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Sample records for matrix product state

  1. Matrix product state renormalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, M.; Rams, M. M.; Zauner, V.; Haegeman, J.; Verstraete, F.

    2016-11-01

    The truncation or compression of the spectrum of Schmidt values is inherent to the matrix product state (MPS) approximation of one-dimensional quantum ground states. We provide a renormalization group picture by interpreting this compression as an application of Wilson's numerical renormalization group along the imaginary time direction appearing in the path integral representation of the state. The location of the physical index is considered as an impurity in the transfer matrix and static MPS correlation functions are reinterpreted as dynamical impurity correlations. Coarse-graining the transfer matrix is performed using a hybrid variational ansatz based on matrix product operators, combining ideas of MPS and the multiscale entanglement renormalization ansatz. Through numerical comparison with conventional MPS algorithms, we explicitly verify the impurity interpretation of MPS compression, as put forward by V. Zauner et al. [New J. Phys. 17, 053002 (2015), 10.1088/1367-2630/17/5/053002] for the transverse-field Ising model. Additionally, we motivate the conceptual usefulness of endowing MPS with an internal layered structure by studying restricted variational subspaces to describe elementary excitations on top of the ground state, which serves to elucidate a transparent renormalization group structure ingrained in MPS descriptions of ground states.

  2. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms.

    PubMed

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R

    2016-07-07

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  3. Matrix product operators, matrix product states, and ab initio density matrix renormalization group algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic; Keselman, Anna; Nakatani, Naoki; Li, Zhendong; White, Steven R.

    2016-07-01

    Current descriptions of the ab initio density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm use two superficially different languages: an older language of the renormalization group and renormalized operators, and a more recent language of matrix product states and matrix product operators. The same algorithm can appear dramatically different when written in the two different vocabularies. In this work, we carefully describe the translation between the two languages in several contexts. First, we describe how to efficiently implement the ab initio DMRG sweep using a matrix product operator based code, and the equivalence to the original renormalized operator implementation. Next we describe how to implement the general matrix product operator/matrix product state algebra within a pure renormalized operator-based DMRG code. Finally, we discuss two improvements of the ab initio DMRG sweep algorithm motivated by matrix product operator language: Hamiltonian compression, and a sum over operators representation that allows for perfect computational parallelism. The connections and correspondences described here serve to link the future developments with the past and are important in the efficient implementation of continuing advances in ab initio DMRG and related algorithms.

  4. Matrix product states for gauge field theories.

    PubMed

    Buyens, Boye; Haegeman, Jutho; Van Acoleyen, Karel; Verschelde, Henri; Verstraete, Frank

    2014-08-29

    The matrix product state formalism is used to simulate Hamiltonian lattice gauge theories. To this end, we define matrix product state manifolds which are manifestly gauge invariant. As an application, we study (1+1)-dimensional one flavor quantum electrodynamics, also known as the massive Schwinger model, and are able to determine very accurately the ground-state properties and elementary one-particle excitations in the continuum limit. In particular, a novel particle excitation in the form of a heavy vector boson is uncovered, compatible with the strong coupling expansion in the continuum. We also study full quantum nonequilibrium dynamics by simulating the real-time evolution of the system induced by a quench in the form of a uniform background electric field.

  5. Entanglement classification with matrix product states

    PubMed Central

    Sanz, M.; Egusquiza, I. L.; Di Candia, R.; Saberi, H.; Lamata, L.; Solano, E.

    2016-01-01

    We propose an entanglement classification for symmetric quantum states based on their diagonal matrix-product-state (MPS) representation. The proposed classification, which preserves the stochastic local operation assisted with classical communication (SLOCC) criterion, relates entanglement families to the interaction length of Hamiltonians. In this manner, we establish a connection between entanglement classification and condensed matter models from a quantum information perspective. Moreover, we introduce a scalable nesting property for the proposed entanglement classification, in which the families for N parties carry over to the N + 1 case. Finally, using techniques from algebraic geometry, we prove that the minimal nontrivial interaction length n for any symmetric state is bounded by . PMID:27457273

  6. Perturbation Theory for Parent Hamiltonians of Matrix Product States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szehr, Oleg; Wolf, Michael M.

    2015-05-01

    This article investigates the stability of the ground state subspace of a canonical parent Hamiltonian of a Matrix product state against local perturbations. We prove that the spectral gap of such a Hamiltonian remains stable under weak local perturbations even in the thermodynamic limit, where the entire perturbation might not be bounded. Our discussion is based on preceding work by Yarotsky that develops a perturbation theory for relatively bounded quantum perturbations of classical Hamiltonians. We exploit a renormalization procedure, which on large scale transforms the parent Hamiltonian of a Matrix product state into a classical Hamiltonian plus some perturbation. We can thus extend Yarotsky's results to provide a perturbation theory for parent Hamiltonians of Matrix product states and recover some of the findings of the independent contributions (Cirac et al in Phys Rev B 8(11):115108, 2013) and (Michalakis and Pytel in Comm Math Phys 322(2):277-302, 2013).

  7. Sequential generation of matrix-product states in cavity QED

    SciTech Connect

    Schoen, C.; Hammerer, K.; Wolf, M. M.; Cirac, J. I.; Solano, E.

    2007-03-15

    We study the sequential generation of entangled photonic and atomic multiqubit states in the realm of cavity QED. We extend the work of C. Schoen et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 95, 110503 (2005)], where it was shown that all states generated in a sequential manner can be classified efficiently in terms of matrix-product states. In particular, we consider two scenarios: photonic multiqubit states sequentially generated at the cavity output of a single-photon source and atomic multiqubit states generated by their sequential interaction with the same cavity mode.

  8. Unifying time evolution and optimization with matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haegeman, Jutho; Lubich, Christian; Oseledets, Ivan; Vandereycken, Bart; Verstraete, Frank

    2016-10-01

    We show that the time-dependent variational principle provides a unifying framework for time-evolution methods and optimization methods in the context of matrix product states. In particular, we introduce a new integration scheme for studying time evolution, which can cope with arbitrary Hamiltonians, including those with long-range interactions. Rather than a Suzuki-Trotter splitting of the Hamiltonian, which is the idea behind the adaptive time-dependent density matrix renormalization group method or time-evolving block decimation, our method is based on splitting the projector onto the matrix product state tangent space as it appears in the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle. We discuss how the resulting algorithm resembles the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for finding ground states so closely that it can be implemented by changing just a few lines of code and it inherits the same stability and efficiency. In particular, our method is compatible with any Hamiltonian for which ground-state DMRG can be implemented efficiently. In fact, DMRG is obtained as a special case of our scheme for imaginary time evolution with infinite time step.

  9. Geometry of matrix product states: Metric, parallel transport, and curvature

    SciTech Connect

    Haegeman, Jutho Verstraete, Frank; Mariën, Michaël; Osborne, Tobias J.

    2014-02-15

    We study the geometric properties of the manifold of states described as (uniform) matrix product states. Due to the parameter redundancy in the matrix product state representation, matrix product states have the mathematical structure of a (principal) fiber bundle. The total space or bundle space corresponds to the parameter space, i.e., the space of tensors associated to every physical site. The base manifold is embedded in Hilbert space and can be given the structure of a Kähler manifold by inducing the Hilbert space metric. Our main interest is in the states living in the tangent space to the base manifold, which have recently been shown to be interesting in relation to time dependence and elementary excitations. By lifting these tangent vectors to the (tangent space) of the bundle space using a well-chosen prescription (a principal bundle connection), we can define and efficiently compute an inverse metric, and introduce differential geometric concepts such as parallel transport (related to the Levi-Civita connection) and the Riemann curvature tensor.

  10. Simulation of braiding anyons using matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ayeni, Babatunde M.; Singh, Sukhwinder; Pfeifer, Robert N. C.; Brennen, Gavin K.

    2016-04-01

    Anyons exist as pointlike particles in two dimensions and carry braid statistics, which enable interactions that are independent of the distance between the particles. Except for a relatively few number of models, which are analytically tractable, much of the physics of anyons remains still unexplored. In this paper, we show how U(1) symmetry can be combined with the previously proposed anyonic matrix product states to simulate ground states and dynamics of anyonic systems on a lattice at any rational particle number density. We provide proof of principle by studying itinerant anyons on a one-dimensional chain where no natural notion of braiding arises and also on a two-leg ladder where the anyons hop between sites and possibly braid. We compare the result of the ground-state energies of Fibonacci anyons against hardcore bosons and spinless fermions. In addition, we report the entanglement entropies of the ground states of interacting Fibonacci anyons on a fully filled two-leg ladder at different interaction strength, identifying gapped or gapless points in the parameter space. As an outlook, our approach can also prove useful in studying the time dynamics of a finite number of non-Abelian anyons on a finite two-dimensional lattice.

  11. Quasi-degenerate perturbation theory using matrix product states

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sandeep Jeanmairet, Guillaume; Alavi, Ali

    2016-01-21

    In this work, we generalize the recently proposed matrix product state perturbation theory (MPSPT) for calculating energies of excited states using quasi-degenerate (QD) perturbation theory. Our formulation uses the Kirtman-Certain-Hirschfelder canonical Van Vleck perturbation theory, which gives Hermitian effective Hamiltonians at each order, and also allows one to make use of Wigner’s 2n + 1 rule. Further, our formulation satisfies Granovsky’s requirement of model space invariance which is important for obtaining smooth potential energy curves. Thus, when we use MPSPT with the Dyall Hamiltonian, we obtain a model space invariant version of quasi-degenerate n-electron valence state perturbation theory (NEVPT), a property that the usual formulation of QD-NEVPT2 based on a multipartitioning technique lacked. We use our method on the benchmark problems of bond breaking of LiF which shows ionic to covalent curve crossing and the twist around the double bond of ethylene where significant valence-Rydberg mixing occurs in the excited states. In accordance with our previous work, we find that multi-reference linearized coupled cluster theory is more accurate than other multi-reference theories of similar cost.

  12. Matrix product states and the non-Abelian rotor model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Milsted, Ashley

    2016-04-01

    We use uniform matrix product states to study the (1 +1 )D O (2 ) and O (4 ) rotor models, which are equivalent to the Kogut-Susskind formulation of matter-free non-Abelian lattice gauge theory on a "Hawaiian earring" graph for U (1 ) and S U (2 ), respectively. Applying tangent space methods to obtain ground states and determine the mass gap and the β function, we find excellent agreement with known results, locating the Berezinskii-Kosterlitz-Thouless transition for O (2 ) and successfully entering the asymptotic weak-coupling regime for O (4 ). To obtain a finite local Hilbert space, we truncate in the space of generalized Fourier modes of the gauge group, comparing the effects of different cutoff values. We find that higher modes become important in the crossover and weak-coupling regimes of the non-Abelian theory, where entanglement also suddenly increases. This could have important consequences for tensor network state studies of Yang-Mills on higher-dimensional graphs.

  13. Chebyshev matrix product state approach for time evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halimeh, Jad C.; Kolley, Fabian; McCulloch, Ian P.

    2015-09-01

    We present and test a new algorithm for time-evolving quantum many-body systems initially proposed by Holzner et al. [Phys. Rev. B 83, 195115 (2011), 10.1103/PhysRevB.83.195115]. The approach is based on merging the matrix product state (MPS) formalism with the method of expanding the time-evolution operator in Chebyshev polynomials. We calculate time-dependent observables of a system of hardcore bosons quenched under the Bose-Hubbard Hamiltonian on a one-dimensional lattice. We compare the new algorithm to more standard methods using the MPS architecture. We find that the Chebyshev method gives numerically exact results for small times. However, the reachable times are smaller than the ones obtained with the other state-of-the-art methods. We further extend the new method using a spectral-decomposition-based projective scheme that utilizes an effective bandwidth significantly smaller than the full bandwidth, leading to longer evolution times than the nonprojective method and more efficient information storage, data compression, and less computational effort.

  14. Fermionic matrix product states and one-dimensional topological phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultinck, Nick; Williamson, Dominic J.; Haegeman, Jutho; Verstraete, Frank

    2017-02-01

    We develop the formalism of fermionic matrix product states (fMPS) and show how irreducible fMPS fall in two different classes, related to the different types of simple Z2 graded algebras, which are physically distinguished by the absence or presence of Majorana edge modes. The local structure of fMPS with Majorana edge modes also implies that there is always a twofold degeneracy in the entanglement spectrum. Using the fMPS formalism, we make explicit the correspondence between the Z8 classification of time-reversal-invariant spinless superconductors and the modulo 8 periodicity in the representation theory of real Clifford algebras. Studying fMPS with general onsite unitary and antiunitary symmetries allows us to define invariants that label symmetry-protected phases of interacting fermions. The behavior of these invariants under stacking of fMPS is derived, which reveals the group structure of such interacting phases. We also consider spatial symmetries and show how the invariant phase factor in the partition function of reflection-symmetric phases on an unorientable manifold appears in the fMPS framework.

  15. Simulating spin-boson models with matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-05-01

    The global coupling of few-level quantum systems (``spins'') to a discrete set of bosonic modes is a key ingredient for many applications in quantum science, including large-scale entanglement generation, quantum simulation of the dynamics of long-range interacting spin models, and hybrid platforms for force and spin sensing. In many situations, the bosons are integrated out, leading to effective long-range interactions between the spins; however, strong spin-boson coupling invalidates this approach, and spin-boson entanglement degrades the fidelity of quantum simulation of spin models. We present a general numerical method for treating the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of spin-boson systems based on matrix product states. While most efficient for weak coupling or small numbers of boson modes, our method applies for any spatial and operator dependence of the spin-boson coupling. In addition, our approach allows straightforward computation of many quantities of interest, such as the full counting statistics of collective spin measurements and quantum simulation infidelity due to spin-boson entanglement. We apply our method to ongoing trapped ion quantum simulator experiments in analytically intractable regimes. This work is supported by JILA-NSF-PFC-1125844, NSF-PIF- 1211914, ARO, AFOSR, AFOSR-MURI, and the NRC.

  16. Simulating generic spin-boson models with matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wall, Michael L.; Safavi-Naini, Arghavan; Rey, Ana Maria

    2016-11-01

    The global coupling of few-level quantum systems ("spins") to a discrete set of bosonic modes is a key ingredient for many applications in quantum science, including large-scale entanglement generation, quantum simulation of the dynamics of long-range interacting spin models, and hybrid platforms for force and spin sensing. We present a general numerical framework for treating the out-of-equilibrium dynamics of such models based on matrix product states. Our approach applies for generic spin-boson systems: it treats any spatial and operator dependence of the two-body spin-boson coupling and places no restrictions on relative energy scales. We show that the full counting statistics of collective spin measurements and infidelity of quantum simulation due to spin-boson entanglement, both of which are difficult to obtain by other techniques, are readily calculable in our approach. We benchmark our method using a recently developed exact solution for a particular spin-boson coupling relevant to trapped ion quantum simulators. Finally, we show how decoherence can be incorporated within our framework using the method of quantum trajectories, and study the dynamics of an open-system spin-boson model with spatially nonuniform spin-boson coupling relevant for trapped atomic ion crystals in the presence of molecular ion impurities.

  17. Thouless theorem for matrix product states and subsequent post density matrix renormalization group methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wouters, Sebastian; Nakatani, Naoki; Van Neck, Dimitri; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2013-08-01

    The similarities between Hartree-Fock (HF) theory and the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) are explored. Both methods can be formulated as the variational optimization of a wave-function Ansatz. Linearization of the time-dependent variational principle near a variational minimum allows to derive the random phase approximation (RPA). We show that the nonredundant parameterization of the matrix product state (MPS) tangent space [J. Haegeman, J. I. Cirac, T. J. Osborne, I. Pižorn, H. Verschelde, and F. Verstraete, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.107.070601 107, 070601 (2011)] leads to the Thouless theorem for MPS, i.e., an explicit nonredundant parameterization of the entire MPS manifold, starting from a specific MPS reference. Excitation operators are identified, which extends the analogy between HF and DMRG to the Tamm-Dancoff approximation (TDA), the configuration interaction (CI) expansion, and coupled cluster theory. For a small one-dimensional Hubbard chain, we use a CI-MPS Ansatz with single and double excitations to improve on the ground state and to calculate low-lying excitation energies. For a symmetry-broken ground state of this model, we show that RPA-MPS allows to retrieve the Goldstone mode. We also discuss calculations of the RPA-MPS correlation energy. With the long-range quantum chemical Pariser-Parr-Pople Hamiltonian, low-lying TDA-MPS and RPA-MPS excitation energies for polyenes are obtained.

  18. A practical introduction to tensor networks: Matrix product states and projected entangled pair states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orús, Román

    2014-10-01

    This is a partly non-technical introduction to selected topics on tensor network methods, based on several lectures and introductory seminars given on the subject. It should be a good place for newcomers to get familiarized with some of the key ideas in the field, specially regarding the numerics. After a very general introduction we motivate the concept of tensor network and provide several examples. We then move on to explain some basics about Matrix Product States (MPS) and Projected Entangled Pair States (PEPS). Selected details on some of the associated numerical methods for 1d and 2d quantum lattice systems are also discussed.

  19. Qudit quantum computation on matrix product states with global symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dong-Sheng; Stephen, David T.; Raussendorf, Robert

    2017-03-01

    Resource states that contain nontrivial symmetry-protected topological order are identified for universal single-qudit measurement-based quantum computation. Our resource states fall into two classes: one as the qudit generalizations of the one-dimensional qubit cluster state, and the other as the higher-symmetry generalizations of the spin-1 Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki (AKLT) state, namely, with unitary, orthogonal, or symplectic symmetry. The symmetry in cluster states protects information propagation (identity gate), while the higher symmetry in AKLT-type states enables nontrivial gate computation. This work demonstrates a close connection between measurement-based quantum computation and symmetry-protected topological order.

  20. Matrix-Product-State Algorithm for Finite Fractional Quantum Hall Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhao; Bhatt, R. N.

    2015-09-01

    Exact diagonalization is a powerful tool to study fractional quantum Hall (FQH) systems. However, its capability is limited by the exponentially increasing computational cost. In order to overcome this difficulty, density-matrix-renormalization-group (DMRG) algorithms were developed for much larger system sizes. Very recently, it was realized that some model FQH states have exact matrix-product-state (MPS) representation. Motivated by this, here we report a MPS code, which is closely related to, but different from traditional DMRG language, for finite FQH systems on the cylinder geometry. By representing the many-body Hamiltonian as a matrix-product-operator (MPO) and using single-site update and density matrix correction, we show that our code can efficiently search the ground state of various FQH systems. We also compare the performance of our code with traditional DMRG. The possible generalization of our code to infinite FQH systems and other physical systems is also discussed.

  1. Full counting statistics and the Edgeworth series for matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yifei

    2014-03-01

    We consider full counting statistics of spin in matrix product states. In particular, we study the approach to gaussian distribution for magnetization. We derive the asymptotic corrections to the central limit theorem for magnetization distribution for finite but large blocks in analogy to the Edgeworth series. We also show how central limit theorem like behavior is modified for certain states with topological characteristics such as the AKLT state.

  2. Derivation of matrix product states for the Heisenberg spin chain with open boundary conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Zhongtao; Bolech, C. J.

    2017-03-01

    Using the algebraic Bethe Ansatz, we derive a matrix product representation of the exact Bethe-Ansatz states of the six-vertex Heisenberg chain (either X X X or X X Z and spin-1/2 ) with open boundary conditions. In this representation, the components of the Bethe eigenstates are expressed as traces of products of matrices that act on a tensor product of auxiliary spaces. As compared to the matrix product states of the same Heisenberg chain but with periodic boundary conditions, the dimension of the exact auxiliary matrices is enlarged as if the conserved number of spin-flips considered would have been doubled. This result is generic for any non-nested integrable model, as is clear from our derivation, and we further show this by providing an additional example of the same matrix product state construction for a well-known model of a gas of interacting bosons. Counterintuitively, the matrices do not depend on the spatial coordinate despite the open boundaries, and thus they suggest generic ways of exploiting (emergent) translational invariance both for finite size and in the thermodynamic limit.

  3. Continuous matrix product states with periodic boundary conditions and an application to atomtronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draxler, Damian; Haegeman, Jutho; Verstraete, Frank; Rizzi, Matteo

    2017-01-01

    We introduce a time evolution algorithm for one-dimensional quantum field theories with periodic boundary conditions. This is done by applying the Dirac-Frenkel time-dependent variational principle to the set of translational invariant continuous matrix product states with periodic boundary conditions. Moreover, the ansatz is accompanied with additional boundary degrees of freedom to study quantum impurity problems. The algorithm allows for a cutoff in the spectrum of the transfer matrix and thus has an efficient computational scaling. In particular we study the prototypical example of an atomtronic system—an interacting Bose gas rotating in a ring shaped trap in the presence of a localized barrier potential.

  4. Quantum quenches in two spatial dimensions using chain array matrix product states

    DOE PAGES

    A. J. A. James; Konik, R.

    2015-10-15

    We describe a method for simulating the real time evolution of extended quantum systems in two dimensions (2D). The method combines the benefits of integrability and matrix product states in one dimension to avoid several issues that hinder other applications of tensor based methods in 2D. In particular, it can be extended to infinitely long cylinders. As an example application we present results for quantum quenches in the 2D quantum [(2+1)-dimensional] Ising model. As a result, in quenches that cross a phase boundary we find that the return probability shows nonanalyticities in time.

  5. Density Induced Phase Transitions in the Schwinger Model: A Study with Matrix Product States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bañuls, Mari Carmen; Cichy, Krzysztof; Cirac, J. Ignacio; Jansen, Karl; Kühn, Stefan

    2017-02-01

    We numerically study the zero temperature phase structure of the multiflavor Schwinger model at nonzero chemical potential. Using matrix product states, we reproduce analytical results for the phase structure for two flavors in the massless case and extend the computation to the massive case, where no analytical predictions are available. Our calculations allow us to locate phase transitions in the mass-chemical potential plane with great precision and provide a concrete example of tensor networks overcoming the sign problem in a lattice gauge theory calculation.

  6. Finding Matrix Product State Representations of Highly Excited Eigenstates of Many-Body Localized Hamiltonians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiongjie; Pekker, David; Clark, Bryan K.

    2017-01-01

    A key property of many-body localized Hamiltonians is the area law entanglement of even highly excited eigenstates. Matrix product states (MPS) can be used to efficiently represent low entanglement (area law) wave functions in one dimension. An important application of MPS is the widely used density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for finding ground states of one-dimensional Hamiltonians. Here, we develop two algorithms, the shift-and-invert MPS (SIMPS) and excited state DMRG which find highly excited eigenstates of many-body localized Hamiltonians. Excited state DMRG uses a modified sweeping procedure to identify eigenstates, whereas SIMPS applies the inverse of the shifted Hamiltonian to a MPS multiple times to project out the targeted eigenstate. To demonstrate the power of these methods, we verify the breakdown of the eigenstate thermalization hypothesis in the many-body localized phase of the random field Heisenberg model, show the saturation of entanglement in the many-body localized phase, and generate local excitations.

  7. Multireference linearized coupled cluster theory for strongly correlated systems using matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Sandeep; Alavi, Ali

    2015-09-01

    We propose a multireference linearized coupled cluster theory using matrix product states (MPSs-LCC) which provides remarkably accurate ground-state energies, at a computational cost that has the same scaling as multireference configuration interaction singles and doubles, for a wide variety of electronic Hamiltonians. These range from first-row dimers at equilibrium and stretched geometries to highly multireference systems such as the chromium dimer and lattice models such as periodic two-dimensional 1-band and 3-band Hubbard models. The MPS-LCC theory shows a speed up of several orders of magnitude over the usual Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) algorithm while delivering energies in excellent agreement with converged DMRG calculations. Also, in all the benchmark calculations presented here, MPS-LCC outperformed the commonly used multi-reference quantum chemistry methods in some cases giving energies in excess of an order of magnitude more accurate. As a size-extensive method that can treat large active spaces, MPS-LCC opens up the use of multireference quantum chemical techniques in strongly correlated ab initio Hamiltonians, including two- and three-dimensional solids.

  8. Multireference linearized coupled cluster theory for strongly correlated systems using matrix product states

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Sandeep; Alavi, Ali

    2015-09-14

    We propose a multireference linearized coupled cluster theory using matrix product states (MPSs-LCC) which provides remarkably accurate ground-state energies, at a computational cost that has the same scaling as multireference configuration interaction singles and doubles, for a wide variety of electronic Hamiltonians. These range from first-row dimers at equilibrium and stretched geometries to highly multireference systems such as the chromium dimer and lattice models such as periodic two-dimensional 1-band and 3-band Hubbard models. The MPS-LCC theory shows a speed up of several orders of magnitude over the usual Density Matrix Renormalization Group (DMRG) algorithm while delivering energies in excellent agreement with converged DMRG calculations. Also, in all the benchmark calculations presented here, MPS-LCC outperformed the commonly used multi-reference quantum chemistry methods in some cases giving energies in excess of an order of magnitude more accurate. As a size-extensive method that can treat large active spaces, MPS-LCC opens up the use of multireference quantum chemical techniques in strongly correlated ab initio Hamiltonians, including two- and three-dimensional solids.

  9. Efficient DMFT impurity solver using real-time dynamics with matrix product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganahl, Martin; Aichhorn, Markus; Evertz, Hans Gerd; Thunström, Patrik; Held, Karsten; Verstraete, Frank

    2015-10-01

    We propose to calculate spectral functions of quantum impurity models using the time evolving block decimation (TEBD) for matrix product states. The resolution of the spectral function is improved by a so-called linear prediction approach. We apply the method as an impurity solver within the dynamical mean-field theory (DMFT) for the single- and two-band Hubbard model on the Bethe lattice. For the single-band model, we observe sharp features at the inner edges of the Hubbard bands. A finite-size scaling shows that they remain present in the thermodynamic limit. We analyze the real time-dependence of the double occupation after adding a single electron and observe oscillations at the same energy as the sharp feature in the Hubbard band, indicating a long-lived coherent superposition of states that correspond to the Kondo peak and the side peaks. For a two-band Hubbard model, we observe an even richer structure in the Hubbard bands, which cannot be related to a multiplet structure of the impurity, in addition to sharp excitations at the band edges of a type similar to the single-band case.

  10. Information transmission in bosonic memory channels using Gaussian matrix-product states as near-optimal symbols

    SciTech Connect

    Schäfer, Joachim; Karpov, Evgueni; Cerf, Nicolas J.

    2014-12-04

    We seek for a realistic implementation of multimode Gaussian entangled states that can realize the optimal encoding for quantum bosonic Gaussian channels with memory. For a Gaussian channel with classical additive Markovian correlated noise and a lossy channel with non-Markovian correlated noise, we demonstrate the usefulness using Gaussian matrix-product states (GMPS). These states can be generated sequentially, and may, in principle, approximate well any Gaussian state. We show that we can achieve up to 99.9% of the classical Gaussian capacity with GMPS requiring squeezing parameters that are reachable with current technology. This may offer a way towards an experimental realization.

  11. Exploring Interacting Quantum Many-Body Systems by Experimentally Creating Continuous Matrix Product States in Superconducting Circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eichler, C.; Mlynek, J.; Butscher, J.; Kurpiers, P.; Hammerer, K.; Osborne, T. J.; Wallraff, A.

    2015-10-01

    Improving the understanding of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems such as gases of interacting atoms or electrons is one of the most important challenges in modern condensed matter physics, materials research, and chemistry. Enormous progress has been made in the past decades in developing both classical and quantum approaches to calculate, simulate, and experimentally probe the properties of such systems. In this work, we use a combination of classical and quantum methods to experimentally explore the properties of an interacting quantum gas by creating experimental realizations of continuous matrix product states—a class of states that has proven extremely powerful as a variational ansatz for numerical simulations. By systematically preparing and probing these states using a circuit quantum electrodynamics system, we experimentally determine a good approximation to the ground-state wave function of the Lieb-Liniger Hamiltonian, which describes an interacting Bose gas in one dimension. Since the simulated Hamiltonian is encoded in the measurement observable rather than the controlled quantum system, this approach has the potential to apply to a variety of models including those involving multicomponent interacting fields. Our findings also hint at the possibility of experimentally exploring general properties of matrix product states and entanglement theory. The scheme presented here is applicable to a broad range of systems exploiting strong and tunable light-matter interactions.

  12. Light cone matrix product

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2009-01-01

    We show how to combine the light-cone and matrix product algorithms to simulate quantum systems far from equilibrium for long times. For the case of the XXZ spin chain at {Delta} = 0.5, we simulate to a time of {approx} 22.5. While part of the long simulation time is due to the use of the light-cone method, we also describe a modification of the infinite time-evolving bond decimation algorithm with improved numerical stability, and we describe how to incorporate symmetry into this algorithm. While statistical sampling error means that we are not yet able to make a definite statement, the behavior of the simulation at long times indicates the appearance of either 'revivals' in the order parameter as predicted by Hastings and Levitov (e-print arXiv:0806.4283) or of a distinct shoulder in the decay of the order parameter.

  13. Universal Keplerian state transition matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepperd, S. W.

    1985-01-01

    A completely general method for computing the Keplerian state transition matrix in terms of Goodyear's universal variables is presented. This includes a new scheme for solving Kepler's problem which is a necessary first step to computing the transition matrix. The Kepler problem is solved in terms of a new independent variable requiring the evaluation of only one transcendental function. Furthermore, this transcendental function may be conveniently evaluated by means of a Gaussian continued fraction.

  14. Situating Language Production within the Matrix of Human Cognition: The State of the Art in Language Production Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldrick, Matthew; Costa, Albert; Schiller, Niels O.

    2008-01-01

    A summary of recent work in language production is presented, focusing on the "Third International Workshop on Language Production" (Chicago, USA, August 2006). The articles included in this special issue focus on three overlapping themes: language production in dialogue (Arnold; Costa, Pickering, & Sorace); multilingual language…

  15. Generic construction of efficient matrix product operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hubig, C.; McCulloch, I. P.; Schollwöck, U.

    2017-01-01

    Matrix product operators (MPOs) are at the heart of the second-generation density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm formulated in matrix product state language. We first summarize the widely known facts on MPO arithmetic and representations of single-site operators. Second, we introduce three compression methods (rescaled SVD, deparallelization, and delinearization) for MPOs and show that it is possible to construct efficient representations of arbitrary operators using MPO arithmetic and compression. As examples, we construct powers of a short-ranged spin-chain Hamiltonian, a complicated Hamiltonian of a two-dimensional system and, as proof of principle, the long-range four-body Hamiltonian from quantum chemistry.

  16. How local is the information in tensor networks of matrix product states or projected entangled pairs states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anshu, Anurag; Arad, Itai; Jain, Aditya

    2016-11-01

    Two-dimensional tensor networks such as projected entangled pairs states (PEPS) are generally hard to contract. This is arguably the main reason why variational tensor network methods in two dimensions are still not as successful as in one dimension. However, this is not necessarily the case if the tensor network represents a gapped ground state of a local Hamiltonian; such states are subject to many constraints and contain much more structure. In this paper, we introduce an approach for approximating the expectation value of a local observable in ground states of local Hamiltonians that are represented by PEPS tensor networks. Instead of contracting the full tensor network, we try to estimate the expectation value using only a local patch of the tensor network around the observable. Surprisingly, we demonstrate that this is often easier to do when the system is frustrated. In such case, the spanning vectors of the local patch are subject to nontrivial constraints that can be utilized via a semidefinite program to calculate rigorous lower and upper bounds on the expectation value. We test our approach in one-dimensional systems, where we show how the expectation value can be calculated up to at least 3 or 4 digits of precision, even when the patch radius is smaller than the correlation length.

  17. Anyons and matrix product operator algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bultinck, N.; Mariën, M.; Williamson, D. J.; Şahinoğlu, M. B.; Haegeman, J.; Verstraete, F.

    2017-03-01

    Quantum tensor network states and more particularly projected entangled-pair states provide a natural framework for representing ground states of gapped, topologically ordered systems. The defining feature of these representations is that topological order is a consequence of the symmetry of the underlying tensors in terms of matrix product operators. In this paper, we present a systematic study of those matrix product operators, and show how this relates entanglement properties of projected entangled-pair states to the formalism of fusion tensor categories. From the matrix product operators we construct a C∗-algebra and find that topological sectors can be identified with the central idempotents of this algebra. This allows us to construct projected entangled-pair states containing an arbitrary number of anyons. Properties such as topological spin, the S matrix, fusion and braiding relations can readily be extracted from the idempotents. As the matrix product operator symmetries are acting purely on the virtual level of the tensor network, the ensuing Wilson loops are not fattened when perturbing the system, and this opens up the possibility of simulating topological theories away from renormalization group fixed points. We illustrate the general formalism for the special cases of discrete gauge theories and string-net models.

  18. CONDENSED MATTER: ELECTRONIC STRUCTURE, ELECTRICAL, MAGNETIC, AND OPTICAL PROPERTIES: Properties of Parity Non-conserved and Parity Conserved States in Matrix Product Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing-Min

    2010-08-01

    In terms of reflection transformation of a matrix product state (MPS), the parity of the MPS is defined. Based on the reflective parity non-conserved MPS pair we construct the even-parity state |Φerangle and the odd-parity state |Φorangle. It is interesting to find that the parity non-conserved reflective MPS pair have no long-range correlations; instead the even-parity state |Φerangle and the odd-parity state |Φorangle constructed from them have the same long-range correlations for the parity non-conserved block operators. Moreover, the entanglement between a block of n contiguous spins and the rest of the spin chain for the states |Φerangle and |Φorangle is larger than that for the reflective MPS pair except for n = 1, and the difference of them approaches 1 monotonically and asymptotically from 0 as n increases from 1. These characteristics indicate that MPS parity as a conserved physical quantity represents a kind of coherent collective quantum mode, and that the parity conserved MPSs contain more correlation, coherence, and entanglement than the parity non-conserved ones.

  19. Matrix product purifications for canonical ensembles and quantum number distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    Matrix product purifications (MPPs) are a very efficient tool for the simulation of strongly correlated quantum many-body systems at finite temperatures. When a system features symmetries, these can be used to reduce computation costs substantially. It is straightforward to compute an MPP of a grand-canonical ensemble, also when symmetries are exploited. This paper provides and demonstrates methods for the efficient computation of MPPs of canonical ensembles under utilization of symmetries. Furthermore, we present a scheme for the evaluation of global quantum number distributions using matrix product density operators (MPDOs). We provide exact matrix product representations for canonical infinite-temperature states, and discuss how they can be constructed alternatively by applying matrix product operators to vacuum-type states or by using entangler Hamiltonians. A demonstration of the techniques for Heisenberg spin-1 /2 chains explains why the difference in the energy densities of canonical and grand-canonical ensembles decays as 1 /L .

  20. Critical state of sand matrix soils.

    PubMed

    Marto, Aminaton; Tan, Choy Soon; Makhtar, Ahmad Mahir; Kung Leong, Tiong

    2014-01-01

    The Critical State Soil Mechanic (CSSM) is a globally recognised framework while the critical states for sand and clay are both well established. Nevertheless, the development of the critical state of sand matrix soils is lacking. This paper discusses the development of critical state lines and corresponding critical state parameters for the investigated material, sand matrix soils using sand-kaolin mixtures. The output of this paper can be used as an interpretation framework for the research on liquefaction susceptibility of sand matrix soils in the future. The strain controlled triaxial test apparatus was used to provide the monotonic loading onto the reconstituted soil specimens. All tested soils were subjected to isotropic consolidation and sheared under undrained condition until critical state was ascertain. Based on the results of 32 test specimens, the critical state lines for eight different sand matrix soils were developed together with the corresponding values of critical state parameters, M, λ, and Γ. The range of the value of M, λ, and Γ is 0.803-0.998, 0.144-0.248, and 1.727-2.279, respectively. These values are comparable to the critical state parameters of river sand and kaolin clay. However, the relationship between fines percentages and these critical state parameters is too scattered to be correlated.

  1. An Empirical State Error Covariance Matrix for Batch State Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Joseph H., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    State estimation techniques serve effectively to provide mean state estimates. However, the state error covariance matrices provided as part of these techniques suffer from some degree of lack of confidence in their ability to adequately describe the uncertainty in the estimated states. A specific problem with the traditional form of state error covariance matrices is that they represent only a mapping of the assumed observation error characteristics into the state space. Any errors that arise from other sources (environment modeling, precision, etc.) are not directly represented in a traditional, theoretical state error covariance matrix. Consider that an actual observation contains only measurement error and that an estimated observation contains all other errors, known and unknown. It then follows that a measurement residual (the difference between expected and observed measurements) contains all errors for that measurement. Therefore, a direct and appropriate inclusion of the actual measurement residuals in the state error covariance matrix will result in an empirical state error covariance matrix. This empirical state error covariance matrix will fully account for the error in the state estimate. By way of a literal reinterpretation of the equations involved in the weighted least squares estimation algorithm, it is possible to arrive at an appropriate, and formally correct, empirical state error covariance matrix. The first specific step of the method is to use the average form of the weighted measurement residual variance performance index rather than its usual total weighted residual form. Next it is helpful to interpret the solution to the normal equations as the average of a collection of sample vectors drawn from a hypothetical parent population. From here, using a standard statistical analysis approach, it directly follows as to how to determine the standard empirical state error covariance matrix. This matrix will contain the total uncertainty in the

  2. Matrix product density operators: Renormalization fixed points and boundary theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirac, J. I.; Pérez-García, D.; Schuch, N.; Verstraete, F.

    2017-03-01

    We consider the tensors generating matrix product states and density operators in a spin chain. For pure states, we revise the renormalization procedure introduced in (Verstraete et al., 2005) and characterize the tensors corresponding to the fixed points. We relate them to the states possessing zero correlation length, saturation of the area law, as well as to those which generate ground states of local and commuting Hamiltonians. For mixed states, we introduce the concept of renormalization fixed points and characterize the corresponding tensors. We also relate them to concepts like finite correlation length, saturation of the area law, as well as to those which generate Gibbs states of local and commuting Hamiltonians. One of the main result of this work is that the resulting fixed points can be associated to the boundary theories of two-dimensional topological states, through the bulk-boundary correspondence introduced in (Cirac et al., 2011).

  3. An efficient matrix product operator representation of the quantum chemical Hamiltonian

    SciTech Connect

    Keller, Sebastian Reiher, Markus; Dolfi, Michele Troyer, Matthias

    2015-12-28

    We describe how to efficiently construct the quantum chemical Hamiltonian operator in matrix product form. We present its implementation as a density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for quantum chemical applications. Existing implementations of DMRG for quantum chemistry are based on the traditional formulation of the method, which was developed from the point of view of Hilbert space decimation and attained higher performance compared to straightforward implementations of matrix product based DMRG. The latter variationally optimizes a class of ansatz states known as matrix product states, where operators are correspondingly represented as matrix product operators (MPOs). The MPO construction scheme presented here eliminates the previous performance disadvantages while retaining the additional flexibility provided by a matrix product approach, for example, the specification of expectation values becomes an input parameter. In this way, MPOs for different symmetries — abelian and non-abelian — and different relativistic and non-relativistic models may be solved by an otherwise unmodified program.

  4. An efficient matrix product operator representation of the quantum chemical Hamiltonian.

    PubMed

    Keller, Sebastian; Dolfi, Michele; Troyer, Matthias; Reiher, Markus

    2015-12-28

    We describe how to efficiently construct the quantum chemical Hamiltonian operator in matrix product form. We present its implementation as a density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm for quantum chemical applications. Existing implementations of DMRG for quantum chemistry are based on the traditional formulation of the method, which was developed from the point of view of Hilbert space decimation and attained higher performance compared to straightforward implementations of matrix product based DMRG. The latter variationally optimizes a class of ansatz states known as matrix product states, where operators are correspondingly represented as matrix product operators (MPOs). The MPO construction scheme presented here eliminates the previous performance disadvantages while retaining the additional flexibility provided by a matrix product approach, for example, the specification of expectation values becomes an input parameter. In this way, MPOs for different symmetries - abelian and non-abelian - and different relativistic and non-relativistic models may be solved by an otherwise unmodified program.

  5. Inference from matrix products: a heuristic spin glass algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Hastings, Matthew B

    2008-01-01

    We present an algorithm for finding ground states of two-dimensional spin-glass systems based on ideas from matrix product states in quantum information theory. The algorithm works directly at zero temperature and defines an approximation to the energy whose accuracy depends on a parameter k. We test the algorithm against exact methods on random field and random bond Ising models, and we find that accurate results require a k which scales roughly polynomially with the system size. The algorithm also performs well when tested on small systems with arbitrary interactions, where no fast, exact algorithms exist. The time required is significantly less than Monte Carlo schemes.

  6. Encoding the structure of many-body localization with matrix product operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, David; Clark, Bryan K.

    2015-03-01

    Anderson insulators are non-interacting disordered systems which have localized single particle eigenstates. The interacting analogue of Anderson insulators are the Many-Body Localized (MBL) phases. The natural language for representing the spectrum of the Anderson insulator is that of product states over the single-particle modes. We show that product states over Matrix Product Operators of small bond dimension is the corresponding natural language for describing the MBL phases. In this language all of the many-body eigenstates are encode by Matrix Product States (i.e. DMRG wave function) consisting of only two sets of low bond-dimension matrices per site: the Gi matrix corresponding to the local ground state on site i and the Ei matrix corresponding to the local excited state. All 2 n eigenstates can be generated from all possible combinations of these matrices.

  7. Matrix product solutions of boundary driven quantum chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prosen, Tomaž

    2015-09-01

    We review recent progress on constructing non-equilibrium steady state density operators of boundary driven locally interacting quantum chains, where driving is implemented via Markovian dissipation channels attached to the chain’s ends. We discuss explicit solutions in three different classes of quantum chains, specifically, the paradigmatic (anisotropic) Heisenberg spin-1/2 chain, the Fermi-Hubbard chain, and the Lai-Sutherland spin-1 chain, and discuss universal concepts which characterize these solutions, such as matrix product ansatz and a more structured walking graph state ansatz. The central theme is the connection between the matrix product form of nonequilibrium states and the integrability structures of the bulk Hamiltonian, such as the Lax operators and the Yang-Baxter equation. However, there is a remarkable distinction with respect to the conventional quantum inverse scattering method, namely addressing nonequilibrium steady state density operators requires non-unitary irreducible representations of Yang-Baxter algebra which are typically of infinite dimensionality. Such constructions result in non-Hermitian, and often also non-diagonalisable families of commuting transfer operators which in turn result in novel conservation laws of the integrable bulk Hamiltonians. For example, in the case of the anisotropic Heisenberg model, quasi-local conserved operators which are odd under spin reversal (or spin flip) can be constructed, whereas the conserved operators stemming from orthodox Hermitian transfer operators (via logarithmic differentiation) are all even under spin reversal.

  8. A Prevalidation of the Product-Process Matrix

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashenbaum, Bryan

    2013-01-01

    A major challenge for instructors of supply chain and operations management (SCOM) courses is to help students who have never seen a production floor visualize concepts, such as the product-process matrix from standard introductory SCOM texts. This article presents a classroom exercise, which "prevalidates" the product-process matrix.…

  9. Utilizing Vocational Education to Improve Productivity. Technology/Program Matrix.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conserva, Inc., Raleigh, NC.

    This technology/program matrix and annotated bibliography were created as a product of the first activity in a project to alert vocational educators to forthcoming technological changes and to promote awareness of vocational education as a mechanism for productivity improvement. The classification matrix identifies, describes, and classifies those…

  10. Matrix product formula for {{U}_{q}}(A_{2}^{(1)}) -zero range process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuniba, Atsuo; Okado, Masato

    2017-01-01

    The {{U}q}(An(1)) -zero range processes introduced recently by Mangazeev, Maruyama and the authors are integrable discrete and continuous time Markov processes associated with the stochastic R matrix derived from the well-known {{U}q}(An(1)) quantum R matrix. By constructing a representation of the relevant Zamolodchikov-Faddeev algebra, we present, for n  =  2, a matrix product formula for the steady state probabilities in terms of q-boson operators.

  11. Matrix model for non-Abelian quantum Hall states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorey, Nick; Tong, David; Turner, Carl

    2016-08-01

    We propose a matrix quantum mechanics for a class of non-Abelian quantum Hall states. The model describes electrons which carry an internal SU(p ) spin. The ground states of the matrix model include spin-singlet generalizations of the Moore-Read and Read-Rezayi states and, in general, lie in a class previously introduced by Blok and Wen. The effective action for these states is a U(p ) Chern-Simons theory. We show how the matrix model can be derived from quantization of the vortices in this Chern-Simons theory and how the matrix model ground states can be reconstructed as correlation functions in the boundary WZW model.

  12. Encoding the structure of many-body localization with matrix product operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekker, David; Clark, Bryan K.

    2017-01-01

    Anderson insulators are noninteracting disordered systems which have localized single-particle eigenstates. The interacting analog of Anderson insulators are the many-body localized (MBL) phases. The spectrum of the many-body eigenstates of an Anderson insulator is efficiently represented as a set of product states over the single-particle modes. We show that product states over matrix product operators of small bond dimension is the corresponding efficient description of the spectrum of an MBL insulator. In this language all of the many-body eigenstates are encoded by matrix product states (i.e., density matrix renormalization group wave functions) consisting of only two sets of low bond dimension matrices per site: the Gi matrices corresponding to the local ground state on site i and the Ei matrices corresponding to the local excited state. All 2n eigenstates can be generated from all possible combinations of these sets of matrices.

  13. Empirical State Error Covariance Matrix for Batch Estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Joe

    2015-01-01

    State estimation techniques effectively provide mean state estimates. However, the theoretical state error covariance matrices provided as part of these techniques often suffer from a lack of confidence in their ability to describe the uncertainty in the estimated states. By a reinterpretation of the equations involved in the weighted batch least squares algorithm, it is possible to directly arrive at an empirical state error covariance matrix. The proposed empirical state error covariance matrix will contain the effect of all error sources, known or not. This empirical error covariance matrix may be calculated as a side computation for each unique batch solution. Results based on the proposed technique will be presented for a simple, two observer and measurement error only problem.

  14. Quantum Phase Transitions in Conventional Matrix Product Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Jing-Min; Huang, Fei; Chang, Yan

    2017-02-01

    For matrix product states(MPSs) of one-dimensional spin-1/2 chains, we investigate a new kind of conventional quantum phase transition(QPT). We find that the system has two different ferromagnetic phases; on the line of the two ferromagnetic phases coexisting equally, the system in the thermodynamic limit is in an isolated mediate-coupling state described by a paramagnetic state and is in the same state as the renormalization group fixed point state, the expectation values of the physical quantities are discontinuous, and any two spin blocks of the system have the same geometry quantum discord(GQD) within the range of open interval (0,0.25) and the same classical correlation(CC) within the range of open interval (0,0.75) compared to any phase having no any kind of correlation. We not only realize the control of QPTs but also realize the control of quantum correlation of quantum many-body systems on the critical line by adjusting the environment parameters, which may have potential application in quantum information fields and is helpful to comprehensively and deeply understand the quantum correlation, and the organization and structure of quantum correlation especially for long-range quantum correlation of quantum many-body systems.

  15. Efficient tree tensor network states (TTNS) for quantum chemistry: generalizations of the density matrix renormalization group algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Naoki; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2013-04-07

    We investigate tree tensor network states for quantum chemistry. Tree tensor network states represent one of the simplest generalizations of matrix product states and the density matrix renormalization group. While matrix product states encode a one-dimensional entanglement structure, tree tensor network states encode a tree entanglement structure, allowing for a more flexible description of general molecules. We describe an optimal tree tensor network state algorithm for quantum chemistry. We introduce the concept of half-renormalization which greatly improves the efficiency of the calculations. Using our efficient formulation we demonstrate the strengths and weaknesses of tree tensor network states versus matrix product states. We carry out benchmark calculations both on tree systems (hydrogen trees and π-conjugated dendrimers) as well as non-tree molecules (hydrogen chains, nitrogen dimer, and chromium dimer). In general, tree tensor network states require much fewer renormalized states to achieve the same accuracy as matrix product states. In non-tree molecules, whether this translates into a computational savings is system dependent, due to the higher prefactor and computational scaling associated with tree algorithms. In tree like molecules, tree network states are easily superior to matrix product states. As an illustration, our largest dendrimer calculation with tree tensor network states correlates 110 electrons in 110 active orbitals.

  16. Face recognition using tridiagonal matrix enhanced multivariance products representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ã-zay, Evrim Korkmaz

    2017-01-01

    This study aims to retrieve face images from a database according to a target face image. For this purpose, Tridiagonal Matrix Enhanced Multivariance Products Representation (TMEMPR) is taken into consideration. TMEMPR is a recursive algorithm based on Enhanced Multivariance Products Representation (EMPR). TMEMPR decomposes a matrix into three components which are a matrix of left support terms, a tridiagonal matrix of weight parameters for each recursion, and a matrix of right support terms, respectively. In this sense, there is an analogy between Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) and TMEMPR. However TMEMPR is a more flexible algorithm since its initial support terms (or vectors) can be chosen as desired. Low computational complexity is another advantage of TMEMPR because the algorithm has been constructed with recursions of certain arithmetic operations without requiring any iteration. The algorithm has been trained and tested with ORL face image database with 400 different grayscale images of 40 different people. TMEMPR's performance has been compared with SVD's performance as a result.

  17. Excited State Effects in Nucleon Matrix Element Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Constantia Alexandrou, Martha Constantinou, Simon Dinter, Vincent Drach, Karl Jansen, Theodoros Leontiou, Dru B Renner

    2011-12-01

    We perform a high-statistics precision calculation of nucleon matrix elements using an open sink method allowing us to explore a wide range of sink-source time separations. In this way the influence of excited states of nucleon matrix elements can be studied. As particular examples we present results for the nucleon axial charge g{sub A} and for the first moment of the isovector unpolarized parton distribution x{sub u-d}. In addition, we report on preliminary results using the generalized eigenvalue method for nucleon matrix elements. All calculations are performed using N{sub f} = 2+1+1 maximally twisted mass Wilson fermions.

  18. An Empirical State Error Covariance Matrix Orbit Determination Example

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Joseph H., Jr.

    2015-01-01

    State estimation techniques serve effectively to provide mean state estimates. However, the state error covariance matrices provided as part of these techniques suffer from some degree of lack of confidence in their ability to adequately describe the uncertainty in the estimated states. A specific problem with the traditional form of state error covariance matrices is that they represent only a mapping of the assumed observation error characteristics into the state space. Any errors that arise from other sources (environment modeling, precision, etc.) are not directly represented in a traditional, theoretical state error covariance matrix. First, consider that an actual observation contains only measurement error and that an estimated observation contains all other errors, known and unknown. Then it follows that a measurement residual (the difference between expected and observed measurements) contains all errors for that measurement. Therefore, a direct and appropriate inclusion of the actual measurement residuals in the state error covariance matrix of the estimate will result in an empirical state error covariance matrix. This empirical state error covariance matrix will fully include all of the errors in the state estimate. The empirical error covariance matrix is determined from a literal reinterpretation of the equations involved in the weighted least squares estimation algorithm. It is a formally correct, empirical state error covariance matrix obtained through use of the average form of the weighted measurement residual variance performance index rather than the usual total weighted residual form. Based on its formulation, this matrix will contain the total uncertainty in the state estimate, regardless as to the source of the uncertainty and whether the source is anticipated or not. It is expected that the empirical error covariance matrix will give a better, statistical representation of the state error in poorly modeled systems or when sensor performance

  19. A class of vector coherent states defined over matrix domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thirulogasanthar, K.; Twareque Ali, S.

    2003-11-01

    A general scheme is proposed for constructing vector coherent states, in analogy with the well-known canonical coherent states, and their deformed versions, when these latter are expressed as infinite series in powers of a complex variable z. In the present scheme, the variable z is replaced by matrix valued functions over appropriate domains. As particular examples, we analyze the quaternionic extensions of the canonical coherent states and the Gilmore-Perelomov and Barut-Girardello coherent states arising from representations of SU(1,1). Possible physical applications are indicated.

  20. Exact Matrix Product Solution for the Boundary-Driven Lindblad XXZ Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karevski, D.; Popkov, V.; Schütz, G. M.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that the exact nonequilibrium steady state of the one-dimensional Heisenberg XXZ spin chain driven by boundary Lindblad operators can be constructed explicitly with a matrix product ansatz for the nonequilibrium density matrix where the matrices satisfy a quadratic algebra. This algebra turns out to be related to the quantum algebra Uq[SU(2)]. Coherent state techniques are introduced for the exact solution of the isotropic Heisenberg chain with and without quantum boundary fields and Lindblad terms that correspond to two different completely polarized boundary states. We show that this boundary twist leads to nonvanishing stationary currents of all spin components. Our results suggest that the matrix product ansatz can be extended to more general quantum systems kept far from equilibrium by Lindblad boundary terms.

  1. Charged- and neutral-pion production in the S-matrix approach

    SciTech Connect

    Malafaia, V.; Pena, M. T.; Elster, Ch.; Adam, J. Jr.

    2006-10-15

    The S-matrix approach is used to calculate both charged- and neutral-pion production in nucleon-nucleon (NN) scattering near threshold. The irreducible pion-rescattering diagram, direct production mechanism, {delta} isobars in intermediate states, and Z diagrams mediated by heavy isoscalar mesons are included in the calculation. For the NN distortions, we considered a realistic interaction, within the Bonn family of potentials, which describes the nucleonic inelasticities above the pion production energy threshold.

  2. Product-State Approximations to Quantum States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandão, Fernando G. S. L.; Harrow, Aram W.

    2016-02-01

    We show that for any many-body quantum state there exists an unentangled quantum state such that most of the two-body reduced density matrices are close to those of the original state. This is a statement about the monogamy of entanglement, which cannot be shared without limit in the same way as classical correlation. Our main application is to Hamiltonians that are sums of two-body terms. For such Hamiltonians we show that there exist product states with energy that is close to the ground-state energy whenever the interaction graph of the Hamiltonian has high degree. This proves the validity of mean-field theory and gives an explicitly bounded approximation error. If we allow states that are entangled within small clusters of systems but product across clusters then good approximations exist when the Hamiltonian satisfies one or more of the following properties: (1) high degree, (2) small expansion, or (3) a ground state where the blocks in the partition have sublinear entanglement. Previously this was known only in the case of small expansion or in the regime where the entanglement was close to zero. Our approximations allow an extensive error in energy, which is the scale considered by the quantum PCP (probabilistically checkable proof) and NLTS (no low-energy trivial-state) conjectures. Thus our results put restrictions on the possible Hamiltonians that could be used for a possible proof of the qPCP or NLTS conjectures. By contrast the classical PCP constructions are often based on constraint graphs with high degree. Likewise we show that the parallel repetition that is possible with classical constraint satisfaction problems cannot also be possible for quantum Hamiltonians, unless qPCP is false. The main technical tool behind our results is a collection of new classical and quantum de Finetti theorems which do not make any symmetry assumptions on the underlying states.

  3. The role of muscle cells in regulating cartilage matrix production

    PubMed Central

    Cairns, Dana M.; Lee, Philip G.; Uchimura, Tomoya; Seufert, Christopher R.; Kwon, Heenam; Zeng, Li

    2009-01-01

    Muscle is one of the tissues located in close proximity to cartilage tissue. Although it has been suggested that muscle could influence skeletal development through generating mechanical forces by means of contraction, very little is known regarding whether muscle cells release biochemical signals to regulate cartilage gene expression. We tested the hypothesis that muscle cells directly regulate cartilage matrix production by analyzing chondrocytes co-cultured with muscle cells in 2D or 3D conditions. We found that chondrocytes cultured with C2C12 muscle cells exhibited enhanced alcian blue staining and elevated expression of collagen II and collagen IX proteins. While non-muscle cells do not promote cartilage matrix production, converting them into muscle cells enhanced their pro-chondrogenic activity. Furthermore, muscle cell-conditioned medium led to increased cartilage matrix production, suggesting that muscle cells secrete pro-chondrogenic factors. Taken together, our study suggests that muscle cells may play an important role in regulating cartilage gene expression. This result may ultimately lead to the discovery of novel factors that regulate cartilage formation and homeostasis, and provide insights into improving the strategies for regenerating cartilage. PMID:19813241

  4. Efficient Kriging via Fast Matrix-Vector Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Memarsadeghi, Nargess; Raykar, Vikas C.; Duraiswami, Ramani; Mount, David M.

    2008-01-01

    Interpolating scattered data points is a problem of wide ranging interest. Ordinary kriging is an optimal scattered data estimator, widely used in geosciences and remote sensing. A generalized version of this technique, called cokriging, can be used for image fusion of remotely sensed data. However, it is computationally very expensive for large data sets. We demonstrate the time efficiency and accuracy of approximating ordinary kriging through the use of fast matrixvector products combined with iterative methods. We used methods based on the fast Multipole methods and nearest neighbor searching techniques for implementations of the fast matrix-vector products.

  5. State Support of Domestic Production

    SciTech Connect

    Amy Wright

    2007-12-30

    This project was developed in response to a cooperative agreement offering by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and the National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) under the State Support of Domestic Production DE-FC26-04NT15456. The Interstate Oil and Gas Compact Commission (IOGCC) performed efforts in support of State programs related to the security, reliability and growth if our nation's domestic production of oil and natural gas. The project objectives were to improve the States ability to monitor the security of oil and gas operations; to maximize the production of domestic oil and natural gas thereby minimizing the threat to national security posed by interruptions in energy imports; to assist States in developing and maintaining high standards of environmental protection; to assist in addressing issues that limit the capacity of the industry; to promote the deployment of the appropriate application of technology for regulatory efficiency; and to inform the public about emerging energy issues.

  6. Maximizing sparse matrix vector product performance in MIMD computers

    SciTech Connect

    McLay, R.T.; Kohli, H.S.; Swift, S.L.; Carey, G.F.

    1994-12-31

    A considerable component of the computational effort involved in conjugate gradient solution of structured sparse matrix systems is expended during the Matrix-Vector Product (MVP), and hence it is the focus of most efforts at improving performance. Such efforts are hindered on MIMD machines due to constraints on memory, cache and speed of memory-cpu data transfer. This paper describes a strategy for maximizing the performance of the local computations associated with the MVP. The method focuses on single stride memory access, and the efficient use of cache by pre-loading it with data that is re-used while bypassing it for other data. The algorithm is designed to behave optimally for varying grid sizes and number of unknowns per gridpoint. Results from an assembly language implementation of the strategy on the iPSC/860 show a significant improvement over the performance using FORTRAN.

  7. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Joo, Balint; Lin, Huey -Wen; Negele, John; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Richards, David; Syritsyn, Sergey; Winter, Frank

    2016-06-08

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1-flavor ensemble with lattices of size 323 × 64 generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at a = 0.081 fm and with Mπ = 312 MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a 2-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation tsep. We show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost effectiveness. As a result, a detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of tsep needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the tsep → ∞ estimates is presented.

  8. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    DOE PAGES

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; ...

    2016-06-08

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1-flavor ensemble with lattices of size 323 × 64 generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at a = 0.081 fm and with Mπ = 312 MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a 2-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation tsep. Wemore » show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost effectiveness. As a result, a detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of tsep needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the tsep → ∞ estimates is presented.« less

  9. Controlling excited-state contamination in nucleon matrix elements

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Boram; Gupta, Rajan; Bhattacharya, Tanmoy; Engelhardt, Michael; Green, Jeremy; Joó, Bálint; Lin, Huey-Wen; Negele, John; Orginos, Kostas; Pochinsky, Andrew; Richards, David; Syritsyn, Sergey; Winter, Frank

    2016-06-01

    We present a detailed analysis of methods to reduce statistical errors and excited-state contamination in the calculation of matrix elements of quark bilinear operators in nucleon states. All the calculations were done on a 2+1 flavor ensemble with lattices of size $32^3 \\times 64$ generated using the rational hybrid Monte Carlo algorithm at $a=0.081$~fm and with $M_\\pi=312$~MeV. The statistical precision of the data is improved using the all-mode-averaging method. We compare two methods for reducing excited-state contamination: a variational analysis and a two-state fit to data at multiple values of the source-sink separation $t_{\\rm sep}$. We show that both methods can be tuned to significantly reduce excited-state contamination and discuss their relative advantages and cost-effectiveness. A detailed analysis of the size of source smearing used in the calculation of quark propagators and the range of values of $t_{\\rm sep}$ needed to demonstrate convergence of the isovector charges of the nucleon to the $t_{\\rm sep} \\to \\infty $ estimates is presented.

  10. Extracellular matrix production in vitro in cartilage tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jie-Lin; Duan, Li; Zhu, Weimin; Xiong, Jianyi; Wang, Daping

    2014-04-05

    Cartilage tissue engineering is arising as a technique for the repair of cartilage lesions in clinical applications. However, fibrocartilage formation weakened the mechanical functions of the articular, which compromises the clinical outcomes. Due to the low proliferation ability, dedifferentiation property and low production of cartilage-specific extracellular matrix (ECM) of the chondrocytes, the cartilage synthesis in vitro has been one of the major limitations for obtaining high-quality engineered cartilage constructs. This review discusses cells, biomaterial scaffolds and stimulating factors that can facilitate the cartilage-specific ECM production and accumulation in the in vitro culture system. Special emphasis has been put on the factors that affect the production of ECM macromolecules such as collagen type II and proteoglycans in the review, aiming at providing new strategies to improve the quality of tissue-engineered cartilage.

  11. Smad4 regulates growth plate matrix production and chondrocyte polarity

    PubMed Central

    Whitaker, Amanda T.; Berthet, Ellora; Cantu, Andrea; Laird, Diana J.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Smad4 is an intracellular effector of the TGFβ family that has been implicated in Myhre syndrome, a skeletal dysplasia characterized by short stature, brachydactyly and stiff joints. The TGFβ pathway also plays a critical role in the development, organization and proliferation of the growth plate, although the exact mechanisms remain unclear. Skeletal phenotypes in Myhre syndrome overlap with processes regulated by the TGFβ pathway, including organization and proliferation of the growth plate and polarity of the chondrocyte. We used in vitro and in vivo models of Smad4 deficiency in chondrocytes to test the hypothesis that deregulated TGFβ signaling leads to aberrant extracellular matrix production and loss of chondrocyte polarity. Specifically, we evaluated growth plate chondrocyte polarity in tibiae of Col2-Cre+/−;Smad4fl/fl mice and in chondrocyte pellet cultures. In vitro and in vivo, Smad4 deficiency decreased aggrecan expression and increased MMP13 expression. Smad4 deficiency disrupted the balance of cartilage matrix synthesis and degradation, even though the sequential expression of growth plate chondrocyte markers was intact. Chondrocytes in Smad4-deficient growth plates also showed evidence of polarity defects, with impaired proliferation and ability to undergo the characteristic changes in shape, size and orientation as they differentiated from resting to hypertrophic chondrocytes. Therefore, we show that Smad4 controls chondrocyte proliferation, orientation, and hypertrophy and is important in regulating the extracellular matrix composition of the growth plate. PMID:28167493

  12. Matrix algorithms for solving (in)homogeneous bound state equations.

    PubMed

    Blank, M; Krassnigg, A

    2011-07-01

    In the functional approach to quantum chromodynamics, the properties of hadronic bound states are accessible via covariant integral equations, e.g. the Bethe-Salpeter equation for mesons. In particular, one has to deal with linear, homogeneous integral equations which, in sophisticated model setups, use numerical representations of the solutions of other integral equations as part of their input. Analogously, inhomogeneous equations can be constructed to obtain off-shell information in addition to bound-state masses and other properties obtained from the covariant analogue to a wave function of the bound state. These can be solved very efficiently using well-known matrix algorithms for eigenvalues (in the homogeneous case) and the solution of linear systems (in the inhomogeneous case). We demonstrate this by solving the homogeneous and inhomogeneous Bethe-Salpeter equations and find, e.g. that for the calculation of the mass spectrum it is as efficient or even advantageous to use the inhomogeneous equation as compared to the homogeneous. This is valuable insight, in particular for the study of baryons in a three-quark setup and more involved systems.

  13. Matrix algorithms for solving (in)homogeneous bound state equations

    PubMed Central

    Blank, M.; Krassnigg, A.

    2011-01-01

    In the functional approach to quantum chromodynamics, the properties of hadronic bound states are accessible via covariant integral equations, e.g. the Bethe–Salpeter equation for mesons. In particular, one has to deal with linear, homogeneous integral equations which, in sophisticated model setups, use numerical representations of the solutions of other integral equations as part of their input. Analogously, inhomogeneous equations can be constructed to obtain off-shell information in addition to bound-state masses and other properties obtained from the covariant analogue to a wave function of the bound state. These can be solved very efficiently using well-known matrix algorithms for eigenvalues (in the homogeneous case) and the solution of linear systems (in the inhomogeneous case). We demonstrate this by solving the homogeneous and inhomogeneous Bethe–Salpeter equations and find, e.g. that for the calculation of the mass spectrum it is as efficient or even advantageous to use the inhomogeneous equation as compared to the homogeneous. This is valuable insight, in particular for the study of baryons in a three-quark setup and more involved systems. PMID:21760640

  14. State power plant productivity programs

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1981-02-01

    The findings of a working group formed to review the status of efforts by utilities and utility regulators to increase the availability and reliability of generating units are presented. Representatives from nine state regulatory agencies, NRRI, and DOE, participated on the Working Group. The Federal government has been working cooperatively with utilities, utility organizations, and with regulators to encourage and facilitate improvements in power plant productivity. Cooperative projects undertaken with regulatory and energy commissions in California, Illinois, New York, Ohio, Texas, North Carolina and Mighigan are described. Following initiation of these cooperative projects, DOE funded a survey to determine which states were explicitly addressing power plant productivity through the regulatory process. The Working Group was formed following completion of this survey. The Working Group emphasized the need for those power plant productivity improvements which are cost effective. The cost effectiveness of proposed availability improvement projects should be determined within the context of opportunities for operating and capital improvements available to an entire utility. The Working Group also identified the need for: allowing for plant designs that have a higher construction cost, but are also more reliable; allowing for recovery and reducing recovery lags for productivity-related capital expenditures; identifying and reducing disincentives in the regulatory process; ascertaining that utilities have sufficient money available to undertake timely maintenance; and support of EPRI and NERC to develop a relevant and accurate national data base. The DOE views these as extremely important aspects of any regulatory program to improve power plant productivity.

  15. Uncertainty evaluation for the matrix ``solidified state'' of fissionable elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iliescu, Elena; Iancso, Georgeta

    2012-09-01

    In case of the analysis of the radioactive liquid samples, no matter the relative physical analysis method used, two impediments act that belong to the behavior in time of the dispersion state of the liquid samples to be analyzed and of the standard used in the analysis. That is, one of them refers to the state of the sample to be analyzed when being sampled, which "alter" during the time elapsed from sampling up to the analysis of the sample. The other impediment is the natural change of the dispersion state of the standard radioactive solutions, due to the occurrence and evolution in time of the radiocolloidal and pseudo-radiocolloidal states. These radiocolloidal states are states of aggregation and they lead to the destruction of the homogeneity of the solutions. Taking into consideration the advantages offered by the relative physical methods of analysis as against the chemical or the radiochemical ones, different ways of eliminating these impediments have been tried. We eliminated these impediments processing the liquid reference materials (the solutions calibrated in radionuclides of interest), immediately after the preparation. This processing changes the liquid physical state of the reference materials in a "solidified state". Through this procedure the dispersion states of the samples, practically, can no longer be essentially modified in time and also ensure the uniform distribution of the radionuclides of interest in the elemental matrix of the samples "state solidified". The homogeneity of the distribution of the atoms of the radionuclides from the samples "solidified state" was checked up through the track micromapping technique of the alpha particles. Through this technique, in the chemically etched track detectors that were put in direct contact with the sample for a determined period of time, the alpha exposure time of the detectors, micromaps of alpha tracks were obtained. These micromaps are retorts through tracks of the distributions atoms of

  16. Measurement of spin correlations in t t ‾ production using the matrix element method in the muon+jets final state in pp collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khachatryan, V.; Sirunyan, A. M.; Tumasyan, A.; Adam, W.; Asilar, E.; Bergauer, T.; Brandstetter, J.; Brondolin, E.; Dragicevic, M.; Erö, J.; Flechl, M.; Friedl, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Ghete, V. M.; Hartl, C.; Hörmann, N.; Hrubec, J.; Jeitler, M.; Knünz, V.; König, A.; Krammer, M.; Krätschmer, I.; Liko, D.; Matsushita, T.; Mikulec, I.; Rabady, D.; Rahbaran, B.; Rohringer, H.; Schieck, J.; Schöfbeck, R.; Strauss, J.; Treberer-Treberspurg, W.; Waltenberger, W.; Wulz, C.-E.; Mossolov, V.; Shumeiko, N.; Suarez Gonzalez, J.; Alderweireldt, S.; Cornelis, T.; De Wolf, E. A.; Janssen, X.; Knutsson, A.; Lauwers, J.; Luyckx, S.; Rougny, R.; Van De Klundert, M.; Van Haevermaet, H.; Van Mechelen, P.; Van Remortel, N.; Van Spilbeeck, A.; Abu Zeid, S.; Blekman, F.; D'Hondt, J.; Daci, N.; De Bruyn, I.; Deroover, K.; Heracleous, N.; Keaveney, J.; Lowette, S.; Moreels, L.; Olbrechts, A.; Python, Q.; Strom, D.; Tavernier, S.; Van Doninck, W.; Van Mulders, P.; Van Onsem, G. P.; Van Parijs, I.; Barria, P.; Brun, H.; Caillol, C.; Clerbaux, B.; De Lentdecker, G.; Fasanella, G.; Favart, L.; Grebenyuk, A.; Karapostoli, G.; Lenzi, T.; Léonard, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Marinov, A.; Perniè, L.; Randle-conde, A.; Reis, T.; Seva, T.; Vander Velde, C.; Vanlaer, P.; Yonamine, R.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, F.; Beernaert, K.; Benucci, L.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Dobur, D.; Fagot, A.; Garcia, G.; Gul, M.; Mccartin, J.; Ocampo Rios, A. A.; Poyraz, D.; Ryckbosch, D.; Salva, S.; Sigamani, M.; Strobbe, N.; Tytgat, M.; Van Driessche, W.; Yazgan, E.; Zaganidis, N.; Basegmez, S.; Beluffi, C.; Bondu, O.; Brochet, S.; Bruno, G.; Caudron, A.; Ceard, L.; Da Silveira, G. G.; Delaere, C.; Favart, D.; Forthomme, L.; Giammanco, A.; Hollar, J.; Jafari, A.; Jez, P.; Komm, M.; Lemaitre, V.; Mertens, A.; Nuttens, C.; Perrini, L.; Pin, A.; Piotrzkowski, K.; Popov, A.; Quertenmont, L.; Selvaggi, M.; Vidal Marono, M.; Beliy, N.; Hammad, G. H.; Aldá Júnior, W. L.; Alves, G. A.; Brito, L.; Correa Martins Junior, M.; Hamer, M.; Hensel, C.; Mora Herrera, C.; Moraes, A.; Pol, M. E.; Rebello Teles, P.; Belchior Batista Das Chagas, E.; Carvalho, W.; Chinellato, J.; Custódio, A.; Da Costa, E. M.; De Jesus Damiao, D.; De Oliveira Martins, C.; Fonseca De Souza, S.; Huertas Guativa, L. M.; Malbouisson, H.; Matos Figueiredo, D.; Mundim, L.; Nogima, H.; Prado Da Silva, W. L.; Santoro, A.; Sznajder, A.; Tonelli Manganote, E. J.; Vilela Pereira, A.; Ahuja, S.; Bernardes, C. A.; De Souza Santos, A.; Dogra, S.; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T. R.; Gregores, E. M.; Mercadante, P. G.; Moon, C. S.; Novaes, S. F.; Padula, Sandra S.; Romero Abad, D.; Ruiz Vargas, J. C.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Glushkov, I.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Ahmad, M.; Bian, J. G.; Chen, G. M.; Chen, H. S.; Chen, M.; Cheng, T.; Du, R.; Jiang, C. H.; Plestina, R.; Romeo, F.; Shaheen, S. M.; Tao, J.; Wang, C.; Wang, Z.; Zhang, H.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Ban, Y.; Li, Q.; Liu, S.; Mao, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Wang, D.; Xu, Z.; Zou, W.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Chaparro Sierra, L. F.; Florez, C.; Gomez, J. P.; Gomez Moreno, B.; Sanabria, J. C.; Godinovic, N.; Lelas, D.; Puljak, I.; Ribeiro Cipriano, P. M.; Antunovic, Z.; Kovac, M.; Brigljevic, V.; Kadija, K.; Luetic, J.; Micanovic, S.; Sudic, L.; Attikis, A.; Mavromanolakis, G.; Mousa, J.; Nicolaou, C.; Ptochos, F.; Razis, P. A.; Rykaczewski, H.; Bodlak, M.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; El Sawy, M.; El-khateeb, E.; Elkafrawy, T.; Mohamed, A.; Salama, E.; Calpas, B.; Kadastik, M.; Murumaa, M.; Raidal, M.; Tiko, A.; Veelken, C.; Eerola, P.; Pekkanen, J.; Voutilainen, M.; Härkönen, J.; Karimäki, V.; Kinnunen, R.; Lampén, T.; Lassila-Perini, K.; Lehti, S.; Lindén, T.; Luukka, P.; Mäenpää, T.; Peltola, T.; Tuominen, E.; Tuominiemi, J.; Tuovinen, E.; Wendland, L.; Talvitie, J.; Tuuva, T.; Besancon, M.; Couderc, F.; Dejardin, M.; Denegri, D.; Fabbro, B.; Faure, J. L.; Favaro, C.; Ferri, F.; Ganjour, S.; Givernaud, A.; Gras, P.; Hamel de Monchenault, G.; Jarry, P.; Locci, E.; Machet, M.; Malcles, J.; Rander, J.; Rosowsky, A.; Titov, M.; Zghiche, A.; Antropov, I.; Baffioni, S.; Beaudette, F.; Busson, P.; Cadamuro, L.; Chapon, E.; Charlot, C.; Dahms, T.; Davignon, O.; Filipovic, N.; Florent, A.; Granier de Cassagnac, R.; Lisniak, S.; Mastrolorenzo, L.; Miné, P.; Naranjo, I. N.; Nguyen, M.; Ochando, C.; Ortona, G.; Paganini, P.; Pigard, P.; Regnard, S.; Salerno, R.; Sauvan, J. B.; Sirois, Y.; Strebler, T.; Yilmaz, Y.; Zabi, A.; Agram, J.-L.; Andrea, J.; Aubin, A.; Bloch, D.; Brom, J.-M.; Buttignol, M.; Chabert, E. C.; Chanon, N.; Collard, C.; Conte, E.; Coubez, X.; Fontaine, J.-C.; Gelé, D.; Goerlach, U.; Goetzmann, C.; Le Bihan, A.-C.; Merlin, J. A.; Skovpen, K.

    2016-07-01

    The consistency of the spin correlation strength in top quark pair production with the standard model (SM) prediction is tested in the muon+jets final state. The events are selected from pp collisions, collected by the CMS detector, at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 19.7 fb-1. The data are compared with the expectation for the spin correlation predicted by the SM and with the expectation of no correlation. Using a template fit method, the fraction of events that show SM spin correlations is measured to be 0.72 ± 0.08(stat)-0.13+0.15 (syst), representing the most precise measurement of this quantity in the muon+jets final state to date.

  17. Matrix membrane big bangs and D-brane production

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Sumit R.; Michelson, Jeremy

    2006-06-15

    We construct matrix membrane theory in pp wave backgrounds that have a null linear dilaton in Type IIB string theory. Such backgrounds can serve as toy models of big bang cosmologies. At late times only Abelian degrees of freedom survive, and if the Kaluza-Klein modes along one of the directions of the membrane decouple, standard perturbative strings emerge. Near the 'big bang', non-Abelian configurations of fuzzy ellipsoids are present, as in the Type IIA theories. A generic configuration of these shrink to zero volume at late times. However, the Kaluza-Klein modes (which can be thought of as states of (p,q) strings in the original IIB theory) can be generically produced in pairs in both pp wave and flat backgrounds in the presence of time dependence. Indeed, if we require that at late times the theory evolves to the perturbative string vacuum, these modes must be prepared in a squeezed state with a thermal distribution at early times.

  18. Matrix product operators for symmetry-protected topological phases: Gauging and edge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, Dominic J.; Bultinck, Nick; Mariën, Michael; Şahinoǧlu, Mehmet B.; Haegeman, Jutho; Verstraete, Frank

    2016-11-01

    Projected entangled pair states (PEPS) provide a natural ansatz for the ground states of gapped, local Hamiltonians in which global characteristics of a quantum state are encoded in properties of local tensors. We develop a framework to describe onsite symmetries, as occurring in systems exhibiting symmetry-protected topological (SPT) quantum order, in terms of virtual symmetries of the local tensors expressed as a set of matrix product operators (MPOs) labeled by distinct group elements. These MPOs describe the possibly anomalous symmetry of the edge theory, whose local degrees of freedom are concretely identified in a PEPS. A classification of SPT phases is obtained by studying the obstructions to continuously deforming one set of MPOs into another, recovering the results derived for fixed-point models [Chen et al., Phys. Rev. B 87, 155114 (2013), 10.1103/PhysRevB.87.155114]. Our formalism accommodates perturbations away from fixed-point models, opening the possibility of studying phase transitions between different SPT phases. We also demonstrate that applying the recently developed quantum state gauging procedure to a SPT PEPS yields a PEPS with topological order determined by the initial symmetry MPOs. The MPO framework thus unifies the different approaches to classifying SPT phases, via fixed-point models, boundary anomalies, or gauging the symmetry, into the single problem of classifying inequivalent sets of matrix product operator symmetries that are defined purely in terms of a PEPS.

  19. Chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arai, Yasuo; Iwai, Takashi; Ohmichi, Toshihiko

    1987-12-01

    The chemical state of fission products in irradiated uranium carbide fuel has been estimated by equilibrium calculation using the SOLGASMIX-PV program. Solid state fission products are distributed to the fuel matrix, ternary compounds, carbides of fission products and intermetallic compounds among the condensed phases appearing in the irradiated uranium carbide fuel. The chemical forms are influenced by burnup as well as stoichiometry of the fuel. The results of the present study almost agree with the experimental ones reported for burnup simulated carbides.

  20. Quercetin Attenuates Lactate Production and Extracellular Matrix Secretion in Keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    McKay, T. B.; Lyon, D.; Sarker-Nag, A.; Priyadarsini, S.; Asara, J. M.; Karamichos, D.

    2015-01-01

    Keratoconus(KC) is an ecstatic corneal disease leading to corneal-thinning and the formation of a cone-like cornea. Elevated lactate levels, increased oxidative stress, and myofibroblast formation have all been previously reported. In the current study, we assess the role of Quercetin on collagen secretion and myofibroblast formation in KC in vitro. Human corneal fibroblasts(HCFs) and human keratoconus cells(HKCs) were treated with a stable Vitamin C derivative and cultured for 4 weeks, stimulating formation of a self-assembled extracellular matrix. All samples were analyzed using Western blots and targeted tandem mass spectrometry. Our data showed that Quercetin significantly down regulates myofibroblast differentiation and fibrotic markers, such as α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Collagen III (Col III), in both HCFs and HKCs. Collagen III secretion was reduced 80% in both HCFs and HKCs following Quercetin treatment. Furthermore, Quercetin reduced lactate production by HKCs to normal HCF levels. Quercetin down regulated TGF-βR2 and TGF-β2 expression in HKCs suggesting a significant link to the TGF-β pathway. These results assert that Quercetin is a key regulator of fibrotic markers and ECM assembly by modulating cellular metabolism and TGF-β signaling. Our study suggests that Quercetin is a potential therapeutic for treatment of corneal dystrophies, such as KC. PMID:25758533

  1. Vector and matrix states for Mueller matrices of nondepolarizing optical media.

    PubMed

    Kuntman, Ertan; Ali Kuntman, M; Arteaga, Oriol

    2017-01-01

    Nondepolarizing Mueller matrices contain up to seven independent parameters. However, these seven parameters typically do not appear explicitly among the measured 16 parameters of a Mueller matrix, so that they are not directly accessible for physical interpretation. This work shows that all the information contained in a nondepolarizing Mueller matrix can be conveniently expressed in terms of a four component covariance vector state or a generating 4×4 matrix, which can be understood as a matrix state. The generating matrix, besides being directly related to the nondepolarizing Mueller matrix, mimics all properties of the Jones matrix and provides a powerful mathematical tool for formulating all properties of nondepolarizing systems, including the Mueller symmetries and the anisotropy coefficients.

  2. Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group: efficient algorithms for strongly correlated excited states.

    PubMed

    Nakatani, Naoki; Wouters, Sebastian; Van Neck, Dimitri; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-01-14

    Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG-LRT) was first presented in terms of the DMRG renormalization projectors [J. J. Dorando, J. Hachmann, and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 184111 (2009)]. Later, with an understanding of the manifold structure of the matrix product state (MPS) ansatz, which lies at the basis of the DMRG algorithm, a way was found to construct the linear response space for general choices of the MPS gauge in terms of the tangent space vectors [J. Haegeman, J. I. Cirac, T. J. Osborne, I. Pižorn, H. Verschelde, and F. Verstraete, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 070601 (2011)]. These two developments led to the formulation of the Tamm-Dancoff and random phase approximations (TDA and RPA) for MPS. This work describes how these LRTs may be efficiently implemented through minor modifications of the DMRG sweep algorithm, at a computational cost which scales the same as the ground-state DMRG algorithm. In fact, the mixed canonical MPS form implicit to the DMRG sweep is essential for efficient implementation of the RPA, due to the structure of the second-order tangent space. We present ab initio DMRG-TDA results for excited states of polyenes, the water molecule, and a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster.

  3. Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group: Efficient algorithms for strongly correlated excited states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakatani, Naoki; Wouters, Sebastian; Van Neck, Dimitri; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2014-01-01

    Linear response theory for the density matrix renormalization group (DMRG-LRT) was first presented in terms of the DMRG renormalization projectors [J. J. Dorando, J. Hachmann, and G. K.-L. Chan, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 184111 (2009)]. Later, with an understanding of the manifold structure of the matrix product state (MPS) ansatz, which lies at the basis of the DMRG algorithm, a way was found to construct the linear response space for general choices of the MPS gauge in terms of the tangent space vectors [J. Haegeman, J. I. Cirac, T. J. Osborne, I. Pižorn, H. Verschelde, and F. Verstraete, Phys. Rev. Lett. 107, 070601 (2011)]. These two developments led to the formulation of the Tamm-Dancoff and random phase approximations (TDA and RPA) for MPS. This work describes how these LRTs may be efficiently implemented through minor modifications of the DMRG sweep algorithm, at a computational cost which scales the same as the ground-state DMRG algorithm. In fact, the mixed canonical MPS form implicit to the DMRG sweep is essential for efficient implementation of the RPA, due to the structure of the second-order tangent space. We present ab initio DMRG-TDA results for excited states of polyenes, the water molecule, and a [2Fe-2S] iron-sulfur cluster.

  4. A Criterion for Maximally Six-Qubit Entangled States via Coefficient Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yan; Zha, Xin Wei; Li, Wei

    2017-03-01

    In a recent paper (J. Phys. A: Math. Theor 45, 075308 (2012)), Li et al. established the coefficient matrix of six-qubit entangled states. With an emphasis on six qubits, we present a new criterion for maximally six-qubit entangled states via those coefficient matrices. By calculating the determinants of coefficient matrix, one use the criterion that characterize these states. Moreover, the criterion via the coefficient matrices gives rise to the combination of maximally multi-qubit entangled state(MMES) and matrix, and we believe that the new criterion can play an important role in quantum information.

  5. An Analytical State Transition Matrix for Orbits Perturbed by an Oblate Spheroid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mueller, A. C.

    1977-01-01

    An analytical state transition matrix and its inverse, which include the short period and secular effects of the second zonal harmonic, were developed from the nonsingular PS satellite theory. The fact that the independent variable in the PS theory is not time is in no respect disadvantageous, since any explicit analytical solution must be expressed in the true or eccentric anomaly. This is shown to be the case for the simple conic matrix. The PS theory allows for a concise, accurate, and algorithmically simple state transition matrix. The improvement over the conic matrix ranges from 2 to 4 digits accuracy.

  6. Scalar products in models with the GL(3) trigonometric R-matrix: General case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakuliak, S. Z.; Ragoucy, E.; Slavnov, N. A.

    2014-07-01

    We study quantum integrable models with the GL( 3) trigonometric R-matrix solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz and obtain an explicit representation for a scalar product of generic Bethe vectors in terms of a sum over partitions of Bethe parameters. This representation generalizes the known formula for scalar products in models with the GL( 3)-invariant R-matrix.

  7. Mississippi State Biodiesel Production Project

    SciTech Connect

    Rafael Hernandez; Todd French; Sandun Fernando; Tingyu Li; Dwane Braasch; Juan Silva; Brian Baldwin

    2008-03-20

    Biodiesel is a renewable fuel conventionally generated from vegetable oils and animal fats that conforms to ASTM D6751. Depending on the free fatty acid content of the feedstock, biodiesel is produced via transesterification, esterification, or a combination of these processes. Currently the cost of the feedstock accounts for more than 80% of biodiesel production cost. The main goal of this project was to evaluate and develop non-conventional feedstocks and novel processes for producing biodiesel. One of the most novel and promising feedstocks evaluated involves the use of readily available microorganisms as a lipid source. Municipal wastewater treatment facilities (MWWTF) in the USA produce (dry basis) of microbial sludge annually. This sludge is composed of a variety of organisms, which consume organic matter in wastewater. The content of phospholipids in these cells have been estimated at 24% to 25% of dry mass. Since phospholipids can be transesterified they could serve as a ready source of biodiesel. Examination of the various transesterification methods shows that in situ conversion of lipids to FAMEs provides the highest overall yield of biodiesel. If one assumes a 7.0% overall yield of FAMEs from dry sewage sludge on a weight basis, the cost per gallon of extracted lipid would be $3.11. Since the lipid is converted to FAMEs, also known as biodiesel, in the in Situ extraction process, the product can be used as is for renewable fuel. As transesterification efficiency increases the cost per gallon drops quickly, hitting $2.01 at 15.0% overall yield. An overall yield of 10.0% is required to obtain biodiesel at $2.50 per gallon, allowing it to compete with soybean oil in the marketplace. Twelve plant species with potential for oil production were tested at Mississippi State, MS. Of the species tested, canola, rapeseed and birdseed rape appear to have potential in Mississippi as winter annual crops because of yield. Two perennial crops were investigated, Chinese

  8. An Empirical State Error Covariance Matrix for the Weighted Least Squares Estimation Method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frisbee, Joseph H., Jr.

    2011-01-01

    State estimation techniques effectively provide mean state estimates. However, the theoretical state error covariance matrices provided as part of these techniques often suffer from a lack of confidence in their ability to describe the un-certainty in the estimated states. By a reinterpretation of the equations involved in the weighted least squares algorithm, it is possible to directly arrive at an empirical state error covariance matrix. This proposed empirical state error covariance matrix will contain the effect of all error sources, known or not. Results based on the proposed technique will be presented for a simple, two observer, measurement error only problem.

  9. Entropy Production and Non-Equilibrium Steady States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suzuki, Masuo

    2013-01-01

    The long-term issue of entropy production in transport phenomena is solved by separating the symmetry of the non-equilibrium density matrix ρ(t) in the von Neumann equation, as ρ(t) = ρs(t) + ρa(t) with the symmetric part ρs(t) and antisymmetric part ρa(t). The irreversible entropy production (dS/dt)irr is given in M. Suzuki, Physica A 390(2011)1904 by (dS/dt)irr = Tr( {H}(dρ s{(t)/dt))}/T for the Hamiltonian {H} of the relevant system. The general formulation of the extended von Neumann equation with energy supply and heat extraction is reviewed from the author's paper (M. S.,Physica A391(2012)1074). irreversibility; entropy production; transport phenomena; electric conduction; thermal conduction; linear response; Kubo formula; steady state; non-equilibrium density matrix; energy supply; symmetry-separated von Neumann equation; unboundedness.

  10. Activin A suppresses osteoblast mineralization capacity by altering extracellular matrix (ECM) composition and impairing matrix vesicle (MV) production.

    PubMed

    Alves, Rodrigo D A M; Eijken, Marco; Bezstarosti, Karel; Demmers, Jeroen A A; van Leeuwen, Johannes P T M

    2013-10-01

    During bone formation, osteoblasts deposit an extracellular matrix (ECM) that is mineralized via a process involving production and secretion of highly specialized matrix vesicles (MVs). Activin A, a transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) superfamily member, was previously shown to have inhibitory effects in human bone formation models through unclear mechanisms. We investigated these mechanisms elicited by activin A during in vitro osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Activin A inhibition of ECM mineralization coincided with a strong decline in alkaline phosphatase (ALP(1)) activity in extracellular compartments, ECM and matrix vesicles. SILAC-based quantitative proteomics disclosed intricate protein composition alterations in the activin A ECM, including changed expression of collagen XII, osteonectin and several cytoskeleton-binding proteins. Moreover, in activin A osteoblasts matrix vesicle production was deficient containing very low expression of annexin proteins. ECM enhanced human mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic development and mineralization. This osteogenic enhancement was significantly decreased when human mesenchymal stem cells were cultured on ECM produced under activin A treatment. These findings demonstrate that activin A targets the ECM maturation phase of osteoblast differentiation resulting ultimately in the inhibition of mineralization. ECM proteins modulated by activin A are not only determinant for bone mineralization but also possess osteoinductive properties that are relevant for bone tissue regeneration.

  11. S-matrix decomposition, natural reaction channels, and the quantum transition state approach to reactive scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manthe, Uwe; Ellerbrock, Roman

    2016-05-01

    A new approach for the quantum-state resolved analysis of polyatomic reactions is introduced. Based on the singular value decomposition of the S-matrix, energy-dependent natural reaction channels and natural reaction probabilities are defined. It is shown that the natural reaction probabilities are equal to the eigenvalues of the reaction probability operator [U. Manthe and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 3411 (1993)]. Consequently, the natural reaction channels can be interpreted as uniquely defined pathways through the transition state of the reaction. The analysis can efficiently be combined with reactive scattering calculations based on the propagation of thermal flux eigenstates. In contrast to a decomposition based straightforwardly on thermal flux eigenstates, it does not depend on the choice of the dividing surface separating reactants from products. The new approach is illustrated studying a prototypical example, the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction. The natural reaction probabilities and the contributions of the different vibrational states of the methyl product to the natural reaction channels are calculated and discussed. The relation between the thermal flux eigenstates and the natural reaction channels is studied in detail.

  12. S-matrix decomposition, natural reaction channels, and the quantum transition state approach to reactive scattering.

    PubMed

    Manthe, Uwe; Ellerbrock, Roman

    2016-05-28

    A new approach for the quantum-state resolved analysis of polyatomic reactions is introduced. Based on the singular value decomposition of the S-matrix, energy-dependent natural reaction channels and natural reaction probabilities are defined. It is shown that the natural reaction probabilities are equal to the eigenvalues of the reaction probability operator [U. Manthe and W. H. Miller, J. Chem. Phys. 99, 3411 (1993)]. Consequently, the natural reaction channels can be interpreted as uniquely defined pathways through the transition state of the reaction. The analysis can efficiently be combined with reactive scattering calculations based on the propagation of thermal flux eigenstates. In contrast to a decomposition based straightforwardly on thermal flux eigenstates, it does not depend on the choice of the dividing surface separating reactants from products. The new approach is illustrated studying a prototypical example, the H + CH4 → H2 + CH3 reaction. The natural reaction probabilities and the contributions of the different vibrational states of the methyl product to the natural reaction channels are calculated and discussed. The relation between the thermal flux eigenstates and the natural reaction channels is studied in detail.

  13. An analysis of fiber-matrix interface failure stresses for a range of ply stress states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crews, J. H.; Naik, R. A.; Lubowinski, S. J.

    1993-01-01

    A graphite/bismaleimide laminate was prepared without the usual fiber treatment and was tested over a wide range of stress states to measure its ply cracking strength. These tests were conducted using off-axis flexure specimens and produced fiber-matrix interface failure data over a correspondingly wide range of interface stress states. The absence of fiber treatment, weakened the fiber-matrix interfaces and allowed these tests to be conducted at load levels that did not yield the matrix. An elastic micromechanics computer code was used to calculate the fiber-matrix interface stresses at failure. Two different fiber-array models (square and diamond) were used in these calculations to analyze the effects of fiber arrangement as well as stress state on the critical interface stresses at failure. This study showed that both fiber-array models were needed to analyze interface stresses over the range of stress states. A linear equation provided a close fit to these critical stress combinations and, thereby, provided a fiber-matrix interface failure criterion. These results suggest that prediction procedures for laminate ply cracking can be based on micromechanics stress analyses and appropriate fiber-matrix interface failure criteria. However, typical structural laminates may require elastoplastic stress analysis procedures that account for matrix yielding, especially for shear-dominated ply stress states.

  14. Scalar products in GL(3)-based models with trigonometric R-matrix. Determinant representation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slavnov, N. A.

    2015-03-01

    We study quantum integrable GL(3)-based models with a trigonometric R-matrix solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz. We derive a determinant representation for a special case of scalar products of Bethe vectors. This representation allows one to find a determinant formula for the form factor of one of the monodromy matrix entries. We also point out an essential difference between form factors in the models with the trigonometric R-matrix and their analogs in GL(3)-invariant models.

  15. The estimation error covariance matrix for the ideal state reconstructor with measurement noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polites, Michael E.

    1988-01-01

    A general expression is derived for the state estimation error covariance matrix for the Ideal State Reconstructor when the input measurements are corrupted by measurement noise. An example is presented which shows that the more measurements used in estimating the state at a given time, the better the estimator.

  16. Product spectrum matrix feature extraction and recognition of radar deception jamming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Xiao; Tang, Bin; Gui, Guan

    2013-12-01

    A deception jamming recognition algorithm is proposed based on product spectrum matrix (SPM). Firstly, the product spectral in the different pulse repetition interval (PRI) is calculated, and the product spectral of frequency-slow time is arranged into a two-dimensional matrix. Secondly, non-negative matrix factorisation (NMF) is used to extract the features, and further the separability of the characteristic parameters is analysed by the F-Ratio. Finally, the best features are selected to recognise the deception jamming. The experimental results show that the average recognition accuracy of the proposed deception jamming algorithm is higher than 90% when SNR is greater than 6dB.

  17. The local indistinguishability of multipartite product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yan-Ling; Li, Mao-Sheng; Zheng, Zhu-Jun; Fei, Shao-Ming

    2017-01-01

    We study the perfectly local indistinguishability of multipartite product states. Firstly, we follow the method of Zhang et al. (Phys Rev A 93:012314, 2016) to give another more concise set of 2n-1 orthogonal product states in {mathbb {C}}^m⊗ {mathbb {C}}^n (4le mle n) which can not be distinguished by local operations and classical communication. Then we use the three-dimensional cubes to present some product states which give us an intuitive view on how to construct locally indistinguishable product states in tripartite quantum systems. At last, we give an explicit construction of locally indistinguishable orthogonal product states for general multipartite systems.

  18. Local cloning of two product states

    SciTech Connect

    Ji Zhengfeng; Feng Yuan; Ying Mingsheng

    2005-09-15

    Local quantum operations and classical communication (LOCC) put considerable constraints on many quantum information processing tasks such as cloning and discrimination. Surprisingly, however, discrimination of any two pure states survives such constraints in some sense. We show that cloning is not that lucky; namely, probabilistic LOCC cloning of two product states is strictly less efficient than global cloning. We prove our result by giving explicitly the efficiency formula of local cloning of any two product states.

  19. Strain-Induced Localized States Within the Matrix Continuum of Self-Assembled Quantum Dots

    SciTech Connect

    Popescu, V.; Bester, G.; Zunger, A.

    2009-07-01

    Quantum dot-based infrared detectors often involve transitions from confined states of the dot to states above the minimum of the conduction band continuum of the matrix. We discuss the existence of two types of resonant states within this continuum in self-assembled dots: (i) virtual bound states, which characterize square wells even without strain and (ii) strain-induced localized states. The latter emerge due to the appearance of 'potential wings' near the dot, related to the curvature of the dots. While states (i) do couple to the continuum, states (ii) are sheltered by the wings, giving rise to sharp absorption peaks.

  20. How to Compute the Fukui Matrix and Function for Systems with (Quasi-)Degenerate States.

    PubMed

    Bultinck, Patrick; Cardenas, Carlos; Fuentealba, Patricio; Johnson, Paul A; Ayers, Paul W

    2014-01-14

    A system in a spatially (quasi-)degenerate ground state responds in a qualitatively different way to a change in the external potential. Consequently, the usual method for computing the Fukui function, namely, taking the difference between the electron densities of the N- and N ± 1 electron systems, cannot be applied directly. It is shown how the Fukui matrix, and thus also the Fukui function, depends on the nature of the perturbation. One thus needs to use degenerate perturbation theory for the given perturbing potential to generate the density matrix whose change with respect to a change in the number of electrons equals the Fukui matrix. Accounting for the degeneracy in the case of nitrous oxide reveals that an average over the degenerate states differs significantly from using the proper density matrix. We further show the differences in Fukui functions depending on whether a Dirac delta perturbation is used or an interaction with a true point charge (leading to the Fukui potential).

  1. R-matrix with Pseudo-States (RMPS) method: application to CH+ resonances curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madden, Dermot; Tennyson, Jonathan; Zhang, Rui

    2011-07-01

    In a series of calculations on both electron and positron collisions with small molecules the R-Matrix with Pseudo-States (RMPS) method has been found to recover polarisation effects neglected in other close-coupling methods including the standard R-matrix procedure. The molecular R-Matrix and RMPS methods is being applied to determine low-lying resonance states of CH+ as a function of internuclear separation. Initial results are presented for both a standard R-matrix close-coupling model and for an RMPS calculation. Eigenphase sums and resonances below the 3Π threshold are presented for 2Π total symmetry. These resonances are classified by their quantum defects and compared to previous results. Prospects for these and other calculations using the RMPS method are discussed.

  2. Hydrogen peroxide efflux from muscle mitochondria underestimates matrix superoxide production: a correction using glutathione depletion

    PubMed Central

    TREBERG, Jason R.; QUINLAN, Casey L.; BRAND, Martin D.

    2010-01-01

    Summary The production of H2O2 by isolated mitochondria is frequently used as a measure of mitochondrial superoxide formation. Matrix superoxide dismutase quantitatively converts matrix superoxide to H2O2. However, matrix enzymes such as the glutathione peroxidases can consume H2O2 and compete with efflux of H2O2, causing an underestimate of superoxide production. To assess this underestimate we depleted matrix glutathione in rat skeletal muscle mitochondria by more than 90% by pretreatment with 1-chloro-2,4-dintrobenzene (CDNB). The pretreatment protocol strongly diminished the mitochondrial capacity to consume exogenous H2O2, consistent with decreased peroxidase capacity, but avoided direct stimulation of superoxide production from complex I. It elevated the observed rates of H2O2 formation from matrix-directed superoxide up to two-fold from several sites of production, defined by substrates and electron transport inhibitors, over a wide range of control rates, from 0.2 to 2.5 nmol H2O2 • min−1 • mg protein−1. Similar results were obtained when glutathione was depleted using monochlorobimane or when soluble matrix peroxidase activity was removed by preparation of submitochondrial particles. The data indicate that the increased H2O2 efflux observed with CDNB pretreatment was a result of glutathione depletion and compromised peroxidase activity. A hyperbolic correction curve was constructed, making H2O2 efflux a more quantitative measure of matrix superoxide production. For rat muscle mitochondria, the correction equation was: [CDNB pretreated rate = control rate + (1.43*(control rate))/(0.55+control rate)]. These results have significant ramifications for the rates and topology of superoxide production by isolated mitochondria. PMID:20491900

  3. Matrix Production, Pigment Synthesis, and Sporulation in a Marine Isolated Strain of Bacillus pumilus.

    PubMed

    Di Luccia, Blanda; Riccio, Antonio; Vanacore, Adele; Baccigalupi, Loredana; Molinaro, Antonio; Ricca, Ezio

    2015-10-21

    The ability to produce an extracellular matrix and form multicellular communities is an adaptive behavior shared by many bacteria. In Bacillus subtilis, the model system for spore-forming bacteria, matrix production is one of the possible differentiation pathways that a cell can follow when vegetative growth is no longer feasible. While in B. subtilis the genetic system controlling matrix production has been studied in detail, it is still unclear whether other spore formers utilize similar mechanisms. We report that SF214, a pigmented strain of Bacillus pumilus isolated from the marine environment, can produce an extracellular matrix relying on orthologs of many of the genes known to be important for matrix synthesis in B. subtilis. We also report a characterization of the carbohydrates forming the extracellular matrix of strain SF214. The isolation and characterization of mutants altered in matrix synthesis, pigmentation, and spore formation suggest that in strain SF214 the three processes are strictly interconnected and regulated by a common molecular mechanism.

  4. Rich structure in the correlation matrix spectra in non-equilibrium steady states.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Soham; Leyvraz, Francois; Monroy Castillero, Paulino; Seligman, Thomas H

    2017-01-17

    It has been shown that, if a model displays long-range (power-law) spatial correlations, its equal-time correlation matrix will also have a power law tail in the distribution of its high-lying eigenvalues. The purpose of this paper is to show that the converse is generally incorrect: a power-law tail in the high-lying eigenvalues of the correlation matrix may exist even in the absence of equal-time power law correlations in the initial model. We may therefore view the study of the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix as a more powerful tool than the study of spatial Correlations, one which may in fact uncover structure, that would otherwise not be apparent. Specifically, we show that in the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, whereas there are no clearly visible correlations in the steady state, the eigenvalues of its correlation matrix exhibit a rich structure which we describe in detail.

  5. Rich structure in the correlation matrix spectra in non-equilibrium steady states

    PubMed Central

    Biswas, Soham; Leyvraz, Francois; Monroy Castillero, Paulino; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that, if a model displays long-range (power-law) spatial correlations, its equal-time correlation matrix will also have a power law tail in the distribution of its high-lying eigenvalues. The purpose of this paper is to show that the converse is generally incorrect: a power-law tail in the high-lying eigenvalues of the correlation matrix may exist even in the absence of equal-time power law correlations in the initial model. We may therefore view the study of the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix as a more powerful tool than the study of spatial Correlations, one which may in fact uncover structure, that would otherwise not be apparent. Specifically, we show that in the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, whereas there are no clearly visible correlations in the steady state, the eigenvalues of its correlation matrix exhibit a rich structure which we describe in detail. PMID:28094322

  6. Rich structure in the correlation matrix spectra in non-equilibrium steady states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Soham; Leyvraz, Francois; Monroy Castillero, Paulino; Seligman, Thomas H.

    2017-01-01

    It has been shown that, if a model displays long-range (power-law) spatial correlations, its equal-time correlation matrix will also have a power law tail in the distribution of its high-lying eigenvalues. The purpose of this paper is to show that the converse is generally incorrect: a power-law tail in the high-lying eigenvalues of the correlation matrix may exist even in the absence of equal-time power law correlations in the initial model. We may therefore view the study of the eigenvalue distribution of the correlation matrix as a more powerful tool than the study of spatial Correlations, one which may in fact uncover structure, that would otherwise not be apparent. Specifically, we show that in the Totally Asymmetric Simple Exclusion Process, whereas there are no clearly visible correlations in the steady state, the eigenvalues of its correlation matrix exhibit a rich structure which we describe in detail.

  7. Effect of advective flow in fractures and matrix diffusion on natural gas production

    SciTech Connect

    Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Viswanathan, Hari S.; Painter, Scott L.; Hyman, Jeffrey D.

    2015-10-12

    Although hydraulic fracturing has been used for natural gas production for the past couple of decades, there are significant uncertainties about the underlying mechanisms behind the production curves that are seen in the field. A discrete fracture network based reservoir-scale work flow is used to identify the relative effect of flow of gas in fractures and matrix diffusion on the production curve. With realistic three dimensional representations of fracture network geometry and aperture variability, simulated production decline curves qualitatively resemble observed production decline curves. The high initial peak of the production curve is controlled by advective fracture flow of free gas within the network and is sensitive to the fracture aperture variability. Matrix diffusion does not significantly affect the production decline curve in the first few years, but contributes to production after approximately 10 years. These results suggest that the initial flushing of gas-filled background fractures combined with highly heterogeneous flow paths to the production well are sufficient to explain observed initial production decline. Lastly, these results also suggest that matrix diffusion may support reduced production over longer time frames.

  8. Effect of advective flow in fractures and matrix diffusion on natural gas production

    DOE PAGES

    Karra, Satish; Makedonska, Nataliia; Viswanathan, Hari S.; ...

    2015-10-12

    Although hydraulic fracturing has been used for natural gas production for the past couple of decades, there are significant uncertainties about the underlying mechanisms behind the production curves that are seen in the field. A discrete fracture network based reservoir-scale work flow is used to identify the relative effect of flow of gas in fractures and matrix diffusion on the production curve. With realistic three dimensional representations of fracture network geometry and aperture variability, simulated production decline curves qualitatively resemble observed production decline curves. The high initial peak of the production curve is controlled by advective fracture flow of freemore » gas within the network and is sensitive to the fracture aperture variability. Matrix diffusion does not significantly affect the production decline curve in the first few years, but contributes to production after approximately 10 years. These results suggest that the initial flushing of gas-filled background fractures combined with highly heterogeneous flow paths to the production well are sufficient to explain observed initial production decline. Lastly, these results also suggest that matrix diffusion may support reduced production over longer time frames.« less

  9. Nonequilibrium density-matrix description of steady-state quantum transport.

    PubMed

    Dhar, Abhishek; Saito, Keiji; Hänggi, Peter

    2012-01-01

    With this work we investigate the stationary nonequilibrium density matrix of current carrying nonequilibrium steady states of in-between quantum systems that are connected to reservoirs. We describe the analytical procedure to obtain the explicit result for the reduced density matrix of quantum transport when the system, the connecting reservoirs, and the system-reservoir interactions are described by quadratic Hamiltonians. Our procedure is detailed for both electronic transport described by the tight-binding Hamiltonian and for phonon transport described by harmonic Hamiltonians. For the special case of weak system-reservoir couplings, a more detailed description of the steady-state density matrix is obtained. Several paradigm transport setups for interelectrode electron transport and low-dimensional phonon heat flux are elucidated.

  10. Iron Oxidation States of Matrix in Carbonaceous Chondrites Acfer 094 and MIL 07687

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaccaro, E.; King, A. J.; Schofield, P. F.; Abyaneh, M. K.; Kaulich, B.; Russell, S. S.

    2016-08-01

    STXM Fe-oxidation state study in Acfer 094 and MIL 07687 matrix revealed high Fe3+/ΣFe ratios likely to be a primordial signature. Terrestrial weathering cannot be ruled out but is unlikely to have a pervasive effect throughout entire meteorites.

  11. A proteinaceous organic matrix regulates carbonate mineral production in the marine teleost intestine

    PubMed Central

    Schauer, Kevin L.; LeMoine, Christophe M. R.; Pelin, Adrian; Corradi, Nicolas; Warren, Wesley C.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Marine teleost fish produce CaCO3 in their intestine as part of their osmoregulatory strategy. This precipitation is critical for rehydration and survival of the largest vertebrate group on earth, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate this reaction are unknown. Here, we isolate and characterize an organic matrix associated with the intestinal precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta). Toadfish precipitates were purified using two different methods, and the associated organic matrix was extracted. Greater than 150 proteins were identified in the isolated matrix by mass spectrometry and subsequent database searching using an O. beta transcriptomic sequence library produced here. Many of the identified proteins were enriched in the matrix compared to the intestinal fluid, and three showed no substantial homology to any previously characterized protein in the NCBI database. To test the functionality of the isolated matrix, a micro-modified in vitro calcification assay was designed, which revealed that low concentrations of isolated matrix substantially promoted CaCO3 production, where high concentrations showed an inhibitory effect. High concentrations of matrix also decreased the incorporation of magnesium into the forming mineral, potentially providing an explanation for the variability in magnesium content observed in precipitates produced by different fish species. PMID:27694946

  12. A proteinaceous organic matrix regulates carbonate mineral production in the marine teleost intestine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schauer, Kevin L.; Lemoine, Christophe M. R.; Pelin, Adrian; Corradi, Nicolas; Warren, Wesley C.; Grosell, Martin

    2016-10-01

    Marine teleost fish produce CaCO3 in their intestine as part of their osmoregulatory strategy. This precipitation is critical for rehydration and survival of the largest vertebrate group on earth, yet the molecular mechanisms that regulate this reaction are unknown. Here, we isolate and characterize an organic matrix associated with the intestinal precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta). Toadfish precipitates were purified using two different methods, and the associated organic matrix was extracted. Greater than 150 proteins were identified in the isolated matrix by mass spectrometry and subsequent database searching using an O. beta transcriptomic sequence library produced here. Many of the identified proteins were enriched in the matrix compared to the intestinal fluid, and three showed no substantial homology to any previously characterized protein in the NCBI database. To test the functionality of the isolated matrix, a micro-modified in vitro calcification assay was designed, which revealed that low concentrations of isolated matrix substantially promoted CaCO3 production, where high concentrations showed an inhibitory effect. High concentrations of matrix also decreased the incorporation of magnesium into the forming mineral, potentially providing an explanation for the variability in magnesium content observed in precipitates produced by different fish species.

  13. Scalar products in models with a GL(3) trigonometric R-matrix: Highest coefficient

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pakuliak, S. Z.; Ragoucy, E.; Slavnov, N. A.

    2014-03-01

    We study quantum integrable models with a GL (3) trigonometric R-matrix solvable by the nested algebraic Bethe ansatz. Scalar products of Bethe vectors in such models can be expressed in terms of bilinear combinations of the highest coefficients. We show that there exist two different highest coefficients in the models with a GL (3) trigonometric R-matrix. We obtain various representations for the highest coefficients in terms of sums over partitions. We also prove several important properties of the highest coefficients, which are necessary for evaluating the scalar products.

  14. Difficulty of distinguishing product states locally

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Croke, Sarah; Barnett, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Nonlocality without entanglement is a rather counterintuitive phenomenon in which information may be encoded entirely in product (unentangled) states of composite quantum systems in such a way that local measurement of the subsystems is not enough for optimal decoding. For simple examples of pure product states, the gap in performance is known to be rather small when arbitrary local strategies are allowed. Here we restrict to local strategies readily achievable with current technology: those requiring neither a quantum memory nor joint operations. We show that even for measurements on pure product states, there can be a large gap between such strategies and theoretically optimal performance. Thus, even in the absence of entanglement, physically realizable local strategies can be far from optimal for extracting quantum information.

  15. Biotransformation and adsorption of pharmaceutical and personal care products by activated sludge after correcting matrix effects.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yu; Li, Bing; Yu, Ke; Zhang, Tong

    2016-02-15

    This study reported significant suppressive matrix effects in analyses of six pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in activated sludge, sterilized activated sludge and untreated sewage by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Quantitative matrix evaluation on selected PPCPs supplemented the limited quantification data of matrix effects on mass spectrometric determination of PPCPs in complex environment samples. The observed matrix effects were chemical-specific and matrix-dependent, with the most pronounced average effect (-55%) was found on sulfadiazine in sterilized activated sludge. After correcting the matrix effects by post-spiking known amount of PPCPs, the removal mechanisms and biotransformation kinetics of selected PPCPs in activated sludge system were revealed by batch experiment. Experimental data elucidated that the removal of target PPCPs in the activated sludge process was mainly by biotransformation while contributions of adsorption, hydrolysis and volatilization could be neglected. High biotransformation efficiency (52%) was observed on diclofenac while other three compounds (sulfadiazine, sulfamethoxazole and roxithromycin) were partially biotransformed by ~40%. The other two compounds, trimethoprim and carbamazepine, showed recalcitrant to biotransformation of the activated sludge.

  16. Excited-State Geometry Optimization with the Density Matrix Renormalization Group, as Applied to Polyenes.

    PubMed

    Hu, Weifeng; Chan, Garnet Kin-Lic

    2015-07-14

    We describe and extend the formalism of state-specific analytic density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) energy gradients, first used by Liu et al. [J. Chem. Theor. Comput. 2013, 9, 4462]. We introduce a DMRG wave function maximum overlap following technique to facilitate state-specific DMRG excited-state optimization. Using DMRG configuration interaction (DMRG-CI) gradients, we relax the low-lying singlet states of a series of trans-polyenes up to C20H22. Using the relaxed excited-state geometries, as well as correlation functions, we elucidate the exciton, soliton, and bimagnon ("single-fission") character of the excited states, and find evidence for a planar conical intersection.

  17. Iterative solutions to the steady-state density matrix for optomechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nation, P. D.; Johansson, J. R.; Blencowe, M. P.; Rimberg, A. J.

    2015-01-01

    We present a sparse matrix permutation from graph theory that gives stable incomplete lower-upper preconditioners necessary for iterative solutions to the steady-state density matrix for quantum optomechanical systems. This reordering is efficient, adding little overhead to the computation, and results in a marked reduction in both memory and runtime requirements compared to other solution methods, with performance gains increasing with system size. Either of these benchmarks can be tuned via the preconditioner accuracy and solution tolerance. This reordering optimizes the condition number of the approximate inverse and is the only method found to be stable at large Hilbert space dimensions. This allows for steady-state solutions to otherwise intractable quantum optomechanical systems.

  18. Chitosan Enriched Three-Dimensional Matrix Reduces Inflammatory and Catabolic Mediators Production by Human Chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Oprenyeszk, Frederic; Sanchez, Christelle; Dubuc, Jean-Emile; Maquet, Véronique; Henrist, Catherine; Compère, Philippe; Henrotin, Yves

    2015-01-01

    This in vitro study investigated the metabolism of human osteoarthritic (OA) chondrocytes encapsulated in a spherical matrix enriched of chitosan. Human OA chondrocytes were encapsulated and cultured for 28 days either in chitosan-alginate beads or in alginate beads. The beads were formed by slowly passing dropwise either the chitosan 0.6%–alginate 1.2% or the alginate 1.2% solution through a syringe into a 102 mM CaCl2 solution. Beads were analyzed histologically after 28 days. Interleukin (IL)-6 and -8, prostaglandin (PG) E2, matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), hyaluronan and aggrecan were quantified directly in the culture supernatant by specific ELISA and nitric oxide (NO) by using a colorimetric method based on the Griess reaction. Hematoxylin and eosin staining showed that chitosan was homogeneously distributed through the matrix and was in direct contact with chondrocytes. The production of IL-6, IL-8 and MMP-3 by chondrocytes significantly decreased in chitosan-alginate beads compared to alginate beads. PGE2 and NO decreased also significantly but only during the first three days of culture. Hyaluronan and aggrecan production tended to increase in chitosan-alginate beads after 28 days of culture. Chitosan-alginate beads reduced the production of inflammatory and catabolic mediators by OA chondrocytes and tended to stimulate the synthesis of cartilage matrix components. These particular effects indicate that chitosan-alginate beads are an interesting scaffold for chondrocytes encapsulation before transplantation to repair cartilage defects. PMID:26020773

  19. Application of Heisenberg's S matrix program to the angular scattering of the state-to-state F + H2 reaction.

    PubMed

    Shan, Xiao; Connor, J N L

    2014-08-21

    This paper makes two applications of Heisenberg's S matrix program (HSMP) to the differential cross section (DCS) of the benchmark reaction F + H2(vi = 0, ji = 0, mi = 0) → FH(vf = 3, jf = 3, mf = 0) + H, at a relative translational energy of 0.119 eV (total energy, 0.3872 eV), where v, j, m are vibrational, rotational, and helicity quantum numbers, respectively, for the initial and final states. (1) The first application employs a "weak" version of HSMP in which no potential energy surface (PES) is employed. It uses four simple S matrix parametrizations, two of which are piecewise continuous, and two are piecewise discontinuous, developed earlier by X. Shan and J. N. L. Connor (J. Phys. Chem. A 2012, 116, 11414-11426) for the state-to-state H + D2 reaction. We find that the small-angle DCS is reproduced for only θR ≲ 10° when compared with the DCS for a numerical S matrix obtained in a large-scale quantum scattering computation using a PES. Here θR is the reactive scattering angle. (2) In our second application, we ask the question "Can simple modifications to the parametrized S matrix be made in order to extend the agreement to larger angles?" To answer this question, we adopt a "hybrid" version of HSMP, as outlined by Shan and Connor (Phys. Chem. Chem. Phys. 2011, 13, 8392-8406), which indirectly uses PES information. We make simple Gaussian-type modifications to both the modulus and argument of the S matrix. We then obtain agreement between the DCSs for the modified and numerical S matrices up to θR ≲ 70°, a significant improvement compared with θR ≲ 10° for the unmodified parametrizations. We find that modifying the argument but not the modulus, or modifying the modulus but not the argument, fails to extend the agreement to larger angles. A semiclassical analysis is used to prove that the enhanced small-angle scattering for the "modified-modulus-modified-argument" parametrized S matrix is an example of a forward glory.

  20. Production and characterization of para-hydrogen gas for matrix isolation infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundararajan, K.; Sankaran, K.; Ramanathan, N.; Gopi, R.

    2016-08-01

    Normal hydrogen (n-H2) has 3:1 ortho/para ratio and the production of enriched para-hydrogen (p-H2) from normal hydrogen is useful for many applications including matrix isolation experiments. In this paper, we describe the design, development and fabrication of the ortho-para converter that is capable of producing enriched p-H2. The p-H2 thus produced was probed using infrared and Raman techniques. Using infrared measurement, the thickness and the purity of the p-H2 matrix were determined. The purity of p-H2 was determined to be >99%. Matrix isolation infrared spectra of trimethylphosphate (TMP) and acetylene (C2H2) were studied in p-H2 and n-H2 matrices and the results were compared with the conventional inert matrices.

  1. Comparison of optics and electronics for the calculation of matrix-vector products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gary, C. K.

    1992-01-01

    Optical processors are attractive because of their ability to perform massively parallel operations such as matrix vector products. The inherently analog nature of optical calculations requires that optical processors be based on analog computations. While the speed at which such analog operations can be performed as well as the natural parallelism of optical systems are great advantages of optical processors, the analog representation of values severely limits the achievable accuracy. Furthermore, optical processors are limited by the need to convert information to and from the intensity of light. Digitization can be used to increase the accuracy of optical matrix-vector processors, but causes a severe reduction in speed. This paper compares the throughput and power requirements of optical and electronic processors, showing that optical matrix-vector processors can provide a greater number of operations/Watt than conventional electronics.

  2. Measuring external mycelia production of ectomycorrhizal fungi in the field: the soil matrix matters.

    PubMed

    Hendricks, Joseph J; Mitchell, Robert J; Kuehn, Kevin A; Pecot, Stephen D; Sims, Stephanie E

    2006-01-01

    Assessing mycorrhizal fungi production in field settings has been hindered by the inability to measure external mycelia. Recently, external mycelia production was measured in the field using a novel in-growth core technique with acid-washed sand as the in-growth matrix. Here, we tested the assumption that external mycelia production in acid-washed sand is representative of that in native soil. External mycelia production was estimated as the difference in fungal growth between closed (allowing only saprotrophic fungal production) and open (allowing mycorrhizal and saprotrophic fungal production) cores using a factorial design of soil matrices (acid-washed sand vs native) and fertilization treatments (control vs nitrogen (N)) in a longleaf pine (Pinus palustris) plantation. In native soils, the ectomycorrhizal to saprotrophic fungal biomass signal was strong and consistent facilitating the assessment of external mycelia production, which was 300% higher than corresponding rates in acid-washed sand and inversely correlated with soil N. These results demonstrate the efficacy and importance of using native soil as the in-growth matrix to measure ectomycorrhizal fungi external mycelia production in field settings.

  3. Hot-melt co-extrusion for the production of fixed-dose combination products with a controlled release ethylcellulose matrix core.

    PubMed

    Vynckier, A-K; Dierickx, L; Saerens, L; Voorspoels, J; Gonnissen, Y; De Beer, T; Vervaet, C; Remon, J P

    2014-04-10

    In this study, hot-melt co-extrusion was evaluated as a technique for the production of fixed-dose combination products, using ethylcellulose as a core matrix former to control the release of metoprolol tartrate and a polyethylene oxide-based coat formulation to obtain immediate release of hydrochlorothiazide. By lowering the concentration of the hydrophilic additive polyethylene oxide in the plasticized ethylcellulose matrix or by lowering the drug load, the in vitro metoprolol tartrate release from the core was substantially sustained. The in vitro release of hydrochlorothiazide from the polyethylene oxide/polyethylene glycol coat was completed within 45 min for all formulations. Tensile testing of the core/coat mini-matrices revealed an adequate adhesion between the two layers. Raman mapping showed no migration of active substances. Solid state characterization indicated that the crystalline state of metoprolol tartrate was not affected by thermal processing via hot-melt extrusion, while hydrochlorothiazide was amorphous in the coat. These solid state characteristics were confirmed during the stability study. Considering the bioavailability of metoprolol tartrate after oral administration to dogs, the different co-extruded formulations offered a range of sustained release characteristics. Moreover, high metoprolol tartrate plasma concentrations were reached in dogs allowing the administered dose to be halved.

  4. Age-Related Effects of Advanced Glycation End Products (Ages) in Bone Matrix on Osteoclastic Resorption.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiao; Gandhi, Chintan; Rahman, Md Mizanur; Appleford, Mark; Sun, Lian-Wen; Wang, Xiaodu

    2015-12-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) accumulate in bone extracellular matrix as people age. Previous studies have shown controversial results regarding the role of in situ AGEs accumulation in osteoclastic resorption. To address this issue, this study cultured human osteoclast cells directly on human cadaveric bone slices from different age groups (young and elderly) to warrant its relevance to in vivo conditions. The cell culture was terminated on the 3rd, 7th, and 10th day, respectively, to assess temporal changes in the number of differentiated osteoclasts, the number and size of osteoclastic resorption pits, the amount of bone resorbed, as well as the amount of matrix AGEs released in the medium by resorption. In addition, the in situ concentration of matrix AGEs at each resorption pit was also estimated based on its AGEs autofluorescent intensity. The results indicated that (1) osteoclastic resorption activities were significantly correlated with the donor age, showing larger but shallower resorption pits on the elderly bone substrates than on the younger ones; (2) osteoclast resorption activities were not significantly dependent on the in situ AGEs concentration in bone matrix, and (3) a correlation was observed between osteoclast activities and the concentration of AGEs released by the resorption. These results suggest that osteoclasts tend to migrate away from initial anchoring sites on elderly bone substrate during resorption compared to younger bone substrates. However, such behavior is not directly related to the in situ concentration of AGEs in bone matrix at the resorption sites.

  5. Space shuttle guidance, navigation and control equation document no. 4: Precision state and filter weighting matrix extrapolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Robertson, W. M.

    1972-01-01

    The Precision State and Filter Weighting Matrix Extrapolation Routine is described which provides the capability to extrapolate any spacecraft geocentric state vector either backwards or forwards in time through a force field consisting of the earth's primary central-force gravitational attraction and a superimposed perturbing acceleration. The routine also provides the capability of extrapolating the filter-weighting matrix along the precision trajectory. This matrix is a square root form of the error covariance matrix and contains statistical information relative to the accuracies of the state vectors and certain other optionally estimated quantities. The routine is a cooled algorithm for the numerical solution of modified forms of the basic differential equations which are satisfied by the geocentric state vector of the spacecraft's center of mass and by the filter-weighting matrix.

  6. Hydrophobic matrix-free graphene-oxide composites with isotropic and nematic states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wåhlander, Martin; Nilsson, Fritjof; Carlmark, Anna; Gedde, Ulf W.; Edmondson, Steve; Malmström, Eva

    2016-08-01

    We demonstrate a novel route to synthesise hydrophobic matrix-free composites of polymer-grafted graphene oxide (GO) showing isotropic or nematic alignment and shape-memory effects. For the first time, a cationic macroinitiator (MI) has been immobilised on anionic GO and subsequently grafted with hydrophobic polymer grafts. Dense grafts of PBA, PBMA and PMMA with a wide range of average graft lengths (MW: 1-440 kDa) were polymerised by surface-initiated controlled radical precipitation polymerisation from the statistical MI. The surface modification is designed similarly to bimodal graft systems, where the cationic MI generates nanoparticle repulsion, similar to dense short grafts, while the long grafts offer miscibility in non-polar environments and cohesion. The state-of-the-art dispersions of grafted GO were in the isotropic state. Transparent and translucent matrix-free GO-composites could be melt-processed directly using only grafted GO. After processing, birefringence due to nematic alignment of grafted GO was observed as a single giant Maltese cross, 3.4 cm across. Permeability models for composites containing aligned 2D-fillers were developed, which were compared with the experimental oxygen permeability data and found to be consistent with isotropic or nematic states. The storage modulus of the matrix-free GO-composites increased with GO content (50% increase at 0.67 wt%), while the significant increases in the thermal stability (up to 130 °C) and the glass transition temperature (up to 17 °C) were dependent on graft length. The tuneable matrix-free GO-composites with rapid thermo-responsive shape-memory effects are promising candidates for a vast range of applications, especially selective membranes and sensors.We demonstrate a novel route to synthesise hydrophobic matrix-free composites of polymer-grafted graphene oxide (GO) showing isotropic or nematic alignment and shape-memory effects. For the first time, a cationic macroinitiator (MI) has been

  7. Analysis of the Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm Extracellular Matrix by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Ferreira, Jose A. G.; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Clemons, Karl V.; Stevens, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is commonly responsible for lethal fungal infections among immunosuppressed individuals. A. fumigatus forms biofilm communities that are of increasing biomedical interest due to the association of biofilms with chronic infections and their increased resistance to antifungal agents and host immune factors. Understanding the composition of microbial biofilms and the extracellular matrix is important to understanding function and, ultimately, to developing strategies to inhibit biofilm formation. We implemented a solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to define compositional parameters of the A. fumigatus extracellular matrix (ECM) when biofilms are formed in RPMI 1640 nutrient medium. Whole biofilm and isolated matrix networks were also characterized by electron microscopy, and matrix proteins were identified through protein gel analysis. The 13C NMR results defined and quantified the carbon contributions in the insoluble ECM, including carbonyls, aromatic carbons, polysaccharide carbons (anomeric and nonanomerics), aliphatics, etc. Additional 15N and 31P NMR spectra permitted more specific annotation of the carbon pools according to C-N and C-P couplings. Together these data show that the A. fumigatus ECM produced under these growth conditions contains approximately 40% protein, 43% polysaccharide, 3% aromatic-containing components, and up to 14% lipid. These fundamental chemical parameters are needed to consider the relationships between composition and function in the A. fumigatus ECM and will enable future comparisons with other organisms and with A. fumigatus grown under alternate conditions. PMID:26163318

  8. Analysis of the Aspergillus fumigatus Biofilm Extracellular Matrix by Solid-State Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reichhardt, Courtney; Ferreira, Jose A G; Joubert, Lydia-Marie; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A; Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-11-01

    Aspergillus fumigatus is commonly responsible for lethal fungal infections among immunosuppressed individuals. A. fumigatus forms biofilm communities that are of increasing biomedical interest due to the association of biofilms with chronic infections and their increased resistance to antifungal agents and host immune factors. Understanding the composition of microbial biofilms and the extracellular matrix is important to understanding function and, ultimately, to developing strategies to inhibit biofilm formation. We implemented a solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) approach to define compositional parameters of the A. fumigatus extracellular matrix (ECM) when biofilms are formed in RPMI 1640 nutrient medium. Whole biofilm and isolated matrix networks were also characterized by electron microscopy, and matrix proteins were identified through protein gel analysis. The (13)C NMR results defined and quantified the carbon contributions in the insoluble ECM, including carbonyls, aromatic carbons, polysaccharide carbons (anomeric and nonanomerics), aliphatics, etc. Additional (15)N and (31)P NMR spectra permitted more specific annotation of the carbon pools according to C-N and C-P couplings. Together these data show that the A. fumigatus ECM produced under these growth conditions contains approximately 40% protein, 43% polysaccharide, 3% aromatic-containing components, and up to 14% lipid. These fundamental chemical parameters are needed to consider the relationships between composition and function in the A. fumigatus ECM and will enable future comparisons with other organisms and with A. fumigatus grown under alternate conditions.

  9. On the equilibrium state of a small system with random matrix coupling to its environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebowitz, J. L.; Pastur, L.

    2015-07-01

    We consider a random matrix model of interaction between a small n-level system, S, and its environment, a N-level heat reservoir, R. The interaction between S and R is modeled by a tensor product of a fixed n× n matrix and a N× N Hermitian random matrix. We show that under certain ‘macroscopicity’ conditions on R, the reduced density matrix of the system {{ρ }S}=T{{r}R}ρ S\\cup R(eq), is given by ρ S(c)˜ exp \\{-β {{H}S}\\}, where HS is the Hamiltonian of the isolated system. This holds for all strengths of the interaction and thus gives some justification for using ρ S(c) to describe some nano-systems, like biopolymers, in equilibrium with their environment (Seifert 2012 Rep. Prog. Phys. 75 126001). Our results extend those obtained previously in (Lebowitz and Pastur 2004 J. Phys. A: Math. Gen. 37 1517-34) (Lebowitz et al 2007 Contemporary Mathematics (Providence RI: American Mathematical Society) pp 199-218) for a special two-level system.

  10. The spatiotemporal MEG covariance matrix modeled as a sum of Kronecker products.

    PubMed

    Bijma, Fetsje; de Munck, Jan C; Heethaar, Rob M

    2005-08-15

    The single Kronecker product (KP) model for the spatiotemporal covariance of MEG residuals is extended to a sum of Kronecker products. This sum of KP is estimated such that it approximates the spatiotemporal sample covariance best in matrix norm. Contrary to the single KP, this extension allows for describing multiple, independent phenomena in the ongoing background activity. Whereas the single KP model can be interpreted by assuming that background activity is generated by randomly distributed dipoles with certain spatial and temporal characteristics, the sum model can be physiologically interpreted by assuming a composite of such processes. Taking enough terms into account, the spatiotemporal sample covariance matrix can be described exactly by this extended model. In the estimation of the sum of KP model, it appears that the sum of the first 2 KP describes between 67% and 93%. Moreover, these first two terms describe two physiological processes in the background activity: focal, frequency-specific alpha activity, and more widespread non-frequency-specific activity. Furthermore, temporal nonstationarities due to trial-to-trial variations are not clearly visible in the first two terms, and, hence, play only a minor role in the sample covariance matrix in terms of matrix power. Considering the dipole localization, the single KP model appears to describe around 80% of the noise and seems therefore adequate. The emphasis of further improvement of localization accuracy should be on improving the source model rather than the covariance model.

  11. Determination of transition dipole matrix elements for the 266 nm photofragmentation of JKM state-selected CD3I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pipes, Leonard C.; Kim, Dae Young; Brandstater, Nathan; Fuglesang, Christopher D.; Baugh, Delroy

    1995-12-01

    The photofragmentation of rovibrational energy-level and magnetic-state polarized ( overlineX1A 1)CD 3I ∣JKM>≡∣111> was performed at 266 nm. The ∣ NK) rotational energy level distribution and the angular momentum polarization of the vibrationless ( overlineX2A″ 2) CD 3 photofragment were measured by (2+1) REMPI. State-selecting the parent CD 3I allowed the elements of the transition dipole matrix (or T-matrix) to be determined by relating the initial system (CD 3I plus photon) statistical tensors to measured product statistical moments. This is believed to be the first report of the experimental determination of T-matrix elements for a chemical reaction.

  12. LOCC indistinguishable orthogonal product quantum states

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoqian; Tan, Xiaoqing; Weng, Jian; Li, Yongjun

    2016-01-01

    We construct two families of orthogonal product quantum states that cannot be exactly distinguished by local operation and classical communication (LOCC) in the quantum system of 2k+i ⊗ 2l+j (i, j ∈ {0, 1} and i ≥ j ) and 3k+i ⊗ 3l+j (i, j ∈ {0, 1, 2}). And we also give the tiling structure of these two families of quantum product states where the quantum states are unextendible in the first family but are extendible in the second family. Our construction in the quantum system of 3k+i ⊗ 3l+j is more generalized than the other construction such as Wang et al.’s construction and Zhang et al.’s construction, because it contains the quantum system of not only 2k ⊗ 2l and 2k+1 ⊗ 2l but also 2k ⊗ 2l+1 and 2k+1 ⊗ 2l+1. We calculate the non-commutativity to quantify the quantumness of a quantum ensemble for judging the local indistinguishability. We give a general method to judge the indistinguishability of orthogonal product states for our two constructions in this paper. We also extend the dimension of the quantum system of 2k ⊗ 2l in Wang et al.’s paper. Our work is a necessary complement to understand the phenomenon of quantum nonlocality without entanglement. PMID:27377310

  13. Mechanisms of fluid-flow-induced matrix production in bone tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Morris, H L; Reed, C I; Haycock, J W; Reilly, G C

    2010-12-01

    Matrix production by tissue-engineered bone is enhanced when the growing tissue is subjected to mechanical forces and/or fluid flow in bioreactor culture. Cells deposit collagen and mineral, depending upon the mechanical loading that they receive. However, the molecular mechanisms of flow-induced signal transduction in bone are poorly understood. The hyaluronan (HA) glycocalyx has been proposed as a potential mediator of mechanical forces in bone. Using a parallel-plate flow chamber the effects of removal of HA on flow-induced collagen production and NF-kappaB activation in MLO-A5 osteoid osteocytes were investigated. Short periods of fluid flow significantly increased collagen production and induced translocation of the NF-kappaB subunit p65 to the cell's nuclei in 65 per cent of the cell population. Enzymatic removal of the HA coat and antibody blocking of CD44 (a transmembrane protein that binds to HA) eliminated the fluid-flow-induced increase in collagen production but had no effect on the translocation of p65. HA and CD44 appear to play roles in transducing the flow signals that modulate collagen production over long-term culture but not in the short-term flow-induced activation of NF-kappaB, implying that multiple signalling events are initiated from the commencement of flow. Understanding the mechanotransduction events that enable fluid flow to stimulate bone matrix production will allow the optimization of bioreactor design and flow profiles for bone tissue engineering.

  14. A Tensor Product Formulation of Strassen's Matrix Multiplication Algorithm with Memory Reduction

    DOE PAGES

    Kumar, B.; Huang, C. -H.; Sadayappan, P.; ...

    1995-01-01

    In this article, we present a program generation strategy of Strassen's matrix multiplication algorithm using a programming methodology based on tensor product formulas. In this methodology, block recursive programs such as the fast Fourier Transforms and Strassen's matrix multiplication algorithm are expressed as algebraic formulas involving tensor products and other matrix operations. Such formulas can be systematically translated to high-performance parallel/vector codes for various architectures. In this article, we present a nonrecursive implementation of Strassen's algorithm for shared memory vector processors such as the Cray Y-MP. A previous implementation of Strassen's algorithm synthesized from tensor product formulas required workingmore » storage of size O(7 n ) for multiplying 2 n × 2 n matrices. We present a modified formulation in which the working storage requirement is reduced to O(4 n ). The modified formulation exhibits sufficient parallelism for efficient implementation on a shared memory multiprocessor. Performance results on a Cray Y-MP8/64 are presented.« less

  15. A novel honeycomb matrix for cell immobilization to enhance lactic acid production by Rhizopus oryzae.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Yuanliang; Yang, Shang-Tian; Wang, Runguang; Ren, Huiqing

    2010-07-01

    A new support matrix inspired by honeycomb was developed for cell immobilization to control fungal morphology and enhance mass transfer in bioreactor for lactic acid production by Rhizopus oryzae. The immobilization matrix composed of asterisk-shaped fibrous matrices in a honeycomb configuration provided high surface areas for cell attachment and biofilm growth. More than 90% of inoculated spores were adsorbed onto the matrices within 6-8h and after 10h there was no suspended cell in the fermentation broth, indicating a 100% immobilization efficiency. Compared to free-cell fermentation, lactic acid production increased approximately 70% (49.5 g/L vs. 29.3g/L) and fermentation time reduced 33% (48 h vs. 72 h) in shake-flasks with 80 g/L initial glucose. The immobilized-cell fermentation was evaluated for its long-term performance in a bubble-column bioreactor operated in a repeated batch mode for nine cycles in 36 days. The highest lactic acid production was 68.8 g/L, corresponding to a volumetric productivity of 0.72 g/Lh and 93.4% (w/w) lactic acid yield from consumed glucose. The overall yield and productivity were 77.6% and 0.57 g/Lh, respectively. The fermentation can be improved by increasing aeration and mixing in the bubble-column bioreactor.

  16. Rac1 is Required for Matrix Metalloproteinase-13 Production by Chondrocytes in Response to Fibronectin Fragments

    PubMed Central

    Long, David L.; Willey, Jeffrey S.; Loeser, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Objective Matrix fragments, including fibronectin fragments (Fnf), accumulate during the development of osteoarthritis (OA) stimulating chondrocyte matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) production. The objective of this study was to determine the role of the small GTPase Rac1 in chondrocyte signaling stimulated by Fnf that results in MMP-13 production. Methods Normal human cartilage was from tissue donors and OA cartilage from knee arthroplasty specimens. Rac1 activity was modulated with a chemical inhibitor, siRNA knock-down, constitutively active (CA)-Rac or dominant negative (DN)-Rac adenovirus. Cells were treated with Fnf or without known Rac activators, epidermal growth factor (EGF) or transforming growth factorα (TGFα). Rac1 activity was measured with a colorometric activity ELISA, pulldown assay, and immunostaining with a monoclonal antibody against active Rac. Results Chemical inhibition of Rac1, as well as knockdown by siRNA and expression of DN-Rac blocked Fnf stimulated MMP-13 production while expression of CA-Rac increased MMP-13. Inhibition of Rho-associated kinase had no effect. EGF and TGFα, but not Fnf, increased Rac1 activity and promoted the increase in MMP-13 above that stimulated by Fnf alone. Active Rac was detected by immunostaining in OA cartilage. Conclusion Rac1 is required for Fnf induced signaling that results in increased MMP-13 production. EGF receptor ligands, which activate Rac, can promote this effect. The presence of active Rac in OA cartilage and the ability of Rac to stimulate MMP-13 production suggests that it could play a role in the cartilage matrix destruction seen in OA. PMID:23460186

  17. Model Predictive Control of A Matrix-Converter Based Solid State Transformer for Utility Grid Interaction

    SciTech Connect

    Xue, Yaosuo

    2016-01-01

    The matrix converter solid state transformer (MC-SST), formed from the back-to-back connection of two three-to-single-phase matrix converters, is studied for use in the interconnection of two ac grids. The matrix converter topology provides a light weight and low volume single-stage bidirectional ac-ac power conversion without the need for a dc link. Thus, the lifetime limitations of dc-bus storage capacitors are avoided. However, space vector modulation of this type of MC-SST requires to compute vectors for each of the two MCs, which must be carefully coordinated to avoid commutation failure. An additional controller is also required to control power exchange between the two ac grids. In this paper, model predictive control (MPC) is proposed for an MC-SST connecting two different ac power grids. The proposed MPC predicts the circuit variables based on the discrete model of MC-SST system and the cost function is formulated so that the optimal switch vector for the next sample period is selected, thereby generating the required grid currents for the SST. Simulation and experimental studies are carried out to demonstrate the effectiveness and simplicity of the proposed MPC for such MC-SST-based grid interfacing systems.

  18. A matrix product algorithm for stochastic dynamics on locally tree-like graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barthel, Thomas; de Bacco, Caterina; Franz, Silvio

    In this talk, I describe a novel algorithm for the efficient simulation of generic stochastic dynamics of classical degrees of freedom defined on the vertices of locally tree-like graphs. Such models correspond for example to spin-glass systems, Boolean networks, neural networks, or other technological, biological, and social networks. Building upon the cavity method and ideas from quantum many-body theory, the algorithm is based on a matrix product approximation of the so-called edge messages - conditional probabilities of vertex variable trajectories. The matrix product edge messages (MPEM) are constructed recursively. Computation costs and accuracy can be tuned by controlling the matrix dimensions of the MPEM in truncations. In contrast to Monte Carlo simulations, the approach has a better error scaling and works for both, single instances as well as the thermodynamic limit. Due to the absence of cancellation effects, observables with small expectation values can be evaluated accurately, allowing for the study of decay processes and temporal correlations with unprecedented accuracy. The method is demonstrated for the prototypical non-equilibrium Glauber dynamics of an Ising spin system. Reference: arXiv:1508.03295.

  19. Permutationally Invariant Part of a Density Matrix and Nonseparability of N-Qubit States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Ting; Yan, Fengli; van Enk, S. J.

    2014-05-01

    We consider the concept of "the permutationally invariant (PI) part of a density matrix," which has proven very useful for both efficient quantum state estimation and entanglement characterization of N-qubit systems. We show here that the concept is, in fact, basis dependent but that this basis dependence makes it an even more powerful concept than has been appreciated so far. By considering the PI part ρPI of a general (mixed) N-qubit state ρ, we obtain (i) strong bounds on quantitative nonseparability measures, (ii) a whole hierarchy of multipartite separability criteria (one of which entails a sufficient criterion for genuine N-partite entanglement) that can be experimentally determined by just 2N +1 measurement settings, (iii) a definition of an efficiently measurable degree of separability, which can be used for quantifying a novel aspect of decoherence of N qubits, and (iv) an explicit example that shows there are, for increasing N, genuinely N-partite entangled states lying closer and closer to the maximally mixed state. Moreover, we show that if the PI part of a state is k nonseparable, then so is the actual state. We further argue to add as requirement on any multipartite entanglement measure E that it satisfy E(ρ)≥E(ρPI), even though the operation that maps ρ→ρPI is not local.

  20. Facultative control of matrix production optimizes competitive fitness in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 biofilm models.

    PubMed

    Madsen, Jonas S; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Squyres, Georgia R; Price-Whelan, Alexa; de Santiago Torio, Ana; Song, Angela; Cornell, William C; Sørensen, Søren J; Xavier, Joao B; Dietrich, Lars E P

    2015-12-01

    As biofilms grow, resident cells inevitably face the challenge of resource limitation. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, electron acceptor availability affects matrix production and, as a result, biofilm morphogenesis. The secreted matrix polysaccharide Pel is required for pellicle formation and for colony wrinkling, two activities that promote access to O2. We examined the exploitability and evolvability of Pel production at the air-liquid interface (during pellicle formation) and on solid surfaces (during colony formation). Although Pel contributes to the developmental response to electron acceptor limitation in both biofilm formation regimes, we found variation in the exploitability of its production and necessity for competitive fitness between the two systems. The wild type showed a competitive advantage against a non-Pel-producing mutant in pellicles but no advantage in colonies. Adaptation to the pellicle environment selected for mutants with a competitive advantage against the wild type in pellicles but also caused a severe disadvantage in colonies, even in wrinkled colony centers. Evolution in the colony center produced divergent phenotypes, while adaptation to the colony edge produced mutants with clear competitive advantages against the wild type in this O2-replete niche. In general, the structurally heterogeneous colony environment promoted more diversification than the more homogeneous pellicle. These results suggest that the role of Pel in community structure formation in response to electron acceptor limitation is unique to specific biofilm models and that the facultative control of Pel production is required for PA14 to maintain optimum benefit in different types of communities.

  1. Biogas production: current state and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Weiland, Peter

    2010-01-01

    Anaerobic digestion of energy crops, residues, and wastes is of increasing interest in order to reduce the greenhouse gas emissions and to facilitate a sustainable development of energy supply. Production of biogas provides a versatile carrier of renewable energy, as methane can be used for replacement of fossil fuels in both heat and power generation and as a vehicle fuel. For biogas production, various process types are applied which can be classified in wet and dry fermentation systems. Most often applied are wet digester systems using vertical stirred tank digester with different stirrer types dependent on the origin of the feedstock. Biogas is mainly utilized in engine-based combined heat and power plants, whereas microgas turbines and fuel cells are expensive alternatives which need further development work for reducing the costs and increasing their reliability. Gas upgrading and utilization as renewable vehicle fuel or injection into the natural gas grid is of increasing interest because the gas can be used in a more efficient way. The digestate from anaerobic fermentation is a valuable fertilizer due to the increased availability of nitrogen and the better short-term fertilization effect. Anaerobic treatment minimizes the survival of pathogens which is important for using the digested residue as fertilizer. This paper reviews the current state and perspectives of biogas production, including the biochemical parameters and feedstocks which influence the efficiency and reliability of the microbial conversion and gas yield.

  2. Dynamics of extracellular matrix production and turnover in tissue engineered cardiovascular structures.

    PubMed

    Stock, U A; Wiederschain, D; Kilroy, S M; Shum-Tim, D; Khalil, P N; Vacanti, J P; Mayer, J E; Moses, M A

    2001-03-26

    Appropriate matrix formation, turnover and remodeling in tissue-engineered small diameter vascular conduits are crucial requirements for their long-term patency and function. This complex process requires the deposition and accumulation of extracellular matrix molecules as well as the remodeling of this extracellular matrix (ECM) by matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and their endogenous inhibitors (TIMPs). In this study, we have investigated the dynamics of ECM production and the activity of MMPs and TIMPs in long-term tissue-engineered vascular conduits using quantitative ECM analysis, substrate gel electrophoresis, radiometric enzyme assays and Western blot analyses. Over a time period of 169 days in vivo, levels of elastin and proteoglycans/glycosaminoglycans in tissue-engineered constructs came to approximate those of their native tissue counter parts. The kinetics of collagen deposition and remodeling, however, apparently require a much longer time period. Through the use of substrate gel electrophoresis, proteolytic bands whose molecular weight was consistent with their identification as the active form of MMP-2 (approximately 64--66 kDa) were detected in all native and tissue-engineered samples. Additional proteolytic bands migrating at approximately 72 kDa representing the latent form of MMP-2 were detected in tissue-engineered samples at time points from 5 throughout 55 days. Radiometric assays of MMP-1 activity demonstrated no significant differences between the native and tissue-engineered samples. This study determines the dynamics of ECM production and turnover in a long-term tissue-engineered vascular tissue and highlights the importance of ECM remodeling in the development of successful tissue-engineered vascular structures.

  3. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M.-C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J.-F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M.-A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y.-T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.; D0 Collaboration

    2016-08-01

    We present a measurement of the top quark mass in p p ¯ collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1 . The matrix element technique is applied to t t ¯ events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton +jets final state of t t ¯ decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt=173.93 ±1.84 GeV .

  4. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    SciTech Connect

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; Adams, M.; Adams, T.; Agnew, J. P.; Alexeev, G. D.; Alkhazov, G.; Alton, A.; Askew, A.; Atkins, S.; Augsten, K.; Aushev, V.; Aushev, Y.; Avila, C.; Badaud, F.; Bagby, L.; Baldin, B.; Bandurin, D. V.; Banerjee, S.; Barberis, E.; Baringer, P.; Bartlett, J. F.; Bassler, U.; Bazterra, V.; Bean, A.; Begalli, M.; Bellantoni, L.; Beri, S. B.; Bernardi, G.; Bernhard, R.; Bertram, I.; Besançon, M.; Beuselinck, R.; Bhat, P. C.; Bhatia, S.; Bhatnagar, V.; Blazey, G.; Blessing, S.; Bloom, K.; Boehnlein, A.; Boline, D.; Boos, E. E.; Borissov, G.; Borysova, M.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, O.; Brochmann, M.; Brock, R.; Bross, A.; Brown, D.; Bu, X. B.; Buehler, M.; Buescher, V.; Bunichev, V.; Burdin, S.; Buszello, C. P.; Camacho-Pérez, E.; Casey, B. C. K.; Castilla-Valdez, H.; Caughron, S.; Chakrabarti, S.; Chan, K. M.; Chandra, A.; Chapon, E.; Chen, G.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S.; Choudhary, B.; Cihangir, S.; Claes, D.; Clutter, J.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, W. E.; Corcoran, M.; Couderc, F.; Cousinou, M. -C.; Cuth, J.; Cutts, D.; Das, A.; Davies, G.; de Jong, S. J.; De La Cruz-Burelo, E.; Déliot, F.; Demina, R.; Denisov, D.; Denisov, S. P.; Desai, S.; Deterre, C.; DeVaughan, K.; Diehl, H. T.; Diesburg, M.; Ding, P. F.; Dominguez, A.; Dubey, A.; Dudko, L. V.; Duperrin, A.; Dutt, S.; Eads, M.; Edmunds, D.; Ellison, J.; Elvira, V. D.; Enari, Y.; Evans, H.; Evdokimov, A.; Evdokimov, V. N.; Fauré, A.; Feng, L.; Ferbel, T.; Fiedler, F.; Filthaut, F.; Fisher, W.; Fisk, H. E.; Fortner, M.; Fox, H.; Franc, J.; Fuess, S.; Garbincius, P. H.; Garcia-Bellido, A.; García-González, J. A.; Gavrilov, V.; Geng, W.; Gerber, C. E.; Gershtein, Y.; Ginther, G.; Gogota, O.; Golovanov, G.; Grannis, P. D.; Greder, S.; Greenlee, H.; Grenier, G.; Gris, Ph.; Grivaz, J. -F.; Grohsjean, A.; Grünendahl, S.; Grünewald, M. W.; Guillemin, T.; Gutierrez, G.; Gutierrez, P.; Haley, J.; Han, L.; Harder, K.; Harel, A.; Hauptman, J. M.; Hays, J.; Head, T.; Hebbeker, T.; Hedin, D.; Hegab, H.; Heinson, A. P.; Heintz, U.; Hensel, C.; Heredia-De La Cruz, I.; Herner, K.; Hesketh, G.; Hildreth, M. D.; Hirosky, R.; Hoang, T.; Hobbs, J. D.; Hoeneisen, B.; Hogan, J.; Hohlfeld, M.; Holzbauer, J. L.; Howley, I.; Hubacek, Z.; Hynek, V.; Iashvili, I.; Ilchenko, Y.; Illingworth, R.; Ito, A. S.; Jabeen, S.; Jaffré, M.; Jayasinghe, A.; Jeong, M. S.; Jesik, R.; Jiang, P.; Johns, K.; Johnson, E.; Johnson, M.; Jonckheere, A.; Jonsson, P.; Joshi, J.; Jung, A. W.; Juste, A.; Kajfasz, E.; Karmanov, D.; Katsanos, I.; Kaur, M.; Kehoe, R.; Kermiche, S.; Khalatyan, N.; Khanov, A.; Kharchilava, A.; Kharzheev, Y. N.; Kiselevich, I.; Kohli, J. M.; Kozelov, A. V.; Kraus, J.; Kumar, A.; Kupco, A.; Kurča, T.; Kuzmin, V. A.; Lammers, S.; Lebrun, P.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, S. W.; Lee, W. M.; Lei, X.; Lellouch, J.; Li, D.; Li, H.; Li, L.; Li, Q. Z.; Lim, J. K.; Lincoln, D.; Linnemann, J.; Lipaev, V. V.; Lipton, R.; Liu, H.; Liu, Y.; Lobodenko, A.; Lokajicek, M.; Lopes de Sa, R.; Luna-Garcia, R.; Lyon, A. L.; Maciel, A. K. A.; Madar, R.; Magaña-Villalba, R.; Malik, S.; Malyshev, V. L.; Mansour, J.; Martínez-Ortega, J.; McCarthy, R.; McGivern, C. L.; Meijer, M. M.; Melnitchouk, A.; Menezes, D.; Mercadante, P. G.; Merkin, M.; Meyer, A.; Meyer, J.; Miconi, F.; Mondal, N. K.; Mulhearn, M.; Nagy, E.; Narain, M.; Nayyar, R.; Neal, H. A.; Negret, J. P.; Neustroev, P.; Nguyen, H. T.; Nunnemann, T.; Orduna, J.; Osman, N.; Pal, A.; Parashar, N.; Parihar, V.; Park, S. K.; Partridge, R.; Parua, N.; Patwa, A.; Penning, B.; Perfilov, M.; Peters, Y.; Petridis, K.; Petrillo, G.; Pétroff, P.; Pleier, M. -A.; Podstavkov, V. M.; Popov, A. V.; Prewitt, M.; Price, D.; Prokopenko, N.; Qian, J.; Quadt, A.; Quinn, B.; Ratoff, P. N.; Razumov, I.; Ripp-Baudot, I.; Rizatdinova, F.; Rominsky, M.; Ross, A.; Royon, C.; Rubinov, P.; Ruchti, R.; Sajot, G.; Sánchez-Hernández, A.; Sanders, M. P.; Santos, A. S.; Savage, G.; Savitskyi, M.; Sawyer, L.; Scanlon, T.; Schamberger, R. D.; Scheglov, Y.; Schellman, H.; Schott, M.; Schwanenberger, C.; Schwienhorst, R.; Sekaric, J.; Severini, H.; Shabalina, E.; Shary, V.; Shaw, S.; Shchukin, A. A.; Simak, V.; Skubic, P.; Slattery, P.; Snow, G. R.; Snow, J.; Snyder, S.; Söldner-Rembold, S.; Sonnenschein, L.; Soustruznik, K.; Stark, J.; Stefaniuk, N.; Stoyanova, D. A.; Strauss, M.; Suter, L.; Svoisky, P.; Titov, M.; Tokmenin, V. V.; Tsai, Y. -T.; Tsybychev, D.; Tuchming, B.; Tully, C.; Uvarov, L.; Uvarov, S.; Uzunyan, S.; Van Kooten, R.; van Leeuwen, W. M.; Varelas, N.; Varnes, E. W.; Vasilyev, I. A.; Verkheev, A. Y.; Vertogradov, L. S.; Verzocchi, M.; Vesterinen, M.; Vilanova, D.; Vokac, P.; Wahl, H. D.; Wang, M. H. L. S.; Warchol, J.; Watts, G.; Wayne, M.; Weichert, J.; Welty-Rieger, L.; Williams, M. R. J.; Wilson, G. W.; Wobisch, M.; Wood, D. R.; Wyatt, T. R.; Xie, Y.; Yamada, R.; Yang, S.; Yasuda, T.; Yatsunenko, Y. A.; Ye, W.; Ye, Z.; Yin, H.; Yip, K.; Youn, S. W.; Yu, J. M.; Zennamo, J.; Zhao, T. G.; Zhou, B.; Zhu, J.; Zielinski, M.; Zieminska, D.; Zivkovic, L.

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain a top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.

  5. Measurement of the top quark mass using the matrix element technique in dilepton final states

    DOE PAGES

    Abazov, V. M.; Abbott, B.; Acharya, B. S.; ...

    2016-08-18

    Here, we present a measurement of the top quark mass in pp collisions at a center-of-mass energy of 1.96 TeV at the Fermilab Tevatron collider. The data were collected by the D0 experiment corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 9.7 fb-1. The matrix element technique is applied to tt events in the final state containing leptons (electrons or muons) with high transverse momenta and at least two jets. The calibration of the jet energy scale determined in the lepton+jets final state of tt decays is applied to jet energies. This correction provides a substantial reduction in systematic uncertainties. We obtain amore » top quark mass of mt = 173.93±1.84 GeV.« less

  6. SAMQUA — Quantum Numbers of Compound Nuclear States for R-Matrix Analyses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouland, Olivier; Larson, Nancy M.; Babut, Richard

    2005-05-01

    This paper reports the results of a collaborative effort between CEA of France and the DOE of the United States (in particular between le Laboratoire d'Etudes de Physique de Cadarache and the Nuclear Data Group at Oak Ridge National Laboratory): In preparing input for analyses of differential nuclear data using multilevel multi-channel R-matrix theory, a sometimes daunting and often error-prone task is the generation of quantum-number information for all channels for each compound nuclear state (i.e., for each "spin group," defined by quantum numbers Jπ). For many years, the code SAMQUA has been available to users of the R-matrix code SAMMY to assist in preparation of that input; the original SAMQUA code, however, was limited to single-channel spin group information. In this paper, an improved version of the SAMQUA code is described. The new SAMQUA permits inclusion of all open reaction channels in the low-energy interaction between one particle (neutron or charged particle) and a nuclear target, and considerably simplifies the determination of the quantum numbers needed for the definition of the reaction channels. SAMQUA, in addition to its primary function of preparing quantum numbers for the SAMMY input file, also provides the possibility to visualize immediately all open reaction channels. This paper gives two examples of the use of SAMQUA, with emphasis on the notions of reaction channels and penetrability.

  7. Modified Matrix Method for Calculating Steady-State Span Loading on Flexible Wings in Subsonic Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gainer, Patrick A.; Aiken, William S., Jr.

    1959-01-01

    A method is presented for shortening the computations required to determine the steady-state span loading on flexible wings in subsonic flight. The method makes use of tables of downwash factors to find the necessary aerodynamic-influence coefficients for the application of lifting-line theory. Explicit matrix equations of equilibrium are converted into a matrix power series with a finite number of terms by utilizing certain characteristic properties of matrices. The number of terms in the series is determined by a trial-and-error process dependent upon the required accuracy of the solution. Spanwise distributions of angle of attack, airload, shear, bending moment, and pitching moment are readily obtained as functions of qm(sub R) where q denotes the dynamic pressure and mR denotes the lift-curve slope of a rigid wing. This method is intended primarily to make it practical to solve steady-state aeroelastic problems on the ordinary manually operated desk calculators, but the method is also readily adaptable to automatic computing equipment.

  8. Isolation and identification of oxidation products of syringol from brines and heated meat matrix.

    PubMed

    Bölicke, Sarah-Maria; Ternes, Waldemar

    2016-08-01

    In this study we developed new extraction and detection methods (using HPLC-UV and LC-MS), making it possible to analyze the smoke phenol syringol and its oxidation products nitrososyringol, nitrosyringol, and the syringol dimer 3,3',5,5'-tetramethoxy-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diol, which were identified in heated meat for the first time. Preliminary brine experiments performed with different concentrations of ascorbic acid showed that high amounts of this antioxidant also resulted in almost complete degradation of syringol and to formation of the oxidation products when the brines were heated at low pH values. Heat treatment (80°C) and subsequent simulated digestion applied to meat samples containing syringol, ascorbic acid and different concentrations of sodium nitrite produced 3,3',5,5'-tetramethoxy-1,1'-biphenyl-4,4'-diol even at a low nitrite level in the meat matrix, while nitroso- and nitrosyringol were isolated only after the digestion experiments. Increasing amounts of oxygen in the meat matrix decreased the syringol concentration and enhanced the formation of the reaction products in comparison to the samples without added oxygen.

  9. Continuous ozonation treatment of ofloxacin: transformation products, water matrix effect and aquatic toxicity.

    PubMed

    Carbajo, Jose B; Petre, Alice L; Rosal, Roberto; Herrera, Sonia; Letón, Pedro; García-Calvo, Eloy; Fernández-Alba, Amadeo R; Perdigón-Melón, Jose A

    2015-07-15

    The continuous ozonation of the antibiotic ofloxacin (OFX) has been performed using a synthetic water matrix and in a sewage treatment plant (STP) effluent. The aim was to study the effect of the water matrix on the ozonation with particular emphasis on the aquatic toxicity of treated water. OFX was completely removed in both water matrices, although the amount of ozone consumed for its depletion was strongly matrix-dependent. The extent of mineralization was limited and a number of intermediate transformation products (TPs) appeared, twelve of which could be identified. OFX reaction pathway includes the degradation of piperazinyl and quinolone moieties. The further oxidation of TPs gave rise to the formation and accumulation of carboxylic acids, aldehydes, nitrogen-containing organic compounds and inorganic ions. Aquatic toxicity of treated mixtures was assessed using four standard species: the bacteria Vibrio fischeri and Pseudomonas putida as target organisms and the algae Pseudokirchneriella subcapitata and the protozoan Tetrahymena thermophila as non-target organisms. OFX was toxic for the bacteria and the microalgae at the spiked concentration in untreated water. However, the continuous ozonation at the upper operational limit removed its toxic effects. T. thermophila was not affected by OFX, but was sensitive to STP effluent.

  10. Osteofibrous dysplasia and adamantinoma: correlation of proto-oncogene product and matrix protein expression.

    PubMed

    Maki, Masahiiko; Athanasou, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between osteofibrous dysplasia (OFD) and adamantinoma, we analyzed the expression of several proto-oncogene products and extracellular matrix proteins by immunohistochemistry and correlated our results with histological and ultrastructural findings. C-fos and c-jun, but not c-Met, were observed in OFD and in the fibrous and epithelial components of differentiated and classical adamantinomas. Staining for collagen IV, laminin and galectin-3, a laminin binding protein was seen in OFD and around cell nests in adamantinoma. E-, P-, and N-cadherin expression was found in all cases of classical adamantinoma, but not in differentiated adamantinoma or OFD. Osteonectin was detected in both the epithelial and fibrous components of adamantinomas, but osteopontin and osteocalcin were not seen in classical adamantinomas. The results show common expression of a number of oncoproteins and bone matrix proteins in adamantinoma and OFD, some of which are associated with mesenchymal-to-epithelial cell transformation. These findings would be in keeping with the hypothesis that OFD represents a precursor lesion of adamantinoma. Differential expression of a number of bone matrix protein in adamantinoma may also be of diagnostic use in distinguishing these 2 lesions immunohistochemically.

  11. 19 CFR 145.35 - United States products returned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false United States products returned. 145.35 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MAIL IMPORTATIONS Special Classes of Merchandise § 145.35 United States products returned. Products of the United States returned after having been exported, which have not...

  12. 19 CFR 145.35 - United States products returned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false United States products returned. 145.35 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MAIL IMPORTATIONS Special Classes of Merchandise § 145.35 United States products returned. Products of the United States returned after having been exported, which have not...

  13. 19 CFR 145.35 - United States products returned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false United States products returned. 145.35 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MAIL IMPORTATIONS Special Classes of Merchandise § 145.35 United States products returned. Products of the United States returned after having been exported, which have not...

  14. 19 CFR 145.35 - United States products returned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false United States products returned. 145.35 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MAIL IMPORTATIONS Special Classes of Merchandise § 145.35 United States products returned. Products of the United States returned after having been exported, which have not...

  15. 19 CFR 145.35 - United States products returned.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false United States products returned. 145.35 Section... OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MAIL IMPORTATIONS Special Classes of Merchandise § 145.35 United States products returned. Products of the United States returned after having been exported, which have not...

  16. Vibrio cholerae VpsT Regulates Matrix Production and Motility by Directly Sensing Cyclic di-GMP

    SciTech Connect

    Krasteva, P.; Fong, J; Shikuma, N; Beyhan, S; Navarro, M; Yildiz, F; Sondermann, H

    2010-01-01

    Microorganisms can switch from a planktonic, free-swimming life-style to a sessile, colonial state, called a biofilm, which confers resistance to environmental stress. Conversion between the motile and biofilm life-styles has been attributed to increased levels of the prokaryotic second messenger cyclic di-guanosine monophosphate (c-di-GMP), yet the signaling mechanisms mediating such a global switch are poorly understood. Here we show that the transcriptional regulator VpsT from Vibrio cholerae directly senses c-di-GMP to inversely control extracellular matrix production and motility, which identifies VpsT as a master regulator for biofilm formation. Rather than being regulated by phosphorylation, VpsT undergoes a change in oligomerization on c-di-GMP binding.

  17. Coordination of swarming motility, biosurfactant synthesis, and biofilm matrix exopolysaccharide production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shiwei; Yu, Shan; Zhang, Zhenyin; Wei, Qing; Yan, Lu; Ai, Guomin; Liu, Hongsheng; Ma, Luyan Z

    2014-11-01

    Biofilm formation is a complex process in which many factors are involved. Bacterial swarming motility and exopolysaccharides both contribute to biofilm formation, yet it is unclear how bacteria coordinate swarming motility and exopolysaccharide production. Psl and Pel are two key biofilm matrix exopolysaccharides in Pseudomonas aeruginosa. This opportunistic pathogen has three types of motility, swimming, twitching, and swarming. In this study, we found that elevated Psl and/or Pel production reduced the swarming motility of P. aeruginosa but had little effect on swimming and twitching. The reduction was due to decreased rhamnolipid production with no relation to the transcription of rhlAB, two key genes involved in the biosynthesis of rhamnolipids. Rhamnolipid-negative rhlR and rhlAB mutants synthesized more Psl, whereas exopolysaccharide-deficient strains exhibited a hyperswarming phenotype. These results suggest that competition for common sugar precursors catalyzed by AlgC could be a tactic for P. aeruginosa to balance the synthesis of exopolysaccharides and rhamnolipids and to control bacterial motility and biofilm formation inversely because the biosynthesis of rhamnolipids, Psl, and Pel requires AlgC to provide the sugar precursors and an additional algC gene enhances the biosynthesis of Psl and rhamnolipids. In addition, our data indicate that the increase in RhlI/RhlR expression attenuated Psl production. This implied that the quorum-sensing signals could regulate exopolysaccharide biosynthesis indirectly in bacterial communities. In summary, this study represents a mechanism that bacteria utilize to coordinate swarming motility, biosurfactant synthesis, and biofilm matrix exopolysaccharide production, which is critical for biofilm formation and bacterial survival in the environment.

  18. One plus two-body random matrix ensembles with parity: Density of states and parity ratios

    SciTech Connect

    Vyas, Manan; Srivastava, P. C.; Kota, V. K. B.

    2011-06-15

    One plus two-body embedded Gaussian orthogonal ensemble of random matrices with parity [EGOE(1+2)-{pi}] generated by a random two-body interaction (modeled by GOE in two-particle spaces) in the presence of a mean field for spinless identical fermion systems is defined, generalizing the two-body ensemble with parity analyzed by Papenbrock and Weidenmueller [Phys. Rev. C 78, 054305 (2008)], in terms of two mixing parameters and a gap between the positive ({pi}=+) and negative ({pi}=-) parity single-particle (sp) states. Numerical calculations are used to demonstrate, using realistic values of the mixing parameters appropriate for some nuclei, that the EGOE(1+2)-{pi} ensemble generates Gaussian form (with corrections) for fixed parity eigenvalue densities (i.e., state densities). The random matrix model also generates many features in parity ratios of state densities that are similar to those predicted by a method based on the Fermi-gas model for nuclei. We have also obtained, by applying the formulation due to Chang et al. [Ann. Phys. (NY) 66, 137 (1971)], a simple formula for the spectral variances defined over fixed-(m{sub 1},m{sub 2}) spaces, where m{sub 1} is the number of fermions in the positive parity sp states and m{sub 2} is the number of fermions in the negative parity sp states. Similarly, using the binary correlation approximation, in the dilute limit, we have derived expressions for the lowest two-shape parameters. The smoothed densities generated by the sum of fixed-(m{sub 1},m{sub 2}) Gaussians with lowest two-shape corrections describe the numerical results in many situations. The model also generates preponderance of positive parity ground states for small values of the mixing parameters, and this is a feature seen in nuclear shell-model results.

  19. Measurement of single top quark production at D0 using a matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Mitrevski, Jovan Pavle

    2007-01-01

    Until now, the top quark has only been observed produced in pairs, by the strong force. According to the standard model, it can also be produced singly, via an electroweak interaction. Top quarks produced this way provide powerful ways to test the charged-current electroweak interactions of the top quark, to measure |Vtb|, and to search for physics beyond the standard model. This thesis describes the application of the matrix element analysis technique to the search for single top quark production with the D0 detector using 0.9 fb-1 of Run II data. From a comparison of the matrix element discriminants between data and the background model, assuming a Standard Model s-channel to t-channel cross section ratio of σst = 0.44, we measure the single top quark production cross section: σ(p$\\bar{p}$ → tb + X, tqb + X) = 4.8$-1.4\\atop{+1.6}$ pb. This result has a p-value of 0.08%, corresponding to a 3.2 standard deviation Gaussian equivalent significance.

  20. Improving matrix-vector product performance and multi-level preconditioning for the parallel PCG package

    SciTech Connect

    McLay, R.T.; Carey, G.F.

    1996-12-31

    In this study we consider parallel solution of sparse linear systems arising from discretized PDE`s. As part of our continuing work on our parallel PCG Solver package, we have made improvements in two areas. The first is improving the performance of the matrix-vector product. Here on regular finite-difference grids, we are able to use the cache memory more efficiently for smaller domains or where there are multiple degrees of freedom. The second problem of interest in the present work is the construction of preconditioners in the context of the parallel PCG solver we are developing. Here the problem is partitioned over a set of processors subdomains and the matrix-vector product for PCG is carried out in parallel for overlapping grid subblocks. For problems of scaled speedup, the actual rate of convergence of the unpreconditioned system deteriorates as the mesh is refined. Multigrid and subdomain strategies provide a logical approach to resolving the problem. We consider the parallel trade-offs between communication and computation and provide a complexity analysis of a representative algorithm. Some preliminary calculations using the parallel package and comparisons with other preconditioners are provided together with parallel performance results.

  1. The enamel matrix derivative (Emdogain) enhances human tongue carcinoma cells gelatinase production, migration and metastasis formation.

    PubMed

    Laaksonen, Matti; Suojanen, Juho; Nurmenniemi, Sini; Läärä, Esa; Sorsa, Timo; Salo, Tuula

    2008-08-01

    Enamel matrix derivative Emdogain (EMD) is widely used in periodontal treatment to regenerate lost connective tissue and to improve the attachment of the teeth. Gelatinases (MMP-2 and -9) have an essential role in the promotion and progression of oral cancer growth and metastasis formation. We studied the effects of EMD on human tongue squamous cell carcinoma (HSC-3) cells in vitro and in vivo. In vitro, EMD (100 microg/ml and 200 microg/ml) remarkably induced the MMP-2 and -9 production from HSC-3 cells analysed by zymography and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. EMD also slightly induced the MMP-2 and -9 production from benign human mucosal keratinocytes (HMK). Furthermore, EMD clearly induced the transmigration of HSC-3 cells but had no effect on the HMK migration in transwell assays. The in vitro wound closure of HSC-3 cells was notably accelerated by EMD, whereas it had only minor effect on the wound closure of HMKs. The migration of both cell lines was inhibited by a selective cyclic anti-gelatinolytic peptide CTT-2. EMD had no effect on HSC-3 cell proliferation or apoptosis and only a limited effect on cell attachment to various extracellular matrix components. The in vivo mice experiment revealed that EMD substantially induced HSC-3 xenograft metastasis formation. Our results suggest that the use of EMD for patients with oral mucosal carcinomas or premalignant lesions should be carefully considered, possibly avoided.

  2. Facultative Control of Matrix Production Optimizes Competitive Fitness in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 Biofilm Models

    PubMed Central

    Madsen, Jonas S.; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Squyres, Georgia R.; Price-Whelan, Alexa; de Santiago Torio, Ana; Song, Angela; Cornell, William C.; Sørensen, Søren J.

    2015-01-01

    As biofilms grow, resident cells inevitably face the challenge of resource limitation. In the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14, electron acceptor availability affects matrix production and, as a result, biofilm morphogenesis. The secreted matrix polysaccharide Pel is required for pellicle formation and for colony wrinkling, two activities that promote access to O2. We examined the exploitability and evolvability of Pel production at the air-liquid interface (during pellicle formation) and on solid surfaces (during colony formation). Although Pel contributes to the developmental response to electron acceptor limitation in both biofilm formation regimes, we found variation in the exploitability of its production and necessity for competitive fitness between the two systems. The wild type showed a competitive advantage against a non-Pel-producing mutant in pellicles but no advantage in colonies. Adaptation to the pellicle environment selected for mutants with a competitive advantage against the wild type in pellicles but also caused a severe disadvantage in colonies, even in wrinkled colony centers. Evolution in the colony center produced divergent phenotypes, while adaptation to the colony edge produced mutants with clear competitive advantages against the wild type in this O2-replete niche. In general, the structurally heterogeneous colony environment promoted more diversification than the more homogeneous pellicle. These results suggest that the role of Pel in community structure formation in response to electron acceptor limitation is unique to specific biofilm models and that the facultative control of Pel production is required for PA14 to maintain optimum benefit in different types of communities. PMID:26431965

  3. Matrix Metalloproteinase Inhibition by Heterotrimeric Triple-Helical Peptide Transition State Analogs

    PubMed Central

    Bhowmick, Manishabrata; Stawikowska, Roma; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Fields, Gregg B.

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) have been implicated in numerous pathologies. An overall lack of selectivity has rendered active site targeted MMP inhibitors problematic. The present study describes MMP inhibitors that function by binding both secondary binding sites (exosites) and the active site. Heterotrimeric triple-helical peptide transition-state analog inhibitors (THPIs) were assembled utilizing click chemistry. Three different heterotrimers were constructed, allowing for the inhibitory phosphinate moiety to be present uniquely in the leading, middle, or trailing strand of the triple-helix. All heterotrimeric constructs had sufficient thermally stability to warrant analysis as inhibitors. The heterotrimeric THPIs were effective against MMP-13 and MT1-MMP, with Ki spanning 100–400 nM. Unlike homotrimeric THPIs, the heterotrimeric THPIs offered complete selectivity between MT1-MMP and MMP-1. Exosite-based approaches are providing inhibitors with desired MMP selectivities. PMID:25766890

  4. Symmetry-conserving purification of quantum states within the density matrix renormalization group

    DOE PAGES

    Nocera, Alberto; Alvarez, Gonzalo

    2016-01-28

    The density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm was originally designed to efficiently compute the zero-temperature or ground-state properties of one-dimensional strongly correlated quantum systems. The development of the algorithm at finite temperature has been a topic of much interest, because of the usefulness of thermodynamics quantities in understanding the physics of condensed matter systems, and because of the increased complexity associated with efficiently computing temperature-dependent properties. The ancilla method is a DMRG technique that enables the computation of these thermodynamic quantities. In this paper, we review the ancilla method, and improve its performance by working on reduced Hilbert spaces andmore » using canonical approaches. Furthermore we explore its applicability beyond spins systems to t-J and Hubbard models.« less

  5. Symmetry-conserving purification of quantum states within the density matrix renormalization group

    SciTech Connect

    Nocera, Alberto; Alvarez, Gonzalo

    2016-01-28

    The density matrix renormalization group (DMRG) algorithm was originally designed to efficiently compute the zero-temperature or ground-state properties of one-dimensional strongly correlated quantum systems. The development of the algorithm at finite temperature has been a topic of much interest, because of the usefulness of thermodynamics quantities in understanding the physics of condensed matter systems, and because of the increased complexity associated with efficiently computing temperature-dependent properties. The ancilla method is a DMRG technique that enables the computation of these thermodynamic quantities. In this paper, we review the ancilla method, and improve its performance by working on reduced Hilbert spaces and using canonical approaches. Furthermore we explore its applicability beyond spins systems to t-J and Hubbard models.

  6. Excited-state dynamics and nonlinear optical response of Ge nanocrystals embedded in silica matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razzari, Luca; Gnoli, Andrea; Righini, Marcofabio; Dâna, Aykutlu; Aydinli, Atilla

    2006-05-01

    We use a dedicated Z-scan setup, arranged to account for cumulative effects, to study the nonlinear optical response of Ge nanocrystals embedded in silica matrix. Samples are prepared with plasma-enchanced chemical-vapor deposition and post-thermal annealing. We measure a third-order nonlinear refraction coefficient of γ =1×10-16m2/W. The nonlinear absorption shows an intensity-independent coefficient of β =4×10-10m/W related to fast processes. In addition, we measure a second β component around 10-9m /W with a relaxation time of 300μs that rises linearly with the laser intensity. We associate its origin to the absorption of excited carriers from a surface-defect state with a long depopulation time.

  7. Ultra-thin Solid-State Li-Ion Electrolyte Membrane Facilitated by a Self-Healing Polymer Matrix.

    PubMed

    Whiteley, Justin M; Taynton, Philip; Zhang, Wei; Lee, Se-Hee

    2015-11-18

    Thin solid membranes are formed by a new strategy, whereby an in situ derived self-healing polymer matrix that penetrates the void space of an inorganic solid is created. The concept is applied as a separator in an all-solid-state battery with an FeS2 -based cathode and achieves tremendous performance for over 200 cycles. Processing in dry conditions represents a paradigm shift for incorporating high active-material mass loadings into mixed-matrix membranes.

  8. Replacement of animal-derived collagen matrix by human fibroblast-derived dermal matrix for human skin equivalent products.

    PubMed

    El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Commandeur, Suzan; Rietveld, Marion H; Mulder, Aat A; Willemze, Rein

    2009-01-01

    Reconstructed human skin equivalents (HSEs) are representative models of human skin and widely used for research purposes and clinical applications. Traditional methods to generate HSEs are based on the seeding of human keratinocytes onto three-dimensional human fibroblast-populated non-human collagen matrices. Current HSEs have a limited lifespan of approximately 8 weeks, rendering them unsuitable for long-term studies. Here we present a new generation of HSEs being fully composed of human components and which can be cultured up to 20 weeks. This model is generated on a primary human fibroblast-derived dermal matrix. Pro-collagen type I secretion by human fibroblasts stabilized during long-term culture, providing a continuous and functional human dermal matrix. In contrast to rat-tail collagen-based HSEs, the present fibroblast-derived matrix-based HSEs contain more continuity in the number of viable cell layers in long-term cultures. In addition, these new skin models exhibit normal differentiation and proliferation, based on expression of K10/K15, and K16/K17, respectively. Detection of collagen types IV and VII and laminin 332 was confined to the epidermal-dermal junction, as in native skin. The presence of hemidesmosomes and anchoring fibrils was demonstrated by electron microscopy. Finally, we show that the presented HSE contained a higher concentration of the normal moisturizing factor compared to rat-tail collagen-based skin models, providing a further representation of functional normal human skin in vitro. This study, therefore, demonstrates the role of the dermal microenvironment on epidermal regeneration and lifespan in vitro.

  9. Measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton final state using the matrix element method

    SciTech Connect

    Grohsjean, Alexander

    2008-12-15

    The top quark, discovered in 1995 by the CDF and D0 experiments at the Fermilab Tevatron Collider, is the heaviest known fundamental particle. The precise knowledge of its mass yields important constraints on the mass of the yet-unobserved Higgs boson and allows to probe for physics beyond the Standard Model. The first measurement of the top quark mass in the dilepton channel with the Matrix Element method at the D0 experiment is presented. After a short description of the experimental environment and the reconstruction chain from hits in the detector to physical objects, a detailed review of the Matrix Element method is given. The Matrix Element method is based on the likelihood to observe a given event under the assumption of the quantity to be measured, e.g. the mass of the top quark. The method has undergone significant modifications and improvements compared to previous measurements in the lepton+jets channel: the two undetected neutrinos require a new reconstruction scheme for the four-momenta of the final state particles, the small event sample demands the modeling of additional jets in the signal likelihood, and a new likelihood is designed to account for the main source of background containing tauonic Z decay. The Matrix Element method is validated on Monte Carlo simulated events at the generator level. For the measurement, calibration curves are derived from events that are run through the full D0 detector simulation. The analysis makes use of the Run II data set recorded between April 2002 and May 2008 corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 2.8 fb-1. A total of 107 t$\\bar{t}$ candidate events with one electron and one muon in the final state are selected. Applying the Matrix Element method to this data set, the top quark mass is measured to be mtopRun IIa = 170.6 ± 6.1(stat.)-1.5+2.1(syst.)GeV; mtopRun IIb = 174.1 ± 4.4(stat.)-1.8+2.5(syst.)GeV; m

  10. 75 FR 13345 - Pricing for Certain United States Mint Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... United States Mint Pricing for Certain United States Mint Products AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing the price of First... United States Mint Web site. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: B.B. Craig, Associate Director for...

  11. Baicalin Down-Regulates IL-1β-Stimulated Extracellular Matrix Production in Nasal Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae-Min; Kang, Ju-Hyung; Lee, Seoung-Ae; Park, Il-Ho; Lee, Heung-Man

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Baicalin, a Chinese herbal medicine, has anti-fibrotic and anti-inflammatory effects. The aims of present study were to investigate the effects of baicalin on the myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction of interleukin (IL)-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts and to determine the molecular mechanism of baicalin in nasal fibroblasts. Methods Nasal fibroblasts were isolated from the inferior turbinate of patients. Baicalin was used to treat IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. To evaluate cytotoxicity, a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2yl)-2,5-diphenyl-tetrazolium bromide assay was used. The expression levels of α-smooth muscle actin (SMA), fibronectin, phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (p-MAPK), p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα were measured by western blotting, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT—PCR),or immunofluorescence staining. Fibroblast migration was analyzed with scratch assays and transwell migration assays. Total collagen was evaluated with the Sircol collagen assay. Contractile activity was measured with a collagen gel contraction assay. Results Baicalin (0–50 μM) had no significant cytotoxic effects in nasal fibroblasts. The expression of α–SMA and fibronectin were significantly down-regulated in baicalin-treated nasal fibroblasts. Migration, collagen production, and contraction of IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts were significantly inhibited by baicalin treatment. Baicalin also significantly down-regulated p-MAPK, p-Akt, p-p50, p-p65, and p-IκBα in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. Conclusions We showed that baicalin down-regulated myofibroblast differentiation, extracellular matrix production, migration, and collagen contraction via the MAPK and Akt/ NF-κB pathways in IL-1β-stimulated nasal fibroblasts. PMID:28002421

  12. Extracellular matrix production and calcium carbonate precipitation by coral cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Helman, Yael; Natale, Frank; Sherrell, Robert M.; LaVigne, Michèle; Starovoytov, Valentin; Gorbunov, Maxim Y.; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2008-01-01

    The evolution of multicellularity in animals required the production of extracellular matrices that serve to spatially organize cells according to function. In corals, three matrices are involved in spatial organization: (i) an organic ECM, which facilitates cell–cell and cell–substrate adhesion; (ii) a skeletal organic matrix (SOM), which facilitates controlled deposition of a calcium carbonate skeleton; and (iii) the calcium carbonate skeleton itself, which provides the structural support for the 3D organization of coral colonies. In this report, we examine the production of these three matrices by using an in vitro culturing system for coral cells. In this system, which significantly facilitates studies of coral cell physiology, we demonstrate in vitro excretion of ECM by primary (nondividing) tissue cultures of both soft (Xenia elongata) and hard (Montipora digitata) corals. There are structural differences between the ECM produced by X. elongata cell cultures and that of M. digitata, and ascorbic acid, a critical cofactor for proline hydroxylation, significantly increased the production of collagen in the ECM of the latter species. We further demonstrate in vitro production of SOM and extracellular mineralized particles in cell cultures of M. digitata. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry analysis of Sr/Ca ratios revealed the particles to be aragonite. De novo calcification was confirmed by following the incorporation of 45Ca into acid labile macromolecules. Our results demonstrate the ability of isolated, differentiated coral cells to undergo fundamental processes required for multicellular organization. PMID:18162537

  13. Interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells enhances matrix metalloproteinase-1 production.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Y; Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Takahashi, M; Shimada, K

    2000-08-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) plays an important role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture. The purpose of this study was to investigate the expression of MMP-1 by cell-to-cell interactions between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cells) were cocultured. MMP-1 levels were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Collagenolytic activity was determined by fluorescent labeled-collagen digestion. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cells produce MMP-1. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs markedly increased the MMP-1 levels and activity of the culture media. MMP-1 levels were maximal when the cellular ratio of THP-1 cells/VSMCs was 1.0. Immunohistochemistry revealed that both types of cells in the coculture produced MMP-1. Separated coculture experiments showed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to MMP-1 production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 and tumor necrosis factor-alpha antibodies inhibited coculture conditioned medium-induced MMP-1 production by VSMCs and THP-1 cells. Protein kinase C inhibitors, tyrosine kinase inhibitors, and a mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor significantly inhibited MMP-1 production by cocultures. Direct cell-to-cell interaction between THP-1 cells and VSMCs enhanced MMP-1 synthesis in both types of cells. Increased local MMP-1 production and activity induced by monocyte-VSMC interaction play an important pathogenic role in atherosclerotic plaque rupture.

  14. Matrix engineering, state filling, and charge transport in PbSe quantum dot solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Law, Matt

    Colloidal semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) are attractive building blocks for solar photovoltaics (PV). In this talk, I will highlight our recent progress in designing PbX (X = S, Se, Te) QD thin film absorbers for next-generation PV. Basic requirements for QD absorber layers include efficient light absorption, charge separation, charge transport, and long-term stability. I begin by discussing QD film fabrication, charge transport physics, insights from theory, and evidence that the carrier diffusion length is short and limited by electronic states in the QD band gap. Studies of carrier mobility as a function of basic film parameters such as inter-QD spacing, QD size, and QD size distribution have led to a better understanding of charge transport within highly disordered QD films. Efforts to improve carrier mobility by enhancing inter-dot electronic coupling, passivating surface states, and implementing surface doping will be highlighted. Engineering the inter-QD matrix to produce QD/inorganic or QD/organic nanocomposites is presented as a powerful way to optimize coupling, remove surface states, eliminate hysteretic charge trapping and ion motion, and achieve long-term environmental stability for high-performance, robust QD films that feature good carrier multiplication efficiency. New results on the use of atomic layer deposition infilling of QD films to yield all-inorganic QD transistors free of the bias-stress effect will be presented, and the likely role of ion transport in QD optoelectronics discussed. The use of infrared transmission spectroscopy to understand state filling and study charge transport in QD thin film transistors will be presented.

  15. 9 CFR 107.2 - Products under State license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTIONS FROM PREPARATION...: (1) The State has the authority to license viruses, serums, toxins, and analogous products and... violations of State law regulating viruses, serums, toxins, and analogous products; and (5) The...

  16. 9 CFR 107.2 - Products under State license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTIONS FROM PREPARATION...: (1) The State has the authority to license viruses, serums, toxins, and analogous products and... violations of State law regulating viruses, serums, toxins, and analogous products; and (5) The...

  17. 9 CFR 107.2 - Products under State license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTIONS FROM PREPARATION...: (1) The State has the authority to license viruses, serums, toxins, and analogous products and... violations of State law regulating viruses, serums, toxins, and analogous products; and (5) The...

  18. Production of metal matrix composite mirrors for tank fire control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geiger, Alan L.; Ulph, Eric, Sr.

    1992-09-01

    The first production lot of 50 units of metal matrix composite mirrors for the Leopard I tank fire control system was recently completed by Optical Corporation of America (OCA), Garden Grove, California. The mirror substrates were finish machined from forgings of Optical Grade SXATM metal matrix composite manufactured by Advanced Composite Materials Corporation (ACMC), Greer, South Carolina. Use of forgings rather than hot pressed billet yields more efficient use of material and reduces machining time, resulting in lower cost. The mirrors were fabricated by a process sequence of machining, thermal stabilization, electroless nickel plating, polishing, and coating with a high efficiency, laser damage-resistant optical coating. The mirrors are used in the fire control system for a day channel (direct view) and near infrared (CCD), a muzzle reference system laser transceiver, a laser range finder, and an infrared thermal imaging system. SXA composite was chosen over competitive mirror materials (glass and beryllium) because of its high specific strength and stiffness, good stability, and moderate machining cost. The mirrors exhibit excellent stability and optical performance. Field trials of prototype mirrors in fire control systems have proven successful.

  19. Development of stable cell lines for production or regulated expression using matrix attachment regions.

    PubMed

    Zahn-Zabal, M; Kobr, M; Girod, P A; Imhof, M; Chatellard, P; de Jesus, M; Wurm, F; Mermod, N

    2001-04-27

    One of the major hurdles of isolating stable, inducible or constitutive high-level producer cell lines is the time-consuming selection procedure. Given the variation in the expression levels of the same construct in individual clones, hundreds of clones must be isolated and tested to identify one or more with the desired characteristics. Various boundary elements (BEs), matrix attachment regions, and locus control regions (LCRs) were screened for their ability to augment the expression of heterologous genes in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells. Of the chromatin elements assayed, the chicken lysozyme matrix-attachment region (MAR) was the only element to significantly increase stable reporter expression. We found that the use of the MAR increases the proportion of high-producing clones, thus reducing the number of clones that need to be screened. These benefits are observed both for constructs with MARs flanking the transgene expression cassette, as well as when constructs are co-transfected with the MAR on a separate plasmid. Moreover, the MAR was co-transfected with a multicomponent regulatable beta-galactosidase expression system in C2C12 cells and several clones exhibiting regulated expression were identified. Hence, MARs are useful in the development of stable cell lines for production or regulated expression.

  20. Matrix elements in the coupled-cluster approach - With application to low-lying states in Li

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martensson-Pendrill, Ann-Marie; Ynnerman, Anders

    1990-01-01

    A procedure is suggested for evaluating matrix elements of an operator between wavefunctions in the coupled-cluster form. The use of the exponential ansatz leads to compact exponential expressions also for matrix elements. Algorithms are developed for summing all effects of one-particle clusters and certain chains of two-particle clusters (containing the well-known random-phase approximation as a subset). The treatment of one-particle perturbations in single valence states is investigated in detail. As examples the oscillator strength for the 2s-2p transition in Li as well as the hyperfine structure for the two states are studied and compared to earlier work.

  1. Bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches for bacterial biofilm matrix composition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cegelski, Lynette

    2015-04-01

    The genomics and proteomics revolutions have been enormously successful in providing crucial "parts lists" for biological systems. Yet, formidable challenges exist in generating complete descriptions of how the parts function and assemble into macromolecular complexes and whole-cell assemblies. Bacterial biofilms are complex multicellular bacterial communities protected by a slime-like extracellular matrix that confers protection to environmental stress and enhances resistance to antibiotics and host defenses. As a non-crystalline, insoluble, heterogeneous assembly, the biofilm extracellular matrix poses a challenge to compositional analysis by conventional methods. In this perspective, bottom-up and top-down solid-state NMR approaches are described for defining chemical composition in complex macrosystems. The "sum-of-the-parts" bottom-up approach was introduced to examine the amyloid-integrated biofilms formed by Escherichia coli and permitted the first determination of the composition of the intact extracellular matrix from a bacterial biofilm. An alternative top-down approach was developed to define composition in Vibrio cholerae biofilms and relied on an extensive panel of NMR measurements to tease out specific carbon pools from a single sample of the intact extracellular matrix. These two approaches are widely applicable to other heterogeneous assemblies. For bacterial biofilms, quantitative parameters of matrix composition are needed to understand how biofilms are assembled, to improve the development of biofilm inhibitors, and to dissect inhibitor modes of action. Solid-state NMR approaches will also be invaluable in obtaining parameters of matrix architecture.

  2. Strategies for vectorizing the sparse matrix vector product on the CRAY XMP, CRAY 2, and CYBER 205

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauschlicher, Charles W., Jr.; Partridge, Harry

    1987-01-01

    Large, randomly sparse matrix vector products are important in a number of applications in computational chemistry, such as matrix diagonalization and the solution of simultaneous equations. Vectorization of this process is considered for the CRAY XMP, CRAY 2, and CYBER 205, using a matrix of dimension of 20,000 with from 1 percent to 6 percent nonzeros. Efficient scatter/gather capabilities add coding flexibility and yield significant improvements in performance. For the CYBER 205, it is shown that minor changes in the IO can reduce the CPU time by a factor of 50. Similar changes in the CRAY codes make a far smaller improvement.

  3. The Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Matrix Protein PPXY Late Domain Drives the Production of Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Christopher M.; Eisenhauer, Philip; Bruce, Emily A.; Weir, Marion E.; King, Benjamin R.; Klaus, Joseph P.; Krementsov, Dimitry N.; Shirley, David J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Botten, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Arenaviruses cause severe diseases in humans but establish asymptomatic, lifelong infections in rodent reservoirs. Persistently-infected rodents harbor high levels of defective interfering (DI) particles, which are thought to be important for establishing persistence and mitigating virus-induced cytopathic effect. Little is known about what drives the production of DI particles. We show that neither the PPXY late domain encoded within the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) matrix protein nor a functional endosomal sorting complex transport (ESCRT) pathway is absolutely required for the generation of standard infectious virus particles. In contrast, DI particle release critically requires the PPXY late domain and is ESCRT-dependent. Additionally, the terminal tyrosine in the PPXY motif is reversibly phosphorylated and our findings indicate that this posttranslational modification may regulate DI particle formation. Thus we have uncovered a new role for the PPXY late domain and a possible mechanism for its regulation. PMID:27010636

  4. Matrix-assisted cocrystallization (MAC) simultaneous production and formulation of pharmaceutical cocrystals by hot-melt extrusion.

    PubMed

    Boksa, Kevin; Otte, Andrew; Pinal, Rodolfo

    2014-09-01

    A novel method for the simultaneous production and formulation of pharmaceutical cocrystals, matrix-assisted cocrystallization (MAC), is presented. Hot-melt extrusion (HME) is used to create cocrystals by coprocessing the drug and coformer in the presence of a matrix material. Carbamazepine (CBZ), nicotinamide (NCT), and Soluplus were used as a model drug, coformer, and matrix, respectively. The MAC product containing 80:20 (w/w) cocrystal:matrix was characterized by differential scanning calorimetry, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and powder X-ray diffraction. A partial least squares (PLS) regression model was developed for quantifying the efficiency of cocrystal formation. The MAC product was estimated to be 78% (w/w) cocrystal (theoretical 80%), with approximately 0.3% mixture of free (unreacted) CBZ and NCT, and 21.6% Soluplus (theoretical 20%) with the PLS model. A physical mixture (PM) of a reference cocrystal (RCC), prepared by precipitation from solution, and Soluplus resulted in faster dissolution relative to the pure RCC. However, the MAC product with the exact same composition resulted in considerably faster dissolution and higher maximum concentration (∼five-fold) than those of the PM. The MAC product consists of high-quality cocrystals embedded in a matrix. The processing aspect of MAC plays a major role on the faster dissolution observed. The MAC approach offers a scalable process, suitable for the continuous manufacturing and formulation of pharmaceutical cocrystals.

  5. Continuous propionic acid production with Propionibacterium acidipropionici immobilized in a novel xylan hydrogel matrix.

    PubMed

    Wallenius, Janne; Pahimanolis, Nikolaos; Zoppe, Justin; Kilpeläinen, Petri; Master, Emma; Ilvesniemi, Hannu; Seppälä, Jukka; Eerikäinen, Tero; Ojamo, Heikki

    2015-12-01

    The cell immobilization potential of a novel xylan based disulfide-crosslinked hydrogel matrix reinforced with cellulose nanocrystals was studied with continuous cultivation of Propionibacterium acidipropionici using various dilution rates. The cells were immobilized to hydrogel beads suspended freely in the fermentation broth or else packed into a column connected to a stirred tank reactor. The maximum propionic acid productivity for the combined stirred tank and column was 0.88gL(-1)h(-1) and the maximum productivity for the column was determined to be 1.39gL(-1)h(-1). The maximum propionic acid titer for the combined system was 13.9gL(-1) with a dilution rate of 0.06h(-1). Dry cell density of 99.7gL(-1) was obtained within the column packed with hydrogel beads and productivity of 1.02gL(-1)h(-1) was maintained in the column even with the high circulation rate of 3.37h(-1).

  6. Tracking of proton flow during transition from anaerobiosis to steady state. 1. Response of matrix pH indicators.

    PubMed

    Luvisetto, S; Schmehl, I; Cola, C; Azzone, G F

    1991-11-15

    1. The kinetics of acidification and realkalinization of the matrix after addition of nigericin to respiring and non-respiring mitochondria, recorded by intramitochondrial pH indicators such as neutral red and 2',7'-bis(carboxyethyl)-5(6)-carboxyfluorescein (BCECF), is complementary to that recorded by extramitochondrial pH indicators. The extent of acidification decreases with the logarithm of the KCl concentration and is inhibited by Pi and ammonium ions. 2. Proton translocation during respiration has been compared with proton extraction from matrix bulk water. During oxygen pulses to EGTA-untreated mitochondria, BCECF records an extraction of protons from matrix bulk water of about 2-3 nmol H+/mg, reduced to 1-2 nmol H+/mg in EGTA-treated mitochondria. Since the amount of proton translocation required to achieve steady state is of the order of 6-7 nmol H+/mg, it appears that 75-90% of the protons are not extracted from matrix bulk water. Only a slight response is recorded by neutral red. 3. The effect of permeant cations and of uncouplers on the distribution of proton extraction between membrane and matrix bulk water has been studied in presteady state. During Sr2+ uptake, proton extrusion into cytosolic bulk water, as well as proton extraction from matrix bulk water, corresponds almost to 100% of the protons translocated by the redox proton pumps. In the absence of Sr2+, parallel to the disappearance of the proton extrusion in cytosolic bulk water, the proton extraction from matrix bulk water diminishes to about 20% of the proton translocation. 4. The mechanism by which divalent cation uptake and protonophoric uncouplers affect the distribution of proton extraction between matrix bulk water and membrane domains and the nature of the membrane domains are discussed.

  7. An adaptive method with weight matrix as a function of the state to design the rotatory flexible system control law

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souza, Luiz C. G.; Bigot, P.

    2016-10-01

    One of the most well-known techniques of optimal control is the theory of Linear Quadratic Regulator (LQR). This method was originally applied only to linear systems but has been generalized for non-linear systems: the State Dependent Riccati Equation (SDRE) technique. One of the advantages of SDRE is that the weight matrix selection is the same as in LQR. The difference is that weights are not necessarily constant: they can be state dependent. Then, it gives an additional flexibility to design the control law. Many are applications of SDRE for simulation or real time control but generally SDRE weights are chosen constant so no advantage of this flexibility is taken. This work serves to show through simulation that state dependent weights matrix can improve SDRE control performance. The system is a non-linear flexible rotatory beam. In a brief first part SDRE theory will be explained and the non-linear model detailed. Then, influence of SDRE weight matrix associated with the state Q will be analyzed to get some insight in order to assume a state dependent law. Finally, these laws are tested and compared to constant weight matrix Q. Based on simulation results; one concludes showing the benefits of using an adaptive weight Q rather than a constant one.

  8. Using R-matrix ideas to describe one-nucleon transfers to resonance states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escher, J. E.; Thompson, I. J.; Arbanas, G.; Elster, Ch.; Eremenko, V.; Hlophe, L.; Nunes, F.; Torus Collaboration

    2014-09-01

    (d,p) transfer reactions have long been used to investigate nuclear structure. Carried out in inverse kinematics, they are expected to play a central role in the study of weakly-bound systems at modern RIB facilities. While the theoretical framework and its computational implementation for describing (d,p) reactions have seen much progress, open questions remain. Resonances in the low-energy spectra of weakly-bound nuclei, e.g., are of interest for astrophysical applications and can in principle be studied with transfer reactions. Applying standard transfer reaction theories is problematic, both practically in terms of achieving converged solutions and conceptually in terms of interpreting the results. Recently, a new formalism that utilizes concepts known from the successful and popular R-matrix theory was proposed for the description of (d,p) reactions [Mukhamedzhanov, PRC 2011]. The formalism covers transfers to bound and resonance states and is general enough to include deuteron breakup. We present tests of the proposed formalism, compare calculations to measured cross sections, and discuss implications [Escher et al. PRC 2014]. (d,p) transfer reactions have long been used to investigate nuclear structure. Carried out in inverse kinematics, they are expected to play a central role in the study of weakly-bound systems at modern RIB facilities. While the theoretical framework and its computational implementation for describing (d,p) reactions have seen much progress, open questions remain. Resonances in the low-energy spectra of weakly-bound nuclei, e.g., are of interest for astrophysical applications and can in principle be studied with transfer reactions. Applying standard transfer reaction theories is problematic, both practically in terms of achieving converged solutions and conceptually in terms of interpreting the results. Recently, a new formalism that utilizes concepts known from the successful and popular R-matrix theory was proposed for the description

  9. Ethanol increases matrix metalloproteinase-12 expression via NADPH oxidase-dependent ROS production in macrophages

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Mi Jin; Nepal, Saroj; Lee, Eung-Seok; Jeong, Tae Cheon; Kim, Sang-Hyun; Park, Pil-Hoon

    2013-11-15

    Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), an enzyme responsible for degradation of extracellular matrix, plays an important role in the progression of various diseases, including inflammation and fibrosis. Although most of those are pathogenic conditions induced by ethanol ingestion, the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 has not been explored. In the present study, we investigated the effect of ethanol on MMP-12 expression and its potential mechanisms in macrophages. Here, we demonstrated that ethanol treatment increased MMP-12 expression in primary murine peritoneal macrophages and RAW 264.7 macrophages at both mRNA and protein levels. Ethanol treatment also significantly increased the activity of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADPH) oxidase and the expression of NADPH oxidase-2 (Nox2). Pretreatment with an anti-oxidant (N-acetyl cysteine) or a selective inhibitor of NADPH oxidase (diphenyleneiodonium chloride (DPI)) prevented ethanol-induced MMP-12 expression. Furthermore, knockdown of Nox2 by small interfering RNA (siRNA) prevented ethanol-induced ROS production and MMP-12 expression in RAW 264.7 macrophages, indicating a critical role for Nox2 in ethanol-induced intracellular ROS production and MMP-12 expression in macrophages. We also showed that ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was suppressed by transient transfection with dominant negative IκB-α plasmid or pretreatment with Bay 11-7082, a selective inhibitor of NF-κB, in RAW 264.7 macrophages. In addition, ethanol-induced Nox2 expression was also attenuated by treatment with a selective inhibitor of p38 MAPK, suggesting involvement of p38 MAPK/NF-κB pathway in ethanol-induced Nox2 expression. Taken together, these results demonstrate that ethanol treatment elicited increase in MMP-12 expression via increase in ROS production derived from Nox2 in macrophages. - Highlights: • Ethanol increases ROS production through up-regulation of Nox2 in macrophages. • Enhanced oxidative stress contributes to ethanol

  10. LIM mineralization protein-1 suppresses TNF-α induced intervertebral disc degeneration by maintaining nucleus pulposus extracellular matrix production and inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Pan, Hehai; Yang, Hao; Wang, Jianru; Zhang, Kuibo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Hua; Ding, Wenbin; Li, Bingxue; Zheng, Zhaomin

    2015-03-01

    Imbalanced metabolism of Nucleus pulposus (NP) extracellular matrix (ECM) is closely correlated to Intervertebral Disc Degenerative Disease. LIM mineralization protein-1 (LMP-1) has been proven to induce sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production in NP and have an anti-inflammatory effect in pre-osteoclast. However, whether it has any effect on the NP ECM production and degradation under inflammatory stimulation has not been studied. In the current study, a TNF-α induced cell model was established in vitro. Lentivirus encoding LMP-1 (LV-LMP-1) and short heparin LMP-1 (LV-shLMP-1) were constructed to overexpress and knockdown LMP-1 expression in NP cells. LMP-1 mRNA level was regulated in a dose-dependent manner after transfection. LV-LMP-1 increased whereas LV-shLMP-1 decreased collagen II, aggrecan, versican expression, and sGAG production. LV-LMP-1 abolished while LV-shLMP-1 aggravated TNF-α mediated down-regulation of the above matrix genes via ERK1/2 activation. Moreover, LV-LMP-1 abrogated TNF-α induced MMP-3 and MMP-13 expression via inhibiting p65 translocation and MMP-3 and MMP-13 promoter activity. These results indicated that LMP-1 had an ECM production maintenance effect under inflammatory stimulation. This effect was via up-regulation of matrix genes expression at least partially through ERK1/2 activation, and down-regulation of MMPs expression through NF-κB inhibition.

  11. 9 CFR 107.2 - Products under State license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Products under State license. 107.2 Section 107.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTIONS FROM...

  12. 9 CFR 107.2 - Products under State license.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Products under State license. 107.2 Section 107.2 Animals and Animal Products ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE VIRUSES, SERUMS, TOXINS, AND ANALOGOUS PRODUCTS; ORGANISMS AND VECTORS EXEMPTIONS FROM...

  13. GGA+U study of uranium mononitride: A comparison of the U-ramping and occupation matrix schemes and incorporation energies of fission products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claisse, Antoine; Klipfel, Marco; Lindbom, Niclas; Freyss, Michel; Olsson, Pär

    2016-09-01

    Uranium mononitride is studied in the DFT + U framework. Its ground state is investigated and a study of the incorporation of diverse fission products in the crystal is conducted. The U-ramping and occupation matrix control (OMC) schemes are used to eliminate metastable states. Beyond a certain amount of introduced correlation, the OMC scheme starts to find a lower total energy. The OMC scheme is chosen for the second part of this study. Furthermore, the influence of the magnetic ordering is studied using the U-ramping method, showing that antiferromagnetic order is the most stable one when the U parameter is larger than 1.75 eV. The effect on the density of states is investigated and elastic constants are provided for comparison with other methods and experiments. The incorporation energies of fission products in different defect configurations are calculated and these energies are corrected to take into account the limited size of the supercell.

  14. Numerical Computation of a Continuous-thrust State Transition Matrix Incorporating Accurate Hardware and Ephemeris Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellison, Donald; Conway, Bruce; Englander, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    A significant body of work exists showing that providing a nonlinear programming (NLP) solver with expressions for the problem constraint gradient substantially increases the speed of program execution and can also improve the robustness of convergence, especially for local optimizers. Calculation of these derivatives is often accomplished through the computation of spacecraft's state transition matrix (STM). If the two-body gravitational model is employed as is often done in the context of preliminary design, closed form expressions for these derivatives may be provided. If a high fidelity dynamics model, that might include perturbing forces such as the gravitational effect from multiple third bodies and solar radiation pressure is used then these STM's must be computed numerically. We present a method for the power hardward model and a full ephemeris model. An adaptive-step embedded eight order Dormand-Prince numerical integrator is discussed and a method for the computation of the time of flight derivatives in this framework is presented. The use of these numerically calculated derivatieves offer a substantial improvement over finite differencing in the context of a global optimizer. Specifically the inclusion of these STM's into the low thrust missiondesign tool chain in use at NASA Goddard Spaceflight Center allows for an increased preliminary mission design cadence.

  15. Matrix of Key Federal Statutes and Federal and State Court Decisions Reflecting the Core Concepts of Disability Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Turnbull, H. Rutherford, III; Stowe, Matt; Klein, Samara; Riffel, Brandon

    2012-01-01

    This matrix displays the decisions of the United States Supreme Court and the federal statutes most relevant to individuals with disabilities and their families. It is organized according to the core concepts of disability policy as identified by Rud Turnbull and his colleagues at the Beach Center on Disability, the University of Kansas, Lawrence,…

  16. Transitional states of acrosomal exocytosis and proteolytic processing of the acrosomal matrix in guinea pig sperm.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kye-Seong; Foster, James A; Kvasnicka, Kevin W; Gerton, George L

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we adapted a FluoSphere bead-binding assay to study the exposure and release of guinea pig sperm acrosomal components during the course of capacitation and acrosomal exocytosis. Prior to capacitation or the initiation of exocytosis, acrosomal proteins were not accessible to FluoSpheres coated with antibodies against two acrosomal matrix (AM) proteins, AM67 and AM50; during the course of capacitation and ionophore-induced acrosomal exocytosis, however, we detected the transient exposure of the solid-phase AM proteins on the surface of guinea pig sperm using the antibody-coated fluorescent beads. Several different transitional stages leading to complete acrosomal exocytosis were classified, and we propose these represent true, functional intermediates since some of the AM proteins are orthologues of mouse proteins that bind the zona pellucida (ZP) of unfertilized eggs. In addition, we present evidence that implicates acrosin in the proteolytic processing of AM50 during AM disassembly. Thus, we propose that the transitional states of acrosomal exocytosis involve early binding of AM proteins to the ZP (by what visually appear to be "acrosome-intact" sperm), maintenance of ZP binding that coincides with the progressive exposure of AM proteins, and gradual proteolytic disassembly of the AM to allow sperm movement through the ZP. We feel this "transitional states" model provides a more refined view of acrosomal function that supports a move away from the widely held, overly simplistic, and binary "acrosome-reaction" model, and embraces a more dynamic view of acrosomal exocytosis that involves intermediate stages of the secretory process in ZP binding and penetration.

  17. Isolation and identification of oxidation products of guaiacol from brines and heated meat matrix.

    PubMed

    Bölicke, Sarah-Maria; Ternes, Waldemar

    2016-07-01

    In this study we investigated the formation of the oxidation products of guaiacol in brines and heated meat matrix: 6-nitrosoguaiacol, 4-nitroguaiacol and 6-nitroguaiacol. For this purpose we applied a newly developed HPLC-UV and LC-MS method. For the first time, 6-nitrosoguaiacol was determined in brine and meat (containing guaiacol and sodium nitrite), which had been heated to 80°C and subsequently subjected to simulated digestion. Application of 500mg/L ascorbic acid to the brines reduced guaiacol degradation at pH3 and simultaneously inhibited the formation of 6-nitrosoguaiacol compared to brines containing only 100mg/L of ASC. The oxidation products were isolated with a new extraction method from meat samples containing 400mg/kg sodium nitrite at pH3.6 following simulated digestion. When oxygen was added, 6-nitrosoguaiacol was determined even at legally allowed levels (150mg/kg) of the curing agent. Finally, we developed a new LC-MS method for the separation and qualitative determination of the four main smoke methoxyphenols.

  18. Development of performance matrix for generic product equivalence of acyclovir topical creams.

    PubMed

    Krishnaiah, Yellela S R; Xu, Xiaoming; Rahman, Ziyaur; Yang, Yang; Katragadda, Usha; Lionberger, Robert; Peters, John R; Uhl, Kathleen; Khan, Mansoor A

    2014-11-20

    The effect of process variability on physicochemical characteristics and in vitro performance of qualitatively (Q1) and quantitatively (Q2) equivalent generic acyclovir topical dermatological creams was investigated to develop a matrix of standards for determining their in vitro bioequivalence with reference listed drug (RLD) product (Zovirax®). A fractional factorial design of experiment (DOE) with triplicate center point was used to create 11 acyclovir cream formulations with manufacturing variables such as pH of aqueous phase, emulsification time, homogenization speed, and emulsification temperature. Three more formulations (F-12-F-14) with drug particle size representing RLD were also prepared where the pH of the final product was adjusted. The formulations were subjected to physicochemical characterization (drug particle size, spreadability, viscosity, pH, and drug concentration in aqueous phase) and in vitro drug release studies against RLD. The results demonstrated that DOE formulations were structurally and functionally (e.g., drug release) similar (Q3) to RLD. Moreover, in vitro drug permeation studies showed that extent of drug bioavailability/retention in human epidermis from F-12-F-14 were similar to RLD, although differed in rate of permeation. The results suggested generic acyclovir creams can be manufactured to obtain identical performance as that of RLD with Q1/Q2/Q3.

  19. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOEpatents

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  20. Products of dentin matrix protein-1 degradation by interleukin-1β-induced matrix metalloproteinase-3 promote proliferation of odontoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Hase, Naoko; Ozeki, Nobuaki; Hiyama, Taiki; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Kawai, Rie; Kondo, Ayami; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Mogi, Makio

    2015-08-01

    We have previously reported that interleukin (IL)-1β induces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3-regulated cell proliferation in mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived odontoblast-like cells, suggesting that MMP-3 plays a potentially unique physiological role in regeneration by odontoblast-like cells. MMPs are able to process virtually any component of the extracellular matrix, including collagen, laminin and bioactive molecules. Because odontoblasts produce dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), we examined whether the degraded products of DMP-1 by MMP-3 contribute to enhanced proliferation in odontoblast-like cells. IL-1β increased mRNA and protein levels of odontoblastic marker proteins, including DMP-1, but not osteoblastic marker proteins, such as osteocalcin and osteopontin. The recombinant active form of MMP-3 could degrade DMP-1 protein but not osteocalcin and osteopontin in vitro. The exogenous degraded products of DMP-1 by MMP-3 resulted in increased proliferation of odontoblast-like cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with a polyclonal antibody against DMP-1 suppressed IL-1β-induced cell proliferation to a basal level, but identical treatment had no effect on the IL-1β-induced increase in MMP-3 expression and activity. Treatment with siRNA against MMP-3 potently suppressed the IL-1β-induced increase in DMP-1 expression and suppressed cell proliferation (p < 0.05). Similarly, treatment with siRNAs against Wnt5a and Wnt5b suppressed the IL-1β-induced increase in DMP-1 expression and suppressed cell proliferation (p < 0.05). Rat KN-3 cells, representative of authentic odontoblasts, showed similar responses to the odontoblast-like cells. Taken together, our current study demonstrates the sequential involvement of Wnt5, MMP-3, DMP-1 expression, and DMP-1 degradation products by MMP-3, in effecting IL-1β-induced proliferation of ESC-derived odontoblast-like cells.

  1. Effects of reclaimed water matrix on fate of pharmaceuticals and personal care products in soil.

    PubMed

    Dodgen, L K; Zheng, W

    2016-08-01

    Reclaimed water is increasingly used to supplement water resources. However, reclaimed water has a complex matrix, which includes emerging chemical contaminants, that is introduced to the soil when this water is used for irrigation. The effects of microbial activity, dissolved matter, nutrients, and particulate matter in reclaimed water on half-life of 11 pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in soil were investigated with 7 treatment waters, namely swine lagoon effluent (either unaltered, sterilized, or filtered and sterilized) and nanopure water (either unaltered or with added nitrogen, phosphorus, or potassium). The extractable residues of the parent PPCPs were measured over 35 d. Lagoon microbial activity was significantly (p ≤ 0.05) related to increased half-life of 4 PPCPs (carbamazepine, fluoxetine, ibuprofen, sulfamethoxazole) by 14-74%, and to decreased half-life of 3 others (caffeine, gemfibrozil, naproxen) by 13-25%. The presence of lagoon dissolved matter was significantly correlated with a 20-110% increase in half-life for 6 PPCPs (caffeine, estrone, gemfibrozil, ibuprofen, naproxen, triclocarban). However, lagoon particulate matter was significantly correlated with 9-52% decrease in half-life for these same compounds, as well as trimethoprim. The levels of nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium in the lagoon effluent were not significantly related to half-life for most PPCPs, except caffeine. Overall, specific components of reclaimed water matrix had different effects on the soil half-lives of PPCPs, suggesting that the composition of reclaimed water needs to be considered when evaluating PPCP fate after land application.

  2. Changes in muscle fiber contractility and extracellular matrix production during skeletal muscle hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Mendias, Christopher L; Schwartz, Andrew J; Grekin, Jeremy A; Gumucio, Jonathan P; Sugg, Kristoffer B

    2017-03-01

    Skeletal muscle can adapt to increased mechanical loads by undergoing hypertrophy. Transient reductions in whole muscle force production have been reported during the onset of hypertrophy, but contractile changes in individual muscle fibers have not been previously studied. Additionally, the extracellular matrix (ECM) stores and transmits forces from muscle fibers to tendons and bones, and determining how the ECM changes during hypertrophy is important in understanding the adaptation of muscle tissue to mechanical loading. Using the synergist ablation model, we sought to measure changes in muscle fiber contractility, collagen content, and cross-linking, and in the expression of several genes and activation of signaling proteins that regulate critical components of myogenesis and ECM synthesis and remodeling during muscle hypertrophy. Tissues were harvested 3, 7, and 28 days after induction of hypertrophy, and nonoverloaded rats served as controls. Muscle fiber specific force (sFo), which is the maximum isometric force normalized to cross-sectional area, was reduced 3 and 7 days after the onset of mechanical overload, but returned to control levels by 28 days. Collagen abundance displayed a similar pattern of change. Nearly a quarter of the transcriptome changed over the course of overload, as well as the activation of signaling pathways related to hypertrophy and atrophy. Overall, this study provides insight into fundamental mechanisms of muscle and ECM growth, and indicates that although muscle fibers appear to have completed remodeling and regeneration 1 mo after synergist ablation, the ECM continues to be actively remodeling at this time point.NEW & NOTEWORTHY This study utilized a rat synergist ablation model to integrate changes in single muscle fiber contractility, extracellular matrix composition, activation of important signaling pathways in muscle adaption, and corresponding changes in the muscle transcriptome to provide novel insight into the basic

  3. Measurement of the electroweak top quark production cross section and the CKM matrix element Vtb with the D0 experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Kirsch, Matthias

    2009-06-29

    At particle accelerators the Standard Model has been tested and will be tested further to a great precision. The data analyzed in this thesis have been collected at the world's highest energetic-collider, the Tevatron, located at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL) in the vicinity of Chicago, IL, USA. There, protons and antiprotons are collided at a center-of-mass energy of {radical}s = 1.96 TeV. The discovery of the top quark was one of the remarkable results not only for the CDF and D0 experiments at the Tevatron collider, but also for the Standard Model, which had predicted the existence of the top quark because of symmetry arguments long before already. Still, the Tevatron is the only facility able to produce top quarks. The predominant production mechanism of top quarks is the production of a top-antitop quark pair via the strong force. However, the Standard Model also allows the production of single top quarks via the electroweak interaction. This process features the unique opportunity to measure the |Vtb| matrix element of the Cabbibo-Kobayashi-Maskawa (CKM) matrix directly, without assuming unitarity of the matrix or assuming that the number of quark generations is three. Hence, the measurement of the cross section of electroweak top quark production is more than the technical challenge to extract a physics process that only occurs one out of ten billion collisions. It is also an important test of the V-A structure of the electroweak interaction and a potential window to physics beyond the Standard Model in the case where the measurement of |V{sub tb}| would result in a value significantly different from 1, the value predicted by the Standard Model. At the Tevatron two production processes contribute significantly to the production of single top quarks: the production via the t-channel, also called W-gluon fusion, and the production via the s-channel, known as well as W* process. This analysis searches for the combined s+t channel

  4. Early state research on antifungal natural products.

    PubMed

    Negri, Melyssa; Salci, Tânia P; Shinobu-Mesquita, Cristiane S; Capoci, Isis R G; Svidzinski, Terezinha I E; Kioshima, Erika Seki

    2014-03-07

    Nosocomial infections caused by fungi have increased greatly in recent years, mainly due to the rising number of immunocompromised patients. However, the available antifungal therapeutic arsenal is limited, and the development of new drugs has been slow. Therefore, the search for alternative drugs with low resistance rates and fewer side effects remains a major challenge. Plants produce a variety of medicinal components that can inhibit pathogen growth. Studies of plant species have been conducted to evaluate the characteristics of natural drug products, including their sustainability, affordability, and antimicrobial activity. A considerable number of studies of medicinal plants and alternative compounds, such as secondary metabolites, phenolic compounds, essential oils and extracts, have been performed. Thus, this review discusses the history of the antifungal arsenal, surveys natural products with potential antifungal activity, discusses strategies to develop derivatives of natural products, and presents perspectives on the development of novel antifungal drug candidates.

  5. Modeling State-Space Aeroelastic Systems Using a Simple Matrix Polynomial Approach for the Unsteady Aerodynamics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pototzky, Anthony S.

    2008-01-01

    A simple matrix polynomial approach is introduced for approximating unsteady aerodynamics in the s-plane and ultimately, after combining matrix polynomial coefficients with matrices defining the structure, a matrix polynomial of the flutter equations of motion (EOM) is formed. A technique of recasting the matrix-polynomial form of the flutter EOM into a first order form is also presented that can be used to determine the eigenvalues near the origin and everywhere on the complex plane. An aeroservoelastic (ASE) EOM have been generalized to include the gust terms on the right-hand side. The reasons for developing the new matrix polynomial approach are also presented, which are the following: first, the "workhorse" methods such as the NASTRAN flutter analysis lack the capability to consistently find roots near the origin, along the real axis or accurately find roots farther away from the imaginary axis of the complex plane; and, second, the existing s-plane methods, such as the Roger s s-plane approximation method as implemented in ISAC, do not always give suitable fits of some tabular data of the unsteady aerodynamics. A method available in MATLAB is introduced that will accurately fit generalized aerodynamic force (GAF) coefficients in a tabular data form into the coefficients of a matrix polynomial form. The root-locus results from the NASTRAN pknl flutter analysis, the ISAC-Roger's s-plane method and the present matrix polynomial method are presented and compared for accuracy and for the number and locations of roots.

  6. Ethanol Demand in United States Gasoline Production

    SciTech Connect

    Hadder, G.R.

    1998-11-24

    The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (OWL) Refinery Yield Model (RYM) has been used to estimate the demand for ethanol in U.S. gasoline production in year 2010. Study cases examine ethanol demand with variations in world oil price, cost of competing oxygenate, ethanol value, and gasoline specifications. For combined-regions outside California summer ethanol demand is dominated by conventional gasoline (CG) because the premised share of reformulated gasoline (RFG) production is relatively low and because CG offers greater flexibility for blending high vapor pressure components like ethanol. Vapor pressure advantages disappear for winter CG, but total ethanol used in winter RFG remains low because of the low RFG production share. In California, relatively less ethanol is used in CG because the RFG production share is very high. During the winter in California, there is a significant increase in use of ethanol in RFG, as ethanol displaces lower-vapor-pressure ethers. Estimated U.S. ethanol demand is a function of the refiner value of ethanol. For example, ethanol demand for reference conditions in year 2010 is 2 billion gallons per year (BGY) at a refiner value of $1.00 per gallon (1996 dollars), and 9 BGY at a refiner value of $0.60 per gallon. Ethanol demand could be increased with higher oil prices, or by changes in gasoline specifications for oxygen content, sulfur content, emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCS), and octane numbers.

  7. Matrix elements of the electromagnetic operator between kaon and pion states

    SciTech Connect

    Baum, I.; Lubicz, V.; Martinelli, G.; Orifici, L.; Simula, S.

    2011-10-01

    We compute the matrix elements of the electromagnetic operator sF{sub {mu}{nu}}{sigma}{sup {mu}{nu}}d between kaon and pion states, using lattice QCD with maximally twisted-mass fermions and two flavors of dynamical quarks (N{sub f}=2). The operator is renormalized nonperturbatively in the RI'/MOM scheme and our simulations cover pion masses as light as 270 MeV and three values of the lattice spacing from {approx_equal}0.07 up to {approx_equal}0.1 fm. At the physical point our result for the corresponding tensor form factor at zero-momentum transfer is f{sub T}{sup K{pi}}(0)=0.417(14{sub stat})(5{sub syst}), where the systematic error does not include the effect of quenching the strange and charm quarks. Our result differs significantly from the old quenched result f{sub T}{sup K{pi}}(0)=0.78(6) obtained by the SPQ{sub cd}R Collaboration with pion masses above 500 MeV. We investigate the source of this difference and conclude that it is mainly related to the chiral extrapolation. We also study the tensor charge of the pion and obtain the value f{sub T}{sup {pi}{pi}}(0)=0.195(8{sub stat})(6{sub syst}) in good agreement with, but more accurate than the result f{sub T}{sup {pi}{pi}}(0)=0.216(34) obtained by the QCDSF Collaboration using higher pion masses.

  8. Production of an Extracellular Matrix as an Isotropic Growth Phase of Penicillium rubens on Gypsum

    PubMed Central

    Bekker, M.; Adan, O. C. G.; Samson, R. A.; Wyatt, T.; Dijksterhuis, J.

    2012-01-01

    Indoor mold represents an important environmental concern, but a fundamental knowledge of fungal growth stages is needed to limit indoor fungal proliferation on finishing materials used in buildings. The present study focused on the succession of germination stages of the common indoor fungus Penicillium rubens on a gypsum substrate. This substrate is used as a model system representing porous materials that are widely used in indoor environments. Imaging with cryo-scanning electron microscopy showed that the formation of an extracellular matrix (ECM) is a phase of the isotropic growth of P. rubens that is uniquely related to germinating conidia. Furthermore, the ECM is observed only when a dry-state inoculation of the surface is applied, i.e., applying conidia directly from a 7-day-old colony, mimicking airborne contamination of the surface. When inoculation is done by spraying an aqueous conidial suspension, no ECM is observed. Moreover, it is concluded that the formation of an ECM requires active processes in the fungal cell. The porosity of the substrate proved that the ECM substance has high-viscosity characteristics. The present results stress that studies of indoor fungal growth should consider the method of inoculation, knowing that the common aqueous suspension may obscure specific stages in the initial phases of germination. PMID:22843536

  9. Investigation of Product Performance of Al-Metal Matrix Composites Brake Disc using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fatchurrohman, N.; Marini, C. D.; Suraya, S.; Iqbal, AKM Asif

    2016-02-01

    The increasing demand of fuel efficiency and light weight components in automobile sectors have led to the development of advanced material parts with improved performance. A specific class of MMCs which has gained a lot of attention due to its potential is aluminium metal matrix composites (Al-MMCs). Product performance investigation of Al- MMCs is presented in this article, where an Al-MMCs brake disc is analyzed using finite element analysis. The objective is to identify the potentiality of replacing the conventional iron brake disc with Al-MMCs brake disc. The simulation results suggested that the MMCs brake disc provided better thermal and mechanical performance as compared to the conventional cast iron brake disc. Although, the Al-MMCs brake disc dissipated higher maximum temperature compared to cast iron brake disc's maximum temperature. The Al-MMCs brake disc showed a well distributed temperature than the cast iron brake disc. The high temperature developed at the ring of the disc and heat was dissipated in circumferential direction. Moreover, better thermal dissipation and conduction at brake disc rotor surface played a major influence on the stress. As a comparison, the maximum stress and strain of Al-MMCs brake disc was lower than that induced on the cast iron brake disc.

  10. Cleavage of metastasis suppressor gene product KiSS-1 protein/metastin by matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Takino, Takahisa; Koshikawa, Naohiko; Miyamori, Hisashi; Tanaka, Motohiro; Sasaki, Takuma; Okada, Yasunori; Seiki, Motoharu; Sato, Hiroshi

    2003-07-24

    A human placenta cDNA library was screened by the expression cloning method for gene products that interact with matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and we isolated a cDNA whose product formed a stable complex with pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9. The cDNA encoded the metastasis suppressor gene KiSS-1. KiSS-1 protein was shown to form a complex with pro-MMP. KiSS-1 protein is known to be processed to peptide ligand of a G-protein-coupled receptor (hOT7T175) named metastin, and suppresses metastasis of tumors expressing the receptor. Active MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, MT3-MMP and MT5-MMP cleaved the Gly118-Leu119 peptide bond of not only full-length KiSS-1 protein but also metastin decapeptide. Metastin decapeptide induced formation of focal adhesion and actin stress fibers in cells expressing the receptor, and digestion of metastin decapeptide by MMP abolished its ligand activity. Migration of HT1080 cells expressing hOT7T175 that harbor a high-level MMP activity was only slightly suppressed by either metastin decapeptide or MMP inhibitor BB-94 alone, but the combination of metastin decapeptide and BB-94 showed a synergistic effect in blocking cell migration. We propose that metastin could be used as an antimetastatic agent in combination with MMP inhibitor, or MMP-resistant forms of metastin could be developed and may also be efficacious.

  11. Simulation of coherence selection by pulsed field gradients in liquid-state NMR using an auxiliary matrix formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edwards, Luke J.

    2014-03-01

    An algorithm for simulating coherence selection due to a pulse sequence element consisting of two pulsed field gradients separated by a short collection of pulses and delays is introduced. This algorithm involves computation of the matrix exponential of an auxiliary matrix twice the size of the system Liouvillian, a dimensional increase smaller than is required with other known computational methods. Approximations valid for most simulations of liquid-state NMR spectra are involved in the derivation. Diffusion is omitted, but could be treated in an approximate way as a damping over the pulse sequence element. Several NMR pulse sequences using gradients for coherence selection have been implemented, making use of the functionality of Spinach (http://spindynamics.org/Spinach.php). Example simulations testing these implementations are presented, and the extent to which the formal dimensional reduction can lead to a speedup in simulation time discussed. It is found that the previously known methods can be made competitive with the auxiliary matrix method by making use of their embarrassingly parallel nature. Cases where the relative dimensional reduction of the auxiliary matrix method is very large, or where efficient parallelization of the simulation independent of the nature of the algorithm used exists, are found to lead to situations beneficial for the auxiliary matrix algorithm in this comparison.

  12. Low-lying excited states in armchair polyacene within Pariser-Parr-Pople model: A density matrix renormalization group study

    SciTech Connect

    Das, Mousumi

    2014-03-28

    We studied the nature of the ground state and low-lying excited states of armchair polyacene oligomers (Polyphenanthrene) within long-range Pariser-Parr-Pople model Hamiltonian with up to 14 monomers using symmetrized density matrix renormalization group technique. The ground state of all armchair polyacenes studied is found to be singlet. The results show that lowest singlet dipole allowed excited state has higher energy for armchair polyacenes as compared to linear fused polyacenes. Moreover, unlike linear fused polyacenes, the lowest singlet excited state of these oligomers is always found to lie below the lowest dipole forbidden two-photon state indicating that these armchair polyacene oligomers strongly fluoresce. The calculations of low-lying excitations on singly and triply electron doped armchair polyacene oligomers show a low energy band with strong transition dipole moment that coupled to charge conductivity. This implies armchair polyacene posses novel field-effect transistor properties.

  13. Solid state production of ethanol from sorghum

    SciTech Connect

    Henk, L.L.; Linden, J.C.

    1995-12-01

    Ethanol, produced from renewable resources, such as corn, sugar cane and sweet sorghum, is used as an oxygenate in reformulated gasoline. For biofuels to become economical, means of lowering production costs must be found. Our research focuses on using a modified method of ensiling to produce ethanol from sorghum. Formic acid, +/- cellulase, and yeast were applied to fresh field-chopped sorghum and then packed tightly into five-gallon plastic silos. Counter-current extraction methods were used as a means of biofuel separation. Sorghum receiving 5 IU/grain dry weight cellulase produced 37.7 liters of ethanol per metric ton on a wet weight basis. Sorghum not receiving cellulose additives produced 23.4 liters of ethanol per metric ton. An ethanol plant of intermediate size (565,272 liters of anhydrous ethanol/year) can operate using sorghum grown on less than 1400 acres.

  14. Connective tissue growth factor increases matrix metalloproteinase-2 and suppresses tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 production by cultured renal interstitial fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yang, Min; Huang, Haichang; Li, Jingzi; Huang, Wen; Wang, Haiyan

    2007-01-01

    The involvement of gelatinase (matrix metalloproteinase-2 [MMP-2] and MMP-9) in the matrix remodeling and development of tubulointerstitial fibrosis has been studied recently, but relatively little is known about the regulators and the mechanisms controlling the activation and expression of gelatinase in renal fibroblasts. In these studies, the production and underlying signaling pathway for gelatinase by exogenous connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) treatment were investigated. Here, we show that CTGF acts as a potent promoter of the activation and expression of MMP-2, but not MMP-9 in normal rat kidney fibroblasts cell line (NRK-49F). We found that CTGF significantly increased the activity of MMP-2, as well as MMP-2 protein in conditioned medium and MMP-2 mRNA levels in cells. In studies to address the mechanisms involved in the regulation of MMP-2 activity, we found that the tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), the inhibitor of MMP-2, decreased significantly when cells were treated with CTGF. Further studies showed that extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling is responsible for most of the CTGF-induced MMP-2 expression and TIMP-2 suppression. When NRK-49F fibroblasts were incubated with CTGF, activation of ERK1/2 signaling was observed. Suppression of ERK1/2 activation with nontoxic concentrations of PD98059, a specific inhibitor of ERK activation, was associated with a reduction of CTGF-stimulated MMP-2 activity and protein expression. In addition, the CTGF-mediated reduction of TIMP-2 activity and protein expression was prevented when ERK1/2 activation was inhibited by PD98059. These results provide evidence that CTGF augments activation of MMP-2 through an effect on MMP-2 protein expression and TIMP-2 suppression, and that these effects are dependent on the activation of the ERK1/2 pathway.

  15. Cost effective production techniques for continuous fiber reinforced ceramic matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Vogel, W.D.; Spelz, U.

    1995-09-01

    Cost effective techniques for fabrication of continuous fibre reinforced ceramic matrix composites like filament winding, prepreg technique and resin transfer moulding are reported. The advantages and disadvantages of the three different manufacture routes are given and examples are shown.

  16. Identification of transformation products during advanced oxidation of diatrizoate: Effect of water matrix and oxidation process.

    PubMed

    Azerrad, Sara P; Lütke Eversloh, Christian; Gilboa, Maayan; Schulz, Manoj; Ternes, Thomas; Dosoretz, Carlos G

    2016-10-15

    Removal of micropollutants from reverse osmosis (RO) brines of wastewater desalination by oxidation processes is influenced by the scavenging capacity of brines components, resulting in the accumulation of transformation products (TPs) rather than complete mineralization. In this work the iodinated contrast media diatrizoate (DTZ) was used as model compound due to its relative resistance to oxidation. Identification of TPs was performed in ultrapure water (UPW) and RO brines applying nonthermal plasma (NTP) and UVA-TiO2 as oxidation techniques. The influence of main RO brines components in the formation and accumulation of TPs, such as chloride, bicarbonate alkalinity and humic acid, was also studied during UVA-TiO2. DTZ oxidation pattern in UPW resulted similar in both UVA-TiO2 and NTP achieving 66 and 61% transformation, respectively. However, DTZ transformation in RO brines was markedly lower in UVA-TiO2 (9%) than in NTP (27%). These differences can be attributed to the synergic effect of RO brines components during NTP. Moreover, reactive species other than hydroxyl radical contributed to DTZ transformation, i.e., direct photolysis in UVA-TiO2 and direct photolysis + O3 in NTP accounted for 16 and 23%, respectively. DTZ transformation led to iodide formation in both oxidation techniques but it further oxidized to iodate by ozone in NTP. In total 14 transformation products were identified in UPW of which 3 were present only in UVA-TiO2 and 2 were present exclusively in NTP; 5 of the 14 TPs were absent in RO brines. Five of them were new and were denoted as TP-474A/B, TP-522, TP-586, TP-602, TP-628. TP-522 (mono-chlorinated) was elucidated only in presence of high chloride titer-synthetic water matrix in NTP, most probably formed by active chlorine species generated in situ. TPs accumulation in RO brines was markedly different in comparison to UPW. This denotes the influence of RO brines components in the formation of reactive species that could further attack

  17. Iron Oxidation States and Distribution in the 4Bi2O3. PbO Glass Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simon, V.; Pop, R.; Neumann, M.; Chiuzbaian, S. G.; Coldea, M.; Simon, S.

    Magnetic susceptibility and XPS results on xFe2O3 . (100-x) [4Bi2O3 . PbO] where 0states and the distribution of iron ions in the lead-bismuthate matrix. The valence state of iron ions changes from Fe3+ to Fe2+ as the Fe2O3 content increases from 1 to 20 mol%. The XPS data indicate the migration of metallic elements in the inner part of the bulk investigated samples.

  18. Computer programs for calculation of matrix stability and frequency response from a state-space system description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidel, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    FORTRAN computer subroutines stemming from requirements to process state variable system equations for systems of high order are presented. They find the characteristic equation of a matrix using the method of Danilevsky, the number of roots with positive real parts using the Routh-Horwitz alternate formulation, convert a state variable system description to a Laplace transfer function using the method of Bollinger, and evaluate that transfer function and obtain its frequency response. A sample problem is presented to demonstrate use of the subroutines.

  19. Human osteoblast-like cells respond to mechanical strain with increased bone matrix protein production independent of hormonal regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harter, L. V.; Hruska, K. A.; Duncan, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of osteosarcoma cell lines to chronic intermittent strain increases the activity of mechano-sensitive cation (SA-cat) channels. The impact of mechano-transduction on osteoblast function has not been well studied. We analyzed the expression and production of bone matrix proteins in human osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells, OHS-4, in response to chronic intermittent mechanical strain. The OHS-4 cells exhibit type I collagen production, 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D-inducible osteocalcin, and mineralization of the extracellular matrix. The matrix protein message level was determined from total RNA isolated from cells exposed to 1-4 days of chronic intermittent strain. Northern analysis for type I collagen indicated that strain increased collagen message after 48 h. Immunofluorescent labeling of type I collagen demonstrated that secretion was also enhanced with mechanical strain. Osteopontin message levels were increased several-fold by the application of mechanical load in the absence of vitamin D, and the two stimuli together produced an additive effect. Osteocalcin secretion was also increased with cyclic strain. Osteocalcin levels were not detectable in vitamin D-untreated control cells. However, after 4 days of induced load, significant levels of osteocalcin were observed in the medium. With vitamin D present, osteocalcin levels were 4 times higher in the medium of strained cells compared to nonstrained controls. We conclude that mechanical strain of osteoblast-like cells is sufficient to increase the transcription and secretion of matrix proteins via mechano-transduction without hormonal induction.

  20. Production of Textbooks and Instructional Materials in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wall, Robert S.; Corn, Anne L.

    2002-01-01

    A survey found a wide range of capabilities regarding the production of textbooks and instructional materials for students with visual impairments in 42 states. Shortages of qualified Braille transcribers and inadequate funding were cited as barriers to developing better services. The most effective model was a centralized production center.…

  1. The Impact of Teachers Unions on State-Level Productivity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pantuosco, Louis J.; Ullrich, Laura D.

    2010-01-01

    Using a reduced form version of a theoretical expansion of Hoxby's (1996) education production model, we investigate whether bargaining teachers unions are a boon or a bust to the economy of the state. We anticipate teachers, being in the public sector veiled from competition, are less likely to be efficient. Yet, their product, education,…

  2. State regulation and power plant productivity: background and recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1980-09-01

    This report was prepared by representatives of several state regulatory agencies. It is a guide to some of the activities currently under way in state agencies to promote increased availability of electrical generating power plants. Standard measures of plant performance are defined and the nature of data bases that report such measures is discussed. It includes reviews of current state, federal, and industry programs to enhance power plant productivity and provides detailed outlines of programs in effect in California, Illinois, Michigan, New York, North Carolina, Ohio, and Texas. A number of actions are presented that could be adopted by state regulatory agencies, depending on local conditions. They include: develop a commission position or policy statement to encourage productivity improvements by utilities; coordinate state efforts with ongoing industry and government programs to improve the acquisition of power plant performance data and the maintenance of quality information systems; acquire the capability to perform independent analyses of power plant productivity; direct the establishment of productivity improvement programs, including explicit performance objectives for both existing and planned power plants, and a performance program; establish a program of incentives to motivate productivity improvement activities; and participate in ongoing efforts at all levels and initiate new actions to promote productivity improvements.

  3. R-matrix calculations of triplet gerade states of molecular hydrogen and their use for high-resolution spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oueslati, H.; Argoubi, F.; Bezzaouia, S.; Telmini, M.; Jungen, Ch.

    2014-03-01

    A variational R-matrix approach combined with multichannel quantum defect theory is used for a computational study of triplet gerade states of H2. Electron-ion reaction (quantum defect) matrices are calculated as functions of internuclear distance and energy for the bound and continuum ranges including singly and doubly excited configurations built on the 1σg (X+2Σg+) and 1σu (A+2Σu+) core states of the H2+ ion. It is shown how these matrices can be reduced to effective quantum defect functions adapted to the analysis of high-resolution spectra in the bound range. These R-matrix effective quantum defects are finally adjusted to the available experimental data [Sprecher et al., J. Phys. Chem. A 117, 9462 (2013), 10.1021/jp311793t], producing agreement with experiment to within 0.5 cm-1, nearly as good as obtained by Sprecher et al. In addition, the R-matrix calculations predict the evolution of the quantum defects for higher energies, in a range extending far into the electronic continuum.

  4. Production of an osteoinductive demineralised bone matrix powder without the use of organic solvents.

    PubMed

    Eagle, M J; Rooney, P; Kearney, J N

    2015-09-01

    Demineralised bone matrix (DBM) is produced by grinding cortical bone into a powder, sieving the powder to obtain a desired size range and then demineralising the powder using acid. Protocols for the production of DBM powder have been published since 1965 and the powder can be used in lyophilised form or it can be mixed with a carrier to produce a paste or putty. The powder is generally produced from cortical bone which has been processed to remove blood, bone marrow and bone marrow components, including fat. Removal of fat is accomplished by incorporating incubation in an organic solvent, often chloroform, chloroform/methanol or acetone. The use of organic solvents in a clean room environment in a human tissue bank is problematic and involves operator exposure and the potential for the solvent to be trapped in air filters or recirculated throughout the clean room suite. Consequently, in this study, we have developed a cortical bone washing step which removes fat/lipid without the use of an organic solvent. Bone was prepared from six femoral shafts from three donors by dissecting soft tissue and bisecting the shaft, the shafts were then cut into ~9-10 cm lengths. These struts were then taken through a series of hot water washes at 56-59 °C, centrifugation and decontamination steps. Washed cortical struts were then lyophilised before being ground with a compressed air milling machine. The ground bone was sieved, demineralised, freeze-dried and terminally sterilised with a target dose of 25 kGy gamma irradiation. The DBM powder was evaluated for residual calcium content, in vitro cytotoxicity and osteoinductivity by implantation into the muscle of an athymic mouse. Data indicated that in addition to removing in excess of 97% DNA and extractable soluble protein, the washing protocol reduced lipid 10,000-fold. The processed bone was easily ground without clogging the grinder; the sterilised DBM powder was not cytotoxic but was osteoinductive in the animal model

  5. Matrix elements for the ground-state to ground-state 2{nu}{beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -} decay of Te isotopes in a hybrid model

    SciTech Connect

    Bes, D. R.; Civitarese, O.

    2010-01-15

    Theoretical matrix elements, for the ground-state to ground-state two-neutrino double-{beta}-decay mode (2{nu}{beta}{sup -}{beta}{sup -}gs->gs) of {sup 128,130}Te isotopes, are calculated within a formalism that describes interactions between neutrons in a superfluid phase and protons in a normal phase. The elementary degrees of freedom of the model are proton-pair modes and pairs of protons and quasineutrons. The calculation is basically a parameter-free one, because all relevant parameters are fixed from the phenomenology. A comparison with the available experimental data is presented.

  6. Aberrant production of extracellular matrix proteins and dysfunction in kidney endothelial cells with a short duration of diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Grutzmacher, Cathy; Park, SunYoung; Zhao, Yun; Morrison, Margaret E.; Sheibani, Nader

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy is the most common cause of end-stage renal disease and is a major risk factor for cardiovascular disease. In the United States, microvascular complications during diabetic nephropathy contribute to high morbidity and mortality rates. However, the cell-autonomous impact of diabetes on kidney endothelial cell function requires further investigation. Male Akita/+ [autosomal dominant mutation in the insulin II gene (Ins2)] mice reproducibly develop diabetes by 4 wk of age. Here, we examined the impact a short duration of diabetes had on kidney endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells were prepared from nondiabetic and diabetic mice (4 wk of diabetes) to delineate the early changes in endothelial cell function. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice following 4 wk of diabetes demonstrated aberrant expression of extracellular matrix proteins including decreased osteopontin and increased fibronectin expression which correlated with increased α5-integrin expression. These changes were associated with the attenuation of migration and capillary morphogenesis. Kidney endothelial cells from Akita/+ mice had decreased VEGF levels but increased levels of endothelial nitric oxide synthase(eNOS) and NO, suggesting uncoupling of VEGF-mediated NO production. Knocking down eNOS expression in Akita/+ kidney endothelial cells increased VEGF expression, endothelial cell migration, and capillary morphogenesis. Furthermore, attenuation of sprouting angiogenesis of aortas from Akita/+ mice with 8 wk of diabetes was restored in the presence of the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine. These studies demonstrate that aberrant endothelial cell function with a short duration of diabetes may set the stage for vascular dysfunction and rarefaction at later stages of diabetes. PMID:23077100

  7. Silicate-matrix active media for tunable solid-state lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Kuznetsova, Rimma T; Mayer, G V; Manekina, Yu A; Tel'minov, E N; Arabei, S M; Pavich, T A; Solovyov, Konstantin N

    2007-08-31

    The lasing characteristics of solid active media based on laser dyes (rhodamines, coumarin 2, paraterphenyl) doped into silicate bulk matrices and thin films of different compositions are studied upon optical excitation. The lasing efficiency, photostability, and spectral parameters of laser media are investigated as functions of the excitation wavelength and intensity. Variations in these parameters due to the interaction of organic luminophores with a silicate matrix and radiation are discussed. (active media. lasers)

  8. Conformal affine Toda model of two-dimensional black holes: The end-point state and the [ital S] matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Belgiorno, F.; Cattaneo, A.S. ); Fucito, F. ); Martellini, M. )

    1993-09-15

    In this paper we investigate a dilaton-gravity theory, which can be viewed as an SL(2) conformal affine Toda (CAT) theory. This new model is inspired by some previous work by Bilal, Callan, and de Alwis. The main results obtained in our approach are (i) a field redefinition of the CAT basis in terms of which it is possible to get the black hole solutions already known in the literature, and (ii) an investigation of the scattering matrix problem for the quantum black hole states. Given the validity of our assumptions, there is a range of values of the [ital N] free-falling shock matter fields forming the black hole solution, for which the end-point state of the black hole evaporation is a zero temperature regular remnant geometry. The quantum evolution to this final state seems to be nonunitary, in agreement with Hawking's scenario for black hole evaporation.

  9. Obtaining Hartree-Fock and density functional theory doubly excited states with Car-Parrinello density matrix search

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Wenkel; Isborn, Christine M.; Li, Xiaosong

    2009-11-01

    The calculation of doubly excited states is one of the major problems plaguing the modern day excited state workhorse methodology of linear response time dependent Hartree-Fock (TDHF) and density function theory (TDDFT). We have previously shown that the use of a resonantly tuned field within real-time TDHF and TDDFT is able to simultaneously excite both the α and β electrons to achieve the two-electron excited states of minimal basis H2 and HeH+ [C. M. Isborn and X. Li, J. Chem. Phys. 129, 204107 (2008)]. We now extend this method to many electron systems with the use of our Car-Parrinello density matrix search (CP-DMS) with a first-principles fictitious mass method for wave function optimization [X. Li, C. L. Moss, W. Liang, and Y. Feng, J. Chem. Phys. 130, 234115 (2009)]. Real-time TDHF/TDDFT is used during the application of the laser field perturbation, driving the electron density toward the doubly excited state. The CP-DMS method then converges the density to the nearest stationary state. We present these stationary state doubly excited state energies and properties at the HF and DFT levels for H2, HeH+, lithium hydride, ethylene, and butadiene.

  10. Production and the welfare state: the political context of reforms.

    PubMed

    Navarro, V

    1991-01-01

    This article is an analysis of the political context of reforms in the production process and in the welfare state. The theories of legitimation and Fordism are criticized for considering the capitalist class the main force behind the reforms. The working class and the process of class struggle are primarily responsible for changes in production and for the establishment of the welfare state. The author then shows that the changes in production and in the state that occurred after World War II were a response to political events triggered by labor's rebellions and capital's need to respond to those rebellions. Post-Fordism and the political practice that derives from it are criticized for their hasty dismissal of class and class practices by the dominated forces in society. The article ends by offering an alternative strategy for change.

  11. Rydberg and continuum states of the HeH+ molecular ion: Variational R -matrix and multichannel quantum defect theory calculations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bouhali, I.; Bezzaouia, S.; Telmini, M.; Jungen, Ch.

    2016-08-01

    Variational ab initio R -matrix theory combined with generalized multichannel quantum defect theory is used to calculate singly excited Rydberg states of the hydrohelium molecular ion, HeH+, for Σ,3+1,Π,31,Δ,31,Φ,31, and Γ,31 symmetry. Bound levels are calculated for n values up to n ≈10 , and continuum states up to ≈3 eV above the HeH2 + threshold. The calculations span the range of internuclear distances R from 1 to 5 bohrs. The present work follows a preliminary study on the Δ,31 states of HeH+ [Bouhali, Bezzaouia, Telmini, and Jungen, EPJ Web Conf. 84, 04004 (2015), 10.1051/epjconf/20158404004] which was also based on R -matrix theory. Further—although limited to rather small R values—the present work extends the recent ab initio computations of Jungen and Jungen [Mol. Phys. 113, 2333 (2015), 10.1080/00268976.2015.1040094] to higher excitation energies which are not accessible to standard quantum-chemical methods. Where a comparison with the calculations of Jungen and Jungen and other older results can be made, namely for n ≤5 , very good agreement with previous ab initio results is obtained.

  12. Vertical stratification of matrix production is essential for physical integrity and architecture of macrocolony biofilms of E scherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Serra, Diego O.; Klauck, Gisela

    2015-01-01

    Summary Bacterial macrocolony biofilms grow into intricate three‐dimensional structures that depend on self‐produced extracellular polymers conferring protection, cohesion and elasticity to the biofilm. In E scherichia coli, synthesis of this matrix – consisting of amyloid curli fibres and cellulose – requires CsgD, a transcription factor regulated by the stationary phase sigma factor RpoS, and occurs in the nutrient‐deprived cells of the upper layer of macrocolonies. Is this asymmetric matrix distribution functionally important or is it just a fortuitous by‐product of an unavoidable nutrient gradient? In order to address this question, the RpoS‐dependent csgD promoter was replaced by a vegetative promoter. This re‐wiring of csgD led to CsgD and matrix production in both strata of macrocolonies, with the lower layer transforming into a rigid ‘base plate’ of growing yet curli‐connected cells. As a result, the two strata broke apart followed by desiccation and exfoliation of the top layer. By contrast, matrix‐free cells at the bottom of wild‐type macrocolonies maintain colony contact with the humid agar support by flexibly filling the space that opens up under buckling areas of the macrocolony. Precisely regulated stratification in matrix‐free and matrix‐producing cell layers is thus essential for the physical integrity and architecture of E . coli macrocolony biofilms. PMID:26234179

  13. Combination of platelet-rich plasma within periodontal ligament stem cell sheets enhances cell differentiation and matrix production.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qiu; Li, Bei; Yuan, Lin; Dong, Zhiwei; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Han; Sun, Jin; Ge, Song; Jin, Yan

    2017-03-01

    The longstanding goal of periodontal therapy is to regenerate periodontal tissues. Although platelet-rich plasma (PRP) has been gaining increasing popularity for use in the orofacial region, whether PRP is useful for periodontal regeneration is still unknown. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a mixture of periodontal ligament stem cell (PDLSC) sheets and PRP promoted bone regeneration, one of the most important measurement indices of periodontal tissue regenerative capability in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we evaluated the effects of different doses of PRP on the differentiation of human PDLSCs. Then cell sheet formation, extracellular matrix deposition and osteogenic gene expression in response to different doses of PRP treatment during sheet grafting was investigated. Furthermore, we implanted PDLSC sheets treated with 1% PRP subcutaneously into immunocompromised mice to evaluate their bone-regenerative capability. The results revealed that 1% PRP significantly enhanced the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. Based on the production of extracellular matrix proteins, the results of scanning electron microscopy and the expression of the osteogenic genes ALP, Runx2, Col-1 and OCN, the provision of 1% PRP for PDLSC sheets was the most effective PRP administration mode for cell sheet formation. The results of in vivo transplantation showed that 1% PRP-mediated PDLSC sheets exhibited better periodontal tissue regenerative capability than those obtained without PRP intervention. These data suggest that a suitable concentration of PRP stimulation may enhance extracellular matrix production and positively affect cell behaviour in PDLSC sheets. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  14. Characterization of the Natural History of Extracellular Matrix Production in Tissue-Engineered Vascular Grafts during Neovessel Formation

    PubMed Central

    Naito, Yuji; Williams-Fritze, Misty; Duncan, Daniel R.; Church, Spencer N.; Hibino, Narutoshi; Madri, Joseph A.; Humphrey, Jay D.; Shinoka, Toshiharu; Breuer, Christopher K.

    2011-01-01

    Background The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a critical determinant of neovessel integrity. Materials and Methods: Thirty-six (polyglycolic acid + polycaprolactone and poly lactic acid) tissue-engineered vascular grafts seeded with syngeneic bone marrow mononuclear cells were implanted as inferior vena cava interposition grafts in C57BL/6 mice. Specimens were characterized using immunohistochemical staining and qPCR for representative ECM components in addition to matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). Total collagen, elastin, and glycosaminoglycan (GAG) contents were determined. MMP activity was measured using zymography. Results Collagen production on histology demonstrated an initial increase in type III at 1 week followed by type I production at 2 weeks and type IV at 4 weeks. Gene expression of both type I and type III peaked at 2 weeks, whereas type IV continued to increase over the 4-week period. Histology demonstrated fibrillin-1 deposition at 1 week followed by elastin production at 4 weeks. Elastin gene expression significantly increased at 4 weeks, whereas fibrillin-1 decreased at 4 weeks. GAG demonstrated abundant production at each time point on histology. Gene expression of decorin significantly increased at 4 weeks, whereas versican decreased over time. Biochemical analysis showed that total collagen production was greatest at 2 weeks, and there was a significant increase in elastin and GAG production at 4 weeks. Histological characterization of MMPs showed abundant production of MMP-2 at each time point, while MMP-9 decreased over the 4-week period. Gene expression of MMP-2 significantly increased at 4 weeks, whereas MMP-9 significantly decreased at 4 weeks. Conclusions ECM production during neovessel formation is characterized by early ECM deposition followed by extensive remodeling. PMID:21996715

  15. A Time Integration Algorithm Based on the State Transition Matrix for Structures with Time Varying and Nonlinear Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2003-01-01

    A variable order method of integrating the structural dynamics equations that is based on the state transition matrix has been developed. The method has been evaluated for linear time variant and nonlinear systems of equations. When the time variation of the system can be modeled exactly by a polynomial it produces nearly exact solutions for a wide range of time step sizes. Solutions of a model nonlinear dynamic response exhibiting chaotic behavior have been computed. Accuracy of the method has been demonstrated by comparison with solutions obtained by established methods.

  16. A Numerical Scheme for Ordinary Differential Equations Having Time Varying and Nonlinear Coefficients Based on the State Transition Matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bartels, Robert E.

    2002-01-01

    A variable order method of integrating initial value ordinary differential equations that is based on the state transition matrix has been developed. The method has been evaluated for linear time variant and nonlinear systems of equations. While it is more complex than most other methods, it produces exact solutions at arbitrary time step size when the time variation of the system can be modeled exactly by a polynomial. Solutions to several nonlinear problems exhibiting chaotic behavior have been computed. Accuracy of the method has been demonstrated by comparison with an exact solution and with solutions obtained by established methods.

  17. Roadmap for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-10-01

    arise. Wild Rose manure digester facility in Wisconsin, Dairyland Power Cooperative Roadmap for Bioenergy and Biobased Products in the United States...all stages of biomass tech- nology, this Roadmap update discusses policy measures and related efforts to assist with market penetration of biofuels...barriers be overcome in all stages of the life cycle of developing biomass feedstocks and converting them to biobased fuels, power, and products

  18. Diabatic Population Matrix Formalism for Performing Molecular Mechanics Style Simulations with Multiple Electronic States.

    PubMed

    Park, Jae Woo; Rhee, Young Min

    2014-12-09

    An accurate description of nonbonded interactions is important in investigating dynamics of molecular systems. In many situations, fixed point charge models are successfully applied to explaining various chemical phenomena. However, these models with conventional formulations will not be appropriate in elucidating the detailed dynamics during nonadiabatic events. This is mainly because the chemical properties of any molecule, especially its electronic populations, significantly change with respect to molecular distortions in the vicinity of the surface crossing. To overcome this issue in molecular simulations yet within the framework of the fixed point charge model, we define a diabatic electronic population matrix and substitute it for the conventional adiabatic partial charges. We show that this matrix can be readily utilized toward attaining more reliable descriptions of Coulombic interactions, in combination with the interpolation formalism for obtaining the intramolecular interaction potential. We demonstrate how the mixed formalism with the diabatic charges and the interpolation can be applied to molecular simulations by conducting adiabatic and nonadiabatic molecular dynamics trajectory calculations of the green fluorescent protein chromophore anion in aqueous environment.

  19. Resonance Regge poles and the state-to-state F + H2 reaction: QP decomposition, parametrized S matrix, and semiclassical complex angular momentum analysis of the angular scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Connor, J. N. L.

    2013-03-01

    Three new contributions to the complex angular momentum (CAM) theory of differential cross sections (DCSs) for chemical reactions are reported. They exploit recent advances in the Padé reconstruction of a scattering (S) matrix in a region surrounding the {Renolimits} J axis, where J is the total angular momentum quantum variable, starting from the discrete values, J = 0, 1, 2, …. In particular, use is made of Padé continuations obtained by Sokolovski, Castillo, and Tully [Chem. Phys. Lett. 313, 225 (1999), 10.1016/S0009-2614(99)01016-7] for the S matrix of the benchmark F + H2(vi = 0, ji = 0, mi = 0) → FH(vf = 3, jf = 3, mf = 0) + H reaction. Here vi, ji, mi and vf, jf, mf are the initial and final vibrational, rotational, and helicity quantum numbers, respectively. The three contributions are: (1) A new exact decomposition of the partial wave (PW) S matrix is introduced, which is called the QP decomposition. The P part contains information on the Regge poles. The Q part is then constructed exactly by subtracting a rapidly oscillating phase and the PW P matrix from the input PW S matrix. After a simple modification, it is found that the corresponding scattering subamplitudes provide insight into the angular-scattering dynamics using simple partial wave series (PWS) computations. It is shown that the leading n = 0 Regge pole contributes to the small-angle scattering in the centre-of-mass frame. (2) The Q matrix part of the QP decomposition has simpler properties than the input S matrix. This fact is exploited to deduce a parametrized (analytic) formula for the PW S matrix in which all terms have a direct physical interpretation. This is a long sort-after goal in reaction dynamics, and in particular for the state-to-state F + H2 reaction. (3) The first definitive test is reported for the accuracy of a uniform semiclassical (asymptotic) CAM theory for a DCS based on the Watson transformation. The parametrized S matrix obtained in contribution (2) is used in both

  20. Production and mechanical properties of Al-SiC metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karvanis, K.; Fasnakis, D.; Maropoulos, A.; Papanikolaou, S.

    2016-11-01

    The usage of Al-SiC Metal Matrix Composites is constantly increasing in the last years due to their unique properties such as light weight, high strength, high specific modulus, high fatigue strength, high hardness and low density. Al-SiC composites of various carbide compositions were produced using a centrifugal casting machine. The mechanical properties, tensile and compression strength, hardness and drop-weight impact strength were studied in order to determine the optimum carbide % in the metal matrix composites. Scanning electron microscopy was used to study the microstructure-property correlation. It was observed that the tensile and the compressive strength of the composites increased as the proportion of silicon carbide became higher in the composites. Also with increasing proportion of silicon carbide in the composite, the material became harder and appeared to have smaller values for total displacement and total energy during impact testing.

  1. Macromolecularly crowded in vitro microenvironments accelerate the production of extracellular matrix-rich supramolecular assemblies

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Pramod; Satyam, Abhigyan; Fan, Xingliang; Collin, Estelle; Rochev, Yury; Rodriguez, Brian J.; Gorelov, Alexander; Dillon, Simon; Joshi, Lokesh; Raghunath, Michael; Pandit, Abhay; Zeugolis, Dimitrios I.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic strategies based on the principles of tissue engineering by self-assembly put forward the notion that functional regeneration can be achieved by utilising the inherent capacity of cells to create highly sophisticated supramolecular assemblies. However, in dilute ex vivo microenvironments, prolonged culture time is required to develop an extracellular matrix-rich implantable device. Herein, we assessed the influence of macromolecular crowding, a biophysical phenomenon that regulates intra- and extra-cellular activities in multicellular organisms, in human corneal fibroblast culture. In the presence of macromolecules, abundant extracellular matrix deposition was evidenced as fast as 48 h in culture, even at low serum concentration. Temperature responsive copolymers allowed the detachment of dense and cohesive supramolecularly assembled living substitutes within 6 days in culture. Morphological, histological, gene and protein analysis assays demonstrated maintenance of tissue-specific function. Macromolecular crowding opens new avenues for a more rational design in engineering of clinically relevant tissue modules in vitro. PMID:25736020

  2. The experimental production of matrix lumps within chondrules: Evidence of post-formational processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Connolly, Harold C., Jr.; Hewins, Roger H.

    1993-01-01

    The processes that acted upon chondrules after their formation are as important clues to the nature of the early solar nebula as are the exact processes that formed the chondrules. Recent experiments have studied the rim forming processes and the effects the processes have on chondrules. We present below information on how matrix inclusions found within chondrules may have been formed and the potential usefulness of this information.

  3. Tannase Production by Solid State Fermentation of Cashew Apple Bagasse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podrigues, Tigressa H. S.; Dantas, Maria Alcilene A.; Pinto, Gustavo A. S.; Gonçalves, Luciana R. B.

    The ability of Aspergillus oryzae for the production of tannase by solid state fermentation was investigated using cashew apple bagasse (CAB) as substrate. The effect of initial water content was studied and maximum enzyme production was obtained when 60 mL of water was added to 100.0 g of CAB. The fungal strain was able to grow on CAB without any supplementation but a low enzyme activity was obtained, 0.576 U/g of dry substrate (gds). Optimization of process parameters such as supplementation with tannic acid, phosphorous, and different organic and inorganic nitrogen sources was studied. The addition of tannic acid affected the enzyme production and maximum tannase activity (2.40 U/gds) was obtained with 2.5% (w/w) supplementation. Supplementation with ammonium nitrate, peptone, and yeast extract exerted no influence on tannase production. Ammonium sulphate improved the enzyme production in 3.75-fold compared with control. Based on the experimental results, CAB is a promising substrate for solid state fermentation, enabling A. oryzae growth and the production of tannase, with a maximum activity of 3.42 U/gds and enzyme productivity of 128.5×10-3 U·gds -1·h-1.

  4. Analysis of steady-state shallow cell solidification in metal matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Michaud, V.J.; Mortensen, A.

    1996-11-01

    The influence of capillarity on the near-plane front solidification of metal matrix composites is examined by analysis of the one-sided solidification of a binary alloy in a planar interstice of constant width in the limit of low Peclet number. The authors assume that in this limit, solute isoconcentrates in the liquid are everywhere orthogonal to the growth direction. Capillary causes the alloy to solidify in a cellular mode, even in the absence of constitutional supercooling. Two solution branches are derived for this solidification mode, one for shallow symmetric cells, the other for asymmetric cells. Restricting attention to the former solution branch, as the growth velocity increases, or the temperature gradient decreases, the cell amplitude increases gradually, to reach a critical point which depends strongly on the contact angle along the reinforcement/solidification front triple line.

  5. Floquet topological systems in the vicinity of band crossings: Reservoir-induced coherence and steady-state entropy production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehghani, Hossein; Mitra, Aditi

    2016-06-01

    Results are presented for an open Floquet topological system represented by Dirac fermions coupled to a circularly polarized laser and an external reservoir. It is shown that when the separation between quasienergy bands becomes small, and comparable to the coupling strength to the reservoir, the reduced density matrix in the Floquet basis, even at steady state, has nonzero off-diagonal elements, with the magnitude of the off-diagonal elements increasing with the strength of the coupling to the reservoir. In contrast, the coupling to the reservoir only weakly affects the diagonal elements, hence inducing an effective coherence. The steady-state reduced density matrix synchronizes with the periodic drive, and a Fourier analysis allows the extraction of the occupation probabilities of the Floquet quasienergy levels. The lack of detailed balance at steady state is quantified in terms of an entropy-production rate, and it is shown that this equals the heat current flowing out of the system and into the reservoir. It is also shown that the entropy-production rate mainly depends on the off-diagonal components of the Floquet density matrix. Thus, a stronger coupling to the reservoir leads to an enhanced entropy-production rate, implying a more efficient removal of heat from the system, which in turn helps the system maintain coherence. Analytic expressions in the vicinity of the Dirac point are derived which highlights these results, and also indicates how the reservoir may be engineered to enhance the coherence of the system.

  6. Consumers' Kansei Needs Clustering Method for Product Emotional Design Based on Numerical Design Structure Matrix and Genetic Algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Deng-kai; Gu, Rong; Gu, Yu-feng; Yu, Sui-huai

    2016-01-01

    Consumers' Kansei needs reflect their perception about a product and always consist of a large number of adjectives. Reducing the dimension complexity of these needs to extract primary words not only enables the target product to be explicitly positioned, but also provides a convenient design basis for designers engaging in design work. Accordingly, this study employs a numerical design structure matrix (NDSM) by parameterizing a conventional DSM and integrating genetic algorithms to find optimum Kansei clusters. A four-point scale method is applied to assign link weights of every two Kansei adjectives as values of cells when constructing an NDSM. Genetic algorithms are used to cluster the Kansei NDSM and find optimum clusters. Furthermore, the process of the proposed method is presented. The details of the proposed approach are illustrated using an example of electronic scooter for Kansei needs clustering. The case study reveals that the proposed method is promising for clustering Kansei needs adjectives in product emotional design. PMID:27630709

  7. Consumers' Kansei Needs Clustering Method for Product Emotional Design Based on Numerical Design Structure Matrix and Genetic Algorithms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yan-Pu; Chen, Deng-Kai; Gu, Rong; Gu, Yu-Feng; Yu, Sui-Huai

    2016-01-01

    Consumers' Kansei needs reflect their perception about a product and always consist of a large number of adjectives. Reducing the dimension complexity of these needs to extract primary words not only enables the target product to be explicitly positioned, but also provides a convenient design basis for designers engaging in design work. Accordingly, this study employs a numerical design structure matrix (NDSM) by parameterizing a conventional DSM and integrating genetic algorithms to find optimum Kansei clusters. A four-point scale method is applied to assign link weights of every two Kansei adjectives as values of cells when constructing an NDSM. Genetic algorithms are used to cluster the Kansei NDSM and find optimum clusters. Furthermore, the process of the proposed method is presented. The details of the proposed approach are illustrated using an example of electronic scooter for Kansei needs clustering. The case study reveals that the proposed method is promising for clustering Kansei needs adjectives in product emotional design.

  8. Cotton production in the united states: production expenses and crop diversity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In the United States (U.S) cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) production expenses, as well as the diversity of crops grown on cotton operations, have changed over time. Census of Agriculture data from 1997, 2002, 2007, and 2012 and cost of production estimates from USDA’s Economic Research Service (ERS) we...

  9. Excited-state proton-transfer dynamics of 1-methyl-6-hydroxyquinolinium embedded in a solid matrix of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate).

    PubMed

    Park, Sun-Young; Lee, Young-Shin; Jang, Du-Jeon

    2008-11-28

    The excited-state intrinsic proton transfer and its geminate recombination, as well as the ground-state equilibria, of 1-methyl-6-hydroxyquinolinium embedded in a solid matrix of poly(2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate) have been studied by measuring time-resolved and steady-state fluorescence spectra along with absorption and excitation spectra. Proton transfer takes place within 3.3 ns to form ion pairs while its back-reaction occurs on the time scale of 3.7 ns. The ion pairs in the rigid alcoholic matrix go through neither diffusion to form free ions nor subsequent electronic rearrangement to form the keto species within their excited-state lifetimes.

  10. Entanglement as a resource to distinguish orthogonal product states

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Gao, Fei; Cao, Tian-Qing; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2016-01-01

    It is known that there are many sets of orthogonal product states which cannot be distinguished perfectly by local operations and classical communication (LOCC). However, these discussions have left the following open question: What entanglement resources are necessary and/or sufficient for this task to be possible with LOCC? In m ⊗ n, certain classes of unextendible product bases (UPB) which can be distinguished perfectly using entanglement as a resource, had been presented in 2008. In this paper, we present protocols which use entanglement more efficiently than teleportation to distinguish some classes of orthogonal product states in m ⊗ n, which are not UPB. For the open question, our results offer rather general insight into why entanglement is useful for such tasks, and present a better understanding of the relationship between entanglement and nonlocality. PMID:27458034

  11. Entanglement as a resource to distinguish orthogonal product states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhi-Chao; Gao, Fei; Cao, Tian-Qing; Qin, Su-Juan; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2016-07-01

    It is known that there are many sets of orthogonal product states which cannot be distinguished perfectly by local operations and classical communication (LOCC). However, these discussions have left the following open question: What entanglement resources are necessary and/or sufficient for this task to be possible with LOCC? In m ⊗ n, certain classes of unextendible product bases (UPB) which can be distinguished perfectly using entanglement as a resource, had been presented in 2008. In this paper, we present protocols which use entanglement more efficiently than teleportation to distinguish some classes of orthogonal product states in m ⊗ n, which are not UPB. For the open question, our results offer rather general insight into why entanglement is useful for such tasks, and present a better understanding of the relationship between entanglement and nonlocality.

  12. Development of a sensor and control system for the production of titanium matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Berzins, L.V.; McClelland, M.A.; Anklam, T.M.

    1995-03-01

    Titanium matrix composites promise to dramatically increase the thrust-to-weight ratio of gas turbine engines. Electron Beam Physical Vapor Deposition (EB-PVD) is ideal for coating fibers if issues with composition control can be worked out. LLNL is developing a control system based on Diode Laser Absorption Spectroscopy (DLAS) for the deposition of titanium orthorhombic alloys. In this paper, the important features and components of a DLAS control system are reviewed and a methodology for selecting the appropriate atomic transitions is described. Data characterizing the diagnostic performance as well as information on potential control strategies is presented. Finally, applications of this diagnostic to other alloy systems are discussed.

  13. Two-dimensional mass defect matrix plots for mapping genealogical links in mixtures of lignin depolymerisation products.

    PubMed

    Qi, Yulin; Hempelmann, Rolf; Volmer, Dietrich A

    2016-07-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant natural biopolymer, and lignin wastes are therefore potentially significant sources for renewable chemicals such as fuel compounds, as alternatives to fossil fuels. Waste valorisation of lignin is currently limited to a few applications such as in the pulp industry, however, because of the lack of effective extraction and characterisation methods for the chemically highly complex mixtures after decomposition. Here, we have implemented high resolution mass spectrometry and developed two-dimensional mass defect matrix plots as a data visualisation tool, similar to the Kendrick mass defect plots implemented in fields such as petroleomics. These 2D matrix plots greatly simplified the highly convoluted lignin mass spectral data acquired from Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR)-mass spectrometry, and the derived metrics provided confident peak assignments and strongly improved structural mapping of lignin decomposition product series from the various linkages within the lignin polymer after electrochemical decomposition. Graphical Abstract 2D mass defect matrix plot for a lignin sample after decomposition.

  14. Highly resolved proton matrix ENDOR of oriented photosystem II membranes in the S2 state.

    PubMed

    Nagashima, Hiroki; Mino, Hiroyuki

    2013-10-01

    Proton matrix ENDOR was performed to investigate the protons close to the manganese cluster in oriented samples of photosystem II (PS II). Eight pairs of ENDOR signals were detected in oriented PS II membranes. At an angle of θ=0° between the membrane normal vector n and the external field H0, five pairs of ENDOR signals were exchangeable in D2O medium and three pairs were not exchangeable in D2O medium. The hyperfine splitting of 3.60MHz at θ=0° increased to 3.80MHz at θ=90°. The non-exchangeable signals with 1.73MHz hyperfine splitting at θ=0°, which were assigned to a proton in an amino acid residue, were not detected at θ=90° in oriented PS II or in non-oriented PS II. Highly resolved spectra show that only limited numbers of protons were detected by CW-ENDOR spectra, although many protons were located near the CaMn4O5 cluster. The detected exchangeable protons were proposed to arise from the protons belonging to the water molecules, labeled W1-W4 in the 1.9Å crystal structure, directly ligated to the CaMn4O5 cluster, and nearby amino-acid residue.

  15. Hot-Press Molded Poly(Methyl Methacrylate) Matrix for Solid-State Dye Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yee, Kwong-Cheong; Tou, Teck-Yong; Ng, Seik-Weng

    1998-09-01

    A hot-press molding method was used to fabricate dye-doped poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) slabs. Three rhodamine dyes, Rh640 (ClO 4 ), Rh6G(ClO 4 ), and Rh6G (Cl), were impregnated into the PMMA matrix first by dissolving the dye and granular PMMA in a solvent mixture of chloroform and methanol and then heating the mixture in vacuo at 175 C to obtain a spongy preform. The powdered preform was molded into slabs at 175 C and at 1 mbar, to eliminate the formation of bubbles in the slabs. We annealed the slabs for several hours to improve its optical homogeneity and hence its lasing efficiency. When pumped by a 1.5-mJ nitrogen laser, we obtained peak lasing efficiencies of 8% and 7.8%, respectively, for Rh6G (ClO 4 ) and Rh640 (ClO 4 ) in PMMA matrices. The lasing efficiency of Rh6G (ClO 4 )-doped PMMA suffered a reduction rate of 0.012% shot compared with 0.15% shot for Rh640 (ClO 4 )-doped PMMA. In contrast, Rh6G (Cl) in a hot-press molded PMMA slab suffered thermal bleaching that resulted in a low lasing efficiency of 1%; this can be explained by its absorption and fluorescence characteristics.

  16. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2016-11-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  17. Buckling Reduces eNOS Production and Stimulates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Arteries in Organ Culture.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yangming; Liu, Qin; Han, Hai-Chao

    2016-09-01

    Artery buckling alters the fluid shear stress and wall stress in the artery but its temporal effect on vascular wall remodeling is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to investigate the early effect of artery buckling on endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) expression and extracellular matrix remodeling. Bilateral porcine carotid arteries were maintained in an ex vivo organ culture system with and without buckling while under the same physiological pressure and flow rate for 3-7 days. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III and IV, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2), and eNOS were determined using Western blotting and immunohistochemistry. Our results showed that MMP-2 expression level was significantly higher in buckled arteries than in the controls and higher at the inner curve than at the outer curve of buckled arteries, while collagen IV content showed an opposite trend, suggesting that artery buckling increased MMP-2 expression and collagen IV degradation in a site-specific fashion. However, no differences for MMP-9, fibronectin, elastin, collagen I, III, and TIMP-2 were observed among the outer and inner curve sides of buckled arteries and straight controls. Additionally, eNOS expression was significantly decreased in buckled arteries. These results suggest that artery buckling triggers uneven wall remodeling that could lead to development of tortuous arteries.

  18. In Situ Production of Hard Metal Matrix Composite Coating on Engineered Surfaces Using Laser Cladding Technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raza, Mohammad Shahid; Hussain, Manowar; Kumar, Vikash; Das, Alok Kumar

    2017-01-01

    The growing need for high wear-resistant surface with enhanced physical properties has led to extensive researches in the field of surface engineering. Laser cladding emerged to be a promising method to achieve these objectives in a cost-effective way. The present paper studies the viability of cladding of tungsten disulfide (WS2) powder by using 400 W continuous-wave fiber laser. WS2 was used as a coating material, which was decomposed at higher temperature and underwent several chemical reactions. By this process, in situ formation of metal matrix composites and hard face coating on the substrate surface were attained. The characterization of laser cladded surface was done to study its morphological, microstructural, mechanical and tribological properties. It was observed that cladding of WS2 powder on 304 SS resulted in the formation of Cr-W-C-Fe metal matrix composite having improved mechanical and tribological properties. The value of microhardness of the coated surface was found to increase three to four times in comparison with the parent material surface. Wear test results indicated a decrease in wear by 1/9th (maximum) as compared to the parent 304 SS surface. The volume fractions of tungsten particles on the cladded surface were also investigated through EDS analysis.

  19. RF Plasma Torch System for Metal Matrix Composite Production in Nuclear Fuel Cladding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holik, Eddie, III

    2007-10-01

    For the first time in 30 years, plans are afoot to build new fission power plants in the US. It is timely to develop technology that could improve the safety and efficiency of new reactors. A program of development for advanced fuel cycles and Generation IV reactors is underway. The path to greater efficiency is to increase the core operating temperature. That places particular challenges to the cladding tubes that contain the fission fuel. A promising material for this purpose is a metal matrix composite (MMC) in which ceramic fibers are bonded within a high-strength steel matrix, much like fiberglass. Current MMC technology lacks the ability to effectively bond traditional high-temperature alloys to ceramic strands. The purpose of this project is to design an rf plasma torch system to use titanium as a buffer between the ceramic fibers and the refractory outer material. The design and methods of using an rf plasma torch to produce a non-equilibrium phase reaction to bond together the MMC will be discussed. The effects of having a long lived fuel cladding in the design of future reactors will also be discussed.

  20. Influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into matrix on mechanical properties of plain-woven Carbon Fiber Composite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumamoto, Soichiro; Okubo, Kazuya; Fujii, Toru

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to show the influence of locational states of submicron fibers added into epoxy matrix on mechanical properties of modified plane-woven carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP). To change the locational states of submicron fibers, two kinds of fabrication processes were applied in preparing specimen by hand lay-up method. Submicron fibers were simply added into epoxy resin with ethanol after they were stirred by a dispersion process using homogenizer to be located far from the interface between reinforcement and matrix. In contrast, submicron fibers were attached onto the carbon fibers by injecting from a spray nozzle accompanying with ethanol to be located near the interface, after they were tentatively contained in ethanol. The plain-woven CFRP plates were fabricated by hand lay-up method and cured at 80 degree-C for 1 hour and then at 150 degree-C for 3 hours. After curing, the plain-woven CFRP plates were cut into the dimension of specimen. Tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were determined by tensile lap-shear test and End-notched flexure(ENF) test, respectively. When submicron fibers were located far from the interface between carbon fibers and epoxy resin, tensile shear strength and Mode-II fracture toughness of CFRP were improved 30% and 18% compared with those of unmodified case. The improvement ratio in modified case was rather low (about few percentages) in the case where submicron fibers were located near the interface. The result suggested that crack propagation should be prevented when submicron fibers were existed far from the interface due to the effective stress state around the crack tip.

  1. Bound states in the transfer matrix spectrum for general lattice ferromagnetic spin systems at high temperature

    PubMed

    Schor; O'Carroll

    2000-08-01

    We obtain different properties of general d dimensional lattice ferromagnetic spin systems with nearest neighbor interactions in the high temperature region (beta<1). Each model is characterized by a single site a priori spin distribution, taken to be even. We state our results in terms of the parameter alpha=-3(2) where denotes the kth moment of the a priori distribution. Associated with the model is a lattice quantum field theory that is known to contain particles. We show that for alpha>0, beta small, there exists a bound state with mass below the two-particle threshold. For alpha<0, bound states do not exist. The existence of the bound state has implications on the decay of correlations, i.e., the four-point function decays at a slower rate than twice that of the two-point function. These results are obtained using a lattice version of the Bethe-Salpeter equation in the ladder approximation. The existence and nonexistence results generalize to N-component models with rotationally invariant a priori spin distributions.

  2. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state): an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Wright, D. L.; Koch, D.; Lewis, E. R.; McGraw, R.; Chang, L.-S.; Schwartz, S. E.; Ruedy, R.

    2008-10-01

    A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model (ModelE) are described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol population, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble aerosol populations. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various aerosol population configurations are presented. The box model experiments demonstrate the dependence of cloud activating aerosol number concentration on the aerosol population configuration; comparisons to sectional models are quite favorable. MATRIX is incorporated into the GISS climate model and simulations are carried out primarily to assess its performance/efficiency for global-scale atmospheric model application. Simulation results were compared with aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size to assess the ability of the new method to yield data suitable for such comparison. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the Aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 μm, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment. This is more likely due to

  3. Fostering Creativity in Design Education: Using the Creative Product Analysis Matrix with Chinese Undergraduates in Macau

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsai, Kuan Chen

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of the present study is to explore to what extent the use of a more structured mode of assessing creative products--specifically, the CPAM--could beneficially influence design students' product creativity and creative processes. For this qualitative inquiry, following our CPAM-based intervention, students wrote reflective papers in…

  4. Fuzzy sphere: Star product induced from generalized squeezed states

    SciTech Connect

    Lubo, Musongela

    2005-02-15

    A family of states built from the uncertainty principle on the fuzzy sphere has been shown to reproduce the stereographic projection in the large j limit. These generalized squeezed states are used to construct an associative star product which involves a finite number of derivatives on its primary functional space. It is written in terms of a variable on the complex plane. We show that it actually coincides with the one found by Gross and Presnajder in the simplest cases, endowing the later with a supplementary physical interpretation. We also show how the spherical harmonics emerge in this setting.

  5. The equation of state of predominant detonation products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaug, Joseph; Crowhurst, Jonathan; Bastea, Sorin; Fried, Laurence

    2009-06-01

    The equation of state of detonation products, when incorporated into an experimentally grounded thermochemical reaction algorithm can be used to predict the performance of explosives. Here we report laser based Impulsive Stimulated Light Scattering measurements of the speed of sound from a variety of polar and nonpolar detonation product supercritical fluids and mixtures. The speed of sound data are used to improve the exponential-six potentials employed within the Cheetah thermochemical code. We will discuss the improvements made to Cheetah in terms of predictions vs. measured performance data for common polymer blended explosives. Accurately computing the chemistry that occurs from reacted binder materials is one important step forward in our efforts.

  6. Path to Collagenolysis: COLLAGEN V TRIPLE-HELIX MODEL BOUND PRODUCTIVELY AND IN ENCOUNTERS BY MATRIX METALLOPROTEINASE-12.

    PubMed

    Prior, Stephen H; Byrne, Todd S; Tokmina-Roszyk, Dorota; Fields, Gregg B; Van Doren, Steven R

    2016-04-08

    Collagenolysis is essential in extracellular matrix homeostasis, but its structural basis has long been shrouded in mystery. We have developed a novel docking strategy guided by paramagnetic NMR that positions a triple-helical collagen V mimic (synthesized with nitroxide spin labels) in the active site of the catalytic domain of matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12 or macrophage metalloelastase) primed for catalysis. The collagenolytically productive complex forms by utilizing seven distinct subsites that traverse the entire length of the active site. These subsites bury ∼1,080 Å(2)of surface area, over half of which is contributed by the trailing strand of the synthetic collagen V mimic, which also appears to ligate the catalytic zinc through the glycine carbonyl oxygen of its scissile G∼VV triplet. Notably, the middle strand also occupies the full length of the active site where it contributes extensive interfacial contacts with five subsites. This work identifies, for the first time, the productive and specific interactions of a collagen triple helix with an MMP catalytic site. The results uniquely demonstrate that the active site of the MMPs is wide enough to accommodate two strands from collagen triple helices. Paramagnetic relaxation enhancements also reveal an extensive array of encounter complexes that form over a large part of the catalytic domain. These transient complexes could possibly facilitate the formation of collagenolytically active complexes via directional Brownian tumbling.

  7. Coupled bending-torsion steady-state response of pretwisted, nonuniform rotating beams using a transfer-matrix method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gray, Carl E., Jr.

    1988-01-01

    Using the Newtonian method, the equations of motion are developed for the coupled bending-torsion steady-state response of beams rotating at constant angular velocity in a fixed plane. The resulting equations are valid to first order strain-displacement relationships for a long beam with all other nonlinear terms retained. In addition, the equations are valid for beams with the mass centroidal axis offset (eccentric) from the elastic axis, nonuniform mass and section properties, and variable twist. The solution of these coupled, nonlinear, nonhomogeneous, differential equations is obtained by modifying a Hunter linear second-order transfer-matrix solution procedure to solve the nonlinear differential equations and programming the solution for a desk-top personal computer. The modified transfer-matrix method was verified by comparing the solution for a rotating beam with a geometric, nonlinear, finite-element computer code solution; and for a simple rotating beam problem, the modified method demonstrated a significant advantage over the finite-element solution in accuracy, ease of solution, and actual computer processing time required to effect a solution.

  8. Optimization of antioxidant exopolysaccharidess production by Bacillus licheniformis in solid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Fang, Yaowei; Ahmed, Sibtain; Liu, Shu; Wang, Shujun; Lu, Mingsheng; Jiao, Yuliang

    2013-11-06

    Response surface methodology was applied to optimize physical and nutritional variables for the production of antioxidant exopolysaccharidess (EPSs) by Bacillus licheniformis UD061 in solid state fermentation with squid processing byproduct and maize cob meal used as a carbon and nitrogen source and solid matrix. The factors noted with Plackett-Burman design for optimization of EPSs production were NaCl, MgSO4·7H2O, and moisture level. These factors were further optimized using Box-Behnken design and response surface methodology. Using this methodology, the quadratic regression model of EPSs production was built. Maximum EPSs production was obtained under the optimal conditions of 4.08 g L(-1) NaCl, 0.71 g L(-1) MgSO4·7H2O, and 60.49% moisture level. A production of 14.68 mg gds(-1), which was well in agreement with the predicted value, was achieved by this optimized procedure.

  9. Liquid hydrogen production and commercial demand in the United States

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heydorn, Barbara

    1990-01-01

    Kennedy Space Center, the single largest purchaser of liquid hydrogen (LH2) in the United States, evaluated current and anticipated hydrogen production and consumption in the government and commercial sectors. Specific objectives of the study are as follows: (1) identify LH2 producers in the United States and Canada during 1980-1989 period; (2) compile information in expected changes in LH2 production capabilities over the 1990-2000 period; (3) describe how hydrogen is used in each consuming industry and estimate U.S. LH2 consumption for the chemicals, metals, electronics, fats and oil, and glass industries, and report data on a regional basis; (4) estimate historical and future consumption; and (5) assess the influence of international demands on U.S. plants.

  10. 48 CFR 470.103 - United States origin of agricultural products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS COMMODITY ACQUISITIONS 470.103 United States origin of agricultural products... programs shall be products of United States origin. A product shall not be considered to be a product of... ingredient is: (1) Produced in the United States; and (2) Commercially available in the United States at...

  11. 48 CFR 470.103 - United States origin of agricultural products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS COMMODITY ACQUISITIONS 470.103 United States origin of agricultural products... programs shall be products of United States origin. A product shall not be considered to be a product of... ingredient is: (1) Produced in the United States; and (2) Commercially available in the United States at...

  12. 48 CFR 470.103 - United States origin of agricultural products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS COMMODITY ACQUISITIONS 470.103 United States origin of agricultural products... programs shall be products of United States origin. A product shall not be considered to be a product of... ingredient is: (1) Produced in the United States; and (2) Commercially available in the United States at...

  13. 48 CFR 470.103 - United States origin of agricultural products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS COMMODITY ACQUISITIONS 470.103 United States origin of agricultural products... programs shall be products of United States origin. A product shall not be considered to be a product of... ingredient is: (1) Produced in the United States; and (2) Commercially available in the United States at...

  14. Simulating Potential Switchgrass Production in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Thomson, Allison M.; Izaurralde, Roberto C.; West, T. O.; Parrish, David J.; Tyler, Donald D.; Williams, Jimmy R.

    2009-12-31

    Using results from field trials of switchgrass (Panicum virgatum L.) in the United States, the EPIC (Environmental Policy Integrated Climate) process-level agroecosystem model was calibrated, validated, and applied to simulate potential productivity of switchgrass for use as a biofuel feedstock. The model was calibrated with a regional study of 10-yr switchgrass field trials and subsequently tested against a separate compiled dataset of field trials from across the eastern half of the country. An application of the model in a national database using 8-digit watersheds as the primary modeling unit produces 30-yr average switchgrass yield estimates that can be aggregated to 18 major watersheds. The model projects average annual switchgrass productivity of greater than 7 Mg ha-1 in the Upper Mississippi, Lower Mississippi, and Ohio watersheds. The major factors limiting simulated production vary by region; low precipitation is the primary limiting factor across the western half of the country, while moderately acidic soils limit yields on lands east of the Mississippi River. Average projected switchgrass production on all crop land in the continental US is 5.6 Mg ha-1. At this level of productivity, 28.6 million hectares of crop land would be required to produce the 16 billion gallons of cellulosic ethanol called for by 2022 in the 2007 Energy Independence and Security Act. The model described here can be applied as a tool to inform the land-use and environmental consequences of switchgrass production.

  15. Microbial production of hyaluronic acid: current state, challenges, and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Hyaluronic acid (HA) is a natural and linear polymer composed of repeating disaccharide units of β-1, 3-N-acetyl glucosamine and β-1, 4-glucuronic acid with a molecular weight up to 6 million Daltons. With excellent viscoelasticity, high moisture retention capacity, and high biocompatibility, HA finds a wide-range of applications in medicine, cosmetics, and nutraceuticals. Traditionally HA was extracted from rooster combs, and now it is mainly produced via streptococcal fermentation. Recently the production of HA via recombinant systems has received increasing interest due to the avoidance of potential toxins. This work summarizes the research history and current commercial market of HA, and then deeply analyzes the current state of microbial production of HA by Streptococcus zooepidemicus and recombinant systems, and finally discusses the challenges facing microbial HA production and proposes several research outlines to meet the challenges. PMID:22088095

  16. New Measurements of Hyperon Production from Charmonium States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dobbs, Sean

    Hyperon production in e+e- annihilation provides a clean laboratory for the production of baryons and strangeness in hadronization, and can provide insight into the structure of different hyperons by comparing their production rates. Using 52, 805, and 586 pb-1 of e+e- annihilation data taken at the ψ(2S), ψ(3770), and ψ(4160) resonances, respectively, with the CLEO-c detector, we measure for the first time the inclusive decays of these charmonium states to the Λ0, Σ+, Σ0, Ξ-, Ξ0, Ω- hyperons, and discuss the status of their interpretation. We also discuss the measurements of the isospin-violating decay ψ(2S) → Λ0Σ0 and the Λ0Σ0 form factor.

  17. Very fast dissolving acid carboxymethylcellulose-rifampicin matrix: Development and solid-state characterization.

    PubMed

    Luciani-Giacobbe, Laura C; Ramírez-Rigo, María V; Garro-Linck, Yamila; Monti, Gustavo A; Manzo, Ruben H; Olivera, María E

    2017-01-01

    One of the main obstacles to the successful treatment of tuberculosis is the poor and variable oral bioavailability of rifampicin (RIF), which is mainly due to its low hydrophilicity and dissolution rate. The aim of this work was to obtain a hydrophilic new material that allows a very fast dissolution rate of RIF and therefore is potentially useful in the development of oral solid dosage forms. The acid form of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) was co-processed with RIF by solvent impregnation to obtain CMC-RIF powder, which was characterized by polarized optical microscopy, powder x-ray diffraction, DSC-TGA, hot stage microscopy, (13)C and (15)N solid-state NMR and FT-IR spectroscopy. In addition, the CMC-RIF matrices were subjected to water uptake and dissolution studies to assess hydrophilicity and release kinetics. CMC-RIF is a crystalline solid dispersion. Solid-state characterization indicated that no ionic interaction occurred between the components, but RIF crystallized as a zwitterion over the surface of CMC, which drastically increased the hydrophilicity of the solid. The CMC-RIF matrices significantly improved the water uptake of RIF and disintegrated in a very short period immediately releasing RIF. As CMC improves the hydrophilicity and delivery properties of RIF, CMC-RIF is very useful in the design of oral solid dosage forms with very fast dissolution of RIF, either alone or in combination with other antitubercular drugs.

  18. Tobacco Product Use Among Adults - United States, 2013-2014.

    PubMed

    Hu, S Sean; Neff, Linda; Agaku, Israel T; Cox, Shanna; Day, Hannah R; Holder-Hayes, Enver; King, Brian A

    2016-07-15

    While significant declines in cigarette smoking have occurred among U.S. adults during the past 5 decades, the use of emerging tobacco products* has increased in recent years (1-3). To estimate tobacco use among U.S. adults aged ≥18 years, CDC and the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) analyzed data from the 2013-2014 National Adult Tobacco Survey (NATS). During 2013-2014, 21.3% of U.S. adults used a tobacco product every day or some days, and 25.5% of U.S. adults used a tobacco product every day, some days, or rarely. Despite progress in reducing cigarette smoking, during 2013-2014, cigarettes remained the most commonly used tobacco product among adults. Young adults aged 18-24 years reported the highest prevalence of use of emerging tobacco products, including water pipes/hookahs and electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes). Furthermore, racial/ethnic and sociodemographic differences in the use of any tobacco product were observed, with higher use reported among males; non-Hispanic whites, non-Hispanic blacks, and non-Hispanics of other races(†); persons aged <45 years; persons living in the Midwest or South; persons with a General Educational Development (GED) certificate; persons who were single/never married/not living with a partner or divorced/separated/widowed; persons with annual household income <$20,000; and persons who were lesbian, gay, or bisexual (LGB). Population-level interventions that focus on all forms of tobacco product use, including tobacco price increases, high-impact anti-tobacco mass media campaigns, comprehensive smoke-free laws, and enhanced access to help quitting tobacco use, in conjunction with FDA regulation of tobacco products, are critical to reducing tobacco-related diseases and deaths in the United States.(§).

  19. Toward the Use of Rydberg States for State-Selective Production of Molecular Ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grimes, David; Barnum, Timothy J.; Coy, Stephen; Field, Robert W.

    2014-06-01

    The usual simplified view of Rydberg states of molecules as consisting of a single Rydberg electron loosely bound to a molecular ion core in a well-defined rotation-vibration state suggests an attractive possibility for state-selective production of molecular ions. A Rydberg electron excited above the energy of the ground state of the ion core will spontaneously autoionize, leaving behind a molecular ion. The autoionizing states are of strongly mixed character due to the ubiquitous nonadiabatic interactions between Rydberg series associated with different states of the ion core. Using our complete Multichannel Quantum Defect Theory (MQDT) fit model for CaF, we have predicted the locations and strengths of special autoionizing resonances that decay into a single rotation-vibration state of a molecular ion. Few molecules are as well characterized as CaF, nor as elegantly simple. We additionally describe the use of core nonpenetrating states as a general method to produce an ensemble of molecular ions in a single, selectable quantum state.

  20. Sandwiched confinement of quantum dots in graphene matrix for efficient electron transfer and photocurrent production

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Nan; Zheng, Kaibo; Karki, Khadga J.; Abdellah, Mohamed; Zhu, Qiushi; Carlson, Stefan; Haase, Dörthe; Žídek, Karel; Ulstrup, Jens; Canton, Sophie E.; Pullerits, Tõnu; Chi, Qijin

    2015-01-01

    Quantum dots (QDs) and graphene are both promising materials for the development of new-generation optoelectronic devices. Towards this end, synergic assembly of these two building blocks is a key step but remains a challenge. Here, we show a one-step strategy for organizing QDs in a graphene matrix via interfacial self-assembly, leading to the formation of sandwiched hybrid QD-graphene nanofilms. We have explored structural features, electron transfer kinetics and photocurrent generation capacity of such hybrid nanofilms using a wide variety of advanced techniques. Graphene nanosheets interlink QDs and significantly improve electronic coupling, resulting in fast electron transfer from photoexcited QDs to graphene with a rate constant of 1.3 × 109 s−1. Efficient electron transfer dramatically enhances photocurrent generation in a liquid-junction QD-sensitized solar cell where the hybrid nanofilm acts as a photoanode. We thereby demonstrate a cost-effective method to construct large-area QD-graphene hybrid nanofilms with straightforward scale-up potential for optoelectronic applications. PMID:25996307

  1. Steady state creep behavior of particulate-reinforced titanium matrix composites

    SciTech Connect

    Ranganath, S.; Mishra, R.S.

    1996-03-01

    The steady state creep behavior of unreinforced Ti, Ti-Ti{sub 2}C and Ti-TiB-Ti{sub 2}C composites has been examined in the temperature range 823--923 K. It is shown that the creep deformation of unreinforced Ti is governed by climb-controlled creep mechanism for which the stress exponent is between 4.1 and 4.3 and the activation energy is 236 kJ mol{sup {minus}1}. For composites, the stress exponents are between 6 and 7 at 823 K but are similar to unreinforced Ti at 923 K. The measured steady state creep rate of composites is found to be 2--3 orders of magnitude lower than unreinforced Ti in the investigated temperature range. It is then established that the origin of creep strengthening at 823--923 K is due to the combined effects of increased modulus of composites and the refined microstructure. It is further shown that the change of stress exponent of composites at 823 K is because of the change in creep mechanism from lattice-diffusion controlled dislocation climb to pipe-diffusion controlled dislocation climb. By analyzing the creep data, a modification in the dimensionless constant, A = 3.2 {times} 10{sup 5} exp({minus}24.2V{sub r}) for lattice-diffusion regime and A = 9.4 {times} 10{sup 5} exp({minus}28.1V{sub r}) for pipe-diffusion regime, where V{sub r} is the volume fraction of reinforcements, is suggested to account for the influence of reinforcements on creep kinetics.

  2. Classification of general n-qubit states under stochastic local operations and classical communication in terms of the rank of coefficient matrix.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangrong; Li, Dafa

    2012-05-04

    We solve the entanglement classification under stochastic local operations and classical communication (SLOCC) for general n-qubit states. For two arbitrary pure n-qubit states connected via local operations, we establish an equation between the two coefficient matrices associated with the states. The rank of the coefficient matrix is preserved under SLOCC and gives rise to a simple way of partitioning all the pure states of n qubits into different families of entanglement classes, as exemplified here. When applied to the symmetric states, this approach reveals that all the Dicke states |ℓ,n> with ℓ=1,…,[n/2] are inequivalent under SLOCC.

  3. Fingerprint of Herb Product by Matrix-assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Product authentication, quality assurance, and identification of adulterants/contamination are major issues facing the dietary supplement industry. Scutellaria lateriflora is an herb widely used as a remedy for many ailments ranging from rabies to epilepsy. It could be easily contaminated by similar...

  4. Durability of polymer matrix composites for automotive structural applications: A state-of-the-art review

    SciTech Connect

    Corum, J.M.; Simpson, W.A. Jr.; Sun, C.T.; Talreja, R.; Weitsman, Y.J.

    1995-07-01

    A key unanswered question that must be addressed before polymeric composites will be widely used in automotive structural components is their known durability. Major durability issues are the effects that cyclic loadings, creep, automotive fluid environments, and low-energy impacts have on dimensional stability, strength, and stiffness throughout the required life of a composite component. This report reviews the current state of understanding in each of these areas. It also discusses the limited information that exists on one of the prime candidate materials for automotive structural applications--an isocyanurate reinforced with a continuous strand, swirl mat. Because of the key role that nondestructive evaluations must play in understanding damage development and progression, a chapter is included on ultrasonic techniques. A final chapter then gives conclusions and recommendations for research needed to resolve the various durability issues. These recommendations will help provide a sound basis for program planning for the Durability of Lightweight Composite Structures Project sponsored by the US Department of Energy in cooperation with the Automotive Composites Consortium of Chrysler, Ford, and General Motors.

  5. Methamphetamine and HIV-1 gp120 effects on lipopolysaccharide stimulated matrix metalloproteinase-9 production by human monocyte-derived macrophages.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Jessica L; Mahajan, Supriya D; Aalinkeel, Ravikumar; Nair, Bindukumar; Sykes, Donald E; Schwartz, Stanley A

    2011-01-01

    Monocytes/macrophages are a primary source of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) in the central nervous system (CNS). Macrophages infected with HIV-1 produce a plethora of factors, including matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) that may contribute to the development of HIV-1-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). MMP-9 plays a pivotal role in the turnover of the extracellular matrix (ECM) and functions to remodel cellular architecture. We have investigated the role of methamphetamine and HIV-1 gp120 in the regulation of lipopolysaccaride (LPS) induced-MMP-9 production in monocyte-derived macrophages (MDM). Here, we show that LPS-induced MMP-9 gene expression and protein secretion are potentiated by incubation with methamphetamine alone and gp120 alone. Further, concomitant incubation with gp120 and methamphetamine potentiated LPS-induced MMP-9 expression and biological activity in MDM. Collectively methamphetamine and gp120 effects on MMPs may modulate remodeling of the extracellular environment enhancing migration of monocytes/macrophages to the CNS.

  6. Complete experimental characterization of the quantum state of a light mode via the Wigner function and the density matrix: application to quantum phase distributions of vacuum and squeezed-vacuum states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithey, D. T.; Beck, M.; Cooper, J.; Raymer, M. G.; Faridani, A.

    1993-01-01

    We have used the recently demonstrated method of optical homodyne tomography (OHT) to measure the Wigner quasiprobability distribution (Wigner function) and the density matrix for both a squeezed-vacuum and a vacuum state of a single spatial-temporal mode of the electromagnetic field. This method consists of measuring a set of probability distributions for many different Hilbert-space representations of the field-quadrature amplitude, using balanced homodyne detection, and then using tomography to obtain the Wigner function. Once the Wigner function is obtained, one can acquire the density matrix, including its complex phase. In the case of a pure state, this technique yields an experimentally determined complex wavefunction, as demonstrated here for the vacuum. The density matrix represents a complete quantum mechanical characterization of the state. From the measured density matrix we have obtained the Pegg-Barnett optical phase distribution, and from the Wigner function, the Wigner optical phase distribution.

  7. Progressive lung cell reactions and extracellular matrix production after a brief exposure to asbestos.

    PubMed Central

    Chang, L. Y.; Overby, L. H.; Brody, A. R.; Crapo, J. D.

    1988-01-01

    Inhaled chrysotile asbestos fibers have been shown to deposit initially on the first alveolar duct bifurcations. In brief accidental exposure to asbestos, this would be the most likely site of a significant cellular or fibrotic reaction. The characteristics and progression of tissue reactions occurring at first alveolar duct bifurcations after a single brief asbestos exposure was defined using morphometric techniques. Seven-week-old rats were exposed, nose only, for 1 hour to chrysotile asbestos fibers. After the exposure, the animals were kept in air for 2 days or 1 month, and then their lungs were fixed by vascular perfusion or by intratracheal instillation of 2% glutaraldehyde. The first bifurcations of seven alveolar ducts in each animal were isolated from plastic-embedded tissue and thin-sectioned for electron-microscopic analysis. Two days after exposure, the volume of epithelium and interstitium in the duct bifurcations had increased by 78% and 28%, respectively (P less than 0.05). The total number and volume of alveolar macrophages on the bifurcations increased about 10 times (P less than 0.05), whereas the number and volume of interstitial macrophages increased threefold (P less than 0.05). Statistically significant increases in the numbers of Type I (82%) and Type II (29%) epithelial cells also occurred. One month after the 1-hour exposure, the volume of epithelium and the number of Type I and Type II cells were still greater than control values, but these differences no longer achieved statistical significance. The volume of the interstitium, on the other hand, increased 67% (P less than 0.05), and this was accompanied by a persistently high number of interstitial macrophages, accumulation of myofibroblasts/smooth muscle cells, and an increased volume of interstitial matrix. These results demonstrate that a brief exposure to chrysotile asbestos causes a rapid response that involves an influx of macrophages to the first alveolar duct bifurcations and

  8. Progressive lung cell reactions and extracellular matrix production after a brief exposure to asbestos.

    PubMed

    Chang, L Y; Overby, L H; Brody, A R; Crapo, J D

    1988-04-01

    Inhaled chrysotile asbestos fibers have been shown to deposit initially on the first alveolar duct bifurcations. In brief accidental exposure to asbestos, this would be the most likely site of a significant cellular or fibrotic reaction. The characteristics and progression of tissue reactions occurring at first alveolar duct bifurcations after a single brief asbestos exposure was defined using morphometric techniques. Seven-week-old rats were exposed, nose only, for 1 hour to chrysotile asbestos fibers. After the exposure, the animals were kept in air for 2 days or 1 month, and then their lungs were fixed by vascular perfusion or by intratracheal instillation of 2% glutaraldehyde. The first bifurcations of seven alveolar ducts in each animal were isolated from plastic-embedded tissue and thin-sectioned for electron-microscopic analysis. Two days after exposure, the volume of epithelium and interstitium in the duct bifurcations had increased by 78% and 28%, respectively (P less than 0.05). The total number and volume of alveolar macrophages on the bifurcations increased about 10 times (P less than 0.05), whereas the number and volume of interstitial macrophages increased threefold (P less than 0.05). Statistically significant increases in the numbers of Type I (82%) and Type II (29%) epithelial cells also occurred. One month after the 1-hour exposure, the volume of epithelium and the number of Type I and Type II cells were still greater than control values, but these differences no longer achieved statistical significance. The volume of the interstitium, on the other hand, increased 67% (P less than 0.05), and this was accompanied by a persistently high number of interstitial macrophages, accumulation of myofibroblasts/smooth muscle cells, and an increased volume of interstitial matrix. These results demonstrate that a brief exposure to chrysotile asbestos causes a rapid response that involves an influx of macrophages to the first alveolar duct bifurcations and

  9. Chemical state of fission products in irradiated UO 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imoto, S.

    1986-08-01

    The chemical state of fission products in irradiated UO 2 fuel has been estimated for FBR as well as LWR on the basis of equilibrium calculation with the SOLGASMIX-PV code. The system considered for the calculation is composed of a gas phase, a CaF 2 type oxide phase, three grey phases, a noble metal alloy, a mixed telluride phase and several other phases each consisting of single compound. The distribution of elements into these phases and the amount of chemical species in each phase at different temperatures are obtained as a function of oxygen potential for LWR and FBR. Changes of the chemical potential of the fuel-fission products system during burnup are also evaluated with particular attention to the difference between LWR and FBR. Some informations obtained by the calculation are compared with the results of post irradiation examination of UO 2 fuels.

  10. Production and reactions of triplet CS: Matrix infrared and ultraviolet spectra of C{sub 2}S{sub 2}

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, R.B.; Hannachi, Y.; Andrews, L.

    1992-07-29

    Matrix infrared and visible-ultraviolet absorption spectroscopy and ab initio electronic structure calculations have been used to characterize the reaction products from a Tesla coil Ar/CS{sub 2} discharge. The discharge is an excellent source of CS, which reacts with other molecules to form the major C{sub 3}S{sub 2} product and the transient C{sub 2}S{sub 2} species. The spectra of discharged mixed isotopic samples Ar/{sup 12}CS{sub 2}/{sub 13}CS{sub 2} and Ar/C{sup 32}S{sub 2} exhibit triplet patterns in the CS antisymmetric stretching region, which unambiguously identifies the new C{sub 2}S{sub 2} molecule with two equivalent CS subgroups. The magnitudes of the {sup 12,13}C and {sup 32,34}S isotopic shifts further characterize the diatomic CS subgroup nature of C{sub 2}S{sub 2}. Another product contains two equivalent CS subgroups interacting with inequivalent S atom(s). The formation of C{sub 2}S{sub 2}({sup 3}{Sigma}) from the simple CS{sub 2} discharge requires triplet CS. Evidence was also obtained for other transient cumulene species. 32 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  11. Analysis of malachite green in aquatic products by carbon nanotube-based molecularly imprinted - matrix solid phase dispersion.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yu; Chen, Ligang

    2015-10-01

    A simple method based on matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) using molecularly imprinted polymers (MIPs) as sorbents for selective extraction of malachite green (MG) from aquatic products was developed. The MIPs were prepared by using carbon nanotube as support, MG as template, methacrylic acid as functional monomer, ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate as crosslinker and methylene chloride as solvent. The MIPs were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectrometry and transmission electron microscopy. The isothermal adsorption, kinetics absorption and selective adsorption experiments were carried out. We optimized the extraction conditions as follows: the ratio of MIPs to sample was 2:3, the dispersion time was 15min, washing solvent was 4mL 50% aqueous methanol and elution solvent was 3mL methanol-acetic acid (98: 2, v/v). Once the MSPD process was completed, the MG extracted from aquatic products was determined by high performance liquid chromatography. The detection limit of MG was 0.7μgkg(-1). The relative standard deviations of intra-day and inter-day were obtained in the range of 0.9%-4.7% and 3.4%-9.8%, respectively. In order to evaluate the applicability and reliability of the proposed method, it was applied to determine MG in different aquatic products samples including fish, shrimp, squid and crabs. The satisfied recoveries were in the range of 89.2%-104.6%. The results showed that this method is faster, simpler and makes extraction and purification in the same system.

  12. Boswellia frereana (frankincense) suppresses cytokine-induced matrix metalloproteinase expression and production of pro-inflammatory molecules in articular cartilage.

    PubMed

    Blain, Emma J; Ali, Ahmed Y; Duance, Victor C

    2010-06-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the anti-inflammatory efficacy of Boswellia frereana extracts in an in vitro model of cartilage degeneration and determine its potential as a therapy for treating osteoarthritis. Cartilage degradation was induced in vitro by treating explants with 5 ng/ml interleukin1alpha (IL-1alpha) and 10 ng/ml oncostatin M (OSM) over a 28-day period, in the presence or absence of 100 microg/ml B. frereana. Treatment of IL-1alpha/OSM stimulated cartilage explants with B. frereana inhibited the breakdown of the collagenous matrix. B. frereana reduced MMP9 and MMP13 mRNA levels, inhibited MMP9 expression and activation, and significantly reduced the production of nitrite (stable end product of nitric oxide), prostaglandin E2 and cycloxygenase-2. Epi-lupeol was identified as the principal constituent of B. frereana. This is the first report on the novel anti-inflammatory properties of Boswellia frereana in an in vitro model of cartilage degradation. We have demonstrated that B. frereana prevents collagen degradation, and inhibits the production of pro-inflammatory mediators and MMPs. Due to its efficacy we propose that B. frereana should be examined further as a potential therapeutic agent for treating inflammatory symptoms associated with arthritis.

  13. Solid-state fermentation with Trichoderma reesei for cellulase production

    SciTech Connect

    Chahal, D.S.

    1985-01-01

    Cellulase yields of 250 to 430 IU/g of cellulose were recorded in a new approach to solid-state fermentation of wheat straw with Trichoderma reesei QMY-1. This is an increase of ca. 72% compared with the yields (160 to 250 IU/g of cellulose) in liquid-state fermentation reported in the literature. High cellulase activity (16 to 17 IU/ml) per unit volume of enzyme broth and high yields of cellulases were attributed to the growth of Trichoderma reesei on a hemicellulose fraction during its first phase and then on a cellulose fraction of wheat straw during its later phase for cellulase production, as well as to the close contact of hyphae with the substrate in solid-state fermentation. The cellulase system obtained by the solid-state fermentation of wheat straw contained cellulases (17.2 IU/ml), ..beta..-glucosidase (21.2 IU/ml), and xylanases (540 IU/ml). This cellulase system was capable of hydrolyzing 78 to 90% of delignified wheat straw (10% concentration) in 96 h, without the addition of complementary enzymes, ..beta..-glucosidase, and xylanases. 29 references.

  14. Williamsburg equation of state for detonation product fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, W. Byers; Braithwaite, M.

    1994-07-01

    A simple analytical equation of state has been developed for the internal energy E as a function of volume V and entropy S which is valid from the low densities of perfect gases up to the high densities and temperatures of detonation product fluids. The parameters can all be computed by linear least squares from results along a single adiabat. For use in a hydrocode, the ESO can be witten in the convenient form E=PV/(g-1) where g is a function of volume and entropy related to the adiabatic gamma coefficient.

  15. Study of Metastable N2 Production Using an N2 Matrix Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McConkey, William; Kedzierski, Wladek; Cerkauskas, Cyrus

    2015-05-01

    Metastable N2 molecules produced in the interaction of electrons of carefully controlled energy with a thermal beam of N2 in a crossed beam set-up have been studied in the energy range from threshold to 400 eV. The e-beam is pulsed and the metastables produced drift to a solid nitrogen target held at 10 K. Here they form excimers which immediately radiate. The resultant photons are detected using a photomultiplier-filter combination. Time-of-flight techniques are used to separate these photons from prompt photons produced in the initial electron-N2 collision. The excimer emission is strongest in the green but still significant in the red spectral region. Excitation functions will be presented together with threshold measurements. These help to identify the metastable states being observed and the excitation mechanisms which are responsible. The authors thank NSERC and CFI, (Canada), for financial support.

  16. Detection of Osteogenic Differentiation by Differential Mineralized Matrix Production in Mesenchymal Stromal Cells by Raman Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Chen, He-Guei; Chiang, Hui-Hua Kenny; Lee, Oscar Kuang-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) hold great potential in skeletal tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. However, conventional methods that are used in molecular biology to evaluate osteogenic differentiation of MSCs require a relatively large amount of cells. Cell lysis and cell fixation are also required and all these steps are time-consuming. Therefore, it is imperative to develop a facile technique which can provide real-time information with high sensitivity and selectivity to detect the osteogenic maturation of MSCs. In this study, we use Raman spectroscopy as a biosensor to monitor the production of mineralized matrices during osteogenic induction of MSCs. In summary, Raman spectroscopy is an excellent biosensor to detect the extent of maturation level during MSCs-osteoblast differentiation with a non-disruptive, real-time and label free manner. We expect that this study will promote further investigation of stem cell research and clinical applications. PMID:23734254

  17. Equations of state of detonation products: ammonia and methane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, John; Dattelbaum, Dana; Goodwin, Peter; Garcia, Daniel; Coe, Joshua; Leiding, Jeffery; Gibson, Lloyd; Bartram, Brian

    2015-06-01

    Ammonia (NH3) and methane (CH4) are two principal product gases resulting from explosives detonation, and the decomposition of other organic materials under shockwave loading (such as foams). Accurate thermodynamic descriptions of these gases are important for understanding the detonation performance of high explosives. However, shock compression data often do not exist for molecular species in the dense gas phase, and are limited in the fluid phase. Here, we present equation of state measurements of elevated initial density ammonia and methane gases dynamically compressed in gas-gun driven plate impact experiments. Pressure and density of the shocked gases on the principal Hugoniot were determined from direct particle velocity and shock wave velocity measurements recorded using optical velocimetry (Photonic Doppler velocimetry (PDV) and VISAR (velocity interferometer system for any reflector)). Streak spectroscopy and 5-color pyrometry were further used to measure the emission from the shocked gases, from which the temperatures of the shocked gases were estimated. Up to 0.07 GPa, ammonia was not observed to ionize, with temperature remaining below 7000 K. These results provide quantitative measurements of the Hugoniot locus for improving equations of state models of detonation products.

  18. Entropy production in ZND detonation with realistic equations of state for explosives and products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byers Brown, W.; Braithwaite, M.

    1996-05-01

    The recently developed Williamsburg equation of state (EOS) for detonation products and the new Parsafar-Mason-Vinet EOS for the unreacted explosive phase are used in the one-dimensional ZND model for the reaction zone of a condensed explosive. This is the first time realistic EOSs, capable of describing entropy and temperature changes accurately, have been incorporated into the ZND model. Using an ANFO as an example, results for the two extreme inter-phase assumptions regarding the thermal interaction of the reactant and product phases are described, and the associated entropy changes calculated and discussed.

  19. Phytolacca americana inhibits the high glucose-induced mesangial proliferation via suppressing extracellular matrix accumulation and TGF-beta production.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Seung Il; Kim, Kang Ju; Choo, Yong Kug; Keum, Kyung Soo; Choi, Bong Kyu; Jung, Kyu Yong

    2004-02-01

    This study describes a potential of Phytolaccaceae (Phytolacca americana var.) as an inhibitor of high glucose-stimulated production of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins and TGF-beta in cultured glomerular mesangial cells (GMCs). Raising the ambient glucose concentration for 24 hrs caused a dose-dependent increase in [3H]thymidine incorporation of GMCs, and the maximal response was achieved at 20 mM. Phytolaccaceae extracts (2.5-20 microg/ml) inhibited the high glucose-induced [3H]thymidine incorporation in a dose-dependent manner, and the concentrations tested here did not affect to the cell viability. Exposure of the GMCs to 20 mM glucose caused both ECM (collagen and fibronectin) accumulation and TGF-beta secretion, and these changes were significantly diminished by treatment of GMCs with Phytolaccaceae (10 microg/ml). Taken together, these results indicate that Phytolaccaceae inhibits the high glucose-induced GMCs proliferation partially through suppressing accumulation of ECM components and TGF-beta production, suggesting that Phytolaccaceae may be a promising agent for treating the development and progression of diabetic glomerulopathy.

  20. Large strain stimulation promotes extracellular matrix production and stiffness in an elastomeric scaffold model.

    PubMed

    D׳Amore, Antonio; Soares, Joao S; Stella, John A; Zhang, Will; Amoroso, Nicholas J; Mayer, John E; Wagner, William R; Sacks, Michael S

    2016-09-01

    Mechanical conditioning of engineered tissue constructs is widely recognized as one of the most relevant methods to enhance tissue accretion and microstructure, leading to improved mechanical behaviors. The understanding of the underlying mechanisms remains rather limited, restricting the development of in silico models of these phenomena, and the translation of engineered tissues into clinical application. In the present study, we examined the role of large strip-biaxial strains (up to 50%) on ECM synthesis by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) micro-integrated into electrospun polyester urethane urea (PEUU) constructs over the course of 3 weeks. Experimental results indicated that VSMC biosynthetic behavior was quite sensitive to tissue strain maximum level, and that collagen was the primary ECM component synthesized. Moreover, we found that while a 30% peak strain level achieved maximum ECM synthesis rate, further increases in strain level lead to a reduction in ECM biosynthesis. Subsequent mechanical analysis of the formed collagen fiber network was performed by removing the scaffold mechanical responses using a strain-energy based approach, showing that the denovo collagen also demonstrated mechanical behaviors substantially better than previously obtained with small strain training and comparable to mature collagenous tissues. We conclude that the application of large deformations can play a critical role not only in the quantity of ECM synthesis (i.e. the rate of mass production), but also on the modulation of the stiffness of the newly formed ECM constituents. The improved understanding of the process of growth and development of ECM in these mechano-sensitive cell-scaffold systems will lead to more rational design and manufacturing of engineered tissues operating under highly demanding mechanical environments.

  1. MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state): an aerosol microphysical module for global atmospheric models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, S. E.; Wright, D.; Koch, D.; Lewis, E. R.; McGraw, R.; Chang, L.-S.; Schwartz, S. E.; Ruedy, R.

    2008-05-01

    A new aerosol microphysical module MATRIX, the Multiconfiguation Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state, and its application in the Goddard Institute for Space Studies (GISS) climate model (ModelE) is described. This module, which is based on the quadrature method of moments (QMOM), represents nucleation, condensation, coagulation, internal and external mixing, and cloud-drop activation and provides aerosol particle mass and number concentration and particle size information for up to 16 mixed-mode aerosol populations. Internal and external mixing among aerosol components sulfate, nitrate, ammonium, carbonaceous aerosols, dust and sea-salt particles are represented. The solubility of each aerosol mode, which is explicitly calculated based on its soluble and insoluble components, enables calculation of the dependence of cloud drop activation on the microphysical characterization of multiple soluble modes. A detailed model description and results of box-model simulations of various mode configurations are presented. The number concentration of aerosol particles activated to cloud drops depends on the mode configuration. Simulations on the global scale with the GISS climate model are evaluated against aircraft and station measurements of aerosol mass and number concentration and particle size. The model accurately captures the observed size distributions in the aitken and accumulation modes up to particle diameter 1 μm, in which sulfate, nitrate, black and organic carbon are predominantly located; however the model underestimates coarse-mode number concentration and size, especially in the marine environment.

  2. Electric dipole moment function of the X1 Sigma/+/ state of CO - Vibration-rotation matrix elements for transitions of gas laser and astrophysical interest

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chackerian, C., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    The electric dipole moment function of the ground electronic state of carbon monoxide has been determined by combining numerical solutions of the radial Schrodinger equation with absolute intensity data of vibration-rotation bands. The derived dipole moment function is used to calculate matrix elements of interest to stellar astronomy and of importance in the carbon monoxide laser.

  3. Increase in growth, productivity and nutritional status of wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. WH-711) and enrichment in soil fertility applied with organic matrix entrapped urea.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manoj; Bauddh, Kuldeep; Kumar, Sanjeev; Sainger, Manish; Sainger, Poonam A; Singh, Rana P

    2013-01-01

    Field experiments were conducted during two consequent years in semi-arid, subtropical climate of Rohtak district situated in North-West Indian state Haryana to evaluate the effects of eco-friendly organic matrix entrapped urea (OMEU) on wheat (Triticum aestivum L. cv. WH-711). The OMEU prepared in granular form contained cow dung, rice bran (grain cover of Oryza sativa), neem (Azadirachta indica) leaves and clay soil (diameter of particles < 0.002 mm) in 1:1:1:1 ratios and saresh (plant gum of Acacia sp.) as binder entrapping half of the recommended dose of urea. A basal application of organic matrix entrapped urea showed increase in plant growth in terms of fresh and dry weights, root length, root number, leaf number, tillers, plant height earlet number, earlet length and productivity in terms of grain yield and straw yield over free form of urea (FU) and no fertilizer (NF) application. The OMEU increased total soluble proteins, organic N and free ammonium content in the leaves at 45 and 60 days. The nutritional status of wheat grains in OMEU applied plants was almost similar to that observed for FU applied plants. An increase in organic carbon and available phosphorus (P) was observed in OMEU applied plots on harvest whereas pH was slightly decreased over FU applied plots. The microbial population and activity in terms of fungal and bacterial colony count and activities soil dehydrogenase and alkaline phosphatase were significantly higher in OMEU applied plots as compared to the FU applied plots. Our data indicate that OMEU which are low cost, biodegradable and non-toxic can be used to replace the expensive chemical fertilizers for wheat cultivation in semi-arid, subtropical climate.

  4. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Julie C.; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug. PMID:26962391

  5. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Julie C.; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2017-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug. PMID:28367259

  6. Production of the Y (4260) State in B Meson Decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, R. M.; Nielsen, M.; Zanetti, C. M.

    2016-04-01

    We calculate the branching ratio for the production of the meson Y(4260) in the decay B- → Y(4260)K- . We use QCD sum rules approach and we consider the Y(4260) to be a mixture between charmonium and exotic tetraquark, [c¯q¯][qc], states with JPC = 1--. Using the value of the mixing angle determined previously as: θ = (53.0 ± 0.5)°, we get the branching ratio B(B → Y(4260)K) = (1.34 ± 0.47) x 10-6, which allows us to estimate an interval on the branching fraction 3.0 x 10-8 < B Y < 1.8 x 10-6 in agreement with the experimental upper limit reported by Babar Collaboration.

  7. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon; Sung, Julie C; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2017-02-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug.

  8. United States Food and Drug Administration Product Label Changes.

    PubMed

    Kircik, Leon; Sung, Julie C; Stein-Gold, Linda; Goldenberg, Gary

    2016-01-01

    Once a drug has been approved by the United States Food and Drug Administration and is on the market, the Food and Drug Administration communicates new safety information through product label changes. Most of these label changes occur after a spontaneous report to either the drug manufacturing companies or the Food and Drug Administration MedWatch program. As a result, 400 to 500 label changes occur every year. Actinic keratosis treatments exemplify the commonality of label changes throughout the postmarket course of a drug. Diclofenac gel, 5-fluorouracil cream, imiquimod, and ingenol mebutate are examples of actinic keratosis treatments that have all undergone at least one label revision. With the current system of spontaneous reports leading to numerous label changes, each occurrence does not necessarily signify a radical change in the safety of a drug.

  9. Production of the Y (4260) state in B meson decay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albuquerque, R. M.; Nielsen, M.; Zanetti, C. M.

    2015-07-01

    We calculate the branching ratio for the production of the meson Y (4260) in the decay B- → Y (4260)K-. We use QCD sum rules approach and we consider the Y (4260) to be a mixture between charmonium and exotic tetraquark, [ c bar q bar ] [ qc ], states with JPC =1--. Using the value of the mixing angle determined previously as: θ =(53.0 ± 0.5) ∘, we get the branching ratio B (B → Y (4260) K) = (1.34 ± 0.47) ×10-6, which allows us to estimate an interval on the branching fraction 3.0 ×10-8

  10. A quasi steady state method for solving transient Darcy flow in complex 3D fractured networks accounting for matrix to fracture flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nœtinger, B.

    2015-02-01

    Modeling natural Discrete Fracture Networks (DFN) receives more and more attention in applied geosciences, from oil and gas industry, to geothermal recovery and aquifer management. The fractures may be either natural, or artificial in case of well stimulation. Accounting for the flow inside the fracture network, and accounting for the transfers between the matrix and the fractures, with the same level of accuracy is an important issue for calibrating the well architecture and for setting up optimal resources recovery strategies. Recently, we proposed an original method allowing to model transient pressure diffusion in the fracture network only [1]. The matrix was assumed to be impervious. A systematic approximation scheme was built, allowing to model the initial DFN by a set of N unknowns located at each identified intersection between fractures. The higher N, the higher the accuracy of the model. The main assumption was using a quasi steady state hypothesis, that states that the characteristic diffusion time over one single fracture is negligible compared with the characteristic time of the macroscopic problem, e.g. change of boundary conditions. In that context, the lowest order approximation N = 1 has the form of solving a transient problem in a resistor/capacitor network, a so-called pipe network. Its topology is the same as the network of geometrical intersections between fractures. In this paper, we generalize this approach in order to account for fluxes from matrix to fractures. The quasi steady state hypothesis at the fracture level is still kept. Then, we show that in the case of well separated time scales between matrix and fractures, the preceding model needs only to be slightly modified in order to incorporate these fluxes. The additional knowledge of the so-called matrix to fracture transfer function allows to modify the mass matrix that becomes a time convolution operator. This is reminiscent of existing space averaged transient dual porosity models.

  11. Vegetation Productivity Consequences of Sprawl in the Eastern United States

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, T.; Brown, D. G.; Fang, H.; Liu, T.; Zhang, T.

    2009-12-01

    Urban, suburban, and exurban areas expanded rapidly in the United States during the 1990s, replacing the rural land that lay outside existing metropolitan areas, cities, and towns. The conversion of rural landscapes to urban infrastructures and land uses has significant consequences for the regional vegetation productivity, but these consequences are not yet fully understood. A previous study in the Detroit-Ann Arbor-Flint Consolidated Metropolitan Statistical Areas (CMSA) in Michigan showed that exurbanization and suburbanization, i.e., development at relatively low densities, occupied four times the area of urbanization (development at the highest densities). While urbanization was associated with a net carbon source from the landscape in this CMSA, exurban development from the previous rural areas enhanced the uptake of carbon on land measured by gross primary production (GPP). In this study, similar research approaches were extended to all areas east of the Mississippi River in the United States. Two research questions were of particular interest: 1) Are patterns of sprawl consistent throughout the various regions that make up the Eastern US? and 2) Are relationships between types of sprawl and changes in GPP retain consistent over a large geographic extent? In this study, development was quantitatively evaluated based on Census housing-unit data collected in 1990 and 2000. Changes in GPP over the same time period were estimated based on satellite-derived land cover and vegetation greenness, climate data, and empirical light-use-efficiency parameters for various land-cover types. Results indicated that patterns of sprawl are regionally distinctive; and that relationships between sprawl and changes in GPP are relatively consistent, except for the effects of exurbanization on GPP, which tend to vary by ecoregion.

  12. 75 FR 13345 - Pricing for Certain 2010 United States Mint Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-03-19

    ... United States Mint Pricing for Certain 2010 United States Mint Products AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing the price of the 2010 United States Mint Presidential $1 Coin and First Spouse Medal Sets\\TM\\, 2010 United States...

  13. The chemical state of fission products in oxide fuels at different stages of the nuclear fuel cycle

    SciTech Connect

    Kleykamp, H.

    1988-03-01

    A survey of work at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe is presented on the chemical state of selected fission products that are relevant in the fuel cycle of light water reactor (LWR) and fast breeder reactor fuels. The influence of fuel type and irradiation progress on the composition of the Mo-Tc-Ru-Rh-Pd fission product alloys precipitated in the oxide matrix is examined using the respective multicomponent phase diagrams. The kinetics of dissolution of these phases in nitric acid at the reprocessing stage is discussed. Composition and structure of the residues, and the reprecipitation phenomena from highly active waste (HAW), are elucidated. A second metamorphosis of the fission products is recognized during the vitrification process. The formation of Ru(Rh) oxide and Pd(Rh, U, Te) alloys in simulated vitrified HAW concentrate and in HAW concentrate from the reprocessing of irradiated LWR fuels in interpreted on the basis of heterogeneous equilibria.

  14. Extensive reduction of cell viability and enhanced matrix production in Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 flow biofilms treated with a D-amino acid mixture.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Zoe; Tani, Akio; Kimbara, Kazuhide

    2013-02-01

    Treatment of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 flow biofilms with a D-amino acid mixture caused significant reductions in cell biomass by 75% and cell viability by 71%. No biofilm disassembly occurred, and matrix production increased by 30%, thereby providing a thick protective cover for remaining viable or persister cells.

  15. Effect of tiger-nut (Cyperus esculentus) milk co-product on the surface and diffusional properties of a wheat-based matrix.

    PubMed

    Verdú, Samuel; Barat, José M; Alava, Cecibel; Grau, Raúl

    2017-06-01

    The food processing industry generates huge volumes of waste and co-products which still contain valuable compounds. Tiger-nut milk production generates large amounts of a co-product with a high insoluble fibre content, which is interesting as a bioactive component from a nutritional viewpoint. This co-product is formed by two different tissues in composition, particle size and colour terms, so two different flours were obtained from them. Both flours were included in a wheat-based matrix at different substitution levels: 5%, 10% and 20% (d.b). The surface tension of matrices, and the wettability and diffusion of water and oil, were studied. The results showed the matrix's reduced capacity to interact with solvents, principally from the 10% substitution level, with diminished surface tension, and a longer time was needed for both water and oil to wet and diffuse.

  16. Self-assembling peptide hydrogel fosters chondrocyte extracellular matrix production and cell division: Implications for cartilage tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kisiday, J.; Jin, M.; Kurz, B.; Hung, H.; Semino, C.; Zhang, S.; Grodzinsky, A. J.

    2002-07-01

    Emerging medical technologies for effective and lasting repair of articular cartilage include delivery of cells or cell-seeded scaffolds to a defect site to initiate de novo tissue regeneration. Biocompatible scaffolds assist in providing a template for cell distribution and extracellular matrix (ECM) accumulation in a three-dimensional geometry. A major challenge in choosing an appropriate scaffold for cartilage repair is the identification of a material that can simultaneously stimulate high rates of cell division and high rates of cell synthesis of phenotypically specific ECM macromolecules until repair evolves into steady-state tissue maintenance. We have devised a self-assembling peptide hydrogel scaffold for cartilage repair and developed a method to encapsulate chondrocytes within the peptide hydrogel. During 4 weeks of culture in vitro, chondrocytes seeded within the peptide hydrogel retained their morphology and developed a cartilage-like ECM rich in proteoglycans and type II collagen, indicative of a stable chondrocyte phenotype. Time-dependent accumulation of this ECM was paralleled by increases in material stiffness, indicative of deposition of mechanically functional neo-tissue. Taken together, these results demonstrate the potential of a self-assembling peptide hydrogel as a scaffold for the synthesis and accumulation of a true cartilage-like ECM within a three-dimensional cell culture for cartilage tissue repair.

  17. Secondary Waste Form Screening Test Results—THOR® Fluidized Bed Steam Reforming Product in a Geopolymer Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pires, Richard P.; Westsik, Joseph H.; Serne, R. Jeffrey; Mattigod, Shas V.; Golovich, Elizabeth C.; Valenta, Michelle M.; Parker, Kent E.

    2011-07-14

    Screening tests are being conducted to evaluate waste forms for immobilizing secondary liquid wastes from the Hanford Tank Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP). Plans are underway to add a stabilization treatment unit to the Effluent Treatment Facility to provide the needed capacity for treating these wastes from WTP. The current baseline is to use a Cast Stone cementitious waste form to solidify the wastes. Through a literature survey, DuraLith alkali-aluminosilicate geopolymer, fluidized-bed steam reformation (FBSR) granular product encapsulated in a geopolymer matrix, and a Ceramicrete phosphate-bonded ceramic were identified both as candidate waste forms and alternatives to the baseline. These waste forms have been shown to meet waste disposal acceptance criteria, including compressive strength and universal treatment standards for Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals (as measured by the toxicity characteristic leaching procedure [TCLP]). Thus, these non-cementitious waste forms should also be acceptable for land disposal. Information is needed on all four waste forms with respect to their capability to minimize the release of technetium. Technetium is a radionuclide predicted to be in the secondary liquid wastes in small quantities, but the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF) risk assessment analyses show that technetium, even at low mass, produces the largest contribution to the estimated IDF disposal impacts to groundwater.

  18. Extracellular matrix production by nucleus pulposus and bone marrow stem cells in response to altered oxygen and glucose microenvironments.

    PubMed

    Naqvi, Syeda M; Buckley, Conor T

    2015-12-01

    Bone marrow (BM) stem cells may be an ideal source of cells for intervertebral disc (IVD) regeneration. However, the harsh biochemical microenvironment of the IVD may significantly influence the biological and metabolic vitality of injected stem cells and impair their repair potential. This study investigated the viability and production of key matrix proteins by nucleus pulposus (NP) and BM stem cells cultured in the typical biochemical microenvironment of the IVD consisting of altered oxygen and glucose concentrations. Culture-expanded NP cells and BM stem cells were encapsulated in 1.5% alginate and ionically crosslinked to form cylindrical hydrogel constructs. Hydrogel constructs were maintained under different glucose concentrations (1, 5 and 25 mM) and external oxygen concentrations (5 and 20%). Cell viability was measured using the Live/Dead® assay and the production of sulphated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG), and collagen was quantified biochemically and histologically. For BM stem cells, IVD-like micro-environmental conditions (5 mM glucose and 5% oxygen) increased the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. In contrast, low glucose conditions (1 mM glucose) combined with 5% external oxygen concentration promoted cell death, inhibiting proliferation and the accumulation of sGAG and collagen. NP-encapsulated alginate constructs were relatively insensitive to oxygen concentration or glucose condition in that they accumulated similar amounts of sGAG under all conditions. Under IVD-like microenvironmental conditions, NP cells were found to have a lower glucose consumption rate compared with BM cells and may in fact be more suitable to adapt and sustain the harsh microenvironmental conditions. Considering the highly specialised microenvironment of the central NP, these results indicate that IVD-like concentrations of low glucose and low oxygen are critical and influential for the survival and biological behaviour of stem cells. Such findings may promote and accelerate

  19. Modulation of the pro-inflammatory cytokines and matrix metalloproteinases production in co-cultivated human keratinocytes and melanocytes.

    PubMed

    Decean, H; Perde-Schrepler, M; Tatomir, C; Fischer-Fodor, E; Brie, I; Virag, P

    2013-10-01

    The human epidermis exerts immunoregulatory functions through the variety of cytokines and other molecules elaborated by keratinocytes and melanocytes. Their constitutive production is very low; however, considerably increased upon stimulation. In vivo, keratinocytes and melanocytes have a typical exposure in the skin, referred as melanocyte epidermal unit. In the present study we co-cultivated these cells in vitro proposing to elucidate some communication links in close cell-to-cell association. We assessed the amounts of IL-6, IL-8, and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9) in individually and co-cultured cells, exposed or not to UVB radiation. Normal human epidermal keratinocytes and melanocytes were grown in specific media and supplements. Cells were exposed to UVB radiation (100 mJ/cm(2)) to create comparable stress to the environmental one. Cytokines were determined with ELISA and confirmed with Western blot and metalloproteinases with gel zimography. Pure cultures of keratinocytes and melanocytes released low amounts of cytokines and metalloproteinases, these secretions being enhanced by UVB irradiation. In co-cultures, the cell-to-cell proximity triggered signals which markedly augmented the cytokines' secretions, whereas metalloproteinases were down-regulated. UVB irradiation did not influence either of these secretions in co-cultures. Concurrently with the highest levels of the pro-inflammatory cytokines, MMP-9 was up-regulated creating pro-inflammatory conditions and premises for changes in cellular survival, differentiation and phenotype. A complex network of interactions occurred between keratinocytes and melanocytes in co-cultures, resulting in modulated pro-inflammatory cytokines and metalloproteinases productions. Therefore, any disturbances in the microenvironmental signaling system and its molecular constituents may result in inflammation or even tumorigenesis in the epidermis.

  20. Structure of the nacreous organic matrix of a bivalve mollusk shell examined in the hydrated state using cryo-TEM.

    PubMed

    Levi-Kalisman, Y; Falini, G; Addadi, L; Weiner, S

    2001-07-01

    During mollusk shell formation, the mineral phase forms within an organic matrix composed of beta-chitin, silk-like proteins, and acidic glycoproteins rich in aspartic acid. The matrix is widely assumed to play an important role in controlling mineralization. Thus, understanding its structure is of prime importance. Cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM) studies of the matrix of the bivalve Atrina embedded in vitrified ice show that the interlamellar sheets are composed mainly of highly ordered and aligned beta-chitin fibrils. The silk, which is quantitatively an important component of the matrix, could not be imaged within the sheets. Organic material was, however, observed between sheets. We infer that this is the location of the silk. As this material reveals no regular structure, we suggest that at least prior to mineralization the silk is in the form of a hydrated gel. This is supported by cryo-TEM structural observations of an artificial assembly of beta-chitin with and without silk. This view of the nacreous organic matrix significantly changes previous models of the matrix structure and hence hypotheses pertaining to the mechanisms by which mineral formation occurs.

  1. Modified profile of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 production by human Fallopian tube epithelial cells following infection in vitro with Neisseria gonorrhoeae.

    PubMed

    Rodas, Paula I; Pérez, Doris; Jaffret, Claudia; González, Yaquelin; Carreño, Carolina; Tapia, Cecilia V; Osorio, Eduardo; Velasquez, Luis A; Christodoulides, Myron

    2016-12-08

    Epithelial shedding and scarring of Fallopian tube mucosa are the main consequences of sexually transmitted Neisseria gonorrhoeae infection and likely involves an imbalance of host extracellular matrix components (ECM) and their regulators such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). In this brief report, primary human Fallopian tube epithelial cells were infected with N. gonorrhoeae and MMP patterns examined. Gonococcal infection induced a significant increase in secreted MMP-9 and an accumulation of cytoplasmic MMP-2 over time, but no significant MMP-3 or MMP-8 production was observed. Thus, MMP-9 in particular could play a role in tubal scarring in response to gonococcal infection.

  2. Degradable quantum channels using pure-state to product-of-pure-state isometries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddhu, Vikesh; Griffiths, Robert B.

    2016-11-01

    We consider a family of quantum channels characterized by the fact that certain (in general nonorthogonal) pure states at the channel entrance are mapped to (tensor) products of pure states (PPP; hence "pcubed") at the complementary outputs (the main output and the "environment") of the channel. The pcubed construction, a reformulation of the twisted-diagonal procedure by M. M. Wolf and D. Pérez-García [Phys. Rev. A 75, 012303 (2007)], 10.1103/PhysRevA.75.012303, can be used to produce a large class of degradable quantum channels; degradable channels are of interest because their quantum capacities are easy to calculate. Several known types of degradable channels are either pcubed channels, or subchannels (employing a subspace of the channel entrance), or continuous limits of pcubed channels. The pcubed construction also yields channels which are neither degradable nor antidegradable (i.e., the complement of a degradable channel); a particular example of a qutrit channel of this type is studied in some detail. Determining whether a pcubed channel is degradable or antidegradable or neither is quite straightforward given the pure input and output states that characterize the channel. Conjugate degradable pcubed channels are always degradable.

  3. Biodiesel production--current state of the art and challenges.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, Palligarnai T; Briggs, Michael

    2008-05-01

    Biodiesel is a clean-burning fuel produced from grease, vegetable oils, or animal fats. Biodiesel is produced by transesterification of oils with short-chain alcohols or by the esterification of fatty acids. The transesterification reaction consists of transforming triglycerides into fatty acid alkyl esters, in the presence of an alcohol, such as methanol or ethanol, and a catalyst, such as an alkali or acid, with glycerol as a byproduct. Because of diminishing petroleum reserves and the deleterious environmental consequences of exhaust gases from petroleum diesel, biodiesel has attracted attention during the past few years as a renewable and environmentally friendly fuel. Since biodiesel is made entirely from vegetable oil or animal fats, it is renewable and biodegradable. The majority of biodiesel today is produced by alkali-catalyzed transesterification with methanol, which results in a relatively short reaction time. However, the vegetable oil and alcohol must be substantially anhydrous and have a low free fatty acid content, because the presence of water or free fatty acid or both promotes soap formation. In this article, we examine different biodiesel sources (edible and nonedible), virgin oil versus waste oil, algae-based biodiesel that is gaining increasing importance, role of different catalysts including enzyme catalysts, and the current state-of-the-art in biodiesel production.

  4. Regulatory function of a malleable protein matrix as a novel fermented whey product on features defining the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Beaulieu, J; Millette, E; Trottier, E; Précourt, L-P; Dupont, C; Lemieux, P

    2010-06-01

    Previously, we reported that a malleable protein matrix (MPM), composed of whey fermented by a proprietary Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens strain, has immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory properties. MPM consumption leads to a considerable reduction in the cytokine and chemokine production (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-1beta, and interleukin-6), thus lowering chronic inflammation or metaflammation. Inhibition of metaflammation should provide positive impact, particularly in the context of dyslipidemia, insulin resistance, and hypertension. In this study, we investigated whether short-term MPM supplementation ameliorates those features of metabolic syndrome (MetS). The ability of MPM to potentially regulate triglyceride level, cholesterol level, blood glucose level, and hypertension was evaluated in different animal models. MPM lowers triglyceride level by 37% (P < .05) in a poloxamer 407 dyslipidemia-induced rat model. It also reduces total cholesterol by 18% (P < .05) and low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol level by 32% (P < .05) and raises high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol level by 17% (P < .01) in Syrian Golden hamsters fed a high fat/high cholesterol diet for 2 weeks. MPM reestablishes the fasting glucose insulin ratio index to normal levels (P = .07) in this latter model and lowers the plasma glucose level area under the curve (-10%, P = .09) in fructose-fed rats after 2 weeks of treatment. In spontaneously hypertensive rats, MPM-treated animals showed a reduction of SBP by at least 13% (P < .05) for 4 weeks. Results from this study suggest that MPM is a functional ingredient with beneficial effects on lipid metabolism, blood glucose control, and hypertension that might contribute to the management of MetS and thus reducing the risk of cardiovascular diseases.

  5. Advanced Glycation End Products in Extracellular Matrix Proteins Contribute to the Failure of Sensory Nerve Regeneration in Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Duran-Jimenez, Beatriz; Dobler, Darin; Moffatt, Sarah; Rabbani, Naila; Streuli, Charles H.; Thornalley, Paul J.; Tomlinson, David R.; Gardiner, Natalie J.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The goal of this study was to characterize glycation adducts formed in both in vivo extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins of endoneurium from streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats and in vitro by glycation of laminin and fibronectin with methylglyoxal and glucose. We also investigated the impact of advanced glycation end product (AGE) residue content of ECM on neurite outgrowth from sensory neurons. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Glycation, oxidation, and nitration adducts of ECM proteins extracted from the endoneurium of control and STZ-induced diabetic rat sciatic nerve (3–24 weeks post-STZ) and of laminin and fibronectin that had been glycated using glucose or methylglyoxal were examined by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Methylglyoxal-glycated or unmodified ECM proteins were used as substrata for dissociated rat sensory neurons as in vitro models of regeneration. RESULTS STZ-induced diabetes produced a significant increase in early glycation Nε-fructosyl-lysine and AGE residue contents of endoneurial ECM. Glycation of laminin and fibronectin by methylglyoxal and glucose increased glycation adduct residue contents with methylglyoxal-derived hydroimidazolone and Nε-fructosyl-lysine, respectively, of greatest quantitative importance. Glycation of laminin caused a significant decrease in both neurotrophin-stimulated and preconditioned sensory neurite outgrowth. This decrease was prevented by aminoguanidine. Glycation of fibronectin also decreased preconditioned neurite outgrowth, which was prevented by aminoguanidine and nerve growth factor. CONCLUSIONS Early glycation and AGE residue content of endoneurial ECM proteins increase markedly in STZ-induced diabetes. Glycation of laminin and fibronectin causes a reduction in neurotrophin-stimulated neurite outgrowth and preconditioned neurite outgrowth. This may provide a mechanism for the failure of collateral sprouting and axonal regeneration in diabetic neuropathy. PMID:19720799

  6. Experimental validation of optimum input polarization states for Mueller matrix determination with a dual photoelastic modulator polarimeter.

    PubMed

    Gribble, Adam; Layden, David; Vitkin, I Alex

    2013-12-15

    Dual photoelastic modulator polarimeters can measure light polarization, which is often described as a Stokes vector. By evaluating changes in polarization when light interacts with a sample, the sample Mueller matrix also can be derived, completely describing its interaction with polarized light. The choice of which and how many input Stokes vectors to use for sample investigation is under the experimenter's control. Previous work has predicted that sets of input Stokes vectors forming the vertices of platonic solids on the Poincaré sphere allow for the most robust Mueller matrix determination. Further, when errors specific to the dual photoelastic modulator polarimeter are considered, simulations revealed that one specific shape and orientation of Stokes vectors (cube on the Poincaré sphere with vertices away from principal sphere axes) allows for the most robust Mueller matrix determination. Here we experimentally validate the optimum input Stokes vectors for dual photoelastic modulator Mueller polarimetry, toward developing a robust polarimetric platform of increasing relevance to biophotonics.

  7. Superspin glass state in a diluted nanoparticle system stabilized by interparticle interactions mediated by an antiferromagnetic matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Margaris, G.; Vasilakaki, M.; Peddis, D.; Trohidou, K. N.; Laureti, S.; Binns, C.; Agostinelli, E.; Rinaldi, D.; Mathieu, R.; Fiorani, D.

    2017-01-01

    In nanoparticle systems consisting of two magnetic materials (bi-magnetic nanoparticles or nanoparticles embedded in a magnetic matrix), there is a constantly growing interest in the investigation of the interplay between interparticle interactions and the nanoparticle-matrix interface exchange coupling, because of its enormous impact on a number of technological applications. The understanding of the mechanisms of such interplay is a great challenge, as it would allow controlling equilibrium and non-equilibrium magnetization dynamics of exchange coupled nanoparticles systems and finely tuning their anisotropy. Here, we provide evidence that this interplay leads to a collective superspin glass (SSG) behavior in a system of diluted ferromagnetic (FM) nanoparticles embedded in an antiferromagnetic (AFM) matrix (5% volume fraction of Co particles in Mn film matrix). We have developed a novel mesoscopic model to study the influence of interparticle interaction on the exchange bias (EB) and the dynamical behavior of assemblies of FM nanoparticles embedded in a granular AFM matrix. Our mesoscopic model is based on reducing the amount of simulated spins to the minimum number necessary to describe the magnetic structure of the system and introducing the adequate exchange parameters between the different spins. The model replicates remarkably well the observed static and dynamical SSG properties as well as the EB behavior. In addition, the proposed model well explains the role of the significant Co/Mn alloying and of the granularity of the matrix in mediating interparticle interactions through exchange and dipole-dipole coupling between the uncompensated moments of its grains and the exchange interaction at the Co/Mn interface.

  8. Reanalysis of the ground and three torsional excited states of trans-ethyl methyl ether by using an IAM-like tunneling matrix formalism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Kaori; Sakai, Yusuke; Tsunekawa, Shozo; Miyamoto, Taihei; Fujitake, Masaharu; Ohashi, Nobukimi

    2016-03-01

    The trans-ethyl methyl ether has two inequivalent methyl internal rotors and shows tunneling splittings of maximum up to five components. However, the barrier of these two internal rotation potentials were relatively high and the five components were not resolved in the ground state microwave spectra. In this study, well-resolved Fourier transform microwave ground state spectrum was measured for the first time to resolve the five components. The ground state microwave spectra were reanalyzed based on these new measurements and the additional millimeter-wave spectra as well as those studied previously by Fuchs et al. Ninety Fourier transform microwave spectral lines were assigned to 107 transitions in the ground state and 3508 conventional microwave absorption lines were assigned up to Ka = 16 of the ground state, including all 707 lines reported by Fuchs et al. In addition, 10 transitions were observed by the double resonance experiment. They were least-squares-analyzed by the use of an internal axis method (IAM)-like tunneling matrix formalism based on an extended permutation-inversion group theoretical idea. Twenty-two molecular parameters composed of rotational constants, centrifugal distortion constants, internal rotation parameters and internal rotation tunneling parameters were determined for the ground state. The microwave spectra in the three torsionally excited states, that is, the ν28 = 1 C-CH3 torsional state, the ν29 = 1 O-CH3 torsional state and the ν30 = 1 skeletal torsional state, were also reanalyzed by using the IAM-like tunneling matrix formalism and somewhat extended line assignments.

  9. On the Use of Finite Difference Matrix-Vector Products in Newton-Krylov Solvers for Implicit Climate Dynamics with Spectral Elements

    SciTech Connect

    Gardner, David; Woodward, Carol S.; Evans, Katherine J

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solution of global climate models requires effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a time step dictated by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability governed by the fastest of the time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton s method is applied for these systems. Each iteration of the Newton s method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite-difference which may show a loss of accuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite-difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral-element based shallow-water dynamical-core of the Community Atmosphere Model (CAM).

  10. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    DOE PAGES

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but thismore » Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.« less

  11. On the use of finite difference matrix-vector products in Newton-Krylov solvers for implicit climate dynamics with spectral elements

    SciTech Connect

    Woodward, Carol S.; Gardner, David J.; Evans, Katherine J.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient solutions of global climate models require effectively handling disparate length and time scales. Implicit solution approaches allow time integration of the physical system with a step size governed by accuracy of the processes of interest rather than by stability of the fastest time scales present. Implicit approaches, however, require the solution of nonlinear systems within each time step. Usually, a Newton's method is applied to solve these systems. Each iteration of the Newton's method, in turn, requires the solution of a linear model of the nonlinear system. This model employs the Jacobian of the problem-defining nonlinear residual, but this Jacobian can be costly to form. If a Krylov linear solver is used for the solution of the linear system, the action of the Jacobian matrix on a given vector is required. In the case of spectral element methods, the Jacobian is not calculated but only implemented through matrix-vector products. The matrix-vector multiply can also be approximated by a finite difference approximation which may introduce inaccuracy in the overall nonlinear solver. In this paper, we review the advantages and disadvantages of finite difference approximations of these matrix-vector products for climate dynamics within the spectral element shallow water dynamical core of the Community Atmosphere Model.

  12. By-products from the biodiesel chain as a substrate to citric acid production by solid-state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Manuella; Zimmer, Gabriela F; Cremonese, Ezequiel B; de C de S Schneider, Rosana; Corbellini, Valeriano A

    2014-07-01

    In this study, we propose the use of tung cake for the production of organic acids, with an emphasis on citric acid by solid-state fermentation. We evaluated the conditions of production and the by-products from the biodiesel chain as raw materials involved in this bioprocess. First, we standardized the conditions of solid-state fermentation in tung cake with and without residual fat and with different concentrations of glycerine using the fungus Aspergillus niger The solid-state fermentation process was monitored for 7 days considering the biomass growth and pH level. Citric acid production was determined by high-performance liquid chromatography. Fungal development was better in the crude tung cake, consisting of 20% glycerine. The highest citric acid yield was 350 g kg(-1) of biomass. Therefore, the solid-state fermentation of the tung cake with glycerine led to citric acid production using the Aspergillus niger fungus.

  13. Solving rational matrix equations in the state space with applications to computer-aided control-system design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Packard, A. K.; Sastry, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    A method of solving a class of linear matrix equations over various rings is proposed, using results from linear geometric control theory. An algorithm, successfully implemented, is presented, along with non-trivial numerical examples. Applications of the method to the algebraic control system design methodology are discussed.

  14. Properties of the single-site reduced density matrix in the Bose-Bose resonance model in the ground state and in quantum quenches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorfner, F.; Heidrich-Meisner, F.

    2016-06-01

    We study properties of the single-site reduced density matrix in the Bose-Bose resonance model as a function of system parameters. This model describes a single-component Bose gas with a resonant coupling to a diatomic molecular state, here defined on a lattice. A main goal is to demonstrate that the eigenstates of the single-site reduced density matrix have structures that are characteristic for the various quantum phases of this system. Since the Hamiltonian conserves only the global particle number but not the number of bosons and molecules individually, these eigenstates, referred to as optimal modes, can be nontrivial linear combinations of bare eigenstates of the molecular and boson particle number. We numerically analyze the optimal modes and their weights, the latter giving the importance of the corresponding state, in the ground state of the Bose-Bose resonance model. We find that the single-site von Neumann entropy is sensitive to the location of the phase boundaries. We explain the structure of the optimal modes and their weight spectra using perturbation theory and via a comparison to results for the single-component Bose-Hubbard model. We further study the dynamical evolution of the optimal modes and of the single-site entanglement entropy in two quantum quenches that cross phase boundaries of the model and show that these quantities are thermal in the steady state. For our numerical calculations, we use the density-matrix renormalization group method for ground-state calculations and time evolution in a Krylov subspace for the quench dynamics as well as exact diagonalization.

  15. FTIR matrix-isolation study of the reaction products of vanadium atoms with propene: observation of allylvanadium hydride as a precursor to sacrificial hydrogenation of propene.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Matthew G K; Walker, Stephen W C; Parnis, J Mark

    2011-08-01

    Vanadium atoms have been reacted with different partial pressures of propene in Ar under matrix-isolation conditions, and the products have been observed using Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy. Under dilute propene in Ar conditions, new features are observed in the IR spectra corresponding to a C-H insertion product, identified here as H-V-(η(3)-allyl). Use of d(3)-propene (CD(3)-CH═CH(2)) demonstrates that the initial V-atom insertion occurs at the methyl group of the propene molecule, and DFT calculations have been used to support the identity of the initial product. Upon increasing the partial pressure of propene, additional features corresponding to propane (C(3)H(8)) are observed, with the hydrogen-atom source for the observed hydrogenation demonstrated to be additional propene units. Analysis of a systematic increase in the partial pressure of propene in the system demonstrates that the yield of propane correlates with the decrease of the allyl product, demonstrating the H-V(allyl) species as a reactive intermediate in the overall hydrogenation process. An overall mechanism is proposed to rationalize the formation of the insertion product and ultimately the products of hydrogenation, which agrees with previous gas-phase and matrix-isolation work involving propene and the related system, ethene.

  16. Interleukin-1β activates focal adhesion kinase and Src to induce matrix metalloproteinase-9 production and invasion of MCF-7 breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Mon, Naing Naing; Senga, Takeshi; Ito, Satoko

    2017-01-01

    Interleukin-1β (IL-1b) is a pleiotropic cytokine that is important in tumor progression and invasion. Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which is a secreted matrix-degrading enzyme, is one of the key regulators of tumor invasion and metastasis. The current report indicated that IL-1b promotes MMP-9 production and cell invasion in non-metastatic MCF-7 breast cancer cells. IL-1b activated focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and proto-oncogene tyrosine-protein kinase Src (Src). Moreover, inhibiting the Src/FAK pathway reduced the IL-1b-induced production of MMP-9 and cell invasion. To investigate the functional role of FAK in MMP-9 production cell lines expressing mutant FAK in FAK knock-out mouse fibroblasts were generated. In wild-type FAK-expressing cells, MMP-9 production was induced by IL-1b stimulation. By contrast, IL-1b-induced MMP-9 production was abrogated in FAK knock-out, FAK Y397F, FAK Y925F, and kinase dead mutant-expressing cells. Therefore the results of the current study indicate that FAK and Src kinases are activated by IL-1b and play a critical role in MMP-9 production and tumor cell invasion. PMID:28356984

  17. The whey fermentation product malleable protein matrix decreases triglyceride concentrations in subjects with hypercholesterolemia: a randomized placebo-controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Berthold, H K; Schulte, D M; Lapointe, J-F; Lemieux, P; Krone, W; Gouni-Berthold, I

    2011-02-01

    Malleable protein matrix (MPM) is a unique whey-derived ingredient obtained through a fermentation process using proprietary lactic acid bacteria strains from the Lactobacillus kefiranofaciens species. Because evidence from animal models suggests that MPM decreases serum lipid concentrations, the purpose of the present trial was to assess the hypothesis that MPM exerts lipid-lowering effects in humans. A total of 161 subjects (50% male; age 54.5 ± 9.8 yr, body mass index 26.3 ± 3.6 kg/m(2)) with hypercholesterolemia with baseline low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels of 181 ± 30 mg/dL and normal triglyceride (TG) levels (131 ± 55 mg/dL) were randomized to receive MPM (2 × 15 g/d) or matching placebo. A 6-wk run-in phase was followed by a double-blind 12-wk treatment phase after randomization. The data were analyzed on an intention-to-treat basis. The primary outcome measure was the percentage change of LDL-C. The secondary outcome measures were changes in TG and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations as well as changes in other cardiovascular risk factors. After 12 wk of treatment, the relative TG decrease from baseline reached 9.8%, whereas LDL-C was slightly decreased (by 1.5%) following MPM treatment compared with placebo in the intention-to-treat cohort. The treatment effect on TG reduction was much higher in the subset of subjects having TG levels at baseline of 150 mg/dL or above (n=42), reaching 20.0% compared with placebo. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol concentrations, blood pressure, and fasting blood glucose remained unchanged, whereas a positive treatment effect was seen on hemoglobin A(1c). The MPM product was tolerated well without severe adverse events. In conclusion, MPM has significant TG-lowering properties in subjects with combined hypercholesterolemia and higher TG levels. Its effects on LDL-C concentrations and glucose metabolism deserve further investigation.

  18. Cosmogenic 3He production rates revisited from evidences of grain size dependent release of matrix-sited helium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Blard, P.-H.; Pik, R.; Lave, J.; Bourles, D.; Burnard, P.G.; Yokochi, R.; Marty, B.; Trusdell, F.

    2006-01-01

    Measurements of the cosmogenic 3He (3Hec) content of various size aliquots of exposed olivines show that the fine fraction (<140 μm) has 3Hec concentrations between 14 and 100% lower than that of the coarse fractions (0.14–1 mm). Such differences attest to a grain size dependent partial release of 3Hec from the phenocrysts matrix during the preliminary in vacuo crushing. This result might have important implications since most 3Hec measurements have used for ∼20 yr a standard routine based on the fusion of bulk powdered phenocrysts, whatever their grain size. A suite of new data obtained from coarse olivine grains yielded a mean Sea Level High Latitude 3Hec production rate (SLHL P3) of 128±5 and 136±6 at. g−1 yr−1, depending on the scaling factors used. This new value, which is ∼15% higher than previously published rates, is obtained from 5 ropy flow surfaces of Mt Etna (38°N) and Hawaiian (19°N) volcanoes, at elevations between sea level and 870 m and ranging in age from 1.47±0.05 to 149±23 ka according to independent 14C or K/Ar dating. 3He loss during the crushing step might account for the discrepancy between the standard reference value of 110–115 at. g−1 y−1 and the higher SLHL P3 proposed here. More generally, removal of the powdered fraction before fusion is an important point to consider in further studies in order to avoid any 3Hec systematic underestimates.An altitudinal section has also been sampled on the ropy surface of a ∼1500 yr single flow of Mauna Loa (19°N) which allowed a new empirical atmospheric attenuation length of 149±22 g cm−2 to be documented for 3Hec in olivines between 2400 and 4000 m elevations.

  19. Low charge state heavy ion production with sub-nanosecond laser

    SciTech Connect

    Kanesue, T. Okamura, M.; Kumaki, M.; Ikeda, S.

    2016-02-15

    We have investigated laser ablation plasma of various species using nanosecond and sub-nanosecond lasers for both high and low charge state ion productions. We found that with sub-nanosecond laser, the generated plasma has a long tail which has low charge state ions determined by an electrostatic ion analyzer even under the laser irradiation condition for highly charged ion production. This can be caused by insufficient laser absorption in plasma plume. This property might be suitable for low charge state ion production. We used a nanosecond laser and a sub-nanosecond laser for low charge state ion production to investigate the difference of generated plasma using the Zirconium target.

  20. Low charge state heavy ion production with sub-nanosecond laser.

    PubMed

    Kanesue, T; Kumaki, M; Ikeda, S; Okamura, M

    2016-02-01

    We have investigated laser ablation plasma of various species using nanosecond and sub-nanosecond lasers for both high and low charge state ion productions. We found that with sub-nanosecond laser, the generated plasma has a long tail which has low charge state ions determined by an electrostatic ion analyzer even under the laser irradiation condition for highly charged ion production. This can be caused by insufficient laser absorption in plasma plume. This property might be suitable for low charge state ion production. We used a nanosecond laser and a sub-nanosecond laser for low charge state ion production to investigate the difference of generated plasma using the Zirconium target.

  1. The effect of the fibre orientation of electrospun scaffolds on the matrix production of rabbit annulus fibrosus-derived stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chen; Zhu, Caihong; Li, Jun; Zhou, Pinghui; Chen, Min; Yang, Huilin; Li, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Annulus fibrosus (AF) tissue engineering has recently received increasing attention as a treatment for intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration; however, such engineering remains challenging because of the remarkable complexity of AF tissue. In order to engineer a functional AF replacement, the fabrication of cell-scaffold constructs that mimic the cellular, biochemical and structural features of native AF tissue is critical. In this study, we fabricated aligned fibrous polyurethane scaffolds using an electrospinning technique and used them for culturing AF-derived stem/progenitor cells (AFSCs). Random fibrous scaffolds, also prepared via electrospinning, were used as a control. We compared the morphology, proliferation, gene expression and matrix production of AFSCs on aligned scaffolds and random scaffolds. There was no apparent difference in the attachment or proliferation of cells cultured on aligned scaffolds and random scaffolds. However, compared to cells on random scaffolds, the AFSCs on aligned scaffolds were more elongated and better aligned, and they exhibited higher gene expression and matrix production of collagen-I and aggrecan. The gene expression and protein production of collagen-II did not appear to differ between the two groups. Together, these findings indicate that aligned fibrous scaffolds may provide a favourable microenvironment for the differentiation of AFSCs into cells similar to outer AF cells, which predominantly produce collagen-I matrix. PMID:26273539

  2. General formalism for the efficient calculation of the Hessian matrix of EM data misfit and Hessian-vector products based upon adjoint sources approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pankratov, Oleg; Kuvshinov, Alexey

    2015-03-01

    3-D electromagnetic (EM) studies of the Earth have advanced significantly over the past decade. Despite a certain success of the 3-D EM inversions of real data sets, the quantitative assessment of the recovered models is still a challenging problem. It is known that one can gain valuable information about model uncertainties from the analysis of Hessian matrix. However, even with modern computational capabilities the calculation of the Hessian matrix based on numerical differentiation is extremely time consuming. Much more efficient way to compute the Hessian matrix is provided by an `adjoint sources' methodology. The computation of Hessian matrix (and Hessian-vector products) using adjoint formulation is now well-established approach, especially in seismic inverse modelling. As for EM inverse modelling we did not find in the literature a description of the approach, which would allow EM researchers to apply this methodology in a straightforward manner to their scenario of interest. In the paper, we present formalism for the efficient calculation of the Hessian matrix using adjoint sources approach. We also show how this technique can be implemented to calculate multiple Hessian-vector products very efficiently. The formalism is general in the sense that it allows to work with responses that arise in EM problem set-ups either with natural- or controlled-source excitations. The formalism allows for various types of parametrization of the 3-D conductivity distribution. Using this methodology one can readily obtain appropriate formulae for the specific sounding methods. To illustrate the concept we provide such formulae for two EM techniques: magnetotellurics and controlled-source sounding with vertical magnetic dipole as a source.

  3. Synthesis rates and binding kinetics of matrix products in engineered cartilage constructs using chondrocyte-seeded agarose gels.

    PubMed

    Nims, Robert J; Cigan, Alexander D; Albro, Michael B; Hung, Clark T; Ateshian, Gerard A

    2014-06-27

    Large-sized cartilage constructs suffer from inhomogeneous extracellular matrix deposition due to insufficient nutrient availability. Computational models of nutrient consumption and tissue growth can be utilized as an efficient alternative to experimental trials to optimize the culture of large constructs; models require system-specific growth and consumption parameters. To inform models of the [bovine chondrocyte]-[agarose gel] system, total synthesis rate (matrix accumulation rate+matrix release rate) and matrix retention fractions of glycosaminoglycans (GAG), collagen, and cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) were measured either in the presence (continuous or transient) or absence of TGF-β3 supplementation. TGF-β3's influences on pyridinoline content and mechanical properties were also measured. Reversible binding kinetic parameters were characterized using computational models. Based on our recent nutrient supplementation work, we measured glucose consumption and critical glucose concentration for tissue growth to computationally simulate the culture of a human patella-sized tissue construct, reproducing the experiment of Hung et al. (2003). Transient TGF-β3 produced the highest GAG synthesis rate, highest GAG retention ratio, and the highest binding affinity; collagen synthesis was elevated in TGF-β3 supplementation groups over control, with the highest binding affinity observed in the transient supplementation group; both COMP synthesis and retention were lower than those for GAG and collagen. These results informed the modeling of GAG deposition within a large patella construct; this computational example was similar to the previous experimental results without further adjustments to modeling parameters. These results suggest that these nutrient consumption and matrix synthesis models are an attractive alternative for optimizing the culture of large-sized constructs.

  4. Direct measurement of excited-state dipole matrix elements using electromagnetically induced transparency in the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whiting, Daniel J.; Keaveney, James; Adams, Charles S.; Hughes, Ifan G.

    2016-04-01

    Applying large magnetic fields to gain access to the hyperfine Paschen-Back regime can isolate three-level systems in a hot alkali metal vapors, thereby simplifying usually complex atom-light interactions. We use this method to make the first direct measurement of the |<5 P ||e r ||5 D >| matrix element in 87Rb. An analytic model with only three levels accurately models the experimental electromagnetically induced transparency spectra and extracted Rabi frequencies are used to determine the dipole matrix element. We measure |<5 P3 /2||e r ||5 D5 /2>| =(2.290 ±0 .002stat±0 .04syst) e a0 , which is in excellent agreement with the theoretical calculations of Safronova, Williams, and Clark [Phys. Rev. A 69, 022509 (2004), 10.1103/PhysRevA.69.022509].

  5. Synthetic Organic Chemicals: United States Production and Sales, 1976.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Roger; And Others

    This is the sixth annual report of the U.S. Trade Commission on domestic production and sales of synthetic organic chemicals and the raw materials from which they are made. The report consists of 15 sections, each covering a specified group (based primarily on use) of organic chemicals as follows: tar and tar crudes; primary products from…

  6. Deterministic Production of Photon Number States via Quantum Feedback Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geremia, J. M.

    2006-05-01

    It is well-known that measurements reduce the state of a quantum system, at least approximately, to an eigenstate of the operator associated with the physical property being measured. Here, we employ a continuous measurement of cavity photon number to achieve a robust, nondestructively verifiable procedure for preparing number states of an optical cavity mode. Such Fock states are highly sought after for the enabling role they play in quantum computing, networking and precision metrology. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the particular Fock state produced in each application of the continuous photon number measurement can be controlled using techniques from real-time quantum feedback control. The result of the feedback- stabilized measurement is a deterministic source of (nearly ideal) cavity Fock states. An analysis of feedback stability and the experimental viability of a quantum optical implementation currently underway at the University of New Mexico will be presented.

  7. Current state of coenzyme Q(10) production and its applications.

    PubMed

    Jeya, Marimuthu; Moon, Hee-Jung; Lee, Jeong-Lim; Kim, In-Won; Lee, Jung-Kul

    2010-02-01

    Coenzyme Q(10) (CoQ(10)), an obligatory cofactor in the aerobic respiratory electron transfer for energy generation, is formed from the conjugation of a benzoquinone ring with a hydrophobic isoprenoid chain. CoQ(10) is now used as a nutritional supplement because of its antioxidant properties and is beneficial in the treatment of several human diseases when administered orally. Bioprocesses have been developed for the commercial production of CoQ(10) because of its increased demand, and these bioprocesses depend on microbes that produce high levels of CoQ(10) naturally. However, as knowledge of the biosynthetic enzymes and the regulatory mechanisms modulating CoQ(10) production increases, approaches arise for the genetic engineering of CoQ(10) production in Escherichia coli and Agrobacterium tumefaciens. This review focused on approaches for CoQ(10) production, strategies used to engineer CoQ(10) production in microbes, and potential applications of CoQ(10).

  8. The economics of biomass production in the United States

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, R.L.; Walsh, M.E.; Lichtenberg, E.; Roningen, V.O.; Shapouri, H.

    1995-12-31

    Biomass crops (e.g. poplar, willow, switchgrass) could become important feedstocks for power, liquid fuel, and chemical production. This paper presents estimates of the potential production of biomass in the US under a range of assumptions. Estimates of potential biomass crop yields and production costs from the Department of Energy`s (DOE) Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) are combined with measures of land rents from USDA`s Conservation Reserve Program (CRP), to estimate a competitive supply of biomass wood and grass crops. Estimates are made for one potential biomass use--electric power production--where future costs of electricity production from competing fossil fuels set the demand price. The paper outlines the methodology used and limitations of the analysis.

  9. Effect of food matrix and pH on the volatilization of bases (TVB) in packed north Atlantic gray shrimp (Crangon crangon): volatile bases in MAP fishery products.

    PubMed

    Noseda, Bert; Dewulf, Jo; Goethals, Joke; Ragaert, Peter; Van Bree, Ilse; Pauwels, Danny; Van Langenhove, Herman; Devlieghere, Frank

    2010-11-24

    The total volatile basic nitrogen fraction (TVB-N) is often used as a quality parameter in the fish industry to assess spoilage. This parameter often leads to discussions between producers and retailers when it comes to defining clear limits of acceptability for modified atmosphere (MA) packed fish and fishery products. Suggested product limits (mg N/100 g fish) do not always correlate with the presence of off-odors. Gray shrimp are an economic valuable, very perishable niche product, where the TVB-N fraction plays an important role considering its shelf life. This research focuses on the effect of a shrimp matrix and its pH on the volatilization of these formed bases, revealing the relationship between concentrations in the fishery product and the concentrations of these bases present in the headspace of the packed product. Especially, the pH of the product, which is lowered when fishery products are packed under a carbon dioxide enriched atmosphere, appeared to have an immense effect on the volatilization of these bases. The effect of the fish matrix itself is established by means of calculated equilibration constants (dimensionless) being 2.13×10(-4)±0.38×10(-4) for trimethylamine, 6.34×10(-5)±1.71×10(-5) for dimethylamine, and 2.58×10(-5)±0.49×10(-5) for ammonia. Comparison of these constants with the equilibration constants of an aqueous solution indicated the retention of these bases in the product. This article provides not only the important insights for the interpretation of TVB-N values in modified atmosphere packaged gray shrimp but also the methodology to extend these findings to other fish and fishery products.

  10. Reduction of matrix effects and improvement of sensitivity during determination of two chloridazon degradation products in aqueous matrices by using UPLC-ESI-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kowal, Sebastian; Balsaa, Peter; Werres, Friedrich; Schmidt, Torsten C

    2012-06-01

    The development and validation of a sensitive and reliable detection method for the determination of two polar degradation products, desphenyl-chloridazon (DPC) and methyl-desphenyl-chloridazon (MDPC) in surface water, ground water and drinking water is presented. The method is based on direct large volume injection ultra-performance liquid chromatography electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. This simple but powerful analytical method for polar substances in the aquatic environment is usually hampered by varying matrix effects, depending on the nature of different water bodies. For the two examined degradation products, the matrix effects are particularly strong compared with other polar degradation products of pesticides. Therefore, matrix effects were studied thoroughly with the aim of minimising them and improving sensitivity during determination by postcolumn addition of ammonia solution as a modifier. An internal standard was used in order to compensate for remaining matrix effects. The calibration curve shows very good coefficients of correlation (0.9994 for DPC and 0.9999 for MDPC). Intraday precision values were lower than 5 % for DPC, 3 % for MDPC and the limits of detection were 10 ng/L for both substances. The method was successfully used in a national round robin test with a deviation between 3 and 8 % from target values. Finally, about 1,000 samples from different water bodies have been examined with this method in the Rhine and Ruhr region of North-Rhine-Westphalia (Germany) and in the European Union. Approximately 76 % of analysed samples contained measurable amounts of DPC at concentrations up to 8 μg/L while 53 % of the samples showed MDPC concentrations up to 2.3 μg/L.

  11. The state of autotrophic ethanol production in Cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Dexter, J; Armshaw, P; Sheahan, C; Pembroke, J T

    2015-07-01

    Ethanol production directly from CO2 , utilizing genetically engineered photosynthetic cyanobacteria as a biocatalyst, offers significant potential as a renewable and sustainable source of biofuel. Despite the current absence of a commercially successful production system, significant resources have been deployed to realize this goal. Utilizing the pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas species, metabolically derived pyruvate can be converted to ethanol. This review of both peer-reviewed and patent literature focuses on the genetic modifications utilized for metabolic engineering and the resultant effect on ethanol yield. Gene dosage, induced expression and cassette optimizat-ion have been analyzed to optimize production, with production rates of 0·1-0·5 g L(-1) day(-1) being achieved. The current 'toolbox' of molecular manipulations and future directions focusing on applicability, addressing the primary challenges facing commercialization of cyanobacterial technologies are discussed.

  12. Use of emerging tobacco products in the United States.

    PubMed

    McMillen, Robert; Maduka, Jeomi; Winickoff, Jonathan

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides the first nationally representative estimates for use of four emerging products. Addressing the issue of land-line substitution with cell phones, we used a mixed-mode survey to obtain two representative samples of US adults. Of 3,240 eligible respondents contacted, 74% completed surveys. In the weighted analysis, 13.6% have tried at least one emerging tobacco product; 5.1% snus; 8.8% waterpipe; 0.6% dissolvable tobacco products; 1.8% electronic nicotine delivery systems (ENDS) products. Daily smokers (25.1%) and nondaily smokers (34.9%) were the most likely to have tried at least one of these products, compared to former smokers (17.2%) and never smokers (7.7%), P<.001. 18.2% of young adults 18-24 and 12.8% of those >24 have tried one of these products, P<.01. In multivariable analysis, current daily (5.5, 4.3-7.6), nondaily (6.1, 4.0-9.3), and former smoking status (2.7, 2.1-3.6) remained significant, as did young adults (2.2, 1.6-3.0); males (3.5, 2.8-4.5); higher educational attainment; some college (2.7, 1.7-4.2); college degree (2.0, 1.3-3.3). Use of these products raises concerns about nonsmokers being at risk for nicotine dependence and current smokers maintaining their dependence. Greater awareness of emerging tobacco product prevalence and the high risk demographic user groups might inform efforts to determine appropriate public health policy and regulatory action.

  13. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-28

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  14. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-01

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  15. First order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements between excited states: Implementation and application at the TD-DFT and pp-TDA levels

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Zhendong; Suo, Bingbing; Liu, Wenjian

    2014-12-28

    The recently proposed rigorous yet abstract theory of first order nonadiabatic coupling matrix elements (fo-NACME) between electronically excited states [Z. Li and W. Liu, J. Chem. Phys. 141, 014110 (2014)] is specified in detail for two widely used models: The time-dependent density functional theory and the particle-particle Tamm-Dancoff approximation. The actual implementation employs a Lagrangian formalism with atomic-orbital based direct algorithms, which makes the computation of fo-NACME very similar to that of excited-state gradients. Although the methods have great potential in investigating internal conversions and nonadiabatic dynamics between excited states of large molecules, only prototypical systems as a first pilot application are considered here to illustrate some conceptual aspects.

  16. Biohythane production from organic wastes: present state of art.

    PubMed

    Roy, Shantonu; Das, Debabrata

    2016-05-01

    The economy of an industrialized country is greatly dependent on fossil fuels. However, these nonrenewable sources of energy are nearing the brink of extinction. Moreover, the reliance on these fuels has led to increased levels of pollution which have caused serious adverse impacts on the environment. Hydrogen has emerged as a promising alternative since it does not produce CO2 during combustion and also has the highest calorific value. The biohythane process comprises of biohydrogen production followed by biomethanation. Biological H2 production has an edge over its chemical counterpart mainly because it is environmentally benign. Maximization of gaseous energy recovery could be achieved by integrating dark fermentative hydrogen production followed by biomethanation. Intensive research work has already been carried out on the advancement of biohydrogen production processes, such as the development of suitable microbial consortium (mesophiles or thermophiles), genetically modified microorganism, improvement of the reactor designs, use of different solid matrices for the immobilization of whole cells, and development of two-stage process for higher rate of H2 production. Scale-up studies of the dark fermentation process was successfully carried out in 20- and 800-L reactors. However, the total gaseous energy recovery for two stage process was found to be 53.6 %. From single-stage H2 production, gaseous energy recovery was only 28 %. Thus, two-stage systems not only help in improving gaseous energy recovery but also can make biohythane (mixture of H2 and CH4) concept commercially feasible.

  17. Single step purification of concanavalin A (Con A) and bio-sugar production from jack bean using glucosylated magnetic nano matrix.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ho Myeong; Cho, Eun Jin; Bae, Hyeun-Jong

    2016-08-01

    Jack bean (JB, Canavalia ensiformis) is the source of bio-based products, such as proteins and bio-sugars that contribute to modern molecular biology and biomedical research. In this study, the use of jack bean was evaluated as a source for concanavalin A (Con A) and bio-sugar production. A novel method for purifying Con A from JBs was successfully developed using a glucosylated magnetic nano matrix (GMNM) as a physical support, which facilitated easy separation and purification of Con A. In addition, the enzymatic conversion rate of 2% (w/v) Con A extracted residue to bio-sugar was 98.4%. Therefore, this new approach for the production of Con A and bio-sugar is potentially useful for obtaining bio-based products from jack bean.

  18. Application of bladder acellular matrix in urinary bladder regeneration: the state of the art and future directions.

    PubMed

    Pokrywczynska, Marta; Gubanska, Iga; Drewa, Gerard; Drewa, Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Construction of the urinary bladder de novo using tissue engineering technologies is the "holy grail" of reconstructive urology. The search for the ideal biomaterial for urinary bladder reconstruction has been ongoing for decades. One of the most promising biomaterials for this purpose seems to be bladder acellular matrix (BAM). In this review we determine the most important factors, which may affect biological and physical properties of BAM and its regeneration potential in tissue engineered urinary bladder. We also point out the directions in modification of BAM, which include incorporation of exogenous growth factors into the BAM structure. Finally, we discuss the results of the urinary bladder regeneration with cell seeded BAM.

  19. 10 CFR 431.402 - Preemption of State regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Preemption of State regulations for commercial HVAC & WH... regulations for commercial HVAC & WH products. Beginning on the effective date of such standard, an energy conservation standard set forth in this Part for a commercial HVAC & WH product supersedes any State or...

  20. State-selected chemical reaction dynamics at the S matrix level - Final-state specificities of near-threshold processes at low and high energies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatfield, David C.; Truhlar, Donald G.; Schwenke, David W.

    1992-01-01

    State-to-state reaction probabilities are found to be highly final-state specific at state-selected threshold energies for the reactions O + H2 yield OH + H and H + H2 yield H2 + H. The study includes initial rotational states with quantum numbers 0-15, and the specificity is especially dramatic for the more highly rotationally excited reactants. The analysis is based on accurate quantum mechanical reactive scattering calculations. Final-state specificity is shown in general to increase with the rotational quantum number of the reactant diatom, and the trends are confirmed for both zero and nonzero values of the total angular momentum.

  1. Multispin correlations and pseudo-thermalization of the transient density matrix in solid-state NMR: free induction decay and magic echo

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Steven W.; Oganesyan, Vadim; Boutis, Gregory S.

    2013-01-01

    Quantum unitary evolution typically leads to thermalization of generic interacting many-body systems. There are very few known general methods for reversing this process, and we focus on the magic echo, a radio-frequency pulse sequence known to approximately “rewind” the time evolution of dipolar coupled homonuclear spin systems in a large magnetic field. By combining analytic, numerical, and experimental results we systematically investigate factors leading to the degradation of magic echoes, as observed in reduced revival of mean transverse magnetization. Going beyond the conventional analysis based on mean magnetization we use a phase encoding technique to measure the growth of spin correlations in the density matrix at different points in time following magic echoes of varied durations and compare the results to those obtained during a free induction decay (FID). While considerable differences are documented at short times, the long-time behavior of the density matrix appears to be remarkably universal among the types of initial states considered – simple low order multispin correlations are observed to decay exponentially at the same rate, seeding the onset of increasingly complex high order correlations. This manifestly athermal process is constrained by conservation of the second moment of the spectrum of the density matrix and proceeds indefinitely, assuming unitary dynamics. PMID:23710125

  2. Squeezed States and Particle Production in High Energy Collisions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bambah, Bindu A.

    1996-01-01

    Using the 'quantum optical approach' we propose a model of multiplicity distributions in high energy collisions based on squeezed coherent states. We show that the k-mode squeezed coherent state is the most general one in describing hadronic multiplicity distributions in particle collision processes, describing not only p(bar-p) collisions but e(+)e(-), vp and diffractive collisions as well. The reason for this phenomenological fit has been gained by working out a microscopic theory in which the squeezed coherent sources arise naturally if one considers the Lorentz squeezing of hadrons and works in the covariant phase space formalism.

  3. Positron-molecule bound states and positive ion production

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leventhal, M.; Passner, A.; Surko, C. M.

    1990-01-01

    The interaction was studied of low energy positrons with large molecules such as alkanes. These data provide evidencce for the existence of long lived resonances and bound states of positrons with neutral molecules. The formation process and the nature of these resonances are discussed. The positive ions produced when a positron annihilates with an electron in one of these resonances were observed and this positive ion formation process is discussed. A review is presented of the current state of the understanding of these positron-molecule resonances and the resulting positive ion formation. A number of outstanding issues in this area is also discussed.

  4. Irradiation behavior of the interaction product of U-Mo fuel particle dispersion in an Al matrix.

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Y.S.; Hofman, G.

    2012-06-01

    Irradiation performance of U-Mo fuel particles dispersed in Al matrix is stable in terms of fuel swelling and is suitable for the conversion of research and test reactors from highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). However, tests of the fuel at high temperatures and high burnups revealed obstacles caused by the interaction layers forming between the fuel particle and matrix. In some cases, fission gas filled pores grow and interconnect in the interdiffusion layer resulting in fuel plate failure. Postirradiation observations are made to examine the behavior of the interdiffusion layers. The interdiffusion layers show a fluid-like behavior characteristic of amorphous materials. In the amorphous interdiffusion layers, fission gas diffusivity is high and the material viscosity is low so that the fission gas pores readily form and grow. Based on the observations, a pore formation mechanism is proposed and potential remedies to suppress the pore growth are also introduced.

  5. Assessment of the effect of type of dairy product and of chocolate matrix on the oral absorption of monomeric chocolate flavanols in a small animal model.

    PubMed

    Gossai, D; Lau-Cam, C A

    2009-03-01

    This study has examined the effects of type of dairy product (whole milk, skim milk, heavy cream) and chocolate matrix (baking, dark, dairy milk, white) on the oral absorption of the chocolate flavanols (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin in a small animal model. In the study, each flavanol compound, as a solution in water or a dairy product or as a chocolate dispersion in water, was administered intragastrically to male Sprague-Dawley rats in an amount equal to or equivalent to 350 mg/kg. In each instance, blood samples were collected over a 5 h period, and used to measure plasma total catechin concentrations by HPLC after enzymatic hydrolysis of flavanol conjugates. Pharmacokinetic data were evaluated using a one compartment approach. Whole milk and heavy cream, and to a much lesser extent skim milk, lowered the oral absorption of both (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin and altered the AUC, C(max), k(a), k(e) and t1/2 values in direct proportion to their fat, but not to their protein, content. In addition, the t(max) for solutions of (-)-epicatechin in water and skim milk occurred 2 h earlier than from solutions in whole milk and heavy cream. Similarly, dispersions of baking chocolate in water and in whole milk yielded plasma levels of monomeric catechins that were, respectively, about equal to and much lower than those from aqueous solutions of authentic flavanols. A determining role for a chocolate matrix (dark, dairy milk or white chocolate) on the oral absorption of its constitutive monomeric flavanols was suggested by the apparent variability in plasma total catechins levels that existed among them both before and after their spiking with equal amounts of exogenous (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin. Such a variability could reflect differences among different chocolates in terms of their physical properties, matrix components, and matrix characteristics imposed by the manufacturing process used for each type of chocolate. In all the experiments, (+)-catechin

  6. US EPA, Pesticide Product Label, STATE FORMULA 475, 06 ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    2011-04-14

    ... 931 ~~:1'X;~~~~ c:6~-5/4/8i. 5714/8~' Neecee. If. e1<. de ..... I'f • I' I i I I I I I 1 f ; i I I' f '1 • , " , STATE FORMULA 475 U :d , . , i • I; • , : 1 ...

  7. Trends in United States cotton yield productivity since 1980

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is produced in over 30 countries and provides a major fiber source of textile manufacturers. In the U.S., upland cotton is produced along the southern most portion of the country in sixteen states from California to Virginia. In 2012, the direct market value of 17.0 million bales of U.S. cott...

  8. Quantum hyperparallel algorithm for matrix multiplication.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xin-Ding; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2016-04-29

    Hyperentangled states, entangled states with more than one degree of freedom, are considered as promising resource in quantum computation. Here we present a hyperparallel quantum algorithm for matrix multiplication with time complexity O(N(2)), which is better than the best known classical algorithm. In our scheme, an N dimensional vector is mapped to the state of a single source, which is separated to N paths. With the assistance of hyperentangled states, the inner product of two vectors can be calculated with a time complexity independent of dimension N. Our algorithm shows that hyperparallel quantum computation may provide a useful tool in quantum machine learning and "big data" analysis.

  9. Quantum hyperparallel algorithm for matrix multiplication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xin-Ding; Zhang, Xiao-Ming; Xue, Zheng-Yuan

    2016-04-01

    Hyperentangled states, entangled states with more than one degree of freedom, are considered as promising resource in quantum computation. Here we present a hyperparallel quantum algorithm for matrix multiplication with time complexity O(N2), which is better than the best known classical algorithm. In our scheme, an N dimensional vector is mapped to the state of a single source, which is separated to N paths. With the assistance of hyperentangled states, the inner product of two vectors can be calculated with a time complexity independent of dimension N. Our algorithm shows that hyperparallel quantum computation may provide a useful tool in quantum machine learning and “big data” analysis.

  10. Accumulation of Extracellular Matrix and Developmental Dysregulation in the Pancreas by Transgenic Production of Transforming Growth Factor-β1

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myung-Shik; Gu, Danling; Feng, Lili; Curriden, Scott; Arnush, Marc; Krahl, Troy; Gurushanthaiah, Deepak; Wilson, Curtis; Loskutoff, David L.; Fox, Howard; Sarvetnick, Nora

    1995-01-01

    Transgenic mice expressing transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) in the pancreatic β-islet cells directed by human insulin promoter were produced to study in vivo effects of TGF-β1. Fibroblast proliferation and abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix were observed from birth onward, finally replacing almost all the exocrine pancreas. Cellular infiltrates comprising macrophages and neutrophils were also observed. Plasminogen activator inhibitor was induced in the transgenic pancreas as well as fibronectin and laminin, partly explaining accumulation of extracellular matrix. TGF-β1 inhibited proliferation of acinar cells in vivo as evidenced by decreased bromodeoxyuridine incorporation. Development of pancreatic islets was dysregulated, resulting in small islet cell clusters without formation of normal adult islets; however, the overall islet cell mass was not signfifcantly diminished. Additional transgenic lines with less pronounced phenotypes had less expression of TGF-β1 transgene. These findings suggest that TGF-β1 might be a mediator of diseases associated with extracellular matrix deposition such as chronic pancreatitis, and this mouse model will be useful for further analysis of the in vivo effects of TGF-β1, including its potential for immunosuppression. Imagesp43-aFigure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6 PMID:7604884

  11. Vascular smooth muscle cells from injured rat aortas display elevated matrix production associated with transforming growth factor-beta activity.

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, L. M.; Wolf, Y. G.; Ruoslahti, E.

    1995-01-01

    The arterial response to injury is characterized by a short period of increased proliferation and migration of vascular smooth muscle cells, followed by an extended period of extracellular matrix accumulation in the intima. Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) has been implicated as a causative factor in the formation of extracellular matrix in this process, which leads to progressive thickening of the intima, known as intimal hyperplasia. In vitro analysis of vascular smooth muscle cells harvested from normal rat aortas and from aortas injured 14 days earlier showed that both types of cells attached equally well to culture dishes but that the initial spreading of the cells was increased in cells derived from injured vessels. Cells from the injured arteries produced more fibronectin and proteoglycans into the culture medium than the cells from normal arteries and contained more TGF-beta 1 mRNA. TGF-beta 1 increased proteoglycan synthesis by normal smooth muscle cells, and the presence of a neutralizing anti-TGF-beta 1 antibody reduced proteoglycan synthesis by the cells from injured arteries in culture. Fibronectin synthesis was not altered by these treatments. These results indicate that the accumulation of extracellular matrix components in neointimal lesions is at least partially caused by autocrine TGF-beta activity in vascular smooth muscle cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:7573349

  12. Trends in United States cotton yield productivity since 1980

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton is produced in over 30 countries and provides a major fiber source for textile manufacturers. In 2012, the direct market value of 17.0 million bales of U.S. cotton equated to US$ 8.1 billion. The objective of this study was to document trends in U.S. upland cotton yield productivity since 198...

  13. Biotechnological production of eleutherosides: current state and perspectives.

    PubMed

    Murthy, Hosakatte Niranjana; Kim, Yun-Soo; Georgiev, Milen I; Paek, Kee-Yoeup

    2014-09-01

    Eleutherosides, the phenylpropanoid and lignan glycosides, are the active ingredients accumulated in the roots and stems of Eleutherococcus species and in Eleutherococcus senticosus in particular. Syringin (=eleutheroside B) and (-) syringaresinol-di-O-β-D-glucoside (=eleutheroside E) appear as the most important bioactive compounds which are used as adaptogens, besides their abundant antidiabetic and anticancer properties. As the availability of "Eleuthero" is becoming increasingly limited because of its scanty natural distribution, the production of these compounds by biotechnological means has become an attractive alternative. In E. senticosus and other closely related species, Eleutherococcus sessiliflorus, Eleutherococcus chiisanensis, and Eleutherococcus koreanum, organogenic cultures have been induced for the production of eleutherosides. Bioreactor cultures have been established and various parameters, which influence on the accumulation of biomass and secondary metabolites, have been thoroughly investigated. Pilot-scale cultures have also been accomplished for the large-scale production of somatic embryos containing abundant amounts of eleutherosides. This review describes the biotechnological approaches and challenges for the production of eleutherosides.

  14. Measurement of the WW + WZ production cross section using the lepton + jets final state at CDF II.

    PubMed

    Aaltonen, T; Adelman, J; Alvarez González, B; Amerio, S; Amidei, D; Anastassov, A; Annovi, A; Antos, J; Apollinari, G; Apresyan, A; Arisawa, T; Artikov, A; Asaadi, J; Ashmanskas, W; Attal, A; Aurisano, A; Azfar, F; Badgett, W; Barbaro-Galtieri, A; Barnes, V E; Barnett, B A; Barria, P; Bartos, P; Bauer, G; Beauchemin, P-H; Bedeschi, F; Beecher, D; Behari, S; Bellettini, G; Bellinger, J; Benjamin, D; Beretvas, A; Bhatti, A; Binkley, M; Bisello, D; Bizjak, I; Blair, R E; Blocker, C; Blumenfeld, B; Bocci, A; Bodek, A; Boisvert, V; Bortoletto, D; Boudreau, J; Boveia, A; Brau, B; Bridgeman, A; Brigliadori, L; Bromberg, C; Brubaker, E; Budagov, J; Budd, H S; Budd, S; Burkett, K; Busetto, G; Bussey, P; Buzatu, A; Byrum, K L; Cabrera, S; Calancha, C; Camarda, S; Campanelli, M; Campbell, M; Canelli, F; Canepa, A; Carls, B; Carlsmith, D; Carosi, R; Carrillo, S; Carron, S; Casal, B; Casarsa, M; Castro, A; Catastini, P; Cauz, D; Cavaliere, V; Cavalli-Sforza, M; Cerri, A; Cerrito, L; Chang, S H; Chen, Y C; Chertok, M; Chiarelli, G; Chlachidze, G; Chlebana, F; Cho, K; Chokheli, D; Chou, J P; Chung, K; Chung, W H; Chung, Y S; Chwalek, T; Ciobanu, C I; Ciocci, M A; Clark, A; Clark, D; Compostella, G; Convery, M E; Conway, J; Corbo, M; Cordelli, M; Cox, C A; Cox, D J; Crescioli, F; Cuenca Almenar, C; Cuevas, J; Culbertson, R; Cully, J C; Dagenhart, D; Datta, M; Davies, T; de Barbaro, P; De Cecco, S; Deisher, A; De Lorenzo, G; Dell'Orso, M; Deluca, C; Demortier, L; Deng, J; Deninno, M; d'Errico, M; Di Canto, A; di Giovanni, G P; Di Ruzza, B; Dittmann, J R; D'Onofrio, M; Donati, S; Dong, P; Dorigo, T; Dube, S; Ebina, K; Elagin, A; Erbacher, R; Errede, D; Errede, S; Ershaidat, N; Eusebi, R; Fang, H C; Farrington, S; Fedorko, W T; Feild, R G; Feindt, M; Fernandez, J P; Ferrazza, C; Field, R; Flanagan, G; Forrest, R; Frank, M J; Franklin, M; Freeman, J C; Furic, I; Gallinaro, M; Galyardt, J; Garberson, F; Garcia, J E; Garfinkel, A F; Garosi, P; Gerberich, H; Gerdes, D; Gessler, A; Giagu, S; Giakoumopoulou, V; Giannetti, P; Gibson, K; Gimmell, J L; Ginsburg, C M; Giokaris, N; Giordani, M; Giromini, P; Giunta, M; Giurgiu, G; Glagolev, V; Glenzinski, D; Gold, M; Goldschmidt, N; Golossanov, A; Gomez, G; Gomez-Ceballos, G; Goncharov, M; González, O; Gorelov, I; Goshaw, A T; Goulianos, K; Gresele, A; Grinstein, S; Grosso-Pilcher, C; Group, R C; Grundler, U; Guimaraes da Costa, J; Gunay-Unalan, Z; Haber, C; Hahn, S R; Halkiadakis, E; Han, B-Y; Han, J Y; Happacher, F; Hara, K; Hare, D; Hare, M; Harr, R F; Hartz, M; Hatakeyama, K; Hays, C; Heck, M; Heinrich, J; Herndon, M; Heuser, J; Hewamanage, S; Hidas, D; Hill, C S; Hirschbuehl, D; Hocker, A; Hou, S; Houlden, M; Hsu, S-C; Hughes, R E; Hurwitz, M; Husemann, U; Hussein, M; Huston, J; Incandela, J; Introzzi, G; Iori, M; Ivanov, A; James, E; Jang, D; Jayatilaka, B; Jeon, E J; Jha, M K; Jindariani, S; Johnson, W; Jones, M; Joo, K K; Jun, S Y; Jung, J E; Junk, T R; Kamon, T; Kar, D; Karchin, P E; Kato, Y; Kephart, R; Ketchum, W; Keung, J; Khotilovich, V; Kilminster, B; Kim, D H; Kim, H S; Kim, H W; Kim, J E; Kim, M J; Kim, S B; Kim, S H; Kim, Y K; Kimura, N; Kirsch, L; Klimenko, S; Kondo, K; Kong, D J; Konigsberg, J; Korytov, A; Kotwal, A V; Kreps, M; Kroll, J; Krop, D; Krumnack, N; Kruse, M; Krutelyov, V; Kuhr, T; Kulkarni, N P; Kurata, M; Kwang, S; Laasanen, A T; Lami, S; Lammel, S; Lancaster, M; Lander, R L; Lannon, K; Lath, A; Latino, G; Lazzizzera, I; LeCompte, T; Lee, E; Lee, H S; Lee, J S; Lee, S W; Leone, S; Lewis, J D; Lin, C-J; Linacre, J; Lindgren, M; Lipeles, E; Lister, A; Litvintsev, D O; Liu, C; Liu, T; Lockyer, N S; Loginov, A; Lovas, L; Lucchesi, D; Lueck, J; Lujan, P; Lukens, P; Lungu, G; Lys, J; Lysak, R; MacQueen, D; Madrak, R; Maeshima, K; Makhoul, K; Maksimovic, P; Malde, S; Malik, S; Manca, G; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A; Margaroli, F; Marino, C; Marino, C P; Martin, A; Martin, V; Martínez, M; Martínez-Ballarín, R; Mastrandrea, P; Mathis, M; Mattson, M E; Mazzanti, P; McFarland, K S; McIntyre, P; McNulty, R; Mehta, A; Mehtala, P; Menzione, A; Mesropian, C; Miao, T; Mietlicki, D; Miladinovic, N; Miller, R; Mills, C; Milnik, M; Mitra, A; Mitselmakher, G; Miyake, H; Moed, S; Moggi, N; Mondragon, M N; Moon, C S; Moore, R; Morello, M J; Morlock, J; Movilla Fernandez, P; Mülmenstädt, J; Mukherjee, A; Muller, Th; Murat, P; Mussini, M; Nachtman, J; Nagai, Y; Naganoma, J; Nakamura, K; Nakano, I; Napier, A; Nett, J; Neu, C; Neubauer, M S; Neubauer, S; Nielsen, J; Nodulman, L; Norman, M; Norniella, O; Nurse, E; Oakes, L; Oh, S H; Oh, Y D; Oksuzian, I; Okusawa, T; Orava, R; Osterberg, K; Pagan Griso, S; Pagliarone, C; Palencia, E; Papadimitriou, V; Papaikonomou, A; Paramanov, A A; Parks, B; Pashapour, S; Patrick, J; Pauletta, G; Paulini, M; Paus, C; Peiffer, T; Pellett, D E; Penzo, A; Phillips, T J; Piacentino, G; Pianori, E; Pinera, L; Pitts, K; Plager, C; Pondrom, L; Potamianos, K; Poukhov, O; Prokoshin, F; Pronko, A; Ptohos, F; Pueschel, E; Punzi, G; Pursley, J; Rademacker, J; Rahaman, A; Ramakrishnan, V; Ranjan, N; Redondo, I; Renton, P; Renz, M; Rescigno, M; Richter, S; Rimondi, F; Ristori, L; Robson, A; Rodrigo, T; Rodriguez, T; Rogers, E; Rolli, S; Roser, R; Rossi, M; Rossin, R; Roy, P; Ruiz, A; Russ, J; Rusu, V; Rutherford, B; Saarikko, H; Safonov, A; Sakumoto, W K; Santi, L; Sartori, L; Sato, K; Savoy-Navarro, A; Schlabach, P; Schmidt, A; Schmidt, E E; Schmidt, M A; Schmidt, M P; Schmitt, M; Schwarz, T; Scodellaro, L; Scribano, A; Scuri, F; Sedov, A; Seidel, S; Seiya, Y; Semenov, A; Sexton-Kennedy, L; Sforza, F; Sfyrla, A; Shalhout, S Z; Shears, T; Shepard, P F; Shimojima, M; Shiraishi, S; Shochet, M; Shon, Y; Shreyber, I; Simonenko, A; Sinervo, P; Sisakyan, A; Slaughter, A J; Slaunwhite, J; Sliwa, K; Smith, J R; Snider, F D; Snihur, R; Soha, A; Somalwar, S; Sorin, V; Squillacioti, P; Stanitzki, M; St Denis, R; Stelzer, B; Stelzer-Chilton, O; Stentz, D; Strologas, J; Strycker, G L; Suh, J S; Sukhanov, A; Suslov, I; Taffard, A; Takashima, R; Takeuchi, Y; Tanaka, R; Tang, J; Tecchio, M; Teng, P K; Thom, J; Thome, J; Thompson, G A; Thomson, E; Tipton, P; Ttito-Guzmán, P; Tkaczyk, S; Toback, D; Tokar, S; Tollefson, K; Tomura, T; Tonelli, D; Torre, S; Torretta, D; Totaro, P; Tourneur, S; Trovato, M; Tsai, S-Y; Tu, Y; Turini, N; Ukegawa, F; Uozumi, S; van Remortel, N; Varganov, A; Vataga, E; Vázquez, F; Velev, G; Vellidis, C; Vidal, M; Vila, I; Vilar, R; Vogel, M; Volobouev, I; Volpi, G; Wagner, P; Wagner, R G; Wagner, R L; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Wakisaka, T; Wallny, R; Wang, S M; Warburton, A; Waters, D; Weinberger, M; Weinelt, J; Wester, W C; Whitehouse, B; Whiteson, D; Wicklund, A B; Wicklund, E; Wilbur, S; Williams, G; Williams, H H; Wilson, P; Winer, B L; Wittich, P; Wolbers, S; Wolfe, C; Wolfe, H; Wright, T; Wu, X; Würthwein, F; Yagil, A; Yamamoto, K; Yamaoka, J; Yang, U K; Yang, Y C; Yao, W M; Yeh, G P; Yi, K; Yoh, J; Yorita, K; Yoshida, T; Yu, G B; Yu, I; Yu, S S; Yun, J C; Zanetti, A; Zeng, Y; Zhang, X; Zheng, Y; Zucchelli, S

    2010-03-12

    We report two complementary measurements of the WW + WZ cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using pp collision data at square root of s = 1.96 TeV collected by the CDF II detector. The first method uses the dijet invariant mass distribution while the second more sensitive method uses matrix-element calculations. The result from the second method has a signal significance of 5.4sigma and is the first observation of WW + WZ production using this signature. Combining the results gives sigma(WW + WZ) = 16.0 +/- 3.3 pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  15. Measurement of the WW+WZ Production Cross Section Using the lepton+jets Final State at CDF II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaltonen, T.; Adelman, J.; Álvarez González, B.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, D.; Anastassov, A.; Annovi, A.; Antos, J.; Apollinari, G.; Apresyan, A.; Arisawa, T.; Artikov, A.; Asaadi, J.; Ashmanskas, W.; Attal, A.; Aurisano, A.; Azfar, F.; Badgett, W.; Barbaro-Galtieri, A.; Barnes, V. E.; Barnett, B. A.; Barria, P.; Bartos, P.; Bauer, G.; Beauchemin, P.-H.; Bedeschi, F.; Beecher, D.; Behari, S.; Bellettini, G.; Bellinger, J.; Benjamin, D.; Beretvas, A.; Bhatti, A.; Binkley, M.; Bisello, D.; Bizjak, I.; Blair, R. E.; Blocker, C.; Blumenfeld, B.; Bocci, A.; Bodek, A.; Boisvert, V.; Bortoletto, D.; Boudreau, J.; Boveia, A.; Brau, B.; Bridgeman, A.; Brigliadori, L.; Bromberg, C.; Brubaker, E.; Budagov, J.; Budd, H. S.; Budd, S.; Burkett, K.; Busetto, G.; Bussey, P.; Buzatu, A.; Byrum, K. L.; Cabrera, S.; Calancha, C.; Camarda, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campbell, M.; Canelli, F.; Canepa, A.; Carls, B.; Carlsmith, D.; Carosi, R.; Carrillo, S.; Carron, S.; Casal, B.; Casarsa, M.; Castro, A.; Catastini, P.; Cauz, D.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Chang, S. H.; Chen, Y. C.; Chertok, M.; Chiarelli, G.; Chlachidze, G.; Chlebana, F.; Cho, K.; Chokheli, D.; Chou, J. P.; Chung, K.; Chung, W. H.; Chung, Y. S.; Chwalek, T.; Ciobanu, C. I.; Ciocci, M. A.; Clark, A.; Clark, D.; Compostella, G.; Convery, M. E.; Conway, J.; Corbo, M.; Cordelli, M.; Cox, C. A.; Cox, D. J.; Crescioli, F.; Cuenca Almenar, C.; Cuevas, J.; Culbertson, R.; Cully, J. C.; Dagenhart, D.; Datta, M.; Davies, T.; de Barbaro, P.; de Cecco, S.; Deisher, A.; de Lorenzo, G.; Dell'Orso, M.; Deluca, C.; Demortier, L.; Deng, J.; Deninno, M.; D'Errico, M.; di Canto, A.; di Giovanni, G. P.; di Ruzza, B.; Dittmann, J. R.; D'Onofrio, M.; Donati, S.; Dong, P.; Dorigo, T.; Dube, S.; Ebina, K.; Elagin, A.; Erbacher, R.; Errede, D.; Errede, S.; Ershaidat, N.; Eusebi, R.; Fang, H. C.; Farrington, S.; Fedorko, W. T.; Feild, R. G.; Feindt, M.; Fernandez, J. P.; Ferrazza, C.; Field, R.; Flanagan, G.; Forrest, R.; Frank, M. J.; Franklin, M.; Freeman, J. C.; Furic, I.; Gallinaro, M.; Galyardt, J.; Garberson, F.; Garcia, J. E.; Garfinkel, A. F.; Garosi, P.; Gerberich, H.; Gerdes, D.; Gessler, A.; Giagu, S.; Giakoumopoulou, V.; Giannetti, P.; Gibson, K.; Gimmell, J. L.; Ginsburg, C. M.; Giokaris, N.; Giordani, M.; Giromini, P.; Giunta, M.; Giurgiu, G.; Glagolev, V.; Glenzinski, D.; Gold, M.; Goldschmidt, N.; Golossanov, A.; Gomez, G.; Gomez-Ceballos, G.; Goncharov, M.; González, O.; Gorelov, I.; Goshaw, A. T.; Goulianos, K.; Gresele, A.; Grinstein, S.; Grosso-Pilcher, C.; Group, R. C.; Grundler, U.; Guimaraes da Costa, J.; Gunay-Unalan, Z.; Haber, C.; Hahn, S. R.; Halkiadakis, E.; Han, B.-Y.; Han, J. Y.; Happacher, F.; Hara, K.; Hare, D.; Hare, M.; Harr, R. F.; Hartz, M.; Hatakeyama, K.; Hays, C.; Heck, M.; Heinrich, J.; Herndon, M.; Heuser, J.; Hewamanage, S.; Hidas, D.; Hill, C. S.; Hirschbuehl, D.; Hocker, A.; Hou, S.; Houlden, M.; Hsu, S.-C.; Hughes, R. E.; Hurwitz, M.; Husemann, U.; Hussein, M.; Huston, J.; Incandela, J.; Introzzi, G.; Iori, M.; Ivanov, A.; James, E.; Jang, D.; Jayatilaka, B.; Jeon, E. J.; Jha, M. K.; Jindariani, S.; Johnson, W.; Jones, M.; Joo, K. K.; Jun, S. Y.; Jung, J. E.; Junk, T. R.; Kamon, T.; Kar, D.; Karchin, P. E.; Kato, Y.; Kephart, R.; Ketchum, W.; Keung, J.; Khotilovich, V.; Kilminster, B.; Kim, D. H.; Kim, H. S.; Kim, H. W.; Kim, J. E.; Kim, M. J.; Kim, S. B.; Kim, S. H.; Kim, Y. K.; Kimura, N.; Kirsch, L.; Klimenko, S.; Kondo, K.; Kong, D. J.; Konigsberg, J.; Korytov, A.; Kotwal, A. V.; Kreps, M.; Kroll, J.; Krop, D.; Krumnack, N.; Kruse, M.; Krutelyov, V.; Kuhr, T.; Kulkarni, N. P.; Kurata, M.; Kwang, S.; Laasanen, A. T.; Lami, S.; Lammel, S.; Lancaster, M.; Lander, R. L.; Lannon, K.; Lath, A.; Latino, G.; Lazzizzera, I.; Lecompte, T.; Lee, E.; Lee, H. S.; Lee, J. S.; Lee, S. W.; Leone, S.; Lewis, J. D.; Lin, C.-J.; Linacre, J.; Lindgren, M.; Lipeles, E.; Lister, A.; Litvintsev, D. O.; Liu, C.; Liu, T.; Lockyer, N. S.; Loginov, A.; Lovas, L.; Lucchesi, D.; Lueck, J.; Lujan, P.; Lukens, P.; Lungu, G.; Lys, J.; Lysak, R.; MacQueen, D.; Madrak, R.; Maeshima, K.; Makhoul, K.; Maksimovic, P.; Malde, S.; Malik, S.; Manca, G.; Manousakis-Katsikakis, A.; Margaroli, F.; Marino, C.; Marino, C. P.; Martin, A.; Martin, V.; Martínez, M.; Martínez-Ballarín, R.; Mastrandrea, P.; Mathis, M.; Mattson, M. E.; Mazzanti, P.; McFarland, K. S.; McIntyre, P.; McNulty, R.; Mehta, A.; Mehtala, P.; Menzione, A.; Mesropian, C.; Miao, T.; Mietlicki, D.; Miladinovic, N.; Miller, R.; Mills, C.; Milnik, M.; Mitra, A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Miyake, H.; Moed, S.; Moggi, N.; Mondragon, M. N.; Moon, C. S.; Moore, R.; Morello, M. J.; Morlock, J.; Movilla Fernandez, P.; Mülmenstädt, J.; Mukherjee, A.; Muller, Th.; Murat, P.; Mussini, M.; Nachtman, J.; Nagai, Y.; Naganoma, J.; Nakamura, K.; Nakano, I.; Napier, A.; Nett, J.; Neu, C.; Neubauer, M. S.; Neubauer, S.; Nielsen, J.; Nodulman, L.; Norman, M.; Norniella, O.; Nurse, E.; Oakes, L.; Oh, S. H.; Oh, Y. D.; Oksuzian, I.; Okusawa, T.; Orava, R.; Osterberg, K.; Pagan Griso, S.; Pagliarone, C.; Palencia, E.; Papadimitriou, V.; Papaikonomou, A.; Paramanov, A. A.; Parks, B.; Pashapour, S.; Patrick, J.; Pauletta, G.; Paulini, M.; Paus, C.; Peiffer, T.; Pellett, D. E.; Penzo, A.; Phillips, T. J.; Piacentino, G.; Pianori, E.; Pinera, L.; Pitts, K.; Plager, C.; Pondrom, L.; Potamianos, K.; Poukhov, O.; Prokoshin, F.; Pronko, A.; Ptohos, F.; Pueschel, E.; Punzi, G.; Pursley, J.; Rademacker, J.; Rahaman, A.; Ramakrishnan, V.; Ranjan, N.; Redondo, I.; Renton, P.; Renz, M.; Rescigno, M.; Richter, S.; Rimondi, F.; Ristori, L.; Robson, A.; Rodrigo, T.; Rodriguez, T.; Rogers, E.; Rolli, S.; Roser, R.; Rossi, M.; Rossin, R.; Roy, P.; Ruiz, A.; Russ, J.; Rusu, V.; Rutherford, B.; Saarikko, H.; Safonov, A.; Sakumoto, W. K.; Santi, L.; Sartori, L.; Sato, K.; Savoy-Navarro, A.; Schlabach, P.; Schmidt, A.; Schmidt, E. E.; Schmidt, M. A.; Schmidt, M. P.; Schmitt, M.; Schwarz, T.; Scodellaro, L.; Scribano, A.; Scuri, F.; Sedov, A.; Seidel, S.; Seiya, Y.; Semenov, A.; Sexton-Kennedy, L.; Sforza, F.; Sfyrla, A.; Shalhout, S. Z.; Shears, T.; Shepard, P. F.; Shimojima, M.; Shiraishi, S.; Shochet, M.; Shon, Y.; Shreyber, I.; Simonenko, A.; Sinervo, P.; Sisakyan, A.; Slaughter, A. J.; Slaunwhite, J.; Sliwa, K.; Smith, J. R.; Snider, F. D.; Snihur, R.; Soha, A.; Somalwar, S.; Sorin, V.; Squillacioti, P.; Stanitzki, M.; St. Denis, R.; Stelzer, B.; Stelzer-Chilton, O.; Stentz, D.; Strologas, J.; Strycker, G. L.; Suh, J. S.; Sukhanov, A.; Suslov, I.; Taffard, A.; Takashima, R.; Takeuchi, Y.; Tanaka, R.; Tang, J.; Tecchio, M.; Teng, P. K.; Thom, J.; Thome, J.; Thompson, G. A.; Thomson, E.; Tipton, P.; Ttito-Guzmán, P.; Tkaczyk, S.; Toback, D.; Tokar, S.; Tollefson, K.; Tomura, T.; Tonelli, D.; Torre, S.; Torretta, D.; Totaro, P.; Tourneur, S.; Trovato, M.; Tsai, S.-Y.; Tu, Y.; Turini, N.; Ukegawa, F.; Uozumi, S.; van Remortel, N.; Varganov, A.; Vataga, E.; Vázquez, F.; Velev, G.; Vellidis, C.; Vidal, M.; Vila, I.; Vilar, R.; Vogel, M.; Volobouev, I.; Volpi, G.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, R. G.; Wagner, R. L.; Wagner, W.; Wagner-Kuhr, J.; Wakisaka, T.; Wallny, R.; Wang, S. M.; Warburton, A.; Waters, D.; Weinberger, M.; Weinelt, J.; Wester, W. C., III; Whitehouse, B.; Whiteson, D.; Wicklund, A. B.; Wicklund, E.; Wilbur, S.; Williams, G.; Williams, H. H.; Wilson, P.; Winer, B. L.; Wittich, P.; Wolbers, S.; Wolfe, C.; Wolfe, H.; Wright, T.; Wu, X.; Würthwein, F.; Yagil, A.; Yamamoto, K.; Yamaoka, J.; Yang, U. K.; Yang, Y. C.; Yao, W. M.; Yeh, G. P.; Yi, K.; Yoh, J.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, T.; Yu, G. B.; Yu, I.; Yu, S. S.; Yun, J. C.; Zanetti, A.; Zeng, Y.; Zhang, X.; Zheng, Y.; Zucchelli, S.; CDF Collaboration

    2010-03-01

    We report two complementary measurements of the WW+WZ cross section in the final state consisting of an electron or muon, missing transverse energy, and jets, performed using pp¯ collision data at s=1.96TeV collected by the CDF II detector. The first method uses the dijet invariant mass distribution while the second more sensitive method uses matrix-element calculations. The result from the second method has a signal significance of 5.4σ and is the first observation of WW+WZ production using this signature. Combining the results gives σWW+WZ=16.0±3.3pb, in agreement with the standard model prediction.

  16. Decomposition of fractional quantum Hall model states: Product rule symmetries and approximations

    SciTech Connect

    Thomale, Ronny; Bernevig, B. Andrei; Estienne, Benoit; Regnault, Nicolas

    2011-07-15

    We provide a detailed description of a product rule structure of the monomial (Slater) expansion coefficients of bosonic (fermionic) fractional quantum Hall (FQH) states derived recently, which we now extend to spin-singlet states. We show that the Haldane-Rezayi spin-singlet state can be obtained without exact diagonalization through a differential equation method that we conjecture to be generic to other FQH model states. The product rule symmetries allow us to build approximations of FQH states that exhibit increasing overlap with the exact state (as a function of system size) even though our approximation omits more than half of the Hilbert space. We show that the product rule is valid for any FQH state that can be written as an expectation value of parafermionic operators.

  17. 48 CFR 470.103 - United States origin of agricultural products.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... FOOD ASSISTANCE PROGRAMS COMMODITY ACQUISITIONS 470.103 United States origin of agricultural products... ingredient is: (1) Produced in the United States; and (2) Commercially available in the United States at fair and reasonable prices from domestic sources. (b) Use by the Food and Nutrition Service....

  18. Analysis of energy disposal - Thermodynamic aspects of the entropy deficiency of a product state distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, R. D.; Bernstein, R. B.

    1973-01-01

    A thermodynamic-like approach to the characterization of product state distributions is outlined. A moment analysis of the surprisal and the entropy deficiency is presented from a statistical mechanical viewpoint. The role of reactant state selection is discussed using the 'state function' property of the entropy.

  19. 75 FR 50033 - WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding United States-Measures Affecting the Production and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-08-16

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office OFFICE OF THE UNITED STATES TRADE REPRESENTATIVE WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding United States-- Measures Affecting the Production and Sale of Clove Cigarettes AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative....

  20. Betulin suppressed interleukin-1β-induced gene expression, secretion and proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase in cultured articular chondrocytes and production of matrix metalloproteinase in the knee joint of rat

    PubMed Central

    Ra, Ho Jong; Lee, Hyun Jae; Jo, Ho Seung; Nam, Dae Cheol; Lee, Young Bok; Kang, Byeong Hun; Moon, Dong Kyu; Kim, Dong Hee

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether betulin affects the gene expression, secretion and proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) in primary cultured rabbit articular chondrocytes, as well as in vivo production of MMP-3 in the rat knee joint to evaluate the potential chondroprotective effect of betulin. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were cultured and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to measure interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-1, MMP-13, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-4 (ADAMTS-4), ADAMTS-5 and type II collagen. Effect of betulin on IL-1β-induced secretion and proteolytic activity of MMP-3 was investigated using western blot analysis and casein zymography, respectively. Effect of betulin on MMP-3 protein production was also examined in vivo. The results were as follows: (1) betulin inhibited the gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-1, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5, but increased the gene expression of type II collagen; (2) betulin inhibited the secretion and proteolytic activity of MMP-3; (3) betulin suppressed the production of MMP-3 protein in vivo. These results suggest that betulin can regulate the gene expression, secretion, and proteolytic activity of MMP-3, by directly acting on articular chondrocytes. PMID:28066137

  1. Effect of oleanolic acid on the activity, secretion and gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 in articular chondrocytes in vitro and the production of matrix metalloproteinase-3 in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Dong-Geun; Lee, Hyun Jae; Kim, Kun Tae; Hwang, Sun-Chul

    2017-01-01

    In the present study, we tried to examine whether oleanolic acid regulates the activity, secretion and gene expression of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) in primary cultured rabbit articular chondrocytes, as well as the production of MMP-3 in the knee joint of rat to evaluate the potential chondroprotective effect of oleanolic acid. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were cultured in a monolayer, and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to measure interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-1, MMP-13, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-4 (ADAMTS-4), ADAMTS-5 and type II collagen. In rabbit articular chondrocytes, the effects of oleanolic acid on IL-1β-induced secretion and proteolytic activity of MMP-3 were investigated using western blot analysis and casein zymography, respectively. The effect of oleanolic acid on in vivo MMP-3 protein production was also examined, after intra-articular injection to the knee joint of rat. The results were as follows: (1) oleanolic acid inhibited the gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-1, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5, but increased the gene expression of type II collagen; (2) oleanolic acid reduced the secretion and proteolytic activity of MMP-3; (3) oleanolic acid suppressed the production of MMP-3 protein in vivo. These results suggest that oleanolic acid can regulate the activity, secretion and gene expression of MMP-3, by directly acting on articular chondrocytes. PMID:28280413

  2. Betulin suppressed interleukin-1β-induced gene expression, secretion and proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase in cultured articular chondrocytes and production of matrix metalloproteinase in the knee joint of rat.

    PubMed

    Ra, Ho Jong; Lee, Hyun Jae; Jo, Ho Seung; Nam, Dae Cheol; Lee, Young Bok; Kang, Byeong Hun; Moon, Dong Kyu; Kim, Dong Hee; Lee, Choong Jae; Hwang, Sun-Chul

    2017-01-01

    We investigated whether betulin affects the gene expression, secretion and proteolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3) in primary cultured rabbit articular chondrocytes, as well as in vivo production of MMP-3 in the rat knee joint to evaluate the potential chondroprotective effect of betulin. Rabbit articular chondrocytes were cultured and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) was used to measure interleukin-1β (IL-1β)-induced gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-1, MMP-13, a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motifs-4 (ADAMTS-4), ADAMTS-5 and type II collagen. Effect of betulin on IL-1β-induced secretion and proteolytic activity of MMP-3 was investigated using western blot analysis and casein zymography, respectively. Effect of betulin on MMP-3 protein production was also examined in vivo. The results were as follows: (1) betulin inhibited the gene expression of MMP-3, MMP-1, MMP-13, ADAMTS-4, and ADAMTS-5, but increased the gene expression of type II collagen; (2) betulin inhibited the secretion and proteolytic activity of MMP-3; (3) betulin suppressed the production of MMP-3 protein in vivo. These results suggest that betulin can regulate the gene expression, secretion, and proteolytic activity of MMP-3, by directly acting on articular chondrocytes.

  3. Trends in Braille and Large-Print Production in the United States: 2000-2004

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Emerson, Robert Wall; Corn, Anne; Sille, Mary Ann

    2006-01-01

    This study investigated practices in the production and distribution of braille and large-print textbooks, highlighting changes in production and delivery systems from 2000 to 2004. The findings indicate that fewer states use production models for the statewide acquisition and distribution of special materials and that there is a greater reliance…

  4. Oxygen production using solid-state zirconia electrolyte technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suitor, Jerry W.; Clark, Douglas J.

    1991-01-01

    High purity oxygen is required for a number of scientific, medical, and industrial applications. Traditionally, these needs have been met by cryogenic distillation or pressure swing adsorption systems designed to separate oxygen from air. Oxygen separation from air via solid-state zirconia electrolyte technology offers an alternative to these methods. The technology has several advantages over the traditional methods, including reliability, compactness, quiet operation, high purity output, and low power consumption.

  5. Extracellular matrix as a solid-state regulator in angiogenesis: identification of new targets for anti-cancer therapy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ingber, D. E.

    1992-01-01

    Angiogenesis, the growth of blood capillaries, is regulated by soluble growth factors and insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Soluble angiogenic mitogens act over large distances to initiate capillary growth whereas changes in ECM govern whether individual cells will grow, differentiate, or involute in response to these stimuli in the local tissue microenvironment. Analysis of this local control mechanism has revealed that ECM molecules switch capillary endothelial cells between differentiation and growth by both binding specific transmembrane integrin receptors and physically resisting cell-generated mechanical loads that are applied to these receptors. Control of capillary endothelial cell form and function therefore may be exerted by altering the mechanical properties of the ECM as well as its chemical composition. Understanding of this mechanochemical control mechanism has led to the development of new angiogenesis inhibitors that may be useful for the treatment of cancer.

  6. Improving rapeseed production practices in the southeastern United States

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, D.L.; Breve, M.A.; Raymer, P.L.; Minton, N.A.; Sumner, D.R. . Georgia Coastal Plain Experiment Station)

    1990-04-01

    Oilseed rape or rapeseed is a crop which offers a potential for double-cropping in the southeastern United States. This final project report describes the results from a three year study aimed at evaluating the effect of different planting and harvesting practices on establishment and yield of three rape cultivars, and the double cropping potential of rapeseed in the southeastern United States. The project was conducted on two yield sites in Tifton, Georgia during 1986--87, 1987--88 and 1988--89. The general objective of this research is to improve the seed and biomass yield of winter rapeseed in the southeastern United States by developing appropriate agronomic practices for the region. The primary constraint is to grow rapeseed within the allowable period for double cropping with an economically desirable crop, such as peanut or soybean. Planting and harvesting are the most critical steps in this process. Therefore, the specific objectives of this research were: evaluate and improve the emergence of rapeseed by developing planting techniques that enhance the soil, water and seed regimes for winter rapeseed in the southeast, and evaluate and improve the yields of harvested rapeseed by developing techniques for determining the optimum timing of harvest and efficient methods for harvesting winter rapeseed in the southeast. 6 refs., 12 figs., 9 tabs.

  7. A new solid polymer electrolyte incorporating Li10GeP2S12 into a polyethylene oxide matrix for all-solid-state lithium batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yanran; Wu, Chuan; Peng, Gang; Chen, Xiaotian; Yao, Xiayin; Bai, Ying; Wu, Feng; Chen, Shaojie; Xu, Xiaoxiong

    2016-01-01

    Li10GeP2S12 (LGPS) is incorporated into polyethylene oxide (PEO) matrix to fabricate composite solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) membranes. The lithium ion conductivities of as-prepared composite membranes are evaluated, and the optimal composite membrane exhibits a maximum ionic conductivity of 1.21 × 10-3 S cm-1 at 80 °C and an electrochemical window of 0-5.7 V. The phase transition behaviors for electrolytes are characterized by DSC, and the possible reasons for their enhanced ionic conductivities are discussed. The LGPS microparticles, acting as active fillers incorporation into the PEO matrix, have a positive effect on the ionic conductivity, lithium ion transference number and electrochemical stabilities. In addition, two kinds of all-solid-state lithium batteries (LiFeO4/SPE/Li and LiCoO2/SPE/Li) are fabricated to demonstrate the good compatibility between this new SPE membrane and different electrodes. And the LiFePO4/Li battery exhibits fascinating electrochemical performance with high capacity retention (92.5% after 50 cycles at 60 °C) and attractive capacities of 158, 148, 138 and 99 mAh g-1 at current rates of 0.1 C, 0.2 C, 0.5 C and 1 C at 60 °C, respectively. It is demonstrated that this new composite SPE should be a promising electrolyte applied in solid state batteries based on lithium metal electrode.

  8. Contributions of gluconeogenesis to glucose production in the fasted state.

    PubMed Central

    Landau, B R; Wahren, J; Chandramouli, V; Schumann, W C; Ekberg, K; Kalhan, S C

    1996-01-01

    Healthy subjects ingested 2H2O and after 14, 22, and 42 h of fasting the enrichments of deuterium in the hydrogens bound to carbons 2, 5, and 6 of blood glucose and in body water were determined. The hydrogens bound to the carbons were isolated in formaldehyde which was converted to hexamethylenetetramine for assay. Enrichment of the deuterium bound to carbon 5 of glucose to that in water or to carbon 2 directly equals the fraction of glucose formed by gluconeogenesis. The contribution of gluconeogenesis to glucose production was 47 +/- 49% after 14 h, 67 +/- 41% after 22 h, and 93 +/- 2% after 42 h of fasting. Glycerol's conversion to glucose is included in estimates using the enrichment at carbon 5, but not carbon 6. Equilibrations with water of the hydrogens bound to carbon 3 of pyruvate that become those bound to carbon 6 of glucose and of the hydrogen at carbon 2 of glucose produced via glycogenolysis are estimated from the enrichments to be approximately 80% complete. Thus, rates of gluconeogenesis can be determined without corrections required in other tracer methodologies. After an overnight fast gluconeogenesis accounts for approximately 50% and after 42 h of fasting for almost all of glucose production in healthy subjects. PMID:8755648

  9. Partial transpose criteria for symmetric states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bohnet-Waldraff, F.; Braun, D.; Giraud, O.

    2016-10-01

    We express the positive-partial-transpose (PPT) separability criterion for symmetric states of multiqubit systems in terms of matrix inequalities based on the recently introduced tensor representation for spin states. We construct a matrix from the tensor representation of the state and show that it is similar to the partial transpose of the density matrix written in the computational basis. Furthermore, the positivity of this matrix is equivalent to the positivity of a correlation matrix constructed from tensor products of Pauli operators. This allows for a more transparent experimental interpretation of the PPT criteria for an arbitrary spin-j state. The unitary matrices connecting our matrix to the partial transpose of the state generalize the so-called magic basis that plays a central role in Wootters' explicit formula for the concurrence of a two-qubit system and the Bell bases used for the teleportation of a one- or two-qubit state.

  10. GR@PPA 2.8: Initial-state jet matching for weak-boson production processes at hadron collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Odaka, Shigeru; Kurihara, Yoshimasa

    2012-04-01

    The initial-state jet matching method introduced in our previous studies has been applied to the event generation of single W and Z production processes and diboson (WW, WZ and ZZ) production processes at hadron collisions in the framework of the GR@PPA event generator. The generated events reproduce the transverse momentum spectra of weak bosons continuously in the entire kinematical region. The matrix elements (ME) for hard interactions are still at the tree level. As in previous versions, the decays of weak bosons are included in the matrix elements. Therefore, spin correlations and phase-space effects in the decay of weak bosons are exact at the tree level. The program package includes custom-made parton shower programs as well as ME-based hard interaction generators in order to achieve self-consistent jet matching. The generated events can be passed to general-purpose event generators to make the simulation proceed down to the hadron level. Catalogue identifier: ADRH_v3_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/ADRH_v3_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: Standard CPC licence, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 112 146 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 596 667 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Fortran; with some included libraries coded in C and C++ Computer: All Operating system: Any UNIX-like system RAM: 1.6 Mega bytes at minimum Classification: 11.2 Catalogue identifier of previous version: ADRH_v2_0 Journal reference of previous version: Comput. Phys. Comm. 175 (2006) 665 External routines: Bash and Perl for the setup, and CERNLIB, ROOT, LHAPDF, PYTHIA according to the user's choice. Does the new version supersede the previous version?: No, this version supports only a part of the processes included in the previous versions. Nature of problem: We

  11. Solid-state production of ethanol from sorghum

    SciTech Connect

    Henk, L.L.; Linden, J.C.

    1996-12-31

    The main goal of this research is to study the solid-state fermentation of sorghum-sudangrass, Grazex II (F{sub 1} hybrid of Sorghum vulgare X Sorghum sudanese), to ethanol. Our research focuses on using a modified method of ensiling to produce ethanol directly in the silo. Thirty-eight liters of ethanol/metric ton (L/MT) on a wet-weight basis were produced from sorghum receiving cellulose compared to 23.4 L/MT for sorghum not receiving cellulose additives. Based on total free sugar content, 101 and 84% of theoretical yield are achieved for cellulase-amended and nonamended sorghum, respectively. 47 refs., 4 figs., 4 tabs.

  12. Electromagnetic methods for development and production: State of the art

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, M.; Alumbaugh, D.

    1997-10-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) methods, long used for borehole logging as a formation evaluation tool in developed oil fields, are rarely applied in surface or crosshole configurations or applied in cased wells. This is largely due to the high levels of cultural noise and the preponderance of steel well casing. However, recent experimental success with crosshole EM systems for water and steam flood monitoring using fiberglass cased wells has shown promise in applying these techniques to development and production (D & P) problems. This paper describes technological solutions that will allow for successful application of EM techniques in oil fields, despite surface noise and steel casing. First an example sites the application of long offset logging to map resistivity structure away from the borehole. Next, a successful application of crosshole EM where one of the wells is steel cased is described. The potential application of earth`s field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to map fluid saturation at large distances from the boreholes is also discussed.

  13. Succinoglycan production by solid-state fermentation with Agrobacterium tumefaciens.

    PubMed

    Stredansky, M; Conti, E

    1999-09-01

    Succinoglycan was produced by cultivating Agrobacterium tumefaciens on various solid substrates, including agar medium, spent malt grains, ivory nut shavings, and grated carrots, impregnated with a nutrient+ solution. Fermentations were performed on a laboratory scale, both under static conditions and with agitation, using bottles and a prototype horizontal bioreactor. Several fermentation parameters were examined and optimized, including carbon and nitrogen composition, water content and layer thickness of the substrate. The yields and rheological properties of the polymers obtained under different fermentation conditions were compared. The highest succinoglycan yield was achieved in static cultivation, reaching 42 g/l of impregnating solution, corresponding to 30 g/kg of wet substrate. The polymer production in the horizontal bioreactor was faster, but the final yield was lower (29 g/l of impregnating solution).

  14. Clonorchis sinensis excretory-secretory products regulate migration and invasion in cholangiocarcinoma cells via extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2/nuclear factor-κB-dependent matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression.

    PubMed

    Pak, Jhang Ho; Shin, Jimin; Song, In-Sung; Shim, Sungbo; Jang, Sung-Wuk

    2017-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 plays an important role in the invasion and metastasis of various types of cancer cells. We have previously reported that excretory-secretory products from Clonorchis sinensis increases matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression. However, the regulatory mechanisms through which matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression affects cholangiocarcinoma development remain unclear. In the current study, we examined the potential role of excretory-secretory products in regulating the migration and invasion of various cholangiocarcinoma cell lines. We demonstrated that excretory-secretory products significantly induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression and activity in a concentration-dependent manner. Reporter gene and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that excretory-secretory products induced matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression by enhancing the activity of nuclear factor-kappa B. Moreover, excretory-secretory products induced the degradation and phosphorylation of IκBα and stimulated nuclear factor-kappa B p65 nuclear translocation, which was regulated by extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2. Taken together, our findings indicated that the excretory-secretory product-dependent enhancement of matrix metalloproteinase-9 activity and subsequent induction of IκBα and nuclear factor-kappa B activities may contribute to the progression of cholangiocarcinoma.

  15. Stimulated Photon Echo Studies of Protein-Matrix Solvation Dynamics and Interexciton-State Radiationless Decay in Allophycocyanin and α Phycocyanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beck, Warren F.; Homoelle, Bradley J.; Diffey, William M.

    1998-03-01

    We have employed two third-order femtosecond spectroscopic methods, stimulated-photon-echo peak-shift (3PEPS) and transient-grating (TG) spectroscopy, to characterize solvation dynamics at physiological temperatures in phycobiliprotein systems, the α subunit of C-phycocyanin and allophycocyanin in the trimeric aggregation state. Both systems exhibit a biphasic solvation response: an inertial phase, arising from librational motions of the amino acids or included water molecules in the chromophore-binding site, contributes a 80--100-fs component to the 3PEPS profile and appears as a rapidly-damped 72-cm-1 modulation of the TG signal; the diffusive phase, arising from collective protein-matrix motions, exhibits a component in the TG signal and 3PEPS profile on the 5--20-ps and longer time scales. The 3PEPS profile observed with allophycocyanin exhibits additional fast decay components, with time constants of 56 fs and 220 fs, that report the additional contributions to electronic dephasing that arise from interexciton-state radiationless decay and vibrational relaxation in the lower exciton state, respectively. These results, taken along with those of previous transient hole-burning experiments, show that the exciton states in allophycocyanin are imperfectly correlated.

  16. Automated Finite State Workflow for Distributed Data Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hajdu, L.; Didenko, L.; Lauret, J.; Amol, J.; Betts, W.; Jang, H. J.; Noh, S. Y.

    2016-10-01

    In statistically hungry science domains, data deluges can be both a blessing and a curse. They allow the narrowing of statistical errors from known measurements, and open the door to new scientific opportunities as research programs mature. They are also a testament to the efficiency of experimental operations. However, growing data samples may need to be processed with little or no opportunity for huge increases in computing capacity. A standard strategy has thus been to share resources across multiple experiments at a given facility. Another has been to use middleware that “glues” resources across the world so they are able to locally run the experimental software stack (either natively or virtually). We describe a framework STAR has successfully used to reconstruct a ~400 TB dataset consisting of over 100,000 jobs submitted to a remote site in Korea from STAR's Tier 0 facility at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. The framework automates the full workflow, taking raw data files from tape and writing Physics-ready output back to tape without operator or remote site intervention. Through hardening we have demonstrated 97(±2)% efficiency, over a period of 7 months of operation. The high efficiency is attributed to finite state checking with retries to encourage resilience in the system over capricious and fallible infrastructure.

  17. Multiphase production systems R and D state of the art

    SciTech Connect

    Bratu, C.

    1996-12-31

    Studies and developments concerning multiphase production prompted a significant effort in R and D areas of pipeline flow behavior, pumps, instrumentation and fluids process (hydrates and paraffin deposition). Multiphase flow in pipelines network in steady and transient conditions is still a basic goal; experimental correlations and computer codes are now in validation phase using field data banks. Multiphase pumps groups development reaches the industrial phase; the rotodynamic pump (Poseidon) and the volumetric twin-screw booster (Novopignone, Bornemann) prototypes were recently tested on actual fields. Dedicated to measure mixture flow rates, the instrumentation is still an uneven development. A lot of instruments are commercially ready, but their accuracy, stability, intrusive character or operational difficulties delay extensive field application. An important feature is related to the process of complex fluids in operational conditions that involves hydrates and paraffin deposit formation. Studies and experimental approach are focused on physico-chemical mechanism of deposit build-up pipeline multiphase flow configurations (including solid phase) and additives (dispersants, kinetic or combined).

  18. Advanced fusion welding processes, solid state joining and a successful marriage. [production of aerospace structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, F. R.

    1972-01-01

    Joining processes for aerospace systems combine fusion welding and solid state joining during production of metal structures. Detailed characteristics of electron beam welding, plasma arc welding, diffusion welding, inertia welding and weldbond processes are discussed.

  19. State-of-the-Art Fuel Cell Voltage Durability Status: Spring 2013 Composite Data Products

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtz, J.; Sprik, S.; Saur, G.; Peters, M.; Post, M.; Ainscough, C.

    2013-05-01

    This presentation from the U.S. Department of Energy's National Renewable Energy Laboratory includes composite data products (CDPs) produced in 2013 for state-of-the-art fuel cell voltage durability status.

  20. Zinc l-pyrrolidone carboxylate inhibits the UVA-induced production of matrix metalloproteinase-1 by in vitro cultured skin fibroblasts, whereas it enhances their collagen synthesis.

    PubMed

    Takino, Y; Okura, F; Kitazawa, M; Iwasaki, K; Tagami, H

    2012-02-01

    Reduced collagen matrix in the dermis constitutes one of the characteristic features of chronologically aged skin, which is further enhanced on the sun-exposed portions of the body by chronic ultraviolet light (UV) irradiation, inducing the unique changes associated with skin photoageing. The zinc salt of l-pyrrolidone carboxylate (Zinc PCA) has long been used as a cosmetic ingredient, because of its astringent and anti-microbial properties. In the present study, by employing cultured normal human dermal fibroblasts, we found that Zinc PCA suppressed UVA-induced activation of activator protein-1 (AP-1) and reduced matrix metalloproteinase-1 production in these cells, which is thought to be involved in collagen degradation in photoaged skin. Moreover, Zinc PCA treatment of the cells increased the expression of an ascorbic acid transporter mRNA, SVCT2, but not SVCT1, resulting in the enhanced production of type I collagen. Based on these in vitro findings, we consider Zinc PCA to be a promising candidate for an anti-skin ageing agent.

  1. Irradiation by pulsed Nd:YAG laser induces the production of extracellular matrix molecules by cells of the connective tissues: a tool for tissue repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monici, Monica; Basile, Venere; Cialdai, Francesca; Romano, Giovanni; Fusi, Franco; Conti, Antonio

    2008-04-01

    Many studies demonstrated that mechanical stress is a key factor for tissue homeostasis, while unloading induce loss of mass and impairment of function. Because of their physiological function, muscle, connective tissue, bone and cartilage dynamically interact with mechanical and gravitational stress, modifying their properties through the continuous modification of their composition. Indeed, it is known that mechanical stress increases the production of extracellular matrix (ECM) components by cells, but the mechanotransduction mechanisms and the optimal loading conditions required for an optimal tissue homeostasis are still unknown. Considering the importance of cell activation and ECM production in tissue regeneration, a proper use of mechanical stimulation could be a powerful tool in tissue repair and tissue engineering. Studies exploring advanced modalities for supplying mechanical stimuli are needed to increase our knowledge on mechanobiology and to develop effective clinical applications. Here we describe the effect of photomechanical stress, supplied by a pulsed Nd:YAG laser on ECM production by cells of connective tissues. Cell morphology, production of ECM molecules (collagens, fibronectin, mucopolysaccharides), cell adhesion and cell energy metabolism have been studied by using immunofluorescence and autofluorescence microscopy. The results show that photomechanical stress induces cytoskeleton remodelling, redistribution of membrane integrins, increase in production of ECM molecules. These results could be of consequence for developing clinical protocols for the treatment of connective tissue dideases by pulsed Nd:YAG laser.

  2. ZKCM: A C++ library for multiprecision matrix computation with applications in quantum information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    SaiToh, Akira

    2013-08-01

    ZKCM is a C++ library developed for the purpose of multiprecision matrix computation, on the basis of the GNU MP and MPFR libraries. It provides an easy-to-use syntax and convenient functions for matrix manipulations including those often used in numerical simulations in quantum physics. Its extension library, ZKCM_QC, is developed for simulating quantum computing using the time-dependent matrix-product-state simulation method. This paper gives an introduction about the libraries with practical sample programs.

  3. Matrix effects on the triplet state of the OLED emitter Ir(4,6-dFppy)2(pic) (FIrpic): investigations by high-resolution optical spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Rausch, Andreas F; Thompson, Mark E; Yersin, Hartmut

    2009-03-02

    The sky-blue emitting compound Ir(4,6-dFppy)(2)(pic) (iridium(III)bis[2-(4',6'-difluorophenyl)pyridinato-N,C(2')]-picolinate), commonly referred to as FIrpic and representing a well-known emitter material for organic light emitting diodes (OLEDs), has been investigated in detail by optical spectroscopy. Studies at temperatures from T = 1.5 K to T = 300 K were carried out in CH(2)Cl(2) and tetrahydrofuran (THF). In CH(2)Cl(2), two discrete sites were observed at cryogenic temperatures and studied by site-selective, high-resolution spectroscopy. The investigations reveal that the molecules located at the two sites exhibit distinctly different photophysical properties. For example, the three substates I, II, and III of the emitting triplet state T(1) of the low-energy site A show a distinctly larger zero-field splitting (ZFS) and exhibit shorter individual decay times than observed for the high-energy site B. The vibrational satellite structures in the emission spectra of the substates I(A) and I(B) exhibit clear differences in the ranges of metal-ligand (M-L) vibrations. For the compound studied in a polycrystalline THF host, giving only strongly inhomogeneously broadened spectra, the ZFS parameters and substate decay times vary in a similar range as observed for the two discrete sites in the CH(2)Cl(2) matrix. Thus, the amount of ZFS, the emission decay times, and also the intensities of the M-L vibrational satellites are affected by the matrix cage, that is, the host environment of the emitting complex. These properties are discussed with respect to variations of spin-orbit coupling routes. In particular, changes of d-orbital admixtures, that is, differences of the metal-to-ligand charge transfer (MLCT) character in the emitting triplet, play an important role. The matrix effects are expected to be also of importance for FIrpic and other Ir(III) compounds when applied as emitters in amorphous OLED matrixes.

  4. Niche marketing production practices for beef cattle in the United States and prevalence of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Fox, J Trent; Reinstein, Shelby; Jacob, Megan E; Nagaraja, T G

    2008-10-01

    Niche-marketed food products are rapidly gaining market share in today's society. Consumers are willing to pay premium prices for food perceived to be safer, healthier, more nutritious, and better tasting than conventional food. This review outlines typical production practices for niche-market beef production systems in the United States and compares prevalence estimates of foodborne pathogens in animals and produce from conventional and niche-market production systems. The two main niches for food animal production are organic and natural productions. Organic and natural beef productions are becoming increasingly popular and there is high consumer demand. Two major differences between conventional beef production systems and niche-market production systems (natural and organic) are in the use of antimicrobials and growth-promoting hormones. The impacts of these production systems on foodborne pathogens in beef cattle are variable and often data are nonexistent. Studies directly comparing conventional and niche-market production systems for dairy, swine, poultry, and produce have observed that the prevalence of foodborne pathogens was seldom statistically different between production systems, but when differences were observed, prevalence was typically greater for the niche-market production systems than the conventional production system. The published literature suggests that the perception of niche-marketed food products being safer and healthier for consumers with regard to foodborne pathogens may not be justified.

  5. Matrix-Specific Method Validation of an Automated Most-Probable-Number System for Use in Measuring Bacteriological Quality of Grade "A" Milk Products.

    PubMed

    Lindemann, Samantha; Kmet, Matthew; Reddy, Ravinder; Uhlig, Steffen

    2016-11-01

    The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) oversees a long-standing cooperative federal and state milk sanitation program that uses the grade "A" Pasteurized Milk Ordinance standards to maintain the safety of grade "A" milk sold in the United States. The Pasteurized Milk Ordinance requires that grade "A" milk samples be tested using validated total aerobic bacterial and coliform count methods. The objective of this project was to conduct an interlaboratory method validation study to compare performance of a film plate method with an automated most-probable-number method for total aerobic bacterial and coliform counts, using statistical approaches from international data standards. The matrix-specific validation study was administered concurrently with the FDA's annual milk proficiency test to compare method performance in five milk types. Eighteen analysts from nine laboratories analyzed test portions from 12 samples in triplicate. Statistics, including mean bias and matrix standard deviation, were calculated. Sample-specific bias of the alternative method for total aerobic count suggests that there are no large deviations within the population of samples considered. Based on analysis of 648 data points, mean bias of the alternative method across milk samples for total aerobic count was 0.013 log CFU/ml and the confidence interval for mean deviation was -0.066 to 0.009 log CFU/ml. These results indicate that the mean difference between the selected methods is small and not statistically significant. Matrix standard deviation was 0.077 log CFU/ml, showing that there is a low risk for large sample-specific bias based on milk matrix. Mean bias of the alternative method was -0.160 log CFU/ml for coliform count data. The 95% confidence interval was -0.210 to -0.100 log CFU/ml, indicating that mean deviation is significantly different from zero. The standard deviation of the sample-specific bias for coliform data was 0.033 log CFU/ml, indicating no significant effect of

  6. Coherent States for Kronecker Products of Non Compact Groups: Formulation and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bambah, Bindu A.; Agarwal, Girish S.

    1996-01-01

    We introduce and study the properties of a class of coherent states for the group SU(1,1) X SU(1,1) and derive explicit expressions for these using the Clebsch-Gordan algebra for the SU(1,1) group. We restrict ourselves to the discrete series representations of SU(1,1). These are the generalization of the 'Barut Girardello' coherent states to the Kronecker Product of two non-compact groups. The resolution of the identity and the analytic phase space representation of these states is presented. This phase space representation is based on the basis of products of 'pair coherent states' rather than the standard number state canonical basis. We discuss the utility of the resulting 'bi-pair coherent states' in the context of four-mode interactions in quantum optics.

  7. Influence of Adhesion Force on icaA and cidA Gene Expression and Production of Matrix Components in Staphylococcus aureus Biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Harapanahalli, Akshay K.; Chen, Yun; Li, Jiuyi; Busscher, Henk J.

    2015-01-01

    The majority of human infections are caused by biofilms. The biofilm mode of growth enhances the pathogenicity of Staphylococcus spp. considerably, because once they adhere, staphylococci embed themselves in a protective, self-produced matrix of extracellular polymeric substances (EPSs). The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of forces of staphylococcal adhesion to different biomaterials on icaA (which regulates the production of EPS matrix components) and cidA (which is associated with cell lysis and extracellular DNA [eDNA] release) gene expression in Staphylococcus aureus biofilms. Experiments were performed with S. aureus ATCC 12600 and its isogenic mutant, S. aureus ATCC 12600 Δpbp4, deficient in peptidoglycan cross-linking. Deletion of pbp4 was associated with greater cell wall deformability, while it did not affect the planktonic growth rate, biofilm formation, cell surface hydrophobicity, or zeta potential of the strains. The adhesion forces of S. aureus ATCC 12600 were the strongest on polyethylene (4.9 ± 0.5 nN), intermediate on polymethylmethacrylate (3.1 ± 0.7 nN), and the weakest on stainless steel (1.3 ± 0.2 nN). The production of poly-N-acetylglucosamine, eDNA presence, and expression of icaA genes decreased with increasing adhesion forces. However, no relation between adhesion forces and cidA expression was observed. The adhesion forces of the isogenic mutant S. aureus ATCC 12600 Δpbp4 (deficient in peptidoglycan cross-linking) were much weaker than those of the parent strain and did not show any correlation with the production of poly-N-acetylglucosamine, eDNA presence, or expression of the icaA and cidA genes. This suggests that adhesion forces modulate the production of the matrix molecule poly-N-acetylglucosamine, eDNA presence, and icaA gene expression by inducing nanoscale cell wall deformation, with cross-linked peptidoglycan layers playing a pivotal role in this adhesion force sensing. PMID:25746995

  8. Lecturers' Perception of Research Activities for Knowledge Production in Universities in Cross River State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uchendu, C. C.; Osim, R. O.; Odigwe, F. N.; Alade, F. N.

    2014-01-01

    This study examined lecturers' perception of research activities for knowledge production in universities in Cross River State, Nigeria. Two hypotheses were isolated to give direction to this investigation. 240 university lecturers were sampled from a population of 1,868 from the two universities in Cross River State, using stratified random…

  9. Determinants of Adoption of Improved Fish Production Technologies among Fish Farmers in Delta State, Nigeria

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ofuoku, A. U.; Olele, N. F.; Emah, G. N.

    2008-01-01

    This study was conducted to isolate the determinants of improved fish production technologies in Delta State, Nigeria. Data were collected from a sample population of 250 fish farmers from ten randomly selected Local Government Areas of Delta State. The data were elicited from respondents with the use of structured interview schedule while…

  10. The Production of Bachelor's Degrees and Financial Aspects of State Higher Education Policy: A Dynamic Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Marvin A.

    2009-01-01

    Although several studies have examined the extent to which tuition influences college enrollment at the undergraduate level (e.g., Heller, 1999; Kane, 1995, 1999), there is no known research that examines how changes in financial aspects of state higher education policy affect the production of postsecondary degrees. Using state-level data…

  11. Bachelor's Degree Productivity X-Inefficiency: The Role of State Higher Education Policy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Titus, Marvin A.

    2010-01-01

    Using stochastic frontier analysis and dynamic fixed-effects panel modeling, this study examines how changes in the x-inefficiency of bachelor's degree production are influenced by changes in state higher education policy. The findings from this research show that increases in need-based state financial aid help to mitigate the convergence among…

  12. Economic Growth, Productivity, and Public Education Funding: Is South Carolina a Death Spiral State?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Driscoll, Lisa G.; Knoeppel, Robert C.; Della Sala, Matthew R.; Watson, Jim R.

    2014-01-01

    As a result of the Great Recession of 2007-2009, most states experienced declines in employment, consumer spending, and economic productivity (Alm, Buschman, and Sjoquist 2011). In turn, these events led to historic declines in state tax revenues (Mikesell and Mullins 2010; Boyd and Dadayan 2009), resulting in major cuts in public spending. Local…

  13. Laser induced fluorescence and phosphorescence of matrix isolated glyoxal - Evidence for exciplex formation in the A 1Au and a 3Au states

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Ijzendoorn, L. J.; Baas, F.; Koernig, S.; Greenberg, J. M.; Allamandola, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    Laser-induced fluorescence and phosphorescence as well as infrared and visible absorption spectra of glyoxal in Ar, N2, and CO matrices are presented and analyzed. Glyoxal in its first excited electronic state is shown to form an exciplex with its nearest neighbors in all three matrices, and transitions normally forbidden dominate the emission spectra. The spectral characteristics of these complexes are similar to those of the Ar-glyoxal complex found in supersonic beam experiments. Due to the matrix cage effect, no vibrational predissociation is observed. The phosphorescence lifetime is determined and an upper limit is given for the fluorescence lifetime. This, in combination with the relative intensities of fluorescence and phosphorescence, can be used to place limits on the quantum yields of the various relaxation processes.

  14. Employment Opportunities and Training Needs in Agribusiness. Competencies for Cotton Production in the United States.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holcomb, John W.; And Others

    The competencies necessary for entry and advancement in cotton production were determined by surveying people in the cotton production industry from nine of the ten leading cotton producing states. A preliminary listing of competencies was developed from a review of the literature and from a survey of specialized personnel in soil and crop…

  15. Ongoing development of dryland oilseed production systems in the northwestern region of the United States

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This report addresses the development of dryland oilseed crops to provide feedstock for production of biofuels in semiarid portions of the northwestern United States. Bioenergy feedstocks derived from Brassica oilseed crops have been considered for production of hydrotreated renewable jet fuel, but...

  16. State Taxation of Mineral Deposits and Production. Rural Development Research Report No. 2.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stinson, Thomas F.

    Alternative methods for taxing the mineral industry at the State level include four types of taxes: the ad valorem tax, severance tax, gross production tax, and net production tax. An ad valorem tax is a property tax levied on a mineral deposit's assessed value and due whether the deposit is being worked or not. The severance tax is usually an…

  17. 75 FR 27614 - WTO Dispute Settlement Proceeding Regarding United States-Measures Affecting the Production and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-17

    ... Production and Sale of Clove Cigarettes AGENCY: Office of the United States Trade Representative. ACTION... clove. This ] request may be found at http://www.wto.org in a document designated as WT/DS406/1. USTR..., including clove, but would continue to permit the production and sale of other cigarettes,...

  18. Asymptotic analysis of the density of states in random matrix models associated with a slowly decaying weight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuijlaars, A. B. J.

    2001-08-01

    The asymptotic behavior of polynomials that are orthogonal with respect to a slowly decaying weight is very different from the asymptotic behavior of polynomials that are orthogonal with respect to a Freud-type weight. While the latter has been extensively studied, much less is known about the former. Following an earlier investigation into the zero behavior, we study here the asymptotics of the density of states in a unitary ensemble of random matrices with a slowly decaying weight. This measure is also naturally connected with the orthogonal polynomials. It is shown that, after suitable rescaling, the weak limit is the same as the weak limit of the rescaled zeros.

  19. Development of an image converter of radical design. [employing solid state electronics towards the production of an advanced engineering model camera system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Irwin, E. L.; Farnsworth, D. L.

    1972-01-01

    A long term investigation of thin film sensors, monolithic photo-field effect transistors, and epitaxially diffused phototransistors and photodiodes to meet requirements to produce acceptable all solid state, electronically scanned imaging system, led to the production of an advanced engineering model camera which employs a 200,000 element phototransistor array (organized in a matrix of 400 rows by 500 columns) to secure resolution comparable to commercial television. The full investigation is described for the period July 1962 through July 1972, and covers the following broad topics in detail: (1) sensor monoliths; (2) fabrication technology; (3) functional theory; (4) system methodology; and (5) deployment profile. A summary of the work and conclusions are given, along with extensive schematic diagrams of the final solid state imaging system product.

  20. Rye bran as fermentation matrix boosts in situ dextran production by Weissella confusa compared to wheat bran.

    PubMed

    Kajala, Ilkka; Mäkelä, Jari; Coda, Rossana; Shukla, Shraddha; Shi, Qiao; Maina, Ndegwa Henry; Juvonen, Riikka; Ekholm, Päivi; Goyal, Arun; Tenkanen, Maija; Katina, Kati

    2016-04-01

    The consumption of fiber-rich foods such as cereal bran is highly recommended due to its beneficial health effects. Pre-fermentation of bran with lactic acid bacteria can be used to improve the otherwise impaired flavor and textural qualities of bran-rich products. These positive effects are attributed to enzymatic modification of bran components and the production of functional metabolites like organic acids and exopolysaccharides such as dextrans. The aim of this study was to investigate dextran production in wheat and rye bran by fermentation with two Weissella confusa strains. Bran raw materials were analyzed for their chemical compositions and mineral content. Microbial growth and acidification kinetics were determined from the fermentations. Both strains produced more dextran in rye bran in which the fermentation-induced acidification was slower and the acidification lag phase longer than in wheat bran. Higher dextran production in rye bran is expected to be due to the longer period of optimal pH for dextran synthesis during fermentation. The starch content of wheat bran was higher, which may promote isomaltooligosaccharide formation at the expense of dextran production. W. confusa Cab3 produced slightly higher amounts of dextran than W. confusa VTT E-90392 in all raw materials. Fermentation with W. confusa Cab3 also resulted in lower residual fructose content which has technological relevance. The results indicate that wheat and particularly rye bran are promising matrices for producing technologically significant amounts of dextran, which facilitates the use of nutritionally valuable raw bran in food applications.

  1. Improvement of xylanase production by Cochliobolus sativus in solid state fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Bakri, Yasser; Jawhar, Mohammed; Arabi, Mohammed Imad Eddin

    2008-01-01

    The xylanase production by Cochliobolus sativus strain Cs6 was improved under solid state fermentation (SSF). High xylanase activity (1079 U/g) was obtained when wheat straw was used after 8 days of incubation. Combinations of sodium nitrate with peptone or yeast extract resulted in an increased xylanase production (1543 and 1483 U/g, respectively). The Cs6 strain grown in SSF in a simple medium, proved to be a promising microorganism for xylanase production. PMID:24031273

  2. Evidence for single top-quark production in the s-channel in proton-proton collisions at √{ s} = 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector using the Matrix Element Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Altheimer, A.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Álvarez Piqueras, D.; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Amor Dos Santos, S. P.; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Aurousseau, M.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bacci, C.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Bain, T.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barisonzi, M.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barreiro, F.; Barreiro Guimarães da Costa, J.; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bell, W. H.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besana, M. I.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; Bilbao De Mendizabal, J.; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Borroni, S.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bozic, I.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Bronner, J.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; Bruckman de Renstrom, P. A.; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catastini, P.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerny, K.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chalupkova, I.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, L.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; Cherkaoui El Moursli, R.; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. 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C.; van der Geer, R.; van der Graaf, H.; van Eldik, N.; van Gemmeren, P.; Van Nieuwkoop, J.; van Vulpen, I.; van Woerden, M. C.; Vanadia, M.; Vandelli, W.; Vanguri, R.; Vaniachine, A.; Vannucci, F.; Vardanyan, G.; Vari, R.; Varnes, E. W.; Varol, T.; Varouchas, D.; Vartapetian, A.; Varvell, K. E.; Vazeille, F.; Vazquez Schroeder, T.; Veatch, J.; Veloce, L. M.; Veloso, F.; Velz, T.; Veneziano, S.; Ventura, A.; Ventura, D.; Venturi, M.; Venturi, N.; Venturini, A.; Vercesi, V.; Verducci, M.; Verkerke, W.; Vermeulen, J. C.; Vest, A.; Vetterli, M. C.; Viazlo, O.; Vichou, I.; Vickey, T.; Vickey Boeriu, O. E.; Viehhauser, G. H. A.; Viel, S.; Vigne, R.; Villa, M.; Villaplana Perez, M.; Vilucchi, E.; Vincter, M. G.; Vinogradov, V. B.; Vivarelli, I.; Vlachos, S.; Vladoiu, D.; Vlasak, M.; Vogel, M.; Vokac, P.; Volpi, G.; Volpi, M.; von der Schmitt, H.; von Radziewski, H.; von Toerne, E.; Vorobel, V.; Vorobev, K.; Vos, M.; Voss, R.; Vossebeld, J. H.; Vranjes, N.; Vranjes Milosavljevic, M.; Vrba, V.; Vreeswijk, M.; Vuillermet, R.; Vukotic, I.; Vykydal, Z.; Wagner, P.; Wagner, W.; Wahlberg, H.; Wahrmund, S.; Wakabayashi, J.; Walder, J.; Walker, R.; Walkowiak, W.; Wang, C.; Wang, F.; Wang, H.; Wang, H.; Wang, J.; Wang, J.; Wang, K.; Wang, R.; Wang, S. M.; Wang, T.; Wang, T.; Wang, X.; Wanotayaroj, C.; Warburton, A.; Ward, C. P.; Wardrope, D. R.; Washbrook, A.; Wasicki, C.; Watkins, P. M.; Watson, A. T.; Watson, I. J.; Watson, M. F.; Watts, G.; Watts, S.; Waugh, B. M.; Webb, S.; Weber, M. S.; Weber, S. W.; Webster, J. S.; Weidberg, A. R.; Weinert, B.; Weingarten, J.; Weiser, C.; Weits, H.; Wells, P. S.; Wenaus, T.; Wengler, T.; Wenig, S.; Wermes, N.; Werner, M.; Werner, P.; Wessels, M.; Wetter, J.; Whalen, K.; Wharton, A. M.; White, A.; White, M. J.; White, R.; White, S.; Whiteson, D.; Wickens, F. J.; Wiedenmann, W.; Wielers, M.; Wienemann, P.; Wiglesworth, C.; Wiik-Fuchs, L. A. M.; Wildauer, A.; Wilkens, H. G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, A.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamada, M.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Yau Wong, K. H.; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yurkewicz, A.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2016-05-01

    This Letter presents evidence for single top-quark production in the s-channel using proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 TeV with the ATLAS detector at the CERN Large Hadron Collider. The analysis is performed on events containing one isolated electron or muon, large missing transverse momentum and exactly two b-tagged jets in the final state. The analysed data set corresponds to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb-1. The signal is extracted using a maximum-likelihood fit of a discriminant which is based on the matrix element method and optimized in order to separate single-top-quark s-channel events from the main background contributions, which are top-quark pair production and W boson production in association with heavy-flavour jets. The measurement leads to an observed signal significance of 3.2 standard deviations and a measured cross-section of σs = 4.8 ± 0.8(stat.)-1.3+1.6 (syst.) pb, which is consistent with the Standard Model expectation. The expected significance for the analysis is 3.9 standard deviations.

  3. Toxicity induced enhanced extracellular matrix production in osteoblastic cells cultured on single-walled carbon nanotube networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tutak, Wojtek; Park, Ki Ho; Vasilov, Anatoly; Starovoytov, Valentin; Fanchini, Giovanni; Cai, Shi-Qing; Partridge, Nicola C.; Sesti, Federico; Chhowalla, Manish

    2009-06-01

    A central effort in biomedical research concerns the development of materials for sustaining and controlling cell growth. Carbon nanotube based substrates have been shown to support the growth of different kinds of cells (Hu et al 2004 Nano Lett. 4 507-11 Kalbacova et al 2006 Phys. Status Solidi b 13 243; Zanello et al 2006 Nano Lett. 6 562-7) however the underlying molecular mechanisms remain poorly defined. To address the fundamental question of mechanisms by which nanotubes promote bone mitosis and histogenesis, primary calvariae osteoblastic cells were grown on single-walled carbon nanotube thin film (SWNT) substrates. Using a combination of biochemical and optical techniques we demonstrate here that SWNT networks promote cell development through two distinct steps. Initially, SWNTs are absorbed in a process that resembles endocytosis, inducing acute toxicity. Nanotube-mediated cell destruction, however, induces a release of endogenous factors that act to boost the activity of the surviving cells by stimulating the synthesis of extracellular matrix.

  4. HSP70 increases extracellular matrix production by human vascular smooth muscle through TGF-β1 up-regulation.

    PubMed

    González-Ramos, Marta; Calleros, Laura; López-Ongil, Susana; Raoch, Viviana; Griera, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Puyol, Manuel; de Frutos, Sergio; Rodríguez-Puyol, Diego

    2013-02-01

    The circulating levels of heat shock proteins (HSP) are increased in cardiovascular diseases; however, the implication of this for the fibrotic process typical of such diseases remains unclear. HSP70 can interact with the vascular smooth muscle cells (SMC), the major producer of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, through the Toll-like receptors 4 (TLR4). The transforming growth factor type-β1 (TGF-β1) is a well known vascular pro-fibrotic cytokine that is regulated in part by AP-1-dependent transcriptional mechanisms. We hypothesized that extracellular HSP70 could interact with SMCs, inducing TGF-β1 synthesis and subsequent changes in the vascular ECM. We demonstrate that extracellular HSP70 binds to human aorta SMC TLR4, which up-regulates the AP-1-dependent transcriptional activity of the TGF-β1 promoter. This is achieved through the mitogen activated protein kinases JNK and ERK, as demonstrated by the use of specific blockers and the knockdown of TLR4 with specific small interfering RNAs. The TGF-β1 upregulation increase the expression of the ECM proteins type I collagen and fibronectin. This novel observation may elucidate the mechanisms by which HSP70 contributes in the inflammation and fibrosis present in atherosclerosis and other fibrosis-related diseases.

  5. Blockade of recombinant human IL-6 by tocilizumab suppresses matrix metalloproteinase-9 production in the C28/I2 immortalized human chondrocyte cell line.

    PubMed

    Meszaros, Evan C; Dahoud, Wissam; Mesiano, Sam; Malemud, Charles J

    Two immortalized human juvenile chondrocyte cell lines, T/C28a2 and C28/I2, were employed to determine the extent to which recombinant human (rh) IL-6 or rh-TNF-α increased the production of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9). The effect of rhIL-6 on neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) was also assessed. Although C28/I2 chondrocytes incubated with rhIL-6 (50 ng/ml) increased MMP-9 production which could not be mimicked by the T/C28a2 chondrocyte line, the effect of rhTNF-α on MMP-9 was more robust than with rhIL-6. The combinations of rhIL-6 and soluble IL-6 receptor-α (sIL-6Rα) or rhIL-6 and tocilizumab (TCZ), a fully-humanized recombinant monoclonal antibody that neutralizes the interaction between IL-6 and IL-6R significantly reduced MMP-9 production by C28/I2 chondrocytes. However, TCZ had no effect on rhTNF-α-induced MMP-9 production. By contrast, rhIL-6 did not increase the production of NGAL by C28/I2 chondrocytes although the number of NGAL-positive cells was significantly reduced by sIL-6R compared to its control group, but not by the combination of rhIL-6 plus TCZ compared to rhIL-6. In summary, these results showed that rhIL-6 stimulated the production of MMP-9, but not NGAL, in the C28/I2 chondrocyte line. TCZ or sIL-6Rα suppressed rhIL-6-induced MMP-9 production.

  6. Evaluation of Aerosol Mixing State Classes in the GISS Modele-matrix Climate Model Using Single-particle Mass Spectrometry Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Ault, Andrew; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2013-01-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere are composed of multiple chemical species. The aerosol mixing state, which describes how chemical species are mixed at the single-particle level, provides critical information on microphysical characteristics that determine the interaction of aerosols with the climate system. The evaluation of mixing state has become the next challenge. This study uses aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) data and compares the results to those of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies modelE-MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state) model, a global climate model that includes a detailed aerosol microphysical scheme. We use data from field campaigns that examine a variety of air mass regimens (urban, rural, and maritime). At all locations, polluted areas in California (Riverside, La Jolla, and Long Beach), a remote location in the Sierra Nevada Mountains (Sugar Pine) and observations from Jeju (South Korea), the majority of aerosol species are internally mixed. Coarse aerosol particles, those above 1 micron, are typically aged, such as coated dust or reacted sea-salt particles. Particles below 1 micron contain large fractions of organic material, internally-mixed with sulfate and black carbon, and few external mixtures. We conclude that observations taken over multiple weeks characterize typical air mass types at a given location well; however, due to the instrumentation, we could not evaluate mass budgets. These results represent the first detailed comparison of single-particle mixing states in a global climate model with real-time single-particle mass spectrometry data, an important step in improving the representation of mixing state in global climate models.

  7. Evaluation of aerosol mixing state classes in the GISS modelE-MATRIX climate model using single-particle mass spectrometry measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Susanne E.; Ault, Andrew; Prather, Kimberly A.

    2013-09-01

    Aerosol particles in the atmosphere are composed of multiple chemical species. The aerosol mixing state, which describes how chemical species are mixed at the single-particle level, provides critical information on microphysical characteristics that determine the interaction of aerosols with the climate system. The evaluation of mixing state has become the next challenge. This study uses aerosol time-of-flight mass spectrometry (ATOFMS) data and compares the results to those of the Goddard Institute for Space Studies modelE-MATRIX (Multiconfiguration Aerosol TRacker of mIXing state) model, a global climate model that includes a detailed aerosol microphysical scheme. We use data from field campaigns that examine a variety of air mass regimens (urban, rural, and maritime). At all locations, polluted areas in California (Riverside, La Jolla, and Long Beach), a remote location in the Sierra Nevada Mountains (Sugar Pine) and observations from Jeju (South Korea), the majority of aerosol species are internally mixed. Coarse aerosol particles, those above 1 µm, are typically aged, such as coated dust or reacted sea-salt particles. Particles below 1 µm contain large fractions of organic material, internally mixed with sulfate and black carbon, and few external mixtures. We conclude that observations taken over multiple weeks characterize typical air mass types at a given location well; however, due to the instrumentation, we could not evaluate mass budgets. These results represent the first detailed comparison of single-particle mixing states in a global climate model with real-time single-particle mass spectrometry data, an important step in improving the representation of mixing state in global climate models.

  8. Partial dissociative emission cross sections and product state distributions of the resulting photofragments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picconi, David; Grebenshchikov, Sergy Yu.

    2016-12-01

    This paper relates the partial cross section of a continuous optical emission into a given scattering channel of the lower electronic state to the photofragment population. This allows one to infer partial emission cross sections 'non-optically' from product state distributions; in computations, explicit construction of exact scattering states is therefore avoided. Applications to the emission spectra of NaI, CO2, and pyrrole are given. It is also demonstrated that a similar relationship holds between partial cross sections of dissociative photoionization and distributions of ionic fragments over final product channels.

  9. QCD radiation in the production of high s-hat final states

    SciTech Connect

    Skands, Peter; Plehn, Tilman; Rainwater, David; /Rochester U.

    2005-11-01

    In the production of very heavy final states--high Mandelstam {cflx s}--extra QCD radiation can play a significant role. By comparing several different parton shower approximations to results obtained with fixed-order perturbation theory, they quantify the degree to which these approaches agree (or disagree), focusing on initial state radiation above p{perpendicular} = 50 GeV, for top pair production at the Tevatron and at the LHC, and for SUSY pair production at the LHC. Special attention is paid to ambiguities associated with the choice of the maximum value of the ordering variable in parton shower models.

  10. Identification of unwanted photoproducts of cosmetic preservatives in personal care products under ultraviolet-light using solid-phase microextraction and micro-matrix solid-phase dispersion.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rivera, Gerardo; Llompart, Maria; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Lores, Marta

    2015-04-17

    The photochemical transformation of widely used cosmetic preservatives including benzoates, parabens, BHA, BHT and triclosan has been investigated in this work applying an innovative double-approach strategy: identification of transformation products in aqueous photodegradation experiments (UV-light, 254nm), followed by targeted screening analysis of such photoproducts in UV-irradiated cosmetic samples. Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) was applied, using different fiber coatings, in order to widen the range of detectable photoproducts in water, whereas UV-irradiated personal care products (PCPs) containing the target preservatives were extracted by micro-matrix solid-phase dispersion (micro-MSPD). Both SPME and micro-MSPD-based methodologies were successfully optimized and validated. Degradation kinetics of parent species, and photoformation of their transformation by-products were monitored by gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Thirty nine photoproducts were detected in aqueous photodegradation experiments, being tentatively identified based on their mass spectra. Transformation pathways between structurally related by-products, consistent with their kinetic behavior were postulated. The photoformation of unexpected photoproducts such as 2- and 4-hydroxybenzophenones, and 2,8-dichlorodibenzo-p-dioxin in PCPs are reported in this work for the first time.

  11. Elevated expression of transforming growth factor-beta and proteoglycan production in experimental glomerulonephritis. Possible role in expansion of the mesangial extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Okuda, S; Languino, L R; Ruoslahti, E; Border, W A

    1990-01-01

    Glomerular accumulation of extracellular matrix is a prominent feature of progressive glomerulonephritis. Previously, we have shown that transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta) is unique among growth factors in regulating the production of the proteoglycans biglycan and decorin by glomerular mesangial cells in vitro. We now provide evidence of an elevated expression of TGF-beta, proteoglycans, and fibronectin in glomerulonephritis induced in rats by injection of anti-thymocyte serum (ATS). Glomeruli were cultured from rat kidneys at 1, 4, 7, 14, and 28 d after ATS administration. Increased proteoglycan synthesis was detected beginning on day 4, which peaked at a 4,900% increase compared with control on day 7, and returned toward control levels by day 28. The increased proteoglycan synthesis by cultured nephritic glomeruli, as well as that of fibronectin, were greatly reduced by addition of antiserum raised against a synthetic peptide from TGF-beta. Conditioned media from ATS glomerular cultures, when added to normal cultured mesangial cells, induced elevated proteoglycan synthesis that also peaked on day 7 and that mimicked the response to added exogenous TGF-beta. The stimulatory activity of the conditioned media was blocked by addition of TGF-beta antiserum. Prior addition of the immunizing peptide to the antiserum abolished the blocking effect. The main induced proteoglycans were identified as biglycan and decorin by immunoprecipitation with antiserum made against synthetic peptides from the proteoglycan core proteins. Glomerular histology showed mesangial matrix expansion in a time course that roughly paralleled both the elevated proteoglycan synthesis by the ATS glomeruli and the ability of the conditioned media from these glomeruli to induce proteoglycan synthesis. At the same time there was an increased expression of TGF-beta mRNA and TGF-beta protein in the glomeruli. These results suggest a central role for TGF-beta in the accumulation of pathological

  12. Effects of final-state interaction and screening on strange and heavy quark production

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, Cheuk-Yin; Chatterjee, L. ||

    1996-10-01

    Final-state interaction and screening have a great influence on {ital q{anti q}} production cross sections, which are important quantities in many problems in quark-gluon plasma physics. They lead to an enhancement of the cross section for a {ital q{anti q}} color-singlet state and a suppression for a color-octet state. The effects are large near the production threshold. The presence of screening gives rise to resonances for {ital q{anti q}} production just above the threshold at specific plasma temperatures. These resonances, especially {ital c{anti c}} and {ital b{anti b}} resonances, may be utilized to search for the quark-gluon plasma by studying the temperature dependence of heavy-quark pair production just above the threshold.

  13. Growth Differentiation Factor-15–Induced Contractile Activity and Extracellular Matrix Production in Human Trabecular Meshwork Cells

    PubMed Central

    Muralidharan, Arumugam Ramachandran; Maddala, Rupalatha; Skiba, Nikolai P.; Rao, Ponugoti Vasantha

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To determine the role and regulation of growth differentiation factor-15 (GDF-15), a TGF-β–related cytokine in human trabecular meshwork (TM) cells in the context of aqueous humor (AH) outflow and IOP. Methods Regulation of expression by external cues, and the distribution and secretion of GDF-15 by human TM primary cell cultures, and the effects of recombinant (r) GDF-15 on TM cell contractile characteristics, actin cytoskeleton, cell adhesion, extracellular matrix (ECM), α-smooth muscle actin (αSMA), SMAD signaling, and gene expression were determined by immunoblot, immunofluorescence, mass spectrometry, cDNA microarray, and real-time quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) analyses. Results Growth differentiation factor-15, a common constituent of ECM derived from the human TM cells, was confirmed to be distributed throughout the conventional aqueous humor outflow pathway of the human eye. Growth differentiation factor-15 protein levels were significantly increased in human TM cells in response to TGF-β2, dexamethasone, endothelin-1, lysophosphatidic acid, TNF-α, IL-1β treatment, and by cyclic mechanical stretch. Stimulation of human TM cells with rGDF-15 caused a significant increase in the formation of actin stress fibers and focal adhesions, myosin light chain phosphorylation, SMAD signaling, gene expression, and the levels of αSMA and ECM proteins. Conclusions The results of this study, including a robust induction of GDF-15 expression by several external factors known to elevate IOP, and rGDF-15–induced increase in contractility, cell adhesion, and the levels of ECM proteins and αSMA in TM cells, collectively suggest a potential role for GDF-15 in homeostasis and dysregulation of AH outflow and IOP in normal and glaucomatous eyes, respectively. PMID:27918822

  14. Solid-state NMR investigations of cellulose structure and interactions with matrix polysaccharides in plant primary cell walls.

    PubMed

    Wang, Tuo; Hong, Mei

    2016-01-01

    Until recently, the 3D architecture of plant cell walls was poorly understood due to the lack of high-resolution techniques for characterizing the molecular structure, dynamics, and intermolecular interactions of the wall polysaccharides in these insoluble biomolecular mixtures. We introduced multidimensional solid-state NMR (SSNMR) spectroscopy, coupled with (13)C labelling of whole plants, to determine the spatial arrangements of macromolecules in near-native plant cell walls. Here we review key evidence from 2D and 3D correlation NMR spectra that show relatively few cellulose-hemicellulose cross peaks but many cellulose-pectin cross peaks, indicating that cellulose microfibrils are not extensively coated by hemicellulose and all three major polysaccharides exist in a single network rather than two separate networks as previously proposed. The number of glucan chains in the primary-wall cellulose microfibrils has been under active debate recently. We show detailed analysis of quantitative (13)C SSNMR spectra of cellulose in various wild-type (WT) and mutant Arabidopsis and Brachypodium primary cell walls, which consistently indicate that primary-wall cellulose microfibrils contain at least 24 glucan chains.

  15. Options for state and local governments to regulate non-cigarette tobacco products.

    PubMed

    Freiberg, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Most tobacco control laws were written to address the scourge of smoking--particularly smoking cigarettes. As a result, these laws frequently exclude non-cigarette tobacco products, which are becoming more prevalent on the market. These regulatory gaps jeopardize public health by increasing the possibility that these products will be used--particularly by minors and young adults. This article examines gaps in regulation using five products as case studies: dissolvable tobacco products, electronic cigarettes, little cigars, snus, and water pipes. In addition, this article presents policy options that state and local governments can adopt to regulate these products more effectively, including regulations relating to price, flavors, youth access, use in public places, point-of-sale warnings, and marketing. Furthermore, this article contains extensive discussion of the recently adopted federal Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act, which both limits and expands the power of state and local governments.

  16. Pediatric eye injuries related to consumer products in the United States, 1997-2006.

    PubMed

    Moren Cross, Jennifer; Griffin, Russell; Owsley, Cynthia; McGwin, Gerald

    2008-12-01

    This study examines which consumer products are most commonly associated with pediatric eye injuries that are treated in emergency departments in the United States. The results demonstrate that, overall, boys experienced proportionally more consumer product-related eye injuries than girls, but eye injuries from specific product categories are more likely to be associated with one sex than the other. Age-specific patterns also revealed that certain product categories are more likely to be associated with eye injuries among different age groups. These findings are salient because children experience a disproportionate amount of ocular trauma, possibly resulting in visual disability or blindness and concomitant developmental delays. Given the heretofore lack of detailed information on products that may contribute to the burden of pediatric eye injuries in the United States, the results of the current study provide valuable information for identifying priorities for prevention and intervention.

  17. Production and elliptic flow of dileptons and photons in a matrix model of the quark-gluon plasma.

    PubMed

    Gale, Charles; Hidaka, Yoshimasa; Jeon, Sangyong; Lin, Shu; Paquet, Jean-François; Pisarski, Robert D; Satow, Daisuke; Skokov, Vladimir V; Vujanovic, Gojko

    2015-02-20

    We consider a nonperturbative approach to the thermal production of dileptons and photons at temperatures near the critical temperature in QCD. The suppression of colored excitations at low temperature is modeled by including a small value of the Polyakov loop, in a "semi"-quark-gluon plasma (QGP). Comparing the semi-QGP to the perturbative QGP, we find a mild enhancement of thermal dileptons. In contrast, to leading logarithmic order in weak coupling there are far fewer hard photons from the semi-QGP than the usual QGP. To illustrate the possible effects on photon and dilepton production in heavy-ion collisions, we integrate the rate with a simulation using ideal hydrodynamics. Dileptons uniformly exhibit a small flow, but the strong suppression of photons in the semi-QGP tends to weight the elliptical flow of photons to that generated in the hadronic phase.

  18. Simulation Study on E-commerce Recommender System Based on a Customer-Product Purchase-Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, Chi-Myung; Kim, Seong-Yeon

    This paper investigates the efficiencies of CF method and SVD-based recommender system for producing useful recommendations to customers when large-scale customer-product purchase data are available. Simulation experiments on synthetic transaction data show SVD-based recommender system yields a better performance than the CF method. Reduced product dimensionality from SVD may be more effective in generating a reliable neighborhood than CF method, and thereby it may improve the efficiency of recommendation performance. In applying SVD-based recommender system, the recommendation quality increases as the size of the neighborhood increase up to a certain point, but after that point, the improvement gains diminish. Our simulation results also show that an appropriate number of products for recommendation would be 10 in term of the error of false positives since around this point, the recall is not small, and both precision and F1 metric appear to be maximal. Even though the recommendation quality depends upon the dimension and structure of transaction data set, we consider such information may be useful in applying recommender system

  19. γ production as a probe for early state dynamics in high energy nuclear collisions at RHIC

    DOE PAGES

    Liu, Yunpeng; Chen, Baoyi; Xu, Nu; ...

    2011-02-01

    γ production in heavy ion collisions at RHIC energy is investigated. While the transverse momentum spectra of the ground state γ(1s) are controlled by the initial state Cronin effect, the excited bb⁻ states are characterized by the competition between the cold and hot nuclear matter effects and sensitive to the dissociation temperatures determined by the heavy quark potential. We emphasize that it is necessary to measure the excited heavy quark states in order to extract the early stage information in high energy nuclear collisions at RHIC.

  20. Shrinkage estimation of the realized relationship matrix

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The additive relationship matrix plays an important role in mixed model prediction of breeding values. For genotype matrix X (loci in columns), the product XX' is widely used as a realized relationship matrix, but the scaling of this matrix is ambiguous. Our first objective was to derive a proper ...

  1. Assessment of genotoxicity of herbal medicinal products: application of the "bracketing and matrixing" concept using the example of Valerianae radix (valerian root).

    PubMed

    Kelber, Olaf; Wegener, Tankred; Steinhoff, Barbara; Staiger, Christiane; Wiesner, Jacqueline; Knöss, Werner; Kraft, Karin

    2014-01-01

    An assessment of genotoxicity is a precondition for marketing authorization respectively registration of herbal medicinal products (HMPs), as well as for inclusion into the 'Community list of herbal substances, preparations and combinations thereof for use in traditional herbal medicinal products' established by the European Commission in accordance with Directive 2001/83/EC as amended, and based on proposals from the Committee on Herbal Medicinal Products (HMPC). In the 'Guideline on the assessment of genotoxicity of herbal substances/preparations' (EMEA/HMPC/107079/2007) HMPC has described a stepwise approach for genotoxicity testing, according to which the Ames test is a sufficient base for the assessment of genotoxicity in case of an unequivocally negative result. For reducing efforts for testing of individual herbal substances/preparations, HMPC has also developed the 'guideline on selection of test materials for genotoxicity testing for traditional herbal medicinal products/herbal medicinal products' (EMEA/HMPC/67644/2009) with the aim to allow testing of a standard range of test materials which could be considered representative of the commonly used preparations from a specific herbal drug according to a 'bracketing/matrixing' approach. The purpose of this paper is to provide data on the practical application of this bracketing and matrixing concept using the example of Valerianae radix, with the intention of facilitating its inclusion in the "Community list". Five extraction solvents, representing the extremes of the polarity range and including also mid-range extraction solvents, were used, covering the entire spectrum of phytochemical constituents of Valerianae radix, thereby including polar and non-polar constituents. Extracts were tested in the Ames test according to all relevant guidelines. Results were unequivocally negative for all extracts. A review of the literature showed that this result is in accordance with the available data, thus

  2. Lipases production by solid-state fermentation: the case of Rhizopus homothallicus in perlite.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Lozano, Susana; Volke-Sepulveda, Tania; Favela-Torres, Ernesto

    2012-01-01

    Lipases are widely used in the industry for different purposes. Although these enzymes are mainly produced by submerged fermentation, lipase production by solid-state fermentation (SSF) has been gaining interest due to the advantages of this type of culture. Major advantages are higher production titers and productivity, less catabolite repression, and use of the dried fermented material as biocatalyst. This chapter describes a traditional methodology to produce fungal (Rhizopus homothallicus) lipases by SSF using perlite as inert support. The use of different devices (glass columns or Erlenmeyer flasks) and type of inoculum (spores or growing mycelium) is considered so that lipase production by SSF could be easily performed in any laboratory.

  3. Calculation of electronic coupling matrix elements for ground and excited state electron transfer reactions: Comparison of the generalized Mulliken-Hush and block diagonalization methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cave, Robert J.; Newton, Marshall D.

    1997-06-01

    Two independent methods are presented for the nonperturbative calculation of the electronic coupling matrix element (Hab) for electron transfer reactions using ab initio electronic structure theory. The first is based on the generalized Mulliken-Hush (GMH) model, a multistate generalization of the Mulliken Hush formalism for the electronic coupling. The second is based on the block diagonalization (BD) approach of Cederbaum, Domcke, and co-workers. Detailed quantitative comparisons of the two methods are carried out based on results for (a) several states of the system Zn2OH2+ and (b) the low-lying states of the benzene-Cl atom complex and its contact ion pair. Generally good agreement between the two methods is obtained over a range of geometries. Either method can be applied at an arbitrary nuclear geometry and, as a result, may be used to test the validity of the Condon approximation. Examples of nonmonotonic behavior of the electronic coupling as a function of nuclear coordinates are observed for Zn2OH2+. Both methods also yield a natural definition of the effective distance (rDA) between donor (D) and acceptor (A) sites, in contrast to earlier approaches which required independent estimates of rDA, generally based on molecular structure data.

  4. Construction of diabatic Hamiltonian matrix from ab initio calculated molecular symmetry adapted nonadiabatic coupling terms and nuclear dynamics for the excited states of Na3 cluster.

    PubMed

    Mukherjee, Saikat; Bandyopadhyay, Sudip; Paul, Amit Kumar; Adhikari, Satrajit

    2013-04-25

    We present the molecular symmetry (MS) adapted treatment of nonadiabatic coupling terms (NACTs) for the excited electronic states (2(2)E' and 1(2)A1') of Na3 cluster, where the adiabatic potential energy surfaces (PESs) and the NACTs are calculated at the MRCI level by using an ab initio quantum chemistry package (MOLPRO). The signs of the NACTs at each point of the configuration space (CS) are determined by employing appropriate irreducible representations (IREPs) arising due to MS group, and such terms are incorporated into the adiabatic to diabatic transformation (ADT) equations to obtain the ADT angles. Since those sign corrected NACTs and the corresponding ADT angles demonstrate the validity of curl condition for the existence of three-state (2(2)E' and 1(2)A1') sub-Hilbert space, it becomes possible to construct the continuous, single-valued, symmetric, and smooth 3 × 3 diabatic Hamiltonian matrix. Finally, nuclear dynamics has been carried out on such diabatic surfaces to explore whether our MS-based treatment of diabatization can reproduce the pattern of the experimental spectrum for system B of Na3 cluster.

  5. Reduction of facial wrinkles by hydrolyzed water-soluble egg membrane associated with reduction of free radical stress and support of matrix production by dermal fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Gitte S; Shah, Bijal; Holtz, Robert; Patel, Ashok; Lo, Donald C

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of water-soluble egg membrane (WSEM) on wrinkle reduction in a clinical pilot study and to elucidate specific mechanisms of action using primary human immune and dermal cell-based bioassays. Methods To evaluate the effects of topical application of WSEM (8%) on human skin, an open-label 8-week study was performed involving 20 healthy females between the age of 45 years and 65 years. High-resolution photography and digital analysis were used to evaluate the wrinkle depth in the facial skin areas beside the eye (crow’s feet). WSEM was tested for total antioxidant capacity and effects on the formation of reactive oxygen species by human polymorphonuclear cells. Human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells) were used for quantitative polymerase chain reaction analysis of the antioxidant response element genes Nqo1, Gclm, Gclc, and Hmox1. Evaluation of effects on human primary dermal fibroblasts in vitro included cellular viability and production of the matrix components collagen and elastin. Results Topical use of a WSEM-containing facial cream for 8 weeks resulted in a significant reduction of wrinkle depth (P<0.05). WSEM contained antioxidants and reduced the formation of reactive oxygen species by inflammatory cells in vitro. Despite lack of a quantifiable effect on Nrf2, WSEM induced the gene expression of downstream Nqo1, Gclm, Gclc, and Hmox1 in human keratinocytes. Human dermal fibroblasts treated with WSEM produced more collagen and elastin than untreated cells or cells treated with dbcAMP control. The increase in collagen production was statistically significant (P<0.05). Conclusion The topical use of WSEM on facial skin significantly reduced the wrinkle depth. The underlying mechanisms of this effect may be related to protection from free radical damage at the cellular level and induction of several antioxidant response elements, combined with stimulation of human dermal fibroblasts to secrete high levels of

  6. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  7. Matrix IR spectra and quantum-chemical calculations of the products of small nickel cluster interactions with water molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serebrennikov, L. V.; Dalvyatshin, D. I.; Golovkin, A. V.

    2010-12-01

    Reactions of Ni n clusters with water molecules were studied by IR spectroscopy in inert matrices and quantum chemistry methods. The geometric configurations, total energies, and vibrational frequencies of all the possible Ni2(H2O) and Ni3(H2O) isomers were calculated. For both systems, the main minima and transition states were found. Water was shown to dissociate to hydrogen and hydroxyl in the reactions, and, in all the complexes formed, hydrogen is situated in the bridge position on the Ni-Ni bond.

  8. Analysis of plasticizers and synthetic musks in cosmetic and personal care products by matrix solid-phase dispersion gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Llompart, Maria; Celeiro, Maria; Pablo Lamas, J; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Lores, Marta; Garcia-Jares, Carmen

    2013-06-07

    Matrix solid-phase dispersion (MSPD) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry were used for the rapid determination of 18 plasticizers (phthalates and adipates), 7 polycyclic musks and 5 nitromusks, which makes a total of 30 targets, in both rinse-off and leave-on cosmetic formulations. The MSPD method was miniaturized and customized to avoid or minimize risks of phthalate contamination and to reduce residues and costs. The amount of sample and extraction solvent employed were 0.1g and 1mL, respectively. The procedure was optimized by means of an experimental design and under the optima conditions it showed satisfactory linearity, repeatability and intermediate precision. LOQs were, in general, in the low ngg(-1), and recoveries were quantitative for all the 18 plasticizers and the 12 fragrances. Twenty-six cosmetic products such as creams, emulsions, lotions, gels for the skin, bath and shower preparations, deodorants, hair-setting, hair-cleansing and hair-conditioning products, shaving products, and sunbathing products, were analyzed. Twenty-five out of thirty targets were detected in the samples. The most frequently found compounds were galaxolide and tonalide reaching concentrations above 0.1% (1000μgg(-1)), and diethyl phthalate (between 0.7 and 357μgg(-1)). The presence of banned substances (Regulation (EC) No. 1223/2009) such as dibutyl phthalate, diisobutyl phthalate, dimethoxyethyl phthalate, benzylbutyl phthalate, diethylhexyl phthalate, diisopentyl phthalate and dipentyl phthalate, musk ambrette and musk tibetene was confirmed in sixteen of the twenty-six personal care products (62%).

  9. CCN2 (Connective Tissue Growth Factor) is essential for extracellular matrix production and integrin signaling in chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Nishida, Takashi; Kawaki, Harumi; Baxter, Ruth M.; DeYoung, R. Andrea; Takigawa, Masaharu

    2007-01-01

    The matricellular protein CCN2 (Connective Tissue Growth Factor; CTGF) is an essential mediator of ECM composition, as revealed through analysis of Ccn2 deficient mice. These die at birth due to complications arising from impaired endochondral ossification. However, the mechanism(s) by which CCN2 mediates its effects in cartilage are unclear. We investigated these mechanisms using Ccn2−/− chondrocytes. Expression of type II collagen and aggrecan were decreased in Ccn2−/− chondrocytes, confirming a defect in ECM production. Ccn2−/− chondrocytes also exhibited impaired DNA synthesis and reduced adhesion to fibronectin. This latter defect is associated with decreased expression of α5 integrin. Moreover, CCN2 can bind to integrin α5β1 in chondrocytes and can stimulate increased expression of integrin α5. Consistent with an essential role for CCN2 as a ligand for integrins, immunofluorescence and Western blot analysis revealed that levels of focal adhesion kinase (FAK) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK)1/2 phosphorylation were reduced in Ccn2−/− chondrocytes. These findings argue that CCN2 exerts major effects in chondrocytes through its ability to (1) regulate ECM production and integrin α5 expression, (2) engage integrins and (3) activate integrin-mediated signaling pathways. PMID:18481209

  10. Effects of rosuvastatin on the production and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and migration of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells induced by homocysteine*

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Ya-fei; Chi, Ju-fang; Tang, Wei-liang; Xu, Fu-kang; Liu, Long-bin; Ji, Zheng; Lv, Hai-tao; Guo, Hang-yuan

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To test the influence of homocysteine on the production and activation of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2) and tissue inhibitors of matrix metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2) and on cell migration of cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Also, to explore whether rosuvastatin can alter the abnormal secretion and activation of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 and migration of VSMCs induced by homocysteine. Methods: Rat VSMCs were incubated with different concentrations of homocysteine (50–5 000 μmol/L). Western blotting and gelatin zymography were used to investigate the expressions and activities of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 in VSMCs in culture medium when induced with homocysteine for 24, 48, and 72 h. Transwell chambers were employed to test the migratory ability of VSMCs when incubated with homocysteine for 48 h. Different concentrations of rosuvastatin (10−9–10−5 mol/L) were added when VSMCs were induced with 1 000 μmol/L homocysteine. The expressions and activities of MMP-2 and TIMP-2 were examined after incubating for 24, 48, and 72 h, and the migration of VSMCs was also examined after incubating for 48 h. Results: Homocysteine (50–1 000 μmol/L) increased the production and activation of MMP-2 and expression of TIMP-2 in a dose-dependent manner. However, when incubated with 5 000 μmol/L homocysteine, the expression of MMP-2 was up-regulated, but its activity was down-regulated. Increased homocysteine-induced production and activation of MMP-2 were reduced by rosuvastatin in a dose-dependent manner whereas secretion of TIMP-2 was not significantly altered by rosuvastatin. Homocysteine (50–5 000 μmol/L) stimulated the migration of VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner, but this effect was eliminated by rosuvastatin. Conclusions: Homocysteine (50–1 000 μmol/L) significantly increased the production and activation of MMP-2, the expression of TIMP-2, and the migration of VSMCs in a dose-dependent manner. Additional extracellular rosuvastatin can decrease

  11. Natural gas productive capacity for the lower 48 states 1984 through 1996, February 1996

    SciTech Connect

    1996-02-09

    This is the fourth wellhead productive capacity report. The three previous ones were published in 1991, 1993, and 1994. This report should be of particular interest to those in Congress, Federal and State agencies, industry, and the academic community, who are concerned with the future availability of natural gas. The EIA Dallas Field Office has prepared five earlier reports regarding natural gas productive capacity. These reports, Gas Deliverability and Flow Capacity of Surveillance Fields, reported deliverability and capacity data for selected gas fields in major gas producing areas. The data in the reports were based on gas-well back-pressure tests and estimates of gas-in-place for each field or reservoir. These reports use proven well testing theory, most of which has been employed by industry since 1936 when the Bureau of Mines first published Monograph 7. Demand for natural gas in the United States is met by a combination of natural gas production, underground gas storage, imported gas, and supplemental gaseous fuels. Natural gas production requirements in the lower 48 States have been increasing during the last few years while drilling has remained at low levels. This has raised some concern about the adequacy of future gas supplies, especially in periods of peak heating or cooling demand. The purpose of this report is to address these concerns by presenting a 3-year projection of the total productive capacity of natural gas at the wellhead for the lower 48 States. Alaska is excluded because Alaskan gas does not enter the lower-48 States pipeline system. The Energy Information Administration (EIA) generates this 3-year projection based on historical gas-well drilling and production data from State, Federal, and private sources. In addition to conventional gas-well gas, coalbed gas and oil-well gas are also included.

  12. Matrix Embedded Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakolanu, U. G.; Freund, F. T.

    2016-05-01

    In the matrix of minerals such as olivine, a redox reaction of the low-z elements occurs. Oxygen is oxidized to the peroxy state while the low-Z-elements become chemically reduced. We assign them a formula [CxHyOzNiSj]n- and call them proto-organics.

  13. Potential effects of sulfur pollutants on grape production in New York State

    SciTech Connect

    Knudson, D.A.; Viessman, S.

    1983-01-01

    This paper presents the results of a prototype analysis of sulfur pollutants on graph production in New York State. Principal grape production areas for the state are defined and predictions of sulfur dioxide concentrations associated with present and projected sources are computed. Sulfur dioxide concentrations are based on the results of a multi-source dispersion model, whereas concentrations for other pollutants are derived from observations. This information is used in conjunction with results from experiments conducted to identify threshold levels of damage and/or injury to a variety of grape species to pollutants. Determination is then made whether the subject crop is at risk from present and projected concentrations of pollutants.

  14. A Study of The Standard Model Higgs, WW and ZZ Production in Dilepton Plus Missing Transverse Energy Final State at CDF Run II

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, Shih-Chieh

    2008-01-01

    We report on a search for Standard Model (SM) production of Higgs to WW* in the two charged lepton (e, μ) and two neutrino final state in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at a center of mass energy √s = 1.96 TeV. The data were collected with the CDF II detector at the Fermilab Tevatron and correspond to an integrated luminosity of 1.9fb-1. The Matrix Element method is developed to calculate the event probability and to construct a likelihood ratio discriminator. There are 522 candidates observed with an expectation of 513 ± 41 background events and 7.8 ± 0.6 signal events for Higgs mass 160GeV/c2 at next-to-next-to-leading logarithmic level calculation. The observed 95% C.L. upper limit is 0.8 pb which is 2.0 times the SM prediction while the median expected limit is 3.1$+1.3\\atop{-0.9}$ with systematics included. Results for 9 other Higgs mass hypotheses ranging from 110GeV/c2 to 200GeV/c2 are also presented. The same dilepton plus large transverse energy imbalance (ET) final state is used in the SM ZZ production search and the WW production study. The observed significance of ZZ → llvv channel is 1.2σ. It adds extra significance to the ZZ → 4l channel and leads to a strong evidence of ZZ production with 4.4 σ significance. The potential improvement of the anomalous triple gauge coupling measurement by using the Matrix Element method in WW production is also studied.

  15. Matrix thermalization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craps, Ben; Evnin, Oleg; Nguyen, Kévin

    2017-02-01

    Matrix quantum mechanics offers an attractive environment for discussing gravitational holography, in which both sides of the holographic duality are well-defined. Similarly to higher-dimensional implementations of holography, collapsing shell solutions in the gravitational bulk correspond in this setting to thermalization processes in the dual quantum mechanical theory. We construct an explicit, fully nonlinear supergravity solution describing a generic collapsing dilaton shell, specify the holographic renormalization prescriptions necessary for computing the relevant boundary observables, and apply them to evaluating thermalizing two-point correlation functions in the dual matrix theory.

  16. A Study of United States Army Product Support Manager (PSM) Training

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-03-25

    and managers need to allow the time to train their personnel. • Training is critical to the underpinnings of a good PSM. Experience and training go...Running head: PRODUCT SUPPORT MANAGER (PSM) TRAINING 1 A Study of United States Army Product Support Manager (PSM) Training John C...presented to the Defense Acquisition University (DAU) for partial fulfillment of the academic requirements for the Army’s Senior Service College

  17. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes. PMID:26478452

  18. 9 CFR 381.196 - Eligibility of foreign countries for importation of poultry products into the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... importation of poultry products into the United States. 381.196 Section 381.196 Animals and Animal Products...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Imported Poultry Products § 381.196 Eligibility of foreign countries for...

  19. 9 CFR 381.196 - Eligibility of foreign countries for importation of poultry products into the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... importation of poultry products into the United States. 381.196 Section 381.196 Animals and Animal Products...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Imported Poultry Products § 381.196 Eligibility of foreign countries for...

  20. 9 CFR 381.196 - Eligibility of foreign countries for importation of poultry products into the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... importation of poultry products into the United States. 381.196 Section 381.196 Animals and Animal Products...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Imported Poultry Products § 381.196 Eligibility of foreign countries for...

  1. 9 CFR 381.196 - Eligibility of foreign countries for importation of poultry products into the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... importation of poultry products into the United States. 381.196 Section 381.196 Animals and Animal Products...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Imported Poultry Products § 381.196 Eligibility of foreign countries for...

  2. 9 CFR 381.196 - Eligibility of foreign countries for importation of poultry products into the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... importation of poultry products into the United States. 381.196 Section 381.196 Animals and Animal Products...; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION REGULATIONS Imported Poultry Products § 381.196 Eligibility of foreign countries for...

  3. 9 CFR 590.910 - Eligibility of foreign countries for importation of egg products into the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... importation of egg products into the United States. 590.910 Section 590.910 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Imports § 590.910 Eligibility of foreign countries...

  4. 9 CFR 590.910 - Eligibility of foreign countries for importation of egg products into the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... importation of egg products into the United States. 590.910 Section 590.910 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Imports § 590.910 Eligibility of foreign countries...

  5. 9 CFR 590.910 - Eligibility of foreign countries for importation of egg products into the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... importation of egg products into the United States. 590.910 Section 590.910 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Imports § 590.910 Eligibility of foreign countries...

  6. 9 CFR 590.910 - Eligibility of foreign countries for importation of egg products into the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... importation of egg products into the United States. 590.910 Section 590.910 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Imports § 590.910 Eligibility of foreign countries...

  7. 9 CFR 590.910 - Eligibility of foreign countries for importation of egg products into the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... importation of egg products into the United States. 590.910 Section 590.910 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION INSPECTION OF EGGS AND EGG PRODUCTS (EGG PRODUCTS INSPECTION ACT) Imports § 590.910 Eligibility of foreign countries...

  8. The Pathway of Product Release from the R State of Aspartate Transcarbamoylase

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, K.; Kantrowitz, E

    2010-01-01

    The pathway of product release from the R state of aspartate transcarbamoylase (ATCase; EC 2.1.3.2, aspartate carbamoyltransferase) has been determined here by solving the crystal structure of Escherichia coli ATCase locked in the R quaternary structure by specific introduction of disulfide bonds. ATCase displays ordered substrate binding and product release, remaining in the R state until substrates are exhausted. The structure reported here represents ATCase in the R state bound to the final product molecule, phosphate. This structure has been difficult to obtain previously because the enzyme relaxes back to the T state after the substrates are exhausted. Hence, cocrystallizing the wild-type enzyme with phosphate results in a T-state structure. In this structure of the enzyme trapped in the R state with specific disulfide bonds, we observe two phosphate molecules per active site. The position of the first phosphate corresponds to the position of the phosphate of carbamoyl phosphate (CP) and the position of the phosphonate of N-phosphonacetyl-L-aspartate. However, the second, more weakly bound phosphate is bound in a positively charged pocket that is more accessible to the surface than the other phosphate. The second phosphate appears to be on the path that phosphate would have to take to exit the active site. Our results suggest that phosphate dissociation and CP binding can occur simultaneously and that the dissociation of phosphate may actually promote the binding of CP for more efficient catalysis.

  9. COAL DERIVED MATRIX PITCHES FOR CARBON-CARBON COMPOSITE MANUFACTURE/PRODUCTION OF FIBERS AND COMPOSITES FROM COAL-BASED PRECURSORS

    SciTech Connect

    Peter G. Stansberry; John W. Zondlo

    2001-07-01

    The Consortium for premium Carbon Products from Coal, with funding from the US Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory continue with the development of innovative technologies that will allow coal or coal-derived feedstocks to be used in the production of value-added carbon materials. In addition to supporting eleven independent projects during budget period 3, three meetings were held at two separate locations for the membership. The first was held at Nemacolin Woodlands Resort on May 15-16, 2000. This was followed by two meetings at Penn State, a tutorial on August 11, 2000 and a technical progress meeting on October 26-27.

  10. Light quality and efficiency of consumer grade solid state lighting products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dam-Hansen, Carsten; Corell, Dennis Dan; Thorseth, Anders; Poulsen, Peter Behrensdorff

    2013-03-01

    The rapid development in flux and efficiency of Light Emitting Diodes (LED) has resulted in a flooding of the lighting market with Solid State Lighting (SSL) products. Many traditional light sources can advantageously be replaced by SSL products. There are, however, large variations in the quality of these products, and some are not better than the ones they are supposed to replace. A lack of quality demands and standards makes it difficult for consumers to get an overview of the SSL products. Here the results of a two year study investigating SSL products on the Danish market are presented. Focus has been on SSL products for replacement of incandescent lamps and halogen spotlights. The warm white light and good color rendering properties of these traditional light sources are a must for lighting in Denmark and the Nordic countries. 266 SSL replacement lamps have been tested for efficiency and light quality with respect to correlated color temperature and color rendering properties. This shows a trade-off between high color rendering warm white light and energy efficiency. The lumen and color maintenance over time has been investigated and results for products running over 11000 h will be presented. A new internet based SSL product selection tool will be shown. Here the products can be compared on efficiency, light quality parameters, thus providing a better basis for the selection of SSL products for consumers.

  11. Max-min distance nonnegative matrix factorization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jim Jing-Yan; Gao, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Nonnegative Matrix Factorization (NMF) has been a popular representation method for pattern classification problems. It tries to decompose a nonnegative matrix of data samples as the product of a nonnegative basis matrix and a nonnegative coefficient matrix. The columns of the coefficient matrix can be used as new representations of these data samples. However, traditional NMF methods ignore class labels of the data samples. In this paper, we propose a novel supervised NMF algorithm to improve the discriminative ability of the new representation by using the class labels. Using the class labels, we separate all the data sample pairs into within-class pairs and between-class pairs. To improve the discriminative ability of the new NMF representations, we propose to minimize the maximum distance of the within-class pairs in the new NMF space, and meanwhile to maximize the minimum distance of the between-class pairs. With this criterion, we construct an objective function and optimize it with regard to basis and coefficient matrices, and slack variables alternatively, resulting in an iterative algorithm. The proposed algorithm is evaluated on three pattern classification problems and experiment results show that it outperforms the state-of-the-art supervised NMF methods.

  12. Phase diagram of matrix compressed sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schülke, Christophe; Schniter, Philip; Zdeborová, Lenka

    2016-12-01

    In the problem of matrix compressed sensing, we aim to recover a low-rank matrix from a few noisy linear measurements. In this contribution, we analyze the asymptotic performance of a Bayes-optimal inference procedure for a model where the matrix to be recovered is a product of random matrices. The results that we obtain using the replica method describe the state evolution of the Parametric Bilinear Generalized Approximate Message Passing (P-BiG-AMP) algorithm, recently introduced in J. T. Parker and P. Schniter [IEEE J. Select. Top. Signal Process. 10, 795 (2016), 10.1109/JSTSP.2016.2539123]. We show the existence of two different types of phase transition and their implications for the solvability of the problem, and we compare the results of our theoretical analysis to the numerical performance reached by P-BiG-AMP. Remarkably, the asymptotic replica equations for matrix compressed sensing are the same as those for a related but formally different problem of matrix factorization.

  13. Determination of dyes in cosmetic products by micro-matrix solid phase dispersion and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Guerra, Eugenia; Celeiro, Maria; Lamas, J Pablo; Llompart, Maria; Garcia-Jares, Carmen

    2015-10-09

    A simple method based on micro-matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) followed by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has been developed for the rapid and simultaneous determination of nine regulated water-soluble dyes in personal care and decorative products. The proposed miniaturized extraction procedure was optimized by means of experimental designs in order to obtain the highest extraction efficiency. Under the optimal selected conditions, the method was validated showing satisfactory performance in terms of linearity, sensitivity, and intra-day and inter-day precision. Recoveries were evaluated in different cosmetic matrices and they can be considered quantitative with average values between 70 and 120% with relative standard deviations (RSD) lower than 15%. Finally, the validated method was applied to 24 samples of cosmetic and personal care products, including decorative makeup, lipsticks, lip gloss, toothpastes, regenerating creams, shampoos, and eye shadows, among others, to cover a broad range of commercial real samples. Seven of the analyzed dyes were detected, being declared all of them in the label list of ingredients. More than 50% of the samples contained at least two dyes. Tartrazine was the most frequently found (50% of the samples) at concentration levels of 0.243-79.9μgg(-1). Other targets were found in 1-9 samples, highlighting the presence of Quinoline at high concentration (>500μgg(-1)) in a toothpaste sample.

  14. Stachybotrys microspora triprenyl phenol-7, a novel fibrinolytic agent, suppresses superoxide production, matrix metalloproteinase-9 expression, and thereby attenuates ischemia/reperfusion injury in rat brain.

    PubMed

    Akamatsu, Yosuke; Saito, Atsushi; Fujimura, Miki; Shimizu, Hiroaki; Mekawy, Moataz; Hasumi, Keiji; Tominaga, Teiji

    2011-10-03

    Stachybotrys microspora triprenyl phenol-7 (SMTP-7) is a novel fibrinolytic agent with anti-inflammatory effect. Previous study demonstrated that SMTP-7 further ameliorated infarction volume in a mouse embolic stroke model compared with tissue type plasminogen activator (tPA), but the reason SMTP-7 has more beneficial effect than tPA has not yet been determined. In the present study, we investigated whether SMTP-7 has an intrinsic neuroprotective effect against transient focal cerebral ischemia (tFCI). Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to tFCI by intraluminal middle cerebral artery occlusion for 2h. Following induction of tFCI, rats were randomized into two groups based on the agent administered: SMTP-7 group and vehicle group. We examined cerebral infarction volume 24h after reperfusion, and evaluated superoxide production, the expressions of nitrotyrosine and matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), which play major roles in secondary brain injury and hemorrhagic transformation. The findings showed that SMTP-7 significantly suppressed superoxide production, the expression of nitrotyrosine and MMP-9 after tFCI, and consequently attenuated ischemic neuronal damage. These results suggest that SMTP-7 has an intrinsic neuroprotective effect on ischemia/reperfusion injury through the suppression of oxidative stress and MMP-9 activation.

  15. Sync Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Metz, William C.; Metz, W. Chris; Mitrani, Jacques E.; Hewett, Jr., Paul L.; Jones, Christopher A.

    2004-12-31

    Sync Matrix provides a graphic display of the relationships among all of the response activities of each jurisdiction. This is accomplished through software that organizes and displays the activities by jurisdiction, function, and time for easy review and analysis. The software can also integrate the displays of multiple jurisdictions to allow examination of the total response.

  16. Coal resources, reserves and peak coal production in the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Milici, Robert C.; Flores, Romeo M.; Stricker, Gary D.

    2013-01-01

    In spite of its large endowment of coal resources, recent studies have indicated that United States coal production is destined to reach a maximum and begin an irreversible decline sometime during the middle of the current century. However, studies and assessments illustrating coal reserve data essential for making accurate forecasts of United States coal production have not been compiled on a national basis. As a result, there is a great deal of uncertainty in the accuracy of the production forecasts. A very large percentage of the coal mined in the United States comes from a few large-scale mines (mega-mines) in the Powder River Basin of Wyoming and Montana. Reported reserves at these mines do not account for future potential reserves or for future development of technology that may make coal classified currently as resources into reserves in the future. In order to maintain United States coal production at or near current levels for an extended period of time, existing mines will eventually have to increase their recoverable reserves and/or new large-scale mines will have to be opened elsewhere. Accordingly, in order to facilitate energy planning for the United States, this paper suggests that probabilistic assessments of the remaining coal reserves in the country would improve long range forecasts of coal production. As it is in United States coal assessment projects currently being conducted, a major priority of probabilistic assessments would be to identify the numbers and sizes of remaining large blocks of coal capable of supporting large-scale mining operations for extended periods of time and to conduct economic evaluations of those resources.

  17. Benchmarking road safety of U.S. states: a DEA-based Malmquist productivity index approach.

    PubMed

    Egilmez, Gokhan; McAvoy, Deborah

    2013-04-01

    In this study, a DEA based Malmquist index model was developed to assess the relative efficiency and productivity of U.S. states in decreasing the number of road fatalities. Even though the national trend in fatal crashes has reached to the lowest level since 1949 (Traffic Safety Annual Assessment Highlights, 2010), a state-by-state analysis and comparison has not been studied considering other characteristics of the holistic national road safety assessment problem in any work in the literature or organizational reports. In this study, a DEA based Malmquist index model was developed to assess the relative efficiency and productivity of 50 U.S. states in reducing the number of fatal crashes. The single output, fatal crashes, and five inputs were aggregated into single road safety score and utilized in the DEA-based Malmquist index mathematical model. The period of 2002-2008 was considered due to data availability for the inputs and the output considered. According to the results, there is a slight negative productivity (an average of -0.2 percent productivity) observed in the U.S. on minimizing the number of fatal crashes along with an average of 2.1 percent efficiency decline and 1.8 percent technological improvement. The productivity in reducing the fatal crashes can only be attributed to the technological growth since there is a negative efficiency growth is occurred. It can be concluded that even though there is a declining trend observed in the fatality rates, the efficiency of states in utilizing societal and economical resources towards the goal of zero fatality is not still efficient. More effective policy making towards increasing safety belt usage and better utilization of safety expenditures to improve road condition are derived as the key areas to focus on for state highway safety agencies from the scope of current research.

  18. Rovibrational product state distribution for inelastic H+D2 collisions.

    PubMed

    Pomerantz, Andrew E; Ausfelder, Florian; Zare, Richard N; Juanes-Marcos, Juan Carlos; Althorpe, Stuart C; Sáez Rábanos, V; Aoiz, F J; Bañares, L; Castillo, J F

    2004-10-08

    Experimental measurements of rovibrational product state distributions for the inelastic scattering process H + D2(nu=0,j)-->H + D2(nu' = 1,2,j') are presented and compared with the results of quasiclassical and quantum mechanical calculations. Agreement between theory and experiment is almost quantitative. Two subtle trends are found: the relative amount of energy in product rotational excitation decreases slightly with increasing collision energy and increases slightly with increasing product vibrational excitation. These trends are the reverse of what has been found for reactive scattering in which the opposite trends are much more pronounced.

  19. Landslide remediation on Ohio State Route 83 using clean coal combustion by-products

    SciTech Connect

    Payette, R.; Chen, Xi You; Wolfe, W.; Beeghly, J.

    1995-12-31

    The disposal of flue gas desulfurization (FGD) by-products has become a major concern as issues of emission cleansing and landfill costs continue to rise. Laboratory tests conducted at the Ohio State University have shown that dry FGD by-products possess certain engineering properties that have proven desirable in a number of construction uses. As a follow on to the laboratory program, a field investigation into engineering uses of dry FGD wastes was initiated. In the present work, an FGD by-product was used to reconstruct the failed portion of a highway embankment. The construction process and the stability of the repaired embankment are examined.

  20. Evaluation of a recent product to remove lipids and other matrix co-extractives in the analysis of pesticide residues and environmental contaminants in foods.

    PubMed

    Han, Lijun; Matarrita, Jessie; Sapozhnikova, Yelena; Lehotay, Steven J

    2016-06-03

    This study demonstrates the application of a novel lipid removal product to the residue analysis of 65 pesticides and 52 environmental contaminants in kale, pork, salmon, and avocado by fast, low pressure gas chromatography - tandem mass spectrometry (LPGC-MS/MS). Sample preparation involves QuEChERS extraction followed by use of EMR-Lipid ("enhanced matrix removal of lipids") and an additional salting out step for cleanup. The optimal amount of EMR-Lipid was determined to be 500mg for 2.5mL extracts for most of the analytes. The co-extractive removal efficiency by the EMR-Lipid cleanup step was 83-98% for fatty samples and 79% for kale, including 76% removal of chlorophyll. Matrix effects were typically less than ±20%, in part because analyte protectants were used in the LPGC-MS/MS analysis. The recoveries of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and diverse pesticides were mostly 70-120%, whereas recoveries of nonpolar polybrominated diphenyl ethers and polychlorinated biphenyls were mostly lower than 70% through the cleanup procedure. With the use of internal standards, method validation results showed that 76-85 of the 117 analytes achieved satisfactory results (recoveries of 70-120% and RSD≤20%) in pork, avocado, and kale, while 53 analytes had satisfactory results in salmon. Detection limits were 5-10ng/g for all but a few analytes. EMR-Lipid is a new sample preparation tool that serves as another useful option for cleanup in multiresidue analysis, particularly of fatty foods.

  1. Studies Related to the Oregon State University High Temperature Test Facility: Scaling, the Validation Matrix, and Similarities to the Modular High Temperature Gas-Cooled Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Richard R. Schultz; Paul D. Bayless; Richard W. Johnson; William T. Taitano; James R. Wolf; Glenn E. McCreery

    2010-09-01

    The Oregon State University (OSU) High Temperature Test Facility (HTTF) is an integral experimental facility that will be constructed on the OSU campus in Corvallis, Oregon. The HTTF project was initiated, by the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), on September 5, 2008 as Task 4 of the 5 year High Temperature Gas Reactor Cooperative Agreement via NRC Contract 04-08-138. Until August, 2010, when a DOE contract was initiated to fund additional capabilities for the HTTF project, all of the funding support for the HTTF was provided by the NRC via their cooperative agreement. The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) began their involvement with the HTTF project in late 2009 via the Next Generation Nuclear Plant project. Because the NRC interests in HTTF experiments were only centered on the depressurized conduction cooldown (DCC) scenario, NGNP involvement focused on expanding the experimental envelope of the HTTF to include steady-state operations and also the pressurized conduction cooldown (PCC). Since DOE has incorporated the HTTF as an ingredient in the NGNP thermal-fluids validation program, several important outcomes should be noted: 1. The reference prismatic reactor design, that serves as the basis for scaling the HTTF, became the modular high temperature gas-cooled reactor (MHTGR). The MHTGR has also been chosen as the reference design for all of the other NGNP thermal-fluid experiments. 2. The NGNP validation matrix is being planned using the same scaling strategy that has been implemented to design the HTTF, i.e., the hierarchical two-tiered scaling methodology developed by Zuber in 1991. Using this approach a preliminary validation matrix has been designed that integrates the HTTF experiments with the other experiments planned for the NGNP thermal-fluids verification and validation project. 3. Initial analyses showed that the inherent power capability of the OSU infrastructure, which only allowed a total operational facility power capability of 0.6 MW, is

  2. Vibronic states in organic semiconductors based on non-metal naphthalocyanine. Detection of heterocyclic phthalocyanine compounds in a flexible dielectric matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Belogorokhov, I. A.; Tikhonov, E. V.; Dronov, M. A.; Belogorokhova, L. I.; Ryabchikov, Yu. V.; Tomilova, L. G.; Khokhlov, D. R.

    2012-01-15

    The vibronic properties of semiconductor structures based on non-metal naphthalocyanine molecules are studied using IR and Raman spectroscopy methods. New absorption lines in the transmission spectra of such materials are detected and identified. Three transmission lines are observed in the range 2830-3028 cm{sup -1}, which characterize carbon-hydrogen bonds of peripheral molecular groups. Their spectral positions are 2959, 2906, and 2866 cm{sup -1}. It is detected that the phthalocyanine ring can also exhibit its specific vibronic properties in the Raman spectra at 767, 717, and 679 cm{sup -1}. The naphthalocyanine molecule in the organic dielectric matrix of microfibers is described using IR spectroscopy. It is shown that the set of vibrations characterizing the isoindol group, pyrrole ring, naphtha group, and C-H bonds, allows an accurate enough description of the vibronic states of the naphthalocyanine complex in complex heterostructures to be made. The spectral range with fundamental modes, characterizing a naphthalocyanine semiconductor in a heterostructure, is 600-1600 cm{sup -1}. A comparison of the compositions of complex systems with a similar heterostructure containing lutetium diphthalocyanine demonstrated few errors.

  3. Effect of molecular-orbital rotations on ground-state energies in the parametric two-electron reduced density matrix method.

    PubMed

    Sand, Andrew M; Mazziotti, David A

    2013-06-28

    Different sets of molecular orbitals and the rotations connecting them are of great significance in molecular electronic structure. Most electron correlation methods depend on a reference wave function that separates the orbitals into occupied and unoccupied spaces. Energies and properties from these methods depend upon rotations between the spaces. Some electronic structure methods, such as modified coupled electron pair approximations and the recently developed parametric two-electron reduced density matrix (2-RDM) methods [D. A. Mazziotti, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 253002 (2008)], also depend upon rotations between occupied orbitals and rotations between unoccupied orbitals. In this paper, we explore the sensitivity of the ground-state energies from the parametric 2-RDM method to rotations within the occupied space and within the unoccupied space. We discuss the theoretical origin of the rotational dependence and provide computational examples at both equilibrium and non-equilibrium geometries. We also study the effect of these rotations on the size extensivity of the parametric 2-RDM method. Computations show that the orbital rotations have a small effect upon the parametric 2-RDM energies in comparison to the energy differences observed between methodologies such as coupled cluster and parametric 2-RDM. Furthermore, while the 2-RDM method is rigorously size extensive in a local molecular orbital basis set, calculations reveal negligible deviations in nonlocal molecular orbital basis sets such as those from canonical Hartree-Fock calculations.

  4. Solid state fermentation of food waste mixtures for single cell protein, aroma volatiles and fat production.

    PubMed

    Aggelopoulos, Theodoros; Katsieris, Konstantinos; Bekatorou, Argyro; Pandey, Ashok; Banat, Ibrahim M; Koutinas, Athanasios A

    2014-02-15

    Growth of selected microorganisms of industrial interest (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Kluyveromyces marxianus and kefir) by solid state fermentation (SSF) of various food industry waste mixtures was studied. The fermented products were analysed for protein, and nutrient minerals content, as well as for aroma volatile compounds by GC/MS. The substrate fermented by K. marxianus contained the highest sum of fat and protein concentration (59.2% w/w dm) and therefore it could be considered for utilisation of its fat content and for livestock feed enrichment. Regarding volatiles, the formation of high amounts of ε-pinene was observed only in the SSF product of kefir at a yield estimated to be 4 kg/tn of SSF product. A preliminary design of a biorefinery-type process flow sheet and its economic analysis, indicated potential production of products (enriched livestock feed, fat and ε-pinene) of significant added value.

  5. Production of Lingzhi or Reishi medicinal mushroom, Ganoderma lucidum (W.Curt. :Fr.) P. Karst. (higher Basidiomycetes), biomass and polysaccharides by solid state cultivation.

    PubMed

    Berovic, Marin; Habijanic, Jozica; Boh, Bojana; Wraber, Branka; Petravic-Tominac, Vlatka

    2012-01-01

    Solid state cultivation of Ganoderma lucidum biomass, strain BFWS Gal 4, originally isolated from the Slovenian forest, was studied in a horizontal stirred tank reactor. Periodic mixing of N = 80 rpm, 2 min/day was used. Production of fungal polysaccharides and fungal biomass on solid substrate based on beech sawdust, olive oil, and mineral salts was studied. Optimal moisture of the solid matrix was in the range of 80% to 74%. When the moisture content dropped below 57%, the growth of the mycelium and polysaccharide production stopped, but it revived when wet air was applied in further processing. Final concentration of biomass was 0.68 mg/g of solid substrate, while proportions of extracellular and intracellular polysaccharides were 4.5 mg/g and 1.05 mg/g, respectively.

  6. Production of extremely high-lying states by 80-GHz microwave fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arakelyan, Alexandr; Gallagher, Thomas F.

    2015-05-01

    It was previously reported that ionization of Rydberg atoms of Na and Li by strong microwave (MW) fields of 17 and 38 GHz yields a substantial fraction of population left in the high-lying states with n > 250. This phenomenon was observed for any initial state at least fractionally ionized and was reported as a consequence of MW ionization of atoms. We present results of a similar experiment conducted with an 80-GHz MW field. The production of the high-lying states after the strong 80-GHz pulse is observed, but, in contrast to previous studies, not for any initial state. The high-lying states are only observed if atoms are excited to a zero-field state that is in a multiphoton resonance with the ionization limit (IL). We attribute the difference in the results of 80 and 17-GHz experiments to the fact that the ponderomotive shift is 4 and 90 GHz, respectively, at 100-V/cm. Consequently, we show that the high-lying states are produced if an initial state can be shifted in resonance with the IL. We also report MW ionization thresholds observed at 80 GHz to be much higher than those measured at 15 GHz: a transition to n + 1 state occurs only when big static field is present. Moreover, unlike results of 15-GHz experiment, ionization thresholds depend strongly on the width of the MW pulse. This work has been supported by the National Science Foundation.

  7. Extent of Utilizing Electrical Equipment in Poultry Production in Ebonyi State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ogba, E. I.; Ogbu, J. E.

    2016-01-01

    This study was designed to investigate the extent of utilizing electrical equipment in poultry production in the rural areas of Ebonyi State, Nigeria. A survey research design was adopted for the study. Three research questions guided the study. The population for the study was 46 respondents comprising 16 Extension agents and 30 Poultry farmers.…

  8. Who, what, and where: Cotton production in the United States 1997-2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The “who, what and where” of cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) production in the United States has changed since 1997. Using Census of Agriculture data from 1997, 2002, 2007, and 2012, three general questions are considered: 1) Who are cotton producers; 2) What types of operations are producing cotton;...

  9. Increasing plant density in eastern United States broccoli production systems to maximize marketable head yields

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Increased demand for fresh market broccoli (Brassica oleracea L. var. italica) has led to increased production along the eastern seaboard of the United States. Maximizing broccoli yields is a primary concern for quickly expanding eastern commercial markets. Thus, a plant density study was carried ...

  10. Non-Timber Forest Products' Marketing in Nigeria. A Case Study of Osun State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiyeloja, Adedapo Ayo; Ajewole, Opeyemi Isaac

    2006-01-01

    Research on markets and marketing of some non-timber forest products (NTFPs) was carried out in selected locations of Osun State. The NTFPs considered are chewing sticks such as "Massularia acuminata" and bush meat like "Thryonomys swinderianus", representing both the flora and fauna aspects of NTFPs, respectively. Five Local…

  11. Faculty Productivity. Report & Recommendations to the Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oklahoma State Regents for Higher Education, Oklahoma City.

    A review of Oklahoma higher education faculty productivity at state supported institutions resulted in recommendations to enhance quality while working within policy goals. The review identified faculty workload as the central issue and found that studies consistently show that full-time faculty members work 50 to 65 hours a week with about half…

  12. Squeezed states and graviton-entropy production in the early universe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giovannini, Massimo

    1994-01-01

    Squeezed states are a very useful framework for the quantum treatment of tensor perturbations (i.e. gravitons production) in the early universe. In particular, the non equilibrium entropy growth in a cosmological process of pair production is completely determined by the associated squeezing parameter and is insensitive to the number of particles in the initial state. The total produced entropy may represent a significant fraction of the entropy stored today in the cosmic blackbody radiation, provided pair production originates from a change in the background metric at a curvature scale of the Planck order. Within the formalism of squeezed thermal states it is also possible to discuss the stimulated emission of gravitons from an initial thermal bath, under the action of the cosmic gravitational background field. We find that at low energy the graviton production is enhanced, if compared with spontaneous creation from the vacuum; as a consequence, the inflation scale must be lowered, in order not to exceed the observed CMB quadrupole anisotropy. This effect is important, in particular, for models based on a symmetry-breaking transition which require, as initial condition, a state of thermal equilibrium at temperatures higher than the inflation scale and in which inflation has a minimal duration.

  13. Fungal pretreatment of albizia chips for enhanced biogas production by solid-state anaerobic digestion

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Albizia biomass is a forestry waste, and holds a great potential in biogas production by solid-state anaerobic digestion (SS-AD). However, low methane yields from albizia chips were observed due to their recalcitrant structure. In this study, albizia chips were pretreated by Ceriporiopsis subvermisp...

  14. Equation of state for high explosives detonation products with explicit polar and ionic species

    SciTech Connect

    Bastea, S; Glaesemann, K R; Fried, L E

    2006-06-28

    We introduce a new thermodynamic theory for detonation products that includes polar and ionic species. The new formalism extends the domain of validity of the previously developed EXP6 equation of state library and opens the possibility of new applications. We illustrate the scope of the new approach on PETN detonation properties and water ionization models.

  15. The evolution of sunscreen products in the United States--a 12-year cross sectional study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Steven Q; Tanner, Paul R; Lim, Henry W; Nash, J F

    2013-01-01

    Excessive exposure from ultraviolet (UV) radiation contributes to the development of skin cancers and photoaging. Topical sunscreen products remain one of the most widely used forms of protection for the majority of the public. The objective of this analysis was to examine photoprotection trends (e.g., SPF value) and the degree of UVA I protection from 1997 to 2009 in the United States. Sunscreen products purchased and evaluated in 1997 (N = 59), 2003 (N = 188) and again in 2009 (N = 330), totaling 577, were included in this analysis. Information regarding (1) the SPF value, (2) name and concentration of the active ingredients, (3) type of products (i.e., daily vs. recreational/beach), and (4) claims of UVA protection was recorded and analyzed. In addition, the critical wavelength (CW) of 330 products from 2009 was determined. The results showed an increase in the SPF values of products from 1997 to 2009. The percentage of low SPF products (SPF 4-14) decreased from 27% in 1997 to 6% in 2009. The number of products containing a known UVA-I filter (i.e., avobenzone or zinc oxide) increased from 5% in 1997 to 70% in 2009. Lastly, approximately, 225 (68%) of the products tested in 2009 attained CW > 370 nm. In the past decade, sunscreen products have undergone fundamental improvements, the most significant of which is the breadth of protection against UVA I.

  16. Production of Cold-Active Bacterial Lipases through Semisolid State Fermentation Using Oil Cakes.

    PubMed

    Joseph, Babu; Upadhyaya, Supriya; Ramteke, Pramod

    2011-01-01

    Production of cold active lipase by semisolid state fermentation involves the use of agroindustrial residues. In the present study, semisolid state fermentation was carried out for the production of cold active lipase using Micrococcus roseus, isolated from soil samples of Gangotri glaciers, Western Himalayas. Among various substrate tested, groundnut oil cake (GOC) favored maximal yield of lipases at 15 ± 1°C within 48 h. Supplementation of glucose 1% (w/v) as additional carbon source and ammonium nitrate 2% (w/v) as additional nitrogen source enhanced production of lipase. Addition of triglycerides 0.5% (v/v) tends to repress the lipase production. Further mixed preparation of groundnut oil cake (GOC) along with mustard oil cake (MOC) in the ratio of 1 : 1, and its optimization resulted in improved production of cold active lipase. The enzyme exhibited maximum activity at 10-15°C and was stable at temperatures lower than 30°C. The lipase exhibited optimum activity at pH 8 and showed more than 60% stability at pH 9. Semisolid state fermentation process by utilizing agroindustrial wastes will direct to large-scale commercialization of lipase catalyzed process in cost-effective systems.

  17. Potential Role of Fibroblast-Like Synoviocytes in Joint Damage Induced by Brucella abortus Infection through Production and Induction of Matrix Metalloproteinases ▿

    PubMed Central

    Scian, Romina; Barrionuevo, Paula; Giambartolomei, Guillermo H.; De Simone, Emilio A.; Vanzulli, Silvia I.; Fossati, Carlos A.; Baldi, Pablo C.; Delpino, M. Victoria

    2011-01-01

    Arthritis is one of the most common complications of human brucellosis, but its pathogenic mechanisms have not been elucidated. Fibroblast-like synoviocytes (FLS) are known to be central mediators of joint damage in inflammatory arthritides through the production of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) that degrade collagen and of cytokines and chemokines that mediate the recruitment and activation of leukocytes. In this study we show that Brucella abortus infects and replicates in human FLS (SW982 cell line) in vitro and that infection results in the production of MMP-2 and proinflammatory mediators (interleukin-6 [IL-6], IL-8, monocyte chemotactic protein 1 [MCP-1], and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor [GM-CSF]). Culture supernatants from Brucella-infected FLS induced the migration of monocytes and neutrophils in vitro and also induced these cells to secrete MMP-9 in a GM-CSF- and IL-6-dependent fashion, respectively. Reciprocally, culture supernatants from Brucella-infected monocytes and neutrophils induced FLS to produce MMP-2 in a tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α)-dependent fashion. The secretion of proinflammatory mediators and MMP-2 by FLS did not depend on bacterial viability, since it was also induced by heat-killed B. abortus (HKBA) and by a model Brucella lipoprotein (L-Omp19). These responses were mediated by the recognition of B. abortus antigens through Toll-like receptor 2. The intra-articular injection of HKBA or L-Omp19 into the knee joint of mice resulted in the local induction of the proinflammatory mediators MMP-2 and MMP-9 and in the generation of a mixed inflammatory infiltrate. These results suggest that FLS, and phagocytes recruited by them to the infection focus, may be involved in joint damage during brucellar arthritis through the production of MMPs and proinflammatory mediators. PMID:21730088

  18. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) (II. 2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile Inhibition of Motility and Stalk Production in the Marine Diatom Achnanthes longipes).

    PubMed

    Wang, Y.; Lu, J.; Mollet, J. C.; Gretz, M. R.; Hoagland, K. D.

    1997-04-01

    The cellulose synthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) and the DCB analogs 2-chloro-6-fluorobenzonitrile, 3-amino-2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, and 5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfonyl-(3-cyano-2, 4-dichloro)aniline (DCBF) inhibited extracellular adhesive production in the marine diatom Achnanthes longipes, resulting in a loss of motility and a lack of permanent adhesion. The effect was fully reversible upon removal of the inhibitor, and cell growth was not affected at concentrations of inhibitors adequate to effectively interrupt the adhesion sequence. Video microscopy revealed that the adhesion sequence was mediated by the export and assembly of polymers, and consisted of initial attachment followed by cell motility and eventual production of permanent adhesive structures in the form of stalks that elevated the diatom above the substratum. A. longipes adhesive polymers are primarily composed of noncellulosic polysaccharides (B.A. Wustman, M.R. Gretz, and K.D. Hoagland [1997] Plant Physiol 113: 1059-1069). These results, together with the discovery of DCB inhibition of extracellular matrix assembly in noncellulosic red algal unicells (S.M. Arad, O. Dubinsky, and B. Simon [1994] Phycologia 33: 158-162), indicate that DCB inhibits synthesis of noncellulosic extracellular polysaccharides. A fluorescent probe, DCBF, was synthesized and shown to inhibit adhesive polymer production in the same manner as DCB. DCBF specifically labeled an 18-kD polypeptide isolated from a membrane fraction. Inhibition of adhesion by DCB and its analogs provides evidence of a direct relationship between polysaccharide synthesis and motility and permanent adhesion.

  19. Extracellular Matrix Assembly in Diatoms (Bacillariophyceae) (II. 2,6-Dichlorobenzonitrile Inhibition of Motility and Stalk Production in the Marine Diatom Achnanthes longipes).

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y.; Lu, J.; Mollet, J. C.; Gretz, M. R.; Hoagland, K. D.

    1997-01-01

    The cellulose synthesis inhibitor 2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile (DCB) and the DCB analogs 2-chloro-6-fluorobenzonitrile, 3-amino-2,6-dichlorobenzonitrile, and 5-dimethylamino-naphthalene-1-sulfonyl-(3-cyano-2, 4-dichloro)aniline (DCBF) inhibited extracellular adhesive production in the marine diatom Achnanthes longipes, resulting in a loss of motility and a lack of permanent adhesion. The effect was fully reversible upon removal of the inhibitor, and cell growth was not affected at concentrations of inhibitors adequate to effectively interrupt the adhesion sequence. Video microscopy revealed that the adhesion sequence was mediated by the export and assembly of polymers, and consisted of initial attachment followed by cell motility and eventual production of permanent adhesive structures in the form of stalks that elevated the diatom above the substratum. A. longipes adhesive polymers are primarily composed of noncellulosic polysaccharides (B.A. Wustman, M.R. Gretz, and K.D. Hoagland [1997] Plant Physiol 113: 1059-1069). These results, together with the discovery of DCB inhibition of extracellular matrix assembly in noncellulosic red algal unicells (S.M. Arad, O. Dubinsky, and B. Simon [1994] Phycologia 33: 158-162), indicate that DCB inhibits synthesis of noncellulosic extracellular polysaccharides. A fluorescent probe, DCBF, was synthesized and shown to inhibit adhesive polymer production in the same manner as DCB. DCBF specifically labeled an 18-kD polypeptide isolated from a membrane fraction. Inhibition of adhesion by DCB and its analogs provides evidence of a direct relationship between polysaccharide synthesis and motility and permanent adhesion. PMID:12223661

  20. Determination of isothiazolinone preservatives in cosmetics and household products by matrix solid-phase dispersion followed by high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Rivera, Gerardo; Dagnac, Thierry; Lores, Marta; Garcia-Jares, Carmen; Sanchez-Prado, Lucia; Lamas, J Pablo; Llompart, Maria

    2012-12-28

    In this work, the development of a new efficient methodology applying, for the first time, matrix solid phase dispersion (MSPD) for the determination of sensitizer isothiazolinone biocides in cosmetics and household products - 2-methyl-3-isothiazolinone (MI), 5-chloro-2-methyl-3-isothiazolinone (CMI), 1,2-benzisothiazolinone (BzI) and 2-octyl-3-isothiazolinone (OI) - is described. The main factors affecting the MSPD extraction procedure, the dispersive phase and the elution solvent, are assessed and optimized through a multicategorical experimental design, using a real cosmetic sample. The most suitable extraction conditions comprise the use of 2g of florisil as dispersive phase and 5 mL of methanol as elution solvent. Subsequently, the extract is readily analyzed by HPLC-MS/MS without any further clean-up or concentration steps. Method performance was evaluated demonstrating to have a broad linear range (R(2)>0.9980) and limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) at the low nanogram per gram level, which are well below the required limits for UE regulation compliance. Satisfactory recoveries above 80%, except for MI (mean values close to 60%), were obtained. In all cases, the method precision (% RSD) was lower than 7%, making this low cost extraction method reliable for routine control. The validated methodology was finally applied to the analysis of a wide variety of cosmetics and household products. Most of the real samples analyzed have been shown to comply with the current European Cosmetic Regulation, although the results obtained for some rinse-off cosmetics (e.g. baby care products) revealed high isothiazolinone content.