Science.gov

Sample records for matter supramolecular chemistry

  1. Supramolecular chemistry: from molecular information towards self-organization and complex matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2004-03-01

    supramolecular polymers and liquid crystals, and provide an original approach to nanoscience and nanotechnology. In particular, the spontaneous but controlled generation of well-defined, functional supramolecular architectures of nanometric size through self-organization represents a means of performing programmed engineering and processing of nanomaterials. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry, in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when a molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibly, so as to make possible a continuous change in constitution and structure by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. This behaviour defines a constitutional dynamic chemistry that allows self-organization by selection as well as by design at both the molecular and supramolecular levels. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization by selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation in a Darwinistic fashion. The merging of the features, information and programmability, dynamics and reversibility, constitution and structural diversity, points towards the emergence of adaptative and evolutionary chemistry. Together with the corresponding fields of physics and biology, it constitutes a science of informed matter, of organized, adaptative complex matter. This article was originally published in 2003 by the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities in the framework of its Albert Einstein Memorial Lectures series. Reprinted by permission of the Israel Academy of Sciences and Humanities.

  2. Carbohydrates in Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Delbianco, Martina; Bharate, Priya; Varela-Aramburu, Silvia; Seeberger, Peter H

    2016-02-24

    Carbohydrates are involved in a variety of biological processes. The ability of sugars to form a large number of hydrogen bonds has made them important components for supramolecular chemistry. We discuss recent advances in the use of carbohydrates in supramolecular chemistry and reveal that carbohydrates are useful building blocks for the stabilization of complex architectures. Systems are presented according to the scaffold that supports the glyco-conjugate: organic macrocycles, dendrimers, nanomaterials, and polymers are considered. Glyco-conjugates can form host-guest complexes, and can self-assemble by using carbohydrate-carbohydrate interactions and other weak interactions such as π-π interactions. Finally, complex supramolecular architectures based on carbohydrate-protein interactions are discussed.

  3. Constitutional dynamic chemistry: bridge from supramolecular chemistry to adaptive chemistry.

    PubMed

    Lehn, Jean-Marie

    2012-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry aims at implementing highly complex chemical systems from molecular components held together by non-covalent intermolecular forces and effecting molecular recognition, catalysis and transport processes. A further step consists in the investigation of chemical systems undergoing self-organization, i.e. systems capable of spontaneously generating well-defined functional supramolecular architectures by self-assembly from their components, thus behaving as programmed chemical systems. Supramolecular chemistry is intrinsically a dynamic chemistry in view of the lability of the interactions connecting the molecular components of a supramolecular entity and the resulting ability of supramolecular species to exchange their constituents. The same holds for molecular chemistry when the molecular entity contains covalent bonds that may form and break reversibility, so as to allow a continuous change in constitution by reorganization and exchange of building blocks. These features define a Constitutional Dynamic Chemistry (CDC) on both the molecular and supramolecular levels.CDC introduces a paradigm shift with respect to constitutionally static chemistry. The latter relies on design for the generation of a target entity, whereas CDC takes advantage of dynamic diversity to allow variation and selection. The implementation of selection in chemistry introduces a fundamental change in outlook. Whereas self-organization by design strives to achieve full control over the output molecular or supramolecular entity by explicit programming, self-organization with selection operates on dynamic constitutional diversity in response to either internal or external factors to achieve adaptation.The merging of the features: -information and programmability, -dynamics and reversibility, -constitution and structural diversity, points to the emergence of adaptive and evolutive chemistry, towards a chemistry of complex matter.

  4. Combining supramolecular chemistry with biology.

    PubMed

    Uhlenheuer, Dana A; Petkau, Katja; Brunsveld, Luc

    2010-08-01

    Supramolecular chemistry has primarily found its inspiration in biological molecules, such as proteins and lipids, and their interactions. Currently the supramolecular assembly of designed compounds can be controlled to great extent. This provides the opportunity to combine these synthetic supramolecular elements with biomolecules for the study of biological phenomena. This tutorial review focuses on the possibilities of the marriage of synthetic supramolecular architectures and biological systems. It highlights that synthetic supramolecular elements are for example ideal platforms for the recognition and modulation of proteins and cells. The unique features of synthetic supramolecular systems with control over size, shape, valency, and interaction strength allow the generation of structures fitting the demands to approach the biological problems at hand. Supramolecular chemistry has come full circle, studying the biology and its molecules which initially inspired its conception.

  5. Supramolecular Chemistry Targeting Proteins.

    PubMed

    van Dun, Sam; Ottmann, Christian; Milroy, Lech-Gustav; Brunsveld, Luc

    2017-09-28

    The specific recognition of protein surface elements is a fundamental challenge in the life sciences. New developments in this field will form the basis of advanced therapeutic approaches and lead to applications such as sensors, affinity tags, immobilization techniques, and protein-based materials. Synthetic supramolecular molecules and materials are creating new opportunities for protein recognition that are orthogonal to classical small molecule and protein-based approaches. As outlined here, their unique molecular features enable the recognition of amino acids, peptides, and even whole protein surfaces, which can be applied to the modulation and assembly of proteins. We believe that structural insights into these processes are of great value for the further development of this field and have therefore focused this Perspective on contributions that provide such structural data.

  6. Physical organic chemistry of supramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Serpe, Michael J; Craig, Stephen L

    2007-02-13

    Unlike the case of traditional covalent polymers, the entanglements that determine properties of supramolecular polymers are defined by very specific, intermolecular interactions. Recent work using modular molecular platforms to probe the mechanisms underlying mechanical response of supramolecular polymers is reviewed. The contributions of supramolecular kinetics, thermodynamics, and conformational flexibility to supramolecular polymer properties in solutions of discrete polymers, in networks, and at interfaces, are described. Molecule-to-material relationships are established through methods reminiscent of classic physical organic chemistry.

  7. Physical Organic Chemistry of Supramolecular Polymers

    PubMed Central

    Serpe, Michael J.; Craig, Stephen L.

    2008-01-01

    Unlike the case of traditional covalent polymers, the entanglements that determine properties of supramolecular polymers are defined by very specific, intermolecular interactions. Recent work using modular molecular platforms to probe the mechanisms underlying mechanical response of supramolecular polymers is reviewed. The contributions of supramolecular kinetics, thermodynamics, and conformational flexibility to supramolecular polymer properties in solutions of discrete polymers, in networks, and at interfaces, are described. Molecule-to-material relationships are established through methods reminiscent of classic physical organic chemistry. PMID:17279638

  8. Switching surface chemistry with supramolecular machines.

    PubMed

    Bunker, Bruce C; Huber, Dale L; Kushmerick, James G; Dunbar, Timothy; Kelly, Michael; Matzke, Carolyn; Cao, Jianguo; Jeppesen, Jan O; Perkins, Julie; Flood, Amar H; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2007-01-02

    Tethered supramolecular machines represent a new class of active self-assembled monolayers in which molecular configurations can be reversibly programmed using electrochemical stimuli. We are using these machines to address the chemistry of substrate surfaces for integrated microfluidic systems. Interactions between the tethered tetracationic cyclophane host cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) and dissolved pi-electron-rich guest molecules, such as tetrathiafulvalene, have been reversibly switched by oxidative electrochemistry. The results demonstrate that surface-bound supramolecular machines can be programmed to adsorb or release appropriately designed solution species for manipulating surface chemistry.

  9. Cellular uptake: lessons from supramolecular organic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gasparini, Giulio; Bang, Eun-Kyoung; Montenegro, Javier; Matile, Stefan

    2015-07-04

    The objective of this Feature Article is to reflect on the importance of established and emerging principles of supramolecular organic chemistry to address one of the most persistent problems in life sciences. The main topic is dynamic covalent chemistry on cell surfaces, particularly disulfide exchange for thiol-mediated uptake. Examples of boronate and hydrazone exchange are added for contrast, comparison and completion. Of equal importance are the discussions of proximity effects in polyions and counterion hopping, and more recent highlights on ring tension and ion pair-π interactions. These lessons from supramolecular organic chemistry apply to cell-penetrating peptides, particularly the origin of "arginine magic" and the "pyrenebutyrate trick," and the currently emerging complementary "disulfide magic" with cell-penetrating poly(disulfide)s. They further extend to the voltage gating of neuronal potassium channels, gene transfection, and the delivery of siRNA. The collected examples illustrate that the input from conceptually innovative chemistry is essential to address the true challenges in biology beyond incremental progress and random screening.

  10. On some problems of inorganic supramolecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Pervov, Vladislav S; Zotova, Anna E

    2013-12-02

    In this study, some features that distinguish inorganic supramolecular host-guest objects from traditional architectures are considered. Crystalline inorganic supramolecular structures are the basis for the development of new functional materials. Here, the possible changes in the mechanism of crystalline inorganic supramolecular structure self-organization at high interaction potentials are discussed. The cases of changes in the host structures and corresponding changes in the charge states under guest intercalation, as well as their impact on phase stability and stoichiometry are considered. It was demonstrated that the deviation from the geometrical and topological complementarity conditions may be due to the additional energy gain from forming inorganic supramolecular structures. It has been assumed that molecular recognition principles can be employed for the development of physicochemical analysis and interpretation of metastable states in inorganic crystalline alloys. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. 8th International Symposium on Supramolecular and Macrocyclic Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Jeffery T.

    2015-09-18

    This report summarizes the 8th International Conference on Supramolecular and Macrocyclic Chemistry (ISMSC-8). DOE funds were used to make it more affordable for students, post-docs and junior faculty to attend the conference by covering their registration costs. The conference was held in Crystal City, VA from July 7-11, 2013. See http://www.indiana.edu/~ismsc8/ for the conference website. ISMSC-8 encompassed the broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the field. We met our goal to bring together leading scientists in molecular recognition and supramolecular chemistry. New research directions and collaborations resulted this conference. The DOE funding was crucial for us achieving our primary goal.

  12. A Supramolecular Approach to Medicinal Chemistry: Medicine Beyond the Molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, David K.

    2005-03-01

    This article focuses on the essential roles played by intermolecular forces in mediating the interactions between chemical molecules and biological systems. Intermolecular forces constitute a key topic in chemistry programs, yet can sometimes seem disconnected from real-life applications. However, by taking a "supramolecular" view of medicinal chemistry and focusing on interactions between molecules, it is possible to come to a deeper understanding of recent developments in medicine. This allows us to gain a real insight into the interface between biology and chemistry—an interdisciplinary area that is crucial for the development of modern medicinal products. This article emphasizes a conceptual view of medicinal chemistry, which has important implications for the future, as the supramolecular approach to medicinal-chemistry products outlined here is rapidly allowing nanotechnology to converge with medicine. In particular, this article discusses recent developments including the rational design of drugs such as Relenza and Tamiflu, the mode of action of vancomycin, and the mechanism by which bacteria develop resistance, drug delivery using cyclodextrins, and the importance of supramolecular chemistry in understanding protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's and Creutzfield Jacob. The article also indicates how taking a supramolecular approach will enable the development of new nanoscale medicines.

  13. Physical chemistry of supramolecular polymer networks.

    PubMed

    Seiffert, Sebastian; Sprakel, Joris

    2012-01-21

    Supramolecular polymer networks are three-dimensional structures of crosslinked macromolecules connected by transient, non-covalent bonds; they are a fascinating class of soft materials, exhibiting properties such as stimuli-responsiveness, self-healing, and shape-memory. This critical review summarizes the current state of the art in the physical-chemical characterization of supramolecular networks and relates this knowledge to that about classical, covalently jointed and crosslinked networks. We present a separate focus on the formation, the structure, the dynamics, and the mechanics of both permanent chemical and transient supramolecular networks. Particular emphasis is placed on features such as the formation and the effect of network inhomogeneities, the manifestation of the crosslink relaxation dynamics in the macroscopic sample behavior, and the applicability of concepts developed for classical polymer melts, solutions, and networks such as the reptation model and the principle of time-temperature superposition (263 references).

  14. From steroids to aqueous supramolecular chemistry: an autobiographical career review.

    PubMed

    Gibb, Bruce C

    2016-01-01

    The focus of my group's research is aqueous supramolecular chemistry; we try to understand how chemical entities interact with water and consequently how they interact with each other. This personal history recounts my career experiences that led to his involvement with this fascinating area of science.

  15. From steroids to aqueous supramolecular chemistry: an autobiographical career review

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary The focus of my group’s research is aqueous supramolecular chemistry; we try to understand how chemical entities interact with water and consequently how they interact with each other. This personal history recounts my career experiences that led to his involvement with this fascinating area of science. PMID:27340461

  16. Supramolecular chemistry-general principles and selected examples from anion recognition and metallosupramolecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Markus

    2007-12-01

    This review gives an introduction into supramolecular chemistry describing in the first part general principles, focusing on terms like noncovalent interaction, molecular recognition, self-assembly, and supramolecular function. In the second part those will be illustrated by simple examples from our laboratories. Supramolecular chemistry is the science that bridges the gap between the world of molecules and nanotechnology. In supramolecular chemistry noncovalent interactions occur between molecular building blocks, which by molecular recognition and self-assembly form (functional) supramolecular entities. It is also termed the "chemistry of the noncovalent bond." Molecular recognition is based on geometrical complementarity based on the "key-and-lock" principle with nonshape-dependent effects, e.g., solvatization, being also highly influential. Self-assembly leads to the formation of well-defined aggregates. Hereby the overall structure of the target ensemble is controlled by the symmetry features of the certain building blocks. Finally, the aggregates can possess special properties or supramolecular functions, which are only found in the ensemble but not in the participating molecules. This review gives an introduction on supramolecular chemistry and illustrates the fundamental principles by recent examples from our group.

  17. [Special impact of supramolecular chemistry on Chinese medicine theories].

    PubMed

    He, Fu-Yuan; Zhou, Yi-Qun; Deng, Kai-Wen; Deng, Jun-Lin; Shi, Ji-Lian; Liu, Wen-Long; Yang, Yan-Tao; Tang, Yu; Liu, Zhi-Gang

    2014-04-01

    The paper aimed to elucidate the specific impact of supramolecular chemistry on the Chinese medicine theories (CMT) in their modernization, after had summarized up the research status of supramolecular chemistry and analyzed the possible supramolecular forms of Chinese medicine (CM), as well as considered the problems in modernization of CM theories. On comparison of the classical chemistry that delt with chemical bonds among atoms, the supramolecular chemistry was rather concerned with varietes of weak noncovalent bonds intermolecules, and reflected the macro-apparent chemical properties of each molecules, and was the most appropriate chemical theories to explain the CMT and microcosmic materials. The molecules in the human body and Chinese material medica (CMM) formed supramolecules by way of self-assembly, self-organization, self-recognition and self-replication, with themselves or with complexation, composition, chelation, inclusion, neutralization etc. Meridian and Zang-fu viscera in CMT might be a space channel structure continuously consisted of unique molecules cavity that was imprinted with the supramolecularly template inside and outside of cells, through which the molecules in CMM interacted with the meridian and Zang-fu viscera. When small molecules in human body imprinted with macromolecules in meridian and Zang-fu viscera, in other words, they migrated along within imprinting channels of meridian and Zang-fu viscera on behavior of "Qi chromatography" impulsed by the heart beat, finally showed up on macroscopic the anisotropy of tissue and organ, as described namely as visceral manifestation in Chinese medical science. When small molecules in CMM interacted with imprinting channel on meridian and Zang-fu viscera, the natural properties and efficacy regularities of CMM was reflected on macroscopic. Therefore, the special representation forms of basic CMT is based on the macroscopic expression of "Qi chromatography" abided by imprinting effect

  18. Statistical mechanics approach to lock-key supramolecular chemistry interactions.

    PubMed

    Odriozola, Gerardo; Lozada-Cassou, Marcelo

    2013-03-08

    In the supramolecular chemistry field, intuitive concepts such as molecular complementarity and molecular recognition are used to explain the mechanism of lock-key associations. However, these concepts lack a precise definition, and consequently this mechanism is not well defined and understood. Here we address the physical basis of this mechanism, based on formal statistical mechanics, through Monte Carlo simulation and compare our results with recent experimental data for charged or uncharged lock-key colloids. We find that, given the size range of the molecules involved in these associations, the entropy contribution, driven by the solvent, rules the interaction, over that of the enthalpy. A universal behavior for the uncharged lock-key association is found. Based on our results, we propose a supramolecular chemistry definition.

  19. Detecting single photons: a supramolecular matter?

    PubMed

    Cangiano, Lorenzo; Dell'Orco, Daniele

    2013-01-04

    Rod photoreceptors detect single photons through a tradeoff of light collecting ability, amplification and speed. Key roles are played by rhodopsin (Rh) and transducin (G(t)), whose complex supramolecular organization in outer segment disks begs for a functional interpretation. Here we review past and recent evidence of a temperature-dependence of photon detection by mammalian rods, and link this phenomenon with the putative oligomeric organization of Rh and new ideas on the dynamics of Rh-G(t) interaction. Identifying an electrophysiological correlate of the supramolecular organization of Rh and G(t) may shed light on the evolutionary advantage it confers to night vision. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Getting Hooked on Supramolecular Coordination Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Fromm, Katharina M

    2009-12-01

    The author describes the beginnings of her research in Switzerland, the inspiration she received from her senior colleagues as well as her first successful research results in the chemistry of alkaline earth metal aggregates and silver coordination polymer networks. Her current interest lies in the design of smart materials, using different building blocks from previous projects. These projects evolved in Geneva, Karlsruhe, Basel, and Fribourg, where she became a full professor in 2006.

  1. Supramolecular chemistry at interfaces: host-guest interactions for fabricating multifunctional biointerfaces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Hui; Yuan, Bin; Zhang, Xi; Scherman, Oren A

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Host-guest chemistry can greatly improve the selectivity of biomolecule-ligand binding on account of recognition-directed interactions. In addition, functional structures and the actuation of supramolecular assemblies in molecular systems can be controlled efficiently through various host-guest chemistry. Together, these highly selective, strong yet dynamic interactions can be exploited as an alternative methodology for applications in the field of programmable and controllable engineering of supramolecular soft materials through the reversible binding between complementary components. Many processes in living systems such as biotransformation, transportation of matter, and energy transduction begin with interfacial molecular recognition, which is greatly influenced by various external stimuli at biointerfaces. Detailed investigations about the molecular recognition at interfaces can result in a better understanding of life science, and further guide us in developing new biomaterials and medicines. In order to mimic complicated molecular-recognition systems observed in nature that adapt to changes in their environment, combining host-guest chemistry and surface science is critical for fabricating the next generation of multifunctional biointerfaces with efficient stimuli-responsiveness and good biocompatibility. In this Account, we will summarize some recent progress on multifunctional stimuli-responsive biointerfaces and biosurfaces fabricated by cyclodextrin- or cucurbituril-based host-guest chemistry and highlight their potential applications including drug delivery, bioelectrocatalysis, and reversible adsorption and resistance of peptides, proteins, and cells. In addition, these biointerfaces and biosurfaces demonstrate efficient response toward various external stimuli, such as UV light, pH, redox chemistry, and competitive guests. All of these external stimuli can aid in mimicking the biological stimuli evident in complex biological environments

  2. Supramolecular chemistry—general principles and selected examples from anion recognition and metallosupramolecular chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albrecht, Markus

    2007-12-01

    This review gives an introduction into supramolecular chemistry describing in the first part general principles, focusing on terms like noncovalent interaction, molecular recognition, self-assembly, and supramolecular function. In the second part those will be illustrated by simple examples from our laboratories. Supramolecular chemistry is the science that bridges the gap between the world of molecules and nanotechnology. In supramolecular chemistry noncovalent interactions occur between molecular building blocks, which by molecular recognition and self-assembly form (functional) supramolecular entities. It is also termed the “chemistry of the noncovalent bond.” Molecular recognition is based on geometrical complementarity based on the “key-and-lock” principle with nonshape-dependent effects, e.g., solvatization, being also highly influential. Self- assembly leads to the formation of well-defined aggregates. Hereby the overall structure of the target ensemble is controlled by the symmetry features of the certain building blocks. Finally, the aggregates can possess special properties or supramolecular functions, which are only found in the ensemble but not in the participating molecules. This review gives an introduction on supramolecular chemistry and illustrates the fundamental principles by recent examples from our group.

  3. Host-guest chemistry in two-dimensional supramolecular networks.

    PubMed

    Teyssandier, Joan; Feyter, Steven De; Mali, Kunal S

    2016-09-20

    Nanoporous supramolecular networks physisorbed on solid surfaces have been extensively used to immobilize a variety of guest molecules. Host-guest chemistry in such two-dimensional (2D) porous networks is a rapidly expanding field due to potential applications in separation technology, catalysis and nanoscale patterning. Diverse structural topologies with high crystallinity have been obtained to capture molecular guests of different sizes and shapes. A range of non-covalent forces such as hydrogen bonds, van der Waals interactions, coordinate bonds have been employed to assemble the host networks. Recent years have witnessed a surge in the activity in this field with the implementation of rational design strategies for realizing controlled and selective guest capture. In this feature article, we review the development in the field of surface-supported host-guest chemistry as studied by scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). Typical host-guest architectures studied on solid surfaces, both under ambient conditions at the solution-solid interface as well as those formed at the ultrahigh vacuum (UHV)-solid interface, are described. We focus on isoreticular host networks, hosts functionalized pores and dynamic host-guest systems that respond to external stimuli.

  4. Pillar-Shaped Macrocyclic Hosts Pillar[n]arenes: New Key Players for Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Ogoshi, Tomoki; Yamagishi, Tada-Aki; Nakamoto, Yoshiaki

    2016-07-27

    In 2008, we reported a new class of pillar-shaped macrocyclic hosts, known as "pillar[n]arenes". Today, pillar[n]arenes are recognized as key players in supramolecular chemistry because of their facile synthesis, unique pillar shape, versatile functionality, interesting host-guest properties, and original supramolecular assembly characteristics, which have resulted in numerous electrochemical and biomedical material applications. In this Review, we have provided historical background to macrocyclic chemistry, followed by a detailed discussion of the fundamental properties of pillar[n]arenes, including their synthesis, structure, and host-guest properties. Furthermore, we have discussed the applications of pillar[n]arenes to materials science, as well as their applications in supramolecular chemistry, in terms of their fundamental properties. Finally, we have described the future perspectives of pillar[n]arene chemistry. We hope that this Review will provide a useful reference for researchers working in the field and inspire discoveries concerning pillar[n]arene chemistry.

  5. Astronomy Matters for Chemistry Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Jay S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes basic misconceptions about the origin of elements and forms of matter found in chemistry texts that need modification in light of modern observational data and interpretations given in astronomy. Notes that there are forms of matter other than elements and compounds. Confounding examples from astronomy include white dwarfs, neutron…

  6. Astronomy Matters for Chemistry Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huebner, Jay S.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes basic misconceptions about the origin of elements and forms of matter found in chemistry texts that need modification in light of modern observational data and interpretations given in astronomy. Notes that there are forms of matter other than elements and compounds. Confounding examples from astronomy include white dwarfs, neutron…

  7. A journey in bioinspired supramolecular chemistry: from molecular tweezers to small molecules that target myotonic dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary This review summarizes part of the author’s research in the area of supramolecular chemistry, beginning with his early life influences and early career efforts in molecular recognition, especially molecular tweezers. Although designed to complex DNA, these hosts proved more applicable to the field of host–guest chemistry. This early experience and interest in intercalation ultimately led to the current efforts to develop small molecule therapeutic agents for myotonic dystrophy using a rational design approach that heavily relies on principles of supramolecular chemistry. How this work was influenced by that of others in the field and the evolution of each area of research is highlighted with selected examples. PMID:26877815

  8. Supramolecular coordination chemistry: the synergistic effect of serendipity and rational design.

    PubMed

    Saalfrank, Rolf W; Maid, Harald; Scheurer, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Supramolecular coordination compounds bear exceptional advantages over their organic counterparts. They are available in one-pot reactions and in high yields and display physical properties that are generally inaccessible with organic species. Moreover, their weak, reversible, noncovalent bonding interactions facilitate error checking and self-correction. This Review emphasizes the achievements in supramolecular coordination chemistry initiated by serendipity and their materialization based on rational design. The recognition of similarities in the synthesis of different supramolecular assemblies allows prediction of potential results in related cases. Supramolecular synthesis obeys guidelines comparable to the "lead sheet" used by small jazz ensembles for improvisation and therefore more often leads to unpredicted results. The combination of detailed symmetry considerations with the basic rules of coordination chemistry has only recently allowed for the design of rational strategies for the construction of a variety of nanosized systems with specified size and shape.

  9. Synthesis and Characterization of Calixarene Tetraethers: An Exercise in Supramolecular Chemistry for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debbert, Stefan L.; Hoh, Bradley D.; Dulak, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment for an introductory undergraduate organic chemistry lab, students tetraalkylate tertbutylcalix[4]arene, a bowl-shaped macrocyclic oligophenol, and examine the supramolecular chemistry of the tetraether product by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Complexation with a sodium ion reduces the conformational…

  10. Synthesis and Characterization of Calixarene Tetraethers: An Exercise in Supramolecular Chemistry for the Undergraduate Organic Laboratory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Debbert, Stefan L.; Hoh, Bradley D.; Dulak, David J.

    2016-01-01

    In this experiment for an introductory undergraduate organic chemistry lab, students tetraalkylate tertbutylcalix[4]arene, a bowl-shaped macrocyclic oligophenol, and examine the supramolecular chemistry of the tetraether product by proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. Complexation with a sodium ion reduces the conformational…

  11. Nanoparticle-Protein Interactions: Therapeutic Approaches and Supramolecular Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Kopp, Mathis; Kollenda, Sebastian; Epple, Matthias

    2017-06-20

    . Essentially, these effects cannot be understood in purely chemical approaches but require biological environments and systems because the underlying processes are simply too complicated to be modeled in nonbiological systems. The area of nanoparticle-protein interactions strongly relies on different approaches: Synthetic chemistry is involved to prepare, stabilize, and functionalize nanoparticles. High-end analytical chemistry is required to understand the nature of a nanoparticle surface and the steps of its interaction with proteins. Concepts from supramolecular chemistry help to understand the complex noncovalent interactions between the surfaces of proteins and nanoparticles. Protein chemistry and biophysical chemistry are required to understand the behavior of a protein in contact with a nanoparticle. Finally, all chemical concepts must live up to the "biological reality", first in cell culture experiments in vitro and finally in animal or human experiments in vivo, to open new therapies in the 21st century. This interdisciplinary approach makes the field highly exciting but also highly demanding for chemists who, however, have to learn to understand the language of other areas.

  12. Supramolecular Chemistry: Computer-Assisted Instruction in Undergraduate and Graduate Chemistry Courses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varnek, Alexandre A.; Dietrich, Bernard; Wipff, Georges; Lehn, Jean-Marie; Boldyreva, Elena V.

    2000-02-01

    An interactive electronic textbook (SC-WEB) based on Supramolecular Chemistry, by J.-M. Lehn, is described. It includes the text, which has been specially adapted for teaching, and data on the structures of molecules and supermolecules. The list includes about 100 structures retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database (version 1997) as well as those obtained from molecular dynamics simulations in solution. The structures can be retrieved either from the text or, independently, from the list. SC-WEB uses two types of programs: the first one reads files in HTML format (Word97, Netscape, or Internet Explorer), and WebLab Viewer Lite is used for visualizing and manipulating the structures. It can run on any PC (W95/NT4.0) computer. The application of SC-WEB for a course in supramolecular chemistry, as well as in other chemical courses, is discussed. A few examples related to the binding of alkali cations by organic and inorganic receptors, and of R-NH3+ cations by organic receptors, are considered in more detail.

  13. Supramolecular Hydrogelators and Hydrogels: From Soft Matter to Molecular Biomaterials

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    In this review we intend to provide a relatively comprehensive summary of the work of supramolecular hydrogelators after 2004 and to put emphasis particularly on the applications of supramolecular hydrogels/hydrogelators as molecular biomaterials. After a brief introduction of methods for generating supramolecular hydrogels, we discuss supramolecular hydrogelators on the basis of their categories, such as small organic molecules, coordination complexes, peptides, nucleobases, and saccharides. Following molecular design, we focus on various potential applications of supramolecular hydrogels as molecular biomaterials, classified by their applications in cell cultures, tissue engineering, cell behavior, imaging, and unique applications of hydrogelators. Particularly, we discuss the applications of supramolecular hydrogelators after they form supramolecular assemblies but prior to reaching the critical gelation concentration because this subject is less explored but may hold equally great promise for helping address fundamental questions about the mechanisms or the consequences of the self-assembly of molecules, including low molecular weight ones. Finally, we provide a perspective on supramolecular hydrogelators. We hope that this review will serve as an updated introduction and reference for researchers who are interested in exploring supramolecular hydrogelators as molecular biomaterials for addressing the societal needs at various frontiers. PMID:26646318

  14. Supramolecular Hydrogelators and Hydrogels: From Soft Matter to Molecular Biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Junfeng; Xu, Bing

    2015-12-23

    In this review we intend to provide a relatively comprehensive summary of the work of supramolecular hydrogelators after 2004 and to put emphasis particularly on the applications of supramolecular hydrogels/hydrogelators as molecular biomaterials. After a brief introduction of methods for generating supramolecular hydrogels, we discuss supramolecular hydrogelators on the basis of their categories, such as small organic molecules, coordination complexes, peptides, nucleobases, and saccharides. Following molecular design, we focus on various potential applications of supramolecular hydrogels as molecular biomaterials, classified by their applications in cell cultures, tissue engineering, cell behavior, imaging, and unique applications of hydrogelators. Particularly, we discuss the applications of supramolecular hydrogelators after they form supramolecular assemblies but prior to reaching the critical gelation concentration because this subject is less explored but may hold equally great promise for helping address fundamental questions about the mechanisms or the consequences of the self-assembly of molecules, including low molecular weight ones. Finally, we provide a perspective on supramolecular hydrogelators. We hope that this review will serve as an updated introduction and reference for researchers who are interested in exploring supramolecular hydrogelators as molecular biomaterials for addressing the societal needs at various frontiers.

  15. Art, auto-mechanics, and supramolecular chemistry. A merging of hobbies and career.

    PubMed

    Anslyn, Eric V

    2016-01-01

    While the strict definition of supramolecular chemistry is "chemistry beyond the molecule", meaning having a focus on non-covalent interactions, the field is primarily associated with the creation of synthetic receptors and self-assembly. For synthetic ease, the receptors and assemblies routinely possess a high degree of symmetry, which lends them an aspect of aesthetic beauty. Pictures of electron orbitals similarly can be seen as akin to works of art. This similarity was an early draw for me to the fields of supramolecular chemistry and molecular orbital theory, because I grew up in a household filled with art. In addition to art, my childhood was filled with repairing and constructing mechanical entities, such as internal combustion motors, where many components work together to achieve a function. Analogously, the field of supramolecular chemistry creates systems of high complexity that achieve functions or perform tasks. Therefore, in retrospect a career in supramolecular chemistry appears to be simply an extension of childhood hobbies involving art and auto-mechanics.

  16. Art, auto-mechanics, and supramolecular chemistry. A merging of hobbies and career

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Summary While the strict definition of supramolecular chemistry is “chemistry beyond the molecule”, meaning having a focus on non-covalent interactions, the field is primarily associated with the creation of synthetic receptors and self-assembly. For synthetic ease, the receptors and assemblies routinely possess a high degree of symmetry, which lends them an aspect of aesthetic beauty. Pictures of electron orbitals similarly can be seen as akin to works of art. This similarity was an early draw for me to the fields of supramolecular chemistry and molecular orbital theory, because I grew up in a household filled with art. In addition to art, my childhood was filled with repairing and constructing mechanical entities, such as internal combustion motors, where many components work together to achieve a function. Analogously, the field of supramolecular chemistry creates systems of high complexity that achieve functions or perform tasks. Therefore, in retrospect a career in supramolecular chemistry appears to be simply an extension of childhood hobbies involving art and auto-mechanics. PMID:26977197

  17. Supramolecular Chemistry and Mechanochemistry of Macromolecules: Recent Advances by Single-Molecule Force Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Bo; Cui, Shuxun

    2015-01-01

    Atomic force spectroscopy (AFM)-based single-molecule force spectroscopy (SMFS) was invented in the 1990s. Since then, SMFS has been developed into a powerful tool to study the inter- and intra-molecular interactions of macromolecules. Using SMFS, a number of problems in the field of supramolecular chemistry and mechanochemistry have been studied at the single-molecule level, which are not accessible by traditional ensemble characterization methods. In this review, the principles of SMFS are introduced, followed by the discussion of several problems of contemporary interest at the interface of supramolecular chemistry and mechanochemistry of macromolecules, including single-chain elasticity of macromolecules, interactions between water and macromolecules, interactions between macromolecules and solid surface, and the interactions in supramolecular polymers.

  18. Supramolecular chemistry: from aromatic foldamers to solution-phase supramolecular organic frameworks

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary This mini-review covers the growth, education, career, and research activities of the author. In particular, the developments of various folded, helical and extended secondary structures from aromatic backbones driven by different noncovalent forces (including hydrogen bonding, donor–acceptor, solvophobicity, and dimerization of conjugated radical cations) and solution-phase supramolecular organic frameworks driven by hydrophobically initiated aromatic stacking in the cavity of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) are highlighted. PMID:26664626

  19. Supramolecular organic photochemistry: Control of covalent bond formation through noncovalent supramolecular interactions and magnetic effects

    PubMed Central

    Turro, Nicholas J.

    2002-01-01

    Supramolecular organic photochemistry, a field concerned with the interaction of light with supramolecular assemblies of organic molecules, has been inspired by the remarkable structural and dynamic features of guest@host chemistry, particularly as exemplified by enzymes. Exemplars of supramolecular organic photochemistry from soft-matter hosts (micelles) and hard-matter hosts (porous solids) are discussed with an emphasis on how noncovalent interactions, which are at the heart of supramolecular chemistry, can be systematically exploited to control the catalytic and magnetic effects on the formation of covalent bonds from photochemically produced pairs of radicals. PMID:11880603

  20. Astronomy Matters for Chemistry Teachers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huebner, Jay S.; Vergenz, Robert A.; Smith, Terry L.

    1996-11-01

    The purpose of this paper is to encourage more chemistry teachers to become familiar with some of the basic ideas described in typical introductory astronomy courses (1 - 9), including those about the origin of elements and forms of matter. These ideas would enrich chemistry courses and help resolve some basic misconceptions that are expressed in many introductory texts (10 - 16) and journal articles for chemistry teachers (17, 18). These misconceptions are typified by statements such as "we can classify all substances as either elements or compounds," and "nature has provided 92 elements out of which all matter is composed." If students accept these misconceptions, they could be deprived of (i) an appreciation of the history of elements and knowing that the elemental composition of the universe continues to evolve, (ii) knowing that of the first 92 elements in the periodic table, technetium and promethium do not occur naturally on Earth, and (iii) understanding that there are forms of matter other than elements and compounds. This paper briefly explores these ideas.

  1. Supramolecular chemistry and chemical warfare agents: from fundamentals of recognition to catalysis and sensing.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, M R; Notman, S

    2013-12-21

    Supramolecular chemistry presents many possible avenues for the mitigation of the effects of chemical warfare agents (CWAs), including sensing, catalysis and sequestration. To-date, efforts in this field both to study fundamental interactions between CWAs and to design and exploit host systems remain sporadic. In this tutorial review the non-covalent recognition of CWAs is considered from first principles, including taking inspiration from enzymatic systems, and gaps in fundamental knowledge are indicated. Examples of synthetic systems developed for the recognition of CWAs are discussed with a focus on the supramolecular complexation behaviour and non-covalent approaches rather than on the proposed applications.

  2. [Study on meridian tropism of medicinal property theory for Chines medicines by supramolecular chemistry (I)].

    PubMed

    He, Fu-yuan; Deng, Kai-wen; Yang, Yan-tao; Zhou, Yi-qun; Shi, Ji-lian; Liu, Wen-long; Tang, Yu

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, based on the special influence of supramolecular chemistry on the basic theory of Chinese medicines ( CM) , the authors further analyzed the history of meridian tropism and natural origins of CM organisms and explained CM ingredients and the universal regularity of the automatic action of the supramolecular "imprinting templates" hole channel structure. After entering human bodies, CMs, as the aggregation of supramolecular "imprinting templates" , automatically seek supramolecular subjects that are matched with their "imprinting templates" in human meridians and organs for the purpose of self-recognition, self-organization, self-assembly and self-replication, so as to generate specific efficacy in meridians and organs, which is reflected as the meridian tropism phenomena at macro level. This regularity can be studied by in vitro and in vivo experimental studies. In vitro methods are mostly supra molecular structure analysis and kinetic and thermodynamic parameter calculation; Whereas in vivo methods are dominated by the analysis on object component distribution, chromatopharmacodynamic parameters and network chromatopharmacodynamic parameters; Particularly, the acupoint-medicine method can simplify to study the supramolecular subject-object relations. Consequently, CM's'meridian tropism reveals the universal regularity for interactions of macromolecular and micromolecular "imprinting templates" of subjects and objects in natural organisms. As the first barrier for the material base of the CM theory and breakthrough in the modernization of the basic CM theory, meridian tropism plays an important role in studies on basic theories of the basic CM theory.

  3. Positioning protein molecules on surfaces: A nanoengineering approach to supramolecular chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Gang-Yu; Amro, Nabil A.

    2002-01-01

    We discuss a nanoengineering approach for supramolecular chemistry and self assembly. The collective properties and biofunctionalities of molecular ensembles depend not only on individual molecular building blocks but also on organization at the molecular or nanoscopic level. Complementary to “bottom-up” approaches, which construct supramolecular ensembles by the design and synthesis of functionalized small molecular units or large molecular motifs, nanofabrication explores whether individual units, such as small molecular ligands, or large molecules, such as proteins, can be positioned with nanometer precision. The separation and local environment can be engineered to control subsequent intermolecular interactions. Feature sizes as small as 2 × 4 nm2 (32 alkanethiol molecules) are produced. Proteins may be aligned along a 10-nm-wide line or within two-dimensional islands of desired geometry. These high-resolution engineering and imaging studies provide new and molecular-level insight into supramolecular chemistry and self-assembly processes in bioscience that are otherwise unobtainable, e.g., the influence of size, separation, orientation, and local environment of reaction sites. This nanofabrication methodology also offers a new strategy in construction of two- and three-dimensional supramolecular structures for cell, virus, and bacterial adhesion, as well as biomaterial and biodevice engineering. PMID:11959965

  4. Pyrazine-based organometallic complex: synthesis, characterization, and supramolecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bhowmick, Sourav; Chakraborty, Sourav; Das, Atanu; Rajamohanan, P R; Das, Neeladri

    2015-03-16

    The design, synthesis, and characterization of a new pyrazine-based ditopic platinum(II) organometallic complex are reported. The molecular structure of the organoplatinum pyrazine dipod was determined by single-crystal X-ray crystallography. The potential utility of this organometallic ditopic acceptor as a building block in the construction of neutral metallasupramolecular macrocycles containing the pyrazine motif was explored. Pyrazine motifs containing supramolecules were characterized by multinuclear NMR (including (1)H DOSY), mass spectrometry, and elemental analysis. The geometry of each supramolecular framework was optimized by employing the PM6 semiempirical molecular orbital method to predict its shape and size. The ability of the pyrazine-based organoplatinum complex to act as a host for nitroaromatic guest (2,4-dinitrotoluene and PA) molecules was explored by isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC). The binding stoichiometry and thermodynamic parameters of these host-guest complexation reactions were evaluated using ITC. Theoretical calculations were performed to obtain insight into the binding pattern between the organometallic host and nitroaromatic guests. The preferable binding propensity of the binding sites of complex 1 for both nitroaromatics (PA and 2,4-dinitrotoluene) determined by molecular simulation studies corroborates well with the experimental results as obtained by ITC experiments.

  5. A journey from supramolecular chemistry to nanoscale networks.

    PubMed

    Constable, Edwin C

    2013-01-01

    The use of the coordination properties of metal centres to organise organic ligands in space is a concept that dates back to the seminal work of Alfred Werner that was recognised by the award of the first Nobel Proze for Chemistry in inorganic chemistry 100 years ago. Metal ions may be used to control the assembly of one-, two- or three-dimensional structures by matching the coordination number and geometry with the number and arrangement of donor atoms within ligands. These so-called coordination polymers have recently emerged from the category of unwanted insoluble side-products to materials of high scietrific interest and economic potential. This short article presents the simple design principles that lie behind the synthesis of materials possessing useful properties and, often stunningly attractive structural motifs.

  6. Recent aspects of self-oscillating polymeric materials: designing self-oscillating polymers coupled with supramolecular chemistry and ionic liquid science.

    PubMed

    Ueki, Takeshi; Yoshida, Ryo

    2014-06-14

    Herein, we summarise the recent developments in self-oscillating polymeric materials based on the concepts of supramolecular chemistry, where aggregates of molecular building blocks with non-covalent bonds evolve the temporal or spatiotemporal structure. By utilising the rhythmic oscillation of the association/dissociation of molecular aggregates coupled with the redox oscillation by the BZ reaction, novel soft materials that express similar functions as those of living matter will be achieved. Further, from the viewpoint of materials science, our recent approach to prepare self-oscillating materials that operate long-term under mild conditions will be introduced.

  7. Supramolecular Chemistry in Microflow Fields: Toward a New Material World of Precise Kinetic Control.

    PubMed

    Numata, Munenori

    2015-12-01

    Constructing new and versatile self-assembling systems in supramolecular chemistry is much like the development of new reactions or new catalysts in synthetic organic chemistry. As one such new technology, conventional supramolecular assembly systems have been combined with microflow techniques to control intermolecular or interpolymer interactions through precise regulation of a flowing self-assembly field. The potential of the microflow system has been explored by using various simple model compounds. Uniform solvent diffusion in the microflow leads to rapid activation of molecules in a nonequilibrium state and, thereby, enhanced interactions. All of these self-assembly processes begin from a temporally activated state and proceed in a uniform chemical environment, forming a synchronized cluster and resulting in effective conversion to supramolecules, with precise tuning of molecular (or polymer) interactions. This approach allows the synthesis of a variety of discrete microstructures (e.g., fibers, sheets) and unique supramolecules (e.g., hierarchical assemblies, capped fibers, polymer networks, supramolecules with time-delayed action) that have previously been inaccessible.

  8. Pretargeted Positron Emission Tomography Imaging That Employs Supramolecular Nanoparticles with in Vivo Bioorthogonal Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Hou, Shuang; Choi, Jin-Sil; Garcia, Mitch Andre; Xing, Yan; Chen, Kuan-Ju; Chen, Yi-Ming; Jiang, Ziyue K; Ro, Tracy; Wu, Lily; Stout, David B; Tomlinson, James S; Wang, Hao; Chen, Kai; Tseng, Hsian-Rong; Lin, Wei-Yu

    2016-01-26

    A pretargeted oncologic positron emission tomography (PET) imaging that leverages the power of supramolecular nanoparticles with in vivo bioorthogonal chemistry was demonstrated for the clinically relevant problem of tumor imaging. The advantages of this approach are that (i) the pharmacokinetics (PKs) of tumor-targeting and imaging agents can be independently altered via chemical alteration to achieve the desired in vivo performance and (ii) the interplay between the two PKs and other controllable variables confers a second layer of control toward improved PET imaging. In brief, we utilized supramolecular chemistry to synthesize tumor-targeting nanoparticles containing transcyclooctene (TCO, a bioorthogonal reactive motif), called TCO⊂SNPs. After the intravenous injection and subsequent concentration of the TCO⊂SNPs in the tumors of living mice, a small molecule containing both the complementary bioorthogonal motif (tetrazine, Tz) and a positron-emitting radioisotope ((64)Cu) was injected to react selectively and irreversibly to TCO. High-contrast PET imaging of the tumor mass was accomplished after the rapid clearance of the unreacted (64)Cu-Tz probe. Our nanoparticle approach encompasses a wider gamut of tumor types due to the use of EPR effects, which is a universal phenomenon for most solid tumors.

  9. Supramolecular DNA assembly.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Christopher K; Hamblin, Graham D; Sleiman, Hanadi F

    2011-12-01

    The powerful self-assembly features of DNA make it a unique template to finely organize and control matter on the nanometre scale. While DNA alone offers a high degree of fidelity in its self-assembly, a new area of research termed 'supramolecular DNA assembly' has recently emerged. This field combines DNA building blocks with synthetic organic, inorganic and polymeric structures. It thus brings together the toolbox of supramolecular chemistry with the predictable and programmable nature of DNA. The result of this molecular partnership is a variety of hybrid architectures, that expand DNA assembly beyond the boundaries of Watson-Crick base pairing into new structural and functional properties. In this tutorial review we outline this emerging field of study, and describe recent research aiming to synergistically combine the properties inherent to DNA with those of a number of supramolecular scaffolds. This ultimately creates structures with numerous potential applications in materials science, catalysis and medicine.

  10. Testing electronic structure methods for describing intermolecular H...H interactions in supramolecular chemistry.

    PubMed

    Casadesús, Ricard; Moreno, Miquel; González-Lafont, Angels; Lluch, José M; Repasky, Matthew P

    2004-01-15

    In this article a wide variety of computational approaches (molecular mechanics force fields, semiempirical formalisms, and hybrid methods, namely ONIOM calculations) have been used to calculate the energy and geometry of the supramolecular system 2-(2'-hydroxyphenyl)-4-methyloxazole (HPMO) encapsulated in beta-cyclodextrin (beta-CD). The main objective of the present study has been to examine the performance of these computational methods when describing the short range H. H intermolecular interactions between guest (HPMO) and host (beta-CD) molecules. The analyzed molecular mechanics methods do not provide unphysical short H...H contacts, but it is obvious that their applicability to the study of supramolecular systems is rather limited. For the semiempirical methods, MNDO is found to generate more reliable geometries than AM1, PM3 and the two recently developed schemes PDDG/MNDO and PDDG/PM3. MNDO results only give one slightly short H...H distance, whereas the NDDO formalisms with modifications of the Core Repulsion Function (CRF) via Gaussians exhibit a large number of short to very short and unphysical H...H intermolecular distances. In contrast, the PM5 method, which is the successor to PM3, gives very promising results. Our ONIOM calculations indicate that the unphysical optimized geometries from PM3 are retained when this semiempirical method is used as the low level layer in a QM:QM formulation. On the other hand, ab initio methods involving good enough basis sets, at least for the high level layer in a hybrid ONIOM calculation, behave well, but they may be too expensive in practice for most supramolecular chemistry applications. Finally, the performance of the evaluated computational methods has also been tested by evaluating the energetic difference between the two most stable conformations of the host(beta-CD)-guest(HPMO) system.

  11. Exploring macrocycles in functional supramolecular gels: from stimuli responsiveness to systems chemistry.

    PubMed

    Qi, Zhenhui; Schalley, Christoph A

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Supramolecular gels are ideal candidates for soft, stimuli-responsive materials, because they combine the elastic behavior of solids with the microviscous properties of fluids. The dynamic networks of fibers in supramolecular gels are reminiscent of the cytoskeleton of a cell and provide scaffolds to implement function. When gels are made responsive to stimuli, these mechanical properties can be controlled. Gel-sol transitions also open opportunities to immobilize molecules inside the gel's cavities and to release them on demand. To establish selective responsiveness, suitable recognition sites are required influencing the properties of the fiber network depending on the presence of the stimulus. Supramolecular gels are expected to be stimuli-responsive per se, for example, to temperature, mechanical stress, or an environment that is competitive with the noncovalent interactions connecting the low-molecular weight gelators. Nevertheless, the opportunities for controlling the mechanical properties are rather limited, if one merely relies on interfering with these interactions. It would be much more promising to equip the gel with additional receptor sites that offer selectivity for a broader variety of chemical stimuli. Macrocycles often exhibit a distinct host-guest chemistry and thus are excellent candidates for this purpose. A broad variety of macrocycles differing with respect to structure, topology, solubility, or biocompatibility have been incorporated in gels and endow gels with responsiveness and function. Macrocycles can have different roles: They offer rather rigid scaffolds for the construction of structurally well-defined gelator molecules. Furthermore, their host-guest interactions can be integral to gel formation, if these interactions are required to build the gel fibers. Finally, macrocycles can also be functional groups with which gelators are equipped that would also form gels in the absence of the macrocycle. Here, the macrocycle can

  12. Supramolecular ferroelectrics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tayi, Alok S.; Kaeser, Adrien; Matsumoto, Michio; Aida, Takuzo; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2015-04-01

    Supramolecular chemistry uses non-covalent interactions to coax molecules into forming ordered assemblies. The construction of ordered materials with these reversible bonds has led to dramatic innovations in organic electronics, polymer science and biomaterials. Here, we review how supramolecular strategies can advance the burgeoning field of organic ferroelectricity. Ferroelectrics -- materials with a spontaneous and electrically reversible polarization -- are touted for use in non-volatile computer memories, sensors and optics. Historically, this physical phenomenon has been studied in inorganic materials, although some organic examples are known and strong interest exists to extend the search for ferroelectric molecular systems. Other undiscovered applications outside this regime could also emerge. We describe the key features necessary for molecular and supramolecular dipoles in organic ferroelectrics and their incorporation into ordered systems, such as porous frameworks and liquid crystals. The goal of this Review is to motivate the development of innovative supramolecular ferroelectrics that exceed the performance and usefulness of known systems.

  13. Quantitative Measurement of Magnetic Hyperfine Parameters and the Physical Organic Chemistry of Supramolecular Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bender, Christopher J.

    The physical principles that underlie organic reactions were established by a systematic study of chemical reaction dynamics that employed correlated measurements of reaction rates and a physical parameter that could be related of the electronic properties of the molecules in question (Hammett, 1970). Today, molecular science emphasizes the concept of molecular device, which connotes a supramolecular structure (the term "supramolecule" loosely means a molecule that has multiple functionalities associated with it; for example, an enzyme might be regarded as a supramolecule in the sense that it features a supported metal catalyst and a receptor site that recognizes a specific substrate upon which the catalyst acts) that acts in some specific fashion. A molecular device may be biological (e.g., enzymes, contractile proteins; cf. Tanford & Reynolds, 2001), or it may be produced by synthetic means (e.g., molecular wires, switches, machines, etc.; cf. Sauvage, 2001; Balzani et al., 2003). Current synthetic chemistry provides the technical means that enable one to create and modify molecular devices so that structure may elicit some specific function, and so physical organic chemists are interested in reactions that involve engineered and structurally complex systems such as supported catalysts, protein active sites, or nanostructures (cf. amilton, 1996; Tidwell et al., 1997).

  14. The supramolecular chemistry of lipid oxidation and antioxidation in bulk oils

    PubMed Central

    Budilarto, Elizabeth S; Kamal-Eldin, Afaf

    2015-01-01

    The microenvironment formed by surface active compounds is being recognized as the active site of lipid oxidation. Trace amounts of water occupy the core of micro micelles and several amphiphilic minor components (e.g., phospholipids, monoacylglycerols, free fatty acids, etc.) act as surfactants and affect lipid oxidation in a complex fashion dependent on the structure and stability of the microemulsions in a continuous lipid phase such as bulk oil. The structures of the triacylglycerols and other lipid-soluble molecules affect their organization and play important roles during the course of the oxidation reactions. Antioxidant head groups, variably located near the water-oil colloidal interfaces, trap and scavenge radicals according to their location and concentration. According to this scenario, antioxidants inhibit lipid oxidation not only by scavenging radicals via hydrogen donation but also by physically stabilizing the micelles at the microenvironments of the reaction sites. There is a cut-off effect (optimum value) governing the inhibitory effects of antioxidants depending inter alias on their hydrophilic/lipophilic balance and their concentrations. These complex effects, previously considered as paradoxes in antioxidants research, are now better explained by the supramolecular chemistry of lipid oxidation and antioxidants, which is discussed in this review. PMID:26448722

  15. Fun with photons, reactive intermediates, and friends. Skating on the edge of the paradigms of physical organic chemistry, organic supramolecular photochemistry, and spin chemistry.

    PubMed

    Turro, Nicholas J

    2011-12-16

    This Perspective presents a review and survey of the science and philosophy of my research career over the past five decades at Columbia as a physical organic chemist and photochemist. I explore the role of paradigms, structure, and geometric thinking in my own cognitive and intellectual development. The Perspective describes my investigations of high energy content molecules in electronically excited states and the development of electronic spin and supramolecular photochemistry chemistry. Current research dealing with the nuclear spin chemistry of H(2) incarcerated in buckyballs is illustrated. In the second part of this Perspective, I recount a personal role of the philosophy and history of science and the scientific communities' use of paradigms in their every day research and intellectual activities. Examples are given of the crucial role of geometry and structure in the rapid development of organic chemistry and physical organic chemistry over the past century.

  16. Global atmospheric chemistry - which air matters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prather, Michael J.; Zhu, Xin; Flynn, Clare M.; Strode, Sarah A.; Rodriguez, Jose M.; Steenrod, Stephen D.; Liu, Junhua; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Fiore, Arlene M.; Horowitz, Larry W.; Mao, Jingqiu; Murray, Lee T.; Shindell, Drew T.; Wofsy, Steven C.

    2017-07-01

    An approach for analysis and modeling of global atmospheric chemistry is developed for application to measurements that provide a tropospheric climatology of those heterogeneously distributed, reactive species that control the loss of methane and the production and loss of ozone. We identify key species (e.g., O3, NOx, HNO3, HNO4, C2H3NO5, H2O, HOOH, CH3OOH, HCHO, CO, CH4, C2H6, acetaldehyde, acetone) and presume that they can be measured simultaneously in air parcels on the scale of a few km horizontally and a few tenths of a km vertically. As a first step, six global models have prepared such climatologies sampled at the modeled resolution for August with emphasis on the vast central Pacific Ocean basin. Objectives of this paper are to identify and characterize differences in model-generated reactivities as well as species covariances that could readily be discriminated with an unbiased climatology. A primary tool is comparison of multidimensional probability densities of key species weighted by the mass of such parcels or frequency of occurrence as well as by the reactivity of the parcels with respect to methane and ozone. The reactivity-weighted probabilities tell us which parcels matter in this case, and this method shows skill in differentiating among the models' chemistry. Testing 100 km scale models with 2 km measurements using these tools also addresses a core question about model resolution and whether fine-scale atmospheric structures matter to the overall ozone and methane budget. A new method enabling these six global chemistry-climate models to ingest an externally sourced climatology and then compute air parcel reactivity is demonstrated. Such an objective climatology containing these key species is anticipated from the NASA Atmospheric Tomography (ATom) aircraft mission (2015-2020), executing profiles over the Pacific and Atlantic Ocean basins. This modeling study addresses a core part of the design of ATom.

  17. Supramolecular chemistry of pillar[n]arenes functionalised by a copper(i)-catalysed alkyne-azide cycloaddition "click" reaction.

    PubMed

    Kakuta, T; Yamagishi, T; Ogoshi, T

    2017-05-09

    Since we discovered pillar[n]arenes in 2008, many chemists have developed a strong interest in pillar[n]arene chemistry because of the many advantages associated with these materials, including their facile and high yielding synthesis, versatile functionality, planar chirality and unique host-guest properties. In this feature article, we discuss recent advances in the field of supramolecular chemistry based on the use of pillar[n]arenes as substrates for copper(i)-catalysed alkyne-azide cycloaddition (CuAAC) "click" chemistry. The CuAAC reaction provides facile access to 1,4-disubstituted triazoles by a reaction between alkyne and azido substrates in the presence of a Cu(i) catalyst. Pillar[n]arenes bearing alkyne or azido groups can therefore be used as substrates for this reaction. Herein, we discuss not only the synthesis of pillar[n]arenes bearing alkyne or azido groups but also the application of these functionalised systems to the CuAAC reaction to construct supramolecular assemblies. We also discuss the rational molecular design and synthesis of guest compounds using the CuAAC reaction because linear alkanes sandwiched between 1,2,3-triazole moieties are good guests for cyclic pentamer pillar[5]arenes.

  18. New developments in theoretical thermochemistry and electronic structure applications in supramolecular chemistry and cluster science

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramabhadran, Raghunath Ozhapakkam

    In a concise display of the power and diversity of electronic structure theory (EST), the work presented herein involves the development of new computational methods to advance the practical utility of quantum chemistry, as well as solving different types of challenging chemical problems by applying existing EST tools. The research presented is highly interdisciplinary in nature and features synergistic collaborations to solve real-life problems such as regulating toxic chemicals and generating alternative sources of energy. In the first chapter of this dissertation, the solution to a long-standing problem in theoretical thermochemistry is accomplished by the development of the automated, chemically intuitive and generalized thermochemical hierarchy, Connectivity-Based Hierarchy (CBH) to accurately predict the thermochemical properties of organic molecules. The extension of the hierarchy to predict the enthalpies of formations of biomonomers such as amino acids is also presented. The development of a computationally efficient protocol to accurately extrapolate to high CCSD(T) energies based on MP2 and DFT energies using CBH is presented in the second chapter, thus merging theoretical thermochemistry with fragment-based methods in quantum chemistry. This merger drastically reduces the computational cost involved in a CCSD(T) calculation, while retaining the impeccable accuracy it offers. The practical utility of the CH hydrogen bond, commonly thought as being too weak to be used in supramolecular applications has been demonstrated by DFT calculations (along with experimental results from the Flood group) in the third chapter. This is accomplished by systematically studying the binding of monoatomic chloride, diatomic and toxic cyanide and the polyatomic bi-fluoride anions for the first time using only CH hydrogen bonds within a triazolophane macrocycle. The fourth chapter contains the introduction of the concept of fluxionality in the chemical reactions of

  19. Proton Mediated Chemistry and Catalysis in a Self-Assembled Supramolecular Host

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael; Bergman, Robert; Raymond, Kenneth

    2009-04-10

    Synthetic supramolecular host assemblies can impart unique reactivity to encapsulated guest molecules. Synthetic host molecules have been developed to carry out complex reactions within their cavities, despite the fact that they lack the type of specifically tailored functional groups normally located in the analogous active sites of enzymes. Over the past decade, the Raymond group has developed a series of self-assembled supramolecules and the Bergman group has developed and studied a number of catalytic transformations. In this Account, we detail recent collaborative work between these two groups, focusing on chemical catalysis stemming from the encapsulation of protonated guests and expanding to acid catalysis in basic solution. We initially investigated the ability of a water-soluble, self-assembled supramolecular host molecule to encapsulate protonated guests in its hydrophobic core. Our study of encapsulated protonated amines revealed rich host-guest chemistry. We established that self-exchange (that is, in-out guest movement) rates of protonated amines were dependent on the steric bulk of the amine rather than its basicity. The host molecule has purely rotational tetrahedral (T) symmetry, so guests with geminal N-methyl groups (and their attendant mirror plane) were effectively desymmetrized; this allowed for the observation and quantification of the barriers for nitrogen inversion followed by bond rotation. Furthermore, small nitrogen heterocycles, such as N-alkylaziridines, N-alkylazetidines, and N-alkylpyrrolidines, were found to be encapsulated as proton-bound homodimers or homotrimers. We further investigated the thermodynamic stabilization of protonated amines, showing that encapsulation makes the amines more basic in the cavity. Encapsulation raises the effective basicity of protonated amines by up to 4.5 pK{sub a} units, a difference almost as large as that between the moderate and strong bases carbonate and hydroxide. The thermodynamic stabilization

  20. Factors Controlling the Spectroscopic Properties and Supramolecular Chemistry of an Electron Deficient 5,5- Dimethylphlorin Architecture

    SciTech Connect

    Pistner, Allen; Lutterman, Daniel A; Ghidiu, Michael J.; Walker, Eric; Yapp, Glenn P. A.; Rosenthal, Joel

    2014-01-01

    A new 5,5-dimethylphlorin derivative (3H-(PhlCF3)) was prepared and studied through a combination of redox, photophysical, and computational experiments. The phlorin macrocycle is significantly distorted from planarity compared to more traditional tetrapyrrole architectures and displays solvatochroism in the soret region of the UV vis spectrum ( 370 420 nm). DFT calculations indicate that this solvatochromic behavior stems from the polarized nature of the frontier orbital (LUMO+1) that is most heavily involved in these transitions. Compound 3H(PhlCF3) also displays an intriguing supramolecular chemistry with certain anions; this phlorin can cooperatively hydrogen-bond two equivalents of fluoride to form 3H(PhlCF3) 2F but does not bind larger halides such as Cl or Br . Analogous studies revealed that the phlorin can hydrogen-bond with carboxylate anions such as acetate to form 1:1 complexes such as 3H(PhlCF3) OAc . These supramolecular assemblies are robust and form even in relatively polar solvents such as MeCN. Hydrogen-bonding of fluoride and acetate anions to the phlorin N H residues significantly attenuates the redox and photophysical properties of the phlorin. Moreover, The ability to independently vary the size and pKa of a series of carboxylate hydrogen-bond acceptors has allowed us to probe how phlorin anion association is controlled by the anion s size and/or basicity. These studies elucidate the physical properties and the electronic effects that shape the supramolecular chemistry displayed by the phlorin platform.

  1. Supramolecular Nanomedicine - An Overview.

    PubMed

    Sekhon, Bhupinder Singh

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry enabling molecules and molecular complexes binding through non-covalent bonds allows nanomedicines to serve their desirable function to deliver drugs at the right time and the right place with minimal invasiveness. Supramolecular nanomedicine is the application of nanosupramolecules to the human health and disease and its main applications include diagnosis and therapy, drug and gene delivery, and tissue engineering. Nanoparticles with different structures obtained by assembling supraamphiphiles are promising candidates for multifunctional therapeutic platforms combining imaging and therapeutic capabilities. Encapsulation in supramolecular nanocarriers such as polymeric micelles, polymeric vesciles, layer-by-layer assembly, and porphysomes has the potential to deliver imaging and therapeutic drugs to the sites of action in the body. Hybrid supramolecular nanostructures of organic and inorganic molecules show promising potential in nanomedicine. Research is progressing towards rapid development on supramolecular nanotheranostic devices. Moreover, supramolecular nanoparticles exhibit low-toxicity, low-immunogenicity, nonpathogenicity, and in vivo degradability.

  2. Extending supramolecular fullerene-porphyrin chemistry to pillared metal-organic frameworks

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Dayong; Tham, Fook S.; Reed, Christopher A.; Boyd, Peter D. W.

    2002-01-01

    Porphyrins and fullerenes are spontaneously attracted to each other. This supramolecular recognition element can be exploited to produce ordered arrays of interleaved porphyrins and fullerenes. C60⋅H2TpyP⋅Pb(NO3)2⋅1.5TCE (H2TpyP = tetra-4-pyridylporphyrin; TCE = 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane) crystallizes in the tetragonal P4/n space group and the structure has been solved to high resolution. The Pb2+ ions connect the pyridylporphyrins in infinite sheets with an interlayer spacing of 12.1 Å. The fullerenes are intercalated between these layers, acting as pillars. The 6:6 ring juncture bonds of C60 are centered over the porphyrins, bringing the layers into strict tetragonal register. This arranagement identifies the fullerene–porphyrin interaction as a structure-defining element. The same motif is seen in a related ribbon structure having C70 intercalated into HgI2-linked H2TpyTP. The supramolecular design principles involved in assembling these chromophores may have applications in materials science. PMID:11943855

  3. Thiodiacetate-manganese chemistry with N ligands: unique control of the supramolecular arrangement over the metal coordination mode.

    PubMed

    Grirrane, Abdessamad; Pastor, Antonio; Galindo, Agustín; Alvarez, Eleuterio; Mealli, Carlo; Ienco, Andrea; Orlandini, Annabella; Rosa, Patrick; Caneschi, Andrea; Barra, Anne-Laure; Sanz, Javier Fernández

    2011-09-12

    Compounds based on the Mn-tda unit (tda=S(CH(2)COO)(2)(-2) ) and N co-ligands have been analyzed in terms of structural, spectroscopic, magnetic properties and DFT calculations. The precursors [Mn(tda)(H(2)O)](n) (1) and [Mn(tda)(H(2)O)(3)]·H(2)O (2) have been characterized by powder and X-ray diffraction, respectively. Their derivatives with bipyridyl-type ligands have formulas [Mn(tda)(bipy)](n) (3), [{Mn(N-N)}(2)(μ-H(2)O)(μ-tda)(2)](n) (N-N=4,4'-Me(2)bipy (4), 5,5'-Me(2)bipy, (5)) and [Mn(tda){(MeO)(2)bipy}·2H(2)O](n) (6). Depending on the presence/position of substituents at bipy, the supramolecular arrangement can affect the metal coordination type. While all the complexes consist of 1D coordination polymers, only 3 has a copper-acetate core with local trigonal prismatic metal coordination. The presence of substituents in 4-6, together with water co-ligands, reduces the supramolecular interactions and typical octahedral Mn(II) ions are observed. The unicity of 3 is also supported by magnetic studies and by DFT calculations, which confirm that the unusual Mn coordination is a consequence of extended noncovalent interactions (π-π stacking) between bipy ligands. Moreover, 3 is an example of broken paradigm for supramolecular chemistry. In fact, the desired stereochemical properties are achieved by using rigid metal building blocks, whereas in 3 the accumulation of weak noncovalent interactions controls the metal geometry. Other N co-ligands have also been reacted with 1 to give the compounds [Mn(tda)(phen)](2)·6H(2)O (7) (phen=1,10-phenanthroline), [Mn(tda)(terpy)](n) (8) (terpy=2,2':6,2''-terpyridine), [Mn(tda)(pyterpy)](n) (9) (pyterpy=4'-(4-pyridyl)-2,2':6,2''-terpyridine), [Mn(tda)(tpt)(H(2)O)]·2H(2)O (10) and [Mn(tda)(tpt)(H(2)O)](2)·2H(2)O (11) (tpt=2,4,6-tris(2-pyridyl)-1,3,5-triazine). Their identified mono-, bi- or polynuclear structures clearly indicate that hydrogen bonding is variously competitive with π-π stacking. Copyright © 2011 WILEY

  4. Molecular Recognition Directed Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Architectures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    chemistry. The ability of these supramolecular architectures to form liquid crystalline phases is determined by the shape of the self-assembled...be discussed. In the case of TMV-like supramolecular architectures a comparison between various supramolecdr (generated via H-bonding, ionic and...molecular, macromolecular and supramolecular chemistry. The ability of these supramolecular architectures to form liquid crystalline phases is determined

  5. The btp [2,6-bis(1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)pyridine] binding motif: a new versatile terdentate ligand for supramolecular and coordination chemistry.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Joseph P; Kitchen, Jonathan A; Gunnlaugsson, Thorfinnur

    2014-08-07

    Ligands containing the btp [2,6-bis(1,2,3-triazol-4-yl)pyridine] motif have appeared with increasing regularity over the last decade. This class of ligands, formed in a one pot ‘click’ reaction, has been studied for various purposes, such as for generating d and f metal coordination complexes and supramolecular self-assemblies, and in the formation of dendritic and polymeric networks, etc. This review article introduces btp as a novel and highly versatile terdentate building block with huge potential in inorganic supramolecular chemistry. We will focus on the coordination chemistry of btp ligands with a wide range of metals, and how it compares with other classical pyridyl and polypyridyl based ligands, and then present a selection of applications including use in catalysis, enzyme inhibition, photochemistry, molecular logic and materials, e.g. polymers, dendrimers and gels. The photovoltaic potential of triazolium derivatives of btp and its interactions with anions will also be discussed.

  6. Polyoxotungstates now also with pentagonal units: supramolecular chemistry and tuning of magnetic exchange in {(M)M5}12V30 Keplerates (M = Mo, W).

    PubMed

    Todea, Ana Maria; Merca, Alice; Bögge, Hartmut; Glaser, Thorsten; Engelhardt, Larry; Prozorov, Ruslan; Luban, Marshall; Müller, Achim

    2009-06-21

    The deliberate synthesis of the Keplerate [K(20) subset{(W)W(5)O(21)(SO(4))}(12)(VO)(30)(SO(4))(H(2)O)(63)](18-) with 20 pores all closed by K(+) in a supramolecular fashion proves that it is possible to follow new routes in polyoxotungstate chemistry based on pentagonal {(W)W(5)}-type units and to tune magnetic exchange couplings in {(M)M(5)}(12)M'(30) type Keplerates.

  7. Prion-like nanofibrils of small molecules (PriSM): A new frontier at the intersection of supramolecular chemistry and cell biology.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Du, Xuewen; Xu, Bing

    2015-01-01

    Formed by non-covalent interactions and not defined at genetic level, the assemblies of small molecules in biology are complicated and less explored. A common morphology of the supramolecular assemblies of small molecules is nanofibrils, which coincidentally resembles the nanofibrils formed by proteins such as prions. So these supramolecular assemblies are termed as prion-like nanofibrils of small molecules (PriSM). Emerging evidence from several unrelated fields over the past decade implies the significance of PriSM in biology and medicine. This perspective aims to highlight some recent advances of the research on PriSM. This paper starts with description of the intriguing similarities between PriSM and prions, discusses the paradoxical features of PriSM, introduces the methods for elucidating the biological functions of PriSM, illustrates several examples of beneficial aspects of PriSM, and finishes with the promises and current challenges in the research of PriSM. We anticipate that the research of PriSM will contribute to the fundamental understanding at the intersection of supramolecular chemistry and cell biology and ultimately lead to a new paradigm of molecular (or supramolecular) therapeutics for biomedicine.

  8. Supramolecular Based Membrane Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz; Rezapour, Morteza; Faridbod, Farnoush; Pourjavid, Mohammad Reza

    2006-01-01

    Supramolecular chemistry can be defined as a field of chemistry, which studies the complex multi-molecular species formed from molecular components that have relatively simpler structures. This field has been subject to extensive research over the past four decades. This review discusses classification of supramolecules and their application in design and construction of ion selective sensors.

  9. Supramolecular biofunctional materials.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jie; Li, Jie; Du, Xuewen; Xu, Bing

    2017-06-01

    This review discusses supramolecular biofunctional materials, a novel class of biomaterials formed by small molecules that are held together via noncovalent interactions. The complexity of biology and relevant biomedical problems not only inspire, but also demand effective molecular design for functional materials. Supramolecular biofunctional materials offer (almost) unlimited possibilities and opportunities to address challenging biomedical problems. Rational molecular design of supramolecular biofunctional materials exploit powerful and versatile noncovalent interactions, which offer many advantages, such as responsiveness, reversibility, tunability, biomimicry, modularity, predictability, and, most importantly, adaptiveness. In this review, besides elaborating on the merits of supramolecular biofunctional materials (mainly in the form of hydrogels and/or nanoscale assemblies) resulting from noncovalent interactions, we also discuss the advantages of small peptides as a prevalent molecular platform to generate a wide range of supramolecular biofunctional materials for the applications in drug delivery, tissue engineering, immunology, cancer therapy, fluorescent imaging, and stem cell regulation. This review aims to provide a brief synopsis of recent achievements at the intersection of supramolecular chemistry and biomedical science in hope of contributing to the multidisciplinary research on supramolecular biofunctional materials for a wide range of applications. We envision that supramolecular biofunctional materials will contribute to the development of new therapies that will ultimately lead to a paradigm shift for developing next generation biomaterials for medicine.

  10. Diffuse cloud chemistry. [in interstellar matter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van Dishoeck, Ewine F.; Black, John H.

    1988-01-01

    The current status of models of diffuse interstellar clouds is reviewed. A detailed comparison of recent gas-phase steady-state models shows that both the physical conditions and the molecular abundances in diffuse clouds are still not fully understood. Alternative mechanisms are discussed and observational tests which may discriminate between the various models are suggested. Recent developments regarding the velocity structure of diffuse clouds are mentioned. Similarities and differences between the chemistries in diffuse clouds and those in translucent and high latitude clouds are pointed out.

  11. Aromatic Radicals-Acetylene Particulate Matter Chemistry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-12-01

    atmosphere1. In addition to acute respiratory problems, long-term effects include lung cancer and cardiopulmonary diseases , as studied by Pope at al...problems such as ischemic heart disease , fatal arrhythmia, and congestive heart failure4,5. Strategies to reduce fine particulate matter (PM...acetylene reaction have been made by Fahr and Stein15, who deduced an Arrhenius expression in a 4 temperature range between 1000 and 1330 K in

  12. The death of the Job plot, transparency, open science and online tools, uncertainty estimation methods and other developments in supramolecular chemistry data analysis.

    PubMed

    Brynn Hibbert, D; Thordarson, Pall

    2016-10-25

    Data analysis is central to understanding phenomena in host-guest chemistry. We describe here recent developments in this field starting with the revelation that the popular Job plot method is inappropriate for most problems in host-guest chemistry and that the focus should instead be on systematically fitting data and testing all reasonable binding models. We then discuss approaches for estimating uncertainties in binding studies using case studies and simulations to highlight key issues. Related to this is the need for ready access to data and transparency in the methodology or software used, and we demonstrate an example a webportal () that aims to address this issue. We conclude with a list of best-practice protocols for data analysis in supramolecular chemistry that could easily be translated to other related problems in chemistry including measuring rate constants or drug IC50 values.

  13. Novel chemistry of matter under high pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miao, Maosheng

    2015-03-01

    The periodicity of the elements and the non-reactivity of the inner-shell electrons are two related principles of chemistry, rooted in the atomic shell structure. Within compounds, Group I elements, for example, invariably assume the +1 oxidation state, and their chemical properties differ completely from those of the p-block elements. These general rules govern our understanding of chemical structures and reactions. Using first principles calculations, we demonstrate that under high pressure, the above doctrines can be broken. We show that both the inner shell electrons and the outer shell empty orbitals of Cs and other elements can involve in chemical reactions. Furthermore, we show that the quantized orbitals of the enclosed interstitial space may play the same role as atomic orbitals, an unprecedented view that led us to a unified theory for the recently observed high-pressure electride phenomenon.

  14. Abiotic Supramolecular Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-02

    preparation of supramolecular and larger structures with unusual and desirable properties based upon coordination chemistry . The following...with unusual and desirable properties based upon coordination chemistry . The following objectives were specifically targeted: (1) new and flexible...2. “Porosity Tuning of Carborane-Based Metal Organic Frameworks (MOFs) via Coordination Chemistry and Ligand Design,” A.M. Spokoyny, O.K. Farha, K

  15. Stimuli-responsive supramolecular hydrogels with high extensibility and fast self-healing via precoordinated mussel-inspired chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Sen; Ma, Peter X.

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular hydrogels have the advantages of stimuli responsiveness and self-healing compared to covalently crosslinked hydrogels. However, the existing supramolecular hydrogels are usually poor in mechanical properties especially in extensibility. In addition, these supramolecular hydrogels need a long self-healing time and have low self-healing efficiency. In this manuscript, we report a novel strategy to develop highly extensible and fast self-healing supramolecular hydrogels by using pre-coordinated mussel-inspired catechol-Fe3+ complexes as dynamic crosslinkers. The hydrogel can be fabricated and cast into various shapes by one-step photo-crosslinking. Thus fabricated hydrogels can be stretched beyond 10 times their original lengths, and the high extensibility can completely recover within a very short time (less than 20 minutes) even after the hydrogels are entirely cut apart. Utilizing the dynamic nature of supramolecular hydrogels, we can realize different mechanical behaviors including strength, extensibility and recoverability by varying the loading conditions. In addition, the hydrogels respond to multiple stimuli including mechanical force, temperature and certain chemicals because of the dynamic catechol-Fe3+ bond. PMID:26834315

  16. Supramolecular solar cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Subbaiyan, Navaneetha Krishnan

    Supramolecular chemistry - chemistry of non-covalent bonds including different type of intermolecular interactions viz., ion-pairing, ion-dipole, dipole-dipole, hydrogen bonding, cation-pi and Van der Waals forces. Applications based on supramolecular concepts for developing catalysts, molecular wires, rectifiers, photochemical sensors have been evolved during recent years. Mimicking natural photosynthesis to build energy harvesting devices has become important for generating energy and solar fuels that could be stored for future use. In this dissertation, supramolecular chemistry is being explored for creating light energy harvesting devices. Photosensitization of semiconductor metal oxide nanoparticles, such as titanium dioxide (TiO2) and tin oxide (SnO2,), via host-guest binding approach has been explored. In the first part, self-assembly of different porphyrin macrocyclic compounds on TiO2 layer using axial coordination approach is explored. Supramolecular dye sensitized solar cells built based on this approach exhibited Incident Photon Conversion Efficiency (IPCE) of 36% for a porphyrin-ferrocene dyad. In the second part, surface modification of SnO2 with water soluble porphyrins and phthalocyanine resulted in successful self-assembly of dimers on SnO2 surface. IPCE more than 50% from 400 - 700 nm is achieved for the supramolecular self-assembled heterodimer photocells is achieved. In summary, the axial ligation and ion-pairing method used as supramolecular tools to build photocells, exhibited highest quantum efficiency of light energy conversion with panchromatic spectral coverage. The reported findings could be applied to create interacting molecular systems for next generation of efficient solar energy harvesting devices.

  17. Use of Multiple Representations in Developing Preservice Chemistry Teachers' Understanding of the Structure of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yakmaci-Guzel, Buket; Adadan, Emine

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the changes in 19 preservice chemistry teachers' understandings of the structure of matter, including the aspects of the physical states of matter, the physical composition of matter, and the chemical composition of matter, before, immediately after, and months after they received a specific instruction.…

  18. Representations of Fundamental Chemistry Concepts in Relation to the Particulate Nature of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirbulut, Zubeyde Demet; Beeth, Michael Edward

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated high school students' understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts - states of matter, melting, evaporation, condensation, boiling, and vapor pressure, in relation to their understanding of the particulate nature of matter. A sample of six students (four females and two males) enrolled in a second year chemistry course…

  19. Representations of Fundamental Chemistry Concepts in Relation to the Particulate Nature of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirbulut, Zübeyde Demet; Beeth, Michael Edward

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated high school students' understanding of fundamental chemistry concepts--states of matter, melting, evaporation, condensation, boiling, and vapor pressure, in relation to their understanding of the particulate nature of matter. A sample of six students (four females and two males) enrolled in a second year chemistry course at…

  20. Using PARSEL Modules to Contextualizing the States-of-Matter Approach (SOMA) to Introductory Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tsaparlis, Georgios

    2008-01-01

    SOMA (States-Of-Matter Approach) is an introductory chemistry program for all students in the tenth or eleventh grade (age 16-17), which introduces chemistry through the separate study of the three states of matter. SOMA is basically a formalistic approach. In this paper, we discuss the use of PARSEL modules in providing a teaching approach to…

  1. Gated supramolecular chemistry in hybrid mesoporous silica nanoarchitectures: controlled delivery and molecular transport in response to chemical, physical and biological stimuli.

    PubMed

    Alberti, Sebastián; Soler-Illia, Galo J A A; Azzaroni, Omar

    2015-04-11

    This review presents and discusses recent advances in the emerging field of "gated nanochemistry", outlining the substantial progress made so far. The development of hybrid mesoporous silica with complex tailored pore nanoarchitectures bridges the gap between molecular materials and the requirements of nanodevices for controlled nanoscale chemistry. In the last decade, membranes, particles and thin film porous architectures have been designed, synthesized and selectively modified by molecular, polymeric, organometallic or biologically active groups. The exquisite manipulation of mesopore morphology and interconnection combined with molecular or supramolecular functionalities, and the intrinsic biological compatibility of silica have made these materials a potential platform for selective sensing and drug delivery. The wide répertoire of these hard-soft architectures permit us to envisage sophisticated intelligent nano-systems that respond to a variety of external stimuli such as pH, redox potential, molecule concentration, temperature, or light. Transduction of these stimuli into a predefined response implies exploiting spatial and physico-chemical effects such as charge distribution, steric constraints, equilibria displacements, or local changes in ionic concentration, just to name a few examples. As expected, this "positional mesochemistry" can be only attained through the concerted control of assembly, surface tailoring and, confinement conditions, thus giving birth to a new class of stimuli-responsive materials with modulable transport properties. As a guiding framework the emerging field of "gated nanochemistry" offers methodologies and tools for building up stimuli-sensitive porous architectures equipped with switchable entities whose transport properties can be triggered at will. The gated nanoscopic hybrid materials discussed here not only herald a new era in the integrative design of "smart" drug delivery systems, but also give the reader a perspective of

  2. Influence of pH and organic ligands on the supramolecular network based on molybdenum phosphate/strontium chemistry.

    PubMed

    Yu, Kai; Zhou, Bai-Bin; Yu, Yang; Su, Zhan-Hua; Wang, Hai-yan; Wang, Chun-mei; Wang, Chun-xiao

    2012-09-07

    Three supramolecular materials based on different poly(oxomolybdophosphate) clusters, (H(2)imi)(6)(Himi)(4)[{Sr(H(2)O)(4)}(2){Sr ⊂ P(6)Mo(4)(V)Mo(14)(VI)O(73)}(2)]·17H(2)O (1), (H(2)(4,4'-bpy))(2)[Cu(2)Sr(2)Mo(12)O(24)·(OH)(6)(H(2)O)(6)(H(2)PO(4))(2)(HPO(4))(2)(PO(4))(4)]·5H(2)O (2), and (H(2)bim)(H(2)bim)[SrP(2)Mo(5)O(23)(H(2)O)(3)]·2H(2)O (3) (imi = imidazole, 4,4'-bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine, and bim = 2,2'-biimidazole), have been hydrothermally synthesized and structurally characterized by the elemental analysis, TG, IR, UV-vis, XPS and the single-crystal X-ray diffraction. Compound 1 is made up of unusual basket-shape [Sr ⊂ P(6)Mo(18)O(73)](10-) cages linked by [Sr(H(2)O)(4)](2+) fragments to yield unprecedented dimeric chains, which represent the first 1-D assemblies of basket-type POMs. Compound 2 exhibits a novel string constructed from sandwich-like [Cu(P(4)Mo(6)O(31))(2)] units and {Sr(2)Cu} trinuclear linkers. Compound 3 is the first chain of Strandberg-type polyoxoanions connected by Sr(2+) cations. All the 1-D chains are further packed into various 3-D supramolecular assemblies via strong hydrogen-bonding interactions. The electrochemical and electrocatalysis behavior of 1, 2, and 3-CPE have been investigated in detail.

  3. The Heart of Matter: A Nuclear Chemistry Module.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viola, Vic

    This book is one in a series of Interdisciplinary Approaches to Chemistry (IAC) designed to help students discover that chemistry is a lively science and actively used to pursue solutions to the important problems of today. It is expected for students to see how chemistry takes place continuously all around and to readily understand the daily…

  4. Supramolecular aromaticity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karabıyık, Hande; Sevinçek, Resul; Karabıyık, Hasan

    2014-05-01

    We report experimental and theoretical evidences for supramolecular aromaticity as a new concept to be widely used in researches about molecular crystals. CSD survey regarding frequently encountered resonance-assisted H-bonds (RAHBs) in formic acid, formamide, formimidamide, formic acid-formamide, and formamide-formimidamide dimers shows that supramolecular quasirings formed by RAHBs have remarkable electronic delocalization within themselves, which is reminiscent of aromaticity at supramolecular level. This study criticizes and reevaluates the validity of conventional judgment which states that ring systems formed by intermolecular H-bonds cannot be aromatic. Thus, the term aromaticity can be extended to supramolecular systems formed by RAHBs. Supramolecular aromaticity has a multi-fold nature involving both σ- and π-delocalization, and σ-delocalization through RAHBs takes on a task of compensating σ-deficiency within quasirings. Atomic composition in donor-acceptor set of the dimers is descriptive for supramolecular aromaticity. We revised bond-valence parameters for RAHBs and they suggest that hypervalent character of H atoms is more pronounced than their hypovalent character in RAHBs. The σ-delocalized bonding within H-bonded quasirings necessitates hypervalent character of H atoms. Quantum chemical calculations based on adiabatic Hydrogen Atom Transfer (HAT) between the monomers reveal that topological parameters at ring critical points (RCPs) of the quasirings correlate well with Shannon's entropic aromaticity index. The presence of additional LP orbital on O atoms implying more diffused LP-orbitals in donor-acceptor set leads to the formation of resonance-disabling states reducing supramolecular aromaticity of a quasiring and energetic cost of the electron transfer between the monomers. There is a nonignorable electron transfer between the monomers even in the cases where H atoms are close to donor or acceptor atom. NBO analyses have revealed that

  5. Supramolecular biomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Matthew J.; Appel, Eric A.; Meijer, E. W.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Polymers, ceramics and metals have historically dominated the application of materials in medicine. Yet rationally designed materials that exploit specific, directional, tunable and reversible non-covalent interactions offer unprecedented advantages: they enable modular and generalizable platforms with tunable mechanical, chemical and biological properties. Indeed, the reversible nature of supramolecular interactions gives rise to biomaterials that can sense and respond to physiological cues, or that mimic the structural and functional aspects of biological signalling. In this Review, we discuss the properties of several supramolecular biomaterials, as well as their applications in drug delivery, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine and immunology. We envision that supramolecular biomaterials will contribute to the development of new therapies that combine highly functional materials with unmatched patient- and application-specific tailoring of both material and biological properties.

  6. Supramolecular Chirality of the Two-Component Supramolecular Copolymer Gels: Who Determines the Handedness?

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaqing; Chen, Chunfeng; Wang, Tianyu; Liu, Minghua

    2016-01-12

    Natural supramolecular systems typically contain a wide variety of chiral molecules. Studying the chiral conflict within different supramolecular assemblies not only can be very helpful for understanding the inherent principles of supramolecular chirality but also can guide the preparation of many functional chiral soft matters. For assemblies containing only structurally similar molecules, supramolecular chirality is determined by enantiomeric excess of molecular building blocks. For supramolecular systems assembled by structurally different chiral molecules, however, the optical activity of the systems and the chiral conflict among different chiral molecules can be very complex. We found rather unexpected results regarding the chiral conflict within two-component supramolecular copolymer gels in this study. The handedness of the chirality of supramolecular copolymer gels, which were formed by the coassembly of bolaamphiphilic L-histidine derivatives and tartaric acids, was found to be dependent on the ordering molecular packing, instead of the preponderance of certain chiral molecules.

  7. Medicinal chemistry matters - a call for discipline in our discipline.

    PubMed

    Johnstone, Craig

    2012-06-01

    Medicinal chemistry makes a vital contribution to small molecule drug discovery, and the quality of it contributes directly to research effectiveness as well as to downstream costs, speed and survival in development. In recent years, the discipline of medicinal chemistry has evolved and witnessed many noteworthy contributions that propose and offer potential improvements to medicinal chemistry practice; however, the impact of these ideas is limited by their acceptance and deployment into every-day activity and, as a result, the quality of medicinal chemistry remains variable. For the good of the industry and the medicinal chemistry discipline, there is a need to move from retrospective learning to prospective control of medicinal chemistry practice to improve cost effectiveness, probability of success and survival rates.

  8. Data Mining as a Guide for the Construction of Cross-Linked Nanoparticles with Low Immunotoxicity via Control of Polymer Chemistry and Supramolecular Assembly.

    PubMed

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L

    2015-06-16

    The potential immunotoxicity of nanoparticles that are currently being approved, in different phases of clinical trials, or undergoing rigorous in vitro and in vivo characterizations in several laboratories has recently raised special attention. Products with no apparent in vitro or in vivo toxicity may still trigger various components of the immune system unintentionally and lead to serious adverse reactions. Cytokines are one of the useful biomarkers for predicting the effect of biotherapeutics on modulation of the immune system and for screening the immunotoxicity of nanoparticles both in vitro and in vivo, and they were recently found to partially predict the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of nanomaterials. Control of polymer chemistry and supramolecular assembly provides a great opportunity for the construction of biocompatible nanoparticles for biomedical clinical applications. However, the sources of data collected regarding immunotoxicities of nanomaterials are diverse, and experiments are usually conducted using different assays under specific conditions. As a result, making direct comparisons nearly impossible, and thus, tailoring the properties of nanomaterials on the basis of the available data is challenging. In this Account, the effects of chemical structure, cross-linking, degradability, morphology, concentration, and surface chemistry on the immunotoxicity of an expansive array of polymeric nanomaterials will be highlighted, with a focus on assays conducted using the same in vitro and in vivo models and experimental conditions. Furthermore, numerical descriptive values have been utilized uniquely to stand for induction of cytokines by nanoparticles. This treatment of available data provides a simple way to compare the immunotoxicities of various nanomaterials, and the values were found to correlate well with published data. On the basis of the polymeric systems investigated in this study, valuable information has been collected that

  9. Data Mining as a Guide for the Construction of Crosslinked Nanoparticles with Low Immunotoxicity via Controlling Polymer Chemistry and Supramolecular Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Elsabahy, Mahmoud; Wooley, Karen L.

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS The potential immunotoxicity of nanoparticles that are currently being approved or in different phases of clinical trials or under rigorous in vitro and in vivo characterizations in several laboratories has recently raised special attention. Products with no apparent in vitro or in vivo toxicity may still trigger the various components of the immune system, unintentionally, and lead to serious adverse reactions. Cytokines are one of the useful biomarkers to predict the effect of biotherapeutics on modulating the immune system and for screening the immunotoxicity of nanoparticles, both in vitro and in vivo, and were found recently to partially predict the in vivo pharmacokinetics and biodistribution of nanomaterials. Control of polymer chemistry and supramolecular assembly provides a great opportunity for construction of biocompatible nanoparticles for biomedical clinical applications. However, the sources of data collected regarding immunotoxicities of nanomaterials are diverse and experiments are usually conducted using different assays and under specific conditions, making direct comparisons nearly impossible and, thus, tailoring properties of nanomaterials based on the available data is challenging. In this account, the effects of chemical structure, crosslinking, degradability, morphology, concentration and surface chemistry on the immunotoxicity of an expansive array of polymeric nanomaterials will be highlighted, with focus being given on assays conducted using the same in vitro and in vivo models and experimental conditions. Furthermore, numerical descriptive values have been utilized, uniquely, to stand for induction of cytokines by nanoparticles. This treatment of available data provides a simple and easy way to compare the immunotoxicity of various nanomaterials, and the values were found to correlate-well with published data. Based on the investigated polymeric systems in this study, valuable information has been collected that aids in the

  10. Interstellar chemistry recorded in organic matter from primitive meteorites.

    PubMed

    Busemann, Henner; Young, Andrea F; Alexander, Conel M O'd; Hoppe, Peter; Mukhopadhyay, Sujoy; Nittler, Larry R

    2006-05-05

    Organic matter in extraterrestrial materials has isotopic anomalies in hydrogen and nitrogen that suggest an origin in the presolar molecular cloud or perhaps in the protoplanetary disk. Interplanetary dust particles are generally regarded as the most primitive solar system matter available, in part because until recently they exhibited the most extreme isotope anomalies. However, we show that hydrogen and nitrogen isotopic compositions in carbonaceous chondrite organic matter reach and even exceed those found in interplanetary dust particles. Hence, both meteorites (originating from the asteroid belt) and interplanetary dust particles (possibly from comets) preserve primitive organics that were a component of the original building blocks of the solar system.

  11. Host-guest supramolecular chemistry in solid-state nanopores: potassium-driven modulation of ionic transport in nanofluidic diodes.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Mitta, Gonzalo; Albesa, Alberto G; Knoll, Wolfgang; Trautmann, Christina; Toimil-Molares, María Eugenia; Azzaroni, Omar

    2015-10-14

    We describe the use of asymmetric nanopores decorated with crown ethers for constructing robust signal-responsive chemical devices. The modification of single conical nanopores with 18-crown-6 units led to a nanodevice whose electronic readout, derived from the transmembrane ion current, can be finely tuned over a wide range of K(+) concentrations. The electrostatic characteristics of the nanopore environment arising from host-guest ion-recognition processes taking place on the pore walls are responsible for tuning the transmembrane ionic transport and the rectification properties of the pore. This work illustrates the potential and versatility of host-guest chemistry, in combination with nanofluidic elements, as a key enabler to achieve addressable chemical nanodevices mimicking the ion transport properties and gating functions of specific biological channels.

  12. Host-guest supramolecular chemistry in solid-state nanopores: potassium-driven modulation of ionic transport in nanofluidic diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Mitta, Gonzalo; Albesa, Alberto G.; Knoll, Wolfgang; Trautmann, Christina; Toimil-Molares, María Eugenia; Azzaroni, Omar

    2015-09-01

    We describe the use of asymmetric nanopores decorated with crown ethers for constructing robust signal-responsive chemical devices. The modification of single conical nanopores with 18-crown-6 units led to a nanodevice whose electronic readout, derived from the transmembrane ion current, can be finely tuned over a wide range of K+ concentrations. The electrostatic characteristics of the nanopore environment arising from host-guest ion-recognition processes taking place on the pore walls are responsible for tuning the transmembrane ionic transport and the rectification properties of the pore. This work illustrates the potential and versatility of host-guest chemistry, in combination with nanofluidic elements, as a key enabler to achieve addressable chemical nanodevices mimicking the ion transport properties and gating functions of specific biological channels.We describe the use of asymmetric nanopores decorated with crown ethers for constructing robust signal-responsive chemical devices. The modification of single conical nanopores with 18-crown-6 units led to a nanodevice whose electronic readout, derived from the transmembrane ion current, can be finely tuned over a wide range of K+ concentrations. The electrostatic characteristics of the nanopore environment arising from host-guest ion-recognition processes taking place on the pore walls are responsible for tuning the transmembrane ionic transport and the rectification properties of the pore. This work illustrates the potential and versatility of host-guest chemistry, in combination with nanofluidic elements, as a key enabler to achieve addressable chemical nanodevices mimicking the ion transport properties and gating functions of specific biological channels. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details of the preparation and characterization of the brush-modified nanopores. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr04645a

  13. Do airborne microbes matter for atmospheric chemistry and cloud formation?

    PubMed

    Konstantinidis, Konstantinos T

    2014-06-01

    The role of airborne microbial cells in the chemistry of the atmosphere and cloud formation remains essentially speculative. Recent studies have indicated that microbes might be more important than previously anticipated for atmospheric processes. However, more work and direct communication between microbiologists and atmospheric scientists and modellers are necessary to better understand and model bioaerosol-cloud-precipitation-climate interactions.

  14. The Heart of Matter: A Nuclear Chemistry Module. Teacher's Guide.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Viola, Vic; Hearle, Robert

    This teacher's guide is designed to provide science teachers with the necessary guidance and suggestions for teaching nuclear chemistry. In this book, the fundamental concepts of nuclear science and the applications of nuclear energy are discussed. The material in this book can be integrated with the other modules in a sequence that helps students…

  15. Communicating about Matter with Symbols: Evolving from Alchemy to Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabbrizzi, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Modern chemists know that alchemists were their historical predecessors, yet they are not proud of this relationship, which chemists today tend to hide or forget. However, no discontinuity exists between alchemy and chemistry and we still use laboratory techniques that were invented by alchemists hundreds or thousands of years ago. Alchemists used…

  16. Communicating about Matter with Symbols: Evolving from Alchemy to Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabbrizzi, Luigi

    2008-01-01

    Modern chemists know that alchemists were their historical predecessors, yet they are not proud of this relationship, which chemists today tend to hide or forget. However, no discontinuity exists between alchemy and chemistry and we still use laboratory techniques that were invented by alchemists hundreds or thousands of years ago. Alchemists used…

  17. Supramolecular soft and hard materials based on self-assembly algorithms of alkyl-conjugated fullerenes.

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, Takashi

    2010-05-28

    Dimensionally controlled and hierarchically assembled supramolecular architectures in nano/micro/bulk length scales are formed by self-organization of alkyl-conjugated fullerenes. The simple molecular design of covalently attaching hydrophobic long alkyl chains to fullerene (C(60)) is different from the conventional (hydrophobic-hydrophilic) amphiphilic molecular designs. The two different units of the alkyl-conjugated C(60) are incompatible but both are soluble in organic solvents. The van der Waals intermolecular forces among long hydrocarbon chains and the pi-pi interaction between C(60) moieties govern the self-organization of the alkyl-conjugated C(60) derivatives. A delicate balance between the pi-pi and van der Waals forces in the assemblies leads to a wide variety of supramolecular architectures and paves the way for developing supramolecular soft materials possessing various morphologies and functions. For instance, superhydrophobic films, electron-transporting thermotropic liquid crystals and room-temperature liquids have been demonstrated. Furthermore, the unique morphologies of the assemblies can be utilised as a template for the fabrication of nanostructured metallic surfaces in a highly reproducible and sustainable way. The resulting metallic surfaces can serve as excellent active substrates for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) owing to their plasmon enhancing characteristics. The use of self-assembling supramolecular objects as a structural template to fabricate innovative well-defined metal nanomaterials links soft matter chemistry to hard matter sciences.

  18. Supramolecularly self-organized nanomaterials: A voyage from inorganic particles to organic light-harvesting materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varotto, Alessandro

    In 2009 the U.S. National Science Foundation announced the realignment of the Chemistry Divisions introducing the new interdisciplinary program of "Macromolecular, Supramolecular and Nanochemistry." This statement officially recognizes a field of studies that has already seen the publication of many thousands of works in the past 20 years. Nanotechnology and supramolecular chemistry can be found in the most diverse disciplines, from biology to engineering, to physics. Furthermore, many technologies rely on nanoscale dimensions for more than one component. Nanomaterials and technologies are on the market with a range of applications from composite materials, to electronics, to medicine, to sensing and more. This thesis will introduce a variety of studies and applications of supramolecular chemistry to form nanoscale photonic materials from soft matter. We will first illustrate a method to synthesize metallic nanoparticles using plasmids DNA as a mold. The circular DNA functions as a sacrificial template to shape the particles into narrowly monodispersed nanodiscs. Secondly, we will describe the synthesis of a highly fluorinated porphyrin derivative and how the fluorines improve the formation of ultra thin films when the porphyrin is blended with fullerene C60. Finally, we will show how to increase the short-circuit current in a solar cell built with an internal parallel tandem light harvesting design. A blend of phthalocyanines, each with a decreasing optical band gap, is supramolecularly self-organized with pyridyl-C60 within thin films. The different band gaps of the single phthalocyanines capture a wider segment of the solar spectrum increasing the overall efficiency of the device. In conclusion, we have presented a number of studies for the preparation of inorganic and organic nanomaterials and their application in supramolecularly organized photonic devices.

  19. Vegetation effects on soil organic matter chemistry of aggregate fractions in a Hawaiian forest

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We examined chemical changes from live plant tissue to soil organic matter (SOM) to determine the persistence of individual plant compounds into soil aggregate fractions. We characterized the tissue chemistry of a slow- (Dicranopteris linearis) and fast-decomposing species (Cheirodendron trigynum) a...

  20. Effects of subject-area degree and classroom experience on new chemistry teachers' subject matter knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Campbell, Benjamin K.; Luft, Julie A.

    2016-07-01

    Science teachers need to understand the subject matter they teach. While subject matter knowledge (SMK) can improve with classroom teaching experience, it is problematic that many secondary science teachers leave the profession before garnering extensive classroom experience. Furthermore, many new science teachers are assigned to teach science subjects for which they do not hold a degree. This study investigates the SMK of new secondary science teachers assigned to teach chemistry in their first three years of teaching. These new teachers do not have the advantage of years of experience to develop their SMK and half hold a degree in biology rather than chemistry. This qualitative study explores the effects of holding a degree in the subject area one teaches as well as classroom teaching experience on teachers' SMK for two chemistry topics, conservation of mass and chemical equilibrium. Qualitative analysis of semi-structured interviews indicated that the SMK of teachers who had a chemistry degree and more extensive classroom experience was more coherent, chemistry-focused, and sophisticated than that of teachers who lacked this preparation and experience. This study provides evidence that new science teachers' SMK is influenced by both holding a degree in the subject area and having classroom experience.

  1. Supramolecular Organometallic Polymer Chemistry: Self-Assembly of a Novel Poly(ferrocene)-b-polysiloxane-b-poly(ferrocene) Triblock Copolymer in Solution.

    PubMed

    Resendes; Massey; Dorn; Power; Winnik; Manners

    1999-09-01

    Micelles with unprecedented flowerlike arrangements of the poly(ferrocene) cores (shown in the TEM image) are among the supramolecular architectures generated in the self-assembly of a novel organometallic triblock copolymer from silicon-bridged [1]ferrocenophane monomers and [Me(2)SiO](3) in hexane, a solvent selective for the central polysiloxane block.

  2. Supramolecular dendritic polymers: from synthesis to applications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruijiao; Zhou, Yongfeng; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2014-07-15

    applications in a wide range of fields. A variety of synthetic methods using non-covalent interactions have been established to prepare different types of SDPs based on varied mono- or multifunctionalized building blocks (e.g., monomer, dendron, dendrimer, and hyperbranched polymer) with homo- or heterocomplementary units. In addition, SDPs can be further endowed with excellent functionalities by employing different modification approaches involving terminal, focal-point, and backbone modification. Similar to conventional dendritic polymers, SDPs can self-assemble into diverse supramolecular structures such as micelles, vesicles, fibers, nanorings, tubes, and many hierarchical structures. Finally, we highlight some typical examples of recent applications of SDP-based systems in biomedical fields (e.g., controlled drug/gene/protein delivery, bioimaging, and biomimetic chemistry), nanotechnology (e.g., nanoreactors, catalysis, and molecular imprinting), and functional materials. The current research on SDPs is still at the very early stage, and much more work needs to be done. We anticipate that future studies of SDPs will focus on developing multifunctional, hierarchical supramolecular materials toward their practical applications by utilization of cooperative non-covalent interactions.

  3. On the Applicability of the Green Chemistry Principles to Sustainability of Organic Matter on Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolb, Vera M.

    2010-06-01

    The connection between astrobiology and green chemistry represents a new approach to sustainability of organic matter on asteroids or similar bodies. Green chemistry is chemistry which is environmentally friendly. One obvious way for chemistry to be green is to use water as a solvent, instead of more toxic organic solvents. Many astrobiological reactions occur in the aqueous medium, for example in the prebiotic soup or during the aqueous alteration period on asteroids. Thus any advances in the green organic reactions in water are directly applicable to astrobiology. Another green chemistry approach is to abolish use of toxic solvents. This can be accomplished by carrying out the reactions without a solvent in the solventless or solid-state reactions. The advances in these green reactions are directly applicable to the chemistry on asteroids during the periods when water was not available. Many reactions on asteroids may have been done in the solid mixtures. These reactions may be responsible for a myriad of organic compounds that have been isolated from the meteorites.

  4. Effects of dissolved Ca2+, Mg2+, and Na+ ions on the supramolecular aggregation of natural organic matter in aqueous solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, W.; Kalinichev, A. G.; Clark, M. M.

    2008-12-01

    The complexation of natural organic matter (NOM) with metal ions, minerals and organic species in soil and water allows NOM to form water-soluble and water-insoluble aggregates of widely differing chemical and biological stabilities. Metal-NOM interaction induces strong correlations between the concentration of natural organic matter and the speciation, solubility and toxicity of many metals in the environment. In water purification and desalination, NOM is also implicated in fouling of nanofiltration and reverse osmosis membranes, either as the primary foulant or as a conditioning layer for microbial attachment ("biofouling"). In this work we investigated the effects of various metal ions on NOM aggregation in aqueous solutions, by a combination of dynamic light scattering (DLS), small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and large-scale molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations. This allows a detailed molecular-scale statistical analysis of the size and the structural topology of metal-NOM aggregates. The DLS measurements show that Ca2+ ions present in a Suwannee River NOM (SRNOM) solution lead to the formation of a wide range of supramolecular structures with sizes between 100 and 1,000 nm. In contrast, Mg2+ and Na+ do not affect the aggregation of SRNOM as strongly. SANS data are inconclusive but indicate the presence of quite large (>50 nm) fractal particles formed presumably through a cluster-cluster aggregation. MD simulations confirm these observations and show that NOM can aggregate in aqueous solutions by two different mechanisms. On the one hand, NOM molecules can spontaneously aggregate by hydrogen bonding between their functional groups when only Na+ and Mg2+ are present as background cations. This promotes the formation of uniformly shaped NOM clusters. On the other hand, if Ca2+ ions are present in solution, they can more strongly bind two different NOM molecules by co-complexing the carboxylate groups, thus promoting the formation of longer linear and

  5. Modification of chemical and conformational properties of natural organic matter by click chemistry as revealed by ESI-Orbitrap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Nebbioso, Antonio; Piccolo, Alessandro

    2015-11-01

    A click reaction is reported here for the first time as a useful technique to control the conformational stability of natural organic matter (NOM) suprastructures. Click conjugates were successfully formed between a previously butynylated NOM hydrophobic fraction and a hydrophilic polyethylene glycol (PEG)-amino chain. The click products were shown by size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC) hyphenated with Orbitrap mass spectrometry (MS) in electrospray ionization (ESI) (+), while precursors were visible in ESI (-). Despite their increase in molecular weight, HPSEC elution of click conjugates occurred after that of precursors, thus showing their departure from the NOM supramolecular association. This indicates that the click-conjugated NOM molecules were varied in their hydrophilic and cationic character and lost the capacity to accommodate in the original hydrophobic suprastructures. The most abundant product had the C16H30O5N4 formula, a click conjugate of butanoic acid, while other products were short-chained (C4-C8) linear unsaturated and hydroxylated carboxylic acids. Tandem MS revealed formation of triazole rings in clicked conjugates and their two fragmentations at the ester and the C-N alkyl-aryl bonds. The behavior of NOM molecules modified by click chemistry confirms that hydrophobicity and ionic charge of humic molecules play a pivotal role in stabilizing intermolecular forces in NOM. Moreover, the versatility of the click reaction may become useful to decorate NOM molecules with a variety of substrates, in order to alter NOM conformational and chemical properties and diversify its applications in the environment.

  6. Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of the Nature of Science in the Particle Nature of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bektas, Oktay; Ekiz, Betul; Tuysuz, Mustafa; Kutucu, Elif Selcan; Tarkin, Aysegul; Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci, Esen

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated pre-service chemistry teachers' pedagogical content knowledge of the nature of science (NOS) in the content of the particle nature of matter. Qualitative research design was utilized. Data were collected from seven pre-service chemistry teachers (PCTs) by using open-ended questions, interviews, observations, lesson plans,…

  7. Pre-Service Chemistry Teachers' Pedagogical Content Knowledge of the Nature of Science in the Particle Nature of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bektas, Oktay; Ekiz, Betul; Tuysuz, Mustafa; Kutucu, Elif Selcan; Tarkin, Aysegul; Uzuntiryaki-Kondakci, Esen

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated pre-service chemistry teachers' pedagogical content knowledge of the nature of science (NOS) in the content of the particle nature of matter. Qualitative research design was utilized. Data were collected from seven pre-service chemistry teachers (PCTs) by using open-ended questions, interviews, observations, lesson plans,…

  8. Functional supramolecular polymers for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruijiao; Zhou, Yongfeng; Huang, Xiaohua; Zhu, Xinyuan; Lu, Yunfeng; Shen, Jian

    2015-01-21

    As a novel class of dynamic and non-covalent polymers, supramolecular polymers not only display specific structural and physicochemical properties, but also have the ability to undergo reversible changes of structure, shape, and function in response to diverse external stimuli, making them promising candidates for widespread applications ranging from academic research to industrial fields. By an elegant combination of dynamic/reversible structures with exceptional functions, functional supramolecular polymers are attracting increasing attention in various fields. In particular, functional supramolecular polymers offer several unique advantages, including inherent degradable polymer backbones, smart responsiveness to various biological stimuli, and the ease for the incorporation of multiple biofunctionalities (e.g., targeting and bioactivity), thereby showing great potential for a wide range of applications in the biomedical field. In this Review, the trends and representative achievements in the design and synthesis of supramolecular polymers with specific functions are summarized, as well as their wide-ranging biomedical applications such as drug delivery, gene transfection, protein delivery, bio-imaging and diagnosis, tissue engineering, and biomimetic chemistry. These achievements further inspire persistent efforts in an emerging interdisciplin-ary research area of supramolecular chemistry, polymer science, material science, biomedical engineering, and nanotechnology. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Coordination-Driven Syntheses of Compact Supramolecular Metallacycles toward Extended Metallo-organic Stacked Supramolecular Assemblies.

    PubMed

    Lescop, Christophe

    2017-04-18

    One important concept associated with supramolecular chemistry is supramolecular self-assembly, which deals with the way discrete individual components interact via intermolecular interactions in order to build, upon their spontaneous association, high order functional assemblies. The accumulation of these very simple and localized noncovalent interactions (such as H-bonding, dipole-dipole, hydrophobic/hydrophilic, van der Waals, π-π, π-CH, etc.) is ubiquitous in the complexity of natural systems (such as DNA, proteins, membranes, micelles, etc.). It can also be transposed to the directed synthesis of intricate artificial scaffolds, which have anticipated geometries and properties. Among the synthetic strategies based on this concept, coordination-driven supramolecular chemistry uses the robust, reversible, and directional metal-to-ligand coordinative bond to build discrete metallo-supramolecular architectures. Within the last two decades, coordination-driven supramolecular chemistry has proved to be one of the most powerful contemporary synthetic approaches and has provided a significant number of increasingly complex supramolecular assemblies, which have predetermined sizes and geometries. While much focus has been devoted to architectures bearing internal cavities for host-guest chemistry or to generate specific reactivity, particular attention can also be paid to compact supramolecular assemblies given that their specific structures are characterized by peculiar synthetic guiding rules as well as by alternative long-range self-assembling properties. This Account describes how a preassembled Cu(I) bimetallic clip bearing short intermetallic distances can be used as a U-shaped molecular clip to give general and versatile access to a large variety of original compact supramolecular metallacycles. When this Cu(I) precursor is reacted with various cyano-capped ditopic linkers that have increasing lengths and complexities, specific effects guiding the selective

  10. Redox chemistry and natural organic matter (NOM): Geochemists' dream, analytical chemists' nightmare

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Macalady, Donald L.; Walton-Day, Katherine

    2011-01-01

    Natural organic matter (NOM) is an inherently complex mixture of polyfunctional organic molecules. Because of their universality and chemical reversibility, oxidation/reductions (redox) reactions of NOM have an especially interesting and important role in geochemistry. Variabilities in NOM composition and chemistry make studies of its redox chemistry particularly challenging, and details of NOM-mediated redox reactions are only partially understood. This is in large part due to the analytical difficulties associated with NOM characterization and the wide range of reagents and experimental systems used to study NOM redox reactions. This chapter provides a summary of the ongoing efforts to provide a coherent comprehension of aqueous redox chemistry involving NOM and of techniques for chemical characterization of NOM. It also describes some attempts to confirm the roles of different structural moieties in redox reactions. In addition, we discuss some of the operational parameters used to describe NOM redox capacities and redox states, and describe nomenclature of NOM redox chemistry. Several relatively facile experimental methods applicable to predictions of the NOM redox activity and redox states of NOM samples are discussed, with special attention to the proposed use of fluorescence spectroscopy to predict relevant redox characteristics of NOM samples.

  11. Do Long-Term Changes in Organic Matter Inputs to Forest Soils Affect Dissolved Organic Matter Chemistry and Export?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lajtha, K.; Strid, A.; Lee, B. S.

    2014-12-01

    Dissolved organic matter (DOM) production and transport play an important role in regulating organic matter (OM) distribution through a soil profile and ultimately, OM stabilization or export to aquatic systems. The contributions of varying OM inputs to the quality and amount of DOM as it passes through a soil profile remain relatively unknown. The Detrital Input and Removal Treatment (DIRT) site at the H. J. Andrews Experimental Forest in Oregon has undergone 17 years of litter, wood and root input manipulations and allows us to guage shifts in DOM chemistry induced by long-term changes to aboveground and belowground OM additions and exclusions. Using fluorescence and UV spectroscopy to characterize fluorescent properties, extent of decomposition, and sources of DOM in streams and soil solutions collected with lysimeters and soil extractions, we have assessed the importance of fresh OM inputs to DOM chemistry. Soil extracts from DIRT plots had a higher fluorescence index (FI) than lysimeter solutions or stream water. A high FI in surface water is generally interpreted as indicative of a high proportion of microbially-derived DOM. However, we suspect that the high FI in soil extracts is due to a higher proportion of non-aromatic DOM from fresh soil that microorganisms consume in transit through the soil profile to lysimeters or to streams. High redox index (RI) values were observed in lysimeters from the April 2014 sampling compared with the November 2013 sampling. These RI values show evidence of more reducing conditions at the end of the rainy season in the spring compared to the onset of the rainy season in the fall. Lysimeter water collected in No Input, No Litter, and No Root treatments contained high proportions of protein, suggesting the absence of carbon inputs changes activities of the microbial community. Observed variations reflect the viability of using fluorescent properties to explore the terrestrial-aquatic interface.

  12. Tetrahedral Arrangements of Perylene Bisimide Columns via Supramolecular Orientational Memory.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Dipankar; Peterca, Mihai; Aqad, Emad; Partridge, Benjamin E; Heiney, Paul A; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans W; Zeng, Xiangbing; Percec, Virgil

    2017-01-24

    Chiral, shape, and liquid crystalline memory effects are well-known to produce commercial macroscopic materials with important applications as springs, sensors, displays, and memory devices. A supramolecular orientational memory effect that provides complex nanoscale arrangements was only recently reported. This supramolecular orientational memory was demonstrated to preserve the molecular orientation and packing within supramolecular units of a self-assembling cyclotriveratrylene crown at the nanoscale upon transition between its columnar hexagonal and Pm3̅n cubic periodic arrays. Here we report the discovery of supramolecular orientational memory in a dendronized perylene bisimide (G2-PBI) that self-assembles into tetrameric crowns and subsequently self-organizes into supramolecular columns and spheres. This supramolecular orientation memory upon transition between columnar hexagonal and body-centered cubic (BCC) mesophases preserves the 3-fold cubic [111] orientations rather than the 4-fold [100] axes, generating an unusual tetrahedral arrangement of supramolecular columns. These results indicate that the supramolecular orientational memory concept may be general for periodic arrays of self-assembling dendrons and dendrimers as well as for other periodic and quasiperiodic nanoscale organizations comprising supramolecular spheres, generated from other organized complex soft matter including block copolymers and surfactants.

  13. Supramolecular Nanofibers of Peptide Amphiphiles for Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Webber, Matthew J.; Berns, Eric J.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2014-01-01

    Peptide nanostructures are an exciting class of supramolecular systems that can be designed for novel therapies with great potential in advanced medicine. This paper reviews progress on nanostructures based on peptide amphiphiles capable of forming one-dimensional assemblies that emulate in structure the nanofibers present in extracellular matrices. These systems are highly tunable using supramolecular chemistry, and can be designed to signal cells directly with bioactive peptides. Peptide amphiphile nanofibers can also be used to multiplex functions through co-assembly and designed to deliver proteins, nucleic acids, drugs, or cells. We illustrate here the functionality of these systems describing their use in regenerative medicine of bone, cartilage, the nervous system, the cardiovascular system, and other tissues. In addition, we highlight recent work on the use of peptide amphiphile assemblies to create hierarchical biomimetic structures with order beyond the nanoscale, and also discuss the future prospects of these supramolecular systems. PMID:24532851

  14. Combination of spectroscopic and computational methods to get an understanding of supramolecular chemistry of drugs: from simple host systems to biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Monti, Sandra; Manet, Ilse; Marconi, Giancarlo

    2011-12-21

    Circular dichroism (CD) spectra of non-covalent ligand : biomolecule couples contain information on the equilibrium geometries of the associated structures that can be retrieved upon comparison of the sign and intensity of the experimental CD bands with the quantum mechanically calculated rotational strengths of low energy supramolecular complexes, obtained from molecular modelling methods. For both chiral and achiral ligands this approach proved useful to reach a structure based rationale of ground and excited state properties of the non-covalent ligand : protein associates. In this Perspective we illustrate the potential of this method focusing on the main achievements of our recent spectroscopic, conformational and photochemical studies on drug-albumin complexes and collocate it in the frame of current methodologies of molecular modelling and spectroscopic investigation of ligand : biomolecule binding.

  15. Supramolecular chemistry of halogens: complementary features of inorganic (M-X) and organic (C-X') halogens applied to M-X...X'-C halogen bond formation.

    PubMed

    Zordan, Fiorenzo; Brammer, Lee; Sherwood, Paul

    2005-04-27

    Electronic differences between inorganic (M-X) and organic (C-X) halogens in conjunction with the anisotropic charge distribution associated with terminal halogens have been exploited in supramolecular synthesis based upon intermolecular M-X...X'-C halogen bonds. The synthesis and crystal structures of a family of compounds trans-[MCl(2)(NC(5)H(4)X-3)(2)] (M = Pd(II), Pt(II); X = F, Cl, Br, I; NC(5)H(4)X-3 = 3-halopyridine) are reported. With the exception of the fluoropyridine compounds, network structures propagated by M-Cl...X-C halogen bonds are adopted and involve all M-Cl and all C-X groups. M-Cl...X-C interactions show Cl...X separations shorter than van der Waals values, shorter distances being observed for heavier halogens (X). Geometries with near linear Cl...X-C angles (155-172 degrees ) and markedly bent M-Cl...X angles (92-137 degrees ) are consistently observed. DFT calculations on the model dimers {trans-[MCl(2)(NH(3))(NC(5)H(4)X-3)]}(2) show association through M-Cl...X-C (X not equal F) interactions with geometries similar to experimental values. DFT calculations of the electrostatic potential distributions for the compounds trans-[PdCl(2)(NC(5)H(4)X-3)(2)] (X = F, Cl, Br, I) demonstrate the effectiveness of the strategy to activate C-X groups toward halogen bond formation by enhancing their electrophilicity, and explain the absence of M-Cl...F-C interactions. The M-Cl...X-C halogen bonds described here can be viewed unambiguously as nucleophile-electrophile interactions that involve an attractive electrostatic contribution. This contrasts with some types of halogen-halogen interactions previously described and suggests that M-Cl...X-C halogen bonds could provide a valuable new synthon for supramolecular chemists.

  16. Perceptions of student-teacher relationships, self-efficacy, and subject matter retention in a secondary chemistry course

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bechtel, Michael Dean

    This was a study of students who had completed a chemistry course taught by one instructor in a large urban high school during 2009-2010. It was conducted in two phases: Phase One assessed self-efficacy, teaching practices, and subject matter retention taken 16 months after course completion. Phase Two consisted of a multiple-choice final exam retaken 17 months after course completion. Phase One results showed positive relations between teaching practices and retention of chemistry subject matter. Phase Two results showed positive relations between teaching practices, student-teacher relationships, and perceived self-efficacy. Implications for future research were offered.

  17. Catalytic control over supramolecular gel formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boekhoven, Job; Poolman, Jos M.; Maity, Chandan; Li, Feng; van der Mee, Lars; Minkenberg, Christophe B.; Mendes, Eduardo; van Esch, Jan H.; Eelkema, Rienk

    2013-05-01

    Low-molecular-weight gels show great potential for application in fields ranging from the petrochemical industry to healthcare and tissue engineering. These supramolecular gels are often metastable materials, which implies that their properties are, at least partially, kinetically controlled. Here we show how the mechanical properties and structure of these materials can be controlled directly by catalytic action. We show how in situ catalysis of the formation of gelator molecules can be used to accelerate the formation of supramolecular hydrogels, which drastically enhances their resulting mechanical properties. Using acid or nucleophilic aniline catalysis, it is possible to make supramolecular hydrogels with tunable gel-strength in a matter of minutes, under ambient conditions, starting from simple soluble building blocks. By changing the rate of formation of the gelator molecules using a catalyst, the overall rate of gelation and the resulting gel morphology are affected, which provides access to metastable gel states with improved mechanical strength and appearance despite an identical gelator composition.

  18. Catalytic control over supramolecular gel formation.

    PubMed

    Boekhoven, Job; Poolman, Jos M; Maity, Chandan; Li, Feng; van der Mee, Lars; Minkenberg, Christophe B; Mendes, Eduardo; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2013-05-01

    Low-molecular-weight gels show great potential for application in fields ranging from the petrochemical industry to healthcare and tissue engineering. These supramolecular gels are often metastable materials, which implies that their properties are, at least partially, kinetically controlled. Here we show how the mechanical properties and structure of these materials can be controlled directly by catalytic action. We show how in situ catalysis of the formation of gelator molecules can be used to accelerate the formation of supramolecular hydrogels, which drastically enhances their resulting mechanical properties. Using acid or nucleophilic aniline catalysis, it is possible to make supramolecular hydrogels with tunable gel-strength in a matter of minutes, under ambient conditions, starting from simple soluble building blocks. By changing the rate of formation of the gelator molecules using a catalyst, the overall rate of gelation and the resulting gel morphology are affected, which provides access to metastable gel states with improved mechanical strength and appearance despite an identical gelator composition.

  19. Supramolecular methods for controlling intermolecular [2+2] photocycloaddition reactions of unsaturated compounds in solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ushakov, E. N.; Gromov, S. P.

    2015-08-01

    This review deals with the methods of supramolecular chemistry used for controlling the efficiency and stereoselectivity of intermolecular [2+2] photocycloaddition of olefins and other unsaturated compounds in homogeneous solutions. The best-studied methods are self-assembly through cation-macrocycle interactions, complexation with molecular templates through hydrogen bonding, and confinement of the reactants in supramolecular containers. The possibilities of using anionic templates and combined supramolecular approaches are discussed. The bibliography includes 107 references.

  20. Climate, Litter Chemistry, and Nitrogen Controls on Litter Decomposition and Organic Matter Stabilization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DelGrosso, S.; Parton, W. J.; Adair, C.

    2012-12-01

    Climate interacts with N availability and other factors to control organic matter decomposition rates and carbon cycling. We analyzed data from the LIDET (Long-Term Inter-site Decomposition Experiment Team) experiment to investigate the controls on litter decomposition rates and organic matter stabilization. Bags containing vegetative litter from different woody and herbaceous species were placed in 28 sites representing a wide array of biomes. Samples were collected approximately ten times, once per year for all sites except tropical sites, which were sampled every 3-6 months. Each sample was analyzed for total N, ash, lignin, and cellulose using near infrared reflectance spectroscopy. To account for water and temperature impacts on decomposition, we calculated a Climate Decomposition Index (CDI) for each site based on long term weather data. We then performed step-wise regression analyses to test how well CDI and litter chemistry were correlated with the amount of biomass remaining in litter bags after 1, 5, and 10 years. CDI was the primary control, accounting for 74, 48, and 58% of variability in biomass remaining at 1, 5, and 10 years, respectively. In addition to CDI, The C/N ratio of labile organic matter and lignin content significantly impacted biomass remaining at 1 and 5 years, while lignin and cellulose content were significant for biomass remaining at 10 years. Increased C/N ratio was associated with slower initial decomposition rate. Lignin content was positively, and cellulose negatively, correlated with long term organic matter stabilization. If CDI and lignin content were similar, then C/N did not influence long term stabilization. If N was not limiting, cellulose decomposed quickly.

  1. Supramolecular interactions in the solid state

    PubMed Central

    Resnati, Giuseppe; Boldyreva, Elena; Bombicz, Petra; Kawano, Masaki

    2015-01-01

    In the last few decades, supramolecular chemistry has been at the forefront of chemical research, with the aim of understanding chemistry beyond the covalent bond. Since the long-range periodicity in crystals is a product of the directionally specific short-range intermolecular interactions that are responsible for molecular assembly, analysis of crystalline solids provides a primary means to investigate intermolecular interactions and recognition phenomena. This article discusses some areas of contemporary research involving supramolecular interactions in the solid state. The topics covered are: (1) an overview and historical review of halogen bonding; (2) exploring non-ambient conditions to investigate intermolecular interactions in crystals; (3) the role of intermolecular interactions in morphotropy, being the link between isostructurality and polymorphism; (4) strategic realisation of kinetic coordination polymers by exploiting multi-interactive linker molecules. The discussion touches upon many of the prerequisites for controlled preparation and characterization of crystalline materials. PMID:26594375

  2. Distinct Optical Chemistry of Dissolved Organic Matter in Urban Pond Ecosystems

    PubMed Central

    McEnroe, Nicola A.; Williams, Clayton J.; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A.; Porcal, Petr; Frost, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Urbanization has the potential to dramatically alter the biogeochemistry of receiving freshwater ecosystems. We examined the optical chemistry of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in forty-five urban ponds across southern Ontario, Canada to examine whether optical characteristics in these relatively new ecosystems are distinct from other freshwater systems. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations ranged from 2 to 16 mg C L-1 across the ponds with an average value of 5.3 mg C L-1. Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modelling showed urban pond DOM to be characterized by microbial-like and, less importantly, by terrestrial derived humic-like components. The relatively transparent, non-humic DOM in urban ponds was more similar to that found in open water, lake ecosystems than to rivers or wetlands. After irradiation equivalent to 1.7 days of natural solar radiation, DOC concentrations, on average, decreased by 38% and UV absorbance decreased by 25%. Irradiation decreased the relative abundances of terrestrial humic-like components and increased protein-like aspects of the DOM pool. These findings suggest that high internal production and/or prolonged exposure to sunlight exerts a distinct and significant influence on the chemistry of urban pond DOM, which likely reduces its chemical similarity with upstream sources. These properties of urban pond DOM may alter its biogeochemical role in these relatively novel aquatic ecosystems. PMID:24348908

  3. Distinct optical chemistry of dissolved organic matter in urban pond ecosystems.

    PubMed

    McEnroe, Nicola A; Williams, Clayton J; Xenopoulos, Marguerite A; Porcal, Petr; Frost, Paul C

    2013-01-01

    Urbanization has the potential to dramatically alter the biogeochemistry of receiving freshwater ecosystems. We examined the optical chemistry of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in forty-five urban ponds across southern Ontario, Canada to examine whether optical characteristics in these relatively new ecosystems are distinct from other freshwater systems. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations ranged from 2 to 16 mg C L(-1) across the ponds with an average value of 5.3 mg C L(-1). Excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy and parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) modelling showed urban pond DOM to be characterized by microbial-like and, less importantly, by terrestrial derived humic-like components. The relatively transparent, non-humic DOM in urban ponds was more similar to that found in open water, lake ecosystems than to rivers or wetlands. After irradiation equivalent to 1.7 days of natural solar radiation, DOC concentrations, on average, decreased by 38% and UV absorbance decreased by 25%. Irradiation decreased the relative abundances of terrestrial humic-like components and increased protein-like aspects of the DOM pool. These findings suggest that high internal production and/or prolonged exposure to sunlight exerts a distinct and significant influence on the chemistry of urban pond DOM, which likely reduces its chemical similarity with upstream sources. These properties of urban pond DOM may alter its biogeochemical role in these relatively novel aquatic ecosystems.

  4. Recent advances in structure and reactivity of dissolved organic matter: radiation chemistry of non-isolated natural organic matter and selected model compounds.

    PubMed

    Ayatollahi, Shakiba; Kalnina, Daina; Song, Weihua; Cottrell, Barbara A; Gonsior, Michael; Cooper, William J

    2012-01-01

    The importance of natural organic matter (NOM) as a source of carbon in natural waters, as the source of reactive oxygen species, or for the complications its presence causes in treatment of natural waters, is undeniable. Recent studies have also pointed to the major photochemical role of triplet excited state of natural organic matter in the environmental fate of pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) in waters. However, the characterization of NOM is problematic due to its complex molecular structure. One approach to better understand NOM chemistry is the use of model compounds. As the condensation of a plant's phenolic compounds leads to humification and the formation of NOM, a structurally broad group of nine phenolic compounds were selected as model compounds for this study. With methods used in the discipline of radiation chemistry, the oxidative chemistry and transient spectra of these phenols were studied. In addition, the oxidative chemistry and transient spectra of a sample of NOM from the Black River, North Carolina, USA, was characterized. This natural water sample was used as received and represents the first studies of non-isolated NOM by pulsed radiolysis. The results of the transient spectra of the NOM revealed that the radical intermediates were very long lived. This phenomenon was not captured using the nine model compounds suggesting that more complex compounds are needed to further our understanding of the oxidation chemistry of NOM.

  5. Chemistry of Living Matter, Energy Capture & Growth, Parts Three & Four of an Integrated Science Sequence, Student Guide, 1971 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Portland Project Committee, OR.

    This student guide is divided into two sections, "Chemistry of Living Matter" and "Energy Capture and Growth," constituting parts three and four of the third year of the Portland Project, a three-year high school integrated science curriculum. The underlying intention of the third year is to study energy and its importance to…

  6. Reasoning Using Particulate Nature of Matter: An Example of a Sociochemical Norm in a University-Level Physical Chemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Nicole; Rasmussen, Chris; Sweeney, George; Wawro, Megan; Towns, Marcy; Cole, Renee

    2013-01-01

    In college level chemistry courses, reasoning using molecular and particulate descriptions of matter becomes central to understanding physical and chemical properties. In this study, we used a qualitative approach to analyzing classroom discourse derived from Toulmin's model of argumentation in order to describe the ways in which students develop…

  7. Reasoning Using Particulate Nature of Matter: An Example of a Sociochemical Norm in a University-Level Physical Chemistry Class

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Becker, Nicole; Rasmussen, Chris; Sweeney, George; Wawro, Megan; Towns, Marcy; Cole, Renee

    2013-01-01

    In college level chemistry courses, reasoning using molecular and particulate descriptions of matter becomes central to understanding physical and chemical properties. In this study, we used a qualitative approach to analyzing classroom discourse derived from Toulmin's model of argumentation in order to describe the ways in which students develop…

  8. Kant and the nature of matter: Mechanics, chemistry, and the life sciences.

    PubMed

    Gaukroger, Stephen

    2016-08-01

    Kant believed that the ultimate processes that regulate the behavior of material bodies can be characterized exclusively in terms of mechanics. In 1790, turning his attention to the life sciences, he raised a potential problem for his mechanically-based account, namely that many of the operations described in the life sciences seemed to operate teleologically. He argued that the life sciences do indeed require us to think in teleological terms, but that this is a fact about us, not about the processes themselves. Nevertheless, even were we to concede his account of the life sciences, this would not secure the credentials of mechanics as a general theory of matter. Hardly any material properties studied in the second half of the eighteenth century were, or could have been, conceived in mechanical terms. Kant's concern with teleology is tangential to the problems facing a general matter theory grounded in mechanics, for the most pressing issues have nothing to do with teleology. They derive rather from a lack of any connection between mechanical forces and material properties. This is evident in chemistry, which Kant dismisses as being unscientific on the grounds that it cannot be formulated in mechanical terms.

  9. 3D Printing Polymers with Supramolecular Functionality for Biological Applications.

    PubMed

    Pekkanen, Allison M; Mondschein, Ryan J; Williams, Christopher B; Long, Timothy E

    2017-09-11

    Supramolecular chemistry continues to experience widespread growth, as fine-tuned chemical structures lead to well-defined bulk materials. Previous literature described the roles of hydrogen bonding, ionic aggregation, guest/host interactions, and π-π stacking to tune mechanical, viscoelastic, and processing performance. The versatility of reversible interactions enables the more facile manufacturing of molded parts with tailored hierarchical structures such as tissue engineered scaffolds for biological applications. Recently, supramolecular polymers and additive manufacturing processes merged to provide parts with control of the molecular, macromolecular, and feature length scales. Additive manufacturing, or 3D printing, generates customizable constructs desirable for many applications, and the introduction of supramolecular interactions will potentially increase production speed, offer a tunable surface structure for controlling cell/scaffold interactions, and impart desired mechanical properties through reinforcing interlayer adhesion and introducing gradients or self-assembled structures. This review details the synthesis and characterization of supramolecular polymers suitable for additive manufacture and biomedical applications as well as the use of supramolecular polymers in additive manufacturing for drug delivery and complex tissue scaffold formation. The effect of supramolecular assembly and its dynamic behavior offers potential for controlling the anisotropy of the printed objects with exquisite geometrical control. The potential for supramolecular polymers to generate well-defined parts, hierarchical structures, and scaffolds with gradient properties/tuned surfaces provides an avenue for developing next-generation biomedical devices and tissue scaffolds.

  10. Clear effects of soil organic matter chemistry, as determined by NMR spectroscopy, on the sorption of diuron.

    PubMed

    Ahangar, Ahmad Gholamalizadeh; Smernik, Ronald J; Kookana, Rai S; Chittleborough, David J

    2008-01-01

    Organic matter has long been recognized as the main sorbent phase in soils for hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs). In recent times, there has been an increasing realization that not only the amount, but also the chemical composition, of organic matter can influence the sorption properties of a soil. Here, we show that the organic carbon-normalized sorption coefficient (K(OC)) for diuron is 27-81% higher in 10 A11 horizons than in 10 matching A12 horizons for soils collected from a small (2ha) field. K(OC) was generally greater for the deeper (B) horizons, although these values may be inflated by sorption of diuron to clays. Organic matter chemistry of the A11 and A12 horizons was determined using solid-state 13C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. K(OC) was positively correlated with aryl C (r2=0.59, significance level 0.001) and negatively correlated with O-alkyl C (r2=0.84, significance level <0.001). This is only the second report of correlations between whole soil K(OC) and NMR-derived measures of organic matter chemistry. We suggest that this success may be a consequence of limiting this study to a very small area (a single field). There is growing evidence that interactions between organic matter and clay minerals strongly affect K(OC). However, because the soil mineralogy varies little across the field, the influence of these interactions is greatly diminished, allowing the effect of organic matter chemistry on K(OC) to be seen clearly. This study in some way reconciles studies that show strong correlations between K(OC) and the chemistry of purified organic materials and the general lack of such correlations for whole soils.

  11. Synthesis and Characterization of Supramolecular Colloids.

    PubMed

    Vilanova, Neus; De Feijter, Isja; Voets, Ilja K

    2016-04-22

    Control over colloidal assembly is of utmost importance for the development of functional colloidal materials with tailored structural and mechanical properties for applications in photonics, drug delivery and coating technology. Here we present a new family of colloidal building blocks, coined supramolecular colloids, whose self-assembly is controlled through surface-functionalization with a benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derived supramolecular moiety. Such BTAs interact via directional, strong, yet reversible hydrogen-bonds with other identical BTAs. Herein, a protocol is presented that describes how to couple these BTAs to colloids and how to quantify the number of coupling sites, which determines the multivalency of the supramolecular colloids. Light scattering measurements show that the refractive index of the colloids is almost matched with that of the solvent, which strongly reduces the van der Waals forces between the colloids. Before photo-activation, the colloids remain well dispersed, as the BTAs are equipped with a photo-labile group that blocks the formation of hydrogen-bonds. Controlled deprotection with UV-light activates the short-range hydrogen-bonds between the BTAs, which triggers the colloidal self-assembly. The evolution from the dispersed state to the clustered state is monitored by confocal microscopy. These results are further quantified by image analysis with simple routines using ImageJ and Matlab. This merger of supramolecular chemistry and colloidal science offers a direct route towards light- and thermo-responsive colloidal assembly encoded in the surface-grafted monolayer.

  12. The effects of organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry on diuron sorption across a diverse range of soils.

    PubMed

    Smernik, Ronald J; Kookana, Rai S

    2015-01-01

    Sorption of non-ionic organic compounds to soil is usually expressed as the carbon-normalized partition coefficient (KOC), because it is assumed that the main factor that influences the amount sorbed is the organic carbon content of the soil. However, KOC can vary by a factor of at least ten across a range of soils. We investigated two potential causes of variation in diuron KOC - organic matter-mineral interactions and organic matter chemistry - for a diverse set of 34 soils from Sri Lanka, representing a wide range of soil types. Treatment with hydrofluoric acid (HF-treatment) was used to concentrate soil organic matter. HF-treatment increased KOC for the majority of soils (average factor 2.4). We attribute this increase to the blocking of organic matter sorption sites in the whole soils by minerals. There was no significant correlation between KOC for the whole soils and KOC for the HF-treated soils, indicating that the importance of organic matter-mineral interactions varied greatly amongst these soils. There was as much variation in KOC across the HF-treated soils as there was across the whole soils, indicating that the nature of soil organic matter is also an important contributor to KOC variability. Organic matter chemistry, determined by solid-state (13)C nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, was correlated with KOC for the HF-treated soils. In particular, KOC increased with the aromatic C content (R=0.64, p=1×10(-6)), and decreased with O-alkyl C (R=-0.32, p=0.03) and alkyl C (R=-0.41, p=0.004) content.

  13. Transforming Matter: A History of Chemistry from Alchemy to the Buckyball by Trevor H. Levere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Truman Schwartz, A.

    2001-08-01

    By and large, the chemistry is presented in a logical and comprehensible form. People and ideas are emphasized. However, because of Transforming Matter's brevity and its intended audience, there are inevitable oversimplifications and sins of omission. There were also a few sins of commission in the uncorrected proof that I read. On page 159 there is an implication that equilibrium does not exist in "irreversible" processes such as the precipitation of silver chloride. The author rushes through electron orbitals in one paragraph (page 178) in which he mistakenly refers to something he calls "Planck's equation" and appears to identify p orbitals with n = 2. On the next page we are told that "overlapping p orbitals produced a pi bond." True, but they can also produce a sigma bond. And on page 198 we learn that "a single Freon molecule can cause the decomposition of millions of ozone molecules." The most frequently cited estimate is 100,000 ozone molecules decomposed per Freon molecule. This may be the nit picking of a physical chemist, but it does reflect some of the hazards of trying to achieve an admirable goal--introducing readers to the fascinating history of our fascinating science.

  14. Chemistry characterization of jet aircraft engine particulate matter by XPS: Results from APEX III

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vander Wal, Randy L.; Bryg, Victoria M.; Huang, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis of jet exhaust particulate matter (PM) from a B737, Lear, ERJ and A300 aircraft during the APEX III NASA led field campaign. Carbon hybridization and bonding chemistry are identified by high-resolution scans about the C1s core-shell region. Significant organic content as gauged by the sp3/sp2 ratio is found across engines and powers. Polar oxygen functional groups include carboxylic, carbonyl and phenol with combined content of 20% or more. By survey scans various elements including transition metals are identified along with lighter elements such as S, N and O in the form of oxides. Additives within lubricants are probable sources of Na, Ba, Ca, Zn, P and possibly Sn. Elements present and their percentages varied significantly across all engines, not revealing any trend or identifiable cause for the differences, though the origin is likely the same for the same element when observed. This finding suggests that their collective presence could serve as an environmental tracer for identifying PM originating from aircraft engines and serving as a diagnostic for engine performance and wear.

  15. Adsorption and desorption of dissolved organic matter by carbon nanotubes: Effects of solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-06-01

    Increasing use of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) has led to their introduction into the environment where they can interact with dissolved organic matter (DOM). This study focuses on solution chemistry effects on DOM adsorption/desorption processes by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Our data show that DOM adsorption is controlled by the attachment of DOM molecules to the SWCNTs, and that the initial adsorption rate is dependent on solution parameters. Adsorbed amount of DOM at high ionic strength was limited, possibly due to alterations in SWCNT bundling. Desorption of DOM performed at low pH resulted in additional DOM adsorption, whereas at high pH, adsorbed DOM amount decreased. The extent of desorption conducted at increased ionic strength was dependent on pre-adsorbed DOM concentration: low DOM loading stimulated additional adsorption of DOM, whereas high DOM loading facilitated release of adsorbed DOM. Elevated ionic strength and increased adsorbed amount of DOM reduced the oxidation temperature of the SWCNTs, suggesting that changes in the assembly of the SWCNTs had occurred. Moreover, DOM-coated SWCNTs at increased ionic strength provided fewer sites for atrazine adsorption. This study enhances our understanding of DOM-SWCNT interactions in aqueous systems influenced by rapid changes in salinity, and facilitates potential use of SWCNTs in water-purification technologies.

  16. Emerging Supramolecular Therapeutic Carriers Based on Host-Guest Interactions.

    PubMed

    Karim, Anis Abdul; Dou, Qingqing; Li, Zibiao; Loh, Xian Jun

    2016-05-06

    Recent advances in host-guest chemistry have significantly influenced the construction of supramolecular soft biomaterials. The highly selective and non-covalent interactions provide vast possibilities of manipulating supramolecular self-assemblies at the molecular level, allowing a rational design to control the sizes and morphologies of the resultant objects as carrier vehicles in a delivery system. In this Focus Review, the most recent developments of supramolecular self-assemblies through host-guest inclusion, including nanoparticles, micelles, vesicles, hydrogels, and various stimuli-responsive morphology transition materials are presented. These sophisticated materials with diverse functions, oriented towards therapeutic agent delivery, are further summarized into several active domains in the areas of drug delivery, gene delivery, co-delivery and site-specific targeting deliveries. Finally, the possible strategies for future design of multifunctional delivery carriers by combining host-guest chemistry with biological interface science are proposed.

  17. Supramolecular Dynamics of Mucus

    PubMed Central

    Verdugo, Pedro

    2012-01-01

    Our purpose here is not to address specific issues of mucus pathology, but to illustrate how polymer networks theory and its remarkable predictive power can be applied to study the supramolecular dynamics of mucus. Avoiding unnecessary mathematical formalization, in the light of available theory, we focus on the rather slow progress and the still large number of missing gaps in the complex topology and supramolecular dynamics of airway mucus. We start with the limited information on the polymer physics of respiratory mucins to then converge on the supramolecular organization and resulting physical properties of the mucus gel. In each section, we briefly discuss progress on the subject, the uncertainties associated with the established knowledge, and the many riddles that still remain. PMID:23125200

  18. Supramolecular luminescence from oligofluorenol-based supramolecular polymer semiconductors.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Guang-Wei; Wang, Long; Xie, Ling-Hai; Lin, Jin-Yi; Huang, Wei

    2013-11-13

    Supramolecular luminescence stems from non-covalent exciton behaviors of active π-segments in supramolecular entities or aggregates via intermolecular forces. Herein, a π-conjugated oligofluorenol, containing self-complementary double hydrogen bonds, was synthesized using Suzuki coupling as a supramolecular semiconductor. Terfluorenol-based random supramolecular polymers were confirmed via concentration-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The photoluminescent spectra of the TFOH-1 solution exhibit a green emission band (g-band) at approximately ~520 nm with reversible features, as confirmed through titration experiments. Supramolecular luminescence of TFOH-1 thin films serves as robust evidence for the aggregates of g-band. Our results suggest that the presence of polyfluorene ketone defects is a sufficient condition, rather than a sufficient-necessary condition for the g-band. Supramolecular electroluminescence will push organic devices into the fields of supramolecular optoelectronics, spintronics, and mechatronics.

  19. Supramolecular Luminescence from Oligofluorenol-Based Supramolecular Polymer Semiconductors

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Guang-Wei; Wang, Long; Xie, Ling-Hai; Lin, Jin-Yi; Huang, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Supramolecular luminescence stems from non-covalent exciton behaviors of active π-segments in supramolecular entities or aggregates via intermolecular forces. Herein, a π-conjugated oligofluorenol, containing self-complementary double hydrogen bonds, was synthesized using Suzuki coupling as a supramolecular semiconductor. Terfluorenol-based random supramolecular polymers were confirmed via concentration-dependent nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and dynamic light scattering (DLS). The photoluminescent spectra of the TFOH-1 solution exhibit a green emission band (g-band) at approximately ~520 nm with reversible features, as confirmed through titration experiments. Supramolecular luminescence of TFOH-1 thin films serves as robust evidence for the aggregates of g-band. Our results suggest that the presence of polyfluorene ketone defects is a sufficient condition, rather than a sufficient-necessary condition for the g-band. Supramolecular electroluminescence will push organic devices into the fields of supramolecular optoelectronics, spintronics, and mechatronics. PMID:24232455

  20. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  1. Chemical Equilibrium in Supramolecular Systems as Studied by NMR Spectrometry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gonzalez-Gaitano, Gustavo; Tardajos, Gloria

    2004-01-01

    Undergraduate students are required to study the chemical balance in supramolecular assemblies constituting two or more interacting species, by using proton NMR spectrometry. A good knowledge of physical chemistry, fundamentals of chemical balance, and NMR are pre-requisites for conducting this study.

  2. Biophysical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Häussinger, Daniel; Pfohl, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Biophysical chemistry at the Department of Chemistry, University of Basel, covers the NMR analysis of protein-protein interaction using paramagnetic tags and sophisticated microscopy techniques investigating the dynamics of biological matter.

  3. Molecular recognition directed self-assembly of supramolecular architectures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Percec, C.; Heck, J.; Johansson, G.; Tomazos, D.; Kawasumi, M.

    1994-06-01

    This paper reviews some of our research on three classes of supramolecular architectures which are generated via various combinations of molecular, macromolecular and supramolecular chemistry. The ability of these supramolecular architectures to form liquid crystalline phases is determined by the shape of the self-assembled architecture and will be used to visualize it via various characterization techniques. The molecular design of selected examples of structural units containing taper shaped exo-receptors and crown-ether, oligooxyethylenic, and H-bonding based endo-receptors which self-assemble into cylindrical channel-like architectures via principles resembling those of tobacco mosaic virus (TMV), of macrocyclics which self-assemble into a willow-like architecture will be discussed. In the case of TMV-like supramolecular architectures a comparison between various supramolecular (generated via H-bonding, ionic and electrostatic interactions) and molecular 'polymer backbones' will be made. The present state of the art of the engineering of these supramolecular architectures and some possible novel material functions derived from them will be briefly mentioned.

  4. The Examination of Secondary Education Chemistry Curricula Published between 1957-2007 in Terms of the Dimensions of Rationale, Goals, and Subject-Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pekdag, Bulent; Erol, Hilal

    2013-01-01

    Fifteen secondary education chemistry curricula published from 1957 until 2007 were examined based on the dimensions of rationale, goals, and subject matter. An examination of documents in the scope of qualitative research was carried out in the study. The goals included in the examined chemistry curricula were analyzed according to the cognitive,…

  5. Spatial control of chirality in supramolecular aggregates.

    PubMed

    Castriciano, Maria A; Gentili, Denis; Romeo, Andrea; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Scolaro, Luigi Monsù

    2017-03-09

    Chirality is one of the most intriguing properties of matter related to a molecule's lack of mirror symmetry. The transmission of chirality from the molecular level up to the macroscopic scale has major implications in life sciences but it is also relevant for many chemical applications ranging from catalysis to spintronic. These technological applications require an accurate control of morphology, homogeneity and chiral handedness of thin films and nanostructures. We demonstrate a simple approach to specifically transfer chirality to the model supramolecular system of J aggregates of the protonated form of tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphyrin by utilizing a soft lithography technique. This approach successfully allows the fabrication of an ordered distribution of sub-micrometric structures in precise and controllable positions with programmed chirality, providing a fundamental breakthrough toward the exploitation of chiral supramolecular aggregates in technological applications, such as sensors, non-linear optics and spintronic.

  6. Spatial control of chirality in supramolecular aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Castriciano, Maria A.; Gentili, Denis; Romeo, Andrea; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Scolaro, Luigi Monsù

    2017-01-01

    Chirality is one of the most intriguing properties of matter related to a molecule’s lack of mirror symmetry. The transmission of chirality from the molecular level up to the macroscopic scale has major implications in life sciences but it is also relevant for many chemical applications ranging from catalysis to spintronic. These technological applications require an accurate control of morphology, homogeneity and chiral handedness of thin films and nanostructures. We demonstrate a simple approach to specifically transfer chirality to the model supramolecular system of J aggregates of the protonated form of tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphyrin by utilizing a soft lithography technique. This approach successfully allows the fabrication of an ordered distribution of sub-micrometric structures in precise and controllable positions with programmed chirality, providing a fundamental breakthrough toward the exploitation of chiral supramolecular aggregates in technological applications, such as sensors, non-linear optics and spintronic. PMID:28275239

  7. Spatial control of chirality in supramolecular aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castriciano, Maria A.; Gentili, Denis; Romeo, Andrea; Cavallini, Massimiliano; Scolaro, Luigi Monsù

    2017-03-01

    Chirality is one of the most intriguing properties of matter related to a molecule’s lack of mirror symmetry. The transmission of chirality from the molecular level up to the macroscopic scale has major implications in life sciences but it is also relevant for many chemical applications ranging from catalysis to spintronic. These technological applications require an accurate control of morphology, homogeneity and chiral handedness of thin films and nanostructures. We demonstrate a simple approach to specifically transfer chirality to the model supramolecular system of J aggregates of the protonated form of tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)-porphyrin by utilizing a soft lithography technique. This approach successfully allows the fabrication of an ordered distribution of sub-micrometric structures in precise and controllable positions with programmed chirality, providing a fundamental breakthrough toward the exploitation of chiral supramolecular aggregates in technological applications, such as sensors, non-linear optics and spintronic.

  8. PHYS: Division of Physical Chemistry 258 - Properties and Origins of Cometary and Asteroidal Organic Matter Delivered to the Early Earth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Messenger, Scott; Nguyen, Ann

    2017-01-01

    Comets and asteroids may have contributed much of the Earth's water and organic matter. The Earth accretes approximately 4x10(exp 7) Kg of dust and meteorites from these sources every year. The least altered meteorites contain complex assemblages of organic compounds and abundant hydrated minerals. These carbonaceous chondrite meteorites probably derive from asteroids that underwent hydrothermal processing within the first few million years after their accretion. Meteorite organics show isotopic and chemical signatures of low-T ion-molecule and grain-surface chemistry and photolysis of icy grains that occurred in cold molecular clouds and the outer protoplanetary disk. These signatures have been overprinted by aqueously mediated chemistry in asteroid parent bodies, forming amino acids and other prebiotic molecules. Comets are much richer in organic matter but it is less well characterized. Comet dust collected in the stratosphere shows larger H and N isotopic anomalies than most meteorites, suggesting better preservation of primordial organics. Rosetta studies of comet 67P coma dust find complex organic matter that may be related to the macromolecular material that dominates the organic inventory of primitive meteorites. The exogenous organic material accreting on Earth throughout its history is made up of thousands of molecular species formed in diverse processes ranging from circumstellar outflows to chemistry at near absolute zero in dark cloud cores and the formative environment within minor planets. NASA and JAXA are currently flying sample return missions to primitive, potentially organic-rich asteroids. The OSIRIS-REx and Hayabusa2 missions will map their target asteroids, Bennu and Ryugu, in detail and return regolith samples to Earth. Laboratory analyses of these pristine asteroid samples will provide unprecedented views of asteroidal organic matter relatively free of terrestrial contamination within well determined geological context. Studies of

  9. Self-assembly of supramolecularly engineered polymers and their biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Wang, Dali; Tong, Gangsheng; Dong, Ruijiao; Zhou, Yongfeng; Shen, Jian; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2014-10-18

    supramolecular chemistry, polymer materials, biomedicine, nano-science and technology.

  10. Mechanically interlocked molecules incorporating cucurbituril and their supramolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kimoon

    2002-03-01

    Mechanically interlocked molecules incorporating cucurbituril (CB[6]) as a molecular 'bead' and their supramolecular assemblies are described. An efficient synthesis of 1D, 2D and 3D polyrotaxanes with high structural regularity and molecular necklaces has been achieved by a combination of self-assembly and coordination chemistry. The functional aspects of these interlocked molecules and their supramolecular assemblies, including molecular machines and switches based on [2]rotaxanes, a 2D polyrotaxane with large cavities and channels, pseudorotaxane-terminated dendrimers, and interaction of pseudorotaxanes containing polyamines and CB[6] with DNA are also described.

  11. Role of solvents in coordination supramolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Peng; Du, Miao

    2011-06-07

    Solvent effect is a vital subject in the domain of coordination chemistry. In this connection, previous researches mainly focus on the role of solvents in reaction kinetics and thermodynamics during the coordination processes. In virtue of the recent efforts on coordination supramolecular systems, especially coordination polymers or metal-organic frameworks, this feature article aims to demonstrate the solvent effect on regulating such diversiform metallosupramolecular solids, incorporating their crystal growth/assembly, structural modulation, dynamic transformations, and potential applications, which may provide new insights into the rational design and construction of such advanced crystalline materials.

  12. Nature of Matter, Chemistry K-6, Elementary Science Unit No. 4.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bethlehem Area Schools, PA.

    This unit emphasizes concept-learning through the discovery approach and child-centered activities. "Discovering Matter" is treated in the kindergarten, "Matter Around Us" in grade 1, "Changes in Matter" in grade 4 and "Atoms and Molecules" in grade 6. The unit for each grade contains (1) understandings to be discovered, (2) activities and (3)…

  13. Preparation for College General Chemistry: More than Just a Matter of Content Knowledge Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cracolice, Mark S.; Busby, Brittany D.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the potential of five factors that may be predictive of success in college general chemistry courses: prior knowledge of common alternate conceptions, intelligence, scientific reasoning ability, proportional reasoning ability, and attitude toward chemistry. We found that both prior knowledge and scientific reasoning ability…

  14. Preparation for College General Chemistry: More than Just a Matter of Content Knowledge Acquisition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cracolice, Mark S.; Busby, Brittany D.

    2015-01-01

    This study investigates the potential of five factors that may be predictive of success in college general chemistry courses: prior knowledge of common alternate conceptions, intelligence, scientific reasoning ability, proportional reasoning ability, and attitude toward chemistry. We found that both prior knowledge and scientific reasoning ability…

  15. Supramolecular polymers constructed from macrocycle-based host-guest molecular recognition motifs.

    PubMed

    Dong, Shengyi; Zheng, Bo; Wang, Feng; Huang, Feihe

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Supramolecular polymers, fabricated via the combination of supramolecular chemistry and polymer science, are polymeric arrays of repeating units held together by reversible, relatively weak noncovalent interactions. The introduction of noncovalent interactions, such as hydrogen bonding, aromatic stacking interactions, metal coordination, and host-guest interactions, endows supramolecular polymers with unique stimuli responsiveness and self-adjusting abilities. As a result, diverse monomer structures have been designed and synthesized to construct various types of supramolecular polymers. By changing the noncovalent interaction types, numbers, or chemical structures of functional groups in these monomers, supramolecular polymeric materials can be prepared with tailored chemical and physical properties. In recent years, the interest in supramolecular polymers has been extended from the preparation of intriguing topological structures to the discoveries of potential applications as functional materials. Compared with traditional polymers, supramolecular polymers show some advantages in the fabrication of reversible or responsive materials. The development of supramolecular polymers also offers a platform to construct complex and sophisticated materials with a bottom-up approach. Macrocylic hosts, including crown ethers, cyclodextrins, calixarenes, cucurbiturils, and pillararenes, are the most commonly used building blocks in the fabrication of host-guest interaction-based supramolecular polymers. With the introduction of complementary guest molecules, macrocylic hosts demonstrate selective and stimuli-responsive host-guest complexation behaviors. By elaborate molecular design, the resultant supramolecular polymers can exhibit diverse structures based on the self-selectivity of host-guest interactions. The introduction of reversible host-guest interactions can further endow these supramolecular polymers with interesting and fascinating chemical

  16. Supramolecular Interactions in Chemomechanical Polymers

    PubMed Central

    SCHNEIDER, HANS-JÖRG; STRONGIN, ROBERT M.

    2009-01-01

    Conspectus Molecular recognition is the basis for the operation of most biological functions; outside of nature, it has also been developed to a high degree of sophistication within the framework of supramolecular chemistry. More recently, selective noncovalent interactions—which constitute molecular recognition—are being used in intelligent new materials that transform chemical signals into actions, such as the release of drugs. The presence of supramolecular binding sites allows chemomechanical polymers to operate as sensors and actuators within a single unit without the need for any additional devices such as transducers or power supplies. A polymer can be designed so that a particular chemical substance, most often in aqueous surroundings, will trigger either a large expansion or a large contraction, depending on the mechanism. The translation of binding energy into mechanical motion can, with a suitable arrangement of the materials in tubes or on flexible films, be harnessed for unidirectional drives, flow control, the liberation of drugs, or the uptake of toxic compounds, among other applications. Miniaturization of the polymer particles allows one to enhance both the sensitivity and speed of the response, which is of particular importance in sensing. The basis for the selective response to external effector compounds, such as metal ions, amino acids, peptides, or nucleotides, is their noncovalent interaction with complementary functions covalently bound to the polymer network. With suitable polymers, selectivity between structural isomers—and even between enantiomers—as triggers can be achieved. As with supramolecular complexes in solution, the underlying interactions in polymers comprise a variety of noncovalent binding mechanisms, which are not easy to distinguish and quantify—and more so with polymers, which are not monodisperse. In this Account, we present systematic comparisons of different polymers and effector classes that allow, for the

  17. Selective Organic and Organometallic Reactions in Water-Soluble Host-Guest Supramolecular Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Bergman, Robert G.

    2008-02-16

    Inspired by the efficiency and selectivity of enzymes, synthetic chemists have designed and prepared a wide range of host molecules that can bind smaller molecules with their cavities; this area has become known as 'supramolecular' or 'host-guest' chemistry. Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Pedersen, and Breslow, and followed up by a large number of more recent investigators, it has been found that the chemical environment in each assembly - defined by the size, shape, charge, and functional group availability - greatly influences the guest-binding characteristics of these compounds. In contrast to the large number of binding studies that have been carried out in this area, the exploration of chemistry - especially catalytic chemistry - that can take place inside supramolecular host cavities is still in its infancy. For example, until the work described here was carried out, very few examples of organometallic reactivity inside supramolecular hosts were known, especially in water solution. For that reason, our group and the group directed by Kenneth Raymond decided to take advantage of our complementary expertise and attempt to carry out metal-mediated C-H bond activation reactions in water-soluble supramolecular systems. This article begins by providing background from the Raymond group in supramolecular coordination chemistry and the Bergman group in C-H bond activation. It goes on to report the results of our combined efforts in supramolecular C-H activation reactions, followed by extensions of this work into a wider range of intracavity transformations.

  18. Supramolecular Polymers in Aqueous Media.

    PubMed

    Krieg, Elisha; Bastings, Maartje M C; Besenius, Pol; Rybtchinski, Boris

    2016-02-24

    This review discusses one-dimensional supramolecular polymers that form in aqueous media. First, naturally occurring supramolecular polymers are described, in particular, amyloid fibrils, actin filaments, and microtubules. Their structural, thermodynamic, kinetic, and nanomechanical properties are highlighted, as well as their importance for the advancement of biologically inspired supramolecular polymer materials. Second, five classes of synthetic supramolecular polymers are described: systems based on (1) hydrogen-bond motifs, (2) large π-conjugated surfaces, (3) host-guest interactions, (4) peptides, and (5) DNA. We focus on recent studies that address key challenges in the field, providing mechanistic understanding, rational polymer design, important functionality, robustness, or unusual thermodynamic and kinetic properties.

  19. Supramolecular tilt chirality in crystals of steroids and alkaloids.

    PubMed

    Hisaki, Ichiro; Tohnai, Norimitsu; Miyata, Mikiji

    2008-03-01

    The concept of supramolecular chirality has assumed increasing importance in association with the development of supramolecular chemistry over the last two decades. In chiral crystals, 2 1 helical molecular assemblies are frequently observed as key motifs. Helical handedness of the 2 1 assemblies, however, has not been determined from the mathematical or crystallographical viewpoints. In this context, we have proposed two new concepts, three-axial chirality and tilt chirality. On the basis of the concepts, we describe supramolecular chirality and determine the handedness of 2 1 assemblies that are composed of relatively complicated molecules with multiple stereogenic centers such as brucine, bile acids, and cinchona alkaloids as well as those of simple molecules.

  20. Supramolecular functional assemblies: dynamic membrane transporters and peptide nanotubular composites.

    PubMed

    Fuertes, Alberto; Juanes, Marisa; Granja, Juan R; Montenegro, Javier

    2017-07-11

    The fabrication of functional molecular devices constitutes one of the most important current challenges for chemical sciences. The complex processes accomplished by living systems continuously demand the assistance of non-covalent interactions between molecular building blocks. Additionally, these building blocks (proteins, membranes, nucleotides) are also constituted by self-assembled structures. Therefore, supramolecular chemistry is the discipline required to understand the properties of the minimal self-assembled building blocks of living systems and to develop new functional smart materials. In the first part of this feature article, we highlight selected examples of the preparation of supramolecular membrane transporters with special emphasis on the application of dynamic covalent bonds. In the second section of the paper we review recent breakthroughs in the preparation of peptide nanotube hybrids with functional applications. The development of these devices constitutes an exciting process from where we can learn how to understand and manipulate supramolecular functional assemblies.

  1. Bioinspired Supramolecular Enzymatic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-28

    Redox Shuttles In Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells ,” Angew. Chem., 2010, 49, 5339-5343. 98. Spokoyny, A. M.; Farha, O. K.; Mulfort, K. L.; Hupp, J. T...Sensitized Solar Cells Containing a Ni(III)/(IV) Bis(discarbollide) Shuttle,” J. Phys. Chem. C., 2011, 115, 11257–11264. 102. Machan, C. W.; Spokoyny...based on mechanostereochemical bonds, porous hybrid materials, and stimuli-responsive metal-orqanic supramolecular structures. These structures exhibit a

  2. Reversible manipulation of the G-quadruplex structures and enzymatic reactions through supramolecular host-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Song, Yanyan; Wei, Lai; Wang, Jiaqi; Fu, Boshi; He, Zhiyong; Yang, Xi-Ran; Wu, Fan; Xu, Guohua; Liu, Si-Min; Li, Conggang; Wang, Shaoru; Zhou, Xiang

    2017-01-23

    Supramolecular chemistry addresses intermolecular forces and consequently promises great flexibility and precision. Biological systems are often the inspirations for supramolecular research. The G-quadruplex (G4) belongs to one of the most important secondary structures in nucleic acids. Until recently, the supramolecular manipulation of the G4 has not been reported. The present study is the first to disclose a supramolecular switch for the reversible control of human telomere G4s. Moreover, this supramolecular switch has been successfully used to manipulate an enzymatic reaction. Using various methods, we show that cucurbit[7]uril preferably locks and encapsulates the positively charged piperidines of Razo through supramolecular interactions. They can switch the conformations of the DNA inhibitor between a flexible state and the rigid G4 and are therefore responsible for the reversible control of the thrombin activity. Thus, our findings open a promising route and exhibit potential applications in future studies of chemical biology.

  3. Anion transport and supramolecular medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Gale, Philip A; Davis, Jeffery T; Quesada, Roberto

    2017-04-05

    New approaches to the transmembrane transport of anions are discussed in this review. Advances in the design of small molecule anion carriers are reviewed in addition to advances in the design of synthetic anion channels. The application of anion transporters to the potential future treatment of disease is discussed in the context of recent findings on the selectivity of anion transporters.

  4. Effects of Subject-Area Degree and Classroom Experience on New Chemistry Teachers' Subject Matter Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Campbell, Benjamin K.; Luft, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Science teachers need to understand the subject matter they teach. While subject matter knowledge (SMK) can improve with classroom teaching experience, it is problematic that many secondary science teachers leave the profession before garnering extensive classroom experience. Furthermore, many new science teachers are assigned to teach science…

  5. Effects of Subject-Area Degree and Classroom Experience on New Chemistry Teachers' Subject Matter Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nixon, Ryan S.; Campbell, Benjamin K.; Luft, Julie A.

    2016-01-01

    Science teachers need to understand the subject matter they teach. While subject matter knowledge (SMK) can improve with classroom teaching experience, it is problematic that many secondary science teachers leave the profession before garnering extensive classroom experience. Furthermore, many new science teachers are assigned to teach science…

  6. Integrating Organic Matter Structure with Ecosystem Function using Advanced Analytical Chemistry Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boot, C. M.

    2012-12-01

    Microorganisms are the primary transformers of organic matter in terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems. The structure of organic matter controls its bioavailability and researchers have long sought to link the chemical characteristics of the organic matter pool to its lability. To date this effort has been primarily attempted using low resolution descriptive characteristics (e.g. organic matter content, carbon to nitrogen ratio, aromaticity, etc .). However, recent progress in linking these two important ecosystem components has been advanced using advanced high resolution tools (e.g. nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, and mass spectroscopy (MS)-based techniques). A series of experiments will be presented that highlight the application of high resolution techniques in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic ecosystems with the focus on how these data explicitly provide the foundation for integrating organic matter structure into our concept of ecosystem function. The talk will highlight results from a series of experiments including: an MS-based metabolomics and fluorescence excitation emission matrix approach evaluating seasonal and vegetation based changes in dissolved organic matter (DOM) composition from arctic soils; Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) MS and MS metabolomics analysis of DOM from three lakes in an alpine watershed; and the transformation of 13C labeled glucose track with NMR during a rewetting experiment from Colorado grassland soils. These data will be synthesized to illustrate how the application of advanced analytical techniques provides novel insight into our understanding of organic matter processing in a wide range of ecosystems.

  7. Structure of Cytoskeletal Supramolecular Assemblies in the Nerve Cell Axon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ojeda-López, Miguel A.; Case, Ryan; Miller, Herb P.; Wilson, Leslie; Safinya, Cyrus R.

    2001-03-01

    The cytoskeleton of eucaryotic cells is an intricate network of supramolecular assemblies of protein filaments, e.g., actin, intermediate filaments (IFs), tubulin, and a multi-associated family of cross-linking proteins. Most of its multiple functions rely on its structural stability, which depends on a variety of specific interactions of the subunit proteins and its local physico-chemical environment. In neurodegenerative diseases the cytoskeletal supramolecular structure is almost universally altered. Preliminary results on the supramolecular structure of cytoskeletal filaments in isolated axons from bovine white matter will be presented as obtained using synchrotron small angle x-ray diffraction. These results will be compared to our ongoing cell-free studies on the structures formed by neurofilaments in vitro. Supported by NIH GM59288, NSF-DMR-9972246, and University of California Biotechnology Grant 99-14 & UC.

  8. Does Teaching Sequence Matter When Teaching High School Chemistry with Scientific Visualisations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Ian; Geelan, David; Mukherjee, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Five Canadian high school Chemistry classes in one school, taught by three different teachers, studied the concepts of dynamic chemical equilibria and Le Chatelier's Principle. Some students received traditional teacher-led explanations of the concept first and used an interactive scientific visualisation second, while others worked with the…

  9. Learning Processes in Chemistry: Drawing upon Cognitive Resources to Learn about the Particulate Structure of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.; Garcia-Franco, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    This article explores 11- to 16-year-old students' explanations for phenomena commonly studied in school chemistry from an inclusive cognitive resources or knowledge-in-pieces perspective that considers that student utterances may reflect the activation of knowledge elements at a range of levels of explicitness. We report 5 themes in student…

  10. Does Teaching Sequence Matter When Teaching High School Chemistry with Scientific Visualisations?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fogarty, Ian; Geelan, David; Mukherjee, Michelle

    2012-01-01

    Five Canadian high school Chemistry classes in one school, taught by three different teachers, studied the concepts of dynamic chemical equilibria and Le Chatelier's Principle. Some students received traditional teacher-led explanations of the concept first and used an interactive scientific visualisation second, while others worked with the…

  11. Learning Processes in Chemistry: Drawing upon Cognitive Resources to Learn about the Particulate Structure of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Taber, Keith S.; Garcia-Franco, Alejandra

    2010-01-01

    This article explores 11- to 16-year-old students' explanations for phenomena commonly studied in school chemistry from an inclusive cognitive resources or knowledge-in-pieces perspective that considers that student utterances may reflect the activation of knowledge elements at a range of levels of explicitness. We report 5 themes in student…

  12. Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Conceptions of the Conservation of Matter and Related Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haidar, Abdullateef

    1997-01-01

    Reports a study of the quality and extent of understanding of certain well-known theoretical concepts which are held by prospective teachers (N=173) of chemistry in Yemen. Results indicate that teacher understanding ranges from a partial understanding with a specific misconception to no understanding. Contains 25 references. (DDR)

  13. Prospective Chemistry Teachers' Conceptions of the Conservation of Matter and Related Concepts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haidar, Abdullateef

    1997-01-01

    Reports a study of the quality and extent of understanding of certain well-known theoretical concepts which are held by prospective teachers (N=173) of chemistry in Yemen. Results indicate that teacher understanding ranges from a partial understanding with a specific misconception to no understanding. Contains 25 references. (DDR)

  14. Supramolecular motifs in dynamic covalent PEG-hemiaminal organogels

    PubMed Central

    Fox, Courtney H.; ter Hurrne, Gijs M.; Wojtecki, Rudy J.; Jones, Gavin O.; Horn, Hans W.; Meijer, E. W.; Frank, Curtis W.; Hedrick, James L.; García, Jeannette M.

    2015-01-01

    Dynamic covalent materials are stable materials that possess reversible behaviour triggered by stimuli such as light, redox conditions or temperature; whereas supramolecular crosslinks depend on the equilibrium constant and relative concentrations of crosslinks as a function of temperature. The combination of these two reversible chemistries can allow access to materials with unique properties. Here, we show that this combination of dynamic covalent and supramolecular chemistry can be used to prepare organogels comprising distinct networks. Two materials containing hemiaminal crosslink junctions were synthesized; one material is comprised of dynamic covalent junctions and the other contains hydrogen-bonding bis-hemiaminal moieties. Under specific network synthesis conditions, these materials exhibited self-healing behaviour. This work reports on both the molecular-level detail of hemiaminal crosslink junction formation as well as the macroscopic behaviour of hemiaminal dynamic covalent network (HDCN) elastomeric organogels. These materials have potential applications as elastomeric components in printable materials, cargo carriers and adhesives. PMID:26174864

  15. Why surface chemistry matters for QD–QD resonance energy transfer

    DOE PAGES

    Hoffman, Jacob B.; Alam, Rabeka; Kamat, Prashant V.

    2017-01-12

    Resonance energy transfer (RET) has been shown to occur in films of semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) with variation in QD composition and size. When coupled with charge carrier transfer, RET could provide a complementary strategy for light harvesting in QD based solid state photovoltaic devices. Due to a direct dependence on the optical properties of the donor and acceptor, QD surface chemistry plays a drastic role in determining the efficiency of RET. Here, the impact of QD surface chemistry on RET in QD films was investigated using a pair of different sized CdSe QDs spin-cast onto a glass substrate. Themore » effects of QD surface passivation on RET were studied by removing surface ligands through QD washing and adding an insulating ZnS shell. In addition, QD films were subjected to solid state ligand exchanges with thiolated ligands in order to mimic a layer-by-layer deposition method commonly used in the construction of QD photovoltaics. These solid state ligand exchanges exhibit drastic quenching of RET in the films. As a result, these experiments highlight the importance of understanding surface chemistry when designing photovoltaics that utilize RET.« less

  16. Supramolecular transformations within discrete coordination-driven supramolecular architectures.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Wang, Yu-Xuan; Yang, Hai-Bo

    2016-05-03

    In this review, a comprehensive summary of supramolecular transformations within discrete coordination-driven supramolecular architectures, including helices, metallacycles, metallacages, etc., is presented. Recent investigations have demonstrated that coordination-driven self-assembled architectures provide an ideal platform to study supramolecular transformations mainly due to the relatively rigid yet dynamic nature of the coordination bonds. Various stimuli have been extensively employed to trigger the transformation processes of metallosupramolecular architectures, such as solvents, concentration, anions, guests, change in component fractions or chemical compositions, light, and post-modification reactions, which allowed for the formation of new structures with specific properties and functions. Thus, it is believed that supramolecular transformations could serve as another highly efficient approach for generating diverse metallosupramolecular architectures. Classified by the aforementioned various stimuli used to induce the interconversion processes, the emphasis in this review will be on the transformation conditions, structural changes, mechanisms, and the output of specific properties and functions upon induction of structural transformations.

  17. Transport of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes through silica based porous media: influences of aquatic chemistry, surface chemistry, and natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jin; Bitter, Julie L; Smith, Billy A; Fairbrother, D Howard; Ball, William P

    2013-12-17

    This paper provides results from studies of the transport of oxidized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (O-MWCNTs) of varying surface oxygen concentrations under a range of aquatic conditions and through uniform silica glass bead media. In the presence of Na(+), the required ionic strength (IS) for maximum particle attachment efficiency (i.e., the critical deposition concentration, or CDC) increased as the surface oxygen concentration of the O-MWCNTs or pH increased, following qualitative tenets of theories based on electrostatic interactions. In the presence of Ca(2+), CDC values were lower than those with Na(+) present, but were no longer sensitive to surface oxygen content, suggesting that Ca(2+) impacts the interactions between O-MWCNTs and glass beads by mechanisms other than electrostatic alone. The presence of Suwannee River natural organic matter (SRNOM) decreased the attachment efficiency of O-MWCNTs in the presence of either Na(+) or Ca(2+), but with more pronounced effects when Na(+) was present. Nevertheless, low concentrations of SRNOM (<4 mg/L of dissolved organic carbon) were sufficient to mobilize all O-MWCNTs studied at CaCl2 concentrations as high as 10 mM. Overall, this study reveals that NOM content, pH, and cation type show more importance than surface chemistry in affecting O-MWCNTs deposition during transport through silica-based porous media.

  18. Conceptual Change Texts in Chemistry Teaching: A Study on the Particle Model of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beerenwinkel, Anne; Parchmann, Ilka; Grasel, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the effect of a conceptual change text on students' awareness of common misconceptions on the particle model of matter. The conceptual change text was designed based on principles of text comprehensibility, of conceptual change instruction and of instructional approaches how to introduce the particle model. It was evaluated in…

  19. Conceptual Change Texts in Chemistry Teaching: A Study on the Particle Model of Matter

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beerenwinkel, Anne; Parchmann, Ilka; Grasel, Cornelia

    2011-01-01

    This study explores the effect of a conceptual change text on students' awareness of common misconceptions on the particle model of matter. The conceptual change text was designed based on principles of text comprehensibility, of conceptual change instruction and of instructional approaches how to introduce the particle model. It was evaluated in…

  20. Conceptual versus Algorithmic Problem-Solving: Focusing on Problems Dealing with Conservation of Matter in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salta, Katerina; Tzougraki, Chryssa

    2011-01-01

    The students' performance in various types of problems dealing with the conservation of matter during chemical reactions has been investigated at different levels of schooling. The participants were 499 ninth grade (ages 14, 15 years) and 624 eleventh grade (ages 16, 17 years) Greek students. Data was collected using a written questionnaire…

  1. Conceptual versus Algorithmic Problem-Solving: Focusing on Problems Dealing with Conservation of Matter in Chemistry

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salta, Katerina; Tzougraki, Chryssa

    2011-01-01

    The students' performance in various types of problems dealing with the conservation of matter during chemical reactions has been investigated at different levels of schooling. The participants were 499 ninth grade (ages 14, 15 years) and 624 eleventh grade (ages 16, 17 years) Greek students. Data was collected using a written questionnaire…

  2. Soil warming affects soil organic matter chemistry of all density fractions of a mountain forest soil

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schnecker, Jörg; Wanek, Wolfgang; Borken, Werner; Schindlbacher, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Rising temperatures enhance microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and increase thereby the soil CO2 efflux. Elevated microbial activity might differently affect distinct SOM pools, depending on their stability and accessibility. Soil fractions derived from density fractionation have been suggested to represent SOM pools with different turnover times and stability against microbial decomposition. We here investigated the chemical and isotopic composition of bulk soil and three different density fractions of forest soils from a long term warming experiment in the Austrian Alps. At the time of sampling the soils in this experiment had been warmed during the snow-free period for 8 consecutive years. During that time no thermal adaptation of the microbial community could be identified and CO2 release from the soil continued to be elevated by the warming treatment. Our results which included organic C content, total N content, δ13C, δ 14C, δ 15N and the chemical composition, identified by pyrolysis-GC/MS, showed no significant differences in bulk soil between warming treatment and control. The differences in the three individual fractions (free particulate organic matter, occluded particulate organic matter and mineral associated organic matter) were mostly small and the direction of warming induced change was variable with fraction and sampling depth. We did however find statistically significant effects of warming in all density fractions from 0-10 cm depth, 10-20 cm depth or both. Our results also including significant changes in the supposedly more stable mineral associated organic matter fraction where δ 13C values decreased at both sampling depths and the relative proportion of N-bearing compounds decreased at a sampling depth of 10-20 cm. All the observed changes can be attributed to an interplay of enhanced microbial decomposition of SOM and increased root litter input. This study suggests that soil warming destabilizes all density fractions of

  3. The effect of fertilization levels and genetic deployment on soil organic matter chemistry and turnover in managed loblolly pine forests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vogel, J. G.; Jokela, E. J.; He, D.; Hockaday, W. C.; Schuur, E. A.

    2013-12-01

    Soil organic matter (SOM) dynamics were examined for two managed loblolly pine forests (Pinus taeda L.) located in north-central Florida on sandy Spodosols. The study designs were split-plots with the whole plots designated as fertilization levels, and the split-plots full-sib families of loblolly pine. The forests were aged 9 and 10 years at sampling. Roots, wood, and charcoal were hand-picked from SOM and density fractionation (1.6 g/ml) used to further separate SOM into a light (LF) and heavy fraction (HF). LF turnover rates were estimated using radiocarbon and LF chemistry determined with nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR). Family or fertilization level effects on the mass of SOM components were not significant at both sites. The largest proportions of SOM were in the LF (83% and 85%) and wood (6% and 9%). Varying in relative contributions were charcoal (2% and 3%) and the HF (4% and 1%) while fine dead roots were between 1-2% of total SOM. Higher fertilization levels generally depressed fine root (<1 mm) biomass, but whether the effect was significant varied with family and soil horizon. The turnover rate for one family under low fertilization was significantly slower (14 yrs) than the other treatments. This treatment also had a greater proportion of lignin, and given the slow turnover, the results suggest this lignin derived from the previous stand. At the other site lignin and lipids differed significantly (p<0.05) between families. These results suggest that tree genetics in forests can influence SOM chemistry, but that family and the degree of fertilization have little net effect on SOM chemistry and turnover.

  4. Catalysis of Supramolecular Hydrogelation.

    PubMed

    Trausel, Fanny; Versluis, Frank; Maity, Chandan; Poolman, Jos M; Lovrak, Matija; van Esch, Jan H; Eelkema, Rienk

    2016-07-19

    One often thinks of catalysts as chemical tools to accelerate a reaction or to have a reaction run under more benign conditions. As such, catalysis has a role to play in the chemical industry and in lab scale synthesis that is not to be underestimated. Still, the role of catalysis in living systems (cells, organisms) is much more extensive, ranging from the formation and breakdown of small molecules and biopolymers to controlling signal transduction cascades and feedback processes, motility, and mechanical action. Such phenomena are only recently starting to receive attention in synthetic materials and chemical systems. "Smart" soft materials could find many important applications ranging from personalized therapeutics to soft robotics to name but a few. Until recently, approaches to control the properties of such materials were largely dominated by thermodynamics, for instance, looking at phase behavior and interaction strength. However, kinetics plays a large role in determining the behavior of such soft materials, for instance, in the formation of kinetically trapped (metastable) states or the dynamics of component exchange. As catalysts can change the rate of a chemical reaction, catalysis could be used to control the formation, dynamics, and fate of supramolecular structures when the molecules making up these structures contain chemical bonds whose formation or exchange are susceptible to catalysis. In this Account, we describe our efforts to use synthetic catalysts to control the properties of supramolecular hydrogels. Building on the concept of synthesizing the assembling molecule in the self-assembly medium from nonassembling precursors, we will introduce the use of catalysis to change the kinetics of assembler formation and thereby the properties of the resulting material. In particular, we will focus on the synthesis of supramolecular hydrogels where the use of a catalyst provides access to gel materials with vastly different appearance and mechanical

  5. Metallo-supramolecular cyclic polymers.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ke; Zha, Yongping; Peng, Bo; Chen, Yongming; Tew, Gregory N

    2013-10-30

    Cyclic brush polymers represent an exciting new macromolecular topology. For the first time, this new topology has been combined with metallo-supramolecular interactions to construct novel cyclic brush polymers. Here, ring-expansion metathesis polymerization was used to synthesize a universal cyclic template with a polynorbornene backbone, which was further modified with the metal-chelating synthon terpyridine. The terpyridine side chains served as the key supramolecular unit for the creation of cyclic polymer brushes and gels. This metallo-supramolecular functionality allowed direct visualization of the cyclic brush polymers by transmission electron microscopy for the first time. This demonstration should open a new area in which supramolecular interactions are used to build an array of novel cyclic brush copolymers as well as other cyclic-polymer-based architectures generating new materials.

  6. Amphiphiles for DNA Supramolecular Assemblies

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-15

    to drug or biomolecule delivery systems. In order to take advantage of forces that hold nucleic acid helices together, (Watson- Crick/Hoogsteen...supramolecular assemblies that highlight the underlying principles are evident in numerous biological (e.g., lipids) and synthetic (e.g., nanofibers ) systems.2...3). Additionally, they form hydrogels and organogels. The supramolecular systems obtained are promising in many aspects and could lead to new types

  7. Polyoxometalate-based Supramolecular Gel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peilei; Xu, Biao; Liu, Huiling; He, Su; Saleem, Faisal; Wang, Xun

    2013-05-01

    Self-assemblyings of surfactant-encapsulated Wells-Dawson polyoxometalates (SEPs) nanobuilding blocks in butanone and esters yielded supramolecular gels showing thermo and photo responsive properties. The gels can be further polymerized if unsaturated esters were used and subsequently electrospinned into nanowires and non-woven mats. The as-prepared non-woven mats have a Young's modulus as high as 542.55 MPa. It is believed that this supramolecular gel is a good platform for polyoxometalates processing.

  8. Little effects on soil organic matter chemistry of density fractions after seven years of forest soil warming

    PubMed Central

    Schnecker, Jörg; Borken, Werner; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Rising temperatures enhance microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby increase the soil CO2 efflux. Elevated decomposition rates might differently affect distinct SOM pools, depending on their stability and accessibility. Soil fractions derived from density fractionation have been suggested to represent SOM pools with different turnover times and stability against microbial decomposition. To investigate the effect of soil warming on functionally different soil organic matter pools, we here investigated the chemical and isotopic composition of bulk soil and three density fractions (free particulate organic matter, fPOM; occluded particulate organic matter, oPOM; and mineral associated organic matter, MaOM) of a C-rich soil from a long-term warming experiment in a spruce forest in the Austrian Alps. At the time of sampling, the soil in this experiment had been warmed during the snow-free period for seven consecutive years. During that time no thermal adaptation of the microbial community could be identified and CO2 release from the soil continued to be elevated by the warming treatment. Our results, which included organic carbon content, total nitrogen content, δ13C, Δ14C, δ15N and the chemical composition, identified by pyrolysis-GC/MS, showed no significant differences in bulk soil between warming treatment and control. Surprisingly, the differences in the three density fractions were mostly small and the direction of warming induced change was variable with fraction and soil depth. Warming led to reduced N content in topsoil oPOM and subsoil fPOM and to reduced relative abundance of N-bearing compounds in subsoil MaOM. Further, warming increased the δ13C of MaOM at both sampling depths, reduced the relative abundance of carbohydrates while it increased the relative abundance of lignins in subsoil oPOM. As the size of the functionally different SOM pools did not significantly change, we assume that the few and small modifications in SOM

  9. Little effects on soil organic matter chemistry of density fractions after seven years of forest soil warming.

    PubMed

    Schnecker, Jörg; Borken, Werner; Schindlbacher, Andreas; Wanek, Wolfgang

    2016-12-01

    Rising temperatures enhance microbial decomposition of soil organic matter (SOM) and thereby increase the soil CO2 efflux. Elevated decomposition rates might differently affect distinct SOM pools, depending on their stability and accessibility. Soil fractions derived from density fractionation have been suggested to represent SOM pools with different turnover times and stability against microbial decomposition. To investigate the effect of soil warming on functionally different soil organic matter pools, we here investigated the chemical and isotopic composition of bulk soil and three density fractions (free particulate organic matter, fPOM; occluded particulate organic matter, oPOM; and mineral associated organic matter, MaOM) of a C-rich soil from a long-term warming experiment in a spruce forest in the Austrian Alps. At the time of sampling, the soil in this experiment had been warmed during the snow-free period for seven consecutive years. During that time no thermal adaptation of the microbial community could be identified and CO2 release from the soil continued to be elevated by the warming treatment. Our results, which included organic carbon content, total nitrogen content, δ(13)C, Δ(14)C, δ(15)N and the chemical composition, identified by pyrolysis-GC/MS, showed no significant differences in bulk soil between warming treatment and control. Surprisingly, the differences in the three density fractions were mostly small and the direction of warming induced change was variable with fraction and soil depth. Warming led to reduced N content in topsoil oPOM and subsoil fPOM and to reduced relative abundance of N-bearing compounds in subsoil MaOM. Further, warming increased the δ(13)C of MaOM at both sampling depths, reduced the relative abundance of carbohydrates while it increased the relative abundance of lignins in subsoil oPOM. As the size of the functionally different SOM pools did not significantly change, we assume that the few and small modifications

  10. Intelligent Chiral Sensing Based on Supramolecular and Interfacial Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Richards, Gary J.; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Izawa, Hironori; Hill, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    Of the known intelligently-operating systems, the majority can undoubtedly be classed as being of biological origin. One of the notable differences between biological and artificial systems is the important fact that biological materials consist mostly of chiral molecules. While most biochemical processes routinely discriminate chiral molecules, differentiation between chiral molecules in artificial systems is currently one of the challenging subjects in the field of molecular recognition. Therefore, one of the important challenges for intelligent man-made sensors is to prepare a sensing system that can discriminate chiral molecules. Because intermolecular interactions and detection at surfaces are respectively parts of supramolecular chemistry and interfacial science, chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts is a significant topic. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in these fields, including supramolecular hosts for color detection on chiral sensing, indicator-displacement assays, kinetic resolution in supramolecular reactions with analyses by mass spectrometry, use of chiral shape-defined polymers, such as dynamic helical polymers, molecular imprinting, thin films on surfaces of devices such as QCM, functional electrodes, FET, and SPR, the combined technique of magnetic resonance imaging and immunoassay, and chiral detection using scanning tunneling microscopy and cantilever technology. In addition, we will discuss novel concepts in recent research including the use of achiral reagents for chiral sensing with NMR, and mechanical control of chiral sensing. The importance of integration of chiral sensing systems with rapidly developing nanotechnology and nanomaterials is also emphasized. PMID:22163577

  11. Intelligent chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts.

    PubMed

    Ariga, Katsuhiko; Richards, Gary J; Ishihara, Shinsuke; Izawa, Hironori; Hill, Jonathan P

    2010-01-01

    Of the known intelligently-operating systems, the majority can undoubtedly be classed as being of biological origin. One of the notable differences between biological and artificial systems is the important fact that biological materials consist mostly of chiral molecules. While most biochemical processes routinely discriminate chiral molecules, differentiation between chiral molecules in artificial systems is currently one of the challenging subjects in the field of molecular recognition. Therefore, one of the important challenges for intelligent man-made sensors is to prepare a sensing system that can discriminate chiral molecules. Because intermolecular interactions and detection at surfaces are respectively parts of supramolecular chemistry and interfacial science, chiral sensing based on supramolecular and interfacial concepts is a significant topic. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances in these fields, including supramolecular hosts for color detection on chiral sensing, indicator-displacement assays, kinetic resolution in supramolecular reactions with analyses by mass spectrometry, use of chiral shape-defined polymers, such as dynamic helical polymers, molecular imprinting, thin films on surfaces of devices such as QCM, functional electrodes, FET, and SPR, the combined technique of magnetic resonance imaging and immunoassay, and chiral detection using scanning tunneling microscopy and cantilever technology. In addition, we will discuss novel concepts in recent research including the use of achiral reagents for chiral sensing with NMR, and mechanical control of chiral sensing. The importance of integration of chiral sensing systems with rapidly developing nanotechnology and nanomaterials is also emphasized.

  12. Supramolecular Hydrogels Made of the Basic Biological Building Blocks

    PubMed Central

    Du, Xuewen; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Bing

    2014-01-01

    As a consequence of the self-assembly of small organic molecules in water, supramolecular hydrogels are evolving from serendipitous events during organic synthesis to become a new type of materials that promise increased applications in biomedicine. In this focus review, we describe the recent development on the use of basic biological building blocks for creating molecules that act as hydrogelators and the potential applications of the corresponding hydrogels. After introducing the concept of supramolecular hydrogels and defining the scope of this review, we briefly describe the methods for making and characterizing supramolecular hydrogels. Then, we discuss representative hydrogelators according to the categories of their building blocks, such as amino acids, nucleobases, and saccharides, and highlight the applications of the hydrogels when necessary. Finally, we offer our perspectives and outlooks on this fast-growing field at the interface of organic chemistry, materials, biology, and medicine. By providing a snapshot for chemists, engineers, and medical scientists, we hope that this focus review will contribute to the development of multidisciplinary research on supramolecular hydrogels for a wide range of applications in different fields. PMID:24623474

  13. Living supramolecular polymerization realized through a biomimetic approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogi, Soichiro; Sugiyasu, Kazunori; Manna, Swarup; Samitsu, Sadaki; Takeuchi, Masayuki

    2014-03-01

    Various conventional reactions in polymer chemistry have been translated to the supramolecular domain, yet it has remained challenging to devise living supramolecular polymerization. To achieve this, self-organization occurring far from thermodynamic equilibrium—ubiquitously observed in nature—must take place. Prion infection is one example that can be observed in biological systems. Here, we present an ‘artificial infection’ process in which porphyrin-based monomers assemble into nanoparticles, and are then converted into nanofibres in the presence of an aliquot of the nanofibre, which acts as a ‘pathogen’. We have investigated the assembly phenomenon using isodesmic and cooperative models and found that it occurs through a delicate interplay of these two aggregation pathways. Using this understanding of the mechanism taking place, we have designed a living supramolecular polymerization of the porphyrin-based monomers. Despite the fact that the polymerization is non-covalent, the reaction kinetics are analogous to that of conventional chain growth polymerization, and the supramolecular polymers were synthesized with controlled length and narrow polydispersity.

  14. Supramolecular self-assemblies as functional nanomaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Busseron, Eric; Ruff, Yves; Moulin, Emilie; Giuseppone, Nicolas

    2013-07-01

    In this review, we survey the diversity of structures and functions which are encountered in advanced self-assembled nanomaterials. We highlight their flourishing implementations in three active domains of applications: biomedical sciences, information technologies, and environmental sciences. Our main objective is to provide the reader with a concise and straightforward entry to this broad field by selecting the most recent and important research articles, supported by some more comprehensive reviews to introduce each topic. Overall, this compilation illustrates how, based on the rules of supramolecular chemistry, the bottom-up approach to design functional objects at the nanoscale is currently producing highly sophisticated materials oriented towards a growing number of applications with high societal impact.

  15. Controlling supramolecular assembly using electronic effects.

    PubMed

    Aakeröy, Christer B; Epa, Kanishka

    2014-01-01

    Through systematic structural studies using custom designed probe molecules, it has been shown that the balance between hydrogen-bonds in the context of supramolecular chemistry and crystal engineering can be understood and guided by a semiquantitative thermodynamic assessment that integrates theoretical and experimental views of solution-based molecular recognition events. Although pKa values can be used for ranking hydrogen-bond donors/acceptors within a family of compounds, they do not offer reliable information when comparing different functional groups. However, against a backdrop of a simple electrostatic interpretation of hydrogen bonds coupled with a focus on the primary non-covalent interactions, molecular electrostatic potential surfaces can be employed for guiding the synthesis of binary- and ternary co-crystals with the desired connectivity and dimensionality.

  16. What matters? Assessing and developing inquiry and multivariable reasoning skills in high school chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daftedar Abdelhadi, Raghda Mohamed

    Although the Next Generation Science Standards (NGSS) present a detailed set of Science and Engineering Practices, a finer grained representation of the underlying skills is lacking in the standards document. Therefore, it has been reported that teachers are facing challenges deciphering and effectively implementing the standards, especially with regards to the Practices. This analytical study assessed the development of high school chemistry students' (N = 41) inquiry, multivariable causal reasoning skills, and metacognition as a mediator for their development. Inquiry tasks based on concepts of element properties of the periodic table as well as reaction kinetics required students to conduct controlled thought experiments, make inferences, and declare predictions of the level of the outcome variable by coordinating the effects of multiple variables. An embedded mixed methods design was utilized for depth and breadth of understanding. Various sources of data were collected including students' written artifacts, audio recordings of in-depth observational groups and interviews. Data analysis was informed by a conceptual framework formulated around the concepts of coordinating theory and evidence, metacognition, and mental models of multivariable causal reasoning. Results of the study indicated positive change towards conducting controlled experimentation, making valid inferences and justifications. Additionally, significant positive correlation between metastrategic and metacognitive competencies, and sophistication of experimental strategies, signified the central role metacognition played. Finally, lack of consistency in indicating effective variables during the multivariable prediction task pointed towards the fragile mental models of multivariable causal reasoning the students had. Implications for teacher education, science education policy as well as classroom research methods are discussed. Finally, recommendations for developing reform-based chemistry

  17. Workhorse semilocal density functional for condensed matter physics and quantum chemistry.

    PubMed

    Perdew, John P; Ruzsinszky, Adrienn; Csonka, Gábor I; Constantin, Lucian A; Sun, Jianwei

    2009-07-10

    Semilocal density functionals for the exchange-correlation energy are needed for large electronic systems. The Tao-Perdew-Staroverov-Scuseria (TPSS) meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) is semilocal and usefully accurate, but predicts too-long lattice constants. Recent "GGA's for solids" yield good lattice constants but poor atomization energies of molecules. We show that the construction principle for one of them (restoring the density gradient expansion for exchange over a wide range of densities) can be used to construct a "revised TPSS" meta-GGA with accurate lattice constants, surface energies, and atomization energies for ordinary matter.

  18. Programming supramolecular biohybrids as precision therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Ng, David Yuen Wah; Wu, Yuzhou; Kuan, Seah Ling; Weil, Tanja

    2014-12-16

    CONSPECTUS: Chemical programming of macromolecular structures to instill a set of defined chemical properties designed to behave in a sequential and precise manner is a characteristic vision for creating next generation nanomaterials. In this context, biopolymers such as proteins and nucleic acids provide an attractive platform for the integration of complex chemical design due to their sequence specificity and geometric definition, which allows accurate translation of chemical functionalities to biological activity. Coupled with the advent of amino acid specific modification techniques, "programmable" areas of a protein chain become exclusively available for any synthetic customization. We envision that chemically reprogrammed hybrid proteins will bridge the vital link to overcome the limitations of synthetic and biological materials, providing a unique strategy for tailoring precision therapeutics. In this Account, we present our work toward the chemical design of protein- derived hybrid polymers and their supramolecular responsiveness, while summarizing their impact and the advancement in biomedicine. Proteins, in their native form, represent the central framework of all biological processes and are an unrivaled class of macromolecular drugs with immense specificity. Nonetheless, the route of administration of protein therapeutics is often vastly different from Nature's biosynthesis. Therefore, it is imperative to chemically reprogram these biopolymers to direct their entry and activity toward the designated target. As a consequence of the innate structural regularity of proteins, we show that supramolecular interactions facilitated by stimulus responsive chemistry can be intricately designed as a powerful tool to customize their functions, stability, activity profiles, and transportation capabilities. From another perspective, a protein in its denatured, unfolded form serves as a monodispersed, biodegradable polymer scaffold decorated with functional side

  19. Synthesis of Organic Matter of Prebiotic Chemistry at the Protoplanetary Disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snytnikov, Valeriy; Stoynovskaya, Olga; Rudina, Nina

    We have carried out scanning electron microscopic examination of CM carbonaceous chondrites meteorites Migey, Murchison, Staroe Boriskino aged more than 4.56 billion years (about 50 million years from the beginning of the formation of the Solar system). Our study confirmed the conclusion of Rozanov, Hoover and other researchers about the presence of microfossils of bacterial origin in the matrix of all these meteorites. Since the time of the Solar system formation is 60 - 100 million years, the primary biocenosis emerged in the protoplanetary disc of the Solar system before meteorites or simultaneously with them. It means that prebiological processes and RNA world appeared even earlier in the circumsolar protoplanetary disc. Most likely, this appearance of prebiotic chemistry takes place nowday in massive and medium-massive discs of the observed young stellar objects (YSO) class 0 and I. The timescale of the transition from chemical to biological evolution took less than 50 million years for the Solar system. Further evolution of individual biocenosis in a protoplanetary disc associated with varying physico-chemical conditions during the formation of the Solar system bodies. Biocenosis on these bodies could remove or develop under the influence of many cosmic factors and geological processes in the case of Earth. To complete the primary biosphere formation in short evolution time - millions of years - requires highly efficient chemical syntheses. In industrial chemistry for the efficient synthesis of ammonia, hydrogen cyanide, methanol and other organic species, that are the precursors to obtain prebiotic compounds, catalytic reactors of high pressure are used. Thus (1) necessary amount of the proper catalyst in (2) high pressure areas of the disc can trigger these intense syntheses. The disc contains the solids with the size from nanoparticle to pebble. Iron and magnesium is catalytically active ingredient for such solids. The puzzle is a way to provide hydrogen

  20. Adhesion of bacterial pathogens to soil colloidal particles: influences of cell type, natural organic matter, and solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Wenqiang; Walker, Sharon L; Huang, Qiaoyun; Cai, Peng

    2014-04-15

    Bacterial adhesion to granular soil particles is well studied; however, pathogen interactions with naturally occurring colloidal particles (<2 μm) in soil has not been investigated. This study was developed to identify the interaction mechanisms between model bacterial pathogens and soil colloids as a function of cell type, natural organic matter (NOM), and solution chemistry. Specifically, batch adhesion experiments were conducted using NOM-present, NOM-stripped soil colloids, Streptococcus suis SC05 and Escherichia coli WH09 over a wide range of solution pH (4.0-9.0) and ionic strength (IS, 1-100 mM KCl). Cell characterization techniques, Freundlich isotherm, and Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory (sphere-sphere model) were utilized to quantitatively determine the interactions between cells and colloids. The adhesion coefficients (Kf) of S. suis SC05 to NOM-present and NOM-stripped soil colloids were significantly higher than E. coli WH09, respectively. Similarly, Kf values of S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 adhesion to NOM-stripped soil colloids were greater than those colloids with NOM-present, respectively, suggesting NOM inhibits bacterial adhesion. Cell adhesion to soil colloids declined with increasing pH and enhanced with rising IS (1-50 mM). Interaction energy calculations indicate these adhesion trends can be explained by DLVO-type forces, with S. suis SC05 and E. coli WH09 being weakly adhered in shallow secondary energy minima via polymer bridging and charge heterogeneity. S. suis SC05 adhesion decreased at higher IS 100 mM, which is attributed to the change of hydrophobic effect and steric repulsion resulted from the greater presence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) on S. suis SC05 surface as compared to E. coli WH09. Hence, pathogen adhesion to the colloidal material is determined by a combination of DLVO, charge heterogeneity, hydrophobic and polymer interactions as a function of solution chemistry.

  1. Alchemy as studies of life and matter: reconsidering the place of vitalism in early modern chemistry.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ku-ming

    2011-06-01

    Early modern alchemy studied both matter and life, much like today's life sciences. What material life is and how it comes about intrigued alchemists. Many found the answer by assuming a vital principle that served as the source and cause of life. Recent literature has presented important cases in which vitalist formulations incorporated corpuscular or mechanical elements that were characteristic of the New Science and other cases in which vitalist thinking influenced important figures of the Scientific Revolution. Not merely speculative, vitalist ideas also motivated chymical practice. The unity of life science and material science that is found in many formulations of Renaissance alchemy disintegrated in Georg Ernst Stahl's version of post-Cartesian vitalism.

  2. Supramolecular Protein Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, Nelson B.; Wan, Zhu-li; Whittaker, Linda; Hu, Shi-Quan; Huang, Kun; Hua, Qing-xin; Whittaker, Jonathan; Ismail-Beigi, Faramarz; Weiss, Michael A.

    2010-01-01

    Bottom-up control of supramolecular protein assembly can provide a therapeutic nanobiotechnology. We demonstrate that the pharmacological properties of insulin can be enhanced by design of “zinc staples” between hexamers. Paired (i, i+4) His substitutions were introduced at an α-helical surface. The crystal structure contains both classical axial zinc ions and novel zinc ions at hexamer-hexamer interfaces. Although soluble at pH 4, the combined electrostatic effects of the substitutions and bridging zinc ions cause isoelectric precipitation at neutral pH. Following subcutaneous injection in a diabetic rat, the analog effected glycemic control with a time course similar to that of long acting formulation Lantus®. Relative to Lantus, however, the analog discriminates at least 30-fold more stringently between the insulin receptor and mitogenic insulin-like growth factor receptor. Because aberrant mitogenic signaling may be associated with elevated cancer risk, such enhanced specificity may improve safety. Zinc stapling provides a general strategy to modify the pharmacokinetic and biological properties of a subcutaneous protein depot. PMID:20181952

  3. Supramolecular assembly/reassembly processes: molecular motors and dynamers operating at surfaces.

    PubMed

    Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2011-04-01

    Among the many significant advances within the field of supramolecular chemistry over the past decades, the development of the so-called "dynamers" features a direct relevance to materials science. Defined as "combinatorial dynamic polymers", dynamers are constitutional dynamic systems and materials resulting from the application of the principles of supramolecular chemistry to polymer science. Like supramolecular materials in general, dynamers are reversible dynamic multifunctional architectures, capable of modifying their constitution by exchanging, recombining, incorporating components. They may exhibit a variety of novel properties and behave as adaptive materials. In this review we focus on the design of responsive switchable monolayers, i.e. monolayers capable to undergo significant changes in their physical or chemical properties as a result of external stimuli. Scanning tunneling microscopy studies provide direct evidence with a sub-nanometre resolution, on the formation and dynamic response of these self-assembled systems featuring controlled geometries and properties.

  4. Solid State Synthesis Under Supramolecular Control of a 2D Heterotetratopic Self-complementary Tecton Tailored to Halogen Bonding

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-31

    Article 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Solid State Synthesis Under Supramolecular Control of a 2D...Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std. 239.18 Solid state synthesis under supramolecular control of a 2D heterotetratopic self...chloroform molecules. Introduction Solid state synthesis is one of the most fascinating and rapidly emerging fields of Chemistry.1 The interest in this

  5. World Trade Center fine particulate matter--chemistry and toxic respiratory effects: an overview.

    PubMed Central

    Gavett, Stephen H

    2003-01-01

    The 11 September 2001 terrorist attack on New York City's World Trade Center (WTC) caused an unprecedented environmental emergency. The collapse of the towers sent a tremendous cloud of crushed building materials and other pollutants into the air of lower Manhattan. In response to the calamity, federal, state, and city environmental authorities and research institutes devoted enormous resources to evaluate the impact of WTC-derived air pollution on public health. Unfortunately, on the day of the disaster, no air-sampling monitors were operating close to the WTC site to characterize and quantify pollutants in the dust cloud. However, analysis of fallen dust samples collected 5 and 6 days after the attack showed that 1-4% by weight consisted of particles small enough to be respirable (Lioy et al. 2002). These particles included fine particulate matter, or PM(subscript)2.5(/subscript) [PM < 2.5 micro m mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD)], which can be inhaled deep into the lung and is associated with cardiovascular and respiratory health effects. Because of the extremely high concentrations of dust immediately after the collapse of the towers, even a relatively small proportion of PM(subscript)2.5(/subscript) in the dust clouds could have contributed to breathing problems in rescue workers and others who were not wearing protective masks. PMID:12782500

  6. World Trade Center fine particulate matter--chemistry and toxic respiratory effects: an overview.

    PubMed

    Gavett, Stephen H

    2003-06-01

    The 11 September 2001 terrorist attack on New York City's World Trade Center (WTC) caused an unprecedented environmental emergency. The collapse of the towers sent a tremendous cloud of crushed building materials and other pollutants into the air of lower Manhattan. In response to the calamity, federal, state, and city environmental authorities and research institutes devoted enormous resources to evaluate the impact of WTC-derived air pollution on public health. Unfortunately, on the day of the disaster, no air-sampling monitors were operating close to the WTC site to characterize and quantify pollutants in the dust cloud. However, analysis of fallen dust samples collected 5 and 6 days after the attack showed that 1-4% by weight consisted of particles small enough to be respirable (Lioy et al. 2002). These particles included fine particulate matter, or PM(subscript)2.5(/subscript) [PM < 2.5 micro m mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD)], which can be inhaled deep into the lung and is associated with cardiovascular and respiratory health effects. Because of the extremely high concentrations of dust immediately after the collapse of the towers, even a relatively small proportion of PM(subscript)2.5(/subscript) in the dust clouds could have contributed to breathing problems in rescue workers and others who were not wearing protective masks.

  7. Self-Assembly of Optical Molecules with Supramolecular Concepts

    PubMed Central

    Okamoto, Ken; Chithra, Parayalil; Richards, Gary J.; Hill, Jonathan P.; Ariga, Katsuhiko

    2009-01-01

    Fabrication of nano-sized objects is one of the most important issues in nanoscience and nanotechnology. Soft nanomaterials with flexible properties have been given much attention and can be obtained through bottom-up processing from functional molecules, where self-assembly based on supramolecular chemistry and designed assembly have become crucial processes and techniques. Among the various functional molecules, dyes have become important materials in certain areas of nanotechnology and their self-assembling behaviors have been actively researched. In this short review, we briefly introduce recent progress in self-assembly of optical molecules and dyes, based mainly on supramolecular concepts. The introduced examples are classified into four categories: self-assembly of (i) low-molecular-weight dyes and (ii) polymeric dyes and dye self-assembly (iii) in nanoscale architectures and (iv) at surfaces. PMID:19564931

  8. Assessing the Influence of Mineral Surface Chemistry on Soil Organic Matter Stability in the US in Response to Climate Change

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, A.; Heckman, K.; Rasmussen, C.; Harden, J. W.; Johnson, M.; Swanston, C.

    2014-12-01

    Soils represent a significant pool for carbon storage and sequestration. Previous field experiments have indicated that some mineral compositions are more effective in preserving soil organic matter (SOM) from microbial degradation. Due to climate change, it is important to quantify which soil types are changing in mineral surface chemistry. One way to do that is by differentiating the SOM stabilization mechanisms in different soil types at various depths. This study focused on examining the distribution of soil mass and composition by the soils density and mineral classification and the soils stability by measuring the amount of carbon and radiocarbon abundance. The United States Geological Survey collected the soils in Oregon, Mississippi, Alaska, and Arizona. The four different soil types were separated by density using density fractionation. Radiocarbon analysis of the different soils varying in density was conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Lab-Center for Accelerator Mass Spectrometry to determine the 13C/14C ratios. The ratios were used to determine the average age of the carbon in the samples. To determine the composition of the soil types, the soils were processed at Lawrence Berkeley National Lab using Fourier Transform Infrared-Attenuated Total Reflection. Results confirmed the amount of carbon, radiocarbon abundance and composition varied among the sites, thus SOM responds differently to climate change depending on the soil type.

  9. Removal of graphene oxide nanomaterials from aqueous media via coagulation: Effects of water chemistry and natural organic matter.

    PubMed

    Duan, Lin; Hao, Rongjie; Xu, Zhu; He, Xizhen; Adeleye, Adeyemi S; Li, Yao

    2017-02-01

    With the increasing use of graphene oxide (GO) nanomaterials, its possible environmental release and human effects have received much attention. As GO may enter drinking or wastewater treatment systems like other carbonaceous nanomaterials, and have potential impact on human and/or environmental health, its removal efficiency during water treatment is important and requires investigation. In this study, the removal efficiency of GO during water treatment procedure via coagulation was evaluated, and the effects of solution chemistry and natural organic matter on the coagulation-based removal of GO nanomaterials were investigated. The results indicate that the removal efficiency of GO with alum coagulation can reach 80% with 20 mg/L alum dosage at neutral pH, and will not change significantly with higher concentration of alum. The coagulation mechanism and efficiency were strongly affected by the Al species in aqueous phase, which are controlled by pH. Co-existing cations (e.g. Na) may have minimal effect on GO removal efficiency, and the presence of humic acid (HA) suppresses coagulation remarkably at alum concentrations below 40 mg/L. The results from this study provide critical information for predicting the removal efficiency of GO nanomaterials during alum coagulation phase of water treatment procedure.

  10. Advances in switchable supramolecular nanoassemblies.

    PubMed

    Fenske, Tassilo; Korth, Hans-Gert; Mohr, Andreas; Schmuck, Carsten

    2012-01-16

    Supramolecular nanoassemblies are gaining increasing importance as promising new materials with considerable potential for novel and promising applications. Within supramolecular nanoassemblies the connectivity of the monomeric units is based on reversible noncovalent interactions, like van der Waals interactions, hydrogen bonding, or ionic interactions. As the strength of these interactions depends on the molecular surrounding, the formation of nanoassemblies in principle can be controlled externally by changing the environment and/or the molecular shape of the underlying monomer. This way it is not only possible to switch the self-assembly on or off, but also to change between different aggregation states. In this minireview we present some recent selected approaches to supramolecular stimuli-responsive nanoassemblies.

  11. Polyoxometalate-based Supramolecular Gel

    PubMed Central

    He, Peilei; Xu, Biao; Liu, Huiling; He, Su; Saleem, Faisal; Wang, Xun

    2013-01-01

    Self-assemblyings of surfactant-encapsulated Wells-Dawson polyoxometalates (SEPs) nanobuilding blocks in butanone and esters yielded supramolecular gels showing thermo and photo responsive properties. The gels can be further polymerized if unsaturated esters were used and subsequently electrospinned into nanowires and non-woven mats. The as-prepared non-woven mats have a Young's modulus as high as 542.55 MPa. It is believed that this supramolecular gel is a good platform for polyoxometalates processing. PMID:23666013

  12. Pathological-Condition-Driven Construction of Supramolecular Nanoassemblies for Bacterial Infection Detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Li-Li; Ma, Huai-Lei; Qi, Guo-Bin; Zhang, Di; Yu, Faquan; Hu, Zhiyuan; Wang, Hao

    2016-01-13

    A pyropheophorbide-α-based building block (Ppa-PLGVRG-Van) can be used to construct self-aggregated superstructures in vivo for highly specific and sensitive diagnosis of bacterial infection by noninvasive photoacoustic tomography. This in vivo supramolecular chemistry approach opens a new avenue for efficient, rapid, and early-stage disease diagnosis with high sensitivity and specificity.

  13. Formation of vesicles with an organometallic amphiphile bilayer by supramolecular arrangement of metal carbonyl metallosurfactants.

    PubMed

    Parera, Elisabet; Comelles, Francesc; Barnadas, Ramon; Suades, Joan

    2011-04-21

    Metallo-vesicles are formed in water medium as a result of the supramolecular arrangement of molybdenum carbonyl metallosurfactants. These new kind of surfactants contain a hydrophobic metal carbonyl fragment and are easily prepared from surfactant phosphine ligands. © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  14. Effect of invader litter chemistries on soil organic matter compositions: consequences of Polygonum cuspidatum and Pueraria lobata invasions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tharayil, N.; Tamura, M.

    2012-12-01

    Carbon fixation during photosynthesis forms the precursor of all organic carbon in soil and the predominant source of energy that drives soil microbial processes; hence the molecular identity of the fixed carbon could influence the formation of soil organic matter (SOM). Due to their high resource acquisition and resource use efficiencies, some invasive plants can input disproportionately high quantities of litter that are qualitatively distinctive, and this could influence the accrual of organic carbon and overall carbon cycling in invaded habitats. Hence, we hypothesized that invasive plants with unique litter chemistries would significantly influence the overall carbon cycling in the invaded soils. We tested this hypothesis by comparing plants exhibiting recalcitrant vs. labile litter chemistries using japanese knotweed (Polygonum cuspidatum) and kudzu (Pueraria lobata), respectively. Japanese knotweed produces low litter abundant in polyphenols which selectively hinders microbially mediated decomposition and re-synthesis; whereas kudzu produces low C:N, high quality litter that can stimulate microbial decomposition. Soil samples were collected at 5-cm intervals and from inside and outside 15 to 20 year old stands of the invasive species. The novelty of our study was that both of our study species were invading into soils of contrasting substrate qualities relative to the invading litter quality. The molecular composition of carbon in the soils and the degradation stage of the SOM were assessed with a biomarker approach using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry to determine the source of biomolecules (plant or microbes). Stability of SOM fractions was assessed through oxidation with hydrogen peroxide, serving as a proxy of biological degradation, followed by stable isotope analysis. Fungal communities dominated the uppermost soils under knotweed whereas kudzu litter suppressed fungal biomass in the top 10-cm. In constrast, increase in active microbial biomass C

  15. Revisiting the concept of recalcitrance and organic matter persistence in soils and aquatic systems: Does environment trump chemistry?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marin-Spiotta, E.

    2014-12-01

    Most ecological models of decomposition rely on plant litter chemistry. However, growing evidence suggests that the chemical composition of organic matter (OM) is not a good predictor of its eventual fate in terrestrial or aquatic environments. New data on variable decomposition rates of select organic compounds challenge concepts of chemical recalcitrance, i.e. the inherent ability of certain molecular structures to resist biodegradation. The role of environmental or "ecosystem" properties on influencing decomposition dates back to some of the earliest research on soil OM. Despite early recognition that the physical and aqueous matrices are critical in determining the fate of organic compounds, the prevailing paradigm hinges on intrinsic chemical properties as principal predictors of decay rate. Here I build upon recent reviews and discuss new findings that contribute to three major transformations in our understanding of OM persistence: (1) a shift away from an emphasis on chemical recalcitrance as a primary predictor of turnover, (2) new interpretations of radiocarbon ages which challenge predictions of reactivity, and (3) the recognition that most detrital OM accumulating in soils and in water has been microbially processed. Predictions of OM persistence due to aromaticity are challenged by high variability in lignin and black C turnover observed in terrestrial and aquatic environments. Contradictions in the behavior of lignin are, in part, influenced by inconsistent methodologies among research communities. Even black C, long considered to be one of the most recalcitrant components of OM, is susceptible to biodegradation, challenging predictions of the stability of aromatic structures. At the same time, revised interpretations of radiocarbon data suggest that organic compounds can acquire long mean residence times by various mechanisms independent of their molecular structure. Understanding interactions between environmental conditions and biological

  16. Removal of triazine-based pollutants from water by carbon nanotubes: Impact of dissolved organic matter (DOM) and solution chemistry.

    PubMed

    Engel, Maya; Chefetz, Benny

    2016-12-01

    Adsorption of organic pollutants by carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in the environment or removal of pollutants during water purification require deep understanding of the impacts of the presence of dissolved organic matter (DOM). DOM is an integral part of environmental systems and plays a key role affecting the behavior of organic pollutants. In this study, the effects of solution chemistry (pH and ionic strength) and the presence of DOM on the removal of atrazine and lamotrigine by single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) was investigated. The solubility of atrazine slightly decreased (∼5%) in the presence of DOM, whereas that of lamotrigine was significantly enhanced (by up to ∼70%). Simultaneous introduction of DOM and pollutant resulted in suppression of removal of both atrazine and lamotrigine, which was attributed to DOM-pollutant competition or blockage of adsorption sites by DOM. However the decrease in removal of lamotrigine was also a result of its complexation with DOM. Pre-introduction of DOM significantly reduced pollutant adsorption by the SWCNTs, whereas introduction of DOM after the pollutant resulted in the release of adsorbed atrazine and lamotrigine from the SWCNTs. These data imply that DOM exhibits higher affinity for the adsorption sites than the triazine-based pollutants. In the absence of DOM atrazine was a more effective competitor than lamotrigine for adsorption sites in SWCNTs. However, competition between pollutants in the presence of DOM revealed lamotrigine as the better competitor. Our findings help unravel the complex DOM-organic pollutant-CNT system and will aid in CNT-implementation in water-purification technologies.

  17. Encoding complexity within supramolecular analogues of frustrated magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairns, Andrew B.; Cliffe, Matthew J.; Paddison, Joseph A. M.; Daisenberger, Dominik; Tucker, Matthew G.; Coudert, François-Xavier; Goodwin, Andrew L.

    2016-05-01

    The solid phases of gold(I) and/or silver(I) cyanides are supramolecular assemblies of inorganic polymer chains in which the key structural degrees of freedom—namely, the relative vertical shifts of neighbouring chains—are mathematically equivalent to the phase angles of rotating planar (‘XY’) spins. Here, we show how the supramolecular interactions between chains can be tuned to mimic different magnetic interactions. In this way, the structures of gold(I) and/or silver(I) cyanides reflect the phase behaviour of triangular XY magnets. Complex magnetic states predicted for this family of magnets—including collective spin-vortices of relevance to data storage applications—are realized in the structural chemistry of these cyanide polymers. Our results demonstrate how chemically simple inorganic materials can behave as structural analogues of otherwise inaccessible ‘toy’ spin models and also how the theoretical understanding of those models allows control over collective (‘emergent’) phenomena in supramolecular systems.

  18. Supramolecular interfacial architectures for biosensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Fang; Yao, Danfeng; Christensen, Danica; Neumann, Thomas; Sinner, Eva-Kathrin; Knoll, Wolfgang

    2004-12-01

    This contribution summarizes some of our efforts in designing, assembling and functionally characterizing supramolecular interfacial architectures for bio-affinity studies and for biosensor development. All the surface interaction studies will be based on the recently introduced novel sensor platforms involving surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS) and -microscopy (SPFM). Emphasis will be put on documenting the distance-dependence of fluorescence intensity at the metal-dielectric interface and utilizing this principle to optimize the conformation/orientation of the interfacial supra-molecular sensor coatings. This is exemplified by a number of examples, including a layer-by-layer assembly system, antibody-antigen interactions, oligonucleotide-oligonucleotide, and oligonucleotide-PCR amplicon hybridization. For practical sensing purposes, a three-dimensionally extended surface coating is then employed to overcome the fluorescence quenching problem on a planar matrix. A commercial dextran layer is shown to be an optimized matrix for SPFS, with an example of a protein-binding study.

  19. Supramolecular catalysis beyond enzyme mimics.

    PubMed

    Meeuwissen, Jurjen; Reek, Joost N H

    2010-08-01

    Supramolecular catalysis - the assembly of catalyst species by harnessing multiple weak intramolecular interactions - has, until recently, been dominated by enzyme-inspired approaches. Such approaches often attempt to create an enzyme-like 'active site' and have concentrated on reactions similar to those catalysed by enzymes themselves. Here, we discuss the application of supramolecular assembly to the more traditional transition metal catalysis and to small-molecule organocatalysis. The modularity of self-assembled multicomponent catalysts means that a relatively small pool of catalyst components can provide rapid access to a large number of catalysts that can be evaluated for industrially relevant reactions. In addition, we discuss how catalyst-substrate interactions can be tailored to direct substrates along particular reaction paths and selectivities.

  20. Evidence for linkages between ecoenzyme activity and soil organic matter chemistry following encroachment of leguminous woody plant into grasslands.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, Timothy; Stott, Diane; Boutton, Thomas; Creamer, Courtney; Olk, Dan

    2010-05-01

    The encroachment of woody plants into grasslands is a worldwide phenomenon. In the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas, subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by the N-fixing tree Prosopis glandulosa have largely replaced native grasslands as a result of fire suppression and extensive cattle grazing. This land cover change has resulted in the increase of belowground stocks of C, N, and P, changes to the amount and chemical nature of soil-stabilized plant biopolymers, and the composition and activity of soil microbes. Given that extracellular enzymes produced by plants and microbes are the principal means by which complex compounds are degraded and that the production of such enzymes is triggered or suppressed by changes in substrate and nutrient availability we sought to relate how these fundamental changes in this ecosystem are reflected in the activity of soil stabilized ecoenzymes and soil organic matter (SOM) chemistry in this system. We investigated a chronosequence of woody encroachment (14-86 yrs) into a C4-dominant grassland. We related the potential activities of five extracellular enzymes (arylamidase, acid phosphatase, β-glucosidase, β-glucosaminidase (NAGase, polyphenoloxidase (PPO)) and a general marker for hydrolytic activity, fluorescein diacetate (FDA) to the molecular composition and concentration of total hydrolysable amino acids and amino sugars, sugars, as well as CuO extractable lignin and substituted fatty acid to. When normalized to dry weight soil all chemical components increase in concentration with cluster age and all clusters have greater concentrations than background grasslands. All enzymes activities exhibit higher potential activity in woody clusters than grasslands but only NAGase and FDA increase with cluster age when normalized to dry weight of soil. Conversely, when normalized to SOC only lignin phenols, hydroxyl proline, and glucose from cellulose are positively correlated with cluster age indicating a selective accrual with

  1. Linkages between land Cover, enzymes, and soil organic matter chemistry following encroachment of leguminous woody plant into grasslands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filley, T. R.; Stott, D. E.; Boutton, T. W.; Creamer, C. A.; Olk, D.

    2009-12-01

    In the Rio Grande Plains of southern Texas, subtropical thorn woodlands dominated by the N-fixing tree Prosopis glandulosa have largely replaced native grasslands over the last 150 years as a result of fire suppression and over grazing. This land cover change has resulted in the increase of belowground stocks of C, N, and P, changes to the amount and chemical nature of soil-stabilized plant biopolymers, and the composition and activity of soil microbes. Given that extracellular enzymes produced by plants and microbes are the principal means by which complex compounds are degraded and the production of such enzymes is triggered or suppressed by changes in primary input and nutrient availability we sought to relate how these fundamental changes in this ecosystem are reflected in the activity of soil stabilized extracellular enzymes and soil organic matter (SOM) chemistry in this system. We focused upon a successional chronosequence from C4-dominant grassland to woody patches of up to 86 yrs age since mesquite establishment. We related the molecular composition and concentration of hydrolysable amino acids and amino sugars, as well as CuO extractable lignin and substituted fatty acid to the potential activities of five extracellular enzymes (arylamidase, acid phosphatase, β-glucosidase, β-glucosaminidase (NAGase, polyphenoloxidase (PPO)) and a general marker for hydrolytic activity, fluorescein diacetate (FDA). Each of these enzymes, with the exception of PPO, showed higher potential activity in soils from woody clusters than grasslands and had activities generally well correlated to carbon content. PPO, often defined as a proxy for microbial lignin decay activity, showed no statistical difference between grassland and forest sites and no significant relationship to soil C content. Yields of total amino acids and amino sugars all show increases in content with cluster age when normalized to soil mass, as did the enzyme activities targeted to their decomposition, but

  2. Beyond molecules: mesoporous supramolecular frameworks self-assembled from coordination cages and inorganic anions.

    PubMed

    Luo, Dong; Zhou, Xiao-Ping; Li, Dan

    2015-05-18

    Biological function arises by the assembly of individual biomolecular modules into large aggregations or highly complex architectures. A similar strategy is adopted in supramolecular chemistry to assemble complex and highly ordered structures with advanced functions from simple components. Here we report a series of diamond-like supramolecular frameworks featuring mesoporous cavities, which are assembled from metal-imidazolate coordination cages and various anions. Small components (metal ions, amines, aldehydes, and anions) are assembled into the hierarchical complex structures through multiple interactions including covalent bonds, dative bonds, and weak C-H⋅⋅⋅X (X=O, F, and π) hydrogen bonds. The mesoporous cavities are large enough to trap organic dye molecules, coordination cages, and vitamin B12. The study is expected to inspire new types of crystalline supramolecular framework materials based on coordination motifs and inorganic ions. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  3. A Molecular Artisans Guide to Supramolecular Coordination Complexes and Metal Organic Frameworks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xialu; Young, David J.; Hor, T. S. Andy

    2015-10-01

    As molecular synthesis advances, we are beginning to learn control of not only the chemical reactivity (and function) of molecules, but also of their interactions with other molecules. It is this basic idea that has led to the current explosion of supramolecular science and engineering. Parallel to this development, chemists have been actively pursuing the design of very large molecules using basic molecular building blocks. Herein, we review the general development of supramolecular chemistry and particularly of two new branches: supramolecular coordination complexes (SCCs) and metal organic frameworks (MOFs). These two fields are discussed in detail with typical examples to illustrate what is now possible and what challenges lie ahead for tomorrow's molecular artisans.

  4. Optically responsive supramolecular polymer glasses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balkenende, Diederik W. R.; Monnier, Christophe A.; Fiore, Gina L.; Weder, Christoph

    2016-03-01

    The reversible and dynamic nature of non-covalent interactions between the constituting building blocks renders many supramolecular polymers stimuli-responsive. This was previously exploited to create thermally and optically healable polymers, but it proved challenging to achieve high stiffness and good healability. Here we present a glass-forming supramolecular material that is based on a trifunctional low-molecular-weight monomer ((UPyU)3TMP). Carrying three ureido-4-pyrimidinone (UPy) groups, (UPyU)3TMP forms a dynamic supramolecular polymer network, whose properties are governed by its cross-linked architecture and the large content of the binding motif. This design promotes the formation of a disordered glass, which, in spite of the low molecular weight of the building block, displays typical polymeric behaviour. The material exhibits a high stiffness and offers excellent coating and adhesive properties. On account of reversible dissociation and the formation of a low-viscosity liquid upon irradiation with ultraviolet light, rapid optical healing as well as (de)bonding on demand is possible.

  5. Optically responsive supramolecular polymer glasses

    PubMed Central

    Balkenende, Diederik W. R.; Monnier, Christophe A.; Fiore, Gina L.; Weder, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    The reversible and dynamic nature of non-covalent interactions between the constituting building blocks renders many supramolecular polymers stimuli-responsive. This was previously exploited to create thermally and optically healable polymers, but it proved challenging to achieve high stiffness and good healability. Here we present a glass-forming supramolecular material that is based on a trifunctional low-molecular-weight monomer ((UPyU)3TMP). Carrying three ureido-4-pyrimidinone (UPy) groups, (UPyU)3TMP forms a dynamic supramolecular polymer network, whose properties are governed by its cross-linked architecture and the large content of the binding motif. This design promotes the formation of a disordered glass, which, in spite of the low molecular weight of the building block, displays typical polymeric behaviour. The material exhibits a high stiffness and offers excellent coating and adhesive properties. On account of reversible dissociation and the formation of a low-viscosity liquid upon irradiation with ultraviolet light, rapid optical healing as well as (de)bonding on demand is possible. PMID:26983805

  6. Non-equilibrium supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Markvoort, Albert J; de Greef, Tom F A; Hermans, Thomas M

    2017-03-28

    Supramolecular polymerization has been traditionally focused on the thermodynamic equilibrium state, where one-dimensional assemblies reside at the global minimum of the Gibbs free energy. The pathway and rate to reach the equilibrium state are irrelevant, and the resulting assemblies remain unchanged over time. In the past decade, the focus has shifted to kinetically trapped (non-dissipative non-equilibrium) structures that heavily depend on the method of preparation (i.e., pathway complexity), and where the assembly rates are of key importance. Kinetic models have greatly improved our understanding of competing pathways, and shown how to steer supramolecular polymerization in the desired direction (i.e., pathway selection). The most recent innovation in the field relies on energy or mass input that is dissipated to keep the system away from the thermodynamic equilibrium (or from other non-dissipative states). This tutorial review aims to provide the reader with a set of tools to identify different types of self-assembled states that have been explored so far. In particular, we aim to clarify the often unclear use of the term "non-equilibrium self-assembly" by subdividing systems into dissipative, and non-dissipative non-equilibrium states. Examples are given for each of the states, with a focus on non-dissipative non-equilibrium states found in one-dimensional supramolecular polymerization.

  7. Supramolecular nanoparticles that target phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase overcome insulin resistance and exert pronounced antitumor efficacy

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Ashish A.; Roy, Bhaskar; Rao, Poornima S.; Wyant, Gregory A.; Mahmoud, Ayaat; Ramachandran, Madhumitha; Sengupta, Poulomi; Goldman, Aaron; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Basu, Sudipta; Mashelkar, Raghunath A; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Dinulescu, Daniela M.; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2013-01-01

    The centrality of phosphatidylinositol-3-kinase (PI3K) in cancer etiology is well established, but clinical translation of PI3K inhibitors has been limited by feedback signaling, suboptimal intra-tumoral concentration and an insulin resistance ‘class effect’. The current study was designed to explore the use of supramolecular nanochemistry for targeting PI3K to enhance antitumor efficacy and potentially overcome these limitations. PI3K inhibitor structures were rationally modified using a cholesterol-based derivative, facilitating supramolecular nanoassembly with L-α-phosphatidylcholine and DSPE-PEG. The supramolecular nanoparticles that were assembled were physicochemically characterized and functionally evaluated in vitro. Antitumor efficacy was quantified in vivo using 4T1 breast cancer and K-RasLSL/+/Ptenfl/fl ovarian cancer models, with effects on glucose homeostasis evaluated using an insulin sensitivity test. The use of PI103 and PI828 as surrogate molecules to engineer the supramolecular nanoparticles highlighted the need to keep design principles in perspective; specifically, potency of the active molecule and the linker chemistry were critical principles for efficacy, similar to antibody-drug conjugates. We found that the supramolecular nanoparticles exerted a temporally-sustained inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, S6K and 4EBP in vivo. These effects were associated with increased antitumor efficacy and survival as compared with PI103 and PI828. Efficacy was further increased by decorating the nanoparticle surface with tumor-homing peptides. Notably, the use of supramolecular nanoparticles abrogated the insulin resistance that has been associated widely with other PI3K inhibitors. This study provides a preclinical foundation for the use of supramolecular nanochemistry to overcome current challenges associated with PI3K inhibitors, offering a paradigm for extension to other molecularly targeted therapeutics being explored for cancer treatment

  8. International journal of quantum chemistry. Quantum Chemistry Symposium Number 27: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Atomic, Molecular, and Condensed Matter Theory and Computational Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lowdin, Per-Olov; Ohrn, N. Y.; Sabin, John R.; Zerner, Michael C.

    1993-03-01

    The topics covered at the 33rd annual Sanibel Symposium, organized by the faculty and staff of the Quantum Theory Project of the University of Florida, and held March 13 - 20, 1993, include advanced scientific computing, interaction of photons and matter, quantum molecular dynamics, electronic structure methods, polymeric systems, and quantum chemical methods for extended systems.

  9. Supramolecular Chemistry of 4,4'-Bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide in Transition Metal Complexes: A Rich Diversity of Co-ordinate, Hydrogen-Bond and Aromatic Stacking Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Junhua; Hubberstey, Peter; Champness, Neil R.; Schröder, Martin

    4,4'-Bipyridine-N,N'-dioxide (L1) has enormous flexibility as a supramolecular linker since it can be involved not only in co-ordinate and hydrogen bonds via its N,N'-dioxide oxygen centres, but the pyridine-N-oxide rings can also form aromatic π-π stacking interactions. Thus, L1 can bridge between, or act as a pendant ligand to metal centres and can support hydrogen-bonds within a lattice in a site remote from the metal centre. Of the structurally characterised transition metal complexes abstracted from the literature for this review, 26 form molecular compounds, 14 form 1D chains, 9 form 2D sheets of either 36, 44 or 63 topology, while 5 form 3D networks with either 41263 (α-Po type) or 48668 topology. To target multidimensional architectures it has been found to be necessary to avoid aqueous solutions and strongly co-ordinating anions, and consequently the synthesis of multidimensional L1-bridged transition metal co-ordination polymers has usually involved reaction of L1 with metal salts of weakly co-ordinating anions in low molecular weight alcohols. Of the 98 distinct molecules of L1 reported for complexes in the literature, 42 are bridging, 36 pendant and 20 are non-co-ordinated hydrogen-bonded molecules. Approximately 75% of the bridging L1 molecules adopt an anti-conformation, while the remainder adopt a syn-conformation. This prevalence of the anti-conformation contrasts markedly with the situation observed for lanthanide compounds, for which approximately 75% adopt a syn-conformation. A number of trends in the co-ordination behaviour of L1 with transition metals can be identified. Co-ordination to metal centres is based on sp 2 hybridised oxygen donors, but the π-interaction between the oxygen p z orbital and the aromatic ring is sufficiently weak that the oxygen lone pairs are normally twisted out of the plane of the pyridine-N-oxide by a steric clash between the metal centre and the α-hydrogen of the pyridine ring. As a result of this steric

  10. Supramolecular polymers constructed by orthogonal self-assembly based on host-guest and metal-ligand interactions.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peifa; Yan, Xuzhou; Huang, Feihe

    2015-02-07

    Supramolecular polymers constructed by orthogonal self-assembly based on host-guest and metal-ligand interactions are attracting increasing attention currently because of their interesting properties and potential applications. Host-guest interactions impart these polymers with good selectivity and convenient enviro-responsiveness, and metal-ligand interactions endow them with various coordination geometries, strong yet tunable coordination binding abilities, as well as magnetic, redox, photophysical, and electrochromic properties. Therefore, supramolecular polymers constructed by orthogonal host-guest and metal-ligand interactions have wide applications in the fields of soft matter, fluorescence sensing, heterocatalysis, electronics, gas storage, etc. In this critical review, we will address the recent development of supramolecular polymeric systems involving metal-ligand interactions and host-guest molecular recognition. Specifically, we classify the related supramolecular polymers depending on the types of macrocyclic hosts, and highlight their intriguing properties originating from the elegant combination of host-guest complexation and metal centers.

  11. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  12. Chemistry on Stamps.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schreck, James O.

    1986-01-01

    Suggests how postage stamps can be incorporated into chemistry teaching. Categories considered include emergence of chemistry as a science, metric system, atoms (and molecules and ions), stoichiometry, energy relationships in chemical systems, chemical bonding, nuclear chemistry, biochemistry, geochemistry, matter (gases, liquids, and solids),…

  13. Highly Flexible, Tough, and Self-Healing Supramolecular Polymeric Materials Using Host-Guest Interaction.

    PubMed

    Nakahata, Masaki; Takashima, Yoshinori; Harada, Akira

    2015-09-23

    Flexible, tough, and self-healable polymeric materials are promising to be a solution to the energy problem by substituting for conventional heavy materials. A fusion of supramolecular chemistry and polymer chemistry is a powerful method to create such intelligent materials. Here, a supramolecular polymeric material using multipoint molecular recognition between cyclodextrin (CD) and hydrophobic guest molecules at polymer side chain is reported. A transparent, flexible, and tough hydrogel (host-guest gel) is formed by a simple preparation procedure. The host-guest gel shows self-healing property in both wet state and dry state due to reversible nature of host-guest interaction. The practical utility of the host-guest gel as a scratch curable coating is demonstrated.

  14. The beauty of chemistry in the words of writers and in the hands of scientists.

    PubMed

    Venturi, Margherita; Marchi, Enrico; Balzani, Vincenzo

    2012-01-01

    Chemistry is a central science because all the processes that sustain life are based on chemical reactions, and all things that we use in everyday life are natural or artificial chemical compounds. Chemistry is also a fantastic world populated by an unbelievable number of nanometric objects called molecules, the smallest entities that have distinct shapes, sizes, and properties. Molecules are the words of matter. Indeed, most of the other sciences have been permeated by the concepts of chemistry and the language of molecules. Like words, molecules contain specific pieces of information that are revealed when they interact with one another or when they are stimulated by photons or electrons. In the hands of chemists, molecules, particularly when they are suitably combined or assembled to create supramolecular systems, can play a variety of functions, even more complex and more clever than those invented by nature. The wonderful world of chemistry has inspired scientists not only to prepare new molecules or investigate new chemical processes, but also to create masterpieces. Some nice stories based on chemical concepts (1) show that there cannot be borders on the Earth, (2) underline that there is a tight connection among all forms of matter, and (3) emphasize the irreplaceable role of sunlight.

  15. Biocatalytic induction of supramolecular order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Andrew R.; Roy, Sangita; Arora, Meenakshi; Das, Apurba K.; Hodson, Nigel; Murray, Paul; Marshall, Stephen; Javid, Nadeem; Sefcik, Jan; Boekhoven, Job; van Esch, Jan H.; Santabarbara, Stefano; Hunt, Neil T.; Ulijn, Rein V.

    2010-12-01

    Supramolecular gels, which demonstrate tunable functionalities, have attracted much interest in a range of areas, including healthcare, environmental protection and energy-related technologies. Preparing these materials in a reliable manner is challenging, with an increased level of kinetic defects observed at higher self-assembly rates. Here, by combining biocatalysis and molecular self-assembly, we have shown the ability to more quickly access higher-ordered structures. By simply increasing enzyme concentration, supramolecular order expressed at molecular, nano- and micro-levels is dramatically enhanced, and, importantly, the gelator concentrations remain identical. Amphiphile molecules were prepared by attaching an aromatic moiety to a dipeptide backbone capped with a methyl ester. Their self-assembly was induced by an enzyme that hydrolysed the ester. Different enzyme concentrations altered the catalytic activity and size of the enzyme clusters, affecting their mobility. This allowed structurally diverse materials that represent local minima in the free energy landscape to be accessed based on a single gelator structure.

  16. Supramolecular nanocarriers with photoresponsive cargo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Tang, Sicheng; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Raymo, FranÒ«isco M.

    2016-03-01

    The covalent integration of fluorescent and photoswitchable components within the same molecular skeleton can be exploited to activate fluorescence under optical control. Specifically, a photoswitchable oxazine heterocycle can be connected to either a coumarin or a borondipyrromethene fluorophore. Illumination of the resulting molecular dyads at an appropriate activation wavelength either opens the heterocycle reversibly or cleaves it irreversibly, depending on the relative positions of its methylene and nitro substituents. These photochemical transformations shift bathochromically the main absorption band of the fluorophore and allow its selective excitation at a given wavelength. These hydrophobic molecular dyads can be entrapped within the hydrophobic interior of self-assembling nanoparticles of amphiphilic polymer. The supramolecular envelope around the switchable compounds enables their transfer into aqueous environments and their operation under these conditions with minimal influence on their photochemical and photophysical properties. The reversible fluorescence activation, possible in one instance, imposes intermittence on the detected emission and offers the opportunity to resolve closely-spaced nanocarriers in time to reconstruct images with subdiffraction resolution. The irreversible fluorescence activation, possible in the other, maintains emission on after the activation event and permits the monitoring of the diffusion of the activated nanocarriers in real time with the sequential acquisition of images. Thus, these operating principles to solubilize and operate photoswitchable fluorophores in aqueous environments with the aid of supramolecular nanocarriers can lead to valuable protocols to image specimens with subdiffraction resolution and to monitor dynamic events noninvasively.

  17. Supramolecular photochemistry and solar cells

    PubMed

    Iha

    2000-01-01

    Supramolecular photochemistry as well as solar cells are fascinating topics of current interest in Inorganic Photochemistry and very active research fields which have attracted wide attention in last two decades. A brief outline of the investigations in these fields carried out in our Laboratory of Inorganic Photochemistry and Energy Conversion is given here with no attempt of an exhaustive coverage of the literature. The emphasis is placed on recent work and information on the above mentioned subjects. Three types of supramolecular systems have been the focus of this work: (i) cage-type coordination compounds; (ii) second-sphere coordination compounds, exemplified by ion-pair photochemistry of cobalt complexes and (iii) covalently-linked systems. In the latter, modulation of the photoluminescence and photochemistry of some rhenium complexes are discussed. Solar energy conversion and development of thin-layer photoelectrochemical solar cells based on sensitization of nanocrystalline semiconductor films by some ruthenium polypyridyl complexes are presented as an important application that resulted from specifically engineered artificial assemblies.

  18. Supercooled Water in Supramolecular Hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiener, Clinton; Vogt, Bryan; Weiss, R. A.

    The suppression of water crystallization with appreciable water supercooling is challenging due to its large enthalpy of fusion. A common theme to supercool water is to confine the water in the pores of microporous/mesoporous solids where mechanical confinement prevents water crystallization. Nature takes a different approach with crystallization suppression through a combination of preferential adsorption on ice nuclei and confinement between hydrophobic residues using organic components only. Here, we demonstrate that mechanically robust confinement within a hard material is not necessary to significantly supercool water. In this case, a supramolecular hydrogel, based on a random amphiphilic copolymer, is used to provide soft confinement of water between the hydrophobic aggregates with an interdomain spacing <8 nm. Small angle neutron scattering (SANS) provides insight into the structural evolution of the supramolecular structure of the hydrogel on supercooling. The structural changes are sensitive to the composition of the copolymer as determined by contrast variation SANS. Similarly, the dynamics of both the copolymer and water are probed using quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS). Using QENS, a highly mobile water phase (tau ~23 ps) is identified to be present even when slowly cooling to as low as 220K.

  19. Multivalent supramolecular dendrimer-based drugs.

    PubMed

    Galeazzi, Simone; Hermans, Thomas M; Paolino, Marco; Anzini, Maurizio; Mennuni, Laura; Giordani, Antonio; Caselli, Gianfranco; Makovec, Francesco; Meijer, E W; Vomero, Salvatore; Cappelli, Andrea

    2010-01-11

    Supramolecular complexes consisting of a hydrophobic dendrimer host [DAB-dendr-(NHCONH-Ad)(64)] as well as solubilizing and bioactive guest molecules have been synthesized using a noncovalent approach. The guest-host supramolecular assembly is first preassembled in chloroform and transferred via the neat phase to aqueous solution. The bioactive guest molecules can bind to a natural (serotonin 5-HT(3)) receptor with nanomolar affinity as well as to the synthetic dendrimer receptor in aqueous solution, going toward a dynamic multivalent supramolecular construct capable of adapting itself to a multimeric receptor motif.

  20. The fate or organic matter during planetary accretion - Preliminary studies of the organic chemistry of experimentally shocked Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tingle, Tracy N.; Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Becker, Christopher H.

    1992-01-01

    The fate of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites during hypervelocity (1-2 km/sec) impacts is investigated using results of experiments in which three samples of the Murchison (CM2) carbonaceous chondrite were shocked to 19, 20, and 36 GPa and analyzed by highly sensitive thermal-desorption photoionization mass spectrometry (SALI). The thermal-desorptive SALI mass spectra of unshocked CM2 material revealed presence of indigenous aliphatic, aromatic, sulfur, and organosulfur compounds, and samples shocked to about 20 GPa showed little or no loss of organic matter. On the other hand, samples shocked to 36 GPa exhibited about 70 percent loss of organic material and a lower alkene/alkane ratio than did the starting material. The results suggest that it is unlikely that the indigenous organic matter in carbonaceous chondritelike planetesimals could have survived the impact on the earth in the later stages of earth's accretion.

  1. The fate or organic matter during planetary accretion - Preliminary studies of the organic chemistry of experimentally shocked Murchison meteorite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tingle, Tracy N.; Tyburczy, James A.; Ahrens, Thomas J.; Becker, Christopher H.

    1992-01-01

    The fate of organic matter in carbonaceous meteorites during hypervelocity (1-2 km/sec) impacts is investigated using results of experiments in which three samples of the Murchison (CM2) carbonaceous chondrite were shocked to 19, 20, and 36 GPa and analyzed by highly sensitive thermal-desorption photoionization mass spectrometry (SALI). The thermal-desorptive SALI mass spectra of unshocked CM2 material revealed presence of indigenous aliphatic, aromatic, sulfur, and organosulfur compounds, and samples shocked to about 20 GPa showed little or no loss of organic matter. On the other hand, samples shocked to 36 GPa exhibited about 70 percent loss of organic material and a lower alkene/alkane ratio than did the starting material. The results suggest that it is unlikely that the indigenous organic matter in carbonaceous chondritelike planetesimals could have survived the impact on the earth in the later stages of earth's accretion.

  2. The ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus converts organic matter in plant litter using a trimmed brown-rot mechanism involving Fenton chemistry.

    PubMed

    Rineau, Francois; Roth, Doris; Shah, Firoz; Smits, Mark; Johansson, Tomas; Canbäck, Björn; Olsen, Peter Bjarke; Persson, Per; Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Lindquist, Erika; Grigoriev, Igor V; Lange, Lene; Tunlid, Anders

    2012-06-01

    Soils in boreal forests contain large stocks of carbon. Plants are the main source of this carbon through tissue residues and root exudates. A major part of the exudates are allocated to symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi. In return, the plant receives nutrients, in particular nitrogen from the mycorrhizal fungi. To capture the nitrogen, the fungi must at least partly disrupt the recalcitrant organic matter-protein complexes within which the nitrogen is embedded. This disruption process is poorly characterized. We used spectroscopic analyses and transcriptome profiling to examine the mechanism by which the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus degrades organic matter when acquiring nitrogen from plant litter. The fungus partially degraded polysaccharides and modified the structure of polyphenols. The observed chemical changes were consistent with a hydroxyl radical attack, involving Fenton chemistry similar to that of brown-rot fungi. The set of enzymes expressed by Pa. involutus during the degradation of the organic matter was similar to the set of enzymes involved in the oxidative degradation of wood by brown-rot fungi. However, Pa. involutus lacked transcripts encoding extracellular enzymes needed for metabolizing the released carbon. The saprotrophic activity has been reduced to a radical-based biodegradation system that can efficiently disrupt the organic matter-protein complexes and thereby mobilize the entrapped nutrients. We suggest that the released carbon then becomes available for further degradation and assimilation by commensal microbes, and that these activities have been lost in ectomycorrhizal fungi as an adaptation to symbiotic growth on host photosynthate. The interdependence of ectomycorrhizal symbionts and saprophytic microbes would provide a key link in the turnover of nutrients and carbon in forest ecosystems.

  3. New insights into the fouling mechanism of dissolved organic matter applying nanofiltration membranes with a variety of surface chemistries.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Ghulam; Wyns, Kenny; Buekenhoudt, Anita; Meynen, Vera

    2016-04-15

    Nanofiltration (NF) membrane fouling by DOM remains a major and poorly understood issue. To acquire a better insight we studied the fouling of the DOM fractions humic acids (HAs) and fulvic acids (FAs), with and without Ca(2+), on native and grafted ceramic NF membranes. Grafting with two methods and three different grafting groups allowed to create a range of membranes with a variety of surface chemistries, and a wide range of surface polarity, much broader than ever used in previous studies. A typical polymer (polyamide) NF membrane was included for comparison. All obtained results reveal that membrane fouling is not determined by membrane hydrophilicity/hydrophobicity as a general and sole criterion, but rather on the whole of the surface chemistry determining the amount and strength of the possible foulant-membrane interactions. As a consequence the effect of inorganic ions on the fouling is also dependent on the surface chemistry. Important new insight in the DOM fouling mechanism was acquired, shedding new light on the state-of-the-art knowledge.

  4. Supramolecular engineering of carbon nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jian, Kengqing

    This thesis identifies a new and flexible route to control graphene layer structure in carbons, which is the key to carbon properties and applications, and focuses on the synthesis, structure-property relationships, and potential applications of new "supramolecular" carbon nanomaterials. This new approach begins with the studies of surface anchoring and assembly mechanisms among planar discotic liquid crystals. The results show that disk-like polyaromatics exhibit weak noncovalent interactions with most surfaces and prefer edge-on anchoring at these surfaces; only on a few surfaces such as graphite and platinum, they prefer face-on anchoring. A theory of pi-pi bond preservation has been proposed to explain the wetting, anchoring, and assembly phenomena. Based on the assembly study, a supramolecular approach was developed, which uses surfaces, flows, and confinement to create well-defined order in discotic liquid crystals, which can then be covalently captured by cross-linking and converted into a carbon material whose structure is an accurate replica of the molecular order in the precursor. This technique has been successfully applied to create innovative nanocarbons with controllable nanostructures. The new nanomaterials synthesized by supramolecular route include organic and carbon films with precise crystal structure control using surface anchoring and flow. Lithographic techniques were employed to make micro-patterned surfaces with preprogrammed molecular orientations. Fully dense and ordered carbon thin films were prepared from lytropic liquid crystals. These films exhibit surfaces rich in edge-sites and are either anisotropic unidirectional or multi-domain. In addition, four different types of high-aspect-ratio nanocarbons were synthesized and analyzed: (1) "orthogonal" carbon nanofibers with perpendicular graphene layers, (2) "concentric" C/C-composite nanofibers with graphene layers parallel to the fiber axis, (3) "inverted" nanotubes exhibiting graphene

  5. Supramolecular catalysis: Terpenes in tight spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, Jeremy J.; Shenvi, Ryan A.

    2015-03-01

    The ability of enzymes to direct the synthesis of complex natural products from simple starting materials is epitomized by terpene biosynthesis. Now, a supramolecular catalyst has been shown to mimic some of the reactivity of this process.

  6. Supramolecular materials: Self-organized nanostructures

    SciTech Connect

    Stupp, S.I.; LeBonheur, V.; Walker, K.

    1997-04-18

    Miniaturized triblock copolymers have been found to self-assemble into nanostructures that are highly regular in size and shape. Mushroom-shaped supramolecular structures of about 200 kilodaltons form by crystallization of the chemically identical blocks and self-organize into films containing 100 or more layers stacked in a polar arrangement. The polar supramolecular material exhibits spontaneous second-harmonic generation from infrared to green photons and has an adhesive tape-like character with nonadhesive-hydrophobic and hydrophilic-sticky opposite surfaces. The films also have reasonable shear strength and adhere tenaciously to glass surfaces on one side only. The regular and finite size of the supramolecular units is believed to be mediated by repulsive forces among some of the segments in the triblock molecules. A large diversity of multifunctional materials could be formed from regular supramolecular units weighing hundreds of kilodaltons. 21 refs., 10 figs.

  7. Adsorption and desorption of reversible supramolecular polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zweistra, Henk J. A.; Besseling, N. A. M.

    2006-08-01

    We report numerical mean-field results on the quasichemical level of approximation that describe adsorption of reversible supramolecular polymers at a flat interface. Emphasis is laid on the regime of strong adsorption from a dilute solution. There are two differences with respect to macromolecular polymer adsorption: (i) adsorption sets in at relatively high monomer concentrations of the surrounding solution, and (ii) the surface is filled within a much narrower concentration range. Contrary to macromolecular polymers, supramolecular polymers can therefore be desorbed by dilution of the equilibrium solution by solvent within an experimentally accessible concentration window. Based on simple thermodynamic arguments, we provide a quantitative explanation why supramolecular polymers adsorb at relatively high concentrations. Moreover, we discuss the (by comparison) narrow concentration window wherein filling of the surface occurs. This is attributed to the cooperative nature of supramolecular polymer adsorption. The degree of cooperativity is quantified by means of the Hill parameter n .

  8. Supramolecular polymers: Molecular machines muscle up

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruns, Carson J.; Stoddart, J. Fraser

    2013-01-01

    A supramolecular polymer made of thousands of bistable [c2]daisy chains amplifies individual nanometric displacements up to the micrometre-length scale, in a concerted process reminiscent of muscular cells.

  9. Synthesis and supramolecular assembly of biomimetic polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marciel, Amanda Brittany

    A grand challenge in materials chemistry is the synthesis of macromolecules and polymers with precise shapes and architectures. Polymer microstructure and architecture strongly affect the resulting functionality of advanced materials, yet understanding the static and dynamic properties of these complex macromolecules in bulk has been difficult due to their inherit polydispersity. Single molecule studies have provided a wealth of information on linear flexible and semi-flexible polymers in dilute solutions. However, few investigations have focused on industrially relevant complex topologies (e.g., star, comb, hyperbranched polymers) in industrially relevant solution conditions (e.g., semi-dilute, concentrated). Therefore, from this perspective there is a strong need to synthesize precision complex architectures for bulk studies as well as complex architectures compatible with current single molecule techniques to study static and dynamic polymer properties. In this way, we developed a hybrid synthetic strategy to produce branched polymer architectures based on chemically modified DNA. Overall, this approach enables control of backbone length and flexibility, as well as branch grafting density and chemical identity. We utilized a two-step scheme based on enzymatic incorporation of non-natural nucleotides containing bioorthogonal dibenzocyclooctyne (DBCO) functional groups along the main polymer backbone, followed by copper-free "click" chemistry to graft synthetic polymer branches or oligonucleotide branches to the DNA backbone, thereby allowing for the synthesis of a variety of polymer architectures, including three-arm stars, H-polymers, graft block copolymers, and comb polymers for materials assembly and single molecule studies. Bulk materials properties are also affected by industrial processing conditions that alter polymer morphology. Therefore, in an alternative strategy we developed a microfluidic-based approach to assemble highly aligned synthetic

  10. Thioamides: versatile bonds to induce directional and cooperative hydrogen bonding in supramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Mes, Tristan; Cantekin, Seda; Balkenende, Dirk W R; Frissen, Martijn M M; Gillissen, Martijn A J; De Waal, Bas F M; Voets, Ilja K; Meijer, E W; Palmans, Anja R A

    2013-06-24

    The amide bond is a versatile functional group and its directional hydrogen-bonding capabilities are widely applied in, for example, supramolecular chemistry. The potential of the thioamide bond, in contrast, is virtually unexplored as a structuring moiety in hydrogen-bonding-based self-assembling systems. We report herein the synthesis and characterisation of a new self-assembling motif comprising thioamides to induce directional hydrogen bonding. N,N',N''-Trialkylbenzene-1,3,5-tris(carbothioamide)s (thioBTAs) with either achiral or chiral side-chains have been readily obtained by treating their amide-based precursors with P2S5. The thioBTAs showed thermotropic liquid crystalline behaviour and a columnar mesophase was assigned. IR spectroscopy revealed that strong, three-fold, intermolecular hydrogen-bonding interactions stabilise the columnar structures. In apolar alkane solutions, thioBTAs self-assemble into one-dimensional, helical supramolecular polymers stabilised by three-fold hydrogen bonding. Concentration- and temperature-dependent self-assembly studies performed by using a combination of UV and CD spectroscopy demonstrated a cooperative supramolecular polymerisation mechanism and a strong amplification of supramolecular chirality. The high dipole moment of the thioamide bond in combination with the anisotropic shape of the resulting cylindrical aggregate gives rise to sufficiently strong depolarised light scattering to enable depolarised dynamic light scattering (DDLS) experiments in dilute alkane solution. The rotational and translational diffusion coefficients, D(trans) and D(rot), were obtained from the DDLS measurements, and the average length, L, and diameter, d, of the thioBTA aggregates were derived (L = 490 nm and d = 3.6 nm). These measured values are in good agreement with the value L(w) = 755 nm obtained from fitting the temperature-dependent CD data by using a recently developed equilibrium model. This experimental verification

  11. Self-assembly of cationic multidomain peptide hydrogels: supramolecular nanostructure and rheological properties dictate antimicrobial activity.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Linhai; Xu, Dawei; Sellati, Timothy J; Dong, He

    2015-12-07

    Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would also protect the hydrogel itself from being adversely affected by microbial attachment to its surface. We have previously demonstrated the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of supramolecular assemblies of cationic multi-domain peptides (MDPs) in solution. Here, we extend the 1-D soluble supramolecular assembly to 3-D hydrogels to investigate the effect of the supramolecular nanostructure and its rheological properties on the antimicrobial activity of self-assembled hydrogels. Among designed MDPs, the bactericidal activity of peptide hydrogels was found to follow an opposite trend to that in solution. Improved antimicrobial activity of self-assembled peptide hydrogels is dictated by the combined effect of supramolecular surface chemistry and storage modulus of the bulk materials, rather than the ability of individual peptides/peptide assemblies to penetrate bacterial cell membrane as observed in solution. The structure-property-activity relationship developed through this study will provide important guidelines for designing biocompatible peptide hydrogels with built-in antimicrobial activity for various biomedical applications.

  12. Physics and Chemistry of the Interiors of Large Planets: A new generation of condensed matter using NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Collins, G.

    2009-04-15

    Matter at extreme densities is predicted to have truly exotic properties, including hightemperature superconductivity, superfluidity, and Wigner crystallization to name a few. However, these extreme states of matter exist only in the deepest interiors of large planets, brown dwarfs, and low-mass stars, and there are no data to test these predictions. Integral to developing predictive models for the evolution of both terrestrial and gas giant planets is an understanding of the materials states that occur deep inside these massive objects. Since we are not able to drill into the deep interiors of planets such as Jupiter to explore these extreme material states of During the last year we initiated a world wide effort to explore such material states using the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This effort has mobilized a new effort in extreme condensed condensed matter science. Over the course of the year we developed several experimental designs showing how NIF might be used to accurately characterize states of matter predicted to exist at the center of both large terrestrial and gas planets. In particular, we identified ways to compress iron to TPa conditions while keeping it solid and hydrogen to near TPa conditions at < eV temperatures using a variety of novel compression techniques. Then several of these diagnostic and compression techniques have been tested on the Jupiter laser facility and the Omega laser facility leading to several publications. In addition, several conference sessions and meetings were held which generated significant enthusiasum in the community for this new field of science. Below we give a brief synopsis of some of the resultant publications.

  13. Supramolecular Archimedean cages assembled with 72 hydrogen bonds.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuzhou; Hu, Chunhua; Comotti, Angiolina; Ward, Michael D

    2011-07-22

    Self-assembly of multiple components into well-defined and predictable structures remains one of the foremost challenges in chemistry. Here, we report on the rational design of a supramolecular cage assembled from 20 ions of three distinct species through 72 hydrogen bonds. The cage is constructed from two kinds of hexagonal molecular tiles, a tris(guanidinium)nitrate cluster and a hexa(4-sulfonatophenyl)benzene, joined at their edges through complementary and metrically matched N-H···O-S hydrogen bonds to form a truncated octahedron, one of the Archimedean polyhedra. The truncated octahedron, with an interior volume of 2200 cubic angstroms, serves as the composite building unit of a body-centered cubic zeolite-like framework, which exhibits an ability to encapsulate a wide range of differently charged species, including organic molecules, transition metal complexes, and "ship-in-a-bottle" nanoclusters not observed otherwise.

  14. Supramolecular Archimedean Cages Assembled with 72 Hydrogen Bonds

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yuzhou; Hu, Chunhua; Comotti, Angiolina; Ward, Michael D.

    2011-12-09

    Self-assembly of multiple components into well-defined and predictable structures remains one of the foremost challenges in chemistry. Here, we report on the rational design of a supramolecular cage assembled from 20 ions of three distinct species through 72 hydrogen bonds. The cage is constructed from two kinds of hexagonal molecular tiles, a tris(guanidinium)nitrate cluster and a hexa(4-sulfonatophenyl)benzene, joined at their edges through complementary and metrically matched N-H {hor_ellipsis} O-S hydrogen bonds to form a truncated octahedron, one of the Archimedean polyhedra. The truncated octahedron, with an interior volume of 2200 cubic angstroms, serves as the composite building unit of a body-centered cubic zeolite-like framework, which exhibits an ability to encapsulate a wide range of differently charged species, including organic molecules, transition metal complexes, and 'ship-in-a-bottle' nanoclusters not observed otherwise.

  15. Environment-dependent guest exchange in supramolecular hosts.

    PubMed

    Li, Longyu; Thayumanavan, S

    2014-10-21

    Dynamic exchange of guest molecules, encapsulated in host assemblies, is a phenomenon in supramolecular chemistry that has important implications in several applications. While the mechanism of exchange in micellar assemblies has been previously investigated, the effect of host and guest environment upon the guest-exchange dynamics has received little attention, if any. In this paper, we study the guest-exchange mechanism in pH-sensitive nanogels along with pH-insensitive nanogels as a control. By systematically comparing the behavior of these nanogels, we show that size, concentration, and hydrophobicity can all play a critical role in guest-exchange dynamics. More importantly, these studies reveal that the dominant mechanism of guest exchange can intimately depend on environmental factors.

  16. Kinetic control over pathway complexity in supramolecular polymerization through modulating the energy landscape by rational molecular design.

    PubMed

    Ogi, Soichiro; Fukui, Tomoya; Jue, Melinda L; Takeuchi, Masayuki; Sugiyasu, Kazunori

    2014-12-22

    Far-from-equilibrium thermodynamic systems that are established as a consequence of coupled equilibria are the origin of the complex behavior of biological systems. Therefore, research in supramolecular chemistry has recently been shifting emphasis from a thermodynamic standpoint to a kinetic one; however, control over the complex kinetic processes is still in its infancy. Herein, we report our attempt to control the time evolution of supramolecular assembly in a process in which the supramolecular assembly transforms from a J-aggregate to an H-aggregate over time. The transformation proceeds through a delicate interplay of these two aggregation pathways. We have succeeded in modulating the energy landscape of the respective aggregates by a rational molecular design. On the basis of this understanding of the energy landscape, programming of the time evolution was achieved through adjusting the balance between the coupled equilibria. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. Facile synthesis of supramolecular ionic polymers that combine unique rheological, ionic conductivity, and self-healing properties.

    PubMed

    Aboudzadeh, M Ali; Muñoz, M Eugenia; Santamaría, Antxon; Marcilla, Rebeca; Mecerreyes, David

    2012-02-27

    A new family of supramolecular ionic polymers is synthesized by a simple method using (di-/tri-)carboxylic acids and (di-/tri-)alkyl amines. These polymers are formed by carboxylate and ammonium molecules that are weakly bonded together by a combination of ionic and hydrogen bonds, becoming solid at room temperature. The supramolecular ionic polymers show a sharp rheological transition from a viscoelastic gel to a viscous liquid between 30 and 80 °C. This sharp viscosity decrease is responsible for an unprecedented jump in ionic conductivity of four orders of magnitude in that temperature range. As a potential application, this chemistry can be used to develop polymeric materials with self-healing properties, since it combines properties from supramolecular polymers and ionomers into the same material. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. Modular self-assembly, characterization, and host-guest chemistry of nanoscale organometallic architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Manna, J.; Kuehl, C.J.; Stang, P.J.; Muddiman, D.C.; Smith, R.D.

    1997-12-31

    The supramolecular synthesis and chemistry of organic macrocycles has been the focus of considerable study for over thirty years. In contrast, the chemistry of analogous inorganic and organometallic macrocycles is in it infancy; little is know about the stability, spectroscopic and physical properties, and chemistry of these species. We will report on the design of several unique supramolecular macrocycles and the characterization of these species by a range of spectroscopic techniques, including electrospray-ionization Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance spectrometry. Preliminary data concerning the host-guest chemistry of these macrocycles will also be presented.

  19. A chiroptical switch based on supramolecular chirality transfer through alkyl chain entanglement and dynamic covalent bonding.

    PubMed

    Lv, Kai; Qin, Long; Wang, Xiufeng; Zhang, Li; Liu, Minghua

    2013-12-14

    Chirality transfer is an interesting phenomenon in Nature, which represents an important step to understand the evolution of chiral bias and the amplification of the chirality. In this paper, we report the chirality transfer via the entanglement of the alkyl chains between chiral gelator molecules and achiral amphiphilic Schiff base. We have found that although an achiral Schiff base amphiphile could not form organogels in any kind of organic solvents, it formed co-organogels when mixed with a chiral gelator molecule. Interestingly, the chirality of the gelator molecules was transferred to the Schiff base chromophore in the mixed co-gels and there was a maximum mixing ratio for the chirality transfer. Furthermore, the supramolecular chirality was also produced based on a dynamic covalent chemistry of an imine formed by the reaction between an aldehyde and an amine. Such a covalent bond of imine was formed reversibly depending on the pH variation. When the covalent bond was formed the chirality transfer occurred, when it was destroyed, the transfer stopped. Thus, a supramolecular chiroptical switch is obtained based on supramolecular chirality transfer and dynamic covalent chemistry.

  20. The effect of learning styles and attitude on preservice elementary teachers' conceptual understanding of chemistry and the nature of matter in a simulation-based learning environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Jaroudi, Mo H.

    This causal-comparative descriptive study investigated the achievement of pre-service elementary teachers taking an introductory physical science course that integrates inquiry-based instruction with computer simulations. The study was intended to explore if pre-service elementary teachers with different attitudes towards science as well as students with different learning styles would benefit differentially. Four research questions including four hypotheses were developed. The first major question consist of four specific hypothesis that addressed preservice elementary teachers' learning styles (Active/Reflective, Sensing/Intuitive, Visual/Verbal, and Sequential/Global) and their conceptual understanding of chemistry and the particulate nature of matter in a science class which use hands-on learning integrated with computer based simulated activities. The second major question pertained to the relationship between preservice teachers learning science and chemistry and their attitude towards science. The third major question related to preservice elementary teachers science and chemistry achievement gain scores and attitude average affected by their learning styles. Finally, the fourth question pertained to the dissipation or the minimization of preservice elementary teachers' science and chemistry misconceptions over the course of study. Three instruments were given to preservice elementary teachers in three different classes: pretest/posttest for the science conceptual understanding examination, and pretest-only for the science attitude and learning styles instruments. Total usable science attitude surveys returned was 67 out of 70. The overall average mean was 3.13 (SD = .51) on a five point scale. Total return of science achievement instrument was 65, with a total mean test score (quantitative and qualitative together) of 6.38 (SD = 3.05) on the pretest, with a post test mean of 9.06 (SD = 4.19). Results revealed no statistically significant achievement gain

  1. Polymerized supramolecular assemblies and biocompatibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, David F.

    2001-03-01

    The creation of durable, biomembrane-mimetic coatings for inorganic and polymeric surfaces that are biocompatible, i.e. resistant to nonspecific protein adsorption, remains an important goal that is expected to impact numerous fields. It has already been shown that the physical stability of lipid bilayer vesicles can be dramatically enhanced by cross-linking polymerization of reactive lipids, such as phosphatidylcholines. Bilayers of these same lipids on clean silicon dioxide surfaces can be formed by fusion of small bilayer vesicles with the surface. Radical initiated polymerization of these supported bilayers yields a stable poly(lipid) film that is not perturbed upon exposure to surfactant. Moreover, the cross-linked bilayer film can be removed from water into air with retention of the poly(lipid) bilayer structure. These polymerized bilayer films could be repeatedly transferred from water to air to water with no obvious change in their biocompatibility. The supported bilayer films were equally resistant to non-specific protein adsorption before and after polymerization. This indicates that biocompatible nature of the phosphorylcholine head group of the lipids was not compromised by polymerization of the lipids. The ability to maintain surface biocompatibility of membranes while substantially increasing their stability would appear to extend the technological uses of supramolecular assemblies of lipids.

  2. Supramolecular nesting of cyclic polymers.

    PubMed

    Kondratuk, Dmitry V; Perdigão, Luís M A; Esmail, Ayad M S; O'Shea, James N; Beton, Peter H; Anderson, Harry L

    2015-04-01

    Advances in template-directed synthesis make it possible to create artificial molecules with protein-like dimensions, directly from simple components. These synthetic macromolecules have a proclivity for self-organization that is reminiscent of biopolymers. Here, we report the synthesis of monodisperse cyclic porphyrin polymers, with diameters of up to 21 nm (750 C–C bonds). The ratio of the intrinsic viscosities for cyclic and linear topologies is 0.72, indicating that these polymers behave as almost ideal flexible chains in solution. When deposited on gold surfaces, the cyclic polymers display a new mode of two-dimensional supramolecular organization, combining encapsulation and nesting; one nanoring adopts a near-circular conformation, thus allowing a second nanoring to be captured within its perimeter, in a tightly folded conformation. Scanning tunnelling microscopy reveals that nesting occurs in combination with stacking when nanorings are deposited under vacuum, whereas when they are deposited directly from solution under ambient conditions there is stacking or nesting, but not a combination of both.

  3. Supramolecular Polymer Nanocomposites - Improvement of Mechanical Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hinricher, Jesse; Neikirk, Colin; Priestley, Rodney

    2015-03-01

    Supramolecular polymers differ from traditional polymers in that their repeat units are connected by hydrogen bonds that can reversibly break and form under various stimuli. They can be more easily recycled than conventional materials, and their highly temperature dependent viscosities result in reduced energy consumption and processing costs. Furthermore, judicious selection of supramolecular polymer architecture and functionality allows the design of advanced materials including shape memory and self-healing materials. Supramolecular polymers have yet to see widespread use because they can't support much weight due to their inherent mechanical weakness. In order to address this issue, the mechanical strength of supramolecular polymer nanocomposites based on ureidopyrmidinone (UPy) telechelic poly(caprolactone) doped with surface activated silica nanoparticles was investigated by tensile testing and dynamic mechanical analysis. The effects of varying amounts and types of nanofiller surface functionality were investigated to glean insight into the contributions of filler-filler and filler-matrix interactions to mechanical reinforcement in supramolecular polymer nanocomposites. MRSEC NSF DMR 0819860 (PI: Prof. N. Phuan Ong) REU Site Grant: NSF DMR-1156422 (PI: Prof. Mikko Haataja)

  4. Supramolecular chemistry: Unexplored territory for self-assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuerle, Florian

    2016-12-01

    Cage-like structures can self-assemble from suitable metal ions and organic linkers, but the size of the assemblies was limited. The surprise discovery of a new series of cages opens up fresh horizons for self-assembly. See Letter p.563

  5. Varying molecular interactions by coverage in supramolecular surface chemistry.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yeliang; Fabris, Stefano; White, Thomas W; Pagliuca, Federico; Moras, Paolo; Papagno, Marco; Topwal, Dinesh; Sheverdyaeva, Polina; Carbone, Carlo; Lingenfelder, Magalí; Classen, Thomas; Kern, Klaus; Costantini, Giovanni

    2012-01-14

    The possibility of modifying the intermolecular interactions of absorbed benzene-carboxylic acids from coordination to hydrogen bonding by changing their surface coverage is demonstrated through a combination of scanning tunnelling microscopy, X-ray photoemission spectroscopy and density functional theory calculations.

  6. Neutronographic investigations of supramolecular structures on upgraded small-angle spectrometer YuMO

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuklin, A. I.; Rogachev, A. V.; Soloviov, D. V.; Ivankov, O. I.; Kovalev, Yu S.; Utrobin, P. K.; Kutuzov, S. A.; Soloviev, A. G.; Rulev, M. I.; Gordeliy, V. I.

    2017-05-01

    Abstract.The work is a review of neutronographic investigations of supramolecular structures on upgraded small-angle spectrometer YuMO. Here, key parameters of small-angle spectrometers are considered. It is shown that two-detector system is the basis of YuMO upgrade. It allows to widen the dynamic q-range twice. In result, the available q-range is widened and dynamic q-range and data collection rate are doubled. The detailed description of YuMO spectrometer is given.The short review of experimental researches made on the spectrometer in the polymers field, biology, material science and physical chemistry is given. The current investigations also have a methodological aspect. It is shown that upgraded spectrometer provides advanced world level of research of supramolecular structures.

  7. Cooking with Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosser, Arthur E.

    1984-01-01

    Suggests chemistry of cooking and analysis of culinary recipes as subject matter for introducing chemistry to an audience, especially to individuals with neutral or negative attitudes toward science. Includes sample recipes and experiments and a table listing scientific topics with related cooking examples. (JN)

  8. The ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus converts organic matter in plant litter using a trimmed brown-rot mechanism involving Fenton chemistry

    PubMed Central

    Rineau, Francois; Roth, Doris; Shah, Firoz; Smits, Mark; Johansson, Tomas; Canbäck, Björn; Olsen, Peter Bjarke; Persson, Per; Grell, Morten Nedergaard; Lindquist, Erika; Grigoriev, Igor V; Lange, Lene; Tunlid, Anders

    2012-01-01

    Soils in boreal forests contain large stocks of carbon. Plants are the main source of this carbon through tissue residues and root exudates. A major part of the exudates are allocated to symbiotic ectomycorrhizal fungi. In return, the plant receives nutrients, in particular nitrogen from the mycorrhizal fungi. To capture the nitrogen, the fungi must at least partly disrupt the recalcitrant organic matter–protein complexes within which the nitrogen is embedded. This disruption process is poorly characterized. We used spectroscopic analyses and transcriptome profiling to examine the mechanism by which the ectomycorrhizal fungus Paxillus involutus degrades organic matter when acquiring nitrogen from plant litter. The fungus partially degraded polysaccharides and modified the structure of polyphenols. The observed chemical changes were consistent with a hydroxyl radical attack, involving Fenton chemistry similar to that of brown-rot fungi. The set of enzymes expressed by Pa. involutus during the degradation of the organic matter was similar to the set of enzymes involved in the oxidative degradation of wood by brown-rot fungi. However, Pa. involutus lacked transcripts encoding extracellular enzymes needed for metabolizing the released carbon. The saprotrophic activity has been reduced to a radical-based biodegradation system that can efficiently disrupt the organic matter–protein complexes and thereby mobilize the entrapped nutrients. We suggest that the released carbon then becomes available for further degradation and assimilation by commensal microbes, and that these activities have been lost in ectomycorrhizal fungi as an adaptation to symbiotic growth on host photosynthate. The interdependence of ectomycorrhizal symbionts and saprophytic microbes would provide a key link in the turnover of nutrients and carbon in forest ecosystems. PMID:22469289

  9. Energy landscapes and functions of supramolecular systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantakitti, Faifan; Boekhoven, Job; Wang, Xin; Kazantsev, Roman V.; Yu, Tao; Li, Jiahe; Zhuang, Ellen; Zandi, Roya; Ortony, Julia H.; Newcomb, Christina J.; Palmer, Liam C.; Shekhawat, Gajendra S.; de La Cruz, Monica Olvera; Schatz, George C.; Stupp, Samuel I.

    2016-04-01

    By means of two supramolecular systems--peptide amphiphiles engaged in hydrogen-bonded β-sheets, and chromophore amphiphiles driven to assemble by π-orbital overlaps--we show that the minima in the energy landscapes of supramolecular systems are defined by electrostatic repulsion and the ability of the dominant attractive forces to trap molecules in thermodynamically unfavourable configurations. These competing interactions can be selectively switched on and off, with the order of doing so determining the position of the final product in the energy landscape. Within the same energy landscape, the peptide-amphiphile system forms a thermodynamically favoured product characterized by long bundled fibres that promote biological cell adhesion and survival, and a metastable product characterized by short monodisperse fibres that interfere with adhesion and can lead to cell death. Our findings suggest that, in supramolecular systems, functions and energy landscapes are linked, superseding the more traditional connection between molecular design and function.

  10. Fibonacci Sequence and Supramolecular Structure of DNA.

    PubMed

    Shabalkin, I P; Grigor'eva, E Yu; Gudkova, M V; Shabalkin, P I

    2016-05-01

    We proposed a new model of supramolecular DNA structure. Similar to the previously developed by us model of primary DNA structure [11-15], 3D structure of DNA molecule is assembled in accordance to a mathematic rule known as Fibonacci sequence. Unlike primary DNA structure, supramolecular 3D structure is assembled from complex moieties including a regular tetrahedron and a regular octahedron consisting of monomers, elements of the primary DNA structure. The moieties of the supramolecular DNA structure forming fragments of regular spatial lattice are bound via linker (joint) sequences of the DNA chain. The lattice perceives and transmits information signals over a considerable distance without acoustic aberrations. Linker sequences expand conformational space between lattice segments allowing their sliding relative to each other under the action of external forces. In this case, sliding is provided by stretching of the stacked linker sequences.

  11. Enantioselective Recognition by Chiral Supramolecular Gels.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Li; Jin, Qingxian; Liu, Minghua

    2016-10-06

    Chiral supramolecular gels, in which small organic molecules self-assemble into chiral nanostructures and entangle each other to immobilize solvents through various noncovalent interactions, can work as a matrix for enantioselective recognition on chiral analytes. Through gelation and the formation of well-defined nanostructures, the chiral sense of the component molecules can be accumulated or amplified, and thus, the enantioselective recognition ability can be enhanced. Furthermore, a chiral microenvironment formed in the gel networks could provide additional stereochemical recognition geometry and attribute to efficient recognition. In this focus review, enantioselective recognition on chiral analytes through chiral supramolecular gels, with either amplified signals or the gel-sol phase transition, is discussed. This review is expected to provide useful insights into the design and fabrication of supramolecular gel systems with chiral features and high enantioselectivity.

  12. Energy landscapes and functions of supramolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Tantakitti, Faifan; Boekhoven, Job; Wang, Xin; Kazantsev, Roman V; Yu, Tao; Li, Jiahe; Zhuang, Ellen; Zandi, Roya; Ortony, Julia H; Newcomb, Christina J; Palmer, Liam C; Shekhawat, Gajendra S; de la Cruz, Monica Olvera; Schatz, George C; Stupp, Samuel I

    2016-04-01

    By means of two supramolecular systems--peptide amphiphiles engaged in hydrogen-bonded β-sheets, and chromophore amphiphiles driven to assemble by π-orbital overlaps--we show that the minima in the energy landscapes of supramolecular systems are defined by electrostatic repulsion and the ability of the dominant attractive forces to trap molecules in thermodynamically unfavourable configurations. These competing interactions can be selectively switched on and off, with the order of doing so determining the position of the final product in the energy landscape. Within the same energy landscape, the peptide-amphiphile system forms a thermodynamically favoured product characterized by long bundled fibres that promote biological cell adhesion and survival, and a metastable product characterized by short monodisperse fibres that interfere with adhesion and can lead to cell death. Our findings suggest that, in supramolecular systems, functions and energy landscapes are linked, superseding the more traditional connection between molecular design and function.

  13. Self-healing polymers via supramolecular forces.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Florian; Döhler, Diana; Michael, Philipp; Binder, Wolfgang H

    2013-02-12

    As polymers and polymeric materials are "the" smart invention and technological driving force of the 20th century, the quest for self-healing or self-repairing polymers is strong. The concept of supramolecular self-healing materials relies on the use of noncovalent, transient bonds to generate networks, which are able to heal the damaged site, putting aspects of reversibility and dynamics of a network as crucial factors for the understanding and design of such self-healing materials. This Review describes recent examples and concepts of supramolecular polymers based on hydrogen bonding, π-π interactions, ionomers, and coordinative bonds, thus convincingly discussing the advantages and versatility of these supramolecular forces for the design and realization of self-healing polymers. Copyright © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Influences of solution chemistry and polymeric natural organic matter on the removal of aquatic pharmaceutical residuals by nanofiltration.

    PubMed

    Zazouli, Mohammad Ali; Susanto, Heru; Nasseri, Simin; Ulbricht, Mathias

    2009-07-01

    This study demonstrates the removal efficiency and the permeate flux behavior during cross-flow nanofiltration (NF) of aqueous solutions of five pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs). Cephalexin, tetracycline, acetaminophen, indomethacin and amoxicillin were used as models of PhACs, and alginate was selected as model of natural organic matter (NOM). Two commercial composite NF membranes (SR2 and SR3) with different characteristics were used. The highest rejection was observed for tetracycline, i.e., 75-95% for membrane SR 2 and 95-100% for membrane SR 3, while the rejection was least for acetaminophen (32-36% for SR2 and 52-59% for SR3). As the pH of acetaminophen solution was increased (from 6 to 9) the rejection would increase. Changes of ionic content (from 10 to 20mM) lead to increase (from 89 to 93% for SR 3) or decrease (from 100 to 91% for SR2) of cephalexin rejection depending on the membrane used. The permeate flux would decrease with decreasing the pH solution and increasing ionic strength. The addition of alginate in the feed stream decreased the permeate flux, with lower reduction for SR3, and increased the PhAC rejection except for acetaminophen and amoxicillin. Both size and Donnan exclusions seemed to occur, and the effect of Donnan exclusion was more pronounced for the NF membrane having larger effective pore size (SR2).

  15. Enzymatic induction of supramolecular order and bioactivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Chengbiao; Ren, Xinrui; Ding, Dan; Wang, Ling; Yang, Zhimou

    2016-05-01

    We showed in this study that enzymatic triggering is a totally different pathway for the preparation of self-assembling nanomaterials to the heating-cooling process. Because the molecules were under lower energy levels and the molecular conformation was more ordered during the enzymatic triggeration under mild conditions, nanomaterials with higher supramolecular order could be obtained through biocatalytic control. In this study, nanoparticles were obtained by an enzymatic reaction and nanofibers were observed through the heating-cooling process. We observed a distinct trough at 318 nm from the CD spectrum of a particle sample but not a fiber sample, suggesting the long range arrangement of molecules and helicity in the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles with higher supramolecular order possessed much better potency as a protein vaccine adjuvant because it accelerated the DC maturation and elicited stronger T-cells cytokine production than the nanofibers. Our study demonstrated that biocatalytic triggering is a useful method for preparing supramolecular nanomaterials with higher supramolecular order and probably better bioactivity.We showed in this study that enzymatic triggering is a totally different pathway for the preparation of self-assembling nanomaterials to the heating-cooling process. Because the molecules were under lower energy levels and the molecular conformation was more ordered during the enzymatic triggeration under mild conditions, nanomaterials with higher supramolecular order could be obtained through biocatalytic control. In this study, nanoparticles were obtained by an enzymatic reaction and nanofibers were observed through the heating-cooling process. We observed a distinct trough at 318 nm from the CD spectrum of a particle sample but not a fiber sample, suggesting the long range arrangement of molecules and helicity in the nanoparticles. The nanoparticles with higher supramolecular order possessed much better potency as a protein vaccine

  16. Photoresponsive Supramolecular Complexes as Efficient DNA Regulator

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Hong-Bo; Zhang, Ying-Ming; Xu, Chao; Liu, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Two supramolecular complexes of trans-1⊂CB[8] and trans-2⊂CB[8] were successfully achieved by the controlled selective complexation process of cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) with hetero-guest pair containing azobenzene and bispyridinium moieties in aqueous solution, exhibiting the reversibly light-driven movements of CB[8] upon the photocontrollable isomerization of azophenyl axle components. Significantly, the obtained bistable supramolecular complexes and their corresponding [2]pseudorotaxanes could act as a promising concentrator and cleavage agent to regulate the binding behaviors with DNA molecules. PMID:24572680

  17. Real World of Industrial Chemistry: Industrial Chemistry Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marmor, Solomon

    1985-01-01

    Presented is a bibliography of articles published in the "Journal of Chemical Education" (1968-1983) which focused on industrial chemistry. Items are listed under these headings: real world of industrial chemistry; industrial notes; subject matter articles; industrial chemistry experiments/demonstrations; academic-industrial interface;…

  18. Supramolecular Allosteric Cofacial Porphyrin Complexes

    SciTech Connect

    Oliveri, Christopher G.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.; Nguyen, Son Binh T.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Pink, Maren

    2008-04-12

    Nature routinely uses cooperative interactions to regulate cellular activity. For years, chemists have designed synthetic systems that aim toward harnessing the reactivity common to natural biological systems. By learning how to control these interactions in situ, one begins to allow for the preparation of man-made biomimetic systems that can efficiently mimic the interactions found in Nature. To this end, we have designed a synthetic protocol for the preparation of flexible metal-directed supramolecular cofacial porphyrin complexes which are readily obtained in greater than 90% yield through the use of new hemilabile porphyrin ligands with bifunctional ether-phosphine or thioether-phosphine substituents at the 5 and 15 positions on the porphyrin ring. The resulting architectures contain two hemilabile ligand-metal domains (Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} sites) and two cofacially aligned porphyrins (Zn{sup II} sites), offering orthogonal functionalities and allowing these multimetallic complexes to exist in two states, 'condensed' or 'open'. Combining the ether-phosphine ligand with the appropriate Rh{sup I} or Cu{sup I} transition-metal precursors results in 'open' macrocyclic products. In contrast, reacting the thioether-phosphine ligand with RhI or CuI precursors yields condensed structures that can be converted into their 'open' macrocyclic forms via introduction of additional ancillary ligands. The change in cavity size that occurs allows these structures to function as allosteric catalysts for the acyl transfer reaction between X-pyridylcarbinol (where X = 2, 3, or 4) and 1-acetylimidazole. For 3- and 4-pyridylcarbinol, the 'open' macrocycle accelerates the acyl transfer reaction more than the condensed analogue and significantly more than the porphyrin monomer. In contrast, an allosteric effect was not observed for 2-pyridylcarbinol, which is expected to be a weaker binder and is unfavorably constrained inside the macrocyclic cavity.

  19. Supramolecular Allosteric Cofacial Porphyrin Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Oliveri, Christopher G.; Gianneschi, Nathan C.; Nguyen, SonBinh T.; Mirkin, Chad A.; Stern, Charlotte L.; Wawrzak, Zdzislaw; Pink, Maren

    2008-01-01

    Nature routinely uses cooperative interactions to regulate cellular activity. For years, chemists have designed synthetic systems that aim toward harnessing the reactivity common to natural biological systems. By learning how to control these interactions in situ, one begins to allow for the preparation of man-made biomimetic systems that can efficiently mimic the interactions found in Nature. To this end, we have designed a synthetic protocol for the preparation of flexible metal-directed supramolecular cofacial porphyrin complexes which are readily obtained in greater than 90% yield through the use of new hemilabile porphyrin ligands with bifunctional ether–phosphine or thioether–phosphine substituents at the 5 and 15 positions on the porphyrin ring. The resulting architectures contain two hemilabile ligand–metal domains (RhI or CuI sites) and two cofacially aligned porphyrins (ZnII sites), offering orthogonal functionalities and allowing these multimetallic complexes to exist in two states, “condensed” or “open”. Combining the ether–phosphine ligand with the appropriate RhI or CuI transition-metal precursors results in “open” macrocyclic products. In contrast, reacting the thioether–phosphine ligand with RhI or CuI precursors yields condensed structures that can be converted into their “open” macrocyclic forms via introduction of additional ancillary ligands. The change in cavity size that occurs allows these structures to function as allosteric catalysts for the acyl transfer reaction between X-pyridylcarbinol (where X = 2, 3, or 4) and 1-acetylimidazole. For 3-and 4-pyridylcarbinol, the “open” macrocycle accelerates the acyl transfer reaction more than the condensed analogue and significantly more than the porphyrin monomer. In contrast, an allosteric effect was not observed for 2-pyridylcarbinol, which is expected to be a weaker binder and is unfavorably constrained inside the macrocyclic cavity. PMID:17165783

  20. Supramolecular Assemblies Responsive to Biomolecules toward Biological Applications.

    PubMed

    Shigemitsu, Hajime; Hamachi, Itaru

    2015-10-01

    Stimuli-responsive supramolecular assemblies consisting of small molecules are attractive functional materials for biological applications such as drug delivery, medical diagnosis, enzyme immobilization, and tissue engineering. By use of their dynamic and reversible properties, many supramolecular assemblies responsive to a variety of biomolecules have been designed and synthesized. This review focuses on promising strategies for the construction of such dynamic supramolecular assemblies and their functions. While studies of biomolecule-responsive supramolecular assemblies have mainly been performed in vitro, it has recently been demonstrated that some of them can work in live cells. Supramolecular assemblies now open up new avenues in chemical biology and biofunctional materials.

  1. Changes Matter!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Kimberly; Jensen, Anitra

    2012-01-01

    Being able to distinguish between physical and chemical changes of matter is a foundational chemistry concept that at first seems like a simple elementary concept to teach, but students often have misconceptions that hinder their understanding. These misconceptions are seen among elementary students, but these ideas are perpetuated throughout…

  2. Changes Matter!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lott, Kimberly; Jensen, Anitra

    2012-01-01

    Being able to distinguish between physical and chemical changes of matter is a foundational chemistry concept that at first seems like a simple elementary concept to teach, but students often have misconceptions that hinder their understanding. These misconceptions are seen among elementary students, but these ideas are perpetuated throughout…

  3. Spectroscopic characterization of the coordination chemistry and hydrolysis of gallium(III) in the presence of aquatic organic matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagvall, Kristoffer; Persson, Per; Karlsson, Torbjörn

    2014-12-01

    Interactions between metals and natural organic matter (NOM) are of great environmental importance and one of the key factors influencing hydrolysis, solubility, and speciation of the metals. However, studying geochemically relevant metals like Al, Fe, and Cu is sometimes associated with analytical problems; for example Fe and Cu are both redox active. Gallium (Ga) is a non-redox active metal that usually occurs at very low concentrations in environmental samples and therefore a wide concentration range of metal(III)-NOM species can be explored by adding Ga(III) to such samples. This makes Ga(III) a good probe and analogue for other metal ions, in particular Al. In addition, due to the increased usage of Ga in society, a better understanding of how Ga interacts with NOM is of importance but such studies are scarce. In this work, Ga(III) interactions with two different organic materials (Suwannee River natural organic matter and Suwannee River fulvic acid) were studied using infrared (IR) and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy in a large experimental range (101-84,076 μg Ga g-1 dry weight; pH 3-8). Our IR spectroscopic results showed that Ga(III) is bonded mainly to carboxylic functional groups and suggested that only a fraction of the total number of carboxylic sites in the samples was actively involved in the bonding. Modeling of the EXAFS data revealed that Ga(III) formed mononuclear chelate complexes with NOM that strongly suppressed the hydrolysis and polymerization of Ga(III). At low Ga(III) concentrations (1675-16,649 μg g-1) organic complexes, consisting of 1-3 chelate ring structures, were the dominating species in the entire pH range while at higher concentrations (67,673-84,076 μg g-1, pH 3.0-7.0) we detected mixtures of mononuclear organic Ga(III) complexes, Ga(III) (hydr)oxide, and free Ga(III) (here defined as the hydrated Ga(III) ion and its soluble hydrolysis products). Moreover, the EXAFS results showed significantly

  4. Potential Rapid Effects on Soil Organic Matter Characteristics and Chemistry Following a Change in Dominant Litter Inputs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crow, S. E.; Filley, T.; Conyers, G.; Stott, D.; McCormick, M.; Whigham, D.; Taylor, D.

    2006-12-01

    Changes in vegetation structure are expected in forests globally under predicted future climate scenarios. Shifts in type or quantity of litter inputs, which will be associated with changes in plant community, may influence soil organic matter (SOM) characteristics. We altered litter inputs in a mixed-deciduous forest at the Smithsonian Environmental Research Center beginning in May 2004: litter removal, leaf amendment, and wood amendment plots were established in three old (120-150 y) and three young (50-70 y) forests. Plots were amended with wood and leaves collected locally from the dominant tree species, tulip poplar (Lirodendron tulipifera). 0-5 cm A horizon soil was collected in November 2005, 18 months after initial treatment, and physically fractionated first by dispersal in HMP and size separation (53 μm) to remove silts and clays then the >53 μm fraction by density (1.4 g cm-3) in SPT to separate the organic debris (light fraction, LF) from the mineral material. Soil with the greatest amount of C present within the LF came from the wood amendment treatment (35.2 ± 0.1%), followed by the leaf amendment (27.7 ± 0.0%) and the litter removal (24.5 ± 0.0%) treatments. In a pattern opposite of the other treatments, leaf amended soil from the old sites had less C within LF than the young. Potentially, a priming effect from the leaf addition at the old sites resulted in increased decomposition of soil LF. While at the young sites, invasive earthworms potentially provided a rapid, direct mode for incorporation of fresh leaf inputs into LF. Preliminary data indicate differences in lignin and cutin/suberin decay rates during litter decomposition between old and young sites. An investigation into the biopolymer composition of LF will determine whether altering litter inputs will ultimately influence SOM dynamics at both the old and young forest sites.

  5. Supramolecular polymeric materials via cyclodextrin-guest interactions.

    PubMed

    Harada, Akira; Takashima, Yoshinori; Nakahata, Masaki

    2014-07-15

    CONSPECTUS: Cyclodextrins (CDs) have many attractive functions, including molecular recognition, hydrolysis, catalysis, and polymerization. One of the most important uses of CDs is for the molecular recognition of hydrophobic organic guest molecules in aqueous solutions. CDs are desirable host molecules because they are environmentally benign and offer diverse functions. This Account demonstrates some of the great advances in the development of supramolecular materials through host-guest interactions within the last 10 years. In 1990, we developed topological supramolecular complexes with CDs, polyrotaxane, and CD tubes, and these preparation methods take advantage of self-organization between the CDs and the polymers. The combination of polyrotaxane with αCD forms a hydrogel through the interaction of αCDs with the OH groups on poly(ethylene glycol). We categorized these polyrotaxane chemistries within main chain type complexes. At the same time, we studied the interactions of side chain type supramolecular complexes with CDs. In these systems the guest molecules modified the polymers and selectively formed inclusion complexes with CDs. The systems that used low molecular weight compounds did not show such selectivity with CDs. The multivalency available within the complex cooperatively enhances the selective binding of CD with guest molecules via the polymer side chains, a phenomenon that is analogous to binding patterns observed in antigen-antibody complexes. To incorporate the molecular recognition properties of CDs within the polymer side chains, we first prepared stimuli-responsive sol-gel switching materials through host-guest interactions. We chose azobenzene derivatives for their response to light and ferrocene derivatives for their response to redox conditions. The supramolecular materials were both redox-responsive and self-healing, and these properties resulted from host-guest interactions. These sol-gels with built in switches gave us insight for

  6. Supramolecular polymers for organocatalysis in water.

    PubMed

    Neumann, Laura N; Baker, Matthew B; Leenders, Christianus M A; Voets, Ilja K; Lafleur, René P M; Palmans, Anja R A; Meijer, E W

    2015-07-28

    A water-soluble benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) derivative that self-assembles into one-dimensional, helical, supramolecular polymers is functionalised at the periphery with one L-proline moiety. In water, the BTA-derivative forms micrometre long supramolecular polymers, which are stabilised by hydrophobic interactions and directional hydrogen bonds. Furthermore, we co-assemble a catalytically inactive, but structurally similar, BTA with the L-proline functionalised BTA to create co-polymers. This allows us to assess how the density of the L-proline units along the supramolecular polymer affects its activity and selectivity. Both the supramolecular polymers and co-polymers show high activity and selectivity as catalysts for the aldol reaction in water when using p-nitrobenzaldehyde and cyclohexanone as the substrates for the aldol reaction. After optimisation of the reaction conditions, a consistent conversion of 92 ± 7%, deanti of 92 ± 3%, and eeanti of 97 ± 1% are obtained with a concentration of L-proline as low as 1 mol%.

  7. pH-controllable supramolecular systems.

    PubMed

    Leung, Ken Cham-Fai; Chak, Chun-Pong; Lo, Chui-Man; Wong, Wing-Yan; Xuan, Shouhu; Cheng, Christopher H K

    2009-03-02

    This Focus Review surveys representative examples of pH-controllable supramolecular systems with interesting features and state-of-the-art applications such as 1) conformational changes within individual molecules; 2) folding/unfolding of polymers; 3) simultaneous binding of cations and anions; 4) logic function; 5) ON-OFF switchable colorimetric sensing; 6) translocation of macrocycle-in-rotaxane molecules; 7) large-scale movement within molecules; and 8) regulation of the substrate flow in nanocontainers. In particular, systems will be discussed that involve: pH-induced conformational changes of a resorcinarene cavitand and a bis(iron porphyrin) complex; pH control in assembly and disassembly of supramolecular systems stabilized with different major noncovalent interactions; pH-driven movements of interlocked molecules involving rotaxanes, molecular elevators, and molecular muscles; and, finally, multicomponent supramolecular systems immobilized on solid supports as pH-responsive nanovalves for the controlled release of specific substrates. Recent advances in the understanding of pH-controllable supramolecular systems have led to the construction of meaningful molecular machines for electronic and biological applications that are amenable to control by simple perturbation with acids and bases.

  8. Supramolecular organization in prokaryotic respiratory systems.

    PubMed

    Magalon, Axel; Arias-Cartin, Rodrigo; Walburger, Anne

    2012-01-01

    Prokaryotes are characterized by an extreme flexibility of their respiratory systems allowing them to cope with various extreme environments. To date, supramolecular organization of respiratory systems appears as a conserved evolutionary feature as supercomplexes have been isolated in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. Most of the yet identified supercomplexes in prokaryotes are involved in aerobic respiration and share similarities with those reported in mitochondria. Supercomplexes likely reflect a snapshot of the cellular respiration in a given cell population. While the exact nature of the determinants for supramolecular organization in prokaryotes is not understood, lipids, proteins, and subcellular localization can be seen as key players. Owing to the well-reported supramolecular organization of the mitochondrial respiratory chain in eukaryotes, several hypotheses have been formulated to explain the consequences of such arrangement and can be tested in the context of prokaryotes. Considering the inherent metabolic flexibility of a number of prokaryotes, cellular distribution and composition of the supramolecular assemblies should be studied in regards to environmental signals. This would pave the way to new concepts in cellular respiration.

  9. A light-driven supramolecular nanowire actuator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Junho; Oh, Seungwhan; Pyo, Jaeyeon; Kim, Jong-Man; Je, Jung Ho

    2015-04-21

    A single photomechanical supramolecular nanowire actuator with an azobenzene-containing 1,3,5-tricarboxamide derivative is developed by employing a direct writing method. Single nanowires display photoinduced reversible bending and the bending behavior follows first-order kinetics associated with azobenzene photoisomerization. A wireless photomechanical nanowire tweezers that remotely manipulates a single micro-particle is also demonstrated.

  10. Ultra-large supramolecular coordination cages composed of endohedral Archimedean and Platonic bodies

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Kevin; Zubair, Muhammad; Zhu, Nianyong; Zhou, Xiao-Ping; Fox, Daniel S.; Zhang, Hongzhou; Twamley, Brendan; Lennox, Matthew J.; Düren, Tina; Schmitt, Wolfgang

    2017-01-01

    Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Peterson and Breslow, supramolecular chemistry concepts have evolved providing fundamental knowledge of the relationships between the structures and reactivities of organized molecules. A particular fascinating class of metallo-supramolecular molecules are hollow coordination cages that provide cavities of molecular dimensions promoting applications in diverse areas including catalysis, enzyme mimetics and material science. Here we report the synthesis of coordination cages with exceptional cross-sectional diameters that are composed of multiple sub-cages providing numerous distinctive binding sites through labile coordination solvent molecules. The building principles, involving Archimedean and Platonic bodies, renders these supramolecular keplerates as a class of cages whose composition and topological aspects compare to characteristics of edge-transitive {Cu2} MOFs with A3X4 stoichiometry. The nature of the cavities in these double-shell metal-organic polyhedra and their inner/outer binding sites provide perspectives for post-synthetic functionalizations, separations and catalysis. Transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrate that single molecules are experimentally accessible. PMID:28485392

  11. Metal Coordination Stoichiometry Controlled Formation of Linear and Hyperbranched Supramolecular Polymers.

    PubMed

    Lin, Cuiling; Xu, Luonan; Huang, Libo; Chen, Jia; Liu, Yuanyuan; Ma, Yifan; Ye, Feixiang; Qiu, Huayu; He, Tian; Yin, Shouchun

    2016-09-01

    Controlling the topologies of polymers is a hot topic in polymer chemistry because the physical and/or chemical properties of polymers are determined (at least partially) by their topologies. This study exploits the host-guest interactions between dibenzo-24-crown-8 and secondary ammonium salts and metal coordination interactions between 2,6-bis(benzimidazolyl)-pyridine units with metal ions (Zn(II) and/or Eu(III) ) as orthogonal non-covalent interactions to prepare supramolecular polymers. By changing the ratios of the metal ion additives (Zn(NO3 )2 and Eu(NO3 )3 ) linkers to join the host-guest dimeric complex, the linear supramolecular polymers (100 mol% Zn(NO3 )2 per ligand) and hyperbranched supramolecular polymers (97 mol% Zn(NO3 )2 and 3 mol% Eu(NO3 )3 per ligand) are separately and successfully constructed. This approach not only expands topological control over polymeric systems, but also paves the way for the functionalization of smart and adaptive materials.

  12. Ultra-large supramolecular coordination cages composed of endohedral Archimedean and Platonic bodies.

    PubMed

    Byrne, Kevin; Zubair, Muhammad; Zhu, Nianyong; Zhou, Xiao-Ping; Fox, Daniel S; Zhang, Hongzhou; Twamley, Brendan; Lennox, Matthew J; Düren, Tina; Schmitt, Wolfgang

    2017-05-09

    Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Peterson and Breslow, supramolecular chemistry concepts have evolved providing fundamental knowledge of the relationships between the structures and reactivities of organized molecules. A particular fascinating class of metallo-supramolecular molecules are hollow coordination cages that provide cavities of molecular dimensions promoting applications in diverse areas including catalysis, enzyme mimetics and material science. Here we report the synthesis of coordination cages with exceptional cross-sectional diameters that are composed of multiple sub-cages providing numerous distinctive binding sites through labile coordination solvent molecules. The building principles, involving Archimedean and Platonic bodies, renders these supramolecular keplerates as a class of cages whose composition and topological aspects compare to characteristics of edge-transitive {Cu2} MOFs with A3X4 stoichiometry. The nature of the cavities in these double-shell metal-organic polyhedra and their inner/outer binding sites provide perspectives for post-synthetic functionalizations, separations and catalysis. Transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrate that single molecules are experimentally accessible.

  13. Making hybrid [n]-rotaxanes as supramolecular arrays of molecular electron spin qubits

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez, Antonio; Ferrando-Soria, Jesus; Pineda, Eufemio Moreno; Tuna, Floriana; Vitorica-Yrezabal, Iñigo J.; Knappke, Christiane; Ujma, Jakub; Muryn, Christopher A.; Timco, Grigore A.; Barran, Perdita E.; Ardavan, Arzhang; Winpenny, Richard E.P.

    2016-01-01

    Quantum information processing (QIP) would require that the individual units involved—qubits—communicate to other qubits while retaining their identity. In many ways this resembles the way supramolecular chemistry brings together individual molecules into interlocked structures, where the assembly has one identity but where the individual components are still recognizable. Here a fully modular supramolecular strategy has been to link hybrid organic–inorganic [2]- and [3]-rotaxanes into still larger [4]-, [5]- and [7]-rotaxanes. The ring components are heterometallic octanuclear [Cr7NiF8(O2CtBu)16]– coordination cages and the thread components template the formation of the ring about the organic axle, and are further functionalized to act as a ligand, which leads to large supramolecular arrays of these heterometallic rings. As the rings have been proposed as qubits for QIP, the strategy provides a possible route towards scalable molecular electron spin devices for QIP. Double electron–electron resonance experiments demonstrate inter-qubit interactions suitable for mediating two-qubit quantum logic gates. PMID:26742716

  14. Ultra-large supramolecular coordination cages composed of endohedral Archimedean and Platonic bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrne, Kevin; Zubair, Muhammad; Zhu, Nianyong; Zhou, Xiao-Ping; Fox, Daniel S.; Zhang, Hongzhou; Twamley, Brendan; Lennox, Matthew J.; Düren, Tina; Schmitt, Wolfgang

    2017-05-01

    Pioneered by Lehn, Cram, Peterson and Breslow, supramolecular chemistry concepts have evolved providing fundamental knowledge of the relationships between the structures and reactivities of organized molecules. A particular fascinating class of metallo-supramolecular molecules are hollow coordination cages that provide cavities of molecular dimensions promoting applications in diverse areas including catalysis, enzyme mimetics and material science. Here we report the synthesis of coordination cages with exceptional cross-sectional diameters that are composed of multiple sub-cages providing numerous distinctive binding sites through labile coordination solvent molecules. The building principles, involving Archimedean and Platonic bodies, renders these supramolecular keplerates as a class of cages whose composition and topological aspects compare to characteristics of edge-transitive {Cu2} MOFs with A3X4 stoichiometry. The nature of the cavities in these double-shell metal-organic polyhedra and their inner/outer binding sites provide perspectives for post-synthetic functionalizations, separations and catalysis. Transmission electron microscopy studies demonstrate that single molecules are experimentally accessible.

  15. The use of laminar inorganic salts to make organic molecules display new properties at the supramolecular level in the solid state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunet, E.; Alhendawi, H. M. H.; Alonso, M.; Cerro, C.; Jiménez, L.; Juanes, O.; Mata, M. J.; Salvador, A.; Victoria, M.; Rodríguez-Payán, E.; Rodríguez-Ubis, J. C.

    2010-06-01

    The design of porous solids of controlled molecular geometry for umpteen applications is a challenge of enormous technological and scientific importance. The placing of organic molecules between the layers of certain inorganic salts leads to enduring solid materials where the confinement makes the organic molecules change their properties or even display new ones at the supramolecular level. Past and ongoing results of our research group concerning the chemistry of metal phosphates/phosphonates are reviewed in relation with recognition, chemically-driven porosity changes, chiral memory and supramolecular chirality, luminescence signaling, photoinduced electron-transfer, gas storage and drug confinement.

  16. On the development of multifunctional luminescent supramolecular hydrogel of gold and egg white

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patra, Sudeshna; Ravulapalli, Sathyavathi; Hahm, Myung Gwan; Tadi, Kiran Kumar; Narayanan, Tharangattu N.

    2016-10-01

    Highly stable, luminescent, and printable/paintable supramolecular egg white hydrogel-based surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) matrix is created by an in situ synthesis of gold clusters inside a luminescent egg white hydrogel (Au-Gel). The synthesis of stable luminescent egg-white-based hydrogel, where the hydrogel can act as a three dimensional (3D) matrix, using a simple cross-linking chemistry, has promising application in the biomedical field including in 3D cell culturing. Furthermore, this functional hydrogel is demonstrated for micromolar-level detection of Rhodamine 6G using the SERS technique, where Au-Gel is painted over a flexible cellulose pad.

  17. Neutral coordination polymers based on a metal-mono(dithiolene) complex: synthesis, crystal structure and supramolecular chemistry of [Zn(dmit)(4,4'-bpy)]n, [Zn(dmit)(4,4'-bpe)]n and [Zn(dmit)(bix)]n (4,4'-bpy = 4,4'-bipyridine, 4,4'-bpe = trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene, bix = 1,4-bis(imidazole-1-ylmethyl)-benzene.

    PubMed

    Madhu, Vedichi; Das, Samar K

    2011-12-28

    This article describes a unique synthetic route that enables a neutral mono(dithiolene)metal unit, {Zn(dmit)}, to link with three different organic molecules, resulting in the isolation of a new class of neutral coordination polymers. The species {Zn(dmit)} coordinates with 4,4'-bipyridine (4,4'-bpy), trans-1,2-bis(4-pyridyl)ethene (4,4'-bpe) and 1,4-bis(imidazole-1-ylmethyl)-benzene (bix) as linkers giving rise to the formation of coordination polymers [Zn(dmit)(4,4'-bpy)](n) (1), [Zn(dmit)(4,4'-bpe)](n) (2) and [Zn(dmit)(bix)](n) (3) respectively. Compounds 1-3 were characterized by elemental analyses, IR, diffuse reflectance and single crystal X-ray diffraction studies. Compounds 1 and 3 crystallize in the monoclinic space group P2(1)/n, whereby compound 2 crystallizes in triclinic space group P1[combining macron]. In the present study, we chose three linkers 4,4'-bpy, 4,4'-bpe and bix (see , respectively, for their structural drawings), that differ in terms of their molecular dimensions. The crystal structures of compounds 1-3 are described here in terms of their supramolecular diversities that include π-π interactions, not only among aromatic stacking (compounds 1 and 3), but also between an aromatic ring and an ethylenic double bond (compound 2). The electronic absorption spectroscopy of compounds 1-3 support these intermolecular π-π interactions. This journal is © The Royal Society of Chemistry 2011

  18. Self-assembly of cationic multidomain peptide hydrogels: supramolecular nanostructure and rheological properties dictate antimicrobial activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Linhai; Xu, Dawei; Sellati, Timothy J.; Dong, He

    2015-11-01

    Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would also protect the hydrogel itself from being adversely affected by microbial attachment to its surface. We have previously demonstrated the broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity of supramolecular assemblies of cationic multi-domain peptides (MDPs) in solution. Here, we extend the 1-D soluble supramolecular assembly to 3-D hydrogels to investigate the effect of the supramolecular nanostructure and its rheological properties on the antimicrobial activity of self-assembled hydrogels. Among designed MDPs, the bactericidal activity of peptide hydrogels was found to follow an opposite trend to that in solution. Improved antimicrobial activity of self-assembled peptide hydrogels is dictated by the combined effect of supramolecular surface chemistry and storage modulus of the bulk materials, rather than the ability of individual peptides/peptide assemblies to penetrate bacterial cell membrane as observed in solution. The structure-property-activity relationship developed through this study will provide important guidelines for designing biocompatible peptide hydrogels with built-in antimicrobial activity for various biomedical applications.Hydrogels are an important class of biomaterials that have been widely utilized for a variety of biomedical/medical applications. The biological performance of hydrogels, particularly those used as wound dressing could be greatly advanced if imbued with inherent antimicrobial activity capable of staving off colonization of the wound site by opportunistic bacterial pathogens. Possessing such antimicrobial properties would

  19. Optical microscopy in the study of supramolecular structure of protein systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzoverya, M. E.; Shishpor, I. V.

    2016-10-01

    Fluctuations of the supramolecular structure of albumin facies are analyzed. Two stable states of the supramolecular structure of facies are revealed at room temperature. Optical microscopy is used to assess dynamic character of the supramolecular structure of human serum albumin.

  20. Mesoporous hybrid thin films: the physics and chemistry beneath.

    PubMed

    Soler-Illia, G J A A; Innocenzi, P

    2006-06-02

    Mesoporous films containing organic or biological functions within an organised array of cavities are produced by combining sol-gel, self-assembly of supramolecular templates and surface chemistry. This paper reviews the essential physics and chemical concepts behind the synthesis of these complex multifunctional materials.

  1. Supramolecular nanoparticles that target phosphoinositide-3-kinase overcome insulin resistance and exert pronounced antitumor efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish A; Roy, Bhaskar; Rao, Poornima S; Wyant, Gregory A; Mahmoud, Ayaat; Ramachandran, Madhumitha; Sengupta, Poulomi; Goldman, Aaron; Kotamraju, Venkata Ramana; Basu, Sudipta; Mashelkar, Raghunath A; Ruoslahti, Erkki; Dinulescu, Daniela M; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2013-12-01

    The centrality of phosphoinositide-3-kinase (PI3K) in cancer etiology is well established, but clinical translation of PI3K inhibitors has been limited by feedback signaling, suboptimal intratumoral concentration, and an insulin resistance "class effect." This study was designed to explore the use of supramolecular nanochemistry for targeting PI3K to enhance antitumor efficacy and potentially overcome these limitations. PI3K inhibitor structures were rationally modified using a cholesterol-based derivative, facilitating supramolecular nanoassembly with L-α-phosphatidylcholine and DSPE-PEG [1,2-distearoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[amino(polythylene glycol)]. The supramolecular nanoparticles (SNP) that were assembled were physicochemically characterized and functionally evaluated in vitro. Antitumor efficacy was quantified in vivo using 4T1 breast cancer and K-Ras(LSL/+)/Pten(fl/fl) ovarian cancer models, with effects on glucose homeostasis evaluated using an insulin sensitivity test. The use of PI103 and PI828 as surrogate molecules to engineer the SNPs highlighted the need to keep design principles in perspective; specifically, potency of the active molecule and the linker chemistry were critical principles for efficacy, similar to antibody-drug conjugates. We found that the SNPs exerted a temporally sustained inhibition of phosphorylation of Akt, mTOR, S6K, and 4EBP in vivo. These effects were associated with increased antitumor efficacy and survival as compared with PI103 and PI828. Efficacy was further increased by decorating the nanoparticle surface with tumor-homing peptides. Notably, the use of SNPs abrogated the insulin resistance that has been associated widely with other PI3K inhibitors. This study provides a preclinical foundation for the use of supramolecular nanochemistry to overcome current challenges associated with PI3K inhibitors, offering a paradigm for extension to other molecularly targeted therapeutics being explored for cancer

  2. Combined Effect of Chain Extension and Supramolecular Interactions on Rheological and Adhesive Properties of Acrylic Pressure-Sensitive Adhesives.

    PubMed

    Callies, Xavier; Herscher, Olivier; Fonteneau, Cécile; Robert, Alexis; Pensec, Sandrine; Bouteiller, Laurent; Ducouret, Guylaine; Creton, Costantino

    2016-12-07

    A new approach for the elaboration of low molecular weight pressure-sensitive adhesives based on supramolecular chemistry is explored. The synthesis of model systems coupled with probe-tack tests and rheological experiments highlights the influence of the transient network formed by supramolecular bonds on the adhesion energy. The first step of our approach consists of synthesizing poly(butyl acrylate-co-glycidyl methacrylate) copolymers from a difunctional initiator able to self-associate by four hydrogen bonds between urea groups. Linear copolymers with a low dispersity (Mn = 10 kg/mol, Ip < 1.4) have been synthesized via atom transfer radical polymerization. Films of the copolymers were then partially cross-linked through reaction of the epoxy functions with a diamine. The systematic variation of the average ratio of glycidyl methacrylate and diamine per copolymer shed light on the respective role played by the supramolecular interactions (between bis-urea groups and with the side chains) and by the chain extension and branching induced by the diamine/epoxy reaction. In this strategy, the adhesive performance can be optimized by modifying the strength of "stickers" (via the structure of the supramolecular initiator, for instance) and the polymer network (e.g., via the length and level of branching of the copolymer chains) in order to approach commercial PSA-like properties (high debonding energy and clean removal).

  3. Computational chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnold, J. O.

    1987-01-01

    With the advent of supercomputers, modern computational chemistry algorithms and codes, a powerful tool was created to help fill NASA's continuing need for information on the properties of matter in hostile or unusual environments. Computational resources provided under the National Aerodynamics Simulator (NAS) program were a cornerstone for recent advancements in this field. Properties of gases, materials, and their interactions can be determined from solutions of the governing equations. In the case of gases, for example, radiative transition probabilites per particle, bond-dissociation energies, and rates of simple chemical reactions can be determined computationally as reliably as from experiment. The data are proving to be quite valuable in providing inputs to real-gas flow simulation codes used to compute aerothermodynamic loads on NASA's aeroassist orbital transfer vehicles and a host of problems related to the National Aerospace Plane Program. Although more approximate, similar solutions can be obtained for ensembles of atoms simulating small particles of materials with and without the presence of gases. Computational chemistry has application in studying catalysis, properties of polymers, all of interest to various NASA missions, including those previously mentioned. In addition to discussing these applications of computational chemistry within NASA, the governing equations and the need for supercomputers for their solution is outlined.

  4. A New Class of Supramolecular Wires

    SciTech Connect

    Sumpter, Bobby G; Meunier, Vincent; Castellano, Ronald K; Lampkins, Andrew J; Li, Hengfeng; Valeev, Edward F

    2007-01-01

    We present an unconventional approach to 1-D supramolecular wires based on the self-assembly of donor-sigma-acceptor molecules. The concept is demonstrated using one class of these systems, 1-aza-adamantanetriones (AATs), that are well-characterized in terms of their solution/solid-state self-assembly and chemical manipulation. Our results show that accompanying spontaneous organization of the molecules into 1-D periodic arrays is delocalization of the frontier molecular orbitals through the saturated tricyclic cores of the monomers that spans the entire system. The electronic band structure for the 1-D wire reveals significant dispersion and can be tuned from the insulating regime to the semiconducting regime by suitable chemical functionalization of the core. The theoretical understanding of this new class of supramolecular structures sets the stage for the tailored design of novel functional materials that are alternative to those comprised of traditional -conjugated systems

  5. Supramolecular Synthons: Will Giant Rigid Superspheres Do?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    For the first time, the concept of supramolecular synthons was applied to giant rigid superspheres based on pentaphosphaferrocene [CpRFe(η5-P5)] (R = Me, Et) and Cu(I) halides, which reach 2.1–3.0 nm in diameter. Two supramolecular synthons, σ–π and π–π, are discovered based on halogen···CpR and Cp*···Cp* specific interactions, respectively. The geometry of the synthons is reproducible in a series of crystal structures of various supramolecules. The σ–π synthon alone is realized more frequently for Br-containing superspheres. A combination of the σ–π and π–π synthons is more typical for Cl-containing supramolecules. Each supramolecule can bear up to nine synthons to give mostly 2D and 3D architectures. PMID:27081373

  6. Fast fluorescence switching within hydrophilic supramolecular assemblies.

    PubMed

    Cusido, Janet; Battal, Mutlu; Deniz, Erhan; Yildiz, Ibrahim; Sortino, Salvatore; Raymo, Françisco M

    2012-08-13

    We designed a supramolecular strategy to modulate fluorescence in water under optical control. It is based on the entrapment of fluorophore-photochrome dyads within the hydrophobic interior of an amphiphilic polymer. The polymeric envelope around the dyads protects them from the aqueous environment, while imposing hydrophilic character on the overall supramolecular construct. In the resulting assemblies, the photochromic component can be operated reversibly on a microsecond timescale under the influence of ultraviolet stimulations. In turn, the reversible transformations control the emission intensity of the adjacent fluorophore. As a result, the fluorescence of such nanostructured constructs can be photomodulated for hundreds of cycles in water with microsecond switching speeds. Thus, our protocol for fast fluorescence switching in aqueous solutions can eventually lead to the realization of functional probes for the investigation of biological samples.

  7. Condensed matter physics and chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Nellis, W.J.

    1995-10-01

    The proposed Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) upgrade is ideally suited for science-based stockpile stewardship (SBSS) because LANSCE is a highly-intensity pulsed neutron source located at a nuclear weapons design laboratory. The attributes of a high-intensity pulsed source are essential for performing experiments on Pu and other materials important for SBSS. Neutrons can accurately probe thick bulk specimens, probe thin layers both freestanding and embedded in thicker specimens, and provide time-resolution for some phenomena. Both ordered structures and disorder in solids, liquids, and amorphous materials can be characterized, as well as phase transition. Because LANSCE is at a nuclear design laboratory, specimens important for SBSS issues are available. Los Alamos National Laboratory is an appropriate place to develop the requisite hardware to accommodate SBSS specimens, such as Pu.

  8. Supramolecular Multiblock Copolymers Featuring Complex Secondary Structures.

    PubMed

    Elacqua, Elizabeth; Manning, Kylie B; Lye, Diane S; Pomarico, Scott K; Morgia, Federica; Weck, Marcus

    2017-09-06

    This contribution introduces main-chain supramolecular ABC and ABB'A block copolymers sustained by orthogonal metal coordination and hydrogen bonding between telechelic polymers that feature distinct secondary structure motifs. Controlled polymerization techniques in combination with supramolecular assembly are used to engineer heterotelechelic π-sheets that undergo high-fidelity association with both helical and coil-forming synthetic polymers. Our design features multiple advances to achieve our targeted structures, in particular, those emulating sheet-like structural aspects using poly(p-phenylenevinylene)s (PPVs). To engineer heterotelechelic PPVs in a sheet-like design, we engineer an iterative one-pot cross metathesis-ring-opening metathesis polymerization (CM-ROMP) strategy that affords functionalized Grubbs-II initiators that subsequently polymerize a paracyclophanediene. Supramolecular assembly of two heterotelechelic PPVs is used to realize a parallel π-sheet, wherein further orthogonal assembly with helical motifs is possible. We also construct an antiparallel π-sheet, wherein terminal PPV blocks are adjacent to a flexible coil-like poly(norbornene) (PNB). The PNB is designed, through supramolecular chain collapse, to expose benzene and perfluorobenzene motifs that promote a hairpin turn via charge-transfer-aided folding. We demonstrate that targeted helix-(π-sheet)-helix and helix-(π-sheet)-coil assemblies occur without compromising intrinsic helicity, while both parallel and antiparallel β-sheet-like structures are realized. Our main-chain orthogonal assembly approach allows the engineering of multiblock copolymer scaffolds featuring diverse secondary structures via the directional assembly of telechelic building blocks. The targeted assemblies, a mix of sequence-defined helix-sheet-coil and helix-sheet-helix architectures, are Nature-inspired synthetic mimics that expose α/β and α+β protein classes via de novo design and cooperative assembly

  9. Physics and engineering of peptide supramolecular nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Handelman, Amir; Beker, Peter; Amdursky, Nadav; Rosenman, Gil

    2012-05-14

    The emerging "bottom-up" nanotechnology reveals a new field of bioinspired nanomaterials composed of chemically synthesized biomolecules. They are formed from elementary constituents in supramolecular structures by the use of a developed nature self-assembly mechanism. The focus of this perspective paper is on intrinsic fundamental physical properties of bioinspired peptide nanostructures and their small building units linked by weak noncovalent bonds. The observed exceptional optical properties indicate a phenomenon of quantum confinement in these supramolecular structures, which originates from nanoscale size of their elementary building blocks. The dimensionality of the confinement gives insight into intrinsic packing of peptide supramolecular nanomaterials. QC regions, revealed in bioinspired nanostructures, were found by us in amyloid fibrils formed from insulin protein. We describe ferroelectric and related properties found at the nanoscale based on original crystalline asymmetry of the nanoscale building blocks, packing these structures. In this context, we reveal a classic solid state physics phenomenon such as reconstructive phase transition observed in bioorganic peptide nanotubes. This irreversible phase transformation leads to drastic reshaping of their quantum structure from quantum dots to quantum wells, which is followed by variation of their space group symmetry from asymmetric to symmetric. We show that the supramolecular origin of these bioinspired nanomaterials provides them a unique chance to be disassembled into elementary building block peptide nanodots of 1-2 nm size possessing unique electronic, optical and ferroelectric properties. These multifunctional nanounits could lead to a new future step in nanotechnology and nanoscale advanced devices in the fields of nanophotonics, nanobiomedicine, nanobiopiezotronics, etc. This journal is © the Owner Societies 2012

  10. Supramolecular electron transfer by anion binding.

    PubMed

    Fukuzumi, Shunichi; Ohkubo, Kei; D'Souza, Francis; Sessler, Jonathan L

    2012-10-11

    Anion binding has emerged as an attractive strategy to construct supramolecular electron donor-acceptor complexes. In recent years, the level of sophistication in the design of these systems has advanced to the point where it is possible to create ensembles that mimic key aspects of the photoinduced electron-transfer events operative in the photosynthetic reaction centre. Although anion binding is a reversible process, kinetic studies on anion binding and dissociation processes, as well as photoinduced electron-transfer and back electron-transfer reactions in supramolecular electron donor-acceptor complexes formed by anion binding, have revealed that photoinduced electron transfer and back electron transfer occur at time scales much faster than those associated with anion binding and dissociation. This difference in rates ensures that the linkage between electron donor and acceptor moieties is maintained over the course of most forward and back electron-transfer processes. A particular example of this principle is illustrated by electron-transfer ensembles based on tetrathiafulvalene calix[4]pyrroles (TTF-C4Ps). In these ensembles, the TTF-C4Ps act as donors, transferring electrons to various electron acceptors after anion binding. Competition with non-redox active substrates is also observed. Anion binding to the pyrrole amine groups of an oxoporphyrinogen unit within various supramolecular complexes formed with fullerenes also results in acceleration of the photoinduced electron-transfer process but deceleration of the back electron transfer; again, this is ascribed to favourable structural and electronic changes. Anion binding also plays a role in stabilizing supramolecular complexes between sulphonated tetraphenylporphyrin anions ([MTPPS](4-): M = H(2) and Zn) and a lithium ion encapsulated C(60) (Li(+)@C(60)); the resulting ensemble produces long-lived charge-separated states upon photoexcitation of the porphyrins.

  11. Supramolecular gel electrophoresis of large DNA fragments.

    PubMed

    Tazawa, Shohei; Kobayashi, Kazuhiro; Oyoshi, Takanori; Yamanaka, Masamichi

    2017-07-06

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis is a frequent technique used to separate exceptionally large DNA fragments. In a typical continuous field electrophoresis, it is challenging to separate DNA fragments larger than 20 kbp because they migrate at a comparable rate. To overcome this challenge, it is necessary to develop a novel matrix for the electrophoresis. Here, we describe the electrophoresis of large DNA fragments up to 166 kbp using a supramolecular gel matrix and a typical continuous field electrophoresis system. C3 -symmetric tris-urea self-assembled into a supramolecular hydrogel in tris-boric acid-EDTA buffer, a typical buffer for DNA electrophoresis, and the supramolecular hydrogel was used as a matrix for electrophoresis to separate large DNA fragments. Three types of DNA marker, the λ-Hind III digest (2 to 23 kbp), Lambda DNA-Mono Cut Mix (10 to 49 kbp), and Marker 7 GT (10 to 165 kbp), were analyzed in this study. Large DNA fragments of greater than 100 kbp showed distinct mobility using a typical continuous field electrophoresis system. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Protein self-assembly via supramolecular strategies.

    PubMed

    Bai, Yushi; Luo, Quan; Liu, Junqiu

    2016-05-21

    Proteins, as the elemental basis of living organisms, mostly execute their biological tasks in the form of supramolecular self-assemblies with subtle architectures, dynamic interactions and versatile functionalities. Inspired by the structural harmony and functional beauty of natural protein self-assemblies to fabricate sophisticated yet highly ordered protein superstructures represents an adventure in the pursuit of nature's supreme wisdom. In this review, we focus on building protein self-assembly systems based on supramolecular strategies and classify recent progress by the types of utilized supramolecular driving forces. Especially, the design strategy, structure control and the thermodynamic/kinetic regulation of the self-assemblies, which will in turn provide insights into the natural biological self-assembly mechanism, are highlighted. In addition, recently, this research field is starting to extend its interest beyond constructing complex morphologies towards the potential applications of the self-assembly systems; several attempts to design functional protein complexes are also discussed. As such, we hope that this review will provide a panoramic sketch of the field and draw a roadmap towards the ultimate construction of advanced protein self-assemblies that even can serve as analogues of their natural counterparts.

  13. Photochromic supramolecular azopolyimides based on hydrogen bonds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schab-Balcerzak, Ewa; Flakus, Henryk; Jarczyk-Jedryka, Anna; Konieczkowska, Jolanta; Siwy, Mariola; Bijak, Katarzyna; Sobolewska, Anna; Stumpe, Joachim

    2015-09-01

    The approach of deriving new photoresponsive active supramolecular azopolymers based on the hydrogen bonds is described. Polymers with imide rings, i.e., poly(esterimide)s and poly(etherimide)s, with phenolic hydroxyl or carboxylic groups were applied as matrixes for the polymer-dye supramolecular systems. Supramolecular films were built on the basis of the hydrogen bonds between the functional groups of the polymers and various azochromophores, that is, 4-phenylazophenol, 4-[4-(6-hydroxyhexyloxy)phenylazo]benzene, 4-[4-(6-hexadecaneoxy)phenylazo]pyridine and 4-(4-hydroxyphenylazo)pyridine. The hydrogen bonding interaction in azo-systems were studied by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and for selected assembles by 1H NMR technique. The obtained polyimide azo-assembles were characterized by X-ray diffraction and DSC measurements. H-bonds allow attaching a chromophore to each repeating unit of the polymer, thereby suppressing the macroscopic phase separation except for the systems based on 4-[4-(6-hydroxyhexyloxy)phenylazo]benzene. H-bonds systems were amorphous and revealed glass transition temperatures lower than for the polyimide matrixes (170-260 °C). The photoresponsive behavior of the azo-assemblies was tasted in holographic recording experiment.

  14. Halogen-bonding-triggered supramolecular gel formation.

    PubMed

    Meazza, Lorenzo; Foster, Jonathan A; Fucke, Katharina; Metrangolo, Pierangelo; Resnati, Giuseppe; Steed, Jonathan W

    2013-01-01

    Supramolecular gels are topical soft materials involving the reversible formation of fibrous aggregates using non-covalent interactions. There is significant interest in controlling the properties of such materials by the formation of multicomponent systems, which exhibit non-additive properties emerging from interaction of the components. The use of hydrogen bonding to assemble supramolecular gels in organic solvents is well established. In contrast, the use of halogen bonding to trigger supramolecular gel formation in a two-component gel ('co-gel') is essentially unexplored, and forms the basis for this study. Here, we show that halogen bonding between a pyridyl substituent in a bis(pyridyl urea) and 1,4-diiodotetrafluorobenzene brings about gelation, even in polar media such as aqueous methanol and aqueous dimethylsulfoxide. This demonstrates that halogen bonding is sufficiently strong to interfere with competing gel-inhibitory interactions and create a 'tipping point' in gel assembly. Using this concept, we have prepared a halogen bond donor bis(urea) gelator that forms co-gels with halogen bond acceptors.

  15. Calix 2007:9th International Conference on Calixarene Chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffery Davis

    2011-09-09

    The DOE funds helped support an International Conference, Calix 2007, whose focus was on Supramolecular Chemistry. The conference was held at the University of Maryland from August 6-9, 2007 (Figure 1). The conference website is at www.chem.umd.edu/Conferences/Calix2007. This biannual conference had previously been held in the Czech Republic (2005), Canada (2003), Netherlands (2001), Australia (1999), Italy (1997), USA (Fort Worth, 1995) Japan (1993) and Germany (1991). Calixarenes are cup-shaped compounds that are a major part of Supramolecular Chemistry, for which Cram, Lehn and Pederson were awarded a Nobel Prize 20 years ago. Calixarene chemistry has expanded greatly in the last 2 decades, as these compounds are used in synthetic and mechanistic chemistry, separations science, materials science, nanoscience and biological chemistry. The organizing committee was quite happy that Calix 2007 encompassed the broad scope and interdisciplinary nature of the field. Our goal was to bring together leading scientists interested in calixarenes, molecular recognition, nanoscience and supramolecular chemistry. We believe that new research directions and collaborations resulted from an exchange of ideas between conferees. This grant from the DOE was crucial toward achieving that goal, as the funds helped cover some of the registration and accommodations costs for the speakers.

  16. Multifunctional Supramolecular Hybrid Materials Constructed from Hierarchical Self-Ordering of In Situ Generated Metal-Organic Framework (MOF) Nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chaudhari, Abhijeet K; Han, Intaek; Tan, Jin-Chong

    2015-06-25

    A synergistic approach is described to engineer supramolecular hybrid materials based on metal-organic frameworks, encompassing HKUST-1 nanoparticles formed in situ, coexisting with an electrically conducting gel fiber network. Following findings were made: (a) multistimuli-responsive structural transformation via reversible sol-gel switching, and (b) radical conversion of a soft hybrid gel into a mechanically malleable, viscoelastic matter. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  17. The Study of Matter.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Peter

    2000-01-01

    Reviews the booklet "The Study of Matter" produced by the Institute of Physics as part of their Shaping the Future series. This booklet is designed for teachers of chemistry, physics, design and technology, and biology. (Author/CCM)

  18. Supramolecular Nanoparticles for Molecular Diagnostics and Therapeutics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Kuan-Ju

    Over the past decades, significant efforts have been devoted to explore the use of various nanoparticle-based systems in the field of nanomedicine, including molecular imaging and therapy. Supramolecular synthetic approaches have attracted lots of attention due to their flexibility, convenience, and modularity for producing nanoparticles. In this dissertation, the developmental story of our size-controllable supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs) will be discussed, as well as their use in specific biomedical applications. To achieve the self-assembly of SNPs, the well-characterized molecular recognition system (i.e., cyclodextrin/adamantane recognition) was employed. The resulting SNPs, which were assembled from three molecular building blocks, possess incredible stability in various physiological conditions, reversible size-controllability and dynamic disassembly that were exploited for various in vitro and in vivo applications. An advantage of using the supramolecular approach is that it enables the convenient incorporation of functional ligands onto SNP surface that confers functionality ( e.g., targeting, cell penetration) to SNPs. We utilized SNPs for molecular imaging such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) by introducing reporter systems (i.e., radio-isotopes, MR contrast agents, and fluorophores) into SNPs. On the other hand, the incorporation of various payloads, including drugs, genes and proteins, into SNPs showed improved delivery performance and enhanced therapeutic efficacy for these therapeutic agents. Leveraging the powers of (i) a combinatorial synthetic approach based on supramolecular assembly and (ii) a digital microreactor, a rapid developmental pathway was developed that is capable of screening SNP candidates for the ideal structural and functional properties that deliver optimal performance. Moreover, SNP-based theranostic delivery systems that combine reporter systems and therapeutic payloads into a

  19. Dynamic structural transformations of coordination supramolecular systems upon exogenous stimulation.

    PubMed

    Li, Cheng-Peng; Chen, Jing; Liu, Chun-Sen; Du, Miao

    2015-02-18

    Reactions in the solid state, especially single-crystal-to-single-crystal (SC-SC) transformations, provide an appealing pathway to obtain target crystalline materials with modified properties via a solvent-free green chemistry approach. This feature article focuses on the progress to date in the context of coordination supramolecular systems (CSSs), especially coordination polymers (CPs) or metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which show interesting dynamic natures upon exposure to various exogenous stimuli, including concentration, temperature, light and mechanical force, as well as their synergic effect. In essence, dynamic CSSs normally possess crucial crystalline-reactive characteristics: (i) metal ions or clusters with unstable or metastable electronic configurations and coordination geometries; (ii) organic ligands bearing physicochemically active functional groups for subsequent reactions; (iii) polymeric networks of high flexibility for structural bending, rotation, swelling, or shrinking; (iv) guest moieties to be freely exchanged or eliminated by varying the environmental conditions. The significant changes in catalytic, sorption, magnetic, or luminescent properties accompanied by the structural transformations will also be discussed, which reveal the proof-of-concept thereof in designing new functional crystalline materials.

  20. Supramolecular Guest-Host Interactions for the Preparation of Biomedical Materials.

    PubMed

    Rodell, Christopher B; Mealy, Joshua E; Burdick, Jason A

    2015-12-16

    Supramolecular chemistry has emerged as an important technique for the formation of biomaterials, including nano- and microparticles and hydrogels. One specific class of supramolecular chemistry is the direct association of guest-host pairs, which involves host macrocycles such as cyclodextrins and cucurbit[n]urils and a wide range of guest molecules, where association is typically driven by molecule size and hydrophobicity. These systems are of particular interest in the biomedical field due to their dynamic nature, chemical diversity, relative ease of synthesis, and ability to interact with biological or synthetic molecules. In this review, we discuss aspects of polymeric material assembly mediated by guest-host interactions, including the fundamentals of assembly into functional biomedical materials. Additionally, applications of biomaterials that utilize guest-host interactions are discussed with a focus on injectable material formulations, the sequestration and delivery of encapsulated cargo (i.e., drugs, biomolecules), and the investigation of cell-material interactions (i.e., adhesion, differentiation, and delivery). While methodologies for guest-host mediated assembly and biological interaction have rapidly evolved in recent years, they remain far from realizing their full potential in the biomaterials field.

  1. Supramolecular fibres: Self-sorting shows its true colours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Draper, Emily R.; Adams, Dave J.

    2016-08-01

    Self-sorting events in supramolecular assembly lead to complex systems that are attractive for the design of functional materials, but have remained difficult to understand and control. Now, the growth of self-sorted supramolecular nanofibres has been elucidated by direct imaging through real-time in situ confocal microscopy.

  2. Alternation and tunable composition in hydrogen bonded supramolecular copolymers.

    PubMed

    Felder, Thorsten; de Greef, Tom F A; Nieuwenhuizen, Marko M L; Sijbesma, Rint P

    2014-03-07

    Sequence control in supramolecular copolymers is limited by the selectivity of the associating monomer end groups. Here we introduce the use of monomers with aminopyrimidinone and aminohydroxynaphthyridine quadruple hydrogen bonding end groups, which both homodimerize, but form even stronger heterodimers. These features allow the formation of supramolecular copolymers with a tunable composition and a preference for alternating sequences.

  3. Algorithm for Designing Nanoscale Supramolecular Therapeutics with Increased Anticancer Efficacy.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Ashish; Pandey, Prithvi; Rao, Poornima; Mahmoud, Ayaat; Goldman, Aaron; Sabbisetti, Venkata; Parcha, Shashikanth; Natarajan, Siva Kumar; Chandrasekar, Vineethkrishna; Dinulescu, Daniela; Roy, Sudip; Sengupta, Shiladitya

    2016-09-27

    In the chemical world, evolution is mirrored in the origin of nanoscale supramolecular structures from molecular subunits. The complexity of function acquired in a supramolecular system over a molecular subunit can be harnessed in the treatment of cancer. However, the design of supramolecular nanostructures is hindered by a limited atomistic level understanding of interactions between building blocks. Here, we report the development of a computational algorithm, which we term Volvox after the first multicellular organism, that sequentially integrates quantum mechanical energy-state- and force-field-based models with large-scale all-atomistic explicit water molecular dynamics simulations to design stable nanoscale lipidic supramolecular structures. In one example, we demonstrate that Volvox enables the design of a nanoscale taxane supramolecular therapeutic. In another example, we demonstrate that Volvox can be extended to optimizing the ratio of excipients to form a stable nanoscale supramolecular therapeutic. The nanoscale taxane supramolecular therapeutic exerts greater antitumor efficacy than a clinically used taxane in vivo. Volvox can emerge as a powerful tool in the design of nanoscale supramolecular therapeutics for effective treatment of cancer.

  4. Gelation induced supramolecular chirality: chirality transfer, amplification and application.

    PubMed

    Duan, Pengfei; Cao, Hai; Zhang, Li; Liu, Minghua

    2014-08-14

    Supramolecular chirality defines chirality at the supramolecular level, and is generated from the spatial arrangement of component molecules assembling through non-covalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding, van der Waals interactions, π-π stacking, hydrophobic interactions and so on. During the formation of low molecular weight gels (LMWGs), one kind of fascinating soft material, one frequently encounters the phenomenon of chirality as well as chiral nanostructures, either from chiral gelators or even achiral gelators. A view of gelation-induced supramolecular chirality will be very helpful to understand the self-assembly process of the gelator molecules as well as the chiral structures, the regulation of the chirality in the gels and the development of the "smart" chiral materials such as chiroptical devices, catalysts and chiral sensors. It necessitates fundamental understanding of chirality transfer and amplification in these supramolecular systems. In this review, recent progress in gelation-induced supramolecular chirality is discussed.

  5. UV-Responsive Supramolecular Vesicles with Double Hydrophobic Chains.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaojin; Dai, Yu; Chen, Xin; Zhuo, Renxi

    2016-06-01

    In order to improve the stability of polymeric vesicles, supramolecular vesicles are developed via self-assembly of the inclusion of γ-cyclodextrin (γ-CD) and 1-pyrenemethyl palmitate (Py-pal). The inclusion has one hydrophilic head and double hydrophobic tails, which looks like the phospholipid. From the transmission electron microscopy (TEM) image, it can be observed that the average diameter of supramolecular vesicles is approximately 55 nm and there is a huge cavity in supramolecular vesicles. Due to the photo-breakable ester of Py-pal, supramolecular vesicles are broken under UV irradiation. Supramolecular vesicles are used as UV-responsive drug carriers to release the hydrophilic drug such as doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX•HCl). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Exploiting Biocatalysis in the Synthesis of Supramolecular Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Sangita; Ulijn, Rein V.

    This chapter details the exploitation of biocatalysis in generating supramolecular polymers. This approach provides highly dynamic supramolecular structures, inspired by biological polymeric systems found in the intra- and extracellular space. The molecular design of the self-assembling precursors is discussed in terms of enzyme recognition, molecular switching mechanisms and non-covalent interactions that drive the supramolecular polymerisation process, with an emphasis on aromatic peptide amphiphiles. We discuss a number of unique features of these systems, including spatiotemporal control of nucleation and growth of supramolecular polymers and the possibility of kinetically controlling mechanical properties. Fully reversible systems that operate under thermodynamic control allow for defect correction and selection of the most stable structures from mixtures of monomers. Finally, a number of potential applications of enzymatic supramolecular polymerisations are discussed in the context of biomedicine and nanotechnology.

  7. Anion-switchable supramolecular gels for controlling pharmaceutical crystal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, Jonathan A.; Piepenbrock, Marc-Oliver M.; Lloyd, Gareth O.; Clarke, Nigel; Howard, Judith A. K.; Steed, Jonathan W.

    2010-12-01

    We describe the use of low-molecular-weight supramolecular gels as media for the growth of molecular crystals. Growth of a range of crystals of organic compounds, including pharmaceuticals, was achieved in bis(urea) gels. Low-molecular-weight supramolecular gelators allow access to an unlimited range of solvent systems, in contrast to conventional aqueous gels such as gelatin and agarose. A detailed study of carbamazepine crystal growth in four different bis(urea) gelators, including a metallogelator, is reported. The crystallization of a range of other drug substances, namely sparfloxacin, piroxicam, theophylline, caffeine, ibuprofen, acetaminophen (paracetamol), sulindac and indomethacin, was also achieved in supramolecular gel media without co-crystal formation. In many cases, crystals can be conveniently recovered from the gels by using supramolecular anion-triggered gel dissolution; however, crystals of substances that themselves bind to anions are dissolved by them. Overall, supramolecular gel-phase crystallization offers an extremely versatile new tool in pharmaceutical polymorph screening.

  8. Art in Chemistry: Chemistry in Art. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Barbara R.; Patterson, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    This textbook integrates chemistry and art with hands-on activities and fascinating demonstrations that enable students to see and understand how the science of chemistry is involved in the creation of art. It investigates such topics as color integrated with electromagnetic radiation, atoms, and ions; paints integrated with classes of matter,…

  9. Art in Chemistry: Chemistry in Art. Second Edition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greenberg, Barbara R.; Patterson, Dianne

    2008-01-01

    This textbook integrates chemistry and art with hands-on activities and fascinating demonstrations that enable students to see and understand how the science of chemistry is involved in the creation of art. It investigates such topics as color integrated with electromagnetic radiation, atoms, and ions; paints integrated with classes of matter,…

  10. Supramolecular Explorations: Exhibiting the Extent of Extended Cationic Cyclophanes.

    PubMed

    Dale, Edward J; Vermeulen, Nicolaas A; Juríček, Michal; Barnes, Jonathan C; Young, Ryan M; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-02-16

    Acting as hosts, cationic cyclophanes, consisting of π-electron-poor bipyridinium units, are capable of entering into strong donor-acceptor interactions to form host-guest complexes with various guests when the size and electronic constitution are appropriately matched. A synthetic protocol has been developed that utilizes catalytic quantities of tetrabutylammonium iodide to make a wide variety of cationic pyridinium-based cyclophanes in a quick and easy manner. Members of this class of cationic cyclophanes with boxlike geometries, dubbed Ex(n)Boxm(4+) for short, have been prepared by altering a number of variables: (i) n, the number of "horizontal" p-phenylene spacers between adjoining pyridinium units, to modulate the "length" of the cavity; (ii) m, the number of "vertical" p-phenylene spacers, to modulate the "width" of the cavity; and (iii) the aromatic linkers, namely, 1,4-di- and 1,3,5-trisubstituted units for the construction of macrocycles (ExBoxes) and macrobicycles (ExCages), respectively. This Account serves as an exploration of the properties that emerge from these structural modifications of the pyridinium-based hosts, coupled with a call for further investigation into the wealth of properties inherent in this class of compounds. By variation of only the aforementioned components, the role of these cationic receptors covers ground that spans (i) synthetic methodology, (ii) extraction and sequestration, (iii) catalysis, (iv) molecular electronics, (v) physical organic chemistry, and (vi) supramolecular chemistry. Ex(1)Box(4+) (or simply ExBox(4+)) has been shown to be a multipurpose receptor capable of binding a wide range of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), while also being a suitable component in switchable mechanically interlocked molecules. Additionally, the electronic properties of some host-guest complexes allow the development of artificial photosystems. Ex(2)Box(4+) boasts the ability to bind both π-electron-rich and -poor aromatic

  11. [Supramolecular reorganizations in cellulose during hydration].

    PubMed

    Grunin, Iu B; Grunin, L Iu; Talantsev, V I; Nikol'skaia, E A; Masas, D S

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of modern ideas about the structural organization of the cellulose microfibrils is carried out. The mechanism of the formation of additional capillary-porous system of cellulose under moistening is offered. It is established that when the moisture content of cellulose reaches 8-10%, the filling of its micropores occurs with a simultaneous increase in their cross sizes, a specific surface and reduction in the degree of crystallinity of specimens. Within the proposed model of microfibril construction the parameters of supramolecular structure and capillary-porous system of cotton cellulose are determined.

  12. Cucurbit[n]uril-Based Microcapsules Self-Assembled within Microfluidic Droplets: A Versatile Approach for Supramolecular Architectures and Materials

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Conspectus Microencapsulation is a fundamental concept behind a wide range of daily applications ranging from paints, adhesives, and pesticides to targeted drug delivery, transport of vaccines, and self-healing concretes. The beauty of microfluidics to generate microcapsules arises from the capability of fabricating monodisperse and micrometer-scale droplets, which can lead to microcapsules/particles with fine-tuned control over size, shape, and hierarchical structure, as well as high reproducibility, efficient material usage, and high-throughput manipulation. The introduction of supramolecular chemistry, such as host–guest interactions, endows the resultant microcapsules with stimuli-responsiveness and self-adjusting capabilities, and facilitates hierarchical microstructures with tunable stability and porosity, leading to the maturity of current microencapsulation industry. Supramolecular architectures and materials have attracted immense attention over the past decade, as they open the possibility to obtain a large variety of aesthetically pleasing structures, with myriad applications in biomedicine, energy, sensing, catalysis, and biomimicry, on account of the inherent reversible and adaptive nature of supramolecular interactions. As a subset of supramolecular interactions, host–guest molecular recognition involves the formation of inclusion complexes between two or more moieties, with specific three-dimensional structures and spatial arrangements, in a highly controllable and cooperative manner. Such highly selective, strong yet dynamic interactions could be exploited as an alternative methodology for programmable and controllable engineering of supramolecular architectures and materials, exploiting reversible interactions between complementary components. Through the engineering of molecular structures, assemblies can be readily functionalized based on host–guest interactions, with desirable physicochemical characteristics. In this Account, we summarize

  13. Cucurbit[n]uril-Based Microcapsules Self-Assembled within Microfluidic Droplets: A Versatile Approach for Supramolecular Architectures and Materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ji; Lan, Yang; Yu, Ziyi; Tan, Cindy S Y; Parker, Richard M; Abell, Chris; Scherman, Oren A

    2017-02-21

    Microencapsulation is a fundamental concept behind a wide range of daily applications ranging from paints, adhesives, and pesticides to targeted drug delivery, transport of vaccines, and self-healing concretes. The beauty of microfluidics to generate microcapsules arises from the capability of fabricating monodisperse and micrometer-scale droplets, which can lead to microcapsules/particles with fine-tuned control over size, shape, and hierarchical structure, as well as high reproducibility, efficient material usage, and high-throughput manipulation. The introduction of supramolecular chemistry, such as host-guest interactions, endows the resultant microcapsules with stimuli-responsiveness and self-adjusting capabilities, and facilitates hierarchical microstructures with tunable stability and porosity, leading to the maturity of current microencapsulation industry. Supramolecular architectures and materials have attracted immense attention over the past decade, as they open the possibility to obtain a large variety of aesthetically pleasing structures, with myriad applications in biomedicine, energy, sensing, catalysis, and biomimicry, on account of the inherent reversible and adaptive nature of supramolecular interactions. As a subset of supramolecular interactions, host-guest molecular recognition involves the formation of inclusion complexes between two or more moieties, with specific three-dimensional structures and spatial arrangements, in a highly controllable and cooperative manner. Such highly selective, strong yet dynamic interactions could be exploited as an alternative methodology for programmable and controllable engineering of supramolecular architectures and materials, exploiting reversible interactions between complementary components. Through the engineering of molecular structures, assemblies can be readily functionalized based on host-guest interactions, with desirable physicochemical characteristics. In this Account, we summarize the current state

  14. General Chemistry, 1970 Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dunham, Orson W.; Franke, Douglas C.

    This publication is a syllabus for a senior high school chemistry course designed for the average ability, nonscience major. The content of the syllabus is divided into three basic core areas: Area I: Similarities and Dissimilarities of Matter (9 weeks); Area II: Preparation and Separation of Substances (10 weeks); Area III: Structure and…

  15. Computer Simulation of Metallo-Supramolecular Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihu; Chen, Chun-Chung; Dormidontova, Elena

    2009-03-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulation we studied formation of reversible metallo-supramolecular networks based on 3:1 ligand-metal complexes between end-functionalized oligomers and metal ions. The fraction of 1:1, 2:1 and 3:1 ligand-metal complexes was obtained and analyzed using an analytical approach as a function of oligomer concentration, c and metal-to-oligomer ratio. We found that at low concentration the maximum in the number-average molecular weight is achieved near the stoichiometric composition and it shifts to higher metal-to- oligomer ratios at larger concentrations. Predictions are made regarding the onset of network formation, which occurs in a limited range of metal-to-oligomer ratios at sufficiently large oligomer concentrations. The average molecular weight between effective crosslinks decreases with oligomer concentration and reaches its minimum at the stoichiometric composition, where the high-frequency elastic plateau modulus approaches its maximal value. At high oligomer concentrations the plateau modulus follows a c^1.8 concentration dependence, similar to recent experimental results for metallo-supramolecular networks.

  16. Chiral NH-Controlled Supramolecular Metallacycles.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinqiao; Tan, Chunxia; Zhang, Kang; Liu, Yan; Low, Paul J; Jiang, Jianwen; Cui, Yong

    2017-02-01

    Chiral NH functionalities-based discrimination is a key feature of Nature's chemical armory, yet selective binding of biologically active molecules in synthetic systems with high enantioselectivity poses significant challenges. Here we report the assembly of three chiral fluorescent Zn6L6 metallacycles from pyridyl-functionalized Zn(salalen) or Zn(salen) complexes. Each of these metallacycles has a nanoscale hydrophobic cavity decorated with six, three, or zero chiral NH functionalities and packs into a three-dimensional supramolecular porous framework. The binding affinity and enantioselectivity of the metallacycles toward α-hydroxycarboxylic acids, amino acids, small molecule pharamaceuticals (l-dopa, d-penicillamine), and chiral amines increase with the number of chiral NH moieties in the cyclic structure. From single-crystal X-ray diffraction, molecular simulations, and quantum chemical calculations, the chiral recognition and discrimination are attributed to the specific binding of enantiomers in the chiral pockets of the metallacycles. The parent metallacycles are fluorescent with the intensity of emission being linearly related to the enantiomeric composition of the chiral biorelevant guests, which allow them to be utilized in chiral sensing. The fact that manipulation of chiral NH functionalities in metallacycles can control the enantiorecognition of biomolecular complexes would facilitate the design of more effective supramolecular assemblies for enantioselective processes.

  17. Dipole-moment-driven cooperative supramolecular polymerization.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Chidambar; Bejagam, Karteek K; Senanayak, Satyaprasad P; Narayan, K S; Balasubramanian, S; George, Subi J

    2015-03-25

    While the mechanism of self-assembly of π-conjugated molecules has been well studied to gain control over the structure and functionality of supramolecular polymers, the intermolecular interactions underpinning it are poorly understood. Here, we study the mechanism of self-assembly of perylene bisimide derivatives possessing dipolar carbonate groups as linkers. It was observed that the combination of carbonate linkers and cholesterol/dihydrocholesterol self-assembling moieties led to a cooperative mechanism of self-assembly. Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations of an assembly in explicit solvent strongly suggest that the dipole-dipole interaction between the carbonate groups imparts a macro-dipolar character to the assembly. This is confirmed experimentally through the observation of a significant polarization in the bulk phase for molecules following a cooperative mechanism. The cooperativity is attributed to the presence of dipole-dipole interaction in the assembly. Thus, anisotropic long-range intermolecular interactions such as dipole-dipole interaction can serve as a way to obtain cooperative self-assembly and aid in rationalizing and predicting the mechanisms in various synthetic supramolecular polymers.

  18. A supramolecular helix that disregards chirality.

    PubMed

    Roche, Cécile; Sun, Hao-Jan; Leowanawat, Pawaret; Araoka, Fumito; Partridge, Benjamin E; Peterca, Mihai; Wilson, Daniela A; Prendergast, Margaret E; Heiney, Paul A; Graf, Robert; Spiess, Hans W; Zeng, Xiangbing; Ungar, Goran; Percec, Virgil

    2016-01-01

    The functions of complex crystalline systems derived from supramolecular biological and non-biological assemblies typically emerge from homochiral programmed primary structures via first principles involving secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures. In contrast, heterochiral and racemic compounds yield disordered crystals, amorphous solids or liquids. Here, we report the self-assembly of perylene bisimide derivatives in a supramolecular helix that in turn self-organizes in columnar hexagonal crystalline domains regardless of the enantiomeric purity of the perylene bisimide. We show that both homochiral and racemic perylene bisimide compounds, including a mixture of 21 diastereomers that cannot be deracemized at the molecular level, self-organize to form single-handed helical assemblies with identical single-crystal-like order. We propose that this high crystalline order is generated via a cogwheel mechanism that disregards the chirality of the self-assembling building blocks. We anticipate that this mechanism will facilitate access to previously inaccessible complex crystalline systems from racemic and homochiral building blocks.

  19. Intracellular guest exchange between dynamic supramolecular hosts.

    PubMed

    Swaminathan, Subramani; Fowley, Colin; McCaughan, Bridgeen; Cusido, Janet; Callan, John F; Raymo, Françisco M

    2014-06-04

    Decyl and oligo(ethylene glycol) chains were appended to the same poly(methacrylate) backbone to generate an amphiphilic polymer with a ratio between hydrophobic and hydrophilic segments of 2.5. At concentrations greater than 10 μg mL(-1) in neutral buffer, multiple copies of this particular macromolecule assemble into nanoparticles with a hydrodynamic diameter of 15 nm. In the process of assembling, these nanoparticles can capture anthracene donors and borondipyrromethene acceptors within their hydrophobic interior and permit the transfer of excitation energy with an efficiency of 95%. Energy transfer is observed also if nanocarriers containing exclusively the donors are mixed with nanoparticles preloaded separately with the acceptors in aqueous media. The two sets of supramolecular assemblies exchange their guests with fast kinetics upon mixing to co-localize complementary chromophores within the same nanostructured container and enable energy transfer. After guest exchange, the nanoparticles can cross the membrane of cervical cancer cells and bring the co-entrapped donors and acceptors within the intracellular environment. Alternatively, intracellular energy transfer is also established after sequential cell incubation with nanoparticles containing the donors first and then with nanocarriers preloaded with the acceptors or vice versa. Under these conditions, the nanoparticles exchange their cargo only after internalization and allow energy transfer exclusively within the cell interior. Thus, the dynamic character of such supramolecular containers offers the opportunity to transport independently complementary species inside cells and permit their interaction only within the intracellular space.

  20. Supramolecular assembly in telechelic polymer blends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, R.; Fredrickson, Glenn H.

    2009-10-01

    Equilibrium, supramolecular assembly in melt blends of two species of telechelic polymers with reversible bonding sites at both ends is theoretically investigated. The bonding between polymers, whether between like or dislike chains, is controlled by affinities of chain bonding set by specified bond energies. Low affinities, or low overall bond strength, results in a monodisperse population of unlinked chains while larger affinities cause longer chains to assemble, forming a polydisperse blend. We investigate sequentially blends with only homobonding (like chain), only heterobonding (dislike chain), and finally a mixed homo- and heterobonding melt. In the first case, the effects of longer chain assembly and polydispersity in a homogeneous melt and its bulk demixing transition are explored. In contrast with the homobonding case, large heterobonding affinities cause alternating blocks to assemble into multiblock copolymers, which can lead to mesophases. The weak bonding region between bulk phase separation and mesophase stability is investigated and a novel Lifshitz point is found indicating a region prone to emulsify. Mixed homo- and heterobonding systems are also examined. Polymeric segments of both species are modeled as flexible Gaussian threads and nonspecific interactions between dissimilar blocks are contactlike Flory-Huggins repulsions. The melts are assumed to be incompressible and all calculations are carried out within mean-field theory. A new integral equation formalism is developed for enumerating all linear species in these complex supramolecular systems, and the random phase approximation and numerical self-consistent field theory are invoked in this context to map out a variety of phase diagrams.

  1. Immune responses to coiled coil supramolecular biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Rudra, Jai S; Tripathi, Pulak K; Hildeman, David A; Jung, Jangwook P; Collier, Joel H

    2010-11-01

    Self-assembly has been increasingly utilized in recent years to create peptide-based biomaterials for 3D cell culture, tissue engineering, and regenerative medicine, but the molecular determinants of these materials' immunogenicity have remained largely unexplored. In this study, a set of molecules that self-assembled through coiled coil oligomerization was designed and synthesized, and immune responses against them were investigated in mice. Experimental groups spanned a range of oligomerization behaviors and included a peptide from the coiled coil region of mouse fibrin that did not form supramolecular structures, an engineered version of this peptide that formed coiled coil bundles, and a peptide-PEG-peptide triblock bioconjugate that formed coiled coil multimers and supramolecular aggregates. In mice, the native peptide and engineered peptide did not produce any detectable antibody response, and none of the materials elicited detectable peptide-specific T cell responses, as evidenced by the absence of IL-2 and interferon-gamma in cultures of peptide-challenged splenocytes or draining lymph node cells. However, specific antibody responses were elevated in mice injected with the multimerizing peptide-PEG-peptide. Minimal changes in secondary structure were observed between the engineered peptide and the triblock peptide-PEG-peptide, making it possible that the triblock's multimerization was responsible for this antibody response.

  2. Molecular "wiring" glucose oxidase in supramolecular architecture.

    PubMed

    Deng, Liu; Liu, Ying; Yang, Guocheng; Shang, Li; Wen, Dan; Wang, Fuan; Xu, Zhiai; Dong, Shaojun

    2007-07-01

    Supramolecular organized multilayers were constructed by multiwalled carbon nanotubes modified with ferrocene-derivatized poly(allylamine) redox polymer and glucose oxidase by electrostatic self-assembly. From the analysis of voltammetric signals and fluorescence results, a linear increment of the coverage of enzyme per bilayer was estimated, which demonstrated that the multilayer is constructed in a spatially ordered manner. The cyclic voltammograms obtained from the indium tin oxide (ITO) electrodes coated by the (Fc-PAH@CNT/GOx)n multilayers revealed that bioelectrocatalytic response is directly correlated to the number of deposited bilayers; that is, the sensitivity is tunable by controlling the number of bilayers associated with ITO electrodes. The incorporation of redox-polymer-functionalized carbon nanotubes (CNT) into enzyme films resulted in a 6-10-fold increase in the glucose electrocatalytic current; the bimolecular rate constant of FADH2 oxidation (wiring efficiency) was increased up to 12-fold. Impedance spectroscopy data have yielded the electron diffusion coefficient (De) of this nanostructure to be over 10(-8) cm2 s(-1), which is typically higher than those systems without CNT by at least a factor of 10, indicating that electron transport in the new supramolecular architecture was enhanced by communication of the redox active site of enzyme, redox polymer, and CNT.

  3. Implementation and Evaluation of Web-Based Learning Activities on Bonding and the Structure of Matter for 10-th Grade Chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frailich, Marcel

    This study deals with the development, implementation, and evaluation of web-based activities associated with the topic of chemical bonding , as taught in 10th grade chemistry. A website was developed entitled: "Chemistry and the Chemical Industry in the Service of Mankind", its URL is: http://stwww.weizmann.ac.il/g-chem/learnchem (Kesner, Frailich, & Hofstein, 2003). The main goal of this study was to assess the educational effectiveness of website activities dealing with the chemical bonding concept. These activities include visualization tools, as well as topics relevant to daily life and industrial applications. The study investigated the effectiveness of a web-based learning environment regarding the understanding of chemical bonding concepts, students' perceptions of the classroom learning environment, their attitudes regarding the relevance of learning chemistry to everyday life, and their interest in chemistry studies. As mentioned before, in the present study we focused on activities (from the website), all of which deal with chemical bonding concept. The following are the reasons for the decision to focus on this topic: (1) Chemical bonding is a key concept that is taught in 10th grade chemistry in high school. It provides the basis for many other chemistry topics that are taught later, and (2) Chemical bonding is a difficult for students using existing tools (e. g., static models in books, ball-and- stick models), which are insufficient to demonstrate the abstract nature phenomena associated with this topic. The four activities developed for this study are (1) models of the atomic structure, (2) metals -- structure and properties, (3) ionic substances in everyday life and in industry, and (4) molecular substances -- structure, properties, and uses. The study analyzed both quantitative and qualitative research. The quantitative tools of the study included: A Semantic Differential questionnaire and a Chemistry Classroom Web-Based Learning Environment

  4. Versatile supramolecular reactivity of zinc-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin in crystalline solids: Polymeric grids with zinc dichloride and hydrogen-bonded networks with mellitic acid.

    PubMed

    Lipstman, Sophia; Goldberg, Israel

    2009-12-11

    Crystal engineering studies confirm that the zinc-tetra(4-pyridyl)porphyrin building block reveals versatile supramolecular chemistry. In this work, it was found to be reactive in the assembly of both (a) a 2D polymeric array by a unique combination of self-coordination and coordination through external zinc dichloride linkers and (b) an extended heteromolecular hydrogen-bonded network with mellitic acid sustained by multiple connectivity between the component species.

  5. International Journal of Quantum Chemistry. Quantum Chemistry Symposium Number 26: Proceedings of the International Symposium on Atomic, Molecular, and Condensed Matter Theory and Computational Methods Held in St. Augustine, Florida on 14-21 March 1992

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    DK-5230 Denmark JOHN HEAD University of Hawaii MU SHIK JHON Department of Chemistry Korea Advanced Institute of Science 2545 The Mall and Technology...R. A. Whiteside. R. Seeger. C. F. Melhs. J. Baker. R. L. Martin. L. R, Kahn.J. J. P. Stewart , S. lopiol. and J. A. Pope. GAYUSSIAN 90 ) Revision I...A. Teukolsky. and W. T. Vetterling, Numerical Recipes(Cambridge University Press. Cambridge. UK. 1989). [12] W. J. Hehre. R. F. Stewart , and J. A

  6. Self-construction of supramolecular polyrotaxane films by an electrotriggered morphogen-driven process.

    PubMed

    Rydzek, Gaulthier; Garnier, Tony; Schaaf, Pierre; Voegel, Jean-Claude; Senger, Bernard; Frisch, Benoît; Haikel, Youssef; Petit, Corinne; Schlatter, Guy; Jierry, Loïc; Boulmedais, Fouzia

    2013-08-27

    The design of films using a one-pot process has recently attracted increasing interest in the field of polymer thin film formation. Herein we describe the preparation of one-pot supramolecular polyrotaxane (PRX) films using the morphogen-driven self-construction process. This one-pot buildup strategy where the film growth is triggered by the electrochemical formation and diffusion of a catalyst in close vicinity of the substrate has recently been introduced by our group. A one-pot mixture was used that contained (i) poly(acrylic acid) (PAA) functionalized by azide groups grafted on the polymer chain through oligo(ethylene glycol) (EG) arms, leading to PAA-EG13-N3, (ii) cyclodextrins (α and β CD), as macrocycles that can be threaded along EG arms, (iii) alkyne-functionalized stoppers (ferrocene or adamantane), to cap the PRX assembly by click chemistry, and (iv) copper sulfate. The one-pot mixture solution was brought into contact with a gold electrode. Cu(I), the morphogen, was generated electrochemically from Cu(II) at the electrode/one-pot solution interface. This electrotriggered click reaction leads to the capping of polypseudorotaxane yielding to PRXs. The PRXs can self-assemble through lateral supramolecular interactions to form aggregates and ensure the cohesion of the film. The film buildup was investigated using different types of CD and alkyne functionalized stoppers. Supramolecular PRX aggregates were characterized by X-ray diffraction measurements. The film topographies were imaged by atomic force microscopy. The influence of the concentration in CD and the presence of a competitor were studied as well. The stability of the resulting film was tested in contact with 8 M urea and during the electrochemical oxidation of ferrocene.

  7. Diffusion of a Highly-Charged Supramolecular Assembly: Direct Observation of Ion-Association in Water

    SciTech Connect

    University of California, Berkeley; Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory; Raymond, Kenneth; Pluth, Michael D.; Tiedemann, Bryan E.F.; van Halbeek, Herman; Nunlist, Rudi; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2007-10-22

    Understanding the solution behavior of supramolecular assemblies is essential for a full understanding of the formation and chemistry of synthetic host-guest systems. While the interaction between host and guest molecules is generally the focus of mechanistic studies of host-guest complexes, the interaction of the host-guest complex with other species in solution remains largely unknown, although in principle accessible by diffusion studies. Several NMR techniques are available to monitor diffusion and have recently been reviewed. Pulsed gradient spin-echo (PGSE) NMR methods have attracted increasing interest, since they allow diffusion coefficients to be measured with high accuracy; they have been successfully used with observation of {sup 7}Li and {sup 31}P nuclei as well as with {sup 1}H NMR. We report here the direct measurement of diffusion coefficients to observe ion-association interactions by counter cations with a highly-charged supramolecular assembly. Raymond and coworkers have described the design and chemistry of a class of metal-ligand supramolecular assemblies over the past decade. The [Ga{sub 4}L{sub 6}]{sup 12-} (L = 1,5-bis(2,3-dihydroxybenzamido)naphthalene) (1) (Figure 1) assembly has garnered the most attention, with the exploration of the dynamics and mechanism of guest exchange as well as the ability of 1 to achieve either stoichiometric or catalytic reactions inside its interior cavity. Recent studies have revealed the importance of counter cations in solution on the chemistry of 1. During the mechanistic study of the C-H bond activation of aldehydes by [Cp*Ir(PMe{sub 3})(olefin){sup +} {contained_in} 1]{sup 11-} a stepwise guest dissociation mechanism with an ion-paired intermediate was proposed. Similarly, in the mechanism for the hydrolysis of iminium cations generated from the 3-aza Cope rearrangement of enammonium cations in 1, the presence of an exterior ion association was part of the kinetic model. To further substantiate the

  8. Layer-by-layer fabrication of supramolecular dyes on TiO2 surfaces for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kong, Xiaoqing; Maguire, Shawn; Lye, Diane; Weck, Marcus; Lee, Stephanie

    We present a modular layer-by-layer approach based on metal coordination chemistry to assemble supramolecular dyes exhibiting increased absorption in the visible range on electrode surfaces. Specifically, palladiated bis-pincer complexes (Pd-BPCs) were employed as linkers between pyridyl-terminated organic molecules via dative bonding. By alternately immersing mesoporous TiO2-coated glass substrates in solutions containing dissolved zinc porphyin (ZnP) and Pd-BPCs, supramolecular dyes were assembled layer-by-layer on the TiO2 surfaces. UV-visible absorption spectra of these assembled structures revealed a linear increase in the Soret and Q bands of ZnP after each immersion of the substrate in the ZnP solution. Coordination of the ZnP layers with Pd-BPC resulted in a slight red shift (<10 nm) of the absorption bands. The modular nature of the assembly process afforded the incorporation of other pyridyl-terminated organic molecules in specific layers of the supramolecular assemblies. By assembling unique organic dyes that absorb different wavelengths of light, we expect to expand light absorption across the visible region of the solar spectrum for solar cell applications.

  9. Biomimetic supramolecular designs for the controlled release of growth factors in bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Azevedo, Helena S; Pashkuleva, Iva

    2015-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of tissues is an assembly of insoluble macromolecules that specifically interact with soluble bioactive molecules and regulate their distribution and availability to cells. Recapitulating this ability has been an important target in controlled growth factor delivery strategies for tissue regeneration and requires the design of multifunctional carriers. This review describes the integration of supramolecular interactions on the design of delivery strategies that encompass self-assembling and engineered affinity components to construct advanced biomimetic carriers for growth factor delivery. Several glycan- and peptide-based self-assemblies reported in the literature are highlighted and commented upon. These examples demonstrate how molecular design and chemistry are successfully employed to create versatile multifunctional molecules which self-assemble/disassemble in a precisely predicted manner, thus controlling compartmentalization, transport and delivery. Finally, we discuss whether recent advances in the design and preparation of supramolecular delivery systems have been sufficient to drive real translation towards a clinical impact. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction: Supramolecular Aspects of Solvent Exchange Volume 21

    SciTech Connect

    Gloe, Karsten; Tasker, Peter A; Oshima, Tatsuya; Watarai, Hitoshi; Nilsson, Mikael

    2013-01-01

    Preface The theme of supramolecular chemistry (SC), entailing the organization of multiple species through noncovalent interactions, has permeated virtually all aspects of chemical endeavor over the past several decades. Given that the observed behavior of discrete molecular species depends upon their weak interactions with one another and with matrix components, one would have to conclude that SC must indeed form part of the fabric of chemistry itself. A vast literature now serves to categorize SC phenomena within a body of consistent terminology. The word supramolecular itself appears in the titles of dozens of books, several journals, and a dedicated encyclopedia. Not surprisingly, the theme of SC also permeates the field of solvent extraction (SX), inspiring the framework for this volume of Ion Exchange and Solvent Extraction. It is attempted in the six chapters of this volume to identify both how supramolecular behavior occurs and is studied in the context of SX and how SC is influencing the current direction of SX. Researchers and practitioners have long dealt with supramolecular interactions in SX. Indeed, the use of polar extractant molecules in nonpolar media virtually assures that aggregative interactions will dominate the solution behavior of SX. Analytical chemists working in the 1930s to the 1950s with simple mono- and bidentate chelating ligands as extractants noted that extraction of metal ions obeyed complicated mass-action equilibria involving complex stoichiometries. As chemists and engineers developed processes for nuclear and hydrometallurgical applications in the 1950s and 1960s, the preference for aliphatic diluents only enhanced the complexity and supramolecular nature of extraction chemistry. Use of physical techniques such as light scattering and vapor-pressure measurements together with various spectroscopic methods revealed organic-phase aggregates from well-defined dimers to small aggregates containing a few extractant molecules to large

  11. Cyclic pyridyltriazole-Cu(II) dimers as supramolecular hosts.

    PubMed

    Pokharel, Uttam R; Fronczek, Frank R; Maverick, Andrew W

    2013-10-21

    Tetradentate bis(pyridyltriazole) ligands containing aromatic spacers of different sizes react with Cu(2+) to produce metallo-supramolecular hosts that bind 1,4-diazabicyclo[2.2.2]octane molecules internally.

  12. Anisotropic ionic conductivities in lyotropic supramolecular liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Huang, Youju; Cong, Yuanhua; Li, Junjun; Wang, Daoliang; Zhang, Jingtuo; Xu, Lu; Li, Weili; Li, Liangbin; Pan, Guoqiang; Yang, Chuanlu

    2009-12-28

    The designed aromatic amide discotic molecule with sulfonic acid groups at its periphery exhibits a hexagonal supramolecular columnar liquid crystalline phase, which leads to the achievement of anisotropic ionic conductivity through macroscopically aligning the ionic channels.

  13. Detection of nerve agent via perturbation of supramolecular gel formation.

    PubMed

    Hiscock, Jennifer R; Piana, Francesca; Sambrook, Mark R; Wells, Neil J; Clark, Alistair J; Vincent, Jack C; Busschaert, Nathalie; Brown, Richard C D; Gale, Philip A

    2013-10-14

    The formation of tren-based tris-urea supramolecular gels in organic solvents is perturbed by the presence of the nerve agent soman providing a new method of sensing the presence of organophosphorus warfare agents.

  14. Photoresponsive, reversible immobilization of virus particles on supramolecular platforms.

    PubMed

    Weineisen, N L; Hommersom, C A; Voskuhl, J; Sankaran, S; Depauw, A M A; Katsonis, N; Jonkheijm, P; Cornelissen, J J L M

    2017-02-07

    Here we report on the covalent attachment of photoresponsive azobenzene moieties to cowpea chlorotic mottle virus (CCMV). The modified virus capsids can be reversibly immobilized on cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]) bearing surfaces via supramolecular complexation.

  15. Long-Lived Supramolecular Helices Promoted by Fluorinated Photoswitches.

    PubMed

    Huang, He; Orlova, Tetiana; Matt, Benjamin; Katsonis, Nathalie

    2017-09-12

    Chiral azobenzenes can be used as photoswitchable dopants to control supramolecular helices in liquid crystals. However, the lack of thermal stability of the cis-isomer precludes envisioning the generation of long-lived supramolecular helices with light. Here, this study demonstrates thermally stable and axially chiral azobenzene switches that can be used as chiral dopants to create supramolecular helices from (achiral) nematic liquid crystals. Their trans-to-cis photoisomerization leads to a variation of helical twisting power that reaches up to 60%, and the helical superstructure that is engineered with light displays a relaxation time that reaches tens of hours. These results demonstrate that combining ortho-fluorination with axial chirality in molecular photoswitches constitutes an efficient strategy to promote long-lived helical states. Further, this approach shows potential to design supramolecular machines that are controlled by light entirely. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. A supramolecular approach to combining enzymatic and transition metal catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Z. Jane; Clary, Kristen N.; Bergman, Robert G.; Raymond, Kenneth N.; Toste, F. Dean

    2013-02-01

    The ability of supramolecular host-guest complexes to catalyse organic reactions collaboratively with an enzyme is an important goal in the research and discovery of synthetic enzyme mimics. Herein we present a variety of catalytic tandem reactions that employ esterases, lipases or alcohol dehydrogenases and gold(I) or ruthenium(II) complexes encapsulated in a Ga4L6 tetrahedral supramolecular cluster. The host-guest complexes are tolerated well by the enzymes and, in the case of the gold(I) host-guest complex, show improved reactivity relative to the free cationic guest. We propose that supramolecular encapsulation of organometallic complexes prevents their diffusion into the bulk solution, where they can bind amino-acid residues on the proteins and potentially compromise their activity. Our observations underline the advantages of the supramolecular approach and suggest that encapsulation of reactive complexes may provide a general strategy for carrying out classic organic reactions in the presence of biocatalysts.

  17. Template effects and supramolecular control of photoreactions in solution.

    PubMed

    Bibal, Brigitte; Mongin, Cédric; Bassani, Dario M

    2014-06-21

    A review of supramolecular and template effects on photochemical reactions in solution is presented. Photoinduced [2+2] and [4+4] cycloaddition reactions, isomerization, electron transfer and radical processes are covered, as well as examples of DNA photoligation.

  18. Polyphosphate gel/methyl orange supramolecular composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galembeck, André; Silva, Sidicleia B. C.; Silva, José Augusto P.; Del Nero, J.

    2004-01-01

    The aims of this work were to investigate theoretically the optical properties of methyl orange (MO) and the synthesis of new supramolecular composites based on the incorporation of this dye in an aluminum polyphosphate gel network. The theoretical methodology was based in semiempirical (AM1 and INDO/S-CI) and ab initio (3-21G*) methods. Our results reveal the existence of different electronic patterns for the acidic and basic forms of these molecules. Also, we present a theoretical spectroscopic study for the molecules including interactions with water molecules. MO was successfully incorporated in its acidic form within the host matrix, leading to pink-red transparent self-standing films. The dye could be converted to its basic form upon exposure to ammonia vapor. The spectrum of MO basic form within the gel network differs from its behavior in aqueous solution.

  19. Supramolecular assembly in the epiisopiloturine hydrochloride salt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mafud, Ana Carolina; Reinheimer, Eric W.; Lima, Filipe Camargo Dalmatti Alves; Batista, Larissa Fernandes; de Paula, Karina; Véras, Leiz Maria Costa; de Souza de Almeida Leite, José Roberto; Venancio, Tiago; Mascarenhas, Yvonne Primerano

    2017-05-01

    Epiisopiloturine hydrochloride (Epi-HCl) salt was synthetized from epiisopiloturine, an in vivo anthelmintic compound against Schistosoma mansoni worms. Despite there being no acute toxicity in mammalian cells, the compound's water insolubility makes its administration difficult. In this communication, we report the characterization of Epi-HCl its features by spectroscopy, thermal analysis, and PXRD. The single crystals suitable to X-ray diffraction were grown by slow evaporation technique. To better understand the nature of Epi-HCl' solid state, SS-NMR was also used. The salt's intramolecular structure was maintained via cation-pi intramolecular interactions, which in conjunction with hydrogen bonding, gives rise to an extended supramolecular assembly. The interatomic distances within the cations and environment around the chloride anion vary as function of temperature, suggesting a packing relaxation.

  20. Supramolecular photochemistry of drugs in biomolecular environments.

    PubMed

    Monti, Sandra; Manet, Ilse

    2014-06-21

    In this tutorial review we illustrate how the interaction of photoactive drugs/potential drugs with proteins or DNA in supramolecular complexes can determine the course of the reactions initiated by the drug absorbed photons, evidencing the mechanistic differences with respect to the solution conditions. We focus on photoprocesses, independent of oxygen, that lead to chemical modification of the biomolecules, with formation of new covalent bonds or cleavage of existing bonds. Representative systems are mainly selected from the literature of the last decade. The photoreactivity of some aryl propionic acids, (fluoro)quinolones, furocoumarins, metal coordination complexes, quinine-like compounds, naphthaleneimides and pyrenyl-peptides with proteins or DNA is discussed. The use of light for biomolecule photomodification, historically relevant to biological photosensitization processes and some forms of photochemotherapy, is nowadays becoming more and more important in the development of innovative methods in nanomedicine and biotechnology.

  1. Shape memory rubber bands & supramolecular ionic copolymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brostowitz, Nicole

    subject covered in this dissertation is supra-molecular ionic copolymers. Supramolecular interactions are non-covalent; e.g. hydrogen bonding, ionic interactions, van der Waals forces. Supramolecular interactions in polymers can be used to tailor the thermo-mechanical properties by controlling bond association and dissociation. Recent research has focused on hydrogen bonded systems due to established synthesis mechanisms. Reversibility of the supramolecular interactions can be triggered by environmental changes. Ionic interactions would provide greater bond strength and more control over operating conditions. Research has been limited on ionic copolymers due to complicated synthesis methods needed to include functionalization. Low molecular weight polymers were synthesized by atom transfer radical polymerization with post polymerization conversion to phosphonium end-groups. Both polystyrene and poly(methyl acrylate) were investigated with similar reaction conditions. Chromatography measured the molecular weight and indicated a low polydispersity consistent with controlled reactions. Copolymers were formed by interfacial mixing of the cationic polymers with multifunctional, anionic oligomers. Oligomers containing sulfonate groups were used to create linear or three-dimensional polymer networks. NMR and rheology was used to characterize the presence and effect of ionic groups when compared to the neat polymer.

  2. Seamless growth of a supramolecular carpet

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ju-Hyung; Ribierre, Jean-Charles; Yang, Yu Seok; Adachi, Chihaya; Kawai, Maki; Jung, Jaehoon; Fukushima, Takanori; Kim, Yousoo

    2016-01-01

    Organic/metal interfaces play crucial roles in the formation of intermolecular networks on metal surfaces and the performance of organic devices. Although their purity and uniformity have profound effects on the operation of organic devices, the formation of organic thin films with high interfacial uniformity on metal surfaces has suffered from the intrinsic limitation of molecular ordering imposed by irregular surface structures. Here we demonstrate a supramolecular carpet with widely uniform interfacial structure and high adaptability on a metal surface via a one-step process. The high uniformity is achieved with well-balanced interfacial interactions and site-specific molecular rearrangements, even on a pre-annealed amorphous gold surface. Co-existing electronic structures show selective availability corresponding to the energy region and the local position of the system. These findings provide not only a deeper insight into organic thin films with high structural integrity, but also a new way to tailor interfacial geometric and electronic structures. PMID:26839053

  3. Supramolecular Nanostructures Formed by Anticancer Drug Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Cheetham, Andrew G.; Zhang, Pengcheng; Lin, Yi-an; Lock, Lye Lin; Cui, Honggang

    2013-01-01

    We report here a supramolecular strategy to directly assemble the small molecular hydrophobic anticancer drug camptothecin (CPT) into discrete, stable, well-defined nanostructures with a high and quantitative drug loading. Depending on the number of CPTs in the molecular design, the resulting nanostructures can be either nanofibers or nanotubes, and have a fixed CPT loading content ranging from 23% to 38%. We found that formation of nanostructures provides protection for both the CPT drug and the biodegradable linker from the external environment and thus offers a mechanism for controlled release of CPT. Under tumor-relevant conditions, these drug nanostructures can release the bioactive form of CPT and show in vitro efficacy against a number of cancer cell lines. This strategy can be extended to construct nanostructures of other types of anticancer drugs, and thus presents new opportunities for the development of self-delivering drugs for cancer therapeutics. PMID:23379791

  4. Supramolecular hydrogels as drug delivery systems.

    PubMed

    Saboktakin, Mohammad Reza; Tabatabaei, Roya Mahdavi

    2015-04-01

    Drug delivery from a hydrogel carrier implanted under the kidney capsule is an innovative way to induce kidney tissue regeneration and/or prevent kidney inflammation or fibrosis. We report here on the development of supramolecular hydrogels for this application. Chain-extended hydrogelators containing hydrogen bonding units in the main chain, and bifunctional hydrogelators end-functionalized with hydrogen bonding moieties, were made. The influence of these hydrogels on the renal cortex when implanted under the kidney capsule was studied. The overall tissue response to these hydrogels was found to be mild, and minimal damage to the cortex was observed, using the infiltration of macrophages, formation of myofibroblasts, and the deposition of collagen III as relevant read-out parameters. Differences in tissue response to these hydrogels could be related to the different physico-chemical properties of the three hydrogels.

  5. Tailoring the properties of supramolecular gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buerkle, Lauren

    Supramolecular gels created from low molecular weight species (gelators) have gathered wide attention over the past few decades on account of their highly ordered assembly and ability to respond to external stimuli. These properties make such gels highly promising candidates for a diverse range of applications including biomaterials, viscosity modifiers, sensors, and liquid crystalline materials. We have focused on the design and tailoring of guanosine (the ribonucleoside of the nucleobase guanine) hydrogels. It is well known that in an aqueous environment, guanosine forms circular hydrogen-bonded quartets around a monovalent metal ion, most commonly potassium. These quartets then stack to form high-aspect ratio fibers that entangle and branch to form gels. Despite facile gel formation, crystallization of the guanosine molecules out of the gel is a common occurrence that leads to gel collapse within hours of fabrication. In addition, guanosine and related gelators often require a high potassium concentration or acidic pH to gel, which presents limited practical use in our target application of tissue engineering. We have focused on the modification and analysis of guanosine gels via an additive and/or a change in chemical structure to inhibit crystallization and promote gelation at physiological salt concentrations. Additionally, initial cell culture experiments suggest that these gel materials show great potential as an easily accessible and inexpensive tissue engineering scaffold. We also examined the potential for supramolecular gels for use in personal care formulations as electrolyte-resistant rheology modifiers for aqueous systems. Sugar-based gels fit the necessary criteria; however, many of these molecules also crystallize from the gel over time. We achieved lifetime stabilization again via a mixing approach and examined the resulting properties of the stabilized gels.

  6. Molecular Recognition Directed Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Polymers

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    SUPRAMOLECULAR POLYMERS by V. Percec, J. Heck, G. Johansson, D. Tomazos, M. Kawasumi and G. Ungar Published in the J. Macromol. SOi: Part A: Pure...W.asetaqIom OC JOS0l 4 TITE AN SUBITLES. FUNDING NUMBERS Molecular Recognition Directed Self-Assembly of Suprainolecular Polymers N00014-89--J-1828 6. AUTHOR(S...comparison between various supramolecular (generated via H-bonding, iions) and molecular " polymer backbones" will be made. The present limitations

  7. Supramolecular Complexes Formed in Systems Bile Salt-Bilirubin-Silica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlasova, N. N.; Severinovskaya, O. V.; Golovkova, L. P.

    The formation of supramolecular complexes between bilirubin and primary micelles of bile salts has been studied. The association constants of bile salts and binding of bilirubin with these associates have been determined. The adsorption of bilirubin and bile salts from individual and mixed aqueous solutions onto hydrophobic silica surfaces has been investigated. The interaction of bilirubin with primary bile salt micelles and the strong retention in mixed micelles, which are supramolecular complexes, result in the adsorption of bilirubin in free state only.

  8. Recent Researches in Metal Supramolecular Complexes as Anticancer Agents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng-He; Zhang, Yi-Yi; Yan, Cong-Yan; Wan, Kun; Gan, Lin-Ling; Shi, Yuan

    2010-04-12

    The research and development of metal supramolecular complexes as anticancer supramolecular drugs, which are aggregates mainly formed by one or more inorganic metal compounds with one or more either inorganic or organic molecules in general via coordination bonds, has been a quite rapidly developing, increasingly active and newly rising highlight interdisciplinary field. Numerous efforts have been directed toward metal supramolecular complexes as potential anticancer agents and the unprecedented progress has been made. This has opened up a wholly new and infinite space to create novel metal-based bioactive supermolecules. More importantly, metal-based complex supermolecules as potential anticancer agents with wide potential applications have become highlight topics in recent years, and are becoming increasingly useful and important in preventing and treating cancer diseases. In view of the rapid progress in metal complex anticancer supermolecules with rich variation of structural types, this work systematically reviewed the recent research and development of the whole range of metal-based supramolecular complexes as anticancer agents mainly in 2009. The perspectives of the foreseeable future and potential application of metal supramolecular complexes in cancer therapy were also presented. It is hoped that this review will serve as a stimulant for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic metal supramolecular complex anticancer drugs.

  9. Recent researches in metal supramolecular complexes as anticancer agents.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Cheng-He; Zhang, Yi-Yi; Yan, Cong-Yan; Wan, Kun; Gan, Lin-Ling; Shi, Yuan

    2010-06-01

    The research and development of metal supramolecular complexes as anticancer supramolecular drugs, which are aggregates mainly formed by one or more inorganic metal compounds with one or more either inorganic or organic molecules in general via coordination bonds, has been a quite rapidly developing, increasingly active and newly rising highlight interdisciplinary field. Numerous efforts have been directed toward metal supramolecular complexes as potential anticancer agents and the unprecedented progress has been made. This has opened up a wholly new and infinite space to create novel metal-based bioactive supermolecules. More importantly, metal-based complex supermolecules as potential anticancer agents with wide potential applications have become highlight topics in recent years, and are becoming increasingly useful and important in preventing and treating cancer diseases. In view of the rapid progress in metal complex anticancer supermolecules with rich variation of structural types, this work systematically reviewed the recent research and development of the whole range of metal-based supramolecular complexes as anticancer agents mainly in 2009. The perspectives of the foreseeable future and potential application of metal supramolecular complexes in cancer therapy were also presented. It is hoped that this review will serve as a stimulant for new thoughts in the quest for rational designs of more active and less toxic metal supramolecular complex anticancer drugs.

  10. Injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel for delivery of hydrophobic anticancer drugs.

    PubMed

    Fu, CuiXiang; Lin, XiaoXiao; Wang, Jun; Zheng, XiaoQun; Li, XingYi; Lin, ZhengFeng; Lin, GuangYong

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, an injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel composed of α-cyclodextrin (α-CD) and monomethoxy poly(ethylene glycol)-b-poly(ε-caplactone) (MPEG5000-PCL5000) micelles was developed by a simple method for hydrophobic anticancer drug delivery. By mixing α-CD aqueous solution and MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles, an injectable micellar supramolecular hydrogel could be formed under mild condition due to the inclusion complexation between α-CD and MPEG segment of MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles. The resultant supramolecular hydrogel was thereafter characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The effect of α-CD amount on the gelation time, mechanical strength and thixotropic property was studied by a rheometer. Payload of hydrophobic paclitaxel (PTX) to supramolecular hydrogel was achieved by encapsulation of PTX into MPEG5000-PCL5000 micelles prior mixing with α-CD aqueous solution. In vitro release study showed that the release behavior of PTX from hydrogel could be modulated by change the α-CD amount in hydrogel. Furthermore, such supramolecular hydrogel could enhance the biological activity of encapsulated PTX compared to free PTX, as indicated by in vitro cytotoxicity assay. All these results indicated that the developed micellar supramolecular hydrogel might be a promising injectable drug delivery system for anticancer therapy.

  11. Hierarchical supramolecular spinning of nanofibers in a microfluidic channel: tuning nanostructures at a dynamic interface.

    PubMed

    Numata, Munenori; Takigami, Yusuke; Takayama, Momoko; Kozawa, Tomohiro; Hirose, Naoya

    2012-10-08

    One of the fundamental problems in supramolecular chemistry, as well as in material sciences, is how to control the self-assembly of polymers on the nanometer scale and how to spontaneously organize them towards the macroscopic scale. To overcome this problem, inspired by the self-assembly systems in nature, which feature the dynamically controlled self-assembly of biopolymers, we have previously proposed a self-assembly system that uses a dynamic liquid/liquid interface with dimensions in the micrometer regime, thereby allowing polymers to self-assemble under precisely controlled nonequilibrium conditions. Herein, we further extend this system to the creation of hierarchical self-assembled architectures of polysaccharides. A natural polysaccharide, β-1,3-glucan (SPG), and water were injected into opposite "legs" of microfluidic devices that had a Y-shape junction, so that two solvents would gradually mix in the down stem, thereby causing SPG to spontaneously self-assemble along the flow in a head-to-tail fashion, mainly through hydrophobic interactions. In the initial stage, several SPG nanofibers would self-assemble at the Y-junction owing to the shearing force, thereby creating oligomers with a three-way junction point. This unique structure, which could not be created through conventional mixing procedures, has a divergent self-assembly capability. The dynamic flow allows the oligomers to interact continuously with SPG nanofibers that are fed into the Y-junction, thus amplifying the nanostructure along the flow to form SPG networks. Consequently, we were able to create stable, centimeter-length macroscopic polysaccharide strands under the selected flow conditions, which implies that SPG nanofibers were assembled hierarchically in a supramolecular fashion in the dynamic flow. Microscopic observations, including SEM and AFM analysis, revealed the existence of clear hierarchical structures inside the obtained strand. The network structures self-assembled to form

  12. The Chemistry and Applications of π-Gels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghosh, Samrat; Praveen, Vakayil K.; Ajayaghosh, Ayyappanpillai

    2016-07-01

    π-Gels are a promising class of functional soft materials formed out of short π-conjugated molecules. By utilizing the chemistry of noncovalent interactions, researchers have created a wide range of π-gels that are composed of supramolecular polymers. During the last two decades, supramolecular gel chemistry has been pursued with the hope of developing new materials for applications in, for example, organic electronics, energy harvesting, sensing, and imaging. The high expectations for π-gels were centered mainly around their electronic properties, such as tunable emission, energy transfer, electron transfer, charge transport, and electrical conductivity; such properties are amenable to modulation through size and shape control of molecular assemblies. Although a large number of exciting publications have appeared, a major technological breakthrough is yet to be realized. In this review, we analyze the recent advancements in the area of functional π-gels and their scope in future applications.

  13. Supramolecular Assembly of Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Polyoxometalate Nanoclusters at Solid-liquid Interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Na; Jing, Benxin; Zhu, Yingxi

    2013-03-01

    Polyoxometalate (POM) inorganic nanoclusters have recently emerged as building blocks for the design and synthesis of novel functional materials for broad applications ranging from catalysis to nanomedicines. Rather than taking the slow self-assembly of POMs in aqueous solutions, we have investigated the assembly of hybrid Anderson-type Mo-based POMs with organic ligands at a solid surface by Langmuir-Blodgett (LB) deposition and characterized the films by AFM, TEM, and X-ray diffraction. We have observed the formation of well-ordered monolayer or bilayer consisting of periodic arrangement of hybrid POM nanoclusters, showing a strong dependence on substrate chemistry and LB compression pressure. The controlled assembly of hybrid POM nanocluster films by LB deposition could be used as a template with stoichiometric crystalline nanostructure to the programmed assembly of novel multi-functional supramolecular complexes.

  14. Supramolecular regulation of bioorthogonal catalysis in cells using nanoparticle-embedded transition metal catalysts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tonga, Gulen Yesilbag; Jeong, Youngdo; Duncan, Bradley; Mizuhara, Tsukasa; Mout, Rubul; Das, Riddha; Kim, Sung Tae; Yeh, Yi-Cheun; Yan, Bo; Hou, Singyuk; Rotello, Vincent M.

    2015-07-01

    Bioorthogonal catalysis broadens the functional possibilities of intracellular chemistry. Effective delivery and regulation of synthetic catalytic systems in cells are challenging due to the complex intracellular environment and catalyst instability. Here, we report the fabrication of protein-sized bioorthogonal nanozymes through the encapsulation of hydrophobic transition metal catalysts into the monolayer of water-soluble gold nanoparticles. The activity of these catalysts can be reversibly controlled by binding a supramolecular cucurbit[7]uril ‘gate-keeper’ onto the monolayer surface, providing a biomimetic control mechanism that mimics the allosteric regulation of enzymes. The potential of this gated nanozyme for use in imaging and therapeutic applications was demonstrated through triggered cleavage of allylcarbamates for pro-fluorophore activation and propargyl groups for prodrug activation inside living cells.

  15. Gels with sense: supramolecular materials that respond to heat, light and sound.

    PubMed

    Jones, Christopher D; Steed, Jonathan W

    2016-11-21

    Advances in the field of supramolecular chemistry have made it possible, in many situations, to reliably engineer soft materials to address a specific technological problem. Particularly exciting are "smart" gels that undergo reversible physical changes on exposure to remote, non-invasive environmental stimuli. This review explores the development of gels which are transformed by heat, light and ultrasound, as well as other mechanical inputs, applied voltages and magnetic fields. Focusing on small-molecule gelators, but with reference to organic polymers and metal-organic systems, we examine how the structures of gelator assemblies influence the physical and chemical mechanisms leading to thermo-, photo- and mechano-switchable behaviour. In addition, we evaluate how the unique and versatile properties of smart materials may be exploited in a wide range of applications, including catalysis, crystal growth, ion sensing, drug delivery, data storage and biomaterial replacement.

  16. Supramolecular regulation of bioorthogonal catalysis in cells using nanoparticle-embedded transition metal catalysts.

    PubMed

    Tonga, Gulen Yesilbag; Jeong, Youngdo; Duncan, Bradley; Mizuhara, Tsukasa; Mout, Rubul; Das, Riddha; Kim, Sung Tae; Yeh, Yi-Cheun; Yan, Bo; Hou, Singyuk; Rotello, Vincent M

    2015-07-01

    Bioorthogonal catalysis broadens the functional possibilities of intracellular chemistry. Effective delivery and regulation of synthetic catalytic systems in cells are challenging due to the complex intracellular environment and catalyst instability. Here, we report the fabrication of protein-sized bioorthogonal nanozymes through the encapsulation of hydrophobic transition metal catalysts into the monolayer of water-soluble gold nanoparticles. The activity of these catalysts can be reversibly controlled by binding a supramolecular cucurbit[7]uril 'gate-keeper' onto the monolayer surface, providing a biomimetic control mechanism that mimics the allosteric regulation of enzymes. The potential of this gated nanozyme for use in imaging and therapeutic applications was demonstrated through triggered cleavage of allylcarbamates for pro-fluorophore activation and propargyl groups for prodrug activation inside living cells.

  17. Anion Recognition in Water: Recent Advances from a Supramolecular and Macromolecular Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Langton, Matthew J.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The recognition of anions in water remains a key challenge in modern supramolecular chemistry, and is essential if proposed applications in biological, medical, and environmental arenas that typically require aqueous conditions are to be achieved. However, synthetic anion receptors that operate in water have, in general, been the exception rather than the norm to date. Nevertheless, a significant step change towards routinely conducting anion recognition in water has been achieved in the past few years, and this Review highlights these approaches, with particular focus on controlling and using the hydrophobic effect, as well as more exotic interactions such as C−H hydrogen bonding and halogen bonding. We also look beyond the field of small‐molecule recognition into the macromolecular domain, covering recent advances in anion recognition based on biomolecules, polymers, and nanoparticles. PMID:26612067

  18. From molecular to supramolecular: an exploration into the modes of self- assembly in conformationally locked polycyclitols.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Goverdhan; Sen, Saikat

    2012-01-01

    This brief account highlights the notable findings of our investigation into the supramolecular chemistry of conformationally locked polycyclitols in the solid state. The study was aimed at analyzing the crystal packing and unraveling the modalities of non-covalent interactions (particularly, intramolecular vis-à-vis intermolecular O-H˙˙˙O hydrogen bonds) in polyols. The know-how obtained thereof, was successfully utilized to engineer self-assemblies of designer polycyclitols, having hydrogen bond donors and acceptors fettered onto a trans-decalin scaffold. The results seek to draw particular attention to the intrinsic attribute of this rigid carbocyclic framework to lock functional groups into spatially invariant positions and bring potential intramolecular hydrogen bonding partners into favorable interaction geometry to engender predictability in the self-assembly patterns.

  19. Chemistry Dashboard

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Chemistry Dashboard is part of a suite of dashboards developed by EPA to help evaluate the safety of chemicals. The Chemistry Dashboard provides access to a variety of information on over 700,000 chemicals currently in use.

  20. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  1. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  2. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  3. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1976

    1976-01-01

    Described are eight chemistry experiments and demonstrations applicable to introductory chemistry courses. Activities include: measure of lattice enthalpy, Le Chatelier's principle, decarboxylation of soap, use of pocket calculators in pH measurement, and making nylon. (SL)

  4. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1983

    1983-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and chemistry experiments. Topics include sublimation, electronegativity, electrolysis, experimental aspects of strontianite, halide test, evaluation of present and future computer programs in chemistry, formula building, care of glass/saturated calomel…

  5. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1978

    1978-01-01

    Describes experiments, demonstrations, activities and ideas relating to various fields of chemistry to be used in chemistry courses of secondary schools. Three experiments concerning differential thermal analysis are among these notes presented. (HM)

  6. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Thirteen ideas are presented that may be of use to chemistry teachers. Topics covered include vitamin C, industrial chemistry, electrical conductivity, electrolysis, alkali metals, vibration modes infra-red, dynamic equilibrium, and some new demonstrations in gaseous combinations. (PS)

  7. The nature of soil organic matter affects sorption of pesticides. 1. Relationships with carbon chemistry as determined by 13C CPMAS NMR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, R; Kookana, R S; Alston, A M; Skjemstad, J O

    2001-03-01

    The structural composition of soil organic matter (SOM) was determined in twenty-seven soils with different vegetation from several ecological zones of Australia and Pakistan using solid-state CPMAS 13C NMR. The SOM was characterized using carbon types derived from the NMR spectra. Relationships were determined between Koc (sorption per unit organic C) of carbaryl(1-naphthylmethylcarbamate) and phosalone (S-6-chloro-2,3-dihydro-2-oxobenzoxazol-3-ylmethyl O,O-diethyl phosphorodithioate) and the nature of organic matter in the soils. Substantial variations were revealed in the structural composition of organic matter in the soils studied. The variations in Koc values of the pesticides observed for the soils could be explained only when variations in the aromatic components of SOM were taken into consideration. The highly significant positive correlations of aromaticity of SOM and Koc values of carbaryl and phosalone revealed that the aromatic component of SOM is a good predictor of a soil's ability to bind such nonionic pesticides.

  8. CuAAC: An Efficient Click Chemistry Reaction on Solid Phase.

    PubMed

    Castro, Vida; Rodríguez, Hortensia; Albericio, Fernando

    2016-01-11

    Click chemistry is an approach that uses efficient and reliable reactions, such as Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition (CuAAC), to bind two molecular building blocks. CuAAC has broad applications in medicinal chemistry and other fields of chemistry. This review describes the general features and applications of CuAAC in solid-phase synthesis (CuAAC-SP), highlighting the suitability of this kind of reaction for peptides, nucleotides, small molecules, supramolecular structures, and polymers, among others. This versatile reaction is expected to become pivotal for meeting future challenges in solid-phase chemistry.

  9. Current developments of coumarin compounds in medicinal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xin-Mei; Damu, Guri L V; Zhou, Cheng- He

    2013-01-01

    Coumarin compounds represent an important type of naturally occurring and synthetic oxygen-containing heterocycles with typical benzopyrone framework. This type of special benzopyrone structure enables its derivatives readily interact with a diversity of enzymes and receptors in organisms through weak bond interactions, thereby exhibit wide potentiality as medicinal drugs. So far, some coumarin-based drugs such as anticoagulant and antineurodegenerative agents have been extensively used in clinic. Coumarin-containing supramolecular medicinal agents as a new increasing expansion of supramolecular chemistry in pharmaceutical science have also been actively investigated in recent years. Coumarin-derived artificial ion receptors, fluorescent probes and biological stains are growing quickly and have a variety of potential applications in monitoring timely enzyme activity, complex biological events as well as accurate pharmacological and pharmacokinetic properties. This review provides a systematic summary and insight of the whole range of medicinal chemistry in the current developments of coumarin compounds as anticoagulant, antineurodegenerative, anticancer, antioxidative, antibacterial, antifungal, antiviral, antiparasitic, antiinflammatory and analgesic, antidiabetic, antidepressive and other bioactive agents as well as supramolecular medicinal drugs, diagnostic agents and pathologic probes, and biological stains. Some rational design strategies, structure-activity relationships and action mechanisms are discussed. The perspectives of the future development of coumarinbased medicinal chemistry are also presented.

  10. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  11. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1982

    1982-01-01

    Presents background information, laboratory procedures, classroom materials/activities, and experiments for chemistry. Topics include superheavy elements, polarizing power and chemistry of alkali metals, particulate carbon from combustion, tips for the chemistry laboratory, interesting/colorful experiments, behavior of bismuth (III) iodine, and…

  12. Self-assemblies based on the "outer-surface interactions" of cucurbit[n]urils: new opportunities for supramolecular architectures and materials.

    PubMed

    Ni, Xin-Long; Xiao, Xin; Cong, Hang; Zhu, Qian-Jiang; Xue, Sai-Feng; Tao, Zhu

    2014-04-15

    Supramolecular architectures and materials have attracted immense attention during the last decades because they not only open the possibility of obtaining a large variety of aesthetically interesting structures but also have applications in gas storage, sensors, separation, catalysis, and so on. On the other hand, cucurbit[n]urils (Q[n]s), a relatively new class of macrocyclic hosts with a rigid hydrophobic cavity and two identical carbonyl fringed portals, have attracted much attention in supramolecular chemistry. Because of the strong charge-dipole and hydrogen bonding interactions, as well as hydrophobic and hydrophilic effect derived from the negative portals and rigid cavities of Q[n]s, nearly all research in Q[n]s has been focused on utilizing the portals and cavities to construct supramolecular assemblies similar to other macrocyclic receptors such as cyclodextrin and calixarenes. Interestingly, a recent study revealed that other weak noncovalent interactions such as hydrogen bonding and π···π stacking, as well as C-H···π and ion-dipole interactions, could also be defined as "outer-surface interactions", which are derived from the electrostatically positive outer surface of Q[n]s. These interactions could be the driving forces in the formation of various novel Q[n]-based supramolecular architectures and functional materials. In this Account, we provide a comprehensive overview of supramolecular self-assemblies based on the outer-surface interactions of Q[n]s. These outer-surface interactions include those between Q[n]s, Q[n]s and aromatic molecules, Q[n]s and calixarenes, Q[n]s and inorganic complex ions, and Q[n]s and polyoxometalates. Pioneering work has shown that such weak noncovalent interactions play very important roles in the formation of various Q[n]-based functional materials and supramolecular architectures. For example, hydrogen bonds in outer-surface interactions between Q[n] molecules not only function as the sole driving force in the

  13. Organic Chemistry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations, theoretical modeling, laboratory simulation and analysis of extraterrestrial material have enhanced our knowledge of the inventory of organic matter in the interstellar medium (ISM) and on small bodies such as comets and asteroids (Ehrenfreund & Charnley 2000). Comets, asteroids and their fragments, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), contributed significant amounts of extraterrestrial organic matter to the young Earth. This material degraded and reacted in a terrestrial prebiotic chemistry to form organic structures that may have served as building blocks for life on the early Earth. In this talk I will summarize our current understanding of the organic composition and chemistry of interstellar clouds. Molecules of astrobiological relevance include the building blocks of our genetic material: nucleic acids, composed of subunits such as N-heterocycles (purines and pyrimidines), sugars and amino acids. Signatures indicative of inheritance of pristine and modified interstellar material in comets and meteorites will also be discussed.

  14. Organic Chemistry in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Charnley, Steven

    2009-01-01

    Astronomical observations, theoretical modeling, laboratory simulation and analysis of extraterrestrial material have enhanced our knowledge of the inventory of organic matter in the interstellar medium (ISM) and on small bodies such as comets and asteroids (Ehrenfreund & Charnley 2000). Comets, asteroids and their fragments, meteorites and interplanetary dust particles (IDPs), contributed significant amounts of extraterrestrial organic matter to the young Earth. This material degraded and reacted in a terrestrial prebiotic chemistry to form organic structures that may have served as building blocks for life on the early Earth. In this talk I will summarize our current understanding of the organic composition and chemistry of interstellar clouds. Molecules of astrobiological relevance include the building blocks of our genetic material: nucleic acids, composed of subunits such as N-heterocycles (purines and pyrimidines), sugars and amino acids. Signatures indicative of inheritance of pristine and modified interstellar material in comets and meteorites will also be discussed.

  15. High-tech applications of self-assembling supramolecular nanostructured gel-phase materials: from regenerative medicine to electronic devices.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Andrew R; Escuder, Beatriu; Miravet, Juan F; Smith, David K

    2008-01-01

    It is likely that nanofabrication will underpin many technologies in the 21st century. Synthetic chemistry is a powerful approach to generate molecular structures that are capable of assembling into functional nanoscale architectures. There has been intense interest in self-assembling low-molecular-weight gelators, which has led to a general understanding of gelation based on the self-assembly of molecular-scale building blocks in terms of non-covalent interactions and packing parameters. The gelator molecules generate hierarchical, supramolecular structures that are macroscopically expressed in gel formation. Molecular modification can therefore control nanoscale assembly, a process that ultimately endows specific material function. The combination of supramolecular chemistry, materials science, and biomedicine allows application-based materials to be developed. Regenerative medicine and tissue engineering using molecular gels as nanostructured scaffolds for the regrowth of nerve cells has been demonstrated in vivo, and the prospect of using self-assembled fibers as one-dimensional conductors in gel materials has captured much interest in the field of nanoelectronics.

  16. CLUSTER CHEMISTRY

    SciTech Connect

    Muetterties, Earl L.

    1980-05-01

    Metal cluster chemistry is one of the most rapidly developing areas of inorganic and organometallic chemistry. Prior to 1960 only a few metal clusters were well characterized. However, shortly after the early development of boron cluster chemistry, the field of metal cluster chemistry began to grow at a very rapid rate and a structural and a qualitative theoretical understanding of clusters came quickly. Analyzed here is the chemistry and the general significance of clusters with particular emphasis on the cluster research within my group. The importance of coordinately unsaturated, very reactive metal clusters is the major subject of discussion.

  17. Forensic chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bell, Suzanne

    2009-01-01

    Forensic chemistry is unique among chemical sciences in that its research, practice, and presentation must meet the needs of both the scientific and the legal communities. As such, forensic chemistry research is applied and derivative by nature and design, and it emphasizes metrology (the science of measurement) and validation. Forensic chemistry has moved away from its analytical roots and is incorporating a broader spectrum of chemical sciences. Existing forensic practices are being revisited as the purview of forensic chemistry extends outward from drug analysis and toxicology into such diverse areas as combustion chemistry, materials science, and pattern evidence.

  18. Multifunctional, supramolecular, continuous artificial nacre fibres

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Xiaozhen; Xu, Zhen; Gao, Chao

    2012-01-01

    Nature has created amazing materials during the process of evolution, inspiring scientists to studiously mimic them. Nacre is of particular interest, and it has been studied for more than half-century for its strong, stiff, and tough attributes resulting from the recognized “brick-and-mortar” (B&M) layered structure comprised of inorganic aragonite platelets and biomacromolecules. The past two decades have witnessed great advances in nacre-mimetic composites, but they are solely limited in films with finite size (centimetre-scale). To realize the adream target of continuous nacre-mimics with perfect structures is still a great challenge unresolved. Here, we present a simple and scalable strategy to produce bio-mimic continuous fibres with B&M structures of alternating graphene sheets and hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) binders via wet-spinning assembly technology. The resulting macroscopic supramolecular fibres exhibit excellent mechanical properties comparable or even superior to nacre and bone, and possess fine electrical conductivity and outstanding corrosion-resistance. PMID:23097689

  19. Multifunctional, supramolecular, continuous artificial nacre fibres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaozhen; Xu, Zhen; Gao, Chao

    2012-10-01

    Nature has created amazing materials during the process of evolution, inspiring scientists to studiously mimic them. Nacre is of particular interest, and it has been studied for more than half-century for its strong, stiff, and tough attributes resulting from the recognized ``brick-and-mortar'' (B&M) layered structure comprised of inorganic aragonite platelets and biomacromolecules. The past two decades have witnessed great advances in nacre-mimetic composites, but they are solely limited in films with finite size (centimetre-scale). To realize the adream target of continuous nacre-mimics with perfect structures is still a great challenge unresolved. Here, we present a simple and scalable strategy to produce bio-mimic continuous fibres with B&M structures of alternating graphene sheets and hyperbranched polyglycerol (HPG) binders via wet-spinning assembly technology. The resulting macroscopic supramolecular fibres exhibit excellent mechanical properties comparable or even superior to nacre and bone, and possess fine electrical conductivity and outstanding corrosion-resistance.

  20. Experimental Binding Energies in Supramolecular Complexes.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, Frank; Schneider, Hans-Jörg

    2016-05-11

    On the basis of many literature measurements, a critical overview is given on essential noncovalent interactions in synthetic supramolecular complexes, accompanied by analyses with selected proteins. The methods, which can be applied to derive binding increments for single noncovalent interactions, start with the evaluation of consistency and additivity with a sufficiently large number of different host-guest complexes by applying linear free energy relations. Other strategies involve the use of double mutant cycles, of molecular balances, of dynamic combinatorial libraries, and of crystal structures. Promises and limitations of these strategies are discussed. Most of the analyses stem from solution studies, but a few also from gas phase. The empirically derived interactions are then presented on the basis of selected complexes with respect to ion pairing, hydrogen bonding, electrostatic contributions, halogen bonding, π-π-stacking, dispersive forces, cation-π and anion-π interactions, and contributions from the hydrophobic effect. Cooperativity in host-guest complexes as well as in self-assembly, and entropy factors are briefly highlighted. Tables with typical values for single noncovalent free energies and polarity parameters are in the Supporting Information.

  1. [Supramolecular nanomachines for sugar responsive insulin release systems].

    PubMed

    Egawa, Yuya; Seki, Toshinobu

    2013-01-01

    Cyclodextrins (CyDs) are cyclic oligosaccharides composed of 6, 7, or 8 glucopyranoside units, named α-, β-, or γ-CD, respectively. CyDs consist of a hydrophobic cavity in which hydrophobic molecules are encapsulated to form an inclusion complex. CyDs are widely used in pharmaceutical applications because they function as nanocapsules to improve the stability and solubility of drugs. Recently, CyDs have attracted much attention as for use as components of supramolecular nanostructures that are particularly attractive because of their unique structures. We modified CyDs with phenylboronic acid (PBA), which forms covalent bonds with the diol groups of sugar, and used the resulting PBA-CyDs to prepare supramolecular nanomachines that undergo structural transformation in the presence of a chemical signal in the form of a sugar. PBA-α-CyD formed a supramolecular polymer that showed consecutive intermolecular interactions between PBA and the cavity of another PBA-α-CyD, whereas PBA-β-CyD formed head-to-head dimers in which one PBA moiety was encapsulated in the other. These supramolecular nanostructures disintegrated in the presence of sugars because of the structural change in the PBA moiety and loss of the driving force of the supramolecular assembly. These features of disintegration can be potentially used to prepare a nanomachine that would act as a sugar-responsive insulin release system. Currently, we are studying sugar-responsive nanomachines composed of PEGylated insulin and PBA-γ-CyD.

  2. Metal-induced supramolecular chirality inversion of small self-assembled molecules in solution.

    PubMed

    Kokan, Zoran; Perić, Berislav; Vazdar, Mario; Marinić, Željko; Vikić-Topić, Dražen; Meštrović, Ernest; Kirin, Srećko I

    2017-02-07

    A non-covalent self-assembled chiral alanyl aminopyridine ligand exhibits supramolecular chirality in solution, independent of the organic solvent used. The supramolecular chirality of the assemblies is completely inverted by complexation to zinc ions. To date, such a supramolecular metal-ligand system has not been reported in the literature.

  3. Synthesis and characterization of (6-{[2-(pyridin-2-yl)hydrazinylidene]methyl}pyridin-2-yl)methanol: a supramolecular and topological study.

    PubMed

    Soto-Monsalve, Monica; Cabrera-Espinoza, Andrea; Grande, Carlos D; D'Vries, Richard F; Chaur, Manuel N

    2015-07-01

    Hydrazones exhibit a versatile chemistry and are of interest for their potential use as functional molecular systems capable of undergoing reversible changes of configuration, i.e. E/Z isomerization. The title compound, C12H12N4O, has an E configuration with respect to the hydrazone C=N bond. The crystal packing is formed by N-H...N and O-H...N hydrogen bonds that give a two-dimensional layer structure and C-H...C interactions associated with layer stacking to produce the three-dimensional supramolecular structure. These intermolecular interactions were analyzed and quantified by the Hirshfeld surface method and the two-dimensional supramolecular arrangement was topologically simplified as a hcb network.

  4. Applications of the Cambridge Structural Database in organic chemistry and crystal chemistry.

    PubMed

    Allen, Frank H; Motherwell, W D Samuel

    2002-06-01

    The Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) and its associated software systems have formed the basis for more than 800 research applications in structural chemistry, crystallography and the life sciences. Relevant references, dating from the mid-1970s, and brief synopses of these papers are collected in a database, DBUse, which is freely available via the CCDC website. This database has been used to review research applications of the CSD in organic chemistry, including supramolecular applications, and in organic crystal chemistry. The review concentrates on applications that have been published since 1990 and covers a wide range of topics, including structure correlation, conformational analysis, hydrogen bonding and other intermolecular interactions, studies of crystal packing, extended structural motifs, crystal engineering and polymorphism, and crystal structure prediction. Applications of CSD information in studies of crystal structure precision, the determination of crystal structures from powder diffraction data, together with applications in chemical informatics, are also discussed.

  5. Biopolymers and supramolecular polymers as biomaterials for biomedical applications

    PubMed Central

    Freeman, Ronit; Boekhoven, Job; Dickerson, Matthew B.; Naik, Rajesh R.

    2015-01-01

    Protein- and peptide-based structural biopolymers are abundant building blocks of biological systems. Either in their natural forms, such as collagen, silk or fibronectin, or as related synthetic materials they can be used in various technologies. An emerging area is that of biomimetic materials inspired by protein-based biopolymers, which are made up of small molecules rather than macromolecules and can therefore be described as supramolecular polymers. These materials are very useful in biomedical applications because of their ability to imitate the extracellular matrix both in architecture and their capacity to signal cells. This article describes important features of the natural extracellular matrix and highlight how these features are being incorporated into biomaterials composed of biopolymers and supramolecular polymers. We particularly focus on the structures, properties, and functions of collagen, fibronectin, silk, and the supramolecular polymers inspired by them as biomaterials for regenerative medicine. PMID:26989295

  6. Supramolecular clippers for controlling photophysical processes through preorganized chromophores.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Mohit; Ushie, Onumashi Afi; George, Subi J

    2014-04-22

    A novel supramolecular clipping design for influencing the photophysical properties of functional molecular assemblies, by the preorganization (clipping) of chromophores, is described. Several chromophores end functionalized with molecular recognition units were designed. These molecular recognition units serve as handles to appropriately position these systems upon noncovalent interactions with multivalent guest molecules (supramolecular clippers). Towards this goal, we have synthesized 1,5-dialkoxynaphthalene (DAN) and naphthalenediimide (NDI) functionalized with dipicolylethylenediamine (DPA) motifs. These molecules could preorganize upon noncovalent clipping with adenosine di- or triphosphates, which resulted in preassociated excimers and mixed (cofacial) charge-transfer (CT) assemblies. Chiral guest binding could also induce supramolecular chirality, not only into the individual chromophoric assembly but also into the heteromeric CT organization, as seen from the strong circular dichroism (CD) signal of the CT transition. The unique ability of this design to influence the intermolecular interactions by changing the binding strength of the clippers furthermore makes it very attractive for controlling the bimolecular photophysical processes.

  7. Supramolecular assembly of C3 peptidic molecules into helical polymers.

    PubMed

    Dai, Yutang; Zhao, Xin; Su, Xinyan; Li, Guangyu; Zhang, Afang

    2014-08-01

    Self-assembly of C3 discotic molecules bearing dipeptide pendants into helical supramolecular polymers is investigated. The dipeptides are constituted from glycine and alanine with altered sequence, aiming at modulating the steric hindrance and examining the steric effects on the assembly. This steric hindrance effect is further illustrated with a dipeptide formed from glycine and valine, which carries a much larger isopropyl side unit. Their supramolecular polymerization is examined in various organic solvents and at different temperatures. The assembly morphology is directly visualized with atomic force microscopy. It is found that small changes in the dipeptide motifs in combination with solvent structure and the solution concentrations lead to different expression of the supramolecular assembly.

  8. Supramolecular delivery of photoactivatable fluorophores in developing embryos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yang; Tang, Sicheng; Sansalone, Lorenzo; Thapaliya, Ek Raj; Baker, James D.; Raymo, Françisco M.

    2017-02-01

    The identification of noninvasive strategies to monitor dynamics within living organisms in real time is essential to elucidate the fundamental factors governing a diversity of biological processes. This study demonstrates that the supramolecular delivery of photoactivatable fluorophores in Drosophila melanogaster embryos allows the real-time tracking of translocating molecules. The designed photoactivatable fluorophores switch from an emissive reactant to an emissive product with spectrally-resolved fluorescence, under moderate blue-light irradiation conditions. These hydrophobic fluorescent probes can be encapsulated within supramolecular hosts and delivered to the cellular blastoderm of the embryos. Thus, the combination of supramolecular delivery and fluorescence photoactivation translates into a noninvasive method to monitor dynamics in vivo and can evolve into a general chemical tool to track motion in biological specimens.

  9. Supramolecular balance: using cooperativity to amplify weak interactions.

    PubMed

    Roman, Mihaela; Cannizzo, Caroline; Pinault, Thomas; Isare, Benjamin; Andrioletti, Bruno; van der Schoot, Paul; Bouteiller, Laurent

    2010-12-01

    Gathering precise knowledge on weak supramolecular interactions is difficult yet is of utmost importance for numerous scientific fields, including catalysis, crystal engineering, ligand binding, and protein folding. We report on a combined theoretical and experimental approach showing that it is possible to vastly improve the sensitivity of current methods to probe weak supramolecular interactions in solution. The concept consists of using a supramolecular platform involving a highly cooperative configurational transition, the perturbation of which (by the modification of the molecular building blocks) can be monitored in a temperature scanning experiment. We tested this concept with a particular bisurea platform, and our first results show that it is possible to detect the presence of interaction differences as low as 60 J/mol, which may be due to steric repulsion between vinyl and alkyl groups or may be the result of solvation effects.

  10. Evidence of induced chirality in stirred solutions of supramolecular nanofibers.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Oriol; Canillas, Adolf; Purrello, Roberto; Ribó, Josep M

    2009-07-15

    Two-modulator generalized ellipsometry is used to determine the spectroscopic Mueller matrix of a solution of porphyrin supramolecular aggregates that have fibrous form. During the measurements the solutions were stirred in clockwise and anticlockwise directions. The pseudopolar decompostion is applied to the experimental Mueller matrices to unveil the birefringent and dichroics properties of the sample. The vortex flow in the stirred solution is found to modify the optical response of the aggregates to polarized light, and, in particular, its chiral signature is determined by the stirring direction in a totally reversible process. The data found show that chirality can be induced by stirring in solutions of supramolecular fibers and that a effective transfer of chirality from a macroscopic phenomenon to the supramolecular structures takes place.

  11. Biopolymers and supramolecular polymers as biomaterials for biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Freeman, Ronit; Boekhoven, Job; Dickerson, Matthew B; Naik, Rajesh R; Stupp, Samuel I

    2015-12-01

    Protein- and peptide-based structural biopolymers are abundant building blocks of biological systems. Either in their natural forms, such as collagen, silk or fibronectin, or as related synthetic materials they can be used in various technologies. An emerging area is that of biomimetic materials inspired by protein-based biopolymers, which are made up of small molecules rather than macromolecules and can therefore be described as supramolecular polymers. These materials are very useful in biomedical applications because of their ability to imitate the extracellular matrix both in architecture and their capacity to signal cells. This article describes important features of the natural extracellular matrix and highlight how these features are being incorporated into biomaterials composed of biopolymers and supramolecular polymers. We particularly focus on the structures, properties, and functions of collagen, fibronectin, silk, and the supramolecular polymers inspired by them as biomaterials for regenerative medicine.

  12. Hybrid Supramolecular and Colloidal Hydrogels that Bridge Multiple Length Scales.

    PubMed

    Janeček, Emma-Rose; McKee, Jason R; Tan, Cindy S Y; Nykänen, Antti; Kettunen, Marjo; Laine, Janne; Ikkala, Olli; Scherman, Oren A

    2015-04-27

    Hybrid nanocomposites were constructed based on colloidal nanofibrillar hydrogels with interpenetrating supramolecular hydrogels, displaying enhanced rheological yield strain and a synergistic improvement in storage modulus. The supramolecular hydrogel consists of naphthyl-functionalized hydroxyethyl cellulose and a cationic polystyrene derivative decorated with methylviologen moieties, physically cross-linked with cucurbit[8]uril macrocyclic hosts. Fast exchange kinetics within the supramolecular system are enabled by reversible cross-linking through the binding of the naphthyl and viologen guests. The colloidal hydrogel consists of nanofibrillated cellulose that combines a mechanically strong nanofiber skeleton with a lateral fibrillar diameter of a few nanometers. The two networks interact through hydroxyethyl cellulose adsorption to the nanofibrillated cellulose surfaces. This work shows methods to bridge the length scales of molecular and colloidal hybrid hydrogels, resulting in synergy between reinforcement and dynamics.

  13. Reversible Guest Exchange Mechanisms in Supramolecular Host-GuestAssemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Pluth, Michael D.; Raymond, Kenneth N.

    2006-09-01

    Synthetic chemists have provided a wide array of supramolecular assemblies able to encapsulate guest molecules. The scope of this tutorial review focuses on supramolecular host molecules capable of reversibly encapsulating polyatomic guests. Much work has been done to determine the mechanism of guest encapsulation and guest release. This review covers common methods of monitoring and characterizing guest exchange such as NMR, UV-VIS, mass spectroscopy, electrochemistry, and calorimetry and also presents representative examples of guest exchange mechanisms. The guest exchange mechanisms of hemicarcerands, cucurbiturils, hydrogen-bonded assemblies, and metal-ligand assemblies are discussed. Special attention is given to systems which exhibit constrictive binding, a motif common in supramolecular guest exchange systems.

  14. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  15. Trace Chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radhakrishnan, Krishnan; Whitefield, Philip

    1999-01-01

    The goals of the trace chemistry group were to identify the processes relevant to aerosol and aerosol precursor formation occurring within aircraft gas turbine engines; that is, within the combustor, turbine, and nozzle. The topics of discussion focused on whether the chemistry of aerosol formation is homogeneous or heterogeneous; what species are important for aerosol and aerosol precursor formation; what modeling/theoretical activities to pursue; what experiments to carry out that both support modeling activities and elucidate fundamental processes; and the role of particulates in aerosol and aerosol precursor formation. The consensus of the group was that attention should be focused on SO2, SO3, and aerosols. Of immediate concern is the measurement of the concentration of the species SO3, SO2, H2SO4 OH, HO2, H2O2, O, NO, NO2, HONO, HNO3, CO, and CO2 and particulates in various engines, both those currently in use and those in development. The recommendation was that concentration measurements should be made at both the combustor exit and the engine exit. At each location the above species were classified into one of four categories of decreasing importance, Priority I through IV, as follows: Combustor exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2, and particulates; Priority II species: OH and O; Priority III species - NO and NO2; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. For the Engine exit: Priority I species - SO3:SO2 ratio, SO3, SO2,H2SO4, and particulates; Priority II species: OH,HO2, H2O2, and O; Priority III species - NO, NO2, HONO, and HNO3; and Priority IV species - CO and CO2. Table I summarizes the anticipated concentration range of each of these species. For particulate matter, the quantities of interest are the number density, size distribution, and composition. In order to provide data for validating multidimensional reacting flow models, it would be desirable to make 2-D, time-resolved measurements of the concentrations of the above species and

  16. Does plant apparency matter? Thirty years of data provide limited support but reveal clear patterns of the effects of plant chemistry on herbivores.

    PubMed

    Smilanich, Angela M; Fincher, R Malia; Dyer, Lee A

    2016-05-01

    According to the plant-apparency hypothesis, apparent plants allocate resources to quantitative defenses that negatively affect generalist and specialist herbivores, while unapparent plants invest more in qualitative defenses that negatively affect nonadapted generalists. Although this hypothesis has provided a useful framework for understanding the evolution of plant chemical defense, there are many inconsistencies surrounding associated predictions, and it has been heavily criticized and deemed obsolete. We used a hierarchical Bayesian meta-analysis model to test whether defenses from apparent and unapparent plants differ in their effects on herbivores. We collected a total of 225 effect sizes from 158 published papers in which the effects of plant chemistry on herbivore performance were reported. As predicted by the plant-apparency hypothesis, we found a prevalence of quantitative defenses in woody plants and qualitative defenses in herbaceous plants. However, the detrimental impacts of qualitative defenses were more effective against specialists than generalists, and the effects of chemical defenses did not significantly differ between specialists and generalists for woody or herbaceous plants. A striking pattern that emerged from our data was a pervasiveness of beneficial effects of secondary metabolites on herbivore performance, especially generalists. This pattern provides evidence that herbivores are evolving effective counteradaptations to putative plant defenses.

  17. Metallo-supramolecular modules as a paradigm for materials science

    PubMed Central

    Kurth, Dirk G.

    2008-01-01

    Metal ion coordination in discrete or extended metallo-supramolecular assemblies offers ample opportunity to fabricate and study devices and materials that are equally important for fundamental research and new technologies. Metal ions embedded in a specific ligand field offer diverse thermodynamic, kinetic, chemical, physical and structural properties that make these systems promising candidates for active components in functional materials. A key challenge is to improve and develop methodologies for placing these active modules in suitable device architectures, such as thin films or mesophases. This review highlights recent developments in extended, polymeric metallo-supramolecular systems and discrete polyoxometalates with an emphasis on materials science. PMID:27877929

  18. Flagella of halophilic archaea: differences in supramolecular organization.

    PubMed

    Syutkin, A S; Pyatibratov, M G; Fedorov, O V

    2014-12-01

    Archaeal flagella are similar functionally to bacterial flagella, but structurally they are completely different. Helical archaeal flagellar filaments are formed of protein subunits called flagellins (archaellins). Notwithstanding progress in studies of archaeal flagella achieved in recent years, many problems in this area are still unsolved. In this review, we analyze the formation of these supramolecular structures by the example of flagellar filaments of halophilic archaea. Recent data on the structure of the flagellar filaments demonstrate that their supramolecular organization differs considerably in different haloarchaeal species.

  19. Proton Transport in Imidazoles: Unraveling the Role of Supramolecular Structure

    DOE PAGES

    Cosby, James T.; Holt, Adam P.; Griffin, Phillip; ...

    2015-09-18

    The impact of supramolecular hydrogen bonded networks on dynamics and charge transport in 2-ethyl-4-methylimidazole (2E4MIm), a model proton-conducting system, is investigated by broadband dielectric spectroscopy, depolarized dynamic light scattering, viscometry, and calorimetry. It is observed that the slow, Debye-like relaxation reflecting the supramolecular structure in neat 2E4MIm is eliminated upon the addition of minute amounts of levulinic acid. This is attributed to the dissociation of imidazole molecules and the breaking down of hydrogen-bonded chains, which leads to a 10-fold enhancement of ionic conductivity.

  20. Phase Transition to Bundles of Flexible Supramolecular Polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, B. A. H.; Bolhuis, P. G.; Fasolino, A.

    2008-05-01

    We report Monte Carlo simulations of the self-assembly of supramolecular polymers based on a model of patchy particles. We find a first-order phase transition, characterized by hysteresis and nucleation, toward a solid bundle of polymers, of length much greater than the average gas phase length. We argue that the bundling transition is the supramolecular equivalent of the sublimation transition, which results from a weak chain-chain interaction. We provide a qualitative equation of state that gives physical insight beyond the specific values of the parameters used in our simulations.

  1. Supramolecular Assembly of Biohybrid Photoconversion Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cardoso, Mateus B; Smolensky, Dmitriy; Heller, William T; Hong, Kunlun; O'Neill, Hugh Michael

    2011-01-01

    Self-assembled membrane architectures have great potential for the development of materials for the conversion of solar energy into electricity or fuels. Discovering the design principles that promote self-assembly in natural photosynthetic systems may provide inspiration for the development of synthetic solar conversion systems. We report for the first time that naturally occurring light harvesting antennae can alter the phase behavior of a poly(ethylene oxide)-block-poly(propylene oxide)-block-poly(ethylene oxide) (PEO-PPO-PEO) block copolymer system from micellar to lamellar structures mimicking their role in maintaining the supramolecular architecture of the photosynthetic membrane. Small-angle neutron scattering shows that PEO{sub 43}-PPO{sub 16}-PEO{sub 43} micelles undergo a phase transition from a micellar state to a lamellar structure with a {approx}60 {angstrom} spatial repetition in the presence of plant light harvesting complex II (LHCII). In addition, spectrophotometric analysis indicates that the protein self-assembles in the synthetic membrane structure. Photodependent hydrogen production mediated by LHCII embedded in the block copolymer had a maximum rate of 6.4 {micro}mol h{sup -1} per mg chlorophyll. The production of H{sub 2} was sustained for greater than 100 hours showing the potential of this approach for the development of self-assembled bioinspired photoconversion systems. Although excited energy transfer is the primary function of LHCII, this work provides evidence that the protein complex can also perform electron transfer, a role not known to occur in vivo. The significance of this work is that it provides a novel approach for developing a new class of membrane-based smart material with a well-controlled architecture that is dependent on the assembly of interacting components, and it could also have important implications in self-repair and control of energy transfer in photoconversion devices.

  2. Supramolecular structure of the casein micelle.

    PubMed

    McMahon, D J; Oommen, B S

    2008-05-01

    The supramolecular structure of colloidal casein micelles in milk was investigated by using a sample preparation protocol based on adsorption of proteins onto a poly-l-lysine and parlodion-coated copper grid, staining of proteins and calcium phosphate by uranyl oxalate, instantaneous freezing, and drying under a high vacuum. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy stereo-images were obtained showing the interior structure of casein micelles. On the basis of our interpretation of these images, an interlocked lattice model was developed in which both casein-calcium phosphate aggregates and casein polymer chains act together to maintain casein micelle integrity. The caseins form linear and branched chains (2 to 5 proteins long) interlocked by the casein-stabilized calcium phosphate nanoclusters. This model suggests that stabilization of calcium phosphate nanoclusters by phosphoserine domains of alpha(s1)-, alpha(s2)-, or beta-casein, or their combination, would orient their hydrophobic domains outward, allowing interaction and binding to other casein molecules. Other interactions between the caseins, such as calcium bridging, could also occur and further stabilize the supramolecule. The combination of having an interlocked lattice structure and multiple interactions results in an open, sponge-like colloidal supramolecule that is resistant to spatial changes and disintegration. Hydrophobic interactions between caseins surrounding a calcium phosphate nanocluster would prevent complete dissociation of casein micelles when the calcium phosphate nanoclusters are solubilized. Likewise, calcium bridging and other electrostatic interactions between caseins would prevent dissociation of the casein micelles into casein-calcium phosphate nanocluster aggregates when milk is cooled or urea is added to milk, and hydrophobic interactions are reduced. The appearance of both polymer chains and small aggregate particles during milk synthesis would also be expected based on

  3. Quantum Chemistry via the Periodic Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinder, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an approach to quantum mechanics exploiting the periodic structure of the elements as a foundation for the quantum theory of matter. Indicates that a quantum chemistry course can be developed using this approach. (SK)

  4. Quantum Chemistry via the Periodic Law.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blinder, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    Describes an approach to quantum mechanics exploiting the periodic structure of the elements as a foundation for the quantum theory of matter. Indicates that a quantum chemistry course can be developed using this approach. (SK)

  5. Chemistry in 1876: The Way It Was

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernheim, Robert A.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a brief history of chemistry up to the founding of the American Chemical Society in 1876. Includes developments in the understanding of matter, phlogiston theory, atomic theory, and chemical reactions. (MLH)

  6. Chemistry in 1876: The Way It Was

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernheim, Robert A.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a brief history of chemistry up to the founding of the American Chemical Society in 1876. Includes developments in the understanding of matter, phlogiston theory, atomic theory, and chemical reactions. (MLH)

  7. Soft matter: food for thought

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogborn, Jon

    2004-01-01

    'Soft matter' is a lively current field of research, looking at fundamental theoretical questions about the structure and behaviour of complex forms of matter, and at very practical problems of, for example, improving the performance of glues or the texture of ice cream. Foodstuffs provide an excellent way in to this modern topic, which lies on the boundary between physics and chemistry.

  8. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  9. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1972

    1972-01-01

    Twelve new chemistry expermiments are described. Broad areas covered include atomic structure, solubility, gaseous diffusion, endothermic reactions, alcohols, equilibrium, atomic volumes, and some improvised apparatus. (PS)

  10. Technetium chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Burns, C.; Bryan, J.; Cotton, F.; Ott, K.; Kubas, G.; Haefner, S.; Barrera, J.; Hall, K.; Burrell, A.

    1996-04-01

    Technetium chemistry is a young and developing field. Despite the limited knowledge of its chemistry, technetium is the workhorse for nuclear medicine. Technetium is also a significant environmental concern because it is formed as a byproduct of nuclear weapons production and fission-power generators. Development of new technetium radio-pharmaceuticals and effective environmental control depends strongly upon knowledge of basic technetium chemistry. The authors performed research into the basic coordination and organometallic chemistry of technetium and used this knowledge to address nuclear medicine and environmental applications. This is the final report of a three-year Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL).

  11. Competition for spectral irradiance between epilimnetic optically active dissolved and suspended matter and phytoplankton in the metalimnion. Consequences for limnology and chemistry.

    PubMed

    Bracchini, Luca; Dattilo, Arduino Massimo; Falcucci, Margherita; Hull, Vincent; Tognazzi, Antonio; Rossi, Claudio; Loiselle, Steven Arthur

    2011-06-01

    In deep lakes, water column stratification isolates the surface water from the deeper bottom layers, creating a three dimensional differentiation of the chemical, physical, biological and optical characteristics of the waters. Chromophoric dissolved organic matter (CDOM) and total suspended solids (TSS) play an important role in the attenuation of ultraviolet and photosynthetically active radiation. In the present analysis of spectral irradiance, we show that the wavelength composition of the metalimnetic visible irradiance was influenced by epilimnetic spatial distribution of CDOM. We found a low occurrence of blue-green photons in the metalimnion where epilimnetic concentrations of CDOM are high. In this field study, the spatial variation of the spectral irradiance in the metalimnion correlates with the observed metalimnetic concentrations of chlorophyll a as well as chlorophyll a : chlorophyll b/c ratios. Dissolved oxygen, pH, and nutrients trends suggest that chlorophyll a concentrations were representative of the phytoplankton biomass and primary production. Thus, metalimnetic changes of spectral irradiance may have a direct impact on primary production and an indirect effect on the spatial trends of pH, dissolved oxygen, and inorganic nutrients in the metalimnion.

  12. Polymer Conjugation as a Strategy for Long-Range Order in Supramolecular Polymers.

    PubMed

    Benjamin, Ari; Keten, Sinan

    2016-04-07

    Supramolecular polymers are polymers in which the individual subunits self-assemble via noncovalent and reversible bonds. An important axis of control for systems of mixed subunit composition is the order in which the subunit types assemble. Existing ordering techniques, which rely on pairwise interactions through the inclusion of highly specific chemistry, have the downside that patterns of length n require n specific chemistries, making long-range order complicated to attain. Here we present a simple alternative method: we attach varying numbers of polymers to self-assembling subunits, in our case ring shaped macrocycles, and the polymers' aversion to confinement imposes system order. We evaluate the feasibility of the strategy using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations of polymer-conjugated rings designed to model cyclic peptide nanotubes. We discuss the effects of polymer conjugation on the energetics of association and predict the equilibrium orderings for various ratios of ring types. The emergent patterns are associated with a certain stochastic disorder, which we quantify by deriving and employing a formula for the expected statistical weight of any pattern within the ensemble of all possible orderings.

  13. Supramolecular Nanoparticles via Single-Chain Folding Driven by Ferrous Ions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Pu, Hongting; Jin, Ming; Wan, Decheng

    2016-02-01

    Single-chain nanoparticles can be obtained via single-chain folding assisted by intramolecular crosslinking reversibly or irreversibly. Single-chain folding is also an efficient route to simulate biomacromolecules. In present study, poly(N-hydroxyethylacrylamide-co-4'-(propoxy urethane ethyl acrylate)-2,2':6',2''-terpyridine) (P(HEAm-co-EMA-Tpy)) is synthesized via reversible addition fragmentation chain transfer polymerization. Single-chain folding and intramolecular crosslinking of P(HEAm-co-EMA-Tpy) are achieved via metal coordination chemistry. The intramolecular interaction is characterized on ultraviolet/visible spectrophotometer (UV-vis spectroscopy), proton nuclear magnetic resonance ((1)H NMR), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The supramolecular crosslinking mediated by Fe(2+) plays an important role in the intramolecular collapsing of the single-chain and the formation of the nanoparticles. The size and morphology of the nanoparticles can be controlled reversibly via metal coordination chemistry, which can be characterized by dynamic light scattering (DLS), transmission electron microscope (TEM), and atomic force microscope (AFM). © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Photocontrolled Supramolecular Assembling of Azobenzene-Based Biscalix[4]arenes upon Starting and Stopping Laser Trapping.

    PubMed

    Yuyama, Ken-Ichi; Marcelis, Lionel; Su, Pei-Mei; Chung, Wen-Sheng; Masuhara, Hiroshi

    2017-01-24

    Laser trapping in chemistry covers various studies ranging from single molecules, nanoparticles, and quantum dots to crystallization and liquid-liquid phase separation of amino acids. In this work, a supramolecular assembly of azobenzene-based biscalix[4]arene is generated in ethyl acetate using laser trapping; its nucleation and growth are elucidated. No trapping behavior was observed when a 1064 nm laser beam was focused inside of the solution; however, interesting assembling phenomena were induced when it was shined at the air/solution interface. A single disk having two layers was first prepared at the focal point of ∼1 μm and then expanded to the size of a few tens of micrometers, although no optical force was exerted outside of the focal volume. Upon switching the trapping laser off, needles were generated at the outer layer of the assembly, giving a stable sea urchin-like morphology to the generated assembly. At a 30-50% dilution of the initial solution in ethyl acetate, a mushroom-like morphology was also observed. Laser trapping-induced assembly of azobenzene-based biscalix[4]arene was quite different from the sharp-ellipsoidal aggregates obtained by the spontaneous evaporation of the solution. These trapping phenomena were specifically observed for biscalix[4]arene in the trans conformation of azo-benzene moiety but not for the cis-form, suggesting that the laser trapping of this azobenzene-based biscalix[4]arene is photocontrollable. Dynamics and mechanism of the supramolecular assembling are considered, referring to laser trapping-induced nucleation and liquid-liquid phase separation of amino acids.

  15. Dynamic imine chemistry.

    PubMed

    Belowich, Matthew E; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2012-03-21

    Formation of an imine--from an amine and an aldehyde--is a reversible reaction which operates under thermodynamic control such that the formation of kinetically competitive intermediates are, in the fullness of time, replaced by the thermodynamically most stable product(s). For this fundamental reason, the imine bond has emerged as an extraordinarily diverse and useful one in the hands of synthetic chemists. Imine bond formation is one of a handful of reactions which define a discipline known as dynamic covalent chemistry (DCC), which is now employed widely in the construction of exotic molecules and extended structures on account of the inherent 'proof-reading' and 'error-checking' associated with these reversible reactions. While both supramolecular chemistry and DCC operate under the regime of reversibility, DCC has the added advantage of constructing robust molecules on account of the formation of covalent bonds rather than fragile supermolecules resulting from noncovalent bonding interactions. On the other hand, these products tend to require more time to form--sometimes days or even months--but their formation can often be catalysed. In this manner, highly symmetrical molecules and extended structures can be prepared from relatively simple precursors. When DCC is utilised in conjunction with template-directed protocols--which rely on the use of noncovalent bonding interactions between molecular building blocks in order to preorganise them into certain relative geometries as a prelude to the formation of covalent bonds under equilibrium control--an additional level of control of structure and topology arises which offers a disarmingly simple way of constructing mechanically-interlocked molecules, such as rotaxanes, catenanes, Borromean rings, and Solomon knots. This tutorial review focuses on the use of dynamic imine bonds in the construction of compounds and products formed with and without the aid of additional templates. While synthesis under thermodynamic

  16. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  17. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Outlines laboratory procedures, demonstrations, teaching suggestions, and content information related to chemistry. Topics include polarizing power; calorimetry and momentum; microcomputers in school chemistry; a constant-volume dispenser for liquids, floating magnets, and crystal lattices; preparation of chromium; and solvent polarity and…

  18. Monosaccharides as Versatile Units for Water-Soluble Supramolecular Polymers.

    PubMed

    Leenders, Christianus M A; Jansen, Gijs; Frissen, Martijn M M; Lafleur, René P M; Voets, Ilja K; Palmans, Anja R A; Meijer, E W

    2016-03-18

    We introduce monosaccharides as versatile water-soluble units to compatibilise supramolecular polymers based on the benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxamide (BTA) moiety with water. A library of monosaccharide-based BTAs is evaluated, varying the length of the alkyl chain (hexyl, octyl, decyl and dodecyl) separating the BTA and saccharide units, as well as the saccharide units (α-glucose, β-glucose, α-mannose and α-galactose). In all cases, the monosaccharides impart excellent water compatibility. The length of the alkyl chain is the determining factor to obtain either long, one-dimensional supramolecular polymers (dodecyl spacer), small aggregates (decyl spacer) or molecularly dissolved (octyl and hexyl) BTAs in water. For the BTAs comprising a dodecyl spacer, our results suggest that a cooperative self-assembly process is operative and that the introduction of different monosaccharides does not significantly change the self- assembly behaviour. Finally, we investigate the potential of post-assembly functionalisation of the formed supramolecular polymers by taking advantage of dynamic covalent bond formation between the monosaccharides and benzoxaboroles. We observe that the supramolecular polymers readily react with a fluorescent benzoxaborole derivative permitting imaging of these dynamic complexes by confocal fluorescence microscopy.

  19. Protein-based supramolecular polymers: progress and prospect.

    PubMed

    Luo, Quan; Dong, Zeyuan; Hou, Chunxi; Liu, Junqiu

    2014-09-11

    Proteins are naturally evolved macromolecules with highly sophisticated structures and diverse properties. The design and controlled self-assembly of proteins into polymeric architectures via supramolecular interactions offers unique advantages in understanding the spontaneously self-organisational process and fabrication of various bioactive materials. This feature article highlights recent advances and future trends in supramolecular polymers that are directly assembled from the building blocks of proteins. Non-covalent interactions capable of inducing polymerization include aromatic π-π stacking, host-guest interactions, metal coordination, and interprotein interactions combined with site-selective protein modification to explore the dynamic and specific unidirectional aggregation behaviours among protein units. We also discuss some extended supramolecular protein polymers achieved by rational design and fine-tuning the protein-protein interactions, which may help to inspire future design of more complicated polymeric protein assemblies. The protein-based supramolecular polymer system provides a versatile platform for functionalization and thereby shows great potential in the development of novel biomaterials with controlled structures and properties.

  20. Supramolecular Inclusion in Cyclodextrins: A Pictorial Spectroscopic Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haldar, Basudeb; Mallick, Arabinda; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    A spectroscopic experiment is presented that reveals that the hydrophobically end-modified water-soluble polymeric fluorophore, pyrene end-capped poly(ethylene oxide) (PYPY), interacts differently with [alpha], [beta], and [gamma]-cyclodextrins (CD) to form supramolecular inclusion complexes. The emission spectrum of PYPY in aqueous solution shows…

  1. Analyzing the molecular weight distribution in supramolecular polymers.

    PubMed

    Schmid, Stephan A; Abbel, Robert; Schenning, Albertus P H; Meijer, E W; Sijbesma, Rint P; Herz, Laura M

    2009-12-09

    We have investigated the formation process of supramolecular linear polymer chains and its influence on the resulting chain length distribution function. For this purpose, we explored the migration of excitation energy between oligofluorene units coupled together through quadruple hydrogen-bonding groups to form linear chains that are terminated by oligophenylene vinylene end-caps acting as energy traps. The energy transfer dynamics from the main chain to the chain end was monitored experimentally using time-resolved PL spectroscopy and compared to an equivalent Monte Carlo simulation incorporating information on the structure of the chains, the transition transfer rates, and various weight distribution trial functions. We find that the assumption of a Flory distribution of chain lengths leads to excellent agreement between experimental and simulated data for a wide range of end-cap concentrations. On the other hand, both a Poisson function and a simplified assumption of a monodisperse distribution significantly underestimate the presence of long chains in the ensemble. Our results therefore show that supramolecular polymerization is a steplike process equivalent to polycondensation reactions in linear covalent polymers. These findings emphasize that equal reactivity of the supramolecular building blocks leads to a dynamic growth process for the supramolecular chain involving all chain components at all times.

  2. Phase behaviors of supramolecular graft copolymers with reversible bonding

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Xu; Wang, Liquan E-mail: lq-wang@ecust.edu.cn; Jiang, Tao; Lin, Jiaping E-mail: lq-wang@ecust.edu.cn

    2013-11-14

    Phase behaviors of supramolecular graft copolymers with reversible bonding interactions were examined by the random-phase approximation and real-space implemented self-consistent field theory. The studied supramolecular graft copolymers consist of two different types of mutually incompatible yet reactive homopolymers, where one homopolymer (backbone) possesses multifunctional groups that allow second homopolymers (grafts) to be placed on. The calculations carried out show that the bonding strength exerts a pronounced effect on the phase behaviors of supramolecular graft copolymers. The length ratio of backbone to graft and the positions of functional groups along the backbone are also of importance to determine the phase behaviors. Phase diagrams were constructed at high bonding strength to illustrate this architectural dependence. It was found that the excess unbounded homopolymers swell the phase domains and shift the phase boundaries. The results were finally compared with the available experimental observations, and a well agreement is shown. The present work could, in principle, provide a general understanding of the phase behaviors of supramolecular graft copolymers with reversible bonding.

  3. Comparison of Cellulose Supramolecular Structures Between Nanocrystals of Different Origins

    Treesearch

    Umesh P. Agarwal; Richard S. Reiner; Christopher G. Hunt; Jeffery Catchmark; E. Johan Foster; Akira Isogai

    2015-01-01

    In this study, morphologies and supramolecular structures of CNCs from wood-pulp, cotton, bacteria, tunicate, and cladophora were investigated. TEM was used to study the morphological aspects of the nanocrystals whereas Raman spectroscopy provided information on the cellulose molecular structure and its organization within a CNC. Dimensional differences between the...

  4. Supramolecular Inclusion in Cyclodextrins: A Pictorial Spectroscopic Demonstration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haldar, Basudeb; Mallick, Arabinda; Chattopadhyay, Nitin

    2008-01-01

    A spectroscopic experiment is presented that reveals that the hydrophobically end-modified water-soluble polymeric fluorophore, pyrene end-capped poly(ethylene oxide) (PYPY), interacts differently with [alpha], [beta], and [gamma]-cyclodextrins (CD) to form supramolecular inclusion complexes. The emission spectrum of PYPY in aqueous solution shows…

  5. Flexible metal–organic supramolecular isomers for gas separation

    SciTech Connect

    Motkuri, Radha K.; Tian, Jian; Thallapally, Praveen K.; Fernandez, Carlos A.; Dalgarno, Scott J.; Warren, John E.; McGrail, B. Peter; Atwood, Jerry L.

    2010-01-01

    Here in we report three porous metal-organic supramolecular isomers (PtS, Diamondoid and Lonsdaleite networks) generated from a single building block (tetrakis[4-(carboxyphenyl)oxamethyl]methane, 1), with the differences in solid-state packing, amount of gas uptake and selectivity towards other gases and so on

  6. An Introduction to Air Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Samuel S.; Charlson, Robert J.

    Designed for those with no previous experience in the field, this book synthesizes the areas of chemistry and meteorology required to bring into focus some of the complex problems associated with the atmospheric environment. Subject matter moves from a review of the relevant chemical and meteorological principles to a discussion of the general…

  7. An Introduction to Air Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Samuel S.; Charlson, Robert J.

    Designed for those with no previous experience in the field, this book synthesizes the areas of chemistry and meteorology required to bring into focus some of the complex problems associated with the atmospheric environment. Subject matter moves from a review of the relevant chemical and meteorological principles to a discussion of the general…

  8. Synthesis of bi- and bis-1,2,3-triazoles by copper-catalyzed Huisgen cycloaddition: A family of valuable products by click chemistry.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Zhan-Jiang; Wang, Ding; Xu, Zheng; Xu, Li-Wen

    2015-01-01

    The Cu(I)-catalyzed azide-alkyne cycloaddition reaction, also known as click chemistry, has become a useful tool for the facile formation of 1,2,3-triazoles. Specifically, the utility of this reaction has been demonstrated by the synthesis of structurally diverse bi- and bis-1,2,3-triazoles. The present review focuses on the synthesis of such bi- and bistriazoles and the importance of using copper-promoted click chemistry (CuAAC) for such transformations. In addition, the application of bitriazoles and the related CuAAAC reaction in different fields, including medicinal chemistry, coordination chemistry, biochemistry, and supramolecular chemistry, have been highlighted.

  9. Amphoteric Aqueous Hafnium Cluster Chemistry.

    PubMed

    Goberna-Ferrón, Sara; Park, Deok-Hie; Amador, Jenn M; Keszler, Douglas A; Nyman, May

    2016-05-17

    Selective dissolution of hafnium-peroxo-sulfate films in aqueous tetramethylammonium hydroxide enables extreme UV lithographic patterning of sub-10 nm HfO2 structures. Hafnium speciation under these basic conditions (pH>10), however, is unknown, as studies of hafnium aqueous chemistry have been limited to acid. Here, we report synthesis, crystal growth, and structural characterization of the first polynuclear hydroxo hafnium cluster isolated from base, [TMA]6 [Hf6 (μ-O2 )6 (μ-OH)6 (OH)12 ]⋅38 H2 O. The solution behavior of the cluster, including supramolecular assembly via hydrogen bonding is detailed via small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS). The study opens a new chapter in the aqueous chemistry of hafnium, exemplifying the concept of amphoteric clusters and informing a critical process in single-digit-nm lithography. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Dynamic chemistry of anion recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu

    2012-01-01

    In the past 40 years, anion recognition by synthetic receptors has grown into a rich and vibrant research topic, developing into a distinct branch of Supramolecular Chemistry. Traditional anion receptors comprise organic scaffolds functionalized with complementary binding groups that are assembled by multistep organic synthesis. Recently, a new approach to anion receptors has emerged, in which the host is dynamically self-assembled in the presence of the anionic guest, via reversible bond formation between functional building units. While coordination bonds were initially employed for the self-assembly of the anion hosts, more recent studies demonstrated that reversible covalent bonds can serve the same purpose. In both cases, due to their labile connections, the molecular constituents have the ability to assemble, dissociate, and recombine continuously, thereby creating a dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) of receptors. The anionic guests, through specific molecular recognition, may then amplify (express) the formation of a particular structure among all possible combinations (real or virtual) by shifting the equilibria involved towards the most optimal receptor. This approach is not limited to solution self-assembly, but is equally applicable to crystallization, where the fittest anion-binding crystal may be selected. Finally, the pros and cons of employing dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) vs molecular design for developing anion receptors, and the implications of both approaches to selective anion separations, will be discussed.

  11. Circumstellar chemistry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glassgold, Alfred E.; Huggins, Patrick J.

    1987-01-01

    The study of the outer envelopes of cool evolved stars has become an active area of research. The physical properties of CS envelopes are presented. Observations of many wavelengths bands are relevant. A summary of observations and a discussion of theoretical considerations concerning the chemistry are summarized. Recent theoretical considerations show that the thermal equilibrium model is of limited use for understanding the chemistry of the outer CS envelopes. The theoretical modeling of the chemistry of CS envelopes provides a quantitive test of chemical concepts which have a broader interest than the envelopes themselves.

  12. System-pH-dependent supramolecular isomers of puckered three-dimensional layered hydrogen-bonded networks: Syntheses, characterization and fluorescent properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Pang-Kuan; Che, Yun-Xia; Li, Yu-Mei; Zheng, Ji-Min

    2006-08-01

    Two true supramolecular isomers ( 1 and 2) formulated as [Zn(bipy)(H 2btc) 2] n (bipy=2,2'-bipyridine, H 3btc=benzene-1,3,5-tricarboxylic acid) have been hydrothermally prepared through systematically changing the pH value of reaction mixture, and characterized by single-crystal X-ray diffraction, element analysis, infrared spectra (IR), and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Isomer 1 crystallizes in triclinic space group P-1, tetrahedral Zn(ΙΙ) ions possess four-coordinated environment, while isomer 2 crystallizes in monoclinic space group C2/ c and the distorted octahedral Zn(II) ions adopt six-coordinated fashion. 1 and 2 can be regarded as supramolecular structural isomers, the formation of which should be undoubtedly attributed to the preference for pH-dependent crystallization leading to multiple connectivity (monodentate and chelating bidentate) of organic ligand despite the same stoichiometry employed. The supramolecular chemistry, which organizes the coordination complexes into three-dimensional (3D) layered open structure, is driven by a combination of hydrogen-bond and π- π interactions. Moreover, 1 emits fluorescence at 350.1 nm ( λ=310.0 nm) and 2 exhibits fluorescent property at about 351.4 nm ( λ=302.0 nm).

  13. Conductive oxygen barrier films using supramolecular assembly of graphene embedded polyelectrolyte multilayers.

    PubMed

    Gokhale, Ankush A; Lu, Jue; Parker, Nathan J; Izbicki, Andrew P; Sanyal, Oishi; Lee, Ilsoon

    2013-11-01

    The supramolecular self-assembly of polyelectrolyte multilayers (PEMs) provides robust bottom-up strategies to assemble a broad spectrum of nanostructures on the host substrates. In this study, we discuss the formation of graphene nanoplatelet (GNP) embedded polyelectrolyte films to enhance the oxygen barrier properties of poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) films. Despite cheaper costs and high mechanical strength, the diffusion of small gas molecules such as oxygen through PET films remains a matter of great concern. The simple yet robust supramolecular deposition of GNP/polyelectrolyte on PET substrates significantly increases the tortuous path the oxygen molecule has to travel, making it harder to diffuse through the PET film. With permeability coefficients in the range of 10-18 cc cm/cm(2) s Pa, the coatings developed in this study show three orders of magnitude reduction as compared to the permeability coefficient of the bare PET film, significantly lower than that of ethylene vinyl alcohol (EVOH) and comparable to silicon oxide thin films used in commercial gas barrier foils. The use of GNPs in the multilayered films also helped reduce the electrical sheet resistance to about 1MΩ which is five orders of magnitude lower than the original PET substrate opening up promising opportunities for future use in semiconductor and electronics industry. Making suitable modifications in the deposition process, three configurations of GNP embedded PEM multilayers namely hydrogen bonded, electrostatic, and composite films were developed and their effect on oxygen barrier property and sheet resistance was monitored. Oxygen permeability of films was tested in accordance with ASTM D-3985 using a MOCON 2/21 ML instrument, whereas electrical sheet resistance was quantified using a Gamry Femtostat Electrochemical Impedance station.

  14. Nuclear analytical chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, D.; Forkman, B.; Persson, B.

    1984-01-01

    This book covers the general theories and techniques of nuclear chemical analysis, directed at applications in analytical chemistry, nuclear medicine, radiophysics, agriculture, environmental sciences, geological exploration, industrial process control, etc. The main principles of nuclear physics and nuclear detection on which the analysis is based are briefly outlined. An attempt is made to emphasise the fundamentals of activation analysis, detection and activation methods, as well as their applications. The book provides guidance in analytical chemistry, agriculture, environmental and biomedical sciences, etc. The contents include: the nuclear periodic system; nuclear decay; nuclear reactions; nuclear radiation sources; interaction of radiation with matter; principles of radiation detectors; nuclear electronics; statistical methods and spectral analysis; methods of radiation detection; neutron activation analysis; charged particle activation analysis; photon activation analysis; sample preparation and chemical separation; nuclear chemical analysis in biological and medical research; the use of nuclear chemical analysis in the field of criminology; nuclear chemical analysis in environmental sciences, geology and mineral exploration; and radiation protection.

  15. A rapid pathway toward a superb gene delivery system: programming structural and functional diversity into a supramolecular nanoparticle library.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hao; Liu, Kan; Chen, Kuan-Ju; Lu, Yujie; Wang, Shutao; Lin, Wei-Yu; Guo, Feng; Kamei, Ken-ichiro; Chen, Yi-Chun; Ohashi, Minori; Wang, Mingwei; Garcia, Mitch André; Zhao, Xing-Zhong; Shen, Clifton K-F; Tseng, Hsian-Rong

    2010-10-26

    Nanoparticles are regarded as promising transfection reagents for effective and safe delivery of nucleic acids into a specific type of cells or tissues providing an alternative manipulation/therapy strategy to viral gene delivery. However, the current process of searching novel delivery materials is limited due to conventional low-throughput and time-consuming multistep synthetic approaches. Additionally, conventional approaches are frequently accompanied with unpredictability and continual optimization refinements, impeding flexible generation of material diversity creating a major obstacle to achieving high transfection performance. Here we have demonstrated a rapid developmental pathway toward highly efficient gene delivery systems by leveraging the powers of a supramolecular synthetic approach and a custom-designed digital microreactor. Using the digital microreactor, broad structural/functional diversity can be programmed into a library of DNA-encapsulated supramolecular nanoparticles (DNA⊂SNPs) by systematically altering the mixing ratios of molecular building blocks and a DNA plasmid. In vitro transfection studies with DNA⊂SNPs library identified the DNA⊂SNPs with the highest gene transfection efficiency, which can be attributed to cooperative effects of structures and surface chemistry of DNA⊂SNPs. We envision such a rapid developmental pathway can be adopted for generating nanoparticle-based vectors for delivery of a variety of loads.

  16. Control over Structure and Function of Peptide Amphiphile Supramolecular Assemblies through Molecular Design and Energy Landscapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tantakitti, Faifan

    Supramolecular chemistry is a powerful tool to create a material of a defined structure with tunable properties. This strategy has led to catalytically active, bioactive, and environment-responsive materials, among others, that are valuable in applications ranging from sensor technology to energy and medicine. Supramolecular polymers formed by peptide amphiphiles (PAs) have been especially relevant in tissue regeneration due to their ability to form biocompatible structures and mimic many important signaling molecules in biology. These supramolecular polymers can form nanofibers that create networks which mimic natural extracellular matrices. PA materials have been shown to induce growth of blood vessels, bone, cartilage, and nervous tissue, among others. The work described in this thesis not only studied the relationship between molecular structure and functions of PA assemblies, but also uncovered a powerful link between the energy landscape of their supramolecular self-assembly and the ability of PA materials to interact with cells. In chapter 2, it is argued that fabricating fibrous nanostructures with defined mechanical properties and decoration with bioactive molecules is not sufficient to create a material that can effectively communicate with cells. By systemically placing the fibronectin-derived RGDS epitope at increasing distances from the surface of PA nanofibers through a linker of one to five glycine residues, integrin-mediated RGDS signaling was enhanced. The results suggested that the spatial presentation of an epitope on PA nanofibers strongly influences the bioactivity of the PA substrates. In further improving functionality of a PA-based scaffold to effectively direct cell growth and differentiation, chapter 3 explored the use of a cell microcarrier to compartmentalize and simultaneously tune insoluble and soluble signals in a single matrix. PA nanofibers were incorporated at the surface of the microcarrier in order to promote cell adhesion, while

  17. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  18. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  19. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  20. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  1. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  2. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  3. Catalytic Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Borer, Londa; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Describes an approach for making chemistry relevant to everyday life. Involves the study of kinetics using the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by vegetable juices. Allows students to design and carry out experiments and then draw conclusions from their results. (JRH)

  4. Nuclear Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1979

    1979-01-01

    Provides a brief review of the latest developments in nuclear chemistry. Nuclear research today is directed toward increased activity in radiopharmaceuticals and formation of new isotopes by high-energy, heavy-ion collisions. (Author/BB)

  5. Chemistry Notes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1973

    1973-01-01

    Several ideas are proposed for chemistry teachers to try in their classrooms. Subjects included are polymerization of acrylate, polymerization of styrene, conductivity, pollution, preparation of chlorine, redox equations, chemiluminescence, and molecular sieves. (PS)

  6. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1980

    1980-01-01

    Describes equipment, activities, and experiments useful in chemistry instruction, including among others, a rapid method to determine available chlorine in bleach, simple flame testing apparatus, and a simple apparatus demonstrating the technique of flash photolysis. (SK)

  7. Chemistry Notes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    School Science Review, 1981

    1981-01-01

    Describes 13 activities, experiments and demonstrations, including the preparation of iron (III) chloride, simple alpha-helix model, investigating camping gas, redox reactions of some organic compounds, a liquid crystal thermometer, and the oxidation number concept in organic chemistry. (JN)

  8. Precolumbian Chemistry.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Robinson, Janet Bond

    1995-01-01

    Describes the content and development of a curriculum that provides an approach to descriptive chemistry and the history of technology through consideration of the pottery, metallurgy, pigments, dyes, agriculture, and medicine of pre-Columbian people. (DDR)

  9. Stratospheric chemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brune, William H.

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  10. Stratospheric chemistry

    SciTech Connect

    Brune, W.H. )

    1991-01-01

    Advances in stratospheric chemistry made by investigators in the United States from 1987 to 1990 are reviewed. Subject areas under consideration include photochemistry of the polar stratosphere, photochemistry of the global stratosphere, and assessments of inadvertent modification of the stratosphere by anthropogenic activity. Particular attention is given to early observations and theories, gas phase chemistry, Antarctic observations, Arctic observations, odd-oxygen, odd-hydrogen, odd-nitrogen, halogens, aerosols, modeling of stratospheric ozone, and reactive nitrogen effects.

  11. Supramolecular modeling of mono-copper enzyme active sites with calix[6]arene-based funnel complexes.

    PubMed

    Le Poul, Nicolas; Le Mest, Yves; Jabin, Ivan; Reinaud, Olivia

    2015-07-21

    Supramolecular bioinorganic chemistry is a natural evolution in biomimetic metallic systems since it constitutes a further degree of complexity in modeling. The traditional approach consisting of mimicking the first coordination sphere of metal sites proved to be very efficient, because valuable data are extracted from these examples to gain insight in natural systems mechanisms. But it does not reproduce several specific aspects of enzymes that can be mimicked by the implementation of a cavity embedding the labile active site and thus controlling the properties of the metal ion by noncovalent interactions. This Account reports on a strategy aimed at reproducing some supramolecular aspects encountered in the natural systems. The cavity complexes described herein display a coordination site constructed on a macrocycle. Thanks to a careful design of the cavity-based ligands, complexes orienting their labile site specifically toward the inside of the macrocycle were obtained. The supramolecular systems are based on the flexible calix[6]arene core that surrounds the metal ion labile site, thereby constraining exogenous molecules to pass through the conic funnel to reach the metal center. Such an architecture confers to the metal ion very unusual properties and behaviors, which in many aspects are biologically relevant. Three generations of calix[6]-based ligands are presented and discussed in the context of modeling the monocopper sites encountered in some enzymes. A wide range of phenomena are highlighted such as the impact that the size and shape of the access channel to the metal center have on the selectivity and rate of the binding process, the possible remote control of the electronics through small modifications operated on the cavity edges, induced-fit behavior associated with host-guest association (shoe-tree effect) that affects the redox properties of the metal ion and the electron exchange pathway, consequences of forbidden associative ligand exchange

  12. Binary supramolecular adduct based upon trimeric perfluoro-ortho-phenylenemercury and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde: Enumerating the strength of perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fisher, Steven P.; Krueger, Herman R.; Groeneman, Ryan H.; Reinheimer, Eric W.

    2016-01-01

    Due to its proximity of Hg(II) atoms, electron-withdrawing properties and inherent accessibility to electrophilic sites on the molecular surface, trimeric perfluoro-ortho-phenylenemercury, (o-C6F4Hg)3, has demonstrated a capacity to form supramolecular adducts with a variety of neutral and anionic substrates. Often within these complexes the Lewis acid, (o-C6F4Hg)3, interacts with a Lewis base rather than itself in the solid state via various supramolecular interactions. Among these, perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interactions have been utilized in the construction of various supramolecular materials; however, within these molecular complexes, this category of non-covalent interaction is not often observed. Even though these perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interactions have been used to produce new materials, their overall strength has not been generally reported in the literature. In this contribution, we highlight not only the synthesis, structural and spectroscopic properties of a novel binary supramolecular adduct between (o-C6F4Hg)3 and 4-chlorobenzaldehyde (4-ClBA) [(o-C6F4Hg)3(4-ClBA)] 1, but also report on the overall strength of the perfluorophenyl-perfluorophenyl interaction energies determined by means of computational chemistry. The carbonyl group of the 4-ClBA substrate was found to interact with all three mercury atoms within (o-C6F4Hg)3 via Hg⋯O contacts. An infrared spectroscopic analysis of 1 demonstrated a lower wavenumber for the carbonyl stretching frequency when compared to that for the free substrate confirming the presence of these Hg⋯O interactions.

  13. Kinetic parameters for thermal decomposition of supramolecular polymers derived from diclofenac-meglumine supramolecular adducts.

    PubMed

    Cassimiro, Douglas L; Ferreira, Leonardo M B; Capela, Jorge M V; Crespi, Marisa S; Ribeiro, Clóvis A

    2013-01-25

    Meglumine is an aminocarbohydrate able to form supramolecular adducts with organic acids. The recognition is based on hydrogen bonds and the structures resulting from the complexation have high solubility in water. This property has been exploited by the pharmaceutical industry in the improvement of existing drugs, and the successful example of this approach involves the poorly soluble non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Investigation of the thermal behavior of adduct obtained from meglumine and the NSAID diclofenac revealed that a polymer-like material is formed from the self-assembly of diclofenac-meglumine adducts in the melt. This polymer showed a high molecular weight around 2.0×10(5)kDa. The kinetic parameters for the thermal decomposition step of the polymer were determined by the Capela-Ribeiro non-linear isoconversional method. From data for the TG curves in nitrogen atmosphere and heating rates of 5, 10, 15 and 20°Cmin(-1), the E(α) and B(α) terms could be determined, and consequently the pre-exponential factor, A(α), as well as the kinetic model, g(α). Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Self-assembly of a supramolecular hexagram and a supramolecular pentagram

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhilong; Li, Yiming; Wang, Ming; Song, Bo; Wang, Kun; Sun, Mingyu; Liu, Die; Li, Xiaohong; Yuan, Jie; Chen, Mingzhao; Guo, Yuan; Yang, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Tong; Moorefield, Charles N.; Newkome, George R.; Xu, Bingqian; Li, Xiaopeng; Wang, Pingshan

    2017-05-01

    Five- and six-pointed star structures occur frequently in nature as flowers, snow-flakes, leaves and so on. These star-shaped patterns are also frequently used in both functional and artistic man-made architectures. Here following a stepwise synthesis and self-assembly approach, pentagonal and hexagonal metallosupramolecules possessing star-shaped motifs were prepared based on the careful design of metallo-organic ligands (MOLs). In the MOL design and preparation, robust ruthenium-terpyridyl complexes were employed to construct brominated metallo-organic intermediates, followed by a Suzuki coupling reaction to achieve the required ensemble. Ligand LA (VRu2+X, V=bisterpyridine, X=tetraterpyridine, Ru=Ruthenium) was initially used for the self-assembly of an anticipated hexagram upon reaction with Cd2+ or Fe2+ however, unexpected pentagonal structures were formed, that is, [Cd5LA5]30+ and [Fe5LA5]30+. In our redesign, LB [V(Ru2+X)2] was synthesized and treated with 60° V-shaped bisterpyridine (V) and Cd2+ to create hexagonal hexagram [Cd12V3LB3]36+ along with traces of the triangle [Cd3V3]6+. Finally, a pure supramolecular hexagram [Fe12V3LB3]36+ was successfully isolated in a high yield using Fe2+ with a higher assembly temperature.

  15. Aerogen Bonding Interaction: A New Supramolecular Force?

    PubMed

    Bauzá, Antonio; Frontera, Antonio

    2015-06-15

    We report evidence of the favorable noncovalent interaction between a covalently bonded atom of Group 18 (known as noble gases or aerogens) and a negative site, for example, a lone pair of a Lewis base or an anion. It involves a region of positive electrostatic potential (σ-hole), therefore it is a totally new and unexplored σ-hole-based interaction, namely aerogen bonding. We demonstrate for the first time the existence of σ-hole regions in aerogen derivatives by means of high-level ab initio calculations. In addition, several crystal structures retrieved from the Cambridge Structural Database (CSD) give reliability to the calculations. Energetically, aerogen bonds are comparable to hydrogen bonds and other σ-hole-based interactions but less directional. They are expected to be important in xenon chemistry.

  16. Chiral induction and amplification in supramolecular systems at the liquid-solid interface.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hong; Ghijsens, Elke; George, Subi J; Wolffs, Martin; Tomović, Željko; Schenning, Albertus P H J; De Feyter, Steven

    2013-06-03

    Chiral induction and amplification in surface-confined supramolecular monolayers are investigated at the liquid-solid interface. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) proves that achiral molecules can self-assemble into globally chiral patterns through a variety of approaches, including induction by chiral solvents or by a novel chiral amplification method. Our study demonstrates the aptness of both approaches, which have already been applied to (supramolecular) polymers in solution, to create chiral supramolecular monolayers at the liquid-solid interface.

  17. Computer simulation of supramolecular assembly by metal-ligand complexation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shihu; Chen, Chun-Chung; Dormidontova, Elena E.

    2006-03-01

    Monte Carlo simulations were employed to study the supramolecular assembly of oligomers end-functionalized by ligands capable of complexation with metal ions. The properties of these metallo-supramolecular polymers strongly depend on the oligomer concentration, strength of complexation, and metal-to- ligand ratio. At high oligomer concentration the average molecular weight exhibits a maximum near the stoichiometric composition and decreases for higher or lower metal content. On the other hand, at low oligomer concentration the molecular weight shows a local minimum around the stoichiometric composition. This unusual behavior is attributed to the larger population of small rings around the stoichiometric composition, which make up a significant fraction of the overall molecular weight at low oligomer concentration. This effect is especially pronounced at low temperature, where the fraction of rings is higher. The fraction of chains and rings for different concentrations, temperatures and oligomer lengths were calculated and compared with experimental data.

  18. Non-equilibrium steady states in supramolecular polymerization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sorrenti, Alessandro; Leira-Iglesias, Jorge; Sato, Akihiro; Hermans, Thomas M.

    2017-06-01

    Living systems use fuel-driven supramolecular polymers such as actin to control important cell functions. Fuel molecules like ATP are used to control when and where such polymers should assemble and disassemble. The cell supplies fresh ATP to the cytosol and removes waste products to sustain steady states. Artificial fuel-driven polymers have been developed recently, but keeping them in sustained non-equilibrium steady states (NESS) has proven challenging. Here we show a supramolecular polymer that can be kept in NESS, inside a membrane reactor where ATP is added and waste removed continuously. Assembly and disassembly of our polymer is regulated by phosphorylation and dephosphorylation, respectively. Waste products lead to inhibition, causing the reaction cycle to stop. Inside the membrane reactor, however, waste can be removed leading to long-lived NESS conditions. We anticipate that our approach to obtain NESS can be applied to other stimuli-responsive materials to achieve more life-like behaviour.

  19. 3D Printing of Biocompatible Supramolecular Polymers and their Composites.

    PubMed

    Hart, Lewis R; Li, Siwei; Sturgess, Craig; Wildman, Ricky; Jones, Julian R; Hayes, Wayne

    2016-02-10

    A series of polymers capable of self-assembling into infinite networks via supramolecular interactions have been designed, synthesized, and characterized for use in 3D printing applications. The biocompatible polymers and their composites with silica nanoparticles were successfully utilized to deposit both simple cubic structures, as well as a more complex twisted pyramidal feature. The polymers were found to be not toxic to a chondrogenic cell line, according to ISO 10993-5 and 10993-12 standard tests and the cells attached to the supramolecular polymers as demonstrated by confocal microscopy. Silica nanoparticles were then dispersed within the polymer matrix, yielding a composite material which was optimized for inkjet printing. The hybrid material showed promise in preliminary tests to facilitate the 3D deposition of a more complex structure.

  20. Supramolecular macrocycles reversibly assembled by Te…O chalcogen bonding

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Peter C.; Szydlowski, Patrick; Sinclair, Jocelyn; Elder, Philip J. W.; Kübel, Joachim; Gendy, Chris; Lee, Lucia Myongwon; Jenkins, Hilary; Britten, James F.; Morim, Derek R.; Vargas-Baca, Ignacio

    2016-01-01

    Organic molecules with heavy main-group elements frequently form supramolecular links to electron-rich centres. One particular case of such interactions is halogen bonding. Most studies of this phenomenon have been concerned with either dimers or infinitely extended structures (polymers and lattices) but well-defined cyclic structures remain elusive. Here we present oligomeric aggregates of heterocycles that are linked by chalcogen-centered interactions and behave as genuine macrocyclic species. The molecules of 3-methyl-5-phenyl-1,2-tellurazole 2-oxide assemble a variety of supramolecular aggregates that includes cyclic tetramers and hexamers, as well as a helical polymer. In all these aggregates, the building blocks are connected by Te…O–N bridges. Nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopic experiments demonstrate that the two types of annular aggregates are persistent in solution. These self-assembled structures form coordination complexes with transition-metal ions, act as fullerene receptors and host small molecules in a crystal. PMID:27090355

  1. Dual stimuli-responsive self-assembled supramolecular nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Stoffelen, Carmen; Voskuhl, Jens; Jonkheijm, Pascal; Huskens, Jurriaan

    2014-03-24

    Supramolecular nanoparticles (SNPs) encompass multiple copies of different building blocks brought together by specific noncovalent interactions. The inherently multivalent nature of these systems allows control of their size as well as their assembly and disassembly, thus promising potential as biomedical delivery vehicles. Here, dual responsive SNPs have been based on the ternary host-guest complexation between cucurbit[8]uril (CB[8]), a methyl viologen (MV) polymer, and mono- and multivalent azobenzene (Azo) functionalized molecules. UV switching of the Azo groups led to fast disruption of the ternary complexes, but to a relatively slow disintegration of the SNPs. Alternating UV and Vis photoisomerization of the Azo groups led to fully reversible SNP disassembly and reassembly. SNPs were only formed with the Azo moieties in the trans and the MV units in the oxidized states, respectively, thus constituting a supramolecular AND logic gate. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Supramolecular host guest complexes based on cyclodextrin diphenylhexatriene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabara, L.; Aranyosiova, M.; Velic, D.

    2006-07-01

    Supramolecular host-guest complex cyclodextrin-diphenylhexatriene as a model of noncovalent binding is studied by means of time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry. Cyclodextrin and diphenylhexatriene are in forms of β-cyclodextrin (C 42H 70O 35) and 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene (C 18H 16), respectively. The whole intact supramolecular host-guest 1:1 complex between cyclodextrin and diphenylhexatriene is observed in cationized forms with Na at 1389.5 m/ z and with K at 1405.5 m/ z. The focus is on the higher ratio complexes, where the complexes of cyclodextrin-diphenylhexatriene with ratios of 1:2 and 2:1 are observed in cationized forms with Na at 1622 and at 2524 m/ z, and with K at 1638 and 2541 m/ z, respectively. These complexes are assumed to be basic building blocks of cyclodextrin-diphenylhexatriene nanowire structure.

  3. Enzyme-responsive protein/polysaccharide supramolecular nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hou, Xiao-Fang; Chen, Yong; Liu, Yu

    2015-03-28

    Biocompatible and enzyme-responsive supramolecular assemblies have attracted more and more interest in biomaterial fields, and find many feasible applications especially in the controlled drug release at specific sites where the target enzyme is located. In this work, novel supramolecular nanoparticles were successfully constructed from two biocompatible materials, i.e. a cyclic polysaccharide named sulfato-β-cyclodextrin (SCD) and a protein named protamine, through non-covalent association, and fully characterized by means of atomic force microscopy (AFM) and high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Significantly, the disassembly of the resulting nanoparticles can respond especially to trypsin over other enzymes. Owing to their trypsin-triggered disassembly behaviors, these nanoparticles can efficiently release the encapsulated model substrate in a controlled manner. That is, the model substrate can be encapsulated inside the nanoparticles with a high stability and released when treated with trypsin.

  4. A supramolecular approach to fabricate highly emissive smart materials.

    PubMed

    Liu, Kai; Yao, Yuxing; Kang, Yuetong; Liu, Yu; Han, Yuchun; Wang, Yilin; Li, Zhibo; Zhang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    The aromatic chromophores, for example, perylene diimides (PDIs) are well known for their desirable absorption and emission properties. However, their stacking nature hinders the exploitation of these properties and further applications. To fabricate emissive aggregates or solid-state materials, it has been common practice to decrease the degree of stacking of PDIs by incorporating substituents into the parent aromatic ring. However, such practice often involves difficultorganic synthesis with multiple steps. A supramolecular approach is established here to fabricate highly fluorescent and responsive soft materials, which has greatly decreases the number of required synthetic steps and also allows for a system with switchable photophysical properties. The highly fluorescent smart material exhibits great adaptivity and can be used as a supramolecular sensor for the rapid detection of spermine with high sensitivity and selectivity, which is crucial for the early diagnosis of malignant tumors.

  5. Supramolecular helices: chirality transfer from conjugated molecules to structures.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yang; Zhang, Yajie; Wei, Zhixiang

    2013-11-13

    Different scales of chirality endow a material with many excellent properties and potential applications. In this review, using π-conjugated molecules as functional building blocks, recent progress on supramolecular helices inspired by biological helicity is summarized. First, induced chirality on conjugated polymers and small molecules is introduced. Molecular chirality can be amplified to nanostructures, superstructures, and even macroscopic structures by a self-assembly process. Then, the principles for tuning the helicity of supramolecular chirality, as well as formation of helical heterojunctions, are summarized. Finally, the potential applications of chiral structures in chiral sensing and organic electronic devices are critically reviewed. Due to recent progress in chiral structures, an interdisciplinary area called "chiral electronics" is expected to gain wide popularity in the near future.

  6. Electrostatically Directed Self-Assembly of Ultrathin Supramolecular Polymer Microcapsules

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Richard M; Zhang, Jing; Zheng, Yu; Coulston, Roger J; Smith, Clive A; Salmon, Andrew R; Yu, Ziyi; Scherman, Oren A; Abell, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Supramolecular self-assembly offers routes to challenging architectures on the molecular and macroscopic scale. Coupled with microfluidics it has been used to make microcapsules—where a 2D sheet is shaped in 3D, encapsulating the volume within. In this paper, a versatile methodology to direct the accumulation of capsule-forming components to the droplet interface using electrostatic interactions is described. In this approach, charged copolymers are selectively partitioned to the microdroplet interface by a complementary charged surfactant for subsequent supramolecular cross-linking via cucurbit[8]uril. This dynamic assembly process is employed to selectively form both hollow, ultrathin microcapsules and solid microparticles from a single solution. The ability to dictate the distribution of a mixture of charged copolymers within the microdroplet, as demonstrated by the single-step fabrication of distinct core–shell microcapsules, gives access to a new generation of innovative self-assembled constructs. PMID:26213532

  7. 25th Anniversary Article: Supramolecular Materials for Regenerative Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Boekhoven, Job

    2014-01-01

    In supramolecular materials, molecular building blocks are designed to interact with one another via non-covalent interactions in order to create function. This offers the opportunity to create structures similar to those found in living systems that combine order and dynamics through the reversibility of intermolecular bonds. For regenerative medicine there is a great need to develop materials that signal cells effectively, deliver or bind bioactive agents in vivo at controlled rates, have highly tunable mechanical properties, but at the same time, can biodegrade safely and rapidly after fulfilling their function. These requirements make supramolecular materials a great platform to develop regenerative therapies. This review illustrates the emerging science of these materials and their use in a number of applications for regenerative medicine. PMID:24496667

  8. A multiple-responsive self-healing supramolecular polymer gel network based on multiple orthogonal interactions.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Jiayi; Zhang, Mingming; Zhou, Mi; Liu, Bin; Chen, Dong; Liu, Yuanyuan; Chen, Qianqian; Qiu, Huayu; Yin, Shouchun

    2014-08-01

    Supramolecular polymer networks have attracted considerable attention not only due to their topological importance but also because they can show some fantastic properties such as stimuli-responsiveness and self-healing. Although various supramolecular networks are constructed by supramolecular chemists based on different non-covalent interactions, supramolecular polymer networks based on multiple orthogonal interactions are still rare. Here, a supramolecular polymer network is presented on the basis of the host-guest interactions between dibenzo-24-crown-8 (DB24C8) and dibenzylammonium salts (DBAS), the metal-ligand coordination interactions between terpyridine and Zn(OTf)2 , and between 1,2,3-triazole and PdCl2 (PhCN)2 . The topology of the networks can be easily tuned from monomer to main-chain supramolecular polymer and then to the supramolecular networks. This process is well studied by various characterization methods such as (1) H NMR, UV-vis, DOSY, viscosity, and rheological measurements. More importantly, a supramolecular gel is obtained at high concentrations of the supramolecular networks, which demonstrates both stimuli-responsiveness and self-healing properties. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  9. Supramolecular Assembly of Complementary Cyanine Salt J-Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong'an; Mukhopadhyay, Sukrit; Jang, Sei-Hum; Brédas, Jean-Luc; Jen, Alex K-Y

    2015-09-23

    An understanding of structure-property relationships in cyanine dyes is critical for their design and application. Anionic and cationic cyanines can be organized into complementary cyanine salts, offering potential building blocks to modulate their intra/intermolecular interactions in the solid state. Here, we demonstrate how the structures of these complementary salts can be tuned to achieve highly ordered J-type supramolecular aggregate structures of heptamethine dyes in crystalline solids.

  10. Anion Recognition as a Supramolecular Switch of Cell Internalization

    PubMed Central

    Couceiro, José R.; Nitschke, Jonathan R.; Vázquez, M. Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L.

    2017-01-01

    The cell internalization of designed oligoarginine peptides equipped with six glutamic acid residues and an anionic pyranine at the N-terminus is triggered upon addition of a supramolecular host. This host binds specifically to the pyranine moiety, enabling the complex to traverse the cell membrane. Interestingly, none of the components, neither the host nor the guest, are able to cross the cell membrane on their own. PMID:27984855

  11. Molecular Recognition Directed Self-Assembly of Supramolecular Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-06-30

    supramolecular (generated via H-bonding, ionic and electrostatic interactions) and molecular " polymer backbones" will be made. The formation of columnar hexagonal...electrostatic interactions) and molecular " polymer backbones" will be made. The formation of columnar hexagonal (0h), nematic and re-entrant isotropic phases by...trihydroxybenzoate with either bromoalkanes or with alkoxybenzyloxybenzyl chloride. Variants of these taper shaped side groups were attached to polymer

  12. [Solubilization characteristics of licorice based on supramolecular "imprinted template" theory].

    PubMed

    Tao, Ye-Qin; Tang, Wen-Han; Liu, Jin-Ling; Deng, Kai-Wen; He, Fu-Yuan; Zhou, Yi-Qun

    2016-05-01

    To investigate the effect of the ingredient group of traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) with different "imprinted template" on the supramolecular solubilization ability of licorice, in order to lay a theoretical foundation for explaining the solubilization phenomenon of the components of TCM. Based on the independent supramolecular "imprinted template" rules, molecular connectivity index (MCI) and the correlation of n-octanol-water partition coefficient (logP) were used to indicate hydrophilic lipophilic capacity of TCM, and the extractum rate was used to indicate the solubilization effect of licoriceon single TCM herbs or compounds. The solubilization ability of licorice was evaluated based on MCI, logP and the extractum rate. According to the results, the correlation coefficient between MCI and logP for single herbs was 0.942, and that for single herb adding licorice was 0.916. The extractum rate of most herbs was increased after adding licorice. The correlation coefficient among the extractum rate as well as MCI and logP change values before and after adding licorice were respectively 0.837, 0.405. The correlation coefficient between MCI and logP for eight compounds was 0.937. Meanwhile, licorice had a solubilization effect on the remaining 7 compound except for Huangqi decoction. Therefore, licorice shows the solubilization effect through the independent supramolecular "imprinted template", so as to improve the hydrophilic lipophilic ability. There was a high positive correlation between the MCI and logP in ingredients for TCM, which could be used as important parameters to indicate the "imprinted template" feature for components of TCM. The study on the solubilizing effect of TCM with the supramolecular "imprinted template" theory was feasible, and will lay a foundation for the reform of single-herb dosage form. Copyright© by the Chinese Pharmaceutical Association.

  13. Supramolecular Complexation of Carbon Nanostructures by Crown Ethers.

    PubMed

    Moreira, Luis; Illescas, Beatriz M; Martín, Nazario

    2017-04-07

    Since their discovery, crown ethers as well as the most recent carbon nanostructures, namely fullerenes, carbon nanotubes, and graphene, have received a lot of attention from the chemical community. Merging these singular chemical structures by noncovalent forces has provided a large number of unprecedented supramolecular assemblies with new geometric and electronic properties whose more representative examples are presented in this Synopsis organized according to the different nature of the carbon nanostructures.

  14. Azobenzene-based supramolecular polymers for processing MWCNTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maggini, Laura; Marangoni, Tomas; Georges, Benoit; Malicka, Joanna M.; Yoosaf, K.; Minoia, Andrea; Lazzaroni, Roberto; Armaroli, Nicola; Bonifazi, Davide

    2012-12-01

    Photothermally responsive supramolecular polymers containing azobenzene units have been synthesised and employed as dispersants for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in organic solvents. Upon triggering the trans-cis isomerisation of the supramolecular polymer intermolecular interactions between MWCNTs and the polymer are established, reversibly affecting the suspensions of the MWCNTs, either favouring it (by heating, i.e. cis --> trans isomerisation) or inducing the CNTs' precipitation (upon irradiation, trans --> cis isomerisation). Taking advantage of the chromophoric properties of the molecular subunits, the solubilisation/precipitation processes have been monitored by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The structural properties of the resulting MWCNT-polymer hybrid materials have been thoroughly investigated via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) and modelled with molecular dynamics simulations.Photothermally responsive supramolecular polymers containing azobenzene units have been synthesised and employed as dispersants for multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) in organic solvents. Upon triggering the trans-cis isomerisation of the supramolecular polymer intermolecular interactions between MWCNTs and the polymer are established, reversibly affecting the suspensions of the MWCNTs, either favouring it (by heating, i.e. cis --> trans isomerisation) or inducing the CNTs' precipitation (upon irradiation, trans --> cis isomerisation). Taking advantage of the chromophoric properties of the molecular subunits, the solubilisation/precipitation processes have been monitored by UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy. The structural properties of the resulting MWCNT-polymer hybrid materials have been thoroughly investigated via thermogravimetric analysis (TGA), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and atomic force microscopy

  15. Characterization of photosynthetic supramolecular assemblies using small angle neutron scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Tiede, D.M.; Marone, P.; Wagner, A.M.; Thiyagarajan, P.

    1995-12-31

    We are using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) to resolve structural features of supramolecular assemblies of photosynthetic proteins in liquid and frozen solutions. SANS resolves the size, shape, and structural homogeneity of macromolecular assemblies in samples identical to those used for spectroscopic assays of photosynthetic function. Likely molecular structures of the supramolecular assemblies can be identified by comparing experimental scattering data with scattering profiles calculated for model supramolecular assemblies built from crystal structures of the individual proteins. SANS studies of the Rhodobacter sphaeroides reaction center, RC, presented here, show that the detergent solubilized RC exists in a variety of monomeric and aggregation states. The distribution between monomer and aggregate was found to depend strongly upon detergent, temperature and nature of additives, such as ethylene glycol used for low temperature spectroscopy and polyethylene glycol used for crystallization. Likely aggregate structures are being identified by fitting the experimental scattering profiles with those calculated for model aggregates built-up using the RC crystal structure. This work establishes the foundation for using SANS to identify intermediates in the RC crystallization pathways, and for determining likely structures of complexes formed between the RC and its physiological reaction partners, cytochrome c, and the LHI antenna complex.

  16. Nanostructures on graphene using supramolecule and supramolecular nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Peter; Kao, Joseph; Chen, Jian-Hao; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alex; Xu, Ting

    2014-04-01

    Nanopatterning and functionalizing of graphene is often required to tune or enhance its unique physical properties. However, complex processes are needed to overcome the chemical incompatibilities between the patterning template, the functional small molecules or nanoparticles, and the underlying graphene. We present a block copolymer (BCP)-based supramolecular thin film as a versatile platform for the generation of periodic patterns of small molecules and ordered assemblies of nanoparticles on top of a graphene substrate without chemical modification of any components. The present approach opens opportunities to readily pattern and functionalize graphene, and to investigate the structure-property correlations of graphene/nanoparticle and graphene/small molecule composite materials.Nanopatterning and functionalizing of graphene is often required to tune or enhance its unique physical properties. However, complex processes are needed to overcome the chemical incompatibilities between the patterning template, the functional small molecules or nanoparticles, and the underlying graphene. We present a block copolymer (BCP)-based supramolecular thin film as a versatile platform for the generation of periodic patterns of small molecules and ordered assemblies of nanoparticles on top of a graphene substrate without chemical modification of any components. The present approach opens opportunities to readily pattern and functionalize graphene, and to investigate the structure-property correlations of graphene/nanoparticle and graphene/small molecule composite materials. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details and GISAXS characterization of supramolecular nanocomposite thin films on graphene substrate. See DOI: 10.1039/c4nr00420e

  17. Supramolecular hydrogels: synthesis, properties and their biomedical applications.

    PubMed

    Dong, Ruijiao; Pang, Yan; Su, Yue; Zhu, Xinyuan

    2015-07-01

    As a novel class of three-dimensional (3D) hydrophilic cross-linked polymers, supramolecular hydrogels not only display unique physicochemical properties (e.g., water-retention ability, drug loading capacity, biodegradability and biocompatibility, biostability) as well as specific functionalities (e.g., optoelectronic properties, bioactivity, self-healing ability, shape memory ability), but also have the capability to undergo reversible gel-sol transition in response to various environmental stimuli inherent to the noncovalent cross-linkages, thereby showing great potential as promising biomaterial scaffolds for diagnosis and therapy. In this Review, we summarized the recent progress in the design and synthesis of supramolecular hydrogels through specific, directional noncovalent interactions, with particular emphasis on the structure-property relationship, as well as their wide-ranging applications in disease diagnosis and therapy including bioimaging, biodetection, therapeutic delivery, and tissue engineering. We believe that these current achievements in supramolecular hydrogels will greatly stimulate new ideas and inspire persistent efforts in this hot topic area in future.

  18. Activation-deactivation of self-healing in supramolecular rubbers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corte, Laurent; Maes, Florine; Montarnal, Damien; Cantournet, Sabine; Tournilhac, Francois; Leibler, Ludwik; Mines-Paristech Cnrs (Umr7633) Team; Espci-Paristech Cnrs (Umr7167) Team

    2011-03-01

    Self-healing materials have the ability to restore autonomously their structural integrity after damage. Such a remarkable property was obtained recently in supramolecular rubbers formed by a network of small molecules associated via hydrogen bonds. Here we explore this self-healing through an original tack experiment where two parts of supramolecular rubber are brought into contact and then separated. These experiments reveal that a strong self-healing ability is activated by damage even though the surfaces of a molded part are weakly self-adhesive. In our testing conditions, a five minute contact between crack faces is sufficient to recover most mechanical properties of the bulk while days are required to obtain such adhesion levels with melt-pressed surfaces. We show that the deactivation of this self-healing ability seems unexpectedly slow as compared to the predicted dynamics of supramolecular networks. Fracture faces stored apart at room temperature still self-heal after days but are fully deactivated within hours by annealing. Combining these results with microstructural observations gives us a deeper insight into the mechanisms involved in this self-healing process.

  19. A nanomesh scaffold for supramolecular nanowire optoelectronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lei; Zhong, Xiaolan; Pavlica, Egon; Li, Songlin; Klekachev, Alexander; Bratina, Gvido; Ebbesen, Thomas W.; Orgiu, Emanuele; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-10-01

    Supramolecular organic nanowires are ideal nanostructures for optoelectronics because they exhibit both efficient exciton generation as a result of their high absorption coefficient and remarkable light sensitivity due to the low number of grain boundaries and high surface-to-volume ratio. To harvest photocurrent directly from supramolecular nanowires it is necessary to wire them up with nanoelectrodes that possess different work functions. However, devising strategies that can connect multiple nanowires at the same time has been challenging. Here, we report a general approach to simultaneously integrate hundreds of supramolecular nanowires of N,N‧-dioctyl-3,4,9,10-perylenedicarboximide (PTCDI-C8) in a hexagonal nanomesh scaffold with asymmetric nanoelectrodes. Optimized PTCDI-C8 nanowire photovoltaic devices exhibit a signal-to-noise ratio approaching 107, a photoresponse time as fast as 10 ns and an external quantum efficiency >55%. This nanomesh scaffold can also be used to investigate the fundamental mechanism of photoelectrical conversion in other low-dimensional semiconducting nanostructures.

  20. A new configurational bias scheme for sampling supramolecular structures

    SciTech Connect

    De Gernier, Robin; Mognetti, Bortolo M.; Curk, Tine; Dubacheva, Galina V.; Richter, Ralf P.

    2014-12-28

    We present a new simulation scheme which allows an efficient sampling of reconfigurable supramolecular structures made of polymeric constructs functionalized by reactive binding sites. The algorithm is based on the configurational bias scheme of Siepmann and Frenkel and is powered by the possibility of changing the topology of the supramolecular network by a non-local Monte Carlo algorithm. Such a plan is accomplished by a multi-scale modelling that merges coarse-grained simulations, describing the typical polymer conformations, with experimental results accounting for free energy terms involved in the reactions of the active sites. We test the new algorithm for a system of DNA coated colloids for which we compute the hybridisation free energy cost associated to the binding of tethered single stranded DNAs terminated by short sequences of complementary nucleotides. In order to demonstrate the versatility of our method, we also consider polymers functionalized by receptors that bind a surface decorated by ligands. In particular, we compute the density of states of adsorbed polymers as a function of the number of ligand–receptor complexes formed. Such a quantity can be used to study the conformational properties of adsorbed polymers useful when engineering adsorption with tailored properties. We successfully compare the results with the predictions of a mean field theory. We believe that the proposed method will be a useful tool to investigate supramolecular structures resulting from direct interactions between functionalized polymers for which efficient numerical methodologies of investigation are still lacking.