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Sample records for matrix subunit compaction

  1. Elongated Polyproline Motifs Facilitate Enamel Evolution through Matrix Subunit Compaction

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Xianghong; Dangaria, Smit; Walker, Cameron; Allen, Michael; Kulkarni, Ashok; Gibson, Carolyn; Braatz, Richard; Liao, Xiubei; Diekwisch, Thomas G. H.

    2009-01-01

    Vertebrate body designs rely on hydroxyapatite as the principal mineral component of relatively light-weight, articulated endoskeletons and sophisticated tooth-bearing jaws, facilitating rapid movement and efficient predation. Biological mineralization and skeletal growth are frequently accomplished through proteins containing polyproline repeat elements. Through their well-defined yet mobile and flexible structure polyproline-rich proteins control mineral shape and contribute many other biological functions including Alzheimer's amyloid aggregation and prolamine plant storage. In the present study we have hypothesized that polyproline repeat proteins exert their control over biological events such as mineral growth, plaque aggregation, or viscous adhesion by altering the length of their central repeat domain, resulting in dramatic changes in supramolecular assembly dimensions. In order to test our hypothesis, we have used the vertebrate mineralization protein amelogenin as an exemplar and determined the biological effect of the four-fold increased polyproline tandem repeat length in the amphibian/mammalian transition. To study the effect of polyproline repeat length on matrix assembly, protein structure, and apatite crystal growth, we have measured supramolecular assembly dimensions in various vertebrates using atomic force microscopy, tested the effect of protein assemblies on crystal growth by electron microscopy, generated a transgenic mouse model to examine the effect of an abbreviated polyproline sequence on crystal growth, and determined the structure of polyproline repeat elements using 3D NMR. Our study shows that an increase in PXX/PXQ tandem repeat motif length results (i) in a compaction of protein matrix subunit dimensions, (ii) reduced conformational variability, (iii) an increase in polyproline II helices, and (iv) promotion of apatite crystal length. Together, these findings establish a direct relationship between polyproline tandem repeat fragment

  2. Vibrotactile pattern recognition: a portable compact tactile matrix.

    PubMed

    Thullier, Francine; Bolmont, Benoît; Lestienne, Francis G

    2012-02-01

    Compact tactile matrix (CTM) is a vibrotactile device composed of a seven-by-seven array of electromechanical vibrators "tactip" used to represent tactile patterns applied to a small skin area. The CTM uses a dynamic feature to generate spatiotemporal tactile patterns. The design requirements focus particularly on maximizing the transmission of the vibration from one tactip to the others as well as to the skin over a square area of 16 cm (2) while simultaneously minimizing the transmission of vibrations throughout the overall structure of the CTM. Experiments were conducted on 22 unpracticed subjects to evaluate how the CTM could be used to develop a tactile semantics for communication of instructions in order to test the ability of the subjects to identify: 1) directional prescriptors for gesture guidance and 2) instructional commands for operational task requirements in a military context. The results indicate that, after familiarization, recognition accuracies in the tactile patterns were remarkably precise for more 80% of the subjects.

  3. Evaluation of roll compaction as a preparation method for hydroxypropyl cellulose-based matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Imjak; Gilli, Tiziana; Betz, Gabriele

    2011-04-01

    Roll compaction was applied for the preparation of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based sustained-release matrix tablets. Matrix tablets made via roll compaction exhibited higher dosage uniformity and faster drug release than direct-compacted tablets. HPC viscosity grade, roll pressure, and milling speed affected tablet properties significantly. Roll compaction seems to be an adequate granulation method for the preparation of HPC-based matrix tablets due to the simplicity of the process, less handling difficulty from HPC tackiness as well as easier particle size targeting. Selecting the optimum ratio of plastic excipients and the particle size of starting materials can however be critical issues in this method. PMID:21687348

  4. Evaluation of roll compaction as a preparation method for hydroxypropyl cellulose-based matrix tablets

    PubMed Central

    Jeon, Imjak; Gilli, Tiziana; Betz, Gabriele

    2011-01-01

    Roll compaction was applied for the preparation of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based sustained-release matrix tablets. Matrix tablets made via roll compaction exhibited higher dosage uniformity and faster drug release than direct-compacted tablets. HPC viscosity grade, roll pressure, and milling speed affected tablet properties significantly. Roll compaction seems to be an adequate granulation method for the preparation of HPC-based matrix tablets due to the simplicity of the process, less handling difficulty from HPC tackiness as well as easier particle size targeting. Selecting the optimum ratio of plastic excipients and the particle size of starting materials can however be critical issues in this method. PMID:21687348

  5. Evaluation of roll compaction as a preparation method for hydroxypropyl cellulose-based matrix tablets.

    PubMed

    Jeon, Imjak; Gilli, Tiziana; Betz, Gabriele

    2011-04-01

    Roll compaction was applied for the preparation of hydroxypropyl cellulose (HPC)-based sustained-release matrix tablets. Matrix tablets made via roll compaction exhibited higher dosage uniformity and faster drug release than direct-compacted tablets. HPC viscosity grade, roll pressure, and milling speed affected tablet properties significantly. Roll compaction seems to be an adequate granulation method for the preparation of HPC-based matrix tablets due to the simplicity of the process, less handling difficulty from HPC tackiness as well as easier particle size targeting. Selecting the optimum ratio of plastic excipients and the particle size of starting materials can however be critical issues in this method.

  6. The powder flow and compact mechanical properties of two recently developed matrix-forming polymers.

    PubMed

    Hancock, B C; Carlson, G T; Ladipo, D D; Langdon, B A; Mullarney, M P

    2001-09-01

    The powder flow and compact mechanical properties of two recently developed matrix-forming polymers were determined. The polymers are cross-linked high-amylose starch (Contramid) and poly(acrylic acid) (Carbopol EX507), and their properties were compared with those of two established matrix-forming polymers, hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (Methocel K100LV) and hydroxypropyl cellulose (Klucel EXF). The particle morphology, size distribution and true density of the four materials were quite different and they exhibited measurable performance differences with respect to powder flow, compact ductility, compact elasticity and compact tensile strength. Recommendations for formulating solid dosage forms with each of these excipients were made, based on a consideration of their physical properties and their anticipated processing performance.

  7. The ground state of the D = 11 supermembrane and matrix models on compact regions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulton, Lyonell; Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar; Restuccia, Alvaro

    2016-09-01

    We establish a general framework for the analysis of boundary value problems of matrix models at zero energy on compact regions. We derive existence and uniqueness of ground state wavefunctions for the mass operator of the D = 11 regularized supermembrane theory, that is the N = 16 supersymmetric SU (N) matrix model, on balls of finite radius. Our results rely on the structure of the associated Dirichlet form and a factorization in terms of the supersymmetric charges. They also rely on the polynomial structure of the potential and various other supersymmetric properties of the system.

  8. Matrix Proteins of Nipah and Hendra Viruses Interact with Beta Subunits of AP-3 Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Weina; McCrory, Thomas S.; Khaw, Wei Young; Petzing, Stephanie; Myers, Terrell

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Paramyxoviruses and other negative-strand RNA viruses encode matrix proteins that coordinate the virus assembly process. The matrix proteins link the viral glycoproteins and the viral ribonucleoproteins at virus assembly sites and often recruit host machinery that facilitates the budding process. Using a co-affinity purification strategy, we have identified the beta subunit of the AP-3 adapter protein complex, AP3B1, as a binding partner for the M proteins of the zoonotic paramyxoviruses Nipah virus and Hendra virus. Binding function was localized to the serine-rich and acidic Hinge domain of AP3B1, and a 29-amino-acid Hinge-derived polypeptide was sufficient for M protein binding in coimmunoprecipitation assays. Virus-like particle (VLP) production assays were used to assess the relationship between AP3B1 binding and M protein function. We found that for both Nipah virus and Hendra virus, M protein expression in the absence of any other viral proteins led to the efficient production of VLPs in transfected cells, and this VLP production was potently inhibited upon overexpression of short M-binding polypeptides derived from the Hinge region of AP3B1. Both human and bat (Pteropus alecto) AP3B1-derived polypeptides were highly effective at inhibiting the production of VLPs. VLP production was also impaired through small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated depletion of AP3B1 from cells. These findings suggest that AP-3-directed trafficking processes are important for henipavirus particle production and identify a new host protein-virus protein binding interface that could become a useful target in future efforts to develop small molecule inhibitors to combat paramyxoviral infections. IMPORTANCE Henipaviruses cause deadly infections in humans, with a mortality rate of about 40%. Hendra virus outbreaks in Australia, all involving horses and some involving transmission to humans, have been a continuing problem. Nipah virus caused a large outbreak in Malaysia in 1998

  9. Analysis of Natural Graphite, Synthetic Graphite, and Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compact Matrix

    SciTech Connect

    Trammell, Michael P; Pappano, Peter J

    2011-09-01

    The AGR-1 and AGR-2 compacting process involved overcoating TRISO particles and compacting them in a steel die. The overcoating step is the process of applying matrix to the OPyC layer of TRISO particles in a rotating drum in order to build up an overcoat layer of desired thickness. The matrix used in overcoating is a mixture of natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and thermosetting resin in the ratio, by weight, of 64:16:20. A wet mixing process was used for AGR-1 and AGR-2, in that the graphites and resin were mixed in the presence of ethyl alcohol. The goal of the wet mixing process was to 'resinate' the graphite particles, or coat each individual graphite particle with a thin layer of resin. This matrix production process was similar to the German, Chinese, Japanese, and South African methods, which also use various amount of solvent during mixing. See Appendix 1 for information on these countries matrix production techniques. The resin used for AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by Hexion, specifically Hexion grade Durite SC1008. Durite SC1008 is a solvated (liquid) resole phenolic resin. A resole resin does not typically have a hardening agent added. The major constituent of SC1008 is phenol, with minor amounts of formaldehyde. Durite SC1008 is high viscosity, so additional ethyl alcohol was added during matrix production in order to reduce its viscosity and enhance graphite particle resination. The current compacting scale up plan departs from a wet mixing process. The matrix production method specified in the scale up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered phenolic resin and graphite are all fed into a jet mill at the same time. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. The jet milling/mixing process requires that a suite of solid or powdered resins be investigated. The synthetic graphite used in AGR-1 and AGR-2 was provided by SGL Carbon, grade KRB2000. KRB2000 is a

  10. Matrix models, 4D black holes and topological strings on non-compact Calabi-Yau manifolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danielsson, Ulf H.; Olsson, Martin E.; Vonk, Marcel

    2004-11-01

    We study the relation between c = 1 matrix models at self-dual radii and topological strings on non-compact Calabi-Yau manifolds. Particularly the special case of the deformed matrix model is investigated in detail. Using recent results on the equivalence of the partition function of topological strings and that of four dimensional BPS black holes, we are able to calculate the entropy of the black holes, using matrix models. In particular, we show how to deal with the divergences that arise as a result of the non-compactness of the Calabi-Yau. The main result is that the entropy of the black hole at zero temperature coincides with the canonical free energy of the matrix model, up to a proportionality constant given by the self-dual temperature of the matrix model.

  11. Purification of subunit B of Shiga toxin using a synthetic trisaccharide-based affinity matrix.

    PubMed

    Pozsgay, V; Trinh, L; Shiloach, J; Robbins, J B; Donohue-Rolfe, A; Calderwood, S B

    1996-01-01

    The blood group P1 antigenic trisaccharide (3), which is the receptor-binding ligand of Shiga-like toxins, is synthesized in a spacer-equipped form (32) from 2-(trimethylsilyl)ethyl glucoside 5 and the 1-thiogalactoside building blocks 10 and 22 in a stereocontrolled, stepwise fashion. Covalent attachment of 32 to hydrazine group-containing agarose gel by reductive amination provided the P1 trisaccharide-containing affinity sorbent which was used for preparative scale isolation of subunit B of Shiga toxin. PMID:8741990

  12. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry of charge-reduced protein complexes reveals general trends in the collisional ejection of compact subunits.

    PubMed

    Bornschein, Russell E; Ruotolo, Brandon T

    2015-10-21

    Multiprotein complexes have been shown to play critical roles across a wide range of cellular functions, but most probes of protein quaternary structure are limited in their ability to analyze complex mixtures and polydisperse structures using small amounts of total protein. Ion mobility-mass spectrometry offers a solution to many of these challenges, but relies upon gas-phase measurements of intact multiprotein complexes, subcomplexes, and subunits that correlate well with solution structures. The greatest bottleneck in such workflows is the generation of representative subcomplexes and subunits. Collisional activation of complexes can act to produce product ions reflective of protein complex composition, but such product ions are typically challenging to interpret in terms of their relationship to solution structure due to their typically string-like conformations following activation and subsequent dissociation. Here, we used ion-ion chemistry to perform a broad survey of the gas-phase dissociation of charge-reduced protein complex ions, revealing general trends associated with the collisional ejection of compact, rather than unfolded, protein subunits. Furthermore, we also discover peptide and co-factor dissociation channels that dominate the product ion populations generated for such charge reduced complexes. We assess both sets of observations and discuss general principles that can be extended to the analysis of protein complex ions having unknown structures.

  13. The PB2 Subunit of the Influenza A Virus RNA Polymerase Is Imported into the Mitochondrial Matrix

    PubMed Central

    Long, Joshua C. D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The polymerase basic 2 (PB2) subunit of the RNA polymerase complex of seasonal human influenza A viruses has been shown to localize to the mitochondria. Various roles, including the regulation of apoptosis and innate immune responses to viral infection, have been proposed for mitochondrial PB2. In particular, PB2 has been shown to inhibit interferon expression by associating with the mitochondrial antiviral signaling (MAVS) protein, which acts downstream of RIG-I and MDA-5 in the interferon induction pathway. However, in spite of a growing body of literature on the potential roles of mitochondrial PB2, the exact location of PB2 in mitochondria has not been determined. Here, we used enhanced ascorbate peroxidase (APEX)-tagged PB2 proteins and electron microscopy to study the localization of PB2 in mitochondria. We found that PB2 is imported into mitochondria, where it localizes to the mitochondrial matrix. We also demonstrated that MAVS is not required for the import of PB2 into mitochondria by showing that PB2 associates with mitochondria in MAVS knockout mouse embryo fibroblasts. Instead, we found that amino acid residue 9 in the N-terminal mitochondrial targeting sequence is a determinant of the mitochondrial import of PB2, differentiating the localization of PB2 of human from that of avian influenza A virus strains. We also showed that a virus encoding nonmitochondrial PB2 is attenuated in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) compared with an isogenic virus encoding mitochondrial PB2, in a MAVS-independent manner, suggesting a role for PB2 within the mitochondrial matrix. This work extends our understanding of the interplay between influenza virus and mitochondria. IMPORTANCE The PB2 subunit of the influenza virus RNA polymerase is a major determinant of viral pathogenicity. However, the molecular mechanisms of how PB2 determines pathogenicity remain poorly understood. PB2 associates with mitochondria and inhibits the function of the mitochondrial

  14. Quasi-disjoint pentadiagonal matrix systems for the parallelization of compact finite-difference schemes and filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jae Wook

    2013-05-01

    This paper proposes a novel systematic approach for the parallelization of pentadiagonal compact finite-difference schemes and filters based on domain decomposition. The proposed approach allows a pentadiagonal banded matrix system to be split into quasi-disjoint subsystems by using a linear-algebraic transformation technique. As a result the inversion of pentadiagonal matrices can be implemented within each subdomain in an independent manner subject to a conventional halo-exchange process. The proposed matrix transformation leads to new subdomain boundary (SB) compact schemes and filters that require three halo terms to exchange with neighboring subdomains. The internode communication overhead in the present approach is equivalent to that of standard explicit schemes and filters based on seven-point discretization stencils. The new SB compact schemes and filters demand additional arithmetic operations compared to the original serial ones. However, it is shown that the additional cost becomes sufficiently low by choosing optimal sizes of their discretization stencils. Compared to earlier published results, the proposed SB compact schemes and filters successfully reduce parallelization artifacts arising from subdomain boundaries to a level sufficiently negligible for sophisticated aeroacoustic simulations without degrading parallel efficiency. The overall performance and parallel efficiency of the proposed approach are demonstrated by stringent benchmark tests.

  15. The nuclear matrix protein p255 is a highly phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit which associates with spliceosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Vincent, M; Lauriault, P; Dubois, M F; Lavoie, S; Bensaude, O; Chabot, B

    1996-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody CC-3 recognizes a phosphodependent epitope on a 255 kDa nuclear matrix protein (p255) recently shown to associate with splicing complexes as part of the [U4/U6.U5] tri-snRNP particle [Chabot et al. (1995) Nucleic Acids Res. 23, 3206-3213]. In mouse and Drosophila cultured cells the electrophoretic mobility of p255, faster in the latter species, was identical to that of the hyperphosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit (IIo). The CC-3 immunoreactivity of p255 was abolished by 5,6-dichloro-1-beta-D-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole, which is known to cause the dephosphorylation of the C-terminal domain of subunit IIo by inhibiting the TFIIH-associated kinase. The identity of p255 was confirmed by showing that CC-3-immunoprecipitated p255 was recognized by POL3/3 and 8WG16, two antibodies specific to RNA polymerase II largest subunit. Lastly, the recovery of RNA polymerase II largest subunit from HeLa splicing mixtures was compromised by EDTA, which prevents the interaction of p255 with splicing complexes and inhibits splicing. Our results indicate that p255 represents a highly phosphorylated form of RNA polymerase II largest subunit physically associated with spliceosomes and possibly involved in coupling transcription to RNA processing. PMID:8972849

  16. Massless ground state for a compact SU (2) matrix model in 4D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boulton, Lyonell; Garcia del Moral, Maria Pilar; Restuccia, Alvaro

    2015-09-01

    We show the existence and uniqueness of a massless supersymmetric ground state wavefunction of a SU (2) matrix model in a bounded smooth domain with Dirichlet boundary conditions. This is a gauge system and we provide a new framework to analyze the quantum spectral properties of this class of supersymmetric matrix models subject to constraints which can be generalized for arbitrary number of colors.

  17. Matrix Extension Study: Validation of the Compact Dry TC Method for Enumeration of Total Aerobic Bacteria in Selected Foods.

    PubMed

    Mizuochi, Shingo; Nelson, Maria; Baylis, Chris; Jewell, Keith; Green, Becky; Limbum, Rob; Fernandez, Maria Cristina; Salfinger, Yvonne; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    A validation study was conducted to extend the matrix claim for the Nissui Compact Dry Total Count (TC), Performance Tested Method(s)(SM) (PTM) Certification No. 010404, to cooked chicken, lettuce, frozen fish, milk powder, and pasteurized whole milk. The method was originally certified by the AOAC Research Institute Performance Tested Method(s)(SM) Program for raw meat products. The Compact Dry TC is a ready-to-use dry media sheet that is rehydrated by adding 1 mL of diluted sample. A total aerobic colony count can be determined in the sample following 48 h of incubation. Matrix extension studies were conducted by Campden BRI (formerly Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association Technology Limited), Chipping Campden, UK. Single-laboratory data were collected for cooked chicken, lettuce, frozen fish, and milk powder, whereas a multilaboratory study was conducted on pasteurized milk. Fourteen laboratories participated in the collaborative study. The Compact Dry TC was tested at two time points, 48 ± 3 h and 72 ± 3 h and compared with the current International Organization for Standardization (ISO) method at the time of the study, ISO 4833:2003 (this standard is withdrawn and has been replaced by: ISO 4833-1:2013 and ISO 4833-2:2013), Microbiology of food and animal feeding stuffs-Horizontal method for the enumeration of microorganisms-Colony-count technique at 30°C. The data were logarithmically transformed and evaluated for repeatability (plus reproducibility for pasteurized milk), RSD of repeatability (plus RSD of reproducibility for milk), r(2), and mean difference between methods with 95% confidence interval (CI). A CI outside of (-0.5 to 0.5) on the log10 mean difference was used as the criterion to establish significant statistical difference between methods. No significant differences were found between the Compact Dry TC 48 and 72 h time points, with the exception of one contamination level of cooked chicken and one contamination level of dry milk

  18. Matrix Extension Study: Validation of the Compact Dry TC Method for Enumeration of Total Aerobic Bacteria in Selected Foods.

    PubMed

    Mizuochi, Shingo; Nelson, Maria; Baylis, Chris; Jewell, Keith; Green, Becky; Limbum, Rob; Fernandez, Maria Cristina; Salfinger, Yvonne; Chen, Yi

    2016-01-01

    A validation study was conducted to extend the matrix claim for the Nissui Compact Dry Total Count (TC), Performance Tested Method(s)(SM) (PTM) Certification No. 010404, to cooked chicken, lettuce, frozen fish, milk powder, and pasteurized whole milk. The method was originally certified by the AOAC Research Institute Performance Tested Method(s)(SM) Program for raw meat products. The Compact Dry TC is a ready-to-use dry media sheet that is rehydrated by adding 1 mL of diluted sample. A total aerobic colony count can be determined in the sample following 48 h of incubation. Matrix extension studies were conducted by Campden BRI (formerly Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association Technology Limited), Chipping Campden, UK. Single-laboratory data were collected for cooked chicken, lettuce, frozen fish, and milk powder, whereas a multilaboratory study was conducted on pasteurized milk. Fourteen laboratories participated in the collaborative study. The Compact Dry TC was tested at two time points, 48 ± 3 h and 72 ± 3 h and compared with the current International Organization for Standardization (ISO) method at the time of the study, ISO 4833:2003 (this standard is withdrawn and has been replaced by: ISO 4833-1:2013 and ISO 4833-2:2013), Microbiology of food and animal feeding stuffs-Horizontal method for the enumeration of microorganisms-Colony-count technique at 30°C. The data were logarithmically transformed and evaluated for repeatability (plus reproducibility for pasteurized milk), RSD of repeatability (plus RSD of reproducibility for milk), r(2), and mean difference between methods with 95% confidence interval (CI). A CI outside of (-0.5 to 0.5) on the log10 mean difference was used as the criterion to establish significant statistical difference between methods. No significant differences were found between the Compact Dry TC 48 and 72 h time points, with the exception of one contamination level of cooked chicken and one contamination level of dry milk

  19. Matrix Extension Study: Validation of the Compact Dry CF Method for Enumeration of Total Coliform Bacteria in Selected Foods.

    PubMed

    Mizuochi, Shingo; Nelson, Maria; Baylis, Chris; Green, Becky; Jewell, Keith; Monadjemi, Farinaz; Chen, Yi; Salfinger, Yvonne; Fernandez, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Dry "Nissui" CF method, Performance Tested Method(SM) 110401, was originally certified for enumeration of coliform bacteria by the AOAC Research Institute Performance Tested Methods(SM) program for raw meat products. Compact Dry CF is a ready-to-use dry media sheet, containing a cold-soluble gelling agent, a chromogenic medium, and selective agents, which are rehydrated by adding 1 mL of diluted sample. Coliform bacteria produce blue/blue-green colonies on the Compact Dry CF, allowing a coliform colony count to be determined in the sample after 24 ± 2 h incubation. A validation study was organized by Campden BRI (formerly Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association Technology, Ltd), Chipping Campden, United Kingdom, to extend the method's claim to include cooked chicken, fresh bagged prewashed shredded iceberg lettuce, frozen fish, milk powder, and pasteurized 2% milk. Campden BRI collected single-laboratory data for cooked chicken, lettuce, frozen fish, and milk powder, whereas a multilaboratory study was conducted on pasteurized milk. Thirteen laboratories participated in the interlaboratory study. The Compact Dry CF method was compared to ISO 4832:2006 "Microbiology of food and animal feeding stuffs-Horizontal method for the enumeration of coliforms-Colony-count technique," the current version at the time this study was conducted. Each matrix was evaluated at either four or five contamination levels of coliform bacteria (including an uncontaminated level). After logarithmic transformation of counts at each level, the data for pasteurized whole milk were analyzed for sr, sR, RSDr, and RSDR. Regression analysis was also performed and r(2) was reported. Mean difference between methods with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. A log10 range of -0.5 to 0.5 for the CI was used as the acceptance criterion to establish significant statistical difference between methods. In the single-laboratory evaluation (for cooked chicken, lettuce, frozen

  20. Matrix Extension Study: Validation of the Compact Dry CF Method for Enumeration of Total Coliform Bacteria in Selected Foods.

    PubMed

    Mizuochi, Shingo; Nelson, Maria; Baylis, Chris; Green, Becky; Jewell, Keith; Monadjemi, Farinaz; Chen, Yi; Salfinger, Yvonne; Fernandez, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Dry "Nissui" CF method, Performance Tested Method(SM) 110401, was originally certified for enumeration of coliform bacteria by the AOAC Research Institute Performance Tested Methods(SM) program for raw meat products. Compact Dry CF is a ready-to-use dry media sheet, containing a cold-soluble gelling agent, a chromogenic medium, and selective agents, which are rehydrated by adding 1 mL of diluted sample. Coliform bacteria produce blue/blue-green colonies on the Compact Dry CF, allowing a coliform colony count to be determined in the sample after 24 ± 2 h incubation. A validation study was organized by Campden BRI (formerly Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association Technology, Ltd), Chipping Campden, United Kingdom, to extend the method's claim to include cooked chicken, fresh bagged prewashed shredded iceberg lettuce, frozen fish, milk powder, and pasteurized 2% milk. Campden BRI collected single-laboratory data for cooked chicken, lettuce, frozen fish, and milk powder, whereas a multilaboratory study was conducted on pasteurized milk. Thirteen laboratories participated in the interlaboratory study. The Compact Dry CF method was compared to ISO 4832:2006 "Microbiology of food and animal feeding stuffs-Horizontal method for the enumeration of coliforms-Colony-count technique," the current version at the time this study was conducted. Each matrix was evaluated at either four or five contamination levels of coliform bacteria (including an uncontaminated level). After logarithmic transformation of counts at each level, the data for pasteurized whole milk were analyzed for sr, sR, RSDr, and RSDR. Regression analysis was also performed and r(2) was reported. Mean difference between methods with 95% confidence interval (CI) was calculated. A log10 range of -0.5 to 0.5 for the CI was used as the acceptance criterion to establish significant statistical difference between methods. In the single-laboratory evaluation (for cooked chicken, lettuce, frozen

  1. Roller compaction of hydrophilic extended release tablets-combined effects of processing variables and drug/matrix former particle size.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Johanna; Tajarobi, Farhad; Gururajan, Bindhumadhavan; Juppo, Anne; Abrahmsén-Alami, Susanna

    2015-04-01

    The present study shows that roller compaction (RC) can successfully be used as a granulation method to prepare hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)-based extended release matrix tablets containing a high drug load, both for materials deforming mainly by fragmentation (paracetamol) as for those having mainly plastic deformation (ibuprofen). The combined effect of RC process variables and composition on the manufacturability of HPMC tablets was investigated. Standard wet granulation grade HPMC was compared with a larger particle size direct compressible HPMC grade. Higher roll pressure was found to result in larger paracetamol granules and narrower granule particle size distributions, especially for formulations containing smaller size HPMC. However, for ibuprofen, no clear effect of roll pressure was observed. High roll pressure also resulted in denser ribbon and less bypass fines during RC. Loss of compactibility was observed for granules compared to powder blends, which was found to be related to differences in granule porosity and morphology. Using the large-sized HPMC grade did in some cases result in lower tensile strength tablets but had the advantage to improve the powder flow into the roller compactor. This work also indicates that when the HPMC level lies near the percolation threshold, significant changes can occur in the drug release rate due to changes in other factors (raw material characteristics and processing). PMID:25273028

  2. Roller compaction of hydrophilic extended release tablets-combined effects of processing variables and drug/matrix former particle size.

    PubMed

    Heiman, Johanna; Tajarobi, Farhad; Gururajan, Bindhumadhavan; Juppo, Anne; Abrahmsén-Alami, Susanna

    2015-04-01

    The present study shows that roller compaction (RC) can successfully be used as a granulation method to prepare hydroxypropyl methylcellulose (HPMC)-based extended release matrix tablets containing a high drug load, both for materials deforming mainly by fragmentation (paracetamol) as for those having mainly plastic deformation (ibuprofen). The combined effect of RC process variables and composition on the manufacturability of HPMC tablets was investigated. Standard wet granulation grade HPMC was compared with a larger particle size direct compressible HPMC grade. Higher roll pressure was found to result in larger paracetamol granules and narrower granule particle size distributions, especially for formulations containing smaller size HPMC. However, for ibuprofen, no clear effect of roll pressure was observed. High roll pressure also resulted in denser ribbon and less bypass fines during RC. Loss of compactibility was observed for granules compared to powder blends, which was found to be related to differences in granule porosity and morphology. Using the large-sized HPMC grade did in some cases result in lower tensile strength tablets but had the advantage to improve the powder flow into the roller compactor. This work also indicates that when the HPMC level lies near the percolation threshold, significant changes can occur in the drug release rate due to changes in other factors (raw material characteristics and processing).

  3. Is the extraction by Whatman FTA filter matrix technology and sequencing of large ribosomal subunit D1-D2 region sufficient for identification of clinical fungi?

    PubMed

    Kiraz, Nuri; Oz, Yasemin; Aslan, Huseyin; Erturan, Zayre; Ener, Beyza; Akdagli, Sevtap Arikan; Muslumanoglu, Hamza; Cetinkaya, Zafer

    2015-10-01

    Although conventional identification of pathogenic fungi is based on the combination of tests evaluating their morphological and biochemical characteristics, they can fail to identify the less common species or the differentiation of closely related species. In addition these tests are time consuming, labour-intensive and require experienced personnel. We evaluated the feasibility and sufficiency of DNA extraction by Whatman FTA filter matrix technology and DNA sequencing of D1-D2 region of the large ribosomal subunit gene for identification of clinical isolates of 21 yeast and 160 moulds in our clinical mycology laboratory. While the yeast isolates were identified at species level with 100% homology, 102 (63.75%) clinically important mould isolates were identified at species level, 56 (35%) isolates at genus level against fungal sequences existing in DNA databases and two (1.25%) isolates could not be identified. Consequently, Whatman FTA filter matrix technology was a useful method for extraction of fungal DNA; extremely rapid, practical and successful. Sequence analysis strategy of D1-D2 region of the large ribosomal subunit gene was found considerably sufficient in identification to genus level for the most clinical fungi. However, the identification to species level and especially discrimination of closely related species may require additional analysis.

  4. Characterization of B- and C-type low molecular weight glutenin subunits by electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Muccilli, Vera; Cunsolo, Vincenzo; Saletti, Rosaria; Foti, Salvatore; Masci, Stefania; Lafiandra, Domenico

    2005-02-01

    Low molecular weight glutenin subunits (LMW-GS) are typically subdivided into three groups, according to their molecular weights and isoelectric points, namely the B-, C-, and D groups. Enriched B- and C-type LMW-GS fractions extracted from the bread wheat cultivar Chinese Spring were characterized using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) directly interfaced with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry and HPLC coupled off-line with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry, in order to ascertain the number and relative molecular masses of the components present in each fraction and determine the number of cysteine residues. About 70 components were detected in each of the fractions examined by the combined use of these two techniques, with 18 components common to both fractions. Analysis of the fractions after alkylation with 4-vinylpyridine allowed determination of the number of the cysteines present in about 40 subunits. The proteins detected were tentatively classified based on the relative molecular masses and number of cysteine residues. Cross-contamination was found in both B- and C- fractions, along with the presence of D-type LMW-GS. The two fractions also contained unexpected components, probably lipid transfer proteins and omega-gliadins. The presence of extensive microheterogeneity was suggested by the detection of several co-eluting proteins with minor differences in their molecular masses.

  5. Sucrose esters with various hydrophilic-lipophilic properties: novel controlled release agents for oral drug delivery matrix tablets prepared by direct compaction.

    PubMed

    Chansanroj, K; Betz, G

    2010-08-01

    Sucrose esters (SE) are esters of sucrose and fatty acids with various hydrophilic-lipophilic properties which have attracted interest from being used in pharmaceutical applications. This study aimed to gain insight into the use of SE as controlled release agents for direct compacted matrix tablets. The study focused on the effect of hydrophilic-lipophilic properties on tableting properties and drug release. Sucrose stearate with hydrophilic-lipophilic balance (HLB) values ranging from 0 to 16 was systematically tested. Tablet formulations contained SE, metoprolol tartrate as a highly soluble model drug and dibasic calcium phosphate dihydrate as a tablet formulation filler in the ratio 1:1:2. The compaction behaviour of matrix tablets was compared with the compacts of individual starting materials as reference. SE incorporation improved the plasticity, compressibility and lubricating property of powder mixtures. The hydrophilic-lipophilic properties of SE affected tableting properties, drug release rate and release mechanism. Increasing hydrophilicity corresponding to the increased monoesters in SE composition increased the relative porosity, elastic recovery and tensile strength of the tablets due to the increased hydrogen bonding between the monoesters. This also facilitated the swelling behaviour of SE, which sustained the drug release rate. A sustained release effect prevailed in tablets containing SE with HLB values of 3-16. The ability to improve the tableting properties as well as sustain the drug release rate of the highly soluble model drug via gelation of SE highlights SE as promising controlled release regulators for direct compacted matrix tablets comprising drugs with various solubilities according to the Biopharmaceutics Classification System. PMID:20132913

  6. Efficacy of a non-updated, Matrix-C-based equine influenza subunit-tetanus vaccine following Florida sublineage clade 2 challenge.

    PubMed

    Pouwels, H G W; Van de Zande, S M A; Horspool, L J I; Hoeijmakers, M J H

    2014-06-21

    Assessing the ability of current equine influenza vaccines to provide cross-protection against emerging strains is important. Horses not vaccinated previously and seronegative for equine influenza based on haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assay were assigned at random to vaccinated (n=7) or non-vaccinated (control, n=5) groups. Vaccination was performed twice four weeks apart with a 1 ml influenza subunit (A/eq/Prague/1/56, A/eq/Newmarket/1/93, A/eq/Newmarket/2/93), tetanus toxoid vaccine with Matrix-C adjuvant (EquilisPrequenza Te). All the horses were challenged individually by aerosol with A/eq/Richmond/1/07 three weeks after the second vaccination. Rectal temperature, clinical signs, serology and virus excretion were monitored for 14 days after challenge. There was no pain at the injection site or increases in rectal temperature following vaccination. Increases in rectal temperature and characteristic clinical signs were recorded in the control horses. Clinical signs were minimal in vaccinated horses. Clinical (P=0.0345) and total clinical scores (P=0.0180) were significantly lower in the vaccinated than in the control horses. Vaccination had a significant effect on indicators of viraemia - the extent (P=0.0006) and duration (P=<0.0001) of virus excretion and the total amount of virus excreted (AUC, P=0.0006). Vaccination also had a significant effect (P=0.0017) on whether a horse was positive or negative for virus excretion during the study. Further research is needed to fully understand the specific properties of this vaccine that may contribute to its cross-protective capacity.

  7. Role of the Emp Pilus Subunits of Enterococcus faecium in Biofilm Formation, Adherence to Host Extracellular Matrix Components, and Experimental Infection.

    PubMed

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Singh, Kavindra V; Somarajan, Sudha R; Yadav, Puja; Chang, Chungyu; Spencer, Robert; Sillanpää, Jouko; Ton-That, Hung; Murray, Barbara E

    2016-05-01

    Enterococcus faecium is an important cause of hospital-associated infections, including urinary tract infections (UTIs), bacteremia, and infective endocarditis. Pili have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of Gram-positive bacteria, including E. faecium We previously demonstrated that a nonpiliated ΔempABC::cat derivative of E. faecium TX82 was attenuated in biofilm formation and in a UTI model. Here, we studied the contributions of the individual pilus subunits EmpA, EmpB, and EmpC to pilus architecture, biofilm formation, adherence to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, and infection. We identified EmpA as the tip of the pili and found that deletion of empA reduced biofilm formation to the same level as deletion of the empABC operon, a phenotype that was restored by reconstituting in situ the empA gene. Deletion of empB also caused a reduction in biofilm, while EmpC was found to be dispensable. Significant reductions in adherence to fibrinogen and collagen type I were observed with deletion of empA and empB, while deletion of empC had no adherence defect. Furthermore, we showed that each deletion mutant was significantly attenuated in comparison to the isogenic parental strain, TX82, in a mixed-inoculum UTI model (P < 0.001 to 0.048), that reconstitution of empA restored virulence in the UTI model, and that deletion of empA also resulted in attenuation in an infective endocarditis model (P = 0.0088). Our results indicate that EmpA and EmpB, but not EmpC, contribute to biofilm and adherence to ECM proteins; however, all the Emp pilins are important for E. faecium to cause infection in the urinary tract. PMID:26930703

  8. Role of the Emp Pilus Subunits of Enterococcus faecium in Biofilm Formation, Adherence to Host Extracellular Matrix Components, and Experimental Infection.

    PubMed

    Montealegre, Maria Camila; Singh, Kavindra V; Somarajan, Sudha R; Yadav, Puja; Chang, Chungyu; Spencer, Robert; Sillanpää, Jouko; Ton-That, Hung; Murray, Barbara E

    2016-05-01

    Enterococcus faecium is an important cause of hospital-associated infections, including urinary tract infections (UTIs), bacteremia, and infective endocarditis. Pili have been shown to play a role in the pathogenesis of Gram-positive bacteria, including E. faecium We previously demonstrated that a nonpiliated ΔempABC::cat derivative of E. faecium TX82 was attenuated in biofilm formation and in a UTI model. Here, we studied the contributions of the individual pilus subunits EmpA, EmpB, and EmpC to pilus architecture, biofilm formation, adherence to extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins, and infection. We identified EmpA as the tip of the pili and found that deletion of empA reduced biofilm formation to the same level as deletion of the empABC operon, a phenotype that was restored by reconstituting in situ the empA gene. Deletion of empB also caused a reduction in biofilm, while EmpC was found to be dispensable. Significant reductions in adherence to fibrinogen and collagen type I were observed with deletion of empA and empB, while deletion of empC had no adherence defect. Furthermore, we showed that each deletion mutant was significantly attenuated in comparison to the isogenic parental strain, TX82, in a mixed-inoculum UTI model (P < 0.001 to 0.048), that reconstitution of empA restored virulence in the UTI model, and that deletion of empA also resulted in attenuation in an infective endocarditis model (P = 0.0088). Our results indicate that EmpA and EmpB, but not EmpC, contribute to biofilm and adherence to ECM proteins; however, all the Emp pilins are important for E. faecium to cause infection in the urinary tract.

  9. Near-infrared spectroscopic analysis of the breaking force of extended-release matrix tablets prepared by roller-compaction: influence of plasticizer levels and sintering temperature.

    PubMed

    Dave, Vivek S; Fahmy, Raafat M; Hoag, Stephen W

    2015-06-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the feasibility of near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopy for the determination of the influence of sintering temperature and plasticizer levels on the breaking force of extended-release matrix tablets prepared via roller-compaction. Six formulations using theophylline as a model drug, Eudragit® RL PO or Eudragit® RS PO as a matrix former and three levels of TEC (triethyl citrate) as a plasticizer were prepared. The powder blend was roller compacted using a fixed roll-gap of 1.5 mm, feed screw speed to roller speed ratio of 5:1 and roll pressure of 4 MPa. The granules, after removing fines, were compacted into tablets on a Stokes B2 rotary tablet press at a compression force of 7 kN. The tablets were thermally treated at different temperatures (Room Temperature, 50, 75 and 100 °C) for 5 h. These tablets were scanned in reflectance mode in the wavelength range of 400-2500 nm and were evaluated for breaking force. Tablet breaking force significantly increased with increasing plasticizer levels and with increases in the sintering temperature. An increase in tablet hardness produced an upward shift (increase in absorbance) in the NIR spectra. The principle component analysis (PCA) of the spectra was able to distinguish samples with different plasticizer levels and sintering temperatures. In addition, a 9-factor partial least squares (PLS) regression model for tablets containing Eudragit® RL PO had an r(2) of 0.9797, a standard error of calibration of 0.6255 and a standard error of cross validation (SECV) of 0.7594. Similar analysis of tablets containing Eudragit® RS PO showed an r(2) of 0.9831, a standard error of calibration of 0.9711 and an SECV of 1.192.

  10. Effect of Polyethylene Glycol and Sodium Lauryl Sulphate on the Compaction Characteristics of Eudragit and Drug Release from its Matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emeje, M. O.; Isimi, C. Y.; Kunle, O. O.; Ofoefule, S. I.

    A study on the compaction characteristics of Eudragit l-100 both in the presence and in the absence of two commonly used additives, polyethylene glycol 6000 (PEG 6000) and Sodium Lauryl Sulphate (SLS) was done. Eudragit granules, with and without the additives and drug were prepared separately by the wet granulation method and compacts were made at varying compression pressures. Compaction characteristics using Kawakita and Heckel analysis revealed a concentration dependent effect of the additives on the compressibility of Eudragit granules, with 2.5% PEG 6000 producing the largest effect and 5.0% PEG 6000, the least. Irrespective of the concentration of PEG 6000, the yield value increased, while SLS either had no effect or decreased the yield value of Eudragit granules. The highest yield value of 21.69 kN was produced by formulations containing 2.5% PEG 6000. While in some cases, the effect of the additive was slight, in others, it was drastic. The extent and nature of the effect depended on both the type and concentration of the additive used. SLS was found to increase the deformation of Eudragit more than PEG 6000. In vitro dissolution in simulated intestinal fluid as indicated by time for 70% drug release (t70%) shows that both additives modulated drug release, with 2.5 % SLS and 5% PEG 6000 enhancing drug release, while 5% SLS resulted in retarded but erratic drug release. The results of this study show that additives such as PEG 6000 and SLS affect the compaction characteristics of Eudragit l-100 and these were also found to affect the retardant behavior of Eudragit.

  11. Matrix Extension Study: Validation of the Compact Dry EC Method for Enumeration of Escherichia coli and non-E. coli Coliform Bacteria in Selected Foods.

    PubMed

    Mizuochi, Shingo; Nelson, Maria; Baylis, Chris; Green, Becky; Jewell, Keith; Monadjemi, Farinaz; Chen, Yi; Salfinger, Yvonne; Fernandez, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Dry "Nissui" EC method, originally certified by the AOAC Research Institute Performance Test Method(SM) program for enumeration of Escherichia coli and non-E. coli coliforms in raw meat products (Performance Tested Method(SM) 110402), has undergone an evaluation to extend the method's claim to cooked chicken, prewashed bagged shredded iceberg lettuce, frozen cod filets, instant nonfat dry milk powder, and pasteurized milk (2% fat). Compact Dry EC is a ready-to-use dry media sheet containing a cold-soluble gelling agent, selective agents, and a chromogenic medium, which are rehydrated by adding 1 mL diluted sample. E. coli form blue/blue-purple colonies, whereas other coliform bacteria form red/pink colonies. Users can obtain an E. coli count (blue/blue-purple colonies only) and a total coliform count (red/pink plus blue/blue-purple colonies) after 24 ± 2 h of incubation at 37 ± 1°C. The matrix extension study was organized by Campden BRI (formerly Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association Technology, Ltd), Chipping Campden, United Kingdom. Method comparison data for cooked chicken, prewashed bagged shredded iceberg lettuce, frozen cod filets, and instant nonfat dry milk powder were collected in a single-laboratory evaluation by Campden BRI. A multilaboratory study was conducted on pasteurized milk (2% fat), with 13 laboratories participating. The Compact Dry EC method was compared to ISO 16649-2:2001 "Microbiology of food and animal feeding stuffs-Horizontal method for the enumeration of beta-glucuronidase-positive Escherichia coli-Part 2: Colony-count technique at 44 degrees C using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl beta-D-glucuronide" and to ISO 4832:2006 "Microbiology of food and animal feeding stuffs-Horizontal method for the enumeration of coliforms-Colony-count technique," the current standards at the time of this study. Each matrix was evaluated separately for E. coli and non-E. coli coliforms at each contamination level (including an

  12. Matrix Extension Study: Validation of the Compact Dry EC Method for Enumeration of Escherichia coli and non-E. coli Coliform Bacteria in Selected Foods.

    PubMed

    Mizuochi, Shingo; Nelson, Maria; Baylis, Chris; Green, Becky; Jewell, Keith; Monadjemi, Farinaz; Chen, Yi; Salfinger, Yvonne; Fernandez, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    The Compact Dry "Nissui" EC method, originally certified by the AOAC Research Institute Performance Test Method(SM) program for enumeration of Escherichia coli and non-E. coli coliforms in raw meat products (Performance Tested Method(SM) 110402), has undergone an evaluation to extend the method's claim to cooked chicken, prewashed bagged shredded iceberg lettuce, frozen cod filets, instant nonfat dry milk powder, and pasteurized milk (2% fat). Compact Dry EC is a ready-to-use dry media sheet containing a cold-soluble gelling agent, selective agents, and a chromogenic medium, which are rehydrated by adding 1 mL diluted sample. E. coli form blue/blue-purple colonies, whereas other coliform bacteria form red/pink colonies. Users can obtain an E. coli count (blue/blue-purple colonies only) and a total coliform count (red/pink plus blue/blue-purple colonies) after 24 ± 2 h of incubation at 37 ± 1°C. The matrix extension study was organized by Campden BRI (formerly Campden and Chorleywood Food Research Association Technology, Ltd), Chipping Campden, United Kingdom. Method comparison data for cooked chicken, prewashed bagged shredded iceberg lettuce, frozen cod filets, and instant nonfat dry milk powder were collected in a single-laboratory evaluation by Campden BRI. A multilaboratory study was conducted on pasteurized milk (2% fat), with 13 laboratories participating. The Compact Dry EC method was compared to ISO 16649-2:2001 "Microbiology of food and animal feeding stuffs-Horizontal method for the enumeration of beta-glucuronidase-positive Escherichia coli-Part 2: Colony-count technique at 44 degrees C using 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl beta-D-glucuronide" and to ISO 4832:2006 "Microbiology of food and animal feeding stuffs-Horizontal method for the enumeration of coliforms-Colony-count technique," the current standards at the time of this study. Each matrix was evaluated separately for E. coli and non-E. coli coliforms at each contamination level (including an

  13. Characterization of heat-labile toxin-subunit B from Escherichia coli by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Sospedra, I; De Simone, C; Soriano, J M; Mañes, J; Ferranti, P; Ritieni, A

    2012-11-01

    The possibilities of characterizing the heat-labile enterotoxin (LT) of enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) by liquid chromatography electrospray mass spectrometry (LC/ESI-MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption with time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) were investigated. The B subunit from recombinant E. coli (expression in Pichia pastoris) can be detected by LC/ESI-MS expressed in P. pastoris and the charge envelope signals can be observed; LC/ESI-MS and MALDI-TOF-MS analysis allowed the acquisition of labile toxin subunit B (LTB) molecular weight and preliminary structural characterization of LTB toxin. MALDI-TOF analysis after reduction and alkylation of the protein evidenced the presence of one disulfide bond in the structure of the protein. Confirmatory analysis was carried out by detection of most of the tryptic fragments of the B subunit by MALDI-TOF-MS, obtaining total coverage of the protein sequence. Possible biovariations in the toxin can mostly be determined by sequencing, where an increase of molecular mass in the N-terminal side of the protein was identified. This modification may be due to an O-GlcNAc-1-phosphorylation. PMID:22921353

  14. Matrix-assisted laser desorption-ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry in the subunit stoichiometry study of high-mass non-covalent complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moniatte, M.; Lesieur, C.; Vecsey-Semjen, B.; Buckley, J. T.; Pattus, F.; van der Goot, F. G.; van Dorsselaer, A.

    1997-12-01

    This study explores the potential of MALDI-TOF MS for the mass measurement of large non-covalent protein complexes. The following non-covalent complexes have been investigated: aerolysin from Aeromonas hydrophila (335 kDa) and [alpha]-haemolysin from Staphylococcus aureus (233 kDa) which are both cytolytic toxins, three enzymes known to be homotetramers in solution: bovine liver catalase (235 kDa), rabbit muscle pyruvate kinase (232 kDa), yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (147 kDa) and finally a lectin, concanavalin A (102 kDa). Three different matrix preparations were systematically tested under various conditions: ferulic acid dissolved in THF, 2,6-dihydroxyacetophenone in 20 mM aqueous ammonium citrate and a two-step sample preparation with sinapinic acid. It was possible to find a suitable combination of matrix and preparation type which allowed the molecularity of all complexes tested to be deduced from the MALDI mass spectrum. Trimeric and tetrameric intermediates accumulating during the formation of the active heptameric aerolysin complex were also identified, this allowing a formation mechanism to be proposed. The observation of large specific non-covalent complexes has been found to be dependent on the choice of matrix, the type of sample preparation used, the solvent evaporation speed, the pH of the resulting matrix-sample mixture and the number of shots acquired on a given area. From this set of experiments, some useful guidelines for the observation of large complexes by MALDI could therefore be deduced. Fast evaporation of the solvent is particularly necessary in the case of pH sensitive complexes. An ESMS study on the same non-covalent complexes indicated that, rather surprisingly, reliable results could be obtained by MALDI-TOF MS on several very large complexes (above 200 kDa) for which ESMS yielded no clear spectra.

  15. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, Moshe; Gruen, Dieter M.; Mendelsohn, Marshall H.; Sheft, Irving

    1981-01-01

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  16. Method for preparing porous metal hydride compacts

    DOEpatents

    Ron, M.; Gruen, D.M.; Mendelsohn, M.H.; Sheft, I.

    1980-01-21

    A method for preparing porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts which can be repeatedly hydrided and dehydrided without disintegration. A mixture of a finely divided metal hydride and a finely divided matrix metal is contacted with a poison which prevents the metal hydride from dehydriding at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The mixture of matrix metal and poisoned metal hydride is then compacted under pressure at room temperature to form porous metallic-matrix hydride compacts.

  17. Matrix differentiation formulas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Usikov, D. A.; Tkhabisimov, D. K.

    1983-01-01

    A compact differentiation technique (without using indexes) is developed for scalar functions that depend on complex matrix arguments which are combined by operations of complex conjugation, transposition, addition, multiplication, matrix inversion and taking the direct product. The differentiation apparatus is developed in order to simplify the solution of extremum problems of scalar functions of matrix arguments.

  18. Single and compact ESD device Beta-Matrix solution based on bidirectional SCR Network in advanced 28/32 nm technology node

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgeat, Johan; Galy, Philippe

    2013-09-01

    Advanced CMOS technologies, like CMOS32 nm high K metal gate, become more and more sensitive to electrostatic discharge (ESD) phenomenon particularly because of their low overvoltage robustness. In this context, we develop a Beta-Matrix concept [1] which merges six silicon controlled rectifier (SCR) in a same structure and having one single triggering gate N (GN) for a high integration and high flexibility in IO frame. This device is the center of a new protection strategy which combined both local and global protection approach [1]. Also, a specific trigger circuit has been developed to turn-on Beta-Matrix whatever stressed pins during an ESD event and to keep it off when IC is in normal operation mode and is presented in [2]. Both, Beta-Matrix and trigger circuit, make a robust and very efficient ESD network which allows removing all IO placement constraint and power IO [3]. Also, this study is a synthesis of both previous work and a development of new Beta-Matrix topology to improve the device behavior, particularly by improving the uniformity of activation and decreasing triggering voltage of the structure. This work presents results of 3 dimensional TCAD simulations and measurements of transmission line pulse (TLP) and very fast-TLP.

  19. VIBRATION COMPACTION

    DOEpatents

    Hauth, J.J.

    1962-07-01

    A method of compacting a powder in a metal container is described including the steps of vibrating the container at above and below the resonant frequency and also sweeping the frequency of vibration across the resonant frequency several times thereby following the change in resonant frequency caused by compaction of the powder. (AEC)

  20. Ureilite compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walker, D.; Agee, C. B.

    1988-03-01

    Ureilite meteorites show the simple mineralogy and compact recrystallized textures of adcumulate rock or melting residues. A certain amount of controversy exists about whether they are in fact adcumulate rocks or melting residues and about the nature of the precursor liquid or solid assemblage. The authors undertook a limited experimental study which made possible the evaluation of the potential of the thermal migration mechanism (diffusion on a saturation gradient) for forming ureilite-like aggregates from carbonaceous chondrite precursors. They find that the process can produce compact recrystallized aggregates of silicate crystals which do resemble the ureilities and other interstitial-liquid-free adcumulate rocks in texture.

  1. Compact accelerator

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Kirbie, Hugh C.

    2007-02-06

    A compact linear accelerator having at least one strip-shaped Blumlein module which guides a propagating wavefront between first and second ends and controls the output pulse at the second end. Each Blumlein module has first, second, and third planar conductor strips, with a first dielectric strip between the first and second conductor strips, and a second dielectric strip between the second and third conductor strips. Additionally, the compact linear accelerator includes a high voltage power supply connected to charge the second conductor strip to a high potential, and a switch for switching the high potential in the second conductor strip to at least one of the first and third conductor strips so as to initiate a propagating reverse polarity wavefront(s) in the corresponding dielectric strip(s).

  2. Biofilm Matrix Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Fong, Jiunn N. C.; Yildiz, Fitnat H.

    2015-01-01

    Proteinaceous components of the biofilm matrix include secreted extracellular proteins, cell surface adhesins and protein subunits of cell appendages such as flagella and pili. Biofilm matrix proteins play diverse roles in biofilm formation and dissolution. They are involved in attaching cells to surfaces, stabilizing the biofilm matrix via interactions with exopolysaccharide and nucleic acid components, developing three-dimensional biofilm architectures, and dissolving biofilm matrix via enzymatic degradation of polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. In this chapter, we will review functions of matrix proteins in a selected set of microorganisms, studies of the matrix proteomes of Vibrio cholerae and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and roles of outer membrane vesicles and of nucleoid-binding proteins in biofilm formation. PMID:26104709

  3. Compact magnetograph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Title, A. M.; Gillespie, B. A.; Mosher, J. W.

    1982-01-01

    A compact magnetograph system based on solid Fabry-Perot interferometers as the spectral isolation elements was studied. The theory of operation of several Fabry-Perot systems, the suitability of various magnetic lines, signal levels expected for different modes of operation, and the optimal detector systems were investigated. The requirements that the lack of a polarization modulator placed upon the electronic signal chain was emphasized. The PLZT modulator was chosen as a satisfactory component with both high reliability and elatively low voltage requirements. Thermal control, line centering and velocity offset problems were solved by a Fabry-Perot configuration.

  4. Technology Selections for Cylindrical Compact Fabrication

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey A. Phillips

    2010-10-01

    A variety of process approaches are available and have been used historically for manufacture of cylindrical fuel compacts. The jet milling, fluid bed overcoating, and hot press compacting approach being adopted in the U.S. AGR Fuel Development Program for scale-up of the compacting process involves significant paradigm shifts from historical approaches. New methods are being pursued because of distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of process mixed waste. Recent advances in jet milling technology allow simplified dry matrix powder preparation. The matrix preparation method is well matched with patented fluid bed powder overcoating technology recently developed for the pharmaceutical industry and directly usable for high density fuel particle matrix overcoating. High density overcoating places fuel particles as close as possible to their final position in the compact and is matched with hot press compacting which fully fluidizes matrix resin to achieve die fill at low compacting pressures and without matrix end caps. Overall the revised methodology provides a simpler process that should provide very high yields, improve homogeneity, further reduce defect fractions, eliminate intermediate grading and QC steps, and allow further increases in fuel packing fractions.

  5. Recent Advances in Subunit Vaccine Carriers

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Abhishek; Sucheck, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    The lower immunogenicity of synthetic subunit antigens, compared to live attenuated vaccines, is being addressed with improved vaccine carriers. Recent reports indicate that the physio-chemical properties of these carriers can be altered to achieve optimal antigen presentation, endosomal escape, particle bio-distribution, and cellular trafficking. The carriers can be modified with various antigens and ligands for dendritic cells targeting. They can also be modified with adjuvants, either covalently or entrapped in the matrix, to improve cellular and humoral immune responses against the antigen. As a result, these multi-functional carrier systems are being explored for use in active immunotherapy against cancer and infectious diseases. Advancing technology, improved analytical methods, and use of computational methodology have also contributed to the development of subunit vaccine carriers. This review details recent breakthroughs in the design of nano-particulate vaccine carriers, including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, and inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27104575

  6. Recent Advances in Subunit Vaccine Carriers.

    PubMed

    Vartak, Abhishek; Sucheck, Steven J

    2016-01-01

    The lower immunogenicity of synthetic subunit antigens, compared to live attenuated vaccines, is being addressed with improved vaccine carriers. Recent reports indicate that the physio-chemical properties of these carriers can be altered to achieve optimal antigen presentation, endosomal escape, particle bio-distribution, and cellular trafficking. The carriers can be modified with various antigens and ligands for dendritic cells targeting. They can also be modified with adjuvants, either covalently or entrapped in the matrix, to improve cellular and humoral immune responses against the antigen. As a result, these multi-functional carrier systems are being explored for use in active immunotherapy against cancer and infectious diseases. Advancing technology, improved analytical methods, and use of computational methodology have also contributed to the development of subunit vaccine carriers. This review details recent breakthroughs in the design of nano-particulate vaccine carriers, including liposomes, polymeric nanoparticles, and inorganic nanoparticles. PMID:27104575

  7. Compact Reactor

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Pharis E.

    2007-01-30

    Weyl's Gauge Principle of 1929 has been used to establish Weyl's Quantum Principle (WQP) that requires that the Weyl scale factor should be unity. It has been shown that the WQP requires the following: quantum mechanics must be used to determine system states; the electrostatic potential must be non-singular and quantified; interactions between particles with different electric charges (i.e. electron and proton) do not obey Newton's Third Law at sub-nuclear separations, and nuclear particles may be much different than expected using the standard model. The above WQP requirements lead to a potential fusion reactor wherein deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei. Because the deuterium nuclei are preferentially fused into helium nuclei at temperatures and energies lower than specified by the standard model there is no harmful radiation as a byproduct of this fusion process. Therefore, a reactor using this reaction does not need any shielding to contain such radiation. The energy released from each reaction and the absence of shielding makes the deuterium-plus-deuterium-to-helium (DDH) reactor very compact when compared to other reactors, both fission and fusion types. Moreover, the potential energy output per reactor weight and the absence of harmful radiation makes the DDH reactor an ideal candidate for space power. The logic is summarized by which the WQP requires the above conditions that make the prediction of DDH possible. The details of the DDH reaction will be presented along with the specifics of why the DDH reactor may be made to cause two deuterium nuclei to preferentially fuse to a helium nucleus. The presentation will also indicate the calculations needed to predict the reactor temperature as a function of fuel loading, reactor size, and desired output and will include the progress achieved to date.

  8. Ceramic powder compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, S.J.; Ewsuk, K.G.; Mahoney, F.M.

    1995-12-31

    With the objective of developing a predictive model for ceramic powder compaction we have investigated methods for characterizing density gradients in ceramic powder compacts, reviewed and compared existing compaction models, conducted compaction experiments on a spray dried alumina powder, and conducted mechanical tests and compaction experiments on model granular materials. Die filling and particle packing, and the behavior of individual granules play an important role in determining compaction behavior and should be incorporated into realistic compaction models. These results support the use of discrete element modeling techniques and statistical mechanics principals to develop a comprehensive model for compaction, something that should be achievable with computers with parallel processing capabilities.

  9. Grassmann matrix quantum mechanics

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Anninos, Dionysios; Denef, Frederik; Monten, Ruben

    2016-04-21

    We explore quantum mechanical theories whose fundamental degrees of freedom are rectangular matrices with Grassmann valued matrix elements. We study particular models where the low energy sector can be described in terms of a bosonic Hermitian matrix quantum mechanics. We describe the classical curved phase space that emerges in the low energy sector. The phase space lives on a compact Kähler manifold parameterized by a complex matrix, of the type discovered some time ago by Berezin. The emergence of a semiclassical bosonic matrix quantum mechanics at low energies requires that the original Grassmann matrices be in the long rectangular limit.more » In conclusion, we discuss possible holographic interpretations of such matrix models which, by construction, are endowed with a finite dimensional Hilbert space.« less

  10. Compact Process Development at Babcock & Wilcox

    SciTech Connect

    Eric Shaber; Jeffrey Phillips

    2012-03-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of compaction trials have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel at packing fractions exceeding 46% by volume. Results from these trials are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operable using nuclear fuel materials. Final process testing is in progress to certify the process for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts in 2012.

  11. Structure of subcomplex Iβ of mammalian respiratory complex I leads to new supernumerary subunit assignments

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiapeng; King, Martin S.; Yu, Minmin; Klipcan, Liron; Leslie, Andrew G. W.; Hirst, Judy

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial complex I (proton-pumping NADH:ubiquinone oxidoreductase) is an essential respiratory enzyme. Mammalian complex I contains 45 subunits: 14 conserved “core” subunits and 31 “supernumerary” subunits. The structure of Bos taurus complex I, determined to 5-Å resolution by electron cryomicroscopy, described the structure of the mammalian core enzyme and allowed the assignment of 14 supernumerary subunits. Here, we describe the 6.8-Å resolution X-ray crystallography structure of subcomplex Iβ, a large portion of the membrane domain of B. taurus complex I that contains two core subunits and a cohort of supernumerary subunits. By comparing the structures and composition of subcomplex Iβ and complex I, supported by comparisons with Yarrowia lipolytica complex I, we propose assignments for eight further supernumerary subunits in the structure. Our new assignments include two CHCH-domain containing subunits that contain disulfide bridges between CX9C motifs; they are processed by the Mia40 oxidative-folding pathway in the intermembrane space and probably stabilize the membrane domain. We also assign subunit B22, an LYR protein, to the matrix face of the membrane domain. We reveal that subunit B22 anchors an acyl carrier protein (ACP) to the complex, replicating the LYR protein–ACP structural module that was identified previously in the hydrophilic domain. Thus, we significantly extend knowledge of how the mammalian supernumerary subunits are arranged around the core enzyme, and provide insights into their roles in biogenesis and regulation. PMID:26371297

  12. Advancements in the development of subunit influenza vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Naru; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Yusen; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying

    2014-01-01

    The ongoing threat of influenza epidemics and pandemics has emphasized the importance of developing safe and effective vaccines against infections from divergent influenza viruses. In this review, we first introduce the structure and life cycle of influenza A viruses, describing major influenza A virus-caused pandemics. We then compare different types of influenza vaccines and discuss current advancements in the development of subunit influenza vaccines, particularly those based on nucleoprotein (NP), extracellular domain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins. We also illustrate potential strategies for improving the efficacy of subunit influenza vaccines. PMID:25529753

  13. Advancements in the development of subunit influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Naru; Zheng, Bo-Jian; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Yusen; Jiang, Shibo; Du, Lanying

    2015-02-01

    The ongoing threat of influenza epidemics and pandemics has emphasized the importance of developing safe and effective vaccines against infections from divergent influenza viruses. In this review, we first introduce the structure and life cycle of influenza A viruses, describing major influenza A virus-caused pandemics. We then compare different types of influenza vaccines and discuss current advancements in the development of subunit influenza vaccines, particularly those based on nucleoprotein (NP), extracellular domain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) and hemagglutinin (HA) proteins. We also illustrate potential strategies for improving the efficacy of subunit influenza vaccines.

  14. Mouse Embryo Compaction.

    PubMed

    White, M D; Bissiere, S; Alvarez, Y D; Plachta, N

    2016-01-01

    Compaction is a critical first morphological event in the preimplantation development of the mammalian embryo. Characterized by the transformation of the embryo from a loose cluster of spherical cells into a tightly packed mass, compaction is a key step in the establishment of the first tissue-like structures of the embryo. Although early investigation of the mechanisms driving compaction implicated changes in cell-cell adhesion, recent work has identified essential roles for cortical tension and a compaction-specific class of filopodia. During the transition from 8 to 16 cells, as the embryo is compacting, it must also make fundamental decisions regarding cell position, polarity, and fate. Understanding how these and other processes are integrated with compaction requires further investigation. Emerging imaging-based techniques that enable quantitative analysis from the level of cell-cell interactions down to the level of individual regulatory molecules will provide a greater understanding of how compaction shapes the early mammalian embryo. PMID:27475854

  15. Interaction of factor XIII subunits.

    PubMed

    Katona, Eva; Pénzes, Krisztina; Csapó, Andrea; Fazakas, Ferenc; Udvardy, Miklós L; Bagoly, Zsuzsa; Orosz, Zsuzsanna Z; Muszbek, László

    2014-03-13

    Coagulation factor XIII (FXIII) is a heterotetramer consisting of 2 catalytic A subunits (FXIII-A2) and 2 protective/inhibitory B subunits (FXIII-B2). FXIII-B, a mosaic protein consisting of 10 sushi domains, significantly prolongs the lifespan of catalytic subunits in the circulation and prevents their slow progressive activation in plasmatic conditions. In this study, the biochemistry of the interaction between the 2 FXIII subunits was investigated. Using a surface plasmon resonance technique and an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-type binding assay, the equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) for the interaction was established in the range of 10(-10) M. Based on the measured Kd, it was calculated that in plasma approximately 1% of FXIII-A2 should be in free form. This value was confirmed experimentally by measuring FXIII-A2 in plasma samples immunodepleted of FXIII-A2B2. Free plasma FXIII-A2 is functionally active, and when activated by thrombin and Ca(2+), it can cross-link fibrin. In cerebrospinal fluid and tears with much lower FXIII subunit concentrations, >80% of FXIII-A2 existed in free form. A monoclonal anti-FXIII-B antibody that prevented the interaction between the 2 subunits reacted with the recombinant combined first and second sushi domains of FXIII-B, and its epitope was localized to the peptide spanning positions 96 to 103 in the second sushi domain. PMID:24408323

  16. Reversible DNA compaction.

    PubMed

    González-Pérez, Alfredo

    2014-01-01

    In this review we summarize and discuss the different methods we can use to achieve reversible DNA compaction in vitro. Reversible DNA compaction is a natural process that occurs in living cells and viruses. As a result these process long sequences of DNA can be concentrated in a small volume (compacted) to be decompacted only when the information carried by the DNA is needed. In the current work we review the main artificial compacting agents looking at their suitability for decompaction. The different approaches used for decompaction are strongly influenced by the nature of the compacting agent that determines the mechanism of compaction. We focus our discussion on two main artificial compacting agents: multivalent cations and cationic surfactants that are the best known compacting agents. The reversibility of the process can be achieved by adding chemicals like divalent cations, alcohols, anionic surfactants, cyclodextrins or by changing the chemical nature of the compacting agents via pH modifications, light induced conformation changes or by redox-reactions. We stress the relevance of electrostatic interactions and self-assembly as a main approach in order to tune up the DNA conformation in order to create an on-off switch allowing a transition between coil and compact states. The recent advances to control DNA conformation in vitro, by means of molecular self-assembly, result in a better understanding of the fundamental aspects involved in the DNA behavior in vivo and serve of invaluable inspiration for the development of potential biomedical applications. PMID:24444152

  17. Dynamically compacted all-ceramic lithium-ion batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jak, Michiel J. G.; Ooms, Frans G. B.; Kelder, Erik M.; Legerstee, Waiter J.; Schoonman, Joop; Weisenburger, Alfons

    This paper deals with a cell design and a unique manufacturing process for all solid-state lithium-ion batteries. Detailed analyses of the manufacturing of the components for such a battery and the compaction of the green battery are presented. The electrodes were made of coatings of LiMn 2O 4 on metal foils. The electrolyte was a free-standing foil of the ceramic electrolyte Li-doped BPO 4 in a polymer matrix. The different layers were wound and compacted by using magnetic pulse compaction. Several characteristics of the compacted batteries are presented.

  18. Mesoscale Modeling of Impact Compaction of Primitive Solar System Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Thomas M.; Collins, Gareth S.; Bland, Philip A.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a method for simulating the mesoscale compaction of early solar system solids in low-velocity impact events using the iSALE shock physics code. Chondrules are represented by non-porous disks, placed within a porous matrix. By simulating impacts into bimodal mixtures over a wide range of parameter space (including the chondrule-to-matrix ratio, the matrix porosity and composition, and the impact velocity), we have shown how each of these parameters influences the shock processing of heterogeneous materials. The temperature after shock processing shows a strong dichotomy: matrix temperatures are elevated much higher than the chondrules, which remain largely cold. Chondrules can protect some matrix from shock compaction, with shadow regions in the lee side of chondrules exhibiting higher porosity that elsewhere in the matrix. Using the results from this mesoscale modeling, we show how the ɛ - α porous-compaction model parameters depend on initial bulk porosity. We also show that the timescale for the temperature dichotomy to equilibrate is highly dependent on the porosity of the matrix after the shock, and will be on the order of seconds for matrix porosities of less than 0.1, and on the order of tens to hundreds of seconds for matrix porosities of ˜0.3-0.5. Finally, we have shown that the composition of the post-shock material is able to match the bulk porosity and chondrule-to-matrix ratios of meteorite groups such as carbonaceous chondrites and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites.

  19. Mechanics of tissue compaction.

    PubMed

    Turlier, Hervé; Maître, Jean-Léon

    2015-12-01

    During embryonic development, tissues deform by a succession and combination of morphogenetic processes. Tissue compaction is the morphogenetic process by which a tissue adopts a tighter structure. Recent studies characterized the respective roles of cells' adhesive and contractile properties in tissue compaction. In this review, we formalize the mechanical and molecular principles of tissue compaction and we analyze through the prism of this framework several morphogenetic events: the compaction of the early mouse embryo, the formation of the fly retina, the segmentation of somites and the separation of germ layers during gastrulation.

  20. Compaction Scale Up and Optimization of Cylindrical Fuel Compacts for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey J. Einerson; Jeffrey A. Phillips; Eric L. Shaber; Scott E. Niedzialek; W. Clay Richardson; Scott G. Nagley

    2012-10-01

    Multiple process approaches have been used historically to manufacture cylindrical nuclear fuel compacts. Scale-up of fuel compacting was required for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) project to achieve an economically viable automated production process capable of providing a minimum of 10 compacts/minute with high production yields. In addition, the scale-up effort was required to achieve matrix density equivalent to baseline historical production processes, and allow compacting at fuel packing fractions up to 46% by volume. The scale-up approach of jet milling, fluid-bed overcoating, and hot-press compacting adopted in the U.S. Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) Fuel Development Program involves significant paradigm shifts to capitalize on distinct advantages in simplicity, yield, and elimination of mixed waste. A series of designed experiments have been completed to optimize compaction conditions of time, temperature, and forming pressure using natural uranium oxycarbide (NUCO) fuel. Results from these experiments are included. The scale-up effort is nearing completion with the process installed and operational using nuclear fuel materials. The process is being certified for manufacture of qualification test fuel compacts for the AGR-5/6/7 experiment at the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at the Idaho National Laboratory (INL).

  1. Compaction properties of isomalt.

    PubMed

    Bolhuis, Gerad K; Engelhart, Jeffrey J P; Eissens, Anko C

    2009-08-01

    Although other polyols have been described extensively as filler-binders in direct compaction of tablets, the polyol isomalt is rather unknown as pharmaceutical excipient, in spite of its description in all the main pharmacopoeias. In this paper the compaction properties of different types of ispomalt were studied. The types used were the standard product sieved isomalt, milled isomalt and two types of agglomerated isomalt with a different ratio between 6-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-sorbitol (GPS) and 1-O-alpha-d-glucopyranosyl-d-mannitol dihydrate (GPM). Powder flow properties, specific surface area and densities of the different types were investigated. Compactibility was investigated by compression of the tablets on a compaction simulator, simulating the compression on high-speed tabletting machines. Lubricant sensitivity was measured by compressing unlubricated tablets and tablets lubricated with 1% magnesium stearate on an instrumented hydraulic press. Sieved isomalt had excellent flow properties but the compactibility was found to be poor whereas the lubricant sensitivity was high. Milling resulted in both a strong increase in compactibility as an effect of the higher surface area for bonding and a decrease in lubricant sensitivity as an effect of the higher surface area to be coated with magnesium stearate. However, the flow properties of milled isomalt were too bad for use as filler-binder in direct compaction. Just as could be expected, agglomeration of milled isomalt by fluid bed agglomeration improved flowability. The good compaction properties and the low lubricant sensitivity were maintained. This effect is caused by an early fragmentation of the agglomerated material during the compaction process, producing clean, lubricant-free particles and a high surface for bonding. The different GPS/GPM ratios of the agglomerated isomalt types studied had no significant effect on the compaction properties. PMID:19327398

  2. Stabilization of compactible waste

    SciTech Connect

    Franz, E.M.; Heiser, J.H. III; Colombo, P.

    1990-09-01

    This report summarizes the results of series of experiments performed to determine the feasibility of stabilizing compacted or compactible waste with polymers. The need for this work arose from problems encountered at disposal sites attributed to the instability of this waste in disposal. These studies are part of an experimental program conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) investigating methods for the improved solidification/stabilization of DOE low-level wastes. The approach taken in this study was to perform a series of survey type experiments using various polymerization systems to find the most economical and practical method for further in-depth studies. Compactible dry bulk waste was stabilized with two different monomer systems: styrene-trimethylolpropane trimethacrylate (TMPTMA) and polyester-styrene, in laboratory-scale experiments. Stabilization was accomplished by wetting or soaking compactible waste (before or after compaction) with monomers, which were subsequently polymerized. Three stabilization methods are described. One involves the in-situ treatment of compacted waste with monomers in which a vacuum technique is used to introduce the binder into the waste. The second method involves the alternate placement and compaction of waste and binder into a disposal container. In the third method, the waste is treated before compaction by wetting the waste with the binder using a spraying technique. A series of samples stabilized at various binder-to-waste ratios were evaluated through water immersion and compression testing. Full-scale studies were conducted by stabilizing two 55-gallon drums of real compacted waste. The results of this preliminary study indicate that the integrity of compacted waste forms can be readily improved to ensure their long-term durability in disposal environments. 9 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Modeling Dynamic Compaction of Porous Materials with the Overstress Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Yehuda

    2013-06-01

    To model compaction of a porous material (PM) we need 1) an equation of state (EOS) of the PM in terms of the EOS of its matrix, and 2) a compaction law. For the EOS it is common to use Herrmann's suggestion, as in his P α model. For a compaction law it is common to use a quasi-static compaction relation obtained from 1) a mezzo-scale model (as in Carroll and Holt's spherical shell model), or from 2) quasi-static tests. Here we are interested in dynamic compaction, like in a planar impact test. In dynamic compaction, the state may change too fast for the state point to follow the quasi-static compaction curve. We therefore get an overstress situation. The state point moves out of the quasi-static compaction boundary, and only with time collapses back towards it at a certain rate. In this way the dynamic compaction event becomes rate dependent. In the paper we first write down the rate equations for dynamic compaction according to this overstress approach. We then implement these equations in a hydro-code, and run some examples. We show how the overstress rate parameter can be calibrated from tests.

  4. Modelling dynamic compaction of porous materials with the overstress approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partom, Y.

    2014-05-01

    To model compaction of a porous material we need 1) an equation of state of the porous material in terms of the equation of state of its matrix, and 2) a compaction law. For an equation of state it is common to use Herrmann's suggestion, as in his Pα model. For a compaction law it is common to use a quasi-static compaction relation obtained from 1) a meso-scale model (as in Carroll and Holt's spherical shell model), or from 2) quasi-static tests. Here we are interested in dynamic compaction, like in a planar impact test. In dynamic compaction the state may change too fast for the state point to follow the quasi-static compaction curve. We therefore get an overstress situation. The state point moves out of the quasi-static compaction boundary, and only with time collapses back towards it at a certain rate. In this way the dynamic compaction event becomes rate dependent. In the paper we first write down the rate equations for dynamic compaction according to the overstress approach. We then implement these equations in a hydro-code and run some examples. We show how the overstress rate parameter can be calibrated from tests.

  5. The ribosomal subunit assembly line

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur

    2005-01-01

    Recent proteomic studies in Saccharomyces cerevisiae have identified nearly 200 proteins, other than the structural ribosomal proteins, that participate in the assembly of ribosomal subunits and their transport from the nucleus. In a separate line of research, proteomic studies of mature plant ribosomes have revealed considerable variability in the protein composition of individual ribosomes. PMID:16207363

  6. Mechanical compaction in Bleurswiller sandstone: effective pressure law and compaction localization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baud, Patrick; Reuschlé, Thierry; Ji, Yuntao; Wong, Teng-fong

    2016-04-01

    We performed a systematic investigation of mechanical compaction and strain localization in Bleurswiller sandstone of 24% porosity. 70 conventional triaxial compression experiments were performed at confining pressures up to 200 MPa and pore pressures ranging from 5 to 100 MPa. Our new data show that the effective pressure principle can be applied in both the brittle faulting and cataclastic flow regimes, with an effective pressure coefficient close to but somewhat less than 1. Under relatively high confinement, the samples typically fail by development of compaction bands. X-ray computed tomography (CT) was used to resolve preexisting porosity clusters, as well as the initiation and propagation of the compaction bands in deformed samples. Synthesis of the CT and microstructural data indicates that there is no casual relation between collapse of the porosity clusters in Bleurswiller sandstone and nucleation of the compaction bands. Instead, the collapsed porosity clusters may represent barriers for the propagation of compaction localization, rendering the compaction bands to propagate along relatively tortuous paths so as to avoid the porosity clusters. The diffuse and tortuous geometry of compaction bands results in permeability reduction that is significantly lower than that associated with compaction band formation in other porous sandstones. Our data confirm that Bleurswiller sandstone stands out as the only porous sandstone associated with a compactive cap that is linear, and our CT and microstructural observation show that it is intimately related to collapse of the porosity clusters. We demonstrate that the anomalous linear caps and their slopes are in agreement with a micromechanical model based on the collapse of a spherical pore embedded in an elastic-plastic matrix that obeys the Coulomb failure criterion.

  7. Pixel-Level Digital-to-Analog Conversion Scheme for Compact Data Drivers of Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Low-Temperature Polycrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Wook; Choi, Byong-Deok

    2010-03-01

    This paper shows that a part of a digital-to-analog conversion (DAC) function can be included in a pixel circuit to save the circuit area of an integrated data driver fabricated with low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs). Because the pixel-level DAC can be constructed by two TFTs and one small capacitor, the pixel circuit does not become markedly complex. The design of an 8-bit DAC, which combines a 6-bit resistor-string-based DAC and a 2-bit pixel-level DAC for a 4-in. diagonal VGA format active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED), is shown in detail. In addition, analysis results are presented, revealing that the 8-bit DAC scheme including a 2-bit pixel-level DAC with 1:3 demultiplexing can be applied to very high video formats, such as XGA, for a 3 to 4-in. diagonal AMOLED. Even for a 9- to 12-in. diagonal AMOLED, the proposed scheme can still be applied to the XGA format, even though no demultiplexing is allowed. The total height of the proposed 8-bit DAC is approximately 960 µm, which is almost one-half of that of the previous 6-bit resistor-string-based DAC.

  8. Pixel-Level Digital-to-Analog Conversion Scheme for Compact Data Drivers of Active Matrix Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with Low-Temperature Polycrystalline Silicon Thin-Film Transistors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tae-Wook Kim,; Byong-Deok Choi,

    2010-03-01

    This paper shows that a part of a digital-to-analog conversion (DAC) function can be included in a pixel circuit to save the circuit area of an integrated data driver fabricated with low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS-TFTs). Because the pixel-level DAC can be constructed by two TFTs and one small capacitor, the pixel circuit does not become markedly complex. The design of an 8-bit DAC, which combines a 6-bit resistor-string-based DAC and a 2-bit pixel-level DAC for a 4-in. diagonal VGA format active matrix organic light-emitting diode (AMOLED), is shown in detail. In addition, analysis results are presented, revealing that the 8-bit DAC scheme including a 2-bit pixel-level DAC with 1:3 demultiplexing can be applied to very high video formats, such as XGA, for a 3 to 4-in. diagonal AMOLED. Even for a 9- to 12-in. diagonal AMOLED, the proposed scheme can still be applied to the XGA format, even though no demultiplexing is allowed. The total height of the proposed 8-bit DAC is approximately 960 μm, which is almost one-half of that of the previous 6-bit resistor-string-based DAC.

  9. Pixel-Level Digital-to-Analog Conversion Scheme with Compensation of Thin-Film-Transistor Variations for Compact Integrated Data Drivers of Active Matrix Organic Light Emitting Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Tae-Wook; Park, Sang-Gyu; Choi, Byong-Deok

    2011-03-01

    The previous pixel-level digital-to-analog-conversion (DAC) scheme that implements a part of a DAC in a pixel circuit turned out to be very efficient for reducing the peripheral area of an integrated data driver fabricated with low-temperature polycrystalline silicon thin-film transistors (LTPS TFTs). However, how the pixel-level DAC can be compatible with the existing pixel circuits including compensation schemes of TFT variations and IR drops on supply rails, which is of primary importance for active matrix organic light emitting diodes (AMOLEDs) is an issue in this scheme, because LTPS TFTs suffer from random variations in their characteristics. In this paper, we show that the pixel-level DAC scheme can be successfully used with the previous compensation schemes by giving two examples of voltage- and current-programming pixels. The previous pixel-level DAC schemes require additional two TFTs and one capacitor, but for these newly proposed pixel circuits, the overhead is no more than two TFTs by utilizing the already existing capacitor. In addition, through a detailed analysis, it has been shown that the pixel-level DAC can be expanded to a 4-bit resolution, or be applied together with 1:2 demultiplexing driving for 6- to 8-in. diagonal XGA AMOLED display panels.

  10. Compact microchannel system

    DOEpatents

    Griffiths, Stewart

    2003-09-30

    The present invention provides compact geometries for the layout of microchannel columns through the use of turns and straight channel segments. These compact geometries permit the use of long separation or reaction columns on a small microchannel substrate or, equivalently, permit columns of a fixed length to occupy a smaller substrate area. The new geometries are based in part on mathematical analyses that provide the minimum turn radius for which column performance in not degraded. In particular, we find that straight channel segments of sufficient length reduce the required minimum turn radius, enabling compact channel layout when turns and straight segments are combined. The compact geometries are obtained by using turns and straight segments in overlapped or nested arrangements to form pleated or coiled columns.

  11. Compact turbidity meter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirschberg, J. G.

    1979-01-01

    Proposed monitor that detects back-reflected infrared radiation makes in situ turbidity measurements of lakes, streams, and other bodies of water. Monitor is compact, works well in daylight as at night, and is easily operated in rough seas.

  12. All three subunits of soybean beta-conglycinin are potential food allergens.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Kim, Won-Seok; Jang, Sungchan; Kerley, Monty S

    2009-02-11

    Soybeans are recognized as one of the "big 8" food allergens. IgE antibodies from soybean-sensitive patients recognize more than 15 soybean proteins. Among these proteins only the alpha-subunit of beta-conglycinin, but not the highly homologous alpha'- and beta-subunits, has been shown to be a major allergenic protein. The objective of this study was to examine if the alpha'- and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin can also serve as potential allergens. Immunoblot analysis using sera collected from soybean-allergic patients revealed the presence of IgE antibodies that recognized several soy proteins including 72, 70, 52, 34, and 21 kDa proteins. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis of trypsin-digested 72, 70, and 52 kDa proteins indicated that these proteins were the alpha'-, alpha-, and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin, respectively. Additionally, purified alpha'-, alpha-, and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin were recognized by IgE antibodies present in the soybean-allergic patients. The IgE reactivity to the beta-subunit of beta-conglycinin was not abolished when this glycoprotein was either deglycosylated using glycosidases or expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli . The results suggest that in addition to the previously recognized alpha-subunit of beta-conglycinin, the alpha'- and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin also are potential food allergens. PMID:19138084

  13. All three subunits of soybean beta-conglycinin are potential food allergens.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Hari B; Kim, Won-Seok; Jang, Sungchan; Kerley, Monty S

    2009-02-11

    Soybeans are recognized as one of the "big 8" food allergens. IgE antibodies from soybean-sensitive patients recognize more than 15 soybean proteins. Among these proteins only the alpha-subunit of beta-conglycinin, but not the highly homologous alpha'- and beta-subunits, has been shown to be a major allergenic protein. The objective of this study was to examine if the alpha'- and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin can also serve as potential allergens. Immunoblot analysis using sera collected from soybean-allergic patients revealed the presence of IgE antibodies that recognized several soy proteins including 72, 70, 52, 34, and 21 kDa proteins. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF) analysis of trypsin-digested 72, 70, and 52 kDa proteins indicated that these proteins were the alpha'-, alpha-, and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin, respectively. Additionally, purified alpha'-, alpha-, and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin were recognized by IgE antibodies present in the soybean-allergic patients. The IgE reactivity to the beta-subunit of beta-conglycinin was not abolished when this glycoprotein was either deglycosylated using glycosidases or expressed as a recombinant protein in Escherichia coli . The results suggest that in addition to the previously recognized alpha-subunit of beta-conglycinin, the alpha'- and beta-subunits of beta-conglycinin also are potential food allergens.

  14. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    PubMed Central

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O’Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-01-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2′OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit. PMID:26876483

  15. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S.; Okafor, C. Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B.; Hud, Nicholas V.; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-01

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2‧OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  16. Ribosomal small subunit domains radiate from a central core.

    PubMed

    Gulen, Burak; Petrov, Anton S; Okafor, C Denise; Vander Wood, Drew; O'Neill, Eric B; Hud, Nicholas V; Williams, Loren Dean

    2016-02-15

    The domain architecture of a large RNA can help explain and/or predict folding, function, biogenesis and evolution. We offer a formal and general definition of an RNA domain and use that definition to experimentally characterize the rRNA of the ribosomal small subunit. Here the rRNA comprising a domain is compact, with a self-contained system of molecular interactions. A given rRNA helix or stem-loop must be allocated uniquely to a single domain. Local changes such as mutations can give domain-wide effects. Helices within a domain have interdependent orientations, stabilities and interactions. With these criteria we identify a core domain (domain A) of small subunit rRNA. Domain A acts as a hub, linking the four peripheral domains and imposing orientational and positional restraints on the other domains. Experimental characterization of isolated domain A, and mutations and truncations of it, by methods including selective 2'OH acylation analyzed by primer extension and circular dichroism spectroscopy are consistent with our architectural model. The results support the utility of the concept of an RNA domain. Domain A, which exhibits structural similarity to tRNA, appears to be an essential core of the small ribosomal subunit.

  17. Quaternion from rotation matrix. [four-parameter representation of coordinate transformation matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepperd, S. W.

    1978-01-01

    A quaternion is regarded as a four-parameter representation of a coordinate transformation matrix, where the four components of the quaternion are treated on an equal basis. This leads to a unified, compact, and singularity-free approach to determining the quaternion when the matrix is given.

  18. Identification of bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase subunits modified by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal.

    PubMed

    Musatov, Andrej; Carroll, Christopher A; Liu, Yuan-Chao; Henderson, George I; Weintraub, Susan T; Robinson, Neal C

    2002-06-25

    Bovine heart cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) was inactivated by the lipid peroxidation product 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner with pseudo-first-order kinetics. Cytochrome c oxidase electron transport activity decreased by as much as 50% when the enzyme was incubated for 2 h at room temperature with excess HNE (300-500 microM). HNE-modified CcO subunits were identified by two mass spectrometric methods: electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) and matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/MS). All of the experimentally determined molecular masses were in excellent agreement with published sequence values with an accuracy of approximately 1 part per 10000 mass units for subunits smaller than 20 kDa and approximately 1 part per 1000 mass units for the three subunits larger than 20 kDa. Both MS methods detected six CcO subunits with an increased mass of 156 Da after reaction with HNE (subunits II, IV, Vb, VIIa, VIIc, and VIII); this result indicates a single Michael-type reaction site on either a lysine or histidine residue within each subunit. Reaction of HNE with either subunit VIIc or subunit VIII (modified approximately 30% and 50-75%, respectively) must be responsible for CcO inhibition. None of the other subunits were modified more than 5% and could not account for the observed loss of activity. Reaction of HNE with His-36 of subunit VIII is most consistent with the approximately 50% inhibition of CcO: (1) subunit VIII is modified more than any other subunit by HNE; (2) the time dependence of subunit VIII modification is consistent with the percent inhibition of CcO; (3) His-36 was identified as the HNE-modified amino acid residue within subunit VIII by tandem MS analysis. PMID:12069614

  19. Physically detached 'compact groups'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hernquist, Lars; Katz, Neal; Weinberg, David H.

    1995-01-01

    A small fraction of galaxies appear to reside in dense compact groups, whose inferred crossing times are much shorter than a Hubble time. These short crossing times have led to considerable disagreement among researchers attempting to deduce the dynamical state of these systems. In this paper, we suggest that many of the observed groups are not physically bound but are chance projections of galaxies well separated along the line of sight. Unlike earlier similar proposals, ours does not require that the galaxies in the compact group be members of a more diffuse, but physically bound entity. The probability of physically separated galaxies projecting into an apparent compact group is nonnegligible if most galaxies are distributed in thin filaments. We illustrate this general point with a specific example: a simulation of a cold dark matter universe, in which hydrodynamic effects are included to identify galaxies. The simulated galaxy distribution is filamentary and end-on views of these filaments produce apparent galaxy associations that have sizes and velocity dispersions similar to those of observed compact groups. The frequency of such projections is sufficient, in principle, to explain the observed space density of groups in the Hickson catalog. We discuss the implications of our proposal for the formation and evolution of groups and elliptical galaxies. The proposal can be tested by using redshift-independent distance estimators to measure the line-of-sight spatial extent of nearby compact groups.

  20. Preliminary results of post-irradiation examination of the AGR-1 TRISO fuel compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Paul Demkowicz; John Hunn; Robert Morris; Jason Harp; Philip Winston; Charles Baldwin; Fred Montgomery; Scott Ploger; Isabella van Rooyen

    2012-10-01

    Five irradiated fuel compacts from the AGR-1 experiment have been examined in detail in order to assess in-pile fission product release behavior. Compacts were electrolytically deconsolidated and analyzed using the leach-burn-leach technique to measure fission product inventory in the compact matrix and identify any particles with a defective SiC layer. Loose particles were then gamma counted to measure the fission product inventory. One particle with a defective SiC layer was found in the five compacts examined. The fractional release of Ag 110m from the particles was significant. The total fraction of silver released from all the particles within a compact ranged from 0-0.63 and individual particles within a single compact often exhibited a very wide range of silver release. The average fractional release of Eu-154 from all particles in a compact was 2.4×10-4—1.3×10-2, which is indicative of release through intact coatings. The fractional Cs-134 inventory in the compact matrix was <2×10-5 when all coatings remained intact, indicating good cesium retention. Approximately 1% of the palladium inventory was found in the compact matrix for two of the compacts, indicating significant release through intact coatings.

  1. Mechanism of release of active alpha subunit from dimeric alpha beta avian myeloblastosis virus DNA polymerase.

    PubMed Central

    Papas, T S; Marciani, D J; Samuel, K; Chirikjian, J G

    1976-01-01

    Storage of the dimeric (alphabeta) form of avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV) DNA polymerase in glycerol resulted in the release of the smaller alpha subunit, as detected by glycerol gradient sedimentation. Analysis by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of enzyme stored in glycerol showed the concomitant appearance of several polypeptides and a lowering in the level of both beta and alpha components. This reduction appears to be the result of cleavages introduced by traces of hydrolytic activity present in glycerol samples. An enhancement of alpha subunit released, as detected by activity profile, was also achieved upon direct but limited exposure of purified avian myeloblastosis virus DNA polymerase to carboxymethyl-cellulose-bound trypsin matrix. Electrophoretic analysis of digested enzyme revealed a progressive fragmentation, with simultaneous increase in the alpha subunit and decrease in the beta subunit. PMID:58080

  2. Matrix superpotentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nikitin, Anatoly G.; Karadzhov, Yuri

    2011-07-01

    We present a collection of matrix-valued shape invariant potentials which give rise to new exactly solvable problems of SUSY quantum mechanics. It includes all irreducible matrix superpotentials of the generic form W=kQ+\\frac{1}{k} R+P, where k is a variable parameter, Q is the unit matrix multiplied by a real-valued function of independent variable x, and P and R are the Hermitian matrices depending on x. In particular, we recover the Pron'ko-Stroganov 'matrix Coulomb potential' and all known scalar shape invariant potentials of SUSY quantum mechanics. In addition, five new shape invariant potentials are presented. Three of them admit a dual shape invariance, i.e. the related Hamiltonians can be factorized using two non-equivalent superpotentials. We find discrete spectrum and eigenvectors for the corresponding Schrödinger equations and prove that these eigenvectors are normalizable.

  3. Compact, Integrated Photoelectron Linacs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, David

    2000-12-01

    The innovative compact high energy iniector which has been developed by DULY Research Inc., will have wide scientific industrial and medical applications. The new photoelectron injector integrates the photocathode directly into a multicell linear accelerator with no drift space between the injector and the linac. By focusing the beam with solenoid or permanent magnets, and producing high current with low emittance, extremely high brightness is achieved. In addition to providing a small footprint and improved beam quality in an integrated structure, the compact system considerably simplifies external subsystems required to operate the photoelectron linac, including rf power transport, beam focusing, vacuum and cooling. The photoelectron linac employs an innovative Plane-Wave-Transformer (PWT) design, which provides strong cell-to-cell coupling, relaxes manufacturing tolerance and facilitates the attachment of external ports to the compact structure with minimal field interference. DULY Research Inc. under the support of the DOE Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program, has developed, constructed and installed a 20-MeV, S-band compact electron source at UCLA. DULY Research is also presently engaged in the development of an X-band photoelectron linear accelerator in another SBIR project. The higher frequency structure when completed will be approximately three times smaller, and capable of a beam brightness ten times higher than the S-band structure.

  4. COMPACT SCHOOL AND $$ SAVINGS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    BAIR, W.G.

    A REVIEW OF THE CRITERIA FOR CONSIDERING THE USE OF A TOTAL ENERGY SYSTEM WITHIN A SCHOOL BUILDING STATES THE WINDOWLESS, COMPACT SCHOOL OFFERS MORE EFFICIENT SPACE UTILIZATION WITH LESS AREA REQUIRED FOR GIVEN STUDENT POPULATION AND LOWER OPERATION COSTS. THE AUTHOR RECOMMENDS THAT THESE BUILDINGS BE WINDOWLESS TO REDUCE HEAT COSTS, HOWEVER, AT…

  5. Compact optical transconductance varistor

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen

    2015-09-22

    A compact radiation-modulated transconductance varistor device having both a radiation source and a photoconductive wide bandgap semiconductor material (PWBSM) integrally formed on a substrate so that a single interface is formed between the radiation source and PWBSM for transmitting PWBSM activation radiation directly from the radiation source to the PWBSM.

  6. Compact ultradense matter impactors.

    PubMed

    Rafelski, Johann; Labun, Lance; Birrell, Jeremiah

    2013-03-15

    We study interactions of meteorlike compact ultradense objects (CUDO), having nuclear or greater density, with Earth and other rocky bodies in the Solar System as a possible source of information about novel forms of matter. We study the energy loss in CUDO puncture of the body and discuss differences between regular matter and CUDO impacts.

  7. Mesoscale Modeling of Impact Compaction of Primitive Solar System Solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, Thomas M.; Collins, Gareth S.; Bland, Philip A.

    2016-04-01

    We have developed a method for simulating the mesoscale compaction of early solar system solids in low-velocity impact events using the iSALE shock physics code. Chondrules are represented by non-porous disks, placed within a porous matrix. By simulating impacts into bimodal mixtures over a wide range of parameter space (including the chondrule-to-matrix ratio, the matrix porosity and composition, and the impact velocity), we have shown how each of these parameters influences the shock processing of heterogeneous materials. The temperature after shock processing shows a strong dichotomy: matrix temperatures are elevated much higher than the chondrules, which remain largely cold. Chondrules can protect some matrix from shock compaction, with shadow regions in the lee side of chondrules exhibiting higher porosity that elsewhere in the matrix. Using the results from this mesoscale modeling, we show how the ε ‑ α porous-compaction model parameters depend on initial bulk porosity. We also show that the timescale for the temperature dichotomy to equilibrate is highly dependent on the porosity of the matrix after the shock, and will be on the order of seconds for matrix porosities of less than 0.1, and on the order of tens to hundreds of seconds for matrix porosities of ∼0.3–0.5. Finally, we have shown that the composition of the post-shock material is able to match the bulk porosity and chondrule-to-matrix ratios of meteorite groups such as carbonaceous chondrites and unequilibrated ordinary chondrites.

  8. Experimental Measurement and Numerical Modeling of the Effective Thermal Conductivity of TRISO Fuel Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, Charles; Xing, Changhu; Jensen, Colby; Ban, Heng; Marshall, Douglas W.

    2015-03-01

    Accurate modeling capability of thermal conductivity of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts is important to fuel performance modeling and safety of Generation IV reactors. To date, the effective thermal conductivity (ETC) of tristructural-isotropic (TRISO) fuel compacts has not been measured directly. The composite fuel is a complicated structure comprised of layered particles in a graphite matrix. In this work, finite element modeling is used to validate an analytic ETC model for application to the composite fuel material for particle-volume fractions up to 40%. The effect of each individual layer of a TRISO particle is analyzed showing that the overall ETC of the compact is most sensitive to the outer layer constituent. In conjunction with the modeling results, the thermal conductivity of matrix-graphite compacts and the ETC of surrogate TRISO fuel compacts have been successfully measured using a previously developed measurement system. The ETC of the surrogate fuel compacts varies between 50 and 30 W m-1 K-1 over a temperature range of 50-600°C. As a result of the numerical modeling and experimental measurements of the fuel compacts, a new model and approach for analyzing the effect of compact constituent materials on ETC is proposed that can estimate the fuel compact ETC with approximately 15-20% more accuracy than the old method. Using the ETC model with measured thermal conductivity of the graphite matrix-only material indicate that, in the composite form, the matrix material has a much greater thermal conductivity, which is attributed to the high anisotropy of graphite thermal conductivity. Therefore, simpler measurements of individual TRISO compact constituents combined with an analytic ETC model, will not provide accurate predictions of overall ETC of the compacts emphasizing the need for measurements of composite, surrogate compacts.

  9. Progress in Compact Toroid Experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Dolan, Thomas James

    2002-09-01

    The term "compact toroids" as used here means spherical tokamaks, spheromaks, and field reversed configurations, but not reversed field pinches. There are about 17 compact toroid experiments under construction or operating, with approximate parameters listed in Table 1.

  10. Compact Spreader Schemes

    SciTech Connect

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J. -Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-07-25

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  11. Compact torsatron reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Lyon, J.F.; Carreras, B.A.; Lynch, V.E.; Tolliver, J.S.; Sviatoslavsky, I.N.

    1988-05-01

    Low-aspect-ratio torsatron configurations could lead to compact stellarator reactors with R/sub 0/ = 8--11m, roughly one-half to one-third the size of more conventional stellarator reactor designs. Minimum-size torsatron reactors are found using various assumptions. Their size is relatively insensitive to the choice of the conductor parameters and depends mostly on geometrical constraints. The smallest size is obtained by eliminating the tritium breeding blanket under the helical winding on the inboard side and by reducing the radial depth of the superconducting coil. Engineering design issues and reactor performance are examined for three examples to illustrate the feasibility of this approach for compact reactors and for a medium-size (R/sub 0/ approx. = 4 m,/bar a/ /approx lt/ 1 m) copper-coil ignition experiment. 26 refs., 11 figs., 7 tabs.

  12. Compact spreader schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Placidi, M.; Jung, J.-Y.; Ratti, A.; Sun, C.

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes beam distribution schemes adopting a novel implementation based on low amplitude vertical deflections combined with horizontal ones generated by Lambertson-type septum magnets. This scheme offers substantial compactness in the longitudinal layouts of the beam lines and increased flexibility for beam delivery of multiple beam lines on a shot-to-shot basis. Fast kickers (FK) or transverse electric field RF Deflectors (RFD) provide the low amplitude deflections. Initially proposed at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center (SLAC) as tools for beam diagnostics and more recently adopted for multiline beam pattern schemes, RFDs offer repetition capabilities and a likely better amplitude reproducibility when compared to FKs, which, in turn, offer more modest financial involvements both in construction and operation. Both solutions represent an ideal approach for the design of compact beam distribution systems resulting in space and cost savings while preserving flexibility and beam quality.

  13. Super-Compact Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Microcosm, Inc. produced the portable Farfield-2 laser for field applications that require high power pulsed illumination. The compact design was conceived through research at Goddard Space Flight Center on laser instruments for space missions to carry out geoscience studies of Earth. An exclusive license to the key NASA patent for the compact laser design was assigned to Microcosm. The FarField-2 is ideal for field applications, has low power consumption, does not need water cooling or gas supplies, and produces nearly ideal beam quality. The properties of the laser also make it effective over long distances, which is one reason why NASA developed the technology for laser altimeters that can be toted aboard spacecraft. Applications for the FarField-2 include medicine, biology, and materials science and processing, as well as diamond marking, semiconductor line-cutting, chromosome surgery, and fluorescence microscopy.

  14. Compact power reactor

    DOEpatents

    Wetch, Joseph R.; Dieckamp, Herman M.; Wilson, Lewis A.

    1978-01-01

    There is disclosed a small compact nuclear reactor operating in the epithermal neutron energy range for supplying power at remote locations, as for a satellite. The core contains fuel moderator elements of Zr hydride with 7 w/o of 93% enriched uranium alloy. The core has a radial beryllium reflector and is cooled by liquid metal coolant such as NaK. The reactor is controlled and shut down by moving portions of the reflector.

  15. Sync Matrix

    2004-12-31

    Sync Matrix provides a graphic display of the relationships among all of the response activities of each jurisdiction. This is accomplished through software that organizes and displays the activities by jurisdiction, function, and time for easy review and analysis. The software can also integrate the displays of multiple jurisdictions to allow examination of the total response.

  16. Purification of glucagon by subunit exchange chromatography.

    PubMed

    Carrea, G; Pasta, P; Antonini, E

    1985-05-01

    Glucagon was immobilized onto Sepharose matrices activated with CNBr or tresyl chloride, as a function of several parameters including pH of coupling, concentration of added polypeptide, and presence or absence of urea. The hormone was linked to the matrix through a single point per molecule, namely, the epsilon -amino group of Lys(12) when the coupling was carried out at alkaline pH, or the imidazole group of His(1) when the coupling was carried out at acidic pH. Glucagon immobilized at alkaline pH interacted specifically with soluble glucogon. The extent of self-association was similar to that of free glucagon, which exists in solution in a monomer-trimer equilibrium whose association constant is highly dependent on the characteristics of the buffer (pH, ionic strength, and nature of anions). The immobilized hormone proved to be suitable for the purification of the free one from a pancreatic extract. After a preliminary treatment with charcoal-dextran, the extract was percolated on a glucagon-Sepharose column under associating conditions (high concentrations of salting out anions and alkaline pH) and then, following a washing to remove extraneous compounds, the specifically bound hormone was eluted under dissociating conditions (low ionic strength). The subunit exchange chromatography of the extract gave a ca. 90% pure product. The overall recovery of the process was ca. 66%. The leakage of immobilized hormone was 40% in the case of CNBr activation of Sepharose and 15% in the case of tresyl chloride activation, after an eight-day treatment under working conditions.

  17. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  18. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  19. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  20. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  1. 28 CFR 51.6 - Political subunits.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Political subunits. 51.6 Section 51.6 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE (CONTINUED) PROCEDURES FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF SECTION 5 OF THE VOTING RIGHTS ACT OF 1965, AS AMENDED General Provisions § 51.6 Political subunits. All...

  2. Hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolites.

    PubMed

    Oren, A Hakan; Ozdamar, Tuğçe

    2013-06-01

    Hydraulic conductivities of compacted zeolites were investigated as a function of compaction water content and zeolite particle size. Initially, the compaction characteristics of zeolites were determined. The compaction test results showed that maximum dry unit weight (γ(dmax)) of fine zeolite was greater than that of granular zeolites. The γ(dmax) of compacted zeolites was between 1.01 and 1.17 Mg m(-3) and optimum water content (w(opt)) was between 38% and 53%. Regardless of zeolite particle size, compacted zeolites had low γ(dmax) and high w(opt) when compared with compacted natural soils. Then, hydraulic conductivity tests were run on compacted zeolites. The hydraulic conductivity values were within the range of 2.0 × 10(-3) cm s(-1) to 1.1 × 10(-7) cm s(-1). Hydraulic conductivity of all compacted zeolites decreased almost 50 times as the water content increased. It is noteworthy that hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite was strongly dependent on the zeolite particle size. The hydraulic conductivity decreased almost three orders of magnitude up to 39% fine content; then, it remained almost unchanged beyond 39%. Only one report was found in the literature on the hydraulic conductivity of compacted zeolite, which is in agreement with the findings of this study.

  3. Infiltration kinetics of aluminum in silicon carbide compacts. Annual report

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, G.R.; Olson, D.L.

    1987-07-01

    Although metal-matrix composites have been fabricated by various techniques, the most successful are solid state processes such as powder metallurgy and diffusion bonding. Liquid-metal processes such as compucasting, pultrusion, and infiltration, while less successful, are potentially more economical. The advantages of producing silicon carbide-aluminum matrix composites by liquid-metal infiltration techniques can not be fully realized without an improved understanding of the infiltration behavior and the fiber/matrix bonding mechanisms. This paper reports on infiltration models which consider the physical properties of the liquid and preform (either porous compact or capillary/tube bundle). These properties include viscosity, density, surface tension, and wettability (pore shape and size in the case of the porous compact). The models have been assessed in terms of their ability to predict infiltration behavior from known physical properties of the materials.

  4. Wheat gluten: high molecular weight glutenin subunits--structure, genetics, and relation to dough elasticity.

    PubMed

    Anjum, Faqir Muhammad; Khan, Moazzam Rafiq; Din, Ahmad; Saeed, Muhammad; Pasha, Imran; Arshad, Muhammad Umair

    2007-04-01

    Gluten proteins, representing the major protein fraction of the starchy endosperm, are predominantly responsible for the unique position of wheat amongst cereals. These form a continuous proteinaceous matrix in the cells of the mature dry grain and form a continuous viscoelastic network during the mixing process of dough development. These viscoelastic properties underline the utilization of wheat to prepare bread and other wheat flour based foodstuffs. One group of gluten proteins is glutenin, which consists of high molecular weight (HMW) and low molecular weight (LMW) subunits. The HMW glutenin subunits (HMW-GS) are particularly important for determining dough elasticity. The common wheat possesses 3 to 5 HMW subunits encoded at the Glu-1 loci on the long arms of group 1 chromosomes (1A, 1B, and 1D). The presence of certain HMW subunits is positively correlated with good bread-making quality. Glutamine-rich repetitive sequences that comprise the central part of the HMW subunits are actually responsible for the elastic properties due to extensive arrays of interchain hydrogen bonds. Genetic engineering can be used to manipulate the amount and composition of the HMW subunits, leading to either increased dough strength or more drastic changes in gluten structure and properties.

  5. Compact gate valve

    DOEpatents

    Bobo, Gerald E.

    1977-01-01

    This invention relates to a double-disc gate valve which is compact, comparatively simple to construct, and capable of maintaining high closing pressures on the valve discs with low frictional forces. The valve casing includes axially aligned ports. Mounted in the casing is a sealed chamber which is pivotable transversely of the axis of the ports. The chamber contains the levers for moving the valve discs axially, and an actuator for the levers. When an external drive means pivots the chamber to a position where the discs are between the ports and axially aligned therewith, the actuator for the levers is energized to move the discs into sealing engagement with the ports.

  6. COMPACT CASCADE IMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Lippmann, M.

    1964-04-01

    A cascade particle impactor capable of collecting particles and distributing them according to size is described. In addition the device is capable of collecting on a pair of slides a series of different samples so that less time is required for the changing of slides. Other features of the device are its compactness and its ruggedness making it useful under field conditions. Essentially the unit consists of a main body with a series of transverse jets discharging on a pair of parallel, spaced glass plates. The plates are capable of being moved incremental in steps to obtain the multiple samples. (AEC)

  7. Compact laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Carr, R.B.

    1974-02-26

    A compact laser amplifier system is described in which a plurality of face-pumped annular disks, aligned along a common axis, independently radially amplify a stimulating light pulse. Partially reflective or lasing means, coaxially positioned at the center of each annualar disk, radially deflects a stimulating light directed down the common axis uniformly into each disk for amplification, such that the light is amplified by the disks in a parallel manner. Circumferential reflecting means coaxially disposed around each disk directs amplified light emission, either toward a common point or in a common direction. (Official Gazette)

  8. Compact Q-balls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazeia, D.; Losano, L.; Marques, M. A.; Menezes, R.; da Rocha, R.

    2016-07-01

    In this work we deal with non-topological solutions of the Q-ball type in two space-time dimensions, in models described by a single complex scalar field that engenders global symmetry. The main novelty is the presence of stable Q-balls solutions that live in a compact interval of the real line and appear from a family of models controlled by two distinct parameters. We find analytical solutions and study their charge and energy, and show how to control the parameters to make the Q-balls classically and quantum mechanically stable.

  9. Compact Plasma Accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E.

    2004-01-01

    A plasma accelerator has been conceived for both material-processing and spacecraft-propulsion applications. This accelerator generates and accelerates ions within a very small volume. Because of its compactness, this accelerator could be nearly ideal for primary or station-keeping propulsion for spacecraft having masses between 1 and 20 kg. Because this accelerator is designed to generate beams of ions having energies between 50 and 200 eV, it could also be used for surface modification or activation of thin films.

  10. Compact LINAC for deuterons

    SciTech Connect

    Kurennoy, S S; O' Hara, J F; Rybarcyk, L J

    2008-01-01

    We are developing a compact deuteron-beam accelerator up to the deuteron energy of a few MeV based on room-temperature inter-digital H-mode (IH) accelerating structures with the transverse beam focusing using permanent-magnet quadrupoles (PMQ). Combining electromagnetic 3-D modeling with beam dynamics simulations and thermal-stress analysis, we show that IHPMQ structures provide very efficient and practical accelerators for light-ion beams of considerable currents at the beam velocities around a few percent of the speed of light. IH-structures with PMQ focusing following a short RFQ can also be beneficial in the front end of ion linacs.

  11. Hand-Held Ultrasonic Instrument for Reading Matrix Symbols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schramm, Harry F.; Kula, John P.; Gurney, John W.; Lior, Ephraim D.

    2008-01-01

    A hand-held instrument that would include an ultrasonic camera has been proposed as an efficient means of reading matrix symbols. The proposed instrument could be operated without mechanical raster scanning. All electronic functions from excitation of ultrasonic pulses through final digital processing for decoding matrix symbols would be performed by dedicated circuitry within the single, compact instrument housing.

  12. Subunit arrangement in beef heart complex III

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Halphen, D.; Lindorfer, M.A.; Capaldi, R.A.

    1988-09-06

    Beef heart mitochondrial complex III was separated into 12 polypeptide bands representing 11 different subunits by using the electrophoresis conditions described previously. Eight of the 12 polypeptide bands were identified from their NH/sub 2/-terminal sequences as obtained by electroblotting directly from the NaDodSO/sub 4/-polyacrylamide gel onto a solid support. The topology of the subunits in complex III was explored by three different approaches. (1) Protease digestion experiments of submitochrondial particles in the presence and absence of detergent showed that subunits II and VI are on the M side of the inner membrane and subunits V and XI on the C side. (2) Labeling experiments with the membrane-intercalated probes (/sup 125/I)TID and arylazidoPE indicated that cytochrome b is the predominant bilayer embedded subunit of complex III, while the non-heme iron protein appears to be peripherally located. (3) Cross-linking studies with carbodiimides and homobifunctional cleavable reagents demonstrated that near-neighbor pairs include subunits I+II, II+VI, III+VI, IV+V, V+X, and V+VII. The cytochrome c binding site was found to include subunits IV, VII, and X. The combined data are used to provide an updated model of the topology of beef heart complex III.

  13. A compact SADM family

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barbet, Vincent; Le Quintrec, Cyrille; Jeandot, Xavier; Chaix, Alain; Grain, Eric; Roux, Jerome

    2005-07-01

    Alcatel Space has developed a new SADM family driven by cost, modularity, mass and performances. The modularity concept is based on separating the rotation drive function from the electrical transfer function. The drive actuator has been designed for various applications where pointing and reliability is needed. It can be associated with high dissipative rotary devices (SA collectors, RF joints..). The design goal was to minimize the number of parts in order to reach the most simple and compact mechanism. Mass reduction was achieved by reducing as much as possible the load path between the Solar Array interface and the spacecraft interface. Following these guidelines, the drive actuator was developed and qualified on ATV SADM (part od Alcatel Space Solar Array Drive Sub System for ATV). Further more a high power integrated collector was qualified inside the SADM for Geo-stationary telecom satellite (SPACEBUS platforms). Fine thermal and mechanical modeling was necessary to predict SADM behaviors for the numerous thermal environments over the missions (steady and transient cases). These modeling were well correlated through mechanical and thermal balances qualification tests. The challenging approach of thermal dissipation in a compact design leads to a family of 3 SADM capabilities form 2kW up to 15kW per SADM weighing less than 4.5 kg each.

  14. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Stephen J. Gerdemann; Paul D. Jablonski

    2010-11-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  15. Compaction of Titanium Powders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gerdemann, Stephen J.; Jablonski, Paul D.

    2011-05-01

    Accurate modeling of powder densification has been an area of active research for more than 60 years. The earliest efforts were focused on linearization of the data because computers were not readily available to assist with curve-fitting methods. In this work, eight different titanium powders (three different sizes of sponge fines <150 μm, <75 μm, and < 45 μm; two different sizes of a hydride-dehydride [HDH] <75 μm and < 45 μm; an atomized powder; a commercially pure [CP] Ti powder from International Titanium Powder [ITP]; and a Ti 6 4 alloy powder) were cold pressed in a single-acting die instrumented to collect stress and deformation data during compaction. From these data, the density of each compact was calculated and then plotted as a function of pressure. The results show that densification of all the powders, regardless of particle size, shape, or chemistry, can be modeled accurately as the sum of an initial density plus the sum of a rearrangement term and a work-hardening term. These last two terms are found to be a function of applied pressure and take the form of an exponential rise.

  16. Site Specific Phosphorylation of Cytochrome c Oxidase Subunits I, IVi1 and Vb in Rabbit Hearts Subjected to Ischemia/Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Ji-Kang; Prabu, Subbuswamy K.; Sepuri, Naresh B.; Raza, Haider; Anandatheerthavarada, Hindupur K.; Galati, Domenico; Spear, Joseph; Avadhani, Narayan G.

    2007-01-01

    We have mapped the sites of ischemia/reperfusion induced phosphorylation of cytochrome c oxidase (CcO) subunits in rabbit hearts by using a combination of Blue Native gel/Tricine gel electrophoresis and nano-LC-MS/MS approaches. We used precursor ion scanning combined with neutral loss scanning and found that mature CcO subunit I was phosphorylated at tandem Ser115/Ser116 positions, subunit IVi1 at Thr52 and subunit Vb at Ser40. These sites are highly conserved in mammalian species. Molecular modeling suggests that phosphorylation sites of subunit I face the inter membrane space while those of subunits IVi1 and Vb face the matrix side. PMID:17349628

  17. Cleft Lip Repair: The Hybrid Subunit Method.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, Travis T

    2016-04-01

    The unilateral cleft lip repair is one of the most rewarding and challenging of plastic surgery procedures. Surgeons have introduced a variety of straight line, geometric, and rotation-advancement designs, while in practice the majority of North American surgeons have been using hybrids of the rotation-advancement techniques. The anatomic subunit approach was introduced in 2005 by Fisher and has gained popularity, with early adopters of the design touting its simplicity and effectiveness. The objectives of this article are to summarize the basic tenets of respecting the philtral subunit, accurate measurement and planning, and tips for transitioning to this subunit approach.

  18. Cleft Lip Repair: The Hybrid Subunit Method.

    PubMed

    Tollefson, Travis T

    2016-04-01

    The unilateral cleft lip repair is one of the most rewarding and challenging of plastic surgery procedures. Surgeons have introduced a variety of straight line, geometric, and rotation-advancement designs, while in practice the majority of North American surgeons have been using hybrids of the rotation-advancement techniques. The anatomic subunit approach was introduced in 2005 by Fisher and has gained popularity, with early adopters of the design touting its simplicity and effectiveness. The objectives of this article are to summarize the basic tenets of respecting the philtral subunit, accurate measurement and planning, and tips for transitioning to this subunit approach. PMID:27097136

  19. Letter-Matrix of Compact Representation of two-Dimensional Data Multitude for Visualization of Modal Parameters' Time-History With Implication to Seismic Survey of Life-Time and Characteristics of Excited Modal States of a Wide Range of Dynamic Structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaurov, D.

    2013-12-01

    The PSWT technique assumes definition of modal parameters on the basis of modal differential equation by processing of a segment of seismic response with stationary properties by a set of modulate functions. Thus, calculating necessary convolution integrals in the limits of the time-window with a modulate function and its claimed derivatives fixed within the window with zero values on its edges and having a limited transparent spectral window, a system of algebraic equation regard to looking for parameters can be formed. Leading correct conception of moving window analysis, total parametric scanning of the records in both time and frequency domains when the time-window should be moving by a certain step while varying its width in some boundaries that corresponds to shifting the spectral window in frequency domain allowing to find dominant filtration of the fundamental mode, should be proceeded. Revealed time segments with steady series of parameters' estimations are evidence of stationary of the modal state and that trial estimations are true, otherwise, non-stationary of dynamic properties and, or ill-filtration on some segments are the cause of the series of estimations to be dispersed. Final numeric output of the scanning require a vast storage paper space and it is time consuming of its graphic representation and interpretation. But the following idea allows the representation to be a completely formalized one. Thus, the numeric multitude of estimations should be grouping for each parameter and represented by corresponding compact symbolic, letter fields. Symbolic conform representation can be accomplished by assuming a quantum symbolic scale limited by accepted set of 53 symbols: +ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOPQRSTUVWXYZ0123456789!?#$%&@(/{<|>})*- which is coherent to appropriate domain of continuous numeric measure scale of each parameter estimations' multitude. A certain step is admitted for quantization, and a respective symbol is assigned in sequence to each quantum

  20. METHOD OF FORMING ELONGATED COMPACTS

    DOEpatents

    Larson, H.F.

    1959-05-01

    A powder compacting procedure and apparatus which produces elongated compacts of Be is described. The powdered metal is placed in a thin metal tube which is chemically compatible to lubricant, powder, atmosphere, and die material and will undergo a high degree of plastic deformation and have intermediate hardness. The tube is capped and placed in the die, and punches are applied to the ends. During the compacting stroke the powder seizes the tube and a thickening and shortening of the tube occurs. The tube is easily removed from the die, split, and peeled from the compact. (T.R.H.)

  1. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    SciTech Connect

    Bennett, G.A.

    1991-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a compact acoustic refrigeration system that actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment.

  2. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  3. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  4. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, G.A.

    1992-11-24

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits, in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine includes first thermodynamic elements for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator includes second thermodynamic elements located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements. A resonator volume cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements, first heat pipes transfer heat from the heat load to the second thermodynamic elements and second heat pipes transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements to the borehole environment. 18 figs.

  5. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    SciTech Connect

    Bocarov, Viktor; Cermak, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Stekl, Ivan

    2009-11-09

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  6. Multipurpose Compact Spectrometric Unit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bočarov, Viktor; Čermák, Pavel; Mamedov, Fadahat; Štekl, Ivan

    2009-11-01

    A new standalone compact spectrometer was developed. The device consists of analog (peamplifier, amplifier) and digital parts. The digital part is based on the 160 MIPS Digital Signal Processor. It contains 20 Msps Flash-ADC, 1 MB RAM for spectra storage, 128 KB Flash/ROM for firmware storage, Real Time Clock and several voltage regulators providing the power for user peripherals (e.g. amplifier, temperature sensors, etc.). Spectrometer is connected with a notebook via high-speed USB 2.0 bus. The spectrometer is multipurpose device, which is planned to be used for measurements of Rn activities, energy of detected particles by CdTe pixel detector or for coincidence measurements.

  7. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  8. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  9. Compact acoustic refrigerator

    DOEpatents

    Bennett, Gloria A.

    1992-01-01

    A compact acoustic refrigeration system actively cools components, e.g., electrical circuits (22), in a borehole environment. An acoustic engine (12, 14) includes first thermodynamic elements (12) for generating a standing acoustic wave in a selected medium. An acoustic refrigerator (16, 26, 28) includes second thermodynamic elements (16) located in the standing wave for generating a relatively cold temperature at a first end of the second thermodynamic elements (16) and a relatively hot temperature at a second end of the second thermodynamic elements (16). A resonator volume (18) cooperates with the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to support the standing wave. To accommodate the high heat fluxes required for heat transfer to/from the first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16), first heat pipes (24, 26) transfer heat from the heat load (22) to the second thermodynamic elements (16) and second heat pipes (28, 32) transfer heat from first and second thermodynamic elements (12, 16) to the borehole environment.

  10. Compact reactor design automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nassersharif, Bahram; Gaeta, Michael J.

    1991-01-01

    A conceptual compact reactor design automation experiment was performed using the real-time expert system G2. The purpose of this experiment was to investigate the utility of an expert system in design; in particular, reactor design. The experiment consisted of the automation and integration of two design phases: reactor neutronic design and fuel pin design. The utility of this approach is shown using simple examples of formulating rules to ensure design parameter consistency between the two design phases. The ability of G2 to communicate with external programs even across networks provides the system with the capability of supplementing the knowledge processing features with conventional canned programs with possible applications for realistic iterative design tools.

  11. Compact artificial hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiker, G. A.; Mann, W. A. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A relatively simple, compact artificial hand, is described which includes hooks pivotally mounted on first frame to move together and apart. The first frame is rotatably mounted on a second frame to enable "turning at the wrist" movement without limitation. The second frame is pivotally mounted on a third frame to permit 'flexing at the wrist' movement. A hook-driving motor is fixed to the second frame but has a shaft that drives a speed reducer on the first frame which, in turn, drives the hooks. A second motor mounted on the second frame, turns a gear on the first frame to rotate the first frame and the hooks thereon. A third motor mounted on the third frame, turns a gear on a second frame to pivot it.

  12. Compaction-based VLSI layout

    SciTech Connect

    Xiong, Xiao-Ming.

    1989-01-01

    Generally speaking, a compaction based VLSI layout system consists of two major parts: (1) a symbolic editor which maintains explicit connectivity and structural information about the circuit; (2) a compactor which translates the high level description of a circuit to the detailed layout needed for fabrication and tries to make as compact a layout as Possible without violating any design rules. Instead of developing a complete compaction based VLSI layout system, this thesis presents some theoretical concepts and several new compaction techniques, such as scan line based approach, which can either cooperate with a symbolic editor to form a layout system or work as a post-process step to improve the results obtained by an existing layout system. Also, some compaction related problems are solved and proposed. Based on the special property of channel routing, the author presents a geometric method for channel compaction. For a given channel routing topology, the minimum channel height is always achieved with the incorporation of sliding contacts and automatically inserting necessary jogs. The geometric compaction approach is then generalized and applied to compact the entire VLSI chip at the building-block level. With a systematic way of automatic jog insertion, he proves that under the given layout topology and design rules, the lower bound of one dimensional compaction with automatic jog insertion is achieved by the geometric compaction algorithm. A new simultaneous two-dimensional compaction algorithm is developed primarily for placement refinement of building-block layout. The algorithm is based on a set of defined graph operations on a mixed adjacency graph for a given placement. The mixed-adjacency graph can be updated efficiently if the placement is represented by tiles in the geometric domain.

  13. Secondary compaction after secondary porosity: Can it form a pressure seal?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weedman, Suzanne D.; Brantley, Susan L.; Albrecht, Wolfgang

    1992-04-01

    Petrography analysis of sandstones from the vicinity of a pressure seal (transition from normal to overpressure) at 5.5-km depth in the lower Tuscaloosa Formation in Louisiana documents local, high porosity above and below the seal. Packing analysis shows that compaction is greater in normally pressured, high-porosity sandstones than in overpressured, high-porosity sandstones; compaction in overpressured, high-porosity sandstones is similar to that in normally pressured, well-cemented sandstones. We propose that focused corrosive fluids created a zone of high secondary porosity, allowing further compaction that we call "secondary compaction." Secondary compaction is greater above the seal than below, suggesting that high-pressure fluid below the seal has preserved porosity and that the pressure seal became effective soon after dissolution of cement. Cuttings from the pressure-seal zone reveal an unusual texture of fragmented, pressure-solved grains and matrix, which may be a result of extensive secondary compaction.

  14. Compost improves compacted urban soil

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Urban construction sites usually result in compacted soils that limit infiltration and root growth. The purpose of this study was to determine if compost, aeration, and/or prairie grasses can remediate a site setup as a simulated post-construction site (compacted). Five years after establishing the ...

  15. The Meaning of a Compact

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wasescha, Anna

    2016-01-01

    To mark the 30th anniversary of "Campus Compact," leaders from across the network came together in the summer of 2015 to reaffirm a shared commitment to the public purposes of higher education. Campus Compact's 30th Anniversary Action Statement of Presidents and Chancellors is the product of that collective endeavor. In signing the…

  16. The major fimbrial subunit of Bordetella pertussis binds to sulfated sugars.

    PubMed Central

    Geuijen, C A; Willems, R J; Mooi, F R

    1996-01-01

    Bordetella pertussis fimbriae are composed of major and minor subunits, and recently it was shown that the minor fimbrial subunit binds to Vla-5, a receptor located on monocytes (W. Hazenbos, C. Geuijen, B. van den Berg, F. Mooi, and R. van Furth, J. Infect. Dis. 171:924-929, 1995). Here we present evidence that the major subunits bind to sulfated sugars, which are ubiquitous in the respiratory tract. Binding was observed to chondroitin sulfate, heparan sulfate, and dextran sulfate but not to dextran. Removal of the minor subunit from fimbriae did not significantly affect binding to sulfated sugars, indicating that the major subunit alone is sufficient for this binding. Fimbriae were also able to bind HEp-2 cells, which are known to display glycoconjugates on their surface. This binding was not dependent on the presence of the minor subunit. However, binding was dependent on the sulfation state of the glycoconjugates, since inhibition of the sulfation resulted in a significant reduction of fimbria binding. The specificity of fimbria binding was further characterized by using heparan sulfate-derived disaccharides in inhibition assays. Two disaccharides were highly effective inhibitors, and it was observed that both the degree of sulfation and the arrangement of the sulfate groups on the disaccharides were important for binding to fimbriae. B. pertussis bacteria also bound to sulfated sugars and HEp-2 cells, and analysis of B. pertussis mutants indicated that both filamentous hemagglutinin and fimbriae were required for this binding. A host protein present in the extracellular matrix, fibronectin, has binding activities similar to those of B. pertussis fimbriae, binding to both Vla-5 and sulfated sugars. Two regions in the major fimbrial subunit were identified which showed similarity with fibronectin peptides which bind to sulfated sugars. Thus, B. pertussis fimbriae exemplify molecular mimicry and may co-opt host processes by mimicking natural ligand

  17. Purification of chymotrypsin by subunit exchange chromatography on the denatured protein

    SciTech Connect

    Carrea, G.; Antonini, E.; Pasta, P.

    1983-05-01

    The ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin subunits immobilized under denaturing conditions (6M urea or 1% SDS) on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, were found to interact with soluble chymotrypsin subunits with the formation of oligomers higher than dimers. Subunits immobilized under nondenaturing conditions form only dimers. The effects of several parameters, such as organic solvents, cations, and anions of the lyotropic series, on the associating properties of the immobilized derivatives were examined. The interaction between immobilized and free enzyme was shown to be specific because extraneous proteins and compounds were not bound by the derivatives. Chymotrypsinogen, studied analogously, did not show appreciable self-associating capacity. Chymotrypsin subunits immobilized under denaturing conditions and packed in a column proved to be suitable for the purification of chymotrypsin from both bovine and porcine pancreatic extracts. The ''subunit exchange'' chromatography of such extracts, carried out between pH 2.5 and 4, gave an eightfold purification with a 93% recovery of chymotryptic activity. The specific activity was ca. 12,000 Schwert and Takenaka units/mg. Only 6% of the tryptic activity was bound by the column. The capacity of the matrix, 6 mg chymotrypsin/mL, dropped to about 70% of the original value.

  18. Purification of chymotrypsin by subunit exchange chromatography on the denatured protein.

    PubMed

    Carrea, G; Pasta, P; Antonini, E

    1983-05-01

    The alpha-chymotrypsin subunits immobilized under denaturing conditions (6 M urea or 1% SDS) on CNBr-activated Sepharose 4B, were found to interact with soluble chymotrypsin subunits with the formation of oligomers higher than dimers. Subunits immobilized under nondenaturing conditions form only dimers. The effects of several parameters, such as organic solvents, cations, and anions of the lyotropic series, on the associating properties of the immobilized derivatives were examined. The interaction between immobilized and free enzyme was shown to be specific because extraneous proteins and compounds were not bound by the derivatives. Chymotrypsinogen, studied analogously, did not show appreciable self-associating capacity. Chymotrypsin subunits immobilized under denaturing conditions and packed in a column proved to be suitable for the purification of chymotrypsin from both bovine and porcine pancreatic extracts. The "subunit exchange" chromatography of such extracts, carried out between pH 2.5 and 4, gave an eightfold purification with a 93% recovery of chymotryptic activity. The specific activity was ca. 12,000 Schwert and Takenaka units/mg. Only 6% of the tryptic activity was bound by the column. The capacity of the matrix, 6 mg chymotrypsin/mL, dropped to about 70% of the original value after.

  19. Protein synthesis by ribosomes with tethered subunits.

    PubMed

    Orelle, Cédric; Carlson, Erik D; Szal, Teresa; Florin, Tanja; Jewett, Michael C; Mankin, Alexander S

    2015-08-01

    The ribosome is a ribonucleoprotein machine responsible for protein synthesis. In all kingdoms of life it is composed of two subunits, each built on its own ribosomal RNA (rRNA) scaffold. The independent but coordinated functions of the subunits, including their ability to associate at initiation, rotate during elongation, and dissociate after protein release, are an established model of protein synthesis. Furthermore, the bipartite nature of the ribosome is presumed to be essential for biogenesis, since dedicated assembly factors keep immature ribosomal subunits apart and prevent them from translation initiation. Free exchange of the subunits limits the development of specialized orthogonal genetic systems that could be evolved for novel functions without interfering with native translation. Here we show that ribosomes with tethered and thus inseparable subunits (termed Ribo-T) are capable of successfully carrying out protein synthesis. By engineering a hybrid rRNA composed of both small and large subunit rRNA sequences, we produced a functional ribosome in which the subunits are covalently linked into a single entity by short RNA linkers. Notably, Ribo-T was not only functional in vitro, but was also able to support the growth of Escherichia coli cells even in the absence of wild-type ribosomes. We used Ribo-T to create the first fully orthogonal ribosome-messenger RNA system, and demonstrate its evolvability by selecting otherwise dominantly lethal rRNA mutations in the peptidyl transferase centre that facilitate the translation of a problematic protein sequence. Ribo-T can be used for exploring poorly understood functions of the ribosome, enabling orthogonal genetic systems, and engineering ribosomes with new functions.

  20. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  1. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  2. A compact acoustic recorder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stein, Ronald

    1989-09-01

    The design and operation of a portable compact acoustic recorder is discussed. Designed to be used in arctic conditions for applications that require portable equipment, the device is configured to fit into a lightweight briefcase. It will operate for eight hours at -40 F with heat provided by a hot water bottle. It has proven to be an effective scientific tool in the measurement of underwater acoustic signals in arctic experiments. It has also been used successfully in warmer climates, e.g., in recording acoustic signals from small boats with no ac power. The acoustic recorder's cost is moderate since it is based on a Sony Walkman Professional (WM-D6C) tape recorder playback unit. A speaker and battery assembly and a hydrophone interface electronic assembly complete the system electronics. The interface assembly supplies a number of functions, including a calibration tone generator, an audio amplifier, and a hydrophone interface. Calibrated acoustic recordings can be made by comparing the calibration tone amplitude with the acoustic signal amplitude. The distortion of the recording is minimized by using a high quality, consumer tape recorder.

  3. Compact plasma accelerator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foster, John E. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A compact plasma accelerator having components including a cathode electron source, an anodic ionizing gas source, and a magnetic field that is cusped. The components are held by an electrically insulating body having a central axis, a top axial end, and a bottom axial end. The cusped magnetic field is formed by a cylindrical magnet having an axis of rotation that is the same as the axis of rotation of the insulating body, and magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends; and an annular magnet coaxially surrounding the cylindrical magnet, magnetized with opposite poles at its two axial ends such that a top axial end has a magnetic polarity that is opposite to the magnetic polarity of a top axial end of the cylindrical magnet. The ionizing gas source is a tubular plenum that has been curved into a substantially annular shape, positioned above the top axial end of the annular magnet such that the plenum is centered in a ring-shaped cusp of the magnetic field generated by the magnets. The plenum has one or more capillary-like orifices spaced around its top such that an ionizing gas supplied through the plenum is sprayed through the one or more orifices. The plenum is electrically conductive and is positively charged relative to the cathode electron source such that the plenum functions as the anode; and the cathode is positioned above and radially outward relative to the plenum.

  4. Compact neutron generator

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Lou, Tak Pui

    2005-03-22

    A compact neutron generator has at its outer circumference a toroidal shaped plasma chamber in which a tritium (or other) plasma is generated. A RF antenna is wrapped around the plasma chamber. A plurality of tritium ion beamlets are extracted through spaced extraction apertures of a plasma electrode on the inner surface of the toroidal plasma chamber and directed inwardly toward the center of neutron generator. The beamlets pass through spaced acceleration and focusing electrodes to a neutron generating target at the center of neutron generator. The target is typically made of titanium tubing. Water is flowed through the tubing for cooling. The beam can be pulsed rapidly to achieve ultrashort neutron bursts. The target may be moved rapidly up and down so that the average power deposited on the surface of the target may be kept at a reasonable level. The neutron generator can produce fast neutrons from a T-T reaction which can be used for luggage and cargo interrogation applications. A luggage or cargo inspection system has a pulsed T-T neutron generator or source at the center, surrounded by associated gamma detectors and other components for identifying explosives or other contraband.

  5. Compact Dexterous Robotic Hand

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher Scott (Inventor); Diftler, Myron A. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    A compact robotic hand includes a palm housing, a wrist section, and a forearm section. The palm housing supports a plurality of fingers and one or more movable palm members that cooperate with the fingers to grasp and/or release an object. Each flexible finger comprises a plurality of hingedly connected segments, including a proximal segment pivotally connected to the palm housing. The proximal finger segment includes at least one groove defining first and second cam surfaces for engagement with a cable. A plurality of lead screw assemblies each carried by the palm housing are supplied with power from a flexible shaft rotated by an actuator and output linear motion to a cable move a finger. The cable is secured within a respective groove and enables each finger to move between an opened and closed position. A decoupling assembly pivotally connected to a proximal finger segment enables a cable connected thereto to control movement of an intermediate and distal finger segment independent of movement of the proximal finger segment. The dexterous robotic hand closely resembles the function of a human hand yet is light weight and capable of grasping both heavy and light objects with a high degree of precision.

  6. Crystal structure of the C-terminal domain of the RAP74 subunit of human transcription factor IIF

    SciTech Connect

    Kamada, Katsuhiko; De Angelis, Jacqueline; Roeder, Robert G.; Burley, Stephen K.

    2012-12-13

    The x-ray structure of a C-terminal fragment of the RAP74 subunit of human transcription factor (TF) IIF has been determined at 1.02-{angstrom} resolution. The {alpha}/{beta} structure is strikingly similar to the globular domain of linker histone H5 and the DNA-binding domain of hepatocyte nuclear factor 3{gamma} (HNF-3{gamma}), making it a winged-helix protein. The surface electrostatic properties of this compact domain differ significantly from those of bona fide winged-helix transcription factors (HNF-3{gamma} and RFX1) and from the winged-helix domains found within the RAP30 subunit of TFIIF and the {beta} subunit of TFIIE. RAP74 has been shown to interact with the TFIIF-associated C-terminal domain phosphatase FCP1, and a putative phosphatase binding site has been identified within the RAP74 winged-helix domain.

  7. Bubble migration in a compacting crystal-liquid mush

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boudreau, Alan

    2016-04-01

    Recent theoretical models have suggested that bubbles are unlikely to undergo significant migration in a compaction crystal mush by capillary invasion while the system remains partly molten. To test this, experiments of bubble migration during compaction in a crystal-liquid mush were modeled using deformable foam crystals in corn syrup in a volumetric burette, compacted with rods of varying weights. A bubble source was provided by sodium bicarbonate (Alka-Seltzer®). Large bubbles (>several crystal sizes) are pinched by the compacting matrix and become overpressured and deformed as the bubbles experience a load change from hydrostatic to lithostatic. Once they begin to move, they move much faster than the compaction-driven liquid. Bubbles that are about the same size as the crystals but larger than the narrower pore throats move by deformation or breaking into smaller bubbles as they are forced through pore restrictions. Bubbles that are less than the typical pore diameter generally move with the liquid: The liquid + bubble mixture behaves as a single phase with a lower density than the bubble-free liquid, and as a consequence it rises faster than bubble-free liquid and allows for faster compaction. The overpressure required to force a bubble through the matrix (max grain size = 5 mm) is modest, about 5 %, and it is estimated that for a grain size of 1 mm, the required overpressure would be about 25 %. Using apatite distribution in a Stillwater olivine gabbro as an analog for bubble nucleation and growth, it is suggested that relatively large bubbles initially nucleate and grow in liquid-rich channels that develop late in the compaction history. Overpressure from compaction allows bubbles to rise higher into hotter parts of the crystal pile, where they redissolve and increase the volatile content of the liquid over what it would have without the bubble migration, leading to progressively earlier vapor saturation during crystallization of the interstitial liquid

  8. Molecular phylogeny of the Heterotrichea (Ciliophora, Postciliodesmatophora) based on small subunit rRNA gene sequences.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Stephanie L; Foissner, Wilhelm; Schlegel, Martin; Bernhard, Detlef

    2007-01-01

    A comprehensive molecular analysis of the phylogenetic relationships within the Heterotrichea including all described families is still lacking. For this reason, the complete nuclear small subunit (SSU) rDNA was sequenced from further representatives of the Blepharismidae and the Stentoridae. In addition, the SSU rDNA of a new, undescribed species of the genus Condylostomides (Condylostomatidae) was sequenced. The detailed phylogenetic analyses revealed a consistent branching pattern: while the terminal branches are generally well resolved, the basal relationships remain unsolved. Moreover, the data allow some conclusions about the macronuclear evolution within the genera Blepharisma, Stentor, and Spirostomum suggesting that a single, compact macronucleus represents the ancestral state. PMID:17669161

  9. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  10. Compact Grism Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teare, S. W.

    2003-05-01

    Many observatories and instrument builders are retrofitting visible and near-infrared spectrometers into their existing imaging cameras. Camera designs that reimage the focal plane and have the optical filters located in a pseudo collimated beam are ideal candidates for the addition of a spectrometer. One device commonly used as the dispersing element for such spectrometers is a grism. The traditional grism is constructed from a prism that has had a diffraction grating applied on one surface. The objective of such a design is to use the prism wedge angle to select the desired "in-line" or "zero-deviation" wavelength that passes through on axis. The grating on the surface of the prism provides much of the dispersion for the spectrometer. A grism can also be used in a "constant-dispersion" design which provides an almost linear spatial scale across the spectrum. In this paper we provide an overview of the development of a grism spectrometer for use in a near infrared camera and demonstrate that a compact grism spectrometer can be developed on a very modest budget that can be afforded at almost any facility. The grism design was prototyped using visible light and then a final device was constructed which provides partial coverage in the near infrared I, J, H and K astronomical bands using the appropriate band pass filter for order sorting. The near infrared grism presented here provides a spectral resolution of about 650 and velocity resolution of about 450 km/s. The design of this grism relied on a computer code called Xspect, developed by the author, to determine the various critical parameters of the grism. This work was supported by a small equipment grant from NASA and administered by the AAS.

  11. Compact Holographic Data Storage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, T. H.; Reyes, G. F.; Zhou, H.

    2001-01-01

    NASA's future missions would require massive high-speed onboard data storage capability to Space Science missions. For Space Science, such as the Europa Lander mission, the onboard data storage requirements would be focused on maximizing the spacecraft's ability to survive fault conditions (i.e., no loss in stored science data when spacecraft enters the 'safe mode') and autonomously recover from them during NASA's long-life and deep space missions. This would require the development of non-volatile memory. In order to survive in the stringent environment during space exploration missions, onboard memory requirements would also include: (1) survive a high radiation environment (1 Mrad), (2) operate effectively and efficiently for a very long time (10 years), and (3) sustain at least a billion write cycles. Therefore, memory technologies requirements of NASA's Earth Science and Space Science missions are large capacity, non-volatility, high-transfer rate, high radiation resistance, high storage density, and high power efficiency. JPL, under current sponsorship from NASA Space Science and Earth Science Programs, is developing a high-density, nonvolatile and rad-hard Compact Holographic Data Storage (CHDS) system to enable large-capacity, high-speed, low power consumption, and read/write of data in a space environment. The entire read/write operation will be controlled with electrooptic mechanism without any moving parts. This CHDS will consist of laser diodes, photorefractive crystal, spatial light modulator, photodetector array, and I/O electronic interface. In operation, pages of information would be recorded and retrieved with random access and high-speed. The nonvolatile, rad-hard characteristics of the holographic memory will provide a revolutionary memory technology meeting the high radiation challenge facing the Europa Lander mission. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  12. Compact, Reliable EEPROM Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katz, Richard; Kleyner, Igor

    2010-01-01

    A compact, reliable controller for an electrically erasable, programmable read-only memory (EEPROM) has been developed specifically for a space-flight application. The design may be adaptable to other applications in which there are requirements for reliability in general and, in particular, for prevention of inadvertent writing of data in EEPROM cells. Inadvertent writes pose risks of loss of reliability in the original space-flight application and could pose such risks in other applications. Prior EEPROM controllers are large and complex and do not provide all reasonable protections (in many cases, few or no protections) against inadvertent writes. In contrast, the present controller provides several layers of protection against inadvertent writes. The controller also incorporates a write-time monitor, enabling determination of trends in the performance of an EEPROM through all phases of testing. The controller has been designed as an integral subsystem of a system that includes not only the controller and the controlled EEPROM aboard a spacecraft but also computers in a ground control station, relatively simple onboard support circuitry, and an onboard communication subsystem that utilizes the MIL-STD-1553B protocol. (MIL-STD-1553B is a military standard that encompasses a method of communication and electrical-interface requirements for digital electronic subsystems connected to a data bus. MIL-STD- 1553B is commonly used in defense and space applications.) The intent was to both maximize reliability while minimizing the size and complexity of onboard circuitry. In operation, control of the EEPROM is effected via the ground computers, the MIL-STD-1553B communication subsystem, and the onboard support circuitry, all of which, in combination, provide the multiple layers of protection against inadvertent writes. There is no controller software, unlike in many prior EEPROM controllers; software can be a major contributor to unreliability, particularly in fault

  13. Subunit Asa1 spans all the peripheral stalk of the mitochondrial ATP synthase of the chlorophycean alga Polytomella sp.

    PubMed

    Colina-Tenorio, Lilia; Miranda-Astudillo, Héctor; Cano-Estrada, Araceli; Vázquez-Acevedo, Miriam; Cardol, Pierre; Remacle, Claire; González-Halphen, Diego

    2016-04-01

    Mitochondrial F1FO-ATP synthase of chlorophycean algae is dimeric. It contains eight orthodox subunits (alpha, beta, gamma, delta, epsilon, OSCP, a and c) and nine atypical subunits (Asa1 to 9). These subunits build the peripheral stalk of the enzyme and stabilize its dimeric structure. The location of the 66.1kDa subunit Asa1 has been debated. On one hand, it was found in a transient subcomplex that contained membrane-bound subunits Asa1/Asa3/Asa5/Asa8/a (Atp6)/c (Atp9). On the other hand, Asa1 was proposed to form the bulky structure of the peripheral stalk that contacts the OSCP subunit in the F1 sector. Here, we overexpressed and purified the recombinant proteins Asa1 and OSCP and explored their interactions in vitro, using immunochemical techniques and affinity chromatography. Asa1 and OSCP interact strongly, and the carboxy-terminal half of OSCP seems to be instrumental for this association. In addition, the algal ATP synthase was partially dissociated at relatively high detergent concentrations, and an Asa1/Asa3/Asa5/Asa8/a/c10 subcomplex was identified. Furthermore, Far-Western analysis suggests an Asa1-Asa8 interaction. Based on these results, a model is proposed in which Asa1 spans the whole peripheral arm of the enzyme, from a region close to the matrix-exposed side of the mitochondrial inner membrane to the F1 region where OSCP is located. 3D models show elongated, helix-rich structures for chlorophycean Asa1 subunits. Asa1 subunit probably plays a scaffolding role in the peripheral stalk analogous to the one of subunit b in orthodox mitochondrial enzymes. PMID:26657474

  14. What Is Business's Social Compact?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Avishai, Bernard

    1994-01-01

    Under the "new" social compact, businesses must focus on continuous learning and thus have both an obligation to support teaching and an opportunity to profit from it. Learning organizations must also be teaching organizations. (SK)

  15. A Compact Beam Measurement Setup

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Urs U.

    2016-08-01

    We present the design of a compact measurement device to determine the position of a beam in a radio optical setup. The unit is used to align the Terahertz optics of the GREAT instrument on the airborne astronomical observatory SOFIA.

  16. MESOSCALE SIMULATIONS OF POWDER COMPACTION

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, Ilya; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-28

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  17. Mesoscale Simulations of Powder Compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya.; Fujino, Don; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-12-01

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of shock compaction of metal and ceramic powders have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating a well-characterized shock compaction experiment of a porous ductile metal. Simulation results using the Steinberg material model and handbook values for solid 2024 aluminum showed good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not as well studied as metals, so a simple material model for solid ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powders have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. The numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as that measured experimentally using VISAR. The numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line as observed in experiments. We found that for good quantitative agreement with experiments 3D simulations are essential.

  18. An isolated compact galaxy triplet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Shuai; Shao, Zheng-Yi; Shen, Shi-Yin; Argudo-Fernández, Maria; Wu, Hong; Lam, Man-I.; Yang, Ming; Yuan, Fang-Ting

    2016-05-01

    We report the discovery of an isolated compact galaxy triplet SDSS J084843.45+164417.3, which is first detected by the LAMOST spectral survey and then confirmed by a spectroscopic observation of the BFOSC mounted on the 2.16 meter telescope located at Xinglong Station, which is administered by National Astronomical Observatories, Chinese Academy of Sciences. It is found that this triplet is an isolated and extremely compact system, which has an aligned configuration and very small radial velocity dispersion. The member galaxies have similar colors and show marginal star formation activities. These results support the opinion that the compact triplets are well-evolved systems rather than hierarchically forming structures. This serendipitous discovery reveals the limitations of fiber spectral redshift surveys in studying such a compact system, and demonstrates the necessity of additional observations to complete the current redshift sample.

  19. Compact Ho:YLF Laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hemmati, H.

    1988-01-01

    Longitudinal pumping by laser diodes increases efficiency. Improved holmium:yttrium lithium fluoride laser radiates as much as 56 mW of power at wavelength of 2.1 micrometer. New Ho:YLF laser more compact and efficient than older, more powerful devices of this type. Compact, efficient Ho:YLF laser based on recent successes in use of diode lasers to pump other types of solid-state lasers.

  20. High strength-high conductivity Cu--Fe composites produced by powder compaction/mechanical reduction

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, John D.; Spitzig, William A.; Gibson, Edwin D.; Anderson, Iver E.

    1991-08-27

    A particulate mixture of Cu and Fe is compacted and mechanically reduced to form an "in-situ" Cu-Fe composite having high strength and high conductivity. Compaction and mechanical reduction of the particulate mixture are carried out at a temperature and time at temperature selected to avoid dissolution of Fe into the Cu matrix particulates to a harmful extent that substantially degrades the conductivity of the Cu-Fe composite.

  1. High strength-high conductivity Cu-Fe composites produced by powder compaction/mechanical reduction

    DOEpatents

    Verhoeven, J.D.; Spitzig, W.A.; Gibson, E.D.; Anderson, I.E.

    1991-08-27

    A particulate mixture of Cu and Fe is compacted and mechanically reduced to form an ''in-situ'' Cu-Fe composite having high strength and high conductivity. Compaction and mechanical reduction of the particulate mixture are carried out at a temperature and time at temperature selected to avoid dissolution of Fe into the Cu matrix particulates to a harmful extent that substantially degrades the conductivity of the Cu-Fe composite. 5 figures.

  2. Compact Optoelectronic Compass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christian, Carl

    2004-01-01

    A compact optoelectronic sensor unit measures the apparent motion of the Sun across the sky. The data acquired by this chip are processed in an external processor to estimate the relative orientation of the axis of rotation of the Earth. Hence, the combination of this chip and the external processor finds the direction of true North relative to the chip: in other words, the combination acts as a solar compass. If the compass is further combined with a clock, then the combination can be used to establish a threeaxis inertial coordinate system. If, in addition, an auxiliary sensor measures the local vertical direction, then the resulting system can determine the geographic position. This chip and the software used in the processor are based mostly on the same design and operation as those of the unit described in Micro Sun Sensor for Spacecraft (NPO-30867) elsewhere in this issue of NASA Tech Briefs. Like the unit described in that article, this unit includes a small multiple-pinhole camera comprising a micromachined mask containing a rectangular array of microscopic pinholes mounted a short distance in front of an image detector of the active-pixel sensor (APS) type (see figure). Further as in the other unit, the digitized output of the APS in this chip is processed to compute the centroids of the pinhole Sun images on the APS. Then the direction to the Sun, relative to the compass chip, is computed from the positions of the centroids (just like a sundial). In the operation of this chip, one is interested not only in the instantaneous direction to the Sun but also in the apparent path traced out by the direction to the Sun as a result of rotation of the Earth during an observation interval (during which the Sun sensor must remain stationary with respect to the Earth). The apparent path of the Sun across the sky is projected on a sphere. The axis of rotation of the Earth lies at the center of the projected circle on the sphere surface. Hence, true North (not magnetic

  3. Novel subunit-subunit interactions in the structure of glutamine synthetase.

    PubMed

    Almassy, R J; Janson, C A; Hamlin, R; Xuong, N H; Eisenberg, D

    We present an atomic model for glutamine synthetase, an enzyme of central importance in bacterial nitrogen metabolism, from X-ray crystallography. The 12 identical subunits are arranged as the carbon atoms in two face-to-face benzene rings, with unusual subunit contacts. Our model, which places the active sites at the subunit interfaces, suggests a mechanism for the main functional role of glutamine synthetase: how the enzyme regulates the rate of synthesis of glutamine in response to covalent modification and feedback inhibition. PMID:2876389

  4. Measuring the full transverse beam matrix using a single octupole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ögren, J.; Ruber, R.; Ziemann, V.; Farabolini, W.

    2015-07-01

    We propose a method to fully determine the transverse beam matrix using a simple setup consisting of two steering magnets, an octupole field and a screen. This works in principle for any multipole field, i.e., sextupole, octupole magnet or a radio frequency structure with a multipole field. We have experimentally verified the method at the Compact Linear Collider Test Facility 3 at CERN using a Compact Linear Collider accelerating structure, which has an octupole component of the radio frequency fields. By observing the position shifts of the beam centroid together with changes in transverse beam size on a screen, we determined the full transverse beam matrix, with all correlations.

  5. Assignment of the gene encoding the [beta]-subunit of the electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETFB) to human chromosome 19q13. 3

    SciTech Connect

    Antonacci, R. ); Colombo, I.; Volta, M.; DiDonato, S.; Finocchiaro, G. ); Archidiacono, N.; Rocchi, M. )

    1994-01-01

    The electron-transfer flavoprotein (ETF), located in the mitochondrial matrix, is a nuclear-encoded enzyme delivering to the respiratory chain electrons by straight-chain acyl-CoA dehydrogenases and other dehydrogenases. ETF is composed of a 35-kDa [alpha]-subunit that is cleaved to a 32-kDa protein during mitochondrial import (ETFA) and a [beta]-subunit that reaches the mitochondrion unmodified (ETFB). The cDNA encoding both these subunits has been cloned and sequenced. 14 refs., 1 fig.

  6. Directional Oscillations, Concentrations, and Compensated Compactness via Microlocal Compactness Forms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rindler, Filip

    2015-01-01

    This work introduces microlocal compactness forms (MCFs) as a new tool to study oscillations and concentrations in L p -bounded sequences of functions. Decisively, MCFs retain information about the location, value distribution, and direction of oscillations and concentrations, thus extending at the same time the theories of (generalized) Young measures and H-measures. In L p -spaces oscillations and concentrations precisely discriminate between weak and strong compactness, and thus MCFs allow one to quantify the difference in compactness. The definition of MCFs involves a Fourier variable, whereby differential constraints on the functions in the sequence can also be investigated easily—a distinct advantage over Young measure theory. Furthermore, pointwise restrictions are reflected in the MCF as well, paving the way for applications to Tartar's framework of compensated compactness; consequently, we establish a new weak-to-strong compactness theorem in a "geometric" way. After developing several aspects of the abstract theory, we consider three applications; for lamination microstructures, the hierarchy of oscillations is reflected in the MCF. The directional information retained in an MCF is harnessed in the relaxation theory for anisotropic integral functionals. Finally, we indicate how the theory pertains to the study of propagation of singularities in certain systems of PDEs. The proofs combine measure theory, Young measures, and harmonic analysis.

  7. Detection of constitutive heterodimerization of the integrin Mac-1 subunits by fluorescence resonance energy transfer in living cells

    SciTech Connect

    Fu Guo; Yang Huayan; Wang Chen; Zhang Feng; You Zhendong; Wang Guiying; He Cheng; Chen Yizhang . E-mail: yzchen0928@yahoo.com; Xu Zhihan . E-mail: zzxu@mail.shcnc.ac.cn

    2006-08-04

    Macrophage differentiation antigen associated with complement three receptor function (Mac-1) belongs to {beta}{sub 2} subfamily of integrins that mediate important cell-cell and cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Biochemical studies have indicated that Mac-1 is a constitutive heterodimer in vitro. Here, we detected the heterodimerization of Mac-1 subunits in living cells by means of two fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) techniques (fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy) and our results demonstrated that there is constitutive heterodimerization of the Mac-1 subunits and this constitutive heterodimerization of the Mac-1 subunits is cell-type independent. Through FRET imaging, we found that heterodimers of Mac-1 mainly localized in plasma membrane, perinuclear, and Golgi area in living cells. Furthermore, through analysis of the estimated physical distances between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) fused to Mac-1 subunits, we suggested that the conformation of Mac-1 subunits is not affected by the fusion of CFP or YFP and inferred that Mac-1 subunits take different conformation when expressed in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) and human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293T cells, respectively.

  8. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  9. Proteomic analysis of transducin beta-subunit structural heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Clack, James W; Juhl, Martha; Rice, Carol A; Li, Junyu; Witzmann, Frank A

    2003-10-01

    Partially purified transducin was resolved using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). Peptide mass fingerprinting of several different spots believed to correspond to the 37 kDa beta-subunit of transducin (T(beta)) was performed. Spots were excised and proteolyzed using modified trypsin. Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS) was performed on the peptide mixture resulting from each spot. As many as six spots with different pI, ranging from 5.2 to 6.1, were observed when separated using 2-DE. MALDI peptide mass fingerprinting determined with high probability that all of the spots were the same gene product, guanine nucleotide-binding protein G(I)/G(S)/G(T) beta-subunit 1 (GNB1; T(beta1)). This suggested that post-translational modification was responsible for the differences in pI. Phosphorylation experiments showed that at least one T(beta1) spot was phosphorylated in vitro with [gamma-(32)P]ATP by an endogenous kinase. Treatment of T(beta) with alkaline phosphatase caused a large change in the spot pattern of T(beta), suggesting that phosphorylated T(beta) is a substrate for alkaline phosphatase. We conclude that T(beta1) constitutes over 99% of the T(beta) expressed in bovine rod outer segments and displays structural heterogeneity that is due to post-translational modification. We also conclude that some, but not all, of the heterogeneity observed is due to phosphorylation of Tb1. PMID:14595696

  10. Blue ellipticals in compact groups

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zepf, Stephen E.; Whitmore, Bradley C.

    1990-01-01

    By studying galaxies in compact groups, the authors examine the hypothesis that mergers of spiral galaxies make elliptical galaxies. The authors combine dynamical models of the merger-rich compact group environment with stellar evolution models and predict that roughly 15 percent of compact group ellipticals should be 0.15 mag bluer in B - R color than normal ellipticals. The published colors of these galaxies suggest the existence of this predicted blue population, but a normal distribution with large random errors can not be ruled out based on these data alone. However, the authors have new ultraviolet blue visual data which confirm the blue color of the two ellipticals with blue B - R colors for which they have their own colors. This confirmation of a population of blue ellipticals indicates that interactions are occurring in compact groups, but a blue color in one index alone does not require that these ellipticals are recent products of the merger of two spirals. The authors demonstrate how optical spectroscopy in the blue may distinguish between a true spiral + spiral merger and the swallowing of a gas-rich system by an already formed elliptical. The authors also show that the sum of the luminosity of the galaxies in each group is consistent with the hypothesis that the final stage in the evolution of compact group is an elliptical galaxy.

  11. Viral RNAs Are Unusually Compact

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Ajaykumar; Egecioglu, Defne E.; Yoffe, Aron M.; Ben-Shaul, Avinoam; Rao, Ayala L. N.; Knobler, Charles M.; Gelbart, William M.

    2014-01-01

    A majority of viruses are composed of long single-stranded genomic RNA molecules encapsulated by protein shells with diameters of just a few tens of nanometers. We examine the extent to which these viral RNAs have evolved to be physically compact molecules to facilitate encapsulation. Measurements of equal-length viral, non-viral, coding and non-coding RNAs show viral RNAs to have among the smallest sizes in solution, i.e., the highest gel-electrophoretic mobilities and the smallest hydrodynamic radii. Using graph-theoretical analyses we demonstrate that their sizes correlate with the compactness of branching patterns in predicted secondary structure ensembles. The density of branching is determined by the number and relative positions of 3-helix junctions, and is highly sensitive to the presence of rare higher-order junctions with 4 or more helices. Compact branching arises from a preponderance of base pairing between nucleotides close to each other in the primary sequence. The density of branching represents a degree of freedom optimized by viral RNA genomes in response to the evolutionary pressure to be packaged reliably. Several families of viruses are analyzed to delineate the effects of capsid geometry, size and charge stabilization on the selective pressure for RNA compactness. Compact branching has important implications for RNA folding and viral assembly. PMID:25188030

  12. Involvement of proteasomal subunits zeta and iota in RNA degradation.

    PubMed Central

    Petit, F; Jarrousse, A S; Dahlmann, B; Sobek, A; Hendil, K B; Buri, J; Briand, Y; Schmid, H P

    1997-01-01

    We have identified two distinct subunits of 20 S proteasomes that are associated with RNase activity. Proteasome subunits zeta and iota, eluted from two-dimensional Western blots, hydrolysed tobacco mosaic virus RNA, whereas none of the other subunits degraded this substrate under the same conditions. Additionally, proteasomes were dissociated by 6 M urea, and subunit zeta, containing the highest RNase activity, was isolated by anion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. Purified subunit zeta migrated as a single spot on two-dimensional PAGE with a molecular mass of approx. 28 kDa. Addition of anti-(subunit zeta) antibodies led to the co-precipitation of this proteasome subunit and nuclease activity. This is the first evidence that proteasomal alpha-type subunits are associated with an enzymic activity, and our results provide further evidence that proteasomes may be involved in cellular RNA metabolism. PMID:9337855

  13. Isolation of the alpha subunits of GTP-binding regulatory proteins by affinity chromatography with immobilized beta gamma subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Pang, I H; Sternweis, P C

    1989-01-01

    Immobilized beta gamma subunits of GTP-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) were used to isolate alpha subunits from solubilized membranes of bovine tissues and to separate specific alpha subunits based on their differential affinities for beta gamma subunits. The beta gamma subunits were cross-linked to omega-aminobutyl agarose. Up to 7 nmol of alpha subunit could bind to each milliliter of beta gamma-agarose and be recovered by elution with AIF4-. This affinity resin effectively separated the alpha subunits of Gi1 and Gi2 from "contaminating" alpha subunits of Go, the most abundant G protein in bovine brain, by taking advantage of the apparent lower affinity of the alpha subunits of Go for beta gamma subunits. The beta gamma-agarose was also used to isolate mixtures of alpha subunits from cholate extracts of membranes from different bovine tissues. alpha subunits of 39-41 kDa (in various ratios) as well as the alpha subunits of Gs were purified. The yields from extracts exceeded 60% for all alpha subunits examined and apparently represented the relative content of alpha subunits in the tissues. This technique can rapidly isolate and identify, from a small amount of sample, the endogenous G proteins in various tissues and cells. So far, only polypeptides in the range of 39-52 kDa have been detected with this approach. If other GTP-binding proteins interact with these beta gamma subunits, the interaction is either of low affinity or mechanistically unique from the alpha subunits isolated in this study. Images PMID:2510152

  14. On the spline-based wavelet differentiation matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jameson, Leland

    1993-01-01

    The differentiation matrix for a spline-based wavelet basis is constructed. Given an n-th order spline basis it is proved that the differentiation matrix is accurate of order 2n + 2 when periodic boundary conditions are assumed. This high accuracy, or superconvergence, is lost when the boundary conditions are no longer periodic. Furthermore, it is shown that spline-based bases generate a class of compact finite difference schemes.

  15. Dissociation of ribosomes into large and small subunits.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Maria C; Maguire, Bruce; Lake, James A

    2015-04-01

    Structural and functional studies of ribosomal subunits require the dissociation of intact ribosomes into individual small and large ribosomal subunits. The dissociation of the prokaryotic 70S ribosomes into the 50S and 30S subunits is achieved by dialysis against a buffer containing a lower Mg(2+) concentration. Eukaryotic 80S ribosomes are dissociated into 60S and 40S subunits by incubation in a buffer containing puromycin and higher KCl and Mg(2+) concentrations.

  16. Compact orthogonal NMR field sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Gerald, II, Rex E.; Rathke, Jerome W.

    2009-02-03

    A Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor for emitting two orthogonal electro-magnetic fields in a common space. More particularly, a replacement inductor for existing NMR (Nuclear Magnetic Resonance) sensors to allow for NMR imaging. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor has a conductive coil and a central conductor electrically connected in series. The central conductor is at least partially surrounded by the coil. The coil and central conductor are electrically or electro-magnetically connected to a device having a means for producing or inducing a current through the coil and central conductor. The Compact Orthogonal Field Sensor can be used in NMR imaging applications to determine the position and the associated NMR spectrum of a sample within the electro-magnetic field of the central conductor.

  17. Compaction Stress in Fine Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, A.J.; Kenkre, V.M.; Pease, E.A.; Scott, J.E.

    1999-04-01

    A vexing feature in granular materials compaction is density extrema interior to a compacted shape. Such inhomogeneities can lead to weaknesses and loss of dimensional control in ceramic parts, unpredictable dissolution of pharmaceuticals, and undesirable stress concentration in load-bearing soil. As an example, the centerline density in a cylindrical compact often does not decrease monotonically from the pressure source but exhibits local maxima and minima. Two lines of thought in the literature predict, respectively, diffusive and wavelike propagation of stress. Here, a general memory function approach has been formulated that unifies these previous treatments as special cases; by analyzing a convenient intermediate case, the telegrapher's equation, one sees that local density maxima arise via semidiffusive stress waves reflecting from the die walls and adding constructively at the centerline.

  18. Homodimerization of the p51 Subunit of HIV-1 Reverse Transcriptase

    SciTech Connect

    Zheng, X.; Mueller, G; Cuneo, M; DeRose, E; London, R

    2010-01-01

    The dimerization of HIV reverse transcriptase (RT), required to obtain the active form of the enzyme, is influenced by mutations, non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), nucleotide substrates, Mg ions, temperature, and specifically designed dimerization inhibitors. In this study, we have utilized nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy of the [methyl-{sup 13}C]methionine-labeled enzyme and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) to investigate how several of these factors influence the dimerization behavior of the p51 subunit. The {sup 1}H-{sup 13}C HSQC spectrum of p51 obtained at micromolar concentrations indicates that a significant fraction of the p51 adopts a 'p66-like' conformation. SAXS data obtained for p51 samples were used to determine the fractions of monomer and dimer in the sample and to evaluate the conformation of the fingers/thumb subdomain. All of the p51 monomer observed was found to adopt the compact, 'p51C' conformation observed for the p51 subunit in the RT heterodimer. The NMR and SAXS data indicate that the p51 homodimer adopts a structure that is similar to the p66/p51 heterodimer, with one p51C subunit and a second p51 subunit in an extended, 'p51E' conformation that resembles the p66 subunit of the heterodimer. The fractional dimer concentration and the fingers/thumb orientation are found to depend strongly on the experimental conditions and exhibit a qualitative dependence on nevirapine and ionic strength (KCl) that is similar to the behavior reported for the heterodimer and the p66 homodimer. The L289K mutation interferes with p51 homodimer formation as it does with formation of the heterodimer, despite its location far from the dimer interface. This effect is readily interpreted in terms of a conformational selection model, in which p51{sub L289K} has a much greater preference for the compact, p51C conformation. A reduced level of dimer formation then results from the reduced ratio of the p51E{sub L289K} to p51C

  19. Compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit

    DOEpatents

    Roesler, Alexander W.; Vernon, George E.; Hoke, Darren A.; De Marquis, Virginia K.; Harris, Steven M.

    2007-06-26

    A compact monolithic capacitive discharge unit (CDU) is disclosed in which a thyristor switch and a flyback charging circuit are both sandwiched about a ceramic energy storage capacitor. The result is a compact rugged assembly which provides a low-inductance current discharge path. The flyback charging circuit preferably includes a low-temperature co-fired ceramic transformer. The CDU can further include one or more ceramic substrates for enclosing the thyristor switch and for holding various passive components used in the flyback charging circuit. A load such as a detonator can also be attached directly to the CDU.

  20. Compact intermediates in RNA folding

    SciTech Connect

    Woodson, S.A.

    2011-12-14

    Large noncoding RNAs fold into their biologically functional structures via compact yet disordered intermediates, which couple the stable secondary structure of the RNA with the emerging tertiary fold. The specificity of the collapse transition, which coincides with the assembly of helical domains, depends on RNA sequence and counterions. It determines the specificity of the folding pathways and the magnitude of the free energy barriers to the ensuing search for the native conformation. By coupling helix assembly with nascent tertiary interactions, compact folding intermediates in RNA also play a crucial role in ligand binding and RNA-protein recognition.

  1. Compact accelerator for medical therapy

    DOEpatents

    Caporaso, George J.; Chen, Yu-Jiuan; Hawkins, Steven A.; Sampayan, Stephen E.; Paul, Arthur C.

    2010-05-04

    A compact accelerator system having an integrated particle generator-linear accelerator with a compact, small-scale construction capable of producing an energetic (.about.70-250 MeV) proton beam or other nuclei and transporting the beam direction to a medical therapy patient without the need for bending magnets or other hardware often required for remote beam transport. The integrated particle generator-accelerator is actuable as a unitary body on a support structure to enable scanning of a particle beam by direction actuation of the particle generator-accelerator.

  2. PKA regulatory subunit expression in tooth development.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in many biological processes including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cellular metabolism and gene regulation. Mutation in PKA regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A has previously been identified in odontogenic myxomas, but it is unclear whether PKA is involved in tooth development. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of alpha isoforms of PKA regulatory subunit (Prkar1a and Prkar2a) in mouse and human odontogenesis by in situ hybridization. PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A mRNA transcription was further confirmed in a human deciduous germ by qRT-PCR. Mouse Prkar1a and human PRKAR2A exhibited a dynamic spatio-temporal expression in tooth development, whereas neither human PRKAR1A nor mouse Prkar2a showed their expression in odontogenesis. These isoforms thus showed different expression pattern between human and mouse tooth germs. PMID:24755349

  3. PKA regulatory subunit expression in tooth development.

    PubMed

    de Sousa, Sílvia Ferreira; Kawasaki, Katsushige; Kawasaki, Maiko; Volponi, Ana Angelova; Gomez, Ricardo Santiago; Gomes, Carolina Cavaliéri; Sharpe, Paul T; Ohazama, Atsushi

    2014-05-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) plays critical roles in many biological processes including cell proliferation, cell differentiation, cellular metabolism and gene regulation. Mutation in PKA regulatory subunit, PRKAR1A has previously been identified in odontogenic myxomas, but it is unclear whether PKA is involved in tooth development. The aim of the present study was to assess the expression of alpha isoforms of PKA regulatory subunit (Prkar1a and Prkar2a) in mouse and human odontogenesis by in situ hybridization. PRKAR1A and PRKAR2A mRNA transcription was further confirmed in a human deciduous germ by qRT-PCR. Mouse Prkar1a and human PRKAR2A exhibited a dynamic spatio-temporal expression in tooth development, whereas neither human PRKAR1A nor mouse Prkar2a showed their expression in odontogenesis. These isoforms thus showed different expression pattern between human and mouse tooth germs.

  4. BASIC Matrix Operations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Digital Equipment Corp., Maynard, MA.

    The curriculum materials and computer programs in this booklet introduce the idea of a matrix. They go on to discuss matrix operations of addition, subtraction, multiplication by a scalar, and matrix multiplication. The last section covers several contemporary applications of matrix multiplication, including problems of communication…

  5. Subunit organization in cytoplasmic dynein subcomplexes

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Bonilla, Myriam; Rodgers, Michael E.; Schroer, Trina A.

    2002-01-01

    Because cytoplasmic dynein plays numerous critical roles in eukaryotic cells, determining the subunit composition and the organization and functions of the subunits within dynein are important goals. This has been difficult partly because of accessory polypeptide heterogeneity of dynein populations. The motor domain containing heavy chains of cytoplasmic dynein are associated with multiple intermediate, light intermediate, and light chain accessory polypeptides. We examined the organization of these subunits within cytoplasmic dynein by separating the molecule into two distinct subcomplexes. These subcomplexes were competent to reassemble into a molecule with dynein-like properties. One subcomplex was composed of the dynein heavy and light intermediate chains whereas the other subcomplex was composed of the intermediate and light chains. The intermediate and light chain subcomplex could be further separated into two pools, only one of which contained dynein light chains. The two pools had distinct intermediate chain compositions, suggesting that intermediate chain isoforms have different light chain–binding properties. When the two intermediate chain pools were characterized by analytical velocity sedimentation, at least four molecular components were seen: intermediate chain monomers, intermediate chain dimers, intermediate chain monomers with bound light chains, and a mixture of intermediate chain dimers with assorted bound light chains. These data provide new insights into the compositional heterogeneity and assembly of the cytoplasmic dynein complex and suggest that individual dynein molecules have distinct molecular compositions in vivo. PMID:11967380

  6. Arrangement of subunits in microribbons from Giardia.

    PubMed

    Holberton, D V

    1981-02-01

    Ultrasound has been used to disperse the cytoplasm of Giardia muris and Giardia duodenalis trophozoites, releasing disk cytoskeletons for negative staining and study by electron microscopy. Sonication also breaks down the corss-bridges uniting microribbons in disks. Individual ribbons and small bundles of these structures, are found in these preparations and have been imaged both from their edges and in flat face view. The outer layers of ribbons are 2 sheets of regularly arranged globular subunits, held apart by a fibrous inner core. The axial repeat of the microribbon is 15 nm, which is also the distance separating cross-bridge sites along ribbons. Pronounced striping at this interval is a feature of ribbon faces where they are joined in bundles. Subunits in the outer layer are arranged in vertical protofilaments that are set orthogonally to the long axis of the ribbon. Protofilaments bind tannic acid and are seen clearly in sectioned ribbons. Three protofilaments fit into the 15-nm longitudinal spacing. Optical diffraction patterns from ribbon images are dominated by orders of the 15-nm periodicity, including the third-order reflexions expected from protofilaments spacings. Fourth-order reflexions indicate that the ribbon core may also be structured. Ribbon face images give rise to a strong 4-nm layer line, corresponding to the vertical spacing of subunits in protofilaments. Neighbouring protofilaments are staggered by about 0.67 nm. The lattices found in ribbons are consistent with studies of cytoskeleton composition.

  7. DNA sequences, recombinant DNA molecules and processes for producing the A and B subunits of cholera toxin and preparations containing so-obtained subunit or subunits

    SciTech Connect

    Harford, N.; De Wilde, M.

    1987-05-19

    A recombinant DNA molecule is described comprising at least a portion coding for subunits A and B of cholera toxin, or a fragment or derivative of the portion wherein the fragment or derivative codes for a polypeptide have an activity which can induce an immune response to subunit A; can induce an immune response to subunit A and cause epithelial cell penetration and the enzymatic effect leading to net loss of fluid into the gut lumen; can bind to the membrane receptor for the B subunit of cholera toxin; can induce an immune response to subunit B; can induce an immune response to subunit B and bind to the membrane receptor; or has a combination of the activities.

  8. Na+ Channel β Subunits: Overachievers of the Ion Channel Family

    PubMed Central

    Brackenbury, William J.; Isom, Lori L.

    2011-01-01

    Voltage-gated Na+ channels (VGSCs) in mammals contain a pore-forming α subunit and one or more β subunits. There are five mammalian β subunits in total: β1, β1B, β2, β3, and β4, encoded by four genes: SCN1B–SCN4B. With the exception of the SCN1B splice variant, β1B, the β subunits are type I topology transmembrane proteins. In contrast, β1B lacks a transmembrane domain and is a secreted protein. A growing body of work shows that VGSC β subunits are multifunctional. While they do not form the ion channel pore, β subunits alter gating, voltage-dependence, and kinetics of VGSCα subunits and thus regulate cellular excitability in vivo. In addition to their roles in channel modulation, β subunits are members of the immunoglobulin superfamily of cell adhesion molecules and regulate cell adhesion and migration. β subunits are also substrates for sequential proteolytic cleavage by secretases. An example of the multifunctional nature of β subunits is β1, encoded by SCN1B, that plays a critical role in neuronal migration and pathfinding during brain development, and whose function is dependent on Na+ current and γ-secretase activity. Functional deletion of SCN1B results in Dravet Syndrome, a severe and intractable pediatric epileptic encephalopathy. β subunits are emerging as key players in a wide variety of physiopathologies, including epilepsy, cardiac arrhythmia, multiple sclerosis, Huntington’s disease, neuropsychiatric disorders, neuropathic and inflammatory pain, and cancer. β subunits mediate multiple signaling pathways on different timescales, regulating electrical excitability, adhesion, migration, pathfinding, and transcription. Importantly, some β subunit functions may operate independently of α subunits. Thus, β subunits perform critical roles during development and disease. As such, they may prove useful in disease diagnosis and therapy. PMID:22007171

  9. Compact Circuit Preprocesses Accelerometer Output

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr.

    1993-01-01

    Compact electronic circuit transfers dc power to, and preprocesses ac output of, accelerometer and associated preamplifier. Incorporated into accelerometer case during initial fabrication or retrofit onto commercial accelerometer. Made of commercial integrated circuits and other conventional components; made smaller by use of micrologic and surface-mount technology.

  10. Generalized high order compact methods.

    SciTech Connect

    Spotz, William F.; Kominiarczuk, Jakub

    2010-09-01

    The fundamental ideas of the high order compact method are combined with the generalized finite difference method. The result is a finite difference method that works on unstructured, nonuniform grids, and is more accurate than one would classically expect from the number of grid points employed.

  11. Upwind Compact Finite Difference Schemes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christie, I.

    1985-07-01

    It was shown by Ciment, Leventhal, and Weinberg ( J. Comput. Phys.28 (1978), 135) that the standard compact finite difference scheme may break down in convection dominated problems. An upwinding of the method, which maintains the fourth order accuracy, is suggested and favorable numerical results are found for a number of test problems.

  12. Mesoscale Simulations of Power Compaction

    SciTech Connect

    Lomov, I; Fujino, D; Antoun, T; Liu, B

    2009-08-06

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to match experimental compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line also observed in experiments. They found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations.

  13. Mesoscale simulations of powder compaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomov, Ilya; Antoun, Tarabay; Liu, Benjamin

    2009-06-01

    Mesoscale 3D simulations of metal and ceramic powder compaction in shock waves have been performed with an Eulerian hydrocode GEODYN. The approach was validated by simulating shock compaction of porous well-characterized ductile metal using Steinberg material model. Results of the simulations with handbook values for parameters of solid 2024 aluminum have good agreement with experimental compaction curves and wave profiles. Brittle ceramic materials are not so well studied as metals, so material model for ceramic (tungsten carbide) has been fitted to shock compression experiments of non-porous samples and further calibrated to experimental match compaction curves. Direct simulations of gas gun experiments with ceramic powder have been performed and showed good agreement with experimental data. Numerical shock wave profile has same character and thickness as measured with VISAR. Numerical results show evidence of hard-to-explain reshock states above the single-shock Hugoniot line, which have also been observed in the experiments. We found that to receive good quantitative agreement with experiment it is essential to perform 3D simulations, since 2D results tend to underpredict stress levels for high-porosity powders regardless of material properties. We developed a process to extract macroscale information for the simulation which can be directly used in calibration of continuum model for heterogeneous media.

  14. Properties of dynamically compacted WIPP salt

    SciTech Connect

    Brodsky, N.S.; Hansen, F.D.; Pfeifle, T.W.

    1996-07-01

    Dynamic compaction of mine-run salt is being investigated for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), where compacted salt is being considered for repository sealing applications. One large-scale and two intermediate-scale dynamic compaction demonstrations were conducted. Initial fractional densities of the compacted salt range form 0.85 to 0.90, and permeabilities vary. Dynamically-compacted specimens were further consolidated in the laboratory by application of hydrostatic pressure. Permeability as a function of density was determined, and consolidation microprocesses were studied. Experimental results, in conjunction with modeling results, indicate that the compacted salt will function as a viable seal material.

  15. A matrix lower bound

    SciTech Connect

    Grcar, Joseph F.

    2002-02-04

    A matrix lower bound is defined that generalizes ideas apparently due to S. Banach and J. von Neumann. The matrix lower bound has a natural interpretation in functional analysis, and it satisfies many of the properties that von Neumann stated for it in a restricted case. Applications for the matrix lower bound are demonstrated in several areas. In linear algebra, the matrix lower bound of a full rank matrix equals the distance to the set of rank-deficient matrices. In numerical analysis, the ratio of the matrix norm to the matrix lower bound is a condition number for all consistent systems of linear equations. In optimization theory, the matrix lower bound suggests an identity for a class of min-max problems. In real analysis, a recursive construction that depends on the matrix lower bound shows that the level sets of continuously differential functions lie asymptotically near those of their tangents.

  16. PKA catalytic subunit mutations in adrenocortical Cushing's adenoma impair association with the regulatory subunit.

    PubMed

    Calebiro, Davide; Hannawacker, Annette; Lyga, Sandra; Bathon, Kerstin; Zabel, Ulrike; Ronchi, Cristina; Beuschlein, Felix; Reincke, Martin; Lorenz, Kristina; Allolio, Bruno; Kisker, Caroline; Fassnacht, Martin; Lohse, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    We recently identified a high prevalence of mutations affecting the catalytic (Cα) subunit of protein kinase A (PKA) in cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. The two identified mutations (Leu206Arg and Leu199_Cys200insTrp) are associated with increased PKA catalytic activity, but the underlying mechanisms are highly controversial. Here we utilize a combination of biochemical and optical assays, including fluorescence resonance energy transfer in living cells, to analyze the consequences of the two mutations with respect to the formation of the PKA holoenzyme and its regulation by cAMP. Our results indicate that neither mutant can form a stable PKA complex, due to the location of the mutations at the interface between the catalytic and the regulatory subunits. We conclude that the two mutations cause high basal catalytic activity and lack of regulation by cAMP through interference of complex formation between the regulatory and the catalytic subunits of PKA. PMID:25477193

  17. Liquisolid compacts: the effect of cosolvent and HPMC on theophylline release.

    PubMed

    Nokhodchi, Ali; Aliakbar, Roya; Desai, Sandip; Javadzadeh, Yousef

    2010-08-01

    Liquisolid technique as an approach was developed to sustain the drug release from matrix compacts. Liquisolid tablets were prepared by mixing liquid medication with silica-Eudragit RL or RS followed by the compaction of the mixture. For comparison purposes physical mixtures of all ingredients were prepared. The effect of the type of liquid medication and HPMC concentration on drug release was investigated. The interaction between excipients and theophylline was investigated by differential scanning calorimetry. Comparison study of physicomechnanical properties of liquisolid tablets with conventional tablets showed that most of liquisolid formulations had superior flowability and compactibility in comparison with physical mixtures. The results suggested that the presence of non-volatile cosolvent is vital to produce slow release pattern for some of liquisolid compacts. The type of cosolvent had significant effect on drug release and it was revealed that by changing the type of cosolvent the desirable release profile is achievable. The sustained release action of HPMC was enhanced in liquisolid compacts in comparison to simple sustained release matrix tablets. It was shown that liquisolid compacts has a potential to produce zero-order release kinetics for less water soluble drugs such as theophylline. PMID:20451361

  18. Physical properties and subunit structure of l-asparaginase isolated from Erwinia carotovora

    PubMed Central

    Cammack, K. A.; Marlborough, D. I.; Miller, D. S.

    1972-01-01

    1. l-Asparaginases from Erwinia carotovora and Escherichia coli (EC2 enzyme) are both capable of inhibiting and eliminating certain types of tumour cells. The Er. carotovora enzyme is a more basic protein, however, and in contrast with the EC2 enzyme it contains neither tryptophan nor cystine, and disulphide bonds are therefore absent. The molecule is very stable in solution from pH3.0 to about pH12.0, and is somewhat more stable at alkaline pH than is the Esch. coli enzyme. Calculations based on a s020,w 7.43S and a sedimentation-equilibrium molecular weight of 135000±10000 give a frictional ratio (f/f0) of 1.08. The molecular conformation is therefore very compact in solution, and the electron microscope shows the negatively stained molecules as almost spherical particles with a diameter of 7.2±0.7nm. 2. Sedimentation-velocity and equilibrium ultracentrifugation, in 5–8m solutions of urea and guanidinium chloride, and also electrophoresis in sodium dodecyl sulphate–polyacrylamide gel, reveal a dissociation of the native protein molecule into four subunits of similar molecular weight in the range 32500–38000. The enzymically inactive subunits can be physically reassembled into an active tetramer when urea is removed by dialysis. Although the subunit structures of the Er. carotovora enzyme and the Esch. coli enzyme molecules are similar, the secondary bonding forces holding the subunits together in the tetramer are somewhat stronger in the Er. carotovora enzyme. 3. The optical-rotatory-dispersion (o.r.d.) parameters that characterize the Cotton effects arising from ordered structure in the molecule are [m′]233=−3522±74° and [m′]200=9096±1700°. These show very marked changes as the secondary structure is disrupted and the molecule dissociates into subunits. A correlation pathway was traced on the basis of o.r.d. parameters and enzyme activity as the polypeptide chains were denatured and renatured (and reconstituted) into active molecules after the

  19. Invariant distributions on compact homogeneous spaces

    SciTech Connect

    Gorbatsevich, V V

    2013-12-31

    In this paper, we study distributions on compact homogeneous spaces, including invariant distributions and also distributions admitting a sub-Riemannian structure. We first consider distributions of dimension 1 and 2 on compact homogeneous spaces. After this, we study the cases of compact homogeneous spaces of dimension 2, 3, and 4 in detail. Invariant distributions on simply connected compact homogeneous spaces are also treated. Bibliography: 18 titles.

  20. Design of a wideband compact square waveguide polariser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arndt, F.; Tucholke, W.; Wriedt, T.

    1985-06-01

    A design proposal for a compact exponentially profiled square waveguide polarizer is presented, and discontinuities in the fields of individual waveguide sections are investigated theoretically. Field components are derived from the axial z-components of the magnetic and electric Hertzian vector potentials Pi sub h and Pi sub e. The scattering matrix of the total polarizer structure is calculated by combining the matrices of individual waveguide sections. Input parameters for a polarizer CAD program are given, and the calculated differential phase shift and VSWR curves of a 21-iris polarizer design are described in a graph.

  1. [Nose surgical anatomy in six aesthetic subunits].

    PubMed

    Chaput, B; Lauwers, F; Lopez, R; Saboye, J; André, A; Grolleau, J-L; Chavoin, J-P

    2013-04-01

    The nose is a complex entity, combining aesthetic and functional roles. Descriptive anatomy is a fundamental science that it can be difficult to relate directly to our daily surgical activity. Reasoning in terms of aesthetic subunits to decide on his actions appeared to us so obvious. The aim of this paper is to resume the anatomical bases relevant to our daily practice in order to fully apprehend the restorative or cosmetic procedures. We discuss the limits of the systematization of these principles in nasal oncology.

  2. β-Subunit Binding Is Sufficient for Ligands to Open the Integrin αIIbβ3 Headpiece.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu-Yang; Zhu, Jianghai; Eng, Edward T; Hudson, Nathan E; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-02-26

    The platelet integrin αIIbβ3 binds to a KQAGDV motif at the fibrinogen γ-chain C terminus and to RGD motifs present in loops in many extracellular matrix proteins. These ligands bind in a groove between the integrin α and β-subunits; the basic Lys or Arg side chain hydrogen bonds to the αIIb-subunit, and the acidic Asp side chain coordinates to a metal ion held by the β3-subunit. Ligand binding induces headpiece opening, with conformational change in the β-subunit. During this opening, RGD slides in the ligand-binding pocket toward αIIb, with movement of the βI-domain β1-α1 loop toward αIIb, enabling formation of direct, charged hydrogen bonds between the Arg side chain and αIIb. Here we test whether ligand interactions with β3 suffice for stable ligand binding and headpiece opening. We find that the AGDV tetrapeptide from KQAGDV binds to the αIIbβ3 headpiece with affinity comparable with the RGDSP peptide from fibronectin. AGDV induced complete headpiece opening in solution as shown by increase in hydrodynamic radius. Soaking of AGDV into closed αIIbβ3 headpiece crystals induced intermediate states similarly to RGDSP. AGDV has very little contact with the α-subunit. Furthermore, as measured by epitope exposure, AGDV, like the fibrinogen γ C-terminal peptide and RGD, caused integrin extension on the cell surface. Thus, pushing by the β3-subunit on Asp is sufficient for headpiece opening and ligand sliding, and no pulling by the αIIb subunit on Arg is required. PMID:26631735

  3. β-Subunit Binding Is Sufficient for Ligands to Open the Integrin αIIbβ3 Headpiece*

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Fu-Yang; Zhu, Jianghai; Eng, Edward T.; Hudson, Nathan E.; Springer, Timothy A.

    2016-01-01

    The platelet integrin αIIbβ3 binds to a KQAGDV motif at the fibrinogen γ-chain C terminus and to RGD motifs present in loops in many extracellular matrix proteins. These ligands bind in a groove between the integrin α and β-subunits; the basic Lys or Arg side chain hydrogen bonds to the αIIb-subunit, and the acidic Asp side chain coordinates to a metal ion held by the β3-subunit. Ligand binding induces headpiece opening, with conformational change in the β-subunit. During this opening, RGD slides in the ligand-binding pocket toward αIIb, with movement of the βI-domain β1-α1 loop toward αIIb, enabling formation of direct, charged hydrogen bonds between the Arg side chain and αIIb. Here we test whether ligand interactions with β3 suffice for stable ligand binding and headpiece opening. We find that the AGDV tetrapeptide from KQAGDV binds to the αIIbβ3 headpiece with affinity comparable with the RGDSP peptide from fibronectin. AGDV induced complete headpiece opening in solution as shown by increase in hydrodynamic radius. Soaking of AGDV into closed αIIbβ3 headpiece crystals induced intermediate states similarly to RGDSP. AGDV has very little contact with the α-subunit. Furthermore, as measured by epitope exposure, AGDV, like the fibrinogen γ C-terminal peptide and RGD, caused integrin extension on the cell surface. Thus, pushing by the β3-subunit on Asp is sufficient for headpiece opening and ligand sliding, and no pulling by the αIIb subunit on Arg is required. PMID:26631735

  4. The sodium channel auxiliary subunits beta1 and beta2 are differentially expressed in the spinal cord of neuropathic rats.

    PubMed

    Blackburn-Munro, G; Fleetwood-Walker, S M

    1999-04-01

    Neuropathic pain is thought to arise from ectopic discharges at the site of injury within the peripheral nervous system, and is manifest as a general increase in the level of neuronal excitability within primary afferent fibres and their synaptic contacts within the spinal cord. Voltage-activated Na+ channel blockers such as lamotrigine have been shown to be clinically effective in the treatment of neuropathic pain. Na+ channels are structurally diverse comprising a principal a subunit (of which there are variable isoforms) and two auxiliary subunits termed beta1 and beta2. Both beta subunits affect the rates of channel activation and inactivation, and can modify alpha subunit density within the plasma membrane. In addition, these subunits may interact with extracellular matrix molecules to affect growth and myelination of axons. Using in situ hybridization histochemistry we have shown that the expression of the beta1 and beta2 subunits within the dorsal horn of the spinal cord of neuropathic rats is differentially regulated by a chronic constrictive injury to the sciatic nerve. At days 12-15 post-neuropathy, beta1 messenger RNA levels had increased, whereas beta2 messenger RNA levels had decreased significantly within laminae I, II on the ipsilateral side of the cord relative to the contralateral side. Within laminae III-IV beta2 messenger RNA levels showed a small but significant decrease on the ipsilateral side relative to the contralateral side, whilst expression of beta1 messenger RNA remained unchanged. Thus, differential regulation of the individual beta subunit types may (through their distinct influences on Na+ channel function) contribute to altered excitability of central neurons after neuropathic injury.

  5. Organization of Subunits in the Membrane Domain of the Bovine F-ATPase Revealed by Covalent Cross-linking*

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jennifer; Ding, ShuJing; Walpole, Thomas B.; Holding, Andrew N.; Montgomery, Martin G.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The F-ATPase in bovine mitochondria is a membrane-bound complex of about 30 subunits of 18 different kinds. Currently, ∼85% of its structure is known. The enzyme has a membrane extrinsic catalytic domain, and a membrane intrinsic domain where the turning of the enzyme's rotor is generated from the transmembrane proton-motive force. The domains are linked by central and peripheral stalks. The central stalk and a hydrophobic ring of c-subunits in the membrane domain constitute the enzyme's rotor. The external surface of the catalytic domain and membrane subunit a are linked by the peripheral stalk, holding them static relative to the rotor. The membrane domain contains six additional subunits named ATP8, e, f, g, DAPIT (diabetes-associated protein in insulin-sensitive tissues), and 6.8PL (6.8-kDa proteolipid), each with a single predicted transmembrane α-helix, but their orientation and topography are unknown. Mutations in ATP8 uncouple the enzyme and interfere with its assembly, but its roles and the roles of the other five subunits are largely unknown. We have reacted accessible amino groups in the enzyme with bifunctional cross-linking agents and identified the linked residues. Cross-links involving the supernumerary subunits, where the structures are not known, show that the C terminus of ATP8 extends ∼70 Å from the membrane into the peripheral stalk and that the N termini of the other supernumerary subunits are on the same side of the membrane, probably in the mitochondrial matrix. These experiments contribute significantly toward building up a complete structural picture of the F-ATPase. PMID:25851905

  6. β-Subunit Binding Is Sufficient for Ligands to Open the Integrin αIIbβ3 Headpiece.

    PubMed

    Lin, Fu-Yang; Zhu, Jianghai; Eng, Edward T; Hudson, Nathan E; Springer, Timothy A

    2016-02-26

    The platelet integrin αIIbβ3 binds to a KQAGDV motif at the fibrinogen γ-chain C terminus and to RGD motifs present in loops in many extracellular matrix proteins. These ligands bind in a groove between the integrin α and β-subunits; the basic Lys or Arg side chain hydrogen bonds to the αIIb-subunit, and the acidic Asp side chain coordinates to a metal ion held by the β3-subunit. Ligand binding induces headpiece opening, with conformational change in the β-subunit. During this opening, RGD slides in the ligand-binding pocket toward αIIb, with movement of the βI-domain β1-α1 loop toward αIIb, enabling formation of direct, charged hydrogen bonds between the Arg side chain and αIIb. Here we test whether ligand interactions with β3 suffice for stable ligand binding and headpiece opening. We find that the AGDV tetrapeptide from KQAGDV binds to the αIIbβ3 headpiece with affinity comparable with the RGDSP peptide from fibronectin. AGDV induced complete headpiece opening in solution as shown by increase in hydrodynamic radius. Soaking of AGDV into closed αIIbβ3 headpiece crystals induced intermediate states similarly to RGDSP. AGDV has very little contact with the α-subunit. Furthermore, as measured by epitope exposure, AGDV, like the fibrinogen γ C-terminal peptide and RGD, caused integrin extension on the cell surface. Thus, pushing by the β3-subunit on Asp is sufficient for headpiece opening and ligand sliding, and no pulling by the αIIb subunit on Arg is required.

  7. 7 CFR 51.582 - Fairly compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.582 Fairly compact. Fairly compact means that the branches on the... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fairly compact. 51.582 Section 51.582 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  8. 7 CFR 51.572 - Compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.572 Compact. Compact means that the branches on the stalk are fairly... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Compact. 51.572 Section 51.572 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  9. 7 CFR 51.572 - Compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.572 Compact. Compact means that the branches on the stalk are fairly... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Compact. 51.572 Section 51.572 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  10. 7 CFR 51.582 - Fairly compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Standards for Celery Definitions § 51.582 Fairly compact. Fairly compact means that the branches on the... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fairly compact. 51.582 Section 51.582 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections,...

  11. Rapid compaction during RNA folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Rick; Millett, Ian S.; Tate, Mark W.; Kwok, Lisa W.; Nakatani, Bradley; Gruner, Sol M.; Mochrie, Simon G. J.; Pande, Vijay; Doniach, Sebastian; Herschlag, Daniel; Pollack, Lois

    2002-04-01

    We have used small angle x-ray scattering and computer simulations with a coarse-grained model to provide a time-resolved picture of the global folding process of the Tetrahymena group I RNA over a time window of more than five orders of magnitude. A substantial phase of compaction is observed on the low millisecond timescale, and the overall compaction and global shape changes are largely complete within one second, earlier than any known tertiary contacts are formed. This finding indicates that the RNA forms a nonspecifically collapsed intermediate and then searches for its tertiary contacts within a highly restricted subset of conformational space. The collapsed intermediate early in folding of this RNA is grossly akin to molten globule intermediates in protein folding.

  12. Compact torus studies: Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Morse, E.C.

    1987-06-01

    The compact torus (CT) device has been proposed for use in some applications which are of interest in Laboratory programs in the areas of pulsed power and inertial confinement fusion. These applications involve compression and acceleration of CT plasmas. The RACE (Ring Accelerator Experiment) experimental program at Livermore has been initiated to study these applications. The work reported here involves studies of plasma physics and other aspects of these compact torus applications. The studies conducted identify specific problem areas associated with the CT device and examine these areas in some detail. This report contains studies of three particular problem areas of the CT applications. These three areas are: the general nonlinear properties of the CT as a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) equilibrium, particle simulation of the compression of the CT, with a focus on the non-MHD effects, and nonlinear RF interaction problems in the CT.

  13. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, V.A.; Ward, M.B.

    1988-05-23

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observations means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns. 7 figs.

  14. Compact portable diffraction moire interferometer

    DOEpatents

    Deason, Vance A.; Ward, Michael B.

    1989-01-01

    A compact and portable moire interferometer used to determine surface deformations of an object. The improved interferometer is comprised of a laser beam, optical and fiber optics devices coupling the beam to one or more evanescent wave splitters, and collimating lenses directing the split beam at one or more specimen gratings. Observation means including film and video cameras may be used to view and record the resultant fringe patterns.

  15. Compact planar microwave blocking filters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    U-Yen, Kongpop (Inventor); Wollack, Edward J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A compact planar microwave blocking filter includes a dielectric substrate and a plurality of filter unit elements disposed on the substrate. The filter unit elements are interconnected in a symmetrical series cascade with filter unit elements being organized in the series based on physical size. In the filter, a first filter unit element of the plurality of filter unit elements includes a low impedance open-ended line configured to reduce the shunt capacitance of the filter.

  16. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, M.L.

    1994-12-20

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module. 4 figures.

  17. Compact magnetic energy storage module

    DOEpatents

    Prueitt, Melvin L.

    1994-01-01

    A superconducting compact magnetic energy storage module in which a plurality of superconducting toroids, each having a toroidally wound superconducting winding inside a poloidally wound superconducting winding, are stacked so that the flow of electricity in each toroidally wound superconducting winding is in a direction opposite from the direction of electrical flow in other contiguous superconducting toroids. This allows for minimal magnetic pollution outside of the module.

  18. COMB: Compact embedded object simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Jason D.

    2016-06-01

    COMB supports the simulation on the sphere of compact objects embedded in a stochastic background process of specified power spectrum. Support is provided to add additional white noise and convolve with beam functions. Functionality to support functions defined on the sphere is provided by the S2 code (ascl:1606.008); HEALPix (ascl:1107.018) and CFITSIO (ascl:1010.001) are also required.

  19. 78 FR 61384 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-03

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... of this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  20. 76 FR 20044 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-11

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  1. 75 FR 62568 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-12

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact). Thus far,...

  2. 75 FR 17161 - Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-05

    ... Federal Bureau of Investigation Meeting of the Compact Council for the National Crime Prevention and... purpose of this notice is to announce a meeting of the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Council (Council) created by the National Crime Prevention and Privacy Compact Act of 1998 (Compact)....

  3. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, Mohammad; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    1996-01-01

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles.

  4. Carbonate fuel cell matrix

    DOEpatents

    Farooque, M.; Yuh, C.Y.

    1996-12-03

    A carbonate fuel cell matrix is described comprising support particles and crack attenuator particles which are made platelet in shape to increase the resistance of the matrix to through cracking. Also disclosed is a matrix having porous crack attenuator particles and a matrix whose crack attenuator particles have a thermal coefficient of expansion which is significantly different from that of the support particles, and a method of making platelet-shaped crack attenuator particles. 8 figs.

  5. Compaction Waves in Granular HMX

    SciTech Connect

    E. Kober; R. Menikoff

    1999-01-01

    Piston driven compaction waves in granular HMX are simulated with a two-dimensional continuum mechanics code in which individual grains are resolved. The constitutive properties of the grains are modeled with a hydrostatic pressure and a simple elastic-plastic model for the shear stress. Parameters are chosen to correspond to inert HMX. For a tightly packed random grain distribution (with initial porosity of 19%) we varied the piston velocity to obtain weak partly compacted waves and stronger fully compacted waves. The average stress and wave speed are compatible with the porous Hugoniot locus for uni- axial strain. However, the heterogeneities give rise to stress concentrations, which lead to localized plastic flow. For weak waves, plastic deformation is the dominant dissipative mechanism and leads to dispersed waves that spread out in time. In addition to dispersion, the granular heterogeneities give rise to subgrain spatial variation in the thermodynamic variables. The peaks in the temperature fluctuations, known as hot spots, are in the range such that they are the critical factor for initiation sensitivity.

  6. Compact Stellarator Path to DEMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyon, J. F.

    2007-11-01

    Issues for a DEMO reactor are sustaining an ignited/high-Q plasma in steady state, avoiding disruptions and large variations in power flux to the wall, adequate confinement of thermal plasma and alpha-particles, control of a burning plasma, particle and power handling, etc. Compact stellarators have key advantages -- steady-state high-plasma-density operation without external current drive or disruptions, stability without a close conducting wall or active feedback systems, and low recirculating power -- in addition to moderate plasma aspect ratio, good confinement, and high-beta potential. The ARIES-CS study established that compact stellarators can be competitive with tokamaks as reactors. Many of the issues for a compact stellarator DEMO can be answered using results from large tokamaks, ITER D-T experiments and fusion materials, technology and component development programs, in addition to stellarators in operation, under construction or in development. However, a large next-generation stellarator will be needed to address some physics issues: size scaling and confinement at higher parameters, burning plasma issues, and operation with a strongly radiative divertor. Technology issues include simpler coils, structure, and divertor fabrication, and better cost information.

  7. Subunit Arrangement and Function in NMDA Receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Furukawa,H.; Singh, S.; Mancusso, R.; Gouaux, E.

    2005-01-01

    Excitatory neurotransmission mediated by NMDA (N-methyl-D-aspartate) receptors is fundamental to the physiology of the mammalian central nervous system. These receptors are heteromeric ion channels that for activation require binding of glycine and glutamate to the NR1 and NR2 subunits, respectively. NMDA receptor function is characterized by slow channel opening and deactivation, and the resulting influx of cations initiates signal transduction cascades that are crucial to higher functions including learning and memory. Here we report crystal structures of the ligand-binding core of NR2A with glutamate and that of the NR1-NR2A heterodimer with glutamate and glycine. The NR2A-glutamate complex defines the determinants of glutamate and NMDA recognition, and the NR1-NR2A heterodimer suggests a mechanism for ligand-induced ion channel opening. Analysis of the heterodimer interface, together with biochemical and electrophysiological experiments, confirms that the NR1-NR2A heterodimer is the functional unit in tetrameric NMDA receptors and that tyrosine 535 of NR1, located in the subunit interface, modulates the rate of ion channel deactivation.

  8. Matrix with Prescribed Eigenvectors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ahmad, Faiz

    2011-01-01

    It is a routine matter for undergraduates to find eigenvalues and eigenvectors of a given matrix. But the converse problem of finding a matrix with prescribed eigenvalues and eigenvectors is rarely discussed in elementary texts on linear algebra. This problem is related to the "spectral" decomposition of a matrix and has important technical…

  9. Strong cooperativity between subunits in voltage-gated proton channels

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez, Carlos; Koch, Hans P.; Drum, Ben M.; Larsson, H. Peter

    2010-01-01

    Voltage-activated proton (HV) channels are essential components in the innate immune response. HV channels are dimeric proteins with one proton permeation pathway per subunit. It is not known how HV channels are activated by voltage and whether there is any cooperativity between subunits during voltage activation. Using cysteine accessibility measurements and voltage clamp fluorometry, we show data that are consistent with that the fourth transmembrane segment S4 functions as the voltage sensor in HV channels from Ciona intestinalis. Surprisingly, in a dimeric HV channel, S4 in both subunits have to move to activate the two proton permeation pathways. In contrast, if HV subunits are prevented from dimerizing, then the movement of a single S4 is sufficient to activate the proton permeation pathway in a subunit. These results suggest a strong cooperativity between subunits in dimeric HV channels. PMID:20023639

  10. Subunit stoichiometry of the chloroplast photosystem I complex

    SciTech Connect

    Bruce, B.D.; Malkin, R.

    1988-05-25

    A native photosystem I (PS I) complex and a PS I core complex depleted of antenna subunits has been isolated from the uniformly /sup 14/C-labeled aquatic higher plant, Lemna. These complexes have been analyzed for their subunit stoichiometry by quantitative sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis methods. The results for both preparations indicate that one copy of each high molecular mass subunit is present per PS I complex and that a single copy of most low molecular mass subunits is also present. These results suggest that iron-sulfur center X, an early PS I electron acceptor proposed to bind to the high molecular mass subunits, contains a single (4Fe-4S) cluster which is bound to a dimeric structure of high molecular mass subunits, each providing 2 cysteine residues to coordinate this cluster.

  11. Subunit structure of the phycobiliproteins of blue-green algae.

    PubMed

    Glazer, A N; Cohen-Bazire, G

    1971-07-01

    The phycobiliproteins of the blue-green algae Synechococcus sp. and Aphanocapsu sp. were characterized with respect to homogeneity, isoelectric point, and subunit composition. Each of the biliproteins consisted of two different noncovalently associated subunits, with molecular weights of about 20,000 and 16,000 for phycocyanin, 17,500 and 15,500 for allophycocyanin, and 22,000 and 20,000 for phycoerythrin. Covalently bound chromophore was associated with each subunit.

  12. Diversity of heterotrimeric G-protein γ subunits in plants

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Heterotrimeric G-proteins, consisting of three subunits Gα, Gβ and Gγ are present in most eukaryotes and mediate signaling in numerous biological processes. In plants, Gγ subunits were shown to provide functional selectivity to G-proteins. Three unconventional Gγ subunits were recently reported in Arabidopsis, rice and soybean but no structural analysis has been reported so far. Their relationship with conventional Gγ subunits and taxonomical distribution has not been yet demonstrated. Results After an extensive similarity search through plant genomes, transcriptomes and proteomes we assembled over 200 non-redundant proteins related to the known Gγ subunits. Structural analysis of these sequences revealed that most of them lack the obligatory C-terminal prenylation motif (CaaX). According to their C-terminal structures we classified the plant Gγ subunits into three distinct types. Type A consists of Gγ subunits with a putative prenylation motif. Type B subunits lack a prenylation motif and do not have any cysteine residues in the C-terminal region, while type C subunits contain an extended C-terminal domain highly enriched with cysteines. Comparative analysis of C-terminal domains of the proteins, intron-exon arrangement of the corresponding genes and phylogenetic studies suggested a common origin of all plant Gγ subunits. Conclusion Phylogenetic analyses suggest that types C and B most probably originated independently from type A ancestors. We speculate on a potential mechanism used by those Gγ subunits lacking isoprenylation motifs to anchor the Gβγ dimer to the plasma membrane and propose a new flexible nomenclature for plant Gγ subunits. Finally, in the light of our new classification, we give a word of caution about the interpretation of Gγ research in Arabidopsis and its generalization to other plant species. PMID:23113884

  13. Unified compaction curve model for tensile strength of tablets made by roller compaction and direct compression.

    PubMed

    Farber, Leon; Hapgood, Karen P; Michaels, James N; Fu, Xi-Young; Meyer, Robert; Johnson, Mary-Ann; Li, Feng

    2008-01-01

    A model that describes the relationship between roller-compaction conditions and tablet strength is proposed. The model assumes that compaction is cumulative during roller compaction and subsequent granule compaction, and compact strength (ribbon and tablet) is generated irreversibly as if strength is controlled by plastic deformation of primary particles only. Roller-compaction is treated as a compaction step where the macroscopic ribbon strength is subsequently destroyed in milling. This loss in strength is irreversible and tablets compressed from the resulting granulation are weaker than those compressed by direct compression at the same compression force. Roller-compacted ribbons were produced at a range of roll forces for three formulations and subsequently milled and compacted into tablets. Once the total compaction history is taken in account, the compaction behavior of the uncompacted blends and the roller-compacted granules ultimately follow a single master compaction curve--a unified compaction curve (UCC). The model successfully described the compaction behavior of DC grade starch and formulations of lactose monohydrate with 50% or more microcrystalline cellulose, and may be more generally applicable to systems containing significant proportions of any plastically deforming material, including MCC and starch. PMID:17689211

  14. Lung-specific loss of the laminin α3 subunit confers resistance to mechanical injury.

    PubMed

    Urich, Daniela; Eisenberg, Jessica L; Hamill, Kevin J; Takawira, Desire; Chiarella, Sergio E; Soberanes, Saul; Gonzalez, Angel; Koentgen, Frank; Manghi, Tomas; Hopkinson, Susan B; Misharin, Alexander V; Perlman, Harris; Mutlu, Gokhan M; Budinger, G R Scott; Jones, Jonathan C R

    2011-09-01

    Laminins are heterotrimeric glycoproteins of the extracellular matrix that are secreted by epithelial cells and which are crucial for the normal structure and function of the basement membrane. We have generated a mouse harboring a conditional knockout of α3 laminin (Lama3(fl/fl)), one of the main laminin subunits in the lung basement membrane. At 60 days after intratracheal treatment of adult Lama3(fl/fl) mice with an adenovirus encoding Cre recombinase (Ad-Cre), the protein abundance of α3 laminin in whole lung homogenates was more than 50% lower than that in control-treated mice, suggesting a relatively long half-life for the protein in the lung. Upon exposure to an injurious ventilation strategy (tidal volume of 35 ml per kg of body weight for 2 hours), the mice with a knockdown of the α3 laminin subunit had less severe injury, as shown by lung mechanics, histology, alveolar capillary permeability and survival when compared with Ad-Null-treated mice. Knockdown of the α3 laminin subunit resulted in evidence of lung inflammation. However, this did not account for their resistance to mechanical ventilation. Rather, the loss of α3 laminin was associated with a significant increase in the collagen content of the lungs. We conclude that the loss of α3 laminin in the alveolar epithelium results in an increase in lung collagen, which confers resistance to mechanical injury. PMID:21878500

  15. Redefining the roles of mitochondrial DNA-encoded subunits in respiratory Complex I assembly

    PubMed Central

    Vartak, Rasika; Deng, Janice; Fang, Hezhi; Bai, Yidong

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory Complex I deficiency is implicated in numerous degenerative and metabolic diseases. In particular, mutations in several mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA)-encoded Complex I subunits including ND4, ND5 and ND6 have been identified in several neurological diseases. We previously demonstrated that these subunits played essential roles in Complex I assembly which in turn affected mitochondrial function. Here, we carried out a comprehensive study of the Complex I assembly pathway. We identified a new Complex I intermediate containing both membrane and matrix arms at an early assembly stage. We find that lack of the ND6 subunit does not hinder membrane arm formation; instead it recruits ND1 and ND5 enter the intermediate. While ND4 is important for the formation of the newly identified intermediate, the addition of ND5 stabilizes the complex and is required for the critical transition from Complex I to supercomplexes assembly. As a result, the Complex I assembly pathway has been redefined in this study. PMID:25887158

  16. The Integrin β1 Subunit Regulates Paracellular Permeability of Kidney Proximal Tubule Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Elias, Bertha C.; Mathew, Sijo; Srichai, Manakan B.; Palamuttam, Riya; Bulus, Nada; Mernaugh, Glenda; Singh, Amar B.; Sanders, Charles R.; Harris, Raymond C.; Pozzi, Ambra; Zent, Roy

    2014-01-01

    Epithelial cells lining the gastrointestinal tract and kidney have different abilities to facilitate paracellular and transcellular transport of water and solutes. In the kidney, the proximal tubule allows both transcellular and paracellular transport, while the collecting duct primarily facilitates transcellular transport. The claudins and E-cadherin are major structural and functional components regulating paracellular transport. In this study we present the novel finding that the transmembrane matrix receptors, integrins, play a role in regulating paracellular transport of renal proximal tubule cells. Deleting the integrin β1 subunit in these cells converts them from a “loose” epithelium, characterized by low expression of E-cadherin and claudin-7 and high expression of claudin-2, to a “tight” epithelium with increased E-cadherin and claudin-7 expression and decreased claudin-2 expression. This effect is mediated by the integrin β1 cytoplasmic tail and does not entail β1 heterodimerization with an α-subunit or its localization to the cell surface. In addition, we demonstrate that deleting the β1 subunit in the proximal tubule of the kidney results in a major urine-concentrating defect. Thus, the integrin β1 tail plays a key role in regulating the composition and function of tight and adherens junctions that define paracellular transport properties of terminally differentiated renal proximal tubule epithelial cells. PMID:24509849

  17. Nanocrystal doped matrixes

    SciTech Connect

    Parce, J. Wallace; Bernatis, Paul; Dubrow, Robert; Freeman, William P.; Gamoras, Joel; Kan, Shihai; Meisel, Andreas; Qian, Baixin; Whiteford, Jeffery A.; Ziebarth, Jonathan

    2010-01-12

    Matrixes doped with semiconductor nanocrystals are provided. In certain embodiments, the semiconductor nanocrystals have a size and composition such that they absorb or emit light at particular wavelengths. The nanocrystals can comprise ligands that allow for mixing with various matrix materials, including polymers, such that a minimal portion of light is scattered by the matrixes. The matrixes of the present invention can also be utilized in refractive index matching applications. In other embodiments, semiconductor nanocrystals are embedded within matrixes to form a nanocrystal density gradient, thereby creating an effective refractive index gradient. The matrixes of the present invention can also be used as filters and antireflective coatings on optical devices and as down-converting layers. Processes for producing matrixes comprising semiconductor nanocrystals are also provided. Nanostructures having high quantum efficiency, small size, and/or a narrow size distribution are also described, as are methods of producing indium phosphide nanostructures and core-shell nanostructures with Group II-VI shells.

  18. (De)compaction of porous viscoelastoplastic media: Solitary porosity waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yarushina, Viktoriya M.; Podladchikov, Yuri Y.; Connolly, James A. D.

    2015-07-01

    Buoyancy-driven flow in deformable porous media is important for understanding sedimentary compaction as well as magmatic and metamorphic differentiation processes. Here mathematical analysis of the viscoplastic compaction equations is used to develop an understanding of the porosity wave instability and its sensitivity to the choice of rheological model. The conditions of propagation, size, speed, and shape of the porosity waves depend strongly on the properties of the solid rock frame. Whereas most of the previous studies on porosity waves were focused on viscous or viscoelastic mode, here we consider the ability of a solid matrix to undergo simultaneous plastic (rate-independent) and viscous (rate-dependent) deformation in parallel. Plastic yielding is identified as a cause of compaction-decompaction asymmetry in porous media—this is known to lead to a strong focusing of porous flow. Speed and amplitude of a porosity wave are given as functions of material parameters and a volume of a source region. Formulation is applicable to fluid flow in sedimentary rocks where viscous deformation is due to pressure solution as well as in deep crustal or upper mantle rocks deforming in a semibrittle regime.

  19. Functional Brain Network Classification With Compact Representation of SICE Matrices.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jianjia; Zhou, Luping; Wang, Lei; Li, Wanqing

    2015-06-01

    Recently, a sparse inverse covariance estimation (SICE) technique has been employed to model functional brain connectivity. The inverse covariance matrix (SICE matrix in short) estimated for each subject is used as a representation of brain connectivity to discriminate Alzheimers disease from normal controls. However, we observed that direct use of the SICE matrix does not necessarily give satisfying discrimination, due to its high dimensionality and the scarcity of training subjects. Looking into this problem, we argue that the intrinsic dimensionality of these SICE matrices shall be much lower, considering 1) an SICE matrix resides on a Riemannian manifold of symmetric positive definiteness matrices, and 2) human brains share common patterns of connectivity across subjects. Therefore, we propose to employ manifold-based similarity measures and kernel-based PCA to extract principal connectivity components as a compact representation of brain network. Moreover, to cater for the requirement of both discrimination and interpretation in neuroimage analysis, we develop a novel preimage estimation algorithm to make the obtained connectivity components anatomically interpretable. To verify the efficacy of our method and gain insights into SICE-based brain networks, we conduct extensive experimental study on synthetic data and real rs-fMRI data from the ADNI dataset. Our method outperforms the comparable methods and improves the classification accuracy significantly.

  20. Crosstalk between primase subunits can act to regulate primersynthesis in trans

    SciTech Connect

    Corn, Jacob E.; Pease, Paul J.; Hura, Greg L.; Berger, James M.

    2005-08-12

    The coordination of primase function within the replisome is an essential but poorly understood feature of lagging strand synthesis. By using crystallography and small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), we show that functional elements of bacterial primase transition between two dominant conformations: an extended form that uncouples a regulatory domain from its associated RNA polymerase core and a compact state that sequesters the regulatory region from the site of primer synthesis. FRET studies and priming assays reveal that the regulatory domain of one primase subunit productively associates with nucleic acid that is bound to the polymerase domain of a second protomer in trans. This intersubunit interaction allows primase to select initiation sites on template DNA and implicates the regulatory domain as a 'molecular brake' that restricts primer length. Our data suggest that the replisome may cooperatively use multiple primases and this conformational switch to control initiation frequency, processivity, and ultimately, Okazaki fragment synthesis.

  1. Compilation of small ribosomal subunit RNA structures.

    PubMed Central

    Neefs, J M; Van de Peer, Y; De Rijk, P; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1993-01-01

    The database on small ribosomal subunit RNA structure contained 1804 nucleotide sequences on April 23, 1993. This number comprises 365 eukaryotic, 65 archaeal, 1260 bacterial, 30 plastidial, and 84 mitochondrial sequences. These are stored in the form of an alignment in order to facilitate the use of the database as input for comparative studies on higher-order structure and for reconstruction of phylogenetic trees. The elements of the postulated secondary structure for each molecule are indicated by special symbols. The database is available on-line directly from the authors by ftp and can also be obtained from the EMBL nucleotide sequence library by electronic mail, ftp, and on CD ROM disk. PMID:8332525

  2. Compaction of Space Mission Wastes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisher, John; Pisharody, Suresh; Wignarajah, K.

    2004-01-01

    The current solid waste management system employed on the International Space Station (ISS) consists of compaction, storage, and disposal. Wastes such plastic food packaging and trash are compacted manually and wrapped in duct tape footballs by the astronauts. Much of the waste is simply loaded either into the empty Russian Progress vehicle for destruction on reentry or into Shuttle for return to Earth. This manual method is wasteful of crew time and does not transition well to far term missions. Different wastes onboard spacecraft vary considerably in their characteristics and in the appropriate method of management. In advanced life support systems for far term missions, recovery of resources such as water from the wastes becomes important. However waste such as plastic food packaging, which constitutes a large fraction of solid waste (roughly 21% on ISS, more on long duration missions), contains minimal recoverable resource. The appropriate management of plastic waste is waste stabilization and volume minimization rather than resource recovery. This paper describes work that has begun at Ames Research Center on development of a heat melt compactor that can be used on near term and future missions, that can minimize crew interaction, and that can handle wastes with a significant plastic composition. The heat melt compactor takes advantage of the low melting point of plastics to compact plastic materials using a combination of heat and pressure. The US Navy has demonstrated successful development of a similar unit for shipboard application. Ames is building upon the basic approach demonstrated by the Navy to develop an advanced heat melt type compactor for space mission type wastes.

  3. Influence of Binder in Iron Matrix Composites

    SciTech Connect

    Shamsuddin, S.; Jamaludin, S. B.; Hussain, Z.; Ahmad, Z. A.

    2010-03-11

    The ability to use iron and its alloys as the matrix material in composite systems is of great importance because it is the most widely used metallic material with a variety of commercially available steel grades [1]. The aim of this study is to investigate the influence of binder in particulate iron based metal matrix composites. There are four types of binder that were used in this study; Stearic Acid, Gummi Arabisch, Polyvinyl alcohol 15000 MW and Polyvinyl alcohol 22000 MW. Six different weight percentage of each binder was prepared to produce the composite materials using powder metallurgy (P/M) route; consists of dry mixing, uniaxially compacting at 750 MPa and vacuum sintering at 1100 deg. C for two hours. Their characterization included a study of density, porosity, hardness and microstructure. Results indicate that MMC was affected by the binder and stearic acid as a binder produced better properties of the composite.

  4. Two Piece Compaction Die Design

    SciTech Connect

    Coffey, Ethan N

    2010-03-01

    Compaction dies used to create europium oxide and tantalum control plates were modeled using ANSYS 11.0. Two-piece designs were considered in order to make the dies easier to assemble than the five-piece dies that were previously used. The two areas of concern were the stresses at the interior corner of the die cavity and the distortion of the cavity wall due to the interference fit between the two pieces and the pressure exerted on the die during the compaction process. A successful die design would have stresses less than the yield stress of the material and a maximum wall distortion on the order of 0.0001 in. Design factors that were investigated include the inner corner radius, the value of the interference fit, the compaction force, the size of the cavity, and the outer radius and geometry of the outer ring. The results show that for the europium oxide die, a 0.01 in. diameter wire can be used to create the cavity, leading to a 0.0055 in. radius corner, if the radial interference fit is 0.003 in. For the tantalum die, the same wire can be used with a radial interference fit of 0.001 in. Also, for the europium oxide die with a 0.003 in. interference fit, it is possible to use a wire with a diameter of 0.006 in. for the wire burning process. Adding a 10% safety factor to the compaction force tends to lead to conservative estimates of the stresses but not for the wall distortion. However, when the 10% safety factor is removed, the wall distortion is not affected enough to discard the design. Finally, regarding the europium oxide die, when the cavity walls are increased by 0.002 in. per side or the outer ring is made to the same geometry as the tantalum die, all the stresses and wall distortions are within the desired range. Thus, the recommendation is to use a 0.006 in. diameter wire and a 0.003 in. interference fit for the europium oxide die and a 0.01 in. diameter wire and a 0.001 in. interference fit for the tantalum die. The dies can also be made to have the

  5. Shock compaction of molybdenum powder

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ahrens, T. J.; Kostka, D.; Vreeland, T., Jr.; Schwarz, R. B.; Kasiraj, P.

    1983-01-01

    Shock recovery experiments which were carried out in the 9 to 12 GPa range on 1.4 distension Mo and appear adequate to compact to full density ( 45 (SIGMA)m) powders were examined. The stress levels, however, are below those calculated to be from 100 to approx. 22 GPa which a frictional heating model predicts are required to consolidate approx. 10 to 50 (SIGMA)m particles. The model predicts that powders that have a distension of m=1.6 shock pressures of 14 to 72 GPa are required to consolidate Mo powders in the 50 to 10 (SIGMA)m range.

  6. New charged anisotropic compact models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kileba Matondo, D.; Maharaj, S. D.

    2016-07-01

    We find new exact solutions to the Einstein-Maxwell field equations which are relevant in the description of highly compact stellar objects. The relativistic star is charged and anisotropic with a quark equation of state. Exact solutions of the field equations are found in terms of elementary functions. It is interesting to note that we regain earlier quark models with uncharged and charged matter distributions. A physical analysis indicates that the matter distributions are well behaved and regular throughout the stellar structure. A range of stellar masses are generated for particular parameter values in the electric field. In particular the observed mass for a binary pulsar is regained.

  7. Compact objects in Horndeski gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, Hector O.; Maselli, Andrea; Minamitsuji, Masato; Berti, Emanuele

    2016-04-01

    Horndeski gravity holds a special position as the most general extension of Einstein’s theory of general relativity (GR) with a single scalar degree of freedom and second-order field equations. Because of these features, Horndeski gravity is an attractive phenomenological playground to investigate the consequences of modifications of GR in cosmology and astrophysics. We present a review of the progress made so far in the study of compact objects (black holes (BHs) and neutron stars (NSs)) within Horndeski gravity. In particular, we review our recent work on slowly rotating BHs and present some new results on slowly rotating NSs.

  8. Simplified compact containment BWR plant

    SciTech Connect

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Tsutagawa, M.; Hiraiwa, K.; Arai, K.; Hida, T.

    2004-07-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR), which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to both energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's small power output of 300 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, internal upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) with ring-type dryers and simplified ECCS system with high pressure containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The internal upper entry CRDs reduce the height of the reactor vessel (RPV) and consequently reduce the height of the primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration below the top of the core, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC), passive auto catalytic recombiner and in-vessel retention (IVR) capability. The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. The recombiner decreases hydrogen concentration in the PCV in the case of a severe accident. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. The feasibility of CCR safety system has been confirmed by LOCA

  9. Compact Radiometers Expand Climate Knowledge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    To gain a better understanding of Earth's water, energy, and carbon cycles, NASA plans to embark on the Soil Moisture Active and Passive mission in 2015. To prepare, Goddard Space Flight Center provided Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) funding to ProSensing Inc., of Amherst, Massachusetts, to develop a compact ultrastable radiometer for sea surface salinity and soil moisture mapping. ProSensing incorporated small, low-cost, high-performance elements into just a few circuit boards and now offers two lightweight radiometers commercially. Government research agencies, university research groups, and large corporations around the world are using the devices for mapping soil moisture, ocean salinity, and wind speed.

  10. QUANTITATIVE HOMOGENEITY AND IN-CONTACT PARTICLES OF HIGH TEMPERATURE REACTORS (HTR) COMPACTS DETERMINATION VIA X-RAY TOMOGRAPHY

    SciTech Connect

    Lecomte, G.; Letang, J. M.; Tisseur, D.; Banchet, J.; Vitali, M. P.

    2008-02-28

    In AREVA Nuclear Power's High Temperature Reactor (HTR) design called ANTARES, fuel consists of compacts composed of few thousands millimetric quasi-spherical particles dispersed in a graphite matrix. Compact homogeneity, defined as the homogeneous particles spatial distribution in the matrix, as well as the possibility of obtaining particles in contact, need to be assessed since they condition the thermo-mechanical behavior of the nuclear fuel under irradiation. In this paper, image and data processing algorithms are developed to do so, based on X-Ray tomographic images.

  11. Liposome-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccines: Formulation Strategies for Subunit Antigens and Immunostimulators

    PubMed Central

    Tandrup Schmidt, Signe; Foged, Camilla; Smith Korsholm, Karen; Rades, Thomas; Christensen, Dennis

    2016-01-01

    The development of subunit vaccines has become very attractive in recent years due to their superior safety profiles as compared to traditional vaccines based on live attenuated or whole inactivated pathogens, and there is an unmet medical need for improved vaccines and vaccines against pathogens for which no effective vaccines exist. The subunit vaccine technology exploits pathogen subunits as antigens, e.g., recombinant proteins or synthetic peptides, allowing for highly specific immune responses against the pathogens. However, such antigens are usually not sufficiently immunogenic to induce protective immunity, and they are often combined with adjuvants to ensure robust immune responses. Adjuvants are capable of enhancing and/or modulating immune responses by exposing antigens to antigen-presenting cells (APCs) concomitantly with conferring immune activation signals. Few adjuvant systems have been licensed for use in human vaccines, and they mainly stimulate humoral immunity. Thus, there is an unmet demand for the development of safe and efficient adjuvant systems that can also stimulate cell-mediated immunity (CMI). Adjuvants constitute a heterogeneous group of compounds, which can broadly be classified into delivery systems or immunostimulators. Liposomes are versatile delivery systems for antigens, and they can carefully be customized towards desired immune profiles by combining them with immunostimulators and optimizing their composition, physicochemical properties and antigen-loading mode. Immunostimulators represent highly diverse classes of molecules, e.g., lipids, nucleic acids, proteins and peptides, and they are ligands for pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs), which are differentially expressed on APC subsets. Different formulation strategies might thus be required for incorporation of immunostimulators and antigens, respectively, into liposomes, and the choice of immunostimulator should ideally be based on knowledge regarding the specific PRR

  12. Incompletely compacted equilibrated ordinary chondrites

    SciTech Connect

    Sasso, M.R.; Macke, R.J.; Boesenberg, J.S.; Britt, D.T.; Rovers, M.L.; Ebel, D.S.; Friedrich, J.M.

    2010-01-22

    We document the size distributions and locations of voids present within five highly porous equilibrated ordinary chondrites using high-resolution synchrotron X-ray microtomography ({mu}CT) and helium pycnometry. We found total porosities ranging from {approx}10 to 20% within these chondrites, and with {mu}CT we show that up to 64% of the void space is located within intergranular voids within the rock. Given the low (S1-S2) shock stages of the samples and the large voids between mineral grains, we conclude that these samples experienced unusually low amounts of compaction and shock loading throughout their entire post accretionary history. With Fe metal and FeS metal abundances and grain size distributions, we show that these chondrites formed naturally with greater than average porosities prior to parent body metamorphism. These materials were not 'fluffed' on their parent body by impact-related regolith gardening or events caused by seismic vibrations. Samples of all three chemical types of ordinary chondrites (LL, L, H) are represented in this study and we conclude that incomplete compaction is common within the asteroid belt.

  13. High flux compact neutron generators

    SciTech Connect

    Reijonen, J.; Lou, T.-P.; Tolmachoff, B.; Leung, K.-N.; Verbeke, J.; Vujic, J.

    2001-06-15

    Compact high flux neutron generators are developed at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. The neutron production is based on D-D or D-T reaction. The deuterium or tritium ions are produced from plasma using either a 2 MHz or 13.56 MHz radio frequency (RF) discharge. RF-discharge yields high fraction of atomic species in the beam which enables higher neutron output. In the first tube design, the ion beam is formed using a multiple hole accelerator column. The beam is accelerated to energy of 80 keV by means of a three-electrode extraction system. The ion beam then impinges on a titanium target where either the 2.4 MeV D-D or 14 MeV D-T neutrons are generated. The MCNP computation code has predicted a neutron flux of {approximately}10{sup 11} n/s for the D-D reaction at beam intensity of 1.5 A at 150 kV. The neutron flux measurements of this tube design will be presented. Recently new compact high flux tubes are being developed which can be used for various applications. These tubes also utilize RF-discharge for plasma generation. The design of these tubes and the first measurements will be discussed in this presentation.

  14. Manufacturability of compact synchrotron mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Douglas, Gary M.

    1997-11-01

    While many of the government funded research communities over the years have put their faith and money into increasingly larger synchrotrons, such as Spring8 in Japan, and the APS in the United States, a viable market appears to exist for smaller scale, research and commercial grade, compact synchrotrons. These smaller, and less expensive machines, provide the research and industrial communities with synchrotron radiation beamline access at a portion of the cost of their larger and more powerful counterparts. A compact synchrotron, such as the Aurora-2D, designed and built by Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. of japan (SHI), is a small footprint synchrotron capable of sustaining 20 beamlines. Coupled with a Microtron injector, with 150 MeV of injection energy, an entire facility fits within a 27 meter [88.5 ft] square floorplan. The system, controlled by 2 personal computers, is capable of producing 700 MeV electron energy and 300 mA stored current. Recently, an Aurora-2D synchrotron was purchased from SHI by the University of Hiroshima. The Rocketdyne Albuquerque Operations Beamline Optics Group was approached by SHI with a request to supply a group of 16 beamline mirrors for this machine. These mirrors were sufficient to supply 3 beamlines for the Hiroshima machine. This paper will address engineering issues which arose during the design and manufacturing of these mirrors.

  15. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, Ronald Alfred; Lewis, Irwin Charles

    1997-01-01

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (i) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (ii) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (iii) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counterelectrode.

  16. Compacted carbon for electrochemical cells

    DOEpatents

    Greinke, R.A.; Lewis, I.C.

    1997-10-14

    This invention provides compacted carbon that is useful in the electrode of an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell of improved capacity selected from the group consisting of: (a) coke having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.00 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 47%; and (b) graphite having the following properties: (1) an x-ray density of at least 2.20 grams per cubic centimeters, (2) a closed porosity of no greater than 5%, and (3) an open porosity of no greater than 25%. This invention also relates to an electrode for an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising compacted carbon as described above and a binder. This invention further provides an alkali metal/carbon electrochemical cell comprising: (a) an electrode as described above, (b) a non-aqueous electrolytic solution comprising an organic aprotic solvent and an electrolytically conductive salt and an alkali metal, and (c) a counter electrode. 10 figs.

  17. A compact THz imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sešek, Aleksander; Å vigelj, Andrej; Trontelj, Janez

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this paper is the development of a compact low cost imaging THz system, usable for observation of the objects near to the system and also for stand-off detection. The performance of the system remains at the high standard of more expensive and bulkiest system on the market. It is easy to operate as it is not dependent on any fine mechanical adjustments. As it is compact and it consumes low power, also a portable system was developed for stand-off detection of concealed objects under textile or inside packages. These requirements rule out all optical systems like Time Domain Spectroscopy systems which need fine optical component positioning and requires a large amount of time to perform a scan and the image capture pixel-by-pixel. They are also almost not suitable for stand-off detection due to low output power. In the paper the antenna - bolometer sensor microstructure is presented and the THz system described. Analysis and design guidelines for the bolometer itself are discussed. The measurement results for both near and stand-off THz imaging are also presented.

  18. Compact submanifolds supporting singular interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Kaynak, Burak Tevfik Teoman Turgut, O.

    2013-12-15

    A quantum particle moving under the influence of singular interactions on embedded surfaces furnish an interesting example from the spectral point of view. In these problems, the possible occurrence of a bound-state is perhaps the most important aspect. Such systems can be introduced as quadratic forms and generically they do not require renormalization. Yet an alternative path through the resolvent is also beneficial to study various properties. In the present work, we address these issues for compact surfaces embedded in a class of ambient manifolds. We discover that there is an exact bound state solution written in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold for a range of coupling strengths. Moreover, we develop techniques to estimate bounds on the ground state energy when several surfaces, each of which admits a bound state solution, coexist. -- Highlights: •Schrödinger operator with singular interactions supported on compact submanifolds. •Exact bound-state solution in terms of the heat kernel of the ambient manifold. •Generalization of the variational approach to a collection of submanifolds. •Existence of a lower bound for a unique ground state energy.

  19. Compact Microscope Imaging System Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McDowell, Mark

    2001-01-01

    The Compact Microscope Imaging System (CMIS) is a diagnostic tool with intelligent controls for use in space, industrial, medical, and security applications. The CMIS can be used in situ with a minimum amount of user intervention. This system, which was developed at the NASA Glenn Research Center, can scan, find areas of interest, focus, and acquire images automatically. Large numbers of multiple cell experiments require microscopy for in situ observations; this is only feasible with compact microscope systems. CMIS is a miniature machine vision system that combines intelligent image processing with remote control capabilities. The software also has a user-friendly interface that can be used independently of the hardware for post-experiment analysis. CMIS has potential commercial uses in the automated online inspection of precision parts, medical imaging, security industry (examination of currency in automated teller machines and fingerprint identification in secure entry locks), environmental industry (automated examination of soil/water samples), biomedical field (automated blood/cell analysis), and microscopy community. CMIS will improve research in several ways: It will expand the capabilities of MSD experiments utilizing microscope technology. It may be used in lunar and Martian experiments (Rover Robot). Because of its reduced size, it will enable experiments that were not feasible previously. It may be incorporated into existing shuttle orbiter and space station experiments, including glove-box-sized experiments as well as ground-based experiments.

  20. Hydrostatic compaction of Microtherm HT.

    SciTech Connect

    Broome, Scott Thomas; Bauer, Stephen J.

    2010-09-01

    Two samples of jacketed Microtherm{reg_sign}HT were hydrostatically pressurized to maximum pressures of 29,000 psi to evaluate both pressure-volume response and change in bulk modulus as a function of density. During testing, each of the two samples exhibited large irreversible compactive volumetric strains with only small increases in pressure; however at volumetric strains of approximately 50%, the Microtherm{reg_sign}HT stiffened noticeably at ever increasing rates. At the maximum pressure of 29,000 psi, the volumetric strains for both samples were approximately 70%. Bulk modulus, as determined from hydrostatic unload/reload loops, increased by more than two-orders of magnitude (from about 4500 psi to over 500,000 psi) from an initial material density of {approx}0.3 g/cc to a final density of {approx}1.1 g/cc. An empirical fit to the density vs. bulk modulus data is K = 492769{rho}{sup 4.6548}, where K is the bulk modulus in psi, and {rho} is the material density in g/cm{sup 3}. The porosity decreased from 88% to {approx}20% indicating that much higher pressures would be required to compact the material fully.

  1. Cold compaction of water ice

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Durham, W.B.; McKinnon, W.B.; Stern, L.A.

    2005-01-01

    Hydrostatic compaction of granulated water ice was measured in laboratory experiments at temperatures 77 K to 120 K. We performed step-wise hydrostatic pressurization tests on 5 samples to maximum pressures P of 150 MPa, using relatively tight (0.18-0.25 mm) and broad (0.25-2.0 mm) starting grain-size distributions. Compaction change of volume is highly nonlinear in P, typical for brittle, granular materials. No time-dependent creep occurred on the lab time scale. Significant residual porosity (???0.10) remains even at highest P. Examination by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) reveals a random configuration of fractures and broad distribution of grain sizes, again consistent with brittle behavior. Residual porosity appears as smaller, well-supported micropores between ice fragments. Over the interior pressures found in smaller midsize icy satellites and Kuiper Belt objects (KBOs), substantial porosity can be sustained over solar system history in the absence of significant heating and resultant sintering. Copyright 2005 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Dense and Homogeneous Compaction of Fine Ceramic and Metallic Powders: High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, Hiroyuki Y.

    2008-02-15

    High-Speed Centrifugal Compaction Process (HCP) is a variation of colloidal compacting method, in which the powders sediment under huge centrifugal force. Compacting mechanism of HCP differs from conventional colloidal process such as slip casting. The unique compacting mechanism of HCP leads to a number of characteristics such as a higher compacting speed, wide applicability for net shape formation, flawless microstructure of the green compacts, etc. However, HCP also has several deteriorative characteristics that must be overcome to fully realize this process' full potential.

  3. Brittle and compaction creep in porous sandstone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heap, Michael; Brantut, Nicolas; Baud, Patrick; Meredith, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Strain localisation in the Earth's crust occurs at all scales, from the fracture of grains at the microscale to crustal-scale faulting. Over the last fifty years, laboratory rock deformation studies have exposed the variety of deformation mechanisms and failure modes of rock. Broadly speaking, rock failure can be described as either dilatant (brittle) or compactive. While dilatant failure in porous sandstones is manifest as shear fracturing, their failure in the compactant regime can be characterised by either distributed cataclastic flow or the formation of localised compaction bands. To better understand the time-dependency of strain localisation (shear fracturing and compaction band growth), we performed triaxial deformation experiments on water-saturated Bleurswiller sandstone (porosity = 24%) under a constant stress (creep) in the dilatant and compactive regimes, with particular focus on time-dependent compaction band formation in the compactive regime. Our experiments show that inelastic strain accumulates at a constant stress in the brittle and compactive regimes leading to the development of shear fractures and compaction bands, respectively. While creep in the dilatant regime is characterised by an increase in porosity and, ultimately, an acceleration in axial strain to shear failure (as observed in previous studies), compaction creep is characterised by a reduction in porosity and a gradual deceleration in axial strain. The overall deceleration in axial strain, AE activity, and porosity change during creep compaction is punctuated by excursions interpreted as the formation of compaction bands. The growth rate of compaction bands formed during creep is lower as the applied differential stress, and hence background creep strain rate, is decreased, although the inelastic strain required for a compaction band remains constant over strain rates spanning several orders of magnitude. We find that, despite the large differences in strain rate and growth rate

  4. The light subunit of system bo,+ is fully functional in the absence of the heavy subunit

    PubMed Central

    Reig, Núria; Chillarón, Josep; Bartoccioni, Paola; Fernández, Esperanza; Bendahan, Annie; Zorzano, Antonio; Kanner, Baruch; Palacín, Manuel; Bertran, Joan

    2002-01-01

    The heteromeric amino acid transporters are composed of a type II glycoprotein and a non-glycosylated polytopic membrane protein. System bo,+ exchanges dibasic for neutral amino acids. It is composed of rBAT and bo,+AT, the latter being the polytopic membrane subunit. Mutations in either of them cause malfunction of the system, leading to cystinuria. bo,+AT-reconstituted systems from HeLa or MDCK cells catalysed transport of arginine that was totally dependent on the presence of one of the bo,+ substrates inside the liposomes. rBAT was essential for the cell surface expression of bo,+AT, but it was not required for reconstituted bo,+AT transport activity. No system bo,+ transport was detected in liposomes derived from cells expressing rBAT alone. The reconstituted bo,+AT showed kinetic asymmetry. Expressing the cystinuria-specific mutant A354T of bo,+AT in HeLa cells together with rBAT resulted in defective arginine uptake in whole cells, which was paralleled by the reconstituted bo,+AT activity. Thus, subunit bo,+AT by itself is sufficient to catalyse transmembrane amino acid exchange. The polytopic subunits may also be the catalytic part in other heteromeric transporters. PMID:12234930

  5. The diversity of GABA(A) receptor subunit distribution in the normal and Huntington's disease human brain.

    PubMed

    Waldvogel, H J; Faull, R L M

    2015-01-01

    GABA(A) receptors are assembled into pentameric receptor complexes from a total of 19 different subunits derived from a variety of different subunit classes (α1-6, β1-3, γ1-3, δ, ɛ, θ, and π) which surround a central chloride ion channel. GABA(A) receptor complexes are distributed heterogeneously throughout the brain and spinal cord and are activated by the extensive GABAergic inhibitory system. In this chapter, we describe the heterogeneous distribution of six of the most widely distributed subunits (α1, α2, α3, β2,3, and γ2) throughout the human basal ganglia. This review describes the studies we have carried out on the normal and Huntington's disease human basal ganglia using autoradiographic labeling and immunohistochemistry in the human basal ganglia. GABA(A) receptors are known to react to changing conditions in the brain in neurological disorders, especially in Huntington's disease and display a high degree of plasticity which is thought to compensate for loss of function caused by disease. In Huntington's disease, the variable loss of GABAergic medium spiny striatopallidal projection neurons is associated with a loss of GABA(A) receptor subunits in the striosome and/or the matrix compartments of the striatum. By contrast in the globus pallidus, a loss of the GABAergic striatal projection neurons results in a dramatic upregulation of subunits on the large postsynaptic pallidal neurons; this is thought to be a compensatory plastic mechanism resulting from the loss of striatal GABAergic input. Most interestingly, our studies have revealed that the subventricular zone overlying the caudate nucleus contains a variety of proliferating progenitor stem cells that possess a heterogeneity of GABA(A) receptor subunits which may play a role in human brain repair mechanisms.

  6. Automatic switching matrix

    DOEpatents

    Schlecht, Martin F.; Kassakian, John G.; Caloggero, Anthony J.; Rhodes, Bruce; Otten, David; Rasmussen, Neil

    1982-01-01

    An automatic switching matrix that includes an apertured matrix board containing a matrix of wires that can be interconnected at each aperture. Each aperture has associated therewith a conductive pin which, when fully inserted into the associated aperture, effects electrical connection between the wires within that particular aperture. Means is provided for automatically inserting the pins in a determined pattern and for removing all the pins to permit other interconnecting patterns.

  7. Epitopes from two soybean glycinin subunits antigenic in pigs

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background: Glycinin is a seed storage protein in soybean (Glycine max) that is allergenic in pigs. Glycinin is a hexamer composed of subunits consisting of a basic and acidic portion joined by disulfide bridges. There are 5 glycinin subunits designated Gy1-Gy5. Results: Twenty seven out of 30 pi...

  8. The Development and Institutionalization of Subunit Power in Organizations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boeker, Warren

    1989-01-01

    Examines the effects of founding events on the evolution of subunit importance in the semiconductor industry from 1958 to 1985. Distributions of power and subunit importance represent not only influences of current conditions, but also vestiges of earlier events, including the institution's founding. Includes 55 references. (MLH)

  9. Proteopedia Entry: The Large Ribosomal Subunit of "Haloarcula Marismortui"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Decatur, Wayne A.

    2010-01-01

    This article presents a "Proteopedia" page that shows the refined version of the structure of the "Haloarcula" large ribosomal subunit as solved by the laboratories of Thomas Steitz and Peter Moore. The landmark structure is of great impact as it is the first atomic-resolution structure of the highly conserved ribosomal subunit which harbors…

  10. Observations on infiltration of silicon carbide compacts with an aluminium alloy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Asthana, R.; Rohatgi, P. K.

    1992-01-01

    The melt infiltration of ceramic particulates permits an opportunity to observe such fundamental materials phenomena as nucleation, dynamic wetting and growth in constrained environments. Experimental observations are presented on the infiltration behavior and matrix microstructures that form when porous compacts of platelet-shaped single crystals of alpha- (hexagonal) silicon carbide are infiltrated with a liquid 2014 Al alloy. The infiltration process involved counter gravity infiltration of suitably tamped and preheated compacts of silicon carbide platelets under an external pressure in a special pressure chamber for a set period, then by solidification of the infiltrant metal in the interstices of the bed at atmospheric pressure.

  11. Compact Solid State Cooling Systems: Compact MEMS Electrocaloric Module

    SciTech Connect

    2010-10-01

    BEETIT Project: UCLA is developing a novel solid-state cooling technology to translate a recent scientific discovery of the so-called giant electrocaloric effect into commercially viable compact cooling systems. Traditional air conditioners use noisy, vapor compression systems that include a polluting liquid refrigerant to circulate within the air conditioner, absorb heat, and pump the heat out into the environment. Electrocaloric materials achieve the same result by heating up when placed within an electric field and cooling down when removed—effectively pumping heat out from a cooler to warmer environment. This electrocaloric-based solid state cooling system is quiet and does not use liquid refrigerants. The innovation includes developing nano-structured materials and reliable interfaces for heat exchange. With these innovations and advances in micro/nano-scale manufacturing technologies pioneered by semiconductor companies, UCLA is aiming to extend the performance/reliability of the cooling module.

  12. Mixed matrix membrane development.

    PubMed

    Kulprathipanja, Santi

    2003-03-01

    Two types of mixed matrix membranes were developed by UOP in the late 1980s. The first type includes adsorbent polymers, such as silicalite-cellulose acetate (CA), NaX-CA, and AgX-CA mixed matrix membranes. The silicalite-CA has a CO(2)/H(2) selectivity of 5.15 +/- 2.2. In contrast, the CA membrane has a CO(2)/H(2) selectivity of 0.77 +/- 0.06. The second type of mixed matrix membrane is PEG-silicone rubber. The PEG-silicone rubber mixed matrix membrane has high selectivity for polar gases, such as SO(2), NH(3), and H(2)S.

  13. Rapid Sintering of Nano-Diamond Compacts

    SciTech Connect

    Osipov, A.; Nauyoks, S; Zerda, T; Zaporozhets, O

    2009-01-01

    Diamond compacts were sintered from nano-size diamond crystals at high pressure, 8 GPa, and temperature above 1500 degrees C for very short times ranging from 5 to 11 s. Structure and mechanical properties of the compacts have been characterized. Although we have not completely avoided graphitization of diamonds, the amount of graphite produced was low, less than 2%, and despite relatively high porosity, the compacts were characterized by high hardness, bulk and Young moduli.

  14. Geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit, and methods of use

    DOEpatents

    Croteau, Rodney B.; Burke, Charles C.; Wildung, Mark R.

    2001-10-16

    A cDNA encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit from peppermint has been isolated and sequenced, and the corresponding amino acid sequence has been determined. Replicable recombinant cloning vehicles are provided which code for geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit). In another aspect, modified host cells are provided that have been transformed, transfected, infected and/or injected with a recombinant cloning vehicle and/or DNA sequence encoding geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit. In yet another aspect, the present invention provides isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase protein comprising an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase large subunit protein and an isolated, recombinant geranyl diphosphate synthase small subunit protein. Thus, systems and methods are provided for the recombinant expression of geranyl diphosphate synthase.

  15. Periostin Promotes Atrioventricular Mesenchyme Matrix Invasion and Remodeling Mediated by Integrin Signaling through Rho/PI 3-Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Butcher, Jonathan T.; Norris, Russell A.; Hoffman, Stanley; Mjaatvedt, Corey H.; Markwald, Roger R.

    2007-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that extracellular matrix components may play a signaling role in embryonic valve development. We have previously identified the spatiotemporal expression patterns of periostin in developing valves, but its function during this process is largely unknown. To evaluate the functional role periostin plays during valvulogenesis, two separate three-dimensional culture assay systems, which model chick atrioventricular cushion development, were employed. These assays demonstrated that cushion mesenchymal cells adhered and spread on purified periostin in a dose responsive manner, similar to collagen I and fibronectin via αvβ3 and β1 integrin pairs. Periostin overexpression resulted in enhanced mesenchyme invasion through 3D collagen gels and increased matrix compaction. This invasion was dependent on αvβ3 more than β1 integrin signaling, and was mediated differentially by Rho kinase and PI 3-kinase. Both matrix invasion and compaction were associated with a colocalization of periostin and β1 integrin expression to migratory cell phenotype in both surface and deep cells. The Rho/PI 3-kinase pathway also differentially mediated matrix compaction. Both Rho and PI 3-kinase were involved in normal cushion mesenchyme matrix compaction, but only PI 3-kinase was required for the enhanced matrix compaction due to periostin. Taken together, these results highlight periostin as a mediator of matrix remodeling by cushion mesenchyme towards a mature valve structure. PMID:17070513

  16. A revised model for AMP-activated protein kinase structure: The alpha-subunit binds to both the beta- and gamma-subunits although there is no direct binding between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

    PubMed

    Wong, Kelly A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2006-11-24

    The 5'-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master sensor for cellular metabolic energy state. It is activated by a high AMP/ATP ratio and leads to metabolic changes that conserve energy and utilize alternative cellular fuel sources. The kinase is composed of a heterotrimeric protein complex containing a catalytic alpha-subunit, an AMP-binding gamma-subunit, and a scaffolding beta-subunit thought to bind directly both the alpha- and gamma-subunits. Here, we use coimmunoprecipitation of proteins in transiently transfected cells to show that the alpha2-subunit binds directly not only to the beta-subunit, confirming previous work, but also to the gamma1-subunit. Deletion analysis of the alpha2-subunit reveals that the C-terminal 386-552 residues are sufficient to bind to the beta-subunit. The gamma1-subunit binds directly to the alpha2-subunit at two interaction sites, one within the catalytic domain consisting of alpha2 amino acids 1-312 and a second within residues 386-552. Binding of the alpha2 and the gamma1-subunits was not affected by 400 mum AMP or ATP. Furthermore, we show that the beta-subunit C terminus is essential for binding to the alpha2-subunit but, in contrast to previous work, the beta-subunit does not bind directly to the gamma1-subunit. Taken together, this study presents a new model for AMPK heterotrimer structure where through its C terminus the beta-subunit binds to the alpha-subunit that, in turn, binds to the gamma-subunit. There is no direct interaction between the beta- and gamma-subunits.

  17. Hidden secrets of deformation: Impact-induced compaction within a CV chondrite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Forman, L. V.; Bland, P. A.; Timms, N. E.; Collins, G. S.; Davison, T. M.; Ciesla, F. J.; Benedix, G. K.; Daly, L.; Trimby, P. W.; Yang, L.; Ringer, S. P.

    2016-10-01

    The CV3 Allende is one of the most extensively studied meteorites in worldwide collections. It is currently classified as S1-essentially unshocked-using the classification scheme of Stöffler et al. (1991), however recent modelling suggests the low porosity observed in Allende indicates the body should have undergone compaction-related deformation. In this study, we detail previously undetected evidence of impact through use of Electron Backscatter Diffraction mapping to identify deformation microstructures in chondrules, AOAs and matrix grains. Our results demonstrate that forsterite-rich chondrules commonly preserve crystal-plastic microstructures (particularly at their margins); that low-angle boundaries in deformed matrix grains of olivine have a preferred orientation; and that disparities in deformation occur between chondrules, surrounding and non-adjacent matrix grains. We find heterogeneous compaction effects present throughout the matrix, consistent with a highly porous initial material. Given the spatial distribution of these crystal-plastic deformation microstructures, we suggest that this is evidence that Allende has undergone impact-induced compaction from an initially heterogeneous and porous parent body. We suggest that current shock classifications (Stöffler et al., 1991) relying upon data from chondrule interiors do not constrain the complete shock history of a sample.

  18. Synaptic GABAA Receptor Clustering without the γ2 Subunit

    PubMed Central

    Kerti-Szigeti, Katalin

    2014-01-01

    Rapid activation of postsynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAARs) is crucial in many neuronal functions, including the synchronization of neuronal ensembles and controlling the precise timing of action potentials. Although the γ2 subunit is believed to be essential for the postsynaptic clustering of GABAARs, synaptic currents have been detected in neurons obtained from γ2−/− mice. To determine the role of the γ2 subunit in synaptic GABAAR enrichment, we performed a spatially and temporally controlled γ2 subunit deletion by injecting Cre-expressing viral vectors into the neocortex of GABAARγ277Ilox mice. Whole-cell recordings revealed the presence of miniature IPSCs in Cre+ layer 2/3 pyramidal cells (PCs) with unchanged amplitudes and rise times, but significantly prolonged decays. Such slowly decaying currents could be evoked in PCs by action potentials in presynaptic fast-spiking interneurons. Freeze-fracture replica immunogold labeling revealed the presence of the α1 and β3 subunits in perisomatic synapses of cells that lack the γ2 subunit. Miniature IPSCs in Cre+ PCs were insensitive to low concentrations of flurazepam, providing a pharmacological confirmation of the lack of the γ2 subunit. Receptors assembled from only αβ subunits were unlikely because Zn2+ did not block the synaptic currents. Pharmacological experiments indicated that the αβγ3 receptor, rather than the αβδ, αβε, or αβγ1 receptors, was responsible for the slowly decaying IPSCs. Our data demonstrate the presence of IPSCs and the synaptic enrichment of the α1 and β3 subunits and suggest that the γ3 subunit is the most likely candidate for clustering GABAARs at synapses in the absence of the γ2 subunit. PMID:25080584

  19. Modification of K+ channel–drug interactions by ancillary subunits

    PubMed Central

    Bett, Glenna C L; Rasmusson, Randall L

    2008-01-01

    Reconciling ion channel α-subunit expression with native ionic currents and their pharmacological sensitivity in target organs has proved difficult. In native tissue, many K+ channel α-subunits co-assemble with ancillary subunits, which can profoundly affect physiological parameters including gating kinetics and pharmacological interactions. In this review, we examine the link between voltage-gated potassium ion channel pharmacology and the biophysics of ancillary subunits. We propose that ancillary subunits can modify the interaction between pore blockers and ion channels by three distinct mechanisms: changes in (1) binding site accessibility; (2) orientation of pore-lining residues; (3) the ability of the channel to undergo post-binding conformational changes. Each of these subunit-induced changes has implications for gating, drug affinity and use dependence of their respective channel complexes. A single subunit may modulate its associated α-subunit by more than one of these mechanisms. Voltage-gated potassium channels are the site of action of many therapeutic drugs. In addition, potassium channels interact with drugs whose primary target is another channel, e.g. the calcium channel blocker nifedipine, the sodium channel blocker quinidine, etc. Even when K+ channel block is the intended mode of action, block of related channels in non-target organs, e.g. the heart, can result in major and potentially lethal side-effects. Understanding factors that determine specificity, use dependence and other properties of K+ channel drug binding are therefore of vital clinical importance. Ancillary subunits play a key role in determining these properties in native tissue, and so understanding channel–subunit interactions is vital to understanding clinical pharmacology. PMID:18096604

  20. Structural modeling of the catalytic subunit-regulatory subunit dimeric complex of the camp-dependent protein kinase.

    SciTech Connect

    Tung, C-S; Gallagher, S. C.; Walsh, D. A.; Trewhella, J.

    2001-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) is a multifunctional kinase that serves as a prototype for understanding second messenger signaling and protein phosphorylation. In the absence of a cAMP signal, PKA exists as a dimer of dimers, consisting of two regulatory (R) and two catalystic (C) subunits. Based on experimentally derived data (i.e., crystal structures of the R and C subunits, mutagenesis data identifying points of subunit-subunit contacts), the neutron scattering derived model for the heterodimer (Zhao et al., 1998) and using a set of computational approaches (homology modeling, Monte Carlo simulation), they have developed a high-resolution model of the RII{alpha}-C{alpha} dimer. The nature of the subunit-subunit interface was studied. The model reveals an averaged size dimer interface (2100 Angstrom{sup 2}) that is distant from the pseudo-substrate binding site on the C subunit. The additional contacts made by the pseudosubstrate increases the stability of the dimeric complex. Based on a set of R-C dimer structures derived using a simulated annealing approach, specific interactions (hydrogen bonds) between the two subunits and were identified.

  1. A preformed compact ribosome-binding domain in the cricket paralysis-like virus IRES RNAs

    PubMed Central

    COSTANTINO, DAVID; KIEFT, JEFFREY S.

    2005-01-01

    The internal ribosome site RNA of the cricket paralysis-like viruses (CrPV-like) binds directly to the ribosome, assembling the translation machinery without initiation factors. This mechanism does not require initiator tRNA, and translation starts from a non-AUG codon. A wealth of biochemical data has yielded a working model for this process, but the three-dimensional structure and biophysical characteristics of the unbound CrPV-like IRES RNAs are largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that the CrPV-like IRESes prefold into a two-part structure in the presence of magnesium ions. The largest part is a prefolded compact RNA domain that shares folding and structural characteristics with other compactly folded RNAs such as group I intron RNAs and RNase P RNA. Chemical probing reveals that the CrPV-like IRES’ compact domain contains RNA helices that are packed tightly enough to exclude solvent, and analytical ultracentrifugation indicates a large change in the shape of the IRES upon folding. Formation of this compact domain is necessary for binding of the 40S subunit, and the structural organization of the unbound IRES RNA is consistent with the hypothesis that the IRES is functionally and structurally preorganized before ribosome binding. PMID:15701733

  2. A compact versatile femtosecond spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagarajan, V.; Johnson, E.; Schellenberg, P.; Parson, W.; Windeler, R.

    2002-12-01

    A compact apparatus for femtosecond pump-probe experiments is described. The apparatus is based on a cavity-dumped titanium:sapphire laser. Probe pulses are generated by focusing weak (˜1 nJ) pulses into a microstructure fiber that produces broadband continuum pulses with high efficiency. With the pump pulses compressed and probe pulses uncompressed, the rise time of the pump-probe signals is <100 fs. The 830 nm pump pulses are also frequency doubled to generate light for excitation at 415 nm. The versatility of the spectrometer is demonstrated by exciting molecules at either 830 or 415 nm, and probing at wavelengths ranging from 500 to 950 nm. Some results on the green fluorescent protein are presented.

  3. A Compact Wakefield Measurement Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Power, J. G.; Gai, W.

    2015-10-01

    The conceptual design of a compact, photoinjector-based, facility for high precision measurements of wakefields is presented. This work is motivated by the need for a thorough understanding of beam induced wakefield effects for any future linear collider. We propose to use a high brightness photoinjector to generate (approximately) a 2 nC, 2 mm-mrad drive beam at 20 MeV to excite wakefields and a second photoinjector to generate a 5 MeV, variably delayed, trailing witness beam to probe both the longitudinal and transverse wakefields in the structure under test. Initial estimates show that we can detect a minimum measurable dipole transverse wake function of 0.1 V/pC/m/mm and a minimum measurable monopole longitudinal wake function of 2.5 V/pC/m. Simulations results for the high brightness photoinjector, calculations of the facility's wakefield measurement resolution, and the facility layout are presented.

  4. Compact anti-radon facility

    SciTech Connect

    Fajt, L.; Kouba, P.; Mamedov, F.; Smolek, K.; Štekl, I.

    2015-08-17

    Suppression of radon background is one of main tasks in ultra-low background experiments. The most promising technique for suppression of radon is its adsorption on charcoal. Within the frame of the NEMO-3 experiment, radon trapping facility (RTF) was installed in Modane underground laboratory in 2004. Based on long-term experience with this facility a new compact transportable anti-radon facility was constructed in cooperation among IEAP CTU, SÚRO and ATEKO company. The device provides 20m{sup 3}/h of purified air (air radon activity at the output ∼10mBq/m{sup 3}). The basic features and preliminary results of anti-radon device testing are presented.

  5. Compact Microwave Fourier Spectrum Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savchenkov, Anatoliy; Matsko, Andrey; Strekalov, Dmitry

    2009-01-01

    A compact photonic microwave Fourier spectrum analyzer [a Fourier-transform microwave spectrometer, (FTMWS)] with no moving parts has been proposed for use in remote sensing of weak, natural microwave emissions from the surfaces and atmospheres of planets to enable remote analysis and determination of chemical composition and abundances of critical molecular constituents in space. The instrument is based on a Bessel beam (light modes with non-zero angular momenta) fiber-optic elements. It features low power consumption, low mass, and high resolution, without a need for any cryogenics, beyond what is achievable by the current state-of-the-art in space instruments. The instrument can also be used in a wide-band scatterometer mode in active radar systems.

  6. Compact hybrid particulate collector (COHPAC)

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, R.

    1992-10-27

    This patent describes a method for retrofit filtering of particulates in a flue gas from a combustion source having an existing conventional electrostatic precipitator connected thereto and a smoke stack connected to the precipitator. It comprises: removing at least one discharge electrode and collecting electrode from within the housing of the electrostatic precipitator; attaching a tubesheet within the housing; supporting a compact baghouse filter within the separate filter section by the tubesheet; whereby the remaining discharge electrodes and corresponding collecting electrodes in the electrostatis precipitator serve to remove a majority of particulates form the flue gas and impart a residual charge on remaining particulates discharged to the separate filter section, and the remaining particulates are collected by the baghouse filter before the residual electric charge substantially dissipates.

  7. Compact Quantum Cascade Laser Transmitter

    SciTech Connect

    Anheier, Norman C.; Hatchell, Brian K.; Gervais, Kevin L.; Wojcik, Michael D.; Krishnaswami, Kannan; Bernacki, Bruce E.

    2009-04-01

    ): In this paper we present design considerations, thermal and optical modeling results, and device performance for a ruggedized, compact laser transmitter that utilizes a room temperature quantum cascade (QC) laser source. The QC laser transmitter is intended for portable mid-infrared (3-12 µm) spectroscopy applications, where the atmospheric transmission window is relatively free of water vapor interference and where the molecular rotational vibration absorption features can be used to detect and uniquely identify chemical compounds of interest. Initial QC laser-based sensor development efforts were constrained by the complications of cryogenic operation. However, improvements in both QC laser designs and fabrication processes have provided room-temperature devices that now enable significant miniaturization and integration potential for national security, environmental monitoring, atmospheric science, and industrial safety applications.

  8. Experimental studies of compact toroids

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    The Berkeley Compact Toroid Experiment (BCTX) device is a plasma device with a Marshall-gun generated, low aspect ratio toroidal plasma. The device is capable of producing spheromak-type discharges and may, with some modification, produce low-aspect ratio tokamak configurations. A unique aspect of this experimenal devie is its large lower hybrid (LH) heating system, which consists of two 450MHz klystron tubes generating 20 megawatts each into a brambilla-type launching structure. Successful operation with one klystron at virtually full power (18 MW) has been accomplished with 110 {mu}s pulse length. A second klystron is currently installed in its socket and magnet but has not been added to the RF drive system. This report describes current activities and accomplishments and describes the anticipated results of next year's activity.

  9. General Relativity&Compact Stars

    SciTech Connect

    Glendenning, Norman K.

    2005-08-16

    Compact stars--broadly grouped as neutron stars and white dwarfs--are the ashes of luminous stars. One or the other is the fate that awaits the cores of most stars after a lifetime of tens to thousands of millions of years. Whichever of these objects is formed at the end of the life of a particular luminous star, the compact object will live in many respects unchanged from the state in which it was formed. Neutron stars themselves can take several forms--hyperon, hybrid, or strange quark star. Likewise white dwarfs take different forms though only in the dominant nuclear species. A black hole is probably the fate of the most massive stars, an inaccessible region of spacetime into which the entire star, ashes and all, falls at the end of the luminous phase. Neutron stars are the smallest, densest stars known. Like all stars, neutron stars rotate--some as many as a few hundred times a second. A star rotating at such a rate will experience an enormous centrifugal force that must be balanced by gravity or else it will be ripped apart. The balance of the two forces informs us of the lower limit on the stellar density. Neutron stars are 10{sup 14} times denser than Earth. Some neutron stars are in binary orbit with a companion. Application of orbital mechanics allows an assessment of masses in some cases. The mass of a neutron star is typically 1.5 solar masses. They can therefore infer their radii: about ten kilometers. Into such a small object, the entire mass of our sun and more, is compressed.

  10. Ductile compaction in volcanic conduits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wadsworth, Fabian; Vasseur, Jeremie; Lavallée, Yan; Scheu, Bettina; Dingwell, Donald

    2014-05-01

    Silicic magmas typically outgas through connected pore and crack networks with a high gas permeability without the need for decoupled movement of pores in the melt. It is the efficiency with which this process can occur which governs the pressure in the pore network. However, such a connected coupled network is generally mechanically unstable and will relax until volume equilibrium when the pores become smaller and isolated. Consequently, gas permeability can be reduced during densification. Cycles of outgassing events recorded in gas monitoring data show that permeable flow of volatiles is often transient, which is interpreted to reflect magma densification and the closing of pore-networks. Understanding the timescale over which this densification process occurs is critical to refining conduit models that seek to predict the pressure evolution in a pore-network leading to eruptions. We conduct uniaxial compaction experiments to parameterize non-linear creep and relaxation processes that occur in magmas with total pore fractions 0.2-0.85. We analyze our results by applying both viscous sintering and viscoelastic deformation theory to test the applicability of currently accepted models to flow dynamics in the uppermost conduit involving highly porous magmas. We show that purely ductile compaction can occur rapidly and that pore networks can close over timescales analogous to the inter-eruptive periods observed during classic cyclic eruptions such as those at Soufriere Hills volcano, Montserrat, in 1997. At upper-conduit axial stresses (0.1-5 MPa) and magmatic temperatures (830-900 oC), we show that magmas can evolve to porosities analogous to dome lavas erupted at the same volcano. Such dramatic densification events over relatively short timescales and in the absence of brittle deformation show that permeable flow will be inhibited at upper conduit levels. We therefore propose that outgassing is a key feature at many silicic volcanoes and should be incorporated into

  11. AGR-1 Fuel Compact 6-3-2 Post-Irradiation Examination Results

    SciTech Connect

    Paul demkowicz; jason Harp; Scott Ploger

    2012-12-01

    Destructive post-irradiation examination was performed on fuel Compact 6-3-2, which was irradiated in the AGR-1 experiment to a final compact average burnup of 11.3% FIMA and a time-average, volume-average temperature of 1070°C. The analysis of this compact was focused on characterizing the extent of fission product release from the particles and examining particles to determine the condition of the kernels and coating layers. The work included deconsolidation of the compact and leach-burn-leach analysis, visual inspection and gamma counting of individual particles, measurement of fuel burnup by several methods, metallurgical preparation of selected particles, and examination of particle cross-sections with optical microscopy. A single particle with a defective SiC layer was identified during deconsolidation-leach-burn-leach analysis, which is in agreement with previous measurements showing elevated cesium in the Capsule 6 graphite fuel holder associated with this fuel compact. The fraction of the compact europium inventory released from the particles and retained in the matrix was relatively high (approximately 6E-3), indicating release from intact particle coatings. The Ag-110m inventory in individual particles exhibited a very broad distribution, with some particles retaining =80% of the predicted inventory and others retaining less than 25%. The average degree of Ag-110m retention in 60 gamma counted particles was approximately 50%. This elevated silver release is in agreement with analysis of silver on the Capsule 6 components, which indicated an average release of 38% of the Capsule 6 inventory from the fuel compacts. In spite of the relatively high degree of silver release from the particles, virtually none of the Ag-110m released was found in the compact matrix, and presumably migrated out of the compact and was deposited on the irradiation capsule components. Release of all other fission products from the particles appears to be less than a single

  12. Subunit dissociations in natural and recombinant hemoglobins.

    PubMed

    Manning, L R; Jenkins, W T; Hess, J R; Vandegriff, K; Winslow, R M; Manning, J M

    1996-04-01

    A precise and rapid procedure employing gel filtration on Superose-12 to measure the tetramer-dimer dissociation constants of some natural and recombinant hemoglobins in the oxy conformation is described. Natural sickle hemoglobin was chosen to verify the validity of the results by comparing the values with those reported using an independent method not based on gel filtration. Recombinant sickle hemoglobin, as well as a sickle double mutant with a substitution at the Val-6(beta) receptor site, had approximately the same dissociation constant as natural sickle hemoglobin. Of the two recombinant hemoglobins with amino acid replacements in the alpha 1 beta 2 subunit interface, one was found to be extensively dissociated and the other completely dissociated. In addition, the absence of an effect of the allosteric regulators DPG and IHP on the dissociation constant was demonstrated. Thus, a tetramer dissociation constant can now be determined readily and used together with other criteria for characterization of hemoglobins and their interaction with small regulatory molecules. PMID:8845768

  13. α6 integrin subunit regulates cerebellar development

    PubMed Central

    Marchetti, Giovanni; De Arcangelis, Adèle; Pfister, Véronique; Georges-Labouesse, Elisabeth

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding several basal lamina components as well as their cellular receptors disrupt normal deposition and remodeling of the cortical basement membrane resulting in a disorganized cerebral and cerebellar cortex. The α6 integrin was the first α subunit associated with cortical lamination defects and formation of neural ectopias. In order to understand the precise role of α6 integrin in the central nervous system (CNS), we have generated mutant mice carrying specific deletion of α6 integrin in neuronal and glia precursors by crossing α6 conditional knockout mice with Nestin-Cre line. Cerebral cortex development occurred properly in the resulting α6fl/fl;nestin-Cre mutant animals. Interestingly, however, cerebellum displayed foliation pattern defects although granule cell (GC) proliferation and migration were not affected. Intriguingly, analysis of Bergmann glial (BG) scaffold revealed abnormalities in fibers morphology associated with reduced processes outgrowth and altered actin cytoskeleton. Overall, these data show that α6 integrin receptors are required in BG cells to provide a proper fissure formation during cerebellum morphogenesis. PMID:23722246

  14. Gel-based chemical cross-linking analysis of 20S proteasome subunit-subunit interactions in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Song, Hai; Xiong, Hua; Che, Jing; Xi, Qing-Song; Huang, Liu; Xiong, Hui-Hua; Zhang, Peng

    2016-08-01

    The ubiquitin-proteasome system plays a pivotal role in breast tumorigenesis by controlling transcription factors, thus promoting cell cycle growth, and degradation of tumor suppressor proteins. However, breast cancer patients have failed to benefit from proteasome inhibitor treatment partially due to proteasome heterogeneity, which is poorly understood in malignant breast neoplasm. Chemical crosslinking is an increasingly important tool for mapping protein three-dimensional structures and proteinprotein interactions. In the present study, two cross-linkers, bis (sulfosuccinimidyl) suberate (BS(3)) and its water-insoluble analog disuccinimidyl suberate (DSS), were used to map the subunit-subunit interactions in 20S proteasome core particle (CP) from MDA-MB-231 cells. Different types of gel electrophoresis technologies were used. In combination with chemical cross-linking and mass spectrometry, we applied these gel electrophoresis technologies to the study of the noncovalent interactions among 20S proteasome subunits. Firstly, the CP subunit isoforms were profiled. Subsequently, using native/SDSPAGE, it was observed that 0.5 mmol/L BS(3) was a relatively optimal cross-linking concentration for CP subunit-subunit interaction study. 2-DE analysis of the cross-linked CP revealed that α1 might preinteract with α2, and α3 might pre-interact with α4. Moreover, there were different subtypes of α1α2 and α3α4 due to proteasome heterogeneity. There was no significant difference in cross-linking pattern for CP subunits between BS(3) and DSS. Taken together, the gel-based characterization in combination with chemical cross-linking could serve as a tool for the study of subunit interactions within a multi-subunit protein complex. The heterogeneity of 20S proteasome subunit observed in breast cancer cells may provide some key information for proteasome inhibition strategy. PMID:27465334

  15. Molecular Evolution of Multi-subunit RNA Polymerases: Sequence Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lane, William J.; Darst, Seth A.

    2009-01-01

    Transcription in all cellular organisms is performed by multi-subunit, DNA-dependent RNA polymerases that synthesize RNA from DNA templates. Previous sequence and structural studies have elucidated the importance of shared regions common to all multi-subunit RNA polymerases. In addition RNA polymerases contain multiple lineage-specific domain insertions involved in protein-protein and protein-nucleic acid interactions. We have created comprehensive multiple sequence alignments using all available sequence data for the multi-subunit RNA polymerase large subunits, including the bacterial β and β′ subunits and their homologues from archaebacterial RNA polymerases, the eukaryotic RNA polymerases I, II, and III, the nuclear-cytoplasmic large double-stranded DNA Virus RNA polymerases, and plant plastid RNA polymerases. In order to overcome technical difficulties inherent to the large subunit sequences, including large sequence length, small and large lineage-specific insertions, split subunits, and fused proteins, we created an automated and customizable sequence retrieval and processing system. In addition, we used our alignments to create a more expansive set of shared sequence regions and bacterial lineage-specific domain insertions. We also analyzed the intergenic gap between the bacterial β and β′ genes. PMID:19895820

  16. Prokaryotic and eukaryotic RNA polymerases have homologous core subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Sweetser, D; Nonet, M; Young, R A

    1987-01-01

    Eukaryotic RNA polymerases are complex aggregates whose component subunits are functionally ill-defined. The gene that encodes the 140,000-dalton subunit of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II was isolated and studied in detail to obtain clues to the protein's function. This gene, RPB2, exists in a single copy in the haploid genome. Disruption of the gene is lethal to the yeast cell. RPB2 encodes a protein of 138,750 daltons, which contains sequences implicated in binding purine nucleotides and zinc ions and exhibits striking sequence homology with the beta subunit of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase. These observations suggest that the yeast and the E. coli subunit have similar roles in RNA synthesis, as the beta subunit contains binding sites for nucleotide substrates and a portion of the catalytic site for RNA synthesis. The subunit homologies reported here, and those observed previously with the largest RNA polymerase subunit, indicate that components of the prokaryotic RNA polymerase "core" enzyme have counterparts in eukaryotic RNA polymerases. PMID:3547406

  17. RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation.

    PubMed Central

    Kolodziej, P A; Woychik, N; Liao, S M; Young, R A

    1990-01-01

    RNA polymerase II subunit composition, stoichiometry, and phosphorylation were investigated in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by attaching an epitope coding sequence to a well-characterized RNA polymerase II subunit gene (RPB3) and by immunoprecipitating the product of this gene with its associated polypeptides. The immunopurified enzyme catalyzed alpha-amanitin-sensitive RNA synthesis in vitro. The 10 polypeptides that immunoprecipitated were identical in size and number to those previously described for RNA polymerase II purified by conventional column chromatography. The relative stoichiometry of the subunits was deduced from knowledge of the sequence of the subunits and from the extent of labeling with [35S]methionine. Immunoprecipitation from 32P-labeled cell extracts revealed that three of the subunits, RPB1, RPB2, and RPB6, are phosphorylated in vivo. Phosphorylated and unphosphorylated forms of RPB1 could be distinguished; approximately half of the RNA polymerase II molecules contained a phosphorylated RPB1 subunit. These results more precisely define the subunit composition and phosphorylation of a eucaryotic RNA polymerase II enzyme. Images PMID:2183013

  18. Strength of field compacted clayey embankments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; Lovell, C. W.

    1982-02-01

    The shearing behavior of a plastic Indiana clay (St. Croix) was studied for both laboratory and field compaction. This interim report deals with the field compacted phase. The strength tests were performed by unconsolidated undrained (UU) and saturated consolidated undrained (CIU) triaxials. These were run at various confining pressures to approximate the end of construction and long term conditions at several embankment depths.

  19. The non-compact Weyl equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doikou, Anastasia; Ioannidou, Theodora

    2011-04-01

    A non-compact version of the Weyl equation is proposed, based on the infinite dimensional spin zero representation of the mathfrak{s}{mathfrak{l}_2} algebra. Solutions of the aforementioned equation are obtained in terms of the Kummer functions. In this context, we discuss the ADHMN approach in order to construct the corresponding non-compact BPS monopoles.

  20. Enhancement of anion-exchange chromatography of DNA using compaction agents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Murphy, Jason C.; Fox, George E.; Willson, Richard C.

    2003-01-01

    The use of adsorptive chromatography for preparative nucleic acid separations is often limited by low capacity. The possibility that the adsorbent surface area sterically accessible to nucleic acid molecules could be increased by reducing their radius of gyration with compaction agents has been investigated. The equilibrium adsorption capacity of Q Sepharose anion-exchange matrix for plasmid DNA at 600 mM NaCl was enhanced by up to ca. 40% in the presence of 2.5 mM spermine. In addition, compaction agent selectivity has been demonstrated. Spermine, for example, enhances the adsorption of both plasmid and genomic DNA, spermidine enhances binding only of plasmid, and hexamine cobalt enhances only the binding of genomic DNA. Compaction may be generally useful for enhancing adsorptive separations of nucleic acids.

  1. Rheology Analysis of Thermosetting Resin Candidates for Use in Fuel Compacting

    SciTech Connect

    Trammell, Michael P.

    2012-06-01

    The AGR-1 and AGR-2 overcoating and compacting method utilized a wet mixing process where liquid resin (Hexion Durite SC-1008) was blended with natural and synthetic graphite to produce a graphite/resin matrix for overcoating. The matrix production method specified in the scale-up plan is a co-grinding jet mill process where powdered resin and graphite are fed at the same time into a jet mill. Because of the change in matrix production style, SC-1008 cannot be used in the jet milling process because it is a liquid. Also, attempts to dry out matrix made with SC-1008 for use in the overcoating process at B&W had mixed results. The SC-1008 resin became tacky when dried which caused the matrix to build up inside the overcoater. The scale- up jet milling/mixing and overcoating processes required that a suite of solid or powdered resins be identified. Suitable resins candidates were down selected to two resins, specifically Plenco 14838 and Hexion SD-1708. These resins are referred to as novolac or “two-stage” resins because they require the addition of a curing agent such as hexamethylenetetramine (Hexa) to promote an increased level of cross linking. The overcoating matrix is made of 3 components; natural graphite, synthetic graphite, and resin. The most influential component of the compacting process is the resin component and how it behaves with regards to time, temperature, and pressure. The selected scale-up resins are considered fast curing which means that the increase in molecular weight (curing) occurs over a relatively short period of time, ranging from a few seconds to several minutes depending on the temperature. To find the optimal compacting conditions it is useful to quantify this behavior. In this report, rheology is used to investigate viscosity as a function of time at specific temperatures for the previously mentioned resins.

  2. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, J.S.; Hietala, V.M.; Plut, T.A.

    1995-01-03

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N[times]M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise. 6 figures.

  3. Hybrid matrix amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Martens, Jon S.; Hietala, Vincent M.; Plut, Thomas A.

    1995-01-01

    The present invention comprises a novel matrix amplifier. The matrix amplifier includes an active superconducting power divider (ASPD) having N output ports; N distributed amplifiers each operatively connected to one of the N output ports of the ASPD; and a power combiner having N input ports each operatively connected to one of the N distributed amplifiers. The distributed amplifier can included M stages of amplification by cascading superconducting active devices. The power combiner can include N active elements. The resulting (N.times.M) matrix amplifier can produce signals of high output power, large bandwidth, and low noise.

  4. Mueller matrix differential decomposition.

    PubMed

    Ortega-Quijano, Noé; Arce-Diego, José Luis

    2011-05-15

    We present a Mueller matrix decomposition based on the differential formulation of the Mueller calculus. The differential Mueller matrix is obtained from the macroscopic matrix through an eigenanalysis. It is subsequently resolved into the complete set of 16 differential matrices that correspond to the basic types of optical behavior for depolarizing anisotropic media. The method is successfully applied to the polarimetric analysis of several samples. The differential parameters enable one to perform an exhaustive characterization of anisotropy and depolarization. This decomposition is particularly appropriate for studying media in which several polarization effects take place simultaneously. PMID:21593943

  5. Measurement matrix optimization method based on matrix orthogonal similarity transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Jinfeng

    2016-05-01

    Optimization of the measurement matrix is one of the important research aspects of compressive sensing theory. A measurement matrix optimization method is presented based on the orthogonal similarity transformation of the information operator's Gram matrix. In terms of the fact that the information operator's Gram matrix is a singular symmetric matrix, a simplified orthogonal similarity transformation is deduced, and thus the simplified diagonal matrix that is orthogonally similar to it is obtained. Then an approximation of the Gram matrix is obtained by letting all the nonzero diagonal entries of the simplified diagonal matrix equal their average value. Thus an optimized measurement matrix can be acquired according to its relationship with the information operator. Results of experiments show that the optimized measurement matrix compared to the random measurement matrix is less coherent with dictionaries. The relative signal recovery error also declines when the proposed measurement matrix is utilized.

  6. Shrinking mechanism of a porous collagen matrix immersed in solution.

    PubMed

    Chen, Po-Yang; Hsieh, Hsyue-Jen; Huang, Lynn L H

    2014-12-01

    The porous structure of collagen-based matrices enables the infiltration of cells both in in vitro and clinical applications. Reconstituted porous collagen matrices often collapse when they are in contact with aqueous solutions; however, the mechanism for the collapse of the pores is not understood. We, therefore, investigated the interactions between the collagen matrix and different solutions, and discuss the mechanisms for the change in microstructure of the matrix on immersing it in solution. When a dried collagen matrix was immersed in aqueous solutions, the matrix shrunk and pores close to the surface closed. The shrinkage ratio and thickness of the compact microstructure close to the superficial area decreased with increasing ethanol content in the solution. The original porous structure of the collagen matrix was preserved when the matrix was immersed in absolute ethanol. The shrinkage of a porous collagen matrix in contact with aqueous solutions was attributed to the liquid/gas interfacial tension. The average pore diameter of the matrix also significantly affected the shrinkage of the matrix. The shrinkage of the matrix, explained using the Young-Laplace equation, was found to result from the pressure drop, and especially in the pores located superficially, leading to the collapse of the matrix microstructure. The integrity of the porous microstructure allows better penetration of cells in medical applications. The numbers of NIH/3T3 fibroblasts penetrated through the hydrated Col/PBS porous collagen matrices pre-immersed in absolute ethanol with subsequent water and DMEM culture medium replacements were significantly higher than those through matrices hydrated directly in DMEM.

  7. Accelerated direct semiclassical molecular dynamics using a compact finite difference Hessian scheme.

    PubMed

    Ceotto, Michele; Zhuang, Yu; Hase, William L

    2013-02-01

    This paper shows how a compact finite difference Hessian approximation scheme can be proficiently implemented into semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics. Effects of the approximation on the monodromy matrix calculation are tested by propagating initial sampling distributions to determine power spectra for analytic potential energy surfaces and for "on the fly" carbon dioxide direct dynamics. With the approximation scheme the computational cost is significantly reduced, making ab initio direct semiclassical dynamics computationally more feasible and, at the same time, properly reproducing important quantum effects inherent in the monodromy matrix and the pre-exponential factor of the semiclassical propagator. PMID:23406107

  8. Accelerated direct semiclassical molecular dynamics using a compact finite difference Hessian scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceotto, Michele; Zhuang, Yu; Hase, William L.

    2013-02-01

    This paper shows how a compact finite difference Hessian approximation scheme can be proficiently implemented into semiclassical initial value representation molecular dynamics. Effects of the approximation on the monodromy matrix calculation are tested by propagating initial sampling distributions to determine power spectra for analytic potential energy surfaces and for "on the fly" carbon dioxide direct dynamics. With the approximation scheme the computational cost is significantly reduced, making ab initio direct semiclassical dynamics computationally more feasible and, at the same time, properly reproducing important quantum effects inherent in the monodromy matrix and the pre-exponential factor of the semiclassical propagator.

  9. Pesticide-Exposure Matrix

    Cancer.gov

    The "Pesticide-exposure Matrix" was developed to help epidemiologists and other researchers identify the active ingredients to which people were likely exposed when their homes and gardens were treated for pests in past years.

  10. Genetic analysis of the cytoplasmic dynein subunit families.

    PubMed

    Pfister, K Kevin; Shah, Paresh R; Hummerich, Holger; Russ, Andreas; Cotton, James; Annuar, Azlina Ahmad; King, Stephen M; Fisher, Elizabeth M C

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles.

  11. A process yields large quantities of pure ribosome subunits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Friedman, M.; Lu, P.; Rich, A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of process for in-vitro protein synthesis from living cells followed by dissociation of ribosomes into subunits is discussed. Process depends on dialysis or use of chelating agents. Operation of process and advantages over previous methods are outlined.

  12. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; Chapelle, S; De Wachter, R

    1994-01-01

    A database on large ribosomal subunit RNA is made available. It contains 258 sequences. It provides sequence, alignment and secondary structure information in computer-readable formats. Files can be obtained using ftp. PMID:7524023

  13. Genetic Analysis of the Cytoplasmic Dynein Subunit Families

    PubMed Central

    2006-01-01

    Cytoplasmic dyneins, the principal microtubule minus-end-directed motor proteins of the cell, are involved in many essential cellular processes. The major form of this enzyme is a complex of at least six protein subunits, and in mammals all but one of the subunits are encoded by at least two genes. Here we review current knowledge concerning the subunits, their interactions, and their functional roles as derived from biochemical and genetic analyses. We also carried out extensive database searches to look for new genes and to clarify anomalies in the databases. Our analysis documents evolutionary relationships among the dynein subunits of mammals and other model organisms, and sheds new light on the role of this diverse group of proteins, highlighting the existence of two cytoplasmic dynein complexes with distinct cellular roles. PMID:16440056

  14. The Linkage Between Oxygenation and Subunit Dissociation in Human Hemoglobin

    PubMed Central

    Ackers, Gary K.; Halvorson, Herbert R.

    1974-01-01

    The use of subunit dissociation as a means of probing intersubunit contact energy changes which accompany cooperative ligand binding has been studied for the case of human hemoglobin. An analysis is presented delineating the information that can be obtained from the linkage relationships between ligand binding and subunit dissociation of hemoglobin tetramers into dimers. The analysis defines (a) the variation of the saturation function, Ȳ, with total protein concentration, (b) the variation of the subunit dissociation constant xK2 with ligand concentration (X) and (c) the correlations between changes in dimer-dimer contact energy and the sequential ligand binding steps. Sensitivity of the linkage function has been explored by numerical simulation. It is shown that subunit dissociation may appreciably affect oxygenation curves under usual conditions of measurement and that relying solely on either xK2 or Ȳ may lead to incorrect picutres of the energetics, whereas the combination defines the system much more exactly. PMID:4530985

  15. Dynamic compaction of granular materials

    PubMed Central

    Favrie, N.; Gavrilyuk, S.

    2013-01-01

    An Eulerian hyperbolic multiphase flow model for dynamic and irreversible compaction of granular materials is constructed. The reversible model is first constructed on the basis of the classical Hertz theory. The irreversible model is then derived in accordance with the following two basic principles. First, the entropy inequality is satisfied by the model. Second, the corresponding ‘intergranular stress’ coming from elastic energy owing to contact between grains decreases in time (the granular media behave as Maxwell-type materials). The irreversible model admits an equilibrium state corresponding to von Mises-type yield limit. The yield limit depends on the volume fraction of the solid. The sound velocity at the yield surface is smaller than that in the reversible model. The last one is smaller than the sound velocity in the irreversible model. Such an embedded model structure assures a thermodynamically correct formulation of the model of granular materials. The model is validated on quasi-static experiments on loading–unloading cycles. The experimentally observed hysteresis phenomena were numerically confirmed with a good accuracy by the proposed model. PMID:24353466

  16. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector.

  17. Compact drilling and sample system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillis-Smith, Greg R.; Petercsak, Doug

    1998-01-01

    The Compact Drilling and Sample System (CDSS) was developed to drill into terrestrial, cometary, and asteroid material in a cryogenic, vacuum environment in order to acquire subsurface samples. Although drills were used by the Apollo astronauts some 20 years ago, this drill is a fraction of the mass and power and operates completely autonomously, able to drill, acquire, transport, dock, and release sample containers in science instruments. The CDSS has incorporated into its control system the ability to gather science data about the material being drilled by measuring drilling rate per force applied and torque. This drill will be able to optimize rotation and thrust in order to achieve the highest drilling rate possible in any given sample. The drill can be commanded to drill at a specified force, so that force imparted on the rover or lander is limited. This paper will discuss the cryo dc brush motors, carbide gears, cryogenic lubrication, quick-release interchangeable sampling drill bits, percussion drilling and the control system developed to achieve autonomous, cryogenic, vacuum, lightweight drilling.

  18. Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blaney, Diana L.; Green, Robert; Mouroulis, Pantazis; Cable, Morgan; Ehlmann, Bethany; Haag, Justin; Lamborn, Andrew; McKinley, Ian; Rodriguez, Jose; van Gorp, Byron

    2016-10-01

    The Ultra Compact Imaging Spectrometer (UCIS) is a modular visible to short wavelength infrared imaging spectrometer architecture which could be adapted to a variety of mission concepts requiring low mass and low power. Imaging spectroscopy is an established technique to address complex questions of geologic evolution by mapping diagnostic absorption features due to minerals, organics, and volatiles throughout our solar system. At the core of UCIS is an Offner imaging spectrometer using M3 heritage and a miniature pulse tube cryo-cooler developed under the NASA Maturation of Instruments for Solar System Exploration (MatISSE) program to cool the focal plane array. The TRL 6 integrated spectrometer and cryo-cooler provide a basic imaging spectrometer capability that is used with a variety of fore optics to address lunar, mars, and small body science goals. Potential configurations include: remote sensing from small orbiters and flyby spacecraft; in situ panoramic imaging spectroscopy; and in situ micro-spectroscopy. A micro-spectroscopy front end is being developed using MatISSE funding with integration and testing planned this summer.

  19. Compact Nanowire Sensors Probe Microdroplets.

    PubMed

    Schütt, Julian; Ibarlucea, Bergoi; Illing, Rico; Zörgiebel, Felix; Pregl, Sebastian; Nozaki, Daijiro; Weber, Walter M; Mikolajick, Thomas; Baraban, Larysa; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio

    2016-08-10

    The conjunction of miniature nanosensors and droplet-based microfluidic systems conceptually opens a new route toward sensitive, optics-less analysis of biochemical processes with high throughput, where a single device can be employed for probing of thousands of independent reactors. Here we combine droplet microfluidics with the compact silicon nanowire based field effect transistor (SiNW FET) for in-flow electrical detection of aqueous droplets one by one. We chemically probe the content of numerous (∼10(4)) droplets as independent events and resolve the pH values and ionic strengths of the encapsulated solution, resulting in a change of the source-drain current ISD through the nanowires. Further, we discuss the specificities of emulsion sensing using ion sensitive FETs and study the effect of droplet sizes with respect to the sensor area, as well as its role on the ability to sense the interior of the aqueous reservoir. Finally, we demonstrate the capability of the novel droplets based nanowire platform for bioassay applications and carry out a glucose oxidase (GOx) enzymatic test for glucose detection, providing also the reference readout with an integrated parallel optical detector. PMID:27417510

  20. Compact stellarators with modular coils

    PubMed Central

    Garabedian, P. R.

    2000-01-01

    Compact stellarator designs with modular coils and only two or three field periods are now available; these designs have both good stability and quasiaxial symmetry providing adequate transport for a magnetic fusion reactor. If the bootstrap current assumes theoretically predicted values a three field period configuration is optimal, but if that net current turns out to be lower, a device with two periods and just 12 modular coils might be better. There are also attractive designs with quasihelical symmetry and four or five periods whose properties depend less on the bootstrap current. Good performance requires that there be a satisfactory magnetic well in the vacuum field, which is a property lacking in a stellarator-tokamak hybrid that has been proposed for a proof of principle experiment. In this paper, we present an analysis of stability for these configurations that is based on a mountain pass theorem asserting that, if two solutions of the problem of magnetohydrodynamic equilibrium can be found, then there has to be an unstable solution. We compare results of our theory of equilibrium, stability, and transport with recently announced measurements from the large LHD experiment in Japan. PMID:10899993

  1. Matrix fractional systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tenreiro Machado, J. A.

    2015-08-01

    This paper addresses the matrix representation of dynamical systems in the perspective of fractional calculus. Fractional elements and fractional systems are interpreted under the light of the classical Cole-Cole, Davidson-Cole, and Havriliak-Negami heuristic models. Numerical simulations for an electrical circuit enlighten the results for matrix based models and high fractional orders. The conclusions clarify the distinction between fractional elements and fractional systems.

  2. Ribitol dehydrogenase from Klebsiella aerogenes. Purification and subunit structure

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Susan S.; Rigby, Peter W. J.; Hartley, Brian S.

    1974-01-01

    Ribitol dehydrogenase has been purified to homogeneity from several strains of Klebsiella aerogenes. One strain yields 3–6g of pure enzyme from 1kg of cells. The enzyme is a tetramer of four subunits, mol.wt. 27000. Preliminary studies of the activity of the enzyme are reported. Peptide `maps' together with the amino acid composition indicate that the subunits are identical. ImagesPLATE 2PLATE 1 PMID:4618776

  3. Subunit-Specific Trafficking of GABAA Receptors during Status Epilepticus

    PubMed Central

    Goodkin, Howard P.; Joshi, Suchitra; Mtchedlishvili, Zakaria; Brar, Jasmit; Kapur, Jaideep

    2010-01-01

    It is proposed that a reduced surface expression of GABAA receptors (GABARs) contributes to the pathogenesis of status epilepticus (SE), a condition characterized by prolonged seizures. This hypothesis was based on the finding that prolonged epileptiform bursting (repetitive bursts of prolonged depolarizations with superimposed action potentials) in cultures of dissociated hippocampal pyramidal neurons (dissociated cultures) results in the increased intracellular accumulation of GABARs. However, it is not known whether this rapid modification in the surface-expressed GABAR pool results from selective, subunit-dependent or nonselective, subunit-independent internalization of GABARs. In hippocampal slices obtained from animals undergoing prolonged SE (SE-treated slices), we found that the surface expression of the GABARβ2/3 and γ2 subunits was reduced, whereas that of the δ subunit was not. Complementary electrophysiological recordings from dentate granule cells in SE-treated slices demonstrated a reduction in GABAR-mediated synaptic inhibition, but not tonic inhibition. A reduction in the surface expression of the γ2 subunit, but not the δ subunit was also observed in dissociated cultures and organotypic hippocampal slice cultures when incubated in an elevated KCl external medium or an elevated KCl external medium supplemented with NMDA, respectively. Additional studies demonstrated that the reduction in the surface expression of the γ2 subunit was independent of direct ligand binding of the GABAR. These findings demonstrate that the regulation of surface-expressed GABAR pool during SE is subunit-specific and occurs independent of ligand binding. The differential modulation of the surface expression of GABARs during SE has potential implications for the treatment of this neurological emergency. PMID:18322097

  4. Properties of the subunits of wheat germ initiation factor 3.

    PubMed

    Heufler, C; Browning, K S; Ravel, J M

    1988-11-10

    Wheat germ initiation factor 3 (eukaryotic initiation factor 3, eIF-3) contains ten non-identical subunits (p116, p107, p87, p83, p56, p45, p41, p36, p34 and p28). Monoclonal antibodies to all except two of the subunits (p41 and p28) were obtained. None of the monoclonal antibodies react with more than one subunit, and only monoclonal antibodies to p36 inhibit the ability of eIF-3 to support initiation of polypeptide synthesis. Two of the subunits (p116 and p107) are highly basic polypeptides (pI greater than or equal to 8); five (p87, p56, p45, p34 and p28) are acidic polypeptides (pI = 5.4-6.1); and three (p83, p41 and p36) appear to exist in more than one isoelectric form. Eight of the subunits of eIF-3 are iodinated rapidly in vitro; the highest incorporation is into p56 and the lowest incorporation is into p28. No incorporation into p41 or p28 is observed. When eIF-3 is treated with N-[3H]ethylmaleimide, approx. 30 alkyl groups per eIF-3 are incorporated, and the eIF-3 is inactivated. No incorporation into p83 or p28 is observed; incorporation of the alkyl groups into the other eight subunits occurs at different rates. The rate of inactivation of eIF-3 by N-ethylmaleimide is slower than the overall rate of incorporation of alkyl groups. eIF-3 is stable between pH 5.5 and 10. Below pH 5.5, eIF-3 is inactivated and precipitation of protein occurs. Partial dissociation of the subunits and inactivation of eIF-3 is obtained by treatment with 2 M urea. Attempts to reassociate the subunits into an active particle were unsuccessful.

  5. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-10-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes.

  6. Optical coherency matrix tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kagalwala, Kumel H.; Kondakci, H. Esat; Abouraddy, Ayman F.; Saleh, Bahaa E. A.

    2015-01-01

    The coherence of an optical beam having multiple degrees of freedom (DoFs) is described by a coherency matrix G spanning these DoFs. This optical coherency matrix has not been measured in its entirety to date—even in the simplest case of two binary DoFs where G is a 4 × 4 matrix. We establish a methodical yet versatile approach—optical coherency matrix tomography—for reconstructing G that exploits the analogy between this problem in classical optics and that of tomographically reconstructing the density matrix associated with multipartite quantum states in quantum information science. Here G is reconstructed from a minimal set of linearly independent measurements, each a cascade of projective measurements for each DoF. We report the first experimental measurements of the 4 × 4 coherency matrix G associated with an electromagnetic beam in which polarization and a spatial DoF are relevant, ranging from the traditional two-point Young’s double slit to spatial parity and orbital angular momentum modes. PMID:26478452

  7. Stabilisation of matrix polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo, R.

    2015-10-01

    A state feedback is proposed to analyse the stability of a matrix polynomial in closed loop. First, it is shown that a matrix polynomial is stable if and only if a state space realisation of a ladder form of certain transfer matrix is stable. Following the ideas of the Routh-Hurwitz stability procedure for scalar polynomials, certain continued-fraction expansions of polynomial matrices are carrying out by unimodular matrices to achieve the Euclid's division algorithm which leads to an extension of the well-known Routh-Hurwitz stability criteria but this time in terms of matrix coefficients. After that, stability of the closed-loop matrix polynomial is guaranteed based on a Corollary of a Lyapunov Theorem. The sufficient stability conditions are: (i) The matrices of one column of the presented array must be symmetric and positive definite and (ii) the matrices of the cascade realisation must satisfy a commutative condition. These stability conditions are also necessary for matrix polynomial of second order. The results are illustrated through examples.

  8. A compaction front in North Sea chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, P.; Dysthe, D. K.; Hartz, E. H.; Jamtveit, B.

    2012-04-01

    North Sea chalk from 18 wells shows a pronounced porosity drop, from ˜20% to less than 10% over a compaction front of less than 300 m. The position of the compaction frontis independent of stratigraphic position, temperature, and actual depth, but closely tied to an effective stress of ˜17 MPa. These observations require a strongly nonlinear rheology with a marked increase in compaction rate at a specific effective stress. Grain-scale observations demonstrate that the compaction front coincides with marked grain coarsening and recrystallization of fossils and fossil fragments. We propose that this nonlinear rheology is caused by stress-driven failure of the larger pores and the associated generation of reactive surface area by subcritical crack propagation away from these pores. Before the onset of this instability, compaction by pressure solution is slowed down by the inhibitory effect of organic compounds associated with the fossils. Although the compaction mechanism is mainly by pressure solution, the rheological response to burial may still be dominantly plastic and controlled by the (fracturing controlled) rate of exposure of reactive surface area. The nonlinear compaction of chalk has significant implications for the evolution of petroleum systems in the central North Sea, both with respect to sea-floor subsidence above hydrocarbon-producing chalk reservoirs and for the formation of low-porosity pressure seals within the chalk.

  9. A compaction front in North Sea chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Japsen, P.; Dysthe, D. K.; Hartz, E. H.; Stipp, S. L. S.; Yarushina, V. M.; Jamtveit, B.

    2011-11-01

    North Sea chalk from 18 wells shows a pronounced porosity drop, from ˜20% to less than 10% over a compaction front of less than 300 m. The position of the compaction front is independent of stratigraphic position, temperature, and actual depth, but closely tied to an effective stress (load stress minus fluid pressure) of ˜17 MPa. These observations require a strongly nonlinear rheology with a marked increase in compaction rate at a specific effective stress. Grain-scale observations demonstrate that the compaction front coincides with marked grain coarsening and recrystallization of fossils and fossil fragments. We propose that this nonlinear rheology is caused by stress-driven failure of the larger pores and the associated generation of reactive surface area by subcritical crack propagation away from these pores. Before the onset of this instability, compaction by pressure solution is slowed down by the inhibitory effect of organic compounds associated with the fossils. Although the compaction mechanism is mainly by pressure solution, the rheological response to burial may still be dominantly plastic and controlled by the (fracturing controlled) rate of exposure of reactive surface area. The nonlinear compaction of chalk has significant implications for the evolution of petroleum systems in the central North Sea, both with respect to sea-floor subsidence above hydrocarbon-producing chalk reservoirs and for the formation of low-porosity pressure seals within the chalk.

  10. Thermodynamic analysis of compact formation; compaction, unloading, and ejection. I. Design and development of a compaction calorimeter and mechanical and thermal energy determinations of powder compaction.

    PubMed

    DeCrosta, M T; Schwartz, J B; Wigent, R J; Marshall, K

    2000-03-30

    The aim of this investigation was to determine and evaluate the thermodynamic properties, i.e. heat, work, and internal energy change, of the compaction process by developing a 'Compaction Calorimeter'. Compaction of common excipients and acetaminophen was performed by a double-ended, constant-strain tableting waveform utilizing an instrumented 'Compaction Simulator.' A constant-strain waveform provides a specific quantity of applied compaction work. A calorimeter, built around the dies, used a metal oxide thermistor to measure the temperature of the system. A resolution of 0.0001 degrees C with a sampling time of 5 s was used to monitor the temperature. An aluminum die within a plastic insulating die, in conjunction with fiberglass punches, comprised the calorimeter. Mechanical (work) and thermal (heat) calibrations of the elastic punch deformation were performed. An energy correction method was outlined to account for system heat effects and mechanical work of the punches. Compaction simulator transducers measured upper and lower punch forces and displacements. Measurements of the effective heat capacity of the samples were performed utilizing an electrical resistance heater. Specific heat capacities of the samples were determined by differential scanning calorimetry. The calibration techniques were utilized to determine heat, work, and the change in internal energies of powder compaction. Future publications will address the thermodynamic evaluation of the tablet sub-processes of unloading and ejection. PMID:10722955

  11. The classification of 2 -compact groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Kasper K. S.; Grodal, Jesper

    2009-04-01

    We prove that any connected 2 -compact group is classified by its 2 -adic root datum, and in particular the exotic 2 -compact group operatorname{DI}(4) , constructed by Dwyer-Wilkerson, is the only simple 2 -compact group not arising as the 2 -completion of a compact connected Lie group. Combined with our earlier work with Mo/ller and Viruel for p odd, this establishes the full classification of p -compact groups, stating that, up to isomorphism, there is a one-to-one correspondence between connected p -compact groups and root data over the p -adic integers. As a consequence we prove the maximal torus conjecture, giving a one-to-one correspondence between compact Lie groups and finite loop spaces admitting a maximal torus. Our proof is a general induction on the dimension of the group, which works for all primes. It refines the Andersen-Grodal-Mo/ller-Viruel methods by incorporating the theory of root data over the p -adic integers, as developed by Dwyer-Wilkerson and the authors. Furthermore we devise a different way of dealing with the rigidification problem by utilizing obstruction groups calculated by Jackowski-McClure-Oliver in the early 1990s.

  12. Horizontal membrane-intrinsic α-helices in the stator a-subunit of an F-type ATP synthase.

    PubMed

    Allegretti, Matteo; Klusch, Niklas; Mills, Deryck J; Vonck, Janet; Kühlbrandt, Werner; Davies, Karen M

    2015-05-14

    ATP, the universal energy currency of cells, is produced by F-type ATP synthases, which are ancient, membrane-bound nanomachines. F-type ATP synthases use the energy of a transmembrane electrochemical gradient to generate ATP by rotary catalysis. Protons moving across the membrane drive a rotor ring composed of 8-15 c-subunits. A central stalk transmits the rotation of the c-ring to the catalytic F1 head, where a series of conformational changes results in ATP synthesis. A key unresolved question in this fundamental process is how protons pass through the membrane to drive ATP production. Mitochondrial ATP synthases form V-shaped homodimers in cristae membranes. Here we report the structure of a native and active mitochondrial ATP synthase dimer, determined by single-particle electron cryomicroscopy at 6.2 Å resolution. Our structure shows four long, horizontal membrane-intrinsic α-helices in the a-subunit, arranged in two hairpins at an angle of approximately 70° relative to the c-ring helices. It has been proposed that a strictly conserved membrane-embedded arginine in the a-subunit couples proton translocation to c-ring rotation. A fit of the conserved carboxy-terminal a-subunit sequence places the conserved arginine next to a proton-binding c-subunit glutamate. The map shows a slanting solvent-accessible channel that extends from the mitochondrial matrix to the conserved arginine. Another hydrophilic cavity on the lumenal membrane surface defines a direct route for the protons to an essential histidine-glutamate pair. Our results provide unique new insights into the structure and function of rotary ATP synthases and explain how ATP production is coupled to proton translocation.

  13. Independent in vitro assembly of all three major morphological parts of the 30S ribosomal subunit of Thermus thermophilus.

    PubMed

    Agalarov, S C; Selivanova, O M; Zheleznyakova, E N; Zheleznaya, L A; Matvienko, N I; Spirin, A S

    1999-12-01

    Fragments of the 16S rRNA of Thermus thermophilus representing the 3' domain (nucleotides 890-1515) and the 5' domain (nucleotides 1-539) have been prepared by transcription in vitro. Incubation of these fragments with total 30S ribosomal proteins of T. thermophilus resulted in formation of specific RNPs. The particle assembled on the 3' RNA domain contained seven proteins corresponding to Escherichia coli ribosomal proteins S3, S7, S9, S10, S13, S14, and S19. All of them have previously been shown to interact with the 3' domain of the 16S RNA and to be localized in the head of the 30S ribosomal subunit. The particle formed on the 5' RNA domain contained five ribosomal proteins corresponding to E. coli proteins S4, S12, S17, S16, and S20. These proteins are known to be localized in the main part of the body of the 30S subunit. Both types of particle were compact and had sedimentation coefficients of 15.5 S and 13 S, respectively. Together with our recent demonstration of the reconstitution of the RNA particle representing the platform of the T. thermophilus 30S ribosomal subunit [Agalarov, S.C., Zheleznyakova, E.N., Selivanova, O.M., Zheleznaya, L.A., Matvienko, N.I., Vasiliev, V.D. & Spirin, A.S. (1998) Proc. Natl Acad. Sci. USA 95, 999-1003], these experiments establish that all three main structural lobes of the small ribosomal subunit can be reconstituted independently of each other and prepared in the individual state.

  14. Equilibrium calculations for plasma control in CIT (Compact Ignition Tokamak)

    SciTech Connect

    Strickler, D.J.; Peng, Y-K.M. . Fusion Engineering Design Center); Pomphrey, N.; Jardin, S.C. . Plasma Physics Lab.)

    1990-01-01

    The free-boundary equilibrium code VEQ provides equilibrium data that are used by the Tokamak Simulation Code (TSC) in design and analysis of the poloidal field (PF) system for the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT). VEQ serves as an important design tool for locating the PF coils and defining coil current trajectories and control systems for TSC. In this report, VEQ and its role in the TSC analysis of the CIT PF system are described. Equilibrium and coil current calculations are discussed, an overview of the CIT PF system is presented, a set of reference equilibria for modeling a complete discharge in CIT is described, and the concept of a plasma shape control matrix is introduced. 9 refs., 8 figs., 7 tabs.

  15. Transcriptional regulators of Na,K-ATPase subunits

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhiqin; Langhans, Sigrid A.

    2015-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase classically serves as an ion pump creating an electrochemical gradient across the plasma membrane that is essential for transepithelial transport, nutrient uptake and membrane potential. In addition, Na,K-ATPase also functions as a receptor, a signal transducer and a cell adhesion molecule. With such diverse roles, it is understandable that the Na,K-ATPase subunits, the catalytic α-subunit, the β-subunit and the FXYD proteins, are controlled extensively during development and to accommodate physiological needs. The spatial and temporal expression of Na,K-ATPase is partially regulated at the transcriptional level. Numerous transcription factors, hormones, growth factors, lipids, and extracellular stimuli modulate the transcription of the Na,K-ATPase subunits. Moreover, epigenetic mechanisms also contribute to the regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. With the ever growing knowledge about diseases associated with the malfunction of Na,K-ATPase, this review aims at summarizing the best-characterized transcription regulators that modulate Na,K-ATPase subunit levels. As abnormal expression of Na,K-ATPase subunits has been observed in many carcinoma, we will also discuss transcription factors that are associated with epithelial-mesenchymal transition, a crucial step in the progression of many tumors to malignant disease. PMID:26579519

  16. Effects of Detergents on Ribosomal Precursor Subunits of Bacillus megaterium

    PubMed Central

    Body, Barbara A.; Brownstein, Bernard H.

    1978-01-01

    Cell extracts prepared by osmotic lysis of protoplasts were analyzed by sucrose gradient sedimentation. In the absence of detergents, ribosomal precursor particles were found in a gradient fraction which sedimented faster than mature 50S subunits and in two other fractions coincident with mature 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits. Phospholipid, an indicator of membrane, was shown to be associated with only the fastest-sedimenting ribosomal precursor particle fraction. After the extracts were treated with detergents, all phospholipid was found at the top of the gradients. Brij 58, Triton X-100, and Nonidet P-40 did not cause a change in the sedimentation values of precursors; however, the detergents deoxycholate or LOC (Amway Corp.) disrupted the fastest-sedimenting precursor and converted the ribosomal precursor subunits which sedimented at the 50S and 30S positions to five different classes of more slowly sedimenting particles. Earlier reports on the in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits have shown that several stages of ribosomal precursor subunits exist, and, in the presence of the detergents deoxycholate and LOC, which had been used to prepare cell extracts, the precursors sedimented more slowly. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that those detergents selectively modify the structure of ribosomal precursors and lend further support to the hypothesis that the in vivo ribosomal precursor subunits have 50S and 30S sedimentation values. In addition, these data support the idea that the ribosomal precursor particles found in the fast-sedimenting fraction may constitute a unique precursor fraction. PMID:412833

  17. Effects of detergents on ribosomal precursor subunits of Bacillus megaterium.

    PubMed

    Body, A; Brownstein, B H

    1978-01-01

    Cell extracts prepared by osmotic lysis of protoplasts were analyzed by sucrose gradient sedimentation. In the absence of detergents, ribosomal precursor particles were found in a gradient fraction which sedimented faster than mature 50S subunits and in two other fractions coincident with mature 50S and 30S ribosomal subunits. Phospholipid, an indicator of membrane, was shown to be associated with only the fastest-sedimenting ribosomal precursor particle fraction. After the extracts were treated with detergents, all phospholipid was found at the top of the gradients. Brij 58, Triton X-100, and Nonidet P-40 did not cause a change in the sedimentation values of precursors; however, the detergents deoxycholate or LOC (Amway Corp.) disrupted the fastest-sedimenting precursor and converted the ribosomal precursor subunits which sedimented at the 50S and 30S positions to five different classes of more slowly sedimenting particles. Earlier reports on the in vivo assembly of ribosomal subunits have shown that several stages of ribosomal precursor subunits exist, and, in the presence of the detergents deoxycholate and LOC, which had been used to prepare cell extracts, the precursors sedimented more slowly. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that those detergents selectively modify the structure of ribosomal precursors and lend further support to the hypothesis that the in vivo ribosomal precursor subunits have 50S and 30S sedimentation values. In addition, these data support the idea that the ribosomal precursor particles found in the fast-sedimenting fraction may constitute a unique precursor fraction.

  18. Compaction of North-sea chalk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keszthelyi, Dániel; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Jamtveit, Bjørn

    2014-05-01

    The Ekofisk field is the largest petroleum field in the Norwegian North Sea territory where oil is produced from chalk formations. Early stage of oil production caused considerable changes in pore fluid pressure which led to a reservoir compaction. Pore collapse mechanism caused by the dramatic increase of effective stress, which in turn was caused by the pressure reduction by hydrocarbon depletion, was early identified as a principal reason for the reservoir compaction (Sulak et al. 1991). There have been several attempts to model this compaction. They performed with variable success on predicting the Ekofisk subsidence. However, the most of these models are based on empirical relations and do not investigate in detail the phenomena involved in the compaction. In sake of predicting the Ekofisk subsidence while using only independently measurable variables we used a chalk compaction model valid on geological time-scales (Japsen et al. 2011) assuming plastic pore-collapse mechanism at a threshold effective stress level. We identified the phenomena involved in the pore collapse. By putting them in a sequential order we created a simple statistical analytical model. We also investigated the time-dependence of the phenomena involved and by assuming that one of the phenomena is rate-limiting we could make estimations of the compaction rate at smaller length-scales. By carefully investigating the nature of pressure propagation we could upscale our model to reservoir scale. We found that the predicted compaction rates are close enough to the measured rates. We believe that we could further increase accuracy by refining our model. Sulak, R. M., Thomas, L. K., Boade R. R. (1991) 3D reservoir simulation of Ekofisk compaction drive. Journal of Petroleum Technology, 43(10):1272-1278, 1991. Japsen, P., Dysthe, D. K., Hartz, E. H., Stipp, S. L. S., Yarushina, V. M., Jamtveit. (2011) A compaction front in North Sea chalk. Journal of Geophysical Research: Solid Earth (1978

  19. Global chromatin fibre compaction in response to DNA damage

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Charlotte; Hayward, Richard L.; Gilbert, Nick

    2011-11-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Robust KAP1 phosphorylation in response to DNA damage in HCT116 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA repair foci are found in soluble chromatin. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Biophysical analysis reveals global chromatin fibre compaction after DNA damage. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer DNA damage is accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation. -- Abstract: DNA is protected by packaging it into higher order chromatin fibres, but this can impede nuclear processes like DNA repair. Despite considerable research into the factors required for signalling and repairing DNA damage, it is unclear if there are concomitant changes in global chromatin fibre structure. In human cells DNA double strand break (DSB) formation triggers a signalling cascade resulting in H2AX phosphorylation ({gamma}H2AX), the rapid recruitment of chromatin associated proteins and the subsequent repair of damaged sites. KAP1 is a transcriptional corepressor and in HCT116 cells we found that after DSB formation by chemicals or ionising radiation there was a wave of, predominantly ATM dependent, KAP1 phosphorylation. Both KAP1 and phosphorylated KAP1 were readily extracted from cells indicating they do not have a structural role and {gamma}H2AX was extracted in soluble chromatin indicating that sites of damage are not attached to an underlying structural matrix. After DSB formation we did not find a concomitant change in the sensitivity of chromatin fibres to micrococcal nuclease digestion. Therefore to directly investigate higher order chromatin fibre structures we used a biophysical sedimentation technique based on sucrose gradient centrifugation to compare the conformation of chromatin fibres isolated from cells before and after DNA DSB formation. After damage we found global chromatin fibre compaction, accompanied by rapid linker histone dephosphorylation, consistent with fibres being more regularly folded or fibre deformation being stabilized by

  20. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rey-Raap, Natalia; Gallardo, Antonio

    2012-05-01

    In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52±0.4ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16±8.9ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74±0.5ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste.

  1. Compacting Plastic-Bonded Explosive Molding Powders to Dense Solids

    SciTech Connect

    B. Olinger

    2005-04-15

    Dense solid high explosives are made by compacting plastic-bonded explosive molding powders with high pressures and temperatures for extended periods of time. The density is influenced by manufacturing processes of the powders, compaction temperature, the magnitude of compaction pressure, pressure duration, and number of repeated applications of pressure. The internal density variation of compacted explosives depends on method of compaction and the material being compacted.

  2. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function

    PubMed Central

    Szklarczyk, Arek; Ewaleifoh, Osefame; Beique, Jean-Claude; Wang, Yue; Knorr, David; Haughey, Norman; Malpica, Tanya; Mattson, Mark P.; Huganir, Richard; Conant, Katherine

    2008-01-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are zinc-dependent enzymes that play a role in the inflammatory response. These enzymes have been well studied in the context of cancer biology and inflammation. Recent studies, however, suggest that these enzymes also play roles in brain development and neurodegenerative disease. Select MMPs can target proteins critical to synaptic structure and neuronal survival, including integrins and cadherins. Here, we show that one member of the MMP family, MMP-7, which may be released from cells, including microglia, can target a protein critical to synaptic function. Through analysis of extracts from murine cortical slice preparations, we show that MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 subunit of the N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor to generate an N-terminal fragment of ∼65 kDa. Moreover, studies with recombinant protein show that MMP-7-mediated cleavage of NR1 occurs at amino acid 517, which is extracellular and just distal to the first transmembrane domain. Data suggest that NR2A, which shares sequence homology with NR1, is also cleaved following treatment of slices with MMP-7, while select AMPA receptor subunits are not. Consistent with a potential effect of MMP-7 on ligand binding, additional experiments demonstrate that NMDA-mediated calcium flux is significantly diminished by MMP-7 pretreatment of cultures. In addition, the AMPA/NMDA ratio is increased by MMP-7 pretreatment. These data suggest that synaptic function may be altered in neurological conditions associated with increased levels of MMP-7.—Szklarczyk, A., Ewaleifoh, O., Beique, J.-C., Wang, Y., Knorr, D., Haughey, N., Malpica, T., Mattson, M. P., Huganir, R., Conant, K. MMP-7 cleaves the NR1 NMDA receptor subunit and modifies NMDA receptor function. PMID:18644839

  3. Role of glycoprotein IIa (beta 1 subunit of very late activation antigens) in platelet functions.

    PubMed

    Parmentier, S; Catimel, B; McGregor, L; Leung, L L; McGregor, J L

    1991-10-15

    Very late activation antigens (VLAs) are glycoproteins (GPs) that play a major role in platelet adhesion to extracellular matrix. These GPs, members of the integrin family, are heterodimer complexes with different alpha subunits noncovalently associated with a common beta 1 subunit known as GPIIa. GPIa-IIa (also known as VLA2), GPIc-IIa (VLA5), and GPIc*-IIa (VLA6) are involved, respectively, in platelet adhesion to collagen, fibronectin, and laminin. At this stage, very little is known about the role of GPIIa in platelet adhesive functions. In this study, we have generated a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) (LYP22) directed against GPIIa. Immunoaffinity chromatography using LYP22 combined with two-dimensional nonreduced-reduced sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis shows that the antibody brings down all VLA subunits. Western blots indicate that the binding site of LYP22 on GPIIa is disulfide bridge-dependent. The number of LYP22 binding sites is not increased on stimulation with thrombin and is in the range of what is observed with another anti-GPIIa MoAb (A-1A5). LYP22 is the first anti-GPIIa MoAb to inhibit aggregation and secretion of washed platelets stimulated with collagen, thrombin, or arachidonic acid. Moreover, the lag-phase usually observed on collagen stimulation is significantly prolonged (by 60 seconds) in the presence of LYP22. This lag-phase, mediated by LYP22, is also observed in the presence of plasma proteins and is coupled with a reduced effect on collagen-induced platelet aggregation. In addition, LYP22 affects the adhesion of resting platelets to type III collagen, but not to fibronectin, laminin, or type I collagen. These results strongly indicate that the site on GPIIa, bearing the LYP22 epitope, is an active participant in signal transduction controlling platelet functions.

  4. Strategy Guideline. Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, Arlan

    2013-06-01

    This guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  5. Compacting a Kentucky coal for quality logs

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Y.; Li, Z.; Mao, S.

    1999-07-01

    A Kentucky coal was found more difficult to be compacted into large size strong logs. Study showed that compaction parameters affecting the strength of compacted coal logs could be categorized into three groups. The first group is coal inherent properties such as elasticity and coefficient of friction, the second group is machine properties such as mold geometry, and the third group is the coal mixture preparation parameters such as particle size distribution. Theoretical analysis showed that an appropriate backpressure can reduce surface cracks occurring during ejection. This has been confirmed by the experiments conducted.

  6. Isolation, Characterization, and Aggregation of a Structured Bacterial Matrix Precursor*

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Liraz; Romero, Diego; Kayatekin, Can; Akabayov, Barak; Vlamakis, Hera; Losick, Richard; Kolter, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Biofilms are surface-associated groups of microbial cells that are embedded in an extracellular matrix (ECM). The ECM is a network of biopolymers, mainly polysaccharides, proteins, and nucleic acids. ECM proteins serve a variety of structural roles and often form amyloid-like fibers. Despite the extensive study of the formation of amyloid fibers from their constituent subunits in humans, much less is known about the assembly of bacterial functional amyloid-like precursors into fibers. Using dynamic light scattering, atomic force microscopy, circular dichroism, and infrared spectroscopy, we show that our unique purification method of a Bacillus subtilis major matrix protein component results in stable oligomers that retain their native α-helical structure. The stability of these oligomers enabled us to control the external conditions that triggered their aggregation. In particular, we show that stretched fibers are formed on a hydrophobic surface, whereas plaque-like aggregates are formed in solution under acidic pH conditions. TasA is also shown to change conformation upon aggregation and gain some β-sheet structure. Our studies of the aggregation of a bacterial matrix protein from its subunits shed new light on assembly processes of the ECM within bacterial biofilms. PMID:23632024

  7. Conformational Differences Among Solution Structures of the Type I[alpha], II[alpha], and II[beta] Protein Kinase A Regulatory Subunit Homodimers: Role of the Linker Regions

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, D.; Blumenthal, D.K.; Heller, W.T.; Brown, S.; Canaves, J.M.; Taylor, S.S.; Trewhella, J.

    2010-11-16

    The regulatory (R) subunits of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (protein kinase A or PKA) are multi-domain proteins responsible for conferring cAMP-dependence and localizing PKA to specific subcellular locations. There are four isoforms of the R subunit in mammals that are similar in molecular mass and domain organization, but clearly serve different biological functions. Although high-resolution structures are available for the cAMP-binding domains and dimerization/docking domains of two isoforms, there are no high-resolution structures of any of the intact R subunit homodimer isoforms. The results of small-angle X-ray scattering studies presented here indicate that the RI{alpha}, RII{alpha}, and RII{beta} homodimers differ markedly in overall shape, despite extensive sequence homology and similar molecular masses. The RII{alpha} and RII{beta} homodimers have very extended, rod-like shapes, whereas the RI{alpha} homodimer likely has a compact Y-shape. Based on a comparison of the R subunit sequences, we predict that the linker regions are the likely cause of these large differences in shape among the isoforms. In addition, we show that cAMP binding does not cause large conformational changes in type I{alpha} or II{alpha} R subunit homodimers, suggesting that the activation of PKA by cAMP involves only local conformational changes in the R subunits.

  8. Nanocomposites Fabricated by a Combination of Green Compact Nanoparticle Incorporation and Ultrasonic Treatment of the Melted Compact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kandemir, Sinan; Atkinson, Helen V.; Weston, David P.; Hainsworth, Sarah V.

    2014-11-01

    Thixoforming is a type of semi-solid processing which is based on forming metals in the semi-solid state rather than fully liquid or solid state. There have been no reports of the thixoforming of nanocomposites in the literature. The incorporation of ceramic nanoparticles into liquid metals is a challenging task for the fabrication of metal matrix nanocomposites due to their large surface-to-volume ratio and poor wettability. Previous research work by a number of workers has highlighted the challenges with the incorporation of nanoparticles into liquid aluminum alloy. In the present study, SiC and TiB2 nanoparticles with an average diameter between 20 and 30 nm were firstly incorporated into green compacts by a powder forming route, and then the compacts were melted and treated ultrasonically. The microstructural studies reveal that the engulfment and relatively effective distribution of the nanoparticles into the melt were achieved. The hardness was considerably improved with only 0.8 wt pct addition of the nanoparticles. The nanocomposites were successfully thixoformed at a solid fraction between 0.65 and 0.70. The microstructures, hardness, and tensile mechanical properties of the thixoformed nanocomposites were investigated and compared with those of the as-received A356 and thixoformed A356 alloys. The tensile properties of the thixoformed nanocomposites were significantly enhanced compared to thixoformed A356 alloy without reinforcement, indicating the strengthening effects of the nanoparticles.

  9. Deep Compaction Control of Sandy Soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bałachowski, Lech; Kurek, Norbert

    2015-02-01

    Vibroflotation, vibratory compaction, micro-blasting or heavy tamping are typical improvement methods for the cohesionless deposits of high thickness. The complex mechanism of deep soil compaction is related to void ratio decrease with grain rearrangements, lateral stress increase, prestressing effect of certain number of load cycles, water pressure dissipation, aging and other effects. Calibration chamber based interpretation of CPTU/DMT can be used to take into account vertical and horizontal stress and void ratio effects. Some examples of interpretation of soundings in pre-treated and compacted sands are given. Some acceptance criteria for compaction control are discussed. The improvement factors are analysed including the normalised approach based on the soil behaviour type index.

  10. Steady state compact toroidal plasma production

    DOEpatents

    Turner, William C.

    1986-01-01

    Apparatus and method for maintaining steady state compact toroidal plasmas. A compact toroidal plasma is formed by a magnetized coaxial plasma gun and held in close proximity to the gun electrodes by applied magnetic fields or magnetic fields produced by image currents in conducting walls. Voltage supply means maintains a constant potential across the electrodes producing an increasing magnetic helicity which drives the plasma away from a minimum energy state. The plasma globally relaxes to a new minimum energy state, conserving helicity according to Taylor's relaxation hypothesis, and injecting net helicity into the core of the compact toroidal plasma. Controlling the voltage so as to inject net helicity at a predetermined rate based on dissipative processes maintains or increases the compact toroidal plasma in a time averaged steady state mode.

  11. Diagnostics for the National Compact Stellarator Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    B.C. Stratton; D. Johnson; R. Feder; E. Fredrickson; H. Neilson; H. Takahashi; M. Zarnstorf; M. Cole; P. Goranson; E. Lazarus; B. Nelson

    2003-09-16

    The status of planning of the National Compact Stellarator Experiment (NCSX) diagnostics is presented, with the emphasis on resolution of diagnostics access issues and on diagnostics required for the early phases of operation.

  12. Detection of phosphorylated subunits by combined LA-ICP-MS and MALDI-FTICR-MS analysis in yeast mitochondrial membrane complexes separated by blue native/SDS-PAGE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krause-Buchholz, Udo; Becker, J. Susanne; Zoriy, Miroslav; Pickhardt, Carola; Przybylski, Michael; Rödel, Gerhard; Becker, J. Sabine

    2006-01-01

    We report on the identification of phosphorylated subunits of yeast mitochondrial ATPase using a novel screening technique in combination with BN/SDS-PAGE. Protein complexes present in yeast mitochondrial membranes were separated in their native state in the first dimension and their subunit composition was resolved by SDS-PAGE in the second dimension. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was used to rapidly screen for the presence of phosphorus in the subunits. The detection limits of elements investigated in selected protein spots are in the low [mu]g g-1 concentration range. Sulfur was used as the internal standard element for quantification. Phosphorus was detected in two of the proteins, that were identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (MALDI-FTICR-MS) as subunits Atp1p and Atp2p of the ATPase. These results were confirmed by Western blot analysis using antibodies directed against phosphorylated amino acids. The combination of LA-ICP-MS and MALDI-FTICR-MS with BN/SDS-PAGE provides a fast and sensitive tool for structure analysis of phosphorus and metal-containing subunits of membrane protein complexes.

  13. Compact reflective imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOEpatents

    Chrisp, Michael P.

    2006-05-09

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, a first mirror that receives said light and reflects said light, an immersive diffraction grating that diffracts said light, a second mirror that focuses said light, and a detector array that receives said focused light. The compact imaging spectrometer can be utilized for remote sensing imaging spectrometers where size and weight are of primary importance.

  14. Compact Proton Accelerator for Cancer Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Paul, A C

    2007-06-12

    An investigation is being made into the feasibility of making a compact proton dielectric wall (DWA) accelerator for medical radiation treatment based on the high gradient insulation (HGI) technology. A small plasma device is used for the proton source. Using only electric focusing fields for transporting and focusing the beam on the patient, the compact DWA proton accelerator m system can deliver wide and independent variable ranges of beam currents, energies and spot sizes.

  15. Phosphorylation of ATPase subunits of the 26S proteasome.

    PubMed

    Mason, G G; Murray, R Z; Pappin, D; Rivett, A J

    1998-07-01

    The 26S proteasome complex plays a major role in the non-lysosomal degradation of intracellular proteins. Purified 26S proteasomes give a pattern of more than 40 spots on 2D-PAGE gels. The positions of subunits have been identified by mass spectrometry of tryptic peptides and by immunoblotting with subunit-specific antipeptide antibodies. Two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from [32P]phosphate-labelled human embryo lung L-132 cells revealed the presence of at least three major phosphorylated polypeptides among the regulatory subunits as well as the C8 and C9 components of the core 20S proteasome. Comparison with the positions of the regulatory polypeptides revealed a minor phosphorylated form to be S7 (MSS1). Antibodies against S4, S6 (TBP7) and S12 (MOV34) all cross-reacted at the position of major phosphorylated polypeptides suggesting that several of the ATPase subunits may be phosphorylated. The phosphorylation of S4 was confirmed by double immunoprecipitation experiments in which 26S proteasomes were immunoprecipitated as above and dissociated and then S4 was immunoprecipitated with subunit-specific antibodies. Antibodies against the non-ATPase subunit S10, which has been suggested by others to be phosphorylated, did not coincide with the position of a phosphorylated polypeptide. Some differences were observed in the 2D-PAGE pattern of proteasomes immunoprecipitated from cultured cells compared to purified rat liver 26S proteasomes suggesting possible differences in subunit compositions of 26S proteasomes.

  16. Cytochrome c oxidase: Evolution of control via nuclear subunit addition☆

    PubMed Central

    Pierron, Denis; Wildman, Derek E.; Hüttemann, Maik; Markondapatnaikuni, Gopi Chand; Aras, Siddhesh; Grossman, Lawrence I.

    2014-01-01

    According to theory, present eukaryotic cells originated from a beneficial association between two free-living cells. Due to this endosymbiotic event the pre-eukaryotic cell gained access to oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS), which produces more than 15 times as much ATP as glycolysis. Because cellular ATP needs fluctuate and OXPHOS both requires and produces entities that can be toxic for eukaryotic cells such as ROS or NADH, we propose that the success of endosymbiosis has largely depended on the regulation of endosymbiont OXPHOS. Several studies have presented cytochrome c oxidase as a key regulator of OXPHOS; for example, COX is the only complex of mammalian OXPHOS with known tissue-specific isoforms of nuclear encoded subunits. We here discuss current knowledge about the origin of nuclear encoded subunits and the appearance of different isozymes promoted by tissue and cellular environments such as hypoxia. We also review evidence for recent selective pressure acting on COX among vertebrates, particularly in primate lineages, and discuss the unique pattern of co-evolution between the nuclear and mitochondrial genomes. Finally, even though the addition of nuclear encoded subunits was a major event in eukaryotic COX evolution, this does not lead to emergence of a more efficient COX, as might be expected from an anthropocentric point of view, for the “higher” organism possessing large brains and muscles. The main function of these subunits appears to be “only” to control the activity of the mitochondrial subunits. We propose that this control function is an as yet underappreciated key point of evolution. Moreover, the importance of regulating energy supply may have caused the addition of subunits encoded by the nucleus in a process comparable to a “domestication scenario” such that the host tends to control more and more tightly the ancestral activity of COX performed by the mtDNA encoded subunits. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled

  17. FABRICATION OF URANIUM OXYCARBIDE KERNELS AND COMPACTS FOR HTR FUEL

    SciTech Connect

    Dr. Jeffrey A. Phillips; Eric L. Shaber; Scott G. Nagley

    2012-10-01

    As part of the program to demonstrate tristructural isotropic (TRISO)-coated fuel for the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP), Advanced Gas Reactor (AGR) fuel is being irradiation tested in the Advanced Test Reactor (ATR) at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). This testing has led to improved kernel fabrication techniques, the formation of TRISO fuel particles, and upgrades to the overcoating, compaction, and heat treatment processes. Combined, these improvements provide a fuel manufacturing process that meets the stringent requirements associated with testing in the AGR experimentation program. Researchers at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) are working in conjunction with a team from Babcock and Wilcox (B&W) and Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to (a) improve the quality of uranium oxycarbide (UCO) fuel kernels, (b) deposit TRISO layers to produce a fuel that meets or exceeds the standard developed by German researches in the 1980s, and (c) develop a process to overcoat TRISO particles with the same matrix material, but applies it with water using equipment previously and successfully employed in the pharmaceutical industry. A primary goal of this work is to simplify the process, making it more robust and repeatable while relying less on operator technique than prior overcoating efforts. A secondary goal is to improve first-pass yields to greater than 95% through the use of established technology and equipment. In the first test, called “AGR-1,” graphite compacts containing approximately 300,000 coated particles were irradiated from December 2006 to November 2009. The AGR-1 fuel was designed to closely replicate many of the properties of German TRISO-coated particles, thought to be important for good fuel performance. No release of gaseous fission product, indicative of particle coating failure, was detected in the nearly 3-year irradiation to a peak burn up of 19.6% at a time-average temperature of 1038–1121°C. Before fabricating AGR-2 fuel, each

  18. Compaction of Ductile and Fragile Grains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Creissac, S.; Pouliquen, O.; Dalloz-Dubrujeaud, B.

    2009-06-01

    The compaction of powders into tablets is widely used in several industries (cosmetics, food, pharmaceutics…). In all these industries, the composition of the initial powder is complex, and the behaviour under compaction is not well known, also the mechanical behaviour of the tablets. The aim of this paper is to understand the behaviour (pressure vs density) of a simplified media made of fragile and ductile powders, varying the relative ratio of each powder. Some compaction experiments were carried out with glass beads (fragile) and Polyethylen Glycol powder (ductile). We observe two typical behaviours, depending on the relative volumic fraction of each component. A transition is pointed out, observing the evolution of the slope of the curve pressure/density. This transition is explained by geometrical considerations during compaction. A model is proposed, based on the assumption that the studied media can be compare to a diphasic material with a continuous phase (the ductile powder) and a discrete phase (the fragile powder). The result of this model is compare to the experimental results of compaction, and give a good prediction of the behaviour of the different mixing, knowing the behaviour of the ductile and the fragile phase separately. These results were also interpreted in terms of Heckel parameter which characterizes the ability of the powder to deform plastically under compaction. Some mechanical tests were also performed to compare the mechanical resitance of the obtained tablets.

  19. Dynamic compaction of tungsten carbide powder.

    SciTech Connect

    Gluth, Jeffrey Weston; Hall, Clint Allen; Vogler, Tracy John; Grady, Dennis Edward

    2005-04-01

    The shock compaction behavior of a tungsten carbide powder was investigated using a new experimental design for gas-gun experiments. This design allows the Hugoniot properties to be measured with reasonably good accuracy despite the inherent difficulties involved with distended powders. The experiments also provide the first reshock state for the compacted powder. Experiments were conducted at impact velocities of 245, 500, and 711 m/s. A steady shock wave was observed for some of the sample thicknesses, but the remainder were attenuated due to release from the back of the impactor or the edge of the sample. The shock velocity for the powder was found to be quite low, and the propagating shock waves were seen to be very dispersive. The Hugoniot density for the 711 m/s experiment was close to ambient crystal density for tungsten carbide, indicating nearly complete compaction. When compared with quasi-static compaction results for the same material, the dynamic compaction data is seen to be significantly stiffer for the regime over which they overlap. Based on these initial results, recommendations are made for improving the experimental technique and for future work to improve our understanding of powder compaction.

  20. Matrix interdiction problem

    SciTech Connect

    Pan, Feng; Kasiviswanathan, Shiva

    2010-01-01

    In the matrix interdiction problem, a real-valued matrix and an integer k is given. The objective is to remove k columns such that the sum over all rows of the maximum entry in each row is minimized. This combinatorial problem is closely related to bipartite network interdiction problem which can be applied to prioritize the border checkpoints in order to minimize the probability that an adversary can successfully cross the border. After introducing the matrix interdiction problem, we will prove the problem is NP-hard, and even NP-hard to approximate with an additive n{gamma} factor for a fixed constant {gamma}. We also present an algorithm for this problem that achieves a factor of (n-k) mUltiplicative approximation ratio.

  1. Compact fission counter for DANCE

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C Y; Chyzh, A; Kwan, E; Henderson, R; Gostic, J; Carter, D; Bredeweg, T; Couture, A; Jandel, M; Ullmann, J

    2010-11-06

    and still be able to maintain a stable operation under extreme radioactivity and the ability to separate fission fragments from {alpha}'s. In the following sections, the description is given for the design and performance of this new compact PPAC, for studying the neutron-induced reactions on actinides using DANCE at LANL.

  2. Stylolite compaction and stress models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koehn, D.; Ebner, M.; Renard, F.; Toussaint, R.

    2009-04-01

    Stylolites are rough dissolution seams that develop during pressure solution in the Earth's crust. Especially in limestone quarries they exhibit a spectacular roughness with spikes and large columns. They are visible as dark lines of residual clays and other non-dissolvable components in the white limestone. The roughening phenomena seems to be universal since stylolites can also be found in quarzites, mylonites and all kinds of rocks that undergo pressure solution. The genesis of stylolites is not well understood even though they have been used to estimate compaction and to determine the direction of the main compressive stress. We have developed a numerical model to study the dynamic development of the roughness and its dependence on stress. Based on the model we present estimates of finite strain and depth of burial. The numerical stylolites are studied in two ways: the temporal evolution of the roughness on one hand and the fractal characteristics of the roughness on the other hand. In addition we vary the noise in the model and illustrate the importance of the grain size on the roughening process. Surface energies are dominant for small wavelengths and the initial stylolite growth is non-linear and as slow as a diffusive process. However, once a critical wavelength is reached the elastic regime becomes dominant and the growth is still non-linear but not as strong as in the surface energy dominated case. The growth of the roughness speeds up and teeth structures develop. Depending on the system size the growth will reach a third regime where saturation is reached and the roughness stays constant. We will present a scaling law based on these findings that can be used to estimate finite strain from natural stylolites. The roughness of the stylolite itself is self-affine with two different roughness exponents. The switch from one exponent to the other is dependent on stress. We show how stylolites can thus be used as palaeo-stress-gauges. A variation of the

  3. Porous Compaction in Transient Creep Regime and Implications for Melt and Petroleum Extraction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chauveau, B.; Kaminski, E.

    2007-12-01

    Liquid segregation through a porous medium depends on the ability of the matrix to deform and compact. The key question of the rheological behavior of the porous matrix has been mainly investigated for Newtonian and simple visco-elastic Maxwell-like rheologies. Earth's materials have a more complex rheological behavior, in which the balance between the elastic and viscous contribution to the deformation is time-dependent. In this paper, we propose a Burger-type model to investigate the implications of transient rheology for viscous compaction of a porous material. The model is characterized by three dimensionless parameters: (1) the Deborah number, De, defined as the ratio of an elastic time scale over the compaction time scale, (2) the ratio of the transient and steady viscosities, λμ, and (3) the ratio of the transient and steady rigidity moduli, λG. We perform 1-D numerical experiments to illustrate the general behavior of compaction in a transient creep regime as a function of the model parameters. For small De (De< 10-2) the compaction occurs in the classical viscous mode and solitary waves (magmons) are generated. For larger De, the compaction mechanism is mainly controlled by λμ. For small transient viscosity (λμ → 0), compaction occurs in an elastic mode and shock waves are generated. For increasing λμ, two new regimes are observed, first "shaggy" shock waves and then "polytons". The threshold value of λμ that defines the two regimes is a decreasing function of De. Shaggy shock waves are characterized by the presence of secondary peaks at the wave propagation front. The length-scale of the peaks is a decreasing function of λG and their amplitude decreases along the propagation. In the polytons regime, the peaks tend to detach and mimic the behavior of solitary waves. Based on a discussion of the likely values of the model parameters for the Earth, we conclude that the influence of transient creep should not be neglected. Polytons and shaggy

  4. Compact Fuel Element Environment Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradley, D. E.; Mireles, O. R.; Hickman, R. R.; Broadway, J. W.

    2012-01-01

    Deep space missions with large payloads require high specific impulse (I(sub sp)) and relatively high thrust to achieve mission goals in reasonable time frames. Conventional, storable propellants produce average I(sub sp). Nuclear thermal rockets (NTRs) capable of high I(sub sp) thrust have been proposed. NTR employs heat produced by fission reaction to heat and therefore accelerate hydrogen, which is then forced through a rocket nozzle providing thrust. Fuel element temperatures are very high (up to 3,000 K) and hydrogen is highly reactive with most materials at high temperatures. Data covering the effects of high-temperature hydrogen exposure on fuel elements are limited. The primary concern is the mechanical failure of fuel elements that employ high melting point metals, ceramics, or a combination (cermet) as a structural matrix into which the nuclear fuel is distributed. It is not necessary to include fissile material in test samples intended to explore high-temperature hydrogen exposure of the structural support matrices. A small-scale test bed designed to heat fuel element samples via noncontact radio frequency heating and expose samples to hydrogen for typical mission durations has been developed to assist in optimal material and manufacturing process selection without employing fissile material. This Technical Memorandum details the test bed design and results of testing conducted to date.

  5. Matrixed business support comparison study.

    SciTech Connect

    Parsons, Josh D.

    2004-11-01

    The Matrixed Business Support Comparison Study reviewed the current matrixed Chief Financial Officer (CFO) division staff models at Sandia National Laboratories. There were two primary drivers of this analysis: (1) the increasing number of financial staff matrixed to mission customers and (2) the desire to further understand the matrix process and the opportunities and challenges it creates.

  6. The first transmembrane domain (TM1) of β2-subunit binds to the transmembrane domain S1 of α-subunit in BK potassium channels

    PubMed Central

    Morera, Francisco J.; Alioua, Abderrahmane; Kundu, Pallob; Salazar, Marcelo; Gonzalez, Carlos; Martinez, Agustin D.; Stefani, Enrico; Toro, Ligia; Latorre, Ramon

    2012-01-01

    The BK channel is one of the most broadly expressed ion channels in mammals. In many tissues, the BK channel pore-forming α-subunit is associated to an auxiliary β-subunit that modulates the voltage- and Ca2+-dependent activation of the channel. Structural components present in β-subunits that are important for the physical association with the α-subunit are yet unknown. Here, we show through co-immunoprecipitation that the intracellular C-terminus, the second transmembrane domain (TM2) and the extracellular loop of the β2-subunit are dispensable for association with the α-subunit pointing transmembrane domain 1 (TM1) as responsible for the interaction. Indeed, the TOXCAT assay for transmembrane protein–protein interactions demonstrated for the first time that TM1 of the β2-subunit physically binds to the transmembrane S1 domain of the α-subunit. PMID:22710124

  7. Synaptic localization of NMDA receptor subunits in the rat retina.

    PubMed

    Fletcher, E L; Hack, I; Brandstätter, J H; Wässle, H

    2000-04-24

    The distribution and synaptic clustering of N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors were studied in the rat retina by using subunit specific antisera. A punctate immunofluorescence was observed in the inner plexiform layer (IPL) for all subunits tested, and electron microscopy confirmed that the immunoreactive puncta represent labeling of receptors clustered at postsynaptic sites. Double labeling of sections revealed that NMDA receptor clusters within the IPL are composed of different subunit combinations: NR1/NR2A, NR1/NR2B, and in a small number of synapses NR1/NR2A/NR2B. The majority of NMDA receptor clusters were colocalized with the postsynaptic density proteins PSD-95, PSD-93, and SAP 102. Double labeling of the NMDA receptor subunit specific antisera with protein kinase C (PKC), a marker of rod bipolar cells, revealed very little colocalization at the rod bipolar cell axon terminal. This suggests that NMDA receptors are important in mediating neurotransmission within the cone bipolar cell pathways of the IPL. The postsynaptic neurons are a subset of amacrine cells and most ganglion cells. Usually only one of the two postsynaptic processes at the bipolar cell ribbon synapses expressed NMDA receptors. In the outer plexiform layer (OPL), punctate immunofluoresence was observed for the NR1C2; subunit, which was shown by electron microscopy to be localized presynaptically within both rod and cone photoreceptor terminals.

  8. A distinct holoenzyme organization for two-subunit pyruvate carboxylase

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Philip H.; Jo, Jeanyoung; Lin, Yu-Cheng; Lin, Min-Han; Chou, Chi-Yuan; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Tong, Liang

    2016-01-01

    Pyruvate carboxylase (PC) has important roles in metabolism and is crucial for virulence for some pathogenic bacteria. PC contains biotin carboxylase (BC), carboxyltransferase (CT) and biotin carboxyl carrier protein (BCCP) components. It is a single-chain enzyme in eukaryotes and most bacteria, and functions as a 500 kD homo-tetramer. In contrast, PC is a two-subunit enzyme in a collection of Gram-negative bacteria, with the α subunit containing the BC and the β subunit the CT and BCCP domains, and it is believed that the holoenzyme has α4β4 stoichiometry. We report here the crystal structures of a two-subunit PC from Methylobacillus flagellatus. Surprisingly, our structures reveal an α2β4 stoichiometry, and the overall architecture of the holoenzyme is strikingly different from that of the homo-tetrameric PCs. Biochemical and mutagenesis studies confirm the stoichiometry and other structural observations. Our functional studies in Pseudomonas aeruginosa show that its two-subunit PC is important for colony morphogenesis. PMID:27708276

  9. GABA receptor subunit composition relative to insecticide potency and selectivity.

    PubMed

    Ratra, G S; Casida, J E

    2001-07-01

    Three observations on the 4-[(3)H]propyl-4'-ethynylbicycloorthobenzoate ([(3)H]EBOB) binding site in the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) receptor indicate the specific target for insecticide action in human brain and a possible mechanism for selectivity. First, from published data, alpha-endosulfan, lindane and fipronil compete for the [(3)H]EBOB binding site with affinities of 0.3--7 nM in both human recombinant homooligomeric beta 3 receptors and housefly head membranes. Second, from structure-activity studies, including new data, GABAergic insecticide binding potency on the pentameric receptor formed from the beta 3 subunit correlates well with that on the housefly receptor (r=0.88, n=20). This conserved inhibitor specificity is consistent with known sequence homologies in the housefly GABA receptor and the human GABA(A) receptor beta 3 subunit. Third, as mostly new findings, various combinations of alpha 1, alpha 6, and gamma 2 subunits coexpressed with a beta 1 or beta 3 subunit confer differential insecticide binding sensitivity, particularly to fipronil, indicating that subunit composition is a major factor in insecticide selectivity.

  10. Facilitating Image Search With a Scalable and Compact Semantic Mapping.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Li, Weisheng; Liu, Dong; Ni, Bingbing; Shen, Jialie; Yan, Shuicheng

    2015-08-01

    This paper introduces a novel approach to facilitating image search based on a compact semantic embedding. A novel method is developed to explicitly map concepts and image contents into a unified latent semantic space for the representation of semantic concept prototypes. Then, a linear embedding matrix is learned that maps images into the semantic space, such that each image is closer to its relevant concept prototype than other prototypes. In our approach, the semantic concepts equated with query keywords and the images mapped into the vicinity of the prototype are retrieved by our scheme. In addition, a computationally efficient method is introduced to incorporate new semantic concept prototypes into the semantic space by updating the embedding matrix. This novelty improves the scalability of the method and allows it to be applied to dynamic image repositories. Therefore, the proposed approach not only narrows semantic gap but also supports an efficient image search process. We have carried out extensive experiments on various cross-modality image search tasks over three widely-used benchmark image datasets. Results demonstrate the superior effectiveness, efficiency, and scalability of our proposed approach.

  11. Preassembly of interleukin 2 (IL-2) receptor subunits on resting Kit 225 K6 T cells and their modulation by IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15: a fluorescence resonance energy transfer study.

    PubMed

    Damjanovich, S; Bene, L; Matkó, J; Alileche, A; Goldman, C K; Sharrow, S; Waldmann, T A

    1997-11-25

    Assembly and mutual proximities of alpha, beta, and gamma(c) subunits of the interleukin 2 receptors (IL-2R) in plasma membranes of Kit 225 K6 T lymphoma cells were investigated by fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) using fluorescein isothiocyanate- and Cy3-conjugated monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that were directed against the IL-2R alpha, IL-2R beta, and gamma(c) subunits of IL-2R. The cell-surface distribution of subunits was analyzed at the nanometer scale (2-10 nm) by FRET on a cell-by-cell basis. The cells were probed in resting phase and after coculture with saturating concentrations of IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15. FRET data from donor- and acceptor-labeled IL-2R beta-alpha, gamma-alpha, and gamma-beta pairs demonstrated close proximity of all subunits to each other in the plasma membrane of resting T cells. These mutual proximities do not appear to represent mAb-induced microaggregation, because FRET measurements with Fab fragments of the mAbs gave similar results. The relative proximities were meaningfully modulated by binding of IL-2, IL-7, and IL-15. Based on FRET analysis the topology of the three subunits at the surface of resting cells can be best described by a "triangular model" in the absence of added interleukins. IL-2 strengthens the bridges between the subunits, making the triangle more compact. IL-7 and IL-15 act in the opposite direction by opening the triangle possibly because they associate their private specific alpha receptors with the beta and/or gamma(c) subunits of the IL-2R complex. These data suggest that IL-2R subunits are already colocalized in resting T cells and do not require cytokine-induced redistribution. This colocalization is significantly modulated by binding of relevant interleukins in a cytokine-specific manner.

  12. Processing and mechanical properties of aluminium-silicon carbide metal matrix composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuruzzaman, D. M.; Kamaruzaman, F. F. B.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, aluminium-silicon carbide (Al-SiC) metal matrix composites (MMCs) of different compositions were prepared under different compaction loads. Three different types Al-SiC composite specimens having 10%, 20% and 30% volume fractions of silicon carbide were fabricated using conventional powder metallurgy (PM) route. The specimens of different compositions were prepared under different compaction loads 10 ton and 15 ton. The effect of volume fraction of SiC particulates and compaction load on the properties of Al/SiC composites were investigated. The obtained results show that density and hardness of the composites are greatly influenced by volume fraction of silicon carbide particulates. Results also show that density, hardness and microstructure of Al-SiC composites are significantly influenced depending on the compaction load. The increase in the volume fraction of SiC enhances the density and hardness of the Al/SiC composites. For 15 ton compaction load, the composites show increased density and hardness as well as improved microstructure than the composites prepared under 10 ton compaction load. Furthermore, optical micrographs reveal that SiC particulates are uniformly distributed in the Al matrix.

  13. The Acrosomal Matrix.

    PubMed

    Foster, James A; Gerton, George L

    2016-01-01

    The acrosome, a single exocytotic vesicle on the head of sperm, has an essential role in fertilization, but the exact mechanisms by which it facilitates sperm-egg interactions remain unresolved. The acrosome contains dozens of secretory proteins that are packaged into the forming structure during spermatogenesis; many of these proteins are localized into specific topographical areas of the acrosome, while others are more diffusely distributed. Acrosomal proteins can also be biochemically classified as components of the acrosomal matrix, a large, relatively insoluble complex, or as soluble proteins. This review focuses on recent findings using genetically modified mice (gene knockouts and transgenic "green acrosome" mice) to study the effects of eliminating acrosomal matrix-associated proteins on sperm structure and function. Some gene knockouts produce infertile phenotypes with obviously missing, specific activities that affect acrosome biogenesis during spermatogenesis or interfere with acrosome function in mature sperm. Mutations that delete some components produce fertile phenotypes with subtler effects that provide useful insights into acrosomal matrix function in fertilization. In general, these studies enable the reassessment of paradigms to explain acrosome formation and function and provide novel, objective insights into the roles of acrosomal matrix proteins in fertilization. The use of genetically engineered mouse models has yielded new mechanistic information that complements recent, important in vivo imaging studies. PMID:27194348

  14. Constructing the matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, John

    2012-09-01

    As part of our 'toolkit' for analysing an extraterrestrial signal, the facility for calculating structural affinity to known phenomena must be part of our core capabilities. Without such a resource, we risk compromising our potential for detection and decipherment or at least causing significant delay in the process. To create such a repository for assessing structural affinity, all known systems (language parameters) need to be structurally analysed to 'place' their 'system' within a relational communication matrix. This will need to include all known variants of language structure, whether 'living' (in current use) or ancient; this must also include endeavours to incorporate yet undeciphered scripts and non-human communication, to provide as complete a picture as possible. In creating such a relational matrix, post-detection decipherment will be assisted by a structural 'map' that will have the potential for 'placing' an alien communication with its nearest known 'neighbour', to assist subsequent categorisation of basic parameters as a precursor to decipherment. 'Universal' attributes and behavioural characteristics of known communication structure will form a range of templates (Elliott, 2001 [1] and Elliott et al., 2002 [2]), to support and optimise our attempt at categorising and deciphering the content of an extraterrestrial signal. Detection of the hierarchical layers, which comprise intelligent, complex communication, will then form a matrix of calculations that will ultimately score affinity through a relational matrix of structural comparison. In this paper we develop the rationales and demonstrate functionality with initial test results.

  15. Matrix Embedded Organic Synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamakolanu, U. G.; Freund, F. T.

    2016-05-01

    In the matrix of minerals such as olivine, a redox reaction of the low-z elements occurs. Oxygen is oxidized to the peroxy state while the low-Z-elements become chemically reduced. We assign them a formula [CxHyOzNiSj]n- and call them proto-organics.

  16. Roller compaction of moist pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-Y; Hung, W-L; Miguélez-Morán, A M; Gururajan, B; Seville, J P K

    2010-05-31

    The compression behaviour of powders during roller compaction is dominated by a number of factors, such as process conditions (roll speed, roll gap, feeding mechanisms and feeding speed) and powder properties (particle size, shape, moisture content). The moisture content affects the powder properties, such as the flowability and cohesion, but it is not clear how the moisture content will influence the powder compression behaviour during roller compaction. In this study, the effect of moisture contents on roller compaction behaviour of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Avicel PH102) was investigated experimentally. MCC samples of different moisture contents were prepared by mixing as-received MCC powder with different amount of water that was sprayed onto the powder bed being agitated in a rotary mixer. The flowability of these samples were evaluated in terms of the poured angle of repose and flow functions. The moist powders were then compacted using the instrumented roller compactor developed at the University of Birmingham. The flow and compression behaviour during roller compaction and the properties of produced ribbons were examined. It has been found that, as the moisture content increases, the flowability of moist MCC powders decreases and the powder becomes more cohesive. As a consequence of non-uniform flow of powder into the compaction zone induced by the friction between powder and side cheek plates, all produced ribbons have a higher density in the middle and lower densities at the edges. For the ribbons made of powders with high moisture contents, different hydration states across the ribbon width were also identified from SEM images. Moreover, it was interesting to find that these ribbons were split into two halves. This is attributed to the reduction in the mechanical strength of moist powder compacts with high moisture contents produced at high compression pressures.

  17. Roller compaction of moist pharmaceutical powders.

    PubMed

    Wu, C-Y; Hung, W-L; Miguélez-Morán, A M; Gururajan, B; Seville, J P K

    2010-05-31

    The compression behaviour of powders during roller compaction is dominated by a number of factors, such as process conditions (roll speed, roll gap, feeding mechanisms and feeding speed) and powder properties (particle size, shape, moisture content). The moisture content affects the powder properties, such as the flowability and cohesion, but it is not clear how the moisture content will influence the powder compression behaviour during roller compaction. In this study, the effect of moisture contents on roller compaction behaviour of microcrystalline cellulose (MCC, Avicel PH102) was investigated experimentally. MCC samples of different moisture contents were prepared by mixing as-received MCC powder with different amount of water that was sprayed onto the powder bed being agitated in a rotary mixer. The flowability of these samples were evaluated in terms of the poured angle of repose and flow functions. The moist powders were then compacted using the instrumented roller compactor developed at the University of Birmingham. The flow and compression behaviour during roller compaction and the properties of produced ribbons were examined. It has been found that, as the moisture content increases, the flowability of moist MCC powders decreases and the powder becomes more cohesive. As a consequence of non-uniform flow of powder into the compaction zone induced by the friction between powder and side cheek plates, all produced ribbons have a higher density in the middle and lower densities at the edges. For the ribbons made of powders with high moisture contents, different hydration states across the ribbon width were also identified from SEM images. Moreover, it was interesting to find that these ribbons were split into two halves. This is attributed to the reduction in the mechanical strength of moist powder compacts with high moisture contents produced at high compression pressures. PMID:20176096

  18. Separation and characterization of alpha-chain subunits from tilapia (Tilapia zillii) skin gelatin using ultrafiltration.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shulin; Tang, Lanlan; Su, Wenjin; Weng, Wuyin; Osako, Kazufumi; Tanaka, Munehiko

    2015-12-01

    Alpha-chain subunits were separated from tilapia skin gelatin using ultrafiltration, and the physicochemical properties of obtained subunits were investigated. As a result, α1-subunit and α2-subunit could be successfully separated by 100 kDa MWCO regenerated cellulose membranes and 150 kDa MWCO polyethersulfone membranes, respectively. Glycine was the most dominant amino acid in both α1-subunit and α2-subunit. However, the tyrosine content was higher in α2-subunit than in α1-subunit, resulting in strong absorption near 280 nm observed in the UV absorption spectrum. Based on the DSC analysis, it was found that the glass transition temperatures of gelatin, α1-subunit and α2-subunit were 136.48 °C, 126.77 °C and 119.43 °C, respectively. Moreover, the reduced viscosity and denaturation temperature of α1-subunit were higher than those of α2-subunit, and the reduced viscosity reached the highest when α-subunits were mixed with α1/α2 ratio of approximately 2, suggesting that α1-subunit plays a more important role in the thermostability of gelatin than α2-subunit.

  19. Cholera Toxin B: One Subunit with Many Pharmaceutical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Baldauf, Keegan J.; Royal, Joshua M.; Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2015-01-01

    Cholera, a waterborne acute diarrheal disease caused by Vibrio cholerae, remains prevalent in underdeveloped countries and is a serious health threat to those living in unsanitary conditions. The major virulence factor is cholera toxin (CT), which consists of two subunits: the A subunit (CTA) and the B subunit (CTB). CTB is a 55 kD homopentameric, non-toxic protein binding to the GM1 ganglioside on mammalian cells with high affinity. Currently, recombinantly produced CTB is used as a component of an internationally licensed oral cholera vaccine, as the protein induces potent humoral immunity that can neutralize CT in the gut. Additionally, recent studies have revealed that CTB administration leads to the induction of anti-inflammatory mechanisms in vivo. This review will cover the potential of CTB as an immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory agent. We will also summarize various recombinant expression systems available for recombinant CTB bioproduction. PMID:25802972

  20. Chromosomal localization of human RNA polymerase II subunit genes

    SciTech Connect

    Acker, J.; Wintzerith, M.; Vigneron, M.; Kedinger, C. ); Mattei, M.G.; Roeckel, N.; Depetris, D. )

    1994-04-01

    The eukaryotic DNA-dependent RNA polymerase II (or B) is composed of 10 to 14 polypeptides ranging from 220 to 10 kDa. To gain further insight into the molecular structure and function of these subunits, the authors have undertaken the molecular cloning of nucleotide sequences corresponding to the human enzyme. The cDNAs of five subunits (hRPB220, hRPB140, hRPB33, hRPB25, and hRPB14.5) have been isolated. Using in situ hybridization, they show that the genes of these subunits have distinct chromosomal locations (17p13, 4q12, 16q13-q21, 19p13.3, and 19q12, respectively). Thus, if assembly of active polymerase molecules requires coordinated expression from these independent genes, mechanisms that ensure tight coregulation of the corresponding promoters must exist. 20 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  1. Dengue vaccine: an update on recombinant subunit strategies.

    PubMed

    Martin, J; Hermida, L

    2016-03-01

    Dengue is an increasing public health problem worldwide, with the four serotypes of the virus infecting over 390 million people annually. There is no specific treatment or antiviral drug for dengue, and prevention is largely limited to controlling the mosquito vectors or disrupting the human-vector contact. Despite the considerable progress made in recent years, an effective vaccine against the virus is not yet available. The development of a dengue vaccine has been hampered by many unique challenges, including the need to ensure the absence of vaccine-induced enhanced severity of disease. Recombinant protein subunit vaccines offer a safer alternative to other vaccine approaches. Several subunit vaccine candidates are presently under development, based on different structural and non-structural proteins of the virus. Novel adjuvants or immunopotentiating strategies are also being tested to improve their immunogenicity. This review summarizes the current status and development trends of subunit dengue vaccines.

  2. KAP, the accessory subunit of kinesin-2, binds the predicted coiled-coil stalk of the motor subunits.

    PubMed

    Doodhi, Harinath; Ghosal, Debnath; Krishnamurthy, Mahalakshmi; Jana, Swadhin C; Shamala, Divya; Bhaduri, Anirban; Sowdhamini, R; Ray, Krishanu

    2009-03-17

    Kinesin-2 is an anterograde motor involved in intraflagellar transport and certain other intracellular transport processes. It consists of two different motor subunits and an accessory protein KAP (kinesin accessory protein). The motor subunits were shown to bind each other through the coiled-coil stalk domains, while KAP was proposed to bind the tail domains of the motor subunits. Although several genetic studies established that KAP plays an important role in kinesin-2 functions, its exact role remains unclear. Here, we report the results of a systematic analysis of the KAP binding sites by using recombinant Drosophila kinesin-2 subunits as well as the endogenous proteins. These show that at least one of the coiled-coil stalks is sufficient to bind the N-terminal region of DmKAP. The soluble complex involving the recombinant kinesin-2 fragments is reconstituted in vitro at high salt concentrations, suggesting that the interaction is primarily nonionic. Furthermore, independent distant homology modeling indicated that DmKAP may bind along the coiled-coil stalks through a combination of predominantly hydrophobic interactions and hydrogen bonds. These observations led us to propose that KAP would stabilize the motor subunit heterodimer and help assemble a greater kinesin-2 complex in vivo. PMID:19161286

  3. Subunits of the Schizosaccharomyces pombe RNA polymerase II: enzyme purification and structure of the subunit 3 gene.

    PubMed Central

    Azuma, Y; Yamagishi, M; Ishihama, A

    1993-01-01

    To improve our understanding of the structure and function of eukaryotic RNA polymerase II, we purified the enzyme from the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The highly purified RNA polymerase II contained more than eleven polypeptides. The sizes of the largest the second-, and the third-largest polypeptides as measured by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis were about 210, 150, and 40 kilodaltons (kDa), respectively, and are similar to those of RPB1, 2, and 3 subunits of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNA polymerase II. Using the degenerated primers designed after amino acid micro-sequencing of the 40 kDa third-largest polypeptide (subunit 3), we cloned the subunit 3 gene (rpb3) and determined its DNA sequence. Taken together with the sequence of parts of PCR-amplified cDNA, the predicted coding sequence of rpb3, interrupted by two introns, was found to encode a polypeptide of 297 amino acid residues in length with a molecular weight of 34 kDa. The S. pombe subunit 3 contains four structural domains conserved for the alpha-subunit family of RNA polymerase from both eukaryotes and prokaryotes. A putative leucine zipper motif was found to exist in the C-terminal proximal conserved region (domain D). Possible functions of the conserved domains are discussed. Images PMID:8367291

  4. Sequence of a functional invertebrate GABAA receptor subunit which can form a chimeric receptor with a vertebrate alpha subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Harvey, R J; Vreugdenhil, E; Zaman, S H; Bhandal, N S; Usherwood, P N; Barnard, E A; Darlison, M G

    1991-01-01

    The sequence of an invertebrate GABAA receptor subunit is described. This was deduced from a cDNA which was isolated from the mollusc Lymnaea stagnalis and which corresponds to a transcript of extremely low abundance. The cDNA was isolated using short exonic sequences from part of the corresponding gene in combination with a variant of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) known as RACE (rapid amplification of cDNA ends). The mature polypeptide has a predicted molecular weight of 54,569 Daltons and exhibits approximately 50% identity to vertebrate GABAA receptor beta subunits. The six intron-exon boundaries determined to date in the molluscan gene occur at the same relative positions as those found in vertebrate GABAA receptor genes. Functional expression, in Xenopus oocytes, of the molluscan cDNA alone results in the formation of GABA-activated chloride ion channels that have a finite open probability even in the absence of agonist. These GABA-evoked currents can be reversibly blocked by the vertebrate GABAA receptor antagonist bicuculline. Surprisingly, the molluscan beta subunit is capable of replacing vertebrate beta subunits in co-expression experiments with the bovine GABAA receptor alpha 1 subunit. These findings suggest that invertebrate GABAA receptors exist in vivo as hetero-oligomeric complexes. PMID:1655414

  5. G alpha 12 and G alpha 13 subunits define a fourth class of G protein alpha subunits.

    PubMed Central

    Strathmann, M P; Simon, M I

    1991-01-01

    Heterotrimeric guanine nucleotide-binding regulatory proteins (G proteins) are central to the signaling processes of multicellular organisms. We have explored the diversity of the G protein subunits in mammals and found evidence for a large family of genes that encode the alpha subunits. Amino acid sequence comparisons show that the different alpha subunits fall into at least three classes. These classes have been conserved in animals separated by considerable evolutionary distances; they are present in mammals, Drosophila, and nematodes. We have now obtained cDNA clones encoding two murine alpha subunits, G alpha 12 and G alpha 13, that define a fourth class. The translation products are predicted to have molecular masses of 44 kDa and to be insensitive to ADP-ribosylation by pertussis toxin. They share 67% amino acid sequence identity with each other and less than 45% identity with other alpha subunits. Their transcripts can be detected in every tissue examined, although the relative levels of the G alpha 13 message appear somewhat variable. Images PMID:1905812

  6. Effect of the Compaction Pressure and Ni Content on the Modified Aluminum-Based Perovskite Synthesis Designed to Immobilize the Radioactive Waste in Combustion Mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarasova, E. S.; Dolmatov, O. Yu; Isachenko, D. S.; Permikin, A. A.; Semenov, A. O.

    2016-06-01

    The article deals with the synthesis of perovskite-like ceramics matrix material for immobilization of radioactive waste by SHS method. The dependence of the compaction pressure on the synthesis of the samples was established. Synthesis conditions for the matrix with the desired properties of the composition were determined that is acceptable for reliable isolation of radionuclides throughout the long-term storage of waste. The maximum amount of aluminum perovskite is observed when the initial mixture compaction pressure equal to 30 MPa and 25% wt. Nickel.

  7. Localisation of AMPK γ subunits in cardiac and skeletal muscles.

    PubMed

    Pinter, Katalin; Grignani, Robert T; Watkins, Hugh; Redwood, Charles

    2013-12-01

    The trimeric protein AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is an important sensor of energetic status and cellular stress, and mutations in genes encoding two of the regulatory γ subunits cause inherited disorders of either cardiac or skeletal muscle. AMPKγ2 mutations cause hypertrophic cardiomyopathy with glycogen deposition and conduction abnormalities; mutations in AMPKγ3 result in increased skeletal muscle glycogen. In order to gain further insight into the roles of the different γ subunits in muscle and into possible disease mechanisms, we localised the γ2 and γ3 subunits, along with the more abundant γ1 subunit, by immunofluorescence in cardiomyocytes and skeletal muscle fibres. The predominant cardiac γ2 variant, γ2-3B, gave a striated pattern in cardiomyocytes, aligning with the Z-disk but with punctate staining similar to T-tubule (L-type Ca(2+) channel) and sarcoplasmic reticulum (SERCA2) markers. In skeletal muscle fibres AMPKγ3 localises to the I band, presenting a uniform staining that flanks the Z-disk, also coinciding with the position of Ca(2+) influx in these muscles. The localisation of γ2-3B- and γ3-containing AMPK suggests that these trimers may have similar functions in the different muscles. AMPK containing γ2-3B was detected in oxidative skeletal muscles which had low expression of γ3, confirming that these two regulatory subunits may be co-ordinately regulated in response to metabolic requirements. Compartmentalisation of AMPK complexes is most likely dependent on the regulatory γ subunit and this differential localisation may direct substrate selection and specify particular functional roles.

  8. COMPACT PROTON INJECTOR AND FIRST ACCELERATOR SYSTEM TEST FOR COMPACT PROTON DIELECTRIC WALL CANCER THERAPY ACCELERATOR

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Y; Guethlein, G; Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Blackfield, D; Cook, E; Falabella, S; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Nelson, S; Poole, B; Richardson, R; Watson, J; Weir, J; Pearson, D

    2009-04-23

    A compact proton accelerator for cancer treatment is being developed by using the high-gradient dielectric insulator wall (DWA) technology [1-4]. We are testing all the essential DWA components, including a compact proton source, on the First Article System Test (FAST). The configuration and progress on the injector and FAST will be presented.

  9. Modeling of planetesimal compaction by hot pressing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, W.; Breuer, D.; Spohn, T.

    2014-07-01

    Compaction of initially porous material prior to melting is an important process that has influenced the interior structure and the thermal evolution of planetesimals in their early history. On one hand, compaction decreases the porosity resulting in a reduction of the radius. On the other hand, the loss of porosity results in an increase of the thermal conductivity of the material and, thus, in a more efficient cooling. Porosity loss by hot pressing is the most efficient process of compaction in planetesimals and can be described by creep flow, which depends on temperature and stress. Hot pressing has been repeatedly modeled using a simplified approach, for which the porosity is gradually reduced in some fixed temperature interval between ~650 K and 700 K [see e.g. 1--3]. This approach neglects the dependence of compaction on stress. In the present study [see 4], we compare this ''parametrized'' method with a self-consistent calculation of porosity loss via a ''creep-related'' approach. We use our thermal evolution model from previous studies [5] to model compaction of an initially porous ordinary chondritic body and consider four basic packings of spherical dust grains (simple cubic, orthorhombic, rhombohedral, and body-centered cubic). Depending on the grain packing, we calculate the effective stress and the associated porosity change via the thermally activated creep flow. For comparison, compaction is also modeled by simply reducing the initial porosity linearly to zero between 650 and 700 K. Since we are interested in thermal metamorphism and not melting, we only consider bodies that experience a maximum temperature below the solidus temperature of the metal phase. For the creep related approach, the temperature interval in which compaction takes place depends strongly on the size of the planetesimal and is not fixed as assumed in the parametrized approach. Depending on the radius, the initial grain size, the activation energy, the initial porosity, and the

  10. Mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yildirim, Yetkin

    According to Superpave mixture design, gyratory specimens are mixed and compacted at equiviscous binder temperatures corresponding to viscosities of 0.17 and 0.28 Pa.s. respectively. These were the values previously used in the Marshal mix design method to determine optimal mixing and compaction temperatures. In order to estimate the appropriate mixing and compaction temperatures for Superpave mixture design, a temperature-viscosity relationship for the binder needs to be developed (ASTM D 2493, Calculation of Mixing and Compaction Temperatures). The current approach is simple and provides reasonable temperatures for unmodified binders. However, some modified binders have exhibited unreasonably high temperatures for mixing and compaction using this technique. These high temperatures can result in construction problems, damage of asphalt, and production of fumes. Heating asphalt binder to very high temperatures during construction oxidizes the binder and separates the polymer from asphalt binder. It is known that polymer modified asphalt binders have many benefits to the roads, such as; increasing rutting resistance, enhancing low temperature cracking resistance, improving traction, better adhesion and cohesion, elevating tensile strength which are directly related to the service life of the pavement. Therefore, oxidation and separation of the polymer from the asphalt binder results in reduction of the service life. ASTM D 2493 was established for unmodified asphalt binders which are Newtonian fluids at high temperatures. For these materials, viscosity does not depend on shear rate. However, most of the modified asphalt binders exhibit a phenomenon known as pseudoplasticity, where viscosity does depend on shear rate. Thus, at the high shear rates occurring during mixing and compaction, it is not necessary to go to very high temperatures. This research was undertaken to determine the shear rate during compaction such that the effect of this parameter could be

  11. Micelle-Based Adjuvants for Subunit Vaccine Delivery

    PubMed Central

    Trimaille, Thomas; Verrier, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    In the development of subunit vaccines with purified or recombinant antigens for cancer and infectious diseases, the design of improved and safe adjuvants able to efficiently target the antigen presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, represents a crucial challenge. Nanoparticle-based antigen delivery systems have been identified as an innovative strategy to improve the efficacy of subunit vaccines. Among them, self-assembled micellar nanoparticles from amphiphilic (macro)molecules have recently emerged as promising candidates. In this short review, we report on the recent research findings highlighting the versatility and potential of such systems in vaccine delivery. PMID:26426060

  12. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Morozova, Elena; Lysyakova, Ludmila; Kasyanenko, Nina; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-01

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  13. DNA compaction by azobenzene-containing surfactant

    SciTech Connect

    Zakrevskyy, Yuriy; Kopyshev, Alexey; Lomadze, Nino; Santer, Svetlana

    2011-08-15

    We report on the interaction of cationic azobenzene-containing surfactant with DNA investigated by absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy, dynamic light scattering, and atomic force microscopy. The properties of the surfactant can be controlled with light by reversible switching of the azobenzene unit, incorporated into the surfactant tail, between a hydrophobic trans (visible irradiation) and a hydrophilic cis (UV irradiation) configuration. The influence of the trans-cis isomerization of the azobenzene on the compaction process of DNA molecules and the role of both isomers in the formation and colloidal stability of DNA-surfactant complexes is discussed. It is shown that the trans isomer plays a major role in the DNA compaction process. The influence of the cis isomer on the DNA coil configuration is rather small. The construction of a phase diagram of the DNA concentration versus surfactant/DNA charge ratio allows distancing between three major phases: colloidally stable and unstable compacted globules, and extended coil conformation. There is a critical concentration of DNA above which the compacted globules can be hindered from aggregation and precipitation by adding an appropriate amount of the surfactant in the trans configuration. This is because of the compensation of hydrophobicity of the globules with an increasing amount of the surfactant. Below the critical DNA concentration, the compacted globules are colloidally stable and can be reversibly transferred with light to an extended coil state.

  14. Strategy Guideline: Compact Air Distribution Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Burdick, A.

    2013-06-01

    This Strategy Guideline discusses the benefits and challenges of using a compact air distribution system to handle the reduced loads and reduced air volume needed to condition the space within an energy efficient home. Traditional systems sized by 'rule of thumb' (i.e., 1 ton of cooling per 400 ft2 of floor space) that 'wash' the exterior walls with conditioned air from floor registers cannot provide appropriate air mixing and moisture removal in low-load homes. A compact air distribution system locates the HVAC equipment centrally with shorter ducts run to interior walls, and ceiling supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls along the ceiling plane; alternatively, high sidewall supply outlets throw the air toward the exterior walls. Potential drawbacks include resistance from installing contractors or code officials who are unfamiliar with compact air distribution systems, as well as a lack of availability of low-cost high sidewall or ceiling supply outlets to meet the low air volumes with good throw characteristics. The decision criteria for a compact air distribution system must be determined early in the whole-house design process, considering both supply and return air design. However, careful installation of a compact air distribution system can result in lower material costs from smaller equipment, shorter duct runs, and fewer outlets; increased installation efficiencies, including ease of fitting the system into conditioned space; lower loads on a better balanced HVAC system, and overall improved energy efficiency of the home.

  15. Dynamic magnetic compaction of porous materials

    SciTech Connect

    1998-10-29

    IAP Research began development of the Dynamic Magnetic Compaction (DMC) process three years before the CRADA was established. IAP Research had experimentally demonstrated the feasibility of the process, and conducted a basic market survey. IAP identified and opened discussions with industrial partners and established the basic commercial cost structure. The purpose of this CRADA project was to predict and verify optimum pressure vs. time history for the compaction of porous copper and tungsten. LLNL modeled the rapid compaction of powdered material from an initial density of about 30% theoretical maximum to more than 90% theoretical maximum. The compaction simulations were benchmarked against existing data and new data was acquired by IAP Research. The modeling was used to perform parameter studies on the pressure loading time history, initial porosity and temperature. LLNL ran simulations using codes CALE or NITO and compared the simulations with published compaction data and equation of state (EOS) data. This project did not involve the development or modification of software code. CALE and NITO were existing software programs at LLNL. No modification of these programs occurred within the scope of the CRADA effort.

  16. Ultra-Compact Motor Controller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, William T.; Crowell, Adam; Hauptman, Traveler; Pratt, Gill Andrews

    2012-01-01

    knowledge by each motor controller of the state of all the motors in the system at 500 Hz also allows parallel processing of higher-level kinematic matrix calculations.

  17. Phased array compaction cell for measurement of the transversely isotropic elastic properties of compacting sediments

    SciTech Connect

    Nihei, K.T.; Nakagawa, S.; Reverdy, F.; Meyer, L.R.; Duranti, L.; Ball, G.

    2010-12-15

    Sediments undergoing compaction typically exhibit transversely isotropic (TI) elastic properties. We present a new experimental apparatus, the phased array compaction cell, for measuring the TI elastic properties of clay-rich sediments during compaction. This apparatus uses matched sets of P- and S-wave ultrasonic transducers located along the sides of the sample and an ultrasonic P-wave phased array source, together with a miniature P-wave receiver on the top and bottom ends of the sample. The phased array measurements are used to form plane P-waves that provide estimates of the phase velocities over a range of angles. From these measurements, the five TI elastic constants can be recovered as the sediment is compacted, without the need for sample unloading, recoring, or reorienting. This paper provides descriptions of the apparatus, the data processing, and an application demonstrating recovery of the evolving TI properties of a compacting marine sediment sample.

  18. Improved Underwater Excitation-Emission Matrix Fluorometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moore, Casey; daCunha, John; Rhoades, Bruce; Twardowski, Michael

    2007-01-01

    A compact, high-resolution, two-dimensional excitation-emission matrix fluorometer (EEMF) has been designed and built specifically for use in identifying and measuring the concentrations of organic compounds, including polluting hydrocarbons, in natural underwater settings. Heretofore, most EEMFs have been designed and built for installation in laboratories, where they are used to analyze the contents of samples collected in the field and brought to the laboratories. Because the present EEMF can be operated in the field, it is better suited to measurement of spatially and temporally varying concentrations of substances of interest. In excitation-emission matrix (EEM) fluorometry, fluorescence is excited by irradiating a sample at one or more wavelengths, and the fluorescent emission from the sample is measured at multiple wavelengths. When excitation is provided at only one wavelength, the technique is termed one-dimensional (1D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting matrix of fluorescence emission data (the EEM) contains only one row or column. When excitation is provided at multiple wavelengths, the technique is termed two-dimensional (2D) EEM fluorometry because the resulting EEM contains multiple rows and columns. EEM fluorometry - especially the 2D variety - is well established as a means of simultaneously detecting numerous dissolved and particulate compounds in water. Each compound or pool of compounds has a unique spectral fluorescence signature, and each EEM is rich in information content, in that it can contain multiple fluorescence signatures. By use of deconvolution and/or other mixture-analyses techniques, it is often possible to isolate the spectral signature of compounds of interest, even when their fluorescence spectra overlap. What distinguishes the present 2D EEMF over prior laboratory-type 2D EEMFs are several improvements in packaging (including a sealed housing) and other aspects of design that render it suitable for use in natural underwater

  19. Efficient reconstitution of functional Escherichia coli 30S ribosomal subunits from a complete set of recombinant small subunit ribosomal proteins.

    PubMed

    Culver, G M; Noller, H F

    1999-06-01

    Previous studies have shown that the 30S ribosomal subunit of Escherichia coli can be reconstituted in vitro from individually purified ribosomal proteins and 16S ribosomal RNA, which were isolated from natural 30S subunits. We have developed a 30S subunit reconstitution system that uses only recombinant ribosomal protein components. The genes encoding E. coli ribosomal proteins S2-S21 were cloned, and all twenty of the individual proteins were overexpressed and purified. Reconstitution, following standard procedures, using the complete set of recombinant proteins and purified 16S ribosomal RNA is highly inefficient. Efficient reconstitution of 30S subunits using these components requires sequential addition of proteins, following either the 30S subunit assembly map (Mizushima & Nomura, 1970, Nature 226:1214-1218; Held et al., 1974, J Biol Chem 249:3103-3111) or following the order of protein assembly predicted from in vitro assembly kinetics (Powers et al., 1993, J MoI Biol 232:362-374). In the first procedure, the proteins were divided into three groups, Group I (S4, S7, S8, S15, S17, and S20), Group II (S5, S6, S9, Sll, S12, S13, S16, S18, and S19), and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21), which were sequentially added to 16S rRNA with a 20 min incubation at 42 degrees C following the addition of each group. In the second procedure, the proteins were divided into Group I (S4, S6, S11, S15, S16, S17, S18, and S20), Group II (S7, S8, S9, S13, and S19), Group II' (S5 and S12) and Group III (S2, S3, S10, S14, and S21). Similarly efficient reconstitution is observed whether the proteins are grouped according to the assembly map or according to the results of in vitro 30S subunit assembly kinetics. Although reconstitution of 30S subunits using the recombinant proteins is slightly less efficient than reconstitution using a mixture of total proteins isolated from 30S subunits, it is much more efficient than reconstitution using proteins that were individually isolated

  20. Thermal evolution and sintering of chondritic planetesimals. II. Improved treatment of the compaction process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gail, Hans-Peter; Henke, Stephan; Trieloff, Mario

    2015-04-01

    Context. Reconstruction of the thermal history of individual meteorites which can be assigned to the same parent body allows us to derive general characteristics of the parent body, such as its size and formation time, which hold important clues on the planetary formation process. This requires us to construct a detailed model of the heating of such a body by short lived radioactives, in particular by 26Al, and its cooling by heat conduction, which may then be compared to the reconstructed cooling histories of the meteorites. Aims: The heat conductivity of the material from which planetesimals are composed depends critically on the porosity of the chondritic material. This changes during the process of compaction (also called sintering) of the material at elevated temperatures and pressures. Therefore, compaction of an initially granular material is a key process determining the thermal history of the parent bodies of meteorites. The most realistic modelling of sintering of chondritic material is required. Methods: The modelling of the compaction process is improved by applying concepts originally developed for the modelling of hot isostatic pressing in metallurgical processes, and by collecting data available from geosciences for the materials of interest. It is extended to a binary mixture of granular components of very different diameters - matrix and chondrules - as observed in chondrites. Results: By comparison with some published data on sintering experiments it is shown that the algorithm to follow the decrease of porosity of granular material during progressive sintering allows a sufficiently accurate modelling of the compaction of silicate material. The dependence of the compaction process on the nature of the precursor material, either matrix-dominated or chondrule-dominated, is discussed. It is shown that the characteristic temperature at which sintering occurs is different for matrix or chondrule-dominated precursor material. We apply the new method for

  1. Capability enhancement in compact digital holographic microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Weijuan; Wen, Yongfu; Wang, Zhaomin; Yang, Fang; Asundi, Anand

    2015-03-01

    A compact reflection digital holographic microscopy (DHM) system integrated with the light source and optical interferometer is developed for 3D topographic characterization and real-time dynamic inspection for Microelectromechanical systems (MEMS). Capability enhancement methods in lateral resolution, axial resolving range and large field of view for the compact DHM system are presented. To enhance the lateral resolution, the numerical aperture of a reflection DHM system is analyzed and optimum designed. To enhance the axial resolving range, dual wavelengths are used to extend the measuring range. To enable the large field of view, stitching of the measurement results is developed in the user-friendly software. Results from surfaces structures on silicon wafer, micro-optics on fused silica and dynamic inspection of MEMS structures demonstrate applications of this compact reflection digital holographic microscope for technical inspection in material science.

  2. Compaction and Sintering of Mo Powders

    SciTech Connect

    Nunn, Stephen D; Kiggans, Jim; Bryan, Chris

    2013-01-01

    To support the development of Mo-99 production by NorthStar Medical Technologies, LLC, Mo metal powders were evaluated for compaction and sintering characteristics as they relate to Mo-100 accelerator target disk fabrication. Powders having a natural isotope distribution and enriched Mo-100 powder were examined. Various powder characteristics are shown to have an effect on both the compaction and sintering behavior. Natural Mo powders could be cold pressed directly to >90% density. All of the powders, including the Mo-100 samples, could be sintered after cold pressing to >90% density. As an example, a compacted Mo-100 disk reached 89.7% density (9.52 g/cm3) after sintering at 1000 C for 1 hr. in flowing Ar/4%H2. Higher sintering temperatures were required for other powder samples. The relationships between processing conditions and the resulting densities of consolidated Mo disks will be presented.

  3. Lacunary Fourier Series for Compact Quantum Groups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Simeng

    2016-05-01

    This paper is devoted to the study of Sidon sets, {Λ(p)} -sets and some related notions for compact quantum groups. We establish several different characterizations of Sidon sets, and in particular prove that any Sidon set in a discrete group is a strong Sidon set in the sense of Picardello. We give several relations between Sidon sets, {Λ(p)} -sets and lacunarities for L p -Fourier multipliers, generalizing a previous work by Blendek and Michalic̆ek. We also prove the existence of {Λ(p)} -sets for orthogonal systems in noncommutative L p -spaces, and deduce the corresponding properties for compact quantum groups. Central Sidon sets are also discussed, and it turns out that the compact quantum groups with the same fusion rules and the same dimension functions have identical central Sidon sets. Several examples are also included.

  4. Activation analysis of the compact ignition tokamak

    SciTech Connect

    Selcow, E.C.

    1986-01-01

    The US fusion program has completed the conceptual design of a compact tokamak device that achieves ignition. The high neutron wall loadings associated with this compact deuterium-tritium-burning device indicate that radiation-related issues may be significant considerations in the overall system design. Sufficient shielding will be requied for the radiation protection of both reactor components and occupational personnel. A close-in igloo shield has been designed around the periphery of the tokamak structure to permit personnel access into the test cell after shutdown and limit the total activation of the test cell components. This paper describes the conceptual design of the igloo shield system and discusses the major neutronic concerns related to the design of the Compact Ignition Tokamak.

  5. Shock compaction of high- Tc superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Weir, S.T.; Nellis, W.J.; McCandless, P.C.; Brocious, W.F. ); Seaman, C.L.; Early, E.A.; Maple, M.B. . Dept. of Physics); Kramer, M.J. ); Syono, Y.; Kikuchi, M. )

    1990-09-01

    We present the results of shock compaction experiments on high-{Tc} superconductors and describe the way in which shock consolidation addresses critical problems concerning the fabrication of high J{sub c} bulk superconductors. In particular, shock compaction experiments on YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7} show that shock-induced defects can greatly increase intragranular critical current densities. The fabrication of crystallographically aligned Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8} samples by shock-compaction is also described. These experiments demonstrate the potential of the shock consolidation method as a means for fabricating bulk high-{Tc} superconductors having high critical current densities.

  6. Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birrell, Jeremey; Labun, Lance; Rafelski, Johann

    2012-03-01

    We propose to search for nuclear density or greater compact ultra dense objects (CUDOs), which could constitute a significant fraction of the dark matter [1]. Considering their high density, the gravitational tidal forces are significant and atomic-density matter cannot stop an impacting CUDO, which punctures the surface of the target body, pulverizing, heating and entraining material near its trajectory through the target [2]. Because impact features endure over geologic timescales, the Earth, Moon, Mars, Mercury and large asteroids are well-suited to act as time-integrating CUDO detectors. There are several potential candidates for CUDO structure such as strangelet fragments or more generally dark matter if mechanisms exist for it to form compact objects. [4pt] [1] B. J. Carr, K. Kohri, Y. Sendouda, & J.'i. Yokoyama, Phys. Rev. D81, 104019 (2010). [0pt] [2] L. Labun, J. Birrell, J. Rafelski, Solar System Signatures of Impacts by Compact Ultra Dense Objects, arXiv:1104.4572.

  7. Hall MHD Equilibrium of Accelerated Compact Toroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howard, S. J.; Hwang, D. Q.; Horton, R. D.; Evans, R. W.; Brockington, S. J.

    2007-11-01

    We examine the structure and dynamics of the compact toroid's magnetic field. The compact toroid is dramatically accelerated by a large rail-gun Lorentz force density equal to j xB. We use magnetic data from the Compact Toroid Injection Experiment to answer the question of exactly where in the system j xB has nonzero values, and to what extent we can apply the standard model of force-free equilibrium. In particular we present a method of analysis of the magnetic field probe signals that allows direct comparison to the predictions of the Woltjer-Taylor force-free model and Turner's generalization of magnetic relaxation in the presence of a non-zero Hall term and fluid vorticity.

  8. Subwavelength metrological chracterization by Mueller matrix polarimeter and finite difference time domain method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adhikari, Achyut; Dev, Kapil; Asundi, Anand

    2016-11-01

    Wire grid polarizers (WGP), are sub-wavelength gratings with applications in display projection system due to their compact size, wide field of view and long-term stability. Measurement and testing of these structures are important to optimize their use. This is done by first measuring the Mueller matrix of the WGP using a Mueller matrix polarimeter. Next the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method is used to simulate a similar Mueller matrix thus providing the period and step height of the WGP. This approach may lead to more generic determination of sub-wavelength structures including diffractive optical structures.

  9. Conservation of complete trimethylation of lysine-43 in the rotor ring of c-subunits of metazoan adenosine triphosphate (ATP) synthases.

    PubMed

    Walpole, Thomas B; Palmer, David N; Jiang, Huibing; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M; Walker, John E

    2015-04-01

    The rotors of ATP synthases turn about 100 times every second. One essential component of the rotor is a ring of hydrophobic c-subunits in the membrane domain of the enzyme. The rotation of these c-rings is driven by a transmembrane proton-motive force, and they turn against a surface provided by another membrane protein, known as subunit a. Together, the rotating c-ring and the static subunit a provide a pathway for protons through the membrane in which the c-ring and subunit a are embedded. Vertebrate and invertebrate c-subunits are well conserved. In the structure of the bovine F1-ATPase-c-ring subcomplex, the 75 amino acid c-subunit is folded into two transmembrane α-helices linked by a short loop. Each bovine rotor-ring consists of eight c-subunits with the N- and C-terminal α-helices forming concentric inner and outer rings, with the loop regions exposed to the phospholipid head-group region on the matrix side of the inner membrane. Lysine-43 is in the loop region and its ε-amino group is completely trimethylated. The role of this modification is unknown. If the trimethylated lysine-43 plays some important role in the functioning, assembly or degradation of the c-ring, it would be expected to persist throughout vertebrates and possibly invertebrates also. Therefore, we have carried out a proteomic analysis of c-subunits across representative species from different classes of vertebrates and from invertebrate phyla. In the twenty-nine metazoan species that have been examined, the complete methylation of lysine-43 is conserved, and it is likely to be conserved throughout the more than two million extant metazoan species. In unicellular eukaryotes and prokaryotes, when the lysine is conserved it is unmethylated, and the stoichiometries of c-subunits vary from 9-15. One possible role for the trimethylated residue is to provide a site for the specific binding of cardiolipin, an essential component of ATP synthases in mitochondria.

  10. Conservation of Complete Trimethylation of Lysine-43 in the Rotor Ring of c-Subunits of Metazoan Adenosine Triphosphate (ATP) Synthases*

    PubMed Central

    Walpole, Thomas B.; Palmer, David N.; Jiang, Huibing; Ding, Shujing; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    The rotors of ATP synthases turn about 100 times every second. One essential component of the rotor is a ring of hydrophobic c-subunits in the membrane domain of the enzyme. The rotation of these c-rings is driven by a transmembrane proton-motive force, and they turn against a surface provided by another membrane protein, known as subunit a. Together, the rotating c-ring and the static subunit a provide a pathway for protons through the membrane in which the c-ring and subunit a are embedded. Vertebrate and invertebrate c-subunits are well conserved. In the structure of the bovine F1-ATPase-c-ring subcomplex, the 75 amino acid c-subunit is folded into two transmembrane α-helices linked by a short loop. Each bovine rotor-ring consists of eight c-subunits with the N- and C-terminal α-helices forming concentric inner and outer rings, with the loop regions exposed to the phospholipid head-group region on the matrix side of the inner membrane. Lysine-43 is in the loop region and its ε-amino group is completely trimethylated. The role of this modification is unknown. If the trimethylated lysine-43 plays some important role in the functioning, assembly or degradation of the c-ring, it would be expected to persist throughout vertebrates and possibly invertebrates also. Therefore, we have carried out a proteomic analysis of c-subunits across representative species from different classes of vertebrates and from invertebrate phyla. In the twenty-nine metazoan species that have been examined, the complete methylation of lysine-43 is conserved, and it is likely to be conserved throughout the more than two million extant metazoan species. In unicellular eukaryotes and prokaryotes, when the lysine is conserved it is unmethylated, and the stoichiometries of c-subunits vary from 9–15. One possible role for the trimethylated residue is to provide a site for the specific binding of cardiolipin, an essential component of ATP synthases in mitochondria. PMID:25608518

  11. Starch-free grewia gum matrices: Compaction, swelling, erosion and drug release behaviour.

    PubMed

    Nep, E I; Asare-Addo, K; Ghori, M U; Conway, B R; Smith, A M

    2015-12-30

    Polysaccharides are suitable for application as hydrophilic matrices because of their ability to hydrate and swell upon contact with fluids, forming a gel layer which controls drug release. When extracted from plants, polysaccharides often contain significant quantities of starch that impacts upon their functional properties. This study aimed to evaluate differences in swelling, erosion and drug release from matrix tablets prepared from grewia gum (GG) and starch-free grewia gum (GDS) extracted from the stems of Grewia mollis. HPMC was used as a control polymer with theophylline as a model drug. Swelling, erosion, and in-vitro release were performed in deionized water, pH 1.2 and pH 6.8 media. The Vergnaud and Krosmeyer-Peppas model were used for swelling and drug release kinetics, respectively. However, linear regression technique was used to determine the erosion rate. GDS compacts were significantly harder than the native GG and HPMC compacts. GDS matrices exhibited the fastest erosion and drug release in deionised water and phosphate buffer compared with the GG and HPMC. At pH 1.2, GDS exhibited greater swelling than erosion, and drug release was similar to GG and HPMC. This highlights the potential of GDS as a matrix for controlled release similar to HPMC and GG at pH 1.2 but with a more rapid release at pH 6.8. GDS may have wider application in reinforcing compacts with relatively low mechanical strength.

  12. Optical shutter switching matrix

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grove, Charles H.

    1991-01-01

    The interface switching systems are discussed which are related to those used in the Space Shuttle ground control system, transmission systems, communications systems, and airborne radar electronic countermeasure systems. The main goal is to identify a need that exists throughout the comprehensive information processing and communications disciplines supporting the Space Shuttle and Space Station programs, and introduce one viable approach to satisfy that need. The proposed device, described in NASA patent entitled 'Optical Shutter Switch Matrix', is discussed.

  13. Complex interactions between the laminin 4 subunit and integrins regulate endothelial cell behavior in vitro and angiogenesis in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Annette M.; Gonzales, Meredith; Herron, G. Scott; Nagavarapu, Usha; Hopkinson, Susan B.; Tsuruta, Daisuke; Jones, Jonathan C. R.

    2002-12-01

    The 4 laminin subunit is a component of the basement membrane of blood vessels where it codistributes with the integrins v3, 31, and 61. An antibody against the G domain (residues 919-1207; G919-1207) of the 4 laminin subunit inhibits angiogenesis in a mouse-human chimeric model, indicating the functional importance of this domain. Additional support for the latter derives from the ability of recombinant G919-1207 to support endothelial cell adhesion. In particular, endothelial cell adhesion to G919-1207 is half-maximal at 1.4 nM, whereas residues 919-1018 and 1016-1207 of the G domain are poor cellular ligands. Function blocking antibodies against integrins v3 and 1 and a combination of antibodies against 3 and α6 integrin subunits inhibit endothelial cell attachment to G919-1207. Moreover, both αvβ3 and α3β1 integrin bind with high affinity to G919-1207. Together, our studies demonstrate that the G domain of laminin α4 chain is a specific, high affinity ligand for the αvβ3 and α3β1 integrin heterodimers and that these integrins, together with α6β1, function cooperatively to mediate endothelial cell-α4 laminin interaction and hence blood vessel development. We propose a model based on these data that reconcile apparent discrepancies in the recent literature with regard to the role of the αvβ3 integrin in angiogenesis. matrix | matrix receptor | blood vessels

  14. Hypercube matrix computation task

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calalo, Ruel H.; Imbriale, William A.; Jacobi, Nathan; Liewer, Paulett C.; Lockhart, Thomas G.; Lyzenga, Gregory A.; Lyons, James R.; Manshadi, Farzin; Patterson, Jean E.

    1988-01-01

    A major objective of the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is to investigate the applicability of a parallel computing architecture to the solution of large-scale electromagnetic scattering problems. Three scattering analysis codes are being implemented and assessed on a JPL/California Institute of Technology (Caltech) Mark 3 Hypercube. The codes, which utilize different underlying algorithms, give a means of evaluating the general applicability of this parallel architecture. The three analysis codes being implemented are a frequency domain method of moments code, a time domain finite difference code, and a frequency domain finite elements code. These analysis capabilities are being integrated into an electromagnetics interactive analysis workstation which can serve as a design tool for the construction of antennas and other radiating or scattering structures. The first two years of work on the Hypercube Matrix Computation effort is summarized. It includes both new developments and results as well as work previously reported in the Hypercube Matrix Computation Task: Final Report for 1986 to 1987 (JPL Publication 87-18).

  15. Structural characterization of the entire 1.3S subunit of transcarboxylase from Propionibacterium shermanii.

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, D. V.; Rothemund, S.; Shenoy, B. C.; Carey, P. R.; Sönnichsen, F. D.

    1998-01-01

    Transcarboxylase (TC) from Propionibacterium shermanii, a biotin-dependent enzyme, catalyzes the transfer of a carboxyl group from methylmalonyl-CoA to pyruvate in two partial reactions. Within the multisubunit enzyme complex, the 1.3S subunit functions as the carboxyl group carrier. The 1.3S is a 123-amino acid polypeptide (12.6 kDa), to which biotin is covalently attached at Lys 89. We have expressed 1.3S in Escherichia coli with uniform 15N labeling. The backbone structure and dynamics of the protein have been characterized in aqueous solution by three-dimensional heteronuclear nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The secondary structure elements in the protein were identified based on NOE information, secondary chemical shifts, homonuclear 3J(HNHalpha) coupling constants, and amide proton exchange data. The protein contains a predominantly disordered N-terminal half, while the C-terminal half is folded into a compact domain comprising eight beta-strands connected by short loops and turns. The topology of the C-terminal domain is consistent with the fold found in both carboxyl carrier and lipoyl domains, to which this domain has approximately 26-30% sequence similarity. PMID:9792103

  16. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Coyne, Martin J.; Fiscus, Gregory M.; Sammel, Alfred G.

    1998-01-01

    A system for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut.

  17. Remote vacuum compaction of compressible hazardous waste

    DOEpatents

    Coyne, M.J.; Fiscus, G.M.; Sammel, A.G.

    1998-10-06

    A system is described for remote vacuum compaction and containment of low-level radioactive or hazardous waste comprising a vacuum source, a sealable first flexible container, and a sealable outer flexible container for receiving one or more first flexible containers. A method for compacting low level radioactive or hazardous waste materials at the point of generation comprising the steps of sealing the waste in a first flexible container, sealing one or more first containers within an outer flexible container, breaching the integrity of the first containers, evacuating the air from the inner and outer containers, and sealing the outer container shut. 8 figs.

  18. Portable compact cold atoms clock topology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pechoneri, R. D.; Müller, S. T.; Bueno, C.; Bagnato, V. S.; Magalhães, D. V.

    2016-07-01

    The compact frequency standard under development at USP Sao Carlos is a cold atoms system that works with a distributed hardware system principle and temporal configuration of the interrogation method of the atomic sample, in which the different operation steps happen in one place: inside the microwave cavity. This type of operation allows us to design a standard much more compact than a conventional one, where different interactions occur in the same region of the apparatus. In this sense, it is necessary to redefine all the instrumentation associated with the experiment. This work gives an overview of the topology we are adopting for the new system.

  19. Microstructure of explosively compacted aluminum nitride ceramic

    SciTech Connect

    Gourdin, W.H.; Echer, C.J.; Cline, C.F.; Tanner, L.E.

    1981-05-01

    Observations are reported of the microstructure of aluminum nitride (A1N) ceramic produced by explosive consolidation of the powder. Similarities between the grain structure of the compact and the starting powders are striking. Grain growth does not occur during densification and the 0.1 ..mu.. particle size of the powder is retained, although considerable deformation is introduced into individual grains. Of particular interest is an intergranular phase which appears throughout the compact. Observations in the transmission electron microscope indicate that this phase is amorphous.The influence of this glassy intergranular phase on bonding is discussed. 5 figures.

  20. Hollow fibers for compact infrared gas sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lambrecht, A.; Hartwig, S.; Herbst, J.; Wöllenstein, J.

    2008-02-01

    Hollow fibers can be used for compact infrared gas sensors. The guided light is absorbed by the gas introduced into the hollow core. High sensitivity and a very small sampling volume can be achieved depending on fiber parameters i.e. attenuation, flexibility, and gas exchange rates. Different types of infrared hollow fibers including photonic bandgap fibers were characterized using quantum cascade lasers and thermal radiation sources. Obtained data are compared with available product specifications. Measurements with a compact fiber based ethanol sensor are compared with a system simulation. First results on the detection of trace amounts of the explosive material TATP using hollow fibers and QCL will be shown.

  1. COMPACT ACCELERATOR CONCEPT FOR PROTON THERAPY

    SciTech Connect

    Caporaso, G; Sampayan, S; Chen, Y; Harris, J; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Krogh, M; Nelson, S; Nunnally, W; Paul, A; Poole, B; Rhodes, M; Sanders, D; Selenes, K; Sullivan, J; Wang, L; Watson, J

    2006-08-18

    A new type of compact induction accelerator is under development at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory that promises to increase the average accelerating gradient by at least an order of magnitude over that of existing induction machines. The machine is based on the use of high gradient vacuum insulators, advanced dielectric materials and switches and is being developed as a compact flash x-ray radiography source. Research describing an extreme variant of this technology aimed at proton therapy for cancer will be presented.

  2. Compact Focal Plane Assembly for Planetary Science

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Ari; Aslam, Shahid; Huang, Wei-Chung; Steptoe-Jackson, Rosalind

    2013-01-01

    A compact radiometric focal plane assembly (FPA) has been designed in which the filters are individually co-registered over compact thermopile pixels. This allows for construction of an ultralightweight and compact radiometric instrument. The FPA also incorporates micromachined baffles in order to mitigate crosstalk and low-pass filter windows in order to eliminate high-frequency radiation. Compact metal mesh bandpass filters were fabricated for the far infrared (FIR) spectral range (17 to 100 microns), a game-changing technology for future planetary FIR instruments. This fabrication approach allows the dimensions of individual metal mesh filters to be tailored with better than 10- micron precision. In contrast, conventional compact filters employed in recent missions and in near-term instruments consist of large filter sheets manually cut into much smaller pieces, which is a much less precise and much more labor-intensive, expensive, and difficult process. Filter performance was validated by integrating them with thermopile arrays. Demonstration of the FPA will require the integration of two technologies. The first technology is compact, lightweight, robust against cryogenic thermal cycling, and radiation-hard micromachined bandpass filters. They consist of a copper mesh supported on a deep reactive ion-etched silicon frame. This design architecture is advantageous when constructing a lightweight and compact instrument because (1) the frame acts like a jig and facilitates filter integration with the FPA, (2) the frame can be designed so as to maximize the FPA field of view, (3) the frame can be simultaneously used as a baffle for mitigating crosstalk, and (4) micron-scale alignment features can be patterned so as to permit high-precision filter stacking and, consequently, increase the filter bandwidth and sharpen the out-of-band rolloff. The second technology consists of leveraging, from another project, compact and lightweight Bi0.87Sb0.13/Sb arrayed thermopiles

  3. Compact, Robust Chips Integrate Optical Functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    Located in Bozeman, Montana, AdvR Inc. has been an active partner in NASA's Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) and Small Business Technology Transfer (STTR) programs. Langley Research Center engineers partnered with AdvR through the SBIR program to develop new, compact, lightweight electro-optic components for remote sensing systems. While the primary customer for this technology will be NASA, AdvR foresees additional uses for its NASA-derived circuit chip in the fields of academic and industrial research anywhere that compact, low-cost, stabilized single-frequency lasers are needed.

  4. Momentum compaction and phase slip factor

    SciTech Connect

    Ng, K.Y.; /Fermilab

    2010-10-01

    Section 2.3.11 of the Handbook of Accelerator Physics and Engineering on Landau damping is updated. The slip factor and its higher orders are given in terms of the various orders of the momentum compaction. With the aid of a simplified FODO lattice, formulas are given for the alteration of the lower orders of the momentum compaction by various higher multipole magnets. The transition to isochronicity is next demonstrated. Formulas are given for the extraction of the first three orders of the slip factor from the measurement of the synchrotron tune while changing the rf frequency. Finally bunch-length compression experiments in semi-isochronous rings are reported.

  5. Construction of weighted upwind compact scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhengjie

    Enormous endeavor has been devoted in spatial high order high resolution schemes in more than twenty five years previously, like total variation diminishing (TVD), essentially non-oscillatory scheme, weighted essentially non-oscillatory scheme for finite difference, and Discontinuous Galerkin methods for finite element and the finite volume. In this dissertation, a high order finite difference Weighted Upwind Compact Scheme has been constructed by dissipation and dispersion analysis. Secondly, a new method to construct global weights has been tested. Thirdly, a methodology to compromise dissipation and dispersion in constructing Weighted Upwind Compact Scheme has been derived. Finally, several numerical test cases have been shown.

  6. Dynamic Compaction Modeling of Porous Silica Powder

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borg, John P.; Schwalbe, Larry; Cogar, John; Chapman, D. J.; Tsembelis, K.; Ward, Aaron; Lloyd, Andrew

    2006-07-01

    A computational analysis of the dynamic compaction of porous silica is presented and compared with experimental measurements. The experiments were conducted at Cambridge University's one-dimensional flyer plate facility. The experiments shock loaded samples of silica dust of various initial porous densities up to a pressure of 2.25 GPa. The computational simulations utilized a linear Us-Up Hugoniot. The compaction events were modeled with CTH, a 3D Eulerian hydrocode developed at Sandia National Laboratory. Simulated pressures at two test locations are presented and compared with measurements.

  7. Repressing the Keratinocyte Genome: How the Polycomb Complex Subunits Operate in Concert to Control Skin and Hair Follicle Development.

    PubMed

    Botchkarev, Vladimir A; Mardaryev, Andrei N

    2016-08-01

    The Polycomb group proteins are transcriptional repressors that are critically important in the control of stem cell activity and maintenance of the identity of differentiated cells. Polycomb proteins interact with each other to form chromatin-associated repressive complexes (Polycomb repressive complexes 1 and 2) leading to chromatin compaction and gene silencing. However, the roles of the distinct components of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 in the control of skin development and keratinocyte differentiation remain obscure. Dauber et al. demonstrate the conditional ablations of three essential Polycomb repressive complex 2 subunits (EED, Suz12, or Ezh1/2) in the epidermal progenitors result in quite similar skin phenotypes including premature acquisition of a functional epidermal barrier, formation of ectopic Merkel cells, and defective postnatal hair follicle development. The reported data demonstrate that in skin epithelia, EED, Suz12, and Ezh1/2 function largely as subunits of the Polycomb repressive complex 2, which is important in the context of data demonstrating their independent activities in other cell types. The report provides an important platform for further analyses of the role of distinct Polycomb components in the control of gene expression programs in the disorders of epidermal differentiation, such as psoriasis and epidermal cancer. PMID:27450498

  8. GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate stress resilience.

    PubMed

    O'Leary, Olivia F; Felice, Daniela; Galimberti, Stefano; Savignac, Hélène M; Bravo, Javier A; Crowley, Tadhg; El Yacoubi, Malika; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Dinan, Timothy G; Cryan, John F

    2014-10-21

    Stressful life events increase the susceptibility to developing psychiatric disorders such as depression; however, many individuals are resilient to such negative effects of stress. Determining the neurobiology underlying this resilience is instrumental to the development of novel and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. GABAB receptors are emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders such as depression. These receptors are predominantly expressed as heterodimers of a GABAB(2) subunit with either a GABAB(1a) or a GABAB(1b) subunit. Here we show that mice lacking the GABAB(1b) receptor isoform are more resilient to both early-life stress and chronic psychosocial stress in adulthood, whereas mice lacking GABAB(1a) receptors are more susceptible to stress-induced anhedonia and social avoidance compared with wild-type mice. In addition, increased hippocampal expression of the GABAB(1b) receptor subunit is associated with a depression-like phenotype in the helpless H/Rouen genetic mouse model of depression. Stress resilience in GABAB(1b)(-/-) mice is coupled with increased proliferation and survival of newly born cells in the adult ventral hippocampus and increased stress-induced c-Fos activation in the hippocampus following early-life stress. Taken together, the data suggest that GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate the deleterious effects of stress and, thus, may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression.

  9. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products, and functions.

    PubMed

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits - which differ among various taxa - affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating (i) the expression of the biosynthesis apparatus, (ii) the export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and (iii) the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of resulting biofilms, which is particularly important for the interactions of bacteria with higher organisms - leading to rhizosphere colonization and modulating the virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. We review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operon found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms and in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host.

  10. Emergence of ion channel modal gating from independent subunit kinetics.

    PubMed

    Bicknell, Brendan A; Goodhill, Geoffrey J

    2016-09-01

    Many ion channels exhibit a slow stochastic switching between distinct modes of gating activity. This feature of channel behavior has pronounced implications for the dynamics of ionic currents and the signaling pathways that they regulate. A canonical example is the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) channel, whose regulation of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration is essential for numerous cellular processes. However, the underlying biophysical mechanisms that give rise to modal gating in this and most other channels remain unknown. Although ion channels are composed of protein subunits, previous mathematical models of modal gating are coarse grained at the level of whole-channel states, limiting further dialogue between theory and experiment. Here we propose an origin for modal gating, by modeling the kinetics of ligand binding and conformational change in the IP3R at the subunit level. We find good agreement with experimental data over a wide range of ligand concentrations, accounting for equilibrium channel properties, transient responses to changing ligand conditions, and modal gating statistics. We show how this can be understood within a simple analytical framework and confirm our results with stochastic simulations. The model assumes that channel subunits are independent, demonstrating that cooperative binding or concerted conformational changes are not required for modal gating. Moreover, the model embodies a generally applicable principle: If a timescale separation exists in the kinetics of individual subunits, then modal gating can arise as an emergent property of channel behavior. PMID:27551100

  11. Insecticidal Pilin Subunit from the Insect Pathogen Xenorhabdus nematophila

    PubMed Central

    Khandelwal, Puneet; Choudhury, Devapriya; Birah, Ajanta; Reddy, M. K.; Gupta, Gorakh Prasad; Banerjee, Nirupama

    2004-01-01

    Xenorhabdus nematophila is an insect pathogen and produces protein toxins which kill the larval host. Previously, we characterized an orally toxic, large, outer membrane-associated protein complex from the culture medium of X. nematophila. Here, we describe the cloning, expression, and characterization of a 17-kDa pilin subunit of X. nematophila isolated from that protein complex. The gene was amplified by PCR, cloned, and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant protein was refolded in vitro in the absence of its cognate chaperone by using a urea gradient. The protein oligomerized during in vitro refolding, forming multimers. Point mutations in the conserved N-terminal residues of the pilin protein greatly destabilized its oligomeric organization, demonstrating the importance of the N terminus in refolding and oligomerization of the pilin subunit by donor strand complementation. The recombinant protein was cytotoxic to cultured Helicoverpa armigera larval hemocytes, causing agglutination and subsequent release of the cytoplasmic enzyme lactate dehydrogenase. The agglutination of larval cells by the 17-kDa protein was inhibited by several sugar derivatives. The biological activity of the purified recombinant protein indicated that it has a conformation similar to that of the native protein. The 17-kDa pilin subunit was found to be orally toxic to fourth- or fifth-instar larvae of an important crop pest, H. armigera, causing extensive damage to the midgut epithelial membrane. To our knowledge, this is first report describing an insecticidal pilin subunit of a bacterium. PMID:15375127

  12. The Essential Anatomical Subunit Approximation Unilateral Cleft Lip Repair.

    PubMed

    Chong, David K; Swanson, Jordan W

    2016-07-01

    The anatomical subunit approximation cleft lip repair advantageously achieves a balanced lip contour, with the line of repair hidden along seams of aesthetic subunits. Dr. David Fisher's original description of the repair reflects the considerable thought that went into the evolution of his design. As his technique has gained acceptance in the intervening 10 years, the authors note several key principles embodied in it that represent a shift in the cleft lip repair paradigm. The authors believe understanding these principles is important to mastery of the anatomical subunit technique, and facilitate its teaching. First, design a plan that adheres to anatomical subunits and perform measurements precisely. Second, identify and adequately release each cleft tissue layer from the lip and nose to enable restoration of balance. Third, drive surgical approximation through inset of the lateral muscle into the superiorly backcut medial orbicularis muscle, followed by skin closure with inferior triangle interposition above the white roll. In this article, the authors present essential components of the technique, and identify several principles that enable its successful execution. PMID:27348690

  13. CMF70 is a subunit of the dynein regulatory complex.

    PubMed

    Kabututu, Zakayi P; Thayer, Michelle; Melehani, Jason H; Hill, Kent L

    2010-10-15

    Flagellar motility drives propulsion of several important pathogens and is essential for human development and physiology. Motility of the eukaryotic flagellum requires coordinate regulation of thousands of dynein motors arrayed along the axoneme, but the proteins underlying dynein regulation are largely unknown. The dynein regulatory complex, DRC, is recognized as a focal point of axonemal dynein regulation, but only a single DRC subunit, trypanin/PF2, is currently known. The component of motile flagella 70 protein, CMF70, is broadly and uniquely conserved among organisms with motile flagella, suggesting a role in axonemal motility. Here we demonstrate that CMF70 is part of the DRC from Trypanosoma brucei. CMF70 is located along the flagellum, co-sediments with trypanin in sucrose gradients and co-immunoprecipitates with trypanin. RNAi knockdown of CMF70 causes motility defects in a wild-type background and suppresses flagellar paralysis in cells with central pair defects, thus meeting the functional definition of a DRC subunit. Trypanin and CMF70 are mutually conserved in at least five of six extant eukaryotic clades, indicating that the DRC was probably present in the last common eukaryotic ancestor. We have identified only the second known subunit of this ubiquitous dynein regulatory system, highlighting the utility of combined genomic and functional analyses for identifying novel subunits of axonemal sub-complexes. PMID:20876659

  14. Production of Heteromeric Transmembrane Receptors with Defined Subunit Stoichiometry.

    PubMed

    Malinauskas, Tomas; Furukawa, Hiro

    2016-05-01

    Signal transduction across cell membranes often requires assembly of heteromeric receptors with defined stoichiometry. In this issue of Structure, Morales-Perez et al. (2016) present elegant methods for the expression of heteromeric nicotinic acetylcholine receptors with a defined α4β2 stoichiometry involving controlled baculovirus-mediated transduction and subunit counting by measurement of two fluorescent signals.

  15. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products, and functions.

    PubMed

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y

    2015-09-01

    Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits - which differ among various taxa - affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating (i) the expression of the biosynthesis apparatus, (ii) the export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and (iii) the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of resulting biofilms, which is particularly important for the interactions of bacteria with higher organisms - leading to rhizosphere colonization and modulating the virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. We review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operon found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms and in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  16. GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate stress resilience

    PubMed Central

    O’Leary, Olivia F.; Felice, Daniela; Galimberti, Stefano; Savignac, Hélène M.; Bravo, Javier A.; Crowley, Tadhg; El Yacoubi, Malika; Vaugeois, Jean-Marie; Gassmann, Martin; Bettler, Bernhard; Dinan, Timothy G.; Cryan, John F.

    2014-01-01

    Stressful life events increase the susceptibility to developing psychiatric disorders such as depression; however, many individuals are resilient to such negative effects of stress. Determining the neurobiology underlying this resilience is instrumental to the development of novel and more effective treatments for stress-related psychiatric disorders. GABAB receptors are emerging therapeutic targets for the treatment of stress-related disorders such as depression. These receptors are predominantly expressed as heterodimers of a GABAB(2) subunit with either a GABAB(1a) or a GABAB(1b) subunit. Here we show that mice lacking the GABAB(1b) receptor isoform are more resilient to both early-life stress and chronic psychosocial stress in adulthood, whereas mice lacking GABAB(1a) receptors are more susceptible to stress-induced anhedonia and social avoidance compared with wild-type mice. In addition, increased hippocampal expression of the GABAB(1b) receptor subunit is associated with a depression-like phenotype in the helpless H/Rouen genetic mouse model of depression. Stress resilience in GABAB(1b)−/− mice is coupled with increased proliferation and survival of newly born cells in the adult ventral hippocampus and increased stress-induced c-Fos activation in the hippocampus following early-life stress. Taken together, the data suggest that GABAB(1) receptor subunit isoforms differentially regulate the deleterious effects of stress and, thus, may be important therapeutic targets for the treatment of depression. PMID:25288769

  17. Chemical crosslinking of the subunits of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase.

    PubMed Central

    Debyser, Z.; De Clercq, E.

    1996-01-01

    The reverse transcriptase (RT) of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is composed of two subunits of 66 and 51 kDa in a 1 to 1 ratio. Because dimerization is a prerequisite for enzymatic activity, interference with the dimerization process could constitute an alternative antiviral strategy for RT inhibition. Here we describe an in vitro assay for the study of the dimerization state of HIV-1 reverse transcriptase based on chemical crosslinking of the subunits with dimethylsuberimidate. Crosslinking results in the formation of covalent bonds between the subunits, so that the crosslinked species can be resolved by denaturing gel electrophoresis. Crosslinked RT species with molecular weight greater than that of the dimeric form accumulate during a 1-15-min time course. Initial evidence suggests that those high molecular weight species represent trimers and tetramers and may be the result of intramolecular crosslinking of the subunits of a higher-order RT oligomer. A peptide that corresponds to part of the tryptophan repeat motif in the connection domain of HIV-1 RT inhibits crosslink formation as well as enzymatic activity. The crosslinking assay thus allows the investigation of the effect of inhibitors on the dimerization of HIV-1 RT. PMID:8745406

  18. Bacterial cellulose biosynthesis: diversity of operons, subunits, products and functions

    PubMed Central

    Römling, Ute; Galperin, Michael Y.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Recent studies of bacterial cellulose biosynthesis, including structural characterization of a functional cellulose synthase complex, provided the first mechanistic insight into this fascinating process. In most studied bacteria, just two subunits, BcsA and BcsB, are necessary and sufficient for the formation of the polysaccharide chain in vitro. Other subunits – which differ among various taxa – affect the enzymatic activity and product yield in vivo by modulating expression of biosynthesis apparatus, export of the nascent β-D-glucan polymer to the cell surface, and the organization of cellulose fibers into a higher-order structure. These auxiliary subunits play key roles in determining the quantity and structure of the resulting biofilm, which is particularly important for interactions of bacteria with higher organisms that lead to rhizosphere colonization and modulate virulence of cellulose-producing bacterial pathogens inside and outside of host cells. Here we review the organization of four principal types of cellulose synthase operons found in various bacterial genomes, identify additional bcs genes that encode likely components of the cellulose biosynthesis and secretion machinery, and propose a unified nomenclature for these genes and subunits. We also discuss the role of cellulose as a key component of biofilms formed by a variety of free-living and pathogenic bacteria and, for the latter, in the choice between acute infection and persistence in the host. PMID:26077867

  19. Rapid high mass resolution mass spectrometry using matrix-assisted ionization.

    PubMed

    Trimpin, Sarah; Thawoos, Shameemah; Foley, Casey D; Woodall, Daniel W; Li, Jing; Inutan, Ellen D; Stemmer, Paul M

    2016-07-15

    Matrix-assisted ionization (MAI) is demonstrated to be a robust and sensitive analytical method capable of analyzing proteins such as cholera toxin B-subunit and pertussis toxin mutant from conditions containing relatively high amounts of inorganic salts, buffers, and preservatives without the need for prior sample clean-up or concentration. By circumventing some of the sample preparation steps, MAI simplifies and accelerates the analytical workflow for biological samples in complex media. The benefits of multiply charged ions characteristic of electrospray ionization (ESI) and the robustness of matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) can be obtained from a single method, making it well suited for analysis of proteins and other biomolecules at ultra-high resolution as demonstrated on an Orbitrap Fusion where protein subunits were resolved for which MALDI-time-of-flight failed. MAI results are compared with those obtained with ESI, MALDI, and laserspray ionization methods and fundamental commonalities discussed.

  20. MOP /Matrix Operation Programs system/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Muller, P. M.

    1968-01-01

    MOP /Matrix Operation Programs/ system consists of a set of FORTRAN 4 subroutines which are related through a small common allocation. The system accomplishes all matrix algebra operations plus related input-output and housekeeping details.

  1. Matrix Theory of Small Oscillations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chavda, L. K.

    1978-01-01

    A complete matrix formulation of the theory of small oscillations is presented. Simple analytic solutions involving matrix functions are found which clearly exhibit the transients, the damping factors, the Breit-Wigner form for resonances, etc. (BB)

  2. The Biochemistry, Ultrastructure, and Subunit Assembly Mechanism of AMPA Receptors

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    The AMPA-type ionotropic glutamate receptors (AMPA-Rs) are tetrameric ligand-gated ion channels that play crucial roles in synaptic transmission and plasticity. Our knowledge about the ultrastructure and subunit assembly mechanisms of intact AMPA-Rs was very limited. However, the new studies using single particle EM and X-ray crystallography are revealing important insights. For example, the tetrameric crystal structure of the GluA2cryst construct provided the atomic view of the intact receptor. In addition, the single particle EM structures of the subunit assembly intermediates revealed the conformational requirement for the dimer-to-tetramer transition during the maturation of AMPA-Rs. These new data in the field provide new models and interpretations. In the brain, the native AMPA-R complexes contain auxiliary subunits that influence subunit assembly, gating, and trafficking of the AMPA-Rs. Understanding the mechanisms of the auxiliary subunits will become increasingly important to precisely describe the function of AMPA-Rs in the brain. The AMPA-R proteomics studies continuously reveal a previously unexpected degree of molecular heterogeneity of the complex. Because the AMPA-Rs are important drug targets for treating various neurological and psychiatric diseases, it is likely that these new native complexes will require detailed mechanistic analysis in the future. The current ultrastructural data on the receptors and the receptor-expressing stable cell lines that were developed during the course of these studies are useful resources for high throughput drug screening and further drug designing. Moreover, we are getting closer to understanding the precise mechanisms of AMPA-R-mediated synaptic plasticity. PMID:21080238

  3. On the Matrix Exponential Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hou, Shui-Hung; Hou, Edwin; Pang, Wan-Kai

    2006-01-01

    A novel and simple formula for computing the matrix exponential function is presented. Specifically, it can be used to derive explicit formulas for the matrix exponential of a general matrix A satisfying p(A) = 0 for a polynomial p(s). It is ready for use in a classroom and suitable for both hand as well as symbolic computation.

  4. Regulation of Na,K-ATPase Subunit Abundance by Translational Repression*

    PubMed Central

    Clifford, Rebecca J.; Kaplan, Jack H.

    2009-01-01

    The Na,K-ATPase is an αβ heterodimer responsible for maintaining fluid and electrolyte homeostasis in mammalian cells. We engineered Madin-Darby canine kidney cell lines expressing α1FLAG, β1FLAG, or β2MYC subunits via a tetracycline-regulated promoter and a line expressing both stable β1MYC and tetracycline-regulated β1FLAG to examine regulatory mechanisms of sodium pump subunit expression. When overexpression of exogenous β1FLAG increased total β subunit levels by >200% without changes in α subunit abundance, endogenous β1 subunit (β1E) abundance decreased. β1E down-regulation did not occur during β2MYC overexpression, indicating isoform specificity of the repression mechanism. Measurements of RNA stability and content indicated that decreased β subunit expression was not accompanied by any change in mRNA levels. In addition, the degradation rate of β subunits was not altered by β1FLAG overexpression. Cells stably expressing β1MYC, when induced to express β1FLAG subunits, showed reduced β1MYC and β1E subunit abundance, indicating that these effects occur via the coding sequences of the down-regulated polypeptides. In a similar way, Madin-Darby canine kidney cells overexpressing exogenous α1FLAG subunits exhibited a reduction of endogenous α1 subunits (α1E) with no change in α mRNA levels or β subunits. The reduction in α1E compensated for α1FLAG subunit expression, resulting in unchanged total α subunit abundance. Thus, regulation of α subunit expression maintained its native level, whereas β subunit was not as tightly regulated and its abundance could increase substantially over native levels. These effects also occurred in human embryonic kidney cells. These data are the first indication that cellular sodium pump subunit abundance is modulated by translational repression. This mechanism represents a novel, potentially important mechanism for regulation of Na,K-ATPase expression. PMID:19553675

  5. 7 CFR 51.608 - Fairly compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Fairly compact. 51.608 Section 51.608 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF...

  6. 7 CFR 51.608 - Fairly compact.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Fairly compact. 51.608 Section 51.608 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE REGULATIONS AND STANDARDS UNDER THE AGRICULTURAL MARKETING ACT OF...

  7. A compact transportable Josephson voltage standard

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, C.A.; Burroughs, C.J.; Kupferman, S.L.

    1996-06-01

    The development of a compact, portable 10 V Josephson calibration system is described. Its accuracy is the same as typical laboratory systems and its weight and volume are reduced by more than a factor of three. The new system will replace travelling voltage standards used within several NASA and DOE standards laboratories.

  8. Materials needs for compact fusion reactors

    SciTech Connect

    Krakowski, R.A.

    1983-01-01

    The economic prospects for magnetic fusion energy can be dramatically improved if for the same total power output the fusion neutron first-wall (FW) loading and the system power density can be increased by factors of 3 to 5 and 10 to 30, respectively. A number of compact fusion reactor embodiments have been proposed, all of which would operate with increased FW loadings, would use thin (0.5 to 0.6 m) blankets, and would confine quasi-steady-state plasma with resistive, water-cooled copper or aluminum coils. Increased system power density (5 to 15 MWt/m/sup 3/ versus 0.3 to 0.5 MW/m/sup 3/), considerably reduced physical size of the fusion power core (FPC), and appreciably reduced economic leverage exerted by the FPC and associated physics result. The unique materials requirements anticipated for these compact reactors are outlined against the well documented backdrop provided by similar needs for the mainline approaches. Surprisingly, no single materials need that is unique to the compact systems is identified; crucial uncertainties for the compact approaches must also be addressed by the mainline approaches, particularly for in-vacuum components (FWs, limiters, divertors, etc.).

  9. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-08-02

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  10. Rotation and gravitational compaction in asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Halling, R.

    A theoretical model of gravitational compaction during the formation of asteroids is developed on the basis of the planetesimal-accretion theory of Alfven and Arrhenius (1976) and applied to the observational data of Dermott and Murray (1982) on nonfamily main-belt C, S, and M asteroids of diameter 50 km or greater (assumed to be primordial objects). Three phases of accretion are defined: initial accretion of porous material at constant density until a critical radius and central pressure (of the order of 1 MPa) are attained, breakdown and compaction proceeding outward and resulting in a reduction of asteroid radius, and continued accretion with an increase in the volume friction in the compact state. A spin-frequency/diameter relation is derived by fitting this model to the data and found to give porous-state densities between 0.75 and 1.60 g/cu cm, compact-state densities 2.20-4.50 g/cu cm, critical radii 55-101 km, and postbreakdown radii 53-90 km.

  11. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, Walter D.; Rudduck, Roger C.; Yu, Jiunn S.

    1988-01-01

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector.

  12. Compact range for variable-zone measurements

    DOEpatents

    Burnside, W.D.; Rudduck, R.C.; Yu, J.S.

    1987-02-27

    A compact range for testing antennas or radar targets includes a source for directing energy along a feedline toward a parabolic reflector. The reflected wave is a spherical wave with a radius dependent on the distance of the source from the focal point of the reflector. 2 figs.

  13. Compact Translating-Head Magnetic Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Katti, Romney R.

    1992-01-01

    Stationary magnetic media stores information at densities up to 6.5 Gb/cm(Sup 2). High-density memory devices combine features of advanced rotating-disk magnetic recording and playback systems with compact two-axis high-acceleration linear actuators. New devices weigh less, occupy less space, and consume less power than disk and tape recorders.

  14. COMPACT DISCLOSURE: Realizing CD-ROM's Potential.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Halperin, Michael; Pagell, Ruth A.

    1986-01-01

    The advantages and disadvantages of the compact disk version of the DISCLOSURE database are compared to the print version and other online formats. Currentness of information, searching methods, users' perceptions taken from a student survey, price, availability, response time, and browsabiity are considered. Sample menus and screen displays are…

  15. Compact continuum brain model for human electroencephalogram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, J. W.; Shin, H.-B.; Robinson, P. A.

    2007-12-01

    A low-dimensional, compact brain model has recently been developed based on physiologically based mean-field continuum formulation of electric activity of the brain. The essential feature of the new compact model is a second order time-delayed differential equation that has physiologically plausible terms, such as rapid corticocortical feedback and delayed feedback via extracortical pathways. Due to its compact form, the model facilitates insight into complex brain dynamics via standard linear and nonlinear techniques. The model successfully reproduces many features of previous models and experiments. For example, experimentally observed typical rhythms of electroencephalogram (EEG) signals are reproduced in a physiologically plausible parameter region. In the nonlinear regime, onsets of seizures, which often develop into limit cycles, are illustrated by modulating model parameters. It is also shown that a hysteresis can occur when the system has multiple attractors. As a further illustration of this approach, power spectra of the model are fitted to those of sleep EEGs of two subjects (one with apnea, the other with narcolepsy). The model parameters obtained from the fittings show good matches with previous literature. Our results suggest that the compact model can provide a theoretical basis for analyzing complex EEG signals.

  16. Compact imaging spectrometer utilizing immersed gratings

    DOEpatents

    Lerner, Scott A.

    2005-12-20

    A compact imaging spectrometer comprising an entrance slit for directing light, lens means for receiving the light, refracting the light, and focusing the light; an immersed diffraction grating that receives the light from the lens means and defracts the light, the immersed diffraction grating directing the detracted light back to the lens means; and a detector that receives the light from the lens means.

  17. Analytic vortex solutions on compact hyperbolic surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maldonado, Rafael; Manton, Nicholas S.

    2015-06-01

    We construct, for the first time, abelian Higgs vortices on certain compact surfaces of constant negative curvature. Such surfaces are represented by a tessellation of the hyperbolic plane by regular polygons. The Higgs field is given implicitly in terms of Schwarz triangle functions and analytic solutions are available for certain highly symmetric configurations.

  18. Pathway to a compact SASE FEL device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dattoli, G.; Di Palma, E.; Petrillo, V.; Rau, Julietta V.; Sabia, E.; Spassovsky, I.; Biedron, S. G.; Einstein, J.; Milton, S. V.

    2015-10-01

    Newly developed high peak power lasers have opened the possibilities of driving coherent light sources operating with laser plasma accelerated beams and wave undulators. We speculate on the combination of these two concepts and show that the merging of the underlying technologies could lead to new and interesting possibilities to achieve truly compact, coherent radiator devices.

  19. Compact, Lightweight Servo-Controllable Brakes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovchik, Christopher S.; Townsend, William; Guertin, Jeffrey; Matsuoka, Yoky

    2010-01-01

    Compact, lightweight servo-controllable brakes capable of high torques are being developed for incorporation into robot joints. A brake of this type is based partly on the capstan effect of tension elements. In a brake of the type under development, a controllable intermediate state of torque is reached through on/off switching at a high frequency.

  20. MTI compact electronic meter testing program

    SciTech Connect

    O`Rourke, E.L.

    1995-12-31

    MTI has completed an extensive test program to ensure a new compact electronic gas meter meets all specifications and standards customarily employed by the U.S. gas industry. Thirty (30) test plans were developed to cover all American National Standards Institute (ANSI) performance requirements. (1) The prototype meters have met or exceeded the ANSI B109.1 standards. (2) The prototype meters have demonstrated the feasibility of GRI`s decision to seek a compact meter for early market entry. (3) Several leading U.S. utilities have participated in sponsoring the project and have expressed keen interest in field testing the compact meter. (4) American Meter Company (AMC), the predominant U.S. meter manufacturer, has participated in the sponsorship and testing of the compact meter and has formed a joint venture with Select Corporation to bring the meter to the U.S. and world-wide marketplace. (5) The meter generates the necessary electronic output for either telephonic or radio based automatic meter reading (AMR). The pre-production meters for the North American market are being fabricated currently by AMC. Following their completion, an extensive field test program will take place. Three hundred units will be installed at ten to fifteen utilities and tested for a period of up to one year.

  1. Mitotic chromosome compaction via active loop extrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goloborodko, Anton; Imakaev, Maxim; Marko, John; Mirny, Leonid; MIT-Northwestern Team

    During cell division, two copies of each chromosome are segregated from each other and compacted more than hundred-fold into the canonical X-shaped structures. According to earlier microscopic observations and the recent Hi-C study, chromosomes are compacted into arrays of consecutive loops of ~100 kilobases. Mechanisms that lead to formation of such loop arrays are largely unknown. Here we propose that, during cell division, chromosomes can be compacted by enzymes that extrude loops on chromatin fibers. First, we use computer simulations and analytical modeling to show that a system of loop-extruding enzymes on a chromatin fiber self-organizes into an array of consecutive dynamic loops. Second, we model the process of loop extrusion in 3D and show that, coupled with the topo II strand-passing activity, it leads to robust compaction and segregation of sister chromatids. This mechanism of chromosomal condensation and segregation does not require additional proteins or specific DNA markup and is robust against variations in the number and properties of such loop extruding enzymes. Work at NU was supported by the NSF through Grants DMR-1206868 and MCB-1022117, and by the NIH through Grants GM105847 and CA193419. Work at MIT was supported by the NIH through Grants GM114190 R01HG003143.

  2. Soil compaction across the old rotation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Evaluating soil compaction levels across the Old Rotation, the world’s oldest continuous cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.) experiment, has not been conducted since the experiment transitioned to conservation tillage and high residue cover crops with and without irrigation. Our objective was to charact...

  3. Holographic Compact Disk Read-Only Memories

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tsuen-Hsi

    1996-01-01

    Compact disk read-only memories (CD-ROMs) of proposed type store digital data in volume holograms instead of in surface differentially reflective elements. Holographic CD-ROM consist largely of parts similar to those used in conventional CD-ROMs. However, achieves 10 or more times data-storage capacity and throughput by use of wavelength-multiplexing/volume-hologram scheme.

  4. Compact microwave cavity for hydrogen atomic clock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zhang, Dejun; Zhang, Yan; Fu, Yigen; Zhang, Yanjun

    1992-01-01

    A summary is presented that introduces the compact microwave cavity used in the hydrogen atomic clock. Special emphasis is placed on derivation of theoretical calculating equations of main parameters of the microwave cavity. A brief description is given of several methods for discriminating the oscillating modes. Experimental data and respective calculated values are also presented.

  5. Compaction and Wear Concerns on Sports Fields.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gillan, John

    1999-01-01

    Describes relatively simple measures athletic-facility managers can use to alleviate the turf destruction and compaction of athletic fields including seed and soil amendments and modifications on team practice. Ways of enhancing surface traction and lessen surface hardness are explored. (GR)

  6. Kinematics of luminous blue compact galaxies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Östlin, Göran; Amram, Philippe; Boulesteix, Jaques; Bergvall, Nils; Masegosa, Josefa; Márquez, Isabel

    We present results from a Fabry-Perot study of the Hα velocity fields and morphologies of a sample of luminous blue compact galaxies. We estimate masses from photometry and kinematics and show that many of these BCGs are not rotationally supported. Mergers or strong interactions appear to be the triggering mechanism of the extreme starbursts seen in these galaxies.

  7. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  8. The cellulose resource matrix.

    PubMed

    Keijsers, Edwin R P; Yılmaz, Gülden; van Dam, Jan E G

    2013-03-01

    The emerging biobased economy is causing shifts from mineral fossil oil based resources towards renewable resources. Because of market mechanisms, current and new industries utilising renewable commodities, will attempt to secure their supply of resources. Cellulose is among these commodities, where large scale competition can be expected and already is observed for the traditional industries such as the paper industry. Cellulose and lignocellulosic raw materials (like wood and non-wood fibre crops) are being utilised in many industrial sectors. Due to the initiated transition towards biobased economy, these raw materials are intensively investigated also for new applications such as 2nd generation biofuels and 'green' chemicals and materials production (Clark, 2007; Lange, 2007; Petrus & Noordermeer, 2006; Ragauskas et al., 2006; Regalbuto, 2009). As lignocellulosic raw materials are available in variable quantities and qualities, unnecessary competition can be avoided via the choice of suitable raw materials for a target application. For example, utilisation of cellulose as carbohydrate source for ethanol production (Kabir Kazi et al., 2010) avoids the discussed competition with easier digestible carbohydrates (sugars, starch) deprived from the food supply chain. Also for cellulose use as a biopolymer several different competing markets can be distinguished. It is clear that these applications and markets will be influenced by large volume shifts. The world will have to reckon with the increase of competition and feedstock shortage (land use/biodiversity) (van Dam, de Klerk-Engels, Struik, & Rabbinge, 2005). It is of interest - in the context of sustainable development of the bioeconomy - to categorize the already available and emerging lignocellulosic resources in a matrix structure. When composing such "cellulose resource matrix" attention should be given to the quality aspects as well as to the available quantities and practical possibilities of processing the

  9. A study of compressibility and compactibility of directly compressible tableting materials containing tramadol hydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Mužíková, Jitka; Kubíčková, Alena

    2016-09-01

    The paper evaluates and compares the compressibility and compactibility of directly compressible tableting materials for the preparation of hydrophilic gel matrix tablets containing tramadol hydrochloride and the coprocessed dry binders Prosolv® SMCC 90 and Disintequik™ MCC 25. The selected types of hypromellose are Methocel™ Premium K4M and Methocel™ Premium K100M in 30 and 50 % concentrations, the lubricant being magnesium stearate in a 1 % concentration. Compressibility is evaluated by means of the energy profile of compression process and compactibility by the tensile strength of tablets. The values of total energy of compression and plasticity were higher in the tableting materials containing Prosolv® SMCC 90 than in those containing Disintequik™ MCC 25. Tramadol slightly decreased the values of total energy of compression and plasticity. Tableting materials containing Prosolv® SMCC 90 yielded stronger tablets. Tramadol decreased the strength of tablets from both coprocessed dry binders.

  10. Pressure–temperature evolution of primordial solar system solids during impact-induced compaction

    PubMed Central

    Bland, P. A.; Collins, G. S.; Davison, T. M.; Abreu, N. M.; Ciesla, F. J.; Muxworthy, A. R.; Moore, J.

    2014-01-01

    Prior to becoming chondritic meteorites, primordial solids were a poorly consolidated mix of mm-scale igneous inclusions (chondrules) and high-porosity sub-μm dust (matrix). We used high-resolution numerical simulations to track the effect of impact-induced compaction on these materials. Here we show that impact velocities as low as 1.5 km s−1 were capable of heating the matrix to >1,000 K, with pressure–temperature varying by >10 GPa and >1,000 K over ~100 μm. Chondrules were unaffected, acting as heat-sinks: matrix temperature excursions were brief. As impact-induced compaction was a primary and ubiquitous process, our new understanding of its effects requires that key aspects of the chondrite record be re-evaluated: palaeomagnetism, petrography and variability in shock level across meteorite groups. Our data suggest a lithification mechanism for meteorites, and provide a ‘speed limit’ constraint on major compressive impacts that is inconsistent with recent models of solar system orbital architecture that require an early, rapid phase of main-belt collisional evolution. PMID:25465283

  11. Pressure-temperature evolution of primordial solar system solids during impact-induced compaction.

    PubMed

    Bland, P A; Collins, G S; Davison, T M; Abreu, N M; Ciesla, F J; Muxworthy, A R; Moore, J

    2014-01-01

    Prior to becoming chondritic meteorites, primordial solids were a poorly consolidated mix of mm-scale igneous inclusions (chondrules) and high-porosity sub-μm dust (matrix). We used high-resolution numerical simulations to track the effect of impact-induced compaction on these materials. Here we show that impact velocities as low as 1.5 km s(-1) were capable of heating the matrix to >1,000 K, with pressure-temperature varying by >10 GPa and >1,000 K over ~100 μm. Chondrules were unaffected, acting as heat-sinks: matrix temperature excursions were brief. As impact-induced compaction was a primary and ubiquitous process, our new understanding of its effects requires that key aspects of the chondrite record be re-evaluated: palaeomagnetism, petrography and variability in shock level across meteorite groups. Our data suggest a lithification mechanism for meteorites, and provide a 'speed limit' constraint on major compressive impacts that is inconsistent with recent models of solar system orbital architecture that require an early, rapid phase of main-belt collisional evolution. PMID:25465283

  12. Investigation of HMA compactability using GPR technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plati, Christina; Georgiou, Panos; Loizos, Andreas

    2014-05-01

    In-situ field density is often regarded as one of the most important controls used to ensure that an asphalt pavement being placed is of high quality. The achieved density results from the effectiveness of the applied compaction mode on the Hot Mix Asphalt (HMA) layer. It is worthwhile mentioning that the proper compaction of HMA increases pavement fatigue life, decreases the amount of permanent deformation or rutting, reduces the amount of oxidation or aging, decreases moisture damage or stripping, increases strength and internal stability, and may decrease slightly the amount of low-temperature cracking that may occur in the mix. Conventionally, the HMA density in the field is assessed by direct destructive methods, including through the cutting of samples or drilling cores. These methods are characterized by a high accuracy, although they are intrusive and time consuming. In addition, they provide local information, i.e. information only for the exact test location. To overcome these limitations, the use of non-intrusive techniques is often recommended. The Ground Penetrating Radar (GPR) technique is an example of a non-intrusive technique that has been increasingly used for pavement investigations over the years. GPR technology is practical and application-oriented with the overall design concept, as well as the hardware, usually dependent on the target type and the material composing the target and its surroundings. As the sophistication of operating practices increases, the technology matures and GPR becomes an intelligent sensor system. The intelligent sensing deals with the expanded range of GPR applications in pavements such as determining layer thickness, detecting subsurface distresses, estimating moisture content, detecting voids and others. In addition, the practice of using GPR to predict in-situ field density of compacted asphalt mixture material is still under development and research; however the related research findings seem to be promising

  13. On Hermite Matrix Polynomials of Two Variables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahmmash, Ghazi S.

    This study deals with the two-variable Hermite matrix polynomials, some relevant matrix functions appear interims of the two-variable Hermite matrix polynomials the relationships with Hermite matrix polynomials of one variable, Chepyshev matrix polynomials of the second kind have been obtained and expansion of the. Gegenbauer matrix polynomials as series of Hermite matrix polynomials.

  14. Supported Molecular Matrix Electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Matsuno, Yu-Ki; Kameyama, Akihiko

    2015-01-01

    Mucins are difficult to separate using conventional gel electrophoresis methods such as SDS-PAGE and agarose gel electrophoresis, owing to their large size and heterogeneity. On the other hand, cellulose acetate membrane electrophoresis can separate these molecules, but is not compatible with glycan analysis. Here, we describe a novel membrane electrophoresis technique, termed "supported molecular matrix electrophoresis" (SMME), in which a porous polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane filter is used to achieve separation. This description includes the separation, visualization, and glycan analysis of mucins with the SMME technique. PMID:26139278

  15. Reconstructing evolution from eukaryotic small-ribosomal-subunit RNA sequences: calibration of the molecular clock.

    PubMed

    Van de Peer, Y; Neefs, J M; De Rijk, P; De Wachter, R

    1993-08-01

    The detailed descriptions now available for the secondary structure of small-ribosomal-subunit RNA, including areas of highly variable primary structure, facilitate the alignment of nucleotide sequences. However, for optimal exploitation of the information contained in the alignment, a method must be available that takes into account the local sequence variability in the computation of evolutionary distance. A quantitative definition for the variability of an alignment position is proposed in this study. It is a parameter in an equation which expresses the probability that the alignment position contains a different nucleotide in two sequences, as a function of the distance separating these sequences, i.e., the number of substitutions per nucleotide that occurred during their divergence. This parameter can be estimated from the distance matrix resulting from the conversion of pairwise sequence dissimilarities into pairwise distances. Alignment positions can then be subdivided into a number of sets of matching variability, and the average variability of each set can be derived. Next, the conversion of dissimilarity into distance can be recalculated for each set of alignment positions separately, using a modified version of the equation that corrects for multiple substitutions and changing for each set the parameter that reflects its average variability. The distances computed for each set are finally averaged, giving a more precise distance estimation. Trees constructed by the algorithm based on variability calibration have a topology markedly different from that of trees constructed from the same alignments in the absence of calibration. This is illustrated by means of trees constructed from small-ribosomal-subunit RNA sequences of Metazoa. A reconstruction of vertebrate evolution based on calibrated alignments matches the consensus view of paleontologists, contrary to trees based on uncalibrated alignments. In trees derived from sequences covering several metazoan

  16. Expressions of integrin subunits in osteoblasts during weightlessness simulation using clionstat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S.; Wang, B.; Zhao, D.; Nie, J.; Li, Y.

    Space flight experiments and studies carried out in altered gravity environments have revealed that exposure to altered gravity conditions results in (mal)adaptation of cellular function. In the present study, we used a clinostat to generate a vector-averaged gravity to simulate weightlessness environment. We then observed the responses of rat calvarial osteoblasts subsequent to rotation at 30 revolutions per minute (rpm) for 72 h. We found that the gene expressions of three integrin subunits started to change from 24 h of rotation in clinostat but not in stationary cultures. The decreased percent changes of integrin a5 mRNA at 24, 48 and 72 h were 11.3 +/- 2.6%, 18.7 +/- 4.2% and 9.8 +/ - 2.1%, respectively. The same trend was saw in the expression of integrin av mRNA as 23.0 +/- 4.7%, 12.3 +/- 1.6% and 16.7 +/- 3.2%, respectively. Moreover, the expressions of integrin ß1 mRNA in different periods were also declined with the percent changes of 15.3 +/- 1.3%, 11.4 +/- 1.2% and 26.4 +/- 5.5%, respectively. All cells contain membrane-anchored attachment proteins able to recognize specific chemical motifs in the extracellular macromolecules forming the supporting scaffold, made of various types of collagen, adhesive glycoproteins, elastin, proteoglycans, etc. These cell-matrix interactions are mainly mediated by receptors of the integrins family, heterodimeric molecules made of an extracellular domain connected through a transmembrane sequence to an intracytoplasmic tail. Our results suggest that vector-averaged gravity causes alterations of signal transduction and integrin-mediated cell adhesion in osteoblasts by altering the gene expressions of several crucial integrin subunits. These alterations might contribute to the pathogenesis of osteoporotic bone loss as observed in actual space flights.

  17. Catalytic Subunit 1 of Protein Phosphatase 2A Is a Subunit of the STRIPAK Complex and Governs Fungal Sexual Development

    PubMed Central

    Beier, Anna; Krisp, Christoph; Wolters, Dirk A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The generation of complex three-dimensional structures is a key developmental step for most eukaryotic organisms. The details of the molecular machinery controlling this step remain to be determined. An excellent model system to study this general process is the generation of three-dimensional fruiting bodies in filamentous fungi like Sordaria macrospora. Fruiting body development is controlled by subunits of the highly conserved striatin-interacting phosphatase and kinase (STRIPAK) complex, which has been described in organisms ranging from yeasts to humans. The highly conserved heterotrimeric protein phosphatase PP2A is a subunit of STRIPAK. Here, catalytic subunit 1 of PP2A was functionally characterized. The Δpp2Ac1 strain is sterile, unable to undergo hyphal fusion, and devoid of ascogonial septation. Further, PP2Ac1, together with STRIPAK subunit PRO22, governs vegetative and stress-related growth. We revealed in vitro catalytic activity of wild-type PP2Ac1, and our in vivo analysis showed that inactive PP2Ac1 blocks the complementation of the sterile deletion strain. Tandem affinity purification, followed by mass spectrometry and yeast two-hybrid analysis, verified that PP2Ac1 is a subunit of STRIPAK. Further, these data indicate links between the STRIPAK complex and other developmental signaling pathways, implying the presence of a large interconnected signaling network that controls eukaryotic developmental processes. The insights gained in our study can be transferred to higher eukaryotes and will be important for understanding eukaryotic cellular development in general. PMID:27329756

  18. Matrix-based, finite-difference algorithms for computational acoustics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Sanford

    1990-01-01

    A compact numerical algorithm is introduced for simulating multidimensional acoustic waves. The algorithm is expressed in terms of a set of matrix coefficients on a three-point spatial grid that approximates the acoustic wave equation with a discretization error of O(h exp 5). The method is based on tracking a local phase variable and its implementation suggests a convenient coordinate splitting along with natural intermediate boundary conditions. Results are presented for oblique plane waves and compared with other procedures. Preliminary computations of acoustic diffraction are also considered.

  19. Sharp Estimates in Ruelle Theorems for Matrix Transfer Operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, J.; Latushkin, Y.

    A matrix coefficient transfer operator , on the space of -sections of an m-dimensional vector bundle over n-dimensional compact manifold is considered. The spectral radius of is estimated bya; and the essential spectral radius by Here is the set of ergodic f-invariant measures, and for is the measure-theoretic entropy of f, is the largest Lyapunov exponent of the cocycle over f generated by , and is the smallest Lyapunov exponent of the differential of f.

  20. GABAA receptor beta subunit heterogeneity: functional expression of cloned cDNAs.

    PubMed Central

    Ymer, S; Schofield, P R; Draguhn, A; Werner, P; Köhler, M; Seeburg, P H

    1989-01-01

    Cloned cDNAs encoding two new beta subunits of the rat and bovine GABAA receptor have been isolated using a degenerate oligonucleotide probe based on a highly conserved peptide sequence in the second transmembrane domain of GABAA receptor subunits. The beta 2 and beta 3 subunits share approximately 72% sequence identity with the previously characterized beta 1 polypeptide. Northern analysis showed that both beta 2 and beta 3 mRNAs are more abundant in the brain than beta 1 mRNA. All three beta subunit encoding cDNAs were also identified in a library constructed from adrenal medulla RNA. Each beta subunit, when co-expressed in Xenopus oocytes with an alpha subunit, forms functional GABAA receptors. These results, together with the known alpha subunit heterogeneity, suggest that a variety of related but functionally distinct GABAA receptor subtypes are generated by different subunit combinations. Images PMID:2548852

  1. Structure, subunit composition, and molecular weight of RD-114 RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Kung, H J; Bailey, J M; Davidson, N; Nicolson, M O; McAllister, R M

    1975-01-01

    The properties and subunit composition of the RNA extracted from RD-114 virions have been studied. The RNA extracted from the virion has a sedimentation coefficient of 52S in a nondenaturing aqueous electrolyte. The estimated molecular weight by sedimentation in nondenaturing and weakly denaturing media is in the range 5.7 X 10(6) to 7.0 X 10(6). By electron microscopy, under moderately denaturing conditions, the 52S molecule is seen to be an extended single strand with a contour length of about 4.0 mum corresponding to a molecular weight of 5.74 X 10(6). It contains two characteristic secondary structure features: (i) a central Y- or T-shaped structure (the rabbit ears) with a molecular weight of 0.3 X 10(6), (ii) two symmetreically disposed loops on each side of and at equal distance from the center. The 52S molecule consists of two half-size molecules, with molecular weight 2.8 X 10(6), joined together within the central rabbit ears feature. Melting of the rabbit ears with concomitant dissociation of the 52S molecule into subunits, has been caused by either one of two strongly denaturing treatments: incubation in a mixture of CH3HgOH and glyoxal at room temperature, or thermal dissociation in a urea-formamide solvent. When half-size molecules are quenched from denaturing temperatures, a new off-center secondary structure feature termed the branch-like structure is seen. The dissociation behavior of the 52S complex and the molecular weight of the subunits have been confirmed by gel electrophoresis studies. The loop structures melt at fairly low temperatures; the dissociation of the 52S molecule into its two subunits occurs at a higher temperature corresponding to a base composition of about 63% guanosine plus cytosine. Polyadenylic acid mapping by electron microscopy shows that the 52S molecule contains two polyadenylic acid segments, one at each end. It thus appears that 52S RD-114 RNA consists of two 2.8 X 10(6) dalton subunits, each with a characteristic

  2. Arrangement of Kv1 alpha subunits dictates sensitivity to tetraethylammonium.

    PubMed

    Al-Sabi, Ahmed; Shamotienko, Oleg; Dhochartaigh, Sorcha Ni; Muniyappa, Nagesh; Le Berre, Marie; Shaban, Hamdy; Wang, Jiafu; Sack, Jon T; Dolly, J Oliver

    2010-09-01

    Shaker-related Kv1 channels contain four channel-forming alpha subunits. Subfamily member Kv1.1 often occurs oligomerized with Kv1.2 alpha subunits in synaptic membranes, and so information was sought on the influence of their positions within tetramers on the channels' properties. Kv1.1 and 1.2 alpha genes were tandem linked in various arrangements, followed by expression as single-chain proteins in mammalian cells. As some concatenations reported previously seemed not to reliably position Kv1 subunits in their assemblies, the identity of expressed channels was methodically evaluated. Surface protein, isolated by biotinylation of intact transiently transfected HEK-293 cells, gave Kv1.1/1.2 reactivity on immunoblots with electrophoretic mobilities corresponding to full-length concatenated tetramers. There was no evidence of protein degradation, indicating that concatemers were delivered intact to the plasmalemma. Constructs with like genes adjacent (Kv1.1-1.1-1.2-1.2 or Kv1.2-1.2-1.1-1.1) yielded delayed-rectifying, voltage-dependent K(+) currents with activation parameters and inactivation kinetics slightly different from the diagonally positioned genes (Kv1.1-1.2-1.1-1.2 or 1.2-1.1-1.2-1.1). Pore-blocking petidergic toxins, alpha dendrotoxin, agitoxin-1, tityustoxin-Kalpha, and kaliotoxin, were unable to distinguish between the adjacent and diagonal concatamers. Unprecedentedly, external application of the pore-blocker tetraethylammonium (TEA) differentially inhibited the adjacent versus diagonal subunit arrangements, with diagonal constructs having enhanced susceptibility. Concatenation did not directly alter the sensitivities of homomeric Kv1.1 or 1.2 channels to TEA or the toxins. TEA inhibition of currents generated by channels made up from dimers (Kv1.1-1.2 and/or Kv1.2-1.1) was similar to the adjacently arranged constructs. These collective findings indicate that assembly of alpha subunits can be directed by this optimized concatenation, and that subunit

  3. Coaxial fiber-optic chemical-sensing excitation-emission matrix fluorometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Chang; Jordan, James A; Chávez, Diana; Booksh, Karl S

    2011-02-01

    Great reductions in the overall size and complexity of high throughput multichannel UV-visible fluorometers were achieved by coupling a compact optical fiber array to compact dispersive transmission optics. The coaxial configuration centers on the insertion of a silica/silica optical fiber into the hollow region of a UV-fused silica capillary waveguide. The outer core delivers the maximum power of the narrow wavelength region of the excitation spectrum created by coupling a xenon arc discharge lamp to a compact spectrometer. The molecular fluorescence resulting from the interaction of light emitted at the distal end of the hollow waveguide and the sample matrix is received and transmitted to a CCD via a compact dispersive grating-prism (grism) optical assembly. A linear array of the coaxial optical fibers permits a full excitation-emission matrix spectrum of the analyte matrix to be projected onto the face of the CCD. The in situ identification and monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was carried out for the initial application testing for this prototype.

  4. Coaxial fiber-optic chemical-sensing excitation-emission matrix fluorometer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Yoon-Chang; Jordan, James A; Chávez, Diana; Booksh, Karl S

    2011-02-01

    Great reductions in the overall size and complexity of high throughput multichannel UV-visible fluorometers were achieved by coupling a compact optical fiber array to compact dispersive transmission optics. The coaxial configuration centers on the insertion of a silica/silica optical fiber into the hollow region of a UV-fused silica capillary waveguide. The outer core delivers the maximum power of the narrow wavelength region of the excitation spectrum created by coupling a xenon arc discharge lamp to a compact spectrometer. The molecular fluorescence resulting from the interaction of light emitted at the distal end of the hollow waveguide and the sample matrix is received and transmitted to a CCD via a compact dispersive grating-prism (grism) optical assembly. A linear array of the coaxial optical fibers permits a full excitation-emission matrix spectrum of the analyte matrix to be projected onto the face of the CCD. The in situ identification and monitoring of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons was carried out for the initial application testing for this prototype. PMID:21283188

  5. The mitochondrial F1ATPase alpha-subunit is necessary for efficient import of mitochondrial precursors.

    PubMed

    Yuan, H; Douglas, M G

    1992-07-25

    The mitochondrial import and assembly of the F1ATPase subunits requires, respectively, the participation of the molecular chaperones hsp70SSA1 and hsp70SSC1 and other components operating on opposite sides of the mitochondrial membrane. In previous studies, both the homology and the assembly properties of the F1ATPase alpha-subunit (ATP1p) compared to the groEL homologue, hsp60, have led to the proposal that this subunit could exhibit chaperone-like activity. In this report the extent to which this subunit participates in protein transport has been determined by comparing import into mitochondria that lack the F1ATPase alpha-subunit (delta ATP1) versus mitochondria that lack the other major catalytic subunit, the F1ATPase beta-subunit (delta ATP2). Yeast mutants lacking the alpha-subunit but not the beta-subunit grow much more slowly than expected on fermentable carbon sources and exhibit delayed kinetics of protein import for several mitochondrial precursors such as the F1 beta subunit, hsp60MIF4 and subunits 4 and 5 of the cytochrome oxidase. In vitro and in vivo the F1 beta-subunit precursor accumulates as a translocation intermediate in absence of the F1 alpha-subunit. In the absence of both the ATPase subunits yeast grows at the same rate as a strain lacking only the beta-subunit, and import of mitochondrial precursors is restored to that of wild type. These data indicate that the F1 alpha-subunit likely functions as an "assembly partner" to influence protein import rather than functioning directly as a chaperone. These data are discussed in light of the relationship between the import and assembly of proteins in mitochondria.

  6. Regulation of expression of a soybean storage protein subunit gene. Progress report

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, J.F.; Madison, J.T.

    1984-04-23

    We have found that the methionine repression of the ..beta..-subunit gene expression is not due to degradation of the ..beta..-subunit but is due to an effect on synthesis of the ..beta..-subunit. The effect of methionine on the synthesis of the ..beta..-is due to an inhibition of ..beta..-subunit mRNA synthesis. 3 references, 1 figure.

  7. Determination of mercury distribution inside spent compact fluorescent lamps by atomic absorption spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Rey-Raap, Natalia

    2012-05-15

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer New treatments for CFL are required considering the aim of Directive 202/96/CE. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It is shown that most of the mercury introduced into a CFL is in the phosphor powder. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Experimental conditions for microwave-assisted sample digestion followed by AAS measurements are described. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer By washing the glass it is possible to reduce the concentration below legal limits. - Abstract: In this study, spent compact fluorescent lamps were characterized to determine the distribution of mercury. The procedure used in this research allowed mercury to be extracted in the vapor phase, from the phosphor powder, and the glass matrix. Mercury concentration in the three phases was determined by the method known as cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometry. Median values obtained in the study showed that a compact fluorescent lamp contained 24.52 {+-} 0.4 ppb of mercury in the vapor phase, 204.16 {+-} 8.9 ppb of mercury in the phosphor powder, and 18.74 {+-} 0.5 ppb of mercury in the glass matrix. There are differences in mercury concentration between the lamps since the year of manufacture or the hours of operation affect both mercury content and its distribution. The 85.76% of the mercury introduced into a compact fluorescent lamp becomes a component of the phosphor powder, while more than 13.66% is diffused through the glass matrix. By washing and eliminating all phosphor powder attached to the glass surface it is possible to classified the glass as a non-hazardous waste.

  8. Can compaction, caused by melt extraction and intrusion, generate tectonically effective stresses in the lithosphere?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallner, Herbert; Schmeling, Harro

    2016-04-01

    Aim of our study is to deepen understanding the role of melt processes while the lithospheric evolution by means of numerical modeling. In the sense of plate tectonics, on the one hand, stresses are transferred by stiff lithospheric plates, on the other, lithosphere is deformed, broken, or modified in various ways. Melting often plays an important role but is not easy to model numerically due to all the interactions of physics, phase changes, non-linearities, time scales, petrology, heterogeneities and chemical reactions. Here we restrict on a thermo-mechanical model of visco-plastic two phase flow with partial melting. Viscosity is temperature-, stress- and depth-dependent. Freezing and melting are determined by a simplified linear binary solid solution model. The fast melt transport through and into the lithosphere, acting on a short time scale, is replaced by melt extraction and intrusion in a given emplacement level. Numerical approximation is done in 2D with Finite Differences with markers in an Eulerian formulation. A scenario of continental rifting serves for a model of lithosphere above asthenosphere under extensional conditions. An anomaly of increased temperature at the bottom produces a low fraction of melt initially in the asthenosphere. Above a porosity limit melt is extracted and leads to compaction at its origin which induces under-pressure attracting ambient melt and contracting the depleted matrix. In a higher, colder lithospheric level the emplaced melt extends the matrix, immediately freezes; an increase of enrichment and heating takes place. The dilatation of the rock matrix generates relative high compaction pressures if it's viscosity is high as in the uppermost mantle lithosphere. Local and temporary varying stresses provide deviatoric components which sometimes may be the origin of tectonic activity in nature. Divergence terms of the full compaction formulation, responsible for viscous stress, are tested and reviewed. Quality and stability

  9. First elevated-temperature performance testing of coated particle fuel compacts from the AGR-1 irradiation experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Charles A. Baldwin; John D. Hunn; Robert N. Morris; Fred C. Montgomery; Chinthaka M. Silva; Paul A. Demkowicz

    2014-05-01

    In the AGR-1 irradiation experiment, 72 coated-particle fuel compacts were taken to a peak burnup of 19.5% fissions per initial metal atom with no in-pile failures. This paper discusses the first post-irradiation test of these mixed uranium oxide/uranium carbide fuel compacts at elevated temperature to examine the fuel performance under a simulated depressurized conduction cooldown event. A compact was heated for 400 h at 1600 degrees C. Release of 85Kr was monitored throughout the furnace test as an indicator of coating failure, while other fission product releases from the compact were periodically measured by capturing them on exchangeable, water-cooled deposition cups. No coating failure was detected during the furnace test, and this result was verified by subsequent electrolytic deconsolidation and acid leaching of the compact, which showed that all SiC layers were still intact. However, the deposition cups recovered significant quantities of silver, europium, and strontium. Based on comparison of calculated compact inventories at the end of irradiation versus analysis of these fission products released to the deposition cups and furnace internals, the minimum estimated fractional losses from the compact during the furnace test were 1.9 x 10-2 for silver, 1.4 x 10-3 for europium, and 1.1 x 10-5 for strontium. Other post-irradiation examination of AGR-1 compacts indicates that similar fractions of europium and silver may have already been released by the intact coated particles during irradiation, and it is therefore likely that the detected fission products released from the compact in this 1600 degrees C furnace test were from residual fission products in the matrix. Gamma analysis of coated particles deconsolidated from the compact after the heating test revealed that silver content within each particle varied considerably; a result that is probably not related to the furnace test, because it has also been observed in other as-irradiated AGR-1 compacts. X

  10. Mathematical relation predicts achievable densities of compacted particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ayer, J. E.; Soppet, F. E.

    1967-01-01

    Series of mathematical relationships predicts compact densities of spherical shapes in a cylinder as a function of particle dimension, and compact density of angular shapes as a function of particle shape and absolute size.

  11. The alpha and beta subunits of phosphorylase kinase are homologous: cDNA cloning and primary structure of the beta subunit.

    PubMed Central

    Kilimann, M W; Zander, N F; Kuhn, C C; Crabb, J W; Meyer, H E; Heilmeyer, L M

    1988-01-01

    We have cloned cDNA molecules encoding the beta subunit of phosphorylase kinase (ATP:phosphorylase-b phosphotransferase; EC 2.7.1.38) from rabbit fast-twitch skeletal muscle and have determined the complete primary structure of the polypeptide by a combination of peptide and DNA sequencing. In the mature beta subunit, the initial methionine is replaced by an acetyl group. The subunit is composed of 1092 amino acids and has a calculated molecular mass of 125,205 Da. Alignment of its sequence with the alpha subunit of phosphorylase kinase reveals extensive regions of homology, but each molecule also possesses unique sequences. Two of the three phosphorylation sites known for the beta subunit and all seven phosphorylation sites known for the alpha subunit are located in these unique domains. Images PMID:3200826

  12. Dissolution and compaction instabilities in geomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stefanou, I.; Sulem, J.; de Sauvage, J.

    2014-12-01

    Compaction bands play an important role in reservoir engineering and geological storage. Their presence in geological formations may also provide useful information on various geological processes. Several mechanisms can be involved at different scales and may be responsible for compaction band instabilities [1]. Compaction bands can be seen as a particular instability of the governing mathematical system leading to localization of deformation [2-4]. In a saturated porous rock, the progressive mechanical damage of the solid skeleton during compaction, results in the increase of the interface area of the reactants and consequently in the acceleration of the dissolution rate of the solid phase [2,5]. Thus, the solid skeleton is degraded more rapidly (mass removal because of dissolution), the overall mechanical properties of the system diminish (contraction of the elastic domain - chemical softening), deformations increase and the solid skeleton is further damaged (intergranular fractures, debonding, breakage of the porous network etc.). The stability of this positive feedback process is investigated analytically through linear stability analysis by considering the strong chemo-poro-mechanical coupling due to chemical dissolution. The post bifurcation behavior is then studied analytically and numerically revealing the compaction band thickness and periodicity. The effect of various parameters is studied as for instance the influence of the hydraulic diffusivity on the compaction band thickness. [1] P. Baud, S. Vinciguerra, C. David, A. Cavallo, E. Walker and T. Reuschlé (2009), Pure Appl. Geophys., 166(5-7), 869-898 [2] I. Stefanou and J. Sulem (2014), JGR: Solid Earth, 119(2), 880-899. doi:10.1002/2013JB010342I [3] J.W. Rudnicki and J.R. Rice (1975), Journal of the Mechanics and Physics of Solids 23(6),: 371-394 [4] K.A. Issen and J.W. Rudnicki (2000), JGR, 105(B9), 21529. doi:10.1029/2000JB900185 [5] R. Nova, R. Castellanza and C. Tamagnini (2003), International

  13. Improved compaction of dried tannery wastewater sludge.

    PubMed

    Della Zassa, M; Zerlottin, M; Refosco, D; Santomaso, A C; Canu, P

    2015-12-01

    We quantitatively studied the advantages of improving the compaction of a powder waste by several techniques, including its pelletization. The goal is increasing the mass storage capacity in a given storage volume, and reducing the permeability of air and moisture, that may trigger exothermic spontaneous reactions in organic waste, particularly as powders. The study is based on dried sludges from a wastewater treatment, mainly from tanneries, but the indications are valid and useful for any waste in the form of powder, suitable to pelletization. Measurements of bulk density have been carried out at the industrial and laboratory scale, using different packing procedures, amenable to industrial processes. Waste as powder, pellets and their mixtures have been considered. The bulk density of waste as powder increases from 0.64 t/m(3) (simply poured) to 0.74 t/m(3) (tapped) and finally to 0.82 t/m(3) by a suitable, yet simple, packing procedure that we called dispersion filling, with a net gain of 28% in the compaction by simply modifying the collection procedure. Pelletization increases compaction by definition, but the packing of pellets is relatively coarse. Some increase in bulk density of pellets can be achieved by tapping; vibration and dispersion filling are not efficient with pellets. Mixtures of powder and pellets is the optimal packing policy. The best compaction result was achieved by controlled vibration of a 30/70 wt% mixture of powders and pellets, leading to a final bulk density of 1t/m(3), i.e. an improvement of compaction by more than 54% with respect to simply poured powders, but also larger than 35% compared to just pellets. That means increasing the mass storage capacity by a factor of 1.56. Interestingly, vibration can be the most or the least effective procedure to improve compaction of mixtures, depending on characteristics of vibration. The optimal packing (30/70 wt% powders/pellets) proved to effectively mitigate the onset of smouldering

  14. Design study status of compact containment BWR

    SciTech Connect

    Heki, H.; Nakamaru, M.; Kuroki, M.; Kojima, Y.; Arai, K.; Tahara, M.; Hoshi, T.

    2006-07-01

    The reactor concept considered in this paper has a relatively mid/small power output, a compact containment and a simplified BWR configuration with comprehensive safety features. The Japan Atomic Power Company has been taking initiative in developing the concept of the Compact Containment Boiling Water Reactor (CCR). The CCR., which is being developed with matured BWR technologies together with innovative systems/components, is expected to prove attractive in the world energy markets due to its flexibility in regard to energy demands and site conditions, its high potential for reducing investment risk and its safety features facilitating public acceptance. The flexibility is achieved by CCR's relatively mid/small power output of 400 MWe class and capability of long operating cycle (refueling intervals). CCR is expected to be attractive from view point of investment due to its simplification/innovation in design such as natural circulation core cooling with the bottom located short core, upper entry control rod drives (CRDs) and simplified safety system with high pressure resistible containment concept. The natural circulation core eliminates recirculation pumps and the maintenance of such pumps. The upper entry CRDs enable a simplified safety system followed by in-vessel retention (IVR) capability with the compact primary containment vessel (PCV). The safety features mainly consist of large water inventory above the core without large penetration of RPV below the top of the core height, passive cooling system by isolation condenser (IC). The large inventory increases the system response time in the case of design-base accidents, including loss of coolant accidents. The IC suppresses PCV pressure by steam condensation without any AC power. Cooling the molten core inside the RPV if the core should be damaged by loss of core coolability could attain the IVR. Further core design study has been carried out taking into account compact reactor size and reduction of fuel

  15. Depolarization synthesis: understanding the optics of Mueller matrix depolarization.

    PubMed

    Cloude, Shane R

    2013-04-01

    In this paper, we consider the forward problem in depolarization by optical systems. That is, we seek a compact parameterization that allows us to take an arbitrary "pure" optical system (namely one defined by a single Mueller-Jones matrix) and model all possible ways in which that system can depolarize light. We model this structure using compound unitary transformations and illustrate physical interpretation of the parameters involved by considering four examples, the family of depolarizers generated by scattering by random nonspherical particle clouds. We then turn attention to circular polarizers before considering all ways in which mirror reflection can cause depolarization. Finally, we consider a numerical example applied to a published Mueller matrix for backscatter from chiral turbid media.

  16. Dynamic compaction of boron carbide by a shock wave

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzyurkin, Andrey E.; Kraus, Eugeny I.; Lukyanov, Yaroslav L.

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents experiments on explosive compaction of boron carbide powder and modeling of the stress state behind the shock front at shock loading. The aim of this study was to obtain a durable low-porosity compact sample. The explosive compaction technology is used in this problem because the boron carbide is an extremely hard and refractory material. Therefore, its compaction by traditional methods requires special equipment and considerable expenses.

  17. Single subunit type of ferritin from visceral mass of Saccostrea cucullata: cloning, expression and cisplatin-subunit analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Bo; Lin, Qing; Ke, Cai-Huan; Huang, He-Qing

    2011-09-01

    Ferritin, the iron storage protein, plays a key role in iron metabolism. Here, we have cloned an inducible ferritin cDNA with 516 bp within the open reading frame fragment from the visceral mass of Saccostrea cucullata. The subunit sequence of the ferritin was predicted to be a polypeptide of 171 amino acids with a molecular weight (MW) of 19.9182 kDa and an isoelectric point of 5.24. The cDNA sequence of S. cucullata ferritin was constructed into a pET-32a expression system for expressing its relative protein efficiently in the Escherichia coli BL21 strain under isopropyl-β-D-thiogalactoside (IPTG) induction. The recombinant ferritin, which was further purified on a Ni-NTA resin column and digested with enterokinase, was detected as a single subunit of approximately MW 20 kDa using both SDS-PAGE and mass spectrometry. S. cucullata ferritin (ScFer) showed 98% identity with Crassostrea gigas ferritin at the amino acid level. The secondary structure and phosphorylation sites of deduced amino acids were predicted with ExPASy proteomics tools and the NetPhos 2.0 server, respectively, and the subunit space structure of recombinant S. cucullata ferritin (rScFer) was built using the molecular operating environmental software system. The results of both in-gel digestion and identification using MALDI-TOF MS/MS showed that the recombinant protein was ScFer. ICP-MS indicated that rScFer subunit can directly bind to cisplatin[cis-Diaminedichloroplatinum(CDDP)], giving approximately 22.9 CDDP/ferritin subunit for forming a novel complex of CDDP-subunit, which suggests that it constructs a nanometer CDDP core-ferritin for developing a new drug of anti-cancer. The results of both the real-time PCR and Western blotting showed that the expression of ScFer mRNA was up-regulated in the oyster under the stress of Cd(2+). In addition, the expression increment of ScFer mRNA under bacterial challenge indicated that ferritin participated in the immune response of S. cucullata. The

  18. Methodology to probe subunit interactions in ribonucleotide reductases†

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, A Quamrul; Wang, Yongting; Plate, Lars; Stubbe, JoAnne

    2009-01-01

    Ribonucleotide reductases (RNRs) catalyze the conversion of nucleotides to deoxynucleotides, providing the monomeric precursors required for DNA replication and repair. E. coli RNR is a 1:1 complex of two homodimeric subunits: α2 and β2. The interactions between α2 and β2 are thought to be largely associated with the C-terminal 20 amino acids (residues 356-375) of β2. To study subunit interactions, a single reactive cysteine has been introduced into each of fifteen positions along the C-terminal tail of β2. Each cysteine has been modified with the photo cross-linker benzophenone (BP) and the environmentally sensitive fluorophore, dimethylaminonaphthalene (DAN). Each construct has been purified to homogeneity and characterized by SDS PAGE and ESI-MS. Each BP-β2 has been incubated with 1 equivalent of α2, photolyzed, and the results analyzed quantitatively by SDS-PAGE. Each DAN-β2 was incubated with 50-fold excess of α2 and the emission maximum and intensity measured. A comparison of the results from the two sets of probes reveals that sites with most extensive cross-linking are also associated with the greatest changes in fluorescence. Titration of four different DAN-β2 variants (351, 356, 365 and 367) with α2 gave a Kd of ∼0.4 μM for subunit interaction. Disruption of the interaction of α2DAN-β2 complex is accompanied by a decrease in fluorescence intensity and can serve as a high throughput screen for inhibitors of subunit interactions. PMID:19012414

  19. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Caers, A; Van de Peer, Y; De Wachter, R

    1998-01-01

    The rRNA WWW Server at URL http://rrna.uia.ac.be/ now provides a database of 496 large subunit ribosomal RNA sequences. All these sequences are aligned, incorporate secondary structure information, and can be obtained in a number of formats. Other information about the sequences, such as literature references, accession numbers and taxonomic information is also available and searchable. If necessary, the data on the server can also be obtained by anonymous ftp. PMID:9399830

  20. Database on the structure of large ribosomal subunit RNA.

    PubMed Central

    De Rijk, P; Van de Peer, Y; De Wachter, R

    1996-01-01

    Our database on large ribosomal subunit RNA contained 334 sequences in July, 1995. All sequences in the database are aligned, taking into account secondary structure. The aligned sequences are provided, together with incorporated secondary structure information, in several computer-readable formats. These data can easily be obtained through the World Wide Web. The files in the database are also available via anonymous ftp. PMID:8594610