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Sample records for matrix factorisation models

  1. An integrated PM2.5 source apportionment study: Positive Matrix Factorisation vs. the chemical transport model CAMx

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bove, M. C.; Brotto, P.; Cassola, F.; Cuccia, E.; Massabò, D.; Mazzino, A.; Piazzalunga, A.; Prati, P.

    2014-09-01

    Receptor and Chemical Transport Models are commonly used tools in source apportionment studies, even if different expertise is required. We describe an experiment using both approaches to apportion the PM2.5 (i.e., particulate matter with aerodynamic diameters below 2.5 μm) sources in the city of Genoa (Italy). A sampling campaign was carried out to collect PM2.5 samples daily for approximately six month during 2011 in three sites. The subsequent compositional analyses included the speciation of elements, major ions and both organic and elemental carbon; these data produced a large database for receptor modelling through Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF). In the same period, a meteorological and air quality modelling system was implemented based on the mesoscale numerical weather prediction model WRF and the chemical transport model CAMx to obtain meteorological and pollutant concentrations up to a resolution of 1.1 km. The source apportionment was evaluated by CAMx over the same period that was used for the monitoring campaign using the Particulate Source Apportionment Technology tool. Even if the source categorisations were changed (i.e., groups of time-correlated compounds in PMF vs. activity categories in CAMx), the PM2.5 source apportionment by PMF and CAMx produced comparable results. The different information provided by the two approaches (e.g., real-world factor profile by PMF and apportionment of a secondary aerosol by CAMx) was used jointly to elucidate the composition and origin of PM2.5 and to develop a more general methodology. When studying the primary and secondary components of PM, the main anthropogenic sources in the area were road transportation, energy production/industry and maritime emissions, accounting for 40%-50%, 20%-30% and 10%-15%, of PM2.5, respectively.

  2. Tracking Time Evolution of Collective Attention Clusters in Twitter: Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation

    PubMed Central

    Saito, Shota; Hirata, Yoshito; Sasahara, Kazutoshi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Micro-blogging services, such as Twitter, offer opportunities to analyse user behaviour. Discovering and distinguishing behavioural patterns in micro-blogging services is valuable. However, it is difficult and challenging to distinguish users, and to track the temporal development of collective attention within distinct user groups in Twitter. In this paper, we formulate this problem as tracking matrices decomposed by Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation for time-sequential matrix data, and propose a novel extension of Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation, which we refer to as Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation (TENMF). In our method, we describe users and words posted in some time interval by a matrix, and use several matrices as time-sequential data. Subsequently, we apply Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation to these time-sequential matrices. TENMF can decompose time-sequential matrices, and can track the connection among decomposed matrices, whereas previous NMF decomposes a matrix into two lower dimension matrices arbitrarily, which might lose the time-sequential connection. Our proposed method has an adequately good performance on artificial data. Moreover, we present several results and insights from experiments using real data from Twitter. PMID:26417999

  3. Tracking Time Evolution of Collective Attention Clusters in Twitter: Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation.

    PubMed

    Saito, Shota; Hirata, Yoshito; Sasahara, Kazutoshi; Suzuki, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    Micro-blogging services, such as Twitter, offer opportunities to analyse user behaviour. Discovering and distinguishing behavioural patterns in micro-blogging services is valuable. However, it is difficult and challenging to distinguish users, and to track the temporal development of collective attention within distinct user groups in Twitter. In this paper, we formulate this problem as tracking matrices decomposed by Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation for time-sequential matrix data, and propose a novel extension of Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation, which we refer to as Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation (TENMF). In our method, we describe users and words posted in some time interval by a matrix, and use several matrices as time-sequential data. Subsequently, we apply Time Evolving Nonnegative Matrix Factorisation to these time-sequential matrices. TENMF can decompose time-sequential matrices, and can track the connection among decomposed matrices, whereas previous NMF decomposes a matrix into two lower dimension matrices arbitrarily, which might lose the time-sequential connection. Our proposed method has an adequately good performance on artificial data. Moreover, we present several results and insights from experiments using real data from Twitter.

  4. An extended inner-outer factorisation algorithm based on the structure of a transfer function matrix inverse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhao, Chunhui; He, Xing; Zhang, Weidong

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, the structure feature of the inverse of a multi-input/multi-output square transfer function matrix is explored. Instead of complicated advanced mathematical tools, we only use basic results of complex analysis in the analysing procedure. By employing the Laurent expression, an elegant structure form of the expansion is obtained for the transfer function matrix inverse. This expansion form is the key of deriving an analytical solution to the inner-outer factorisation for both stable plants and unstable plants. Different from other computation algorithm, the obtained inner-outer factorisation is given in an analytical form. The solution is exact and without approximation. Numerical examples are provided to verify the correctness of the obtained results.

  5. Comparative source apportionment of PM10 in Switzerland for 2008/2009 and 1998/1999 by Positive Matrix Factorisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gianini, M. F. D.; Fischer, A.; Gehrig, R.; Ulrich, A.; Wichser, A.; Piot, C.; Besombes, J.-L.; Hueglin, C.

    2012-07-01

    PM10 speciation data from various sites in Switzerland for two time periods (January 1998-March 1999 and August 2008-July 2009) have been analysed for major sources by receptor modelling using Positive Matrix Factorisation (PMF). For the 2008/2009 period, it was found that secondary aerosols (sulphate- and nitrate-rich secondary aerosols, SSA and NSA) are the most abundant components of PM10 at sites north of the Alps. Road traffic and wood combustion were found to be the largest sources of PM10 at these sites. Except at the urban roadside site where road traffic is dominating (40% of PM10 -- including road salt), the annual average contribution of these two sources is of similar importance (17% and 14% of PM10, respectively). At a rural site south of the Alps wood combustion and road traffic contributions to PM10 were higher (31% and 24%, respectively), and the fraction of secondary aerosols lower (29%) than at similar site types north of the Alps. Comparison of PMF analyses for the two time periods (1998/1999 and 2008/2009) revealed decreasing average contributions of road traffic and SSA to PM10 at all sites. This indicates that the measures that were implemented in Switzerland and in neighbouring countries to reduce emissions of sulphur dioxide and PM10 from road traffic were successful. On the other hand, contributions of wood combustion did not change during this ten year period, and the contribution of nitrate-rich secondary aerosols has even increased. It is shown that PMF can be a helpful tool for the assessment of long-term changes of source contributions to ambient particulate matter.

  6. Convergence of the standard RLS method and UDUT factorisation of covariance matrix for solving the algebraic Riccati equation of the DLQR via heuristic approximate dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moraes Rêgo, Patrícia Helena; Viana da Fonseca Neto, João; Ferreira, Ernesto M.

    2015-08-01

    The main focus of this article is to present a proposal to solve, via UDUT factorisation, the convergence and numerical stability problems that are related to the covariance matrix ill-conditioning of the recursive least squares (RLS) approach for online approximations of the algebraic Riccati equation (ARE) solution associated with the discrete linear quadratic regulator (DLQR) problem formulated in the actor-critic reinforcement learning and approximate dynamic programming context. The parameterisations of the Bellman equation, utility function and dynamic system as well as the algebra of Kronecker product assemble a framework for the solution of the DLQR problem. The condition number and the positivity parameter of the covariance matrix are associated with statistical metrics for evaluating the approximation performance of the ARE solution via RLS-based estimators. The performance of RLS approximators is also evaluated in terms of consistence and polarisation when associated with reinforcement learning methods. The used methodology contemplates realisations of online designs for DLQR controllers that is evaluated in a multivariable dynamic system model.

  7. Towards geometric D6-brane model building on non-factorisable toroidal ℤ 4-orbifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berasaluce-González, Mikel; Honecker, Gabriele; Seifert, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    We present a geometric approach to D-brane model building on the non-factorisable torus backgrounds of T 6/ ℤ 4, which are A 3 × A 3 and A 3 × A 1 × B 2. Based on the counting of `short' supersymmetric three-cycles per complex structure vev, the number of physically inequivalent lattice orientations with respect to the anti-holomorphic involution ℛ of the Type IIA/Ωℛ orientifold can be reduced to three for the A 3 × A 3 lattice and four for the A 3 × A 1 × B 2 lattice. While four independent three-cycles on A 3 × A 3 cannot accommodate phenomenologically interesting global models with a chiral spectrum, the eight-dimensional space of three-cycles on A 3 × A 1 × B 2 is rich enough to provide for particle physics models, with several globally consistent two- and four-generation Pati-Salam models presented here.

  8. Non-negative matrix factorisation methods for the spectral decomposition of MRS data from human brain tumours

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background In-vivo single voxel proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (SV 1H-MRS), coupled with supervised pattern recognition (PR) methods, has been widely used in clinical studies of discrimination of brain tumour types and follow-up of patients bearing abnormal brain masses. SV 1H-MRS provides useful biochemical information about the metabolic state of tumours and can be performed at short (< 45 ms) or long (> 45 ms) echo time (TE), each with particular advantages. Short-TE spectra are more adequate for detecting lipids, while the long-TE provides a much flatter signal baseline in between peaks but also negative signals for metabolites such as lactate. Both, lipids and lactate, are respectively indicative of specific metabolic processes taking place. Ideally, the information provided by both TE should be of use for clinical purposes. In this study, we characterise the performance of a range of Non-negative Matrix Factorisation (NMF) methods in two respects: first, to derive sources correlated with the mean spectra of known tissue types (tumours and normal tissue); second, taking the best performing NMF method for source separation, we compare its accuracy for class assignment when using the mixing matrix directly as a basis for classification, as against using the method for dimensionality reduction (DR). For this, we used SV 1H-MRS data with positive and negative peaks, from a widely tested SV 1H-MRS human brain tumour database. Results The results reported in this paper reveal the advantage of using a recently described variant of NMF, namely Convex-NMF, as an unsupervised method of source extraction from SV1H-MRS. Most of the sources extracted in our experiments closely correspond to the mean spectra of some of the analysed tumour types. This similarity allows accurate diagnostic predictions to be made both in fully unsupervised mode and using Convex-NMF as a DR step previous to standard supervised classification. The obtained results are comparable to, or

  9. Controllability discrepancy and irreducibility/reducibility of Floquet factorisations in linear continuous-time periodic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jun; Lu, Xinbiao; Qian, Huimin

    2016-09-01

    The paper reports interesting but unnoticed facts about irreducibility (resp., reducibility) of Flouqet factorisations and their harmonic implication in term of controllability in finite-dimensional linear continuous-time periodic (FDLCP) systems. Reducibility and irreducibility are attributed to matrix logarithm algorithms during computing Floquet factorisations in FDLCP systems, which are a pair of essential features but remain unnoticed in the Floquet theory so far. The study reveals that reducible Floquet factorisations may bring in harmonic waves variance into the Fourier analysis of FDLCP systems that in turn may alter our interpretation of controllability when the Floquet factors are used separately during controllability testing; namely, controllability interpretation discrepancy (or simply, controllability discrepancy) may occur and must be examined whenever reducible Floquet factorisations are involved. On the contrary, when irreducible Floquet factorisations are employed, controllability interpretation discrepancy can be avoided. Examples are included to illustrate such observations.

  10. Factorising a Quadratic Expression with Geometric Insights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joarder, Anwar H.

    2015-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for factorising a quadratic expression to facilitate instruction and learning. It appeals to elementary geometry which may provide better insights to some students or teachers. There have been many methods for factorising a quadratic expression described in school text books. However, students often seem to struggle with…

  11. Using sparse LU factorisation to precondition GMRES for a family of similarly structured matrices arising from process modelling

    SciTech Connect

    Brooking, C.

    1996-12-31

    Process engineering software is used to simulate the operation of large chemical plants. Such simulations are used for a variety of tasks, including operator training. For the software to be of practical use for this, dynamic simulations need to run in real-time. The models that the simulation is based upon are written in terms of Differential Algebraic Equations (DAE`s). In the numerical time-integration of systems of DAE`s using an implicit method such as backward Euler, the solution of nonlinear systems is required at each integration point. When solved using Newton`s method, this leads to the repeated solution of nonsymmetric sparse linear systems. These systems range in size from 500 to 20,000 variables. A typical integration may require around 3000 timesteps, and if 4 Newton iterates were needed on each time step, then this means approximately 12,000 linear systems must be solved. The matrices produced by the simulations have a similar sparsity pattern throughout the integration. They are also severely ill-conditioned, and have widely-scattered spectra.

  12. Multiscale entropy analysis of resting-state magnetoencephalogram with tensor factorisations in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Javier; Acar, Evrim; Fernández, Alberto; Bro, Rasmus

    2015-10-01

    Tensor factorisations have proven useful to model amplitude and spectral information of brain recordings. Here, we assess the usefulness of tensor factorisations in the multiway analysis of other brain signal features in the context of complexity measures recently proposed to inspect multiscale dynamics. We consider the "refined composite multiscale entropy" (rcMSE), which computes entropy "profiles" showing levels of physiological complexity over temporal scales for individual signals. We compute the rcMSE of resting-state magnetoencephalogram (MEG) recordings from 36 patients with Alzheimer's disease and 26 control subjects. Instead of traditional simple visual examinations, we organise the entropy profiles as a three-way tensor to inspect relationships across temporal and spatial scales and subjects with multiway data analysis techniques based on PARAFAC and PARAFAC2 factorisations. A PARAFAC2 model with two factors was appropriate to account for the interactions in the entropy tensor between temporal scales and MEG channels for all subjects. Moreover, the PARAFAC2 factors had information related to the subjects' diagnosis, achieving a cross-validated area under the ROC curve of 0.77. This confirms the suitability of tensor factorisations to represent electrophysiological brain data efficiently despite the unsupervised nature of these techniques. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neural data analysis'.

  13. A matrix model for WZW

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorey, Nick; Tong, David; Turner, Carl

    2016-08-01

    We study a U( N) gauged matrix quantum mechanics which, in the large N limit, is closely related to the chiral WZW conformal field theory. This manifests itself in two ways. First, we construct the left-moving Kac-Moody algebra from matrix degrees of freedom. Secondly, we compute the partition function of the matrix model in terms of Schur and Kostka polynomials and show that, in the large N limit, it coincides with the partition function of the WZW model. This same matrix model was recently shown to describe non-Abelian quantum Hall states and the relationship to the WZW model can be understood in this framework.

  14. On quantization of matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodubtsev, Artem

    2002-12-01

    The issue of non-perturbative background independent quantization of matrix models is addressed. The analysis is carried out by considering a simple matrix model which is a matrix extension of ordinary mechanics reduced to 0 dimension. It is shown that this model has an ordinary mechanical system evolving in time as a classical solution. But in this treatment the action principle admits a natural modification which results in algebraic relations describing quantum theory. The origin of quantization is similar to that in Adler's generalized quantum dynamics. The problem with extension of this formalism to many degrees of freedom is solved by packing all the degrees of freedom into a single matrix. The possibility to apply this scheme to various matrix models is discussed.

  15. Homolumo gap and matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Andric, I.; Jonke, L.; Jurman, D.; Nielsen, H. B.

    2008-06-15

    We discuss a dynamical matrix model by which probability distribution is associated with Gaussian ensembles from random matrix theory. We interpret the matrix M as a Hamiltonian representing interaction of a bosonic system with a single fermion. We show that a system of second-quantized fermions influences the ground state of the whole system by producing a gap between the highest occupied eigenvalue and the lowest unoccupied eigenvalue.

  16. M-theoretic matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassi, Alba; Mariño, Marcos

    2015-02-01

    Some matrix models admit, on top of the usual 't Hooft expansion, an M-theory-like expansion, i.e. an expansion at large N but where the rest of the parameters are fixed, instead of scaling with N . These models, which we call M-theoretic matrix models, appear in the localization of Chern-Simons-matter theories, and also in two-dimensional statistical physics. Generically, their partition function receives non-perturbative corrections which are not captured by the 't Hooft expansion. In this paper, we discuss general aspects of these type of matrix integrals and we analyze in detail two different examples. The first one is the matrix model computing the partition function of supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory in three dimensions with one adjoint hypermultiplet and N f fundamentals, which has a conjectured M-theory dual, and which we call the N f matrix model. The second one, which we call the polymer matrix model, computes form factors of the 2d Ising model and is related to the physics of 2d polymers. In both cases we determine their exact planar limit. In the N f matrix model, the planar free energy reproduces the expected behavior of the M-theory dual. We also study their M-theory expansion by using Fermi gas techniques, and we find non-perturbative corrections to the 't Hooft expansion.

  17. A New Factorisation of a General Second Order Differential Equation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clegg, Janet

    2006-01-01

    A factorisation of a general second order ordinary differential equation is introduced from which the full solution to the equation can be obtained by performing two integrations. The method is compared with traditional methods for solving these type of equations. It is shown how the Green's function can be derived directly from the factorisation…

  18. Matrix model approach to cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaney, A.; Lu, Lei; Stern, A.

    2016-03-01

    We perform a systematic search for rotationally invariant cosmological solutions to toy matrix models. These models correspond to the bosonic sector of Lorentzian Ishibashi, Kawai, Kitazawa and Tsuchiya (IKKT)-type matrix models in dimensions d less than ten, specifically d =3 and d =5 . After taking a continuum (or commutative) limit they yield d -1 dimensional Poisson manifolds. The manifolds have a Lorentzian induced metric which can be associated with closed, open, or static space-times. For d =3 , we obtain recursion relations from which it is possible to generate rotationally invariant matrix solutions which yield open universes in the continuum limit. Specific examples of matrix solutions have also been found which are associated with closed and static two-dimensional space-times in the continuum limit. The solutions provide for a resolution of cosmological singularities, at least within the context of the toy matrix models. The commutative limit reveals other desirable features, such as a solution describing a smooth transition from an initial inflation to a noninflationary era. Many of the d =3 solutions have analogues in higher dimensions. The case of d =5 , in particular, has the potential for yielding realistic four-dimensional cosmologies in the continuum limit. We find four-dimensional de Sitter d S4 or anti-de Sitter AdS4 solutions when a totally antisymmetric term is included in the matrix action. A nontrivial Poisson structure is attached to these manifolds which represents the lowest order effect of noncommutativity. For the case of AdS4 , we find one particular limit where the lowest order noncommutativity vanishes at the boundary, but not in the interior.

  19. A quenched c = 1 critical matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Zongan; Rey, Soo-Jong

    1990-12-01

    We study a variant of the Penner-Distler-Vafa model, proposed as a c = 1 quantum gravity: `quenched` matrix model with logarithmic potential. The model is exactly soluble, and exhibits a two-cut branching as observed in multicritical unitary matrix models and multicut Hermitian matrix models. Using analytic continuation of the power in the conventional polynomial potential, we also show that both the Penner-Distler-Vafa model and our `quenched` matrix model satisfy Virasoro algebra constraints.

  20. A quenched c = 1 critical matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Zongan; Rey, Soo-Jong.

    1990-12-01

    We study a variant of the Penner-Distler-Vafa model, proposed as a c = 1 quantum gravity: quenched' matrix model with logarithmic potential. The model is exactly soluble, and exhibits a two-cut branching as observed in multicritical unitary matrix models and multicut Hermitian matrix models. Using analytic continuation of the power in the conventional polynomial potential, we also show that both the Penner-Distler-Vafa model and our quenched' matrix model satisfy Virasoro algebra constraints.

  1. Thermoplastic matrix composite processing model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dara, P. H.; Loos, A. C.

    1985-01-01

    The effects the processing parameters pressure, temperature, and time have on the quality of continuous graphite fiber reinforced thermoplastic matrix composites were quantitatively accessed by defining the extent to which intimate contact and bond formation has occurred at successive ply interfaces. Two models are presented predicting the extents to which the ply interfaces have achieved intimate contact and cohesive strength. The models are based on experimental observation of compression molded laminates and neat resin conditions, respectively. Identified as the mechanism explaining the phenomenon by which the plies bond to themselves is the theory of autohesion (or self diffusion). Theoretical predictions from the Reptation Theory between autohesive strength and contact time are used to explain the effects of the processing parameters on the observed experimental strengths. The application of a time-temperature relationship for autohesive strength predictions is evaluated. A viscoelastic compression molding model of a tow was developed to explain the phenomenon by which the prepreg ply interfaces develop intimate contact.

  2. Matrix model description of baryonic deformations

    SciTech Connect

    Bena, Iosif; Murayama, Hitoshi; Roiban, Radu; Tatar, Radu

    2003-03-13

    We investigate supersymmetric QCD with N{sub c} + 1 flavors using an extension of the recently proposed relation between gauge theories and matrix models.The impressive agreement between the two sides provides a beautiful confirmation of the extension of the gauge theory-matrix model relation to this case.

  3. Matrix Models, Emergent Spacetime and Symmetry Breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Grosse, Harald; Steinacker, Harold; Lizzi, Fedele

    2009-12-15

    We discuss how a matrix model recently shown to describe emergent gravity may contain extra degrees of freedom which reproduce some characteristics of the standard model, in particular the breaking of symmetries and the correct quantum numbers of fermions.

  4. Multiscale Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Mital, Subodh K.; Pineda, Evan J.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2015-01-01

    Results of multiscale modeling simulations of the nonlinear response of SiC/SiC ceramic matrix composites are reported, wherein the microstructure of the ceramic matrix is captured. This micro scale architecture, which contains free Si material as well as the SiC ceramic, is responsible for residual stresses that play an important role in the subsequent thermo-mechanical behavior of the SiC/SiC composite. Using the novel Multiscale Generalized Method of Cells recursive micromechanics theory, the microstructure of the matrix, as well as the microstructure of the composite (fiber and matrix) can be captured.

  5. Micromechanical Modeling of Woven Metal Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Pindera, Marek-Jerzy

    1997-01-01

    This report presents the results of an extensive micromechanical modeling effort for woven metal matrix composites. The model is employed to predict the mechanical response of 8-harness (8H) satin weave carbon/copper (C/Cu) composites. Experimental mechanical results for this novel high thermal conductivity material were recently reported by Bednarcyk et al. along with preliminary model results. The micromechanics model developed herein is based on an embedded approach. A micromechanics model for the local (micro-scale) behavior of the woven composite, the original method of cells (Aboudi), is embedded in a global (macro-scale) micromechanics model (the three-dimensional generalized method of cells (GMC-3D) (Aboudi). This approach allows representation of true repeating unit cells for woven metal matrix composites via GMC-3D, and representation of local effects, such as matrix plasticity, yarn porosity, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding. In addition, the equations of GMC-3D were reformulated to significantly reduce the number of unknown quantities that characterize the deformation fields at the microlevel in order to make possible the analysis of actual microstructures of woven composites. The resulting micromechanical model (WCGMC) provides an intermediate level of geometric representation, versatility, and computational efficiency with respect to previous analytical and numerical models for woven composites, but surpasses all previous modeling work by allowing the mechanical response of a woven metal matrix composite, with an elastoplastic matrix, to be examined for the first time. WCGMC is employed to examine the effects of composite microstructure, porosity, residual stresses, and imperfect fiber-matrix bonding on the predicted mechanical response of 8H satin C/Cu. The previously reported experimental results are summarized, and the model predictions are compared to monotonic and cyclic tensile and shear test data. By considering appropriate levels of porosity

  6. Matrix Models, Monopoles and Modified Moduli

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Erlich, Joshua; Hong, Sungho; Unsal, Mithat

    2004-09-01

    Motivated by the Dijkgraaf-Vafa correspondence, we consider the matrix model duals of Script N = 1 supersymmetric SU(Nc) gauge theories with Nf flavors. We demonstrate via the matrix model solutions a relation between vacua of theories with different numbers of colors and flavors. This relation is due to an Script N = 2 nonrenormalization theorem which is inherited by these Script N = 1 theories. Specializing to the case Nf = Nc, the simplest theory containing baryons, we demonstrate that the explicit matrix model predictions for the locations on the Coulomb branch at which monopoles condense are consistent with the quantum modified constraints on the moduli in the theory. The matrix model solutions include the case that baryons obtain vacuum expectation values. In specific cases we check explicitly that these results are also consistent with the factorization of corresponding Seiberg-Witten curves. Certain results are easily understood in terms of M5-brane constructions of these gauge theories.

  7. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-01-01

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  8. Matrix models of 2d gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Ginsparg, P.

    1991-12-31

    These are introductory lectures for a general audience that give an overview of the subject of matrix models and their application to random surfaces, 2d gravity, and string theory. They are intentionally 1.5 years out of date.

  9. A matrix model from string field theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeze, Syoji

    2016-09-01

    We demonstrate that a Hermitian matrix model can be derived from level truncated open string field theory with Chan-Paton factors. The Hermitian matrix is coupled with a scalar and U(N) vectors which are responsible for the D-brane at the tachyon vacuum. Effective potential for the scalar is evaluated both for finite and large N. Increase of potential height is observed in both cases. The large N matrix integral is identified with a system of N ZZ branes and a ghost FZZT brane.

  10. Matrix models as CFT: Genus expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostov, Ivan

    2010-10-01

    We show how the formulation of the matrix models as conformal field theories on a Riemann surfaces can be used to compute the genus expansion of the observables. Here we consider the simplest example of the Hermitian matrix model, where the classical solution is described by a hyperelliptic Riemann surface. To each branch point of the Riemann surface we associate an operator which represents a twist field dressed by the modes of the twisted boson. The partition function of the matrix model is computed as a correlation function of such dressed twist fields. The perturbative construction of the dressing operators yields a set of Feynman rules for the genus expansion, which involve vertices, propagators and tadpoles. The vertices are universal, the propagators and the tadpoles depend on the Riemann surface. As a demonstration we evaluate the genus-two free energy using the Feynman rules.

  11. Radiative transfer model: matrix operator method.

    PubMed

    Liu, Q; Ruprecht, E

    1996-07-20

    A radiative transfer model, the matrix operator method, is discussed here. The matrix operator method is applied to a plane-parallel atmosphere within three spectral ranges: the visible, the infrared, and the microwave. For a homogeneous layer with spherical scattering, the radiative transfer equation can be solved analytically. The vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere can be subdivided into a set of homogeneous layers. The solution of the radiative transfer equation for the vertically inhomogeneous atmosphere is obtained recurrently from the analytical solutions for the subdivided layers. As an example for the application of the matrix operator method, the effects of the cirrus and the stratocumulus clouds on the net radiation at the surface and at the top of the atmosphere are investigated. The relationship between the polarization in the microwave range and the rain rates is also studied. Copies of the FORTRAN program and the documentation of the FORTRAN program on a diskette are available.

  12. Schwarzschild geometry emerging from matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaschke, Daniel N.; Steinacker, Harold

    2010-09-01

    We demonstrate how various geometries can emerge from Yang-Mills-type matrix models with branes, and consider the examples of Schwarzschild and Reissner-Nordström geometries. We provide an explicit embedding of these branes in \\mathds{R}^{2,5} and \\mathds{R}^{4,6}, as well as an appropriate Poisson resp. symplectic structure which determines the non-commutativity of spacetime. The embedding is asymptotically flat with the asymptotically constant θμν for large r, and therefore suitable for a generalization to many-body configurations. This is an illustration of our previous work (Blaschke and Steinacker 2010 Class. Quantum Grav. 27 165010 (arXiv:1003.4132)), where we have shown how the Einstein-Hilbert action can be realized within such matrix models.

  13. Nano- and mesoscale modeling of cement matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Zechuan; Lau, Denvid

    2015-04-01

    Atomistic simulations of cementitious material can enrich our understanding of its structural and mechanical properties, whereas current computational capacities restrict the investigation length scale within 10 nm. In this context, coarse-grained simulations can translate the information from nanoscale to mesoscale, thus bridging the multi-scale investigations. Here, we develop a coarse-grained model of cement matrix using the concept of disk-like building block. The objective is to introduce a new method to construct a coarse-grained model of cement, which could contribute to the scale-bridging issue from nanoscale to mesoscale. PAC codes: 07.05.Tp, 62.25.-g, 82.70.Dd

  14. Nano- and mesoscale modeling of cement matrix.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zechuan; Lau, Denvid

    2015-01-01

    Atomistic simulations of cementitious material can enrich our understanding of its structural and mechanical properties, whereas current computational capacities restrict the investigation length scale within 10 nm. In this context, coarse-grained simulations can translate the information from nanoscale to mesoscale, thus bridging the multi-scale investigations. Here, we develop a coarse-grained model of cement matrix using the concept of disk-like building block. The objective is to introduce a new method to construct a coarse-grained model of cement, which could contribute to the scale-bridging issue from nanoscale to mesoscale. PAC codes: 07.05.Tp, 62.25.-g, 82.70.Dd.

  15. Transition matrix model for evolutionary game dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ermentrout, G Bard; Griffin, Christopher; Belmonte, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    We study an evolutionary game model based on a transition matrix approach, in which the total change in the proportion of a population playing a given strategy is summed directly over contributions from all other strategies. This general approach combines aspects of the traditional replicator model, such as preserving unpopulated strategies, with mutation-type dynamics, which allow for nonzero switching to unpopulated strategies, in terms of a single transition function. Under certain conditions, this model yields an endemic population playing non-Nash-equilibrium strategies. In addition, a Hopf bifurcation with a limit cycle may occur in the generalized rock-scissors-paper game, unlike the replicator equation. Nonetheless, many of the Folk Theorem results are shown to hold for this model. PMID:27078323

  16. Transition matrix model for evolutionary game dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ermentrout, G. Bard; Griffin, Christopher; Belmonte, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    We study an evolutionary game model based on a transition matrix approach, in which the total change in the proportion of a population playing a given strategy is summed directly over contributions from all other strategies. This general approach combines aspects of the traditional replicator model, such as preserving unpopulated strategies, with mutation-type dynamics, which allow for nonzero switching to unpopulated strategies, in terms of a single transition function. Under certain conditions, this model yields an endemic population playing non-Nash-equilibrium strategies. In addition, a Hopf bifurcation with a limit cycle may occur in the generalized rock-scissors-paper game, unlike the replicator equation. Nonetheless, many of the Folk Theorem results are shown to hold for this model.

  17. Transition matrix model for evolutionary game dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ermentrout, G Bard; Griffin, Christopher; Belmonte, Andrew

    2016-03-01

    We study an evolutionary game model based on a transition matrix approach, in which the total change in the proportion of a population playing a given strategy is summed directly over contributions from all other strategies. This general approach combines aspects of the traditional replicator model, such as preserving unpopulated strategies, with mutation-type dynamics, which allow for nonzero switching to unpopulated strategies, in terms of a single transition function. Under certain conditions, this model yields an endemic population playing non-Nash-equilibrium strategies. In addition, a Hopf bifurcation with a limit cycle may occur in the generalized rock-scissors-paper game, unlike the replicator equation. Nonetheless, many of the Folk Theorem results are shown to hold for this model.

  18. Mitosis: spindle evolution and the matrix model.

    PubMed

    Pickett-Heaps, Jeremy; Forer, Art

    2009-03-01

    Current spindle models explain "anaphase A" (movement of chromosomes to the poles) in terms of a motility system based solely on microtubules (MTs) and that functions in a manner unique to mitosis. We find both these propositions unlikely. An evolutionary perspective suggests that when the spindle evolved, it should have come to share not only components (e.g., microtubules) of the interphase cell but also the primitive motility systems available, including those using actin and myosin. Other systems also came to be involved in the additional types of motility that now accompany mitosis in extant spindles. The resultant functional redundancy built reliability into this critical and complex process. Such multiple mechanisms are also confusing to those who seek to understand how chromosomes move. Narrowing this commentary down to just anaphase A, we argue that the spindle matrix participates with MTs in anaphase A and that this matrix may contain actin and myosin. The diatom spindle illustrates how such a system could function. This matrix may be motile and work in association with the MT cytoskeleton, as it does with the actin cytoskeleton during cell ruffling and amoeboid movement. Instead of pulling the chromosome polewards, the kinetochore fibre's role might be to slow polewards movement to allow correct chromosome attachment to the spindle. Perhaps the earliest eukaryotic cell was a cytoplast organised around a radial MT cytoskeleton. For cell division, it separated into two cytoplasts via a spindle of overlapping MTs. Cytokinesis was actin-based cleavage. As chromosomes evolved into individual entities, their interaction with the dividing cytoplast developed into attachment of the kinetochore to radial (cytoplast) MTs. We believe it most likely that cytoplasmic motility systems participated in these events. PMID:19255823

  19. Automation of the lifting factorisation of wavelet transforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maslen, M.; Abbott, P.

    2000-05-01

    Wavelets are sets of basis functions used in the analysis of signals and images. In contrast to Fourier analysis, wavelets have both spatial and frequency localization, making them useful for the analysis of sharply-varying or non-periodic signals. The lifting scheme for finding the discrete wavelet transform was demonstrated by Daubechies and Sweldens (1996). In particular, they showed that this method depends on the factorization of polyphase matrices, whose entries are Laurent polynomials, using the Euclidean algorithm extended to Laurent polynomials. Such factorization is not unique and hence there are multiple factorizations of the polyphase matrix. In this paper we outline a Mathematica program that finds all factorizations of such matrices by automating the Euclidean algorithm for Laurent polynomials. Polynomial reduction using Gröbner bases was also incorporated into the program so as to reduce the number of wavelet filter coefficients appearing in a given expression through use of the relations they satisfy, thus permitting exact symbolic factorizations for any polyphase matrix.

  20. Random matrix model of adiabatic quantum computing

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, David R.; Adami, Christoph; Lue, Waynn; Williams, Colin P.

    2005-05-15

    We present an analysis of the quantum adiabatic algorithm for solving hard instances of 3-SAT (an NP-complete problem) in terms of random matrix theory (RMT). We determine the global regularity of the spectral fluctuations of the instantaneous Hamiltonians encountered during the interpolation between the starting Hamiltonians and the ones whose ground states encode the solutions to the computational problems of interest. At each interpolation point, we quantify the degree of regularity of the average spectral distribution via its Brody parameter, a measure that distinguishes regular (i.e., Poissonian) from chaotic (i.e., Wigner-type) distributions of normalized nearest-neighbor spacings. We find that for hard problem instances - i.e., those having a critical ratio of clauses to variables - the spectral fluctuations typically become irregular across a contiguous region of the interpolation parameter, while the spectrum is regular for easy instances. Within the hard region, RMT may be applied to obtain a mathematical model of the probability of avoided level crossings and concomitant failure rate of the adiabatic algorithm due to nonadiabatic Landau-Zener-type transitions. Our model predicts that if the interpolation is performed at a uniform rate, the average failure rate of the quantum adiabatic algorithm, when averaged over hard problem instances, scales exponentially with increasing problem size.

  1. Matrix variate logistic regression model with application to EEG data.

    PubMed

    Hung, Hung; Wang, Chen-Chien

    2013-01-01

    Logistic regression has been widely applied in the field of biomedical research for a long time. In some applications, the covariates of interest have a natural structure, such as that of a matrix, at the time of collection. The rows and columns of the covariate matrix then have certain physical meanings, and they must contain useful information regarding the response. If we simply stack the covariate matrix as a vector and fit a conventional logistic regression model, relevant information can be lost, and the problem of inefficiency will arise. Motivated from these reasons, we propose in this paper the matrix variate logistic (MV-logistic) regression model. The advantages of the MV-logistic regression model include the preservation of the inherent matrix structure of covariates and the parsimony of parameters needed. In the EEG Database Data Set, we successfully extract the structural effects of covariate matrix, and a high classification accuracy is achieved.

  2. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 1; Matrix Constitutive Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this first paper of a two part report, background information is presented, along with the constitutive equations which will be used to model the rate dependent nonlinear deformation response of the polymer matrix. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive models which were originally developed to model the viscoplastic deformation of metals have been adapted to model the nonlinear viscoelastic deformation of polymers. The modified equations were correlated by analyzing the tensile/ compressive response of both 977-2 toughened epoxy matrix and PEEK thermoplastic matrix over a variety of strain rates. For the cases examined, the modified constitutive equations appear to do an adequate job of modeling the polymer deformation response. A second follow-up paper will describe the implementation of the polymer deformation model into a composite micromechanical model, to allow for the modeling of the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of polymer matrix composites.

  3. Modeling for Matrix Multicracking Evolution of Cross-ply Ceramic-Matrix Composites Using Energy Balance Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    The matrix multicracking evolution of cross-ply ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated using energy balance approach. The multicracking of cross-ply CMCs was classified into five modes, i.e., (1) mode 1: transverse multicracking; (2) mode 2: transverse multicracking and matrix multicracking with perfect fiber/matrix interface bonding; (3) mode 3: transverse multicracking and matrix multicracking with fiber/matrix interface debonding; (4) mode 4: matrix multicracking with perfect fiber/matrix interface bonding; and (5) mode 5: matrix multicracking with fiber/matrix interface debonding. The stress distributions of four cracking modes, i.e., mode 1, mode 2, mode 3 and mode 5, are analysed using shear-lag model. The matrix multicracking evolution of mode 1, mode 2, mode 3 and mode 5, has been determined using energy balance approach. The effects of ply thickness and fiber volume fraction on matrix multicracking evolution of cross-ply CMCs have been investigated.

  4. Probabilistic Modeling of Ceramic Matrix Composite Strength

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shan, Ashwin R.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Mital, Subodh K.; Bhatt, Ramakrishna T.

    1998-01-01

    Uncertainties associated with the primitive random variables such as manufacturing process (processing temperature, fiber volume ratio, void volume ratio), constituent properties (fiber, matrix and interface), and geometric parameters (ply thickness, interphase thickness) have been simulated to quantify the scatter in the first matrix cracking strength (FMCS) and the ultimate tensile strength of SCS-6/RBSN (SiC fiber (SCS-6) reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride composite) ceramic matrix composite laminate at room temperature. Cumulative probability distribution function for the FMCS and ultimate tensile strength at room temperature (RT) of (0)(sub 8), (0(sub 2)/90(sub 2), and (+/-45(sub 2))(sub S) laminates have been simulated and the sensitivity of primitive variables to the respective strengths have been quantified. Computationally predicted scatter of the strengths for a uniaxial laminate have been compared with those from limited experimental data. Also the experimental procedure used in the tests has been described briefly. Results show a very good agreement between the computational simulation and the experimental data. Dominating failure modes in (0)(sub 8), (0/90)(sub s) and (+/-45)(sub S) laminates have been identified. Results indicate that the first matrix cracking strength for the (0)(sub S), and (0/90)(sub S) laminates is sensitive to the thermal properties, modulus and strengths of both the fiber and matrix whereas the ultimate tensile strength is sensitive to the fiber strength and the fiber volume ratio. In the case of a (+/-45)(sub S), laminate, both the FMCS and the ultimate tensile strengths have a small scatter range and are sensitive to the fiber tensile strength as well as the fiber volume ratio.

  5. Matrix model for non-Abelian quantum Hall states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorey, Nick; Tong, David; Turner, Carl

    2016-08-01

    We propose a matrix quantum mechanics for a class of non-Abelian quantum Hall states. The model describes electrons which carry an internal SU(p ) spin. The ground states of the matrix model include spin-singlet generalizations of the Moore-Read and Read-Rezayi states and, in general, lie in a class previously introduced by Blok and Wen. The effective action for these states is a U(p ) Chern-Simons theory. We show how the matrix model can be derived from quantization of the vortices in this Chern-Simons theory and how the matrix model ground states can be reconstructed as correlation functions in the boundary WZW model.

  6. An improved transfer-matrix model for optical superlenses.

    PubMed

    Moore, Ciaran P; Blaikie, Richard J; Arnold, Matthew D

    2009-08-01

    The use of transfer-matrix analyses for characterizing planar optical superlensing systems is studied here, and the simple model of the planar superlens as an isolated imaging element is shown to be defective in certain situations. These defects arise due to neglected interactions between the superlens and the spatially varying shadow masks that are normally used as scattering objects for imaging, and which are held in near-field proximity to the superlenses. An extended model is proposed that improves the accuracy of the transfer-matrix analysis, without adding significant complexity, by approximating the reflections from the shadow mask by those from a uniform metal layer. Results obtained using both forms of the transfer matrix model are compared to finite element models and two example superlenses, one with a silver monolayer and the other with three silver sublayers, are characterized. The modified transfer matrix model gives much better agreement in both cases.

  7. MOEMS Modeling Using the Geometrical Matrix Toolbox

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, William C.; Atkinson, Gary M.

    2005-01-01

    New technologies such as MicroOptoElectro-Mechanical Systems (MOEMS) require new modeling tools. These tools must simultaneously model the optical, electrical, and mechanical domains and the interactions between these domains. To facilitate rapid prototyping of these new technologies an optical toolbox has been developed for modeling MOEMS devices. The toolbox models are constructed using MATLAB's dynamical simulator, Simulink. Modeling toolboxes will allow users to focus their efforts on system design and analysis as opposed to developing component models. This toolbox was developed to facilitate rapid modeling and design of a MOEMS based laser ultrasonic receiver system.

  8. Modeling of progressive damage in unidirectional ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Solti, J.P.; Mall, S.; Robertson, D.D.

    1995-12-31

    This paper modifies an existing shear-lag model to analyze the damage progression within unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under a monotonic increasing load. The shear-lag model presented by Kuo and Chou is extended using the concept of a critical strain energy to determine analytical solutions for matrix cracking and fiber failure within these composite systems. In all, the damage mechanisms considered herein are matrix cracking, fiber/matrix interfacial debonding and fiber fracture. A priori knowledge of the composite`s proportional limit yields a complete closed form stress-strain solution. The utility of the proposed model lies in its ability to determine the laminate`s stress-strain response with minimum reliance on empirical data. Further, the proposed approach may offer an alternative means of estimating the interfacial strength through empirical fitting of crack density and stress-strain data.

  9. Modeling the Stress Strain Behavior of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.

    2006-01-01

    Woven SiC fiber reinforced SiC matrix composites represent one of the most mature composite systems to date. Future components fabricated out of these woven ceramic matrix composites are expected to vary in shape, curvature, architecture, and thickness. The design of future components using woven ceramic matrix composites necessitates a modeling approach that can account for these variations which are physically controlled by local constituent contents and architecture. Research over the years supported primarily by NASA Glenn Research Center has led to the development of simple mechanistic-based models that can describe the entire stress-strain curve for composite systems fabricated with chemical vapor infiltrated matrices and melt-infiltrated matrices for a wide range of constituent content and architecture. Several examples will be presented that demonstrate the approach to modeling which incorporates a thorough understanding of the stress-dependent matrix cracking properties of the composite system.

  10. Higgs production via gluon fusion in k{sub T} factorisation

    SciTech Connect

    Hautmann, F.; Jung, H.; Pandis, V.

    2011-07-15

    Theoretical studies of Higgs production via gluon fusion are frequently carried out in the limit where the top quark mass is much larger than the Higgs mass, an approximation which reduces the top quark loop to an effective vertex. We present a numerical analysis of the error thus introduced by performing a Monte Carlo calculation for gg{yields}h in k{sub T}-factorisation, using the parton shower generator CASCADE. By examining both inclusive and exclusive quantities, we find that retaining the top-mass dependence results in only a small enhancement of the cross-section. We then proceed to compare CASCADE to the collinear Monte Carlos PYTHIA, MC-NLO and POWHEG.

  11. Geometric deviation modeling by kinematic matrix based on Lagrangian coordinate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Weidong; Hu, Yueming; Liu, Yu; Dai, Wanyi

    2015-09-01

    Typical representation of dimension and geometric accuracy is limited to the self-representation of dimension and geometric deviation based on geometry variation thinking, yet the interactivity affection of geometric variation and gesture variation of multi-rigid body is not included. In this paper, a kinematic matrix model based on Lagrangian coordinate is introduced, with the purpose of unified model for geometric variation and gesture variation and their interactive and integrated analysis. Kinematic model with joint, local base and movable base is built. The ideal feature of functional geometry is treated as the base body; the fitting feature of functional geometry is treated as the adjacent movable body; the local base of the kinematic model is fixed onto the ideal geometry, and the movable base of the kinematic model is fixed onto the fitting geometry. Furthermore, the geometric deviation is treated as relative location or rotation variation between the movable base and the local base, and it's expressed by the Lagrangian coordinate. Moreover, kinematic matrix based on Lagrangian coordinate for different types of geometry tolerance zones is constructed, and total freedom for each kinematic model is discussed. Finally, the Lagrangian coordinate library, kinematic matrix library for geometric deviation modeling is illustrated, and an example of block and piston fits is introduced. Dimension and geometric tolerances of the shaft and hole fitting feature are constructed by kinematic matrix and Lagrangian coordinate, and the results indicate that the proposed kinematic matrix is capable and robust in dimension and geometric tolerances modeling.

  12. Exact [ital S] matrix of the deformed [ital c]=1 matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Demeterfi, K.; Klebanov, I.R. ); Rodrigues, J.P. )

    1993-11-22

    We consider the [ital c]=1 matrix model deformed by the operator 1/2[ital M] [ital Tr][Phi][sup [minus]2], which was conjectured by Jevicki and Yoneya to describe a two-dimensional black hole of mass [ital M]. We calculate the exact nonperturbative [ital S] matrix and show that all the amplitudes involving an odd number of particles vanish at least to all orders of perturbation theory. We conjecture that these amplitudes vanish nonperturbatively and prove this for the 2[ital n][r arrow]1 scattering. For the two- and four-particle amplitudes we give some leading terms of the perturbative expansion.

  13. Amerciamysis bahia Stochastic Matrix Population Model for Laboratory Populations

    EPA Science Inventory

    The population model described here is a stochastic, density-independent matrix model for integrating the effects of toxicants on survival and reproduction of the marine invertebrate, Americamysis bahia. The model was constructed using Microsoft® Excel 2003. The focus of the mode...

  14. System matrix modelling of externally tracked motion

    PubMed Central

    Rahmim, Arman; Cheng, Ju-Chieh; Dinelle, Katie; Shilov, Mikhail; Segars, W. Paul; Rousset, Olivier G.; Tsui, Benjamin M.W.; Wong, Dean F.; Sossi, Vesna

    2010-01-01

    Background and aim In high-resolution emission tomography imaging, even small patient movements can considerably degrade image quality. The aim of this work was to develop a general approach to motion-corrected reconstruction of motion-contaminated data in the case of rigid motion (particularly brain imaging) which would be applicable to any PET scanner in the field, without specialized data-acquisition requirements. Methods Assuming the ability to externally track subject motion during scanning (e.g., using the Polaris camera), we proposed to incorporate the measured rigid motion information into the system matrix of the expectation maximization reconstruction algorithm. Furthermore, we noted and developed a framework to incorporate the additional effect of motion on modifying the attenuation factors. A new mathematical brain phantom was developed and used along with elaborate combined Simset/GATE simulations to compare the proposed framework with the cases of no motion correction. Results and conclusion Clear qualitative and quantitative improvements were observed when incorporating the proposed framework. The method is very practical to implement for any scanner in the field, not requiring any hardware modifications or access to the list-mode acquisition capability. PMID:18458606

  15. Truncating an exact matrix product state for the XY model: Transfer matrix and its renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rams, Marek M.; Zauner, Valentin; Bal, Matthias; Haegeman, Jutho; Verstraete, Frank

    2015-12-01

    We discuss how to analytically obtain an essentially infinite matrix product state (MPS) representation of the ground state of the XY model. On one hand this allows us to illustrate how the Ornstein-Zernike form of the correlation function emerges in the exact case using standard MPS language. On the other hand we study the consequences of truncating the bond dimension of the exact MPS, which is also part of many tensor network algorithms, and analyze how the truncated MPS transfer matrix is representing the dominant part of the exact quantum transfer matrix. In the gapped phase we observe that the correlation length obtained from a truncated MPS approaches the exact value following a power law in effective bond dimension. In the gapless phase we find a good match between a state obtained numerically from standard MPS techniques with finite bond dimension and a state obtained by effective finite imaginary time evolution in our framework. This provides a direct hint for a geometric interpretation of finite entanglement scaling at the critical point in this case. Finally, by analyzing the spectra of transfer matrices, we support the interpretation put forward by V. Zauner et al. [New J. Phys. 17, 053002 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/5/053002] that the MPS transfer matrix emerges from the quantum transfer matrix though the application of Wilson's numerical renormalization group along the imaginary-time direction.

  16. Looking for a Matrix model for ABJM theory

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammed, Asadig; Murugan, Jeff; Nastase, Horatiu

    2010-10-15

    Encouraged by the recent construction of fuzzy sphere solutions in the Aharony, Bergman, Jafferis, and Maldacena (ABJM) theory, we re-analyze the latter from the perspective of a Matrix-like model. In particular, we argue that a vortex solution exhibits properties of a supergraviton, while a kink represents a 2-brane. Other solutions are also consistent with the Matrix-type interpretation. We study vortex scattering and compare with graviton scattering in the massive ABJM background, however our results are inconclusive. We speculate on how to extend our results to construct a Matrix theory of ABJM.

  17. Automatic generation of matrix element derivatives for tight binding models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elena, Alin M.; Meister, Matthias

    2005-10-01

    Tight binding (TB) models are one approach to the quantum mechanical many-particle problem. An important role in TB models is played by hopping and overlap matrix elements between the orbitals on two atoms, which of course depend on the relative positions of the atoms involved. This dependence can be expressed with the help of Slater-Koster parameters, which are usually taken from tables. Recently, a way to generate these tables automatically was published. If TB approaches are applied to simulations of the dynamics of a system, also derivatives of matrix elements can appear. In this work we give general expressions for first and second derivatives of such matrix elements. Implemented in a tight binding computer program, like, for instance, DINAMO, they obviate the need to type all the required derivatives of all occurring matrix elements by hand.

  18. Proposed framework for thermomechanical life modeling of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halford, Gary R.; Lerch, Bradley A.; Saltsman, James F.

    1993-01-01

    The framework of a mechanics of materials model is proposed for thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) life prediction of unidirectional, continuous-fiber metal matrix composites (MMC's). Axially loaded MMC test samples are analyzed as structural components whose fatigue lives are governed by local stress-strain conditions resulting from combined interactions of the matrix, interfacial layer, and fiber constituents. The metallic matrix is identified as the vehicle for tracking fatigue crack initiation and propagation. The proposed framework has three major elements. First, TMF flow and failure characteristics of in situ matrix material are approximated from tests of unreinforced matrix material, and matrix TMF life prediction equations are numerically calibrated. The macrocrack initiation fatigue life of the matrix material is divided into microcrack initiation and microcrack propagation phases. Second, the influencing factors created by the presence of fibers and interfaces are analyzed, characterized, and documented in equation form. Some of the influences act on the microcrack initiation portion of the matrix fatigue life, others on the microcrack propagation life, while some affect both. Influencing factors include coefficient of thermal expansion mismatch strains, residual (mean) stresses, multiaxial stress states, off-axis fibers, internal stress concentrations, multiple initiation sites, nonuniform fiber spacing, fiber debonding, interfacial layers and cracking, fractured fibers, fiber deflections of crack fronts, fiber bridging of matrix cracks, and internal oxidation along internal interfaces. Equations exist for some, but not all, of the currently identified influencing factors. The third element is the inclusion of overriding influences such as maximum tensile strain limits of brittle fibers that could cause local fractures and ensuing catastrophic failure of surrounding matrix material. Some experimental data exist for assessing the plausibility of the proposed

  19. $\\cN$-FOLD SUPERSYMMETRY IN QUANTUM MECHANICAL MATRIX MODELS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanaka, Toshiaki

    2012-03-01

    We formulate Ņ-fold supersymmetry in quantum mechanical matrix models. As an example, we construct general two-by-two Hermitian matrix two-fold supersymmetric quantum mechanical systems. We find that there are two inequivalent such systems, both of which are characterized by two arbitrary scalar functions, and one of which does not reduce to the scalar system. The obtained systems are all weakly quasi-solvable.

  20. Matrix model maps in AdS/CFT correspondence

    SciTech Connect

    Donos, Aristomenis; Jevicki, Antal; Rodrigues, Joao P.

    2005-12-15

    We discuss an extension of a map between BPS states and free fermions. The extension involves states associated with a full two matrix problem which are constructed using a sequence of integral equations. A two parameter set of matrix model eigenstates is then related to states in SUGRA. Their wave functions are characterized by nontrivial dependence on the radial coordinate of AdS and of the Sphere, respectively. A kernel defining a one to one map between these states is then constructed.

  1. Holography and entropy bounds in the plane wave matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Bousso, Raphael; Mints, Aleksey L.

    2006-06-15

    As a quantum theory of gravity, matrix theory should provide a realization of the holographic principle, in the sense that a holographic theory should contain one binary degree of freedom per Planck area. We present evidence that Bekenstein's entropy bound, which is related to area differences, is manifest in the plane wave matrix model. If holography is implemented in this way, we predict crossover behavior at strong coupling when the energy exceeds N{sup 2} in units of the mass scale.

  2. A matrix model for the β-Jacobi ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lippert, Ross A.

    2003-10-01

    This note presents a random matrix model for general (β>0) β-Jacobi ensembles. This generalizes the well-known MANOVA models for β=1,2,4 and eliminates the quantization of β (and other parameters) present in the previously known models. This model is a partial answer to an open problem presented by Dumitriu and Edelman, where they also presented models for the β-Laguerre and β-Hermite ensembles.

  3. On matrix model formulations of noncommutative Yang-Mills theories

    SciTech Connect

    Azeyanagi, Tatsuo; Hirata, Tomoyoshi; Hanada, Masanori

    2008-11-15

    We study the stability of noncommutative spaces in matrix models and discuss the continuum limit which leads to the noncommutative Yang-Mills theories. It turns out that most noncommutative spaces in bosonic models are unstable. This indicates perturbative instability of fuzzy R{sup D} pointed out by Van Raamsdonk and Armoni et al. persists to nonperturbative level in these cases. In this sense, these bosonic noncommutative Yang-Mills theories are not well-defined, or at least their matrix model formulations studied in this paper do not work. We also show that noncommutative backgrounds are stable in a supersymmetric matrix model deformed by a cubic Myers term, though the deformation itself breaks supersymmetry.

  4. Hierarchical spatiotemporal matrix models for characterizing invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, M.B.; Wikle, C.K.; Dorazio, R.M.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The growth and dispersal of biotic organisms is an important subject in ecology. Ecologists are able to accurately describe survival and fecundity in plant and animal populations and have developed quantitative approaches to study the dynamics of dispersal and population size. Of particular interest are the dynamics of invasive species. Such nonindigenous animals and plants can levy significant impacts on native biotic communities. Effective models for relative abundance have been developed; however, a better understanding of the dynamics of actual population size (as opposed to relative abundance) in an invasion would be beneficial to all branches of ecology. In this article, we adopt a hierarchical Bayesian framework for modeling the invasion of such species while addressing the discrete nature of the data and uncertainty associated with the probability of detection. The nonlinear dynamics between discrete time points are intuitively modeled through an embedded deterministic population model with density-dependent growth and dispersal components. Additionally, we illustrate the importance of accommodating spatially varying dispersal rates. The method is applied to the specific case of the Eurasian Collared-Dove, an invasive species at mid-invasion in the United States at the time of this writing.

  5. Hierarchical spatiotemporal matrix models for characterizing invasions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hooten, M.B.; Wikle, C.K.; Dorazio, R.M.; Royle, J. Andrew

    2007-01-01

    The growth and dispersal of biotic organisms is an important subject in ecology. Ecologists are able to accurately describe survival and fecundity in plant and animal populations and have developed quantitative approaches to study the dynamics of dispersal and population size. Of particular interest are the dynamics of invasive species. Such nonindigenous animals and plants can levy significant impacts on native biotic communities. Effective models for relative abundance have been developed; however, a better understanding of the dynamics of actual population size (as opposed to relative abundance) in an invasion would be beneficial to all branches of ecology. In this article, we adopt a hierarchical Bayesian framework for modeling the invasion of such species while addressing the discrete nature of the data and uncertainty associated with the probability of detection. The nonlinear dynamics between discrete time points are intuitively modeled through an embedded deterministic population model with density-dependent growth and dispersal components. Additionally, we illustrate the importance of accommodating spatially varying dispersal rates. The method is applied to the specific case of the Eurasian Collared-Dove, an invasive species at mid-invasion in the United States at the time of this writing. ?? 2006, The International Biometric Society.

  6. A model of consensus formation for reconciling nursing's disciplinary matrix.

    PubMed

    Dobratz, Marjorie C

    2010-01-01

    With questions raised as to whether or not nursing knowledge should be developed from extant conceptual/theoretical models or from practice-based environments, this paper utilizes Kuhn's disciplinary matrix and Laudan's model of consensus formation to explore the changing nature of the discipline's structural matrix. Kuhn's notion that a discipline's structural matrix includes symbolic generalizations, models and exemplars, and Laudan's view that a maturing discipline embraces factual, methodological, and axiological (goals and aims) knowledge, and that context and discourse are also involved in advancing a discipline is described as a means for reconciling the source of nursing knowledge. This paper posits that shared axiological goals connect both theorists and practitioners, and resolve potential conflicts as to viable sources of nursing knowledge. Through shared goals that include humanization, meaning, quality of life, caring, consciousness, transcendence, and presence, which bridge both theoretical and practice approaches, nursing's charge to contribute to the good of society is fulfilled. PMID:20017883

  7. A model of consensus formation for reconciling nursing's disciplinary matrix.

    PubMed

    Dobratz, Marjorie C

    2010-01-01

    With questions raised as to whether or not nursing knowledge should be developed from extant conceptual/theoretical models or from practice-based environments, this paper utilizes Kuhn's disciplinary matrix and Laudan's model of consensus formation to explore the changing nature of the discipline's structural matrix. Kuhn's notion that a discipline's structural matrix includes symbolic generalizations, models and exemplars, and Laudan's view that a maturing discipline embraces factual, methodological, and axiological (goals and aims) knowledge, and that context and discourse are also involved in advancing a discipline is described as a means for reconciling the source of nursing knowledge. This paper posits that shared axiological goals connect both theorists and practitioners, and resolve potential conflicts as to viable sources of nursing knowledge. Through shared goals that include humanization, meaning, quality of life, caring, consciousness, transcendence, and presence, which bridge both theoretical and practice approaches, nursing's charge to contribute to the good of society is fulfilled.

  8. Explicit examples of DIM constraints for network matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awata, Hidetoshi; Kanno, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Takuya; Mironov, Andrei; Morozov, Alexei; Morozov, Andrey; Ohkubo, Yusuke; Zenkevich, Yegor

    2016-07-01

    Dotsenko-Fateev and Chern-Simons matrix models, which describe Nekrasov functions for SYM theories in different dimensions, are all incorporated into network matrix models with the hidden Ding-Iohara-Miki (DIM) symmetry. This lifting is especially simple for what we call balanced networks. Then, the Ward identities (known under the names of Virasoro/ {W} -constraints or loop equations or regularity condition for qq-characters) are also promoted to the DIM level, where they all become corollaries of a single identity.

  9. Modeling fatigue crack growth in cross ply titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.

    1993-01-01

    In this study, the fatigue crack growth behavior of fiber bridging matrix cracks in cross-ply SCS-6/Ti-15-3 and SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates containing center holes was investigated. Experimental observations revealed that matrix cracking was far more extensive and wide spread in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates compared to that in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. In addition, the fatigue life of the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates was significantly longer than that of the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates. The matrix cracking observed in both material systems was analyzed using a fiber bridging (FB) model which was formulated using the boundary correction factors and weight functions for center hole specimen configurations. A frictional shear stress is assumed in the FB model and was used as a curve fitting parameter to model matrix crack growth data. The higher frictional shear stresses calculated in the SCS-6/Timetal-21S laminates resulted in lower stress intensity factors in the matrix and higher axial stresses in the fibers compared to those in the SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates at the same applied stress levels.

  10. Matrix models for quantifying competitive intransitivity

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Werner; Soliveres, Santiago; Kryszewski, Wojciech; Maestre, Fernando T.; Gotelli, Nicholas J.

    2015-01-01

    Assessing the relative importance of intransitive competition networks in nature has been difficult because it requires a large number of pairwise competition experiments linked to observed field abundances of interacting species. Here we introduce metrics and statistical tests for evaluating the contribution of intransitivity to community structure using two kinds of data: competition matrices derived from the outcomes of pairwise experimental studies (C matrices) and species abundance matrices. We use C matrices to develop patch transition matrices (P) that predict community structure in a simple Markov chain model. We propose a randomization test to evaluate the degree of intransitivity from these P matrices in combination with empirical or simulated C matrices. Benchmark tests revealed that the methods could correctly detect intransitive competition networks, even in the absence of direct measures of pairwise competitive strength. These tests represent the first tools for estimating the degree of intransitivity in competitive networks from observational datasets. They can be applied to both spatio-temporal data sampled in homogeneous environments or across environmental gradients, and to experimental measures of pairwise interactions. To illustrate the methods, we analyzed empirical data matrices on the colonization of slug carrion by necrophagous flies and their parasitoids. PMID:25914427

  11. A holographic view on matrix model of black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suyama, Takao; Yi, Piljin

    2004-02-01

    We investigate a deformed matrix model proposed by Kazakov et.al. in relation to Witten's two-dimensional black hole. The existing conjectures assert the equivalence of the two by mapping each to a deformed c = 1 theory called the sine-Liouville theory. We point out that the matrix theory in question may be naturally interpreted as a gauged quantum mechanics deformed by insertion of an exponentiated Wilson loop operator, which gives us more direct and holographic map between the two sides. The matrix model in the usual scaling limit must correspond to the bosonic SL(2,Bbb R)/U(1) theory in genus expansion but exact in alpha'. We successfully test this by computing the Wilson loop expectation value and comparing it against the bulk computation. For the latter, we employ the alpha'-exact geometry proposed by Dijkgraaf, Verlinde, and Verlinde, which was further advocated by Tseytlin. We close with comments on open problems.

  12. Resilient organizations: matrix model and service line management.

    PubMed

    Westphal, Judith A

    2005-09-01

    Resilient organizations modify structures to meet the demands of the marketplace. The author describes a structure that enables multihospital organizations to innovate and rapidly adapt to changes. Service line management within a matrix model is an evolving organizational structure for complex systems in which nurses are pivotal members.

  13. Unitary matrix models and 2D quantum gravity

    SciTech Connect

    Dalley, S. . Joseph Henry Labs.); Johnson, C.V.; Morris, T.R. . Dept. of Physics); Watterstam, A. )

    1992-09-21

    In this paper the KdV and modified KdV integrable hierarchies are shown to be different descriptions of the same 2D gravitational system - open-closed string theory. Non-perturbative solutions of the multicritical unitary matrix models map to non-singular solutions of the renormalization group equation for the string susceptibility, [P, Q] = Q. The authors also demonstrate that the large-N solutions of unitary matrix integrals in external fields, studied by Gross and Newman, equal the non-singular pure closed-string solutions of [[bar P], Q] = Q.

  14. Modeling of 3-D Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Sullivan, Roy M.; Mital, Subodh K.

    2003-01-01

    Three different approaches are being pursued at the NASA Glenn Research Center to predict the nanostructural behavior of three-dimensional woven ceramic matrix composites. These are: a micromechanics-based approach using W-CEMCAN (Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer), a laminate analogy method and a structural frame approach (based on the finite element method). All three techniques are applied to predict the thermomechanical properties of a three-dimensional woven angle interlock C/SiC composite. The properties are predicted for room temperature and 1100 C and the predicted properties are compared to measurements. General observations regarding the three approaches for three-dimensional composite modeling are discussed.

  15. Life Modeling and Design Analysis for Ceramic Matrix Composite Materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The primary research efforts focused on characterizing and modeling static failure, environmental durability, and creep-rupture behavior of two classes of ceramic matrix composites (CMC), silicon carbide fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (SiC/SiC) and carbon fibers in a silicon carbide matrix (C/SiC). An engineering life prediction model (Probabilistic Residual Strength model) has been developed specifically for CMCs. The model uses residual strength as the damage metric for evaluating remaining life and is posed probabilistically in order to account for the stochastic nature of the material s response. In support of the modeling effort, extensive testing of C/SiC in partial pressures of oxygen has been performed. This includes creep testing, tensile testing, half life and residual tensile strength testing. C/SiC is proposed for airframe and propulsion applications in advanced reusable launch vehicles. Figures 1 and 2 illustrate the models predictive capabilities as well as the manner in which experimental tests are being selected in such a manner as to ensure sufficient data is available to aid in model validation.

  16. Matrix Models from Operators and Topological Strings, 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kashaev, Rinat; Mariño, Marcos; Zakany, Szabolcs

    2016-10-01

    The quantization of mirror curves to toric Calabi--Yau threefolds leads to trace class operators, and it has been conjectured that the spectral properties of these operators provide a non-perturbative realization of topological string theory on these backgrounds. In this paper, we find an explicit form for the integral kernel of the trace class operator in the case of local P1xP1, in terms of Faddeev's quantum dilogarithm. The matrix model associated to this integral kernel is an O(2) model, which generalizes the ABJ(M) matrix model. We find its exact planar limit, and we provide detailed evidence that its 1/N expansion captures the all genus topological string free energy on local P1xP1.

  17. Matrix models and stochastic growth in Donaldson-Thomas theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szabo, Richard J.; Tierz, Miguel

    2012-10-01

    We show that the partition functions which enumerate Donaldson-Thomas invariants of local toric Calabi-Yau threefolds without compact divisors can be expressed in terms of specializations of the Schur measure. We also discuss the relevance of the Hall-Littlewood and Jack measures in the context of BPS state counting and study the partition functions at arbitrary points of the Kähler moduli space. This rewriting in terms of symmetric functions leads to a unitary one-matrix model representation for Donaldson-Thomas theory. We describe explicitly how this result is related to the unitary matrix model description of Chern-Simons gauge theory. This representation is used to show that the generating functions for Donaldson-Thomas invariants are related to tau-functions of the integrable Toda and Toeplitz lattice hierarchies. The matrix model also leads to an interpretation of Donaldson-Thomas theory in terms of non-intersecting paths in the lock-step model of vicious walkers. We further show that these generating functions can be interpreted as normalization constants of a corner growth/last-passage stochastic model.

  18. Matrix σ-MODELS for Multi D-Brane Dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizzi, Fedele; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Szabo, Richard J.

    We describe a dynamical worldsheet origin for the Lagrangian describing the low-energy dynamics of a system of parallel D-branes. We show how matrix-valued collective coordinate fields for the D-branes naturally arise as couplings of a worldsheet σ-model, and that the quantum dynamics require that these couplings be mutually noncommutative. We show that the low-energy effective action for the σ-model couplings describes the propagation of an open string in the background of the multiple D-brane configuration, in which all string interactions between the constituent branes are integrated out and the genus expansion is taken into account, with a matrix-valued coupling. The effective field theory is governed by the non-Abelian Born-Infeld target space action which leads to the standard one for D-brane field theory.

  19. DLCQ and plane wave matrix Big Bang models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blau, Matthias; O'Loughlin, Martin

    2008-09-01

    We study the generalisations of the Craps-Sethi-Verlinde matrix big bang model to curved, in particular plane wave, space-times, beginning with a careful discussion of the DLCQ procedure. Singular homogeneous plane waves are ideal toy-models of realistic space-time singularities since they have been shown to arise universally as their Penrose limits, and we emphasise the role played by the symmetries of these plane waves in implementing the flat space Seiberg-Sen DLCQ prescription for these curved backgrounds. We then analyse various aspects of the resulting matrix string Yang-Mills theories, such as the relation between strong coupling space-time singularities and world-sheet tachyonic mass terms. In order to have concrete examples at hand, in an appendix we determine and analyse the IIA singular homogeneous plane wave - null dilaton backgrounds.

  20. Four-point function in the IOP matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, Ben; Polchinski, Joseph; Rosenhaus, Vladimir; Suh, S. Josephine

    2016-05-01

    The IOP model is a quantum mechanical system of a large- N matrix oscillator and a fundamental oscillator, coupled through a quartic interaction. It was introduced previously as a toy model of the gauge dual of an AdS black hole, and captures a key property that at infinite N the two-point function decays to zero on long time scales. Motivated by recent work on quantum chaos, we sum all planar Feynman diagrams contributing to the four-point function. We find that the IOP model does not satisfy the more refined criteria of exponential growth of the out-of-time-order four-point function.

  1. Chiral matrix model of the semi-QGP in QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pisarski, Robert D.; Skokov, Vladimir V.

    2016-08-01

    Previously, a matrix model of the region near the transition temperature, in the "semi"quark gluon plasma, was developed for the theory of S U (3 ) gluons without quarks. In this paper we develop a chiral matrix model applicable to QCD by including dynamical quarks with 2 +1 flavors. This requires adding a nonet of scalar fields, with both parities, and coupling these to quarks through a Yukawa coupling, y . Treating the scalar fields in mean field approximation, the effective Lagrangian is computed by integrating out quarks to one loop order. As is standard, the potential for the scalar fields is chosen to be symmetric under the flavor symmetry of S U (3 )L×S U (3 )R×Z (3 )A, except for a term linear in the current quark mass, mqk. In addition, at a nonzero temperature T it is necessary to add a new term, ˜mqkT2. The parameters of the gluon part of the matrix model are identical to those for the pure glue theory without quarks. The parameters in the chiral matrix model are fixed by the values, at zero temperature, of the pion decay constant and the masses of the pions, kaons, η , and η'. The temperature for the chiral crossover at Tχ=155 MeV is determined by adjusting the Yukawa coupling y . We find reasonable agreement with the results of numerical simulations on the lattice for the pressure and related quantities. In the chiral limit, besides the divergence in the chiral susceptibility there is also a milder divergence in the susceptibility between the Polyakov loop and the chiral order parameter, with critical exponent β -1 . We compute derivatives with respect to a quark chemical potential to determine the susceptibilities for baryon number, the χ2 n. Especially sensitive tests are provided by χ4-χ2 and by χ6, which changes in sign about Tχ. The behavior of the susceptibilities in the chiral matrix model strongly suggests that as the temperature increases from Tχ, that the transition to deconfinement is significantly quicker than indicated by the

  2. Modeling mechanophore activation within a crosslinked glassy matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silberstein, Meredith N.; Min, Kyoungmin; Cremar, Lee D.; Degen, Cassandra M.; Martinez, Todd J.; Aluru, Narayana R.; White, Scott R.; Sottos, Nancy R.

    2013-07-01

    Mechanically induced reactivity is a promising means for designing self-reporting materials. Mechanically sensitive chemical groups called mechanophores are covalently linked into polymers in order to trigger specific chemical reactions upon mechanical loading. These mechanophores can be linked either within the backbone or as crosslinks between backbone segments. Mechanophore response is sensitive to both the matrix properties and placement within the matrix, providing two avenues for material design. A model framework is developed to describe reactivity of mechanophores located as crosslinks in a glassy polymer matrix. Simulations are conducted at the molecular and macromolecular scales in order to develop macroscale constitutive relations. The model is developed specifically for the case of spiropyran (SP) in lightly crosslinked polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). This optically trackable mechanophore (fluorescent when activated) allows the model to be assessed in terms of observed experimental behavior. The force modified potential energy surface (FMPES) framework is used in conjunction with ab initio steered molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of SP to determine the mechanophore kinetics. MD simulations of the crosslinked PMMA structure under shear deformation are used to determine the relationship between macroscale stress and local force on the crosslinks. A continuum model implemented in a finite element framework synthesizes these mechanochemical relations with the mechanical behavior. The continuum model with parameters taken directly from the FMPES and MD analyses under predicts stress-driven activation relative to experimental data. The continuum model, with the physically motivated modification of force fluctuations, provides an accurate prediction for monotonic loading across three decades of strain rate and creep loading, suggesting that the fundamental physics are captured.

  3. Density matrix renormalization group approach to the massive Schwinger model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrnes, T. M.; Sriganesh, P.; Bursill, R. J.; Hamer, C. J.

    2002-07-01

    The massive Schwinger model is studied using a density matrix renormalization group approach to the staggered lattice Hamiltonian version of the model. Lattice sizes up to 256 sites are calculated, and the estimates in the continuum limit are almost two orders of magnitude more accurate than previous calculations. Coleman's picture of ``half-asymptotic'' particles at a background field θ=π is confirmed. The predicted phase transition at finite fermion mass (m/g) is accurately located and demonstrated to belong in the 2D Ising universality class.

  4. Matrix viscoplasticity and its shielding by active mechanics in microtissue models: experiments and mathematical modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Alan S.; Wang, Hailong; Copeland, Craig R.; Chen, Christopher S.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2016-09-01

    The biomechanical behavior of tissues under mechanical stimulation is critically important to physiological function. We report a combined experimental and modeling study of bioengineered 3D smooth muscle microtissues that reveals a previously unappreciated interaction between active cell mechanics and the viscoplastic properties of the extracellular matrix. The microtissues’ response to stretch/unstretch actuations, as probed by microcantilever force sensors, was dominated by cellular actomyosin dynamics. However, cell lysis revealed a viscoplastic response of the underlying model collagen/fibrin matrix. A model coupling Hill-type actomyosin dynamics with a plastic perfectly viscoplastic description of the matrix quantitatively accounts for the microtissue dynamics, including notably the cells’ shielding of the matrix plasticity. Stretch measurements of single cells confirmed the active cell dynamics, and were well described by a single-cell version of our model. These results reveal the need for new focus on matrix plasticity and its interactions with active cell mechanics in describing tissue dynamics.

  5. Matrix viscoplasticity and its shielding by active mechanics in microtissue models: experiments and mathematical modeling

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Alan S.; Wang, Hailong; Copeland, Craig R.; Chen, Christopher S.; Shenoy, Vivek B.; Reich, Daniel H.

    2016-01-01

    The biomechanical behavior of tissues under mechanical stimulation is critically important to physiological function. We report a combined experimental and modeling study of bioengineered 3D smooth muscle microtissues that reveals a previously unappreciated interaction between active cell mechanics and the viscoplastic properties of the extracellular matrix. The microtissues’ response to stretch/unstretch actuations, as probed by microcantilever force sensors, was dominated by cellular actomyosin dynamics. However, cell lysis revealed a viscoplastic response of the underlying model collagen/fibrin matrix. A model coupling Hill-type actomyosin dynamics with a plastic perfectly viscoplastic description of the matrix quantitatively accounts for the microtissue dynamics, including notably the cells’ shielding of the matrix plasticity. Stretch measurements of single cells confirmed the active cell dynamics, and were well described by a single-cell version of our model. These results reveal the need for new focus on matrix plasticity and its interactions with active cell mechanics in describing tissue dynamics. PMID:27671239

  6. Derivation of stiffness matrix in constitutive modeling of magnetorheological elastomer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, D.; Sun, L.; Sun, J.; Lin, Y.

    2013-02-01

    Magnetorheological elastomers (MREs) are a class of smart materials whose mechanical properties change instantly by the application of a magnetic field. Based on the specially orthotropic, transversely isotropic stress-strain relationships and effective permeability model, the stiffness matrix of constitutive equations for deformable chain-like MRE is considered. To valid the components of shear modulus in this stiffness matrix, the magnetic-structural simulations with finite element method (FEM) are presented. An acceptable agreement is illustrated between analytical equations and numerical simulations. For the specified magnetic field, sphere particle radius, distance between adjacent particles in chains and volume fractions of ferrous particles, this constitutive equation is effective to engineering application to estimate the elastic behaviour of chain-like MRE in an external magnetic field.

  7. Modeling of matrix acidizing process under reservoir conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turegeldieva, Karlygash; Assilbekov, Bakhytzhan; Zhapbasbayev, Uzak; Zolotukhin, Anatoly; Bekibaev, Timur; Kenzhebekov, Nurlan; Gubkin Russian State University of oil; gas Collaboration

    2013-11-01

    Effectiveness of the process depends on the parameters: well choice, geological structure of the reservoir, definition of physical and chemical properties of rocks and fluids, agent choice. There are different mathematical models of the matrix acidizing, including the two scale model. These models describe the process in the core scale and Darcy scale, i.e. in an area with dimensions of several centimeters. It leads to the main problem - how to use these models to the near wellbore scale under reservoir conditions. Some authors have increased the dimensions of the cores in numerical simulations and investigated the influence of the core dimensions to acidizing process. In this paper effort to indirectly solve this problem made. It based on boundary conditions alteration and simultaneous solution of matrix acidizing in damaged zone and reservoir fluid flow models. Furthermore in this work the criterion of the acid injection shut down for optimal breakthrough volume calculation was modified. Influence of boundary conditions on near well-bore zone treatment process was investigated. Science Committee of Ministry of Education and Science of Republic of Kazakhstan.

  8. Matrix population models from 20 studies of perennial plant populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Martha M.; Williams, Jennifer L.; Lesica, Peter; Bell, Timothy J.; Bierzychudek, Paulette; Bowles, Marlin; Crone, Elizabeth E.; Doak, Daniel F.; Ehrlen, Johan; Ellis-Adam, Albertine; McEachern, Kathryn; Ganesan, Rengaian; Latham, Penelope; Luijten, Sheila; Kaye, Thomas N.; Knight, Tiffany M.; Menges, Eric S.; Morris, William F.; den Nijs, Hans; Oostermeijer, Gerard; Quintana-Ascencio, Pedro F.; Shelly, J. Stephen; Stanley, Amanda; Thorpe, Andrea; Tamara, Ticktin; Valverde, Teresa; Weekley, Carl W.

    2012-01-01

    Demographic transition matrices are one of the most commonly applied population models for both basic and applied ecological research. The relatively simple framework of these models and simple, easily interpretable summary statistics they produce have prompted the wide use of these models across an exceptionally broad range of taxa. Here, we provide annual transition matrices and observed stage structures/population sizes for 20 perennial plant species which have been the focal species for long-term demographic monitoring. These data were assembled as part of the "Testing Matrix Models" working group through the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). In sum, these data represent 82 populations with >460 total population-years of data. It is our hope that making these data available will help promote and improve our ability to monitor and understand plant population dynamics.

  9. Matrix population models from 20 studies of perennial plant populations

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ellis, Martha M.; Williams, Jennifer L.; Lesica, Peter; Bell, Timothy J.; Bierzychudek, Paulette; Bowles, Marlin; Crone, Elizabeth E.; Doak, Daniel F.; Ehrlen, Johan; Ellis-Adam, Albertine; McEachern, Kathryn; Ganesan, Rengaian; Latham, Penelope; Luijten, Sheila; Kaye, Thomas N.; Knight, Tiffany M.; Menges, Eric S.; Morris, William F.; den Nijs, Hans; Oostermeijer, Gerard; Quintana-Ascencio, Pedro F.; Shelly, J. Stephen; Stanley, Amanda; Thorpe, Andrea; Tamara, Ticktin; Valverde, Teresa; Weekley, Carl W.

    2012-01-01

    Demographic transition matrices are one of the most commonly applied population models for both basic and applied ecological research. The relatively simple framework of these models and simple, easily interpretable summary statistics they produce have prompted the wide use of these models across an exceptionally broad range of taxa. Here, we provide annual transition matrices and observed stage structures/population sizes for 20 perennial plant species which have been the focal species for long-term demographic monitoring. These data were assembled as part of the 'Testing Matrix Models' working group through the National Center for Ecological Analysis and Synthesis (NCEAS). In sum, these data represent 82 populations with >460 total population-years of data. It is our hope that making these data available will help promote and improve our ability to monitor and understand plant population dynamics.

  10. An Uncertainty Structure Matrix for Models and Simulations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, Lawrence L.; Blattnig, Steve R.; Hemsch, Michael J.; Luckring, James M.; Tripathi, Ram K.

    2008-01-01

    Software that is used for aerospace flight control and to display information to pilots and crew is expected to be correct and credible at all times. This type of software is typically developed under strict management processes, which are intended to reduce defects in the software product. However, modeling and simulation (M&S) software may exhibit varying degrees of correctness and credibility, depending on a large and complex set of factors. These factors include its intended use, the known physics and numerical approximations within the M&S, and the referent data set against which the M&S correctness is compared. The correctness and credibility of an M&S effort is closely correlated to the uncertainty management (UM) practices that are applied to the M&S effort. This paper describes an uncertainty structure matrix for M&S, which provides a set of objective descriptions for the possible states of UM practices within a given M&S effort. The columns in the uncertainty structure matrix contain UM elements or practices that are common across most M&S efforts, and the rows describe the potential levels of achievement in each of the elements. A practitioner can quickly look at the matrix to determine where an M&S effort falls based on a common set of UM practices that are described in absolute terms that can be applied to virtually any M&S effort. The matrix can also be used to plan those steps and resources that would be needed to improve the UM practices for a given M&S effort.

  11. Filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible thermal flows.

    PubMed

    Zhuo, Congshan; Zhong, Chengwen; Cao, Jun

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann (FMLB) model is proposed and extended to include incompressible thermal flows. A new equilibrium solution is found in the improved FMLB model, which is derived from the Hermite expansion. As a result, the velocity-dependent pressure is removed, which is an inherent defect of Somers's FMLB model. In addition, the improved model is extended to include incompressible thermal flows by introducing a class of temperature-distribution function for evaluating the temperature field. Two different temperature-distribution functions are discussed. The improved FMLB model and the temperature-evaluation equation are combined into one coupled model. Numerical simulations are performed on the two-dimensional (2D) lid-driven square cavity flow and the 2D natural convection flow in a square cavity using the improved FMLB model and the two coupled models, respectively. The numerical results of the 2D lid-driven square cavity flow show that the improved FMLB model is superior to the lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) model in terms of both accuracy and stability. When compared with the multi-relaxation-time (MRT) model, the similar accuracy and slightly enhanced stability can be obtained by the improved model. The advantage of the improved model is that it no longer relies on difficult selection of the free parameters requested by the MRT model; in addition, the force term is already included in the collision operator of the improved model. In the case of 2D natural convection flow, the numerical results of the two present models are almost the same, and both exhibit good agreement with the benchmark solution.

  12. Filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann model for incompressible thermal flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhuo, Congshan; Zhong, Chengwen; Cao, Jun

    2012-04-01

    In this study, a new filter-matrix lattice Boltzmann (FMLB) model is proposed and extended to include incompressible thermal flows. A new equilibrium solution is found in the improved FMLB model, which is derived from the Hermite expansion. As a result, the velocity-dependent pressure is removed, which is an inherent defect of Somers's FMLB model. In addition, the improved model is extended to include incompressible thermal flows by introducing a class of temperature-distribution function for evaluating the temperature field. Two different temperature-distribution functions are discussed. The improved FMLB model and the temperature-evaluation equation are combined into one coupled model. Numerical simulations are performed on the two-dimensional (2D) lid-driven square cavity flow and the 2D natural convection flow in a square cavity using the improved FMLB model and the two coupled models, respectively. The numerical results of the 2D lid-driven square cavity flow show that the improved FMLB model is superior to the lattice Bhatnagar-Gross-Krook (LBGK) model in terms of both accuracy and stability. When compared with the multi-relaxation-time (MRT) model, the similar accuracy and slightly enhanced stability can be obtained by the improved model. The advantage of the improved model is that it no longer relies on difficult selection of the free parameters requested by the MRT model; in addition, the force term is already included in the collision operator of the improved model. In the case of 2D natural convection flow, the numerical results of the two present models are almost the same, and both exhibit good agreement with the benchmark solution.

  13. Modeling cell-matrix traction forces in Keratinocyte colonies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Shiladitya

    2013-03-01

    Crosstalk between cell-cell and cell-matrix adhesions plays an essential role in the mechanical function of tissues. The traction forces exerted by cohesive keratinocyte colonies with strong cell-cell adhesions are mostly concentrated at the colony periphery. In contrast, for weak cadherin-based intercellular adhesions, individual cells in a colony interact with their matrix independently, with a disorganized distribution of traction forces extending throughout the colony. In this talk I will present a minimal physical model of the colony as contractile elastic media linked by springs and coupled to an elastic substrate. The model captures the spatial distribution of traction forces seen in experiments. For cell colonies with strong cell-cell adhesions, the total traction force of the colony measured in experiments is found to scale with the colony's geometrical size. This scaling suggests the emergence of an effective surface tension of magnitude comparable to that measured for non-adherent, three-dimensional cell aggregates. The physical model supports the scaling and indicates that the surface tension may be controlled by acto-myosin contractility. Supported by the NSF through grant DMR-1004789. This work was done in collaboration with Aaron F. Mertz, Eric R. Dufresne and Valerie Horsley (Yale University) and M. Cristina Marchetti (Syracuse University).

  14. Chiral condensate in the Schwinger model with matrix product operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañuls, Mari Carmen; Cichy, Krzysztof; Jansen, Karl; Saito, Hana

    2016-05-01

    Tensor network (TN) methods, in particular the matrix product states (MPS) ansatz, have proven to be a useful tool in analyzing the properties of lattice gauge theories. They allow for a very good precision, much better than standard Monte Carlo (MC) techniques for the models that have been studied so far, due to the possibility of reaching much smaller lattice spacings. The real reason for the interest in the TN approach, however, is its ability, shown so far in several condensed matter models, to deal with theories which exhibit the notorious sign problem in MC simulations. This makes it prospective for dealing with the nonzero chemical potential in QCD and other lattice gauge theories, as well as with real-time simulations. In this paper, using matrix product operators, we extend our analysis of the Schwinger model at zero temperature to show the feasibility of this approach also at finite temperature. This is an important step on the way to deal with the sign problem of QCD. We analyze in detail the chiral symmetry breaking in the massless and massive cases and show that the method works very well and gives good control over a broad range of temperatures, essentially from zero to infinite temperature.

  15. Modeling of cumulative tool wear in machining metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, N.P.; Tan, V.K.; Oon, B.E.

    1995-12-31

    Metal matrix composites (MMCs) are notoriously known for their low machinability because of the abrasive and brittle reinforcement. Although a near-net-shape product could be produced, finish machining is still required for the final shape and dimension. The classical Taylor`s tool life equation that relates tool life and cutting conditions has been traditionally used to study machinability. The turning operation is commonly used to investigate the machinability of a material; tedious and costly milling experiments have to be performed separately; while a facing test is not applicable for the Taylor`s model since the facing speed varies as the tool moves radially. Collecting intensive machining data for MMCs is often difficult because of the constraints on size, cost of the material, and the availability of sophisticated machine tools. A more flexible model and machinability testing technique are, therefore, sought. This study presents and verifies new models for turning, facing, and milling operations. Different cutting conditions were utilized to assess the machinability of MMCs reinforced with silicon carbide or alumina particles. Experimental data show that tool wear does not depend on the order of different cutting speeds since abrasion is the main wear mechanism. Correlation between data for turning, milling, and facing is presented. It is more economical to rank machinability using data for facing and then to convert the data for turning and milling, if required. Subsurface damages such as work-hardened and cracked matrix alloy, and fractured and delaminated particles are discussed.

  16. The implementation of holography in the plane wave matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mints, Aleksey Leonidovich

    It is expected that at the core of nonperturbative theories of quantum gravity, such as M-theory, lies the realization of the holographic principle, in the sense that a holographic theory should contain one binary degree of freedom per Planck area. Present understanding of such theories requires the holographic encoding of bulk data in large matrices. Currently this mapping is poorly understood. The plane wave matrix model provides a laboratory for isolating aspects of this problem in a controlled setting. At large boosts, configurations of concentric membranes become superselection sectors, whose exact spectra are known. From the bulk point of view one expects product states of individual membranes to be contained within the full spectrum. However, for non-BPS states this inclusion relation is obscured by Gauss law constraints. Its validity rests on nontrivial relations in representation theory, which we identify and verify by explicit computation. Beyond the decoding and partial identification of selected states in large matrices, one would like to get a better understanding of the holographic state counting of these degrees of freedom, i.e., entropy. Contrary to the naive expectation of holography realized in terms of the covariant entropy bound, we present evidence that it is the Bekenstein entropy bound, which is related to area differences, that is manifest in the plane wave matrix model. If holography is implemented in this way, we predict crossover behavior at strong coupling when the energy exceeds N2 in units of the mass scale.

  17. Matrix model approach to minimal Liouville gravity revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belavin, V.; Rud, Yu

    2015-05-01

    Using the connection with the Frobenius manifold (FM) structure, we study the matrix model description of minimal Liouville gravity (MLG) based on the Douglas String equation. Our goal is to find an exact discrete formulation of the (q,p) MLG model that intrinsically contains information about the conformal selection rules. We discuss how to modify the FM structure appropriately for this purposes. We propose a modification of the construction for Lee-Yang series involving the {{A}p-1} algebra instead of the previously used A1 algebra. With the new prescription, we calculate correlators on the sphere up to four points and find full agreement with the continuous approach without using resonance transformations.

  18. An Empirically Based Method of Q-Matrix Validation for the DINA Model: Development and Applications

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de la Torre, Jimmy

    2008-01-01

    Most model fit analyses in cognitive diagnosis assume that a Q matrix is correct after it has been constructed, without verifying its appropriateness. Consequently, any model misfit attributable to the Q matrix cannot be addressed and remedied. To address this concern, this paper proposes an empirically based method of validating a Q matrix used…

  19. Teaching Improvement Model Designed with DEA Method and Management Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Montoneri, Bernard

    2014-01-01

    This study uses student evaluation of teachers to design a teaching improvement matrix based on teaching efficiency and performance by combining management matrix and data envelopment analysis. This matrix is designed to formulate suggestions to improve teaching. The research sample consists of 42 classes of freshmen following a course of English…

  20. β-deformed matrix model and Nekrasov partition function

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishinaka, Takahiro; Rim, Chaiho

    2012-02-01

    We study Penner type matrix models in relation with the Nekrasov partition function of four dimensional mathcal{N} = {2} , SU(2) supersymmetric gauge theories with N F = 2 , 3 and 4. By evaluating the resolvent using the loop equation for general β, we explicitly construct the first half-genus correction to the free energy and demonstrate the result coincides with the corresponding Nekrasov partition function with general Ω-background, including higher instanton contributions after modifying the relation of the Coulomb branch parameter with the filling fraction. Our approach complements the proof using the Selberg integrals directly which is useful to find the contribution in the series of instanton numbers for a given deformation parameter.

  1. Analytical Model of Water Flow in Coal with Active Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemek, Jakub; Stopa, Jerzy

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents new analytical model of gas-water flow in coal seams in one dimension with emphasis on interactions between water flowing in cleats and coal matrix. Coal as a flowing system, can be viewed as a solid organic material consisting of two flow subsystems: a microporous matrix and a system of interconnected macropores and fractures. Most of gas is accumulated in the microporous matrix, where the primary flow mechanism is diffusion. Fractures and cleats existing in coal play an important role as a transportation system for macro scale flow of water and gas governed by Darcy's law. The coal matrix can imbibe water under capillary forces leading to exchange of mass between fractures and coal matrix. In this paper new partial differential equation for water saturation in fractures has been formulated, respecting mass exchange between coal matrix and fractures. Exact analytical solution has been obtained using the method of characteristics. The final solution has very simple form that may be useful for practical engineering calculations. It was observed that the rate of exchange of mass between the fractures and the coal matrix is governed by an expression which is analogous to the Newton cooling law known from theory of heat exchange, but in present case the mass transfer coefficient depends not only on coal and fluid properties but also on time and position. The constant term of mass transfer coefficient depends on relation between micro porosity and macro porosity of coal, capillary forces, and microporous structure of coal matrix. This term can be expressed theoretically or obtained experimentally. W artykule zaprezentowano nowy model matematyczny przepływu wody i gazu w jednowymiarowej warstwie węglowej z uwzględnieniem wymiany masy między systemem szczelin i matrycą węglową. Węgiel jako system przepływowy traktowany jest jako układ o podwójnej porowatości i przepuszczalności, składający się z mikroporowatej matrycy węglowej oraz z

  2. Modeling Woven Polymer Matrix Composites with MAC/GMC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    NASA's Micromechanics Analysis Code with Generalized Method of Cells (MAC/GMC) is used to predict the elastic properties of plain weave polymer matrix composites (PMCs). The traditional one step three-dimensional homogertization procedure that has been used in conjunction with MAC/GMC for modeling woven composites in the past is inaccurate due to the lack of shear coupling inherent to the model. However, by performing a two step homogenization procedure in which the woven composite repeating unit cell is homogenized independently in the through-thickness direction prior to homogenization in the plane of the weave, MAC/GMC can now accurately model woven PMCs. This two step procedure is outlined and implemented, and predictions are compared with results from the traditional one step approach and other models and experiments from the literature. Full coupling of this two step technique with MAC/ GMC will result in a widely applicable, efficient, and accurate tool for the design and analysis of woven composite materials and structures.

  3. Link community detection using generative model and nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    He, Dongxiao; Jin, Di; Baquero, Carlos; Liu, Dayou

    2014-01-01

    Discovery of communities in complex networks is a fundamental data analysis problem with applications in various domains. While most of the existing approaches have focused on discovering communities of nodes, recent studies have shown the advantages and uses of link community discovery in networks. Generative models provide a promising class of techniques for the identification of modular structures in networks, but most generative models mainly focus on the detection of node communities rather than link communities. In this work, we propose a generative model, which is based on the importance of each node when forming links in each community, to describe the structure of link communities. We proceed to fit the model parameters by taking it as an optimization problem, and solve it using nonnegative matrix factorization. Thereafter, in order to automatically determine the number of communities, we extend the above method by introducing a strategy of iterative bipartition. This extended method not only finds the number of communities all by itself, but also obtains high efficiency, and thus it is more suitable to deal with large and unexplored real networks. We test this approach on both synthetic benchmarks and real-world networks including an application on a large biological network, and compare it with two highly related methods. Results demonstrate the superior performance of our approach over competing methods for the detection of link communities.

  4. Nonlinear Penalized Estimation of True Q-Matrix in Cognitive Diagnostic Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Xiang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    A key issue of cognitive diagnostic models (CDMs) is the correct identification of Q-matrix which indicates the relationship between attributes and test items. Previous CDMs typically assumed a known Q-matrix provided by domain experts such as those who developed the questions. However, misspecifications of Q-matrix had been discovered in the past…

  5. Assessing Fit of Item Response Models Using the Information Matrix Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranger, Jochen; Kuhn, Jorg-Tobias

    2012-01-01

    The information matrix can equivalently be determined via the expectation of the Hessian matrix or the expectation of the outer product of the score vector. The identity of these two matrices, however, is only valid in case of a correctly specified model. Therefore, differences between the two versions of the observed information matrix indicate…

  6. Model of the Human Eye Based on ABCD Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, G. Díaz; Castillo, M. David Iturbe

    2008-04-01

    At the moment several models of the human eye exist, nevertheless the gradient index models of the human lens (crystalline) have received little attention in optometry and vision sciences, although they consider how the refractive index and the refracting power can change with the accommodation. On the other hand, in study fields like ophthalmology and optometry, exist cases where there is a lack of information about the factors that influence the change of refractive power and therefore the focal length of the eye. By such reason, in this paper we present a model of the human eye based on the ABCD matrix in order to describe the propagation of light rays, that can be understood by professional people in optics, ophthalmology and optometry, and the dispersions of the different ocular mediums are taken into account,. The aim of the model is to obtain data about the refractive power of the eye under different considerations, such as: changes in wavelength, radius of curvature and thicknesses of the ocular mediums. We present results of simulations in Matlab of our model, assuming that the object is punctual and is placed to a certain distance of the eye, and considering at the beginning to the crystalline like a medium with fixed refractive index, and after like a gradient lens. By means of graphs, we show the total refractive power of the eye and its form and type of dependence with respect to variations in radius of curvature and thicknesses of the cornea and crystalline, as well as variations in the thickness of the previous and later cameras.

  7. Simulating spin-boson models with matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    The global coupling of few-level quantum systems (``spins'') to a discrete set of bosonic modes is a key ingredient for many applications in quantum science, including large-scale entanglement generation, quantum simulation of the dynamics of long-range interacting spin models, and hybrid platforms for force and spin sensing. In many situations, the bosons are integrated out, leading to effective long-range interactions between the spins; however, strong spin-boson coupling invalidates this approach, and spin-boson entanglement degrades the fidelity of quantum simulation of spin models. We present a general numerical method for treating the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of spin-boson systems based on matrix product states. While most efficient for weak coupling or small numbers of boson modes, our method applies for any spatial and operator dependence of the spin-boson coupling. In addition, our approach allows straightforward computation of many quantities of interest, such as the full counting statistics of collective spin measurements and quantum simulation infidelity due to spin-boson entanglement. We apply our method to ongoing trapped ion quantum simulator experiments in analytically intractable regimes. This work is supported by JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PIF- 1211914, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI, and the NRC.

  8. How many parameters does a quark mass matrix model need

    SciTech Connect

    Koide, Y. )

    1990-11-01

    An investigation independent of matrix form is made of how many parameters, which characterize the difference between up- and down-quark mass matrices, are, at least, required from the present data on quark masses and mixings. From a general study of the model with hierarchical three-step mass generations described by the three parameters {alpha}{sub {ital q}}, {beta}{sub {ital q}}, and {gamma}{sub {ital q}} ({vert bar}{alpha}{sub {ital q}}{vert bar}{much gt}{vert bar}{beta}{sub {ital q}}{vert bar}{much gt}{vert bar}{gamma}{sub {ital q}}{vert bar}; {ital q}={ital u},{ital d}), it is pointed out that the model with {beta}{sub {ital u}}/{beta}{sub {ital d}}={gamma}{sub {ital u}}/{gamma}{sub {ital d}} (i.e., with two independent parameters {alpha}{sub {ital q}} and {beta}{sub {ital q}}) is ruled out.

  9. Scalar products in GL(3)-based models with trigonometric R-matrix. Determinant representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavnov, N. A.

    2015-03-01

    We study quantum integrable GL(3)-based models with a trigonometric R-matrix solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz. We derive a determinant representation for a special case of scalar products of Bethe vectors. This representation allows one to find a determinant formula for the form factor of one of the monodromy matrix entries. We also point out an essential difference between form factors in the models with the trigonometric R-matrix and their analogs in GL(3)-invariant models.

  10. Two-dimensional String Theory from the c = 1 Matrix Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhar, Avinash

    1996-02-01

    We identify the nonlocal and nonlinear operator in the c = 1 matrix model which satisfies the tachyron β-function equation of 2-dimensional string theory in flat-space and linear-dilaton background. This reinforces the viewpoint thata nonlocal transform is required to extract the space-time physics of the 2-dimensional strong theory from the matrix model. We also comment on the realization of the W-infinity symmetry of the matrix model in the string theory.

  11. Physical model of differential Mueller matrix for depolarizing uniform media.

    PubMed

    Devlaminck, Vincent

    2013-11-01

    In this article, we address the question of significance of the parameters of differential Mueller matrix formalism. We show how the concept of mean value and uncertainty of the optical properties recently introduced to depict this differential matrix can be related to the random fluctuations of these optical properties. From the layered-medium interpretation introduced by Jones [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 38, 671 (1948)] and extended to Mueller-Jones matrix by Azzam [J. Opt. Soc. Am. 68, 1756 (1978)], a generalization to depolarizing Mueller matrices is proposed. Based on the random Mueller-Jones matrix approach, the obtained parameterization perfectly fits the previous results from the literature. Necessary conditions of positivity on specific coefficients imposed in order to have physical Mueller matrix are introduced in a natural way and not inferred a posteriori. Interpretations of the underlying physical processes are also presented. An illustrative experimental example is provided from literature data.

  12. Matrix product states and the non-Abelian rotor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milsted, Ashley

    2016-04-01

    We use uniform matrix product states to study the (1 +1 )D O (2 ) and O (4 ) rotor models, which are equivalent to the Kogut-Susskind formulation of matter-free non-Abelian lattice gauge theory on a "Hawaiian earring" graph for U (1 ) and S U (2 ), respectively. Applying tangent space methods to obtain ground states and determine the mass gap and the β function, we find excellent agreement with known results, locating the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition for O (2 ) and successfully entering the asymptotic weak-coupling regime for O (4 ). To obtain a finite local Hilbert space, we truncate in the space of generalized Fourier modes of the gauge group, comparing the effects of different cutoff values. We find that higher modes become important in the crossover and weak-coupling regimes of the non-Abelian theory, where entanglement also suddenly increases. This could have important consequences for tensor network state studies of Yang-Mills on higher-dimensional graphs.

  13. Shell model nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms contributing to double beta decay

    SciTech Connect

    Horoi, Mihai

    2013-12-30

    Recent progress in the shell model approach to the nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay process are presented. This includes nuclear matrix elements for competing mechanisms to neutrionless double beta decay, a comparison between closure and non-closure approximation for {sup 48}Ca, and an updated shell model analysis of nuclear matrix elements for the double beta decay of {sup 136}Xe.

  14. Linking Student Retention Model with Institutional Planning: The Benefits and Limitations of a Student Matrix Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schartman, Laura; Rhee, Byung-Shik

    This study explored the possibility of linking the Luna (1999) student flow matrix model with institutional planning at a comprehensive state institution, investigating how student flow environments were associated with student characteristics such as race, gender, citizenship, class level, entry type, and cumulative grade point average. The study…

  15. Modeling Background Attenuation by Sample Matrix in Gamma Spectrometric Analyses

    SciTech Connect

    Bastos, Rodrigo O.; Appoloni, Carlos R.

    2008-08-07

    In laboratory gamma spectrometric analyses, the procedures for estimating background usually overestimate it. If an empty container similar to that used to hold samples is measured, it does not consider the background attenuation by sample matrix. If a 'blank' sample is measured, the hypothesis that this sample will be free of radionuclides is generally not true. The activity of this 'blank' sample is frequently sufficient to mask or to overwhelm the effect of attenuation so that the background remains overestimated. In order to overcome this problem, a model was developed to obtain the attenuated background from the spectrum acquired with the empty container. Beyond reasonable hypotheses, the model presumes the knowledge of the linear attenuation coefficient of the samples and its dependence on photon energy and samples densities. An evaluation of the effects of this model on the Lowest Limit of Detection (LLD) is presented for geological samples placed in cylindrical containers that completely cover the top of an HPGe detector that has a 66% relative efficiency. The results are presented for energies in the range of 63 to 2614keV, for sample densities varying from 1.5 to 2.5 g{center_dot}cm{sup -3}, and for the height of the material on the detector of 2 cm and 5 cm. For a sample density of 2.0 g{center_dot}cm{sup -3} and with a 2cm height, the method allowed for a lowering of 3.4% of the LLD for the energy of 1460keV, from {sup 40}K, 3.9% for the energy of 911keV from {sup 228}Ac, 4.5% for the energy of 609keV from {sup 214}Bi, and8.3% for the energy of 92keV from {sup 234}Th. For a sample density of 1.75 g{center_dot}cm{sup -3} and a 5cm height, the method indicates a lowering of 6.5%, 7.4%, 8.3% and 12.9% of the LLD for the same respective energies.

  16. Estimating Origin-Destination Matrix of Bogor City Using Gravity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekowicaksono, I.; Bukhari, F.; Aman, A.

    2016-01-01

    Origin-Destination (O-D) Matrix describes people movement in a certain area. An O-D matrix is necessary for planning a good public transportation system. However, the exact values of O-D matrix are difficult to measure. There are several ways to estimate O-D matrix such as gravity model, gravity opportunity model, etc. In this study, gravity model was used to estimate the O-D matrix in Bogor city. The following assumptions were used to estimate the O-D matrix: (i) forces between two different zones are related to some existing parameters such as population, social-economic condition, etc. (ii) the people movements are influenced by accessibility from origin to destination, and the accessibility affected by distance, time, and/or cost.

  17. Destructive interference of E2 matrix elements in a triaxial rotor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allmond, J. M.; Wood, J. L.; Kulp, W. D.

    2010-05-01

    A triaxial rotor model with independent inertia and electric quadrupole tensors is applied to nuclei that have certain E2 matrix elements equal to zero. It is shown that such vanishing E2 matrix elements are explained by the model as a destructive interference effect. The example of Pt196 is considered.

  18. Destructive interference of E2 matrix elements in a triaxial rotor model

    SciTech Connect

    Allmond, James M; Wood, J. L.; Kulp, W. D.

    2010-01-01

    A triaxial rotor model with independent inertia and electric quadrupole tensors is applied to nuclei that have certain E2 matrix elements equal to zero. It is shown that such vanishing E2 matrix elements are explained by the model as a destructive interference effect. The example of 196Pt is considered.

  19. Genus one correction to Seiberg-Witten prepotential from β-deformed matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baek, Jong-Hyun

    2013-04-01

    We study β-deformed matrix models with Penner type potentials, which correspond to {N}=2 SU(2) supersymmetric gauge theories with N F = 2 , 3, and 4 flavors. We compute explicitly the genus one corrections to the free energy of the matrix model and show that they match the corresponding results obtained from the Nekrasov partition function.

  20. Massless ground state for a compact SU (2) matrix model in 4D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulton, Lyonell; Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar; Restuccia, Alvaro

    2015-09-01

    We show the existence and uniqueness of a massless supersymmetric ground state wavefunction of a SU (2) matrix model in a bounded smooth domain with Dirichlet boundary conditions. This is a gauge system and we provide a new framework to analyze the quantum spectral properties of this class of supersymmetric matrix models subject to constraints which can be generalized for arbitrary number of colors.

  1. Scalar products in models with the GL(3) trigonometric R-matrix: General case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakuliak, S. Z.; Ragoucy, E.; Slavnov, N. A.

    2014-07-01

    We study quantum integrable models with the GL( 3) trigonometric R-matrix solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz and obtain an explicit representation for a scalar product of generic Bethe vectors in terms of a sum over partitions of Bethe parameters. This representation generalizes the known formula for scalar products in models with the GL( 3)-invariant R-matrix.

  2. Application of fiber bridging models to fatigue crack growth in unidirectional titanium matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G., Jr.; Johnson, W. S.

    1992-01-01

    Several fiber bridging models were reviewed and applied to study the matrix fatigue crack growth behavior in center notched (0)(sub 8) SCS-6/Ti-15-3 and (0)(sub 4) SCS-6/Ti-6Al-4V laminates. Observations revealed that fatigue damage consisted primarily of matrix cracks and fiber matrix interfacial failure in the (0)(sub 8) SCS-6/Ti-15-3 laminates. Fiber-matrix interface failure included fracture of the brittle reaction zone and cracking between the two carbon rich fiber coatings. Intact fibers in the wake of the matrix cracks reduce the stress intensity factor range. Thus, an applied stress intensity factor range is inappropriate to characterize matrix crack growth behavior. Fiber bridging models were used to determine the matrix stress intensity factor range in titanium metal matrix composites. In these models, the fibers in the wake of the crack are idealized as a closure pressure. An unknown constant frictional shear stress is assumed to act along the debond or slip length of the bridging fibers. The frictional shear stress was used as a curve fitting parameter to available data (crack growth data, crack opening displacement data, and debond length data). Large variations in the frictional shear stress required to fit the experimental data indicate that the fiber bridging models in their present form lack predictive capabilities. However, these models provide an efficient and relatively simple engineering method for conducting parametric studies of the matrix growth behavior based on constituent properties.

  3. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G.G.; Hubbard, C.R.; Misture, S.T.; Wang, X.L.

    1996-04-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  4. Neutron diffraction measurements and modeling of residual strains in metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saigal, A.; Leisk, G. G.; Hubbard, C. R.; Misture, S. T.; Wang, X. L.

    1996-01-01

    Neutron diffraction measurements at room temperature are used to characterize the residual strains in tungsten fiber-reinforced copper matrix, tungsten fiber-reinforced Kanthal matrix, and diamond particulate-reinforced copper matrix composites. Results of finite element modeling are compared with the neutron diffraction data. In tungsten/Kanthal composites, the fibers are in compression, the matrix is in tension, and the thermal residual strains are a strong function of the volume fraction of fibers. In copper matrix composites, the matrix is in tension and the stresses are independent of the volume fraction of tungsten fibers or diamond particles and the assumed stress free temperature because of the low yield strength of the matrix phase.

  5. Double scaling limit for matrix models with nonanalytic potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shcherbina, Mariya

    2008-03-01

    We study the double scaling limit for unitary invariant ensembles of random matrices with nonanalytic potentials and find the asymptotic expansion for the entries of the corresponding Jacobi matrix. Our approach is based on the perturbation expansion for the string equations. The first order perturbation terms of the Jacobi matrix coefficients are expressed through the Hastings-McLeod solution of the Painleve II equation. The limiting reproducing kernel is expressed in terms of solutions of the Dirac system of differential equations with a potential defined by the first order terms of the expansion.

  6. CONSTRUCTING, PERTURBATION ANALYSIIS AND TESTING OF A MULTI-HABITAT PERIODIC MATRIX POPULATION MODEL

    EPA Science Inventory

    We present a matrix model that explicitly incorporates spatial habitat structure and seasonality and discuss preliminary results from a landscape level experimental test. Ecological risk to populations is often modeled without explicit treatment of spatially or temporally distri...

  7. Semiclassical matrix model for quantum chaotic transport with time-reversal symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Novaes, Marcel

    2015-10-15

    We show that the semiclassical approach to chaotic quantum transport in the presence of time-reversal symmetry can be described by a matrix model. In other words, we construct a matrix integral whose perturbative expansion satisfies the semiclassical diagrammatic rules for the calculation of transport statistics. One of the virtues of this approach is that it leads very naturally to the semiclassical derivation of universal predictions from random matrix theory.

  8. Unified continuum damage model for matrix cracking in composite rotor blades

    SciTech Connect

    Pollayi, Hemaraju; Harursampath, Dineshkumar

    2015-03-10

    This paper deals with modeling of the first damage mode, matrix micro-cracking, in helicopter rotor/wind turbine blades and how this effects the overall cross-sectional stiffness. The helicopter/wind turbine rotor system operates in a highly dynamic and unsteady environment leading to severe vibratory loads present in the system. Repeated exposure to this loading condition can induce damage in the composite rotor blades. These rotor/turbine blades are generally made of fiber-reinforced laminated composites and exhibit various competing modes of damage such as matrix micro-cracking, delamination, and fiber breakage. There is a need to study the behavior of the composite rotor system under various key damage modes in composite materials for developing Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system. Each blade is modeled as a beam based on geometrically non-linear 3-D elasticity theory. Each blade thus splits into 2-D analyzes of cross-sections and non-linear 1-D analyzes along the beam reference curves. Two different tools are used here for complete 3-D analysis: VABS for 2-D cross-sectional analysis and GEBT for 1-D beam analysis. The physically-based failure models for matrix in compression and tension loading are used in the present work. Matrix cracking is detected using two failure criterion: Matrix Failure in Compression and Matrix Failure in Tension which are based on the recovered field. A strain variable is set which drives the damage variable for matrix cracking and this damage variable is used to estimate the reduced cross-sectional stiffness. The matrix micro-cracking is performed in two different approaches: (i) Element-wise, and (ii) Node-wise. The procedure presented in this paper is implemented in VABS as matrix micro-cracking modeling module. Three examples are presented to investigate the matrix failure model which illustrate the effect of matrix cracking on cross-sectional stiffness by varying the applied cyclic load.

  9. Improved Porosity and Permeability Models with Coal Matrix Block Deformation Effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yinbo; Li, Zenghua; Yang, Yongliang; Zhang, Lanjun; Qi, Qiangqiang; Si, Leilei; Li, Jinhu

    2016-09-01

    Coal permeability is an important parameter in coalbed methane (CBM) exploration and greenhouse gas storage. A reasonable theoretical permeability model is helpful for analysing the influential factors of gas flowing in a coalbed. As an unconventional reservoir, the unique feature of a coal structure deformation determines the state of gas seepage. The matrix block and fracture change at the same time due to changes in the effective stress and adsorption; the porosity and permeability also change. Thus, the matrix block deformation must be ignored in the theoretical model. Based on the cubic model, we analysed the characteristics of matrix block deformation and fracture deformation. The new models were developed with the change in matrix block width a. We compared the new models with other models, such as the Palmer-Manson (P-M) model and the Shi-Durucan (S-D) model, and used a constant confining stress. By matching the experimental data, our model matches quite well and accurately predicts the evolution of permeability. The sorption-induced strain coefficient f differs between the strongly adsorbing gases and weakly adsorbing gases because the matrix block deformation is more sensitive for the weakly adsorbing gases and the coefficient f is larger. The cubic relationship between porosity and permeability overlooks the importance of the matrix block deformation. In our model, the matrix block deformation suppresses the permeability ratio growth. With a constant confining stress, the weight of the matrix block deformation for the strongly adsorbing gases is larger than that for weakly adsorbing gases. The weight values increase as the pore pressure increases. It can be concluded that the matrix block deformation is an important phenomenon for researching coal permeability and can be crucial for the prediction of CBM production due to the change in permeability.

  10. A comparison between the fission matrix method, the diffusion model and the transport model

    SciTech Connect

    Dehaye, B.; Hugot, F. X.; Diop, C. M.

    2013-07-01

    The fission matrix method may be used to solve the critical eigenvalue problem in a Monte Carlo simulation. This method gives us access to the different eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the transport or fission operator. We propose to compare the results obtained via the fission matrix method with those of the diffusion model, and an approximated transport model. To do so, we choose to analyse the mono-kinetic and continuous energy cases for a Godiva-inspired critical sphere. The first five eigenvalues are computed with TRIPOLI-4{sup R} and compared to the theoretical ones. An extension of the notion of the extrapolation distance is proposed for the modes other than the fundamental one. (authors)

  11. High Strain Rate Deformation Modeling of a Polymer Matrix Composite. Part 2; Composite Micromechanical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Stouffer, Donald C.

    1998-01-01

    Recently applications have exposed polymer matrix composite materials to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under these extreme conditions. In this second paper of a two part report, a three-dimensional composite micromechanical model is described which allows for the analysis of the rate dependent, nonlinear deformation response of a polymer matrix composite. Strain rate dependent inelastic constitutive equations utilized to model the deformation response of a polymer are implemented within the micromechanics method. The deformation response of two representative laminated carbon fiber reinforced composite materials with varying fiber orientation has been predicted using the described technique. The predicted results compare favorably to both experimental values and the response predicted by the Generalized Method of Cells, a well-established micromechanics analysis method.

  12. Analytical Derivations of Single-Particle Matrix Elements in Nuclear Shell Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatah, Aziz H.; Radhi, R. A.; Abdullah, Nzar R.

    2016-07-01

    We present analytical method to calculate single particle matrix elements used in atomic and nuclear physics. We show seven different formulas of matrix elements of the operator f(r)dr m where f(r) = rμ, rμ jJ(qr), V(r) corresponding to the Gaussian and the Yukawa potentials used in nuclear shell models and nuclear structure. In addition, we take into account a general integral formula of the matrix element that covers all seven matrix elements obtained analytically.

  13. Preconditioning of Nonlinear Mixed Effects Models for Stabilisation of Variance-Covariance Matrix Computations.

    PubMed

    Aoki, Yasunori; Nordgren, Rikard; Hooker, Andrew C

    2016-03-01

    As the importance of pharmacometric analysis increases, more and more complex mathematical models are introduced and computational error resulting from computational instability starts to become a bottleneck in the analysis. We propose a preconditioning method for non-linear mixed effects models used in pharmacometric analyses to stabilise the computation of the variance-covariance matrix. Roughly speaking, the method reparameterises the model with a linear combination of the original model parameters so that the Hessian matrix of the likelihood of the reparameterised model becomes close to an identity matrix. This approach will reduce the influence of computational error, for example rounding error, to the final computational result. We present numerical experiments demonstrating that the stabilisation of the computation using the proposed method can recover failed variance-covariance matrix computations, and reveal non-identifiability of the model parameters.

  14. Form factors in quantum integrable models with GL(3)-invariant R-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakuliak, S.; Ragoucy, E.; Slavnov, N. A.

    2014-04-01

    We study integrable models solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz and possessing GL(3)-invariant R-matrix. We obtain determinant representations for form factors of off-diagonal entries of the monodromy matrix. These representations can be used for the calculation of form factors and correlation functions of the XXX SU(3)-invariant Heisenberg chain.

  15. Recognizing Uncertainty in the Q-Matrix via a Bayesian Extension of the DINA Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCarlo, Lawrence T.

    2012-01-01

    In the typical application of a cognitive diagnosis model, the Q-matrix, which reflects the theory with respect to the skills indicated by the items, is assumed to be known. However, the Q-matrix is usually determined by expert judgment, and so there can be uncertainty about some of its elements. Here it is shown that this uncertainty can be…

  16. A coupled model of neovessel growth and matrix mechanics describes and predicts angiogenesis in vitro.

    PubMed

    Edgar, Lowell T; Maas, Steve A; Guilkey, James E; Weiss, Jeffrey A

    2015-08-01

    During angiogenesis, sprouting microvessels interact with the extracellular matrix (ECM) by degrading and reorganizing the matrix, applying traction forces, and producing deformation. Morphometric features of the resulting microvascular network are affected by the interaction between the matrix and angiogenic microvessels. The objective of this study was to develop a continuous-discrete modeling approach to simulate mechanical interactions between growing neovessels and the deformation of the matrix in vitro. This was accomplished by coupling an existing angiogenesis growth model which uses properties of the ECM to regulate angiogenic growth with the nonlinear finite element software FEBio (www.febio.org). FEBio solves for the deformation and remodeling of the matrix caused by active stress generated by neovessel sprouts, and this deformation was used to update the ECM into the current configuration. After mesh resolution and parameter sensitivity studies, the model was used to accurately predict vascular alignment for various matrix boundary conditions. Alignment primarily arises passively as microvessels convect with the deformation of the matrix, but active alignment along collagen fibrils plays a role as well. Predictions of alignment were most sensitive to the range over which active stresses were applied and the viscoelastic time constant in the material model. The computational framework provides a flexible platform for interpreting in vitro investigations of vessel-matrix interactions, predicting new experiments, and simulating conditions that are outside current experimental capabilities. PMID:25429840

  17. General structure of democratic mass matrix of quark sector in E6 model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciftci, R.; ćiftci, A. K.

    2016-03-01

    An extension of the Standard Model (SM) fermion sector, which is inspired by the E6 Grand Unified Theory (GUT) model, might be a good candidate to explain a number of unanswered questions in SM. Existence of the isosinglet quarks might explain great mass difference of bottom and top quarks. Also, democracy on mass matrix elements is a natural approach in SM. In this study, we have given general structure of Democratic Mass Matrix (DMM) of quark sector in E6 model.

  18. From matrix models' topological expansion to topological string theories: counting surfaces with algebraic geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orantin, N.

    2007-09-01

    The 2-matrix model has been introduced to study Ising model on random surfaces. Since then, the link between matrix models and combinatorics of discrete surfaces has strongly tightened. This manuscript aims to investigate these deep links and extend them beyond the matrix models, following my work's evolution. First, I take care to define properly the hermitian 2 matrix model which gives rise to generating functions of discrete surfaces equipped with a spin structure. Then, I show how to compute all the terms in the topological expansion of any observable by using algebraic geometry tools. They are obtained as differential forms on an algebraic curve associated to the model: the spectral curve. In a second part, I show how to define such differentials on any algebraic curve even if it does not come from a matrix model. I then study their numerous symmetry properties under deformations of the algebraic curve. In particular, I show that these objects coincide with the topological expansion of the observable of a matrix model if the algebraic curve is the spectral curve of this model. Finally, I show that fine tuning the parameters ensure that these objects can be promoted to modular invariants and satisfy the holomorphic anomaly equation of the Kodaira-Spencer theory. This gives a new hint that the Dijkgraaf-Vafa conjecture is correct.

  19. Analytical Micromechanics Modeling Technique Developed for Ceramic Matrix Composites Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, James B.

    2005-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites (CMCs) promise many advantages for next-generation aerospace propulsion systems. Specifically, carbon-reinforced silicon carbide (C/SiC) CMCs enable higher operational temperatures and provide potential component weight savings by virtue of their high specific strength. These attributes may provide systemwide benefits. Higher operating temperatures lessen or eliminate the need for cooling, thereby reducing both fuel consumption and the complex hardware and plumbing required for heat management. This, in turn, lowers system weight, size, and complexity, while improving efficiency, reliability, and service life, resulting in overall lower operating costs.

  20. Orientifold ABJM matrix model: chiral projections and worldsheet instantons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moriyama, Sanefumi; Nosaka, Tomoki

    2016-06-01

    We study the partition function of the orientifold ABJM theory, which is a superconformal Chern-Simons theory associated with the orthosymplectic supergroup. We find that the partition function associated with any orthosymplectic supergroup can be realized as the partition function of a Fermi gas system whose density matrix is identical to that associated with the corresponding unitary supergroup with a projection to the even or odd chirality. Furthermore we propose an identity which gives directly all of the Gopakumar-Vafa invariants for the worldsheet instanton effects in the chirally projected theories. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  1. Nuclear Matrix Model: A path to nuclear physics from superstrings

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koji

    2011-10-21

    We derive nuclear forces and nuclear density saturation from large N{sub c} QCD, by applying AdS/CFT correspondence of string theory, called holographic QCD. This is made possible by a new description of a multi-baryon system in the holographic QCD. The description employs a matrix quantum mechanics which can be derived via the correspondence. This talk is based on collaboration work with N. Iizuka and P. Yi [1], with N. Iizuka [2, 3] and with T. Morita [4].

  2. A review of failure models for unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under monotonic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, David E.; Hemann, John H.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites offer significant potential for improving the performance of turbine engines. In order to achieve their potential, however, improvements in design methodology are needed. In the past most components using structural ceramic matrix composites were designed by trial and error since the emphasis of feasibility demonstration minimized the development of mathematical models. To understand the key parameters controlling response and the mechanics of failure, the development of structural failure models is required. A review of short term failure models with potential for ceramic matrix composite laminates under monotonic loads is presented. Phenomenological, semi-empirical, shear-lag, fracture mechanics, damage mechanics, and statistical models for the fast fracture analysis of continuous fiber unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under monotonic loads are surveyed.

  3. A review of failure models for ceramic matrix composite laminates under monotonic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tripp, David E.; Hemann, John H.; Gyekenyesi, John P.

    1989-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites offer significant potential for improving the performance of turbine engines. In order to achieve their potential, however, improvements in design methodology are needed. In the past most components using structural ceramic matrix composites were designed by trial and error since the emphasis of feasibility demonstration minimized the development of mathematical models. To understand the key parameters controlling response and the mechanics of failure, the development of structural failure models is required. A review of short term failure models with potential for ceramic matrix composite laminates under monotonic loads is presented. Phenomenological, semi-empirical, shear-lag, fracture mechanics, damage mechanics, and statistical models for the fast fracture analysis of continuous fiber unidirectional ceramic matrix composites under monotonic loads are surveyed.

  4. Numerical modelling of transdermal delivery from matrix systems: parametric study and experimental validation with silicone matrices.

    PubMed

    Snorradóttir, Bergthóra S; Jónsdóttir, Fjóla; Sigurdsson, Sven Th; Másson, Már

    2014-08-01

    A model is presented for transdermal drug delivery from single-layered silicone matrix systems. The work is based on our previous results that, in particular, extend the well-known Higuchi model. Recently, we have introduced a numerical transient model describing matrix systems where the drug dissolution can be non-instantaneous. Furthermore, our model can describe complex interactions within a multi-layered matrix and the matrix to skin boundary. The power of the modelling approach presented here is further illustrated by allowing the possibility of a donor solution. The model is validated by a comparison with experimental data, as well as validating the parameter values against each other, using various configurations with donor solution, silicone matrix and skin. Our results show that the model is a good approximation to real multi-layered delivery systems. The model offers the ability of comparing drug release for ibuprofen and diclofenac, which cannot be analysed by the Higuchi model because the dissolution in the latter case turns out to be limited. The experiments and numerical model outlined in this study could also be adjusted to more general formulations, which enhances the utility of the numerical model as a design tool for the development of drug-loaded matrices for trans-membrane and transdermal delivery.

  5. Time series, correlation matrices and random matrix models

    SciTech Connect

    Vinayak; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2014-01-08

    In this set of five lectures the authors have presented techniques to analyze open classical and quantum systems using correlation matrices. For diverse reasons we shall see that random matrices play an important role to describe a null hypothesis or a minimum information hypothesis for the description of a quantum system or subsystem. In the former case various forms of correlation matrices of time series associated with the classical observables of some system. The fact that such series are necessarily finite, inevitably introduces noise and this finite time influence lead to a random or stochastic component in these time series. By consequence random correlation matrices have a random component, and corresponding ensembles are used. In the latter we use random matrices to describe high temperature environment or uncontrolled perturbations, ensembles of differing chaotic systems etc. The common theme of the lectures is thus the importance of random matrix theory in a wide range of fields in and around physics.

  6. Modeling the Effect of Multiple Matrix Cracking Modes on Cyclic Hysteresis Loops of 2D Woven Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, the effect of multiple matrix cracking modes on cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) has been investigated. The interface slip between fibers and the matrix existed in matrix cracking mode 3 and mode 5, in which matrix cracking and interface debonding occurred in longitudinal yarns, are considered as the major reason for hysteresis loops of 2D woven CMCs. The effects of fiber volume content, peak stress, matrix crack spacing, interface properties, matrix cracking mode proportion and interface wear on interface slip and hysteresis loops have been analyzed. The cyclic loading/unloading hysteresis loops of 2D woven SiC/SiC composite corresponding to different peak stresses have been predicted using the present analysis. It was found that the damage parameter, i.e., the proportion of matrix cracking mode 3 in the entire cracking modes of the composite, increases with increasing peak stress.

  7. Detection of extracellular matrix modification in cancer models with inverse spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spicer, Graham L. C.; Azarin, Samira M.; Yi, Ji; Young, Scott T.; Ellis, Ronald; Bauer, Greta M.; Shea, Lonnie D.; Backman, Vadim

    2016-10-01

    In cancer biology, there has been a recent effort to understand tumor formation in the context of the tissue microenvironment. In particular, recent progress has explored the mechanisms behind how changes in the cell-extracellular matrix ensemble influence progression of the disease. The extensive use of in vitro tissue culture models in simulant matrix has proven effective at studying such interactions, but modalities for non-invasively quantifying aspects of these systems are scant. We present the novel application of an imaging technique, Inverse Spectroscopic Optical Coherence Tomography, for the non-destructive measurement of in vitro biological samples during matrix remodeling. Our findings indicate that the nanoscale-sensitive mass density correlation shape factor D of cancer cells increases in response to a more crosslinked matrix. We present a facile technique for the non-invasive, quantitative study of the micro- and nano-scale structure of the extracellular matrix and its host cells.

  8. The finite and large-N behaviors of independent-value matrix models

    SciTech Connect

    Ben Geloun, Joseph; Klauder, John R.

    2014-03-15

    We investigate the finite and large N behaviors of independent-value O(N)-invariant matrix models. These are models defined with matrix-type fields and with no gradient term in their action. They are generically nonrenormalizable but can be handled by nonperturbative techniques. We find that the functional integral of any O(N) matrix trace invariant may be expressed in terms of an O(N)-invariant measure. Based on this result, we prove that, in the limit that all interaction coupling constants go to zero, any interacting theory is continuously connected to a pseudo-free theory. This theory differs radically from the familiar free theory consisting in putting the coupling constants to zero in the initial action. The proof is given for generic, finite-size matrix models, whereas, in the limiting case N → ∞, we succeed in showing this behavior for restricted types of actions using a particular scaling of the parameters.

  9. Estimation and Q-Matrix Validation for Diagnostic Classification Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feng, Yuling

    2013-01-01

    Diagnostic classification models (DCMs) are structured latent class models widely discussed in the field of psychometrics. They model subjects' underlying attribute patterns and classify subjects into unobservable groups based on their mastery of attributes required to answer the items correctly. The effective implementation of DCMs depends…

  10. Modeling the tumor extracellular matrix: Tissue engineering tools repurposed towards new frontiers in cancer biology.

    PubMed

    Gill, Bartley J; West, Jennifer L

    2014-06-27

    Cancer progression is mediated by complex epigenetic, protein and structural influences. Critical among them are the biochemical, mechanical and architectural properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM). In recognition of the ECM's important role, cancer biologists have repurposed matrix mimetic culture systems first widely used by tissue engineers as new tools for in vitro study of tumor models. In this review we discuss the pathological changes in tumor ECM, the limitations of 2D culture on both traditional and polyacrylamide hydrogel surfaces in modeling these characteristics and advances in both naturally derived and synthetic scaffolds to facilitate more complex and controllable 3D cancer cell culture. Studies using naturally derived matrix materials like Matrigel and collagen have produced significant findings related to tumor morphogenesis and matrix invasion in a 3D environment and the mechanotransductive signaling that mediates key tumor-matrix interaction. However, lack of precise experimental control over important matrix factors in these matrices have increasingly led investigators to synthetic and semi-synthetic scaffolds that offer the engineering of specific ECM cues and the potential for more advanced experimental manipulations. Synthetic scaffolds composed of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), for example, facilitate highly biocompatible 3D culture, modular bioactive features like cell-mediated matrix degradation and complete independent control over matrix bioactivity and mechanics. Future work in PEG or similar reductionist synthetic matrix systems should enable the study of increasingly complex and dynamic tumor-ECM relationships in the hopes that accurate modeling of these relationships may reveal new cancer therapeutics targeting tumor progression and metastasis.

  11. A micromechanics model for predicting the tensile strength of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Subramanian, S.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper, a micromechanics model has been developed to predict the tensile strength of unidirectional metal matrix composites (MMC). A simplified shear lag analysis is used to estimate the local stresses in the various constituents (fiber/matrix/interface). In this work, the matrix is assumed to carry both normal and shear stresses. Global matrix plasticity is considered by assuming that the matrix behaves in an elastic-perfectly plastic manner. Local interfacial debonding is assumed to occur when the average interfacial shear stress exceeds the interfacial shear strength value. The shear lag analysis including the effects of interfacial debonding and global matrix plasticity is used to estimate the stress concentration in fibers adjacent to broken fibers and the ineffective length. The tensile strength is estimated by considering the accumulation of fiber fractures. The effects of residual thermal stresses and statistical distribution of strength of the fibers are also included in this analysis. Parametric studies were conducted to investigate the influence of various parameters such as fiber volume fraction, temperature, interfacial shear strength, matrix properties and fiber strength, on the unidirectional tensile strength of MMC. The model was also used to predict the effects of volume fraction and temperature, on the strength of SCS6/Ti 24-11 composites. The predicted values compared well with the experimental results.

  12. A new coal-permeability model: Internal swelling stress and fracture-matrix interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, H.H.; Rutqvist, J.

    2009-10-01

    We have developed a new coal-permeability model for uniaxial strain and constant confining stress conditions. The model is unique in that it explicitly considers fracture-matrix interaction during coal deformation processes and is based on a newly proposed internal-swelling stress concept. This concept is used to account for the impact of matrix swelling (or shrinkage) on fracture-aperture changes resulting from partial separation of matrix blocks by fractures that do not completely cut through the whole matrix. The proposed permeability model is evaluated with data from three Valencia Canyon coalbed wells in the San Juan Basin, where increased permeability has been observed during CH{sub 4} gas production, as well as with published data from laboratory tests. Model results are generally in good agreement with observed permeability changes. The importance of fracture-matrix interaction in determining coal permeability, demonstrated in this work using relatively simple stress conditions, underscores the need for a dual-continuum (fracture and matrix) mechanical approach to rigorously capture coal-deformation processes under complex stress conditions, as well as the coupled flow and transport processes in coal seams.

  13. Unitary-matrix models as exactly solvable string theories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Periwal, Vipul; Shevitz, Danny

    1990-01-01

    Exact differential equations are presently found for the scaling functions of models of unitary matrices which are solved in a double-scaling limit, using orthogonal polynomials on a circle. For the case of the simplest, k = 1 model, the Painleve II equation with constant 0 is obtained; possible nonperturbative phase transitions exist for these models. Equations are presented for k = 2 and 3, and discussed with a view to asymptotic behavior.

  14. Models for predicting damage evolution in metal matrix composites subjected to cyclic loading

    SciTech Connect

    Allen, D.H.; Hurtado, L.D.; Helms, K.L.E.

    1995-03-01

    A thermomechanical analysis of a continuous fiber metal matrix composite (MMC) subjected to cyclic loading is performed herein. The analysis includes the effects of processing induced residual thermal stresses, matrix inelasticity, and interface cracking. Due to these complexities, the analysis is performed computationally using the finite element method. Matrix inelasticity is modelled with a rate dependent viscoplasticity model. Interface fracture is modelled by the use of a nonlinear interface constitutive model. The problem formulation is summarized, and results are given for a four-ply unidirectional SCS-6/{beta}21S titanium composite under high temperature isothermal mechanical fatigue. Results indicate rate dependent viscoplasticity can be a significant mechanism for dissipating the energy available for damage propagation, thus contributing to improved ductility of the composite. Results also indicate that the model may be useful for inclusion in life prediction methodologies for MMC`s.

  15. Camera-Model Identification Using Markovian Transition Probability Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guanshuo; Gao, Shang; Shi, Yun Qing; Hu, Ruimin; Su, Wei

    Detecting the (brands and) models of digital cameras from given digital images has become a popular research topic in the field of digital forensics. As most of images are JPEG compressed before they are output from cameras, we propose to use an effective image statistical model to characterize the difference JPEG 2-D arrays of Y and Cb components from the JPEG images taken by various camera models. Specifically, the transition probability matrices derived from four different directional Markov processes applied to the image difference JPEG 2-D arrays are used to identify statistical difference caused by image formation pipelines inside different camera models. All elements of the transition probability matrices, after a thresholding technique, are directly used as features for classification purpose. Multi-class support vector machines (SVM) are used as the classification tool. The effectiveness of our proposed statistical model is demonstrated by large-scale experimental results.

  16. Sloppy-model universality class and the Vandermonde matrix.

    PubMed

    Waterfall, Joshua J; Casey, Fergal P; Gutenkunst, Ryan N; Brown, Kevin S; Myers, Christopher R; Brouwer, Piet W; Elser, Veit; Sethna, James P

    2006-10-13

    In a variety of contexts, physicists study complex, nonlinear models with many unknown or tunable parameters to explain experimental data. We explain why such systems so often are sloppy: the system behavior depends only on a few "stiff" combinations of the parameters and is unchanged as other "sloppy" parameter combinations vary by orders of magnitude. We observe that the eigenvalue spectra for the sensitivity of sloppy models have a striking, characteristic form with a density of logarithms of eigenvalues which is roughly constant over a large range. We suggest that the common features of sloppy models indicate that they may belong to a common universality class. In particular, we motivate focusing on a Vandermonde ensemble of multiparameter nonlinear models and show in one limit that they exhibit the universal features of sloppy models.

  17. Bethe Vectors of Quantum Integrable Models with GL(3) Trigonometric R-Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belliard, Samuel; Pakuliak, Stanislav; Ragoucy, Eric; Slavnov, Nikita A.

    2013-10-01

    We study quantum integrable models with GL(3) trigonometric R-matrix and solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz. Using the presentation of the universal Bethe vectors in terms of projections of products of the currents of the quantum affine algebra U_q(widehat{{gl}}_3) onto intersections of different types of Borel subalgebras, we prove that the set of the nested Bethe vectors is closed under the action of the elements of the monodromy matrix.

  18. Classical solutions of a torsion gravity from a large N matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Isono, Hiroshi; Tomino, Dan

    2010-04-15

    Large N matrices can describe covariant derivatives in curved space. Applying this interpretation to the Ishibashi, Kawai, Kitazawa, and Tsuchiya matrix model, the field equation of gravity is derived from the matrix equation of motion. We study classical solutions of this field equation with torsion degrees of freedom in empty spacetime. Time-dependent solutions with homogeneity and isotropy, and time-independent solutions with spherical symmetry are investigated under particular settings of torsions.

  19. Modeling the Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites Under Multiple Fatigue Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Longbiao

    2016-06-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple fatigue loading. The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure and the difference existed in the new and original interface debonded region. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The interface shear stress degradation model and fibers strength degradation model have been adopted to analyze the interface wear effect on the tensile strength of the composite subjected to multiple fatigue loading. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining the interface wear model and fibers failure model based on the assumption that the fiber strength is subjected to two - parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the Global Load Sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength corresponding to multiple fatigue peak stress levels and different cycle number have been analyzed.

  20. Modelling the nanomechanical response of a micro particle–matrix system for nanoindentation tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yunyi; Duan, Pengfei; Chen, Jinju

    2016-05-01

    A lot of experimental, numerical simulation and analytical modelling work has been done on how the substrate affects the measured hardness and elastic modulus of the coating/substrate system for nanoindentation tests. Little work has been done on the elastic–plastic behaviour of micro particle–matrix systems. Clifford et al have proposed an empirical model to describe the spatially dependent composite modulus during nanoindentation tests for linear elastic particles embedded in a linear elastic matrix. However, no such models have been developed for elastic–plastic composites. In this study, finite element simulations were used to determine the elastic modulus and hardness of hard particles embedded in a soft matrix and vice versa. An extended Clifford model has been developed to determine the elastic modulus and hardness for elastic–plastic composites with various particle shapes and volume fractions.

  1. Exact solution of Chern-Simons-matter matrix models with characteristic/orthogonal polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tierz, Miguel

    2016-04-01

    We solve for finite N the matrix model of supersymmetric U( N ) Chern-Simons theory coupled to N f fundamental and N f anti-fundamental chiral multiplets of R-charge 1 /2 and of mass m, by identifying it with an average of inverse characteristic polynomials in a Stieltjes-Wigert ensemble. This requires the computation of the Cauchy transform of the Stieltjes-Wigert polynomials, which we carry out, finding a relationship with Mordell integrals, and hence with previous analytical results on the matrix model. The semiclassical limit of the model is expressed, for arbitrary N f , in terms of a single Hermite polynomial. This result also holds for more general matter content, involving matrix models with doublesine functions.

  2. Followee Recommendation in Microblog Using Matrix Factorization Model with Structural Regularization

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Yan; Qiu, Robin G.

    2014-01-01

    Microblog that provides us a new communication and information sharing platform has been growing exponentially since it emerged just a few years ago. To microblog users, recommending followees who can serve as high quality information sources is a competitive service. To address this problem, in this paper we propose a matrix factorization model with structural regularization to improve the accuracy of followee recommendation in microblog. More specifically, we adapt the matrix factorization model in traditional item recommender systems to followee recommendation in microblog and use structural regularization to exploit structure information of social network to constrain matrix factorization model. The experimental analysis on a real-world dataset shows that our proposed model is promising. PMID:25143979

  3. A penny-shaped crack in a filament reinforced matrix. 1: The filament model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Pacella, A. H.

    1973-01-01

    The electrostatic problem of a penny-shaped crack in an elastic matrix which reinforced by filaments or fibers perpendicular to the plane of the crack was studied. The elastic filament model was developed for application to evaluation studies of the stress intensity factor along the periphery of the crack, the stresses in the filaments or fibers, and the interface shear between the matrix and the filaments or fibers. The requirements expected of the model are a sufficiently accurate representation of the filament and applicability to the interaction problems involving a cracked elastic continuum with multi-filament reinforcements. The technique for developing the model and numerical examples of it are shown.

  4. Scalar products in models with a GL(3) trigonometric R-matrix: Highest coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakuliak, S. Z.; Ragoucy, E.; Slavnov, N. A.

    2014-03-01

    We study quantum integrable models with a GL (3) trigonometric R-matrix solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz. Scalar products of Bethe vectors in such models can be expressed in terms of bilinear combinations of the highest coefficients. We show that there exist two different highest coefficients in the models with a GL (3) trigonometric R-matrix. We obtain various representations for the highest coefficients in terms of sums over partitions. We also prove several important properties of the highest coefficients, which are necessary for evaluating the scalar products.

  5. Continuing Education Leadership Matrix: A Model for Practitioners in Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moroney, Peter

    2007-01-01

    Continuing education (CE) units are a diverse blend of philosophical and pedagogical approaches, personal aptitudes, and professional knowledge and skills. The Continuing Education Leadership Matrix model is presented as a conceptual framework for understanding and managing CE practice. The model is useful to leaders and managers working within CE…

  6. Fractional quantum Hall effect on the two-sphere: A matrix model proposal

    SciTech Connect

    Morariu, Bogdan; Polychronakos, Alexios P.

    2005-12-15

    We present a Chern-Simons matrix model describing the fractional quantum Hall effect on the two sphere. We demonstrate the equivalence of our proposal to particular restrictions of the Calogero-Sutherland model, reproduce the quantum states and filling fraction and show the compatibility of our result with the Haldane spherical wave functions.

  7. Matrix Solution of Coupled Differential Equations and Looped Car Following Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCartney, Mark

    2008-01-01

    A simple mathematical model for the behaviour of how vehicles follow each other along a looped stretch of road is described. The resulting coupled first order differential equations are solved using appropriate matrix techniques and the physical significance of the model is discussed. A number possible classroom exercises are suggested to help…

  8. SMARTIES: Spheroids Modelled Accurately with a Robust T-matrix Implementation for Electromagnetic Scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Somerville, W. R. C.; Auguié, B.; Le Ru, E. C.

    2016-03-01

    SMARTIES calculates the optical properties of oblate and prolate spheroidal particles, with comparable capabilities and ease-of-use as Mie theory for spheres. This suite of MATLAB codes provides a fully documented implementation of an improved T-matrix algorithm for the theoretical modelling of electromagnetic scattering by particles of spheroidal shape. Included are scripts that cover a range of scattering problems relevant to nanophotonics and plasmonics, including calculation of far-field scattering and absorption cross-sections for fixed incidence orientation, orientation-averaged cross-sections and scattering matrix, surface-field calculations as well as near-fields, wavelength-dependent near-field and far-field properties, and access to lower-level functions implementing the T-matrix calculations, including the T-matrix elements which may be calculated more accurately than with competing codes.

  9. An anomalous subdiffusion model with fractional derivatives for methane desorption in heterogeneous coal matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Jianhong; Zhou, Fubao; Ye, Gaobang; Liu, Yingke

    2015-12-01

    Methane desorption in coal matrix is one of the fundamental gas transport processes during coalbed methane extraction, the mechanism of which is commonly described by Fickian diffusion theory. Here, an anomalous subdiffusion model with fractional derivatives is developed to explore the methane desorption in coal matrix with a highly heterogeneous pore structure. Numerical simulations reproduce the volume fraction of gas desorbed over the entire timescale of experimental desorption. It is suggested that the diffusion of methane in heterogeneous coal matrix may obey the anomalous time and space subdiffusion, rather than Fickian second law. The physical reason is perhaps due to the basic topological complexity inherent to porous coal matrix and the strong adsorption effect of coal on methane molecules.

  10. 3D self-consistent modeling of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions.

    PubMed

    Tarnev, Kh; Demerdjiev, A; Shivarova, A; Lishev, St

    2016-02-01

    The paper is in the scope of studies on the rf driving of a matrix source of negative hydrogen ions: a matrix of small radius discharges with planar-coil inductive driving and single aperture extraction from each discharge. The results from a three-dimensional model, in which plasma description is coupled to electrodynamics, confirm former conclusion that a single coil driving of the whole matrix by a zigzag coil with an omega-shaped conductor on the bottom of each discharge tube ensures efficient rf power deposition to the plasma. The latter is due to similarities with the rf driving of a single discharge by a single planar coil, shown by the obtained induced current and spatial distribution of the plasma parameters. Distinctions associated with the coil configuration as a single coil for the whole matrix are also discussed. PMID:26932005

  11. Interface Cohesive Elements to Model Matrix Crack Evolution in Composite Laminates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Y.; Pinna, C.; Soutis, C.

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, the transverse matrix (resin) cracking developed in multidirectional composite laminates loaded in tension was numerically investigated by a finite element (FE) model implemented in the commercially available software Abaqus/Explicit 6.10. A theoretical solution using the equivalent constraint model (ECM) of the damaged laminate developed by Soutis et al. was employed to describe matrix cracking evolution and compared to the proposed numerical approach. In the numerical model, interface cohesive elements were inserted between neighbouring finite elements that run parallel to fibre orientation in each lamina to simulate matrix cracking with the assumption of equally spaced cracks (based on experimental measurements and observations). The stress based traction-separation law was introduced to simulate initiation of matrix cracking and propagation under mixed-mode loading. The numerically predicted crack density was found to depend on the mesh size of the model and the material fracture parameters defined for the cohesive elements. Numerical predictions of matrix crack density as a function of applied stress are in a good agreement to experimentally measured and theoretically (ECM) obtained values, but some further refinement will be required in near future work.

  12. 3-D shear lag model for the analysis of interface damage in ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Dharani, L.R.; Ji, F.

    1995-12-31

    In this paper a micromechanics analytical model is presented for characterizing the behavior of a unidirectional brittle matrix composite containing initial matrix flaws, specifically, as they approach a fiber-matrix interface. It is contemplated that when a matrix crack impinges on the interface it may go around the fiber or go through the fiber by breaking it or debond the fiber/matrix interface. It has been experimentally observed that the crack front does not remain straight, rather it bows once it impinges on a row of fibers. If a unit cell approach is used, the problem is clearly non-axisymmetric and three-dimensional. Since most of the previous analyses dealing with self-similar cracking and interface debonding have considered axisymmetric cracking or two-dimensional planar geometries, the development of an analytical micromechanics model using a 3-D (non-axisymmetric) formulation is needed. The model is based on the consistent shear lag constitutive relations and does account for the large stiffness of the ceramic matrix. Since the present consistent shear lag model is for Cartesian coordinates, we have first derived the consistent shear lag constitutive relations in cylindrical coordinates. The governing equations are obtained by minimizing the potential energy in which the three displacements are represented by means of finite exponential series. Since the full field stresses and displacements are known, the strain energy release rates for self-similar extension of the matrix crack (Gp) and the interface debonding (Gd) are calculated using the Compliance method. The competition between various failure modes will be assessed based on the above strain energy release rates and the corresponding critical (toughness) values. The type of interfaces addressed include fictional, elastic, and gradient with varying properties (interphase). An extensive parametric study will be presented involving different constitutive properties and interface conditions.

  13. A creep model for metallic composites based on matrix testing: Application to Kanthal composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Binienda, W. K.; Robinson, D. N.; Arnold, S. M.; Bartolotta, Paul A.

    1990-01-01

    An anisotropic creep model is formulated for metallic composites with strong fibers and low to moderate fiber volume percent (less than 40 percent). The idealization admits no creep in the local fiber direction and assumes equal creep strength in longitudinal and transverse shear. Identification of the matrix behavior with that of the isotropic limit of the theory permits characterization of the composite through uniaxial creep tests on the matrix material. Constant and step-wise creep tests are required as a data base. The model provides an upper bound on the transverse creep strength of a composite having strong fibers embedded in a particular matrix material. Comparison of the measured transverse strength with the upper bound gives an assessment of the integrity of the composite. Application is made to a Kanthal composite, a model high-temperature composite system. Predictions are made of the creep response of fiber reinforced Kanthal tubes under interior pressure.

  14. Extracellular Matrix Deposition in Engineered Micromass Cartilage Pellet Cultures: Measurements and Modelling.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Miranda C; MacArthur, Ben D; Tare, Rahul S; Oreffo, Richard O C; Please, Colin P

    2016-01-01

    This article explores possible mechanisms governing extracellular matrix deposition in engineered cartilaginous cell pellets. A theoretical investigation is carried out alongside an experimental study measuring proteoglycan and collagen volume fractions within murine chondrogenic (ATDC-5) cell pellets. The simple mathematical model, which adopts a nutrient-dependent proteoglycan production rate, successfully reproduces the periphery-dominated proteoglycan deposition, characteristic of the growth pattern observed experimentally within pellets after 21 days of culture. The results suggest that this inhomogeneous proteoglycan production is due to nutrient deficiencies at the pellet centre. Our model analysis further indicates that a spatially uniform distribution of proteoglycan matrix could be maintained by initiating the culture process with a smaller-sized pellet. Finally, possible extensions are put forward with an aim to improve the model predictions for the early behaviour, where different mechanisms appear to dominate the matrix production within the pellets.

  15. Extracellular Matrix Deposition in Engineered Micromass Cartilage Pellet Cultures: Measurements and Modelling

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Miranda C.; MacArthur, Ben D.; Tare, Rahul S.; Oreffo, Richard O. C.; Please, Colin P.

    2016-01-01

    This article explores possible mechanisms governing extracellular matrix deposition in engineered cartilaginous cell pellets. A theoretical investigation is carried out alongside an experimental study measuring proteoglycan and collagen volume fractions within murine chondrogenic (ATDC-5) cell pellets. The simple mathematical model, which adopts a nutrient-dependent proteoglycan production rate, successfully reproduces the periphery-dominated proteoglycan deposition, characteristic of the growth pattern observed experimentally within pellets after 21 days of culture. The results suggest that this inhomogeneous proteoglycan production is due to nutrient deficiencies at the pellet centre. Our model analysis further indicates that a spatially uniform distribution of proteoglycan matrix could be maintained by initiating the culture process with a smaller-sized pellet. Finally, possible extensions are put forward with an aim to improve the model predictions for the early behaviour, where different mechanisms appear to dominate the matrix production within the pellets. PMID:26889833

  16. Computational modeling of structure of metal matrix composite in centrifugal casting process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zagórski, Roman

    2007-04-01

    The structure of alumina matrix composite reinforced with crystalline particles obtained during centrifugal casting process are studied. Several parameters of cast process like pouring temperature, temperature, rotating speed and size of casting mould which influent on structure of composite are examined. Segregation of crystalline particles depended on other factors such as: the gradient of density of the liquid matrix and reinforcement, thermal processes connected with solidifying of the cast, processes leading to changes in physical and structural properties of liquid composite are also investigated. All simulation are carried out by CFD program Fluent. Numerical simulations are performed using the FLUENT two-phase free surface (air and matrix) unsteady flow model (volume of fluid model — VOF) and discrete phase model (DPM).

  17. Collective field theory of a singular supersymmetric matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    de Mello Koch, R.; Rodrigues, J.P.

    1995-05-15

    The supersymmetric collective field theory with the potential {ital v}{prime}({ital x})={omega}{ital x}{minus}{eta}/{ital x} is studied. Consistency with supersymmetry enforces a two band solution. A supersymmetric classical configuration is found, and interpreted in terms of the density of zeroes of certain Laguerre polynomials. The spectrum of the model is then studied and is seen to correspond to a massless scalar and a Majorana fermion. The {ital x} space eigenfunctions are constructed and expressed in terms of Chebyshev polynomials. Higher order interactions are also discussed.

  18. Random matrix models for decoherence and fidelity decay in quantum information systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pineda, Carlos; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2008-03-01

    This course aims to introduce the student to random matrix models for decoherence and fidelity decay. They present a very powerful alternate approach, that emphasizes the disordered character of many environments and uncontrollable perturbations/couplings. The inherent integrability of such models makes analytic studies possible. We limit our considerations to linear response treatment, as high fidelity and small decoherence are the backbone of quantum information processes. For fidelity decay, where experimental results are available, a comparison with experiments shows excellent agreement with random matrix theory predictions.

  19. Matrix model maps and reconstruction of AdS supergravity interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Cremonini, Sera; Mello Koch, Robert de; Jevicki, Antal

    2008-05-15

    We consider the question of reconstructing (cubic) SUGRA interactions in AdS/CFT. The method we introduce is based on the matrix model maps (MMP) which were previously successfully employed at the linearized level. The strategy is to start with the map for 1/2 BPS configurations, which is exactly known (to all orders) in the Hamiltonian framework. We then use the extension of the matrix model map with the corresponding Ward identities to completely specify the interaction. A central point in this construction is the nonvanishing of off-shell interactions (even for highest-weight states)

  20. The ground state of the D = 11 supermembrane and matrix models on compact regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulton, Lyonell; Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar; Restuccia, Alvaro

    2016-09-01

    We establish a general framework for the analysis of boundary value problems of matrix models at zero energy on compact regions. We derive existence and uniqueness of ground state wavefunctions for the mass operator of the D = 11 regularized supermembrane theory, that is the N = 16 supersymmetric SU (N) matrix model, on balls of finite radius. Our results rely on the structure of the associated Dirichlet form and a factorization in terms of the supersymmetric charges. They also rely on the polynomial structure of the potential and various other supersymmetric properties of the system.

  1. Modeling the Matrix of Articular Cartilage Using a Continuous Fiber Angular Distribution Predicts Many Observed Phenomena

    PubMed Central

    Ateshian, Gerard A.; Rajan, Vikram; Chahine, Nadeen O.; Canal, Clare E.; Hung, Clark T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Cartilage is a hydrated soft tissue whose solid matrix consists of negatively charged proteoglycans enmeshed within a fibrillar collagen network. Though many aspects of cartilage mechanics are well understood today, most notably in the context of porous media mechanics, there remain a number of responses observed experimentally whose prediction from theory has been challenging. Method of approach In this study the solid matrix of cartilage is modeled with a continuous fiber angular distribution, where fibers can only sustain tension, swelled by the osmotic pressure of a proteoglycan ground matrix. Results It is shown that this representation of cartilage can predict a number of observed phenomena in relation to the tissue’s equilibrium response to mechanical and osmotic loading, when flow-dependent and flow-independent viscoelastic effects have subsided. In particular, this model can predict the transition of Poisson’s ratio from very low values in compression (~0.02) to very high values in tension (~2.0). Most of these phenomena cannot be explained when using only three orthogonal fiber bundles to describe the tissue matrix, a common modeling assumption used to date. Conclusions The main picture emerging from this analysis is that the anisotropy of the fibrillar matrix of articular cartilage is intimately dependent on the mechanism of tensed fiber recruitment, in the manner suggested by our recent theoretical study (G. A. Ateshian. J Biomech Eng, 129(2):240-9, 2007). PMID:19449957

  2. Modeling Single Well Injection-Withdrawal (SWIW) Tests for Characterization of Complex Fracture-Matrix Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cotte, F.P.; Doughty, C.; Birkholzer, J.

    2010-11-01

    The ability to reliably predict flow and transport in fractured porous rock is an essential condition for performance evaluation of geologic (underground) nuclear waste repositories. In this report, a suite of programs (TRIPOLY code) for calculating and analyzing flow and transport in two-dimensional fracture-matrix systems is used to model single-well injection-withdrawal (SWIW) tracer tests. The SWIW test, a tracer test using one well, is proposed as a useful means of collecting data for site characterization, as well as estimating parameters relevant to tracer diffusion and sorption. After some specific code adaptations, we numerically generated a complex fracture-matrix system for computation of steady-state flow and tracer advection and dispersion in the fracture network, along with solute exchange processes between the fractures and the porous matrix. We then conducted simulations for a hypothetical but workable SWIW test design and completed parameter sensitivity studies on three physical parameters of the rock matrix - namely porosity, diffusion coefficient, and retardation coefficient - in order to investigate their impact on the fracture-matrix solute exchange process. Hydraulic fracturing, or hydrofracking, is also modeled in this study, in two different ways: (1) by increasing the hydraulic aperture for flow in existing fractures and (2) by adding a new set of fractures to the field. The results of all these different tests are analyzed by studying the population of matrix blocks, the tracer spatial distribution, and the breakthrough curves (BTCs) obtained, while performing mass-balance checks and being careful to avoid some numerical mistakes that could occur. This study clearly demonstrates the importance of matrix effects in the solute transport process, with the sensitivity studies illustrating the increased importance of the matrix in providing a retardation mechanism for radionuclides as matrix porosity, diffusion coefficient, or retardation

  3. A new procedure to built a model covariance matrix: first results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barzaghi, R.; Marotta, A. M.; Splendore, R.; Borghi, A.

    2012-04-01

    In order to validate the results of geophysical models a common procedure is to compare model predictions with observations by means of statistical tests. A limit of this approach is the lack of a covariance matrix associated to model results, that may frustrate the achievement of a confident statistical significance of the results. Trying to overcome this limit, we have implemented a new procedure to build a model covariance matrix that could allow a more reliable statistical analysis. This procedure has been developed in the frame of the thermo-mechanical model described in Splendore et al. (2010), that predicts the present-day crustal velocity field in the Tyrrhenian due to Africa-Eurasia convergence and to lateral rheological heterogeneities of the lithosphere. Modelled tectonic velocity field has been compared to the available surface velocity field based on GPS observation, determining the best fit model and the degree of fitting, through the use of a χ2 test. Once we have identified the key models parameters and defined their appropriate ranges of variability, we have run 100 different models for 100 sets of randomly values of the parameters extracted within the corresponding interval, obtaining a stack of 100 velocity fields. Then, we calculated variance and empirical covariance for the stack of results, taking into account also cross-correlation, obtaining a positive defined, diagonal matrix that represents the covariance matrix of the model. This empirical approach allows us to define a more robust statistical analysis with respect the classic approach. Reference Splendore, Marotta, Barzaghi, Borghi and Cannizzaro, 2010. Block model versus thermomechanical model: new insights on the present-day regional deformation in the surroundings of the Calabrian Arc. In: Spalla, Marotta and Gosso (Eds) Advances in Interpretation of Geological Processes: Refinement of Multi scale Data and Integration in Numerical Modelling. Geological Society, London, Special

  4. One-factor model for the cross-correlation matrix in the Vietnamese stock market

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Quang

    2013-07-01

    Random matrix theory (RMT) has been applied to the analysis of the cross-correlation matrix of a financial time series. The most important findings of previous studies using this method are that the eigenvalue spectrum largely follows that of random matrices but the largest eigenvalue is at least one order of magnitude higher than the maximum eigenvalue predicted by RMT. In this work, we investigate the cross-correlation matrix in the Vietnamese stock market using RMT and find similar results to those of studies realized in developed markets (US, Europe, Japan) [9-18] as well as in other emerging markets[20,21,19,22]. Importantly, we found that the largest eigenvalue could be approximated by the product of the average cross-correlation coefficient and the number of stocks studied. We demonstrate this dependence using a simple one-factor model. The model could be extended to describe other characteristics of the realistic data.

  5. Micromechanical modeling of damage growth in titanium based metal-matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, James A.; Quimby, Howard M.

    1994-01-01

    The thermomechanical behavior of continuous-fiber reinforced titanium based metal-matrix composites (MMC) is studied using the finite element method. A thermoviscoplastic unified state variable constitutive theory is employed to capture inelastic and strain-rate sensitive behavior in the Timetal-21s matrix. The SCS-6 fibers are modeled as thermoplastic. The effects of residual stresses generated during the consolidation process on the tensile response of the composites are investigated. Unidirectional and cross-ply geometries are considered. Differences between the tensile responses in composites with perfectly bonded and completely debonded fiber/matrix interfaces are discussed. Model simulations for the completely debonded-interface condition are shown to correlate well with experimental results.

  6. Numerical Modeling on Two phase Fluid flow in a Coupled Fracture-Skin-Matrix System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valsala Kumari, R.; G, S. K.

    2015-12-01

    Multiphase flow modeling studies below the ground surface is very essential for designing suitable remediation strategies for contaminated aquifers and for the development of petroleum and geothermal reservoirs. Presence of fractured bedrock beneath the ground surface will make multiphase flow process more complex due to its highly heterogeneous nature. A major challenge in modeling flow within a fractured rock is to capture the interaction between the high permeability fracture and the low permeability rock-matrix. In some instances, weathering and mineral depositions will lead to formation of an additional layer named fracture-skin at the fracture-matrix interface. Porosity and permeability of fracture-skin may significantly vary from the adjacent rock matrix and this variation will result in different flow and transport behavior within the fracture-skin. In the present study, an attempt has been made to model simultaneous flow of two immiscible phases (water and LNAPL) in a saturated coupled fracture-skin-matrix system. A fully-implicit finite difference model has been developed to simulate the variation of pressure and saturation of fluid phases along the fracture and within the rock-matrix. Sensitivity studies have been done to analyze the effect of change of various fracture-skin parameters such as porosity, diffusion coefficient and thickness on pressure and saturation distribution of both wetting and non-wetting fluid phases. It can be concluded from the study that the presence of fracture-skin is significantly affecting the fluid flow at the fracture-matrix interface and it can also be seen from the study that the flow behavior of both fluid phases is sensitive to fracture-skin parameters.

  7. Matrix model and holographic baryons in the D0-D4 background

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Si-wen; Jia, Tuo

    2015-08-01

    We study the spectrum and short-distance two-body force of holographic baryons by the matrix model, which is derived from the Sakai-Sugimoto model in the D0-D4 background (D0-D4/D8 system). The matrix model is derived by using the standard technique in string theory, and it can describe multibaryon systems. We rederive the action of the matrix model from open string theory on the baryon vertex, which is embedded in the D0-D4/D8 system. The matrix model offers a more systematic approach to the dynamics of the baryons at short distances. In our system, we find that the matrix model describes stable baryonic states only if ζ =UQ0 3/UKK 3<2 , where UQ0 3 is related to the number density of smeared D0-branes. This result in our paper is exactly the same as some previous results studied in this system, presented in [W. Cai, C. Wu, and Z. Xiao, Phys. Rev. D 90, 106001 (2014)]. We also compute the baryon spectrum (k =1 case) and short-distance two-body force of baryons (k =2 case). The baryon spectrum is modified and could be able to fit the experimental data if we choose a suitable value for ζ . And the short-distance two-body force of baryons is also modified by the appearance of smeared D0-branes from the original Sakai-Sugimoto model. If ζ >2 , we find that the baryon spectrum will be totally complex and an attractive force will appear in the short-distance interaction of baryons, which may consistently correspond to the existence of unstable baryonic states.

  8. Elasticity analyses of size-based red and white abalone matrix models: management and conservation.

    PubMed

    Rogers-Bennett, Laura; Leaf, Robert T

    2006-02-01

    Prospective elasticity analyses have been used to aid in the management of fished species and the conservation of endangered species. Elasticities were examined for deterministic size-based matrix models of red abalone, Haliotis rufescens, and white abalone, H. sorenseni, to evaluate which size classes influenced population growth (lambda) the most. In the red abalone matrix, growth transitions were determined from a tag recapture study and grouped into nine size classes. In the white abalone matrix, abalone growth was determined from a laboratory study and grouped into five size classes. Survivorship was estimated from tag recapture data for red abalone using a Jolly-Seber model with size as a covariate and used for both red and white abalone. Reproduction estimates for both models used averages of the number of mature eggs produced by female red and white abalone in each size class from four-year reproduction studies. Population growth rate (lambda) was set to 1.0, and the first-year survival (larval survival through to the first size class) was estimated by iteration. Survival elasticities were higher than fecundity elasticities in both the red and white matrix models. The sizes classes with the greatest survival elasticities, and therefore the most influence on population growth in the model, were the sublegal red abalone (150-178 mm) and the largest white abalone size class (140-175 mm). For red abalone, the existing minimum legal size (178 mm) protects the size class the model suggests is critical to population growth. Implementation of education programs for novice divers coupled with renewed enforcement may serve to minimize incidental mortality of the critical size class. For white abalone, conservation efforts directed at restoring adults may have more of an impact on population growth than efforts focusing on juveniles. Our work is an example of how prospective elasticity analyses of size-structured matrix models can be used to quantitatively evaluate

  9. 3-D FEM Modeling of fiber/matrix interface debonding in UD composites including surface effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pupurs, A.; Varna, J.

    2012-02-01

    Fiber/matrix interface debond growth is one of the main mechanisms of damage evolution in unidirectional (UD) polymer composites. Because for polymer composites the fiber strain to failure is smaller than for the matrix multiple fiber breaks occur at random positions when high mechanical stress is applied to the composite. The energy released due to each fiber break is usually larger than necessary for the creation of a fiber break therefore a partial debonding of fiber/matrix interface is typically observed. Thus the stiffness reduction of UD composite is contributed both from the fiber breaks and from the interface debonds. The aim of this paper is to analyze the debond growth in carbon fiber/epoxy and glass fiber/epoxy UD composites using fracture mechanics principles by calculation of energy release rate GII. A 3-D FEM model is developed for calculation of energy release rate for fiber/matrix interface debonds at different locations in the composite including the composite surface region where the stress state differs from the one in the bulk composite. In the model individual partially debonded fiber is surrounded by matrix region and embedded in a homogenized composite.

  10. The accuracy of matrix population model projections for coniferous trees in the Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    van Mantgem, P.J.; Stephenson, N.L.

    2005-01-01

    1 We assess the use of simple, size-based matrix population models for projecting population trends for six coniferous tree species in the Sierra Nevada, California. We used demographic data from 16 673 trees in 15 permanent plots to create 17 separate time-invariant, density-independent population projection models, and determined differences between trends projected from initial surveys with a 5-year interval and observed data during two subsequent 5-year time steps. 2 We detected departures from the assumptions of the matrix modelling approach in terms of strong growth autocorrelations. We also found evidence of observation errors for measurements of tree growth and, to a more limited degree, recruitment. Loglinear analysis provided evidence of significant temporal variation in demographic rates for only two of the 17 populations. 3 Total population sizes were strongly predicted by model projections, although population dynamics were dominated by carryover from the previous 5-year time step (i.e. there were few cases of recruitment or death). Fractional changes to overall population sizes were less well predicted. Compared with a null model and a simple demographic model lacking size structure, matrix model projections were better able to predict total population sizes, although the differences were not statistically significant. Matrix model projections were also able to predict short-term rates of survival, growth and recruitment. Mortality frequencies were not well predicted. 4 Our results suggest that simple size-structured models can accurately project future short-term changes for some tree populations. However, not all populations were well predicted and these simple models would probably become more inaccurate over longer projection intervals. The predictive ability of these models would also be limited by disturbance or other events that destabilize demographic rates. ?? 2005 British Ecological Society.

  11. LS-DYNA Implementation of Polymer Matrix Composite Model Under High Strain Rate Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zheng, Xia-Hua; Goldberg, Robert K.; Binienda, Wieslaw K.; Roberts, Gary D.

    2003-01-01

    A recently developed constitutive model is implemented into LS-DYNA as a user defined material model (UMAT) to characterize the nonlinear strain rate dependent behavior of polymers. By utilizing this model within a micromechanics technique based on a laminate analogy, an algorithm to analyze the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of a fiber reinforced polymer matrix composite is then developed as a UMAT to simulate the response of these composites under high strain rate impact. The models are designed for shell elements in order to ensure computational efficiency. Experimental and numerical stress-strain curves are compared for two representative polymers and a representative polymer matrix composite, with the analytical model predicting the experimental response reasonably well.

  12. Generating Multiple Imputations for Matrix Sampling Data Analyzed with Item Response Models.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Neal; Gan, Nianci

    1997-01-01

    Describes and assesses missing data methods currently used to analyze data from matrix sampling designs implemented by the National Assessment of Educational Progress. Several improved methods are developed, and these models are evaluated using an EM algorithm to obtain maximum likelihood estimates followed by multiple imputation of complete data…

  13. Micromechanical Modeling for Tensile Behaviour of Carbon Fiber - Reinforced Ceramic - Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    The stress-strain curves of fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs) exhibit obvious non-linear behaviour under tensile loading. The occurrence of multiple damage mechanisms, i.e., matrix multicracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding and fibers fracture, is the mainly reason for the non-linear characteristic. The micromechanics approach has been developed to predict the tensile stress-strain curves of unidirectional, cross-ply and woven CMCs. The shear-lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite. The damage models were used to determine the evolution of micro damage parameters, i.e., matrix crack spacing, interface debonded length and broken fibers fraction. By combining the shear-lag model with damage models and considering the effect of transverse multicracking in the 90° plies or transverse yarns in cross-ply or woven CMCs, the tensile stress-strain curves of unidirectional, cross-ply, 2D and 2.5D woven CMCs have been predicted. The results agreed with experimental data.

  14. Nucleon statistics in holographic QCD: Aharonov-Bohm effect in a matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Hashimoto, Koji; Iizuka, Norihiro

    2010-11-15

    We show that the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the nuclear matrix model [K. Hashimoto, N. Iizuka, and P. Yi, J. High Energy Phys. 10 (2010), 3.] derives the statistical nature of nucleons in holographic QCD. For N{sub c}=odd (even), the nucleon is shown to be a fermion (boson).

  15. Nucleon statistics in holographic QCD: Aharonov-Bohm effect in a matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Koji; Iizuka, Norihiro

    2010-11-01

    We show that the Aharonov-Bohm effect in the nuclear matrix model [K. Hashimoto, N. Iizuka, and P. Yi, J. High Energy Phys.JHEPFG1029-8479 10 (2010), 3.10.1007/JHEP10(2010)003] derives the statistical nature of nucleons in holographic QCD. For Nc=odd (even), the nucleon is shown to be a fermion (boson).

  16. Power-law expansion of the Universe from the bosonic Lorentzian type IIB matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ito, Yuta; Nishimura, Jun; Tsuchiya, Asato

    2015-11-01

    Recent studies on the Lorentzian version of the type IIB matrix model show that (3+1)D expanding universe emerges dynamically from (9+1)D space-time predicted by superstring theory. Here we study a bosonic matrix model obtained by omitting the fermionic matrices. With the adopted simplification and the usage of a large-scale parallel computer, we are able to perform Monte Carlo calculations with matrix size up to N = 512, which is twenty times larger than that used previously for the studies of the original model. When the matrix size is larger than some critical value N c ≃ 110, we find that (3+1)D expanding universe emerges dynamically with a clear large- N scaling property. Furthermore, the observed increase of the spatial extent with time t at sufficiently late times is consistent with a power-law behavior t 1/2, which is reminiscent of the expanding behavior of the Friedmann-Robertson-Walker universe in the radiation dominated era. We discuss possible implications of this result on the original supersymmetric model including fermionic matrices.

  17. Modeling of Interaction Layer Growth Between U-Mo Particles and an Al Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Yeon Soo Kim; G. L. Hofman; Ho Jin Ryu; Jong Man Park; A. B. Robinson; D. M. Wachs

    2013-12-01

    Interaction layer growth between U-Mo alloy fuel particles and Al in a dispersion fuel is a concern due to the volume expansion and other unfavorable irradiation behavior of the interaction product. To reduce interaction layer (IL) growth, a small amount of Si is added to the Al. As a result, IL growth is affected by the Si content in the Al matrix. In order to predict IL growth during fabrication and irradiation, empirical models were developed. For IL growth prediction during fabrication and any follow-on heating process before irradiation, out-of-pile heating test data were used to develop kinetic correlations. Two out-of-pile correlations, one for the pure Al matrix and the other for the Al matrix with Si addition, respectively, were developed, which are Arrhenius equations that include temperature and time. For IL growth predictions during irradiation, the out-of-pile correlations were modified to include a fission-rate term to consider fission enhanced diffusion, and multiplication factors to incorporate the Si addition effect and the effect of the Mo content. The in-pile correlation is applicable for a pure Al matrix and an Al matrix with the Si content up to 8 wt%, for fuel temperatures up to 200 degrees C, and for Mo content in the range of 6 – 10wt%. In order to cover these ranges, in-pile data were included in modeling from various tests, such as the US RERTR-4, -5, -6, -7 and -9 tests and Korea’s KOMO-4 test, that were designed to systematically examine the effects of the fission rate, temperature, Si content in Al matrix, and Mo content in U-Mo particles. A model converting the IL thickness to the IL volume fraction in the meat was also developed.

  18. A New Equation Solver for Modeling Turbulent Flow in Coupled Matrix-Conduit Flow Models.

    PubMed

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Karst aquifers represent dual flow systems consisting of a highly conductive conduit system embedded in a less permeable rock matrix. Hybrid models iteratively coupling both flow systems generally consume much time, especially because of the nonlinearity of turbulent conduit flow. To reduce calculation times compared to those of existing approaches, a new iterative equation solver for the conduit system is developed based on an approximated Newton-Raphson expression and a Gauß-Seidel or successive over-relaxation scheme with a single iteration step at the innermost level. It is implemented and tested in the research code CAVE but should be easily adaptable to similar models such as the Conduit Flow Process for MODFLOW-2005. It substantially reduces the computational effort as demonstrated by steady-state benchmark scenarios as well as by transient karst genesis simulations. Water balance errors are found to be acceptable in most of the test cases. However, the performance and accuracy may deteriorate under unfavorable conditions such as sudden, strong changes of the flow field at some stages of the karst genesis simulations.

  19. A New Equation Solver for Modeling Turbulent Flow in Coupled Matrix-Conduit Flow Models.

    PubMed

    Hubinger, Bernhard; Birk, Steffen; Hergarten, Stefan

    2016-07-01

    Karst aquifers represent dual flow systems consisting of a highly conductive conduit system embedded in a less permeable rock matrix. Hybrid models iteratively coupling both flow systems generally consume much time, especially because of the nonlinearity of turbulent conduit flow. To reduce calculation times compared to those of existing approaches, a new iterative equation solver for the conduit system is developed based on an approximated Newton-Raphson expression and a Gauß-Seidel or successive over-relaxation scheme with a single iteration step at the innermost level. It is implemented and tested in the research code CAVE but should be easily adaptable to similar models such as the Conduit Flow Process for MODFLOW-2005. It substantially reduces the computational effort as demonstrated by steady-state benchmark scenarios as well as by transient karst genesis simulations. Water balance errors are found to be acceptable in most of the test cases. However, the performance and accuracy may deteriorate under unfavorable conditions such as sudden, strong changes of the flow field at some stages of the karst genesis simulations. PMID:26821785

  20. Matrix Metalloproteinases Contribute to Neuronal Dysfunction in Animal Models of Drug Dependence, Alzheimer's Disease, and Epilepsy

    PubMed Central

    Mizoguchi, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Kiyofumi; Nabeshima, Toshitaka

    2011-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) remodel the pericellular environment by regulating the cleavage of extracellular matrix proteins, cell surface components, neurotransmitter receptors, and growth factors that mediate cell adhesion, synaptogenesis, synaptic plasticity, and long-term potentiation. Interestingly, increased MMP activity and dysregulation of the balance between MMPs and TIMPs have also been implicated in various pathologic conditions. In this paper, we discuss various animal models that suggest that the activation of the gelatinases MMP-2 and MMP-9 is involved in pathogenesis of drug dependence, Alzheimer's disease, and epilepsy. PMID:22235372

  1. Statistical model of dephasing in mesoscopic devices introduced in the scattering matrix formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pala, Marco G.; Iannaccone, Giuseppe

    2004-06-01

    We propose a phenomenological model of dephasing in mesoscopic transport, based on the introduction of random-phase fluctuations in the computation of the scattering matrix of the system. A Monte Carlo averaging procedure allows us to extract electrical and microscopic device properties. We show that, in this picture, scattering matrix properties enforced by current conservation and time-reversal invariance still hold. In order to assess the validity of the proposed approach, we present simulations of conductance and magnetoconductance of Aharonov-Bohm rings that reproduce the behavior observed in experiments, in particular as far as aspects related to decoherence are concerned.

  2. The effect of stochiastic technique on estimates of population viability from transition matrix models

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kaye, T.N.; Pyke, David A.

    2003-01-01

    Population viability analysis is an important tool for conservation biologists, and matrix models that incorporate stochasticity are commonly used for this purpose. However, stochastic simulations may require assumptions about the distribution of matrix parameters, and modelers often select a statistical distribution that seems reasonable without sufficient data to test its fit. We used data from long-term (5a??10 year) studies with 27 populations of five perennial plant species to compare seven methods of incorporating environmental stochasticity. We estimated stochastic population growth rate (a measure of viability) using a matrix-selection method, in which whole observed matrices were selected at random at each time step of the model. In addition, we drew matrix elements (transition probabilities) at random using various statistical distributions: beta, truncated-gamma, truncated-normal, triangular, uniform, or discontinuous/observed. Recruitment rates were held constant at their observed mean values. Two methods of constraining stage-specific survival to a??100% were also compared. Different methods of incorporating stochasticity and constraining matrix column sums interacted in their effects and resulted in different estimates of stochastic growth rate (differing by up to 16%). Modelers should be aware that when constraining stage-specific survival to 100%, different methods may introduce different levels of bias in transition element means, and when this happens, different distributions for generating random transition elements may result in different viability estimates. There was no species effect on the results and the growth rates derived from all methods were highly correlated with one another. We conclude that the absolute value of population viability estimates is sensitive to model assumptions, but the relative ranking of populations (and management treatments) is robust. Furthermore, these results are applicable to a range of perennial plants and

  3. Massive quiver matrix models for massive charged particles in AdS

    DOE PAGES

    Asplund, Curtis T.; Denef, Frederik; Dzienkowski, Eric

    2016-01-11

    Here, we present a new class of N = 4 supersymmetric quiver matrix models and argue that it describes the stringy low-energy dynamics of internally wrapped D-branes in four-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS) flux compactifications. The Lagrangians of these models differ from previously studied quiver matrix models by the presence of mass terms, associated with the AdS gravitational potential, as well as additional terms dictated by supersymmetry. These give rise to dynamical phenomena typically associated with the presence of fluxes, such as fuzzy membranes, internal cyclotron motion and the appearance of confining strings. We also show how these models can bemore » obtained by dimensional reduction of four-dimensional supersymmetric quiver gauge theories on a three-sphere.« less

  4. Modeling and life prediction methodology for Titanium Matrix Composites subjected to mission profiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mirdamadi, M.; Johnson, W. S.

    1994-01-01

    Titanium matrix composites (TMC) are being evaluated as structural materials for elevated temperature applications in future generation hypersonic vehicles. In such applications, TMC components are subjected to complex thermomechanical loading profiles at various elevated temperatures. Therefore, thermomechanical fatigue (TMF) testing, using a simulated mission profile, is essential for evaluation and development of life prediction methodologies. The objective of the research presented in this paper was to evaluate the TMF response of the (0/90)2s SCS-6/Timetal-21S subjected to a generic hypersonic flight profile and its portions with a temperature ranging from -130 C to 816 C. It was found that the composite modulus, prior to rapid degradation, had consistent values for all the profiles tested. A micromechanics based analysis was used to predict the stress-strain response of the laminate and of the constituents in each ply during thermomechanical loading conditions by using only constituent properties as input. The fiber was modeled as elastic with transverse orthotropic and temperature dependent properties. The matrix was modeled using a thermoviscoplastic constitutive relation. In the analysis, the composite modulus degradation was assumed to result from matrix cracking and was modeled by reducing the matrix modulus. Fatigue lives of the composite subjected to the complex generic hypersonic flight profile were well correlated using the predicted stress in 0 degree fibers.

  5. Unitarity violation of the CKM matrix in a nonuniversal gauge interaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Young

    2005-06-01

    We explore the unitarity violation of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix in the model where the third generation fermions are subjected to the separate SU(2){sub L} gauge interaction. With the recent LEP and SLAC linear collider (SLC) data at Z-pole and low-energy neutral current interaction data, the analysis on the parameter space of the model is updated, and the unitary violation is predicted under the constraint.

  6. Form factors of the monodromy matrix entries in gl (2 | 1)-invariant integrable models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hutsalyuk, A.; Liashyk, A.; Pakuliak, S. Z.; Ragoucy, E.; Slavnov, N. A.

    2016-10-01

    We study integrable models solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz and described by gl (2 | 1) or gl (1 | 2) superalgebras. We obtain explicit determinant representations for form factors of the monodromy matrix entries. We show that all form factors are related to each other at special limits of the Bethe parameters. Our results allow one to obtain determinant formulas for form factors of local operators in the supersymmetric t- J model.

  7. Model Determined for Predicting Fatigue Lives of Metal Matrix Composites Under Mean Stresses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Bradley

    1997-01-01

    Aircraft engine components invariably are subjected to mean stresses over and above the cyclic loads. In monolithic materials, it has been observed that tensile mean stresses are detrimental and compressive mean stresses are beneficial to fatigue life in comparison to a base of zero mean stress. Several mean stress models exist for monolithic metals, but each differ quantitatively in the extent to which detrimental or beneficial effects are ascribed. There have been limited attempts to apply these models to metal matrix composites. At the NASA Lewis Research Center, several mean stress models--the Smith-Watson- Topper, Walker, Normalized Goodman, and Soderberg models--were examined for applicability to this class of composite materials. The Soderberg approach, which normalizes the mean stress to a 0.02-percent yield strength, was shown to best represent the effect of mean stresses over the range covered. The other models varied significantly in their predictability and often failed to predict the composite behavior at very high tensile mean stresses. This work is the first to systematically demonstrate the influence of mean stresses on metal matrix composites and model their effects. Attention also was given to fatigue-cracking mechanisms in the Ti-15-3 matrix and to micromechanics analyses of mean stress effects.

  8. A differential CDM model for fatigue of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Kruch, S.

    1992-01-01

    A multiaxial, isothermal, continuum damage mechanics (CDM) model for fatigue of a unidirectional metal matrix composite volume element is presented. The model is phenomenological, stress based, and assumes a single scalar internal damage variable, the evolution of which is anisotropic. The development of the fatigue damage model, (i.e., evolutionary law) is based on the definition of an initially transversely isotropic fatigue limit surface, a static fracture surface, and a normalized stress amplitude function. The anisotropy of these surfaces and function, and therefore the model, is defined through physically meaningful invariants reflecting the local stress and material orientation. This transversely isotropic model is shown, when taken to it's isotropic limit, to directly simplify to a previously developed and validated isotropic fatigue continuum damage model. Results of a nondimensional parametric study illustrate (1) the flexibility of the present formulation in attempting to characterize a class of composite materials, and (2) the capability of the formulation in predicting anticipated qualitative trends in the fatigue behavior of unidirectional metal matrix composites. Also, specific material parameters representing an initial characterization of the composite system SiC/Ti 15-3 and the matrix material (Ti 15-3) are reported.

  9. Discrete element modeling of boudinage: Insights on rock rheology, matrix flow, and evolution of geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abe, Steffen; Urai, Janos L.

    2012-01-01

    We use discrete element model simulations to model the full boudinage process from initial fracturing of intact material to post-fracture flow of material into gaps between fragments and to investigate the role which the material properties of the weak and strong layers play in this process. The models are deformed in 2D plane strain under a range of confining stresses, in coaxial bulk flow. Results show that the material properties, i.e. Mohr-Coulomb or quasi-viscous for the matrix and elastic-brittle for the competent layer, lead to the development of natural looking boudin morphologies and deformation patterns in the matrix. The details of the matrix rheology only have a minor influence on the morphology of the boudins. By varying the material properties of the competent layer between fully brittle and semi-ductile we obtain a wide range of deformation patterns ranging from pinch-and-swell structures to a variety of boudin types including drawn, shear band and straight sided torn boudins. In a number of models we observe rotation of the boudin blocks despite the applied deformation being purely coaxial. These rotations are generally related to asymmetrical (rhombic) boudin shapes. Some features observed in natural boudins such as concave block faces or the formation of veins between fragments are not modeled because pore fluids are not yet included in our model.

  10. Shell-model analysis of the 136Xe double beta decay nuclear matrix elements.

    PubMed

    Horoi, M; Brown, B A

    2013-05-31

    Neutrinoless double beta decay, if observed, could distinguish whether the neutrino is a Dirac or a Majorana particle, and it could be used to determine the absolute scale of the neutrino masses. 136Xe is one of the most promising candidates for observing this rare event. However, until recently there were no positive results for the allowed and less rare two-neutrino double beta decay mode. The small nuclear matrix element associated with the long half-life represents a challenge for nuclear structure models used for its calculation. We report a new shell-model analysis of the two-neutrino double beta decay of 136Xe, which takes into account all relevant nuclear orbitals necessary to fully describe the associated Gamow-Teller strength. We further use the new model to analyze the main contributions to the neutrinoless double beta decay matrix element, and show that they are also diminished.

  11. Phase Structure of the T-matrix and Multichannel Unitary Isobar Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razavi, S.; Nakayama, K.

    2015-04-01

    By exploiting the full phase structure of the meson-baryon coupled channels reaction amplitude-here including also the photon-baryon channel-an isobar model is constructed which fulfills automatically the unitarity and analyticity conditions of the S-matrix, in addition to gauge invariance in the case of photoproduction. In particular, it is shown that the unitarity of the (resonance) pole amplitude arises from the dressing mechanism inherent in the basic T-matrix equation, requiring no extra unitarity condition on the pole amplitude as is the case in earlier works on isobar models. As an example, the present model is applied in the description of the meson-nucleon reactions including the πN , ηN , σN , ρN and πΔ channels. The latter three account effectively for the ππN channel. FFE-COSY Grant No. 41788390.

  12. Backward bifurcations and strong Allee effects in matrix models for the dynamics of structured populations

    PubMed Central

    Cushing, J.M.

    2014-01-01

    In nonlinear matrix models, strong Allee effects typically arise when the fundamental bifurcation of positive equilibria from the extinction equilibrium at r=1 (or R 0=1) is backward. This occurs when positive feedback (component Allee) effects are dominant at low densities and negative feedback effects are dominant at high densities. This scenario allows population survival when r (or equivalently R 0) is less than 1, provided population densities are sufficiently high. For r>1 (or equivalently R 0>1) the extinction equilibrium is unstable and a strong Allee effect cannot occur. We give criteria sufficient for a strong Allee effect to occur in a general nonlinear matrix model. A juvenile–adult example model illustrates the criteria as well as some other possible phenomena concerning strong Allee effects (such as positive cycles instead of equilibria). PMID:24963977

  13. Data-resolution matrix and model-resolution matrix for Rayleigh-wave inversion using a damped least-squares method

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Xia, J.; Miller, R.D.; Xu, Y.

    2008-01-01

    Inversion of multimode surface-wave data is of increasing interest in the near-surface geophysics community. For a given near-surface geophysical problem, it is essential to understand how well the data, calculated according to a layered-earth model, might match the observed data. A data-resolution matrix is a function of the data kernel (determined by a geophysical model and a priori information applied to the problem), not the data. A data-resolution matrix of high-frequency (>2 Hz) Rayleigh-wave phase velocities, therefore, offers a quantitative tool for designing field surveys and predicting the match between calculated and observed data. We employed a data-resolution matrix to select data that would be well predicted and we find that there are advantages of incorporating higher modes in inversion. The resulting discussion using the data-resolution matrix provides insight into the process of inverting Rayleigh-wave phase velocities with higher-mode data to estimate S-wave velocity structure. Discussion also suggested that each near-surface geophysical target can only be resolved using Rayleigh-wave phase velocities within specific frequency ranges, and higher-mode data are normally more accurately predicted than fundamental-mode data because of restrictions on the data kernel for the inversion system. We used synthetic and real-world examples to demonstrate that selected data with the data-resolution matrix can provide better inversion results and to explain with the data-resolution matrix why incorporating higher-mode data in inversion can provide better results. We also calculated model-resolution matrices in these examples to show the potential of increasing model resolution with selected surface-wave data. ?? Birkhaueser 2008.

  14. Deformed matrix models, supersymmetric lattice twists and Script N = ¼ supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ünsal, Mithat

    2009-05-01

    A manifestly supersymmetric nonperturbative matrix regularization for a twisted version of Script N = (8,8) theory on a curved background (a two-sphere) is constructed. Both continuum and the matrix regularization respect four exact scalar supersymmetries under a twisted version of the supersymmetry algebra. We then discuss a succinct Script Q = 1 deformed matrix model regularization of Script N = 4 SYM in d = 4, which is equivalent to a non-commutative A4* orbifold lattice formulation. Motivated by recent progress in supersymmetric lattices, we also propose a Script N = ¼ supersymmetry preserving deformation of Script N = 4 SYM theory on Bbb R4. In this class of Script N = ¼ theories, both the regularized and continuum theory respect the same set of (scalar) supersymmetry. By using the equivalence of the deformed matrix models with the lattice formulations, we give a very simple physical argument on why the exact lattice supersymmetry must be a subset of scalar subalgebra. This argument disagrees with the recent claims of the link approach, for which we give a new interpretation.

  15. Deformed Matrix Models, Supersymmetric Lattice Twists and N=1/4 Supersymmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Unsal, Mithat

    2008-09-24

    A manifestly supersymmetric nonperturbative matrix regularization for a twisted version of N = (8, 8) theory on a curved background (a two-sphere) is constructed. Both continuum and the matrix regularization respect four exact scalar supersymmetries under a twisted version of the supersymmetry algebra. We then discuss a succinct Q = 1 deformed matrix model regularization of N = 4 SYM in d = 4, which is equivalent to a non-commutative A*{sub 4} orbifold lattice formulation. Motivated by recent progress in supersymmetric lattices, we also propose a N = 1/4 supersymmetry preserving deformation of N = 4 SYM theory on R{sup 4}. In this class of N = 1/4 theories, both the regularized and continuum theory respect the same set of (scalar) supersymmetry. By using the equivalence of the deformed matrix models with the lattice formulations, we give a very simple physical argument on why the exact lattice supersymmetry must be a subset of scalar subalgebra. This argument disagrees with the recent claims of the link approach, for which we give a new interpretation.

  16. Development of a hybrid wave based-transfer matrix model for sound transmission analysis.

    PubMed

    Dijckmans, A; Vermeir, G

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, a hybrid wave based-transfer matrix model is presented that allows for the investigation of the sound transmission through finite multilayered structures placed between two reverberant rooms. The multilayered structure may consist of an arbitrary configuration of fluid, elastic, or poro-elastic layers. The field variables (structural displacements and sound pressures) are expanded in terms of structural and acoustic wave functions. The boundary and continuity conditions in the rooms determine the participation factors in the pressure expansions. The displacement of the multilayered structure is determined by the mechanical impedance matrix, which gives a relation between the pressures and transverse displacements at both sides of the structure. The elements of this matrix are calculated with the transfer matrix method. First, the hybrid model is numerically validated. Next a comparison is made with sound transmission loss measurements of a hollow brick wall and a sandwich panel. Finally, numerical simulations show the influence of structural damping, room dimensions and plate dimensions on the sound transmission loss of multilayered structures.

  17. Differential continuum damage mechanics models for creep and fatigue of unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, S. M.; Kruch, S.

    1991-01-01

    Three multiaxial isothermal continuum damage mechanics models for creep, fatigue, and creep/fatigue interaction of a unidirectional metal matrix composite volume element are presented, only one of which will be discussed in depth. Each model is phenomenological and stress based, with varying degrees of complexity to accurately predict the initiation and propagation of intergranular and transgranular defects over a wide range of loading conditions. The development of these models is founded on the definition of an initially transversely isotropic fatigue limit surface, static fracture surface, normalized stress amplitude function and isochronous creep damage failure surface, from which both fatigue and creep damage evolutionary laws can be obtained. The anisotropy of each model is defined through physically meaningful invariants reflecting the local stress and material orientation. All three transversely isotropic models have been shown, when taken to their isotropic limit, to directly simplify to previously developed and validated creep and fatigue continuum damage theories. Results of a nondimensional parametric study illustrate (1) the flexibility of the present formulation when attempting to characterize a large class of composite materials, and (2) its ability to predict anticipated qualitative trends in the fatigue behavior of unidirectional metal matrix composites. Additionally, the potential for the inclusion of various micromechanical effects (e.g., fiber/matrix bond strength, fiber volume fraction, etc.), into the phenomenological anisotropic parameters is noted, as well as a detailed discussion regarding the necessary exploratory and characterization experiments needed to utilize the featured damage theories.

  18. Model parameter adaption-based multi-model algorithm for extended object tracking using a random matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Borui; Mu, Chundi; Han, Shuli; Bai, Tianming

    2014-01-01

    Traditional object tracking technology usually regards the target as a point source object. However, this approximation is no longer appropriate for tracking extended objects such as large targets and closely spaced group objects. Bayesian extended object tracking (EOT) using a random symmetrical positive definite (SPD) matrix is a very effective method to jointly estimate the kinematic state and physical extension of the target. The key issue in the application of this random matrix-based EOT approach is to model the physical extension and measurement noise accurately. Model parameter adaptive approaches for both extension dynamic and measurement noise are proposed in this study based on the properties of the SPD matrix to improve the performance of extension estimation. An interacting multi-model algorithm based on model parameter adaptive filter using random matrix is also presented. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive approaches and multi-model algorithm. The estimation performance of physical extension is better than the other algorithms, especially when the target maneuvers. The kinematic state estimation error is lower than the others as well. PMID:24763252

  19. Model parameter adaption-based multi-model algorithm for extended object tracking using a random matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Borui; Mu, Chundi; Han, Shuli; Bai, Tianming

    2014-04-24

    Traditional object tracking technology usually regards the target as a point source object. However, this approximation is no longer appropriate for tracking extended objects such as large targets and closely spaced group objects. Bayesian extended object tracking (EOT) using a random symmetrical positive definite (SPD) matrix is a very effective method to jointly estimate the kinematic state and physical extension of the target. The key issue in the application of this random matrix-based EOT approach is to model the physical extension and measurement noise accurately. Model parameter adaptive approaches for both extension dynamic and measurement noise are proposed in this study based on the properties of the SPD matrix to improve the performance of extension estimation. An interacting multi-model algorithm based on model parameter adaptive filter using random matrix is also presented. Simulation results demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive approaches and multi-model algorithm. The estimation performance of physical extension is better than the other algorithms, especially when the target maneuvers. The kinematic state estimation error is lower than the others as well.

  20. Mathematical model of water transport in Bacon and alkaline matrix-type hydrogen-oxygen fuel cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prokopius, P. R.; Easter, R. W.

    1972-01-01

    Based on general mass continuity and diffusive transport equations, a mathematical model was developed that simulates the transport of water in Bacon and alkaline-matrix fuel cells. The derived model was validated by using it to analytically reproduce various Bacon and matrix-cell experimental water transport transients.

  1. The Development of Multicultural Counselling Competencies (MCC) Training Module Based on MCC Matrix Model by Sue et al. (1992)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anuar, Azad Athahiri; Rozubi, Norsayyidatina Che; Abdullah, Haslee Sharil

    2015-01-01

    The aims of this study were to develop and validate a MCC training module for trainee counselor based on MCC matrix model by Sue et al. (1992). This module encompassed five sub modules and 11 activities developed along the concepts and components of the MCC matrix model developed by Sue, Arredondo dan McDavis (1992). The design method used in this…

  2. B(s) 0-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gámiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; Heller, U. M.; Kronfeld, A. S.; Laiho, J.; Mackenzie, P. B.; Neil, E. T.; Simone, J.; Sugar, R.; Toussaint, D.; Van de Water, R. S.; Zhou, Ran; Fermilab Lattice; MILC Collaborations

    2016-06-01

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B -meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ =1.206 (18 )(6 ), where the second error stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B -meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vt d|=8.00 (34 )(8 )×10-3, |Vt s|=39.0 (1.2 )(0.4 )×10-3, and |Vt d/Vt s|=0.2052 (31 )(10 ), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2 σ . These results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.

  3. Matrix models, 4D black holes and topological strings on non-compact Calabi-Yau manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, Ulf H.; Olsson, Martin E.; Vonk, Marcel

    2004-11-01

    We study the relation between c = 1 matrix models at self-dual radii and topological strings on non-compact Calabi-Yau manifolds. Particularly the special case of the deformed matrix model is investigated in detail. Using recent results on the equivalence of the partition function of topological strings and that of four dimensional BPS black holes, we are able to calculate the entropy of the black holes, using matrix models. In particular, we show how to deal with the divergences that arise as a result of the non-compactness of the Calabi-Yau. The main result is that the entropy of the black hole at zero temperature coincides with the canonical free energy of the matrix model, up to a proportionality constant given by the self-dual temperature of the matrix model.

  4. Numerical modelling and experimental investigation of drug release from layered silicone matrix systems.

    PubMed

    Snorradóttir, Bergthóra S; Jónsdóttir, Fjóla; Sigurdsson, Sven Th; Thorsteinsson, Freygardur; Másson, Már

    2013-07-16

    Medical devices and polymeric matrix systems that release drugs or other bioactive compounds are of interest for a variety of applications. The release of the drug can be dependent on a number of factors such as the solubility, diffusivity, dissolution rate and distribution of the solid drug in the matrix. Achieving the goal of an optimal release profile can be challenging when relying solely on traditional experimental work. Accurate modelling complementing experimentation is therefore desirable. Numerical modelling is increasingly becoming an integral part of research and development due to the significant advances in computer simulation technology. This work focuses on numerical modelling and investigation of multi-layered silicone matrix systems. A numerical model that can be used to model multi-layered systems was constructed and validated by comparison with experimental data. The model could account for the limited dissolution rate and effect of the drug distribution on the release profiles. Parametric study showed how different factors affect the characteristics of drug release. Multi-layered medical silicone matrices were prepared in special moulds, where the quantity of drug in each layer could be varied, and release was investigated with Franz-diffusion cell setup. Data for long-term release was fitted to the model and the full depletion of the system predicted. The numerical model constructed for this study, whose input parameters are the diffusion, effective dissolution rate and dimensional solubility coefficients, does not require any type of steady-state approximation. These results indicate that numerical model can be used as a design tool for development of controlled release systems such as drug-loaded medical devices.

  5. Flexible matrix composites: Dynamic characterization, modeling, and potential for driveshaft applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shan, Ying

    Flexible matrix composites (FMCs) utilize the high elongation capability of elastomers such as polyurethane to withstand large strains in the direction transverse to the fiber reinforcement while retaining strength and stiffness in the longitudinal direction. FMCs are highly anisotropic and can therefore be tailored to achieve distinctive mechanical characteristics that are difficult to obtain using conventional rigid matrix composites. In the current study, the potential of using an FMC to construct a flexurally-soft, torsionally-stiff driveshaft is examined. The FMC selected for the current investigation is a carbon fiber/polyurethane matrix material system. Both quasi-static and dynamic tests have been performed to characterize the properties of the FMC material. By modeling viscoelastic FMC lamina properties with a fractional derivative approach, a novel damping model that accounts for the frequency and temperature dependence of the FMC material is developed. This is the first time fractional derivative model has been applied to a fiber composite. Good agreement between the damping model and experimental data for angle-ply tubes was obtained. Based on the validated damping model, a self-heating model to predict the temperature increase caused by internal damping of a FMC shaft under misaligned rotation is also proposed. A laboratory-scale, misaligned FMC shaft rotation test stand was built to validate the proposed model. Good agreement is shown between the self-heating model predictions and experiment results. This model can be valuable in the selection of constituent materials for FMCs and also in the design of FMC shafts. Preliminary fatigue test results show that FMC materials have potentially good fatigue performance in shaft applications.

  6. Highly accelerated cardiac cine parallel MRI using low-rank matrix completion and partial separability model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyu, Jingyuan; Nakarmi, Ukash; Zhang, Chaoyi; Ying, Leslie

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a new approach to highly accelerated dynamic parallel MRI using low rank matrix completion, partial separability (PS) model. In data acquisition, k-space data is moderately randomly undersampled at the center kspace navigator locations, but highly undersampled at the outer k-space for each temporal frame. In reconstruction, the navigator data is reconstructed from undersampled data using structured low-rank matrix completion. After all the unacquired navigator data is estimated, the partial separable model is used to obtain partial k-t data. Then the parallel imaging method is used to acquire the entire dynamic image series from highly undersampled data. The proposed method has shown to achieve high quality reconstructions with reduction factors up to 31, and temporal resolution of 29ms, when the conventional PS method fails.

  7. Microfluidic vascularized bone tissue model with hydroxyapatite-incorporated extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Jusoh, Norhana; Oh, Soojung; Kim, Sudong; Kim, Jangho; Jeon, Noo Li

    2015-10-21

    Current in vitro systems mimicking bone tissues fail to fully integrate the three-dimensional (3D) microvasculature and bone tissue microenvironments, decreasing their similarity to in vivo conditions. Here, we propose 3D microvascular networks in a hydroxyapatite (HA)-incorporated extracellular matrix (ECM) for designing and manipulating a vascularized bone tissue model in a microfluidic device. Incorporation of HA of various concentrations resulted in ECM with varying mechanical properties. Sprouting angiogenesis was affected by mechanically modulated HA-extracellular matrix interactions, generating a model of vascularized bone microenvironment. Using this platform, we observed that hydroxyapatite enhanced angiogenic properties such as sprout length, sprouting speed, sprout number, and lumen diameter. This new platform integrates fibrin ECM with the synthetic bone mineral HA to provide in vivo-like microenvironments for bone vessel sprouting.

  8. Floating Node Method and Virtual Crack Closure Technique for Modeling Matrix Cracking-Delamination Migration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarvalho, Nelson V.; Chen, B. Y.; Pinho, Silvestre T.; Baiz, P. M.; Ratcliffe, James G.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach is proposed for high-fidelity modeling of progressive damage and failure in composite materials that combines the Floating Node Method (FNM) and the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to represent multiple interacting failure mechanisms in a mesh-independent fashion. In this study, the approach is applied to the modeling of delamination migration in cross-ply tape laminates. Delamination, matrix cracking, and migration are all modeled using fracture mechanics based failure and migration criteria. The methodology proposed shows very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments.

  9. Floating Node Method and Virtual Crack Closure Technique for Modeling Matrix Cracking-Delamination Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeCarvalho, N. V.; Chen, B. Y.; Pinho, S. T.; Baiz, P. M.; Ratcliffe, J. G.; Tay, T. E.

    2013-01-01

    A novel approach is proposed for high-fidelity modeling of progressive damage and failure in composite materials that combines the Floating Node Method (FNM) and the Virtual Crack Closure Technique (VCCT) to represent multiple interacting failure mechanisms in a mesh-independent fashion. In this study, the approach is applied to the modeling of delamination migration in cross-ply tape laminates. Delamination, matrix cracking, and migration are all modeled using fracture mechanics based failure and migration criteria. The methodology proposed shows very good qualitative and quantitative agreement with experiments.

  10. Parallel Fock matrix construction with distributed shared memory model for the FMO-MO method.

    PubMed

    Umeda, Hiroaki; Inadomi, Yuichi; Watanabe, Toshio; Yagi, Toru; Ishimoto, Takayoshi; Ikegami, Tsutomu; Tadano, Hiroto; Sakurai, Tetsuya; Nagashima, Umpei

    2010-10-01

    A parallel Fock matrix construction program for FMO-MO method has been developed with the distributed shared memory model. To construct a large-sized Fock matrix during FMO-MO calculations, a distributed parallel algorithm was designed to make full use of local memory to reduce communication, and was implemented on the Global Array toolkit. A benchmark calculation for a small system indicates that the parallelization efficiency of the matrix construction portion is as high as 93% at 1,024 processors. A large FMO-MO application on the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) protein (17,246 atoms and 96,234 basis functions) was also carried out at the HF/6-31G level of theory, with the frontier orbitals being extracted by a Sakurai-Sugiura eigensolver. It takes 11.3 h for the FMO calculation, 49.1 h for the Fock matrix construction, and 10 min to extract 94 eigen-components on a PC cluster system using 256 processors.

  11. Numerical Modeling of Combined Matrix Cracking and Delamination in Composite Laminates Using Cohesive Elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Roy, Rene; Kweon, Jin-Hwe; Choi, Jin-ho

    2016-06-01

    Sub-laminate damage in the form of matrix cracking and delamination was simulated by using interface cohesive elements in the finite element (FE) software ABAQUS. Interface cohesive elements were inserted parallel to the fiber orientation in the transverse ply with equal spacing (matrix cracking) and between the interfaces (delamination). Matrix cracking initiation in the cohesive elements was based on stress traction separation laws and propagated under mixed-mode loading. We expanded the work of Shi et al. (Appl. Compos. Mater. 21, 57-70 2014) to include delamination and simulated additional [45/-45/0/90]s and [02/90n]s { n = 1,2,3} CFRP laminates and a [0/903]s GFRP laminate. Delamination damage was quantified numerically in terms of damage dissipative energy. We observed that transverse matrix cracks can propagate to the ply interface and initiate delamination. We also observed for [0/90n/0] laminates that as the number of 90° ply increases past n = 2, the crack density decreases. The predicted crack density evolution compared well with experimental results and the equivalent constraint model (ECM) theory. Empirical relationships were established between crack density and applied stress by linear curve fitting. The reduction of laminate elastic modulus due to cracking was also computed numerically and it is in accordance with reported experimental measurements.

  12. Evolution of the CKM matrix in the universal extra dimension model

    SciTech Connect

    Cornell, A. S.; Liu Luxin

    2011-02-01

    The evolution of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and the quark Yukawa couplings is performed for the one-loop renormalization group equations in the universal extra dimension model. It is found that the evolution of mixing angles and the CP violation measure J may rapidly vary in the presence of the Kaluza-Klein modes, and this variation becomes dramatic as the energy approaches the unification scale.

  13. Effects of Sample Size on Estimates of Population Growth Rates Calculated with Matrix Models

    PubMed Central

    Fiske, Ian J.; Bruna, Emilio M.; Bolker, Benjamin M.

    2008-01-01

    Background Matrix models are widely used to study the dynamics and demography of populations. An important but overlooked issue is how the number of individuals sampled influences estimates of the population growth rate (λ) calculated with matrix models. Even unbiased estimates of vital rates do not ensure unbiased estimates of λ–Jensen's Inequality implies that even when the estimates of the vital rates are accurate, small sample sizes lead to biased estimates of λ due to increased sampling variance. We investigated if sampling variability and the distribution of sampling effort among size classes lead to biases in estimates of λ. Methodology/Principal Findings Using data from a long-term field study of plant demography, we simulated the effects of sampling variance by drawing vital rates and calculating λ for increasingly larger populations drawn from a total population of 3842 plants. We then compared these estimates of λ with those based on the entire population and calculated the resulting bias. Finally, we conducted a review of the literature to determine the sample sizes typically used when parameterizing matrix models used to study plant demography. Conclusions/Significance We found significant bias at small sample sizes when survival was low (survival = 0.5), and that sampling with a more-realistic inverse J-shaped population structure exacerbated this bias. However our simulations also demonstrate that these biases rapidly become negligible with increasing sample sizes or as survival increases. For many of the sample sizes used in demographic studies, matrix models are probably robust to the biases resulting from sampling variance of vital rates. However, this conclusion may depend on the structure of populations or the distribution of sampling effort in ways that are unexplored. We suggest more intensive sampling of populations when individual survival is low and greater sampling of stages with high elasticities. PMID:18769483

  14. A nonperturbative definition of N = 4 Super Yang-Mills by the plane wave matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Shimasaki, Shinji

    2008-11-23

    We propose a nonperturbative definition of N = 4 Super Yang-Mills(SYM). We realize N = 4 SYM on RxS{sup 3} as the theory around a vacuum of the plane wave matrix model. Our regularization preserves 16 supersymmetries and the gauge symmetry. We perform the one-loop calculation to give evidence that in the continuum limit the superconformal symmetry is restored.

  15. Unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix and a nonuniversal gauge interaction model

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Kang Young

    2007-12-01

    Recent measurements of |V{sub us}| from kaon decays strongly support the unitarity of the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa matrix. The unitarity provides a stringent constraint on the parameter space of the nonuniversal gauge interaction model based on the separate SU(2){sub L} gauge group acting on the third generation fermions. I show that this constraint is stronger than those from the CERN LEP and SLC data and low-energy experiment data.

  16. Efficient methodologies for system matrix modelling in iterative image reconstruction for rotating high-resolution PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortuño, J. E.; Kontaxakis, G.; Rubio, J. L.; Guerra, P.; Santos, A.

    2010-04-01

    A fully 3D iterative image reconstruction algorithm has been developed for high-resolution PET cameras composed of pixelated scintillator crystal arrays and rotating planar detectors, based on the ordered subsets approach. The associated system matrix is precalculated with Monte Carlo methods that incorporate physical effects not included in analytical models, such as positron range effects and interaction of the incident gammas with the scintillator material. Custom Monte Carlo methodologies have been developed and optimized for modelling of system matrices for fast iterative image reconstruction adapted to specific scanner geometries, without redundant calculations. According to the methodology proposed here, only one-eighth of the voxels within two central transaxial slices need to be modelled in detail. The rest of the system matrix elements can be obtained with the aid of axial symmetries and redundancies, as well as in-plane symmetries within transaxial slices. Sparse matrix techniques for the non-zero system matrix elements are employed, allowing for fast execution of the image reconstruction process. This 3D image reconstruction scheme has been compared in terms of image quality to a 2D fast implementation of the OSEM algorithm combined with Fourier rebinning approaches. This work confirms the superiority of fully 3D OSEM in terms of spatial resolution, contrast recovery and noise reduction as compared to conventional 2D approaches based on rebinning schemes. At the same time it demonstrates that fully 3D methodologies can be efficiently applied to the image reconstruction problem for high-resolution rotational PET cameras by applying accurate pre-calculated system models and taking advantage of the system's symmetries.

  17. Noninteractive macroscopic reliability model for ceramic matrix composites with orthotropic material symmetry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.; Manderscheid, Jane M.

    1989-01-01

    A macroscopic noninteractive reliability model for ceramic matrix composites is presented. The model is multiaxial and applicable to composites that can be characterized as orthotropic. Tensorial invariant theory is used to create an integrity basis with invariants that correspond to physical mechanisms related to fracture. This integrity basis is then used to construct a failure function per unit volume (or area) of material. It is assumed that the overall strength of the composite is governed by weakest link theory. This leads to a Weibull type model similar in nature to the principle of independent action (PIA) model for isotropic monolithic ceramics. An experimental program to obtain model parameters is briefly discussed. In addition, qualitative features of the model are illustrated by presenting reliability surfaces for various model parameters.

  18. Phase space distribution for two-gap solution in unitary matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dutta, Parikshit; Dutta, Suvankar

    2016-04-01

    We analyze the dynamics of weakly coupled finite temperature U( N ) gauge theories on S 3 by studying a class of effective unitary matrix model. Solving Dyson-Schwinger equation at large N , we find that different phases of gauge theories are characterized by gaps in eigenvalue distribution over a unit circle. In particular, we obtain no-gap, one-gap and two-gap solutions at large N for a class of matrix model we are considering. The same effective matrix model can equivalently be written as a sum over representations (or Young diagrams) of unitary group. We show that at large N , Young diagrams corresponding to different phases can be classified in terms of discontinuities in number of boxes in two consecutive rows. More precisely, the representation, where there is no discontinuity, corresponds to no-gap and one-gap solution, where as, a diagram with one discontinuity corresponds to two-gap phase, mentioned above. This observation allows us to write a one to one relation between eigenvalue distribution function and Young tableaux distribution function for each saddle point, in particular for two-gap solution. We find that all the saddle points can be described in terms of free fermions with a phase space distribution for no-gap, one-gap and two-gap phases.

  19. Special geometry of local Calabi-Yau manifolds and superpotentials from holomorphic matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilal, Adel; Metzger, Steffen

    2005-08-01

    We analyse the (rigid) special geometry of a class of local Calabi-Yau manifolds given by hypersurfaces in Bbb C4 as W'(x)2+f0(x)+v2+w2+z2 = 0, that arise in the study of the large-N duals of four-dimensional Script N = 1 supersymmetric SU(N) Yang-Mills theories with adjoint field Φ and superpotential W(Φ). The special geometry relations are deduced from the planar limit of the corresponding holomorphic matrix model. The set of cycles is split into a bulk sector, for which we obtain the standard rigid special geometry relations, and a set of relative cycles, that come from the non-compactness of the manifold, for which we find cut-off dependent corrections to the usual special geometry relations. The (cut-off independent) prepotential is identified with the free energy of the holomorphic matrix model in the planar limit. On the way, we clarify various subtleties pertaining to the saddle point approximation of the holomorphic matrix model. A formula for the superpotential of IIB string theory with background fluxes on these local Calabi-Yau manifolds is proposed that is based on pairings similar to the ones of relative cohomology.

  20. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    PubMed Central

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-01-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs. PMID:26354724

  1. MATRIX-VBS Condensing Organic Aerosols in an Aerosol Microphysics Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Chloe Y.; Tsigaridis, Konstas; Bauer, Susanne E.

    2015-01-01

    The condensation of organic aerosols is represented in a newly developed box-model scheme, where its effect on the growth and composition of particles are examined. We implemented the volatility-basis set (VBS) framework into the aerosol mixing state resolving microphysical scheme Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state (MATRIX). This new scheme is unique and advances the representation of organic aerosols in models in that, contrary to the traditional treatment of organic aerosols as non-volatile in most climate models and in the original version of MATRIX, this new scheme treats them as semi-volatile. Such treatment is important because low-volatility organics contribute significantly to the growth of particles. The new scheme includes several classes of semi-volatile organic compounds from the VBS framework that can partition among aerosol populations in MATRIX, thus representing the growth of particles via condensation of low volatility organic vapors. Results from test cases representing Mexico City and a Finish forrest condistions show good representation of the time evolutions of concentration for VBS species in the gas phase and in the condensed particulate phase. Emitted semi-volatile primary organic aerosols evaporate almost completely in the high volatile range, and they condense more efficiently in the low volatility range.

  2. Fast and accurate computation of system matrix for area integral model-based algebraic reconstruction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Shunli; Zhang, Dinghua; Gong, Hao; Ghasemalizadeh, Omid; Wang, Ge; Cao, Guohua

    2014-11-01

    Iterative algorithms, such as the algebraic reconstruction technique (ART), are popular for image reconstruction. For iterative reconstruction, the area integral model (AIM) is more accurate for better reconstruction quality than the line integral model (LIM). However, the computation of the system matrix for AIM is more complex and time-consuming than that for LIM. Here, we propose a fast and accurate method to compute the system matrix for AIM. First, we calculate the intersection of each boundary line of a narrow fan-beam with pixels in a recursive and efficient manner. Then, by grouping the beam-pixel intersection area into six types according to the slopes of the two boundary lines, we analytically compute the intersection area of the narrow fan-beam with the pixels in a simple algebraic fashion. Overall, experimental results show that our method is about three times faster than the Siddon algorithm and about two times faster than the distance-driven model (DDM) in computation of the system matrix. The reconstruction speed of our AIM-based ART is also faster than the LIM-based ART that uses the Siddon algorithm and DDM-based ART, for one iteration. The fast reconstruction speed of our method was accomplished without compromising the image quality.

  3. Modeling of wave propagation in drill strings using vibration transfer matrix methods.

    PubMed

    Han, Je-Heon; Kim, Yong-Joe; Karkoub, Mansour

    2013-09-01

    In order to understand critical vibration of a drill bit such as stick-slip and bit-bounce and their wave propagation characteristics through a drill string system, it is critical to model the torsional, longitudinal, and flexural waves generated by the drill bit vibration. Here, a modeling method based on a vibration transfer matrix between two sets of structural wave variables at the ends of a constant cross-sectional, hollow, circular pipe is proposed. For a drill string system with multiple pipe sections, the total vibration transfer matrix is calculated by multiplying all individual matrices, each is obtained for an individual pipe section. Since drill string systems are typically extremely long, conventional numerical analysis methods such as a finite element method (FEM) require a large number of meshes, which makes it computationally inefficient to analyze these drill string systems numerically. The proposed "analytical" vibration transfer matrix method requires significantly low computational resources. For the validation of the proposed method, experimental and numerical data are obtained from laboratory experiments and FEM analyses conducted by using a commercial FEM package, ANSYS. It is shown that the modeling results obtained by using the proposed method are well matched with the experimental and numerical results. PMID:23967925

  4. An improved tensile deformation model for in-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. H.; Qiao, J. W.; Jiao, Z. M.; Wang, Z. H.; Yang, H. J.; Xu, B. S.

    2015-09-01

    With regard to previous tensile deformation models simulating the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite-reinforced metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) [Qiao et al., Acta Mater. 59 (2011) 4126; Sci. Rep. 3 (2013) 2816], some parameters, such as yielding strength of the dendrites and glass matrix, and the strain-hardening exponent of the dendrites, are estimated based on literatures. Here, Ti48Zr18V12Cu5Be17 MGMCs are investigated in order to improve the tensile deformation model and reveal the tensile deformation mechanisms. The tensile behavior of dendrites is obtained experimentally combining nano-indentation measurements and finite-element-method analysis for the first time, and those of the glass matrix and composites are obtained by tension. Besides, the tensile behavior of the MGMCs is divided into four stages: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (work-hardening), and (4) plastic-plastic (softening). The respective constitutive relationships at different deformation stages are quantified. The calculated results coincide well with the experimental results. Thus, the improved model can be applied to clarify and predict the tensile behavior of the MGMCs.

  5. Optimal Substrate Preheating Model for Thermal Spray Deposition of Thermosets onto Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ivosevic, M.; Knight, R.; Kalidindi, S. R.; Palmese, G. R.; Tsurikov, A.; Sutter, J. K.

    2003-01-01

    High velocity oxy-fuel (HVOF) sprayed, functionally graded polyimide/WC-Co composite coatings on polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are being investigated for applications in turbine engine technologies. This requires that the polyimide, used as the matrix material, be fully crosslinked during deposition in order to maximize its engineering properties. The rapid heating and cooling nature of the HVOF spray process and the high heat flux through the coating into the substrate typically do not allow sufficient time at temperature for curing of the thermoset. It was hypothesized that external substrate preheating might enhance the deposition behavior and curing reaction during the thermal spraying of polyimide thermosets. A simple analytical process model for the deposition of thermosetting polyimide onto polymer matrix composites by HVOF thermal spray technology has been developed. The model incorporates various heat transfer mechanisms and enables surface temperature profiles of the coating to be simulated, primarily as a function of substrate preheating temperature. Four cases were modeled: (i) no substrate preheating; (ii) substrates electrically preheated from the rear; (iii) substrates preheated by hot air from the front face; and (iv) substrates electrically preheated from the rear and by hot air from the front.

  6. Modeling of wave propagation in drill strings using vibration transfer matrix methods.

    PubMed

    Han, Je-Heon; Kim, Yong-Joe; Karkoub, Mansour

    2013-09-01

    In order to understand critical vibration of a drill bit such as stick-slip and bit-bounce and their wave propagation characteristics through a drill string system, it is critical to model the torsional, longitudinal, and flexural waves generated by the drill bit vibration. Here, a modeling method based on a vibration transfer matrix between two sets of structural wave variables at the ends of a constant cross-sectional, hollow, circular pipe is proposed. For a drill string system with multiple pipe sections, the total vibration transfer matrix is calculated by multiplying all individual matrices, each is obtained for an individual pipe section. Since drill string systems are typically extremely long, conventional numerical analysis methods such as a finite element method (FEM) require a large number of meshes, which makes it computationally inefficient to analyze these drill string systems numerically. The proposed "analytical" vibration transfer matrix method requires significantly low computational resources. For the validation of the proposed method, experimental and numerical data are obtained from laboratory experiments and FEM analyses conducted by using a commercial FEM package, ANSYS. It is shown that the modeling results obtained by using the proposed method are well matched with the experimental and numerical results.

  7. A density-matrix model of photosynthetic electron transfer with microscopically estimated vibrational relaxation times

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parson, William W.; Warshel, Arieh

    2004-01-01

    The dispersed-polaron (spin-boson) model is reviewed briefly and then used to develop a density-matrix model for studies of electron transfer in condensed phases. The frequencies and Franck-Condon factors for solvent vibrational modes that are coupled to electron transfer are obtained from molecular dynamics (MD) simulations by the dispersed-polaron treatment. Microscopic rate constants for vibrational relaxations, dephasing and coherence transfer between the solvent modes are obtained by fitting the time dependence of the solvent coordinates in the density-matrix treatment to the corresponding time dependence obtained from molecular-dynamics simulations with a classical linear-response approximation. This is done by adjusting a single parameter, the time constant for thermal equilibration of the two lowest levels of a solvent mode ( T10). The model thus focuses on the coupling between solvent modes, rather than on the more widely studied coupling of solute modes by the thermal bath. The resulting density-matrix model is used to examine vibronic coupling in the initial electron-transfer step in photosynthetic bacterial reaction centers. Values of T10 in the range of 1-2 ps are consistent with molecular-dynamics simulations of the time-dependent energy gap between the reactant and product states (P* and P +B -), and also with the damping of coherent vibrational motions that are seen experimentally after excitation of reaction centers with a short pulse of light. In both the density-matrix model and the MD simulations, the autocorrelation function of the energy gap also has a decay component with a time constant of about 50 fs, which we ascribe to the group dephasing of oscillatory motions at many different frequencies. This component is insensitive to vibrational relaxations and is largely irrelevant to the electron-transfer dynamics. Using values of T10 in the range of 1-2 ps, a model with five vibrational modes reproduces the main features of electron transfer

  8. Analytical Modeling of the High Strain Rate Deformation of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Roberts, Gary D.; Gilat, Amos

    2003-01-01

    The results presented here are part of an ongoing research program to develop strain rate dependent deformation and failure models for the analysis of polymer matrix composites subject to high strain rate impact loads. State variable constitutive equations originally developed for metals have been modified in order to model the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymeric matrix materials. To account for the effects of hydrostatic stresses, which are significant in polymers, the classical 5 plasticity theory definitions of effective stress and effective plastic strain are modified by applying variations of the Drucker-Prager yield criterion. To verify the revised formulation, the shear and tensile deformation of a representative toughened epoxy is analyzed across a wide range of strain rates (from quasi-static to high strain rates) and the results are compared to experimentally obtained values. For the analyzed polymers, both the tensile and shear stress-strain curves computed using the analytical model correlate well with values obtained through experimental tests. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented within a strength of materials based micromechanics method to predict the nonlinear, strain rate dependent deformation of polymer matrix composites. In the micromechanics, the unit cell is divided up into a number of independently analyzed slices, and laminate theory is then applied to obtain the effective deformation of the unit cell. The composite mechanics are verified by analyzing the deformation of a representative polymer matrix composite (composed using the representative polymer analyzed for the correlation of the polymer constitutive equations) for several fiber orientation angles across a variety of strain rates. The computed values compare favorably to experimentally obtained results.

  9. Development of Source-Receptor matrix over South Korea in support of GAINS-Korea model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, K. C.; Woo, J. H.; Kim, H. K.; Lee, Y. M.; Kim, Y.; Heyes, C.; Lee, J. B.; Song, C. K.; Han, J.

    2014-12-01

    A comprehensive and combined analysis of air pollution and climate change could reveal important synergies of emission control measures, which could be of high policy relevance. IIASA's GAINS model (The Greenhouse gas - Air pollution Interactions and Synergies) has been developed as a tool to identify emission control strategies that achieve given targets on air quality and greenhouse gas emissions at least costs. The GAINS-Korea Model, which is being jointly developed by Konkuk University and IIASA, should play an important role in understanding the impact of air quality improvements across the regions in Korea. Source-Receptor relationships (S-R) is an useful methodology in air pollution studies to determine the areas of origin of chemical compounds at receptor point, and thus be able to target actions to reduce pollutions. The GAINS model can assess the impact of emission reductions of sources on air quality in receptor regions based on S-R matrix, derived from chemical transport model. In order to develop S-R matrix for GAINS-Korea, the CAMx model with PSAT/OSAT tools was applied in this study. The coarse domain covers East Asia, and a nesting domain as main research area was used for Korea peninsula. To evaluate of S-R relationships, a modeling domain is divided into sixteen regions over South Korea with three outside of S. Korea countries (China, N. Korea and Japan) for estimating transboundary contributions. The results of our analysis will be presented at the conference.

  10. New non-equilibrium matrix imbibition equation for double porosity model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konyukhov, Andrey; Pankratov, Leonid

    2016-07-01

    The paper deals with the global Kondaurov double porosity model describing a non-equilibrium two-phase immiscible flow in fractured-porous reservoirs when non-equilibrium phenomena occur in the matrix blocks, only. In a mathematically rigorous way, we show that the homogenized model can be represented by usual equations of two-phase incompressible immiscible flow, except for the addition of two source terms calculated by a solution to a local problem being a boundary value problem for a non-equilibrium imbibition equation given in terms of the real saturation and a non-equilibrium parameter.

  11. The monodromy matrix in the F-basis for arbitrary six-vertex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, M. J.; Zuparic, M.

    2011-10-01

    We present the expressions for the monodromy matrix elements of the six-vertex model in the F-basis for arbitrary Boltzmann weights. The results rely solely on the property of unitarity and Yang-Baxter relations, avoiding any specific parameterization of the weights. This allows us to write complete algebraic expressions for the inner products and the underlying domain wall partition functions in the case of arbitrary rapidities. We then apply our results for the trigonometric six-vertex model in the presence of inhomogeneous electric fields and obtain a determinant formula for the respective on-shell scalar products.

  12. U{sub A}(1) breaking and phase transition in chiral random matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Sano, T.; Fujii, H.; Ohtani, M.

    2009-08-01

    We propose a chiral random matrix model which properly incorporates the flavor-number dependence of the phase transition owing to the U{sub A}(1) anomaly term. At finite temperature, the model shows the second-order phase transition with mean-field critical exponents for two massless flavors, while in the case of three massless flavors the transition turns out to be of the first order. The topological susceptibility satisfies the anomalous U{sub A}(1) Ward identity and decreases gradually with the temperature increased.

  13. Extrapolation methods for obtaining low-lying eigenvalues of a large-dimensional shell model Hamiltonian matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshinaga, N.; Arima, A.

    2010-04-15

    We propose some new, efficient, and practical extrapolation methods to obtain a few low-lying eigenenergies of a large-dimensional Hamiltonian matrix in the nuclear shell model. We obtain those energies at the desired accuracy by extrapolation after diagonalizing small-dimensional submatrices of the sorted Hamiltonian matrix.

  14. Creep of Refractory Fibers and Modeling of Metal and Ceramic Matrix Composite Creep Behavior

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tewari, S.N.

    1995-01-01

    Our concentration during this research was on the following subprograms. (1) Ultra high vacuum creep tests on 218, ST300 and WHfC tungsten and MoHfC molybdenum alloy wires, temperature range from 1100 K to 1500 K, creep time of 1 to 500 hours. (2) High temperature vacuum tensile tests on 218, ST300 and WHfC tungsten and MoHfC molybdenum alloy wires. (3) Air and vacuum tensile creep tests on polycrystalline and single crystal alumina fibers, such as alumina-mullite Nextel fiber, yttrium aluminum ganet (YAG) and Saphikon, temperature range from 1150 K to 1470 K, creep time of 2 to 200 hours. (4) Microstructural evaluation of crept fibers, TEM study on the crept metal wires, SEM study on the fracture surface of ceramic fibers. (5) Metal Matrix Composite creep models, based on the fiber creep properties and fiber-matrix interface zone formation.

  15. Constitutive Modeling and Testing of Polymer Matrix Composites Incorporating Physical Aging at Elevated Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veazie, David R.

    1998-01-01

    Advanced polymer matrix composites (PMC's) are desirable for structural materials in diverse applications such as aircraft, civil infrastructure and biomedical implants because of their improved strength-to-weight and stiffness-to-weight ratios. For example, the next generation military and commercial aircraft requires applications for high strength, low weight structural components subjected to elevated temperatures. A possible disadvantage of polymer-based composites is that the physical and mechanical properties of the matrix often change significantly over time due to the exposure of elevated temperatures and environmental factors. For design, long term exposure (i.e. aging) of PMC's must be accounted for through constitutive models in order to accurately assess the effects of aging on performance, crack initiation and remaining life. One particular aspect of this aging process, physical aging, is considered in this research.

  16. Modeling limit languages via limit adjacency matrix and Yusof-Goode approaches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Wen Li, Yusof, Yuhani

    2015-05-01

    Limit language was introduced by Goode and Pixton in 2004 under the framework of formal language theory. It is a subset of splicing languages which is restricted to the molecules that will be presented in the splicing system after the reaction of biochemical has run to its completion. In this paper, limit adjacency matrix will be introduced to model the existence of limit languages from splicing languages. Besides, it can be used to characterize the splicing language in terms of active persistent, adult/inert and transient properties based on Yusof-Goode splicing system. In this paper, some examples and theorems that have been formulated via limit adjacency matrix approach will be presented too.

  17. Tissue performance of bladder following stretched electrospun silk fibroin matrix and bladder acellular matrix implantation in a rabbit model.

    PubMed

    Huang, Jian-Wen; Xu, Yue-Min; Li, Zhao-Bo; Murphy, Sean V; Zhao, Weixin; Liu, Qiang-Qiang; Zhu, Wei-Dong; Fu, Qiang; Zhang, Yao-Peng; Song, Lu-Jie

    2016-01-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the tissue performance of bladder following stretched electrospun silk fibroin matrix (SESFM) implantation compared with bladder acellular matrix (BAM). We compared SESFM with BAM based on porosity and pore size. Scaffolds were separately transplanted into opposite walls of the bladder of 30 rabbits after stripping the bladder mucosa and smooth muscle (1.5 × 2.0 cm(2)). Gross anatomical observation, histological analysis and muscle contractility studies were performed at 2, 4, and 8 weeks post-op. SESFM has higher porosity and larger pore size compared with BAM (p < 0.05). At 2 weeks, the presence of vesical calculus was evident in 7/10 rabbits. Histological analysis showed that SESFM and BAM promoted similar degree of urothelium regeneration (p > 0.05). However, SESFM promoted a higher degree of smooth muscle and vessel regeneration compared to BAM (p < 0.05). In addition, muscle strips supported by SESFM displayed higher contractile responses to carbachol, KCl, and phenylephrine compared with BAM. At 8 weeks, both matrices elicited similar mild acute and chronic inflammatory reactions. Our results demonstrated that SESFM has greater ability to promote bladder tissue regeneration with structural and functional properties compared to BAM, and with similar biocompatibility. PMID:26148477

  18. a Structural Flexibility Transformation Matrix for Modelling Open-Kinematic Chains with Revolute and Prismatic Joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chalhoub, N. G.; Chen, L.

    1998-11-01

    A general approach to systematically derive the equations of motion of flexible open-kinematic chains is presented in this paper. The methodology exploits the serial characteristics of the kinematic chain by complementing the 4×4 Denavit-Hartenberg transformation matrix with a 4×4 structural flexibility matrix. The latter is defined based on a floating coordinate system which rendered the formulation applicable to both prismatic and revolute joints. The versatility of the approach is demonstrated through its implementation to formulate forward kinematic problems of manipulators with revolute and prismatic joints. Moreover, the proposed flexibility matrix is used in the development of a dynamic model for a compliant spherical robotic manipulator. This task has a dual purpose. First, it demonstrates how the flexibility matrix can be implemented in a systematic approach for deriving the equations of motion of an open-kinematic chain that account for the axial geometric shortening, the torsional vibration, and the in-plane and out-of-plane transverse deformations of the compliant member. Second, the inclusion of the torsional vibration in the equation of motion serves to broaden the scope of previous research work done on modelling open-kinematic chains. The formulation can now address dynamic problems that are not limited to the positioning but are also concerned with the orientation of rigid body payloads as they are being manipulated by robotic manipulators. The digital simulation results exhibit the interaction between the torsional vibration and the rigid body motion of the arm. Furthermore, they demonstrate a strong coupling effect between the torsional vibration and the transverse deformations of the arm whenever the payload is not grasped at its mass center by the gripper.

  19. An inner-outer nonlinear programming approach for constrained quadratic matrix model updating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andretta, M.; Birgin, E. G.; Raydan, M.

    2016-01-01

    The Quadratic Finite Element Model Updating Problem (QFEMUP) concerns with updating a symmetric second-order finite element model so that it remains symmetric and the updated model reproduces a given set of desired eigenvalues and eigenvectors by replacing the corresponding ones from the original model. Taking advantage of the special structure of the constraint set, it is first shown that the QFEMUP can be formulated as a suitable constrained nonlinear programming problem. Using this formulation, a method based on successive optimizations is then proposed and analyzed. To avoid that spurious modes (eigenvectors) appear in the frequency range of interest (eigenvalues) after the model has been updated, additional constraints based on a quadratic Rayleigh quotient are dynamically included in the constraint set. A distinct practical feature of the proposed method is that it can be implemented by computing only a few eigenvalues and eigenvectors of the associated quadratic matrix pencil.

  20. Density matrix renormalization group study of triangular Kitaev-Heisenberg model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sota, Shigetoshi; Sjinjo, Kazuya; Shirakawa, Tomonori; Tohyama, Takami; Yunoki, Seiji

    2015-03-01

    Topological insulator has been one of the most active subjects in the current condensed matter physics. For most of topological insulators electron correlations are considered to be not essential. However, in the case where electron correlations are strong, novel phases such as a spin liquid phase can emerge in competition with a spin-orbit coupling. Here, using the density matrix renormalization group method, we investigate magnetic phase of a triangular Kitaev-Heisenberg (quantum compass) model that contains a spin-orbital interaction and spin frustration in the antiferromagnetic region. The triangular Kitaev-Heisenberg model is regarded as a dual model of the honeycomb Kitaev-Heisenberg model that is usually employed to discuss A2CuO3 (A=Na, K). Systematically calculating ground state energy, entanglement entropy, entanglement spectrum, and spin-spin correlation functions, we discuss the duality between the triangular and the honeycomb Kitaev-Heisenberg model as well as the ground state magnetic phases.

  1. A Micromechanical Constitutive Model of Progressive Crushing in Random Carbon Fiber Polymer Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, H.K.; Simunovic, S.

    1999-09-01

    A micromechanical damage constitutive model is presented to predict the overall elastoplastic behavior and damage evolution in random carbon fiber polymer matrix composites (RFPCs).To estimate the overall elastoplastic damage responses,an effective yield criterion is derived based on the ensemble-volume averaging process and first-order effects of eigenstrains due to the existence of spheroidal (prolate) fibers.The proposed effective yield criterion,to ether with the assumed overall associative plastic flow rule and hardening law, constitutes the analytical foundation for the estimation of effective elastoplastic behavior of ductile matrix composites.First,an effective elastoplastic constitutive dama e model for aligned fiber-reinforced composites is proposed.A micromechanical damage constitutive model for RFPCs is then developed.The average process over all orientations upon overning constitutive field equations and overall yield function for aligned fiber-reinforced composites i s performed to obtain the constitutive relations and effective yield function of RFPCs.The discrete numerical integration algorithms and the continuum tan ent operator are also presented to implement the proposed dama e constitutive model.The dama e constitutive model forms the basis for the pro ressive crushing in composite structures under impact loading.

  2. Black holes as random particles: entanglement dynamics in infinite range and matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magán, Javier M.

    2016-08-01

    We first propose and study a quantum toy model of black hole dynamics. The model is unitary, displays quantum thermalization, and the Hamiltonian couples every oscillator with every other, a feature intended to emulate the color sector physics of large- {N} matrix models. Considering out of equilibrium initial states, we analytically compute the time evolution of every correlator of the theory and of the entanglement entropies, allowing a proper discussion of global thermalization/scrambling of information through the entire system. Microscopic non-locality causes factorization of reduced density matrices, and entanglement just depends on the time evolution of occupation densities. In the second part of the article, we show how the gained intuition extends to large- {N} matrix models, where we provide a gauge invariant entanglement entropy for `generalized free fields', again depending solely on the quasinormal frequencies. The results challenge the fast scrambling conjecture and point to a natural scenario for the emergence of the so-called brick wall or stretched horizon. Finally, peculiarities of these models in regards to the thermodynamic limit and the information paradox are highlighted.

  3. Modeling the Effect of Interface Wear on Fatigue Hysteresis Behavior of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of interface wear on fatigue hysteresis behavior in carbon fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs). The damage mechanisms, i.e., matrix multicracking, fiber/matrix interface debonding and interface wear, fibers fracture, slip and pull-out, have been considered. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. Upon first loading to fatigue peak stress and subsequent cyclic loading, the fibers failure probabilities and fracture locations were determined by combining the interface wear model and fiber statistical failure model based on the assumption that the loads carried by broken and intact fibers satisfy the global load sharing criterion. The effects of matrix properties, i.e., matrix cracking characteristic strength and matrix Weibull modulus, interface properties, i.e., interface shear stress and interface debonded energy, fiber properties, i.e., fiber Weibull modulus and fiber characteristic strength, and cycle number on fibers failure, hysteresis loops and interface slip, have been investigated. The hysteresis loops under fatigue loading from the present analytical method were in good agreement with experimental data.

  4. $$B^0_{(s)}$$-mixing matrix elements from lattice QCD for the Standard Model and beyond

    DOE PAGES

    Bazavov, A.; Bernard, C.; Bouchard, C. M.; Chang, C. C.; DeTar, C.; Du, Daping; El-Khadra, A. X.; Freeland, E. D.; Gamiz, E.; Gottlieb, Steven; et al

    2016-06-28

    We calculate—for the first time in three-flavor lattice QCD—the hadronic matrix elements of all five local operators that contribute to neutral B0- and Bs-meson mixing in and beyond the Standard Model. We present a complete error budget for each matrix element and also provide the full set of correlations among the matrix elements. We also present the corresponding bag parameters and their correlations, as well as specific combinations of the mixing matrix elements that enter the expression for the neutral B-meson width difference. We obtain the most precise determination to date of the SU(3)-breaking ratio ξ=1.206(18)(6), where the second errormore » stems from the omission of charm-sea quarks, while the first encompasses all other uncertainties. The threefold reduction in total uncertainty, relative to the 2013 Flavor Lattice Averaging Group results, tightens the constraint from B mixing on the Cabibbo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) unitarity triangle. Our calculation employs gauge-field ensembles generated by the MILC Collaboration with four lattice spacings and pion masses close to the physical value. We use the asqtad-improved staggered action for the light-valence quarks and the Fermilab method for the bottom quark. We use heavy-light meson chiral perturbation theory modified to include lattice-spacing effects to extrapolate the five matrix elements to the physical point. We combine our results with experimental measurements of the neutral B-meson oscillation frequencies to determine the CKM matrix elements |Vtd| = 8.00(34)(8)×10-3, |Vts| = 39.0(1.2)(0.4)×10-3, and |Vtd/Vts| = 0.2052(31)(10), which differ from CKM-unitarity expectations by about 2σ. In addition, these results and others from flavor-changing-neutral currents point towards an emerging tension between weak processes that are mediated at the loop and tree levels.« less

  5. Evaluation of Solid Modeling Software for Finite Element Analysis of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Noel N.; Mital, Subodh; Lang, Jerry

    2010-01-01

    Three computer programs, used for the purpose of generating 3-D finite element models of the Repeating Unit Cell (RUC) of a textile, were examined for suitability to model woven Ceramic Matrix Composites (CMCs). The programs evaluated were the open-source available TexGen, the commercially available WiseTex, and the proprietary Composite Material Evaluator (COMATE). A five-harness-satin (5HS) weave for a melt-infiltrated (MI) silicon carbide matrix and silicon carbide fiber was selected as an example problem and the programs were tested for their ability to generate a finite element model of the RUC. The programs were also evaluated for ease-of-use and capability, particularly for the capability to introduce various defect types such as porosity, ply shifting, and nesting of a laminate. Overall, it was found that TexGen and WiseTex were useful for generating solid models of the tow geometry; however, there was a lack of consistency in generating well-conditioned finite element meshes of the tows and matrix. TexGen and WiseTex were both capable of allowing collective and individual shifting of tows within a ply and WiseTex also had a ply nesting capability. TexGen and WiseTex were sufficiently userfriendly and both included a Graphical User Interface (GUI). COMATE was satisfactory in generating a 5HS finite element mesh of an idealized weave geometry but COMATE lacked a GUI and was limited to only 5HS and 8HS weaves compared to the larger amount of weave selections available with TexGen and WiseTex.

  6. Longitudinal Measurement of Extracellular Matrix Rigidity in 3D Tumor Models Using Particle-tracking Microrheology

    PubMed Central

    El-Hamidi, Hamid; Celli, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    The mechanical microenvironment has been shown to act as a crucial regulator of tumor growth behavior and signaling, which is itself remodeled and modified as part of a set of complex, two-way mechanosensitive interactions. While the development of biologically-relevant 3D tumor models have facilitated mechanistic studies on the impact of matrix rheology on tumor growth, the inverse problem of mapping changes in the mechanical environment induced by tumors remains challenging. Here, we describe the implementation of particle-tracking microrheology (PTM) in conjunction with 3D models of pancreatic cancer as part of a robust and viable approach for longitudinally monitoring physical changes in the tumor microenvironment, in situ. The methodology described here integrates a system of preparing in vitro 3D models embedded in a model extracellular matrix (ECM) scaffold of Type I collagen with fluorescently labeled probes uniformly distributed for position- and time-dependent microrheology measurements throughout the specimen. In vitro tumors are plated and probed in parallel conditions using multiwell imaging plates. Drawing on established methods, videos of tracer probe movements are transformed via the Generalized Stokes Einstein Relation (GSER) to report the complex frequency-dependent viscoelastic shear modulus, G*(ω). Because this approach is imaging-based, mechanical characterization is also mapped onto large transmitted-light spatial fields to simultaneously report qualitative changes in 3D tumor size and phenotype. Representative results showing contrasting mechanical response in sub-regions associated with localized invasion-induced matrix degradation as well as system calibration, validation data are presented. Undesirable outcomes from common experimental errors and troubleshooting of these issues are also presented. The 96-well 3D culture plating format implemented in this protocol is conducive to correlation of microrheology measurements with therapeutic

  7. Asymptotic Expansion of β Matrix Models in the One-cut Regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borot, G.; Guionnet, A.

    2013-01-01

    We prove the existence of a 1/ N expansion to all orders in β matrix models with a confining, offcritical potential corresponding to an equilibrium measure with a connected support. Thus, the coefficients of the expansion can be obtained recursively by the "topological recursion" derived in Chekhov and Eynard (JHEP 0612:026, 2006). Our method relies on the combination of a priori bounds on the correlators and the study of Schwinger-Dyson equations, thanks to the uses of classical complex analysis techniques. These a priori bounds can be derived following (Boutet de Monvel et al. in J Stat Phys 79(3-4):585-611, 1995; Johansson in Duke Math J 91(1):151-204, 1998; Kriecherbauer and Shcherbina in Fluctuations of eigenvalues of matrix models and their applications, 2010) or for strictly convex potentials by using concentration of measure (Anderson et al. in An introduction to random matrices, Sect. 2.3, Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, 2010). Doing so, we extend the strategy of Guionnet and Maurel-Segala (Ann Probab 35:2160-2212, 2007), from the hermitian models ( β = 2) and perturbative potentials, to general β models. The existence of the first correction in 1/ N was considered in Johansson (1998) and more recently in Kriecherbauer and Shcherbina (2010). Here, by taking similar hypotheses, we extend the result to all orders in 1/ N.

  8. Study of extracellular matrix in vocal fold biomechanics using a two-phase model.

    PubMed

    Miri, Amir K; Li, Nicole Y K; Avazmohammadi, Reza; Thibeault, Susan L; Mongrain, Rosaire; Mongeau, Luc

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the vocal fold tissue consists primarily of fibrous and interstitial proteins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of selective enzymatic digestion of two ECM proteins, namely elastin and versican, on the elasticity of rabbit vocal fold tissue. Quasi-static, sinusoidal, uniaxial tensile tests were performed. The data were analyzed within the framework of a model of the ECM as a two-phase composite material consisting of collagen fibrils as the reinforcing fibers and noncollagenous ECM proteins as the matrix. To validate the two-phase model, the regression parameters for the fibers' volume fraction and shear modulus in a different animal model were compared with corresponding published data. The proposed model was then used to analyze rabbit vocal fold tissues. The mean value and the standard deviation of the fiber volume fraction were found to be 8.49 ± 3.75 % for the control samples (n = 4), 0.59 ± 1.13 % after elastin removal (n = 4), and 8.22 ± 1.06 % after versican removal (n = 4). The results suggest that elastin removal may lead to a reduction in tissue stiffness, through counteracting the reinforcement of collagen fibrils. PMID:24792897

  9. Study of extracellular matrix in vocal fold biomechanics using a two-phase model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nicole Y. K.; Avazmohammadi, Reza; Thibeault, Susan L.; Mongrain, Rosaire; Mongeau, Luc

    2014-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of the vocal fold tissue consists primarily of fibrous and interstitial proteins. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of selective enzymatic digestion of two ECM proteins, namely elastin and versican, on the elasticity of rabbit vocal fold tissue. Quasi-static, sinusoidal, uniaxial tensile tests were performed. The data were analyzed within the framework of a model of the ECM as a two-phase composite material consisting of collagen fibrils as the reinforcing fibers and noncollagenous ECM proteins as the matrix. To validate the two-phase model, the regression parameters for the fibers’ volume fraction and shear modulus in a different animal model were compared with corresponding published data. The proposed model was then used to analyze rabbit vocal fold tissues. The mean value and the standard deviation of the fiber volume fraction were found to be 8.49 ±3.75% for the control samples (n =4), 0.59 ±1.13 % after elastin removal (n =4), and 8.22 ±1.06% after versican removal (n =4). The results suggest that elastin removal may lead to a reduction in tissue stiffness, through counteracting the reinforcement of collagen fibrils. PMID:24792897

  10. Enamel matrix derivative for replanted teeth in animal models: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Ryu, Steven I.

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To investigate the effect of enamel matrix derivative (EMD) on periodontal healing of replanted teeth in animal models. Materials and Methods The authors searched MEDLINE, PubMed, EMBASE, Cochrane Library, Web of Knowledge and Scopus for articles published up to Oct 2012. Animal studies in which EMD was applied in transplanted or replanted teeth with adequate controls and histological data were considered. Normal periodontal healing or root resorption determined by histology after EMD was applied in replanted teeth with adequate controls was used as outcome measures. The following search strategy was used: ('Emdogain' OR 'enamel matrix proteins' OR 'enamel matrix derivative') AND ('avulsion' OR 'transplantion' OR 'autotransplantation' OR 'replantation'). Results Six animal studies were included in the final review. There was great heterogeneity in study design among included studies. Two studies with similar study designs were identified and analyzed by a meta-analysis. The pooled estimates showed a significantly higher normal healing and surface resorption and significantly less inflammatory and replacement resorption in EMD-treated groups compared with non-EMD-treated groups. Conclusions With the limitations of this systematic review, the use of EMD led to greater normal periodontal healing and surface root resorption and less inflammatory and replacement root resorption in the presence of periodontal ligaments. However, no definite conclusion could be drawn with regard to the effect of EMD on periodontal healing and root resorption when no periodontal ligaments exist. PMID:24303353

  11. Application of Transfer Matrix Approach to Modeling and Decentralized Control of Lattice-Based Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, Nick; Swei, Sean Shan-Min; Cheung, Kenny; Teodorescu, Mircea

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a modeling and control of aerostructure developed by lattice-based cellular materials/components. The proposed aerostructure concept leverages a building block strategy for lattice-based components which provide great adaptability to varying ight scenarios, the needs of which are essential for in- ight wing shaping control. A decentralized structural control design is proposed that utilizes discrete-time lumped mass transfer matrix method (DT-LM-TMM). The objective is to develop an e ective reduced order model through DT-LM-TMM that can be used to design a decentralized controller for the structural control of a wing. The proposed approach developed in this paper shows that, as far as the performance of overall structural system is concerned, the reduced order model can be as e ective as the full order model in designing an optimal stabilizing controller.

  12. Mathematical model to predict regions of chromatin attachment to the nuclear matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Singh, G B; Kramer, J A; Krawetz, S A

    1997-01-01

    The potentiation and subsequent initiation of transcription are complex biological phenomena. The region of attachment of the chromatin fiber to the nuclear matrix, known as the matrix attachment region or scaffold attachment region (MAR or SAR), are thought to be requisite for the transcriptional regulation of the eukaryotic genome. As expressed sequences should be contained in these regions, it becomes significant to answer the following question: can these regions be identified from the primary sequence data alone and subsequently used as markers for expressed sequences? This paper represents an effort toward achieving this goal and describes a mathematical model for the detection of MARs. The location of matrix associated regions has been linked to a variety of sequence patterns. Consequently, a list of these patterns is compiled and represented as a set of decision rules using an AND-OR formulation. The DNA sequence was then searched for the presence of these patterns and a statistical significance was associated with the frequency of occurrence of the various patterns. Subsequently, a mathematical potential value,MAR-Potential, was assigned to a sequence region as the inverse proportion to the probability that the observed pattern population occurred at random. Such a MAR detection process was applied to the analysis of a variety of known MAR containing sequences. Regions of matrix association predicted by the software essentially correspond to those determined experimentally. The human T-cell receptor and the DNA sequence from the Drosophila bithorax region were also analyzed. This demonstrates the usefulness of the approach described as a means to direct experimental resources. PMID:9060438

  13. EFFECT OF MODEL-DEPENDENT COVARIANCE MATRIX FOR STUDYING BARYON ACOUSTIC OSCILLATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Labatie, A.; Starck, J. L.

    2012-12-01

    Large-scale structures in the universe are a powerful tool to test cosmological models and constrain cosmological parameters. A particular feature of interest comes from baryon acoustic oscillations (BAOs), which are sound waves traveling in the hot plasma of the early universe that stopped at the recombination time. This feature can be observed as a localized bump in the correlation function at the scale of the sound horizon r{sub s} . As such, it provides a standard ruler and a lot of constraining power in the correlation function analysis of galaxy surveys. Moreover, the detection of BAOs at the expected scale gives strong support to cosmological models. Both of these studies (BAO detection and parameter constraints) rely on a statistical modeling of the measured correlation function {xi}-circumflex. Usually {xi}-circumflex is assumed to be Gaussian, with a mean {xi}{sub {theta}} depending on the cosmological model and a covariance matrix C generally approximated as a constant (i.e., independent of the model). In this article, we study whether a realistic model-dependent C {sub {theta}} changes the results of cosmological parameter constraints compared to the approximation of a constant covariance matrix C. For this purpose, we use a new procedure to generate lognormal realizations of the luminous red galaxy sample of the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 to obtain a model-dependent C {sub {theta}} in a reasonable time. The approximation of C {sub {theta}} as a constant creates small changes in the cosmological parameter constraints on our sample. We quantify this modeling error using a lot of simulations and find that it only has a marginal influence on cosmological parameter constraints for current and next-generation galaxy surveys. It can be approximately taken into account by extending the 1{sigma} intervals by a factor Almost-Equal-To 1.3.

  14. A Bridging Cell Multiscale Methodology to Model the Structural Behaviour of Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacobellis, Vincent

    Composite and nanocomposite materials exhibit behaviour which is inherently multiscale, extending from the atomistic to continuum levels. In composites, damage growth tends to occur at the nano and microstructural scale by means of crack growth and fibre-matrix debonding. Concurrent multiscale modeling provides a means of efficiently solving such localized phenomena, however its use in this application has been limited due to a number of existing issues in the multiscale field. These include the seamless transfer of information between continuum and atomistic domains, the small timesteps required for dynamic simulation, and limited research into concurrent multiscale modeling of amorphous polymeric materials. The objective of this thesis is thus twofold: to formulate a generalized approach to solving a coupled atomistic-to-continuum system that addresses these issues and to extend the application space of concurrent multiscale modeling to damage modeling in composite microstructures. To achieve these objectives, a finite element based multiscale technique termed the Bridging Cell Method (BCM), has been formulated with a focus on crystalline material systems. Case studies are then presented that show the effectiveness of the developed technique with respect to full atomistic simulations. The BCM is also demonstrated for applications of stress around a nanovoid, nanoindentation, and crack growth due to monotonic and cyclic loading. Next, the BCM is extended to modeling amorphous polymeric material systems where an adaptive solver and a two-step iterative solution algorithm are introduced. Finally, the amorphous and crystalline BCM is applied to modeling a polymer-graphite interface. This interface model is used to obtain cohesive zone parameters which are used in a cohesive zone model of fibre-matrix interfacial cracking in a composite microstructure. This allows for an investigation of the temperature dependent damage mechanics from the nano to microscale within

  15. Matrix Models and Eigenvalue Statistics for Truncations of Classical Ensembles of Random Unitary Matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Killip, Rowan; Kozhan, Rostyslav

    2016-05-01

    We consider random non-normal matrices constructed by removing one row and column from samples from Dyson's circular ensembles or samples from the classical compact groups. We develop sparse matrix models whose spectral measures match these ensembles. This allows us to compute the joint law of the eigenvalues, which have a natural interpretation as resonances for open quantum systems or as electrostatic charges located in a dielectric medium. Our methods allow us to consider all values of {β > 0} , not merely {β=1,2,4}.

  16. R-matrix and Potential Model Extrapolations for NACRE Update and Extension Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Arai, Koji; Katsuma, Masahiko; Takahashi, Kohji; Arnould, Marcel; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2006-07-01

    NACRE, the `nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates', has been widely utilized in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Its update and extension programme started within a Konan-Université Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) collaboration. At the present moment, experimental data in refereed journals have been collected, and their theoretical extrapolations are being performed using the R-matrix or potential models. For the 3H(d,n)4He and 2H(p,γ)3He reactions, we present preliminary results that could well reproduce the experimental data.

  17. Optical spectra of hot alkali-metal clusters from the random-matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Akulin, V.M.; Brechignac, C.; Sarfati, A.

    1997-01-01

    We show that the experimentally observed spectra of optical absorption of sodium cluster ions can be explained in the framework of the same random-matrix model, that has been employed earlier [Phys. Rev. Lett. {bold 75}, 220 (1995)] for the ground-state properties of alkali-metal clusters. This approach reveals the effect of cluster symmetry {open_quotes}on average{close_quotes} on the optical-absorption profiles, describes their temperature dependence, and predicts the line shapes of two-photon absorption. {copyright} {ital 1996} {ital The American Physical Society}

  18. Modeling deformation behavior of Cu-Zr-Al bulk metallic glass matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauly, S.; Liu, G.; Wang, G.; Das, J.; Kim, K. B.; Kühn, U.; Kim, D. H.; Eckert, J.

    2009-09-01

    In the present work we prepared an in situ Cu47.5Zr47.5Al5 bulk metallic glass matrix composite derived from the shape memory alloy CuZr. We use a strength model, which considers percolation and a three-microstructural-element body approach, to understand the effect of the crystalline phase on the yield stress and the fracture strain under compressive loading, respectively. The intrinsic work-hardenability due to the martensitic transformation of the crystalline phase causes significant work hardening also of the composite material.

  19. R-matrix and Potential Model Extrapolations for NACRE Update and Extension Project

    SciTech Connect

    Aikawa, Masayuki; Katsuma, Masahiko; Takahashi, Kohji; Arnould, Marcel; Arai, Koji; Utsunomiya, Hiroaki

    2006-07-12

    NACRE, the 'nuclear astrophysics compilation of reaction rates', has been widely utilized in stellar evolution and nucleosynthesis studies. Its update and extension programme started within a Konan-Universite Libre de Bruxelles (ULB) collaboration. At the present moment, experimental data in refereed journals have been collected, and their theoretical extrapolations are being performed using the R-matrix or potential models. For the 3H(d,n)4He and 2H(p,{gamma})3He reactions, we present preliminary results that could well reproduce the experimental data.

  20. Human colonization of the central territory of Argentina: design matrix models and craniometric evidence.

    PubMed

    Fabra, Mariana; Laguens, Andrés G; Demarchi, Darío A

    2007-08-01

    In this study we test several hypotheses about the peopling of the central territory of Argentina, archaeologically known as Sierras Centrales, by testing the association between four alternative models of the peopling of the area and cranial morphological variation through distance and matrix correlation analyses. Our results show that the ancient inhabitants of Sierras Centrales demonstrated close morphological similarities with the Patagonian and Tierra del Fuego populations. Moreover, the correlation and partial correlation analyses suggest that the peopling of the Sierras Centrales most likely took place as a migratory wave proceeding from the present area of Northeastern Argentina, and continued southward to Patagonia and Tierra del Fuego.

  1. The Role of Extracellular Matrix in Glioma Invasion: A Cellular Potts Model Approach

    PubMed Central

    Rubenstein, Brenda M.; Kaufman, Laura J.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a cellular Potts model based on the differential adhesion hypothesis is employed to analyze the relative importance of select cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) contacts in glioma invasion. To perform these simulations, three types of cells and two ECM components are included. The inclusion of explicit ECM with an inhomogeneous fibrous component and a homogeneously dispersed afibrous component allows exploration of the importance of relative energies of cell-cell and cell-ECM contacts in a variety of environments relevant to in vitro and in vivo experimental investigations of glioma invasion. Simulations performed here focus chiefly on reproducing findings of in vitro experiments on glioma spheroids embedded in collagen I gels. For a given range and set ordering of energies associated with key cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions, our model qualitatively reproduces the dispersed glioma invasion patterns found for most glioma cell lines embedded as spheroids in collagen I gels of moderate concentration. In our model, we find that invasion is maximized at intermediate collagen concentrations, as occurs experimentally. This effect is seen more strongly in model gels composed of short collagen fibers than in those composed of long fibers, which retain significant connectivity even at low density. Additional simulations in aligned model matrices further elucidate how matrix structure dictates invasive patterns. Finally, simulations that allow invading cells to both dissolve and deposit ECM components demonstrate how Q-Potts models may be elaborated to allow active cell alteration of their surroundings. The model employed here provides a quantitative framework with which to bound the relative values of cell-cell and cell-ECM interactions and investigate how varying the magnitude and type of these interactions, as well as ECM structure, could potentially curtail glioma invasion. PMID:18835895

  2. Matrix Pseudospectral Method for (Visco)Elastic Tides Modeling of Planetary Bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabranova, Eliska; Hanyk, Ladidslav; Matyska, Ctirad

    2010-05-01

    We deal with the equations and boundary conditions describing deformation and gravitational potential of prestressed spherically symmetric elastic bodies by decomposing governing equations into a series of boundary value problems (BVP) for ordinary differential equations (ODE) of the second order. In contrast to traditional Runge-Kutta integration techniques, highly accurate pseudospectral schemes are employed to directly discretize the BVP on Chebyshev grids and a set of linear algebraic equations with an almost block diagonal matrix is derived. As a consequence of keeping the governing ODEs of the second order instead of the usual first-order equations, the resulting algebraic system is half-sized but derivatives of the model parameters are required. Moreover, they can be easily evaluated for models, where structural parametres are piecewise polynomially dependent. Both accuracy and efficiency of the method are tested by evaluating the tidal Love numbers for the Earth's model PREM. Finally, we also derive complex Love numbers for models with the Maxwell viscoelastic rheology, where viscosity is a depth-dependent function. The method is applied to evaluation of the tidal Love numbers for models of Mars and Venus. The Love numbers of the two Martian models - the former optimized to cosmochemical data and the latter to the moment of inertia (Sohl and Spohn, 1997) - are h2=0.172 (0.212) and k2=0.093 (0.113). For Venus, the value of k2=0.295 (Konopliv and Yoder, 1996), obtained from the gravity-field analysis, is consistent with the results for our model with the liquid-core radius of 3110 km (Zábranová et al., 2009). Together with rapid evaluation of free oscillation periods by an analogous method, this combined matrix approach could by employed as an efficient numerical tool in structural studies of planetary bodies. REFERENCES Konopliv, A. S. and Yoder, C. F., 1996. Venusian k2 tidal Love number from Magellan and PVO tracking data, Geophys. Res. Lett., 23, 1857

  3. Micromechanics Fatigue Damage Analysis Modeling for Fabric Reinforced Ceramic Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, J. B.; Xue, D.; Shi, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A micromechanics analysis modeling method was developed to analyze the damage progression and fatigue failure of fabric reinforced composite structures, especially for the brittle ceramic matrix material composites. A repeating unit cell concept of fabric reinforced composites was used to represent the global composite structure. The thermal and mechanical properties of the repeating unit cell were considered as the same as those of the global composite structure. The three-phase micromechanics, the shear-lag, and the continuum fracture mechanics models were integrated with a statistical model in the repeating unit cell to predict the progressive damages and fatigue life of the composite structures. The global structure failure was defined as the loss of loading capability of the repeating unit cell, which depends on the stiffness reduction due to material slice failures and nonlinear material properties in the repeating unit cell. The present methodology is demonstrated with the analysis results evaluated through the experimental test performed with carbon fiber reinforced silicon carbide matrix plain weave composite specimens.

  4. A Tensile Deformation Model for In-situ Dendrite/Metallic Glass Matrix Composites

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, J. W.; Zhang, T.; Yang, F. Q.; Liaw, P. K.; Pauly, S.; Xu, B. S.

    2013-01-01

    In-situ dendrite/metallic glass matrix composites (MGMCs) with a composition of Ti46Zr20V12Cu5Be17 exhibit ultimate tensile strength of 1510 MPa and fracture strain of about 7.6%. A tensile deformation model is established, based on the five-stage classification: (1) elastic-elastic, (2) elastic-plastic, (3) plastic-plastic (yield platform), (4) plastic-plastic (work hardening), and (5) plastic-plastic (softening) stages, analogous to the tensile behavior of common carbon steels. The constitutive relations strongly elucidate the tensile deformation mechanism. In parallel, the simulation results by a finite-element method (FEM) are in good agreement with the experimental findings and theoretical calculations. The present study gives a mathematical model to clarify the work-hardening behavior of dendrites and softening of the amorphous matrix. Furthermore, the model can be employed to simulate the tensile behavior of in-situ dendrite/MGMCs. PMID:24085187

  5. An efficient method for computing genus expansions and counting numbers in the Hermitian matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Gabriel; Martínez Alonso, Luis; Medina, Elena

    2011-07-01

    We present a method to compute the genus expansion of the free energy of Hermitian matrix models from the large N expansion of the recurrence coefficients of the associated family of orthogonal polynomials. The method is based on the Bleher-Its deformation of the model, on its associated integral representation of the free energy, and on a method for solving the string equation which uses the resolvent of the Lax operator of the underlying Toda hierarchy. As a byproduct we obtain an efficient algorithm to compute generating functions for the enumeration of labeled k-maps which does not require the explicit expressions of the coefficients of the topological expansion. Finally we discuss the regularization of singular one-cut models within this approach.

  6. Computational modelling of large aluminium stabilized conductors in an indirectly cooled magnet matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Baynham, D.E.; Sampson, P.L.

    1996-07-01

    Many of the detector magnets in use for Particle Physics experiments are based on a common technology developed in the 1980s: indirect cooling, pure aluminium stabilized conductor and monolithic resin impregnation (DELPHI, ALEPH, H1, TOPAZ etc.). In such indirectly cooled magnets stable behavior is a balance between the transient heat removal capacity of the winding and the thermal disturbances. For the extrapolation in magnet technology towards LHC detectors it is important to understand more fully this stability balance. This paper describes computational modelling techniques developed to predict the behavior of conductors in an indirectly cooled magnet matrix. The verification of the model is based on experimental studies of a test coil for the DELPHI solenoid. The computational model has been used to carry out a parametric study of the stability of the conductors proposed for the ATLAS End Cap Toroids at LHC. Results of the parametric study are presented.

  7. Conductance statistics for the power-law banded random matrix model

    SciTech Connect

    Martinez-Mendoza, A. J.; Mendez-Bermudez, J. A.; Varga, Imre

    2010-12-21

    We study numerically the conductance statistics of the one-dimensional (1D) Anderson model with random long-range hoppings described by the Power-law Banded Random Matrix (PBRM) model. Within a scattering approach to electronic transport, we consider two scattering setups in absence and presence of direct processes: 2M single-mode leads attached to one side and to opposite sides of 1D circular samples. For both setups we show that (i) the probability distribution of the logarithm of the conductance T behaves as w(lnT){proportional_to}T{sup M2/2}, for T<<, for both the critical and the non-critical samples; and (ii) at criticality there is a smooth crossover from localized-like to delocalized-like behavior in the transport properties of the PBRM model by decreasing the fractality of its eigenstates.

  8. Electronic quasiparticles in the quantum dimer model: Density matrix renormalization group results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Junhyun; Sachdev, Subir; White, Steven R.

    2016-09-01

    We study a recently proposed quantum dimer model for the pseudogap metal state of the cuprates. The model contains bosonic dimers, representing a spin-singlet valence bond between a pair of electrons, and fermionic dimers, representing a quasiparticle with spin-1/2 and charge +e . By density matrix renormalization group calculations on a long but finite cylinder, we obtain the ground-state density distribution of the fermionic dimers for a number of different total densities. From the Friedel oscillations at open boundaries, we deduce that the Fermi surface consists of small hole pockets near (π /2 ,π /2 ) , and this feature persists up to a doping density of 1/16. We also compute the entanglement entropy and find that it closely matches the sum of the entanglement entropies of a critical boson and a low density of free fermions. Our results support the existence of a fractionalized Fermi liquid in this model.

  9. A micro to macro approach to polymer matrix composites damage modeling : final LDRD report.

    SciTech Connect

    English, Shawn Allen; Brown, Arthur A.; Briggs, Timothy M.

    2013-12-01

    Capabilities are developed, verified and validated to generate constitutive responses using material and geometric measurements with representative volume elements (RVE). The geometrically accurate RVEs are used for determining elastic properties and damage initiation and propagation analysis. Finite element modeling of the meso-structure over the distribution of characterizing measurements is automated and various boundary conditions are applied. Plain and harness weave composites are investigated. Continuum yarn damage, softening behavior and an elastic-plastic matrix are combined with known materials and geometries in order to estimate the macroscopic response as characterized by a set of orthotropic material parameters. Damage mechanics and coupling effects are investigated and macroscopic material models are demonstrated and discussed. Prediction of the elastic, damage, and failure behavior of woven composites will aid in macroscopic constitutive characterization for modeling and optimizing advanced composite systems.

  10. Modeling the Effect of Oxidation on Tensile Strength of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    An analytical method has been developed to investigate the effect of oxidation on the tensile strength of carbon fiber - reinforced ceramic - matrix composites (CMCs). The Budiansky - Hutchinson - Evans shear - lag model was used to describe the micro stress field of the damaged composite considering fibers failure. The statistical matrix multicracking model and fracture mechanics interface debonding criterion were used to determine the matrix crack spacing and interface debonded length. The fiber strength degradation model and oxidation region propagation model have been adopted to analyze the oxidation effect on tensile strength of the composite, which is controlled by diffusion of oxygen gas through matrix cracks. Under tensile loading, the fibers failure probabilities were determined by combining oxidation model and fiber statistical failure model based on the assumption that fiber strength is subjected to two-parameter Weibull distribution and the loads carried by broken and intact fibers statisfy the global load sharing criterion. The composite can no longer support the applied load when the total loads supported by broken and intact fibers approach its maximum value. The conditions of a single matrix crack and matrix multicrackings for tensile strength considering oxidation time and temperature have been analyzed.

  11. Multiscale computational model of fluid flow and matrix deformation in decellularized liver.

    PubMed

    Nishii, Kenichiro; Reese, Greg; Moran, Emma C; Sparks, Jessica L

    2016-04-01

    Currently little is known about the biomechanical environment in decellularized tissue. The goal of this research is to quantify the mechanical microenvironment in decellularized liver, for varying organ-scale perfusion conditions, using a combined experimental/computational approach. Needle-guided ultra-miniature pressure sensors were inserted into liver tissue to measure parenchymal fluid pressure ex-situ in portal vein-perfused native (n=5) and decellularized (n=7) ferret liver, for flow rates from 3-12mL/min. Pressures were also recorded at the inlet near the portal vein cannula to estimate total vascular resistance of the specimens. Experimental results were fit to a multiscale computational model to simulate perfusion conditions inside native versus decellularized livers for four experimental flow rates. The multiscale model consists of two parts: an organ-scale electrical analog model of liver hemodynamics and a tissue-scale model that predicts pore fluid pressure, pore fluid velocity, and solid matrix stress and deformation throughout the 3D hepatic lobule. Distinct models were created for native versus decellularized liver. Results show that vascular resistance decreases by 82% as a result of decellularization. The hydraulic conductivity of the decellularized liver lobule, a measure of tissue permeability, was 5.6 times that of native liver. For the four flow rates studied, mean fluid pressures in the decellularized lobule were 0.6-2.4mmHg, mean fluid velocities were 211-767μm/s, and average solid matrix principal strains were 1.7-6.1%. In the future this modeling platform can be used to guide the optimization of perfusion seeding and conditioning strategies for decellularized scaffolds in liver bioengineering.

  12. Modelling the carbonation of cementitious matrixes by means of the unreacted-core model, UR-CORE

    SciTech Connect

    Castellote, M. Andrade, C.

    2008-12-15

    This paper presents a model for the carbonation of cementitious matrixes (UR-CORE). The model is based on the principles of the 'unreacted-core' systems, typical of chemical engineering processes, in which the reacted product remains in the solid as a layer of inert ash, adapted for the specific case of carbonation. Development of the model has been undertaken in three steps: 1) Establishment of the controlling step in the global carbonation rate, by using data of fractional conversion of different phases of the cementitious matrixes, obtained by the authors through neutron diffraction data experiments, and reported in [M. Castellote, C. Andrade, X. Turrillas, J. Campo, G. Cuello, Accelerated carbonation of cement pastes in situ monitored by neutron diffraction, Cem. Concr. Res. (2008), doi:10.1016/j.cemconres.2008.07.002]. 2) Then, the model has been adapted and applied to the cementitious materials using different concentrations of CO{sub 2}, with the introduction of the needed assumptions and factors. 3) Finally, the model has been validated with laboratory data at different concentrations (taken from literature) and for long term natural exposure of concretes. As a result, the model seems to be reliable enough to be applied to cementitious materials, being able to extrapolate the results from accelerated tests in any conditions to predict the rate of carbonation in natural exposure, being restricted, at present stage, to conditions with a constant relative humidity.

  13. Ability of matrix models to explain the past and predict the future of plant populations.

    PubMed

    Crone, Elizabeth E; Ellis, Martha M; Morris, William F; Stanley, Amanda; Bell, Timothy; Bierzychudek, Paulette; Ehrlén, Johan; Kaye, Thomas N; Knight, Tiffany M; Lesica, Peter; Oostermeijer, Gerard; Quintana-Ascencio, Pedro F; Ticktin, Tamara; Valverde, Teresa; Williams, Jennifer L; Doak, Daniel F; Ganesan, Rengaian; McEachern, Kathyrn; Thorpe, Andrea S; Menges, Eric S

    2013-10-01

    Uncertainty associated with ecological forecasts has long been recognized, but forecast accuracy is rarely quantified. We evaluated how well data on 82 populations of 20 species of plants spanning 3 continents explained and predicted plant population dynamics. We parameterized stage-based matrix models with demographic data from individually marked plants and determined how well these models forecast population sizes observed at least 5 years into the future. Simple demographic models forecasted population dynamics poorly; only 40% of observed population sizes fell within our forecasts' 95% confidence limits. However, these models explained population dynamics during the years in which data were collected; observed changes in population size during the data-collection period were strongly positively correlated with population growth rate. Thus, these models are at least a sound way to quantify population status. Poor forecasts were not associated with the number of individual plants or years of data. We tested whether vital rates were density dependent and found both positive and negative density dependence. However, density dependence was not associated with forecast error. Forecast error was significantly associated with environmental differences between the data collection and forecast periods. To forecast population fates, more detailed models, such as those that project how environments are likely to change and how these changes will affect population dynamics, may be needed. Such detailed models are not always feasible. Thus, it may be wiser to make risk-averse decisions than to expect precise forecasts from models. PMID:23565966

  14. Ability of matrix models to explain the past and predict the future of plant populations.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McEachern, Kathryn; Crone, Elizabeth E.; Ellis, Martha M.; Morris, William F.; Stanley, Amanda; Bell, Timothy; Bierzychudek, Paulette; Ehrlen, Johan; Kaye, Thomas N.; Knight, Tiffany M.; Lesica, Peter; Oostermeijer, Gerard; Quintana-Ascencio, Pedro F.; Ticktin, Tamara; Valverde, Teresa; Williams, Jennifer I.; Doak, Daniel F.; Ganesan, Rengaian; Thorpe, Andrea S.; Menges, Eric S.

    2013-01-01

    Uncertainty associated with ecological forecasts has long been recognized, but forecast accuracy is rarely quantified. We evaluated how well data on 82 populations of 20 species of plants spanning 3 continents explained and predicted plant population dynamics. We parameterized stage-based matrix models with demographic data from individually marked plants and determined how well these models forecast population sizes observed at least 5 years into the future. Simple demographic models forecasted population dynamics poorly; only 40% of observed population sizes fell within our forecasts' 95% confidence limits. However, these models explained population dynamics during the years in which data were collected; observed changes in population size during the data-collection period were strongly positively correlated with population growth rate. Thus, these models are at least a sound way to quantify population status. Poor forecasts were not associated with the number of individual plants or years of data. We tested whether vital rates were density dependent and found both positive and negative density dependence. However, density dependence was not associated with forecast error. Forecast error was significantly associated with environmental differences between the data collection and forecast periods. To forecast population fates, more detailed models, such as those that project how environments are likely to change and how these changes will affect population dynamics, may be needed. Such detailed models are not always feasible. Thus, it may be wiser to make risk-averse decisions than to expect precise forecasts from models.

  15. Matrix Diffusion and Colloid-Facilitated Transport in Fractured Rocks: Model and Parameter Validation

    SciTech Connect

    Zavarin, M

    2002-08-02

    In this report, we review the results of Reimus et al. (2000a; 2000b) regarding matrix diffusion and colloid-facilitated transport in fractured rock and evaluate the implications of these results on modeling fracture flow at the Nevada Test Site (NTS). In particular, we examine these data in the context of the recent Cheshire hydrologic source term (HST) model results (Pawloski et al., 2001). This report is divided into several sections. In the first, we evaluate the effective diffusion coefficient (D{sub e}) data reported in Reimus et al. (2000a) for conservative tracer species ({sup 3}H, {sup 14}C, and {sup 99}Tc) and fit a simple effective diffusion model to these data. In the second, we use the fitted effective diffusion model, in conjunction with a surface complexation model, to simulate plutonium-colloid transport and compare model results to data reported in Reimus et al. (2000b). In the third, we evaluate the implications of these data with regards to radionuclide transport through fractures at the field scale and, in particular, with regards to the Cheshire HST model (Pawloski et al., 2001). Finally, we make recommendations regarding future radionuclide transport modeling efforts at the NTS.

  16. Ability of matrix models to explain the past and predict the future of plant populations.

    PubMed

    Crone, Elizabeth E; Ellis, Martha M; Morris, William F; Stanley, Amanda; Bell, Timothy; Bierzychudek, Paulette; Ehrlén, Johan; Kaye, Thomas N; Knight, Tiffany M; Lesica, Peter; Oostermeijer, Gerard; Quintana-Ascencio, Pedro F; Ticktin, Tamara; Valverde, Teresa; Williams, Jennifer L; Doak, Daniel F; Ganesan, Rengaian; McEachern, Kathyrn; Thorpe, Andrea S; Menges, Eric S

    2013-10-01

    Uncertainty associated with ecological forecasts has long been recognized, but forecast accuracy is rarely quantified. We evaluated how well data on 82 populations of 20 species of plants spanning 3 continents explained and predicted plant population dynamics. We parameterized stage-based matrix models with demographic data from individually marked plants and determined how well these models forecast population sizes observed at least 5 years into the future. Simple demographic models forecasted population dynamics poorly; only 40% of observed population sizes fell within our forecasts' 95% confidence limits. However, these models explained population dynamics during the years in which data were collected; observed changes in population size during the data-collection period were strongly positively correlated with population growth rate. Thus, these models are at least a sound way to quantify population status. Poor forecasts were not associated with the number of individual plants or years of data. We tested whether vital rates were density dependent and found both positive and negative density dependence. However, density dependence was not associated with forecast error. Forecast error was significantly associated with environmental differences between the data collection and forecast periods. To forecast population fates, more detailed models, such as those that project how environments are likely to change and how these changes will affect population dynamics, may be needed. Such detailed models are not always feasible. Thus, it may be wiser to make risk-averse decisions than to expect precise forecasts from models.

  17. Soft core fluid in a quenched matrix of soft core particles: A mobile mixture in a model gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Archer, A. J.; Schmidt, M.; Evans, R.

    2006-01-01

    We present a density-functional study of a binary phase-separating mixture of soft core particles immersed in a random matrix of quenched soft core particles of larger size. This is a model for a binary polymer mixture immersed in a cross-linked rigid polymer network. Using the replica “trick” for quenched-annealed mixtures we derive an explicit density functional theory that treats the quenched species on the level of its one-body density distribution. The relation to a set of effective external potentials acting on the annealed components is discussed. We relate matrix-induced condensation in bulk to the behavior of the mixture around a single large particle. The interfacial properties of the binary mixture at a surface of the quenched matrix display a rich interplay between capillary condensation inside the bulk matrix and wetting phenomena at the matrix surface.

  18. Altered Chondrocyte Differentiation and Extracellular Matrix Homeostasis in a Zebrafish Model for Mucolipidosis II

    PubMed Central

    Flanagan-Steet, Heather; Sias, Christina; Steet, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Mucolipidosis II (ML-II) is a pediatric disorder caused by defects in the biosynthesis of mannose 6-phosphate, the carbohydrate recognition signal responsible for targeting certain acid hydrolases to lysosomes. The mechanisms underlying the developmental defects of ML-II are largely unknown due in part to the lack of suitable animal models. To overcome these limitations, we developed a model for ML-II in zebrafish by inhibiting the expression of N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase, the enzyme that initiates mannose 6-phosphate biosynthesis. Morphant embryos manifest craniofacial defects, impaired motility, and abnormal otolith and pectoral fin development. Decreased mannose phosphorylation of several lysosomal glycosidases was observed in morphant lysates, consistent with the reduction in phosphotransferase activity. Investigation of the craniofacial defects in the morphants uncovered striking changes in the timing and localization of both type II collagen and Sox9 expression, suggestive of an accelerated chondrocyte differentiation program. Accumulation of type II collagen was also noted within misshapen cartilage elements at later stages of development. Furthermore, we observed abnormal matrix formation and calcium deposition in morphant otoliths. Collectively, these data provide new insight into the developmental pathology of ML-II and suggest that altered production and/or homeostasis of extracellular matrix proteins are integral to the disease process. These findings highlight the potential of the zebrafish system in studying lysosomal disease pathogenesis. PMID:19834066

  19. Modeling Optical Properties of Polluted Dust and its Morphological Effects by T-Matrix Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, G.; Yang, P.; Brooks, S. D.

    2015-12-01

    Dust storms largely contribute to regional or global aerosol loads, influence radiative energy budget, and air quality, and cause atmospheric environmental, public health problems. As dusts are transported long distances, aerosols such as black carbon can pollute the air mass along the transport path. Two mixing processes, externally and semi-externally (sticking) mixing may substantially affect the single-scattering and radiative properties of polluted dust particles compared to the unpolluted counterparts. This study focuses on quantifying the changes in the optical properties of dust aerosols due to black carbon contamination. The dust model we use is an irregular polyhedron, which is in good agreement with the laboratory measurement. The black carbon model is spherules aggregate defined with a cluster-cluster aggregation algorithm. Specifically, we define the degree of pollution in terms of two variables, the adhesion degree of pollutants and their mixing ratios, since both can alter the optical properties of polluted dust in different ways. By applying the Invariant Imbedding T-matrix Method (II-TM), we obtain the scattering phase matrix and other optical properties of dust aerosols with different degrees of contamination. Furthermore, the morphological effects on the optical properties of polluted dust are quantified by considering different fractal dimensions of black carbon as particles age. The overall changes due to different degrees of pollution by black carbon are investigated at various wavelengths.

  20. Modelling of Fiber/Matrix Debonding of Composites Under Cyclic Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naghipour, Paria; Pineda, Evan J.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.; Arnold, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    The micromechanics theory, generalized method of cells (GMC), was employed to simulate the debonding of fiber/matrix interfaces, within a repeating unit cell subjected to global, cyclic loading, utilizing a cyclic crack growth law. Cycle dependent, interfacial debonding was implemented as a new module to the available GMC formulation. The degradation of interfacial stresses, with applied load cycles, was achieved via progressive evolution of the interfacial compliance. A periodic repeating unit cell, representing the fiber/matrix architecture of a composite, was subjected to combined normal and shear loadings, and degradation of the global transverse stress in successive cycles was monitored. The obtained results were compared to values from a corresponding finite element model. Reasonable agreement was achieved for combined normal and shear loading conditions, with minimal variation for pure loading cases. The local effects of interfacial debonding, and fatigue damage will later be combined as sub-models to predict the experimentally obtained fatigue life of Ti-15-3/Sic composites at the laminate level.

  1. Hydrogel core flexible matrix composite (H-FMC) actuators: theory and preliminary modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dicker, M. P. M.; Weaver, P. M.; Rossiter, J. M.; Bond, I. P.

    2014-09-01

    The underlying theory of a new actuator concept based on hydrogel core flexible matrix composites (H-FMC) is presented. The key principle that underlines the H-FMC actuator operation is that the three-dimensional swelling of a hydrogel is partially constrained in order to improve the amount of useful work done. The partial constraint is applied to the hydrogel by a flexible matrix composite (FMC) that minimizes the hydrogel's volume expansion while swelling. This constraint serves to maximize the fixed charge density and resulting osmotic pressure, the driving force behind actuation. In addition, for certain FMC fibre orientations the Poisson's ratio of the anisotropic FMC laminate converts previously unused hydrogel swelling in the radial and circumferential directions into useful axial strains. The potential benefit of the H-FMC concept to hydrogel actuator performance is shown through comparison of force-stroke curves and evaluation of improvements in useful actuation work. The model used to achieve this couples chemical and electrical components, represented with the Nernst-Plank and Poisson equations, as well as a linear elastic mechanical material model, encompassing limited geometric nonlinearities. It is found that improvements in useful actuation work in the order of 1500% over bare hydrogel performance are achieved by the H-FMC concept. A parametric study is also undertaken to determine the effect of various FMC design parameters on actuator free strain and blocking stress. A comparison to other actuator concepts is also included.

  2. Carbon isotope composition of ambient CO2 and recycling: a matrix simulation model

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    da Silveira Lobo Sternberg, Leonel; DeAngelis, Donald L.

    2002-01-01

    The relationship between isotopic composition and concentration of ambient CO2 in a canopy and its associated convective boundary layer was modeled. The model divides the canopy and convective boundary layer into several layers. Photosynthesis, respiration, and exchange between each layer can be simulated by matrix equations. This simulation can be used to calculate recycling; defined here as the amount of respired CO2 re-fixed by photosynthesis relative to the total amount of respired CO2. At steady state the matrix equations can be solved for the canopy and convective boundary layer CO2 concentration and isotopic profile, which can be used to calculate a theoretical recycling index according to a previously developed equation. There is complete agreement between simulated and theoretical recycling indices for different exchange scenarios. Recycling indices from a simulation of gas exchange between a heterogeneous vegetation canopy and the troposphere also agreed with a more generalized form of the theoretical recycling equation developed here.

  3. Stokes phenomena and non-perturbative completion in the multi-cut two-matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Chuan-Tsung; Irie, Hirotaka; Yeh, Chi-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    The Stokes multipliers in the matrix models are invariants in the string-theory moduli space and related to the D-instanton chemical potentials. They not only represent non-perturbative information but also play an important role in connecting various perturbative string theories in the moduli space. They are a key concept to the non-perturbative completion of string theory and also expected to imply some remnant of strong coupling dynamics in M theory. In this paper, we investigate the non-perturbative completion problem consisting of two constraints on the Stokes multipliers. As the first constraint, Stokes phenomena which realize the multi-cut geometry are studied in the Z symmetric critical points of the multi-cut two-matrix models. Sequence of solutions to the constraints are obtained in general k-cut critical points. A discrete set of solutions and a continuum set of solutions are explicitly shown, and they can be classified by several constrained configurations of the Young diagram. As the second constraint, we discuss non-perturbative stability of backgrounds in terms of the Riemann-Hilbert problem. In particular, our procedure in the 2-cut (1,2) case (pure-supergravity case) completely fixes the D-instanton chemical potentials and results in the Hastings-McLeod solution to the Painlevé II equation. It is also stressed that the Riemann-Hilbert approach realizes an off-shell background independent formulation of non-critical string theory.

  4. Continuum modeling of a porous solid with pressure-sensitive dilatant matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, T. F.; Faleskog, J.; Shih, C. F.

    The pressure-sensitive plastic response of a material has been studied in terms of the intrinsic sensitivity of its yield stress to pressure and the presence and growth of cavities. This work focuses on the interplay between these two distinctly different mechanisms and the attendant material behavior. To this end, a constitutive model is proposed taking both mechanisms into account. Using Gurson's homogenization, an upper bound model is developed for a voided solid with a plastically dilatant matrix material. This model is built around a three-parameter axisymmetric velocity field for a unit sphere containing a spherical void. The void is also subjected to internal pressure; this can be relevant for polymeric adhesives permeated by moisture that vaporizes at elevated temperatures. The plastic response of the matrix material is described by Drucker-Prager's yield criterion and an associated flow rule. The resulting yield surface and porosity evolution law of the homogenized constitutive model are presented in parametric form. Using the solutions to special cases as building blocks, approximate models with explicit forms are proposed. The parametric form and an approximate explicit form are compared against full-field solutions obtained from finite element analysis. They are also studied for loading under generalized tension conditions. These computational simulations shed light on the interplay between the two mechanisms and its enhanced effect on yield strength and plastic flow. Among other things, the tensile yield strength of the porous solid is greatly reduced by the internal void pressure, particularly when a liquid/vapor phase is the source of the internal pressure.

  5. Comparison of Damage Models for Predicting the Non-Linear Response of Laminates Under Matrix Dominated Loading Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schuecker, Clara; Davila, Carlos G.; Rose, Cheryl A.

    2010-01-01

    Five models for matrix damage in fiber reinforced laminates are evaluated for matrix-dominated loading conditions under plane stress and are compared both qualitatively and quantitatively. The emphasis of this study is on a comparison of the response of embedded plies subjected to a homogeneous stress state. Three of the models are specifically designed for modeling the non-linear response due to distributed matrix cracking under homogeneous loading, and also account for non-linear (shear) behavior prior to the onset of cracking. The remaining two models are localized damage models intended for predicting local failure at stress concentrations. The modeling approaches of distributed vs. localized cracking as well as the different formulations of damage initiation and damage progression are compared and discussed.

  6. UTOPIAN: user-driven topic modeling based on interactive nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Choo, Jaegul; Lee, Changhyun; Reddy, Chandan K; Park, Haesun

    2013-12-01

    Topic modeling has been widely used for analyzing text document collections. Recently, there have been significant advancements in various topic modeling techniques, particularly in the form of probabilistic graphical modeling. State-of-the-art techniques such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) have been successfully applied in visual text analytics. However, most of the widely-used methods based on probabilistic modeling have drawbacks in terms of consistency from multiple runs and empirical convergence. Furthermore, due to the complicatedness in the formulation and the algorithm, LDA cannot easily incorporate various types of user feedback. To tackle this problem, we propose a reliable and flexible visual analytics system for topic modeling called UTOPIAN (User-driven Topic modeling based on Interactive Nonnegative Matrix Factorization). Centered around its semi-supervised formulation, UTOPIAN enables users to interact with the topic modeling method and steer the result in a user-driven manner. We demonstrate the capability of UTOPIAN via several usage scenarios with real-world document corpuses such as InfoVis/VAST paper data set and product review data sets.

  7. UTOPIAN: user-driven topic modeling based on interactive nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Choo, Jaegul; Lee, Changhyun; Reddy, Chandan K; Park, Haesun

    2013-12-01

    Topic modeling has been widely used for analyzing text document collections. Recently, there have been significant advancements in various topic modeling techniques, particularly in the form of probabilistic graphical modeling. State-of-the-art techniques such as Latent Dirichlet Allocation (LDA) have been successfully applied in visual text analytics. However, most of the widely-used methods based on probabilistic modeling have drawbacks in terms of consistency from multiple runs and empirical convergence. Furthermore, due to the complicatedness in the formulation and the algorithm, LDA cannot easily incorporate various types of user feedback. To tackle this problem, we propose a reliable and flexible visual analytics system for topic modeling called UTOPIAN (User-driven Topic modeling based on Interactive Nonnegative Matrix Factorization). Centered around its semi-supervised formulation, UTOPIAN enables users to interact with the topic modeling method and steer the result in a user-driven manner. We demonstrate the capability of UTOPIAN via several usage scenarios with real-world document corpuses such as InfoVis/VAST paper data set and product review data sets. PMID:24051765

  8. Matrix Product State, Quantum Entanglement, and Criticality in the One-Dimensional Dimerized Antiferromagnetic Heisenberg Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Guang-Hua; Tian, Guang-Shan

    2012-08-01

    The matrix product state (MPS) is utilized to investigate the ground state properties and quantum phase transitions (QPTs) of the dimerized antiferromagnetic Heisenberg (DAH) model. The ground state MPS wavefunctions determined by the infinite time-evolving block decimation (iTEBD) algorithm are shown to be very efficient descriptions of DAH model. In the thermodynamic limit, the quantum entanglement, the bond energy, and the nearest-neighbor correlations are calculated. It is revealed that the singular behavior of the bipartite entanglement can detect the QPTs directly. The critical point Jc2 = 1.0 is determined evidently, and the quantum phase transition is argued to belong to the second-order category. At the critical point, logarithmic divergent character of the block entanglement is observed, and the system can be described by a free bosonic field theory.

  9. Phase field modelling of strain induced crystal growth in an elastic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laghmach, Rabia; Candau, Nicolas; Chazeau, Laurent; Munch, Etienne; Biben, Thierry

    2015-06-01

    When a crystal phase grows in an amorphous matrix, such as a crystallisable elastomer, containing cross-links and/or entanglements, these "topological constraints" need to be pushed away from the crystal phase to allow further crystallization. The accumulation of these topological constraints in the vicinity of the crystal interface may store elastic energy and affect the phase transition. To evaluate the consequences of such mechanism, we introduce a phase field model based on the Flory theory of entropic elasticity. We show that the growth process is indeed sensibly affected, in particular, an exponential increase of the surface energy with the displacement of the interface is induced. This explains the formation of stable nano-crystallites as it is observed in the Strain Induced Crystallization (SIC) of natural rubber. Although simple, the model developed here is able to account for many interesting features of SIC, for instance, the crystallite shapes and their sizes which depend on the applied deformation.

  10. String states, loops and effective actions in noncommutative field theory and matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinacker, Harold C.

    2016-09-01

    Refining previous work by Iso, Kawai and Kitazawa, we discuss bi-local string states as a tool for loop computations in noncommutative field theory and matrix models. Defined in terms of coherent states, they exhibit the stringy features of noncommutative field theory. This leads to a closed form for the 1-loop effective action in position space, capturing the long-range non-local UV/IR mixing for scalar fields. The formalism applies to generic fuzzy spaces. The non-locality is tamed in the maximally supersymmetric IKKT or IIB model, where it gives rise to supergravity. The linearized supergravity interactions are obtained directly in position space at one loop using string states on generic noncommutative branes.

  11. Modeling of drug release from matrix systems involving moving boundaries: approximate analytical solutions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ping I

    2011-10-10

    The purpose of this review is to provide an overview of approximate analytical solutions to the general moving boundary diffusion problems encountered during the release of a dispersed drug from matrix systems. Starting from the theoretical basis of the Higuchi equation and its subsequent improvement and refinement, available approximate analytical solutions for the more complicated cases involving heterogeneous matrix, boundary layer effect, finite release medium, surface erosion, and finite dissolution rate are also discussed. Among various modeling approaches, the pseudo-steady state assumption employed in deriving the Higuchi equation and related approximate analytical solutions appears to yield reasonably accurate results in describing the early stage release of a dispersed drug from matrices of different geometries whenever the initial drug loading (A) is much larger than the drug solubility (C(s)) in the matrix (or A≫C(s)). However, when the drug loading is not in great excess of the drug solubility (i.e. low A/C(s) values) or when the drug loading approaches the drug solubility (A→C(s)) which occurs often with drugs of high aqueous solubility, approximate analytical solutions based on the pseudo-steady state assumption tend to fail, with the Higuchi equation for planar geometry exhibiting a 11.38% error as compared with the exact solution. In contrast, approximate analytical solutions to this problem without making the pseudo-steady state assumption, based on either the double-integration refinement of the heat balance integral method or the direct simplification of available exact analytical solutions, show close agreement with the exact solutions in different geometries, particularly in the case of low A/C(s) values or drug loading approaching the drug solubility (A→C(s)). However, the double-integration heat balance integral approach is generally more useful in obtaining approximate analytical solutions especially when exact solutions are not

  12. [Local population of Eritrichium caucasicum as an object of mathematical modelling. I. Life cycle graph and a nonautonomous matrix model].

    PubMed

    Logofet, D O; Belova, I N; Kazantseva, E S; Onipchenko, V G

    2016-01-01

    For the plant species, which is considered a short-lived perennial, we have composed a scale of ontogenetic stages and the life cycle graph (LCG) according to annual observations on permanent sample plots in an Alpine lichen heath during the 2009-2014 period. The LCG that reflects seed reproduction has been reduced to the one that avoids the stage of soil seed bank, yet preserves the arcs of annual recruitment. The corresponding matrix model of stage-structured population dynamics has four stages: juvenile plants (including seedlings), virginal, generative, and 'terminally generative' (the plants die after seed production). Model calibration reduces to directly calculating the rates of transition between stages and those of delays within stages from the data of only one time step, while keeping the two reproduction rates uncertain, yet confined to the quantitative bounds of observed recruitment. This has enabled us to determine a feasible range for the dominant eigenvalue of the model matrix, i.e., the quantitative bounds for the measure of how the local population adapts to its environment, at each of the five time steps, resulting in aformally nonautonomous model. To obtain 'age-specific parameters' from a stage-classified model, we have applied the technique that constructs a virtual absorbing Markov chain and calculates its fundamental matrix. In a nonautonomous model, the estimates of life expectancy also depend on the time of observation (that fixes certain environmental conditions), and vary from two to nearly seven years. The estimates reveal how specifically short lives the short-lived perennial, while their range motivates the task to average the model matrices over the whole period of observation. The model indicates that Eritrichium caucasicum plants spend the most part of their life span in the virginal stage under each of the environment conditions observed, thus revealing the place retention strategy by C. K6rner (2003), or the delayed

  13. [Local population of Eritrichium caucasicum as an object of mathematical modelling. I. Life cycle graph and a nonautonomous matrix model].

    PubMed

    Logofet, D O; Belova, I N; Kazantseva, E S; Onipchenko, V G

    2016-01-01

    For the plant species, which is considered a short-lived perennial, we have composed a scale of ontogenetic stages and the life cycle graph (LCG) according to annual observations on permanent sample plots in an Alpine lichen heath during the 2009-2014 period. The LCG that reflects seed reproduction has been reduced to the one that avoids the stage of soil seed bank, yet preserves the arcs of annual recruitment. The corresponding matrix model of stage-structured population dynamics has four stages: juvenile plants (including seedlings), virginal, generative, and 'terminally generative' (the plants die after seed production). Model calibration reduces to directly calculating the rates of transition between stages and those of delays within stages from the data of only one time step, while keeping the two reproduction rates uncertain, yet confined to the quantitative bounds of observed recruitment. This has enabled us to determine a feasible range for the dominant eigenvalue of the model matrix, i.e., the quantitative bounds for the measure of how the local population adapts to its environment, at each of the five time steps, resulting in aformally nonautonomous model. To obtain 'age-specific parameters' from a stage-classified model, we have applied the technique that constructs a virtual absorbing Markov chain and calculates its fundamental matrix. In a nonautonomous model, the estimates of life expectancy also depend on the time of observation (that fixes certain environmental conditions), and vary from two to nearly seven years. The estimates reveal how specifically short lives the short-lived perennial, while their range motivates the task to average the model matrices over the whole period of observation. The model indicates that Eritrichium caucasicum plants spend the most part of their life span in the virginal stage under each of the environment conditions observed, thus revealing the place retention strategy by C. K6rner (2003), or the delayed

  14. Tuning stochastic matrix models with hydrologic data to predict the population dynamics of a riverine fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sakaris, P.C.; Irwin, E.R.

    2010-01-01

    We developed stochastic matrix models to evaluate the effects of hydrologic alteration and variable mortality on the population dynamics of a lotie fish in a regulated river system. Models were applied to a representative lotic fish species, the flathead catfish (Pylodictis olivaris), for which two populations were examined: a native population from a regulated reach of the Coosa River (Alabama, USA) and an introduced population from an unregulated section of the Ocmulgee River (Georgia, USA). Size-classified matrix models were constructed for both populations, and residuals from catch-curve regressions were used as indices of year class strength (i.e., recruitment). A multiple regression model indicated that recruitment of flathead catfish in the Coosa River was positively related to the frequency of spring pulses between 283 and 566 m3/s. For the Ocmulgee River population, multiple regression models indicated that year class strength was negatively related to mean March discharge and positively related to June low flow. When the Coosa population was modeled to experience five consecutive years of favorable hydrologic conditions during a 50-year projection period, it exhibited a substantial spike in size and increased at an overall 0.2% annual rate. When modeled to experience five years of unfavorable hydrologic conditions, the Coosa population initially exhibited a decrease in size but later stabilized and increased at a 0.4% annual rate following the decline. When the Ocmulgee River population was modeled to experience five years of favorable conditions, it exhibited a substantial spike in size and increased at an overall 0.4% annual rate. After the Ocmulgee population experienced five years of unfavorable conditions, a sharp decline in population size was predicted. However, the population quickly recovered, with population size increasing at a 0.3% annual rate following the decline. In general, stochastic population growth in the Ocmulgee River was more

  15. Matrix Design: An Alternative Model for Organizing the School or Department.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salem, Philip J.; Gratz, Robert D.

    1984-01-01

    Explains the matrix organizational structure and describes conditions or pressures that lead an administrator to consider the matrix approach. Provides examples of how it operates in a department or school. (PD)

  16. Financial Distress Prediction Using Discrete-time Hazard Model and Rating Transition Matrix Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Bi-Huei; Chang, Chih-Huei

    2009-08-01

    Previous studies used constant cut-off indicator to distinguish distressed firms from non-distressed ones in the one-stage prediction models. However, distressed cut-off indicator must shift according to economic prosperity, rather than remains fixed all the time. This study focuses on Taiwanese listed firms and develops financial distress prediction models based upon the two-stage method. First, this study employs the firm-specific financial ratio and market factors to measure the probability of financial distress based on the discrete-time hazard models. Second, this paper further focuses on macroeconomic factors and applies rating transition matrix approach to determine the distressed cut-off indicator. The prediction models are developed by using the training sample from 1987 to 2004, and their levels of accuracy are compared with the test sample from 2005 to 2007. As for the one-stage prediction model, the model in incorporation with macroeconomic factors does not perform better than that without macroeconomic factors. This suggests that the accuracy is not improved for one-stage models which pool the firm-specific and macroeconomic factors together. In regards to the two stage models, the negative credit cycle index implies the worse economic status during the test period, so the distressed cut-off point is adjusted to increase based on such negative credit cycle index. After the two-stage models employ such adjusted cut-off point to discriminate the distressed firms from non-distressed ones, their error of misclassification becomes lower than that of one-stage ones. The two-stage models presented in this paper have incremental usefulness in predicting financial distress.

  17. T-Matrix Modeling of Linear Depolarization by Morphologically Complex Soot and Soot-Containing Aerosols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mishchenko, Michael I.; Liu, Li; Mackowski, Daniel W.

    2013-01-01

    We use state-of-the-art public-domain Fortran codes based on the T-matrix method to calculate orientation and ensemble averaged scattering matrix elements for a variety of morphologically complex black carbon (BC) and BC-containing aerosol particles, with a special emphasis on the linear depolarization ratio (LDR). We explain theoretically the quasi-Rayleigh LDR peak at side-scattering angles typical of low-density soot fractals and conclude that the measurement of this feature enables one to evaluate the compactness state of BC clusters and trace the evolution of low-density fluffy fractals into densely packed aggregates. We show that small backscattering LDRs measured with groundbased, airborne, and spaceborne lidars for fresh smoke generally agree with the values predicted theoretically for fluffy BC fractals and densely packed near-spheroidal BC aggregates. To reproduce higher lidar LDRs observed for aged smoke, one needs alternative particle models such as shape mixtures of BC spheroids or cylinders.

  18. Relapse and Risk-taking among Iranian Methamphetamine Abusers Undergoing Matrix Treatment Model

    PubMed Central

    Taymoori, Parvaneh; Pashaei, Tahereh

    2016-01-01

    Background This study investigated the correlation between risk-taking and relapse among methamphetamine (MA) abusers undergoing the Matrix Model of treatment. Methods This cross-sectional study was conducted on male patients who were stimulant drug abusers undergoing the matrix treatment in the National Center for Addiction Research. A sampling was done using the availability method including 92 male patients. Demographic questionnaires and drug abuse related questionnaire were completed for each patient. Then, Bart’s balloon risk-taking test was administered to the patients. Findings Participants had a mean age ± standard deviation (SD) of 27.59 ± 6.60 years with an age range of 17-29 years. Unemployment, unmarried status, criminal offense, and also addiction family history increased the probability of relapse. In addition, a greater adjusted score of the risk-taking test increased the odds of relapse by more than 97%. The simultaneous abuse of opium and stimulants compared to the abuse of stimulants only, revealed no statistically significant differences for relapse. Patients with higher risk-taking behavior had a more probability of relapse. Conclusion This finding indirectly implies the usefulness of Bart’s risk-taking test in assessing risk-taking behavior in stimulant drug abusers. PMID:27274793

  19. Facultative control of matrix production optimizes competitive fitness in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm models.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jonas S; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Squyres, Georgia R; Price-Whelan, Alexa; de Santiago Torio, Ana; Song, Angela; Cornell, William C; Sørensen, Søren J; Xavier, Joao B; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2015-12-01

    As biofilms grow, resident cells inevitably face the challenge of resource limitation. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, electron acceptor availability affects matrix production and, as a result, biofilm morphogenesis. The secreted matrix polysaccharide Pel is required for pellicle formation and for colony wrinkling, two activities that promote access to O2. We examined the exploitability and evolvability of Pel production at the air-liquid interface (during pellicle formation) and on solid surfaces (during colony formation). Although Pel contributes to the developmental response to electron acceptor limitation in both biofilm formation regimes, we found variation in the exploitability of its production and necessity for competitive fitness between the two systems. The wild type showed a competitive advantage against a non-Pel-producing mutant in pellicles but no advantage in colonies. Adaptation to the pellicle environment selected for mutants with a competitive advantage against the wild type in pellicles but also caused a severe disadvantage in colonies, even in wrinkled colony centers. Evolution in the colony center produced divergent phenotypes, while adaptation to the colony edge produced mutants with clear competitive advantages against the wild type in this O2-replete niche. In general, the structurally heterogeneous colony environment promoted more diversification than the more homogeneous pellicle. These results suggest that the role of Pel in community structure formation in response to electron acceptor limitation is unique to specific biofilm models and that the facultative control of Pel production is required for PA14 to maintain optimum benefit in different types of communities.

  20. Two approaches to the model drug immobilization into conjugated polymer matrix.

    PubMed

    Krukiewicz, Katarzyna; Stokfisz, Anna; Zak, Jerzy K

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop biocompatible and conducting coating being carrier of biologically active compounds with the potential use in neuroprosthetics. Conducting polypyrrole matrix has been used to immobilize and release model drugs, quercetin and ciprofloxacin. Two routes of immobilization are described: drugs have been incorporated in the polymer matrix in the course of the electropolymerization process or after polymerization, in the course of polymer oxidation. Using UV/Vis spectroscopic detection we demonstrate that both immobilization approaches display different drug-loading efficiencies. In the case of ciprofloxacin, drug incorporation following synthesis is a more efficient immobilization approach (final drug concentration: 43.3 (±9.5) μM/cm(2)), while for quercetin the highest loading is accomplished by drug incorporation during synthesis (final drug concentration: 29.1 (±5.9) μM/cm(2)). The process of drug incorporation results in the variation of surface morphology with respect to the method of immobilization as well as the choice of drug. The results prove that electrochemical methods are efficient procedures for making multifunctional polymer matrices which might be perspective bioactive coatings for implantable neuroprosthetic devices.

  1. Accounting for management costs in sensitivity analyses of matrix population models.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Peter W J; McCarthy, Michael A; Possingham, Hugh P; Menkhorst, Peter W; McLean, Natasha

    2006-06-01

    Traditional sensitivity and elasticity analyses of matrix population models have been used to inform management decisions, but they ignore the economic costs of manipulating vital rates. For example, the growth rate of a population is often most sensitive to changes in adult survival rate, but this does not mean that increasing that rate is the best option for managing the population because it may be much more expensive than other options. To explore how managers should optimize their manipulation of vital rates, we incorporated the cost of changing those rates into matrix population models. We derived analytic expressions for locations in parameter space where managers should shift between management of fecundity and survival, for the balance between fecundity and survival management at those boundaries, and for the allocation of management resources to sustain that optimal balance. For simple matrices, the optimal budget allocation can often be expressed as simple functions of vital rates and the relative costs of changing them. We applied our method to management of the Helmeted Honeyeater (Lichenostomus melanops cassidix; an endangered Australian bird) and the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) as examples. Our method showed that cost-efficient management of the Helmeted Honeyeater should focus on increasing fecundity via nest protection, whereas optimal koala management should focus on manipulating both fecundity and survival simultaneously. These findings are contrary to the cost-negligent recommendations of elasticity analysis, which would suggest focusing on managing survival in both cases. A further investigation of Helmeted Honeyeater management options, based on an individual-based model incorporating density dependence, spatial structure, and environmental stochasticity, confirmed that fecundity management was the most cost-effective strategy. Our results demonstrate that decisions that ignore economic factors will reduce management efficiency.

  2. Accounting for management costs in sensitivity analyses of matrix population models.

    PubMed

    Baxter, Peter W J; McCarthy, Michael A; Possingham, Hugh P; Menkhorst, Peter W; McLean, Natasha

    2006-06-01

    Traditional sensitivity and elasticity analyses of matrix population models have been used to inform management decisions, but they ignore the economic costs of manipulating vital rates. For example, the growth rate of a population is often most sensitive to changes in adult survival rate, but this does not mean that increasing that rate is the best option for managing the population because it may be much more expensive than other options. To explore how managers should optimize their manipulation of vital rates, we incorporated the cost of changing those rates into matrix population models. We derived analytic expressions for locations in parameter space where managers should shift between management of fecundity and survival, for the balance between fecundity and survival management at those boundaries, and for the allocation of management resources to sustain that optimal balance. For simple matrices, the optimal budget allocation can often be expressed as simple functions of vital rates and the relative costs of changing them. We applied our method to management of the Helmeted Honeyeater (Lichenostomus melanops cassidix; an endangered Australian bird) and the koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) as examples. Our method showed that cost-efficient management of the Helmeted Honeyeater should focus on increasing fecundity via nest protection, whereas optimal koala management should focus on manipulating both fecundity and survival simultaneously. These findings are contrary to the cost-negligent recommendations of elasticity analysis, which would suggest focusing on managing survival in both cases. A further investigation of Helmeted Honeyeater management options, based on an individual-based model incorporating density dependence, spatial structure, and environmental stochasticity, confirmed that fecundity management was the most cost-effective strategy. Our results demonstrate that decisions that ignore economic factors will reduce management efficiency. PMID

  3. Experimental Tests of the Crystal Lattice Model of the R-Matrix Code SAMMY

    SciTech Connect

    Courcelle, A.; Noguere, G.; Larson, N.M.

    2005-05-24

    In the evaluation of low-energy cross sections, the broadening of neutron resonances due to the motion of the target nucleus was thoroughly studied. The widely used model for Doppler broadening is the Free Gas Model (FGM) that neglects atomic interactions between target atoms. When the target atoms are bound to a molecule or a crystal, the incident neutron energy can change the atomic vibrational or rotational quantum state, and a more realistic treatment is needed. In the early days of cross-section theories, Lamb derived a theoretical model, known as the Crystal Lattice Model (CLM), to account for the emission or absorption of one or more phonons (quanta of vibrational energy). This model was recently implemented in the Bayesian R-matrix fitting computer code SAMMY. In the present work, the CLM of SAMMY is tested against transmission experiments performed at GELINA (Geel ELectron LINear Acelerator) on 238U with U and UO2 samples at 23.7 K and at room temperature. The CLM of SAMMY is then used to improve the evaluation of 238U resonance parameters in progress at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory.

  4. Convection equation modeling: A non-iterative direct matrix solution algorithm for use with SINDA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schrage, Dean S.

    1993-01-01

    The determination of the boundary conditions for a component-level analysis, applying discrete finite element and finite difference modeling techniques often requires an analysis of complex coupled phenomenon that cannot be described algebraically. For example, an analysis of the temperature field of a coldplate surface with an integral fluid loop requires a solution to the parabolic heat equation and also requires the boundary conditions that describe the local fluid temperature. However, the local fluid temperature is described by a convection equation that can only be solved with the knowledge of the locally-coupled coldplate temperatures. Generally speaking, it is not computationally efficient, and sometimes, not even possible to perform a direct, coupled phenomenon analysis of the component-level and boundary condition models within a single analysis code. An alternative is to perform a disjoint analysis, but transmit the necessary information between models during the simulation to provide an indirect coupling. For this approach to be effective, the component-level model retains full detail while the boundary condition model is simplified to provide a fast, first-order prediction of the phenomenon in question. Specifically for the present study, the coldplate structure is analyzed with a discrete, numerical model (SINDA) while the fluid loop convection equation is analyzed with a discrete, analytical model (direct matrix solution). This indirect coupling allows a satisfactory prediction of the boundary condition, while not subjugating the overall computational efficiency of the component-level analysis. In the present study a discussion of the complete analysis of the derivation and direct matrix solution algorithm of the convection equation is presented. Discretization is analyzed and discussed to extend of solution accuracy, stability and computation speed. Case studies considering a pulsed and harmonic inlet disturbance to the fluid loop are analyzed to

  5. PBPK modeling of the percutaneous absorption of perchloroethylene from a soil matrix in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Poet, Torka S; Weitz, Karl K; Gies, Richard A; Edwards, Jeffrey A; Thrall, Karla D; Corley, Richard A; Tanojo, Hanafi; Hui, Xiaoying; Maibach, Howard I; Wester, Ronald C

    2002-05-01

    Perchloroethylene (PCE) is a widely used volatile organic chemical. Exposures to PCE are primarily through inhalation and dermal contact. The dermal absorption of PCE from a soil matrix was compared in rats and humans using real-time MS/MS exhaled breath technology and physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. Studies with rats were performed to compare the effects of loading volume, concentration, and occlusion. In rats, the percutaneous permeability coefficient (K(P)) for PCE was 0.102 +/- 0.017, and was independent of loading volume, concentration, or occlusion. Exhaled breath concentrations peaked within 1 h in nonoccluded exposures, but were maintained over the 5 h exposure period when the system was occluded. Three human volunteers submerged a hand in a container of PCE-laden soil for 2 h and their exhaled breath was continually monitored during and for 2.5 h following exposure. The absorption and elimination kinetics of PCE were slower in these subjects than initially predicted based upon the PBPK model developed from rat dermal kinetic data. The resulting K(P) for humans was over 100-fold lower than for the rat utilizing a single, well-stirred dermal compartment. Therefore, two additional PBPK skin compartment models were evaluated: a parallel model to simulate follicular uptake and a layered model to portray a stratum corneum barrier. The parallel dual dermal compartment model was not capable of describing the exhaled breath kinetics, whereas the layered model substantially improved the fit of the model to the complex kinetics of dermal absorption through the hand. In real-world situations, percutaneous absorption of PCE is likely to be minimal.

  6. Hybrid-Space Density Matrix Renormalization Group Study of the Two-Dimensional Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Georg; Noack, Reinhard M.

    We investigate the ground state of the two-dimensional Hubbard model on a cylinder geometry at intermediate coupling and weak doping. We study properties such as the behavior of the ground-state energy, pair-field correlations, and the appearance of stripes. We find striped ground states generically, with the width of the stripes depending on the filling, the boundary conditions, and the circumference of the cylinder. Furthermore, we analyse the interplay between the different stripe configurations and the decay of the pairing correlations. Our analysis is based on a hybrid-space density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) approach, which uses a momentum-space representation in the transverse and a real-space representation in the longitudinal direction. Exploiting the transverse momentum quantum number makes significant speedup and memory savings compared to the real-space DMRG possible. In particular, we obtain computational costs that are independent of the cylinder width for fixed size of the truncated Hilbert space.

  7. Evaluation of Johnson-Cook model constants for aluminum based particulate metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilfi, H.; Brar, N. S.

    1996-05-01

    High strain rate and high temperature response of three types of aluminum based particulate metal matrix ceramic composites is investigated by performing split Hopkinson pressure bar (SHPB) experiments. The composites are: NGP-2014 (15% SiC), NGT-6061 (15% SiC), and NGU-6061 (15% Al2O3), in which all the reinforcement materials are percentage by volume. Johnson-Cook constitutive model constants are evaluated from the high strain rate/high temperature data and implemented in a two dimensional finite element computer code (EPIC-2D) to simulate the penetration of an ogive nose tungsten projectile (23 grams) at a velocity 1.17 km/sec into the base 6061-T6 aluminum alloy and the composite NGU-6061. The simulated penetrations in the composite and in 6061-T6 aluminum agree with in 2%, in both materials, with the measured values.

  8. A solution of the Gross-Witten matrix model by nonlinear random processes

    SciTech Connect

    Buividovich, P. V.

    2011-05-23

    We illustrate the stochastic method for solving the Schwinger-Dyson equations in large-N quantum field theories described in ArXiv:1009.4033 on the example of the Gross-Witten unitary matrix model. In the strong-coupling limit, this method can be applied directly, while in the weak-coupling limit we change the variables from compact to noncompact ones in order to cast the Schwinger-Dyson equations in the stochastic form. This leads to a new action with an infinite number of higher-order interaction terms. Nevertheless, such an action can be efficiently handled. This suggests the way to apply the method of ArXiv:1009.4033 to field theories with U(N) field variables as well as to effective field theories in the large-N limit.

  9. Spacetime Emergence of the Robertson-Walker Universe from a Matrix Model

    SciTech Connect

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Meyer, Rene; Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2007-06-29

    Using a novel, string theory-inspired formalism based on a Hamiltonian constraint, we obtain a conformal mechanical system for the spatially flat four-dimensional Robertson-Walker Universe. Depending on parameter choices, this system describes either a relativistic particle in the Robertson-Walker background or metric fluctuations of the Robertson-Walker geometry. Moreover, we derive a tree-level M theory matrix model in this time-dependent background. Imposing the Hamiltonian constraint forces the spacetime geometry to be fuzzy near the big bang, while the classical Robertson-Walker geometry emerges as the Universe expands. From our approach, we also derive the temperature of the Universe interpolating between the radiation and matter dominated eras.

  10. Spacetime emergence of the robertson-walker universe from a matrix model.

    PubMed

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Meyer, René; Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2007-06-29

    Using a novel, string theory-inspired formalism based on a Hamiltonian constraint, we obtain a conformal mechanical system for the spatially flat four-dimensional Robertson-Walker Universe. Depending on parameter choices, this system describes either a relativistic particle in the Robertson-Walker background or metric fluctuations of the Robertson-Walker geometry. Moreover, we derive a tree-level M theory matrix model in this time-dependent background. Imposing the Hamiltonian constraint forces the spacetime geometry to be fuzzy near the big bang, while the classical Robertson-Walker geometry emerges as the Universe expands. From our approach, we also derive the temperature of the Universe interpolating between the radiation and matter dominated eras.

  11. Interfacial shear stress distribution in model composites. I - A Kevlar 49 fibre in an epoxy matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Jahankhani, H.; Galiotis, C. )

    1991-05-01

    The technique of Laser Raman Spectroscopy has been applied in the study of aramid fibers, such as Kevlar 49, and aramid/epoxy interfaces. A linear relationship has been found between Raman frequencies and strain upon loading a single Kevlar 49 filament in air. Model composites of single Kevlar 49 fibers embedded in epoxy resins have been fabricated and subjected to various degrees of mechanical deformation. The transfer lengths for reinforcement have been measured at various levels of applied tensile load and the dependence of transfer length upon applied matrix strain has been established. Finally, by balancing the tensile and the shear forces acting along the interface, the interfacial shear stress (ISS) distribution along the embedded fiber was obtained. 52 refs.

  12. Chiral random matrix model at finite chemical potential: Characteristic determinant and edge universality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yizhuang; Nowak, Maciej A.; Zahed, Ismail

    2016-08-01

    We derive an exact formula for the stochastic evolution of the characteristic determinant of a class of deformed Wishart matrices following from a chiral random matrix model of QCD at finite chemical potential. In the WKB approximation, the characteristic determinant describes a sharp droplet of eigenvalues that deforms and expands at large stochastic times. Beyond the WKB limit, the edges of the droplet are fuzzy and described by universal edge functions. At the chiral point, the characteristic determinant in the microscopic limit is universal. Remarkably, the physical chiral condensate at finite chemical potential may be extracted from current and quenched lattice Dirac spectra using the universal edge scaling laws, without having to solve the QCD sign problem.

  13. Matrix metalloproteinases and genetic mouse models in cancer research: a mini-review.

    PubMed

    Wieczorek, Edyta; Jablonska, Ewa; Wasowicz, Wojciech; Reszka, Edyta

    2015-01-01

    Carcinogenesis is a multistep and also a multifactorial process that involves agents like genetic and environmental factors. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are major proteolytic enzymes which are involved in cancer cell migration, invasion, and metastasis. Genetic variations in genes encoding the MMPs were shown in human studies to influence cancer risk and phenotypic features of a tumor. The complex role of MMPs seems to be important in the mechanism of carcinogenesis, but it is not well recognized. Rodent studies concentrated particularly on the better understanding of the biological functions of the MMPs and their impact on the pathological process, also through the modification of Mmp genes. This review presents current knowledge and the existing evidence on the importance of selected MMPs in genetic mouse models of cancer and human genetic association studies. Further, this work can be useful for scientists studying the role of the genetic impact of MMPs in carcinogenesis. PMID:25352026

  14. Spacetime emergence of the robertson-walker universe from a matrix model.

    PubMed

    Erdmenger, Johanna; Meyer, René; Park, Jeong-Hyuck

    2007-06-29

    Using a novel, string theory-inspired formalism based on a Hamiltonian constraint, we obtain a conformal mechanical system for the spatially flat four-dimensional Robertson-Walker Universe. Depending on parameter choices, this system describes either a relativistic particle in the Robertson-Walker background or metric fluctuations of the Robertson-Walker geometry. Moreover, we derive a tree-level M theory matrix model in this time-dependent background. Imposing the Hamiltonian constraint forces the spacetime geometry to be fuzzy near the big bang, while the classical Robertson-Walker geometry emerges as the Universe expands. From our approach, we also derive the temperature of the Universe interpolating between the radiation and matter dominated eras. PMID:17678078

  15. The agroecological matrix as alternative to the land-sparing/agriculture intensification model.

    PubMed

    Perfecto, Ivette; Vandermeer, John

    2010-03-30

    Among the myriad complications involved in the current food crisis, the relationship between agriculture and the rest of nature is one of the most important yet remains only incompletely analyzed. Particularly in tropical areas, agriculture is frequently seen as the antithesis of the natural world, where the problem is framed as one of minimizing land devoted to agriculture so as to devote more to conservation of biodiversity and other ecosystem services. In particular, the "forest transition model" projects an overly optimistic vision of a future where increased agricultural intensification (to produce more per hectare) and/or increased rural-to-urban migration (to reduce the rural population that cuts forest for agriculture) suggests a near future of much tropical aforestation and higher agricultural production. Reviewing recent developments in ecological theory (showing the importance of migration between fragments and local extinction rates) coupled with empirical evidence, we argue that there is little to suggest that the forest transition model is useful for tropical areas, at least under current sociopolitical structures. A model that incorporates the agricultural matrix as an integral component of conservation programs is proposed. Furthermore, we suggest that this model will be most successful within a framework of small-scale agroecological production.

  16. Numerical Computation of a Continuous-thrust State Transition Matrix Incorporating Accurate Hardware and Ephemeris Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald; Conway, Bruce; Englander, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A significant body of work exists showing that providing a nonlinear programming (NLP) solver with expressions for the problem constraint gradient substantially increases the speed of program execution and can also improve the robustness of convergence, especially for local optimizers. Calculation of these derivatives is often accomplished through the computation of spacecraft's state transition matrix (STM). If the two-body gravitational model is employed as is often done in the context of preliminary design, closed form expressions for these derivatives may be provided. If a high fidelity dynamics model, that might include perturbing forces such as the gravitational effect from multiple third bodies and solar radiation pressure is used then these STM's must be computed numerically. We present a method for the power hardward model and a full ephemeris model. An adaptive-step embedded eight order Dormand-Prince numerical integrator is discussed and a method for the computation of the time of flight derivatives in this framework is presented. The use of these numerically calculated derivatieves offer a substantial improvement over finite differencing in the context of a global optimizer. Specifically the inclusion of these STM's into the low thrust missiondesign tool chain in use at NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center allows for an increased preliminary mission design cadence.

  17. A transverse isotropic model for microporous solids: Application to coal matrix adsorption and swelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinoza, D. N.; Vandamme, M.; Dangla, P.; Pereira, J.-M.; Vidal-Gilbert, S.

    2013-12-01

    Understanding the adsorption-induced swelling in coal is critical for predictable and enhanced coal bed methane production. The coal matrix is a natural anisotropic disordered microporous solid. We develop an elastic transverse isotropic poromechanical model for microporous solids which couples adsorption and strain through adsorption stress functions and expresses the adsorption isotherm as a multivariate function depending on fluid pressure and solid strains. Experimental data from the literature help invert the anisotropic adsorptive-mechanical properties of Brzeszcze coal samples exposed to CO2. The main findings include the following: (1) adsorption-induced swelling can be modeled by including fluid-specific and pressure-dependent adsorption stress functions into equilibrium equations, (2) modeling results suggest that swelling anisotropy is mostly caused by anisotropy of the solid mechanical properties, and (3) the total amount of adsorbed gas measured by immersing coal in the adsorbate overestimates adsorption amount compared to in situ conditions up to ˜20%. The developed fully coupled model can be upscaled to determine the coal seam permeability through permeability-stress relationships.

  18. Modeling multi-component transport and enhanced anaerobic dechlorination processes in a single fracture-clay matrix system.

    PubMed

    Chambon, Julie C; Broholm, Mette M; Binning, Philip J; Bjerg, Poul L

    2010-03-01

    Clayey tills contaminated with chlorinated solvents are a threat to groundwater and are difficult to remediate. A numerical model is developed for assessing leaching processes and for simulating the remediation via enhanced anaerobic dechlorination. The model simulates the transport of a contaminant in a single fracture-clay matrix system coupled with a reactive model for anaerobic dechlorination. The model takes into account microbially driven anaerobic dechlorination, where sequential Monod kinetics with competitive inhibition is used to model the reaction rates, and degradation is localized to account for potential pore size limitations on microbial entry to the clay matrix. The model is used to assess the distribution of TCE and its daughter products in the clay matrix and the concentration of the different compounds at the outlet of the fracture. The time frame for complete cleanup and the contaminant flux out of the clay system are assessed for different distributions of microbial degradation. Results from a set of scenarios show that time to remove 90% of the initial mass is halved when dechlorination occurs in a 5cm reaction zone in the clay at the fracture-matrix interface (from 419 to 195years) and decreases by an order of magnitude when dechlorination occurs in the entire matrix (to 32years). The fracture spacing and the microbial parameters are shown to be the critical parameter for estimation of time frames depending on the system in question. Generally, the system is more sensitive to the physical processes, mainly diffusion in the matrix, than to the biogeochemical processes, when dechlorination is assumed to take place in a limited reaction zone only. The inclusion of sequential dechlorination in clay fracture transport models is crucial, as the contaminant flux to the aquifer will increase as a result of degradation due to the higher mobility of the formed daughter products DCE and VC. The model is used to examine the relationship between flux

  19. Modeling & processing of ceramic and polymer precursor ceramic matrix composite materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaolin

    of filler particle reaction, microstructure evolution, at the microscale as well as transient fluid flow, heat transfer, and species transport at the macroscale. The model comprises of (i) a microscale model and (ii) a macroscale transport model, and aims to provide optimal conditions for the fabrication process of the ceramics. The porous media macroscale model for SiC-based metal-ceramic materials processing will be developed to understand the thermal polymer pyrolysis, chemical reaction of active fillers and transport phenomena in the porous media. The macroscale model will include heat and mass transfer, curing, pyrolysis, chemical reaction and crystallization in a mixture of preceramic polymers and submicron/nano-sized metal particles of uranium, zirconium, niobium, or hafnium. The effects of heating rate, sample size, size and volume ratio of the metal particles on the reaction rate and product uniformity will be studied. The microscale model will be developed for modeling the synthesis of SiC matrix and metal particles. The macroscale model provides thermal boundary conditions to the microscale model. The microscale model applies to repetitive units in the porous structure and describes mass transport, composition changes and motion of metal particles. The unit-cell is the representation unit of the source material, and it consists of several metal particles, SiC matrix and other components produced from the synthesis process. The reactions between different components, the microstructure evolution of the product will be considered. The effects of heating rate and metal particle size on species uniformity and microstructure are investigated.

  20. An open-access modeled passenger flow matrix for the global air network in 2010.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhuojie; Wu, Xiao; Garcia, Andres J; Fik, Timothy J; Tatem, Andrew J

    2013-01-01

    The expanding global air network provides rapid and wide-reaching connections accelerating both domestic and international travel. To understand human movement patterns on the network and their socioeconomic, environmental and epidemiological implications, information on passenger flow is required. However, comprehensive data on global passenger flow remain difficult and expensive to obtain, prompting researchers to rely on scheduled flight seat capacity data or simple models of flow. This study describes the construction of an open-access modeled passenger flow matrix for all airports with a host city-population of more than 100,000 and within two transfers of air travel from various publicly available air travel datasets. Data on network characteristics, city population, and local area GDP amongst others are utilized as covariates in a spatial interaction framework to predict the air transportation flows between airports. Training datasets based on information from various transportation organizations in the United States, Canada and the European Union were assembled. A log-linear model controlling the random effects on origin, destination and the airport hierarchy was then built to predict passenger flows on the network, and compared to the results produced using previously published models. Validation analyses showed that the model presented here produced improved predictive power and accuracy compared to previously published models, yielding the highest successful prediction rate at the global scale. Based on this model, passenger flows between 1,491 airports on 644,406 unique routes were estimated in the prediction dataset. The airport node characteristics and estimated passenger flows are freely available as part of the Vector-Borne Disease Airline Importation Risk (VBD-Air) project at: www.vbd-air.com/data.

  1. The Effects of Q-Matrix Misspecification on Parameter Estimates and Classification Accuracy in the DINA Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rupp, Andre A.; Templin, Jonathan

    2008-01-01

    This article reports a study that investigated the effects of Q-matrix misspecifications on parameter estimates and misclassification rates for the deterministic-input, noisy "and" gate (DINA) model, which is a restricted latent class model for multiple classifications of respondents that can be useful for cognitively motivated diagnostic…

  2. Constrained positive matrix factorization: Elemental ratios, spatial distinction, and chemical transport model source contributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sturtz, Timothy M.

    Source apportionment models attempt to untangle the relationship between pollution sources and the impacts at downwind receptors. Two frameworks of source apportionment models exist: source-oriented and receptor-oriented. Source based apportionment models use presumed emissions and atmospheric processes to estimate the downwind source contributions. Conversely, receptor based models leverage speciated concentration data from downwind receptors and apply statistical methods to predict source contributions. Integration of both source-oriented and receptor-oriented models could lead to a better understanding of the implications sources have on the environment and society. The research presented here investigated three different types of constraints applied to the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model within the framework of the Multilinear Engine (ME-2): element ratio constraints, spatial separation constraints, and chemical transport model (CTM) source attribution constraints. PM10-2.5 mass and trace element concentrations were measured in Winston-Salem, Chicago, and St. Paul at up to 60 sites per city during two different seasons in 2010. PMF was used to explore the underlying sources of variability. Information on previously reported PM10-2.5 tire and brake wear profiles were used to constrain these features in PMF by prior specification of selected species ratios. We also modified PMF to allow for combining the measurements from all three cities into a single model while preserving city-specific soil features. Relatively minor differences were observed between model predictions with and without the prior ratio constraints, increasing confidence in our ability to identify separate brake wear and tire wear features. Using separate data, source contributions to total fine particle carbon predicted by a CTM were incorporated into the PMF receptor model to form a receptor-oriented hybrid model. The level of influence of the CTM versus traditional PMF was

  3. An iterative parallel sparse matrix equation solver with application to finite element modeling of electromagnetic scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Cwik, T.; Jamnejad, V.; Zuffada, C.

    1994-12-31

    The usefulness of finite element modeling follows from the ability to accurately simulate the geometry and three-dimensional fields on the scale of a fraction of a wavelength. To make this modeling practical for engineering design, it is necessary to integrate the stages of geometry modeling and mesh generation, numerical solution of the fields-a stage heavily dependent on the efficient use of a sparse matrix equation solver, and display of field information. The stages of geometry modeling, mesh generation, and field display are commonly completed using commercially available software packages. Algorithms for the numerical solution of the fields need to be written for the specific class of problems considered. Interior problems, i.e. simulating fields in waveguides and cavities, have been successfully solved using finite element methods. Exterior problems, i.e. simulating fields scattered or radiated from structures, are more difficult to model because of the need to numerically truncate the finite element mesh. To practically compute a solution to exterior problems, the domain must be truncated at some finite surface where the Sommerfeld radiation condition is enforced, either approximately or exactly. Approximate methods attempt to truncate the mesh using only local field information at each grid point, whereas exact methods are global, needing information from the entire mesh boundary. In this work, a method that couples three-dimensional finite element (FE) solutions interior to the bounding surface, with an efficient integral equation (IE) solution that exactly enforces the Sommerfeld radiation condition is developed. The bounding surface is taken to be a surface of revolution (SOR) to greatly reduce computational expense in the IE portion of the modeling.

  4. Comprehensive analysis of leukocytes, vascularization and matrix metalloproteinases in human menstrual xenograft model.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong; He, Bin; Xu, Xiangbo; Wang, Jiedong

    2011-02-17

    In our previous study, menstrual-like changes in mouse were provoked through the pharmacologic withdrawal of progesterone with mifepristone following induction of decidualization. However, mouse is not a natural menstruation animal, and the menstruation model using external stimuli may not truly reflect the occurrence and development of the human menstrual process. Therefore, we established a model of menstruation based on human endometrial xenotransplantation. In this model, human endometrial tissues were transplanted subcutaneously into SCID mice that were ovarectomized and supplemented with estrogen and progestogen by silastic implants with a scheme imitating the endocrinological milieu of human menstrual cycle. Morphology, hormone levels, and expression of vimentin and cytokeratin markers were evaluated to confirm the menstrual-like changes in this model. With 28 days of hormone treatment, transplanted human endometrium survived and underwent proliferation, differentiation and disintegration, similar to human endometrium in vivo. Human CD45+ cells showed a peak of increase 28 days post-transplantation. Three days after progesterone withdrawal, mouse CD45+ cells increased rapidly in number and were significantly greater than human CD45+ cell counts. Mouse CD31+ blood vascular-like structures were detected in both transplanted and host tissues. After progesterone withdrawal, the expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 1, 2, and 9 were increased. In summary, we successfully established a human endometrial xenotransplantation model in SCID mice, based on the results of menstrual-like changes in which MMP-1, 2 and 9 are involved. We showed that leukocytes are originated from in situ proliferation in human xenografts and involved in the occurrence of menstruation. This model will help to further understand the occurrence, growth, and differentiation of the endometrium and the underlying mechanisms of menstruation.

  5. Fluid-matrix interactions during high-temperature aquifer storage - lab experiments and modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wismeth, Carina; Ueckert, Martina; Muffler, Selina; Niessner, Reinhard; Baumann, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    High-temperature aquifer storage is a promising extension to combined heat and power plants because it allows to store excess heat during the summer months and to recuperate the heat in winter when the heat demand exceeds the production. Within a research project funded by the Bavarian State Ministry for Economic Affairs and Media, Energy and Technology and the BMW Group, a pilot scale test was run at the Dingolfing site (Bavaria, Germany) in 2014. Field data and an a priori numerical model suggest dissolution and precipitation of the processes in the calcareous aquifer. In order to quantify the reaction kinetics, lab experiments were run in an autoclave. The experimental results were used to setup and calibrate a numerical hydrogeochemical model based on PhreeqC. Laboratory experiments were performed in a closed system with respect to CO2 and under pre-defined conditions using a high temperature autoclave. Within the dissolution test series original core samples of different depth were heated up with ultrapure water in defined heating cycles up to 110 °C and at defined pressure. For combined dissolution and precipitation processes, tap water from Munich was used. The gas phase was equilibrated with CO2 regarding the pCO2 of tap water. Five water samples were taken for each heating cycle and analyzed by ion chromatography to quantify the calcium/magnesium concentrations and ratio. Additionally the sorption properties of the core materials were tested with respect to the fluorescent dyes used in the field tests. The starting point to model the fluid matrix interactions was literature data of dolomite and calcite rates, which were integrated in the conceptional model. While the model results matched the experimentally determined concentrations nicely, there was a discrepancy with respect to the effective surface areas, which is likely due to impurities of the natural rock materials. The model was able to describe the minor precipitation of calcite during the

  6. Decellularized skeletal muscle as an in vitro model for studying drug-extracellular matrix interactions

    PubMed Central

    Wassenaar, Jean W.; Boss, Gerry R.; Christman, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    Several factors can affect drug absorption after intramuscular (IM) injection: drug solubility, drug transport across cell membranes, and drug metabolism at the injection site. We found that potential interactions between the drug and the extracellular matrix (ECM) at the injection site can also affect the rate of absorption post-injection. Using decellularized skeletal muscle, we developed a simple method to model drug absorption after IM injection, and showed that the nature of the drug-ECM interaction could be investigated by adding compounds that alter binding. We validated the model using the vitamin B12 analog cobinamide with different bound ligands. Cobinamide is being developed as an IM injectable treatment for cyanide poisoning, and we found that the in vitro binding data correlated with previously published in vivo drug absorption in animals. Commercially available ECM products, such as collagen and GelTrex, did not recapitulate drug binding behavior. While decellularized ECM has been widely studied in fields such as tissue engineering, this work establishes a novel use of skeletal muscle ECM as a potential in vitro model to study drug-ECM interactions during drug development. PMID:26125502

  7. A model realizing the Harrison-Perkins-Scott lepton mixing matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimus, Walter; Lavoura, Luís

    2006-01-01

    We present a supersymmetric model in which the lepton mixing matrix U obeys, at the seesaw scale, the Harrison-Perkins-Scott Ansatz — vanishing Ue3, maximal atmospheric neutrino mixing, and sin 2θodot = 1/3 (θodot is the solar mixing angle). The model features a permutation symmetry S3 among the three lepton multiplets of each type — left-handed doublets, right-handed charged leptons, and right-handed neutrinos — and among three Higgs doublets and three zero-hypercharge scalar singlets; a fourth right-handed neutrino, a fourth Higgs doublet, and a fourth scalar singlet are invariant under S3. In addition, the model has seven Bbb Z2 symmetries, out of which six do not commute with S3. Supersymmetry is needed in order to eliminate some quartic terms from the scalar potential, quartic terms which would make impossible to obtain the required vacuum expectation values of the three Higgs doublets and three scalar singlets. The Yukawa couplings to the charged leptons are flavour diagonal, so that flavour-changing neutral Yukawa interactions only arise at loop level.

  8. Thimble regularization at work: From toy models to chiral random matrix theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Renzo, F.; Eruzzi, G.

    2015-10-01

    We apply the Lefschetz thimble formulation of field theories to a couple of different problems. We first address the solution of a complex zero-dimensional ϕ4 theory. Although very simple, this toy model makes us appreciate a few key issues of the method. In particular, we will solve the model by a correct accounting of all the thimbles giving a contribution to the partition function and we will discuss a number of algorithmic solutions to simulate this (simple) model. We will then move to a chiral random matrix (CRM) theory. This is a somehow more realistic setting, giving us once again the chance to tackle the same couple of fundamental questions: How many thimbles contribute to the solution? How can we make sure that we correctly sample configurations on the thimble? Since the exact result is known for the observable we study (a condensate), we can verify that, in the region of parameters we studied, only one thimble contributes and that the algorithmic solution that we set up works well, despite its very crude nature. The deviation of results from phase quenched ones highlights that in a certain region of parameter space there is a quite important sign problem. In view of this, the success of our thimble approach is quite a significant one.

  9. The agroecological matrix as alternative to the land-sparing/agriculture intensification model

    PubMed Central

    Perfecto, Ivette; Vandermeer, John

    2010-01-01

    Among the myriad complications involved in the current food crisis, the relationship between agriculture and the rest of nature is one of the most important yet remains only incompletely analyzed. Particularly in tropical areas, agriculture is frequently seen as the antithesis of the natural world, where the problem is framed as one of minimizing land devoted to agriculture so as to devote more to conservation of biodiversity and other ecosystem services. In particular, the “forest transition model” projects an overly optimistic vision of a future where increased agricultural intensification (to produce more per hectare) and/or increased rural-to-urban migration (to reduce the rural population that cuts forest for agriculture) suggests a near future of much tropical aforestation and higher agricultural production. Reviewing recent developments in ecological theory (showing the importance of migration between fragments and local extinction rates) coupled with empirical evidence, we argue that there is little to suggest that the forest transition model is useful for tropical areas, at least under current sociopolitical structures. A model that incorporates the agricultural matrix as an integral component of conservation programs is proposed. Furthermore, we suggest that this model will be most successful within a framework of small-scale agroecological production. PMID:20339080

  10. Transfer matrix modeling and experimental validation of cellular porous material with resonant inclusions.

    PubMed

    Doutres, Olivier; Atalla, Noureddine; Osman, Haisam

    2015-06-01

    Porous materials are widely used for improving sound absorption and sound transmission loss of vibrating structures. However, their efficiency is limited to medium and high frequencies of sound. A solution for improving their low frequency behavior while keeping an acceptable thickness is to embed resonant structures such as Helmholtz resonators (HRs). This work investigates the absorption and transmission acoustic performances of a cellular porous material with a two-dimensional periodic arrangement of HR inclusions. A low frequency model of a resonant periodic unit cell based on the parallel transfer matrix method is presented. The model is validated by comparison with impedance tube measurements and simulations based on both the finite element method and a homogenization based model. At the HR resonance frequency (i) the transmission loss is greatly improved and (ii) the sound absorption of the foam can be either decreased or improved depending on the HR tuning frequency and on the thickness and properties of the host foam. Finally, the diffuse field sound absorption and diffuse field sound transmission loss performance of a 2.6 m(2) resonant cellular material are measured. It is shown that the improvements observed at the Helmholtz resonant frequency on a single cell are confirmed at a larger scale. PMID:26093437

  11. Probing models of Dirac neutrino masses via the flavor structure of the mass matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanemura, Shinya; Sakurai, Kodai; Sugiyama, Hiroaki

    2016-07-01

    We classify models of the Dirac neutrino mass by concentrating on flavor structures of the mass matrix. The advantage of our classification is that we do not need to specify detail of models except for Yukawa interactions because flavor structures can be given only by products of Yukawa matrices. All possible Yukawa interactions between leptons (including the right-handed neutrino) are taken into account by introducing appropriate scalar fields. We also take into account the case of Yukawa interactions of leptons with the dark matter candidate. Then, we see that flavor structures can be classified into seven groups. The result is useful for the efficient test of models of the neutrino mass. One of seven groups can be tested by measuring the absolute neutrino mass. Other two can be tested by probing the violation of the lepton universality in ℓ →ℓ‧ ν ν ‾. In order to test the other four groups, we can rely on searches for new scalar particles at collider experiments.

  12. Modeling of Gas-Liquid Flow Through An Interconnected Channel Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Crandall, Dustin; Ahmadi, Goodarz; Smith, Duane.H

    2009-01-01

    The motion of a less viscous, non-wetting gas into a liquid-saturated porous medium is known as drainage. Drainage is an important process in environmental applications, such as enhanced oil recovery and geologic CO2 sequestration. Understanding what conditions will increase the volume of gas that can saturate an initially water-saturated porous medium is of importance for predictions of the total CO2 volume that can be sequestered in known geologic formations. To further the understanding of how drainage flow properties are related to different injection flow-rates, a porous medium consisting of interconnected channels and pores was manufactured to perform bench-top experiments of drainage. Additionally, a finite-volume model of this interconnected channel matrix was constructed. Numerical simulations of constant-rate injection into the model porous medium are first shown to compare favorably to the bench-top experiments. The fluid and injection properties of the drainage process were then varied to evaluate the flow conditions which would maximize the volume of gas trapped within the porous medium. In particular, CO2 displacing brine within the porous medium was modeled, with representative subsurface temperatures and fluid properties. It was shown with these fluid conditions a higher final saturation of the invading less-viscous CO2 was obtained, as compared to air into water experiments at similar injection rates.

  13. A novel preclinical rodent model of collagenase-induced germinal matrix/intraventricular hemorrhage.

    PubMed

    Alles, Yanet Chong Juarez; Greggio, Samuel; Alles, Raul Miguel; Azevedo, Pâmella Nunes; Xavier, Léder Leal; DaCosta, Jaderson Costa

    2010-10-14

    Germinal matrix/intraventricular hemorrhage (GMH/IVH) is a complication that arises in premature infants associated with neurological sequelae. Greater understanding of GMH/IVH is needed to develop therapies, a goal that depends on the existence of appropriate animal models. Towards this goal, we aimed to develop a rodent model of GMH/IVH based on collagenase-induced hemorrhage that exhibits histological and neurological consequences similar to that seen in patients. Male 6-day-old rats were placed on a warming pad and anesthetized with halothane/nitrous oxide delivered by face mask. Uni- or bilateral periventricular injections of 2-μl collagenase (2.0 U) were performed freehand with a needle inserted percutaneously. Sham rats were infused with saline. Early neonatal development, long-term motor and cognitive performances and alterations in brain volume were assessed. Collagenase-based GMH/IVH negatively affected ambulation, surface righting and negative geotaxis outcomes more evidently in bilaterally infused rats, which also presented an early decrease in brain volume, as assessed by the Cavalieri method. In adult animals, a unilateral collagenase infusion produced no significant alteration on forepaw preference. Only bilaterally infused rats presented an impairment of object recognition memory and locomotor deficit. Nevertheless, histological evaluation also demonstrated a persistent brain volume reduction in bilaterally infused rats. Our study provides a pioneering animal model of collagenase-based GMH/IVH, which can be used to evaluate preventive strategies and potential therapeutic interventions for this disorder. PMID:20692236

  14. Discrete Element Framework for Modelling Extracellular Matrix, Deformable Cells and Subcellular Components

    PubMed Central

    Gardiner, Bruce S.; Wong, Kelvin K. L.; Joldes, Grand R.; Rich, Addison J.; Tan, Chin Wee; Burgess, Antony W.; Smith, David W.

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a framework for modelling biological tissues based on discrete particles. Cell components (e.g. cell membranes, cell cytoskeleton, cell nucleus) and extracellular matrix (e.g. collagen) are represented using collections of particles. Simple particle to particle interaction laws are used to simulate and control complex physical interaction types (e.g. cell-cell adhesion via cadherins, integrin basement membrane attachment, cytoskeletal mechanical properties). Particles may be given the capacity to change their properties and behaviours in response to changes in the cellular microenvironment (e.g., in response to cell-cell signalling or mechanical loadings). Each particle is in effect an ‘agent’, meaning that the agent can sense local environmental information and respond according to pre-determined or stochastic events. The behaviour of the proposed framework is exemplified through several biological problems of ongoing interest. These examples illustrate how the modelling framework allows enormous flexibility for representing the mechanical behaviour of different tissues, and we argue this is a more intuitive approach than perhaps offered by traditional continuum methods. Because of this flexibility, we believe the discrete modelling framework provides an avenue for biologists and bioengineers to explore the behaviour of tissue systems in a computational laboratory. PMID:26452000

  15. Transfer matrix modeling and experimental validation of cellular porous material with resonant inclusions.

    PubMed

    Doutres, Olivier; Atalla, Noureddine; Osman, Haisam

    2015-06-01

    Porous materials are widely used for improving sound absorption and sound transmission loss of vibrating structures. However, their efficiency is limited to medium and high frequencies of sound. A solution for improving their low frequency behavior while keeping an acceptable thickness is to embed resonant structures such as Helmholtz resonators (HRs). This work investigates the absorption and transmission acoustic performances of a cellular porous material with a two-dimensional periodic arrangement of HR inclusions. A low frequency model of a resonant periodic unit cell based on the parallel transfer matrix method is presented. The model is validated by comparison with impedance tube measurements and simulations based on both the finite element method and a homogenization based model. At the HR resonance frequency (i) the transmission loss is greatly improved and (ii) the sound absorption of the foam can be either decreased or improved depending on the HR tuning frequency and on the thickness and properties of the host foam. Finally, the diffuse field sound absorption and diffuse field sound transmission loss performance of a 2.6 m(2) resonant cellular material are measured. It is shown that the improvements observed at the Helmholtz resonant frequency on a single cell are confirmed at a larger scale.

  16. Oxidation of Carbon Fibers in a Cracked Ceramic Matrix Composite Modeled as a Function of Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Halbig, Michael C.; Cawley, James D.; Eckel, Andrew J.

    2003-01-01

    The oxidation model simulates the oxidation of the reinforcing carbon fibers within a ceramic matrix composite material containing as-fabricated microcracks. The physics-based oxidation model uses theoretically and experimentally determined variables as input for the model. The model simulates the ingress of oxygen through microcracks into a two-dimensional plane within the composite material. Model input includes temperature, oxygen concentration, the reaction rate constant, the diffusion coefficient, and the crack opening width as a function of the mechanical and thermal loads. The model is run in an iterative process for a two-dimensional grid system in which oxygen diffuses through the porous and cracked regions of the material and reacts with carbon in short time steps. The model allows the local oxygen concentrations and carbon volumes from the edge to the interior of the composite to be determined over time. Oxidation damage predicted by the model was compared with that observed from microstructural analysis of experimentally tested composite material to validate the model for two temperatures of interest. When the model is run for low-temperature conditions, the kinetics are reaction controlled. Carbon and oxygen reactions occur relatively slowly. Therefore, oxygen can bypass the carbon near the outer edge and diffuse into the interior so that it saturates the entire composite at relatively high concentrations. The kinetics are limited by the reaction rate between carbon and oxygen. This results in an interior that has high local concentrations of oxygen and a similar amount of consumed carbon throughout the cross section. When the model is run for high-temperature conditions, the kinetics are diffusion controlled. Carbon and oxygen reactions occur very quickly. The carbon consumes oxygen as soon as it is supplied. The kinetics are limited by the relatively slow rate at which oxygen is supplied in comparison to the relatively fast rate at which carbon and

  17. A fiber matrix model for fluid flow and streaming potentials in the canaliculi of an osteon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zeng, Y.; Cowin, S. C.; Weinbaum, S.

    1994-01-01

    A theoretical model is developed to predict the fluid shear stress and streaming potential at the surface of osteocytic processes in the lacunar-canalicular porosity of an osteon when the osteon is subject to mechanical loads that are parallel or perpendicular to its axis. The theory developed in Weinbaum et al. (31) for the flow through a proteoglycan matrix in a canaliculus is employed in a poroelastic model for the osteon. Our formulation is a generalization of that of Petrov et al. (17). Our model predicts that, in order to satisfy the measured frequency dependence of the phase and magnitude of the SGP in macroscopic bone samples, the fiber spacing in the fluid annulus must lie in the narrow range 6-7 nm typical of the spacing of GAG sidechains along a protein monomer. The model predictions for the local SGP profiles in the osteon agree with the experimental observations of Starkebaum et al. (24). The theory predicts that the pore pressure relaxation time, tau d, for a 150-300 microns diameter osteon with the foregoing matrix structure is approximately 0.03-0.13 sec, and that the amplitude of the mean fluid shear stress on the membrane of the osteocytic process at the mean areal radius of the osteon has a maximum at 28 Hz if tau d = 0.06 sec. This maximum, which is independent of the magnitude of the loading, could be important in vivo since the recent experiments of Turner et al. (28) and McLeod et al. (15) have a peak in the strain frequency spectrum between 20 and 30 Hz that also appears to be independent of the type (magnitude) of loading. Numerical predictions for the amplitude of the average fluid shear stress on the osteocytic membrane at the mean areal radius of the osteon show that the fluid shear stress associated with the low amplitude 20-30 Hz spectral strain component is at least as large as the average fluid shear stress associated with the high amplitude 1 Hz stride component, although the latter loading is an order of magnitude larger, and has a

  18. Modeling extracellular matrix (ECM) alterations in ovarian cancer by multiphoton excited fabrication of stromal models (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campagnola, Paul J.; Ajeti, Visar; Lara, Jorge; Eliceiri, Kevin W.; Patankar, Mansh

    2016-04-01

    A profound remodeling of the extracellular matrix (ECM) occurs in human ovarian cancer but it unknown how this affects tumor growth, where this understanding could lead to better diagnostics and therapeutic approaches. We investigate the role of these ECM alterations by using multiphoton excited (MPE) polymerization to fabricate biomimetic models to investigate operative cell-matrix interactions in invasion/metastasis. First, we create nano/microstructured gradients mimicking the basal lamina to study adhesion/migration dynamics of ovarian cancer cells of differing metastatic potential. We find a strong haptotactic response that depends on both contact guidance and ECM binding cues. While we found enhanced migration for more invasive cells, the specifics of alignment and directed migration also depend on cell polarity. We further use MPE fabrication to create collagen scaffolds with complex, 3D submicron morphology. The stromal scaffold designs are derived directly from "blueprints" based on SHG images of normal, high risk, and malignant ovarian tissues. The models are seeded with different cancer cell lines and this allows decoupling of the roles of cell characteristics (metastatic potential) and ECM structure and composition (normal vs cancer) on adhesion/migration dynamics. We found the malignant stroma structure promotes enhanced migration and proliferation and also cytoskeletal alignment. Creating synthetic models based on fibers patterns further allows decoupling the topographic roles of the fibers themselves vs their alignment within the tissue. These models cannot be synthesized by other conventional fabrication methods and we suggest the MPE image-based fabrication method will enable a variety of studies in cancer biology.

  19. An Investigation of Reliability Models for Ceramic Matrix Composites and their Implementation into Finite Element Codes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duffy, Stephen F.

    1998-01-01

    The development of modeling approaches for the failure analysis of ceramic-based material systems used in high temperature environments was the primary objective of this research effort. These materials have the potential to support many key engineering technologies related to the design of aeropropulsion systems. Monolithic ceramics exhibit a number of useful properties such as retention of strength at high temperatures, chemical inertness, and low density. However, the use of monolithic ceramics has been limited by their inherent brittleness and a large variation in strength. This behavior has motivated material scientists to reinforce the monolithic material with a ceramic fiber. The addition of a second ceramic phase with an optimized interface increases toughness and marginally increases strength. The primary purpose of the fiber is to arrest crack growth, not to increase strength. The material systems of interest in this research effort were laminated ceramic matrix composites, as well as two- and three- dimensional fabric reinforced ceramic composites. These emerging composite systems can compete with metals in many demanding applications. However, the ongoing metamorphosis of ceramic composite material systems, and the lack of standardized design data has in the past tended to minimize research efforts related to structural analysis. Many structural components fabricated from ceramic matrix composites (CMC) have been designed by "trial and error." The justification for this approach lies in the fact that during the initial developmental phases for a material system fabrication issues are paramount. Emphasis is placed on demonstrating feasibility rather than fully understanding the processes controlling mechanical behavior. This is understandable during periods of rapid improvements in material properties for any composite system. But to avoid the ad hoc approach, the analytical methods developed under this effort can be used to develop rational structural

  20. Facultative Control of Matrix Production Optimizes Competitive Fitness in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 Biofilm Models

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Jonas S.; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Squyres, Georgia R.; Price-Whelan, Alexa; de Santiago Torio, Ana; Song, Angela; Cornell, William C.; Sørensen, Søren J.

    2015-01-01

    As biofilms grow, resident cells inevitably face the challenge of resource limitation. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, electron acceptor availability affects matrix production and, as a result, biofilm morphogenesis. The secreted matrix polysaccharide Pel is required for pellicle formation and for colony wrinkling, two activities that promote access to O2. We examined the exploitability and evolvability of Pel production at the air-liquid interface (during pellicle formation) and on solid surfaces (during colony formation). Although Pel contributes to the developmental response to electron acceptor limitation in both biofilm formation regimes, we found variation in the exploitability of its production and necessity for competitive fitness between the two systems. The wild type showed a competitive advantage against a non-Pel-producing mutant in pellicles but no advantage in colonies. Adaptation to the pellicle environment selected for mutants with a competitive advantage against the wild type in pellicles but also caused a severe disadvantage in colonies, even in wrinkled colony centers. Evolution in the colony center produced divergent phenotypes, while adaptation to the colony edge produced mutants with clear competitive advantages against the wild type in this O2-replete niche. In general, the structurally heterogeneous colony environment promoted more diversification than the more homogeneous pellicle. These results suggest that the role of Pel in community structure formation in response to electron acceptor limitation is unique to specific biofilm models and that the facultative control of Pel production is required for PA14 to maintain optimum benefit in different types of communities. PMID:26431965

  1. Iterative linearized density matrix propagation for modeling coherent excitation energy transfer in photosynthetic light harvesting.

    PubMed

    Huo, P; Coker, D F

    2010-11-14

    Rather than incoherent hopping between chromophores, experimental evidence suggests that the excitation energy transfer in some biological light harvesting systems initially occurs coherently, and involves coherent superposition states in which excitation spreads over multiple chromophores separated by several nanometers. Treating such delocalized coherent superposition states in the presence of decoherence and dissipation arising from coupling to an environment is a significant challenge for conventional theoretical tools that either use a perturbative approach or make the Markovian approximation. In this paper, we extend the recently developed iterative linearized density matrix (ILDM) propagation scheme [E. R. Dunkel et al., J. Chem. Phys. 129, 114106 (2008)] to study coherent excitation energy transfer in a model of the Fenna-Matthews-Olsen light harvesting complex from green sulfur bacteria. This approach is nonperturbative and uses a discrete path integral description employing a short time approximation to the density matrix propagator that accounts for interference between forward and backward paths of the quantum excitonic system while linearizing the phase in the difference between the forward and backward paths of the environmental degrees of freedom resulting in a classical-like treatment of these variables. The approach avoids making the Markovian approximation and we demonstrate that it successfully describes the coherent beating of the site populations on different chromophores and gives good agreement with other methods that have been developed recently for going beyond the usual approximations, thus providing a new reliable theoretical tool to study coherent exciton transfer in light harvesting systems. We conclude with a discussion of decoherence in independent bilinearly coupled harmonic chromophore baths. The ILDM propagation approach in principle can be applied to more general descriptions of the environment.

  2. Anomalous NMR relaxation in cartilage matrix components and native cartilage: Fractional-order models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magin, Richard L.; Li, Weiguo; Pilar Velasco, M.; Trujillo, Juan; Reiter, David A.; Morgenstern, Ashley; Spencer, Richard G.

    2011-06-01

    We present a fractional-order extension of the Bloch equations to describe anomalous NMR relaxation phenomena ( T1 and T2). The model has solutions in the form of Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions that generalize conventional exponential relaxation. Such functions have been shown by others to be useful for describing dielectric and viscoelastic relaxation in complex, heterogeneous materials. Here, we apply these fractional-order T1 and T2 relaxation models to experiments performed at 9.4 and 11.7 Tesla on type I collagen gels, chondroitin sulfate mixtures, and to bovine nasal cartilage (BNC), a largely isotropic and homogeneous form of cartilage. The results show that the fractional-order analysis captures important features of NMR relaxation that are typically described by multi-exponential decay models. We find that the T2 relaxation of BNC can be described in a unique way by a single fractional-order parameter ( α), in contrast to the lack of uniqueness of multi-exponential fits in the realistic setting of a finite signal-to-noise ratio. No anomalous behavior of T1 was observed in BNC. In the single-component gels, for T2 measurements, increasing the concentration of the largest components of cartilage matrix, collagen and chondroitin sulfate, results in a decrease in α, reflecting a more restricted aqueous environment. The quality of the curve fits obtained using Mittag-Leffler and stretched exponential functions are in some cases superior to those obtained using mono- and bi-exponential models. In both gels and BNC, α appears to account for micro-structural complexity in the setting of an altered distribution of relaxation times. This work suggests the utility of fractional-order models to describe T2 NMR relaxation processes in biological tissues.

  3. Incorporating uncertainty of management costs in sensitivity analyses of matrix population models.

    PubMed

    Salomon, Yacov; McCarthy, Michael A; Taylor, Peter; Wintle, Brendan A

    2013-02-01

    The importance of accounting for economic costs when making environmental-management decisions subject to resource constraints has been increasingly recognized in recent years. In contrast, uncertainty associated with such costs has often been ignored. We developed a method, on the basis of economic theory, that accounts for the uncertainty in population-management decisions. We considered the case where, rather than taking fixed values, model parameters are random variables that represent the situation when parameters are not precisely known. Hence, the outcome is not precisely known either. Instead of maximizing the expected outcome, we maximized the probability of obtaining an outcome above a threshold of acceptability. We derived explicit analytical expressions for the optimal allocation and its associated probability, as a function of the threshold of acceptability, where the model parameters were distributed according to normal and uniform distributions. To illustrate our approach we revisited a previous study that incorporated cost-efficiency analyses in management decisions that were based on perturbation analyses of matrix population models. Incorporating derivations from this study into our framework, we extended the model to address potential uncertainties. We then applied these results to 2 case studies: management of a Koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) population and conservation of an olive ridley sea turtle (Lepidochelys olivacea) population. For low aspirations, that is, when the threshold of acceptability is relatively low, the optimal strategy was obtained by diversifying the allocation of funds. Conversely, for high aspirations, the budget was directed toward management actions with the highest potential effect on the population. The exact optimal allocation was sensitive to the choice of uncertainty model. Our results highlight the importance of accounting for uncertainty when making decisions and suggest that more effort should be placed on

  4. A current-matrix model for metallic and dielectric postwall waveguides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coenen, T. J.; Bekers, D. J.; Tauritz, J. L.; van Vliet, F. E.

    2011-10-01

    Waveguide structure integration in planar substrates for use in microwave components has received considerable attention in recent years. Waveguides with side walls consisting of cylindrical posts (postwall waveguides or PWWGs) are of interest, since they are compatible with standard PCB fabrication technology and exhibit low loss. In this paper we present an electromagnetic model for PWWG building blocks, whose characteristics are described entirely in terms of equivalent electric and magnetic surface currents at predefined port interfaces consistent with Lorentz's reciprocity theorem. Introducing input and output surface currents, we determine the response of a block for a given port excitation. The expansion of the currents in terms of suitable bases results in a matrix that relates input and output currents. The scattering parameters of a building block are determined by expressing waveguide modes in terms of these bases. This facilitates the future integration of PWWG components in a microwave circuit simulator. We validate our model by comparing the results for simulated and measured uniform PWWGs implemented with metallic and dielectric posts.

  5. Singular-potential random-matrix model arising in mean-field glassy systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akemann, Gernot; Villamaina, Dario; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2014-06-01

    We consider an invariant random matrix ensemble where the standard Gaussian potential is distorted by an additional single pole of arbitrary fixed order. Potentials with first- and second-order poles have been considered previously and found applications in quantum chaos and number theory. Here we present an application to mean-field glassy systems. We derive and solve the loop equation in the planar limit for the corresponding class of potentials. We find that the resulting mean or macroscopic spectral density is generally supported on two disconnected intervals lying on the two sides of the repulsive pole, whose edge points can be completely determined imposing the additional constraint of traceless matrices on average. For an unbounded potential with an attractive pole, we also find a possible one-cut solution for certain values of the couplings, which is ruled out when the traceless condition is imposed. Motivated by the calculation of the distribution of the spin-glass susceptibility in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin-glass model, we consider in detail a second-order pole for a zero-trace model and provide the most explicit solution in this case. In the limit of a vanishing pole, we recover the standard semicircle. Working in the planar limit, our results apply to matrices with orthogonal, unitary, and symplectic invariance. Numerical simulations and an independent analytical Coulomb fluid calculation for symmetric potentials provide an excellent confirmation of our results.

  6. STAT3 accelerates uterine epithelial regeneration in a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Hiraoka, Takehiro; Saito-Fujita, Tomoko; Matsuo, Mitsunori; Egashira, Mahiro; Matsumoto, Leona; Haraguchi, Hirofumi; Dey, Sudhansu K.; Furukawa, Katsuko S.; Fujii, Tomoyuki; Osuga, Yutaka

    2016-01-01

    Although a close connection between uterine regeneration and successful pregnancy in both humans and mice has been consistently observed, its molecular basis remains unclear. We here established a mouse model of decellularized uterine matrix (DUM) transplantation. Resected mouse uteri were processed with SDS to make DUMs without any intact cells. DUMs were transplanted into the mouse uteri with artificially induced defects, and all the uterine layers were recovered at the DUM transplantation sites within a month. In the regenerated uteri, normal hormone responsiveness in early pregnancy was observed, suggesting the regeneration of functional uteri. Uterine epithelial cells rapidly migrated and formed a normal uterine epithelial layer within a week, indicating a robust epithelial-regenerating capacity. Stromal and myometrial regeneration occurred following epithelial regeneration. In ovariectomized mice, uterine regeneration of the DUM transplantation was similarly observed, suggesting that ovarian hormones are not essential for this regeneration process. Importantly, the regenerating epithelium around the DUM demonstrated heightened STAT3 phosphorylation and cell proliferation, which was suppressed in uteri of Stat3 conditional knockout mice. These data suggest a key role of STAT3 in the initial step of the uterine regeneration process. The DUM transplantation model is a powerful tool for uterine regeneration research. PMID:27358915

  7. Estimating nonnegative matrix model activations with deep neural networks to increase perceptual speech quality.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Donald S; Wang, Yuxuan; Wang, DeLiang

    2015-09-01

    As a means of speech separation, time-frequency masking applies a gain function to the time-frequency representation of noisy speech. On the other hand, nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) addresses separation by linearly combining basis vectors from speech and noise models to approximate noisy speech. This paper presents an approach for improving the perceptual quality of speech separated from background noise at low signal-to-noise ratios. An ideal ratio mask is estimated, which separates speech from noise with reasonable sound quality. A deep neural network then approximates clean speech by estimating activation weights from the ratio-masked speech, where the weights linearly combine elements from a NMF speech model. Systematic comparisons using objective metrics, including the perceptual evaluation of speech quality, show that the proposed algorithm achieves higher speech quality than related masking and NMF methods. In addition, a listening test was performed and its results show that the output of the proposed algorithm is preferred over the comparison systems in terms of speech quality. PMID:26428778

  8. Mechanics and crack formation in the extracellular matrix with articular cartilage as a model system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearns, Sarah; Silverberg, Jesse; Bonassar, Lawrence; Cohen, Itai; Das, Moumita

    We investigate the mechanical structure-function relations in the extracellular matrix (ECM) with focus on crack formation and failure. As a model system, our study focuses on the ECM in articular cartilage (AC), the tissue that covers the ends of bones, and distributes load in joints including in the knees, shoulders, and hips. The strength, toughness, and crack resistance of native articular cartilage is unparalleled in materials made by humankind. This mechanical response is mainly due to its ECM. The ECM in AC has two major mechanobiological components: a network of the biopolymer collagen and a flexible aggrecan gel. We model this system as a biopolymer network embedded in a swelling gel, and investigate the conditions for the formation and propagation of cracks using a combination of rigidity percolation theory and energy minimization approaches. Our results may provide useful insights into the design principles of the ECM as well as of biomimetic hydrogels that are mechanically robust and can, at the same time, easily adapt to cues in their surroundings. This work was partially supported by a Cottrell College Science Award.

  9. Density-matrix based determination of low-energy model Hamiltonians from ab initio wavefunctions

    SciTech Connect

    Changlani, Hitesh J.; Zheng, Huihuo; Wagner, Lucas K.

    2015-09-14

    We propose a way of obtaining effective low energy Hubbard-like model Hamiltonians from ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations for molecular and extended systems. The Hamiltonian parameters are fit to best match the ab initio two-body density matrices and energies of the ground and excited states, and thus we refer to the method as ab initio density matrix based downfolding. For benzene (a finite system), we find good agreement with experimentally available energy gaps without using any experimental inputs. For graphene, a two dimensional solid (extended system) with periodic boundary conditions, we find the effective on-site Hubbard U{sup ∗}/t to be 1.3 ± 0.2, comparable to a recent estimate based on the constrained random phase approximation. For molecules, such parameterizations enable calculation of excited states that are usually not accessible within ground state approaches. For solids, the effective Hamiltonian enables large-scale calculations using techniques designed for lattice models.

  10. Transfer matrix modeling of a tensioned piezo-solar hybrid energy harvesting ribbon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chatterjee, Punnag; Bryant, Matthew

    2015-04-01

    This paper proposes a multifunctional compliant structure that can harvest electrical power from both incident sunlight and ambient mechanical energy including wind flow or vibration. The energy harvesting device consists of a slender, ribbon-like, flexible thin film solar cell that is laminated with piezoelectric patches. The harvester is mounted in longitudinal tension and subjected to a transverse wind flow to excite flow-induced aeroelastic vibrations. This paper formulates an analytic model of the bending dynamics of the device. We present a Transfer Matrix formulation that also accounts for the changes in natural frequencies and mode shapes of the system when subjected to axial loads in a beam. It also observed that mode shape obtained using TMM formulation shows numerical stability even for very high tensile loads providing results consistent with the geometric boundary conditions applied at the ends of a beam. This article also discusses about structurally modeling a piezo - solar energy harvester using TMM methodology, where a thin clampedclamped solar film is bonded with piezo patches having a much higher bending stiffness. Additionally, the effect of axial tension on the mode shape of the thin host structure of the piezo-solar ribbon is presented and it is shown how this tension can be used advantageously to affect the strain distribution of the entire structure and introduce higher strains at the piezo patches.

  11. The neurochemical mobile with non-linear interaction matrix: an exploratory computational model.

    PubMed

    Qi, Z; Fieni, D; Tretter, F; Voit, E O

    2013-05-01

    Several years ago, the "neurochemical mobile" was introduced as a visual tool for explaining the different balances between neurotransmitters in the brain and their role in mental disorders. Here we complement this concept with a non-linear computational systems model representing the direct and indirect interactions between neurotransmitters, as they have been described in the "neurochemical interaction matrix." The model is constructed within the framework of biochemical systems theory, which facilitates the mapping of numerically ill-characterized systems into a mathematical and computational construct that permits a variety of analyses. Simulations show how short- and long-term perturbations in any of the neurotransmitters migrate through the entire system, thereby affecting the balances within the mobile. In cases of short-term alterations, transients are of particular interest, whereas long-term changes shed light on persistently altered, allostatic states, which in mental diseases and sleep disorders could be due to a combination of unfavorable factors, resulting from a specific genetic predisposition, epigenetic effects, disease, or the repeated use of drugs, such as opioids and amphetamines.

  12. Singular-potential random-matrix model arising in mean-field glassy systems.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Gernot; Villamaina, Dario; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2014-06-01

    We consider an invariant random matrix ensemble where the standard Gaussian potential is distorted by an additional single pole of arbitrary fixed order. Potentials with first- and second-order poles have been considered previously and found applications in quantum chaos and number theory. Here we present an application to mean-field glassy systems. We derive and solve the loop equation in the planar limit for the corresponding class of potentials. We find that the resulting mean or macroscopic spectral density is generally supported on two disconnected intervals lying on the two sides of the repulsive pole, whose edge points can be completely determined imposing the additional constraint of traceless matrices on average. For an unbounded potential with an attractive pole, we also find a possible one-cut solution for certain values of the couplings, which is ruled out when the traceless condition is imposed. Motivated by the calculation of the distribution of the spin-glass susceptibility in the Sherrington-Kirkpatrick spin-glass model, we consider in detail a second-order pole for a zero-trace model and provide the most explicit solution in this case. In the limit of a vanishing pole, we recover the standard semicircle. Working in the planar limit, our results apply to matrices with orthogonal, unitary, and symplectic invariance. Numerical simulations and an independent analytical Coulomb fluid calculation for symmetric potentials provide an excellent confirmation of our results.

  13. Density-matrix based determination of low-energy model Hamiltonians from ab initio wavefunctions.

    PubMed

    Changlani, Hitesh J; Zheng, Huihuo; Wagner, Lucas K

    2015-09-14

    We propose a way of obtaining effective low energy Hubbard-like model Hamiltonians from ab initio quantum Monte Carlo calculations for molecular and extended systems. The Hamiltonian parameters are fit to best match the ab initio two-body density matrices and energies of the ground and excited states, and thus we refer to the method as ab initio density matrix based downfolding. For benzene (a finite system), we find good agreement with experimentally available energy gaps without using any experimental inputs. For graphene, a two dimensional solid (extended system) with periodic boundary conditions, we find the effective on-site Hubbard U(∗)/t to be 1.3 ± 0.2, comparable to a recent estimate based on the constrained random phase approximation. For molecules, such parameterizations enable calculation of excited states that are usually not accessible within ground state approaches. For solids, the effective Hamiltonian enables large-scale calculations using techniques designed for lattice models. PMID:26374007

  14. Line-Mixing Relaxation Matrix model for spectroscopic and radiative transfer studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mendaza, Teresa; Martin-Torres, Javier

    2016-04-01

    We present a generic model to compute the Relaxation Matrix easily adaptable to any molecule and type of spectroscopic lines or bands in non-reactive molecule collisions regimes. It also provides the dipole moment of every transition and level population of the selected molecule. The model is based on the Energy-Corrected Sudden (ECS) approximation/theory introduced by DePristo (1980), and on previous Relaxation Matrix studies for the interaction between molecular ro-vibrational levels (Ben-Rueven, 1966), atoms (Rosenkranz, 1975), linear molecules (Strow and Reuter, 1994; Niro, Boulet and Hartmann, 2004), and symmetric but not linear molecules (Tran et al., 2006). The model is open source, and it is user-friendly. To the point that the user only has to select the wished molecule and vibrational band to perform the calculations. It reads the needed spectroscopic data from the HIgh-resolution TRANsmission molecular absorption (HITRAN) (Rothman et al., 2013) and ExoMol (Tennyson and Yurchenko, 2012). In this work we present an example of the calculations with our model for the case of the 2ν3 band of methane (CH4), and a comparison with a previous work (Tran et al., 2010). The data produced by our model can be used to characterise the line-mixing effects on ro-vibrational lines of the infrared emitters of any atmosphere, to calculate accurate absorption spectra, that are needed in the interpretation of atmospheric spectra, radiative transfer modelling and General Circulation Models (GCM). References [1] A.E. DePristo, Collisional influence on vibration-rotation spectral line shapes: A scaling theoretical analysis and simplification, J. Chem. Phys. 73(5), 1980. [2] A. Ben-Reuven, Impact broadening of microwave spectra, Phys. Rev. 145(1), 7-22, 1966. [3] P.W. Rosenkranz, Shape of the 5 mm Oxygen Band in the Atmosphere, IEEE Transactions on Antennas and Propagation, vol. AP-23, no. 4, pp. 498-506, 1975. [4] Strow, L.L., D.D. Tobin, and S.E. Hannon, A compilation of

  15. Mouse model of pulmonary cavitary tuberculosis and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Alvaro A; Tasneen, Rokeya; Pokkali, Supriya; Xu, Ziyue; Converse, Paul J; Klunk, Mariah H; Mollura, Daniel J; Nuermberger, Eric L; Jain, Sanjay K

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation is a key pathological feature of human tuberculosis (TB), and is a well-recognized risk factor for transmission of infection, relapse after treatment and the emergence of drug resistance. Despite intense interest in the mechanisms underlying cavitation and its negative impact on treatment outcomes, there has been limited study of this phenomenon, owing in large part to the limitations of existing animal models. Although cavitation does not occur in conventional mouse strains after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, cavitary lung lesions have occasionally been observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice. However, to date, there has been no demonstration that cavitation can be produced consistently enough to support C3HeB/FeJ mice as a new and useful model of cavitary TB. We utilized serial computed tomography (CT) imaging to detect pulmonary cavitation in C3HeB/FeJ mice after aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis Post-mortem analyses were performed to characterize lung lesions and to localize matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) previously implicated in cavitary TB in situ A total of 47-61% of infected mice developed cavities during primary disease or relapse after non-curative treatments. Key pathological features of human TB, including simultaneous presence of multiple pathologies, were noted in lung tissues. Optical imaging demonstrated increased MMP activity in TB lesions and MMP-9 was significantly expressed in cavitary lesions. Tissue MMP-9 activity could be abrogated by specific inhibitors. In situ, three-dimensional analyses of cavitary lesions demonstrated that 22.06% of CD11b+ signal colocalized with MMP-9. C3HeB/FeJ mice represent a reliable, economical and tractable model of cavitary TB, with key similarities to human TB. This model should provide an excellent tool to better understand the pathogenesis of cavitation and its effects on TB treatments. PMID:27482816

  16. Mouse model of pulmonary cavitary tuberculosis and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9.

    PubMed

    Ordonez, Alvaro A; Tasneen, Rokeya; Pokkali, Supriya; Xu, Ziyue; Converse, Paul J; Klunk, Mariah H; Mollura, Daniel J; Nuermberger, Eric L; Jain, Sanjay K

    2016-07-01

    Cavitation is a key pathological feature of human tuberculosis (TB), and is a well-recognized risk factor for transmission of infection, relapse after treatment and the emergence of drug resistance. Despite intense interest in the mechanisms underlying cavitation and its negative impact on treatment outcomes, there has been limited study of this phenomenon, owing in large part to the limitations of existing animal models. Although cavitation does not occur in conventional mouse strains after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, cavitary lung lesions have occasionally been observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice. However, to date, there has been no demonstration that cavitation can be produced consistently enough to support C3HeB/FeJ mice as a new and useful model of cavitary TB. We utilized serial computed tomography (CT) imaging to detect pulmonary cavitation in C3HeB/FeJ mice after aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis Post-mortem analyses were performed to characterize lung lesions and to localize matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) previously implicated in cavitary TB in situ A total of 47-61% of infected mice developed cavities during primary disease or relapse after non-curative treatments. Key pathological features of human TB, including simultaneous presence of multiple pathologies, were noted in lung tissues. Optical imaging demonstrated increased MMP activity in TB lesions and MMP-9 was significantly expressed in cavitary lesions. Tissue MMP-9 activity could be abrogated by specific inhibitors. In situ, three-dimensional analyses of cavitary lesions demonstrated that 22.06% of CD11b+ signal colocalized with MMP-9. C3HeB/FeJ mice represent a reliable, economical and tractable model of cavitary TB, with key similarities to human TB. This model should provide an excellent tool to better understand the pathogenesis of cavitation and its effects on TB treatments.

  17. Density matrix embedding theory studies of the two-dimensional Hubbard model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bo-Xiao

    Density matrix embedding theory (DMET) provides a quantum embedding framework to compute the electronic structure in strongly correlated lattice systems. It has been applied to various model Hamiltonians and ab initio systems. In this talk, I will review the results obtained in the two-dimensional one-band Hubbard model using DMET. Over the last years, we mapped a calibrated ground-state phase diagram of the two-dimensional Hubbard model, concerning magnetic, superconducting and various inhomogeneous phases. Based on the results from this work, as well as the consistent data from other numerical methods, we are able to conclude that many parts of the Hubbard phase diagram is already settled up to an accurate energy scale of 0.001t. Recently, by using large-scale auxiliary-field quantum Monte Carlo (AFQMC) in the impurity problem, we are able to treat much larger embedded clusters at half-filling (and with the constrained path approximation at non-half-filling), which provides a deeper understanding on the finite-size effects of energy and observables in both quantum embedding and finite cluster numerical methods. Finally, we systematically investigated the putative inhomogeneous phases in the underdoped, strong coupling Hubbard model, proposing new inhomogeneous patterns as strong candidates for the ground state. Reference: [1] Bo-Xiao Zheng, Garnet K.-L. Chan, arXiv:1504.01784 [2] J.P.F. Leblanc, Andrey E. Antipov, et al., arXiv:1505.02290 We acknowledge funding from the US Department of Energy, Office of Science, through DE-SC0008624 and DE-SC0010530. This work was also performed as part of the Simons Collaboration on the Many Electron Problem, sponsored by the Simons Foundation.

  18. Mouse model of pulmonary cavitary tuberculosis and expression of matrix metalloproteinase-9

    PubMed Central

    Ordonez, Alvaro A.; Tasneen, Rokeya; Pokkali, Supriya; Xu, Ziyue; Converse, Paul J.; Klunk, Mariah H.; Mollura, Daniel J.; Nuermberger, Eric L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Cavitation is a key pathological feature of human tuberculosis (TB), and is a well-recognized risk factor for transmission of infection, relapse after treatment and the emergence of drug resistance. Despite intense interest in the mechanisms underlying cavitation and its negative impact on treatment outcomes, there has been limited study of this phenomenon, owing in large part to the limitations of existing animal models. Although cavitation does not occur in conventional mouse strains after infection with Mycobacterium tuberculosis, cavitary lung lesions have occasionally been observed in C3HeB/FeJ mice. However, to date, there has been no demonstration that cavitation can be produced consistently enough to support C3HeB/FeJ mice as a new and useful model of cavitary TB. We utilized serial computed tomography (CT) imaging to detect pulmonary cavitation in C3HeB/FeJ mice after aerosol infection with M. tuberculosis. Post-mortem analyses were performed to characterize lung lesions and to localize matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) previously implicated in cavitary TB in situ. A total of 47-61% of infected mice developed cavities during primary disease or relapse after non-curative treatments. Key pathological features of human TB, including simultaneous presence of multiple pathologies, were noted in lung tissues. Optical imaging demonstrated increased MMP activity in TB lesions and MMP-9 was significantly expressed in cavitary lesions. Tissue MMP-9 activity could be abrogated by specific inhibitors. In situ, three-dimensional analyses of cavitary lesions demonstrated that 22.06% of CD11b+ signal colocalized with MMP-9. C3HeB/FeJ mice represent a reliable, economical and tractable model of cavitary TB, with key similarities to human TB. This model should provide an excellent tool to better understand the pathogenesis of cavitation and its effects on TB treatments. PMID:27482816

  19. Exact matrix treatment of an osmotic ensemble model of adsorption and pressure induced structural transitions in metal organic frameworks.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Lawrence J; Manos, George

    2016-03-14

    Here we present an exactly treated quasi-one dimensional statistical mechanical osmotic ensemble model of pressure and adsorption induced breathing structural transformations of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). The treatment uses a transfer matrix method. The model successfully reproduces the gas and pressure induced structural changes which are observed experimentally in MOFs. The model treatment presented here is a significant step towards analytical statistical mechanical treatments of flexible metal-organic frameworks.

  20. Conceptualizing Matrix Multiplication: A Framework for Student Thinking, an Historical Analysis, and a Modeling Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Little is known about the variety of ways students conceptualize matrix multiplication, yet this is a fundamental part of most introductory linear algebra courses. My dissertation follows a three-paper format, with the three papers exploring conceptualizations of matrix multiplication from a variety of viewpoints. In these papers, I explore (1)…

  1. Degradation of extracellular matrix by mouse trophoblast outgrowths: a model for implantation

    PubMed Central

    Glass, RH; Aggeler, J; Spindle, A; Pederson, RA; Werb, Z

    1983-01-01

    During implantation the embryo attaches to the endometrial surface and trophoblast traverses the uterine epithelium, anchoring in the uterine connective tissue. To determine whether trophoblast can facilitate invasion of the uterus by degrading components of normal uterine extracellular matrix, mouse blastocysts were cultured on a radio-labeled extracellular matrix that contained glycoproteins, elastin, and collagen. The embryos attached to the matrix, and trophoblast spread over the surface. Starting on day 5 of culture there was a release of labeled peptides into the medium. The radioactive peptides released from the matrix by the embryos had molecular weights ranging from more than 25,000 to more than 200. By day 7 there were areas where individual trophoblast cells had separated from one another, revealing the underlying substratum that was cleared of matrix. When trophoblast cells were lysed with NH(4)OH on day 8, it was apparent that the area underneath the trophoblast outgrowth had been cleared of matrix. Scanning electron microscopy and time-lapse cinemicrography confirmed that the digestion of matrix was highly localized, taking place only underneath the trophoblast, with no evidence of digestion of the matrix beyond the periphery of the trophoblast outgrowth. The sharp boundaries of degredation observed may be due to localized proteinase secretion by trophoblast, to membrane proteinases on the surface of trophoblast, or to endocytosis. Digestion of the matrix was not dependent on plasminogen, thus ruling out a role for plasminogen activator. Digestion was not inhibited by a variety of hormones and inhibitors, including progesterone, 17β-estradiol, leupeptin, EDTA, colchicine, NH(4)Cl, or ε-aminocaproic acid. This system of culturing embryos on extracellular matrix may be useful in determining the processes that regulate trophoblast migration and invasion into the maternal tissues during implantation.0 PMID:6339525

  2. Data and Knowledge Base on the Basis of the Expanded Matrix Model of Their Representation for the Intelligent System of Road-Climatic Zoning of Territories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yankovskaya, A.; Cherepanov, D.; Selivanikova, O.

    2016-08-01

    An extended matrix model of data and knowledge representation on the investigated area, as well as a matrix model of data representation on the territory under investigation, are proposed for the intelligent system of road-climatic zoning of territories (RCZT) - the main information technology of RCZT. A part of the West Siberian region has been selected as the investigated territory. The extended matrix model of knowledge representation is filled out by knowledge engineers with participation of highly qualified experts in the field of RCZT. The matrix model of data representation on the territory under investigation is filled out by persons concerned in RCZT of the motor-roads management system.

  3. Detection of Q-Matrix Misspecification Using Two Criteria for Validation of Cognitive Structures under the Least Squares Distance Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Romero, Sonia J.; Ordoñez, Xavier G.; Ponsoda, Vincente; Revuelta, Javier

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive Diagnostic Models (CDMs) aim to provide information about the degree to which individuals have mastered specific attributes that underlie the success of these individuals on test items. The Q-matrix is a key element in the application of CDMs, because contains links item-attributes representing the cognitive structure proposed for solve…

  4. Modeling State-Space Aeroelastic Systems Using a Simple Matrix Polynomial Approach for the Unsteady Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.

    2008-01-01

    A simple matrix polynomial approach is introduced for approximating unsteady aerodynamics in the s-plane and ultimately, after combining matrix polynomial coefficients with matrices defining the structure, a matrix polynomial of the flutter equations of motion (EOM) is formed. A technique of recasting the matrix-polynomial form of the flutter EOM into a first order form is also presented that can be used to determine the eigenvalues near the origin and everywhere on the complex plane. An aeroservoelastic (ASE) EOM have been generalized to include the gust terms on the right-hand side. The reasons for developing the new matrix polynomial approach are also presented, which are the following: first, the "workhorse" methods such as the NASTRAN flutter analysis lack the capability to consistently find roots near the origin, along the real axis or accurately find roots farther away from the imaginary axis of the complex plane; and, second, the existing s-plane methods, such as the Roger s s-plane approximation method as implemented in ISAC, do not always give suitable fits of some tabular data of the unsteady aerodynamics. A method available in MATLAB is introduced that will accurately fit generalized aerodynamic force (GAF) coefficients in a tabular data form into the coefficients of a matrix polynomial form. The root-locus results from the NASTRAN pknl flutter analysis, the ISAC-Roger's s-plane method and the present matrix polynomial method are presented and compared for accuracy and for the number and locations of roots.

  5. Macrophage Depletion Attenuates Extracellular Matrix Deposition and Ductular Reaction in a Mouse Model of Chronic Cholangiopathies.

    PubMed

    Best, Jan; Verhulst, Stefaan; Syn, Wing-Kin; Lagaisse, Kimberly; van Hul, Noemi; Heindryckx, Femke; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Peeters, Liesbeth; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Leclercq, Isabelle A; Canbay, Ali; Dollé, Laurent; van Grunsven, Leo A

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cholangiopathies, such as primary and secondary sclerosing cholangitis, are progressive disease entities, associated with periportal accumulation of inflammatory cells, encompassing monocytes and macrophages, peribiliary extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and ductular reaction (DR). This study aimed to elucidate the relevance of macrophages in the progression of chronic cholangiopathies through macrophage depletion in a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) mouse model. One group of mice received a single i.p. injection of Clodronate encapsulated liposomes (CLOLipo) at day 7 of a 14 day DDC treatment, while control animals were co-treated with PBSLipo instead. Mice were sacrificed after 7 or respectively 14 days of treatment for immunohistochemical assessment of macrophage recruitment (F4/80), ECM deposition (Sirius Red, Laminin) and DR (CK19). Macrophage depletion during a 14 day DDC treatment resulted in a significant inhibition of ECM deposition. Porto-lobular migration patterns of laminin-rich ECM and ductular structures were significantly attenuated and a progression of DR was effectively inhibited by macrophage depletion. CLOLipo co-treatment resulted in a confined DR to portal regions without amorphous cell clusters. This study suggests that therapeutic options selectively directed towards macrophages might represent a feasible treatment for chronic cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:27618307

  6. Cauchy-Laguerre Two-Matrix Model and the Meijer-G Random Point Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bertola, M.; Gekhtman, M.; Szmigielski, J.

    2014-02-01

    We apply the general theory of Cauchy biorthogonal polynomials developed in Bertola et al. (Commun Math Phys 287(3):983-1014, 2009) and Bertola et al. (J Approx Th 162(4):832-867, 2010) to the case associated with Laguerre measures. In particular, we obtain explicit formulae in terms of Meijer-G functions for all key objects relevant to the study of the corresponding biorthogonal polynomials and the Cauchy two-matrix model associated with them. The central theorem we prove is that a scaling limit of the correlation functions for eigenvalues near the origin exists, and is given by a new determinantal two-level random point field, the Meijer-G random field. We conjecture that this random point field leads to a novel universality class of random fields parametrized by exponents of Laguerre weights. We express the joint distributions of the smallest eigenvalues in terms of suitable Fredholm determinants and evaluate them numerically. We also show that in a suitable limit, the Meijer-G random field converges to the Bessel random field and hence the behavior of the eigenvalues of one of the two matrices converges to the one of the Laguerre ensemble.

  7. Optical characterization of murine model's in-vivo skin using Mueller matrix polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Núñez, Azael; Martinez-Ponce, Geminiano; Garcia-Torales, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetric imaging (MMPI) provides a complete characterization of an anisotropic optical medium. Subsequent single value decomposition allows image interpretation in terms of basic optical anisotropies, such as depolarization, diattenuation, and retardance. In this work, healthy in-vivo skin at different anatomical locations of a biological model (Rattus norvegicus) was imaged by the MMPI technique using 532nm coherent illumination. The body parts under study were back, abdomen, tail, and calvaria. Because skin components are randomly distributed and skin thickness depends on its location, polarization measures arise from the average over a single detection element (pixel) and on the number of free optical paths, respectively. Optical anisotropies over the imaged skin indicates, mainly, the presence of components related to the physiology of the explored region. In addition, a MMPI-based comparison between a tumor on the back of one test subject and proximal healthy skin was made. The results show that the single values of optical anisotropies can be helpful in distinguishing different areas of in-vivo skin and also lesions.

  8. Synthetic biodegradable hydrogel delivery of demineralized bone matrix for bone augmentation in a rat model

    PubMed Central

    Kinard, Lucas A.; Dahlin, Rebecca L.; Lam, Johnny; Lu, Steven; Lee, Esther J.; Kasper, F. Kurtis; Mikos, Antonios G.

    2014-01-01

    There exists a strong clinical need for a more capable and robust method to achieve bone augmentation, and a system with fine-tuned delivery of demineralized bone matrix (DBM) has potential to meet that need. As such, the objective of the present study was to investigate a synthetic biodegradable hydrogel for the delivery of DBM for bone augmentation in a rat model. Oligo(poly(ethylene glycol) fumarate) (OPF) constructs were designed and fabricated by varying the content of rat-derived DBM particles (either 1:3, 1:1, or 3:1 DBM:OPF weight ratio on a dry basis) and using two DBM particle size ranges (50–150 or 150–250 μm). The physical properties of the constructs and the bioactivity of the DBM were evaluated. Select formulations (1:1 and 3:1 with 50–150 μm DBM) were evaluated in vivo compared to an empty control to investigate the effect of DBM dose and construct properties on bone augmentation. Overall, 3:1 constructs with higher DBM content achieved the greatest volume of bone augmentation exceeding 1:1 constructs and empty implants by 3-fold and 5-fold, respectively. As such, we have established that a synthetic, biodegradable hydrogel can function as a carrier for DBM, and that the volume of bone augmentation achieved by the constructs correlated directly to DBM dose. PMID:25046637

  9. The Effect of Platelet-rich Fibrin Matrix on Rotator Cuff Healing in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S; Weinberg, M; Khatib, O; Jazrawi, L; Strauss, E J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine if the application of platelet-rich fibrin matrix could improve regeneration of the tendon-bone insertion site in a rat rotator cuff repair model. 25 Lewis syngeneic rats underwent bilateral tenotomy and repair of the supraspinatus tendon. 10 separate rats were used for PRFM harvest. All left (control) shoulders underwent transosseous rotator cuff repair, while all right (treatment) shoulders were repaired similarly with PRFM augmentation. 9 rats were sacrificed at 2-weeks and ten at 4-weeks for biomechanical testing. 3 separate rats were sacrificed at 2-weeks and 4-weeks each for histologic analysis of the insertion site. At 2 weeks, the experimental group repairs were significantly stronger in ultimate load to failure (P=0.01), stress (P=0.03), and stiffness (P=0.03). Differences in biomechanical testing were not found between the groups at 4 weeks. Histological analysis revealed less collagen organization and cartilage formation at the insertion site in the experimental group. Semiquantitative histologic analysis confirmed our qualitative assessment of the specimens. PRFM does not recapitulate the native enthesis, but rather induces an exuberant and disordered healing response that is characterized by fibrovascular scar tissue. PMID:26509369

  10. Characterization of metal matrix composites by linear ultrasonics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesheng; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt; Wright, David

    2013-02-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) offer advantages over traditional materials for aerospace applications due to the increased mechanical strength of the materials. But the non-destructive inspection of these materials, especially with ultrasound, is in an infancy stage. If the manufacturing process of TiMMC is not correctly controlled, then disbonds and voids between the fibers can result. The effective microstructure of the composite makes difficulty to interpret results from traditional ultrasound techniques because of the scattering caused by fibers; the scattering prevents the ultrasound from penetrating far into the composite region and produces a background signal masking any reflections from voids. In this paper, relatively low frequency ultrasound is used to probe the composite region, and the state of the composite (porosity) is inferred from the velocity of the ultrasound traversing the composite. The relationship between the velocity and porosity is complex in this regime, so finite element (FE) analysis is used to model the composite regions and relate the velocity to the porosity. The FE simulated results are validated by ultrasound velocity measurements. PMID:23363095

  11. Efficient model reduction of parametrized systems by matrix discrete empirical interpolation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Negri, Federico; Manzoni, Andrea; Amsallem, David

    2015-12-01

    In this work, we apply a Matrix version of the so-called Discrete Empirical Interpolation (MDEIM) for the efficient reduction of nonaffine parametrized systems arising from the discretization of linear partial differential equations. Dealing with affinely parametrized operators is crucial in order to enhance the online solution of reduced-order models (ROMs). However, in many cases such an affine decomposition is not readily available, and must be recovered through (often) intrusive procedures, such as the empirical interpolation method (EIM) and its discrete variant DEIM. In this paper we show that MDEIM represents a very efficient approach to deal with complex physical and geometrical parametrizations in a non-intrusive, efficient and purely algebraic way. We propose different strategies to combine MDEIM with a state approximation resulting either from a reduced basis greedy approach or Proper Orthogonal Decomposition. A posteriori error estimates accounting for the MDEIM error are also developed in the case of parametrized elliptic and parabolic equations. Finally, the capability of MDEIM to generate accurate and efficient ROMs is demonstrated on the solution of two computationally-intensive classes of problems occurring in engineering contexts, namely PDE-constrained shape optimization and parametrized coupled problems.

  12. Characterization of metal matrix composites by linear ultrasonics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xuesheng; Sharples, Steve D; Clark, Matt; Wright, David

    2013-02-01

    Titanium metal matrix composites (TiMMCs) offer advantages over traditional materials for aerospace applications due to the increased mechanical strength of the materials. But the non-destructive inspection of these materials, especially with ultrasound, is in an infancy stage. If the manufacturing process of TiMMC is not correctly controlled, then disbonds and voids between the fibers can result. The effective microstructure of the composite makes difficulty to interpret results from traditional ultrasound techniques because of the scattering caused by fibers; the scattering prevents the ultrasound from penetrating far into the composite region and produces a background signal masking any reflections from voids. In this paper, relatively low frequency ultrasound is used to probe the composite region, and the state of the composite (porosity) is inferred from the velocity of the ultrasound traversing the composite. The relationship between the velocity and porosity is complex in this regime, so finite element (FE) analysis is used to model the composite regions and relate the velocity to the porosity. The FE simulated results are validated by ultrasound velocity measurements.

  13. The Effect of Platelet-rich Fibrin Matrix on Rotator Cuff Healing in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Hasan, S; Weinberg, M; Khatib, O; Jazrawi, L; Strauss, E J

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the current study was to determine if the application of platelet-rich fibrin matrix could improve regeneration of the tendon-bone insertion site in a rat rotator cuff repair model. 25 Lewis syngeneic rats underwent bilateral tenotomy and repair of the supraspinatus tendon. 10 separate rats were used for PRFM harvest. All left (control) shoulders underwent transosseous rotator cuff repair, while all right (treatment) shoulders were repaired similarly with PRFM augmentation. 9 rats were sacrificed at 2-weeks and ten at 4-weeks for biomechanical testing. 3 separate rats were sacrificed at 2-weeks and 4-weeks each for histologic analysis of the insertion site. At 2 weeks, the experimental group repairs were significantly stronger in ultimate load to failure (P=0.01), stress (P=0.03), and stiffness (P=0.03). Differences in biomechanical testing were not found between the groups at 4 weeks. Histological analysis revealed less collagen organization and cartilage formation at the insertion site in the experimental group. Semiquantitative histologic analysis confirmed our qualitative assessment of the specimens. PRFM does not recapitulate the native enthesis, but rather induces an exuberant and disordered healing response that is characterized by fibrovascular scar tissue.

  14. On matrix-model approach to simplified Khovanov-Rozansky calculus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Morozov, And.; Popolitov, A.

    2015-10-01

    Wilson-loop averages in Chern-Simons theory (HOMFLY polynomials) can be evaluated in different ways - the most difficult, but most interesting of them is the hypercube calculus, the only one applicable to virtual knots and used also for categorification (higher-dimensional extension) of the theory. We continue the study of quantum dimensions, associated with hypercube vertices, in the drastically simplified version of this approach to knot polynomials. At q = 1 the problem is reformulated in terms of fat (ribbon) graphs, where Seifert cycles play the role of vertices. Ward identities in associated matrix model provide a set of recursions between classical dimensions. For q ≠ 1 most of these relations are broken (i.e. deformed in a still uncontrollable way), and only few are protected by Reidemeister invariance of Chern-Simons theory. Still they are helpful for systematic evaluation of entire series of quantum dimensions, including negative ones, which are relevant for virtual link diagrams. To illustrate the effectiveness of developed formalism we derive explicit expressions for the 2-cabled HOMFLY of virtual trefoil and virtual 3.2 knot, which involve respectively 12 and 14 intersections - far beyond any dreams with alternative methods. As a more conceptual application, we describe a relation between the genus of fat graph and Turaev genus of original link diagram, which is currently the most effective tool for the search of thin knots.

  15. Macrophage Depletion Attenuates Extracellular Matrix Deposition and Ductular Reaction in a Mouse Model of Chronic Cholangiopathies

    PubMed Central

    Syn, Wing-Kin; Lagaisse, Kimberly; van Hul, Noemi; Heindryckx, Femke; Sowa, Jan-Peter; Peeters, Liesbeth; Van Vlierberghe, Hans; Leclercq, Isabelle A.; Canbay, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Chronic cholangiopathies, such as primary and secondary sclerosing cholangitis, are progressive disease entities, associated with periportal accumulation of inflammatory cells, encompassing monocytes and macrophages, peribiliary extracellular matrix (ECM) deposition and ductular reaction (DR). This study aimed to elucidate the relevance of macrophages in the progression of chronic cholangiopathies through macrophage depletion in a 3,5-diethoxycarbonyl-1,4-dihydrocollidine (DDC) mouse model. One group of mice received a single i.p. injection of Clodronate encapsulated liposomes (CLOLipo) at day 7 of a 14 day DDC treatment, while control animals were co-treated with PBSLipo instead. Mice were sacrificed after 7 or respectively 14 days of treatment for immunohistochemical assessment of macrophage recruitment (F4/80), ECM deposition (Sirius Red, Laminin) and DR (CK19). Macrophage depletion during a 14 day DDC treatment resulted in a significant inhibition of ECM deposition. Porto-lobular migration patterns of laminin-rich ECM and ductular structures were significantly attenuated and a progression of DR was effectively inhibited by macrophage depletion. CLOLipo co-treatment resulted in a confined DR to portal regions without amorphous cell clusters. This study suggests that therapeutic options selectively directed towards macrophages might represent a feasible treatment for chronic cholestatic liver diseases. PMID:27618307

  16. Glottic Regeneration with Tissue Engineering Technique Using Acellular Extracellular Matrix Scaffold in Canine Model

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Morimasa; Hirano, Shigeru; Kanemaru, Shin-ichi; Kitani, Yoshiharu; Ohno, Satoshi; Kojima, Tsuyoshi; Nakamura, Tatsuo; Ito, Juichi; Rosen, Clark A.; Gilbert, Thomas W.

    2014-01-01

    Acellular extracellular matrix scaffold derived from porcine urinary bladder (UBM) is decellularized material that has shown success for constructive remodeling of various tissues and organs. The regenerative effects of UBM were reported for the tympanic membrane, esophagus, trachea, larynx, pleura, and pericardium in animal studies with promising results. The aim of this study was to investigate regenerative effects of UBM to regenerate hemilarynx using a canine model. A left partial hemilaryngectomy was performed, and the surgical defects were reconstructed by insertion of UBM scaffold. Although local infection was observed in one dog in a week after implantation of the scaffold, all dogs showed good re-epithelialization with minimum complication in one month. The effect of regeneration of the larynx was evaluated 6 months after the operation. The excised larynx experiments were performed to measure phonation threshold pressure (PTP), normalized mucosal wave amplitude (NMWA), and normalized glottal gap (NGG). The results of the measurements showed that PTP was normal or near normal in 2 cases, NMWA was within normal range in 3 cases, although there were individual variations. Histologic examination was completed to evaluate structural changes of the scaffold with appearance of new cartilaginous structure. However the regenerated vocal fold mucosa is mostly scarred. The UBM scaffold has shown to be biocompatible, biodegradable, and useful for tissue regeneration of the hemilarynx with possible restoration of the vocal fold function. The vocal fold mucosa was scarred, which is the next challenge to improve. PMID:24403099

  17. Assessment of the impact of localized disturbances on SI-POF transmission using a matrix propagation model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losada, M. A.; Mateo, J.; Martínez-Muro, J. J.

    2011-05-01

    Our aim is to extend the matrix approach of the power flow equation to study the effects of different devices over light propagation in step index plastic optical fibers (SI-POFs). Here we devise an experimental method to characterize a particular scrambler as a matrix which can be directly introduced into the model framework to predict transmission properties. Thus, fiber bandwidth versus length was simulated for different scrambler configurations and then compared with experimental data to verify the characterization method. A study of the scrambler effects for different launching conditions reveals important aspects of its impact on transmission.

  18. Incorporating plasticity of the interfibrillar matrix in shear lag models is necessary to replicate the multiscale mechanics of tendon fascicles.

    PubMed

    Szczesny, Spencer E; Elliott, Dawn M

    2014-12-01

    Despite current knowledge of tendon structure, the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying tendon mechanics and failure are unknown. We recently showed that a shear lag model, which explicitly assumed plastic interfibrillar load transfer between discontinuous fibrils, could explain the multiscale fascicle mechanics, suggesting that fascicle yielding is due to plastic deformation of the interfibrillar matrix. However, it is unclear whether alternative physical mechanisms, such as elastic interfibrillar deformation or fibril yielding, also contribute to fascicle mechanical behavior. The objective of the current work was to determine if plasticity of the interfibrillar matrix is uniquely capable of explaining the multiscale mechanics of tendon fascicles including the tissue post-yield behavior. This was examined by comparing the predictions of a continuous fibril model and three separate shear lag models incorporating an elastic, plastic, or elastoplastic interfibrillar matrix with multiscale experimental data. The predicted effects of fibril yielding on each of these models were also considered. The results demonstrated that neither the continuous fibril model nor the elastic shear lag model can successfully predict the experimental data, even if fibril yielding is included. Only the plastic or elastoplastic shear lag models were capable of reproducing the multiscale tendon fascicle mechanics. Differences between these two models were small, although the elastoplastic model did improve the fit of the experimental data at low applied tissue strains. These findings suggest that while interfibrillar elasticity contributes to the initial stress response, plastic deformation of the interfibrillar matrix is responsible for tendon fascicle post-yield behavior. This information sheds light on the physical processes underlying tendon failure, which is essential to improve our understanding of tissue pathology and guide the development of successful repair. PMID:25262202

  19. Incorporating Plasticity of the Interfibrillar Matrix in Shear Lag Models is Necessary to Replicate the Multiscale Mechanics of Tendon Fascicles

    PubMed Central

    Szczesny, Spencer E.; Elliott, Dawn M.

    2015-01-01

    Despite current knowledge of tendon structure, the fundamental deformation mechanisms underlying tendon mechanics and failure are unknown. We recently showed that a shear lag model, which explicitly assumed plastic interfibrillar load transfer between discontinuous fibrils, could explain the multiscale fascicle mechanics, suggesting that fascicle yielding is due to plastic deformation of the interfibrillar matrix. However, it is unclear whether alternative physical mechanisms, such as elastic interfibrillar deformation or fibril yielding, also contribute to fascicle mechanical behavior. The objective of the current work was to determine if plasticity of the interfibrillar matrix is uniquely capable of explaining the multiscale mechanics of tendon fascicles including the tissue post-yield behavior. This was examined by comparing the predictions of a continuous fibril model and three separate shear lag models incorporating an elastic, plastic, or elastoplastic interfibrillar matrix with multiscale experimental data. The predicted effects of fibril yielding on each of these models were also considered. The results demonstrated that neither the continuous fibril model nor the elastic shear lag model can successfully predict the experimental data, even if fibril yielding is included. Only the plastic or elastoplastic shear lag models were capable of reproducing the multiscale tendon fascicle mechanics. Differences between these two models were small, although the elastoplastic model did improve the fit of the experimental data at low applied tissue strains. These findings suggest that while interfibrillar elasticity contributes to the initial stress response, plastic deformation of the interfibrillar matrix is responsible for tendon fascicle post-yield behavior. This information sheds light on the physical processes underlying tendon failure, which is essential to improve our understanding of tissue pathology and guide the development of successful repair. PMID:25262202

  20. Transfer matrix computation of critical polynomials for two-dimensional Potts models

    DOE PAGES

    Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke; Scullard, Christian R.

    2013-02-04

    We showed, In our previous work, that critical manifolds of the q-state Potts model can be studied by means of a graph polynomial PB(q, v), henceforth referred to as the critical polynomial. This polynomial may be defined on any periodic two-dimensional lattice. It depends on a finite subgraph B, called the basis, and the manner in which B is tiled to construct the lattice. The real roots v = eK — 1 of PB(q, v) either give the exact critical points for the lattice, or provide approximations that, in principle, can be made arbitrarily accurate by increasing the size ofmore » B in an appropriate way. In earlier work, PB(q, v) was defined by a contraction-deletion identity, similar to that satisfied by the Tutte polynomial. Here, we give a probabilistic definition of PB(q, v), which facilitates its computation, using the transfer matrix, on much larger B than was previously possible.We present results for the critical polynomial on the (4, 82), kagome, and (3, 122) lattices for bases of up to respectively 96, 162, and 243 edges, compared to the limit of 36 edges with contraction-deletion. We discuss in detail the role of the symmetries and the embedding of B. The critical temperatures vc obtained for ferromagnetic (v > 0) Potts models are at least as precise as the best available results from Monte Carlo simulations or series expansions. For instance, with q = 3 we obtain vc(4, 82) = 3.742 489 (4), vc(kagome) = 1.876 459 7 (2), and vc(3, 122) = 5.033 078 49 (4), the precision being comparable or superior to the best simulation results. More generally, we trace the critical manifolds in the real (q, v) plane and discuss the intricate structure of the phase diagram in the antiferromagnetic (v < 0) region.« less

  1. Climate implications of carbonaceous aerosols: An aerosol microphysical study using the GISS/MATRIX climate model

    SciTech Connect

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Menon, Surabi; Koch, Dorothy; Bond, Tami; Tsigaridis, Kostas

    2010-04-09

    Recently, attention has been drawn towards black carbon aerosols as a likely short-term climate warming mitigation candidate. However the global and regional impacts of the direct, cloud-indirect and semi-direct forcing effects are highly uncertain, due to the complex nature of aerosol evolution and its climate interactions. Black carbon is directly released as particle into the atmosphere, but then interacts with other gases and particles through condensation and coagulation processes leading to further aerosol growth, aging and internal mixing. A detailed aerosol microphysical scheme, MATRIX, embedded within the global GISS modelE includes the above processes that determine the lifecycle and climate impact of aerosols. This study presents a quantitative assessment of the impact of microphysical processes involving black carbon, such as emission size distributions and optical properties on aerosol cloud activation and radiative forcing. Our best estimate for net direct and indirect aerosol radiative forcing change is -0.56 W/m{sup 2} between 1750 and 2000. However, the direct and indirect aerosol effects are very sensitive to the black and organic carbon size distribution and consequential mixing state. The net radiative forcing change can vary between -0.32 to -0.75 W/m{sup 2} depending on these carbonaceous particle properties. Assuming that sulfates, nitrates and secondary organics form a coating shell around a black carbon core, rather than forming a uniformly mixed particles, changes the overall net radiative forcing from a negative to a positive number. Black carbon mitigation scenarios showed generally a benefit when mainly black carbon sources such as diesel emissions are reduced, reducing organic and black carbon sources such as bio-fuels, does not lead to reduced warming.

  2. Time-dependent occupation numbers in reduced-density-matrix-functional theory: Application to an interacting Landau-Zener model

    SciTech Connect

    Requist, Ryan; Pankratov, Oleg

    2011-05-15

    We prove that if the two-body terms in the equation of motion for the one-body reduced density matrix are approximated by ground-state functionals, the eigenvalues of the one-body reduced density matrix (occupation numbers) remain constant in time. This deficiency is related to the inability of such an approximation to account for relative phases in the two-body reduced density matrix. We derive an exact differential equation giving the functional dependence of these phases in an interacting Landau-Zener model and study their behavior in short- and long-time regimes. The phases undergo resonances whenever the occupation numbers approach the boundaries of the interval [0,1]. In the long-time regime, the occupation numbers display correlation-induced oscillations and the memory dependence of the functionals assumes a simple form.

  3. Modeling for Fatigue Hysteresis Loops of Carbon Fiber-Reinforced Ceramic-Matrix Composites under Multiple Loading Stress Levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longbiao, Li

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, the fatigue hysteresis loops of fiber-reinforced ceramic-matrix composites (CMCs) under multiple loading stress levels considering interface wear has been investigated using micromechanical approach. Under fatigue loading, the fiber/matrix interface shear stress decreases with the increase of cycle number due to interface wear. Upon increasing of fatigue peak stress, the interface debonded length would propagate along the fiber/matrix interface. The difference of interface shear stress existed in the new and original debonded region would affect the interface debonding and interface frictional slipping between the fiber and the matrix. Based on the fatigue damage mechanism of fiber slipping relative to matrix in the interface debonded region upon unloading and subsequent reloading, the interface slip lengths, i.e., the interface debonded length, interface counter-slip length and interface new-slip length, are determined by fracture mechanics approach. The fatigue hysteresis loops models under multiple loading stress levels have been developed. The effects of single/multiple loading stress levels and different loading sequences on fatigue hysteresis loops have been investigated. The fatigue hysteresis loops of unidirectional C/SiC composite under multiple loading stress levels have been predicted.

  4. Modeling the Nonlinear, Strain Rate Dependent Deformation of Woven Ceramic Matrix Composites With Hydrostatic Stress Effects Included

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldberg, Robert K.; Carney, Kelly S.

    2004-01-01

    An analysis method based on a deformation (as opposed to damage) approach has been developed to model the strain rate dependent, nonlinear deformation of woven ceramic matrix composites with a plain weave fiber architecture. In the developed model, the differences in the tension and compression response have also been considered. State variable based viscoplastic equations originally developed for metals have been modified to analyze the ceramic matrix composites. To account for the tension/compression asymmetry in the material, the effective stress and effective inelastic strain definitions have been modified. The equations have also been modified to account for the fact that in an orthotropic composite the in-plane shear stiffness is independent of the stiffness in the normal directions. The developed equations have been implemented into a commercially available transient dynamic finite element code, LS-DYNA, through the use of user defined subroutines (UMATs). The tensile, compressive, and shear deformation of a representative plain weave woven ceramic matrix composite are computed and compared to experimental results. The computed values correlate well to the experimental data, demonstrating the ability of the model to accurately compute the deformation response of woven ceramic matrix composites.

  5. Assessment of a hybrid finite element-transfer matrix model for flat structures with homogeneous acoustic treatments.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Luca; Atalla, Noureddine; Berry, Alain; Sgard, Franck

    2014-05-01

    Modeling complex vibroacoustic systems including poroelastic materials using finite element based methods can be unfeasible for practical applications. For this reason, analytical approaches such as the transfer matrix method are often preferred to obtain a quick estimation of the vibroacoustic parameters. However, the strong assumptions inherent within the transfer matrix method lead to a lack of accuracy in the description of the geometry of the system. As a result, the transfer matrix method is inherently limited to the high frequency range. Nowadays, hybrid substructuring procedures have become quite popular. Indeed, different modeling techniques are typically sought to describe complex vibroacoustic systems over the widest possible frequency range. As a result, the flexibility and accuracy of the finite element method and the efficiency of the transfer matrix method could be coupled in a hybrid technique to obtain a reduction of the computational burden. In this work, a hybrid methodology is proposed. The performances of the method in predicting the vibroacoutic indicators of flat structures with attached homogeneous acoustic treatments are assessed. The results prove that, under certain conditions, the hybrid model allows for a reduction of the computational effort while preserving enough accuracy with respect to the full finite element solution.

  6. RECEPTOR MODELING OF AMBIENT PARTICULATE MATTER DATA USING POSITIVE MATRIX FACTORIZATION REVIEW OF EXISTING METHODS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Methods for apportioning sources of ambient particulate matter (PM) using the positive matrix factorization (PMF) algorithm are reviewed. Numerous procedural decisions must be made and algorithmic parameters selected when analyzing PM data with PMF. However, few publications docu...

  7. Modeling of stress/strain behavior of fiber-reinforced ceramic matrix composites including stress redistribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Murthy, Pappu L. N.; Chamis, Christos C.

    1994-01-01

    A computational simulation procedure is presented for nonlinear analyses which incorporates microstress redistribution due to progressive fracture in ceramic matrix composites. This procedure facilitates an accurate simulation of the stress-strain behavior of ceramic matrix composites up to failure. The nonlinearity in the material behavior is accounted for at the constituent (fiber/matrix/interphase) level. This computational procedure is a part of recent upgrades to CEMCAN (Ceramic Matrix Composite Analyzer) computer code. The fiber substructuring technique in CEMCAN is used to monitor the damage initiation and progression as the load increases. The room-temperature tensile stress-strain curves for SiC fiber reinforced reaction-bonded silicon nitride (RBSN) matrix unidirectional and angle-ply laminates are simulated and compared with experimentally observed stress-strain behavior. Comparison between the predicted stress/strain behavior and experimental stress/strain curves is good. Collectively the results demonstrate that CEMCAN computer code provides the user with an effective computational tool to simulate the behavior of ceramic matrix composites.

  8. A model for overview of student learning: a matrix of educational outcomes versus methodologies.

    PubMed

    Johnsen, David C; Marshall, Teresa A; Finkelstein, Michael W; Cunningham-Ford, Marsha A; Straub-Morarend, Cheryl L; Holmes, David C; Armstrong, Steven R; Aquilino, Steven A; Sharp, Helen M; Solow, Catherine M; McQuistan, Michelle R

    2011-02-01

    A concise overview of an institution's aspirations for its students becomes increasingly elusive because dental education has evolving emphases on priorities like critical thinking and adapting to new technology. The purpose of this article is to offer a learner-oriented matrix that gives a focus for discussion and an overview of an institution's educational outcomes. On one axis of the matrix, common educational outcomes are listed: knowledge, technical skills, critical thinking, ethical and professional values, patient and practice management, and social responsibility awareness. On the other axis, methodologies are listed: definition, cultivation strategies, measures (summative/formative, objective/subjective), institutional coordination, and competency determination. By completing the matrix, an overview of the process by which students reach these outcomes emerges. Each institution would likely complete the matrix differently and, ideally, with active discussion. While the matrix can first be used to establish "Where are we now?" for an institution, it can also be a starting point for more extensive matrices and further discussion. Vertical and horizontal analyses of the matrix provide a unique lens for viewing the institution's learning environment. PMID:21293038

  9. A matrix projection method for on line stable estimation of 1D and 3D shear building models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Angel García-Illescas, Miguel; Alvarez-Icaza, Luis

    2016-12-01

    An estimation method is presented that combines the use of recursive least squares, a matrix parameterized model, Gershgorin circles and tridiagonal matrices properties to allow the identification of stable shear building models in the presence of low excitation or low damping. The resultant scheme yields a significant reduction on the number of calculations involved, when compared with the standard vector parameterization based schemes. As real buildings are always open loop stable, the use of an stable shear building model for vibration control purposes allows the design of more robust control laws. Extensive simulation results are presented for cases of low excitation comparing the results of using or not this matrix projection method with different sets of initial conditions. Results indicate that the use of this projection method does not have an influence in the recovery of natural frequencies, however, it significantly improves the recovery of mode shapes.

  10. Maladaptive matrix remodeling and regional biomechanical dysfunction in a mouse model of aortic valve disease.

    PubMed

    Krishnamurthy, Varun K; Opoka, Amy M; Kern, Christine B; Guilak, Farshid; Narmoneva, Daria A; Hinton, Robert B

    2012-04-01

    Aortic valve disease (AVD) occurs in 2.5% of the general population and often requires surgical intervention. Aortic valve malformation (AVM) underlies the majority of cases, suggesting a developmental etiology. Elastin haploinsufficiency results in complex cardiovascular problems, and 20-45% of patients have AVM and/or AVD. Elastin insufficient (Eln+/-) mice demonstrate AVM and latent AVD due to abnormalities in the valve annulus region. The objective of this study was to examine extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and biomechanical properties in regional aortic valve tissue and determine the impact of early AVM on late AVD in the Eln+/- mouse model. Aortic valve ECM composition and remodeling from juvenile, adult, and aged stages were evaluated in Eln+/- mice using histology, ELISA, immunohistochemistry and gelatin zymography. Aortic valve tissue biomechanical properties were determined using micropipette aspiration. Cartilage-like nodules were demonstrated within the valve annulus region at all stages identifying a developmental abnormality preceding AVD. Interestingly, maladaptive ECM remodeling was observed in early AVM without AVD and worsened with late AVD, as evidenced by increased MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and activity, as well as abnormalities in ADAMTS-mediated versican processing. Cleaved versican was increased in the valve annulus region of aged Eln+/- mice, and this abnormality correlated temporally with adverse alterations in valve tissue biomechanical properties and the manifestation of AVD. These findings identify maladaptive ECM remodeling in functional AVM as an early disease process with a progressive natural history, similar to that seen in human AVD, emphasizing the importance of the annulus region in pathogenesis. Combining molecular and engineering approaches provides complementary mechanistic insights that may be informative in the search for new therapeutic targets and durable valve bioprostheses.

  11. Matrix Metalloproteinase-8 Augments Bacterial Clearance in a Juvenile Sepsis Model

    PubMed Central

    Atkinson, Sarah J; Varisco, Brian M; Sandquist, Mary; Daly, Meghan N; Klingbeil, Lindsey; Kuethe, Joshua W; Midura, Emily F; Harmon, Kelli; Opoka, Amy; Lahni, Patrick; Piraino, Giovanna; Hake, Paul; Zingarelli, Basilia; Mortensen, Joel E; Wynn, James L; Wong, Hector R

    2016-01-01

    Genetic ablation or pharmacologic inhibition of matrix metalloproteinase-8 (MMP8) improves survival in an adult murine sepsis model. Because developmental age influences the host inflammatory response, we hypothesized that developmental age influences the role of MMP8 in sepsis. First, we compared sepsis survival between wild-type (WT, C57BL/6) and MMP8 null juvenile-aged mice (12–14 d) after intraperitoneal injection of a standardized cecal slurry. Second, peritoneal lavages collected 6 h and 18 h after cecal slurry injection were analyzed for bacterial burden, leukocyte subsets and inflammatory cytokines. Third, juvenile WT mice were pretreated with an MMP8 inhibitor prior to cecal slurry injection; analysis of their bacterial burden was compared with vehicle-injected animals. Fourth, the phagocytic capacity of WT and MMP8 null peritoneal macrophages was compared. Finally, peritoneal neutrophil extracellular traps (NETs) were compared using immunofluorescent imaging and quantitative image analysis. We found that juvenile MMP8 null mice had greater mortality and higher bacterial burden than WT mice. Leukocyte counts and cytokine concentrations in the peritoneal fluid were increased in the MMP8 null mice relative to the wild-type mice. Peritoneal macrophages from MMP8 null mice had reduced phagocytic capacity compared to WT macrophages. There was no quantitative difference in NET formation, but fewer bacteria were adherent to NETs from MMP8 null animals. In conclusion, in contrast to septic adult mice, genetic ablation of MMP8 increased mortality following bacterial peritonitis in juvenile mice. This increase in mortality was associated with reduced bacterial clearance and reduced NET efficiency. We conclude that developmental age influences the role of MMP8 in sepsis. PMID:27506554

  12. Modeling Coal Matrix Shrinkage and Differential Swelling with CO2 Injection for Enhanced Coalbed Methane Recovery and Carbon Sequestration Applications

    SciTech Connect

    L. J. Pekot; S. R. Reeves

    2002-03-31

    Matrix shrinkage and swelling can cause profound changes in porosity and permeability of coalbed methane reservoirs during depletion or when under CO{sub 2} injection processes, with significant implication for primary or enhanced methane recovery. Two models that are used to describe these effects are discussed. The first was developed by Advanced Resources International (ARI) and published in 1990 by Sawyer, et al. The second model was published by Palmer and Mansoori in 1996. This paper shows that the two provide equivalent results for most applications. However, their differences in formulation cause each to have relative advantages and disadvantages under certain circumstances. Specifically, the former appears superior for undersaturated coalbed methane reservoirs while the latter would be better if a case is found where matrix swelling is strongly disproportional to gas concentration. Since its presentation in 1996, the Palmer and Mansoori model has justifiably received much critical praise. However, the model developed by ARI for the COMET reservoir simulation program has been in use since 1990, and has significant advantages in certain settings. A review of data published by Levine in 1996 reveals that carbon dioxide causes a greater degree of coal matrix swelling compared to methane, even when measured on a unit of concentration basis. This effect is described in this report as differential swelling. Differential swelling may have important consequences for enhanced coalbed methane and carbon sequestration projects. To handle the effects of differential swelling, an extension to the matrix shrinkage and swelling model used by the COMET simulator is presented and shown to replicate the data of Levine. Preliminary field results from a carbon dioxide injection project are also presented in support of the extended model. The field evidence supports that considerable changes to coal permeability occur with CO{sub 2} injection, with significant implication for

  13. Strain rate-dependent deformation and strength modeling of a polymer matrix composite utilizing a micromechanics approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldberg, Robert Keith

    1999-11-01

    Potential gas turbine applications will expose polymer matrix composites to very high strain rate loading conditions, requiring an ability to understand and predict the material behavior under extreme conditions. Specifically, analytical methods designed for these applications must have the capability of properly capturing the strain rate sensitivities and nonlinearities that are present in the material response. The Ramaswamy-Stouffer constitutive equations, originally developed to analyze the viscoplastic deformation of metals, have been modified to simulate the nonlinear deformation response of ductile, crystalline polymers. The constitutive model is characterized and correlated for two representative ductile polymers, Fiberite 977-2 and PEEK, and the computed results correlate well with experimental values. The polymer constitutive equations are implemented in a mechanics of materials based composite micromechanics model to predict the nonlinear, rate dependent deformation response of a composite ply. Uniform stress and uniform strain assumptions are applied to compute the effective stresses of a composite unit cell from the applied strains. The micromechanics equations are successfully verified for two polymer matrix composites, IM7/977-2 and AS4/PEEK. The ultimate strength of a composite ply is predicted with the Hashin failure criteria that were implemented in the composite micromechanics model. The failure stresses of the two composite material systems are accurately predicted for a variety of fiber orientations and strain rates. The composite deformation model is implemented in LS-DYNA, a commercially available transient dynamic explicit finite element code. The matrix constitutive equations are converted into an incremental form, and the model is implemented into LS-DYNA through the use of a user defined material subroutine. The deformation response of a bulk polymer and a polymer matrix composite are predicted by finite element analyses. The results

  14. Transfer matrix computation of critical polynomials for two-dimensional Potts models

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke; Scullard, Christian R.

    2013-02-04

    We showed, In our previous work, that critical manifolds of the q-state Potts model can be studied by means of a graph polynomial PB(q, v), henceforth referred to as the critical polynomial. This polynomial may be defined on any periodic two-dimensional lattice. It depends on a finite subgraph B, called the basis, and the manner in which B is tiled to construct the lattice. The real roots v = eK — 1 of PB(q, v) either give the exact critical points for the lattice, or provide approximations that, in principle, can be made arbitrarily accurate by increasing the size of B in an appropriate way. In earlier work, PB(q, v) was defined by a contraction-deletion identity, similar to that satisfied by the Tutte polynomial. Here, we give a probabilistic definition of PB(q, v), which facilitates its computation, using the transfer matrix, on much larger B than was previously possible.We present results for the critical polynomial on the (4, 82), kagome, and (3, 122) lattices for bases of up to respectively 96, 162, and 243 edges, compared to the limit of 36 edges with contraction-deletion. We discuss in detail the role of the symmetries and the embedding of B. The critical temperatures vc obtained for ferromagnetic (v > 0) Potts models are at least as precise as the best available results from Monte Carlo simulations or series expansions. For instance, with q = 3 we obtain vc(4, 82) = 3.742 489 (4), vc(kagome) = 1.876 459 7 (2), and vc(3, 122) = 5.033 078 49 (4), the precision being comparable or superior to the best simulation results. More generally, we trace the critical manifolds in the real (q, v) plane and discuss the intricate structure of the phase diagram in the antiferromagnetic (v < 0) region.

  15. Bioadhesive characterization of poly(methylidene malonate 2.12) microparticle on model extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Chan, Vincent; Liu, Kuo-Kang; Le Visage, Catherine; Ju, Bin-Feng; Leong, Kam W

    2004-08-01

    The efficacy of a drug delivery system is predicated on its retention in the target tissue. Microparticle is one of the most popular and effective drug delivery configurations. Recently, it has been shown that the interaction between drug-loaded microparticles and tissues is related to the effectiveness of paclitaxel delivery to the bladder wall of mice for treating superficial bladder cancer. In this study, the adhesive interaction between poly(methylidene malonate 2.12) or PMM 2.1.2 microparticles and collagen, which serves as the model extracellular matrix for bladder wall, was probed with confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM), single-particle compressive force measurement and contact mechanics theory. Young's modulus of single PMM 2.1.2 microparticle was determined as 1.56 +/- 0.25 x 10(4)N/m(2). For plain PMM 2.1.2 microparticle in water (pH 5.5), the degree of deformation (a/R) on collagen coated substrate decreased from 0.77 to 0.26 against the increase of mid-plane diameter from 2 to 18 microm. The adhesion energy of PMM 2.1.2 microparticle was determined from Maguis-JKR theory and remained at around 1.5 mJ/m(2) against the increase of particle diameter. At pH 4, the average degree of particle deformation and adhesion energy was increased by 11% and 32%, respectively, in comparison with that at pH 5.5. The loading of paclitaxel in PMM 2.1.2 microspheres enhanced the deformation and adhesion of microspheres at pH 5.5. It is hypothesized that the electrostatic repulsion between paclitaxel and collagen at pH 4 reduces the adhesion energy of PMM 2.1.2-paclitaxel microsphere. This study may offer insight for design of future microparticulate delivery systems by providing the experimental and theoretical tools to study the bioadhesive interaction between drug-loaded microparticles and model extracellular matrices.

  16. Machinability and modeling of cutting mechanism for Titanium Metal Matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bejjani, Roland

    Titanium Metal Matrix composites (TiMMC) is a new class of material. However, it is a very difficult to cut material. Therefore, the tool life is limited. In order to optimize the machining of TiMMC, three approaches (stages) were used. First, a TAGUCHI method for the design of experiments was used in order to identify the effects of the machining inputs (speed, feed, depth) to the output (cutting forces, surface roughness). To enhance even further the tool life, Laser Assisted Machining (LAM) was also experimented. In a second approach, and in order to better understand the cutting mechanism of TiMMC, the chip formation was analyzed and a new model for the adiabatic shear band in the chip segment was developed. In the last approach, and in order to have a better analysis tool to understand the cutting mechanism, a new constitutive model for TiMMC for simulation purposes was developed, with an added damage model. The FEM simulations results led to predictions of temperature, stress, strain, and damage, and can be used as an analysis tool and even for industrial applications. Following experimental work and analysis, I found that cutting TiMMC at higher speeds is more efficient and productive because it increases tool life. It was found that at higher speeds, fewer hard TiC particles are broken, resulting in reduced tool abrasion wear. In order to further optimize the machining of TiMMC, an unconventional machining method was used. In fact, Laser Assisted Machining (LAM) was used and was found to increase the tool life by approximately 180%. To understand the effects of the particles on the tool, micro scale observations of hard particles with SEM microscopy were performed and it was found that the tool/particle interaction while cutting can exist under three forms. The particles can either be cut at the surface, pushed inside the material, or even some of the pieces of the cut particles can be pushed inside the material. No particle de-bonding was observed. Some

  17. Three-Dimensional In Vitro Skin and Skin Cancer Models Based on Human Fibroblast-Derived Matrix.

    PubMed

    Berning, Manuel; Prätzel-Wunder, Silke; Bickenbach, Jackie R; Boukamp, Petra

    2015-09-01

    Three-dimensional in vitro skin and skin cancer models help to dissect epidermal-dermal and tumor-stroma interactions. In the model presented here, normal human dermal fibroblasts isolated from adult skin self-assembled into dermal equivalents with their specific fibroblast-derived matrix (fdmDE) over 4 weeks. The fdmDE represented a complex human extracellular matrix that was stabilized by its own heterogeneous collagen fiber meshwork, largely resembling a human dermal in vivo architecture. Complemented with normal human epidermal keratinocytes, the skin equivalent (fdmSE) thereof favored the establishment of a well-stratified and differentiated epidermis and importantly allowed epidermal regeneration in vitro for at least 24 weeks. Moreover, the fdmDE could be used to study the features of cutaneous skin cancer. Complementing fdmDE with HaCaT cells in different stages of malignancy or tumor-derived cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma cell lines, the resulting skin cancer equivalents (fdmSCEs) recapitulated the respective degree of tumorigenicity. In addition, the fdmSCE invasion phenotypes correlated with their individual degree of tissue organization, disturbance in basement membrane organization, and presence of matrix metalloproteinases. Together, fdmDE-based models are well suited for long-term regeneration of normal human epidermis and, as they recapitulate tumor-specific growth, differentiation, and invasion profiles of cutaneous skin cancer cells, also provide an excellent human in vitro skin cancer model.

  18. Three-Dimensional Culture of Cells and Matrix Biomolecules for Engineered Tissue Development and Biokinetics Model Validation

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Shelley S.; Kohles, Sean S.; Zelick, Randy D.; Winn, Shelley R.; Saha, Asit K.

    2011-01-01

    There has been considerable progress in cellular and molecular engineering due to recent advances in multiscale technology. Such technologies allow controlled manipulation of physiochemical interactions among cells in tissue culture. In particular, a novel chemomechanical bioreactor has recently been designed for the study of bone and cartilage tissue development, with particular focus on extracellular matrix formation. The bioreactor is equally significant as a tool for validation of mathematical models that explore biokinetic regulatory thresholds (Saha, A. K., and Kohles, S. S., 2010, “A Distinct Catabolic to Anabolic Threshold Due to Single-Cell Nanomechanical Stimulation in a Cartilage Biokinetics Model,” J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med., 1(3), p. 031005; 2010, “Periodic Nanomechanical Stimulation in a Biokinetics Model Identifying Anabolic and Catabolic Pathways Associated With Cartilage Matrix Homeostasis,” J. Nanotechnol. Eng. Med., 1(4), p. 041001). In the current study, three-dimensional culture protocols are described for maintaining the cellular and biomolecular constituents within defined parameters. Preliminary validation of the bioreactor’s form and function, expected bioassays of the resulting matrix components, and application to biokinetic models are described. This approach provides a framework for future detailed explorations combining multiscale experimental and mathematical analyses, at nanoscale sensitivity, to describe cell and biomolecule dynamics in different environmental regimes. PMID:21709743

  19. Regulation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling Proteins by Osteoblasts in Titanium Nanoparticle-Induced Aseptic Loosening Model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Hou, Yanhua; Fu, Na; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Li, Guo; Peng, Qiang; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    Titanium (Ti)-wear particles, formed at the bone-implant interface, are responsible for aseptic loosening, which is a main cause of total joint replacement failure. There have been many studies on Ti particle-induced function changes in mono-cultured osteoblasts and synovial cells. However, little is known on extracellular matrix remodeling displayed by osteoblasts when in coexistence with Synovial cells. To further mimic the bone-implant interface environment, we firstly established a nanoscaled-Ti particle-induced aseptic loosening system by co-culturing osteoblasts and Synovial cells. We then explored the impact of the Synovial cells on Ti particle-engulfed osteoblasts in the mimicked flamed niche. The matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases expression levels, two protein families which are critical in osseointegration, were examined under induction by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. It was found that the co-culture between the osteoblasts and Synovial cells markedly increased the migration and proliferation of the osteoblasts, even in the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts. Importantly, the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts, induced by TNF-alpha after the co-culture, enhanced the release of the matrix metalloproteinases and reduced the expressions of lysyl oxidases. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling at the protein level was further assessed by investigations on gene expression of the matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases, which also suggested that the regulation started at the genetic level. Our research work has therefore revealed the critical role of multi cell-type interactions in the extracellular matrix remodeling within the peri-prosthetic tissues, which provides new insights on aseptic loosening and brings new clues about incomplete osseointegration between the implantation materials and their surrounding bones. PMID:26502645

  20. An In Vivo Comparison of Hemostatic Gelatin Matrix Products in a Porcine Spleen Biopsy-punch Model.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Richard W; Werrlein, Stephanie; Johns, Douglas B; Zhang, Gary; Clymer, Jeffrey W; Kocharian, Richard

    2015-11-01

    Flowable gelatin matrix products have established themselves as effective, easy-to-use hemostatic agents useful in a variety of surgical situations. A recently reformulated gelatin matrix, Surgiflo® (Ethicon Inc., Somerville, NJ), can be prepared quickly and provides consistent flow over an 8-hr. period. No in vivo studies have yet been reported comparing hemostasis with the new Surgiflo to other currently marketed flowable gelatin matrix products. This study was conducted to determine whether Surgiflo in actual use has hemostatic qualities different from another commercial gelatin matrix. An in vivo model based on porcine spleen biopsy punch-induced bleeding was used to compare Surgiflo and Floseal™ (Baxter Healthcare Corporation, Hayward, CA), both with thrombin. Time required to achieve hemostasis and proportion of sites achieving hemostasis within 30 s were determined for both hemostatic agents and a control of saline-soaked gauze. Results were stratified by the degree of initial bleeding (mild, moderate, severe). Hemostasis was achieved within 3 minutes at all sites for both test products regardless of level of initial bleeding, and control sites continued bleeding past 10 minutes. There were no statistically significant differences between Surgiflo and Floseal for either mean time to hemostasis or proportion of sites hemostatic within 30 s. In this realistic in vivo model both gelatin matrix products were effective, and there were no significant differences observed in hemostatic efficacy between Surgiflo and Floseal. Other factors, such as ease of preparation and application, in-use stability, and economic considerations may affect a surgeon's decision in selection of a desirable hemostatic product.

  1. Ion Yields in the Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics Model of Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knochenmuss, Richard

    2015-08-01

    The Coupled Chemical and Physical Dynamics (CPCD) model of matrix assisted laser desorption ionization has been restricted to relative rather than absolute yield comparisons because the rate constant for one step in the model was not accurately known. Recent measurements are used to constrain this constant, leading to good agreement with experimental yield versus fluence data for 2,5-dihydroxybenzoic acid. Parameters for alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid are also estimated, including contributions from a possible triplet state. The results are compared with the polar fluid model, the CPCD is found to give better agreement with the data.

  2. Exact matrix treatment of statistical mechanical lattice model of adsorption induced gate opening in metal-organic frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunne, Lawrence J.; Manos, George

    2015-05-01

    Here we present a statistical mechanical lattice model which is exactly solvable using a matrix method and allows treatment of adsorption induced gate opening structural transformations of metal-organic frameworks which are nanoporous materials with exceptional adsorption properties. Modelling of these structural changes presents a serious theoretical challenge when the solid and gas species are treated in an even handed way. This exactly solvable model complements other simulation based approaches. The methodology presented here highlights the competition between the potential for adsorption and the energy required for structural transition as a driving force for the features in the adsorption isotherms.

  3. Integrating temperature-dependent life table data into a matrix projection model for Drosophila suzukii population estimation.

    PubMed

    Wiman, Nik G; Walton, Vaughn M; Dalton, Daniel T; Anfora, Gianfranco; Burrack, Hannah J; Chiu, Joanna C; Daane, Kent M; Grassi, Alberto; Miller, Betsey; Tochen, Samantha; Wang, Xingeng; Ioriatti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-dependent fecundity and survival data was integrated into a matrix population model to describe relative Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) population increase and age structure based on environmental conditions. This novel modification of the classic Leslie matrix population model is presented as a way to examine how insect populations interact with the environment, and has application as a predictor of population density. For D. suzukii, we examined model implications for pest pressure on crops. As case studies, we examined model predictions in three small fruit production regions in the United States (US) and one in Italy. These production regions have distinctly different climates. In general, patterns of adult D. suzukii trap activity broadly mimicked seasonal population levels predicted by the model using only temperature data. Age structure of estimated populations suggest that trap and fruit infestation data are of limited value and are insufficient for model validation. Thus, we suggest alternative experiments for validation. The model is advantageous in that it provides stage-specific population estimation, which can potentially guide management strategies and provide unique opportunities to simulate stage-specific management effects such as insecticide applications or the effect of biological control on a specific life-stage. The two factors that drive initiation of the model are suitable temperatures (biofix) and availability of a suitable host medium (fruit). Although there are many factors affecting population dynamics of D. suzukii in the field, temperature-dependent survival and reproduction are believed to be the main drivers for D. suzukii populations. PMID:25192013

  4. Integrating temperature-dependent life table data into a matrix projection model for Drosophila suzukii population estimation.

    PubMed

    Wiman, Nik G; Walton, Vaughn M; Dalton, Daniel T; Anfora, Gianfranco; Burrack, Hannah J; Chiu, Joanna C; Daane, Kent M; Grassi, Alberto; Miller, Betsey; Tochen, Samantha; Wang, Xingeng; Ioriatti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-dependent fecundity and survival data was integrated into a matrix population model to describe relative Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) population increase and age structure based on environmental conditions. This novel modification of the classic Leslie matrix population model is presented as a way to examine how insect populations interact with the environment, and has application as a predictor of population density. For D. suzukii, we examined model implications for pest pressure on crops. As case studies, we examined model predictions in three small fruit production regions in the United States (US) and one in Italy. These production regions have distinctly different climates. In general, patterns of adult D. suzukii trap activity broadly mimicked seasonal population levels predicted by the model using only temperature data. Age structure of estimated populations suggest that trap and fruit infestation data are of limited value and are insufficient for model validation. Thus, we suggest alternative experiments for validation. The model is advantageous in that it provides stage-specific population estimation, which can potentially guide management strategies and provide unique opportunities to simulate stage-specific management effects such as insecticide applications or the effect of biological control on a specific life-stage. The two factors that drive initiation of the model are suitable temperatures (biofix) and availability of a suitable host medium (fruit). Although there are many factors affecting population dynamics of D. suzukii in the field, temperature-dependent survival and reproduction are believed to be the main drivers for D. suzukii populations.

  5. Integrating Temperature-Dependent Life Table Data into a Matrix Projection Model for Drosophila suzukii Population Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Wiman, Nik G.; Walton, Vaughn M.; Dalton, Daniel T.; Anfora, Gianfranco; Burrack, Hannah J.; Chiu, Joanna C.; Daane, Kent M.; Grassi, Alberto; Miller, Betsey; Tochen, Samantha; Wang, Xingeng; Ioriatti, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Temperature-dependent fecundity and survival data was integrated into a matrix population model to describe relative Drosophila suzukii Matsumura (Diptera: Drosophilidae) population increase and age structure based on environmental conditions. This novel modification of the classic Leslie matrix population model is presented as a way to examine how insect populations interact with the environment, and has application as a predictor of population density. For D. suzukii, we examined model implications for pest pressure on crops. As case studies, we examined model predictions in three small fruit production regions in the United States (US) and one in Italy. These production regions have distinctly different climates. In general, patterns of adult D. suzukii trap activity broadly mimicked seasonal population levels predicted by the model using only temperature data. Age structure of estimated populations suggest that trap and fruit infestation data are of limited value and are insufficient for model validation. Thus, we suggest alternative experiments for validation. The model is advantageous in that it provides stage-specific population estimation, which can potentially guide management strategies and provide unique opportunities to simulate stage-specific management effects such as insecticide applications or the effect of biological control on a specific life-stage. The two factors that drive initiation of the model are suitable temperatures (biofix) and availability of a suitable host medium (fruit). Although there are many factors affecting population dynamics of D. suzukii in the field, temperature-dependent survival and reproduction are believed to be the main drivers for D. suzukii populations. PMID:25192013

  6. On implementation of EM-type algorithms in the stochastic models for a matrix computing on GPU

    SciTech Connect

    Gorshenin, Andrey K.

    2015-03-10

    The paper discusses the main ideas of an implementation of EM-type algorithms for computing on the graphics processors and the application for the probabilistic models based on the Cox processes. An example of the GPU’s adapted MATLAB source code for the finite normal mixtures with the expectation-maximization matrix formulas is given. The testing of computational efficiency for GPU vs CPU is illustrated for the different sample sizes.

  7. Big-Bang reaction rates within the R-matrix model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Descouvemont, P.; Adahchour, A.; Angulo, C.; Coc, A.; Vangioni-Flam, E.

    2005-07-01

    We use the R-matrix theory to fit S-factor data on nuclear reactions involved in Big Bang nucleosynthesis. We derive the reaction rates with associated uncertainties, which are evaluated on statistical grounds. We provide S factors and reaction rates in tabular and graphical formats (available at http://pntpm3.ulb.ac.be/bigbang).

  8. Development of a Subcell Based Modeling Approach for Modeling the Architecturally Dependent Impact Response of Triaxially Braided Polymer Matrix Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sorini, Chris; Chattopadhyay, Aditi; Goldberg, Robert K.; Kohlman, Lee W.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the high velocity impact response of polymer matrix composites with complex architectures is critical to many aerospace applications, including engine fan blade containment systems where the structure must be able to completely contain fan blades in the event of a blade-out. Despite the benefits offered by these materials, the complex nature of textile composites presents a significant challenge for the prediction of deformation and damage under both quasi-static and impact loading conditions. The relatively large mesoscale repeating unit cell (in comparison to the size of structural components) causes the material to behave like a structure rather than a homogeneous material. Impact experiments conducted at NASA Glenn Research Center have shown the damage patterns to be a function of the underlying material architecture. Traditional computational techniques that involve modeling these materials using smeared homogeneous, orthotropic material properties at the macroscale result in simulated damage patterns that are a function of the structural geometry, but not the material architecture. In order to preserve heterogeneity at the highest length scale in a robust yet computationally efficient manner, and capture the architecturally dependent damage patterns, a previously-developed subcell modeling approach where the braided composite unit cell is approximated as a series of four adjacent laminated composites is utilized. This work discusses the implementation of the subcell methodology into the commercial transient dynamic finite element code LS-DYNA (Livermore Software Technology Corp.). Verification and validation studies are also presented, including simulation of the tensile response of straight-sided and notched quasi-static coupons composed of a T700/PR520 triaxially braided [0deg/60deg/-60deg] composite. Based on the results of the verification and validation studies, advantages and limitations of the methodology as well as plans for future work

  9. Modeling of Damage Initiation and Progression in a SiC/SiC Woven Ceramic Matrix Composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mital, Subodh K.; Goldberg, Robert K.; Bonacuse, Peter J.

    2012-01-01

    The goal of an ongoing project at NASA Glenn is to investigate the effects of the complex microstructure of a woven ceramic matrix composite and its variability on the effective properties and the durability of the material. Detailed analysis of these complex microstructures may provide clues for the material scientists who `design the material? or to structural analysts and designers who `design with the material? regarding damage initiation and damage propagation. A model material system, specifically a five-harness satin weave architecture CVI SiC/SiC composite composed of Sylramic-iBN fibers and a SiC matrix, has been analyzed. Specimens of the material were serially sectioned and polished to capture the detailed images of fiber tows, matrix and porosity. Open source analysis tools were used to isolate various constituents and finite elements models were then generated from simplified models of those images. Detailed finite element analyses were performed that examine how the variability in the local microstructure affected the macroscopic behavior as well as the local damage initiation and progression. Results indicate that the locations where damage initiated and propagated is linked to specific microstructural features.

  10. Long-term performance of ceramic matrix composites at elevated temperatures: Modelling of creep and creep rupture

    SciTech Connect

    Curtin, W.A.; Fabeny, B.; Ibnabdeljalil, M.; Iyengar, N.; Reifsnider, K.L.

    1996-07-31

    The models developed, contain explicit dependences on constituent material properties and their changes with time, so that composite performance can be predicted. Three critical processes in ceramic composites at elevated temperatures have been modeled: (1) creep deformation of composite vs stress and time-dependent creep of fibers and matrix, and failure of these components; (2) creep deformation of ``interface`` around broken fibers; and (3) lifetime of the composite under conditions of fiber strength loss over time at temperature. In (1), general evolution formulas are derived for relaxation time of matrix stresses and steady-state creep rate of composite; the model is tested against recent data on Ti-MMCs. Calculations on a composite of Hi-Nicalon fibers in a melt-infiltrated SiC matrix are presented. In (2), numerical simulations of composite failure were made to map out time-to-failure vs applied load for several sets of material parameters. In (3), simple approximate relations are obtained between fiber life and composite life that should be useful for fiber developers and testers. Strength degradation data on Hi-Nicalon fibers is used to assess composite lifetime vs fiber lifetime for Hi-Nicalon fiber composites.

  11. Modeling and Analysis of Granite Matrix Pore Structure and Hydraulic Characteristics in 2D and 3D Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gvozdik, L.; Polak, M.; Zaruba, J.; Vanecek, M.

    2010-12-01

    A geological environment labeled as a Granite massif represents in terms of groundwater flow and transport a distinct hydrogeological environment from that of sedimentary basins, the characterisation of which is generally more complex and uncertain. Massifs are composed of hard crystalline rocks with the very low effective porosity. Due to their rheological properties such rocks are predisposed to brittle deformation resulting from changes in stress conditions. Our specific research project (Research on the influence of intergrangular porosity on deep geological disposal: geological formations, methodology and the development of measurement apparatus) is focussed on the problem of permeable zones within apparently undisturbed granitic rock matrix. The project including the both laboratory and in-situ tracer tests study migration along and through mineral grains in fresh and altered granite. The objective of the project is to assess whether intergranular porosity is a general characteristic of the granitic rock matrix or subject to significant evolution resulting from geochemical and/or hydrogeochemical processes, geotechnical and/or mechanical processes. Moreover, the research is focussed on evaluating methods quantifying intergranular porosity by both physical testing and mathematical modelling using verified standard hydrological software tools. Groundwater flow in microfractures and intergranular pores in granite rock matrix were simulated in three standard hydrogeological modeling programs with completely different conceptual approaches: MODFLOW (Equivalent Continuum concept), FEFLOW (Discrete Fracture and Equivalent Continuum concepts) and NAPSAC (Discrete Fracture Network concept). Specialized random fracture generators were used for creation of several 2D and 3D models in each of the chosen program. Percolation characteristics of these models were tested and analyzed. Several scenarios of laboratory tests of the rock samples permeability made in triaxial

  12. Probing mechanical principles of focal contacts in cell–matrix adhesion with a coupled stochastic–elastic modelling framework

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Huajian; Qian, Jin; Chen, Bin

    2011-01-01

    Cell–matrix adhesion depends on the collective behaviours of clusters of receptor–ligand bonds called focal contacts between cell and extracellular matrix. While the behaviour of a single molecular bond is governed by statistical mechanics at the molecular scale, continuum mechanics should be valid at a larger scale. This paper presents an overview of a series of recent theoretical studies aimed at probing the basic mechanical principles of focal contacts in cell–matrix adhesion via stochastic–elastic models in which stochastic descriptions of molecular bonds and elastic descriptions of interfacial traction–separation are unified in a single modelling framework. The intention here is to illustrate these principles using simple analytical and numerical models. The aim of the discussions is to provide possible clues to the following questions: why does the size of focal adhesions (FAs) fall into a narrow range around the micrometre scale? How can cells sense and respond to substrates of varied stiffness via FAs? How do the magnitude and orientation of mechanical forces affect the binding dynamics of FAs? The effects of cluster size, cell–matrix elastic modulus, loading direction and cytoskeletal pretension on the lifetime of FA clusters have been investigated by theoretical arguments as well as Monte Carlo numerical simulations, with results showing that intermediate adhesion size, stiff substrate, cytoskeleton stiffening, low-angle pulling and moderate cytoskeletal pretension are factors that contribute to stable FAs. From a mechanistic point of view, these results provide possible explanations for a wide range of experimental observations and suggest multiple mechanisms by which cells can actively control adhesion and de-adhesion via cytoskeletal contractile machinery in response to mechanical properties of their surroundings. PMID:21632610

  13. Gelatin Methacrylate Hydrogels as Biomimetic Three-Dimensional Matrixes for Modeling Breast Cancer Invasion and Chemoresponse in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Arya, Anuradha D; Hallur, Pavan M; Karkisaval, Abhijith G; Gudipati, Aditi; Rajendiran, Satheesh; Dhavale, Vaibhav; Ramachandran, Balaji; Jayaprakash, Aravindakshan; Gundiah, Namrata; Chaubey, Aditya

    2016-08-31

    Recent studies have shown that three-dimensional (3D) culture environments allow the study of cellular responses in a setting that more closely resembles the in vivo milieu. In this context, hydrogels have become popular scaffold options for the 3D cell culture. Because the mechanical and biochemical properties of culture matrixes influence crucial cell behavior, selecting a suitable matrix for replicating in vivo cellular phenotype in vitro is essential for understanding disease progression. Gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogels have been the focus of much attention because of their inherent bioactivity, favorable hydration and diffusion properties, and ease-of-tailoring of their physicochemical characteristics. Therefore, in this study we examined the efficacy of GelMA hydrogels as a suitable platform to model specific attributes of breast cancer. We observed increased invasiveness in vitro and increased tumorigenic ability in vivo in breast cancer cells cultured on GelMA hydrogels. Further, cells cultured on GelMA matrixes were more resistant to paclitaxel treatment, as shown by the results of cell-cycle analysis and gene expression. This study, therefore, validates GelMA hydrogels as inexpensive, cell-responsive 3D platforms for modeling key characteristics associated with breast cancer metastasis, in vitro. PMID:27494432

  14. [The inclusion of nutritionists in Primary Health Care: a proposal for a matrix model of nutritional care].

    PubMed

    Borelli, Marina; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Mais, Laís Amaral; Pavan, Juliana; Taddei, José Augusto de Aguiar Carrazedo

    2015-09-01

    Nutritionists were integrated into the Family Health Support Centers back in 2008. Focusing on the development of technical and pedagogical support and assistance to Family Health Teams, the aim of this study was to develop a proposal for a matrix model for nutrition aimed at women and children in the Family Health Strategy. The study was conducted in a Basic Health Unit and was divided into Cycle I, including interviews with families of 0 to 6-year-old children to establish the confines of the territory; and Cycles II and III, with the development of intersectorial field activities to promote food and nutritional security based on matrix support. Following the diagnosis of social vulnerability, children's nutritional risk, indicators of early weaning and inadequate food intake, actions were developed in order to propose a matrix model of nutritional measures in three scenarios, namely at the community, family and individual level. Among the activities that were developed, the main ones included cooking classes, prenatal care, and the training of Community Health Agents. This study tested ways to develop nutritional care by broadened clinical action and territory recognition, seeking to enhance the activities of nutritionists as health educators. PMID:26331508

  15. [The inclusion of nutritionists in Primary Health Care: a proposal for a matrix model of nutritional care].

    PubMed

    Borelli, Marina; Domene, Semíramis Martins Álvares; Mais, Laís Amaral; Pavan, Juliana; Taddei, José Augusto de Aguiar Carrazedo

    2015-09-01

    Nutritionists were integrated into the Family Health Support Centers back in 2008. Focusing on the development of technical and pedagogical support and assistance to Family Health Teams, the aim of this study was to develop a proposal for a matrix model for nutrition aimed at women and children in the Family Health Strategy. The study was conducted in a Basic Health Unit and was divided into Cycle I, including interviews with families of 0 to 6-year-old children to establish the confines of the territory; and Cycles II and III, with the development of intersectorial field activities to promote food and nutritional security based on matrix support. Following the diagnosis of social vulnerability, children's nutritional risk, indicators of early weaning and inadequate food intake, actions were developed in order to propose a matrix model of nutritional measures in three scenarios, namely at the community, family and individual level. Among the activities that were developed, the main ones included cooking classes, prenatal care, and the training of Community Health Agents. This study tested ways to develop nutritional care by broadened clinical action and territory recognition, seeking to enhance the activities of nutritionists as health educators.

  16. Gelatin Methacrylate Hydrogels as Biomimetic Three-Dimensional Matrixes for Modeling Breast Cancer Invasion and Chemoresponse in Vitro.

    PubMed

    Arya, Anuradha D; Hallur, Pavan M; Karkisaval, Abhijith G; Gudipati, Aditi; Rajendiran, Satheesh; Dhavale, Vaibhav; Ramachandran, Balaji; Jayaprakash, Aravindakshan; Gundiah, Namrata; Chaubey, Aditya

    2016-08-31

    Recent studies have shown that three-dimensional (3D) culture environments allow the study of cellular responses in a setting that more closely resembles the in vivo milieu. In this context, hydrogels have become popular scaffold options for the 3D cell culture. Because the mechanical and biochemical properties of culture matrixes influence crucial cell behavior, selecting a suitable matrix for replicating in vivo cellular phenotype in vitro is essential for understanding disease progression. Gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogels have been the focus of much attention because of their inherent bioactivity, favorable hydration and diffusion properties, and ease-of-tailoring of their physicochemical characteristics. Therefore, in this study we examined the efficacy of GelMA hydrogels as a suitable platform to model specific attributes of breast cancer. We observed increased invasiveness in vitro and increased tumorigenic ability in vivo in breast cancer cells cultured on GelMA hydrogels. Further, cells cultured on GelMA matrixes were more resistant to paclitaxel treatment, as shown by the results of cell-cycle analysis and gene expression. This study, therefore, validates GelMA hydrogels as inexpensive, cell-responsive 3D platforms for modeling key characteristics associated with breast cancer metastasis, in vitro.

  17. Suprathel-antiseptic matrix: in vitro model for local antiseptic treatment?

    PubMed

    Ryssel, Henning; Andreas Radu, Christian; Germann, Guenter; Kloeters, Oliver; Riedel, Katrin; Otte, Maximilian; Kremer, Thomas

    2011-02-01

    Acetic acid is a traditional antiseptic agent that has been used for more than 6000 years. The main goal of this study was to demonstrate the suitability of Suprathel (PolyMedics Innovations GmbH, Denkendorf, Germany) in combination with various antiseptic agents to create an "antiseptic-matrix" especially designed for problematic microorganisms such as Proteus vulgaris, Acinetobacter baumannii, or Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which are frequently associated with burns. The study was designed to test the in vitro antimicrobial effect of a "Suprathel-antiseptic matrix" (Suprathel combined with acetic acid 3%, povidone-iodine 11% [Betaisodona], polyhexanide 0.04% [Lavasept], phenoxyethanol 2%/octenidine dihydrochloride 0.1% [Octenisept], mafenide acetate 5%, and chlorhexidine gluconate 1.5%/cetrimid 15% [Hibicet]). As a means to assess the typical bacterial spectrum of a burn unit, the following Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria strains were tested: Escherichia coli, P vulgaris, P aeruginosa, A baumannii, Enterococcus faecalis, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Staphylococcus aureus, methicillin-resistant S aureus, and β-hemolytic streptococcus groups A and B. The tests showed a positive bactericidal effect of the Suprathel-antiseptic matrix, particularly with problematic Gram-negative bacteria such as P vulgaris, P aeruginosa, and A baumannii, except for the combination of Suprathel and mafenide acetate. It can be concluded that Suprathel-antiseptic matrix appears to be suitable as a local antiseptic agent, but clinical studies need to be performed to confirm these in vitro observations. The authors' previous studies have shown that acetic acid demonstrates a wide antiseptic spectrum for microorganisms typically found in burn patients. The combination of Suprathel and acetic acid worked well in this study and appears to be promising for future clinical application.

  18. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  19. Mechanical characterization and modeling of non-linear deformation and fracture of a fiber reinforced metal matrix composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jansson, S.

    1991-01-01

    The nonlinear anisotropic mechanical behavior of an aluminum alloy metal matrix composite reinforced with continuous alumina fibers was determined experimentally. The mechanical behavior of the composite were modeled by assuming that the composite has a periodical microstructure. The resulting unit cell problem was solved with the finite element method. Excellent agreement was found between theoretically predicted and measured stress-strain responses for various tensile and shear loadings. The stress-strain responses for transverse and inplane shear were found to be identical and this will provide a simplification of the constitutive equations for the composite. The composite has a very low ductility in transverse tension and a limited ductility in transverse shear that was correlated to high hydrostatic stresses that develop in the matrix. The shape of the initial yield surface was calculated and good agreement was found between the calculated shape and the experimentally determined shape.

  20. Processing of single-walled carbon-nanotube metal matrix composites and a finite element model for the process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Kenneth

    In the present investigation, single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT or SWNT) reinforced titanium (Ti) matrix composites have been produced by powder metallurgy (PM) and induction heating methods. It has been found that a nickel coating and a fast processing time associated with the induction heating method enables carbon nanotubes to survive the high-temperature (above 1950 K) processing conditions. The result has been a Ti-SWCNT metal-matrix composite (MMC) which is three times stronger and harder than Ti alone, a consequence that has never been accomplished before. This is a promising new development in the application of SWCNT technology to materials science. A mathematical model is given to support the experimental findings.

  1. Quantitative analysis of ultrasonic images of fibrotic liver using co-occurrence matrix based on multi-Rayleigh model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Isono, Hiroshi; Hirata, Shinnosuke; Hachiya, Hiroyuki

    2015-07-01

    In medical ultrasonic images of liver disease, a texture with a speckle pattern indicates a microscopic structure such as nodules surrounded by fibrous tissues in hepatitis or cirrhosis. We have been applying texture analysis based on a co-occurrence matrix to ultrasonic images of fibrotic liver for quantitative tissue characterization. A co-occurrence matrix consists of the probability distribution of brightness of pixel pairs specified with spatial parameters and gives new information on liver disease. Ultrasonic images of different types of fibrotic liver were simulated and the texture-feature contrast was calculated to quantify the co-occurrence matrices generated from the images. The results show that the contrast converges with a value that can be theoretically estimated using a multi-Rayleigh model of echo signal amplitude distribution. We also found that the contrast value increases as liver fibrosis progresses and fluctuates depending on the size of fibrotic structure.

  2. A numerical model for predicting crack path and modes of damage in unidirectional metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bakuckas, J. G.; Tan, T. M.; Lau, A. C. W.; Awerbuch, J.

    1993-01-01

    A finite element-based numerical technique has been developed to simulate damage growth in unidirectional composites. This technique incorporates elastic-plastic analysis, micromechanics analysis, failure criteria, and a node splitting and node force relaxation algorithm to create crack surfaces. Any combination of fiber and matrix properties can be used. One of the salient features of this technique is that damage growth can be simulated without pre-specifying a crack path. In addition, multiple damage mechanisms in the forms of matrix cracking, fiber breakage, fiber-matrix debonding and plastic deformation are capable of occurring simultaneously. The prevailing failure mechanism and the damage (crack) growth direction are dictated by the instantaneous near-tip stress and strain fields. Once the failure mechanism and crack direction are determined, the crack is advanced via the node splitting and node force relaxation algorithm. Simulations of the damage growth process in center-slit boron/aluminum and silicon carbide/titanium unidirectional specimens were performed. The simulation results agreed quite well with the experimental observations.

  3. On the Numerical Formulation of Parametric Linear Fractional Transformation (LFT) Uncertainty Models for Multivariate Matrix Polynomial Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcastro, Christine M.

    1998-01-01

    Robust control system analysis and design is based on an uncertainty description, called a linear fractional transformation (LFT), which separates the uncertain (or varying) part of the system from the nominal system. These models are also useful in the design of gain-scheduled control systems based on Linear Parameter Varying (LPV) methods. Low-order LFT models are difficult to form for problems involving nonlinear parameter variations. This paper presents a numerical computational method for constructing and LFT model for a given LPV model. The method is developed for multivariate polynomial problems, and uses simple matrix computations to obtain an exact low-order LFT representation of the given LPV system without the use of model reduction. Although the method is developed for multivariate polynomial problems, multivariate rational problems can also be solved using this method by reformulating the rational problem into a polynomial form.

  4. Probabilistic models and numerical calculation of system matrix and sensitivity in list-mode MLEM 3D reconstruction of Compton camera images.

    PubMed

    Maxim, Voichita; Lojacono, Xavier; Hilaire, Estelle; Krimmer, Jochen; Testa, Etienne; Dauvergne, Denis; Magnin, Isabelle; Prost, Rémy

    2016-01-01

    This paper addresses the problem of evaluating the system matrix and the sensitivity for iterative reconstruction in Compton camera imaging. Proposed models and numerical calculation strategies are compared through the influence they have on the three-dimensional reconstructed images. The study attempts to address four questions. First, it proposes an analytic model for the system matrix. Second, it suggests a method for its numerical validation with Monte Carlo simulated data. Third, it compares analytical models of the sensitivity factors with Monte Carlo simulated values. Finally, it shows how the system matrix and the sensitivity calculation strategies influence the quality of the reconstructed images.

  5. An analytical/numerical correlation study of the multiple concentric cylinder model for the thermoplastic response of metal matrix composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pindera, Marek-Jerzy; Salzar, Robert S.; Williams, Todd O.

    1993-01-01

    The utility of a recently developed analytical micromechanics model for the response of metal matrix composites under thermal loading is illustrated by comparison with the results generated using the finite-element approach. The model is based on the concentric cylinder assemblage consisting of an arbitrary number of elastic or elastoplastic sublayers with isotropic or orthotropic, temperature-dependent properties. The elastoplastic boundary-value problem of an arbitrarily layered concentric cylinder is solved using the local/global stiffness matrix formulation (originally developed for elastic layered media) and Mendelson's iterative technique of successive elastic solutions. These features of the model facilitate efficient investigation of the effects of various microstructural details, such as functionally graded architectures of interfacial layers, on the evolution of residual stresses during cool down. The available closed-form expressions for the field variables can readily be incorporated into an optimization algorithm in order to efficiently identify optimal configurations of graded interfaces for given applications. Comparison of residual stress distributions after cool down generated using finite-element analysis and the present micromechanics model for four composite systems with substantially different temperature-dependent elastic, plastic, and thermal properties illustrates the efficacy of the developed analytical scheme.

  6. Evaluation of the Majorana phases of a general Majorana neutrino mass matrix: Testability of hierarchical flavour models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samanta, Rome; Chakraborty, Mainak; Ghosal, Ambar

    2016-03-01

    We evaluate the Majorana phases for a general 3 × 3 complex symmetric neutrino mass matrix on the basis of Mohapatra-Rodejohann's phase convention using the three rephasing invariant quantities I12, I13 and I23 proposed by Sarkar and Singh. We find them interesting as they allow us to evaluate each Majorana phase in a model independent way even if one eigenvalue is zero. Utilizing the solution of a general complex symmetric mass matrix for eigenvalues and mixing angles we determine the Majorana phases for both the hierarchies, normal and inverted, taking into account the constraints from neutrino oscillation global fit data as well as bound on the sum of the three light neutrino masses (Σimi) and the neutrinoless double beta decay (ββ0ν) parameter |m11 |. This methodology of finding the Majorana phases is applied thereafter in some predictive models for both the hierarchical cases (normal and inverted) to evaluate the corresponding Majorana phases and it is shown that all the sub cases presented in inverted hierarchy section can be realized in a model with texture zeros and scaling ansatz within the framework of inverse seesaw although one of the sub cases following the normal hierarchy is yet to be established. Except the case of quasi degenerate neutrinos, the methodology obtained in this work is able to evaluate the corresponding Majorana phases, given any model of neutrino masses.

  7. Disassemblability modeling technology of configurable product based on disassembly constraint relation weighted design structure matrix(DSM)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiu, Lemiao; Liu, Xiaojian; Zhang, Shuyou; Sun, Liangfeng

    2014-05-01

    The current research of configurable product disassemblability focuses on disassemblability evaluation and disassembly sequence planning. Little work has been done on quantitative analysis of configurable product disassemblability. The disassemblability modeling technology for configurable product based on disassembly constraint relation weighted design structure matrix (DSM) is proposed. Major factors affecting the disassemblability of configurable product are analyzed, and the disassembling degrees between components in configurable product are obtained by calculating disassembly entropies such as joint type, joint quantity, disassembly path, disassembly accessibility and material compatibility. The disassembly constraint relation weighted DSM of configurable product is constructed and configuration modules are formed by matrix decomposition and tearing operations. The disassembly constraint relation in configuration modules is strong coupling, and the disassembly constraint relation between modules is weak coupling, and the disassemblability configuration model is constructed based on configuration module. Finally, taking a hydraulic forging press as an example, the decomposed weak coupling components are used as configuration modules alone, components with a strong coupling are aggregated into configuration modules, and the disassembly sequence of components inside configuration modules is optimized by tearing operation. A disassemblability configuration model of the hydraulic forging press is constructed. By researching the disassemblability modeling technology of product configuration design based on disassembly constraint relation weighted DSM, the disassembly property in maintenance, recycling and reuse of configurable product are optimized.

  8. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy to Quantify Collagen and Elastin in an In Vitro Model of Extracellular Matrix Degradation in Aorta

    PubMed Central

    Cheheltani, Rabee; McGoverin, Cushla M.; Rao, Jayashree; Vorp, David A.; Kiani, Mohammad F.; Pleshko, N.

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) is a key component and regulator of many biological tissues including aorta. Several aortic pathologies are associated with significant changes in the composition of the matrix, especially in the content, quality and type of aortic structural proteins, collagen and elastin. The purpose of this study was to develop an infrared spectroscopic methodology that is comparable to biochemical assays to quantify collagen and elastin in aorta. Enzymatically degraded porcine aorta samples were used as a model of ECM degradation in abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA). After enzymatic treatment, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectra of the aortic tissue were acquired by an infrared fiber optic probe (IFOP) and FTIR imaging spectroscopy (FT-IRIS). Collagen and elastin content were quantified biochemically and partial least squares (PLS) models were developed to predict collagen and elastin content in aorta based on FTIR spectra. PLS models developed from FT-IRIS spectra were able to predict elastin and collagen content of the samples with strong correlations (RMSE of validation = 8.4% and 11.1% of the range respectively), and IFOP spectra were successfully used to predict elastin content (RMSE = 11.3% of the range). The PLS regression coefficients from the FT-IRIS models were used to map collagen and elastin in tissue sections of degraded porcine aortic tissue as well as a human AAA biopsy tissue, creating a similar map of each component compared to histology. These results support further application of FTIR spectroscopic techniques for evaluation of AAA tissues. PMID:24761431

  9. Food Matrix Effects on Bioaccessibility of β-Carotene Can be Measured in an in Vitro Gastrointestinal Model

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Since the food matrix determines β-carotene availability for intestinal absorption, food matrix effects on the bioaccessibility of β-carotene from two diets were investigated in vitro and compared with in vivo data. The “mixed diet” consisted of β-carotene-rich vegetables, and the “oil diet” contained β-carotene-low vegetables with supplemental β-carotene. The application of extrinsically labeled β-carotene was also investigated. The bioaccessibility of β-carotene was 28 μg/100 μg β-carotene from the mixed diet and 53 μg/100 μg β-carotene from the oil diet. This ratio of 1.9:1 was consistent with in vivo data, where the apparent absorption was 1.9-fold higher in the oil diet than in the mixed diet. The labeled β-carotene was not equally distributed over time. In conclusion, the food matrix effects on bioaccessibility of β-carotene could be measured using an in vitro model and were consistent with in vivo data. The application of extrinsically labeled β-carotene was not confirmed. PMID:24397305

  10. Characteristic matrix and tubular basement membrane abnormalities in the CBA/Ca-kdkd mouse model of hereditary tubulointerstitial disease.

    PubMed

    Sibalic, V; Sun, L; Sibalic, A; Oertli, B; Ritthaler, T; Wüthrich, R P

    1998-11-01

    CBA/CaH-kdkd mice develop hereditary tubulointerstitial disease with mononuclear cell infiltration and cyst formation, possibly representing a model of human nephronophthisis. The purpose of the present investigation was to examine the components of the fibrotic changes which typically develop in the kidneys of these mice. By conventional histology, kdkd mice displayed progressive interstitial fibroblast and matrix accumulation. Immunohistological analysis of kdkd kidneys showed marked deposition of fibronectin in the tubulointerstitial space and revealed prominent irregularities for laminin and collagen type IV in the tubular basement membrane (TBM), including thickening, widening and folding. Electron microscopy confirmed the TBM abnormalities and showed marked undulation and thickening in areas of proximal tubular (PT) degeneration. Immunofluorescence staining analysis for the fibronectin receptors VLA-4 and VLA-5 showed no expression on injured proximal tubules, whereas the expression of the laminin receptor VLA-6 was increased and irregular on altered PT. Analysis of RNA derived from kdkd kidneys revealed marked upregulation of steady-state mRNA levels for the fibrogenic growth factor TGF-beta. We conclude that TBM alterations, matrix accumulation and changes in integrin expression together with enhanced TGF-beta production are typical features of kdkd tubulointerstitial disease and suggest that characteristic TBM or matrix alterations could contribute to the pathogenesis of the disease in these mice.

  11. Intact Pericellular Matrix of Articular Cartilage Is Required for Unactivated Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 in the Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Lin; Polur, Ilona; Servais, Jacqueline M.; Hsieh, Sirena; Lee, Peter L.; Goldring, Mary B.; Li, Yefu

    2011-01-01

    Increased expression of the discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) results from its interaction with collagen type II. This induces expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, leading to osteoarthritis (OA). To investigate the impact of the pericellular matrix of chondrocytes on DDR2, we generated a mouse model with inducible overexpression of DDR2 in cartilage. Conditional overexpression of DDR2 in mature mouse articular cartilage was controlled via the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein promoter using the Tet-Off-inducible system. Doxycycline was withdrawn at 1 month of age, and knee joints were examined at 2, 3, and 4 months of age. Microsurgery was performed on 3-month-old transgenic mice overexpressing DDR2 to destabilize the medial meniscus, and serial paraffin sections were examined at 2, 4, 8, and 12 weeks after surgery. DDR2 expression increased in the knee joints of transgenic mice. However, the increased DDR2 did not induce MMP-13 expression. No OA-like changes were observed in the transgenic mice at the age of 4 months. When transgenic mice were subjected to destabilizing of the medial meniscus, we observed accelerated progression to OA, which was associated with DDR2 activation. Therefore, conditionally overexpressing DDR2 in the mature articular cartilage of mouse knee joints requires activation to induce OA, and altered biomechanical stress can accelerate the onset of cartilage loss and progression to OA in transgenic mice. PMID:21855682

  12. Modeling of light scattering by biconcave and deformed red blood cells with the invariant imbedding T-matrix method.

    PubMed

    Bi, Lei; Yang, Ping

    2013-05-01

    The invariant imbedding T-matrix method (II-TM) is employed to simulate the optical properties of normal biconcave and deformed red blood cells (RBCs). The phase matrix elements of a RBC model computed with the II-TM are compared with their counterparts computed with the discrete-dipole approximation (DDA) method. As expected, the DDA results approach the II-TM results with an increase in the number of dipoles per incident wavelength. Computationally, the II-TM is faster than the DDA when multiple RBC orientations are considered. For a single orientation, the DDA is comparable with or even faster than the II-TM because the DDA efficiently converges for optically soft particles; however, the DDA method demands significantly more computer memory than the II-TM. After the applicability of the II-TM is numerically confirmed, a comparison is conducted of the optical properties of oxygenated and deoxygenated RBCs and of normal and deformed RBCs. The spectral variations of RBCs' optical properties are investigated in the wavelength range from 0.25 to 1.0 μm. Furthermore, the statistically averaged phase matrix of spheres and biconcave RBCs are compared. Conducted numerical simulations suggest the applicability of the II-TM for the inverse light scattering analysis and radiative transfer simulations in blood.

  13. An equivalent roughness model for seabed backscattering at very high frequencies using a band-matrix approach.

    PubMed

    Wendelboe, Gorm; Jacobsen, Finn; Bell, Judith M

    2007-02-01

    This work concerns modeling of very high frequency (>100 kHz) sonar images obtained from a sandy seabed. The seabed is divided into a discrete number of ID height profiles. For each height profile the backscattered pressure is computed by an integral equation method for interface scattering between two homogeneous media as formulated by Chan [IEEE Trans. Antennas Propag. 46, 142-149 (1998)]. However, the seabed is inhomogeneous, and volume scattering is a major contributor to backscattering. The SAX99 experiments revealed that the density in the unconsolidated sediment within the first 5 mm exhibits a high spatial variation. For that reason, additional roughness is introduced: For each surface point a stochastic realization of the density along the vertical is generated, and the sediment depth at which the density has its maximum value will constitute the new height field value. The matrix of the full integral equation is reduced to a band matrix as the interaction between the point sources on the seabed is neglected from a certain range; this allows computations on long height profiles with lengths up to approximately 25 m (at 300 kHz). The equivalent roughness approach, combined with the band-matrix approach, agrees with SAX99 data at 300 kHz.

  14. Modeling the rabbit's eye with the Mueller matrix for birefringent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baba, Justin S.; Cooper, Califf T.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2003-07-01

    The effect of changing corneal birefringence, due to motion artifact, remains a major obstacle to the development of an accurate non-invasive polarimetric glucose sensor for patients with diabetes mellitus. Consequently, there is still a need to characterize fully, and to quantify the relative changes in corneal birefringence to facilitate the optimization of detection algorithms, enabling in vivo accuracy within 10mg/dl. In this paper, we present preliminary results, utilizing a Mueller matrix imaging technique, that demonstrates notable relative changes in the apparent retardance and in the apparent fast axis location of rabbit cornea.

  15. Modeling neural differentiation on micropatterned substrates coated with neural matrix components

    PubMed Central

    García-Parra, Patricia; Cavaliere, Fabio; Maroto, Marcos; Bilbao, Leire; Obieta, Isabel; López de Munain, Adolfo; Álava, José Iñaki; Izeta, Ander

    2012-01-01

    Topographical and biochemical characteristics of the substrate are critical for neuronal differentiation including axonal outgrowth and regeneration of neural circuits in vivo. Contact stimuli and signaling molecules allow neurons to develop and stabilize synaptic contacts. Here we present the development, characterization and functional validation of a new polymeric support able to induce neuronal differentiation in both PC12 cell line and adult primary skin-derived precursor cells (SKPs) in vitro. By combining a photolithographic technique with use of neural extracellular matrix (ECM) as a substrate, a biocompatible and efficient microenvironment for neuronal differentiation was developed. PMID:22435050

  16. Image-based modeling of the flow transition from a Berea rock matrix to a propped fracture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanematsu, P.; Willson, C. S.; Thompson, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    In the past decade, new technologies and advances in horizontal hydraulic fracturing to extract oil and gas from tight rocks have raised questions regarding the physics of the flow and transport processes that occur during production. Many of the multi-dimensional details of flow from the rock matrix into the fracture and within the proppant-filled fracture are still unknown, which leads to unreliable well production estimations. In this work, we use x-ray computed micro tomography (XCT) to image 30/60 CarboEconoprop light weight ceramic proppant packed between berea sandstone cores (6 mm in diameter and ~2 mm in height) under 4000 psi (~28 MPa) loading stress. Image processing and segmentation of the 6 micron voxel resolution tomography dataset into solid and void space involved filtering with anisotropic diffusion (AD), segmentation using an indicator kriging (IK) algorithm, and removal of noise using a remove islands and holes program. Physically-representative pore network structures were generated from the XCT images, and a representative elementary volume (REV) was analyzed using both permeability and effective porosity convergence. Boundary conditions were introduced to mimic the flow patterns that occur when fluid moves from the matrix into the proppant-filled fracture and then downstream within the proppant-filled fracture. A smaller domain, containing Berea and proppants close to the interface, was meshed using an in-house unstructured meshing algorithm that allows different levels of refinement. Although most of this domain contains proppants, the Berea section accounted for the majority of the elements due to mesh refinement in this region of smaller pores. A finite element method (FEM) Stokes flow model was used to provide more detailed insights on the flow transition from rock matrix to fracture. Results using different pressure gradients are used to describe the flow transition from the Berea rock matrix to proppant-filled fracture.

  17. Predictive model for microcracking and mechanical properties of polymer-matrix composite materials for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Issoupov, V.; Viel-Inguimbert, V.; Dinguirard, M.; Startsev, O. V.; Nikishin, E. F.

    2003-09-01

    Thermal ageing of polymer-matrix composite materials of any long-life spacecraft in LEO involves evolution of mechanical, thermophysical and morphological properties, especially if the structure operates under external mechanical stress like bending. Behavior of KMU-4l carbon/epoxy composite material under combined effect of thermal profiles and static mechanical loading has been studied in a simulated LEO space environment. Thermal cycling was performed on specimens under bending stress reaching 30.4% of the material ultimate strength. Specimens subjected to combined thermal and mechanical fatigue were examined in a series of 4 intermediate points with a maximum of 120 cycles. The DMTA technique has been employed to follow the global thermomechanical response of KMU-4l composite. The degradation produced was detected by moisture diffusion analysis, the crack density was estimated at the edges of the specimens using a scanning electron microscope. Effects such as the temperature dependence of material properties and matrix post-curing phenomena are also discussed. The results are compared with the appropriate data obtained on specimens of KMU-4l exposed for up to 1501 days to LEO space environments onboard SALYUT and MIR space stations.

  18. Antimycobacterial drugs modulate immunopathogenic matrix metalloproteinases in a cellular model of pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Singh, Shivani; Kubler, Andre; Singh, Utpal K; Singh, Ajay; Gardiner, Harriet; Prasad, Rajniti; Elkington, Paul T; Friedland, Jon S

    2014-08-01

    Tuberculosis is characterized by extensive destruction and remodelling of the pulmonary extracellular matrix. Stromal cell-derived matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are implicated in this process and may be a target for adjunctive immunotherapy. We hypothesized that MMPs are elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of tuberculosis patients and that antimycobacterial agents may have a modulatory effect on MMP secretion. Concentrations of MMP-1, -2, -3, -7, -8, and -9 were elevated in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from tuberculosis patients compared to those in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with other pulmonary conditions. There was a positive correlation between MMP-3, MMP-7, and MMP-8 and a chest radiological score of cavitation and parenchymal damage. Respiratory epithelial cell-derived MMP-3 was suppressed by moxifloxacin, rifampicin, and azithromycin in a dose-dependent manner. Respiratory epithelial cell-derived MMP-1 was suppressed by moxifloxacin and azithromycin, whereas MMP-9 secretion was only decreased by moxifloxacin. In contrast, moxifloxacin and azithromycin both increased MMP-1 and -3 secretion from MRC-5 fibroblasts, demonstrating that the effects of these drugs are cell specific. Isoniazid did not affect MMP secretion. In conclusion, MMPs are elevated in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from tuberculosis patients and correlate with parameters of tissue destruction. Antimycobacterial agents have a hitherto-undescribed immunomodulatory effect on MMP release by stromal cells.

  19. Pericellular Matrix Mechanics in the Anulus Fibrosus Predicted by a Three-Dimensional Finite Element Model and In Situ Morphology

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Li; Guilak, Farshid; Setton, Lori A.

    2009-01-01

    Anulus fibrosus (AF) cells have been demonstrated to exhibit dramatic differences in morphology and biologic responses to different types of mechanical stimuli. AF cells may reside as single cell, paired or multiple cells in a contiguous pericellular matrix (PCM), whose structure and properties are expected to have a significant influence on the mechanical stimuli that these cells may experience during physiologic loading of the spine, as well as in tissue degeneration and regeneration. In this study, a computational model was developed to predict the micromechanical stimuli, such as stress and strain, fluid pressure and flow, of cells and their surrounding PCM in the AF tissue using three-dimensional (3D) finite element models based on in situ morphology. 3D solid geometries of cell-PCM regions were registered from serial confocal images obtained from mature rat AF tissues by custom codes. Distinct cell-matrix units were modeled with a custom 3D biphasic finite element code (COMSOL Multiphysics), and simulated to experience uni-axial tensile strain along the local collagen fiber direction. AF cells were predicted to experience higher volumetric strain with a strain amplification ratio (relative to that in the extracellular matrix) of ~ 3.1 – 3.8 at equilibrium, as compared to the PCM domains (1.3 – 1.9). The strain concentrations were generally found at the cell/PCM interface and stress concentration at the PCM/ECM interface. Increased numbers of cells within a contiguous PCM was associated with an apparent increase of strain levels and decreased rate of fluid pressurization in the cell, with magnitudes dependent on the cell size, shape and relative position inside the PCM. These studies provide spatio-temporal information on micromechanics of AF cells in understanding the mechanotransduction in the intervertebral disc. PMID:19946619

  20. Multi-objective control of a full-car model using linear-matrix-inequalities and fixed-order optimisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Türkay, Semiha; Akçay, Hüseyin

    2014-03-01

    This paper studies multi-objective control of a full-vehicle suspension excited by random road disturbances. The control problem is first formulated as a mixed ℋ2/ℋ∞ synthesis problem and an output-feedback solution is obtained by using linear-matrix-inequalities. Next, the multi-objective control problem is re-formulated as a non-convex and non-smooth optimisation problem with controller order restricted to be less than the vehicle model order. For a range of orders, controllers are synthesised by using the HIFOO toolbox. The efficacy of the presented procedures are demonstrated by several design examples.

  1. Misleading population estimates: biases and consistency of visual surveys and matrix modelling in the endangered bearded vulture.

    PubMed

    Margalida, Antoni; Oro, Daniel; Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Heredia, Rafael; Donázar, José A

    2011-01-01

    Conservation strategies for long-lived vertebrates require accurate estimates of parameters relative to the populations' size, numbers of non-breeding individuals (the "cryptic" fraction of the population) and the age structure. Frequently, visual survey techniques are used to make these estimates but the accuracy of these approaches is questionable, mainly because of the existence of numerous potential biases. Here we compare data on population trends and age structure in a bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) population from visual surveys performed at supplementary feeding stations with data derived from population matrix-modelling approximations. Our results suggest that visual surveys overestimate the number of immature (<2 years old) birds, whereas subadults (3-5 y.o.) and adults (>6 y.o.) were underestimated in comparison with the predictions of a population model using a stable-age distribution. In addition, we found that visual surveys did not provide conclusive information on true variations in the size of the focal population. Our results suggest that although long-term studies (i.e. population matrix modelling based on capture-recapture procedures) are a more time-consuming method, they provide more reliable and robust estimates of population parameters needed in designing and applying conservation strategies. The findings shown here are likely transferable to the management and conservation of other long-lived vertebrate populations that share similar life-history traits and ecological requirements.

  2. A hybrid finite element-transfer matrix model for vibroacoustic systems with flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Luca; Atalla, Noureddine; Berry, Alain; Sgard, Franck

    2015-02-01

    Practical vibroacoustic systems involve passive acoustic treatments consisting of highly dissipative media such as poroelastic materials. The numerical modeling of such systems at low to mid frequencies typically relies on substructuring methodologies based on finite element models. Namely, the master subsystems (i.e., structural and acoustic domains) are described by a finite set of uncoupled modes, whereas condensation procedures are typically preferred for the acoustic treatments. However, although accurate, such methodology is computationally expensive when real life applications are considered. A potential reduction of the computational burden could be obtained by approximating the effect of the acoustic treatment on the master subsystems without introducing physical degrees of freedom. To do that, the treatment has to be assumed homogeneous, flat, and of infinite lateral extent. Under these hypotheses, simple analytical tools like the transfer matrix method can be employed. In this paper, a hybrid finite element-transfer matrix methodology is proposed. The impact of the limiting assumptions inherent within the analytical framework are assessed for the case of plate-cavity systems involving flat and homogeneous acoustic treatments. The results prove that the hybrid model can capture the qualitative behavior of the vibroacoustic system while reducing the computational effort.

  3. Misleading Population Estimates: Biases and Consistency of Visual Surveys and Matrix Modelling in the Endangered Bearded Vulture

    PubMed Central

    Margalida, Antoni; Oro, Daniel; Cortés-Avizanda, Ainara; Heredia, Rafael; Donázar, José A.

    2011-01-01

    Conservation strategies for long-lived vertebrates require accurate estimates of parameters relative to the populations' size, numbers of non-breeding individuals (the “cryptic” fraction of the population) and the age structure. Frequently, visual survey techniques are used to make these estimates but the accuracy of these approaches is questionable, mainly because of the existence of numerous potential biases. Here we compare data on population trends and age structure in a bearded vulture (Gypaetus barbatus) population from visual surveys performed at supplementary feeding stations with data derived from population matrix-modelling approximations. Our results suggest that visual surveys overestimate the number of immature (<2 years old) birds, whereas subadults (3–5 y.o.) and adults (>6 y.o.) were underestimated in comparison with the predictions of a population model using a stable-age distribution. In addition, we found that visual surveys did not provide conclusive information on true variations in the size of the focal population. Our results suggest that although long-term studies (i.e. population matrix modelling based on capture-recapture procedures) are a more time-consuming method, they provide more reliable and robust estimates of population parameters needed in designing and applying conservation strategies. The findings shown here are likely transferable to the management and conservation of other long-lived vertebrate populations that share similar life-history traits and ecological requirements. PMID:22039550

  4. Efficient fully 3D list-mode TOF PET image reconstruction using a factorized system matrix with an image domain resolution model

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Jian; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-01-01

    A factorized system matrix utilizing an image domain resolution model is attractive in fully 3D TOF PET image reconstruction using list-mode data. In this paper, we study a factored model based on sparse matrix factorization that is comprised primarily of a simplified geometrical projection matrix and an image blurring matrix. Beside the commonly-used Siddon's raytracer, we propose another more simplified geometrical projector based on the Bresenham's raytracer which further reduces the computational cost. We discuss in general how to obtain an image blurring matrix associated with a geometrical projector, and provide theoretical analysis that can be used to inspect the efficiency in model factorization. In simulation studies, we investigate the performance of the proposed sparse factorization model in terms of spatial resolution, noise properties and computational cost. The quantitative results reveal that the factorization model can be as efficient as a nonfactored model such as the analytical model while its computational cost can be much lower. In addition we conduct Monte Carlo simulations to identify the conditions under which the image resolution model can become more efficient in terms of image contrast recovery. We verify our observations using the provided theoretical analysis. The result offers a general guide to achieve optimal reconstruction performance based on a sparse factorization model with an only image domain resolution model. PMID:24434568

  5. Expanding (3+1)-dimensional universe from a lorentzian matrix model for superstring theory in (9+1) dimensions.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang-Woo; Nishimura, Jun; Tsuchiya, Asato

    2012-01-01

    We reconsider the matrix model formulation of type IIB superstring theory in (9+1)-dimensional space-time. Unlike the previous works in which the Wick rotation was used to make the model well defined, we regularize the Lorentzian model by introducing infrared cutoffs in both the spatial and temporal directions. Monte Carlo studies reveal that the two cutoffs can be removed in the large-N limit and that the theory thus obtained has no parameters other than one scale parameter. Moreover, we find that three out of nine spatial directions start to expand at some "critical time," after which the space has SO(3) symmetry instead of SO(9).

  6. Biomaterials approaches to modeling macrophage-extracellular matrix interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nora L; Fischbach, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Tumors are characterized by aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and chronic inflammation. While advances in biomaterials and tissue engineering strategies have led to important new insights regarding the role of ECM composition, structure, and mechanical properties in cancer in general, the functional link between these parameters and macrophage phenotype is poorly understood. Nevertheless, increasing experimental evidence suggests that macrophage behavior is similarly controlled by physicochemical properties of the ECM and consequential changes in mechanosignaling. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage biology and ECM-mediated differences in mechanotransduction and discuss future opportunities of biomaterials and tissue engineering platforms to interrogate the functional relationship between these parameters and their relevance to cancer. PMID:26921768

  7. Biomaterials approaches to modeling macrophage-extracellular matrix interactions in the tumor microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Springer, Nora L; Fischbach, Claudia

    2016-08-01

    Tumors are characterized by aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and chronic inflammation. While advances in biomaterials and tissue engineering strategies have led to important new insights regarding the role of ECM composition, structure, and mechanical properties in cancer in general, the functional link between these parameters and macrophage phenotype is poorly understood. Nevertheless, increasing experimental evidence suggests that macrophage behavior is similarly controlled by physicochemical properties of the ECM and consequential changes in mechanosignaling. Here, we will summarize the current knowledge of macrophage biology and ECM-mediated differences in mechanotransduction and discuss future opportunities of biomaterials and tissue engineering platforms to interrogate the functional relationship between these parameters and their relevance to cancer.

  8. Model of brittle matrix composite toughening based on discrete fiber reinforcement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubinstein, Asher A.

    1992-01-01

    An analytical approach for the analysis of the effectiveness of fiber reinforcement in brittle matrix composites is presented. The analytical method allows consideration of discrete fiber distribution and examination of the development of crack growth parameters on microscale. The problem associated with the bridging zone development is addressed here; therefore, the bridging zone is considered to be smaller than the main preexisting crack, and the small scale approach is used. The mechanics of the reinforcement is accurately accounted for in the process zone of a growing crack. Closed form solutions characterizing the initial failure process are presented for linear and nonlinear force - fiber pullout displacement relationships. The implicit exact solution for the extended bridging zone is presented as well.

  9. Cohomological gauge theory, quiver matrix models and Donaldson-Thomas theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirafici, Michele; Sinkovics, Annamaria; Szabo, Richard J.

    2009-03-01

    We study the relation between Donaldson-Thomas theory of Calabi-Yau threefolds and a six-dimensional topological Yang-Mills theory. Our main example is the topological U(N) gauge theory on flat space in its Coulomb branch. To evaluate its partition function we use equivariant localization techniques on its noncommutative deformation. As a result the gauge theory localizes on noncommutative instantons which can be classified in terms of N-coloured three-dimensional Young diagrams. We give to these noncommutative instantons a geometrical description in terms of certain stable framed coherent sheaves on projective space by using a higher-dimensional generalization of the ADHM formalism. From this formalism we construct a topological matrix quantum mechanics which computes an index of BPS states and provides an alternative approach to the six-dimensional gauge theory.

  10. Optimized Fock space in the large N limit of quartic interactions in matrix models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hynek, Mariusz

    2016-05-01

    We consider the problem of quantization of the bosonic membrane via the large N limit of its matrix regularizations HN in Fock space. We prove that there exists a choice of the Fock space frequency such that HN can be written as a sum of a non-interacting Hamiltonian H0,N and the original normal ordered quartic potential. Using this decomposition we obtain upper and lower bounds for the ground state energy in the planar limit, we study a perturbative expansion about the spectrum of H0,N, and show that the spectral gap remains finite at N = ∞ at least up to the second order. We also apply the method to the U (N)-invariant anharmonic oscillator, and demonstrate that our bounds agree with the exact result of Brezin et al.

  11. Effects of processing on the recovery of food allergens from a model dark chocolate matrix.

    PubMed

    Khuda, Sefat E; Jackson, Lauren S; Fu, Tong-Jen; Williams, Kristina M

    2015-02-01

    To alleviate the risk to allergic consumers, it is crucial to improve factors affecting the detection of food allergens in processed chocolate products. This study evaluated processing effects on (1) recovery of peanut, egg, and milk allergens using five different extraction buffers, and (2) identification of specific allergenic proteins from extracts of incurred chocolate using allergen-specific antibodies and human allergic sera. Immunochemical staining with polyclonal antibodies showed that the addition of detergent or reducing agent improved extraction efficiency of peanut proteins, but not of egg and milk proteins. Tempering decreased antibody binding regardless of extractant. Detection of IgE-reactive peanut, egg, and milk allergens was differentially affected by tempering and extractant. Detection problems associated with matrix and processing effects may be overcome by the choice of extraction buffer and detecting antibody.

  12. A unified multicomponent stress-diffusion model of drug release from non-biodegradable polymeric matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Ali; Zhao, Jin; Cabelka, Tim D; Larson, Ronald G

    2016-02-28

    We propose a new transport model of drug release from hydrophilic polymeric matrices, based on Stefan-Maxwell flux laws for multicomponent transport. Polymer stress is incorporated in the total mixing free energy, which contributes directly to the diffusion driving force while leading to time-dependent boundary conditions at the tablet interface. Given that hydrated matrix tablets are dense multicomponent systems, extended Stefan-Maxwell (ESM) flux laws are adopted to ensure consistency with the Onsager reciprocity principle and the Gibbs-Duhem thermodynamic constraint. The ESM flux law for any given component takes into account the friction exerted by all other species and is invariant with respect to reference velocity, thus satisfying Galilean translational invariance. Our model demonstrates that penetrant-induced plasticization of polymer chains partially or even entirely offsets the steady decline of chemical potential gradients at the tablet-medium interface that drive drug release. Utilizing a Flory-Huggins thermodynamic model, a modified form of the upper convected Maxwell constitutive equation for polymer stress and a Fujita-type dependence of mutual diffusivities on composition, depending on parameters, Fickian, anomalous or case II drug transport arises naturally from the model, which are characterized by quasi-power-law release profiles with exponents ranging from 0.5 to 1, respectively. A necessary requirement for non-Fickian release in our model is that the matrix stress relaxation time is comparable to the time scale for water diffusion. Mutual diffusivities and their composition dependence are the most decisive factors in controlling drug release characteristics in our model. Regression of the experimental polymer dissolution and drug release profiles in a system of Theophylline/cellulose (K15M) demonstrate that API-water mutual diffusivity in the presence of excipient cannot generally be taken as a constant.

  13. A unified multicomponent stress-diffusion model of drug release from non-biodegradable polymeric matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Salehi, Ali; Zhao, Jin; Cabelka, Tim D; Larson, Ronald G

    2016-02-28

    We propose a new transport model of drug release from hydrophilic polymeric matrices, based on Stefan-Maxwell flux laws for multicomponent transport. Polymer stress is incorporated in the total mixing free energy, which contributes directly to the diffusion driving force while leading to time-dependent boundary conditions at the tablet interface. Given that hydrated matrix tablets are dense multicomponent systems, extended Stefan-Maxwell (ESM) flux laws are adopted to ensure consistency with the Onsager reciprocity principle and the Gibbs-Duhem thermodynamic constraint. The ESM flux law for any given component takes into account the friction exerted by all other species and is invariant with respect to reference velocity, thus satisfying Galilean translational invariance. Our model demonstrates that penetrant-induced plasticization of polymer chains partially or even entirely offsets the steady decline of chemical potential gradients at the tablet-medium interface that drive drug release. Utilizing a Flory-Huggins thermodynamic model, a modified form of the upper convected Maxwell constitutive equation for polymer stress and a Fujita-type dependence of mutual diffusivities on composition, depending on parameters, Fickian, anomalous or case II drug transport arises naturally from the model, which are characterized by quasi-power-law release profiles with exponents ranging from 0.5 to 1, respectively. A necessary requirement for non-Fickian release in our model is that the matrix stress relaxation time is comparable to the time scale for water diffusion. Mutual diffusivities and their composition dependence are the most decisive factors in controlling drug release characteristics in our model. Regression of the experimental polymer dissolution and drug release profiles in a system of Theophylline/cellulose (K15M) demonstrate that API-water mutual diffusivity in the presence of excipient cannot generally be taken as a constant. PMID:26763374

  14. Investigations on the effect of antioxidant type and concentration and model system matrix on acrylamide formation in model Maillard reaction systems.

    PubMed

    Constantinou, Costas; Koutsidis, Georgios

    2016-04-15

    The formation of acrylamide in model Maillard reaction systems containing phenolic compounds was examined, with regards to phenolic type, concentration, and model system matrix. In dry glyoxal/asparagine waxy maize starch (WMS) systems, 9 out of 10 examined phenolics demonstrated an inhibiting effect, with the most significant reductions (55-60%) observed for caffeoylquinic acids. In WMS glucose/asparagine systems, examination of three different concentrations (0.1, 0.5 and 1 μmol/g WMS) suggested a 'minimum effective concentration' for epicatechin and caffeic acid, whilst addition of caffeoylquinic acids resulted in dose-dependent acrylamide reduction (25-75%). The discordant results of further studies utilising different matrices (dry and wet-to-dry) indicated that, apart from the nature and chemical reactivity, the matrix and the physical state of the reactants might be important for acrylamide formation.

  15. Thiol Functionalized Silica-Mixed Matrix Membranes for Silver Capture from Aqueous Solutions: Experimental Results and Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Ladhe, A. R.; Frailie, P.; Hua, D.; Darsillo, M.; Bhattacharyya, D.

    2009-01-01

    The study deals with an aqueous phase application of Mixed Matrix Membranes (MMMs) for silver ion (Ag+) capture. Silica particles were functionalized with 3-mercaptopropyltrimethoxy silane (MPTMS) to introduce free thiol (-SH) groups on the surface. The particles were used as the dispersed phase in the polysulfone or cellulose acetate polymer matrix. The membranes were prepared by the phase inversion method to create more open and interconnected porous structures suitable for liquid phase applications. The effects of the silica properties such as particle size, specific surface area, and porous/nonporous morphology on the silver ion capture capacity were studied. It was demonstrated that the membranes are capable of selectively capturing silver from a solution containing significant concentrations of other metal ions like Ca2+. The membranes were studied to quantify the dynamic capacity for silver ion capture and its dependence on residence time through the adjustment of transmembrane pressure. The thiol-Ag+ interaction was quantified with Quartz Crystal Microbalance in a continuous flow mode experiment and the observations were compared with the membrane results. One dimensional unsteady state model with overall volumetric mass transfer coefficient was developed and solved to predict the silver concentration in the liquid phase and the solid silica phase along the membrane thickness at varying time. The breakthrough data predicted using the model is comparable with the experimental observations. The study demonstrates successful application of the functionalized silica-mixed matrix membranes for selective aqueous phase Ag+ capture with high capacity at low transmembrane pressures. The technique can be easily extended to other applications by altering the functionalized groups on the silica particles. PMID:20098490

  16. A cellular Potts model for the MMP-dependent and -independent cancer cell migration in matrix microtracks of different dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scianna, Marco; Preziosi, Luigi

    2014-03-01

    Cell migration is fundamental in a wide variety of physiological and pathological phenomena, among other in cancer invasion and development. In particular, the migratory/invasive capability of single metastatic cells is fundamental in determining the malignancy of a solid tumor. Specific cell migration phenotypes result for instance from the reciprocal interplay between the biophysical and biochemical properties of both the malignant cells themselves and of the surrounding environment. In particular, the extracellular matrices (ECMs) forming connective tissues can provide both loosely organized zones and densely packed barriers, which may impact cell invasion mode and efficiency. The critical processes involved in cell movement within confined spaces are (i) the proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and (ii) the deformation of the entire cell body, and in particular of the nucleus. We here present an extended cellular Potts model (CPM) to simulate a bio-engineered matrix system, which tests the active motile behavior of a single cancer cell into narrow channels of different widths. As distinct features of our approach, the cell is modeled as a compartmentalized discrete element, differentiated in the nucleus and in the cytosolic region, while a directional shape-dependent movement is explicitly driven by the evolution of its polarity vector. As outcomes, we find that, in a large track, the tumor cell is not able to maintain a directional movement. On the contrary, a structure of subcellular width behaves as a contact guidance sustaining cell persistent locomotion. In particular, a MMP-deprived cell is able to repolarize and follow the micropattern geometry, while a full MMP activity leads to a secondary track expansion by degrading the matrix structure. Finally, we confirm that cell movement within a subnuclear structure can be achieved either by pericellular proteolysis or by a significant deformation of cell nucleus.

  17. Glucosamine Supplementation Demonstrates a Negative Effect On Intervertebral Disc Matrix in an Animal Model of Disc Degeneration

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, Lloydine; Vo, Nam; Coehlo, J. Paulo; Dong, Qing; Bechara, Bernard; Woods, Barrett; Hempen, Eric; Hartman, Robert; Preuss, Harry; Balk, Judith; Kang, James; Sowa, Gwendolyn

    2013-01-01

    Study Design Laboratory based controlled in vivo study Objective To determine the in vivo effects of oral glucosamine sulfate on intervertebral disc degeneration Summary of Background Data Although glucosamine has demonstrated beneficial effect in articular cartilage, clinical benefit is uncertain. A CDC report from 2009 reported that many patients are using glucosamine supplementation for low back pain (LBP), without significant evidence to support its use. Because disc degeneration is a major contributor of LBP, we explored the effects of glucosamine on disc matrix homeostasis in an animal model of disc degeneration. Methods Eighteen skeletally mature New Zealand White rabbits were divided into four groups: control, annular puncture, glucosamine, and annular puncture+glucosamine. Glucosamine treated rabbits received daily oral supplementation with 107mg/day (weight based equivalent to human 1500mg/day). Annular puncture surgery involved puncturing the annulus fibrosus (AF) of 3 lumbar discs with a 16G needle to induce degeneration. Serial MRIs were obtained at 0, 4, 8, 12, and 20 weeks. Discs were harvested at 20 weeks for determination of glycosaminoglycan(GAG) content, relative gene expression measured by RT-PCR, and histological analyses. Results The MRI index and NP area of injured discs of glucosamine treated animals with annular puncture was found to be lower than that of degenerated discs from rabbits not supplemented with glucosamine. Consistent with this, decreased glycosaminoglycan was demonstrated in glucosamine fed animals, as determined by both histological and GAG content. Gene expression was consistent with a detrimental effect on matrix. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the net effect on matrix in an animal model in vivo, as measured by gene expression, MRI, histology, and total proteoglycan is anti-anabolic. This raises concern over this commonly used supplement, and future research is needed to establish the clinical relevance of these

  18. Efficient fully 3D list-mode TOF PET image reconstruction using a factorized system matrix with an image domain resolution model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jian; Qi, Jinyi

    2014-02-01

    A factorized system matrix utilizing an image domain resolution model is attractive in fully 3D time-of-flight PET image reconstruction using list-mode data. In this paper, we study a factored model based on sparse matrix factorization that is comprised primarily of a simplified geometrical projection matrix and an image blurring matrix. Beside the commonly-used Siddon’s ray-tracer, we propose another more simplified geometrical projector based on the Bresenham’s ray-tracer which further reduces the computational cost. We discuss in general how to obtain an image blurring matrix associated with a geometrical projector, and provide theoretical analysis that can be used to inspect the efficiency in model factorization. In simulation studies, we investigate the performance of the proposed sparse factorization model in terms of spatial resolution, noise properties and computational cost. The quantitative results reveal that the factorization model can be as efficient as a non-factored model, while its computational cost can be much lower. In addition we conduct Monte Carlo simulations to identify the conditions under which the image resolution model can become more efficient in terms of image contrast recovery. We verify our observations using the provided theoretical analysis. The result offers a general guide to achieve the optimal reconstruction performance based on a sparse factorization model with an image domain resolution model.

  19. Bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on glioblastoma cell behavior using PEG-based hydrogels.

    PubMed

    Wang, Christine; Tong, Xinming; Yang, Fan

    2014-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most common and aggressive form of primary brain tumor with a median survival of 12-15 months, and the mechanisms underlying GBM tumor progression remain largely elusive. Given the importance of tumor niche signaling in driving GBM progression, there is a strong need to develop in vitro models to facilitate analysis of brain tumor cell-niche interactions in a physiologically relevant and controllable manner. Here we report the development of a bioengineered 3D brain tumor model to help elucidate the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate using poly(ethylene-glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels with brain-mimicking biochemical and mechanical properties. We have chosen PEG given its bioinert nature and tunable physical property, and the resulting hydrogels allow tunable matrix stiffness without changing the biochemical contents. To facilitate cell proliferation and migration, CRGDS and a MMP-cleavable peptide were chemically incorporated. Hyaluronic acid (HA) was also incorporated to mimic the concentration in the brain extracellular matrix. Using U87 cells as a model GBM cell line, we demonstrate that such biomimetic hydrogels support U87 cell growth, spreading, and migration in 3D over the course of 3 weeks in culture. Gene expression analyses showed U87 cells actively deposited extracellular matrix and continued to upregulate matrix remodeling genes. To examine the effects of matrix stiffness on GBM cell fate in 3D, we encapsulated U87 cells in soft (1 kPa) or stiff (26 kPa) hydrogels, which respectively mimics the matrix stiffness of normal brain or GBM tumor tissues. Our results suggest that changes in matrix stiffness induce differential GBM cell proliferation, morphology, and migration modes in 3D. Increasing matrix stiffness led to delayed U87 cell proliferation inside hydrogels, but cells formed denser spheroids with extended cell protrusions. Cells cultured in stiff hydrogels also showed upregulation of HA synthase 1 and matrix

  20. CD44 deficiency improves healing tendon mechanics and increases matrix and cytokine expression in a mouse patellar tendon injury model.

    PubMed

    Ansorge, Heather L; Beredjiklian, Pedro K; Soslowsky, Louis J

    2009-10-01

    CD44 plays an important role in inflammation and healing. Previous studies investigated its role in inflammatory diseases and skin wounds; however, the role of CD44 in tendon healing is unknown. Therefore, we investigated the effect of CD44 in the healing of the patellar tendon in a knockout mouse model. We hypothesized that in comparison to wild-type counterparts, CD44 knockout mice would have decreased material parameters, increased organization, decreased expression of proinflammatory cytokines, and increased expression of matrix components during healing. These hypotheses were tested through an in vivo surgical model and mechanical, organizational, and gene expression analyses. Material strength and tissue organization were significantly improved in the CD44 knockout mouse. This could be attributed to increased expression of cytokines and matrix components that are also elevated in regenerative healing. Our study showed that the absence of CD44 in a mouse patellar tendon injury creates an environment that is conducive to regenerative healing through altered gene expression, resulting in superior material properties and reduced cross-sectional area. Therefore, limiting the role of CD44 may improve healing parameters in adult tendon injury.

  1. Two-flux transfer matrix model for predicting the reflectance and transmittance of duplex halftone prints.

    PubMed

    Mazauric, Serge; Hébert, Mathieu; Simonot, Lionel; Fournel, Thierry

    2014-12-01

    We introduce a model allowing convenient calculation of the spectral reflectance and transmittance of duplex prints. It is based on flux transfer matrices and enables retrieving classical Kubelka-Munk formulas, as well as extended formulas for nonsymmetric layers. By making different assumptions on the flux transfers, we obtain two predictive models for the duplex halftone prints: the "duplex Clapper-Yule model," which is an extension of the classical Clapper-Yule model, and the "duplex primary reflectance-transmittance model." The two models can be calibrated from either reflectance or transmittance measurements; only the second model can be calibrated from both measurements, thus giving optimal accuracy for both reflectance and transmittance predictions. The conceptual differences between the two models are deeply analyzed, as well as their advantages and drawbacks in terms of calibration. According to the test carried out in this study with paper printed in inkjet, their predictive performances are good provided appropriate calibration options are selected.

  2. Kinematic behaviour of an interface and competence contrast: analogue models with different degrees of bonding between deformable inclusions and their matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odonne, F.

    1994-07-01

    In a system composed of a ductile matrix with a particle included in it, the deformation of the matrix, the displacement field, and the rotation and the deformation of the block are related to the viscosity ratio between block and matrix and also to the degree of bonding between the matrix and the block. In this paper, belemnites from the Lower Lias of the Alps provide a natural example of moderately deformed objects included in a slaty matrix. They are compared with analogue models made of paraffin, in which a long block of a more competent paraffin is included. Depending on the degree of bonding between matrix and object, the same block appears to be deformable or quite rigid. With a high degree of bonding, the strain refraction observed corresponds to the viscosity ratio between the block and the matrix. When the degree of bonding is weak, the block is quite undeformed, its rotation is great and the deviation of the strain in the matrix is analogous to that observed around a fault. The kinematic conditions appear to have a greater effect on the finite strain than the viscosity ratio of the materials.

  3. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    DOE PAGES

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-21

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit.more » In conclusion, we discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.« less

  4. Matrix approach for modeling of emission from multilayer spin-polarized light-emitting diodes and lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fördös, Tibor; Postava, Kamil; Jaffrès, Henri; Pištora, Jaromír

    2014-06-01

    Spin-polarized light sources such as the spin-polarized light-emitting diodes (spin-LEDs) and spin-polarized lasers (spin-lasers) are prospective devices in which the radiative recombination of spin-polarized carriers results in emission of circularly polarized photons. The main goal of this article is to model emitted radiation and its polarization properties from spin-LED and spin-controlled vertical-cavity surface-emitting laser (spin-VCSEL) solid-state structures. A novel approach based on 4 × 4 transfer matrix formalism is derived for modeling of the interaction of light with matter in active media of resonant multilayer anisotropic structure and enables magneto-optical effects. Quantum transitions, which result in photon emission, are described using general Jones source vectors.

  5. ɛ-CORRECTED Seiberg-Witten Prepotential Obtained from Half-Genus Expansion in β-DEFORMED Matrix Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoyama, H.; Yonezawa, N.

    We consider the half-genus expansion of the resolvent function in the β-deformed matrix model with three-Penner potential under the AGT conjecture and the 0d-4d dictionary. The partition function of the model, after the specification of the paths, becomes the DF conformal block for fixed c and provides the Nekrasov partition function expanded both in gs = √ {-ɛ 1&epsilon_2; } and in ɛ = ɛ1+ɛ2. Exploiting the explicit expressions for the lower terms of the free energy extracted from the above expansion, we derive the first few ɛ corrections to the Seiberg-Witten prepotential in terms of the parameters of SU(2), Nf = 4, { N} = 2 supersymmetric gauge theory.

  6. Olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) degrade neurocan in injured spinal cord by secreting matrix metalloproteinase-2 in a rat contusion model.

    PubMed

    Yui, Sho; Fujita, Naoki; Chung, Cheng-Shu; Morita, Maresuke; Nishimura, Ryohei

    2014-11-01

    The mechanism by which olfactory ensheathing cells (OECs) exert their potential to promote functional recovery after transplantation into spinal cord injury (SCI) tissue is not fully understood, but the relevance of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) has been suggested. We evaluated the expression of MMPs in OECs in vitro and the MMP secretion by OECs transplanted in injured spinal cord in vivo using a rat SCI model. We also evaluated the degradation of neurocan, which is one of the axon-inhibitory chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, using SCI model rats. The in vitro results showed that MMP-2 was the dominant MMP expressed by OECs. The in vivo results revealed that transplanted OECs secreted MMP-2 in injured spinal cord and that the expression of neurocan was significantly decreased by the transplantation of OECs. These results suggest that OECs transplanted into injured spinal cord degraded neurocan by secreting MMP-2.

  7. Degradation of extracellular matrix by larvae of Schistosoma mansoni. I. Degradation by cercariae as a model for initial parasite invasion of host

    SciTech Connect

    McKerrow, J.H.; Keene, W.E.; Jeong, K.H.; Werb, Z.

    1983-01-01

    The ability of cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni to degrade a model extracellular connective tissue matrix produced by rat vascular smooth muscle cells in culture was investigated. In this model, connective tissue macromolecules are present in the interactive framework that characterizes their structure in vivo. Cercariae were stimulated to degrade the matrix by skin lipid or linoleic acid. At the maximally stimulating concentration of linoleic acid (25 ..mu..g/cm/sup 2/), 68% of the total matrix was degraded, including 57% of the glycoprotein, 79% of the elastin, and 8% of the collagen. Degradation of matrix was inhibited by ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor and soybean trypsin inhibitor. Ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid inhibited degradation by unstimulated but not linoleic acid-stimulated cercariae. Preacetabular gland secretions collected from cercariae also degraded the matrix with an activity 86% of that of live cercariae. Preacetabular gland proteolytic activity was also inhibited by ..cap alpha../sub 1/-proteinase inhibitor, soybean trypsin inhibitor, and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid. The similar characteristics of matrix degradation by both live cercariae and cercarial preacetabular gland secretions support the idea that a proteinase secreted from cercarial preacetabular glands facilitates invasion of skin and connective tissue by these larvae. Degradation of elastin and glycoprotein constituentes of extracellular matrix is probably essential for skin penetration.

  8. ATOMISTIC MODELING OF OIL SHALE KEROGENS AND ASPHALTENES ALONG WITH THEIR INTERACTIONS WITH THE INORGANIC MINERAL MATRIX

    SciTech Connect

    Facelli, Julio; Pugmire, Ronald; Pimienta, Ian

    2011-03-31

    The goal of this project is to obtain and validate three dimensional atomistic models for the organic matter in both oil shales and oil sands. In the case of oil shales the modeling was completed for kerogen, the insoluble portion of the organic matter; for oil sands it was for asphaltenes, a class of molecules found in crude oil. The three dimensional models discussed in this report were developed starting from existing literature two dimensional models. The models developed included one kerogen, based on experimental data on a kerogen isolated from a Green River oil shale, and a set of six representative asphaltenes. Subsequently, the interactions between these organic models and an inorganic matrix was explored in order to gain insight into the chemical nature of this interaction, which could provide vital information in developing efficient methods to remove the organic material from inorganic mineral substrate. The inorganic substrate used to model the interaction was illite, an aluminum silicate oxide clay. In order to obtain the feedback necessary to validate the models, it is necessary to be able to calculate different observable quantities and to show that these observables both reproduce the results of experimental measurements on actual samples as well as that the observables are sensitive to structural differences between models. The observables that were calculated using the models include 13C NMR spectra, the IR vibrational spectra, and the atomic pair wise distribution function; these were chosen as they are among the methods for which both experimental and calculated values can be readily obtained. Where available, comparison was made to experiment results. Finally, molecular dynamic simulations of pyrolysis were completed on the models to gain an understanding into the nature of the decomposition of these materials when heated.

  9. Modeling of the separated-aperture mine detection sensor using the transmission line matrix (TLM) technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sherbondy, Kelly D.; Amazeen, Charles A.

    1995-06-01

    A numerical time-domain technique known as the transmission line matrix (TLM) method was used to analyze a ground penetrating radar (GPR) concept historically known as the separated aperture technique. This GPR concept is basically a dielectric anomaly (mine) detection sensor which operates near the L band frequency. This mine sensor consists of transmit and receive broadband dipole antenna. Each antenna is contained within a metallic cavity and the cavities are connected by a metallic septum. Normally, when the mine sensor is scanned over homogeneous earth, very little transmitted power is received by the receiving antenna. The power received by the receiving antenna however, is significantly increased when the detector is scanned over a buried dielectric anomaly (mine). This technique has performed in terms of probability of detection and false-alarm rates at different sites with different mine types. The TLM method was used to analyze the separated aperture mine detector's response to targets, clutter, and to provide insight into the fundamental wave interactions.

  10. Effect of Extracellular Matrix Membrane on Bone Formation in a Rabbit Tibial Defect Model

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Sungtae; Kim, Se Won; Lee, Jong Ho

    2016-01-01

    Absorbable extracellular matrix (ECM) membrane has recently been used as a barrier membrane (BM) in guided tissue regeneration (GTR) and guided bone regeneration (GBR). Absorbable BMs are mostly based on collagen, which is more biocompatible than synthetic materials. However, implanted absorbable BMs can be rapidly degraded by enzymes in vivo. In a previous study, to delay degradation time, collagen fibers were treated with cross-linking agents. These compounds prevented the enzymatic degradation of BMs. However, cross-linked BMs can exhibit delayed tissue integration. In addition, the remaining cross-linker could induce inflammation. Here, we attempted to overcome these problems using a natural ECM membrane. The membrane consisted of freshly harvested porcine pericardium that was stripped from cells and immunoreagents by a cleaning process. Acellular porcine pericardium (APP) showed a bilayer structure with a smooth upper surface and a significantly coarser bottom layer. APP is an ECM with a thin layer (0.18–0.35 mm) but with excellent mechanical properties. Tensile strength of APP was 14.15 ± 2.24 MPa. In in vivo experiments, APP was transplanted into rabbit tibia. The biocompatible material was retained for up to 3 months without the need for cross-linking. Therefore, we conclude that APP could support osteogenesis as a BM for up to 3 months. PMID:27047963

  11. Role of Matrix Metalloproteinases 2 and 9 in Lacrimal Gland Disease in Animal Models of Sjögren's Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Aluri, Hema S.; Kublin, Claire L.; Thotakura, Suharika; Armaos, Helene; Samizadeh, Mahta; Hawley, Dillon; Thomas, William M.; Leavis, Paul; Makarenkova, Helen P.; Zoukhri, Driss

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Chronic inflammation of the lacrimal gland results in changes in the composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM), which is believed to compromise tissue repair. We hypothesized that increased production/activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), especially MMP-2 and -9, in inflamed lacrimal glands modifies the ECM environment, therefore disrupting tissue repair. Methods The lacrimal glands from female MRL/lpr and male NOD mice along with their respective control strains were harvested and divided into three pieces and processed for histology, immunohistochemistry, zymography, Western blotting, and RNA analyses. In another study, MRL/lpr mice were treated for 5 weeks with a selective MMP2/9 inhibitor peptide or a control peptide. At the end of treatment, the lacrimal glands were excised and the tissue was processed as described above. Results There was a 2.5- and 2.7-fold increase in MMP2 gene expression levels in MRL/lpr and NOD mice, respectively. Matrix metalloproteinase 2 and 9 enzymatic activities and protein expression levels were significantly upregulated in the lacrimal glands of MRL/lpr and NOD mice compared to controls. Treatment with the MMP2/9 inhibitor resulted in decreased activity of MMP-2 and -9 both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, MMP2/9 inhibitor treatment of MRL/lpr mice improved aqueous tear production and resulted in reduced number and size of lymphocytic foci in diseased lacrimal glands. Conclusions We conclude that MMP2/9 expression and activity are elevated in lacrimal glands of two murine models of Sjögren's syndrome, suggesting that manipulation of MMP2/9 activity might be a potential therapeutic target in chronically inflamed lacrimal glands. PMID:26244298

  12. Molecular surface area based predictive models for the adsorption and diffusion of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix.

    PubMed

    Xu, Suxin; Chen, Jiangang; Wang, Bijia; Yang, Yiqi

    2015-11-15

    Two predictive models were presented for the adsorption affinities and diffusion coefficients of disperse dyes in polylactic acid matrix. Quantitative structure-sorption behavior relationship would not only provide insights into sorption process, but also enable rational engineering for desired properties. The thermodynamic and kinetic parameters for three disperse dyes were measured. The predictive model for adsorption affinity was based on two linear relationships derived by interpreting the experimental measurements with molecular structural parameters and compensation effect: ΔH° vs. dye size and ΔS° vs. ΔH°. Similarly, the predictive model for diffusion coefficient was based on two derived linear relationships: activation energy of diffusion vs. dye size and logarithm of pre-exponential factor vs. activation energy of diffusion. The only required parameters for both models are temperature and solvent accessible surface area of the dye molecule. These two predictive models were validated by testing the adsorption and diffusion properties of new disperse dyes. The models offer fairly good predictive ability. The linkage between structural parameter of disperse dyes and sorption behaviors might be generalized and extended to other similar polymer-penetrant systems.

  13. Multi-scale damage modelling in a ceramic matrix composite using a finite-element microstructure meshfree methodology.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Mora, L; Marrow, T J

    2016-07-13

    The problem of multi-scale modelling of damage development in a SiC ceramic fibre-reinforced SiC matrix ceramic composite tube is addressed, with the objective of demonstrating the ability of the finite-element microstructure meshfree (FEMME) model to introduce important aspects of the microstructure into a larger scale model of the component. These are particularly the location, orientation and geometry of significant porosity and the load-carrying capability and quasi-brittle failure behaviour of the fibre tows. The FEMME model uses finite-element and cellular automata layers, connected by a meshfree layer, to efficiently couple the damage in the microstructure with the strain field at the component level. Comparison is made with experimental observations of damage development in an axially loaded composite tube, studied by X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlation. Recommendations are made for further development of the model to achieve greater fidelity to the microstructure. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'.

  14. Multi-scale damage modelling in a ceramic matrix composite using a finite-element microstructure meshfree methodology.

    PubMed

    Saucedo-Mora, L; Marrow, T J

    2016-07-13

    The problem of multi-scale modelling of damage development in a SiC ceramic fibre-reinforced SiC matrix ceramic composite tube is addressed, with the objective of demonstrating the ability of the finite-element microstructure meshfree (FEMME) model to introduce important aspects of the microstructure into a larger scale model of the component. These are particularly the location, orientation and geometry of significant porosity and the load-carrying capability and quasi-brittle failure behaviour of the fibre tows. The FEMME model uses finite-element and cellular automata layers, connected by a meshfree layer, to efficiently couple the damage in the microstructure with the strain field at the component level. Comparison is made with experimental observations of damage development in an axially loaded composite tube, studied by X-ray computed tomography and digital volume correlation. Recommendations are made for further development of the model to achieve greater fidelity to the microstructure. This article is part of the themed issue 'Multiscale modelling of the structural integrity of composite materials'. PMID:27242308

  15. Matrix Population Model for Estimating Effects from Time-Varying Aquatic Exposures: Technical Documentation

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Office of Pesticide Programs models daily aquatic pesticide exposure values for 30 years in its risk assessments. However, only a fraction of that information is typically used in these assessments. The population model employed herein is a deterministic, density-dependent pe...

  16. A mechanistic model of wormhole growth in carbonate matrix acidizing and acid fracturing

    SciTech Connect

    Hung, K.M.; Hill, A.D.; Sepehrnoorl, K.

    1989-01-01

    A mathematical model that describes the growth and competition of wormholes during ann acidizing treatment in a carbonate formation was developed. The model is initialized with the distribution of largest pores. Wormhole characteristics (size, length, and distribution) were found too be controlled by acid-injection, diffusion, and fluid-loss rates.

  17. Matrix fractional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the matrix representation of dynamical systems in the perspective of fractional calculus. Fractional elements and fractional systems are interpreted under the light of the classical Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole, and Havriliak-Negami heuristic models. Numerical simulations for an electrical circuit enlighten the results for matrix based models and high fractional orders. The conclusions clarify the distinction between fractional elements and fractional systems.

  18. Acceleration of tendon-bone healing in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction using an enamel matrix derivative in a rat model.

    PubMed

    Kadonishi, Y; Deie, M; Takata, T; Ochi, M

    2012-02-01

    We examined whether enamel matrix derivative (EMD) could improve healing of the tendon-bone interface following reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) using a hamstring tendon in a rat model. ACL reconstruction was performed in both knees of 30 Sprague-Dawley rats using the flexor digitorum tendon. The effect of commercially available EMD (EMDOGAIN), a preparation of matrix proteins from developing porcine teeth, was evaluated. In the left knee joint the space around the tendon-bone interface was filled with 40 µl of EMD mixed with propylene glycol alginate (PGA). In the right knee joint PGA alone was used. The ligament reconstructions were evaluated histologically and biomechanically at four, eight and 12 weeks (n = 5 at each time point). At eight weeks, EMD had induced a significant increase in collagen fibres connecting to bone at the tendon-bone interface (p = 0.047), whereas the control group had few fibres and the tendon-bone interface was composed of cellular and vascular fibrous tissues. At both eight and 12 weeks, the mean load to failure in the treated specimens was higher than in the controls (p = 0.009). EMD improved histological tendon-bone healing at eight weeks and biomechanical healing at both eight and 12 weeks. EMD might therefore have a human application to enhance tendon-bone repair in ACL reconstruction.

  19. Language-Model Assisted Brain Computer Interface for Typing: A Comparison of Matrix and Rapid Serial Visual Presentation.

    PubMed

    Moghadamfalahi, Mohammad; Orhan, Umut; Akcakaya, Murat; Nezamfar, Hooman; Fried-Oken, Melanie; Erdogmus, Deniz

    2015-09-01

    Noninvasive electroencephalography (EEG)-based brain-computer interfaces (BCIs) popularly utilize event-related potential (ERP) for intent detection. Specifically, for EEG-based BCI typing systems, different symbol presentation paradigms have been utilized to induce ERPs. In this manuscript, through an experimental study, we assess the speed, recorded signal quality, and system accuracy of a language-model-assisted BCI typing system using three different presentation paradigms: a 4 × 7 matrix paradigm of a 28-character alphabet with row-column presentation (RCP) and single-character presentation (SCP), and rapid serial visual presentation (RSVP) of the same. Our analyses show that signal quality and classification accuracy are comparable between the two visual stimulus presentation paradigms. In addition, we observe that while the matrix-based paradigm can be generally employed with lower inter-trial-interval (ITI) values, the best presentation paradigm and ITI value configuration is user dependent. This potentially warrants offering both presentation paradigms and variable ITI options to users of BCI typing systems.

  20. An in vitro model system to predict the bioaccessibility of heterocyclic amines from a cooked meat matrix.

    PubMed

    Kulp, Kristen S; Fortson, Susan L; Knize, Mark G; Felton, James S

    2003-12-01

    To understand the impact of variation in digestion parameters on the release of heterocyclic amines naturally formed during cooking, we developed and characterized a model system to assess the effect of amylase, pepsin, and pancreatin on digestion of well-done chicken. The amounts of MeIQx, DiMeIQx, IFP, and PhIP in the liquid portion of the digestate were compared to levels in the undigested meat to determine the percentage released (accessible fraction). Incubating the meat with amylase and pepsin did not change the accessibility of HAs when compared to incubation with water alone. In contrast, increasing amounts of pancreatin increased the accessibility up to 6.4-fold. Comparing the amounts of the HAs in the liquid to the solid fraction showed that there was more MeIQx, DiMeIQx, and IFP in the liquid fraction. In contrast, PhIP was equally divided between the solid and liquid fractions. For all four compounds, increasing the doneness of the meat decreased the amount of the compound accessible from the meat matrix. Our data suggest that bioaccessability of HAs may vary according to the polarity of the individual HAs and also may depend upon the doneness of the meat. These results may have important ramifications for human feeding studies, which assume that the total amount of each HA in the meat matrix is equally bioavailable.