly by a ductile mechanism involving localized necking of the intervoid matrix. The rate of reinforcement fracture depends on the strength of the ceramic reinforcements and on the stresses acting on them, and the modeling of the processes of damage accumulation in DRAC requires the knowledge of both. In particular, the stresses acting on the reinforcements during monotonic tensile deformation are a function of the applied strain, of the matrix and reinforcement properties, and of the volume fraction and shape of the ceramic reinforcements. A parametrical study is presented in this article of the influence of these factors on the stress acting on the reinforcements. The numerical results covered the whole range of matrix strengths which are typical in DRAC and were fitted to simple analytical expressions to facilitate their use by other researchers.

  6. Ceramic fiber reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A slurry of BSAS glass powders is cast into tapes which are cut to predetermined sizes. Mats of continuous chemical vapor deposition (CVD)-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with these matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite which is heated to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot-pressed to form a BSAS glass-ceramic fiber-reinforced composite.

  7. Ductility of a continuous fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, Frederick A.

    1991-01-01

    The transverse properties of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced by continuous alumina fibers have been investigated. The composite is subjected to both mechanical and cyclic thermal loading. The ductility can vary by an order of magnitude according to the operating conditions. For high mechanical and low thermal loading the ductility is small, for low mechanical and high thermal loading the ductility is an order of magnitude higher. Experiments on a beam in bending confirm that the ductility is strongly dependent on the loading conditions. The observations suggest a means of utilizing the inherent ductility of the matrix.

  8. Simulation of Damage Evolution in Discontinously Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Biner, S.B.; Hu, Shenyang Y.

    2009-08-01

    First, a phase-field model for elastic-plastic solids obeying von Mises yield criterion will be described. Then, this phase-field model will be extended to simulate the damage evolution due to nucleation and growth of voids in ductile matrix for discontinuously reinforced composites. The role of reinforcement morphology and the modulus effects leading to final failure all included in the simulations in an effort to make a parametric investigation. The advantages and disadvantages of such phase-field modeling approach in comparison to well established other continuum methods will be elucidated.

  9. Interfacial studies in fiber-reinforced thermoplastic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Brady, R.L.

    1989-01-01

    The major theme of this dissertation is structure/property relationships in fiber-reinforced thermoplastic-matrix composites. Effort has been focused on the interface: interfacial crystallization and fiber/matrix adhesion. Included are investigations on interfacial nucleation and morphology, measurement of fiber/matrix adhesion, effects of interfacial adsorption and crystallization on fiber/matrix adhesion, and composites reinforced with thermotropic liquid crystal copolyester fibers. Crystallization of a copolyester and polybutylene terephthalate with glass, carbon, or aramid fibers has been studied with regard to interfacial morphology. Techniques employed included hot-stage optical microscopy and differential scanning calorimetry. Nucleation by the fibers was found to be a general phenomenon. Morphology could be varied by changing the cooling rate. In order to better monitor fiber /matrix adhesion, a buckled plate test has been developed. The test measures transverse toughness as the parameter characterizing interfacial adhesion in unidirectional, continuous-fiber composites. The test is simple to perform yet has advantages over other interfacial evaluation techniques. The buckled plate test was found to be a sensitive measure of fiber/matrix adhesion. The buckled plate test has been used along with the transverse tensile test to examine how interfacial adsorption and crystallization affect fiber/matrix adhesion in polycarbonate/carbon fiber composites. Adsorption was found to be of primary importance in developing adhesion, while crystallization is a secondary effect. The toughness data have been fit successfully for annealing time and temperature dependence. The dependence of adsorption and transverse toughness on matrix molecular weight was found to be large, with higher molecular weights adsorbing more effectively.

  10. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1992-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  11. Creep behavior of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, T. L.

    1989-01-01

    Tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal matrix composites were evaluated for use in space nuclear power conversion systems. The composite panels were fabricated using the arc-spray monotape technique at the NASA Lewis Research Center. The creep behavior of W/Nb composite material was determined at 1400 and 1500 K in vacuum over a wide range of applied loads. The time to reach 1 percent strain, the time to rupture, and the minimum creep rate were measured. The W/Nb composites exceeded the properties of monolithic niobium alloys significantly even when compared on a strength to density basis. The effect of fiber orientation on the creep strength also was evaluated. Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis. A relationship was found between the fiber orientation and the creep strength.

  12. Carbide-reinforced metal matrix composite by direct metal deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novichenko, D.; Thivillon, L.; Bertrand, Ph.; Smurov, I.

    Direct metal deposition (DMD) is an automated 3D laser cladding technology with co-axial powder injection for industrial applications. The actual objective is to demonstrate the possibility to produce metal matrix composite objects in a single-step process. Powders of Fe-based alloy (16NCD13) and titanium carbide (TiC) are premixed before cladding. Volume content of the carbide-reinforced phase is varied. Relationships between the main laser cladding parameters and the geometry of the built-up objects (single track, 2D coating) are discussed. On the base of parametric study, a laser cladding process map for the deposition of individual tracks was established. Microstructure and composition of the laser-fabricated metal matrix composite objects are examined. Two different types of structures: (a) with the presence of undissolved and (b) precipitated titanium carbides are observed. Mechanism of formation of diverse precipitated titanium carbides is studied.

  13. Thermomechanical fatigue cracking in fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, G.; McMeeking, R. M.

    1995-09-01

    A theoretical model is developed for thermomechanical fatigue cracking in fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites. Interfacial debonding is assumed to occur readily, allowing fibers to slide relative to the matrix resisted by a uniform shear stress. The fibers therefore bridge any matrix crack which develops. The crack bridging traction law is obtained, including the effect of thermal expansion mismatch between the fiber and the matrix and a temperature dependence of the frictional shear stress. Any combination of thermal and mechanical cycling is considered as long as the slip zone along the fiber increases in length monotonically during each increment of cycling. However, for clarity, the results are presented in terms of in-phase and out-of-phase cycling of the thermal and mechanical loads at the same frequency. For each case, the stress distributions in the bridging zone as well as the stress intensity factors at the crack tip are computed for relevant regimes of the thermal and mechanical loading conditions. Predictions are made of the matrix fatigue crack growth under combined thermal and mechanical loading conditions. It is found that when the thermal expansion coefficient of the fiber is less than that of the matrix, a significant increase in the crack growth rate results in out-of-phase thermomechanical fatigue. On the other hand, there is decreased tendency for fibers to fail in this case. For in-phase thermomechanical fatigue, the crack growth rate is reduced but the stress in the fiber is larger than that due to mechanical loading alone, resulting in an increased tendency for fiber failure. The implications for life prediction for fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites are discussed.

  14. Electrical behavior of carbon whisker reinforced elastomer matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chellappa, V.; Chiou, Z.W.; Jang, B.Z.

    1994-12-31

    The electrical and mechanical properties of carbon whisker reinforced thermoplastic elastomer composites were investigated. The reinforcement whisker was made by a catalytic chemical vapor deposition (CCVD) process and the polymer matrix was from a thermoplastic elastomer (TPE, a butadiene-styrene block co-polymer). The electrical resistivity ({rho}) of the CCVD carbon whisker-elastomer composites can be varied by uniaxial deformation (10{sup 1}-10{sup 8}{Omega}-cm) and by changing the temperature (10{sup 1}-10{sup 5}{Omega}-cm). The temperature-resistivity studies indicate, that the resistivity of these composites depend on the physical property of the elastomer. The {rho} vs 1/T curves exhibit two distinct slopes intersected at the T{sub g} of the elastomer (-50{degrees}C). Further uniaxial deformation studies at room temperature (20{degrees}C) demonstrated that the resistivity increased exponentially with the deformation. The dependence of resistivity (or conductivity) of the composites with respect to deformation and temperature was explained on the basis of electron tunnelling induced conduction. CCVD carbon whiskers can be used as a reinforcement (filler) for the elastomer and can also make them electrically conductive.

  15. Dual-nanoparticulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Cho, Seungchan; Leparoux, Marc; Kawasaki, Akira

    2012-06-01

    Aluminum (Al) matrix composite materials reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNT) and silicon carbide nanoparticles (nano-SiC) were fabricated by mechanical ball milling, followed by hot-pressing. Nano-SiC was used as an active mixing agent for dispersing the CNTs in the Al powder. The hardness of the produced composites was dramatically increased, up to eight times higher than bulk pure Al, by increasing the amount of nano-SiC particles. A small quantity of aluminum carbide (Al4C3) was observed by TEM analysis and quantified using x-ray diffraction. The composite with the highest hardness values contained some nanosized Al4C3. Along with the CNT and the nano-SiC, Al4C3 also seemed to play a role in the enhanced hardness of the composites. The high energy milling process seems to lead to a homogeneous dispersion of the high aspect ratio CNTs, and of the nearly spherical nano-SiC particles in the Al matrix. This powder metallurgical approach could also be applied to other nanoreinforced composites, such as ceramics or complex matrix materials.

  16. Matrix cracking of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Varun P.; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) under general loadings remains incomplete. The present paper addresses one outstanding aspect of this problem: the development of matrix cracks in unidirectional plies under shear loading. To this end, we develop a model based on potential energy differences upstream and downstream of a fully bridged steady-state matrix crack. Through a combination of analytical solutions and finite element simulations of the constituent stresses before and after cracking, we identify the dominant stress components that drive crack growth. We show that, when the axial slip lengths are much larger than the fiber diameter and when interfacial slip precedes cracking, the shear stresses in the constituents are largely unaffected by the presence of the crack; the changes that do occur are confined to a 'core' region within a distance of about one fiber diameter from the crack plane. Instead, the driving force for crack growth derives mainly from the axial stresses-tensile in the fibers and compressive in the matrix-that arise upon cracking. These stresses are well-approximated by solutions based on shear-lag analysis. Combining these solutions with the governing equation for crack growth yields an analytical estimate of the critical shear stress for matrix cracking. An analogous approach is used in deriving the critical stresses needed for matrix cracking under arbitrary in-plane loadings. The applicability of these results to cross-ply CMC laminates is briefly discussed.

  17. Shock Interaction Studies on Glass Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reddy, K. P. J.; Jagadeesh, G.; Jayaram, V.; Reddy, B. Harinath; Madhu, V.; Reddy, C. Jaya Rami

    Glass fibre reinforced polymer matrix composites are being extensively used for structural applications both in civil and defense sectors, owing to their high specific strength, stiffness and good energy absorbing capability. Understanding the dynamic response of these composites on shock loading is very essential for effective design of structures resistant to blast loads. In the present study, E- glass/epoxy composite laminate has been fabricated and evaluated for their mechanical properties such as tensile strength, flexural strength and inter laminar shear strength (ILSS). Further, dynamic response of E-glass laminates is presently studied by shock loading. When E-glass composite subjected to peak shock reflected pressure of 7.2 MPa and estimated temperature of about 14000 K for short duration, it underwent surface discolorations and charring of epoxy matrix. Post test analysis of the composite sample was carried out to study the damage analysis using Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM), changes in thermal properties of composites using Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA) and Thermo-Gravimetric Analyzer (TGA). The results of these investigations are discussed in this paper.

  18. Rapid Prototyping of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Green, C.; Phillips, T.; Cipriani, R.; Yarlagadda, S.; Gillespie, J. W., Jr.; Effinger, M.; Cooper, K. C.

    2003-01-01

    For ceramics to be used as structural components in high temperature applications, their fracture toughness is improved by embedding continuous ceramic fibers. Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow increasing the overall operating temperature, raising the temperature safety margins, avoiding the need for cooling, and improving the damping capacity, while reducing the weight at the same time. They also need to be reliable and available in large quantities as well. In this paper, an innovative rapid prototyping technique to fabricate continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. The process is simple, robust and will be widely applicable to a number of high temperature material systems. This technique was originally developed at the University of Delaware Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) for rapid fabrication of polymer matrix composites by a technique called automated tow placement or ATP. The results of mechanical properties and microstructural characterization are presented, together with examples of complex shapes and parts. It is believed that the process will be able to create complex shaped parts at an order of magnitude lower cost than current chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) and polymer impregnation and pyrolysis (PIP) processes.

  19. Rapid Prototyping of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaidyanathan, R.; Green, C.; Phillips, T.; Cipriani, R.; Yarlagadda, S.; Gillespie, J.; Effinger, M.; Cooper, K. C.; Gordon, Gail (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    For ceramics to be used as structural components in high temperature applications, their fracture toughness is improved by embedding continuous ceramic fibers. Ceramic matrix composite (CMC) materials allow increasing the overall operating temperature, raising the temperature safety margins, avoiding the need for cooling, and improving the damping capacity, while reducing the weight at the same time. They also need to be reliable and available in large quantities as well. In this paper, an innovative rapid prototyping technique to fabricate continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites is described. The process is simple, robust and will be widely applicable to a number of high temperature material systems. This technique was originally developed at the University of Delaware Center for Composite Materials (UD-CCM) for rapid fabrication of polymer matrix composites by a technique called automated tow placement or ATP. The results of mechanical properties and microstructural characterization are presented, together with examples of complex shapes and parts. It is believed that the process will be able to create complex shaped parts at an order of magnitude lower cost than current CVI and PIP processes.

  20. Flexural analysis of palm fiber reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Raghav, Dasarath; Santhosh Kiran, R.; Mahesh, Bhargav; Kumar, Krishna

    2015-07-01

    Uncertainty in availability of fossil fuels in the future and global warming increased the need for more environment friendly materials. In this work, an attempt is made to fabricate a hybrid polymer matrix composite. The blend is a mixture of General Purpose Resin and Cashew Nut Shell Liquid, a natural resin extracted from cashew plant. Palm fiber, which has high strength, is used as reinforcement material. The fiber is treated with alkali (NaOH) solution to increase its strength and adhesiveness. Parametric study of flexure strength is carried out by varying alkali concentration, duration of alkali treatment and fiber volume. Taguchi L9 Orthogonal array is followed in the design of experiments procedure for simplification. With the help of ANOVA technique, regression equations are obtained which gives the level of influence of each parameter on the flexure strength of the composite.

  1. Mechanical Behaviour of Alumina Silicon Carbide Reinforced Particulate Reinforced Metal Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raghu Ram, K. S.; Sweanney Bandi, Sharon Rose; Sivarama Krishna, Ch.

    2017-08-01

    The present study was aimed at evaluating the effect of hardness and impact strength of Aluminum Al2O3SiC particulate reinforced Composites. These AMCs with multiple reinforcement (hybrid MMCs) are finding increased applications in aerospace, automobile, space, underwater and transportation applications. An effort is made to enhance the Hardness, flexural strength and Impact properties of AMCs by reinforcing Aluminum matrix with Varying Proportion of small particles of Al2O3SiC by stir casting method. Aluminum alloy matrix varying proportions of Al2O3SiC particulates were fabricated. The microstructure, hardness and impact strength properties of the fabricated AMCs were analyzed. The optical microstructure study revealed the homogeneous dispersion of Al2O3SiC particles in the matrix. Based on the results obtained from the Hardness and Impact of the metal matrix composites it is observed that, the hardness and impact strength increases with increase in the amount of reinforcement content.

  2. Solidification of particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanumanth, G. S.; Irons, G. A.

    1996-08-01

    The solidification behavior of ceramic particle-reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs) is different from that of the bare matrix, not only because of the presence of the ceramic particles, but also due to their redistribution in the melt that results in nonhomogeneous thermophysical properties. The MMCs comprised of 10-to 15-μm SiC particles of varying volume fractions, dispersed uniformly in a modified aluminum A356 alloy by the melt stirring technique, were solidified unidirectionally in a thermocouple-instrumented cylindrical steel mold. The cooling rates were continually monitored by measuring temperatures at different depths in the melt, and the solidified MMCs were sectioned into disks and chemically analyzed for SiC volume fraction. The results point out that the cooling rate increased with increasing volume fraction of SiC particles. A small increase in the bulk SiC volume fraction of the cast MMC was observed due to particle settling during solidification. A one-dimensional enthalpy model of MMC solidification was formulated, wherein particle settling occurring in the solidifying matrix was coupled to the enthalpy equation by means of the Richardson-Zaki hindered settling correlation. A comparative study of simulations with experiments suggested that the thermal response of SiC particles used in this study was similar to that of single crystals, and their presence increased the effective thermal conductivity of the composite.

  3. Fatigue damage criteria - Matrix, fibers and interfaces of continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    Continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are projected for use in high temperature, stiffness critical parts that will be subjected to cyclic loadings. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four catagories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage are discussed and illustrated by examples. The emphasis is on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  4. Graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic glass matrix composites for use at 1000 F

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Minford, E. J.

    1985-01-01

    The fabrication and properties of the graphite fiber reinforced glass matrix composite system are described. By reinforcing borosilicate glass with graphite fibers it has been possible to develop a composite whose properties can be compared favorably with resin matrix counterparts. Both high elastic modulus and strength can be obtained and maintained to temperatures of approximately 600 C. In addition, composite dimensional stability is superior to resin or metal matrix systems due to the low thermal expansion behavior of the glass matrix.

  5. Creep Forming of Carbon-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughn, Wallace L.; Scotti, Stephan J.; Ashe, Melissa P.; Connolly, Liz

    2007-01-01

    A set of lecture slides describes an investigation of creep forming as a means of imparting desired curvatures to initially flat stock plates of carbon-reinforced ceramic-matrix composite (C-CMC) materials. The investigation is apparently part of a continuing effort to develop improved means of applying small CCMC repair patches to reinforced carbon-carbon leading edges of aerospace vehicles (e.g., space shuttles) prior to re-entry into the atmosphere of the Earth. According to one of the slides, creep forming would be an intermediate step in a process that would yield a fully densified, finished C-CMC part having a desired size and shape (the other steps would include preliminary machining, finish machining, densification by chemical vapor infiltration, and final coating). The investigation included experiments in which C-CMC disks were creep-formed by heating them to unspecified high temperatures for time intervals of the order of 1 hour while they were clamped into single- and double-curvature graphite molds. The creep-formed disks were coated with an oxidation- protection material, then subjected to arc-jet tests, in which the disks exhibited no deterioration after exposure to high-temperature test conditions lasting 490 seconds.

  6. Mechanics of Matrix Cracking in Brittle-Matrix Fibre-Reinforced Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCartney, L. N.

    1987-02-01

    Energy-balance calculations for a continuum model of cracking in a uniaxially fibre-reinforced composite having a brittle matrix are presented. It is assumed that the fibres are strong enough to remain intact when the matrix cracks across the entire cross section of the composite. By equating the energy availability for the cracking of continuum and discrete fibre models it is shown how the crack boundary condition relating fibre stress to crack opening must be selected. It is confirmed that the Griffith fracture criterion is valid for matrix cracking in composites. By considering the energy balance of long cracks it is shown that the limiting value of the stress intensity factor is independent of crack length and that it predicts a matrix-cracking strain that is consistent with the known result. An improved numerical method is described for solving a crack problem arising from the study of the cracking of brittle-matrix composites. Numerical results of high accuracy are obtained, which show how the cracking stress is related to the size of a pre-existing defect. Of special significance is the prediction of the correct threshold stress (i.e. matrix-cracking stress) below which matrix cracking is impossible no matter how large the pre-existing defect.

  7. Elasto-plastic analysis of interface layers for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doghri, I.; Leckie, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion (CTE) of fiber and matrix in metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic fibers induces high thermal stresses in the matrix. Elasto-plastic analyses - with different degrees of simplification and modelization - show that an interface layer with a sufficiently high CTE can reduce the tensile hoop stress in the matrix substantially.

  8. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Wang, Z; Georgarakis, K; Nakayama, K S; Li, Y; Tsarkov, A A; Xie, G; Dudina, D; Louzguine-Luzgin, D V; Yavari, A R

    2016-04-12

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  9. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-04-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses.

  10. Microstructure and mechanical behavior of metallic glass fiber-reinforced Al alloy matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Z.; Georgarakis, K.; Nakayama, K. S.; Li, Y.; Tsarkov, A. A.; Xie, G.; Dudina, D.; Louzguine-Luzgin, D. V.; Yavari, A. R.

    2016-01-01

    Metallic glass-reinforced metal matrix composites are an emerging class of composite materials. The metallic nature and the high mechanical strength of the reinforcing phase offers unique possibilities for improving the engineering performance of composites. Understanding the structure at the amorphous/crystalline interfaces and the deformation behavior of these composites is of vital importance for their further development and potential application. In the present work, Zr-based metallic glass fibers have been introduced in Al7075 alloy (Al-Zn-Mg-Cu) matrices using spark plasma sintering (SPS) producing composites with low porosity. The addition of metallic glass reinforcements in the Al-based matrix significantly improves the mechanical behavior of the composites in compression. High-resolution TEM observations at the interface reveal the formation of a thin interdiffusion layer able to provide good bonding between the reinforcing phase and the Al-based matrix. The deformation behavior of the composites was studied, indicating that local plastic deformation occurred in the matrix near the glassy reinforcements followed by the initiation and propagation of cracks mainly through the matrix. The reinforcing phase is seen to inhibit the plastic deformation and retard the crack propagation. The findings offer new insights into the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites reinforced with metallic glasses. PMID:27067824

  11. Studies on natural fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, R. H.; Kapatel, P. M.; Machchhar, A. D.; Kapatel, Y. A.

    2016-05-01

    Natural fiber reinforced composites show increasing importance in day to days applications because of their low cost, lightweight, easy availability, non-toxicity, biodegradability and environment friendly nature. But these fibers are hydrophilic in nature. Thus they have very low reactivity and poor compatibility with polymers. To overcome these limitations chemical modifications of the fibers have been carried out. Therefore, in the present work jute fibers have chemically modified by treating with sodium hydroxide (NaOH) solutions. These treated jute fibers have been used to fabricate jute fiber reinforced epoxy composites. Mechanical properties like tensile strength, flexural strength and impact strength have been found out. Alkali treated composites show better properties compare to untreated composites.

  12. Fatigue of continuous fiber reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    Several lay-ups of SCS-6/Ti-15-3 composites were investigated. Static and fatigue tests were conducted for both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. Test results indicated that the stress in the 0 fibers is the controlling factor in fatigue life. The static and fatigue strength of these materials is shown to be dependent on the level of residual stresses and the fiber/ matrix interfacial strength. Fatigue tests of notched specimens showed that cracks can initiate and grow many fiber spacings in the matrix material without breaking fibers. These matrix cracks can significantly reduce the residual strength of notched composite.

  13. Thermal shock of fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eckel, Andrew J.; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Herbell, Thomas P.; Generazio, Edward R.

    1991-01-01

    Monolithic silicon carbide and silicon nitride and a Nicalon fiber reinforced silicon carbide composite were subjected to severe thermal shock conditions via impingement of a hydrogen-oxygen flame. Surface heating rates of 1000 C/sec to 2500 C/sec were generated. The performance of the monolithic reference materials are compared and contrasted to the significantly greater thermal shock resistance of the composite. Ultrasonic and radiographic NDE techniques were used to evaluate the integrity of the composite subsequent to thermal shock. Tensile tests were performed to determine the residual tensile strength and modulus. Physical property changes are discussed as a function of number and severity of thermal shock cycles.

  14. Wear Performance of A356 Matrix Composites Reinforced with Different Types of Reinforcing Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Mostafa; Shojaeefard, Mohammad Hasan; Asadi, Parviz; Khalkhali, Abolfazl

    2017-09-01

    To improve the wear resistance of Al-Si alloys, different types of reinforcing particles such as SiC, TiC, ZrO2, and B4C were used to produce matrix composites by friction stir processing (FSP). First, microstructural properties of different locations of stir zone (SZ) in the FSPed specimens such as advancing side, retreating side, shoulder-affected area, and pin-affected area were investigated. The results demonstrate that Si particles size is not the same in different SZ subdomains. SEM investigation was performed in order to investigate the particles distribution in different areas of the SZ as well as bonding quality between particles and metal matrix. Hardness and wear tests were carried out to determine mechanical and wear properties of the composites. The pin-on-disk wear tests were performed at room temperature, with the normal applied loads of 5, 10, and 20 N and sliding speed of 1 and 2 m/s. All fabricated composites show higher resistance in wear than A356 alloy. Wear test results show, by increasing the normal load and sliding velocity, the wear loss weight of all composites increased gradually.

  15. Interface Characterization in Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naya, F.; Molina-Aldareguía, J. M.; Lopes, C. S.; González, C.; LLorca, J.

    2017-01-01

    A novel methodology is presented and applied to measure the shear interface strength of fiber-reinforced polymers. The strategy is based in fiber push-in tests carried out on the central fiber of highly-packed fiber clusters with hexagonal symmetry, and it is supported by a detailed finite element analysis of the push-in test to account for the influence of hygrothermal residual stresses, fiber constraint and fiber anisotropy on the interface strength. Examples of application are presented to determine the shear interface strength in carbon and glass fiber composites reinforced with either thermoset or thermoplastic matrices. In addition, the influence of the environment (either dry or wet conditions) on the interface strength in C/epoxy composites is demonstrated.

  16. Cost effective production techniques for continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, W.D.; Spelz, U.

    1995-09-01

    Cost effective techniques for fabrication of continuous fibre reinforced ceramic matrix composites like filament winding, prepreg technique and resin transfer moulding are reported. The advantages and disadvantages of the three different manufacture routes are given and examples are shown.

  17. Fracture Analysis of Particulate Reinforced Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.; Cornie, James A.

    2013-01-01

    A fracture analysis of highly loaded particulate reinforced composites was performed using laser moire interferometry to measure the displacements within the plastic zone at the tip of an advancing crack. Ten castings were made of five different particulate reinforcement-aluminum alloy combinations. Each casting included net-shape specimens which were used for the evaluation of fracture toughness, tensile properties, and flexure properties resulting in an extensive materials properties data. Measured fracture toughness range from 14.1 MPa for an alumina reinforced 356 aluminum alloy to 23.9 MPa for a silicon carbide reinforced 2214 aluminum alloy. For the combination of these K(sub Ic) values and the measured tensile strengths, the compact tension specimens were too thin to yield true plane strain K(sub Ic) values. All materials exhibited brittle behavior characterized by very small tensile ductility suggesting that successful application of these materials requires that the design stresses be below the elastic limit. Probabilistic design principles similar to those used with ceramics are recommended when using these materials. Such principles would include the use of experimentally determined design allowables. In the absence of thorough testing, a design allowable stress of 60 percent of the measured ultimate tensile stress is recommended.

  18. Recycling of ceramic particulate reinforced aluminium metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, S.C.; Murthy, C.S.C.; Kamath, R.; Vinai Babu, B.R.; Satish, B.M.; Girish, B.M.

    1995-12-31

    The aluminum matrix composites with ceramic dispersoids can be separated by the density difference concept. In the proposed work, composite scrap is recycled using an oil fired furnace. The scrap is melted in the furnace and temperature is maintained below 740 degree centigrade. Because of the density difference the lighter dispersoids will float and heavier dispersoids will settle down. The clean melt is separated be removing the floating and settled dispersoids, and then filtering using ceramic filters.

  19. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOEpatents

    Cornie, James A.; Kattamis, Theodoulos; Chambers, Brent V.; Bond, Bruce E.; Varela, Raul H.

    1989-01-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys.

  20. Method of making metal matrix composites reinforced with ceramic particulates

    DOEpatents

    Cornie, J.A.; Kattamis, T.; Chambers, B.V.; Bond, B.E.; Varela, R.H.

    1989-08-01

    Composite materials and methods for making such materials are disclosed in which dispersed ceramic particles are at chemical equilibrium with a base metal matrix, thereby permitting such materials to be remelted and subsequently cast or otherwise processed to form net weight parts and other finished (or semi-finished) articles while maintaining the microstructure and mechanical properties (e.g. wear resistance or hardness) of the original composite. The composite materials of the present invention are composed of ceramic particles in a base metal matrix. The ceramics are preferably carbides of titanium, zirconium, tungsten, molybdenum or other refractory metals. The base metal can be iron, nickel, cobalt, chromium or other high temperature metal and alloys thereof. For ferrous matrices, alloys suitable for use as the base metal include cast iron, carbon steels, stainless steels and iron-based superalloys. 2 figs.

  1. Short-term microdamageability of a fibrous composite with physically nonlinear matrix and microdamaged reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khoroshun, L. P.; Shikula, E. N.

    2006-02-01

    A structural theory of short-term microdamage is proposed for a fibrous composite with physically nonlinear matrix and microdamaged reinforcement. The theory is based on the stochastic elasticity equations of a fibrous composite with porous fibers. Microvolumes of the fiber material are damaged in accordance with the Huber-Mises failure criterion. A balance equation for damaged microvolumes in the reinforcement is derived. This equation together with the equations relating macrostresses and macrostrains of a fibrous composite with porous reinforcement and physically nonlinear matrix constitute a closed-form system. This system describes the coupled processes of physically nonlinear deformation and microdamage that occur in different components of the composite. Algorithms are proposed for computing the dependences of microdamage on macrostrains and macrostresses on macrostrains. Uniaxial tension curves are plotted for a fibrous composite with a linearly hardening matrix

  2. Ceramic fiber-reinforced monoclinic celsian phase glass-ceramic matrix composite material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor); Dicarlo, James A. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A hyridopolysilazane-derived ceramic fiber reinforced monoclinic celsian phase barium aluminum silicate glass-ceramic matrix composite material is prepared by ball-milling an aqueous slurry of BAS glass powder and fine monoclinic celsian seeds. The fibers improve the mechanical strength and fracture toughness and with the matrix provide superior dielectric properties.

  3. Method of making carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Brian (Inventor); Benander, Robert (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A method of making a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforced ceramic composite wherein the result is a carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement is embedded within a ceramic matrix. The ceramic matrix does not penetrate into the carbon fiber-carbon matrix reinforcement to any significant degree. The carbide matrix is a formed in situ solid carbide of at least one metal having a melting point above about 1850 degrees centigrade. At least when the composite is intended to operate between approximately 1500 and 2000 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time the solid carbide with the embedded reinforcement is formed first by reaction infiltration. Molten silicon is then diffused into the carbide. The molten silicon diffuses preferentially into the carbide matrix but not to any significant degree into the carbon-carbon reinforcement. Where the composite is intended to operate between approximately 2000 and 2700 degrees centigrade for extended periods of time such diffusion of molten silicon into the carbide is optional and generally preferred, but not essential.

  4. Matrix cracking initiation stress in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kangutkar, Pramod Balkrishna

    1991-05-01

    One of the important design parameters in CMC's in the Matrix Cracking Initiation Stress (MCIS) which corresponds to the stress at which first matrix cracks are observed. Above the MCIS, the fibers will be exposed to the oxidizing environment which may degrade the mechanical property of the fibers and thus of the composite. In this thesis a systematic study to explore the effects of matrix toughness and inherent strength, fiber diameter, stiffness and volume fraction, temperature and interfacial bonding on the MCIS was carried out. Composites were fabricated using three different matrices--borosilicate glass, aluminosilicate glass and polycrystalline zirconium silicate (or zircon), and two different reinforcing fibers--an SiC monofilament (140 micron diameter) and an SiC yarn (16 micron diameter). In-situ observations during 3-point bend test inside the SEM indicate that matrix cracking is a local phenomenon and occurs first in the matrix between widest spaced fibers. In all composites the MCIS was found to increase with fiber additions and scaled with the monolithic strength. The relative increase in MCIS over the monolithic strength with fiber volume fraction, however, was found to depend strongly on the a(sub 0)/S ratio, where a(sub 0) is the inherent unreinforced matrix flaw size and S is the inter-fiber spacing. For small ratios, the effect of fiber additions on enhancing MCIS are minimal. As the ratio approaches unity, the role of the fibers in constraining the inherent flaw increases, thereby increasing the MCIS. Thermal residual stresses were also seen to play an important role in determining the MCIS; systems with compressive residual stresses in the matrix show higher MCIS at room temperature than at a higher temperature. In systems such as the 7740/Nicalon, which had negligible thermal stresses, MCIS showed minimal changes on testing at 520 C. Several theoretical models were reviewed and the predictions were compared to the experimental results. It was

  5. Effect of fiber reinforcements on thermo-oxidative stability and mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of studies have investigated the thermo-oxidative behavior of polymer matrix composites. Two significant observations have been made from these research efforts: (1) fiber reinforcement has a significant effect on composite thermal stability; and (2) geometric effects must be considered when evaluating thermal aging data. A compilation of some results from these studies is presented, and this information shows the influence of the reinforcement fibers on the oxidative degradation of various polymer matrix composites. The polyimide PMR-15 was the matrix material that was used in these studies. The control composite material was reinforced with Celion 6000 graphite fiber. T-40R graphite fibers, along with some very stable ceramic fibers were selected as reinforcing fibers because of their high thermal stability. The ceramic fibers were Nicalon (silicon carbide) and Nextel 312 (alumina-silica-boron oxide). The mechanical properties of the two graphite fiber composites were significantly different, probably owing to variations in interfacial bonding between the fibers and the polyimide matrix. The Celion 6000/PMR-15 bond is very tight but the T-40/PMR-15 bond is less tight. Three oxidation mechanisms were observed: (1) the preferential oxidation of the Celion 6000 fiber ends at cut surfaces, leaving a surface of matrix material with holes where the fiber ends were originally situated; (2) preferential oxidation of the composite matrix; and (3) interfacial degradation by oxidation. The latter two mechanisms were also observed on fiber end cut surfaces. The fiber and interface attacks appeared to initiate interfiber cracking along these surfaces.

  6. Method of producing a ceramic fiber-reinforced glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber-reinforced composite composed of a BaO-Al2O3-2SiO2 (BAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD silicon carbide continuous fibers. A slurry of BAS glass powders is prepared and celsian seeds are added during ball melting. The slurry is cast into tapes which are cut to the proper size. Continuous CVD-SiC fibers are formed into mats of the desired size. The matrix tapes and the fiber mats are alternately stacked in the proper orientation. This tape-mat stack is warm pressed to produce a 'green' composite. The 'green' composite is then heated to an elevated temperature to burn out organic constituents. The remaining interim material is then hot pressed to form a silicon carbide fiber-reinforced celsian (BAS) glass-ceramic matrix composite which may be machined to size.

  7. Synthesis and Characterization of Multi Wall Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNT) Reinforced Sintered Magnesium Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijaya Bhaskar, S.; Rajmohan, T.; Palanikumar, K.; Bharath Ganesh Kumar, B.

    2016-04-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with ceramic nano particles (less than 100 nm), termed as metal matrix nano composites (MMNCs), can overcome those disadvantages associated with the conventional MMCs. MMCs containing carbon nanotubes are being developed and projected for diverse applications in various fields of engineering like automotive, avionic, electronic and bio-medical sectors. The present investigation deals with the synthesis and characterization of hybrid magnesium matrix reinforced with various different wt% (0-0.45) of multi wall carbon nano tubes (MWCNT) and micro SiC particles prepared through powder metallurgy route. Microstructure and mechanical properties such as micro hardness and density of the composites were examined. Microstructure of MMNCs have been investigated by scanning electron microscope, X-ray diffraction and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) for better observation of dispersion of reinforcement. The results indicated that the increase in wt% of MWCNT improves the mechanical properties of the composite.

  8. Synthesis and Characterization of TiB2 Reinforced Aluminium Matrix Composites: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Narendra; Gautam, Gaurav; Gautam, Rakesh Kumar; Mohan, Anita; Mohan, Sunil

    2016-10-01

    Aluminium-matrix composites (AMCs) are developed to meet the demands of light weight high performance materials in aerospace, automotive, marine and other applications. The properties of AMCs can be tailored suitably by combinations of matrix, reinforcement and processing route. AMCs are one of the most attractive alternatives for the manufacturing of light weight and high strength parts due to their low density and high specific strength. There are various techniques for preparing the AMCs with different reinforcement particles. In AMCs, the reinforcements are usually in the form of metal oxides, carbides, borides, nitrides and their combination. Among the various reinforcements titanium di-boride (TiB2) is of much interest due to its excellent stiffness, hardness, and wear resistance. This paper attempts to provide an overview to explore the possibilities of synthesizing titanium di-boride reinforced AMCs with different techniques. The mechanical and tribological properties of these composites have been emphasized to project these as tribo-materials.

  9. A compliant, high failure strain, fibre-reinforced glass-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    A glass-matrix composite reinforced by discontinuous graphite fibers was produced by hot pressing glass-powder-impregnated two-dimensional arrays of in-plane randomly oriented graphite fibers held together by approximately 5-10% by weight of organic binder (generally polyester). The composite tensile behavior is characterized by a highly nonlinear stress-strain curve which differs markedly from that of either unreinforced glass or a similarly reinforced epoxy-matrix composite. By virtue of this nonlinearity, the composite is able to redistribute applied stresses to achieve a high load-carrying capacity. The fibrous microstructure and the low fiber-matrix bond provide a mechanism for achieving high fracture toughness and unusually high compliance. For a 96%-silica-matrix composite, the strength is retained to over 1000 C.

  10. A compliant, high failure strain, fibre-reinforced glass-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.

    1982-01-01

    A glass-matrix composite reinforced by discontinuous graphite fibers was produced by hot pressing glass-powder-impregnated two-dimensional arrays of in-plane randomly oriented graphite fibers held together by approximately 5-10% by weight of organic binder (generally polyester). The composite tensile behavior is characterized by a highly nonlinear stress-strain curve which differs markedly from that of either unreinforced glass or a similarly reinforced epoxy-matrix composite. By virtue of this nonlinearity, the composite is able to redistribute applied stresses to achieve a high load-carrying capacity. The fibrous microstructure and the low fiber-matrix bond provide a mechanism for achieving high fracture toughness and unusually high compliance. For a 96%-silica-matrix composite, the strength is retained to over 1000 C.

  11. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermo-oxidative stability of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers that were studied included graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber-sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  12. Hardness and wear resistance of carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum-copper matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Nam, Dong Hoon; Kim, Jae Hwang; Cha, Seung Il; Jung, Seung Il; Lee, Jong Kook; Park, Hoon Mo; Park, Hyun Dal; Hong, Hyung

    2014-12-01

    Recently, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been attracted to reinforcement of composite materials due to their extraordinary mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. Many researchers have attempted to develop CNT reinforced metal composites with various fabrication methods and have shown possibilities for structural and functional applications. Among them, CNT reinforced Al matrix composites have become very attractive due to their huge structural application in industry. In this study, CNT reinforced Al-Cu matrix composites with a microstructure of homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in the Al-Cu matrix are investigated. The CNT/Al-Cu composites are fabricated by mixing of CNT/Cu composite powders and Al powders by high energy ball mill process followed by hot extrusion process. The hardness and wear resistance of the CNT/Al-Cu composites are enhanced by 1.4 and 3 times, respectively, compared to those values for the Al-Cu matrix. This remarkable enhancement mainly originates from the homogeneous dispersion of CNTs in Al-Cu matrix and self-lubricant effect of CNTs.

  13. Fabrication and characterization of carbon nanotube reinforced magnesium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mindivan, Harun; Efe, Arife; Kosatepe, A. Hadi; Kayali, E. Sabri

    2014-11-01

    In the present investigation, Mg chips are recycled to produce Mg-6 wt.% Al reinforced with 0.5, 1, 2 and 4 wt.% nanosized CNTs by mechanical ball milling, cold pressing and subsequently hot extrusion process without sintering step. The microstructure, mechanical properties and corrosion behavior of Mg/Al without CNT (base alloy) and composites were evaluated. The distribution of CNTs was analyzed using a Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) equipped with Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) analyzer and a Wavelength Dispersive X-Ray Fluorescence spectrometer (WDXRF). Microstructural analysis revealed that the CNTs on the Mg chips were present throughout the extrusion direction and the uniform distribution of CNTs at the chip surface decreased with increase in the CNT content. The results of the mechanical and corrosion test showed that small addition of CNTs (0.5 wt.%) evidently improved the hardness and corrosion resistance of the composite by comparing with the base alloy, while increase in the CNT weight fraction in the initial mixture resulted in a significant decrease of hardness, compression strength, wear rate and corrosion resistance.

  14. A study of the composition and microstructure of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with alumina fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zolotova, D.; Serpova, V.; Prokofiev, M.; Rabinskiy, L.; Shavnev, A.

    2016-04-01

    This article presents the results of a study of the microstructure and the composition of aluminum-based metal matrix composites (MMC) reinforced with continuous alumina fibers. An Al-Mg-Cu alloy similar to that of AA 2024 was used. X-ray diffraction and X-ray fluorescence analyses were used for investigation of a probable volume fraction of a spinel phase in MMC. Scanning electron microscopy and an X-ray microanalysis were used to study a change of the elemental composition of the composites microstructure on the polished cross sections. The constant mass fractions of magnesium (0.65 wt. %) and copper (1.25 wt. %) were found in the interphase area within radius of 1 μm around fibers.

  15. Extraordinary synergy in the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites reinforced with 2 nanocarbons.

    PubMed

    Prasad, K Eswar; Das, Barun; Maitra, Urmimala; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Rao, C N R

    2009-08-11

    One of the applications of nanomaterials is as reinforcements in composites, wherein small additions of nanomaterials lead to large enhancements in mechanical properties. There have been extensive studies in the literature on composites where a polymer matrix is reinforced by a single nanomaterial such as carbon nanotubes. In this article, we examine the significant synergistic effects observed when 2 different types of nanocarbons are incorporated in a polymer matrix. Thus, binary combinations of nanodiamond, few-layer graphene, and single-walled nanotubes have been used to reinforce polyvinyl alcohol. The mechanical properties of the resulting composites, evaluated by the nanoindentation technique, show extraordinary synergy, improving the stiffness and hardness by as much as 400% compared to those obtained with single nanocarbon reinforcements. These results suggest a way of designing advanced materials with extraordinary mechanical properties by incorporating small amounts of 2 nanomaterials such as graphene plus nanodiamond or nanodiamond plus carbon nanotube.

  16. Extraordinary synergy in the mechanical properties of polymer matrix composites reinforced with 2 nanocarbons

    PubMed Central

    Prasad, K. Eswar; Das, Barun; Maitra, Urmimala; Ramamurty, Upadrasta; Rao, C. N. R.

    2009-01-01

    One of the applications of nanomaterials is as reinforcements in composites, wherein small additions of nanomaterials lead to large enhancements in mechanical properties. There have been extensive studies in the literature on composites where a polymer matrix is reinforced by a single nanomaterial such as carbon nanotubes. In this article, we examine the significant synergistic effects observed when 2 different types of nanocarbons are incorporated in a polymer matrix. Thus, binary combinations of nanodiamond, few-layer graphene, and single-walled nanotubes have been used to reinforce polyvinyl alcohol. The mechanical properties of the resulting composites, evaluated by the nanoindentation technique, show extraordinary synergy, improving the stiffness and hardness by as much as 400% compared to those obtained with single nanocarbon reinforcements. These results suggest a way of designing advanced materials with extraordinary mechanical properties by incorporating small amounts of 2 nanomaterials such as graphene plus nanodiamond or nanodiamond plus carbon nanotube. PMID:19651605

  17. Interfacial characterization in carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Housaer, F.; Beclin, F.; Touzin, M.; Tingaud, D.; Legris, A.; Addad, A.

    2015-12-15

    In this work, the effects of the sintering parameters, such as temperature and the techniques used (HP and SPS), on CNT/Al composite interfaces are studied. The major role of the native aluminum oxide (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) layer covering the aluminum grains is highlighted. It is shown that, for a sintering temperature below 620 °C, the amorphous Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} layer prevents the reaction between aluminum and carbon. For greater sintering temperatures, the breaking of the oxide layer due to its crystallization leads to the formation of aluminum carbide (Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}) by reaction between aluminum and the CNT. The Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} crystals grow perpendicularly to the matrix grain boundaries by thermally activated diffusion of the carbon atoms coming from the CNT. It is also demonstrated that, by limiting the sintering time, which is the case in SPS, it is possible to limit the growth of the Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} crystals and thus to preserve the CNT. - Highlights: • The high reactivity between CNT and Al matrix, resulting Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} formation during the sintering process is highlighted. • We demonstrate, thanks to in-situ TEM observations, that Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} crystals grow into aluminum grains by carbon diffusion. • The native aluminum oxide around the aluminum particles prevents the diffusion of carbon into the aluminum grains. • We show that the protective layer can be broken because of its crystallization, leading to the formation of Al{sub 4}C{sub 3}. • SPS, by limiting the sintering duration, is an interesting way for preparing CNT/Al composites without carbide formation.

  18. Evaluation of several micromechanics models for discontinuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. Steven; Birt, M. J.

    1990-01-01

    A systematic experimental evaluation of whisker and particulate reinforced aluminum matrix composites was conducted to assess the variation in tensile properties with reinforcement type, volume fraction, and specimen thickness. Each material was evaluated in three thicknesses, 1.8, 3.18, and 6.35 mm, to determine the size, distribution, and orientation of the reinforcements. This information was used to evaluate several micromechanical models that predict composite moduli. The longitudinal and transverse moduli were predicted for reinforced aluminum. The Paul model, the Cox model and the Halpin-Tsai model were evaluated. The Paul model gave a good upper bound prediction for the particulate reinforced composites but under predicted whisker reinforced composite moduli. The Cox model gave good moduli predictions for the whisker reinforcement, but was too low for the particulate. The Halpin-Tsai model gave good results for both whisker and particulate reinforced composites. An approach using a trigonometric projection of whisker length to predict the fiber contribution to the modulus in the longitudinal and transverse directions was compared to the more conventional lamination theory approach.

  19. Reinforcement Size Dependence of Load Bearing Capacity in Ultrafine-Grained Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hanry; Jiang, Lin; Balog, Martin; Krizik, Peter; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2017-09-01

    The length-scale effects on the load bearing capacity of reinforcement particles in an ultrafine-grained metal matrix composite (MMC) were studied, paying particular attention to the nanoscale effects. We observed that the nanoparticles provide the MMCs with a higher strength but a lower stiffness compared to equivalent materials reinforced with submicron particles. The reduction in stiffness is attributed to ineffective load transfer of the local stresses to the small and equiaxed nanoparticles.

  20. Reinforcement Size Dependence of Load Bearing Capacity in Ultrafine-Grained Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hanry; Jiang, Lin; Balog, Martin; Krizik, Peter; Schoenung, Julie M.

    2017-07-01

    The length-scale effects on the load bearing capacity of reinforcement particles in an ultrafine-grained metal matrix composite (MMC) were studied, paying particular attention to the nanoscale effects. We observed that the nanoparticles provide the MMCs with a higher strength but a lower stiffness compared to equivalent materials reinforced with submicron particles. The reduction in stiffness is attributed to ineffective load transfer of the local stresses to the small and equiaxed nanoparticles.

  1. Seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures and process for their manufacture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A metallic outer sleeve is provided which is capable of enveloping a hollow metallic inner member having continuous reinforcing fibers attached to the distal end thereof. The inner member is then introduced into outer sleeve until inner member is completely enveloped by outer sleeve. A liquid matrix member is then injected into space between inner member and outer sleeve. A pressurized heat transfer medium is flowed through the inside of inner member, thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. thereby forming a fiber reinforced matrix composite material. The wall thicknesses of both inner member and outer sleeve are then reduced to the appropriate size by chemical etching, to adjust the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to the desired value. The novelty of this invention resides in the development of a efficient method of producing seamless metal clad fiber reinforced organic matrix composite structures.

  2. Nanofiber reinforcement of a geopolymer matrix for improved composite materials mechanical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahman, AKM Samsur

    Geopolymers have the potential to cross the process performance gap between polymer matrix and ceramic matrix composites (CMC), enabling high temperature capable composites that are manufactured at relatively low temperatures. Unfortunately, the inherently low toughness of these geopolymers limits the performance of the resulting fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites. Toughness improvements in composites can be addressed through the adjustments in the fiber/matrix interfacial strength and through the improvements in the inherent toughness of the constituent materials. This study investigates the potential to improve the inherent toughness of the geopolymer matrix material through the addition of nanofillers, by considering physical dimensions, mechanical properties, reinforcing capability and interfacial bond strength effects. A process optimization study was first undertaken to develop the ability to produce consistent, neat geopolymer samples, a critical precursor to producing nano-filled geopolymer for toughness evaluation. After that, single edge notched bend beam fracture toughness and un-notched beam flexural strength were evaluated for silicon carbide, alumina and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymer samples treated at various temperatures in reactive and inert environments. Toughness results of silicon carbide and carbon nanofillers reinforced geopolymers suggested that with the improved baseline properties, high aspect ratio nanofillers with high interfacial bond strength are the most capable in further improving the toughness of geopolymers. Among the high aspect ratio nanofillers i.e. nanofibers, 2vol% silicon carbide whicker (SCW) showed the highest improvement in fracture toughness and flexural strength of ~164% & ~185%, respectively. After heat treatment at 650 °C, SCW reinforcement was found to be effective, with little reduction in the performance, while the performance of alumina nanofiber (ANF) reinforced geopolymer significantly

  3. The role of rapid solidification processing in the fabrication of fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Locci, Ivan E.; Noebe, Ronald D.

    1989-01-01

    Advanced composite processing techniques for fiber reinforced metal matrix composites require the flexibility to meet several widespread objectives. The development of uniquely desired matrix microstructures and uniformly arrayed fiber spacing with sufficient bonding between fiber and matrix to transmit load between them without degradation to the fiber or matrix are the minimum requirements necessary of any fabrication process. For most applications these criteria can be met by fabricating composite monotapes which are then consolidated into composite panels or more complicated components such as fiber reinforced turbine blades. Regardless of the end component, composite monotapes are the building blocks from which near net shape composite structures can be formed. The most common methods for forming composite monotapes are the powder cloth, foil/fiber, plasma spray, and arc spray processes. These practices, however, employ rapid solidification techniques in processing of the composite matrix phase. Consequently, rapid solidification processes play a vital and yet generally overlooked role in composite fabrication. The future potential of rapid solidification processing is discussed.

  4. CermeTi® discontinuously reinforced Ti-matrix composites: Manufacturing, properties, and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkowitz, Stanley; Abkowitz, Susan M.; Fisher, Harvey; Schwartz, Patricia J.

    2004-05-01

    Advanced powder-metallurgy technology has led to the development of the CermeTi® family of titanium metalmatrix composites. Reinforcing the titanium alloy matrix with titanium carbide or titanium boride particles results in superior properties. These discontinuously reinforced titanium composites have excellent room- and elevated-temperature properties and are exceptionally wear resistant. High quality, near-net shape CermeTi composite components are being produced commercially and are being evaluated for potential applications in military vehicles, commercial automotive engines, sporting goods, industrial tooling, and biomedical devices.

  5. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various continuous fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermooxidative stability of PMR-15 composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers studied include graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight-loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  6. Thermo-oxidative stability studies of PMR-15 polymer matrix composites reinforced with various continuous fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1990-01-01

    An experimental study was conducted to measure the thermooxidative stability of PMR-15 composites reinforced with various fibers and to observe differences in the way they degrade in air. The fibers studied include graphite and the thermally stable Nicalon and Nextel ceramic fibers. Weight-loss rates for the different composites were assessed as a function of mechanical properties, specimen geometry, fiber sizing, and interfacial bond strength. Differences were observed in rates of weight loss, matrix cracking, geometry dependency, and fiber sizing effects. It was shown that Celion 6000 fiber-reinforced composites do not exhibit a straight-line Arrhenius relationship at temperatures above 316 C.

  7. Niobium Carbide-Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by High-Energy Ball Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travessa, Dilermando Nagle; Silva, Marina Judice; Cardoso, Kátia Regina

    2017-06-01

    Aluminum and its alloys are key materials for the transportation industry as they contribute to the development of lightweight structures. The dispersion of hard ceramic particles in the Al soft matrix can lead to a substantial strengthening effect, resulting in composite materials exhibiting interesting mechanical properties and inspiring their technological use in sectors like the automotive and aerospace industries. Powder metallurgy techniques are attractive to design metal matrix composites, achieving a homogeneous distribution of the reinforcement into the metal matrix. In this work, pure aluminum has been reinforced with particles of niobium carbide (NbC), an extremely hard and stable refractory ceramic. Its use as a reinforcing phase in metal matrix composites has not been deeply explored. Composite powders produced after different milling times, with 10 and 20 vol pct of NbC were produced by high-energy ball milling and characterized by scanning electron microscopy and by X-ray diffraction to establish a relationship between the milling time and size, morphology, and distribution of the particles in the composite powder. Subsequently, an Al/10 pct NbC composite powder was hot extruded into cylindrical bars. The strength of the obtained composite bars is comparable to the commercial high-strength, aeronautical-grade aluminum alloys.

  8. Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites: Influence of Interface Modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Unidirectional celsian matrix composites having 42-45 vol % of uncoated or BN-SIC coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were tested in three-point bend at room temperature. The uncoated fiber-reinforced composites showed catastrophic failure with strength of 210 35 MPa and a flat fracture surface. In contrast, composites reinforced with coated fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout. Values of first matrix cracking stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01%, respectively, with ultimate strength as high as 960 MPa. The elastic Young modulus of the uncoated and coated fiber-reinforced composites were 184 +/- 4 GPa and 165 +/- 5 GPa, respectively. Fiber push-through tests and microscopic examination indicated no chemical reaction at the uncoated or coated fiber-matrix interface. The low strength of composite with uncoated fibers is due to degradation of the fiber strength from mechanical damage during processing. Because both the coated- and uncoated-fiber-reinforced composites exhibited weak interfaces, the beneficial effect of the BN-SIC dual layer is primarily the protection of fibers from mechanical damage during processing.

  9. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Structural Space Based Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-07-31

    1988) 2745-2752. 2 R89-917704-1 10. V. C. Nardone and K. M. Prewo, "Tensile Performance of Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Glass," J. Mater. Sci., 23 (1988...168-180. 11. K. M. Prewo and V. C. Nardone , "Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Space Based Applications," UTRC Report R86-917161-1...Mater. Sci., 23 (1988) 2745-2752. 11. V. C. Nardone and K. M. Prewo, "Tensile Performance of Carbon-Fibre-Reinforced Glass," J. Mater. Sci., 23 (1988

  10. Application of ceramic fibers to the manufacture of reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wielage, B.; Rahm, J.; Steinhaeuser, S.

    1995-12-31

    The application of the thermal spraying process is a new way to produce carbon fiber or Tyranno fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites. Spreaded fiber rovings are enveloped in the matrix material with wire flame spraying. The advantage of the thermal spraying process is based in the low times for contacting between the fibers and the liquid matrix material. Chemical reactions on the interface fiber/matrix, which are caused by the decreasing of the fiber tensile strength, can be excluded. The thermal sprayed prepregs can be compressed to MMC by hot pressing process. This longfiber reinforced composites are used to increase f.e. casted components of motors. The aim of this research is the estimation of possibilities to applicate the wire flame spray process for prepreg manufacturing.

  11. In situ measurement of the reinforcement modulus in a metal matrix composite by acoustic microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Canumalla, S.; Gordon, G.A.; Pangborn, R.N.

    1995-12-31

    The mechanical properties of metal-matrix composites have been observed to be a strong function of the content of non-fiber inclusions. Shot particles, with the nominal composition of the reinforcement, have been found to crack prematurely, thus representing prefer-red failure initiation sites under mechanical and thermal fatigue of discontinuous, alumina-silicate fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites. To better understand the differences between the responses of the shot and fibers to loading, the Young`s modulus of the shot is measured and compared to that of the fibers. Scanning acoustic microscopy is used to nondestructively measure the modulus of the shot in situ, and the fiber modulus is obtained from the previously measured composite response. The shot, with a modulus of 131.5 GPa, has a Young`s modulus that is approximately 40% lower than that of the fibers. The influence of this on the composite response will be discussed.

  12. Determination of Material Parameters for Microbuckling Analysis of Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanowicz, M.

    2015-05-01

    This research focuses on studying the effect of the constitutive law adopted for a matrix material on the compressive response of a unidirectional fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite. To investigate this effect, a periodic unit cell model of a unidirectional composite with an initial fiber waviness and inelastic behavior of the matrix was used. The sensitivity of the compressive strength to the hydrostatic pressure, the flow rule and the fiber misalignment angle were presented. The model was verified against an analytical solution and experimental data. Results of this study indicate that a micromechanical model with correctly identified material parameters provides a useful alternative to theoretical models and experimentation.

  13. Mechanisms controlling fatigue damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    Damage in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composite materials can be quite complex since there are a number of different constituents (fiber, matrix, and the fiber/matrix interface) that can fail. Multidirectional lay-ups have an even greater number of possible damage orientations and mechanisms. Based on the simplifying assumption of equivalent constituent strain states in the absence of damage, a strain based failure criteria may be applied to determine when and where initial damage will occur. Based on the relative strain to fatigue failure of the fiber and matrix, the possible damage mechanisms of an MMC can be grouped into three categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, and (3) self-similar damage growth. A fourth type of damage development, fiber/matrix interface failure, is dependent on the relative strength of the fiber/matrix interface and the matrix yield strength. These four types of damage are discussed and illustrated by examples.

  14. Carbon Fiber Reinforced Glass Matrix Composites for Satellite Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-06-01

    graphite basal planes. On the other hand, a high elastic modulus fiber derived from a mesophase pitch precursor, such as P-100, has a radial...and B. V. Perov. Elsevier Science Publishers B. V., Amsterdam, 1985. 2. B. Rand, "Carbon Fibres from Mesophase Pitch " pp. 495-575 in ibid.. 3. W. K...HMU fiber and the other reinforced with pitch -based fiber (P- 100 or FT700), will be described and compared with respect to various features of the

  15. Synergistic Effects of Temperature and Oxidation on Matrix Cracking in Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2017-06-01

    In this paper, the synergistic effects of temperatrue and oxidation on matrix cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated using energy balance approach. The shear-lag model cooperated with damage models, i.e., the interface oxidation model, interface debonding model, fiber strength degradation model and fiber failure model, has been adopted to analyze microstress field in the composite. The relationships between matrix cracking stress, interface debonding and slipping, fiber fracture, oxidation temperatures and time have been established. The effects of fiber volume fraction, interface properties, fiber strength and oxidation temperatures on the evolution of matrix cracking stress versus oxidation time have been analyzed. The matrix cracking stresses of C/SiC composite with strong and weak interface bonding after unstressed oxidation at an elevated temperature of 700 °C in air condition have been predicted for different oxidation time.

  16. Synergistic Effects of Temperature and Oxidation on Matrix Cracking in Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, the synergistic effects of temperatrue and oxidation on matrix cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated using energy balance approach. The shear-lag model cooperated with damage models, i.e., the interface oxidation model, interface debonding model, fiber strength degradation model and fiber failure model, has been adopted to analyze microstress field in the composite. The relationships between matrix cracking stress, interface debonding and slipping, fiber fracture, oxidation temperatures and time have been established. The effects of fiber volume fraction, interface properties, fiber strength and oxidation temperatures on the evolution of matrix cracking stress versus oxidation time have been analyzed. The matrix cracking stresses of C/SiC composite with strong and weak interface bonding after unstressed oxidation at an elevated temperature of 700 °C in air condition have been predicted for different oxidation time.

  17. Processing and characterization of continuous fiber-reinforced glass and glass-ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Shaio-Wen.

    1990-01-01

    An investigation of the processing and mechanical behavior, particularly damage evolution and failure mechanisms, of continuous fiber reinforced glass and glass-ceramic composites was conducted. The processing effort utilized a slurry infiltration/hot pressing technique to fabricate carbon fiber reinforced borosilicate glass and Nicalon SiC fiber reinforced borosilicate glass composites. A slurry infiltration prepregging setup was designed and successfully operated. Processing parameters including slurry composition, binder burnout cycle and hot pressing schedule were systematically studied and optimized. Mechanical behavior studies were conducted on Nicalon SiC/Calcium Aluminosilicate (CAS) composites. The nature and the strength of the fiber/matrix interface was first characterized using a variety of fiber indentation test methods and transmission electron microscopy.

  18. Mechanical Behavior of Sapphire Reinforced Alumina Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaskowiak, Martha H.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.; Setlock, John A.; Gyekenyesi, John Z.

    1997-01-01

    Zirconia coated sapphire reinforced alumina matrix composites have been tested both after heat treatment to 1400 C and at temperatures ranging from 800 C to 1200 C in. air. Interfacial shear stress has also been measured with fiber pushout tests performed in air at room temperature, 800 C and 1OOO C. Matrix crack spacing was measured for the tensile tested composites and used to estimate interfacial shear stress up to 1200 C. Electron microscopy was used to determine the source of fiber fracture and to study interfacial failure within the composite.

  19. The oxidative stability of carbon fibre reinforced glass-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Batt, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The environmental stability of carbon fibre reinforced glass-matrix composites is assessed. Loss of composite strength due to oxidative exposure at elevated temperatures under no load, static load and cyclic fatigue as well as due to thermal cycling are all examined. It is determined that strength loss is gradual and predictable based on the oxidation of carbon fibres. The glass matrix was not found to prevent this degradation but simply to limit it to a gradual process progressing from the composite surfaces inward.

  20. The oxidative stability of carbon fibre reinforced glass-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Batt, J. A.

    1988-01-01

    The environmental stability of carbon fibre reinforced glass-matrix composites is assessed. Loss of composite strength due to oxidative exposure at elevated temperatures under no load, static load and cyclic fatigue as well as due to thermal cycling are all examined. It is determined that strength loss is gradual and predictable based on the oxidation of carbon fibres. The glass matrix was not found to prevent this degradation but simply to limit it to a gradual process progressing from the composite surfaces inward.

  1. Effect of fiber shape on mechanical behavior of composite with elastoplastic matrix and SMA reinforcement.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Yuping; Dui, Guansuo

    2009-10-01

    In this paper, an equivalent three-phase micromechanical model of composite with an elasto- plastic matrix and shape memory alloy (SMA) reinforcement is developed. Compared with the traditional two-phase method, the interaction among the austenitic phase, the martensite phase and the matrix phase is considered. During applications of the model, the predicted curve shows good agreement with the experimental result. Most attention is given to the effect of fiber shape on the overall response of the composite and the residual stress. It is helpful to design an intelligent composite.

  2. Evaluation of tensile strength of hybrid fiber (jute/gongura) reinforced hybrid polymer matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venkatachalam, G.; Gautham Shankar, A.; Vijay, Kumar V.; Chandan, Byral R.; Prabaharan, G. P.; Raghav, Dasarath

    2015-07-01

    The polymer matrix composites attract many industrial applications due to its light weight, less cost and easy for manufacturing. In this paper, an attempt is made to prepare and study of the tensile strength of hybrid (two natural) fibers reinforced hybrid (Natural + Synthetic) polymer matrix composites. The samples were prepared with hybrid reinforcement consists of two different fibers such as jute and Gongura and hybrid polymer consists of polyester and cashew nut shell resins. The hybrid composites tensile strength is evaluated to study the influence of various fiber parameters on mechanical strength. The parameters considered here are the duration of fiber treatment, the concentration of alkali in fiber treatment and nature of fiber content in the composites.

  3. The mechanical properties measurement of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manjula Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal

    2015-05-15

    Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite containing carbon nanotubes were fabricated using physical mixing method followed by cold pressing. The microstructure of the composite has been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. These studies revealed that the carbon nanotubes were homogeneously dispersed throughout the metal matrix. The consolidated samples were pressureless sintered in inert atmosphere to further actuate a strong interface between carbon nanotubes and aluminum matrix. The nanoindentation tests carried out on considered samples showed that with the addition of 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, the hardness and elastic modulus of the aluminum matrix increased by 21.2 % and 2 % repectively. The scratch tests revealed a decrease in the friction coefficient of the carbon nanotubes reinforced composite due to the presence of lubricating interfacial layer. The prepared composites were promising entities to be used in the field of sporting goods, construction materials and automobile industries.

  4. Characterization of SiC (SCS-6) Fiber Reinforced Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, Mrityunjay; Dickerson, Robert M.

    1995-01-01

    Silicon carbide (SCS-6) fiber reinforced-reaction formed silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated using NASA's reaction forming process. Silicon-2 at a percent of niobium alloy was used as an infiltrant instead of pure silicon to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix after reaction forming. The matrix primarily consists of silicon carbide with a bi-modal grain size distribution. Minority phases dispersed within the matrix are niobium disilicide (NbSi2), carbon and silicon. Fiber push-out tests on these composites determined a debond stress of approx. 67 MPa and a frictional stress of approx. 60 MPa. A typical four point flexural strength of the composite is 297 MPa (43.1 KSi). This composite shows tough behavior through fiber pull out.

  5. Characterization of SiC Fiber (SCS-6) Reinforced-Reaction-Formed Silicon Carbide Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Dickerson, R. M.

    1996-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (SCS-6) reinforced-reaction-formed silicon carbide matrix composites were fabricated using a reaction-forming process. Silicon-2 at.% niobium alloy was used as an infiltrant instead of pure silicon to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix after reaction forming. The matrix primarily consists of silicon carbide with a bimodal grain size distribution. Minority phases dispersed within the matrix are niobium disilicide (NbSi2), carbon, and silicon. Fiber pushout tests on these composites determined a debond stress of approximately 67 MPa and a frictional stress of approximately 60 MPa. A typical four-point flexural strength of the composite is 297 MPa (43.1 KSi). This composite shows tough behavior through fiber pullout.

  6. The mechanical properties measurement of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Manjula; Pal, Hemant; Sharma, Vimal

    2015-05-01

    Nanocrystalline aluminum matrix composite containing carbon nanotubes were fabricated using physical mixing method followed by cold pressing. The microstructure of the composite has been investigated using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy techniques. These studies revealed that the carbon nanotubes were homogeneously dispersed throughout the metal matrix. The consolidated samples were pressureless sintered in inert atmosphere to further actuate a strong interface between carbon nanotubes and aluminum matrix. The nanoindentation tests carried out on considered samples showed that with the addition of 0.5 wt% carbon nanotubes, the hardness and elastic modulus of the aluminum matrix increased by 21.2 % and 2 % repectively. The scratch tests revealed a decrease in the friction coefficient of the carbon nanotubes reinforced composite due to the presence of lubricating interfacial layer. The prepared composites were promising entities to be used in the field of sporting goods, construction materials and automobile industries.

  7. Fabrication of fibre reinforced nickel aluminide matrix composites by reactive processing

    SciTech Connect

    Downing, M.; Horsfall, I.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes the fabrication by reactive processing of short, and continuous, alumina fibre reinforced nickel aluminide matrix composites. The fibre is introduced into the aluminide system to increase toughness and high temperature strength. The short fibre reinforced nickel aluminide is formed by squeeze casting a porous preform containing nickel powder and SAFFIL fibre with an aluminium or aluminium alloy melt. The continuous fibre reinforced nickel aluminide is formed by squeeze casting a jig containing nickel coated ALMAX fibre. The short fibre reinforced composite (containing 10% and 20% volume fibre) reacted during infiltration with an aluminium melt to form a single phase intermetallic. Using an aluminium-copper melt the intermetallic formation was inhibited and a multi-phase composite was obtained. A preliminary study into reactive processing of this system by utilising a hot isostatic pressing (HIP) cycle is presented. HIP was required to prevent the formation of porosity due to an imbalance in the diffusive mobility of the various components. It was found that HIP was only effective on canned samples, the preferred encapsulation material being glass. The continuous fibre reinforced composite did not react to an intermetallic phase when infiltrated with an aluminum melt. Use of an aluminum-copper melt resulted in partial nickel-melt reaction producing various nickel-aluminum (-copper) phases. HIP was then used to form a two phase intermetallic matrix with no evidence of fibre damage.

  8. Ultrasonic velocity technique for monitoring property changes in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kautz, Harold E.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1991-01-01

    A technique for measuring ultrasonic velocity was used to monitor changes that occur during processing and heat treatment of a SiC/RBSM composite. Results indicated that correlations exist between the ultrasonic velocity data and elastic modulus and interfacial shear strength data determined from mechanical tests. The ultrasonic velocity data can differentiate strength. The advantages and potential of this nondestructive evaluation method for fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite applications are discussed.

  9. Evaluation of Amorphous Ribbon Reinforced Resin Matrix Composites.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-04-30

    29 1. 2826 MB Ribbon Tensile Properties .... ............. ... 29 2. Thermal Expansion Characteristics . . . . . . . . . .... 30 a. Ribbon...Thermal Expansion Behavior ... ......... . 30 b. Composite Thermal Expansion Behavior ... .......... . 31 3. Composite Mechanical Properties...Fracture Mode Utilizing 0.51 in. Wide Ribbon Fig. 40 Tensile Properties of 13un Ribbon - RB776-1PF4545 Spool #1 Fig. 41 Thermal Expansion of 2826MB

  10. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.; Phillips, Ronald E.

    1990-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2) sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  11. Laminate behavior for SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composite laminates (SiC/RBSN) have been measured. The laminates contained approx 30 volume fraction of aligned 142-micron diameter SiC fiber in a porous RBSN matrix. Three types of laminate studied were unidirectional: (1) (0) sub 8, (2) (10) sub 8, and (3) (45) sub 8, and (90) sub 8; cross plied laminates (0 sub 2/90 sub 2); and angle plied laminates: (+45 sub 2/-45 sub 2). Each laminate contained eight fiber plies. Results of the unidirectionally reinforced composites tested at various angles to the reinforcement direction indicate large anisotropy in in-plane properties. In addition, strength properties of these composites along the fiber direction were independent of specimen gage length and were unaffected by notches normal to the fiber direction. Splitting parallel to the fiber at the notch tip appears to be the dominant crack blunting mechanism responsible for notch insensitive behavior of these composites. In-plane properties of the composites can be improved by 2-D laminate construction. Mechanical property results for (0 sub 2/90 sub 2)sub s and (+45/-45 sub 2) sub s laminates showed that their matrix failure strains were similar to that for (0) sub 8 laminates, but their primary elastic moduli, matrix cracking strengths, and ultimate composite strengths were lower. The elastic properties of unidirectional, cross-ply, and angle-ply composites can be predicted from modified constitutive equations and laminate theory. Further improvements in laminate properties may be achieved by reducing the matrix porosity and by optimizing the bond strength between the SiC fiber and RBSN matrix.

  12. Effect of reinforcement type and porosity on strength of metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulkarni, S. G.; Lal, Achchhe; Menghani, J. V.

    2016-05-01

    In the present work, experimental investigation and the numerical analysis are carried out for strength analysis of A356 alloy matrix composites reinforced with alumina, fly ash and hybrid particle composites. The combined strengthening effect of load bearing, Hall-Petch, Orowan, coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch and elastic modulus mismatch is studied for predicting accurate uniaxial stress-strain behavior of A356 based alloy matrix composite. The unit cell micromechanical approach and nine noded isoparametric finite element analysis (FEA) is used to investigate the yield failure load by considering material defect of porosity as fabrication errors in particulate composite. The Ramberg-Osgood approach is considered for the linear and nonlinear relationship between stress and strain of A356 based metal matrix composites containing different amounts of fly ash and alumina reinforcing particles. A numerical analysis of material porosity on the stress strain behavior of the composite is performed. The literature and experimental results exhibit the validity of this model and confirm the importance of the fly ash as the cheapest and low density reinforcement obtained as a waste by product in thermal power plants.

  13. Role of interfacial and matrix creep during thermal cycling of continuous fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, I.

    2000-03-14

    A uni-dimensional micro-mechanical model for thermal cycling of continuous fiber reinforced metal-matrix composites is developed. The model treats the fiber and matrix as thermo-elastic and thermo-elasto-plastic-creeping solids, respectively, and allows the operation of multiple matrix creep mechanisms at various stages of deformation through the use of unified creep laws. It also incorporates the effect of interfacial sliding by an interface-diffusion-controlled diffusional creep mechanism proposed earlier (Funn and Dutta, Acta mater., 1999, 47, 149). The results of thermal cycling simulations based on a graphite fiber reinforced pure aluminum-matrix composite were compared with experimental data on a P100 graphite-6061 Al composite. The model successfully captured all the important features of the observed heating/cooling rate dependence, strain hysteresis, residual permanent strain at the end of a cycle, as well as both intrusion and protrusion of the fiber-ends relative to the matrix at the completion of cycling. The analysis showed that the dominant deformation mechanism operative in the matrix changes continually during thermal cycling due to continuous stress and temperature revision. Based on these results, a framework for the construction of a transient deformation mechanism map for thermal excursions of continuous fiber composites is proposed.

  14. Sliding Wear Behavior of TiC-Reinforced Cu-4 wt.% Ni Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jha, Pushkar; Gautam, R. K.; Tyagi, Rajnesh; Kumar, Devendra

    2016-10-01

    The present investigation explores the effect of TiC content on the sliding wear properties of Cu-4 wt.% Ni matrix composites. Cu-4 wt.% Ni - x wt.% TiC ( x = 0, 2, 4 and 8 wt.%) metal matrix composites were developed by powder metallurgy route. Their friction and wear was studied under dry sliding at different loads of 5, 7.5 and 10 N and constant sliding speed of 2 m/s using a pin-on-disk machine. The metallographic observations showed an almost uniform distribution of TiC particles in the matrix. Hardness of the composites increased with increasing TiC content (up to 4 wt.%). Friction and wear results of TiC-reinforced composites show better wear resistance than unreinforced matrix alloy. However, the optimum wear resistance was observed for 4 wt.% TiC-reinforced composites. Worn surfaces of specimens indicated the abrasion as the primary mechanism of wear in all the materials investigated in the study. The observed behavior has been explained on the basis of (1) the hardness which results in a decrease in real area of contact in composites containing TiC particles and (2) the formation of a transfer layer of wear debris on the surface of the composites which protects underlying substrate by inhibiting metal-metal contact.

  15. Effect of Fiber Poisson Contraction on Matrix Multicracking Evolution of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical methodology has been developed to investigate the effect of fiber Poisson contraction on matrix multicracking evolution of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). The modified shear-lag model incorporated with the Coulomb friction law is adopted to solve the stress distribution in the interface slip region and intact region of the damaged composite. The critical matrix strain energy criterion which presupposes the existence of an ultimate or critical strain energy limit beyond which the matrix fails has been adopted to describe matrix multicracking of CMCs. As more energy is placed into the composite, matrix fractures and the interface debonding occurs to dissipate the extra energy. The interface debonded length under the process of matrix multicracking is obtained by treating the interface debonding as a particular crack propagation problem along the fiber/matrix interface. The effects of the interfacial frictional coefficient, fiber Poisson ratio, fiber volume fraction, interface debonded energy and cycle number on the interface debonding and matrix multicracking evolution have been analyzed. The theoretical results are compared with experimental data of unidirectional SiC/CAS, SiC/CAS-II and SiC/Borosilicate composites.

  16. Strengthening behavior of chopped multi-walled carbon nanotube reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shin, S.E.; Bae, D.H.

    2013-09-15

    Strengthening behavior of the aluminum composites reinforced with chopped multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) or aluminum carbide formed during annealing at 500 °C has been investigated. The composites were fabricated by hot-rolling the powders which were ball-milled under various conditions. During the early annealing process, aluminum atoms can cluster inside the tube due to the diffusional flow of aluminum atoms into the tube, providing an increase of the strength of the composite. Further annealing induces the formation of the aluminum carbide phase, leading to an overall drop in the strength of the composites. While the strength of the composites can be evaluated according to the rule of mixture, a particle spacing effect can be additionally imparted on the strength of the composites reinforced with the chopped MWCNTs or the corresponding carbides since the reinforcing agents are smaller than the submicron matrix grains. - Highlights: • Strengthening behavior of chopped CNT reinforced Al-based composites is investigated. • Chopped CNTs have influenced the strength and microstructures of the composites. • Chopped CNTs are created under Ar- 3% H2 atmosphere during mechanical milling. • Strength can be evaluated by the rule of the mixture and a particle spacing effect.

  17. Izod Impact Test in Epoxi Matrix Composites Reinforced with Hemp Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohen, Lázaro A.; Margem, Frederico M.; Neves, Anna C. C.; Monteiro, Sérgio N.; Gomes, Maycon A.; de Castro, Rafael G.; Maurício, F. V. Carlos; de Paula, Fernanda

    Synthetic fiber has been gradually replaced by natural fiber, such as lignocellulosic fiber. In comparison with synthetic fiber, natural fiber has shown economic and environmental advantages. The natural fiber presents interfacial characteristics with polymeric matrices that favor a high impact energy absorption by the composite structure. However, until now little has been evaluated about the hemp fiber incorporated in polymeric matrices. This study has the purpose of evaluate the impact resistance of this kind of epoxy matrix composite reinforced with different percentages of hemp fibers. The impact resistance has substantially increased the relative amount of hemp fiber incorporated as reinforcement in the composite. This performance was associated with the difficulty of rupture imposed by the fibers resulting from the interaction of hemp fiber / epoxy matrix that helps absorb the impact energy.

  18. Strong and Tough Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1997-01-01

    Strong, tough and almost fully dense Hi-Nicalon/BN/SiC fiber reinforced celsian matrix composites have been fabricated by impregnation of the fiber tows with the matrix slurry, winding on a drum, stacking the prepreg tapes in the desired orientation, and hot pressing. The monoclinic celsian phase in the matrix was produced in situ, during hot pressing, from a mixed oxide precursor. The unidirectional composites having approx. 42 volume percent of fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout in three-point bend tests at room temperature. Values of first matrix cracking stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 %, respectively, and ultimate strengths of 900 +/- 60 MPa were observed. The Young's modulus of the composites was 165 +/- 5 GPa.

  19. Micromechanics Fatigue Damage Analysis Modeling for Fabric Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Xue, D.; Shi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A micromechanics analysis modeling method was developed to analyze the damage progression and fatigue failure of fabric reinforced composite structures, especially for the brittle ceramic matrix material composites. A repeating unit cell concept of fabric reinforced composites was used to represent the global composite structure. The thermal and mechanical properties of the repeating unit cell were considered as the same as those of the global composite structure. The three-phase micromechanics, the shear-lag, and the continuum fracture mechanics models were integrated with a statistical model in the repeating unit cell to predict the progressive damages and fatigue life of the composite structures. The global structure failure was defined as the loss of loading capability of the repeating unit cell, which depends on the stiffness reduction due to material slice failures and nonlinear material properties in the repeating unit cell. The present methodology is demonstrated with the analysis results evaluated through the experimental test performed with carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix plain weave composite specimens.

  20. Thermal expansion of multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced nanocrystalline silver matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Manjula Sharma, Vimal; Pal, Hemant

    2014-04-24

    Multiwall carbon nanotube reinforced silver matrix composite was fabricated by novel molecular level mixing method, which involves nucleation of Ag ions inside carbon nanotube dispersion at the molecular level. As a result the carbon nanotubes get embedded within the powder rather than on the surfaces. Micro structural characterization by X- ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy reveals that the nanotubes are homogeneously dispersed and anchored within the matrix. The thermal expansion of the composite with the multiwall nanotube content (0, 1.5 vol%) were investigated and it is found that coefficient of thermal expansion decreases with the addition of multiwall nanotube content and reduce to about 63% to that of pure Ag.

  1. Silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3 - 2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  2. Method of producing a silicon carbide fiber reinforced strontium aluminosilicate glass-ceramic matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A SrO-Al2O3-2SrO2 (SAS) glass ceramic matrix is reinforced with CVD SiC continuous fibers. This material is prepared by casting a slurry of SAS glass powder into tapes. Mats of continuous CVD-SiC fibers are alternately stacked with the matrix tapes. This tape-mat stack is warm-pressed to produce a 'green' composite. Organic constituents are burned out of the 'green' composite, and the remaining interim material is hot pressed.

  3. Flexural Test in Epoxy Matrix Composites Reinforced with Hemp Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neves, Anna Carolina C.; Rohen, Lázaro A.; Margem, Frederico M.; Vieira, Carlos Maurício F.; Monteiro, Sergio N.

    Synthetic fiber has been gradually replaced by natural fiber, such as lignocellulosic fiber. In comparison with synthetic fiber, natural fiber has shown economic and environmental advantages. The natural fiber presents interfacial characteristics with polymeric matrices that favor a high impact energy absorption by the composite structure. However, until now, little information has been released about the hemp fiber incorporated in polymeric matrices. Specimens containing 0, 10, 20 and 30% in volume of hemp fibers were aligned along the entire length of a mold to create plates of these composites. Those plates were cut following the ASTM standard to obtain specimens for bending tests and the results showed the increase in the flexural strength with the increase of fiber amount.

  4. Residual stresses in shape memory alloy fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsz Loong, Tang; Jamian, Saifulnizan; Ismail, Al Emran; Nur, Nik Hisyammudin Muhd; Watanabe, Yoshimi

    2017-01-01

    Process-induced residual stress in shape memory alloy (SMA) fiber reinforced aluminum (Al) matrix composite was simulated by ANSYS APDL. The manufacturing process of the composite named as NiTi/Al is start with loading and unloading process of nickel titanium (NiTi) wire as SMA to generate a residual plastic strain. Then, this plastic deformed NiTi wire would be embedded into Al to become a composite. Lastly, the composite is heated form 289 K to 363 K and then cooled back to 300 K. Residual stress is generated in composite because of shape memory effect of NiTi and mismatch of thermal coefficient between NiTi wire and Al matrix of composite. ANSYS APDL has been used to simulate the distribution of residual stress and strain in this process. A sensitivity test has been done to determine the optimum number of nodes and elements used. Hence, the number of nodes and elements used are 15680 and 13680, respectively. Furthermore, the distribution of residual stress and strain of nickel fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite (Ni/Al) and titanium fiber reinforced aluminium matrix composite (Ti/Al) under same simulation process also has been simulated by ANSYS APDL as comparison to NiTi/Al. The simulation results show that compressive residual stress is generated on Al matrix of Ni/Al, Ti/Al and NiTi/Al during heating and cooling process. Besides that, they also have similar trend of residual stress distribution but difference in term of value. For Ni/Al and Ti/Al, they are 0.4% difference on their maximum compressive residual stress at 363K. At same circumstance, NiTi/Al has higher residual stress value which is about 425% higher than Ni/Al and Ti/Al composite. This implies that shape memory effect of NiTi fiber reinforced in composite able to generated higher compressive residual stress in Al matrix, hence able to enhance tensile property of the composite.

  5. Graphite-Fiber-Reinforced Glass-Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prewo, K. M.; Dicus, D. L.

    1982-01-01

    G/GI structural composite material made of graphite fibers embedded in borosilicate glass exhibit excellent strength, fracture toughness, and dimensional stability at elevated temperatures. It is made by passing graphite-fiber yarn through slurry containing suspension of fine glass particles in carrier liquid and winding on drum to produce prepegged uniaxial tape. After drying, tapes are cut into appropriate lengths and laid up in graphite die in desired stacking scheme. Stack is consolidated by hot pressing in furnace.

  6. Microstructure and wear characteristics of si particulate reinforced al matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Suk-Jin; Kim, Do-Hyang; Kim, Jun-Su

    1997-08-01

    In order to obtain a homogeneous distribution of fine Si particles in aluminium matrix and thus to improve the adaptability of Al-Si alloy for aerospace and automobile applications, Si particulate reinforced aluminium matrix composites have been processed by using powder metallurgy method. The Si pariticulates with 20-40 μm size and Al alloy powders were mixed, degassed and extruded at 350°C or 400°C depending on the composition of the matrix alloy. The microstructural characteristics of the composites such as interfacial stability at high temperatures have been investigated by various experimental techniques. Wear properties of the composites were investigated by using a pin-on-disk type wear tester. The results were compared with these obtained from the conventionally cast hypereutectic Al-Si alloys and discussed in terms of the observed microstructural characteristics and physical properties such as hardness and tensile properties.

  7. Microstructural evolution in WC-Co cermet reinforced - A17075 metal matrix composites by stir casting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gopal Krishna, U. B.; Ranganatha, P.; Auradi, V.; Mahendra Kumar, S.; Vasudeva, B.

    2016-09-01

    Aluminium metal matrix composites (AMMCs) are preferred because of their enhanced properties like high strength to weight ratio, stiffness and wear resistance. In the present work, an attempt is made to develop cermet (WC-Co) reinforced with Al7075 metal matrix composite by stir casting technique. WC-Co cermet is reduced to an average size of 10μm through ball milling using Alumina as grinding media. Ball milled WC-Co Cermet in an amount of 6 wt. % is used as reinforcement in Al7075 matrix. Microstructural characterization of the prepared composites is carried out using SEM/EDX and XRD studies. X-ray diffraction studies have revealed the peaks corresponding to α-Al, WC, Co and minor Al5W phases. SEM/EDX characterization revealed the uniform distribution of cermet in Al matrix. Further studies also revealed that, addition of WC-Co cermet to Al7075 matrix has resulted in improvement in hardness and Densities of Al7075 matrix.

  8. Dynamic Effects in Elastothermodynamic Damping of Hollow Particle Reinforced Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Bhanu Kumar

    2016-06-01

    The Metal-Matrix Composites (MMCs) containing hollow spherical reinforcements are under active development for the applications such as space structures, submarine hulls etc. where weight is of critical importance. When these materials are subjected to a time varying strain field, energy is dissipated because of the thermoelastic effect (Elastothermodynamic Damping or ETD). The quasi-static ETD analysis for the MMCs containing hollow spherical particles has been reported in literature. The entropic approach, which is better suited for composite materials with perfect or imperfect interfaces, is used for the analysis. In the present work, the effect of inertia forces is carried out on ETD of hollow particle-reinforced MMCs. For given particle volume fractions (V p ), the inertia forces are found to be more significant at higher value of thermal parameter (Ω T1) (alternatively, frequency of vibration if reinforcement radius is fixed), large cavity volume fraction (V h ) and low value of the parameter B1.

  9. Dynamic Effects in Elastothermodynamic Damping of Hollow Particle Reinforced Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srivastava, Sunil Kumar; Mishra, Bhanu Kumar

    2017-04-01

    The Metal-Matrix Composites (MMCs) containing hollow spherical reinforcements are under active development for the applications such as space structures, submarine hulls etc. where weight is of critical importance. When these materials are subjected to a time varying strain field, energy is dissipated because of the thermoelastic effect (Elastothermodynamic Damping or ETD). The quasi-static ETD analysis for the MMCs containing hollow spherical particles has been reported in literature. The entropic approach, which is better suited for composite materials with perfect or imperfect interfaces, is used for the analysis. In the present work, the effect of inertia forces is carried out on ETD of hollow particle-reinforced MMCs. For given particle volume fractions ( V p ), the inertia forces are found to be more significant at higher value of thermal parameter (Ω T1) (alternatively, frequency of vibration if reinforcement radius is fixed), large cavity volume fraction ( V h ) and low value of the parameter B1.

  10. Space environmental effects on LDEF low Earth orbit exposed graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    George, Pete

    1992-01-01

    The Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) was deployed on April 7, 1984 in low earth orbit (LEO) at an altitude of 482 kilometers. On board experiments experienced the harsh LEO environment including atomic oxygen (AO), ultraviolet radiation (UV), and thermal cycling. During the 5.8 year mission, the LDEF orbit decayed to 340 kilometers where significantly higher AO concentrations exist. LDEF was retrieved on January 12, 1990 from this orbit. One experiment on board LDEF was M0003, Space Effects on Spacecraft Materials. As a subset of M0003 nearly 500 samples of polymer, metal, and glass matrix composites were flown as the Advanced Composites Experiment M0003-10. The Advanced Composites Experiment is a joint effort between government and industry with the Aerospace Corporation serving as the experiment integrator. A portion of the graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites were furnished by the Boeing Defense and Space Group, Seattle, Washington. Test results and discussions for the Boeing portion of M0003-10 are presented. Experiment and specimen location on the LDEF are presented along with a quantitative summary of the pertinent exposure conditions. Matrix materials selected for the test were epoxy, polysulfone, and polyimide. These composite materials were selected due to their suitability for high performance structural capability in spacecraft applications. Graphite reinforced polymer matrix composites offer higher strength to weight ratios along with excellent dimensional stability. The Boeing space exposed and corresponding ground control composite specimens were subjected to post flight mechanical, chemical, and physical testing in order to determine any changes in critical properties and performance characteristics. Among the more significant findings are the erosive effect of atomic oxygen on leading edge exposed specimens and microcracking in non-unidirectionally reinforced flight specimens.

  11. Multi-Scale CNT-Based Reinforcing Polymer Matrix Composites for Lightweight Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eberly, Daniel; Ou, Runqing; Karcz, Adam; Skandan, Ganesh; Mather, Patrick; Rodriguez, Erika

    2013-01-01

    Reinforcing critical areas in carbon polymer matrix composites (PMCs), also known as fiber reinforced composites (FRCs), is advantageous for structural durability. Since carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have extremely high tensile strength, they can be used as a functional additive to enhance the mechanical properties of FRCs. However, CNTs are not readily dispersible in the polymer matrix, which leads to lower than theoretically predicted improvement in mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of CNT composites. The inability to align CNTs in a polymer matrix is also a known issue. The feasibility of incorporating aligned CNTs into an FRC was demonstrated using a novel, yet commercially viable nanofiber approach, termed NRMs (nanofiber-reinforcing mats). The NRM concept of reinforcement allows for a convenient and safe means of incorporating CNTs into FRC structural components specifically where they are needed during the fabrication process. NRMs, fabricated through a novel and scalable process, were incorporated into FRC test panels using layup and vacuum bagging techniques, where alternating layers of the NRM and carbon prepreg were used to form the reinforced FRC structure. Control FRC test panel coupons were also fabricated in the same manner, but comprised of only carbon prepreg. The FRC coupons were machined to size and tested for flexural, tensile, and compression properties. This effort demonstrated that FRC structures can be fabricated using the NRM concept, with an increased average load at break during flexural testing versus that of the control. The NASA applications for the developed technologies are for lightweight structures for in-space and launch vehicles. In addition, the developed technologies would find use in NASA aerospace applications such as rockets, aircraft, aircraft/spacecraft propulsion systems, and supporting facilities. The reinforcing aspect of the technology will allow for more efficient joining of fiber composite parts, thus offering

  12. Porosity characterization of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite using synchrotron X-ray computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, C.; Marrow, T. J.; Reinhard, C.; Li, B.; Zhang, C.; Wang, S.

    2016-03-01

    The pore structure and porosity of a continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composite has been characterized using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray computed tomography (XCT). Segmentation of the reconstructed tomograph images reveals different types of pores within the composite, the inter-fiber bundle open pores displaying a "node-bond" geometry, and the intra-fiber bundle isolated micropores showing a piping shape. The 3D morphology of the pores is resolved and each pore is labeled. The quantitative filtering of the pores measures a total porosity 8.9% for the composite, amid which there is about 7.1~ 9.3% closed micropores.

  13. Process for the preparation of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Haller, W.; Deshmukh, U.V.

    1993-06-22

    A process for the preparation of a fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite comprised of monofilament fibers having a continuous uniform coating of a ceramic matrix material is described comprising the steps of: (a) coating at least one monofilament fiber by drawing the fiber through a filament guide immersed in a slurry comprised of a ceramic matrix material in an amount sufficient to form a continuous uniform coating on the surface of the fiber and an ultraviolet curing agent in an amount sufficient to bind the continuous uniform coating of ceramic matrix material to the fiber upon curing with ultraviolet radiation; (b) rapidly curing the coating before breakup of the coating slurry on the fiber by exposure to ultraviolet radiation; (c) heat treating at least one coated and cured monofilament fiber to decompose the ultraviolet curing agent and sinter the ceramic material to form a compact; and (d) densifying the compact to produce a fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composite comprised of at least one monofilament fiber having a continuous uniform coating of a ceramic matrix material.

  14. Matrix free fiber reinforced polymeric composites via high-temperature high-pressure sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tao

    2004-11-01

    A novel manufacturing process called high-temperature high-pressure sintering was studied and explored. Solid fiber reinforced composites are produced by consolidating and compacting layers of polymeric fabrics near their melting temperature under high pressure. There is no need to use an additional matrix as a bonding material. Partial melting and recrystallization of the fibers effectively fuse the material together. The product is called a "matrix free" fiber reinforced composite and essentially a one-polymer composite in which the fiber and the matrix have the same chemical composition. Since the matrix is eliminated in the process, it is possible to achieve a high fiber volume fraction and light weight composite. Interfacial adhesion between fibers and matrix is very good due to the molecular continuity throughout the system and the material is thermally shapeable. Plain woven Spectra RTM cloth made of SpectraRTM fiber was used to comprehensively study the process. The intrinsic properties of the material demonstrate that matrix free SpectraRTM fiber reinforced composites have the potential to make ballistic shields such as body armor and helmets. The properties and structure of the original fiber and the cloth were carefully examined. Optimization of the processing conditions started with the probing of sintering temperatures by Differential Scanning Calorimetry. Coupled with the information from structural, morphological and mechanical investigations on the samples sintered at different processing conditions, the optimal processing windows were determined to ensure that the outstanding original properties of the fibers translate into high ballistic performance of the composites. Matrix free SpectraRTM composites exhibit excellent ballistic resistance in the V50 tests conducted by the US Army. In the research, process-structure-property relationship is established and correlations between various properties and structures are understood. Thorough knowledge is

  15. SiC reinforced-MoSi sub 2 based matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Petrovic, J.J.; Honnell, R.E.

    1990-01-01

    SiC reinforced-MoSi{sub 2} based matrix composites possess very significant potential as high temperature structural materials for temperatures above 1200{degree}C in oxidizing environments, due to their combination of oxidation resistance, thermodynamic stability, machinability, elevated temperature ductility and strength, and ability to alloy the MoSi{sub 2} matrix with other silicides. The fabrication, microstructures, oxidation, and mechanical properties of these materials are described, and their current properties are compared to high temperature metals and structural ceramics. 22 refs., 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  16. Flexural properties of glass fiber reinforced composite with multiphase biopolymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Väkiparta, M; Yli-Urpo, A; Vallittu, P K

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate flexural properties of glass fiber-reinforced composites with a multiphase biopolymer matrix. Continuous unidirectional E-glass fibers were preimpregnated with a novel biopolymer of poly(hydroxyproline) amide and ester. The preimpregnated fibers were then further impregnated in a co-monomer system of Bis-GMA-TEGDMA, which formed semi-interpenetrating polymer networks (semi-IPN) with the preimpregnated polymer. After light initiated polymerization of the monomer system, rectangular shaped bar specimens (n = 4) were tested by the three-point bending test. The control material was a fiber-reinforced composite with a Bis-GMA-TEDGMA-matrix only. The mean flexural strength of poly(hydroxyproline) amide preimpregnated fiber composite was higher than that of the control (FS = 888 vs. 805 MPa). The poly(hydroxyproline) ester preimpregnated fibers resulted in lower strength (FS = 541 MPa). The results of this study suggest that preimpregnation of glass fibers with poly(hydroxyproline) amide and the use of such fibers in fiber-reinforced composites with IPN polymer matrices, can reach relatively high mechanical properties.

  17. Modeling of stress/strain behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites including stress redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is presented for nonlinear analyses which incorporates microstress redistribution due to progressive fracture in ceramic matrix composites. This procedure facilitates an accurate simulation of the stress-strain behavior of ceramic matrix composites up to failure. The nonlinearity in the material behavior is accounted for at the constituent (fiber/matrix/interphase) level. This computational procedure is a part of recent upgrades to CEMCAN (Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code. The fiber substructuring technique in CEMCAN is used to monitor the damage initiation and progression as the load increases. The room-temperature tensile stress-strain curves for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix unidirectional and angle-ply laminates are simulated and compared with experimentally observed stress-strain behavior. Comparison between the predicted stress/strain behavior and experimental stress/strain curves is good. Collectively the results demonstrate that CEMCAN computer code provides the user with an effective computational tool to simulate the behavior of ceramic matrix composites.

  18. Thermal expansion of selected graphite reinforced polyimide-, epoxy-, and glass-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thermal expansion of three epoxy-matrix composites, a polyimide-matrix composite and a borosilicate glass-matrix composite, each reinforced with continuous carbon fibers, has been measured and compared. The expansion of a composite with a rubber toughened epoxy-matrix and P75S carbon fibers was very different from the expansion of two different single phase epoxy-matrix composites with P75S fibers although all three had the same stacking sequence. Reasonable agreement was obtained between measured thermal-expansion data and results from classical laminate theory. The thermal expansion of a material may change markedly as a result of thermal cycling. Microdamage, induced by 250 cycles between -156 C and 121 C in the graphite/polyimide laminate, caused a 53 percent decrease in the coefficient of thermal expansion. The thermal expansion of the graphite/glass laminate was not changed by 100 thermal cycles from -129 C to 38 C; however, a residual strain of about 10 x 10 to the minus 6 power was measured for the laminate tested.

  19. Heat treatment response of TiC-reinforced steel matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seong Hoon; Kim, Dae Ha; Hwang, Keum-Cheol; Lee, Sang-Bok; Lee, Sang-Kwan; Hong, Hyun Uk; Suh, Dong-Woo

    2016-09-01

    A particulate TiC-reinforced SKD11 steel matrix composite is fabricated by using a pressure infiltration casting, achieving a homogeneous distribution of the particles with 60 vol%. The retained austenite fraction in the composite matrix is approximately 19% after quenching from the austenitization temperature of 1010 °C, which is larger than 13% in as-quenched condition of unreinforced SKD11. A combined analysis on the austenite lattice parameter using XRD profiles and first-principle calculation suggests the increase of carbon content in the steel matrix possibly by partial dissolution of TiC during casting. The change of carbon content and prior austenite grain size reasonably accounts for the increase of retained austenite fraction in the composite matrix. In the austenitizing temperatures ranging from 950 °C to 1040 °C, the retained austenite fraction in the composite matrix in as-quenched condition increases more rapidly than that of unreinforced SKD11 with the increase of austenitization temperature, while the hardness of the composite is less sensitive to the austenitization temperature. This suggests that it is advantageous to conduct the austenitization at a temperature below 1010 °C, which is typical practice of austenitization of the unreinforced SKD11, because the retention of austenite is effectively suppressed while minimizing the loss of hardness.

  20. Short-fibre and particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.J.

    1989-08-01

    Short fibres, whiskers or particles of ceramic materials, e.g. silicon carbide and alumina, when dispersed in a more or less random manner in a metallic matrix can promote increases in stiffness and strength at ambient and elevated temperatures without imposing a weight penalty. The paper considers the available routes for the fabrication of such composites, e.g. by squeeze casting, spray forming, powder technologies and hot working etc. Influences of type and amount of reinforcement, matrix alloy selection and processing route on strength, creep and fatigue resistance are discussed. Comparisons are made with conventional metals and alloys, and polymers and metals reinforced with continuous fibres. Attention is drawn to the behaviour of these materials under compressive loading as well as to their thermal expansion and conductivity. The majority of the matrices considered are aluminium-based.

  1. Tribological properties of metal-matrix composite materials reinforced by superelastic hard carbon particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakova, I. N.; Drozdova, E. I.; Chernogorova, O. P.; Blinov, V. M.; Ekimov, E. A.

    2016-05-01

    Metal-matrix composite materials (CMs) are synthesized from a mixture of a metal powder (Ti, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, Al-based alloy) and fullerenes (10 wt %). The thermobaric synthesis conditions (700-1000°C, 5-8 GPa) ensure the collapse of fullerene molecules and their transformation into superelastic carbon phase particles with an indentation hardness H IT = 10-37 GPa, an elastic modulus E IT = 60-260 GPa, and an elastic recovery of >80% upon indentation. After reinforcing by superelastic hard carbon, the friction coefficient of CM decreases by a factor of 2-4 as compared to the friction coefficient of the matrix metal, and the abrasive wear resistance increases by a factor of 4-200. Superelastic hard carbon particles are a unique reinforcing material for an increase in the wear resistance and a simultaneous decrease in the friction coefficient of CM.

  2. Carbon Nanotube-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites Produced by High-Energy Ball Milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Travessa, Dilermando N.; da Rocha, Geovana V. B.; Cardoso, Kátia R.; Lieblich, Marcela

    2017-05-01

    Although multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) are promising materials to strengthen lightweight aluminum matrix composites, their dispersion into the metallic matrix is challenge. In the present work, MWCNT were dispersed into age-hardenable AA6061 aluminum alloy by high-energy ball milling and the blend was subsequently hot-extruded. The composite bars obtained were heat-treated by solution heat treatment at 520 °C and artificially aged at 177 °C for 8 h, in order to reach the T6 temper. Special attention was given to the integrity of the MWCNT along the entire composite production. The microstructure of the obtained bars was evaluated by optical and scanning electron microscopy, and the mechanical properties were evaluated by Vickers microhardness tests. Raman spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy were employed to evaluate the structural integrity of MWCNT. It was found that milling time is critical to reach a proper dispersion of the reinforcing phase. The composite hardness increased up to 67% with the dispersion of 2% in weight of MWCNT, when comparing with un-reinforced bars produced by similar route. However, age hardening was not observed in composite bars after heat treatment. It was also found that MWCNT continuously degraded along the process, being partially converted into Al4C3 in the final composite.

  3. A first look at erosion of continuous-fiber reinforced ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Karasek, K.R.; Gonczy, S.T.; Kupperman, J.B.; Zamirowski, E.J.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L.

    1991-12-01

    We report the initial results of a study of solid-particle erosion of Nicalon{trademark} Sic reinforced carbon-modified-silica-glass composites. SiC abrasives with diameters between 42 to 390{mu}m were used with impact angles of 30{degrees} and 90{degrees}, and velocities ranged 30 to 80 m/s. Fibers were parallel to the surface in all cases. Woven-fiber composites exhibited the same erosive behavior as uniaxial composites. Interfacial chemistry was controlled, and the comparison between composites which exhibit low-strength-brittle and high-strength-fibrous fractures under flexure conditions showed no significant difference in erosion resistance. This result and SEM data indicate that most of the fracture occurs within the matrix and/or at the fiber-matrix interface. We have found in previous work that polymer-matrix composites (with fibers parallel to the surface) are more susceptible to erosion damage than the matrix polymer. This also appears to be the case for the ceramic composites.

  4. A first look at erosion of continuous-fiber reinforced ceramic-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Karasek, K.R.; Gonczy, S.T. ); Kupperman, J.B.; Zamirowski, E.J.; Goretta, K.C.; Routbort, J.L. )

    1991-12-01

    We report the initial results of a study of solid-particle erosion of Nicalon{trademark} Sic reinforced carbon-modified-silica-glass composites. SiC abrasives with diameters between 42 to 390{mu}m were used with impact angles of 30{degrees} and 90{degrees}, and velocities ranged 30 to 80 m/s. Fibers were parallel to the surface in all cases. Woven-fiber composites exhibited the same erosive behavior as uniaxial composites. Interfacial chemistry was controlled, and the comparison between composites which exhibit low-strength-brittle and high-strength-fibrous fractures under flexure conditions showed no significant difference in erosion resistance. This result and SEM data indicate that most of the fracture occurs within the matrix and/or at the fiber-matrix interface. We have found in previous work that polymer-matrix composites (with fibers parallel to the surface) are more susceptible to erosion damage than the matrix polymer. This also appears to be the case for the ceramic composites.

  5. Thermal expansion of selected graphite-reinforced polyimide-, epoxy-, and glass-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal expansion of continuous carbon-fiber reinforced composites with epoxy-, polyimide-, and borosilicate glass-matrices has been measured and compared. The expansion of a rubber-toughened epoxy-matrix/P75S carbon-fiber composite was very different from the expansion of two different single-phase epoxy-matrix/P75S composites, although all three had the same stacking sequence. Reasonable agreement was obtained between measured thermal expansion data and results from classical laminate theory. Microdamage in the graphite/polyimide laminate, induced by 250 cycles between -156 and 121 C, caused a 53 percent decrease in the coefficient of thermal expansion. The thermal expansion of the graphite/glass laminate was not changed after 100 thermal cycles from -129 to 38 C; however, a residual strain of about 10 x 10 to the -6 was observed for the laminate tested.

  6. Vacuum brazing of high volume fraction SiC particles reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Dongfeng; Niu, Jitai; Gao, Zeng; Wang, Peng

    2015-03-01

    This experiment chooses A356 aluminum matrix composites containing 55% SiC particle reinforcing phase as the parent metal and Al-Si-Cu-Zn-Ni alloy metal as the filler metal. The brazing process is carried out in vacuum brazing furnace at the temperature of 550°C and 560°C for 3 min, respectively. The interfacial microstructures and fracture surfaces are investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy spectrum analysis (EDS). The result shows that adequacy of element diffusion are superior when brazing at 560°C, because of higher activity and liquidity. Dislocations and twins are observed at the interface between filler and composite due to the different expansion coefficient of the aluminum alloy matrix and SiC particles. The fracture analysis shows that the brittle fracture mainly located at interface of filler and composites.

  7. Thermal expansion of selected graphite-reinforced polyimide-, epoxy-, and glass-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tompkins, S. S.

    1987-01-01

    The thermal expansion of continuous carbon-fiber reinforced composites with epoxy-, polyimide-, and borosilicate glass-matrices has been measured and compared. The expansion of a rubber-toughened epoxy-matrix/P75S carbon-fiber composite was very different from the expansion of two different single-phase epoxy-matrix/P75S composites, although all three had the same stacking sequence. Reasonable agreement was obtained between measured thermal expansion data and results from classical laminate theory. Microdamage in the graphite/polyimide laminate, induced by 250 cycles between -156 and 121 C, caused a 53 percent decrease in the coefficient of thermal expansion. The thermal expansion of the graphite/glass laminate was not changed after 100 thermal cycles from -129 to 38 C; however, a residual strain of about 10 x 10 to the -6 was observed for the laminate tested.

  8. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-06-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  9. Effects of matrix porosity on the mechanical properties of fiber-reinforced oxide composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattoni, Michael Anthony

    Damage tolerance in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites can be achieved through weak bonding between fibers and matrix by the use of fine-scale porosity within the matrix. The effects of matrix porosity on the mechanical properties of porous-matrix, oxide composites are investigated. Porosity is systematically varied through impregnation and pyrolysis of a ceramic precursor solution, and mechanical tests are performed to identify the role of the matrix in both fiber- and matrix-dominated loadings. Two families of composites are examined in this study. The first family possesses a non-uniform porosity distribution due to precursor segregation during drying. Mechanical testing demonstrates a loss of damage tolerance and tensile strength along the fiber direction as the porosity is reduced. Concurrently some improvements in interlaminar shear strength are observed. Building upon this investigation, segregation is eliminated in subsequent studies through use of a gelation step following precursor impregnation. In this family, moderate additions of precursor-derived alumina to the matrix improve the in-plane shear and tensile strength. Concurrently, a significant increase in notch sensitivity is observed. Two theoretical frameworks are developed for the notched strength of ceramic matrix composites. The first considers composites that exhibit rising fracture resistance and is based upon established concepts of crack stability under stress-controlled loadings. The form of the resistance curve assumes that the crack tip inelastic zone is small in relation to the geometric and bridging length scales, making this framework applicable to relatively dense porous matrix composites. The results reveal salient trends in strength with notch length and specimen geometry. An assessment of the theory is made through comparison with experimental measurements. The second framework developed for notch-sensitivity explicitly accounts for large-scale inelasticity, allowing

  10. Reinforced Si3N4 matrix composites formed by the directed metal oxidation process

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, W.B.

    1992-10-01

    Results of an exploratory study in which the DIMOX directed metal oxidation process was used to form reinforced Si3N4 matrix composites are reported. The study focused on C-fiber reinforcement, which is satisfactory for low-to-moderate temperature applications, including some aerospace and turbine engine applications. It is noted, however, that whenever C-fibers are used at high temperatures in an oxidizing environment, the oxidation resistance of the resulting composites must be addressed. The need for investigating more stable fibers, such as SiC, is emphasized. The approach offers the potential to produce lightweight materials with high room temperature and elevated temperature strength as well as the net or near-net shape capability. 15 refs.

  11. Processing and Material Characterization of Continuous Basalt Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Polymer Derived Ceramics.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cox, Sarah B.

    2014-01-01

    The need for high performance vehicles in the aerospace industry requires materials which can withstand high loads and high temperatures. New developments in launch pads and infrastructure must also be made to handle this intense environment with lightweight, reusable, structural materials. By using more functional materials, better performance can be seen in the launch environment, and launch vehicle designs which have not been previously used can be considered. The development of high temperature structural composite materials has been very limited due to the high cost of the materials and the processing needed. Polymer matrix composites can be used for temperatures up to 260C. Ceramics can take much higher temperatures, but they are difficult to produce and form in bulk volumes. Polymer Derived Ceramics (PDCs) begin as a polymer matrix, allowing a shape to be formed and cured and then to be pyrolized in order to obtain a ceramic with the associated thermal and mechanical properties. The use of basalt in structural and high temperature applications has been under development for over 50 years, yet there has been little published research on the incorporation of basalt fibers as a reinforcement in the composites. In this study, continuous basalt fiber reinforced PDCs have been fabricated and tested for the applicability of this composite system as a high temperature structural composite material. The oxyacetylene torch testing and three point bend testing have been performed on test panels and the test results are presented.

  12. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1989-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  13. Fatigue testing and damage development in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.

    1988-01-01

    A general overview of the fatigue behavior of metal matrix composites (MMC) is presented. The first objective is to present experimental procedures and techniques for conducting a meaningful fatigue test to detect and quantify fatigue damage in MMC. These techniques include interpretation of stress-strain responses, acid etching of the matrix, edge replicas of the specimen under load, radiography, and micrographs of the failure surfaces. In addition, the paper will show how stiffness loss in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites can be a useful parameter for detecting fatigue damage initiation and accumulation. Second, numerous examples of how fatigue damage can initiate and grow in various MMC are given. Depending on the relative fatigue behavior of the fiber and matrix, and the interface properties, the failure modes of MMC can be grouped into four categories: (1) matrix dominated, (2) fiber dominated, (3) self-similar damage growth, and (4) fiber/matrix interfacial failures. These four types of damage will be discussed and illustrated by examples with the emphasis on the fatigue of unnotched laminates.

  14. Damage evolution in uniaxial silicon carbide fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanan, Jay Clarke

    Fiber fractures initiate damage zones ultimately determining the strength and lifetime of metal matrix composites (MMCs). The evolution of damage in a MMC comprising a row of unidirectional SiC fibers (32 vol.%) surrounded by a Ti matrix was examined using X-ray microdiffraction (gym beam size) and macrodiffraction (mm beam size). A comparison of high-energy X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques including a powerful two-dimensional XRD method capable of obtaining powder averaged strains from a small number of grains is presented (HEmuXRD2). Using macrodiffraction, the bulk residual strain in the composite was determined against a true strain-free reference. In addition, the bulk in situ response of both the fiber reinforcement and the matrix to tensile stress was observed and compared to a three-dimensional finite element model. Using microdiffraction, multiple strain maps including both phases were collected in situ before, during, and after the application of tensile stress, providing an unprecedented detailed picture of the micromechanical behavior in the laminate metal matrix composite. Finally, the elastic axial strains were compared to predictions from a modified shear lag model, which unlike other shear lag models, considers the elastic response of both constituents. The strains showed excellent correlation with the model. The results confirmed, for the first time, both the need and validity of this new model specifically developed for large scale multifracture and damage evolution simulations of metal matrix composites. The results also provided unprecedented insight for the model, revealing the necessity of incorporating such factors as plasticity of the matrix, residual stress in the composite, and selection of the load sharing parameter. The irradiation of a small number of grains provided strain measurements comparable to a continuum mechanical state in the material. Along the fiber axes, thermal residual stresses of 740 MPa (fibers) and +350 MPa (matrix

  15. Analysis of stress-strain, fracture and ductility behavior of aluminum matrix composites containing discontinuous silicon carbide reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcdanels, D. L.

    1984-01-01

    Mechanical properties and stress-strain behavior for several types of commercially fabricated aluminum matrix composites, containing up to 40 vol % discontinuous SiC whisker, nodule, or particulate reinforcement were evaluated. It was found that the elastic modulus of the composites was isotropic, to be independent of type of reinforcement, and to be controlled solely by the volume percentage of SiC reinforcement present. The yield/tensile strengths and ductility were controlled primarily by the matrix alloy and temper condition. Ductility decreased with increasing reinforcement content, however, the fracture strains observed were higher than those reported in the literature for this type of composite. This increase in fracture strain is attributed to cleaner matrix powder and increased mechanical working during fabrication. Conventional aluminum and titanium structural alloys were compared and have shown that the properties of these low cost, lightweight composites have good potential for application to aerospace structures.

  16. Graphene-reinforced aluminum matrix composites prepared by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Wen-ming; Li, Song-mei; Wang, Bo; Chen, Xin; Liu, Jian-hua; Yu, Mei

    2016-06-01

    Graphene-reinforced 7055 aluminum alloy composites with different contents of graphene were prepared by spark plasma sintering (SPS). The structure and mechanical properties of the composites were investigated. Testing results show that the hardness, compressive strength, and yield strength of the composites are improved with the addition of 1wt% graphene. A clean, strong interface is formed between the metal matrix and graphene via metallurgical bonding on atomic scale. Harmful aluminum carbide (Al4C3) is not formed during SPS processing. Further addition of graphene (above 1wt%) results in the deterioration in mechanical properties of the composites. The agglomeration of graphene plates is exacerbated with increasing graphene content, which is the main reason for this deterioration.

  17. Mechanical behavior of fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN ceramic matrix composites: Theory and experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of continuous fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN (Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride) composites with various fiber contents is evaluated. Both catastrophic and noncatastrophic failures are observed in tensile specimens. Damage and failure mechanisms are identified via in-situ monitoring using NDE (nondestructive evaluation) techniques through the loading history. Effects of fiber/matrix interface debonding (splitting) parallel to fibers are discussed. Statistical failure behavior of fibers is also observed, especially when the interface is weak. Micromechanical models incorporating residual stresses to calculate the critical matrix cracking strength, ultimate strength, and work of pull-out are reviewed and used to predict composite response. For selected test problems, experimental measurements are compared to analytical predictions.

  18. Recrystallization in SiC particulate reinforced 6061 aluminium metal matrix composites following low strain deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, D.; Munroe, P.R.; Bandyopadhyay, S. . School of Materials Science and Engineering); Mouritz, A.P. . Materials Research Lab.)

    1994-04-01

    Aluminum metal matrix composites (MMC) are envisaged as candidate materials for the aerospace and automotive industries because of their low density, high stiffness, and strength. While the studies have examined the recrystallization behavior of MMCs deformed by large amounts of cold work, little work has been done on the behavior of the matrix microstructure during annealing following lower amounts (i.e.< 10% reduction) of deformation. The work presented in this paper examines the effect of small amounts of deformation in compression on the recovery and recrystallization behavior of MMCs, in two aluminium-based composites (6xxx series) reinforced with either 3 [mu]m or 20 [mu]m diameter SiC particulates.

  19. An analytical model for particulate reinforced composites (PRCs) taking account of particle debonding and matrix cracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Yunpeng

    2016-10-01

    In this work, a simple micromechanics-based model was developed to describe the overall stress-strain relations of particulate reinforced composites (PRCs), taking into account both particle debonding and matrix cracking damage. Based on the secant homogenization frame, the effective compliance tensor could be firstly given for the perfect composites without any damage. The progressive interface debonding damage is controlled by a Weibull probability function, and then the volume fraction of detached particles is involved in the equivalent compliance tensor to account for the impact of particle debonding. The matrix cracking was introduced in the present model to embody the stress softening stage in the deformation of PRCs. The analytical model was firstly verified by comparing with the corresponding experiment, and then parameter analyses were conducted. This modeling will shed some light on optimizing the microstructures in effectively improving the mechanical behaviors of PRCs.

  20. Fabrication Of Carbon-Boron Reinforced Dry Polymer Matrix Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L.; Cano, Roberto J.; Treasure, Monte; Shahood, Thomas W.

    1999-01-01

    Future generation aerospace vehicles will require specialized hybrid material forms for component structure fabrication. For this reason, high temperature composite prepregs in both dry and wet forms are being developed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC). In an attempt to improve compressive properties of carbon fiber reinforced composites, a hybrid carbon-boron tape was developed and used to fabricate composite laminates which were subsequently cut into flexural and compression specimens and tested. The hybrid material, given the designation HYCARB, was fabricated by modifying a previously developed process for the manufacture of dry polymer matrix composite (PMC) tape at LaRC. In this work, boron fibers were processed with IM7/LaRC(TradeMark)IAX poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg to form a dry hybrid tape for Automated Tow Placement (ATP). Boron fibers were encapsulated between two (2) layers of reduced volatile, low fiber areal weight poly(amide acid) solution-coated prepreg. The hybrid prepreg was then fully imidized and consolidated into a dry tape suitable for ATP. The fabrication of a hybrid boron material form for tow placement aids in the reduction of the overall manufacturing cost of boron reinforced composites, while realizing the improved compression strengths. Composite specimens were press-molded from the hybrid material and exhibited excellent mechanical properties.

  1. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-01-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT–ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  2. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT-ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  3. Recent advances in understanding the reinforcing ability and mechanism of carbon nanotubes in ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estili, Mehdi; Sakka, Yoshio

    2014-12-01

    Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), commonly referred to as ultimate reinforcement, the main purpose for fabricating CNT-ceramic matrix composites has been mainly to improve the fracture toughness and strength of the ceramic matrix materials. However, there have been many studies reporting marginal improvements or even the degradation of mechanical properties. On the other hand, those studies claiming noticeable toughening measured using indentation, which is an indirect/unreliable characterization method, have not demonstrated the responsible mechanisms applicable to the nanoscale, flexible CNTs; instead, those studies proposed those classical methods applicable to microscale fiber/whisker reinforced ceramics without showing any convincing evidence of load transfer to the CNTs. Therefore, the ability of CNTs to directly improve the macroscopic mechanical properties of structural ceramics has been strongly questioned and debated in the last ten years. In order to properly discuss the reinforcing ability (and possible mechanisms) of CNTs in a ceramic host material, there are three fundamental questions to our knowledge at both the nanoscale and macroscale levels that need to be addressed: (1) does the intrinsic load-bearing ability of CNTs change when embedded in a ceramic host matrix?; (2) when there is an intimate atomic-level interface without any chemical reaction with the matrix, could one expect any load transfer to the CNTs along with effective load bearing by them during crack propagation?; and (3) considering their nanometer-scale dimensions, flexibility and radial softness, are the CNTs able to improve the mechanical properties of the host ceramic matrix at the macroscale when individually, intimately and uniformly dispersed? If so, how? Also, what is the effect of CNT concentration in such a defect-free composite system? Here, we briefly review the recent studies addressing the above fundamental questions. In particular, we discuss the new

  4. An evaluation of fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites for advanced high-temperature aerospace applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larsen, James M.; Russ, Stephan M.; Jones, J. W.

    1995-12-01

    The current capabilities of continuous silicon-carbide fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites (TMCs) are reviewed with respect to application needs and compared to the capabilities of conventional high-temperature monolithic alloys and aluminides. In particular, the properties of a firstgeneration titanium aluminide composite, SCS-6/Ti-24Al-11Nb, and a second-generation metastable beta alloy composite, SCS-6/TIMETAL 21S, are compared with the nickel-base superalloy IN100, the high-temperature titanium alloy Ti-1100, and a relatively new titanium aluminide alloy. Emphasis is given to life-limiting cyclic and monotonie properties and to the influence of time-dependent deformation and environmental effects on these properties. The composite materials offer a wide range of performance capabilities, depending on laminate architecture. In many instances, unidirectional composites exhibit outstanding properties, although the same materials loaded transverse to the fiber direction typically exhibit very poor properties, primarily due to the weak fiber/matrix interface. Depending on the specific mechanical property under consideration, composite cross-ply laminates often show no improvement over the capability of conventional monolithic materials. Thus, it is essential that these composite materials be tailored to achieve a balance of properties suitable to the specific application needs if these materials are to be attractive candidates to replace more conventional materials.

  5. An evaluation of fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites for advanced high-temperature aerospace applications

    SciTech Connect

    Larsen, J.M.; Russ, S.M.; Jones, J.W.

    1995-12-01

    The current capabilities of continuous silicon-carbide fiber-reinforced titanium matrix composites (TMCs) are reviewed with respect to application needs and compared to the capabilities of conventional high-temperature monolithic alloys and aluminides. In particular, the properties of a first-generation titanium aluminide composite, SCS-6/Ti-24Al-11Nb, and a second-generation metastable beta alloy composite, SCS-6/TIMETAL 21S, are compared with the nickel-base superalloy IN100, the high-temperature titanium alloy Ti-1100, and a relatively new titanium aluminide alloy. Emphasis is given to life-limiting cyclic and monotonic properties and to the influence of time-dependent deformation and environmental effects on these properties. The composite materials offer a wide range of performance capabilities, depending on laminate architecture. In many instances, unidirectional composites exhibit outstanding properties, although the same materials loaded transverse to the fiber direction typically exhibit very poor properties, primarily due to the weak fiber/matrix interface. Depending on the specific mechanical property under consideration, composite cross-ply laminates often show no improvement over the capability of conventional monolithic materials. Thus, it is essential that these composite materials be tailored to achieve a balance of properties suitable to the specific application needs if these materials are to be attractive candidates to replace more conventional materials.

  6. Prediction of transverse fatigue behavior of unidirectionally reinforced metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    John, R.; Buchanan, D.J.; Larsen, J.M.

    1998-11-03

    Unidirectionally reinforced metal matrix composites (MMC) are targeted for use in many aerospace applications which require high specific strength and stiffness at elevated temperatures. Such applications include blings and disks. The primary weakness of a component made of unidirectionally reinforced MMC is its susceptibility to transverse loads. The strength of the component in the transverse direction is significantly lower than that in the longitudinal direction under monotonic, sustained and fatigue loading conditions. Hence, replacement of monolithic components with MMC components requires that the transverse strength of the MMC should be predicted accurately. This paper discusses the applicability of a net-section based model to predict the fatigue behavior of [909] MMC under transverse loading.

  7. Model of brittle matrix composite toughening based on discrete fiber reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical approach for the analysis of the effectiveness of fiber reinforcement in brittle matrix composites is presented. The analytical method allows consideration of discrete fiber distribution and examination of the development of crack growth parameters on microscale. The problem associated with the bridging zone development is addressed here; therefore, the bridging zone is considered to be smaller than the main preexisting crack, and the small scale approach is used. The mechanics of the reinforcement is accurately accounted for in the process zone of a growing crack. Closed form solutions characterizing the initial failure process are presented for linear and nonlinear force - fiber pullout displacement relationships. The implicit exact solution for the extended bridging zone is presented as well.

  8. Properties of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Copper Matrix Composites for Space Power Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.

    1992-01-01

    The thermal and mechanical properties of pitch-based graphite fiber reinforced copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites usable for space applications such as radiator fins were investigated. Thermal conductivity was measured as a function of fiber volume fraction and architecture. Results showed for unidirectional P-100 Gr/Cu composites, the longitudinal thermal conductivity was nearly independent of fiber volume fraction. Transverse thermal conductivities (perpendicular to the fibers) were strongly affected by the fiber volume fraction with higher volume fractions resulting in lower thermal conductivities. The effect of architecture on thermal conductivity followed the cosine squared law for simple architectures. Insufficient data are available currently to model more complex architectures, but adding fibers in the direction of the heat flow increases the thermal conductivity as low conductivity plies are supplemented by high conductivity plies. Thermal expansion tests were conducted on the Gr fibers and Gr/Cu composites. The results show a considerable thermal expansion mismatch between the fibers and the Cu matrix. The longitudinal thermal expansion showed a strong dependence on the architecture of the Gr/Cu composites. The composites also show a thermal expansion hysteresis. The hysteresis was eliminated by an engineered interface. Mechanical testing concentrated on the dynamic modulus and strength of the composites. The dynamic modulus of the Gr/Cu composites was 305 GPa up to 400 C, a value equivalent to Be. The strengths of the composites were less than expected, but this is attributed to the poor bond across the interface between the Gr fibers and Cu matrix. Testing of composites with an engineered interface is expected to yield strengths nearer the values predicted by the rule of mixtures.

  9. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbothermally Reduced of Fly Ash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamasri, Wildan, M. W.; Sulardjaka, Kusnanto

    2011-01-01

    The addition of fly ash into aluminum as reinforcement can potentially reduce the production cost and density of aluminum. However, mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composite reinforced by fly ash (MMC ALFA) have some limitations due to the characteristic of fly ash. In this study, a carbothermal reduction process of fly ash and activated carbon powder with particle size <32 μm was performed prior to produce MMC ALFA. The process was carried out in a furnace at 1300° C in vacuum condition under argon flow. Synthesis product was analyzed by XRD with Cu-Kα radiation. From XRD analysis, it shows that the synthesis process can produce SiC powder. The synthesis product was subsequently used as reinforcement particle. Aluminum powder was mixed with 5, 10 and 15% of the synthesized powder, and then uni-axially compacted at pressure of 300 MPa. The compacted product was sintered for 2 hours in argon atmosphere at temperature variation of 550 and 600° C. Flexural strength, hardness and density of MMC ALFA's product were respectively evaluated using a four point bending test method based on ASTM C1161 standard, Brinell hardness scale and Archimedes method. The result of this study shows that the increase of weight of reinforcement can significantly increase the hardness and flexural strength of MMCs. The highest hardness and flexural strength of the MMC product are 300 kg/mm2 and 107.5 MPa, respectively.

  10. Mechanical Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composite Reinforced by Carbothermally Reduced of Fly Ash

    SciTech Connect

    Jamasri; Wildan, M. W.; Sulardjaka; Kusnanto

    2011-01-17

    The addition of fly ash into aluminum as reinforcement can potentially reduce the production cost and density of aluminum. However, mechanical properties of aluminum matrix composite reinforced by fly ash (MMC ALFA) have some limitations due to the characteristic of fly ash. In this study, a carbothermal reduction process of fly ash and activated carbon powder with particle size <32 {mu}m was performed prior to produce MMC ALFA.The process was carried out in a furnace at 1300 deg. C in vacuum condition under argon flow. Synthesis product was analyzed by XRD with Cu-K{sub {alpha}} radiation. From XRD analysis, it shows that the synthesis process can produce SiC powder. The synthesis product was subsequently used as reinforcement particle. Aluminum powder was mixed with 5, 10 and 15% of the synthesized powder, and then uni-axially compacted at pressure of 300 MPa. The compacted product was sintered for 2 hours in argon atmosphere at temperature variation of 550 and 600 deg. C. Flexural strength, hardness and density of MMC ALFA's product were respectively evaluated using a four point bending test method based on ASTM C1161 standard, Brinell hardness scale and Archimedes method. The result of this study shows that the increase of weight of reinforcement can significantly increase the hardness and flexural strength of MMCs. The highest hardness and flexural strength of the MMC product are 300 kg/mm{sup 2} and 107.5 MPa, respectively.

  11. RC beams shear-strengthened with fabric-reinforced-cementitious-matrix (FRCM) composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loreto, Giovanni; Babaeidarabad, Saman; Leardini, Lorenzo; Nanni, Antonio

    2015-12-01

    The interest in retrofit/rehabilitation of existing concrete structures has increased due to degradation and/or introduction of more stringent design requirements. Among the externally-bonded strengthening systems fiber-reinforced polymers is the most widely known technology. Despite its effectiveness as a material system, the presence of an organic binder has some drawbacks that could be addressed by using in its place a cementitious binder as in fabric-reinforced cementitious matrix (FRCM) systems. The purpose of this paper is to evaluate the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams strengthened in shear with U-wraps made of FRCM. An extensive experimental program was undertaken in order to understand and characterize this composite when used as a strengthening system. The laboratory results demonstrate the technical viability of FRCM for shear strengthening of RC beams. Based on the experimental and analytical results, FRCM increases shear strength but not proportionally to the number of fabric plies installed. On the other hand, FRCM failure modes are related with a high consistency to the amount of external reinforcement applied. Design considerations based on the algorithms proposed by ACI guidelines are also provided.

  12. Solidification of SiC/Al fiber-reinforced metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ho, S.; Saigal, A. . Dept. of Mechanical Engineering)

    1994-08-01

    In recent years there has been considerable interest in the development and improvement of near net shape manufacturing processes for the fabrication of metal matrix composites (MMCs). Among the techniques available today, the solidification processing technique, including a casting process, provides the most direct route to a finished shape and stands out as potentially simple and economical. In the present study, the solidification of fiber-reinforced composites was investigated by means of the finite element method (FEM). The finite element formulation of general heat conduction equations is typically done by Galerkin's method, which is one of the weighted residual methods. Numerical results from FEM are compared with analytical solutions for the phase change problems. The interface between the solid and liquid phases and the temperature distribution in the composite are analyzed as a function of volume fraction of fibers. ABAQUS, a general purpose commercially available finite element code, was used in this study.

  13. Dislocation fiber interactions in short fiber reinforced metal matrix composites during creep and during thermal cycling

    SciTech Connect

    Eggeler, G.F.; Earthman, J.C.

    1997-12-22

    Short fiber reinforced metal matrix composites (SFR MMCs) are attractive engineering materials because they exhibit increased strength and wear resistance as compared to the fiber free matrix materials. For example, an aluminum alloy containing 15 volume percent of Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} fibers with average dimensions of 200 {micro}m length and 3 {micro}m diameter exhibits an improved creep strength with respect to the fiber free matrix. In addition to extended periods of isothermal and static creep loading high temperature components are subjected to temperature changes which are associated with thermal stresses. Thermal cycles can be due to start up and shut down events and can also be a consequence of anisothermal operating conditions. In short fiber reinforced aluminum alloys, in the stress and temperature range of interest, dislocation creep governs the deformation behavior of the MMC`s metallic matrix. It is therefore interesting to discuss the role of dislocations during creep and during thermal cycling of SFR MMCs. In the present paper the authors describe some basic dislocation mechanisms near the fiber/matrix-interface (FMI) of SFR MMCs. They first consider dislocation structures which are associated with the processing of SFR MMCs. Then dislocation processes which are associated with (1) static isothermal creep and (2) thermal cycling are discussed. Common and distinct features of the associated dislocation structures in the matrix zone near the FMI are highlighted. The authors then use the insight they have gained to qualitatively understand the role of dislocations in the macroscopic response of a SFR MMC under more complex load profiles.

  14. Influence of thermal residual stress on behaviour of metal matrix composites reinforced with particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán, R. E.; Hernández Arroyo, E.

    2016-02-01

    The properties of a metallic matrix composites materials (MMC's) reinforced with particles can be affected by different events occurring within the material in a manufacturing process. The existence of residual stresses resulting from the manufacturing process of these materials (MMC's) can markedly differentiate the curves obtained in tensile tests obtained from compression tests. One of the themes developed in this work is the influence of residual stresses on the mechanical behaviour of these materials. The objective of this research work presented is numerically estimate the thermal residual stresses using a unit cell model for the Mg ZC71 alloy reinforced with SiC particles with volume fraction of 12% (hot-forging technology). The MMC's microstructure is represented as a three dimensional prismatic cube-shaped with a cylindrical reinforcing particle located in the centre of the prism. These cell models are widely used in predicting stress/strain behaviour of MMC's materials, in this analysis the uniaxial stress/strain response of the composite can be obtained through the calculation using the commercial finite-element code.

  15. Specimen Preparation for Metal Matrix Composites with a High Volume Fraction of Reinforcing Particles for EBSD Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, A. S.; Belozerov, G. A.; Smirnova, E. O.; Konovalov, A. V.; Shveikin, V. P.; Muizemnek, O. Yu.

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with a procedure of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis of a metal matrix composite (MMC) with a high volume fraction of reinforcing particles. Unlike standard procedures of preparing a specimen surface for the EBSD analysis, the proposed procedure is iterative with consecutive application of mechanical and electrochemical polishing. This procedure significantly improves the results of an indexed MMC matrix in comparison with the standard procedure of specimen preparation. The procedure was verified on a MMC with pure aluminum (99.8% Al) as the matrix, SiC particles being used as reinforcing elements. The average size of the SiC particles is 14 μm, and their volume fraction amounts to 50% of the total volume of the composite. It has been experimentally found that, for making the EBSD analysis of a material matrix near reinforcing particles, the difference in height between the particles and the matrix should not exceed 2 µm.

  16. Influence of oxide reinforcement materials on high-temperatue oxidation resistance of Ni sub 3 A1 matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Tortorelli, P.F.; DeVan, J.H.; McKamey, C.G.; Howell, M.

    1990-01-01

    The oxidation resistance of Ni{sub 3}Al-based metal matrix composites was studied in high-temperature air under isothermal and thermal cycling conditions as a function of the composition and form of oxide reinforcement material. The incorporation of oxide fibers Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, or Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}--ZrO{sub 2} or particles into the Ni{sub 3}Al matrix led to oxidation rates significantly greater than that for the monolithic aluminide. The increase in susceptibility was primarily due to internal oxidation along the fiber- (or particle-) matrix interfaces and depended on the type of reinforcement material and its deposition in the matrix. The results suggest that the choice of reinforcement material and the method of materials processing will be important considerations in the design of oxidation-resistant Ni{sub 3}Al composites. 10 refs, 4 figs.

  17. Crashworthiness characteristics of a carbon fiber reinforced dual-phase epoxy–polyurea hybrid matrix composite

    DOE PAGES

    Zhou, Hongyu; Attard, Thomas L.; Dhiradhamvit, Kittinan; ...

    2014-11-07

    In this paper, the crashworthiness characteristics of rectangular tubes made from a Carbon-fiber reinforced Hybrid-Polymeric Matrix (CHMC) composite were investigated using quasi-static and impact crush tests. The hybrid matrix formulation of the CHMC was created by combining an epoxy-based thermosetting polymer with a lightly crosslinked polyurea elastomer at various cure-time intervals and volumetric ratios. The load–displacement responses of both CHMC and carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy (CF/epoxy) specimens were obtained under various crushing speeds; and crashworthiness parameters, such as the average crushing force and specific energy absorption (SEA), were calculated using subsequent load–displacement relationships. The CHMC maintained a high level of structuralmore » integrity and post-crush performance, relative to traditional CF/epoxy. The influence of the curing time and volumetric ratios of the polyurea/epoxy dual-hybridized matrix system on the crashworthiness parameters was also investigated. The results reveal that the load carrying capacity and total energy absorption tend to increase with greater polyurea thickness and lower elapsed reaction curing time of the epoxy although this is typically a function of the loading rate. In conclusion, the mechanism by which the CHMC provides increased damage tolerance was also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).« less

  18. Crashworthiness characteristics of a carbon fiber reinforced dual-phase epoxy–polyurea hybrid matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, Hongyu; Attard, Thomas L.; Dhiradhamvit, Kittinan; Wang, Yanli; Erdman, Donald

    2014-11-07

    In this paper, the crashworthiness characteristics of rectangular tubes made from a Carbon-fiber reinforced Hybrid-Polymeric Matrix (CHMC) composite were investigated using quasi-static and impact crush tests. The hybrid matrix formulation of the CHMC was created by combining an epoxy-based thermosetting polymer with a lightly crosslinked polyurea elastomer at various cure-time intervals and volumetric ratios. The load–displacement responses of both CHMC and carbon-fiber reinforced epoxy (CF/epoxy) specimens were obtained under various crushing speeds; and crashworthiness parameters, such as the average crushing force and specific energy absorption (SEA), were calculated using subsequent load–displacement relationships. The CHMC maintained a high level of structural integrity and post-crush performance, relative to traditional CF/epoxy. The influence of the curing time and volumetric ratios of the polyurea/epoxy dual-hybridized matrix system on the crashworthiness parameters was also investigated. The results reveal that the load carrying capacity and total energy absorption tend to increase with greater polyurea thickness and lower elapsed reaction curing time of the epoxy although this is typically a function of the loading rate. In conclusion, the mechanism by which the CHMC provides increased damage tolerance was also investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  19. The influence of reinforcement size on the microstructure and mechanical behavior of a nanostructured aluminum-based metal matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behm, Nathan Adam

    With increased availability and growing commercial applications, aluminum-based metal matrix composites show promise as high specific strength structural materials. Before they can be implemented however, they require thorough characterization and testing. A novel nanostructured aluminum-based metal matrix composite (MMC) was characterized through a combination of microstructural analysis and mechanical testing. Two composites were studied, an aluminum MMC reinforced with 50 nm boron carbide, (B4C) and an aluminum MMC reinforced with 500 nm boron carbide. Transmission electron microscopy (TEM) analysis revealed an ultra-fine grained matrix with grains on the order of 100--300 nm. The quasi-static and dynamic response of the composites was compared with the behavior of the unreinforced aluminum alloy, and it was found that the reinforcement resulted in a 30% improvement in strength. The decrease in the reinforcement size from 500 to 50 nm activated an additional strengthening mechanism, which further improved the strength of the MMC reinforced with the 50 nm B4C. Dynamic compression tests were performed at elevated temperatures up 400°C on the composites, and it was found that they exhibited impressive strengths considering the thermal softening prevalent in aluminum. The reinforcement size was found to play an important role in the strain softening exhibited at elevated temperature, fracture mechanism, and composite strength. Models to describe the composite behavior are presented.

  20. Process for the manufacture of seamless metal-clad fiber-reinforced organic matrix composite structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bluck, Raymond M. (Inventor); Bush, Harold G. (Inventor); Johnson, Robert R. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A process for producing seamless metal-clad composite structures includes providing a hollow, metallic inner member and an outer sleeve to surround the inner member and define an inner space therebetween. A plurality of continuous reinforcing fibers is attached to the distal end of the outside diameter of the inner member, and the inner member is then introduced, distal end first, into one end of the outer sleeve. The inner member is then moved, distal end first, into the outer sleeve until the inner member is completely enveloped by the outer sleeve. A liquid matrix material is then injected into the space containing the reinforcing fibers between the inner member and the outer sleeve. Next a pressurized heat transfer medium is passed through the inner member to cure the liquid matrix material. Finally, the wall thickness of both the inner member and the outer sleeve are reduced to desired dimensions by chemical etching, which adjusts the thermal expansion coefficient of the metal-clad composite structure to a desired value.

  1. Evolution of In-Situ Generated Reinforcement Precipitates in Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kar, S. K.; Catalina, A. V.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2004-01-01

    Due to certain inherent advantages, in-situ production of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have received considerable attention in the recent past. ln-situ techniques typically involve a chemical reaction that results in precipitation of a ceramic reinforcement phase. The size and spatial distribution of these precipitates ultimately determine the mechanical properties of these MMCs. In this paper we will investigate the validity of using classical growth laws and analytical expressions to describe the interaction between a precipitate and a solid-liquid interface (SLI) to predict the size and spatial evolution of the in-situ generated precipitates. Measurements made on size and distribution of Tic precipitates in a Ni&I matrix will be presented to test the validity of such an approach.

  2. Evolution of In-Situ Generated Reinforcement Precipitates in Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sen, S.; Kar, S. K.; Catalina, A. V.; Stefanescu, D. M.; Dhindaw, B. K.

    2004-01-01

    Due to certain inherent advantages, in-situ production of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) have received considerable attention in the recent past. ln-situ techniques typically involve a chemical reaction that results in precipitation of a ceramic reinforcement phase. The size and spatial distribution of these precipitates ultimately determine the mechanical properties of these MMCs. In this paper we will investigate the validity of using classical growth laws and analytical expressions to describe the interaction between a precipitate and a solid-liquid interface (SLI) to predict the size and spatial evolution of the in-situ generated precipitates. Measurements made on size and distribution of Tic precipitates in a Ni&I matrix will be presented to test the validity of such an approach.

  3. Mechanical properties of waste paper/jute fabric reinforced polyester resin matrix hybrid composites.

    PubMed

    Das, Sekhar

    2017-09-15

    Hybrid composites were prepared with jute fabric and un-shredded newspaper in polyester resin matrix. The experiment was designed 1:2 weights ratio jute and unshredded newspaper to have 42 (w/w)% fibre content hybrid composites and two different sequences jute/paper/jute and paper/jute/paper of waste newspaper and jute fabric arrangement. Reinforcing material is characterized by chemically, X-ray diffraction methods, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and tensile testing. The tensile, flexural and interlaminar shear strength and fracture surface morphology of composites were evaluated and compared. It was found that tensile and flexural properties of the hybrid composite are higher than that of pure paper-based composite but less than pure woven jute composite. The hybridization effect of woven jute fabric and layering pattern effect on mechanical properties of newspaper/woven jute fabric hybrid composites were studied. The test results of composites were analyzed by one-way ANOVA (α=0.05), it showed significant differences among the groups. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Micromechanical Modeling for Tensile Behaviour of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    The stress-strain curves of fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) exhibit obvious non-linear behaviour under tensile loading. The occurrence of multiple damage mechanisms, i.e., matrix multicracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers fracture, is the mainly reason for the non-linear characteristic. The micromechanics approach has been developed to predict the tensile stress-strain curves of unidirectional, cross-ply and woven CMCs. The shear-lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite. The damage models were used to determine the evolution of micro damage parameters, i.e., matrix crack spacing, interface debonded length and broken fibers fraction. By combining the shear-lag model with damage models and considering the effect of transverse multicracking in the 90° plies or transverse yarns in cross-ply or woven CMCs, the tensile stress-strain curves of unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D and 2.5D woven CMCs have been predicted. The results agreed with experimental data.

  5. Dry Sliding Wear Behaviour of Flyash Reinforced ZA-27 Alloy Based Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, S. C.; Krishna, M.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    In the present investigation, an attempt has been made to evaluate the wear rate of ZA-27 alloy composites reinforced with fly ash particles from 1 to 3 wt% in steps of 1 wt%. The compo-casting method has been used to fabricate the composites using Raichur fly ash of average size 3-5 microns. The wear specimens are tested under dry conditions using a pin-on-disc sliding wear testing machine with wear loads of 20-120 N in steps of 20 N, and the sliding distances in the range of 0.5 km to 2.5 km. The results indicate that the wear rate of the composites is less than that of the matrix alloy and it further decreases with the increase in fly ash content. However, the material loss in terms of wear rate and wear volume increases with the increase in load and sliding distance, both in the cases of composites and the matrix alloy. An increase in the applied load increases the wear severity by changing the wear mechanism from abrasion to particle-cracking induced delamination wear. It is found that with the increase in fly ash content, the wear resistance increases monotonically. The observations have been explained using scanning electron microscope (SEM) analysis of the worn surfaces of the composites.

  6. Effect of matrix on the dry friction coefficient of unidirectional fiber-reinforced composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vettegren, V. I.; Savitskii, A. V.; Lyashkov, A. I.; Mamalimov, R. I.

    2008-10-01

    The coefficients of dry rest (μ0) and sliding (μ s ) friction on a polished disk made of quenched steel have been measured for various polymer matrices and fibers and for a composite unidirectionally reinforced with poly(amidobenzimidazole) (PABI) fibers. It is established that μ0 > μ s for matrices and fibers with glass transition temperatures T g below room temperature T R , otherwise μ0 ≈ μ s . This effect is explained by a sharp growth in the plasticity of polymers at T g , which leads to an increase in the polymer-steel contact area. For a composite with T g > T R , the dry friction coefficients obey the relation μ0 ≈ μ s ≈ μ e / C, where μ e is the coefficients of sliding friction of PABI fibers and C is their concentration. For T g < T R (plastic matrix), the friction coefficients of the composite and matrix are close because the latter cannot hold the fiber ends during friction. As a result, they are bent and aligned along the matrix surface or embedded in the surface layer.

  7. Microstructure and microwave absorption properties of MWCNTs reinforced magnesium matrix composites fabriccated by FSP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yu-hua; Mao, Yu-qing; Xie, Ji-lin; Zhan, Zi-lin; Yu, Liang

    2017-01-01

    Multiwall carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) reinforced magnesium matrix (MWCNTs/Mg) composites were successfully fabricated by friction stir processing (FSP). Microstructure and microwave-absorption properties of WCNTs/Mg composites are studied. The results show that with increasing the MWCNTs content to 7.1% in volume fraction, the agglomeration of MWCNTs is found in the WCNTs/Mg composites. The addition of MWCNTs has little effect on microwave-absorption properties. With increasing the frequency from 2 GHz to 18 GHz, the microwave absorption of the composites decreases. Compared with the absorption loss of the MWCNTs, the reflection loss of base material takes the most part of the loss of the microwave, and the increase of the reflection loss can promote electromagnetic shielding properties of the composites. Moreover, the electromagnetic shielding properties of the composites are less than -85 dB in the lower frequency range from 0.1 MHz to 3 GHz. With increasing the content of MWCNTs, the electrical conductivity of the composites is decreased, and the electromagnetic shielding properties is slightly enhanced.

  8. A Brief Research Review for Improvement Methods the Wettability between Ceramic Reinforcement Particulate and Aluminium Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzaq, Alaa Mohammed; Majid, Dayang Laila Abang Abdul; Ishak, M. R.; B, Uday M.

    2017-05-01

    The development of new methods for addition fine ceramic powders to Al aluminium alloy melts, which would lead to more uniform distribution and effective incorporation of the reinforcement particles into the aluminium matrix alloy. Recently the materials engineering research has moved to composite materials from monolithic, adapting to the global need for lightweight, low cost, quality, and high performance advanced materials. Among the different methods, stir casting is one of the simplest ways of making aluminium matrix composites. However, it suffers from poor distribution and combination of the reinforcement ceramic particles in the metal matrix. These problems become significantly effect to reduce reinforcement size, more agglomeration and tendency with less wettability for the ceramic particles in the melt process. Many researchers have carried out different studies on the wettability between the metal matrix and dispersion phase, which includes added wettability agents, fluxes, preheating the reinforcement particles, coating the reinforcement particles, and use composting techniques. The enhancement of wettability of ceramic particles by the molten matrix alloy and the reinforcement particles distribution improvement in the solidified matrix is the main objective for many studies that will be discussed in this paper.

  9. Mechanical behavior of a continuous fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite subjected to transverse and thermal loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1991-01-01

    The transverse properties of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced by continuous alumina fibers were investigated. The composite is subjected to both mechanical and cyclic thermal loading. The results of an experimental program indicate that the shakedown concept of structural mechanics provides a means of describing the material behavior. When the loading conditions are within the shakedown region, the material finally responds in an elastic manner after initial plastic response, and for loading conditions outside the shakedown region, the material exhibits a rapid incremental plastic strain accumulation. The failure strain varies by an order of magnitude according to the operating conditions. Hence, for high mechanical and low thermal loading, the failure strains is small; for low mechanical and high thermal loading, the failure strain is large.

  10. Anodization Mechanism on SiC Nanoparticle Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by Power Metallurgy

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Sonia C.; Conde, Ana; Arenas, María A.; Rocha, Luis A.; Velhinho, Alexandre

    2014-01-01

    Specimens of aluminum-based composites reinforced by silicon carbide nanoparticles (Al/SiCnp) produced by powder metallurgy (PM) were anodized under voltage control in tartaric-sulfuric acid (TSA). In this work, the influence of the amount of SiCnp on the film growth during anodizing was investigated. The current density versus time response and the morphology of the porous alumina film formed at the composite surface are compared to those concerning a commercial aluminum alloy (AA1050) anodized under the same conditions. The processing method of the aluminum alloys influences the efficiency of the anodizing process, leading to a lower thicknesses for the unreinforced Al-PM alloy regarding the AA1050. The current density versus time response is strongly dependent on the amount of SiCnp. The current peaks and the steady-state current density recorded at each voltage step increases with the SiCnp volume fraction due to the oxidation of the SiCnp. The formation mechanism of the anodic film on Al/SiCnp composites is different from that occurring in AA1050, partly due the heterogeneous distribution of the reinforcement particles in the metallic matrix, but also to the entrapment of SiCnp in the anodic film. PMID:28788295

  11. Anodization Mechanism on SiC Nanoparticle Reinforced Al Matrix Composites Produced by Power Metallurgy.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Sonia C; Conde, Ana; Arenas, María A; Rocha, Luis A; Velhinho, Alexandre

    2014-12-19

    Specimens of aluminum-based composites reinforced by silicon carbide nanoparticles (Al/SiCnp) produced by powder metallurgy (PM) were anodized under voltage control in tartaric-sulfuric acid (TSA). In this work, the influence of the amount of SiCnp on the film growth during anodizing was investigated. The current density versus time response and the morphology of the porous alumina film formed at the composite surface are compared to those concerning a commercial aluminum alloy (AA1050) anodized under the same conditions. The processing method of the aluminum alloys influences the efficiency of the anodizing process, leading to a lower thicknesses for the unreinforced Al-PM alloy regarding the AA1050. The current density versus time response is strongly dependent on the amount of SiCnp. The current peaks and the steady-state current density recorded at each voltage step increases with the SiCnp volume fraction due to the oxidation of the SiCnp. The formation mechanism of the anodic film on Al/SiCnp composites is different from that occurring in AA1050, partly due the heterogeneous distribution of the reinforcement particles in the metallic matrix, but also to the entrapment of SiCnp in the anodic film.

  12. Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction...Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and Volume Fraction Ralph P. I. Adler and Daniel J. Snoha...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Characterization of Corrosion on Outdoor-Exposed Aluminum Metal-Matrix Composites as a Function of Reinforcement Specie and

  13. Jet Electrochemical Machining of Particle Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites with Different Neutral Electrolytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Martin, A.; Schubert, A.

    2016-03-01

    Conventional mechanical machining of particle reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) is challenging because the hard ceramic particles in the soft aluminum matrix lead to an increased tool wear. Furthermore, the mechanical and thermal impact during conventional machining affects the microstructure of the AMCs. Electrochemical machining (ECM) is an alternative method to machine AMCs. Based on anodic dissolution, ECM has a slight influence on the work piece material structure and is independent of material strength and hardness. So the microstructure of the work piece remains unaffected. One method of ECM is electrochemical machining with continuous electrolytic free jet (Jet-ECM). Hereby the electrochemical removal is localized by the geometry of the electrolyte jet. By moving the electrolyte jet micro-structures and microgeometries can be generated quickly and flexibly in metallic parts [1]. Another advantage of Jet-ECM is the low consumption of electrolyte which allows an easy and inexpensive change of electrolyte for investigations with different types of electrolyte. In this study AMCs reinforced with different amounts of SiC-particles are machined with two pH-neutral electrolytes using Jet-ECM. The results provide information about the suitability of the selected electrolytes for the machining of AMCs. In addition, the influence of the particle content on the electrochemical removal result will be evaluated.

  14. Dynamic tensile deformation behavior of Zr-based amorphous alloy matrix composites reinforced with tungsten or tantalum fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hyungsoo; Kim, Gyeong Su; Jeon, Changwoo; Sohn, Seok Su; Lee, Sang-Bok; Lee, Sang-Kwan; Kim, Hyoung Seop; Lee, Sunghak

    2016-07-01

    Zr-based amorphous alloy matrix composites reinforced with tungsten (W) or tantalum (Ta) continuous fibers were fabricated by liquid pressing process. Their dynamic tensile properties were investigated in relation with microstructures and deformation mechanisms by using a split Hopkinson tension bar. The dynamic tensile test results indicated that the maximum strength of the W-fiber-reinforced composite (757 MPa) was much lower than the quasi-statically measured strength, whereas the Ta-fiber-reinforced composite showed very high maximum strength (2129 MPa). In the W-fiber-reinforced composite, the fracture abruptly occurred in perpendicular to the tensile direction because W fibers did not play a role in blocking cracks propagated from the amorphous matrix, thereby resulting in abrupt fracture within elastic range and consequent low tensile strength. The very high dynamic tensile strength of the Ta-fiber-reinforced composite could be explained by the presence of ductile Ta fibers in terms of mechanisms such as (1) interrupted propagation of cracks initiated in the amorphous matrix, (2) formation of lots of cracks in the amorphous matrix, and (3) sharing of loads and severe deformation (necking) of Ta fibers in cracked regions.

  15. Effect of surface modification on carbon fiber and its reinforced phenolic matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Hua; Wang, Chengguo; Zhang, Shan; Lin, Xue

    2012-10-01

    In this work, polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fiber were chemically modified with H2SO4, KClO3 and silane coupling agent (γ-aminopropyltriethoxysilane, APS), and carbon fiber reinforced phenolic matrix composites were prepared. The structural and surface characteristics of the carbon fiber were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), laser Raman scattering (LRS) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). Single fiber mechanical properties, specific surface area, composite impact properties and interfacial shear strength (ILSS) were researched to indicate the effects of surface modification on fibers and the interaction between modified fiber surface and phenolic matrix. The results showed that carbon fiber surface modification by oxidation and APS can strengthen fiber surface chemical activity and enlarge the fiber surface area as well as its roughness. When carbon fiber (CF) is oxidized treatment, the oxygen content as well as the O/C ratio will be obviously increased. Oxygen functional groups increase with oxidation time increasing. Carbon fiber treated with APS will make Csbnd Osbnd R content increase and Osbnd Cdbnd O content decrease due to surface reaction. Proper treatment of carbon fiber with acid and silane coupling agent prove an effective way to increase the interfacial adhesion and improve the mechanical and outdoor performance of the resulting fiber/resin composites.

  16. A novel Al matrix composite reinforced by nano-AlNp network

    PubMed Central

    Ma, X.; Zhao, Y. F.; Tian, W. J.; Qian, Z.; Chen, H. W.; Wu, Y. Y.; Liu, X. F.

    2016-01-01

    In pursuit of lightweighting of automobiles and low emission of transportation, the efforts to develop high-strength, heat-resistant and fatigue-resistant Al alloys and/or composites have been ongoing. Here we report a novel Al matrix composite with ultrahigh strength reinforced by a three dimensional network of nano-AlN particles for the first time. The in-situ synthesized AlN particles are connected by twinning bonding chains and built up a three dimensional network strengthening Al matrix enormously like the skeleton to human body. The composite containing 16.4wt.% AlN particles shows excellent properties: the ultimate tensile strengths can be up to 518MPa at room temperature and 190MPa at 350 °C. This peculiar performance results from the novel spatial distribution of nano-scale AlN particles. Our findings in this work would help to develop a potential candidate for high-performance heat resistance light-metal based materials. PMID:27721417

  17. A novel Al matrix composite reinforced by nano-AlNp network.

    PubMed

    Ma, X; Zhao, Y F; Tian, W J; Qian, Z; Chen, H W; Wu, Y Y; Liu, X F

    2016-10-10

    In pursuit of lightweighting of automobiles and low emission of transportation, the efforts to develop high-strength, heat-resistant and fatigue-resistant Al alloys and/or composites have been ongoing. Here we report a novel Al matrix composite with ultrahigh strength reinforced by a three dimensional network of nano-AlN particles for the first time. The in-situ synthesized AlN particles are connected by twinning bonding chains and built up a three dimensional network strengthening Al matrix enormously like the skeleton to human body. The composite containing 16.4wt.% AlN particles shows excellent properties: the ultimate tensile strengths can be up to 518MPa at room temperature and 190MPa at 350 °C. This peculiar performance results from the novel spatial distribution of nano-scale AlN particles. Our findings in this work would help to develop a potential candidate for high-performance heat resistance light-metal based materials.

  18. Reuse of EAF Slag as Reinforcing Filler for Polypropylene Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cornacchia, G.; Agnelli, S.; Gelfi, M.; Ramorino, G.; Roberti, R.

    2015-06-01

    Electric-arc furnace (EAF) slag, the by-product of steel fabricated at the EAF, is in most cases still sent to dumps, with serious environmental consequences. This work shows an innovative, economically convenient application for EAF slag: its use as reinforcing filler for polypropylene. Composites based on polypropylene containing 10-40 wt.% of EAF slag particles were prepared by melt compounding followed by injection molding. A physical-chemical analysis of the EAF slag was performed to determine microstructural features and main component phases. Leaching tests demonstrated that, although EAF slag can release small amounts of toxic elements, such as heavy metals, incorporating such material into the polymeric matrix immobilizes the heavy metals inside that matrix. The mechanical characterization of the polymer-based composites was performed. Incorporating EAF slag particles raises the Young's modulus and the tensile strength at yield, whereas elongation at break and the impact strength of the polymer-based composite are significantly reduced only when large amounts of filler are added, i.e., 30% or more.

  19. A novel Al matrix composite reinforced by nano-AlNp network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, X.; Zhao, Y. F.; Tian, W. J.; Qian, Z.; Chen, H. W.; Wu, Y. Y.; Liu, X. F.

    2016-10-01

    In pursuit of lightweighting of automobiles and low emission of transportation, the efforts to develop high-strength, heat-resistant and fatigue-resistant Al alloys and/or composites have been ongoing. Here we report a novel Al matrix composite with ultrahigh strength reinforced by a three dimensional network of nano-AlN particles for the first time. The in-situ synthesized AlN particles are connected by twinning bonding chains and built up a three dimensional network strengthening Al matrix enormously like the skeleton to human body. The composite containing 16.4wt.% AlN particles shows excellent properties: the ultimate tensile strengths can be up to 518MPa at room temperature and 190MPa at 350 °C. This peculiar performance results from the novel spatial distribution of nano-scale AlN particles. Our findings in this work would help to develop a potential candidate for high-performance heat resistance light-metal based materials.

  20. Mechanics of interfaces in fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN ceramic matrix composites. [reaction bonded silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of continuous fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN composites with strong and weak interface characteristics is evaluated. Both catastrophic and noncatastrophic failures are observed in tensile specimens. Effects of fiber/matrix interface debonding (splitting) parallel to the fibers are discussed. Micromechanical models incorporating residual stresses to calculate the critical matrix cracking strength, ultimate strength and work of pull-out are reviewed and used to predict composite response. Experimental results are compared to analytical predictions.

  1. Effects of Interface Modification on Mechanical Behavior of Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1997-01-01

    Unidirectional celsian matrix composites having approx. 42 volume percent of uncoated or BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were tested in three-point bend at room temperature. The uncoated fiber-reinforced composites showed catastrophic failure with strength of 210 +/- 35 MPa and a flat fracture surface. In contrast, composites reinforced with BN/SiC-coated fibers exhibited graceful failure with extensive fiber pullout. Values of first matrix cracking stress and strain were 435 +/- 35 MPa and 0.27 +/- 0.01 %, respectively, with ultimate strength as high as 960 MPa. The elastic Young's modulus of the uncoated and BN/SiC-coated fiber-reinforced composites were measured as 184 q 4 GPa and 165 +/- 5 GPa, respectively. Fiber push-through tests and microscopic examination indicated no chemical reaction at the uncoated or coated fiber-matrix interface. The low strength of the uncoated fiber-reinforced composite is probably due to degradation of the fibers from mechanical surface damage during processing. Because both the coated and uncoated fiber reinforced composites exhibited weak interfaces, the beneficial effect of the BN-SiC dual layer is primarily the protection of fibers from mechanical damage during processing.

  2. Self-healing of damage in fibre-reinforced polymer-matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Hayes, S A; Zhang, W; Branthwaite, M; Jones, F R

    2007-04-22

    Self-healing resin systems have been discussed for over a decade and four different technologies had been proposed. However, little work on their application as composite matrices has been published although this was one of the stated aims of the earliest work in the field. This paper reports on the optimization of a solid-state self-healing resin system and its subsequent use as a matrix for high volume fraction glass fibre-reinforced composites. The resin system was optimized using Charpy impact testing and repeated healing, while the efficiency of healing in composites was determined by analysing the growth of delaminations following repeated impacts with or without a healing cycle. To act as a reference, a non-healing resin system was subjected to the same treatments and the results are compared with the healable system. The optimized resin system displays a healing efficiency of 65% after the first healing cycle, dropping to 35 and 30% after the second and third healing cycles, respectively. Correction for any healability due to further curing showed that approximately 50% healing efficiency could be achieved with the bisphenol A-based epoxy resin containing 7.5% of polybisphenol-A-co-epichlorohydrin. The composite, on the other hand, displays a healing efficiency of approximately 30%. It is therefore clear that the solid-state self-healing system is capable of healing transverse cracks and delaminations in a composite, but that more work is needed to optimize matrix healing within a composite and to develop a methodology for assessing recovery in performance.

  3. Acoustic emission during fatigue crack propagation in SiC particle reinforced Al matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Niklas, A.; Froyen, L.; Wevers, M.; Delaey, L.

    1995-12-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) behavior during fatigue propagation in aluminum 6061 and aluminum 6061 matrix composites containing 5, 10, and 20 wt pct SiC particle reinforcement was investigated under tension-tension fatigue loading. The purpose of this investigation was to monitor fatigue crack propagation by the AE technique and to identify the source(s) of AE. Most of the AEs detected were observed at the top of the load cycles. The cumulative number of AE events was found to correspond closely to the fatigue crack growth and to increase with increasing SiC content. Fractographic studies revealed an increasing number of fractured particles and to a lesser extent decohered particles on the fatigue fracture surface as the crack propagation rate (e.g., {Delta}K) or the SiC content was increased.

  4. Comprehensive properties of a novel fiber reinforced composite with a UEDMA-based resin matrix.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Meng; Matinlinna, Jukka Pekka; Botelho, Michael George; Säilynoja, Eija Sinikka

    2014-07-01

    The traditional fiber reinforced composite (FRC) contains bisphenol A glycidyl methacrylate (bis-GMA) in the resin matrix, which is thought to have some disadvantages. This research aimed at replacing bis-GMA with another monomer-urethane dimethacrylate (UEDMA), with the desired properties for dental use still retained. Four groups were prepared with light-curing (n = 30), one Control group with a bis-GMA-based resin matrix and three experimental groups with UEDMA-based matrices (Exper 1, Exper 2 and Exper 3 with a varying UEDMA weight percentage). Specimens were stored in dry conditions for 24 h or in deionized water for 1, 3, 6 or 12 months prior to the tests. Water sorption (n = 6), Vicker's hardness (n = 6) and flexural properties (n = 6) after each storage time were investigated. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) images were taken at the fracture sites after 3-point bending. All the results were statistically analyzed (α = 0.05). The Exper 1 group exhibited the lowest weight increase after water storage among the experimental groups. As for dry conditions, 1- and 6-month storage, different resin matrix compositions made no significant difference to hardness, while for 3- and 12-month storage, "Control" possessed the highest hardness. The Control group's strength and modulus, Exper 1 and Exper 2's modulus were stable during water storage. Compared to other experimental groups, Exper 1 had the highest strength and modulus values with most of the storage times. SEM images showed relatively good adhesion between the fiber and the matrix. With all the tested properties considered, the Exper 1 group had superior performance among all the three experimental groups.

  5. Matrix Dominated Failure of Fiber-Reinforced Composite Laminates Under Static and Dynamic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Joseph Daniel

    Hierarchical material systems provide the unique opportunity to connect material knowledge to solving specific design challenges. Representing the quickest growing class of hierarchical materials in use, fiber-reinforced polymer composites (FRPCs) offer superior strength and stiffness-to-weight ratios, damage tolerance, and decreasing production costs compared to metals and alloys. However, the implementation of FRPCs has historically been fraught with inadequate knowledge of the material failure behavior due to incomplete verification of recent computational constitutive models and improper (or non-existent) experimental validation, which has severely slowed creation and development. Noted by the recent Materials Genome Initiative and the Worldwide Failure Exercise, current state of the art qualification programs endure a 20 year gap between material conceptualization and implementation due to the lack of effective partnership between computational coding (simulation) and experimental characterization. Qualification processes are primarily experiment driven; the anisotropic nature of composites predisposes matrix-dominant properties to be sensitive to strain rate, which necessitates extensive testing. To decrease the qualification time, a framework that practically combines theoretical prediction of material failure with limited experimental validation is required. In this work, the Northwestern Failure Theory (NU Theory) for composite lamina is presented as the theoretical basis from which the failure of unidirectional and multidirectional composite laminates is investigated. From an initial experimental characterization of basic lamina properties, the NU Theory is employed to predict the matrix-dependent failure of composites under any state of biaxial stress from quasi-static to 1000 s-1 strain rates. It was found that the number of experiments required to characterize the strain-rate-dependent failure of a new composite material was reduced by an order of

  6. Nondestructive Evaluation of Advanced Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites: A Technology Assessment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yolken, H. Thomas; Matzkanin, George A.

    2009-01-01

    Because of their increasing utilization in structural applications, the nondestructive evaluation (NDE) of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites continues to receive considerable research and development attention. Due to the heterogeneous nature of composites, the form of defects is often very different from a metal and fracture mechanisms are more complex. The purpose of this report is to provide an overview and technology assessment of the current state-of-the-art with respect to NDE of advanced fiber reinforced polymer composites.

  7. Mechanical characterization of copper coated carbon nanotubes reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Maqbool, Adnan; Hussain, M. Asif; Khalid, F. Ahmad; Bakhsh, Nabi; Hussain, Ali; Kim, Myong Ho

    2013-12-15

    In this investigation, carbon nanotube (CNT) reinforced aluminum composites were prepared by the molecular-level mixing process using copper coated CNTs. The mixing of CNTs was accomplished by ultrasonic mixing and ball milling. Electroless Cu-coated CNTs were used to enhance the interfacial bonding between CNTs and aluminum. Scanning electron microscope analysis revealed the homogenous dispersion of Cu-coated CNTs in the composite samples compared with the uncoated CNTs. The samples were pressureless sintered under vacuum followed by hot rolling to promote the uniform microstructure and dispersion of CNTs. In 1.0 wt.% uncoated and Cu-coated CNT/Al composites, compared to pure Al, the microhardness increased by 44% and 103%, respectively. As compared to the pure Al, for 1.0 wt.% uncoated CNT/Al composite, increase in yield strength and ultimate tensile strength was estimated about 58% and 62%, respectively. However, in case of 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, yield strength and ultimate tensile strength were increased significantly about 121% and 107%, respectively. - Graphical Abstract: Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. Optimizing the plating bath to (1:1) by wt CNTs with Cu, thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm. Cu-coated CNTs developed the stronger interfacial bonding with the Al matrix which resulted in the efficient transfer of load. Highlights: • Copper coated CNTs were synthesized by the electroless plating process. • Thickness of Cu-coated CNTs has been reduced to 100 nm by optimized plating bath. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, microhardness increased by 103%. • Cu-coated CNTs transfer load efficiently with stronger interfacial bonding. • In 1.0 wt.% Cu-coated CNT/Al composite, Y.S and UTS increased by 126% and 105%.

  8. Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hunt, Warren; Herling, Darrell R.

    2004-02-01

    Metal matrix composites comprise a relatively wide range of materials defined by the metal matrix, reinforcement type, and reinforcement geometry. In the area of the matrix, most metallic systems have been explored for use in metal matrix composites, including Al, Be, Mg, Ti, Fe, Ni, Co, and Ag. By far, the largest usage is in aluminum matrix composites. From a reinforcement perspective, the materials used are typically ceramics since they provide a very desirable combination of stiffness, strength, and relatively low density. Candidate reinforcement materials include SiC, Al2O3, B4C, TiC, TiB2, graphite, and a number of other ceramics. In addition, there has been work on metallic materials as reinforcements, notably W and steel fibers. The morphology of the reinforcement material is another variable of importance in metal matrix composites. The three major classes of reinforcement morphology are continuous fiber, chopped fiber or whisker, and particulate. Typically, the selection of the reinforcement morphology is determined by the desired property/cost combination. Generally, continuous fiber reinforced MMCs provide the highest properties in the direction of the fiber orientation but are the most expensive. Chopped fiber and whisker reinforced materials can produce significant property improvements in the plane or direction of their orientation, at somewhat lower cost. Particulates provide a comparatively more moderate but isotropic increase in properties and are typically available at the lowest cost. By adding to the three variables of metallic matrix, reinforcement material, and reinforcement morphology the further options of reinforcement volume fraction, orientation, and matrix alloy composition and heat treatment, it is apparent that there is a very wide range of available material combinations and resultant properties. This paper will focus on how MMCs have been applied in specific application areas.

  9. The effect of matrix microstructure and reinforcement shape on the creep deformation of near-{gamma} titanium aluminide composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kampe, S.L.; Christodoulou, J.; Feng, C.R.; Michel, D.J.; Christodoulou, L.

    1998-05-01

    The influences of composite matrix microstructure, reinforcement shape, and processing methodology have been evaluated for a series of near-gamma (Ti{sub 3}Al + TiAl) titanium aluminide matrix composites evaluated in tension and tensile-creep at 800 C. Specifically, heat treatments were imposed to evolve either fully-equiaxed or fully-lamellar composite matrices containing either dispersed particulate or high-aspect-ratio short-fiber boride reinforcement. The results indicate that the highest creep rates are associated with composites containing particulate reinforcement in equiaxed matrices, whereas the lowest rates were obtained for short-fiber reinforcement in lamellar matrices. The mechanisms controlling creep deformation are observed to rely only on the morphology and details of the matrix microstructure and are independent of the type and shape of the reinforcing phase. The enhanced work hardening tendencies of the lamellar microstructure is shown to improve creep resistance as manifested by a reduced steady state creep rate as well as prolonging primary creep to higher values of accumulated strain.

  10. Fracture behavior of reinforced aluminum alloy matrix composites using thermal imaging tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avdelidis, N. P.; Exarchos, D.; Vazquez, P.; Ibarra-Castanedo, C.; Sfarra, S.; Maldague, X. P. V.; Matikas, T. E.

    2016-05-01

    In this work the influence of the microstructure at the vicinity of the interface on the fracture behavior of particulate-reinforced aluminum alloy matrix composites (Al/SiCp composites) is studied by using thermographic tools. In particular, infrared thermography was used to monitor the plane crack propagation behavior of the materials. The deformation of solid materials is almost always accompanied by heat release. When the material becomes deformed or is damaged and fractured, a part of the energy necessary to initiate and propagate the damage is transformed in an irreversible way into heat. The thermal camera detects the heat wave, generated by the thermo-mechanical coupling and the intrinsic dissipated energy during mechanical loading of the sample. By using an adapted detector, thermography records the two dimensional "temperature" field as it results from the infrared radiation emitted by the object. The principal advantage of infrared thermography is its noncontact, non-destructive character. This methodology is being applied to characterise the fracture behavior of the particulate composites. Infrared thermography is being used to monitor the plane crack propagation behavior of such materials. Furthermore, an innovative approach to use microscopic measurements using IR microscopic lenses was attempted, in order to enable smaller features (in the micro scale) to be imaged with accuracy and assurance.

  11. Carbon Nanotubes Reinforced Composites for Biomedical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo. PMID:24707488

  12. Carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Zhu, Yuhe; Liao, Susan; Li, Jiajia

    2014-01-01

    This review paper reported carbon nanotubes reinforced composites for biomedical applications. Several studies have found enhancement in the mechanical properties of CNTs-based reinforced composites by the addition of CNTs. CNTs reinforced composites have been intensively investigated for many aspects of life, especially being made for biomedical applications. The review introduced fabrication of CNTs reinforced composites (CNTs reinforced metal matrix composites, CNTs reinforced polymer matrix composites, and CNTs reinforced ceramic matrix composites), their mechanical properties, cell experiments in vitro, and biocompatibility tests in vivo.

  13. The Mechanics of Creep Deformation in Polymer Derived Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lara-Curzio, E.

    2001-01-30

    The objective of this Cooperative Research and Development Agreement between Lockheed Martin Energy Research Corporation and Dow Corning Corporation was to study the effects of temperature, stress, fiber type and fiber architecture on the time-dependent deformation and stress-rupture behavior of polymer-derived ceramic matrix composites developed by the Dow Corning Corporation. Materials reinforced with CG-Nicalon{trademark}, Hi-Nicalon{trademark} and Sylramic{reg_sign} fibers were evaluated under fast fracture, stress-relaxation, and stress-rupture conditions at temperatures between 700 C and 1400 C in ambient air and for stresses between 50 and 200 MPa. Some of the stress-rupture tests conducted as part of this program are among the longest-duration experiments ever conducted with these materials. The possibility of using accelerated test techniques to evaluate the very-long term stress-rupture/creep behavior of these materials was investigated by means of stress-relaxation experiments. However it was found that because these materials exhibit non-linear stress-strain behavior at stresses larger than the matrix cracking stress and because of environmentally-induced changes in the micro and mesostructure of the material, particularly at elevated temperatures, this approach is impractical. However, the results of stress-relaxation experiments will be useful to predict the behavior of these materials in applications where stresses are thermally-induced and therefore driven by strains (e.g., when components are subjected to thermal gradients). The evolution of the microstructure of the fibers, matrix and fiber-matrix interface was studied as a function of stress and temperature, using analytical electron microscopy. The results from these analyses were essential to understand the relationships between environment, stress, temperature and processing on the microstructure and properties of these materials.

  14. Effect of Size, Content and Shape of Reinforcements on the Behavior of Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) Under Tension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paknia, A.; Pramanik, A.; Dixit, A. R.; Chattopadhyaya, S.

    2016-10-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the mechanical behavior of metal matrix composites (MMCs) 6061 aluminum, reinforced with silicon carbide particles, under unidirectional tensile loading by finite element analysis. The effects of particle's shape, size and content on the tensile properties of the composites were studied and compared with each other. In addition, stress and strain distributions and possible particle fracture or debonding were investigated. It was found that, among different shapes, a certain shape of reinforcement particle provided better tensile properties for MMCs and, within each shape category, composites with smaller particle size and higher particle content (20%) also showed better properties. It was also found that when the reinforcement content was 10%, the effects of shape and size of the particles were negligible. Not only interfacial length between the reinforcement and matrix materials, but also state of matrix material, due to the presence of the reinforcement particles, affected the stiffness of the MMCs. In almost all of the cases, except for MMCs with triangular particles, when the stress increased, with the increase in the applied positive displacement, the stress distributions remained unchanged.

  15. Characterization and modeling of three-dimensional self-healing shape memory alloy-reinforced metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Pingping; Cui, Zhiwei; Kesler, Michael S.; Newman, John A.; Manuel, Michele V.; Wright, M. Clara; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2016-09-10

    In this paper, three-dimensional metal-matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced by shape memory alloy (SMA) wires are modeled and simulated, by adopting an SMA constitutive model accounting for elastic deformation, phase transformation and plastic behavior. A modeling method to create composites with pre-strained SMA wires is also proposed to improve the self-healing ability. Experimental validation is provided with a composite under three-point bending. This modeling method is applied in a series of finite element simulations to investigate the self-healing effects in pre-cracked composites, especially the role of the SMA reinforcement, the softening property of the matrix, and the effect of pre-strain in the SMA. The results demonstrate that SMA reinforcements provide stronger shape recovery ability than other, non-transforming materials. The softening property of the metallic matrix and the pre-strain in SMA are also beneficial to help crack closure and healing. This modeling approach can serve as an efficient tool to design SMA-reinforced MMCs with optimal self-healing properties that have potential applications in components needing a high level of reliability.

  16. Lifetime Response of a Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Melt-Infiltrated SiC Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Becher, P.F.; Lin, H.T.; Singh, M.

    1999-04-25

    Lifetime studies in four-point flexure were performed on a Hi-NicalonTM fiber-reinforced SiC matrix composite over a temperature range of 700 degrees to 1150 degrees C in air. The composite consisted of ~40 vol. % Hi-NicalonTM fiber (8-harness weave) with a 0.5 Mu-m BN fiber coating and a melt-infiltration SiC matrix wand was tested with as-machined surfaces. Lifetime results indicated that the composite exhibited a stress-dependent lifetime at stress levels above an apparent fatigue limit, similar to the trend observed in CG-NicalonTM fiber reinforced CVI SiC matrix composites. At less than or equal to 950 degrees C, the lifetimes of Hi-Nicalon/MI SiC composites decreased with increasing applied stress level and test temperature. However, the lifetimes were extended as test temperature increased from 950 degees to 1150 degrees C as a result of surface crack sealing due to glass formation by the oxidation of Mi SiC matrix. The lifetime governing processes were, in general, attributed to the progressive oxidation of BN fiber coating and formation of glassy phase, which formed a strong bond between fiber and matrix, resulting in embrittlement of the composite with time.

  17. Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of Electroless Ni-Plated Short Carbon Fiber Reinforced Geopolymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Tiesong; Jia, Dechang

    Electroless Ni-plated short carbon fiber reinforced geopolymer matrix composites with various carbon fiber/matrix interface coating thicknesses have been successfully fabricated. The influences of coating thickness on the mechanical properties and fracture behavior have been investigated by three-point bending test and scanning electron microscopy. The flexural strength and Young's modulus of Ni-plated short carbon fiber reinforced geopolymer composites exhibit maximums as the average fiber coating thickness increases, but the work of fracture has a sharp decrease, and the fracture manner changes from ductile to brittle. This is mainly attributed to the fact that the carbon fibers favor breakage rather than pulling-out during loading because of the higher interface bonding strength of fiber/matrix, and pliability of the carbon fibers decreases with the increase of the coating thickness.

  18. Mechanical Properties of SiC, Al2O3 Reinforced Aluminium 6061-T6 Hybrid Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murugan, S. Senthil; Jegan, V.; Velmurugan, M.

    2017-06-01

    This paper contains the investigation of tensile, compression and impact characterization of SiC, Al2O3 reinforced Aluminium 6061-T6 matrix hybrid composite. Hybrid matrix composite fabrication was done by stir casting method. An attempt has been made by keeping Al2O3 percentage (7%) constant and increasing SiC percentage (10, 15, and 20%). After fabricating, the samples were prepared and tested to find out the various mechanical properties like tensile, compressive, and impact strength of the developed composites of different weight % of silicon carbide and Alumina in Aluminium alloy. The main objective of the study is to compare the values obtained and choose the best composition of the hybrid matrix composite from the mechanical properties point of view.

  19. Fatigue damage growth mechanisms in continuous fiber reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Naik, R. A.; Pollock, W. D.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fiber/matrix interface strength, residual thermal stresses, and fiber and matrix properties on fatigue damage accumulation in continuous fiber metal matrix composites (MMC) is discussed. Results from titanium matrix silicon carbide fiber composites is the primary topic of discussion. Results were obtained from both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The stress in the 0 deg fibers was identified as the controlling factor in fatigue life. Fatigue of the notched specimens indicated that cracks can grow in the matrix materials without breaking fibers.

  20. Fatigue damage growth mechanisms in continuous fiber reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Naik, R. A.; Pollock, W. D.

    1990-01-01

    The role of fiber/matrix interface strength, residual thermal stresses, and fiber and matrix properties on fatigue damage accumulation in continuous fiber metal matrix composites (MMC) will be discussed. Results from titanium matrix/silicon-carbide fiber composites will be the primary topic of discussion. Results have been obtained from both notched and unnotched specimens at room and elevated temperatures. The stress in the 0 deg fibers has been indentified as the controlling factor in fatigue life. Fatigue of the notched specimens indicated that cracks can grow many fiber spacings in the matrix materials without breaking fibers.

  1. Improvement of Wear Resistance in Alumina Matrix Composites Reinforced with Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Wan; Chung, Won Sub; Sohn, Kee-Sun; Son, Chang-Young; Lee, Sunghak

    2010-02-01

    Alumina matrix composites reinforced with carbon nanotubes (CNTs) fabricated by CNT purification, mixing, compaction, and sintering processes, and the effects of the CNT addition on wear resistance were investigated in relation to the relative density, hardness, and fracture toughness. Wear resistance and fracture toughness were measured by the dry sliding wear test method and the indentation fracture test method, respectively. Zero to ~3 vol pct of CNTs were homogeneously distributed in the composites, although some pores existed. The wear resistance and fracture toughness increased with an increasing CNT fraction, but the composite specimen containing 3.0 vol pct of CNTs hardly showed an increase over the specimen containing 2.25 vol pct of CNTs. Observations of worn surfaces revealed that the wear mechanism involved both the abrasive and delamination wear modes in the specimens containing 0 to ~0.75 vol pct of CNTs, whereas the surface was worn largely in an abrasive wear mode in the specimens containing 1.5 to ~3.0 vol pct of CNTs. This was because CNTs helped to change the delamination wear mode to the abrasive wear mode by preventing crack initiation and propagation at alumina grains. The fracture toughness increase provided beneficial effects in the resistance to crack initiation and propagation, the reduction in delamination wear on the worn surface, and the consequent improvement in wear resistance. Because the effect of the porosity increase due to the CNT addition unfavorably affected the improvement of wear resistance and fracture toughness in the specimen containing 3.0 vol pct of CNTs, the appropriate level of CNT fraction was 1.5 to ~2.25 vol pct.

  2. Evaluation of the Technical-Economic Potential of Particle- Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites and Electrochemical Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schubert, A.; Götze, U.; Hackert-Oschätzchen, M.; Lehnert, N.; Herold, F.; Meichsner, G.; Schmidt, A.

    2016-03-01

    Compared to conventional cutting, the processing of materials by electrochemical machining offers some technical advantages like high surface quality, no thermal or mechanical impact on the work piece and preservation of the microstructure of the work piece material. From the economic point of view, the possibility of process parallelization and the absence of any process-related tool wear are mentionable advantages of electrochemical machining. In this study, based on experimental results, it will be evaluated to what extent the electrochemical machining is technically and economically suitable for the finish-machining of particle- reinforced aluminum matrix composites (AMCs). Initial studies showed that electrochemical machining - in contrast to other machining processes - has the potential to fulfil demanding requirements regarding precision and surface quality of products or components especially when applied to AMCs. In addition, the investigations show that processing of AMCs by electrochemical machining requires less energy than the electrochemical machining of stainless steel. Therefore, an evaluation of electrochemically machined AMCs - compared to stainless steel - from a technical and an economic perspective will be presented in this paper. The results show the potential of electro-chemically machined AMCs and contribute to the enhancement of instruments for technical-economic evaluations as well as a comprehensive innovation control.

  3. Structure and properties of a pulp fibre-reinforced composite with regenerated cellulose matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gindl, W.; Schöberl, T.; Keckes, J.

    2006-04-01

    Fully bio-based cellulose cellulose composites were produced by partly dissolving beech pulp fibres in lithium chloride/dimethylacetamide (LiCl/DMAc) and subsequent regeneration of matrix cellulose in the presence of undissolved fibres. Compared to cellulose epoxy composites produced from the same fibres, a two-fold increase in tensile strength and elastic modulus was observed for cellulose cellulose composites. From scanning electron microscopy and nanoindentation it is concluded that changes in the fibre cell wall during LiCl/DMAc treatment, improved matrix properties of regenerated cellulose compared to epoxy, and improved fibre matrix adhesion are responsible for the superior properties of cellulose cellulose composites.

  4. The correlation of low-velocity impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with matrix properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1986-01-01

    Summarized are basic studies that were conducted to correlate the impact resistance of graphite-fiber-reinforced composites with polymer matrix properties. Three crosslinked epoxy resins and a linear polysulfone were selected as composite matrices. As a group, these resins possess a significantly large range of mechanical properties. The mechanical properties of the resins and their respective composites were measured. Neat resin specimens and unidirectional and crossply composite specimens were impact tested with an instrumented dropweight tester. Impact resistances of the specimens were assessed on the basis of loading capability, energy absorption, and extent of damage.

  5. Effect of Matrix Multicracking on the Hysteresis Loops of Carbon-Fiber-Reinforced Cross-Ply Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L. B.

    2017-01-01

    The effect of matrix multicracking on the stress-strain hysteresis loops of cross-ply C/SiC ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) under cyclic loading/unloading was investigated. When matrix multicracking and fiber/matrix interface debonding occur in the 0° plies, fiber slipping relative to the matrix in the debonded region of interface is the mainly reason for occurrence of the loops. The interfacial slip lengths, i.e., the debonded lengths of interface are determined, with consideration of matrix multicracking in the 90° and 0° plies, by using the fracture mechanics approach. The effects of peak stress, fiber volume content, fiber/matrix interfacial shear stress, and number of cycles on the hysteresis loops are analyzed. The stress-strain hysteresis loops of cross-ply C/SiC composites corresponding to different peak stresses and numbers of cycles are predicted.

  6. Processing, compatibility and oxidation of diboride-reinforced oxide matrix composites for ultrahigh-temperature applications

    SciTech Connect

    Abada, A.

    1990-01-01

    Promising results for the development of a ceramic/ceramic composite to be used for structural applications in the ultra high temperature range (1650 to 1850 C) were obtained for alumina reinforced with titanium or zirconium diboride coated with molybdenum disilicide. Calculations of the compatibility and stability of oxide matrices with the diborides in vacuum showed positive energies of formation, indicating suitability of reinforcement of alumina under vacuum conditions. Stability and chemical compatibility of the particulate and ternary composites in their as hot pressed states and following their vacuum and air oxidation treatment were characterized.

  7. Microstructural study and densification analysis of hot work tool steel matrix composites reinforced with TiB{sub 2} particles

    SciTech Connect

    Fedrizzi, A.; Pellizzari, M.; Zadra, M.; Marin, E.

    2013-12-15

    Hot work tool steels are characterized by good toughness and high hot hardness but are less wear resistant than other tooling materials, such as high speed steel. Metal matrix composites show improved tribological behavior, but not much work has been done in the field of hot work tool steels. In this paper TiB{sub 2}-reinforced hot work tool steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering (SPS). Mechanical alloying (MA) was proposed as a suited process to improve the composite microstructure. Density measurements and microstructure confirmed that MA promotes sintering and produces a fine and homogeneous dispersion of reinforcing particles. X-ray diffraction patterns of the sintered composites highlighted the formation of equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC, as predicted by thermodynamic calculations using Thermo-Calc® software. Scanning electron microscopy as well as scanning Kelvin probe force microscopy highlighted the reaction of the steel matrix with TiB{sub 2} particles, showing the formation of a reaction layer at the TiB{sub 2}-steel interface. Phase investigations pointed out that TiB{sub 2} is not chemically stable in steel matrix because of the presence of carbon even during short time SPS. - Highlights: • TiB{sub 2} reinforced steel matrix composites were produced by spark plasma sintering. • TiB{sub 2} was successfully dispersed in the steel matrix by mechanical alloying. • Steel and TiB{sub 2} react during sintering forming equilibrium Fe{sub 2}B and TiC. • The new phases were investigated by means of AFM, Volta potential and XRD analyses.

  8. Interphase for ceramic matrix composites reinforced by non-oxide ceramic fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DiCarlo, James A. (Inventor); Bhatt, Ramakrishna (Inventor); Morscher, Gregory N. (Inventor); Yun, Hee-Mann (Inventor)

    2008-01-01

    A ceramic matrix composite material is disclosed having non-oxide ceramic fibers, which are formed in a complex fiber architecture by conventional textile processes; a thin mechanically weak interphase material, which is coated on the fibers; and a non-oxide or oxide ceramic matrix, which is formed within the interstices of the interphase-coated fiber architecture. During composite fabrication or post treatment, the interphase is allowed to debond from the matrix while still adhering to the fibers, thereby providing enhanced oxidative durability and damage tolerance to the fibers and the composite material.

  9. Hot Extrusion of A356 Aluminum Metal Matrix Composite with Carbon Nanotube/Al2O3 Hybrid Reinforcement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, H. H.; Babu, J. S. S.; Kang, C. G.

    2014-05-01

    Over the years, the attention of material scientists and engineers has shifted from conventional composite materials to nanocomposite materials for the development of light weight and high-performance devices. Since the discovery of carbon nanotubes (CNTs), many researchers have tried to fabricate metal matrix composites (MMCs) with CNT reinforcements. However, CNTs exhibit low dispersibility in metal melts owing to their poor wettability and large surface-to-volume ratio. The use of an array of short fibers or hybrid reinforcements in a preform could overcome this problem and enhance the dispersion of CNTs in the matrix. In this study, multi-walled CNT/Al2O3 preform-based aluminum hybrid composites were fabricated using the infiltration method. Then, the composites were extruded to evaluate changes in its mechanical properties. In addition, the dispersion of reinforcements was investigated using a hardness test. The required extrusion pressure of hybrid MMCs increased as the Al2O3/CNT fraction increased. The deformation resistance of hybrid material was over two times that of the original A356 aluminum alloy material due to strengthening by the Al2O3/CNTs reinforcements. In addition, an unusual trend was detected; primary transition was induced by the hybrid reinforcements, as can be observed in the pressure-displacement curve. Increasing temperature of the material can help increase formability. In particular, temperatures under 623 K (350 °C) and over-incorporating reinforcements (Al2O3 20 pct, CNTs 3 pct) are not recommended owing to a significant increase in the brittleness of the hybrid material.

  10. Effect of cutting parameters on surface finish and machinability of graphite reinforced Al-8011 matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anil, K. C.; Vikas, M. G.; Shanmukha Teja, B.; Sreenivas Rao, K. V.

    2017-04-01

    Many materials such as alloys, composites find their applications on the basis of machinability, cost and availability. In the present work, graphite (Grp) reinforced Aluminium 8011 is synthesized by convention stir casting process and Surface finish & machinability of prepared composite is examined by using lathe tool dynamometer attached with BANKA Lathe by varying the machining parameters like spindle speed, Depth of cut and Feed rate in 3 levels. Also, Roughness Average (Ra) of machined surfaces is measured by using Surface Roughness Tester (Mitutoyo SJ201). From the studies it is cleared that mechanical properties of a composites increases with addition of Grp and The cutting force were decreased with the reinforcement percentage and thus increases the machinability of composites and also results in increased surface finish.

  11. Mechanical characterization and modeling of non-linear deformation and fracture of a fiber reinforced metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic mechanical behavior of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced with continuous alumina fibers was determined experimentally. The mechanical behavior of the composite were modeled by assuming that the composite has a periodical microstructure. The resulting unit cell problem was solved with the finite element method. Excellent agreement was found between theoretically predicted and measured stress-strain responses for various tensile and shear loadings. The stress-strain responses for transverse and inplane shear were found to be identical and this will provide a simplification of the constitutive equations for the composite. The composite has a very low ductility in transverse tension and a limited ductility in transverse shear that was correlated to high hydrostatic stresses that develop in the matrix. The shape of the initial yield surface was calculated and good agreement was found between the calculated shape and the experimentally determined shape.

  12. Fabrication and Characterization of Squeezed Cast Aluminum Matrix Composites Containing Boride Reinforcements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olaya-Luengas, L.; Estremera-Pérez, E.; Muñoz, L.; Suárez, O. M.

    2010-12-01

    Aluminum alloys containing 2 and 4 wt.% copper reinforced with aluminum dodecaborides were successfully fabricated by squeeze casting employing pressures up to 62 MPa. The distribution of reinforcements throughout the composites was quantified, whereas the effect of pressure on the composites density and hardness was determined. In addition, the reinforcement chemical stability was examined using high-temperature x-ray diffraction which permitted to confirm the formation of AlB2 phase a result of AlB12 decomposition. The pressure effect on the squeezed composites was investigated by optical microscopy, Vickers microhardness testing, superficial Rockwell hardness testing, and differential thermal analysis. At the highest applied pressures, the castings density increased when the shrinkage porosity was practically eliminated. The composite superficial hardness improved by increasing the applied squeeze. The indirect squeeze cast technique caused Al2Cu phase segregation to upper regions of the specimens, while conversely, the AlB12 reinforcements segregated preferentially at lower regions of the casting.

  13. Failure Characterization of a Fiber Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composite with Circular Holes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    cyanoacrylate glue , one at the side of the hole (on the axis normal to the load direction) and one centered 0.9 cm from the center of the hole, midway between the...such as FormicaT), concrete reinforced with steel rods, and steel-belted tires. Even in nature, wood is a composite material, with cellulose fibers bound

  14. Styrene-terminated polysulfone oligomers as matrix material for graphite reinforced composites: An initial study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Dana; Bowles, Kenneth J.; Vannucci, Raymond D.

    1987-01-01

    Styrene terminated polysulfone oligomers are part of an oligomeric class of compounds with end groups capable of thermal polymerization. These materials can be used as matrices for graphite reinforced composites. The initial evaluation of styrene terminated polysulfone oligomer based composites are summarized in terms of fabrication methods, and mechanical and environmental properties. In addition, a description and evaluation is provided of the NASA/Industry Fellowship Program for Technology Transfer.

  15. Approach to In- Situ Producing Reinforcing Phase Within an Active-Transient Liquid Phase Bond Seam for Aluminum Matrix Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guifeng; Liao, Xianjin; Chen, Bo; Zhang, Linjie; Zhang, Jianxun

    2015-06-01

    To optimize the braze composition design route for aluminum matrix composite, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the transient liquid phase bond seam matrix, by adding active melting point increaser (MPI, e.g., Ti) together with general melting point depressant (MPD, e.g., Cu) into the interlayer, was demonstrated. For SiC p /A356 composite, by comparing the wettability, joint microstructure, joint shear strength, and fracture path for the developed Al-19Cu-1Ti, Al-19Cu, Al-33Cu-1Ti, Al-33Cu (wt pct), and commercial Cu foils as interlayer, the feasibility of in situ producing reinforcing phase within the bond seam by adding Ti was demonstrated. Especially for Al-19Cu-1Ti active braze, small and dispersed ternary aluminide of Al-Si-Ti phase was obtained within the bond seam as in situ reinforcement, leading to a favorable fracture path within SiC p /A356, not along the initial interface or within the bond seam. For the formation mechanism of the in situ reinforcing phase of MPI-containing intermetallic compound within the bond seam, a model of repeating concentration-precipitation-termination-engulfment during isothermal solidification is proposed.

  16. Reduction of thermal stresses in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites with interface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1992-01-01

    The potential of using interface layer to reduce thermal stresses in the matrix of composites with a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion of fiber and matrix has been investigated. It was found that compliant layers, with properties of readily available materials, do not have the potential to reduce thermal stresses significantly. However, interface layers with high coefficient of thermal expansion can compensate for the mismatch and reduce thermal stresses in the matrix significantly.

  17. Reduction of thermal stresses in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites with interface layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.; Leckie, F. A.

    1990-01-01

    The potential of using an interface layer to reduce thermal stresses in the matrix of composites with a mismatch in coefficients of thermal expansion of fiber and matrix was investigated. It was found that compliant layers, with properties of readily available materials, do not have the potential to reduce thermal stresses significantly. However, interface layers with high coefficient of thermal expansion can compensate for the mismatch and reduce thermal stresses in the matrix significantly.

  18. Understanding the interdiffusion behavior and determining the long term stability of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium-base matrix composite systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tien, John K.

    1990-01-01

    The long term interdiffusional stability of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium alloy composites is addressed. The matrix alloy that is most promising for use as a high temperature structural material for reliable long-term space power generation is Nb1Zr. As an ancillary project to this program, efforts were made to assess the nature and kinetics of interphase reaction between selected beryllide intermetallics and nickel and iron aluminides.

  19. Thermal diffusivity of Al-Mg based metallic matrix composite reinforced with Al2O3 ceramic particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cruz-Orea, A.; Morales, J. E.; Saavedra S, R.; Carrasco, C.

    2010-03-01

    Thermal diffusivities of Al-Mg based metallic matrix composite reinforced with ceramic particles of Al2O3 are reported in this article. The samples were produced by rheocasting and the studied operational condition in this case is the shear rate: 800, 1400 and 2000 rpm. Additionally, the AlMg base alloy was tested. Measurements of thermal diffusivity were performed at room temperature by using photoacoustic technique.

  20. Self reinforcing polymer composites

    SciTech Connect

    Kenig, S.

    1993-12-31

    In the advent of liquid crystalline polymers (LCPs), self reinforcing polymer composites comprising a polymer matrix and an LCP reinforcement, have become a reality. The so called self reinforcement is due to the LCPs orientability characteristics resulting from their rigid molecular backbone and anisotropy structure in the fluid state. Orientation development takes place during melt processing of the LCP composite blends where shear as well as elongational flows occur prior to consolidation to the solid state. By proper flow control anisotropy develops and in-situ composites are obtained. Polymer composites comprising self-reinforcement by LCPs during processing induced flow, were analyzed and studied with respect to their orientation development and resultant mechanical properties. The analysis commenced with the hydrodynamics of immiscible fluids in shear and elongational flows. Based on the analysis, orientation and morphology development in capillary extrusion was studied, using a variety of thermoplastic polymer matrices like amorphous and crystalline polyamides, polycarbonate and polyester in conjunction of a naphthalene based thermotropic LCP. Based on the flow-morphology relationship the amorphous polyamide/LCP composite was further investigated as it exhibited enhanced properties. Laminated composites based on LCP/amorphous polyamide were developed composed of unidirectional extruded and drawn sheets that were subsequently compression molded. Unidirectional, +45/{minus}45 and quasi-isotropic laminates were prepared and analyzed as to their microstructure and mechanical properties.

  1. Unveiling the Semicoherent Interface with Definite Orientation Relationships between Reinforcements and Matrix in Novel Al3BC/Al Composites.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yongfeng; Qian, Zhao; Ma, Xia; Chen, Houwen; Gao, Tong; Wu, Yuying; Liu, Xiangfa

    2016-10-05

    High-strength lightweight Al-based composites are promising materials for a wide range of applications. To provide high performance, a strong bonding interface for effective load transfer from the matrix to the reinforcement is essential. In this work, the novel Al3BC reinforced Al composites have been in situ fabricated through a liquid-solid reaction method and the bonding interface between Al3BC and Al matrix has been unveiled. The HRTEM characterizations on the Al3BC/Al interface verify it to be a semicoherent bonding structure with definite orientation relationships: (0001)Al3BC//(11̅1)Al;[112̅0]Al3BC//[011]Al. Periodic arrays of geometrical misfit dislocations are also observed along the interface at each (0001)Al3BC plane or every five (11̅1)Al planes. This kind of interface between the reinforcement and the matrix is strong enough for effective load transfer, which would lead to the evidently improved strength and stiffness of the introduced new Al3BC/Al composites.

  2. Corrosion of Continuous Fiber Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites (CF-AMCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiwari, Shruti

    The first objective of this research is to study the atmospheric corrosion behavior of continuous reinforced aluminum matrix composites (CF-AMCs). The materials used for this research were alumina (Al2O3) and nickel (Ni) coated carbon (C) fibers reinforced AMCs. The major focus is to identify the correlation between atmospheric parameters and the corrosion rates of CF-AMCs in the multitude of microclimates and environments in Hawai'i. The micro-structures of CF-AMCs were obtained to correlate the microstructures with their corrosion performances. Also electrochemical polarization experiments were conducted in the laboratory to explain the corrosion mechanism of CF-AMCs. In addition, CF-AMCs were exposed to seven different test sites for three exposure periods. The various climatic conditions like temperature (T), relative humidity (RH), rainfall (RF), time of wetness (TOW), chloride (Cl- ) and sulfate (SO42-) deposition rate, and pH were monitored for three exposure period. Likewise, mass losses of CF-AMCs at each test site for three exposure periods were determined. The microstructure of the CF-AMCS showed that Al/C/50f MMCs contained a Ni-rich phase in the matrix, indicating that the Ni coating on the C fiber dissolved in the matrix. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al-2wt% Cu/Al 2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al-2wt%-T6 monolith were rich in Cu and Fe. The intermetallic phases obtained in Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC and Al 7075-T6 monolith also contained traces of Mg, Zn, Ni, and Si. Electrochemical polarization experiment indicated that the Al/Al 2O3/50f Al-2wt% Cu/Al2O3/50f-T6 and Al 7075/Al2O3/50f-T6 MMC showed similar corrosion trends as their respective monoliths pure Al, Al-2wt%-T6 and Al 7075-T6 in both aerated and deaerated condition. Al2O3 fiber, being an insulator, did not have a great effect on the polarization behavior of the composites. Al/C/50f MMCs corroded at a much faster rate as compared to pure Al monolith due to the galvanic effect between C and Al

  3. Microstructural evolution and micromechanical modeling of the mechanical behavior of a ceramic particle-reinforced metal-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Christman, T.A.

    1989-01-01

    The objective was to develop a thorough understanding of the precipitation characteristics and mechanical behavior of a 2124 Al-SiC Aluminum alloy reinforced with 13.2 volume% SiC whiskers. Microstructural development of the 2124 Al-SiC composite subject to controlled and systematic aging treatments was investigated. The results indicate that the matrix of the composite material has a much greater dislocation density than the control alloy. The increased dislocation density facilitates the nucleation of the strengthening precipitates whereby the incubation time for precipitate nucleation and the time to reach peak hardness in the matrix of the composite are significantly reduced. Theoretical analysis of dislocation generation due to thermal contraction mismatch and of the punching of dislocations at whisker ends are examined in the context of microstructural development. An experimental and theoretical investigation into the uniaxial: stress-strain response of the 2124 Al-SiC whisker composite system was undertaken where the effects of accelerated aging of the matrix of the composite were incorporated into the modeling of deformation behavior. The 0.2% offset yield strength was found to be independent of aging state, whereas the strain to failure was found to decrease monotonically with an increase in aging time for the composite. A self consistent approximation was formulated and was found to provide the most accurate predictions for the elastic response of the composite. A finite-element unit-cell model was used to predict the plastic response of the composite material. The effects of SiC reinforcement and matrix aging treatment on crack growth under quasi-static and fatigue loading were also investigated. The composite exhibits a fatigue threshold value which is about twice that of the control alloy.

  4. Carbon nanofiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites and syntactic foams - mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poveda, Ronald Leonel

    The tailorability of composite materials is crucial for use in a wide array of real-world applications, which range from heat-sensitive computer components to fuselage reinforcement on commercial aircraft. The mechanical, electrical, and thermal properties of composites are highly dependent on their material composition, method of fabrication, inclusion orientation, and constituent percentages. The focus of this work is to explore carbon nanofibers (CNFs) as potential nanoscale reinforcement for hollow particle filled polymer composites referred to as syntactic foams. In the present study, polymer composites with high weight fractions of CNFs, ranging from 1-10 wt.%, are used for quasi-static and high strain rate compression analysis, as well as for evaluation and characterization of thermal and electrical properties. It is shown that during compressive characterization of vapor grown carbon nanofiber (CNF)/epoxy composites in the strain rate range of 10-4-2800 s-1, a difference in the fiber failure mechanism is identified based on the strain rate. Results from compression analyses show that the addition of fractions of CNFs and glass microballoons varies the compressive strength and elastic modulus of epoxy composites by as much as 53.6% and 39.9%. The compressive strength and modulus of the syntactic foams is also shown to generally increase by a factor of 3.41 and 2.96, respectively, with increasing strain rate when quasi-static and high strain rate testing data are compared, proving strain rate sensitivity of these reinforced composites. Exposure to moisture over a 6 month period of time is found to reduce the quasi-static and high strain rate strength and modulus, with a maximum of 7% weight gain with select grades of CNF/syntactic foam. The degradation of glass microballoons due to dealkalization is found to be the primary mechanism for reduced mechanical properties, as well as moisture diffusion and weight gain. In terms of thermal analysis results, the

  5. The effect of matrix microstructure on the tensile and fatigue behavior of SiC particle-reinforced 2080 Al matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Chawla, N.; Habel, U.; Shen, Y.L.; Andres, C.; Jones, J.W.; Allison, J.E.

    2000-02-01

    The effect of matrix microstructure on the stress-controlled fatigue behavior of a 2080 Al alloy reinforced with 30 pct SiC particles was investigated. A thermomechanical heat treatment (T8) produced a fine and homogeneous distribution of S{prime} precipitates, while a thermal heat treatment (T6) resulted in coarser and inhomogeneously distributed S{prime} precipitates. The cyclic and monotonic strength, as well as the cyclic stress-strain response, were found to be significantly affected by the microstructure of the matrix. Because of the finer and more-closely spaced precipitates, the composite given the T8 treatment exhibited higher yield strengths than the T6 materials. Despite its lower yield strength, the T6 matrix composite exhibited higher fatigue resistance than the T8 matrix composite. The cyclic deformation behavior of the composites is compared to monotonic deformation behavior and is explained in terms of microstructural instabilities that cause cyclic hardening or softening. The effect of precipitate spacing and size has a significant effect on fatigue behavior and is discussed. The interactive role of matrix strength and SiC reinforcement on stress within rogue inclusions was quantified using a finite-element analysis (FEA) unit-cell model.

  6. Fundamental Studies of Low Velocity Impact Resistance of Graphite Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to relate the impact resistance of graphite fiber reinforced composites with matrix properties through gaining an understanding of the basic mechanics involved in the deformation and fracture process, and the effect of the polymer matrix structure on these mechanisms. It was found that the resin matrix structure influences the composite impact resistance in at least two ways. The integration of flexibilizers into the polymer chain structure tends to reduce the T sub g and the mechanical properties of the polymer. The reduction in the mechanical properties of the matrix does not enhance the composite impact resistance because it allows matrix controlled failure to initiate impact damage. It was found that when the instrumented dropweight impact tester is used as a means for assessing resin toughness, the resin toughness is enhanced by the ability of the clamped specimen to deflect enough to produce sufficient membrane action to support a significant amount of the load. The results of this study indicate that crossplied composite impact resistance is very much dependent on the matrix mechanical properties.

  7. Modeling the Effect of Oxidation on Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of oxidation on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs). The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The fiber strength degradation model and oxidation region propagation model have been adopted to analyze the oxidation effect on tensile strength of the composite, which is controlled by diffusion of oxygen gas through matrix cracks. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining oxidation model and fiber statistical failure model based on the assumption that fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers statisfy the global load sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength considering oxidation time and temperature have been analyzed.

  8. Fracture and cyclic-fatigue behavior of ductile phase reinforced brittle matrix laminated composites: Effect of laminate orientation and reinforcement layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bloyer, Donald Ray, Jr.

    The fracture and cyclic fatigue properties of ductile phase reinforced brittle matrix laminated composites have been investigated through the examination of the effect of layer orientation and reinforcement layer thickness on niobium metal reinforced Nbsb3Al intermetallic laminates. Two laminate orientations, the crack arrester and crack divider, were prepared with layer thickness combinations of 50 mum Nb/200 mum Nbsb3Al, 125 mum Nb/500 mum Nbsb3Al, and 250 mum Nb/1000 mum Nbsb3A1. This gave a nominally constant reinforcement volume fraction of 0.2. The fracture and resistance-curve behavior of these laminates has been compared with similarly reinforced in situ particulate and microlaminate composites. The high aspect ratio of the Nb laminates led to improved toughness in the Nbsb3Al matrix by a factor of 10-20. Laminate orientation had a small effect on crack growth resistance, and properties were optimal in the arrester as compared to the divider orientation. In addition, thicker Nb layers yielded improved fracture toughness. The high fracture toughness observed in these laminates resulted from large crack tip shielding zones formed by bridging Nb layers in the crack wake. These zones were of sufficient size that large scale bridging conditions generally dominated. R-curve modeling using weight function methods allowed simple approximations of the bridging traction functions which were then used to make small scale bridging predictions of the steady state toughness for each laminate. Promising fatigue crack growth resistance properties were observed for the Nb/Nbsb3Al laminates evaluated under cyclic loading conditions. The laminates provided significantly better fatigue resistance than both Nbsb3Al and Nb/Nbsb3Al particulate composites. For a given composite layer thickness, the arrester orientation showed improved cyclic crack growth resistance as compared to divider orientation. The enhanced fatigue behavior of these composites resulted from extrinsic

  9. Computational Simulation of Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.; Mital, Subodh K.

    1996-01-01

    This report describes a methodology which predicts the behavior of ceramic matrix composites and has been incorporated in the computational tool CEMCAN (CEramic Matrix Composite ANalyzer). The approach combines micromechanics with a unique fiber substructuring concept. In this new concept, the conventional unit cell (the smallest representative volume element of the composite) of the micromechanics approach is modified by substructuring it into several slices and developing the micromechanics-based equations at the slice level. The methodology also takes into account nonlinear ceramic matrix composite (CMC) behavior due to temperature and the fracture initiation and progression. Important features of the approach and its effectiveness are described by using selected examples. Comparisons of predictions and limited experimental data are also provided.

  10. Low cycle fatigue behavior of a SiCp reinforced aluminum matrix composite at ambient and elevated temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Han, N.L.; Wang, Z.G.; Sun, L.Z.

    1995-06-01

    Based on an investigation of low cycle fatigue life and cyclic stress response characteristics of SiC particulates reinforced pure aluminum and unreinforced matrix aluminum at 298 K and 441 K, the following observations were made. (1) Cyclic stress response of the unreinforced matrix aluminum, in the as-extruded condition, revealed initial cyclic hardening, cyclic stability and second hardening at ambient temperature. With a contrast, the unreinforced aluminum at elevated temperature showed progressively cyclic softening behavior without initial hardening. (2) The cyclic stress response characteristics of the composite were different from that of its unreinforced matrix at room temperature. In spite of the initial hardening, the composite showed progressive softening in most of the fatigue life. At elevated temperature the composite also displayed continuous cyclic softening behavior. The reason for the softening behavior probably was that the dislocation tangles in the composite specimen with a likely work-hardened status was not stable and could be changed under a cyclic loading. (3) The SiCp/Al composite and the unreinforced matrix followed the Coffin-Manson law. The low cycle fatigue resistance of the composite at room temperature was lower than that of the unreinforced matrix. A decrease in the fatigue endurance due to a rise in test temperature was observed for the composite and the unreinforced matrix especially at low cyclic plastic strain ranges. The induction of fatigue life of the unreinforced aluminum was faster than that of the composite, so the fatigue resistance of the composite was stronger than that of the unreinforced aluminum under lower cyclic strain ranges at elevated temperature.

  11. Fabrication of SiC particulate reinforced polyester matrix composite and investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selvam, R.; Ravi, S.; Raja, R.

    2017-05-01

    Polymer composite provokes a new alternative material to engineering and domestic application. Polymeric nano composite have been intensively investigated due to the performance improvement when a small amount of nano sized particulates are added to matrix. The distinguished properties of SiC particulates influence to make a polymeric composite. This composite material has many application such as mechanical, automobile, marine, appliances and packaging. The composite material is fabricated in deferent weight ratio and it is characterized to understand the mechanical behavior, which was studied by various testing method under external load.

  12. Tensile Properties of Nano AL2O3 Particulate-Reinforced Aluminum Matrix Composites by Mechanical Alloying and Hot Extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehdinia, M.; Jenabali Jahromi, S. A.

    The powder of the micro Al and variant volume fractions of nano Al2O3 were milled by a high energy planetary ball-mill. By milling, a homogenous distribution of nano Al2O3 particles in the metal matrix were developed. Then the milled powder was cold compressed and sintered at 545°C for one hr. The mold and the sintered sample hold in a furnace until the temperature reached 545°C. Then the hot 27mm diameter sample was extruded to 6mm diameter. From the extruded specimens, tensile, hardness and microstructure of the prepared specimens were determined. By these tests the effect of milling time, the percent of nano-particles and the microstructure were evaluated. The hardness and tensile behaviors of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with nano Al2O3 particulate have been found to increase remarkably with the volume fraction of the reinforcement.

  13. The erosion performance of particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings produced by co-deposition cold gas dynamic spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peat, Tom; Galloway, Alexander; Toumpis, Athanasios; McNutt, Philip; Iqbal, Naveed

    2017-02-01

    This work reports on the erosion performance of three particle reinforced metal matrix composite coatings, co-deposited with an aluminium binder via cold-gas dynamic spraying. The deposition of ceramic particles is difficult to achieve with typical cold spray techniques due to the absence of particle deformation. This issue has been overcome in the present study by simultaneously spraying the reinforcing particles with a ductile metallic binder which has led to an increased level of ceramic/cermet particles deposited on the substrate with thick (>400 μm) coatings produced. The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the erosion performance of the co-deposited coatings within a slurry environment. The study also incorporated standard metallographic characterisation techniques to evaluate the distribution of reinforcing particles within the aluminium matrix. All coatings exhibited poorer erosion performance than the uncoated material, both in terms of volume loss and mass loss. The Al2O3 reinforced coating sustained the greatest amount of damage following exposure to the slurry and recorded the greatest volume loss (approx. 2.8 mm3) out of all of the examined coatings. Despite the poor erosion performance, the WC-CoCr reinforced coating demonstrated a considerable hardness increase over the as-received AA5083 (approx. 400%) and also exhibited the smallest free space length between adjacent particles. The findings of this study reveal that the removal of the AA5083 matrix by the impinging silicon carbide particles acts as the primary wear mechanism leading to the degradation of the coating. Analysis of the wear scar has demonstrated that the damage to the soft matrix alloy takes the form of ploughing and scoring which subsequently exposes carbide/oxide particles to the impinging slurry.

  14. Applicability of ultrasonic testing for the determination of volume fraction of particulates in alumina-reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, C.K.; Fang, R.L.; Weng, W.P.; Chuang, T.H.

    1999-10-01

    An ultrasonic testing technique was employed to determine the volume fraction of alumina particulate reinforcement in 6061 aluminum matrix composites. this study was performed on various composites with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} nominal volume fractions of 10, 15, and 20%. For comparison, other techniques were employed as well, including the Archimedes method, metallographic image analysis, X-ray diffraction, and acid dissolution. Observations indicated that ultrasonic testing and acid dissolution methods are more reliable than the other techniques, while ultrasonic testing is faster than the acid dissolution method.

  15. Micromechanics for particulate reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Mital, Subodh K.

    1996-01-01

    A set of micromechanics equations for the analysis of particulate reinforced composites is developed using the mechanics of materials approach. Simplified equations are used to compute homogenized or equivalent thermal and mechanical properties of particulate reinforced composites in terms of the properties of the constituent materials. The microstress equations are also presented here to decompose the applied stresses on the overall composite to the microstresses in the constituent materials. The properties of a 'generic' particulate composite as well as those of a particle reinforced metal matrix composite are predicted and compared with other theories as well as some experimental data. The micromechanics predictions are in excellent agreement with the measured values.

  16. Creep and Stress-strain Behavior After Creep from Sic Fiber Reinforced, Melt-infiltrated Sic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Pujar, Vijay

    2004-01-01

    Silicon carbide fiber (Hi-Nicalon Type S, Nippon Carbon) reinforced silicon carbide matrix composites containing melt-infiltrated Si were subjected to creep at 1315 C for a number of different stress conditions, This study is aimed at understanding the time-dependent creep behavior of CMCs for desired use-conditions, and also more importantly, how the stress-strain response changes as a result of the time-temperature-stress history of the crept material. For the specimens that did not rupture, fast fracture experiments were performed at 1315 C or at room temperature immediately following tensile creep. In many cases, the stress-strain response and the resulting matrix cracking stress of the composite change due to stress-redistribution between composite constituents during tensile creep. The paper will discuss these results and its implications on applications of these materials for turbine engine components.

  17. Part I. Corrosion studies of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites. Part II. Galvanic corrosion between continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites and 4340 steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jun

    Part I. The corrosion performance of continuous alumina fiber reinforced aluminum-matrix composites (CF-AMCs) was investigated in both the laboratory and field environments by comparing them with their respective monolithic matrix alloys, i.e., pure Al, A1-2wt%Cu T6, and Al 6061 T6. The corrosion initiation sites were identified by monitoring the changes in the surface morphology. Corrosion current densities and pH profiles at localized corrosion sites were measured using the scanning-vibrating electrode technique and the scanning ion-selective electrode technique, respectively. The corrosion damage of the materials immersed in various electrolytes, as well as those exposed in a humidity chamber and outdoor environments, was evaluated. Potentiodynamic polarization behavior was also studied. The corrosion initiation for the composites in 3.15 wt% NaCl occurred primarily around the Fe-rich intermetallic particles, which preferentially existed around the fiber/matrix interface on the composites. The corrosion initiation sites were also caused by physical damage (e.g., localized deformation) to the composite surface. At localized corrosion sites, the buildup of acidity was enhanced by the formation of micro-crevices resulting from fibers left in relief as the matrix corroded. The composites that were tested in exposure experiments exhibited higher corrosion rates than their monolithic alloys. The composites and their monolithic alloys were subjected to pitting corrosion when anodically polarized in the 3.15 wt% NaCl, while they passivated when anodically polarized in 0.5 M Na2SO4. The experimental results indicated that the composites exhibited inferior corrosion resistance compared to their monolithic matrix alloys. Part II. Galvanic corrosion studies were conducted on CF-AMCs coupled to 4340 steel since CF-AMCs have low density and excellent mechanical properties and are being considered as potential jacketing materials for reinforcing steel gun barrels. Coupled and

  18. Thermal conductivity and thermal expansion of graphite fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellis, David L.; Mcdanels, David L.

    1993-01-01

    The high specific conductivity of graphite fiber/copper matrix (Gr/Cu) composites offers great potential for high heat flux structures operating at elevated temperatures. To determine the feasibility of applying Gr/Cu composites to high heat flux structures, composite plates were fabricated using unidirectional and cross-plied pitch-based P100 graphite fibers in a pure copper matrix. Thermal conductivity of the composites was measured from room temperature to 1073 K, and thermal expansion was measured from room temperature to 1050 K. The longitudinal thermal conductivity, parallel to the fiber direction, was comparable to pure copper. The transverse thermal conductivity, normal to the fiber direction, was less than that of pure copper and decreased with increasing fiber content. The longitudinal thermal expansion decreased with increasing fiber content. The transverse thermal expansion was greater than pure copper and nearly independent of fiber content.

  19. Toughening and reinforcing alumina matrix composite with single-wall carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Jin-Peng; Zhuang, Da-Ming; Zhao, Da-Qing; Zhang, Gong; Wu, Min-Sheng; Wei, Fei; Fan, Zhuang-Jun

    2006-09-01

    The authors report an efficient way of incorporating single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) into alumina matrix with strong interfaces by heterocoagulation. The fracture toughness of SWNTs/Al2O3 composite reaches 6.40±0.3MPam1/2, which is twice as high as that of unreinforced alumina. The flexure strength of the composite also increases by 20%. The main toughening mechanism is crack bridging of SWNTs, and SWNT pullout takes effect also.

  20. Electrospun Yarn Reinforced NanoHA Composite Matrix as a Potential Bone Substitute for Enhanced Regeneration of Segmental Defects.

    PubMed

    Anitha, A; Joseph, John; Menon, Deepthy; Nair, Shantikumar V; Nair, Manitha B

    2017-04-01

    Nanohydroxyapatite (nanoHA) is a well-established synthetic bone substitute with excellent osteoconduction and osteointegration. However, brittleness coupled with slow degradation curtails its load-bearing and bone regeneration potential, respectively. To address these limitations, nanoHA composite matrix reinforced with electrospun fibrous yarns was fabricated and tested in vitro and in vivo. Different weight percentages (5, 10, 15 wt%) and varying lengths (short and continuous) of poly(l-lactic acid) yarns were randomly dispersed in a gelatinous matrix containing nanoHA. This significantly improved the compressive strength as well as work of fracture, especially for continuous yarns at high weight percentages (10 and 15 wt%). Incorporation of yarns did not adversely affect the pore size (50-350 μm) or porosity of the scaffolds as well as the in vitro cellular response. Finally, when tested in a critical-sized femoral segmental defect in rat, the nanocomposite scaffolds induced osteoblast cell infiltration at 2 months that subsequently underwent increased mature lamellar bone formation at 4 months, in both the mid and peripheral defect regions. Histomorphometric analysis demonstrated that new bone formation and biomaterial degradation were significantly enhanced in the composite scaffold when compared to commercially available HA. Overall, the composite matrix reinforced with electrospun yarns proved to be a potential bone substitute having an appropriate balance between mechanical strength, porosity, biodegradation, and bone regeneration ability.

  1. On the effect of pre-straining on the fatigue behavior of a particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Beyer, G.; Biermann, H.; Mughrabi, H.

    1997-04-15

    Since the development of the Duralcan melt-stirring process, particulate-reinforced metal-matrix composites (MMCs) can be produced in sufficient amounts and at low enough cost to meet industrial demands. Aluminium-alloy based MMCs with Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} particulate reinforcement fabricated by casting processes have already been applied as engine components and other automotive parts, mainly because of their high strength and stiffness and their superior wear resistance. Another property of great interest and practical importance is the fatigue behavior of MMCs which has been studied repeatedly in the past. A particular aspect which has not been investigated so far is the influence of pre-straining on the fatigue properties. In view of the possibility of pre-straining during the finishing process, its effect on the fatigue behavior is of interest. Here the authors report results on the fatigue behavior of a ceramic-particle reinforced MMC obtained in the framework of a more extended study. In an earlier publication, quantitative data on the stress-dependence of the Young`s modulus in tension and compression were reported. The present paper deals with the influence of pre-straining on the fatigue properties and on the fatigue life of the aluminium-matrix composite AA6061-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}-15p-T6. The mechanical tests were supplemented by microstructural investigations, using in particular optical, scanning (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM).

  2. Dynamic-Mechanical Characterization of Polyester Matrix Composites Reinforced with Eucalyptus Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Oliveira, Caroline G.; Neves, Anna C. C.; Simonassi, Noan T.; Pereira, Artur C.; Margem, Frederico M.; Barbosa, Anderson; Monteiro, Sergio N.

    Recently, the eucalyptus fibers have been investigated as a potential option in composites application, due to some advantages in comparison with synthetic fibers. It is largely cultivated in all Brazilian territory. The present work has as objective to characterize the dynamic-mechanical behavior of eucalyptus fiber composites subjected to thermal and mechanical constraints. In this work, the temperature variation and the dynamic-mechanical parameters of polyester composites incorporated with up to 30% in volume of eucalyptus fibers were investigated by Dynamic Mechanical Analysis (DMA) experiments. The results showed that the incorporation of eucalyptus fibers tends to increase the viscoelastic stiffness of the polyester matrix. It was also observed

  3. Poly /Diels-Alder/ matrix resins. [high temperature resistant graphite reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Orell, M. K.; Sheppard, C. H.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A poly (Diels-Alder) (PDA) resin approach was investigated as a means to achieve autoclavability of high-temperature resistant resin/fiber composites under mild fabrication conditions. The results of the study were highly promising and program objectives were achieved. Low-void content Type A-S graphite reinforced composites were autoclave fabricated from a PDA resin/fiber prepreg prepared from an acetone:methanol:dioxane varnish. Autoclave conditions were 400 F and 100 psi for up to two hours duration. After postcure at temperatures up to 600 F, the composites demonstrated high initial mechanical properties at temperatures up to 550 F. The results from isothermal aging studies in air for 1000 hours indicated potential for long-term (over 1000 hours) use at 500 F and shorter-term use at 550 F.

  4. Poly /Diels-Alder/ matrix resins. [high temperature resistant graphite reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, R. J.; Orell, M. K.; Sheppard, C. H.; Vaughan, R. W.

    1977-01-01

    A poly (Diels-Alder) (PDA) resin approach was investigated as a means to achieve autoclavability of high-temperature resistant resin/fiber composites under mild fabrication conditions. The results of the study were highly promising and program objectives were achieved. Low-void content Type A-S graphite reinforced composites were autoclave fabricated from a PDA resin/fiber prepreg prepared from an acetone:methanol:dioxane varnish. Autoclave conditions were 400 F and 100 psi for up to two hours duration. After postcure at temperatures up to 600 F, the composites demonstrated high initial mechanical properties at temperatures up to 550 F. The results from isothermal aging studies in air for 1000 hours indicated potential for long-term (over 1000 hours) use at 500 F and shorter-term use at 550 F.

  5. Laser surface forming of AlCoCrCuFeNi particle reinforced AZ91D matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Guanghui; Yue, T. M.; Lin, Xin; Yang, Haiou; Xie, Hui; Ding, Xu

    2015-07-01

    Traditionally, the laser melt injection (LMI) technique can only be used for forming ceramic particles reinforced metal matrix composites (MMCs) for enhancing surface properties of lightweight engineering materials. In this research, the LMI method was employed to form metal particles reinforced MMCs on AZ91D instead. This was viable because of the unique properties of the AlCoCrCuFeNi high-entropy alloy (HEA) metal particles used. The large difference in melting point between the HEA and the substrate material (AZ91D), and the limited reaction and the lack of fusion between the HEA and Mg have made it possible that a metal particles reinforced AZ91D composite material was produced. The reason of limited reaction was considered mainly due to the relatively high mixing enthalpy between the HEA constituent elements and Mg. Although there was some melting occurred at the particles surface with some solute segregation found in the vicinity close to the surface, intermetallic compounds were not observed. With regard to the wear resistance of the MMCs, it was found that when the volume fraction of the reinforcement phase, i.e. the HEA particles, reached about 0.4, the wear volume loss of the coating was only one-seventh of that of the substrate material.

  6. Strain intensity factor approach for predicting the strength of continuously reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    A method was previously developed to predict the fracture toughness (stress intensity factor at failure) of composites in terms of the elastic constants and the tensile failing strain of the fibers. The method was applied to boron/aluminum composites made with various proportions of 0 to + or - 45 deg plies. Predicted values of fracture toughness were in gross error because widespread yielding of the aluminum matrix made the compliance very nonlinear. An alternate method was developed to predict the strain intensity factor at failure rather than the stress intensity factor because the singular strain field was not affected by yielding as much as the stress field. Strengths of specimens containing crack-like slits were calculated from predicted failing strains using uniaxial stress-strain curves. Predicted strengths were in good agreement with experimental values, even for the very nonlinear laminates that contained only + or - 45 deg plies. This approach should be valid for other metal matrix composites that have continuous fibers.

  7. Damping mechanisms in alumina borate whisker-reinforced-aluminum matrix composites with or without SnO{sub 2} coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, J.; Wang, X. F.; Zheng, Z. Z.

    2010-01-15

    SnO{sub 2} was successfully coated on the surface of alumina borate whiskers. The pure aluminum matrix composites reinforced with a SnO{sub 2}-coated alumina borate whisker were fabricated by squeeze casting. The effects of coating contents on the damping properties of the coated composites at various temperatures, frequencies, and strain amplitudes were examined. The microstructures of the coated composites were also investigated through transmission electron microscopy observations. These results indicate that the introduction of Sn at the interface between whisker and matrix in the coated composites during the squeeze casting process alters not only the interface structures but also the dislocation status of the matrices in the vicinity of the interface. The results of damping characterization indicate that the damping capacities of the coated composites strongly depend on the coating contents and strain amplitudes. A damping peak at low temperatures appeared not only in the coated composites but also in the noncoated one, which is related to dislocation motion and interfacial slip caused by Sn. A damping peak at high temperatures appeared only in the coated composites, and the damping mechanisms at high temperature change with the increase in strain amplitudes. Sn played an important role on the damping mechanisms of the coated composites all along.

  8. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1989-01-01

    The room temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  9. Properties of silicon carbide fiber-reinforced silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of NASA Lewis developed SiC/RBSN composites and their thermal and environmental stability havd been studied. The composites consist of nearly 30 vol pct of aligned 142 micron diameter chemically vapor-deposited SiC fibers in a relatively porous silicon nitride matrix. In the as-fabricated condition, the unidirectional and 2-D composites exhibited metal-like stress-strain behavior, graceful failure, and showed improved properties when compared with unreinforced matrix of comparable density. Furthermore, the measured room temperature tensile properties were relativley independent of tested volume and were unaffected by artifical notches normal to the loading direction or by thermal shocking from temperatures up to 800 C. The four-point bend strength data measured as a function of temperature to 1400 C in air showed that as-fabricated strength was maintained to 1200 C. At 1400 C, however, nearly 15 pct loss in strength was observed. Measurement of room temperature tensile strength after 100 hr exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in a nitrogen environment indicated no loss from the as-fabricated composite strength. On the other hand, after 100 hr exposure in flowing oxygen at 1200 and 1400 C, the composites showed approximately 40 pct loss from their as-fabricated ultimate tensile strength. Those exposed between 400 to 1200 C showed nearly 60 pct strength loss. Oxidation of the fiber/matrix interface as well as internal oxidation of the porous Si3N4 matrix are likely mechanisms for strength degradation. The excellent strength reproducibility, notch insensitivity, and high temperature strength of the composite makes it an ideal candidate for advanced heat engine applications provided coating or densification methods are developed to avoid internal oxidation attack.

  10. Development and analysis of three-dimensionally reinforced cellular matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wei

    2000-10-01

    The objective of this research was to develop a new class of lightweight three-dimensional textile reinforced cellular matrix composite (3-D CMC) materials using a high-pressure foaming method. The scope of the research includes fabrication, experimental evaluation and mathematical modeling of the new composite materials. Principles of thermodynamics and transport phenomena involved in the cell nucleation and bubble growth in plastics using gas blowing agents were reviewed. The determinative factors for the foaming process were the foaming pressure, surface tension, viscous and inertial resistance forces. Foaming of epoxy resins by pressure quenching were carried out using a high-pressure vessel with a digital temperature controller and nitrogen gas as the blowing agent, at 100°C and 28--110.5 bar. The cure time was 2--2.5 hr., well before the time of gel point, 293 min., determined by means of dynamic mechanical spectroscopy. It was found that the foam density decreased monotonously and the average bubble radius slightly decreased, while the cell density increased, with the increasing foaming pressure. Cure time of 2 and 2.5 hours have no influence on the foam density, but have opposite influences on the bubble radius and cell density. Samples of 3-D woven carbon CMC materials were fabricated using the high-pressure foaming apparatus at a foaming pressure of 60 bar as the epoxy resin cured for 1.5--2 hr. at 100°C. Photomicrographs of cross-sections of the samples revealed that the epoxy resins in the epoxy pockets of the 3-D CMC samples were removed during foaming. Average density was found 1.009 g/cm 3 for TM samples and 1.076 g/cm3 for TS samples, corresponding to weight reduction of 36.92% and 28.37%, respectively, as compared with the 3-D RMC material, where TM and TS samples used 3-D woven carbon preforms of different weaving parameters. Tensile test, 3-point bending and high velocity projectile impact test were conducted to evaluate the mechanical

  11. Mechanical properties of several neat polymer matrix materials and unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coguill, Scott L.; Adams, Donald F.

    1989-01-01

    The mechanical and physical properties of three neat matrix materials, i.e., PEEK (polyetheretherketone) thermoplastic, Hexcel F155 rubber-toughened epoxy and Hercules 8551-7 rubber-toughened epoxy, were experimentally determined. Twelve unidirectional carbon fiber composites, incorporating matrix materials characterized in this or earlier studies (with one exception; the PISO(sub 2)-TPI matrix itself was not characterized), were also tested. These composite systems included AS4/2220-1, AS4/2220-3, T500/R914, IM6/HX1504, T300/4901A (MDA), T700/4901A (MDA), T300/4901B (MPDA), T700/4901B (MPDA), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, ICI), APC2 (AS4/PEEK, Langley Research Center), AS4/8551-7, and AS4/PISO(sub 2)-TPI. For the neat matrix materials, the tensile, shear, fracture toughness, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were measured as a function of both temperature and moisture content. For the unidirectional composites, axial and transverse tensile, longitudinal shear, coefficient of thermal expansion, and coefficient of moisture expansion properties were determined, at room temperature and 100 C.

  12. The Dependance of Damage Accumulation in Carbon Fibre Reinforced Epoxy Composites on Matrix Properties.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Diguuibutiofl Unlimited 0- Contract U.S. AIR FORCE/ARMINES- Centre des Matdriaux No A.F.O.S.R. 84-0397 - Final Report December 1985 THE DEPENDANCE OF DAMAGE...61102F 2301 D1 185 11 TITLE (include Security Classification) THE DEPENDANCE OF DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN CARBON FIBRE REINFORCED EPOXY COMPOSITES ON...ATN OF: LTS/Autovon 235-4299 26 March 1986 SUBJECT: EOARD-TR-86-04, Final Scientific Report, "The Dependance of Damage Accumu- lation in Carbon Fibre

  13. Mechanical behavior of fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN ceramic matrix composites - Theory and experiment. [Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chulya, Abhisak; Gyekenyesi, John P.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1991-01-01

    The mechanical behavior of continuous fiber reinforced SiC/RBSN (Reaction Bonded Silicon Nitride) composites with various fiber contents is evaluated. Both catastrophic and noncatastrophic failures are observed in tensile specimens. Damage and failure mechanisms are identified via in-situ monitoring using NDE (nondestructive evaluation) techniques throughout the loading history. Effects of fiber/matrix interface debonding (splitting) parallel to fibers are discussed. Statistical failure behavior of fibers is also observed, especially when the interface is weak. Micromechanical models incorproating residual stresses to calculate the critical matrix cracking strength, ultimate strength, and work of pull-out are reviewed and used to predict composite response. For selected test problems, experimental measurements are compared to analytical predictions.

  14. Crack initiation and propagation behavior of WC particles reinforced Fe-based metal matrix composite produced by laser melting deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Jiandong; Li, Liqun; Tao, Wang

    2016-08-01

    It is generally believed that cracks in metal matrix composites (MMC) parts manufacturing are crucial to the reliable material properties, especially for the reinforcement particles with high volume fraction. In this paper, WC particles (WCp) reinforced Fe-based metal matrix composites (WCp/Fe) were manufactured by laser melting deposition (LMD) technology to investigate the characteristics of cracks formation. The section morphology of composites were analyzed by optical microscope (OM), and microstructure of WCp, matrix and interface were analyzed by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), in order to study the crack initiation and propagation behavior under different laser process conditions. The temperature of materials during the laser melting deposition was detected by the infrared thermometer. The results showed that the cracks often appeared after five layers laser deposition in this experiment. The cracks crossed through WC particles rather than the interface, so the strength of interface obtained by the LMD was relatively large. When the thermal stress induced by high temperature gradient during LMD and the coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch between WC and matrix was larger than yield strength of WC, the cracks would initiate inside WC particle. Cracks mostly propagated along the eutectic phases whose brittleness was very large. The obtained thin interface was beneficial to transmitting the stress from particle to matrix. The influence of volume fraction of particles, laser power and scanning speed on cracks were investigated. This paper investigated the influence of WC particles size on cracks systematically, and the smallest size of cracked WC in different laser processing parameters was also researched.

  15. Effect of γ irradiation on the properties of basalt fiber reinforced epoxy resin matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Gu, Yizhuo; Yang, Zhongjia; Li, Min; Wang, Shaokai; Zhang, Zuoguang

    2015-11-01

    Gamma-ray (γ-ray) irradiation is a crucial reason for the aging in materials used for nuclear industry. Due to high specific strength and stiffness, light weight and good corrosion resistance, fiber reinforced composites are regarded as an alternative of traditional materials used on nuclear facilities. In this study, basalt fiber (BF)/AG80 epoxy composite laminates were fabricated by autoclave process and treated with 60Co gamma irradiation dose up to 2.0 MGy. Irradiation induced polymer chain scission and oxidation of AG80 resin were detected from physical and chemical analysis. The experimental results show that the tensile and flexural performances of irradiated BF/AG80 composite maintain stable and have a low amplitude attenuation respectively, and the interlaminar shear strength has increased from irradiation dose of 0-1.5 MGy. Furthermore, the comparison between the studied BF composite and reported polymer and composite materials was done for evaluating the γ resistance property of BF composite.

  16. Steady state creep behavior of particulate-reinforced titanium matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganath, S.; Mishra, R.S.

    1996-03-01

    The steady state creep behavior of unreinforced Ti, Ti-Ti{sub 2}C and Ti-TiB-Ti{sub 2}C composites has been examined in the temperature range 823--923 K. It is shown that the creep deformation of unreinforced Ti is governed by climb-controlled creep mechanism for which the stress exponent is between 4.1 and 4.3 and the activation energy is 236 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. For composites, the stress exponents are between 6 and 7 at 823 K but are similar to unreinforced Ti at 923 K. The measured steady state creep rate of composites is found to be 2--3 orders of magnitude lower than unreinforced Ti in the investigated temperature range. It is then established that the origin of creep strengthening at 823--923 K is due to the combined effects of increased modulus of composites and the refined microstructure. It is further shown that the change of stress exponent of composites at 823 K is because of the change in creep mechanism from lattice-diffusion controlled dislocation climb to pipe-diffusion controlled dislocation climb. By analyzing the creep data, a modification in the dimensionless constant, A = 3.2 {times} 10{sup 5} exp({minus}24.2V{sub r}) for lattice-diffusion regime and A = 9.4 {times} 10{sup 5} exp({minus}28.1V{sub r}) for pipe-diffusion regime, where V{sub r} is the volume fraction of reinforcements, is suggested to account for the influence of reinforcements on creep kinetics.

  17. The optimal fiber volume fraction and fiber-matrix property compatibility in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Ning

    1992-01-01

    Although the question of minimum or critical fiber volume fraction beyond which a composite can then be strengthened due to addition of fibers has been dealt with by several investigators for both continuous and short fiber composites, a study of maximum or optimal fiber volume fraction at which the composite reaches its highest strength has not been reported yet. The present analysis has investigated this issue for short fiber case based on the well-known shear lag (the elastic stress transfer) theory as the first step. Using the relationships obtained, the minimum spacing between fibers is determined upon which the maximum fiber volume fraction can be calculated, depending on the fiber packing forms within the composites. The effects on the value of this maximum fiber volume fraction due to such factors as fiber and matrix properties, fiber aspect ratio and fiber packing forms are discussed. Furthermore, combined with the previous analysis on the minimum fiber volume fraction, this maximum fiber volume fraction can be used to examine the property compatibility of fiber and matrix in forming a composite. This is deemed to be useful for composite design. Finally some examples are provided to illustrate the results.

  18. Field assisted sintering of refractory carbide ceramics and fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gephart, Sean

    materials. While FAST sintered materials showed higher average values, in general they also showed consistently larger variation in the scattered data and consequently larger standard deviation for the resulting material properties. In addition, dynamic impact testing (V50 test) was conducted on the resulting materials and it was determined that there was no discernable correlation between observed mechanical properties of the ceramic materials and the resulting dynamic testing. Another study was conducted on the sintering of SiC and carbon fiber reinforced SiC ceramic matrix composites (CMC) using FAST. There has been much interest recently in fabricating high strength, low porosity SiC CMC.s for high temperature structural applications, but the current methods of production, namely chemical vapor infiltration (CVI), melt infiltration (MI), and polymer infiltration and pyrolysis (PIP), are considered time consuming and involve material related shortcomings associated with their respective methodologies. In this study, SiC CMC.s were produced using the 25 ton laboratory unit with a target sample size of 40 mm diameter and 3 mm thickness, as well as on the larger 250 ton industrial FAST system targeting a sample size of 101.6 x 101.6 x 3 mm3 to investigate issues associated with scaling. Several sintering conditions were explored including: pressure of 35-65 MPa, temperature of 1700-1900°C, and heating rates between 50-400°C/min. The SiC fibers used in this study were coated using chemical vapor deposition (CVD) with boron nitride (BN) and pyrolytic carbon to act as a barrier layer and preserve the integrity of the fibers during sintering. Then the barrier coating was coated by an outer layer of SiC to enhance the bonding between the fibers and the SiC matrix. Microstructures of the sintered samples were examined by FE-SEM. Mechanical properties including flexural strength-deflection and stress-strain were characterized using 4-point bend testing. Tensile testing was

  19. Tensile and fatigue behavior of Al-based metal matrix composites reinforced with continuous carbon or alumina fibers: Part I. Quasi-unidirectional composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacquesson, M.; Girard, A.; Vidal-Sétif, M.-H.; Valle, R.

    2004-10-01

    The thermomechanical (dilatometric, tensile, and fatigue) behavior of Al-based metal matrix composites (MMCs) is investigated. These composites are reinforced by quasi-unidirectional (quasi-UD) woven fabric preforms with 90 pct of continuous fibers in the longitudinal direction and 10 pct in the transverse direction. The two composite systems investigated feature a highly ductile matrix (AU2: Al-2Cu wt pct) with a strongly bonded fiber-matrix interface (N610 alumina fibers) and an alloyed, high-strength matrix (A357: Al-7Si-0.6Mg wt pct) with a weak fiber-matrix interface (K139 carbon fibers). Microstructural investigation of the tested specimens has permitted identification of the specific characteristics of these composites: undulation of the longitudinal bundles, presence of the straight transverse bundles, interply shearing, and role of brittle phases. Moreover, simple semiquantitative models ( e.g., interply shearing) have enabled explanation of the specific mechanical behavior of these quasi-UD composites, which exhibit high tensile and fatigue strengths, as compared with the corresponding pure UD composites. Knowledge of the specific characteristics and mechanical behavior of these quasi-UD composites will facilitate the further investigation of the (0, ±45, 90 deg) quasi-UD laminates (Part II). At a more theoretical viewpoint, the specific geometry and behavior of these quasi-UD composites allows exacerbation of fatigue mechanisms, even more intense than in “model” composites.

  20. Fabrication of single crystalline diamond reinforced aluminum matrix composite by powder metallurgy route

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Hansang; Leparoux, Marc; Heintz, Jean-Marc; Silvain, Jean-François; Kawasaki, Akira

    2011-10-01

    We have successfully fabricated highly densified aluminum (Al)-diamond composite materials by a simple hot press method. The thermal conductivity of the Al-diamond composite materials was measured. These materials had different types, sizes and fractions of diamond. These obtained values were discussed based on theoretically calculated values. The thermal conductivity of the composite materials, measured by Laser-Flash method, was found to have slightly increased compared to that of pure bulk Al. The obtained microstructures of the composite materials showed a lot of cleavage existing in the interface between the Al matrix and the diamond particles, which led to the low increment of the thermal conductivity. Moreover, Al-diamond bulk materials with different sintering temperatures in solid state, liquid phase, and transient region between solid and liquid of Al, have been synthesized.

  1. Fabrication of in-situ grown graphene reinforced Cu matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yakun; Zhang, Xiang; Liu, Enzuo; He, Chunnian; Shi, Chunsheng; Li, Jiajun; Nash, Philip; Zhao, Naiqin

    2016-01-01

    Graphene/Cu composites were fabricated through a graphene in-situ grown approach, which involved ball-milling of Cu powders with PMMA as solid carbon source, in-situ growth of graphene on flaky Cu powders and vacuum hot-press sintering. SEM and TEM characterization results indicated that graphene in-situ grown on Cu powders guaranteed a homogeneous dispersion and a good combination between graphene and Cu matrix, as well as the intact structure of graphene, which was beneficial to its strengthening effect. The yield strength of 244 MPa and tensile strength of 274 MPa were achieved in the composite with 0.95 wt.% graphene, which were separately 177% and 27.4% enhancement over pure Cu. Strengthening effect of in-situ grown graphene in the matrix was contributed to load transfer and dislocation strengthening. PMID:26763313

  2. The Microstructure-Processing-Property Relationships in an Al Matrix Composite System Reinforced by Al-Cu-Fe Alloy Particles

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, Fei

    2004-01-01

    Metal matrix composites (MMC), especially Al matrix composites, received a lot of attention during many years of research because of their promise for the development of automotive and aerospace materials with improved properties and performance, such as lighter weight and better structural properties, improved thermal conductivity and wear resistance. In order to make the MMC materials more viable in various applications, current research efforts on the MMCs should continue to focus on two important aspects, including improving the properties of MMCs and finding more economical techniques to produce MMCs. Solid state vacuum sintering was studied in tap densified Al powder and in hot quasi-isostatically forged samples composed of commercial inert gas atomized or high purity Al powder, generated by a gas atomization reaction synthesis (GARS) technique. The GARS process results in spherical Al powder with a far thinner surface oxide. The overall results indicated the enhanced ability of GARS-processed Al and Al alloy powders for solid state sintering, which may lead to simplification of current Al powder consolidation processing methods. Elemental Al-based composites reinforced with spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders were produced by quasi-isostatic forging and vacuum hot pressing (VHP) consolidation methods. Microstructures and tensile properties of AYAl-Cu-Fe composites were characterized. It was proved that spherical Al-Cu-Fe alloy powders can serve as an effective reinforcement particulate for elemental Al-based composites, because of their high hardness and a preferred type of matrix/reinforcement interfacial bonding, with reduced strain concentration around the particles. Ultimate tensile strength and yield strength of the composites were increased over the corresponding Al matrix values, far beyond typical observations. This remarkable strengthening was achieved without precipitation hardening and without severe strain hardening during consolidation because of

  3. Dependence of Crack Propagation/Deflection Mechanism on Characteristics of Fiber Coating or Interphase in Ceramics Matrix Continuous Fiber Reinforced Composites (Postprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-01

    CERAMICS MATRIX CONTINUOUS FIBER REINFORCED COMPOSITES (POSTPRINT) Craig P. Przybyla AFRL/RXCCP JULY 2014 Interim Report...ASSIGNED DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT. //Signature// //Signature// CRAIG P. PRZYBYLA MICHAEL J. KINSELLA, Chief Composites Branch... Composites Branch Structural Materials Division Structural Materials Division //Signature// TIMOTHY J. SCHUMACHER, Chief Structural

  4. Bibliography on Ceramic Matrix Composites and Reinforcing Whiskers, Platelets, and Fibers, 1970-1990

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-01

    Pigott, G. H. Shalek, P D. Hurley, G F Pinto , P. J. Christiansen, D. E. Parkinson, W J J. Mater. Sci. Lett. Katz, J. D. 7 (4), 350-352, 1988 Metal Matrix...of Silicon Carbide-Silicon Carbide Materials Edited by A. R. Bunsell, Abbe, Francois Chermant, Jean -Louis P. Lamicq and A. Massiah J. Am. Ceram. Soc...Babonneau, Florence Livage, Jacques Zirconium Diboride and Tantalum Carbide Soraru, Gian D. Carturan. G Carbon Composites Mackenzie, J. D. Starrett, H

  5. Metal matrix composite structures

    SciTech Connect

    Krivov, G.A.; Beletsky, V.M.; Gribkov, A.N.

    1993-12-31

    High strength-weight properties, stiffness and fatigue resistance characteristics together with low sensitivity to stress concentration make metal matrix composites (MMC) rather promising for their use in structures. Metal matrix composites consist of a matrix (aluminum, magnesium, titanium and their alloys are the most frequently used) and reinforcers (carbon and boron fibers, high-strength steel wire, silicon carbide whiskers, etc.). This work considers various types of MMC and their applications in structures. The methods of structure production from metal matrix CM of aluminum-boron system with the help of machining, deformation, part joining by welding and riveting are given.

  6. Characterization of anisotropic elastic constants of silicon-carbide particulate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites; Part 1: Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, H. ); Hsu, D.K. . Center for Nondestructive Evaluation); Shannon, R.E. . Materials Reliability Dept.); Liaw, P.K. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1994-04-01

    The anisotropic elastic properties of silicon-carbide particulate (SiC[sub p]) reinforced Al metal matrix composites were characterized using ultrasonic techniques and microstructural analysis. The composite materials, fabricated by a powder metallurgy extrusion process, included 2124, 6061, and 7091 Al alloys reinforced by 10 to 30 pct of [alpha]-SiC[sub p] by volume. Results were presented for the assumed orthotropic elastic constants obtained from ultrasonic velocities and for the microstructural data on particulate shape, aspect ratio, and orientation distribution. All of the composite samples exhibited a systematic anisotropy: the stiffness in the extrusion direction was the highest, and the stiffness in the out-of-plane direction was the lowest. Microstructural analysis suggested that the observed anisotropy could be attributed to the preferred orientation of SiC[sub p]. The ultrasonic velocity was found to be sensitive to internal defects such as porosity and intermetallic compounds. It has been observed that ultrasonics may be a useful, nondestructive technique for detecting small directional differences in the overall elastic constants of the composites since a good correlation has been noted between the velocity and microstructure and the mechanical test. By incorporating the observed microstructural characteristics, a theoretical model for predicting the anisotropic stiffnesses of the composites has been developed and is presented in a companion article (Part 2).

  7. Characterization of anisotropie elastic constants of silicon-carbide participate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites: Part I. Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Hyunjo; Hsu, David K.; Shannon, Robert E.; Liaw, Peter K.

    1994-04-01

    The anisotropic elastic properties of silicon-carbide particulate (SiC p ) reinforced Al metal matrix composites were characterized using ultrasonic techniques and microstructural analysis. The composite materials, fabricated by a powder metallurgy extrusion process, included 2124, 6061, and 7091 Al alloys reinforced by 10 to 30 pct of α-SiC p by volume. Results were presented for the assumed orthotropic elastic constants obtained from ultrasonic velocities and for the microstructural data on particulate shape, aspect ratio, and orientation distribution. All of the composite samples exhibited a systematic anisotropy: the stiffness in the extrusion direction was the highest, and the stiffness in the out-of-plane direction was the lowest. Microstructural analysis suggested that the observed anisotropy could be attributed to the preferred orientation of SiC p . The ultrasonic velocity was found to be sensitive to internal defects such as porosity and intermetallic compounds. It has been observed that ultrasonics may be a useful, nondestructive technique for detecting small directional differences in the overall elastic constants of the composites since a good correlation has been noted between the velocity and microstructure and the mechanical test. By incorporating the observed microstructural characteristics, a theoretical model for predicting the anisotropic stiffnesses of the composites has been developed and is presented in a companion article (Part II).

  8. Tribological Wear Behaviour and Hardness Measurement of SiC, Al2O3 Reinforced Al. Matrix Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Senthil Murugan; Vijayan, Jegan; Muthaiah, Velmurugan

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, Aluminium Matrix Hybrid Composite (AMHC) of 6061-T6 alloy reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) particulate and further addition of aluminium oxide (Al2O3) particulate was fabricated by stir casting process. The wear resistance and frictional properties of that AMHC were studied by performing dry sliding wear test using a pin on disk wear tester. The experiments were conducted at a constant sliding velocity of 1.57 m/s and sliding distance of 1800 m under loading conditions of 10 and 20 N. Further tests were also carried out by keeping Al2O3 percentage (7%) constant and increasing the SiC percentage (10, 15, and 20%). The results show that the reinforcement of the metal matrix with SiC and Al2O3 reduces the wear rate range and also indicate that the wear of the test specimen increases with the increasing load and sliding distance. The coefficient of friction increases with load and increasing volume content of reinforcement. The worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscope to study the wear mechanism. By using wear mechanism analysis, the wear surfaces and wear properties of AMHC were determined.

  9. Tribological Wear Behaviour and Hardness Measurement of SiC, Al2O3 Reinforced Al. Matrix Hybrid Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subramanian, Senthil Murugan; Vijayan, Jegan; Muthaiah, Velmurugan

    2017-10-01

    In the present study, Aluminium Matrix Hybrid Composite (AMHC) of 6061-T6 alloy reinforced with silicon carbide (SiC) particulate and further addition of aluminium oxide (Al2O3) particulate was fabricated by stir casting process. The wear resistance and frictional properties of that AMHC were studied by performing dry sliding wear test using a pin on disk wear tester. The experiments were conducted at a constant sliding velocity of 1.57 m/s and sliding distance of 1800 m under loading conditions of 10 and 20 N. Further tests were also carried out by keeping Al2O3 percentage (7%) constant and increasing the SiC percentage (10, 15, and 20%). The results show that the reinforcement of the metal matrix with SiC and Al2O3 reduces the wear rate range and also indicate that the wear of the test specimen increases with the increasing load and sliding distance. The coefficient of friction increases with load and increasing volume content of reinforcement. The worn surfaces were examined by scanning electron microscope to study the wear mechanism. By using wear mechanism analysis, the wear surfaces and wear properties of AMHC were determined.

  10. On Porosity Formation in Metal Matrix Composites Made with Dual-Scale Fiber Reinforcements Using Pressure Infiltration Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Etemadi, Reihaneh; Pillai, Krishna M.; Rohatgi, Pradeep K.; Hamidi, Sajad Ahmad

    2015-05-01

    This is the first such study on porosity formation phenomena observed in dual-scale fiber preforms during the synthesis of metal matrix composites (MMCs) using the gas pressure infiltration process. In this paper, different mechanisms of porosity formation during pressure infiltration of Al-Si alloys into Nextel™ 3D-woven ceramic fabric reinforcements (a dual-porosity or dual-scale porous medium) are studied. The effect of processing conditions on porosity content of the ceramic fabric infiltrated by the alloys through the gas PIP (PIP stands for "Pressure Infiltration Process" in which liquid metal is injected under pressure into a mold packed with reinforcing fibers.) is investigated. Relative density (RD), defined as the ratio of the actual MMC density and the density obtained at ideal 100 pct saturation of the preform, was used to quantify the overall porosity. Increasing the infiltration temperature led to an increase in RD due to reduced viscosity of liquid metal and enhanced wettability leading to improved feedability of the liquid metal. Similarly, increasing the infiltration pressure led to enhanced penetration of fiber tows and resulted in higher RD and reduced porosity. For the first time, the modified Capillary number ( Ca*), which is found to predict formation of porosity in polymer matrix composites quite well, is employed to study porosity in MMCs made using PIP. It is observed that in the high Ca* regime which is common in PIP, the overall porosity shows a strong downward trend with increasing Ca*. In addition, the effect of matrix shrinkage on porosity content of the samples is studied through using a zero-shrinkage Al-Si alloy as the matrix; usage of this alloy as the matrix led to a reduction in porosity content.

  11. Effect of re-melting on particle distribution and interface formation in SiC reinforced 2124Al matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Durbadal; Viswanathan, Srinath

    2013-12-15

    The interface between metal matrix and ceramic reinforcement particles plays an important role in improving properties of the metal matrix composites. Hence, it is important to find out the interface structure of composite after re-melting. In the present investigation, the 2124Al matrix with 10 wt.% SiC particle reinforced composite was re-melted at 800 °C and 900 °C for 10 min followed by pouring into a permanent mould. The microstructures reveal that the SiC particles are distributed throughout the Al-matrix. The volume fraction of SiC particles varies from top to bottom of the composite plate and the difference increases with the decrease of re-melting temperature. The interfacial structure of re-melted 2124Al–10 wt.%SiC composite was investigated using scanning electron microscopy, an electron probe micro-analyzer, a scanning transmission electron detector fitted with scanning electron microscopy and an X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer. It is found that a thick layer of reaction product is formed at the interface of composite after re-melting. The experimental results show that the reaction products at the interface are associated with high concentration of Cu, Mg, Si and C. At re-melting temperature, liquid Al reacts with SiC to form Al{sub 4}C{sub 3} and Al–Si eutectic phase or elemental Si at the interface. High concentration of Si at the interface indicates that SiC is dissociated during re-melting. The X-ray energy dispersive spectrometer analyses confirm that Mg- and Cu-enrich phases are formed at the interface region. The Mg is segregated at the interface region and formed MgAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} in the presence of oxygen. The several elements identified at the interface region indicate that different types of interfaces are formed in between Al matrix and SiC particles. The Al–Si eutectic phase is formed around SiC particles during re-melting which restricts the SiC dissolution. - Highlights: • Re-melted composite shows homogeneous particle

  12. Life Limiting Behavior in Interlaminar Shear of Continuous Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Bansal, Narottam P.; Verrilli, Michael J.

    2006-01-01

    Interlaminar shear strength of four different fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites was determined with doublenotch shear test specimens as a function of test rate at elevated temperatures ranging from 1100 to 1316 C in air. Life limiting behavior, represented as interlaminar shear strength degradation with decreasing test rate, was significant for 2-D crossplied SiC/MAS-5 and 2-D plain-woven C/SiC composites, but insignificant for 2-D plain-woven SiC/SiC and 2-D woven Sylramic (Dow Corning, Midland, Michigan) SiC/SiC composites. A phenomenological, power-law delayed failure model was proposed to account for and to quantify the rate dependency of interlaminar shear strength of the composites. Additional stress rupture testing in interlaminar shear was conducted at elevated temperatures to validate the proposed model. The model was in good agreement with SiC/MAS-5 and C/SiC composites, but in poor to reasonable agreement with Sylramic SiC/SiC. Constant shear stress-rate testing was proposed as a possible means of life prediction testing methodology for ceramic matrix composites subjected to interlaminar shear at elevated temperatures when short lifetimes are expected.

  13. Microstructure and Wear Behavior of High-Cr WCI Matrix Surface Composite Reinforced with Cemented Carbide Rods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Shuzeng; Bao, Chonggao; Zhang, Zhiyun; Bai, Yaping

    2013-07-01

    The present article reports a new superior wear resistance surface composite prepared by a vacuum evaporative pattern casting-in process. This surface composite was constructed with reinforcing cemented carbide rod (CCR) array within high-Cr white cast iron (WCI) matrix. Three reaction zones that formed around the CCRs were characterized and established the good metallurgical bonding between CCRs and matrix. In addition, some compound carbide containing Fe, Cr, W, and Co elements were formed in the reaction zones, owing to the partial dissolution of the CCRs and the resulting interdiffusion of elements such as W, Co, C, Fe, and Cr. The wear behavior of the composite was evaluated and compared with unreinforced high-Cr WCI by means of a three-body abrasive wear tester. The results showed that the wear resistance of the composite was significantly higher than that of the unreinforced high-Cr WCI. The exciting wear resistance can be ascribed to protective effect introduced by the CCRs during wear process and the good metallurgical bonding between CCRs and matrix.

  14. Effect of volume fraction of SiC{sub p} reinforcement on the processing maps for 2124 Al matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Radhakrishna Bhat, B.V.; Mahajan, Y.R.; Prasad, Y.V.R.K.

    2000-03-01

    The hot working characteristics of 2124 Al alloy matrix composites reinforced with 0,5,10,15, and 20 vol pct of SiC particulate, produced by the powder metallurgy route, were studied using processing maps. The maps based on the dynamic materials model were generated from the flow stress data obtained from hot compression tests, carried out at strain rates ranging from 0.001 to 10 s{sup {minus}1} and temperatures ranging from 300 C to 525 C. all the compositions studied exhibited domains of dynamic recrystallization (DRX) and superplasticity. flow instabilities were found at higher strain rates and lower temperatures. The composite with 10 vol pct SiC showed a tendency for abnormal grain growth at lower strains, which manifested itself as a shift in the DRX domain to lower strain rates and the disappearance of the superplasticity domain.

  15. Nanostructured composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D [Oak Ridge, TN; Ripley, Edward B [Knoxville, TN; Ludtka, Gerard M [Oak Ridge, TN

    2012-07-31

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  16. Wear behavior of Al-Si alloy based metal matrix composite reinforced with TiB2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahoo, J. K.; Sahoo, S. K.; Sutar, H.; Sarangi, B.

    2017-02-01

    Al-Si alloy based composites are widely used in automotive, aerospace and for structural application due to improved strength to weight ratio, low density, and better wear resistance. In the present work, Al-xSi-5TiB2 (x=7, 11, 12.6) in-situ composite was synthesized successfully by stir casting method. Here the composites were prepared by the exothermic reaction of K2TiF6 and KBF4 salts with the molten Al-x Si alloy. The dry sliding wear behavior of Al-Si matrix composites reinforced with 5 % TiB2 was studied using a pin-on-disc wear testing machine to study the effect of % Si, load (10, 20, 30 N), sliding speed (1.36, 1.82, 2.27 m.s-1) and sliding distance on stir cast Al–xSi-5TiB2 composites. The Al-Si alloy and the reinforcement mixers were confirmed by the X-ray Diffraction analysis. The microstructure of Al-xSi-5TiB2 composite was investigated by using Optical Microscope to determine the phases present in the prepared composites. The prepared AMC composites were tested for hardness using Vickers Hardness tester with the variation of Si. Wear rate (mm3/m), Wear resistance (m/mm3), Specific Wear rate (m3/N.m) and were analyzed with various conditions. The worn surfaces of the specimens were analyzed before and after wear testing by Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) to determine the governing wear mechanisms in the composites. Wear rate and specific wear rate decreases at all the operating condition with increase in wt% Si. Wear resistance all most increases with increase in wt% Si. Hardness values are increased with increase in amount of Si.

  17. Interfacial sliding strength in fibre reinforced ceramic matrix composites involving positive radial thermal misfit strain

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, B.; Benoit, M.; Rouby, D. )

    1993-06-01

    The mechanical properties of ceramic matrix fibre composites largely depend on the behavior of the fibre-matrix interface and their characteristics have been the subject of much research. However, very little information is available about the experimental analysis of the effect of the fibre diameter. The Nicalon[trademark] Si-O-C fibre (from Nippon Carbon) is known to exhibit a large variation in diameter, from roughly 5 to more than 20 micrometers, with an average value close to 15 micrometers. This feature give one a good opportunity for studying the interfacial characteristics as a function of fibre size. In addition, recent works clearly show that the interface roughness plays an important role in the frictional sliding mechanisms. The purpose of the present paper is to present and to analyze the effect of the fibre radius on the interfacial shear stress related to the friction characteristic (ISSF) measured by means of the non-instrumentated indentation method, in the case of a Nicalon[trademark]/glass-ceramic composite where the thermal expansion coefficient (CTE) of the matrix is lower than that of the fibres.

  18. Materials characterization of silicon carbide reinforced titanium (Ti/SCS-6) metal matrix composites: Part I. Tensile and fatigue behavior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaw, P. K.; Diaz, E. S.; Chiang, K. T.; Loh, D. H.

    1995-12-01

    Flexural fatigue behavior was investigated on titanium (Ti-15V-3Cr) metal matrix composites reinforced with cross-ply, continuous silicon carbide (SiC) fibers. The titanium composites had an eightply (0, 90, +45, -45 deg) symmetric layup. Fatigue life was found to be sensitive to fiber layup sequence. Increasing the test temperature from 24 °C to 427 °C decreased fatigue life. Interface debonding and matrix and fiber fracture were characteristic of tensile behavior regardless of test temperature. In the tensile fracture process, interface debonding between SiC and the graphite coating and between the graphite coating and the carbon core could occur. A greater amount of coating degradation at 427 °C than at 24 °C reduced the Ti/SiC interface bonding integrity, which resulted in lower tensile properties at 427 °C. During tensile testing, a crack could initiate from the debonded Ti/SiC interface and extend to the debonded interface of the neighboring fiber. The crack tended to propagate through the matrix and the interface. Dimpled fracture was the prime mode of matrix fracture. During fatigue testing, four stages of flexural deflection behavior were observed. The deflection at stage I increased slightly with fatigue cycling, while that at stage II increased significantly with cycling. Interestingly, the deflection at stage III increased negligibly with fatigue cycling. Stage IV was associated with final failure, and the deflection increased abruptly. Interface debonding, matrix cracking, and fiber bridging were identified as the prime modes of fatigue mechanisms. To a lesser extent, fiber fracture was observed during fatigue. However, fiber fracture was believed to occur near the final stage of fatigue failure. In fatigued specimens, facet-type fracture appearance was characteristic of matrix fracture morphology. Theoretical modeling of the fatigue behavior of Ti/SCS-6 composites is presented in Part II of this series of articles.

  19. Wear Resistance of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Al2O3 Particles After Multiple Remelting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klasik, Adam; Pietrzak, Krystyna; Makowska, Katarzyna; Sobczak, Jerzy; Rudnik, Dariusz; Wojciechowski, Andrzej

    2016-08-01

    Based on previous results, the commercial composites of A359 (AlSi9Mg) alloy reinforced with 22 vol.% Al2O3 particles were submitted to multiple remelting by means of gravity casting and squeeze-casting procedures. The studies were focused on tribological tests, x-ray phase analyses, and microstructural examinations. More promising results were obtained for squeeze-casting method mainly because of the reduction of the negative microstructural effects such as shrinkage porosity or other microstructural defects and discontinuities. The results showed that direct remelting may be treated as economically well-founded and alternative way compared to other recycling processes. It was underlined that the multiple remelting method must be analyzed for any material separately.

  20. Mechanical properties of neat polymer matrix materials and their unidirectional carbon fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerman, Richard S.; Adams, Donald F.

    1988-01-01

    The mechanical properties of two neat resin systems for use in carbon fiber epoxy composites were characterized. This included tensile and shear stiffness and strengths, coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion, and fracture toughness. Tests were conducted on specimens in the dry and moisture-saturated states, at temperatures of 23, 82 and 121 C. The neat resins tested were American Cyanamid 1806 and Union Carbide ERX-4901B(MPDA). Results were compared to previously tested neat resins. Four unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced composites were mechanically characterized. Axial and transverse tension and in-plane shear strengths and stiffness were measured, as well as transverse coefficients of thermal and moisture expansion. Tests were conducted on dry specimens only at 23 and 100 C. The materials tested were AS4/3502, AS6/5245-C, T300/BP907, and C6000/1806 unidirectional composites. Scanning electron microscopic examination of fracture surfaces was performed to permit the correlation of observed failure modes with the environmental test conditions.

  1. Effect of heat treatment on microstructure and interface of SiC particle reinforced 2124 Al matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Mandal, Durbadal; Viswanathan, Srinath

    2013-11-15

    The microstructure and interface between metal matrix and ceramic reinforcement of a composite play an important role in improving its properties. In the present investigation, the interface and intermetallic compound present in the samples were characterized to understand structural stability at an elevated temperature. Aluminum based 2124 alloy with 10 wt.% silicon carbide (SiC) particle reinforced composite was prepared through vortex method and the solid ingot was deformed by hot rolling for better particle distribution. Heat treatment of the composite was carried out at 575 °C with varying holding time from 1 to 48 h followed by water quenching. In this study, the microstructure and interface of the SiC particle reinforced Al based composites have been studied using optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM) coupled with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron probe micro-analyzer (EPMA) associated with wavelength dispersive spectroscopy (WDS) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to identify the precipitate and intermetallic phases that are formed during heat treatment. The SiC particles are uniformly distributed in the aluminum matrix. The microstructure analyses of Al–SiC composite after heat treatment reveal that a wide range of dispersed phases are formed at grain boundary and surrounding the SiC particles. The energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and wavelength dispersive spectroscopy analyses confirm that finely dispersed phases are CuAl{sub 2} and CuMgAl{sub 2} intermetallic and large spherical phases are Fe{sub 2}SiAl{sub 8} or Al{sub 15}(Fe,Mn){sub 3}Si. It is also observed that a continuous layer enriched with Cu and Mg of thickness 50–80 nm is formed at the interface in between Al and SiC particles. EDS analysis also confirms that Cu and Mg are segregated at the interface of the composite while no carbide is identified at the interface. - Highlights: • The composite was successfully heat treated at 575°C for 1

  2. Hydrothermal and mechanical stresses degrade fiber-matrix interfacial bond strength in dental fiber-reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Bouillaguet, Serge; Schütt, Andrea; Alander, Pasi; Schwaller, Patrick; Buerki, Gerhard; Michler, Johann; Cattani-Lorente, Maria; Vallittu, Pekka K; Krejci, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs) show great promise as long-term restorative materials in dentistry and medicine. Recent evidence indicates that these materials degrade in vivo, but the mechanisms are unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate mechanisms of deterioration of glass fiber-polymer matrix bond strengths in dental fiber-reinforced composites during hydrothermal and mechanical aging. Conventional three-point bending tests on dental FRCs were used to assess flexural strengths and moduli. Micro push-out tests were used to measure glass fiber-polymer matrix bond strengths, and nanoindentation tests were used to determine the modulus of elasticity of fiber and polymer matrix phases separately. Bar-shaped specimens of FRCs (EverStick, StickTech, and Vectris Pontic, Ivoclar-Vivadent) were either stored at room temperature, in water (37 and 100 degrees C) or subjected to ageing (10(6) cycles, load: 49 N), then tested by three-point bending. Thin slices were prepared for micro push-out and nanoindentation tests. The ultimate flexural strengths of both FRCs were significantly reduced after aging (p < 0.05). Both water storage and mechanical loading reduced the interfacial bond strengths of glass fibers to polymer matrices. Nanoindentation tests revealed a slight reduction in the elastic modulus of the EverStick and Vectris Pontic polymer matrix after water storage. Mechanical properties of FRC materials degrade primarily by a loss of interfacial bond strength between the glass and resin phases. This degradation is detectable by micro push-out and nanoindentation methods.

  3. Structure formation during processing short carbon fiber- reinforced aluminum alloy matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciby, S.; Pai, B. C.; Satyanarayana, K. G.; Vaidyan, V. K.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1993-06-01

    Nickel- and copper-coated, as well as uncoated, short carbon fibers were dispersed in melts of aluminum or aluminum alloys by stirring followed by solidification of composite melts. Microstructural examina-tion of cast composites indicated extensive damage to the surface of the carbon fibers when uncoated carbon fibers were introduced into the melt under the conditions of the present investigation. When nickel- or copper-coated carbon fibers were used to make composites under similar conditions, the fibers generally did not exhibit observable amounts of fiber surface degradation at the interface, except for small islands of an Al4C3 phase. When nickel-coated carbon fibers were used to make composites, the coating reacted with the melt, and NiAl3 intermetallic phase particles were observed in the matrix away from the fibers, indicating a preference for nucleation of NiAl3 away from the fiber surfaces. Under a transmission electron microscope (TEM), the NiAl3 phase was not observed on the surface of carbon fi-bers, except in some regions where the NiAl3 phase engulfed the carbon fibers during growth. When cop-per-coated carbon fibers were used to make composites, the coating reacted with the melt, and particles of CuAl2 intermetallic compound were generally dispersed in the matrix away from the fibers, except for a few locations where the CuAl2 phase was found at the interface under TEM observation. These micro-structures are discussed in terms of nucleation of primary α aluminum and NiAl3 or CuAl2 phases and the interaction between short carbon fibers and these phases during growth while the composite was so-lidifying. Additionally, the role of the reaction between nickel or copper coatings and the melt on struc-ture formation is discussed; some of the differences between the nickel and copper coatings are attributed to the fact that nickel dissolves with an exothermic reaction. The differences between solidification of short fiber composites and particle or fiber

  4. Studies of Matrix/Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials for the High Speed Research (HSR) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The research on the curing mechanism of the phenylethynyl terminated imide matrix resins was the primary focus of this research. The ability to process high performance polymers into useful adhesives and high quality composites has been significantly advanced by synthetic techniques in which oligomers terminated with reactive groups cure or crosslink at elevated temperature after the article has been fabricated. The research used a variety of analytical techniques. Many stable products were isolated, and attempts at identification were made. This research was intended to provide fundamental insight into the molecular structure of these new engineering materials.

  5. Studies of Matrix/Fiber Reinforced Composite Materials for the High Speed Research (HSR) Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orwoll, Robert A.

    1998-01-01

    The research on the curing mechanism of the phenylethynyl terminated imide matrix resins was the primary focus of this research. The ability to process high performance polymers into useful adhesives and high quality composites has been significantly advanced by synthetic techniques in which oligomers terminated with reactive groups cure or crosslink at elevated temperature after the article has been fabricated. The research used a variety of analytical techniques. Many stable products were isolated, and attempts at identification were made. This research was intended to provide fundamental insight into the molecular structure of these new engineering materials.

  6. Processing of a fiber-reinforced transparent glass matrix composite and study of micromechanics of load transfer from matrix to fiber using micro-fluorescence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Debangshu

    The brittleness of monolithic ceramic materials can be overcome by reinforcing them with high strength, high modulus ceramic fibers. These ceramic matrix composites exhibit improved strength, toughness, and work of fracture. Successful design of a ceramic matrix composite (CMC) depends on two factors: proper choice of fiber, matrix, and interface material, and understanding the mechanics of fracture. The conventional techniques for measuring stress and strain at a local level in CMCs are based on indirect experiments and analytical models. In recent years a couple of optical techniques have been explored for non- contact and direct evaluation of the stress and strain in materials, such as laser Raman spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy. In order to employ spectroscopy to study stress in a composite, a transparent matrix was needed. In this study a SiC fiber reinforced transparent glass matrix composite was developed. A tape casting, binder burnout, and sintering route was adopted to achieve the optimum transparency with proper fiber alignment and interfacial properties. Sapphire fibers were used to act as probe to generate fluorescence signals for measuring stress. A fugitive carbon coating was developed to act as a weak interface for the sapphire fiber, which otherwise, forms a strong bond with the matrix. A fixture was designed to apply stress on the composite specimen, in situ, under the microscope of the spectrometer. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, the micromechanics of load transfer from matrix to fibers were studied. Studies were conducted on both strongly and weakly bonded fibers, as well as on single fiber, and multi fiber situations. Residual stresses arising from thermal expansion mismatch have been mapped along the fiber length with resolution in microns. Residual axial stress was found to follow a shear lag profile along the fiber length. A finite residual axial stress was detected at the fiber ends. Correction of the measured stress for sample

  7. Fiber phase transformation and matrix plastic flow in a room temperature tensile strained NiTi shape memory alloy fiber reinforced 6082 aluminum matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Armstrong, W.D.; Lorentzen, T.

    1997-05-01

    Macroscopic tensile and in-situ neutron diffraction measurements are reported from a 20.5 volume percent, 50.7 at% Ni-Ti fiber reinforced 6082-T6 aluminum matrix composite subjected to a room temperature, 4% tensile elongation. The austenite B2(110) diffraction intensity was essentially stable until approximately 0.9% strain, beyond which, the austenite B2(110) diffraction intensity strongly decreased with increasing tensile strain. The martensite M(001) diffraction intensity strongly increased from a zero intensity intercept at approximately 2.3% strain to the conclusion of tensile straining. This report concludes that the initial decrease in austenite B2(11) diffraction intensity locates the initiation of stress induced transformations in the NiTi reinforcement, furthermore this feature corresponds with an elevated yield point region in the macroscopic tensile results. Therefore, it appears that the elevated yield point region is caused by a temporary inhibition of fiber stress induced transformations.

  8. Zrb2 nanoparticle cluster reinforced Al matrix composites fabricated by direct melt reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenya; Yang, Rui; Liu, Menglu; Yue, Yamei; Tang, Zhenming; Meng, Mingai; Jiao, Lei

    2017-01-01

    In this work, ZrB2 nanoparticle cluster reinforced 6061Al composites were synthesized by direct melt reaction between halide salts (KBF4 and K2ZrF6) and Al. The experimental results revealed that the formation of Type III cluster (>60 µm, grain interior) depended on ZrB2 addition levels (>2 vol. %), whilst Type I (˜5 µm, grain interior) and II (5˜60 µm, grain/ interdendritic boundaries) were always present. The optimum tensile strength and elongation obtained in 2vol. % ZrB2/6061Al composite were substantially improved to approximately 1.52 and 2.75 times those of the 6061Al alloy. The enhanced strength was attributed to a combination effect of grain refinement (Type II cluster) and Orowan/CTE strengthening (Type I cluster). On the other hand, the impressive ductility increase was also ascribed to the presence of toughened clusters (Type I and II) that introduced the plastic slip bands and equiaxed dimples.

  9. Residual stresses in particulate and short fiber reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, S.J.; Cai, H.W.; Zhang, G.D.; Wu, R.J.

    1993-12-31

    Thermal residual stresses in the matrix alloy of both SiC particulate 2124 aluminum alloy and Saffil ({delta}-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}) short fiber Al-3.4%Cu composites in different heat treatment conditions were measured using a conventional X-ray diffractometer. A multi-exposure technique (sin{sup 2} {psi} method) was employed. Under all the heat-treated conditions, i.e. furnace cooled, quenched and aged, compressive residual stresses were detected in the surface regions of both composites. These measured stresses are the resultant of the micro and macro-stresses present in the composites. During aging the stress relaxed slowly at ambient and more rapidly at elevated temperatures (180{degree}C). In the Saffil short fiber composite the surface stress in the fiber plane was much reduced when compared with that in a perpendicular plane, when both samples were in the as-quenched condition. The pattern of stress relaxation is explained in part in terms of the precipitation reactions which take place in the two alloys during aging.

  10. SiC (SCS-6) Fiber Reinforced-Reaction Formed SiC Matrix Composites: Microstructure and Interfacial Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Singh, M.; Dickerson, R. M.; Olmstead, Forrest A.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1997-01-01

    Microstructural and interfacial characterization of unidirectional SiC (SCS-6) fiber reinforced-reaction formed SiC (RFSC) composites has been carried out. Silicon-1.7 at.% molybdenum alloy was used as the melt infiltrant, instead of pure silicon, to reduce the activity of silicon in the melt as well as to reduce the amount of free silicon in the matrix. Electron microprobe analysis was used to evaluate the microstructure and phase distribution in these composites. The matrix is SiC with a bi-modal grain-size distribution and small amounts of MoSi2, silicon, and carbon. Fiber push-outs tests on these composites showed that a desirably low interfacial shear strength was achieved. The average debond shear stress at room temperature varied with specimen thickness from 29 to 64 MPa, with higher values observed for thinner specimens. Initial frictional sliding stresses showed little thickness dependence with values generally close to 30 MPa. Push-out test results showed very little change when the test temperature was increased to 800 C from room temperature, indicating an absence of significant residual stresses in the composite.

  11. Effect of monomer composition of polymer matrix on flexural properties of glass fibre-reinforced orthodontic archwire.

    PubMed

    Ohtonen, J; Vallittu, P K; Lassila, L V J

    2013-02-01

    To compare force levels obtained from glass fibre-reinforced composite (FRC) archwires. Specifically, FRC wires were compared with polymer matrices having different dimethacrylate monomer compositions. FRC material (E-glass provided by Stick Tech Ltd, Turku, Finland) with continuous unidirectional glass fibres and four different types of dimethacrylate monomer compositions for the resin matrix were tested. Cross-sectionally round FRC archwires fitting into the 0.3 mm slot of a bracket were divided into 16 groups with six specimens in each group. Glass fibres were impregnated by the manufacturer, and they were initially light-cured by hand light-curing unit or additionally post-cured in light-curing oven. The FRC archwire specimens were tested at 37°C according to a three-point bending test in dry and wet conditions using a span length of 10 mm and a crosshead speed of 1.0 mm/minute. The wires were loaded until final failure. The data were statistically analysed using analysis of variance (ANOVA). The dry FRC archwire specimens revealed higher load values than water stored ones, regardless of the polymer matrix. A majority of the FRC archwires showed higher load values after being post-cured. ANOVA revealed that the polymer matrix, curing method, and water storage had a significant effect (P < 0.05) on the flexural behaviour of the FRC archwire. Polymer matrix composition, curing method, and water storage affected the flexural properties and thus, force level and working range which could be obtained from the FRC archwire.

  12. Fatigue Life Prediction of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites with Different Fiber Preforms at Room and Elevated Temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, the fatigue life of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) with different fiber preforms, i.e., unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D (two dimensional), 2.5D and 3D CMCs at room and elevated temperatures in air and oxidative environments, has been predicted using the micromechanics approach. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fiber broken fraction was determined by combining the interface wear model and fiber statistical failure model at room temperature, and interface/fiber oxidation model, interface wear model and fiber statistical failure model at elevated temperatures, based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the load carried by broken and intact fibers satisfies the Global Load Sharing (GLS) criterion. When the broken fiber fraction approaches the critical value, the composites fatigue fracture. PMID:28773332

  13. An experimental and theoretical investigation of the rapid consolidation of continuously reinforced, metal-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolaou, P.D.; Semiatin, S.L.; Goetz, R.L.

    1996-06-01

    The feasibility of the rapid consolidation of Ti-14Al-21Nb/SCS-6 foil/fiber/foil composites using a forging approach was established as an alternative to slower and more expensive processes such as those based on hot isostatic pressing (HIP) or vacuum hot pressing (VHP). A firm basis for the technique was developed through theoretical analyses of temperature transients, forging pressures, and fiber fracture. These analyses demonstrated that there exists an optimal forging speed at which the consolidation stresses are a minimum. It was also shown that the flow stress of the encapsulation material relative to that of the densifying layup is an important consideration in achieving full consolidation during forging. Specifically, the difference in flow stress between the two materials influences the magnitude and sign of the in-plane (secondary) stresses that are developed during forging and therefore the rate of pore closure during the latter stages of the process. With regard to fiber fracture, analyses were performed to estimate the axial and tangential stresses during rapid consolidation. The theoretical work was validated by experimental trials using the Ti-14Al-21Nb matrix/silicon carbide fiber system. Measured forging pressures were in good agreement wit h predictions. Fiber fracture observations indicated that tangential tensile stresses developed in the fiber control failure; a forging window to avoid such failures was thus developed. Finally, it was demonstrated that matrix microstructures and mechanical properties similar to those of conventionally consolidated Ti-14Al-21Nb/silicon carbide composites can be achieved by the forge-consolidation technique.

  14. An experimental and theoretical investigation of the rapid consolidation of continuously reinforced, metal-matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolaou, P. D.; Semiatin, S. L.; Goetz, R. L.

    1996-06-01

    The feasibility of the rapid consolidation of T-14Al-21Nb/SCS-6 foil/fiber/foil composites using a forging approach was established as an alternative to slower and more expensive processes such as those based on hot isostatic pressing (HIP) or vacuum hot pressing (VHP). A firm basis for the technique was developed through theoretical analyses of temperature transients, forging pressures, and fiber fracture. These analyses demonstrated that there exists an optimal forging speed at which the consolidation stresses are a minimum. It was also shown that the flow stress of the encapsulation material relative to that of the densifying layup is an important consideration in achieving full consolidation during forging. Specifically, the difference in flow stress between the two materials influences the magnitude and sign of the in-plane (secondary) stresses that are developed during forging and therefore the rate of pore closure during the latter stages of the process. With regard to fiber fracture, analyses were performed to estimate the axial and tangential stresses during rapid consolidation. The theoretical work was validated by experimental trials using the Ti-14Al-21Nb matrix/silicon carbide fiber system. Measured forging pressures were in good agreement with predictions. Fiber fracture observations indicated that tangential tensile stresses developed in the fiber control failure; a forging window to avoid such failures was thus developed. Finally, it was demonstrated that matrix microstructures and mechanical properties similar to those of conventionally consolidated Ti-14Al-21Nb/silicon carbide composites can be achieved by the forge-consolidation technique.

  15. Relationship Between Hysteresis Dissipated Energy and Temperature Rising in Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, the relationship between hysteresis dissipated energy and temperature rising of the external surface in fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) during the application of cyclic loading has been analyzed. The temperature rise, which is caused by frictional slip of fibers within the composite, is related to the hysteresis dissipated energy. Based on the fatigue hysteresis theories considering fibers failure, the hysteresis dissipated energy and a hysteresis dissipated energy-based damage parameter changing with the increase of cycle number have been investigated. The relationship between the hysteresis dissipated energy, a hysteresis dissipated energy-based damage parameter and a temperature rise-based damage parameter have been established. The experimental temperature rise-based damage parameter of unidirectional, cross-ply and 2D woven CMCs corresponding to different fatigue peak stresses and cycle numbers have been predicted. It was found that the temperature rise-based parameter can be used to monitor the fatigue damage evolution and predict the fatigue life of fiber-reinforced CMCs.

  16. Oxidation of SiC Fiber-Reinforced SiC Matrix Composites with a BN Interphase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Opila, Elizabeth; Boyd, Meredith K.

    2010-01-01

    SiC-fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites with a BN interphase were oxidized in reduced oxygen partial pressures of oxygen to simulate the environment for hypersonic vehicle leading edge applications. The constituent fibers as well as composite coupons were oxidized in oxygen partial pressures ranging from 1000 ppm O2 to 5% O2 balance argon. Exposure temperatures ranged from 816 C to 1353 C (1500 F to 2450 F). The oxidation kinetics of the coated fibers were monitored by thermogravimetric analysis (TGA). An initial rapid transient weight gain was observed followed by parabolic kinetics. Possible mechanisms for the transient oxidation are discussed. One edge of the composite coupon seal coat was ground off to simulate damage to the composite which allowed oxygen ingress to the interior of the composite. Oxidation kinetics of the coupons were characterized by scanning electron microscopy since the weight changes were minimal. It was found that sealing of the coupon edge by silica formation occurred. Differences in the amount and morphology of the sealing silica as a function of time, temperature and oxygen partial pressure are discussed. Implications for use of these materials for hypersonic vehicle leading edge materials are summarized.

  17. Composite Intersection Reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misciagna, David T. (Inventor); Fuhrer, Jessica J. (Inventor); Funk, Robert S. (Inventor); Tolotta, William S. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    An assembly and method for manufacturing a composite reinforcement for unitizing a structure are provided. According to one embodiment, the assembly includes a base having a plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom to define a structure about which a composite fiber is wound to define a composite reinforcement preform. The assembly also includes a plurality of mandrels positioned adjacent to the base and at least a portion of the composite reinforcement preform, and a cap that is positioned over at least a portion of the plurality of mandrels. The cap is configured to engage each of the mandrels to support the mandrels and the composite reinforcement preform during a curing process to form the composite reinforcement.

  18. Composite intersection reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Misciagna, David T. (Inventor); Fuhrer, Jessica J. (Inventor); Funk, Robert S. (Inventor); Tolotta, William S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    An assembly and method for manufacturing a composite reinforcement for unitizing a structure are provided. According to one embodiment, the assembly includes a base having a plurality of pins extending outwardly therefrom to define a structure about which a composite fiber is wound to define a composite reinforcement preform. The assembly also includes a plurality of mandrels positioned adjacent to the base and at least a portion of the composite reinforcement preform, and a cap that is positioned over at least a portion of the plurality of mandrels. The cap is configured to engage each of the mandrels to support the mandrels and the composite reinforcement preform during a curing process to form the composite reinforcement.

  19. The interface in tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal-matrix composites. Final Report Ph.D. Thesis - Case Western Reserve Univ., Cleveland, OH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grobstein, Toni L.

    1989-01-01

    The creep resistance of tungsten fiber reinforced niobium metal-matrix composites was evaluated. The interface region between the fiber and matrix was characterized by microhardness and electron probe microanalysis measurements which indicated that its properties were between those of fiber and matrix. However, the measured properties of the composite exceeded those calculated by the rule of mixtures even when the interface zone was assumed to retain all the strength of the fiber. The composite structure appeared to enhance the strengths of both the fibers and the matrix above what they exhibited in stand-alone tests. The effect of fiber orientation and matrix alloy composition on the fiber/matrix interface were also evaluated. Small alloying additions of zirconium and tungsten to the niobium matrix affected the creep resistance of the composites only slightly. A decrease in the creep resistance of the composite with increasing zirconium content in the matrix was ascribed to an increase in the diffusion rate of the fiber/matrix interdiffusion reaction, and a slight increase in the creep resistance of the composite was observed with an addition of 9 w percent tungsten to the matrix. In addition, Kirkendall void formation was observed at the fiber/matrix interface; the void distribution differed depending on the fiber orientation relative to the stress axis.

  20. Tribological Behavior of TiAl Metal Matrix Composite Brake Disk with TiC Reinforcement Under Dry Sliding Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liaquat, Hassan; Shi, Xiaoliang; Yang, Kang; Huang, Yuchun; Liu, Xiyao; Wang, Zhihai

    2017-07-01

    In this investigation, the effect of TiC particulate reinforcement and sintering parameters on tribological behavior of TiAl metal matrix composite (TMMC) has been studied and compared with commercially conventional gray cast iron to evaluate the use of TMMC as brake disk material in an automobile. Three sample disks of TMMC containing TiC particulate reinforcement (D1-5 wt.%, D2 and D3-10 wt.%) were produced by the spark plasma sintering process. D3 compared with D2 was sintered at a higher temperature to evaluate the effect of SPS parameters on the wear characteristics of TMMC. All experiments were performed on pin-on-disk tribotester under a dry sliding condition with different loads (10-11.5 N) and sliding velocities (0.2-0.9 m/s). It is found that higher content of TiC increased TMMC hardness and density. XRD technique has been used to analyze the phase composition. Owing to the high sintering temperature, α-2 Ti3Al phase was formed which further enhanced the matrix anti-wear capability. Scanning electron microscope (SEM) was used to capture the wear track and observe wear mechanism. Energy-dispersive spectroscopy (EDS) has been used to analyze the tribofilm and wear debris. The results showed that the tribofilm for TMMC was mainly composed of metal oxides. Oxidation of Al and Ti due to frictional heat provides wear-resistant protective layer. Under almost all sliding conditions, TMMC, especially disk D3, exhibited minimum wear rate and stable friction coefficient, whereas gray cast iron exhibited lower and unstable friction coefficient as well as higher wear rate. TMMC has shown superior tribological characteristics over gray cast iron in terms of low wear rate along with stable and adequate friction coefficient which is necessary for braking operation and life of brake disk. However, further investigation on full-scale automobile conditions is needed for its practical application.

  1. Synthesis and Characterization of In Situ Dendritic/Particulate α-Al(Fe,TM)Si Phase Reinforced Al Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, L. G.; Wang, Shuai; He, Z. B.; Zhang, D.; Wang, X. D.; Zhuang, L. Z.; Zhang, J. S.

    2016-12-01

    The strength and ductility of transition metallic element alloyed Al alloys could be inevitably and severely weakened if these elements appeared as coarse intermetallics. Present studies aimed to optimize the morphologies and sizes of these intermetallics via composition design and process selection so as to decrease their detrimental effects to the properties. It is shown that the dendritic α-Al(Fe,TM)Si phase solidified as primary phase can be refined into small dendrites or micro- and submicro-sized particles via controlling the cooling rate and alloy composition, and this phase exhibits better heat resistance. After spark plasma sintering (SPS) the atomized alloy powders, the bulk aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) were successfully prepared and well strengthened by the uniformly distributed particulate α-Al(Fe,TM)Si phase. These sintered bulk composites also possess good heat resistance that might facilitate their application for some heat-resistant parts. The transmission electron microscope (TEM) and high-resolution TEM (HRTEM) results indicate these α-Al(Fe,TM)Si phases possesses body-centered-cubic structure with a lattice constant of 1.25 to 1.27 nm. The solidification or phase formation of these alloys is discussed as well as the densification process for the SPS of powders. The present studies indicate a possibility to prepare in situ small dendritic/particulate α-Al(Fe,TM)Si phase reinforced AMCs by using the casting process and controlling the normal impurity elements in Al alloys.

  2. Impact of long-term thermal exposure on a SiC fiber-reinforced copper matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimmig, S.; Elgeti, S.; You, Jeong-Ha

    2013-11-01

    Silicon carbide long fiber-reinforced copper matrix composites offer huge potential as a heat sink material of divertor for applications at temperatures above 300 °C thanks to the beneficial combination of strong ceramic fibers and highly conductive copper. For applications at higher operation temperatures, long term thermal stability is an issue, as thermal exposure may cause a detrimental change in microstructure in terms of chemistry and integrity of the constituents leading to overall deterioration of composite strength. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of long term thermal exposure at an elevated temperature on a Cu/SiCf composite material. To this end, composite samples were fabricated and subjected to a heat treatment at 550 °C for 400 h. Extensive tensile tests were conducted for a wide range of fibers volume fractions to evaluate the strength before and after the heat treatment. Acoustic emission was detected in situ during tensile tests for tracking the failure events. Microscopic analysis was carried out to capture the chemical change and damage. It turned out that the applied heat treatment caused significant reduction of strength. Microanalysis revealed that infiltration and diffusion of copper into the fibers via the cracks of the damaged fibers are the direct cause of the embrittlement.

  3. Fabrication of protective-coated SiC reinforced tungsten matrix composites with reduced reaction phases by spark plasma sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umer, Malik Adeel; Lee, Dongju; Waseem, Owais Ahmed; Ryu, Ho Jin; Hong, Soon Hyung

    2016-05-01

    SiC reinforced tungsten matrix composites were fabricated via the spark plasma sintering process. In order to prevent an interfacial reaction between the SiC and tungsten during sintering, TiOx coated SiC particles were synthesized by a solution-based process. TiOx layer coated SiC particles were treated in high temperature nitriding conditions or annealed in a high temperature vacuum to form TiN or TiC coated SiC particles, respectively. The TiC layers coated on SiC particles successfully prevented tungsten from reacting with SiC; hence the proposed process resulted in successful fabrication of the SiC/W composites. The mechanical properties such as compressive strength and flexural strength of the composites were measured. Additionally, the effect of SiC on the high temperature oxidative ablation of tungsten was also investigated. The addition of SiC resulted in an improved oxidative ablation resistance of the tungsten-based composites.

  4. Tensile properties of short fiber-reinforced SiC/Ai composites: Part I. effects of matrix precipitates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Papazian, J. M.; Adler, P. N.

    1990-01-01

    The tensile behavior of aluminum matrix composites reinforced with 8 and 20 pet SiC whiskers or paniculate was characterized. Two matrix alloys were employed, a solution-hardened Al-Mg alloy (5456) and a precipitation-hardened Al-Cu-Mg alloy (2124). The precipitation-hardened alloy was aged to develop a variety of precipitate microstructures. It was found that additions of SiC caused monotonie increases in the elastic modulus, 0.2 pct offset yield stress, work-hardening rate, and ultimate tensile stress. The proportional limit, however, was found to first decrease and then increase with SiC content. Whiskers caused a greater increase in the longitudinal elastic modulus than particles. For the 2124 alloy, it was found that the proportional limit could be varied between 60 and 650 MPa by changing the precipitate microstructure, while changes in the SiC content had much smaller effects. These observations are discussed in relation to current theories of the strengthening of short fiber composites, with primary emphasis being placed on the effects of SiC additions on the elastic modulus and the work-hardening rate.

  5. Hot pressing titanium metal matrix composites reinforced with graphene nanoplatelets through an in-situ reactive method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mu, X. N.; Zhang, H. M.; Cai, H. N.; Fan, Q. B.; Wu, Y.; Fu, Z. J.; Wang, Q. X.

    2017-05-01

    This study proposed an in-situ reactive method that uses graphene as a reinforcement to fabricate titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) through powder metallurgy processing route. The volume fraction of graphene nanoplatelets was 1.8%vol, and the pure titanium was used as a matrix. The Archimedes density, hardness, microstructure and mechanical properties of specimens were compared under different ball milling times (20 min and 2.5 h) and hot pressing temperatures (900°C, 1150°C, and 1300°C,). The ultimate tensile strength of 630 MPa, which demonstrated a 27.3% increase compared with pure Ti, was achieved under a ball milling time of 20 min. Elongation increased with increasing temperature. When the ball milling time and hot pressing temperature were increased to 2.5 h and 1300 °C, respectively, the ultimate tensile strength of the composites reached 750 MPa, showing an increase of 51.5% compared with pure Ti.

  6. Processing and properties of fiber reinforced polymeric matrix composites: I. IM7/LARC(TM)-PETI-7 polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    1995-01-01

    A phenylethynyl terminated imide oligomer formed from the reaction of benzophenone tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride, an 75:25 molar ratio of 4,4'-oxydianiline and meta-phenylenediamine and 4-phenylethynylphthalic anhydride as the endcapper at a theoretical number average molecular weight (Mn) of approximately 3,700 g/mol was evaluated as a composite resin matrix. A glass transition temperature (Tg) of 315 deg C was reached after 250 deg C/1 hr annealing of the matrix resin. Unidirectional prepreg was made by coating an N-methylpyrrolidinone solution of the amide acid oligomer onto unsized IM7 graphite fibers. The thermal and rheological properties and the solvent/volatile depletion rates of the amide acid/NMP system were determined. This information was used to successfully design a molding cycle for composite fabrication. Composites molded under 800 Psi at 371 C consistently yielded good consolidation as measured by C-scan and optical photomicrography. The composite's short beam shear strength (SBS), longitudinal and transverse flexural strengths and moduli were measured at various temperatures. These composites exhibited excellent room temperature (RT) longitudinal flexural strength and modulus and RT SBS strength retention at 177 C.

  7. Raman Study of Uncoated and p-BN/SiC-Coated Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites. Part 1; Distribution and Nanostructure of Different Phases

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouadec, Gwenael; Colomban, Philippe; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2000-01-01

    Hi-Nicalon fiber reinforced celsian matrix composites were characterized by Raman spectroscopy and imaging, using several laser wavelengths. Composite #1 is reinforced by as-received fibers while coatings of p-BN and SiC protect the fibers in composite #2. The matrix contains traces of the hexagonal phase of celsian, which is concentrated in the neighborhood of fibers in composite #1. Some free silicon was evident in the coating of composite #2 which might involve a {BN + SiC yields BNC + Si} "reaction" at the p-BN/SiC interface. Careful analysis of C-C peaks revealed no abnormal degradation of the fiber core in the composites.

  8. Rehabilitation of notch damaged steel beam using a carbon fiber reinforced multiphase-matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, HongYu; Attard, Dr. Thomas L.; Wang, Yanli; Wang, Jy-An John; Ren, Fei

    2013-01-01

    The retrofit of notch damaged steel beams is investigated via the experimental testing of nine wide-flange steel beam specimens and finite element simulation. Three notch configurations representing various damage levels were identified, and the beam specimens were retrofitted using CFRP laminates and a recently developed polymeric matrix composite - CarbonFlex - that exhibits superior energy dissipation and ductility properties, where the peak-load deflections were between 49.4% and 65.2% higher using the CarbonFlex-retrofitted beams. The results are attributed to the substantially higher damage tolerance capability of CarbonFlex than conventional CFRP. Finite element models were developed to investigate the damage processes and strain/ stress distributions near the notch tips. The numerical results match closely with the experimentally determined load-deflection curves and the strain fields obtained by the digital imaging correlations (DIC) system. Both experimental and numerical results clearly indicate the effectiveness of CarbonFlex, as a candidate retrofitting material, to retrofit damaged steel structures. Lastly, the micro-mechanisms by which CarbonFlex could sufficiently sustain a significant amount of the peak strength at large displacement ductility values are discussed with the aid of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) pictures.

  9. Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Andreas; Llorca, Javier

    2010-08-01

    In metal matrix composites, a metal is combined with another, often nonmetallic, phase to produce a novel material having attractive engineering attributes of its own. A subject of much research in the 1980s and 1990s, this class of materials has, in the past decade, increased significantly in variety. Copper matrix composites, layered composites, high-conductivity composites, nanoscale composites, microcellular metals, and bio-derived composites have been added to a palette that, ten years ago, mostly comprised ceramic fiber- or particle-reinforced light metals together with some well-established engineering materials, such as WC-Co cermets. At the same time, research on composites such as particle-reinforced aluminum, aided by novel techniques such as large-cell 3-D finite element simulation or computed X-ray microtomography, has served as a potent vehicle for the elucidation of the mechanics of high-contrast two-phase elastoplastic materials, with implications that range well beyond metal matrix composites.

  10. Fabric orientation effects on the monotonic and fatigue behavior of continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CFCCs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miriyala, Narendernath

    Fabric orientation effects on the monotonic and fatigue behavior of two commercially available continuous fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CFCCs) were investigated by performing flexure tests at room temperature in air, and at 1,000sp°C in an argon environment. The two CFCCs used in the study were: (i) a Nicalon woven-fabric reinforced alumina (Alsb2Osb3) matrix composite fabricated by the directed metal oxidation (DIMOX) process, and (ii) a Nicalon woven-fabric reinforced silicon carbide (SiC) matrix composite fabricated by an isothermal chemical vapor infiltration (ICVI) process. Specimens of square cross-section (3 mm x 3 mm of Nicalon/Alsb2Osb3 and 2 mm x 2 mm of Nicalon/SiC) were subjected to four-point bending loads to perform the monotonic and fatigue tests at room and elevated temperatures. The specimen configurations were designated as edge-on and transverse, depending on whether the load was applied parallel or perpendicular to the fabric plies, respectively. The monotonic and fatigue behavior of the Nicalon/Alsb2Osb3 composite was remarkably affected by the fabric orientation at room and elevated temperatures. The ultimate flexural strength (UFS) was significantly higher in the edge-on orientation, as compared to that in the transverse orientation, at RT and 1,000sp°C. Also, the stress at which the samples survived one million load cycles was higher in the edge-on orientation, relative to that in the transverse orientation, particularly at RT. Under monotonic and fatigue loadings, the samples tested in the edge-on orientation failed by specimen severance into two pieces, while the transversely oriented samples failed by specimen collapse. Due to the interlaminar weakness of the material, delamination cracks propagated in the transversely oriented samples, and the specimens failed by a complex combination of tensile, compressive and shear stresses. In contrast, the specimens tested in the edge-on orientation failed in a predominantly tensile

  11. Fiber reinforced PMR polyimide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cavano, P. J.; Winters, W. E.

    1978-01-01

    Commercially obtained PMR-15 polyimide prepregs with S-glass and graphite fiber reinforcements were evaluated along with in-house prepared glass and graphite cloth PMR 2 materials. A novel autoclave approach was conceived and used to demonstrate that both the PMR systems respond to 1.4 MPa (200 psi) autoclave pressures to produce void free composites equivalent to die molded laminates. Isothermal gravimetric analysis and subsequent mechanical property tests indicated that the PMR 2 system was significantly superior in thermo-oxidative stability, and that S-glass reinforcements may contribute to the accelerated degradation of composites at 316 C (600 F) when compared to graphite fiber reinforced composites. Fully reversed bending fatigue experiments were conducted with a type of fixture unused for organic matrix composites. These studies indicated that the graphite fiber composites were clearly superior in fatigue resistance to the glass fiber reinforced material and that PMR matrix composite systems yield performance of the same order as composite materials employing other families of matrices.

  12. Effects of damage and thermal residual stresses on the overall elastoplastic behavior of particle-reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Haitao

    The objective of the present study is to investigate damage mechanisms and thermal residual stresses of composites, and to establish the frameworks to model the particle-reinforced metal matrix composites with particle-matrix interfacial debonding, particle cracking or thermal residual stresses. An evolutionary interfacial debonding model is proposed for the composites with spheroidal particles. The construction of the equivalent stiffness is based on the fact that when debonding occurs in a certain direction, the load-transfer ability will lose in that direction. By using this equivalent method, the interfacial debonding problem can be converted into a composite problem with perfectly bonded inclusions. Considering the interfacial debonding is a progressive process in which the debonding area increases in proportion to external loading, a progressive interfacial debonding model is proposed. In this model, the relation between external loading and the debonding area is established using a normal stress controlled debonding criterion. Furthermore, an equivalent orthotropic stiffness tensor is constructed based on the debonding areas. This model is able to study the composites with randomly distributed spherical particles. The double-inclusion theory is recalled to model the particle cracking problems. Cracks inside particles are treated as penny-shape particles with zero stiffness. The disturbed stress field due to the existence of a double-inclusion is expressed explicitly. Finally, a thermal mismatch eigenstrain is introduced to simulate the inconsistent expansions of the matrix and the particles due to the difference of the coefficients of thermal expansion. Micromechanical stress and strain fields are calculated due to the combination of applied external loads and the prescribed thermal mismatch eigenstrains. For all of the above models, ensemble-volume averaging procedures are employed to derive the effective yield function of the composites. Numerical

  13. Effects of Temperature, Oxidation and Fiber Preforms on Fatigue Life of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effects of temperature, oxidation and fiber preforms on the fatigue life of carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide ceramic-matrix composites (C/SiC CMCs) have been investigated. An effective coefficient of the fiber volume fraction along the loading direction (ECFL) was introduced to describe the fiber architecture of preforms. Under cyclic fatigue loading, the fibers broken fraction was determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at room temperature, and interface/fibers oxidation model, interface wear model and fibers statistical failure model at elevated temperatures in the oxidative environments. When the broken fibers fraction approaches to the critical value, the composites fatigue fracture. The fatigue life S-N curves and fatigue limits of unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D, 2.5D and 3D C/SiC composites at room temperature, 800 °C in air, 1100, 1300 and 1500 °C in vacuum conditions have been predicted.

  14. Effects of High-Temperature Annealing in Air on Hi-Nicalon Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2008-01-01

    BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fiber-reinforced celsian matrix composites (CMC) were annealed for 100 h in air at various temperatures to 1200 C, followed by flexural strength measurements at room temperature. Values of yield stress and strain, ultimate strength, and composite modulus remain almost unchanged for samples annealed up to 1100 C. A thin porous layer formed on the surface of the 1100 C annealed sample and its density decreased from 3.09 to 2.90 g/cu cm. The specimen annealed at 1200 C gained 0.43 wt%, was severely deformed, and was covered with a porous layer of thick shiny glaze which could be easily peeled off. Some gas bubbles were also present on the surface. This surface layer consisted of elongated crystals of monoclinic celsian and some amorphous phase(s). The fibers in this surface ply of the CMC had broken into small pieces. The fiber-matrix interface strength was characterized through fiber push-in technique. Values of debond stress, alpha(sub d), and frictional sliding stress, tau(sub f), for the as-fabricated CMC were 0.31+/-0.14 GPa and 10.4+/-3.1 MPa, respectively. These values compared with 0.53+/-0.47 GPa and 8.33+/-1.72 MPa for the fibers in the interior of the 1200 C annealed sample, indicating hardly any change in fiber-matrix interface strength. The effects of thermal aging on microstructure were investigated using scanning electron microscopy. Only the surface ply of the 1200 C annealed specimens had degraded from oxidation whereas the bulk interior part of the CMC was unaffected. A mechanism is proposed explaining the various steps involved during the degradation of the CMC on annealing in air at 1200 C.

  15. Carbon nanofiber reinforced aluminum matrix composite fabricated by combined process of spark plasma sintering and hot extrusion.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Hansang; Kurita, Hiroki; Leparoux, Marc; Kawasaki, Akira

    2011-05-01

    Spark plasma sintering and hot extrusion processes have been employed for fabricating carbon nanofiber (CNF)-aluminum (Al) matrix bulk materials. The Al powder and the CNFs were mixed in a mixing medium of natural rubber. The CNFs were well dispersed onto the Al particles. After removal of the natural rubber, the Al-CNF mixture powders were highly densified. From the microstructural viewpoint, the composite materials were observed by optical, field-emission scanning electron, and high-resolution transmission electron microscopies. The CNFs were found to be located on every grain boundary and aligned with the extrusion direction of the Al-CNF bulk materials. Some Al carbides (Al4C3) were also observed at the surface of the CNFs. This carbide was created by a reaction between the Al and the disordered CNF. The CNFs and the formation of Al4C3 play an important role in the enhancement of the mechanical properties of the Al-CNF bulk material. The CNFs can also be used for engineering reinforcement of other matrix materials such as ceramics, polymers and more complex matrices.

  16. Novel iron metal matrix composite reinforced by quartz sand for the effective dechlorination of aqueous 2-chlorophenol.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yunfei; Yang, Bo; Han, Yanni; Jiang, Chaojin; Wu, Deli; Fan, Jinhong; Ma, Luming

    2016-03-01

    In this work, we tested a novel iron metal matrix composite (MMC) synthesized by mechanically introducing quartz sand (SiO2) into an iron matrix (denoted as SiO2-Fe MMC). The pseudo-first-order reaction rate constant of the SiO2-Fe MMC (initial pH 5.0) for 20 mg/L of 2-chlorophenol (2-CP) was 0.051 × 10(-3) L/m(2)/min, which was even higher than that of some reported Pd/Fe bimetals. This extraordinary high activity was promoted by the quick iron dissolution rate, which was caused by the formation of Fe-C internal electrolysis from carbonization of process control agent (PCA) and the active reinforcement/metal interfaces during the milling process. In addition, pH has slight effect on the dechlorination rate. The SiO2-Fe MMC retained relatively stable activity, still achieving 71% removal efficiency for 2-CP after six consecutive cycles. The decrease in dechlorination efficiency can be attributed to the rapid consumption of Fe(0). A dechlorination mechanism using the SiO2-Fe MMC was proposed by a direct electron transfer from Fe(0) to 2-CP at the quartz sand/iron interface. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Continuous carbon nanotube reinforced composites.

    PubMed

    Ci, L; Suhr, J; Pushparaj, V; Zhang, X; Ajayan, P M

    2008-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes are considered short fibers, and polymer composites with nanotube fillers are always analogues of random, short fiber composites. The real structural carbon fiber composites, on the other hand, always contain carbon fiber reinforcements where fibers run continuously through the composite matrix. With the recent optimization in aligned nanotube growth, samples of nanotubes in macroscopic lengths have become available, and this allows the creation of composites that are similar to the continuous fiber composites with individual nanotubes running continuously through the composite body. This allows the proper utilization of the extreme high modulus and strength predicted for nanotubes in structural composites. Here, we fabricate such continuous nanotube polymer composites with continuous nanotube reinforcements and report that under compressive loadings, the nanotube composites can generate more than an order of magnitude improvement in the longitudinal modulus (up to 3,300%) as well as damping capability (up to 2,100%). It is also observed that composites with a random distribution of nanotubes of same length and similar filler fraction provide three times less effective reinforcement in composites.

  18. Toughened and machinable glass matrix composites reinforced with graphene and graphene-oxide nano platelets.

    PubMed

    Porwal, Harshit; Tatarko, Peter; Grasso, Salvatore; Hu, Chunfeng; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, Mike J

    2013-10-01

    The processing conditions for preparing well dispersed silica-graphene nanoplatelets and silica-graphene oxide nanoplatelets (GONP) composites were optimized using powder and colloidal processing routes. Fully dense silica-GONP composites with up to 2.5 vol% loading were consolidated using spark plasma sintering. The GONP aligned perpendicularly to the applied pressure during sintering. The fracture toughness of the composites increased linearly with increasing concentration of GONP and reached a value of ∼0.9 MPa m(1/2) for 2.5 vol% loading. Various toughening mechanisms including GONP necking, GONP pull-out, crack bridging, crack deflection and crack branching were observed. GONP decreased the hardness and brittleness index (BI) of the composites by ∼30 and ∼50% respectively. The decrease in BI makes silica-GONP composites machinable compared to pure silica. When compared to silica-Carbon nanotube composites, silica-GONP composites show better process-ability and enhanced mechanical properties.

  19. Recycling of aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Nishida, Yoshinori; Izawa, Norihisa; Kuramasu, Yukio

    1999-03-01

    Separation of matrix metals in composites was tried on alumina short fiber-reinforced aluminum and 6061 alloy composites and SiC whisker-reinforced 6061 alloy composite for recycling. It is possible to separate molten matrix metals from fibers in the composites using fluxes that are used for melt treatment to remove inclusions. About 50 vol pct of the matrix metals was separated from the alumina short fiber-reinforced composites. The separation ratio of the matrix from the SiC whisker-reinforced 6061 alloy composite was low and about 20 vol pct. The separation mechanism was discussed thermodynamically using interface free energies. Since the flux/fiber interface energy is smaller than the aluminum/fiber interface energy, the replacement of aluminum with fluxes in composites takes place easily. Gases released by the decomposition of fluxes act an important role in pushing out the molten matrix metal from the composite. The role was confirmed by the great amount cavity formed in the composite after the matrix metal flowed out.

  20. Processing and Properties of Fiber Reinforced Polymeric Matrix Composites. Part 2; Processing Robustness of IM7/PETI Polyimide Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    1996-01-01

    The processability of a phenylethynyl terminated imide (PETI) resin matrix composite was investigated. Unidirectional prepregs were made by coating an N-methylpyrrolidone solution of the amide acid oligomer onto unsized IM7. Two batches of prepregs were used: one was made by NASA in-house, and the other was from an industrial source. The composite processing robustness was investigated with respect to the effect of B-staging conditions, the prepreg shelf life, and the optimal processing window. Rheological measurements indicated that PETI's processability was only slightly affected over a wide range of B-staging temperatures (from 250 C to 300 C). The open hole compression (OHC) strength values were statistically indistinguishable among specimens consolidated using various B-staging conditions. Prepreg rheology and OHC strengths were also found not to be affected by prolonged (i.e., up to 60 days) ambient storage. An optimal processing window was established using response surface methodology. It was found that IM7/PETI composite is more sensitive to the consolidation temperature than to the consolidation pressure. A good consolidation was achievable at 371 C/100 Psi, which yielded an OHC strength of 62 Ksi at room temperature. However, processability declined dramatically at temperatures below 350 C.

  1. Toughened and machinable glass matrix composites reinforced with graphene and graphene-oxide nano platelets

    PubMed Central

    Porwal, Harshit; Tatarko, Peter; Grasso, Salvatore; Hu, Chunfeng; Boccaccini, Aldo R; Dlouhý, Ivo; Reece, Mike J

    2013-01-01

    The processing conditions for preparing well dispersed silica–graphene nanoplatelets and silica–graphene oxide nanoplatelets (GONP) composites were optimized using powder and colloidal processing routes. Fully dense silica–GONP composites with up to 2.5 vol% loading were consolidated using spark plasma sintering. The GONP aligned perpendicularly to the applied pressure during sintering. The fracture toughness of the composites increased linearly with increasing concentration of GONP and reached a value of ∼0.9 MPa m1/2 for 2.5 vol% loading. Various toughening mechanisms including GONP necking, GONP pull-out, crack bridging, crack deflection and crack branching were observed. GONP decreased the hardness and brittleness index (BI) of the composites by ∼30 and ∼50% respectively. The decrease in BI makes silica–GONP composites machinable compared to pure silica. When compared to silica–Carbon nanotube composites, silica–GONP composites show better process-ability and enhanced mechanical properties. PMID:27877614

  2. Modeling of Progressive Damage in Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-03-01

    composite. Experimental data are from Kuo [103] and Zawada et al [209]. 5-19 Finally, the degradation in the laminate modulus for a [(0/90)3],, SiC/1723...ceramic composite is also shown in Fig. 5.16. The experimental data are from Zawada et al [209] and are shown for =max 210 MPa. The elastic modulus...Figure 5.20 Peak stress versus cycles to failure for a [(0/90)3],, SiC/1723 ceramic composite. Experimental data are from Zawada et al [209]. 5-23 VI

  3. Cold Spray Deposition of Ni and WC-Reinforced Ni Matrix Composite Coatings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alidokht, S. A.; Vo, P.; Yue, S.; Chromik, R. R.

    2017-09-01

    Ni-WC composites are ideal protective coatings against wear and are often fabricated using laser cladding and thermal spray processes, but the high temperatures of these processes result in decarburization, which deteriorates the performance of the coating. Cold spray has the potential to deposit Ni-WC composite coatings and retain the composition of the initial WC feedstock. However, the insignificant plastic deformation of hard WC particles makes it difficult to build up a high WC content coating by cold spray. By using three different WC powder sizes, the effect of feedstock powder size on WC retention was tested. To improve WC retention, a WC/Ni composite powder in mixture with Ni was also sprayed. Microstructural characterization, including the deformed structure of Ni splats, retention, distribution, and fragmentation of WC, was performed by scanning electron microscopy. An improvement in WC retention was achieved using finer WC particles. Significant improvement in WC particles retention was achieved using WC/Ni composite powder, with the WC content in the coating being close to that of the feedstock.

  4. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of an unidirectional, 9 vol percent tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling via elastic-plastic finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects that the residual stresses and the degree of matrix work hardening (i.e., cold-worked, annealed) have upon the behavior of a 9 vol percent, unidirectional W/Cu composite, undergoing tensile loading. The inclusion of the residual stress-containing state as well as the simulated matrix material conditions proved to be significant since the Cu matrix material exhibited plastic deformation, which affected the subsequent tensile response of the composite system. The stresses generated during cooldown to room temperature from the manufacturing temperature were more of a factor on the annealed-matrix composite, since they induced the softened matrix to plastically flow. This event limited the total load-carrying capacity of this matrix-dominated, ductile-ductile type material system. Plastic deformation of the hardened-matrix composite during the thermal cooldown stage was not considerable, therefore, the composite was able to sustain a higher stress before showing any appreciable matrix plasticity. The predicted room temperature, stress-strain response, and deformation stages under both material conditions represented upper and lower bounds characteristic of the composite's tensile behavior. The initial deformation stage for the hardened material condition showed negligible matrix plastic deformation while for the annealed state, its initial deformation stage showed extensive matrix plasticity. Both material conditions exhibited a final deformation stage where the fiber and matrix were straining plastically. The predicted stress-strain results were compared to the experimental, room temperature, tensile stress-strain curve generated from this particular composite system. The analyses indicated that the actual thermal-mechanical state of the composite's Cu matrix, represented by the experimental data, followed the annealed material condition.

  5. On matrix cracking in fiber reinforced ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Yih-Cheng; Wang, A. S. D.; Chou, Tsu-Wei

    1993-07-01

    THISPAPER addresses critical stress at the propagation of a fiber-bridged matrix crack of arbitrary length in fiber-reinforced brittle matrix composites. The formulation of the problem follows the approach adopted earlier by Marshall, Cox and Evans, but a new shear-lag model that accounts for the matrix shear deformation above the slipping region is used here to derive the relationship between the crack opening displacement and the crack surface closure traction. The inclusion of the matrix shear deformation above the slipping region significantly affects the calculated crack tip stress intensity factor and the prediction of the critical stress at the propagation of the crack. Illustrative examples are cited using three available composite systems of SiC-borosilicate, C-borosilicate and Nicalon-lithium-aluminosilicate (LAS).

  6. Sodium Sulfate Corrosion of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Calcium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-03-01

    NaAISiO4), Wollastonite ( CaSiO3 ), Rankinite (Ca3Si 2 0 7 ), Albite (NaAISi3O,) and glassy phases. In the argon atmosphere fiber degradation was present...Wollastonite ( CaSiO3 ) and a glassy region were present. Minimal fiber and matrix degradation was observed in the uncoated sample heat treated in air. 14...corroded the silicon fiber resulting in a silica zj.zh, Nepheline (NaAlSiO4 ), Wollastonite ( CaSiO3 ), Rankinite (Ca3Si 207 ), Albite (NaAISi 308 ) and

  7. Microstructure and properties of TiB2-TiB reinforced titanium matrix composite coating by laser cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Yinghua; Yao, Jianhua; Lei, Yongping; Fu, Hanguang; Wang, Liang

    2016-11-01

    TiB2 particle and TiB short fiber reinforced titanium matrix composite coatings were prepared utilizing in situ synthesized technique by laser cladding on the surface of Ti6Al4V alloy. Through the experiment, it was found that the surface of the single-track coatings appeared in the depression, but it can be improved by laser track overlapping. With the increase of laser power density, the amount of TiB short fiber was increased, and the distribution of TiB2 and TiB became more uniform from the top to bottom. The micro-hardness of TiB2/TiB coating showed a gradient decreasing trend, and the average micro-hardness of the coatings was two-fold higher than that of the substrate. Due to the strengthening effect of TiB2 particle and TiB short fiber, the wear volume loss of the center of the coating was approximately 30% less than that of the Ti-6Al-4V substrate, and the wear mechanism of the coating was mild fatigue particle detachment.

  8. Investigation into the Mechanical Properties and Fracture Behavior of A356 Aluminum Alloy-Based ZrO2-Particle-Reinforced Metal-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdizadeh, H.; Baghchesara, M. A.

    2013-11-01

    In the present study, an investigation has been carried out into the influence of ZrO2 content and casting temperature on the mechanical properties and fracture behavior of A356 Al/ZrO2 composites. A356 aluminum alloy matrix composites reinforced with 5, 10 and 15 vol.% ZrO2 were fabricated at 750, 850, and 95 0°C via the stir-casting method. Based on the results obtained, the optimum amount of reinforcement and casting temperature were determined by evaluating the density and mechanical properties of the composites through the use of hardness and tensile tests. The fracture surfaces of composite specimens were also studied to identify the main fracture mechanisms of the composites. The results obtained indicated that all samples fractured due to the interdendritic cracking of the matrix alloy. Reinforcing the Al matrix alloy with ZrO2 particles increased the hardness and ultimate tensile strength of the alloy to the maximum values of 70 BHN and 232 MPa, respectively. The best mechanical properties were obtained for the specimens with 15 vol.% of ZrO2 produced at 75 0°C.

  9. Fatigue damage characterization of braided and woven fiber reinforced polymer matrix composites at room and elevated temperatures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montesano, John

    The use of polymer matrix composites (PMC) for manufacturing primary load-bearing structural components has significantly increased in many industrial applications. Specifically in the aerospace industry, PMCs are also being considered for elevated temperature applications. Current aerospace-grade composite components subjected to fatigue loading are over-designed due to insufficient understanding of the material failure processes, and due to the lack of available generic fatigue prediction models. A comprehensive literature survey reveals that there are few fatigue studies conducted on woven and braided fabric reinforced PMC materials, and even fewer at elevated temperatures. It is therefore the objective of this study to characterize and subsequently model the elevated temperature fatigue behaviour of a triaxial braided PMC, and to investigate the elevated temperature fatigue properties of two additional woven PMCs. An extensive experimental program is conducted using a unique test protocol on the braided and woven composites, which consists of static and fatigue testing at various test temperatures. The development of mechanically-induced damage is monitored using a combination of non-destructive techniques which included infrared thermography, fiber optic sensors and edge replication. The observed microscopic damage development is quantified and correlated to the exhibited macroscopic material behaviour at all test temperatures. The fiber-dominated PMC materials considered in this study did not exhibit notable time- or temperature-dependent static properties. However, fatigue tests reveal that the local damage development is in fact notably influenced by temperature. The elevated temperature environment increases the toughness of the thermosetting polymers, which results in consistently slower fatigue crack propagation rates for the respective composite materials. This has a direct impact on the stiffness degradation rate and the fatigue lives for the braided

  10. The effects of long-duration space exposure on the mechanical properties of some carbon-reinforced resin matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vyhnal, Richard F.

    1993-01-01

    Long Duration Exposure Facility (LDEF) Experiment A0175 involved the non-instrumented exposure of seven carbon-fiber reinforced resin-matrix advanced composite panels contained in two trays - A7 and A1. These two trays were located, respectively, on the leading and trailing faces of LDEF, obliquely oriented to the RAM (Row 9) and WAKE (Row 3) directions. The identity and location of the seven panels, which consisted of six flat laminates of the following material systems are shown: carbon/epoxy (T300/934), carbon/bismaleimide (T300/F178), and carbon/polyimide (C6000/LARC-160 and C6000/PMR-15), plus one bonded honeycomb sandwich panel (T300/934 face sheets and Nomex core) patterned after the Space Shuttle payload bay door construction. These material systems were selected to represent a range of then-available matrix resins which, by virtue of their differing polymer chemistry, could conceivably exhibit differing susceptibility to the low-earth orbit (LEO) environment. The principal exposure conditions of the LDEF environment at these tray locations are shown. Noteworthy to some of the observations discussed is the four-orders-of magnitude difference in the atomic oxygen (AO) fluence, which made a shallow incidence angle (approximately 22 deg) to Tray A7, while Tray A1 on the trailing face was essentially shielded from AO exposure. This evaluation focused on determining the individual and relative suitability of a variety of resin-matrix composite systems for long-term space structural applications. This was accomplished primarily by measuring and comparing a range of engineering mechanical properties on over 300 test coupons sectioned from the flight panels and from identical control panels, and tested at ambient and elevated temperatures. This testing was supported by limited physical characterization, involving visual examination of flight panel surface features, measurements of weight loss and warpage, and examination for changes in internal integrity (micro

  11. Low pressure process for continuous fiber reinforced polyamic acid resin matrix composite laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Druyun, Darleen A. (Inventor); Hou, Tan-Hung (Inventor); Kidder, Paul W. (Inventor); Reddy, Rakasi M. (Inventor); Baucom, Robert M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A low pressure processor was developed for preparing a well-consolidated polyimide composite laminate. Prepreg plies were formed from unidirectional fibers and a polyamic acid resin solution. Molding stops were placed at the sides of a matched metal die mold. The prepreg plies were cut shorter than the length of the mold in the in-plane lateral direction and were stacked between the molding stops to a height which was higher than the molding stops. The plies were then compressed to the height of the stops and heated to allow the volatiles to escape and to start the imidization reaction. After removing the stops from the mold, the heat was increased and 0 - 500 psi was applied to complete the imidization reaction. The heat and pressure were further increased to form a consolidated polyimide composite laminate.

  12. Mechanical behaviour of an alumina fibre reinforced silicon carbide matrix composite at high temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Steen, M.; Valles, J.L.; Lamouroux, F. |

    1995-12-01

    In this study, the high temperature mechanical response of a 2D Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(f)/SiC composite is investigated by uniaxial tensile, creep and fatigue tests under vacuum. During the tests, unloading-reloading cycles are introduced in order to study the evolution of damage with accumulated strain. The results show that creep damage is governed by interfacial debonding, whereas in the cyclic tests either fatigue damage only, or combined creep-fatigue damage occurs.

  13. Combined mode I-mode III fracture toughness of a particulate reinforced metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the fracture behavior of a particulate reinfored aluminum alloy composite under combined mode I-mode III loading conditions. A modified three-point bend specimen was used to carry out these tests. It was found that the mode I loading condition was energetically most favorable. Addition of mode III components to the system seems to increase the amount of redundant work during fracture without affecting the critical fracture criterion.

  14. Combined mode I-mode III fracture toughness of a particulate reinforced metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manoharan, M.; Lewandowski, J. J.

    1991-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to determine the fracture behavior of a particulate reinfored aluminum alloy composite under combined mode I-mode III loading conditions. A modified three-point bend specimen was used to carry out these tests. It was found that the mode I loading condition was energetically most favorable. Addition of mode III components to the system seems to increase the amount of redundant work during fracture without affecting the critical fracture criterion.

  15. Studies on the Spatial Homogeneity and Flexural Strength of Several sic Fiber-Reinforced Cvi-Sic Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araki, H.; Noda, T.; Yang, W.; Hu, Q. L.; Suzuki, H.; Kohyama, A.

    2003-06-01

    Several SiC/SiC composites with 2D plain-woven Nicalon-CG, Hi-Nicalon, or Tyranno-SA fiber cloths as the reinforcements were fabricated by chemical vapor infiltration (CVI) process. The as-fabricated composites are 120mm in diameter and 3-4mm in thickness. The flexural properties and fracture behaviors were investigated using three-point bending tests and scanning electron microscope (SEM). About 30 bending tests are conducted for each composite for a statistic study on the effect of the density (and the spatial homogeneity) on the flexural strength. The Hi-Nicalon/SiC composite showed an average fracture strength of 665MPa with Weibull modulus of 7.43. Both the composites reinforced with Nicalon-CG and Tyranno-SA fibers showed lower strength coupled with near brittle failure behaviors.

  16. Influence of interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1990-01-01

    The influence of fiber/matrix interface microstructure and interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of a fiber-reinforced ceramic composite was evaluated. The composite consisted of approximately 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 microns diameter SiC fibers (Textron SCS-6) in a reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix (SiC/RBSN). The interface microstructure was varied by controlling the composite fabrication conditions and by heat treating the composite in an oxidizing environment. Interfacial shear strength was determined by the matrix crack spacing method. The results of microstructural examination indicate that the carbon-rich coating provided with the as-produced SiC fibers was stable in composites fabricated at 1200 C in a nitrogen or in a nitrogen plus 4 percent hydrogen mixture for 40 hr. However this coating degraded in composites fabricated at 1350 C in N2 + 4 percent H2 for 40 and 72 hr and also in composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment at 600 C for 100 hr after fabrication at 1200 C in a nitrogen. It was determined that degradation occurred by carbon removal which in turn had a strong influence on interfacial shear strength and other mechanical properties. Specifically, as the carbon coating was removed, the composite interfacial shear strength, primary elastic modulus, first matrix cracking stress, and ultimate tensile strength decreased, but the first matrix cracking strain remained nearly the same.

  17. Admixtures in Cement-Matrix Composites for Mechanical Reinforcement, Sustainability, and Smart Features

    PubMed Central

    Bastos, Guillermo; Patiño-Barbeito, Faustino; Patiño-Cambeiro, Faustino; Armesto, Julia

    2016-01-01

    For more than a century, several inclusions have been mixed with Portland cement—nowadays the most-consumed construction material worldwide—to improve both the strength and durability required for construction. The present paper describes the different families of inclusions that can be combined with cement matrix and reviews the achievements reported to date regarding mechanical performance, as well as two other innovative functionalities of growing importance: reducing the high carbon footprint of Portland cement, and obtaining new smart features. Nanomaterials stand out in the production of such advanced features, allowing the construction of smart or multi-functional structures by means of thermal- and strain-sensing, and photocatalytic properties. The first self-cleaning concretes (photocatalytic) have reached the markets. In this sense, it is expected that smart concretes will be commercialized to address specialized needs in construction and architecture. Conversely, other inclusions that enhance strength or reduce the environmental impact remain in the research stage, in spite of the promising results reported in these issues. Despite the fact that such functionalities are especially profitable in the case of massive cement consumption, the shift from the deeply established Portland cement to green cements still has to overcome economic, institutional, and technical barriers. PMID:28774091

  18. Admixtures in Cement-Matrix Composites for Mechanical Reinforcement, Sustainability, and Smart Features.

    PubMed

    Bastos, Guillermo; Patiño-Barbeito, Faustino; Patiño-Cambeiro, Faustino; Armesto, Julia

    2016-11-30

    For more than a century, several inclusions have been mixed with Portland cement-nowadays the most-consumed construction material worldwide-to improve both the strength and durability required for construction. The present paper describes the different families of inclusions that can be combined with cement matrix and reviews the achievements reported to date regarding mechanical performance, as well as two other innovative functionalities of growing importance: reducing the high carbon footprint of Portland cement, and obtaining new smart features. Nanomaterials stand out in the production of such advanced features, allowing the construction of smart or multi-functional structures by means of thermal- and strain-sensing, and photocatalytic properties. The first self-cleaning concretes (photocatalytic) have reached the markets. In this sense, it is expected that smart concretes will be commercialized to address specialized needs in construction and architecture. Conversely, other inclusions that enhance strength or reduce the environmental impact remain in the research stage, in spite of the promising results reported in these issues. Despite the fact that such functionalities are especially profitable in the case of massive cement consumption, the shift from the deeply established Portland cement to green cements still has to overcome economic, institutional, and technical barriers.

  19. The Effect of Fiber Coating on the Mechanical Behavior of Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Titanium Aluminide Matrix Composites. Ph.D. Thesis

    SciTech Connect

    Chiu, H.P.

    1994-01-01

    Fiber coating is known to improve the interfacial properties of SiC fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composites. The effectiveness of several potential coating systems is investigated using criteria such as interfacial compatibility, thermal stability, thermal residual stress, interfacial bond strength, and transverse fracture characteristics. The Ag/Ta coating was shown to be the most promising to satisfy the requirements for a strong, tough, and damage-tolerant SiC fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composite. The Ag/Ta-coated SiC fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide matrix composites was then specifically selected as a model material. The mechanical properties such as tensile, flexural, creep, and fracture resistance under static and cyclic loading in both longitudinal and transverse directions were determined. The damage mechanisms were also characterized and compared with those for uncoated composites. The results indicate that the Ag/Ta coating significantly enhances the interfacial bond strength and improves the matrix morphology in the vicinity of interfaces, leading to much improved transverse tensile and flexural properties without degrading the longitudinal strength. The Ag/Ta coating also facilitates the load-transfer efficiency during the primary creep stage, and therefore reduces the transient strain and accordingly prolongs the creep rupture life. The effectiveness and stability of Ag/Ta coating is dependent on the time and temperature of thermal exposure. On the other hand, the stronger interfacial bond strength is also responsible for the worse fracture resistance behavior under both static and fatigue loading. This study validates the feasibility of applying a multilayer coating onto SiC fibers in titanium aluminide and titanium alloy matrix composites. The elimination of a reaction zone and the creation of a benign ductile beta-Ti layer have been proved to be vital in improving the mechanical behavior of the composites.

  20. Valorization of an industrial organosolv-sugarcane bagasse lignin: Characterization and use as a matrix in biobased composites reinforced with sisal fibers.

    PubMed

    Ramires, Elaine C; Megiatto, Jackson D; Gardrat, Christian; Castellan, Alain; Frollini, Elisabete

    2010-11-01

    In the present study, the main focus was the characterization and application of the by-product lignin isolated through an industrial organosolv acid hydrolysis process from sugarcane bagasse, aiming at the production of bioethanol. The sugarcane lignin was characterized and used to prepare phenolic-type resins. The analysis confirmed that the industrial sugarcane lignin is of HGS type, with a high proportion of the less substituted aromatic ring p-hydroxyphenyl units, which favors further reaction with formaldehyde. The lignin-formaldehyde resins were used to produce biobased composites reinforced with different proportions of randomly distributed sisal fibers. The presence of lignin moieties in both the fiber and matrix increases their mutual affinity, as confirmed by SEM images, which showed good adhesion at the biocomposite fiber/matrix interface. This in turn allowed good load transference from the matrix to the fiber, leading to biobased composites with good impact strength (near 500 J m(-1) for a 40 wt% sisal fiber-reinforced composite). The study demonstrates that sugarcane bagasse lignin obtained from a bioethanol plant can be used without excessive purification in the preparation of lignocellulosic fiber-reinforced biobased composites displaying high mechanical properties.

  1. Fracture toughness of fiber-reinforced glass ceramic and ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stull, Kevin R.; Parvizi-Majidi, A.

    1991-01-01

    A fracture mechanics investigation of 2D woven Nicalon SiC/SiC and Nicalon SiC/LAS has been undertaken. An energy approach has been adopted to characterize and quantify the fracture properties of these materials. Chevron-notched bend specimens were tested in an edgewise configuration in which the crack propagated perpendicular to the ply direction. R-curves were obtained from repeated loading and unloading of specimens using several methods of data reduction. Values correconding to the plateau regions of the R-curves were taken as steady-state crack-growth resistance. These ranged from 37 to 63 kJ/sq m for 2D-SiC/LAS and 2.6 to 2.8 kJ/sq m for 2D-SiC/SiC composites.

  2. Achieving high strength and high ductility in metal matrix composites reinforced with a discontinuous three-dimensional graphene-like network.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiang; Shi, Chunsheng; Liu, Enzuo; He, Fang; Ma, Liying; Li, Qunying; Li, Jiajun; Bacsa, Wolfgang; Zhao, Naiqin; He, Chunnian

    2017-08-24

    Graphene or graphene-like nanosheets have been emerging as an attractive reinforcement for composites due to their unique mechanical and electrical properties as well as their fascinating two-dimensional structure. It is a great challenge to efficiently and homogeneously disperse them within a metal matrix for achieving metal matrix composites with excellent mechanical and physical performance. In this work, we have developed an innovative in situ processing strategy for the fabrication of metal matrix composites reinforced with a discontinuous 3D graphene-like network (3D GN). The processing route involves the in situ synthesis of the encapsulation structure of 3D GN powders tightly anchored with Cu nanoparticles (NPs) (3D GN@Cu) to ensure mixing at the molecular level between graphene-like nanosheets and metal, coating of Cu on the 3D GN@Cu (3D GN@Cu@Cu), and consolidation of the 3D GN@Cu@Cu powders. This process can produce GN/Cu composites on a large scale, in which the in situ synthesized 3D GN not only maintains the perfect 3D network structure within the composites, but also has robust interfacial bonding with the metal matrix. As a consequence, the as-obtained 3D GN/Cu composites exhibit exceptionally high strength and superior ductility (the uniform and total elongation to failure of the composite are even much higher than the unreinforced Cu matrix). To the best of our knowledge, this work is the first report validating that a discontinuous 3D graphene-like network can simultaneously remarkably enhance the strength and ductility of the metal matrix.

  3. Modeling Strength Degradation of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites Subjected to Cyclic Loading at Elevated Temperatures in Oxidative Environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2017-04-01

    In this paper, the strength degradation of non-oxide and oxide/oxide fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) subjected to cyclic loading at elevated temperatures in oxidative environments has been investigated. Considering damage mechanisms of matrix cracking, interface debonding, interface wear, interface oxidation and fibers fracture, the composite residual strength model has been established by combining the micro stress field of the damaged composites, the damage models, and the fracture criterion. The relationships between the composite residual strength, fatigue peak stress, interface debonding, fibers failure and cycle number have been established. The effects of peak stress level, initial and steady-state interface shear stress, fiber Weibull modulus and fiber strength, and testing temperature on the degradation of composite strength and fibers failure have been investigated. The evolution of residual strength versus cycle number curves of non-oxide and oxide/oxide CMCs under cyclic loading at elevated temperatures in oxidative environments have been predicted.

  4. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-03

    Angstadt, Y.-P. Sun, and K.L. Koudela, Micro-Mechanics Based Derivation of the Materials Constitutive Relations for Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Poly-Vinyl...intralamina and interlamina damage mechanisms (e.g., fiber breakage within the yarns , fiber/matrix de-bonding, diffuse delamination/interlam- ina separation...a closer look is given to the architecture of the woven fabric. Specifically, details of yarn weaving and crimping, yarn cross-section change, and

  5. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar (registered trademark)-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-01

    Derivation of the Materials Constitutive Relations for Carbon Nanotube Reinforced Poly-Vinyl-Ester-Epoxy Based Composites, J. Mater. Sci., 2007, 42, p...within the yarns , fiber/matrix de-bonding, diffuse delamination/interlam- ina separation, etc.) as well as discrete damage modes (e.g., transverse...fabric. Specifically, details of yarn weaving and crimping, yarn cross-section change, and yarn sliding at the warp- yarn /weft- yarn cross-over points are

  6. Stress-Dependent Matrix Cracking in 2D Woven SiC-Fiber Reinforced Melt-Infiltrated SiC Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2003-01-01

    The matrix cracking of a variety of SiC/SiC composites has been characterized for a wide range of constituent variation. These composites were fabricated by the 2-dimensional lay-up of 0/90 five-harness satin fabric consisting of Sylramic fiber tows that were then chemical vapor infiltrated (CVI) with BN, CVI with SiC, slurry infiltrated with SiC particles followed by molten infiltration of Si. The composites varied in number of plies, the number of tows per length, thickness, and the size of the tows. This resulted in composites with a fiber volume fraction in the loading direction that ranged from 0.12 to 0.20. Matrix cracking was monitored with modal acoustic emission in order to estimate the stress-dependent distribution of matrix cracks. It was found that the general matrix crack properties of this system could be fairly well characterized by assuming that no matrix cracks originated in the load-bearing fiber, interphase, chemical vapor infiltrated Sic tow-minicomposites, i.e., all matrix cracks originate in the 90 degree tow-minicomposites or the large unreinforced Sic-Si matrix regions. Also, it was determined that the larger tow size composites had a much narrower stress range for matrix cracking compared to the standard tow size composites.

  7. Machining fiber-reinforced composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komanduri, Ranga

    1993-04-01

    Compared to high tool wear and high costs of tooling of fiber-reinforced composites (FRCs), noncontact material-removal processes offer attractive alternative. Noncontact machining methods can also minimize dust, noise, and extensive plastic deformation and consequent heat generation associated with conventional machining of FRCs, espacially those with an epoxy matrix. The paper describes the principles involved in and the details of machining of FRCs by laser machining, water jet-cutting and abrasive water jet-cutting, and electrical discharge machining of composites, as well as the limitations of each method.

  8. Molybdenum disilicide matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Carter, David H.; Gac, Frank D.

    1990-01-01

    A composition consisting of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, which is reinforced with VS silicon carbide whiskers dispersed throughout it and a method of making the reinforced composition. Use of the reinforcing material increases fracture toughness at low temperatures and strength at high temperatures, as compared to pure molybdenum disilicide.

  9. Molybdenum disilicide matrix composite

    DOEpatents

    Petrovic, John J.; Carter, David H.; Gac, Frank D.

    1991-01-01

    A composition consisting of an intermetallic compound, molybdenum disilicide, which is reinforced with VS silicon carbide whiskers dispersed throughout it and a method of making the reinforced composition. Use of the reinforcing material increases fracture toughness at low temperatures and strength at high temperatures, as compared to pure molybdenum disilicide.

  10. In Situ Synthesis Aluminum Borate Whiskers Reinforced TiB2 Matrix Composites for Application in Aluminum Reduction Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Gang; Yang, Jianhong

    2013-11-01

    The TiB2 matrix ceramics reinforced by aluminum borate whiskers (Al18B4O33 w) had been prepared by the pressureless sintering method. The mechanical properties and densification behavior of the TiB2 matrix ceramics were investigated. The results showed that Al18B4O33 w was in situ synthesized by the reaction of boehmite (AlOOH) and TiB2 powders during the sintering process. Increasing the sintering temperature had benefited for densification of the TiB2 matrix ceramics. Al18B4O33 w could increase the flexural strength and Vicker's hardness. It is obtained that the maximum value Vicker's hardness with 1.81 GPa and flexural strength with 82 MPa for samples sintered at 1600°C.

  11. Development of an in-situ multi-component reinforced Al-based metal matrix composite by direct metal laser sintering technique — Optimization of process parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Ghosh, Subrata Kumar; Bandyopadhyay, Kaushik; Saha, Partha

    2014-07-01

    In the present investigation, an in-situ multi-component reinforced aluminum based metal matrix composite was fabricated by the combination of self-propagating high-temperature synthesis and direct metal laser sintering process. The different mixtures of Al, TiO{sub 2} and B{sub 4}C powders were used to initiate and maintain the self-propagating high-temperature synthesis by laser during the sintering process. It was found from the X-ray diffraction analysis and scanning electron microscopy that the reinforcements like Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were formed in the composite. The scanning electron microscopy revealed the distribution of the reinforcement phases in the composite and phase identities. The variable parameters such as powder layer thickness, laser power, scanning speed, hatching distance and composition of the powder mixture were optimized for higher density, lower porosity and higher microhardness using Taguchi method. Experimental investigation shows that the density of the specimen mainly depends upon the hatching distance, composition and layer thickness. On the other hand, hatching distance, layer thickness and laser power are the significant parameters which influence the porosity. The composition, laser power and layer thickness are the key influencing parameters for microhardness. - Highlights: • The reinforcements such as Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, TiC, and TiB{sub 2} were produced in Al-MMC through SHS. • The density is mainly influenced by the material composition and hatching distance. • Hatching distance is the major influencing parameter on porosity. • The material composition is the significant parameter to enhance the microhardness. • The SEM micrographs reveal the distribution of TiC, TiB{sub 2} and Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} in the composite.

  12. A simple model to predict the effect of volume fraction, diameter, and length of fibres on strength of fibre reinforced brittle matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kundu, T.; Jang, H. S.; Cha, Y. H.; Desai, C. S.

    2000-06-01

    A simplified model is presented to predict the strength variations of brittle matrix composites, reinforced by steel fibres, with the variations of fibre parameters - length, diameter and volume fraction. This model predicts that its tensile and flexural strength increase non-linearly with the fibre volume fraction. It also predicts that similar non-linear behaviour should be observed with the reduction of the fibre diameter when other parameters are kept constant. The experimental results support both these theoretical predictions. It is also explained why an increase in the fibre length does not always significantly increase the fracture toughness. The objective of this paper is not to explain and understand in great detail the science of all phenomena responsible for the strength increase of fibre reinforced brittle matrix composites, but to provide a simple engineering explanation as to why its strength increases with the fibre addition, and how this increase can be quantitatively related to the variations in fibre parameters - fibre volume fraction, fibre length and diameter. These simplifying steps are needed to provide a tool that the practicing engineers can use to predict the brittle matrix strength variation with the fibre parameters. In the area of geomechanics, the results presented here can be used to assess and predict the behaviour of fibre-reinforced earth.

  13. Tensile and Dry Sliding Wear Behavior of In-Situ Al3Zr + Al2O3-Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gautam, G.; Ghose, A. K.; Chakrabarty, I.

    2015-12-01

    In the present study, aluminum-based in-situ intermetallic Al3Zr and Al2O3-reinforced metal matrix composites have been synthesized by direct melt reaction through stir casting of zirconium oxychloride (ZrOCl2·8H2O) powder in commercially pure aluminum. The in-situ reaction produces intermetallic Al3Zr needles that change to feathery morphology with increasing ZrOCl2·8H2O, while the Al2O3 is of fine globular shape. The tensile strengths of these composites increase with increasing volume percent reinforcements, attaining a peak value with 18 pct addition. The dry sliding wear behavior of the composites was evaluated with varying parameters, viz. sliding distance, normal load, and sliding velocities. The wear mechanisms are explained based on the microstructure, the topography of the worn surface, and the interfacial strength of the matrix and reinforcement. The tensile and wear properties are compared with widely used wear resistant hypereutectic Al-17 pct Si cast alloy.

  14. Microwave combustion synthesis of in situ Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 3}Zr reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Heguo; Hua, Bo; Cui, Tao; Huang, Jiewen; Li, Jianliang; Xie, Zonghan

    2015-08-15

    Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Al{sub 3}Zr reinforced aluminum matrix composites were fabricated from Al and ZrO{sub 2} powders by SiC assisted microwave combustion synthesis. The microstructure and reaction pathways were analyzed by using differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results showed that the heating rate during microwave synthesis was very high and the entire process took several minutes and that the ignition temperature of the reaction was much lower than that of conventional methods. In addition, the resulting microstructure was found to be finer than that prepared by the conventional methods and no cracks can be seen in the Al{sub 3}Zr reinforcements. As such, the newly developed composites have potential for safety-critical applications where catastrophic failure is not tolerated.

  15. Fabrication of carbon nanofiber-reinforced aluminum matrix composites assisted by aluminum coating formed on nanofiber surface by in situ chemical vapor deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogawa, Fumio; Masuda, Chitoshi

    2015-01-01

    The van der Waals agglomeration of carbon nanofibers (CNFs) and the weight difference and poor wettability between CNFs and aluminum hinder the fabrication of dense CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites with superior properties. In this study, to improve this situation, CNFs were coated with aluminum by a simple and low-cost in situ chemical vapor deposition (in situ CVD). Iodine was used to accelerate the transport of aluminum atoms. The coating layer formed by the in situ CVD was characterized using scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy, and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The results confirmed that the CNFs were successfully coated with aluminum. The composites were fabricated to investigate the effect of the aluminum coating formed on the CNFs. The dispersion of CNFs, density, Vickers micro-hardness and thermal conductivity of the composites fabricated by powder metallurgy were improved. Pressure-less infiltration experiments were conducted to fabricate composites by casting. The results demonstrated that the wettability and infiltration were dramatically improved by the aluminum coating layer on CNFs. The aluminum coating formed by the in situ CVD technique was proved to be effective for the fabrication of CNF-reinforced aluminum matrix composites.

  16. Raman Study of Uncoated and P-bn/sic-coated Hi-nicalon Reinforced Celsian Matrix Composites. Part 2; Residual Stress in the Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gouadec, Gwenael; Colomban, Philippe; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2000-01-01

    Band shifts on Raman spectra were used to assess, at a microscopic scale, the residual strain existing in Hi-Nicalon fibers reinforcing celsian matrix composites. Uncoated as well as p-BN/SiC- and p-B(Si)N/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers were used as the reinforcements. We unambiguously conclude that the fibers are in a state of compressive residual stress. Quantitative determination of the residual stress was made possible by taking into account the heating induced by laser probing and by using a reference line, of fixed wavenumber. We found fiber compressive residual stress values between 110 and 960 MPa depending on the fiber/matrix coating in the composite. A stress relaxation-like phenomenon was observed at the surface of p-BN/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers whereas the uncoated or p-B(Si)N/SiC-coated Hi-Nicalon fibers did not show any stress relaxation in the Celsian matrix composites.

  17. Effects of oxyfluorination on surface and mechanical properties of carbon fiber-reinforced polarized-polypropylene matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyun-Ii; Choi, Woong-Ki; Oh, Sang-Yub; Seo, Min-Kang; Park, Soo-Jin; An, Kay-Hyeok; Lee, Young Sil; Kim, Byung-Joo

    2014-12-01

    In this work, oxyfluorination treatments on carbon fiber surfaces were carried out to improve the interfacial adhesion between carbon fibers and polarized-polypropylene (P-PP). The surface properties of oxyfluorinated carbon fibers were characterized using a single fiber contact angle, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The mechanical properties of the composites were calculated in terms of work of adhesion between fibers and matrices and also measured by a critical stress intensity factor (K(IC)). The K(IC) of oxyfluorinated carbon fibers-reinforced composites showed higher values than those of as-received carbon fibers-reinforced composites. The results showed that the adhesion strength between the carbon fibers and P-PP had significantly increased after the oxyfluorination treatments. As the theoretical and practical comparisons, OF-CF-60s showed the best mechanical interfacial performance due to the good surface free energy. This indicates that oxyfluorination produced highly polar functional groups on the fiber surface, resulting in strong adhesion between carbon fibers and P-PP in this composite system.

  18. Developing analytical solutions for transverse, matrix strain magnification and fibre strain reduction in uniaxially aligned continuous fibre reinforced composites, based on the principle of conservation of strain energy and the Reuss rule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maringa, M.; Masu, L. M.

    2017-06-01

    Analytical solutions for transverse matrix strain magnification and transverse fibre strain reduction in uniaxially aligned continuous fibre reinforced composites developed here for a Representative Volume Element (RVE), based on the Reuss rule and the principle of constant strain energy. The results obtained show respective matrix and fibre transverse strain magnification and reduction that increase with increasing volume fraction of the reinforcing fibre for both square and hexagonal fibre packing geometries. The square arrays register higher values of matrix and fibre transverse strain magnification and reduction, respectively, than hexagonal arrays. The values of transverse stress ratio between the fibre and matrix in the RVE central sub-region, and between the two and the RVE central sub-region composite are seen to vary with the volume fraction of reinforcing fibre. The results obtained here denote a dependency of respective matrix and fibre transverse strain magnification and reduction as well a stress ratio on the reinforcing fibre packing geometry and volume fraction.

  19. A model cerium oxide matrix composite reinforced with a homogeneous dispersion of silver particulate - prepared using the glycine-nitrate process

    SciTech Connect

    Weil, K. Scott; Hardy, John S.

    2005-01-31

    Recently a new method of ceramic brazing has been developed. Based on a two-phase liquid composed of silver and copper oxide, brazing is conducted directly in air without the need of an inert cover gas or the use of surface reactive fluxes. Because the braze displays excellent wetting characteristics on a number ceramic surfaces, including alumina, various perovskites, zirconia, and ceria, we were interested in investigating whether a metal-reinforced ceramic matrix composite (CMC) could be developed with this material. In the present study, two sets of homogeneously mixed silver/copper oxide/ceria powders were synthesized using a combustion synthesis technique. The powders were compacted and heat treated in air above the liquidus temperature for the chosen Ag-CuO composition. Metallographic analysis indicates that the resulting composite microstructures are extremely uniform with respect to both the size of the metallic reinforcement as well as its spatial distribution within the ceramic matrix. The size, morphology, and spacing of the metal particulate in the densified composite appears to be dependent on the original size and the structure of the starting combustion synthesized powders.

  20. Oxidation effects on the mechanical properties of a SiC-fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4 matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1992-01-01

    The room-temperature mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride composites were measured after 100 hrs exposure at temperatures to 1400 C in nitrogen and oxygen environments. The composites consisted of approx. 30 vol percent uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The results indicate that composites heat treated in a nitrogen environment at temperatures to 1400 C showed deformation and fracture behavior equivalent to that of the as-fabricated composites. Also, the composites heat treated in an oxidizing environment beyond 400 C yielded significantly lower tensile strength values. Specifically in the temperature range from 600 to 1000 C, composites retained approx. 40 percent of their as-fabricated strength, and those heat treated in the temperatures from 1200 to 1400 C retained 70 percent. Nonetheless, for all oxygen heat treatment conditions, composite specimens displayed strain capability beyond the matrix fracture stress; a typical behavior of a tough composite.

  1. Titanium matrix composites: Mechanical behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Mall, S.; Nicholas, T.

    1997-12-31

    Because of their unique mix of properties and behavior in high-performance applications, Titanium Matrix Composites are presently the focus of special research and development activity. This new book presents a review of current technology on the mechanical behavior of these materials. Each chapter was prepared specifically for this new book by one or more specialists in this subject. This book is divided into the following chapters: (1) Introduction; (2) Monotonic Response; (3) Micromechanical Theories for Inelastic Fibrous Composite Materials; (4) Interfaces in Metal Matrix Composites; (5) Fatigue Failure Mechanisms in TMCs; (6) Fatigue and Thermomechanical Fatigue Life Prediction; (7) Creep Behavior of Fiber Reinforced Titanium Matrix Composites; (8) Fatigue Crack Growth; (9) Notch Strength of Titanium Matrix Composites; and (10) Micromechanical Analysis and Modeling.

  2. Enhanced micro-vibration sensitive high-damping capacity and mechanical strength achieved in Al matrix composites reinforced with garnet-like lithium electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Yi; Xia, Yu; Jiang, Wei-Bing; Liu, Hui; Liu, Wang; Gao, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Tao; Fang, Qian-Feng

    2016-12-01

    A novel micro-vibration sensitive-type high-damping Al matrix composites reinforced with Li7-xLa3Zr2-xNbxO12 (LLZNO, x = 0.25) was designed and prepared using an advanced spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The damping capacity and mechanical properties of LLZNO/Al composites (LLZNO content: 0-40 wt.%) were found to be greatly improved by the LLZNO addition. The maximum damping capacity and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of LLZNO/Al composite can be respectively up to 0.033 and 101.2 MPa in the case of 20 wt.% LLZNO addition. The enhancement of damping and mechanical properties of the composites was ascribed to the intrinsic high-damping capacity and strengthening effects of hard LLZNO particulate. This investigation provides a new insight to sensitively suppress micro-vibration of payloads in the aerospace environment.

  3. Enhanced micro-vibration sensitive high-damping capacity and mechanical strength achieved in Al matrix composites reinforced with garnet-like lithium electrolyte

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xian-Ping; Zhang, Yi; Xia, Yu; Jiang, Wei-Bing; Liu, Hui; Liu, Wang; Gao, Yun-Xia; Zhang, Tao; Fang, Qian-Feng

    2017-03-01

    A novel micro-vibration sensitive-type high-damping Al matrix composites reinforced with Li7- x La3Zr2- x Nb x O12 (LLZNO, x = 0.25) was designed and prepared using an advanced spark plasma sintering (SPS) technique. The damping capacity and mechanical properties of LLZNO/Al composites (LLZNO content: 0-40 wt.%) were found to be greatly improved by the LLZNO addition. The maximum damping capacity and the ultimate tensile strength (UTS) of LLZNO/Al composite can be respectively up to 0.033 and 101.2 MPa in the case of 20 wt.% LLZNO addition. The enhancement of damping and mechanical properties of the composites was ascribed to the intrinsic high-damping capacity and strengthening effects of hard LLZNO particulate. This investigation provides a new insight to sensitively suppress micro-vibration of payloads in the aerospace environment.

  4. Synergistic Effects of Stress-Rupture and Cyclic Loading on Strain Response of Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites at Elevated Temperature in Oxidizing Atmosphere

    PubMed Central

    Li, Longbiao

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, the synergistic effects of stress rupture and cyclic loading on the strain response of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) at elevated temperature in air have been investigated. The stress-strain relationships considering interface wear and interface oxidation in the interface debonded region under stress rupture and cyclic loading have been developed to establish the relationship between the peak strain, the interface debonded length, the interface oxidation length and the interface slip lengths. The effects of the stress rupture time, stress levels, matrix crack spacing, fiber volume fraction and oxidation temperature on the peak strain and the interface slip lengths have been investigated. The experimental fatigue hysteresis loops, interface slip lengths, peak strain and interface oxidation length of cross-ply SiC/MAS (magnesium alumino-silicate, MAS) composite under cyclic fatigue and stress rupture at 566 and 1093 °C in air have been predicted. PMID:28772544

  5. Boron Nitride Nanotubes-Reinforced Glass Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam; Hurst, Janet B.; Choi, Sung R.

    2005-01-01

    Boron nitride nanotubes of significant lengths were synthesized by reaction of boron with nitrogen. Barium calcium aluminosilicate glass composites reinforced with 4 weight percent of BN nanotubes were fabricated by hot pressing. Ambient-temperature flexure strength and fracture toughness of the glass-BN nanotube composites were determined. The strength and fracture toughness of the composite were higher by as much as 90 and 35 percent, respectively, than those of the unreinforced glass. Microscopic examination of the composite fracture surfaces showed pullout of the BN nanotubes. The preliminary results on the processing and improvement in mechanical properties of BN nanotube reinforced glass matrix composites are being reported here for the first time.

  6. The effect of severe plastic deformation on the microstructure and mechanical properties of (TiB+TiC) reinforced titanium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, W.; Han, Y.; Xiang, J.; Li, J.; Mao, J.; Zhang, D.

    2017-05-01

    Equal-channel angular pressing (ECAP) was successfully applied to in-situ synthesized particulate reinforced titanium matrix composites. The results prove that the ultrafine-grained structure can be effectively obtained in the titanium matrix composite by ECAP at different temperatures and passes. Formation of homogenous TiB and TiC particles with ultrafine grains and sub-grains were obtained after 4 ECAP passes, which indicates that the reinforcement-induced ultrafine grains. The lamellar α phases are also twisted obviously due to the shear stress, which can reduce the average thickness of lamellar α phases to less than 1μm. After ECAP at relatively low temperature, dislocation pile-ups, dislocation tangling and plenty of cell structures with size of about 500nm can be observed in the matrix. While many newly formed ultrafine grains with clear grain boundaries and size of 100~500 nanometers have formed. The tensile test results show that the yield strength is improved by ECAP pressing and saturate after 4 ECAP passes to a value of 1150MPa, and the ductility is much higher compared with the first ECAP pass.

  7. In-plane and Interlaminar Shear Strength of a Unidirectional Hi-nicalon Fiber-reinforced Celsian Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Uenal, O.; Bansal, N. P.

    2000-01-01

    In-plane and interlaminar shear strength of a unidirectional SiC fiber-reinforced (BaSr)Al2Si2O8 celsian composite were measured by the double-notch shear test method between room temperature and 1200 C. The interlaminar shear strength was lower than the in-plane shear strength at all temperatures. Stress analysis, using finite element modeling, indicated that shear stress concentration was not responsible for the observed difference in strength. Instead, the difference in layer architecture and thus, the favorable alignment of fiber-rich layers with the shear plane in the interlaminar specimens appears to be the reason for the low strength of this composite. A rapid decrease in strength was observed with temperature due to softening of the glassy phase in the material.

  8. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  9. Hybridized polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    House, E. E.; Hoggatt, J. T.; Symonds, W. A.

    1980-01-01

    The extent to which graphite fibers are released from resin matrix composites that are exposed to fire and impact conditions was determined. Laboratory simulations of those conditions that could exist in the event of an aircraft crash and burn situation were evaluated. The effectiveness of various hybridizing concepts in preventing this release of graphite fibers were also evaluated. The baseline (i.e., unhybridized) laminates examined were prepared from commercially available graphite/epoxy, graphite/polyimide, and graphite/phenolic materials. Hybridizing concepts investigated included resin fillers, laminate coatings, resin blending, and mechanical interlocking of the graphite reinforcement. The baseline and hybridized laminates' mechanical properties, before and after isothermal and humidity aging, were also compared. It was found that a small amount of graphite fiber was released from the graphite/epoxy laminates during the burn and impact conditions used in this program. However, the extent to which the fibers were released is not considered a severe enough problem to preclude the use of graphite reinforced composites in civil aircraft structure. It also was found that several hybrid concepts eliminated this fiber release. Isothermal and humidity aging did not appear to alter the fiber release tendencies.

  10. The effect of TiB2 reinforcement on the mechanical properties of an Al-Cu-Li alloy-based metal-matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The addition of ceramic particles to aluminum based alloys can substantially improve mechanical properties, especially Young's modulus and room and elevated temperature strengths. However, these improvements typically occur at the expense of tensile ductility. The mechanical properties are evaluated to a metal matrix composite (MMC) consisting of an ultrahigh strength aluminum lithium alloy, Weldalite (tm) 049, reinforced with TiB2 particles produced by an in situ precipitation technique called the XD (tm) process. The results are compared to the behavior of a nonreinforced Weldalite 049 variant. It is shown that both 049 and 049-TiB2 show very attractive warm temperature properties e.g., 625 MPa yield strength at 150 C after 100 h at temperature. Weldalite 049 reinforced with a nominal 4 v pct. TiB2 shows an approx. 8 pct. increase in modulus and a good combination of strength (529 MPa UTS) and ductility (6.5 pct.) in the T3 temper. And the high ductility of Weldalite 049 in the naturally aged and underaged tempers makes the alloy a good, high strength matrix for ceramic reinforcement.

  11. Flexural behavior of a glass fiber reinforced wood fiber composite

    SciTech Connect

    Smulski, S.J.

    1985-01-01

    The static and dynamic flexural properties of a wood fiber matrix internally reinforced with continuous glass fibers were investigated. When modeled as sandwich composite, the static flexural modulus of elasticity (MOE) of glass fiber reinforced hardboard could be successfully predicted from the static flexural MOE of the wood fiber matrix, and the tensile MOE and effective volume fraction of the glass fiber reinforcement. Under the same assumption, the composite modulus of rupture (MOR) was a function of the reinforcement tensile MOE and effective volume fraction, and the matrix stress at failure. The composite MOR was predicted on this basis with limited success. The static flexural modulus of elasticity, dynamic modulus of elasticity, and modulus of rupture of glass fiber reinforced hardboard increased with increasing effective reinforcement volume fraction. The logarithmic decrement of the composite decreased with increasing effective reinforcement volume fraction. The short-term flexural creep behavior of glass fiber reinforced hardboard was accurately described by a 4-element linear viscoelastic model.

  12. Influence of interfacial shear strength on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1990-01-01

    An evaluation is made of the influence of interfacial microstructure and shear strength on the mechanical properties of a 30 vol pct uniaxially-aligned SiC fiber-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4-matrix composite whose interface microstructure was varied through control of fabrication conditions and by heat-treatment in an oxidizing environment. The carbon-rich coating of the as-produced SiC fibers was stable in composites fabricated at 1200 C in an N or N + 4-percent H mixture for 40 hrs. This coating was degraded in composites fabricated at 1350 C in N + 4 percent H for 40 and 72 hrs, as well as after heat-treatment in an oxidizing environment at 600 C for 100 hrs even after fabrication at 1200 C in N. This degradation occurred via carbon removal.

  13. Thermal effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fibre reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The elevated temperature four-point flexural strength and the room temperature tensile and flexural strength properties after thermal shock were measured for ceramic composites consisting of 30 vol pct uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The elevated temperature strengths were measured after 15 min of exposure in air at temperatures to 1400 C. Thermal shock treatment was accomplished by heating the composite in air for 15 min at temperatures to 1200 C and then quenching in water at 25 C. The results indicate no significant loss in strength properties either at temperature or after thermal shock when compared with the strength data for composites in the as-fabricated condition.

  14. Thermal effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fibre reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1990-01-01

    The elevated temperature four-point flexural strength and the room temperature tensile and flexural strength properties after thermal shock were measured for ceramic composites consisting of 30 vol pct uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The elevated temperature strengths were measured after 15 min of exposure in air at temperatures to 1400 C. Thermal shock treatment was accomplished by heating the composite in air for 15 min at temperatures to 1200 C and then quenching in water at 25 C. The results indicate no significant loss in strength properties either at temperature or after thermal shock when compared with the strength data for composites in the as-fabricated condition.

  15. Dynamic deformation behavior of Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloy matrix composites reinforced with 20 vol. % SiC

    SciTech Connect

    Hong, S.I.; Gray, G.T. III ); Lewandowski, J.J. . Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering)

    1993-08-01

    The dynamic mechanical response and substructure evolution of underaged and overaged Al-Zn-Mg-Cu alloys with and without 20 vol.% SiC particles were investigated and compared to those following quasi-static compression. The hardening rates of the overaged composites and control alloys were found to be smaller than those of their underaged counterparts. Overaged composites and the control alloys showed more strain rate sensitive behavior than the underaged composites and alloys. The flow stress of the composites was found to decrease at total strains larger than 0.15 in the high-rate Hopkinson pressure bar test. A more raped decrease in stress in the underaged composites suggests that microstructural damage in the underaged condition is greater than that in the overaged condition tested at high strain rates. Cracks near the SiC/matrix interfaces were observed more frequently in the underaged Hopkinson pressure bar samples. The more frequent interface cracks in the underaged composites are thought to result from much slower relaxation of the stresses and strains built up at the interface due to much more difficult thermally activated deformation.

  16. Thermal oxidation induced degradation of carbon fiber reinforced composites and carbon nanotube sheet enhanced fiber/matrix interface for high temperature aerospace structural applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haque, Mohammad Hamidul

    Recent increase in the use of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite, especially for high temperature applications in aerospace primary and secondary structures along with wind energy and automotive industries, have generated new challenges to predict its failure mechanisms and service life. This dissertation reports the experimental study of a unidirectional carbon fiber reinforced bismaleimide (BMI) composites (CFRC), an excellent candidate for high temperature aerospace components, undergoing thermal oxidation at 260 °C in air for over 3000 hours. The key focus of the work is to investigate the mechanical properties of the carbon fiber BMI composite subjected to thermal aging in three key aspects - first, studying its bulk flexural properties (in macro scale), second, characterizing the crack propagation along the fiber direction, representing the interfacial bonding strength between fiber and matrix (in micro scale), and third, introducing nano-structured materials to modify the interface (in nano scale) between the carbon fiber and BMI resin and mechanical characterization to study its influence on mitigating the aging effect. Under the first category, weight loss and flexural properties have been monitored as the oxidation propagates through the fiber/matrix interface. Dynamic mechanical analysis and micro-computed tomography analysis have been performed to analyze the aging effects. In the second category, the long-term effects of thermal oxidation on the delamination (between the composite plies) and debonding (between fiber and matrix) type fracture toughness have been characterized by preparing two distinct types of double cantilever beam specimens. Digital image correlation has been used to determine the deformation field and strain distribution around the crack propagation path. Finally the resin system and the fiber/matrix interface have been modified using nanomaterials to mitigate the degradations caused by oxidation. Nanoclay modified

  17. Effect of Spark-Plasma-Sintering Conditions on Tensile Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Imai, H.; Umeda, J.; Takahashi, M.; Kondoh, K.

    2017-02-01

    In this study, aluminum (Al) matrix composites containing 2 wt.% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were fabricated by powder metallurgy using high-energy ball milling (HEBM), spark plasma sintering (SPS), and subsequent hot extrusion. The effect of SPS conditions on the tensile properties of CNT/Al composites was investigated. The results showed that composites with well-dispersed CNTs and nearly full-density CNT/Al can be obtained. During HEBM, CNTs were shortened, inserted into welded Al powder particles, bonded to Al, and still stable without CNT-Al reaction. After consolidation, Al4C3 phases formed in composites under different sintering conditions. With the increase of sintering temperature and holding time, the strength decreased. Conversely, the ductility and toughness noticeably increased. As a result, a good balance between strength (367 MPa in ultimate tensile strength) and ductility (13% in elongation) was achieved in the as-extruded CNT/Al composite sintered at 630°C with a holding time of 300 min.

  18. Effect of Spark-Plasma-Sintering Conditions on Tensile Properties of Aluminum Matrix Composites Reinforced with Multiwalled Carbon Nanotubes (MWCNTs)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, B.; Imai, H.; Umeda, J.; Takahashi, M.; Kondoh, K.

    2017-04-01

    In this study, aluminum (Al) matrix composites containing 2 wt.% multiwalled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) were fabricated by powder metallurgy using high-energy ball milling (HEBM), spark plasma sintering (SPS), and subsequent hot extrusion. The effect of SPS conditions on the tensile properties of CNT/Al composites was investigated. The results showed that composites with well-dispersed CNTs and nearly full-density CNT/Al can be obtained. During HEBM, CNTs were shortened, inserted into welded Al powder particles, bonded to Al, and still stable without CNT-Al reaction. After consolidation, Al4C3 phases formed in composites under different sintering conditions. With the increase of sintering temperature and holding time, the strength decreased. Conversely, the ductility and toughness noticeably increased. As a result, a good balance between strength (367 MPa in ultimate tensile strength) and ductility (13% in elongation) was achieved in the as-extruded CNT/Al composite sintered at 630°C with a holding time of 300 min.

  19. Celsian Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Dicarlo, James A.

    1996-01-01

    Glass-ceramic matrix reinforced fiber composite materials developed for use in low dielectric applications, such as radomes. Materials strong and tough, exhibit low dielectric properties, and endure high temperatures.

  20. Numerical, micro-mechanical prediction of crack growth resistance in a fibre-reinforced/brittle matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Michael G.; Ghosh, Asish; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1990-01-01

    Micromechanics fracture models are incorporated into three distinct fracture process zones which contribute to the crack growth resistance of fibrous composites. The frontal process zone includes microcracking, fiber debonding, and some fiber failure. The elastic process zone is related only to the linear elastic creation of new matrix and fiber fracture surfaces. The wake process zone includes fiber bridging, fiber pullout, and fiber breakage. The R-curve predictions of the model compare well with empirical results for a unidirectional, continuous fiber C/C composite. Separating the contributions of each process zone reveals the wake region to contain the dominant crack growth resistance mechanisms. Fractography showed the effects of the micromechanisms on the macroscopic fracture behavior.

  1. Numerical, micro-mechanical prediction of crack growth resistance in a fibre-reinforced/brittle matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, Michael G.; Ghosh, Asish; Salem, Jonathan A.

    1990-01-01

    Micromechanics fracture models are incorporated into three distinct fracture process zones which contribute to the crack growth resistance of fibrous composites. The frontal process zone includes microcracking, fiber debonding, and some fiber failure. The elastic process zone is related only to the linear elastic creation of new matrix and fiber fracture surfaces. The wake process zone includes fiber bridging, fiber pullout, and fiber breakage. The R-curve predictions of the model compare well with empirical results for a unidirectional, continuous fiber C/C composite. Separating the contributions of each process zone reveals the wake region to contain the dominant crack growth resistance mechanisms. Fractography showed the effects of the micromechanisms on the macroscopic fracture behavior.

  2. Influence of fiber interconnections on the thermomechanical behavior of metal matrix composites consisting of Zn-Al alloy reinforced with steel fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tao, L.; Delannay, F.

    1998-11-20

    Interconnected fiber networks presenting transverse isotropic symmetry with variable fiber interconnectivity were prepared by sintering assemblies of low carbon steel fibers. The strength and stiffness of these fiber preforms was found to increase very much when increasing sintering temperature or sintering time. Squeeze cast composites were prepared by infiltrating these preforms with alloy ZA8. Creep tests and tensile tests were carried out at 150 C. Both the creep strength and the back-flow strains at unloading drastically increase with increasing preform sintering temperature or time. Also thermal expansion is much affected by fiber interconnectivity. Especially, during cooling, the matrix dilatation strains brought about by thermal mismatches increase with increasing fiber interconnectivity. These results demonstrate that plastic and viscoplastic behaviors of network reinforced composites depend on the mechanical properties of the network as a whole.

  3. Recycling and characterization of carbon fibers from carbon fiber reinforced epoxy matrix composites by a novel super-heated-steam method.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwan-Woo; Lee, Hye-Min; An, Jeong-Hun; Chung, Dong-Chul; An, Kay-Hyeok; Kim, Byung-Joo

    2017-05-12

    In order to manufacture high quality recycled carbon fibers (R-CFs), carbon fiber-reinforced composite wastes were pyrolysed with super-heated steam at 550 °C in a fixed bed reactor for varying reaction times. The mechanical and surface properties of the R-CFs were characterized with a single fiber tensile test, interface shear strength (IFSS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The surface analysis showed that there was no matrix char residue on the fiber surfaces. The tensile strength and IFSS values of the R-CFs were 90% and 115% compared to those of virgin carbon fibers (V-CFs), respectively. The recycling efficiency of the R-CFs from the composites were strongly dependent on the pyrolysis temperature, reaction time, and super-heated steam feeding rate. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Evaluation of the mechanical properties of conventionally-cast Al matrix composites reinforced by quasicrystalline Al-Cu-Fe particles using continuous ball indentation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, E.; Lee, S. M.; Kim, W. T.; Kim, D. H.

    2000-10-01

    Room temperature mechanical properties of the Al/(AlCuFe)p and Al96Cu4/(AlCuFe)p cast composites were estimated from uniaxial compressive test and continuous ball indentation technique. Values of the Young's modulus and yield stress determined from continuous ball indentation tests were slightly overestimated, suggesting a surface effect on the mechanical properties. However, it was shown that the Al-Cu-Fe particles provided a significant increase of the elastic modulus, yield stress, and strain hardening, especially in the range up to 10% volume fraction of reinforcements. Also, determination of the hardness by continuous-ball-indentation tests revealed a strong influence of the matrix strength on the mechanical properties of the conventionally cast composites.

  5. Microtensile bond strength of fiber-reinforced composite with semi-interpenetrating polymer matrix to dentin using various bonding systems.

    PubMed

    Tezvergil-Mutluay, Arzu; Lassila, Lippo V J; Vallittu, Pekka K

    2008-11-01

    This study investigated the microtensile bond strength (microTBS) of fiber-reinforced composite (FRC) to dentin using various adhesive systems. Forty eight (n = 8/group) human molars were flattened to expose dentin. A layer of preimpregnated unidirectional FRC (everStick) was applied on the dentin surface after treatment with either a single-step self-etching adhesive, two-step self-etching system, or a conventional three-step adhesive system. For the control, particulate filler composite (PFC) (Filtek Z250) layering without FRC was used. After 24-hour water storage at 37 degrees C, the specimens were sectioned, further water-stored at 37 degrees C for 30 days and then tested. Data were analyzed using ANOVA and Tukey's test, and reliability was analyzed with Weibull distribution. microTBS values differed significantly according to the adhesive material used (p < 0.05). Single-step self-etching adhesive showed the lowest bond reliability and microTBS values with both FRC and PFC, whereas conventional three-step and two-step self-etching systems showed higher bond reliability and microTBS with both materials.

  6. Ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites: A comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying theory of continuous fiber reinforcement of ceramic matrix and resin matrix composites, their fabrication, microstructure, physical and mechanical properties are contrasted. The growing use of organometallic polymers as precursors to ceramic matrices is discussed as a means of providing low temperature processing capability without the fiber degradation encountered with more conventional ceramic processing techniques. Examples of ceramic matrix composites derived from particulate-filled, high char yield polymers and silsesquioxane precursors are provided.

  7. Cure Cycle Design Methodology for Fabricating Reactive Resin Matrix Fiber Reinforced Composites: A Protocol for Producing Void-free Quality Laminates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hou, Tan-Hung

    2014-01-01

    For the fabrication of resin matrix fiber reinforced composite laminates, a workable cure cycle (i.e., temperature and pressure profiles as a function of processing time) is needed and is critical for achieving void-free laminate consolidation. Design of such a cure cycle is not trivial, especially when dealing with reactive matrix resins. An empirical "trial and error" approach has been used as common practice in the composite industry. Such an approach is not only costly, but also ineffective at establishing the optimal processing conditions for a specific resin/fiber composite system. In this report, a rational "processing science" based approach is established, and a universal cure cycle design protocol is proposed. Following this protocol, a workable and optimal cure cycle can be readily and rationally designed for most reactive resin systems in a cost effective way. This design protocol has been validated through experimental studies of several reactive polyimide composites for a wide spectrum of usage that has been documented in the previous publications.

  8. Buckling of Fiber Reinforced Composite Plates with Nanofiber Reinforced Matrices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, Christos C.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.

    2010-01-01

    Anisotropic composite plates were evaluated with nanofiber reinforced matrices (NFRM). The nanofiber reinforcement volumes ratio in the matrix was 0.01. The plate dimensions were 20 by 10 by 1.0 in. (508 by 254 by 25.4 mm). Seven different loading condition cases were evaluated: three for uniaxial loading, three for pairs of combined loading, and one with three combined loadings. The anisotropy arose from the unidirectional plates having been at 30 from the structural axis. The anisotropy had a full 6 by 6 rigidities matrix which were satisfied and solved by a Galerkin buckling algorithm. The buckling results showed that the NFRM plates buckled at about twice those with conventional matrix.

  9. The use of microfiber composites of elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen in the design of vascular grafts.

    PubMed

    Caves, Jeffrey M; Kumar, Vivek A; Martinez, Adam W; Kim, Jeong; Ripberger, Carrie M; Haller, Carolyn A; Chaikof, Elliot L

    2010-09-01

    Collagen and elastin networks contribute to highly specialized biomechanical responses in numerous tissues and species. Biomechanical properties such as modulus, elasticity, and strength ultimately affect tissue function and durability, as well as local cellular behavior. In the case of vascular bypass grafts, compliance at physiologic pressures is correlated with increased patency due to a reduction in anastomotic intimal hyperplasia. In this report, we combine extracellular matrix (ECM) protein analogues to yield multilamellar vascular grafts comprised of a recombinant elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen microfibers. Structural analysis revealed that the fabrication scheme permits a range of fiber orientations and volume fractions, leading to tunable mechanical properties. Burst strengths of 239-2760 mm Hg, compliances of 2.8-8.4%/100 mm Hg, and suture retention strengths of 35-192 gf were observed. The design most closely approximating all target criteria displayed a burst strength of 1483 +/- 143 mm Hg, a compliance of 5.1 +/- 0.8%/100 mm Hg, and a suture retention strength of 173 +/- 4 gf. These results indicate that through incorporation of reinforcing collagen microfibers, recombinant elastomeric protein-based biomaterials can play a significant role in load bearing tissue substitutes. We believe that similar composites can be incorporated into tissue engineering schemes that seek to integrate cells within the structure, prior to or after implantation in vivo.

  10. The use of microfiber composites of elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen in the design of vascular grafts

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Kumar, Vivek A.; Martinez, Adam W.; Kim, Jeong; Ripberger, Carrie M.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2013-01-01

    Collagen and elastin networks contribute to highly specialized biomechanical responses in numerous tissues and species. Biomechanical properties such as modulus, elasticity, and strength ultimately affect tissue function and durability, as well as local cellular behavior. In the case of vascular bypass grafts, compliance at physiologic pressures is correlated with increased patency due to a reduction in anastomotic intimal hyerplasia. In this report, we combine extracellular matrix (ECM) protein analogues to yield multilamellar vascular grafts comprised of a recombinant elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with synthetic collagen microfibers. Structural analysis revealed that the fabrication scheme permits a range of fiber orientations and volume fractions, leading to tunable mechanical properties. Burst strengths of 239–2760 mm Hg, compliances of 2.8–8.4%/100 mm Hg, and suture retention strengths of 35–192 gf were observed. The design most closely approximating all target criteria displayed a burst strength of 1483 ± 43 mm Hg, a compliance of 5.1 ± 0.8%/100 mm Hg, and a suture retention strength of 173 ± 4 gf. These results indicate that through incorporation of reinforcing collagen microfibers, recombinant elastomeric protein-based biomaterials can play a significant role in load bearing tissue substitutes. We believe that similar composites can be incorporated into tissue engineering schemes that seek to integrate cells within the structure, prior to or after implantation in vivo. PMID:20584549

  11. Method Developed for the High-Temperature Nondestructive Evaluation of Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsby, Jon C.

    1998-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites have emerged as candidate materials to allow higher operating temperatures (1000 to 1400 C) in gas turbine engines. A need, therefore, exists to develop nondestructive methods to evaluate material integrity at the material operating temperature by monitoring thermal and mechanical fatigue. These methods would also have potential as quality inspection tools. The goal of this investigation at the NASA Lewis Research Center is to survey and correlate the temperature-dependent damping and stiffness of advanced ceramic composite materials with imposed thermal and stress histories that simulate in-service turbine engine conditions. A typical sample size of 100 by 4 by 2 cubic millimeters, along with the specified stiffness and density, placed the fundamental vibration frequencies between 100 and 2000 Hz. A modified Forster apparatus seemed most applicable to simultaneously measure both damping and stiffness. Testing in vacuum reduced the effects of air on the measurements. In this method, a single composite sample is vibrated at its fundamental tone; then suddenly, the mechanical excitation is removed so that the sample's motion freely decays with time. Typical results are illlustrated in this paper.

  12. Fibre reinforced CMC with polymer/filler derived matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Suttor, D.; Erny, T.; Greil, P.

    1995-09-01

    A ceramic matrix for carbon fibre reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) has been developed from polysiloxane/boron mixtures. Complex geometries can be realized by using processing technologies of fibre reinforced polymer composites. Upon pyrolysis the polymer/filler mixture is converted into a ceramic matrix consisting of SiC, B{sub 4}C, BN and a Si-O-C-(N) glass, without reacting with the carbon fibre. Due to the large volume increase of the reactive boron filler upon nitridation (+142 vol%) no multiple reinfiltration of the structure is necessary in order to achieve a dense matrix. Thermodynamic modelling of the pyrolysis is a useful tool to estimate the qualitative and quantitative phase composition as a function of polymer, filler and gas atmospheres.

  13. Analysis of Graphite-Reinforced Cementitious Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vaughan, R. E.

    2002-01-01

    Strategically embedding graphite meshes in a compliant cementitious matrix produces a composite material with relatively high tension and compressive properties as compared to steel-reinforced structures fabricated from a standard concrete mix. Although these composite systems are somewhat similar, the methods used to analyze steel-reinforced composites often fail to characterize the behavior of their more advanced graphite-reinforced counterparts. This Technical Memorandum describes some of the analytical methods being developed to determine the deflections and stresses in graphite-reinforced cementitious composites. It is initially demonstrated that the standard transform section method fails to provide accurate results when the elastic moduli ratio exceeds 20. An alternate approach is formulated by using the rule of mixtures to determine a set of effective material properties for the composite. Tensile tests are conducted on composite samples to verify this approach. When the effective material properties are used to characterize the deflections of composite beams subjected to pure bending, an excellent agreement is obtained. Laminated composite plate theory is investigated as a means for analyzing even more complex composites, consisting of multiple graphite layers oriented in different directions. In this case, composite beams are analyzed using the laminated composite plate theory with material properties established from tensile tests. Then, finite element modeling is used to verify the results. Considering the complexity of the samples, a very good agreement is obtained.

  14. Microstructure of arc brazed and diffusion bonded joints of stainless steel and SiC reinforced aluminum matrix composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elßner, M.; Weis, S.; Grund, T.; Wagner, G.; Habisch, S.; Mayr, P.

    2016-03-01

    Joint interfaces of aluminum and stainless steel often exhibit intermetallics of Al-Fe, which limit the joint strength. In order to reduce these brittle phases in joints of aluminum matrix composites (AMC) and stainless steel, diffusion bonding and arc brazing are used. Due to the absence of a liquid phase, diffusion welding can reduce the formation of these critical in- termetallics. For this joining technique, the influence of surface treatments and adjusted time- temperature-surface-pressure-regimes is investigated. On the other hand, arc brazing offers the advantage to combine a localized heat input with the application of a low melting filler and was conducted using the system Al-Ag-Cu. Results of the joining tests using both approaches are described and discussed with regard to the microstructure of the joints and the interfaces.

  15. Fuselage structure using advanced technology fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robinson, R. K.; Tomlinson, H. M. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    A fuselage structure is described in which the skin is comprised of layers of a matrix fiber reinforced composite, with the stringers reinforced with the same composite material. The high strength to weight ratio of the composite, particularly at elevated temperatures, and its high modulus of elasticity, makes it desirable for use in airplane structures.

  16. Elastic-plastic stress concentrations around crack-like notches in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1987-01-01

    Continuous fiber silicon-carbide/aluminum composite laminates with slits were tested statically to failure. Five different layups were examined: (0) sub 8, (0 sub 2/ + or - 45) sub s, (0/90) sub 2s), (0/ + or - 45/90 sub s), and (+ or - 45) sub 2s. Either a 9.5 or a 19 mm slit was machined in the center of each specimen. The strain distribution ahead of the slit tip was found experimentally with a series of strain gages bonded ahead of the slit tip. A three-dimensional finite element program (PAFAC) was used to predict the strain distribution ahead of the slit tip for several layups. For all layups, except the (0) sub 8, the yielding of the metal matrix caused the fiber stress concentration factor to increase with increasing load. This is contrary to the behavior seen in homogeneous materials where yielding causes the stress concentration to drop. For the (0) sub 8 laminate, yielding of the matrix caused a decrease in the fiber stress concentration. The finite element analysis predicted these trends correctly.

  17. Elastic-plastic stress concentrations around crack-like notches in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    Continuous fiber silicon-carbide/aluminum composite laminates with slits were tested statically to failure. Five different layups were examined: (0) sub 8, (0 sub 2/ + or - 45) sub s, (0/90) sub 2s), (0/ + or - 45/90 sub s), and (+ or - 45) sub 2s. Either a 9.5 or a 19 mm slit was machined in the center of each specimen. The strain distribution ahead of the slit tip was found experimentally with a series of strain gages bonded ahead of the slit tip. A three-dimensional finite element program (PAFAC) was used to predict the strain distribution ahead of the slit tip for several layups. For all layups, except the (0) sub 8, the yielding of the metal matrix caused the fiber stress concentration factor to increase with increasing load. This is contrary to the behavior seen in homogeneous materials where yielding causes the stress concentration to drop. For the (0) sub 8 laminate, yielding of the matrix caused a decrease in the fiber stress concentration. The finite element analysis predicted these trends correctly.

  18. Elastic-plastic stress concentrations around crack-like notches in continuous fiber reinforced metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, W. S.; Bigelow, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    Continuous fiber silicon-carbide/aluminum composite laminates with slits were tested statically to failure. Five different layups were examined: (0) sub 8, (0 sub 2/ + or - 45) sub s, (0/90) sub 2s), (0/ + or - 45/90 sub s), and (+ or - 45) sub 2s. Either a 9.5 or a 19 mm slit was machined in the center of each specimen. The strain distribution ahead of the slit tip was found experimentally with a series of strain gages bonded ahead of the slit tip. A three-dimensional finite element program (PAFAC) was used to predict the strain distribution ahead of the slit tip for several layups. For all layups, except the (0) sub 8, the yielding of the metal matrix caused the fiber stress concentration factor to increase with increasing load. This is contrary to the behavior seen in homogeneous materials where yielding causes the stress concentration to drop. For the (0) sub 8 laminate, yielding of the matrix caused a decrease in the fiber stress concentration. The finite element analysis predicted these trends correctly.

  19. Multi-Length Scale-Enriched Continuum-Level Material Model for Kevlar®-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grujicic, M.; Pandurangan, B.; Snipes, J. S.; Yen, C.-F.; Cheeseman, B. A.

    2013-03-01

    Fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composite materials display quite complex deformation and failure behavior under ballistic/blast impact loading conditions. This complexity is generally attributed to a number of factors such as (a) hierarchical/multi-length scale architecture of the material microstructure; (b) nonlinear, rate-dependent and often pressure-sensitive mechanical response; and (c) the interplay of various intrinsic phenomena and processes such as fiber twisting, interfiber friction/sliding, etc. Material models currently employed in the computational engineering analyses of ballistic/blast impact protective structures made of this type of material do not generally include many of the aforementioned aspects of the material dynamic behavior. Consequently, discrepancies are often observed between computational predictions and their experimental counterparts. To address this problem, the results of an extensive set of molecular-level computational analyses regarding the role of various microstructural/morphological defects on the Kevlar® fiber mechanical properties are used to upgrade one of the existing continuum-level material models for fiber-reinforced composites. The results obtained show that the response of the material is significantly affected as a result of the incorporation of microstructural effects both under quasi-static simple mechanical testing condition and under dynamic ballistic-impact conditions.

  20. Characterization of interfacial failure in SiC reinforced Si3N4 matrix composite material by both fiber push-out testing and Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Honecy, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    AES depth profiling and a fiber push-out test for interfacial shear-strength determination have been used to ascertain the mechanical/chemical properties of the fiber/matrix interface in SiC-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4, with attention to the weak point where interfacial failure occurs. In the cases of both composite fracture and fiber push-outs, the interfacial failure occurred either between the two C-rich coatings that are present on the double-coated SiC fibers, or between the inner C-rich coating and the SiC fiber. Interface failure occurs at points of very abrupt concentration changes.

  1. Characterization of interfacial failure in SiC reinforced Si3N4 matrix composite material by both fiber push-out testing and Auger electron spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Eldridge, J. I.; Honecy, F. S.

    1990-01-01

    AES depth profiling and a fiber push-out test for interfacial shear-strength determination have been used to ascertain the mechanical/chemical properties of the fiber/matrix interface in SiC-reinforced reaction-bonded Si3N4, with attention to the weak point where interfacial failure occurs. In the cases of both composite fracture and fiber push-outs, the interfacial failure occurred either between the two C-rich coatings that are present on the double-coated SiC fibers, or between the inner C-rich coating and the SiC fiber. Interface failure occurs at points of very abrupt concentration changes.

  2. Development of TiN particulates reinforced SS316 based metal matrix composite by direct metal laser sintering technique and its characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hussain, Manowar; Mandal, Vijay; Kumar, Vikas; Das, A. K.; Ghosh, S. K.

    2017-12-01

    The present study describes the fabrication of TiN particulates reinforced SS316 based Metal Matrix Composites (MMCs) in nitrogen and argon atmosphere. The influence of sintering process parameters on microstructure, density, porosity, wear rate and microhardness of the fabricated samples has been analyzed. The input variable process parameters, such as, laser power density (range: 4.13-5.57 W/cm2 (× 104)), scanning speed (range: 3500-4500 mm/min) and the constant parameters, such as, laser beam diameter (0.4 mm), hatching distance (0.2 mm) and layer thickness (0.4 mm) have been considered in the process. It has been observed from Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy (FESEM) analysis that TiN and SS316 powder mixture can be sintered in which chromium acts as a binder. Fine gaps are not found at the interface between TiN and SS316 when the mixture is sintered in nitrogen atmosphere. With an increase in the percentage of TiN, the density and wear rate decreases. However, when the reinforcement is taken beyond 18% by weight, the wear rate starts increasing. The microhardness also increases with an increase in the percentage of TiN. The microstructure, elemental compositions and phase characterization of the developed sintered MMCs have been examined by FESEM, EDX (Energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy) and XRD (X-ray diffractometer) analysis, respectively. The results have demonstrated the suitability of the TiN reinforced SS316 MMCs for industrial applications.

  3. Corrosion of Titanium Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Covino, B.S., Jr.; Alman, D.E.

    2002-09-22

    The corrosion behavior of unalloyed Ti and titanium matrix composites containing up to 20 vol% of TiC or TiB{sub 2} was determined in deaerated 2 wt% HCl at 50, 70, and 90 degrees C. Corrosion rates were calculated from corrosion currents determined by extrapolation of the tafel slopes. All curves exhibited active-passive behavior but no transpassive region. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiC composites were similar to those for unalloyed Ti except at 90 degrees C where the composites were slightly higher. Corrosion rates for Ti + TiB{sub 2} composites were generally higher than those for unalloyed Ti and increased with higher concentrations of TiB{sub 2}. XRD and SEM-EDS analyses showed that the TiC reinforcement did not react with the Ti matrix during fabrication while the TiB{sub 2} reacted to form a TiB phase.

  4. Effect of microstructure (particulate size and volume fraction) and counterface material on the sliding wear resistance of particulate-reinforced aluminum matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alpas, A. T.; Zhang, J.

    1994-05-01

    The effects of microstructure (namely, particulate volume fraction and particulate size) and the counterface materials on the dry-sliding wear resistance of the aluminum matrix composites 2014A1-SiC and 6061Al-Al2O3 were studied. Experiments were performed within a load range of 0.9 to 350 N at a constant sliding velocity of 0.2 ms-1. Two types of counterface materials, SAE 52100 bearing steel and mullite, were used. At low loads, where particles act as loadbearing constituents, the wear resistance of the 2014A1 reinforced with 15.8 µm diameter SiC was superior to that of the alloy with the same volume fraction of SiC but with 2.4 µm diameter. The wear rates of the composites worn against a steel slider were lower compared with those worn against a mullite slider because of the formation of iron-rich layers that act as in situ solid lubricants in the former case. With increasing the applied load, SiC and A12O3 particles fractured and the wear rates of the composites increased to levels comparable to those of unreinforced matrix alloys. The transition to this regime was delayed to higher loads in the composites with a higher volume percentage of particles. Concurrent with particle fracture, large strains and strain gradients were generated within the aluminum layers adjacent to contact surfaces. This led to the subsurface crack growth and delamination. Because the particles and interfaces provided preferential sites for subsurface crack initiation and growth and because of the propensity of the broken particles to act as third-body abrasive elements at the contact surfaces, no improvement of the wear resistance was observed in the composites in this regime relative to unreinforced aluminum alloys. A second transition, to severe wear, occurred at higher loads when the contact surface temperature exceeded a critical value. The transition loads (and temperatures) were higher in the composites. The alloys with higher volume fraction of reinforcement provided better

  5. Effect of particle concentration on the structure and tribological properties of submicron particle SiC reinforced Ni metal matrix composite (MMC) coatings produced by electrodeposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gül, H.; Kılıç, F.; Uysal, M.; Aslan, S.; Alp, A.; Akbulut, H.

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, a nickel sulfate bath containing SiC submicron particles between 100 and 1000 nm was used as the plating electrolyte. The aim of this work is to obtain Ni-SiC metal matrix composites (MMCs) reinforced with submicron particles on steel surfaces with high hardness and wear resistance for using in anti-wear applications such as dies, tools and working parts for automobiles and vehicles. The influence of the SiC content in the electrolyte on particle distribution, microhardness and wear resistance of nano-composite coatings was studied. During the electroplating process, the proper stirring speed was also determined for sub-micron SiC deposition with Ni matrix. The Ni films were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis. The depositions were controlled to obtain a specific thickness (between 50 and 200 μm) and volume fraction of the particles in the matrix (between 0.02 and 0.10). The hardness of the coatings was measured to be 280-571 HV depending on the particle volume in the Ni matrix. The tribological behaviors of the electrodeposited SiC nanocomposite coatings sliding against an M50 steel ball (Ø 10 mm) were examined on a tribometer. All the friction and wear tests were performed without lubrication at room temperature and in the ambient air (with a relative humidity of 55-65%). The results showed that the wear resistance of the nanocomposites was approximately 2-2.2 times more than those of unreinforced Ni.

  6. Synthesis and analysis of nanocrystalline β1-Cu3Al and β2-NiAl intermetallic-reinforced aluminum matrix composite by high energy ball milling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Hong-Hai; Nguyen, Minh-Thuyet; Kim, Won Joo; Kim, Jin-Chun

    2017-01-01

    Nanocrystalline β1-Cu3Al and β2-NiAl intermetallic compounds were in-situ reinforced in the aluminum matrix with the atomic composition of Al67Cu20Ni13 by the mechanical alloying of elemental powders. Both β1-Cu3Al, β2-NiAl phases that can be only co-synthesized in Cu base alloys have been obtained after 15h milling in this study. The phase evolution during milling process was investigated by X-ray diffraction. The β1-Cu3Al, β2-NiAl phases were metastable with further milling time up to 40 h. Specially, unreacted Al matrix has been totally transformed to amorphous state in the final powder. A remarkable crystalline size of 6.5 nm was reached after 15 h milling time. Thermal stability of the milled powder was also studied by differential thermal analysis. It is shown that β1-Cu3Al, β2-NiAl phases were stable up to higher than 550 °C. Moreover, the inter-diffusion between Al matrix and Cu3Al within the temperature range of 620-740 °C led to the formation of superstructure ζ1-Al3Cu4 phase.

  7. Effects of Fiber Reinforcement Architecture on the Hygrothermal-Mechanical Performance of Polyimide Matrix Composites for Aeropropulsion Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shin, E. Eugene; Thesken, John C.; Sutter, James K.; Chuang, Kathy; Juhas, John; Veverka, Adrienne; Inghram, Linda; Papadopoulos, Demetrios; Burke, Chris; Scheiman, Dan

    2003-01-01

    A lightweight sandwich support structure, for the combustor chamber of a new generation liquid propellant rocket engine, was designed and fabricated using a polymer matrix composite (PMC) facesheet on a Ti honeycomb core. The PMC facesheet consisted of high stiffness carbon fiber, M40JB, and high temperature Polyimides, such as PMR-II-50 and HFPE-II-52. Six different fiber architectures; four harness satin (4HS) woven fabric, uni-tape, woven-uni hybrid, stitched woven fabric, stitched uni-tape and triaxial braided structures have been investigated for optimum stiffness-thickness-weight-hygrothermal performance design criteria for the hygrothermal-mechanical propulsion service exposure conditions including rapid heating up to 200 F/sec, maximum operating temperature of 600 F, internal pressure up to 100 psi. One of the specific objectives in this study is to improve composite blistering resistance in z-direction at minimum expense of in-plane mechanical properties. An extensive property-performance database including dry-wet mechanical properties at various temperatures, thermal-physical properties, such as blistering onset condition was generated for fiber architecture down-selection and design guidelines. Various optimized process methods such as vacuum bag compression molding, solvent assistant resin transfer molding (SaRTM), resin film infusion (RFI) and autoclaving were utilized for PMC panel fabrication depending on the architecture type. In the case of stitched woven fabric architecture, the stitch pattern in terms of stitch density and yarn size was optimized based on both in-plane mechanical properties and blistering performance. Potential reduction of the in-plane properties transverse to the line of stitching was also evaluated. Efforts have been made to correlate the experimental results with theoretical micro-mechanics predictions. Changes in deformation mechanism and failure sequences in terms of fiber architecture will be discussed.

  8. Structural Foaming at the Nano-, Micro-, and Macro-Scales of Continuous Carbon Fiber Reinforced Polymer Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-29

    pore Center of Democritus (National Center of Scientific Research) in Greece, joined our team while on sabbatical, significantly contributing to our... Democritus , as well. PUBLICATIONS 1) Vasileios M. Drakonakis, Chris N. Velisaris, and James C. Seferis, Charalabos C. Doumanidis, CNT Reinforced

  9. Friction behavior of ceramic fiber-reinforced aluminum metal-matrix composites against a 440C steel counterface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prasad, S. V.; Mecklenburg, K. R.

    1993-04-01

    The friction behavior of short ceramic fiber-reinforced aluminum MMCs against a steel counterface is investigated. The friction coefficients between metallographically polished surfaces of kaowool and saffil fiber-reinforced aluminum MMCs and 44 C steel counterface varied between 0.4 and 0.6. The friction traces were rough with characteristic stick-slip behavior. Transfer of aluminum to steel counterface was observed in all cases. The friction coefficients dropped to below 0.2 when the MMC surface was etched; the stick-slip behavior disappeared. The increase in normal load, the friction coefficients of etched MMC surfaces increased progressively with sliding distance and the rough stick-slip type behavior reappeared. The transition from smooth to rough friction behavior was not observed for the etched surface of the MMC reinforced with 17 percent kaowool fibers even at a normal load of 0.7 N; aluminum transfer to steel was not detected in this case. The results demonstrate the feasibility of producing kaowool and saffil-fiber-reinforced aluminum MMCs by a squeeze infiltration route.

  10. Ceramic whisker reinforcement of dental resin composites.

    PubMed

    Xu, H H; Martin, T A; Antonucci, J M; Eichmiller, F C

    1999-02-01

    Resin composites currently available are not suitable for use as large stress-bearing posterior restorations involving cusps due to their tendencies toward excessive fracture and wear. The glass fillers in composites provide only limited reinforcement because of the brittleness and low strength of glass. The aim of the present study was to reinforce dental resins with ceramic single-crystalline whiskers of elongated shapes that possess extremely high strength. A novel method was developed that consisted of fusing silicate glass particles onto the surfaces of individual whiskers for a two-fold benefit: (1) to facilitate silanization regardless of whisker composition; and (2) to enhance whisker retention in the matrix by providing rougher whisker surfaces. Silicon nitride whiskers, with an average diameter of 0.4 microm and length of 5 microm, were coated by the fusion of silica particles 0.04 microm in size to the whisker surface at temperatures ranging from 650 degrees C to 1000 degrees C. The coated whiskers were silanized and manually blended with resins by spatulation. Flexural, fracture toughness, and indentation tests were carried out for evaluation of the properties of the whisker-reinforced composites in comparison with conventional composites. A two-fold increase in strength and toughness was achieved in the whisker-reinforced composite, together with a substantially enhanced resistance to contact damage and microcracking. The highest flexural strength (195+/-8 MPa) and fracture toughness (2.1+/-0.3 MPa x m(1/2)) occurred in a composite reinforced with a whisker-silica mixture at whisker:silica mass ratio of 2:1 fused at 800 degrees C. To conclude, the strength, toughness, and contact damage resistance of dental resin composites can be substantially improved by reinforcement with fillers of ceramic whiskers fused with silica glass particles.

  11. Scanning and transmission electron microscopy study of the microstructural changes occurring in aluminium matrix composites reinforced with SiC particles during casting and welding: interface reactions

    PubMed

    Urena; Gomez De Salazar JM; Gil; Escalera; Baldonedo

    1999-11-01

    Processing of aluminium matrix composites (AMCs), especially those constituted by a reactive system such as Al-SiC, presents great difficulties which limit their potential applications. The interface reactivity between SiC and molten Al generates an aluminium carbide which degrades the composite properties. Scanning and transmission electron microscopes equipped with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopes are essential tools for determining the structure and chemistry of the Al-SiC interfaces in AMCs and changes occurring during casting and arc welding. In the present work, an aluminium-copper alloy (AA2014) reinforced with three different percentages of SiC particles was subjected to controlled remelting tests, at temperatures in the range 750-900 degrees C for 10 and 30 min. Arc welding tests using a tungsten intert gas with power inputs in the range 850-2000 W were also carried out. The results of these studies showed that during remelting there is preferential SiC particle consumption with formation of Al4C3 by interface reaction between the solid SiC particle and the molten aluminium matrix. The formation of Al4C3 by the same mechanism has also been detected in molten pools of arc welded composites. However, in this case there was formation of an almost continuous layer of Al4C3, which protects the particle against further consumption, and formation of aciculate aluminium carbide on the top weld. Both are formed by fusion and dissolution of the SiC in molten aluminium followed by reaction and precipitation of the Al4C3 during cooling.

  12. Production of flexible metal matrix composites reinforced with continuous Si-Ti-C-O fibers by atmospheric plasma spraying

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waku, Y.; Nakagawa, N.; Ohsora, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Shimizu, K.; Yamamura, T.; Ohmori, A.

    1992-06-01

    An experiment is conducted to fabricate a flexible prepreg sheet with a continuous Si-Ti-C-O fiber by means of an air-plasma spraying method for use as an MMC plate. Plasma spraying is conducted under atmospheric conditions, and the prepreg and MMC sheets are investigated by means of a three-point flexural test and Auger electron spectroscopy to study strength and oxidation qualities. The oxidation layer is found to be about 200 A in depth, and the longitudinal and transverse flexural strengths of a unidirectionally reinforced MMC plate fabricated by hot pressing at 660 C are given as 1.0 and 0.25 GPa, respectively. The technique outlined is shown to be useful for developing squeeze-cast MMCs reinforced with Si-Ti-C-O that have high specific strength, specific modulus, and heat resistance.

  13. Production of flexible metal matrix composites reinforced with continuous Si-Ti-C-O fibers by atmospheric plasma spraying

    SciTech Connect

    Waku, Y.; Nakagawa, N.; Ohsora, Y.; Takahashi, T.; Shimizu, K.; Yamamura, T.; Ohmori, A. Osaka University, )

    1992-06-01

    An experiment is conducted to fabricate a flexible prepreg sheet with a continuous Si-Ti-C-O fiber by means of an air-plasma spraying method for use as an MMC plate. Plasma spraying is conducted under atmospheric conditions, and the prepreg and MMC sheets are investigated by means of a three-point flexural test and Auger electron spectroscopy to study strength and oxidation qualities. The oxidation layer is found to be about 200 A in depth, and the longitudinal and transverse flexural strengths of a unidirectionally reinforced MMC plate fabricated by hot pressing at 660 C are given as 1.0 and 0.25 GPa, respectively. The technique outlined is shown to be useful for developing squeeze-cast MMCs reinforced with Si-Ti-C-O that have high specific strength, specific modulus, and heat resistance. 18 refs.

  14. INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 16 (FOAM CORE) / CARBON REINFORCED CYANOESTER (CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITE - CMC) HOT STRUCTURE, PANEL 884-1: SAMPLE 1

  15. INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    INTEGRATED COI S200 - Hi-NiCalon FIBER WITH AN S200 MATRIX (POLYMER MATRIX COMPOSITE - PMC) / AETB 16 (FOAM CORE) / CARBON REINFORCED CYANOESTER (CERAMIC MATRIX COMPOSITE - CMC) HOT STRUCTURE, PANEL 884-1: SAMPLE 3

  16. Matrix grain characterisation by electron backscattering diffraction of powder metallurgy aluminum matrix composites reinforced with MoSi{sub 2} intermetallic particles

    SciTech Connect

    Corrochano, J. Hidalgo, P.; Lieblich, M.; Ibanez, J.

    2010-11-15

    Research highlights: Six extruded PM AA6061/MoSi{sub 2}/15p were processed with and without ball milling {yields} EBSD was used to characterise matrix grain size and grain orientation. {yields} Ball milling decreases matrix grain size to submicrometric level. {yields} Ball milling produces a more equiaxed microstructure and larger misorientation. {yields} Increasing milling time produces matrix texture randomization.

  17. Nanocellulose reinforcement of Transparent Composites

    Treesearch

    Joshua Steele; Hong Dong; James F. Snyder; Josh A. Orlicki; Richard S. Reiner; Alan W. Rudie

    2012-01-01

    In this work, we evaluate the impact of nanocellulose reinforcement on transparent composite properties. Due to the small diameter, high modulus, and high strength of cellulose nanocrystals, transparent composites that utilize these materials should show improvement in bulk mechanical performances without a corresponding reduction in optical properties. In this study...

  18. Fabrication of an r-Al2Ti intermetallic matrix composite reinforced with α-Al2O3 ceramic by discontinuous mechanical milling for thermite reaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mosleh, A.; Ehteshamzadeh, M.; Taherzadeh Mousavian, R.

    2014-10-01

    In this study, a powder mixture with an Al/TiO2 molar ratio of 10/3 was used to form an r-Al2Ti intermetallic matrix composite (IMC) reinforced with α-Al2O3 ceramic by a novel milling technique, called discontinuous mechanical milling (DMM) instead of milling and ignition of the produced thermite. The results of energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) of samples with varying milling time indicate that this fabrication process requires considerable mechanical energy. It is shown that Al2Ti-Al2O3 IMC with small grain size was produced by DMM after 15 h of ball milling. Peaks for γ-TiAl as well as Al2Ti and Al2O3 are observed in XRD patterns after DMM followed by heat treatment. The microhardness of the DMM-treated composite produced after heat treatment was higher than Hv 700.

  19. Impact behavior of hydroxyapatite reinforced polyethylene composites.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Y; Tanner, K E

    2003-01-01

    Hydroxyapatite particulate reinforced high density polyethylene composite (HA-HDPE) has been developed as a bone replacement material. The impact behavior of the composites at 37 degrees C has been investigated using an instrumented falling weight impact testing machine. The fracture surfaces were examined using SEM and the fracture mechanisms are discussed. It was found that the fracture toughness of HA-HDPE composites increased with HDPE molecular weight, but decreased with increasing HA volume fraction. Examination of fracture surfaces revealed weak filler/matrix interfaces which can debond easily to enable crack initiation and propagation. Increasing HA volume fraction increases the interface area, and more cracks can form and develop, thus decreasing the impact resistance of the composites. Another important factor for the impact behavior of the composites is the matrix. At higher molecular weight, HDPE is able to sustain more plastic deformation and dissipates more impact energy, hence improving the impact property.

  20. Oxidation Effects on the Mechanical Properties of SiC Fiber-Reinforced Reaction-Bonded Silicon Nitride Matrix Composites

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-01

    fibers in the fiber mat and the other polymer for preparing pliable silicon cloth. The volume fraction of fiber in the final composite was controlled by...and mechanical properties for the composite are given in Table I. (2) Specimen Preparation and Testing The specimens for thermal stability and for...thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) were prepared from the composite panels by cutting and grinding them with a diamond impregnated abrasive wheel. Nominal

  1. Optical fiber sensor-based life cycling monitoring and quality assessment of carbon fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeda, N.; Minakuchi, S.

    2017-04-01

    Optical fiber sensors are very useful to monitor the internal strain and temperature in composites during manufacturing and assembly as well as in practical operations. The authors have been using both multi-point and distributed strain monitoring techniques to characterize the internal state of composite structures. This paper reports some recent developments of life cycle monitoring and quality control of aerospace composite structures. Specifically, distributed sensing for large-scaled parts, through-thickness strain monitoring for complex-shaped parts, and direction-dependent cure shrinkage monitoring are described, highlighting wide applicability of embedded optical fiber sensors for intelligent process monitoring and quality assessment of composite parts.

  2. Tensile Properties of Epoxy Composites Reinforced with Continuous PALF Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glória, Gabriel O.; Altoé, Giulio R.; Moraes, Ygor M.; Loyola, Rômulo L.; Margem, Frederico M.; Monteiro, Sergio N.

    The tensile properties of DGEBA/TETA epoxy matrix composites reinforced with different amounts of PALF fibers were evaluated. Composites reinforced with up to 30% in volume of long, continuous and aligned PALF fibers were tested in an Instron machine at room temperature. The fracture was analyzed by SEM. This one revealed a weak fiber/matrix interface, which could be responsible for the performance of some properties. The results showed significant changes in the mechanical properties with the amount of PALF fibers.

  3. SiC Fiber-Reinforced Celsian Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Celsian is a promising matrix material for fiber-reinforced composites for high temperature structural applications. Processing and fabrication of small diameter multifilament silicon carbide tow reinforced celsian matrix composites are described. Mechanical and microstructural properties of these composites at ambient and elevated temperatures are presented. Effects of high-temperature exposures in air on the mechanical behavior of these composites are also given. The composites show mechanical integrity up to 1100 C but degrade at higher temperatures in oxidizing atmospheres. A model has been proposed for the degradation of these composites in oxidizing atmospheres at high temperatures.

  4. Nanoscale Reinforced, Polymer Derived Ceramic Matrix Coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Rajendra Bordia

    2009-07-31

    The goal of this project was to explore and develop a novel class of nanoscale reinforced ceramic coatings for high temperature (600-1000 C) corrosion protection of metallic components in a coal-fired environment. It was focused on developing coatings that are easy to process and low cost. The approach was to use high-yield preceramic polymers loaded with nano-size fillers. The complex interplay of the particles in the polymer, their role in controlling shrinkage and phase evolution during thermal treatment, resulting densification and microstructural evolution, mechanical properties and effectiveness as corrosion protection coatings were investigated. Fe-and Ni-based alloys currently used in coal-fired environments do not possess the requisite corrosion and oxidation resistance for next generation of advanced power systems. One example of this is the power plants that use ultra supercritical steam as the working fluid. The increase in thermal efficiency of the plant and decrease in pollutant emissions are only possible by changing the properties of steam from supercritical to ultra supercritical. However, the conditions, 650 C and 34.5 MPa, are too severe and result in higher rate of corrosion due to higher metal temperatures. Coating the metallic components with ceramics that are resistant to corrosion, oxidation and erosion, is an economical and immediate solution to this problem. Good high temperature corrosion protection ceramic coatings for metallic structures must have a set of properties that are difficult to achieve using established processing techniques. The required properties include ease of coating complex shapes, low processing temperatures, thermal expansion match with metallic structures and good mechanical and chemical properties. Nanoscale reinforced composite coatings in which the matrix is derived from preceramic polymers have the potential to meet these requirements. The research was focused on developing suitable material systems and

  5. Effect of fabric structure and polymer matrix on flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress, and energy dissipation of glass fiber-reinforced polymer composites

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We report the effect of glass fiber structure and the epoxy polymer system on the flexural strength, interlaminar shear stress (ILSS), and energy absorption properties of glass fiber-reinforced polymer (GFRP) composites. Four different GFRP composites were fabricated from two glass fiber textiles of...

  6. Alumina-Reinforced Zirconia Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choi, Sung R.; Bansal, Narottam P.

    2003-01-01

    Alumina-reinforced zirconia composites, used as electrolyte materials for solid oxide fuel cells, were fabricated by hot pressing 10 mol percent yttria-stabilized zirconia (10-YSZ) reinforced with two different forms of alumina particulates and platelets each containing 0 to 30 mol percent alumina. Major mechanical and physical properties of both particulate and platelet composites including flexure strength, fracture toughness, slow crack growth, elastic modulus, density, Vickers microhardness, thermal conductivity, and microstructures were determined as a function of alumina content either at 25 C or at both 25 and 1000 C. Flexure strength and fracture toughness at 1000 C were maximized with 30 particulate and 30 mol percent platelet composites, respectively, while resistance to slow crack growth at 1000 C in air was greater for 30 mol percent platelet composite than for 30 mol percent particulate composites.

  7. Braided reinforced composite rods for the internal reinforcement of concrete

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonilho Pereira, C.; Fangueiro, R.; Jalali, S.; Araujo, M.; Marques, P.

    2008-05-01

    This paper reports on the development of braided reinforced composite rods as a substitute for the steel reinforcement in concrete. The research work aims at understanding the mechanical behaviour of core-reinforced braided fabrics and braided reinforced composite rods, namely concerning the influence of the braiding angle, the type of core reinforcement fibre, and preloading and postloading conditions. The core-reinforced braided fabrics were made from polyester fibres for producing braided structures, and E-glass, carbon, HT polyethylene, and sisal fibres were used for the core reinforcement. The braided reinforced composite rods were obtained by impregnating the core-reinforced braided fabric with a vinyl ester resin. The preloading of the core-reinforced braided fabrics and the postloading of the braided reinforced composite rods were performed in three and two stages, respectively. The results of tensile tests carried out on different samples of core-reinforced braided fabrics are presented and discussed. The tensile and bending properties of the braided reinforced composite rods have been evaluated, and the results obtained are presented, discussed, and compared with those of conventional materials, such as steel.

  8. Room Temperature Tensile Behavior and Damage Accumulation of Hi-Nicalon Reinforced SiC Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, G. N.; Gyekenyesi, J. Z.

    1998-01-01

    Composites consisting of woven Hi-Nicalon fibers, BN interphases, and different SiC matrices were studied in tension at room temperature. Composites with SiC matrices processed by CVI and melt infiltration were compared. Monotonic and load/unload/reload tensile hysteresis experiments were performed. A modal acoustic emission (AE) analyzer was used to monitor damage accumulation during the tensile test. Post test polishing of the tensile gage sections was performed to determine the extent of cracking. The occurrence and location of cracking could easily be determined using modal AE. The loss of modulus could also effectively be determined from the change in the velocity of sound across the sample. Finally, the stresses where cracks appear to intersect the load-bearing fibers correspond with high temperature low cycle fatigue run out stresses for these materials.

  9. Thermomechanical Fatigue Behavior of a Silicon Carbide Fiber-Reinforced Calcium Aluminosilicate Glass-Ceramic Matrix Composite.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    The impact of these factors complicating hysteresis analysis may be reduced if the effects of imperfect thermomechanical cycles on material behavior...Temperature," in Fracture Mechanics of Ceramics. Vol. 7: ComPosites. Impact Statistics and High-Temperature Phenomena, Bradt, R.C., Evans, A.G., Hasselman...r), and hoop (0) directions for conditions of applied thermal and mechanical loads may be computed as Ogm A[1 + (b)21] -t, applied(•) (33) armn A 1

  10. High-temperature polymer matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meador, Michael A.

    1990-01-01

    Polymers research at the NASA Lewis Research Center has produced high-temperature, easily processable resin systems, such as PMR-15. In addition, the Polymers Branch has investigated ways to improve the mechanical properties of polymers and the microcracking resistance of polymer matrix composites in response to industry need for new and improved aeropropulsion materials. Current and future research in the Polymers Branch is aimed at advancing the upper use temperature of polymer matrix composites to 700 F and beyond by developing new resins, by examining the use of fiber reinforcements other than graphite, and by developing coatings for polymer matrix composites to increase their oxidation resistance.

  11. Bending Mechanical Behavior of Polyester Matrix Reinforced with Fique Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altoé, Giulio Rodrigues; Netto, Pedro Amoy; Barcelos, Mariana; Gomes, André; Margem, Frederico Muylaert; Monteiro, Sergio Neves

    Environmentally correct composites, made from natural fibers, are among the most investigated and applied today. In this paper, we investigate the mechanical behavior of polyester matrix composites reinforced with continuous fique fibers, through bending tensile tests. Specimens containing 0, 10, 20 and 30% in volume of fique fiber were aligned along the entire length of a mold to create plates of these composites, those plates were cut following the ASTM standard to obtained bending tests specimens. The test was conducted in a Instron Machine and the fractured specimens were analyzed by SEM, the results showed the increase in the materials tensile properties with the increase of fiber amount.

  12. Fabrication of Al matrix composite reinforced with submicrometer-sized Al2O3 particles formed by combustion reaction between HEMM Al and V2O5 composite particles during sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woo, Kee Do; Kim, Jae Hwang; Kwon, Eui Pyo; Moon, Min Seok; Lee, Hyun Bom; Sato, Tatsuo; Liu, Zhiguang

    2010-04-01

    To fabricate an Al-V matrix composite reinforced with submicron-sized Al2O3 and AlxVy (Al3V, Al10V) phases, high energy mechanical milling (HEMM) and sintering were employed. By increasing the milling time, the size of mechanically milled powder was significantly reduced. In this study, the average powder size of 59 μm for Al, and 178 μm for V2O5 decreased with the formation of a new product, Al-Al2O3-AlxVy, with a size range from 1.3 μm to 2.6 μm formed by the in-situ combustion reaction during sintering of HEM milled Al and V2O5 composite powders. The in-situ reaction between Al and V2O5 during the HEMM and sintering transformed the Al2O3 and AlxVy (Al3V, Al10V) phases. Most of the reduced V reacted with excess the Al to form AlxVy (Al3V, Al10V) with very little V dissolved into Al matrix. By increasing the milling time and weight percentage of V2O5, the hardness of the Al-Al2O3-AlxVy composite sintered at 1173 K increased. The composite fabricated with the HEMM Al-20wt.%V2O5 composite powder and sintering at 1173 K for 2 h had the highest hardness.

  13. Experimental investigations on Carbon-Nomex T410 reinforced polymer matrix composite for enhanced mechanical and tribological properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shashi Kumar M., E.; Pramod, R.

    2017-07-01

    Carbon and Nomex have various uses in many applications individually and a combination of these fibres results in enhancement of their properties in the laminate which has many uses in various applications. Nomex is used where high tensile strength and flexure along with good resistance to wear is needed and Carbon is generally used for low weight-high strength and high temperature applications. Thus, combining these two into a single laminate might result in a composite which can be used in applications where high strength with low weight and good wear resistance is needed. The present work focuses on such a combination to determine the required properties.

  14. Thermoforming of thermoplastic matrix composites. Part I

    SciTech Connect

    Harper, R.C.

    1992-03-01

    Long-fiber-reinforced polymer matrix composites find widespread use in a variety of commercial applications requiring properties that cannot be provided by unreinforced plastics or other common materials of construction. However, thermosetting matrix resins have long been plagued by production processes that are slow and difficult to automate. This has limited the use of long-fiber-reinforced composites to relatively low productivity applications in which higher production costs can be justified. Unreinforced thermoplastics, by their very nature, can easily be made into sheet form and processed into a variety of formed shapes by various pressure assisted thermoforming means. It is possible to incorporate various types of fiber reinforcement to suit the end use of the thermoformed shape. Recently developed thermoplastic resins can also sometimes correct physical property deficiencies in a thermoset matrix composite. Many forms of thermoplastic composite material now exist that meet all the requirements of present day automotive and aerospace parts. Some of these are presently in production, while others are still in the development stage. This opens the possibility that long-fiber-reinforced thermoplastics might break the barrier that has long limited the applications for fiber-reinforced composites. 37 refs., 8 figs., 5 tabs.

  15. Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, B. G.; Daniels, J. G.; White, W. T.; Thompson, L. M.; Clemons, L. M.

    1985-01-01

    Kevlar/neoprene composites were prepared by two techniques. One method involved the fabrication of a composite from a rubber prepreg prepared by coating Kevlar with viscous neoprene solution and then allowing the solvent to evaporate (solution impregnation technique). The second method involved heating a stack of Kevlar/neoprene sheets at a temperature sufficient to cause polymer flow (melt flow technique). There was no significant difference in the breaking strength and percent elongation for samples obtained by the two methods; however the shear strength obtained for samples fabricated by the solution impregnation technique (275 psi) was significantly higher than that found for the melt flow fabricated samples (110 psi).

  16. Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, B. G.; Daniels, J. G.; White, W. T.; Thompson, L. M.; Clemons, L. M.

    1985-01-01

    Kevlar/neoprene composites were prepared by two techniques. One method involved the fabrication of a composite from a rubber prepreg prepared by coating Kevlar with viscous neoprene solution and then allowing the solvent to evaporate (solution impregnation technique). The second method involved heating a stack of Kevlar/neoprene sheets at a temperature sufficient to cause polymer flow (melt flow technique). There was no significant difference in the breaking strength and percent elongation for samples obtained by the two methods; however the shear strength obtained for samples fabricated by the solution impregnation technique (275 psi) was significantly higher than that found for the melt flow fabricated samples (110 psi).

  17. Kevlar reinforced neoprene composites

    SciTech Connect

    Penn, B.G.; Daniels, J.G.; White, W.T.; Thompson, L.M.; Clemons, L.M.

    1985-04-01

    Kevlar/neoprene composites were prepared by two techniques. One method involved the fabrication of a composite from a rubber prepreg prepared by coating kevlar with viscous neoprene solution and then allowing the solvent to evaporate (solution impregnation technique). The second method involved heating a stack of kevlar/neoprene sheets at a temperature sufficient to cause polymer flow (melt flow technique). There was no significant difference in the breaking strength and percent elongation for samples obtained by the two methods; however the shear strength obtained for samples fabricated by the solution impregnation technique (275 psi) was significantly higher than that found for the melt flow fabricated samples (110 psi). 1 reference, 2 tables.

  18. Three-Dimensional Microstructure Visualization of Porosity and Fe-Rich Inclusions in SiC Particle-Reinforced Al Alloy Matrix Composites by X-Ray Synchrotron Tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Flávio de Andrade; Williams, Jason J.; Müller, Bernd R.; Hentschel, Manfred P.; Portella, Pedro D.; Chawla, Nikhilesh

    2011-11-15

    Microstructural aspects of composites such as reinforcement particle size, shape, and distribution play important roles in deformation behavior. In addition, Fe-rich inclusions and porosity also influence the behavior of these composites, particularly under fatigue loading. Three-dimensional (3-D) visualization of porosity and Fe-rich inclusions in three dimensions is critical to a thorough understanding of fatigue resistance of metal matrix composites (MMCs), because cracks often initiate at these defects. In this article, we have used X-ray synchrotron tomography to visualize and quantify the morphology and size distribution of pores and Fe-rich inclusions in a SiC particle-reinforced 2080 Al alloy composite. The 3-D data sets were also used to predict and understand the influence of defects on the deformation behavior by 3-D finite element modeling.

  19. Effects of Fiber/Matrix Interface and its Composition on Mechanical Properties of Hi Nicalon/Celsian Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are prospective candidate materials for high temperature structural applications in aerospace, energy conservation, power generation, nuclear, petrochemical, and other industries. At NASA Lewis, we are investigating celsian matrix composites reinforced with various types of silicon carbide fibers. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of fiber/matrix interface and its composition on the mechanical properties of silicon carbide (Hi-Nicalon) fiber-reinforced celsian matrix composites.

  20. Effects of Fiber/Matrix Interface and its Composition on Mechanical Properties of Hi Nicalon/Celsian Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.; Eldridge, Jeffrey I.

    1998-01-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) are prospective candidate materials for high temperature structural applications in aerospace, energy conservation, power generation, nuclear, petrochemical, and other industries. At NASA Lewis, we are investigating celsian matrix composites reinforced with various types of silicon carbide fibers. The objective of the present study was to investigate the effects of fiber/matrix interface and its composition on the mechanical properties of silicon carbide (Hi-Nicalon) fiber-reinforced celsian matrix composites.

  1. Interfacial reactions in titanium-matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, J.M.; Jeng, S.M. )

    1989-11-01

    A study of the interfacial reaction characteristics of SiC fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide and disordered titanium alloy composites has determined that the matrix alloy compositions affect the microstructure and the distribution of the reaction products, as well as the growth kinetics of the reaction zones. The interfacial reaction products in the ordered titanium aluminide composite are more complicated than those in the disordered titanium-alloy composite. The activation energy of the interfacial reaction in the ordered titanium aluminide composite is also higher than that in the disordered titanium alloy composite. Designing an optimum interface is necessary to enhance the reliability and service life at elevated temperatures. 16 refs.

  2. Continuous fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Brindley, P. K.; Froes, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the fabrication techniques, microstructural characteristics, and mechanical behavior of a lightweight, high service temperature SiC-reinforced alpha-2 Ti-14Al-21Nb intermetallic-matrix composite. Fabrication techniques under investigation to improve the low-temperature ductility and environmental resistance of this material system, while reducing manufacturing costs to competitive levels, encompass powder-cloth processing, foil-fiber-foil processing, and thermal-spray processing. Attention is given to composite microstructure problems associated with fiber distribution and fiber-matrix interfaces, as well as with mismatches of thermal-expansion coefficient; major improvements are noted to be required in tensile properties, thermal cycling effects, mechanical damage, creep, and environmental effects.

  3. Continuous fiber-reinforced titanium aluminide composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mackay, R. A.; Brindley, P. K.; Froes, F. H.

    1991-01-01

    An account is given of the fabrication techniques, microstructural characteristics, and mechanical behavior of a lightweight, high service temperature SiC-reinforced alpha-2 Ti-14Al-21Nb intermetallic-matrix composite. Fabrication techniques under investigation to improve the low-temperature ductility and environmental resistance of this material system, while reducing manufacturing costs to competitive levels, encompass powder-cloth processing, foil-fiber-foil processing, and thermal-spray processing. Attention is given to composite microstructure problems associated with fiber distribution and fiber-matrix interfaces, as well as with mismatches of thermal-expansion coefficient; major improvements are noted to be required in tensile properties, thermal cycling effects, mechanical damage, creep, and environmental effects.

  4. Nano polypeptide particles reinforced polymer composite fibers.

    PubMed

    Li, Jiashen; Li, Yi; Zhang, Jing; Li, Gang; Liu, Xuan; Li, Zhi; Liu, Xuqing; Han, Yanxia; Zhao, Zheng

    2015-02-25

    Because of the intensified competition of land resources for growing food and natural textile fibers, there is an urgent need to reuse and recycle the consumed/wasted natural fibers as regenerated green materials. Although polypeptide was extracted from wool by alkaline hydrolysis, the size of the polypeptide fragments could be reduced to nanoscale. The wool polypeptide particles were fragile and could be crushed down to nano size again and dispersed evenly among polymer matrix under melt extrusion condition. The nano polypeptide particles could reinforce antiultraviolet capability, moisture regain, and mechanical properties of the polymer-polypeptide composite fibers.

  5. Initial evaluation of continuous fiber reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    NiAl is being evaluated as a potential matrix material as part of an overall program to develop and understand high-temperature structural composites. Currently, continuous fiber composites have been fabricated by the powder cloth technique incorporating either W(218) or single crystal Al2O3 fibers as reinforcements in both binary NiAl and a solute strengthened NiAl(.05 at. pct Zr) matrix. Initial evaluation of these composite systems have included: fiber push-out testing to measure matrix/fiber bond strengths, bend testing to determine strength as a function of temperature and composite structure, and thermal cycling to establish the effect of matrix and fiber properties on composite life. The effect of matrix/fiber bond strength and matrix strength on several composite properties will be discussed.

  6. Initial evaluation of continuous fiber reinforced NiAl composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noebe, R. D.; Bowman, R. R.; Eldridge, J. I.

    1990-01-01

    NiAl is being evaluated as a potential matrix material as part of an overall program to develop and understand high-temperature structural composites. Currently, continuous fiber composites have been fabricated by the powder cloth technique incorporating either W(218) or single crystal Al2O3 fibers as reinforcements in both binary NiAl and a solute strengthened NiAl(.05 at. pct Zr) matrix. Initial evaluation of these composite systems have included: fiber push-out testing to measure matrix/fiber bond strengths, bend testing to determine strength as a function of temperature and composite structure, and thermal cycling to establish the effect of matrix and fiber properties on composite life. The effect of matrix/fiber bond strength and matrix strength on several composite properties will be discussed.

  7. Shear degradation in fiber reinforced laminates due to matrix damage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salavatian, Mohammedmahdi

    The objective of this study was to develop and implement a shear modulus degradation model to improve the failure analysis of the fiber reinforced composite structures. Matrix damage, involving transverse and shear cracks, is a common failure mode for composite structures, yet little is known concerning their interaction. To understand the material behavior after matrix failure, the nonlinear response of the composite laminate was studied using pressure vessels made from a [+/-o] bias orientation, which tend to exhibit a matrix dominated failure. The result of this work showed laminate matrix hardening in shear and softening in the transverse direction. A modified Iosipescu coupon was proposed to study the evolution of shear and transverse damage and their mutual effects. The proposed method showed good agreement with tubular results and has advantages of simplified specimen fabrication using standard test fixtures. The proposed method was extended by introducing a novel experimental technique to study the shear degradation model under biaxial loading. Experimental results of the transverse modulus reduction were in good agreement with material degradation models, while the predicted shear modulus reduction was higher than experiment. The discrepancy between available models and observations was due to the presence of a traction between the crack surfaces. Accordingly, a closed form solution was proposed for the shear stress-strain field of a cracked laminate by replacing the cracks with cohesive zones. The constitutive equations of the crack laminate were derived including the effects of internal tractions and transverse stress on the shear modulus. The proposed analytical model was shown to be the most comprehensive model for shear modulus degradation reduction of the fiber reinforced laminates. A numerical implementation of the shear degradation model was done using continuum damage mechanics. Through this work it was shown the common assumption of a linear

  8. Processes for fabricating composite reinforced material

    DOEpatents

    Seals, Roland D.; Ripley, Edward B.; Ludtka, Gerard M.

    2015-11-24

    A family of materials wherein nanostructures and/or nanotubes are incorporated into a multi-component material arrangement, such as a metallic or ceramic alloy or composite/aggregate, producing a new material or metallic/ceramic alloy. The new material has significantly increased strength, up to several thousands of times normal and perhaps substantially more, as well as significantly decreased weight. The new materials may be manufactured into a component where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the bulk and/or matrix material, or as a coating where the nanostructure or nanostructure reinforcement is incorporated into the coating or surface of a "normal" substrate material. The nanostructures are incorporated into the material structure either randomly or aligned, within grains, or along or across grain boundaries.

  9. Modified glass fibre reinforced polymer composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumei

    A high ratio of strength to density and relatively low-cost are some of the significant features of glass fibre reinforced polymer composites (GFRPCs) that made them one of the most rapidly developed materials in recent years. They are widely used as the material of construction in the areas of aerospace, marine and everyday life, such as airplane, helicopter, boat, canoe, fishing rod, racket, etc. Traditionally, researchers tried to raise the mechanical properties and keep a high strength/weight ratio using all or some of the following methods: increasing the volume fraction of the fibre; using different polymeric matrix material; or changing the curing conditions. In recent years, some new techniques and processing methods were developed to further improve the mechanical properties of glass fibre (GF) reinforced polymer composite. For example, by modifying the surface condition of the GF, both the interface strength between the GF and the polymer matrix and the shear strength of the final composite can be significantly increased. Also, by prestressing the fibre during the curing process of the composite, the tensile, flexural and the impact properties of the composite can be greatly improved. In this research project, a new method of preparing GFRPCs, which combined several traditional and modern techniques together, was developed. This new method includes modification of the surface of the GF with silica particles, application of different levels of prestressing on the GF during the curing process, and the change of the fibre volume fraction and curing conditions in different sets of experiments. The results of the new processing were tested by the three-point bend test, the short beam shear test and the impact test to determine the new set of properties so formed in the composite material. Scanning electronic microscopy (SEM) was used to study the fracture surface of the new materials after the mechanical tests were performed. By taking advantages of the

  10. Mechanical properties of fiber reinforced lightweight concrete composites

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Pena, M. ); Mobasher, B. )

    1994-01-01

    Hybrid composites with variable strength/toughness properties can be manufactured using combinations of brittle or ductile mesh in addition to brittle and ductile matrix reinforcements. The bending and tensile properties of thin sheet fiber cement composites made from these mixtures were investigated. Composites consisted of a woven mesh of either polyvinyl chloride (PVC) coated E-glass or polypropylene (PP) fibers for the surface reinforcement. In addition, chopped polypropylene, acrylic, nylon, and alkali-resistant (AR) glass fibers were used for the core reinforcement. It is shown that by controlling fiber contents, types, and combinations, design objectives such as strength, stiffness and toughness, can be achieved. Superior post-cracking behavior was measured for composites reinforced both with glass mesh and PP mesh. Load carrying capacity of PP mesh composites can be increased with the use of 1% or higher chopped PP fibers. Glass mesh composites with short AR glass fibers as matrix reinforcement indicate an increased matrix cracking strength and modulus of rupture. Combinations of PP mesh/short AR glass did not show a substantial improvement in the matrix ultimate strength. An increased nylon fiber surface area resulted in improved post peak response.

  11. Evaluation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Okelly, K. P.

    1971-01-01

    The results of an evaluation of candidate metal-matrix composite materials for shuttle space radiators mounted to external structure are presented. The evaluation was specifically applicable to considerations of the manufacturing and properties of a potential space radiator. Two candidates, boron/aluminum and graphite/aluminum were obtained or made in various forms and tested in sufficient depth to allow selection of one of the two for future scale-up programs. The effort accomplished on this program verified that aluminum reinforced with boron was within the state-of-the-art in industry and possessed properties usable in the external skin areas available for shuttle radiators where re-entry temperatures will not exceed 800 F. It further demonstrated that graphite/aluminum has an apparently attractive future for space applications but requires extension development prior to scale-up.

  12. Thermoplastic matrix composite processing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dara, P. H.; Loos, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The effects the processing parameters pressure, temperature, and time have on the quality of continuous graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic matrix composites were quantitatively accessed by defining the extent to which intimate contact and bond formation has occurred at successive ply interfaces. Two models are presented predicting the extents to which the ply interfaces have achieved intimate contact and cohesive strength. The models are based on experimental observation of compression molded laminates and neat resin conditions, respectively. Identified as the mechanism explaining the phenomenon by which the plies bond to themselves is the theory of autohesion (or self diffusion). Theoretical predictions from the Reptation Theory between autohesive strength and contact time are used to explain the effects of the processing parameters on the observed experimental strengths. The application of a time-temperature relationship for autohesive strength predictions is evaluated. A viscoelastic compression molding model of a tow was developed to explain the phenomenon by which the prepreg ply interfaces develop intimate contact.

  13. Reinforcing of Cement Composites by Estabragh Fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merati, A. A.

    2014-04-01

    The influence of Estabragh fibres has been studied to improve the performance characteristics of the reinforced cement composites. The concrete shrinkage was evaluated by counting the number of cracks and measuring the width of cracks on the surface of concrete specimens. Although, the Estabragh fibres lose their strength in an alkali environment of cement composites, but, the ability of Estabragh fibres to bridge on the micro cracks in the concrete matrix causes to decrease the width of the cracks on the surface of the concrete samples in comparison with the plain concrete. However, considering the mechanical properties of specimens such as bending strength and impact resistance, the specimens with 0.25 % of Estabragh fibre performed better in all respects compared to the physical and mechanical properties of reinforced cement composite of concrete. Consequently, by adding 0.25 % of Estabragh fibres to the cement composite of concrete, a remarkable improvement in physical and mechanical properties of fibre-containing cement composite is achieved.

  14. Nanostructured metal composites reinforced with fullerenes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Hernández, Francisco C.; Calderon, H. A.

    2010-02-01

    This work presents the results of the characterization of nanostructured Al or Fe matrix composites reinforced with fullerenes. The fullerene used is a mix of 15 wt%C60, 5 wt.%C70, and 80 wt.% soot that is the product of the primary synthesis of C60. The composites were produced by mechanical alloying and sintered by spark plasma sintering (SPS). It was found that in both composites, C60 withstands mechanical alloying, and acts as a control agent, reducing the agglomeration of the particles. In both composite systems the as-mechanically alloyed powders as well as the SPS sintered products are nanostructured. During the SPS process the effect of the metal (Al or Fe) matrix with the fullerene is different for each composite. For instance, Al reacts with all the carbon in the fullerene mix and forms Al4C3; on the contrary, in the Fe-fullerene composite, Fe sponsors the synthesis of C60 during the SPS process. The synthesis of the C60 is presumably assisted by the catalytic nature of Fe and the electric field generated during the SPS sintering process.

  15. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  16. Process of Making Boron-Fiber Reinforced Composite Tape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belvin, Harry L. (Inventor); Cano, Roberto J. (Inventor); Johnston, Norman J. (Inventor); Marchello, Joseph M. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    The invention is an apparatus and method for producing a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composition from powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and a linear array of boron fibers. The boron fibers are applied onto the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles and then are processed within a processing component having an impregnation bar assembly. After passing through variable-dimension forming nip-rollers, the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with the boron fibers become a hybrid boron reinforced polymer matrix composite tape. A driving mechanism pulls the powder pre-impregnated fiber tow bundles with boron fibers through the processing line of the apparatus and a take-up spool collects the formed hybrid boron-fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite tape.

  17. Unified micromechanics of damping for unidirectional fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saravanos, D. A.; Chamis, C. C.

    1989-01-01

    An integrated micromechanics methodology for the prediction of damping capacity in fiber-reinforced polymer matrix unidirectional composites has been developed. Explicit micromechanics equations based on hysteretic damping are presented relating the on-axis damping capacities to the fiber and matrix properties and volume fraction. The damping capacities of unidirectional composites subjected to off-axis loading are synthesized from thermal effect on the damping performance of unidirectional composites due to temperature and moisture variations is also modeled. The damping contributions from interfacial friction between broken fibers and matrix are incorporated. Finally, the temperature rise in continuously vibrating composite plies is estimated. Application examples illustrate the significance of various parameters on the damping performance of unidirectional and off-axis fiber reinforced composites.

  18. Precipitation hardening of a novel aluminum matrix composite

    SciTech Connect

    Suarez, Oscar Marcelo

    2002-09-15

    Deterioration of properties in cast aluminum matrix composites (AMCs) due to matrix/reinforcement chemical reactions is absent when AlB{sub 2} particles are used as reinforcements. This communication reports the fabrication of a heat-treatable AMC reinforced with borides. Final hardness values can be adjusted by solution and precipitation, which harden the composite. Evolution of the microstructure is concisely presented as observed by secondary electron microscopy. Precipitation hardening of the aluminum matrix, observed by microhardness measurements, has been corroborated by differential thermal analysis.

  19. Microstructural characterization of fiber-reinforced composites

    SciTech Connect

    Summerscales, J.

    1998-12-31

    In the past 50 years, great progress has been made in developing artificial fiber-reinforced composite materials, generally using filaments with microscopic diameters. An array of reinforcement forms can be used in commercial applications--with the microstructure being a critical factor in realizing the required properties in a material. This book comprehensively examines the application of advanced microstructural characterization techniques to fiber-reinforced composites. Its contents include: (1) flexible textile composite microstructure; (2) 3-D confocal microscopy of glass fiber-reinforced composites; (3) geometric modeling of yarn and fiber assemblies; (4) characterization of yarn shape in woven fabric composites; (5) quantitative microstructural analysis for continuous fiber composites; (6) electron microscopy of polymer composites; (7) micromechanics of reinforcement using laser raman spectroscopy; and (8) acoustic microscopy of ceramic fiber composites.

  20. Nano-hydroxyapatite reinforced AZ31 magnesium alloy by friction stir processing: a solid state processing for biodegradable metal matrix composites.

    PubMed

    Ratna Sunil, B; Sampath Kumar, T S; Chakkingal, Uday; Nandakumar, V; Doble, Mukesh

    2014-04-01

    Friction stir processing (FSP) was successfully adopted to fabricate nano-hydroxyapatite (nHA) reinforced AZ31 magnesium alloy composite as well as to achieve fine grain structure. The combined effect of grain refinement and the presence of embedded nHA particles on enhancing the biomineralization and controlling the degradation of magnesium were studied. Grain refinement from 56 to ~4 and 2 μm was observed at the stir zones of FSP AZ31 and AZ31-nHA composite respectively. The immersion studies in super saturated simulated body fluid (SBF 5×) for 24 h suggest that the increased wettability due to fine grain structure and nHA particles present in the AZ31-nHA composite initiated heterogeneous nucleation which favored the early nucleation and growth of calcium-phosphate mineral phase. The nHA particles as nucleation sites initiated rapid biomineralization in the composite. After 72 h of immersion the degradation due to localized pitting was observed to be reduced by enhanced biomineralization in both the FSPed AZ31 and the composite. Also, best corrosion behavior was observed for the composite before and after immersion test. MTT assay using rat skeletal muscle (L6) cells showed negligible toxicity for all the processed and unprocessed samples. However, cell adhesion was observed to be more on the composite due to the small grain size and incorporated nHA.

  1. FIBER-REINFORCED METALLIC COMPOSITE MATERIALS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    COMPOSITE MATERIALS), (*FIBER METALLURGY, TITANIUM ALLOYS , NICKEL ALLOYS , REINFORCING MATERIALS, TUNGSTEN, WIRE, MOLYBDENUM ALLOYS , COBALT ALLOYS , CHROMIUM ALLOYS , ALUMINUM ALLOYS , MECHANICAL PROPERTIES, POWDER METALLURGY.

  2. Effects of thermal cycling on density, elastic modulus, and vibrational damping in an alumina particulate reinforced aluminum metal matrix composite (Al{sub 2}O{sub 3p}/2014 Al)

    SciTech Connect

    Wolfenden, A.; Tang, H.H.; Chawla, K.; Hermel, T.

    1999-07-01

    The effects of thermal cycling on the mechanical and physical properties, namely, the density, dynamic elastic modulus and vibrational damping, were measured for a particular reinforced metal matrix composite (MMC). The material was made by Duralcan. Specimens were exposed to up thermal cycles from room temperature to 300 C. The density of the material was measured by the Archimedes technique. The dynamic Young`s Modulus and vibrational damping of the material were determined by the piezoelectric ultrasonic composite oscillator technique (PUCOT). The results showed that the density and elastic modulus of the material increased only slightly due to the thermal cycling while the damping increased significantly. An increase in dislocation concentration near the particle/matrix interfaces caused by the thermal cycling could account for the measured results.

  3. Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMC) Life Prediction Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Stanley R.; Verrilli, Michael J.; Thomas, David J.; Halbig, Michael C.; Calomino, Anthony M.; Ellis, John R.; Opila, Elizabeth J.

    1990-01-01

    Advanced launch systems will very likely incorporate fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMC) in critical propulsion and airframe components. The use of CMC will save weight, increase operating margin, safety and performance, and improve reuse capability. For reusable and single mission use, accurate life prediction is critical to success. The tools to accomplish this are immature and not oriented toward the behavior of carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC), the primary system of interest for many applications. This paper describes an approach and progress made to satisfy the need to develop an integrated life prediction system that addresses mechanical durability and environmental degradation.

  4. Preliminary evaluation of fiber composite reinforcement of truck frame rails

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Faddoul, J. R.

    1977-01-01

    The use of graphite fiber/resin matrix composite to effectively reinforce a standard steel truck frame rail is studied. A preliminary design was made and it was determined that the reinforcement weight could be reduced by a factor of 10 when compared to a steel reinforcement. A section of a 1/3 scale reinforced rail was fabricated to demonstrate low cost manufacturing techniques. The scale rail section was then tested and increased stiffness was confirmed. No evidence of composite fatigue was found after 500,000 cycles to a fiber stress of 34,000 psi. The test specimen failed in bending in a static test at a load 50 percent greater than that predicted for a non-reinforced rail.

  5. Fabrication and characterization of AZ91/CNT magnesium matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Yong-Ha; Park, Yong-Ho; Park, Ik-Min; Oak, Jeong-jung; Kimura, Hisamichi; Cho, Kyung-Mox

    2008-12-01

    Carbon Nano Tube (CNT) reinforced AZ91 metal matrix composites (MMC) were fabricated by the squeeze infiltrated method. Properties of magnesium alloys have been improved by impurity reduction, surface treatment and alloy design, and thus the usage for the magnesium alloys has been extended recently. However there still remain barriers for the adaption of magnesium alloys for engineering materials. In this study, we report light-weight, high strength heat resistant magnesium matrix composites. Microstructural study and tensile test were performed for the squeeze infiltrated magnesium matrix composites. The wear properties were characterized and the possibility for the application to automotive power train and engine parts was investigated. It was found that the squeeze infiltration technique is a proper method to fabricate magnesium matrix composites reducing casting defects such as pores and matrix/reinforcement interface separation etc. Improved tensile and mechanical properties were obtained with CNT reinforcing magnesium alloys

  6. Pendulum impact resistance of tungsten fiber/metal matrix composites.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Winsa, E. A.; Petrasek, D. W.

    1972-01-01

    The impact properties of copper, copper-10 nickel, and a superalloy matrix reinforced with tungsten fibers were studied. In most cases the following increased composite impact strength: increased fiber or matrix toughness, decreased fiber-matrix reaction, increased test temperature, hot working and heat treatment. Notch sensitivity was reduced by increasing fiber or matrix toughness. The effect of fiber content depended on the relative toughness of the fibers and matrix. Above 530 K a 60 volume per cent superalloy matrix composite had a greater impact strength than a turbine blade superalloy, whereas below 530 K a hot worked 56 volume per cent composite had a greater impact strength than the superalloy.

  7. A comparison of fiber effects on polymer matrix composite oxidation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowles, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A number of thermo-oxidative stability studies addressing the effects of fiber reinforcement on composite thermal stability and influence of geometry on the results of aging studies were performed at NASA-Lewis. The information presented herein, a compilation of some results from these studies, shows the influence of the reinforcement fibers on the oxidative degradation of various PMR-15 composites. Reinforcement of graphite and ceramics were studied and three composite oxidation mechanisms were observed. One was a dominant attack of the reinforcement fiber, the second was the aggressive oxidation of the matrix material, and the third was interfacial degradation.

  8. Fatigue behavior of SiC reinforced titanium composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Grimes, H. H.

    1979-01-01

    The low cycle axial fatigue properties of 25 and 44 fiber volume percent SiC/Ti(6Al-4V) composites were measured at room temperature and at 650 deg C. The S-N curves for the composites showed no anticipated improvement over bulk matrix behavior at room temperature. Although axial and transverse tensile strength results suggest a degradation in SiC fiber strength during composite fabrication, it appears that the poor fatigue life of the composites was caused by a reduced fatigue resistance of the reinforced Ti(6Al-4V) matrix. The reduced matrix behavior was due, to the presence of flawed and fractured fibers created near the specimen surfaces by preparation techniques and to the large residual tensile stresses that can exist in fiber reinforced matrices. The effects of fatigue testing at high temperature are discussed.

  9. Study on the effect of the surface treatment on the residual stress gradient in silicon carbide (SiC) reinforced aluminum metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, J.; Miege, B.; Flavenot, J.; Thery, S. Groupe Usinor Sacilor, Firminy )

    1990-01-01

    In this work, the residual stresses induced on SiC-reinforced MMCs by the manufacturing processes (machining, surface finishing, and surface treatment) were investigated using an incremental hole-drilling method to measure the macroscopic residual stress gradient in depth and X-ray diffraction method to study the surface residual stresses in matrix. Three aluminum matrices (2024, 2124, and 6061) with different proportions of SiC fiber were tested, and the effects of the heat treatment, machining, and shot-peening treatment on the residual stress distribution of the materials were analyzed and compared. Results show that it is possible to optimize the residual stress distribution of MCC materials with adequate posttreatment. 14 refs.

  10. The Role of Microstructural Variability on the Very High-Cycle Fatigue Behavior of Discontinuously-Reinforced Aluminum Metal Matrix Composites using Ultrasonic Fatigue (Preprint)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-05-01

    Strength Controlled by Porosity Population in A 319- type cast Aluminum Alloy Part II: Monte - Carlo Simulation J.Z. Yi, X. Zhu, J.W. Jones and J.E. Allison...this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response , including the time for reviewing instructions, searching existing data...ALUMINUM METAL MATRIX COMPOSITES USING ULTRASONIC FATIGUE (PREPRINT) 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER IN-HOUSE 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER

  11. Development of Matrix Microstructures in UHTC Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Sylvia; Stackpoole, Margaret; Gusman, Michael

    2012-01-01

    One of the major issues hindering the use of ultra high temperature ceramics for aerospace applications is low fracture toughness. There is considerable interest in developing fiber-reinforced composites to improve fracture toughness. Considerable knowledge has been gained in controlling and improving the microstructure of monolithic UHTCs, and this paper addresses the question of transferring that knowledge to composites. Some model composites have been made and the microstructures of the matrix developed has been explored and compared to the microstructure of monolithic materials in the hafnium diboride/silicon carbide family. Both 2D and 3D weaves have been impregnated and processed.

  12. Fabrication of tungsten wire reinforced nickel-base alloy composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brentnall, W. D.; Toth, I. J.

    1974-01-01

    Fabrication methods for tungsten fiber reinforced nickel-base superalloy composites were investigated. Three matrix alloys in pre-alloyed powder or rolled sheet form were evaluated in terms of fabricability into composite monotape and multi-ply forms. The utility of monotapes for fabricating more complex shapes was demonstrated. Preliminary 1093C (2000F) stress rupture tests indicated that efficient utilization of fiber strength was achieved in composites fabricated by diffusion bonding processes. The fabrication of thermal fatigue specimens is also described.

  13. Thermal Analysis of Filler Reinforced Polymeric Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghadge, Mahesh Devidas

    Improving heat dissipating property of composite materials is becoming increasingly important in domains ranging from the automotive industry, electronic devices to aeronautical industry. Effective heat dissipation is required especially in aircraft and racing tires to guarantee high performance and good service life [1]. The present study is focused on improving the thermal conductivity of Emulsion-styrene butadiene rubber (ESBR) which is a cheap alternative to other rubber composites. The disadvantages of ESBR are low thermal conductivity and high heat generation. Adding fillers with high thermal conductivity to ESBR is proposed as a technique for improving the thermal conductivity of ESBR. The purpose of the research is to predict the thermal conductivity of ESBR when filled with fillers of much higher thermal conductivity and also to find out to what extent the filler properties affect the heat transfer capabilities of the composite matrix. The influence of different filler shapes i.e. spherical, cylindrical and platelets on the overall thermal capability of composite matrix is studied, the finite element modelings are conducted using Abaqus. Three-dimensional and two-dimensional models are created in Abaqus to simulate the microstructure of the composite matrix filled with fillers. Results indicate that the overall thermal conductivity increases with increasing filler loading i.e. for a filler volume fraction of 0.27, the conductivity increased by around 50%. Filler shapes, orientation angle, and aspect ratio of the fillers significantly influences the thermal conductivity. Conductivity increases with increasing aspect ratio (length/diameter) of the cylindrical fillers since longer conductive chains are able to form at the same volume percentage as compared to spherical fillers. The composite matrix reaches maximum thermal conductivity when the cylindrical fillers are oriented in the direction of heat flow. The heat conductivity predicted by FEM for ESBR is

  14. Fiber reinforced composite resin systems.

    PubMed

    Giordano, R

    2000-01-01

    The Targis/Vectris and Sculpture/FibreKor systems were devised to create a translucent maximally reinforced resin framework for fabrication of crowns, bridges, inlays, and onlays. These materials are esthetic, have translucency similar to castable glass-ceramics such as OPC and Empress, and have fits that are reported to be acceptable in clinical and laboratory trials. These restorations rely on proper bonding to the remaining tooth structure; therefore, careful attention to detail must be paid to this part of the procedure. Cementation procedures should involve silane treatment of the cleaned abraded internal restoration surface, application of bonding agent to the restoration as well as the etched/primed tooth, and finally use of a composite resin. Each manufacturer has a recommended system which has been tested for success with its resin system. These fiber reinforced resins are somewhat different than classical composites, so not all cementation systems will necessarily work with them. Polishing of the restoration can be accomplished using diamond or alumina impregnated rubber wheels followed by diamond paste. The glass fibers can pose a health risk. They are small enough to be inhaled and deposited in the lungs, resulting in a silicosis-type problem. Therefore, if fibers are exposed and ground on, it is extremely important to wear a mask. Also, the fibers can be a skin irritant, so gloves also should be worn. If the fibers become exposed intraorally, they can cause gingival inflammation and may attract plaque. The fibers should be covered with additional composite resin. If this cannot be accomplished, the restoration should be replaced. The bulk of these restorations are formed using a particulate filled resin, similar in structure to conventional composite resins. Therefore, concerns as to wear resistance, color stability, excessive expansion/contraction, and sensitivity remain until these materials are proven in long-term clinical trials. They do hold the

  15. Effect of Environment on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Calomino, Anthony; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Stress-rupture tests were conducted in air, vacuum, and steam-containing environments to identify the failure modes and degradation mechanisms of a carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite at two temperatures, 600 and 1200 C. Stress-rupture lives in air and steam containing environments (50 - 80% steam with argon) are similar for a composite stress of 69 MPa at 1200 C. Lives of specimens tested in a 20% steam/argon environment were about twice as long. For tests conducted at 600 C, composite life in 20% steam/argon was 20 times longer than life in air. Thermogravimetric analysis of the carbon fibers was conducted under similar conditions to the stress-rupture tests. The oxidation rate of the fibers in the various environments correlated with the composite stress-rupture lives. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that oxidation of the carbon fibers was the primary damage mode for specimens tested in air and steam environments at both temperatures.

  16. Effect of Environment on Stress-Rupture Behavior of a Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Silicon Carbide (C/SiC) Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Verrilli, Michael J.; Opila, Elizabeth J.; Calomino, Anthony; Kiser, J. Douglas

    2002-01-01

    Stress-rupture tests were conducted in air, vacuum, and steam-containing environments to identify the failure modes and degradation mechanisms of a carbon fiber-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) composite at two temperatures, 600 and 1200 C. Stress-rupture lives in air and steam containing environments (50 - 80% steam with argon) are similar for a composite stress of 69 MPa at 1200 C. Lives of specimens tested in a 20% steam/argon environment were about twice as long. For tests conducted at 600 C, composite life in 20% steam/argon was 20 times longer than life in air. Thermogravimetric analysis of the carbon fibers was conducted under similar conditions to the stress-rupture tests. The oxidation rate of the fibers in the various environments correlated with the composite stress-rupture lives. Examination of the failed specimens indicated that oxidation of the carbon fibers was the primary damage mode for specimens tested in air and steam environments at both temperatures.

  17. Optimization of Al Matrix Reinforced with B4C Particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shabani, Mohsen Ostad; Mazahery, Ali

    2013-02-01

    In the current study, abrasive wear resistance and mechanical properties of A356 composite reinforced with B4C particulates were investigated. A center particle swarm optimization algorithm (CenterPSO) is proposed to predict the optimal process conditions in fabrication of aluminum matrix composites. Unlike other ordinary particles, the center particle has no explicit velocity and is set to the center of the swarm at every iteration. Other aspects of the center particle are the same as that of the ordinary particle, such as fitness evaluation and competition for the best particle of the swarm. Because the center of the swarm is a promising position, the center particle generally gets good fitness value. More importantly, due to frequent appearance as the best particle of swarm, it often attracts other particles and guides the search direction of the whole swarm.

  18. Thermal effects on the mechanical properties of SiC fiber reinforced reaction bonded silicon nitride matrix (SiC/RBSN) composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhatt, R. T.; Phillips, R. E.

    1988-01-01

    The elevated temperature four-point flexural strength and the room temperature tensile and flexural strength properties after thermal shock were measured for ceramic composites consisting of 30 vol pct uniaxially aligned 142 micron diameter SiC fibers in a reaction bonded Si3N4 matrix. The elevated temperature strengths were measured after 15 min of exposure in air at temperatures to 1400 C. Thermal shock treatment was accomplished by heating the composite in air for 15 min at temperatures to 1200 C and then quenching in water at 25 C. The results indicate no significant loss in strength properties either at temperature or after thermal shock when compared with the strength data for composites in the as-fabricated condition.

  19. Thermal and mechanical behavior of metal matrix and ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M. (Editor); Moeller, Helen H. (Editor); Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses local stresses in metal-matrix composites (MMCs) subjected to thermal and mechanical loads, the computational simulation of high-temperature MMCs' cyclic behavior, an analysis of a ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) flexure specimen, and a plasticity analysis of fibrous composite laminates under thermomechanical loads. Also discussed are a comparison of methods for determining the fiber-matrix interface frictional stresses of CMCs, the monotonic and cyclic behavior of an SiC/calcium aluminosilicate CMC, the mechanical and thermal properties of an SiC particle-reinforced Al alloy MMC, the temperature-dependent tensile and shear response of a graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMC, the fiber/matrix interface bonding strength of MMCs, and fatigue crack growth in an Al2O3 short fiber-reinforced Al-2Mg matrix MMC.

  20. Thermal and mechanical behavior of metal matrix and ceramic matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, John M. (Editor); Moeller, Helen H. (Editor); Johnson, W. S. (Editor)

    1990-01-01

    The present conference discusses local stresses in metal-matrix composites (MMCs) subjected to thermal and mechanical loads, the computational simulation of high-temperature MMCs' cyclic behavior, an analysis of a ceramic-matrix composite (CMC) flexure specimen, and a plasticity analysis of fibrous composite laminates under thermomechanical loads. Also discussed are a comparison of methods for determining the fiber-matrix interface frictional stresses of CMCs, the monotonic and cyclic behavior of an SiC/calcium aluminosilicate CMC, the mechanical and thermal properties of an SiC particle-reinforced Al alloy MMC, the temperature-dependent tensile and shear response of a graphite-reinforced 6061 Al-alloy MMC, the fiber/matrix interface bonding strength of MMCs, and fatigue crack growth in an Al2O3 short fiber-reinforced Al-2Mg matrix MMC.