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Sample records for matrix proteins utmp16

  1. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  2. Making recombinant extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Ruggiero, Florence; Koch, Manuel

    2008-05-01

    A variety of approaches to understand extracellular matrix protein structure and function require production of recombinant proteins. Moreover, the expression of heterologous extracellular matrix proteins, in particular collagens, using the recombinant technology is of major interest to the biomedical industry. Although extracellular matrix proteins are large, modular and often multimeric, most of them have been successfully produced in various expression systems. This review provides important factors, including the design of the construct, the cloning strategies, the expression vectors, the transfection method and the host cell systems, to consider in choosing a reliable and cost-effective way to make recombinant extracellular matrix proteins. Advantages and drawbacks of each system have been appraised. Protocols that may ease efficient recombinant production of extracellular matrix are described. Emphasis is placed on the recombinant collagen production. Members of the collagen superfamily exhibit specific structural features and generally require complex post-translational modifications to retain full biological activity that make more arduous their recombinant production.

  3. Extracellular matrix proteins of dentine.

    PubMed

    Butler, W T; Ritchie, H H; Bronckers, A L

    1997-01-01

    Bone and dentine extracellular matrix proteins are similar, consisting primarily of type I collagen, acidic proteins and proteoglycans. Although collagen forms the lattice for deposition of calcium and phosphate for formation of carbonate apatite, the non-collagenous proteins are believed to control initiation and growth of the crystals. Despite this similarity, dentine contains three unique proteins apparently absent from bone and other tissue: dentine phosphophoryn (DPP), dentine matrix protein 1 (DMP1) and dentine sialoprotein (DSP). DPP and DMP1 are acidic phosphoproteins probably involved in the control of mineralization processes. DPP may localize in gap regions of collagen and initiate apatite crystal formation by binding large quantities of calcium in a conformation that promotes this process. Extensive studies have been conducted in our laboratory on the nature, biosynthesis, localization and gene structure of DSP. Immunolocalization studies showed that rat DSP, a 53 kDa sialic acid-rich glycoprotein, was synthesized by young and mature odontoblasts, and by dental pulp cells and pre-ameloblasts, but not by ameloblasts, osteoblasts, chondrocytes or other cell types. The cDNA sequence indicated that DSP was a 366-residue protein with several potential N-glycosylation sites, as well as phosphorylation sites, but that the amino acid sequence was dissimilar to that of other known proteins. Northern blot analysis detected several mRNA species near 4.6 and 1.5 kb, indicative of alternative splicing events. Evidence for two DSP genes was obtained, further complicating this picture. Recent in situ hybridization studies utilizing rat and mouse molars and incisors indicated that DSP mRNA was expressed by young odontoblasts and odontoblasts in animals of all ages. Transcripts were also observed in pre-ameloblasts. The expression of DSP mRNA ceased when these cells matured to become secretory ameloblasts. DSP transcripts were not detected in osteoblasts or other cell

  4. Nuclear Matrix Proteins in Human Colon Cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keesee, Susan K.; Meneghini, Marc D.; Szaro, Robert P.; Wu, Ying-Jye

    1994-03-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer.

  5. Matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology.

    PubMed

    Gheorghe, Simona Roxana; Crăciun, Alexandra Mărioara

    2016-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein is a vitamin K-dependent protein secreted by chondrocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells. The presence of matrix Gla protein was reported in arterial and venous walls, lungs, kidney, uterus, heart, tooth cementum and eyes. Several studies identified matrix Gla protein in tumoral pathology. Until recently, it was thought to only have an inhibitory role of physiological and ectopic calcification. New studies demonstrated that it also has a role in physiological and pathological angiogenesis, as well as in tumorigenesis. The aim of this review is to report the latest findings related to the expression and clinical implications of matrix Gla protein in different types of cancer with an emphasis on cerebral tumors.

  6. Dentin Matrix Proteins in Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Ravindran, Sriram; George, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Dentin and bone are mineralized tissue matrices comprised of collagen fibrils and reinforced with oriented crystalline hydroxyapatite. Although both tissues perform different functionalities, they are assembled and orchestrated by mesenchymal cells that synthesize both collagenous and noncollagenous proteins albeit in different proportions. The dentin matrix proteins (DMPs) have been studied in great detail in recent years due to its inherent calcium binding properties in the extracellular matrix resulting in tissue calcification. Recent studies have shown that these proteins can serve both as intracellular signaling proteins leading to induction of stem cell differentiation and also function as nucleating proteins in the extracellular matrix. These properties make the DMPs attractive candidates for bone and dentin tissue regeneration. This chapter will provide an overview of the DMPs, their functionality and their proven and possible applications with respect to bone tissue engineering.

  7. Nuclear matrix proteins in human colon cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Keesee, S K; Meneghini, M D; Szaro, R P; Wu, Y J

    1994-01-01

    The nuclear matrix is the nonchromatin scaffolding of the nucleus. This structure confers nuclear shape, organizes chromatin, and appears to contain important regulatory proteins. Tissue specific nuclear matrix proteins have been found in the rat, mouse, and human. In this study we compared high-resolution two-dimensional gel electropherograms of nuclear matrix protein patterns found in human colon tumors with those from normal colon epithelia. Tumors were obtained from 18 patients undergoing partial colectomy for adenocarcinoma of the colon and compared with tissue from 10 normal colons. We have identified at least six proteins which were present in 18 of 18 colon tumors and 0 of 10 normal tissues, as well as four proteins present in 0 of 18 tumors and in 10 of 10 normal tissues. These data, which corroborate similar findings of cancer-specific nuclear matrix proteins in prostate and breast, suggest that nuclear matrix proteins may serve as important markers for at least some types of cancer. Images PMID:8127905

  8. Localization of peroxisomal matrix proteins by photobleaching

    SciTech Connect

    Buch, Charlotta; Hunt, Mary C.; Alexson, Stefan E.H.; Hallberg, Einar

    2009-10-16

    The distribution of some enzymes between peroxisomes and cytosol, or a dual localization in both these compartments, can be difficult to reconcile. We have used photobleaching in live cells expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fusion proteins to show that imported bona fide peroxisomal matrix proteins are retained in the peroxisome. The high mobility of the GFP-fusion proteins in the cytosol and absence of peroxisomal escape makes it possible to eliminate the cytosolic fluorescence by photobleaching, to distinguish between exclusively cytosolic proteins and proteins that are also present at low levels in peroxisomes. Using this technique we found that GFP tagged bile acid-CoA:amino acid N-acyltransferase (BAAT) was exclusively localized in the cytosol in HeLa cells. We conclude that the cytosolic localization was due to its carboxyterminal non-consensus peroxisomal targeting signal (-SQL) since mutation of the -SQL to -SKL resulted in BAAT being efficiently imported into peroxisomes.

  9. Host interactions of Chandipura virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Rajasekharan, Sreejith; Kumar, Kapila; Rana, Jyoti; Gupta, Amita; Chaudhary, Vijay K; Gupta, Sanjay

    2015-09-01

    The rhabdovirus matrix (M) protein is a multifunctional virion protein that plays major role in virus assembly and budding, virus-induced inhibition of host gene expression and cytopathic effects observed in infected cells. The myriad roles played by this protein in the virus biology make it a critical player in viral pathogenesis. Therefore, discerning the interactions of this protein with host can greatly facilitate our understanding of virus infections, ultimately leading to both improved therapeutics and insight into cellular processes. Chandipura virus (CHPV; Family Rhabdoviridae, Genus Vesiculovirus) is an emerging rhabdovirus responsible for several outbreaks of fatal encephalitis among children in India. The present study aims to screen the human fetal brain cDNA library for interactors of CHPV M protein using yeast two-hybrid system. Ten host protein interactors were identified, three of which were further validated by affinity pull down and protein interaction ELISA. The study identified novel human host interactors for CHPV which concurred with previously described associations in other human viruses.

  10. Structure and assembly of a paramyxovirus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Battisti, Anthony J; Meng, Geng; Winkler, Dennis C; McGinnes, Lori W; Plevka, Pavel; Steven, Alasdair C; Morrison, Trudy G; Rossmann, Michael G

    2012-08-28

    Many pleomorphic, lipid-enveloped viruses encode matrix proteins that direct their assembly and budding, but the mechanism of this process is unclear. We have combined X-ray crystallography and cryoelectron tomography to show that the matrix protein of Newcastle disease virus, a paramyxovirus and relative of measles virus, forms dimers that assemble into pseudotetrameric arrays that generate the membrane curvature necessary for virus budding. We show that the glycoproteins are anchored in the gaps between the matrix proteins and that the helical nucleocapsids are associated in register with the matrix arrays. About 90% of virions lack matrix arrays, suggesting that, in agreement with previous biological observations, the matrix protein needs to dissociate from the viral membrane during maturation, as is required for fusion and release of the nucleocapsid into the host's cytoplasm. Structure and sequence conservation imply that other paramyxovirus matrix proteins function similarly.

  11. Protein conformation as a regulator of cell-matrix adhesion.

    PubMed

    Hytönen, Vesa P; Wehrle-Haller, Bernhard

    2014-04-14

    The dynamic regulation of cell-matrix adhesion is essential for tissue homeostasis and architecture, and thus numerous pathologies are linked to altered cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interaction and ECM scaffold. The molecular machinery involved in cell-matrix adhesion is complex and involves both sensory and matrix-remodelling functions. In this review, we focus on how protein conformation controls the organization and dynamics of cell-matrix adhesion. The conformational changes in various adhesion machinery components are described, including examples from ECM as well as cytoplasmic proteins. The discussed mechanisms involved in the regulation of protein conformation include mechanical stress, post-translational modifications and allosteric ligand-binding. We emphasize the potential role of intrinsically disordered protein regions in these processes and discuss the role of protein networks and co-operative protein interactions in the formation and consolidation of cell-matrix adhesion and extracellular scaffolds.

  12. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  13. A strategy to quantitate global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sroga, Grażyna E; Vashishth, Deepak

    2016-04-15

    Current studies of protein phosphorylation focus primarily on the importance of specific phosphoproteins and their landscapes of phosphorylation in the regulation of different cellular functions. However, global changes in phosphorylation of extracellular matrix phosphoproteins measured "in bulk" are equally important. For example, correct global phosphorylation of different bone matrix proteins is critical to healthy tissue biomineralization. To study changes of bone matrix global phosphorylation, we developed a strategy that combines a procedure for in vitro phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of fully mineralized bone in addition to quantitation of the global phosphorylation levels of bone matrix proteins. For the first time, we show that it is possible to enzymatically phosphorylate/dephosphorylate fully mineralized bone originating from either cadaveric human donors or laboratory animals (mice). Using our strategy, we detected the difference in the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from wild-type and osteopontin knockout mice. We also observed that the global phosphorylation levels of matrix proteins isolated from human cortical bone were lower than those isolated from trabecular bone. The developed strategy has the potential to open new avenues for studies on the global phosphorylation of bone matrix proteins and their role in biomineralization as well for other tissues/cells and protein-based materials.

  14. Polyether sulfone/hydroxyapatite mixed matrix membranes for protein purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Junfen; Wu, Lishun

    2014-07-01

    This work proposes a novel approach for protein purification from solution using mixed matrix membranes (MMMs) comprising of hydroxyapatite (HAP) inside polyether sulfone (PES) matrix. The influence of HAP particle loading on membrane morphology is studied. The MMMs are further characterized concerning permeability and adsorption capacity. The MMMs show purification of protein via both diffusion as well as adsorption, and show the potential of using MMMs for improvements in protein purification techniques. The bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein. The properties and structures of MMMs prepared by immersion phase separation process were characterized by pure water flux, BSA adsorption and scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  15. Protein structure estimation from NMR data by matrix completion.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhicheng; Li, Yang; Lei, Qiang; Zhao, Qing

    2017-02-06

    Knowledge of protein structures is very important to understand their corresponding physical and chemical properties. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is one of the main methods to measure protein structure. In this paper, we propose a two-stage approach to calculate the structure of a protein from a highly incomplete distance matrix, where most data are obtained from NMR. We first randomly "guess" a small part of unobservable distances by utilizing the triangle inequality, which is crucial for the second stage. Then we use matrix completion to calculate the protein structure from the obtained incomplete distance matrix. We apply the accelerated proximal gradient algorithm to solve the corresponding optimization problem. Furthermore, the recovery error of our method is analyzed, and its efficiency is demonstrated by several practical examples.

  16. Dielectric relaxation in a protein matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, D.W.; Boxer, S.G.

    1992-06-25

    The dielectric relaxation of a sperm whale ApoMb-DANCA complex is measured by the fluorescence dynamic Stokes shift method. Emission energy increases with decreasing temperature, suggesting that the relaxation activation energies of the rate-limiting motions either depend on the conformational substrate or different types of protein motions with different frequencies participate in the reaction. Experimental data suggest that there may be relaxations on a scale of <100 ps. 61 refs., 7 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Spectral properties of contact matrix: application to proteins.

    PubMed

    Sadoc, J F

    2005-11-01

    A protein can be modelled by a set of points representing its amino acids. Topologically, this set of points is entirely defined by its contact matrix (adjacency matrix in graph theory). The contact matrix characterizing the relation between neighboring amino acids is deduced from Voronoi or Laguerre decomposition. This method allows contact matrices to be defined without any arbitrary cut-off that could induce arbitrary effects. Eigenvalues of these matrices are related with elementary excitations in proteins. We present some spectral properties of these matrices that reflect global properties of proteins. The eigenvectors indicate participation of each amino acids to the excitation modes of the proteins. It is interesting to compare the protein modelled as a close packing of amino acids, with a random close packing of spheres. The main features of the protein are those of a packing, a result that confirms the importance of the dense packing model for proteins. Nevertheless there are some properties, specific to the hierarchical organization of the protein: the primary chain order, the secondary structures and the domain structures.

  18. Enhancing interacting residue prediction with integrated contact matrix prediction in protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Du, Tianchuan; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H

    2016-12-01

    Identifying the residues in a protein that are involved in protein-protein interaction and identifying the contact matrix for a pair of interacting proteins are two computational tasks at different levels of an in-depth analysis of protein-protein interaction. Various methods for solving these two problems have been reported in the literature. However, the interacting residue prediction and contact matrix prediction were handled by and large independently in those existing methods, though intuitively good prediction of interacting residues will help with predicting the contact matrix. In this work, we developed a novel protein interacting residue prediction system, contact matrix-interaction profile hidden Markov model (CM-ipHMM), with the integration of contact matrix prediction and the ipHMM interaction residue prediction. We propose to leverage what is learned from the contact matrix prediction and utilize the predicted contact matrix as "feedback" to enhance the interaction residue prediction. The CM-ipHMM model showed significant improvement over the previous method that uses the ipHMM for predicting interaction residues only. It indicates that the downstream contact matrix prediction could help the interaction site prediction.

  19. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphisms are associated with coronary artery calcification

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Matrix Gla Protein (MGP) is a key regulator of vascular calcification. Genetic variation at the MGP locus could modulate the development of coronary artery calcification (CAC). We examined the cross-sectional association between MGP SNPs [rs1800802 (T-138C), rs1800801 (G-7A),and rs4236 (Ala102Thr)...

  20. Enamel matrix proteins; old molecules for new applications.

    PubMed

    Lyngstadaas, S P; Wohlfahrt, J C; Brookes, S J; Paine, M L; Snead, M L; Reseland, J E

    2009-08-01

    Emdogain (enamel matrix derivative, EMD) is well recognized in periodontology, where it is used as a local adjunct to periodontal surgery to stimulate regeneration of periodontal tissues lost to periodontal disease. The biological effect of EMD is through stimulation of local growth factor secretion and cytokine expression in the treated tissues, inducing a regenerative process that mimics odontogenesis. The major (>95%) component of EMD is Amelogenins (Amel). No other active components have so far been isolated from EMD, and several studies have shown that purified amelogenins can induce the same effect as the complete EMD. Amelogenins comprise a family of highly conserved extracellular matrix proteins derived from one gene. Amelogenin structure and function is evolutionary well conserved, suggesting a profound role in biomineralization and hard tissue formation. A special feature of amelogenins is that under physiological conditions the proteins self-assembles into nanospheres that constitute an extracellular matrix. In the body, this matrix is slowly digested by specific extracellular proteolytic enzymes (matrix metalloproteinase) in a controlled process, releasing bioactive peptides to the surrounding tissues for weeks after application. Based on clinical and experimental observations in periodontology indicating that amelogenins can have a significant positive influence on wound healing, bone formation and root resorption, several new applications for amelogenins have been suggested. New experiments now confirm that amelogenins have potential for being used also in the fields of endodontics, bone regeneration, implantology, traumatology, and wound care.

  1. Expression, purification and crystallization of a lyssavirus matrix (M) protein

    SciTech Connect

    Assenberg, René; Delmas, Olivier; Graham, Stephen C.; Verma, Anil; Berrow, Nick; Stuart, David I.; Owens, Raymond J.; Bourhy, Hervé; Grimes, Jonathan M.

    2008-04-01

    The expression, purification and crystallization of the full-length matrix protein from three lyssaviruses is described. The matrix (M) proteins of lyssaviruses (family Rhabdoviridae) are crucial to viral morphogenesis as well as in modulating replication and transcription of the viral genome. To date, no high-resolution structural information has been obtained for full-length rhabdovirus M. Here, the cloning, expression and purification of the matrix proteins from three lyssaviruses, Lagos bat virus (LAG), Mokola virus and Thailand dog virus, are described. Crystals have been obtained for the full-length M protein from Lagos bat virus (LAG M). Successful crystallization depended on a number of factors, in particular the addition of an N-terminal SUMO fusion tag to increase protein solubility. Diffraction data have been recorded from crystals of native and selenomethionine-labelled LAG M to 2.75 and 3.0 Å resolution, respectively. Preliminary analysis indicates that these crystals belong to space group P6{sub 1}22 or P6{sub 5}22, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 56.9–57.2, c = 187.9–188.6 Å, consistent with the presence of one molecule per asymmetric unit, and structure determination is currently in progress.

  2. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-12-04

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser(89) is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S(89) was substituted with G(89) (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis.

  3. Glycosylation of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is critical for osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yao; Weng, Yuteng; Zhang, Chenyang; Liu, Yi; Kang, Chen; Liu, Zhongshuang; Jing, Bo; Zhang, Qi; Wang, Zuolin

    2015-01-01

    Proteoglycans play important roles in regulating osteogenesis. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a highly expressed bone extracellular matrix protein that regulates both bone development and phosphate metabolism. After glycosylation, an N-terminal fragment of DMP1 protein was identified as a new proteoglycan (DMP1-PG) in bone matrix. In vitro investigations showed that Ser89 is the key glycosylation site in mouse DMP1. However, the specific role of DMP1 glycosylation is still not understood. In this study, a mutant DMP1 mouse model was developed in which the glycosylation site S89 was substituted with G89 (S89G-DMP1). The glycosylation level of DMP1 was down-regulated in the bone matrix of S89G-DMP1 mice. Compared with wild type mice, the long bones of S89G-DMP1 mice showed developmental changes, including the speed of bone remodeling and mineralization, the morphology and activities of osteocytes, and activities of both osteoblasts and osteoclasts. These findings indicate that glycosylation of DMP1 is a key posttranslational modification process during development and that DMP1-PG functions as an indispensable proteoglycan in osteogenesis. PMID:26634432

  4. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae.

    PubMed

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M; Kerwin, James; Guerrero, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-12-01

    Nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen, can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24-h biofilms, two were found only in 96-h biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24- and 96-h NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation.

  5. Matrix Gla protein and osteocalcin: from gene duplication to neofunctionalization.

    PubMed

    Cancela, M Leonor; Laizé, Vincent; Conceição, Natércia

    2014-11-01

    Osteocalcin (OC or bone Gla protein, BGP) and matrix Gla protein (MGP) are two members of the growing family of vitamin K-dependent (VKD) proteins. They were the first VKD proteins found not to be involved in coagulation and synthesized outside the liver. Both proteins were isolated from bone although it is now known that only OC is synthesized by bone cells under normal physiological conditions, but since both proteins can bind calcium and hydroxyapatite, they can also accumulate in bone. Both OC and MGP share similar structural features, both in terms of protein domains and gene organization. OC gene is likely to have appeared from MGP through a tandem gene duplication that occurred concomitantly with the appearance of the bony vertebrates. Despite their relatively close relationship and the fact that both can bind calcium and affect mineralization, their functions are not redundant and they also have other unrelated functions. Interestingly, these two proteins appear to have followed quite different evolutionary strategies in order to acquire novel functionalities, with OC following a gene duplication strategy while MGP variability was obtained mostly by the use of multiple promoters and alternative splicing, leading to proteins with additional functional characteristics and alternative gene regulatory pathways.

  6. Hyperunstable matrix proteins in the byssus of Mytilus galloprovincialis.

    PubMed

    Sagert, Jason; Waite, J Herbert

    2009-07-01

    The marine mussel Mytilus galloprovincialis is tethered to rocks in the intertidal zone by a holdfast known as the byssus. Functioning as a shock absorber, the byssus is composed of threads, the primary molecular components of which are collagen-containing proteins (preCOLs) that largely dictate the higher order self-assembly and mechanical properties of byssal threads. The threads contain additional matrix components that separate and perhaps lubricate the collagenous microfibrils during deformation in tension. In this study, the thread matrix proteins (TMPs), a glycine-, tyrosine- and asparagine-rich protein family, were shown to possess unique repeated sequence motifs, significant transcriptional heterogeneity and were distributed throughout the byssal thread. Deamidation was shown to occur at a significant rate in a recombinant TMP and in the byssal thread as a function of time. Furthermore, charge heterogeneity presumably due to deamidation was observed in TMPs extracted from threads. The TMPs were localized to the preCOL-containing secretory granules in the collagen gland of the foot and are assumed to provide a viscoelastic matrix around the collagenous fibers in byssal threads.

  7. Multitask Matrix Completion for Learning Protein Interactions Across Diseases.

    PubMed

    Kshirsagar, Meghana; Murugesan, Keerthiram; Carbonell, Jaime G; Klein-Seetharaman, Judith

    2017-01-27

    Disease-causing pathogens such as viruses introduce their proteins into the host cells in which they interact with the host's proteins, enabling the virus to replicate inside the host. These interactions between pathogen and host proteins are key to understanding infectious diseases. Often multiple diseases involve phylogenetically related or biologically similar pathogens. Here we present a multitask learning method to jointly model interactions between human proteins and three different but related viruses: Hepatitis C, Ebola virus, and Influenza A. Our multitask matrix completion-based model uses a shared low-rank structure in addition to a task-specific sparse structure to incorporate the various interactions. We obtain between 7 and 39 percentage points improvement in predictive performance over prior state-of-the-art models. We show how our model's parameters can be interpreted to reveal both general and specific interaction-relevant characteristics of the viruses. Our code is available online.()

  8. Proteomic characterization of oyster shell organic matrix proteins (OMP)

    PubMed Central

    Upadhyay, Abhishek; Thiyagarajan, Vengatesen; Tong, Ying

    2016-01-01

    Oysters are economically and ecologically important bivalves, with its calcareous shell and delicious meat. The shell composition is a blend of inorganic crystals and shell proteins that form an organic matrix which protects the soft inner tissue of the oyster. The objective of the study was to compare the composition of organic matrix proteins (OMP) of two phylogenetically related species: the Hong Kong oyster (Crassostrea hongkongensis) and the Portuguese oyster (Crassostrea angulata) which differ in their shell hardness and mechanical properties. C. hongkongensis shells are comparatively stronger than C. angulata. Modern shotgun proteomics has been used to understand the nature of the OMP and the variations observed in the mechanical properties of these two species of oyster shells. After visualizing proteins on the one (1DE) and two-dimensional electrophoresis (2DE) gels, the protein spots and their intensities were compared using PDQuest software and 14 proteins of C. hongkongensis were found to be significantly different (student׳s t-test; p<0.05) when compared to the C. angulata. Furthermore, shell OMP separated on 1DE gels were processed using Triple TOF5600 mass spectrometry and 42 proteins of C. hongkongensis and 37 of C. angulata identified. A Circos based comparative analysis of the shell proteins of both oyster species were prepared against the shell proteome of other shell forming gastropods and molluscs to study the evolutionary conservation of OMP and their function. This comparative proteomics expanded our understating of the molecular mechanism behind the shells having different hardness and mechanical properties. PMID:28246460

  9. Distance matrix-based approach to protein structure prediction.

    PubMed

    Kloczkowski, Andrzej; Jernigan, Robert L; Wu, Zhijun; Song, Guang; Yang, Lei; Kolinski, Andrzej; Pokarowski, Piotr

    2009-03-01

    Much structural information is encoded in the internal distances; a distance matrix-based approach can be used to predict protein structure and dynamics, and for structural refinement. Our approach is based on the square distance matrix D = [r(ij)(2)] containing all square distances between residues in proteins. This distance matrix contains more information than the contact matrix C, that has elements of either 0 or 1 depending on whether the distance r (ij) is greater or less than a cutoff value r (cutoff). We have performed spectral decomposition of the distance matrices D = sigma lambda(k)V(k)V(kT), in terms of eigenvalues lambda kappa and the corresponding eigenvectors v kappa and found that it contains at most five nonzero terms. A dominant eigenvector is proportional to r (2)--the square distance of points from the center of mass, with the next three being the principal components of the system of points. By predicting r (2) from the sequence we can approximate a distance matrix of a protein with an expected RMSD value of about 7.3 A, and by combining it with the prediction of the first principal component we can improve this approximation to 4.0 A. We can also explain the role of hydrophobic interactions for the protein structure, because r is highly correlated with the hydrophobic profile of the sequence. Moreover, r is highly correlated with several sequence profiles which are useful in protein structure prediction, such as contact number, the residue-wise contact order (RWCO) or mean square fluctuations (i.e. crystallographic temperature factors). We have also shown that the next three components are related to spatial directionality of the secondary structure elements, and they may be also predicted from the sequence, improving overall structure prediction. We have also shown that the large number of available HIV-1 protease structures provides a remarkable sampling of conformations, which can be viewed as direct structural information about the

  10. Sturgeon Osteocalcin Shares Structural Features with Matrix Gla Protein

    PubMed Central

    Viegas, Carla S. B.; Simes, Dina C.; Williamson, Matthew K.; Cavaco, Sofia; Laizé, Vincent; Price, Paul A.; Cancela, M. Leonor

    2013-01-01

    Osteocalcin (OC) and matrix Gla protein (MGP) are considered evolutionarily related because they share key structural features, although they have been described to exert different functions. In this work, we report the identification and characterization of both OC and MGP from the Adriatic sturgeon, a ray-finned fish characterized by a slow evolution and the retention of many ancestral features. Sturgeon MGP shows a primary structure, post-translation modifications, and patterns of mRNA/protein distribution and accumulation typical of known MGPs, and it contains seven possible Gla residues that would make the sturgeon protein the most γ-carboxylated among known MGPs. In contrast, sturgeon OC was found to present a hybrid structure. Indeed, although exhibiting protein domains typical of known OCs, it also contains structural features usually found in MGPs (e.g. a putative phosphorylated propeptide). Moreover, patterns of OC gene expression and protein accumulation overlap with those reported for MGP; OC was detected in bone cells and mineralized structures but also in soft and cartilaginous tissues. We propose that, in a context of a reduced rate of evolution, sturgeon OC has retained structural features of the ancestral protein that emerged millions of years ago from the duplication of an ancient MGP gene and may exhibit intermediate functional features. PMID:23884418

  11. Thermodynamics of protein folding: a random matrix formulation.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Pragya

    2010-10-20

    The process of protein folding from an unfolded state to a biologically active, folded conformation is governed by many parameters, e.g. the sequence of amino acids, intermolecular interactions, the solvent, temperature and chaperon molecules. Our study, based on random matrix modeling of the interactions, shows, however, that the evolution of the statistical measures, e.g. Gibbs free energy, heat capacity, and entropy, is single parametric. The information can explain the selection of specific folding pathways from an infinite number of possible ways as well as other folding characteristics observed in computer simulation studies.

  12. Predicting protein-protein interactions from multimodal biological data sources via nonnegative matrix tri-factorization.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hua; Huang, Heng; Ding, Chris; Nie, Feiping

    2013-04-01

    Protein interactions are central to all the biological processes and structural scaffolds in living organisms, because they orchestrate a number of cellular processes such as metabolic pathways and immunological recognition. Several high-throughput methods, for example, yeast two-hybrid system and mass spectrometry method, can help determine protein interactions, which, however, suffer from high false-positive rates. Moreover, many protein interactions predicted by one method are not supported by another. Therefore, computational methods are necessary and crucial to complete the interactome expeditiously. In this work, we formulate the problem of predicting protein interactions from a new mathematical perspective--sparse matrix completion, and propose a novel nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF)-based matrix completion approach to predict new protein interactions from existing protein interaction networks. Through using manifold regularization, we further develop our method to integrate different biological data sources, such as protein sequences, gene expressions, protein structure information, etc. Extensive experimental results on four species, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Drosophila melanogaster, Homo sapiens, and Caenorhabditis elegans, have shown that our new methods outperform related state-of-the-art protein interaction prediction methods.

  13. Two essential peritrophic matrix proteins mediate matrix barrier functions in the insect midgut.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Sinu; Kelkenberg, Marco; Begum, Khurshida; Steinfeld, Lea; Williams, Clay E; Kramer, Karl J; Beeman, Richard W; Park, Yoonseong; Muthukrishnan, Subbaratnam; Merzendorfer, Hans

    2014-06-01

    The peritrophic matrix (PM) in the midgut of insects consists primarily of chitin and proteins and is thought to support digestion and provide protection from abrasive food particles and enteric pathogens. We examined the physiological roles of 11 putative peritrophic matrix protein (PMP) genes of the red flour beetle, Tribolium castaneum (TcPMPs). TcPMP genes are differentially expressed along the length of the midgut epithelium of feeding larvae. RNAi of individual PMP genes revealed no abnormal developmental phenotypes for 9 of the 11 TcPMPs. However, RNAi for two PMP genes, TcPMP3 and TcPMP5-B, resulted in depletion of the fat body, growth arrest, molting defects and mortality. In situ permeability assays after oral administration of different-sized FITC-dextran beads demonstrated that the exclusion size of the larval peritrophic matrix (PM) decreases progressively from >2 MDa to <4 kDa from the anterior to the most posterior regions of the midgut. In the median midguts of control larvae, 2 MDa dextrans were completely retained within the PM lumen, whereas after RNAi for TcPMP3 and TcPMP5-B, these dextrans penetrated the epithelium of the median midgut, indicating loss of structural integrity and barrier function of the larval PM. In contrast, RNAi for TcPMP5-B, but not RNAi for TcPMP3, resulted in breakdown of impermeability to 4 and 40 kDa dextrans in the PM of the posterior midgut. These results suggest that specific PMPs are involved in the regulation of PM permeability, and that a gradient of barrier function is essential for survival and fat body maintenance.

  14. An innovative protocol for schwann cells extracellular matrix proteins extraction.

    PubMed

    Parisi, L; Zomer Volpato, F; Cagol, N; Siciliano, M; Migliaresi, C; Motta, A; Sala, R

    2016-12-01

    The evidence that extracellular matrix (ECM) components could represent new targets for drugs designed to approach degenerative disease, requires their analysis. Before the analysis, proteins should be extracted from ECM and solubilized. Currently, few protocols for ECM proteins extraction and solubilization are available in literature, and most of them are based mainly on the use of proteolytic enzymes, such as trypsin, which often lead to proteins damage. Moreover, no methods have been so far proposed to solubilize Schwann Cell ECM, which may represent an important target for the therapy of neurodegenerative disorders. In our study, we propose to solubilize SC ECM through the use of surfactants and urea. We compared our method of solubilization, with one of that proposed in literature for a general ECM, mainly based on the use of enzymes. We want to highlight the benefit of solubilizing SC ECM, avoiding the use of proteolytic enzymes. To compare the amount of proteins extracted with both methods, MicroBCA assay was used, while the quality of the proteins extracted was observed through the SDS-PAGE. The results obtained confirm a better solubilization of SC ECM proteins with the proposed protocol, both quantitatively and qualitatively, showing a higher concentration of proteins extracted and a better enrichment of protein fractions, if compared to the enzyme-based protocol. Our results show that SC ECM could be efficiently solubilized through the use of surfactant and urea, avoiding the use of enzyme-base methods. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 3175-3180, 2016.

  15. Analysis of protein dynamics in the pericellular matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scrimgeour, Jan; Young, Dylan

    2015-03-01

    The pericellular matrix (PCM) is a low density, hydrated polymer coating that extends into the extracellular space from the surface of many living cells. The PCM controls access to cell and tissue surfaces, regulating a diverse set of processes from cell adhesion to protein transport and storage. The cell coat consists of a malleable backbone - the large polysaccharide hyaluronan (HA) - with its structure, its material properties, and its bio-functionality tuned by a diverse set of HA binding proteins. These proteins add charge, cross-links and growth factor-like ligands into the brush. Dynamic interactions between the HA and its binding proteins can be observed using single particle tracking in a fluorescence microscope. The resulting single molecule trajectories can contain evidence of site hoping, with the proteins dynamically moving between different states of motion as they bind and unbind from the HA. Here, we present an evaluation of hidden Markov models for the analysis of such multi-mobility trajectories. Simulated trajectories are used to probe the limits of this approach for molecular trajectories of limited length and the results are used to inform the design of particle tracking experiments.

  16. Designing an extracellular matrix protein with enhanced mechanical stability

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Sean P.; Billings, Kate S.; Ohashi, Tomoo; Allen, Mark D.; Best, Robert B.; Randles, Lucy G.; Erickson, Harold P.; Clarke, Jane

    2007-01-01

    The extracellular matrix proteins tenascin and fibronectin experience significant mechanical forces in vivo. Both contain a number of tandem repeating homologous fibronectin type III (fnIII) domains, and atomic force microscopy experiments have demonstrated that the mechanical strength of these domains can vary significantly. Previous work has shown that mutations in the core of an fnIII domain from human tenascin (TNfn3) reduce the unfolding force of that domain significantly: The composition of the core is apparently crucial to the mechanical stability of these proteins. Based on these results, we have used rational redesign to increase the mechanical stability of the 10th fnIII domain of human fibronectin, FNfn10, which is directly involved in integrin binding. The hydrophobic core of FNfn10 was replaced with that of the homologous, mechanically stronger TNfn3 domain. Despite the extensive substitution, FNoTNc retains both the three-dimensional structure and the cell adhesion activity of FNfn10. Atomic force microscopy experiments reveal that the unfolding forces of the engineered protein FNoTNc increase by ≈20% to match those of TNfn3. Thus, we have specifically designed a protein with increased mechanical stability. Our results demonstrate that core engineering can be used to change the mechanical strength of proteins while retaining functional surface interactions. PMID:17535921

  17. Extracellular matrix protein expression is brain region dependent.

    PubMed

    Dauth, Stephanie; Grevesse, Thomas; Pantazopoulos, Harry; Campbell, Patrick H; Maoz, Ben M; Berretta, Sabina; Parker, Kevin Kit

    2016-05-01

    In the brain, extracellular matrix (ECM) components form networks that contribute to structural and functional diversity. Maladaptive remodeling of ECM networks has been reported in neurodegenerative and psychiatric disorders, suggesting that the brain microenvironment is a dynamic structure. A lack of quantitative information about ECM distribution in the brain hinders an understanding of region-specific ECM functions and the role of ECM in health and disease. We hypothesized that each ECM protein as well as specific ECM structures, such as perineuronal nets (PNNs) and interstitial matrix, are differentially distributed throughout the brain, contributing to the unique structure and function in the various regions of the brain. To test our hypothesis, we quantitatively analyzed the distribution, colocalization, and protein expression of aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R throughout the rat brain utilizing immunohistochemistry and mass spectrometry analysis and assessed the effect of aggrecan, brevican, and/or tenascin-R on neurite outgrowth in vitro. We focused on aggrecan, brevican, and tenascin-R as they are especially expressed in the mature brain, and have established roles in brain development, plasticity, and neurite outgrowth. The results revealed a differentiated distribution of all three proteins throughout the brain and indicated that their presence significantly reduces neurite outgrowth in a 3D in vitro environment. These results underline the importance of a unique and complex ECM distribution for brain physiology and suggest that encoding the distribution of distinct ECM proteins throughout the brain will aid in understanding their function in physiology and in turn assist in identifying their role in disease. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1309-1336, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Increases in Photodamaged Skin.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Kawabata, Keigo; Kusaka-Kikushima, Ayumi; Sugiyama, Yoshinori; Mabuchi, Tomotaka; Takekoshi, Susumu; Miyasaka, Muneo; Ozawa, Akira; Sakai, Shingo

    2016-06-01

    Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) is a structural component of cartilage. Recent studies have described COMP as a pathogenic factor that promotes collagen deposition in fibrotic skin disorders such as scleroderma and keloid skin. Although collagen, a major dermis component, is thought to decrease in photoaged skin, recent reports have demonstrated the presence of tightly packed collagen fibrils with a structural resemblance to fibrosis in the papillary dermis of photoaged skin. Here we examined how photoaging damage relates to COMP expression and localization in photoaged skin. In situ hybridization revealed an increase in COMP-mRNA-positive cells with the progress of photoaging in preauricular skin (sun-exposed skin). The signal intensity of immunostaining for COMP increased with photoaging in not only the papillary dermis but also the reticular dermis affected by advancing solar elastosis. Immunoelectron microscopy detected the colocalization of COMP with both elastotic materials and collagen fibrils in photoaged skin. Ultraviolet light A irradiation of human dermal fibroblasts induced COMP expression at both the mRNA and protein levels. Ultraviolet light A-induced COMP expression was inhibited by an anti-transforming growth factor-β antibody or SB431542, an activin receptor-like kinase 5 inhibitor. These results suggest that the transforming growth factor-β-mediated upregulation of COMP expression may contribute to the modulation of dermal extracellular matrix in the photoaging process.

  19. Matrix Gla Protein expression pattern in the early avian embryo.

    PubMed

    Correia, Elizabeth; Conceição, Natércia; Cancela, M Leonor; Belo, José A

    2016-01-01

    MGP (Matrix Gla Protein) is an extracellular matrix vitamin K dependent protein previously identified as a physiological inhibitor of calcification and shown to be well conserved among vertebrates during evolution. MGP is involved in other mechanisms such as TGF-β and BMP activity, and a proposed modulator of cell-matrix interactions. MGP is expressed early in vertebrate development although its role has not been clarified. Previous work in the chicken embryo found MGP localization predominantly in the aorta and aortic valve base, but no data is available earlier in development. Here we examined MGP expression pattern using whole-mount in situ hybridization and histological sectioning during the initial stages of chick development. MGP was first detected at HH10 in the head and in the forming dorsal aorta. At the moment of the onset of blood circulation, MGP was expressed additionally in the venous plexus which will remodel into the vitelline arteries. By E2.25, it is clear that the vitelline arteries are MGP positive. MGP expression progresses centrifugally throughout the area vasculosa of the yolk sac. Between stages HH17 and HH19 MGP is seen in the dorsal aorta, heart, notochord, nephric duct, roof plate, vitelline arteries and in the yolk sac, beneath main arterial branches and in the vicinity of several vessels and venules. MGP expression persists in these areas at least until E4.5. These data suggest that MGP expression could be associated with cell migration and differentiation and to the onset of angiogenesis in the developing chick embryo. This data has biomedical relevance by pointing to the potential use of chick embryo explants to study molecules involved in artery calcification.

  20. Platelet activation by extracellular matrix proteins in haemostasis and thrombosis.

    PubMed

    Watson, Steve P

    2009-01-01

    The prevention of excessive blood loss to avoid fatal haemorrhage is a pivotal process for all organisms possessing a circulatory system. Increased circulating blood volume and pressure, as required in larger animals, make this process all the more important and challenging. It is essential to have a powerful and rapid system to detect damage and generate an effective seal, and which is also exquisitely regulated to prevent unwanted, excessive or systemic activation so as to avoid blockage of vessels. Thus, a highly specialised and efficient haemostatic system has evolved that consists of cellular (platelets) and protein (coagulation factors) components. Importantly, this is able to support haemostasis in both the low shear environment of the venous system and the high shear environment of the arterial system. Endothelial cells, lining the entire circulation system, play a crucial role in the delicate balance between activation and inhibition of the haemostatic system. An intact and healthy endothelium supports blood flow by preventing attachment of cells and proteins which is required for initiation of coagulation and platelet activation. Endothelial cells produce and release the two powerful soluble inhibitors of platelet activation, nitric oxide and prostacyclin, and express high levels of CD39 which rapidly metabolises the major platelet feedback agonist, ADP. This antithrombotic environment however can rapidly change following activation or removal of endothelial cells through injury or rupture of atherosclerotic plaques. Loss of endothelial cells exposes the subendothelial extracellular matrix which creates strong signals for activation of the haemostatic system including powerful platelet adhesion and activation. Quantitative and qualitative changes in the composition of the subendothelial extracellular matrix influence these prothrombotic characteristics with life threatening thrombotic and bleeding complications, as illustrated by formation of

  1. Characterization of the proteins comprising the integral matrix of Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryonic spicules

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Killian, C. E.; Wilt, F. H.

    1996-01-01

    In the present study, we enumerate and characterize the proteins that comprise the integral spicule matrix of the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis of [35S]methionine radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins reveals that there are 12 strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins and approximately three dozen less strongly radiolabeled spicule matrix proteins. The majority of the proteins have acidic isoelectric points; however, there are several spicule matrix proteins that have more alkaline isoelectric points. Western blotting analysis indicates that SM50 is the spicule matrix protein with the most alkaline isoelectric point. In addition, two distinct SM30 proteins are identified in embryonic spicules, and they have apparent molecular masses of approximately 43 and 46 kDa. Comparisons between embryonic spicule matrix proteins and adult spine integral matrix proteins suggest that the embryonic 43-kDa SM30 protein is an embryonic isoform of SM30. An adult 49-kDa spine matrix protein is also identified as a possible adult isoform of SM30. Analysis of the SM30 amino acid sequences indicates that a portion of SM30 proteins is very similar to the carbohydrate recognition domain of C-type lectin proteins.

  2. NMR structure of the myristylated feline immunodeficiency virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Brown, Lola A; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O; Summers, Michael F

    2015-04-30

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag's N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly.

  3. Regulation of Ebola virus VP40 matrix protein by SUMO

    PubMed Central

    Baz-Martínez, Maite; El Motiam, Ahmed; Ruibal, Paula; Condezo, Gabriela N.; de la Cruz-Herrera, Carlos F.; Lang, Valerie; Collado, Manuel; San Martín, Carmen; Rodríguez, Manuel S.; Muñoz-Fontela, Cesar; Rivas, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    The matrix protein of Ebola virus (EBOV) VP40 regulates viral budding, nucleocapsid recruitment, virus structure and stability, viral genome replication and transcription, and has an intrinsic ability to form virus-like particles. The elucidation of the regulation of VP40 functions is essential to identify mechanisms to inhibit viral replication and spread. Post-translational modifications of proteins with ubiquitin-like family members are common mechanisms for the regulation of host and virus multifunctional proteins. Thus far, no SUMOylation of VP40 has been described. Here we demonstrate that VP40 is modified by SUMO and that SUMO is included into the viral like particles (VLPs). We demonstrate that lysine residue 326 in VP40 is involved in SUMOylation, and by analyzing a mutant in this residue we show that SUMO conjugation regulates the stability of VP40 and the incorporation of SUMO into the VLPs. Our study indicates for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, that EBOV hijacks the cellular SUMOylation system in order to modify its own proteins. Modulation of the VP40-SUMO interaction may represent a novel target for the therapy of Ebola virus infection. PMID:27849047

  4. NMR Structure of the Myristylated Feline Immunodeficiency Virus Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Brown, Lola A.; Cox, Cassiah; Baptiste, Janae; Summers, Holly; Button, Ryan; Bahlow, Kennedy; Spurrier, Vaughn; Kyser, Jenna; Luttge, Benjamin G.; Kuo, Lillian; Freed, Eric O.; Summers, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    Membrane targeting by the Gag proteins of the human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV types-1 and -2) is mediated by Gag’s N-terminally myristylated matrix (MA) domain and is dependent on cellular phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. To determine if other lentiviruses employ a similar membrane targeting mechanism, we initiated studies of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV), a widespread feline pathogen with potential utility for development of human therapeutics. Bacterial co-translational myristylation was facilitated by mutation of two amino acids near the amino-terminus of the protein (Q5A/G6S; myrMAQ5A/G6S). These substitutions did not affect virus assembly or release from transfected cells. NMR studies revealed that the myristyl group is buried within a hydrophobic pocket in a manner that is structurally similar to that observed for the myristylated HIV-1 protein. Comparisons with a recent crystal structure of the unmyristylated FIV protein [myr(-)MA] indicate that only small changes in helix orientation are required to accommodate the sequestered myr group. Depletion of PI(4,5)P2 from the plasma membrane of FIV-infected CRFK cells inhibited production of FIV particles, indicating that, like HIV, FIV hijacks the PI(4,5)P2 cellular signaling system to direct intracellular Gag trafficking during virus assembly. PMID:25941825

  5. Extracellular matrix-associated proteins form an integral and dynamic system during Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm development

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Weipeng; Sun, Jin; Ding, Wei; Lin, Jinshui; Tian, Renmao; Lu, Liang; Liu, Xiaofen; Shen, Xihui; Qian, Pei-Yuan

    2015-01-01

    Though the essential role of extracellular matrix in biofilm development has been extensively documented, the function of matrix-associated proteins is elusive. Determining the dynamics of matrix-associated proteins would be a useful way to reveal their functions in biofilm development. Therefore, we applied iTRAQ-based quantitative proteomics to evaluate matrix-associated proteins isolated from different phases of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC27853 biofilms. Among the identified 389 proteins, 54 changed their abundance significantly. The increased abundance of stress resistance and nutrient metabolism-related proteins over the period of biofilm development was consistent with the hypothesis that biofilm matrix forms micro-environments in which cells are optimally organized to resist stress and use available nutrients. Secreted proteins, including novel putative effectors of the type III secretion system were identified, suggesting that the dynamics of pathogenesis-related proteins in the matrix are associated with biofilm development. Interestingly, there was a good correlation between the abundance changes of matrix-associated proteins and their expression. Further analysis revealed complex interactions among these modulated proteins, and the mutation of selected proteins attenuated biofilm development. Collectively, this work presents the first dynamic picture of matrix-associated proteins during biofilm development, and provides evidences that the matrix-associated proteins may form an integral and well regulated system that contributes to stress resistance, nutrient acquisition, pathogenesis and the stability of the biofilm. PMID:26029669

  6. Expression of 16 Nitrogenase Proteins within the Plant Mitochondrial Matrix.

    PubMed

    Allen, Robert S; Tilbrook, Kimberley; Warden, Andrew C; Campbell, Peter C; Rolland, Vivien; Singh, Surinder P; Wood, Craig C

    2017-01-01

    The industrial production and use of nitrogenous fertilizer involves significant environmental and economic costs. Strategies to reduce fertilizer dependency are required to address the world's increasing demand for sustainable food, fibers, and biofuels. Biological nitrogen fixation, a process unique to diazatrophic bacteria, is catalyzed by the nitrogenase complex, and reconstituting this function in plant cells is an ambitious biotechnological strategy to reduce fertilizer use. Here we establish that the full array of biosynthetic and catalytic nitrogenase (Nif) proteins from the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae can be individually expressed as mitochondrial targeting peptide (MTP)-Nif fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana. We show that these are correctly targeted to the plant mitochondrial matrix, a subcellular location with biochemical and genetic characteristics potentially supportive of nitrogenase function. Although Nif proteins B, D, E, F, H, J, K, M, N, Q, S, U, V, X, Y, and Z were all detectable by Western blot analysis, the NifD catalytic component was the least abundant. To address this problem, a translational fusion between NifD and NifK was designed based on the crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein heterodimer. This fusion protein enabled equimolar NifD:NifK stoichiometry and improved NifD expression levels in plants. Finally, four MTP-Nif fusion proteins (B, S, H, Y) were successfully co-expressed, demonstrating that multiple components of nitrogenase can be targeted to plant mitochondria. These results establish the feasibility of reconstituting the complete componentry for nitrogenase in plant cells, within an intracellular environment that could support the conversion of nitrogen gas into ammonia.

  7. Expression of 16 Nitrogenase Proteins within the Plant Mitochondrial Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Allen, Robert S.; Tilbrook, Kimberley; Warden, Andrew C.; Campbell, Peter C.; Rolland, Vivien; Singh, Surinder P.; Wood, Craig C.

    2017-01-01

    The industrial production and use of nitrogenous fertilizer involves significant environmental and economic costs. Strategies to reduce fertilizer dependency are required to address the world's increasing demand for sustainable food, fibers, and biofuels. Biological nitrogen fixation, a process unique to diazatrophic bacteria, is catalyzed by the nitrogenase complex, and reconstituting this function in plant cells is an ambitious biotechnological strategy to reduce fertilizer use. Here we establish that the full array of biosynthetic and catalytic nitrogenase (Nif) proteins from the diazotroph Klebsiella pneumoniae can be individually expressed as mitochondrial targeting peptide (MTP)-Nif fusions in Nicotiana benthamiana. We show that these are correctly targeted to the plant mitochondrial matrix, a subcellular location with biochemical and genetic characteristics potentially supportive of nitrogenase function. Although Nif proteins B, D, E, F, H, J, K, M, N, Q, S, U, V, X, Y, and Z were all detectable by Western blot analysis, the NifD catalytic component was the least abundant. To address this problem, a translational fusion between NifD and NifK was designed based on the crystal structure of the nitrogenase MoFe protein heterodimer. This fusion protein enabled equimolar NifD:NifK stoichiometry and improved NifD expression levels in plants. Finally, four MTP-Nif fusion proteins (B, S, H, Y) were successfully co-expressed, demonstrating that multiple components of nitrogenase can be targeted to plant mitochondria. These results establish the feasibility of reconstituting the complete componentry for nitrogenase in plant cells, within an intracellular environment that could support the conversion of nitrogen gas into ammonia. PMID:28316608

  8. Preparation of Extracellular Matrix Protein Fibers for Brillouin Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Edginton, Ryan S; Mattana, Sara; Caponi, Silvia; Fioretto, Daniele; Green, Ellen; Winlove, C Peter; Palombo, Francesca

    2016-09-15

    Brillouin spectroscopy is an emerging technique in the biomedical field. It probes the mechanical properties of a sample through the interaction of visible light with thermally induced acoustic waves or phonons propagating at a speed of a few km/sec. Information on the elasticity and structure of the material is obtained in a nondestructive contactless manner, hence opening the way to in vivo applications and potential diagnosis of pathology. This work describes the application of Brillouin spectroscopy to the study of biomechanics in elastin and trypsin-digested type I collagen fibers of the extracellular matrix. Fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix are the building blocks of biological tissues and investigating their mechanical and physical behavior is key to establishing structure-function relationships in normal tissues and the changes which occur in disease. The procedures of sample preparation followed by measurement of Brillouin spectra using a reflective substrate are presented together with details of the optical system and methods of spectral data analysis.

  9. Porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM): protein expression, mechanical properties.

    PubMed

    Farhat, Walid A; Chen, Jun; Haig, Jennifer; Antoon, Roula; Litman, Jessica; Sherman, Christopher; Derwin, Kathleen; Yeger, Herman

    2008-06-01

    Experimentally, porcine bladder acellular matrix (ACM) that mimics extracellular matrix has excellent potential as a bladder substitute. Herein we investigated the spatial localization and expression of different key cellular and extracellular proteins in the ACM; furthermore, we evaluated the inherent mechanical properties of the resultant ACM prior to implantation. Using a proprietary decellularization method, the DNA contents in both ACM and normal bladder were measured; in addition we used immunohistochemistry and western blots to quantify and localize the different cellular and extracellular components, and finally the mechanical testing was performed using a uniaxial mechanical testing machine. The mean DNA content in the ACM was significantly lower in the ACM compared to the bladder. Furthermore, the immunohistochemical and western blot analyses showed that collagen I and IV were preserved in the ACM, but possibly denatured collagen III in the ACM. Furthermore, elastin, laminin and fibronectin were mildly reduced in the ACM. Although the ACM did not exhibit nucleated cells, residual cellular components (actin, myosin, vimentin and others) were still present. There was, on the other hand, no significant difference in the mean stiffness between the ACM and the bladder. Although our decellularization method is effective in removing nuclear material from the bladder while maintaining its inherent mechanical properties, further work is mandatory to determine whether these residual DNA and cellular remnants would lead to any immune reaction, or if the mechanical properties of the ACM are preserved upon implantation and cellularization.

  10. Preparation of Extracellular Matrix Protein Fibers for Brillouin Spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Edginton, Ryan S.; Mattana, Sara; Caponi, Silvia; Fioretto, Daniele; Green, Ellen; Winlove, C. Peter; Palombo, Francesca

    2016-01-01

    Brillouin spectroscopy is an emerging technique in the biomedical field. It probes the mechanical properties of a sample through the interaction of visible light with thermally induced acoustic waves or phonons propagating at a speed of a few km/sec. Information on the elasticity and structure of the material is obtained in a nondestructive contactless manner, hence opening the way to in vivo applications and potential diagnosis of pathology. This work describes the application of Brillouin spectroscopy to the study of biomechanics in elastin and trypsin-digested type I collagen fibers of the extracellular matrix. Fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix are the building blocks of biological tissues and investigating their mechanical and physical behavior is key to establishing structure-function relationships in normal tissues and the changes which occur in disease. The procedures of sample preparation followed by measurement of Brillouin spectra using a reflective substrate are presented together with details of the optical system and methods of spectral data analysis. PMID:27684584

  11. The diversity of shell matrix proteins: genome-wide investigation of the pearl oyster, Pinctada fucata.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Endo, Hirotoshi; Hashimoto, Naoki; Limura, Kurin; Isowa, Yukinobu; Kinoshita, Shigeharu; Kotaki, Tomohiro; Masaoka, Tetsuji; Miki, Takumi; Nakayama, Seiji; Nogawa, Chihiro; Notazawa, Atsuto; Ohmori, Fumito; Sarashina, Isao; Suzuki, Michio; Takagi, Ryousuke; Takahashi, Jun; Takeuchi, Takeshi; Yokoo, Naoki; Satoh, Nori; Toyohara, Haruhiko; Miyashita, Tomoyuki; Wada, Hiroshi; Samata, Tetsuro; Endo, Kazuyoshi; Nagasawa, Hiromichi; Asakawa, Shuichi; Watabe, Shugo

    2013-10-01

    In molluscs, shell matrix proteins are associated with biomineralization, a biologically controlled process that involves nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. Identification and characterization of shell matrix proteins are important for better understanding of the adaptive radiation of a large variety of molluscs. We searched the draft genome sequence of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata and annotated 30 different kinds of shell matrix proteins. Of these, we could identified Perlucin, ependymin-related protein and SPARC as common genes shared by bivalves and gastropods; however, most gastropod shell matrix proteins were not found in the P. fucata genome. Glycinerich proteins were conserved in the genus Pinctada. Another important finding with regard to these annotated genes was that numerous shell matrix proteins are encoded by more than one gene; e.g., three ACCBP-like proteins, three CaLPs, five chitin synthase-like proteins, two N16 proteins (pearlins), 10 N19 proteins, two nacreins, four Pifs, nine shematrins, two prismalin-14 proteins, and 21 tyrosinases. This diversity of shell matrix proteins may be implicated in the morphological diversity of mollusc shells. The annotated genes reported here can be searched in P. fucata gene models version 1.1 and genome assembly version 1.0 ( http://marinegenomics.oist.jp/pinctada_fucata ). These genes should provide a useful resource for studies of the genetic basis of biomineralization and evaluation of the role of shell matrix proteins as an evolutionary toolkit among the molluscs.

  12. Circulating Nonphosphorylated Carboxylated Matrix Gla Protein Predicts Survival in ESRD

    PubMed Central

    Westenfeld, Ralf; Krüger, Thilo; Cranenburg, Ellen C.; Magdeleyns, Elke J.; Brandenburg, Vincent M.; Djuric, Zivka; Damjanovic, Tatjana; Ketteler, Markus; Vermeer, Cees; Dimkovic, Nada; Floege, Jürgen; Schurgers, Leon J.

    2011-01-01

    The mechanisms for vascular calcification and its associated cardiovascular mortality in patients with ESRD are not completely understood. Dialysis patients exhibit profound vitamin K deficiency, which may impair carboxylation of the calcification inhibitor matrix gla protein (MGP). Here, we tested whether distinct circulating inactive vitamin K–dependent proteins associate with all-cause or cardiovascular mortality. We observed higher levels of both desphospho-uncarboxylated MGP (dp-ucMGP) and desphospho-carboxylated MGP (dp-cMGP) among 188 hemodialysis patients compared with 98 age-matched subjects with normal renal function. Levels of dp-ucMGP correlated with those of protein induced by vitamin K absence II (PIVKA-II; r = 0.62, P < 0.0001). We found increased PIVKA-II levels in 121 (64%) dialysis patients, indicating pronounced vitamin K deficiency. Kaplan-Meier analysis showed that patients with low levels of dp-cMGP had an increased risk for all-cause and cardiovascular mortality. Multivariable Cox regression confirmed that low levels of dp-cMGP increase mortality risk (all-cause: HR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.1 to 4.3; cardiovascular: HR, 2.7; 95% CI, 1.2 to 6.2). Furthermore, patients with higher vascular calcification scores showed lower levels of dp-cMGP. In 17 hemodialysis patients, daily supplementation with vitamin K2 for 6 weeks reduced dp-ucMGP levels by 27% (P = 0.003) but did not affect dp-cMGP levels. In conclusion, the majority of dialysis patients exhibit pronounced vitamin K deficiency. Lower levels of circulating dp-cMGP may serve as a predictor of mortality in dialysis patients. Whether vitamin K supplementation improves outcomes requires further study. PMID:21289218

  13. Podocan-like protein: a novel small leucine-rich repeat matrix protein in bone.

    PubMed

    Mochida, Yoshiyuki; Kaku, Masaru; Yoshida, Keiko; Katafuchi, Michitsuna; Atsawasuwan, Phimon; Yamauchi, Mitsuo

    2011-07-01

    Recently, significant attention has been drawn to the biology of small leucine-rich repeat proteoglycans (SLRPs) due to their multiple functionalities in various cell types and tissues. Here, we characterize a novel SLRP member, "Podocan-like (Podnl) protein" identified by a bioinformatics approach. The Podnl protein has a signal peptide, a unique cysteine-rich N-terminal cluster, 21 leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motifs, and one putative N-glycosylation site. This protein is structurally similar to podocan in SLRPs. The gene was highly expressed in mineralized tissues and in osteoblastic cells and the high expression level was observed at and after matrix mineralization in vitro. Podnl was enriched in newly formed bones based on immunohistochemical analysis. When Podnl was transfected into osteoblastic cells, the protein with N-glycosylation was detected mainly in the cultured medium, indicating that Podnl is a secreted N-glycosylated protein. The endogenous Podnl protein was also present in bone matrix. These data provide a new insight into our understanding of the emerging SLRP functions in bone formation.

  14. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and its binding partners in the cartilage extracellular matrix: interaction, regulation and role in chondrogenesis.

    PubMed

    Acharya, Chitrangada; Yik, Jasper H N; Kishore, Ashleen; Van Dinh, Victoria; Di Cesare, Paul E; Haudenschild, Dominik R

    2014-07-01

    Thrombospondins (TSPs) are widely known as a family of five calcium-binding matricellular proteins. While these proteins belong to the same family, they are encoded by different genes, regulate different cellular functions and are localized to specific regions of the body. TSP-5 or Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) is the only TSP that has been associated with skeletal disorders in humans, including pseudoachondroplasia (PSACH) and multiple epiphyseal dysplasia (MED). The pentameric structure of COMP, the evidence that it interacts with multiple cellular proteins, and the recent reports of COMP acting as a 'lattice' to present growth factors to cells, inspired this review of COMP and its interacting partners. In our review, we have compiled the interactions of COMP with other proteins in the cartilage extracellular matrix and summarized their importance in maintaining the structural integrity of cartilage as well as in regulating cellular functions.

  15. Identification of proteins associated with the Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilm extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Toyofuku, Masanori; Roschitzki, Bernd; Riedel, Katharina; Eberl, Leo

    2012-10-05

    Biofilms are surface-associated bacteria that are embedded in a matrix of self-produced polymeric substances (EPSs). The EPS is composed of nucleic acids, polysaccharides, lipids, and proteins. While polysaccharide components have been well studied, the protein content of the matrix is largely unknown. Here we conducted a comprehensive proteomic study to identify proteins associated with the biofilm matrix of Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1 (the matrix proteome). This analysis revealed that approximately 30% of the identified matrix proteins were outer membrane proteins, which are also typically found in outer membrane vesicles (OMVs). Electron microscopic inspection confirmed the presence of large amounts of OMVs within the biofilm matrix, supporting previous notions that OMVs are abundant constituents of P. aeruginosa biofilms. Our results demonstrate that while some proteins associated with the P. aeruginosa matrix are derived from secreted proteins and lysed cells, the large majority of the matrix proteins originate from OMVs. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the protein content of planktonic and biofilm OMVs is surprisingly different and may reflect the different physiological states of planktonic and sessile cells.

  16. Evidence for direct association of Vpr and matrix protein p17 within the HIV-1 virion.

    PubMed

    Sato, A; Yoshimoto, J; Isaka, Y; Miki, S; Suyama, A; Adachi, A; Hayami, M; Fujiwara, T; Yoshie, O

    1996-06-01

    Vpr is one of the auxiliary proteins of HIV-1 and is selectively incorporated into the virion by a process involving the C-terminal p6 portion of the Gag precursor Pr55. Vpr and the matrix protein p17 are the components of the viral preintegration complex and appear to play important roles in the nuclear transport of proviral DNA in nondividing cells. In the present study, we have demonstrated by coimmunoprecipitation experiments that Vpr associates with matrix protein p17 but not with capsid protein p24 within the HIV-1 virion. Experiments employing the yeast two-hybrid GAL4 assay for protein-protein interactions also demonstrated a direct association between Vpr and the C-terminal region of matrix protein p17. Association of Vpr and the matrix protein p17 within the mature virion is consistent with their collaborative role in the nuclear transportation of the viral preintegration complex in nondividing cells such as macrophages.

  17. Purification of Capping Protein Using the Capping Protein Binding Site of CARMIL as an Affinity Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A.

    2009-01-01

    Capping Protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function and regulation. PMID:19427903

  18. Purification of capping protein using the capping protein binding site of CARMIL as an affinity matrix.

    PubMed

    Remmert, Kirsten; Uruno, Takehito; Hammer, John A

    2009-10-01

    Capping protein (CP) is a ubiquitously expressed, heterodimeric actin binding protein that is essential for normal actin dynamics in cells. The existing methods for purifying native CP from tissues and recombinant CP from bacteria are time-consuming processes that involve numerous conventional chromatographic steps and functional assays to achieve a homogeneous preparation of the protein. Here, we report the rapid purification of Acanthamoeba CP from amoeba extracts and recombinant mouse CP from E. coli extracts using as an affinity matrix GST-fusion proteins containing the CP binding site from Acanthamoeba CARMIL and mouse CARMIL-1, respectively. This improved method for CP purification should facilitate the in vitro analysis of CP structure, function, and regulation.

  19. Extracellular matrix protein CCN1 limits oncolytic efficacy in glioma.

    PubMed

    Haseley, Amy; Boone, Sean; Wojton, Jeffrey; Yu, Lianbo; Yoo, Ji Young; Yu, Jianhua; Kurozumi, Kazuhiko; Glorioso, Joseph C; Caligiuri, Michael A; Kaur, Balveen

    2012-03-15

    Oncolytic viral therapy has been explored widely as an option for glioma treatment but its effectiveness has remained limited. Cysteine rich 61 (CCN1) is an extracellular matrix (ECM) protein elevated in cancer cells that modulates their adhesion and migration by binding cell surface receptors. In this study, we examined a hypothesized role for CCN1 in limiting the efficacy of oncolytic viral therapy for glioma, based on evidence of CCN1 induction that occurs in this setting. Strikingly, we found that exogenous CCN1 in glioma ECM orchestrated a cellular antiviral response that reduced viral replication and limited cytolytic efficacy. Gene expression profiling and real-time PCR analysis revealed a significant induction of type-I interferon responsive genes in response to CCN1 exposure. This induction was accompanied by activation of the Jak/Stat signaling pathway, consistent with induction of an innate antiviral cellular response. Both effects were mediated by the binding of CCN1 to the cell surface integrin α6β1, activating its signaling and leading to rapid secretion of interferon-α, which was essential for the innate antiviral effect. Together, our findings reveal how an integrin signaling pathway mediates activation of a type-I antiviral interferon response that can limit the efficacy of oncolytic viral therapy. Furthermore, they suggest therapeutic interventions to inhibit CCN1-integrin α6 interactions to sensitize gliomas to viral oncolysis.

  20. Mitochondrial unfolded protein response controls matrix pre-RNA processing and translation.

    PubMed

    Münch, Christian; Harper, J Wade

    2016-06-30

    The mitochondrial matrix is unique in that it must integrate the folding and assembly of proteins derived from the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the mitochondrial unfolded protein response (UPRmt) senses matrix protein misfolding and induces a program of nuclear gene expression, including mitochondrial chaperonins, to promote mitochondrial proteostasis. While misfolded mitochondrial-matrix-localized ornithine transcarbamylase induces chaperonin expression, our understanding of mammalian UPRmt is rudimentary, reflecting a lack of acute triggers for UPRmt activation. This limitation has prevented analysis of the cellular responses to matrix protein misfolding and the effects of UPRmt on mitochondrial translation to control protein folding loads. Here we combine pharmacological inhibitors of matrix-localized HSP90/TRAP1 (ref. 8) or LON protease, which promote chaperonin expression, with global transcriptional and proteomic analysis to reveal an extensive and acute response of human cells to UPRmt. This response encompasses widespread induction of nuclear genes, including matrix-localized proteins involved in folding, pre-RNA processing and translation. Functional studies revealed rapid but reversible translation inhibition in mitochondria occurring concurrently with defects in pre-RNA processing caused by transcriptional repression and LON-dependent turnover of the mitochondrial pre-RNA processing nuclease MRPP3 (ref. 10). This study reveals that acute mitochondrial protein folding stress activates both increased chaperone availability within the matrix and reduced matrix-localized protein synthesis through translational inhibition, and provides a framework for further dissection of mammalian UPRmt.

  1. Photolytic Cross-Linking to Probe Protein-Protein and Protein-Matrix Interactions in Lyophilized Powders.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Lavanya K; Moorthy, Balakrishnan S; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2015-09-08

    Protein structure and local environment in lyophilized formulations were probed using high-resolution solid-state photolytic cross-linking with mass spectrometric analysis (ssPC-MS). In order to characterize structure and microenvironment, protein-protein, protein-excipient, and protein-water interactions in lyophilized powders were identified. Myoglobin (Mb) was derivatized in solution with the heterobifunctional probe succinimidyl 4,4'-azipentanoate (SDA) and the structural integrity of the labeled protein (Mb-SDA) confirmed using CD spectroscopy and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Mb-SDA was then formulated with and without excipients (raffinose, guanidine hydrochloride (Gdn HCl)) and lyophilized. The freeze-dried powder was irradiated with ultraviolet light at 365 nm for 30 min to produce cross-linked adducts that were analyzed at the intact protein level and after trypsin digestion. SDA-labeling produced Mb carrying up to five labels, as detected by LC-MS. Following lyophilization and irradiation, cross-linked peptide-peptide, peptide-water, and peptide-raffinose adducts were detected. The exposure of Mb side chains to the matrix was quantified based on the number of different peptide-peptide, peptide-water, and peptide-excipient adducts detected. In the absence of excipients, peptide-peptide adducts involving the CD, DE, and EF loops and helix H were common. In the raffinose formulation, peptide-peptide adducts were more distributed throughout the molecule. The Gdn HCl formulation showed more protein-protein and protein-water adducts than the other formulations, consistent with protein unfolding and increased matrix interactions. The results demonstrate that ssPC-MS can be used to distinguish excipient effects and characterize the local protein environment in lyophilized formulations with high resolution.

  2. Renal handling of matrix Gla-protein in humans with moderate to severe hypertension.

    PubMed

    Rennenberg, Roger J M W; Schurgers, Leon J; Vermeer, Cees; Scholte, Jan B J; Houben, Alphons J H M; de Leeuw, Peter W; Kroon, Abraham A

    2008-09-01

    Vascular calcifications are common among patients with hypertension. The vitamin K-dependent protein matrix Gla-protein plays an important role in preventing arterial calcification. Since a decrease in renal clearance is a prevalent clinical problem in patients with hypertension, we aimed to study the renal clearance of matrix Gla-protein from the circulation in these patients having a wide range of creatinine clearances. Ninety moderate to severe hypertensive patients who were scheduled for renal angiography were enrolled in the study. In these patients, renal arterial and renal venous blood was sampled prior to the administration of contrast material in order to determine the total renal and single kidney clearance of matrix Gla-protein. The average renal fractional extraction of matrix Gla-protein was 12.8%. There was no significant correlation between creatinine clearance (range 26-154) and renal fractional extraction of matrix Gla-protein in this population. The extraction of matrix Gla-protein was not influenced by the presence of a renal artery stenosis. In conclusion, we demonstrate that the kidney is able to extract matrix Gla-protein from the plasma at a constant level of 12.8%, independent of renal function in hypertensive subjects.

  3. A matrix protein silences transposons and repeats through interaction with retinoblastoma-associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifeng; Wang, Yizhong; Stroud, Hume; Gu, Xiaofeng; Sun, Bo; Gan, Eng-Seng; Ng, Kian-Hong; Jacobsen, Steven E; He, Yuehui; Ito, Toshiro

    2013-02-18

    Epigenetic regulation helps to maintain genomic integrity by suppressing transposable elements (TEs) and also controls key developmental processes, such as flowering time. To prevent TEs from causing rearrangements and mutations, TE and TE-like repetitive DNA sequences are usually methylated, whereas histones are hypoacetylated and methylated on specific residues (e.g., H3 lysine 9 dimethylation [H3K9me2]). TEs and repeats can also attenuate gene expression. However, how various histone modifiers are recruited to target loci is not well understood. Here we show that knockdown of the nuclear matrix protein with AT-hook DNA binding motifs TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENT SILENCING VIA AT-HOOK (TEK) in Arabidopsis Landsberg erecta results in robust activation of various TEs, the TE-like repeat-containing floral repressor genes FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) and FWA. This derepression is associated with chromatin conformational changes, increased histone acetylation, reduced H3K9me2, and even TE transposition. TEK directly binds to an FLC-repressive regulatory region and the silencing repeats of FWA and associates with Arabidopsis homologs of the Retinoblastoma-associated protein 46/48, FVE and MSI5, which mediate histone deacetylation. We propose that the nuclear matrix protein TEK acts in the maintenance of genome integrity by silencing TE and repeat-containing genes.

  4. Quantitative sandwich ELISA for determination of traces of hazelnut (Corylus avellana) protein in complex food matrixes.

    PubMed

    Holzhauser, T; Vieths, S

    1999-10-01

    A hazelnut-specific sandwich-type ELISA based on polyclonal antisera was developed for detection of hidden hazelnut protein residues in complex food matrixes. In the absence of a food matrix, extractable protein from different native and toasted hazelnuts was detected at rates of 94 +/- 13 and 96 +/- 7% applying standards prepared from native and toasted hazelnuts, respectively. From complex food matrixes, 0.001-10% of hazelnut was recovered between 67 and 132%, in average by 106 +/- 17%. Depending on the food matrix, hazelnut protein could be detected down to the ppb (ng/g) level. Intraassay precision was <6% for hazelnut >/= 0.001% and interassay precision was <15% for hazelnut >/= 0.01%. In 12 of 28 commercial food products without labeling or declaration of hazelnut components, between 2 and 421 ppm of hazelnut protein was detected, demonstrating a remarkable presence of potentially allergenic hazelnut protein "hidden" in commercial food products.

  5. Genetic dissection of peroxisome-associated matrix protein degradation in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Sarah E; Lingard, Matthew J; Bartel, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    Peroxisomes are organelles that sequester certain metabolic pathways; many of these pathways generate H(2)O(2), which can damage proteins. However, little is known about how damaged or obsolete peroxisomal proteins are degraded. We exploit developmentally timed peroxisomal content remodeling in Arabidopsis thaliana to elucidate peroxisome-associated protein degradation. Isocitrate lyase (ICL) is a peroxisomal glyoxylate cycle enzyme necessary for early seedling development. A few days after germination, photosynthesis begins and ICL is degraded. We previously found that ICL is stabilized when a peroxisome-associated ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme and its membrane anchor are both mutated, suggesting that matrix proteins might exit the peroxisome for ubiquitin-dependent cytosolic degradation. To identify additional components needed for peroxisome-associated matrix protein degradation, we mutagenized a line expressing GFP-ICL, which is degraded similarly to endogenous ICL, and identified persistent GFP-ICL fluorescence (pfl) mutants. We found three pfl mutants that were defective in PEROXIN14 (PEX14/At5g62810), which encodes a peroxisomal membrane protein that assists in importing proteins into the peroxisome matrix, indicating that proteins must enter the peroxisome for efficient degradation. One pfl mutant was missing the peroxisomal 3-ketoacyl-CoA thiolase encoded by the PEROXISOME DEFECTIVE1 (PED1/At2g33150) gene, suggesting that peroxisomal metabolism influences the rate of matrix protein degradation. Finally, one pfl mutant that displayed normal matrix protein import carried a novel lesion in PEROXIN6 (PEX6/At1g03000), which encodes a peroxisome-tethered ATPase that is involved in recycling matrix protein receptors back to the cytosol. The isolation of pex6-2 as a pfl mutant supports the hypothesis that matrix proteins can exit the peroxisome for cytosolic degradation.

  6. PathwayMatrix: visualizing binary relationships between proteins in biological pathways

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Molecular activation pathways are inherently complex, and understanding relations across many biochemical reactions and reaction types is difficult. Visualizing and analyzing a pathway is a challenge due to the network size and the diversity of relations between proteins and molecules. Results In this paper, we introduce PathwayMatrix, a visualization tool that presents the binary relations between proteins in the pathway via the use of an interactive adjacency matrix. We provide filtering, lensing, clustering, and brushing and linking capabilities in order to present relevant details about proteins within a pathway. Conclusions We evaluated PathwayMatrix by conducting a series of in-depth interviews with domain experts who provided positive feedback, leading us to believe that our visualization technique could be helpful for the larger community of researchers utilizing pathway visualizations. PathwayMatrix is freely available at https://github.com/CreativeCodingLab/PathwayMatrix. PMID:26361499

  7. Guaifenesin stone matrix proteomics: a protocol for identifying proteins critical to stone formation.

    PubMed

    Kolbach-Mandel, A M; Mandel, N S; Cohen, S R; Kleinman, J G; Ahmed, F; Mandel, I C; Wesson, J A

    2016-07-19

    Drug-related kidney stones are a diagnostic problem, since they contain a large matrix (protein) fraction and are frequently incorrectly identified as matrix stones. A urine proteomics study patient produced a guaifenesin stone during her participation, allowing us to both correctly diagnose her disease and identify proteins critical to this drug stone-forming process. The patient provided three random midday urine samples for proteomics studies; one of which contained stone-like sediment with two distinct fractions. These solids were characterized with optical microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. Immunoblotting and quantitative mass spectrometry were used to quantitatively identify the proteins in urine and stone matrix. Infrared spectroscopy showed that the sediment was 60 % protein and 40 % guaifenesin and its metabolite guaiacol. Of the 156 distinct proteins identified in the proteomic studies, 49 were identified in the two stone-components with approximately 50 % of those proteins also found in this patient's urine. Many proteins observed in this drug-related stone have also been reported in proteomic matrix studies of uric acid and calcium containing stones. More importantly, nine proteins were highly enriched and highly abundant in the stone matrix and 8 were reciprocally depleted in urine, suggesting a critical role for these proteins in guaifenesin stone formation. Accurate stone analysis is critical to proper diagnosis and treatment of kidney stones. Many matrix proteins were common to all stone types, but likely not related to disease mechanism. This protocol defined a small set of proteins that were likely critical to guaifenesin stone formation based on their high enrichment and high abundance in stone matrix, and it should be applied to all stone types.

  8. Altered protein levels in the isolated extracellular matrix of failing human hearts with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    DeAguero, Joshua L; McKown, Elizabeth N; Zhang, Liwen; Keirsey, Jeremy; Fischer, Edgar G; Samedi, Von G; Canan, Benjamin D; Kilic, Ahmet; Janssen, Paul M L; Delfín, Dawn A

    Dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM) is associated with extensive pathological cardiac remodeling and involves numerous changes in the protein expression profile of the extracellular matrix of the heart. We obtained seven human, end-stage, failing hearts with DCM (DCM-failing) and nine human, nonfailing donor hearts and compared their extracellular matrix protein profiles. We first showed that the DCM-failing hearts had indeed undergone extensive remodeling of the left ventricle myocardium relative to nonfailing hearts. We then isolated the extracellular matrix from a subset of these hearts and performed a proteomic analysis on the isolated matrices. We found that the levels of 26 structural proteins were altered in the DCM-failing isolated cardiac extracellular matrix compared to nonfailing isolated cardiac extracellular matrix. Overall, most of the extracellular matrix proteins showed reduced levels in the DCM-failing hearts, while all of the contractile proteins showed increased levels. There was a mixture of increased and decreased levels of cytoskeletal and nuclear transport proteins. Using immunoprobing, we verified that collagen IV (α2 and α6 isoforms), zyxin, and myomesin protein levels were reduced in the DCM-failing hearts. We expect that these data will add to the understanding of the pathology associated with heart failure with DCM.

  9. The role of nuclear matrix proteins binding to matrix attachment regions (Mars) in prostate cancer cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Barboro, Paola; Repaci, Erica; D'Arrigo, Cristina; Balbi, Cecilia

    2012-01-01

    In tumor progression definite alterations in nuclear matrix (NM) protein composition as well as in chromatin structure occur. The NM interacts with chromatin via specialized DNA sequences called matrix attachment regions (MARs). In the present study, using a proteomic approach along with a two-dimensional Southwestern assay and confocal laser microscopy, we show that the differentiation of stabilized human prostate carcinoma cells is marked out by modifications both NM protein composition and bond between NM proteins and MARs. Well-differentiated androgen-responsive and slowly growing LNCaP cells are characterized by a less complex pattern and by a major number of proteins binding MAR sequences in comparison to 22Rv1 cells expressing androgen receptor but androgen-independent. Finally, in the poorly differentiated and strongly aggressive androgen-independent PC3 cells the complexity of NM pattern further increases and a minor number of proteins bind the MARs. Furthermore, in this cell line with respect to LNCaP cells, these changes are synchronous with modifications in both the nuclear distribution of the MAR sequences and in the average loop dimensions that significantly increase. Although the expression of many NM proteins changes during dedifferentiation, only a very limited group of MAR-binding proteins seem to play a key role in this process. Variations in the expression of poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) and special AT-rich sequence-binding protein-1 (SATB1) along with an increase in the phosphorylation of lamin B represent changes that might trigger passage towards a more aggressive phenotype. These results suggest that elucidating the MAR-binding proteins that are involved in the differentiation of prostate cancer cells could be an important tool to improve our understanding of this carcinogenesis process, and they could also be novel targets for prostate cancer therapy.

  10. Matrix Gla Protein polymorphism, but not concentrations, is associated with radiographic hand osteoarthritis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective. Factors associated with mineralization and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis (OA) are incompletely understood. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a mineralization inhibitor, have been associated clinically with conditions of abnormal calcification. We therefore evalua...

  11. Structural and functional features of a collagen-binding matrix protein from the mussel byssus.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Michael H; Gertz, Melanie; Steegborn, Clemens; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-02-26

    Blue mussels adhere to surfaces by the byssus, a holdfast structure composed of individual threads representing a collagen fibre reinforced composite. Here, we present the crystal structure and function of one of its matrix proteins, the proximal thread matrix protein 1, which is present in the proximal section of the byssus. The structure reveals two von Willebrand factor type A domains linked by a two-β-stranded linker yielding a novel structural arrangement. In vitro, the protein binds heterologous collagens with high affinity and affects collagen assembly, morphology and arrangement of its fibrils. By providing charged surface clusters as well as insufficiently coordinated metal ions, the proximal thread matrix protein 1 might interconnect other byssal proteins and thereby contribute to the integrity of the byssal threads in vivo. Moreover, the protein could be used for adjusting the mechanical properties of collagen materials, a function likely important in the natural byssus.

  12. Interplay of matrix stiffness and protein tethering in stem cell differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Jessica H.; Vincent, Ludovic G.; Fuhrmann, Alexander; Choi, Yu Suk; Hribar, Kolin C.; Taylor-Weiner, Hermes; Chen, Shaochen; Engler, Adam J.

    2014-10-01

    Stem cells regulate their fate by binding to, and contracting against, the extracellular matrix. Recently, it has been proposed that in addition to matrix stiffness and ligand type, the degree of coupling of fibrous protein to the surface of the underlying substrate, that is, tethering and matrix porosity, also regulates stem cell differentiation. By modulating substrate porosity without altering stiffness in polyacrylamide gels, we show that varying substrate porosity did not significantly change protein tethering, substrate deformations, or the osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation of human adipose-derived stromal cells and marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells. Varying protein-substrate linker density up to 50-fold changed tethering, but did not affect osteogenesis, adipogenesis, surface-protein unfolding or underlying substrate deformations. Differentiation was also unaffected by the absence of protein tethering. Our findings imply that the stiffness of planar matrices regulates stem cell differentiation independently of protein tethering and porosity.

  13. MFP1, a novel plant filament-like protein with affinity for matrix attachment region DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Meier, I; Phelan, T; Gruissem, W; Spiker, S; Schneider, D

    1996-01-01

    The interaction of chromatin with the nuclear matrix via matrix attachment regions (MARs) on the DNA is considered to be of fundamental importance for higher order chromatin organization and regulation of gene expression. Here, we report a novel nuclear matrix-localized MAR DNA binding protein, designated MAR binding filament-like protein 1 (MFP1), from tomato. In contrast to the few animal MAR DNA binding proteins thus far identified, MFP1 contains a predicted N-terminal transmembrane domain and a long filament-like alpha-helical domain that is similar to diverse nuclear and cytoplasmic filament proteins from animals and yeast. DNA binding assays established that MFP1 can discriminate between animal and plant MAR DNAs and non-MAR DNA fragments of similar size and AT content. Deletion mutants of MFP1 revealed a novel, discrete DNA binding domain near the C terminus of the protein. MFP1 is an in vitro substrate for casein kinase II, a nuclear matrix-associated protein kinase. Its structure, MAR DNA binding activity, and nuclear matrix localization suggest that MFP1 is likely to participate in nuclear architecture by connecting chromatin with the nuclear matrix and potentially with the nuclear envelope. PMID:8953774

  14. [Electron transfer between globular proteins. Evaluation of a matrix element].

    PubMed

    Lakhno, V D; Chuev, G N; Ustinin, M N

    1998-01-01

    The dependence of the matrix element of the probability of interprotein electron transfer on the mutual orientation of the donor and acceptor centers and the distance between them was calculated. The calculations were made under the assumption that electron transfer proceeds mainly by a collective excitation of polaron nature, like a solvated electron state. The results obtained are consistent with experimental data and indicate the nonexponential behavior of this dependence in the case when the distance transfer is less than 20 A.

  15. Targeting the extracellular matrix: matricellular proteins regulate cell-extracellular matrix communication within distinct niches of the intervertebral disc.

    PubMed

    Bedore, Jake; Leask, Andrew; Séguin, Cheryle A

    2014-07-01

    The so-called "matricellular" proteins have recently emerged as important regulators of cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions. These proteins modulate a variety of cell functions through a range of interactions with cell-surface receptors, hormones, proteases and structural components of the ECM. As such, matricellular proteins are crucial regulators of cell phenotype, and consequently tissue function. The distinct cell types and microenvironments that together form the IVD provide an excellent paradigm to study how matricellular proteins mediate communication within and between adjacent tissue types. In recent years, the role of several matricellular proteins in the intervertebral disc has been explored in vivo using mutant mouse models in which the expression of target matricellular proteins was deleted from either one or all compartments of the intervertebral disc. The current review outlines what is presently known about the roles of the matricellular proteins belonging to the CCN family, SPARC (Secreted Protein, Acidic, and Rich in Cysteine), and thrombospondin (TSP) 2 in regulating intervertebral disc cell-ECM interactions, ECM synthesis and disc tissue homeostasis using genetically modified mouse models. Furthermore, we provide a brief overview of recent preliminary studies of other matricellular proteins including, periostin (POSTN) and tenascin (TN). Each specific tissue type of the IVD contains a different matricellular protein signature, which varies based on the specific stage of development, maturity or disease. A growing body of direct genetic evidence links IVD development, maintenance and repair to the coordinate interaction of matricellular proteins within their respective niches and suggests that several of these signaling modulators hold promise in the development of diagnostics and/or therapeutics targeting intervertebral disc aging and/or degeneration.

  16. Expression of nuclear matrix proteins binding matrix attachment regions in prostate cancer. PARP-1: New player in tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Barboro, Paola; Ferrari, Nicoletta; Capaia, Matteo; Petretto, Andrea; Salvi, Sandra; Boccardo, Simona; Balbi, Cecilia

    2015-10-01

    Prostate cancer (PCa) displays infrequent point mutations, whereas genomic rearrangements are highly prevalent. In eukaryotes, the genome is compartmentalized into chromatin loop domains by the attachment to the nuclear matrix (NM), and it has been demonstrated that several recombination hot spots are situated at the base of loops. Here, we have characterized the binding between NM proteins and matrix attachment regions (MARs) in PCa. Nontumor and 44 PCa tissues were analyzed. More aggressive tumors were characterized by an increase in the complexity of the NM protein patterns that was synchronous with a decrease in the number of proteins binding the MAR sequences. PARP-1 was the protein that showed the most evident changes. The expression of the PARP-1 associated with NM increased and it was dependent on tumor aggressiveness. Immunohistochemical analysis showed that the protein was significantly overexpressed in tumor cells. To explore the role of PARP-1 in PCa progression, PCa cells were treated with the PARP inhibitor, ABT-888. In androgen-independent PC3 cells, PARP inhibition significantly decreased cell viability, migration, invasion, chromatin loop dimensions and histone acetylation. Collectively, our study provides evidence that MAR-binding proteins are involved in the development and progression of PCa. PARP could play a key role in the compartmentalization of chromatin and in the development of the more aggressive phenotype. Thus, PARP can no longer be viewed only as an enzyme involved in DNA repair, but that its role in chromatin modulation could provide the basis for a new therapeutic approach to the treatment of PCa.

  17. Association of Ebola Virus Matrix Protein VP40 with Microtubules

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    dynein has been reported for African swine fever virus protein 54 (1) as well as VP26 of herpes simplex virus (12), and binding to members of the plus...associated motor pro- teins for movement of viral particles to the site of budding has been proposed for African swine fever virus and vaccinia virus (22...Fernandez-Zapatero, L. Soto, C. Canto, I. Rodriguez-Crespo, L. Dixon, and J. M. Escribano. 2001. African swine fever virus protein p54 interacts with

  18. Conjugation of extracellular matrix proteins to basal lamina analogs enhances keratinocyte attachment.

    PubMed

    Bush, Katie A; Downing, Brett R; Walsh, Sarah E; Pins, George D

    2007-02-01

    The dermal-epidermal junction of skin contains extracellular matrix proteins that are involved in initiating and controlling keratinocyte signaling events such as attachment, proliferation, and terminal differentiation. To characterize the relationship between extracellular matrix proteins and keratinocyte attachment, a biomimetic design approach was used to precisely tailor the surface of basal lamina analogs with biochemistries that emulate the native biochemical composition found at the dermal-epidermal junction. A high-throughput screening device was developed by our laboratory that allows for the simultaneous investigation of the conjugation of individual extracellular matrix proteins (e.g. collagen type I, collagen type IV, laminin, or fibronectin) as well as their effect on keratinocyte attachment, on the surface of an implantable collagen membrane. Fluorescence microscopy coupled with quantitative digital image analyses indicated that the extracellular matrix proteins adsorbed to the collagen-GAG membranes in a dose-dependent manner. To determine the relationship between extracellular matrix protein signaling cues and keratinocyte attachment, cells were seeded on protein-conjugated collagen-GAG membranes and a tetrazolium-based colorimetric assay was used to quantify viable keratinocyte attachment. Our results indicate that keratinocyte attachment was significantly enhanced on the surfaces of collagen membranes that were conjugated with fibronectin and type IV collagen. These findings define a set of design parameters that will enhance keratinocyte binding efficiency on the surface of collagen membranes and ultimately improve the rate of epithelialization for dermal equivalents.

  19. Inflammatory and fibrotic proteins proteomically identified as key protein constituents in urine and stone matrix of patients with kidney calculi.

    PubMed

    Boonla, Chanchai; Tosukhowong, Piyaratana; Spittau, Björn; Schlosser, Andreas; Pimratana, Chaowat; Krieglstein, Kerstin

    2014-02-15

    To uncover whether urinary proteins are incorporated into stones, the proteomic profiles of kidney stones and urine collected from the same patients have to be explored. We employed 1D-PAGE and nanoHPLC-ESI-MS/MS to analyze the proteomes of kidney stone matrix (n=16), nephrolithiatic urine (n=14) and healthy urine (n=3). We identified 62, 66 and 22 proteins in stone matrix, nephrolithiatic urine and healthy urine, respectively. Inflammation- and fibrosis-associated proteins were frequently detected in the stone matrix and nephrolithiatic urine. Eighteen proteins were exclusively found in the stone matrix and nephrolithiatic urine, considered as candidate biomarkers for kidney stone formation. S100A8 and fibronectin, representatives of inflammation and fibrosis, respectively, were up-regulated in nephrolithiasis renal tissues. S100A8 was strongly expressed in infiltrated leukocytes. Fibronectin was over-expressed in renal tubular cells. S100A8 and fibronectin were immunologically confirmed to exist in nephrolithiatic urine and stone matrix, but in healthy urine they were undetectable. Conclusion, both kidney stones and urine obtained from the same patients greatly contained inflammatory and fibrotic proteins. S100A8 and fibronectin were up-regulated in stone-baring kidneys and nephrolithiatic urine. Therefore, inflammation and fibrosis are suggested to be involved in the formation of kidney calculi.

  20. Collagen XII and XIV, new partners of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein in the skin extracellular matrix suprastructure.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Pallavi; Zwolanek, Daniela; Keene, Douglas R; Schulz, Jan-Niklas; Blumbach, Katrin; Heinegård, Dick; Zaucke, Frank; Paulsson, Mats; Krieg, Thomas; Koch, Manuel; Eckes, Beate

    2012-06-29

    The tensile and scaffolding properties of skin rely on the complex extracellular matrix (ECM) that surrounds cells, vasculature, nerves, and adnexus structures and supports the epidermis. In the skin, collagen I fibrils are the major structural component of the dermal ECM, decorated by proteoglycans and by fibril-associated collagens with interrupted triple helices such as collagens XII and XIV. Here we show that the cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), an abundant component of cartilage ECM, is expressed in healthy human skin. COMP expression is detected in the dermal compartment of skin and in cultured fibroblasts, whereas epidermis and HaCaT cells are negative. In addition to binding collagen I, COMP binds to collagens XII and XIV via their C-terminal collagenous domains. All three proteins codistribute in a characteristic narrow zone in the superficial papillary dermis of healthy human skin. Ultrastructural analysis by immunogold labeling confirmed colocalization and further revealed the presence of COMP along with collagens XII and XIV in anchoring plaques. On the basis of these observations, we postulate that COMP functions as an adapter protein in human skin, similar to its function in cartilage ECM, by organizing collagen I fibrils into a suprastructure, mainly in the vicinity of anchoring plaques that stabilize the cohesion between the upper dermis and the basement membrane zone.

  1. Towards a matrix mechanics framework for dynamic protein network

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Protein–protein interaction networks are currently visualized by software generated interaction webs based upon static experimental data. Current state is limited to static, mostly non-compartmental network and non time resolved protein interactions. A satisfactory mathematical foundation for particle interactions within a viscous liquid state (situation within the cytoplasm) does not exist nor do current computer programs enable building dynamic interaction networks for time resolved interactions. Building mathematical foundation for intracellular protein interactions can be achieved in two increments (a) trigger and capture the dynamic molecular changes for a select subset of proteins using several model systems and high throughput time resolved proteomics and, (b) use this information to build the mathematical foundation and computational algorithm for a compartmentalized and dynamic protein interaction network. Such a foundation is expected to provide benefit in at least two spheres: (a) understanding physiology enabling explanation of phenomenon such as incomplete penetrance in genetic disorders and (b) enabling several fold increase in biopharmaceutical production using impure starting materials. PMID:20805933

  2. Yeast pex1 cells contain peroxisomal ghosts that import matrix proteins upon reintroduction of Pex1

    PubMed Central

    Knoops, Kèvin; de Boer, Rinse; Kram, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Pex1 and Pex6 are two AAA-ATPases that play a crucial role in peroxisome biogenesis. We have characterized the ultrastructure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae peroxisome-deficient mutants pex1 and pex6 by various high-resolution electron microscopy techniques. We observed that the cells contained peroxisomal membrane remnants, which in ultrathin cross sections generally appeared as double membrane rings. Electron tomography revealed that these structures consisted of one continuous membrane, representing an empty, flattened vesicle, which folds into a cup shape. Immunocytochemistry revealed that these structures lack peroxisomal matrix proteins but are the sole sites of the major peroxisomal membrane proteins Pex2, Pex10, Pex11, Pex13, and Pex14. Upon reintroduction of Pex1 in Pex1-deficient cells, these peroxisomal membrane remnants (ghosts) rapidly incorporated peroxisomal matrix proteins and developed into peroxisomes. Our data support earlier views that Pex1 and Pex6 play a role in peroxisomal matrix protein import. PMID:26644511

  3. Predicting protein-ligand affinity with a random matrix framework.

    PubMed

    Lee, Alpha A; Brenner, Michael P; Colwell, Lucy J

    2016-11-29

    Rapid determination of whether a candidate compound will bind to a particular target receptor remains a stumbling block in drug discovery. We use an approach inspired by random matrix theory to decompose the known ligand set of a target in terms of orthogonal "signals" of salient chemical features, and distinguish these from the much larger set of ligand chemical features that are not relevant for binding to that particular target receptor. After removing the noise caused by finite sampling, we show that the similarity of an unknown ligand to the remaining, cleaned chemical features is a robust predictor of ligand-target affinity, performing as well or better than any algorithm in the published literature. We interpret our algorithm as deriving a model for the binding energy between a target receptor and the set of known ligands, where the underlying binding energy model is related to the classic Ising model in statistical physics.

  4. Differential label-free quantitative proteomic analysis of avian eggshell matrix and uterine fluid proteins associated with eggshell mechanical property.

    PubMed

    Sun, Congjiao; Xu, Guiyun; Yang, Ning

    2013-12-01

    Eggshell strength is a crucial economic trait for table egg production. During the process of eggshell formation, uncalcified eggs are bathed in uterine fluid that plays regulatory roles in eggshell calcification. In this study, a label-free MS-based protein quantification technology was used to detect differences in protein abundance between eggshell matrix from strong and weak eggs (shell matrix protein from strong eggshells and shell matrix protein from weak eggshells) and between the corresponding uterine fluids bathing strong and weak eggs (uterine fluid bathing strong eggs and uterine fluid bathing weak eggs) in a chicken population. Here, we reported the first global proteomic analysis of uterine fluid. A total of 577 and 466 proteins were identified in uterine fluid and eggshell matrix, respectively. Of 447 identified proteins in uterine fluid bathing strong eggs, up to 357 (80%) proteins were in common with proteins in uterine fluid bathing weak eggs. Similarly, up to 83% (328/396) of the proteins in shell matrix protein from strong eggshells were in common with the proteins in shell matrix protein from weak eggshells. The large amount of common proteins indicated that the difference in protein abundance should play essential roles in influencing eggshell strength. Ultimately, 15 proteins mainly relating to eggshell matrix specific proteins, calcium binding and transportation, protein folding and sorting, bone development or diseases, and thyroid hormone activity were considered to have closer association with the formation of strong eggshell.

  5. Intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix spectral features of cottonseed protein fractions and the effects of denaturants

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To better understand the functional and physicochemical properties of cottonseed protein, we investigated the intrinsic fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectral features of cottonseed protein isolate (CSPI) and sequentially extracted water (CSPw) and alkali (CSPa) protein fractions, an...

  6. The microtubule motor protein KIF13A is involved in intracellular trafficking of the Lassa virus matrix protein Z.

    PubMed

    Fehling, Sarah Katharina; Noda, Takeshi; Maisner, Andrea; Lamp, Boris; Conzelmann, Karl-Klaus; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Klenk, Hans-Dieter; Garten, Wolfgang; Strecker, Thomas

    2013-02-01

    The small matrix protein Z of arenaviruses has been identified as the main driving force to promote viral particle production at the plasma membrane. Although multiple functions of Z in the arenaviral life cycle have been uncovered, the mechanism of intracellular transport of Z to the site of virus budding is poorly understood and cellular motor proteins that mediate Z trafficking remain to be identified. In the present study, we report that the Z protein of the Old World arenavirus Lassa virus (LASV) interacts with the kinesin family member 13A (KIF13A), a plus-end-directed microtubule-dependent motor protein. Plasmid-driven overexpression of KIF13A results in relocalization of Z to the cell periphery, while functional blockage of endogenous KIF13A by overexpression of a dominant-negative mutant or KIF13A-specific siRNA causes a perinuclearaccumulation and decreased production of both Z-induced virus-like particles and infectious LASV. The interaction of KIF13A with Z proteins from both Old and New World arenaviruses suggests a conserved intracellular transport mechanism. In contrast, the intracellular distribution of the matrix proteins of prototypic members of the paramyxo- and rhabdovirus family is independent of KIF13A. In summary, our studies identify for the first time a molecular motor protein as a critical mediator for intracellular microtubule-dependent transport of arenavirus matrix proteins.

  7. Moderate cyclic tensile strain alters the assembly of cartilage extracellular matrix proteins in vitro.

    PubMed

    Bleuel, Judith; Zaucke, Frank; Brüggemann, Gert-Peter; Heilig, Juliane; Wolter, Marie-Louise; Hamann, Nina; Firner, Sara; Niehoff, Anja

    2015-06-01

    Mechanical loading influences the structural and mechanical properties of articular cartilage. The cartilage matrix protein collagen II essentially determines the tensile properties of the tissue and is adapted in response to loading. The collagen II network is stabilized by the collagen II-binding cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen IX, and matrilin-3. However, the effect of mechanical loading on these extracellular matrix proteins is not yet understood. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate if and how chondrocytes assemble the extracellular matrix proteins collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in response to mechanical loading. Primary murine chondrocytes were applied to cyclic tensile strain (6%, 0.5 Hz, 30 min per day at three consecutive days). The localization of collagen II, COMP, collagen IX, and matrilin-3 in loaded and unloaded cells was determined by immunofluorescence staining. The messenger ribo nucleic acid (mRNA) expression levels and synthesis of the proteins were analyzed using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blots. Immunofluorescence staining demonstrated that the pattern of collagen II distribution was altered by loading. In loaded chondrocytes, collagen II containing fibrils appeared thicker and strongly co-stained for COMP and collagen IX, whereas the collagen network from unloaded cells was more diffuse and showed minor costaining. Further, the applied load led to a higher amount of COMP in the matrix, determined by western blot analysis. Our results show that moderate cyclic tensile strain altered the assembly of the extracellular collagen network. However, changes in protein amount were only observed for COMP, but not for collagen II, collagen IX, or matrilin-3. The data suggest that the adaptation to mechanical loading is not always the result of changes in RNA and/or protein expression but might also be the result of changes in matrix assembly and structure.

  8. Isolation of a crystal matrix protein associated with calcium oxalate precipitation in vacuoles of specialized cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Xingxiang; Zhang, Dianzhong; Lynch-Holm, Valerie J; Okita, Thomas W; Franceschi, Vincent R

    2003-10-01

    The formation of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals is considered to be a high-capacity mechanism for regulating Ca in many plants. Ca oxalate precipitation is not a stochastic process, suggesting the involvement of specific biochemical and cellular mechanisms. Microautoradiography of water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) tissue exposed to 3H-glutamate showed incorporation into developing crystals, indicating potential acidic proteins associated with the crystals. Dissolution of crystals leaves behind a crystal-shaped matrix "ghost" that is capable of precipitation of Ca oxalate in the original crystal morphology. To assess whether this matrix has a protein component, purified crystals were isolated and analyzed for internal protein. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of one major polypeptide of about 55 kD and two minor species of 60 and 63 kD. Amino acid analysis indicates the matrix protein is relatively high in acidic amino acids, a feature consistent with its solubility in formic acid but not at neutral pH. 45Ca-binding assays demonstrated the matrix protein has a strong affinity for Ca. Immunocytochemical localization using antibody raised to the isolated protein showed that the matrix protein is specific to crystal-forming cells. Within the vacuole, the surface and internal structures of two morphologically distinct Ca oxalate crystals, raphide and druse, were labeled by the antimatrix protein serum, as were the surfaces of isolated crystals. These results demonstrate that a specific Ca-binding protein exists as an integral component of Ca oxalate crystals, which holds important implications with respect to regulation of crystal formation.

  9. Human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete the extracellular matrix protein, thrombospondin.

    PubMed

    Wikner, N E; Dixit, V M; Frazier, W A; Clark, R A

    1987-02-01

    Thrombospondin (TSP) a glycoprotein originally identified as the endogenous lectin of platelets, is also synthesized by fibroblasts, endothelial cells, pneumocytes, smooth muscle cells, and macrophages. Thrombospondin is subdivided into functional domains which bind specifically to heparin, fibronectin, collagen, and to specific cellular receptors. It is found within the basement membranes of kidney, lung, smooth muscle, and skin. Thus TSP may serve as an important link between cells and matrices. Thrombospondin also has been reported at the epidermal-dermal junction. We wished to determine whether human keratinocytes synthesize and secrete TSP. Pure human keratinocytes were grown in defined medium without fibroblast feeder layers. Immunofluorescent staining with either rabbit polyclonal or mouse monoclonal antibodies to human platelet TSP yielded specific granular staining within the cytoplasm of keratinocytes. Culture media and cellular lysates were harvested from cultures metabolically labeled with [35S]methionine. Trichloroacetic acid precipitation, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE), and autoradiography revealed a major labeled band comigrating with purified platelet TSP in both the media and the cellular lysates. Immunoprecipitation with either the polyclonal or the monoclonal anti-TSP antibodies followed by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography identified this band as TSP. Thus keratinocytes in culture synthesize and secrete TSP. Thrombospondin may play an important role in epidermal interactions with extracellular matrix.

  10. Serum protein fractionation using supported molecular matrix electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Weijie; Matsuno, Yu-ki; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2013-08-01

    Supported molecular matrix electrophoresis (SMME), in which a hydrophilic polymer such as PVA serves as a support within a porous PVDF membrane, was recently developed. This method is similar to cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis but differs in the compatibility to glycan analysis of the separated bands. In this report, we describe the first instance of the application of SMME to human serum fractionation, and demonstrate the differences with serum fractionation by cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis. The SMME membrane exhibited almost no EOF during electrophoresis, unlike the cellulose acetate membrane, but afforded comparative results for serum fractionation. The visualization of each fraction was achieved by conventional staining with dye such as Direct Blue-71, and objective quantification was obtained by densitometry after inducing membrane transparency with 1-nonene. Immunostaining was also achieved. Moreover, mass spectrometric analysis of both N-linked and O-linked glycans from the separated bands was demonstrated. Serum fractionation and glycan profiling of each fraction using SMME will enable novel insights into the relationships between various glycosylation profiles and disease states.

  11. Osteoblast fibronectin mRNA, protein synthesis, and matrix are unchanged after exposure to microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hughes-Fulford, M.; Gilbertson, V.

    1999-01-01

    The well-defined osteoblast line, MC3T3-E1 was used to examine fibronectin (FN) mRNA levels, protein synthesis, and extracellular FN matrix accumulation after growth activation in spaceflight. These osteoblasts produce FN extracellular matrix (ECM) known to regulate adhesion, differentiation, and function in adherent cells. Changes in bone ECM and osteoblast cell shape occur in spaceflight. To determine whether altered FN matrix is a factor in causing these changes in spaceflight, quiescent osteoblasts were launched into microgravity and were then sera activated with and without a 1-gravity field. Synthesis of FN mRNA, protein, and matrix were measured after activation in microgravity. FN mRNA synthesis is significantly reduced in microgravity (0-G) when compared to ground (GR) osteoblasts flown in a centrifuge simulating earth's gravity (1-G) field 2.5 h after activation. However, 27.5 h after activation there were no significant differences in mRNA synthesis. A small but significant reduction of FN protein was found in the 0-G samples 2.5 h after activation. Total FN protein 27.5 h after activation showed no significant difference between any of the gravity conditions, however, there was a fourfold increase in absolute amount of protein synthesized during the incubation. Using immunofluorescence, we found no significant differences in the amount or in the orientation of the FN matrix after 27.5 h in microgravity. These results demonstrate that FN is made by sera-activated osteoblasts even during exposure to microgravity. These data also suggest that after a total period of 43 h of spaceflight FN transcription, translation, or altered matrix assembly is not responsible for the altered cell shape or altered matrix formation of osteoblasts.

  12. Novel proteins identified in the insoluble byssal matrix of the freshwater zebra mussel.

    PubMed

    Gantayet, Arpita; Rees, David J; Sone, Eli D

    2014-04-01

    The freshwater zebra mussel, Dreissena polymorpha, is an invasive, biofouling species that adheres to a variety of substrates underwater, using a proteinaceous anchor called the byssus. The byssus consists of a number of threads with adhesive plaques at the tips. It contains the unusual amino acid 3, 4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), which is believed to play an important role in adhesion, in addition to providing structural integrity to the byssus through cross-linking. Extensive DOPA cross-linking, however, renders the zebra mussel byssus highly resistant to protein extraction, and therefore limits byssal protein identification. We report here on the identification of seven novel byssal proteins in the insoluble byssal matrix following protein extraction from induced, freshly secreted byssal threads with minimal cross-linking. These proteins were identified by LC-MS/MS analysis of tryptic digests of the matrix proteins by spectrum matching against a zebra mussel cDNA library of genes unique to the mussel foot, the organ that secretes the byssus. All seven proteins were present in both the plaque and thread. Comparisons of the protein sequences revealed common features of zebra mussel byssal proteins, and several recurring sequence motifs. Although their sequences are unique, many of the proteins display similarities to marine mussel byssal proteins, as well as to adhesive and structural proteins from other species. The large expansion of the byssal proteome reported here represents an important step towards understanding zebra mussel adhesion.

  13. Fractionation of the Gulf Toadfish Intestinal Precipitate Organic Matrix Reveals Potential Functions of Individual Proteins.

    PubMed

    Schauer, Kevin L; Grosell, Martin

    2017-03-15

    The regulatory mechanisms behind the production of CaCO3 in the marine teleost intestine are poorly studied despite being essential for osmoregulation and responsible for a conservatively estimated 3-15% of annual oceanic CaCO3 production. It has recently been reported that the intestinally derived precipitates produced by fish as a byproduct of their osmoregulatory strategy form in conjunction with a proteinaceous matrix containing nearly 150 unique proteins. The individual functions of these proteins have not been the subject of investigation until now. Here, organic matrix was extracted from precipitates produced by Gulf toadfish (Opsanus beta) and the matrix proteins were fractionated by their charge using strong anion exchange chromatography. The precipitation regulatory abilities of the individual fractions were then analyzed using a recently developed in vitro calcification assay, and the protein constituents of each fraction were determined by mass spectrometry. The different fractions were found to have differing effects on both the rate of carbonate mineral production, as well as the morphology of the crystals that form. Using data collected from the calcification assay as well as the mass spectrometry experiments, individual calcification promotional indices were calculated for each protein, giving the first insight into the functions each of these matrix proteins may play in regulating precipitation.

  14. Expression Patterns of Extracellular Matrix Proteins during Posterior Commissure Development

    PubMed Central

    Stanic, Karen; Saldivia, Natalia; Förstera, Benjamín; Torrejón, Marcela; Montecinos, Hernán; Caprile, Teresa

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules are pivotal for central nervous system (CNS) development, facilitating cell migration, axonal growth, myelination, dendritic spine formation, and synaptic plasticity, among other processes. During axon guidance, the ECM not only acts as a permissive or non-permissive substrate for navigating axons, but also modulates the effects of classical guidance cues, such as netrin or Eph/ephrin family members. Despite being highly important, little is known about the expression of ECM molecules during CNS development. Therefore, this study assessed the molecular expression patterns of tenascin, HNK-1, laminin, fibronectin, perlecan, decorin, and osteopontin along chick embryo prosomere 1 during posterior commissure development. The posterior commissure is the first transversal axonal tract of the embryonic vertebrate brain. Located in the dorso-caudal portion of prosomere 1, posterior commissure axons primarily arise from the neurons of basal pretectal nuclei that run dorsally to the roof plate midline, where some turn toward the ipsilateral side. Expressional analysis of ECM molecules in this area these revealed to be highly arranged, and molecule interactions with axon fascicles suggested involvement in processes other than structural support. In particular, tenascin and the HNK-1 epitope extended in ventro-dorsal columns and enclosed axons during navigation to the roof plate. Laminin and osteopontin were expressed in the midline, very close to axons that at this point must decide between extending to the contralateral side or turning to the ipsilateral side. Finally, fibronectin, decorin, and perlecan appeared unrelated to axonal pathfinding in this region and were instead restricted to the external limiting membrane. In summary, the present report provides evidence for an intricate expression of different extracellular molecules that may cooperate in guiding posterior commissure axons. PMID:27733818

  15. Role of oligomerization domains in thrombospondins and other extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Engel, Jürgen

    2004-06-01

    Coiled coils, collagen triple helices and globular oligomerization domains mediate the subunit assembly of many proteins in vertebrates and invertebrates. Oligomerization offers functional advantages including multivalency, increased binding strength and the combined function of different domains. These features are seen in natural proteins and may be introduced by protein engineering. The special focus of this review is on oligomerization domain of extracellular matrix proteins. For thrombospondins, initial interesting results on the functional role of oligomerization have been published. Other features remain to be explored. For example, it is not clear why thrombospondin-1 and thrombospondin-2 are trimers whereas thrombospondins-3 to -5 are pentamers. To stimulate this type of research, this review makes a survey of oligomerization domains and their functional role in extracellular matrix proteins.

  16. The incorporation of extracellular matrix proteins in protein polymer hydrogels to improve encapsulated beta-cell function.

    PubMed

    Beenken-Rothkopf, Liese N; Karfeld-Sulzer, Lindsay S; Davis, Nicolynn E; Forster, Ryan; Barron, Annelise E; Fontaine, Magali J

    2013-01-01

    Biomaterial encapsulation of islets has been proposed to improve the long-term success of islet transplantation by recreating a suitable microenvironment and enhancing cell-matrix interactions that affect cellular function. Protein polymer hydrogels previously showed promise as a biocompatible scaffold by maintaining high cell viability. Here, enzymatically-crosslinked protein polymers were used to investigate the effects of varying scaffold properties and of introducing ECM proteins on the viability and function of encapsulated MIN6 β-cells. Chemical and mechanical properties of the hydrogel were modified by altering the protein concentrations while collagen IV, fibronectin, and laminin were incorporated to reestablish cell-matrix interactions lost during cell isolation. Rheology indicated all hydrogels formed quickly, resulting in robust, elastic hydrogels with Young's moduli similar to soft tissue. All hydrogels tested supported both high MIN6 β-cell viability and function and have the potential to serve as an encapsulation platform for islet cell delivery in vivo.

  17. Store-Operated Ca2+ Channels in Mesangial Cells Inhibit Matrix Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Wu, Peiwen; Wang, Yanxia; Davis, Mark E; Zuckerman, Jonathan E; Chaudhari, Sarika; Begg, Malcolm; Ma, Rong

    2015-11-01

    Accumulation of extracellular matrix derived from glomerular mesangial cells is an early feature of diabetic nephropathy. Ca(2+) signals mediated by store-operated Ca(2+) channels regulate protein production in a variety of cell types. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of store-operated Ca(2+) channels in mesangial cells on extracellular matrix protein expression. In cultured human mesangial cells, activation of store-operated Ca(2+) channels by thapsigargin significantly decreased fibronectin protein expression and collagen IV mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Conversely, inhibition of the channels by 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate significantly increased the expression of fibronectin and collagen IV. Similarly, overexpression of stromal interacting molecule 1 reduced, but knockdown of calcium release-activated calcium channel protein 1 (Orai1) increased fibronectin protein expression. Furthermore, 2-aminoethyl diphenylborinate significantly augmented angiotensin II-induced fibronectin protein expression, whereas thapsigargin abrogated high glucose- and TGF-β1-stimulated matrix protein expression. In vivo knockdown of Orai1 in mesangial cells of mice using a targeted nanoparticle siRNA delivery system resulted in increased expression of glomerular fibronectin and collagen IV, and mice showed significant mesangial expansion compared with controls. Similarly, in vivo knockdown of stromal interacting molecule 1 in mesangial cells by recombinant adeno-associated virus-encoded shRNA markedly increased collagen IV protein expression in renal cortex and caused mesangial expansion in rats. These results suggest that store-operated Ca(2+) channels in mesangial cells negatively regulate extracellular matrix protein expression in the kidney, which may serve as an endogenous renoprotective mechanism in diabetes.

  18. An Overview of the Medical Applications of Marine Skeletal Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, M. Azizur

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, the medicinal potential of marine organisms has attracted increasing attention. This is due to their immense diversity and adaptation to unique ecological niches that has led to vast physiological and biochemical diversification. Among these organisms, marine calcifiers are an abundant source of novel proteins and chemical entities that can be used for drug discovery. Studies of the skeletal organic matrix proteins of marine calcifiers have focused on biomedical applications such as the identification of growth inducing proteins that can be used for bone regeneration, for example, 2/4 bone morphogenic proteins (BMP). Although a few reports on the functions of proteins derived from marine calcifiers can be found in the literature, marine calcifiers themselves remain an untapped source of proteins for the development of innovative pharmaceuticals. Following an overview of the current knowledge of skeletal organic matrix proteins from marine calcifiers, this review will focus on various aspects of marine skeletal protein research including sources, biosynthesis, structures, and possible strategies for chemical or physical modification. Special attention will be given to potential medical applications and recent discoveries of skeletal proteins and polysaccharides with biologically appealing characteristics. In addition, I will introduce an effective protocol for sample preparation and protein purification that includes isolation technology for biopolymers (of both soluble and insoluble organic matrices) from coralline algae. These algae are a widespread but poorly studied group of shallow marine calcifiers that have great potential for marine drug discovery. PMID:27626432

  19. A composite agarose-polyacrylamide matrix as two-dimensional hard support for solid-phase protein assays.

    PubMed

    Krajewski, Wladyslaw A

    2016-03-15

    The solid-phase protein assays using blotting membranes as hard support do not allow achieving the low background and sensitivity of protein staining in clear gels. The membrane opacity complicates imaging of results on standard lab documentation systems. We describe a low-cost transparent matrix that can be used as an alternative to polymeric membranes for solid-phase assays. Protein samples are spotted onto a dry film of composite agarose-polyacrylamide matrix covering standard glass microscopic slides. After rehydration in protein-fixing solution, matrix with protein samples can be detached from glass support and stained as conventional protein polyacrylamide gels.

  20. Extracellular matrix mineralization in periodontal tissues: Noncollagenous matrix proteins, enzymes, and relationship to hypophosphatasia and X-linked hypophosphatemia

    PubMed Central

    McKee, Marc D.; Hoac, Betty; Addison, William N.; Barros, Nilana M.T.; Millán, José Luis; Chaussain, Catherine

    2013-01-01

    As broadly demonstrated for the formation of a functional skeleton, proper mineralization of periodontal alveolar bone and teeth – where calcium phosphate crystals are deposited and grow within an extracellular matrix – is essential to dental function. Mineralization defects in tooth dentin and cementum of the periodontium invariably lead to a weak (soft or brittle) dentition such that teeth become loose and prone to infection and are lost prematurely. Mineralization of the extremities of periodontal ligament fibres (Sharpey's fibres) where they insert into tooth cementum and alveolar bone is also essential for the function of the tooth suspensory apparatus in occlusion and mastication. Molecular determinants of mineralization in these tissues include mineral ion concentrations (phosphate and calcium), pyrophosphate, small integrin-binding ligand N-linked glycoproteins (SIBLINGs), and matrix vesicles. Amongst the enzymes important in regulating these mineralization determinants, two are discussed at length here with clinical examples given, namely tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase (TNAP) and phosphate-regulating gene with homologies to endopeptidases on the X chromosome (PHEX). Inactivating mutations in these enzymes in humans and in mouse models lead to the soft bones and teeth characteristic of hypophosphatasia (HPP) and X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH), respectively, where levels of local and systemic circulating mineralization determinants are perturbed. In XLH, in addition to renal phosphate wasting causing low circulating phosphate levels, phosphorylated mineralization-regulating SIBLING proteins such as matrix extracellular phosphoglycoprotein (MEPE) and osteopontin (OPN), and the phosphorylated peptides proteolytically released from them such as the acidic serine- and aspartate-rich motif (ASARM) peptide, may accumulate locally to impair mineralization in this disease. PMID:23931057

  1. Silkmapin of Hyriopsis cumingii, a novel silk-like shell matrix protein involved in nacre formation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Bai, Zhiyi; Wang, Guiling; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-25

    Understanding the role of matrix proteins in nacre formation and biomineralization in mollusks is important for the pearl industry. In this study, the gene encoding the novel Hyriopsis cumingii shell matrix protein silkmapin was characterized. The gene encodes a protein of 30.89kDa in which Gly accounts for 34.41% of the amino acid content, and the C-terminal region binds Ca(2+). Secondary structure prediction indicated a predominantly β-fold and a structure typical of filamentous proteins. Real-time quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization showed that silkmapin was expressed in epithelial cells at the edge and pallial of mantle tissue, indicated that silkmapin play roles in the shell nacreous and prismatic layer formation. Further real-time PCR results indicated an involvement in pearl formation via nucleation of calcium carbonate prior to formation of the nacre.

  2. LRPPRC is a mitochondrial matrix protein that is conserved in metazoans

    SciTech Connect

    Sterky, Fredrik H.; Ruzzenente, Benedetta; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Samuelsson, Tore; Larsson, Nils-Goeran

    2010-08-06

    Research highlights: {yields} LRPPRC orthologs are restricted to metazoans. {yields} LRPPRC is imported to the mitochondrial matrix. {yields} No evidence of nuclear isoform. -- Abstract: LRPPRC (also called LRP130) is an RNA-binding pentatricopeptide repeat protein. LRPPRC has been recognized as a mitochondrial protein, but has also been shown to regulate nuclear gene transcription and to bind specific RNA molecules in both the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We here present a bioinformatic analysis of the LRPPRC primary sequence, which reveals that orthologs to the LRPPRC gene are restricted to metazoan cells and that all of the corresponding proteins contain mitochondrial targeting signals. To address the subcellular localization further, we have carefully analyzed LRPPRC in mammalian cells and identified a single isoform that is exclusively localized to mitochondria. The LRPPRC protein is imported to the mitochondrial matrix and its mitochondrial targeting sequence is cleaved upon entry.

  3. Diversity of bone matrix adhesion proteins modulates osteoblast attachment and organization of actin cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    Demais, V; Audrain, C; Mabilleau, G; Chappard, D; Baslé, M F

    2014-06-01

    Interaction of cells with extracellular matrix is an essential event for differentiation, proliferation and activity of osteoblasts. In bone, binding of osteoblasts to bone matrix is required to determine specific activities of the cells and to synthesize matrix bone proteins. Integrins are the major cell receptors involved in the cell linkage to matrix proteins such as fibronectin, type I collagen and vitronectin, via the RGD-sequences. In this study, cultures of osteoblast-like cells (Saos-2) were done on coated glass coverslips in various culture conditions: DMEM alone or DMEM supplemented with poly-L-lysine (PL), fetal calf serum (FCS), fibronectin (FN), vitronectin (VN) and type I collagen (Col-I). The aim of the study was to determine the specific effect of these bone matrix proteins on cell adherence and morphology and on the cytoskeleton status. Morphological characteristics of cultured cells were studied using scanning electron microscopy and image analysis. The heterogeneity of cytoskeleton was studied using fractal analysis (skyscrapers and blanket algorithms) after specific preparation of cells to expose the cytoskeleton. FAK and MAPK signaling pathways were studied by western blotting in these various culture conditions. Results demonstrated that cell adhesion was reduced with PL and VN after 240 min. After 60 min of adhesion, cytoskeleton organization was enhanced with FN, VN and Col-I. No difference in FAK phosphorylation was observed but MAPK phosphorylation was modulated by specific adhesion on extracellular proteins. These results indicate that culture conditions modulate cell adhesion, cytoskeleton organization and intracellular protein pathways according to extracellular proteins present for adhesion.

  4. Mitochondrial Matrix Ca2+ Accumulation Regulates Cytosolic NAD+/NADH Metabolism, Protein Acetylation, and Sirtuin Expression

    PubMed Central

    Marcu, Raluca; Wiczer, Brian M.; Neeley, Christopher K.

    2014-01-01

    Mitochondrial calcium uptake stimulates bioenergetics and drives energy production in metabolic tissue. It is unknown how a calcium-mediated acceleration in matrix bioenergetics would influence cellular metabolism in glycolytic cells that do not require mitochondria for ATP production. Using primary human endothelial cells (ECs), we discovered that repetitive cytosolic calcium signals (oscillations) chronically loaded into the mitochondrial matrix. Mitochondrial calcium loading in turn stimulated bioenergetics and a persistent elevation in NADH. Rather than serving as an impetus for mitochondrial ATP generation, matrix NADH rapidly transmitted to the cytosol to influence the activity and expression of cytosolic sirtuins, resulting in global changes in protein acetylation. In endothelial cells, the mitochondrion-driven reduction in both the cytosolic and mitochondrial NAD+/NADH ratio stimulated a compensatory increase in SIRT1 protein levels that had an anti-inflammatory effect. Our studies reveal the physiologic importance of mitochondrial bioenergetics in the metabolic regulation of sirtuins and cytosolic signaling cascades. PMID:24865966

  5. Conservation of Transit Peptide-Independent Protein Import into the Mitochondrial and Hydrogenosomal Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Garg, Sriram; Stölting, Jan; Zimorski, Verena; Rada, Petr; Tachezy, Jan; Martin, William F.; Gould, Sven B.

    2015-01-01

    The origin of protein import was a key step in the endosymbiotic acquisition of mitochondria. Though the main translocon of the mitochondrial outer membrane, TOM40, is ubiquitous among organelles of mitochondrial ancestry, the transit peptides, or N-terminal targeting sequences (NTSs), recognised by the TOM complex, are not. To better understand the nature of evolutionary conservation in mitochondrial protein import, we investigated the targeting behavior of Trichomonas vaginalis hydrogenosomal proteins in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and vice versa. Hydrogenosomes import yeast mitochondrial proteins even in the absence of their native NTSs, but do not import yeast cytosolic proteins. Conversely, yeast mitochondria import hydrogenosomal proteins with and without their short NTSs. Conservation of an NTS-independent mitochondrial import route from excavates to opisthokonts indicates its presence in the eukaryote common ancestor. Mitochondrial protein import is known to entail electrophoresis of positively charged NTSs across the electrochemical gradient of the inner mitochondrial membrane. Our present findings indicate that mitochondrial transit peptides, which readily arise from random sequences, were initially selected as a signal for charge-dependent protein targeting specifically to the mitochondrial matrix. Evolutionary loss of the electron transport chain in hydrogenosomes and mitosomes lifted the selective constraints that maintain positive charge in NTSs, allowing first the NTS charge, and subsequently the NTS itself, to be lost. This resulted in NTS-independent matrix targeting, which is conserved across the evolutionary divide separating trichomonads and yeast, and which we propose is the ancestral state of mitochondrial protein import. PMID:26338186

  6. Controlled protein delivery from electrospun non-wovens: novel combination of protein crystals and a biodegradable release matrix.

    PubMed

    Puhl, Sebastian; Li, Linhao; Meinel, Lorenz; Germershaus, Oliver

    2014-07-07

    Poly-ε-caprolactone (PCL) is an excellent polymer for electrospinning and matrix-controlled drug delivery combining optimal processability and good biocompatibility. Electrospinning of proteins has been shown to be challenging via the use of organic solvents, frequently resulting in protein unfolding or aggregation. Encapsulation of protein crystals represents an attractive but largely unexplored alternative to established protein encapsulation techniques because of increased thermodynamic stability and improved solvent resistance of the crystalline state. We herein explore the electrospinning of protein crystal suspensions and establish basic design principles for this novel type of protein delivery system. PCL was deployed as a matrix, and lysozyme was used as a crystallizing model protein. By rational combination of lysozyme crystals 0.7 or 2.1 μm in diameter and a PCL fiber diameter between 1.6 and 10 μm, release within the first 24 h could be varied between approximately 10 and 100%. Lysozyme loading of PCL microfibers between 0.5 and 5% was achieved without affecting processability. While relative release was unaffected by loading percentage, the amount of lysozyme released could be tailored. PCL was blended with poly(ethylene glycol) and poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) to further modify the release rate. Under optimized conditions, an almost constant lysozyme release over 11 weeks was achieved.

  7. Immunolocalization of skeletal matrix proteins in tissue and mineral of the coral Stylophora pistillata

    PubMed Central

    Mass, Tali; Drake, Jeana L.; Peters, Esther C.; Jiang, Wenge; Falkowski, Paul G.

    2014-01-01

    The precipitation and assembly of calcium carbonate skeletons by stony corals is a precisely controlled process regulated by the secretion of an ECM. Recently, it has been reported that the proteome of the skeletal organic matrix (SOM) contains a group of coral acid-rich proteins as well as an assemblage of adhesion and structural proteins, which together, create a framework for the precipitation of aragonite. To date, we are aware of no report that has investigated the localization of individual SOM proteins in the skeleton. In particular, no data are available on the ultrastructural mapping of these proteins in the calcification site or the skeleton. This information is crucial to assessing the role of these proteins in biomineralization. Immunological techniques represent a valuable approach to localize a single component within a calcified skeleton. By using immunogold labeling and immunohistochemical assays, here we show the spatial arrangement of key matrix proteins in tissue and skeleton of the common zooxanthellate coral, Stylophora pistillata. To our knowledge, our results reveal for the first time that, at the nanoscale, skeletal proteins are embedded within the aragonite crystals in a highly ordered arrangement consistent with a diel calcification pattern. In the tissue, these proteins are not restricted to the calcifying epithelium, suggesting that they also play other roles in the coral’s metabolic pathways. PMID:25139990

  8. Matrix Sublimation/Recrystallization for Imaging Proteins by Mass Spectrometry at High Spatial Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    We have employed matrix deposition by sublimation for protein image analysis on tissue sections using a hydration/recrystallization process that produces high quality MALDI mass spectra and high spatial resolution ion images. We systematically investigated different washing protocols, the effect of tissue section thickness, the amount of sublimated matrix per unit area and different recrystallization conditions. The results show that an organic solvent rinse followed by ethanol/water rinses substantially increased sensitivity for the detection of proteins. Both the thickness of tissue section and amount of sinapinic acid sublimated per unit area have optimal ranges for maximal protein signal intensity. Ion images of mouse and rat brain sections at 50, 20 and 10 µm spatial resolution are presented and are correlated with H&E stained optical images. For targeted analysis, histology directed imaging can be performed using this protocol where MS analysis and H&E staining are performed on the same section. PMID:21639088

  9. TGF beta receptor II interacting protein-1, an intracellular protein has an extracellular role as a modulator of matrix mineralization

    PubMed Central

    Ramachandran, Amsaveni; Ravindran, Sriram; Huang, Chun-Chieh; George, Anne

    2016-01-01

    Transforming growth factor beta receptor II interacting protein 1 (TRIP-1), a predominantly intracellular protein is localized in the ECM of bone. TRIP-1 lacks a signal peptide, therefore, in this study, we provide evidence that intracellular TRIP-1 can be packaged and exported to the ECM via exosomes. Overexpression of TRIP-1 in MC3T3-E1 cells resulted in increased matrix mineralization during differentiation and knockdown resulted in reduced effects. In vivo function of TRIP-1 was studied by an implantation assay performed using TRIP-1 overexpressing and knockdown cells cultured in a 3-dimmensional scaffold. After 4 weeks, the subcutaneous tissues from TRIP-1 overexpressing cells showed higher calcium and phosphate deposits, arranged collagen fibrils and increased expression of Runx2 and alkaline phosphatase. Nucleation studies on demineralized and deproteinized dentin wafer is a powerful tool to determine the functional role of noncollagenous proteins in matrix mineralization. Using this system, we provide evidence that TRIP-1 binds to Type-I collagen and can promote mineralization. Surface plasmon resonance analysis demonstrated that TRIP-1 binds to collagen with KD = 48 μM. SEM and TEM analysis showed that TRIP-1 promoted the nucleation and growth of calcium phosphate mineral aggregates. Taken together, we provide mechanistic insights of this intracellular protein in matrix mineralization. PMID:27883077

  10. Matrix Gla Protein Binds to Fibronectin and Enhances Cell Attachment and Spreading on Fibronectin

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Satoru Ken; Nishimoto, Miyako

    2014-01-01

    Background. Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a vitamin K-dependent, extracellular matrix protein. MGP is a calcification inhibitor of arteries and cartilage. However MGP is synthesized in many tissues and is especially enriched in embryonic tissues and in cancer cells. The presence of MGP in those instances does not correlate well with the calcification inhibitory role. This study explores a potential mechanism for MGP to bind to matrix proteins and alter cell matrix interactions. Methods. To determine whether MGP influences cell behavior through interaction with fibronectin, we studied MGP binding to fibronectin, the effect of MGP on fibronectin mediated cell attachment and spreading and immunolocalized MGP and fibronectin. Results. First, MGP binds to fibronectin. The binding site for MGP is in a specific fibronectin fragment, called III1-C or anastellin. The binding site for fibronectin is in a MGP C-terminal peptide comprising amino acids 61–77. Second, MGP enhances cell attachment and cell spreading on fibronectin. MGP alone does not promote cell adhesion. Third, MGP is present in fibronectin-rich regions of tissue sections. Conclusions. MGP binds to fibronectin. The presence of MGP increased cell-fibronectin interactions. PMID:25210519

  11. Spatiotemporal segregation of endothelial cell integrin and nonintegrin extracellular matrix-binding proteins during adhesion events

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    Bovine aortic endothelial cell (BAEC) attachments to laminin, fibronectin, and fibrinogen are inhibited by soluble arginine-glycine- aspartate (RGD)-containing peptides, and YGRGDSP activity is responsive to titration of either soluble peptide or matrix protein. To assess the presence of RGD-dependent receptors, immunoprecipitation and immunoblotting studies were conducted and demonstrated integrin beta 1, beta 3, and associated alpha subunits as well as a beta 1 precursor. Immunofluorescence of BAECs plated on laminin, fibronectin, and fibrinogen reveals different matrix-binding specificities of each of these integrin subclasses. By 1 h after plating, organization of beta 1 integrin into fibrillar streaks is influenced by laminin and fibronectin, whereas beta 3 integrin punctate organization is influenced by fibrinogen and the integrin spatial distribution changes with time in culture. In contrast, the nonintegrin laminin-binding protein LB69 only organizes after cell-substrate contact is well established several hours after plating. Migration of BAECs is also mediated by both integrin and nonintegrin matrix-binding proteins. Specifically, BAEC migration on laminin is remarkably sensitive to RGD peptide inhibition, and, in its presence, beta 1 integrin organization dissipates and reorganizes into perinuclear vesicles. However, RGD peptides do not alter LB69 linear organization during migration. Similarly, agents that block LB69--e.g., antibodies to LB69 as well as YIGSR-NH2 peptide--do not inhibit attachment of nonmotile BAECs to laminin. However, both anti-LB69 and YIGSR-NH2 inhibit late adhesive events such as spreading. Accordingly, we propose that integrin and nonintegrin extracellular matrix-binding protein organizations in BAECs are both temporally and spatially segregated during attachment processes. High affinity nonintegrin interaction with matrix may create necessary stable contacts for longterm attachment, while lower affinity integrins may be important

  12. Nipah Virus Matrix Protein Influences Fusogenicity and Is Essential for Particle Infectivity and Stability

    PubMed Central

    Dietzel, Erik; Kolesnikova, Larissa; Sawatsky, Bevan; Heiner, Anja; Weis, Michael; Kobinger, Gary P.; Becker, Stephan; von Messling, Veronika

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Nipah virus (NiV) causes fatal encephalitic infections in humans. To characterize the role of the matrix (M) protein in the viral life cycle, we generated a reverse genetics system based on NiV strain Malaysia. Using an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-expressing M protein-deleted NiV, we observed a slightly increased cell-cell fusion, slow replication kinetics, and significantly reduced peak titers compared to the parental virus. While increased amounts of viral proteins were found in the supernatant of cells infected with M-deleted NiV, the infectivity-to-particle ratio was more than 100-fold reduced, and the particles were less thermostable and of more irregular morphology. Taken together, our data demonstrate that the M protein is not absolutely required for the production of cell-free NiV but is necessary for proper assembly and release of stable infectious NiV particles. IMPORTANCE Henipaviruses cause a severe disease with high mortality in human patients. Therefore, these viruses can be studied only in biosafety level 4 (BSL-4) laboratories, making it more challenging to characterize their life cycle. Here we investigated the role of the Nipah virus matrix protein in virus-mediated cell-cell fusion and in the formation and release of newly produced particles. We found that even though low levels of infectious viruses are produced in the absence of the matrix protein, it is required for the release of highly infectious and stable particles. Fusogenicity of matrixless viruses was slightly enhanced, further demonstrating the critical role of this protein in different steps of Nipah virus spread. PMID:26676785

  13. Influence of lipids on the interfacial disposition of respiratory syncytical virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    McPhee, Helen K; Carlisle, Jennifer L; Beeby, Andrew; Money, Victoria A; Watson, Scott M D; Yeo, R Paul; Sanderson, John M

    2011-01-04

    The propensity of a matrix protein from an enveloped virus of the Mononegavirales family to associate with lipids representative of the viral envelope has been determined using label-free methods, including tensiometry and Brewster angle microscopy on lipid films at the air-water interface and atomic force microscopy on monolayers transferred to OTS-treated silicon wafers. This has enabled factors that influence the disposition of the protein with respect to the lipid interface to be characterized. In the absence of sphingomyelin, respiratory syncytial virus matrix protein penetrates monolayers composed of mixtures of phosphocholines with phosphoethanolamines or cholesterol at the air-water interface. In ternary mixtures composed of sphingomyelin, 1,2-dioleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine, and cholesterol, the protein exhibits two separate behaviors: (1) peripheral association with the surface of sphingomyelin-rich domains and (2) penetration of sphingomyelin-poor domains. Prolonged incubation of the protein with mixtures of phosphocholines and phosphoethanolamines leads to the formation of helical protein assemblies of uniform diameter that demonstrate an inherent propensity of the protein to assemble into a filamentous form.

  14. Identification of Protein-Protein Interactions via a Novel Matrix-Based Sequence Representation Model with Amino Acid Contact Information.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yijie; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-09-24

    Identification of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) is a difficult and important problem in biology. Since experimental methods for predicting PPIs are both expensive and time-consuming, many computational methods have been developed to predict PPIs and interaction networks, which can be used to complement experimental approaches. However, these methods have limitations to overcome. They need a large number of homology proteins or literature to be applied in their method. In this paper, we propose a novel matrix-based protein sequence representation approach to predict PPIs, using an ensemble learning method for classification. We construct the matrix of Amino Acid Contact (AAC), based on the statistical analysis of residue-pairing frequencies in a database of 6323 protein-protein complexes. We first represent the protein sequence as a Substitution Matrix Representation (SMR) matrix. Then, the feature vector is extracted by applying algorithms of Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) on the SMR matrix. Finally, we feed the feature vector into a Random Forest (RF) for judging interaction pairs and non-interaction pairs. Our method is applied to several PPI datasets to evaluate its performance. On the S . c e r e v i s i a e dataset, our method achieves 94 . 83 % accuracy and 92 . 40 % sensitivity. Compared with existing methods, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 0 . 11 percentage points. On the H . p y l o r i dataset, our method achieves 89 . 06 % accuracy and 88 . 15 % sensitivity, the accuracy of our method is increased by 0 . 76 % . On the H u m a n PPI dataset, our method achieves 97 . 60 % accuracy and 96 . 37 % sensitivity, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 1 . 30 % . In addition, we test our method on a very important PPI network, and it achieves 92 . 71 % accuracy. In the Wnt-related network, the accuracy of our method is increased by 16 . 67 % . The source code and all datasets are available

  15. In-depth proteomic analysis of shell matrix proteins of Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chuang; Li, Shiguo; Kong, Jingjing; Liu, Yangjia; Wang, Tianpeng; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-01-01

    The shells of pearl oysters, Pinctada fucata, are composed of calcite and aragonite and possess remarkable mechanical properties. These shells are formed under the regulation of macromolecules, especially shell matrix proteins (SMPs). Identification of diverse SMPs will lay a foundation for understanding biomineralization process. Here, we identified 72 unique SMPs using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) analysis of proteins extracted from the shells of P. fucata combined with a draft genome. Of 72 SMPs, 17 SMPs are related to both the prismatic and nacreous layers. Moreover, according to the diverse domains found in the SMPs, we hypothesize that in addition to controlling CaCO3 crystallization and crystal organization, these proteins may potentially regulate the extracellular microenvironment and communicate between cells and the extracellular matrix (ECM). Immunohistological localization techniques identify the SMPs in the mantle, shells and synthetic calcite. Together, these proteomic data increase the repertoires of the shell matrix proteins in P. fucata and suggest that shell formation in P. fucata may involve tight regulation of cellular activities and the extracellular microenvironment. PMID:26608573

  16. Osteofibrous dysplasia and adamantinoma: correlation of proto-oncogene product and matrix protein expression.

    PubMed

    Maki, Masahiiko; Athanasou, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the relationship between osteofibrous dysplasia (OFD) and adamantinoma, we analyzed the expression of several proto-oncogene products and extracellular matrix proteins by immunohistochemistry and correlated our results with histological and ultrastructural findings. C-fos and c-jun, but not c-Met, were observed in OFD and in the fibrous and epithelial components of differentiated and classical adamantinomas. Staining for collagen IV, laminin and galectin-3, a laminin binding protein was seen in OFD and around cell nests in adamantinoma. E-, P-, and N-cadherin expression was found in all cases of classical adamantinoma, but not in differentiated adamantinoma or OFD. Osteonectin was detected in both the epithelial and fibrous components of adamantinomas, but osteopontin and osteocalcin were not seen in classical adamantinomas. The results show common expression of a number of oncoproteins and bone matrix proteins in adamantinoma and OFD, some of which are associated with mesenchymal-to-epithelial cell transformation. These findings would be in keeping with the hypothesis that OFD represents a precursor lesion of adamantinoma. Differential expression of a number of bone matrix protein in adamantinoma may also be of diagnostic use in distinguishing these 2 lesions immunohistochemically.

  17. Insider trading: Extracellular matrix proteins and their non-canonical intracellular roles.

    PubMed

    Hellewell, Andrew L; Adams, Josephine C

    2016-01-01

    In metazoans, the extracellular matrix (ECM) provides a dynamic, heterogeneous microenvironment that has important supportive and instructive roles. Although the primary site of action of ECM proteins is extracellular, evidence is emerging for non-canonical intracellular roles. Examples include osteopontin, thrombospondins, IGF-binding protein 3 and biglycan, and relate to roles in transcription, cell-stress responses, autophagy and cancer. These findings pose conceptual problems on how proteins signalled for secretion can be routed to the cytosol or nucleus, or can function in environments with diverse redox, pH and ionic conditions. We review evidence for intracellular locations and functions of ECM proteins, and current knowledge of the mechanisms by which they may enter intracellular compartments. We evaluate the experimental methods that are appropriate to obtain rigorous evidence for intracellular localisation and function. Better insight into this under-researched topic is needed to decipher the complete spectrum of physiological and pathological roles of ECM proteins.

  18. Identification of Biofilm Matrix-Associated Proteins from an Acid Mine Drainage Microbial Community

    SciTech Connect

    Jiao, Yongqin; D'Haeseleer, Patrik M; Dill, Brian; Shah, Manesh B; Verberkmoes, Nathan C; Hettich, Robert {Bob} L; Banfield, Jillian F.; Thelen, Michael P.

    2011-01-01

    In microbial communities, extracellular polymeric substances (EPS), also called the extracellular matrix, provide the spatial organization and structural stability during biofilm development. One of the major components of EPS is protein, but it is not clear what specific functions these proteins contribute to the extracellular matrix or to microbial physiology. To investigate this in biofilms from an extremely acidic environment, we used shotgun proteomics analyses to identify proteins associated with EPS in biofilms at two developmental stages, designated DS1 and DS2. The proteome composition of the EPS was significantly different from that of the cell fraction, with more than 80% of the cellular proteins underrepresented or undetectable in EPS. In contrast, predicted periplasmic, outer membrane, and extracellular proteins were overrepresented by 3- to 7-fold in EPS. Also, EPS proteins were more basic by 2 pH units on average and about half the length. When categorized by predicted function, proteins involved in motility, defense, cell envelope, and unknown functions were enriched in EPS. Chaperones, such as histone-like DNA binding protein and cold shock protein, were overrepresented in EPS. Enzymes, such as protein peptidases, disulfide-isomerases, and those associated with cell wall and polysaccharide metabolism, were also detected. Two of these enzymes, identified as -N-acetylhexosaminidase and cellulase, were confirmed in the EPS fraction by enzymatic activity assays. Compared to the differences between EPS and cellular fractions, the relative differences in the EPS proteomes between DS1 and DS2 were smaller and consistent with expected physiological changes during biofilm development.

  19. Regulation of Extracellular Matrix Remodeling Proteins by Osteoblasts in Titanium Nanoparticle-Induced Aseptic Loosening Model.

    PubMed

    Xie, Jing; Hou, Yanhua; Fu, Na; Cai, Xiaoxiao; Li, Guo; Peng, Qiang; Lin, Yunfeng

    2015-10-01

    Titanium (Ti)-wear particles, formed at the bone-implant interface, are responsible for aseptic loosening, which is a main cause of total joint replacement failure. There have been many studies on Ti particle-induced function changes in mono-cultured osteoblasts and synovial cells. However, little is known on extracellular matrix remodeling displayed by osteoblasts when in coexistence with Synovial cells. To further mimic the bone-implant interface environment, we firstly established a nanoscaled-Ti particle-induced aseptic loosening system by co-culturing osteoblasts and Synovial cells. We then explored the impact of the Synovial cells on Ti particle-engulfed osteoblasts in the mimicked flamed niche. The matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases expression levels, two protein families which are critical in osseointegration, were examined under induction by tumor necrosis factor-alpha. It was found that the co-culture between the osteoblasts and Synovial cells markedly increased the migration and proliferation of the osteoblasts, even in the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts. Importantly, the Ti-particle engulfed osteoblasts, induced by TNF-alpha after the co-culture, enhanced the release of the matrix metalloproteinases and reduced the expressions of lysyl oxidases. The regulation of extracellular matrix remodeling at the protein level was further assessed by investigations on gene expression of the matrix metalloproteinases and lysyl oxidases, which also suggested that the regulation started at the genetic level. Our research work has therefore revealed the critical role of multi cell-type interactions in the extracellular matrix remodeling within the peri-prosthetic tissues, which provides new insights on aseptic loosening and brings new clues about incomplete osseointegration between the implantation materials and their surrounding bones.

  20. Adjuvant effect of the human metapneumovirus (HMPV) matrix protein in HMPV subunit vaccines.

    PubMed

    Aerts, Laetitia; Rhéaume, Chantal; Carbonneau, Julie; Lavigne, Sophie; Couture, Christian; Hamelin, Marie-Ève; Boivin, Guy

    2015-04-01

    The human metapneumovirus (HMPV) fusion (F) protein is the most immunodominant protein, yet subunit vaccines containing only this protein do not confer complete protection. The HMPV matrix (M) protein induces the maturation of antigen-presenting cells in vitro. The inclusion of the M protein into an F protein subunit vaccine might therefore provide an adjuvant effect. We administered the F protein twice intramuscularly, adjuvanted with alum, the M protein or both, to BALB/c mice at 3 week intervals. Three weeks after the boost, mice were infected with HMPV and monitored for 14 days. At day 5 post-challenge, pulmonary viral titres, histopathology and cytokine levels were analysed. Mice immunized with F+alum and F+M+alum generated significantly more neutralizing antibodies than mice immunized with F only [titres of 47 ± 7 (P<0.01) and 147 ± 13 (P<0.001) versus 17 ± 2]. Unlike F only [1.6 ± 0.5 × 10(3) TCID50 (g lung)(-1)], pulmonary viral titres in mice immunized with F+M and F+M+alum were undetectable. Mice immunized with F+M presented the most important reduction in pulmonary inflammation and the lowest T-helper Th2/Th1 cytokine ratio. In conclusion, addition of the HMPV-M protein to an F protein-based vaccine modulated both humoral and cellular immune responses to subsequent infection, thereby increasing the protection conferred by the vaccine.

  1. Bioprocess monitoring: minimizing sample matrix effects for total protein quantification with bicinchoninic acid assay.

    PubMed

    Reichelt, Wieland N; Waldschitz, Daniel; Herwig, Christoph; Neutsch, Lukas

    2016-09-01

    Determining total protein content is a routine operation in many laboratories. Despite substantial work on assay optimization interferences, the widely used bicinchoninic acid (BCA) assay remains widely recognized for its robustness. Especially in the field of bioprocess engineering the inaccuracy caused by interfering substances remains hardly predictable and not well understood. Since the introduction of the assay, sample pre-treatment by trichloroacetic acid (TCA) precipitation has been indicated as necessary and sufficient to minimize interferences. However, the sample matrix in cultivation media is not only highly complex but also dynamically changing over process time in terms of qualitative and quantitative composition. A significant misestimation of the total protein concentration of bioprocess samples is often observed when following standard work-up schemes such as TCA precipitation, indicating that this step alone is not an adequate means to avoid measurement bias. Here, we propose a modification of the BCA assay, which is less influenced by sample complexity. The dynamically changing sample matrix composition of bioprocessing samples impairs the conventional approach of compensating for interfering substances via a static offset. Hence, we evaluated the use of a correction factor based on an internal spike measurement for the respective samples. Using protein spikes, the accuracy of the BCA protein quantification could be improved fivefold, taking the BCA protein quantification to a level of accuracy comparable to other, more expensive methods. This will allow reducing expensive iterations in bioprocess development to due inaccurate total protein analytics.

  2. Detection of dimethylarginines in protein hydrolysates by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Cheng-Hsilin; Tam, Ming F

    2006-03-01

    We report a method to detect the presence of dimethylarginines on proteins. Peptides with dimethylarginines were hydrolyzed in acid. The hydrolysates were subjected to matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) mass spectrometric analysis using a mixture of alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid and nitrocellulose as matrix. Both asymmetric omega-N(G),N(G)-dimethylarginine and symmetric omega-N(G),N(G')-dimethylarginine give a clear signal at m/z 203. Recombinant Sbp1p modified by Hmt1p in vivo were isolated by affinity chromatography followed by electrophoresis on a polyacrylamide gel and subjected to acid hydrolysis. MALDI-TOF analysis of the acid hydrolysates confirmed the presence of dimethylarginines. The detection limit of the method is estimated at approximately 1pmol of protein.

  3. High-throughput virtual screening and docking studies of matrix protein vp40 of ebola virus.

    PubMed

    Tamilvanan, Thangaraju; Hopper, Waheeta

    2013-01-01

    Ebolavirus, a member of the Filoviridae family of negative-sense RNA viruses, causes severe haemorrhagic fever leading up to 90% lethality. Ebolavirus matrix protein VP40 is involved in the virus assembly and budding process. The RNA binding pocket of VP40 is considered as the drug target site for structure based drug design. High Throughput Virtual Screening and molecular docking studies were employed to find the suitable inhibitors against VP40. Ten compounds showing good glide score and glide energy as well as interaction with specific amino acid residues were short listed as drug leads. These small molecule inhibitors could be potent inhibitors for VP40 matrix protein by blocking virus assembly and budding process.

  4. Involvement of mitochondrial dynamics in the segregation of mitochondrial matrix proteins during stationary phase mitophagy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abeliovich, Hagai; Zarei, Mostafa; Rigbolt, Kristoffer T. G.; Youle, Richard J.; Dengjel, Joern

    2013-11-01

    Mitophagy, the autophagic degradation of mitochondria, is an important housekeeping function in eukaryotic cells, and defects in mitophagy correlate with ageing phenomena and with several neurodegenerative disorders. A central mechanistic question regarding mitophagy is whether mitochondria are consumed en masse, or whether an active process segregates defective molecules from functional ones within the mitochondrial network, thus allowing a more efficient culling mechanism. Here we combine a proteomic study with a molecular genetics and cell biology approach to determine whether such a segregation process occurs in yeast mitochondria. We find that different mitochondrial matrix proteins undergo mitophagic degradation at distinctly different rates, supporting the active segregation hypothesis. These differential degradation rates depend on mitochondrial dynamics, suggesting a mechanism coupling weak physical segregation with mitochondrial dynamics to achieve a distillation-like effect. In agreement, the rates of mitophagic degradation strongly correlate with the degree of physical segregation of specific matrix proteins.

  5. Identification of bovine sperm acrosomal proteins that interact with a 32-kDa acrosomal matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Nagdas, Subir K; Smith, Linda; Medina-Ortiz, Ilza; Hernandez-Encarnacion, Luisa; Raychoudhury, Samir

    2016-03-01

    Mammalian fertilization is accomplished by the interaction between sperm and egg. Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a stable acrosomal matrix assembly from the bovine sperm acrosome termed the outer acrosomal membrane-matrix complex (OMC). This stable matrix assembly exhibits precise binding activity for acrosin and N-acetylglucosaminidase. A highly purified OMC fraction comprises three major (54, 50, and 45 kDa) and several minor (38-19 kDa) polypeptides. The set of minor polypeptides (38-19 kDa) termed "OMCrpf polypeptides" is selectively solubilized by high-pH extraction (pH 10.5), while the three major polypeptides (55, 50, and 45 kDa) remain insoluble. Proteomic identification of the OMC32 polypeptide (32 kDa polypeptide isolated from high-pH soluble fraction of OMC) yielded two peptides that matched the NCBI database sequence of acrosin-binding protein. Anti-OMC32 recognized an antigenically related family of polypeptides (OMCrpf polypeptides) in the 38-19-kDa range with isoelectric points ranging between 4.0 and 5.1. Other than glycohydrolases, OMC32 may also be complexed to other acrosomal proteins. The present study was undertaken to identify and localize the OMC32 binding polypeptides and to elucidate the potential role of the acrosomal protein complex in sperm function. OMC32 affinity chromatography of a detergent-soluble fraction of bovine cauda sperm acrosome followed by mass spectrometry-based identification of bound proteins identified acrosin, lactadherin, SPACA3, and IZUMO1. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis also demonstrated the interaction of OMC32 with acrosin, lactadherin, SPACA3, and IZUMO1. Our immunofluorescence studies revealed the presence of SPACA3 and lactadherin over the apical segment, whereas IZUMO1 is localized over the equatorial segment of Triton X-100 permeabilized cauda sperm. Immunoblot analysis showed that a significant portion of SPACA3 was released after the lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC)-induced acrosome

  6. Identification of Bovine Sperm Acrosomal Proteins that Interact with a 32kDa Acrosomal Matrix Protein

    PubMed Central

    Nagdas, Subir K; Smith, Linda; Medina-Ortiz, Ilza; Hernandez-Encarnacion, Luisa; Raychoudhury, Samir

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian fertilization is accomplished by the interaction between sperm and egg. Previous studies from this laboratory have identified a stable acrosomal matrix assembly from the bovine sperm acrosome termed the outer acrosomal membrane-matrix complex (OMC). This stable matrix assembly exhibits precise binding activity for acrosin and N-acetylglucosaminidase. A highly purified OMC fraction is comprised of three major (54, 50, and 45kDa) and several minor (38–19kDa) polypeptides. The set of minor polypeptides (38–19kDa) termed “OMCrpf polypeptides” is selectively solubilized by high-pH extraction (pH 10.5) while the three major polypeptides (55, 50 and 45kDa) remain insoluble. Proteomic identification of the OMC32 polypeptide (32kDa polypeptide isolated from high-pH soluble fraction of OMC) yielded two peptides that matched the NCBI database sequence of acrosin-binding protein. Anti-OMC32 recognized an antigenically related family of polypeptides (OMCrpf polypeptides) in the 38–19kDa range with isoelectric points ranging between 4.0 and 5.1. Other than glycohydrolases, OMC32 may also be complexed to other acrosomal proteins. The present study was undertaken to identify and localize the OMC32 binding polypeptides and to elucidate the potential role of the acrosomal protein complex in sperm function. OMC32 affinity chromatography of a detergent soluble fraction of bovine cauda sperm acrosome followed by mass spectrometry-based identification of bound proteins identified acrosin, lactadherin, SPACA3, and IZUMO1. Co-immunoprecipitation analysis also demonstrated the interaction of OMC32 with acrosin, lactadherin, SPACA3, and IZUMO1. Our immunofluorescence studies revealed the presence of SPACA3 and lactadherin over the apical segment; whereas, IZUMO1 is localized over the equatorial segment of Triton X-100 permeabilized cauda sperm. Immunoblot analysis showed that a significant portion of SPACA3 was released after the lysophosphatidyl choline (LPC

  7. Biofilm-specific extracellular matrix proteins of non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Siva; Baum, Marc M.; Kerwin, James; Guerrero-Given, Debbie; Webster, Simon; Schaudinn, Christoph; VanderVelde, David; Webster, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi), a human respiratory tract pathogen can form colony biofilms in vitro. Bacterial cells and the amorphous extracellular matrix (ECM) constituting the biofilm can be separated using sonication. The ECM from 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms contained polysaccharides and proteinaceous components as detected by NMR and FTIR spectroscopy. More conventional chemical assays on the biofilm ECM confirmed the presence of these components and also DNA. Proteomics revealed eighteen proteins present in biofilm ECM that were not detected in planktonic bacteria. One ECM protein was unique to 24 hr biofilms, two were found only in 96 hr biofilms, and fifteen were present in the ECM of both 24 hr and 96 hr NTHi biofilms. All proteins identified were either associated with bacterial membranes or were cytoplasmic proteins. Immunocytochemistry showed two of the identified proteins, a DNA-directed RNA polymerase and the outer membrane protein OMP P2, associated with bacteria and biofilm ECM. Identification of biofilm-specific proteins present in immature biofilms is an important step in understanding the in vitro process of NTHi biofilm formation. The presence of a cytoplasmic protein and a membrane protein in the biofilm ECM of immature NTHi biofilms suggests that bacterial cell lysis may be a feature of early biofilm formation. PMID:24942343

  8. [Immunochemical study of nuclear matrix proteins localization in the structure of perinucleolar chromatin].

    PubMed

    Murasheva, M I; Chentsov, Iu S

    2014-01-01

    Immunofluorescence labeling of proteins with molecular mass of 27, 38, 40, 50 and 65 kDa obtained from serum of patients with autoimmune disease demonstrated different patterns (small clusters or granules) in interphase nuclei of pig kidney cells. It was remarkable that there was no staining inside the nucleoli, but the proteins immunoreactivity was detected around them in the regions of perinucleolar chromatin. Moreover, expression of nucleolar proteins, such as fibrillarin and B23, was found only in nucleoli. After extraction of DNA, PNA and histones, the proteins with molecular mass 27 and 38 kDa were found in the periphery of residual nucleoli, and proteins with molecular mass 40, 50 and 65 kDa had similar localization and were also present in karyoplasm of cells as small clusters. According to our data, nucleolar protein, fibrillarin, was distributed regularly throughout the whole volume of residual nucleoli. At the same time, B23 protein was revealed only at their periphery, where perinucleolar chromatin had localized before treatment. Thus, it has been revealed that the proteins of nuclear matrix with molecular mass 27, 38, 40, 50 and 65 kDa, as well as nucleolar protein B23 are the parts of perinucleolar chromatin, which could be considered as special chromosomal domain associated with the functioning of the nucleolus.

  9. Elastin-like protein matrix reinforced with collagen microfibers for soft tissue repair

    PubMed Central

    Caves, Jeffrey M.; Cui, Wanxing; Wen, Jing; Kumar, Vivek A.; Haller, Carolyn A.; Chaikof, Elliot L.

    2011-01-01

    Artificial composites designed to mimic the structure and properties of native extracellular matrix may lead to acellular materials for soft tissue repair and replacement, which display mechanical strength, stiffness, and resilience resembling native tissue. We describe the fabrication of thin lamellae consisting of continuous collagen microfiber embedded at controlled orientations and densities in a recombinant elastin-like protein polymer matrix. Multilamellar stacking affords flexible, protein-based composite sheets whose properties are dependent upon both the elastomeric matrix and collagen content and organization. Sheets are produced with properties that range over 13-fold in elongation to break (23 – 314%), six-fold in Young’s modulus (5.3 to 33.1 MPa), and more than two-fold in tensile strength (1.85 to 4.08 MPa), exceeding that of a number of native human tissues, including urinary bladder, pulmonary artery, and aorta. A sheet approximating the mechanical response of human abdominal wall fascia is investigated as a fascial substitute for ventral hernia repair. Protein-based composite patches prevent hernia recurrence in Wistar rats over an 8-week period with new tissue formation and sustained structural integrity. PMID:21550111

  10. Random matrix approach to collective behavior and bulk universality in protein dynamics.

    PubMed

    Potestio, Raffaello; Caccioli, Fabio; Vivo, Pierpaolo

    2009-12-31

    Covariance matrices of amino acid displacements, commonly used to characterize the large-scale movements of proteins, are investigated through the prism of random matrix theory. Bulk universality is detected in the local spacing statistics of noise-dressed eigenmodes, which is well described by a Brody distribution with parameter beta approximately = 0.8. This finding, supported by other consistent indicators, implies a novel quantitative criterion to single out the collective degrees of freedom of the protein from the majority of high-energy, localized vibrations.

  11. Trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus.

    PubMed

    Yan, Shao-Min; Wu, Guang

    2009-12-01

    The global warming is an important factor affecting the biological evolution, and the influenza is an important disease that threatens humans with possible epidemics or pandemics. In this study, we attempted to analyze the trends in global warming and evolution of matrix protein 2 family from influenza A virus, because this protein is a target of anti-flu drug, and its mutation would have significant effect on the resistance to anti-flu drugs. The evolution of matrix protein 2 of influenza A virus from 1959 to 2008 was defined using the unpredictable portion of amino-acid pair predictability. Then the trend in this evolution was compared with the trend in the global temperature, the temperature in north and south hemispheres, and the temperature in influenza A virus sampling site, and species carrying influenza A virus. The results showed the similar trends in global warming and in evolution of M2 proteins although we could not correlate them at this stage of study. The study suggested the potential impact of global warming on the evolution of proteins from influenza A virus.

  12. Role of Extracellular Matrix Proteins and Their Receptors in the Development of the Vertebrate Neuromuscular Junction

    PubMed Central

    Singhal, Neha; Martin, Paul T.

    2012-01-01

    The vertebrate neuromuscular junction remains the best-studied model for understanding the mechanisms involved in synaptogenesis, due to its relatively large size, its simplicity of patterning and its unparalleled experimental accessibility. During neuromuscular development, each skeletal myofiber secretes and deposits around its extracellular surface an assemblage of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins that ultimately form a basal lamina. This is also the case at the neuromuscular junction, where the motor nerve contributes additional factors. Before most of the current molecular components were known, it was clear that the synaptic ECM of adult skeletal muscles was unique in composition and contained factors sufficient to induce the differentiation of both pre- and postsynaptic membranes. Biochemical, genetic and microscopy studies have confirmed that agrin, laminin (221, 421, and 521), collagen IV (α3-α6), collagen XIII, perlecan and the ColQ-bound form of acetylcholinesterase are all synaptic ECM proteins with important roles in neuromuscular development. The roles of their many potential receptors and/or binding proteins has been more difficult to assess at the genetic level due to the complexity of membrane interactions with these large proteins, but roles for MuSK-LRP4 in agrin signaling and for integrins, dystroglycan, and voltage-gated calcium channels in laminin-dependent phenotypes have been identified. Synaptic extracellular matrix proteins and their receptors are involved in almost all aspects of synaptic development, including synaptic initiation, topography, ultrastructure, maturation, stability and transmission. PMID:21766463

  13. Protein sequence-similarity search acceleration using a heuristic algorithm with a sensitive matrix.

    PubMed

    Lim, Kyungtaek; Yamada, Kazunori D; Frith, Martin C; Tomii, Kentaro

    2016-12-01

    Protein database search for public databases is a fundamental step in the target selection of proteins in structural and functional genomics and also for inferring protein structure, function, and evolution. Most database search methods employ amino acid substitution matrices to score amino acid pairs. The choice of substitution matrix strongly affects homology detection performance. We earlier proposed a substitution matrix named MIQS that was optimized for distant protein homology search. Herein we further evaluate MIQS in combination with LAST, a heuristic and fast database search tool with a tunable sensitivity parameter m, where larger m denotes higher sensitivity. Results show that MIQS substantially improves the homology detection and alignment quality performance of LAST across diverse m parameters. Against a protein database consisting of approximately 15 million sequences, LAST with m = 10(5) achieves better homology detection performance than BLASTP, and completes the search 20 times faster. Compared to the most sensitive existing methods being used today, CS-BLAST and SSEARCH, LAST with MIQS and m = 10(6) shows comparable homology detection performance at 2.0 and 3.9 times greater speed, respectively. Results demonstrate that MIQS-powered LAST is a time-efficient method for sensitive and accurate homology search.

  14. HIV-1 matrix protein p17: a candidate antigen for therapeutic vaccines against AIDS.

    PubMed

    Fiorentini, Simona; Giagulli, Cinzia; Caccuri, Francesca; Magiera, Anna K; Caruso, Arnaldo

    2010-12-01

    The success in the development of anti-retroviral therapies (HAART) that contain human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection is challenged by the cost of this lifelong therapy and by its toxicity. Immune-based therapeutic strategies that boost the immune response against HIV-1 proteins or protein subunits have been recently proposed to control virus replication in order to provide protection from disease development, reduce virus transmission, and help limit the use of anti-retroviral treatments. HIV-1 matrix protein p17 is a structural protein that is critically involved in most stages of the life cycle of the retrovirus. Besides its well established role in the virus life cycle, increasing evidence suggests that p17 may also be active extracellularly in deregulating biological activities of many different immune cells that are directly or indirectly involved in AIDS pathogenesis. Thus, p17 might represent a promising target for developing a therapeutic vaccine as a contribution to combating AIDS. In this article we review the biological characteristics of HIV-1 matrix protein p17 and we describe why a synthetic peptide representative of the p17 functional epitope may work as a vaccine molecule capable of inducing anti-p17 neutralizing response against p17 derived from divergent HIV-1 strains.

  15. Trimer Enhancement Mutation Effects on HIV-1 Matrix Protein Binding Activities

    PubMed Central

    Alfadhli, Ayna; Mack, Andrew; Ritchie, Christopher; Cylinder, Isabel; Harper, Logan; Tedbury, Philip R.; Freed, Eric O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The HIV-1 matrix (MA) protein is the amino-terminal domain of the HIV-1 precursor Gag (Pr55Gag) protein. MA binds to membranes and RNAs, helps transport Pr55Gag proteins to virus assembly sites at the plasma membranes of infected cells, and facilitates the incorporation of HIV-1 envelope (Env) proteins into virions by virtue of an interaction with the Env protein cytoplasmic tails (CTs). MA has been shown to crystallize as a trimer and to organize on membranes in hexamer lattices. MA mutations that localize to residues near the ends of trimer spokes have been observed to impair Env protein assembly into virus particles, and several of these are suppressed by the 62QR mutation at the hubs of trimer interfaces. We have examined the binding activities of wild-type (WT) MA and 62QR MA variants and found that the 62QR mutation stabilized MA trimers but did not alter the way MA proteins organized on membranes. Relative to WT MA, the 62QR protein showed small effects on membrane and RNA binding. However, 62QR proteins bound significantly better to Env CTs than their WT counterparts, and CT binding efficiencies correlated with trimerization efficiencies. Our data suggest a model in which multivalent binding of trimeric HIV-1 Env proteins to MA trimers contributes to the process of Env virion incorporation. IMPORTANCE The HIV-1 Env proteins assemble as trimers, and incorporation of the proteins into virus particles requires an interaction of Env CT domains with the MA domains of the viral precursor Gag proteins. Despite this knowledge, little is known about the mechanisms by which MA facilitates the virion incorporation of Env proteins. To help elucidate this process, we examined the binding activities of an MA mutant that stabilizes MA trimers. We found that the mutant proteins organized similarly to WT proteins on membranes, and that mutant and WT proteins revealed only slight differences in their binding to RNAs or lipids. However, the mutant proteins showed

  16. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of First Organic Matrix Protein from Sclerites of Red Coral, Corallium rubrum*

    PubMed Central

    Debreuil, Julien; Tambutté, Éric; Zoccola, Didier; Deleury, Emeline; Guigonis, Jean-Marie; Samson, Michel; Allemand, Denis; Tambutté, Sylvie

    2012-01-01

    We report here for the first time the isolation and characterization of a protein from the organic matrix (OM) of the sclerites of the alcyonarian, Corallium rubrum. This protein named scleritin is one of the predominant proteins extracted from the EDTA-soluble fraction of the OM. The entire open reading frame (ORF) was obtained by comparing amino acid sequences from de novo mass spectrometry and Edman degradation with an expressed sequence tag library dataset of C. rubrum. Scleritin is a secreted basic phosphorylated protein which exhibits a short amino acid sequence of 135 amino acids and a signal peptide of 20 amino acids. From specific antibodies raised against peptide sequences of scleritin, we obtained immunolabeling of scleroblasts and OM of the sclerites which provides information on the biomineralization pathway in C. rubrum. PMID:22505718

  17. BmECM25, from the silkworm Bombyx mori, is an extracellular matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Zou, Ziliang; Xu, Yunmin; Ma, Bi; Xiang, Zhonghuai; He, Ningjia

    2015-10-01

    BmECM25 (previously reported as BmVMP25) was previously predicted as a gene encoding the vitelline membrane protein in silkworm, Bombyx mori. In this study, we investigated the detail temporal and spatial patterns of BmECM25 protein. Western blot results showed that BmECM25 was expressed in the follicular epithelium cells from stages -6 to +1, and was then secreted into the oocytes. However, the abundance of BmECM25 decreased during the subsequent oogenesis and finally disappeared in the mature follicles. Immunofluorescence detection showed that BmECM25 locates inside the VM layer and forms a discontinuous layer. These features of BmECM25 suggest that it is an oocyte membrane matrix protein, not a vitelline membrane protein.

  18. Processing of mussel adhesive protein analog thin films by matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cristescu, R.; Patz, T.; Narayan, R. J.; Menegazzo, N.; Mizaikoff, B.; Mihaiescu, D. E.; Messersmith, P. B.; Stamatin, I.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2005-07-01

    Mussel adhesive proteins are a new class of biologically-derived materials that possess unique biocompatibility, bioactivity, and adhesion properties. We have demonstrated successful thin film growth of 3,4-dihydroxyphenyl- L-alanine modified poly(ethylene oxide)-poly(propylene oxide)-poly(ethylene oxide) (DOPA modified- PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymer, a mussel adhesive protein analog, using matrix assisted pulsed laser evaporation. We have demonstrated that the main functional groups of the mussel adhesive protein analog are present in the transferred film. The effect of increasing of chain length of the mussel adhesive protein analog on film structure was also examined. These novel polymer thin films could have numerous medical and technological applications if their thin film properties are similar to what is found in bulk. This is the first report of successful MAPLE deposition of this material as thin films.

  19. Dipolar relaxation within the protein matrix of the green fluorescent protein: a red edge excitation shift study.

    PubMed

    Haldar, Sourav; Chattopadhyay, Amitabha

    2007-12-27

    The fluorophore in green fluorescent protein (GFP) is localized in a highly constrained environment, protected from the bulk solvent by the barrel-shaped protein matrix. We have used the wavelength-selective fluorescence approach (red edge excitation shift, REES) to monitor solvent (environment) dynamics around the fluorophore in enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) under various conditions. Our results show that EGFP displays REES in buffer and glycerol, i.e., the fluorescence emission maxima exhibit a progressive shift toward the red edge, as the excitation wavelength is shifted toward the red edge of the absorption spectrum. Interestingly, EGFP displays REES when incorporated in reverse micelles of sodium bis(2-ethylhexyl)sulfosuccinate (AOT), independent of the hydration state. We interpret the observed REES to the constrained environment experienced by the EGFP fluorophore in the rigid protein matrix, rather than to the dynamics of the bulk solvent. These results are supported by the temperature dependence of REES and characteristic wavelength-dependent changes in fluorescence anisotropy.

  20. Membrane Binding of HIV-1 Matrix Protein: Dependence on Bilayer Composition and Protein Lipidation

    PubMed Central

    Barros, Marilia; Nanda, Hirsh

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT By assembling in a protein lattice on the host's plasma membrane, the retroviral Gag polyprotein triggers formation of the viral protein/membrane shell. The MA domain of Gag employs multiple signals—electrostatic, hydrophobic, and lipid-specific—to bring the protein to the plasma membrane, thereby complementing protein-protein interactions, located in full-length Gag, in lattice formation. We report the interaction of myristoylated and unmyristoylated HIV-1 Gag MA domains with bilayers composed of purified lipid components to dissect these complex membrane signals and quantify their contributions to the overall interaction. Surface plasmon resonance on well-defined planar membrane models is used to quantify binding affinities and amounts of protein and yields free binding energy contributions, ΔG, of the various signals. Charge-charge interactions in the absence of the phosphatidylinositide PI(4,5)P2 attract the protein to acidic membrane surfaces, and myristoylation increases the affinity by a factor of 10; thus, our data do not provide evidence for a PI(4,5)P2 trigger of myristate exposure. Lipid-specific interactions with PI(4,5)P2, the major signal lipid in the inner plasma membrane, increase membrane attraction at a level similar to that of protein lipidation. While cholesterol does not directly engage in interactions, it augments protein affinity strongly by facilitating efficient myristate insertion and PI(4,5)P2 binding. We thus observe that the isolated MA protein, in the absence of protein-protein interaction conferred by the full-length Gag, binds the membrane with submicromolar affinities. IMPORTANCE Like other retroviral species, the Gag polyprotein of HIV-1 contains three major domains: the N-terminal, myristoylated MA domain that targets the protein to the plasma membrane of the host; a central capsid-forming domain; and the C-terminal, genome-binding nucleocapsid domain. These domains act in concert to condense Gag into a membrane

  1. Application of green fluorescent protein-labeled assay for the study of subcellular localization of Newcastle disease virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhiqiang; Li, Qunhui; He, Liang; Zhao, Guo; Chen, Jian; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Xiufan

    2013-12-01

    Green fluorescent protein (GFP) used as a powerful marker of gene expression in vivo has so far been applied widely in studying the localizations and functions of protein in living cells. In this study, GFP-labeled assay was used to investigate the subcellular localization of matrix (M) protein of different virulence and genotype Newcastle disease virus (NDV) strains. The M protein of ten NDV strains fused with GFP (GFP-M) all showed nuclear-and-nucleolar localization throughout transfection, whereas that of the other two strains were observed in the nucleus and nucleolus early in transfection but in the cytoplasm late in transfection. In addition, mutations to the previously defined nuclear localization signal in the GFP-M fusion protein were studied as well. Single changes at positions 262 and 263 did not affect nuclear localization of M, while changing both of these arginine residues to asparagine caused re-localization of M mainly to the cytoplasm. The GFP-M was validated as a suitable system for studying the subcellular localization of M protein and could be used to assist us in further identifying the signal sequences responsible for the nucleolar localization and cytoplasmic localization of M protein.

  2. Regulation of protein glycosylation and sorting by the Golgi matrix proteins GRASP55/65

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Yi; Zhang, Xiaoyan; Nix, David B.; Katoh, Toshihiko; Aoki, Kazuhiro; Tiemeyer, Michael; Wang, Yanzhuang

    2013-01-01

    The Golgi receives the entire output of newly synthesized cargo from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), processes it in the stack largely through modification of bound oligosaccharides, and sorts it in the trans-Golgi network (TGN). GRASP65 and GRASP55, two proteins localized to the Golgi stack and early secretory pathway, mediate processes including Golgi stacking, Golgi ribbon linking, and unconventional secretion. Previously we have shown that GRASP depletion in cells disrupts Golgi stack formation. Here we report that knockdown of the GRASP proteins, alone or combined, accelerates protein trafficking through the Golgi membranes but also has striking negative effects on protein glycosylation and sorting. These effects are not caused by Golgi ribbon unlinking, unconventional secretion, or ER stress. We propose that GRASP55/65 are negative regulators of exocytic transport and that this slowdown helps to ensure more complete protein glycosylation in the Golgi stack and proper sorting at the TGN. PMID:23552074

  3. Protein translocation channel of mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix-exposed import motor communicate via two-domain coupling protein.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Rupa; Gladkova, Christina; Mapa, Koyeli; Witte, Gregor; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-12-29

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are targeted to mitochondria by N-terminal presequences and use the TIM23 complex for their translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. During import, translocation through the channel in the inner membrane is coupled to the ATP-dependent action of an Hsp70-based import motor at the matrix face. How these two processes are coordinated remained unclear. We show here that the two domain structure of Tim44 plays a central role in this process. The N-terminal domain of Tim44 interacts with the components of the import motor, whereas its C-terminal domain interacts with the translocation channel and is in contact with translocating proteins. Our data suggest that the translocation channel and the import motor of the TIM23 complex communicate through rearrangements of the two domains of Tim44 that are stimulated by translocating proteins.

  4. C-Terminal DxD-Containing Sequences within Paramyxovirus Nucleocapsid Proteins Determine Matrix Protein Compatibility and Can Direct Foreign Proteins into Budding Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Greeshma; Schmitt, Phuong Tieu

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxovirus particles are formed by a budding process coordinated by viral matrix (M) proteins. M proteins coalesce at sites underlying infected cell membranes and induce other viral components, including viral glycoproteins and viral ribonucleoprotein complexes (vRNPs), to assemble at these locations from which particles bud. M proteins interact with the nucleocapsid (NP or N) components of vRNPs, and these interactions enable production of infectious, genome-containing virions. For the paramyxoviruses parainfluenza virus 5 (PIV5) and mumps virus, M-NP interaction also contributes to efficient production of virus-like particles (VLPs) in transfected cells. A DLD sequence near the C-terminal end of PIV5 NP protein was previously found to be necessary for M-NP interaction and efficient VLP production. Here, we demonstrate that 15-residue-long, DLD-containing sequences derived from either the PIV5 or Nipah virus nucleocapsid protein C-terminal ends are sufficient to direct packaging of a foreign protein, Renilla luciferase, into budding VLPs. Mumps virus NP protein harbors DWD in place of the DLD sequence found in PIV5 NP protein, and consequently, PIV5 NP protein is incompatible with mumps virus M protein. A single amino acid change converting DLD to DWD within PIV5 NP protein induced compatibility between these proteins and allowed efficient production of mumps VLPs. Our data suggest a model in which paramyxoviruses share an overall common strategy for directing M-NP interactions but with important variations contained within DLD-like sequences that play key roles in defining M/NP protein compatibilities. IMPORTANCE Paramyxoviruses are responsible for a wide range of diseases that affect both humans and animals. Paramyxovirus pathogens include measles virus, mumps virus, human respiratory syncytial virus, and the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Infectivity of paramyxovirus particles depends on matrix-nucleocapsid protein

  5. Constitutive Nuclear Expression of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 Fails to Rescue the Dmp1-null Phenotype*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shuxian; Zhang, Qi; Cao, Zhengguo; Lu, Yongbo; Zhang, Hua; Yan, Kevin; Liu, Ying; McKee, Marc D.; Qin, Chunlin; Chen, Zhi; Feng, Jian Q.

    2014-01-01

    Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) plays multiple roles in bone, tooth, phosphate homeostasis, kidney, salivary gland, reproductive cycles, and the development of cancer. In vitro studies have indicated two different biological mechanisms: 1) as a matrix protein, DMP1 interacts with αvβ3 integrin and activates MAP kinase signaling; and 2) DMP1 serves as a transcription co-factor. In vivo studies have demonstrated its key role in osteocytes. This study attempted to determine whether DMP1 functions as a transcription co-factor and regulates osteoblast functions. For gene expression comparisons using adenovirus constructs, we targeted the expression of DMP1 either to the nucleus only by replacing the endogenous signal peptide with a nuclear localization signal (NLS) sequence (referred to as NLSDMP1) or to the extracellular matrix as the WT type (referred to as SPDMP1) in MC3T3 osteoblasts. High levels of DMP1 in either form greatly increased osteogenic gene expression in an identical manner. However, the targeted NLSDMP1 transgene driven by a 3.6-kb rat Col 1α1 promoter in the nucleus of osteoblasts and osteocytes failed to rescue the phenotyope of Dmp1-null mice, whereas the SPDMP1 transgene rescued the rickets defect. These studies support the notion that DMP1 functions as an extracellular matrix protein, rather than as a transcription co-factor in vivo. We also show that DMP1 continues its expression in osteoblasts during postnatal development and that the deletion of Dmp1 leads to an increase in osteoblast proliferation. However, poor mineralization in the metaphysis indicates a critical role for DMP1 in both osteoblasts and osteocytes. PMID:24917674

  6. LMAN1 (ERGIC-53) is a potential carrier protein for matrix metalloproteinase-9 glycoprotein secretion.

    PubMed

    Duellman, Tyler; Burnett, John; Shin, Alice; Yang, Jay

    2015-08-28

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a secreted glycoprotein with a major role in shaping the extracellular matrix and a detailed understanding of the secretory mechanism could help identify methods to correct diseases resulting from dysregulation of secretion. MMP-9 appears to follow a canonical secretory pathway through a quality control cycle in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before transport of the properly folded protein to the Golgi apparatus and beyond for secretion. Through a complementation assay, we determined that LMAN1, a well-studied lectin-carrier protein, interacts with a secretion-competent N-glycosylated MMP-9 in the ER while N-glycosylation-deficient secretion-compromised MMP-9 does not. In contrast, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated protein interaction between LMAN1 and secretion-compromised N-glycosylation-deficient MMP-9. MMP-9 secretion was reduced in the LMAN1 knockout cell line compared to control cells confirming the functional role of LMAN1. These observations support the role of LMAN1 as a lectin-carrier protein mediating efficient MMP-9 secretion.

  7. Improved binding of acidic bone matrix proteins to cationized filters during solid phase assays.

    PubMed

    Farach-Carson, M C; Wright, G C; Butler, W T

    1992-01-01

    A number of commercially available matrix filter supports have been designed for the immobilization of proteins following either electrotransfer from sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) polyacrylamide gels or direct application during dot blotting assays. These matrices differ with respect to chemical composition, charge, pore size, and degree of hydrophobicity. It follows that the properties of the protein(s) of interest will greatly influence the degree to which they interact with and ultimately bind to various filters. Acidic bone proteins contain diverse post-translational modifications that influence their interactions with solid phase matrices such as those used in immunoblotting (Western or dot blotting) or ion binding (overlay) procedures. This communication describes the results of a study comparing binding of various mixtures of non-collagenous acidic bone matrix phosphoproteins as well as purified osteopontin and osteocalcin to various filters including nitrocellulose and cationized paper or nylon. Based on our findings, we recommend the use of cationized filters for solid phase assays requiring the binding of these acidic macromolecules to background supports.

  8. Analysis of matrix proteins of otolith in upside-down catfish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohnishi, K.; Okamoto, N.; Takahashi, A.; Ohnishi, T.

    We have previously suggested that the calcium density of the otolith in upside-down swimming Synodontis nigriventris is lower than that in upside-up swimming Synodontis multipunctatus Biol Space Sci 2002 In this study we examined EDTA-soluble matrix proteins of otolith in the utricle of the catfish S nigriventris S multipunctatus and upside-up swimming Synodontis brichadi and goldfish Carassius auratus We detected two main bands about 55 kD and 80 kD with SDS-PAGE in the 3 species of the catfish In cntrast goldfish had the about 55 kD band alone The band of about 80 kD was consisted of two sub-bands a lighter and a heavier band A lighter band was observed in S brichadi and a heavier band was observed in S nigriventris S multipunctatus had the both bands Furthermore mass spectrometric analysis showed there were some proteins of molecular weight under 14 kD The molecular weights of the proteins were different among the fishes These results suggest that many different kinds of matrix protein may cause different degree of calcification in otolith formation

  9. HIV-1 matrix protein p17 resides in cell nuclei in association with genomic RNA.

    PubMed

    Bukrinskaya, A G; Vorkunova, G K; Tentsov YYu

    1992-10-01

    We have shown previously that HIV-1 matrix protein p17 is transported to the nucleus of Jurkat-tat and H9 cells soon after infection. As shown in this combination, gag polyprotein p55 synthesized 48 h after cell infection is cleaved in cytosol rapidly after its synthesis, and nascent p17 enters the nuclei and gradually accumulates there. Uncleaved p55 molecules and intermediate precursors are rapidly transported to the membranes and are also found in nuclei. Mature gag proteins are seen in membranes only after prolonged period of labelling or chase (4 or more hours later). To determine whether the nascent p17 is associated with viral genomic RNA in the nuclei, the cells were fractionated, the viral complexes were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against gag proteins, and RNA was extracted and analyzed by slot and blot hybridization. MAb against p17 precipitated all the viral RNA from the nuclei including full-size genomic RNA and essential parts from membranes while MAb against p24 did not precipitate any viral RNA from the nuclei. These data suggest that matrix protein is linked to genomic RNA in the nuclei and raise the possibility that p17 may transfer viral nucleocapsids from the nuclei to plasma membranes, the site of virus assembly.

  10. LMAN1 (ERGIC-53) is a potential carrier protein for matrix metalloproteinase-9 glycoprotein secretion

    PubMed Central

    Duellman, Tyler; Burnett, John; Shin, Alice; Yang, Jay

    2015-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) is a secreted glycoprotein with a major role in shaping the extra-cellular matrix and a detailed understanding of the secretory mechanism could help identify methods to correct diseases resulting from dysregulation of secretion. MMP-9 appears to follow a canonical secretory pathway through a quality control cycle in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) before transport of the properly folded protein to the Golgi apparatus and beyond for secretion. Through a complementation assay, we determined that LMAN1, a well-studied lectin-carrier protein, interacts with a secretion-competent N-glycosylated MMP-9 in the ER while N-glycosylation-deficient secretion-compromised MMP-9 does not. In contrast, co-immunoprecipitation demonstrated protein interaction between LMAN1 and secretion-compromised N-glycosylation-deficient MMP-9. MMP-9 secretion was reduced in the LMAN1 knockout cell line compared to control cells confirming the functional role of LMAN1. These observations support the role of LMAN1 as a lectin-carrier protein mediating efficient MMP-9 secretion. PMID:26150355

  11. Crosslinking of a Peritrophic Matrix Protein Protects Gut Epithelia from Bacterial Exotoxins

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, Toshio; Maki, Kouki; Hadano, Jinki; Fujikawa, Takumi; Kitazaki, Kazuki; Koshiba, Takumi; Kawabata, Shun-ichiro

    2015-01-01

    Transglutaminase (TG) catalyzes protein-protein crosslinking, which has important and diverse roles in vertebrates and invertebrates. Here we demonstrate that Drosophila TG crosslinks drosocrystallin, a peritrophic matrix protein, to form a stable fiber structure on the gut peritrophic matrix. RNA interference (RNAi) of the TG gene was highly lethal in flies and induced apoptosis of gut epithelial cells after oral infection with Pseudomonas entomophila. Moreover, AprA, a metalloprotease secreted by P. entomophila, digested non-crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers, but not drosocrystallin fibers crosslinked by TG. In vitro experiments using recombinant drosocrystallin and monalysin proteins demonstrated that monalysin, a pore-forming exotoxin of P. entomophila, was adsorbed on the crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers in the presence of P. entomophila culture supernatant. In addition, gut-specific TG-RNAi flies had a shorter lifespan than control flies after ingesting P. entomophila, whereas the lifespan after ingesting AprA-knockout P. entomophila was at control levels. We conclude that drosocrystallin fibers crosslinked by TG, but not non-crosslinked drosocrystallin fibers, form an important physical barrier against exotoxins of invading pathogenic microbes. PMID:26506243

  12. Prediction of residue-residue contact matrix for protein-protein interaction with Fisher score features and deep learning.

    PubMed

    Du, Tianchuan; Liao, Li; Wu, Cathy H; Sun, Bilin

    2016-11-01

    Protein-protein interactions play essential roles in many biological processes. Acquiring knowledge of the residue-residue contact information of two interacting proteins is not only helpful in annotating functions for proteins, but also critical for structure-based drug design. The prediction of the protein residue-residue contact matrix of the interfacial regions is challenging. In this work, we introduced deep learning techniques (specifically, stacked autoencoders) to build deep neural network models to tackled the residue-residue contact prediction problem. In tandem with interaction profile Hidden Markov Models, which was used first to extract Fisher score features from protein sequences, stacked autoencoders were deployed to extract and learn hidden abstract features. The deep learning model showed significant improvement over the traditional machine learning model, Support Vector Machines (SVM), with the overall accuracy increased by 15% from 65.40% to 80.82%. We showed that the stacked autoencoders could extract novel features, which can be utilized by deep neural networks and other classifiers to enhance learning, out of the Fisher score features. It is further shown that deep neural networks have significant advantages over SVM in making use of the newly extracted features.

  13. Matrix Pre-coated Targets for High Throughput MALDI Imaging of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Junhai; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed matrix pre-coated targets for imaging proteins in thin tissue sections by MALDI MS (matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry). Gold covered microscope slides were coated with sinapinic acid (SA) in batches in advance and were shown to be stable for over 6 months when kept in the dark. The sample preparation protocol using these SA pre-coated targets involves treatment with diisopropylethylamine (DIEA)-H2O vapor, transforming the matrix layer to a viscous ionic liquid. This SA-DIEA ionic liquid layer extracts proteins and other analytes from tissue sections that are thaw mounted to this target. DIEA is removed by immersion of the target into diluted acetic acid (AcOH), allowing SA to co-crystallizes with extracted analytes directly on the target. Ion images (3–70 kDa) of sections of mouse brain and rat kidney at spatial resolution down to 10 μm were obtained. Use of pre-coated slides greatly reduces sample preparation time for MALDI imaging while providing high throughput, low cost, and high spatial resolution images. PMID:24809903

  14. Expression of matrix Gla protein and osteocalcin in the developing tibial epiphysis of mice.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hongrui; Guo, Jie; Wei, Shanliang; Lv, Shengyu; Feng, Wei; Cui, Jian; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Hongo, Hiromi; Yang, Yang; Li, Xiangzhi; Oda, Kimimitsu; Amizuka, Norio; Li, Minqi

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the expression of matrix Gla protein (MGP) and osteocalcin (OCN) in the tibial epiphysis of developing mice. At 1, 2, 3, and 4 weeks after birth, tibiae were removed and processed for histochemical observations and western blot analyses under anesthesia. To evaluate bone volume, the specimens were scanned with Micro CT Scanner from the articular cartilage through the growth plate, along the long axis of tibia. At 1 week after birth, OCN reactivity was faint in the region of vascular invasion, while hardly any MGP reactivity was discernible. Subsequently, MGP reactivity was seen on the cartilaginous lacunar walls of hypertrophic chondrocytes, while OCN reactivity was evenly found not only in the bone matrix, but also in the cartilaginous lacunar walls and on the bone surfaces. Furthermore, double-immunostaining clearly showed that MGP reactivity appeared closer to the cartilage matrix than OCN reactivity until postnatal week 3. Interestingly, the immunoreactivities for MGP and OCN both showed tidemarks in the articular cartilage at postnatal week 4, and MGP reactivity was more intense than OCN reactivity. Statistical analyses showed an overall upward trend in MGP and OCN expression levels during tibial epiphysis development, even though OCN was more abundant than MGP at every time-point. Taken together, our findings suggest that the expression of MGP and OCN increased gradually in the murine developing tibial epiphysis, and the two mineral-associated proteins may occur at the same location during a particular period, but at different levels.

  15. The extracellular matrix protein WARP is a novel component of a distinct subset of basement membranes.

    PubMed

    Allen, Justin M; Brachvogel, Bent; Farlie, Peter G; Fitzgerald, Jamie; Bateman, John F

    2008-05-01

    WARP is a recently described member of the von Willebrand factor A domain superfamily of extracellular matrix proteins, and is encoded by the Vwa1 gene. We have previously shown that WARP is a multimeric component of the chondrocyte pericellular matrix in articular cartilage and intervertebral disc, where it interacts with the basement membrane heparan sulfate proteoglycan perlecan. However, the tissue-specific expression of WARP in non-cartilaginous tissues and its localization in the extracellular matrix of other perlecan-containing tissues have not been analyzed in detail. To visualize WARP-expressing cells, we generated a reporter gene knock-in mouse by targeted replacement of the Vwa1 gene with beta-galactosidase. Analysis of reporter gene expression and WARP protein localization by immunostaining demonstrates that WARP is a component of a limited number of distinct basement membranes. WARP is expressed in the vasculature of neural tissues and in basement membrane structures of the peripheral nervous system. Furthermore, WARP is also expressed in the apical ectodermal ridge of developing limb buds, and in skeletal and cardiac muscle. These findings are the first evidence for WARP expression in non-cartilaginous tissues, and the identification of WARP as a component of a limited range of specialized basement membranes provides further evidence for the heterogeneous composition of basement membranes between different tissues.

  16. Two distinct membrane potential-dependent steps drive mitochondrial matrix protein translocation.

    PubMed

    Schendzielorz, Alexander Benjamin; Schulz, Christian; Lytovchenko, Oleksandr; Clancy, Anne; Guiard, Bernard; Ieva, Raffaele; van der Laan, Martin; Rehling, Peter

    2017-01-02

    Two driving forces energize precursor translocation across the inner mitochondrial membrane. Although the membrane potential (Δψ) is considered to drive translocation of positively charged presequences through the TIM23 complex (presequence translocase), the activity of the Hsp70-powered import motor is crucial for the translocation of the mature protein portion into the matrix. In this study, we show that mitochondrial matrix proteins display surprisingly different dependencies on the Δψ. However, a precursor's hypersensitivity to a reduction of the Δψ is not linked to the respective presequence, but rather to the mature portion of the polypeptide chain. The presequence translocase constituent Pam17 is specifically recruited by the receptor Tim50 to promote the transport of hypersensitive precursors into the matrix. Our analyses show that two distinct Δψ-driven translocation steps energize precursor passage across the inner mitochondrial membrane. The Δψ- and Pam17-dependent import step identified in this study is positioned between the two known energy-dependent steps: Δψ-driven presequence translocation and adenosine triphosphate-driven import motor activity.

  17. Expression and purification of the matrix protein of Nipah virus in baculovirus insect cell system.

    PubMed

    Masoomi Dezfooli, Seyedehsara; Tan, Wen Siang; Tey, Beng Ti; Ooi, Chien Wei; Hussain, Siti Aslina

    2016-01-01

    Nipah virus (NiV) causes fatal respiratory illness and encephalitis in humans and animals. The matrix (M) protein of NiV plays an important role in the viral assembly and budding process. Thus, an access to the NiV M protein is vital to the design of viral antigens as diagnostic reagents. In this study, recombinant DNA technology was successfully adopted in the cloning and expression of NiV M protein. A recombinant expression cassette (baculovirus expression vector) was used to encode an N-terminally His-tagged NiV M protein in insect cells. A time-course study demonstrated that the highest yield of recombinant M protein (400-500 μg) was expressed from 107 infected cells 3 days after infection. A single-step purification method based on metal ion affinity chromatography was established to purify the NiV M protein, which successfully yielded a purity level of 95.67% and a purification factor of 3.39. The Western blotting and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) showed that the purified recombinant M protein (48 kDa) was antigenic and reacted strongly with the serum of a NiV infected pig.

  18. Protein-transitions in and out of the dough matrix in wheat flour mixing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaolong; Appels, Rudi; Zhang, Xiaoke; Bekes, Ferenc; Torok, Kitti; Tomoskozi, Sandor; Diepeveen, Dean; Ma, Wujun; Islam, Shahidul

    2017-02-15

    Sequential protein behavior in the wheat dough matrix under continuous mixing and heating treatment has been studied using Mixolab-dough samples from two Australian wheat cultivars, Westonia and Wyalkatchem. Size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) and two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DGE) analysis indicated that 32min (80°C) was a critical time point in forming large protein complexes and loosing extractability of several protein groups like y-type high molecular weight glutenin subunits (HMW-GSs), gamma-gliadins, beta-amylases, serpins, and metabolic proteins with higher mass. Up to 32min (80°C) Westonia showed higher protein extractability compared to Wyalkatchem although it was in the opposite direction thereafter. Twenty differentially expressed proteins could be assigned to chromosomes 1D, 3A, 4A, 4B, 4D, 6A, 6B, 7A and 7B. The results expanded the range of proteins associated with changes in the gluten-complex during processing and provided targets for selecting new genetic variants associated with altered quality attributes of the flour.

  19. Loss of caveolin-1 alters extracellular matrix protein expression and ductal architecture in murine mammary glands

    PubMed Central

    Thompson, Christopher; Hielscher, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is abnormal in breast tumors and has been reported to contribute to breast tumor progression. One factor, which may drive ongoing matrix synthesis in breast tumors, is the loss of stromal caveolin-1 (cav-1), a scaffolding protein of caveolae, which has been linked to breast tumor aggressiveness. To determine whether loss of cav-1 results in the abnormal expression of matrix proteins, mammary glands from cav- 1-/- and cav- 1 +/+ mice were investigated for differences in expression of several ECM proteins. In addition, the presence of myofibroblasts, changes in the vessel density, and differences in duct number and size were assessed in the mammary glands of both animal models. Using immunohistochemistry, expression of fibronectin, tenascin-C, collagens and αSMA were significantly increased in the mammary glands of cav-1-/- mice. Second harmonic generation revealed more organized collagen fibers in cav-1 -/- glands and supported immunohistochemical analyses of increased collagen abundance in the glands of cav-1 -/- mice. Analysis of the ductal structure demonstrated a significant increase in the number of proliferating ducts in addition to significant increases in the duct circumference and area in cav-1 -/- glands compared to cav- 1 +/+ glands. Differences in microvessel density weren’t apparent between the animal models. In summary, we found that the loss of cav-1 resulted in increased ECM and α-SMA protein expression in murine mammary glands. Furthermore, we found that an abnormal ductal architecture accompanied the loss of cav-1. These data support a role for cav-1 in maintaining mammary gland structure. PMID:28187162

  20. Loss of caveolin-1 alters extracellular matrix protein expression and ductal architecture in murine mammary glands.

    PubMed

    Thompson, Christopher; Rahim, Sahar; Arnold, Jeremiah; Hielscher, Abigail

    2017-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is abnormal in breast tumors and has been reported to contribute to breast tumor progression. One factor, which may drive ongoing matrix synthesis in breast tumors, is the loss of stromal caveolin-1 (cav-1), a scaffolding protein of caveolae, which has been linked to breast tumor aggressiveness. To determine whether loss of cav-1 results in the abnormal expression of matrix proteins, mammary glands from cav- 1-/- and cav- 1 +/+ mice were investigated for differences in expression of several ECM proteins. In addition, the presence of myofibroblasts, changes in the vessel density, and differences in duct number and size were assessed in the mammary glands of both animal models. Using immunohistochemistry, expression of fibronectin, tenascin-C, collagens and αSMA were significantly increased in the mammary glands of cav-1-/- mice. Second harmonic generation revealed more organized collagen fibers in cav-1 -/- glands and supported immunohistochemical analyses of increased collagen abundance in the glands of cav-1 -/- mice. Analysis of the ductal structure demonstrated a significant increase in the number of proliferating ducts in addition to significant increases in the duct circumference and area in cav-1 -/- glands compared to cav- 1 +/+ glands. Differences in microvessel density weren't apparent between the animal models. In summary, we found that the loss of cav-1 resulted in increased ECM and α-SMA protein expression in murine mammary glands. Furthermore, we found that an abnormal ductal architecture accompanied the loss of cav-1. These data support a role for cav-1 in maintaining mammary gland structure.

  1. Patchwork structure-function analysis of the Sendai virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Mottet-Osman, Geneviève; Miazza, Vincent; Vidalain, Pierre-Olivier; Roux, Laurent

    2014-09-01

    Paramyxoviruses contain a bi-lipidic envelope decorated by two transmembrane glycoproteins and carpeted on the inner surface with a layer of matrix proteins (M), thought to bridge the glycoproteins with the viral nucleocapsids. To characterize M structure-function features, a set of M domains were mutated or deleted. The genes encoding these modified M were incorporated into recombinant Sendai viruses and expressed as supplemental proteins. Using a method of integrated suppression complementation system (ISCS), the functions of these M mutants were analyzed in the context of the infection. Cellular membrane association, localization at the cell periphery, nucleocapsid binding, cellular protein interactions and promotion of viral particle formation were characterized in relation with the mutations. At the end, lack of nucleocapsid binding go together with lack of cell surface localization and both features definitely correlate with loss of M global function estimated by viral particle production.

  2. Soybean Hydrophobic Protein is Present in a Matrix Secreted by the Endocarp Epidermis during Seed Development

    PubMed Central

    Enstone, Daryl E.; Peterson, Carol A.; Gijzen, Mark

    2015-01-01

    Hydrophobic protein from soybean (HPS) is present in soybean dust and is an allergen (Gly m 1) that causes asthma in allergic individuals. Past studies have shown that HPS occurs on the seed surface. To determine the microscopic localization of HPS during seed development, monoclonal antibodies to HPS were used to visualize the protein by fluorescence and transmission electron microscopy. Seed coat and endocarp sections were also examined for pectin, cellulose, callose, starch, and protein by histochemical staining. HPS is present in the endocarp epidermal cells at 18 to 28 days post anthesis. At later stages of seed development, HPS occurs in extracellular secretions that accumulate unevenly on the endocarp epidermis and seed surface. HPS is synthesized by the endocarp epidermis and deposited on the seed surface as part of a heterogeneous matrix. PMID:26455712

  3. The 70 kDa heat shock protein suppresses matrix metalloproteinases in astrocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Eun; Kim, Yeun Jung; Kim, Jong Youl; Lee, Won Taek; Yenari, Midori A; Giffard, Rona G

    2004-03-01

    The 70 kDa heat shock protein (Hsp70) is synthesized in response to a variety of stresses, including ischemia, and is thought to act as a molecular chaperone to prevent protein denaturation and facilitate protein folding. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), a family of serine proteases, are also upregulated by ischemia and are thought to promote cell death and tissue injury. We examined the influence of Hsp70 on expression and activity of MMPs. Astrocyte cultures were prepared from neonatal mice and transfected with retroviral vectors containing hsp70 or lacZ or mock infected, then exposed to oxygen-glucose deprivation followed by reperfusion. Zymograms and Western blots showed that Hsp70 over-expression suppressed MMP-2 and MMP-9. These findings suggest that Hsp70 may protect by regulating MMPs.

  4. Matrix-insensitive protein assays push the limits of biosensors in medicine.

    PubMed

    Gaster, Richard S; Hall, Drew A; Nielsen, Carsten H; Osterfeld, Sebastian J; Yu, Heng; Mach, Kathleen E; Wilson, Robert J; Murmann, Boris; Liao, Joseph C; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Wang, Shan X

    2009-11-01

    Advances in biosensor technologies for in vitro diagnostics have the potential to transform the practice of medicine. Despite considerable work in the biosensor field, there is still no general sensing platform that can be ubiquitously applied to detect the constellation of biomolecules in diverse clinical samples (for example, serum, urine, cell lysates or saliva) with high sensitivity and large linear dynamic range. A major limitation confounding other technologies is signal distortion that occurs in various matrices due to heterogeneity in ionic strength, pH, temperature and autofluorescence. Here we present a magnetic nanosensor technology that is matrix insensitive yet still capable of rapid, multiplex protein detection with resolution down to attomolar concentrations and extensive linear dynamic range. The matrix insensitivity of our platform to various media demonstrates that our magnetic nanosensor technology can be directly applied to a variety of settings such as molecular biology, clinical diagnostics and biodefense.

  5. Dynamic culture substrate that captures a specific extracellular matrix protein in response to light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakanishi, Jun; Nakayama, Hidekazu; Yamaguchi, Kazuo; Garcia, Andres J.; Horiike, Yasuhiro

    2011-08-01

    The development of methods for the off-on switching of immobilization or presentation of cell-adhesive peptides and proteins during cell culture is important because such surfaces are useful for the analysis of the dynamic processes of cell adhesion and migration. This paper describes a chemically functionalized gold substrate that captures a genetically tagged extracellular matrix protein in response to light. The substrate was composed of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) of three disulfide compounds containing (i) a photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG), (ii) nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA) and (iii) hepta(ethylene glycol) (EG7). Although the NTA group has an intrinsic high affinity for oligohistidine tag (His-tag) sequences in its Ni2+-ion complex, the interaction was suppressed by the steric hindrance of coexisting PEG on the substrate surface. Upon photoirradiation of the substrate to release the PEG chain from the surface, this interaction became possible and hence the protein was captured at the irradiated regions, while keeping the non-specific adsorption of non-His-tagged proteins blocked by the EG7 underbrush. In this way, we selectively immobilized a His-tagged fibronectin fragment (FNIII7-10) to the irradiated regions. In contrast, when bovine serum albumin—a major serum protein—was added as a non-His-tagged protein, the surface did not permit its capture, with or without irradiation. In agreement with these results, cells were selectively attached to the irradiated patterns only when a His-tagged FNIII7-10 was added to the medium. These results indicate that the present method is useful for studying the cellular behavior on the specific extracellular matrix protein in cell-culturing environments.

  6. Quantitative proteomics analysis integrated with microarray data reveals that extracellular matrix proteins, catenins, and p53 binding protein 1 are important for chemotherapy response in ovarian cancers.

    PubMed

    Pan, Sheng; Cheng, Lihua; White, James T; Lu, Wei; Utleg, Angelita G; Yan, Xiaowei; Urban, Nicole D; Drescher, Charles W; Hood, Leroy; Lin, Biaoyang

    2009-08-01

    Chemotherapy with carboplatin and paclitaxel is the standard treatment for ovarian cancer patients. Although most patients initially respond to this treatment, few are cured. Resistance to chemotherapy is the major cause of treatment failure. We applied a quantitative proteomic approach based on ICAT/MS/MS technology to analyze tissues harvested at primary debulking surgery before the initiation of combination chemotherapy in order to identify potential naive or intrinsic chemotherapy response proteins in ovarian cancers. We identified 44 proteins that are overexpressed, and 34 proteins that are underexpressed in the chemosensitive tissue compared to the chemoresistant tissue. The overexpressed proteins identified in the chemoresistant tissue include 10 proteins (25.6%) belonging to the extracellular matrix (ECM), including decorin, versican, basigin (CD147), fibulin-1, extracellular matrix protein 1, biglycan, fibronectin 1, dermatopontin, alpha-cardiac actin (smooth muscle actin), and an EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1. Interesting proteins identified as overexpressed in the chemosensitive tissue include gamma-catenin (junction plakoglobin) and delta-catenin, tumor suppressor p53-binding protein 1 (53BP1), insulin-like growth factor-binding protein 2 (IGFBP2), proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), annexin A11, and 53 kDa selenium binding protein 1. Integrative analysis with expression profiling data of eight chemoresistant tissues and 13 chemosensitive tissues revealed that 16 proteins showed consistent changes at both the protein and the RNA levels. These include P53 binding protein 1, catenin delta 1 and plakoglobin, EGF-containing fibulin-like extracellular matrix protein 1 and voltage-dependent anion-selective channel protein 1. Our results suggest that chemotherapy response may be determined by multiple and complex system properties involving extracellular-matrix, cell adhesion and junction proteins.

  7. Protein matrix involved in the lipid retention of foie gras during cooking: a multimodal hyperspectral imaging study.

    PubMed

    Théron, Laëtitia; Vénien, Annie; Jamme, Frédéric; Fernandez, Xavier; Peyrin, Frédéric; Molette, Caroline; Dumas, Paul; Réfrégiers, Matthieu; Astruc, Thierry

    2014-06-25

    Denaturation of the protein matrix during heat treatment of duck foie gras was studied in relationship to the amount of fat loss during cooking. A low fat loss group was compared with a high fat loss group by histochemistry, FT-IR, and synchrotron UV microspectroscopy combination to characterize their protein matrix at different scales. After cooking, the high fat loss group showed higher densification of its matrix, higher ultraviolet tyrosine autofluorescence, and an infrared shift of the amide I band. These results revealed a higher level of protein denaturation and aggregation during cooking in high fat loss than in low fat loss foie gras. In addition, the fluorescence and infrared responses of the raw tissue revealed differences according to the level of fat losses after cooking. These findings highlight the importance of the supramolecular state of the protein matrix in determining the fat loss of foie gras.

  8. Sturgeon osteocalcin shares structural features with matrix Gla protein: evolutionary relationship and functional implications.

    PubMed

    Viegas, Carla S B; Simes, Dina C; Williamson, Matthew K; Cavaco, Sofia; Laizé, Vincent; Price, Paul A; Cancela, M Leonor

    2013-09-27

    Osteocalcin (OC) and matrix Gla protein (MGP) are considered evolutionarily related because they share key structural features, although they have been described to exert different functions. In this work, we report the identification and characterization of both OC and MGP from the Adriatic sturgeon, a ray-finned fish characterized by a slow evolution and the retention of many ancestral features. Sturgeon MGP shows a primary structure, post-translation modifications, and patterns of mRNA/protein distribution and accumulation typical of known MGPs, and it contains seven possible Gla residues that would make the sturgeon protein the most γ-carboxylated among known MGPs. In contrast, sturgeon OC was found to present a hybrid structure. Indeed, although exhibiting protein domains typical of known OCs, it also contains structural features usually found in MGPs (e.g. a putative phosphorylated propeptide). Moreover, patterns of OC gene expression and protein accumulation overlap with those reported for MGP; OC was detected in bone cells and mineralized structures but also in soft and cartilaginous tissues. We propose that, in a context of a reduced rate of evolution, sturgeon OC has retained structural features of the ancestral protein that emerged millions of years ago from the duplication of an ancient MGP gene and may exhibit intermediate functional features.

  9. Nucleophosmin/B23 is a proliferate shuttle protein associated with nuclear matrix.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jing-Ping; Chew, Eng Ching; Liew, Choong-Tsek; Chan, John Y H; Jin, Mei-Lin; Ding, Ming-Xiao; Fai, Yam Hin; Li, H K Richard; Liang, Xiao-Man; Wu, Qiu-Liang

    2003-12-15

    It has become obvious that a better understanding and potential elucidation of the nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 involving in functional interrelationship between nuclear organization and gene expression. In present study, protein B23 expression were investigated in the regenerative hepatocytes at different periods (at days 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 7) during liver regeneration after partial hepatectomy on the rats with immunohistochemistry and Western blot analysis. Another experiment was done with immunolabeling methods and two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis for identification of B23 in the regenerating hepatocytes and HepG2 cells (hepatoblastoma cell line) after sequential extraction with detergents, nuclease, and salt. The results showed that its expression in the hepatocytes had a locative move and quantitative change during the process of liver regeneration post-operation. Its immunochemical localization in the hepatocytes during the process showed that it moved from nucleoli of the hepatocytes in the stationary stage to nucleoplasm, cytoplasm, mitotic spindles, and mitotic chromosomes of the hepatocytes in the regenerating livers. It was quantitatively increased progressively to peak level at day 3 post-operation and declined gradually to normal level at day 7. It was detected in nuclear matrix protein (NMP) composition extracted from the regenerating hepatocytes and HepG2 cells and identified with isoelectric point (pI) value of 5.1 and molecular weight of 40 kDa. These results indicated that B23 was a proliferate shuttle protein involving in cell cycle and cell proliferation associated with nuclear matrix.

  10. Flowering and genome integrity control by a nuclear matrix protein in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yifeng; Gan, Eng-Seng; He, Yuehui; Ito, Toshiro

    2013-01-01

    The matrix attachment regions (MARs) binding proteins could finely orchestrate temporal and spatial gene expression during development. In Arabidopsis, transposable elements (TEs) and TE-like repeat sequences are transcriptionally repressed or attenuated by the coordination of many key players including DNA methyltransferases, histone deacetylases, histone methyltransferases and the siRNA pathway, which help to protect genomic integrity and control multiple developmental processes such as flowering. We have recently reported that an AT-hook nuclear matrix binding protein, TRANSPOSABLE ELEMENT SILENCING VIA AT-HOOK (TEK), participates in a histone deacetylation (HDAC) complex to silence TEs and genes containing a TE-like sequence, including AtMu1, FWA and FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) in Ler background. We have shown that TEK knockdown causes increased histone acetylation, reduced H3K9me2 and moderate reduction of DNA methylation in the target loci, leading to the de-repression of FLC and FWA, as well as TE reactivation. Here we discuss the role of TEK as a putative MAR binding protein which functions in the maintenance of genome integrity and in flowering control by silencing TEs and repeat-containing genes.

  11. Extracellular matrix family proteins that are potential targets of Dd-STATa in Dictyostelium discoideum.

    PubMed

    Shimada, Nao; Nishio, Keiko; Maeda, Mineko; Urushihara, Hideko; Kawata, Takefumi

    2004-10-01

    Dd-STATa is a functional Dictyostelium homologue of metazoan STAT (signal transducers and activators of transcription) proteins, which is activated by cAMP and is thereby translocated into the nuclei of anterior tip cells of the prestalk region of the slug. By using in situ hybridization analyses, we found that the SLF308 cDNA clone, which contains the ecmF gene that encodes a putative extracellular matrix protein and is expressed in the anterior tip cells, was greatly down-regulated in the Dd-STATa-null mutant. Disruption of the ecmF gene, however, resulted in almost no phenotypic change. The absence of any obvious mutant phenotype in the ecmF-null mutant could be due to a redundancy of similar genes. In fact, a search of the Dictyostelium whole genome database demonstrates the existence of an additional 16 homologues, all of which contain a cellulose-binding module. Among these homologues, four genes show Dd-STATa-dependent expression, while the others are Dd-STATa-independent. We discuss the potential role of Dd-STATa in morphogenesis via its effect on the interaction between cellulose and these extracellular matrix family proteins.

  12. The F-BAR protein PSTPIP1 controls extracellular matrix degradation and filopodia formation in macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Starnes, Taylor W.; Bennin, David A.; Bing, Xinyu; Eickhoff, Jens C.; Grahf, Daniel C.; Bellak, Jason M.; Seroogy, Christine M.; Ferguson, Polly J.

    2014-01-01

    PSTPIP1 is a cytoskeletal adaptor and F-BAR protein that has been implicated in autoinflammatory disease, most notably in the PAPA syndrome: pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne. However, the mechanism by which PSTPIP1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and contributes to disease pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we show that endogenous PSTPIP1 negatively regulates macrophage podosome organization and matrix degradation. We identify a novel PSTPIP1-R405C mutation in a patient presenting with aggressive pyoderma gangrenosum. Identification of this mutation reveals that PSTPIP1 regulates the balance of podosomes and filopodia in macrophages. The PSTPIP1-R405C mutation is in the SRC homology 3 (SH3) domain and impairs Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) binding, but it does not affect interaction with protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-PEST. Accordingly, WASP inhibition reverses the elevated F-actin content, filopodia formation, and matrix degradation induced by PSTPIP1-R405C. Our results uncover a novel role for PSTPIP1 and WASP in orchestrating different types of actin-based protrusions. Our findings implicate the cytoskeletal regulatory functions of PSTPIP1 in the pathogenesis of pyoderma gangrenosum and suggest that the cytoskeleton is a rational target for therapeutic intervention in autoinflammatory disease. PMID:24421327

  13. The F-BAR protein PSTPIP1 controls extracellular matrix degradation and filopodia formation in macrophages.

    PubMed

    Starnes, Taylor W; Bennin, David A; Bing, Xinyu; Eickhoff, Jens C; Grahf, Daniel C; Bellak, Jason M; Seroogy, Christine M; Ferguson, Polly J; Huttenlocher, Anna

    2014-04-24

    PSTPIP1 is a cytoskeletal adaptor and F-BAR protein that has been implicated in autoinflammatory disease, most notably in the PAPA syndrome: pyogenic sterile arthritis, pyoderma gangrenosum, and acne. However, the mechanism by which PSTPIP1 regulates the actin cytoskeleton and contributes to disease pathogenesis remains elusive. Here, we show that endogenous PSTPIP1 negatively regulates macrophage podosome organization and matrix degradation. We identify a novel PSTPIP1-R405C mutation in a patient presenting with aggressive pyoderma gangrenosum. Identification of this mutation reveals that PSTPIP1 regulates the balance of podosomes and filopodia in macrophages. The PSTPIP1-R405C mutation is in the SRC homology 3 (SH3) domain and impairs Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASP) binding, but it does not affect interaction with protein-tyrosine phosphatase (PTP)-PEST. Accordingly, WASP inhibition reverses the elevated F-actin content, filopodia formation, and matrix degradation induced by PSTPIP1-R405C. Our results uncover a novel role for PSTPIP1 and WASP in orchestrating different types of actin-based protrusions. Our findings implicate the cytoskeletal regulatory functions of PSTPIP1 in the pathogenesis of pyoderma gangrenosum and suggest that the cytoskeleton is a rational target for therapeutic intervention in autoinflammatory disease.

  14. MAF1, a novel plant protein interacting with matrix attachment region binding protein MFP1, is located at the nuclear envelope.

    PubMed Central

    Gindullis, F; Peffer, N J; Meier, I

    1999-01-01

    The interaction of chromatin with the nuclear matrix via matrix attachment region (MAR) DNA is considered to be of fundamental importance for chromatin organization in all eukaryotic cells. MAR binding filament-like protein 1 (MFP1) from tomato is a novel plant protein that specifically binds to MAR DNA. Its filament protein-like structure makes it a likely candidate for a structural component of the nuclear matrix. MFP1 is located at nuclear matrix-associated, specklelike structures at the nuclear envelope. Here, we report the identification of a novel protein that specifically interacts with MFP1 in yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays. MFP1 associated factor 1 (MAF1) is a small, soluble, serine/threonine-rich protein that is ubiquitously expressed and has no similarity to known proteins. MAF1, like MFP1, is located at the nuclear periphery and is a component of the nuclear matrix. These data suggest that MFP1 and MAF1 are in vivo interaction partners and that both proteins are components of a nuclear substructure, previously undescribed in plants, that connects the nuclear envelope and the internal nuclear matrix. PMID:10488241

  15. [Matrix Gla protein as natural inhibitor of vascular calcification and potential treatment target].

    PubMed

    Mayer, Otto

    2016-01-01

    Vascular calcification was once regarded as an advanced stage of atherosclerosis only. However, calcification is currently considered as highly regulated and potentially reversible process.Matrix Gla protein (MGP) represents natural inhibitor of vascular calcification, whereas vitamin K is key co-factor of its maturation to the active form. There is accumulating evidence that vitamin K status and corresponding MGP activity may influence cardiovascular risk. This review summarizes pathophysiological mechanism and recent evidence relative to MGP. Moreover, available data concerning vitamin K supplementation are depicted.

  16. The application of an enamel matrix protein derivative (Emdogain) in regenerative periodontal therapy: a review.

    PubMed

    Sculean, Anton; Schwarz, Frank; Becker, Jurgen; Brecx, Michel

    2007-01-01

    Regenerative periodontal therapy aims at reconstitution of the lost periodontal structures such as new formation of root cementum, periodontal ligament and alveolar bone. Findings from basic research indicate that enamel matrix protein derivative (EMD) has a key role in periodontal wound healing. Histological results from animal and human studies have shown that treatment with EMD promotes periodontal regeneration. Moreover, clinical studies have indicated that treatment with EMD positively influences periodontal wound healing in humans. This review aims to present an overview of evidence-based clinical indications for regenerative therapy with EMD.

  17. Dimerization of Matrix Protein Is Required for Budding of Respiratory Syncytial Virus

    PubMed Central

    Förster, Andreas; Maertens, Goedele N.; Farrell, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infects epithelial cells of the respiratory tract and is a major cause of bronchiolitis and pneumonia in children and the elderly. The virus assembles and buds through the plasma membrane, forming elongated membrane filaments, but details of how this happens remain obscure. Oligomerization of the matrix protein (M) is a key step in the process of assembly and infectious virus production. In addition, it was suggested to affect the conformation of the fusion protein, the major current target for RSV antivirals, in the mature virus. The structure and assembly of M are thus key parameters in the RSV antiviral development strategy. The structure of RSV M was previously published as a monomer. Other paramyxovirus M proteins have been shown to dimerize, and biochemical data suggest that RSV M also dimerizes. Here, using size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering, we show that the protein is dimeric in solution. We also crystallized M in two crystal forms and show that it assembles into equivalent dimers in both lattices. Dimerization interface mutations destabilize the M dimer in vitro. To assess the biological relevance of dimerization, we used confocal imaging to show that dimerization interface mutants of M fail to assemble into viral filaments on the plasma membrane. Additionally, budding and release of virus-like particles are prevented in M mutants that fail to form filaments. Importantly, we show that M is biologically active as a dimer and that the switch from M dimers to higher-order oligomers triggers viral filament assembly and virus production. IMPORTANCE Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most frequent cause of infantile bronchiolitis and pneumonia. The enormous burden of RSV makes it a major unmet target for a vaccine and antiviral drug therapy. Oligomerization of the matrix protein is a key step in the process of assembly and production of infectious virus, but the molecular

  18. The spindle matrix protein, Chromator, is a novel tubulin binding protein that can interact with both microtubules and free tubulin.

    PubMed

    Yao, Changfu; Wang, Chao; Li, Yeran; Ding, Yun; Rath, Uttama; Sengupta, Saheli; Girton, Jack; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The chromodomain protein, Chromator, is localized to chromosomes during interphase; however, during cell division together with other nuclear proteins Chromator redistributes to form a macro molecular spindle matrix complex that embeds the microtubule spindle apparatus. It has been demonstrated that the CTD of Chromator is sufficient for localization to the spindle matrix and that expression of this domain alone could partially rescue Chro mutant microtubule spindle defects. Furthermore, the presence of frayed and unstable microtubule spindles during mitosis after Chromator RNAi depletion in S2 cells indicated that Chromator may interact with microtubules. In this study using a variety of biochemical assays we have tested this hypothesis and show that Chromator not only has binding activity to microtubules with a Kd of 0.23 µM but also to free tubulin. Furthermore, we have mapped the interaction with microtubules to a relatively small stretch of 139 amino acids in the carboxy-terminal region of Chromator. This sequence is likely to contain a novel microtubule binding interface since database searches did not find any sequence matches with known microtubule binding motifs.

  19. Stimulation of Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells by Dentin Matrix Protein 1 Activates Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Osteoblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Chandrasekaran, Sangeetha; Ramachandran, Amsaveni; Eapen, Asha; George, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Background Periodontitis can ultimately result in tooth loss. Many natural and synthetic materials have been tried to achieve periodontal regeneration, but the results remain variable and unpredictable. We hypothesized that exogenous treatment with dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) activates specific genes and results in phenotypic and functional changes in human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs). Methods hPDLSCs were isolated from extracted teeth and cultured in the presence or absence of DMP1. Quantitative polymerase chain reactions were performed to analyze the expression of several genes involved in periodontal regeneration. hPDLSCs were also processed for immunocytochemical and Western blot analysis using phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) and ERK antibodies. Alkaline phosphatase and von Kossa staining were performed to characterize the differentiation of hPDLSCs into osteoblasts. Field emission scanning electron microscopic analysis of the treated and control cell cultures were also performed. Results Treatment with DMP1 resulted in the upregulation of genes, such as matrix metalloproteinase-2, alkaline phosphatase, and transforming growth factor β1. Activation of ERK mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway and translocation of pERK from the cytoplasm to the nucleus was observed. Overall, DMP1-treated cells showed increased expression of alkaline phosphatase, increased matrix, and mineralized nodule formation when compared with untreated controls. Conclusion DMP1 can orchestrate a coordinated expression of genes and phenotypic changes in hPDLSCs by activation of the ERK signaling pathway, which may provide a valuable strategy for tissue engineering approaches in periodontal regeneration. PMID:22612367

  20. OmpL1 Is an Extracellular Matrix- and Plasminogen-Interacting Protein of Leptospira spp.

    PubMed Central

    Fernandes, Luis G. V.; Vieira, Monica L.; Kirchgatter, Karin; Alves, Ivy J.; de Morais, Zenaide M.; Vasconcellos, Silvio A.; Romero, Eliete C.

    2012-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a zoonosis with multisystem involvement caused by pathogenic strains of the genus Leptospira. OmpL1 is an outer membrane protein of Leptospira spp. that is expressed during infection. In this work, we investigated novel features of this protein. We describe that OmpL1 is a novel leptospiral extracellular matrix (ECM)-binding protein and a plasminogen (PLG) receptor. The recombinant protein was expressed in Escherichia coli BL21(DE3) Star/pLysS as inclusion bodies, refolded, and purified by metal-chelating chromatography. The protein presented a typical β-strand secondary structure, as evaluated by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The recombinant protein reacted with antibodies in serum samples from convalescent leptospirosis patients with a high specificity compared to serum samples from individuals with unrelated diseases. These data strengthen the usefulness of OmpL1 as a diagnostic marker of leptospirosis. The characterization of the immunogenicity of recombinant OmpL1 in inoculated BALB/c mice showed that the protein has the capacity to elicit humoral and cellular immune responses, as denoted by high antibody titers and the proliferation of lymphocytes. We demonstrate that OmpL1 has the ability to mediate attachment to laminin and plasma fibronectin, with KD (equilibrium dissociation constant) values of 2,099.93 ± 871.03 nM and 1,239.23 ± 506.85 nM, respectively. OmpL1 is also a PLG receptor, with a KD of 368.63 ± 121.23 nM, capable of generating enzymatically active plasmin. This is the first report that shows and characterizes OmpL1 as an ECM-interacting and a PLG-binding protein of Leptospira spp. that may play a role in bacterial pathogenesis when expressed during infection. PMID:22802342

  1. [Inhibitory proteins of neuritic regeneration in the extracellular matrix: structure, molecular interactions and their functions. Mechanisms of extracellular balance].

    PubMed

    Vargas, Javier; Uribe-Escamilla, Rebeca; Alfaro-Rodríguez, Alfonso

    2013-01-01

    After injury of the central nervous system (CNS) in higher vertebrates, neurons neither grow nor reconnect with their targets because their axons or dendrites cannot regenerate within the injured site. In the CNS, the signal from the environment regulating neurite regeneration is not exclusively generated by one molecular group. This signal is generated by the interaction of various types of molecules such as extracellular matrix proteins, soluble factors and surface membrane molecules; all these elements interact with one another generating the matrix's biological state: the extracellular balance. Proteins in the balanced extracellular matrix, support and promote cellular physiological states, including neuritic regeneration. We have reviewed three types of proteins of the extracellular matrix possessing an inhibitory effect and that are determinant of neuritic regeneration failure in the CNS: chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans, keratan sulfate proteoglycans and tenascin. We also review some of the mechanisms involved in the balance of extracellular proteins such as isomerization, epimerization, sulfation and glycosylation as well as the assemblage of the extracellular matrix, the interaction between the matrix and soluble factors and its proteolytic degradation. In the final section, we have presented some examples of the matrix's role in development and in tumor propagation.

  2. Design and feasibility of active matrix flat panel detector using avalanche amorphous selenium for protein crystallography.

    PubMed

    Sultana, Afrin; Reznik, Alla; Karim, Karim S; Rowlands, J A

    2008-10-01

    Protein crystallography is the most important technique for resolving the three-dimensional atomic structure of protein by measuring the intensity of its x-ray diffraction pattern. This work proposes a large area flat panel detector for protein crystallography based on direct conversion x-ray detection technique using avalanche amorphous selenium (a-Se) as the high gain photoconductor, and active matrix readout using amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) thin film transistors. The detector employs avalanche multiplication phenomenon of a-Se to make the detector sensitive to each incident x ray. The advantages of the proposed detector over the existing imaging plate and charge coupled device detectors are large area, high dynamic range coupled to single x-ray detection capability, fast readout, high spatial resolution, and inexpensive manufacturing process. The optimal detector design parameters (such as detector size, pixel size, and thickness of a-Se layer), and operating parameters (such as electric field across the a-Se layer) are determined based on the requirements for protein crystallography application. The performance of the detector is evaluated in terms of readout time (<1 s), dynamic range (approximately 10(5)), and sensitivity (approximately 1 x-ray photon), thus validating the detector's efficacy for protein crystallography.

  3. A bioinformatics analysis of alternative exon usage in human genes coding for extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, Noboru Jo; Vibranovski, Maria Dulcetti; de Souza, Sandro José

    2004-12-30

    Alternative splicing increases protein diversity through the generation of different mRNA molecules from the same gene. Although alternative splicing seems to be a widespread phenomenon in the human transcriptome, it is possible that different subgroups of genes present different patterns, related to their biological roles. Analysis of a subgroup may enhance common features of its members that would otherwise disappear amidst a heterogeneous population. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are a good set for such analyses since they are structurally and functionally related. This family of proteins is involved in a large variety of functions, probably achieved by the combinatorial use of protein domains through exon shuffling events. To determine if ECM genes have a different pattern of alternative splicing, we compared clusters of expressed sequences of ECM to all other genes regarding features related to the most frequent type of alternative splicing, alternative exon usage (AEU), such as: the number of alternative exon-intron structures per cluster, the number of AEU events per exon-intron structure, the number of exons per event, among others. Although we did not find many differences between the two sets, we observed a higher frequency of AEU events involving entire protein domains in the ECM set, a feature that could be associated with their multi-domain nature. As other subgroups or even the ECM set in different tissues could present distinct patterns of AEU, it may be premature to conclude that alternative splicing is homogeneous among groups of related genes.

  4. An immunohistochemical study of matrix proteins in the craniofacial cartilage in midterm human fetuses.

    PubMed

    Shibata, S; Sakamoto, Y; Baba, O; Qin, C; Murakami, G; Cho, B H

    2013-12-02

    Immunohistochemical localization of collagen types I, II, and X, aggrecan, versican, dentin matrix protein (DMP)-1, martix extracellular phosphoprotein (MEPE) were performed for Meckel's cartilage, cranial base cartilage, and mandibular condylar cartilage in human midterm fetuses; staining patterns within the condylar cartilage were compared to those within other cartilaginous structures. Mandibular condylar cartilage contained aggrecan; it also had more type I collagen and a thicker hypertrophic cell layer than the other two types of cartilage; these three characteristics are similar to those of the secondary cartilage of rodents. MEPE immunoreactivity was first evident in the cartilage matrix of all types of cartilage in the human fetuses and in Meckel's cartilage of mice and rats. MEPE immunoreactivity was enhanced in the deep layer of the hypertrophic cell layer and in the cartilaginous core of the bone trabeculae in the primary spongiosa. These results indicated that MEPE is a component of cartilage matrix and may be involved in cartilage mineralization. DMP-1 immunoreactivity first became evident in human bone lacunae walls and canaliculi; this pattern of expression was comparable to the pattern seen in rodents. In addition, chondroid bone was evident in the mandibular (glenoid) fossa of the temporal bone, and it had aggrecan, collagen types I and X, MEPE, and DMP-1 immunoreactivity; these findings indicated that chondroid bone in this region has phenotypic expression indicative of both hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocytes.

  5. An Immunohistochemical Study of Matrix Proteins in the Craniofacial Cartilage in Midterm Human Fetuses

    PubMed Central

    Shibata, S.; Sakamoto, Y.; Baba, O.; Qin, C.; Murakami, G.; Cho, B.H.

    2013-01-01

    Immunohistochemical localization of collagen types I, II, and X, aggrecan, versican, dentin matrix protein (DMP)-1, martix extracellular phosphoprotein (MEPE) were performed for Meckel’s cartilage, cranial base cartilage, and mandibular condylar cartilage in human midterm fetuses; staining patterns within the condylar cartilage were compared to those within other cartilaginous structures. Mandibular condylar cartilage contained aggrecan; it also had more type I collagen and a thicker hypertrophic cell layer than the other two types of cartilage; these three characteristics are similar to those of the secondary cartilage of rodents. MEPE immunoreactivity was first evident in the cartilage matrix of all types of cartilage in the human fetuses and in Meckel’s cartilage of mice and rats. MEPE immunoreactivity was enhanced in the deep layer of the hypertrophic cell layer and in the cartilaginous core of the bone trabeculae in the primary spongiosa. These results indicated that MEPE is a component of cartilage matrix and may be involved in cartilage mineralization. DMP-1 immunoreactivity first became evident in human bone lacunae walls and canaliculi; this pattern of expression was comparable to the pattern seen in rodents. In addition, chondroid bone was evident in the mandibular (glenoid) fossa of the temporal bone, and it had aggrecan, collagen types I and X, MEPE, and DMP-1 immunoreactivity; these findings indicated that chondroid bone in this region has phenotypic expression indicative of both hypertrophic chondrocytes and osteocytes. PMID:24441192

  6. Protein kinase D2 induces invasion of pancreatic cancer cells by regulating matrix metalloproteinases

    PubMed Central

    Wille, Christoph; Köhler, Conny; Armacki, Milena; Jamali, Arsia; Gössele, Ulrike; Pfizenmaier, Klaus; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer cell invasion, metastasis, and angiogenesis are major challenges for the development of novel therapeutic strategies. Protein kinase D (PKD) isoforms are involved in controlling tumor cell motility, angiogenesis, and metastasis. In particular PKD2 expression is up-regulated in pancreatic cancer, whereas PKD1 expression is lowered. We report that both kinases control pancreatic cancer cell invasive properties in an isoform-specific manner. PKD2 enhances invasion in three-dimensional extracellular matrix (3D-ECM) cultures by stimulating expression and secretion of matrix metalloproteinases 7 and 9 (MMP7/9), by which MMP7 is likely to act upstream of MMP9. Knockdown of MMP7/9 blocks PKD2-mediated invasion in 3D-ECM assays and in vivo using tumors growing on chorioallantois membranes. Furthermore, MMP9 enhances PKD2-mediated tumor angiogenesis by releasing extracellular matrix–bound vascular endothelial growth factor A, increasing its bioavailability and angiogenesis. Of interest, specific knockdown of PKD1 in PKD2-expressing pancreatic cancer cells further enhanced the invasive properties in 3D-ECM systems by generating a high-motility phenotype. Loss of PKD1 thus may be beneficial for tumor cells to enhance their matrix-invading abilities. In conclusion, we define for the first time PKD1 and 2 isoform–selective effects on pancreatic cancer cell invasion and angiogenesis, in vitro and in vivo, addressing PKD isoform specificity as a major factor for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:24336522

  7. Molecular aspects of the interaction between Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein and artificial phospholipid membrane.

    PubMed

    Junková, P; Prchal, J; Spiwok, V; Pleskot, R; Kadlec, J; Krásný, L; Hynek, R; Hrabal, R; Ruml, T

    2016-11-01

    The Mason-Pfizer monkey virus is a type D retrovirus, which assembles its immature particles in the cytoplasm prior to their transport to the host cell membrane. The association with the membrane is mediated by the N-terminally myristoylated matrix protein. To reveal the role of particular residues which are involved in the capsid-membrane interaction, covalent labelling of arginine, lysine and tyrosine residues of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein bound to artificial liposomes containing 95% of phosphatidylcholine and 5% phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate (PI(4,5)P2 ) was performed. The experimental results were interpreted by multiscale molecular dynamics simulations. The application of these two complementary approaches helped us to reveal that matrix protein specifically recognizes the PI(4,5)P2 molecule by the residues K20, K25, K27, K74, and Y28, while the residues K92 and K93 stabilizes the matrix protein orientation on the membrane by the interaction with another PI(4,5)P2 molecule. Residues K33, K39, K54, Y66, Y67, and K87 appear to be involved in the matrix protein oligomerization. All arginine residues remained accessible during the interaction with liposomes which indicates that they neither contribute to the interaction with membrane nor are involved in protein oligomerization. Proteins 2016; 84:1717-1727. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Uniqueness of the mechanism of protein import into the peroxisome matrix: transport of folded, co-factor-bound and oligomeric proteins by shuttling receptors.

    PubMed

    Léon, Sébastien; Goodman, Joel M; Subramani, Suresh

    2006-12-01

    Based on earlier suggestions that peroxisomes may have arisen from endosymbionts that later lost their DNA, it was expected that protein transport into this organelle would have parallels to systems found in other organelles of endosymbiont origin, such as mitochondria and chloroplasts. This review highlights three features of peroxisomal matrix protein import that make it unique in comparison with these other subcellular compartments - the ability of this organelle to transport folded, co-factor-bound and oligomeric proteins, the dynamics of the import receptors during the matrix protein import cycle and the existence of a peroxisomal quality-control pathway, which insures that the peroxisome membrane is cleared of cargo-free receptors.

  9. Matrix Gla protein regulates differentiation of endothelial cells derived from mouse embryonic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Yao, Jiayi; Guihard, Pierre J; Blazquez-Medela, Ana M; Guo, Yina; Liu, Ting; Boström, Kristina I; Yao, Yucheng

    2016-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is an antagonist of bone morphogenetic proteins and expressed in vascular endothelial cells. Lack of MGP causes vascular abnormalities in multiple organs in mice. The objective of this study is to define the role of MGP in early endothelial differentiation. We find that expression of endothelial markers is highly induced in Mgp null organs, which, in wild type, contain high MGP expression. Furthermore, Mgp null embryonic stem cells express higher levels of endothelial markers than wild-type controls and an abnormal temporal pattern of expression. We also find that the Mgp-deficient endothelial cells adopt characteristics of mesenchymal stem cells. We conclude that loss of MGP causes dysregulation of early endothelial differentiation.

  10. Spaceflight has compartment- and gene-specific effects on mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins in rat femur

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, G. L.; Morey-Holton, E.; Turner, R. T.

    1998-01-01

    In the present study, we evaluated the possibility that the abnormal bone matrix produced during spaceflight may be associated with reduced expression of bone matrix protein genes. To test this possibility, we investigated the effects of a 14-day spaceflight (SLS-2 experiment) on steady-state mRNA levels for glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), osteocalcin, osteonectin, and prepro-alpha(1) subunit of type I collagen in the major bone compartments of rat femur. There were pronounced site-specific differences in the steady-state levels of expression of the mRNAs for the three bone matrix proteins and GAPDH in normal weight-bearing rats, and these relationships were altered after spaceflight. Specifically, spaceflight resulted in decreases in mRNA levels for GAPDH (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteocalcin (decreased in proximal metaphysis), osteonectin (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis), and collagen (decreased in proximal and distal metaphysis) compared with ground controls. There were no changes in mRNA levels for matrix proteins or GAPDH in the shaft and distal epiphysis. These results demonstrate that spaceflight leads to site- and gene-specific decreases in mRNA levels for bone matrix proteins. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that spaceflight-induced decreases in bone formation are caused by concomitant decreases in expression of genes for bone matrix proteins.

  11. Actin-associated protein palladin promotes tumor cell invasion by linking extracellular matrix degradation to cell cytoskeleton.

    PubMed

    von Nandelstadh, Pernilla; Gucciardo, Erika; Lohi, Jouko; Li, Rui; Sugiyama, Nami; Carpen, Olli; Lehti, Kaisa

    2014-09-01

    Basal-like breast carcinomas, characterized by unfavorable prognosis and frequent metastases, are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. During this process, cancer cells undergo cytoskeletal reorganization and up-regulate membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP; MMP14), which functions in actin-based pseudopods to drive invasion by extracellular matrix degradation. However, the mechanisms that couple matrix proteolysis to the actin cytoskeleton in cell invasion have remained unclear. On the basis of a yeast two-hybrid screen for the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic tail-binding proteins, we identify here a novel Src-regulated protein interaction between the dynamic cytoskeletal scaffold protein palladin and MT1-MMP. These proteins were coexpressed in invasive human basal-like breast carcinomas and corresponding cell lines, where they were associated in the same matrix contacting and degrading membrane complexes. The silencing and overexpression of the 90-kDa palladin isoform revealed the functional importance of the interaction with MT1-MMP in pericellular matrix degradation and mesenchymal tumor cell invasion, whereas in MT1-MMP-negative cells, palladin overexpression was insufficient for invasion. Moreover, this invasion was inhibited in a dominant-negative manner by an immunoglobulin domain-containing palladin fragment lacking the dynamic scaffold and Src-binding domains. These results identify a novel protein interaction that links matrix degradation to cytoskeletal dynamics and migration signaling in mesenchymal cell invasion.

  12. Secreted protein acidic and rich in cysteine is a matrix scavenger chaperone.

    PubMed

    Chlenski, Alexandre; Guerrero, Lisa J; Salwen, Helen R; Yang, Qiwei; Tian, Yufeng; Morales La Madrid, Andres; Mirzoeva, Salida; Bouyer, Patrice G; Xu, David; Walker, Matthew; Cohn, Susan L

    2011-01-01

    Secreted Protein Acidic and Rich in Cysteine (SPARC) is one of the major non-structural proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) in remodeling tissues. The functional significance of SPARC is emphasized by its origin in the first multicellular organisms and its high degree of evolutionary conservation. Although SPARC has been shown to act as a critical modulator of ECM remodeling with profound effects on tissue physiology and architecture, no plausible molecular mechanism of its action has been proposed. In the present study, we demonstrate that SPARC mediates the disassembly and degradation of ECM networks by functioning as a matricellular chaperone. While it has low affinity to its targets inside the cells where the Ca(2+) concentrations are low, high extracellular concentrations of Ca(2+) activate binding to multiple ECM proteins, including collagens. We demonstrated that in vitro, this leads to the inhibition of collagen I fibrillogenesis and disassembly of pre-formed collagen I fibrils by SPARC at high Ca(2+) concentrations. In cell culture, exogenous SPARC was internalized by the fibroblast cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner. Pulse-chase assay further revealed that internalized SPARC is quickly released outside the cell, demonstrating that SPARC shuttles between the cell and ECM. Fluorescently labeled collagen I, fibronectin, vitronectin, and laminin were co-internalized with SPARC by fibroblasts, and semi-quantitative Western blot showed that SPARC mediates internalization of collagen I. Using a novel 3-dimensional model of fluorescent ECM networks pre-deposited by live fibroblasts, we demonstrated that degradation of ECM depends on the chaperone activity of SPARC. These results indicate that SPARC may represent a new class of scavenger chaperones, which mediate ECM degradation, remodeling and repair by disassembling ECM networks and shuttling ECM proteins into the cell. Further understanding of this mechanism may provide insight into the

  13. Efficient preservation in a silicon oxide matrix of Escherichia coli, producer of recombinant proteins.

    PubMed

    Desimone, Martín F; De Marzi, Mauricio C; Copello, Guillermo J; Fernández, Marisa M; Malchiodi, Emilio L; Diaz, Luis E

    2005-10-01

    The aim of this work was to study the use of silicon oxide matrices for the immobilization and preservation of recombinant-protein-producing bacteria. We immobilized Escherichia coli BL21 transformants containing different expression plasmids. One contained DNA coding for a T-cell receptor beta chain, which was expressed as inclusion bodies in the cytoplasm. The other two encoded bacterial superantigens Staphylococcal Enterotoxin G and Streptococcal Superantigen, which were expressed as soluble proteins in the periplasm. The properties of immobilization and storage stability in inorganic matrices prepared from two precursors, silicon dioxide and tetraethoxysilane, were studied. Immobilized E. coli was stored in sealed tubes at 4 and 20 degrees C and the number of viable cells and level of recombinant protein production were analyzed weekly. Different tests showed that the biochemical characteristics of immobilized E. coli remained intact. At both temperatures selected, we found that the number of bacteria in silicon dioxide-derived matrix was of the same order of magnitude (10(9) cfu ml(-1)) as before immobilization, for 2 months. After 2 weeks, cells immobilized in an alkoxide-derived matrix decreased to 10(4) cfu ml(-1) at 4 degrees C, and no viable cells were detected at 20 degrees C. We found that immobilized bacteria could be used as a starter to produce recombinant proteins with yields comparable to those obtained from glycerol stocks: 15 mg l(-1) for superantigens and 2 mg l(-1) for T-cell receptor beta chain. These results contribute to the development of methods for microbial cell preservation under field conditions.

  14. Processing of the glycosomal matrix-protein import receptor PEX5 of Trypanosoma brucei

    SciTech Connect

    Gualdrón-López, Melisa; Michels, Paul A.M.

    2013-02-01

    Highlights: ► Most eukaryotic cells have a single gene for the peroxin PEX5. ► PEX5 is sensitive to in vitro proteolysis in distantly related organisms. ► TbPEX5 undergoes N-terminal truncation in vitro and possibly in vivo. ► Truncated TbPEX5 is still capable of binding PTS1-containing proteins. ► PEX5 truncation is physiologically relevant or an evolutionary conserved artifact. -- Abstract: Glycolysis in kinetoplastid protists such as Trypanosoma brucei is compartmentalized in peroxisome-like organelles called glycosomes. Glycosomal matrix-protein import involves a cytosolic receptor, PEX5, which recognizes the peroxisomal-targeting signal type 1 (PTS1) present at the C-terminus of the majority of matrix proteins. PEX5 appears generally susceptible to in vitro proteolytic processing. On western blots of T. brucei, two PEX5 forms are detected with apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa and 72 kDa. 5′-RACE-PCR showed that TbPEX5 is encoded by a unique transcript that can be translated into a protein of maximally 72 kDa. However, recombinant PEX5 migrates aberrantly in SDS–PAGE with an apparent M{sub r} of 100 kDa, similarly as observed for the native peroxin. In vitro protease susceptibility analysis of native and {sup 35}S-labelled PEX5 showed truncation of the 100 kDa form at the N-terminal side by unknown parasite proteases, giving rise to the 72 kDa form which remains functional for PTS1 binding. The relevance of these observations is discussed.

  15. Prospects for treating osteoarthritis: enzyme–protein interactions regulating matrix metalloproteinase activity

    PubMed Central

    Meszaros, Evan

    2012-01-01

    Primary osteoarthritis (OA) is a musculoskeletal disorder of unknown etiology. OA is characterized by an imbalance between anabolism and catabolism in, and altered homeostasis of articular cartilage. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and a disintegrin and metalloproteinase with thrombospondin motif are upregulated in OA joints. Extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins are critical for resistance to compressive forces and for maintaining the tensile properties of the tissue. Tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) is the endogenous inhibitor of MMPs, but in OA, TIMPs do not effectively neutralize MMP activity. Upregulation of MMP gene expression occurs in OA in a milieu of proinflammatory cytokines such as interleukin (IL)-1, IL-6 and tumor necrosis factor α. Presently, the medical therapy of OA includes mainly nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and corticosteroids which dampen pain and inflammation but appear to have little effect on restoring joint function. Experimental interventions to restore the imbalance between anabolism and catabolism include small molecule inhibitors of MMP subtypes or inhibitors of the interaction between IL-1 and its receptor. Although these agents have some positive effects on reducing MMP subtype activity they have little efficacy at the clinical level. MMP-9 is one MMP subtype implicated in the degradation of articular cartilage ECM proteins. MMP-9 was found in OA synovial fluid as a complex with neutrophil gelatinase-associated lipocalin (NGAL) which protected MMP-9 from autodegradation. Suppressing NGAL synthesis or promoting NGAL degradation may result in reducing the activity of MMP-9. We also propose initiating a search for enzyme–protein interactions to dampen other MMP subtype activity which could suppress ECM protein breakdown. PMID:23342237

  16. Abnormal recruitment of extracellular matrix proteins by excess Notch3 ECD: a new pathomechanism in CADASIL.

    PubMed

    Monet-Leprêtre, Marie; Haddad, Iman; Baron-Menguy, Céline; Fouillot-Panchal, Maï; Riani, Meriem; Domenga-Denier, Valérie; Dussaule, Claire; Cognat, Emmanuel; Vinh, Joelle; Joutel, Anne

    2013-06-01

    Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, or CADASIL, one of the most common inherited small vessel diseases of the brain, is characterized by a progressive loss of vascular smooth muscle cells and extracellular matrix accumulation. The disease is caused by highly stereotyped mutations within the extracellular domain of the NOTCH3 receptor (Notch3(ECD)) that result in an odd number of cysteine residues. While CADASIL-associated NOTCH3 mutations differentially affect NOTCH3 receptor function and activity, they all are associated with early accumulation of Notch3(ECD)-containing aggregates in small vessels. We still lack mechanistic explanation to link NOTCH3 mutations with small vessel pathology. Herein, we hypothesized that excess Notch3(ECD) could recruit and sequester functionally important proteins within small vessels of the brain. We performed biochemical, nano-liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry and immunohistochemical analyses, using cerebral and arterial tissue derived from patients with CADASIL and mouse models of CADASIL that exhibit vascular lesions in the end- and early-stage of the disease, respectively. Biochemical fractionation of brain and artery samples demonstrated that mutant Notch3(ECD) accumulates in disulphide cross-linked detergent-insoluble aggregates in mice and patients with CADASIL. Further proteomic and immunohistochemical analyses identified two functionally important extracellular matrix proteins, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases 3 (TIMP3) and vitronectin (VTN) that are sequestered into Notch3(ECD)-containing aggregates. Using cultured cells, we show that increased levels or aggregation of Notch3 enhances the formation of Notch3(ECD)-TIMP3 complex, promoting TIMP3 recruitment and accumulation. In turn, TIMP3 promotes complex formation including NOTCH3 and VTN. In vivo, brain vessels from mice and patients with CADASIL exhibit elevated levels of both insoluble cross

  17. Dermatopontin, a shell matrix protein gene from pearl oyster Pinctada martensii, participates in nacre formation.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Yu; Wang, Huan; Du, Xiaodong; Zhao, Xiaoxia; Wang, Qingheng; Huang, Ronglian; Deng, Yuewen

    2012-08-31

    Dermatopontin (DPT) is identified as a major component of the shell matrix protein. However, its exact function in the shell formation remains obscure. In this study, we described the characteristic and function of DPT gene from Pinctada martensii. DPT cDNA was 797 bp long, containing an open reading fragment (ORF) of 537 bp encoding a polypeptide of 178 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 21.4 kDa and theoretical isoelectric point of 5.97. The 5' untranslated region (UTR) was 11 bp and the 3'UTR was 249 with 18 bp poly (A) tail. In the peptide, there was a signal sequence, six potential phosphorylation sites, one glycosylation site and eight cysteine residues. Moreover, a sequence motif (D-R-X-W/F/Y-X-F/Y/I/L/M-X(1-2)-C) was contained and repeated itself three times in the entire sequence. DPT mRNA was constitutively expressed in all studied tissues with the most abundant mRNA in the mantle, which was nacre formation-related tissue. After decreasing DPT expression using RNA interference (RNAi) technology in the mantle, the nacreous layer showed a disordered growth; whereas the prismatic layer of the shells has no significant changes. These results suggested that DPT obtained in this study was a constitutive matrix protein and participated in nacre formation in P. martensii.

  18. Matrix-Gla protein promotes osteosarcoma lung metastasis and associates with poor prognosis.

    PubMed

    Zandueta, Carolina; Ormazábal, Cristina; Perurena, Naiara; Martínez-Canarias, Susana; Zalacaín, Marta; Julián, Mikel San; Grigoriadis, Agamemnon E; Valencia, Karmele; Campos-Laborie, Francisco J; Rivas, Javier De Las; Vicent, Silvestre; Patiño-García, Ana; Lecanda, Fernando

    2016-08-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is the most prevalent osseous tumour in children and adolescents and, within this, lung metastases remain one of the factors associated with a dismal prognosis. At present, the genetic determinants driving pulmonary metastasis are poorly understood. We adopted a novel strategy using robust filtering analysis of transcriptomic profiling in tumour osteoblastic cell populations derived from human chemo-naive primary tumours displaying extreme phenotypes (indolent versus metastatic) to uncover predictors associated with metastasis and poor survival. We identified MGP, encoding matrix-Gla protein (MGP), a non-collagenous matrix protein previously associated with the inhibition of arterial calcification. Using different orthotopic models, we found that ectopic expression of Mgp in murine and human OS cells led to a marked increase in lung metastasis. This effect was independent of the carboxylation of glutamic acid residues required for its physiological role. Abrogation of Mgp prevented lung metastatic activity, an effect that was rescued by forced expression. Mgp levels dramatically altered endothelial adhesion, trans-endothelial migration in vitro and tumour cell extravasation ability in vivo. Furthermore, Mgp modulated metalloproteinase activities and TGFβ-induced Smad2/3 phosphorylation. In the clinical setting, OS patients who developed lung metastases had high serum levels of MGP at diagnosis. Thus, MGP represents a novel adverse prognostic factor and a potential therapeutic target in OS. Microarray datasets may be found at: http://bioinfow.dep.usal.es/osteosarcoma/ Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Crystal Structure of the Oligomeric Form of Lassa Virus Matrix Protein Z

    PubMed Central

    Hastie, Kathryn M.; Zandonatti, Michelle; Liu, Tong; Li, Sheng; Woods, Virgil L.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The arenavirus matrix protein Z is highly multifunctional and occurs in both monomeric and oligomeric forms. The crystal structure of a dodecamer of Z from Lassa virus, presented here, illustrates a ring-like structure with a highly basic center. Mutagenesis demonstrates that the dimeric interface within the dodecamer and a Lys-Trp-Lys triad at the center of the ring are important for oligomerization. This structure provides an additional template to explore the many functions of Z. IMPORTANCE The arenavirus Lassa virus causes hundreds of thousands of infections each year, many of which develop into fatal hemorrhagic fever. The arenavirus matrix protein Z is multifunctional, with at least four distinct roles. Z exists in both monomeric and oligomeric forms, each of which likely serves a specific function in the viral life cycle. Here we present the dodecameric form of Lassa virus Z and demonstrate that Z forms a “wreath” with a highly basic center. This structure and that of monomeric Z now provide a pair of critical templates by which the multiple roles of Z in the viral life cycle may be interpreted. PMID:26912609

  20. Matrix Gla protein in Xenopus laevis: molecular cloning, tissue distribution, and evolutionary considerations.

    PubMed

    Cancela, M L; Ohresser, M C; Reia, J P; Viegas, C S; Williamson, M K; Price, P A

    2001-09-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) belongs to the family of vitamin K-dependent, Gla-containing proteins and in higher vertebrates, is found in the extracellular matrix of mineralized tissues and soft tissues. MGP synthesis is highly regulated at the transcription and posttranscription levels and is now known to be involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix calcification and maintenance of cartilage and soft tissue integrity during growth and development. However, its mode of action at the molecular level remains unknown. Because there is a large degree of conservation between amino acid sequences of shark and human MGP, the function of MGP probably has been conserved throughout evolution. Given the complexity of the mammalian system, the study of MGP in a lower vertebrate might be advantageous to relate the onset of MGP expression with specific events during development. Toward this goal, MGP was purified from Xenopus long bones and its N-terminal amino acid sequence was determined and used to clone the Xenopus MGP complementary DNA (cDNA) by a mixture of reverse-transcription (RT)- and 5'- rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE)-polymerase chain reaction (PCR). MGP messenger RNA (mRNA) was present in all tissues analyzed although predominantly expressed in Xenopus bone and heart and its presence was detected early in development at the onset of chondrocranium development and long before the appearance of the first calcified structures and metamorphosis. These results show that in this system, as in mammals, MGP may be required to delay or prevent mineralization of cartilage and soft tissues during the early stages of development and indicate that Xenopus is an adequate model organism to further study MGP function during growth and development.

  1. Nuclear localization and secretion competence is conserved amongst henipavirus matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    McLinton, Elisabeth C; Wagstaff, Kylie M; Lee, Alexander; Moseley, Gregory W; Marsh, Glenn A; Wang, Lin-Fa; Jans, David A; Lieu, Kim G; Netter, Hans

    2017-01-05

    Viruses of the genus Henipavirus of the family Paramyxoviridae are zoonotic pathogens, which have emerged in South East Asia, Australia and Africa. Nipah virus (NiV) and Hendra virus (HeV) are highly virulent pathogens transmitted from bats to animals and humans, whilst the henipavirus Cedar virus (CedV) seems to be non-pathogenic in infection studies. The full replication cycle of the Paramyxoviridae occurs in the host cell's cytoplasm where viral assembly is orchestrated by the matrix (M) protein. Unexpectedly, the NiV-M protein traffics through the nucleus as an essential step to engage the plasma membrane in preparation for viral budding/release. Comparative studies were performed to assess whether M protein nuclear localization is a common feature of the henipaviruses including the recently sequenced (although not yet isolated) Ghanaian bat henipavirus (Kumasi virus, GH-M74a virus, KV) and Mojiang virus (MojV). Live-cell confocal microscopy revealed that nuclear translocation of GFP-fused M protein is conserved between henipaviruses in both human and bat-derived cell lines. However, the efficiency of M protein nuclear localization and virus-like particle budding competency varied. Additionally, CedV-, KV- and MojV-M proteins were mutated in a bipartite nuclear localization signal indicating that a key lysine residue is essential for nuclear import, export and for the induction of budding events as previously reported for NiV-M. The results of this study suggest that the M proteins of henipaviruses may utilize a similar nucleocytoplasmic trafficking pathway as an essential step during viral replication in both humans and bats.

  2. An Ensemble Method with Hybrid Features to Identify Extracellular Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Runtao; Zhang, Chengjin; Gao, Rui; Zhang, Lina

    2015-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) is a dynamic composite of secreted proteins that play important roles in numerous biological processes such as tissue morphogenesis, differentiation and homeostasis. Furthermore, various diseases are caused by the dysfunction of ECM proteins. Therefore, identifying these important ECM proteins may assist in understanding related biological processes and drug development. In view of the serious imbalance in the training dataset, a Random Forest-based ensemble method with hybrid features is developed in this paper to identify ECM proteins. Hybrid features are employed by incorporating sequence composition, physicochemical properties, evolutionary and structural information. The Information Gain Ratio and Incremental Feature Selection (IGR-IFS) methods are adopted to select the optimal features. Finally, the resulting predictor termed IECMP (Identify ECM Proteins) achieves an balanced accuracy of 86.4% using the 10-fold cross-validation on the training dataset, which is much higher than results obtained by other methods (ECMPRED: 71.0%, ECMPP: 77.8%). Moreover, when tested on a common independent dataset, our method also achieves significantly improved performance over ECMPP and ECMPRED. These results indicate that IECMP is an effective method for ECM protein prediction, which has a more balanced prediction capability for positive and negative samples. It is anticipated that the proposed method will provide significant information to fully decipher the molecular mechanisms of ECM-related biological processes and discover candidate drug targets. For public access, we develop a user-friendly web server for ECM protein identification that is freely accessible at http://iecmp.weka.cc. PMID:25680094

  3. An Investigation into the Protein Composition of the Teneral Glossina morsitans morsitans Peritrophic Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Clair; Belmonte, Rodrigo; Armstrong, Stuart D.; Molyneux, Gemma; Haines, Lee R.; Lehane, Michael J.; Wastling, Jonathan; Acosta-Serrano, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Background Tsetse flies serve as biological vectors for several species of African trypanosomes. In order to survive, proliferate and establish a midgut infection, trypanosomes must cross the tsetse fly peritrophic matrix (PM), which is an acellular gut lining surrounding the blood meal. Crossing of this multi-layered structure occurs at least twice during parasite migration and development, but the mechanism of how trypanosomes do so is not understood. In order to better comprehend the molecular events surrounding trypanosome penetration of the tsetse PM, a mass spectrometry-based approach was applied to investigate the PM protein composition using Glossina morsitans morsitans as a model organism. Methods PMs from male teneral (young, unfed) flies were dissected, solubilised in urea/SDS buffer and the proteins precipitated with cold acetone/TCA. The PM proteins were either subjected to an in-solution tryptic digestion or fractionated on 1D SDS-PAGE, and the resulting bands digested using trypsin. The tryptic fragments from both preparations were purified and analysed by LC-MS/MS. Results Overall, nearly 300 proteins were identified from both analyses, several of those containing signature Chitin Binding Domains (CBD), including novel peritrophins and peritrophin-like glycoproteins, which are essential in maintaining PM architecture and may act as trypanosome adhesins. Furthermore, 27 proteins from the tsetse secondary endosymbiont, Sodalis glossinidius, were also identified, suggesting this bacterium is probably in close association with the tsetse PM. Conclusion To our knowledge this is the first report on the protein composition of teneral G. m. morsitans, an important vector of African trypanosomes. Further functional analyses of these proteins will lead to a better understanding of the tsetse physiology and may help identify potential molecular targets to block trypanosome development within the tsetse. PMID:24763256

  4. Identification and Characterization of the Lysine-Rich Matrix Protein Family in Pinctada fucata: Indicative of Roles in Shell Formation.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jian; Xie, Jun; Gao, Jing; Xu, Chao-Qun; Yan, Yi; Jia, Gan-Chu; Xiang, Liang; Xie, Li-Ping; Zhang, Rong-Qing

    2016-12-01

    Mantle can secret matrix proteins playing key roles in regulating the process of shell formation. The genes encoding lysine-rich matrix proteins (KRMPs) are one of the most highly expressed matrix genes in pearl oysters. However, the expression pattern of KRMPs is limited and the functions of them still remain unknown. In this study, we isolated and identified six new members of lysine-rich matrix proteins, rich in lysine, glycine and tyrosine, and all of them are basic matrix proteins. Combined with four members of the KRMPs previously reported, all these proteins can be divided into three subclasses according to the results of phylogenetic analyses: KRMP1-3 belong to subclass KPI, KRMP4-5 belong to KPII, and KRMP6-10 belong to KPIII. Three subcategories of lysine-rich matrix proteins are highly expressed in the D-phase, the larvae and adult mantle. Lysine-rich matrix proteins are involved in the shell repairing process and associated with the formation of the shell and pearl. What's more, they can cause abnormal shell growth after RNA interference. In detail, KPI subgroup was critical for the beginning formation of the prismatic layer; both KPII and KPIII subgroups participated in the formation of prismatic layer and nacreous layer. Compared with different temperatures and salinity stimulation treatments, the influence of changes in pH on KRMPs gene expression was the greatest. Recombinant KRMP7 significantly inhibited CaCO3 precipitation, changed the morphology of calcite, and inhibited the growth of aragonite in vitro. Our results are beneficial to understand the functions of the KRMP genes during shell formation.

  5. Sequence-specific fragmentation of matrix-assisted laser-desorbed protein/peptide ions.

    PubMed

    Brown, R S; Lennon, J J

    1995-11-01

    By utilizing delayed pulsed ion extraction of ions generated via the matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) technique, fast (< 320 ns) metastable ion fragmentation is observed for both peptide and protein analytes in the ion source of a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Small peptides such as the oxidized B chain of bovine insulin exhibit fragmentation at the amide linking bond between peptide residues. Overlapping sequence information is provided by fragmentation from both the C- and N-terminal ends of the peptide (cn-, yn-, and z*n-type fragment ions). Larger proteins can also exhibit a wealth of sequence specific fragment ions in favorable cases. One example is cytochrome c, which undergoes substantial (approximately 80%) fast fragmentation at the amide bonds along the amino acid backbone of the protein. Only amide bond cleavages initiating from the C-terminal end (cn fragments) are observed. The observed fragmentation pattern provides a significant amount of potential sequence information for these molecules. External mass calibration of the intact protonated molecular ions is demonstrated with mass accuracies typically around 100 ppm. Mass accuracies for the observed fragment ions ranged from +/- 0.20 Da for the smaller peptides studied (i.e., oxidized B chain of bovine insulin) to +/- 0.38 Da for the largest protein studied (cytochrome c), based upon the known sequences.

  6. Epitope analysis of capsid and matrix proteins of North American ovine lentivirus field isolates.

    PubMed Central

    Marcom, K A; Pearson, L D; Chung, C S; Poulson, J M; DeMartini, J C

    1991-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against two phenotypically distinct ovine lentivirus (OvLV) strains were generated by fusion of BALB/c SP2/0-Ag 14 myeloma cells with spleen cells from mice immunized with purified OvLV. Hybridomas were selected by indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and analysis of reactivity on immunoblots. The majority (17 of 21) of the MAbs recognized the gag-encoded capsid protein, CA p27, of both strains. Four other MAbs recognized a smaller structural protein, presumably a matrix protein, MA p17. Three distinct epitopes on CA p27 and one on MA p17 were distinguished by the MAbs with competition ELISA. MAbs from each epitope group were able to recognize 17 North American field isolates of OvLV and the closely related caprine arthritis-encephalitis virus (CAEV). Analysis of the data indicated that these epitopes were highly conserved among naturally occurring isolates. A representative MAb from each epitope group of anti-CA p27 MAbs reacted with four field strains of OvLV and CAEV on immunoblots. An anti-MA p17 MAb recognized the same OvLV strains on immunoblots but failed to recognize CAEV. MAbs which recognize conserved epitopes of gag-encoded lentivirus proteins (CA p27 and MA p17) are valuable tools. These MAbs can be used to develop sensitive diagnostic assays and to study the pathogenesis of lentivirus infections in sheep and goats. Images PMID:1715884

  7. Protein translocation channel of mitochondrial inner membrane and matrix-exposed import motor communicate via two-domain coupling protein

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Rupa; Gladkova, Christina; Mapa, Koyeli; Witte, Gregor; Mokranjac, Dejana

    2015-01-01

    The majority of mitochondrial proteins are targeted to mitochondria by N-terminal presequences and use the TIM23 complex for their translocation across the mitochondrial inner membrane. During import, translocation through the channel in the inner membrane is coupled to the ATP-dependent action of an Hsp70-based import motor at the matrix face. How these two processes are coordinated remained unclear. We show here that the two domain structure of Tim44 plays a central role in this process. The N-terminal domain of Tim44 interacts with the components of the import motor, whereas its C-terminal domain interacts with the translocation channel and is in contact with translocating proteins. Our data suggest that the translocation channel and the import motor of the TIM23 complex communicate through rearrangements of the two domains of Tim44 that are stimulated by translocating proteins. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.11897.001 PMID:26714107

  8. The Bfp60 surface adhesin is an extracellular matrix and plasminogen protein interacting in Bacteroides fragilis

    PubMed Central

    de Oliveira Ferreira, Eliane; Teixeira, Felipe; Cordeiro, Fabiana; Lobo, Leandro Araujo; Rocha, Edson R.; Smith, Jeffrey C.; Domingues, Regina M C P

    2014-01-01

    Plasminogen (Plg) is a highly abundant protein found in the plasma component of blood and is necessary for the degradation of fibrin, collagen, and other structural components of tissues. This fibrinolytic system is utilized by several pathogenic species of bacteria to manipulate the host plasminogen system and facilitate invasion of tissues during infection by modifying the activation of this process through the binding of Plg at their surface. Bacteroides fragilis is the most commonly isolated Gram-negative obligate anaerobe from human clinical infections, such as intra-abdominal abscesses and anaerobic bacteraemia. The ability of B. fragilis to convert plasminogen (Plg) into plasmin has been associated with an outer membrane protein named Bfp60. In this study, we characterized the function of Bfp60 protein in B. fragilis 638R by constructing the bfp60 defective strain and comparing its with that of the wild type regarding binding to laminin-1 (LMN-1) and activation of Plg into plasmin. Although the results showed in this study indicate that Bfp60 surface protein of B. fragilis is important for the recognition of LMN-1 and Plg activation, a significant slow activation of Plg into plasmin was observed in the mutant strain. For that reason, the possibility of another unidentified mechanism activating Plg is also present in B. fragilis can not be discarded. The results demonstrate that Bfp60 protein is responsible for the recognition of laminin and Plg-plasmin activation. Although the importance of this protein is still unclear in the pathogenicity of the species, it is accepted that since other pathogenic bacteria use this mechanism to disseminate through the extracellular matrix during the infection, it should also contribute to the virulence of B. fragilis. PMID:23850366

  9. Nucleocapsid and matrix protein contributions to selective human immunodeficiency virus type 1 genomic RNA packaging.

    PubMed

    Poon, D T; Li, G; Aldovini, A

    1998-03-01

    The nucleocapsid protein (NC) of retroviruses plays a major role in genomic RNA packaging, and some evidence has implicated the matrix protein (MA) of certain retroviruses in viral RNA binding. To further investigate the role of NC in the selective recognition of genomic viral RNA and to address the potential contribution of MA in this process, we constructed chimeric and deletion human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) mutants that alter the NC or MA protein. Both HIV and mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) NC proteins have two zinc-binding domains and similar basic amino acid compositions but differ substantially in total length, amino acid sequence, and spacing of the zinc-binding motifs. When the entire NC coding sequence of HIV was replaced with the MMTV NC coding sequence, we found that the HIV genome was incorporated into virions at 50% of wild-type levels. Viruses produced from chimeric HIV genomes with complete NC replacements, or with the two NC zinc-binding domains replaced with MMTV sequences, preferentially incorporated HIV genomes when both HIV and MMTV genomes were simultaneously present in the cell. Viruses produced from chimeric MMTV genomes in which the MMTV NC had been replaced with HIV NC preferentially incorporated MMTV genomes when both HIV and MMTV genomes were simultaneously present in the cell. In contrast, viruses produced from chimeric HIV genomes containing the Moloney NC, which contains a single zinc-binding motif, were previously shown to preferentially incorporate Moloney genomic RNA. Taken together, these results indicate that an NC protein with two zinc-binding motifs is required for specific HIV RNA packaging and that the amino acid context of these motifs, while contributing to the process, is less crucial for specificity. The data also suggest that HIV NC may not be the exclusive determinant of RNA selectivity. Analysis of an HIV MA mutant revealed that specific RNA packaging does not require MA protein.

  10. Endometrial inflammation and abnormal expression of extracellular matrix proteins induced by Mycoplasma bovis in dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Guo, Mengyao; Wang, Guoqing; Lv, Tingting; Song, Xiaojing; Wang, Tiancheng; Xie, Guanghong; Cao, Yongguo; Zhang, Naisheng; Cao, Rongfeng

    2014-03-15

    Mycoplasma bovis infection can cause endometrial inflammation leading to infertility and involuntary culling in dairy cows. Because extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins affect the adherence of mycoplasma to eukaryotic cell surface, they may play a role in the pathogenesis of the bacteria. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the endometrial inflammatory response and ECM protein expression induced by M bovis. Endometrial concentrations of inflammatory cytokines tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6, and mRNA and protein expression of collagen IV (CL-IV), fibronectin (FN), and laminin (LN) were evaluated 10, 20, and 30 days after M bovis intrauterine infusion in breed cows 18 days postpartum. The presence of the bacteria in the uterus was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis. Endometrial TNF-α, IL-1β, and IL-6 concentrations in the treatment group were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 20 and 30 days after infusion. Endometrial CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression increased (P < 0.01) 20 days after infusion in all groups. However, the increase was more pronounced in the treatment group and reactive expressions were greater (P < 0.05) than in the positive and negative control groups 10, 20, and 30 days after infusion. In conclusion, M bovis triggered endometrial inflammatory response and increased CL-IV, FN, and LN mRNA and protein expression. The abnormal expression of ECM these proteins may promote the pathogenic effects of M bovis that lead to endometrial tissue damage and infertility.

  11. Proteomic analyses of gastric cancer cells treated with vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Dequan; Zhang, Tao; Zhou, Shengtao; Hu, Hao; Li, Jingyi; Huang, Kai; Lei, Yunlong; Wang, Kui; Zhao, Yong; Liu, Rui; Li, Qiu; Wen, Yanjun; Huang, Canhua

    2011-06-01

    Gastric cancer constitutes the second leading cause of mortality worldwide and the fourth most common cancer. While chemotherapy remains the primary treatment for both resectable and advanced gastric cancer, most gastric cancers are naturally resistant to anticancer drugs, rendering new therapeutic avenues in dire need. Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) was proved to preferentially replicate in many types of tumor cells and eventually induce apoptosis of host cells. The vesicular stomatitis virus matrix protein (MP) plays a major role in its effects. This study proved that expression of MP could effectively inhibit proliferation and induce cell death in gastric carcinoma MKN28 cells. Furthermore, we utilized a proteomics strategy to characterize proteome-wide alterations between MP-treated MKN28 lines and their untreated counterparts. A total of 97 spots were positively identified as differentially expressed, and of these 62 proteins were up-regulated, whereas 35 proteins were down-regulated. Functional analysis unraveled three significantly modified gene product subgroups: glycolytic enzymes, reactive oxygen species-associated proteins and the proteins regulating RNA transport and maturation. Expression of three altered proteins was further validated by semi-quantitative RT-PCR or/and western blotting. Furthermore, we demonstrated that MP expression could induce rapid intracellular ROS accumulation in MKN28 cells. These results provide evidence for the anti-cancer potential of MP, and a novel MP-mediated apoptotic signaling pathway is proposed. Our findings are considered a significant step toward a better understanding the mechanism of MP-induced anti-cancer effect.

  12. Preparation and characterization of monodisperse large-porous silica microspheres as the matrix for protein separation.

    PubMed

    Xia, Hongjun; Wan, Guangping; Zhao, Junlong; Liu, Jiawei; Bai, Quan

    2016-11-04

    High performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) is a kind of efficient separation technology and has been used widely in many fields. Micro-sized porous silica microspheres as the most popular matrix have been used for fast separation and analysis in HPLC. In this paper, the monodisperse large-porous silica microspheres with controllable size and structure were successfully synthesized with polymer microspheres as the templates and characterized. First, the poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) microspheres (PGMA-EDMA) were functionalized with tetraethylenepentamine (TEPA) to generate amino groups which act as a catalyst in hydrolysis of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) to form Si-containing low molecular weight species. Then the low molecular weight species diffused into the functionalized PGMA-EDMA microspheres by induction force of the amino groups to form polymer/silica hybrid microspheres. Finally, the organic polymer templates were removed by calcination, and the large-porous silica microspheres were obtained. The compositions, morphology, size distribution, specific surface area and pore size distribution of the porous silica microspheres were characterized by infrared analyzer, scanning-electron microscopy, dynamic laser scattering, the mercury intrusion method and thermal gravimetric analysis, respectively. The results show that the agglomeration of the hybrid microspheres can be overcome when the templates were functionalized with TEPA as amination reagent, and the yield of 95.7% of the monodisperse large-porous silica microspheres can be achieved with high concentration of polymer templates. The resulting large-porous silica microspheres were modified with octadecyltrichlorosilane (ODS) and the chromatographic evaluation was performed by separating the proteins and the digest of BSA. The baseline separation of seven kinds of protein standards was achieved, and the column delivered a better performance when separating BSA digests

  13. Protein Modification by Deamidation Indicates Variations in Joint Extracellular Matrix Turnover*

    PubMed Central

    Catterall, Jonathan B.; Hsueh, Ming F.; Stabler, Thomas V.; McCudden, Christopher R.; Bolognesi, Michael; Zura, Robert; Jordan, Joanne M.; Renner, Jordan B.; Feng, Sheng; Kraus, Virginia B.

    2012-01-01

    As extracellular proteins age, they undergo and accumulate nonenzymatic post-translational modifications that cannot be repaired. We hypothesized that these could be used to systemically monitor loss of extracellular matrix due to chronic arthritic diseases such as osteoarthritis (OA). To test this, we predicted sites of deamidation in cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) and confirmed, by mass spectroscopy, the presence of deamidated (Asp64) and native (Asn64) COMP epitopes (mean 0.95% deamidated COMP (D-COMP) relative to native COMP) in cartilage. An Asp64, D-COMP-specific ELISA was developed using a newly created monoclonal antibody 6-1A12. In a joint replacement study, serum D-COMP (p = 0.017), but not total COMP (p = 0.5), declined significantly after replacement demonstrating a joint tissue source for D-COMP. In analyses of 450 participants from the Johnston County Osteoarthritis Project controlled for age, gender, and race, D-COMP was associated with radiographic hip (p < 0.0001) but not knee (p = 0.95) OA severity. In contrast, total COMP was associated with radiographic knee (p < 0.0001) but not hip (p = 0.47) OA severity. D-COMP was higher in soluble proteins extracted from hip cartilage proximal to OA lesions compared with remote from lesions (p = 0.007) or lesional and remote OA knee (p < 0.01) cartilage. Total COMP in cartilage did not vary by joint site or proximity to the lesion. This study demonstrates the presence of D-COMP in articular cartilage and the systemic circulation, and to our knowledge, it is the first biomarker to show specificity for a particular joint site. We believe that enrichment of deamidated epitope in hip OA cartilage indicates a lesser repair response of hip OA compared with knee OA cartilage. PMID:22179616

  14. The Human Metapneumovirus Matrix Protein Stimulates the Inflammatory Immune Response In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Bagnaud-Baule, Audrey; Reynard, Olivier; Perret, Magali; Berland, Jean-Luc; Maache, Mimoun; Peyrefitte, Christophe; Vernet, Guy; Volchkov, Viktor; Paranhos-Baccalà, Gláucia

    2011-01-01

    Each year, during winter months, human Metapneumovirus (hMPV) is associated with epidemics of bronchiolitis resulting in the hospitalization of many infants. Bronchiolitis is an acute illness of the lower respiratory tract with a consequent inflammation of the bronchioles. The rapid onset of inflammation suggests the innate immune response may have a role to play in the pathogenesis of this hMPV infection. Since, the matrix protein is one of the most abundant proteins in the Paramyxoviridae family virion, we hypothesized that the inflammatory modulation observed in hMPV infected patients may be partly associated with the matrix protein (M-hMPV) response. By western blot analysis, we detected a soluble form of M-hMPV released from hMPV infected cell as well as from M-hMPV transfected HEK 293T cells suggesting that M-hMPV may be directly in contact with antigen presenting cells (APCs) during the course of infection. Moreover, flow cytometry and confocal microscopy allowed determining that M-hMPV was taken up by dendritic cells (moDCs) and macrophages inducing their activation. Furthermore, these moDCs enter into a maturation process inducing the secretion of a broad range of inflammatory cytokines when exposed to M-hMPV. Additionally, M-hMPV activated DCs were shown to stimulate IL-2 and IFN-γ production by allogeneic T lymphocytes. This M-hMPV-mediated activation and antigen presentation of APCs may in part explain the marked inflammatory immune response observed in pathology induced by hMPV in patients. PMID:21412439

  15. Link protein N-terminal peptide binds to bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type II receptor and drives matrix protein expression in rabbit intervertebral disc cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zili; Weitzmann, M Neale; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Hutton, William C; Yoon, S Tim

    2013-09-27

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and associated spinal disorders are leading sources of morbidity, and they can be responsible for chronic low back pain. Treatments for degenerative disc diseases continue to be a challenge. Intensive research is now focusing on promoting regeneration of degenerated discs by stimulating production of the disc matrix. Link protein N-terminal peptide (LPP) is a proteolytic fragment of link protein, an important cross-linker and stabilizer of the major structural components of cartilage, aggrecan and hyaluronan. In this study we investigated LPP action in rabbit primary intervertebral disc cells cultured ex vivo in a three-dimensional alginate matrix. Our data reveal that LPP promotes disc matrix production, which was evidenced by increased expression of the chondrocyte-specific transcription factor SOX9 and the extracellular matrix macromolecules aggrecan and collagen II. Using colocalization and pulldown studies we further document a noggin-insensitive direct peptide-protein association between LPP and BMP-RII. This association mediated Smad signaling that converges on BMP genes leading to expression of BMP-4 and BMP-7. Furthermore, through a cell-autonomous loop BMP-4 and BMP-7 intensified Smad1/5 signaling though a feedforward circuit involving BMP-RI, ultimately promoting expression of SOX9 and downstream aggrecan and collagen II genes. Our data define a complex regulatory signaling cascade initiated by LPP and suggest that LPP may be a useful therapeutic substitute for direct BMP administration to treat IVD degeneration and to ameliorate IVD-associated chronic low back pain.

  16. Link Protein N-terminal Peptide Binds to Bone Morphogenetic Protein (BMP) Type II Receptor and Drives Matrix Protein Expression in Rabbit Intervertebral Disc Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zili; Weitzmann, M. Neale; Sangadala, Sreedhara; Hutton, William C.; Yoon, S. Tim

    2013-01-01

    Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration and associated spinal disorders are leading sources of morbidity, and they can be responsible for chronic low back pain. Treatments for degenerative disc diseases continue to be a challenge. Intensive research is now focusing on promoting regeneration of degenerated discs by stimulating production of the disc matrix. Link protein N-terminal peptide (LPP) is a proteolytic fragment of link protein, an important cross-linker and stabilizer of the major structural components of cartilage, aggrecan and hyaluronan. In this study we investigated LPP action in rabbit primary intervertebral disc cells cultured ex vivo in a three-dimensional alginate matrix. Our data reveal that LPP promotes disc matrix production, which was evidenced by increased expression of the chondrocyte-specific transcription factor SOX9 and the extracellular matrix macromolecules aggrecan and collagen II. Using colocalization and pulldown studies we further document a noggin-insensitive direct peptide-protein association between LPP and BMP-RII. This association mediated Smad signaling that converges on BMP genes leading to expression of BMP-4 and BMP-7. Furthermore, through a cell-autonomous loop BMP-4 and BMP-7 intensified Smad1/5 signaling though a feedforward circuit involving BMP-RI, ultimately promoting expression of SOX9 and downstream aggrecan and collagen II genes. Our data define a complex regulatory signaling cascade initiated by LPP and suggest that LPP may be a useful therapeutic substitute for direct BMP administration to treat IVD degeneration and to ameliorate IVD-associated chronic low back pain. PMID:23940040

  17. Evidence for Ubiquitin-Regulated Nuclear and Subnuclear Trafficking among Paramyxovirinae Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Pentecost, Mickey; Vashisht, Ajay A.; Beaty, Shannon M.; Park, Arnold; Wang, Yao E.; Yun, Tatyana E; Freiberg, Alexander N.; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Lee, Benhur

    2015-01-01

    The paramyxovirus matrix (M) protein is a molecular scaffold required for viral morphogenesis and budding at the plasma membrane. Transient nuclear residence of some M proteins hints at non-structural roles. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate the nuclear sojourn. Previously, we found that the nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking of Nipah virus M (NiV-M) is a prerequisite for budding, and is regulated by a bipartite nuclear localization signal (NLSbp), a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES), and monoubiquitination of the K258 residue within the NLSbp itself (NLSbp-lysine). To define whether the sequence determinants of nuclear trafficking identified in NiV-M are common among other Paramyxovirinae M proteins, we generated the homologous NES and NLSbp-lysine mutations in M proteins from the five major Paramyxovirinae genera. Using quantitative 3D confocal microscopy, we determined that the NES and NLSbp-lysine are required for the efficient nuclear export of the M proteins of Nipah virus, Hendra virus, Sendai virus, and Mumps virus. Pharmacological depletion of free ubiquitin or mutation of the conserved NLSbp-lysine to an arginine, which inhibits M ubiquitination, also results in nuclear and nucleolar retention of these M proteins. Recombinant Sendai virus (rSeV-eGFP) bearing the NES or NLSbp-lysine M mutants rescued at similar efficiencies to wild type. However, foci of cells expressing the M mutants displayed marked fusogenicity in contrast to wild type, and infection did not spread. Recombinant Mumps virus (rMuV-eGFP) bearing the homologous mutations showed similar defects in viral morphogenesis. Finally, shotgun proteomics experiments indicated that the interactomes of Paramyxovirinae M proteins are significantly enriched for components of the nuclear pore complex, nuclear transport receptors, and nucleolar proteins. We then synthesize our functional and proteomics data to propose a working model for the ubiquitin-regulated nuclear

  18. In-gel expression and in situ immobilization of proteins for generation of three dimensional protein arrays in a hydrogel matrix.

    PubMed

    Byun, Ju-Young; Lee, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ka-Young; Kim, Min-Gon; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2013-03-07

    A method has been developed for the direct conversion of DNA arrays into three dimensional protein arrays on a hydrogel matrix. An agarose gel embedded with bacterial protein synthesis machinery was used as the DNA-programmable expression gel matrix for the in situ translation of genes on a DNA array. Upon incubation of the expression gel matrix cast on a DNA array, protein synthesis took place at the interface of the two surfaces and the cell-free synthesized proteins were deposited on the gel matrix surrounding the corresponding DNA spots. Diffusional dilution of the expressed proteins was minimized by modifying the agarose with Ni-NTA moieties. This procedure resulted in the generation of localized protein spots with confined radii. The developed approach not only simplifies the procedures typically used for the preparation of protein arrays but it also provides conditions for the loading of higher amounts of proteins on the array while retaining their structural integrity and functionality over extended time periods.

  19. A novel acidic matrix protein, PfN44, stabilizes magnesium calcite to inhibit the crystallization of aragonite.

    PubMed

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-31

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium.

  20. A Novel Acidic Matrix Protein, PfN44, Stabilizes Magnesium Calcite to Inhibit the Crystallization of Aragonite*

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Cong; Fang, Dong; Xu, Guangrui; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2014-01-01

    Magnesium is widely used to control calcium carbonate deposition in the shell of pearl oysters. Matrix proteins in the shell are responsible for nucleation and growth of calcium carbonate crystals. However, there is no direct evidence supporting a connection between matrix proteins and magnesium. Here, we identified a novel acidic matrix protein named PfN44 that affected aragonite formation in the shell of the pearl oyster Pinctada fucata. Using immunogold labeling assays, we found PfN44 in both the nacreous and prismatic layers. In shell repair, PfN44 was repressed, whereas other matrix proteins were up-regulated. Disturbing the function of PfN44 by RNAi led to the deposition of porous nacreous tablets with overgrowth of crystals in the nacreous layer. By in vitro circular dichroism spectra and fluorescence quenching, we found that PfN44 bound to both calcium and magnesium with a stronger affinity for magnesium. During in vitro calcium carbonate crystallization and calcification of amorphous calcium carbonate, PfN44 regulated the magnesium content of crystalline carbonate polymorphs and stabilized magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition. Taken together, our results suggested that by stabilizing magnesium calcite to inhibit aragonite deposition, PfN44 participated in P. fucata shell formation. These observations extend our understanding of the connections between matrix proteins and magnesium. PMID:24302723

  1. Dual role for the latent transforming growth factor-beta binding protein in storage of latent TGF-beta in the extracellular matrix and as a structural matrix protein

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The role of the latent TGF-beta binding protein (LTBP) is unclear. In cultures of fetal rat calvarial cells, which form mineralized bonelike nodules, both LTBP and the TGF-beta 1 precursor localized to large fibrillar structures in the extracellular matrix. The appearance of these fibrillar structures preceded the appearance of type I collagen fibers. Plasmin treatment abolished the fibrillar staining pattern for LTBP and released a complex containing both LTBP and TGF-beta. Antibodies and antisense oligonucleotides against LTBP inhibited the formation of mineralized bonelike nodules in long-term fetal rat calvarial cultures. Immunohistochemistry of fetal and adult rat bone confirmed a fibrillar staining pattern for LTBP in vivo. These findings, together with the known homology of LTBP to the fibrillin family of proteins, suggest a novel function for LTBP, in addition to its role in matrix storage of latent TGF-beta, as a structural matrix protein that may play a role in bone formation. PMID:7593177

  2. Staphylococcus aureus Manganese Transport Protein C (MntC) Is an Extracellular Matrix- and Plasminogen-Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, Natália; Castiblanco-Valencia, Mónica Marcela; da Silva, Ludmila Bezerra; de Castro, Íris Arantes; Monaris, Denize; Masuda, Hana Paula; Barbosa, Angela Silva; Arêas, Ana Paula Mattos

    2014-01-01

    Infections caused by Staphylococcus aureus – particularly nosocomial infections - represent a great concern. Usually, the early stage of pathogenesis consists on asymptomatic nasopharynx colonization, which could result in dissemination to other mucosal niches or invasion of sterile sites, such as blood. This pathogenic route depends on scavenging of nutrients as well as binding to and disrupting extracellular matrix (ECM). Manganese transport protein C (MntC), a conserved manganese-binding protein, takes part in this infectious scenario as an ion-scavenging factor and surprisingly as an ECM and coagulation cascade binding protein, as revealed in this work. This study showed a marked ability of MntC to bind to several ECM and coagulation cascade components, including laminin, collagen type IV, cellular and plasma fibronectin, plasminogen and fibrinogen by ELISA. The MntC binding to plasminogen appears to be related to the presence of surface-exposed lysines, since previous incubation with an analogue of lysine residue, ε-aminocaproic acid, or increasing ionic strength affected the interaction between MntC and plasminogen. MntC-bound plasminogen was converted to active plasmin in the presence of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA). The newly released plasmin, in turn, acted in the cleavage of the α and β chains of fibrinogen. In conclusion, we describe a novel function for MntC that may help staphylococcal mucosal colonization and establishment of invasive disease, through the interaction with ECM and coagulation cascade host proteins. These data suggest that this potential virulence factor could be an adequate candidate to compose an anti-staphylococcal human vaccine formulation. PMID:25409527

  3. Humoral and cellular immune responses to matrix protein of measles virus in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis.

    PubMed Central

    Dhib-Jalbut, S; McFarland, H F; Mingioli, E S; Sever, J L; McFarlin, D E

    1988-01-01

    The immune response to matrix (M) protein of measles virus was examined in patients with subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) and controls. Antibodies specific for M and nucleocapsid (NC) proteins in 11 serum and 8 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples from patients with SSPE were quantitated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay by using affinity-purified measles virus proteins. Geometric mean anti-NC antibody titers were higher in the serum (6.58 +/- 0.98 [mean +/- standard deviation]) and CSF (4.38 +/- 0.74) of SSPE patients compared with controls. Anti-M antibodies were present in the serum and CSF of all SSPE samples tested but in titers lower than those of anti-NC antibodies. Geometric mean anti-M antibody titer was 3.35 +/- 0.53 in sera from patients with SSPE compared with 3.05 +/- 0.66 in sera from patients with other neurological diseases and 3.12 +/- 0.74 in sera from healthy individuals. Geometric mean anti-M antibody titer was 2.59 +/- 0.86 in the CSF of eight patients with SSPE compared with a mean less than 1.00 for patients with other neurological disease (controls). Intrathecal synthesis of anti-M or anti-NC antibodies was established in four patients with SSPE. The cellular immune responses to M, F, HA, and NC proteins were examined in four of the patients with SSPE by lymphoproliferation and were not significantly different from those in five healthy controls. The results demonstrate humoral and cellular immune responses to M protein in patients with SSPE and indicate that it is unlikely that a defect in the immune response to this virus component accounts for the disease process in the patients studied. Images PMID:3373575

  4. Nell1-deficient mice have reduced expression of extracellular matrix proteins causing cranial and vertebral defects

    SciTech Connect

    Desai, Jayashree; Shannon, Mark E.; Johnson, Mahlon D.; Ruff, David W.; Hughes, Lori A; Kerley, Marilyn K; Carpenter, D A; Johnson, Dabney K; Rinchik, Eugene M.; Culiat, Cymbeline T

    2006-01-01

    The mammalian Nell1 gene encodes a protein kinase C-b1 (PKC-b1) binding protein that belongs to a new class of cell-signaling molecules controlling cell growth and differentiation. Over-expression of Nell1 in the developing cranial sutures in both human and mouse induces craniosynostosis, the premature fusion of the growing cranial bone fronts. Here, we report the generation, positional cloning and characterization of Nell16R, a recessive, neonatal-lethal point mutation in the mouse Nell1 gene, induced by N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea. Nell16R has a T!A base change that converts a codon for cysteine into a premature stop codon [Cys(502)Ter], resulting in severe truncation of the predicted protein product and marked reduction in steady-state levels of the transcript. In addition to the expected alteration of cranial morphology, Nell16R mutants manifest skeletal defects in the vertebral column and ribcage, revealing a hitherto undefined role for Nell1 in signal transduction in endochondral ossification. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription-PCR assays of 219 genes showed an association between the loss of Nell1 function and reduced expression of genes for extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins critical for chondrogenesis and osteogenesis. Several affected genes are involved in the human cartilage disorder Ehlers-Danlos Syndrome and other disorders associated with spinal curvature anomalies. Nell16R mutant mice are a new tool for elucidating basic mechanisms in osteoblast and chrondrocyte differentiation in the developing skull and vertebral column and understanding how perturbations in the production of ECM proteins can lead to anomalies in these structures.

  5. Critical roles for WDR72 in calcium transport and matrix protein removal during enamel maturation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Kai; Hu, Yuanyuan; Yang, Jie; Smith, Charles E; Nunez, Stephanie M; Richardson, Amelia S; Pal, Soumya; Samann, Andrew C; Hu, Jan C-C; Simmer, James P

    2015-01-01

    Defects in WDR72 (WD repeat-containing protein 72) cause autosomal recessive hypomaturation amelogenesis imperfecta. We generated and characterized Wdr72-knockout/lacZ-knockin mice to investigate the role of WDR72 in enamel formation. In all analyses, enamel formed by Wdr72 heterozygous mice was indistinguishable from wild-type enamel. Without WDR72, enamel mineral density increased early during the maturation stage but soon arrested. The null enamel layer was only a tenth as hard as wild-type enamel and underwent rapid attrition following eruption. Despite the failure to further mineralize enamel deposited during the secretory stage, ectopic mineral formed on the enamel surface and penetrated into the overlying soft tissue. While the proteins in the enamel matrix were successfully degraded, the digestion products remained inside the enamel. Interactome analysis of WDR72 protein revealed potential interactions with clathrin-associated proteins and involvement in ameloblastic endocytosis. The maturation stage mandibular incisor enamel did not stain with methyl red, indicating that the enamel did not acidify beneath ruffle-ended ameloblasts. Attachment of maturation ameloblasts to the enamel layer was weakened, and SLC24A4, a critical ameloblast calcium transporter, did not localize appropriately along the ameloblast distal membrane. Fewer blood vessels were observed in the papillary layer supporting ameloblasts. Specific WDR72 expression by maturation stage ameloblasts explained the observation that enamel thickness and rod decussation (established during the secretory stage) are normal in the Wdr72 null mice. We conclude that WDR72 serves critical functions specifically during the maturation stage of amelogenesis and is required for both protein removal and enamel mineralization. PMID:26247047

  6. Molecular evolution of viral fusion and matrix protein genes and phylogenetic relationships among the Paramyxoviridae.

    PubMed

    Westover, K M; Hughes, A L

    2001-10-01

    Phylogenetic relationships among the Paramyxoviridae, a broad family of viruses whose members cause devastating diseases of wildlife, livestock, and humans, were examined with both fusion (F) and matrix (M) protein-coding sequences. Neighbor-joining trees of F and M protein sequences showed that the Paramyxoviridae was divided into the two traditionally recognized subfamilies, the Paramyxovirinae and the Pneumovirinae. Within the Paramyxovirinae, the results also showed groups corresponding to three currently recognized genera: Respirovirus, Morbillivirus, and Rubulavirus. The relationships among the three genera of the Paramyxovirinae were resolved with M protein sequences and there was significant bootstrap support (100%) showing that members of the genus Respirovirus and the genus Morbillivirus were more closely related to each other than to members of the genus Rubulavirus. Both F and M phylogenies showed that Newcastle disease virus (NDV) was more closely related to the genus Rubulavirus than to the other two genera but were consistent with the proposal (B. S. Seal et al., 2000, Virus Res. 66, 1-11) that NDV be classified as a separate genus within the Paramyxovirinae. Both F and M phylogenies were also consistent with the proposal (L. Wang et al., 2000, J. Virol 74, 9972-9979) that Hendra virus be classified as a new genus closely related and basal to the genus Morbillivirus. Rinderpest was most closely related to measles and a more derived virus than to canine distemper virus, phocine distemper virus, or dolphin morbillivirus.

  7. Structure and function of matrix proteins and peptides in the biomineral formation in crustaceans.

    PubMed

    Nagasawa, Hiromichi

    2011-01-01

    Crustaceans have hard cuticle with layered structure, which is composed mainly of chitin, proteins, and calcium carbonate. Crustaceans grow by shedding the old cuticle and replacing it with a new one. Decalcification in the cuticle during the pre-molt stage and concomitant calcification in the stomach to form gastroliths observed in some crustacean species are triggered by the molting hormone. Various proteins and peptides have been identified from calcified cuticle and gastroliths, and their functions have been examined in terms of calcification and interaction with chitin. Acidic nature of matrix proteins is important for recruitment of calcium ions and interaction with calcium carbonate. Examination of the relationship between amino acid sequence containing acidic amino acid residues and calcification inhibitory activity revealed that the potency did not depend on the sequence but on the number of acidic amino acid residues. Calcium carbonate in the calcified tissues of crustaceans is amorphous in many cases. Crustaceans take a strategy to induce and maintain amorphous calcium carbonate by using low-molecular-weight phosphorus compounds.

  8. Interactions of promonocytic U937 cells with proteins of the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed Central

    Pucillo, C E; Colombatti, A; Vitale, M; Salzano, S; Rossi, G; Formisano, S

    1993-01-01

    Monocyte interaction with proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM) is regulated by expression of specific cell-surface receptors. 12-O-tetradecanoyl phorbol-13-acetate (TPA) has been shown to induce the promonocytic cell line U937 to a more differentiated monocyte-like state. In this study we have analysed the attachment of U937 cells to ECM proteins and the effects of treatment with TPA on this process. Non-induced U937 cells attach to fibronectin- and Matrigel-coated surfaces without TPA stimulation, but TPA further increases adherence to these substrates as measured by an enhanced binding and by the lower concentration of proteins needed in the substrate to achieve 50% of maximal cell adhesion. Attachment to type I collagen was seen only with activated U937 cells, whereas no measurable attachment to bovine serum albumin, vitronectin, and type IV collagen was detected. TPA-activated U937 cells showed a two-fold increase in the expression of the RGD-dependent integrin receptors alpha 3 and alpha 5, and a reduction in the expression of alpha 4, another fibronectin-specific receptor, whereas the common beta 1 chain was unchanged. Attachment of U937 cells to fibronectin was primarily mediated by the alpha 3 and alpha 5 integrins, as revealed by the ability of GRGDS peptides to inhibit attachment, whereas the CS-1 peptide, containing the alpha 4 binding site, was largely ineffective in blocking attachment. PMID:8262552

  9. The association of matrix Gla protein isomers with calcification in capsules surrounding silicone breast implants.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Larry W; Lieske, John C; Tran, Nho V; Miller, Virginia M

    2011-11-01

    Implanted silicone medical prostheses induce a dynamic sequence of histologic events in adjacent tissue resulting in the formation of a fibrotic peri-prosthetic capsule. In some cases, capsular calcification occurs, requiring surgical intervention. In this study we investigated capsules from silicone gel-filled breast prostheses to test the hypothesis that this calcification might be regulated by the small vitamin K-dependent protein, matrix Gla protein (MGP), a potent inhibitor of arterial calcification, or by Fetuin-A, a hepatocyte-derived glycoprotein also implicated as a regulator of pathologic calcification. Immunolocalization studies of explanted capsular tissue, using conformation-specific antibodies, identified the mineralization-protective γ-carboxylated MGP isomer (cMGP) within cells of uncalcified capsules, whereas the non-functional undercarboxylated isomer (uMGP) was typically absent. Both were upregulated in calcific capsules and co-localized with mineral plaque and adjacent fibers. Synovial-like metaplasia was present in one uncalcified capsule in which MGP species were differentially localized within the pseudosynovium. Fetuin-A was localized to cells within uncalcified capsules and to mineral deposits within calcific capsules. The osteoinductive cytokine bone morphogenic protein-2 localized to collagen fibers in uncalcified capsules. These findings demonstrate that MGP, in its vitamin K-activated conformer, may represent a pharmacological target to sustain the health of the peri-prosthetic tissue which encapsulates silicone breast implants as well as other implanted silicone medical devices.

  10. The neuronal extracellular matrix restricts distribution and internalization of aggregated Tau-protein.

    PubMed

    Suttkus, A; Holzer, M; Morawski, M; Arendt, T

    2016-01-28

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic degenerative disorder characterized by fibrillary aggregates of Aß and Tau-protein. Formation and progression of these pathological hallmarks throughout the brain follow a specific spatio-temporal pattern which provides the basis for neuropathological staging. Previously, we could demonstrate that cortical and subcortical neurons are less frequently affected by neurofibrillary degeneration if they are enwrapped by a specialized form of the hyaluronan-based extracellular matrix (ECM), the so called 'perineuronal net' (PN). PNs are composed of large aggregating chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans connected to a hyaluronan backbone, stabilized by link proteins and cross-linked via tenascin-R. Recently, PN-associated neurons were shown to be better protected against iron-induced neurodegeneration compared to neurons without PN, indicating a neuroprotective function. Here, we investigated the role of PNs in distribution and internalization of exogenous Tau-protein by using organotypic slice cultures of wildtype mice as well as mice lacking the ECM-components aggrecan, HAPLN1 or tenascin-R. We could demonstrate that PNs restrict both distribution and internalization of Tau. Accordingly, PN-ensheathed neurons were less frequently affected by Tau-internalization, than neurons without PN. Finally, the PNs as well as their three investigated components were shown to modulate the processes of distribution as well as internalization of Tau.

  11. Molecular dynamics analysis of HIV-1 matrix protein: clarifying differences between crystallographic and solution structures.

    PubMed

    Verli, Hugo; Calazans, Alexandre; Brindeiro, Rodrigo; Tanuri, Amilcar; Guimarães, Jorge A

    2007-07-01

    One of the main structural features of the mature HIV-1 virion is the matrix protein (p17). This partially globular protein presents four helixes centrally organized and a fifth one, H5, projecting away from the packed bundle of helixes. Comparison between solution and crystallographic data of p17 indicates a 6 A displacement of a short 3(10) helix and a partial unfolding of H5 in solution related to crystal. While the behavior of the 3(10) helix has been previously addressed to virion assembly, the relevance and origin of H5 partial unfolding is possibly related to the contacts between p17 and other viral elements, such as p24. In this context, we present a 40 ns conformational sampling of monomeric p17 using molecular dynamics simulations. The performed simulations presented a progressive conversion of the p17 crystallographic structure to the NMR conformation, suggesting that the biological form of this protein may have its C-terminal portion partially unfolded.

  12. Mechanical Stimulation of Piezo1 Receptors Depends on Extracellular Matrix Proteins and Directionality of Force.

    PubMed

    Gaub, Benjamin M; Müller, Daniel J

    2017-02-08

    Piezo receptors convert mechanical forces into electrical signals. In mammals, they play important roles in basic physiological functions including proprioception, sensation of touch, and vascular development. However, basic receptor properties like the gating mechanism, the interaction with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, and the response to mechanical stimulation, remain poorly understood. Here, we establish an atomic force microscopy (AFM)-based assay to mechanically stimulate Piezo1 receptors in living animal cells, while monitoring receptor activation in real-time using functional calcium imaging. Our experiments show that in the absence of ECM proteins Piezo1 receptors are relatively insensitive to mechanical forces pushing the cellular membrane, whereas they can hardly be activated by mechanically pulling the membrane. Yet, if conjugated with Matrigel, a mix of ECM proteins, the receptors become sensitized. Thereby, forces pulling the cellular membrane activate the receptor much more efficiently compared to pushing forces. Finally, we found that collagen IV, a component of the basal lamina, which forms a cohesive network and mechanical connection between cells, sensitizes Piezo1 receptors to mechanical pulling.

  13. The Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 selectively induces vesiculation from phosphatidylserine-enriched membranes.

    PubMed

    Soni, Smita P; Stahelin, Robert V

    2014-11-28

    Ebola virus is from the Filoviridae family of viruses and is one of the most virulent pathogens known with ∼ 60% clinical fatality. The Ebola virus negative sense RNA genome encodes seven proteins including viral matrix protein 40 (VP40), which is the most abundant protein found in the virions. Within infected cells VP40 localizes at the inner leaflet of the plasma membrane (PM), binds lipids, and regulates formation of new virus particles. Expression of VP40 in mammalian cells is sufficient to form virus-like particles that are nearly indistinguishable from the authentic virions. However, how VP40 interacts with the PM and forms virus-like particles is for the most part unknown. To investigate VP40 lipid specificity in a model of viral egress we employed giant unilamellar vesicles with different lipid compositions. The results demonstrate VP40 selectively induces vesiculation from membranes containing phosphatidylserine (PS) at concentrations of PS that are representative of the PM inner leaflet content. The formation of intraluminal vesicles was not significantly detected in the presence of other important PM lipids including cholesterol and polyvalent phosphoinositides, further demonstrating PS selectivity. Taken together, these studies suggest that PM phosphatidylserine may be an important component of Ebola virus budding and that VP40 may be able to mediate PM scission.

  14. NOTCH1 regulates matrix gla protein and calcification gene networks in human valve endothelium.

    PubMed

    White, Mark P; Theodoris, Christina V; Liu, Lei; Collins, William J; Blue, Kathleen W; Lee, Joon Ho; Meng, Xianzhong; Robbins, Robert C; Ivey, Kathryn N; Srivastava, Deepak

    2015-07-01

    Valvular and vascular calcification are common causes of cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Developing effective treatments requires understanding the molecular underpinnings of these processes. Shear stress is thought to play a role in inhibiting calcification. Furthermore, NOTCH1 regulates vascular and valvular endothelium, and human mutations in NOTCH1 can cause calcific aortic valve disease. Here, we determined the genome-wide impact of altering shear stress and NOTCH signaling on human aortic valve endothelium. mRNA-sequencing of primary human aortic valve endothelial cells (HAVECs) with or without knockdown of NOTCH1, in the presence or absence of shear stress, revealed NOTCH1-dependency of the atherosclerosis-related gene connexin 40 (GJA5), and numerous repressors of endochondral ossification. Among these, matrix gla protein (MGP) is highly expressed in aortic valve and vasculature, and inhibits soft tissue calcification by sequestering bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs). Altering NOTCH1 levels affected MGP mRNA and protein in HAVECs. Furthermore, shear stress activated NOTCH signaling and MGP in a NOTCH1-dependent manner. NOTCH1 positively regulated endothelial MGP in vivo through specific binding motifs upstream of MGP. Our studies suggest that shear stress activates NOTCH1 in primary human aortic valve endothelial cells leading to downregulation of osteoblast-like gene networks that play a role in tissue calcification.

  15. Isolation of a Crystal Matrix Protein Associated with Calcium Oxalate Precipitation in Vacuoles of Specialized Cells1

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xingxiang; Zhang, Dianzhong; Lynch-Holm, Valerie J.; Okita, Thomas W.; Franceschi, Vincent R.

    2003-01-01

    The formation of calcium (Ca) oxalate crystals is considered to be a high-capacity mechanism for regulating Ca in many plants. Ca oxalate precipitation is not a stochastic process, suggesting the involvement of specific biochemical and cellular mechanisms. Microautoradiography of water lettuce (Pistia stratiotes) tissue exposed to 3H-glutamate showed incorporation into developing crystals, indicating potential acidic proteins associated with the crystals. Dissolution of crystals leaves behind a crystal-shaped matrix “ghost” that is capable of precipitation of Ca oxalate in the original crystal morphology. To assess whether this matrix has a protein component, purified crystals were isolated and analyzed for internal protein. Polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed the presence of one major polypeptide of about 55 kD and two minor species of 60 and 63 kD. Amino acid analysis indicates the matrix protein is relatively high in acidic amino acids, a feature consistent with its solubility in formic acid but not at neutral pH. 45Ca-binding assays demonstrated the matrix protein has a strong affinity for Ca. Immunocytochemical localization using antibody raised to the isolated protein showed that the matrix protein is specific to crystal-forming cells. Within the vacuole, the surface and internal structures of two morphologically distinct Ca oxalate crystals, raphide and druse, were labeled by the antimatrix protein serum, as were the surfaces of isolated crystals. These results demonstrate that a specific Ca-binding protein exists as an integral component of Ca oxalate crystals, which holds important implications with respect to regulation of crystal formation. PMID:14555781

  16. Products of dentin matrix protein-1 degradation by interleukin-1β-induced matrix metalloproteinase-3 promote proliferation of odontoblastic cells.

    PubMed

    Hase, Naoko; Ozeki, Nobuaki; Hiyama, Taiki; Yamaguchi, Hideyuki; Kawai, Rie; Kondo, Ayami; Nakata, Kazuhiko; Mogi, Makio

    2015-08-01

    We have previously reported that interleukin (IL)-1β induces matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-3-regulated cell proliferation in mouse embryonic stem cell (ESC)-derived odontoblast-like cells, suggesting that MMP-3 plays a potentially unique physiological role in regeneration by odontoblast-like cells. MMPs are able to process virtually any component of the extracellular matrix, including collagen, laminin and bioactive molecules. Because odontoblasts produce dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP-1), we examined whether the degraded products of DMP-1 by MMP-3 contribute to enhanced proliferation in odontoblast-like cells. IL-1β increased mRNA and protein levels of odontoblastic marker proteins, including DMP-1, but not osteoblastic marker proteins, such as osteocalcin and osteopontin. The recombinant active form of MMP-3 could degrade DMP-1 protein but not osteocalcin and osteopontin in vitro. The exogenous degraded products of DMP-1 by MMP-3 resulted in increased proliferation of odontoblast-like cells in a dose-dependent manner. Treatment with a polyclonal antibody against DMP-1 suppressed IL-1β-induced cell proliferation to a basal level, but identical treatment had no effect on the IL-1β-induced increase in MMP-3 expression and activity. Treatment with siRNA against MMP-3 potently suppressed the IL-1β-induced increase in DMP-1 expression and suppressed cell proliferation (p < 0.05). Similarly, treatment with siRNAs against Wnt5a and Wnt5b suppressed the IL-1β-induced increase in DMP-1 expression and suppressed cell proliferation (p < 0.05). Rat KN-3 cells, representative of authentic odontoblasts, showed similar responses to the odontoblast-like cells. Taken together, our current study demonstrates the sequential involvement of Wnt5, MMP-3, DMP-1 expression, and DMP-1 degradation products by MMP-3, in effecting IL-1β-induced proliferation of ESC-derived odontoblast-like cells.

  17. Mechanical and failure properties of extracellular matrix sheets as a function of structural protein composition.

    PubMed

    Black, Lauren D; Allen, Philip G; Morris, Shirley M; Stone, Phillip J; Suki, Béla

    2008-03-01

    The goal of this study was to determine how alterations in protein composition of the extracellular matrix (ECM) affect its functional properties. To achieve this, we investigated the changes in the mechanical and failure properties of ECM sheets generated by neonatal rat aortic smooth muscle cells engineered to contain varying amounts of collagen and elastin. Samples underwent static and dynamic mechanical measurements before, during, and after 30 min of elastase digestion followed by a failure test. Microscopic imaging was used to measure thickness at two strain levels to estimate the true stress and moduli in the ECM sheets. We found that adding collagen to the ECM increased the stiffness. However, further increasing collagen content altered matrix organization with a subsequent decrease in the failure strain. We also introduced collagen-related percolation in a nonlinear elastic network model to interpret these results. Additionally, linear elastic moduli correlated with failure stress which may allow the in vivo estimation of the stress tolerance of ECM. We conclude that, in engineered replacement tissues, there is a tradeoff between improved mechanical properties and decreased extensibility, which can impact their effectiveness and how well they match the mechanical properties of native tissue.

  18. In vivo evaluation of matrix metalloproteinase responsive silk-elastinlike protein polymers for cancer gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Price, Robert; Poursaid, Azadeh; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza

    2015-09-10

    Silk-elastinlike protein polymers (SELPs) have been effectively used as controlled release matrices for the delivery of viruses for cancer gene therapy in preclinical models. However, the degradability of these polymers needs to be tuned for improved localized intratumoral gene delivery. Using recombinant techniques, systematic modifications in distinct regions of the polymer backbone, namely, within the elastin blocks, silk blocks, and adjacent to silk and elastin blocks, have been made to impart sensitivity to specific matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) known to be overexpressed in the tumor environment. In this report we investigated the structure-function relationship of MMP-responsive SELPs for viral mediated gene therapy of head and neck cancer. These polymers showed significant degradation in vitro in the presence of MMPs. Their degradation rate was a function of the location of the MMP-responsive sequence in the polymer backbone when in hydrogel form. Treatment efficacy of the adenoviral vectors released from the MMP responsive SELP analogs in a xenograft mouse model of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) was shown to be polymer structure dependent. These results demonstrate the tunable nature of MMP-responsive SELPs for localized matrix-mediated gene delivery.

  19. Matrix metalloproteinases and protein tyrosine kinases: potential novel targets in acute lung injury and ARDS.

    PubMed

    Aschner, Yael; Zemans, Rachel L; Yamashita, Cory M; Downey, Gregory P

    2014-10-01

    Acute lung injury (ALI) and ARDS fall within a spectrum of pulmonary disease that is characterized by hypoxemia, noncardiogenic pulmonary edema, and dysregulated and excessive inflammation. While mortality rates have improved with the advent of specialized ICUs and lung protective mechanical ventilation strategies, few other therapies have proven effective in the management of ARDS, which remains a significant clinical problem. Further development of biomarkers of disease severity, response to therapy, and prognosis is urgently needed. Several novel pathways have been identified and studied with respect to the pathogenesis of ALI and ARDS that show promise in bridging some of these gaps. This review will focus on the roles of matrix metalloproteinases and protein tyrosine kinases in the pathobiology of ALI in humans, and in animal models and in vitro studies. These molecules can act independently, as well as coordinately, in a feed-forward manner via activation of tyrosine kinase-regulated pathways that are pivotal in the development of ARDS. Specific signaling events involving proteolytic processing by matrix metalloproteinases that contribute to ALI, including cytokine and chemokine activation and release, neutrophil recruitment, transmigration and activation, and disruption of the intact alveolar-capillary barrier, will be explored in the context of these novel molecular pathways.

  20. Effects of enamel matrix proteins on multi-lineage differentiation of periodontal ligament cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Amin, Harsh D; Olsen, Irwin; Knowles, Jonathan C; Dard, Michel; Donos, Nikolaos

    2013-01-01

    The adult periodontal ligament (PDL) is considered to contain progenitor cells that are involved in the healing of periodontal wounds. Treatment with enamel matrix derivative (EMD), a heat-treated preparation derived from enamel matrix proteins (EMPs), has been shown to be of some clinical benefit in eliciting periodontal regeneration in vivo. Although there is extensive information available about the effects of EMD on periodontal regeneration, the precise influence of this material on alveolar bone and the formation of blood vessels and proprioceptive sensory nerves, prominent features of functionally active periodontal tissue, remain unclear. The aim of the present study was therefore to examine the effects of EMD on the ability of human periodontal ligament cells (HPCs) to undergo multi-lineage differentiation in vitro. Our results showed that HPCs treated with EMD under non-selective growth conditions did not show any evidence of osteogenic, adipogenic, chondrogenic, neovasculogenic, neurogenic and gliogenic "terminal" differentiation. In contrast, under selective lineage-specific culture conditions, EMD up-regulated osteogenic, chondrogenic and neovasculogenic genes and "terminal" differentiation, but suppressed adipogenesis, neurogenesis and gliogenesis. These findings thus demonstrate for the first time that EMD can differentially modulate the multi-lineage differentiation of HPCs in vitro.

  1. Extracellular matrix proteins as temporary coating for thin-film neural implants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceyssens, Frederik; Deprez, Marjolijn; Turner, Neill; Kil, Dries; van Kuyck, Kris; Welkenhuysen, Marleen; Nuttin, Bart; Badylak, Stephen; Puers, Robert

    2017-02-01

    Objective. This study investigates the suitability of a thin sheet of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins as a resorbable coating for temporarily reinforcing fragile or ultra-low stiffness thin-film neural implants to be placed on the brain, i.e. microelectrocorticographic (µECOG) implants. Approach. Thin-film polyimide-based electrode arrays were fabricated using lithographic methods. ECM was harvested from porcine tissue by a decellularization method and coated around the arrays. Mechanical tests and an in vivo experiment on rats were conducted, followed by a histological tissue study combined with a statistical equivalence test (confidence interval approach, 0.05 significance level) to compare the test group with an uncoated control group. Main results. After 3 months, no significant damage was found based on GFAP and NeuN staining of the relevant brain areas. Significance. The study shows that ECM sheets are a suitable temporary coating for thin µECOG neural implants.

  2. Beyond the Protein Matrix: Probing Cofactor Variants in a Baeyer-Villiger Oxygenation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Martinoli, Christian; Dudek, Hanna M.; Orru, Roberto; Edmondson, Dale E.; Fraaije, Marco W.; Mattevi, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    A general question in biochemistry is the interplay between the chemical properties of cofactors and the surrounding protein matrix. Here, the functions of NADP+ and FAD are explored by investigation of a representative monooxygenase reconstituted with chemically-modified cofactor analogues. Like pieces of a jigsaw puzzle, the enzyme active site juxtaposes the flavin and nicotinamide rings, harnessing their H-bonding and steric properties to finely construct an oxygen-reacting center that restrains the flavin-peroxide intermediate in a catalytically-competent orientation. Strikingly, the regio- and stereoselectivities of the reaction are essentially unaffected by cofactor modifications. These observations indicate a remarkable robustness of this complex multi-cofactor active site, which has implications for enzyme design based on cofactor engineering approaches. PMID:24443704

  3. Enhanced release of bone morphogenetic proteins from demineralized bone matrix by gamma irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sung, Nak-Yun; Choi, Jong-il

    2015-06-01

    Gamma irradiation is a useful method for sterilizing demineralized bone matrix (DBM), but its effect on the osteoinductivity of DBM is still controversial. In this study, the osteoinductive activity of gamma-irradiated DBM was examined using a mouse myoblastic cell line (C2C12). DBM was extracted from adult bovine bone and was irradiated at a dose of 25 kGy using a 60cobalt gamma-irradiator. Cell proliferation with DBM was not affected by gamma-irradiation, but alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin productions were significantly increased in C2C12 cell groups treated with gamma-irradiated DBM. It was reasoned that bone morphogenetic proteins were more efficiently released from gamma-irradiated DBM than from the non-irradiated control. This result suggests the effectiveness of radiation sterilization of bone implants

  4. The Lymphocytic Choriomeningitis Virus Matrix Protein PPXY Late Domain Drives the Production of Defective Interfering Particles

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Christopher M.; Eisenhauer, Philip; Bruce, Emily A.; Weir, Marion E.; King, Benjamin R.; Klaus, Joseph P.; Krementsov, Dimitry N.; Shirley, David J.; Ballif, Bryan A.; Botten, Jason

    2016-01-01

    Arenaviruses cause severe diseases in humans but establish asymptomatic, lifelong infections in rodent reservoirs. Persistently-infected rodents harbor high levels of defective interfering (DI) particles, which are thought to be important for establishing persistence and mitigating virus-induced cytopathic effect. Little is known about what drives the production of DI particles. We show that neither the PPXY late domain encoded within the lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) matrix protein nor a functional endosomal sorting complex transport (ESCRT) pathway is absolutely required for the generation of standard infectious virus particles. In contrast, DI particle release critically requires the PPXY late domain and is ESCRT-dependent. Additionally, the terminal tyrosine in the PPXY motif is reversibly phosphorylated and our findings indicate that this posttranslational modification may regulate DI particle formation. Thus we have uncovered a new role for the PPXY late domain and a possible mechanism for its regulation. PMID:27010636

  5. Influenza recombinant vaccine: matrix protein M1 on the platform of the adenovirus dodecahedron.

    PubMed

    Naskalska, A; Szolajska, E; Chaperot, L; Angel, J; Plumas, J; Chroboczek, J

    2009-12-09

    We propose a novel influenza vaccine composed of the adenovirus dodecahedron (Dd) as delivery platform carrying an internal influenza matrix protein M1. To attach the antigen to the vector we used WW domains interacting with Dd. Successful internalization of the Dd-M1WW complex was observed using biochemical and cell biology techniques. We show here that the complex of Dd with antigen is a potent activator of human myeloid dendritic cells (MDC), and that it is efficiently presented by MDC to M1-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes. These results show that proposed vaccine model is feasible and that adenovirus dodecahedron is a potent delivery platform for foreign antigens to human cells.

  6. Use of Emdogain enamel matrix proteins in the surgical treatment of aggressive periodontitis.

    PubMed

    Kiernicka, Małgorzata; Owczarek, Barbara; Gałkowska, Ewa; Wysokińska-Miszczuk, Joanna

    2003-01-01

    One of the ways of treating of the aggressive forms of periodontitis is the method of guided tissue regeneration using enamel matrix proteins included in Emdogain preparation. The aim of work was clinical evaluation of the complex treatment of those periodontolyses using the above mentioned material as the implant material. 35 intrabony pockets were operated in 11 patients aged 17-50. The treatment results were described with the use of clinical indices of API and SBI, indices of pockets depth PPD and the loss of the attachment CAL indices before and within the period of 8 to 12 months after the surgeries. The values of the examined features were submitted to statistical analysis using Shapiro-Wilks and Wilcoxon's tests. The treatment that was applied led to extremely statistically significant improvement of the examined parameters.

  7. Microseed matrix screening for optimization in protein crystallization: what have we learned?

    PubMed Central

    D’Arcy, Allan; Bergfors, Terese; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W.; Marsh, May

    2014-01-01

    Protein crystals obtained in initial screens typically require optimization before they are of X-ray diffraction quality. Seeding is one such optimization method. In classical seeding experiments, the seed crystals are put into new, albeit similar, conditions. The past decade has seen the emergence of an alternative seeding strategy: microseed matrix screening (MMS). In this strategy, the seed crystals are transferred into conditions unrelated to the seed source. Examples of MMS applications from in-house projects and the literature include the generation of multiple crystal forms and different space groups, better diffracting crystals and crystallization of previously uncrystallizable targets. MMS can be implemented robotically, making it a viable option for drug-discovery programs. In conclusion, MMS is a simple, time- and cost-efficient optimization method that is applicable to many recalcitrant crystallization problems. PMID:25195878

  8. Nuclear matrix protein Matrin3 regulates alternative splicing and forms overlapping regulatory networks with PTB

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Miguel B; Attig, Jan; Bellora, Nicolás; König, Julian; Hallegger, Martina; Kayikci, Melis; Eyras, Eduardo; Ule, Jernej; Smith, Christopher WJ

    2015-01-01

    Matrin3 is an RNA- and DNA-binding nuclear matrix protein found to be associated with neural and muscular degenerative diseases. A number of possible functions of Matrin3 have been suggested, but no widespread role in RNA metabolism has yet been clearly demonstrated. We identified Matrin3 by its interaction with the second RRM domain of the splicing regulator PTB. Using a combination of RNAi knockdown, transcriptome profiling and iCLIP, we find that Matrin3 is a regulator of hundreds of alternative splicing events, principally acting as a splicing repressor with only a small proportion of targeted events being co-regulated by PTB. In contrast to other splicing regulators, Matrin3 binds to an extended region within repressed exons and flanking introns with no sharply defined peaks. The identification of this clear molecular function of Matrin3 should help to clarify the molecular pathology of ALS and other diseases caused by mutations of Matrin3. PMID:25599992

  9. Flexible and rigid structures in HIV-1 p17 matrix protein monitored by relaxation and amide proton exchange with NMR.

    PubMed

    Ohori, Yuka; Okazaki, Honoka; Watanabe, Satoru; Tochio, Naoya; Arai, Munehito; Kigawa, Takanori; Nishimura, Chiaki

    2014-03-01

    The HIV-1 p17 matrix protein is a multifunctional protein that interacts with other molecules including proteins and membranes. The dynamic structure between its folded and partially unfolded states can be critical for the recognition of interacting molecules. One of the most important roles of the p17 matrix protein is its localization to the plasma membrane with the Gag polyprotein. The myristyl group attached to the N-terminus on the p17 matrix protein functions as an anchor for binding to the plasma membrane. Biochemical studies revealed that two regions are important for its function: D14-L31 and V84-V88. Here, the dynamic structures of the p17 matrix protein were studied using NMR for relaxation and amide proton exchange experiments at the physiological pH of 7.0. The results revealed that the α12-loop, which includes the 14-31 region, was relatively flexible, and that helix 4, including the 84-88 region, was the most protected helix in this protein. However, the residues in the α34-loop near helix 4 had a low order parameter and high exchange rate of amide protons, indicating high flexibility. This region is probably flexible because this loop functions as a hinge for optimizing the interactions between helices 3 and 4. The C-terminal long region of K113-Y132 adopted a disordered structure. Furthermore, the C-terminal helix 5 appeared to be slightly destabilized due to the flexible C-terminal tail based on the order parameters. Thus, the dynamic structure of the p17 matrix protein may be related to its multiple functions.

  10. Cleavage of metastasis suppressor gene product KiSS-1 protein/metastin by matrix metalloproteinases.

    PubMed

    Takino, Takahisa; Koshikawa, Naohiko; Miyamori, Hisashi; Tanaka, Motohiro; Sasaki, Takuma; Okada, Yasunori; Seiki, Motoharu; Sato, Hiroshi

    2003-07-24

    A human placenta cDNA library was screened by the expression cloning method for gene products that interact with matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), and we isolated a cDNA whose product formed a stable complex with pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9. The cDNA encoded the metastasis suppressor gene KiSS-1. KiSS-1 protein was shown to form a complex with pro-MMP. KiSS-1 protein is known to be processed to peptide ligand of a G-protein-coupled receptor (hOT7T175) named metastin, and suppresses metastasis of tumors expressing the receptor. Active MMP-2, MMP-9, MT1-MMP, MT3-MMP and MT5-MMP cleaved the Gly118-Leu119 peptide bond of not only full-length KiSS-1 protein but also metastin decapeptide. Metastin decapeptide induced formation of focal adhesion and actin stress fibers in cells expressing the receptor, and digestion of metastin decapeptide by MMP abolished its ligand activity. Migration of HT1080 cells expressing hOT7T175 that harbor a high-level MMP activity was only slightly suppressed by either metastin decapeptide or MMP inhibitor BB-94 alone, but the combination of metastin decapeptide and BB-94 showed a synergistic effect in blocking cell migration. We propose that metastin could be used as an antimetastatic agent in combination with MMP inhibitor, or MMP-resistant forms of metastin could be developed and may also be efficacious.

  11. Proteins from the organic matrix of core-top and fossil planktonic foraminifera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robbins, L. L.; Brew, K.

    1990-08-01

    Organic constituents isolated from the tests (shells) of six species of core-top planktonic foraminifera, ranging in age between 2 and 4 Ka BP, consist of a heterogeneous mixture of proteins and polypeptides. At least seven discrete polypeptides are present as indicated by reverse phase HPLC and by gel electrophoresis. High percentages of aspartic acid and glutamic acid characterize one class of protein, while glycine, serine, and alanine-rich proteins dominate in a second class. Similar HPLC Chromatographie elution profiles are observed for all species analyzed, varying only in intensity of the peaks and in amino acid composition from species to species. The approximate molecular weights of two major fossil proteins ranged between 50,000 and 70,000 daltons. A comparison of 2-4 and 300 Ka Bp samples shows that while most of the polypeptides are present in both samples, some acidic polypeptides are not present in the older sample. These data suggest that some of the acidic polypeptides may be more soluble than other fractions and are lost more quickly from the test. The remaining hydrophobic, possibly more insoluble, polypeptides may be preserved in much older specimens and may be useful in tracing phylogeny of the planktonic foraminifera. Amino acid analyses of total test extracts before and after dialysis demonstrate that some acidic amino acids, particularly aspartic acid, and possibly peptides less than 6000-8000 daltons are lost during dialysis. Although a large percentage of these components are undoubtedly from the original organic matrix, at this point adsorbed components cannot be ruled out. These data caution against the use of total amino acid compositions in biogeochemical studies.

  12. ALK1 heterozygosity increases extracellular matrix protein expression, proliferation and migration in fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Félix, José M; Perretta-Tejedor, Nuria; Eleno, Nélida; López-Novoa, José M; Martínez-Salgado, Carlos

    2014-06-01

    Fibrosis is a pathological situation in which excessive amounts of extracellular matrix (ECM) are deposited in the tissue. Myofibroblasts play a crucial role in the development and progress of fibrosis as they actively synthesize ECM components such as collagen I, fibronectin and connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and cause organ fibrosis. Transforming growth factor beta 1 (TGF-β1) plays a major role in tissue fibrosis. Activin receptor-like kinase 1 (ALK1) is a type I receptor of TGF-β1 with an important role in angiogenesis whose function in cellular biology and TGF-β signaling is well known in endothelial cells, but its role in fibroblast biology and its contribution to fibrosis is poorly studied. We have recently demonstrated that ALK1 regulates ECM protein expression in a mouse model of obstructive nephropathy. Our aim was to evaluate the role of ALK1 in several processes involved in fibrosis such as ECM protein expression, proliferation and migration in ALK1(+/+) and ALK1(+/-) mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) after TGF-β1 stimulations and inhibitors. ALK1 heterozygous MEFs show increased expression of ECM proteins (collagen I, fibronectin and CTGF/CCN2), cell proliferation and migration due to an alteration of TGF-β/Smad signaling. ALK1 heterozygous disruption shows an increase of Smad2 and Smad3 phosphorylation that explains the increases in CTGF/CCN2, fibronectin and collagen I, proliferation and cell motility observed in these cells. Therefore, we suggest that ALK1 plays an important role in the regulation of ECM protein expression, proliferation and migration.

  13. Peroxisomal ubiquitin-protein ligases peroxin2 and peroxin10 have distinct but synergistic roles in matrix protein import and peroxin5 retrotranslocation in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Burkhart, Sarah E; Kao, Yun-Ting; Bartel, Bonnie

    2014-11-01

    Peroxisomal matrix proteins carry peroxisomal targeting signals (PTSs), PTS1 or PTS2, and are imported into the organelle with the assistance of peroxin (PEX) proteins. From a microscopy-based screen to identify Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) mutants defective in matrix protein degradation, we isolated unique mutations in PEX2 and PEX10, which encode ubiquitin-protein ligases anchored in the peroxisomal membrane. In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), PEX2, PEX10, and a third ligase, PEX12, ubiquitinate a peroxisome matrix protein receptor, PEX5, allowing the PEX1 and PEX6 ATP-hydrolyzing enzymes to retrotranslocate PEX5 out of the membrane after cargo delivery. We found that the pex2-1 and pex10-2 Arabidopsis mutants exhibited defects in peroxisomal physiology and matrix protein import. Moreover, the pex2-1 pex10-2 double mutant exhibited severely impaired growth and synergistic physiological defects, suggesting that PEX2 and PEX10 function cooperatively in the wild type. The pex2-1 lesion restored the unusually low PEX5 levels in the pex6-1 mutant, implicating PEX2 in PEX5 degradation when retrotranslocation is impaired. PEX5 overexpression altered pex10-2 but not pex2-1 defects, suggesting that PEX10 facilitates PEX5 retrotranslocation from the peroxisomal membrane. Although the pex2-1 pex10-2 double mutant displayed severe import defects of both PTS1 and PTS2 proteins into peroxisomes, both pex2-1 and pex10-2 single mutants exhibited clear import defects of PTS1 proteins but apparently normal PTS2 import. A similar PTS1-specific pattern was observed in the pex4-1 ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme mutant. Our results indicate that Arabidopsis PEX2 and PEX10 cooperate to support import of matrix proteins into plant peroxisomes and suggest that some PTS2 import can still occur when PEX5 retrotranslocation is slowed.

  14. Proline and gamma-carboxylated glutamate residues in matrix Gla protein are critical for binding of bone morphogenetic protein-4.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yucheng; Shahbazian, Ani; Boström, Kristina I

    2008-05-09

    Arterial calcification is ubiquitous in vascular disease and is, in part, prevented by matrix Gla protein (MGP). MGP binds calcium ions through gamma-carboxylated glutamates (Gla residues) and inhibits bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2/-4. We hypothesized that a conserved proline (Pro)64 is essential for BMP inhibition. We further hypothesized that calcium binding by the Gla residues is a prerequisite for BMP inhibition. Site-directed mutagenesis was used to modify Pro64 and the Gla residues, and the effect on BMP-4 activity, and binding of BMP-4 and calcium was tested using luciferase reporter gene assays, coimmunoprecipitation, crosslinking, and calcium quantification. The results showed that Pro64 was critical for binding and inhibition of BMP-4 but not for calcium binding. The Gla residues were also required for BMP-4 binding but flexibility existed. As long as 1 Gla residue remained on each side of Pro64, the ability to bind and inhibit BMP-4 was preserved. Chelation of calcium ions by EDTA or warfarin treatment of cells led to loss of ability of MGP to bind BMP-4. Our results also showed that phenylalanine could replace Pro64 without loss of function and that zebrafish MGP, which lacks upstream Gla residues, did not function as a BMP inhibitor. The effect of MGP mutagenesis on vascular calcification was determined in calcifying vascular cells. Only MGP proteins with preserved ability to bind and inhibit BMP-4 prevented osteogenic differentiation and calcification. Together, our results suggest that BMP and calcium binding in MGP are independent but functionally intertwined processes and that the BMP binding is essential for prevention of vascular calcification.

  15. An empirical study on the matrix-based protein representations and their combination with sequence-based approaches.

    PubMed

    Nanni, Loris; Lumini, Alessandra; Brahnam, Sheryl

    2013-03-01

    Many domains have a stake in the development of reliable systems for automatic protein classification. Of particular interest in recent studies of automatic protein classification is the exploration of new methods for extracting features from a protein that enhance classification for specific problems. These methods have proven very useful in one or two domains, but they have failed to generalize well across several domains (i.e. classification problems). In this paper, we evaluate several feature extraction approaches for representing proteins with the aim of sequence-based protein classification. Several protein representations are evaluated, those starting from: the position specific scoring matrix (PSSM) of the proteins; the amino-acid sequence; a matrix representation of the protein, of dimension (length of the protein) ×20, obtained using the substitution matrices for representing each amino-acid as a vector. A valuable result is that a texture descriptor can be extracted from the PSSM protein representation which improves the performance of standard descriptors based on the PSSM representation. Experimentally, we develop our systems by comparing several protein descriptors on nine different datasets. Each descriptor is used to train a support vector machine (SVM) or an ensemble of SVM. Although different stand-alone descriptors work well on some datasets (but not on others), we have discovered that fusion among classifiers trained using different descriptors obtains a good performance across all the tested datasets. Matlab code/Datasets used in the proposed paper are available at http://www.bias.csr.unibo.it\

  16. Efficient HIV-1 replication can occur in the absence of the viral matrix protein.

    PubMed Central

    Reil, H; Bukovsky, A A; Gelderblom, H R; Göttlinger, H G

    1998-01-01

    Matrix (MA), a major structural protein of retroviruses, is thought to play a critical role in several steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle, including the plasma membrane targeting of Gag, the incorporation of envelope (Env) glycoproteins into nascent particles, and the nuclear import of the viral genome in non-dividing cells. We now show that the entire MA protein is dispensable for the incorporation of HIV-1 Env glycoproteins with a shortened cytoplasmic domain. Furthermore, efficient HIV-1 replication in the absence of up to 90% of MA was observed in a cell line in which the cytoplasmic domain of Env is not required. Additional compensatory changes in Gag permitted efficient virus replication even if all of MA was replaced by a heterologous membrane targeting signal. Viruses which lacked the globular domain of MA but retained its N-terminal myristyl anchor exhibited an increased ability to form both extracellular and intracellular virus particles, consistent with a myristyl switch model of Gag membrane targeting. Pseudotyped HIV-1 particles that lacked the structurally conserved globular head of MA efficiently infected macrophages, indicating that MA is dispensable for nuclear import in terminally differentiated cells. PMID:9564051

  17. The HIV matrix protein p17 induces hepatic lipid accumulation via modulation of nuclear receptor transcriptoma

    PubMed Central

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Carino, Adriana; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; Chiara Monti, Maria; Del Sordo, Rachele; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Liver disease is the second most common cause of mortality in HIV-infected persons. Exactly how HIV infection per se affects liver disease progression is unknown. Here we have investigated mRNA expression of 49 nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) and 35 transcriptional coregulators in HepG2 cells upon stimulation with the HIV matrix protein p17. This viral protein regulated mRNA expression of some NRs among which LXRα and its transcriptional co-activator MED1 were highly induced at mRNA level. Dissection of p17 downstream intracellular pathway demonstrated that p17 mediated activation of Jak/STAT signaling is responsible for the promoter dependent activation of LXR. The treatment of both HepG2 as well as primary hepatocytes with HIV p17 results in the transcriptional activation of LXR target genes (SREBP1c and FAS) and lipid accumulation. These effects are lost in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide as well as in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with the natural LXR antagonist gymnestrogenin. These results suggest that HIV p17 affects NRs and their related signal transduction thus contributing to the progression of liver disease in HIV infected patients. PMID:26469385

  18. Mixed matrix hollow fiber membranes for removal of protein-bound toxins from human plasma.

    PubMed

    Tijink, Marlon S L; Wester, Maarten; Glorieux, Griet; Gerritsen, Karin G F; Sun, Junfen; Swart, Pieter C; Borneman, Zandrie; Wessling, Matthias; Vanholder, Raymond; Joles, Jaap A; Stamatialis, Dimitrios

    2013-10-01

    In end stage renal disease (ESRD) waste solutes accumulate in body fluid. Removal of protein bound solutes using conventional renal replacement therapies is currently very poor while their accumulation is associated with adverse outcomes in ESRD. Here we investigate the application of a hollow fiber mixed matrix membrane (MMM) for removal of these toxins. The MMM hollow fiber consists of porous macro-void free polymeric inner membrane layer well attached to the activated carbon containing outer MMM layer. The new membranes have permeation properties in the ultrafiltration range. Under static conditions, they adsorb 57% p-cresylsulfate, 82% indoxyl sulfate and 94% of hippuric acid from spiked human plasma in 4 h. Under dynamic conditions, they adsorb on average 2.27 mg PCS/g membrane and 3.58 mg IS/g membrane in 4 h in diffusion experiments and 2.68 mg/g membrane PCS and 12.85 mg/g membrane IS in convection experiments. Based on the dynamic experiments we estimate that our membranes would suffice to remove the daily production of these protein bound solutes.

  19. The HIV matrix protein p17 induces hepatic lipid accumulation via modulation of nuclear receptor transcriptoma.

    PubMed

    Renga, Barbara; Francisci, Daniela; Carino, Adriana; Marchianò, Silvia; Cipriani, Sabrina; Chiara Monti, Maria; Del Sordo, Rachele; Schiaroli, Elisabetta; Distrutti, Eleonora; Baldelli, Franco; Fiorucci, Stefano

    2015-10-15

    Liver disease is the second most common cause of mortality in HIV-infected persons. Exactly how HIV infection per se affects liver disease progression is unknown. Here we have investigated mRNA expression of 49 nuclear hormone receptors (NRs) and 35 transcriptional coregulators in HepG2 cells upon stimulation with the HIV matrix protein p17. This viral protein regulated mRNA expression of some NRs among which LXRα and its transcriptional co-activator MED1 were highly induced at mRNA level. Dissection of p17 downstream intracellular pathway demonstrated that p17 mediated activation of Jak/STAT signaling is responsible for the promoter dependent activation of LXR. The treatment of both HepG2 as well as primary hepatocytes with HIV p17 results in the transcriptional activation of LXR target genes (SREBP1c and FAS) and lipid accumulation. These effects are lost in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with a serum from HIV positive person who underwent a vaccination with a p17 peptide as well as in HepG2 cells pre-incubated with the natural LXR antagonist gymnestrogenin. These results suggest that HIV p17 affects NRs and their related signal transduction thus contributing to the progression of liver disease in HIV infected patients.

  20. Influence of Extracellular Matrix Proteins and Substratum Topography on Corneal Epithelial Cell Alignment and Migration

    PubMed Central

    Raghunathan, VijayKrishna; McKee, Clayton; Cheung, Wai; Naik, Rachel; Nealey, Paul F.; Russell, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The basement membrane (BM) of the corneal epithelium presents biophysical cues in the form of topography and compliance that can impact the phenotype and behaviors of cells and their nuclei through modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. In addition, it is also well known that the intrinsic biochemical attributes of BMs can modulate cell behaviors. In this study, the influence of the combination of exogenous coating of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) (fibronectin-collagen [FNC]) with substratum topography was investigated on cytoskeletal architecture as well as alignment and migration of immortalized corneal epithelial cells. In the absence of FNC coating, a significantly greater percentage of cells aligned parallel with the long axis of the underlying anisotropically ordered topographic features; however, their ability to migrate was impaired. Additionally, changes in the surface area, elongation, and orientation of cytoskeletal elements were differentially influenced by the presence or absence of FNC. These results suggest that the effects of topographic cues on cells are modulated by the presence of surface-associated ECM proteins. These findings have relevance to experiments using cell cultureware with biomimetic biophysical attributes as well as the integration of biophysical cues in tissue-engineering strategies and the development of improved prosthetics. PMID:23488816

  1. The widely expressed extracellular matrix protein SMOC-2 promotes keratinocyte attachment and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Silke; Paulsson, Mats; Hartmann, Ursula

    2008-08-01

    SMOC-2 is a recently discovered member of the BM-40/SPARC/osteonectin family of extracellular multidomain proteins of so far unknown function. While we have shown earlier that the homologous protein SMOC-1 is associated with basement membranes, in this study we demonstrate that, in the mouse, SMOC-2 could be detected in a large number of non-basement membrane localizations, often showing a diffuse tissue distribution. A more distinct expression pattern was seen in skin where SMOC-2 is mainly present in the basal layers of the epidermis. Functionally, recombinant SMOC-2 stimulated attachment of primary epidermal cells as well as several epidermal-derived cell lines but had no effect on the attachment of non-epidermal cells. Inhibition experiments using blocking antibodies against individual integrin subunits allowed the identification of {alpha}v{beta}6 and {alpha}v{beta}1 integrins as important cellular receptors for SMOC-2. Cell attachment as well as the formation of focal adhesions could be attributed to the extracellular calcium-binding domain. The calcium-binding domain also stimulated migration, but not proliferation of keratinocyte-like HaCaT cells. We conclude that SMOC-2, like other members of the BM40/SPARC family, acts as a regulator of cell-matrix interactions.

  2. [The matrix-gla protein awakening may lead to the demise of vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Delanaye, Pierre; Liabeuf, Sophie; Bouquegneau, Antoine; Cavalier, Étienne; Massy, Ziad A

    2015-07-01

    Matrix-gla-protein (MGP) is mainly secreted by chondrocytes and smooth vascular muscle cells. This potent inhibitor of vascular calcification need to undergo 2 post-transcriptional steps to be fully active: one phosphorylation of 3 serine residues (on 5) and a carboxylation of 5 glutamate residues (on 9). Like other "Gla" proteins, this carboxylation is vitamin K dependant. Several forms of MGP thus circulate in the plasma, some of them being totally inactive (the unphosphorylated and uncarboxylated MGP), some others being partially or fully active, according to the number of phosphorylated or carboxylated sites. A theoretical link exists between MGP, vitamin K, vascular calcifications and cardiovascular diseases. This link is even more evident in patients suffering from chronic kidney diseases (CKD), and notably hemodialysis patients. If this link has been demonstrated in different experimental studies, clinical studies are mainly observational and their results must be interpreted accordingly. MGP concentrations are definitely not yet a surrogate to estimate the levels of vascular calcification, but could allow the monitoring of vitamin K treatment. Modulation of MGP concentrations may reduce vascular calcification in hemodialyzed patients, if the large ongoing trials show an efficiency of this treatment. In this review, we will summarize the role of MGP in the vascular calcifications process, describe the problems linked to the analytical determination of MGP in plasma and finally describe the different clinical studies on MGP and vascular calcifications in the general population and in CKD patients.

  3. Broad Spectrum Anti-Influenza Agents by Inhibiting Self-Association of Matrix Protein 1

    PubMed Central

    Mosier, Philip D.; Chiang, Meng-Jung; Lin, Zhengshi; Gao, Yamei; Althufairi, Bashayer; Zhou, Qibing; Musayev, Faik; Safo, Martin K.; Xie, Hang; Desai, Umesh R.

    2016-01-01

    The matrix protein 1 (M1) of influenza A virus (IAV) exists as a three-dimensional oligomeric structure in mature virions with high sequence conservation across different IAV subtypes, which makes it a potential broad spectrum antiviral target. We hypothesized that impairing self-association of M1 through a small molecule ‘wedge’, which avidly binds to an M1-M1 interface, would result in a completely new class of anti-influenza agents. To establish this proof-of-principle, we performed virtual screening on a library of >70,000 commercially available small molecules that resulted in several plausible ‘wedges’. Biophysical studies showed that the best molecule bound the M1 protein potently and weakened M1-M1 self-association. Most importantly, the agent reduced the thickness of the M1 layer in mature virions and inhibited in ovo propagation of multiple IAV strains including H1N1, pandemic H1N1, H3N2 and H5N1, which supports the “wedge” hypothesis. These results demonstrate that M1 is a promising druggable target for the discovery of a completely new line of broad spectrum anti-IAV agents. PMID:27573445

  4. Efficient HIV-1 replication can occur in the absence of the viral matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Reil, H; Bukovsky, A A; Gelderblom, H R; Göttlinger, H G

    1998-05-01

    Matrix (MA), a major structural protein of retroviruses, is thought to play a critical role in several steps of the HIV-1 replication cycle, including the plasma membrane targeting of Gag, the incorporation of envelope (Env) glycoproteins into nascent particles, and the nuclear import of the viral genome in non-dividing cells. We now show that the entire MA protein is dispensable for the incorporation of HIV-1 Env glycoproteins with a shortened cytoplasmic domain. Furthermore, efficient HIV-1 replication in the absence of up to 90% of MA was observed in a cell line in which the cytoplasmic domain of Env is not required. Additional compensatory changes in Gag permitted efficient virus replication even if all of MA was replaced by a heterologous membrane targeting signal. Viruses which lacked the globular domain of MA but retained its N-terminal myristyl anchor exhibited an increased ability to form both extracellular and intracellular virus particles, consistent with a myristyl switch model of Gag membrane targeting. Pseudotyped HIV-1 particles that lacked the structurally conserved globular head of MA efficiently infected macrophages, indicating that MA is dispensable for nuclear import in terminally differentiated cells.

  5. Influence of extracellular matrix proteins and substratum topography on corneal epithelial cell alignment and migration.

    PubMed

    Raghunathan, Vijaykrishna; McKee, Clayton; Cheung, Wai; Naik, Rachel; Nealey, Paul F; Russell, Paul; Murphy, Christopher J

    2013-08-01

    The basement membrane (BM) of the corneal epithelium presents biophysical cues in the form of topography and compliance that can impact the phenotype and behaviors of cells and their nuclei through modulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. In addition, it is also well known that the intrinsic biochemical attributes of BMs can modulate cell behaviors. In this study, the influence of the combination of exogenous coating of extracellular matrix proteins (ECM) (fibronectin-collagen [FNC]) with substratum topography was investigated on cytoskeletal architecture as well as alignment and migration of immortalized corneal epithelial cells. In the absence of FNC coating, a significantly greater percentage of cells aligned parallel with the long axis of the underlying anisotropically ordered topographic features; however, their ability to migrate was impaired. Additionally, changes in the surface area, elongation, and orientation of cytoskeletal elements were differentially influenced by the presence or absence of FNC. These results suggest that the effects of topographic cues on cells are modulated by the presence of surface-associated ECM proteins. These findings have relevance to experiments using cell cultureware with biomimetic biophysical attributes as well as the integration of biophysical cues in tissue-engineering strategies and the development of improved prosthetics.

  6. Reducing Jagged 1 and 2 levels prevents cerebral arteriovenous malformations in matrix Gla protein deficiency.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yucheng; Yao, Jiayi; Radparvar, Melina; Blazquez-Medela, Ana M; Guihard, Pierre J; Jumabay, Medet; Boström, Kristina I

    2013-11-19

    Cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs) are common vascular malformations, which may result in hemorrhagic strokes and neurological deficits. Bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) and Notch signaling are both involved in the development of cerebral AVMs, but the cross-talk between the two signaling pathways is poorly understood. Here, we show that deficiency of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a BMP inhibitor, causes induction of Notch ligands, dysregulation of endothelial differentiation, and the development of cerebral AVMs in MGP null (Mgp(-/-)) mice. Increased BMP activity due to the lack of MGP induces expression of the activin receptor-like kinase 1, a BMP type I receptor, in cerebrovascular endothelium. Subsequent activation of activin receptor-like kinase 1 enhances expression of Notch ligands Jagged 1 and 2, which increases Notch activity and alters the expression of Ephrin B2 and Ephrin receptor B4, arterial and venous endothelial markers, respectively. Reducing the expression of Jagged 1 and 2 in the Mgp(-/-) mice by crossing them with Jagged 1 or 2 deficient mice reduces Notch activity, normalizes endothelial differentiation, and prevents cerebral AVMs, but not pulmonary or renal AVMs. Our results suggest that Notch signaling mediates and can modulate changes in BMP signaling that lead to cerebral AVMs.

  7. Structure and self-assembly of the calcium binding matrix protein of human metapneumovirus.

    PubMed

    Leyrat, Cedric; Renner, Max; Harlos, Karl; Huiskonen, Juha T; Grimes, Jonathan M

    2014-01-07

    The matrix protein (M) of paramyxoviruses plays a key role in determining virion morphology by directing viral assembly and budding. Here, we report the crystal structure of the human metapneumovirus M at 2.8 Å resolution in its native dimeric state. The structure reveals the presence of a high-affinity Ca²⁺ binding site. Molecular dynamics simulations (MDS) predict a secondary lower-affinity site that correlates well with data from fluorescence-based thermal shift assays. By combining small-angle X-ray scattering with MDS and ensemble analysis, we captured the structure and dynamics of M in solution. Our analysis reveals a large positively charged patch on the protein surface that is involved in membrane interaction. Structural analysis of DOPC-induced polymerization of M into helical filaments using electron microscopy leads to a model of M self-assembly. The conservation of the Ca²⁺ binding sites suggests a role for calcium in the replication and morphogenesis of pneumoviruses.

  8. Transcriptional factor DLX3 promotes the gene expression of enamel matrix proteins during amelogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhichun; Tian, Hua; Lv, Ping; Wang, Weiping; Jia, Zhuqing; Wang, Sainan; Zhou, Chunyan; Gao, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    Mutation of distal-less homeobox 3 (DLX3) is responsible for human tricho-dento-osseous syndrome (TDO) with amelogenesis imperfecta, indicating a crucial role of DLX3 in amelogenesis. However, the expression pattern of DLX3 and its specific function in amelogenesis remain largely unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of DLX3 on enamel matrix protein (EMP) genes. By immunohistochemistry assays of mouse tooth germs, stronger immunostaining of DLX3 protein was identified in ameloblasts in the secretory stage than in the pre-secretory and maturation stages, and the same pattern was found for Dlx3 mRNA using Realtime PCR. In a mouse ameloblast cell lineage, forced expression of DLX3 up-regulated the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam, whereas knockdown of DLX3 down-regulated these four EMP genes. Further, bioinformatics, chromatin immunoprecipitation, and luciferase assays revealed that DLX3 transactivated Enam, Amelx, and Odam through direct binding to their enhancer regions. Particularly, over-expression of mutant-DLX3 (c.571_574delGGGG, responsible for TDO) inhibited the activation function of DLX3 on expression levels and promoter activities of the Enam, Amelx, and Odam genes. Together, our data show that DLX3 promotes the expression of the EMP genes Amelx, Enam, Klk4, and Odam in amelogenesis, while mutant-DLX3 disrupts this regulatory function, thus providing insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying the enamel defects of TDO disease.

  9. Alterations in junctional proteins, inflammatory mediators and extracellular matrix molecules in eosinophilic esophagitis.

    PubMed

    Abdulnour-Nakhoul, Solange M; Al-Tawil, Youhanna; Gyftopoulos, Alex A; Brown, Karen L; Hansen, Molly; Butcher, Kathy F; Eidelwein, Alexandra P; Noel, Robert A; Rabon, Edd; Posta, Allison; Nakhoul, Nazih L

    2013-08-01

    Eosinophilic esophagitis (EoE), an inflammatory atopic disease of the esophagus, causes massive eosinophil infiltration, basal cell hyperplasia, and sub-epithelial fibrosis. To elucidate cellular and molecular factors involved in esophageal tissue damage and remodeling, we examined pinch biopsies from EoE and normal pediatric patients. An inflammation gene array confirmed that eotaxin-3, its receptor CCR3 and interleukins IL-13 and IL-5 were upregulated. An extracellular matrix (ECM) gene array revealed upregulation of CD44 & CD54, and of ECM proteases (ADAMTS1 & MMP14). A cytokine antibody array showed a marked decrease in IL-1α and IL-1 receptor antagonist and an increase in eotaxin-2 and epidermal growth factor. Western analysis indicated reduced expression of intercellular junction proteins, E-cadherin and claudin-1 and increased expression of occludin and vimentin. We have identified a number of novel genes and proteins whose expression is altered in EoE. These findings provide new insights into the molecular mechanisms of the disease.

  10. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaojun; Zeng, Shimei; Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer.

  11. A Novel Matrix Protein Hic31 from the Prismatic Layer of Hyriopsis Cumingii Displays a Collagen-Like Structure

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Shaojian; Jin, Can; Li, Jiale

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we clone and characterize a novel matrix protein, hic31, from the mantle of Hyriopsis cumingii. The amino acid composition of hic31 consists of a high proportion of Glycine residues (26.67%). Tissue expression detection by RT-PCR indicates that hic31 is expressed specifically at the mantle edge. In situ hybridization results reveals strong signals from the dorsal epithelial cells of the outer fold at the mantle edge, and weak signals from inner epithelial cells of the same fold, indicating that hic31 is a prismatic-layer matrix protein. Although BLASTP results identify no shared homology with other shell-matrix proteins or any other known proteins, the hic31 tertiary structure is similar to that of collagen I, alpha 1 and alpha 2. It has been well proved that collagen forms the basic organic frameworks in way of collagen fibrils and minerals present within or outside of these fibrils. Therefore, hic31 might be a framework-matrix protein involved in the prismatic-layer biomineralization. Besides, the gene expression of hic31 increase in the early stages of pearl sac development, indicating that hic31 may play important roles in biomineralization of the pearl prismatic layer. PMID:26262686

  12. Quantification of Extracellular Matrix Proteins from a Rat Lung Scaffold to Provide a Molecular Readout for Tissue Engineering*

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Ryan C.; Calle, Elizabeth A.; Dzieciatkowska, Monika; Niklason, Laura E.; Hansen, Kirk C.

    2015-01-01

    The use of extracellular matrix (ECM)1 scaffolds, derived from decellularized tissues for engineered organ generation, holds enormous potential in the field of regenerative medicine. To support organ engineering efforts, we developed a targeted proteomics method to extract and quantify extracellular matrix components from tissues. Our method provides more complete and accurate protein characterization than traditional approaches. This is accomplished through the analysis of both the chaotrope-soluble and -insoluble protein fractions and using recombinantly generated stable isotope labeled peptides for endogenous protein quantification. Using this approach, we have generated 74 peptides, representing 56 proteins to quantify protein in native (nondecellularized) and decellularized lung matrices. We have focused on proteins of the ECM and additional intracellular proteins that are challenging to remove during the decellularization procedure. Results indicate that the acellular lung scaffold is predominantly composed of structural collagens, with the majority of these proteins found in the insoluble ECM, a fraction that is often discarded using widely accepted proteomic methods. The decellularization procedure removes over 98% of intracellular proteins evaluated and retains, to varying degrees, proteoglycans and glycoproteins of the ECM. Accurate characterization of ECM proteins from tissue samples will help advance organ engineering efforts by generating a molecular readout that can be correlated with functional outcome to drive the next generation of engineered organs. PMID:25660013

  13. Off surface matrix based on-chip electrochemical biosensor platform for protein biomarker detection in undiluted serum.

    PubMed

    Arya, Sunil K; Kongsuphol, Patthara; Park, Mi Kyoung

    2017-06-15

    The manuscript describes a concept of using off surface matrix modified with capturing biomolecule for on-chip electrochemical biosensing. 3D matrix made by laser engraving of polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) sheet as off surface matrix was integrated in very close vicinity of the electrode surface. Laser engraving and holes in PMMA along with spacing from surface provide fluidic channel and incubation chamber. Covalent binding of capturing biomolecule (anti-TNF-α antibody) on off-surface matrix was achieved via azide group activity of 4-fluoro-3-nitro-azidobenzene (FNAB), which act as cross-linker and further covalently binds to anti-TNF-α antibody via thermal reaction. Anti-TNF-α/FNAB/PMMA matrix was then integrated over comb structured gold electrode array based sensor chip. Separate surface modification followed by integration of sensor helped to prevent the sensor chip surface from fouling during functionalization. Nonspecific binding was prevented using starting block T20 (PBS). Results for estimating protein biomarker (TNF-α) in undiluted serum using Anti-TNF-α/FNAB/PMMA/Au reveal that system can detect TNF-α in 100pg/ml to 100ng/ml range with high sensitivity of 119nA/(ng/ml), with negligible interference from serum proteins and other cytokines. Thus, use of off surface matrix may provide the opportunity to electrochemically sense biomarkers sensitively to ng/ml range with negligible nonspecific binding and false signal in undiluted serum.

  14. Viral infectivity and intracellular distribution of matrix (M) protein of canine distemper virus are affected by actin filaments.

    PubMed

    Klauschies, F; Gützkow, T; Hinkelmann, S; von Messling, V; Vaske, B; Herrler, G; Haas, L

    2010-09-01

    To investigate the role of cytoskeletal components in canine distemper virus (CDV) replication, various agents were used that interfere with turnover of actin filaments and microtubules. Only inhibition of actin filaments significantly reduced viral infectivity. Analysis of the intracellular localization of the viral matrix (M) protein revealed that it aligned along actin filaments. Treatment with actin filament-disrupting drugs led to a marked intracellular redistribution of M protein during infection as well as transfection. In contrast, the localization of the CDV fusion (F) protein was not significantly changed during transfection. Thus, a M protein-actin filament interaction appears to be important for generation of infectious CDV.

  15. Proteomic Analysis of Tendon Extracellular Matrix Reveals Disease Stage-specific Fragmentation and Differential Cleavage of COMP (Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein)*

    PubMed Central

    Dakin, Stephanie Georgina; Smith, Roger Kenneth Whealands; Heinegård, Dick; Önnerfjord, Patrik; Khabut, Areej; Dudhia, Jayesh

    2014-01-01

    During inflammatory processes the extracellular matrix (ECM) is extensively remodeled, and many of the constituent components are released as proteolytically cleaved fragments. These degradative processes are better documented for inflammatory joint diseases than tendinopathy even though the pathogenesis has many similarities. The aims of this study were to investigate the proteomic composition of injured tendons during early and late disease stages to identify disease-specific cleavage patterns of the ECM protein cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP). In addition to characterizing fragments released in naturally occurring disease, we hypothesized that stimulation of tendon explants with proinflammatory mediators in vitro would induce fragments of COMP analogous to natural disease. Therefore, normal tendon explants were stimulated with IL-1β and prostaglandin E2, and their effects on the release of COMP and its cleavage patterns were characterized. Analyses of injured tendons identified an altered proteomic composition of the ECM at all stages post injury, showing protein fragments that were specific to disease stage. IL-1β enhanced the proteolytic cleavage and release of COMP from tendon explants, whereas PGE2 had no catabolic effect. Of the cleavage fragments identified in early stage tendon disease, two fragments were generated by an IL-1-mediated mechanism. These fragments provide a platform for the development of neo-epitope assays specific to injury stage for tendon disease. PMID:24398684

  16. Matrix Gla protein inhibits ectopic calcification by a direct interaction with hydroxyapatite crystals.

    PubMed

    O'Young, Jason; Liao, Yinyin; Xiao, Yizhi; Jalkanen, Jari; Lajoie, Gilles; Karttunen, Mikko; Goldberg, Harvey A; Hunter, Graeme K

    2011-11-16

    Mice lacking the gene encoding matrix gla protein (MGP) exhibit massive mineral deposition in blood vessels and die soon after birth. We hypothesize that MGP prevents arterial calcification by adsorbing to growing hydroxyapatite (HA) crystals. To test this, we have used a combined experimental-computational approach. We synthesized peptides covering the entire sequence of human MGP, which contains three sites of serine phosphorylation and five sites of γ-carboxylation, and studied their effects on HA crystal growth using a constant-composition autotitration assay. In parallel studies, the interactions of these sequences with the {100} and {001} faces of HA were analyzed using atomistic molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. YGlapS (amino acids 1-14 of human MGP) and SK-Gla (MGP43-56) adsorbed rapidly to the {100} and {001} faces and strongly inhibited HA growth (IC(50) = 2.96 μg/mL and 4.96 μg/mL, respectively). QR-Gla (MGP29-42) adsorbed more slowly and was a moderate growth inhibitor, while the remaining three (nonpost-translationally modified) peptides had little or no effect in either analysis. Substitution of gla with glutamic acid reduced the adsorption and inhibition activities of SK-Gla and (to a lesser extent) QR-Gla but not YGlapS; substitution of phosphoserine with serine reduced the inhibitory potency of YGlapS. These studies suggest that MGP prevents arterial calcification by a direct interaction with HA crystals that involves both phosphate groups and gla residues of the protein. The strong correlation between simulated adsorption and measured growth inhibition indicates that MD provides a powerful tool to predict the effects of proteins and peptides on crystal formation.

  17. Membrane Interactions of the Mason-Pfizer Monkey Virus Matrix Protein and Its Budding Deficient Mutants.

    PubMed

    Kroupa, Tomáš; Langerová, Hana; Doležal, Michal; Prchal, Jan; Spiwok, Vojtěch; Hunter, Eric; Rumlová, Michaela; Hrabal, Richard; Ruml, Tomáš

    2016-11-20

    Matrix proteins (MAs) play a key role in the transport of retroviral proteins inside infected cells and in the interaction with cellular membranes. In most retroviruses, retroviral MAs are N-terminally myristoylated. This modification serves as a membrane targeting signal and also as an anchor for membrane interaction. The aim of this work was to characterize the interactions anchoring retroviral MA at the plasma membrane of infected cell. To address this issue, we compared the structures and membrane affinity of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) wild-type MA with its two budding deficient double mutants, that is, T41I/T78I and Y28F/Y67F. The structures of the mutants were determined using solution NMR spectroscopy, and their interactions with water-soluble phospholipids were studied. Water-soluble phospholipids are widely used models for studying membrane interactions by solution NMR spectroscopy. However, this approach might lead to artificial results due to unnatural hydrophobic interactions. Therefore, we used a new approach based on the measurement of the loss of the (1)H NMR signal intensity of the protein sample induced by the addition of the liposomes containing phospholipids with naturally long fatty acids. HIV-1 MA was used as a positive control because its ability to interact with liposomes has already been described. We found that in contrast to HIV-1, the M-PMV MA interacted with the liposomes differently and much weaker. In our invivo experiments, the M-PMV MA did not co-localize with lipid rafts. Therefore, we concluded that M-PMV might adopt a different membrane binding mechanism than HIV-1.

  18. Adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts on extracellular matrix protein-functionalized poly(lactic acid).

    PubMed

    Cai, Ning; Gong, Yingxue; Chian, Kerm Sin; Chan, Vincent; Liao, Kin

    2008-03-01

    Effective attachment of esophageal cells on biomaterials is one important requirement in designing engineered esophagus substitute for esophageal cancer treatment. In this study, poly(lactic acid) (PLA) was subjected to surface modification by coupling extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins on its surface to promote cell adhesion. Two typical ECM proteins, collagen type I (COL) and fibronectin (FN), were immobilized on the PLA surface with the aid of glutaraldehyde as a cross linker between aminolyzed PLA and ECM proteins. By using confocal reflectance interference contrast microscopy (C-RICM) integrating with phase contrast microscopy, the long-term adhesion dynamics of porcine esophageal fibroblasts (PEFs) on four types of surfaces (unmodified PLA, PLA-COOH, PLA-COL and PLA-FN) was investigated during 24 h of culture. It is demonstrated by C-RICM results that PEFs form strong adhesion contact on all four types of surfaces at different stages of cell seeding. Among the four surfaces, PEFs on the PLA-FN surface reach the maximum adhesion energy (9.5 x 10(-7) J m(-2)) in the shortest time (20 min) during the initial stage of cell seeding. After adhesion energy reaches the maximum value, PEFs maintain their highly deformed geometries till they reached a steady state after 20 h of culture. F-actin immunostaining results show that the evolvement of spatial organization of F-actin is tightly correlated with the formation of adhesion contact and cell spreading. Furthermore, the cell attachment ratio of PEFs on PLA in 2 h is only 26% compared with 88% on PLA-FN, 73% on PLA-COL and 36% on PLA-COOH. All the results demonstrate the effect of surface functionalization on the biophysical responses of PEFs in cell adhesion. Fibronectin-immobilized PLA demonstrates promising potential for application as an engineered esophagus substitute.

  19. Extracellular matrix protein in calcified endoskeleton: a potential additive for crystal growth and design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azizur Rahman, M.; Fujimura, Hiroyuki; Shinjo, Ryuichi; Oomori, Tamotsu

    2011-06-01

    In this study, we demonstrate a key function of extracellular matrix proteins (ECMPs) on seed crystals, which are isolated from calcified endoskeletons of soft coral and contain only CaCO 3 without any living cells. This is the first report that an ECMP protein extracted from a marine organism could potentially influence in modifying the surface of a substrate for designing materials via crystallization. We previously studied with the ECMPs from a different type of soft coral ( Sinularia polydactyla) without introducing any seed crystals in the process , which showed different results. Thus, crystallization on the seed in the presence of ECMPs of present species is an important first step toward linking function to individual proteins from soft coral. For understanding this interesting phenomenon, in vitro crystallization was initiated in a supersaturated solution on seed particles of calcite (1 0 4) with and without ECMPs. No change in the crystal growth shape occurred without ECMPs present during the crystallization process. However, with ECMPs, the morphology and phase of the crystals in the crystallization process changed dramatically. Upon completion of crystallization with ECMPs, an attractive crystal morphology was found. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) was utilized to observe the crystal morphologies on the seeds surface. The mineral phases of crystals nucleated by ECMPs on the seeds surface were examined by Raman spectroscopy. Although 50 mM Mg 2+ is influential in making aragonite in the crystallization process, the ECMPs significantly made calcite crystals even when 50 mM Mg 2+ was present in the process. Crystallization with the ECMP additive seems to be a technically attractive strategy to generate assembled micro crystals that could be used in crystals growth and design in the Pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries.

  20. The effect of enamel matrix proteins and deproteinized bovine bone mineral on heterotopic bone formation.

    PubMed

    Donos, Nikolaos; Kostopoulos, Lambros; Tonetti, Maurizio; Karring, Thorkild; Lang, Niklaus P

    2006-08-01

    To evaluate the osteoinductive potential of deproteinized bovine bone mineral (DBBM) and an enamel matrix derivative (EMD) in the muscle of rats. Sixteen rats were used in this study. The animals were divided in three groups. Group A: a pouch was created in one of the pectoralis profundis muscles of the thorax of the rats and DBBM particles (Bio-Oss) were placed into the pouch. Healing: 60 days. Group B: a small pouch was created on both pectoralis profundis muscles at each side of the thorax midline. In one side, a mixture of EMD (Emdogain) mixed with DBBM was placed into one of the pouches, whereas in the contralateral side of the thorax the pouch was implanted with DBBM mixed with the propylene glycol alginate (PGA--carrier for enamel matrix proteins of EMD). Healing: 60 days. Group C: the same procedure as group B, but with a healing period of 120 days. Qualitative histological analysis of the results was performed. At 60 days, the histological appearance of the DBBM particles implanted alone was similar to that of the particles implanted together with EMD or PGA at both 60 and 120 days. The DBBM particles were encapsulated into a connective tissue stroma and an inflammatory infiltrate. At 120 days, the DBBM particles implanted together with EMD or PGA exhibited the presence of resorption lacunae in some cases. Intramuscular bone formation was not encountered in any group. The implantation of DBBM particles alone, combined with EMD or its carrier (PGA) failed to exhibit extraskeletal, bone-inductive properties.

  1. On-bead expression of recombinant proteins in an agarose gel matrix coated on a glass slide.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ka-Young; Byun, Ju-Young; Kim, Byung-Gee; Kim, Dong-Myung

    2012-05-07

    A system for expression and in situ display of recombinant proteins on a microbead surface is described. Biotinylated PCR products were immobilized on microbead surfaces, which were then embedded in a gel matrix and supplied with translation machinery and substrates. Upon the incubation of the gel matrix, target proteins encoded on the bead-immobilized DNA were expressed and captured on the same bead, thus allowing bead-mediated linkage of DNA and encoded proteins. The new method combines the simplicity and convenience of solid-phase separation of genetic information with the benefits of cell-free protein synthesis, such as instant translation of genetic information, unrestricted substrate accessibility and flexible assay configuration design.

  2. Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization Imaging Mass Spectrometry for the Investigation of Proteins and Peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burnum, Kristin E.; Frappier, Sara L.; Caprioli, Richard M.

    2008-07-01

    Mass spectrometry (MS) is an excellent technology for molecular imaging because of its high data dimensionality. MS can monitor thousands of individual molecular data channels measured as mass-to-charge (m/z). We describe the use of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) MS for the image analysis of proteins, peptides, lipids, drugs, and metabolites in tissues. We discuss the basic instrumentation and sample preparation methods needed to produce high-resolution images and high image reproducibility. Matrix-addition protocols are briefly discussed along with normal operating procedures, and selected biological and medical applications of MALDI imaging MS are described. We give examples of both two- and three-dimensional imaging, including normal mouse embryo implantation, sperm maturation in mouse epididymis, protein distributions in brain sections, protein alterations as a result of drug administration, and protein changes in brain due to neurodegeneration and tumor formation. Advantages of this technology and future challenges for its improvement are discussed.

  3. [Mineral phase and protein matrix status of rat bony tissue after a flight on the Kosmos-1129 biosatellite].

    PubMed

    Prokhonchukov, A A; Desiatnichenko, K S; Tigranian, R A; Komissarova, N A

    1982-01-01

    The major parameters of the mineral component and protein matrix of bones were investigated in 30 rats flown onboard Cosmos-1129. Postflight, the content of calcium decreased by 7.8%, that of phosphorus diminished by 11.8%, the Ca/P ratio increased by 5.9%, the content of collagen diminished by 14.7% and that of non-collagenous proteins by 45.7% and the content of sialic and hexuronic acids increased by 36.2% and 14.6%, respectively, as compared to the vivarium controls. The paper discusses the role of EDTA-and HCl-protein extracts, soluble and poorly soluble calcium fractions, protein-Ca-phosphate complex, sialic and hexuronic acids in the mechanism of calcium binding by the bone organic matrix.

  4. Hot Melt Extrusion for Sustained Protein Release: Matrix Erosion and In Vitro Release of PLGA-Based Implants.

    PubMed

    Cossé, Anne; König, Corinna; Lamprecht, Alf; Wagner, Karl G

    2017-01-01

    The design of biodegradable implants for sustained release of proteins is a complex challenge optimizing protein polymer interaction in combination with a mini-scale process which is predictive for production. The process of hot melt extrusion (HME) was therefore conducted on 5- and 9-mm mini-scale twin screw extruders. Poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) implants were characterized for their erosion properties and the in vitro release of the embedded protein (bovine serum albumin, BSA). The release of acidic monomers as well as other parameters (pH value, mass loss) during 16 weeks indicated a delayed onset of matrix erosion in week 3. BSA-loaded implants released 17.0% glycolic and 5.9% lactic acid after a 2-week lag time. Following a low burst release (3.7% BSA), sustained protein release started in week 4. Storage under stress conditions (30°C, 75% rH) revealed a shift of erosion onset of 1 week (BSA-loaded implants: 26.9% glycolic and 9.3% lactic acid). Coherent with the changed erosion profiles, an influence on the protein release was observed. Confocal laser scanning and Raman microscopy showed a homogenous protein distribution throughout the matrix after extrusion and during release studies. Raman spectra indicated a conformational change of the protein structure which could be one reason for incomplete protein release. The study underlined the suitability of the HME process to obtain a solid dispersion of protein inside a polymeric matrix providing sustained protein release. However, the incomplete protein release and the impact by storage conditions require thorough characterization and understanding of erosion and release mechanisms.

  5. [The nuclear matrix proteins (mol. mass 38 and 50 kDa) are transported by chromosomes in mitosis].

    PubMed

    Murasheva, M I; Chentsov, Iu S

    2010-01-01

    It was shown by immunofluorescence method that serum M68 and serum K43 from patients with autoimmune disease stain interphase nuclei and periphery of mitotic chromosomes of pig kidney cells. Western blotting reveals the polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa in serum M68, and the polypeptide with mol. mass of 38 kDa in serum K43. In the nuclear protein matrix, the antibodies to protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa stained only nucleolar periphery, while the antibodies to the protein with mol. mass of 50 kDa stained both the nucleolar periphery and all the interphase nucleus. It shows that among all components of nuclear protein matrix (lamina, internuclear network, residual nucleoli) only nucleolar periphery contains the 38 kDa protein, while the 50 kDa protein is a part of residual nucleolar periphery and takes part in nuclear protein network formation. In the interphase cells, both proteins were in situ localized in the nuclei, but one of them with mol. mass of 50 kDa was in the form of small clearly outlined granules, while the other (38 kDa) was in the form of small bright granules against the background of diffusely stained nuclei. Both proteins were also revealed as continuous ring around nucleolar periphery. During all mitotic stages, the 50 kDa protein was seen on the chromosomal periphery as a cover, and the 38 kDa protein formed separate fragments and granules around them. After nuclear and chromosome decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment, both antibodies stain interphase nuclei in diffuse manner, but in mitotic cells they stained the surface of the swollen chromosomes. The polypeptide with mol. mass of 50 kDa maintained strong connection with chromosome periphery both in norm and under condition of decondensation induced by hypotonic treatment and at subsequent recondensation in isotonic medium. In contrast, the protein with mol. mass of 38 kDa partially lost the contact with a chromosome during recondensation appearing also in the form of granules in

  6. Crystallization of bFGF-DNA Aptamer Complexes Using a Sparse Matrix Designed for Protein-Nucleic Acid Complexes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cannone, Jaime J.; Barnes, Cindy L.; Achari, Aniruddha; Kundrot, Craig E.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Sparse Matrix approach for obtaining lead crystallization conditions has proven to be very fruitful for the crystallization of proteins and nucleic acids. Here we report a Sparse Matrix developed specifically for the crystallization of protein-DNA complexes. This method is rapid and economical, typically requiring 2.5 mg of complex to test 48 conditions. The method was originally developed to crystallize basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) complexed with DNA sequences identified through in vitro selection, or SELEX, methods. Two DNA aptamers that bind with approximately nanomolar affinity and inhibit the angiogenic properties of bFGF were selected for co-crystallization. The Sparse Matrix produced lead crystallization conditions for both bFGF-DNA complexes.

  7. A nano-sized manganese oxide in a protein matrix as a natural water-oxidizing site.

    PubMed

    Najafpour, Mohammad Mahdi; Ghobadi, Mohadeseh Zarei; Haghighi, Behzad; Tomo, Tatsuya; Carpentier, Robert; Shen, Jian-Ren; Allakhverdiev, Suleyman I

    2014-08-01

    The purpose of this review is to present recent advances in the structural and functional studies of water-oxidizing center of Photosystem II and its surrounding protein matrix in order to synthesize artificial catalysts for production of clean and efficient hydrogen fuel.

  8. Bap, a Biofilm Matrix Protein of Staphylococcus aureus Prevents Cellular Internalization through Binding to GP96 Host Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Valle, Jaione; Latasa, Cristina; Gil, Carmen; Toledo-Arana, Alejandro; Solano, Cristina; Penadés, José R.; Lasa, Iñigo

    2012-01-01

    The biofilm matrix, composed of exopolysaccharides, proteins, nucleic acids and lipids, plays a well-known role as a defence structure, protecting bacteria from the host immune system and antimicrobial therapy. However, little is known about its responsibility in the interaction of biofilm cells with host tissues. Staphylococcus aureus, a leading cause of biofilm-associated chronic infections, is able to develop a biofilm built on a proteinaceous Bap-mediated matrix. Here, we used the Bap protein as a model to investigate the role that components of the biofilm matrix play in the interaction of S. aureus with host cells. The results show that Bap promotes the adhesion but prevents the entry of S. aureus into epithelial cells. A broad analysis of potential interaction partners for Bap using ligand overlayer immunoblotting, immunoprecipitation with purified Bap and pull down with intact bacteria, identified a direct binding between Bap and Gp96/GRP94/Hsp90 protein. The interaction of Bap with Gp96 provokes a significant reduction in the capacity of S. aureus to invade epithelial cells by interfering with the fibronectin binding protein invasion pathway. Consistent with these results, Bap deficient bacteria displayed an enhanced capacity to invade mammary gland epithelial cells in a lactating mice mastitis model. Our observations begin to elucidate the mechanisms by which components of the biofilm matrix can facilitate the colonization of host tissues and the establishment of persistent infections. PMID:22876182

  9. Differential expression of cardiac muscle mitochondrial matrix proteins in broilers from ascites-resistant and susceptible lines.

    PubMed

    Cisar, C R; Balog, J M; Anthony, N B; Donoghue, A M

    2005-05-01

    Ascites is a metabolic disorder of modern broilers that is distinguished by cardiopulmonary insufficiency in the face of intense oxygen demands of rapidly growing tissues. Broilers with ascites exhibit sustained elevation of pulmonary arterial pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy, the end result of which is heart failure. It has been shown that mitochondrial function is impaired in broilers with ascites. In the current study, mitochondrial matrix protein levels were compared between ascites-resistant line broilers and ascites-susceptible line broilers with and without ascites using two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis. One hundred seventy-two protein spots were detected on the gels, and 9 of the spots were present at different levels in the 4 groups of broilers. These 9 protein spots were selected for identification by mass spectrometry. Two of the spots were found to contain single mitochondrial matrix proteins. Both mitochondrial matrix proteins, the dihydrolipoamide succinyltransferase component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex and the alpha-subunit of mitochondrial trifunctional enzyme, were present at higher levels in ascites-resistant line broilers with ascites in the present study. The elevated levels of 2 key proteins in aerobic metabolism in ascites-resistant line broilers with ascites observed in the present study suggests that the mitochondria of broilers with this disease may respond inappropriately to hypoxia.

  10. Altered expression of tight junction proteins and matrix metalloproteinases in thiamine-deficient mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Beauchesne, Elizabeth; Desjardins, Paul; Hazell, Alan S; Butterworth, Roger F

    2009-09-01

    Wernicke's encephalopathy (WE) in humans is a metabolic disorder caused by thiamine deficiency (TD). In both humans and experimental animals, TD leads to selective neuronal cell death in diencephalic and brainstem structures. Neuropathologic features of WE include petechial hemorrhagic lesions, and blood-brain barrier (BBB) breakdown has been suggested to play an important role in the pathogenesis of TD. The goal of the present study was to examine expression of the tight junction (TJ) protein occludin, its associated scaffolding proteins zona occludens (ZO-1 and ZO-2), and to measure matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) levels as a function of regional BBB permeability changes in thiamine-deficient mice. TD was induced in 12-week-old male C57Bl/6 mice by feeding a thiamine-deficient diet and administration of the central thiamine antagonist pyrithiamine. BBB permeability was measured by IgG extravasation; expression of occludin, ZO-1 and ZO-2 was measured by Western blot analysis and RT-PCR, structural integrity of the BBB was assessed using occludin and ZO-1 immunostaining, and MMPs levels were measured by gelatin zymography and immunohistochemistry. Studies were performed in vulnerable (medial thalamus) versus spared (frontal cortex) regions of the brain. Hemorrhagic lesions, selective increases in brain IgG extravasation, a concomitant loss in protein expression of occludin, ZO-1 and ZO-2, as well as decreased and disrupted patterns of occludin and ZO-1 immunostaining were observed in the medial thalamus of thiamine-deficient mice. MMP-9 levels were also selectively increased in the medial thalamus of these animals, and were found to be localized in the vascular endothelium, as well as in cells with an apparent polymorphonuclear morphology. No changes of TJ gene expression were observed. These results indicate that alterations in TJ proteins occur in TD, and offer a plausible explanation for the selective increase in BBB permeability in thiamine-deficient animals

  11. Casein kinase II protein kinase is bound to lamina-matrix and phosphorylates lamin-like protein in isolated pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    A casein kinase II (CK II)-like protein kinase was identified and partially isolated from a purified envelope-matrix fraction of pea (Pisum sativum L.) nuclei. When [gamma-32P]ATP was directly added to the envelope-matrix preparation, the three most heavily labeled protein bands had molecular masses near 71, 48, and 46 kDa. Protein kinases were removed from the preparation by sequential extraction with Triton X-100, EGTA, 0.3 M NaCl, and a pH 10.5 buffer, but an active kinase still remained bound to the remaining lamina-matrix fraction after these treatments. This kinase had properties resembling CK II kinases previously characterized from animal and plant sources: it preferred casein as an artificial substrate, could use GTP as efficiently as ATP as the phosphoryl donor, was stimulated by spermine, was calcium independent, and had a catalytic subunit of 36 kDa. Some animal and plant CK II kinases have regulatory subunits near 29 kDa, and a lamina-matrix-bound protein of this molecular mass was recognized on immunoblot by anti-Drosophila CK II polyclonal antibodies. Also found associated with the envelope-matrix fraction of pea nuclei were p34cdc2-like and Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinases, but their properties could not account for the protein kinase activity bound to the lamina. The 71-kDa substrate of the CK II-like kinase was lamin A-like, both in its molecular mass and in its cross-reactivity with anti-intermediate filament antibodies. Lamin phosphorylation is considered a crucial early step in the entry of cells into mitosis, so lamina-bound CK II kinases may be important control points for cellular proliferation.

  12. Three distinct cell populations express extracellular matrix proteins and increase in number during skeletal muscle fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Chapman, Mark A; Mukund, Kavitha; Subramaniam, Shankar; Brenner, David; Lieber, Richard L

    2017-02-01

    Tissue extracellular matrix (ECM) provides structural support and creates unique environments for resident cells (Bateman JF, Boot-Handford RP, Lamandé SR. Nat Rev Genet 10: 173-183, 2009; Kjaer M. Physiol Rev 84: 649-98, 2004). However, the identities of cells responsible for creating specific ECM components have not been determined. In striated muscle, the identity of these cells becomes important in disease when ECM changes result in fibrosis and subsequent increased tissue stiffness and dysfunction. Here we describe a novel approach to isolate and identify cells that maintain the ECM in both healthy and fibrotic muscle. Using a collagen I reporter mouse, we show that there are three distinct cell populations that express collagen I in both healthy and fibrotic skeletal muscle. Interestingly, the number of collagen I-expressing cells in all three cell populations increases proportionally in fibrotic muscle, indicating that all cell types participate in the fibrosis process. Furthermore, while some profibrotic ECM and ECM-associated genes are significantly upregulated in fibrotic muscle, the fibrillar collagen gene expression profile is not qualitatively altered. This suggests that muscle fibrosis in this model results from an increased number of collagen I-expressing cells and not the initiation of a specific fibrotic collagen gene expression program. Finally, in fibrotic muscle, we show that these collagen I-expressing cell populations differentially express distinct ECM proteins-fibroblasts express the fibrillar components of ECM, fibro/adipogenic progenitors cells differentially express basal laminar proteins, and skeletal muscle progenitor cells differentially express genes important for the satellite cell.

  13. Peptides of Matrix Gla protein inhibit nucleation and growth of hydroxyapatite and calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals.

    PubMed

    Goiko, Maria; Dierolf, Joshua; Gleberzon, Jared S; Liao, Yinyin; Grohe, Bernd; Goldberg, Harvey A; de Bruyn, John R; Hunter, Graeme K

    2013-01-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated protein that has been shown to prevent the deposition of hydroxyapatite crystals in the walls of blood vessels. MGP is also expressed in kidney and may inhibit the formation of kidney stones, which mainly consist of another crystalline phase, calcium oxalate monohydrate. To determine the mechanism by which MGP prevents soft-tissue calcification, we have synthesized peptides corresponding to the phosphorylated and γ-carboxylated sequences of human MGP in both post-translationally modified and non-modified forms. The effects of these peptides on hydroxyapatite formation and calcium oxalate crystallization were quantified using dynamic light scattering and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. Peptides YGlapS (MGP1-14: YγEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YEpS (YEpSHEpSMEpSYELNP), YGlaS (YγESHESMESYELNP) and SK-Gla (MGP43-56: SKPVHγELNRγEACDD) inhibited formation of hydroxyapatite in order of potency YGlapS > YEpS > YGlaS > SK-Gla. The effects of YGlapS, YEpS and YGlaS on hydroxyapatite formation were on both crystal nucleation and growth; the effect of SK-Gla was on nucleation. YGlapS and YEpS significantly inhibited the growth of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals, while simultaneously promoting the formation of calcium oxalate dihydrate. The effects of these phosphopeptides on calcium oxalate monohydrate formation were on growth of crystals rather than nucleation. We have shown that the use of dynamic light scattering allows inhibitors of hydroxyapatite nucleation and growth to be distinguished. We have also demonstrated for the first time that MGP peptides inhibit the formation of calcium oxalate monohydrate. Based on the latter finding, we propose that MGP function not only to prevent blood-vessel calcification but also to inhibit stone formation in kidney.

  14. Matrix Gla protein is involved in elastic fiber calcification in the dermis of pseudoxanthoma elasticum patients.

    PubMed

    Gheduzzi, Dealba; Boraldi, Federica; Annovi, Giulia; DeVincenzi, Chiara Paolinelli; Schurgers, Leon J; Vermeer, Cees; Quaglino, Daniela; Ronchetti, Ivonne Pasquali

    2007-10-01

    Mature MGP (Matrix gamma-carboxyglutamic acid protein) is known to inhibit soft connective tissues calcification. We investigated its possible involvement in pseudoxanthoma elasticum (PXE), a genetic disorder whose clinical manifestations are due to mineralization of elastic fibers. PXE patients have lower serum concentration of total MGP compared to controls (P<0.001). Antibodies specific for the noncarboxylated (Glu-MGP) and for the gamma-carboxylated (Gla-MGP) forms of MGP were assayed on ultrathin sections of dermis from controls and PXE patients. Normal elastic fibers in controls and patients were slightly positive for both forms of MGP, whereas Gla-MGP was more abundant within control's than within patient's elastic fibers (P<0.001). In patients' calcified elastic fibers, Glu-MGP intensively colocalized with mineral precipitates, whereas Gla-MGP precisely localized at the mineralization front. Data suggest that MGP is present within elastic fibers and is associated with calcification of dermal elastic fibers in PXE. To investigate whether local cells produce MGP, dermal fibroblasts were cultured in vitro and MGP was assayed at mRNA and protein levels. In spite of very similar MGP mRNA expression, cells from PXE patients produced 30% less of Gla-MGP compared to controls. Data were confirmed by immunocytochemistry on ultrathin sections. Normal fibroblasts in vitro were positive for both forms of MGP. PXE fibroblasts were positive for Glu-MGP and only barely positive for Gla-MGP (P<0.001). In conclusion, MGP is involved in elastic fiber calcification in PXE. The lower ratio of Gla-MGP over Glu-MGP in pathological fibroblasts compared to controls suggests these cells may play an important role in the ectopic calcification in PXE.

  15. Matrix Gla protein (MGP) promoter polymorphic variants and its serum level in stenosis of coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Najafi, Mohammad; Roustazadeh, Abazar; Amirfarhangi, Abdollah; Kazemi, Bahram

    2014-03-01

    Although the role of matrix Gla protein (MGP) is not completely known but, its expression within subendothelial macrophages and vascular smooth muscle cells is suggested to be involved in vascular calcification. In this study, we investigated the associations between the serum MGP levels and the MGP promoter high minor allele frequency (MAF) variants with the development of stenosis in coronary arteries. Moreover, we evaluated the allele changes within predicted transcription factor elements with bioinformatics tools. 182 subjects were recruited from who underwent coronary angiography. The MGP promoter rs1800801, rs1800802 and rs1800799 genotypes and haplotypes were detected by ARMS-RFLP PCR techniques. The serum MGP concentration was measured using ELISA method. Jaspar profiles were used for scoring the polymorphic variations within the transcription factor elements. The genotype and two-allelic haplotype distributions were not significant between the patient and control groups (P > 0.05). The serum MGP levels had not significant differences between the genotypes (P > 0.1) and haplotypes (P > 0.4). Based on the prediction studies, we did not observe significant differences between the polymorphic scores in the predicted elements (P > 0.05). We concluded that the genotype and haplotype distributions of the MGP promoter high-MAF polymorphisms, as confirmed in the prediction studies and the serum MGP level are not significantly associated with the coronary artery disease. Based on the study results, the MGP protein did not play an important role in the development of stenosis of coronary arteries.

  16. Not All Inner Ears are the Same: Otolith Matrix Proteins in the Inner Ear of Sub-Adult Cichlid Fish, Oreochromis Mossambicus, Reveal Insights Into the Biomineralization Process.

    PubMed

    Weigele, Jochen; Franz-Odendaal, Tamara A; Hilbig, Reinhard

    2016-02-01

    The fish ear stones (otoliths) consist mainly of calcium carbonate and have lower amounts of a proteinous matrix. This matrix consists of macromolecules, which directly control the biomineralization process. We analyzed the composition of this proteinous matrix by mass spectrometry in a shotgun approach. For this purpose, an enhanced protein purification technique was developed that excludes any potential contamination of proteins from body fluids. Using this method we identified eight proteins in the inner ear of Oreochromis mossambicus. These include the common otolith matrix proteins (OMP-1, otolin-1, neuroserpin, SPARC and otoconin), and three proteins (alpha tectorin, otogelin and transferrin) not previously localized to the otoliths. Moreover, we were able to exclude the occurrence of two matrix proteins (starmaker and pre-cerebellin-like protein) known from other fish species. In further analyses, we show that the absence of the OMP starmaker corresponds to calcitic otoliths and that pre-cerebellin-like protein is not present at any stage during the development of the otoliths of the inner ear. This study shows O. mossambicus does not have all of the known otolith proteins indicating that the matrix proteins in the inner ear of fish are not the same across species. Further functional studies of the novel proteins we identified during otolith development are required.

  17. The skin autofluorescence reflects the posttranslational glycation grade of the matrix protein collagen.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Kathleen; Navarrete Santos, Alexander; Simm, Andreas; Silber, Rolf-Edgar; Hofmann, Britt

    2014-10-01

    Advanced glycation end products (AGEs) seem to be involved in ageing as well as in the development of cardiovascular diseases. Accumulation of AGEs contribute to tissue stiffness and organ dysfunction by crosslinking extracellular matrix proteins like collagen. We aimed to assess whether AGE-modified cardiac tissue collagen and AGE related skin autofluorescence may reflect the cardiac function and have a prognostic value for the outcome of coronary artery bypass surgery patients. Therefore, AGE-modifications in collagen from 72 male patients undergoing isolated coronary artery bypass graft (CABG) surgery were analyzed. Collagen fractions were isolated from the right atrial auricle and the residual bypass graft material (saphenous vein) of these patients and quantified by 4-hydroxyproline assay. AGE modifications were determined by the AGE intrinsic fluorescence (excitation 360nm/emission 440nm). The skin autofluorescence (sAF) as a non-invasive parameter was measured using the AGE reader. The non-extractable collagen contained the highest amounts of AGEs and positively correlates with the patients age (p=0.0001), blood glucose level (p=0.002), HbA1c level (p=0.01) and sAF (p=0.008). The right atrial auricle collagen showed significantly more modifications compared to vein graft material of the same patient (p=0,001). Skin autofluorescence positively correlates with AGE content in cardiac tissue (p=0.01) and therefore could be used as a predictor of tissue stiffness in patients with coronary heart disease.

  18. Different mechanical loading protocols influence serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels in young healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Niehoff, A; Kersting, U G; Helling, S; Dargel, J; Maurer, J; Thevis, M; Brüggemann, G-P

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate whether a relationship between the loading mode of physical activity and serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) concentration exists and whether the lymphatic system contributes to COMP release into the serum. Serum COMP levels were determined in healthy male subjects before, after and at 18 further time points within 7 h at four separate experimental days with four different loading interventions. The loading intervention included high impact running exercise, slow but deep knee bends, and lymphatic drainage of 30 min duration, respectively, and a resting protocol. The serum COMP levels were measured using a commercially available quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. An increase (p < 0.001) in serum COMP concentration was detected immediately after 30 min running exercise. Slow but deep knee bends did not cause any significant changes in serum COMP levels. Lymphatic drainage also had no effect on the serum COMP concentration. After 30 min of complete rest the serum COMP level was significantly (p = 0.008) reduced. The elevation of COMP serum concentration seems to depend on the loading mode of the physical activity and to reflect the extrusion of COMP fragments from the impact loaded articular cartilage or synovial fluid.

  19. Silk-elastin-like protein polymer matrix for intraoperative delivery of an oncolytic vaccinia virus

    PubMed Central

    Price, Daniel L.; Li, Pingdong; Chen, Chun-Hao; Wong, Danni; Yu, Zhenkun; Chen, Nanhai G.; Yu, Yong A.; Szalay, Aladar A.; Cappello, Joseph; Fong, Yuman; Wong, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Oncolytic viral efficacy may be limited by the penetration of the virus into tumors. This may be enhanced by intraoperative application of virus immediately after surgical resection. Methods Oncolytic vaccinia virus GLV-1h68 was delivered in silk-elastin-like protein polymer (SELP) in vitro and in vivo in anaplastic thyroid carcinoma cell line 8505c in nude mice. Results GLV-1h68 in SELP infected and lysed anaplastic thyroid cancer cells in vitro equally as effectively as in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), and at 1 week retains a thousand fold greater infectious plaque-forming units. In surgical resection models of residual tumor, GLV-1h68 in SELP improves tumor control and shows increased viral β-galactosidase expression as compared to PBS. Conclusion The use of SELP matrix for intraoperative oncolytic viral delivery protects infectious viral particles from degradation, facilitates sustained viral delivery and transgene expression, and improves tumor control. Such optimization of methods of oncolytic viral delivery may enhance therapeutic outcomes. PMID:25244076

  20. [Association of allelic polymorphisms of genes matrix Gla-protein system with ischemic atherothrombotic stroke].

    PubMed

    Garbuzova, V Yu; Stroy, D A; Dosenko, V E; Dubovyk, Ye I; Borodenko, A O; Shimko, K A; Obukhova, O A; Ataman, O V

    2015-01-01

    There are results of the determination of 10 polymorphisms of matrix Gla-protein system (gene MGP-T(-138)-->C (rs1800802), G(-7)-->A (rs1800801), Thr83-->Ala (rs4236), gene VDR-FokI (rs2228570), BsmI (rs1544410), ApaI (rs7975232), TaqI (rs731236), gene GGCX-Arg325-->Gln (rs699664), gene VKORS1-T(2255)-->C (rs2359612), gene BMP-2-Ser37-->Ala (rs2273073)) into 170 patients with ischemic atherothrombotic stroke (IATS) and 124 healthy individual is (control group). It is established that there is a connection between the IATS and polymorphic variants of genes MGP (G(-7)-->A) and VKORC1 (T(2255)-->C). The risk of IATS in carriers of minor allele A/A (G(-7)-->A polymorphism) in 2.6 times higher than in carriers of the major allele (G/A + G/G), and C/C genotype (T(2255)-->C polymorphism) in 2.2 times higher than the homozygotes of major allele. The coincidence of patients T/C and G/G, C/C and G/A genotypes, and A/A genotype (G(-7)-->A polymorphism) with any genotype T(2255)-->C polymorphism are increases the risk of IATS.

  1. Detection of Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein Using a Quartz Crystal Microbalance

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shih-Han; Shen, Chi-Yen; Weng, Ting-Chan; Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Yang, Jia-Jyun; Chen, I-Fen; Kuo, Shyh-Ming; Chang, Shwu-Jen; Tu, Yuan-Kun; Kao, Yu-Hsien; Hung, Chih-Hsin

    2010-01-01

    Current methods for diagnosing early stage osteoarthritis (OA) based on the magnetic resonance imaging and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods are specific, but require specialized laboratory facilities and highly trained personal to obtain a definitive result. In this work, a user friendly and non-invasive quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) immunosensor method has been developed to detect Cartilage Oligomeric Matrix Protein (COMP) for early stage OA diagnosis. This QCM immunosensor was fabricated to immobilize COMP antibodies utilizing the self-assembled monolayer technique. The surface properties of the immunosensor were characterized by its FTIR and electrochemical impedance spectra (EIS). The feasibility study was based on urine samples obtained from 41 volunteers. Experiments were carried out in a flow system and the reproducibility of the electrodes was evaluated by the impedance measured by EIS. Its potential dynamically monitored the immunoreaction processes and could increase the efficiency and sensitivity of COMP detection in laboratory-cultured preparations and clinical samples. The frequency responses of the QCM immunosensor changed from 6 kHz when testing 50 ng/mL COMP concentration. The linear regression equation of frequency shift and COMP concentration was determined as: y = 0.0872 x + 1.2138 (R2 = 0.9957). The COMP in urine was also determined by both QCM and EIS for comparison. A highly sensitive, user friendly and cost effective analytical method for the early stage OA diagnosis has thus been successfully developed. PMID:22163547

  2. Vitamin K-Dependent Carboxylation of Matrix Gla Protein Influences the Risk of Calciphylaxis.

    PubMed

    Nigwekar, Sagar U; Bloch, Donald B; Nazarian, Rosalynn M; Vermeer, Cees; Booth, Sarah L; Xu, Dihua; Thadhani, Ravi I; Malhotra, Rajeev

    2017-01-03

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP) is a potent inhibitor of vascular calcification. The ability of MGP to inhibit calcification requires the activity of a vitamin K-dependent enzyme, which mediates MGP carboxylation. We investigated how MGP carboxylation influences the risk of calciphylaxis in adult patients receiving dialysis and examined the effects of vitamin K deficiency on MGP carboxylation. Our study included 20 patients receiving hemodialysis with calciphylaxis (cases) and 20 patients receiving hemodialysis without calciphylaxis (controls) matched for age, sex, race, and warfarin use. Cases had higher plasma levels of uncarboxylated MGP (ucMGP) and carboxylated MGP (cMGP) than controls. However, the fraction of total MGP that was carboxylated (relative cMGP concentration = cMGP/[cMGP + uncarboxylated MGP]) was lower in cases than in controls (0.58±0.02 versus 0.69±0.03, respectively; P=0.003). In patients not taking warfarin, cases had a similarly lower relative cMGP concentration. Each 0.1 unit reduction in relative cMGP concentration associated with a more than two-fold increase in calciphylaxis risk. Vitamin K deficiency associated with lower relative cMGP concentration in multivariable adjusted analyses (β=-8.99; P=0.04). In conclusion, vitamin K deficiency-mediated reduction in relative cMGP concentration may have a role in the pathogenesis of calciphylaxis. Whether vitamin K supplementation can prevent and/or treat calciphylaxis requires further study.

  3. Improved bone morphogenetic protein-2 retention in an injectable collagen matrix using bifunctional peptides.

    PubMed

    Hamilton, Paul T; Jansen, Michelle S; Ganesan, Sathya; Benson, R Edward; Hyde-Deruyscher, Robin; Beyer, Wayne F; Gile, Joseph C; Nair, Shrikumar A; Hodges, Jonathan A; Grøn, Hanne

    2013-01-01

    To promote healing of many orthopedic injuries, tissue engineering approaches are being developed that combine growth factors such as Bone Morphogenetic Proteins (BMP) with biomaterial carriers. Although these technologies have shown great promise, they still face limitations. We describe a generalized approach to create target-specific modular peptides that bind growth factors to implantable biomaterials. These bifunctional peptide coatings provide a novel way to modulate biology on the surface of an implant. Using phage display techniques, we have identified peptides that bind with high affinity to BMP-2. The peptides that bind to BMP-2 fall into two different sequence clusters. The first cluster of peptide sequences contains the motif W-X-X-F-X-X-L (where X can be any amino acid) and the second cluster contains the motif F-P-L-K-G. We have synthesized bifunctional peptide linkers that contain BMP-2 and collagen-binding domains. Using a rat ectopic bone formation model, we have injected rhBMP-2 into a collagen matrix with or without a bifunctional BMP-2: collagen peptide (BC-1). The presence of BC-1 significantly increased osteogenic cellular activity, the area of bone formed, and bone maturity at the site of injection. Our results suggest that bifunctional peptides that can simultaneously bind to a growth factor and an implantable biomaterial can be used to control the delivery and release of growth factors at the site of implantation.

  4. Cellular aspartyl proteases promote the unconventional secretion of biologically active HIV-1 matrix protein p17

    PubMed Central

    Caccuri, Francesca; Iaria, Maria Luisa; Campilongo, Federica; Varney, Kristen; Rossi, Alessandro; Mitola, Stefania; Schiarea, Silvia; Bugatti, Antonella; Mazzuca, Pietro; Giagulli, Cinzia; Fiorentini, Simona; Lu, Wuyuan; Salmona, Mario; Caruso, Arnaldo

    2016-01-01

    The human immune deficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) matrix protein p17 (p17), although devoid of a signal sequence, is released by infected cells and detected in blood and in different organs and tissues even in HIV-1-infected patients undergoing successful combined antiretroviral therapy (cART). Extracellularly, p17 deregulates the function of different cells involved in AIDS pathogenesis. The mechanism of p17 secretion, particularly during HIV-1 latency, still remains to be elucidated. A recent study showed that HIV-1-infected cells can produce Gag without spreading infection in a model of viral latency. Here we show that in Gag-expressing cells, secretion of biologically active p17 takes place at the plasma membrane and occurs following its interaction with phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate and its subsequent cleavage from the precursor Gag (Pr55Gag) operated by cellular aspartyl proteases. These enzymes operate a more complex Gag polypeptide proteolysis than the HIV-1 protease, thus hypothetically generating slightly truncated or elongated p17s in their C-terminus. A 17 C-terminal residues excised p17 was found to be structurally and functionally identical to the full-length p17 demonstrating that the final C-terminal region of p17 is irrelevant for the protein’s biological activity. These findings offer new opportunities to identify treatment strategies for inhibiting p17 release in the extracellular microenvironment. PMID:27905556

  5. Haemophilus influenzae P4 Interacts With Extracellular Matrix Proteins Promoting Adhesion and Serum Resistance.

    PubMed

    Su, Yu-Ching; Mukherjee, Oindrilla; Singh, Birendra; Hallgren, Oskar; Westergren-Thorsson, Gunilla; Hood, Derek; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2016-01-15

    Interaction with the extracellular matrix (ECM) is one of the successful colonization strategies employed by nontypeable Haemophilus influenzae (NTHi). Here we identified Haemophilus lipoprotein e (P4) as a receptor for ECM proteins. Purified recombinant P4 displayed a high binding affinity for laminin (Kd = 9.26 nM) and fibronectin (Kd = 10.19 nM), but slightly less to vitronectin (Kd = 16.51 nM). A P4-deficient NTHi mutant showed a significantly decreased binding to these ECM components. Vitronectin acquisition conferred serum resistance to both P4-expressing NTHi and Escherichia coli transformants. P4-mediated bacterial adherence to pharynx, type II alveolar, and bronchial epithelial cells was mainly attributed to fibronectin. Importantly, a significantly reduced bacterial infection was observed in the middle ear of the Junbo mouse model when NTHi was devoid of P4. In conclusion, our data provide new insight into the role of P4 as an important factor for Haemophilus colonization and subsequent respiratory tract infection.

  6. Biomembranes enriched with TGFbeta1 favor bone matrix protein expression by human osteoblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Lilli, C; Marinucci, L; Stabellini, G; Belcastro, S; Becchetti, E; Balducci, C; Staffolani, N; Locci, P

    2002-01-01

    The use of growth factors in oral tissue regeneration is currently under investigation. When growth factors are combined with commercial materials, the in vitro mechanisms of action still remain unclear. The present study first evaluated the capacity of barrier membranes, used in oral surgery, to sequester TGFbeta(1). Resorbable HYAFF, paroguide, poly DL-lactide and nonresorbable PTFE membranes were immersed in MEM containing 0.2 ng (125)I-TGFbeta(1) for different periods of time. It was found that HYAFF membrane and paroguide sequestered the most TGFbeta(1), which was then released in its active form (as shown by the CCL64 cell line bioassay). Untreated membranes and membranes enriched with TGFbeta(1) were then used as substrate for human bone cells to evaluate the synthesis of the osteoblast phenotype, as indicated by specific parameters. Results showed that membranes enriched with TGFbeta(1) increased alkaline phosphatase activity, collagen, and osteocalcin production more than untreated membranes. HYAFF and paroguide membranes, which sequestered the most of TGFbeta(1), were the most suitable for stimulating bone matrix proteins.

  7. Ambulation speed and corresponding mechanics are associated with changes in serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Denning, W Matt; Becker Pardo, Michael; Winward, Jason G; Hunter, Iain; Ridge, Sarah; Hopkins, J Ty; Reese, C Shane; Parcell, Allen C; Seeley, Matthew K

    2016-02-01

    Because serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP) has been used to reflect articular cartilage condition, we aimed to identify walking and running mechanics that are associated with changes in serum COMP. Eighteen subjects (9 male, 9 female; age=23 ± 2 yrs.; mass=68.3 ± 9.6 kg; height=1.70 ± 0.08 m) completed 4000 steps on an instrumented treadmill on three separate days. Each day corresponded to a different ambulation speed: slow (preferred walking speed), medium (+50% of slow), and fast (+100% of slow). Synchronized ground reaction force and video data were collected to evaluate walking mechanics. Blood samples were collected pre-, post-, 30-minute post-, and 60-minute post-ambulation to determine serum COMP concentration at these times. Serum COMP increased 29%, 18%, and 5% immediately post ambulation for the fast, medium, and slow sessions (p<0.01). When the speeds were pooled, peak ankle inversion, knee extension, knee abduction, hip flexion, hip extension, and hip abduction moment, and knee flexion angle at impact explained 61.4% of total variance in COMP concentration change (p<0.001). These results indicate that (1) certain joint mechanics are associated with acute change in serum COMP due to ambulation, and (2) increased ambulation speed increases serum COMP concentration.

  8. Immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials.

    PubMed

    Lourenço Neto, Natalino; Marques, Nádia C T; Fernandes, Ana Paula; Rodini, Camila O; Sakai, Vivien T; Abdo, Ruy Cesar C; Machado, Maria Aparecida A M; Santos, Carlos F; Oliveira, Thais M

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the immunolocalization of dentin matrix protein (DMP)-1 in human primary teeth treated with different pulp capping materials. Twenty-five primary molars were divided into the following groups: formocresol (FC), calcium hydroxide (CH), mineral trioxide aggregate (MTA), corticosteroid/antibiotic solution + CH (O + CH), and Portland cement (PC), and all received conventional pulpotomy treatment. The teeth at the regular exfoliation period were extracted for histological analysis and immunolocalization of DMP-1. Statistical analysis was performed using the χ(2) test (p < 0.05). Histological analysis revealed statistically significant differences in the comparison among the groups through the use of a score system regarding the presence of hard tissue barrier, odontoblastic layer, and internal resorption, but not regarding pulp calcification. Immunohistochemical analysis showed immunostaining for DMP-1 in groups CH, MTA, O + CH, and PC. Internal resorption was observed in the groups FC and CH. MTA and PC showed pulp repair without inflammation and with the presence of hard tissue barrier. DMP-1 immunostaining was higher for MTA and PC, confirming the reparative and bioinductive capacity of these materials.

  9. Elastin, a novel extracellular matrix protein adhering to mycobacterial antigen 85 complex.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Chih-Jung; Ptak, Christopher P; Hsieh, Ching-Lin; Akey, Bruce L; Chang, Yung-Fu

    2013-02-08

    The antigen 85 complex (Ag85) consists of three predominantly secreted proteins (Ag85A, Ag85B, and Ag85C), which play a key role in the mycobacterial pathogenesis and also possess enzymatic mycolyltransferase activity involved in cell wall synthesis. Ag85 is not only considered to be a virulence factor because its expression is essential for intracellular survival within macrophages, but also because it contributes to adherence, invasion, and dissemination of mycobacteria in host cells. In this study, we report that the extracellular matrix components, elastin and its precursor (tropoelastin) derived from human aorta, lung, and skin, serve as binding partners of Ag85 from Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The binding affinity of M. tuberculosis Ag85 to human tropoelastin was characterized (K(D) = 0.13 ± 0.006 μm), and a novel Ag85-binding motif, AAAKAA(K/Q)(Y/F), on multiple tropoelastin modules was identified. In addition, the negatively charged Glu-258 of Ag85 was demonstrated to participate in an electrostatic interaction with human tropoelastin. Moreover, binding of Ag85 on elastin siRNA-transfected Caco-2 cells was significantly reduced (34.3%), implying that elastin acts as an important ligand contributing to mycobacterial invasion.

  10. Extracellular matrix protein Reelin promotes myeloma progression by facilitating tumor cell proliferation and glycolysis

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Xiaodan; Lin, Liang; Cao, Li; Zhang, Xinwei; Song, Xiao; Hao, Jie; Zhang, Yan; Wei, Risheng; Huang, Xiaojun; Lu, Jin; Ge, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Reelin is an extracellular matrix protein that is crucial for neuron migration, adhesion, and positioning. We examined the expression of Reelin in a large cohort of multiple myeloma patients recorded in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) database and used over-expression and siRNA knockdown of Reelin to investigate the role of Reelin in myeloma cell growth. We find that Reelin expression is negatively associated with myeloma prognosis. Reelin promotes myeloma cell proliferation in vitro as well as in vivo. The Warburg effect, evidenced by increased glucose uptake and lactate production, is also enhanced in Reelin-expressing cells. The activation of FAK/Syk/Akt/mTOR and STAT3 pathways contributes to Reelin-induced cancer cell growth and metabolic reprogramming. Our findings further reveal that activated Akt and STAT3 pathways induce the upregulation of HIF1α and its downstream targets (LDHA and PDK1), leading to increased glycolysis in myeloma cells. Together, our results demonstrate the critical contributions of Reelin to myeloma growth and metabolism. It presents an opportunity for myeloma therapeutic intervention by inhibiting Reelin and its signaling pathways. PMID:28345605

  11. Adolescent binge ethanol treatment alters adult brain regional volumes, cortical extracellular matrix protein and behavioral flexibility.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Leon Garland; Liu, Wen; Oguz, Ipek; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents binge drink more than any other age group, increasing risk of disrupting the development of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that adolescent binge drinking would lead to persistent alterations in adulthood. In this study, we modeled adolescent weekend underage binge-drinking, using adolescent mice (post-natal days [P] 28-37). The adolescent intermittent binge ethanol (AIE) treatment includes 6 binge intragastric doses of ethanol in an intermittent pattern across adolescence. Assessments were conducted in adulthood following extended abstinence to determine if there were persistent changes in adults. Reversal learning, open field and other behavioral assessments as well as brain structure using magnetic imaging and immunohistochemistry were determined. We found that AIE did not impact adult Barnes Maze learning. However, AIE did cause reversal learning deficits in adults. AIE also caused structural changes in the adult brain. AIE was associated with adulthood volume enlargements in specific brain regions without changes in total brain volume. Enlarged regions included the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, 4%), cerebellum (4.5%), thalamus (2%), internal capsule (10%) and genu of the corpus callosum (7%). The enlarged OFC volume in adults after AIE is consistent with previous imaging studies in human adolescents. AIE treatment was associated with significant increases in the expression of several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the adult OFC including WFA (55%), Brevican (32%), Neurocan (105%), Tenacin-C (25%), and HABP (5%). These findings are consistent with AIE causing persistent changes in brain structure that could contribute to a lack of behavioral flexibility.

  12. Adolescent binge ethanol treatment alters adult brain regional volumes, cortical extracellular matrix protein and behavioral flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, Leon Garland; Liu, Wen; Oguz, Ipek; Styner, Martin; Crews, Fulton T.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents binge drink more than any other age group, increasing risk of disrupting the development of the frontal cortex. We hypothesized that adolescent binge drinking would lead to persistent alterations in adulthood. In this study, we modeled adolescent weekend underage binge-drinking, using adolescent mice (post-natal days [P] 28–37). The adolescent intermittent binge ethanol (AIE) treatment includes 6 binge intragastric doses of ethanol in an intermittent pattern across adolescence. Assessments were conducted in adulthood following extended abstinence to determine if there were persistent changes in adults. Reversal learning, open field and other behavioral assessments as well as brain structure using magnetic imaging and immunohistochemistry were determined. We found AIE did not impact adult Barnes Maze learning. However, AIE did cause reversal learning deficits in adults. AIE also caused structural changes in the adult brain. AIE was associated with adulthood volume enlargements in specific brain regions without changes in total brain volume. Enlarged regions included the orbitofrontal cortex (OFC, 4%), cerebellum (4.5%), thalamus (2%), internal capsule (10%) and genu of the corpus callosum (7%). The enlarged OFC volume in adults after AIE is consistent with previous imaging studies in human adolescents. AIE treatment was associated with significant increases in the expression of several extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins in the adult OFC including WFA (55%), Brevican (32%), Neurocan (105%), Tenacin-C (25%), and HABP (5%). These findings are consistent with AIE causing persistent changes in brain structure that could contribute to a lack of behavioral flexibility. PMID:24275185

  13. Evidence that the matrix protein of influenza C virus is coded for by a spliced mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, M; Krystal, M; Palese, P

    1988-01-01

    In contrast to influenza A and B viruses, which encode their matrix (M) proteins via an unspliced mRNA, the influenza C virus M protein appears to be coded for by a spliced mRNA from RNA segment 6. Although an open reading frame in RNA segment 6 of influenza C/JJ/50 virus could potentially code for a protein of 374 amino acids, a splicing event results in an mRNA coding for a 242-amino-acid M protein. The message for this protein represents the major M gene-specific mRNA species in C virus-infected cells. Despite the difference in coding strategies, there are sequence homologies among the M proteins of influenza A, B, and C viruses which confirm the evolutionary relationship of the three influenza virus types. Images PMID:3404579

  14. Identification of conserved proteins from diverse shell matrix proteome in Crassostrea gigas: characterization of genetic bases regulating shell formation

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Dandan; Li, Qi; Yu, Hong; Kong, Lingfeng; Du, Shaojun

    2017-01-01

    The calcifying shell is an excellent model for studying biomineralization and evolution. However, the molecular mechanisms of shell formation are only beginning to be elucidated in Mollusca. It is known that shell matrix proteins (SMPs) play important roles in shell formation. With increasing data of shell matrix proteomes from various species, we carried out a BLASTp bioinformatics analysis using the shell matrix proteome from Crassostrea gigas against 443 SMPs from nine other species. The highly conserved tyrosinase and chitin related proteins were identified in bivalve. In addition, the relatively conserved proteins containing domains of carbonic anhydrase, Sushi, Von Willebrand factor type A, and chitin binding, were identified from all the ten species. Moreover, 25 genes encoding SMPs were annotated and characterized that are involved in CaCO3 crystallization and represent chitin related or ECM related proteins. Together, data from these analyses provide new knowledge underlying the molecular mechanism of shell formation in C.gigas, supporting a refined shell formation model including chitin and ECM-related proteins. PMID:28374770

  15. Application of Recombinant Gnathostoma spinigerum Matrix Metalloproteinase-Like Protein for Serodiagnosis of Human Gnathostomiasis by Immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Janwan, Penchom; Intapan, Pewpan M.; Yamasaki, Hiroshi; Laummaunwai, Porntip; Sawanyawisuth, Kittisak; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Tayapiwatana, Chatchai; Kitkhuandee, Amnat; Lulitanond, Viraphong; Nawa, Yukifumi; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2013-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs) is the extracellular zinc-dependent endopeptidase and is secreted for degrading extracellular matrix molecules of host tissues. A cDNA encoding MMP-like protein of Gnathostoma spinigerum larvae was amplified by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector, and expressed in Escherichia coli. Total immunoglobulin G class (total IgG) antibody responses to the recombinant MMP-like protein were analyzed by immunoblot diagnosis of human gnathostomiasis. Serum samples from proven and clinically suspected cases of gnathostomiasis, other parasitic diseases patients, and from healthy volunteers were tested. The immunoblotting gave high sensitivity (100%) and specificity (94.7%). Positive and negative predictive values were 85.4% and 100%, respectively. Recombinant MMP-like protein can be used as a diagnostic antigen and potentially replace native parasite antigens to develop a gnathostomiasis diagnostic kit. PMID:23716413

  16. Human osteoblast-like cells respond to mechanical strain with increased bone matrix protein production independent of hormonal regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harter, L. V.; Hruska, K. A.; Duncan, R. L.

    1995-01-01

    Exposure of osteosarcoma cell lines to chronic intermittent strain increases the activity of mechano-sensitive cation (SA-cat) channels. The impact of mechano-transduction on osteoblast function has not been well studied. We analyzed the expression and production of bone matrix proteins in human osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells, OHS-4, in response to chronic intermittent mechanical strain. The OHS-4 cells exhibit type I collagen production, 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D-inducible osteocalcin, and mineralization of the extracellular matrix. The matrix protein message level was determined from total RNA isolated from cells exposed to 1-4 days of chronic intermittent strain. Northern analysis for type I collagen indicated that strain increased collagen message after 48 h. Immunofluorescent labeling of type I collagen demonstrated that secretion was also enhanced with mechanical strain. Osteopontin message levels were increased several-fold by the application of mechanical load in the absence of vitamin D, and the two stimuli together produced an additive effect. Osteocalcin secretion was also increased with cyclic strain. Osteocalcin levels were not detectable in vitamin D-untreated control cells. However, after 4 days of induced load, significant levels of osteocalcin were observed in the medium. With vitamin D present, osteocalcin levels were 4 times higher in the medium of strained cells compared to nonstrained controls. We conclude that mechanical strain of osteoblast-like cells is sufficient to increase the transcription and secretion of matrix proteins via mechano-transduction without hormonal induction.

  17. Ultrasound Technologies for the Spatial Patterning of Cells and Extracellular Matrix Proteins and the Vascularization of Engineered Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garvin, Kelley A.

    Technological advancements in the field of tissue engineering could save the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. Currently, two of the primary challenges preventing tissue engineers from developing functional replacement tissues and organs are the need to recreate complex cell and extracellular microenvironments and to vascularize the tissue to maintain cell viability and function. Ultrasound is a form of mechanical energy that can noninvasively and nondestructively interact with tissues at the cell and protein level. In this thesis, novel ultrasound-based technologies were developed for the spatial patterning of cells and extracellular matrix proteins and the vascularization of three-dimensional engineered tissue constructs. Acoustic radiation forces associated with ultrasound standing wave fields were utilized to noninvasively control the spatial organization of cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within collagen-based engineered tissue. Additionally, ultrasound induced thermal mechanisms were exploited to site-specifically pattern various extracellular matrix collagen microstructures within a single engineered tissue construct. Finally, ultrasound standing wave field technology was used to promote the rapid and extensive vascularization of three-dimensional tissue constructs. As such, the ultrasound technologies developed in these studies have the potential to provide the field of tissue engineering with novel strategies to spatially pattern cells and extracellular matrix components and to vascularize engineered tissue, and thus, could advance the fabrication of functional replacement tissues and organs in the field of tissue engineering.

  18. Regulation of extracellular matrix proteins and integrin cell substratum adhesion receptors on epithelium during cutaneous human wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Juhasz, I.; Murphy, G. F.; Yan, H. C.; Herlyn, M.; Albelda, S. M.

    1993-01-01

    Although changes in extracellular matrix proteins during wound healing have been well documented, little is known about the regulation of corresponding extracellular matrix adhesion receptors (integrins). To study this process in a human in vivo model, full thickness human skin grafts were transplanted onto severe combined immunodeficient mice and deep excisional wounds involving both the epidermal and dermal layers were then made. The changes in the expression of cell matrix proteins and epithelial integrins over time were analyzed with specific antibodies using immunohistochemistry. Wounding was associated with alterations in extracellular matrix proteins, namely, loss of laminin and type IV collagen in the region of the wound and expression of tenascin and fibronectin. Changes were also noted in the integrins on the migrating keratinocytes. There was marked up-regulation of the alpha v subunit and de novo expression of the fibronectin receptor (alpha 5 beta 1) during the stage of active migration (days 1 to 3 after wounding). In the later stages of wound healing, after epithelial integrity had been established, redistribution of the alpha 2, alpha 3, alpha 6, and beta 4 collagen/laminin-binding integrin subunits to suprabasal epidermal layers was noted. Thus, during cutaneous wound healing, keratinocytes up-regulate fibronectin/fibrinogen-binding integrins and redistribute collagen/laminin-binding integrins. This study demonstrates that the human skin/severe combined immunodeficient chimera provides a useful model to study events during human wound repair. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:7694470

  19. Molecular cloning and characterization of lustrin A, a matrix protein from shell and pearl nacre of Haliotis rufescens.

    PubMed

    Shen, X; Belcher, A M; Hansma, P K; Stucky, G D; Morse, D E

    1997-12-19

    A specialized extracellular matrix of proteins and polysaccharides controls the morphology and packing of calcium carbonate crystals and becomes occluded within the mineralized composite during formation of the molluscan shell and pearl. We have cloned and characterized the cDNA coding for Lustrin A, a newly described matrix protein from the nacreous layer of the shell and pearl produced by the abalone, Haliotis rufescens, a marine gastropod mollusc. The full-length cDNA is 4,439 base pairs (bp) long and contains an open reading frame coding for 1,428 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence reveals a highly modular structure with a high proportion of Ser (16%), Pro (14%), Gly (13%), and Cys (9%). The protein contains ten highly conserved cysteine-rich domains interspersed by eight proline-rich domains; a glycine- and serine-rich domain lies between the two cysteine-rich domains nearest the C terminus, and these are followed by a basic domain and a C-terminal domain that is highly similar to known protease inhibitors. The glycine- and serine-rich domain and at least one of the proline-rich domains show sequence similarity to proteins of two extracellular matrix superfamilies (one of which also is involved in the mineralized matrixes of bone, dentin, and avian eggshell). The arrangement of alternating cysteine-rich domains and proline-rich domains is strikingly similar to that found in frustulins, the proteins that are integral to the silicified cell wall of diatoms. Its modular structure suggests that Lustrin A is a multifunctional protein, whereas the occurrence of related sequences suggest it is a member of a multiprotein family.

  20. Mueller-matrix mapping of biological tissues in differential diagnosis of optical anisotropy mechanisms of protein networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, V. A.; Sidor, M. I.; Marchuk, Yu F.; Pashkovskaya, N. V.; Andreichuk, D. R.

    2015-03-01

    We report a model of Mueller-matrix description of optical anisotropy of protein networks in biological tissues with allowance for the linear birefringence and dichroism. The model is used to construct the reconstruction algorithms of coordinate distributions of phase shifts and the linear dichroism coefficient. In the statistical analysis of such distributions, we have found the objective criteria of differentiation between benign and malignant tissues of the female reproductive system. From the standpoint of evidence-based medicine, we have determined the operating characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of the Mueller-matrix reconstruction method of optical anisotropy parameters and demonstrated its effectiveness in the differentiation of benign and malignant tumours.

  1. Hydrogen sulfide inhibits high glucose-induced matrix protein synthesis by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in renal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hak Joo; Mariappan, Meenalakshmi M; Feliers, Denis; Cavaglieri, Rita C; Sataranatarajan, Kavithalakshmi; Abboud, Hanna E; Choudhury, Goutam Ghosh; Kasinath, Balakuntalam S

    2012-02-10

    Hydrogen sulfide, a signaling gas, affects several cell functions. We hypothesized that hydrogen sulfide modulates high glucose (30 mm) stimulation of matrix protein synthesis in glomerular epithelial cells. High glucose stimulation of global protein synthesis, cellular hypertrophy, and matrix laminin and type IV collagen content was inhibited by sodium hydrosulfide (NaHS), an H(2)S donor. High glucose activation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) complex 1 (mTORC1), shown by phosphorylation of p70S6 kinase and 4E-BP1, was inhibited by NaHS. High glucose stimulated mTORC1 to promote key events in the initiation and elongation phases of mRNA translation: binding of eIF4A to eIF4G, reduction in PDCD4 expression and inhibition of its binding to eIF4A, eEF2 kinase phosphorylation, and dephosphorylation of eEF2; these events were inhibited by NaHS. The role of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), an inhibitor of protein synthesis, was examined. NaHS dose-dependently stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and restored AMPK phosphorylation reduced by high glucose. Compound C, an AMPK inhibitor, abolished NaHS modulation of high glucose effect on events in mRNA translation as well as global and matrix protein synthesis. NaHS induction of AMPK phosphorylation was inhibited by siRNA for calmodulin kinase kinase β, but not LKB1, upstream kinases for AMPK; STO-609, a calmodulin kinase kinase β inhibitor, had the same effect. Renal cortical content of cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase, hydrogen sulfide-generating enzymes, was significantly reduced in mice with type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes, coinciding with renal hypertrophy and matrix accumulation. Hydrogen sulfide is a newly identified modulator of protein synthesis in the kidney, and reduction in its generation may contribute to kidney injury in diabetes.

  2. NRP/B, a Novel Nuclear Matrix Protein, Associates With p110RB and Is Involved in Neuronal Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Tae-Aug; Lim, Jinkyu; Ota, Setsuo; Raja, Sandhya; Rogers, Rick; Rivnay, Benjamin; Avraham, Hava; Avraham, Shalom

    1998-01-01

    The nuclear matrix is defined as the insoluble framework of the nucleus and has been implicated in the regulation of gene expression, the cell cycle, and nuclear structural integrity via linkage to intermediate filaments of the cytoskeleton. We have discovered a novel nuclear matrix protein, NRP/B (nuclear restricted protein/brain), which contains two major structural elements: a BTB domain–like structure in the predicted NH2 terminus, and a “kelch motif” in the predicted COOH-terminal domain. NRP/B mRNA (5.5 kb) is predominantly expressed in human fetal and adult brain with minor expression in kidney and pancreas. During mouse embryogenesis, NRP/B mRNA expression is upregulated in the nervous system. The NRP/B protein is expressed in rat primary hippocampal neurons, but not in primary astrocytes. NRP/B expression was upregulated during the differentiation of murine Neuro 2A and human SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells. Overexpression of NRP/B in these cells augmented neuronal process formation. Treatment with antisense NRP/B oligodeoxynucleotides inhibited the neurite development of rat primary hippocampal neurons as well as the neuronal process formation during neuronal differentiation of PC-12 cells. Since the hypophosphorylated form of retinoblastoma protein (p110RB) is found to be associated with the nuclear matrix and overexpression of p110RB induces neuronal differentiation, we investigated whether NRP/B is associated with p110RB. Both in vivo and in vitro experiments demonstrate that NRP/B can be phosphorylated and can bind to the functionally active hypophosphorylated form of the p110RB during neuronal differentiation of SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells induced by retinoic acid. Our studies indicate that NRP/B is a novel nuclear matrix protein, specifically expressed in primary neurons, that interacts with p110RB and participates in the regulation of neuronal process formation. PMID:9566959

  3. Demineralized dentin matrix combined with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 in rabbit calvarial defects

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the osteogenic effects of demineralized dentin matrix (DDM) combined with recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in rabbit calvarial defects with DDM and anorganic bovine bone (ABB) combined with rhBMP-2. Materials and Methods Four round defects with 8-mm diameters were created in each rabbit calvaria. Each defect was treated with one of the following: 1) DDM, 2) ABB/rhBMP-2, or 3) DDM/rhBMP-2. The rhBMP-2 was combined with DDM and ABB according to a stepwise dry and dip lyophilizing protocol. Histological and microcomputed tomography (µCT) analyses were performed to measure the amount of bone formation and bone volume after 2- and 8-week healing intervals. Results Upon histological observation at two weeks, the DDM and ABB/rhBMP-2 groups showed osteoconductive bone formation, while the DDM/rhBMP-2 group showed osteoconductive and osteoinductive bone formation. New bone formation was higher in DDM/rhBMP-2, DDM and ABB decreasing order. The amounts of bone formation were very similar at two weeks; however, at eight weeks, the DDM/rhBMP-2 group showed a two-fold greater amount of bone formation compared to the DDM and ABB/rhBMP-2 groups. The µCT analysis showed markedly increased bone volume in the DDM/rhBMP-2 group at eight weeks compared with that of the DDM group. Notably, there was a slight decrease in bone volume in the ABB/rhBMP-2 group at eight weeks. There were no significant differences among the DDM, ABB/rhBMP-2, and DDM/rhBMP-2 groups at two or eight weeks. Conclusion Within the limitations of this study, DDM appears to be a suitable carrier for rhBMP-2 in orthotopic sites. PMID:27162749

  4. Matrix metalloproteinase-20 mediates dental enamel biomineralization by preventing protein occlusion inside apatite crystals.

    PubMed

    Prajapati, Saumya; Tao, Jinhui; Ruan, Qichao; De Yoreo, James J; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Reconstruction of enamel-like materials is a central topic of research in dentistry and material sciences. The importance of precise proteolytic mechanisms in amelogenesis to form a hard tissue with more than 95% mineral content has already been reported. A mutation in the Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) gene results in hypomineralized enamel that is thin, disorganized and breaks from the underlying dentin. We hypothesized that the absence of MMP-20 during amelogenesis results in the occlusion of amelogenin in the enamel hydroxyapatite crystals. We used spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze occluded proteins within the isolated enamel crystals from MMP-20 null and Wild type (WT) mice. Our results showed that the isolated enamel crystals of MMP-20 null mice had more organic macromolecules occluded inside them than enamel crystals from the WT. The crystal lattice arrangements of MMP-20 null enamel crystals analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) were found to be significantly different from those of the WT. Raman studies indicated that the crystallinity of the MMP-20 null enamel crystals was lower than that of the WT. In conclusion, we present a novel functional mechanism of MMP-20, specifically prevention of unwanted organic material entrapped in the forming enamel crystals, which occurs as the result of precise amelogenin cleavage. MMP-20 action guides the growth morphology of the forming hydroxyapatite crystals and enhances their crystallinity. Elucidating such molecular mechanisms can be applied in the design of novel biomaterials for future clinical applications in dental restoration or repair.

  5. Candidate Cell and Matrix Interaction Domains on the Collagen Fibril, the Predominant Protein of Vertebrates

    SciTech Connect

    Sweeney, Shawn M.; Orgel, Joseph P.; Fertala, Andrzej; McAuliffe, Jon D.; Turner, Kevin R.; Di Lullo, Gloria A.; Chen, Steven; Antipova, Olga; Perumal, Shiamalee; Ala-Kokko, Leena; Forlinoi, Antonella; Cabral, Wayne A.; Barnes, Aileen M.; Marini, Joan C.; San Antonio, James D.

    2008-07-18

    Type I collagen, the predominant protein of vertebrates, polymerizes with type III and V collagens and non-collagenous molecules into large cable-like fibrils, yet how the fibril interacts with cells and other binding partners remains poorly understood. To help reveal insights into the collagen structure-function relationship, a data base was assembled including hundreds of type I collagen ligand binding sites and mutations on a two-dimensional model of the fibril. Visual examination of the distribution of functional sites, and statistical analysis of mutation distributions on the fibril suggest it is organized into two domains. The 'cell interaction domain' is proposed to regulate dynamic aspects of collagen biology, including integrin-mediated cell interactions and fibril remodeling. The 'matrix interaction domain' may assume a structural role, mediating collagen cross-linking, proteoglycan interactions, and tissue mineralization. Molecular modeling was used to superimpose the positions of functional sites and mutations from the two-dimensional fibril map onto a three-dimensional x-ray diffraction structure of the collagen microfibril in situ, indicating the existence of domains in the native fibril. Sequence searches revealed that major fibril domain elements are conserved in type I collagens through evolution and in the type II/XI collagen fibril predominant in cartilage. Moreover, the fibril domain model provides potential insights into the genotype-phenotype relationship for several classes of human connective tissue diseases, mechanisms of integrin clustering by fibrils, the polarity of fibril assembly, heterotypic fibril function, and connective tissue pathology in diabetes and aging.

  6. Desphospho-uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein is associated with increased aortic stiffness in a general population.

    PubMed

    Mayer, O; Seidlerová, J; Wohlfahrt, P; Filipovský, J; Vaněk, J; Cífková, R; Windrichová, J; Topolčan, O; Knapen, M H J; Drummen, N E A; Vermeer, C

    2016-07-01

    Matrix Gla protein (MGP), a natural inhibitor of calcification, strongly correlates with the extent of coronary calcification. Vitamin K is the essential cofactor for the activation of MGP. The nonphosphorylated-uncarboxylated isoform of MGP (dp-ucMGP) reflects the status of this vitamin. We investigated whether there is an association between dp-ucMGP and stiffness of elastic and muscular-type large arteries in a random sample from the general population. In a cross-sectional design, we analyzed 1087 subjects from the Czech post-MONICA study. Aortic and femoro-popliteal pulse wave velocities (PWVs) were measured using a Sphygmocor device. Dp-ucMGP concentrations were assessed in freshly frozen samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay methods using the InaKtif MGP iSYS pre-commercial kit developed by IDS and VitaK. Aortic PWV significantly (P<0.0001) increased across the dp-ucMGP quartiles. After adjustment for all potential confounders, aortic PWV independently correlated with dp-ucMGP (with beta coefficient (s.d.) 11.61 (5.38) and P-value=0.031). In a categorized manner, subjects in the top quartile of dp-ucMGP (⩾ 671 pmol l(-1)) had a higher risk of elevated aortic PWV, with corresponding adjusted odds ratio (95% confidence interval) 1.73 (1.17-2.5). In contrast, no relation between dp-ucMGP and femoro-popliteal PWV was found. In conclusion, increased dp-ucMGP, which is a circulating biomarker of vitamin K status and vascular calcification, is independently associated with aortic stiffness, but not with stiffness of distal muscular-type arteries.

  7. Matrix Gla Protein Polymorphism, But Not Concentrations, Is Associated with Radiographic Hand Osteoarthritis

    PubMed Central

    MISRA, DEVYANI; BOOTH, SARAH L.; CROSIER, MICHAEL D.; ORDOVAS, JOSE M.; FELSON, DAVID T.; NEOGI, TUHINA

    2011-01-01

    Objective Factors associated with mineralization and osteophyte formation in osteoarthritis (OA) are incompletely understood. Genetic polymorphisms of matrix Gla protein (MGP), a mineralization inhibitor, have been associated clinically with conditions of abnormal calcification. We therefore evaluated the relationship of MGP concentrations and polymorphisms at the MGP locus to hand OA. Methods Ours was an ancillary study to a 3-year randomized trial assessing the effect of vitamin K supplementation on vascular calcification and bone loss among community-dwelling elders. We studied participants who had serum MGP concentration measured and DNA genotyped for 3 MGP genetic polymorphisms (rs1800802, rs1800801, and rs4236), and who had hand radiographs. We evaluated the cross-sectional associations of serum MGP and the 3 MGP genetic polymorphisms, respectively, with radiographic hand OA using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations, adjusting for potential confounders. Results Radiographic hand OA in ≥ 1 joint was present in 71% of the 376 participants (mean age 74 years, mean body mass index 28 kg/m2, 59% women). No significant association between serum MGP concentrations and radiographic hand OA was found [adjusted OR 1.0 (ref), 1.40, 1.21, and 1.21 for quartiles 1–4, respectively]. Homozygosity of the rs1800802 minor allele was associated with 0.56 times lower prevalence of hand OA compared with having ≥ 1 major allele at this locus (95% CI 0.32–0.99, p = 0.046). Conclusion There may be an association between hand OA and genetic polymorphism at the MGP locus that is not reflected by total MGP serum concentrations. Further studies are warranted to replicate and elucidate potential mechanisms underlying these observed associations. PMID:21724703

  8. Matrix metalloproteinase-20 mediates dental enamel biomineralization by preventing protein occlusion inside apatite crystals

    PubMed Central

    Prajapati, Saumya; Tao, Jinhui; Ruan, Qichao; De Yoreo, James J.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2015-01-01

    Reconstruction of enamel-like materials is a central topic of research in dentistry and material sciences. The importance of precise proteolytic mechanisms in amelogenesis to form a hard tissue with more than 95% mineral content has already been reported. A mutation in the Matrix Metalloproteinase-20 (MMP-20) gene results in hypomineralized enamel that is thin, disorganized and breaks from the underlying dentin. We hypothesized that the absence of MMP-20 during amelogenesis results in the occlusion of amelogenin in the enamel hydroxyapatite crystals. We used spectroscopy and electron microscopy techniques to qualitatively and quantitatively analyze occluded proteins within the isolated enamel crystals from MMP-20 null and Wild type (WT) mice. Our results showed that the isolated enamel crystals of MMP-20 null mice had more organic macromolecules occluded inside them than enamel crystals from the WT. The crystal lattice arrangements of MMP-20 null enamel crystals analyzed by High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HRTEM) were found to be significantly different from those of the WT. Raman studies indicated that the crystallinity of the MMP-20 null enamel crystals was lower than that of the WT. In conclusion, we present a novel functional mechanism of MMP-20, specifically prevention of unwanted organic material entrapped in the forming enamel crystals, which occurs as the result of precise amelogenin cleavage. MMP-20 action guides the growth morphology of the forming hydroxyapatite crystals and enhances their crystallinity. Elucidating such molecular mechanisms can be applied in the design of novel biomaterials for future clinical applications in dental restoration or repair. PMID:26513418

  9. Dentin matrix protein 1 and phosphate homeostasis are critical for postnatal pulp, dentin and enamel formation

    PubMed Central

    Rangiani, Afsaneh; Cao, Zheng-Guo; Liu, Ying; Voisey Rodgers, Anika; Jiang, Yong; Qin, Chun-Lin; Feng, Jian-Quan

    2012-01-01

    Deletion or mutation of dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) leads to hypophosphatemic rickets and defects within the dentin. However, it is largely unknown if this pathological change is a direct role of DMP1 or an indirect role of phosphate (Pi) or both. It has also been previously shown that Klotho-deficient mice, which displayed a high Pi level due to a failure of Pi excretion, causes mild defects in the dentinal structure. This study was to address the distinct roles of DMP1 and Pi homeostasis in cell differentiation, apoptosis and mineralization of dentin and enamel. Our working hypothesis was that a stable Pi homeostasis is critical for postnatal tooth formation, and that DMP1 has an antiapoptotic role in both amelogenesis and dentinogenesis. To test this hypothesis, Dmp1-null (Dmp1−/−), Klotho-deficient (kl/kl), Dmp1/Klotho-double-deficient (Dmp1−/−/kl/kl) and wild-type (WT) mice were killed at the age of 6 weeks. Combinations of X-ray, microcomputed tomography (μCT), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), histology, apoptosis and immunohistochemical methods were used for characterization of dentin, enamel and pulp structures in these mutant mice. Our results showed that Dmp1−/− (a low Pi level) or kl/kl (a high Pi level) mice displayed mild dentin defects such as thin dentin and a reduction of dentin tubules. Neither deficient mouse line exhibited any apparent changes in enamel or pulp structure. However, the double-deficient mice (a high Pi level) displayed severe defects in dentin and enamel structures, including loss of dentinal tubules and enamel prisms, as well as unexpected ectopic ossification within the pulp root canal. TUNEL assay showed a sharp increase in apoptotic cells in ameloblasts and odontoblasts. Based on the above findings, we conclude that DMP1 has a protective role for odontoblasts and ameloblasts in a pro-apoptotic environment (a high Pi level). PMID:23258378

  10. Structural and Molecular Determinants of Membrane Binding by the HIV-1 Matrix Protein.

    PubMed

    Mercredi, Peter Y; Bucca, Nadine; Loeliger, Burk; Gaines, Christy R; Mehta, Mansi; Bhargava, Pallavi; Tedbury, Philip R; Charlier, Landry; Floquet, Nicolas; Muriaux, Delphine; Favard, Cyril; Sanders, Charles R; Freed, Eric O; Marchant, Jan; Summers, Michael F

    2016-04-24

    Assembly of HIV-1 particles is initiated by the trafficking of viral Gag polyproteins from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane, where they co-localize and bud to form immature particles. Membrane targeting is mediated by the N-terminally myristoylated matrix (MA) domain of Gag and is dependent on the plasma membrane marker phosphatidylinositol-4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2]. Recent studies revealed that PI(4,5)P2 molecules containing truncated acyl chains [tr-PI(4,5)P2] are capable of binding MA in an "extended lipid" conformation and promoting myristoyl exposure. Here we report that tr-PI(4,5)P2 molecules also readily bind to non-membrane proteins, including HIV-1 capsid, which prompted us to re-examine MA-PI(4,5)P2 interactions using native lipids and membrane mimetic liposomes and bicelles. Liposome binding trends observed using a recently developed NMR approach paralleled results of flotation assays, although the affinities measured under the equilibrium conditions of NMR experiments were significantly higher. Native PI(4,5)P2 enhanced MA binding to liposomes designed to mimic non-raft-like regions of the membrane, suggesting the possibility that binding of the protein to disordered domains may precede Gag association with, or nucleation of, rafts. Studies with bicelles revealed a subset of surface and myr-associated MA residues that are sensitive to native PI(4,5)P2, but cleft residues that interact with the 2'-acyl chains of tr-PI(4,5)P2 molecules in aqueous solution were insensitive to native PI(4,5)P2 in bicelles. Our findings call to question extended-lipid MA:membrane binding models, and instead support a model put forward from coarse-grained simulations indicating that binding is mediated predominantly by dynamic, electrostatic interactions between conserved basic residues of MA and multiple PI(4,5)P2 and phosphatidylserine molecules.

  11. Extracellular matrix controls tubulin monomer levels in hepatocytes by regulating protein turnover

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mooney, D. J.; Hansen, L. K.; Langer, R.; Vacanti, J. P.; Ingber, D. E.

    1994-01-01

    Cells have evolved an autoregulatory mechanism to dampen variations in the concentration of tubulin monomer that is available to polymerize into microtubules (MTs), a process that is known as tubulin autoregulation. However, thermodynamic analysis of MT polymerization predicts that the concentration of free tubulin monomer must vary if MTs are to remain stable under different mechanical loads that result from changes in cell adhesion to the extracellular matrix (ECM). To determine how these seemingly contradictory regulatory mechanisms coexist in cells, we measured changes in the masses of tubulin monomer and polymer that resulted from altering cell-ECM contacts. Primary rat hepatocytes were cultured in chemically defined medium on bacteriological petri dishes that were precoated with different densities of laminin (LM). Increasing the LM density from low to high (1-1000 ng/cm2), promoted cell spreading (average projected cell area increased from 1200 to 6000 microns2) and resulted in formation of a greatly extended MT network. Nevertheless, the steady-state mass of tubulin polymer was similar at 48 h, regardless of cell shape or ECM density. In contrast, round hepatocytes on low LM contained a threefold higher mass of tubulin monomer when compared with spread cells on high LM. Furthermore, similar results were obtained whether LM, fibronectin, or type I collagen were used for cell attachment. Tubulin autoregulation appeared to function normally in these cells because tubulin mRNA levels and protein synthetic rates were greatly depressed in round cells that contained the highest level of free tubulin monomer. However, the rate of tubulin protein degradation slowed, causing the tubulin half-life to increase from approximately 24 to 55 h as the LM density was lowered from high to low and cell rounding was promoted. These results indicate that the set-point for the tubulin monomer mass in hepatocytes can be regulated by altering the density of ECM contacts and

  12. Shotgun proteomics implicates extracellular matrix proteins and protease systems in neuronal development induced by astrocyte cholinergic stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Moore, Nadia H.; Costa, Lucio G.; Shaffer, Scott A; Goodlett, David R.; Guizzetti, Marina

    2009-01-01

    Astrocytes play an important role in neuronal development through the release of soluble factors that affect neuronal maturation. Shotgun proteomics followed by Gene Ontology analysis was used in this study to identify proteins present in the conditioned medium of primary rat astrocytes. 133 secreted proteins were identified, the majority of which were never before reported to be produced by astrocytes. Extracellular proteins were classified based on their biological and molecular functions; most of the identified proteins were involved in neuronal development. Semi-quantitative proteomic analysis was carried out to identify changes in the levels of proteins released by astrocytes after stimulation with the cholinergic agonist carbachol, as we have previously reported that carbachol-treated astrocytes elicit neuritogenesis in hippocampal neurons through the release of soluble factors. Carbachol up-regulated the secretion of 15 proteins and down-regulated the release of 17 proteins. Changes in the levels of four proteins involved in neuronal differentiation (thrombospondin-1, fibronectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and plasminogen activator urokinase) were verified by Western blot or ELISA. In conclusion, this study identified a large number of proteins involved in neuronal development in the astrocyte secretome and implicated extracellular matrix proteins and protease systems in neuronal development induced by astrocyte cholinergic stimulation. PMID:19077055

  13. Shotgun proteomics implicates extracellular matrix proteins and protease systems in neuronal development induced by astrocyte cholinergic stimulation.

    PubMed

    Moore, Nadia H; Costa, Lucio G; Shaffer, Scott A; Goodlett, David R; Guizzetti, Marina

    2009-02-01

    Astrocytes play an important role in neuronal development through the release of soluble factors that affect neuronal maturation. Shotgun proteomics followed by gene ontology analysis was used in this study to identify proteins present in the conditioned medium of primary rat astrocytes. One hundred and thirty three secreted proteins were identified, the majority of which were never before reported to be produced by astrocytes. Extracellular proteins were classified based on their biological and molecular functions; most of the identified proteins were involved in neuronal development. Semi-quantitative proteomic analysis was carried out to identify changes in the levels of proteins released by astrocytes after stimulation with the cholinergic agonist carbachol, as we have previously reported that carbachol-treated astrocytes elicit neuritogenesis in hippocampal neurons through the release of soluble factors. Carbachol up-regulated secretion of 15 proteins and down-regulated the release of 17 proteins. Changes in the levels of four proteins involved in neuronal differentiation (thrombospondin-1, fibronectin, plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, and plasminogen activator urokinase) were verified by western blot or ELISA. In conclusion, this study identified a large number of proteins involved in neuronal development in the astrocyte secretome and implicated extracellular matrix proteins and protease systems in neuronal development induced by astrocyte cholinergic stimulation.

  14. LIM mineralization protein-1 suppresses TNF-α induced intervertebral disc degeneration by maintaining nucleus pulposus extracellular matrix production and inhibiting matrix metalloproteinases expression.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hui; Pan, Hehai; Yang, Hao; Wang, Jianru; Zhang, Kuibo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Hua; Ding, Wenbin; Li, Bingxue; Zheng, Zhaomin

    2015-03-01

    Imbalanced metabolism of Nucleus pulposus (NP) extracellular matrix (ECM) is closely correlated to Intervertebral Disc Degenerative Disease. LIM mineralization protein-1 (LMP-1) has been proven to induce sulfated glycosaminoglycan (sGAG) production in NP and have an anti-inflammatory effect in pre-osteoclast. However, whether it has any effect on the NP ECM production and degradation under inflammatory stimulation has not been studied. In the current study, a TNF-α induced cell model was established in vitro. Lentivirus encoding LMP-1 (LV-LMP-1) and short heparin LMP-1 (LV-shLMP-1) were constructed to overexpress and knockdown LMP-1 expression in NP cells. LMP-1 mRNA level was regulated in a dose-dependent manner after transfection. LV-LMP-1 increased whereas LV-shLMP-1 decreased collagen II, aggrecan, versican expression, and sGAG production. LV-LMP-1 abolished while LV-shLMP-1 aggravated TNF-α mediated down-regulation of the above matrix genes via ERK1/2 activation. Moreover, LV-LMP-1 abrogated TNF-α induced MMP-3 and MMP-13 expression via inhibiting p65 translocation and MMP-3 and MMP-13 promoter activity. These results indicated that LMP-1 had an ECM production maintenance effect under inflammatory stimulation. This effect was via up-regulation of matrix genes expression at least partially through ERK1/2 activation, and down-regulation of MMPs expression through NF-κB inhibition.

  15. Identification and characterization of a cell surface protein of Prevotella intermedia 17 with broad-spectrum binding activity for extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fan; Iyer, Divya; Anaya, Cecilia; Lewis, Janina P

    2006-11-01

    Prevotella intermedia binds and invades a variety of host cells. This binding is most probably mediated through cell surface proteins termed adhesins. To identify proteins binding to the host extracellular matrix (ECM) component, fibronectin, and study the molecular mechanism underlying bacterial colonization, we applied proteomic approaches to perform a global investigation of P. intermedia strain 17 outer membrane proteins. 2-DE followed by Far Western Blot analysis using fibronectin as a probe revealed a 29-kDa fibronectin-binding protein, designated here AdpB. The molecular identity of the protein was determined using PMF followed by a search of the P. intermedia 17 protein database. Database searches revealed the similarity of AdpB to multiple bacterial outer membrane proteins including the fibronectin-binding protein from Campylobacter jejuni. A recombinant AdpB protein bound fibronectin as well as other host ECM components, including fibrinogen and laminin, in a saturable, dose-dependent manner. Binding of AdpB to immobilized fibronectin was also inhibited by soluble fibronectin, laminin, and fibrinogen, indicating the binding was specific. Finally, immunoelectron microscopy with anti-AdpB demonstrated the cell surface location of the protein. This is the first cell surface protein with a broad-spectrum ECM-binding abilities identified and characterized in P. intermedia 17.

  16. Matrix-assisted laser-desorption-ionization mass spectrometry of proteins using a free-electron laser

    SciTech Connect

    Cramer, R.; Hillenkamp, F.; Haglund, R.

    1995-12-31

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry (MS) is one of the most promising techniques for spectral fingerprinting large molecules, such as proteins, oligonucleotides and carbohydrates. In the usual implementation of this technique, the analyte molecule is dissolved in an aromatic liquid matrix material which resonantly absorbs ultraviolet laser light. Resonant absorption by {pi}-{pi}* transitions volatilizes the matrix and initiates subsequent charge transfer to the analyte molecules, which are detected by time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Recent MALDI-MS studies with Er:YAG (2.94 {mu}m) and CO{sub 2}{sup 4} (9.4-10.6 {mu}m) lasers suggest that them is significant unexplored potential for mass spectrometry of macromolecules, including oligonucleotide, in the mid-infrared. Preliminary experiments show that it is possible to capitalize on the rich rovibronic absorption spectrum of virtually all organics to initiate resonant desorption in matrix material over the entire range of pH values. However, the mechanism of charge transfer is particularly problematic for infrared MALDI because of the low photon energy. In this paper, we report the results of MALI-MS studies on small proteins using the Vanderbilt FEL and several matrix materials. Proteins with masses up to roughly 6,000 amu were detected with high resolution in a linear time-of-flight mass spectrometer. By varying the pulse duration using a broadband Pockels cell, we have been able to compare the results of relatively long (5 {mu}s) and short (0.1 {mu}s) irradiation on the desorption and ionization processes. Compared to uv-MALDI spectra of identical analytes obtained with a nitrogen laser (337 nm) in the same time-of-flight spectrometer, the infrared results appear to show that the desorption and ionization process goes on over a somewhat longer time scale.

  17. The matrix attachment region-binding protein SATB1 participates in negative regulation of tissue-specific gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Liu, J; Bramblett, D; Zhu, Q; Lozano, M; Kobayashi, R; Ross, S R; Dudley, J P

    1997-01-01

    The nuclear matrix has been implicated in several cellular processes, including DNA replication, transcription, and RNA processing. In particular, transcriptional regulation is believed to be accomplished by binding of chromatin loops to the nuclear matrix and by the concentration of specific transcription factors near these matrix attachment regions (MARs). A number of MAR-binding proteins have been identified, but few have been directly linked to tissue-specific transcription. Recently, we have identified two cellular protein complexes (NBP and UBP) that bind to a region of the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) long terminal repeat (LTR) previously shown to contain at least two negative regulatory elements (NREs) termed the promoter-proximal and promoter-distal NREs. These NREs are absent from MMTV strains that cause T-cell lymphomas instead of mammary carcinomas. We show here that NBP binds to a 22-bp sequence containing an imperfect inverted repeat in the promoter-proximal NRE. Previous data showed that a mutation (p924) within the inverted repeat elevated basal transcription from the MMTV promoter and destabilized the binding of NBP, but not UBP, to the proximal NRE. By using conventional and affinity methods to purify NBP from rat thymic nuclear extracts, we obtained a single major protein of 115 kDa that was identified by protease digestion and partial sequencing analysis as the nuclear matrix-binding protein special AT-rich sequence-binding protein 1 (SATB1). Antibody ablation, distamycin inhibition of binding, renaturation and competition experiments, and tissue distribution data all confirmed that the NBP complex contained SATB1. Similar types of experiments were used to show that the UBP complex contained the homeodomain protein Cux/CDP that binds the MAR of the intronic heavy-chain immunoglobulin enhancer. By using the p924 mutation within the MMTV LTR upstream of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, we generated two strains of transgenic mice

  18. Macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate-triallyl isocyanurate-divinylbenzene) matrix as an anion-exchange resin for protein adsorption.

    PubMed

    Yu, Y; Sun, Y

    1999-09-03

    A novel macroporous poly(glycidyl methacrylate-triallyl isocyanurate-divinylbenzene) matrix was prepared by a radical suspension copolymerization. The matrix contained epoxy groups, so diethylaminohydroxypropyl groups were coupled to the matrix, leading to an anion-exchange resin. We studied the components, surface and pore structures of the anion-exchange resin by Fourier transform infared spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). SEM observations showed that the resin abounded in macropores as large as 3 to 8 microns both in the surface and the interior. The back-pressure of the column packed with the resin was modest even at a high flow-rate (60.2 cm/min). Then, bovine serum albumin (BSA) was used as a model protein to examine the adsorption properties of the anion-exchange resin. The results showed that under optimum conditions the resin had a capacity as high as 22.8 mg BSA/g wet resin, or 68.7 mg/g dry resin. The adsorbed protein could be desorbed by increasing the liquid phase ionic strength. Most importantly, the matrix had little nonspecific adsorption for BSA before introducing the ion-exchange groups.

  19. Evidence for sequential appearance of cartilage matrix proteins in developing mouse limbs and in cultures of mouse mesenchymal cells.

    PubMed

    Franzen, A; Heinegard, D; Solursh, M

    1987-01-01

    The initiation of synthesis and the accumulation of four cartilage matrix proteins (type II collagen and three noncollagenous proteins, one of Mr 148, one of Mr 59, and an oligometric protein of Mr above 500 with 100-kDa subunits, respectively) were studied in developing mouse limbs and in cultures of limb bud mesenchyme by means of immunolocalization. On day 13 of gestation, type II collagen was observed throughout the entire humerus, whereas the 148-kDa protein was localized only in the central portion. Neither the 100-kDa-subunit protein nor the 59-kDa protein could be demonstrated in the humerus at that stage. On day 14 1/2, type II collagen and the 148-kDa protein were codistributed throughout the humerus. The 100-kDa-subunit protein was detectable in the periphery of the humerus, whereas little 59-kDa protein could yet be demonstrated. On day 18, all four proteins being studied could be detected immunologically in the developing mouse humerus. They differed in immunolocalization. Type Ii collagen, the 148-kDa protein, and the 100-kDa-subunit protein were codistributed throughout the distal and proximal parts of the cartilage. However, the 148-kDa protein could no longer be detected immunochemically in the outermost part of the cartilage in the proximal shoulder joint. The 148-kDa protein codistributed with type II collagen and the 100-kDa-subunit protein in the distal cartilaginous region, where joint development was less advanced. On the other hand, the 59-kDa protein was not demonstrated directly within the hyaline cartilaginous structures, but surrounded the entire structure. This protein was also present in the same part of the proximal joint region as that in which the 148-kDa protein was not detected. To develop an in vitro model for studies of skeletogenesis, mesenchymal cells prepared from mouse limb buds were cultured as micromass cultures at high initial cell density to favor chondrogenesis. On day 3 of culture, type II collagen was the only protein

  20. Effects of aerobic exercise intervention on serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels and lymphocyte dna damage in obese elderly females

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Su Youn; Roh, Hee Tae

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the reported research was to investigate the effects of regular aerobic exercise on cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and oxidative DNA damage in obese, elderly females. [Subjects and Methods] Sixteen class I obese, elderly females, according to World Health Organization criteria, were randomly and equally assigned to a control group (n=8) or an exercise group (n=8). The exercise group participated in exercise sessions of 60 minutes per day, 3 days per week, for a period of 8 weeks. [Results] After aerobic exercise intervention, weight, body mass index, body fat, waist circumference, and DNA damage (Tail moment) were significantly decreased, compared with baseline values. In contrast, serum cartilage oligomeric matrix protein levels were not significantly different among any groups or time-points. [Conclusion] Regular aerobic exercise may be effective for reducing obesity-induced high DNA damage levels in obese females, without causing the deformation or degradation of lower extremity articular cartilage. PMID:27390441

  1. Solubilization of matrix protein M1/M from virions occurs at different pH for orthomyxo- and paramyxoviruses.

    PubMed

    Zhirnov, O P

    1990-05-01

    Enveloped viruses, of which the orthomyxo- and paramyxoviruses are members, are known to be uncoated by nonionic detergents in a salt concentration-dependent manner. In this study we have shown that detergent uncoating of myxoviruses depends not only on salt concentration but also on pH. Treatment of orthomyxoviruses with Nonidet-P40 or Triton N-101 at low salt concentrations results in solubilization of surface virion glycopolypeptides in alkaline and neutral pH (9.0-6.5), but in acidic pH (6.0-5.0) the viral matrix protein M1 is also removed, and the viral ribonucleoprotein complex is released. Conversely, the paramyxovirus matrix protein M is more completely solubilized in alkaline pH (pH 9.0) than in neutral and acidic pH 7.4-5.0. The described pH-dependent differences are discussed in terms of orthomyxo- and paramyxovirus uncoating in target cells.

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-mediated disruption of tight junction proteins in cerebral vessels is reversed by synthetic matrix metalloproteinase inhibitor in focal ischemia in rat.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yi; Estrada, Eduardo Y; Thompson, Jeffrey F; Liu, Wenlan; Rosenberg, Gary A

    2007-04-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) during reperfusion. Occludin and claudins are recently described tight junction proteins (TJPs) that form the BBB. We hypothesized that the opening of the BBB was because of the degradation of TJPs by the MMPs. Spontaneously hypertensive rats had a 90 mins middle cerebral artery occlusion with reperfusion for 2, 3, or 24 h. Matrix metalloproteinases were measured by immunohistochemistry and in situ and gel zymography. Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) measured mRNAs of MMP-2 and -9, furin, membrane-type MMP (MT1-MMP), occludin, and claudin-5. There was opening of the BBB in the piriform cortex after 3 h of reperfusion, and an MMP inhibitor, BB-1101 (30 mg/kg), prevented the opening. At 3 h, in situ zymograms showed gelatinase activity. Zymography and PCR showed greater increases in MMP-2 than in MMP-9. There were increased mRNA and immunohistochemistry for MT1-MMP and furin, which activate MMP-2. Claudin-5 and occludin mRNA expression decreased at 2 h in both hemispheres with fragments of both proteins seen on Western blot by 3 h on the ischemic side; treatment with BB-1101 reversed the degradation of the TJPs. Immunohistochemistry at 3 h showed fragmented TJPs within the endothelial cell clefts. By 24 h, in situ zymography showed gelatinase activity and gel zymography showed elevated levels of MMP-9. Disrupted TJPs previously seen in endothelial cells appeared in the surrounding astrocytes. Our results provide direct evidence that MMPs open the BBB by degrading TJPs and that an MMP inhibitor prevents degradation of the TJPs by MMPs.

  3. Identification of Proteins with Potential Osteogenic Activity Present in the Water-Soluble Matrix Proteins from Crassostrea gigas Nacre Using a Proteomic Approach

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Daniel V.; Silva, Tomé S.; Cordeiro, Odete D.; Cavaco, Sofia I.; Simes, Dina C.

    2012-01-01

    Nacre, when implanted in vivo in bones of dogs, sheep, mice, and humans, induces a biological response that includes integration and osteogenic activity on the host tissue that seems to be activated by a set of proteins present in the nacre water-soluble matrix (WSM). We describe here an experimental approach that can accurately identify the proteins present in the WSM of shell mollusk nacre. Four proteins (three gigasin-2 isoforms and a cystatin A2) were for the first time identified in WSM of Crassostrea gigas nacre using 2DE and LC-MS/MS for protein identification. These proteins are thought to be involved in bone remodeling processes and could be responsible for the biocompatibility shown between bone and nacre grafts. These results represent a contribution to the study of shell biomineralization process and opens new perspectives for the development of new nacre biomaterials for orthopedic applications. PMID:22666151

  4. Deep conservation of bivalve nacre proteins highlighted by shell matrix proteomics of the Unionoida Elliptio complanata and Villosa lienosa.

    PubMed

    Marie, Benjamin; Arivalagan, Jaison; Mathéron, Lucrèce; Bolbach, Gérard; Berland, Sophie; Marie, Arul; Marin, Frédéric

    2017-01-01

    The formation of the molluscan shell nacre is regulated to a large extent by a matrix of extracellular macromolecules that are secreted by the shell-forming tissue, the mantle. This so-called 'calcifying matrix' is a complex mixture of proteins, glycoproteins and polysaccharides that is assembled and occluded within the mineral phase during the calcification process. Better molecular-level characterization of the substances that regulate nacre formation is still required. Notable advances in expressed tag sequencing of freshwater mussels, such as Elliptio complanata and Villosa lienosa, provide a pre-requisite to further characterize bivalve nacre proteins by a proteomic approach. In this study, we have identified a total of 48 different proteins from the insoluble matrices of the nacre, 31 of which are common to both E. complanata and V. lienosa A few of these proteins, such as PIF, MSI60, CA, shematrin-like, Kunitz-like, LamG, chitin-binding-containing proteins, together with A-, D-, G-, M- and Q-rich proteins, appear to be analogues, if not true homologues, of proteins previously described from the pearl oyster or the edible mussel nacre matrices, thus forming a remarkable list of deeply conserved nacre proteins. This work constitutes a comprehensive nacre proteomic study of non-pteriomorphid bivalves that has enabled us to describe the molecular basis of a deeply conserved biomineralization toolkit among nacreous shell-bearing bivalves, with regard to proteins associated with other shell microstructures, with those of other mollusc classes (gastropods, cephalopods) and, finally, with other lophotrochozoans (brachiopods).

  5. Azimuthally invariant Mueller-matrix mapping of biological tissue in differential diagnosis of mechanisms protein molecules networks an sotropy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushenko, V. A.; Gavrylyak, M. S.

    2013-09-01

    The optical model of polycrystalline networks of blood plasma proteins is suggested. The results of investigating the interrelation between the values of correlation (correlation area, asymmetry coefficient and autocorrelation function excess) and fractal (dispersion of logarithmic dependencies of power spectra) parameters are presented. They characterize the coordinate distributions of Mueller-matrixes elements of blood plasma smears and pathological state of the organism. The diagnostic criteria of breast cancer nascency are determined.

  6. Novel nuclear matrix protein HET binds to and influences activity of the HSP27 promoter in human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Oesterreich, S; Lee, A V; Sullivan, T M; Samuel, S K; Davie, J R; Fuqua, S A

    1997-11-01

    Since the small heat shock protein hsp27 enhances both growth and drug resistance in breast cancer cells, and is a bad prognostic factor in certain subsets of breast cancer patients, we have characterized the transcriptional regulation of hsp27, with the long-term goal of targeting its expression clinically. The majority of the promoter activity resides in the most proximal 200 bp. This region contains an imperfect estrogen response element (ERE) that is separated by a 13-bp spacer that contains a TATA box. Gel-shift analysis revealed the binding of a protein (termed HET for Hsp27-ERE-TATA-binding protein) to this region that was neither the estrogen receptor nor TATA-binding protein. We cloned a complete cDNA (2.9 kb) for HET from an MCF-7 cDNA library. To confirm the identity of the HET clone, we expressed a partial HET clone as a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein, and showed binding to the hsp27 promoter fragment in gel-retardation assays. The HET clone is almost identical to a recently published scaffold attachment factor (SAF-B) cloned from a HeLa cell cDNA library. Scaffold attachment factors are a subset of nuclear matrix proteins (NMP) that interact with matrix attachment regions. Analyzing how HET could act as a regulator of hsp27 transcription and as a SAF/NMP, we studied its subnuclear localization and its effect on hsp27 transcription in human breast cancer cells. We were able to show that HET is localized in the nuclear matrix in various breast cancer cell lines. Furthermore, in transient transfection assays using hsp27 promoter-luciferase reporter constructs, HET overexpression resulted in a dose-dependent decrease of hsp27 promoter activity in several cell lines.

  7. Canine distemper virus matrix protein influences particle infectivity, particle composition, and envelope distribution in polarized epithelial cells and modulates virulence.

    PubMed

    Dietzel, Erik; Anderson, Danielle E; Castan, Alexandre; von Messling, Veronika; Maisner, Andrea

    2011-07-01

    In paramyxoviruses, the matrix (M) protein mediates the interaction between the envelope and internal proteins during particle assembly and egress. In measles virus (MeV), M mutations, such as those found in subacute sclerosing panencephalitis (SSPE) strains, and differences in vaccine and wild-type M proteins can affect the strength of interaction with the envelope glycoproteins, assembly efficiency, and spread. However, the contribution of the M protein to the replication and pathogenesis of the closely related canine distemper virus (CDV) has not been characterized. To this end this, we generated a recombinant wild-type CDV carrying a vaccine strain M protein. The recombinant virus retained the parental growth phenotype in VerodogSLAMtag cells, but displayed an increased particle-to-infectivity ratio very similar to that of the vaccine strain, likely due to inefficient H protein incorporation. Even though infectious virus was released only from the apical surface, consistent with the release polarity of the wild-type CDV strain, envelope protein distribution in polarized epithelial cells reproduced the bipolar pattern seen in vaccine strain-infected cells. Most notably, the chimeric virus was completely attenuated in ferrets and caused only a mild and transient leukopenia, indicating that the differences in particle infectivity and envelope protein sorting mediated by the vaccine M protein contribute importantly to vaccine strain attenuation.

  8. Design and Construction of Artificial Extracellular Matrix (aECM) Proteins from Escherichia coli for Skin Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Low, Pearlie S J; Tjin, Monica S; Fong, Eileen

    2015-06-11

    Recombinant technology is a versatile platform to create novel artificial proteins with tunable properties. For the last decade, many artificial proteins that have incorporated functional domains derived from nature (or created de novo) have been reported. In particular, artificial extracellular matrix (aECM) proteins have been developed; these aECM proteins consist of biological domains taken from fibronectin, laminins and collagens and are combined with structural domains including elastin-like repeats, silk and collagen repeats. To date, aECM proteins have been widely investigated for applications in tissue engineering and wound repair. Recently, Tjin and coworkers developed integrin-specific aECM proteins designed for promoting human skin keratinocyte attachment and propagation. In their work, the aECM proteins incorporate cell binding domains taken from fibronectin, laminin-5 and collagen IV, as well as flanking elastin-like repeats. They demonstrated that the aECM proteins developed in their work were promising candidates for use as substrates in artificial skin. Here, we outline the design and construction of such aECM proteins as well as their purification process using the thermo-responsive characteristics of elastin.

  9. Structural diversity of a collagen-binding matrix protein from the byssus of blue mussels upon refolding.

    PubMed

    Suhre, Michael H; Scheibel, Thomas

    2014-04-01

    Blue mussels firmly adhere to a variety of different substrates by the byssus, an extracorporal structure consisting of several protein threads. These threads are mainly composed of fibrillar collagens called preCols which are embedded in a proteinaceous matrix. One of the two so far identified matrix proteins is the Proximal Thread Matrix Protein 1 (PTMP1). PTMP1 comprises two von Willebrand factor type A-like domains (A1 and A2) in a special arrangement. Here, we describe the refolding of recombinant PTMP1 from inclusion bodies. PTMP1 refolded into two distinct monomeric isoforms. Both isomers exhibited alternative intramolecular disulfide bonds. One of these isomers is thermodynamically favored and presumably represents the native form of PTMP1, while the other isoform is kinetically favored but is likely non-native. Oligomerization during refolding was influenced by, but not strictly dependent on disulfide formation. The conformational stability of PTMP1 indicates an influence of intramolecular disulfides on the native state, but not on unfolding intermediates. Monomeric PTMP1 exhibited a high thermal stability, dependent on the pH of the surrounding environment. Especially under acidic conditions the disulfide bonds were critically involved in thermal stability.

  10. A gastrolith protein serving a dual role in the formation of an amorphous mineral containing extracellular matrix

    PubMed Central

    Shechter, Assaf; Glazer, Lilah; Cheled, Shira; Mor, Eyal; Weil, Simy; Berman, Amir; Bentov, Shmuel; Aflalo, Eliahu D.; Khalaila, Isam; Sagi, Amir

    2008-01-01

    Despite the proclamation of Lowenstam and Weiner that crustaceans are the “champions of mineral mobilization and deposition of the animal kingdom,” relatively few proteins from the two main calcification sites in these animals, i.e., the exoskeleton and the transient calcium storage organs, have been identified, sequenced, and their roles elucidated. Here, a 65-kDa protein (GAP 65) from the gastrolith of the crayfish, Cherax quadricarinatus, is fully characterized and its function in the mineralization of amorphous calcium carbonate (ACC) of the extracellular matrix is demonstrated. GAP 65 is a negatively charged glycoprotein that possesses three predicted domains: a chitin-binding domain 2, a low-density lipoprotein receptor class A domain, and a polysaccharide deacetylase domain. Expression of GAP 65 was localized to columnar epithelial cells of the gastrolith disk during premolt. In vivo administration of GAP 65 dsRNA resulted in a significant reduction of GAP 65 transcript levels in the gastrolith disk. Such gene silencing also caused dramatic structural and morphological deformities in the chitinous-ACC extracellular matrix structure. ACC deposited in these gastroliths appeared to be sparsely packed with large elongated cavities compared with the normal gastrolith, where ACC is densely compacted. ACC spherules deposited in these gastroliths are significantly larger than normal. GAP 65, moreover, inhibited calcium carbonate crystallization in vitro and stabilized synthetic ACC. Thus, GAP 65 is the first protein shown to have dual function, involved both in extracellular matrix formation and in mineral deposition during biomineralization. PMID:18480260

  11. Extracellular Matrix Proteins, Alkaline Phosphatase and Pyrophosphate as Molecular Determinants of Bone, Tooth, Kidney and Vascular Calcification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKee, Marc D.

    2008-09-01

    Progress in biomineralization research in recent years has identified, characterized and described functions for key noncollagenous extracellular matrix proteins regulating crystal growth in the skeleton and dentition. Some of these same proteins expressed in soft tissues undergoing pathologic calcification also inhibit ectopic crystal growth. In addition to extracellular matrix proteins regulating matrix mineralization, the enzyme tissue-nonspecific alkaline phosphatase—which is highly expressed by cells in mineralized tissues—cleaves pyrophosphate, an anionic small-molecule inhibitor of mineralization. Together with the required mineral ion availability necessary for crystal growth, these molecular determinants appear to function in limiting the spread of pathologic calcification seen in soft tissues such as blood vessels and kidneys. Osteopontin, in particular, is a potent calcification inhibitor that accumulates in mineralized tissues and in calcified deposits during vascular calcification and nephrolithiasis/urolithiasis. Additional research is required to establish the exact temporal sequence in which the molecular determinants of pathologic calcification appear relative to mineral crystal growth in different tissues, and to establish their relationship (if any) to the activation of osteogenic differentiation programs.

  12. serpentine and vermiform encode matrix proteins with chitin binding and deacetylation domains that limit tracheal tube length in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Luschnig, Stefan; Bätz, Tilmann; Armbruster, Kristina; Krasnow, Mark A

    2006-01-24

    Many organs contain epithelial tubes that transport gases or liquids . Proper tube size and shape is crucial for organ function, but the mechanisms controlling tube diameter and length are poorly understood. Recent studies of tracheal (respiratory) tube morphogenesis in Drosophila show that chitin synthesis genes produce an expanding chitin cylinder in the apical (luminal) extracellular matrix (ECM) that coordinates the dilation of the surrounding epithelium . Here, we describe two genes involved in chitin modification, serpentine (serp) and vermiform (verm), mutations in which cause excessively long and tortuous tracheal tubes. The genes encode similar proteins with an LDL-receptor ligand binding motif and chitin binding and deacetylation domains. Both proteins are expressed and secreted during tube expansion and localize throughout the lumen in a chitin-dependent manner. Unlike previously characterized chitin pathway genes, serp and verm are not required for chitin synthesis or secretion but rather for its normal fibrillar structure. The mutations also affect structural properties of another chitinous matrix, epidermal cuticle. Our work demonstrates that chitin and the matrix proteins Serp and Verm limit tube elongation, and it suggests that tube length is controlled independently of diameter by modulating physical properties of the chitin ECM, presumably by N-deacetylation of chitin and conversion to chitosan.

  13. Processing of mussel-adhesive protein analog copolymer thin films by matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patz, T.; Cristescu, R.; Narayan, R.; Menegazzo, N.; Mizaikoff, B.; Messersmith, P. B.; Stamatin, I.; Mihailescu, I. N.; Chrisey, D. B.

    2005-07-01

    We have demonstrated the successful thin film growth of a mussel-adhesive protein analog, DOPA-modified PEO-PPO-PEO block copolymer PF127, using matrix-assisted pulsed laser evaporation (MAPLE). The MAPLE-deposited thin films were examined using Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, atomic force microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and contact-angle measurements. We have found that the main functional groups of the mussel-adhesive protein analog are present in the transferred film. These adhesive materials have several potential electronic, medical, and marine applications.

  14. Kappa-alpha plot derived structural alphabet and BLOSUM-like substitution matrix for rapid search of protein structure database

    PubMed Central

    2007-01-01

    We present a novel protein structure database search tool, 3D-BLAST, that is useful for analyzing novel structures and can return a ranked list of alignments. This tool has the features of BLAST (for example, robust statistical basis, and effective and reliable search capabilities) and employs a kappa-alpha (κ, α) plot derived structural alphabet and a new substitution matrix. 3D-BLAST searches more than 12,000 protein structures in 1.2 s and yields good results in zones with low sequence similarity. PMID:17335583

  15. Matrix rigidity activates Wnt signaling through down-regulation of Dickkopf-1 protein.

    PubMed

    Barbolina, Maria V; Liu, Yiuying; Gurler, Hilal; Kim, Mijung; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre A; Rooper, Lisa; Shepard, Jaclyn; Weiss, Michael; Shea, Lonnie D; Penzes, Peter; Ravosa, Matthew J; Stack, M Sharon

    2013-01-04

    Cells respond to changes in the physical properties of the extracellular matrix with altered behavior and gene expression, highlighting the important role of the microenvironment in the regulation of cell function. In the current study, culture of epithelial ovarian cancer cells on three-dimensional collagen I gels led to a dramatic down-regulation of the Wnt signaling inhibitor dickkopf-1 with a concomitant increase in nuclear β-catenin and enhanced β-catenin/Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity. Increased three-dimensional collagen gel invasion was accompanied by transcriptional up-regulation of the membrane-tethered collagenase membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase, and an inverse relationship between dickkopf-1 and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed in human epithelial ovarian cancer specimens. Similar results were obtained in other tissue-invasive cells such as vascular endothelial cells, suggesting a novel mechanism for functional coupling of matrix adhesion with Wnt signaling.

  16. Matrix Rigidity Activates Wnt Signaling through Down-regulation of Dickkopf-1 Protein*

    PubMed Central

    Barbolina, Maria V.; Liu, Yiuying; Gurler, Hilal; Kim, Mijung; Kajdacsy-Balla, Andre A.; Rooper, Lisa; Shepard, Jaclyn; Weiss, Michael; Shea, Lonnie D.; Penzes, Peter; Ravosa, Matthew J.; Stack, M. Sharon

    2013-01-01

    Cells respond to changes in the physical properties of the extracellular matrix with altered behavior and gene expression, highlighting the important role of the microenvironment in the regulation of cell function. In the current study, culture of epithelial ovarian cancer cells on three-dimensional collagen I gels led to a dramatic down-regulation of the Wnt signaling inhibitor dickkopf-1 with a concomitant increase in nuclear β-catenin and enhanced β-catenin/Tcf/Lef transcriptional activity. Increased three-dimensional collagen gel invasion was accompanied by transcriptional up-regulation of the membrane-tethered collagenase membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase, and an inverse relationship between dickkopf-1 and membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase was observed in human epithelial ovarian cancer specimens. Similar results were obtained in other tissue-invasive cells such as vascular endothelial cells, suggesting a novel mechanism for functional coupling of matrix adhesion with Wnt signaling. PMID:23152495

  17. Expression of spicule matrix protein gene SM30 in embryonic and adult mineralized tissues of sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitajima, T.; Tomita, M.; Killian, C. E.; Akasaka, K.; Wilt, F. H.

    1996-01-01

    We have isolated a cDNA clone for spicule matrix protein, SM30, from sea urchin Hemicentrotus pulcherrimus and have studied the expression of this gene in comparison with that of another spicule matrix protein gene, SM50. In cultured micromeres as well as in intact embryos transcripts of SM30 were first detectable around the onset of spicule formation and rapidly increased with the growth of spicules, which accompanied accumulation of glycosylated SM30 protein(s). When micromeres were cultured in the presence of Zn2+, spicule formation and SM30 expression were suppressed, while both events resumed concurrently after the removal of Zn2+ from the culture medium. Expression of SM50, in contrast, started before the appearance of spicules and was not sensitive to Zn2+. Differences were also observed in adult tissues; SM30 mRNA was detected in spines and tube feet but not in the test, while SM50 mRNA was apparent in all of these mineralized tissues at similar levels. These results strongly suggest that the SM30 gene is regulated by a different mechanism to that of the SM50 gene and that the products of these two genes are differently involved in sea urchin biomineralization. A possible role of SM30 protein in skeleton formation is discussed.

  18. Protein Kinase D2 Assembles a Multiprotein Complex at the Trans-Golgi Network to Regulate Matrix Metalloproteinase Secretion.

    PubMed

    Eiseler, Tim; Wille, Christoph; Koehler, Conny; Illing, Anett; Seufferlein, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Vesicle formation and fission are tightly regulated at the trans-Golgi network (TGN) during constitutive secretion. Two major protein families regulate these processes: members of the adenosyl-ribosylation factor family of small G-proteins (ARFs) and the protein kinase D (PKD) family of serine/threonine kinases. The functional relationship between these two key regulators of protein transport from the TGN so far is elusive. We here demonstrate the assembly of a novel functional protein complex at the TGN and its key members: cytosolic PKD2 binds ARF-like GTPase (ARL1) and shuttles ARL1 to the TGN. ARL1, in turn, localizes Arfaptin2 to the TGN. At the TGN, where PKD2 interacts with active ARF1, PKD2, and ARL1 are required for the assembly of a complex comprising of ARF1 and Arfaptin2 leading to secretion of matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -7. In conclusion, our data indicate that PKD2 is a core factor in the formation of this multiprotein complex at the TGN that controls constitutive secretion of matrix metalloproteinase cargo.

  19. A major stylar matrix polypeptide (sp41) is a member of the pathogenesis-related proteins superclass.

    PubMed Central

    Ori, N; Sessa, G; Lotan, T; Himmelhoch, S; Fluhr, R

    1990-01-01

    A novel stylar-specific glycosylated protein, sp41, was characterized. Sp41 constitutes greater than 12% of the transmitting tract tissue soluble proteins and is mainly localized in the extracellular matrix. Two cDNA clones corresponding to sp41 mRNA were isolated and sequenced. The decoded sequences are, respectively, 80% and 49% homologous to acidic and basic pathogen-induced (1-3)-beta-glucanases of the leaf. Thus a subfamily of (1-3)-beta-glucanase pathogenesis-related (PR) proteins constitutes one of the major stylar matrix proteins. The accumulation of sp41 transcripts in normally developing and elicitor-treated styles and leaves was followed using an RNase protection assay. During development sp41 transcript accumulation starts well after carpel differentiation. It is first detected in styles at 8 days before anthesis. The maximal level of accumulation is reached during anthesis. Elicitor-treated styles do not accumulate the leaf-type (1-3)-beta-glucanase transcript, although they retain the capacity to synthesize leaf-type pathogenesis-related proteins such as the pathogen-induced acidic chitinase. The developmental regulation of sp41 expression points to a role for them in the normal processes of flowering and reproductive physiology. Images Fig.1 Fig.2 Fig.5 Fig.6 Fig.7 Fig.8 Fig.9 PMID:2120041

  20. WARP is a new member of the von Willebrand factor A-domain superfamily of extracellular matrix proteins.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, Jamie; Tay Ting, Su; Bateman, John F

    2002-04-24

    We report a new member of the von Willebrand factor A-domain protein superfamily, WARP (for von Willebrand factor A-domain-related protein). The full-length mouse WARP cDNA is 2.3 kb in size and predicts a protein of 415 amino acids which contains a signal sequence, a VA-like domain, two fibronectin type III-like repeats, and a short proline- and arginine-rich segment. WARP mRNA was expressed predominantly in chondrocytes and in vitro expression experiments in transfected 293 cells indicated that WARP is a secreted glycoprotein that forms disulphide-bonded oligomers. We conclude that WARP is a new member of the von Willebrand factor A-domain (VA-domain) superfamily of extracellular matrix proteins which may play a role in cartilage structure and function.

  1. Titin in insect spermatocyte spindle fibers associates with microtubules, actin, myosin and the matrix proteins skeletor, megator and chromator.

    PubMed

    Fabian, Lacramioara; Xia, Xuequin; Venkitaramani, Deepa V; Johansen, Kristen M; Johansen, Jørgen; Andrew, Deborah J; Forer, Arthur

    2007-07-01

    Titin, the giant elastic protein found in muscles, is present in spindles of crane-fly and locust spermatocytes as determined by immunofluorescence staining using three antibodies, each raised against a different, spatially separated fragment of Drosophila titin (D-titin). All three antibodies stained the Z-lines and other regions in insect myofibrils. In western blots of insect muscle extract the antibodies reacted with high molecular mass proteins, ranging between rat nebulin (600-900 kDa) and rat titin (3000-4000 kDa). Mass spectrometry of the high molecular mass band from the Coomassie-Blue-stained gel of insect muscle proteins indicates that the protein the antibodies bind to is titin. The pattern of staining in insect spermatocytes was slightly different in the two species, but in general all three anti-D-titin antibodies stained the same components: the chromosomes, prophase and telophase nuclear membranes, the spindle in general, along kinetochore and non-kinetochore microtubules, along apparent connections between partner half-bivalents during anaphase, and various cytoplasmic components, including the contractile ring. That the same cellular components are stained in close proximity by the three different antibodies, each against a different region of D-titin, is strong evidence that the three antibodies identify a titin-like protein in insect spindles, which we identified by mass spectrometry analysis as being titin. The spindle matrix proteins skeletor, megator and chromator are present in many of the same structures, in positions very close to (or the same as) D-titin. Myosin and actin also are present in spindles in close proximity to D-titin. The varying spatial arrangements of these proteins during the course of division suggest that they interact to form a spindle matrix with elastic properties provided by a titin-like protein.

  2. Molecular decay of enamel matrix protein genes in turtles and other edentulous amniotes

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Secondary edentulism (toothlessness) has evolved on multiple occasions in amniotes including several mammalian lineages (pangolins, anteaters, baleen whales), birds, and turtles. All edentulous amniote clades have evolved from ancestors with enamel-capped teeth. Previous studies have documented the molecular decay of tooth-specific genes in edentulous mammals, all of which lost their teeth in the Cenozoic, and birds, which lost their teeth in the Cretaceous. By contrast with mammals and birds, tooth loss in turtles occurred in the Jurassic (201.6-145.5 Ma), providing an extended time window for tooth gene degradation in this clade. The release of the painted turtle and Chinese softshell turtle genomes provides an opportunity to recover the decayed remains of tooth-specific genes in Testudines. Results We queried available genomes of Testudines (Chrysemys picta [painted turtle], Pelodiscus sinensis [Chinese softshell turtle]), Aves (Anas platyrhynchos [duck], Gallus gallus [chicken], Meleagris gallopavo [turkey], Melopsittacus undulatus [budgerigar], Taeniopygia guttata [zebra finch]), and enamelless mammals (Orycteropus afer [aardvark], Choloepus hoffmanni [Hoffmann’s two-toed sloth], Dasypus novemcinctus [nine-banded armadillo]) for remnants of three enamel matrix protein (EMP) genes with putative enamel-specific functions. Remnants of the AMBN and ENAM genes were recovered in Chrysemys and retain their original synteny. Remnants of AMEL were recovered in both testudines, although there are no shared frameshifts. We also show that there are inactivated copies of AMBN, AMEL and ENAM in representatives of divergent avian lineages including Galloanserae, Passeriformes, and Psittaciformes, and that there are shared frameshift mutations in all three genes that predate the basal split in Neognathae. Among enamelless mammals, all three EMP genes exhibit inactivating mutations in Orycteropus and Choloepus. Conclusions Our results highlight the power of

  3. Peptide substrate specificities and protein cleavage sites of human endometase/matrilysin-2/matrix metalloproteinase-26.

    PubMed

    Park, Hyun I; Turk, Benjamin E; Gerkema, Ferry E; Cantley, Lewis C; Sang, Qing-Xiang Amy

    2002-09-20

    Human endometase/matrilysin-2/matrix metalloproteinase-26 (MMP-26) is a novel epithelial and cancer-specific metalloproteinase. Peptide libraries were used to profile the substrate specificity of MMP-26 from the P4-P4' sites. The optimal cleavage motifs for MMP-26 were Lys-Pro-Ile/Leu-Ser(P1)-Leu/Met(P1')-Ile/Thr-Ser/Ala-Ser. The strongest preference was observed at the P1' and P2 sites where hydrophobic residues were favored. Proline was preferred at P3, and Serine was preferred at P1. The overall specificity was similar to that of other MMPs with the exception that more flexibility was observed at P1, P2', and P3'. Accordingly, synthetic inhibitors of gelatinases and collagenases inhibited MMP-26 with similar efficacy. A pair of stereoisomers had only a 40-fold difference in K(i)(app) values against MMP-26 compared with a 250-fold difference against neutrophil collagenase, indicating that MMP-26 is less stereoselective for its inhibitors. MMP-26 autodigested itself during the folding process. Two of the major autolytic sites were Leu(49)-Thr(50) and Ala(75)-Leu(76), which still left the cysteine switch sequence (PHC(82)GVPD) intact. This suggests that Cys(82) may not play a role in the latency of the zymogen. Interestingly, inhibitor titration studies revealed that only approximately 5% of the total MMP-26 molecules was catalytically active, indicating that the thiol groups of Cys(82) in the active molecules may be dissociated or removed from the active site zinc ions. MMP-26 cleaved Phe(352)-Leu(353) and Pro(357)-Met(358) in the reactive loop of alpha(1)-proteinase inhibitor and His(140)-Val(141) in insulin-like growth factor-binding protein-1, probably rendering these substrates inactive. Among the fluorescent peptide substrates analyzed, Mca-Pro-Leu-Ala-Nva-Dpa-Ala-Arg-NH(2) displayed the highest specificity constant (30,000/molar second) with MMP-26. This report proposes a working model for the future studies of pro-MMP-26 activation, the design of inhibitors

  4. Biomechanics of fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix studied by Brillouin scattering

    PubMed Central

    Palombo, Francesca; Winlove, C. Peter; Edginton, Ryan S.; Green, Ellen; Stone, Nick; Caponi, Silvia; Madami, Marco; Fioretto, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) spectroscopy is a technique that is able to detect thermally excited phonons within a material. The speed of propagation of these phonons can be determined from the magnitude of the Brillouin frequency shift between incident and scattered light, thereby providing a measure of the mechanical properties of the material in the gigahertz range. The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrices of biological tissues and their constituent biopolymers are important for normal tissue function and disturbances in these properties are widely implicated in disease. BLS offers the prospect of measuring mechanical properties on a microscopic scale in living tissues, thereby providing insights into structure–function relationships under normal and pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated BLS in collagen and elastin—the fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Measurements were made on type I collagen in rat tail tendon, type II collagen in articular cartilage and nuchal ligament elastin. The dependence of the BLS spectrum on fibre orientation was investigated in a backscattering geometry using a reflective substrate. Two peaks, a bulk mode arising from phonon propagation along a quasi-radial direction to the fibre axis and a mode parallel to the surface, depending on sample orientation relative to the fibre axis, could be distinguished. The latter peak was fitted to a model of wave propagation through a hexagonally symmetric elastic solid, and the five components of the elasticity tensor were combined to give axial and transverse Young's, shear and bulk moduli of the fibres. These were 10.2, 8.3, 3.2 and 10.9 GPa, and 6.1, 5.3, 1.9 and 8 GPa for dehydrated type I collagen and elastin, respectively. The former values are close to those previously reported. A microfocused BLS approach was also applied providing selection of single fibres. The moduli of collagen and elastin are much higher than those measured at

  5. Intravirion cohesion of matrix protein M1 with ribonucleocapsid is a prerequisite of influenza virus infectivity

    SciTech Connect

    Zhirnov, O.P.; Manykin, A.A.; Rossman, J.S.; Klenk, H.D.

    2016-05-15

    Influenza virus has two major structural modules, an external lipid envelope and an internal ribonucleocapsid containing the genomic RNA in the form of the ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex, both of which are interlinked by the matrix protein M1. Here we studied M1-RNP cohesion within virus exposed to acidic pH in vitro. The effect of acidification was dependent on the cleavage of the surface glycoprotein HA. Acidic pH caused a loss of intravirion RNP-M1 cohesion and activated RNP polymerase activity in virus with cleaved HA (HA1/2) but not in the uncleaved (HA0) virus. The in vitro acidified HA1/2 virus rapidly lost infectivity whereas the HA0 one retained infectivity, following activation by trypsin, suggesting that premature activation and release of the RNP is detrimental to viral infectivity. Rimantadine, an inhibitor of the M2 ion channel, was found to protect the HA1/2 virus interior against acidic disintegration, confirming that M2-dependent proton translocation is essential for the intravirion RNP release and suggesting that the M2 ion channel is only active in virions with cleaved HA. Acidic treatment of both HA0 and HA1/2 influenza viruses induces formation of spikeless bleb-like protrusion of ~25 nm in diameter on the surface of the virion, though only the HA1/2 virus was permeable to protons and permitted RNP release. It is likely that this bleb corresponds to the M2-enriched and M1-depleted focus arising from pinching off of the virus during the completion of budding. Cooperatively, the data suggest that the influenza virus has an asymmetric structure where the M1-mediated organization of the RNP inside the virion is a prerequisite for infectious entry into target cell. - Highlights: • The influenza A virus has a novel asymmetric internal structure. • The structure is largely maintained by M1-RNP cohesion within the virion. • This asymmetry plays an important role during viral entry, facilitating virus uncoating and the initiation of a productive

  6. Biomechanics of fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix studied by Brillouin scattering.

    PubMed

    Palombo, Francesca; Winlove, C Peter; Edginton, Ryan S; Green, Ellen; Stone, Nick; Caponi, Silvia; Madami, Marco; Fioretto, Daniele

    2014-12-06

    Brillouin light scattering (BLS) spectroscopy is a technique that is able to detect thermally excited phonons within a material. The speed of propagation of these phonons can be determined from the magnitude of the Brillouin frequency shift between incident and scattered light, thereby providing a measure of the mechanical properties of the material in the gigahertz range. The mechanical properties of the extracellular matrices of biological tissues and their constituent biopolymers are important for normal tissue function and disturbances in these properties are widely implicated in disease. BLS offers the prospect of measuring mechanical properties on a microscopic scale in living tissues, thereby providing insights into structure-function relationships under normal and pathological conditions. In this study, we investigated BLS in collagen and elastin-the fibrous proteins of the extracellular matrix (ECM). Measurements were made on type I collagen in rat tail tendon, type II collagen in articular cartilage and nuchal ligament elastin. The dependence of the BLS spectrum on fibre orientation was investigated in a backscattering geometry using a reflective substrate. Two peaks, a bulk mode arising from phonon propagation along a quasi-radial direction to the fibre axis and a mode parallel to the surface, depending on sample orientation relative to the fibre axis, could be distinguished. The latter peak was fitted to a model of wave propagation through a hexagonally symmetric elastic solid, and the five components of the elasticity tensor were combined to give axial and transverse Young's, shear and bulk moduli of the fibres. These were 10.2, 8.3, 3.2 and 10.9 GPa, and 6.1, 5.3, 1.9 and 8 GPa for dehydrated type I collagen and elastin, respectively. The former values are close to those previously reported. A microfocused BLS approach was also applied providing selection of single fibres. The moduli of collagen and elastin are much higher than those measured at lower

  7. Synergistic inhibition in cell-cell fusion mediated by the matrix and nucleocapsid protein of canine distemper virus.

    PubMed

    Wiener, Dominique; Plattet, Philippe; Cherpillod, Pascal; Zipperle, Ljerka; Doherr, Marcus G; Vandevelde, Marc; Zurbriggen, Andreas

    2007-11-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV) causes a chronic, demyelinating, progressive or relapsing neurological disease in dogs, because CDV persists in the CNS. Persistence of virulent CDV, such as the A75/17 strain has been reproduced in cell cultures where it is associated with a non-cytolytic infection with very limited cell-cell fusion. This is in sharp contrast to attenuated CDV infection in cell cultures, such as the Onderstepoort (OP) CDV strain, which produces extensive fusion activity and cytolysis. Fusion efficiency may be determined by the structure of the viral fusion protein per se but also by its interaction with other structural proteins of CDV. This was studied by combining genes derived from persistent and non-persistent CDV strains in transient transfection experiments. It was found that fusion efficiency was markedly attenuated by the structure of the fusion protein of the neurovirulent A75/17-CDV. Moreover, we showed that the interaction of the surface glycoproteins with the M protein of the persistent strain greatly influenced fusion activity. Site directed mutagenesis showed that the c-terminus of the M protein is of particular importance in this respect. Interestingly, although the nucleocapsid protein alone did not affect F/H-induced cell-cell fusion, maximal inhibition occurred when the latter was added to combined glycoproteins with matrix protein. Thus, the present study suggests that very limited fusogenicity in virulent CDV infection, which favours persistence by limiting cell destruction involves complex interactions between all viral structural proteins.

  8. Identification of Protein–Protein Interactions via a Novel Matrix-Based Sequence Representation Model with Amino Acid Contact Information

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yijie; Tang, Jijun; Guo, Fei

    2016-01-01

    Identification of protein–protein interactions (PPIs) is a difficult and important problem in biology. Since experimental methods for predicting PPIs are both expensive and time-consuming, many computational methods have been developed to predict PPIs and interaction networks, which can be used to complement experimental approaches. However, these methods have limitations to overcome. They need a large number of homology proteins or literature to be applied in their method. In this paper, we propose a novel matrix-based protein sequence representation approach to predict PPIs, using an ensemble learning method for classification. We construct the matrix of Amino Acid Contact (AAC), based on the statistical analysis of residue-pairing frequencies in a database of 6323 protein–protein complexes. We first represent the protein sequence as a Substitution Matrix Representation (SMR) matrix. Then, the feature vector is extracted by applying algorithms of Histogram of Oriented Gradient (HOG) and Singular Value Decomposition (SVD) on the SMR matrix. Finally, we feed the feature vector into a Random Forest (RF) for judging interaction pairs and non-interaction pairs. Our method is applied to several PPI datasets to evaluate its performance. On the S.cerevisiae dataset, our method achieves 94.83% accuracy and 92.40% sensitivity. Compared with existing methods, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 0.11 percentage points. On the H.pylori dataset, our method achieves 89.06% accuracy and 88.15% sensitivity, the accuracy of our method is increased by 0.76%. On the Human PPI dataset, our method achieves 97.60% accuracy and 96.37% sensitivity, and the accuracy of our method is increased by 1.30%. In addition, we test our method on a very important PPI network, and it achieves 92.71% accuracy. In the Wnt-related network, the accuracy of our method is increased by 16.67%. The source code and all datasets are available at https://figshare.com/s/580c11dce13e63cb9a53. PMID

  9. MassMatrix: A Database Search Program for Rapid Characterization of Proteins and Peptides from Tandem Mass Spectrometry Data

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Hua; Freitas, Michael A.

    2009-01-01

    MassMatrix is a program that matches tandem mass spectra with theoretical peptide sequences derived from a protein database. The program uses a mass accuracy sensitive probabilistic score model to rank peptide matches. The tandem mass spectrometry search software was evaluated by use of a high mass accuracy data set and its results compared with those from Mascot, SEQUEST, X!Tandem, and OMSSA. For the high mass accuracy data, MassMatrix provided better sensitivity than Mascot, SEQUEST, X!Tandem, and OMSSA for a given specificity and the percentage of false positives was 2%. More importantly all manually validated true positives corresponded to a unique peptide/spectrum match. The presence of decoy sequence and additional variable post-translational modifications did not significantly affect the results from the high mass accuracy search. MassMatrix performs well when compared with Mascot, SEQUEST, X!Tandem, and OMSSA with regard to search time. MassMatrix was also run on a distributed memory clusters and achieved search speeds of ~100,000 spectra per hour when searching against a complete human database with 8 variable modifications. The algorithm is available for public searches at http://www.massmatrix.net. PMID:19235167

  10. Nuclear Matrix protein SMAR1 represses HIV-1 LTR mediated transcription through chromatin remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Sreenath, Kadreppa; Pavithra, Lakshminarasimhan; Singh, Sandeep; Sinha, Surajit; Dash, Prasanta K.; Siddappa, Nagadenahalli B.; Ranga, Udaykumar; Mitra, Debashis; Chattopadhyay, Samit

    2010-04-25

    Nuclear Matrix and MARs have been implicated in the transcriptional regulation of host as well as viral genes but their precise role in HIV-1 transcription remains unclear. Here, we show that > 98% of HIV sequences contain consensus MAR element in their promoter. We show that SMAR1 binds to the LTR MAR and reinforces transcriptional silencing by tethering the LTR MAR to nuclear matrix. SMAR1 associated HDAC1-mSin3 corepressor complex is dislodged from the LTR upon cellular activation by PMA/TNFalpha leading to an increase in the acetylation and a reduction in the trimethylation of histones, associated with the recruitment of RNA Polymerase II on the LTR. Overexpression of SMAR1 lead to reduction in LTR mediated transcription, both in a Tat dependent and independent manner, resulting in a decreased virion production. These results demonstrate the role of SMAR1 in regulating viral transcription by alternative compartmentalization of LTR between the nuclear matrix and chromatin.

  11. Expression, purification and characterization of two truncated peste des petits ruminants virus matrix proteins in Escherichia coli, and production of polyclonal antibodies against this protein.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fuxiao; Wu, Xiaodong; Li, Lin; Liu, Zengshan; Wang, Zhiliang

    2013-09-01

    Peste des petits ruminants virus (PPRV), the etiological agent of peste des petits ruminants, is classified into the genus Morbillivirus in the family Paramyxoviridae. The PPRV matrix (M) gene is composed of 1483 base pairs, encoding a 335 amino acids M protein with a molecular weight of approximately 38kD. We have demonstrated previously that the full-length M protein was expressed at an extremely low level or not even expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3). In this study, the M protein was split into two truncated forms to be successfully expressed in E. coli at a high level using the pET30a (+) vector, respectively, by analysis of SDS-PAGE, western blot and MALDI-TOF-MS. The optimization of culture conditions led us to perform the recombinant protein induction with 0.2mM IPTG at 28°C for 12h, whereby both proteins nevertheless were expressed in the insoluble form. Therefore, both His-tagged proteins were purified under the denaturing condition using a commercially available kit. Balb/c mice were immunized with the complex of purified proteins and then effectively produced polyclonal antibodies, which reached to a relatively high titer by the analysis of ELISA. The specificity of the prepared polyclonal antibodies was checked by western blot and immunofluorescence, revealing them with the desirable specificity against both non-denatured and denatured M proteins.

  12. Ultrasonic assisted protein enzymatic digestion for fast protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Sonoreactor versus ultrasonic probe.

    PubMed

    Rial-Otero, R; Carreira, R J; Cordeiro, F M; Moro, A J; Santos, H M; Vale, G; Moura, I; Capelo, J L

    2007-09-28

    Two different ultrasonic energy sources, the sonoreactor and the ultrasonic probe, are compared for enzymatic digestion of proteins for protein identification by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) using the peptide mass fingerprint (PMF) procedure. Variables such as (i) trypsin/protein ratio; (ii) sonication time; (iii) ultrasound amplitude; and (iv) protein concentration are studied and compared. As a general rule, the trypsin/protein ratio and the minimum protein concentration successfully digested are similar with both ultrasonic energy sources. Results showed that the time needed to digest proteins was shorter with the ultrasonic probe, 60s versus 120s, for the same amplitude of sonication, 50%. However, lower standard deviations and cleaner MALDI-TOF-MS spectra were obtained with the sonoreactor. In addition, the sonoreactor device provided higher sample throughput (6 samples for the sonoreactor versus 1 sample for the ultrasonic probe) and easier sample handling for lower sample volumes (25 microl). Finally, a comparison of both methodologies for the specific identification of the adenylylsulphate reductase alfa subunit from a complex protein mixture from Desulfovibrio desulfuricans ATCC 27774 was done as a proof of the procedure.

  13. Matrix metalloproteinase and G protein coupled receptors: co-conspirators in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer.

    PubMed

    Eck, Sarah M; Blackburn, Jessica S; Schmucker, Adam C; Burrage, Peter S; Brinckerhoff, Constance E

    2009-01-01

    Similarities in the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer have been noted for at least 30 years. Inflammatory cytokines and growth factors mediate cell proliferation, and proteinases, especially the collagenase, Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), contribute to disease progression by remodeling the extracellular matrix and modulating the microenvironment. This review focuses on two cancers (melanoma and breast) and on the autoimmune disorder, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and discusses the activated stromal cells found in these diseases. MMP-1 was originally thought to function only to degrade interstitial collagens, but recent studies have revealed novel roles for MMP-1 involving the G protein-coupled receptors: the chemokine receptor, CXCR-4, and Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1). Cooperativity between MMP-1 and CXCR4/SDF-1 signaling influences the behavior of activated fibroblasts in both RA and cancer. Further, MMP-1 is a vital part of an autocrine/paracrine MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis, a function that amplifies its potential to remodel the matrix and to modify cell behavior. Finally, new therapeutic agents directed at MMP-1 and G protein-coupled receptors are emerging. Even though these agents are more specific in their targets than past therapies, these targets are often shared between RA and cancer, underscoring fundamental similarities between autoimmune disorders and some cancers.

  14. Matrix Metalloproteinase and G Protein Coupled Receptors: Co-conspirators in the pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Eck, Sarah M.; Blackburn, Jessica S.; Schmucker, Adam C.; Burrage, Peter S.; Brinckerhoff, Constance E.

    2009-01-01

    Similarities in the pathologies of autoimmune diseases and cancer have been noted for at least 30 years. Inflammatory cytokines and growth factors mediate cell proliferation, and proteinases, especially the collagenase, Matrix Metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1), contribute to disease progression by remodeling the extracellular matrix and modulating the microenvironment. This review focuses on two cancers (melanoma and breast) and on the autoimmune disorder, rheumatoid arthritis (RA), and discusses the activated stromal cells found in these diseases. MMP-1 was originally thought to function only to degrade interstitial collagens, but recent studies have revealed novel roles for MMP-1 involving the G protein-coupled receptors: the chemokine receptor, CXCR-4, and Protease Activated Receptor-1 (PAR-1). Cooperativity between MMP-1 and CXCR4/SDF-1 signaling influences the behavior of activated fibroblasts in both RA and cancer. Further, MMP-1 is a vital part of an autocrine/paracrine MMP-1/PAR-1 signal transduction axis, a function that amplifies its potential to remodel the matrix and to modify cell behavior. Finally, new therapeutic agents directed at MMP-1 and G protein-coupled receptors are emerging. Even though these agents are more specific in their targets than past therapies, these targets are often shared between RA and cancer, underscoring fundamental similarities between autoimmune disorders and some cancers. PMID:19800199

  15. Crystal structure of the Borna disease virus matrix protein (BDV-M) reveals ssRNA binding properties

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Piotr; Lieber, Diana; Meyer, Sylke; Dautel, Philipp; Kerth, Andreas; Kraus, Ina; Garten, Wolfgang; Stubbs, Milton T.

    2009-01-01

    Borna disease virus (BDV) is a neurotropic enveloped RNA virus that causes a noncytolytic, persistent infection of the central nervous system in mammals. BDV belongs to the order Mononegavirales, which also includes the negative-strand RNA viruses (NSVs) Ebola, Marburg, vesicular stomatitis, rabies, mumps, and measles. BDV-M, the matrix protein (M-protein) of BDV, is the smallest M-protein (16.2 kDa) among the NSVs. M-proteins play a critical role in virus assembly and budding, mediating the interaction between the viral capsid, envelope, and glycoprotein spikes, and are as such responsible for the structural stability and individual form of virus particles. Here, we report the 3D structure of BDV-M, a full-length M-protein structure from a nonsegmented RNA NSV. The BDV-M monomer exhibits structural similarity to the N-terminal domain of the Ebola M-protein (VP40), while the surface charge of the tetramer provides clues to the membrane association of BDV-M. Additional electron density in the crystal reveals the presence of bound nucleic acid, interpreted as cytidine-5′-monophosphate. The heterologously expressed BDV-M copurifies with and protects ssRNA oligonucleotides of a median length of 16 nt taken up from the expression host. The results presented here show that BDV-M would be able to bind RNA and lipid membranes simultaneously, expanding the repertoire of M-protein functionalities. PMID:19237566

  16. Identification of amelotin- and ODAM-interacting enamel matrix proteins using the yeast two-hybrid system.

    PubMed

    Holcroft, James; Ganss, Bernhard

    2011-12-01

    The formation of dental enamel is a prototype of functional tissue development through biomineralization. Amelotin (AMTN) is a recently discovered secreted enamel protein predominantly expressed during the maturation stage of enamel formation. It accumulates in a basal lamina-like structure at the interface between ameloblasts and enamel mineral and it co-localizes with another recently described enamel protein, odontogenic ameloblast-associated protein (ODAM). The purpose of this study was to determine whether AMTN and ODAM bind to each other and/or to other well-established enamel matrix proteins. The coding sequences of all enamel proteins were cloned into appropriate vectors of the GAL4-based Matchmaker Gold Yeast Two-Hybrid System. The growth of yeast cells on selective media and color induction were used as indicators for reporter gene expression through protein-protein interactions in combinations of prey and bait constructs. We found that AMTN interacts with itself and with ODAM, but not with amelogenin (AMEL), ameloblastin (AMBN), or enamelin (ENAM). Using ODAM as bait, the interaction with AMTN was confirmed. Furthermore, ODAM was found to bind to itself and to AMBN, as well as weakly to AMEL but not to ENAM. We propose a model where the distinct expression of AMTN and ODAM and their interaction are involved in defining the enamel microstructure at the enamel surface.

  17. Tracking the Fate of Genetically Distinct Vesicular Stomatitis Virus Matrix Proteins Highlights the Role for Late Domains in Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Soh, Timothy K.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) assembly requires condensation of the viral ribonucleoprotein (RNP) core with the matrix protein (M) during budding from the plasma membrane. The RNP core comprises the negative-sense genomic RNA completely coated by the nucleocapsid protein (N) and associated by a phosphoprotein (P) with the large polymerase protein (L). To study the assembly of single viral particles, we tagged M and P with fluorescent proteins. We selected from a library of viruses with insertions in the M gene a replication-competent virus containing a fluorescent M and combined that with our previously described virus containing fluorescent P. Virus particles containing those fusions maintained the same bullet shape appearance as wild-type VSV but had a modest increase in particle length, reflecting the increased genome size. Imaging of the released particles revealed a variation in the amount of M and P assembled into the virions, consistent with a flexible packaging mechanism. We used the recombinants to further study the importance of the late domains in M, which serve to recruit the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT) machinery during budding. Mutations in late domains resulted in the accumulation of virions that failed to pinch off from the plasma membrane. Imaging of single virions released from cells that were coinfected with M tagged with enhanced green fluorescent protein and M tagged with mCherry variants in which the late domains of one virus were inactivated by mutation showed a strong bias against the incorporation of the late-domain mutant into the released virions. In contrast, the intracellular expression and membrane association of the two variants were unaltered. These studies provide new tools for imaging particle assembly and enhance our resolution of existing models for assembly of VSV. IMPORTANCE Assembly of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) particles requires the separate trafficking of the viral replication

  18. Extracellular matrix protein mediated regulation of the osteoblast differentiation of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Smitha; Bhonde, Ramesh; Gupta, Pawan Kumar; Totey, Satish

    2012-09-01

    The biomimetic approach of tissue engineering exploits the favorable properties of the extracellular matrix (ECM), to achieve better scaffold performance and tissue regeneration. ECM proteins regulate cell adhesion and differentiation through integrin mediated signal transduction. In the present study, we have examined the role of ECM proteins such as collagen type I, fibronectin, laminin and vitronectin in regulating the proliferation and osteogenic differentiation of bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs). hMSCs were grown on selected ECM protein treated tissue culture plates. The growth kinetics was assessed by calculating the doubling time of the cells on different ECM treated plates. The cells were directed to osteoblast lineage by growing them in osteogenic induction media for 21 day. Differentiation was evaluated at different time points by osteoblast differentiation associated gene expression, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, histochemical staining for mineralized matrix and calcium quantification. The doubling time of hMSCs cultured on collagen type I was significantly low, which was followed by laminin and fibronectin treated plates. However, doubling time of hMSCs cultured on vitronectin treated plate was not significantly different than that of the untreated control. High ALP gene (ALPL) expression and associated enhancement of mineralization were observed on collagen type I, fibronectin and vitronectin treated plates. Collagen type I showed early onset of mineralization with high ALP activity and up-regulation of osteopontin, ALPL, bone sialoprotein and osteocalcin genes. Vitronectin also up-regulated these genes and showed the highest amount of calcium in the secreted mineral matrix. Therefore, we conclude that, ECM proteins indeed modified the growth patterns and induced the osteoblast differentiation of hMSCs. Our findings have significant implication for bone tissue engineering applications.

  19. Sequence-specific interaction between HIV-1 matrix protein and viral genomic RNA revealed by in vitro genetic selection.

    PubMed Central

    Purohit, P; Dupont, S; Stevenson, M; Green, M R

    2001-01-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type-1 matrix protein (HIV-1 MA) is a multifunctional structural protein synthesized as part of the Pr55 gag polyprotein. We have used in vitro genetic selection to identify an RNA consensus sequence that specifically interacts with MA (Kd = 5 x 10(-7) M). This 13-nt MA binding consensus sequence bears a high degree of homology (77%) to a region (nt 1433-1446) within the POL open reading frame of the HIV-1 genome (consensus sequence from 38 HIV-1 strains). Chemical interference experiments identified the nucleotides within the MA binding consensus sequence involved in direct contact with MA. We further demonstrate that this RNA-protein interaction is mediated through a stretch of basic amino acids within MA. Mutations that disrupt the interaction between MA and its RNA binding site within the HIV-1 genome resulted in a measurable decrease in viral replication. PMID:11345436

  20. Structure and dynamics of Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 by a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pandey, Ras; Farmer, Barry

    Ebola virus matrix protein VP40 (consisting of 326 residues) plays a critical role in viral assembly and its functions such as regulation of viral transcription, packaging, and budding of mature virions into the plasma membrane of infected cells. How does the protein VP40 go through structural evolution during the viral life cycle remains an open question? Using a coarse-grained Monte Carlo simulation we investigate the structural evolution of VP40 as a function of temperature with the input of a knowledge-based residue-residue interaction. A number local and global physical quantities (e.g. mobility profile, contact map, radius of gyration, structure factor) are analyzed with our large-scale simulations. Our preliminary data show that the structure of the protein evolves through different state with well-defined morphologies which can be identified and quantified via a detailed analysis of structure factor.

  1. On plate graphite supported sample processing for simultaneous lipid and protein identification by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Calvano, Cosima Damiana; van der Werf, Inez Dorothé; Sabbatini, Luigia; Palmisano, Francesco

    2015-05-01

    The simultaneous identification of lipids and proteins by matrix assisted laser desorption ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) after direct on-plate processing of micro-samples supported on colloidal graphite is demonstrated. Taking advantages of large surface area and thermal conductivity, graphite provided an ideal substrate for on-plate proteolysis and lipid extraction. Indeed proteins could be efficiently digested on-plate within 15 min, providing sequence coverages comparable to those obtained by conventional in-solution overnight digestion. Interestingly, detection of hydrophilic phosphorylated peptides could be easily achieved without any further enrichment step. Furthermore, lipids could be simultaneously extracted/identified without any additional treatment/processing step as demonstrated for model complex samples such as milk and egg. The present approach is simple, efficient, of large applicability and offers great promise for protein and lipid identification in very small samples.

  2. Cartilage oligomeric matrix protein and hyaluronic acid are sensitive serum biomarkers for early cartilage lesions in the knee joint.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Qiang; Wei, Lei; Chen, Chongwei; Li, Pengcui; Wang, Xiaohu; Li, Yongping; Guo, Li; Zhang, Congming; Wei, Xiaochun

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the relationship between five previously established serum osteoarthritis biomarkers and the severity of cartilage lesions in the knee. Cartilage damage (classified according to the Outerbridge scoring system) and serum concentrations of cartilage oligomeric matrix protein (COMP), collagen type II C-telopeptide (CTX-II), matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP-3), collagen type III N-propeptide, (PIIINP), and hyaluronic acid (HA) were determined in 79 patients who underwent knee arthroscopy or total knee replacement. HA and COMP concentrations were significantly higher in the Outerbridge score 1 and 2 groups, respectively. These results suggest that serum COMP and HA concentrations can be used to predict early cartilage lesions in the knee.

  3. The Nuclear Matrix Protein Megator Regulates Stem Cell Asymmetric Division through the Mitotic Checkpoint Complex in Drosophila Testes.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ying; Singh, Shree Ram; Zeng, Xiankun; Zhao, Jiangsha; Hou, Steven X

    2015-12-01

    In adult Drosophila testis, asymmetric division of germline stem cells (GSCs) is specified by an oriented spindle and cortically localized adenomatous coli tumor suppressor homolog 2 (Apc2). However, the molecular mechanism underlying these events remains unclear. Here we identified Megator (Mtor), a nuclear matrix protein, which regulates GSC maintenance and asymmetric division through the spindle assembly checkpoint (SAC) complex. Loss of Mtor function results in Apc2 mis-localization, incorrect centrosome orientation, defective mitotic spindle formation, and abnormal chromosome segregation that lead to the eventual GSC loss. Expression of mitotic arrest-deficient-2 (Mad2) and monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) of the SAC complex effectively rescued the GSC loss phenotype associated with loss of Mtor function. Collectively our results define a new role of the nuclear matrix-SAC axis in regulating stem cell maintenance and asymmetric division.

  4. Mueller-matrix mapping of biological tissues in differential diagnosis of optical anisotropy mechanisms of protein networks

    SciTech Connect

    Ushenko, V A; Sidor, M I; Marchuk, Yu F; Pashkovskaya, N V; Andreichuk, D R

    2015-03-31

    We report a model of Mueller-matrix description of optical anisotropy of protein networks in biological tissues with allowance for the linear birefringence and dichroism. The model is used to construct the reconstruction algorithms of coordinate distributions of phase shifts and the linear dichroism coefficient. In the statistical analysis of such distributions, we have found the objective criteria of differentiation between benign and malignant tissues of the female reproductive system. From the standpoint of evidence-based medicine, we have determined the operating characteristics (sensitivity, specificity and accuracy) of the Mueller-matrix reconstruction method of optical anisotropy parameters and demonstrated its effectiveness in the differentiation of benign and malignant tumours. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  5. Molecular energy dissipation in nanoscale networks of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 is strongly dependent on ion valence

    PubMed Central

    Adams, J; Fantner, G E; Fisher, L W; Hansma, P K

    2008-01-01

    The fracture resistance of biomineralized tissues such as bone, dentin, and abalone is greatly enhanced through the nanoscale interactions of stiff inorganic mineral components with soft organic adhesive components. A proper understanding of the interactions that occur within the organic component, and between the organic and inorganic components, is therefore critical for a complete understanding of the mechanics of these tissues. In this paper, we use Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) force spectroscopy and dynamic force spectroscopy to explore the effect of ionic interactions within a nanoscale system consisting of networks of Dentin Matrix Protein 1 (DMP1) (a component of both bone and dentin organic matrix), a mica surface, and an AFM tip. We find that DMP1 is capable of dissipating large amounts of energy through an ion-mediated mechanism, and that the effectiveness increases with increasing ion valence. PMID:18843380

  6. Healing of periodontal defects treated with enamel matrix proteins and root surface conditioning--an experimental study in dogs.

    PubMed

    Sakallioğlu, Umur; Açikgöz, Gökhan; Ayas, Bülent; Kirtiloğlu, Tuğrul; Sakallioğlu, Eser

    2004-05-01

    Application of enamel matrix proteins has been introduced as an alternative method for periodontal regenerative therapy. It is claimed that this approach provides periodontal regeneration by a biological approach, i.e. creating a matrix on the root surfaces that promotes cementum, periodontal ligament (PDL) and alveolar bone regeneration, thus mimicking the events occurring during tooth development. Although there have been numerous in vitro and in vivo studies demonstrating periodontal regeneration, acellular cementum formation and clinical outcomes via enamel matrix proteins usage, their effects on the healing pattern of soft and hard periodontal tissues are not well-established and compared with root conditioning alone. In the present study, the effects of Emdogain (Biora, Malmö, Sweden), an enamel matrix derivative mainly composed of enamel matrix proteins (test), on periodontal wound healing were evaluated and compared with root surface conditioning (performed with 36% orthophosphoric acid) alone (control) histopathologically and histomorphometrically by means of the soft and hard tissue profile of periodontium. An experimental periodontitis model performed at premolar teeth of four dogs were used in the study and the healing pattern of periodontal tissues was evaluated at days 7, 14, 21, 28 (one dog at each day), respectively. At day 7, soft tissue attachment evaluated by means of connective tissue and/or epithelial attachment to the root surfaces revealed higher connective tissue attachment rate in the test group and the amount of new connective tissue proliferation in the test group was significantly greater than the control group (p<0.01). New bone formation by osteoconduction initiated at day 14 in the test and control group. At day 21, the orientation of supra-alveolar and PDL fibers established, and new cementum formation observed in both groups. At day 28, although regenerated cementum was cellular in all of the roots in the control samples, an

  7. NF-κB Has a Direct Role in Inhibiting Bmp- and Wnt-Induced Matrix Protein Expression.

    PubMed

    Tarapore, Rohinton S; Lim, Jason; Tian, Chen; Pacios, Sandra; Xiao, Wenmei; Reid, Daniel; Guan, Hancheng; Mattos, Marcelo; Yu, Bo; Wang, Cun-Yu; Graves, Dana T

    2016-01-01

    The host response to pathogens through nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) is an essential defense mechanism for eukaryotic organisms. NF-κB-mediated host responses inhibit bone and other connective tissue synthesis and are thought to affect the transcription of matrix proteins through multiple indirect pathways. We demonstrate that inhibiting NF-κB in osteoblasts increases osteocalcin expression in vivo in mice with periodontal disease. Mutating NF-κB binding sites on osteocalcin (OC) or bone sialoprotein (Bsp) promoters rescues the negative impact of NF-κB on their transcription and that NF-κB can inhibit Wnt- and Bmp-induced OC and Bsp transcription, even when protein synthesis is inhibited, indicating a direct effect of NF-κB. This inhibition depends on p65-p50 NF-κB heterodimer formation and deacetylation by HDAC1 but is not affected by the noncanonical NF-κB pathway. Moreover, NF-κB reduces Runx2 and β-catenin binding to OC/Bsp promoters independently of their nuclear localization. Thus, inflammatory signals stimulate the direct interaction of NF-κB with response elements to inhibit binding of β-catenin and Runx2 binding to nearby consensus sites and reduce expression of matrix proteins. This direct mechanism provides a new explanation for the rapid decrease in new bone formation after inflammation-related NF-κB activation.

  8. Human pathogens utilize host extracellular matrix proteins laminin and collagen for adhesion and invasion of the host.

    PubMed

    Singh, Birendra; Fleury, Christophe; Jalalvand, Farshid; Riesbeck, Kristian

    2012-11-01

    Laminin (Ln) and collagen are multifunctional glycoproteins that play an important role in cellular morphogenesis, cell signalling, tissue repair and cell migration. These proteins are ubiquitously present in tissues as a part of the basement membrane (BM), constitute a protective layer around blood capillaries and are included in the extracellular matrix (ECM). As a component of BMs, both Lns and collagen(s), thus function as major mechanical containment molecules that protect tissues from pathogens. Invasive pathogens breach the basal lamina and degrade ECM proteins of interstitial spaces and connective tissues using various ECM-degrading proteases or surface-bound plasminogen and matrix metalloproteinases recruited from the host. Most pathogens associated with the respiratory, gastrointestinal, or urogenital tracts, as well as with the central nervous system or the skin, have the capacity to bind and degrade Lns and collagen(s) in order to adhere to and invade host tissues. In this review, we focus on the adaptability of various pathogens to utilize these ECM proteins as enhancers for adhesion to host tissues or as a targets for degradation in order to breach the cellular barriers. The major pathogens discussed are Streptococcus, Staphylococcus, Pseudomonas, Salmonella, Yersinia, Treponema, Mycobacterium, Clostridium, Listeria, Porphyromonas and Haemophilus; Candida, Aspergillus, Pneumocystis, Cryptococcus and Coccidioides; Acanthamoeba, Trypanosoma and Trichomonas; retrovirus and papilloma virus.

  9. Characterization of a 65 kDa NIF in the nuclear matrix of the monocot Allium cepa that interacts with nuclear spectrin-like proteins.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Munive, Clara; Blumenthal, Sonal S D; de la Espina, Susana Moreno Díaz

    2012-01-01

    Plant cells have a well organized nucleus and nuclear matrix, but lack orthologues of the main structural components of the metazoan nuclear matrix. Although data is limited, most plant nuclear structural proteins are coiled-coil proteins, such as the NIFs (nuclear intermediate filaments) in Pisum sativum that cross-react with anti-intermediate filament and anti-lamin antibodies, form filaments 6-12 nm in diameter in vitro, and may play the role of lamins. We have investigated the conservation and features of NIFs in a monocot species, Allium cepa, and compared them with onion lamin-like proteins. Polyclonal antisera against the pea 65 kDa NIF were used in 1D and 2D Western blots, ICM (imunofluorescence confocal microscopy) and IEM (immunoelectron microscopy). Their presence in the nuclear matrix was analysed by differential extraction of nuclei, and their association with structural spectrin-like proteins by co-immunoprecipitation and co-localization in ICM. NIF is a conserved structural component of the nucleus and its matrix in monocots with Mr and pI values similar to those of pea 65 kDa NIF, which localized to the nuclear envelope, perichromatin domains and foci, and to the nuclear matrix, interacting directly with structural nuclear spectrin-like proteins. Its similarities with some of the proteins described as onion lamin-like proteins suggest that they are highly related or perhaps the same proteins.

  10. Conserved Ankyrin Repeat Proteins and Their NIMA Kinase Partners Regulate Extracellular Matrix Remodeling and Intracellular Trafficking in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Lažetić, Vladimir; Fay, David S

    2017-01-01

    Molting is an essential developmental process in nematodes during which the epidermal apical extracellular matrix, the cuticle, is remodeled to accommodate further growth. Using genetic approaches, we identified a requirement for three conserved ankyrin repeat-rich proteins, MLT-2/ANKS6, MLT-3/ANKS3, and MLT-4/INVS, in Caenorhabditis elegans molting. Loss of mlt function resulted in severe defects in the ability of larvae to shed old cuticle and led to developmental arrest. Genetic analyses demonstrated that MLT proteins functionally cooperate with the conserved NIMA kinase family members NEKL-2/NEK8 and NEKL-3/NEK6/NEK7 to promote cuticle shedding. MLT and NEKL proteins were specifically required within the hyp7 epidermal syncytium, and fluorescently tagged mlt and nekl alleles were expressed in puncta within this tissue. Expression studies further showed that NEKL-2-MLT-2-MLT-4 and NEKL-3-MLT-3 colocalize within largely distinct assemblies of apical foci. MLT-2 and MLT-4 were required for the normal accumulation of NEKL-2 at the hyp7-seam cell boundary, and loss of mlt-2 caused abnormal nuclear accumulation of NEKL-2 Correspondingly, MLT-3, which bound directly to NEKL-3, prevented NEKL-3 nuclear localization, supporting the model that MLT proteins may serve as molecular scaffolds for NEKL kinases. Our studies additionally showed that the NEKL-MLT network regulates early steps in clathrin-mediated endocytosis at the apical surface of hyp7, which may in part account for molting defects observed in nekl and mlt mutants. This study has thus identified a conserved NEKL-MLT protein network that regulates remodeling of the apical extracellular matrix and intracellular trafficking, functions that may be conserved across species.

  11. Expression of HIV-1 matrix protein p17 and association with B-cell lymphoma in HIV-1 transgenic mice

    PubMed Central

    Carroll, Virginia A.; Lafferty, Mark K.; Marchionni, Luigi; Bryant, Joseph L.; Gallo, Robert C.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 infection is associated with increased risk for B-cell lymphomas. How HIV infection promotes the development of lymphoma is unclear, but it may involve chronic B-cell activation, inflammation, and/or impaired immunity, possibly leading to a loss of control of oncogenic viruses and reduced tumor immunosurveillance. We hypothesized that HIV structural proteins may contribute to lymphomagenesis directly, because they can persist long term in lymph nodes in the absence of viral replication. The HIV-1 transgenic mouse Tg26 carries a noninfectious HIV-1 provirus lacking part of the gag-pol region, thus constituting a model for studying the effects of viral products in pathogenesis. Approximately 15% of Tg26 mice spontaneously develop leukemia/lymphoma. We investigated which viral proteins are associated with the development of leukemia/lymphoma in the Tg26 mouse model, and performed microarray analysis on RNA from spleen and lymph nodes to identify potential mechanisms of lymphomagenesis. Of the viral proteins examined, only expression of HIV-1 matrix protein p17 was associated with leukemia/lymphoma development and was highly expressed in bone marrow before disease. The tumor cells resembled pro-B cells, and were CD19+IgM−IgD−CD93+CD43+CD21−CD23−VpreB+CXCR4+. Consistent with the pro-B-cell stage of B-cell development, microarray analysis revealed enrichment of transcripts, including Rag1, Rag2, CD93, Vpreb1, Vpreb3, and Igll1. We confirmed RAG1 expression in Tg26 tumors, and hypothesized that HIV-1 matrix protein p17 may directly induce RAG1 in B cells. Stimulation of human activated B cells with p17 enhanced RAG1 expression in three of seven donors, suggesting that intracellular signaling by p17 may lead to genomic instability and transformation. PMID:27799525

  12. The polybasic region is not essential for membrane binding of the matrix protein M1 of influenza virus

    SciTech Connect

    Thaa, Bastian; Herrmann, Andreas; Veit, Michael

    2009-01-05

    The matrix protein M1, the organizer of assembly of influenza virus, interacts with other virus components and with cellular membranes. It has been proposed that M1 binding to lipids is mediated by its polybasic region, but this could hitherto not been investigated in vivo since M1 accumulates in the nucleus of transfected cells. We have equipped M1 with nuclear export signals and showed that the constructs are bound to cellular membranes. Exchange of the complete polybasic region and of further hydrophobic amino acids in its vicinity did not prevent association of M1 with membranes. We therefore suppose that M1 probably interacts with membranes via multiple binding sites.

  13. Protein crystallization with microseed matrix screening: application to human germline antibody Fabs

    SciTech Connect

    Obmolova, Galina Malia, Thomas J.; Teplyakov, Alexey; Sweet, Raymond W.; Gilliland, Gary L.

    2014-07-23

    The power of microseed matrix screening is demonstrated in the crystallization of a panel of antibody Fab fragments. The crystallization of 16 human antibody Fab fragments constructed from all pairs of four different heavy chains and four different light chains was enabled by employing microseed matrix screening (MMS). In initial screening, diffraction-quality crystals were obtained for only three Fabs, while many Fabs produced hits that required optimization. Application of MMS, using the initial screens and/or refinement screens, resulted in diffraction-quality crystals of these Fabs. Five Fabs that failed to give hits in the initial screen were crystallized by cross-seeding MMS followed by MMS optimization. The crystallization protocols and strategies that resulted in structure determination of all 16 Fabs are presented. These results illustrate the power of MMS and provide a basis for developing future strategies for macromolecular crystallization.

  14. Effect of Multimerization on Membrane Association of Rous Sarcoma Virus and HIV-1 Matrix Domain Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Dick, Robert A.; Kamynina, Elena

    2013-01-01

    In most retroviruses, plasma membrane (PM) association of the Gag structural protein is a critical step in viral assembly, relying in part on interaction between the highly basic Gag MA domain and the negatively charged inner leaflet of the PM. Assembly is thought to begin with Gag dimerization followed by multimerization, resulting in a hexameric lattice. To directly address the role of multimerization in membrane binding, we fused the MA domains of Rous sarcoma virus (RSV) and HIV-1 to the chemically inducible dimerization domain FK506-binding protein (FKBP) or to the hexameric protein CcmK4 from cyanobacteria. The cellular localization of the resulting green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged chimeric proteins was examined by fluorescence imaging, and the association of the proteins with liposomes was quantified by flotation in sucrose gradients, following synthesis in a reticulocyte extract or as purified proteins. Four lipid compositions were tested, representative of liposomes commonly reported in flotation experiments. By themselves, GFP-tagged RSV and HIV-1 MA proteins were largely cytoplasmic, but both hexamerized proteins were highly concentrated at the PM. Dimerization led to partial PM localization for HIV-1 MA. These in vivo effects of multimerization were reproduced in vitro. In flotation analyses, the intact RSV and HIV-1 Gag proteins were more similar to multimerized MA than to monomeric MA. RNA is reported to compete with acidic liposomes for HIV-1 Gag binding, and thus we also examined the effects of RNase treatment or tRNA addition on flotation. tRNA competed with liposomes in the case of some but not all lipid compositions and ionic strengths. Taken together, our results further underpin the model that multimerization is critical for PM association of retroviral Gag proteins. In addition, they suggest that the modulation of membrane binding by RNA, as previously reported for HIV-1, may not hold for RSV. PMID:24109216

  15. The nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 targets Newcastle disease virus matrix protein to the nucleoli and facilitates viral replication.

    PubMed

    Duan, Zhiqiang; Chen, Jian; Xu, Haixu; Zhu, Jie; Li, Qunhui; He, Liang; Liu, Huimou; Hu, Shunlin; Liu, Xiufan

    2014-03-01

    The cellular nucleolar proteins are reported to facilitate the replication cycles of some human and animal viruses by interaction with viral proteins. In this study, a nucleolar phosphoprotein B23 was identified to interact with Newcastle disease virus (NDV) matrix (M) protein. We found that NDV M protein accumulated in the nucleolus by binding B23 early in infection, but resulted in the redistribution of B23 from the nucleoli to the nucleoplasm later in infection. In vitro binding studies utilizing deletion mutants indicated that amino acids 30-60 of M and amino acids 188-245 of B23 were required for binding. Furthermore, knockdown of B23 by siRNA or overexpression of B23 or M-binding B23-derived polypeptides remarkably reduced cytopathic effect and inhibited NDV replication. Collectively, we show that B23 facilitates NDV replication by targeting M to the nucleolus, demonstrating for the first time a direct role for nucleolar protein B23 in a paramyxovirus replication process.

  16. Detergent enhancement of on-tissue protein analysis by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mainini, Veronica; Angel, Peggi M; Magni, Fulvio; Caprioli, Richard M

    2011-01-15

    Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization (MALDI) Imaging Mass Spectrometry (IMS) is a molecular technology that allows simultaneous investigation of the content and spatial distribution of molecules within tissue. In this work, we examine different classes of detergents, the anionic sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), the nonionic detergents Triton X-100, Tween 20 and Tween 80, and the zwitterionic 3-[(3-cholamidopropyl)dimethylammonio]-1-propanesulfonate (CHAPS) for use in MALDI IMS of analytes above m/z 4000. These detergents were found to be compatible with MALDI MS and did not cause signal suppression relative to non-detergent applications and did not produce interfering background signals. In general, these detergents enhanced signal acquisition within the mass range m/z 4-40 000. Adding detergents into the matrix was comparable with the separate application of detergent and matrix. Evaluation of spectra collected from organ-specific regions of a whole mouse pup section showed that different detergents perform optimally with different organs, indicating that detergent selection should be optimized on the specific tissue for maximum gain. These data show the utility of detergents towards enhancement of protein signals for on-tissue MALDI IMS analysis.

  17. The structure of myristoylated Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein and the role of phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate in its membrane binding.

    PubMed

    Prchal, Jan; Srb, Pavel; Hunter, Eric; Ruml, Tomáš; Hrabal, Richard

    2012-10-26

    We determined the solution structure of myristoylated Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein by NMR spectroscopy. The myristoyl group is buried inside the protein and causes a slight reorientation of the helices. This reorientation leads to the creation of a binding site for phosphatidylinositols. The interaction between the matrix protein and phosphatidylinositols carrying C(8) fatty acid chains was monitored by observation of concentration-dependent chemical shift changes of the affected amino acid residues, a saturation transfer difference experiment and changes in (31)P chemical shifts. No differences in the binding mode or affinity were observed with differently phosphorylated phosphatidylinositols. The structure of the matrix protein-phosphatidylinositol-(4,5)-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P(2)] complex was then calculated with HADDOCK software based on the intermolecular nuclear Overhauser enhancement contacts between the ligand and the matrix protein obtained from a (13)C-filtered/(13)C-edited nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy experiment. PI(4,5)P(2) binding was not strong enough for triggering of the myristoyl-switch. The structural changes of the myristoylated matrix protein were also found to result in a drop in the oligomerization capacity of the protein.

  18. Label-free quantification proteomics reveals novel calcium binding proteins in matrix vesicles isolated from mineralizing Saos-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoying; Cui, Yazhou; Luan, Jing; Zhou, Xiaoyan; Zhang, Genglin; Zhang, Xiumei; Han, Jinxiang

    2013-06-01

    Matrix vesicles (MVs) involved in the initiation of mineralization by deposition of hydroxyapatite (HA) in their lumen are released by the budding of mineralization-competent cells during skeletogenesis and bone development. To identify additional mineralization-related proteins, MVs were isolated from non-stimulated and stimulated Saos-2 cells in culture via an Exoquick™ approach and the corresponding proteomes were identified and quantified with label-free quantitative proteome technology. The isolated MVs were confirmed by electron microscopy, alkaline phosphatase activity (ALP), biomarkers, and mineral formation analyses. Label-free quantitative proteome analysis revealed that 19 calcium binding proteins (CaBPs), including Grp94, calnexin, calreticulin, calmodulin, and S100A4/A10, were up-regulated in MVs of Saos-2 cells upon stimulation of mineralization. This result provides new clues to study the mechanism of the initiation of MV-mediated mineralization.

  19. Temperature and food influence shell growth and mantle gene expression of shell matrix proteins in the pearl oyster Pinctada margaritifera.

    PubMed

    Joubert, Caroline; Linard, Clémentine; Le Moullac, Gilles; Soyez, Claude; Saulnier, Denis; Teaniniuraitemoana, Vaihiti; Ky, Chin Long; Gueguen, Yannick

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed the combined effect of microalgal concentration and temperature on the shell growth of the bivalve Pinctada margaritifera and the molecular mechanisms underlying this biomineralization process. Shell growth was measured after two months of rearing in experimental conditions, using calcein staining of the calcified structures. Molecular mechanisms were studied though the expression of 11 genes encoding proteins implicated in the biomineralization process, which was assessed in the mantle. We showed that shell growth is influenced by both microalgal concentration and temperature, and that these environmental factors also regulate the expression of most of the genes studied. Gene expression measurement of shell matrix protein thereby appears to be an appropriate indicator for the evaluation of the biomineralization activity in the pearl oyster P. margaritifera under varying environmental conditions. This study provides valuable information on the molecular mechanisms of mollusk shell growth and its environmental control.

  20. Expression of cytoskeletal and matrix genes following exposure to ionizing radiation: Dose-rate effects and protein synthesis requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Woloschak, G.E. |; Felcher, P.; Chin-Mei Chang-Liu

    1995-06-01

    Experiments examined the effects of radiation dose-rate and protein synthesis inhibition expression of cytoskeletal and matrix elements in Syrian hamster embryo cells. Results demonstrated little effect of dose-rate for neutrons when comparing expression of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin genes. Cycloheximide repressed accumulation of {alpha}-tubulin-mRNA following exposure to high dose-rate neutrons or {gamma} rays. Cycloheximide did not affect accumulation of actin mRNA. Cycloheximide abrogated induction of fibronectin-mRNA which occurred following exposure to {gamma} rays and high dose-rate neutrons. These results suggest a role for labile proteins in the maintenance of {alpha}-tubulin and fibronectin mRNA accumulation following exposure to radiation. 24 refs., 3 tabs.

  1. [HIV-1 p17 matrix protein is transported into the cell nucleus and binds with genomic viral RNA].

    PubMed

    Bukrinskaia, A G; Vorkunova, G K; Tentsov, Iu Iu

    1993-01-01

    We have shown that gag polyprotein p55 is cleaved in cytosol rapidly after its synthesis, during 2 h, and p17 enters the nuclei while p24 resides in cytosol. To determine whether the nascent p17 is associated with viral genomic RNA in the nuclei, the cells were fractionated, the viral complexes were immunoprecipitated by monoclonal antibodies against gag proteins, and RNA was extracted and analyzed by slot and blot hybridization. Monoclonal antibodies against p17 precipitated all the viral RNA from the nuclei including full-size genomic RNA and essential part from membranes while monoclonal antibodies against p24 did not precipitate any viral RNA from the nuclei. These data suggest that matrix protein is linked to genomic RNA in the nuclei and rise the possibility that p17 may transfer viral nucleocapsids from the nuclei to plasma membranes, the site of virus assembly.

  2. Modulation of Active Site Electronic Structure by the Protein Matrix to Control [NiFe] Hydrogenase Reactivity

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Dayle MA; Raugei, Simone; Squier, Thomas C.

    2014-09-30

    Control of the reactivity of the nickel center of the [NiFe] hydrogenase and other metalloproteins commonly involves outer coordination sphere ligands that act to modify the geometry and physical properties of the active site metal centers. We carried out a combined set of classical molecular dynamics and quantum/classical mechanics calculations to provide quantitative estimates of how dynamic fluctuations of the active site within the protein matrix modulate the electronic structure at the catalytic center. Specifically we focused on the dynamics of the inner and outer coordination spheres of the cysteinate-bound Ni–Fe cluster in the catalytically active Ni-C state. There are correlated movements of the cysteinate ligands and the surrounding hydrogen-bonding network, which modulate the electron affinity at the active site and the proton affinity of a terminal cysteinate. On the basis of these findings, we hypothesize a coupling between protein dynamics and electron and proton transfer reactions critical to dihydrogen production.

  3. Biopolymer matrix for nano-encapsulation of urease - A model protein and its application in urea detection.

    PubMed

    Saxena, Abhishek; Bhattacharya, Arpita; Kumar, Satish; Epstein, Irving R; Sahney, Rachana

    2017-03-15

    Alginate microparticles and nanoparticles crosslinked with Ca(+2) ions are frequently employed in biomedical applications. Here we use microemulsion polymerization to prepare alginate nanoparticles (nanogels) using different crosslinking ions (Ca(+2), Sr(+2), Ba(+2)) to encapsulate a model protein, urease enzyme (jackbeans). With alginate concentrations of 0.2wt% in the aqueous phase, emulsion droplets showed good stability and narrow, monomodal distributions with radii ∼65±10nm. The size of the nanogel varies with the crosslinking cation and its affinity for the mannuronate and guluronate units in the linear alginate chain. The nanogels were further characterized using dynamic light scattering, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectrometry and zeta potential. This work demonstrates the potential application of Ba-alginate as an alternative matrix for nano-encapsulation of proteins and its use for biomedical applications.

  4. The effect of stromelysin-1 (MMP-3) on non-collagenous extracellular matrix proteins of demineralized dentin and the adhesive properties of restorative resins.

    PubMed

    Boukpessi, T; Menashi, S; Camoin, L; Tencate, J M; Goldberg, M; Chaussain-Miller, C

    2008-11-01

    Dentin non-collagenous matrix components (NCPs) are structural proteins involved in the formation, the architecture and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix (ECM). We investigated here how recombinant metalloproteinase stromelysin-1, also termed MMP-3, initiates the release of ECM molecules from artificially demineralized human dentin. Analysis of the supernatants by Western blotting reveals that MMP-3 extracts PGs (decorin, biglycan), and also a series of phosphorylated proteins: dentin sialoprotein (DSP), osteopontin (OPN), bone sialoprotein (BSP) and MEPE, but neither dentin matrix protein-1 (DMP1), another member of the SIBLING family, nor osteocalcin (OC), a non-phosphorylated matrix molecule. After treatment of dentin surfaces by MMP-3, scanning electron microscope (SEM) examination of resin replica shows an increased penetration of the resin into the dentin tubules when compared to surfaces only treated by demineralizing solutions. This preclinical investigation suggests that MMP-3 may be used to improve the adhesive properties of restorative materials.

  5. PPARα and PPARγ attenuate HIV-induced dysregulation of tight junction proteins by modulations of matrix metalloproteinase and proteasome activities

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Wen; Eum, Sung Yong; András, Ibolya E; Hennig, Bernhard; Toborek, Michal

    2009-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) plays an important role in HIV trafficking into the brain and the development of the central nervous system complications in HIV infection. Tight junctions are the main structural and functional elements that regulate the BBB integrity. Exposure of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (hCMEC/D3 cell line) to HIV-infected monocytes resulted in decreased expression of tight junction proteins, such as junctional adhesion molecule-A (JAM)-A, occludin, and zonula occludens (ZO)-1. Control experiments involved exposure to uninfected monocytes. Alterations of tight junction protein expression were associated with increased endothelial permeability and elevated transendothelial migration of HIV-infected monocytes across an in vitro model of the BBB. Notably, overexpression of the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)α or PPARγ attenuated HIV-mediated dysregulation of tight junction proteins. With the use of exogenous PPARγ agonists and silencing of PPARα or PPARγ, these protective effects were connected to down-regulation of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) and proteasome activities. Indeed, the HIV-induced decrease in the expression of JAM-A and occludin was restored by inhibition of MMP activity. Moreover, both MMP and proteasome inhibitors attenuated HIV-mediated altered expression of ZO-1. The present data indicate that down-regulation of MMP and proteasome activities constitutes a novel mechanism of PPAR-induced protections against HIV-induced disruption of brain endothelial cells.—Huang, W., Eum, S. Y., András, I. E., Hennig, B., Toborek, M. PPARα and PPARγ attenuate HIV-induced dysregulation of tight junction proteins by modulations of matrix metalloproteinase and proteasome activities. PMID:19141539

  6. The matrix protein CCN1 (CYR61) promotes proliferation, migration and tube formation of endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yang; Gao, Yu; Wang, Hong; Huang, Lan; Qin, Jun; Guo, Ruiwei; Song, Mingbao; Yu, Shiyong; Chen, Jianfei; Cui, Bin; Gao, Pan

    2008-10-15

    Neovascularization and re-endothelialization relies on circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but their recruitment and angiogenic roles are subjected to regulation by the vascular microenvironment, which remains largely unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of mature ECs and matrix protein CCN1 on the properties of EPCs. In a coculture system, effects of ECs on proliferation, migration and participation in tube-like formation of EPCs were evaluated, and functional assays were employed to identify the exact role of CCN1 in EPCs vitality and function. We demonstrated that ECs, as an indispensable part of the cellular milieu, significantly promoted the proliferation, migration and tube formation activities of EPCs, and more importantly, CCN1 was potentially involved in such effects of ECs. Expression of CCN1 in EPCs was significantly increased by serum, VEGF, ECs-cocultivation and ECs conditioned medium. Moreover, Ad-CCN1-mediated overexpression of CCN1 directly enhanced migration and tube formation of EPCs, whereas silencing of endogenous CCN1 in EPCs inhibits cell functions. Furthermore, CCN1 induced the expressions of chemokines and growth factors, such as MCP-1 and VEGF, suggesting a complex interaction between those proangiogenic factors. Our data suggest that matrix protein CCN1 may play an important role in microenvironment-mediated biological properties of EPCs.

  7. The matrix protein CCN1 (CYR61) promotes proliferation, migration and tube formation of endothelial progenitor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yu Yang; Gao Yu; Wang, Hong; Huang Lan Qin Jun; Guo Ruiwei; Song Mingbao; Yu Shiyong; Chen Jianfei; Cui Bin; Gao Pan

    2008-10-15

    Neovascularization and re-endothelialization relies on circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but their recruitment and angiogenic roles are subjected to regulation by the vascular microenvironment, which remains largely unknown. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of mature ECs and matrix protein CCN1 on the properties of EPCs. In a coculture system, effects of ECs on proliferation, migration and participation in tube-like formation of EPCs were evaluated, and functional assays were employed to identify the exact role of CCN1 in EPCs vitality and function. We demonstrated that ECs, as an indispensable part of the cellular milieu, significantly promoted the proliferation, migration and tube formation activities of EPCs, and more importantly, CCN1 was potentially involved in such effects of ECs. Expression of CCN1 in EPCs was significantly increased by serum, VEGF, ECs-cocultivation and ECs conditioned medium. Moreover, Ad-CCN1-mediated overexpression of CCN1 directly enhanced migration and tube formation of EPCs, whereas silencing of endogenous CCN1 in EPCs inhibits cell functions. Furthermore, CCN1 induced the expressions of chemokines and growth factors, such as MCP-1 and VEGF, suggesting a complex interaction between those proangiogenic factors. Our data suggest that matrix protein CCN1 may play an important role in microenvironment-mediated biological properties of EPCs.

  8. Tissue-specific and SRSF1-dependent splicing of fibronectin, a matrix protein that controls host cell invasion

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Mejia, Isabel Cristina; De Toledo, Marion; Della Seta, Flavio; Fafet, Patrick; Rebouissou, Cosette; Deleuze, Virginie; Blanchard, Jean Marie; Jorgensen, Christian; Tazi, Jamal; Vignais, Marie-Luce

    2013-01-01

    Cell invasion targets specific tissues in physiological placental implantation and pathological metastasis, which raises questions about how this process is controlled. We compare dermis and endometrium capacities to support trophoblast invasion, using matching sets of human primary fibroblasts in a coculture assay with human placental explants. Substituting endometrium, the natural trophoblast target, with dermis dramatically reduces trophoblast interstitial invasion. Our data reveal that endometrium expresses a higher rate of the fibronectin (FN) extra type III domain A+ (EDA+) splicing isoform, which displays stronger matrix incorporation capacity. We demonstrate that the high FN content of the endometrium matrix, and not specifically the EDA domain, supports trophoblast invasion by showing that forced incorporation of plasma FN (EDA–) promotes efficient trophoblast invasion. We further show that the serine/arginine-rich protein serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1) is more highly expressed in endometrium and, using RNA interference, that it is involved in the higher EDA exon inclusion rate in endometrium. Our data therefore show a mechanism by which tissues can be distinguished, for their capacity to support invasion, by their different rates of EDA inclusion, linked to their SRSF1 protein levels. In the broader context of cancer pathology, the results suggest that SRSF1 might play a central role not only in the tumor cells, but also in the surrounding stroma. PMID:23966470

  9. Transcriptional activation by a matrix associating region-binding protein. contextual requirements for the function of bright.

    PubMed

    Kaplan, M H; Zong, R T; Herrscher, R F; Scheuermann, R H; Tucker, P W

    2001-06-15

    Bright (B cell regulator of IgH transcription) is a B cell-specific, matrix associating region-binding protein that transactivates gene expression from the IgH intronic enhancer (E mu). We show here that Bright has multiple contextual requirements to function as a transcriptional activator. Bright cannot transactivate via out of context, concatenated binding sites. Transactivation is maximal on integrated substrates. Two of the three previously identified binding sites in E mu are required for full Bright transactivation. The Bright DNA binding domain defined a new family, which includes SWI1, a component of the SWI.SNF complex shown to have high mobility group-like DNA binding characteristics. Similar to one group of high mobility group box proteins, Bright distorts E mu binding site-containing DNA on binding, supporting the concept that it mediates E mu remodeling. Transfection studies further implicate Bright in facilitating spatially separated promoter-enhancer interactions in both transient and stable assays. Finally, we show that overexpression of Bright leads to enhanced DNase I sensitivity of the endogenous E mu matrix associating regions. These data further suggest that Bright may contribute to increased gene expression by remodeling the immunoglobulin locus during B cell development.

  10. Streptococcus pneumoniae choline-binding protein E interaction with plasminogen/plasmin stimulates migration across the extracellular matrix.

    PubMed

    Attali, Cécile; Frolet, Cécile; Durmort, Claire; Offant, Julien; Vernet, Thierry; Di Guilmi, Anne Marie

    2008-02-01

    The virulence mechanisms leading Streptococcus pneumoniae to convert from nasopharyngeal colonization to a tissue-invasive phenotype are still largely unknown. Proliferation of infection requires penetration of the extracellular matrix, which occurs by recruitment of host proteases to the bacterial cell surface. We present evidence supporting the role of choline-binding protein E (CBPE) (a member of the surface-exposed choline-binding protein family) as an important receptor for human plasminogen, the precursor of plasmin. The results of ligand overlay blot analyses, solid-phase binding assays, and surface plasmon resonance experiments support the idea of an interaction between CBPE and plasminogen. We have shown that the phosphorylcholine esterase (Pce) domain of CBPE interacts with the plasminogen kringle domains. Analysis of the crystal structure of the Pce domain, followed by site-directed mutagenesis, allowed the identification of the plasminogen-binding region composed in part by lysine residues, some of which map in a linear fashion on the surface of the Pce domain. The biological relevance of the CBPE-plasminogen interaction is supported by the fact that, compared to the wild-type strain, a mutant of pneumococcus with the cbpE gene deleted (i) displays a reduced level of plasminogen binding and plasmin activation and (ii) shows reduced ability to cross the extracellular matrix in an in vitro model. These results support the idea of a physiological role for the CBPE-plasminogen interaction in pneumococcal dissemination into human tissue.

  11. The Matrix protein M1 from influenza C virus induces tubular membrane invaginations in an in vitro cell membrane model

    PubMed Central

    Saletti, David; Radzimanowski, Jens; Effantin, Gregory; Midtvedt, Daniel; Mangenot, Stéphanie; Weissenhorn, Winfried; Bassereau, Patricia; Bally, Marta

    2017-01-01

    Matrix proteins from enveloped viruses play an important role in budding and stabilizing virus particles. In order to assess the role of the matrix protein M1 from influenza C virus (M1-C) in plasma membrane deformation, we have combined structural and in vitro reconstitution experiments with model membranes. We present the crystal structure of the N-terminal domain of M1-C and show by Small Angle X-Ray Scattering analysis that full-length M1-C folds into an elongated structure that associates laterally into ring-like or filamentous polymers. Using negatively charged giant unilamellar vesicles (GUVs), we demonstrate that M1-C full-length binds to and induces inward budding of membrane tubules with diameters that resemble the diameter of viruses. Membrane tubule formation requires the C-terminal domain of M1-C, corroborating its essential role for M1-C polymerization. Our results indicate that M1-C assembly on membranes constitutes the driving force for budding and suggest that M1-C plays a key role in facilitating viral egress. PMID:28120862

  12. Regulation of protein binding toward a ligand on chromatographic matrixes by masking and forced-releasing effects using thermoresponsive polymer.

    PubMed

    Yoshizako, Kimihiro; Akiyama, Yoshikatsu; Yamanaka, Hidenori; Shinohara, Yasuro; Hasegawa, Yukio; Carredano, Enrique; Kikuchi, Akihiko; Okano, Teruo

    2002-08-15

    A novel concept of affinity regulation based on masking and forced-releasing effects using a thermoresponsive polymer was elucidated. Affinity chromatographic matrixes were prepared using either poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-ethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) or poly(glycidyl methacrylate-co-triethyleneglycol dimethacrylate) beads immobilized with ligand molecule, Cibacron Blue F3G-A (CB), together with poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PIPAAm), a polymer with a cloud point of 32 degrees C. Two different lengths of spacer molecules were used for the immobilization of CB while maintaining the PIPAAm size constant. Chromatographic analyses using bovine serum albumin as a model protein showed a clear correlation between spacer length and binding capacity at temperatures lower than the lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of PIPAAm. The binding capacity under the LCST was significantly reduced only when the calculated spacer length was shorter than the mean size of the extended PIPAAm. Furthermore, the adsorbed protein could be desorbed (released) from the matrix surface by lowering the temperature to below the LCST while maintaining other factors such as pH and ion strength. Selective recovery of human albumin from human sera was demonstrated using this newly developed thermoresponsive affinity column.

  13. Extracellular matrix contains insulin-like growth factor binding protein-5: potentiation of the effects of IGF-I

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Insulin-like growth factor binding proteins (IGFBPs) have been shown to serve as carrier proteins for the insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) and to modulate their biologic effects. Since extracellular matrix (ECM) has been shown to be a reservoir for IGF-I and IGF-II, we examined the ECM of cultured human fetal fibroblasts and found that IGFBP-5 was incorporated intact into ECM, while mostly inert proteolytic fragments were found in the medium. In contrast, two other forms of IGFBP that are secreted by these cells were either present in ECM in minimal amounts (IGFBP-3) or not detected (IGFBP-4). Likewise, when purified IGFBPs were incubated with ECM, IGFBP-5 bound preferentially. IGFBP-5 was found to bind to types III and IV collagen, laminin, and fibronectin. Increasing salt concentrations inhibited the binding of IGFBP-5 to ECM and accelerated the release of IGFBP-5 from ECM, suggesting an ionic basis for this interaction. ECM-associated IGFBP-5 had a sevenfold decrease in affinity for IGF-I compared to IGFBP-5 in solution. Furthermore, when IGFBP-5 was present in cell culture substrata, it potentiated the growth stimulatory effects of IGF- I on fibroblasts. When IGFBP-5 was present only in the medium, it was degraded to a 22-kD fragment and had no effect on IGF-I-stimulated growth. We conclude that IGFBP-5 is present in fibroblast ECM, where it is protected from degradation and can potentiate the biologic actions of IGF-I. These findings provide a molecular explanation for the association of the IGF's with the extracellular matrix, and suggest that the binding of the IGF's to matrix, via IGFBP-5, may be important in mediating the cellular growth response to these growth factors. PMID:7683690

  14. Dual Roles of the Lysine-Rich Matrix Protein (KRMP)-3 in Shell Formation of Pearl Oyster, Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Jian; Xu, Guangrui; Xie, Jun; Lee, Ilsun; Xiang, Liang; Wang, Hongzhong; Zhang, Guiyou; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2015-01-01

    Matrix proteins play important roles in shell formation. Our group firstly isolated three cDNAs encoding lysine-rich matrix protein from Pinctada fucata in 2006. However, the functions of KRMPs are not fully understood. In addition, KRMPs contain two functional domains, the basic domain and the Gly/Tyr domain respectively. Based on the modular organization, the roles of their two domains were poorly characterized. Furthermore, KRMPs were then reported in other two species, P. maxima and P. margaritifera, which indicated that KRMPs might be very important for shell formation. In this study, the characterization and function of KRMP-3 and its two functional domains were studied in vitro through purification of recombinant glutathione S-transferase tagged KRMP-3 and two KRMP-3 deletion mutants. Western blot and immunofluorescence revealed that native KRMP-3 existed in the EDTA-insoluble matrix of the prismatic layer and was located in the organic sheet and the prismatic sheath. Recombinant KRMP-3 (rKRMP-3) bound tightly to chitin and this binding capacity was duo to the Gly/Tyr-rich region. rKRMP-3 inhibited the precipitation of CaCO3, affected the crystal morphology of calcite and inhibited the growth of aragonite in vitro, which was almost entirely attributed to the lysine-rich region. The results present direct evidence of the roles of KRMP-3 in shell biomineralization. The functional rBR region was found to participate in the growth control of crystals and the rGYR region was responsible to bind to chitin. PMID:26161976

  15. Sequence analysis and expression of the M1 and M2 matrix protein genes of hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nishizawa, T.; Kurath, G.; Winton, J.R.

    1997-01-01

    We have cloned and sequenced a 2318 nucleotide region of the genomic RNA of hirame rhabdovirus (HIRRV), an important viral pathogen of Japanese flounder Paralichthys olivaceus. This region comprises approximately two-thirds of the 3' end of the nucleocapsid protein (N) gene and the complete matrix protein (M1 and M2) genes with the associated intergenic regions. The partial N gene sequence was 812 nucleotides in length with an open reading frame (ORF) that encoded the carboxyl-terminal 250 amino acids of the N protein. The M1 and M2 genes were 771 and 700 nucleotides in length, respectively, with ORFs encoding proteins of 227 and 193 amino acids. The M1 gene sequence contained an additional small ORF that could encode a highly basic, arginine-rich protein of 25 amino acids. Comparisons of the N, M1, and M2 gene sequences of HIRRV with the corresponding sequences of the fish rhabdoviruses, infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) or viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV) indicated that HIRRV was more closely related to IHNV than to VHSV, but was clearly distinct from either. The putative consensus gene termination sequence for IHNV and VHSV, AGAYAG(A)(7), was present in the N-M1, M1-M2, and M2-G intergenic regions of HIRRV as were the putative transcription initiation sequences YGGCAC and AACA. An Escherichia coli expression system was used to produce recombinant proteins from the M1 and M2 genes of HIRRV. These were the same size as the authentic M1 and M2 proteins and reacted with anti-HIRRV rabbit serum in western blots. These reagents can be used for further study of the fish immune response and to test novel control methods.

  16. Stretched Extracellular Matrix Proteins Turn Fouling and Are Functionally Rescued by the Chaperones Albumin and Casein

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    While evidence is mounting that cells exploit protein unfolding for mechanochemical signal conversion (mechanotransduction), what mechanisms are in place to deal with the unwanted consequences of exposing hydrophobic residues upon force-induced protein unfolding? Here, we show that mechanical chaperones exist that can transiently bind to hydrophobic residues that are freshly exposed by mechanical force. The stretch-upregulated binding of albumin or casein to fibronectin fibers is reversible and does not inhibit fiber contraction once the tension is released. PMID:19743815

  17. Purification of water-soluble bone-inductive protein from bovine demineralized bone matrix.

    PubMed

    Yoshimura, Y; Hirano, A; Nishida, M; Kawada, J; Horisaka, Y; Okamoto, Y; Matsumoto, N; Yamashita, K; Takagi, T

    1993-05-01

    The water-soluble fraction containing bone-inductive activity was purified from guanidine-hydrochloride extracts of bovine demineralized bone. The purification steps include ultrafiltration, dialysis, affinity chromatography on heparin-Sepharose and gel chromatography on Sephacryl S-200. Combination of these steps was proven to be an effective and rapid method for the purification of this protein. Subcutaneous implantation of the water-soluble protein with type I collagen was carried out in the thorax of rats. When alkaline phosphatase activity and calcium content in implants were used as indices for purification, the water-soluble bone-inductive protein was purified > 600-fold according to the enzyme activity and 64-fold according to the calcium content. A morphological examination revealed that many chondrocyte and osteoblast cells were seen in the location of the implanted material. Sodium dodecyl sulfate/gel electrophoresis of the protein produced in this way under non-reducing conditions revealed four protein bands of 18, 16, 14 and 11 kDa. None of the separated bands had any biological activity. This result suggests that the water-soluble bone-inductive activity depends on an associated form of various proteins in the range of 18 to 11 kDa.

  18. Influence of eggshell matrix proteins on the precipitation of calcium carbonate (CaCO 3)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández-Hernández, A.; Vidal, M. L.; Gómez-Morales, J.; Rodríguez-Navarro, A. B.; Labas, V.; Gautron, J.; Nys, Y.; García Ruiz, J. M.

    2008-04-01

    To understand the role of eggshell organic matrix on the biomineralization process, we have tested the influence of different purified fractions of the eggshell organic matrix on calcium carbonate (CaCO 3) precipitation. Purification was carried out after successive anion-exchange chromatography, hydrophobic interaction chromatography and gel filtration chromatography of two different prepurified eggshell extracts (A) and (B); the purified fractions (named g, h, n and r) and ( c', g', i', k') respectively were diluted to 50 μg/ml before being tested in vitro and analysed by the sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) procedure and mass spectrometry. The precipitation experiments were carried out by the method of vapour diffusion on crystallization mushrooms. Each purified fraction showed a different effect on CaCO 3 precipitation. Some of them exhibited a strong inhibitory effect on nucleation, thus suppressing the precipitation of CaCO 3 almost totally while the others did not produce any notable effect. However, all fractions favoured the precipitation of calcite over the other CaCO 3 polymorphs. Additionally, all fractions modified in a different manner the size and morphology of the precipitated calcite crystals.

  19. Proteomic strategy for identifying mollusc shell proteins using mild chemical degradation and trypsin digestion of insoluble organic shell matrix: a pilot study on Haliotis tuberculata.

    PubMed

    Bédouet, Laurent; Marie, Arul; Berland, Sophie; Marie, Benjamin; Auzoux-Bordenave, Stéphanie; Marin, Frédéric; Milet, Christian

    2012-08-01

    A successful strategy for the identification of shell proteins is based on proteomic analyses where soluble and insoluble fractions isolated from organic shell matrix are digested with trypsin with the aim of generating peptides, which are used to identify novel shell proteins contained in databases. However, using trypsin as a sole degradative agent is limited by the enzyme's cleavage specificity and is dependent upon the occurrence of lysine and arginine in the shell protein sequence. To bypass this limitation, we investigated the ability of trifluoroacetic acid (TFA), a low-specificity chemical degradative agent, to generate clusters of analyzable peptides from organic shell matrix, suitable for database annotation. Acetic acid-insoluble fractions from Haliotis tuberculata shell were processed by trypsin followed by TFA digestion. The hydrolysates were used to annotate an expressed sequence tag library constructed from the mantle tissue of Haliotis asinina, a tropical abalone species. The characterization of sequences with repeat motifs featured in some of the shell matrix proteins benefited from TFA-induced serial cutting, which can result in peptide ladder series. Using the degradative specificities of TFA and trypsin, we were able to identify five novel shell proteins. This pilot study indicates that a mild chemical digestion of organic shell matrix combined with trypsin generates peptides suitable for proteomic analysis for better characterization of mollusc shell matrix proteins.

  20. Patterns of Expression in the Matrix Proteins Responsible for Nucleation and Growth of Aragonite Crystals in Flat Pearls of Pinctada fucata

    PubMed Central

    Xiang, Liang; Su, Jingtan; Zheng, Guilan; Liang, Jian; Zhang, Guiyou; Wang, Hongzhong; Xie, Liping; Zhang, Rongqing

    2013-01-01

    The initial growth of the nacreous layer is crucial for comprehending the formation of nacreous aragonite. A flat pearl method in the presence of the inner-shell film was conducted to evaluate the role of matrix proteins in the initial stages of nacre biomineralization in vivo. We examined the crystals deposited on a substrate and the expression patterns of the matrix proteins in the mantle facing the substrate. In this study, the aragonite crystals nucleated on the surface at 5 days in the inner-shell film system. In the film-free system, the calcite crystals nucleated at 5 days, a new organic film covered the calcite, and the aragonite nucleated at 10 days. This meant that the nacre lamellae appeared in the inner-shell film system 5 days earlier than that in the film-free system, timing that was consistent with the maximum level of matrix proteins during the first 20 days. In addition, matrix proteins (Nacrein, MSI60, N19, N16 and Pif80) had similar expression patterns in controlling the sequential morphologies of the nacre growth in the inner-film system, while these proteins in the film-free system also had similar patterns of expression. These results suggest that matrix proteins regulate aragonite nucleation and growth with the inner-shell film in vivo. PMID:23776687

  1. Coating extracellular matrix proteins on a (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated glass substrate for improved cell culture.

    PubMed

    Masuda, Hiro-taka; Ishihara, Seiichiro; Harada, Ichiro; Mizutani, Takeomi; Ishikawa, Masayori; Kawabata, Kazushige; Haga, Hisashi

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate that a (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated glass surface is superior to an untreated glass surface for coating with extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins when used as a cell culture substrate to observe cell physiology and behavior. We found that MDCK cells cultured on untreated glass coated with ECM removed the coated ECM protein and secreted different ECM proteins. In contrast, the cells did not remove the coated ECM protein when seeded on (3-aminopropyl)triethoxysilane-treated (i.e., silanized) glass coated with ECM. Furthermore, the morphology and motility of cells grown on silanized glass differed from those grown on non-treated glass, even when both types of glass were initially coated with laminin. We also found that cells on silanized glass coated with laminin had higher motility than those on silanized glass coated with fibronectin. Based on our results, we suggest that silanized glass is a more suitable cell culture substrate than conventional non-treated glass when coated by ECM for observations of ECM effects on cell physiology.

  2. Collagen matrix-induced expression of integrin αVβ3 in circulating angiogenic cells can be targeted by matricellular protein CCN1 to enhance their function.

    PubMed

    McNeill, Brian; Vulesevic, Branka; Ostojic, Aleksandra; Ruel, Marc; Suuronen, Erik J

    2015-04-01

    Circulating angiogenic cells (CACs) play an important role in vascular homeostasis and hold therapeutic promise for treating a variety of cardiovascular diseases. However, further improvements are needed because the effects of CAC therapy remain minimal or transient. The regenerative potential of these cells can be improved by culture on a collagen-based matrix through the up-regulation of key integrin proteins. We found that human CAC function was enhanced by using the matricellular protein CCN1 (CYR61/CTGF/NOV family member 1) to target integrin αV and β3, which are up-regulated on matrix. Compared to matrix-cultured CACs, CCN1-matrix CACs exhibited a 2.2-fold increase in cell proliferation, 1.8-fold greater migration toward VEGF, and 1.7-fold more incorporation into capillary-like structures in an angiogenesis assay. In vivo, intramuscular injection of CCN1-matrix-cultured CACs into ischemic hind limbs of CD-1 nude mice resulted in blood flow recovery to 80% of baseline, which was greater than matrix-cultured CACs (66%) and PBS (35%) treatment groups. Furthermore, transplanted CCN1-matrix CACs exhibited greater engraftment (11-fold) and stimulated the up-regulation of survival and angiogenic genes (>3-fold). These findings reveal the importance of cell-matrix interactions in regulating CAC function and also reveal a mechanism by which these may be exploited to enhance cell therapies for ischemic disease.

  3. Physical properties of artificial extracellular matrix protein hydrogels prepared by thiol-maleimide chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Wenbin; Tirrell, David

    2013-03-01

    Using genetic engineering methods, telechelic proteins were designed from elastin- and fibronectin-derived repeating units and biosynthesized in E. coli. The telechelic proteins bear terminal thiols could either undergo chain-extension with bis-maleimide-functionalized poly(ethylene glycol) (MAL-PEG-MAL) or crosslinking with tetrakis-maleimide-functionalized 4-arm star PEG (star-PEG-MAL). The latter leads to protein-based hydrogels that are transparent, uniform, and highly extensible. The reaction kinetics ranges from several minutes to a few hours depending on the free-thiol content and the protein weight percentage. The mechanical properties of the gel depend on the protein content and the cross-linker concentration. It is also possible to further tune the mechanical properties by using a mixture of MAL-PEG-MAL and star-PEG-MAL for crosslinking. The water contents of the hydrogels are high, especially after swelling. The results suggest its promising application for cell encapsulation and 3D cell culture in tissue engineering.

  4. Resonance assignments of the myristoylated Y28F/Y67F mutant of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus matrix protein.

    PubMed

    Doležal, Michal; Hrabal, Richard; Ruml, Tomáš; Rumlová, Michaela

    2015-10-01

    The matrix protein (MA) of the Mason-Pfizer monkey virus (M-PMV) plays a key role in the transport and budding of immature retroviral particles from the host cell. Natural N-terminal myristoylation of MA is essential for the targeting of the particles to the plasma membrane and participates in the interaction of MA with membranes phospholipids. The mutation Y28F/Y67F in MA reduces budding and thus causes the accumulation of viral particles under the cytoplasmic membrane. To investigate the impact of Y28F/Y67F mutation on the structure of MA, we prepared this protein in amount and quality suitable for NMR spectroscopy. We report backbone, side-chain and myristoyl residue assignments of the Y28F/Y67F mutant of the M-PMV matrix protein, which will be used to study the interaction with membrane phospholipids and to determine the structure of the mutant matrix protein.

  5. A nuclear export signal in the matrix protein of Influenza A virus is required for efficient virus replication.

    PubMed

    Cao, Shuai; Liu, Xiaoling; Yu, Maorong; Li, Jing; Jia, Xiaojuan; Bi, Yuhai; Sun, Lei; Gao, George F; Liu, Wenjun

    2012-05-01

    The influenza A virus matrix 1 protein (M1) shuttles between the cytoplasm and the nucleus during the viral life cycle and plays an important role in the replication, assembly, and budding of viruses. Here, a leucine-rich nuclear export signal (NES) was identified specifically for the nuclear export of the M1 protein. The predicted NES, designated the Flu-A-M1 NES, is highly conserved among all sequences from the influenza A virus subtype, but no similar NES motifs are found in the M1 sequences of influenza B or C viruses. The biological function of the Flu-A-M1 NES was demonstrated by its ability to translocate an enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-NES fusion protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in transfected cells, compared to the even nuclear and cytoplasmic distribution of EGFP. The translocation of EGFP-NES from the nucleus to the cytoplasm was not inhibited by leptomycin B. NES mutations in M1 caused a nuclear retention of the protein and an increased nuclear accumulation of NEP during transfection. Indeed, as shown by rescued recombinant viruses, the mutation of the NES impaired the nuclear export of M1 and significantly reduced the virus titer compared to titers of wild-type viruses. The NES-defective M1 protein was retained in the nucleus during infection, accompanied by a lowered efficiency of the nuclear export of viral RNPs (vRNPs). In conclusion, M1 nuclear export was specifically dependent on the Flu-A-M1 NES and critical for influenza A virus replication.

  6. RESEARCH ARTICLE Molecular cloning and expression analysis of a matrix Gla protein gene in the spinyhead croaker, Collichthys lucidus.

    PubMed

    Song, W; Zhao, M D; Jiang, K J; Zhang, F Y; Zhao, M; Meng, Y Y; Ma, L B

    2016-11-03

    The matrix Gla (gamma-carboxyglutamic acid-rich) protein (MGP), a vitamin K-dependent and Gla-containing protein, is a calcification inhibitor that mainly functions in tissue calcification and mineralization. In this study, we obtained the complete cDNA sequence of MGP from the spinyhead croaker (Collichthys lucidus), which we named Cl-MGP. Cl-MGP was 923 bp long with a 384-bp open reading fragment that encoded 127 amino acids. The predicted MGP protein sequence contained a 19-residue hydrophobic signal peptide, suggesting that it possesses secretory characteristics. The Gla domain and the invariant unit ErraEtCedyspC, which has been identified in all known vitamin K-dependent vertebrate proteins, were highly conserved in Cl-MGP, suggesting that it uses the same mechanism to function as the known proteins. An alignment analysis revealed that Cl-MGP had the highest identity with Larimichthys crocea (93%), which had lost five amino acid residues in the C-terminal. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction revealed that Cl-MGP expression was highest in the gill, followed by the cholecyst and spleen, with almost no expression in the blood, muscle, or testes. The high Cl-MGP expression in the gill is similar to that observed in other fish species, but the relatively high expression found in the cholecyst and spleen is not seen in all species. Future studies should investigate the tissue distributions of both mRNA and proteins in different species, in order to understand the function and evolution of MGP in different species.

  7. Bone morphogenetic protein 4 inhibits TGF-beta2 stimulation of extracellular matrix proteins in optic nerve head cells: role of gremlin in ECM modulation.

    PubMed

    Zode, Gulab S; Clark, Abbot F; Wordinger, Robert J

    2009-05-01

    The characteristic cupping of the optic nerve head (ONH) in glaucoma is associated with elevated TGF-beta2 and increased synthesis and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. In addition to TGF-beta2, the human ONH also expresses bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) and BMP receptors, which are members of the TGF-beta superfamily. We examined the potential effects of BMP4 and the BMP antagonist gremlin on TGF-beta2 induction of ECM proteins in ONH cells. BMP-4 dose dependently inhibited TGF-beta2-induced fibronectin (FN) and PAI-1 expression in ONH astrocytes and lamina cribrosa (LC) cells and also reduced TGF-beta2 stimulation of collagen I, collagen VI, and elastin. Addition of gremlin blocked this BMP-4 response, increasing cellular and secreted FN as well as PAI-1 levels in both cell types. Gremlin was expressed in ONH tissues and ONH cells, and gremlin protein levels were significantly increased in the LC region of human glaucomatous ONH tissues. Interestingly, recombinant gremlin dose dependently increased ECM protein expression in cultured ONH astrocytes and LC cells. Gremlin stimulation of ECM required activation of TGF-beta receptor and R-Smad3. TGF-beta2 increased gremlin mRNA expression and protein levels in ONH cells. Inhibition of either the type I TGF-beta receptor or Smad3 phosphorylation blocked TGF-beta2-induced gremlin expression. In conclusion, BMP4 blocked the TGF-beta2 induction of ECM proteins in ONH cells. The BMP antagonist gremlin reversed this inhibition, allowing TGF-beta2 stimulation of ECM synthesis. Increased expression of gremlin in the glaucomatous ONH may further exacerbate TGF-beta2 effects on ONH ECM metabolism by inhibiting BMP-4 antagonism of TGF-beta2 signaling. Modulation of the ECM via gremlin provides a novel therapeutic target for glaucoma.

  8. Inactive matrix Gla protein is causally related to adverse health outcomes: a Mendelian randomization study in a Flemish population.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Ping; Gu, Yu-Mei; Thijs, Lutgarde; Knapen, Marjo H J; Salvi, Erika; Citterio, Lorena; Petit, Thibault; Carpini, Simona Delli; Zhang, Zhenyu; Jacobs, Lotte; Jin, Yu; Barlassina, Cristina; Manunta, Paolo; Kuznetsova, Tatiana; Verhamme, Peter; Struijker-Boudier, Harry A; Cusi, Daniele; Vermeer, Cees; Staessen, Jan A

    2015-02-01

    Matrix Gla-protein is a vitamin K-dependent protein that strongly inhibits arterial calcification. Vitamin K deficiency leads to production of inactive nonphosphorylated and uncarboxylated matrix Gla protein (dp-ucMGP). The risk associated with dp-ucMGP in the population is unknown. In a Flemish population study, we measured circulating dp-ucMGP at baseline (1996-2011), genotyped MGP, recorded adverse health outcomes until December 31, 2012, and assessed the multivariable-adjusted associations of adverse health outcomes with dp-ucMGP. We applied a Mendelian randomization analysis using MGP genotypes as instrumental variables. Among 2318 participants, baseline dp-ucMGP averaged 3.61 μg/L. Over 14.1 years (median), 197 deaths occurred, 58 from cancer and 70 from cardiovascular disease; 85 participants experienced a coronary event. The risk of death and non-cancer mortality curvilinearly increased (P≤0.008) by 15.0% (95% confidence interval, 6.9-25.3) and by 21.5% (11.1-32.9) for a doubling of the nadir (1.43 and 0.97 μg/L, respectively). With higher dp-ucMGP, cardiovascular mortality log-linearly increased (hazard ratio for dp-ucMGP doubling, 1.14 [1.01-1.28]; P=0.027), but coronary events log-linearly decreased (0.93 [0.88-0.99]; P=0.021). dp-ucMGP levels were associated (P≤0.001) with MGP variants rs2098435, rs4236, and rs2430692. For non-cancer mortality and coronary events (P≤0.022), but not for total and cardiovascular mortality (P≥0.13), the Mendelian randomization analysis suggested causality. Higher dp-ucMGP predicts total, non-cancer and cardiovascular mortality, but lower coronary risk. For non-cancer mortality and coronary events, these associations are likely causal.

  9. Controlling the spatial organization of cells and extracellular matrix proteins in engineered tissues using ultrasound standing wave fields

    PubMed Central

    Garvin, Kelley A.; Hocking, Denise C.; Dalecki, Diane

    2010-01-01

    Tissue engineering holds great potential for saving the lives of thousands of organ transplant patients who die each year while waiting for donor organs. However, to successfully fabricate tissues and organs in vitro, methodologies that recreate appropriate extracellular microenvironments to promote tissue regeneration are needed. In this study, we have developed an application of ultrasound standing wave field (USWF) technology to the field of tissue engineering. Acoustic radiation forces associated with USWF were used to non-invasively control the spatial distribution of mammalian cells and cell-bound extracellular matrix proteins within three-dimensional collagen-based engineered tissues. Cells were suspended in unpolymerized collagen solutions and were exposed to a continuous wave USWF, generated using a 1 MHz source, for 15 min at room temperature. Collagen polymerization occurred during USWF exposure resulting in the formation of three-dimensional collagen gels with distinct bands of aggregated cells. The density of cell bands was dependent on both the initial cell concentration and the pressure amplitude of the USWF. Importantly, USWF exposure did not decrease cell viability, but rather enhanced cell function. Alignment of cells into loosely clustered, planar cell bands significantly increased levels of cell-mediated collagen gel contraction and collagen fiber reorganization as compared to sham-exposed samples with a homogeneous cell distribution. Additionally, the extracellular matrix protein, fibronectin, was localized to cell banded areas by binding the protein to the cell surface prior to USWF exposure. By controlling cell and extracellular organization, this application of USWF technology is a promising approach for engineering tissues in vitro. PMID:20870341

  10. Mussel adhesive protein provides cohesive matrix for collagen type-1α.

    PubMed

    Martinez Rodriguez, Nadine R; Das, Saurabh; Kaufman, Yair; Wei, Wei; Israelachvili, Jacob N; Waite, J Herbert

    2015-05-01

    Understanding the interactions between collagen and adhesive mussel foot proteins (mfps) can lead to improved medical and dental adhesives, particularly for collagen-rich tissues. Here we investigated interactions between collagen type-1, the most abundant load-bearing animal protein, and mussel foot protein-3 (mfp-3) using a quartz crystal microbalance and surface forces apparatus (SFA). Both hydrophilic and hydrophobic variants of mfp-3 were exploited to probe the nature of the interaction between the protein and collagen. Our chief findings are: 1) mfp-3 is an effective chaperone for tropocollagen adsorption to TiO2 and mica surfaces; 2) at pH 3, collagen addition between two mfp-3 films (Wc = 5.4 ± 0.2 mJ/m(2)) increased their cohesion by nearly 35%; 3) oxidation of Dopa in mfp-3 by periodate did not abolish the adhesion between collagen and mfp-3 films, and 4) collagen bridging between both hydrophilic and hydrophobic mfp-3 variant films is equally robust, suggesting that hydrophobic interactions play a minor role. Extensive H-bonding, π-cation and electrostatic interactions are more plausible to explain the reversible bridging of mfp-3 films by collagen.

  11. Redox Capacity of an Extracellular Matrix Protein Associated with Adhesion in Mytilus californianus.

    PubMed

    Nicklisch, Sascha C T; Spahn, Jamie E; Zhou, Hongjun; Gruian, Cristina M; Waite, J Herbert

    2016-04-05

    Adhesive mussel foot proteins (Mfps) rely in part on DOPA (3,4-dihydroxyphenyl-l-alanine) side chains to mediate attachment to mineral surfaces underwater. Oxidation of DOPA to Dopaquinone (Q) effectively abolishes the adsorption of Mfps to these surfaces. The thiol-rich mussel foot protein-6 (Mfp-6) rescues adhesion compromised by adventitious DOPA oxidation by reducing Q back to DOPA. The redox chemistry and kinetics of foot-extracted Mfp-6 were investigated by using a nonspecific chromogenic probe to equilibrate with the redox pool. Foot-extracted Mfp-6 has a reducing capacity of ~17 e(-) per protein; half of this comes from the cysteine residues, whereas the other half comes from other constituents, probably a cohort of four or five nonadhesive, redox-active DOPA residues in Mfp-6 with an anodic peak potential ~500 mV lower than that for oxidation of cysteine to cystine. At higher pH, DOPA redox reversibility is lost possibly due to Q scavenging by Cys thiolates. Analysis by one- and two-dimensional proton nuclear magnetic resonance identified a pronounced β-sheet structure with a hydrophobic core in foot-extracted Mfp-6 protein. The structure endows redox-active side chains in Mfp-6, i.e., cysteine and DOPA, with significant reducing power over a broad pH range, and this power is measurably diminished in recombinant Mfp-6.

  12. Extracellular matrix protein patterns guide human chondrocytes adhesion and alignment characterized by vimentin and matrilin-3.

    PubMed

    Pan, Chang-Jiang; Ding, Hong-Yan; Dong, Yun-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    The main purpose of the present study is to investigate the influences of collagen VI (col-VI) patterns on human chondrocytes behaviors. To this end, col-VI stripes with varying width and interstripe spacing are created on polystyrene (PS) surfaces by microcontact printing (μCP). Human chondrocytes are then seeded on these protein patterns and the cell adhesion and alignment are investigated by staining the vimentin and matrilin-3 secreted by seeded chondrocytes. The results indicate that the cells preferentially attach onto the protein areas, rendering cell patterns and the elongated cell shapes. The pattern dimensions can significantly influence cell adhesion, spreading and orientation. The stripe protein patterns can guide cell adhesion and alignment. The cell morphologies can be controlled by carefully designing the pattern shapes and sizes. Our results suggest that the protein patterns can be used to modify biomaterials' surfaces for selective cell-binding and cell alignment. It could provide some cues for the development of novel implantable biomaterials, such as tissue-engineered scaffolds for cartilage replacement, where specific cell alignment is needed.

  13. The Respiratory Syncytial Virus Phosphoprotein, Matrix Protein, and Fusion Protein Carboxy-Terminal Domain Drive Efficient Filamentous Virus-Like Particle Formation.

    PubMed

    Meshram, Chetan D; Baviskar, Pradyumna S; Ognibene, Cherie M; Oomens, Antonius G P

    2016-12-01

    Virus-like particles (VLPs) are attractive as a vaccine concept. For human respiratory syncytial virus (hRSV), VLP assembly is poorly understood and appears inefficient. Hence, hRSV antigens are often incorporated into foreign VLP systems to generate anti-RSV vaccine candidates. To better understand the assembly, and ultimately to enable efficient production, of authentic hRSV VLPs, we examined the associated requirements and mechanisms. In a previous analysis in HEp-2 cells, the nucleoprotein (N), phosphoprotein (P), matrix protein (M), and fusion protein (F) were required for formation of filamentous VLPs, which, similar to those of wild-type virus, were associated with the cell surface. Using fluorescence and electron microscopy combined with immunogold labeling, we examined the surfaces of transfected HEp-2 cells and further dissected the process of filamentous VLP formation. Our results show that N is not required. Coexpression of P plus M plus F, but not P plus M, M plus F, or P plus F, induced both viral protein coalescence and formation of filamentous VLPs that resembled wild-type virions. Despite suboptimal coalescence in the absence of P, the M and F proteins, when coexpressed, formed cell surface-associated filaments with abnormal morphology, appearing longer and thinner than wild-type virions. For F, only the carboxy terminus (Fstem) was required, and addition of foreign protein sequences to Fstem allowed incorporation into VLPs. Together, the data show that P, M, and the F carboxy terminus are sufficient for robust viral protein coalescence and filamentous VLP formation and suggest that M-F interaction drives viral filament formation, with P acting as a type of cofactor facilitating the process and exerting control over particle morphology.

  14. Advancing the prediction accuracy of protein-protein interactions by utilizing evolutionary information from position-specific scoring matrix and ensemble classifier.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lei; You, Zhu-Hong; Xia, Shi-Xiong; Liu, Feng; Chen, Xing; Yan, Xin; Zhou, Yong

    2017-04-07

    Protein-Protein Interactions (PPIs) are essential to most biological processes and play a critical role in most cellular functions. With the development of high-throughput biological techniques and in silico methods, a large number of PPI data have been generated for various organisms, but many problems remain unsolved. These factors promoted the development of the in silico methods based on machine learning to predict PPIs. In this study, we propose a novel method by combining ensemble Rotation Forest (RF) classifier and Discrete Cosine Transform (DCT) algorithm to predict the interactions among proteins. Specifically, the protein amino acids sequence is transformed into Position-Specific Scoring Matrix (PSSM) containing biological evolution information, and then the feature vector is extracted to present protein evolutionary information using DCT algorithm; finally, the ensemble rotation forest model is used to predict whether a given protein pair is interacting or not. When performed on Yeast and H. pylori data sets, the proposed method achieved excellent results with an average accuracy of 98.54% and 88.27%. In addition, we achieved good prediction accuracy of 98.08%, 92.75%, 98.87% and 98.72% on independent data sets (C.elegans, E.coli, H.sapiens and M.musculus). In order to further evaluate the performance of our method, we compare it with the state-of-the-art Support Vector Machine (SVM) classifier and get good results. As a web server, the source code and Yeast data sets used in this article are freely available at http://202.119.201.126:8888/DCTRF/.

  15. Modulation of corneal and stromal matrix metalloproteinase by the mannose-induced Acanthamoeba cytolytic protein

    PubMed Central

    Alizadeh, Hassan; Li, Haochuan; Neelam, Sudha; Niederkorn, Jerry Y.

    2008-01-01

    The involvement of the mannose-induced Acanthamoeba cytopathic protein (MIP-133) in tissue injury and activation of metalloproteinase of corneal and stromal cells was examined in vitro. Activation of MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 induced by MIP-133 on human corneal epithelial and stromal cell cultures was examined by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and ELISA. MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, and MMP-9 mRNA were expressed in both cultured human corneal epithelial and stromal cells. When the epithelial cells were exposed to MIP-133 protein, the mRNA expression for MMP-1 and MMP-9 was unchanged. However, the transcript for MMP-2 and MMP-3 was decreased by two fold. By contrast, the expression of MMP-2 and MMP-3 was significantly up-regulated (2–4 fold) in the corneal stromal cells 1, 4, and 8 hours after MIP-133 stimulation. At the protein level, there was no significant difference in the level of MMPs between the corneal epithelial cells before and after stimulation with MIP-133. By contrast, the levels of MMP-2 and MMP-3 were significantly higher in the corneal stromal cells stimulated with MIP-133. The supernatants from corneal stromal cells stimulated with MIP-133 were incubated with PMSF and MIP-133 antibody and the level of MMP-2 was measured by ELISA. Activation of MMP-2 by MIP-133 was inhibited in the supernatants pretreated with the serine protease inhibitor, PMSF, and anti-MIP-133. Supernatants pretreated with the cysteine protease inhibitor E6 or control antibody produced the same amount of MMP-2 as the untreated supernatants. To verify the possible of homology between MMPs and A. castellanii proteases, the mRNA from A. castellanii was prepared and analyzed for the expression of MMP genes by PT-PCR. The results showed that A. castellanii did not express mRNA for MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-3, or MMP-9. Thus, A. castellanii mRNA does not cross react with human MMPs. Furthermore, ELISA was used to determine the cross reactivity of MMP antibodies with

  16. Vesiculoviral matrix (M) protein occupies nucleic acid binding site at nucleoporin pair (Rae1 • Nup98).

    PubMed

    Quan, Beili; Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Blobel, Günter; Ren, Yi

    2014-06-24

    mRNA export factor 1 (Rae1) and nucleoporin 98 (Nup98) are host cell targets for the matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). How Rae1 functions in mRNA export and how M protein targets both Rae1 and Nup98 are not understood at the molecular level. To obtain structural insights, we assembled a 1:1:1 complex of M•Rae1•Nup98 and established a crystal structure at 3.15-Å resolution. We found that the M protein contacts the Rae1•Nup98 heterodimer principally by two protrusions projecting from the globular domain of M like a finger and thumb. Both projections clamp to the side of the β-propeller of Rae1, with the finger also contacting Nup98. The most prominent feature of the finger is highly conserved Methionine 51 (Met51) with upstream and downstream acidic residues. The complementary surface on Rae1 displays a deep hydrophobic pocket, into which Met51 fastens like a bolt, and a groove of basic residues on either side, which bond to the acidic residues of the finger. Notably, the M protein competed for in vitro binding of various oligonucleotides to Rae1•Nup98. We localized this competing activity of M to its finger using a synthetic peptide. Collectively, our data suggest that Rae1 serves as a binding protein for the phosphate backbone of any nucleic acid and that the finger of M mimics this ligand. In the context of mRNA export, we propose that a given mRNA segment, after having been deproteinated by helicase, is transiently reproteinated by Nup98-tethered Rae1. We suggest that such repetitive cycles provide cytoplasmic stopover sites required for ratcheting mRNA across the nuclear pore.

  17. Vesiculoviral matrix (M) protein occupies nucleic acid binding site at nucleoporin pair (Rae1∙Nup98)

    SciTech Connect

    Quan, Beili; Seo, Hyuk-Soo; Blobel, Günter; Ren, Yi

    2014-07-01

    mRNA export factor 1 (Rae1) and nucleoporin 98 (Nup98) are host cell targets for the matrix (M) protein of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV). How Rae1 functions in mRNA export and how M protein targets both Rae1 and Nup98 are not understood at the molecular level. To obtain structural insights, we assembled a 1:1:1 complex of M•Rae1•Nup98 and established a crystal structure at 3.15-Å resolution. We found that the M protein contacts the Rae1•Nup98 heterodimer principally by two protrusions projecting from the globular domain of M like a finger and thumb. Both projections clamp to the side of the β-propeller of Rae1, with the finger also contacting Nup98. The most prominent feature of the finger is highly conserved Methionine 51 (Met51) with upstream and downstream acidic residues. The complementary surface on Rae1 displays a deep hydrophobic pocket, into which Met51 fastens like a bolt, and a groove of basic residues on either side, which bond to the acidic residues of the finger. Notably, the M protein competed for in vitro binding of various oligonucleotides to Rae1•Nup98. We localized this competing activity of M to its finger using a synthetic peptide. Collectively, our data suggest that Rae1 serves as a binding protein for the phosphate backbone of any nucleic acid and that the finger of M mimics this ligand. In the context of mRNA export, we propose that a given mRNA segment, after having been deproteinated by helicase, is transiently reproteinated by Nup98-tethered Rae1. We suggest that such repetitive cycles provide cytoplasmic stopover sites required for ratcheting mRNA across the nuclear pore.

  18. Tenascin-X: a novel extracellular matrix protein encoded by the human XB gene overlapping P450c21B

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    A human gene termed XB overlaps the P450c21B gene encoding steroid 21- hydroxylase and encodes a protein that closely resembles extracellular matrix proteins. Sequencing of phage and cosmid clones and of cDNA fragments shows that the XB gene spans 65 kb of DNA, consisting of 39 exons that encode a 12-kb mRNA. The predicted protein o