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Sample records for matrix element governing

  1. Matrix Elements for Hylleraas CI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harris, Frank E.

    The limitation to at most a single interelectron distance in individual configurations of a Hylleraas-type multiconfiguration wave function restricts significantly the types of integrals occurring in matrix elements for energy calculations, but even then if the formulation is not handled efficiently the angular parts of these integrals escalate to create expressions of great complexity. This presentation reviews ways in which the angular-momentum calculus can be employed to systematize and simplify the matrix element formulas, particularly those for the kinetic-energy matrix elements.

  2. Relativistic Dipole Matrix Element Zeros

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajohn, L. A.; Pratt, R. H.

    2002-05-01

    There is a special class of relativistic high energy dipole matrix element zeros (RZ), whose positions with respect to photon energy ω , only depend on the bound state l quantum number according to ω^0=mc^2/(l_b+1) (independent of primary quantum number n, nuclear charge Z, central potential V and dipole retardation). These RZ only occur in (n,l_b,j_b)arrow (ɛ , l_b+1,j_b) transitions such as ns_1/2arrow ɛ p_1/2; np_3/2arrow ɛ d_3/2: nd_5/2arrow ɛ f_5/2 etc. The nonrelativistic limit of these matrix elements can be established explicitly in the Coulomb case. Within the general matrix element formalism (such as that in [1]); when |κ | is substituted for γ in analytic expressions for matrix elements, the zeros remain, but ω^0 now becomes dependent on n and Z. When the reduction to nonrelativistic form is completed by application of the low energy approximation ω mc^2 mc^2, the zeros disappear. This nonzero behavior was noted in nonrelativistic dipole Coulomb matrix elements by Fano and Cooper [2] and later proven by Oh and Pratt[3]. (J. H. Scofield, Phys. Rev. A 40), 3054 (1989 (U. Fano and J. W. Cooper, Rev. Mod. Phys. 40), 441 (1968). (D. Oh and R. H. Pratt, Phys. Rev. A 34), 2486 (1986); 37, 1524 (1988); 45, 1583 (1992).

  3. Weak matrix elements for CP violation.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, W.; Gupta, R.; Christ, N.; Fleming, G. T.; Kilcup, G.; Liu, G.; Mawhinney, R.; Sharpe, S.; Wu, L.; Bhattacharya, T.

    2001-01-01

    We present preliminary results of matrix elements of four fermion operators relevant to the determination of e and E ' / E using staggered fermions. To calculate the matrix elements relevant to CP violation in Kaon decays it is important to use a lattice formulation which preserves (some) chiral symmetry.

  4. Measuring strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J. ); Krein, G. Instituto de Fisica Teorica , Sao Paulo, SP ); Williams, A.G. Florida State Univ., Tallahassee, FL )

    1991-01-01

    Experiments are proposed to measure various strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon. Examples are electro- and neutrino- production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering from isospin zero targets, e.g., deuterons.

  5. Measuring strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Krein, G. |; Williams, A.G. |

    1991-12-31

    Experiments are proposed to measure various strangeness matrix elements of the nucleon. Examples are electro- and neutrino- production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering from isospin zero targets, e.g., deuterons.

  6. Rolling Element Bearing Stiffness Matrix Determination (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Y.; Parker, R.

    2014-01-01

    Current theoretical bearing models differ in their stiffness estimates because of different model assumptions. In this study, a finite element/contact mechanics model is developed for rolling element bearings with the focus of obtaining accurate bearing stiffness for a wide range of bearing types and parameters. A combined surface integral and finite element method is used to solve for the contact mechanics between the rolling elements and races. This model captures the time-dependent characteristics of the bearing contact due to the orbital motion of the rolling elements. A numerical method is developed to determine the full bearing stiffness matrix corresponding to two radial, one axial, and two angular coordinates; the rotation about the shaft axis is free by design. This proposed stiffness determination method is validated against experiments in the literature and compared to existing analytical models and widely used advanced computational methods. The fully-populated stiffness matrix demonstrates the coupling between bearing radial, axial, and tilting bearing deflections.

  7. Interaction matrix element fluctuations in quantum dots

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, L.; Alhassid, Y.

    2008-04-04

    In the Coulomb blockade regime of a ballistic quantum dot, the distribution of conductance peak spacings is well known to be incorrectly predicted by a single-particle picture; instead, matrix element fluctuations of the residual electronic interaction need to be taken into account. In the normalized random-wave model, valid in the semiclassical limit where the number of electrons in the dot becomes large, we obtain analytic expressions for the fluctuations of two-body and one-body matrix elements. However, these fluctuations may be too small to explain low-temperature experimental data. We have examined matrix element fluctuations in realistic chaotic geometries, and shown that at energies of experimental interest these fluctuations generically exceed by a factor of about 3-4 the predictions of the random wave model. Even larger fluctuations occur in geometries with a mixed chaotic-regular phase space. These results may allow for much better agreement between the Hartree-Fock picture and experiment. Among other findings, we show that the distribution of interaction matrix elements is strongly non-Gaussian in the parameter range of experimental interest, even in the random wave model. We also find that the enhanced fluctuations in realistic geometries cannot be computed using a leading-order semiclassical approach, but may be understood in terms of short-time dynamics.

  8. Proton decay matrix elements from lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Aoki, Yasumichi; Shintani, Eigo; Collaboration: RBC Collaboration; UKQCD Collaboration

    2012-07-27

    We report on the calculation of the matrix elements of nucleon to pseudoscalar decay through a three quark operator, a part of the low-energy, four-fermion, baryon-number-violating operator originating from grand unified theories. The direct calculation of the form factors using domain-wall fermions on the lattice, incorporating the u, d and s sea-quarks effects yields the results with all the relevant systematic uncertainties controlled for the first time.

  9. Staggered fermion matrix elements using smeared operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilcup, Greg; Gupta, Rajan; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    1998-02-01

    We investigate the use of two kinds of staggered fermion operators, smeared and unsmeared. The smeared operators extend over a 44 hypercube, and tend to have smaller perturbative corrections than the corresponding unsmeared operators. We use these operators to calculate kaon weak matrix elements on quenched ensembles at β=6.0, 6.2, and 6.4. Extrapolating to the continuum limit, we find BK(NDR,2 GeV)=0.62+/-0.02(stat)+/-0.02(syst). The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty in the matching between lattice and continuum operators due to the truncation of perturbation theory at one loop. We do not include any estimate of the errors due to quenching or to the use of degenerate s and d quarks. For the ΔI=3/2 electromagnetic penguin operators we find B(3/2)7=0.62+/-0.03+/-0.06 and B(3/2)8=0.77+/-0.04+/-0.04. We also use the ratio of unsmeared to smeared operators to make a partially nonperturbative estimate of the renormalization of the quark mass for staggered fermions. We find that tadpole improved perturbation theory works well if the coupling is chosen to be αMS¯(q*=1/a).

  10. Precision measurement of transition matrix elements via light shift cancellation.

    PubMed

    Herold, C D; Vaidya, V D; Li, X; Rolston, S L; Porto, J V; Safronova, M S

    2012-12-14

    We present a method for accurate determination of atomic transition matrix elements at the 10(-3) level. Measurements of the ac Stark (light) shift around "magic-zero" wavelengths, where the light shift vanishes, provide precise constraints on the matrix elements. We make the first measurement of the 5s - 6p matrix elements in rubidium by measuring the light shift around the 421 and 423 nm zeros through diffraction of a condensate off a sequence of standing wave pulses. In conjunction with existing theoretical and experimental data, we find 0.3235(9)ea(0) and 0.5230(8)ea(0) for the 5s - 6p(1/2) and 5s - 6p(3/2) elements, respectively, an order of magnitude more accurate than the best theoretical values. This technique can provide needed, accurate matrix elements for many atoms, including those used in atomic clocks, tests of fundamental symmetries, and quantum information. PMID:23368314

  11. Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

    2011-12-01

    We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

  12. Analytical expressions for vibrational matrix elements of Morse oscillators

    SciTech Connect

    Zuniga, J.; Hidalgo, A.; Frances, J.M.; Requena, A.; Lopez Pineiro, A.; Olivares del Valle, F.J.

    1988-10-15

    Several exact recursion relations connecting different Morse oscillator matrix elements associated with the operators q/sup ..cap alpha../e/sup -//sup ..beta..//sup aq/ and q/sup ..cap alpha../e/sup -//sup ..beta..//sup aq/(d/dr) are derived. Matrix elements of the other useful operators may then be obtained easily. In particular, analytical expressions for (y/sup k/d/dr) and (y/sup k/d/dr+(d/dr)y/sup k/), matrix elements of interest in the study of the internuclear motion in polyatomic molecules, are obtained.

  13. Analytic formula for quadrupole-quadrupole matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosensteel, G.

    1990-12-01

    An analytic formula is reported for general matrix elements of the microscopic quadrupole-quadrupole operator in the U(3)-boson approximation. The complete infinite-dimensional basis of A-fermion wave functions is compatible with the harmonic-oscillator shell model and consists of np-nh configurations, with spurious center-of-mass excitations removed, which are symmetry adapted to the Elliott U(3) and symplectic Sp(3,R) models. The formula expresses the general Q2.Q2 matrix element with respect to this complete orthonormal basis as a Racah SU(3) U coefficient times a closed-shell matrix element. An oscillator closed-shell matrix element of Q2.Q2 is a square root of a rational function of the integer quantum numbers of the U(3) basis.

  14. Automatic generation of matrix element derivatives for tight binding models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elena, Alin M.; Meister, Matthias

    2005-10-01

    Tight binding (TB) models are one approach to the quantum mechanical many-particle problem. An important role in TB models is played by hopping and overlap matrix elements between the orbitals on two atoms, which of course depend on the relative positions of the atoms involved. This dependence can be expressed with the help of Slater-Koster parameters, which are usually taken from tables. Recently, a way to generate these tables automatically was published. If TB approaches are applied to simulations of the dynamics of a system, also derivatives of matrix elements can appear. In this work we give general expressions for first and second derivatives of such matrix elements. Implemented in a tight binding computer program, like, for instance, DINAMO, they obviate the need to type all the required derivatives of all occurring matrix elements by hand.

  15. The dynamic stiffness matrix of two-dimensional elements: application to Kirchhoff's plate continuous elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casimir, J. B.; Kevorkian, S.; Vinh, T.

    2005-10-01

    This paper describes a procedure for building the dynamic stiffness matrix of two-dimensional elements with free edge boundary conditions. The dynamic stiffness matrix is the basis of the continuous element method. Then, the formulation is used to build a Kirchhoff rectangular plate element. Gorman's method of boundary condition decomposition and Levy's series are used to obtain the strong solution of the elementary problem. A symbolic computation software partially performs the construction of the dynamic stiffness matrix from this solution. The performances of the element are evaluated from comparisons with harmonic responses of plates obtained by the finite element method.

  16. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix element technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.

  17. Neutrinoless double-β decay and nuclear transition matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, P. K.

    2015-10-28

    Within mechanisms involving the light Majorana neutrinos, squark-neutrino, Majorons, sterile neutrinos and heavy Majorana neutrino, nuclear transition matrix elements for the neutrinoless (β{sup −}β{sup −}){sub 0ν} decay of {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 128,130}Te and {sup 150}Nd nuclei are calculated by employing the PHFB approach. Effects due to finite size of nucleons, higher order currents, short range correlations, and deformations of parent as well as daughter nuclei on the calculated matrix elements are estimated. Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements within long-ranged mechanisms but for double Majoron accompanied (β{sup −}β{sup −}ϕϕ){sub 0ν} decay modes are 9%–15%. In the case of short ranged heavy Majorona neutrino exchange mechanism, the maximum uncertainty is about 35%. The maximum systematic error within the mechanism involving the exchange of light Majorana neutrino is about 46%.

  18. Distributions of off-diagonal scattering matrix elements: Exact results

    SciTech Connect

    Nock, A. Kumar, S. Sommers, H.-J. Guhr, T.

    2014-03-15

    Scattering is a ubiquitous phenomenon which is observed in a variety of physical systems which span a wide range of length scales. The scattering matrix is the key quantity which provides a complete description of the scattering process. The universal features of scattering in chaotic systems is most generally modeled by the Heidelberg approach which introduces stochasticity to the scattering matrix at the level of the Hamiltonian describing the scattering center. The statistics of the scattering matrix is obtained by averaging over the ensemble of random Hamiltonians of appropriate symmetry. We derive exact results for the distributions of the real and imaginary parts of the off-diagonal scattering matrix elements applicable to orthogonally-invariant and unitarily-invariant Hamiltonians, thereby solving a long standing problem. -- Highlights: •Scattering problem in complex or chaotic systems. •Heidelberg approach to model the chaotic nature of the scattering center. •A novel route to the nonlinear sigma model based on the characteristic function. •Exact results for the distributions of off-diagonal scattering-matrix elements. •Universal aspects of the scattering-matrix fluctuations.

  19. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S.; Frederico, T.; Krein,; Williams, A.G.

    1991-12-31

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  20. Some measurements for determining strangeness matrix elements in the nucleon

    SciTech Connect

    Henley, E.M.; Pollock, S.J.; Ying, S. ); Frederico, T. , Sao Jose dos Campos, SP . Inst. de Estudos Avancados); Krein, . Inst. de Fisica Teorica); Williams, A.G. )

    1991-01-01

    Some experiments to measure strangeness matrix elements of the proton are proposed. Two of these suggestions are described in some detail, namely electro-production of phi mesons and the difference between neutrino and antineutrino scattering for isospin zero targets such as deuterium.

  1. Differential equation for the spherical dipole matrix elements of hydrogen

    SciTech Connect

    Price, P.N.; Harmin, D.A. )

    1990-09-01

    A differential equation in {ital l} for hydrogenic radial dipole matrix elements is generated from the recursion relations of Infeld and Hull (Rev. Mod. Phys. 23, 31 (1951)). The equation is valid for all ({ital n},{ital n}{prime}){much gt}1, for all {vert bar}{Delta}{ital n}{vert bar}{ital ieq}{vert bar}{ital n}{prime}{minus}{ital n}{vert bar}, and for bound-free transitions from excited states. Approximate solutions are obtained for the case {ital l}{much lt}{ital n} and are found to be equivalent to those of other workers when {vert bar}{Delta}{ital n}{vert bar}{much gt}1. We also present a power-series solution in {ital l} good for all {vert bar}{Delta}{ital n}{vert bar}. General features of the dependence of the matrix elements on {ital l} are explained.

  2. Magic wavelengths, matrix elements, polarizabilities, and lifetimes of Cs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safronova, M. S.; Safronova, U. I.; Clark, Charles W.

    2016-07-01

    Motivated by recent interest in their applications, we report a systematic study of Cs atomic properties calculated by a high-precision relativistic all-order method. Excitation energies, reduced matrix elements, transition rates, and lifetimes are determined for levels with principal quantum numbers n ≤12 and orbital angular momentum quantum numbers l ≤3 . Recommended values and estimates of uncertainties are provided for a number of electric-dipole transitions and the electric dipole polarizabilities of the n s , n p , and n d states. We also report a calculation of the electric quadrupole polarizability of the ground state. We display the dynamic polarizabilities of the 6 s and 7 p states for optical wavelengths between 1160 and 1800 nm and identify corresponding magic wavelengths for the 6 s -7 p1 /2 and 6 s -7 p3 /2 transitions. The values of relevant matrix elements needed for polarizability calculations at other wavelengths are provided.

  3. Glueball Spectrum and Matrix Elements on Anisotropic Lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Y. Chen; A. Alexandru; S.J. Dong; T. Draper; I. Horvath; F.X. Lee; K.F. Liu; N. Mathur; C. Morningstar; M. Peardon; S. Tamhankar; B.L. Young; J.B. Zhang

    2006-01-01

    The glueball-to-vacuum matrix elements of local gluonic operators in scalar, tensor, and pseudoscalar channels are investigated numerically on several anisotropic lattices with the spatial lattice spacing ranging from 0.1fm - 0.2fm. These matrix elements are needed to predict the glueball branching ratios in J/{psi} radiative decays which will help identify the glueball states in experiments. Two types of improved local gluonic operators are constructed for a self-consistent check and the finite volume effects are studied. We find that lattice spacing dependence of our results is very weak and the continuum limits are reliably extrapolated, as a result of improvement of the lattice gauge action and local operators. We also give updated glueball masses with various quantum numbers.

  4. Calculation of transition matrix elements by nonsingular orbital transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kývala, Mojmír

    A general strategy is described for the evaluation of transition matrix elements between pairs of full class CI wave functions built up from mutually nonorthogonal molecular orbitals. A new method is proposed for the counter-transformation of the linear expansion coefficients of a full CI wave function under a nonsingular transformation of the molecular-orbital basis. The method, which consists in a straightforward application of the Cauchy-Binet formula to the definition of a Slater determinant, is shown to be simple and suitable for efficient implementation on current high-performance computers. The new method appears mainly beneficial to the calculation of miscellaneous transition matrix elements among individually optimized CASSCF states and to the re-evaluation of the CASCI expansion coefficients in Slater-determinant bases formed from arbitrarily rotated (e.g., localized or, conversely, delocalized) active molecular orbitals.

  5. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Evaluation of a matrix element].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N

    1998-01-01

    The dependence of the matrix element of the probability of interprotein electron transfer on the mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor centers and the distance between them was calculated. The calculations were made under the assumption that electron transfer proceeds mainly by a collective excitation of polaron nature, like a solvated electron state. The results obtained are consistent with experimental data and indicate the nonexponential behavior of this dependence in the case when the distance transfer is less than 20 A.

  6. A stochastic method for computing hadronic matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Alexandrou, Constantia; Constantinou, Martha; Dinter, Simon; Drach, Vincent; Jansen, Karl; Hadjiyiannakou, Kyriakos; Renner, Dru B.

    2014-01-24

    In this study, we present a stochastic method for the calculation of baryon 3-point functions which is an alternative to the typically used sequential method offering more versatility. We analyze the scaling of the error of the stochastically evaluated 3-point function with the lattice volume and find a favorable signal to noise ratio suggesting that the stochastic method can be extended to large volumes providing an efficient approach to compute hadronic matrix elements and form factors.

  7. Weak matrix elements on the lattice - Circa 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Soni, A.

    1995-10-03

    Status of weak matrix elements is reviewed. In particular, e{prime}/e, B {yields} K*{gamma}, B{sub B} and B{sub B}, are discussed and the overall situation with respect to the lattice effort and some of its phenomenological implications are summarised. For e{prime}/e the need for the relevant matrix elements is stressed in view of the forthcoming improved experiments. For some of the operators, (e.g. O{sub 6}), even bound on their matrix elements would be very helpful. On B {yields} K{degrees}{gamma}, a constant behavior of T{sub 2} appears disfavored although dependence of T{sub 2} could, of course, be milder than a simple pole. Improved data is badly needed to settle this important issue firmly, especially in view of its ramification for extractions of V{sub td} from B {yields} {rho}{gamma}. On B{sub {kappa}}, the preliminary result from JLQCD appears to contradict Sharpe et al. JLQCD data seems to fit very well to linear {alpha} dependence and leads to an appreciably lower value of B{sub {kappa}}. Four studies of B{sub {kappa}} in the {open_quotes}full{close_quotes} (n{sub f} = 2) theory indicate very little quenching effects on B{sub {kappa}}; the full theory value seems to be just a little less than the quenched result. Based on expectations from HQET, analysis of B-parameter (B{sub h}{ell}) for the heavy-light mesons via B{sub h}{ell}) = constant + constants{prime}/m{sub h}{ell} is suggested. A summary of an illustrative sample of hadron matrix elements is given and constraints on CKM parameters (e.g. V{sub td}/V{sub ts}, on the unitarity triangle and on x{sub s}/x{sub d}, emerging from the lattice calculations along with experimental results are briefly discussed. In quite a few cases, for the first time, some indication of quenching errors on weak matrix elements are now becoming available.

  8. Multi-jet Merging with NLO Matrix Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Siegert, Frank; Hoche, Stefan; Krauss, Frank; Schonherr, Marek; /Dresden, Tech. U.

    2011-08-18

    In the algorithm presented here, the ME+PS approach to merge samples of tree-level matrix elements into inclusive event samples is combined with the POWHEG method, which includes exact next-to-leading order matrix elements in the parton shower. The advantages of the method are discussed and the quality of its implementation in SHERPA is exemplified by results for e{sup +}e{sup -} annihilation into hadrons at LEP, for deep-inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering at HERA, for Drell-Yan lepton-pair production at the Tevatron and for W{sup +}W{sup -}-production at LHC energies. The simulation of hard QCD radiation in parton-shower Monte Carlos has seen tremendous progress over the last years. It was largely stimulated by the need for more precise predictions at LHC energies where the large available phase space allows additional hard QCD radiation alongside known Standard Model processes or even signals from new physics. Two types of algorithms have been developed, which allow to improve upon the soft-collinear approximations made in the parton shower, such that hard radiation is simulated according to exact matrix elements. In the ME+PS approach [1] higher-order tree-level matrix elements for different final-state jet multiplicity are merged with each other and with subsequent parton shower emissions to generate an inclusive sample. Such a prescription is invaluable for analyses which are sensitive to final states with a large jet multiplicity. The only remaining deficiency of such tree-level calculations is the large uncertainty stemming from scale variations. The POWHEG method [2] solves this problem for the lowest multiplicity subprocess by combining full NLO matrix elements with the parton shower. While this leads to NLO accuracy in the inclusive cross section and the exact radiation pattern for the first emission, it fails to describe higher-order emissions with improved accuracy. Thus it is not sufficient if final states with high jet multiplicities are considered

  9. Acceleration of matrix element computations for precision measurements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Brandt, Oleg; Gutierrez, Gaston; Wang, M. H.L.S.; Ye, Zhenyu

    2014-11-25

    The matrix element technique provides a superior statistical sensitivity for precision measurements of important parameters at hadron colliders, such as the mass of the top quark or the cross-section for the production of Higgs bosons. The main practical limitation of the technique is its high computational demand. Using the example of the top quark mass, we present two approaches to reduce the computation time of the technique by a factor of 90. First, we utilize low-discrepancy sequences for numerical Monte Carlo integration in conjunction with a dedicated estimator of numerical uncertainty, a novelty in the context of the matrix elementmore » technique. We then utilize a new approach that factorizes the overall jet energy scale from the matrix element computation, a novelty in the context of top quark mass measurements. The utilization of low-discrepancy sequences is of particular general interest, as it is universally applicable to Monte Carlo integration, and independent of the computing environment.« less

  10. SYMBMAT: Symbolic computation of quantum transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a set of Mathematica notebooks to compute symbolically quantum transition matrices relevant for atomic ionization processes. The utilization of a symbolic language allows us to obtain analytical expressions for the transition matrix elements required in charged-particle and laser induced ionization of atoms. Additionally, by using a few simple commands, it is possible to export these symbolic expressions to standard programming languages, such as Fortran or C, for the subsequent computation of differential cross sections or other observables. One of the main drawbacks in the calculation of transition matrices is the tedious algebraic work required when initial states other than the simple hydrogenic 1s state need to be considered. Using these notebooks the work is dramatically reduced and it is possible to generate exact expressions for a large set of bound states. We present explicit examples of atomic collisions (in First Born Approximation and Distorted Wave Theory) and laser-matter interactions (within the Dipole and Strong Field Approximations and different gauges) using both hydrogenic wavefunctions and Slater-Type Orbitals with arbitrary nlm quantum numbers as initial states. Catalogue identifier: AEMI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 628 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 444 195 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Single machines using Linux or Windows (with cores with any clock speed, cache memory and bits in a word) Operating system: Any OS that supports Mathematica. The notebooks have been tested under Windows and Linux and with versions 6.x, 7.x and 8.x Classification: 2.6 Nature of problem

  11. Calculation of hadronic matrix elements using lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, R.

    1993-08-01

    The author gives a brief introduction to the scope of lattice QCD calculations in his effort to extract the fundamental parameters of the standard model. This goal is illustrated by two examples. First the author discusses the extraction of CKM matrix elements from measurements of form factors for semileptonic decays of heavy-light pseudoscalar mesons such as D {yields} Ke{nu}. Second, he presents the status of results for the kaon B parameter relevant to CP violation. He concludes the talk with a short outline of his experiences with optimizing QCD codes on the CM5.

  12. Cis-elements governing trinucleotide repeat instability in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Rolfsmeier, M L; Dixon, M J; Pessoa-Brandão, L; Pelletier, R; Miret, J J; Lahue, R S

    2001-01-01

    Trinucleotide repeat (TNR) instability in humans is governed by unique cis-elements. One element is a threshold, or minimal repeat length, conferring frequent mutations. Since thresholds have not been directly demonstrated in model systems, their molecular nature remains uncertain. Another element is sequence specificity. Unstable TNR sequences are almost always CNG, whose hairpin-forming ability is thought to promote instability by inhibiting DNA repair. To understand these cis-elements further, TNR expansions and contractions were monitored by yeast genetic assays. A threshold of approximately 15--17 repeats was observed for CTG expansions and contractions, indicating that thresholds function in organisms besides humans. Mutants lacking the flap endonuclease Rad27p showed little change in the expansion threshold, suggesting that this element is not altered by the presence or absence of flap processing. CNG or GNC sequences yielded frequent mutations, whereas A-T rich sequences were substantially more stable. This sequence analysis further supports a hairpin-mediated mechanism of TNR instability. Expansions and contractions occurred at comparable rates for CTG tract lengths between 15 and 25 repeats, indicating that expansions can comprise a significant fraction of mutations in yeast. These results indicate that several unique cis-elements of human TNR instability are functional in yeast. PMID:11290713

  13. Extracellular Matrix Stiffness and Architecture Govern Intracellular Rheology in Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Baker, Erin L.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.; Zaman, Muhammad H.

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Little is known about the complex interplay between the extracellular mechanical environment and the mechanical properties that characterize the dynamic intracellular environment. To elucidate this relationship in cancer, we probe the intracellular environment using particle-tracking microrheology. In three-dimensional (3D) matrices, intracellular effective creep compliance of prostate cancer cells is shown to increase with increasing extracellular matrix (ECM) stiffness, whereas modulating ECM stiffness does not significantly affect the intracellular mechanical state when cells are attached to two-dimensional (2D) matrices. Switching from 2D to 3D matrices induces an order-of-magnitude shift in intracellular effective creep compliance and apparent elastic modulus. However, for a given matrix stiffness, partial blocking of β1 integrins mitigates the shift in intracellular mechanical state that is invoked by switching from a 2D to 3D matrix architecture. This finding suggests that the increased cell-matrix engagement inherent to a 3D matrix architecture may contribute to differences observed in viscoelastic properties between cells attached to 2D matrices and cells embedded within 3D matrices. In total, our observations show that ECM stiffness and architecture can strongly influence the intracellular mechanical state of cancer cells. PMID:19686648

  14. Matrix effects in PIXE elemental analysis of thick calculi targets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwiatek, Wojciech M.; Lekki, Janusz; Nowak, Tomasz; Dutkiewicz, Erazm M.; Paluszkiewicz, Czeslawa

    1997-02-01

    The PIXE technique for Trace Element Analysis have been applied to the studies of mineral deposits such as kidney stones in human organism. The calculi mainly composed of phosphates, oxalates and uric acid were extracted during surgical operations and were measured at the proton beam as thick targets. Trace elements studies of such samples are influenced by the thick targets matrix effects and by the sample composition changes caused by energy deposition in the target due to the proton beam irradiation. These both difficulties are especially pronounced in the case of the biological samples. In this paper the procedure dealing with the above problems is described, basing on calculations with the use of principal formula for the detected X-ray yields and two complementary techniques for PIXE experiments such as Fourier Transform InfraRed Spectroscopy (FTIR) and Elastic Back Scattering (EBS). A rough estimation of sample chemical composition was achieved by means of the FTIR analysis, which also may serve as a tool for local sample temperature estimation during beam irradiation. Composition of major target elements, needed for beam stopping and X-rays attenuation calculations were determined using the EBS technique applied simultaneously with PIXE. The above approach was used to estimate elemental contents of several samples. Comparison between traditionally calculated and improved results is presented.

  15. Constraining neutrinoless double β decay matrix elements in 130Te

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McAllister, S. A.; Kay, B. P.; Freeman, S. J.; Schiffer, J. P.; Diebel, C. M.; Bloxham, T.; Howard, A. M.; Parker, P. D.; Sharp, D. K.; Thomas, J. S.

    2012-09-01

    If a reliable measurement of a neutrinoless double beta decay (0v2β) rate is made, the effective neutrino masses can be determined from the nuclear matrix element. Theoretical calculations of nuclear matrix elements, however, show some disagreement. To test the suitability of various theoretical models, they should be benchmarked against experimentally measured nuclear properties, such as the ground-state distribution of nucleons in the parent-daughter nuclei, and how they change as a result of the decay process. Single neutron-adding reactions have been performed on the 0v2β candidate nucleus, 130Te. The Macfarlane-French sum rules have then been used to determine the single-particle vacancies. Some quasi-random phase approximations (QRPA) can greatly simplify theoretical calculations by describing the ground state of even-even nuclei using a BCS wavefunction. This assumption has been tested using two-neutron removal, (p,t) reactions. The BCS wavefunction appeared to be a valid approximation for valence neutrons.

  16. Matching tree-level matrix elements with interleaved showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lönnblad, Leif; Prestel, Stefan

    2012-03-01

    We present an implementation of the so-called Ckkw-l merging scheme for combining multi-jet tree-level matrix elements with parton showers. The implementation uses the transverse-momentum-ordered shower with interleaved multiple interactions as implemented in P YTHIA8. We validate our procedure using e+e--annihilation into jets and vector boson production in hadronic collisions, with special attention to details in the algorithm which are formally sub-leading in character, but may have visible effects in some observables. We find substantial merging scale dependencies induced by the enforced rapidity ordering in the default P YTHIA8 shower. If this rapidity ordering is removed the merging scale dependence is almost negligible. We then also find that the shower does a surprisingly good job of describing the hardness of multi-jet events, as long as the hardest couple of jets are given by the matrix elements. The effects of using interleaved multiple interactions as compared to more simplistic ways of adding underlying-event effects in vector boson production are shown to be negligible except in a few sensitive observables. To illustrate the generality of our implementation, we also give some example results from di-boson production and pure QCD jet production in hadronic collisions.

  17. Extracellular matrix structure governs invasion resistance in bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Nadell, Carey D; Drescher, Knut; Wingreen, Ned S; Bassler, Bonnie L

    2015-08-01

    Many bacteria are highly adapted for life in communities, or biofilms. A defining feature of biofilms is the production of extracellular matrix that binds cells together. The biofilm matrix provides numerous fitness benefits, including protection from environmental stresses and enhanced nutrient availability. Here we investigate defense against biofilm invasion using the model bacterium Vibrio cholerae. We demonstrate that immotile cells, including those identical to the biofilm resident strain, are completely excluded from entry into resident biofilms. Motile cells can colonize and grow on the biofilm exterior, but are readily removed by shear forces. Protection from invasion into the biofilm interior is mediated by the secreted protein RbmA, which binds mother-daughter cell pairs to each other and to polysaccharide components of the matrix. RbmA, and the invasion protection it confers, strongly localize to the cell lineages that produce it.

  18. Prion recognition elements govern nucleation, strain specificity and species barriers

    PubMed Central

    Tessier, Peter M.; Lindquist, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Prions are proteins that can switch to self-perpetuating, infectious conformations. The abilities of prions to replicate, form structurally distinct strains, and to establish and overcome transmission barriers between species are poorly understood. We exploit surface-bound peptides to overcome complexities of investigating such problems in solution. For the yeast prion Sup35, we find that the switch to the prion state is controlled with exquisite specificity by small elements of primary sequence. Strikingly, these same sequence elements govern the formation of distinct self-perpetuating conformations (prion strains) and determine species-specific seeding activities. A Sup35 chimera that traverses the transmission barrier between two yeast species possesses the critical sequence elements from both. Using this chimera, we show that the influence of environment and mutations on the formation of species-specific strains is driven by selective recognition of one or the other sequence element. Thus, critical aspects of prion conversion are enciphered by subtle differences between small, highly-specific recognition elements. PMID:17495929

  19. SYMBMAT: Symbolic computation of quantum transition matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciappina, M. F.; Kirchner, T.

    2012-08-01

    We have developed a set of Mathematica notebooks to compute symbolically quantum transition matrices relevant for atomic ionization processes. The utilization of a symbolic language allows us to obtain analytical expressions for the transition matrix elements required in charged-particle and laser induced ionization of atoms. Additionally, by using a few simple commands, it is possible to export these symbolic expressions to standard programming languages, such as Fortran or C, for the subsequent computation of differential cross sections or other observables. One of the main drawbacks in the calculation of transition matrices is the tedious algebraic work required when initial states other than the simple hydrogenic 1s state need to be considered. Using these notebooks the work is dramatically reduced and it is possible to generate exact expressions for a large set of bound states. We present explicit examples of atomic collisions (in First Born Approximation and Distorted Wave Theory) and laser-matter interactions (within the Dipole and Strong Field Approximations and different gauges) using both hydrogenic wavefunctions and Slater-Type Orbitals with arbitrary nlm quantum numbers as initial states. Catalogue identifier: AEMI_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEMI_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 71 628 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 444 195 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Single machines using Linux or Windows (with cores with any clock speed, cache memory and bits in a word) Operating system: Any OS that supports Mathematica. The notebooks have been tested under Windows and Linux and with versions 6.x, 7.x and 8.x Classification: 2.6 Nature of problem

  20. Analytical finite element matrix elements and global matrix assembly for hierarchical 3-D vector basis functions within the hybrid finite element boundary integral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, L.; Wang, K.; Li, H.; Eibert, T. F.

    2014-11-01

    A hybrid higher-order finite element boundary integral (FE-BI) technique is discussed where the higher-order FE matrix elements are computed by a fully analytical procedure and where the gobal matrix assembly is organized by a self-identifying procedure of the local to global transformation. This assembly procedure applys to both, the FE part as well as the BI part of the algorithm. The geometry is meshed into three-dimensional tetrahedra as finite elements and nearly orthogonal hierarchical basis functions are employed. The boundary conditions are implemented in a strong sense such that the boundary values of the volume basis functions are directly utilized within the BI, either for the tangential electric and magnetic fields or for the asssociated equivalent surface current densities by applying a cross product with the unit surface normals. The self-identified method for the global matrix assembly automatically discerns the global order of the basis functions for generating the matrix elements. Higher order basis functions do need more unknowns for each single FE, however, fewer FEs are needed to achieve the same satisfiable accuracy. This improvement provides a lot more flexibility for meshing and allows the mesh size to raise up to λ/3. The performance of the implemented system is evaluated in terms of computation time, accuracy and memory occupation, where excellent results with respect to precision and computation times of large scale simulations are found.

  1. Placing three-dimensional isoparametric elements into NASTRAN. [alterations in matrix assembly to simplify generation of higher order elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newman, M. B.; Filstrup, A. W.

    1973-01-01

    Linear (8 node), parabolic (20 node), cubic (32 node) and mixed (some edges linear, some parabolic and some cubic) have been inserted into NASTRAN, level 15.1. First the dummy element feature was used to check out the stiffness matrix generation routines for the linear element in NASTRAN. Then, the necessary modules of NASTRAN were modified to include the new family of elements. The matrix assembly was changed so that the stiffness matrix of each isoparametric element is only generated once as the time to generate these higher order elements tends to be much longer than the other elements in NASTRAN. This paper presents some of the experiences and difficulties of inserting a new element or family of elements into NASTRAN.

  2. Shell model nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms contributing to double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Horoi, Mihai

    2013-12-30

    Recent progress in the shell model approach to the nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay process are presented. This includes nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms to neutrionless double beta decay, a comparison between closure and non-closure approximation for {sup 48}Ca, and an updated shell model analysis of nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe.

  3. EMRE Is a Matrix Ca(2+) Sensor that Governs Gatekeeping of the Mitochondrial Ca(2+) Uniporter.

    PubMed

    Vais, Horia; Mallilankaraman, Karthik; Mak, Don-On Daniel; Hoff, Henry; Payne, Riley; Tanis, Jessica E; Foskett, J Kevin

    2016-01-26

    The mitochondrial uniporter (MCU) is an ion channel that mediates Ca(2+) uptake into the matrix to regulate metabolism, cell death, and cytoplasmic Ca(2+) signaling. Matrix Ca(2+) concentration is similar to that in cytoplasm, despite an enormous driving force for entry, but the mechanisms that prevent mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload are unclear. Here, we show that MCU channel activity is governed by matrix Ca(2+) concentration through EMRE. Deletion or charge neutralization of its matrix-localized acidic C terminus abolishes matrix Ca(2+) inhibition of MCU Ca(2+) currents, resulting in MCU channel activation, enhanced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, and constitutively elevated matrix Ca(2+) concentration. EMRE-dependent regulation of MCU channel activity requires intermembrane space-localized MICU1, MICU2, and cytoplasmic Ca(2+). Thus, mitochondria are protected from Ca(2+) depletion and Ca(2+) overload by a unique molecular complex that involves Ca(2+) sensors on both sides of the inner mitochondrial membrane, coupled through EMRE.

  4. A top quark mass measurement using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Linacre, Jacob Thomas

    2009-01-01

    A measurement of the mass of the top quark is presented, using top-antitop pair (t$\\bar{t}$) candidate events for the lepton+jets decay channel. The measurement makes use of Tevatron p$\\bar{p}$ collision data at centre-of-mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV, collected at the CDF detector. The top quark mass is measured by employing an unbinned maximum likelihood method where the event probability density functions are calculated using signal (t$\\bar{t}$) and background (W+jets) matrix elements, as well as a set of parameterised jet-to-parton mapping functions. The likelihood function is maximised with respect to the top quark mass, the fraction of signal events, and a correction to the jet energy scale (JES) of the calorimeter jets. The simultaneous measurement of the JES correction (ΔJES) provides an in situ jet energy calibration based on the known mass of the hadronically decaying W boson. Using 578 lepton+jets candidate events corresponding to 3.2 fb -1 of integrated luminosity, the top quark mass is measured to be mt = 172.4± 1.4 (stat+ΔJES) ±1.3 (syst) GeV=c2, one of the most precise single measurements to date.

  5. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Joó, Bálint; Lin, Huey-Wen; Negele, John; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Richards, David; Syritsyn, Sergey; Winter, Frank; Nucleon Matrix Elements NME Collaboration

    2016-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2 +1 -flavor ensemble with lattices of size 323×64 generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at a =0.081 fm and with Mπ=312 MeV . The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a 2-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation tsep. We show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost effectiveness. A detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of tsep needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the tsep→∞ estimates is presented.

  6. Analytical Derivations of Single-Particle Matrix Elements in Nuclear Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatah, Aziz H.; Radhi, R. A.; Abdullah, Nzar R.

    2016-07-01

    We present analytical method to calculate single particle matrix elements used in atomic and nuclear physics. We show seven different formulas of matrix elements of the operator f(r)dr m where f(r) = rμ, rμ jJ(qr), V(r) corresponding to the Gaussian and the Yukawa potentials used in nuclear shell models and nuclear structure. In addition, we take into account a general integral formula of the matrix element that covers all seven matrix elements obtained analytically.

  7. Dirac matrices as elements of a superalgebraic matrix algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monakhov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The paper considers a Clifford extension of the Grassmann algebra, in which operators are built from Grassmann variables and by the derivatives with respect to them. It is shown that a subalgebra which is isomorphic to the usual matrix algebra exists in this algebra, the Clifford exten-sion of the Grassmann algebra is a generalization of the matrix algebra and contains superalgebraic operators expanding matrix algebra and produces supersymmetric transformations.

  8. Destructive interference of E2 matrix elements in a triaxial rotor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allmond, J. M.; Wood, J. L.; Kulp, W. D.

    2010-05-01

    A triaxial rotor model with independent inertia and electric quadrupole tensors is applied to nuclei that have certain E2 matrix elements equal to zero. It is shown that such vanishing E2 matrix elements are explained by the model as a destructive interference effect. The example of Pt196 is considered.

  9. Destructive interference of E2 matrix elements in a triaxial rotor model

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M; Wood, J. L.; Kulp, W. D.

    2010-01-01

    A triaxial rotor model with independent inertia and electric quadrupole tensors is applied to nuclei that have certain E2 matrix elements equal to zero. It is shown that such vanishing E2 matrix elements are explained by the model as a destructive interference effect. The example of 196Pt is considered.

  10. Application of the Finite-Element Z-Matrix Method to e-H2 Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    The present study adapts the Z-matrix formulation using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians. This is a energy-independent basis which allows flexible boundary conditions and is amenable to efficient algorithms for evaluating the necessary matrix elements with molecular targets.

  11. Determination of configuration matrix element and outer synchronization among networks with different topologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lü, Ling; Liu, Shuo; Li, Gang; Zhao, Guannan; Gu, Jiajia; Tian, Jing; Wang, Zhouyang

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we research the outer synchronization among discrete networks with different topologies. Based on Lyapunov theorem, a novel synchronization technique is designed. Further, the control inputs of the networks and the adaptive laws of configuration matrix element are obtained. In the end, a numerical example is given to illustrate the effectiveness of the synchronization technique. It is found that the designed control input of the networks ensures the convergence of the errors among the networks to zero. And the designed adaptive law of configuration matrix element can replace effectively configuration matrix element in networks.

  12. Universal evolution of Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, V.; Berger, M.S.; Ohmann, P. . Dept. of Physics)

    1993-03-01

    We derive the two-loop evolution equations for the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix. We show that to leading order in the mass and CKM hierarchies the scaling of the mixings [vert bar][ital V][sub [ital u][ital b

  13. Zn Isotopes in Chondrites, Chondrules, and Matrix: Origin of the Volatile Element Depletion in Chondrites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moynier, F.; Pringle, E.; Hezel, D.

    2015-07-01

    The variations of Zn isotope ratios among carbonaceous chondrites show that the volatile element depletion in solar system material occurred in the solar nebula. We will also present the Zn isotopic composition of chondrules and matrix from carbonaceous chondrites.

  14. A nodal spectral stiffness matrix for the finite-element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bittencourt, Marco L.; Vazquez, Thais G.

    2008-12-01

    In this paper, shape functions are proposed for the spectral finite-element method aiming to finding a nodal spectral stiffness matrix. The proposed shape functions obtain a nearly diagonal 1D stiffness matrix with better conditioning than using the Lagrange and Jacobi bases.

  15. Calculation of Radiative Corrections to E1 matrix elements in the Neutral Alkalis

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J; Cheng, K T

    2004-09-28

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkalis but significantly larger for the heavier alkalis, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  16. Calculation Of Two Neutrino Double Beta Decay Nuclear Matrix Elements For 128,130Te

    SciTech Connect

    Uenlue, S.; Salamov, D. I.; Babacan, T.; Kuecuekbursa, A.

    2006-04-26

    Based on Pyatov-Salamov method, spin-isospin (Gamow-Teller) effective interaction strength parameter has been found self-consistently. Then, the problem has been solved within the framework of QRPA. Gamow-Teller matrix elements for both {beta}- and {beta}+ transitions and two neutrino double beta decay nuclear matrix elements have been calculated for 128,130Te{yields}128,130Xe transitions. The obtained results have been compared with the corresponding experimental data and other theoretical results.

  17. Generalized ray-transfer matrix for an optical element having an arbitrary wavefront aberration.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Tae Moon; Ko, Do-Kyeong; Lee, Jongmin

    2005-11-15

    A generalized ray-transfer matrix for describing the action of an optical element having an arbitrary wavefront aberration is obtained. In this generalized ray-transfer matrix, the action of the aberrated optical element is represented by the product of radial ray-transfer matrices and tangential ray-transfer matrices. The refraction angle of an incident ray is calculated from the gradient of the wavefront aberration at the point of incidence, and the radial and tangential ray-transfer matrices directly use the gradient as a matrix component. To show the validity of the generalized ray-transfer matrix, intercept heights from a spot diagram are calculated with the generalized ray-transfer matrix and compared with those calculated with commercial ray-tracing software.

  18. Matrix elements and duality for type 2 unitary representations of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n)

    SciTech Connect

    Werry, Jason L.; Gould, Mark D.; Isaac, Phillip S.

    2015-12-15

    The characteristic identity formalism discussed in our recent articles is further utilized to derive matrix elements of type 2 unitary irreducible gl(m|n) modules. In particular, we give matrix element formulae for all gl(m|n) generators, including the non-elementary generators, together with their phases on finite dimensional type 2 unitary irreducible representations which include the contravariant tensor representations and an additional class of essentially typical representations. Remarkably, we find that the type 2 unitary matrix element equations coincide with the type 1 unitary matrix element equations for non-vanishing matrix elements up to a phase.

  19. Matrix elements and duality for type 2 unitary representations of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werry, Jason L.; Gould, Mark D.; Isaac, Phillip S.

    2015-12-01

    The characteristic identity formalism discussed in our recent articles is further utilized to derive matrix elements of type 2 unitary irreducible gl(m|n) modules. In particular, we give matrix element formulae for all gl(m|n) generators, including the non-elementary generators, together with their phases on finite dimensional type 2 unitary irreducible representations which include the contravariant tensor representations and an additional class of essentially typical representations. Remarkably, we find that the type 2 unitary matrix element equations coincide with the type 1 unitary matrix element equations for non-vanishing matrix elements up to a phase.

  20. Insights into Nuclear Triaxiality from Interference Effects in E2 Matrix Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allmond, J. M.; Wood, J. L.; Kulp, W. D.

    2007-10-01

    Recently, we have introduced [1] a triaxial rotor model with independent inertia and E2 tensors. The E2 matrix elements [2] of the osmium isotopes (186, 188, 190, and 192) are studied in the framework of this model (59 of 84 E2 matrix elements deviate by 30% or less). It is shown that interference effects in the inertia tensor (K-mixing) and the E2 tensor can lead to significant reductions in the diagonal E2 matrix elements. In some instances, the diagonal E2 matrix elements may decrease with increasing spin. Additionally, a sum rule for diagonal E2 matrix elements is shown and used to explore missing strength from K-admixtures. [1] J.L. Wood, A-M. Oros-Peusquens, R. Zaballa, J.M. Allmond, and W.D. Kulp, Phys. Rev. C 70, 024308 (2004). [2] C.Y. Wu, D. Cline, T. Czosnyka, A. Backlin, C. Baktash, R.M. Diamond, G.D. Dracoulis, L. Hasselgren, H. Kluge, et al., Nucl. Phys. A607, 178 (1996).

  1. Quenched domain wall QCD with DBW2 gauge action toward nucleon decay matrix element calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aoki, Yasumichi

    2001-10-01

    The domain wall fermion action is a promising way to control chiral symmetry in lattice gauge theory. By the good chiral symmetry of this approach even at finite lattice spacing, one is able to extract hadronic matrix elements, like kaon weak matrix elements, for which the symmetry is extremely important. Ordinary fermions with poor chiral symmetry make calculation difficult because of the large mixing of operators with different chiral structure. Even though the domain wall fermion action with the simple Wilson gauge action has a good chiral symmetry, one can further improve the symmetry by using a different gauge action. We take a non-perturbatively improved action, the DBW2 action of the QCD Taro group. Hadron masses are systematically examined for a range of parameters. Application to nucleon decay matrix element is also discussed.

  2. Constraining anomalous Higgs boson couplings to the heavy-flavor fermions using matrix element techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gritsan, Andrei V.; Röntsch, Raoul; Schulze, Markus; Xiao, Meng

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate anomalous interactions of the Higgs boson with heavy fermions, employing shapes of kinematic distributions. We study the processes p p →t t ¯+H , b b ¯+H , t q +H , and p p →H →τ+τ- and present applications of event generation, reweighting techniques for fast simulation of anomalous couplings, as well as matrix element techniques for optimal sensitivity. We extend the matrix element likelihood approach (MELA) technique, which proved to be a powerful matrix element tool for Higgs boson discovery and characterization during Run I of the LHC, and implement all analysis tools in the JHU generator framework. A next-to-leading-order QCD description of the p p →t t ¯+H process allows us to investigate the performance of the MELA in the presence of extra radiation. Finally, projections for LHC measurements through the end of Run III are presented.

  3. Uncertainties in nuclear transition matrix elements of neutrinoless ββ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Rath, P. K.

    2013-12-30

    To estimate the uncertainties associated with the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} (K=0ν/0N) for the 0{sup +} → 0{sup +} transitions of electron and positron emitting modes of the neutrinoless ββ decay, a statistical analysis has been performed by calculating sets of eight (twelve) different nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} in the PHFB model by employing four different parameterizations of a Hamiltonian with pairing plus multipolar effective two-body interaction and two (three) different parameterizations of Jastrow short range correlations. The averages in conjunction with their standard deviations provide an estimate of the uncertainties associated the nuclear transition matrix elements M{sup (K)} calculated within the PHFB model, the maximum of which turn out to be 13% and 19% owing to the exchange of light and heavy Majorana neutrinos, respectively.

  4. B(s) 0-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran; Fermilab Lattice; MILC Collaborations

    2016-06-01

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B -meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ =1.206 (18 )(6 ), where the second error stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B -meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vt d|=8.00 (34 )(8 )×10-3, |Vt s|=39.0 (1.2 )(0.4 )×10-3, and |Vt d/Vt s|=0.2052 (31 )(10 ), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2 σ . These results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.

  5. Interface Cohesive Elements to Model Matrix Crack Evolution in Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Pinna, C.; Soutis, C.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the transverse matrix (resin) cracking developed in multidirectional composite laminates loaded in tension was numerically investigated by a finite element (FE) model implemented in the commercially available software Abaqus/Explicit 6.10. A theoretical solution using the equivalent constraint model (ECM) of the damaged laminate developed by Soutis et al. was employed to describe matrix cracking evolution and compared to the proposed numerical approach. In the numerical model, interface cohesive elements were inserted between neighbouring finite elements that run parallel to fibre orientation in each lamina to simulate matrix cracking with the assumption of equally spaced cracks (based on experimental measurements and observations). The stress based traction-separation law was introduced to simulate initiation of matrix cracking and propagation under mixed-mode loading. The numerically predicted crack density was found to depend on the mesh size of the model and the material fracture parameters defined for the cohesive elements. Numerical predictions of matrix crack density as a function of applied stress are in a good agreement to experimentally measured and theoretically (ECM) obtained values, but some further refinement will be required in near future work.

  6. Correlation functions of scattering matrix elements in microwave cavities with strong absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schäfer, R.; Gorin, T.; Seligman, T. H.; Stöckmann, H.-J.

    2003-03-01

    The scattering matrix was measured for microwave cavities with two antennae. It was analysed in the regime of overlapping resonances. The theoretical description in terms of a statistical scattering matrix and the rescaled Breit-Wigner approximation has been applied to this regime. The experimental results for the auto-correlation function show that the absorption in the cavity walls yields an exponential decay. This behaviour can only be modelled using a large number of weakly coupled channels. In comparison to the auto-correlation functions, the cross-correlation functions of the diagonal S-matrix elements display a more pronounced difference between regular and chaotic systems.

  7. Calculation of radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements in the neutral alkali metals

    SciTech Connect

    Sapirstein, J.; Cheng, K.T.

    2005-02-01

    Radiative corrections to E1 matrix elements for ns-np transitions in the alkali-metal atoms lithium through francium are evaluated. They are found to be small for the lighter alkali metals but significantly larger for the heavier alkali metals, and in the case of cesium much larger than the experimental accuracy. The relation of the matrix element calculation to a recent decay rate calculation for hydrogenic ions is discussed, and application of the method to parity nonconservation in cesium is described.

  8. Generalization of the Mulliken-Hush treatment for the calculation of electron transfer matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, Robert J.; Newton, Marshall D.

    1996-01-01

    A new method for the calculation of the electronic coupling matrix element for electron transfer processes is introduced and results for several systems are presented. The method can be applied to ground and excited state systems and can be used in cases where several states interact strongly. Within the set of states chosen it is a non-perturbative treatment, and can be implemented using quantities obtained solely in terms of the adiabatic states. Several applications based on quantum chemical calculations are briefly presented. Finally, since quantities for adiabatic states are the only input to the method, it can also be used with purely experimental data to estimate electron transfer matrix elements.

  9. Matrix elements for type 1 unitary irreducible representations of the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n)

    SciTech Connect

    Gould, Mark D.; Isaac, Phillip S.; Werry, Jason L.

    2014-01-15

    Using our recent results on eigenvalues of invariants associated to the Lie superalgebra gl(m|n), we use characteristic identities to derive explicit matrix element formulae for all gl(m|n) generators, particularly non-elementary generators, on finite dimensional type 1 unitary irreducible representations. We compare our results with existing works that deal with only subsets of the class of type 1 unitary representations, all of which only present explicit matrix elements for elementary generators. Our work therefore provides an important extension to existing methods, and thus highlights the strength of our techniques which exploit the characteristic identities.

  10. Hard photon production and matrix-element parton-shower merging

    SciTech Connect

    Hoeche, Stefan; Schumann, Steffen; Siegert, Frank

    2010-02-01

    We present a Monte Carlo approach to prompt-photon production, where photons and QCD partons are treated democratically. The photon fragmentation function is modeled by an interleaved QCD+QED parton shower. This known technique is improved by including higher-order real-emission matrix elements. To this end, we extend a recently proposed algorithm for merging matrix elements and truncated parton showers. We exemplify the quality of the Monte Carlo predictions by comparing them to measurements of the photon fragmentation function at LEP and to measurements of prompt photon and diphoton production from the Tevatron experiments.

  11. Phase space localization and matrix element distributions in systems with mixed classical phase space.

    PubMed

    Mehlig, B; Müller, K; Eckhardt, B

    1999-05-01

    We consider distributions of diagonal matrix elements for smooth observables in systems whose classical phase space has a mixture of chaotic and nearly integrable regions. The quantum distributions agree very well with distributions obtained from classical trajectory segments whose length is the Heisenberg time. Non-Gaussian wings in the distributions can be linked to classical trapping in certain parts of phase space, sometimes connected to islands, but also to regions separated by other barriers to transport. Thus classical deviations from ergodicity are quantitatively reflected in quantum matrix elements. The relation to scars is discussed.

  12. Comparative study and prediction of DNA fragments associated with various elements of the nuclear matrix.

    PubMed

    Glazko, G V; Rogozin, I B; Glazkov, M V

    2001-02-16

    Scaffold/matrix-associated region (S/MAR) sequences are DNA regions that are attached to the nuclear matrix, and participate in many cellular processes. The nuclear matrix is a complex structure consisting of various elements. In this paper we compared frequencies of simple nucleotide motifs in S/MAR sequences and in sequences extracted directly from various nuclear matrix elements, such as nuclear lamina, cores of rosette-like structures, synaptonemal complex. Multivariate linear discriminant analysis revealed significant differences between these sequences. Based on this result we have developed a program, ChrClass (Win/NT version, ftp.bionet.nsc.ru/pub/biology/chrclass/chrclass.zip), for the prediction of the regions associated with various elements of the nuclear matrix in a query sequence. Subsequently, several test samples were analyzed by using two S/MAR prediction programs (a ChrClass and MAR-Finder) and a simple MRS criterion (S/MAR recognition signature) indicating the presence of S/MARs. Some overlap between the predictions of all MAR prediction tools has been found. Simultaneous use of the ChrClass, MRS criterion and MAR-Finder programs may help to obtain a more clearcut picture of S/MAR distribution in a query sequence. In general, our results suggest that the proportion of missed S/MARs is lower for ChrClass, whereas the proportion of wrong S/MARs is lower for MAR-Finder and MRS.

  13. Numerical Modeling of Combined Matrix Cracking and Delamination in Composite Laminates Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rene; Kweon, Jin-Hwe; Choi, Jin-ho

    2016-06-01

    Sub-laminate damage in the form of matrix cracking and delamination was simulated by using interface cohesive elements in the finite element (FE) software ABAQUS. Interface cohesive elements were inserted parallel to the fiber orientation in the transverse ply with equal spacing (matrix cracking) and between the interfaces (delamination). Matrix cracking initiation in the cohesive elements was based on stress traction separation laws and propagated under mixed-mode loading. We expanded the work of Shi et al. (Appl. Compos. Mater. 21, 57-70 2014) to include delamination and simulated additional [45/-45/0/90]s and [02/90n]s { n = 1,2,3} CFRP laminates and a [0/903]s GFRP laminate. Delamination damage was quantified numerically in terms of damage dissipative energy. We observed that transverse matrix cracks can propagate to the ply interface and initiate delamination. We also observed for [0/90n/0] laminates that as the number of 90° ply increases past n = 2, the crack density decreases. The predicted crack density evolution compared well with experimental results and the equivalent constraint model (ECM) theory. Empirical relationships were established between crack density and applied stress by linear curve fitting. The reduction of laminate elastic modulus due to cracking was also computed numerically and it is in accordance with reported experimental measurements.

  14. Probing the many-body localization transition with matrix elements of local operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serbyn, Maksym; Papic, Zlatko; Abanin, Dmitry

    2015-03-01

    We propose the statistics of matrix elements of local operators as a new probe of the many-body localized (MBL) phase. Matrix elements of a given local operator V encode many physical properties, such as the response of the system to a local perturbation induced by the action of V, spectral functions, and dynamics of the system. The distribution of matrix elements of a local operator between system's eigenstates exhibits qualitatively different behavior in the many-body localized and ergodic phases, allowing for an accurate determination of the two phases. To characterize this distribution, for a given system size L, we introduce a parameter g (L) = < log Vi,i+1/Δ >, which is a disorder-averaged ratio of the matrix element of operator V between adjacent eigenstates, and Δ is the level spacing. We find that g (L) decreases with L in the MBL phase, and grows in the ergodic phase. We propose that at the MBL-delocalization transition g (L) is independent of system size, g (L) =gc ~ 1 , and use this criterion to map out the phase diagram of a disordered 1D XXZ spin-1/2 chain. By studying the scaling of g (L) as a function of energy density, we locate the many-body mobility edge. We discuss implications for delocalization phase transition.

  15. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  16. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective.

  17. Matrix-Assisted Plasma Atomization Emission Spectrometry for Surface Sampling Elemental Analysis.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Xin; Zhan, Xuefang; Li, Xuemei; Zhao, Zhongjun; Duan, Yixiang

    2016-01-01

    An innovative technology has been developed involving a simple and sensitive optical spectrometric method termed matrix-assisted plasma atomization emission spectrometry (MAPAES) for surface sampling elemental analysis using a piece of filter paper (FP) for sample introduction. MAPAES was carried out by direct interaction of the plasma tail plume with the matrix surface. The FP absorbs energy from the plasma source and releases combustion heating to the analytes originally present on its surface, thus to promote the atomization and excitation process. The matrix-assisted plasma atomization excitation phenomenon was observed for multiple elements. The FP matrix served as the partial energy producer and also the sample substrate to adsorb sample solution. Qualitative and quantitative determinations of metal ions were achieved by atomic emission measurements for elements Ba, Cu, Eu, In, Mn, Ni, Rh and Y. The detection limits were down to pg level with linear correlation coefficients better than 0.99. The proposed MAPAES provides a new way for atomic spectrometry which offers advantages of fast analysis speed, little sample consumption, less sample pretreatment, small size, and cost-effective. PMID:26762972

  18. $$B^0_{(s)}$$-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gamiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; et al

    2016-06-28

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B-meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ=1.206(18)(6), where the second errormore » stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B-meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vtd| = 8.00(34)(8)×10-3, |Vts| = 39.0(1.2)(0.4)×10-3, and |Vtd/Vts| = 0.2052(31)(10), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2σ. In addition, these results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.« less

  19. SevenOperators, a Mathematica script for harmonic oscillator nuclear matrix elements arising in semileptonic electroweak interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haxton, Wick; Lunardini, Cecilia

    2008-09-01

    Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2227 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 19 382 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Any computer running Mathematica; tested on Mac OS X PowerPC (32-bit) running Mathematica 6.0.0 Operating system: Any running Mathematica RAM: Memory requirements determined by Mathematica; 512 MB or greater RAM and hard drive space of at least 3.0 GB recommended Classification: 17.16, 17.19 Nature of problem: Algebraic evaluation of harmonic oscillator nuclear matrix elements for the one-body multipole operators governing semi-leptonic weak interactions, such as charged- or neutral-current neutrino scattering off nuclei. Solution method: Mathematica evaluation of associated angular momentum algebra and spherical Bessel function radial integrals. Running time: Depends on the complexity of the one-body density matrix employed, but times of a few seconds are typical.

  20. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaman, Muhammad H.; Trapani, Linda M.; Sieminski, Alisha L.; MacKellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D.; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-07-01

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and 1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments. cell motility | EGF receptor | extracellular matrix | matrix metalloproteinase

  1. Maple code for the calculation of the matrix elements of the Boltzmann collision operators for mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shizgal, Bernie D.; Dridi, Raouf

    2010-09-01

    A Maple code is provided which is used to compute the matrix elements of the collision operators in the Boltzmann equation for arbitrary differential elastic collision cross section. The present paper describes an efficient method for the calculation of the matrix elements of the collision operators in the Sonine basis set. The method employs the generating functions for these polynomials. The transport properties of gaseous mixtures of atoms and/or ions are generally determined from solutions of the Boltzmann equation. The solution of the Boltzmann equation for the velocity distribution functions requires a representation of the integral collision operators defined by the differential cross sections describing collisions between pairs of particles. Many applications have considered either the simple hard sphere cross section or the cross section corresponding to the inverse fourth power of the inter-particle distance ("Maxwell molecules"). There are a few applications where realistic quantum mechanical cross sections have been used. The basis set of Sonine (or Laguerre) polynomials is the basis set of choice used to represent the distribution functions. The Maple code provided is used to express the matrix elements of the collision operators in terms of a finite sum of the omega integrals of transport theory and defined by the differential cross section. Thus the matrix representations of the collision operators are applicable to arbitrary interaction potentials. Program summaryProgram title: MCBC Catalogue identifier: AEGJ_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEGJ_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 2422 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 48 653 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Maple

  2. Study of matrix crack-tilted fiber bundle interaction using caustics and finite element method.

    PubMed

    Hao, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Zhu, Qi; Yuan, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the interaction between the matrix crack and a tilted fiber bundle was investigated via caustics and the finite element method (FEM). First, the caustic patterns at the crack tip with different distances from the tilted fiber were obtained and the stress intensity factors were extracted from the geometry of the caustic patterns. Subsequently, the shielding effect of the fiber bundle in front of the crack tip was analyzed. Furthermore, the interaction between the matrix crack and the broken fiber bundle was discussed. Finally, a finite element simulation was carried out using ABAQUS to verify the experimental results. The results demonstrate that the stress intensity factors extracted from caustic experiments are in excellent agreement with the data calculated by FEM. PMID:26931836

  3. Study of matrix crack-tilted fiber bundle interaction using caustics and finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Wenfeng; Zhu, Jianguo; Zhu, Qi; Yuan, Yanan

    2016-02-01

    In this work, the interaction between the matrix crack and a tilted fiber bundle was investigated via caustics and the finite element method (FEM). First, the caustic patterns at the crack tip with different distances from the tilted fiber were obtained and the stress intensity factors were extracted from the geometry of the caustic patterns. Subsequently, the shielding effect of the fiber bundle in front of the crack tip was analyzed. Furthermore, the interaction between the matrix crack and the broken fiber bundle was discussed. Finally, a finite element simulation was carried out using ABAQUS to verify the experimental results. The results demonstrate that the stress intensity factors extracted from caustic experiments are in excellent agreement with the data calculated by FEM.

  4. Calculation of reflection matrix elements of a grating for growing evanescent waves.

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, V.; Kim, K.-J.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2006-01-01

    Reflection matrix elements of a grating play an important role in the study of Smith-Purcell (SP) free-electron lasers (FELs). Especially, the matrix element R00, which couples the incident co-propagating evanescent wave to the reflected co-propagating evanescent wave, is important for evaluation of the gain of an SP-FEL system [1]. We present a calculation of R00for rectangular grating and study its frequency dependence for a given phase velocity of incident wave. For the numerical calculation, we use the modal expansion method and extend it to include waves having slowly varying amplitude. The singularity of R00is studied in some detail and we find that it is possible to get a simple formula for the location of the singularity if we choose the eigenmodes of the groove as a basis set as done by Andrews et al. [2].

  5. Shell-model analysis of the 136Xe double beta decay nuclear matrix elements.

    PubMed

    Horoi, M; Brown, B A

    2013-05-31

    Neutrinoless double beta decay, if observed, could distinguish whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle, and it could be used to determine the absolute scale of the neutrino masses. 136Xe is one of the most promising candidates for observing this rare event. However, until recently there were no positive results for the allowed and less rare two-neutrino double beta decay mode. The small nuclear matrix element associated with the long half-life represents a challenge for nuclear structure models used for its calculation. We report a new shell-model analysis of the two-neutrino double beta decay of 136Xe, which takes into account all relevant nuclear orbitals necessary to fully describe the associated Gamow-Teller strength. We further use the new model to analyze the main contributions to the neutrinoless double beta decay matrix element, and show that they are also diminished.

  6. Nuclear matrix elements for 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay with improved short-range correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Kortelainen, M.; Suhonen, J.

    2007-10-12

    Nuclear matrix elements for the neutrinoless double beta minus (0{nu}{beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -}) decays of all interesting (nearly) spherical nuclei are calculated for the light-neutrino exchange mechanism by using the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA) with a realistic nucleon-nucleon force. The finite size of a nucleon, the higher-order terms of nucleonic weak currents, and the nucleon-nucleon short-range correlations (s.r.c) are taken into account. The s.r.c. are computed by the use of the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM), superior to the traditional Jastrow method. The UCOM computed matrix elements turn out to be considerably larger than the Jastrow computed ones.

  7. Short-distance matrix elements for $D$-meson mixing for 2+1 lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, Chia Cheng

    2015-01-01

    We study the short-distance hadronic matrix elements for D-meson mixing with partially quenched Nf = 2+1 lattice QCD. We use a large set of the MIMD Lattice Computation Collaboration's gauge configurations with a2 tadpole-improved staggered sea quarks and tadpole-improved Lüscher-Weisz gluons. We use the a2 tadpole-improved action for valence light quarks and the Sheikoleslami-Wohlert action with the Fermilab interpretation for the valence charm quark. Our calculation covers the complete set of five operators needed to constrain new physics models for D-meson mixing. We match our matrix elements to the MS-NDR scheme evaluated at 3 GeV. We report values for the Beneke-Buchalla-Greub-Lenz-Nierste choice of evanescent operators.

  8. Addressable test matrix for measuring analog transfer characteristics of test elements used for integrated process control and device evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buehler, Martin G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    A set of addressable test structures, each of which uses addressing schemes to access individual elements of the structure in a matrix, is used to test the quality of a wafer before integrated circuits produced thereon are diced, packaged and subjected to final testing. The electrical characteristic of each element is checked and compared to the electrical characteristic of all other like elements in the matrix. The effectiveness of the addressable test matrix is in readily analyzing the electrical characteristics of the test elements and in providing diagnostic information.

  9. Lidar investigations of hydrosols: notes on the determination of scattering matrix elements.

    PubMed

    Reuter, R

    1982-10-15

    The feasibility of lidar remote sensing of marine particulate matter is discussed. An evaluation of the elements of the scattering matrix requires a bistatic configuration of the instrument. The influence of the rough water surface transmission on the lidar signal is investigated. It is shown that, when using circular polarized laser light, two signals can be obtained without interference of the surface waves. These signals render characteristic signatures concerning the nature of hydrosols.

  10. Useful extremum principle for the variational calculation of matrix elements. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gerjuoy, E.; Rosenberg, L.; Spruch, L.

    1975-01-01

    Recent work (Gerjuoy et al., 1974) on variational principles for diagonal bound state matrix elements of arbitrary Hermitian operators is extended. In particular, it is shown that the previously derived minimum principle for the trial auxiliary function appearing in such variational principles can be constructed using a modified Hamiltonian possessing not heretofore recognized positive definite properties. Thus there is at least one alternative to the particular modified Hamiltonian on which the results of Gerjuoy et al. (1974) originally were based.

  11. An improved method for extracting matrix elements from lattice three-point functions

    SciTech Connect

    C. Aubin, K. Orginos

    2011-12-01

    The extraction of matrix elements from baryon three-point functions is complicated by the fact that the signal-to-noise drops rapidly as a function of time. Using a previously discussed method to improve the signal-to-noise for lattice two-point functions, we use this technique to do so for lattice three-point functions, using electromagnetic form factors for the nucleon and Delta as an example.

  12. Urinary stones as a novel matrix for human biomonitoring of toxic and essential elements.

    PubMed

    Kuta, J; Smetanová, S; Benová, D; Kořistková, T; Machát, J

    2016-02-01

    Monitoring of body burden of toxic elements is usually based on analysis of concentration of particular elements in blood, urine and/or hair. Analysis of these matrices, however, predominantly reflects short- or medium-term exposure to trace elements or pollutants. In this work, urinary stones were investigated as a matrix for monitoring long-term exposure to toxic and essential elements. A total of 431 samples of urinary calculi were subjected to mineralogical and elemental analysis by infrared spectroscopy and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. The effect of mineralogical composition of the stones and other parameters such as sex, age and geographical location on contents of trace and minor elements is presented. Our results demonstrate the applicability of such approach and confirm that the analysis of urinary calculi can be helpful in providing complementary information on human exposure to trace metals and their excretion. Analysis of whewellite stones (calcium oxalate monohydrate) with content of phosphorus <0.6 % has been proved to be a promising tool for biomonitoring of trace and minor elements.

  13. A Data Matrix Method for Improving the Quantification of Element Percentages of SEM/EDX Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lane, John

    2009-01-01

    A simple 2D M N matrix involving sample preparation enables the microanalyst to peer below the noise floor of element percentages reported by the SEM/EDX (scanning electron microscopy/ energy dispersive x-ray) analysis, thus yielding more meaningful data. Using the example of a 2 3 sample set, there are M = 2 concentration levels of the original mix under test: 10 percent ilmenite (90 percent silica) and 20 percent ilmenite (80 percent silica). For each of these M samples, N = 3 separate SEM/EDX samples were drawn. In this test, ilmenite is the element of interest. By plotting the linear trend of the M sample s known concentration versus the average of the N samples, a much higher resolution of elemental analysis can be performed. The resulting trend also shows how the noise is affecting the data, and at what point (of smaller concentrations) is it impractical to try to extract any further useful data.

  14. Evaluation of Solid Modeling Software for Finite Element Analysis of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh; Lang, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Three computer programs, used for the purpose of generating 3-D finite element models of the Repeating Unit Cell (RUC) of a textile, were examined for suitability to model woven Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). The programs evaluated were the open-source available TexGen, the commercially available WiseTex, and the proprietary Composite Material Evaluator (COMATE). A five-harness-satin (5HS) weave for a melt-infiltrated (MI) silicon carbide matrix and silicon carbide fiber was selected as an example problem and the programs were tested for their ability to generate a finite element model of the RUC. The programs were also evaluated for ease-of-use and capability, particularly for the capability to introduce various defect types such as porosity, ply shifting, and nesting of a laminate. Overall, it was found that TexGen and WiseTex were useful for generating solid models of the tow geometry; however, there was a lack of consistency in generating well-conditioned finite element meshes of the tows and matrix. TexGen and WiseTex were both capable of allowing collective and individual shifting of tows within a ply and WiseTex also had a ply nesting capability. TexGen and WiseTex were sufficiently userfriendly and both included a Graphical User Interface (GUI). COMATE was satisfactory in generating a 5HS finite element mesh of an idealized weave geometry but COMATE lacked a GUI and was limited to only 5HS and 8HS weaves compared to the larger amount of weave selections available with TexGen and WiseTex.

  15. On the possibility to measure 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix element for {sup 48}Ca

    SciTech Connect

    Rodin, Vadim

    2011-12-16

    As shown in Ref. [2], the Fermi part M{sub F}{sup 0{nu}} of the total 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix element M{sup 0{nu}} can be related to the single Fermi transition matrix element between the isobaric analog state (IAS) of the ground state of the initial nucleus and the ground state of the final nucleus. The latter matrix element could be measured in charge-exchange reactions. Here we discuss a possibility of such a measurement for {sup 48}Ca and estimate the cross-section of the reaction {sup 48}Ti(n,p){sup 48}Sc(IAS).

  16. Model independent analysis of gluonic pole matrix elements and universality of transverse-momentum-dependent fragmentation functions

    SciTech Connect

    Gamberg, L. P.; Mukherjee, A.; Mulders, P. J.

    2011-04-01

    Gluonic pole matrix elements explain the appearance of single spin asymmetries (SSA) in high-energy scattering processes. They involve a combination of operators which are odd under time reversal (T-odd). Such matrix elements appear in principle both for parton distribution functions and parton fragmentation functions. We show that for parton fragmentation functions, these gluonic pole matrix elements vanish as a consequence of the analytic structure of scattering amplitudes in quantum chromodynamics. This result is important in the study of the universality of transverse-momentum-dependent (TMD) fragmentation functions.

  17. Migration of tumor cells in 3D matrices is governed by matrix stiffness along with cell-matrix adhesion and proteolysis

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Muhammad H.; Trapani, Linda M.; Sieminski, Alisha; MacKellar, Drew; Gong, Haiyan; Kamm, Roger D.; Wells, Alan; Lauffenburger, Douglas A.; Matsudaira, Paul

    2006-01-01

    Cell migration on 2D surfaces is governed by a balance between counteracting tractile and adhesion forces. Although biochemical factors such as adhesion receptor and ligand concentration and binding, signaling through cell adhesion complexes, and cytoskeletal structure assembly/disassembly have been studied in detail in a 2D context, the critical biochemical and biophysical parameters that affect cell migration in 3D matrices have not been quantitatively investigated. We demonstrate that, in addition to adhesion and tractile forces, matrix stiffness is a key factor that influences cell movement in 3D. Cell migration assays in which Matrigel density, fibronectin concentration, and β1 integrin binding are systematically varied show that at a specific Matrigel density the migration speed of DU-145 human prostate carcinoma cells is a balance between tractile and adhesion forces. However, when biochemical parameters such as matrix ligand and cell integrin receptor levels are held constant, maximal cell movement shifts to matrices exhibiting lesser stiffness. This behavior contradicts current 2D models but is predicted by a recent force-based computational model of cell movement in a 3D matrix. As expected, this 3D motility through an extracellular environment of pore size much smaller than cellular dimensions does depend on proteolytic activity as broad-spectrum matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitors limit the migration of DU-145 cells and also HT-1080 fibrosarcoma cells. Our experimental findings here represent, to our knowledge, discovery of a previously undescribed set of balances of cell and matrix properties that govern the ability of tumor cells to migration in 3D environments. PMID:16832052

  18. Experimental studies of nuclear matrix elements for neutrino-less ββ decays

    SciTech Connect

    Ejiri, H.

    2013-12-30

    Nuclear matrix elements M{sup 0ν} for neutrino less double beta decays (0νββ) are crucial for neutrino studies in 0νββ experiments. The neutrino mass to be studied is sensitive to M{sup 0ν}, while theoretical calculations for M{sup 0ν} are hard. Thus experimental studies of nuclear structures and single β matrix elements M{sub β} associated with 0νββ are useful to confirm and help the theoretical calculations. This reports briefly experimental methods and recent charge exchange reaction studies for M{sub β}. The single β elements for M{sup ±}(2{sup −}) associated with M{sup 0ν}(2{sup −}), which is the major component of M{sup 0ν}, are found to be reduced (quenched) much by the spin isospin correlation and the nuclear medium (non-nucleonic isobar) effect. The present result suggests that the spin isospin components of M{sup 0ν} is fairly reduced (quenched)

  19. On- and off-resonance radiation-atom-coupling matrix elements involving extended atomic wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komninos, Yannis; Mercouris, Theodoros; Nicolaides, Cleanthes A.

    2014-01-01

    In continuation of our earlier works, we present results concerning the computation of matrix elements of the multipolar Hamiltonian (MPH) between extended wave functions that are obtained numerically. The choice of the MPH is discussed in connection with the broader issue of the form of radiation-atom (or -molecule) interaction that is appropriate for the systematic solution of various problems of matter-radiation interaction. We derive analytic formulas, in terms of the sine-integral function and spherical Bessel functions of various orders, for the cumulative radial integrals that were obtained and calculated by Komninos, Mercouris, and Nicolaides [Phys. Rev. A 71, 023410 (2005), 10.1103/PhysRevA.71.023410]. This development allows the much faster and more accurate computation of such matrix elements, a fact that enhances the efficiency with which the time-dependent Schrödinger equation is solved nonperturbatively, in the framework of the state-specific expansion approach. The formulas are applicable to the general case where a pair of orbitals with angular parts |ℓ1,m1> and |ℓ2,m2> are coupled radiatively. As a test case, we calculate the matrix elements of the electric field and of the paramagnetic operators for on- and off-resonance transitions, between hydrogenic circular states of high angular momentum, whose quantum numbers are chosen so as to satisfy electric dipole and electric quadrupole selection rules. Because of the nature of their wave function (they are nodeless and the large centrifugal barrier keeps their overwhelming part at large distances from the nucleus), the validity of the electric dipole approximation in various applications where the off-resonance couplings must be considered becomes precarious. For example, for the transition from the circular state with n = 20 to that with n = 21, for which ≈400 a.u., the dipole approximation starts to fail already at XUV wavelengths (λ <125nm).

  20. Electron-H2 Collisions Studied Using the Finite Element Z-Matrix Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huo, Winifred M.; Brown, David; Langhoff, Stephen R. (Technical Monitor)

    1997-01-01

    We have applied the Z-matrix method, using a mixed basis of finite elements and Gaussians, to study e-H2 elastic and inelastic collisions. Special attention is paid to the quality of the basis set and the treatment of electron correlation. The calculated cross sections are invariant, to machine accuracy, with respect to the choice of parameters a, b, d, e as long as they satisfy Equation (3). However, the log derivative approach, i.e., the choice a = -e = 1, b = d = 0 appears to converge slightly faster than other choices. The cross sections agree well with previous theoretical results. Comparison will be made with available experimental data.

  1. Shape and pairing fluctuation effects on neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements.

    PubMed

    López Vaquero, Nuria; Rodríguez, Tomás R; Egido, J Luis

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear matrix elements (NME) for the most promising candidates to detect neutrinoless double beta decay have been computed with energy density functional methods including deformation and pairing fluctuations explicitly on the same footing. The method preserves particle number and angular momentum symmetries and can be applied to any decay without additional fine tunings. The finite range density dependent Gogny force is used in the calculations. An increase of 10%-40% in the NME with respect to the ones found without the inclusion of pairing fluctuations is obtained, reducing the predicted half-lives of these isotopes.

  2. Many-body correlations of QRPA in nuclear matrix elements of double-beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Terasaki, J.

    2015-10-28

    We present two new ideas on the quasiparticle random-phase approximation (QRPA) approach for calculating nuclear matrix elements of double-beta decay. First, it is necessary to calculate overlaps of the QRPA states obtained on the basis of the ground states of different nuclei. We calculate this overlap using quasiboson vacua as the QRPA ground states. Second, we show that two-particle transfer paths are possible to use for the calculation under the closure approximation. A calculation is shown for {sup 150}Nd→{sup 150}Sm using these two new ideas, and their implication is discussed.

  3. Nuclear matrix elements from direct lifetime or cross-section measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Werner, V.; Cooper, N.; Hinton, M.; Ilie, G.; Radeck, D.

    2012-11-20

    The method of simultaneous lifetime and g factor measurements using a plunger device and the RDDS and TDRIV techniques is introduced. Results on lifetimes and hyperfine-interaction parameters for 2{sup +}{sub 1} states in {sup 104-108}Pd, {sup 96,98,104}Ru, and {sup 92,94}Zr, using a plunger device. Another method to obtain electromagnetic matrix elements is direct cross section measurements using NRF. The method is outlined, and some recent results on {sup 76}Se are shown.

  4. Differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction gamma p -> p omega

    SciTech Connect

    M. Williams, D. Applegate, M. Bellis, C.A. Meyer

    2009-12-01

    High-statistics differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction gamma p -> p omega have been measured using the CLAS at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass (CM) energies from threshold up to 2.84 GeV. Results are reported in 112 10-MeV wide CM energy bins, each subdivided into cos(theta_CM) bins of width 0.1. These are the most precise and extensive omega photoproduction measurements to date. A number of prominent structures are clearly present in the data. Many of these have not previously been observed due to limited statistics in earlier measurements.

  5. Derivation of a general expression for the momentum matrix elements within the envelope-function approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szmulowicz, Frank

    1995-01-01

    A general expression for the momentum matrix elements for both intrasubband and intersubband transitions in n- or p-type doped quantum wells, wires, and dots is derived within the envelope-function approximation, in the process unifying the description of optical absorption in n- and p-type heterostructures. The derivation is nontrivially extended to the case of wave-function penetration into the barrier in a way that satisfies the principle of microscopic reversibility. The contribution of the valence-band anisotropy is shown to contribute to normal-incidence absorption in p-type heterostructures.

  6. An accurate quantum expression of the z-dipole matrix element between nearby Rydberg parabolic states and the correspondence principle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dewangan, D. P.

    2008-01-01

    We give an exact quantum formula for the z-component of the dipole matrix element between parabolic states of a hydrogen atom in terms of the Jacobi polynomials. The formula extends the range of numerical computation to larger values of the parabolic quantum numbers for which computation from the standard textbook formula, which is in terms of the hypergeometric functions, is defined. We obtain an accurate quantum expression of the z-dipole matrix element in terms of the ordinary Bessel functions for transition between nearby Rydberg parabolic states. We derive for the first time the formula of the z-dipole matrix element of the correspondence principle method directly from the quantum expression, and in the process of derivation, clarify the nature of classical-quantum correspondence. The expressions obtained in this work solve the problem of computation of the z-dipole matrix element of hydrogen to a large extent.

  7. Multipole operators in semileptonic weak and electromagnetic interactions with nuclei. II. General single-particle matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Donnelly, T.W.; Haxton, W.C.

    1980-01-01

    We extend our previous harmonic oscillator analysis to a treatment of general single-particle matrix elements of the multipole operators arising in studies of semileptonic weak and electromagnetic interactions with nuclei. Together with the earlier harmonic oscillator tables the present work will allow the reader to express these general matrix elements compactly in terms of specific radial integrals, which then usually must be evaluated numerically.

  8. Measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton+jets final state with the matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V.M.; Abbott, B.; Abolins, M.; Acharya, B.S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agelou, M.; Aguilo, E.; Ahn, S.H.; Ahsan, M.; Alexeev, G.D.; /Buenos Aires U. /Rio de Janeiro, CBPF /Sao Paulo, IFT /Alberta U. /Simon Fraser U. /York U., Canada /McGill U. /Hefei, CUST /Andes U., Bogota /Charles U. /Prague, Tech. U.

    2006-09-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass with the Matrix Element method in the lepton+jets final state. As the energy scale for calorimeter jets represents the dominant source of systematic uncertainty, the Matrix Element likelihood is extended by an additional parameter, which is defined as a global multiplicative factor applied to the standard energy scale. The top quark mass is obtained from a fit that yields the combined statistical and systematic jet energy scale uncertainty.

  9. Comparative Study of Various Algorithms for the Merging of Parton Showers and Matrix Elements in Hadronic Collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Alwall, J.; Hoche, S.; Krauss, F.; Lavesson, N.; Lonnblad, L.; Maltoni, F.; Mangano, M.L.; Moretti, M.; Papadopoulos, C.G.; Piccinini, F.; Schumann, S.; Treccani, M.; Winter, J.; Worek, M.; /SLAC /Durham U., IPPP /Lund U. /Louvain U. /CERN /Ferrara U. /INFN, Ferrara /Athens U. /INFN, Pavia /Dresden, Tech. U. /Karlsruhe U., TP /Silesia U.

    2007-06-27

    We compare different procedures for combining fixed-order tree-level matrix-element generators with parton showers. We use the case of W-production at the Tevatron and the LHC to compare different implementations of the so-called CKKW and MLM schemes using different matrix-element generators and different parton cascades. We find that although similar results are obtained in all cases, there are important differences.

  10. Experimental Identification of the Transmittance Matrix for any Element of the Pulsating Gas Manifold

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    CYKLIS, P.

    2001-07-01

    In positive-displacement compressor manifolds there are pressure pulsations due to their cyclic operation. The analysis of pressure pulsations in the compressor manifolds is important for various reasons: they directly affect the quantity of energy required for medium compression due to dynamic pressure charging, or inversely, dynamic suppression of suction and discharge processes; they cause mechanical vibrations of compressed gas piping network, they cause aerodynamic and mechanical noise; they affect the dynamics of working valves in valve compressors, they intensify the process of heat convection in heat exchangers in the gas network. The Helmholtz model used so far, which is the basis for users, who deal with pressure pulsation damping, contains many simplifying assumptions. This is because; a straight pipe segment substitutes each element of the piping system. In many cases this model is insufficient. An attempt of the analysis of other shapes was presented in references [1-3] but only simple geometry elements were considered. In other papers [4-8] the influence of the mean flow velocity caused problems. In the presented method, on the basis of pressure pulsation measurement results, firstly a division into the forward and backward going wave is determined, then the elements of the scattering (transmittance) matrix are calculated defining the installation element. This allows introducing the correction for gas mean velocity. The results of the method using correction for the gas mean velocity have been compared with the results without correction and Helmholtz model showing better accuracy.

  11. Discrete element modeling of boudinage: Insights on rock rheology, matrix flow, and evolution of geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Steffen; Urai, Janos L.

    2012-01-01

    We use discrete element model simulations to model the full boudinage process from initial fracturing of intact material to post-fracture flow of material into gaps between fragments and to investigate the role which the material properties of the weak and strong layers play in this process. The models are deformed in 2D plane strain under a range of confining stresses, in coaxial bulk flow. Results show that the material properties, i.e. Mohr-Coulomb or quasi-viscous for the matrix and elastic-brittle for the competent layer, lead to the development of natural looking boudin morphologies and deformation patterns in the matrix. The details of the matrix rheology only have a minor influence on the morphology of the boudins. By varying the material properties of the competent layer between fully brittle and semi-ductile we obtain a wide range of deformation patterns ranging from pinch-and-swell structures to a variety of boudin types including drawn, shear band and straight sided torn boudins. In a number of models we observe rotation of the boudin blocks despite the applied deformation being purely coaxial. These rotations are generally related to asymmetrical (rhombic) boudin shapes. Some features observed in natural boudins such as concave block faces or the formation of veins between fragments are not modeled because pore fluids are not yet included in our model.

  12. Measurement of single top quark production at D0 using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrevski, Jovan Pavle

    2007-01-01

    Until now, the top quark has only been observed produced in pairs, by the strong force. According to the standard model, it can also be produced singly, via an electroweak interaction. Top quarks produced this way provide powerful ways to test the charged-current electroweak interactions of the top quark, to measure |Vtb|, and to search for physics beyond the standard model. This thesis describes the application of the matrix element analysis technique to the search for single top quark production with the D0 detector using 0.9 fb-1 of Run II data. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the background model, assuming a Standard Model s-channel to t-channel cross section ratio of σst = 0.44, we measure the single top quark production cross section: σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.8$-1.4\\atop{+1.6}$ pb. This result has a p-value of 0.08%, corresponding to a 3.2 standard deviation Gaussian equivalent significance.

  13. Symbolic algorithms for the computation of Moshinsky brackets and nuclear matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ursescu, D.; Tomaselli, M.; Kuehl, T.; Fritzsche, S.

    2005-12-01

    To facilitate the use of the extended nuclear shell model (NSM), a FERMI module for calculating some of its basic quantities in the framework of MAPLE is provided. The Moshinsky brackets, the matrix elements for several central and non-central interactions between nuclear two-particle states as well as their expansion in terms of Talmi integrals are easily given within a symbolic formulation. All of these quantities are available for interactive work. Program summaryTitle of program:Fermi Catalogue identifier:ADVO Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVO Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:None Computer for which the program is designed and others on which is has been tested:All computers with a licence for the computer algebra package MAPLE [Maple is a registered trademark of Waterloo Maple Inc., produced by MapleSoft division of Waterloo Maple Inc.] Instalations:GSI-Darmstadt; University of Kassel (Germany) Operating systems or monitors under which the program has beentested: WindowsXP, Linux 2.4 Programming language used:MAPLE 8 and 9.5 from MapleSoft division of Waterloo Maple Inc. Memory required to execute with typical data:30 MB No. of lines in distributed program including test data etc.:5742 No. of bytes in distributed program including test data etc.:288 939 Distribution program:tar.gz Nature of the physical problem:In order to perform calculations within the nuclear shell model (NSM), a quick and reliable access to the nuclear matrix elements is required. These matrix elements, which arise from various types of forces among the nucleons, can be calculated using Moshinsky's transformation brackets between relative and center-of-mass coordinates [T.A. Brody, M. Moshinsky, Tables of Transformation Brackets, Monografias del Instituto de Fisica, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, 1960] and by the proper use of the nuclear states in different coupling notations

  14. Many-body-localization transition: strong multifractality spectrum for matrix elements of local operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monthus, Cécile

    2016-07-01

    For short-ranged disordered quantum models in one dimension, the many-body-localization is analyzed via the adaptation to the many-body context (Serbyn et al 2015 Phys. Rev. X 5 041047) of the Thouless point of view on the Anderson transition: the question is whether a local interaction between two long chains is able to reshuffle completely the eigenstates (delocalized phase with a volume-law entanglement) or whether the hybridization between tensor states remains limited (many-body-localized phase with an area-law entanglement). The central object is thus the level of hybridization induced by the matrix elements of local operators, as compared with the difference of diagonal energies. The multifractal analysis of these matrix elements of local operators is used to analyze the corresponding statistics of resonances. Our main conclusion is that the critical point is characterized by the strong-multifractality spectrum f(0≤slant α ≤slant 2)=\\fracα{2} , well known in the context of Anderson localization in spaces of effective infinite dimensionality, where the size of the Hilbert space grows exponentially with the volume. Finally, the possibility of a delocalized non-ergodic phase near criticality is discussed.

  15. Measurement of single top quark production at D0 Using a matrix element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrevski, Jovan

    Until now, the top quark has only been observed produced in pairs, by the strong force. According to the standard model, it can also be produced singly, via an electroweak interaction. Top quarks produced this way provide powerful ways to test the charged-current electroweak interactions of the top quark, to measure |Vtb|, and to search for physics beyond the standard model. This thesis describes the application of the matrix element analysis technique to the search for single top quark production with the D0 detector using 0.9 fb-1 of Run II data. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the background model, assuming a Standard Model s-channel to t-channel cross section ratio of sigmas/sigma t = 0.44, we measure the single top quark production cross section: spp¯→ tb+X,tqb+X=4.8+1.6-1.4 pb. This result has a p-value of 0.08%, corresponding to a 3.2 standard deviation Gaussian equivalent significance.

  16. Precision Measurement of the Neutron Twist-3 Matrix Element dn2: Probing Color Forces

    SciTech Connect

    Posik, Matthew; Flay, David; Parno, Diana; Allada, Kalyan; Armstrong, Whitney; Averett, Todd; Benmokhtar, Fatiha; Bertozzi, William; Camsonne, Alexandre; Canan, Mustafa; Cates, Gordon; Chen, Chunhua; Chen, Jian-Ping; Choi, Seonho; Chudakov, Eugene; Cusanno, Francesco; Dalton, Mark; Deconinck, Wouter; De Jager, Cornelis; Deng, Xiaoyan; Deur, Alexandre; Dutta, Chiranjib; El Fassi, Lamiaa; Franklin, Gregg; Friend, Megan; Gao, Haiyan; Garibaldi, Franco; Gilad, Shalev; Gilman, Ronald; Glamazdin, Oleksandr; Golge, Serkan; Gomez, Javier; Guo, Lei; Hansen, Jens-Ole; Higinbotham, Douglas; Holmstrom, Timothy; Huang, J; Hyde, Charles; Ibrahim Abdalla, Hassan; Jiang, Xiaodong; Jin, Ge; Katich, Joseph; Kelleher, Aidan; Kolarkar, Ameya; Korsch, Wolfgang; Kumbartzki, Gerfried; LeRose, John; Lindgren, Richard; Liyanage, Nilanga; Long, Elena; Lukhanin, Oleksandr; Mamyan, Vahe; McNulty, Dustin; Meziani, Zein-Eddine; Michaels, Robert; Mihovilovic, Miha; Moffit, Bryan; Muangma, Navaphon; Nanda, Sirish; Narayan, Amrendra; Nelyubin, Vladimir; Norum, Blaine; Nuruzzaman, nfn; Oh, Yongseok; Peng, Jen-chieh; Qian, Xin; Qiang, Yi; Rakhman, Abdurahim; Riordan, Seamus; Saha, Arunava; Sawatzky, Bradley; Hashemi Shabestari, Mitra; Shahinyan, Albert; Sirca, Simon; Solvignon-Slifer, Patricia; Subedi, Ramesh; Sulkosky, Vincent; Tobias, William; Troth, Wolfgang; Wang, Diancheng; Wang, Y; Wojtsekhowski, Bogdan; Yan, X; Yao, Huan; Ye, Yunxiu; Ye, Zhihong; Yuan, Lulin; Zhan, X; Zhang, Y; Zhang, Y -W; Zhao, Bo; Zheng, Xiaochao

    2014-07-01

    Double-spin asymmetries and absolute cross sections were measured at large Bjorken x (0.25 lte x lte 0.90), in both the deep-inelastic and resonance regions, by scattering longitudinally polarized electrons at beam energies of 4.7 and 5.9 GeV from a transversely and longitudinally polarized 3He target. In this dedicated experiment, the spin structure function g2 on 3He was determined with precision at large x, and the neutron twist-three matrix element dn2 was measured at ?Q2? of 3.21 and 4.32 GeV2/c2, with an absolute precision of about 10?5. Our results are found to be in agreement with lattice QCD calculations and resolve the disagreement found with previous data at ?Q2?= 5 GeV2/c2. Combining dn2 and a newly extracted twist-four matrix element, fn2, the average neutron color electric and magnetic forces were extracted and found to be of opposite sign and about 60 MeV/fm in magnitude.

  17. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton plus Jets Channel Using a Modified Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2008-12-01

    The authors report a measurement of the top quark mass, m{sub t}, obtained from p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. They analyze a sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 1.9 rfb{sup -1}. They select events with an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets in the central region of the detector, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. They calculate a signal likelihood using a matrix element integration method, where the matrix element is modified by using effective propagators to take into account assumptions on event kinematics. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter JES that determines in situ the calibration of the jet energies. They use a neural network discriminant to distinguish signal from background events. They also apply a cut on the peak value of each event likelihood curve to reduce the contribution of background and badly reconstructed events. Using the 318 events that pass all selection criteria, they find m{sub t} = 172.7 {+-} 1.8 (stat. + JES) {+-} 1.2(syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}.

  18. SU(3) flavor breaking in hadronic matrix elements for B-B¯ oscillations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernard, C.; Blum, T.; Soni, A.

    1998-07-01

    Results in the quenched approximation for SU(3) breaking ratios of the heavy-light decay constants and the ΔF=2 mixing matrix elements are reported. Using lattice simulations at 6/g2=5.7, 5.85, 6.0, and 6.3, we directly compute the mixing matrix element Mhl=. Extrapolating to the physical B meson states, B0 and B0s, we obtain Mbs/Mbd=1.76(10)+57-42 in the continuum limit. The systematic error includes the errors within the quenched approximation but not the errors of quenching. We also obtain the ratio of decay constants, fbs/fbd=1.17(2)+12-6. For the B parameters we find Bbs(2 GeV)=Bbd(2 GeV)=1.02(13); we cannot resolve the SU(3) breaking effects in this case.

  19. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but thismore » Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.« less

  20. On the Use of Finite Difference Matrix-Vector Products in Newton-Krylov Solvers for Implicit Climate Dynamics with Spectral Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, David; Woodward, Carol S.; Evans, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solution of global climate models requires effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a time step dictated by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability governed by the fastest of the time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton s method is applied for these systems. Each iteration of the Newton s method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite-difference which may show a loss of accuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite-difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral-element based shallow-water dynamical-core of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM).

  1. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.

  2. Overcoming Matrix Effects in a Complex Sample: Analysis of Multiple Elements in Multivitamins by Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnold, Randy J.; Arndt, Brett; Blaser, Emilia; Blosser, Chris; Caulton, Dana; Chung, Won Sog; Fiorenza, Garrett; Heath, Wyatt; Jacobs, Alex; Kahng, Eunice; Koh, Eun; Le, Thao; Mandla, Kyle; McCory, Chelsey; Newman, Laura; Pithadia, Amit; Reckelhoff, Anna; Rheinhardt, Joseph; Skljarevski, Sonja; Stuart, Jordyn; Taylor, Cassie; Thomas, Scott; Tse, Kyle; Wall, Rachel; Warkentien, Chad

    2011-01-01

    A multivitamin tablet and liquid are analyzed for the elements calcium, magnesium, iron, zinc, copper, and manganese using atomic absorption spectrometry. Linear calibration and standard addition are used for all elements except calcium, allowing for an estimate of the matrix effects encountered for this complex sample. Sample preparation using…

  3. Dipole transition matrix elements for systems with power-law potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Grant, A.K.; Rosner, J.L. )

    1992-11-01

    We study the behavior of dipole matrix elements for systems bound by power-law potentials of the form {ital V}({ital r}){similar to}{ital r}{sup {alpha}}, which are useful in the descriptions of quarkonium systems. The experimental feature for which further understanding is sought is the apparent suppression of the transition {Upsilon}(3{ital S}){r arrow}{chi}{sub {ital b}}{gamma}. We find that this matrix element actually vanishes in a power-law potential {ital r}{sup {alpha}} for a certain power {alpha}{sub 0}{approx}{minus}0.4. The suppression of transitions between states with different numbers of nodes in their radial wave functions is a universal property of most physically interesting power-law potentials. We derive results in the limit of large orbital angular momenta {ital l}, checking that they agree with the known answers for the Coulomb and spherical oscillator potentials. For states with {ital n}{sub {ital r}} nodes in their radial wave functions, we find that the matrix elements {l angle}{ital n}{sub {ital r}},{ital l}{vert bar}{ital r}{vert bar}{ital n}{sub {ital r}},{ital l}+1{r angle} behave as {ital l}{sup 2/(2+{alpha})} for small {ital n}{sub {ital r}} and large {ital l}. Transitions with {Delta}{ital n}{sub {ital r}}={plus minus}1 behave with respect to those with {Delta}{ital n}{sub {ital r}}=0 as const/ {radical}{ital l}, with constants calculated for each {ital n}{sub {ital r}}. Moreover, we find that {l angle}{ital n}{sub {ital r}}=0,{ital l}{vert bar}{ital r}{vert bar}{ital n}{sub {ital r}}=2,{ital l}{minus}1{r angle}/{l angle}{ital n}{sub {ital r}}=0, {ital l}{vert bar}{ital r}{vert bar}{ital n}{sub {ital r}}=0,{ital l}+1{r angle}{r arrow}{Phi}({alpha})/{ital l} as {ital l}{r arrow}{infinity}, where {Phi}({alpha}) is calculated explicitly.

  4. Motivation of concepts for the negative ion extraction from a single element of the matrix source.

    PubMed

    Lishev, St; Shivarova, A; Yordanov, D

    2016-02-01

    A single element of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions (a planar-coil inductively driven small-radius discharge equipped with an extraction system) is studied regarding the ion extraction. Since the spatial distribution of the negative ions obeys that of the dc potential, the latter is controlled by applying a high bias to the plasma electrode of the extraction system. This leads to discharge maintenance by both rf and dc power deposition and, respectively, to similarities with the axial profile of the dc potential in the glow discharges. The discharge length, the applied rf power, and the bias to the plasma electrode and its radius are the parameters varied in determination of proper conditions for the ion extraction. PMID:26931997

  5. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; et al

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain amore » top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.« less

  6. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in p p ¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 . The matrix element technique is applied to t t ¯ events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton +jets final state of t t ¯ decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt=173.93 ±1.84 GeV .

  7. Influence of Pairing on the Nuclear Matrix Elements of the Neutrinoless {beta}{beta} Decays

    SciTech Connect

    Caurier, E.; Nowacki, F.

    2008-02-08

    We study in this Letter the neutrinoless double beta decay nuclear matrix elements (NME's) in the framework of the interacting shell model. We analyze them in terms of the total angular momentum of the decaying neutron pair and as a function of the seniority truncations in the nuclear wave functions. This point of view turns out to be very adequate to gauge the accuracy of the NME's predicted by different nuclear models. In addition, it gives back the protagonist role in this process to the pairing interaction, the one which is responsible for the very existence of double beta decay emitters. We show that low seniority approximations, comparable to those implicit in the quasiparticle RPA in a spherical basis, tend to overestimate the NME's in several decays.

  8. Spin dipole nuclear matrix elements for double beta decay nuclei by charge-exchange reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ejiri, H.; Frekers, D.

    2016-11-01

    Spin dipole (SD) strengths for double beta-decay (DBD) nuclei were studied experimentally for the first time by using measured cross sections of (3He, t) charge-exchange reactions (CERs). Then SD nuclear matrix elements (NMEs) {M}α ({{SD}}) for low-lying 2‑ states were derived from the experimental SD strengths by referring to the experimental α = GT (Gamow–Teller) and α = F (Fermi) strengths. They are consistent with the empirical NMEs M({{SD}}) based on the quasi-particle model with the empirical effective SD coupling constant. The CERs are used to evaluate the SD NME, which is associated with one of the major components of the neutrino-less DBD NME.

  9. Differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp→pω

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, M.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; Meyer, C. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Anghinolfi, M.; Baghdasaryan, H.; Ball, J.; Battaglieri, M.; Bedlinskiy, I.; Berman, B. L.; Biselli, A. S.; Bookwalter, C.; Briscoe, W. J.; Brooks, W. K.; Burkert, V. D.; Careccia, S. L.; Carman, D. S.; Cole, P. L.; Collins, P.; Crede, V.; D'Angelo, A.; Daniel, A.; Vita, R. De; Sanctis, E. De; Deur, A.; Dey, B.; Dhamija, S.; Dickson, R.; Djalali, C.; Dodge, G. E.; Doughty, D.; Dugger, M.; Dupre, R.; Alaoui, A. El; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eugenio, P.; Fedotov, G.; Fegan, S.; Fradi, A.; Gabrielyan, M. Y.; Garçon, M.; Gevorgyan, N.; Gilfoyle, G. P.; Giovanetti, K. L.; Girod, F. X.; Gohn, W.; Golovatch, E.; Gothe, R. W.; Griffioen, K. A.; Guidal, M.; Guo, L.; Hafidi, K.; Hakobyan, H.; Hanretty, C.; Hassall, N.; Hicks, K.; Holtrop, M.; Ilieva, Y.; Ireland, D. G.; Ishkhanov, B. S.; Isupov, E. L.; Jawalkar, S. S.; Jo, H. S.; Johnstone, J. R.; Joo, K.; Keller, D.; Khandaker, M.; Khetarpal, P.; Kim, W.; Klein, A.; Klein, F. J.; Krahn, Z.; Kubarovsky, V.; Kuleshov, S. V.; Kuznetsov, V.; Livingston, K.; Lu, H. Y.; Mayer, M.; McAndrew, J.; McCracken, M. E.; McKinnon, B.; Mikhailov, K.; Mirazita, M.; Mokeev, V.; Moreno, B.; Moriya, K.; Morrison, B.; Moutarde, H.; Munevar, E.; Nadel-Turonski, P.; Nepali, C. S.; Niccolai, S.; Niculescu, G.; Niculescu, I.; Niroula, M. R.; Niyazov, R. A.; Osipenko, M.; Ostrovidov, A. I.; Paris, M.; Park, K.; Park, S.; Pasyuk, E.; Pereira, S. Anefalos; Perrin, Y.; Pisano, S.; Pogorelko, O.; Pozdniakov, S.; Price, J. W.; Procureur, S.; Protopopescu, D.; Raue, B. A.; Ricco, G.; Ripani, M.; Ritchie, B. G.; Rosner, G.; Rossi, P.; Sabatié, F.; Saini, M. S.; Salamanca, J.; Salgado, C.; Schott, D.; Schumacher, R. A.; Seraydaryan, H.; Sharabian, Y. G.; Smith, E. S.; Sober, D. I.; Sokhan, D.; Stepanyan, S. S.; Stoler, P.; Strakovsky, I. I.; Strauch, S.; Taiuti, M.; Tedeschi, D. J.; Tkachenko, S.; Ungaro, M.; Vineyard, M. F.; Voutier, E.; Watts, D. P.; Weinstein, L. B.; Weygand, D. P.; Wood, M. H.; Zhang, J.; Zhao, B.

    2009-12-01

    High-statistics differential cross sections and spin-density matrix elements for the reaction γp→pω have been measured using the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass (c.m.) energies from threshold up to 2.84 GeV. Results are reported in 11210-MeV wide c.m. energy bins, each subdivided into cosθc.m.ω bins of width 0.1. These are the most precise and extensive ω photoproduction measurements to date. A number of prominent structures are clearly present in the data. Many of these have not previously been observed due to limited statistics in earlier measurements.

  10. OMC studies for the matrix elements in ββ decay

    SciTech Connect

    Zinatulina, D.; Brudanin, V.; Egorov, V.; Shirchenko, M.; Vasiliev, R.; Yyutlandov, I.; Briançon, Ch.; Petitjean, C.

    2013-12-30

    Energy and time spectra of gamma-rays following μ-capture in natural Kr, Se, Cd and Sm, as well as isotopic enriched {sup 82}Kr, {sup 76}Se, {sup 106}Cd and {sup 150}Sm, have been measured. Total life-times of muons in different isotopes, as well as partial μ-capture rates to the excited states of {sup 48}Sc, {sup 76}As and {sup 106}Ag, were extracted. These results are discussed in the context of the double-beta decay matrix elements. The data are also compared with data from theoretical calculations and with data from charge-exchange reactions on {sup 48}Ti. It is the first time that μ-capture and charge-exchange reaction data are being compared in the context of ββ decay.

  11. Three-dimensional display utilizing a diffractive optical element and an active matrix liquid crystal display

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nordin, Gregory P.; Jones, Michael W.; Kulick, Jeffrey H.; Lindquist, Robert G.; Kowel, Stephen T.

    1996-12-01

    We describe the design, construction, and performance of the first real-time autostereoscopic 3D display based on the partial pixel 3D display architecture. The primary optical components of the 3D display are an active-matrix liquid crystal display and a diffractive optical element (DOE). The display operates at video frame rates and is driven with a conventional VGA signal. 3D animations with horizontal motion parallax are readily viewable as sets of stereo images. Formation of the virtual viewing slits by diffraction from the partial pixel apertures is experimentally verified. The measured contrast and perceived brightness of the display are excellent, but there are minor flaws in image quality due to secondary images. The source of these images and how they may be eliminated is discussed. The effects of manufacturing-related systematic errors in the DOE are also analyzed.

  12. HELAC-Onia: An automatic matrix element generator for heavy quarkonium physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hua-Sheng

    2013-11-01

    By the virtues of the Dyson-Schwinger equations, we upgrade the published code HELAC to be capable to calculate the heavy quarkonium helicity amplitudes in the framework of NRQCD factorization, which we dub HELAC-Onia. We rewrote the original HELAC to make the new program be able to calculate helicity amplitudes of multi P-wave quarkonium states production at hadron colliders and electron-positron colliders by including new P-wave off-shell currents. Therefore, besides the high efficiencies in computation of multi-leg processes within the Standard Model, HELAC-Onia is also sufficiently numerical stable in dealing with P-wave quarkonia (e.g. h,χ) and P-wave color-octet intermediate states. To the best of our knowledge, it is a first general-purpose automatic quarkonium matrix elements generator based on recursion relations on the market.

  13. An iterative parallel sparse matrix equation solver with application to finite element modeling of electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1994-12-31

    The usefulness of finite element modeling follows from the ability to accurately simulate the geometry and three-dimensional fields on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength. To make this modeling practical for engineering design, it is necessary to integrate the stages of geometry modeling and mesh generation, numerical solution of the fields-a stage heavily dependent on the efficient use of a sparse matrix equation solver, and display of field information. The stages of geometry modeling, mesh generation, and field display are commonly completed using commercially available software packages. Algorithms for the numerical solution of the fields need to be written for the specific class of problems considered. Interior problems, i.e. simulating fields in waveguides and cavities, have been successfully solved using finite element methods. Exterior problems, i.e. simulating fields scattered or radiated from structures, are more difficult to model because of the need to numerically truncate the finite element mesh. To practically compute a solution to exterior problems, the domain must be truncated at some finite surface where the Sommerfeld radiation condition is enforced, either approximately or exactly. Approximate methods attempt to truncate the mesh using only local field information at each grid point, whereas exact methods are global, needing information from the entire mesh boundary. In this work, a method that couples three-dimensional finite element (FE) solutions interior to the bounding surface, with an efficient integral equation (IE) solution that exactly enforces the Sommerfeld radiation condition is developed. The bounding surface is taken to be a surface of revolution (SOR) to greatly reduce computational expense in the IE portion of the modeling.

  14. Matrix elements of four-fermion operators with quenched Wilson fermions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Sharpe, Stephen R.

    1997-04-01

    We present results for the matrix elements of a variety of four-fermion operators calculated using quenched Wilson fermions. Our simulations are done on 170 lattices of size 323×64 at β=6.0. We find BK=0.74+/-0.04+/-0.05, BD=0.78+/-0.01, B3/27=0.58+/-0.02+0.07-0.03, B3/28=0.81+/-0.03+0.03-0.02, with all results being in the NDR scheme at μ=2 GeV. We also calculate the B parameter for the operator Qs, which is needed in the study of the difference of B-meson lifetimes. Our best estimate is BS(NDR,μ=1/a=2.33 GeV) =0.80+/-0.01. This is given at the lattice scale since the required two-loop anomalous dimension matrix is not known. In all these estimates, the first error is statistical, while the second is due to the use of truncated perturbation theory to match continuum and lattice operators. Errors due to quenching and lattice discretization are not included. We also present new results for the perturbative matching coefficients, extending the calculation to all Lorentz scalar four-fermion operators, and using NDR as the continuum scheme.

  15. Nuclear-Structure Data Relevant to Neutinoless-Double-Beta-Decay Matrix Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kay, Benjamin

    2015-10-01

    An observation of neutrinoless double beta decay is one of the most exciting prospects in contemporary physics. It follows that calculations of the nuclear matrix elements for this process are of high priority. The change in the wave functions between the initial and final states of the neutrinoless-double-beta-decay candidates 76Ge-->76Se, 100Mo-->100Ru, 130Te-->130Xe, and 136Xe-->136Ba have been studied with transfer reactions. The data are focused on the change in the occupancies of the valence orbitals in the ground states as two neutrons decay into two protons. The results set a strict constraint on any theoretical calculations describing this rearrangement and thus on the magnitude of the nuclear matrix elements for this process, which currently exhibit uncertainties at the factor of 2-4 level. Prior to these measurements there were limited experimental data were available A = 76 and 100 systems, and very limited data for the A = 130 and 136 systems, in a large part due to the gaseous Xe isotopes involved. The uncertainties on most of these data are estimated to range from 0.1-0.3 nucleons. The program started with the A = 76 system, with subsequent calculations, modified to reproduce the experimental occupancies, exhibiting a significant reduction in the discrepancy between various models. New data are available for the A = 100 , 130, and 136 systems. I review the program, making detailed comparisons between the latest theoretical calculations and the experimental data where available. This material is based upon work supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Office of Nuclear Physics, under Contract Number DE-AC02-06CH11357.

  16. FRODO: a MuPAD program to calculate matrix elements between contracted wavefunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, C.; Cimiraglia, R.

    2005-09-01

    A symbolic program performing the Formal Reduction of Density Operators (FRODO) has been developed in the MuPAD computer algebra system with the purpose of evaluating the matrix elements of the electronic Hamiltonian between internally contracted functions in a complete active space (CAS) scheme. The program is illustrated making use of two meaningful examples. Program summaryTitle of program:FRODO Catalogue identifier:ADVY Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVY Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer:Any computer on which the MuPAD computer algebra system can be installed Operating systems under which the program has been tested:Linux Programming language used:MuPAD vs. 2.5.3 for Linux No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:3939 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:19 661 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of physical problem: In order to improve on the CAS-SCF wavefunction one can resort to multireference perturbation theory or configuration interaction based on internally contracted functions (ICF) which are obtained by application of the excitation operators to the reference CAS-SCF wavefunction. The formulation of such matrix elements is quite cumbersome and a computer algebra system like MuPAD appears ideally suited to perform such a task. Method of solution: The method adopted consists in successively eliminating all occurrences of inactive orbital indices (core and virtual) from the products of excitation operators which appear in the definition of the ICF's and in the electronic Hamiltonian expressed in the second quantization formalism. Restrictions due to the complexity of the problem: The program is limited to no more than doubly excited ICF's.

  17. Spin Density Matrix Elements in Exclusive Production of Omega Mesons at HERMES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marukyan, Hrachya

    2016-02-01

    Exclusive electroproduction of ω mesons on unpolarized hydrogen and deuterium targets is studied at HERMES in the kinematic region of Q2 > 1.0GeV2, 3.0GeV < W < 6.3GeV, and ‑ t‧ < 0.2GeV2. The data were accumulated during the 1996-2007 running period using the 27.6GeV longitudinally polarized electron or positron beams at HERA. The determination of the virtual-photon longitudinal-to-transverse cross-section ratio shows that a considerable part of the cross section arises from transversely polarized photons. Spin density matrix elements are derived and presented in projections of Q2 or ‑ t‧. Violation of s-channel helicity conservation is observed for some of these elements. A sizable contribution from unnatural-parity-exchange amplitudes is found and the phase shift between those amplitudes that describe transverse ω production by longitudinal and transverse virtual photons is determined for the first time. Good agreement is found between the HERMES proton data and results of a pQCD-inspired phenomenological model that includes pion-pole contributions.

  18. Trace Element Geochemistry of Matrix Glass from the Bedout Impact Structure,Canning Basin NW Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poreda, R. J.; Basu, A. R.; Chakrabarti, R.; Becker, L.

    2004-12-01

    We report on geochemical and petrographic analysis of separated matrix glass from Lagrange-1 and Bedout-1 drill cores that penetrated the Bedout structure offshore NW Australia. The results support the conclusion that the Bedout structure was produced by a a major ET impact at the end-Permian that generated shock melted glass and impact breccias (Becker et al., Science, v.304, p.1469, 2004) The Bedout structure is a 30 km, circular, 1.5 km uplifted basment high that occurs on the passive margin offshore NW Australia. The isolated feature, covered by 3 km of Triassic to Recent sediments,is not consistent with any typical volcanic province (i.e. arc or hotspot volcanism). This hypothesis is supported by the unique mineralogy and chemistry of the matrix glass. At Lagrange, major elements crudely resemble low-K, Fe-Ti basalts while the trace element patterns have two distinct signatures. The lower 250 m of Lagrange (3260 - 3010 m depth) have essentially flat REE and "spider" patterns that superficially resemble some E-MORB; a signal not typically found in arc, hotspot or continental margin settings. The upper 150 meters (3000 - 2850m) of Lagrange and the entire Bedout core (3030 - 3070m) have similar light REE-enriched patterns but low levels of alkalis, alkaline-earths and high field strength elements. Again, the chemistry is not consistent with an arc or hotspot setting, based on the low Ba and extremely low Sr (30-110 ppm) concentrations. Based on the geophysical, chemical and petrologic evidence, we hypothesize that the Bedout structure formed as the result` of an ET impact with Permian age rift margin basalts and continental sediment. The basalts did not completely melt as evidenced by the abundance of large (1 mm) An50 plagioclase,that exist as both crystalline plag and shock melted maskelynite. Plagioclase is the major repository of Sr in basalts and the lack of a plagioclase contribution to the melt glass is reflected in the low Sr abundance. Shock

  19. Adaptive rheology and ordering of cell cytoskeleton govern matrix rigidity sensing

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Mukund; Sarangi, Bibhu Ranjan; Deschamps, Joran; Nematbakhsh, Yasaman; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Margadant, Felix; Mège, René-Marc; Lim, Chwee Teck; Voituriez, Raphaël; Ladoux, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Matrix rigidity sensing regulates a large variety of cellular processes and has important implications for tissue development and disease. However, how cells probe matrix rigidity, and hence respond to it, remains unclear. Here, we show that rigidity sensing and adaptation emerge naturally from actin cytoskeleton remodeling. Our in vitro experiments and theoretical modeling demonstrate a bi-phasic rheology of the actin cytoskeleton, which transitions from fluid on soft substrates to solid on stiffer ones. Furthermore, we find that increasing substrate stiffness correlates with the emergence of an orientational order in actin stress fibers, which exhibit an isotropic to nematic transition that we characterize quantitatively in the framework of active matter theory. These findings imply mechanisms mediated by a large-scale reinforcement of actin structures under stress, which could be the mechanical drivers of substrate stiffness dependent cell shape changes and cell polarity. PMID:26109233

  20. Adaptive rheology and ordering of cell cytoskeleton govern matrix rigidity sensing.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mukund; Sarangi, Bibhu Ranjan; Deschamps, Joran; Nematbakhsh, Yasaman; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Margadant, Felix; Mège, René-Marc; Lim, Chwee Teck; Voituriez, Raphaël; Ladoux, Benoît

    2015-01-01

    Matrix rigidity sensing regulates a large variety of cellular processes and has important implications for tissue development and disease. However, how cells probe matrix rigidity, and hence respond to it, remains unclear. Here, we show that rigidity sensing and adaptation emerge naturally from actin cytoskeleton remodelling. Our in vitro experiments and theoretical modelling demonstrate a biphasic rheology of the actin cytoskeleton, which transitions from fluid on soft substrates to solid on stiffer ones. Furthermore, we find that increasing substrate stiffness correlates with the emergence of an orientational order in actin stress fibres, which exhibit an isotropic to nematic transition that we characterize quantitatively in the framework of active matter theory. These findings imply mechanisms mediated by a large-scale reinforcement of actin structures under stress, which could be the mechanical drivers of substrate stiffness-dependent cell shape changes and cell polarity. PMID:26109233

  1. Adaptive rheology and ordering of cell cytoskeleton govern matrix rigidity sensing.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Mukund; Sarangi, Bibhu Ranjan; Deschamps, Joran; Nematbakhsh, Yasaman; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Margadant, Felix; Mège, René-Marc; Lim, Chwee Teck; Voituriez, Raphaël; Ladoux, Benoît

    2015-06-25

    Matrix rigidity sensing regulates a large variety of cellular processes and has important implications for tissue development and disease. However, how cells probe matrix rigidity, and hence respond to it, remains unclear. Here, we show that rigidity sensing and adaptation emerge naturally from actin cytoskeleton remodelling. Our in vitro experiments and theoretical modelling demonstrate a biphasic rheology of the actin cytoskeleton, which transitions from fluid on soft substrates to solid on stiffer ones. Furthermore, we find that increasing substrate stiffness correlates with the emergence of an orientational order in actin stress fibres, which exhibit an isotropic to nematic transition that we characterize quantitatively in the framework of active matter theory. These findings imply mechanisms mediated by a large-scale reinforcement of actin structures under stress, which could be the mechanical drivers of substrate stiffness-dependent cell shape changes and cell polarity.

  2. Adaptive rheology and ordering of cell cytoskeleton govern matrix rigidity sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Mukund; Sarangi, Bibhu Ranjan; Deschamps, Joran; Nematbakhsh, Yasaman; Callan-Jones, Andrew; Margadant, Felix; Mège, René-Marc; Lim, Chwee Teck; Voituriez, Raphaël; Ladoux, Benoît

    2015-06-01

    Matrix rigidity sensing regulates a large variety of cellular processes and has important implications for tissue development and disease. However, how cells probe matrix rigidity, and hence respond to it, remains unclear. Here, we show that rigidity sensing and adaptation emerge naturally from actin cytoskeleton remodelling. Our in vitro experiments and theoretical modelling demonstrate a biphasic rheology of the actin cytoskeleton, which transitions from fluid on soft substrates to solid on stiffer ones. Furthermore, we find that increasing substrate stiffness correlates with the emergence of an orientational order in actin stress fibres, which exhibit an isotropic to nematic transition that we characterize quantitatively in the framework of active matter theory. These findings imply mechanisms mediated by a large-scale reinforcement of actin structures under stress, which could be the mechanical drivers of substrate stiffness-dependent cell shape changes and cell polarity.

  3. Matrix elements in the coupled-cluster approach - With application to low-lying states in Li

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Ynnerman, Anders

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is suggested for evaluating matrix elements of an operator between wavefunctions in the coupled-cluster form. The use of the exponential ansatz leads to compact exponential expressions also for matrix elements. Algorithms are developed for summing all effects of one-particle clusters and certain chains of two-particle clusters (containing the well-known random-phase approximation as a subset). The treatment of one-particle perturbations in single valence states is investigated in detail. As examples the oscillator strength for the 2s-2p transition in Li as well as the hyperfine structure for the two states are studied and compared to earlier work.

  4. Elastic-plastic finite element analyses of an unidirectional, 9 vol percent tungsten fiber reinforced copper matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sanfeliz, Jose G.

    1993-01-01

    Micromechanical modeling via elastic-plastic finite element analyses were performed to investigate the effects that the residual stresses and the degree of matrix work hardening (i.e., cold-worked, annealed) have upon the behavior of a 9 vol percent, unidirectional W/Cu composite, undergoing tensile loading. The inclusion of the residual stress-containing state as well as the simulated matrix material conditions proved to be significant since the Cu matrix material exhibited plastic deformation, which affected the subsequent tensile response of the composite system. The stresses generated during cooldown to room temperature from the manufacturing temperature were more of a factor on the annealed-matrix composite, since they induced the softened matrix to plastically flow. This event limited the total load-carrying capacity of this matrix-dominated, ductile-ductile type material system. Plastic deformation of the hardened-matrix composite during the thermal cooldown stage was not considerable, therefore, the composite was able to sustain a higher stress before showing any appreciable matrix plasticity. The predicted room temperature, stress-strain response, and deformation stages under both material conditions represented upper and lower bounds characteristic of the composite's tensile behavior. The initial deformation stage for the hardened material condition showed negligible matrix plastic deformation while for the annealed state, its initial deformation stage showed extensive matrix plasticity. Both material conditions exhibited a final deformation stage where the fiber and matrix were straining plastically. The predicted stress-strain results were compared to the experimental, room temperature, tensile stress-strain curve generated from this particular composite system. The analyses indicated that the actual thermal-mechanical state of the composite's Cu matrix, represented by the experimental data, followed the annealed material condition.

  5. Key elements of government contracting: an untapped resource for hospital outreach revenues.

    PubMed

    Harris, A

    2001-01-01

    Historically, hospitals hesitate to compete against commercial laboratories for public sector and managed care market opportunities that would increase a hospital's revenue base. Hospital laboratories perceive that they cannot compete in the scope and complexity of testing, the service requirements, or commodity pricing strategies of commercial laboratories. Since 1997, the Department of Pathology Laboratories at Virginia Commonwealth University Health System's Medical College of Virginia Hospitals and Physicians has been awarded major contracts with government agencies and managed care companies to provide laboratory services for local and regional networks. This article reviews the key elements and ongoing price and service strategies in a sequential, easily followed format that hospital outreach programs can use as a resource when expanding their sales effort into the public sector market. Readers instantly should realize the immediate financial rewards from public sector contracts that offset the industry's declining reimbursements from third party payers.

  6. A Practical Approach to Governance and Optimization of Structured Data Elements.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sarah A; Gesner, Emily; Morgan, Steven; Mar, Perry; Maviglia, Saverio; Colburn, Doreen; Tierney, Diana; Rocha, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Definition and configuration of clinical content in an enterprise-wide electronic health record (EHR) implementation is highly complex. Sharing of data definitions across applications within an EHR implementation project may be constrained by practical limitations, including time, tools, and expertise. However, maintaining rigor in an approach to data governance is important for sustainability and consistency. With this understanding, we have defined a practical approach for governance of structured data elements to optimize data definitions given limited resources. This approach includes a 10 step process: 1) identification of clinical topics, 2) creation of draft reference models for clinical topics, 3) scoring of downstream data needs for clinical topics, 4) prioritization of clinical topics, 5) validation of reference models for clinical topics, and 6) calculation of gap analyses of EHR compared against reference model, 7) communication of validated reference models across project members, 8) requested revisions to EHR based on gap analysis, 9) evaluation of usage of reference models across project, and 10) Monitoring for new evidence requiring revisions to reference model.

  7. A Practical Approach to Governance and Optimization of Structured Data Elements.

    PubMed

    Collins, Sarah A; Gesner, Emily; Morgan, Steven; Mar, Perry; Maviglia, Saverio; Colburn, Doreen; Tierney, Diana; Rocha, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Definition and configuration of clinical content in an enterprise-wide electronic health record (EHR) implementation is highly complex. Sharing of data definitions across applications within an EHR implementation project may be constrained by practical limitations, including time, tools, and expertise. However, maintaining rigor in an approach to data governance is important for sustainability and consistency. With this understanding, we have defined a practical approach for governance of structured data elements to optimize data definitions given limited resources. This approach includes a 10 step process: 1) identification of clinical topics, 2) creation of draft reference models for clinical topics, 3) scoring of downstream data needs for clinical topics, 4) prioritization of clinical topics, 5) validation of reference models for clinical topics, and 6) calculation of gap analyses of EHR compared against reference model, 7) communication of validated reference models across project members, 8) requested revisions to EHR based on gap analysis, 9) evaluation of usage of reference models across project, and 10) Monitoring for new evidence requiring revisions to reference model. PMID:26261999

  8. The OIE PVS tools and expert evaluations: key elements for improving the governance of veterinary services.

    PubMed

    Fermet-Quinet, E

    2012-08-01

    The OIE tools for evaluating the Performance of Veterinary Services (OIE PVS tools) were drafted using the same science-based and mutually agreed procedure as for the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code. The aim of the PVS tools is to improve Veterinary Services (VS) in accordance with their own specific context by harmonising the fundamental principles of VS quality and the criteria for evaluating it. Experts use the OIE PVS tools to propose ways of improving VS governance in any context. Clearly, the weakest states do not have the capacity to implement structural reforms without the support of development partners, themselves acting in a coordinated and complementary manner on the basis of OIE PVS analyses. Special attention must be paid to four areas of critical competencies for improving VS governance: Veterinary legislation is the subject of an OIE expert evaluation to enable VS to take ownership of the legislative development process, which is manifestly lacking in many countries. Initial education for veterinarians enforces the gradual but clear harmonisation of curricula under the aegis of the OIE, in partnership with relevant authorities. Maintenance or restoration of the VS chain of command must be clearly identified as a priority factor of governance that is vital to VS effectiveness and efficiency. Lastly, although it is based on multiple criteria, technical independence of VS requires sufficient income levels not only to meet the basic needs of staff (both public and private), but also to ensure that they receive recognition and social and professional protection. These elements must be integrated into the functional analysis and can be analysed using the OIE PVS tools. PMID:23413733

  9. The OIE PVS tools and expert evaluations: key elements for improving the governance of veterinary services.

    PubMed

    Fermet-Quinet, E

    2012-08-01

    The OIE tools for evaluating the Performance of Veterinary Services (OIE PVS tools) were drafted using the same science-based and mutually agreed procedure as for the OIE Terrestrial Animal Health Code. The aim of the PVS tools is to improve Veterinary Services (VS) in accordance with their own specific context by harmonising the fundamental principles of VS quality and the criteria for evaluating it. Experts use the OIE PVS tools to propose ways of improving VS governance in any context. Clearly, the weakest states do not have the capacity to implement structural reforms without the support of development partners, themselves acting in a coordinated and complementary manner on the basis of OIE PVS analyses. Special attention must be paid to four areas of critical competencies for improving VS governance: Veterinary legislation is the subject of an OIE expert evaluation to enable VS to take ownership of the legislative development process, which is manifestly lacking in many countries. Initial education for veterinarians enforces the gradual but clear harmonisation of curricula under the aegis of the OIE, in partnership with relevant authorities. Maintenance or restoration of the VS chain of command must be clearly identified as a priority factor of governance that is vital to VS effectiveness and efficiency. Lastly, although it is based on multiple criteria, technical independence of VS requires sufficient income levels not only to meet the basic needs of staff (both public and private), but also to ensure that they receive recognition and social and professional protection. These elements must be integrated into the functional analysis and can be analysed using the OIE PVS tools.

  10. LATTICE MATRIX ELEMENTS AND CP VIOLATION IN B AND KA PHYSICS: STATUS AND OUTLOOK.

    SciTech Connect

    SONI,A.

    2003-01-03

    Status of lattice calculations of hadron matrix elements along with CP violation in B and in K systems is reviewed. Lattice has provided useful input which, in conjunction with experimental data, leads to the conclusion that CP-odd phase in the CKM matrix plays the dominant role in the observed asymmetry in B {yields} {psi}K{sub s}. It is now quite likely that any beyond the SM, CP-odd, phase will cause only small deviations in B-physics. Search for the effects of the new phase(s) will consequently require very large data samples as well as very precise theoretical predictions. Clean determination of all the angles of the unitarity triangle therefore becomes essential. In this regard B {yields} KD{sup 0} processes play a unique role. Regarding K-decays, remarkable progress made by theory with regard to maintenance of chiral symmetry on the lattice is briefly discussed. First application already provide quantitative information on B{sub K} and the {Delta}I = 1/2 rule. The enhancement in ReA{sub 0} appears to arise solely from tree operators, esp. Q{sub 2}; penguin contribution to ReA{sub 0} appears to be very small. However, improved calculations are necessary for {epsilon}{prime}/{epsilon} as there the contributions of QCD penguins and electroweak penguins largely seem to cancel. There are good reasons, though, to believe that these cancellations will not survive improvements that are now underway. Importance of determining the unitarity triangle purely from K-decays is also emphasized.

  11. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Marini, C. D.; Suraya, S.; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-02-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc.

  12. Characterization of metal matrix composites by linear ultrasonics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesheng; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt; Wright, David

    2013-02-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) offer advantages over traditional materials for aerospace applications due to the increased mechanical strength of the materials. But the non-destructive inspection of these materials, especially with ultrasound, is in an infancy stage. If the manufacturing process of TiMMC is not correctly controlled, then disbonds and voids between the fibers can result. The effective microstructure of the composite makes difficulty to interpret results from traditional ultrasound techniques because of the scattering caused by fibers; the scattering prevents the ultrasound from penetrating far into the composite region and produces a background signal masking any reflections from voids. In this paper, relatively low frequency ultrasound is used to probe the composite region, and the state of the composite (porosity) is inferred from the velocity of the ultrasound traversing the composite. The relationship between the velocity and porosity is complex in this regime, so finite element (FE) analysis is used to model the composite regions and relate the velocity to the porosity. The FE simulated results are validated by ultrasound velocity measurements. PMID:23363095

  13. Calculating three loop ladder and V-topologies for massive operator matrix elements by computer algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ablinger, J.; Behring, A.; Blümlein, J.; De Freitas, A.; von Manteuffel, A.; Schneider, C.

    2016-05-01

    Three loop ladder and V-topology diagrams contributing to the massive operator matrix element AQg are calculated. The corresponding objects can all be expressed in terms of nested sums and recurrences depending on the Mellin variable N and the dimensional parameter ε. Given these representations, the desired Laurent series expansions in ε can be obtained with the help of our computer algebra toolbox. Here we rely on generalized hypergeometric functions and Mellin-Barnes representations, on difference ring algorithms for symbolic summation, on an optimized version of the multivariate Almkvist-Zeilberger algorithm for symbolic integration, and on new methods to calculate Laurent series solutions of coupled systems of differential equations. The solutions can be computed for general coefficient matrices directly for any basis also performing the expansion in the dimensional parameter in case it is expressible in terms of indefinite nested product-sum expressions. This structural result is based on new results of our difference ring theory. In the cases discussed we deal with iterative sum- and integral-solutions over general alphabets. The final results are expressed in terms of special sums, forming quasi-shuffle algebras, such as nested harmonic sums, generalized harmonic sums, and nested binomially weighted (cyclotomic) sums. Analytic continuations to complex values of N are possible through the recursion relations obeyed by these quantities and their analytic asymptotic expansions. The latter lead to a host of new constants beyond the multiple zeta values, the infinite generalized harmonic and cyclotomic sums in the case of V-topologies.

  14. Symmetry of Isoscalar Matrix Elements and Systematics in the sd and beginning of fp shells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orce, J. N.; Petkov, P.; Velázquez, V.; McKay, C. J.; Lesher, S. R.; Choudry, S.; Mynk, M.; Linnemann, A.; Jolie, J.; von Brentano, P.; Werner, V.; Yates, S. W.; McEllistrem, M. T.

    2006-03-01

    A careful determination of the lifetime and measurement of the branching ratio for decay of the first 2T=1+ state in 42Sc has allowed an accurate experimental test of charge independence in the A = 42 isobaric triplet. A lifetime of 69(17) fs was measured at the University of Kentucky, while relative intensities for the 975 keV and 1586 keV transitions depopulating the first 2T=1+ state have been determined at the University of Cologne as 100(1) and 8(1), respectively. Both measurements give an isoscalar matrix element, M0, of 6.4(9) (W.u.)1/2. This result confirms charge independence for the A=42 isobaric triplet. Shell model calculations have been carried out for understanding the global trend of M0 values for A = 4n + 2 isobaric triplets ranging from A = 18 to A = 42. The 21 (T=1)+ → 01 (T=1)+ transition energies, reduced transition probabilities and M0 values are reproduced to a high degree of accuracy. The trend of M0 strength along the sd shell is interpreted in terms of the shell structure. Certain discrepancies arise at the extremes of the sd shell, for the A = 18 and A = 38 isobaric triplets, which might be explained in terms of the low valence space at the extremes of the sd shell.

  15. A measurement of the top quark mass with a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Gibson, Adam Paul

    2006-01-01

    The authors present a measurement of the mass of the top quark. The event sample is selected from proton-antiproton collisions, at 1.96 TeV center-of-mass energy, observed with the CDF detector at Fermilab's Tevatron. They consider a 318 pb-1 dataset collected between March 2002 and August 2004. They select events that contain one energetic lepton, large missing transverse energy, exactly four energetic jets, and at least one displaced vertex b tag. The analysis uses leading-order t$\\bar{t}$ and background matrix elements along with parameterized parton showering to construct event-by-event likelihoods as a function of top quark mass. From the 63 events observed with the 318 pb-1 dataset they extract a top quark mass of 172.0 ± 2.6(stat) ± 3.3(syst) GeV/c2 from the joint likelihood. The mean expected statistical uncertainty is 3.2 GeV/c2 for m $\\bar{t}$ = 178 GTeV/c2 and 3.1 GeV/c2 for m $\\bar{t}$ = 172.5 GeV/c2. The systematic error is dominated by the uncertainty of the jet energy scale.

  16. Theoretical uncertainties in the nuclear matrix elements of neutrinoless double beta decay: The transition operator

    SciTech Connect

    Menéndez, Javier

    2013-12-30

    We explore the theoretical uncertainties related to the transition operator of neutrinoless double-beta (0νββ) decay. The transition operator used in standard calculations is a product of one-body currents, that can be obtained phenomenologically as in Tomoda [1] or Šimkovic et al. [2]. However, corrections to the operator are hard to obtain in the phenomenological approach. Instead, we calculate the 0νββ decay operator in the framework of chiral effective theory (EFT), which gives a systematic order-by-order expansion of the transition currents. At leading orders in chiral EFT we reproduce the standard one-body currents of Refs. [1] and [2]. Corrections appear as two-body (2b) currents predicted by chiral EFT. We compute the effects of the leading 2b currents to the nuclear matrix elements of 0νββ decay for several transition candidates. The 2b current contributions are related to the quenching of Gamow-Teller transitions found in nuclear structure calculations.

  17. Characterization of metal matrix composites by linear ultrasonics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesheng; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt; Wright, David

    2013-02-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) offer advantages over traditional materials for aerospace applications due to the increased mechanical strength of the materials. But the non-destructive inspection of these materials, especially with ultrasound, is in an infancy stage. If the manufacturing process of TiMMC is not correctly controlled, then disbonds and voids between the fibers can result. The effective microstructure of the composite makes difficulty to interpret results from traditional ultrasound techniques because of the scattering caused by fibers; the scattering prevents the ultrasound from penetrating far into the composite region and produces a background signal masking any reflections from voids. In this paper, relatively low frequency ultrasound is used to probe the composite region, and the state of the composite (porosity) is inferred from the velocity of the ultrasound traversing the composite. The relationship between the velocity and porosity is complex in this regime, so finite element (FE) analysis is used to model the composite regions and relate the velocity to the porosity. The FE simulated results are validated by ultrasound velocity measurements.

  18. Automated evaluation of matrix elements between contracted wavefunctions: A Mathematica version of the FRODO program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, C.; Cimiraglia, R.

    2013-02-01

    A symbolic program performing the Formal Reduction of Density Operators (FRODO), formerly developed in the MuPAD computer algebra system with the purpose of evaluating the matrix elements of the electronic Hamiltonian between internally contracted functions in a complete active space (CAS) scheme, has been rewritten in Mathematica. New version : A program summaryProgram title: FRODO Catalogue identifier: ADV Y _v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVY_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3878 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 170729 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Any computer on which the Mathematica computer algebra system can be installed Operating system: Linux Classification: 5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADV Y _v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 171(2005)63 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: No Nature of problem. In order to improve on the CAS-SCF wavefunction one can resort to multireference perturbation theory or configuration interaction based on internally contracted functions (ICFs) which are obtained by application of the excitation operators to the reference CAS-SCF wavefunction. The previous formulation of such matrix elements in the MuPAD computer algebra system, has been rewritten using Mathematica. Solution method: The method adopted consists in successively eliminating all occurrences of inactive orbital indices (core and virtual) from the products of excitation operators which appear in the definition of the ICFs and in the electronic Hamiltonian expressed in the second quantization formalism. Reasons for new version: Some years ago we published in this journal a couple of papers [1, 2

  19. Automated evaluation of matrix elements between contracted wavefunctions: A Mathematica version of the FRODO program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angeli, C.; Cimiraglia, R.

    2013-02-01

    A symbolic program performing the Formal Reduction of Density Operators (FRODO), formerly developed in the MuPAD computer algebra system with the purpose of evaluating the matrix elements of the electronic Hamiltonian between internally contracted functions in a complete active space (CAS) scheme, has been rewritten in Mathematica. New version : A program summaryProgram title: FRODO Catalogue identifier: ADV Y _v2_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADVY_v2_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 3878 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 170729 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: Any computer on which the Mathematica computer algebra system can be installed Operating system: Linux Classification: 5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADV Y _v1_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 171(2005)63 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: No Nature of problem. In order to improve on the CAS-SCF wavefunction one can resort to multireference perturbation theory or configuration interaction based on internally contracted functions (ICFs) which are obtained by application of the excitation operators to the reference CAS-SCF wavefunction. The previous formulation of such matrix elements in the MuPAD computer algebra system, has been rewritten using Mathematica. Solution method: The method adopted consists in successively eliminating all occurrences of inactive orbital indices (core and virtual) from the products of excitation operators which appear in the definition of the ICFs and in the electronic Hamiltonian expressed in the second quantization formalism. Reasons for new version: Some years ago we published in this journal a couple of papers [1, 2

  20. Green's functions and matrix elements in the Furry picture for the electroweak theory with a non-Abelian external field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavrilov, S. P.; Gitman, D. M.

    1993-05-01

    We obtain explict expressions of all types of Green's functions in the Furry picture of the electroweak theory with a free, non-Abelian external field, by solving the corresponding one-particle equations. We also give the expressions for the matrix elements of simple processes in an external field.

  1. A comparison of measured and calculated thermal stresses in a hybrid metal matrix composite spar cap element

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jenkins, J. M.; Taylor, A. H.; Sakata, I. F.

    1985-01-01

    A hybrid spar of titanium with an integrally brazed composite, consisting of an aluminum matrix reinforced with boron-carbide-coated fibers, was heated in an oven and the resulting thermal stresses were measured. Uniform heating of the spar in an oven resulted in thermal stresses arising from the effects of dissimilar materials and anisotropy of the metal matrix composite. Thermal stresses were calculated from a finite element structural model using anisotropic material properties deduced from constituent properties and rules of mixtures. Comparisons of calculated thermal stresses with measured thermal stresses on the spar are presented. It was shown that failure to account for anisotropy in the metal matrix composite elements would result in large errors in correlating measured and calculated thermal stresses. It was concluded that very strong material characterization efforts are required to predict accurate thermal stresses in anisotropic composite structures.

  2. Electronic coupling matrix elements from charge constrained density functional theory calculations using a plane wave basis set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oberhofer, Harald; Blumberger, Jochen

    2010-12-01

    We present a plane wave basis set implementation for the calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements of electron transfer reactions within the framework of constrained density functional theory (CDFT). Following the work of Wu and Van Voorhis [J. Chem. Phys. 125, 164105 (2006)], the diabatic wavefunctions are approximated by the Kohn-Sham determinants obtained from CDFT calculations, and the coupling matrix element calculated by an efficient integration scheme. Our results for intermolecular electron transfer in small systems agree very well with high-level ab initio calculations based on generalized Mulliken-Hush theory, and with previous local basis set CDFT calculations. The effect of thermal fluctuations on the coupling matrix element is demonstrated for intramolecular electron transfer in the tetrathiafulvalene-diquinone (Q-TTF-Q-) anion. Sampling the electronic coupling along density functional based molecular dynamics trajectories, we find that thermal fluctuations, in particular the slow bending motion of the molecule, can lead to changes in the instantaneous electron transfer rate by more than an order of magnitude. The thermal average, ( {< {| {H_ab } |^2 } > } )^{1/2} = 6.7 {mH}, is significantly higher than the value obtained for the minimum energy structure, | {H_ab } | = 3.8 {mH}. While CDFT in combination with generalized gradient approximation (GGA) functionals describes the intermolecular electron transfer in the studied systems well, exact exchange is required for Q-TTF-Q- in order to obtain coupling matrix elements in agreement with experiment (3.9 mH). The implementation presented opens up the possibility to compute electronic coupling matrix elements for extended systems where donor, acceptor, and the environment are treated at the quantum mechanical (QM) level.

  3. Assessment of a hybrid finite element-transfer matrix model for flat structures with homogeneous acoustic treatments.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Luca; Atalla, Noureddine; Berry, Alain; Sgard, Franck

    2014-05-01

    Modeling complex vibroacoustic systems including poroelastic materials using finite element based methods can be unfeasible for practical applications. For this reason, analytical approaches such as the transfer matrix method are often preferred to obtain a quick estimation of the vibroacoustic parameters. However, the strong assumptions inherent within the transfer matrix method lead to a lack of accuracy in the description of the geometry of the system. As a result, the transfer matrix method is inherently limited to the high frequency range. Nowadays, hybrid substructuring procedures have become quite popular. Indeed, different modeling techniques are typically sought to describe complex vibroacoustic systems over the widest possible frequency range. As a result, the flexibility and accuracy of the finite element method and the efficiency of the transfer matrix method could be coupled in a hybrid technique to obtain a reduction of the computational burden. In this work, a hybrid methodology is proposed. The performances of the method in predicting the vibroacoutic indicators of flat structures with attached homogeneous acoustic treatments are assessed. The results prove that, under certain conditions, the hybrid model allows for a reduction of the computational effort while preserving enough accuracy with respect to the full finite element solution.

  4. Constrained positive matrix factorization: Elemental ratios, spatial distinction, and chemical transport model source contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtz, Timothy M.

    Source apportionment models attempt to untangle the relationship between pollution sources and the impacts at downwind receptors. Two frameworks of source apportionment models exist: source-oriented and receptor-oriented. Source based apportionment models use presumed emissions and atmospheric processes to estimate the downwind source contributions. Conversely, receptor based models leverage speciated concentration data from downwind receptors and apply statistical methods to predict source contributions. Integration of both source-oriented and receptor-oriented models could lead to a better understanding of the implications sources have on the environment and society. The research presented here investigated three different types of constraints applied to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model within the framework of the Multilinear Engine (ME-2): element ratio constraints, spatial separation constraints, and chemical transport model (CTM) source attribution constraints. PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. PMF was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles were used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Using separate data, source contributions to total fine particle carbon predicted by a CTM were incorporated into the PMF receptor model to form a receptor-oriented hybrid model. The level of influence of the CTM versus traditional PMF was

  5. Extracellular matrix rigidity governs smooth muscle cell motility in a biphasic fashion.

    PubMed

    Peyton, Shelly R; Putnam, Andrew J

    2005-07-01

    Increasing evidence suggests that mechanical cues inherent to the extracellular matrix (ECM) may be equally as critical as its chemical identity in regulating cell behavior. We hypothesized that the mechanical properties of the ECM directly regulate the motility of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and tested this hypothesis using polyacrylamide substrates with tunable mechanical properties. Quantification of the migration speed on uniformly compliant hydrogels spanning a range of stiffnesses (Young's moduli values from 1.0 to 308 kPa for acrylamide/bisacrylamide ratios between 5/0.1% and 15/1.2%, respectively) revealed a biphasic dependence on substrate compliance, suggesting the existence of an optimal substrate stiffness capable of supporting maximal migration. The value of this optimal stiffness shifted depending on the concentration of ECM protein covalently attached to the substrate. Specifically, on substrates presenting a theoretical density of 0.8 microg/cm(2) fibronectin, the maximum speed of 0.74 +/- 0.09 microm/min was achieved on a 51.9 kPa gel; on substrates presenting a theoretical density of 8.0 microg/cm(2) fibronectin, the maximum speed of 0.72 +/- 0.06 microm/min occurred on a softer 21.6 kPa gel. Pre-treatment of cells with Y27632, an inhibitor of the Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway, reduced these observed maxima to values comparable to those on non-optimal stiffnesses. In parallel, quantification of TritonX-insoluble vinculin via Western blotting, coupled with qualitative fluorescent microscopy, revealed that the formation of focal adhesions and actin stress fibers also depends on ECM stiffness. Combined, these data suggest that the mechanical properties of the underlying ECM regulate Rho-mediated contractility in SMCs by disrupting a presumptive cell-ECM force balance, which in turn regulates cytoskeletal assembly and ultimately, cell migration.

  6. Reanalysis of nuclear spin matrix elements for dark matter spin-dependent scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cannoni, M.

    2013-04-01

    We show how to include in the existing calculations for nuclei other than Xe129 and Xe131 the corrections to the isovector coupling arising in chiral effective field theory recently found in Menendez et al. [Phys. Rev. D 86, 103511 (2012)PRVDAQ1550-7998]. The dominant, momentum-independent, two-body current effect can be taken into account by formally redefining the static spin matrix elements ⟨Sp,n⟩. By further using the normalized form factor at q≠0 built with the one-body level structure functions, we show that the weakly interacting massive particles (WIMP)-nucleus cross section and the upper limits on the WIMP-nucleon cross sections coincide with the ones derived by using the exact functions at the two-body level. We explicitly show it in the case of XENON100 limits on the WIMP-neutron cross section, and we recalculate the limits on the WIMP-proton spin-dependent cross section set by COUPP. We also give practical formulas to obtain ⟨Sp,n⟩ given the structure functions in the various formalisms and notations existing in the literature. We argue that the standard treatment of the spin-dependent cross section in terms of three independent isospin functions, S00(q), S11(q), and S01(q), is redundant in the sense that the interference function S01(q) is the double product |S01(q)|=2S00(q)S11(q) even when including the new effective field theory corrections.

  7. Government-to-private sector energy programs: Identification of common elements leading to successful implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stockton, Keith M.

    This dissertation examines six distinct government energy programs implemented in the United States during the last three decades. A common element within these programs is an attempt by government to drive commercialization of energy technologies leading to changes in energy production or consumptive behavior. We seek to understand the factors that lead to success or failure of these programs with two goals in mind. The first is theoretical in that we test a hypothesis that market-based energy programs have substantially higher success rates than command-and-control programs. The second goal is operational in nature, in which we desire to identify common factors within energy programs that lead either to program success or to failure. We investigate and evaluate three market-based and three command-and-control energy programs. The market-based programs include the federal Corporate Average Fuel Economy and Sulfur Dioxide Emissions Control programs as well as Colorado's Amendment 37. The command-and-control programs include the federal Synthetic Fuels Corporation and Corn Based Ethanol programs as well as Colorado's Solar Electric Power program. We conduct the analysis of each program based on composite methodology derived from leading academics within the Policy Sciences. From our research findings, we conclude that both market-based and command-and-control programs can achieve their legislative goals and objectives, resulting in permanent changes in energy production or consumptive behavior. However, we also find that the economic efficiency is the differentiator between market-based and command-and-control programs. Market-based programs, because of the inherent flexibility, allow participants to react to changing economic and/or technical conditions. In contrast, command-and-control programs lack such flexibility and often result in economic inefficiency when economic conditions change. The financial incentives incorporated in the three command

  8. Direct measurement of excited-state dipole matrix elements using electromagnetically induced transparency in the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Daniel J.; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G.

    2016-04-01

    Applying large magnetic fields to gain access to the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime can isolate three-level systems in a hot alkali metal vapors, thereby simplifying usually complex atom-light interactions. We use this method to make the first direct measurement of the |<5 P ||e r ||5 D >| matrix element in 87Rb. An analytic model with only three levels accurately models the experimental electromagnetically induced transparency spectra and extracted Rabi frequencies are used to determine the dipole matrix element. We measure |<5 P3 /2||e r ||5 D5 /2>| =(2.290 ±0 .002stat±0 .04syst) e a0 , which is in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations of Safronova, Williams, and Clark [Phys. Rev. A 69, 022509 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevA.69.022509].

  9. Expressions for the second-order mixed partial derivatives of Slater-Koster matrix elements at spherical coordinate singularities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meister, Matthias

    2005-10-01

    In a recent publication it has been shown how to generate derivatives with respect to atom coordinates of Slater-Koster matrix elements for the tight binding modeling of a system. For the special case of a mixed second partial derivative at coordinate singularities only the results were stated in that publication. In this work, the derivation of these results is given in detail. Though it may seem rather technical and only applicable to a very special case, atomic configurations where the connecting vector between the two atoms involved in a two-center matrix element is aligned along the z axis (in the usual approach) require results for precisely this case. The expressions derived in this work have been implemented in the DINAMO code.

  10. Estrogen contributes to regulating iron metabolism through governing ferroportin signaling via an estrogen response element.

    PubMed

    Qian, Yi; Yin, Chunyang; Chen, Yue; Zhang, Shuping; Jiang, Li; Wang, Fudi; Zhao, Meirong; Liu, Sijin

    2015-05-01

    Ferroportin (FPN) is the only known iron exporter in mammalian cells, and is universally expressed in most types of cells. FPN signaling plays a crucial role in maintaining iron homeostasis through governing the level of intracellular iron. Serum iron storage is conversely related with the estrogen level in the female bodies, and women in post-menopause are possibly subjected to iron retention. However, the potential effects of estrogen on iron metabolism are not clearly understood. Here, FPN mRNA transcription in all selected estrogen receptor positive (ER+) cells was significantly reduced upon 17β-estradiol (E2) treatment; and this inhibitory effect could be attenuated by ER antagonist tamoxifen. Likewise, in murine bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs), FPN reduction with elevated intracellular iron (reflected by increased ferritin) was observed in response to E2; however, ferritin level barely responded to E2 in FPN-null BMDMs. The observation of inhibition of FPN mRNA expression was not replicated in ER(-) cells upon E2. A functional estrogen response element (ERE) was identified within the promoter of FPN, and this ERE was responsible for the suppressive effect of E2 on FPN expression. Moreover, ovariectomized (OVX) and sham-operated (SHAM) mice were used to further confirm the in vitro finding. The expression of hepatic FPN was induced in OVX mice, compared to that in the SHAM mice. Taken together, our results demonstrated that estrogen is involved in regulating FPN expression through a functional ERE on its promoter, providing additional insights into a vital role of estrogen in iron metabolism.

  11. Static and dynamic behavior of multiphase porous media: Governing equations and finite element implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Changfu

    2001-09-01

    The mechanical behavior of porous media such as geomaterials is largely governed by the interactions of the solid skeleton (or grains) with the fluids existing in the pores. These interactions occur through the interfaces between bulk components. Traditional analysis procedures of porous media, based on the principle of effective stress and Darcy's law, commonly fail to account for these interactions. In this dissertation, a continuum theory of multiphase porous media is developed, capable of rigorously characterizing the interactions among bulk components. Central to the theory is the implementation of the dynamic compatibility conditions that microscopically represent the constraints on the pressure jumps through interfaces. It is shown that Terzaghi's effective stress and capillary pressure can be characterized within a common framework. Within this context, a theoretical framework for poroelastoplasticity is developed, allowing the hysteresis in capillary pressure and plastic deformation of skeleton to be simulated in a hierarchical way. It is found that the mixture theory-based models of porous media can be linked with Biot's poroelasticity theory. A linear model based on the proposed theory is developed and used to analyze the propagation of acoustic waves in unsaturated soils and favorable comparisons to experimental results are obtained. A finite element procedure is developed and implemented into a computer code (called U_DYSAC2) for elastoplastic static and dynamic analyses of saturated and unsaturated porous media. Numerical examples including wave propagation, two-phase flow, consolidation, and seismic behavior of an embankment are presented. These examples show the capability of the theory for modeling a wide variety of behaviors of porous media.

  12. Identification of scaffold/Matrix Attachment (S/MAR) like DNA element from the gastrointestinal protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Chromatin in the nucleus of all eukaryotes is organized into a system of loops and domains. These loops remain fastened at their bases to the fundamental framework of the nucleus, the matrix or the scaffold. The DNA sequences which anchor the bases of the chromatin loops to the matrix are known as Scaffold/Matrix Attachment Regions or S/MARs. Though S/MARs have been studied in yeast and higher eukaryotes and they have been found to be associated with gene organization and regulation of gene expression, they have not been reported in protists like Giardia. Several tools have been discovered and formulated to predict S/MARs from a genome of a higher eukaryote which take into account a number of features. However, the lack of a definitive consensus sequence in S/MARs and the randomness of the protozoan genome in general, make it a challenge to predict and identify such sequences from protists. Results Here, we have analysed the Giardia genome for the probable S/MARs predicted by the available computational tools; and then shown these sequences to be physically associated with the nuclear matrix. Our study also reflects that while no single computational tool is competent to predict such complex elements from protist genomes, a combination of tools followed by experimental verification is the only way to confirm the presence of these elements from these organisms. Conclusion This is the first report of S/MAR elements from the protozoan parasite Giardia lamblia. This initial work is expected to lay a framework for future studies relating to genome organization as well as gene regulatory elements in this parasite. PMID:20565887

  13. Analysis of the influence of external magnetic field on transition matrix elements in quantum well and quantum cascade laser structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demić, Aleksandar; Radovanović, Jelena; Milanović, Vitomir

    2016-08-01

    We present a method for modeling nonparabolicity effects (NPE) in quantum nanostructures in presence of external electric and magnetic field by using second order perturbation theory. The method is applied to analysis of quantum well structure and active region of a quantum cascade laser (QCL). This model will allow us to examine the influence of magnetic field on dipole matrix element in QCL structures, which will provide a better insight to how NPE can affect the gain of QCL structures.

  14. 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay nuclear matrix elements with self-consistent short-range correlations

    SciTech Connect

    Simkovic, Fedor; Faessler, Amand; Muether, Herbert; Rodin, Vadim; Stauf, Markus

    2009-05-15

    A self-consistent calculation of nuclear matrix elements of the neutrinoless double-beta decays (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) of {sup 76}Ge, {sup 82}Se, {sup 96}Zr, {sup 100}Mo, {sup 116}Cd, {sup 128}Te, {sup 130}Te, and {sup 136}Xe is presented in the framework of the renormalized quasiparticle random phase approximation (RQRPA) and the standard QRPA. The pairing and residual interactions as well as the two-nucleon short-range correlations are for the first time derived from the same modern realistic nucleon-nucleon potentials, namely, from the charge-dependent Bonn potential (CD-Bonn) and the Argonne V18 potential. In a comparison with the traditional approach of using the Miller-Spencer Jastrow correlations, matrix elements for the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay are obtained that are larger in magnitude. We analyze the differences among various two-nucleon correlations including those of the unitary correlation operator method (UCOM) and quantify the uncertainties in the calculated 0{nu}{beta}{beta}-decay matrix elements.

  15. The Dynamic Response of an Euler-Bernoulli Beam on an Elastic Foundation by Finite Element Analysis using the Exact Stiffness Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jeong Soo; Kyum Kim, Moon

    2012-08-01

    In this study, finite element analysis of beam on elastic foundation, which received great attention of researchers due to its wide applications in engineering, is performed for estimating dynamic responses of shallow foundation using exact stiffness matrix. First, element stiffness matrix based on the closed solution of beam on elastic foundation is derived. Then, we performed static finite element analysis included exact stiffness matrix numerically, comparing results from the analysis with some exact analysis solutions well known for verification. Finally, dynamic finite element analysis is performed for a shallow foundation structure under rectangular pulse loading using trapezoidal method. The dynamic analysis results exist in the reasonable range comparing solution of single degree of freedom problem under a similar condition. The results show that finite element analysis using exact stiffness matrix is evaluated as a good tool of estimating the dynamic response of structures on elastic foundation.

  16. Qualitative Analysis of Teeth and Evaluation of Amalgam Elements Penetration into Dental Matrix Using Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Gazmeh, Meisam; Bahreini, Maryam; Tavassoli, Seyed Hassan; Asnaashari, Mohammad

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: In this study, laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) is used for qualitative analysis of healthy and carious teeth. The technique of laser ablation is receiving increasing attention for applications in dentistry, specifically for the treatment of teeth such as drilling of micro-holes and plaque removal. Methods: A quality-switched (Q-switched) Neodymium-Doped Yttrium Aluminium Garnet (Nd:YAG) laser operating at wavelength of 1064 nm, pulse energy of 90 mJ/pulse, repetition rate of 2Hz and pulse duration of 6 ns was used in this analysis. In the process of ablation a luminous micro-plasma is normally generated which may be exploited for on-line elemental analysis via laser induced breakdown spectroscopy technique. We propose laser induced breakdown spectroscopy as a rapid, in situ and easy method for monitoring drilling process. Results: The results of elemental analysis show the presence of some trace elements in teeth including P, Ca, Mg, Zn, K, Sr, C, Na, H, O and the permeability of some amalgam (teeth filling materials) elements including Hg, Ag, Cu and Sn into dental matrix. Conclusion: This study addresses the ability of LIBS in elemental analysis of teeth and its feasibility in acute identification of healthy and carious teeth during drilling process for future clinical applications. PMID:25987971

  17. High-performance liquid chromatography of governing liquid to detect illegal bovine milk's addition in water buffalo Mozzarella: comparison with results from raw milk and cheese matrix.

    PubMed

    Enne, Giuseppe; Elez, Danijela; Fondrini, Fabio; Bonizzi, Ivan; Feligini, Maria; Aleandri, Riccardo

    2005-11-11

    A method to detect fraudulent addition of bovine milk in water buffalo Mozzarella cheese by gradient high-performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC), relying on the measurement of quantity ratios within beta-lactoglobulin protein family, is described. Analyses were performed on raw milk, cheese matrix and cheese governing liquid using a C4 column and UV detection. This work demonstrated that bovine milk addition during cheesemaking can be detected in governing liquid of Mozzarella down to the EU law limit of 1% as well as in raw milk and cheese matrix. A significant lowering of peaks' areas and heights was observed in cheese matrix and governing liquid samples in comparison with the corresponding milk ones, possibly due to proteins' degradation during the cheesemaking process. The results show that, unlike previous works reported, the use of a matrix-specific calibration curve is essential in order to achieve a proper quantitation of beta-lactoglobulin proteins, thus allowing a reliable estimation of bovine milk addition.

  18. Transposable Element ‘roo’ Attaches to Nuclear Matrix of the Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Mamillapalli, Anitha; Pathak, Rashmi U.; Garapati, Hita S.; Mishra, Rakesh K.

    2013-01-01

    The genome of eukaryotes is organized into structural units of chromatin loops. This higher order organization is supported by a nuclear skeleton called the nuclear matrix. The genomic DNA associated with the nuclear matrix is called the matrix associated region (MAR). Only a few genome-wide screens have been attempted, although many studies have characterized locusspecific MAR DNA sequences. In this study, a MAR DNA library was prepared from the Drosophila melanogaster Meigen (Diptera: Drosophilidae) genome. One of the sequences identified as a MAR was from a long terminal repeat region of ‘roo’ retrotransposon (roo MAR). Sequence analysis of roo MAR showed its distribution across the D. melanogaster genome. roo MAR also showed high sequence similarity with a previously identified MAR in Drosophila, namely the ‘gypsy’ retrotransposon. Analysis of the genes flanking roo MAR insertions in the Drosophila genome showed that genes were co-ordinately expressed. The results from the present study in D. melanogaster suggest this sequence plays an important role in genome organization and function. The findings point to an evolutionary role of retrotransposons in shaping the genomic architecture of eukaryotes. PMID:24735214

  19. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy ions double charge exchange reactions towards the 0νββ nuclear matrix element determination

    SciTech Connect

    Agodi, C. Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Cuttone, G.; Finocchiaro, P.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.; Cappuzzello, F.; Greco, V.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Longhitano, F.; Branchina, V.; Foti, A.; Lo Presti, D.; Lanzalone, G.; and others

    2015-10-28

    In the NUMEN Project it is proposed an innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering in the expression of the life-time of the neutrinoless double beta decay, using relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. A key aspect is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  20. Teacher Participation in School Government: A Central Element in Educational Reform.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Epp, Juanita Ross

    The demand for educational reform has reopened several debates concerning fundamental aspects of education. Three of these debates--the goals of education, school governance structures, and the locus of control for reform--are linked to teacher participation. This paper suggests that education's goals could best be addressed by action research…

  1. Systematic Discovery of Structural Elements Governing Mammalian mRNA Stability

    PubMed Central

    Goodarzi, Hani; Najafabadi, Hamed S.; Oikonomou, Panos; Greco, Todd M.; Fish, Lisa; Salavati, Reza; Cristea, Ileana M.; Tavazoie, Saeed

    2012-01-01

    Decoding post-transcriptional regulatory programs in RNA is a critical step in the larger goal to develop predictive dynamical models of cellular behavior. Despite recent efforts1–3, the vast landscape of RNA regulatory elements remain largely uncharacterized. A longstanding obstacle is the contribution of local RNA secondary structure in defining interaction partners in a variety of regulatory contexts, including but not limited to transcript stability3, alternative splicing4 and localization3. There are many documented instances where the presence of a structural regulatory element dictates alternative splicing patterns (e.g. human cardiac troponin T) or affects other aspects of RNA biology5. Thus, a full characterization of post-transcriptional regulatory programs requires capturing information provided by both local secondary structures and the underlying sequence3,6. We have developed a computational framework based on context-free grammars3,7 and mutual information2 that systematically explores the immense space of small structural elements and reveals motifs that are significantly informative of genome-wide measurements of RNA behavior. The application of this framework to genome-wide mammalian mRNA stability data revealed eight highly significant elements with substantial structural information, for the strongest of which we showed a major role in global mRNA regulation. Through biochemistry, mass-spectrometry, and in vivo binding studies, we identified HNRPA2B1 as the key regulator that binds this element and stabilizes a large number of its target genes. Ultimately, we created a global post-transcriptional regulatory map based on the identity of the discovered linear and structural cis-regulatory elements, their regulatory interactions and their target pathways. This approach can also be employed to reveal the structural elements that modulate other aspects of RNA behavior. PMID:22495308

  2. Characteristic element of matrix attachment region mediates vector attachment and enhances nerve growth factor expression in Chinese hamster ovary cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, X Y; Zhang, J H; Sun, Q L; Yao, Z Y; Deng, B G; Guo, W Y; Wang, L; Dong, W H; Wang, F; Zhao, C P; Wang, T Y

    2015-08-07

    Preliminary studies have suggested that a characteristic element of the matrix attachment region (MAR) in human interferon-β mediates the adhesion of vectors to Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. In this study, we investigated if vector adhesion increased nerve growth factor (NGF) expression in CHO cells. The MAR characteristic element sequence of human interferon-β was inserted into the multiple-cloning site of the pEGFP-C1 vector. The target NGF gene was inserted upstream of the MAR characteristic element sequence to construct the MAR/NGF expression vector. The recombinant plasmid was transfected into CHO cells and stable monoclonal cells were selected using G418. NGF mRNA and protein expression was detected by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, respectively. Plasmid reduction experiments were used to determine the state of transfected plasmid in mammalian cells. The insertion of MAR into the vector increased NGF expression levels in CHO cells (1.93- fold) compared to the control. The recombinant plasmid expressing the MAR sequence was digested into a linear space vector. The inserted MAR and NGF sequences were consistent with those inserted into the plasmid before recombination. Therefore, we concluded that the MAR characteristic element mediates vector adhesion to CHO cells and enhances the stability and efficiency of the target gene expression.

  3. A hybrid finite element-transfer matrix model for vibroacoustic systems with flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Luca; Atalla, Noureddine; Berry, Alain; Sgard, Franck

    2015-02-01

    Practical vibroacoustic systems involve passive acoustic treatments consisting of highly dissipative media such as poroelastic materials. The numerical modeling of such systems at low to mid frequencies typically relies on substructuring methodologies based on finite element models. Namely, the master subsystems (i.e., structural and acoustic domains) are described by a finite set of uncoupled modes, whereas condensation procedures are typically preferred for the acoustic treatments. However, although accurate, such methodology is computationally expensive when real life applications are considered. A potential reduction of the computational burden could be obtained by approximating the effect of the acoustic treatment on the master subsystems without introducing physical degrees of freedom. To do that, the treatment has to be assumed homogeneous, flat, and of infinite lateral extent. Under these hypotheses, simple analytical tools like the transfer matrix method can be employed. In this paper, a hybrid finite element-transfer matrix methodology is proposed. The impact of the limiting assumptions inherent within the analytical framework are assessed for the case of plate-cavity systems involving flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments. The results prove that the hybrid model can capture the qualitative behavior of the vibroacoustic system while reducing the computational effort.

  4. Pericellular Matrix Mechanics in the Anulus Fibrosus Predicted by a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Model and In Situ Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li; Guilak, Farshid; Setton, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    Anulus fibrosus (AF) cells have been demonstrated to exhibit dramatic differences in morphology and biologic responses to different types of mechanical stimuli. AF cells may reside as single cell, paired or multiple cells in a contiguous pericellular matrix (PCM), whose structure and properties are expected to have a significant influence on the mechanical stimuli that these cells may experience during physiologic loading of the spine, as well as in tissue degeneration and regeneration. In this study, a computational model was developed to predict the micromechanical stimuli, such as stress and strain, fluid pressure and flow, of cells and their surrounding PCM in the AF tissue using three-dimensional (3D) finite element models based on in situ morphology. 3D solid geometries of cell-PCM regions were registered from serial confocal images obtained from mature rat AF tissues by custom codes. Distinct cell-matrix units were modeled with a custom 3D biphasic finite element code (COMSOL Multiphysics), and simulated to experience uni-axial tensile strain along the local collagen fiber direction. AF cells were predicted to experience higher volumetric strain with a strain amplification ratio (relative to that in the extracellular matrix) of ~ 3.1 – 3.8 at equilibrium, as compared to the PCM domains (1.3 – 1.9). The strain concentrations were generally found at the cell/PCM interface and stress concentration at the PCM/ECM interface. Increased numbers of cells within a contiguous PCM was associated with an apparent increase of strain levels and decreased rate of fluid pressurization in the cell, with magnitudes dependent on the cell size, shape and relative position inside the PCM. These studies provide spatio-temporal information on micromechanics of AF cells in understanding the mechanotransduction in the intervertebral disc. PMID:19946619

  5. Matrix equation decomposition and parallel solution of systems resulting from unstructured finite element problems in electromagnetics

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Katz, D.S.

    1996-12-31

    Finite element modeling has proven useful for accurately simulating scattered or radiated electromagnetic fields from complex three-dimensional objects whose geometry varies on the scale of a fraction of an electrical wavelength. An unstructured finite element model of realistic objects leads to a large, sparse, system of equations that needs to be solved efficiently with regard to machine memory and execution time. Both factorization and iterative solvers can be used to produce solutions to these systems of equations. Factorization leads to high memory requirements that limit the electrical problem size of three-dimensional objects that can be modeled. An iterative solver can be used to efficiently solve the system without excessive memory use and in a minimal amount of time if the convergence rate is controlled.

  6. Study on Hankel matrix-based SVD and its application in rolling element bearing fault diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Huiming; Chen, Jin; Dong, Guangming; Liu, Tao; Chen, Gang

    2015-02-01

    Based on the traditional theory of singular value decomposition (SVD), singular values (SVs) and ratios of neighboring singular values (NSVRs) are introduced to the feature extraction of vibration signals. The proposed feature extraction method is called SV-NSVR. Combined with selected SV-NSVR features, continuous hidden Markov model (CHMM) is used to realize the automatic classification. Then the SV-NSVR and CHMM based method is applied in fault diagnosis and performance assessment of rolling element bearings. The simulation and experimental results show that this method has a higher accuracy for the bearing fault diagnosis compared with those using other SVD features, and it is effective for the performance assessment of rolling element bearings.

  7. Study of Core Competency Elements and Factors Affecting Performance Efficiency of Government Teachers in Northeastern Thailand

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chansirisira, Pacharawit

    2012-01-01

    The research aimed to investigate the core competency elements and the factors affecting the performance efficiency of the civil service teachers in the northeastern region, Thailand. The research procedure consisted of two steps. In the first step, the data were collected using a questionnaire with the reliability (Cronbach's Alpha) of 0.90. The…

  8. An Investigation of Reliability Models for Ceramic Matrix Composites and their Implementation into Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1998-01-01

    The development of modeling approaches for the failure analysis of ceramic-based material systems used in high temperature environments was the primary objective of this research effort. These materials have the potential to support many key engineering technologies related to the design of aeropropulsion systems. Monolithic ceramics exhibit a number of useful properties such as retention of strength at high temperatures, chemical inertness, and low density. However, the use of monolithic ceramics has been limited by their inherent brittleness and a large variation in strength. This behavior has motivated material scientists to reinforce the monolithic material with a ceramic fiber. The addition of a second ceramic phase with an optimized interface increases toughness and marginally increases strength. The primary purpose of the fiber is to arrest crack growth, not to increase strength. The material systems of interest in this research effort were laminated ceramic matrix composites, as well as two- and three- dimensional fabric reinforced ceramic composites. These emerging composite systems can compete with metals in many demanding applications. However, the ongoing metamorphosis of ceramic composite material systems, and the lack of standardized design data has in the past tended to minimize research efforts related to structural analysis. Many structural components fabricated from ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have been designed by "trial and error." The justification for this approach lies in the fact that during the initial developmental phases for a material system fabrication issues are paramount. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating feasibility rather than fully understanding the processes controlling mechanical behavior. This is understandable during periods of rapid improvements in material properties for any composite system. But to avoid the ad hoc approach, the analytical methods developed under this effort can be used to develop rational structural

  9. Notch Sensitivity of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites Under Tensile Loading: An Experimental, Analytical, and Finite Element Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haque, A.; Ahmed, L.; Ware, T.; Jeelani, S.; Verrilli, Michael J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The stress concentrations associated with circular notches and subjected to uniform tensile loading in woven ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) have been investigated for high-efficient turbine engine applications. The CMC's were composed of Nicalon silicon carbide woven fabric in SiNC matrix manufactured through polymer impregnation process (PIP). Several combinations of hole diameter/plate width ratios and ply orientations were considered in this study. In the first part, the stress concentrations were calculated measuring strain distributions surrounding the hole using strain gages at different locations of the specimens during the initial portion of the stress-strain curve before any microdamage developed. The stress concentration was also calculated analytically using Lekhnitskii's solution for orthotropic plates. A finite-width correction factor for anisotropic and orthotropic composite plate was considered. The stress distributions surrounding the circular hole of a CMC's plate were further studied using finite element analysis. Both solid and shell elements were considered. The experimental results were compared with both the analytical and finite element solutions. Extensive optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations were carried out for identifying the fracture behavior and failure mechanisms of both the notched and notched specimens. The stress concentration factors (SCF) determined by analytical method overpredicted the experimental results. But the numerical solution underpredicted the experimental SCF. Stress concentration factors are shown to increase with enlarged hole size and the effects of ply orientations on stress concentration factors are observed to be negligible. In all the cases, the crack initiated at the notch edge and propagated along the width towards the edge of the specimens.

  10. Distinct cis regulatory elements govern the expression of TAG1 in embryonic sensory ganglia and spinal cord.

    PubMed

    Hadas, Yoav; Nitzan, Noa; Furley, Andrew J W; Kozlov, Serguei V; Klar, Avihu

    2013-01-01

    Cell fate commitment of spinal progenitor neurons is initiated by long-range, midline-derived, morphogens that regulate an array of transcription factors that, in turn, act sequentially or in parallel to control neuronal differentiation. Included among these are transcription factors that regulate the expression of receptors for guidance cues, thereby determining axonal trajectories. The Ig/FNIII superfamily molecules TAG1/Axonin1/CNTN2 (TAG1) and Neurofascin (Nfasc) are co-expressed in numerous neuronal cell types in the CNS and PNS - for example motor, DRG and interneurons - both promote neurite outgrowth and both are required for the architecture and function of nodes of Ranvier. The genes encoding TAG1 and Nfasc are adjacent in the genome, an arrangement which is evolutionarily conserved. To study the transcriptional network that governs TAG1 and Nfasc expression in spinal motor and commissural neurons, we set out to identify cis elements that regulate their expression. Two evolutionarily conserved DNA modules, one located between the Nfasc and TAG1 genes and the second directly 5' to the first exon and encompassing the first intron of TAG1, were identified that direct complementary expression to the CNS and PNS, respectively, of the embryonic hindbrain and spinal cord. Sequential deletions and point mutations of the CNS enhancer element revealed a 130bp element containing three conserved E-boxes required for motor neuron expression. In combination, these two elements appear to recapitulate a major part of the pattern of TAG1 expression in the embryonic nervous system.

  11. Good governance for nutrition in the Philippines: elements, experiences, and lessons learned.

    PubMed

    Solon, Florentino S

    2006-12-01

    Malnutrition is a multifactorial problem that needs a multisectoral solution. This article reviews the role of good governance in nutrition programs, citing the Philippines as an example. In the Philippines, these efforts are reflected in the partnership between the public and private sectors in the establishment of the country's capability in research, policy-making, and program implementation. The establishment of the different public institutions engaged in research and policy-making is discussed, highlighting the role of political will through legislation. The evolving tasks of the nutrition program are discussed by citing the tasks in two eras. In the 1970s, the challenges were limited national nutrition data, man-power, tools, and health infrastructure. The public and private institutions were able to respond by legislating national nutrition surveys and dedicated nutrition workers in each village. The challenges in the current era are improved implementation of health programs, given the devolution of health services, and the gathering of an evidence base to further strengthen and refine the strategies of supplementation, fortification, breastfeeding, and food security. In responding to these challenges, multisectoral solutions and collaboration are critical in providing an evidence base to formulate policy. The role of the private sector, with the Nutrition Center of the Philippines used as an example, is that of a supportive and collaborative partner in good governance. Finally, the lessons learned from the past decades of implementing a national nutrition program, given changes in political and economic circumstances, are summarized.

  12. Elemental biochemical analysis of the polysaccharides in the extracellular matrix of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Faria-Oliveira, Fábio; Carvalho, Joana; Belmiro, Celso L R; Ramalho, Gustavo; Pavão, Mauro; Lucas, Cândida; Ferreira, Célia

    2015-06-01

    In yeast multicellular aggregates, such as biofilms and colonies, cells are supported by a yeast extracellular matrix (yECM) of glycosidic nature, the composition of which is mostly unknown. Saccharomyces cerevisiae ECM was produced, extracted and partitioned. An analytical-grade pure glycoside fraction was obtained, fractionated by anionic exchange liquid chromatography and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Two different molecular weight polysaccharides were found, composed of glucose, mannose and small relative amounts of galactose. One of the polysaccharides had a low molecular weight, compatible with the association with glycoproteins abundantly occurring in yECM. In addition, these polysaccharide species were separated by diaminopropane agarose gel electrophoresis and induced metachromatic shift, suggesting chemical substitution, which was corroborated by anticoagulation activity. This was shown to be associated with the double deletion of the yeast homologues of the mammalian Hedgehog modulators Hhatl and Hhat, respectively yeast Gup1 and Gup2. These results pioneer the study of the molecular biology of the ECM supporting S. cerevisiae multicellular aggregates such as biofilms.

  13. Discrete Element Framework for Modelling Extracellular Matrix, Deformable Cells and Subcellular Components

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Bruce S.; Wong, Kelvin K. L.; Joldes, Grand R.; Rich, Addison J.; Tan, Chin Wee; Burgess, Antony W.; Smith, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for modelling biological tissues based on discrete particles. Cell components (e.g. cell membranes, cell cytoskeleton, cell nucleus) and extracellular matrix (e.g. collagen) are represented using collections of particles. Simple particle to particle interaction laws are used to simulate and control complex physical interaction types (e.g. cell-cell adhesion via cadherins, integrin basement membrane attachment, cytoskeletal mechanical properties). Particles may be given the capacity to change their properties and behaviours in response to changes in the cellular microenvironment (e.g., in response to cell-cell signalling or mechanical loadings). Each particle is in effect an ‘agent’, meaning that the agent can sense local environmental information and respond according to pre-determined or stochastic events. The behaviour of the proposed framework is exemplified through several biological problems of ongoing interest. These examples illustrate how the modelling framework allows enormous flexibility for representing the mechanical behaviour of different tissues, and we argue this is a more intuitive approach than perhaps offered by traditional continuum methods. Because of this flexibility, we believe the discrete modelling framework provides an avenue for biologists and bioengineers to explore the behaviour of tissue systems in a computational laboratory. PMID:26452000

  14. An Arnoldi-Based Iterative Scheme for Nonsymmetric Matrix Pencils Arising in Finite Element Stability Problems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Natarajan, Ramesh

    1992-05-01

    A method for computing the desired eigenvalues and corresponding eigenvectors of a large-scale, nonsymmetric, complex generalized eigenvalue problem is described. This scheme is primarily intended for the normal mode analysis and the stability characterization of the stationary states of parameterized time-dependent partial differential equations, in particular, when a finite element method is used for the numerical discretization. The algorithm, which is based on the previous work of Saad, may be succintly described as a multiple shift-and-invert, restarted Arnoldi procedure which uses reorthogonalization and automatic shift selection to provide stability and convergence, while minimizing the overall computational effort. The application and efficiency of the method is illustrated using two representative test problems.

  15. U.S. Government Capabilities to Support Analysis of Gamma Ray Data Submitted by Field Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Mercer, D J; Blackadar, J M; Dietrich, D D; Smith, D K; Lasche, G P; Waymire, D R

    2005-07-07

    As radiation detection in the interest of national security becomes increasingly commonplace, inevitable questions arise concerning the interpretation of data from handheld radioisotope identifiers (RIIDs). Field elements typically require fast answers to provide an effective defense and to minimize the impact on legitimate movement of people and goods. To support this need, on-call experts at Sandia, Los Alamos, and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories cooperate in resolving radiation alarms rapidly and accurately. We present an overview, describe the work in progress to improve capabilities, and report on some of the lessons learned.

  16. The nuclear matrix elements of 0vββ decay and the NUMEN project at INFN-LNS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cappuzzello, F.; Agodi, C.; Aciksoz, E.; Acosta, L.; Aslanouglou, X.; Auerbach, N.; Bijker, R.; Bonanno, D.; Bongiovanni, D.; Borello, T.; Boudhaim, S.; Bouhssa, M. L.; Boztosun, I.; Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Calvo, D.; Chávez Lomelí, E. R.; Colonna, M.; D'Agostino, G.; Deshmukh, N.; de Faria, P. N.; Ferrero, A.; Foti, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Gomes, P. R. S.; Greco, V.; Hacisalihoglu, A.; Housni, Z.; Khouaja, A.; Inchaou, J.; Lanzalone, G.; La Via, F.; Lay, J. A.; Lenske, H.; Linares, R.; Lubian, J.; Iazzi, F.; Introzzi, R.; Lavagno, A.; Lo Presti, D.; Medina, N.; Mendes, D. R.; Muoio, A.; Oliveira, J. R. B.; Pakou, A.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Rodrigues, M. R. D.; Santagati, G.; Santopinto, E.; Scaltrito, L.; Sgouros, O.; Solakcı, S. O.; Soukeras, V.; Tudisco, S.; Vsevolodovna, R. I. M.; Zagatto, V.

    2016-07-01

    An innovative technique to access the nuclear matrix elements entering the expression of the life time of the double beta decay by relevant cross section measurements of double charge exchange reactions is proposed. A key aspect of the project is the use of the MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the LNS K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams, already in operation at INFN Laboratory Nazionali del Sud in Catania (Italy). However, a major upgrade is foreseen for the INFN-LNS research infrastructure to cope with beam currents as high as several ppA required by the project.

  17. Potential and matrix elements of the hamiltonian of internal rotation in molecules in the basis set of Mathieu functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turovtsev, V. V.; Orlov, Yu. D.; Tsirulev, A. N.

    2015-08-01

    The advantages of the orthonormal basis set of 2π-periodic Mathieu functions compared to the trigonometric basis set in calculations of torsional states of molecules are substantiated. Explicit expressions are derived for calculating the Hamiltonian matrix elements of a one-dimensional torsional Schrödinger equation with a periodic potential of the general form in the basis set of Mathieu functions. It is shown that variation of a parameter of Mathieu functions allows the rotation potential and the structural function to be approximated with a good accuracy by a small number of series terms. The conditions for the best choice of this parameter are specified, and approximations are obtained for torsional potentials of n-butane upon rotation about the central C-C bond and of its univalent radical n-butyl C2H5C·H2 upon rotation of the C·H2 group. All algorithms are implemented in the Maple package.

  18. Differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction {gamma}p{yields}p{omega}

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, M.; Applegate, D.; Bellis, M.; Meyer, C. A.; Dey, B.; Dickson, R.; Krahn, Z.; McCracken, M. E.; Moriya, K.; Schumacher, R. A.; Adhikari, K. P.; Careccia, S. L.; Dodge, G. E.; Klein, A.; Mayer, M.; Nepali, C. S.; Niroula, M. R.; Seraydaryan, H.; Tkachenko, S.; Weinstein, L. B.

    2009-12-15

    High-statistics differential cross sections and spin-density matrix elements for the reaction {gamma}p{yields}p{omega} have been measured using the CEBAF large acceptance spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab for center-of-mass (c.m.) energies from threshold up to 2.84 GeV. Results are reported in 112 10-MeV wide c.m. energy bins, each subdivided into cos{theta}{sub c.m.}{sup {omega}} bins of width 0.1. These are the most precise and extensive {omega} photoproduction measurements to date. A number of prominent structures are clearly present in the data. Many of these have not previously been observed due to limited statistics in earlier measurements.

  19. Single element of the matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: Measurements of the extracted currents combined with diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Yordanov, D; Lishev, St; Shivarova, A

    2016-02-01

    Combining measurements of the extracted currents with probe and laser-photodetachment diagnostics, the study is an extension of recent tests of factors and gas-discharge conditions stimulating the extraction of volume produced negative ions. The experiment is in a single element of a rf source with the design of a matrix of small-radius inductively driven discharges. The results are for the electron and negative-ion densities, for the plasma potential and for the electronegativity in the vicinity of the plasma electrode as well as for the currents of the extracted negative ions and electrons. The plasma-electrode bias and the rf power have been varied. Necessity of a high bias to the plasma electrode and stable linear increase of the extracted currents with the rf power are the main conclusions.

  20. Occupancies of individual orbits, and the nuclear matrix element of the {sup 76}Ge neutrinoless {beta}{beta} decay

    SciTech Connect

    Menendez, J.; Poves, A.

    2009-10-15

    We discuss the variation of the nuclear matrix element (NME) for the neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decay of {sup 76}Ge when the wave functions are constrained to reproduce the experimental occupancies of the two nuclei involved in the transition. In the interacting shell model description the value of the NME is enhanced about 15% compared to previous calculations, whereas in the QRPA the NME's are reduced by 20%-30%. This diminishes the discrepancies between both approaches. In addition, we discuss the effect of the short-range correlations on the NME in light of the recently proposed parametrizations based on a consistent renormalization of the 0{nu}{beta}{beta} transition operator.

  1. The (d,2He) reaction on Se76 and the double-β-decay matrix elements for A=76

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grewe, E.-W.; Bäumer, C.; Dohmann, H.; Frekers, D.; Harakeh, M. N.; Hollstein, S.; Johansson, H.; Popescu, L.; Rakers, S.; Savran, D.; Simon, H.; Thies, J. H.; van den Berg, A. M.; Wörtche, H. J.; Zilges, A.

    2008-10-01

    The (d,2He) charge-exchange reaction on Se76 was studied at an incident energy of 183 MeV. The outgoing two protons in the 1S0 state, referred to as He2, were both momentum analyzed and detected by the same spectrometer and detector. The experiment was performed at KVI, Groningen, using the magnetic spectrometer BBS at three angular positions: 0°,2.5°, and 5°. Excitation-energy spectra of the residual nucleus As76 were obtained with an energy resolution of about 120 keV (FWHM). Gamow-Teller (GT+) transition strengths were extracted up to 5 MeV and compared with those from an (n,p) experiment at low resolution. Together with the GT- transition strengths from the 76Ge(p,n) experiment leading to the same intermediate nucleus, the nuclear matrix element of the two-neutrino double-β decay of Ge76 was evaluated.

  2. Verification of Threshold Voltage Variation of Scaled Transistors with Ultralarge-Scale Device Matrix Array Test Element Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsunomura, Takaaki; Nishida, Akio; Hiramoto, Toshiro

    2009-12-01

    Randomness of threshold voltage (VT) variations of negative channel field effect transistors (NFETs) and positive channel field effect transistors (PFETs) in the 65 nm technology is precisely examined. For this purpose, an ultralarge-scale device matrix array test element group (DMA-TEG) that contains 1 million single-size metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors (MOSFETs) has been designed and fabricated, and a very rapid measurement system has been developed. By evaluating VT of a very large number of MOSFETs, VT variation can be precisely evaluated. This rapid measurement is achieved by parallel address signal input, optimization of the measurement program, and 4-chip parallel measurements. The measured VT variations are decomposed into random and systematic components. The results reveal that the random component is overwhelmingly dominant in the VT variations in the 65 nm technology and that the VT variations exhibit a normal distribution up to ±5σ.

  3. Am phases in the matrix of a U–Pu–Zr alloy with Np, Am, and rare-earth elements

    SciTech Connect

    Janney, Dawn E.; Kennedy, J. Rory; Madden, James W.; O’Holleran, Thomas P.

    2015-01-01

    Phases and microstructures in the matrix of an as-cast U-Pu-Zr alloy with 3 wt% Am, 2% Np, and 8% rare-earth elements were characterized by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The matrix consists primarily of two phases, both of which contain Am: ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) (~70 at% U, 5% Np, 14% Pu, 1% Am, and 10% Zr) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 (~25% U, 2% Np, 10-15% Pu, 1-2% Am, and 55-60 at% Zr). These phases are similar to those in U-Pu-Zr alloys, although the Zr content in ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) is higher than that in ζ-(U, Pu) and the Zr content in δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 is lower than that in δ-UZr2. Nanocrystalline actinide oxides with structures similar to UO2 occurred in some areas, but may have formed by reactions with the atmosphere during sample handling. Planar features consisting of a central zone of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) bracketed by zones of δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2 bound irregular polygons ranging in size from a few micrometers to a few tens of micrometers across. The rest of the matrix consists of elongated domains of ζ-(U, Np, Pu, Am) and δ-(U, Np, Pu, Am)Zr2. Each of these domains is a few tens of nanometers across and a few hundred nanometers long. The domains display strong preferred orientations involving areas a few hundred nanometers to a few micrometers across.

  4. Determination of trace elements in dolomite and gypsum by atomic absorption spectrometry: overcoming the matrix interference by flotation separation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stafilov, Trajče; Zendelovska, Dragica; Pavlovska, Gorica; Čundeva, Katarina

    2002-05-01

    The interferences of Ca and Mg as matrix elements in dolomite and gypsum on Ag, Cd, Cr, Mn, Tl and Zn absorbances during their electrothermal atomic absorption spectrometric (ETAAS) determination are investigated. The results reveal that Ca and Mg do not interfere on Zn and Mn, tend to decrease absorbances of Ag, Cd and Cr, while Tl suffers the most significant influence. A flotation separation method is proposed to eliminate matrix interferences. Hydrated iron(III) oxide, Fe 2O 3· xH 2O, and iron(III) hexamethylenedithiocarbamate, Fe(HMDTC) 3, are applied as flotation collectors. The influence of hydrophobic dithiocarbamate anion, HMDTC, on flotation recoveries of each analyte is studied. The most suitable concentrations of dolomite and gypsum solutions for flotation are determined. To avoid flotation suppression due to the reaction of Ca 2+ and Mg 2+ with surfactant ions, a fit foaming agent was selected. The elements present in dolomite and gypsum as traces have been analyzed by ETAAS. Their ETAAS limits of detection following flotation are found to be 0.021 μg·g -1 for Ag, 0.019 μg·g -1 for Cd, 0.014 μg·g -1 for Cr and 0.11 μg·g -1 for Tl. The determination of Mn and Zn can be performed by flame AAS (FAAS). The limit of detection for Mn is 1.5 μg·g -1, while for Zn 0.8 μg·g -1.

  5. FERM3D: A finite element R-matrix electron molecule scattering code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonzani, Stefano

    2007-01-01

    FERM3D is a three-dimensional finite element program, for the elastic scattering of a low energy electron from a general polyatomic molecule, which is converted to a potential scattering problem. The code is based on tricubic polynomials in spherical coordinates. The electron-molecule interaction is treated as a sum of three terms: electrostatic, exchange, and polarization. The electrostatic term can be extracted directly from ab initio codes ( GAUSSIAN 98 in the work described here), while the exchange term is approximated using a local density functional. A local polarization potential based on density functional theory [C. Lee, W. Yang, R.G. Parr, Phys. Rev. B 37 (1988) 785] describes the long range attraction to the molecular target induced by the scattering electron. Photoionization calculations are also possible and illustrated in the present work. The generality and simplicity of the approach is important in extending electron-scattering calculations to more complex targets than it is possible with other methods. Program summaryTitle of program:FERM3D Catalogue identifier:ADYL_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADYL_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer for which the program is designed and others on which it has been tested:Intel Xeon, AMD Opteron 64 bit, Compaq Alpha Operating systems or monitors under which the program has been tested:HP Tru64 Unix v5.1, Red Hat Linux Enterprise 3 Programming language used:Fortran 90 Memory required to execute with typical data:900 MB (neutral CO 2), 2.3 GB (ionic CO 2), 1.4 GB (benzene) No. of bits in a word:32 No. of processors used:1 Has the code been vectorized?:No No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:58 383 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:561 653 Distribution format:tar.gzip file CPC Program library subprograms used:ADDA, ACDP Nature of physical problem:Scattering of an

  6. Structural elements that govern Sec14-like PITP sensitivities to potent small molecule inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Khan, Danish; McGrath, Kaitlyn R; Dorosheva, Oleksandra; Bankaitis, Vytas A; Tripathi, Ashutosh

    2016-04-01

    Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol transfer proteins (PITPs) play important biological functions in integrating multiple aspects of intracellular lipid metabolism with phosphatidylinositol-4-phosphate signaling. As such, these proteins offer new opportunities for highly selective chemical interference with specific phosphoinositide pathways in cells. The first and best characterized small molecule inhibitors of the yeast PITP, Sec14, are nitrophenyl(4-(2-methoxyphenyl)piperazin-1-yl)methanones (NPPMs), and a hallmark feature of NPPMs is their exquisite targeting specificities for Sec14 relative to other closely related Sec14-like PITPs. Our present understanding of Sec14::NPPM binding interactions is based on computational docking and rational loss-of-function approaches. While those approaches have been informative, we still lack an adequate understanding of the basis for the high selectivity of NPPMs among closely related Sec14-like PITPs. Herein, we describe a Sec14 motif, which we term the VV signature, that contributes significantly to the NPPM sensitivity/resistance of Sec14-like phosphatidylinositol (PtdIns)/phosphatidylcholine (PtdCho) transfer proteins. The data not only reveal previously unappreciated determinants that govern Sec14-like PITP sensitivities to NPPMs, but enable predictions of which Sec14-like PtdIns/PtdCho transfer proteins are likely to be NPPM resistant or sensitive based on primary sequence considerations. Finally, the data provide independent evidence in support of previous studies highlighting the importance of Sec14 residue Ser173 in the mechanism by which NPPMs engage and inhibit Sec14-like PITPs.

  7. Multi-scale damage modelling in a ceramic matrix composite using a finite-element microstructure meshfree methodology.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Mora, L; Marrow, T J

    2016-07-13

    The problem of multi-scale modelling of damage development in a SiC ceramic fibre-reinforced SiC matrix ceramic composite tube is addressed, with the objective of demonstrating the ability of the finite-element microstructure meshfree (FEMME) model to introduce important aspects of the microstructure into a larger scale model of the component. These are particularly the location, orientation and geometry of significant porosity and the load-carrying capability and quasi-brittle failure behaviour of the fibre tows. The FEMME model uses finite-element and cellular automata layers, connected by a meshfree layer, to efficiently couple the damage in the microstructure with the strain field at the component level. Comparison is made with experimental observations of damage development in an axially loaded composite tube, studied by X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlation. Recommendations are made for further development of the model to achieve greater fidelity to the microstructure. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  8. Multi-scale damage modelling in a ceramic matrix composite using a finite-element microstructure meshfree methodology.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Mora, L; Marrow, T J

    2016-07-13

    The problem of multi-scale modelling of damage development in a SiC ceramic fibre-reinforced SiC matrix ceramic composite tube is addressed, with the objective of demonstrating the ability of the finite-element microstructure meshfree (FEMME) model to introduce important aspects of the microstructure into a larger scale model of the component. These are particularly the location, orientation and geometry of significant porosity and the load-carrying capability and quasi-brittle failure behaviour of the fibre tows. The FEMME model uses finite-element and cellular automata layers, connected by a meshfree layer, to efficiently couple the damage in the microstructure with the strain field at the component level. Comparison is made with experimental observations of damage development in an axially loaded composite tube, studied by X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlation. Recommendations are made for further development of the model to achieve greater fidelity to the microstructure. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242308

  9. Structural Anomalies Detected in Ceramic Matrix Composites Using Combined Nondestructive Evaluation and Finite Element Analysis (NDE and FEA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abdul-Aziz, Ali; Baaklini, George Y.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    2003-01-01

    Most reverse engineering approaches involve imaging or digitizing an object and then creating a computerized reconstruction that can be integrated, in three dimensions, into a particular design environment. The rapid prototyping technique builds high-quality physical prototypes directly from computer-aided design files. This fundamental technique for interpreting and interacting with large data sets is being used here via Velocity2 (an integrated image-processing software, ref. 1) using computed tomography (CT) data to produce a prototype three-dimensional test specimen model for analyses. A study at the NASA Glenn Research Center proposes to use these capabilities to conduct a combined nondestructive evaluation (NDE) and finite element analysis (FEA) to screen pretest and posttest structural anomalies in structural components. A tensile specimen made of silicon nitrite (Si3N4) ceramic matrix composite was considered to evaluate structural durability and deformity. Ceramic matrix composites are being sought as candidate materials to replace nickel-base superalloys for turbine engine applications. They have the unique characteristics of being able to withstand higher operating temperatures and harsh combustion environments. In addition, their low densities relative to metals help reduce component mass (ref. 2). Detailed three-dimensional volume rendering of the tensile test specimen was successfully carried out with Velocity2 (ref. 1) using two-dimensional images that were generated via computed tomography. Subsequent, three-dimensional finite element analyses were performed, and the results obtained were compared with those predicted by NDE-based calculations and experimental tests. It was shown that Velocity2 software can be used to render a three-dimensional object from a series of CT scan images with a minimum level of complexity. The analytical results (ref. 3) show that the high-stress regions correlated well with the damage sites identified by the CT scans

  10. Transient and stability analysis of large scale rotor-bearing system with strong nonlinear elements by the mode summation-transfer matrix method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Zhiping

    This paper extends Riccati transfer matrix method to the transient and stability analysis of large scale rotor-bearing systems with strong nonlinear elements, and proposes a mode summation-transfer matrix method, in which the field transfer matrix of a distributed mass uniform shaft segment is obtained with the aid of the idea of mode summation and Newmark beta formulation, and the Riccati transfer matrix method is adopted to stablize the boundary value problem of the nonlinear systems. In this investigation, the real nonlinearity of the strong nonlinear elements is considered, not linearized, and the advantages of the Riccati transfer matrix are retained. So, this method is especially applicable to analyze the transient response and stability of large-scale rotor-bear systems with strong nonlinear elements. One example, a single-spool rotating system with strong nonlinear elements, is given. The obtained results show that this method is superior to that of Gu and Chen (1990) in accuracy, stability, and economy.

  11. Matrix elements of intraband transitions in quantum dot intermediate band solar cells: the influence of quantum dot presence on the extended-state electron wave-functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nozawa, Tomohiro; Arakawa, Yasuhiko

    2014-04-01

    The intraband transitions which are essential for quantum dot intermediate band solar cells (QD IBSCs) are theoretically investigated by estimating the matrix elements from a ground bound state, which is often regarded as an intermediate band (IB), to conduction band (CB) states for a structure with a quantum dot (QD) embedded in a matrix (a QD/matrix structure). We have found that the QD pushes away the electron envelope functions (probability densities) from the QD region in almost all quantum states above the matrix CB minimum. As a result, the matrix elements of the intraband transitions in the QD/matrix structure are largely reduced, compared to those calculated assuming the envelope functions of free electrons (i.e., plane-wave envelope functions) in a matrix structure as the final states of the intraband transitions. The result indicates the strong influence of the QD itself on the intraband transitions from the IB to the CB states in QD IBSC devices. This work will help in better understanding the problem of the intraband transitions and give new insight, that is, engineering of quantum states is indispensable for the realization of QD IBSCs with high solar energy conversion efficiencies.

  12. Exact tensor hypercontraction: a universal technique for the resolution of matrix elements of local finite-range N-body potentials in many-body quantum problems.

    PubMed

    Parrish, Robert M; Hohenstein, Edward G; Schunck, Nicolas F; Sherrill, C David; Martínez, Todd J

    2013-09-27

    Configuration-space matrix elements of N-body potentials arise naturally and ubiquitously in the Ritz-Galerkin solution of many-body quantum problems. For the common specialization of local, finite-range potentials, we develop the exact tensor hypercontraction method, which provides a quantized renormalization of the coordinate-space form of the N-body potential, allowing for a highly separable tensor factorization of the configuration-space matrix elements. This representation allows for substantial computational savings in chemical, atomic, and nuclear physics simulations, particularly with respect to difficult "exchangelike" contractions. PMID:24116775

  13. Nuclear transition matrix elements for Majoron-accompanied neutrinoless double-β decay within a projected-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rath, P. K.; Chandra, R.; Chaturvedi, K.; Lohani, P.; Raina, P. K.

    2016-02-01

    The model-dependent uncertainties in the nuclear transition matrix elements for the Majoron-accompanied neutrinoless double-β decay (0+→0+transition) of Zr,9694, 100Mo, Te,130128, and 150Nd isotopes are calculated by employing the projected-Hartree-Fock-Bogoliubov formalism with four different parametrizations of the pairing plus multipolar two-body interactions and three different parametrizations of the Jastrow short-range correlations. Uncertainties in the nuclear transition matrix elements turn out to be less than 15% and 21% for decays involving the emission of single and double Majorons, respectively.

  14. Governing equations of multi-component rigid body-spring discrete element models of reinforced concrete columns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, P. B.; Tingatinga, E. A.; Longalong, R. E.; Saguid, J.

    2016-09-01

    During the past decades, the complexity of conventional methods to perform seismic performance assessment of buildings led to the development of more effective approaches. The rigid body spring-discrete element method (RBS-DEM) is one of these approaches and has recently been applied to the study of the behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) buildings subjected to strong earthquakes. In this paper, the governing equations of RBS-DEM planar elements subjected to lateral loads and horizontal ground motion are presented and used to replicate the hysteretic behavior of experimental RC columns. The RBS-DEM models of columns are made up of rigid components connected by systems of springs that simulate axial, shear, and bending behavior of an RC section. The parameters of springs were obtained using Response-2000 software and the hysteretic response of the models of select columns from the Pacific Earthquake Engineering Research (PEER) Structural Performance Database were computed numerically. Numerical examples show that one-component models were able to simulate the initial stiffness reasonably, while the displacement capacity of actual columns undergoing large displacements were underestimated.

  15. Determinations of the matrix element V(ub) from inclusive semileptonic B decays with reduced model dependency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, Edward J.

    This thesis presents several measurements of the CKM quark mixing matrix element |Vub| with reduced theoretical model dependency. The data sample for these results consists of about 90 million Upsilon(4 S) → BB¯ decays collected between 1999 and 2002 with the BABAR detector at the PEP-II asymmetric-energy e+e- collider, located at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The determinations of | Vub| are performed by measuring the invariant hadronic mass spectrum from inclusive semileptonic B meson decays recoiling from a fully reconstructed B meson decaying hadronically. In one method, the partial rate extracted from the charmless semileptonic hadronic mass spectrum below 1.67 GeV/c2 is combined with a weighted integral over the endpoint of the photon energy spectrum from b → sgamma decays and the result |Vub| = (4.43 +/- 0.38stat +/- 0.25syst +/- 0.28theo ) x 10-3 is obtained. In a second method, the charmless hadronic mass spectrum is measured up to 2.50 GeV/c 2, corresponding to 96.5% of the simulated hadronic mass spectrum. The charmless semileptonic branching fraction is deduced from this measurement and results in B (B¯ → Xuℓ n¯ ) = (1.64 +/- 0.60stat +/- 0.25 syst) x 10-3 which yields |V ub| = (3.84 +/- 0.70stat +/- 0.30syst +/- 0.19theo) x 10-3.

  16. Matrix attachment region elements have small and variable effects on transgene expression and stability in field-grown Populus.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingyi; Brunner, Amy M; Meilan, Richard; Strauss, Steven H

    2008-12-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are thought to buffer transgenes from the influence of surrounding chromosomal sequences, and therefore to reduce transgene silencing and variation in expression. The statistical properties of more than 400 independent transgenic events produced in Populus, with and without flanking MAR elements from the tobacco root gene RB7, were analysed. The expression of two reporter genes in two poplar clones during three phases of vegetative growth, and the association of T-DNA characteristics with expression, was examined. It was found that MARs did not show a consistent effect on transgene expression levels; they had no effect on the green fluorescent protein (GFP) reporter gene, but reduced expression in the Basta resistance (BAR) reporter gene by 23%. The presence of MARs reduced expression variability within transformant populations, apparently by reducing the number of silenced or weakly expressing events. Transgene expression was highly stable over vegetative growth cycles that spanned 3 years of growth in the glasshouse and field, but MARs showed no association with the strength of correlations in expression over the years. Nonetheless, MARs increased the correlation in expression between a p35S::GFP and prbcS::BAR transgene linked on the same vector, but the effect was small and varied between the years. The presence of MARs had no effect on the transgene copy number, but was positively associated with T-DNA truncations, as well as with the formation of direct over inverted repeats at the same chromosomal locus. PMID:19548343

  17. A measurement of the top quark mass in 1.96 TeV proton-antiproton collisions using a novel matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, John C

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix elements techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for tt production and decay. however, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  18. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass in 1.96 TeV Proton-Antiproton Collisions Using a Novel Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Freeman, John

    2007-01-01

    A measurement of the top quark mass in t$\\bar{t}$ → l + jets candidate events, obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector, is presented. The measurement approach is that of a matrix element method. For each candidate event, a two dimensional likelihood is calculated in the top pole mass and a constant scale factor, 'JES', where JES multiplies the input particle jet momenta and is designed to account for the systematic uncertainty of the jet momentum reconstruction. As with all matrix element techniques, the method involves an integration using the Standard Model matrix element for t$\\bar{t}$ production and decay. However, the technique presented is unique in that the matrix element is modified to compensate for kinematic assumptions which are made to reduce computation time. Background events are dealt with through use of an event observable which distinguishes signal from background, as well as through a cut on the value of an event's maximum likelihood. Results are based on a 955 pb-1 data sample, using events with a high-pT lepton and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark; 149 events pass all the selection requirements. They find Mmeas = 169.8 ± 2.3(stat.) ± 1.4(syst.) GeV/c2.

  19. Achieving Finite Element Mesh Quality via Optimization of the Jacobian Matrix Norm and Associated Quantities, Part II - A Framework for Volume Mesh Optimization and the Condition Number of the Jacobian Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Knupp, P.M.

    1999-03-26

    Three-dimensional unstructured tetrahedral and hexahedral finite element mesh optimization is studied from a theoretical perspective and by computer experiments to determine what objective functions are most effective in attaining valid, high quality meshes. The approach uses matrices and matrix norms to extend the work in Part I to build suitable 3D objective functions. Because certain matrix norm identities which hold for 2 x 2 matrices do not hold for 3 x 3 matrices. significant differences arise between surface and volume mesh optimization objective functions. It is shown, for example, that the equivalence in two-dimensions of the Smoothness and Condition Number of the Jacobian matrix objective functions does not extend to three dimensions and further. that the equivalence of the Oddy and Condition Number of the Metric Tensor objective functions in two-dimensions also fails to extend to three-dimensions. Matrix norm identities are used to systematically construct dimensionally homogeneous groups of objective functions. The concept of an ideal minimizing matrix is introduced for both hexahedral and tetrahedral elements. Non-dimensional objective functions having barriers are emphasized as the most logical choice for mesh optimization. The performance of a number of objective functions in improving mesh quality was assessed on a suite of realistic test problems, focusing particularly on all-hexahedral ''whisker-weaved'' meshes. Performance is investigated on both structured and unstructured meshes and on both hexahedral and tetrahedral meshes. Although several objective functions are competitive, the condition number objective function is particularly attractive. The objective functions are closely related to mesh quality measures. To illustrate, it is shown that the condition number metric can be viewed as a new tetrahedral element quality measure.

  20. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-28

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism.

  1. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-01

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism.

  2. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. I. Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted excited valence bond wave functions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-28

    In this series, the n-body reduced density matrix (n-RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals and their applications to ab initio valence bond (VB) methods are presented. As the first paper of this series, Hamiltonian matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions are explicitly provided by means of nonorthogonal orbital based RDM approach. To this end, a more generalized Wick's theorem, called enhanced Wick's theorem, is presented both in arithmetical and in graphical forms, by which the deduction of expressions for the matrix elements between internally contracted VB wave functions is dramatically simplified, and the matrix elements are finally expressed in terms of tensor contractions of electronic integrals and n-RDMs of the reference VB self-consistent field wave function. A string-based algorithm is developed for the purpose of evaluating n-RDMs in an efficient way. Using the techniques presented in this paper, one is able to develop new methods and efficient algorithms for nonorthogonal orbital based many-electron theory much easier than by use of the first quantized formulism. PMID:23635123

  3. Positive Matrix Factorization of hourly size-segregated PM elemental concentration at a street canyon: effect of street cleaning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amato, Fulvio; Nava, Silvia; Lucarelli, Franco; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés.

    2010-05-01

    Despite the high environmental and health burden of road dust emissions in urban environments, there is still a dearth of knowledge on the effectiveness of some possible remediation measures such as street cleaning activities. As a consequence of the recent notification from the EU commission for the exceedances of PM limit values (1999/30/EC), several EU countries (Austria, Germany and UK among others) have introduced street cleaning as one of the main measures to be taken in order to meet these limits in the next future. Nevertheless, the effectiveness of street cleaning is still far from being definitively determined since only few tests have been carried out so far and with very different local conditions. An intensive campaign was carried out during spring 2009 in the city centre of Barcelona (NE of Spain) by means of the application of innovative techniques: i) the hourly elemental composition of size segregated PM was used to investigate short term variability of specific tracers of road dust resuspension; ii) a Positive Matrix Factorization was applied in order to identify the daily pattern of each PM source. Hourly elemental concentrations were obtained by a two-stage streaker sampler, where particles are separated on different stages: an impactor deposits the aerosol coarse fraction (aerodynamic diameter between 2.5-10 µm) on a Kapton foil while the fine fraction (<2.5 µm) is collected on a Nuclepore filter having 0.4 µm pores. The two collecting plates (Kapton and Nuclepore) are paired on a cartridge which rotates at constant speed for a week: this produces a circular continuous deposition of particulate matter (streak) on both stages. Totally 349 samples were collected onto three pairs of stages and analyzed by Proton Induced X-Ray Emission (PIXE) external beam facility in Florence, based on a Van de Graaff accelerator. This facility has been used several times in the past for aerosol studies. A Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) model was applied

  4. First measurements of the {rho}{sup 3} spin density matrix elements in {gamma}p --> p {omega} using CLAS at JLAB

    SciTech Connect

    Vernarsky, Brian J.

    2014-01-01

    In an effort towards a ''complete'' experiment for the ω meson, we present studies from an experiment with an unpolarized target and a circularly polarized photon beam (g1c), carried out using the CEBAF Large Acceptance Spectrometer (CLAS) at Jefferson Lab. The experiment was analyzed using an extended maximum likelihood fit with partial wave amplitudes. New likelihood functions were calculated to account for the polarization of the photon beam. Both circular and linear polarizations are explored. The results of these fits are then used to project out the spin density matrix for the {omega}. First measurements of the {rho}{sup 3} spin density matrix elements will be presented using this method.

  5. A recursion relation for matrix elements of the quantum bouncer. Comment on "A quantum bouncing ball," by Julio Gea-Banacloche [Am. J. Phys. 67 (9), 776-782 (1999)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodmanson, David M.

    2000-09-01

    This paper describes a recursion relation for matrix elements of the quantum bouncer. The relation provides an exact expression for the normalization integral, and allows recursive calculation of matrix elements of the form , where z is the spatial coordinate and |m>,|n> are quantum bouncer eigenstates.

  6. Nuclear-structure dependence of O (. alpha. ) corrections to Fermi decays and the value of the Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V sub ud

    SciTech Connect

    Jaus, W.; Rasche, G. )

    1990-01-01

    We calculate nuclear-structure corrections to the {ital ft} values of the eight accurately measured superallowed {beta}{sup +} decays. The statistical fit for the average {ital ft} value is very good. The resulting new value for the matrix element of the Kobayashi-Maskawa (KM) matrix is {vert bar}{ital V}{sub {ital ud}}{vert bar}=0.9735(5). The error in {vert bar}{ital V}{sub {ital ud}}{vert bar} has thus been reduced by 50%. Combining this value for {vert bar}{ital V}{sub {ital ud}}{vert bar} with the presently accepted results from kaon-, hyperon-, and {ital B}-decay constraints, the unitarity of the KM matrix for three generations of quarks seems to be violated.

  7. Element analysis and calculation of the attenuation coefficients for gold, bronze and water matrixes using MCNP, WinXCom and experimental data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esfandiari, M.; Shirmardi, S. P.; Medhat, M. E.

    2014-06-01

    In this study, element analysis and the mass attenuation coefficient for matrixes of gold, bronze and water with various impurities and the concentrations of heavy metals (Cu, Mn, Pb and Zn) are evaluated and calculated by the MCNP simulation code for photons emitted from Barium-133, Americium-241 and sources with energies between 1 and 100 keV. The MCNP data are compared with the experimental data and WinXCom code simulated results by Medhat. The results showed that the obtained results of bronze and gold matrix are in good agreement with the other methods for energies above 40 and 60 keV, respectively. However for water matrixes with various impurities, there is a good agreement between the three methods MCNP, WinXCom and the experimental one in low and high energies.

  8. The O(αs3) massive operator matrix elements of O(nf) for the structure function F2(x,Q2) and transversity

    PubMed Central

    Ablinger, J.; Blümlein, J.; Klein, S.; Schneider, C.; Wißbrock, F.

    2011-01-01

    The contributions ∝nf to the O(αs3) massive operator matrix elements describing the heavy flavor Wilson coefficients in the limit Q2≫m2 are computed for the structure function F2(x,Q2) and transversity for general values of the Mellin variable N. Here, for two matrix elements, Aqq,QPS(N) and Aqg,Q(N), the complete result is obtained. A first independent computation of the contributions to the 3-loop anomalous dimensions γqg(N), γqqPS(N), and γqqNS,(TR)(N) is given. In the computation advanced summation technologies for nested sums over products of hypergeometric terms with harmonic sums have been used. For intermediary results generalized harmonic sums occur, while the final results can be expressed by nested harmonic sums only. PMID:27293308

  9. Improved short-range correlations and 0{nu}{beta}{beta} nuclear matrix elements of {sup 76}Ge and {sup 82}Se

    SciTech Connect

    Kortelainen, Markus; Suhonen, Jouni

    2007-05-15

    We calculate the nuclear matrix elements of the neutrinoless double beta (0{nu}{beta}{beta}) decays of {sup 76}Ge and {sup 82}Se for the light neutrino exchange mechanism. The nuclear wave functions are obtained by using realistic two-body forces within the proton-neutron quasiparticle random-phase approximation (pnQRPA). We include the effects that come from the finite size of a nucleon, from the higher-order terms of nucleonic weak currents, and from the nucleon-nucleon short-range correlations. Most importantly, we improve on the presently available calculations by replacing the rudimentary Jastrow short-range correlations by the more advanced unitary correlation operator method (UCOM). The UCOM-corrected matrix elements turn out to be notably larger in magnitude than the Jastrow-corrected ones. This has drastic consequences for the detectability of 0{nu}{beta}{beta} decay in present and future double beta experiments.

  10. Matching NLO parton shower matrix element with exact phase space: case of W→ lν( γ) and γ ∗→ π + π -( γ)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanava, G.; Xu, Qingjun; WaŞ, Z.

    2010-12-01

    Monte Carlo is often used for simulation of QED effects in decay of intermediate particles and resonances. Momenta are generated in such a way that samples of events cover the whole bremsstrahlung phase space. With the help of selection cuts, experimental acceptance can then be taken into account. The program is based on an exact multi-photon phase space. A crude matrix element is obtained by iteration of a universal multidimensional kernel. It ensures exact distribution in the soft photon region. The algorithm is compatible with exclusive exponentiation. To evaluate the program's precision, it is necessary to control the kernel with the help of perturbative results. If available, the kernel is constructed from the exact first order matrix element. This ensures that all terms necessary for non-leading logarithms are taken into account. In the present paper we will focus on the W→ lν and γ ∗→ π + π - decays. The Born level cross sections for both processes approach zero in some points of the phase space. A process dependent compensating weight is constructed to incorporate the exact matrix element, but is recommended for use in tests only. In the hard photon region, where scalar QED is not expected to be reliable, the compensating weight for γ ∗ decay can be large. With respect to the total rate, the effect remains at the permille level. It is nonetheless of interest. The terms leading to the effect are analogous to some terms appearing in QCD. The present paper can be understood either as a contribution to discussion on how to match two collinear emission chains resulting from charged sources in a way compatible with the exact and complete phase space, exclusive exponentiation and the first order matrix element of QED (scalar QED), or as the practical study of predictions for accelerator experiments.

  11. A Measurement of the Top Quark Mass with the D0 Detector at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV using the Matrix Element Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kroeninger, Kevin Alexander; /Bonn U.

    2004-04-01

    Using a data set of 158 and 169 pb{sup -1} of D0 Run-II data in the electron and muon plus jets channel, respectively, the top quark mass has been measured using the Matrix Element Method. The method and its implementation are described. Its performance is studied in Monte Carlo using ensemble tests and the method is applied to the Moriond 2004 data set.

  12. Simplified Boson Realization of the soq Subalgebra of u_q(3) and Matrix Elements of so_q(3) Quadrupole Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raychev, P. P.; Roussev, R. P.; Terziev, P. A.; Bonatsos, D.; Iudice, N. Lo

    1997-04-01

    A simplified boson realization of the soq subalgebra of u_q(3) is constructed. A simplified form of the corresponding so_q(3) basis states is obtained. The reduced matrix elements of a special second-rank tensor operator (quadrupole operator) are calculated in the so_q(3) basis (P. P. Raychev, R. P. Roussev, P. A. Terziev, D. Bonatsos and N. Lo Iudice, J. Phys. A (1996) in press).

  13. High-energy anomaly in the angle-resolved photoemission spectra of Nd(2-x)Ce(x)CuO₄: evidence for a matrix element effect.

    PubMed

    Rienks, E D L; Ärrälä, M; Lindroos, M; Roth, F; Tabis, W; Yu, G; Greven, M; Fink, J

    2014-09-26

    We use polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the high-energy anomaly (HEA) in the dispersion of Nd(2-x)Ce(x)CuO₄, x=0.123. We find that at particular photon energies the anomalous, waterfall-like dispersion gives way to a broad, continuous band. This suggests that the HEA is a matrix element effect: it arises due to a suppression of the intensity of the broadened quasiparticle band in a narrow momentum range. We confirm this interpretation experimentally, by showing that the HEA appears when the matrix element is suppressed deliberately by changing the light polarization. Calculations of the matrix element using atomic wave functions and simulation of the ARPES intensity with one-step model calculations provide further evidence for this scenario. The possibility to detect the full quasiparticle dispersion further allows us to extract the high-energy self-energy function near the center and at the edge of the Brillouin zone. PMID:25302914

  14. High-Energy Anomaly in the Angle-Resolved Photoemission Spectra of Nd2-xCexCuO4: Evidence for a Matrix Element Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rienks, E. D. L.; ńrrälä, M.; Lindroos, M.; Roth, F.; Tabis, W.; Yu, G.; Greven, M.; Fink, J.

    2014-09-01

    We use polarization-dependent angle-resolved photoemission spectroscopy (ARPES) to study the high-energy anomaly (HEA) in the dispersion of Nd2-xCexCuO4, x =0.123. We find that at particular photon energies the anomalous, waterfall-like dispersion gives way to a broad, continuous band. This suggests that the HEA is a matrix element effect: it arises due to a suppression of the intensity of the broadened quasiparticle band in a narrow momentum range. We confirm this interpretation experimentally, by showing that the HEA appears when the matrix element is suppressed deliberately by changing the light polarization. Calculations of the matrix element using atomic wave functions and simulation of the ARPES intensity with one-step model calculations provide further evidence for this scenario. The possibility to detect the full quasiparticle dispersion further allows us to extract the high-energy self-energy function near the center and at the edge of the Brillouin zone.

  15. Measurement of the electroweak top quark production cross section and the CKM matrix element Vtb with the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, Matthias

    2009-06-29

    At particle accelerators the Standard Model has been tested and will be tested further to a great precision. The data analyzed in this thesis have been collected at the world's highest energetic-collider, the Tevatron, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in the vicinity of Chicago, IL, USA. There, protons and antiprotons are collided at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The discovery of the top quark was one of the remarkable results not only for the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron collider, but also for the Standard Model, which had predicted the existence of the top quark because of symmetry arguments long before already. Still, the Tevatron is the only facility able to produce top quarks. The predominant production mechanism of top quarks is the production of a top-antitop quark pair via the strong force. However, the Standard Model also allows the production of single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. This process features the unique opportunity to measure the |Vtb| matrix element of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix directly, without assuming unitarity of the matrix or assuming that the number of quark generations is three. Hence, the measurement of the cross section of electroweak top quark production is more than the technical challenge to extract a physics process that only occurs one out of ten billion collisions. It is also an important test of the V-A structure of the electroweak interaction and a potential window to physics beyond the Standard Model in the case where the measurement of |V{sub tb}| would result in a value significantly different from 1, the value predicted by the Standard Model. At the Tevatron two production processes contribute significantly to the production of single top quarks: the production via the t-channel, also called W-gluon fusion, and the production via the s-channel, known as well as W* process. This analysis searches for the combined s+t channel

  16. The NASA/Industry Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMVIBS) Program - A government overview. [of rotorcraft technology development using finite element method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, Raymond G.

    1992-01-01

    An overview is presented of government contributions to the program called Design Analysis Methods for Vibrations (DAMV) which attempted to develop finite-element-based analyses of rotorcraft vibrations. NASA initiated the program with a finite-element modeling program for the CH-47D tandem-rotor helicopter. The DAMV program emphasized four areas including: airframe finite-element modeling, difficult components studies, coupled rotor-airframe vibrations, and airframe structural optimization. Key accomplishments of the program include industrywide standards for modeling metal and composite airframes, improved industrial designs for vibrations, and the identification of critical structural contributors to airframe vibratory responses. The program also demonstrated the value of incorporating secondary modeling details to improving correlation, and the findings provide the basis for an improved finite-element-based dynamics design-analysis capability.

  17. Non-negative matrix factorization for the near real-time interpretation of absorption effects in elemental distribution images acquired by X-ray fluorescence imaging.

    PubMed

    Alfeld, Matthias; Wahabzada, Mirwaes; Bauckhage, Christian; Kersting, Kristian; Wellenreuther, Gerd; Barriobero-Vila, Pere; Requena, Guillermo; Boesenberg, Ulrike; Falkenberg, Gerald

    2016-03-01

    Elemental distribution images acquired by imaging X-ray fluorescence analysis can contain high degrees of redundancy and weakly discernible correlations. In this article near real-time non-negative matrix factorization (NMF) is described for the analysis of a number of data sets acquired from samples of a bi-modal α+β Ti-6Al-6V-2Sn alloy. NMF was used for the first time to reveal absorption artefacts in the elemental distribution images of the samples, where two phases of the alloy, namely α and β, were in superposition. The findings and interpretation of the NMF results were confirmed by Monte Carlo simulation of the layered alloy system. Furthermore, it is shown how the simultaneous factorization of several stacks of elemental distribution images provides uniform basis vectors and consequently simplifies the interpretation of the representation. PMID:26917147

  18. Measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the semileptonic decay channel at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Haefner, Petra

    2008-07-31

    The top quark plays a special role in the Standard Model of Particle Physics. With its enormous mass of about 170 GeV it is as heavy as a gold atom and is the only quark with a mass near the electroweak scale. Together with theW boson mass, the top quark mass allows indirect constraints on the mass of the hypothetical Higgs boson, which might hold the clue to the origin of mass. Top pair production with a semileptonic decay t $\\bar{t}$ →W±W b$\\bar{b}$ →q $\\bar{t}$lnb$\\bar{b}$ is the ”golden channel” for mass measurements, due to a large branching fraction and a relatively low background contamination compared to other decay channels. Top mass measurements based on this decay, performed with the matrix element method, have always been among the single best measurements in the world. In 2007, the top mass world average broke the 1% level of precision. Its measurement is no longer dominated by statistical but instead by systematic uncertainties. The reduction of systematic uncertainties has therefore become a key issue for further progress. This thesis introduces two new developments in the treatment of b jets. The first improvement is an optimization in the way b identification information is used. It leads to an enhanced separation between signal and background processes and reduces the statistical uncertainty by about 16%. The second improvement determines differences in the detector response and thus the energy scales of light jets and b jets. Thereby, it addresses the major source of systematic uncertainty in the latest top mass measurements. The method was validated on Monte Carlo events at the generator level, calibrated with fully simulated events, including detector simulation, and applied to D0 Run II data corresponding to 1 fb-1 of integrated luminosity. Possible sources of systematic uncertainties were studied. The top mass is measured to be: mt = (169.2±3.5(stat.)±1.0(syst.)) GeV . The

  19. Detection of Matrix Elements and Trace Impurities in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Photovoltaic Absorbers Using Surface Analytical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Haidong; Lee, Kang-Bong; Lee, Yeonhee

    2015-10-01

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films are well known as the next-generation solar cell materials notable for their high absorption coefficient for solar radiation, suitable band gap, and ability for deposition on flexible substrate materials, allowing the production of highly flexible and lightweight solar panels. To improve solar cell performances, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is much needed. In this study, Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin films were prepared on molybdenum back contacts deposited on soda-lime glass substrates via three-stage evaporation. Surface analyses via AES and SIMS were used to characterize the CIGS thin films and compare their depth profiles. We determined the average concentration of the matrix elements, Cu, In, Ga, and Se, using ICP-AES, XRF, and EPMA. We also obtained depth profiling results using TOF-SIMS, magnetic sector SIMS and AES, and APT, a sub-nanometer resolution characterization technique that enables three-dimensional elemental mapping. The SIMS technique, with its high detection limit and ability to obtain the profiles of elements in parallel, is a powerful tool for monitoring trace elements in CIGS thin films. To identify impurities in a CIGS layer, the distribution of trace elements was also observed according to depth by SIMS and APT.

  20. Long-term analysis of elemental content in airborne particulate matter by PIXE and positive matrix factorization: Annual trends and seasonal variability during 2003 and 2008

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pražnikar, Jure; Cepak, Franka; Žibert, Janez

    2014-09-01

    In the presented study a comprehensive statistical analysis of the chemical composition of atmospheric particulate matter was carried out. The data were collected from April 2003 to August 2008 with a 7-day time resolution in the Northern Adriatic Port of Koper and analyzed by the Proton Induced X-ray method (PIXE). The Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) analysis of fifteen chemical elements identified six source factors, three natural-regional sources and three local-anthropogenic sources. Heavy machinery, industry and iron ore factor were marked as anthropogenic sources. Heavy machinery source was represented by the elements V, Ni and Cu. The elements Fe and Mn are attributed to the Iron ore source and were explained by the proximity of the bulk-cargo warehouse and the intense handling of iron ore in Port of Koper. The heavy industry source represented by Pb and Zn was the only anthropogenic factor, which shows clear seasonal pattern. In contrast to the local-anthropogenic source factors, natural and regional source factors show significant negative trend. The reduction of the crustal elements Ca, Ti and Sr, joined in a soil source, and sulfur-biomass source, represented by elements K and S, have been attributed to more intense precipitation and to the negative trend of the North Atlantic Oscillation (NAO) index. The negative trend of the Cl and Br elements was in line with the negative trend of the wind speed above the sea surface and the significant sea-wave height.

  1. Detection of Matrix Elements and Trace Impurities in Cu(In, Ga)Se2 Photovoltaic Absorbers Using Surface Analytical Techniques.

    PubMed

    Kim, Min Jung; Lee, Jihye; Kim, Seon Hee; Kim, Haidong; Lee, Kang-Bong; Lee, Yeonhee

    2015-10-01

    Chalcopyrite Cu(In, Ga)Se2 (CIGS) thin films are well known as the next-generation solar cell materials notable for their high absorption coefficient for solar radiation, suitable band gap, and ability for deposition on flexible substrate materials, allowing the production of highly flexible and lightweight solar panels. To improve solar cell performances, a quantitative and depth-resolved elemental analysis of photovoltaic thin films is much needed. In this study, Cu(In, Ga)Se2 thin films were prepared on molybdenum back contacts deposited on soda-lime glass substrates via three-stage evaporation. Surface analyses via AES and SIMS were used to characterize the CIGS thin films and compare their depth profiles. We determined the average concentration of the matrix elements, Cu, In, Ga, and Se, using ICP-AES, XRF, and EPMA. We also obtained depth profiling results using TOF-SIMS, magnetic sector SIMS and AES, and APT, a sub-nanometer resolution characterization technique that enables three-dimensional elemental mapping. The SIMS technique, with its high detection limit and ability to obtain the profiles of elements in parallel, is a powerful tool for monitoring trace elements in CIGS thin films. To identify impurities in a CIGS layer, the distribution of trace elements was also observed according to depth by SIMS and APT. PMID:26726401

  2. The use of cation exchange matrix separation coupled with ICP-MS to directly determine platinum group element (PGE) and other trace element emissions from passenger cars equipped with diesel particulate filters (DPF).

    PubMed

    Cairns, Warren R L; De Boni, Antonella; Cozzi, Giulio; Asti, Massimo; Borla, Edoardo Merlone; Parussa, Flavio; Moretto, Ezio; Cescon, Paolo; Boutron, Claude; Gabrieli, Jacopo; Barbante, Carlo

    2011-03-01

    Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry coupled with cation exchange matrix separation has been optimised for the direct determination of platinum group element (PGE) and trace element emissions from a diesel engine car. After matrix separation method detection limits of 1.6 ng g(-1) for Pd, 0.4 ng g(-1) for Rh and 4.3 ng g(-1) for Pt were achieved, the method was validated against the certified reference material BCR 723, urban road dust. The test vehicle was fitted with new and aged catalytic converters with and without diesel particulate filters (DPF). Samples were collected after three consecutive New European Driving Cycle (NEDC) of the particulate and "soluble" phases using a home-made sampler optimised for trace element analysis. Emission factors for the PGEs ranged from 0.021 ng km(-1) for Rh to 70.5 ng km(-1) for Pt; when a DPF was fitted, the emission factors for the PGEs actually used in the catalysts dropped by up to 97% (for Pt). Trace element emission factors were found to drop by a maximum of 92% for Ni to a minimum of 18% for Y when a DPF was fitted; a new DPF was also found to cause a reduction of up to 86% in the emission of particulate matter.

  3. POTHMF: A program for computing potential curves and matrix elements of the coupled adiabatic radial equations for a hydrogen-like atom in a homogeneous magnetic field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chuluunbaatar, O.; Gusev, A. A.; Gerdt, V. P.; Rostovtsev, V. A.; Vinitsky, S. I.; Abrashkevich, A. G.; Kaschiev, M. S.; Serov, V. V.

    2008-02-01

    A FORTRAN 77 program is presented which calculates with the relative machine precision potential curves and matrix elements of the coupled adiabatic radial equations for a hydrogen-like atom in a homogeneous magnetic field. The potential curves are eigenvalues corresponding to the angular oblate spheroidal functions that compose adiabatic basis which depends on the radial variable as a parameter. The matrix elements of radial coupling are integrals in angular variables of the following two types: product of angular functions and the first derivative of angular functions in parameter, and product of the first derivatives of angular functions in parameter, respectively. The program calculates also the angular part of the dipole transition matrix elements (in the length form) expressed as integrals in angular variables involving product of a dipole operator and angular functions. Moreover, the program calculates asymptotic regular and irregular matrix solutions of the coupled adiabatic radial equations at the end of interval in radial variable needed for solving a multi-channel scattering problem by the generalized R-matrix method. Potential curves and radial matrix elements computed by the POTHMF program can be used for solving the bound state and multi-channel scattering problems. As a test desk, the program is applied to the calculation of the energy values, a short-range reaction matrix and corresponding wave functions with the help of the KANTBP program. Benchmark calculations for the known photoionization cross-sections are presented. Program summaryProgram title:POTHMF Catalogue identifier:AEAA_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEAA_v1_0.html Program obtainable from:CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions:Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:8123 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data

  4. Feature extraction and recognition for rolling element bearing fault utilizing short-time Fourier transform and non-negative matrix factorization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Huizhong; Liang, Lin; Chen, Xiaoguang; Xu, Guanghua

    2015-01-01

    Due to the non-stationary characteristics of vibration signals acquired from rolling element bearing fault, the time-frequency analysis is often applied to describe the local information of these unstable signals smartly. However, it is difficult to classify the high dimensional feature matrix directly because of too large dimensions for many classifiers. This paper combines the concepts of time-frequency distribution(TFD) with non-negative matrix factorization(NMF), and proposes a novel TFD matrix factorization method to enhance representation and identification of bearing fault. Throughout this method, the TFD of a vibration signal is firstly accomplished to describe the localized faults with short-time Fourier transform(STFT). Then, the supervised NMF mapping is adopted to extract the fault features from TFD. Meanwhile, the fault samples can be clustered and recognized automatically by using the clustering property of NMF. The proposed method takes advantages of the NMF in the parts-based representation and the adaptive clustering. The localized fault features of interest can be extracted as well. To evaluate the performance of the proposed method, the 9 kinds of the bearing fault on a test bench is performed. The proposed method can effectively identify the fault severity and different fault types. Moreover, in comparison with the artificial neural network(ANN), NMF yields 99.3% mean accuracy which is much superior to ANN. This research presents a simple and practical resolution for the fault diagnosis problem of rolling element bearing in high dimensional feature space.

  5. Processing of single-walled carbon-nanotube metal matrix composites and a finite element model for the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Kenneth

    In the present investigation, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT or SWNT) reinforced titanium (Ti) matrix composites have been produced by powder metallurgy (PM) and induction heating methods. It has been found that a nickel coating and a fast processing time associated with the induction heating method enables carbon nanotubes to survive the high-temperature (above 1950 K) processing conditions. The result has been a Ti-SWCNT metal-matrix composite (MMC) which is three times stronger and harder than Ti alone, a consequence that has never been accomplished before. This is a promising new development in the application of SWCNT technology to materials science. A mathematical model is given to support the experimental findings.

  6. Tests on the extracted current density of negative hydrogen ions from a single element of the matrix source

    SciTech Connect

    Lishev, St.; Yordanov, D. Shivarova, A.

    2015-04-08

    Concepts for the extraction of volume-produced negative hydrogen ions from a rf matrix source (a matrix of small-radius discharges with a planar-coil inductive driving) are presented and discussed based on experimental results for the current densities of the extracted ions and the co-extracted electrons. The experiment has been carried out in a single discharge of the source: a rf discharge with a radius of 2.25 cm inductively driven by a 3.5-turn planar coil. The length of the discharge tube, the area of the reference electrode inserted in the discharge volume, the discharge modes, the magnetic filter and its position along the discharge length, the position of the permanent magnets for the separation of the co-extracted electrons from the extracted ions in the extraction device and the bias applied to its first electrode are considered as factors influencing the extracted currents of negative ions.

  7. A unified derivation of Hamiltonian and optical transition matrix elements for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules using transformation tools of modern quantum mechanics.

    PubMed

    Schwenke, David W

    2015-04-14

    In this work, we systematically derive the matrix elements of the nuclear rotation operators for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules in a parity adapted Hund's case (a) basis. Our expressions are valid for an arbitrary number of electrons and arbitrary electronic configurations. The common ad hoc sign changes of angular momentum operators are shown to be equivalent to a change in phase of basis functions. We show how to relate this basis to that required for scattering calculations. We also give the expressions for Einstein A coefficients for electric dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic dipole transitions.

  8. A unified derivation of Hamiltonian and optical transition matrix elements for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules using transformation tools of modern quantum mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Schwenke, David W.

    2015-04-14

    In this work, we systematically derive the matrix elements of the nuclear rotation operators for open shell diatomic and polyatomic molecules in a parity adapted Hund’s case (a) basis. Our expressions are valid for an arbitrary number of electrons and arbitrary electronic configurations. The common ad hoc sign changes of angular momentum operators are shown to be equivalent to a change in phase of basis functions. We show how to relate this basis to that required for scattering calculations. We also give the expressions for Einstein A coefficients for electric dipole, electric quadrupole, and magnetic dipole transitions.

  9. Nuclear matrix elements for 0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays: Comparative analysis of the QRPA, shell model and IBM predictions

    SciTech Connect

    Civitarese, Osvaldo; Suhonen, Jouni

    2013-12-30

    In this work we report on general properties of the nuclear matrix elements involved in the neutrinoless double β{sup −} decays (0νβ{sup −}β{sup −} decays) of several nuclei. A summary of the values of the NMEs calculated along the years by the Jyväskylä-La Plata collaboration is presented. These NMEs, calculated in the framework of the quasiparticle random phase approximation (QRPA), are compared with those of the other available calculations, like the Shell Model (ISM) and the interacting boson model (IBA-2)

  10. Matrix elements for the ground-state to ground-state 2{nu}{beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -} decay of Te isotopes in a hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, D. R.; Civitarese, O.

    2010-01-15

    Theoretical matrix elements, for the ground-state to ground-state two-neutrino double-{beta}-decay mode (2{nu}{beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -}gs->gs) of {sup 128,130}Te isotopes, are calculated within a formalism that describes interactions between neutrons in a superfluid phase and protons in a normal phase. The elementary degrees of freedom of the model are proton-pair modes and pairs of protons and quasineutrons. The calculation is basically a parameter-free one, because all relevant parameters are fixed from the phenomenology. A comparison with the available experimental data is presented.

  11. FMO3-LCMO study of electron transfer coupling matrix element and pathway: Application to hole transfer between two tryptophans through cis- and trans-polyproline-linker systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitoh-Nishioka, Hirotaka; Ando, Koji

    2016-09-01

    The linear-combination of fragment molecular orbitals with three-body correction (FMO3-LCMO) is examined for electron transfer (ET) coupling matrix elements and ET pathway analysis, with application to hole transfer between two tryptophans bridged by cis- and trans-polyproline linker conformations. A projection to the minimal-valence-plus-core FMO space was found to give sufficient accuracy with significant reduction of computational cost while avoiding the problem of linear dependence of FMOs stemming from involvement of bond detached atoms.

  12. Apparatus and method for identification of matrix materials in which transuranic elements are embedded using thermal neutron capture gamma-ray emission

    DOEpatents

    Close, D.A.; Franks, L.A.; Kocimski, S.M.

    1984-08-16

    An invention is described that enables the quantitative simultaneous identification of the matrix materials in which fertile and fissile nuclides are embedded to be made along with the quantitative assay of the fertile and fissile materials. The invention also enables corrections for any absorption of neutrons by the matrix materials and by the measurement apparatus by the measurement of the prompt and delayed neutron flux emerging from a sample after the sample is interrogated by simultaneously applied neutrons and gamma radiation. High energy electrons are directed at a first target to produce gamma radiation. A second target receives the resulting pulsed gamma radiation and produces neutrons from the interaction with the gamma radiation. These neutrons are slowed by a moderator surrounding the sample and bathe the sample uniformly, generating second gamma radiation in the interaction. The gamma radiation is then resolved and quantitatively detected, providing a spectroscopic signature of the constituent elements contained in the matrix and in the materials within the vicinity of the sample. (LEW)

  13. Induction of transcription within chromosomal DNA loops flanked by MAR elements causes an association of loop DNA with the nuclear matrix

    PubMed Central

    Iarovaia, Olga V.; Akopov, Sergey B.; Nikolaev, Lev G.; Sverdlov, Eugene D.; Razin, Sergey V.

    2005-01-01

    The spatial organization of an ∼170 kb region of human chromosome 19, including CD22 and GPR40–GPR43 genes, was studied using in situ hybridization of a set of cosmid and PAC probes with nuclear halos prepared from proliferating and differentiated HL60 cells. The whole region under study was found to be looped out into the nuclear halo in proliferating cells. It is likely that the loop observed was attached to the nuclear matrix via MAR elements present at the flanks of the area under study. Upon dimethyl sulfoxide-induced differentiation of the cells the looped fragment became associated with the nuclear matrix. This change in the spatial organization correlated with the activation of transcription of at least two (CD22 and GPR43) genes present within the loop. The data obtained are discussed in the framework of the hypothesis postulating that the spatial organization of chromosomal DNA is maintained via constitutive (basic) and facultative (transcription-related) interactions of the latter with the nuclear matrix. PMID:16049024

  14. Induction of transcription within chromosomal DNA loops flanked by MAR elements causes an association of loop DNA with the nuclear matrix.

    PubMed

    Iarovaia, Olga V; Akopov, Sergey B; Nikolaev, Lev G; Sverdlov, Eugene D; Razin, Sergey V

    2005-01-01

    The spatial organization of an approximately 170 kb region of human chromosome 19, including CD22 and GPR40-GPR43 genes, was studied using in situ hybridization of a set of cosmid and PAC probes with nuclear halos prepared from proliferating and differentiated HL60 cells. The whole region under study was found to be looped out into the nuclear halo in proliferating cells. It is likely that the loop observed was attached to the nuclear matrix via MAR elements present at the flanks of the area under study. Upon dimethyl sulfoxide-induced differentiation of the cells the looped fragment became associated with the nuclear matrix. This change in the spatial organization correlated with the activation of transcription of at least two (CD22 and GPR43) genes present within the loop. The data obtained are discussed in the framework of the hypothesis postulating that the spatial organization of chromosomal DNA is maintained via constitutive (basic) and facultative (transcription-related) interactions of the latter with the nuclear matrix. PMID:16049024

  15. Evaluation of matrix elements l angle n , l t bar r sup. beta. t bar n , l prime r angle for arbitrary. beta

    SciTech Connect

    Shertzer, J. )

    1991-09-01

    Simple expressions are obtained for diagonal matrix elements {l angle}{ital n},{ital l}{vert bar}{ital r}{sup {beta}}{vert bar}{ital n},{ital l}{r angle}, for arbitrary {beta} and fixed {ital l}, where {ital l}={ital n}{minus}1, {ital n}{minus}2, {ital n}{minus}3, {ital n}{minus}4, {ital n}{minus}5, {ital n}{minus}6, and {ital n}{minus}7. Off-diagonal matrix elements are also calculated for the special cases {l angle}{ital n},{ital l}{vert bar}{ital r}{sup {beta}}{vert bar}{ital n},{ital l}{plus minus}1{r angle} and {l angle}{ital n},{ital l}{vert bar}{ital r}{sup {beta}}{vert bar}{ital n},{ital l}{plus minus}2{r angle}. The expressions are valid for any real {beta}{ge}{minus}({ital l}+{ital l}{prime}+2).

  16. Relativistic correction to e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+gg at B factories and constraint on color-octet matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    He Zhiguo; Fan Ying; Chao Kuangta

    2010-03-01

    We calculate the relativistic correction to J/{psi} production in the color-singlet process e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+gg at B factories. We employ the nonrelativistic QCD factorization approach, where the short-distance coefficients are calculated perturbatively and the long-distance matrix elements are extracted from the decays of J/{psi} into e{sup +}e{sup -} and light hadrons. We find that the O(v{sup 2}) relativistic correction can enhance the cross section by a factor of 20-30%, comparable to the enhancement due to the O({alpha}{sub s}) radiative correction obtained earlier. Combining the relativistic correction with the QCD radiative correction, we find that the color-singlet contribution to e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+gg can saturate the latest observed cross section {sigma}(e{sup +}e{sup -{yields}}J/{psi}+X{sub non-cc})=0.43{+-}0.09{+-}0.09 pb by Belle, thus leaving little room to the color-octet contributions. This gives a very stringent constraint on the color-octet contribution, and may imply that the values of color-octet matrix elements are much smaller than expected earlier by using the naive velocity scaling rules or extracted from fitting experimental data with the leading-order calculations.

  17. Electrochemical sensor for dopamine based on imprinted silica matrix-poly(aniline boronic acid) hybrid as recognition element.

    PubMed

    Li, Jian; Zhang, Ning; Sun, Qingqing; Bai, Zhanming; Zheng, Jianbin

    2016-10-01

    A novel imprinted silica matrix-poly(aniline boronic acid) hybrid for electrochemical detection of dopamine (DA) was developed. Boronic acid functionalized conducting polymer was electrochemically prepared on Au electrode. The number of covalent binding sites toward DA templates was controlled by potential cycles. A precursory sol solution of ammonium fluorosilicate (as cross-linking monomer) containing DA was spin-coated on the polymer modified electrode. Under NH3 atmosphere, the hydroxyl ions were generated in the solution and catalyzed the hydrolysis of fluorosilicate to form silica matrix. After this aqueous sol-gel process, an inorganic framework around the DA template was formed and the imprinted hybrid for DA was also produced. As revealed by scanning electron microscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry characterization, DA was embedded in the imprinted hybrid successfully. The affinity and selectivity of the imprinted hybrid were also characterized by cyclic voltammetry. The imprinted hybrid showed higher affinity for DA than that for epinephrine, and little or no affinity for ascorbic acid and uric acid due to the combined effects of covalent interaction, cavities matching and electrostatic repulsion. The imprinted hybrid sensor exhibited a quick response (within 5min) to DA in the concentration range from 0.05 to 500μmolL(-1) with a detection limit of 0.018μmolL(-1). The prepared sensor was also applied to detect DA in real samples with a satisfactory result. PMID:27474321

  18. A Fast, Robust Matrix-Free Multi-level Preconditioner for Hybrid Marker-In-Cell Q2-P1 Finite Element Discretisations with Applications to Lithospheric Deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    May, D. A.; Le Pourhiet, L.

    2012-12-01

    The use of a mixed finite element formulation to discretise Stokes equations, coupled with a particle based Lagrangian representation of the material lithology is a common numerical technique employed within geodynamics to study large deformation processes. The extension of this methodology to enable high-resolution, three-dimensional simulations still represents a number of significant computational challenges. Of most concern are the high computational memory requirements of the favoured Q2-P1 element, and the development of efficient, 'light-weight' and robust linear and non-linear solvers, which are performant on multi-core, massively parallel computational hardware. Our objective is to develop a 'cheap' and efficient methodology utilizing the mixed element Q2-P1, to study 3D geodynamic processes including subduction, rifting and folding with the inclusion of visco-plastic materials. For this class of problems, careful treatment of all of the aforementioned technical challenges is essential to achieve high resolution simulations. Here, I describe a flexible methodology which aims to rectify all of these issues. The key to the approach is 1) always pose the discrete problem in defect-correction form and 2) utilise a mixture of assembled and matrix-free operations to evaluate the non-linear residual and apply the operators and smoothers required to define the multi-level preconditioner for the Jacobian. The performance characteristics of the matrix-free, multi-level preconditioning strategy is demonstrated by considering several 3D visco-plastic models. The robustness of the preconditioner and non-linear solver with respect to the viscosity contrast and the topology of the viscosity field, together with the parallel scalability will be demonstrated.

  19. Measurement of the Top Quark Mass at D0 Run II with the Matrix Element Method in the Lepton+Jets Final State

    SciTech Connect

    Schieferdecker, Philipp

    2005-08-05

    The mass of the top quark is a fundamental parameter of the Standard Model. Its precise knowledge yields valuable insights into unresolved phenomena in and beyond the Standard Model. A measurement of the top quark mass with the matrix element method in the lepton+jets final state in D0 Run II is presented. Events are selected requiring an isolated energetic charged lepton (electron or muon), significant missing transverse energy, and exactly four calorimeter jets. For each event, the probabilities to originate from the signal and background processes are calculated based on the measured kinematics, the object resolutions and the respective matrix elements. The jet energy scale is known to be the dominant source of systematic uncertainty. The reference scale for the mass measurement is derived from Monte Carlo events. The matrix element likelihood is defined as a function of both, m{sub top} and jet energy scale JES, where the latter represents a scale factor with respect to the reference scale. The top mass is obtained from a two-dimensional correlated fit, and the likelihood yields both the statistical and jet energy scale uncertainty. Using a dataset of 320 pb-1 of D0 Run II data, the mass of the top quark is measured to be: m$ℓ+jets\\atop{top}$ = 169.5 ± 4.4(stat. + JES)$+1.7\\atop{-1.6}$(syst.) GeV; m$e+jets\\atop{top}$ = 168.8 ± 6.0(stat. + JES)$+1.9\\atop{-1.9}$(syst.) GeV; m$μ+jets\\atop{top}$ = 172.3 ± 9.6(stat.+JES)$+3.4\\atop{-3.3}$(syst.) GeV. The jet energy scale measurement in the ℓ+jets sample yields JES = 1.034 ± 0.034, suggesting good consistency of the data with the simulation. The measurement forecasts significant improvements to the total top mass uncertainty during Run II before the startup of the LHC, as the data sample will grow by a factor of ten and D0's tracking capabilities will be employed in jet energy reconstruction and flavor identification.

  20. Top Quark Produced Through the Electroweak Force: Discovery Using the Matrix Element Analysis and Search for Heavy Gauge Bosons Using Boosted Decision Trees

    SciTech Connect

    Pangilinan, Monica

    2010-05-01

    The top quark produced through the electroweak channel provides a direct measurement of the Vtb element in the CKM matrix which can be viewed as a transition rate of a top quark to a bottom quark. This production channel of top quark is also sensitive to different theories beyond the Standard Model such as heavy charged gauged bosons termed W'. This thesis measures the cross section of the electroweak produced top quark using a technique based on using the matrix elements of the processes under consideration. The technique is applied to 2.3 fb-1 of data from the D0 detector. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the signal and background model using Bayesian statistics, we measure the cross section of the top quark produced through the electroweak mechanism σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.30-1.20+0.98 pb. The measured result corresponds to a 4.9σ Gaussian-equivalent significance. By combining this analysis with other analyses based on the Bayesian Neural Network (BNN) and Boosted Decision Tree (BDT) method, the measured cross section is 3.94 ± 0.88 pb with a significance of 5.0σ, resulting in the discovery of electroweak produced top quarks. Using this measured cross section and constraining |Vtb| < 1, the 95% confidence level (C.L.) lower limit is |Vtb| > 0.78. Additionally, a search is made for the production of W' using the same samples from the electroweak produced top quark. An analysis based on the BDT method is used to separate the signal from expected backgrounds. No significant excess is found and 95% C.L. upper limits on the production cross section are set for W' with masses within 600-950 GeV. For four general models of W{prime} boson production using decay channel W' → t$\\bar{p}$, the lower mass limits are the following: M(W'L with SM couplings) > 840 GeV; M(W'R) > 880 GeV or 890 GeV if the right-handed neutrino is

  1. Exact analytical expressions and numerical analysis of two-center Franck Condon factors and matrix elements over displaced harmonic oscillator wave functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guseinov, I. I.; Mamedov, B. A.; Ekenoğlu, A. S.

    2006-08-01

    A detailed study is undertaken, using various techniques, in deriving analytical formula of Franck-Condon overlap integrals and matrix elements of various functions of power (x), exponential (exp(-2cx)) and Gaussian (exp(-cx)) over displaced harmonic oscillator wave functions with arbitrary frequencies. The results suggested by previous experience with various algorithms are presented in mathematically compact form and consist of generalization. The relationships obtained are valid for the arbitrary values of parameters and the computation results are in good agreement with the literature. The numerical results illustrate clearly a further reduction in calculation times. Program summaryProgram name:FRANCK Catalogue identifier:ADXX_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADXX_v1_0 Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Programming language:Mathematica 5.0 Computer:Pentium M 1.4 GHz Operating system:Mathematica 5.0 RAM:512 MB No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.:825 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.:16 344 Distribution format:tar.gz Nature of problem:The programs calculate the Franck-Condon factors and matrix elements over displaced harmonic oscillator wave functions with arbitrary quantum numbers (n,n), frequencies (a,a) and displacement (d) for the various functions of power (x), exponential (exp(-2cx)) and Gaussian (exp(-cx)). Solution method:The Franck-Condon factors and matrix elements are evaluated using binomial coefficients and basic integrals. Restrictions:The results obtained by the present programs show great numerical stability for arbitrary quantum numbers (n,n), frequencies (a,a) and displacement (d). Unusual features:None Running time:As an example, for the value of Franck-Condon Overlap Integral I(d;α,α)=0.004405001887372332 with n=3, n=2, a=4, a=3, d=2, the compilation time in a Pentium M 1.4 GHz computer is 0.18 s. Execution

  2. Fault diagnosis of rolling element bearing based on S transform and gray level co-occurrence matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Minghang; Tang, Baoping; Tan, Qian

    2015-08-01

    Time-frequency analysis is an effective tool to extract machinery health information contained in non-stationary vibration signals. Various time-frequency analysis methods have been proposed and successfully applied to machinery fault diagnosis. However, little research has been done on bearing fault diagnosis using texture features extracted from time-frequency representations (TFRs), although they may contain plenty of sensitive information highly related to fault pattern. Therefore, to make full use of the textural information contained in the TFRs, this paper proposes a novel fault diagnosis method based on S transform, gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and multi-class support vector machine (Multi-SVM). Firstly, S transform is chosen to generate the TFRs due to its advantages of providing frequency-dependent resolution while keeping a direct relationship with the Fourier spectrum. Secondly, the famous GLCM-based texture features are extracted for capturing fault pattern information. Finally, as a classifier which has good discrimination and generalization abilities, Multi-SVM is used for the classification. Experimental results indicate that the GLCM-based texture features extracted from TFRs can identify bearing fault patterns accurately, and provide higher accuracies than the traditional time-domain and frequency-domain features, wavelet packet node energy or two-direction 2D linear discriminant analysis based features of the same TFRs in most cases.

  3. Identification of positive and negative regulatory elements governing cell-type-specific expression of the neural cell adhesion molecule gene.

    PubMed Central

    Hirsch, M R; Gaugler, L; Deagostini-Bazin, H; Bally-Cuif, L; Goridis, C

    1990-01-01

    The neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) is one of the most prevalent cell adhesion molecules in vertebrates. Its expression is subject to complex cell-type- and developmental-stage-dependent regulation. To study this regulation at the level of transcription, we analyzed the promoter region of the mouse NCAM gene. The NCAM promoter did not contain a typical TATA box. Transcription started at several sites that were used indiscriminately by different cell types, implying that the different NCAM isoforms are expressed from a single promoter. Sequences responsible for both promotion and inhibition of transcription resided within 840 base pairs upstream of the main transcriptional start site. The sequence from positions -645 to -37 relative to the translation initiation site directed high levels of expression in NCAM-expressing N2A cells. The same fragment was six times less active but still significantly active in L cells, but this activity was repressed by inclusion of an additional upstream segment. We mapped eight domains of interactions with nuclear proteins within the 840-base-pair region. The segment with maximum promoter activity contained two adjacent footprints, the occupation of which appeared to be mutually exclusive. One of them corresponded to an Sp1-factor-binding consensus site, the other one bound a factor with nuclear factor I activity. The single protected domain in the fragment harboring a repressor activity consisted of a GGA repeat resembling negative regulatory elements in other promoters. Three adjacent binding sites occupied an A + T-rich segment and contained ATTA motifs also found in the recognition elements of homeodomain proteins. These results show that negative and positive elements interact to regulate the tissue-specific patterns of expression of the NCAM gene and indicate that a factor related to nuclear factor I is involved in its transcriptional control. Images PMID:2325642

  4. Relations between matrix elements of different weak interactions and interpretation of the parity-nonconserving and electron electric-dipole-moment measurements in atoms and molecules

    SciTech Connect

    Dzuba, V. A.; Flambaum, V. V.; Harabati, C.

    2011-11-15

    The relations between matrix elements of different (P,T)-odd weak interactions are derived. We demonstrate that similar relations hold for parity-nonconserving transition amplitudes and electron electric dipole moments (EDMs) of atoms and molecules. This allows one to express P- and T-odd effects in many-electron systems caused by different symmetry-breaking mechanisms via each other using simple analytical formulas. We use these relations for the interpretation of the anapole moment measurements in cesium and thallium and for the analysis of the relative contributions of the scalar-pseudoscalar CP-odd weak interaction and electron EDMs to the EDMs of Cs, Tl, Fr, and other atoms and many polar molecules (YbF, PbO, ThO, etc.). Model-independent limits on electron EDMs and the parameter of the scalar-pseudoscalar CP-odd interaction are found from the analysis of the EDM measurements for Tl and YbF.

  5. NUMEN Project @ LNS : Heavy Ions Double Charge Exchange as a tool towards the 0νββ Nuclear Matrix Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agodi, C.; Cappuzzello, F.; Bonanno, D. L.; Bongiovanni, D. G.; Branchina, V.; Calabrese, S.; Calabretta, L.; Calanna, A.; Carbone, D.; Cavallaro, M.; Colonna, M.; Foti, A.; Finocchiaro, P.; Greco, V.; Lanzalone, G.; Lo Presti, D.; Longhitano, F.; Muoio, A.; Pandola, L.; Rifuggiato, D.; Tudisco, S.

    2016-06-01

    The NUMEN Project, proposed at INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud (LNS) in Catania, has the aim to access the nuclear matrix elements, entering the expression of the life time of double beta decay, by relevant cross sections of double charge exchange reactions. The basic point, on which it is based this innovative technique, is the coincidence of the initial and final state wave-functions in the two classes of processes and the similarity of the transition operators. A key aspect of the Project is the use of MAGNEX large acceptance magnetic spectrometer, for the detection of the ejectiles, and of the INFN LNS K800 Superconducting Cyclotron (CS), for the acceleration of the required high resolution and low emittance heavy-ion beams.

  6. Finite-volume corrections to the CP-odd nucleon matrix elements of the electromagnetic current from the QCD vacuum angle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akan, Tarik; Guo, Feng-Kun; Meißner, Ulf-G.

    2014-09-01

    Nucleon electric dipole moments originating from strong CP-violation are being calculated by several groups using lattice QCD. We revisit the finite volume corrections to the CP-odd nucleon matrix elements of the electromagnetic current, which can be related to the electric dipole moments in the continuum, in the framework of chiral perturbation theory up to next-to-leading order taking into account the breaking of Lorentz symmetry. A chiral extrapolation of the recent lattice results of both the neutron and proton electric dipole moments is performed, which results in dn=(-2.7±1.2)×10-16eθ0 cm and dp=(2.1±1.2)×10-16eθ0 cm.

  7. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-01

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  8. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the lepton+jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and in situ Jet Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Brucken, E.; Devoto, F.; Mehtala, P.; Orava, R.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Casal, B.; Gomez, G.; Palencia, E.; Rodrigo, T.; Ruiz, A.; Scodellaro, L.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Amerio, S.; Dorigo, T.; Gresele, A.; Lazzizzera, I.; Amidei, D.; Campbell, M.

    2010-12-17

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} is obtained using a sample of tt events from pp collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter {Delta}{sub JES} used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events in 5.6 fb{sup -1} of integrated luminosity, a value of m{sub t}=173.0{+-}1.2 GeV/c{sup 2} is measured.

  9. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the lepton+jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and in situ Jet Energy Calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, G.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Brigliadori, L.; Brisuda, A.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Bucciantonio, M.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; D'Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rubbo, F.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber, I.; Siegrist, J.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sissakian, A.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; Denis, R. St.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Volobouev, I.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.

    2010-12-01

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass mt is obtained using a sample of tt¯ events from pp¯ collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of mt and a parameter ΔJES used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events in 5.6fb-1 of integrated luminosity, a value of mt=173.0±1.2GeV/c2 is measured.

  10. Constraint on 0νββ matrix elements from a novel decay channel of the scissors mode: the case of 154Gd.

    PubMed

    Beller, J; Pietralla, N; Barea, J; Elvers, M; Endres, J; Fransen, C; Kotila, J; Möller, O; Richter, A; Rodríguez, T R; Romig, C; Savran, D; Scheck, M; Schnorrenberger, L; Sonnabend, K; Werner, V; Zilges, A; Zweidinger, M

    2013-10-25

    The nucleus (154)Gd is located in a region of the nuclear chart where rapid changes of nuclear deformation occur as a function of particle number. It was investigated using a combination of γ-ray scattering experiments and a γγ-coincidence study following electron capture decay of (154)Tb(m). A novel decay channel from the scissors mode to the first excited 0(+) state was observed. Its transition strength was determined to B(M1;1(sc)(+)→0(2)(+))=0.031(4)μ(N)(2). The properties of the scissors mode of (154)Gd imply a much larger matrix element than previously thought for the neutrinoless double-β decay to the 0(2)(+) state in such a shape-transitional region. Theory indicates an even larger effect for (150)Nd.

  11. First-order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: A Lagrangian formulation at the CIS, RPA, TD-HF, and TD-DFT levels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhendong; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-07-07

    Analytic expressions for the first-order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between electronically excited states are first formulated exactly via both time-independent equation of motion and time-dependent response theory, and are then approximated at the configuration interaction singles, particle-hole/particle-particle random phase approximation, and time-dependent density functional theory/Hartree-Fock levels of theory. Note that, to get the Pulay terms arising from the derivatives of basis functions, the standard response theory designed for electronic perturbations has to be extended to nuclear derivatives. The results are further recast into a Lagrangian form that is similar to that for excited-state energy gradients and allows to use atomic orbital based direct algorithms for large molecules.

  12. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-28

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  13. Time-dependent wave-packet method for the complete determination of S-matrix elements for reactive molecular collisions in three dimensions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Judson, Richard S.; Kouri, Donald J.; Neuhauser, Daniel; Baer, Michael

    1990-01-01

    An alternative time-dependent wave-packet method for treating three-dimensional gas phase reactive atom-diatom collisions is presented. The method employs a nonreactive body-frame wave packet propagation procedure, made possible by judicious use of absorbing optical potentials, a novel scheme for interpolating the wave function from coordinates in one arrangement to those in another and the fact that the time-dependent Schroedinger equation is an initial-value problem. The last feature makes possible a computationally viable and accurate procedure for changing from one arrangement's coordinates to another. In addition, the method allows the determination of S-matrix elements over a wide range of energies from a single wave-packet propagation. The method is illustrated by carrying out detailed calculations of inelastic and reactive scattering in the H + H2 system using the Liu-Siegbahn-Truhlar-Horowitz potential surface.

  14. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the Lepton + Jets Channel Using a Matrix Element Method and \\textit{in situ} Jet Energy Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; /Waseda U. /Dubna, JINR

    2010-10-01

    A precision measurement of the top quark mass m{sub t} is obtained using a sample of t{bar t} events from p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron with the CDF II detector. Selected events require an electron or muon, large missing transverse energy, and exactly four high-energy jets, at least one of which is tagged as coming from a b quark. A likelihood is calculated using a matrix element method with quasi-Monte Carlo integration taking into account finite detector resolution and jet mass effects. The event likelihood is a function of m{sub t} and a parameter {Delta}{sub JES} used to calibrate the jet energy scale in situ. Using a total of 1087 events, a value of m{sub t} = 173.0 {+-} 1.2 GeV/c{sup 2} is measured.

  15. Distinct Structural Elements Govern the Folding, Stability, and Catalysis in the Outer Membrane Enzyme PagP.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Bharat Ramasubramanian; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-09-01

    The outer membrane enzyme PagP is indispensable for lipid A palmitoylation in Gram-negative bacteria and has been implicated in resistance to host immune defenses. PagP possesses an unusual structure for an integral membrane protein, with a highly dynamic barrel domain that is tilted with respect to the membrane normal. In addition, it contains an N-terminal amphipathic helix. Recent functional and structural studies have shown that these molecular factors are critical for PagP to carry out its function in the challenging environment of the bacterial outer membrane. However, the precise contributions of the N-helix to folding and stability and residues that can influence catalytic rates remain to be addressed. Here, we identify a sequence-dependent stabilizing role for the N-terminal helix of PagP in the measured thermodynamic stability of the barrel. Using chimeric barrel sequences, we show that the Escherichia coli PagP N-terminal helix confers 2-fold greater stability to the Salmonella typhimurium barrel. Further, we find that the W78F substitution in S. typhimurium causes a nearly 20-fold increase in the specific activity in vitro for the phospholipase reaction, compared to that of E. coli PagP. Here, phenylalanine serves as a key regulator of catalysis, possibly by increasing the reaction rate. Through coevolution analysis, we detect an interaction network between seemingly unrelated segments of this membrane protein. Exchanging the structural and functional features between homologous PagP enzymes from E. coli and S. typhimurium has provided us with an understanding of the molecular factors governing PagP stability and function. PMID:27525547

  16. Distinct Structural Elements Govern the Folding, Stability, and Catalysis in the Outer Membrane Enzyme PagP.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Bharat Ramasubramanian; Mahalakshmi, Radhakrishnan

    2016-09-01

    The outer membrane enzyme PagP is indispensable for lipid A palmitoylation in Gram-negative bacteria and has been implicated in resistance to host immune defenses. PagP possesses an unusual structure for an integral membrane protein, with a highly dynamic barrel domain that is tilted with respect to the membrane normal. In addition, it contains an N-terminal amphipathic helix. Recent functional and structural studies have shown that these molecular factors are critical for PagP to carry out its function in the challenging environment of the bacterial outer membrane. However, the precise contributions of the N-helix to folding and stability and residues that can influence catalytic rates remain to be addressed. Here, we identify a sequence-dependent stabilizing role for the N-terminal helix of PagP in the measured thermodynamic stability of the barrel. Using chimeric barrel sequences, we show that the Escherichia coli PagP N-terminal helix confers 2-fold greater stability to the Salmonella typhimurium barrel. Further, we find that the W78F substitution in S. typhimurium causes a nearly 20-fold increase in the specific activity in vitro for the phospholipase reaction, compared to that of E. coli PagP. Here, phenylalanine serves as a key regulator of catalysis, possibly by increasing the reaction rate. Through coevolution analysis, we detect an interaction network between seemingly unrelated segments of this membrane protein. Exchanging the structural and functional features between homologous PagP enzymes from E. coli and S. typhimurium has provided us with an understanding of the molecular factors governing PagP stability and function.

  17. A fault diagnosis scheme of rolling element bearing based on near-field acoustic holography and gray level co-occurrence matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenbo; Jiang, Weikang; Wu, Haijun; Hou, Junjian

    2012-07-01

    Vibration signal analysis is the most widely used technique in condition monitoring or fault diagnosis, whereas in some cases vibration-based diagnosis is restrained because of its contact measurement. Acoustic-based diagnosis (ABD) with non-contact measurement has received little attention, although sound field may contain abundant information related to fault pattern. A new scheme of ABD for rolling element bearing fault diagnosis based on near-field acoustic holography (NAH) and gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) is presented in this paper. It focuses on applying the distribution information of sound field to bearing fault diagnosis. A series of rolling element bearings with different types of fault are experimentally studied. Sound fields and corresponding acoustic images in different bearing conditions are obtained by fast Fourier transform (FFT) based NAH. GLCM features are extracted for capturing fault pattern information underlying sound fields. The optimal feature subset selected by improved F-score is fed into multi-class support vector machine (SVM) for fault pattern identification. The feasibility and effectiveness of our proposed scheme is demonstrated on the good experimental results and the comparison with the traditional ABD method. Considering test cost, the quantized level and the number of GLCM features for each characteristic frequency is suggested to be 4 and 32, respectively, with the satisfactory accuracy rate 97.5%.

  18. Reduction of Matrix-Induced Oxide Interferences on Rare Earth Elements and Platinum Using a Desolvating Nebulizer System with Quadrupole Inductively Coupled Plasma Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, F.

    2013-12-01

    This paper will examine the use of a specialized low-flow desolvating nebulizer system for reduction of oxide mass spectral interferences that can occur in quadrupole inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (Q-ICP-MS). This nebulizer system uses an inert low-flow nebulizer (100 microliters/min) coupled to an inert, heated membrane desolvator for efficient water vapor removal before sample aerosol injection to the Q-ICP-MS instrument. Water vapor from conventional nebulizer / spray chamber systems used with Q-ICP-MS can cause numerous mass spectral interferences. One general example is metal oxides formed from the combination of oxygen (from injected water) with sample matrix components. Two specific examples of metal oxide interferences will be investigated with and without membrane desolvation: Ba and Ce oxides on several low-mass rare earth elements (Sm, Eu, and Gd) and Hf oxides on platinum. Rare earth elements are critically important components of modern electronics (ex. magnets, lasers, cell phones, computers) and platinum is a widely used catalyst. Figures of merit for both a conventional nebulizer/spray chamber and the desolvating nebulizer systems will include operating conditions, interference intensities and reduction factors, background equivalent concentrations (BECs), and instrument detection limits (IDLs).

  19. Source apportionment of trace element pollution in surface sediments using positive matrix factorization combined support vector machines: application to the Jinjiang River, China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiyang; Teng, Yanguo; Wang, Jinsheng; Song, Liuting; Zuo, Rui

    2013-03-01

    In this study, a method of positive matrix factorization (PMF) combined support vector machines (SVMs) was adopted to identify possible sources and apportion contributions for trace element pollution in surface sediments from the Jinjiang River, Southeastern China. Utilizing diagnostics tools, four significant factors were extracted from sediment samplers, which were collected in December 2010 at 15 different sites. By treating source identification as a pattern recognition problem, the factor loadings derived from PMF were classified by SVM classifiers which have been trained and validated with fingerprints of eight potential source categories. Using SVM, industrial wastewater from lead ore mining and metal handcraft manufacture, atmospheric deposition, and natural background were identified as main sources of trace element pollution in surface sediments from the Jinjiang River, which were affirmed by visually comparing compound patterns and the differences between the predicted and actual fractional compositions. Apportionment results showed that source of lead ore mining made the largest contribution (33.62 %), followed by atmospheric deposition (30.99 %), metal handcraft manufacture (30.09 %), and natural background (5.29 %).

  20. Determination of elemental constituents in different matrix materials and flow injection studies by the electrolyte cathode glow discharge technique with a new design

    SciTech Connect

    Shekhar, R.; Karunasagar, D.; Ranjit, M.; Arunachalam, J.

    2009-10-15

    An open-to-air type electrolyte cathode discharge (ELCAD) has been developed with a new design. The present configuration leads to a stable plasma even at low flow rates (0.96 mL/min). Plasma fluctuations arising from the variations in the gap between solid anode and liquid cathode were eliminated by providing a V-groove to the liquid glass-capillary. Cathode (ground) connection is given to the solution at the V-groove itself. Interfaced to atomic emission spectrometry (AES), its analytical performance is evaluated. The optimized molarity of the solution is 0.2 M. The analytical response curves for Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn demonstrated good linearity. The limit of detections of Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn are determined to be 17, 11, 5, 45, 15, 28, and 3 ng mL{sup -1}. At an integration time of 0.3 s, the relative standard deviation (RSD) values of the acid blank solutions are found to be less than 10% for the elements Ca, Cu, Cd, Hg, Fe, and Zn and 18% for Pb. The method is applied for the determination of the elemental constituents in different matrix materials such as tuna fish (IAEA-350), oyster tissue (NIST SRM 1566a), and coal fly ash (CFA SRM 1633b). The obtained results are in good agreement with the certified values. The accuracy is found to be between 7% and 0.6% for major to trace levels of constituent elements and the precision between 11% and 0.6%. For the injection of 100 {mu} L of 200 ng mL{sup -1} mercury solution at the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, the flow injection studies resulted in the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 8%, concentration detection limit of 10 ng/mL, and mass detection limit of 1 ng for mercury.

  1. Determination of elemental constituents in different matrix materials and flow injection studies by the electrolyte cathode glow discharge technique with a new design.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, R; Karunasagar, D; Ranjit, Manjusha; Arunachalam, J

    2009-10-01

    An open-to-air type electrolyte cathode discharge (ELCAD) has been developed with a new design. The present configuration leads to a stable plasma even at low flow rates (0.96 mL/min). Plasma fluctuations arising from the variations in the gap between solid anode and liquid cathode were eliminated by providing a V-groove to the liquid glass-capillary. Cathode (ground) connection is given to the solution at the V-groove itself. Interfaced to atomic emission spectrometry (AES), its analytical performance is evaluated. The optimized molarity of the solution is 0.2 M. The analytical response curves for Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn demonstrated good linearity. The limit of detections of Ca, Cu, Cd, Pb, Hg, Fe, and Zn are determined to be 17, 11, 5, 45, 15, 28, and 3 ng mL(-1). At an integration time of 0.3 s, the relative standard deviation (RSD) values of the acid blank solutions are found to be less than 10% for the elements Ca, Cu, Cd, Hg, Fe, and Zn and 18% for Pb. The method is applied for the determination of the elemental constituents in different matrix materials such as tuna fish (IAEA-350), oyster tissue (NIST SRM 1566a), and coal fly ash (CFA SRM 1633b). The obtained results are in good agreement with the certified values. The accuracy is found to be between 7% and 0.6% for major to trace levels of constituent elements and the precision between 11% and 0.6%. For the injection of 100 microL of 200 ng mL(-1) mercury solution at the flow rate of 0.8 mL/min, the flow injection studies resulted in the relative standard deviation (RSD) of 8%, concentration detection limit of 10 ng/mL, and mass detection limit of 1 ng for mercury. PMID:19715301

  2. Response Element Composition Governs Correlations between Binding Site Affinity and Transcription in Glucocorticoid Receptor Feed-forward Loops.

    PubMed

    Sasse, Sarah K; Zuo, Zheng; Kadiyala, Vineela; Zhang, Liyang; Pufall, Miles A; Jain, Mukesh K; Phang, Tzu L; Stormo, Gary D; Gerber, Anthony N

    2015-08-01

    Combinatorial gene regulation through feed-forward loops (FFLs) can bestow specificity and temporal control to client gene expression; however, characteristics of binding sites that mediate these effects are not established. We previously showed that the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) and KLF15 form coherent FFLs that cooperatively induce targets such as the amino acid-metabolizing enzymes AASS and PRODH and incoherent FFLs exemplified by repression of MT2A by KLF15. Here, we demonstrate that GR and KLF15 physically interact and identify low affinity GR binding sites within glucocorticoid response elements (GREs) for PRODH and AASS that contribute to combinatorial regulation with KLF15. We used deep sequencing and electrophoretic mobility shift assays to derive in vitro GR binding affinities across sequence space. We applied these data to show that AASS GRE activity correlated (r(2) = 0.73) with predicted GR binding affinities across a 50-fold affinity range in transfection assays; however, the slope of the linear relationship more than doubled when KLF15 was expressed. Whereas activity of the MT2A GRE was even more strongly (r(2) = 0.89) correlated with GR binding site affinity, the slope of the linear relationship was sharply reduced by KLF15, consistent with incoherent FFL logic. Thus, GRE architecture and co-regulator expression together determine the functional parameters that relate GR binding site affinity to hormone-induced transcriptional responses. Utilization of specific affinity response functions and GR binding sites by FFLs may contribute to the diversity of gene expression patterns within GR-regulated transcriptomes. PMID:26088140

  3. Differential cross sections, charge production asymmetry, and spin-density matrix elements for D ∗±(2010) produced in 500 GeV/ cπ--nucleon interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aitala, E. M.; Amato, S.; Anjos, J. C.; Appel, J. A.; Ashery, D.; Banerjee, S.; Bediaga, I.; Blaylock, G.; Bracker, S. B.; Burchat, P. R.; Burnstein, R. A.; Carter, T.; Carvalho, H. S.; Copty, N. K.; Cremaldi, L. M.; Darling, C.; Denisenko, K.; Devmal, S.; Fernandez, A.; Fox, G. F.; Gagnon, P.; Gobel, C.; Gounder, K.; Halling, A. M.; Herrera, G.; Hurvits, G.; James, C.; Kasper, P. A.; Kwan, S.; Langs, D. C.; Leslie, J.; Lundberg, B.; Magnin, J.; Massafferri, A.; MayTal-Beck, S.; Meadows, B.; de Mello Neto, J. R. T.; Mihalcea, D.; Milburn, R. H.; de Miranda, J. M.; Napier, A.; Nguyen, A.; d'Oliveira, A. B.; O'Shaughnessy, K.; Peng, K. C.; Perera, L. P.; Purohit, M. V.; Quinn, B.; Radeztsky, S.; Rafatian, A.; Reay, N. W.; Reidy, J. J.; dos Reis, A. C.; Rubin, H. A.; Sanders, D. A.; Santha, A. K. S.; Santoro, A. F. S.; Schwartz, A. J.; Sheaff, M.; Sidwell, R. A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Sokoloff, M. D.; Solano Salinas, C. J.; Stanton, N. R.; Stefanski, R. J.; Stenson, K.; Summers, D. J.; Takach, S.; Thorne, K.; Tripathi, A. K.; Watanabe, S.; Weiss-Babai, R.; Wiener, J.; Witchey, N.; Wolin, E.; Yang, S. M.; Yi, D.; Yoshida, S.; Zaliznyak, R.; Zhang, C.; Fermilab E791 Collaboration

    2002-07-01

    We report differential cross sections for the production of D ∗±(2010) produced in 500 GeV/ cπ--nucleon interactions from experiment E791 at Fermilab, as functions of Feynman- x ( xF) and transverse momentum squared ( pT2). We also report the D ∗± charge asymmetry and spin-density matrix elements as functions of these variables. Investigation of the spin-density matrix elements shows no evidence of polarization. The average values of the spin alignment are < η>=0.01±0.02 and -0.01±0.02 for leading and non-leading particles, respectively.

  4. Calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements for ground and excited state electron transfer reactions: Comparison of the generalized Mulliken-Hush and block diagonalization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, Robert J.; Newton, Marshall D.

    1997-06-01

    Two independent methods are presented for the nonperturbative calculation of the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) for electron transfer reactions using ab initio electronic structure theory. The first is based on the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) model, a multistate generalization of the Mulliken Hush formalism for the electronic coupling. The second is based on the block diagonalization (BD) approach of Cederbaum, Domcke, and co-workers. Detailed quantitative comparisons of the two methods are carried out based on results for (a) several states of the system Zn2OH2+ and (b) the low-lying states of the benzene-Cl atom complex and its contact ion pair. Generally good agreement between the two methods is obtained over a range of geometries. Either method can be applied at an arbitrary nuclear geometry and, as a result, may be used to test the validity of the Condon approximation. Examples of nonmonotonic behavior of the electronic coupling as a function of nuclear coordinates are observed for Zn2OH2+. Both methods also yield a natural definition of the effective distance (rDA) between donor (D) and acceptor (A) sites, in contrast to earlier approaches which required independent estimates of rDA, generally based on molecular structure data.

  5. Distal Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) Response Element of Human Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) Binds Activator Protein 1 (AP-1) Transcription Factors and Regulates Gene Expression*

    PubMed Central

    Schmucker, Adam C.; Wright, Jason B.; Cole, Michael D.; Brinckerhoff, Constance E.

    2012-01-01

    The collagenase matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP-13) plays an important role in the destruction of cartilage in arthritic joints. MMP-13 expression is strongly up-regulated in arthritis, largely because of stimulation by inflammatory cytokines such as IL-1β. Treatment of chondrocytes with IL-1β induces transcription of MMP-13 in vitro. IL-1β signaling converges upon the activator protein-1 transcription factors, which have been shown to be required for IL-1β-induced MMP-13 gene expression. Using chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), we detected activator protein-1 binding within an evolutionarily conserved DNA sequence ∼20 kb 5′ relative to the MMP-13 transcription start site (TSS). Also using ChIP, we detected histone modifications and binding of RNA polymerase II within this conserved region, all of which are consistent with transcriptional activation. Chromosome conformation capture indicates that chromosome looping brings this region in close proximity with the MMP-13 TSS. Finally, a luciferase reporter construct driven by a component of the conserved region demonstrated an expression pattern similar to that of endogenous MMP-13. These data suggest that a conserved region at 20 kb upstream from the MMP-13 TSS includes a distal transcriptional response element of MMP-13, which contributes to MMP-13 gene expression. PMID:22102411

  6. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-09

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. In order to separate the signal from the larger tt¯ + jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratiomore » between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, μ, relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95 % confidence level is μ < 4.2 (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value μ^ = 1.2+1.6-1.5.« less

  7. A Search for the Higgs Boson Produced in Association with $Z\\to \\ell^+\\ell^-$ Using the Matrix Element Method at CDF II

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2009-08-01

    We present a search for associated production of the standard model (SM) Higgs boson and a Z boson where the Z boson decays to two leptons and the Higgs decays to a pair of b quarks in p{bar p} collisions at the Fermilab Tevatron. We use event probabilities based on SM matrix elements to construct a likelihood function of the Higgs content of the data sample. In a CDF data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.7 fb{sup -1} we see no evidence of a Higgs boson with a mass between 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. We set 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits on the cross-section for ZH production as a function of the Higgs boson mass m{sub H}; the limit is 8.2 times the SM prediction at m{sub H} = 115 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  8. Spectral diagnostics based on Doppler-broadened H{sub α} line shape in a single element of a matrix source

    SciTech Connect

    Iordanova, S.; Pashov, A.

    2015-04-08

    The study is on optical emission spectroscopy diagnostics of a single element of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions. The method developed for description of the hydrogen atoms behaviour is based on analysis of the Balmer H{sub α} line profile, and it can be readily applied to various low pressure hydrogen discharges. The present observations reveal the existence of thermal as well as of non-thermal fast hydrogen atoms in the discharge. For processing of the experimental data a line shape model, which accounts for details of the plasma kinetics and the fine structure of the Balmer lines is developed. The fit of this model to the recorded at different experimental conditions line shapes results in the temperature of the thermal atoms, the mean energy of the fast atoms, the ratio between the densities of these two group of atoms and the relative populations of the fine structure components of the n = 3 hydrogen state. The present study indicates that the reactions leading to production of fast atoms and the process of energy exchange between thermal and fast atoms may be important for the correct modeling of the plasma kinetics.

  9. Search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2015-06-09

    A search for a standard model Higgs boson produced in association with a top-quark pair and decaying to bottom quarks is presented. Events with hadronic jets and one or two oppositely charged leptons are selected from a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.5fb-1 collected by the CMS experiment at the LHC in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8TeV. In order to separate the signal from the larger tt¯ + jets background, this analysis uses a matrix element method that assigns a probability density value to each reconstructed event under signal or background hypotheses. The ratio between the two values is used in a maximum likelihood fit to extract the signal yield. The results are presented in terms of the measured signal strength modifier, μ, relative to the standard model prediction for a Higgs boson mass of 125GeV. The observed (expected) exclusion limit at a 95 % confidence level is μ < 4.2 (3.3), corresponding to a best fit value μ^ = 1.2+1.6-1.5.

  10. Novel approaches for correction against the soft matrix effects in the quantitative elemental imaging of human substantia nigra tissue using synchrotron X-ray fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Surowka, A. D.; Wrobel, P.; Marzec, M. M.; Adamek, D.; Szczerbowska-Boruchowska, M.

    2016-09-01

    The inherent structural heterogeneity of biological specimens poses a number of problems for analytical techniques to assess for the elemental composition of a sample, and this is the case with quantitative X-ray fluorescence (XRF). Differences in density along with any possible variation in thickness upon frequently used freeze drying of thin samples could influence the results of the quantification and therefore underlie one of the most critical matrix effects in XRF, often referred to as the mass thickness effect. In our study, we analyzed substantia nigra tissue samples of various thicknesses mounted onto silicon nitride membranes. The aim was to show up the variation in the mass thickness of the different substantia nigra tissue compartments: the neuromelanine pigmented neurons and neuropil could influence the final quantitative results. In that respect, the main goal was to derive several semi- and fully-quantitative methods to correct for the mass thickness effects using either a membrane Si transmission signal or the intensity of incoherently scattered primary X-ray radiation. Also, the pioneer topographic studies on dried substantia nigra tissue specimens demonstrated the drying procedure is accompanied by an around 80% reduction in the samples' thickness. The correction scheme is presented together with the semi-theoretical procedure developed to compute for the mass thickness for substantia nigra tissue structures, and the correction scheme's robustness is also presented.

  11. Data analysis techniques, differential cross sections, and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γp → Φp

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Dey, B.; Meyer, C. A.; Bellis, M.; Williams, M.; Adhikari, K. P.; Adikaram, D.; Aghasyan, M.; Amaryan, M. J.; Anderson, M. D.; Anefalos Pereira, S.; et al

    2014-05-27

    High-statistics measurements of differential cross sections and spin density matrix elements for the reaction γ p → Φp have been made using the CLAS detector at Jefferson Lab. We cover center-of-mass energies (√s) from 1.97 to 2.84 GeV, with an extensive coverage in the Φ production angle. The high statistics of the data sample made it necessary to carefully account for the interplay between the Φ natural lineshape and effects of the detector resolution, that are found to be comparable in magnitude. We study both the charged- (Φ → K⁺K⁻) and neutral- (Φ → K0SK0L)more » $$K\\bar{K}$$ decay modes of the Φ. Further, for the charged mode, we differentiate between the cases where the final K⁻ track is directly detected or its momentum reconstructed as the total missing momentum in the event. The two charged-mode topologies and the neutral-mode have different resolutions and are calibrated against each other. Extensive usage is made of kinematic fitting to improve the reconstructed Φ mass resolution. Our final results are reported in 10- and mostly 30-MeV-wide √s bins for the charged- and the neutral-mode, respectively. Possible effects from K⁺Λ* channels with p$$K\\bar{K}$$ final-states are discussed. These present results constitute the most precise and extensive Φ photoproduction measurements to date and in conjunction with the ω photoproduction results recently published by CLAS, will greatly improve our understanding of low energy vector meson photoproduction.« less

  12. Determination of the Form Factors for the Decay B0 -> D*-l+nu_l and of the CKM Matrix Element |Vcb|

    SciTech Connect

    Aubert, B.

    2006-09-26

    The authors present a combined measurement of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element |V{sub cb}| and of the parameters {rho}{sup 2}, R{sub 1}, and R{sub 2}, which fully characterize the form factors of the B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} decay in the framework of HQET, based on a sample of about 52,800 B{sup 0} {yields} D*{sup -}{ell}{sup +}{nu}{sub {ell}} decays recorded by the BABAR detector. The kinematical information of the fully reconstructed decay is used to extract the following values for the parameters (where the first errors are statistical and the second systematic): {rho}{sup 2} = 1.156 {+-} 0.094 {+-} 0.028, R{sub 1} = 1.329 {+-} 0.131 {+-} 0.044, R{sub 2} = 0.859 {+-} 0.077 {+-} 0.022, F(1)|V{sub cb}| = (35.03 {+-} 0.39 {+-} 1.15) x 10{sup -3}. By combining these measurements with the previous BABAR measurements of the form factors which employs a different technique on a partial sample of the data, they improve the statistical accuracy of the measurement, obtaining: {rho}{sup 2} = 1.179 {+-} 0.048 {+-} 0.028, R{sub 1} = 1.417 {+-} 0.061 {+-} 0.044, R{sub 2}, = 0.836 {+-} 0.037 {+-} 0.022, and F(1)|V{sub cb}| = (34.68 {+-} 0.32 {+-} 1.15) x 10{sup -3}. Using the lattice calculations for the axial form factor F(1), they extract |V{sub cb}| = (37.74 {+-} 0.35 {+-} 1.25 {+-} {sub 1.44}{sup 1.23}) x 10{sup -3}, where the third error is due to the uncertainty in F(1).

  13. Precision measurement of the top quark mass in the lepton + jets channel using a matrix element method with Quasi-Monte Carlo integration

    SciTech Connect

    Lujan, Paul Joseph

    2009-12-01

    This thesis presents a measurement of the top quark mass obtained from p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron using the CDF II detector. The measurement uses a matrix element integration method to calculate a t$\\bar{t}$ likelihood, employing a Quasi-Monte Carlo integration, which enables us to take into account effects due to finite detector angular resolution and quark mass effects. We calculate a t$\\bar{t}$ likelihood as a 2-D function of the top pole mass mt and ΔJES, where ΔJES parameterizes the uncertainty in our knowledge of the jet energy scale; it is a shift applied to all jet energies in units of the jet-dependent systematic error. By introducing ΔJES into the likelihood, we can use the information contained in W boson decays to constrain ΔJES and reduce error due to this uncertainty. We use a neural network discriminant to identify events likely to be background, and apply a cut on the peak value of individual event likelihoods to reduce the effect of badly reconstructed events. This measurement uses a total of 4.3 fb-1 of integrated luminosity, requiring events with a lepton, large ET, and exactly four high-energy jets in the pseudorapidity range |η| < 2.0, of which at least one must be tagged as coming from a b quark. In total, we observe 738 events before and 630 events after applying the likelihood cut, and measure mt = 172.6 ± 0.9 (stat.) ± 0.7 (JES) ± 1.1 (syst.) GeV/c2, or mt = 172.6 ± 1.6 (tot.) GeV/c2.

  14. ({sup 3}He,t) reaction on the double {beta} decay nucleus {sup 48}Ca and the importance of nuclear matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Grewe, E.-W.; Frekers, D.; Rakers, S.; Baeumer, C.; Dohmann, H.; Thies, J.; Adachi, T.; Fujita, Y.; Shimbara, Y.; Botha, N. T.; Fujita, H.; Hatanaka, K.; Nakanishi, K.; Sakemi, Y.; Shimizu, Y.; Tameshige, Y.; Tamii, A.; Negret, A.; Popescu, L.; Neveling, R.

    2007-11-15

    High-resolution ({sup 3}He,t) measurements on the double {beta}-decay ({beta}{beta}) nucleus {sup 48}Ca have been performed at RCNP (Osaka, Japan) to determine Gamow-Teller (GT{sup -}) transitions to the nucleus {sup 48}Sc, which represents the intermediate nucleus in the second-order perturbative description of the {beta}{beta} decay. At a bombarding energy of E{sub {sup 3}He}=420 MeV an excitation energy resolution of 40 keV was achieved. The measurements were performed at two angle positions of the Grand Raiden Spectrometer (GRS): 0 deg. and 2.5 deg. The results of both settings were combined to achieve angular distributions, by which the character of single transitions could be determined. To characterize the different multipoles, theoretical angular distributions for states with J{sup {pi}}=1{sup +},2{sup +},2{sup -}, and 3{sup +} were calculated using the distorted-wave Born approximation (DWBA) Code DW81. The GT{sup -} strength was extracted up to E{sub x}=7 MeV and combined with corresponding GT{sup +} strength deduced from the {sup 48}Ti(d,{sup 2}He){sup 48}Sc data to calculate the low-energy part of the {beta}{beta}-decay matrix element for the {sup 48}Ca 2{nu}{beta}{beta} decay. We show that after applying trivial momentum corrections to the ({sup 3}He,t) spectrum, the two reaction probes (p,n) and ({sup 3}He,t) reveal a spectral response to an impressively high degree of similarity in the region of low momentum transfer.

  15. The generalization of the extended Stevens operators to higher ranks and spins, and a systematic review of the tables of the tensor operators and their matrix elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rudowicz, C.; Chung, C. Y.

    2004-08-01

    Spherical (S) and tesseral (T) tensor operators (TOs) have been extensively used in, for example, EMR and optical spectroscopy of transition ions. To enable a systematic review of the published tables of the operators and their matrix elements (MEs) we have generated the relevant tables by computer, using Mathematica programs. Our review reveals several misprints/errors in the major sources of TTOs—the conventional Stevens operators (CSOs—components q\\ge 0 ) and the extended ones (ESOs—all q) for rank k = 2,4, and 6—as well as of some STOs with k\\le 8 . The implications of using incorrect operators and/or MEs for the reliability of EMR-related programs and interpretation of experimental data are discussed. Studies of high-spin complexes like Mn12 (S = 10) and Fe19 (S = 33/2) require operator and ME listings up to k = 2S, which are not presently available. Using the algorithms developed recently by Ryabov, the generalized ESOs and their MEs for arbitrary rank k and spin S are generated by computer, using Mathematica. The extended tables enable simulation of the energy levels for arbitrary spin systems and symmetry cases. Tables are provided for the ESOs not available in the literature, with odd k = 3,5, and 7 for completeness; however, for the newly generalized ESOs with the most useful even rank k = 8,10, and 12 only, in view of the large listings sizes. General source codes for the generation of the ESO listings and their ME tables are available from the authors.

  16. Matrix fractional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the matrix representation of dynamical systems in the perspective of fractional calculus. Fractional elements and fractional systems are interpreted under the light of the classical Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole, and Havriliak-Negami heuristic models. Numerical simulations for an electrical circuit enlighten the results for matrix based models and high fractional orders. The conclusions clarify the distinction between fractional elements and fractional systems.

  17. Forward problem solution as the operator of filtered and back projection matrix to reconstruct the various method of data collection and the object element model in electrical impedance tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Ain, Khusnul; Kurniadi, Deddy; Suprijanto; Santoso, Oerip; Wibowo, Arif

    2015-04-16

    Back projection reconstruction has been implemented to get the dynamical image in electrical impedance tomography. However the implementation is still limited in method of adjacent data collection and circular object element model. The study aims to develop the methods of back projection as reconstruction method that has the high speed, accuracy, and flexibility, which can be used for various methods of data collection and model of the object element. The proposed method uses the forward problem solution as the operator of filtered and back projection matrix. This is done through a simulation study on several methods of data collection and various models of the object element. The results indicate that the developed method is capable of producing images, fastly and accurately for reconstruction of the various methods of data collection and models of the object element.

  18. Matrix Metalloproteinase-14 Both Sheds Cell Surface Neuronal Glial Antigen 2 (NG2) Proteoglycan on Macrophages and Governs the Response to Peripheral Nerve Injury*

    PubMed Central

    Nishihara, Tasuku; Remacle, Albert G.; Angert, Mila; Shubayev, Igor; Shiryaev, Sergey A.; Liu, Huaqing; Dolkas, Jennifer; Chernov, Andrei V.; Strongin, Alex Y.; Shubayev, Veronica I.

    2015-01-01

    Neuronal glial antigen 2 (NG2) is an integral membrane chondroitin sulfate proteoglycan expressed by vascular pericytes, macrophages (NG2-Mφ), and progenitor glia of the nervous system. Herein, we revealed that NG2 shedding and axonal growth, either independently or jointly, depended on the pericellular remodeling events executed by membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP-14). Using purified NG2 ectodomain constructs, individual MMPs, and primary NG2-Mφ cultures, we demonstrated for the first time that MMP-14 performed as an efficient and unconventional NG2 sheddase and that NG2-Mφ infiltrated into the damaged peripheral nervous system. We then characterized the spatiotemporal relationships among MMP-14, MMP-2, and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 in sciatic nerve. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2-free MMP-14 was observed in the primary Schwann cell cultures using the inhibitory hydroxamate warhead-based MP-3653 fluorescent reporter. In teased nerve fibers, MMP-14 translocated postinjury toward the nodes of Ranvier and its substrates, laminin and NG2. Inhibition of MMP-14 activity using the selective, function-blocking DX2400 human monoclonal antibody increased the levels of regeneration-associated factors, including laminin, growth-associated protein 43, and cAMP-dependent transcription factor 3, thereby promoting sensory axon regeneration after nerve crush. Concomitantly, DX2400 therapy attenuated mechanical hypersensitivity associated with nerve crush in rats. Together, our findings describe a new model in which MMP-14 proteolysis regulates the extracellular milieu and presents a novel therapeutic target in the damaged peripheral nervous system and neuropathic pain. PMID:25488667

  19. Matrix Embedded Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakolanu, U. G.; Freund, F. T.

    2016-05-01

    In the matrix of minerals such as olivine, a redox reaction of the low-z elements occurs. Oxygen is oxidized to the peroxy state while the low-Z-elements become chemically reduced. We assign them a formula [CxHyOzNiSj]n- and call them proto-organics.

  20. Search for the Standard Model Higgs Boson associated with a W Boson using Matrix Element Technique in the CDF detector at the Tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez, Barbara Alvarez

    2010-05-01

    method used to estimate the background contribution. The Matrix Element method, that was successfully used in the single top discovery analysis and many other analyses within the CDF collaboration, is the multivariate technique used in this thesis to discriminate signal from background events. With this technique is possible to calculate a probability for an event to be classified as signal or background. These probabilities are then combined into a discriminant function called the Event Probability Discriminant, EPD, which increases the sensitivity of the WH process. This method is described in detail in Chapter 7. As no evidence for the signal has been found, the results obtained with this work are presented in Chapter 8 in terms of exclusion regions as a function of the mass of the Higgs boso, taking into account the full systematics. The conclusions of this work to obtain the PhD are presnted in Chapter 9.

  1. Property Evaluation and Damage Evolution of Environmental Barrier Coatings and Environmental Barrier Coated SiC/SiC Ceramic Matrix Composite Sub-Elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhu, Dongming; Halbig, Michael; Jaskowiak, Martha; Hurst, Janet; Bhatt, Ram; Fox, Dennis S.

    2014-01-01

    This paper describes recent development of environmental barrier coatings on SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites. The creep and fatigue behavior at aggressive long-term high temperature conditions have been evaluated and highlighted. Thermal conductivity and high thermal gradient cyclic durability of environmental barrier coatings have been evaluated. The damage accumulation and complex stress-strain behavior environmental barrier coatings on SiCSiC ceramic matrix composite turbine airfoil subelements during the thermal cyclic and fatigue testing of have been also reported.

  2. Nonorthogonal orbital based N-body reduced density matrices and their applications to valence bond theory. II. An efficient algorithm for matrix elements and analytical energy gradients in VBSCF method.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhenhua; Chen, Xun; Wu, Wei

    2013-04-28

    In this paper, by applying the reduced density matrix (RDM) approach for nonorthogonal orbitals developed in the first paper of this series, efficient algorithms for matrix elements between VB structures and energy gradients in valence bond self-consistent field (VBSCF) method were presented. Both algorithms scale only as nm(4) for integral transformation and d(2)n(β)(2) for VB matrix elements and 3-RDM evaluation, while the computational costs of other procedures are negligible, where n, m, d, and n(β )are the numbers of variable occupied active orbitals, basis functions, determinants, and active β electrons, respectively. Using tensor properties of the energy gradients with respect to the orbital coefficients presented in the first paper of this series, a partial orthogonal auxiliary orbital set was introduced to reduce the computational cost of VBSCF calculation in which orbitals are flexibly defined. Test calculations on the Diels-Alder reaction of butadiene and ethylene have shown that the novel algorithm is very efficient for VBSCF calculations. PMID:23635124

  3. "Governance" or "Governing"?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leslie, David

    This paper draws on four perspectives on power and its exercise in organizations to analyze the practice of governing colleges and universities. The exploration uses political theories (particularly those assessing the legitimacy and effectiveness of stable political entities), leadership studies, analyses of how formal and informal organizations…

  4. Proposed framework for thermomechanical life modeling of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The framework of a mechanics of materials model is proposed for thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction of unidirectional, continuous-fiber metal matrix composites (MMC's). Axially loaded MMC test samples are analyzed as structural components whose fatigue lives are governed by local stress-strain conditions resulting from combined interactions of the matrix, interfacial layer, and fiber constituents. The metallic matrix is identified as the vehicle for tracking fatigue crack initiation and propagation. The proposed framework has three major elements. First, TMF flow and failure characteristics of in situ matrix material are approximated from tests of unreinforced matrix material, and matrix TMF life prediction equations are numerically calibrated. The macrocrack initiation fatigue life of the matrix material is divided into microcrack initiation and microcrack propagation phases. Second, the influencing factors created by the presence of fibers and interfaces are analyzed, characterized, and documented in equation form. Some of the influences act on the microcrack initiation portion of the matrix fatigue life, others on the microcrack propagation life, while some affect both. Influencing factors include coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch strains, residual (mean) stresses, multiaxial stress states, off-axis fibers, internal stress concentrations, multiple initiation sites, nonuniform fiber spacing, fiber debonding, interfacial layers and cracking, fractured fibers, fiber deflections of crack fronts, fiber bridging of matrix cracks, and internal oxidation along internal interfaces. Equations exist for some, but not all, of the currently identified influencing factors. The third element is the inclusion of overriding influences such as maximum tensile strain limits of brittle fibers that could cause local fractures and ensuing catastrophic failure of surrounding matrix material. Some experimental data exist for assessing the plausibility of the proposed

  5. A matrix effect and accuracy evaluation for the determination of elements in milk powder LIBS and laser ablation/ICP-OES spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Gilon, N; El-Haddad, J; Stankova, A; Lei, W; Ma, Q; Motto-Ros, V; Yu, J

    2011-11-01

    Laser ablation coupled to inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (LA-ICP-OES) and laser-induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) were investigated for the determination of Ca, Mg, Zn and Na in milk samples. The accuracy of both methods was evaluated by comparison of the concentration found using LA-ICP-OES and LIBS with classical wet digestion associated with ICP-OES determination. The results were not fully acceptable, with biases from less than 1% to more than 60%. Matrix effects were also investigated. The sample matrix can influence the temperature, electron number density (n (e)) and other excitation characteristics in the ICP. These ICP characteristics were studied and evaluated during ablation of eight milk samples. Differences in n (e) (from 8.9 to 13.8 × 10(14) cm(-3)) and rotational temperature (ranging from 3,400 to 4,400 K) occurred with no correlation with trueness. LIBS results obtained after classical external calibration procedure gave degraded accuracy, indicating a strong matrix effect. The LIBS measurements clearly showed that the major problem in LA-ICP was related to the ablation process and that LIBS spectroscopy is an excellent diagnostic tool for LA-ICP techniques. PMID:21573840

  6. Complete determination of the photoionization dynamics of a polyatomic molecule. II. Determination of radial dipole matrix elements and phases from experimental photoelectron angular distributions from A1Au acetylene.

    PubMed

    Hockett, Paul; Reid, Katharine L

    2007-10-21

    We present a fit to photoelectron angular distributions (PADs) measured following the photoionization of rotationally selected A1Au state acetylene. In the case of the 4(1)2Sigmau- vibronic state of the ion, we are able to use this fit to make a complete determination of the radial dipole matrix elements and phases connecting the prepared level to each photoelectron partial wave. We have also investigated other Renner-Teller subbands with a view to disentangling geometrical and dynamical contributions to the resulting PADs.

  7. A finite element model for sound transmission through panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ramakrishnan, J. V.; Koval, L. R.

    1983-01-01

    A finite element method (FEM) is applied to predicting coupled frequencies and pressures within an acoustic cavity in order to characterize sound transmission through a panel. Structural equations of motion are defined and the FEM model is configured with four-noded plate elements, the lateral displacement and two slopes being the unknowns at every node. Each element then has 12 degrees of freedom (DOF) and the displacement variation is expressed by a 12-term nonconforming polynomial. A consistent mass matrix is used to represent the panel mass matrix and a wave equation governs the acoustic volume. Analysis of pressure and displacement over the panel yields a square coupling matrix, and an eigenanalysis leads to a solution of the forced vibration problem.

  8. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-21

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit.more » In conclusion, we discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.« less

  9. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  10. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  11. Lack of mGluR6-related cascade elements leads to retrograde trans-synaptic effects on rod photoreceptor synapses via matrix-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Tummala, Shanti R; Dhingra, Anuradha; Fina, Marie E; Li, Jian J; Ramakrishnan, Hariharasubramanian; Vardi, Noga

    2016-06-01

    Heterotrimeric G-proteins couple metabotropic receptors to downstream effectors. In retinal ON bipolar cells, Go couples the metabotropic receptor mGluR6 to the TRPM1 channel and closes it in the dark, thus hyperpolarizing the cell. Light, via GTPase-activating proteins, deactivates Go , opens TRPM1 and depolarizes the cell. Go comprises Gαo1 , Gβ3 and Gγ13; all are necessary for efficient coupling. In addition, Gβ3 contributes to trafficking of certain cascade proteins and to maintaining the synaptic structure. The goal of this study was to determine the role of Gαo1 in maintaining the cascade and synaptic integrity. Using mice lacking Gαo1 , we quantified the immunostaining of certain mGluR6-related components. Deleting Gαo1 greatly reduced staining for Gβ3, Gγ13, Gβ5, RGS11, RGS7 and R9AP. Deletion of Gαo1 did not affect mGluR6, TRPM1 or PCP2. In addition, deleting Gαo1 reduced the number of rod bipolar dendrites that invaginate the rod terminal, similar to the effect seen in the absence of mGluR6, Gβ3 or the matrix-associated proteins, pikachurin, dystroglycan and dystrophin, which are localized presynaptically to the rod bipolar cell. We therefore tested mice lacking mGluR6, Gαo1 and Gβ3 for expression of these matrix-associated proteins. In all three genotypes, staining intensity for these proteins was lower than in wild type, suggesting a retrograde trans-synaptic effect. We propose that the mGluR6 macromolecular complex is connected to the presynaptic rod terminal via a protein chain that includes the matrix-associated proteins. When a component of the macromolecular chain is missing, the chain may fall apart and loosen the dendritic tip adherence within the invagination. PMID:27037829

  12. Multiregional periodic matrix for modeling the population dynamics of sardine (Sardina pilchardus) along the moroccan atlantic coast: management elements for fisheries.

    PubMed

    Serghini, Mansour; Boutayeb, Abdesslam; Auger, Pierre; Charouki, Najib; Ramzi, Azeddine; Ettahiri, Omar; Tchuente, Maurice

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a deterministic time discrete mathematical model based on multiregional periodic matrices to describe the dynamics of Sardina pilchardus in the Central Atlantic area of the Moroccan coast. This model deals with two stages (immature and mature) and three spatial zones where sardines are supposed to migrate from one zone to another. The population dynamics is described by an autonomous recurrence equation N(t + 1) = A.N(t), where A is a positive matrix whose entries are estimated using data collected during biannual acoustic surveys carried out from 2001 to 2003 onboard the Norwegian research vessel "Dr Fridtjof Nansen". The dominant eigenvalue lambda of A that gives the long-term growth rate of fish population is smaller than one. This agrees with the stock decrease observed in the data collected. We show that lambda is highly sensitive to the recruitment rate and much less sensitive to the reproduction rate. These results can clearly be used to define an efficient scenario in order to fight for instance against a stock decrease.

  13. Multiregional periodic matrix for modeling the population dynamics of sardine (Sardina pilchardus) along the moroccan atlantic coast: management elements for fisheries.

    PubMed

    Serghini, Mansour; Boutayeb, Abdesslam; Auger, Pierre; Charouki, Najib; Ramzi, Azeddine; Ettahiri, Omar; Tchuente, Maurice

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, we present a deterministic time discrete mathematical model based on multiregional periodic matrices to describe the dynamics of Sardina pilchardus in the Central Atlantic area of the Moroccan coast. This model deals with two stages (immature and mature) and three spatial zones where sardines are supposed to migrate from one zone to another. The population dynamics is described by an autonomous recurrence equation N(t + 1) = A.N(t), where A is a positive matrix whose entries are estimated using data collected during biannual acoustic surveys carried out from 2001 to 2003 onboard the Norwegian research vessel "Dr Fridtjof Nansen". The dominant eigenvalue lambda of A that gives the long-term growth rate of fish population is smaller than one. This agrees with the stock decrease observed in the data collected. We show that lambda is highly sensitive to the recruitment rate and much less sensitive to the reproduction rate. These results can clearly be used to define an efficient scenario in order to fight for instance against a stock decrease. PMID:19842047

  14. Characterization of the cis elements in the proximal promoter regions of the anthocyanin pathway genes reveals a common regulatory logic that governs pathway regulation

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Zhixin; Wang, Hailong; Wang, Yiting; Guan, Shan; Wang, Fang; Tang, Jingyu; Zhang, Ruijuan; Xie, Lulu; Lu, Yingqing

    2015-01-01

    Cellular activities such as compound synthesis often require the transcriptional activation of an entire pathway; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying pathway activation have rarely been explained. Here, the cis regulatory architecture of the anthocyanin pathway genes targeted by the transcription factor (TF) complex including MYB, bHLH, and WDR was systematically analysed in one species and the findings extended to others. In Ipomoea purpurea, the IpMYB1-IpbHLH2-IpWDR1 (IpMBW) complex was found to be orthologous to the PAP1-GL3-TTG1 (AtPGT) complex of Arabidopsis thaliana, and interacted with a 7-bp MYB-recognizing element (MRE) and a 6-bp bHLH-recognizing element (BRE) at the proximal promoter region of the pathway genes. There was little transcription of the gene in the absence of the MRE or BRE. The cis elements identified experimentally converged on two syntaxes, ANCNNCC for MREs and CACN(A/C/T)(G/T) for BREs, and our bioinformatic analysis showed that these were present within anthocyanin gene promoters in at least 35 species, including both gymnosperms and angiosperms. For the anthocyanin pathway, IpMBW and AtPGT recognized the interspecific promoters of both early and later genes. In A. thaliana, the seed-specific TF complex (TT2, TT8, and TTG1) may regulate all the anthocyanin pathway genes, in addition to the proanthocyanidin-specific BAN. When multiple TF complexes in the anthocyanin pathway were compared, the cis architecture played a role larger than the TF complex in determining the variation in promoter activity. Collectively, a cis logic common to the pathway gene promoters was found, and this logic is essential for the trans factors to regulate the pathway. PMID:25911741

  15. Matrix management in hospitals: testing theories of matrix structure and development.

    PubMed

    Burns, L R

    1989-09-01

    A study of 315 hospitals with matrix management programs was used to test several hypotheses concerning matrix management advanced by earlier theorists. The study verifies that matrix management involves several distinctive elements that can be scaled to form increasingly complex types of lateral coordinative devices. The scalability of these elements is evident only cross-sectionally. The results show that matrix complexity is not an outcome of program age, nor does matrix complexity at the time of implementation appear to influence program survival. Matrix complexity, finally, is not determined by the organization's task diversity and uncertainty. The results suggest several modifications in prevailing theories of matrix organization.

  16. Gamow-Teller Strength Distributions in {sup 48}Sc by the {sup 48}Ca(p,n) and {sup 48}Ti(n,p) Reactions and Two-Neutrino Double-beta Decay Nuclear Matrix Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Yako, K.; Sasano, M.; Miki, K.; Sakai, H.; Noji, S.; Dozono, M.; Ihara, E.; Wakasa, T.; Frekers, D.; Greenfield, M. B.; Hatanaka, K.; Kato, M.; Matsubara, H.; Okamura, H.; Sakemi, Y.; Tamii, A.; Kawabata, T.; Sakaguchi, S.; Sasamoto, Y.; Shimizu, Y.

    2009-07-03

    The double-differential cross sections for the {sup 48}Ca(p,n) and {sup 48}Ti(n,p) reactions were measured at 300 MeV. A multipole decomposition technique was applied to the spectra to extract the Gamow-Teller (GT) components. The integrated GT strengths up to an excitation energy of 30 MeV in {sup 48}Sc are 15.3+-2.2 and 2.8+-0.3 in the (p,n) and (n,p) spectra, respectively. In the (n,p) spectra additional GT strengths were found above 8 MeV where shell models within the fp shell-model space predict almost no GT strengths, suggesting that the present shell-model description of the nuclear matrix element of the two-neutrino double-beta decay is incomplete.

  17. Determination of rare earth element in carbonate using laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry: an examination of the influence of the matrix on laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Kazuya; Takahashi, Yoshio; Shimizu, Hiroshi

    2007-02-01

    In this study, we examined the influence of the matrix on rare earth element (REE) analyses of carbonate with laser-ablation inductively-coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) using carbonate and NIST glass standards. A UV 213 nm Nd:YAG laser system was coupled to an ICP-MS. Laser-ablation was carried out in both He and Ar atmospheres to investigate the influence of ablation gas on the analytical results. A small amount of N2 gas was added to the carrier gas to enhance the signal intensities. Synthetic CaCO3 standards, doped with REEs, as well as NIST glasses (NIST SRM 610 and 612) were used as calibration standards. Carbonatite, which is composed of pure calcite, was analyzed as carbonate samples. The degree of the influence of the matrix on the results was evaluated by comparing the results, which were calibrated by the synthetic CaCO3 and NIST glass standards. With laser-ablation in a He atmosphere, the differences between the results calibrated by the synthetic CaCO3 and NIST glass standards were less than 10% across the REE series, except for those of La which were 25%. In contrast, for the measurements made in an Ar atmosphere, the results calibrated by the synthetic CaCO3 and NIST glass standards differed by 25-40%. It was demonstrated that the LA-ICP-MS system can provide quantitative analysis of REE concentrations in carbonate samples using non matrix-matched standards of NIST glasses. PMID:17386560

  18. Student Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Morrow, Joyce

    Materials for running a student government program at the junior high school level are provided in three general sections. Section 1 is a description of student government operations. Topics covered include student government responsibilities and activities, student council meeting procedures, parliamentary rules, responsibilities of the…

  19. Hydrogeochemical processes governing the origin, transport and fate of major and trace elements from mine wastes and mineralized rock to surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nordstrom, D. Kirk

    2011-01-01

    Mobility of potential or actual contaminants from mining and mineral processing activities depends on (1) occurrence: is the mineral source of the contaminant actually present? (2) abundance: is the mineral present in sufficient quantity to make a difference? (3) reactivity: what are the energetics, rates, and mechanisms of sorption and mineral dissolution and precipitation relative to the flow rate of the water? and (4) hydrology: what are the main flow paths for contaminated water? Estimates of relative proportions of minerals dissolved and precipitated can be made with mass-balance calculations if minerals and water compositions along a flow path are known. Combined with discharge, these mass-balance estimates quantify the actual weathering rate of pyrite mineralization in the environment and compare reasonably well with laboratory rates of pyrite oxidation except when large quantities of soluble salts and evaporated mine waters have accumulated underground. Quantitative mineralogy with trace-element compositions can substantially improve the identification of source minerals for specific trace elements through mass balances. Post-dissolution sorption and precipitation (attenuation) reactions depend on the chemical behavior of each element, solution composition and pH, aqueous speciation, temperature, and contact-time with mineral surfaces. For example, little metal attenuation occurs in waters of low pH (2, and redox-sensitive oxyanions (As, Sb, Se, Mo, Cr, V). Once dissolved, metal and metalloid concentrations are strongly affected by redox conditions and pH. Iron is the most reactive because it is rapidly oxidized by bacteria and archaea and Fe(III) hydrolyzes and precipitates at low pH (1–3) which is related directly to its first hydrolysis constant, pK1 = 2.2. Several insoluble sulfate minerals precipitate at low pH including anglesite, barite, jarosite, alunite and basaluminite. Aluminum hydrolyzes near pH 5 (pK1 = 5.0) and provides buffering and removal

  20. Matrix cracking of fiber-reinforced ceramic composites in shear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajan, Varun P.; Zok, Frank W.

    2014-12-01

    The mechanics of cracking in fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) under general loadings remains incomplete. The present paper addresses one outstanding aspect of this problem: the development of matrix cracks in unidirectional plies under shear loading. To this end, we develop a model based on potential energy differences upstream and downstream of a fully bridged steady-state matrix crack. Through a combination of analytical solutions and finite element simulations of the constituent stresses before and after cracking, we identify the dominant stress components that drive crack growth. We show that, when the axial slip lengths are much larger than the fiber diameter and when interfacial slip precedes cracking, the shear stresses in the constituents are largely unaffected by the presence of the crack; the changes that do occur are confined to a 'core' region within a distance of about one fiber diameter from the crack plane. Instead, the driving force for crack growth derives mainly from the axial stresses-tensile in the fibers and compressive in the matrix-that arise upon cracking. These stresses are well-approximated by solutions based on shear-lag analysis. Combining these solutions with the governing equation for crack growth yields an analytical estimate of the critical shear stress for matrix cracking. An analogous approach is used in deriving the critical stresses needed for matrix cracking under arbitrary in-plane loadings. The applicability of these results to cross-ply CMC laminates is briefly discussed.

  1. Specific interaction of mutant p53 with regions of matrix attachment region DNA elements (MARs) with a high potential for base-unpairing

    PubMed Central

    Will, Katrin; Warnecke, Gabriele; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Deppert, Wolfgang

    1998-01-01

    Mutant, but not wild-type p53 binds with high affinity to a variety of MAR-DNA elements (MARs), suggesting that MAR-binding of mutant p53 relates to the dominant-oncogenic activities proposed for mutant p53. MARs recognized by mutant p53 share AT richness and contain variations of an AATATATTT “DNA-unwinding motif,” which enhances the structural dynamics of chromatin and promotes regional DNA base-unpairing. Mutant p53 specifically interacted with MAR-derived oligonucleotides carrying such unwinding motifs, catalyzing DNA strand separation when this motif was located within a structurally labile sequence environment. Addition of GC-clamps to the respective MAR-oligonucleotides or introducing mutations into the unwinding motif strongly reduced DNA strand separation, but supported the formation of tight complexes between mutant p53 and such oligonucleotides. We conclude that the specific interaction of mutant p53 with regions of MAR-DNA with a high potential for base-unpairing provides the basis for the high-affinity binding of mutant p53 to MAR-DNA. PMID:9811860

  2. A novel ligandless-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction method for matrix elimination and the preconcentration of rare earth elements from natural waters.

    PubMed

    Çelik, İbrahim; Kara, Derya; Karadaş, Cennet; Fisher, Andrew; Hill, Steve J

    2015-03-01

    A new, simple, efficient and rapid separation method based on ligandless-dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction (LL-DLLME) was developed for the preconcentration of rare earth elements (REEs) (La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu) in natural water samples, followed by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) detection. Carbon tetrachloride and acetone were used as extraction solvent and disperser solvent, respectively. The experimental parameters affecting the extraction efficiency such as sample pH, volume of extraction/disperser solvent and concentration of NaCl were investigated and optimized. Under the optimum conditions, detection limits between 0.68 and 26.6 ng L(-1) for a 5 mL sample volume were determined. The developed method was successfully applied to samples such as tap water, river water and seawater. Satisfactory recoveries were obtained with the percentage recovery values of the REEs for spiked water samples being between 94 and 111 for tap water, between 89 and 118 for river water and between 92 and 124 for seawater.

  3. Finite element and micromechanical modeling for investigating effective material properties of polymer-matrix nanocomposites with microfiber, reinforced by CNT arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahouneh, Vahid; Mashhadi, Mahmoud Mosavi; Naei, Mohammad Hasan

    2016-09-01

    This paper is motivated by the lack of studies to investigate the effect of fiber reinforced CNT arrays on the material properties of nanocomposites. To make a comprehensive study, this research work is conducted in two ways. Firstly, the effect of microfiber as reinforcement on the effective material properties is investigated; secondly, the study is carried on as the microfibers reinforced by CNT arrays. In both above-mentioned approaches, the results are compared to the results of generalized mixture rule which is known as a widely used micro-mechanical model. The representative volume element (RVE) is considered as a well-known method to investigate the effect of adding CNT arrays on the skin of microfibers. The results show that Generalized Mixture Rule cannot properly predict the effects of changing the length and diameter of nanotubes on the effective properties of nanocomposites. The main objective of this research work is to determine the effects of increasing nanotubes on the elastic properties which are achieved using two aforementioned methods including FE and rule of mixture. It is also absorbed; effective properties of RVE can be improved by increasing the volume fraction, length and decreasing CNT arrays diameter.

  4. Development and implementation of a finite element solution of the coupled neutron transport and thermoelastic equations governing the behavior of small nuclear assemblies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Stephen Christian

    Small, highly enriched reactors designed for weapons effects simulations undergo extreme thermal transients during pulsed operations. The primary shutdown mechanism of these reactors---thermal expansion of fuel material---experiences an inertial delay resulting in a different value for the fuel temperature coefficient of reactivity during pulse operation as compared to the value appropriate for steady-state operation. The value appropriate for pulsed operation may further vary as a function of initial reactivity addition. Here we design and implement a finite element numerical method to predict the pulse operation behavior of Sandia Pulsed Reactor (SPR) II, SPR III, and a hypothetical spherical assembly with identical fuel properties without using operationally observed data in our model. These numerical results are compared to available SPR II and SPR III operational data. The numerical methods employed herein may be modified and expanded in functionality to provide both accurate characterization of the behavior of fast burst reactors of any common geometry or isotropic fuel material in the design phase, as well as a computational tool for general coupled thermomechanical-neutronics behavior in the solid state for any reactor type.

  5. Matrix superpotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Anatoly G.; Karadzhov, Yuri

    2011-07-01

    We present a collection of matrix-valued shape invariant potentials which give rise to new exactly solvable problems of SUSY quantum mechanics. It includes all irreducible matrix superpotentials of the generic form W=kQ+\\frac{1}{k} R+P, where k is a variable parameter, Q is the unit matrix multiplied by a real-valued function of independent variable x, and P and R are the Hermitian matrices depending on x. In particular, we recover the Pron'ko-Stroganov 'matrix Coulomb potential' and all known scalar shape invariant potentials of SUSY quantum mechanics. In addition, five new shape invariant potentials are presented. Three of them admit a dual shape invariance, i.e. the related Hamiltonians can be factorized using two non-equivalent superpotentials. We find discrete spectrum and eigenvectors for the corresponding Schrödinger equations and prove that these eigenvectors are normalizable.

  6. Neutronic fuel element fabrication

    DOEpatents

    Korton, George

    2004-02-24

    This disclosure describes a method for metallurgically bonding a complete leak-tight enclosure to a matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant channels. Coolant tubes containing solid filler pins are disposed in the coolant channels. A leak-tight metal enclosure is then formed about the entire assembly of fuel matrix, coolant tubes and pins. The completely enclosed and sealed assembly is exposed to a high temperature and pressure gas environment to effect a metallurgical bond between all contacting surfaces therein. The ends of the assembly are then machined away to expose the pin ends which are chemically leached from the coolant tubes to leave the coolant tubes with internal coolant passageways. The invention described herein was made in the course of, or under, a contract with the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission. It relates generally to fuel elements for neutronic reactors and more particularly to a method for providing a leak-tight metal enclosure for a high-performance matrix-type fuel element penetrated longitudinally by a multiplicity of coolant tubes. The planned utilization of nuclear energy in high-performance, compact-propulsion and mobile power-generation systems has necessitated the development of fuel elements capable of operating at high power densities. High power densities in turn require fuel elements having high thermal conductivities and good fuel retention capabilities at high temperatures. A metal clad fuel element containing a ceramic phase of fuel intimately mixed with and bonded to a continuous refractory metal matrix has been found to satisfy the above requirements. Metal coolant tubes penetrate the matrix to afford internal cooling to the fuel element while providing positive fuel retention and containment of fission products generated within the fuel matrix. Metal header plates are bonded to the coolant tubes at each end of the fuel element and a metal cladding or can completes the fuel-matrix enclosure

  7. Reinventing Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osborne, David T.

    1993-01-01

    Throughout all levels of American government, a shift is taking place from the rigid, wasteful, centralized bureaucracies of the industrial era to the more flexible, entrepreneurial, decentralized government needed to succeed in today's world. This shift has been brought about by an unprecedented, ongoing fiscal crisis that has created a sudden…

  8. Remaking Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carver, John

    2000-01-01

    The Policy Governance model's philosophical foundations lie in Rousseau's social contract, Greenleaf's servant-leadership, and modern management theory. Policy Governance stresses primacy of the owner-representative role; full-board authority; superintendents as chief executive officers; authoritative prescription of "ends," bounded freedom for…

  9. Policing Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schuster, Jack H.

    1991-01-01

    The American Association of University Professors' (AAUP) new policy authorizing sanctions against colleges when investigation discloses serious departures from accepted governance norms is examined. Issues discussed include the existence and general relevance of governance norms, evidence of violation of those standards, and the AAUP's right to…

  10. State and Local Government Purchasing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Council of State Governments, Lexington, KY.

    This report concerns public purchasing at all levels of government and brings into focus the role of the purchasing official in government management. Covered in the report are essential elements of the purchasing process, including the assessment of needs; written specifications; advertising, evaluating, and awarding bids; and inspection and…

  11. Renewing governance.

    PubMed

    Loos, Gregory P

    2003-01-01

    Globalization's profound influence on social and political institutions need not be negative. Critics of globalization have often referred to the "Impossible Trinity" because decision-making must 1. respect national sovereignty, 2. develop and implement firm regulation, and 3. allow capital markets to be as free as possible. To many, such goals are mutually exclusive because history conditions us to view policy-making and governance in traditional molds. Thus, transnational governance merely appears impossible because current forms of governance were not designed to provide it. The world needs new tools for governing, and its citizens must seize the opportunity to help develop them. The rise of a global society requires a greater level of generality and inclusion than is found in most policy bodies today. Politicians need to re-examine key assumptions about government. States must develop ways to discharge their regulatory responsibilities across borders and collaborate with neighboring jurisdictions, multilateral bodies, and business. Concepts such as multilateralism and tripartism show great promise. Governments must engage civil society in the spirit of shared responsibility and democratic decision-making. Such changes will result in a renewal of the state's purpose and better use of international resources and expertise in governance. PMID:17208717

  12. Improved 206Pb/238U microprobe geochronology by the monitoring of a trace-element-related matrix effect; SHRIMP, ID-TIMS, ELA-ICP-MS and oxygen isotope documentation for a series of zircon standards

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Black, L.P.; Kamo, S.L.; Allen, C.M.; Davis, D.W.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Valley, J.W.; Mundil, R.; Campbell, I.H.; Korsch, R.J.; Williams, I.S.; Foudoulis, C.

    2004-01-01

    Precise isotope dilution-thermal ionisation mass spectrometry (ID-TIMS) documentation is given for two new Palaeozoic zircon standards (TEMORA 2 and R33). These data, in combination with results for previously documented standards (AS3, SL13, QGNG and TEMORA 1), provide the basis for a detailed investigation of inconsistencies in 206Pb/238U ages measured by microprobe. Although these ages are normally consistent between any two standards, their relative age offsets are often different from those established by ID-TIMS. This is true for both sensitive high-resolution ion-microprobe (SHRIMP) and excimer laser ablation-inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ELA-ICP-MS) dating, although the age offsets are in the opposite sense for the two techniques. Various factors have been investigated for possible correlations with age bias, in an attempt to resolve why the accuracy of the method is worse than the indicated precision. Crystallographic orientation, position on the grain-mount and oxygen isotopic composition are unrelated to the bias. There are, however, striking correlations between the 206Pb/238U age offsets and P, Sm and, most particularly, Nd abundances in the zircons. Although these are not believed to be the primary cause of this apparent matrix effect, they indicate that ionisation of 206Pb/238U is influenced, at least in part, by a combination of trace elements. Nd is sufficiently representative of the controlling trace elements that it provides a quantitative means of correcting for the microprobe age bias. This approach has the potential to reduce age biases associated with different techniques, different instrumentation and different standards within and between laboratories. Crown Copyright ?? 2004 Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Sync Matrix

    2004-12-31

    Sync Matrix provides a graphic display of the relationships among all of the response activities of each jurisdiction. This is accomplished through software that organizes and displays the activities by jurisdiction, function, and time for easy review and analysis. The software can also integrate the displays of multiple jurisdictions to allow examination of the total response.

  14. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; et al

    2012-04-02

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb⁻¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limitsmore » are set on σ(pp̄→WH)×B(H→bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.« less

  15. Search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using a matrix element technique at CDF in pp̄ collisions at √s=1.96 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J. A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Auerbach, B.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Bae, T.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauce, M.; Bedeschi, F.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Bland, K. R.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brucken, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Calamba, A.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clarke, C.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Dagenhart, D.; d’Ascenzo, N.; Datta, M.; de Barbaro, P.; Dell’Orso, M.; Demortier, L.; Deninno, M.; Devoto, F.; d’Errico, M.; Di Canto, A.; Di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D’Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, M.; Dorigo, T.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Eppig, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Farrington, S.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Funakoshi, Y.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerchtein, E.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giromini, P.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldin, D.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Hamaguchi, A.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Hewamanage, S.; Hocker, A.; Hopkins, W.; Horn, D.; Hou, S.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussain, N.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jindariani, S.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P. E.; Kasmi, A.; Kato, Y.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kim, Y. J.; Kimura, N.; Kirby, M.; Klimenko, S.; Knoepfel, K.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; LeCompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leo, S.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Limosani, A.; Lin, C.-J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, H.; Liu, Q.; Liu, T.; Lockwitz, S.; Loginov, A.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Maestro, P.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Martínez, M.; Mastrandrea, P.; Matera, K.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzacane, A.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Mitra, A.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Noh, S. Y.; Norniella, O.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Ortolan, L.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Paramonov, A. A.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pilot, J.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Poprocki, S.; Potamianos, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Pranko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Punzi, G.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Rescigno, M.; Riddick, T.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Ruffini, F.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Sakurai, Y.; Santi, L.; Sato, K.; Saveliev, V.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sforza, F.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shochet, M.; Shreyber-Tecker, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Soha, A.; Sorin, V.; Song, H.; Squillacioti, P.; Stancari, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Sudo, Y.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Takemasa, K.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Trovato, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; Varganov, A.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vizán, J.; Vogel, M.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. L.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Wester, W. C.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Wick, F.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, J. S.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Wu, Z.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamato, D.; Yang, T.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W.-M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhou, C.; Zucchelli, S.

    2012-04-02

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a data set corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb⁻¹. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on σ(pp̄→WH)×B(H→bb¯). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between mH=100 GeV/c² and mH=150 GeV/c². The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

  16. Search for Standard Model Higgs Boson Production in Association with a $W$ Boson Using a Matrix Element Technique at CDF in $p\\bar{p}$ Collisions at $\\sqrt{s} = 1.96$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Appel, J.A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; /Dubna, JINR /Texas A-M

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a search for standard model Higgs boson production in association with a W boson using events recorded by the CDF experiment in a dataset corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 5.6 fb{sup -1}. The search is performed using a matrix element technique in which the signal and background hypotheses are used to create a powerful discriminator. The discriminant output distributions for signal and background are fit to the observed events using a binned likelihood approach to search for the Higgs boson signal. We find no evidence for a Higgs boson, and 95% confidence level (C.L.) upper limits are set on {sigma}(p{bar p} {yields} WH) x {Beta}(H {yields} b{bar b}). The observed limits range from 3.5 to 37.6 relative to the standard model expectation for Higgs boson masses between m{sub H} = 100 GeV/c{sup 2} and m{sub H} = 150 GeV/c{sup 2}. The 95% C.L. expected limit is estimated from the median of an ensemble of simulated experiments and varies between 2.9 and 32.7 relative to the production rate predicted by the standard model over the Higgs boson mass range studied.

  17. Evidence for single top-quark production in the s-channel in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector using the Matrix Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Côté, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. 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E.; Primavera, M.; Prince, S.; Proissl, M.; Prokofiev, K.; Prokoshin, F.; Protopapadaki, E.; Protopopescu, S.; Proudfoot, J.; Przybycien, M.; Ptacek, E.; Puddu, D.; Pueschel, E.; Puldon, D.; Purohit, M.; Puzo, P.; Qian, J.; Qin, G.; Qin, Y.; Quadt, A.; Quarrie, D. R.; Quayle, W. B.; Queitsch-Maitland, M.; Quilty, D.; Raddum, S.; Radeka, V.; Radescu, V.; Radhakrishnan, S. K.; Radloff, P.; Rados, P.; Ragusa, F.; Rahal, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rammensee, M.; Rangel-Smith, C.; Rauscher, F.; Rave, S.; Ravenscroft, T.; Raymond, M.; Read, A. L.; Readioff, N. P.; Rebuzzi, D. M.; Redelbach, A.; Redlinger, G.; Reece, R.; Reeves, K.; Rehnisch, L.; Reichert, J.; Reisin, H.; Rembser, C.; Ren, H.; Renaud, A.; Rescigno, M.; Resconi, S.; Rezanova, O. L.; Reznicek, P.; Rezvani, R.; Richter, R.; Richter, S.; Richter-Was, E.; Ricken, O.; Ridel, M.; Rieck, P.; Riegel, C. J.; Rieger, J.; Rifki, O.; Rijssenbeek, M.; Rimoldi, A.; Rinaldi, L.; Ristić, B.; Ritsch, E.; Riu, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rizvi, E.; Robertson, S. H.; Robichaud-Veronneau, A.; Robinson, D.; Robinson, J. E. M.; Robson, A.; Roda, C.; Roe, S.; Røhne, O.; Romaniouk, A.; Romano, M.; Romano Saez, S. M.; Romero Adam, E.; Rompotis, N.; Ronzani, M.; Roos, L.; Ros, E.; Rosati, S.; Rosbach, K.; Rose, P.; Rosenthal, O.; Rossetti, V.; Rossi, E.; Rossi, L. P.; Rosten, J. H. N.; Rosten, R.; Rotaru, M.; Roth, I.; Rothberg, J.; Rousseau, D.; Royon, C. R.; Rozanov, A.; Rozen, Y.; Ruan, X.; Rubbo, F.; Rubinskiy, I.; Rud, V. I.; Rudolph, C.; Rudolph, M. S.; Rühr, F.; Ruiz-Martinez, A.; Rurikova, Z.; Rusakovich, N. A.; Ruschke, A.; Russell, H. L.; Rutherfoord, J. P.; Ruthmann, N.; Ryabov, Y. F.; Rybar, M.; Rybkin, G.; Ryder, N. C.; Ryzhov, A.; Saavedra, A. F.; Sabato, G.; Sacerdoti, S.; Saddique, A.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Sadykov, R.; Safai Tehrani, F.; Saha, P.; Sahinsoy, M.; Saimpert, M.; Saito, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Salamanna, G.; Salamon, A.; Salazar Loyola, J. E.; Saleem, M.; Salek, D.; Sales De Bruin, P. H.; Salihagic, D.; Salnikov, A.; Salt, J.; Salvatore, D.; Salvatore, F.; Salvucci, A.; Salzburger, A.; Sammel, D.; Sampsonidis, D.; Sanchez, A.; Sánchez, J.; Sanchez Martinez, V.; Sandaker, H.; Sandbach, R. L.; Sander, H. G.; Sanders, M. P.; Sandhoff, M.; Sandoval, C.; Sandstroem, R.; Sankey, D. P. C.; Sannino, M.; Sansoni, A.; Santoni, C.; Santonico, R.; Santos, H.; Santoyo Castillo, I.; Sapp, K.; Sapronov, A.; Saraiva, J. G.; Sarrazin, B.; Sasaki, O.; Sasaki, Y.; Sato, K.; Sauvage, G.; Sauvan, E.; Savage, G.; Savard, P.; Sawyer, C.; Sawyer, L.; Saxon, J.; Sbarra, C.; Sbrizzi, A.; Scanlon, T.; Scannicchio, D. A.; Scarcella, M.; Scarfone, V.; Schaarschmidt, J.; Schacht, P.; Schaefer, D.; Schaefer, R.; Schaeffer, J.; Schaepe, S.; Schaetzel, S.; Schäfer, U.; Schaffer, A. C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. 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C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    This Letter presents evidence for single top-quark production in the s-channel using proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The analysis is performed on events containing one isolated electron or muon, large missing transverse momentum and exactly two b-tagged jets in the final state. The analysed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. The signal is extracted using a maximum-likelihood fit of a discriminant which is based on the matrix element method and optimized in order to separate single-top-quark s-channel events from the main background contributions, which are top-quark pair production and W boson production in association with heavy-flavour jets. The measurement leads to an observed signal significance of 3.2 standard deviations and a measured cross-section of σs = 4.8 ± 0.8(stat.)-1.3+1.6 (syst.) pb, which is consistent with the Standard Model expectation. The expected significance for the analysis is 3.9 standard deviations.

  18. Evidence for single top-quark production in the s-channel in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector using the Matrix Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

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C.; Schaile, D.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scharf, V.; Schegelsky, V. A.; Scheirich, D.; Schernau, M.; Schiavi, C.; Schillo, C.; Schioppa, M.; Schlenker, S.; Schmieden, K.; Schmitt, C.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitt, S.; Schmitz, S.; Schneider, B.; Schnellbach, Y. J.; Schnoor, U.; Schoeffel, L.; Schoening, A.; Schoenrock, B. D.; Schopf, E.; Schorlemmer, A. L. S.; Schott, M.; Schouten, D.; Schovancova, J.; Schramm, S.; Schreyer, M.; Schuh, N.; Schultens, M. J.; Schultz-Coulon, H.-C.; Schulz, H.; Schumacher, M.; Schumm, B. A.; Schune, Ph.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwartzman, A.; Schwarz, T. A.; Schwegler, Ph.; Schweiger, H.; Schwemling, Ph.; Schwienhorst, R.; Schwindling, J.; Schwindt, T.; Scifo, E.; Sciolla, G.; Scuri, F.; Scutti, F.; Searcy, J.; Sedov, G.; Sedykh, E.; Seema, P.; Seidel, S. C.; Seiden, A.; Seifert, F.; Seixas, J. M.; Sekhniaidze, G.; Sekhon, K.; Sekula, S. J.; Seliverstov, D. M.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Serfon, C.; Serin, L.; Serkin, L.; Serre, T.; Sessa, M.; Seuster, R.; Severini, H.; Sfiligoj, T.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shabalina, E.; Shamim, M.; Shan, L. Y.; Shang, R.; Shank, J. T.; Shapiro, M.; Shatalov, P. B.; Shaw, K.; Shaw, S. M.; Shcherbakova, A.; Shehu, C. Y.; Sherwood, P.; Shi, L.; Shimizu, S.; Shimmin, C. O.; Shimojima, M.; Shiyakova, M.; Shmeleva, A.; Shoaleh Saadi, D.; Shochet, M. J.; Shojaii, S.; Shrestha, S.; Shulga, E.; Shupe, M. A.; Sicho, P.; Sidebo, P. E.; Sidiropoulou, O.; Sidorov, D.; Sidoti, A.; Siegert, F.; Sijacki, Dj.; Silva, J.; Silver, Y.; Silverstein, S. B.; Simak, V.; Simard, O.; Simic, Lj.; Simion, S.; Simioni, E.; Simmons, B.; Simon, D.; Simon, M.; Sinervo, P.; Sinev, N. B.; Sioli, M.; Siragusa, G.; Sisakyan, A. N.; Sivoklokov, S. Yu.; Sjölin, J.; Sjursen, T. B.; Skinner, M. B.; Skottowe, H. P.; Skubic, P.; Slater, M.; Slavicek, T.; Slawinska, M.; Sliwa, K.; Smakhtin, V.; Smart, B. H.; Smestad, L.; Smirnov, S. Yu.; Smirnov, Y.; Smirnova, L. N.; Smirnova, O.; Smith, M. N. K.; Smith, R. W.; Smizanska, M.; Smolek, K.; Snesarev, A. A.; Snidero, G.; Snyder, S.; Sobie, R.; Socher, F.; Soffer, A.; Soh, D. A.; Sokhrannyi, G.; Solans, C. A.; Solar, M.; Solc, J.; Soldatov, E. Yu.; Soldevila, U.; Solodkov, A. A.; Soloshenko, A.; Solovyanov, O. V.; Solovyev, V.; Sommer, P.; Song, H. Y.; Soni, N.; Sood, A.; Sopczak, A.; Sopko, B.; Sopko, V.; Sorin, V.; Sosa, D.; Sosebee, M.; Sotiropoulou, C. L.; Soualah, R.; Soukharev, A. M.; South, D.; Sowden, B. C.; Spagnolo, S.; Spalla, M.; Spangenberg, M.; Spanò, F.; Spearman, W. R.; Sperlich, D.; Spettel, F.; Spighi, R.; Spigo, G.; Spiller, L. A.; Spousta, M.; St. Denis, R. D.; Stabile, A.; Staerz, S.; Stahlman, J.; Stamen, R.; Stamm, S.; Stanecka, E.; Stanek, R. W.; Stanescu, C.; Stanescu-Bellu, M.; Stanitzki, M. M.; Stapnes, S.; Starchenko, E. A.; Stark, J.; Staroba, P.; Starovoitov, P.; Staszewski, R.; Steinberg, P.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer, H. J.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stenzel, H.; Stewart, G. A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, E.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Succurro, A.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tarrade, F.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, F. E.; Taylor, G. N.; Taylor, P. T. E.; Taylor, W.; Teischinger, F. A.; Teixeira-Dias, P.; Temming, K. K.; Temple, D.; Ten Kate, H.; Teng, P. K.; Teoh, J. J.; Tepel, F.; Terada, S.; Terashi, K.; Terron, J.; Terzo, S.; Testa, M.; Teuscher, R. J.; Theveneaux-Pelzer, T.; Thomas, J. P.; Thomas-Wilsker, J.; Thompson, E. N.; Thompson, P. D.; Thompson, R. J.; Thompson, A. S.; Thomsen, L. A.; Thomson, E.; Thomson, M.; Thun, R. P.; Tibbetts, M. J.; Ticse Torres, R. E.; Tikhomirov, V. O.; Tikhonov, Yu. A.; Timoshenko, S.; Tiouchichine, E.; Tipton, P.; Tisserant, S.; Todome, K.; Todorov, T.; Todorova-Nova, S.; Tojo, J.; Tokár, S.; Tokushuku, K.; Tollefson, K.; Tolley, E.; Tomlinson, L.; Tomoto, M.; Tompkins, L.; Toms, K.; Torrence, E.; Torres, H.; Torró Pastor, E.; Toth, J.; Touchard, F.; Tovey, D. R.; Trefzger, T.; Tremblet, L.; Tricoli, A.; Trigger, I. M.; Trincaz-Duvoid, S.; Tripiana, M. F.; Trischuk, W.; Trocmé, B.; Troncon, C.; Trottier-McDonald, M.; Trovatelli, M.; Truong, L.; Trzebinski, M.; Trzupek, A.; Tsarouchas, C.; Tseng, J. C.-L.; Tsiareshka, P. V.; Tsionou, D.; Tsipolitis, G.; Tsirintanis, N.; Tsiskaridze, S.; Tsiskaridze, V.; Tskhadadze, E. G.; Tsui, K. M.; Tsukerman, I. I.; Tsulaia, V.; Tsuno, S.; Tsybychev, D.; Tudorache, A.; Tudorache, V.; Tuna, A. N.; Tupputi, S. A.; Turchikhin, S.; Turecek, D.; Turra, R.; Turvey, A. J.; Tuts, P. M.; Tykhonov, A.; Tylmad, M.; Tyndel, M.; Ueda, I.; Ueno, R.; Ughetto, M.; Ukegawa, F.; Unal, G.; Undrus, A.; Unel, G.; Ungaro, F. C.; Unno, Y.; Unverdorben, C.; Urban, J.; Urquijo, P.; Urrejola, P.; Usai, G.; Usanova, A.; Vacavant, L.; Vacek, V.; Vachon, B.; Valderanis, C.; Valencic, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Valero, A.; Valery, L.; Valkar, S.; Vallecorsa, S.; Valls Ferrer, J. A.; Van Den Wollenberg, W.; Van Der Deijl, P. C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    This Letter presents evidence for single top-quark production in the s-channel using proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The analysis is performed on events containing one isolated electron or muon, large missing transverse momentum and exactly two b-tagged jets in the final state. The analysed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. The signal is extracted using a maximum-likelihood fit of a discriminant which is based on the matrix element method and optimized in order to separate single-top-quark s-channel events from the main background contributions, which are top-quark pair production and W boson production in association with heavy-flavour jets. The measurement leads to an observed signal significance of 3.2 standard deviations and a measured cross-section of σs = 4.8 ± 0.8(stat.)-1.3+1.6 (syst.) pb, which is consistent with the Standard Model expectation. The expected significance for the analysis is 3.9 standard deviations.

  19. Simulation of slow-motion CW EPR spectrum using stochastic Liouville equation for an electron spin coupled to two nuclei with arbitrary spins: Matrix elements of the Liouville superoperator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Misra, Sushil K.

    2007-11-01

    An algorithm is developed that extends the well known nitroxide slow-motional continuous wave electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) simulation technique developed originally by Meirovitch et al. [E. Meirovitch, D. Inger, E. Inger, G. Moro, J.H. Freed, J. Chem. Phys. 77 (1982) 3915-3938], and implemented by Schneider and Freed [D.J. Schneider, J.H. Freed, Calculating slow motional magnetic resonance spectra: a user's guide, in: Biological Magnetic Resonance, vol. 6, Plenum Publishing Corporation, 1989]. This paper deals with the more general case of coupling of one electron spin to two nuclear spins. A complete listing of the matrix elements of the Liouville superoperator for this extension has been included. This advance has been successfully tested by reproducing the observed spectral lineshapes of a solution of the novel radical Mes ∗(CH 3)P-PMes ∗ [Mes ∗ = 2,4,6 (tBu) 3C 2H 2] in tetrahydrofuran (THF), in which the radical is undergoing slow tumbling, with the coupling of one electron spin to two physically and magnetically inequivalent phosphorus ( 31P) nuclei.

  20. Top Quark Mass Measurement in the t anti-t All Hadronic Channel using a Matrix Element Technique in p anti-p Collisions at s**91/2) = 1.96-TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Akimoto, T.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, Alberto; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; /Purdue U. /Waseda U.

    2008-11-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in the all-hadronic channel (t{bar t} {yields} b{bar b} q{sub 1}{bar q}{sub 2}q{sub 3}{bar q}{sub 4}) using 943 pb{sup -1} of p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV collected at the CDF II detector at Fermilab (CDF). We apply the standard model production and decay matrix-element (ME) to t{bar t} candidate events. We calculate per-event probability densities according to the ME calculation and construct template models of signal and background. The scale of the jet energy is calibrated using additional templates formed with the invariant mass of pairs of jets. These templates form an overall likelihood function that depends on the top quark mass and on the jet energy scale (JES). We estimate both by maximizing this function. Given 72 observed events, we measure a top quark mass of 171.1 {+-} 3.7 (stat.+JES) {+-} 2.1 (syst.) GeV/c{sup 2}. The combined uncertainty on the top quark mass is 4.3 GeV/c{sup 2}.

  1. On the equinoctial orbit elements.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broucke, R. A.; Cefola, P. J.

    1972-01-01

    This paper investigates the equinoctial orbit elements for the two-body problem, showing that the associated matrices are free from singularities for zero eccentricities and zero and ninety degree inclinations. The matrix of the partial derivatives of the position and velocity vectors with respect to the orbit elements is given explicitly, together with the matrix of inverse partial derivatives, in order to facilitate construction of the matrizant (state transition matrix) corresponding to these elements. The Lagrange and Poisson bracket matrices are also given. The application of the equinoctial orbit elements to general and special perturbations is discussed.

  2. Institutionalising Human Governance Determinant: Steering Organizations towards Sustainability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muhamad Hanapiyah, Zulkefli; Daud, Salina; Abdullah, Wan Mohammad Taufik Wan

    2016-03-01

    This paper discusses past researches on human governance elements. Eight elements of human governance are proposed in this paper: leadership, integrity, religiosity, spirituality, culture, recruitment, training and internal control policy. Empirical study shall be conducted in the future study to confirm the eight elements of human governance proposed in this paper. It is expected that these elements may enhance the human governance practice in the organizations.

  3. Government Regulatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Katie

    Government regulation of food products, food processing, and food preparation is imperative in bringing an unadulterated, nonmisleading, and safe food product to market and is relevant to all areas of food science, including engineering, processing, chemistry, and microbiology. The liability associated with providing consumers with an adulterated or substandard product cannot only tarnish a company's name and reputation, but also impose substantial financial repercussions on the company and those individuals who play an active role in the violation. In order for a company to fully comply with the relevant food laws (both federal and state), an intimate knowledge of food science is required. Individuals knowledgeable in food science play an integral role not only in implementing and counseling food companies/processors to ensure compliance with government regulations, but these individuals are also necessary to the state and federal governments that make and enforce the relevant laws and regulators.

  4. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the $\\mid V_{tb} \\mid$ CKM matrix element in pp collisions at $\\sqrt{s}$= 8 TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-06-16

    Our measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop (t¯), in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is σ t-ch. = 83.6 ± 2.3 (stat.) ± 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and t¯ cross sections are measured to be σ t-ch.(t) = 53.8 ± 1.5 (stat.) ± 4.4 (syst.) pb and σ t-ch. (t¯) = 27.6 ± 1.3 (stat.) ± 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is R t-ch. = σ t-ch.(t)/σ t-ch. (t¯) = 1.95 ± 0.10 (stat.) ± 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. Finally, the modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V tb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at √s = 7 TeV, a value |V tb| = 0.998 ± 0.038 (exp.) ± 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.

  5. Measurement of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section and of the $$\\mid V_{tb} \\mid$$ CKM matrix element in pp collisions at $$\\sqrt{s}$$= 8 TeV

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Khachatryan, Vardan

    2014-06-16

    Our measurements are presented of the t-channel single-top-quark production cross section in proton-proton collisions at √s = 8 TeV. The results are based on a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1 recorded with the CMS detector at the LHC. The cross section is measured inclusively, as well as separately for top (t) and antitop (t¯), in final states with a muon or an electron. The measured inclusive t-channel cross section is σ t-ch. = 83.6 ± 2.3 (stat.) ± 7.4 (syst.) pb. The single t and t¯ cross sections are measured to be σ t-ch.(t) =more » 53.8 ± 1.5 (stat.) ± 4.4 (syst.) pb and σ t-ch. (t¯) = 27.6 ± 1.3 (stat.) ± 3.7 (syst.) pb, respectively. The measured ratio of cross sections is R t-ch. = σ t-ch.(t)/σ t-ch. (t¯) = 1.95 ± 0.10 (stat.) ± 0.19 (syst.), in agreement with the standard model prediction. Finally, the modulus of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix element V tb is extracted and, in combination with a previous CMS result at √s = 7 TeV, a value |V tb| = 0.998 ± 0.038 (exp.) ± 0.016 (theo.) is obtained.« less

  6. A Stability Analysis of Cylindrical Panels Using a Finite Element Formulation. Ph.D. Thesis - Va. Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, R. E.

    1971-01-01

    A cylindrical finite element suitable for the linear stability analysis of cylindrical shells is developed. Energy principles and variational methods lead to a problem formulation which lends itself to physical interpretations of the governing matrices of the finite element. By properly grouping the terms which result from taking the second variation of the potential energy of the element, it is possible to identify three distinct types of matrices. The first matrix is the conventional stiffness matrix; the second is an initial stress stiffness matrix; and the third is an initial displacement stiffness matrix. With the assumption of linearity, the buckling problem is stated in terms of the classical linear real eigenvalue equation. This problem formulation was programmed on the CDC 6600 series computer. The computer program is used to analyze the buckling of a variety of structures. Columns, arches, flat plates and curved panels with and without cutouts are considered.

  7. An Economic Theory of School Governance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rada, Roger D.

    Working from the basic assumption that the primary motivation for those involved in school governance is self-interest, this paper develops and discusses 15 hypotheses that form the essential elements of an economic theory of school governance. The paper opens with a review of previous theories of governance and their origins in social science…

  8. The Chondrule-Matrix Complementarity, a Big Data Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harak, M.; Hezel, D. C.

    2016-08-01

    We compiled >3500 chondrule and matrix data from 80 literature sources. We developed an algorithm to automatically search this database, and identified a large number of complementary element relationships between chondrules and matrix.

  9. Hypercube matrix computation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calalo, Ruel H.; Imbriale, William A.; Jacobi, Nathan; Liewer, Paulett C.; Lockhart, Thomas G.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Lyons, James R.; Manshadi, Farzin; Patterson, Jean E.

    1988-01-01

    A major objective of the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is to investigate the applicability of a parallel computing architecture to the solution of large-scale electromagnetic scattering problems. Three scattering analysis codes are being implemented and assessed on a JPL/California Institute of Technology (Caltech) Mark 3 Hypercube. The codes, which utilize different underlying algorithms, give a means of evaluating the general applicability of this parallel architecture. The three analysis codes being implemented are a frequency domain method of moments code, a time domain finite difference code, and a frequency domain finite elements code. These analysis capabilities are being integrated into an electromagnetics interactive analysis workstation which can serve as a design tool for the construction of antennas and other radiating or scattering structures. The first two years of work on the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort is summarized. It includes both new developments and results as well as work previously reported in the Hypercube Matrix Computation Task: Final Report for 1986 to 1987 (JPL Publication 87-18).

  10. Risk Management using Dependency Stucture Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petković, Ivan

    2011-09-01

    An efficient method based on dependency structure matrix (DSM) analysis is given for ranking risks in a complex system or process whose entities are mutually dependent. This rank is determined according to the element's values of the unique positive eigenvector which corresponds to the matrix spectral radius modeling the considered engineering system. For demonstration, the risk problem of NASA's robotic spacecraft is analyzed.

  11. Cohesive Zone Model User Element

    2007-04-17

    Cohesive Zone Model User Element (CZM UEL) is an implementation of a Cohesive Zone Model as an element for use in finite element simulations. CZM UEL computes a nodal force vector and stiffness matrix from a vector of nodal displacements. It is designed for structural analysts using finite element software to predict crack initiation, crack propagation, and the effect of a crack on the rest of a structure.

  12. Earthquake Planning for Government Continuity

    PubMed

    PERRY; LINDELL

    1997-01-01

    / The problem of assuring government operational continuity following earthquakes has been given little research attention. Recent earthquake experience has documented that government organizations without a public safety mission do incur damaged facilities and routinely see increases in public demands following an earthquake. Impediments to service delivery associated with such dam-ages can be minimized if agencies address earthquake plan elements likely to enhance postimpact functioning, including: the potential to relocate operations, protection for the workplace, possession of an organizational inventory, emergency instructions for employees, the ability to use volunteers, and communication capacity. Factors associated with the adoption of these plan elements were studied in one county government and its municipal county seat in the southwestern United States. A census of departments within these jurisdictions was asked to complete a questionnaire reporting the level of planning activity relative to each of these plan elements. It was found that the overall level of preparedness was low, but statistically significantly related to agency size, perceived risk, and information seeking. The implications of these findings underscore the potential for disruption to government service delivery and permit the identification of potential avenues for increasing levels of preparedness.KEY WORDS: Emergency planning; Earthquakes; Government preparedness PMID:8939788

  13. FINITE ELEMENT IMPLEMENTATION OF MECHANO-CHEMICAL PHENOMENA IN NEUTRAL DEFORMABLE POROUS MEDIA UNDER FINITE DEFORMATION

    PubMed Central

    ATESHIAN, GERARD A.; ALBRO, MICHAEL B.; MAAS, STEVE; WEISS, JEFFREY A.

    2012-01-01

    Biological soft tissues and cells may be subjected to mechanical as well as chemical (osmotic) loading under their natural physiological environment or various experimental conditions. The interaction of mechanical and chemical effects may be very significant under some of these conditions, yet the highly nonlinear nature of the set of governing equations describing these mechanisms poses a challenge for the modeling of such phenomena. This study formulated and implemented a finite element algorithm for analyzing mechano-chemical events in neutral deformable porous media under finite deformation. The algorithm employed the framework of mixture theory to model the porous permeable solid matrix and interstitial fluid, where the fluid consists of a mixture of solvent and solute. A special emphasis was placed on solute-solid matrix interactions, such as solute exclusion from a fraction of the matrix pore space (solubility) and frictional momentum exchange that produces solute hindrance and pumping under certain dynamic loading conditions. The finite element formulation implemented full coupling of mechanical and chemical effects, providing a framework where material properties and response functions may depend on solid matrix strain as well as solute concentration. The implementation was validated using selected canonical problems for which analytical or alternative numerical solutions exist. This finite element code includes a number of unique features that enhance the modeling of mechano-chemical phenomena in biological tissues. The code is available in the public domain, open source finite element program FEBio (http://mrl.sci.utah.edu/software). PMID:21950898

  14. 48 CFR 2845.105 - Records of Government property.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 6 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Records of Government... MANAGEMENT GOVERNMENT PROPERTY General 2845.105 Records of Government property. If departmental elements maintain the Government's official property management records, the contract records may be kept as...

  15. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  16. Optical matrix-matrix multiplication method demonstrated by the use of a multifocus hololens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, H. K.; Liang, Y.-Z.

    1984-01-01

    A method of optical matrix-matrix multiplication is presented. The feasibility of the method is also experimentally demonstrated by the use of a dichromated-gelatin multifocus holographic lens (hololens). With the specific values of matrices chosen, the average percentage error between the theoretical and experimental data of the elements of the output matrix of the multiplication of some specific pairs of 3 x 3 matrices is 0.4 percent, which corresponds to an 8-bit accuracy.

  17. Universality of Quark-Lepton Mass Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuyama, Takeshi; Nishiura, Hiroyuki

    2013-03-01

    The recently observed lepton mixing angle θ13 of the MNS mixing matrix is well incorporated in a universal mixing hypothesis between quark and lepton sectors. This hypothesis asserts that, in the charged lepton diagonal base, all other mass matrices for up- and down-type quarks and light neutrinos are diagonalized by the same unitary matrix except for the phase elements. It is expressed as VCKM = UMNS(δ‧)†PUMNS(δ) for quark mixing matrix VCKM and lepton mixing matrix UMNS(δ) in the phenomenological level. Here P is a diagonal phase mass matrix. δ‧ is a slightly different phase parameter from the Dirac CP-violating phase δ = 1.1π (best fit) in the MNS lepton mixing matrix.

  18. Systems and methods for deactivating a matrix converter

    DOEpatents

    Ransom, Ray M.

    2013-04-02

    Systems and methods are provided for deactivating a matrix conversion module. An electrical system comprises an alternating current (AC) interface, a matrix conversion module coupled to the AC interface, an inductive element coupled between the AC interface and the matrix conversion module, and a control module. The control module is coupled to the matrix conversion module, and in response to a shutdown condition, the control module is configured to operate the matrix conversion module to deactivate the first conversion module when a magnitude of a current through the inductive element is less than a threshold value.

  19. Phenomenology of the CKM (Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa) matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Nir, Y.

    1989-07-01

    The way in which an exact determination of the CKM matrix elements tests the Standard Model is demonstrated by a two generation example. The determination of matrix elements from meson semi-leptonic decays is explained, with an emphasis on the respective reliability of quark level and meson level calculations. The assumptions involved in the use of loop processes are described. Finally, the state of the art of our knowledge of the CKM matrix is presented. 19 refs., 2 figs.

  20. New York's Experiment: Participation in Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bragaw, Donald H.

    1989-01-01

    Reports a New York State Education Department mandated government participation course. Course requirements were to examine public policy issues and to incorporate a participatory element. Describes four programs that were implemented by school districts: Effective Participation in Government Program; The Community Service Corps; National Issues…

  1. Fiber-matrix interfaces in ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Besmann, T.M.; Stinton, D.P.; Kupp, E.R.; Shanmugham, S.; Liaw, P.K.

    1996-12-31

    The mechanical properties of ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) are governed by the relationships between the matrix, the interface material, and the fibers. In non-oxide matrix systems compliant pyrolytic carbon and BN have been demonstrated to be effective interface materials, allowing for absorption of mismatch stresses between fiber and matrix and offering a poorly bonded interface for crack deflection. The resulting materials have demonstrated remarkable strain/damage tolerance together with high strength. Carbon or BN, however, suffer from oxidative loss in many service environments, and thus there is a major search for oxidation resistant alternatives. This paper reviews the issues related to developing a stable and effective interface material for non-oxide matrix CMCs.

  2. Calculating the GONG Leakage Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, F.; Howe, R.

    Since spherical harmonics do not form a complete orthonormal basis set over a portion of a sphere, helioseismic spectra computed for a specific target mode with degree ellt and azimuthal degree mt also contain modes with nearby ell'' and m''. These spatial leaks greatly increase the complexity of the observed spectrum, complicating the spectral fitting and degrading the resulting mode parameter estimates. This is particularly true where the target mode and the leaks have similar frequencies. Some strategies for fitting helioseismic spectra explicitly include the leakage matrix which estimates the relative strength of a mode (ell'' and m'') in the spectrum at (ellt,mt). Since the fitting methods assume that the matrix is correct and apply it as a constraint, an inaccurate matrix introduces systematic errors in the estimated mode parameters. It is thus important to have as accurate a matrix as possible. Here we report on the calculation of the leakage matrix for the GONG observations. The matrix elements are essentially the integrals (over the observed portion of the solar surface) of the crossproducts of the two spherical harmonics. However, several effects have been included to increase the accuracy of the matrix. These include the projection factor of the observable (velocity, intensity, modulation), the spatial apodization applied to the data, the finite rectangular pixel dimensions of the observations, and possible errors in the estimated image geometry. Other factors to be incorporated are the observed MTF, the merging of the GONG images, and the horizontal components of the oscillatory velocity field. We will compare the latest calculation with the observed spectrum and assess the relative importance of the input factors. We will also compare the leakage matrices for velocity and intensity to estimate their contribution to the large apparent differences in the helioseismic spectra obtained from these observables.

  3. BASIC Matrix Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digital Equipment Corp., Maynard, MA.

    The curriculum materials and computer programs in this booklet introduce the idea of a matrix. They go on to discuss matrix operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication by a scalar, and matrix multiplication. The last section covers several contemporary applications of matrix multiplication, including problems of communication…

  4. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    feedstock and the performance in the end-application. The cellulose resource matrix should become a practical tool for stakeholders to make choices regarding raw materials, process or market. Although there is a vast amount of scientific and economic information available on cellulose and lignocellulosic resources, the accessibility for the interested layman or entrepreneur is very difficult and the relevance of the numerous details in the larger context is limited. Translation of science to practical accessible information with modern data management and data integration tools is a challenge. Therefore, a detailed matrix structure was composed in which the different elements or entries of the matrix were identified and a tentative rough set up was made. The inventory includes current commodities and new cellulose containing and raw materials as well as exotic sources and specialties. Important chemical and physical properties of the different raw materials were identified for the use in processes and products. When available, the market data such as price and availability were recorded. Established and innovative cellulose extraction and refining processes were reviewed. The demands on the raw material for suitable processing were collected. Processing parameters known to affect the cellulose properties were listed. Current and expected emerging markets were surveyed as well as their different demands on cellulose raw materials and processes. The setting up of the cellulose matrix as a practical tool requires two steps. Firstly, the reduction of the needed data by clustering of the characteristics of raw materials, processes and markets and secondly, the building of a database that can provide the answers to the questions from stakeholders with an indicative character. This paper describes the steps taken to achieve the defined clusters of most relevant and characteristic properties. These data can be expanded where required. More detailed specification can be obtained

  5. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    feedstock and the performance in the end-application. The cellulose resource matrix should become a practical tool for stakeholders to make choices regarding raw materials, process or market. Although there is a vast amount of scientific and economic information available on cellulose and lignocellulosic resources, the accessibility for the interested layman or entrepreneur is very difficult and the relevance of the numerous details in the larger context is limited. Translation of science to practical accessible information with modern data management and data integration tools is a challenge. Therefore, a detailed matrix structure was composed in which the different elements or entries of the matrix were identified and a tentative rough set up was made. The inventory includes current commodities and new cellulose containing and raw materials as well as exotic sources and specialties. Important chemical and physical properties of the different raw materials were identified for the use in processes and products. When available, the market data such as price and availability were recorded. Established and innovative cellulose extraction and refining processes were reviewed. The demands on the raw material for suitable processing were collected. Processing parameters known to affect the cellulose properties were listed. Current and expected emerging markets were surveyed as well as their different demands on cellulose raw materials and processes. The setting up of the cellulose matrix as a practical tool requires two steps. Firstly, the reduction of the needed data by clustering of the characteristics of raw materials, processes and markets and secondly, the building of a database that can provide the answers to the questions from stakeholders with an indicative character. This paper describes the steps taken to achieve the defined clusters of most relevant and characteristic properties. These data can be expanded where required. More detailed specification can be obtained

  6. Long Fibre Composite Modelling Using Cohesive User's Element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozák, Vladislav; Chlup, Zdeněk

    2010-09-01

    The development glass matrix composites reinforced by unidirectional long ceramic fibre has resulted in a family of very perspective structural materials. The only disadvantage of such materials is relatively high brittleness at room temperature. The main micromechanisms acting as toughening mechanism are the pull out, crack bridging, matrix cracking. There are other mechanisms as crack deflection etc. but the primer mechanism is mentioned pull out which is governed by interface between fibre and matrix. The contribution shows a way how to predict and/or optimise mechanical behaviour of composite by application of cohesive zone method and write user's cohesive element into the FEM numerical package Abaqus. The presented results from numerical calculations are compared with experimental data. Crack extension is simulated by means of element extinction algorithms. The principal effort is concentrated on the application of the cohesive zone model with the special traction separation (bridging) law and on the cohesive zone modelling. Determination of micro-mechanical parameters is based on the combination of static tests, microscopic observations and numerical calibration procedures.

  7. Long Fibre Composite Modelling Using Cohesive User's Element

    SciTech Connect

    Kozak, Vladislav; Chlup, Zdenek

    2010-09-30

    The development glass matrix composites reinforced by unidirectional long ceramic fibre has resulted in a family of very perspective structural materials. The only disadvantage of such materials is relatively high brittleness at room temperature. The main micromechanisms acting as toughening mechanism are the pull out, crack bridging, matrix cracking. There are other mechanisms as crack deflection etc. but the primer mechanism is mentioned pull out which is governed by interface between fibre and matrix. The contribution shows a way how to predict and/or optimise mechanical behaviour of composite by application of cohesive zone method and write user's cohesive element into the FEM numerical package Abaqus. The presented results from numerical calculations are compared with experimental data. Crack extension is simulated by means of element extinction algorithms. The principal effort is concentrated on the application of the cohesive zone model with the special traction separation (bridging) law and on the cohesive zone modelling. Determination of micro-mechanical parameters is based on the combination of static tests, microscopic observations and numerical calibration procedures.

  8. Integrated optic vector-matrix multiplier

    DOEpatents

    Watts, Michael R.

    2011-09-27

    A vector-matrix multiplier is disclosed which uses N different wavelengths of light that are modulated with amplitudes representing elements of an N.times.1 vector and combined to form an input wavelength-division multiplexed (WDM) light stream. The input WDM light stream is split into N streamlets from which each wavelength of the light is individually coupled out and modulated for a second time using an input signal representing elements of an M.times.N matrix, and is then coupled into an output waveguide for each streamlet to form an output WDM light stream which is detected to generate a product of the vector and matrix. The vector-matrix multiplier can be formed as an integrated optical circuit using either waveguide amplitude modulators or ring resonator amplitude modulators.

  9. Emergency Response Synchronization Matrix

    1999-06-01

    An emergency response to a disaster is complex, requiring the rapid integration, coordination, and synchronization of multiple levels of governmental and non-governmental organizations from numerous jurisdictions into a unified community response. For example, a community’s response actions to a fixed site hazardous materials incident could occur in an area extending from an on-site storage location to points 25 or more miles away. Response actions are directed and controlled by local governments and agencies situated withinmore » the response area, as well as by state and federal operaticns centers quite removed from the area of impact. Time is critical and the protective action decision-making process is greatly compressed. The response community must carefully plan and coordinate response operations in order to have confidence that they will be effectively implemented when faced with the potentially catastrophic nature of such releases. A graphical depiction of the entire response process via an emergency response synchronization matrix is an effective tool in optimizing the planning, exercising, and implementation of emergency plans. This system—based approach to emergency planning depicts how a community organizes its response tasks across space and time in relation to hazard actions. It provides the opportunity to make real—time adjustments as necessary for maximizing the often limited resources in protecting area residents. A response must involve the entire community and must not be limited by individual jurisdictions and organizations acting on their own without coordination, integration, and synchronization.« less

  10. A matrix lower bound

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2002-02-04

    A matrix lower bound is defined that generalizes ideas apparently due to S. Banach and J. von Neumann. The matrix lower bound has a natural interpretation in functional analysis, and it satisfies many of the properties that von Neumann stated for it in a restricted case. Applications for the matrix lower bound are demonstrated in several areas. In linear algebra, the matrix lower bound of a full rank matrix equals the distance to the set of rank-deficient matrices. In numerical analysis, the ratio of the matrix norm to the matrix lower bound is a condition number for all consistent systems of linear equations. In optimization theory, the matrix lower bound suggests an identity for a class of min-max problems. In real analysis, a recursive construction that depends on the matrix lower bound shows that the level sets of continuously differential functions lie asymptotically near those of their tangents.

  11. On Quark Mixings and CKM Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senju, H.

    1991-05-01

    Inspired by unique features of the preon-subpreon model, we study quark mixings and the CKM matrix. The resultant CKM matrix has very nice properties. V_{cb} =~ - V_{ts} is predicted. Our scheme has a strong possibility to explain that V_{us} and V_{cd} are remarkably large compared with other off-diagonal elements and that V_{ub} and V_{td} are much smaller than V_{cb}.

  12. It's elemental

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Periodic Table of the elements will now have to be updated. An international team of researchers has added element 110 to the Earth's armory of elements. Though short-lived—of the order of microseconds, element 110 bottoms out the list as the heaviest known element on the planet. Scientists at the Heavy Ion Research Center in Darmstadt, Germany, made the 110-proton element by colliding a lead isotope with nickel atoms. The element, which is yet to be named, has an atomic mass of 269.

  13. Analytical solutions to matrix diffusion problems

    SciTech Connect

    Kekäläinen, Pekka

    2014-10-06

    We report an analytical method to solve in a few cases of practical interest the equations which have traditionally been proposed for the matrix diffusion problem. In matrix diffusion, elements dissolved in ground water can penetrate the porous rock surronuding the advective flow paths. In the context of radioactive waste repositories this phenomenon provides a mechanism by which the area of rock surface in contact with advecting elements is greatly enhanced, and can thus be an important delay mechanism. The cases solved are relevant for laboratory as well for in situ experiments. Solutions are given as integral representations well suited for easy numerical solution.

  14. Content addressable systolic array for sparse matrix computation

    SciTech Connect

    Wing, O.

    1983-01-01

    A systolic array is proposed which is specifically designed to solve a system of sparse linear equations. The array consists of a number of processing elements connected in a ring. Each processing element has its own content addressable memory where the nonzero elements of the sparse matrix are stored. Matrix elements to which elementary operations are applied are extracted from the memory by content addressing. The system of equations is solved in a systolic fashion and the solution is obtained in nz+5n-2 steps where nz is the number of nonzero elements along and below the diagonal and n is the number of equations. 13 references.

  15. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  16. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, M.; Yuh, C.Y.

    1996-12-03

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix is described comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles. 8 figs.

  17. Matrix differentiation formulas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usikov, D. A.; Tkhabisimov, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    A compact differentiation technique (without using indexes) is developed for scalar functions that depend on complex matrix arguments which are combined by operations of complex conjugation, transposition, addition, multiplication, matrix inversion and taking the direct product. The differentiation apparatus is developed in order to simplify the solution of extremum problems of scalar functions of matrix arguments.

  18. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  19. Random-matrix approach to RPA equations. I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barillier-Pertuisel, X.; Bohigas, O.; Weidenmüller, H. A.

    2009-09-01

    We study the RPA equations in their most general form by taking the matrix elements appearing in the RPA equations as random. This yields either a unitary or an orthogonally invariant random-matrix model that does not appear in the Altland-Zirnbauer classification. The average spectrum of the model is studied with the help of a generalized Pastur equation. Two independent parameters govern the behaviour of the system: the strength α2 of the coupling between positive- and negative-energy states and the distance between the origin and the centers of the two semicircles that describe the average spectrum for α2 = 0, the latter measured in units of the equal radii of the two semicircles. With increasing α2, positive- and negative-energy states become mixed and ever more of the spectral strength of the positive-energy states is transferred to those at negative energy, and vice versa. The two semicircles are deformed and pulled toward each other. As they begin to overlap, the RPA equations yield non-real eigenvalues: The system becomes unstable. We determine analytically the critical value of the strength for the instability to occur. Several features of the model are illustrated numerically.

  20. Random-matrix approach to RPA equations. I

    SciTech Connect

    Barillier-Pertuisel, X. Bohigas, O.; Weidenmueller, H.A.

    2009-09-15

    We study the RPA equations in their most general form by taking the matrix elements appearing in the RPA equations as random. This yields either a unitary or an orthogonally invariant random-matrix model that does not appear in the Altland-Zirnbauer classification. The average spectrum of the model is studied with the help of a generalized Pastur equation. Two independent parameters govern the behaviour of the system: the strength {alpha}{sup 2} of the coupling between positive- and negative-energy states and the distance between the origin and the centers of the two semicircles that describe the average spectrum for {alpha}{sup 2} = 0, the latter measured in units of the equal radii of the two semicircles. With increasing {alpha}{sup 2}, positive- and negative-energy states become mixed and ever more of the spectral strength of the positive-energy states is transferred to those at negative energy, and vice versa. The two semicircles are deformed and pulled toward each other. As they begin to overlap, the RPA equations yield non-real eigenvalues: The system becomes unstable. We determine analytically the critical value of the strength for the instability to occur. Several features of the model are illustrated numerically.

  1. Exact dynamic stiffness matrix for flexural vibration of three-layered sandwich beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howson, W. P.; Zare, A.

    2005-04-01

    An exact dynamic member stiffness matrix (exact finite element), which defines the flexural motion of a three-layered sandwich beam with unequal faceplates, is developed from the closed form solution of the governing differential equation. This enables the powerful modelling features associated with the finite element technique to be utilised, including the ability to account for nodal masses, spring support stiffnesses and non-classical boundary conditions. However, such a formulation necessitates the solution of a transcendental eigenvalue problem. This is accomplished using the Wittrick-Williams algorithm, which enables the required natural frequencies to be converged upon to any required accuracy with the certain knowledge that none have been missed. The accuracy of the method is confirmed by comparison with three sets of published results and a final example indicates its range of application.

  2. Elemental ZOO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helser, Terry L.

    2003-04-01

    This puzzle uses the symbols of 39 elements to spell the names of 25 animals found in zoos. Underlined spaces and the names of the elements serve as clues. To solve the puzzle, students must find the symbols that correspond to the elemental names and rearrange them into the animals' names.

  3. Metal matrix composites microfracture: Computational simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Caruso, John J.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1990-01-01

    Fiber/matrix fracture and fiber-matrix interface debonding in a metal matrix composite (MMC) are computationally simulated. These simulations are part of a research activity to develop computational methods for microfracture, microfracture propagation and fracture toughness of the metal matrix composites. The three-dimensional finite element model used in the simulation consists of a group of nine unidirectional fibers in three by three unit cell array of SiC/Ti15 metal matrix composite with a fiber volume ration of 0.35. This computational procedure is used to predict the fracture process and establish the hierarchy of fracture modes based on strain energy release rate. It is also used to predict stress redistribution to surrounding matrix-fibers due to initial and progressive fracture of fiber/matrix and due to debonding of fiber-matrix interface. Microfracture results for various loading cases such as longitudinal, transverse, shear and bending are presented and discussed. Step-by-step procedures are outlined to evaluate composite microfracture for a given composite system.

  4. Matrix management for aerospace 2000

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccarthy, J. F., Jr.

    1980-01-01

    The martix management approach to program management is an organized effort for attaining program objectives by defining and structuring all elements so as to form a single system whose parts are united by interaction. The objective of the systems approach is uncompromisingly complete coverage of the program management endeavor. Starting with an analysis of the functions necessary to carry out a given program, a model must be defined; a matrix of responsibility assignment must be prepared; and each operational process must be examined to establish how it is to be carried out and how it relates to all other processes.

  5. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; Li, Nan; Qiao, Junwei; Wang, Gongyao; Ren, Yang; Liaw, Peter K.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric informationmore » (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.« less

  6. Insights from the Lattice-Strain Evolution on Deformation Mechanisms in Metallic-Glass-Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Jia, Haoling; Zheng, Lili; Li, Weidong; Li, Nan; Qiao, Junwei; Wang, Gongyao; Ren, Yang; Liaw, Peter K.; Gao, Yanfei

    2015-02-18

    In this paper, in situ high-energy synchrotron X-ray diffraction experiments and micromechanics-based finite element simulations have been conducted to examine the lattice-strain evolution in metallic-glass-matrix composites (MGMCs) with dendritic crystalline phases dispersed in the metallic-glass matrix. Significant plastic deformation can be observed prior to failure from the macroscopic stress–strain curves in these MGMCs. The entire lattice-strain evolution curves can be divided into elastic–elastic (denoting deformation behavior of matrix and inclusion, respectively), elastic–plastic, and plastic–plastic stages. Characteristics of these three stages are governed by the constitutive laws of the two phases (modeled by free-volume theory and crystal plasticity) and geometric information (crystalline phase morphology and distribution). The load-partitioning mechanisms have been revealed among various crystalline orientations and between the two phases, as determined by slip strain fields in crystalline phase and by strain localizations in matrix. Finally, implications on ductility enhancement of MGMCs are also discussed.

  7. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    SciTech Connect

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  8. Spectral Element Agglomerate AMGe

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, T; Falgout, R; Henson, V E; Jones, J E; Vassilevski, P S; Manteuffel, T A; McCormick, S F; Ruge, J W

    2005-05-20

    The purpose of this note is to describe an algorithm resulting from the uniting of two ideas introduced and applied elsewhere. For many problems, AMG has always been difficult due to complexities whose natures are difficult to discern from the entries of matrix A alone. Element-based interpolation has been shown to be an effective method for some of these problems, but it requires access to the element matrices on all levels. One way to obtain these has been to perform element agglomeration to form coarse elements, but in complicated situations defining the coarse degrees of freedom (dofs) is not easy. The spectral approach to coarse dof selection is very attractive due to its elegance and simplicity. The algorithm presented here combines the robustness of element interpolation, the ease of coarsening by element agglomeration, and the simplicity of defining coarse dofs through the spectral approach. As demonstrated in the numerical results, the method does yield a reasonable solver for the problems described. It can, however, be an expensive method due to the number and cost of the local, small dense linear algebra problems; making it a generally competitive method remains an area for further research.

  9. Assessing Governance Alternatives for University-Owned Public Teaching Hospitals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitley, Evangeline L.

    The governance options matrix is provided to offer a way for state and university policymakers to examine the functioning environments of specific university-owned public teaching hospitals. With it, they can consider the benefits and problems involved with different options for governance. The issues related to the environmental factors affecting…

  10. Leisure, Government and Governance: A Swedish Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindstrom, Lisbeth

    2011-01-01

    The leisure sector has witnessed a tremendous expansion since 1960. The purpose of this article is to analyse the decisions and goals of Swedish government policy during the period 1962 to 2005. The empirical analysis covers government Propositions and governmental investigations. The fields covered are sports, culture, exercise, tourism and…

  11. Filtering of high modal frequencies for stable real-time explicit integration of deformable objects using the Finite Element Method.

    PubMed

    Aguinaga, Iker; Fierz, Basil; Spillmann, Jonas; Harders, Matthias

    2010-12-01

    The behavior, performance, and run-time of mechanical simulations in interactive virtual surgery depend heavily on the type of numerical differential equation solver used to integrate in time the dynamic equations obtained from simulation methods, such as the Finite Element Method. Explicit solvers are fast but only conditionally stable. The condition number of the stiffness matrix limits the highest possible time step. This limit is related to the geometrical properties of the underlying mesh, such as element shape and size. In fact, it can be governed by a small set of ill-shaped elements. For many applications this issue can be solved a priori by a careful meshing. However, when meshes are cut during interactive surgery simulation, it is difficult and computationally expensive to control the quality of the resulting elements. As an alternative, we propose to modify the elemental stiffness matrices directly in order to ensure stability. In this context, we first investigate the behavior of the eigenmodes of the elemental stiffness matrix in a Finite Element Method. We then propose a simple filter to reduce high model frequencies and thus allow larger time steps, while maintaining the general mechanical behavior. PMID:20869390

  12. On the Instanton R-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smirnov, Andrey

    2016-08-01

    A torus action on a symplectic variety allows one to construct solutions to the quantum Yang-Baxter equations ( R-matrices). For a torus action on cotangent bundles over flag varieties the resulting R-matrices are the standard rational solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation, well known in the theory of quantum integrable systems. The torus action on the instanton moduli space leads to more complicated R-matrices, depending additionally on two equivariant parameters t 1 and t 2. In this paper we derive an explicit expression for the R-matrix associated with the instanton moduli space. We study its matrix elements and its Taylor expansion in the powers of the spectral parameter. Certain matrix elements of this R-matrix give a generating function for the characteristic classes of tautological bundles over the Hilbert schemes in terms of the bosonic cut-and-join operators. In particular we rederive from the R-matrix the well known Lehn's formula for the first Chern class. We explicitly compute the first several coefficients for the power series expansion of the R-matrix in the spectral parameter. These coefficients are represented by simple contour integrals of some symmetrized bosonic fields.

  13. Propulsive matrix of a helical flagellum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, He-Peng; Liu, Bin; Bruce, Rodenborn; Harry, L. Swinney

    2014-11-01

    We study the propulsion matrix of bacterial flagella numerically using slender body theory and the regularized Stokeslet method in a biologically relevant parameter regime. All three independent elements of the matrix are measured by computing propulsive force and torque generated by a rotating flagellum, and the drag force on a translating flagellum. Numerical results are compared with the predictions of resistive force theory, which is often used to interpret micro-organism propulsion. Neglecting hydrodynamic interactions between different parts of a flagellum in resistive force theory leads to both qualitative and quantitative discrepancies between the theoretical prediction of resistive force theory and the numerical results. We improve the original theory by empirically incorporating the effects of hydrodynamic interactions and propose new expressions for propulsive matrix elements that are accurate over the parameter regime explored.

  14. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  15. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  16. Mixed matrix membrane development.

    PubMed

    Kulprathipanja, Santi

    2003-03-01

    Two types of mixed matrix membranes were developed by UOP in the late 1980s. The first type includes adsorbent polymers, such as silicalite-cellulose acetate (CA), NaX-CA, and AgX-CA mixed matrix membranes. The silicalite-CA has a CO(2)/H(2) selectivity of 5.15 +/- 2.2. In contrast, the CA membrane has a CO(2)/H(2) selectivity of 0.77 +/- 0.06. The second type of mixed matrix membrane is PEG-silicone rubber. The PEG-silicone rubber mixed matrix membrane has high selectivity for polar gases, such as SO(2), NH(3), and H(2)S.

  17. Studies of fiber-matrix adhesion on compression strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.; Nairn, John A.; Boll, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    A study was initiated on the effect of the matrix polymer and the fiber matrix bond strength of carbon fiber polymer matrix composites. The work includes tests with micro-composites, single ply composites, laminates, and multi-axial loaded cylinders. The results obtained thus far indicate that weak fiber-matrix adhesion dramatically reduces 0 degree compression strength. Evidence is also presented that the flaws in the carbon fiber that govern compression strength differ from those that determine fiber tensile strength. Examination of post-failure damage in the single ply tests indicates kink banding at the crack tip.

  18. Diagnostics of optical anisotropy changesin biological tissues using Mueller matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Ushenko, Yu A; Tomka, Yu Ya; Dubolazov, A V; Telen'ga, O Yu

    2011-03-31

    We study the efficiency of Mueller matrix diagnostics of birefringence in biological tissue layers with different optical thickness by measuring a set of third- and fourth-order statistical moments, characterising the coordinate distributions of the matrix element Z{sub 44} at different points of the histological section. (laser applications and other problems in quantum electronics)

  19. Mueller matrix polarimetry with four photoelastic modulators: theory and calibration.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Oriol; Freudenthal, John; Wang, Baoliang; Kahr, Bart

    2012-10-01

    A spectroscopic Mueller matrix polarimeter with four photoelastic modulators (PEMs) and no moving parts is introduced. In the 4-PEM polarimeter, all the elements of the Mueller matrix are simultaneously determined from the analysis of the frequencies of the time-dependent intensity of the light beam.

  20. Derivation of the state matrix for dynamic analysis of linear homogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Parra Martinez, Juan Pablo; Dazel, Olivier; Göransson, Peter; Cuenca, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    A method to obtain the state matrix of an arbitrary linear homogeneous medium excited by a plane wave is proposed. The approach is based on projections on the eigenspace of the governing equations matrix. It is an alternative to manually obtaining a linearly independent set of equations by combining the governing equations. The resulting matrix has been validated against previously published derivations for an anisotropic poroelastic medium.

  1. Derivation of the state matrix for dynamic analysis of linear homogeneous media.

    PubMed

    Parra Martinez, Juan Pablo; Dazel, Olivier; Göransson, Peter; Cuenca, Jacques

    2016-08-01

    A method to obtain the state matrix of an arbitrary linear homogeneous medium excited by a plane wave is proposed. The approach is based on projections on the eigenspace of the governing equations matrix. It is an alternative to manually obtaining a linearly independent set of equations by combining the governing equations. The resulting matrix has been validated against previously published derivations for an anisotropic poroelastic medium. PMID:27586783

  2. Elemental health

    SciTech Connect

    Tonneson, L.C.

    1997-01-01

    Trace elements used in nutritional supplements and vitamins are discussed in the article. Relevant studies are briefly cited regarding the health effects of selenium, chromium, germanium, silicon, zinc, magnesium, silver, manganese, ruthenium, lithium, and vanadium. The toxicity and food sources are listed for some of the elements. A brief summary is also provided of the nutritional supplements market.

  3. Wyoming Government, Unit VII.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Terry

    This unit on Wyoming government presents concepts, activities, and stories for elementary school students. Concepts stress that the functions of government are determined according to the demands, needs, and traditions of the people; each part of government has a special function; as citizens, we should be loyal to the underlying concepts of our…

  4. LACC Shared Governance Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Spangler, Mary

    This document discusses Los Angeles City College's (LACC) (California) Shared Governance Model. In response to California Assembly Bill 1725, LACC set forth a plan to implement the statutory requirements of shared governance. Shared governance is a concept grounded in the idea that decision-making is a process that affects the entire campus…

  5. Taking Student Government Seriously.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bolen, J. R.

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the student government at La Mesa Middle School (California) that was modeled after the three-branch U.S. government as a means for increasing students' civic understanding. Describes the structure of the legislative, judicial, and executive branches, the different activities of the student government, and the reasons for the hiatus.…

  6. Modelling University Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Trakman, Leon

    2008-01-01

    Twentieth century governance models used in public universities are subject to increasing doubt across the English-speaking world. Governments question if public universities are being efficiently governed; if their boards of trustees are adequately fulfilling their trust obligations towards multiple stakeholders; and if collegial models of…

  7. Governance in Strategic Context

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alfred, Richard L.

    2008-01-01

    This chapter begins with a retrospective look at governance in community colleges based on a working understanding of governance as a correlate of decision making. In its simplest form, governance is "a process for distributing authority, power, and influence in decision making among constituencies" (Alfred and Smydra, 1985, pp. 201-202). What…

  8. Teaching about Comparative Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Risinger, C. Frederick

    2009-01-01

    As international relationships become increasingly important (with both friendly and not-so-friendly governments), the author believes that it is important for U.S. students to learn about how a parliamentary democracy works--how it is similar, but different from a presidential-style government. Learning about the systems of government of other…

  9. Transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor

    SciTech Connect

    Tani, Koji; Nishio, Takayuki; Yamada, Takashi ); Kawase, Yoshihiro . Dept. of Information Science)

    1999-05-01

    For the next generation of high speed railway systems and automobiles new braking systems are currently under development. These braking systems take into account the eddy currents, which are produced by the movement of the conductor in the magnetic field. For their optimum design, it is necessary to know the distribution of eddy currents in the moving conductor. The finite element method (FEM) is often used to simulate them. Here, transient finite element method using edge elements for moving conductor is presented. Here the magnetic vector potential is interpolated at the upwind position and the time derivative term is discretized by the backward difference method. As a result, the system matrix becomes symmetric and the ICCG method is applicable to solve the matrix. This method is used to solve an eddy current rail brake system. The results demonstrate that this approach is suitable to solve transient problems involving movement.

  10. [Healthcare marketing elements].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Marketing puts its foundation on a few key concepts: need-demand, product-service, satisfaction, exchange, market, or business structure manufacturing / supply. The combination of these elements allows you to build an effective marketing strategy. Crucial in this respect is to remember the Porter matrix, which shows that for a correct analysis of the relevant market is necessary to refer to the "five forces at play", ie: customers, competitors, new entrants and substitutes threat. Another key lever for proper marketing oriented approach is the continuous and constant monitoring of the application, anticipating their dissatisfactions. PMID:24777920

  11. [Healthcare marketing elements].

    PubMed

    Ameri, Cinzia; Fiorini, Fulvio

    2014-01-01

    Marketing puts its foundation on a few key concepts: need-demand, product-service, satisfaction, exchange, market, or business structure manufacturing / supply. The combination of these elements allows you to build an effective marketing strategy. Crucial in this respect is to remember the Porter matrix, which shows that for a correct analysis of the relevant market is necessary to refer to the "five forces at play", ie: customers, competitors, new entrants and substitutes threat. Another key lever for proper marketing oriented approach is the continuous and constant monitoring of the application, anticipating their dissatisfactions.

  12. Internal compliance investigations can reduce government sanctions.

    PubMed

    Mustokoff, M M; Yecies, M S

    1997-10-01

    An effective corporate compliance program is facilitated by three essential elements: a well-qualified compliance officer; a policy of immediate investigation of every report of potential fraud and abuse; and clearly defined roles for both corporate and outside counsel in conducting the investigations. A government agency is less likely to exercise the full extent of its powers when these elements are in place and three is evidence of a sincere compliance effort.

  13. Internal compliance investigations can reduce government sanctions.

    PubMed

    Mustokoff, M M; Yecies, M S

    1997-10-01

    An effective corporate compliance program is facilitated by three essential elements: a well-qualified compliance officer; a policy of immediate investigation of every report of potential fraud and abuse; and clearly defined roles for both corporate and outside counsel in conducting the investigations. A government agency is less likely to exercise the full extent of its powers when these elements are in place and three is evidence of a sincere compliance effort. PMID:10173966

  14. Transfer matrix representation for periodic planar media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parrinello, A.; Ghiringhelli, G. L.

    2016-06-01

    Sound transmission through infinite planar media characterized by in-plane periodicity is faced by exploiting the free wave propagation on the related unit cells. An appropriate through-thickness transfer matrix, relating a proper set of variables describing the acoustic field at the two external surfaces of the medium, is derived by manipulating the dynamic stiffness matrix related to a finite element model of the unit cell. The adoption of finite element models avoids analytical modeling or the simplification on geometry or materials. The obtained matrix is then used in a transfer matrix method context, making it possible to combine the periodic medium with layers of different nature and to treat both hard-wall and semi-infinite fluid termination conditions. A finite sequence of identical sub-layers through the thickness of the medium can be handled within the transfer matrix method, significantly decreasing the computational burden. Transfer matrices obtained by means of the proposed method are compared with analytical or equivalent models, in terms of sound transmission through barriers of different nature.

  15. Inelastic deformation of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissenden, C. J.; Herakovich, C. T.; Pindera, M-J.

    1993-01-01

    A theoretical model capable of predicting the thermomechanical response of continuously reinforced metal matrix composite laminates subjected to multiaxial loading was developed. A micromechanical model is used in conjunction with nonlinear lamination theory to determine inelastic laminae response. Matrix viscoplasticity, residual stresses, and damage to the fiber/matrix interfacial zone are explicitly included in the model. The representative cell of the micromechanical model is considered to be in a state of generalized plane strain, enabling a quasi two-dimensional analysis to be performed. Constant strain finite elements are formulated with elastic-viscoplastic constitutive equations. Interfacial debonding is incorporated into the model through interface elements based on the interfacial debonding theory originally presented by Needleman, and modified by Tvergaard. Nonlinear interfacial constitutive equations relate interfacial tractions to displacement discontinuities at the interface. Theoretical predictions are compared with the results of an experimental program conducted on silicon carbide/titanium (SiC/Ti) unidirectional, (O4), and angle-ply, (+34)(sub s), tubular specimens. Multiaxial loading included increments of axial tension, compression, torque, and internal pressure. Loadings were chosen in an effort to distinguish inelastic deformation due to damage from matrix plasticity and separate time-dependent effects from time-independent effects. Results show that fiber/matrix debonding is nonuniform throughout the composite and is a major factor in the effective response. Also, significant creep behavior occurs at relatively low applied stress levels at room temperature.

  16. The NSLS 100 element solid state array detector

    SciTech Connect

    Furenlid, L.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Stephani, D.; Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Beren, J.; Cramer, S.P.

    1991-12-31

    X-ray absorption studies of dilute samples require fluorescence detection techniques. Since signal-to-noise ratios are governed by the ratio of fluorescent to scattered photons counted by a detector, solid state detectors which can discriminate between fluorescence and scattered photons have become the instruments of choice for trace element measurements. Commercially available 13 element Ge array detectors permitting total count rates < 500,000 counts per second are now in routine use. Since x-ray absorption beamlines at high brightness synchrotron sources can already illuminate most dilute samples with enough flux to saturate the current generation of solid state detectors, the development of next-generation instruments with significantly higher total count rates is essential. We present the design and current status of the 100 element Si array detector being developed in a collaboration between the NSLS and the Instrumentation Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detecting array consists of a 10*10 matrix of 4mm * 4mm elements laid out on a single piece of ultra-high purity silicon mounted at the front end of a liquid nitrogen dewar assembly. A matrix of charge sensitive integrating preamplifiers feed signals to an array of shaping amplifiers, single channel analyzers, and scalers. An electronic switch, delay amplifier, linear gate, digital scope, peak sensing A to D converter, and histogramming memory module provide for complete diagnostics and channel calibration. The entire instrument is controlled by a LabView 2 application on a MacII ci; the software also provides full control over beamline hardware and performs the data collection.

  17. The NSLS 100 element solid state array detector

    SciTech Connect

    Furenlid, L.R.; Kraner, H.W.; Rogers, L.C.; Stephani, D.; Beuttenmuller, R.H.; Beren, J. ); Cramer, S.P. . Dept. of Applied Science)

    1991-01-01

    X-ray absorption studies of dilute samples require fluorescence detection techniques. Since signal-to-noise ratios are governed by the ratio of fluorescent to scattered photons counted by a detector, solid state detectors which can discriminate between fluorescence and scattered photons have become the instruments of choice for trace element measurements. Commercially available 13 element Ge array detectors permitting total count rates < 500,000 counts per second are now in routine use. Since x-ray absorption beamlines at high brightness synchrotron sources can already illuminate most dilute samples with enough flux to saturate the current generation of solid state detectors, the development of next-generation instruments with significantly higher total count rates is essential. We present the design and current status of the 100 element Si array detector being developed in a collaboration between the NSLS and the Instrumentation Division at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The detecting array consists of a 10*10 matrix of 4mm * 4mm elements laid out on a single piece of ultra-high purity silicon mounted at the front end of a liquid nitrogen dewar assembly. A matrix of charge sensitive integrating preamplifiers feed signals to an array of shaping amplifiers, single channel analyzers, and scalers. An electronic switch, delay amplifier, linear gate, digital scope, peak sensing A to D converter, and histogramming memory module provide for complete diagnostics and channel calibration. The entire instrument is controlled by a LabView 2 application on a MacII ci; the software also provides full control over beamline hardware and performs the data collection.

  18. Respective Roles of Federal Government, State Governments, and Private Accrediting Agencies in the Governance of Postsecondary Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kaplin, William A.

    The current and future status of the education triad is examined with particular reference to determining eligibility for federal funds. The existing system of postsecondary governance is discussed, followed by a study of the legal constraints on the functions of and interrelationships among the triad elements. The status quo regarding…

  19. Physical quantities involved in a Mueller matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gil, José J.

    2016-05-01

    The polarimetric properties of a material medium are summarized in the sixteen elements of its associated Mueller matrix. The quantities carrying specific information on the significant polarimetric features have to be defined on the basis of the analysis of the mathematical structure of Mueller matrices. It is found that any Mueller matrix can be parameterized through two retardance vectors and ten quantities that are invariant under dual retarder transformations. This parameterization leads to proper definitions of the retardance and depolarization properties, which together with the diattenuation and polarizance properties provide complete polarimetric characterization of the sample under consideration.

  20. Transgene integration: use of matrix attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Allen, George C; Spiker, Steven; Thompson, William F

    2005-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are operationally defined as DNA elements that bind specifically to the nuclear matrix in vitro. When MARs are positioned at the 5'- and 3'-ends of a transgene higher more predictable expression of the transgene results. MARs are increasingly being applied to prevent unwanted transgene silencing, which is especially common when direct DNA transformation methods are used. This chapter describes methods for the isolation of MARs and the subsequent methods allowing the investigator to incorporate MARS into transformation strategies that can both improve transformation frequency and result in predictable, stable expression of the transgenic trait.

  1. Transgene integration: use of matrix attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Allen, George C; Spiker, Steven; Thompson, William F

    2005-01-01

    Matrix attachment regions (MARs) are operationally defined as DNA elements that bind specifically to the nuclear matrix in vitro. When MARs are positioned at the 5'- and 3'-ends of a transgene higher more predictable expression of the transgene results. MARs are increasingly being applied to prevent unwanted transgene silencing, which is especially common when direct DNA transformation methods are used. This chapter describes methods for the isolation of MARs and the subsequent methods allowing the investigator to incorporate MARS into transformation strategies that can both improve transformation frequency and result in predictable, stable expression of the transgenic trait. PMID:15310930

  2. Some remarks on unilateral matrix equations

    SciTech Connect

    Cerchiai, Bianca L.; Zumino, Bruno

    2001-02-01

    We briefly review the results of our paper LBNL-46775: We study certain solutions of left-unilateral matrix equations. These are algebraic equations where the coefficients and the unknown are square matrices of the same order, or, more abstractly, elements of an associative, but possibly noncommutative algebra, and all coefficients are on the left. Recently such equations have appeared in a discussion of generalized Born-Infeld theories. In particular, two equations, their perturbative solutions and the relation between them are studied, applying a unified approach based on the generalized Bezout theorem for matrix polynomials.

  3. An alternative Laplacian electrostatic field finite element formulation

    SciTech Connect

    Barber, P.F.; Lauber, T.S.

    1987-01-01

    An alternative finite element method for calculating three-dimensional electrostatic fields is described. The matrix equation is assembled using linear tetrahedral elements and an electrical network solution techniques known as impedance matrix building with axis discarding. The solutions of sample problems are described.

  4. Modification of acceleration element in ''TRANSPORT''

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, J.W.; McGill, J.

    1987-01-01

    One of the uses at LAMPF of the beam-dynamics code TRANSPORT is to model and tune the proton beams in the side-coupled linac. Significant differences are found between measured beam characteristics and those calculated by an early version of TRANSPORT. These differences are reduced to acceptable limits by modification of the original accelerator transformation matrix used in the code. The modified element and a brief description of its derivation are presented. The modified matrix reduces to the original matrix in the relativistic limit. The modified matrix is also compared to results of numerical integration to obtain some indication of its accuracy.

  5. Superheavy Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsang, Chin Fu

    1975-01-01

    Discusses the possibility of creating elements with an atomic number of around 114. Describes the underlying physics responsible for the limited extent of the periodic table and enumerates problems that must be overcome in creating a superheavy nucleus. (GS)

  6. Elemental Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Daniel, Esther Gnanamalar Sarojini; Saat, Rohaida Mohd.

    2001-01-01

    Introduces a learning module integrating three disciplines--physics, chemistry, and biology--and based on four elements: carbon, oxygen, hydrogen, and silicon. Includes atomic model and silicon-based life activities. (YDS)

  7. A method for damping matrix identification using frequency response data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pradhan, S.; Modak, S. V.

    2012-11-01

    Accurate modeling of damping in structures is of great importance for vibration response analysis and control. This paper addresses the issue of identification of damping matrix of a structure by posing it as a finite element damping matrix updating problem. Many of the current updating approaches, dealing with updating of damping matrix, perform simultaneous updating of mass, stiffness and damping matrices. However, such a strategy is faced with numerical problems in practical implementation, since the magnitude of stiffness and mass matrix elements is generally much more than that of the damping matrix elements causing difficulties in accurate identification of the damping matrix. Some other approaches divide the process of updating of the mass and stiffness matrix and the damping matrix into two stages, but their application is restricted to structures with low levels of damping. This paper addresses these issues by developing an updating formulation that seeks to separate updating of the damping matrix from that of updating of the stiffness and the mass matrix. The proposed damping matrix updating method utilizes the concept of normal frequency response functions (FRFs) available in the literature. The method is formulated so as to reduce the difference between the complex FRFs, which can be measured in practice, and the normal FRFs, whose estimates can be obtained from the measured complex FRFs. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated through a numerical study on a simple but representative beam structure. The issue of coordinate incompleteness and robustness of the method under presence of noise is investigated. It is found that the proposed method is effective in the accurate identification of the damping matrix in cases of complete, incomplete and noisy data and is not limited by the level of damping in the structure.

  8. NUCLEAR REACTOR FUEL-BREEDER FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Currier, E.L. Jr.; Nicklas, J.H.

    1962-08-14

    A fuel-breeder fuel element was developed for a nuclear reactor wherein discrete particles of fissionable material are dispersed in a matrix of fertile breeder material. The fuel element combines the advantages of a dispersion type and a breeder-type. (AEC)

  9. Mueller matrix differential decomposition.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-05-15

    We present a Mueller matrix decomposition based on the differential formulation of the Mueller calculus. The differential Mueller matrix is obtained from the macroscopic matrix through an eigenanalysis. It is subsequently resolved into the complete set of 16 differential matrices that correspond to the basic types of optical behavior for depolarizing anisotropic media. The method is successfully applied to the polarimetric analysis of several samples. The differential parameters enable one to perform an exhaustive characterization of anisotropy and depolarization. This decomposition is particularly appropriate for studying media in which several polarization effects take place simultaneously. PMID:21593943

  10. Matrix method for acoustic levitation simulation.

    PubMed

    Andrade, Marco A B; Perez, Nicolas; Buiochi, Flavio; Adamowski, Julio C

    2011-08-01

    A matrix method is presented for simulating acoustic levitators. A typical acoustic levitator consists of an ultrasonic transducer and a reflector. The matrix method is used to determine the potential for acoustic radiation force that acts on a small sphere in the standing wave field produced by the levitator. The method is based on the Rayleigh integral and it takes into account the multiple reflections that occur between the transducer and the reflector. The potential for acoustic radiation force obtained by the matrix method is validated by comparing the matrix method results with those obtained by the finite element method when using an axisymmetric model of a single-axis acoustic levitator. After validation, the method is applied in the simulation of a noncontact manipulation system consisting of two 37.9-kHz Langevin-type transducers and a plane reflector. The manipulation system allows control of the horizontal position of a small levitated sphere from -6 mm to 6 mm, which is done by changing the phase difference between the two transducers. The horizontal position of the sphere predicted by the matrix method agrees with the horizontal positions measured experimentally with a charge-coupled device camera. The main advantage of the matrix method is that it allows simulation of non-symmetric acoustic levitators without requiring much computational effort. PMID:21859587

  11. Network trending; leadership, followership and neutrality among companies: A random matrix approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mobarhan, N. S. Safavi; Saeedi, A.; Roodposhti, F. Rahnamay; Jafari, G. R.

    2016-11-01

    In this article, we analyze the cross-correlation between returns of different stocks to answer the following important questions. The first one is: If there exists collective behavior in a financial market, how could we detect it? And the second question is: Is there a particular company among the companies of a market as the leader of the collective behavior? Or is there no specified leadership governing the system similar to some complex systems? We use the method of random matrix theory to answer the mentioned questions. Cross-correlation matrix of index returns of four different markets is analyzed. The participation ratio quantity related to each matrices' eigenvectors and the eigenvalue spectrum is calculated. We introduce shuffled-matrix created of cross correlation matrix in such a way that the elements of the later one are displaced randomly. Comparing the participation ratio quantities obtained from a correlation matrix of a market and its related shuffled-one, on the bulk distribution region of the eigenvalues, we detect a meaningful deviation between the mentioned quantities indicating the collective behavior of the companies forming the market. By calculating the relative deviation of participation ratios, we obtain a measure to compare the markets according to their collective behavior. Answering the second question, we show there are three groups of companies: The first group having higher impact on the market trend called leaders, the second group is followers and the third one is the companies who have not a considerable role in the trend. The results can be utilized in portfolio construction.

  12. Measurement matrix optimization method based on matrix orthogonal similarity transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    Optimization of the measurement matrix is one of the important research aspects of compressive sensing theory. A measurement matrix optimization method is presented based on the orthogonal similarity transformation of the information operator's Gram matrix. In terms of the fact that the information operator's Gram matrix is a singular symmetric matrix, a simplified orthogonal similarity transformation is deduced, and thus the simplified diagonal matrix that is orthogonally similar to it is obtained. Then an approximation of the Gram matrix is obtained by letting all the nonzero diagonal entries of the simplified diagonal matrix equal their average value. Thus an optimized measurement matrix can be acquired according to its relationship with the information operator. Results of experiments show that the optimized measurement matrix compared to the random measurement matrix is less coherent with dictionaries. The relative signal recovery error also declines when the proposed measurement matrix is utilized.

  13. Finite element computational fluid mechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baker, A. J.

    1983-01-01

    Finite element analysis as applied to the broad spectrum of computational fluid mechanics is analyzed. The finite element solution methodology is derived, developed, and applied directly to the differential equation systems governing classes of problems in fluid mechanics. The heat conduction equation is used to reveal the essence and elegance of finite element theory, including higher order accuracy and convergence. The algorithm is extended to the pervasive nonlinearity of the Navier-Stokes equations. A specific fluid mechanics problem class is analyzed with an even mix of theory and applications, including turbulence closure and the solution of turbulent flows.

  14. 77 FR 18258 - Government-to-Government Telephonic Consultation Meetings

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-27

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR National Park Service Government-to-Government Telephonic Consultation Meetings AGENCY: National Park Service, Interior. SUMMARY: The National Park Service announces two telephonic government-...

  15. Pesticide-Exposure Matrix

    Cancer.gov

    The "Pesticide-exposure Matrix" was developed to help epidemiologists and other researchers identify the active ingredients to which people were likely exposed when their homes and gardens were treated for pests in past years.

  16. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes.

  17. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes. PMID:26478452

  18. Stabilisation of matrix polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, R.

    2015-10-01

    A state feedback is proposed to analyse the stability of a matrix polynomial in closed loop. First, it is shown that a matrix polynomial is stable if and only if a state space realisation of a ladder form of certain transfer matrix is stable. Following the ideas of the Routh-Hurwitz stability procedure for scalar polynomials, certain continued-fraction expansions of polynomial matrices are carrying out by unimodular matrices to achieve the Euclid's division algorithm which leads to an extension of the well-known Routh-Hurwitz stability criteria but this time in terms of matrix coefficients. After that, stability of the closed-loop matrix polynomial is guaranteed based on a Corollary of a Lyapunov Theorem. The sufficient stability conditions are: (i) The matrices of one column of the presented array must be symmetric and positive definite and (ii) the matrices of the cascade realisation must satisfy a commutative condition. These stability conditions are also necessary for matrix polynomial of second order. The results are illustrated through examples.

  19. Numerical studies of fibrous composites from the view point of fiber-matrix interface and fiber-matrix bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yilmaz, Yahya Ilyas

    In the present research, the micromechanics of fibrous composites was studied numerically. The effects of the fiber/matrix interphase region and fiber/matrix bonding were the main goals of this research. Throughout the research NASTRAN finite element analyses were used. First we investigated the effect of the interphase region on the stress field by varying the thickness of the interphase region and the material properties in the interphase region. Second, we numerically simulated the bonding qualities between the fiber and the matrix by the implementation of the fiber/matrix interphase region. The change for bonding between the fiber and the matrix were simulated through a periodic material property change in the interphase region. Third, we developed a bi-dimensional concentric cylindrical model for stress transfer between the fiber and the matrix model in case of a broken fiber or short fiber composites. This model is unique in accounting for the real non-linear stress-strain relationship for the matrix material. The stress transfer between the fiber and the matrix was also analyzed by finite element models. Toward this end finite element analysis proved a useful tool to help us evaluate key model parameters, most importantly the radius of fiber influence. This parameter is also a key parameter of simple models upon which the new model is based. Finally we applied our stress transfer model to analyze single fiber fragmentation test data obtained at Kansas State University.

  20. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Bean, R.W.

    1963-11-19

    A ceramic fuel element for a nuclear reactor that has improved structural stability as well as improved cooling and fission product retention characteristics is presented. The fuel element includes a plurality of stacked hollow ceramic moderator blocks arranged along a tubular raetallic shroud that encloses a series of axially apertured moderator cylinders spaced inwardly of the shroud. A plurality of ceramic nuclear fuel rods are arranged in the annular space between the shroud and cylinders of moderator and appropriate support means and means for directing gas coolant through the annular space are also provided. (AEC)

  1. The Iraqi Governing Council

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Social Education, 2004

    2004-01-01

    This article provides the details of the chronological events surrounding the establishment of a Governing Council in Iraq in July 2003 by the United States, acting as the leader of the Coalition Provisional Authority (CPA) that administers Iraq. The following topics are discussed in the article: (1) The Composition of the Governing Council; (2)…

  2. Government Quality Conference Proceedings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The Government Quality Conference was an attempt to bring together executive organizations and senior individuals in the Federal Government that have a desire to improve productivity. It was designed to provide an exchange of ideas based on experience, and to encourage individual management initiatives to tap the capabilities of Federal employees.

  3. Restructuring for Good Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robert, Stephen; Carey, Russell C.

    2006-01-01

    American higher education has never been more in need of good governance than it is right now. Yet much of the structure many boards have inherited or created tends to stall or impede timely, well-informed, and broadly supported decision making. At many institutions (ours included), layers of governance have been added with each passing year,…

  4. Using IT Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brobst, Jan; Council, Chip

    2005-01-01

    The discussion in this article is intended to provide an examination of why top management, IT management, and internal auditors should be interested in IT governance. Some aspects of IT management will be described including implementation, auditing, availability, security, and alignment. One governance framework, COBIT, will be utilized as a…

  5. Government Information Policy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dearstyne, Bruce W.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Six articles discuss government information policy in context of technology and electronic records; policies on information resources management from OMB (Office of Management and Budget); state information resources, including Council of State Governments (CSG); state record laws and preservation of archival records; and management of electronic…

  6. Educational Governance in Denmark

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moos, Lejf

    2014-01-01

    Denmark has entered global competition by expanding collaboration with European countries, which is profoundly impacting the public sector and school governance. Relations between the state and institutions are transforming from traditional democratic, public-sector models of governance into new forms characterized as corporate and market-driven…

  7. Policy Governance Revisited.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, William J.

    2001-01-01

    An administrator trainer/former superintendent's experience suggests that corporate governance models don't fit the reality of school governance in many districts. Elected board members define their roles differently than their business counterparts and derive little or no monetary benefit from public service. The "new breed" resemble political…

  8. State and local governments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnes, Dennis

    1990-01-01

    The Virginia Space Grant Consortium approach to a close working relation to state and local governments is presented as a model for consideration. State government relations are especially important in that this is a primary resource in securing matching funds. Avenues for establishing these relationships are listed and discussed.

  9. Truth in Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cousins, Norman

    In this position paper the author examines truth in government. Examination of recent political events, especially in areas of foreign policy, reveals that the government has assumed the right to decide what truths are to be told and when they are to be told. To return to the principles developed by the members of the Constitutional Convention of…

  10. Ceramic Matrix Composite Vane Subelement Burst Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brewer, David N.; Verrilli, Michael; Calomino, Anthony

    2006-01-01

    Burst tests were performed on Ceramic Matrix Composite (CMC) vane specimens, manufactured by two vendors, under the Ultra Efficient Engine Technology (UEET) project. Burst specimens were machined from the ends of 76mm long vane sub-elements blanks and from High Pressure Burner Rig (HPBR) tested specimens. The results of burst tests will be used to compare virgin specimens with specimens that have had an Environmental Barrier Coating (EBC) applied, both HPBR tested and untested, as well as a comparison between vendors.

  11. Residual thermal strains and stresses in nickel aluminide matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saigal, A.; Kupperman, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    Thermally induced residual strains and stresses developed during postfabrication cooling in Saphikon/NiAl and tungsten/NiAl high-temperature composites are investigated through three-dimensional elastoplastic finite-element analyses. Average axial and transverse strains in the matrix are found to be tensile and compressive, respectively, and similar for both Saphikon and W-fiber-reinforced NiAl composites. It is suggested that the residual matrix stresses and strains are controlled more by the low-matrix yield stress than by the fiber/matrix expansion mismatch. Residual thermal strains in the matrix of these composites are measured by using a neutron-diffraction technique; the measured axial and transverse strains in the matrix are found to be in agreement with the computed values.

  12. Merging weak and QCD showers with matrix elements

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Christiansen, Jesper Roy; Prestel, Stefan

    2016-01-22

    In this study, we present a consistent way of combining associated weak boson radiation in hard dijet events with hard QCD radiation in Drell–Yan-like scatterings. This integrates multiple tree-level calculations with vastly different cross sections, QCD- and electroweak parton-shower resummation into a single framework. The new merging strategy is implemented in the P ythia event generator and predictions are confronted with LHC data. Improvements over the previous strategy are observed. Results of the new electroweak-improved merging at a future 100 TeV proton collider are also investigated.

  13. Nuclear matrix elements for double-β decay

    SciTech Connect

    Engel, Jonathan

    2015-07-15

    Recent progress in nuclear-structure theory has been dramatic. I describe applications in progress of ab inito calculations to double-beta decay, and discuss the recent and future application of generator-coordinate methods to the same problem. I also discuss the old and vexing problem of the renormalization of the weak nuclear axial-vector coupling constant “in medium” and plans to resolve it.

  14. Element Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Herald, Christine

    2001-01-01

    Describes a research assignment for 8th grade students on the elements of the periodic table. Students use web-based resources and a chemistry handbook to gather information, construct concept maps, and present the findings to the full class using the mode of their choice: a humorous story, a slideshow or gameboard, a brochure, a song, or skit.…

  15. Mercury, elemental

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Mercury , elemental ; CASRN 7439 - 97 - 6 Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcinoge

  16. Generation of the invariant coefficients of the characteristic polynomial for an nxn matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beaudet, P. R.; Maury, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    In theories of numerical stability, roots to a characteristic polynomial are sought, which, in the case of the predictor with iterative correction method of numerical integration, are eigenvalues of a matrix whose elements depend on the coefficients used in the integration process. The characteristic polynomial is displayed explicitly in terms of the elements of the characteristic matrix.

  17. Method of determining lanthanidies in a transition element host

    DOEpatents

    De Kalb, Edward L.; Fassel, Velmer A.

    1976-02-03

    A phosphor composition contains a lanthanide activator element within a host matrix having a transition element as a major component. The host matrix is composed of certain rare earth phosphates or vanadates such as YPO.sub.4 with a portion of the rare earth replaced with one or more of the transition elements. On X-ray or other electromagnetic excitation, trace lanthanide impurities or additives within the phosphor are spectrometrically determined from their characteristic luminescence.

  18. Physics and Government

    SciTech Connect

    Hendry, Nancy H.

    1999-08-24

    In defining the powers and duties of the three branches of government, the U.S. Constitution never explicitly referred to Science, except in the patent clause. But many technical responsibilities are implied in references to weights and measures, the census, and the like. Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and in particular Benjamin Franklin, were highly literate in science, but it was their disciple, President John Quincy Adams who promoted as a matter of policy a direct role of the government in science--in particular with respect to astronomy, land surveys and navigation--all physical sciences. Some agencies of government--notably the National Bureau of Standards and the Department of Agriculture were founded in the early days of the Republic with scientific and technical missions. Since then the involvement of the government with science has waxed and waned but the major expansion of the interaction between physics and government occurred after World War II when physicists demonstrated the power of their craft during mobilization of science in support of the war effort. In discussing the interaction of physics with government we should distinguish ''science in government''--scientific input into policy making--from ''government in science,'' which is the support and management of that part of the overall scientific endeavor for which the government has responsibility. Let me turn first to the subject of physics in government. An overwhelming fraction of governmental decisions today have scientific and technical components; decisions ignoring these components are wasteful at best and can imperil the nation. For this reason governmental bodies at all levels solicit scientific advice--or at least give lip service to the need for such advice. When such advice was deliberately avoided, as President Reagan did before announcing his Strategic Defense Initiative in March 1983, the technically unattainable goal ''to make nuclear weapons impotent and obsolete'' was proclaimed.

  19. Superheavy Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hofmann, S.

    The nuclear shell model predicts that the next doubly magic shell closure beyond 208Pb is at a proton number Z=114, 120, or 126 and at a neutron number N=172 or 184. The outstanding aim of experimental investigations is the exploration of this region of spherical `SuperHeavy Elements' (SHEs). Experimental methods have been developed which allowed for the identification of new elements at production rates of one atom per month. Using cold fusion reactions which are based on lead and bismuth targets, relatively neutron-deficient isotopes of the elements from 107 to 113 were synthesized at GSI in Darmstadt, Germany, and/or at RIKEN in Wako, Japan. In hot fusion reactions of 48Ca projectiles with actinide targets more neutron-rich isotopes of the elements from 112 to 116 and even 118 were produced at the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions (FLNR) at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (JINR) in Dubna, Russia. Recently, part of these data which represent the first identification of nuclei located on the predicted island of SHEs were confirmed in two independent experiments. The decay data reveal that for the heaviest elements, the dominant decay mode is α emission rather than fission. Decay properties as well as reaction cross-sections are compared with results of theoretical studies. Finally, plans are presented for the further development of the experimental set-up and the application of new techniques. At a higher sensitivity, the detailed exploration of the region of spherical SHEs will be in the center of interest of future experimental work. New data will certainly challenge theoretical studies on the mechanism of the synthesis, on the nuclear decay properties, and on the chemical behavior of these heaviest atoms at the limit of stability.

  20. Modal cost analysis for linear matrix-second-order systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Skelton, R. E.; Hughes, P. C.

    1980-01-01

    Reduced models and reduced controllers for systems governed by matrix-second-order differential equations are obtained by retaining those modes which make the largest contributions to quadratic control objectives. Such contributions, expressed in terms of modal data, used as mode truncation criteria, allow the statement of the specific control objectives to influence the early model reduction from very high order models which are available, for example, from finite element methods. The relative importance of damping, frequency, and eigenvector in the mode truncation decisions are made explicit for each of these control objectives: attitude control, vibration suppression and figure control. The paper also shows that using modal cost analysis (MCA) on the closed loop modes of the optimally controlled system allows the construction of reduced control policies which feedback only those closed loop modal coordinates which are most critical to the quadratic control performance criterion. In this way, the modes which should be controlled (and hence the modes which must be observable by choice of measurements), are deduced from truncations of the optimal controller.

  1. The Mauna Loa environmental matrix: foliar and soil nutrients

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vitousek, P.M.; Aplet, G.; Turner, D.; Lockwood, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    The accumulation of total carbon, nitrogen, and phosphorus in soils, available soil nutrients, and foliar nutrients in the native dominant Metrosideros polymorpha were determined across a wide elevational range on 9 lava flows on Mauna Loa, Hawai'i. The flows included a young (2800 y) a??a?? (rough surface texture) and pa??hoehoe (smooth) flow on the wet east and dry northwest side of the mountain. Soil element pools and nutrient availability increased with flow age independent of climate. The dry sites accumulated organic matter and nutrients more slowly than comparable wet sites, but relative nutrient availability to plants (as indicated by soil assays and foliar nutrients) was greater in the dry sites. Accumulation of soil organic matter and nutrients occurred most rapidly in lowerelevation sites on the young flows, but the largest accumulations occurred at higher elevations on old flows. The range of sites sampled represents a complete and largely independent matrix of major factors governing ecosystem structure and function. ?? 1992 Springer-Verlag.

  2. Russian Traditions in the System of Student Government

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gostev, A. N.; Demchenko, T. S.

    2014-01-01

    The traditions of higher education in Russia dealing with elements of student government have been weakened in recent years, but recent research shows support among Russian students for greater involvement in activities related to their lives as students. This article concludes that in order to improve student government today it will be necessary…

  3. Collective Bargaining and Conflict: Impacts on School Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cresswell, Anthony M.; Simpson, Daniel

    1977-01-01

    Two key elements define the stability of the relationship between the school board and the superintendent and of the governance structure--vulnerability, the existence of, or lack of, checks and balances in the structure, and consensus, the agreement or lack of agreement on governance pattern and system goals. (Author/IRT)

  4. Matrix interdiction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feng; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva

    2010-01-01

    In the matrix interdiction problem, a real-valued matrix and an integer k is given. The objective is to remove k columns such that the sum over all rows of the maximum entry in each row is minimized. This combinatorial problem is closely related to bipartite network interdiction problem which can be applied to prioritize the border checkpoints in order to minimize the probability that an adversary can successfully cross the border. After introducing the matrix interdiction problem, we will prove the problem is NP-hard, and even NP-hard to approximate with an additive n{gamma} factor for a fixed constant {gamma}. We also present an algorithm for this problem that achieves a factor of (n-k) mUltiplicative approximation ratio.

  5. Matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture

    DOEpatents

    Eichenberger, Alexandre E; Gschwind, Michael K; Gunnels, John A

    2013-11-05

    Mechanisms for performing matrix multiplication operations with data pre-conditioning in a high performance computing architecture are provided. A vector load operation is performed to load a first vector operand of the matrix multiplication operation to a first target vector register. A load and splat operation is performed to load an element of a second vector operand and replicating the element to each of a plurality of elements of a second target vector register. A multiply add operation is performed on elements of the first target vector register and elements of the second target vector register to generate a partial product of the matrix multiplication operation. The partial product of the matrix multiplication operation is accumulated with other partial products of the matrix multiplication operation.

  6. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  7. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Fortescue, P.; Zumwalt, L.R.

    1961-11-28

    A fuel element was developed for a gas cooled nuclear reactor. The element is constructed in the form of a compacted fuel slug including carbides of fissionable material in some cases with a breeder material carbide and a moderator which slug is disposed in a canning jacket of relatively impermeable moderator material. Such canned fuel slugs are disposed in an elongated shell of moderator having greater gas permeability than the canning material wherefore application of reduced pressure to the space therebetween causes gas diffusing through the exterior shell to sweep fission products from the system. Integral fission product traps and/or exterior traps as well as a fission product monitoring system may be employed therewith. (AEC)

  8. Government - contractor interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, D. M.

    1983-01-01

    The development of the Administrative Contracting Officer represents an advance in the Government system of contract management because it provides an individual with knowledge, time, and a specialized function to insure performance of Government contracts. However, the development has created a dichotomy between the award and the post-award function which increases the adversary relationship with Government contractors. This paper advocates that this adversary relationship can be decreased if PCOs and ACOs are provided with opportunities to serve in the assignments of the other.

  9. Towards Self-Government.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davies, Peter

    1980-01-01

    The author discusses the advantages of student self-government and describes the work of student committees at Belper High School, Derbyshire, in setting up a student coffee shop, planning school sports, and orienting new students. (SJL)

  10. LESS Government Act

    THOMAS, 112th Congress

    Rep. Latham, Tom [R-IA-4

    2011-06-15

    06/30/2011 Referred to the Subcommittee on Government Organization, Efficiency, and Financial Management . (All Actions) Tracker: This bill has the status IntroducedHere are the steps for Status of Legislation:

  11. 3 CFR - Government Contracting

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... contract oversight could reduce such sums significantly. Government outsourcing for services also raises... governmental functions. Agencies and departments must operate under clear rules prescribing when outsourcing is... oversee acquisitions appropriately; and (4) clarify when governmental outsourcing for services is and...

  12. The Acrosomal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Foster, James A; Gerton, George L

    2016-01-01

    The acrosome, a single exocytotic vesicle on the head of sperm, has an essential role in fertilization, but the exact mechanisms by which it facilitates sperm-egg interactions remain unresolved. The acrosome contains dozens of secretory proteins that are packaged into the forming structure during spermatogenesis; many of these proteins are localized into specific topographical areas of the acrosome, while others are more diffusely distributed. Acrosomal proteins can also be biochemically classified as components of the acrosomal matrix, a large, relatively insoluble complex, or as soluble proteins. This review focuses on recent findings using genetically modified mice (gene knockouts and transgenic "green acrosome" mice) to study the effects of eliminating acrosomal matrix-associated proteins on sperm structure and function. Some gene knockouts produce infertile phenotypes with obviously missing, specific activities that affect acrosome biogenesis during spermatogenesis or interfere with acrosome function in mature sperm. Mutations that delete some components produce fertile phenotypes with subtler effects that provide useful insights into acrosomal matrix function in fertilization. In general, these studies enable the reassessment of paradigms to explain acrosome formation and function and provide novel, objective insights into the roles of acrosomal matrix proteins in fertilization. The use of genetically engineered mouse models has yielded new mechanistic information that complements recent, important in vivo imaging studies. PMID:27194348

  13. Constructing the matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, John

    2012-09-01

    As part of our 'toolkit' for analysing an extraterrestrial signal, the facility for calculating structural affinity to known phenomena must be part of our core capabilities. Without such a resource, we risk compromising our potential for detection and decipherment or at least causing significant delay in the process. To create such a repository for assessing structural affinity, all known systems (language parameters) need to be structurally analysed to 'place' their 'system' within a relational communication matrix. This will need to include all known variants of language structure, whether 'living' (in current use) or ancient; this must also include endeavours to incorporate yet undeciphered scripts and non-human communication, to provide as complete a picture as possible. In creating such a relational matrix, post-detection decipherment will be assisted by a structural 'map' that will have the potential for 'placing' an alien communication with its nearest known 'neighbour', to assist subsequent categorisation of basic parameters as a precursor to decipherment. 'Universal' attributes and behavioural characteristics of known communication structure will form a range of templates (Elliott, 2001 [1] and Elliott et al., 2002 [2]), to support and optimise our attempt at categorising and deciphering the content of an extraterrestrial signal. Detection of the hierarchical layers, which comprise intelligent, complex communication, will then form a matrix of calculations that will ultimately score affinity through a relational matrix of structural comparison. In this paper we develop the rationales and demonstrate functionality with initial test results.

  14. Shared health governance.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2011-07-01

    Health and Social Justice (Ruger 2009a ) developed the "health capability paradigm," a conception of justice and health in domestic societies. This idea undergirds an alternative framework of social cooperation called "shared health governance" (SHG). SHG puts forth a set of moral responsibilities, motivational aspirations, and institutional arrangements, and apportions roles for implementation in striving for health justice. This article develops further the SHG framework and explains its importance and implications for governing health domestically. PMID:21745082

  15. Shared health governance.

    PubMed

    Ruger, Jennifer Prah

    2011-07-01

    Health and Social Justice (Ruger 2009a ) developed the "health capability paradigm," a conception of justice and health in domestic societies. This idea undergirds an alternative framework of social cooperation called "shared health governance" (SHG). SHG puts forth a set of moral responsibilities, motivational aspirations, and institutional arrangements, and apportions roles for implementation in striving for health justice. This article develops further the SHG framework and explains its importance and implications for governing health domestically.

  16. Government Positions for Physicists.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seiler, David

    2006-03-01

    There are a number of government agencies that employ physicists in a wide variety of jobs -- from student internships to post docs to full time staff positions. You can do real, creative, fore-front physics or pursue a wide range of leadership positions. The possibilities are almost unlimited and so is the impact your work can have on the government, academia, and industry. So how do you go about finding a government job? What qualities or abilities are deemed valuable? What are the advantages and disadvantages to working in the government? I will bring some personal experiences and observations from working in the government (one year as a rotator at the National Science Foundation in the Division of Materials Research and almost 18 years at the National Institute of Standards and Technology, both as a Group Leader and a Division Chief) to bear on these questions and more. Prior to my government career I was a physics professor pursuing research and teaching in academia.

  17. Understanding 'anticipatory governance'.

    PubMed

    Guston, David H

    2014-04-01

    Anticipatory governance is 'a broad-based capacity extended through society that can act on a variety of inputs to manage emerging knowledge-based technologies while such management is still possible'. It motivates activities designed to build capacities in foresight, engagement, and integration--as well as through their production ensemble. These capacities encourage and support the reflection of scientists, engineers, policy makers, and other publics on their roles in new technologies. This article reviews the early history of the National Nanotechnology Initiative in the United States, and it further explicates anticipatory governance through exploring the genealogy of the term and addressing a set of critiques found in the literature. These critiques involve skepticism of three proximities of anticipatory governance: to its object, nanotechnology, which is a relatively indistinct one; to the public, which remains almost utterly naive toward nanotechnology; and to technoscience itself, which allegedly renders anticipatory governance complicit in its hubris. The article concludes that the changing venues and the amplification within them of the still, small voices of folks previously excluded from offering constructive visions of futures afforded by anticipatory governance may not be complete solutions to our woes in governing technology, but they certainly can contribute to bending the long arc of technoscience more toward humane ends. PMID:24941612

  18. An improved transfer-matrix model for optical superlenses.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran P; Blaikie, Richard J; Arnold, Matthew D

    2009-08-01

    The use of transfer-matrix analyses for characterizing planar optical superlensing systems is studied here, and the simple model of the planar superlens as an isolated imaging element is shown to be defective in certain situations. These defects arise due to neglected interactions between the superlens and the spatially varying shadow masks that are normally used as scattering objects for imaging, and which are held in near-field proximity to the superlenses. An extended model is proposed that improves the accuracy of the transfer-matrix analysis, without adding significant complexity, by approximating the reflections from the shadow mask by those from a uniform metal layer. Results obtained using both forms of the transfer matrix model are compared to finite element models and two example superlenses, one with a silver monolayer and the other with three silver sublayers, are characterized. The modified transfer matrix model gives much better agreement in both cases.

  19. Shared governance: what it means to those involved.

    PubMed

    Stichler, J F

    1989-06-01

    Nurses saw shared governance as both a management philosophy and an organizational structure that changes the organizational culture and belief system. Because of these two aspects of shared governance, its implementation is an evolutionary process in which former roles are examined and new roles are learned. Power shifts during the implementation of shared governance create role conflicts and confusion in the decision domains of staff and managerial nurses. Shared governance is highly valued by participants as a mechanism to enhance commitment to the organization, accountability for nursing practice, and the professionalism of both the clinical and managerial staff. The participants valued the opportunities for growth and development of leadership skills that shared governance provided. While negative perspective were shared, they seemed to be secondary to the overall satisfaction with shared governance. Some of the negative perspectives seemed to relate to the length of experience with shared governance, whereas others seemed to be essential elements of the experience.

  20. Ion Electrodiffusion Governs Silk Electrogelation

    PubMed Central

    Kojic, Nikola; Panzer, Matthew J.; Leisk, Gary G.; Raja, Waseem K.; Kojic, Milos; Kaplan, David L.

    2012-01-01

    Silk electrogelation involves the transition of an aqueous silk fibroin solution to a gel state (E-gel) in the presence of an electric current. The process is based on local pH changes as a result of water electrolysis – generating H+ and OH− ions at the (+) and (−) electrodes, respectively. Silk fibroin has a pI=4.2 and when local pHelement ion electrodiffusion model was developed. The model relies on electrodiffusion of the generated H+ and OH− ions. Initially, inputs into the model were the measured E-gel and voltage curves. The governing ion electrodiffusion equations were solved and the calculated pH matched the experimental pH profile, indicating that ion electrodiffusion dictates local pH changes and E-gel growth. Furthermore, the model predicted the constant currents (2mA and 3mA) necessary for two hypothetical E-gel growth curves and these results were then validated experimentally. The model thus shows how ion electrodiffusion governs the electrogelation process and also provides predictable outcomes for fundamental and practical E-gel applications. PMID:22822409

  1. FUEL ELEMENT

    DOEpatents

    Howard, R.C.; Bokros, J.C.

    1962-03-01

    A fueled matrlx eontnwinlng uncomblned carbon is deslgned for use in graphlte-moderated gas-cooled reactors designed for operatlon at temperatures (about 1500 deg F) at which conventional metallic cladding would ordlnarily undergo undesired carburization or physical degeneratlon. - The invention comprlses, broadly a fuel body containlng uncombined earbon, clad with a nickel alloy contalning over about 28 percent by' weight copper in the preferred embodlment. Thls element ls supporirted in the passageways in close tolerance with the walls of unclad graphite moderator materlal. (AEC)

  2. Virtues of Mueller matrix detection of objects embedded in random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattawar, George W.

    2000-04-01

    We will present a brief introduction to Mueller matrix imaging from cradle to adolescence and then show how it can be effectively used for detection of objects embedded in a highly scattering medium when ordinary radiance imaging might fail. We will show which elements and combination of elements are important for gaining the highest contrast against the background continuum. The mapping of certain combinations of Mueller matrix elements into an equivalent human visual system will also be discussed.

  3. Virtues of Mueller matrix detection of objects embedded in random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kattawar, George W.

    2000-06-01

    We will present a brief introduction to Mueller matrix imaging (MMI) from cradle to adolescence and then show how it can be effectively used for detection of objects embedded in a highly scattering medium when ordinary radiance imaging might fail. We will show which elements and combination of elements are important for gaining the highest contrast against the background continuum. The mapping of certain combinations of Mueller matrix elements into an equivalent human visual system will also be discussed.

  4. METCAN-PC - METAL MATRIX COMPOSITE ANALYZER

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, P. L.

    1994-01-01

    High temperature metal matrix composites offer great potential for use in advanced aerospace structural applications. The realization of this potential however, requires concurrent developments in (1) a technology base for fabricating high temperature metal matrix composite structural components, (2) experimental techniques for measuring their thermal and mechanical characteristics, and (3) computational methods to predict their behavior. METCAN (METal matrix Composite ANalyzer) is a computer program developed to predict this behavior. METCAN can be used to computationally simulate the non-linear behavior of high temperature metal matrix composites (HT-MMC), thus allowing the potential payoff for the specific application to be assessed. It provides a comprehensive analysis of composite thermal and mechanical performance. METCAN treats material nonlinearity at the constituent (fiber, matrix, and interphase) level, where the behavior of each constituent is modeled accounting for time-temperature-stress dependence. The composite properties are synthesized from the constituent instantaneous properties by making use of composite micromechanics and macromechanics. Factors which affect the behavior of the composite properties include the fabrication process variables, the fiber and matrix properties, the bonding between the fiber and matrix and/or the properties of the interphase between the fiber and matrix. The METCAN simulation is performed as point-wise analysis and produces composite properties which are readily incorporated into a finite element code to perform a global structural analysis. After the global structural analysis is performed, METCAN decomposes the composite properties back into the localized response at the various levels of the simulation. At this point the constituent properties are updated and the next iteration in the analysis is initiated. This cyclic procedure is referred to as the integrated approach to metal matrix composite analysis. METCAN

  5. Battery element and method for making same

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, Thomas J. (Inventor); Pinsky, Naum (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    In a method for producing a battery element useful as at least a positive plate in a lead-acid battery, the element comprising a fluid impervious, electrically conductive matrix having mutually opposing first and second surfaces and positive active electrode material associated with the first surface of the matrix, the improvement which comprises: conditioning the first surface to enhance the association of the positive active electrode material and the first surface; and applying and associating the positive active electrode material to the first surface.

  6. A multithread based new sparse matrix method in bioluminescence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bo; Tian, Jie; Liu, Dan; Sun, Li; Yang, Xin; Han, Dong

    2010-03-01

    Among many molecular imaging modalities, bioluminescence tomography (BLT) stands out as an effective approach for in vivo imaging because of its noninvasive molecular and cellular level detection ability, high sensitivity and low cost in comparison with other imaging technologies. However, there exists the case that large scale problem with large number of points and elements in the structure of mesh standing for the small animal or phantom. And the large scale problem's system matrix generated by the diffuse approximation (DA) model using finite element method (FEM) is large. So there wouldn't be enough random access memory (RAM) for the program and the related inverse problem couldn't be solved. Considering the sparse property of the BLT system matrix, we've developed a new sparse matrix (ZSM) to overcome the problem. And the related algorithms have all been speeded up by multi-thread technologies. Then the inverse problem is solved by Tikhonov regularization method in adaptive finite element (AFE) framework. Finally, the performance of this method is tested on a heterogeneous phantom and the boundary data is obtained through Monte Carlo simulation. During the process of solving the forward model, the ZSM can save more processing time and memory space than the usual way, such as those not using sparse matrix and those using Triples or Cross Linked sparse matrix. Numerical experiments have shown when more CPU cores are used, the processing speed is increased. By incorporating ZSM, BLT can be applied to large scale problems with large system matrix.

  7. Cleanup of fractured rock aquifers: Implications of matrix diffusion.

    PubMed

    Mutch, R D; Scott, J I; Wilson, D J

    1993-01-01

    As contamination moves through a fractured rock aquifer, it tends to diffuse from the flowing fracture water into the rock's essentially stagnant pore water. This process tends both to retard a contamination plume's advance through a fractured rock aquifer and to substantially increase the difficulty of purging contamination from the aquifer. A mathematical model has been developed to evaluate the potential impact of this phenomenon upon water quality restoration in fractured rock aquifers. The numerical modeling reveals that cleanup of fractured rock aquifers will, in many cases, require many decades, even centuries, to achieve, particularly where substantial improvements in water quality are sought. The parameters which most strongly govern the degree to which matrix diffusion prolongs the aquifer restoration process are the rock's matrix porosity, fracture spacing, and matrix diffusivity, the chemical identity of the contaminant(s), and the length of time the aquifer has been contaminated.Since sedimentary rocks tend to have both relatively high matrix porosities and matrix diffusivities, it can be particularly difficult to purge contamination from sedimentary rock aquifers. Crystalline rocks, in contrast, typically have lower matrix porosities and matrix diffusivities, and therefore undergo more rapid cleanup. However, even in crystalline rocks, attainment of very high degrees of water quality improvement may be problematic. Numerical modeling also indicates that conventional groundwater 'pump and treat' programs are not likely to be very effective in speeding up aquifer restoration if the rate limiting step in the process is diffusion of contaminants from the rock matrix.

  8. Systematic errors for a Mueller matrix dual rotating compensator ellipsometer.

    PubMed

    Broch, Laurent; En Naciri, Aotmane; Johann, Luc

    2008-06-01

    The characterization of anisotropic materials and complex systems by ellipsometry has pushed the design of instruments to require the measurement of the full reflection Mueller matrix of the sample with a great precision. Therefore Mueller matrix ellipsometers have emerged over the past twenty years. The values of some coefficients of the matrix can be very small and errors due to noise or systematic errors can induce distored analysis. We present a detailed characterization of the systematic errors for a Mueller Matrix Ellipsometer in the dual-rotating compensator configuration. Starting from a general formalism, we derive explicit first-order expressions for the errors on all the coefficients of the Mueller matrix of the sample. The errors caused by inaccuracy of the azimuthal arrangement of the optical components and residual ellipticity introduced by imperfect optical elements are shown. A new method based on a four-zone averaging measurement is proposed to vanish the systematic errors.

  9. Application of sparse matrix solvers as effective preconditioners

    SciTech Connect

    Young, D.P.; Melvin, R.G.; Johnson, F.T.; Bussoletti, J.E.; Wigton, L.B.; Samant, S.S. )

    1989-11-01

    In this paper the use of a new out-of-core sparse matrix package for the numerical solution of partial differential equations involving complex geometries arising from aerospace applications is discussed. The sparse matrix solver accepts contributions to the matrix elements in random order and assembles the matrix using fast sort/merge routines. Fill-in is reduced through the use of a physically based nested dissection ordering. For very large problems a drop tolerance is used during the matrix decomposition phase. The resulting incomplete factorization is an effective preconditioner for Krylov subspace methods, such as GMRES. Problems involving 200,000 unknowns routinely are solved on the Cray X-MP using 64MW of solid-state storage device (SSD).

  10. Hybrid textures of the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dev, S.; Gautam, Radha Raman; Singh, Lal

    2013-08-01

    We perform a systematic study of neutrino mass matrices having a vanishing cofactor and an equality between two cofactors of the mass matrix. Such texture structures of the effective neutrino mass matrix arise from the type-I seesaw mechanism when the Dirac neutrino mass matrix is diagonal with two equal elements and the right-handed Majorana neutrino mass matrix has hybrid textures with one equality of matrix elements and one zero matrix element. For three right-handed neutrinos there are sixty possible hybrid textures out of which only six are excluded by the present experimental data. We show that such textures can be derived using discrete symmetries. The predictions of experimentally allowed textures are examined for unknown parameters such as the effective Majorana mass of the electron neutrino and the Dirac-type CP-violating phase.

  11. Minimal parameter solution of the orthogonal matrix differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baritzhack, Itzhack Y.; Markley, F. Landis

    1988-01-01

    As demonstrated in this work, all orthogonal matrices solve a first order differential equation. The straightforward solution of this equation requires n sup 2 integrations to obtain the element of the nth order matrix. There are, however, only n(n-1)/2 independent parameters which determine an orthogonal matrix. The questions of choosing them, finding their differential equation and expressing the orthogonal matrix in terms of these parameters are considered. Several possibilities which are based on attitude determination in three dimensions are examined. It is shown that not all 3-D methods have useful extensions to higher dimensions. It is also shown why the rate of change of the matrix elements, which are the elements of the angular rate vector in 3-D, are the elements of a tensor of the second rank (dyadic) in spaces other than three dimensional. It is proven that the 3-D Gibbs vector (or Cayley Parameters) are extendable to other dimensions. An algorithm is developed employing the resulting parameters, which are termed Extended Rodrigues Parameters, and numerical results are presented of the application of the algorithm to a fourth order matrix.

  12. Minimal parameter solution of the orthogonal matrix differential equation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bar-Itzhack, Itzhack Y.; Markley, F. Landis

    1990-01-01

    As demonstrated in this work, all orthogonal matrices solve a first order differential equation. The straightforward solution of this equation requires n sup 2 integrations to obtain the element of the nth order matrix. There are, however, only n(n-1)/2 independent parameters which determine an orthogonal matrix. The questions of choosing them, finding their differential equation and expressing the orthogonal matrix in terms of these parameters are considered. Several possibilities which are based on attitude determination in three dimensions are examined. It is shown that not all 3-D methods have useful extensions to higher dimensions. It is also shown why the rate of change of the matrix elements, which are the elements of the angular rate vector in 3-D, are the elements of a tensor of the second rank (dyadic) in spaces other than three dimensional. It is proven that the 3-D Gibbs vector (or Cayley Parameters) are extendable to other dimensions. An algorithm is developed emplying the resulting parameters, which are termed Extended Rodrigues Parameters, and numerical results are presented of the application of the algorithm to a fourth order matrix.

  13. Optical shutter switching matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    The interface switching systems are discussed which are related to those used in the Space Shuttle ground control system, transmission systems, communications systems, and airborne radar electronic countermeasure systems. The main goal is to identify a need that exists throughout the comprehensive information processing and communications disciplines supporting the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs, and introduce one viable approach to satisfy that need. The proposed device, described in NASA patent entitled 'Optical Shutter Switch Matrix', is discussed.

  14. Government Information Access: A decisive Factor for E-Government

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yikun; Huang, Cui

    In recent years we are witnessing enormous development of e-government, which has brought about great changes in our society. This study examines the relationship between the levels of e-government and the quality of government information access, pointing out that e-government principles are based on the assumption that government information should be accessed among all kinds of organizations. In contrast to government webs' rapid growth, the low quality of government information access has been a dilemma which impacts the usability and efficiency of e-government. This paper also analyzes blocking factors about information access in China, draw a conclusion that on-line government information access should be the key factor of e-government which steps should be taken to enhance accessibility to government information.

  15. Efficient sparse matrix-matrix multiplication for computing periodic responses by shooting method on Intel Xeon Phi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoykov, S.; Atanassov, E.; Margenov, S.

    2016-10-01

    Many of the scientific applications involve sparse or dense matrix operations, such as solving linear systems, matrix-matrix products, eigensolvers, etc. In what concerns structural nonlinear dynamics, the computations of periodic responses and the determination of stability of the solution are of primary interest. Shooting method iswidely used for obtaining periodic responses of nonlinear systems. The method involves simultaneously operations with sparse and dense matrices. One of the computationally expensive operations in the method is multiplication of sparse by dense matrices. In the current work, a new algorithm for sparse matrix by dense matrix products is presented. The algorithm takes into account the structure of the sparse matrix, which is obtained by space discretization of the nonlinear Mindlin's plate equation of motion by the finite element method. The algorithm is developed to use the vector engine of Intel Xeon Phi coprocessors. It is compared with the standard sparse matrix by dense matrix algorithm and the one developed by Intel MKL and it is shown that by considering the properties of the sparse matrix better algorithms can be developed.

  16. Half a century of "the nuclear matrix".

    PubMed

    Pederson, T

    2000-03-01

    A cell fraction that would today be termed "the nuclear matrix" was first described and patented in 1948 by Russian investigators. In 1974 this fraction was rediscovered and promoted as a fundamental organizing principle of eukaryotic gene expression. Yet, convincing evidence for this functional role of the nuclear matrix has been elusive and has recently been further challenged. What do we really know about the nonchromatin elements (if any) of internal nuclear structure? Are there objective reasons (as opposed to thinly veiled disdain) to question experiments that use harsh nuclear extraction steps and precipitation-prone conditions? Are the known biophysical properties of the nucleoplasm in vivo consistent with the existence of an extensive network of anastomosing filaments coursing dendritically throughout the interchromatin space? To what extent may the genome itself contribute information for its own quarternary structure in the interphase nucleus? These questions and recent work that bears on the mystique of the nuclear matrix are addressed in this essay. The degree to which gene expression literally depends on nonchromatin nuclear structure as a facilitating organizational format remains an intriguing but unsolved issue in eukaryotic cell biology, and considerable skepticism continues to surround the nuclear matrix fraction as an accurate representation of the in vivo situation. PMID:10712500

  17. Half a century of "the nuclear matrix".

    PubMed

    Pederson, T

    2000-03-01

    A cell fraction that would today be termed "the nuclear matrix" was first described and patented in 1948 by Russian investigators. In 1974 this fraction was rediscovered and promoted as a fundamental organizing principle of eukaryotic gene expression. Yet, convincing evidence for this functional role of the nuclear matrix has been elusive and has recently been further challenged. What do we really know about the nonchromatin elements (if any) of internal nuclear structure? Are there objective reasons (as opposed to thinly veiled disdain) to question experiments that use harsh nuclear extraction steps and precipitation-prone conditions? Are the known biophysical properties of the nucleoplasm in vivo consistent with the existence of an extensive network of anastomosing filaments coursing dendritically throughout the interchromatin space? To what extent may the genome itself contribute information for its own quarternary structure in the interphase nucleus? These questions and recent work that bears on the mystique of the nuclear matrix are addressed in this essay. The degree to which gene expression literally depends on nonchromatin nuclear structure as a facilitating organizational format remains an intriguing but unsolved issue in eukaryotic cell biology, and considerable skepticism continues to surround the nuclear matrix fraction as an accurate representation of the in vivo situation.

  18. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nick R.; Tranter, Troy J.; Todd, Terry A.; Sebesta, Ferdinand

    2003-02-04

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  19. Ion processing element with composite media

    DOEpatents

    Mann, Nick R.; Tranter, Troy J.; Todd, Terry A.; Sebesta, Ferdinand

    2009-03-24

    An ion processing element employing composite media disposed in a porous substrate, for facilitating removal of selected chemical species from a fluid stream. The ion processing element includes a porous fibrous glass substrate impregnated by composite media having one or more active components supported by a matrix material of polyacrylonitrile. The active components are effective in removing, by various mechanisms, one or more constituents from a fluid stream passing through the ion processing element. Due to the porosity and large surface area of both the composite medium and the substrate in which it is disposed, a high degree of contact is achieved between the active component and the fluid stream being processed. Further, the porosity of the matrix material and the substrate facilitates use of the ion processing element in high volume applications where it is desired to effectively process a high volume flows.

  20. Effect of fiber-matrix debonding on notched strength of titanium metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bigelow, C. A.; Johnson, W. S.

    1991-01-01

    Two specimen configuration of a (0/90)2s SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminate were tested and analyzed: a center hole (CH) specimen and a double edge notch (DEN) specimen. The two specimen configurations failed at similar stress levels. Two analytical techniques, a 3-D finite-element analysis and a macro-micromechanical analysis were used to predict the overall stress-deformation behavior and the notch-tip fiber-matrix interface stresses in both configurations.