Science.gov

Sample records for maturity modelling integrated

  1. Measurement and Analysis in Capability Maturity Model Integration Models and Software Process Improvement

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-07-01

    The explicit incorporation of measurement and analysis as a distinct process area in the Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI(registered...are further elaborated and evolved throughout capability maturity model integration models.

  2. Climbing the ladder: capability maturity model integration level 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Day, Bryce; Lutteroth, Christof

    2011-02-01

    This article details the attempt to form a complete workflow model for an information and communication technologies (ICT) company in order to achieve a capability maturity model integration (CMMI) maturity rating of 3. During this project, business processes across the company's core and auxiliary sectors were documented and extended using modern enterprise modelling tools and a The Open Group Architectural Framework (TOGAF) methodology. Different challenges were encountered with regard to process customisation and tool support for enterprise modelling. In particular, there were problems with the reuse of process models, the integration of different project management methodologies and the integration of the Rational Unified Process development process framework that had to be solved. We report on these challenges and the perceived effects of the project on the company. Finally, we point out research directions that could help to improve the situation in the future.

  3. An integrative model of the maturation of cognitive control.

    PubMed

    Luna, Beatriz; Marek, Scott; Larsen, Bart; Tervo-Clemmens, Brenden; Chahal, Rajpreet

    2015-07-08

    Brains systems undergo unique and specific dynamic changes at the cellular, circuit, and systems level that underlie the transition to adult-level cognitive control. We integrate literature from these different levels of analyses to propose a novel model of the brain basis of the development of cognitive control. The ability to consistently exert cognitive control improves into adulthood as the flexible integration of component processes, including inhibitory control, performance monitoring, and working memory, increases. Unique maturational changes in brain structure, supported by interactions between dopaminergic and GABAergic systems, contribute to enhanced network synchronization and an improved signal-to-noise ratio. In turn, these factors facilitate the specialization and strengthening of connectivity in networks supporting the transition to adult levels of cognitive control. This model provides a novel understanding of the adolescent period as an adaptive period of heightened experience-seeking necessary for the specialization of brain systems supporting cognitive control.

  4. The Rational Unified Process and the Capability Maturity Model - Integrated Systems/Software Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-01-01

    2001 by Carnegie Mellon University RU{/CMMI Tutorial - ESEPG1 The Rational Unified Process® and the Capability Maturity Model ® – Integrated Systems...Software Engineering SM CMMI and CMM Integration are service marks of Carnegie Mellon University. ® Capability Maturity Model , Capability Maturity...TITLE AND SUBTITLE The Rational Unified Process and the Capability Maturity Model - Integrated Systems/Software Engineering 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b

  5. Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI (trademark)), Version 1.1, Staged Representation (CMMI-SW, V1.1, Staged)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-01

    Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI (trademark)) models have evolved the Capability Maturity Model (trademark) (CMM (trademark)) concept...established by the Capability Maturity Model for Software (SW-CMM), to a new level that enables the continued growth and expansion of the CMM concept to

  6. Capability Maturity Model (trade name) Integration (CMMIsm), Version 1.1. CMMIsm for Systems Engineering and Software Engineering (CMMI-SE/SW, V1.1) Staged Representation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI(Service Mark)) models have evolved the Capability Maturity Model (CMM(registered)) concept, established...by the Capability Maturity Model for Software (SW-CMM), to a new level that enables the continued growth and expansion of the CMM concept to multiple

  7. Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMIsm), Version 1.1. CMMIsm for Systems Engineering and Software Engineering (CMMI-SE/SW, V1.1). Continuous Representation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI(Service Mark)) models have evolved the Capability Maturity Model (CMM(registered)) concept, established...by the Capability Maturity Model for Software (SW-CMM), to a new level that enables the continued growth and expansion of the CMM concept to multiple

  8. Integrating the Capability Maturity Model for Software and the Quality Air Force Criteria.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    teachers. Of course, this whole experience at AFIT would not have been possible without the loving support from my wife Mia, and children, Wesley, Casey ...PAUL93a] Paulk , Mark C, and others. Capability Maturity Model for Software, Version 1.1. CMU/SEI-93-TR-24. Pittsburgh: Software Engineering...Institute, February 1993. [PAUL93b] Paulk , Mark C, and others. Key Practices of the Capability Maturity Model. Version 1.1. CMU/SEI-93-TR-25. Pittsburgh

  9. Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMISM), Version 1.1 CMMISM for Systems Engineering, Software Engineering, Integrated Product and Process Development, and Supplier Sourcing (CMMI-SE/SW/IPPD/SS, V1.1). Staged Representation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-03-01

    Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI(Service Mark)) models have evolved the Capability Maturity Model (CMM(registered)) concept, established...by the Capability Maturity Model for Software (SW-CMM), to a new level that enables the continued growth and expansion of the CMM concept to multiple

  10. Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMIsm) Version 1.1. CMMIsm for Systems Engineering, Software Engineering, and Integrated Product and Process Development (CMMI-SE/SW/IPPD, V1.1). Staged Representation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-12-01

    Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI(Service Mark)) models have evolved the Capability Maturity Model (CMM(registered)) concept, established...by the Capability Maturity Model for Software (SW-CMM), to a new level that enables the continued growth and expansion of the CMM concept to multiple

  11. Organization, Maturation, and Plasticity of Multisensory Integration: Insights from Computational Modeling Studies

    PubMed Central

    Cuppini, Cristiano; Magosso, Elisa; Ursino, Mauro

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we present two neural network models – devoted to two specific and widely investigated aspects of multisensory integration – in order to evidence the potentialities of computational models to gain insight into the neural mechanisms underlying organization, development, and plasticity of multisensory integration in the brain. The first model considers visual–auditory interaction in a midbrain structure named superior colliculus (SC). The model is able to reproduce and explain the main physiological features of multisensory integration in SC neurons and to describe how SC integrative capability – not present at birth – develops gradually during postnatal life depending on sensory experience with cross-modal stimuli. The second model tackles the problem of how tactile stimuli on a body part and visual (or auditory) stimuli close to the same body part are integrated in multimodal parietal neurons to form the perception of peripersonal (i.e., near) space. The model investigates how the extension of peripersonal space – where multimodal integration occurs – may be modified by experience such as use of a tool to interact with the far space. The utility of the modeling approach relies on several aspects: (i) The two models, although devoted to different problems and simulating different brain regions, share some common mechanisms (lateral inhibition and excitation, non-linear neuron characteristics, recurrent connections, competition, Hebbian rules of potentiation and depression) that may govern more generally the fusion of senses in the brain, and the learning and plasticity of multisensory integration. (ii) The models may help interpretation of behavioral and psychophysical responses in terms of neural activity and synaptic connections. (iii) The models can make testable predictions that can help guiding future experiments in order to validate, reject, or modify the main assumptions. PMID:21687448

  12. Capability Maturity Model for Software,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    This paper provides a technical overview of the Capability Maturity Model for Software and reflects the most current version. Specifically, this...paper, in combination with the Key Practices of the Capability Maturity Model , is intended to help software organizations use the CMM as a guide to improve the maturity of their software process.

  13. Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM).

    SciTech Connect

    Swiler, Laura Painton; Knupp, Patrick Michael; Urbina, Angel

    2010-10-01

    Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is a communication tool that must include a dicussion of the supporting evidence. PCMM is a tool for managing risk in the use of modeling and simulation. PCMM is in the service of organizing evidence to help tell the modeling and simulation (M&S) story. PCMM table describes what activities within each element are undertaken at each of the levels of maturity. Target levels of maturity can be established based on the intended application. The assessment is to inform what level has been achieved compared to the desired level, to help prioritize the VU activities & to allocate resources.

  14. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Levinson, Alex; Mater, J.; Drummond, R.

    2010-04-28

    The integration of automation associated with electricity resources (including transmission and distribution automation and demand-side resources operated by end-users) is key to supporting greater efficiencies and incorporating variable renewable resources and electric vehicles into the power system. The integration problems faced by this community are analogous to those faced in the health industry, emergency services, and other complex communities with many stakeholders. To highlight this issue and encourage communication and the development of a smart grid interoperability community, the GridWise Architecture Council (GWAC) created an Interoperability Context-Setting Framework. This "conceptual model" has been helpful to explain the importance of organizational alignment in addition to technical and informational interface specifications for "smart grid" devices and systems. As a next step to building a community sensitive to interoperability, the GWAC is investigating an interoperability maturity model (IMM) based on work done by others to address similar circumstances. The objective is to create a tool or set of tools that encourages a culture of interoperability in this emerging community. The tools would measure status and progress, analyze gaps, and prioritize efforts to improve the situation.

  15. Proteolysis regulates cardiomyocyte maturation and tissue integration

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Ryuichi; Gunawan, Felix; Beisaw, Arica; Jimenez-Amilburu, Vanesa; Maischein, Hans-Martin; Kostin, Sawa; Kawakami, Koichi; Stainier, Didier Y. R.

    2017-01-01

    Tissue integrity is critical for organ formation and function. During heart development, cardiomyocytes differentiate and integrate to form a coherent tissue that contracts synchronously. However, the molecular mechanisms regulating cardiac tissue integrity are poorly understood. Here we show that proteolysis, via the E3 ubiquitin ligase ASB2, regulates cardiomyocyte maturation and tissue integrity. Cardiomyocytes in asb2b zebrafish mutants fail to terminally differentiate, resulting in reduced cardiac contractility and output. Mosaic analyses reveal a cell-autonomous requirement for Asb2b in cardiomyocytes for their integration as asb2b mutant cardiomyocytes are unable to meld into wild-type myocardial tissue. In vitro and in vivo data indicate that ASB2 negatively regulates TCF3, a bHLH transcription factor. TCF3 must be degraded for cardiomyocyte maturation, as TCF3 gain-of-function causes a number of phenotypes associated with cardiomyocyte dedifferentiation. Overall, our results show that proteolysis has an important role in cardiomyocyte maturation and the formation of a coherent myocardial tissue. PMID:28211472

  16. Maturity Model for Advancing Smart Grid Interoperability

    SciTech Connect

    Knight, Mark; Widergren, Steven E.; Mater, J.; Montgomery, Austin

    2013-10-28

    Abstract—Interoperability is about the properties of devices and systems to connect and work properly. Advancing interoperability eases integration and maintenance of the resulting interconnection. This leads to faster integration, lower labor and component costs, predictability of projects and the resulting performance, and evolutionary paths for upgrade. When specifications are shared and standardized, competition and novel solutions can bring new value streams to the community of stakeholders involved. Advancing interoperability involves reaching agreement for how things join at their interfaces. The quality of the agreements and the alignment of parties involved in the agreement present challenges that are best met with process improvement techniques. The GridWise® Architecture Council (GWAC) sponsored by the United States Department of Energy is supporting an effort to use concepts from capability maturity models used in the software industry to advance interoperability of smart grid technology. An interoperability maturity model has been drafted and experience is being gained through trials on various types of projects and community efforts. This paper describes the value and objectives of maturity models, the nature of the interoperability maturity model and how it compares with other maturity models, and experiences gained with its use.

  17. The People Capability Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wademan, Mark R.; Spuches, Charles M.; Doughty, Philip L.

    2007-01-01

    The People Capability Maturity Model[R] (People CMM[R]) advocates a staged approach to organizational change. Developed by the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute, this model seeks to bring discipline to the people side of management by promoting a structured, repeatable, and predictable approach for improving an…

  18. Technology Maturation of Integrated System Health Management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feather, Martin S.; Uckun, Serdar; Hicks, Kenneth A.

    2008-01-01

    Despite two decades of significant investments in R&D of Integrated System Health Management (ISHM), mission-critical applications of it in aerospace are few and far between. ISHM is subject to the general difficulty of transitioning technologies out of R&D labs and into practical applications. New and unproven methods such as ISHM introduce multiple mission risks (technology, schedule, cost), and may require a transition to unconventional and as-yet-unproven operations concepts in order to be effective. Laboratory and flight demonstrations are necessary but insufficient to adequately reduce those risks. What is needed is a solid business case before a new technology can be considered for fleetwide deployment. To address these problems, we recently applied a technology maturation assessment process developed at NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory to study the challenges of ISHM technology maturation. This application resulted in identification of the technologies (and technology maturation activities) that would result in the greatest risk reduction per investment dollar. Our approach and its results are described herein.

  19. Maturity model for enterprise interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guédria, Wided; Naudet, Yannick; Chen, David

    2015-01-01

    Historically, progress occurs when entities communicate, share information and together create something that no one individually could do alone. Moving beyond people to machines and systems, interoperability is becoming a key factor of success in all domains. In particular, interoperability has become a challenge for enterprises, to exploit market opportunities, to meet their own objectives of cooperation or simply to survive in a growing competitive world where the networked enterprise is becoming a standard. Within this context, many research works have been conducted over the past few years and enterprise interoperability has become an important area of research, ensuring the competitiveness and growth of European enterprises. Among others, enterprises have to control their interoperability strategy and enhance their ability to interoperate. This is the purpose of the interoperability assessment. Assessing interoperability maturity allows a company to know its strengths and weaknesses in terms of interoperability with its current and potential partners, and to prioritise actions for improvement. The objective of this paper is to define a maturity model for enterprise interoperability that takes into account existing maturity models while extending the coverage of the interoperability domain. The assessment methodology is also presented. Both are demonstrated with a real case study.

  20. Predictive Capability Maturity Model for computational modeling and simulation.

    SciTech Connect

    Oberkampf, William Louis; Trucano, Timothy Guy; Pilch, Martin M.

    2007-10-01

    The Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is a new model that can be used to assess the level of maturity of computational modeling and simulation (M&S) efforts. The development of the model is based on both the authors experience and their analysis of similar investigations in the past. The perspective taken in this report is one of judging the usefulness of a predictive capability that relies on the numerical solution to partial differential equations to better inform and improve decision making. The review of past investigations, such as the Software Engineering Institute's Capability Maturity Model Integration and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration and Department of Defense Technology Readiness Levels, indicates that a more restricted, more interpretable method is needed to assess the maturity of an M&S effort. The PCMM addresses six contributing elements to M&S: (1) representation and geometric fidelity, (2) physics and material model fidelity, (3) code verification, (4) solution verification, (5) model validation, and (6) uncertainty quantification and sensitivity analysis. For each of these elements, attributes are identified that characterize four increasing levels of maturity. Importantly, the PCMM is a structured method for assessing the maturity of an M&S effort that is directed toward an engineering application of interest. The PCMM does not assess whether the M&S effort, the accuracy of the predictions, or the performance of the engineering system satisfies or does not satisfy specified application requirements.

  1. A Maturity Model for Enterprise Interoperability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guédria, Wided; Chen, David; Naudet, Yannick

    Existing interoperability maturity models are fragmented and only cover some interoperability aspects. This paper tentatively proposes a maturity model for enterprise interoperability which is elaborated on the basis of existing ones. It is also consistent to the Enterprise Interoperability Framework currently under the standardization process. After a brief introduction, the paper reviews existing maturity models for interoperability and recalls the basic concepts of the Enterprise Interoperability Framework. Then the proposed maturity model for enterprise interoperability is discussed in details. Metrics for determining maturity levels are presented as well. Finally the last part of the paper gives the conclusions and perspectives for future work.

  2. Overview of the People Capability Maturity Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-09-01

    This document provides an overview and an introduction to the People Capability Maturity Model (P-CMM) (Curtis95). Specifically, this document...capability. The document is intended to provide an overview of the concepts of the P-CMM, while the People Capability Maturity Model (Curtis95) describes the key practices for each level of the P-CMM.

  3. Ovarian follicle maturation and ovulation: An integrated perspective

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Patino, R.; Thomas, P.; Yoshizaki, G.

    2003-01-01

    Numerous studies with teleosts have addressed the regulation and mechanisms of oocyte maturation, but largely at the exclusion of ovulation. A smaller but still considerable number of studies have focused on ovulation, and ignored maturation. Consequently, little is known about the mechanistic linkages between these two events. New information is presented here indicating that luteinizing hormone regulates the acquisition not only of oocyte maturational competence, but also ovulatory competence. The thesis is presented that maturation and ovulation are closely integrated and overlapping events that are best viewed conceptually and experimentally as parts of a functional whole. ?? 2004 Kluwer Academic Publishers.

  4. Game Maturity Model for Health Care.

    PubMed

    de Boer, Jan C; Adriani, Paul; van Houwelingen, Jan Willem; Geerts, A

    2016-04-01

    This article introduces the Game Maturity Model for the healthcare industry as an extension to the general Game Maturity Model and describes the usage by two case studies of applied health games. The Game Maturity Model for healthcare provides a practical and value-adding method to assess existing games and to determine strategic considerations for application of applied health games. Our forecast is that within 5 years the use and development of applied games will have a role in our daily lives and the way we organize health care that will be similar to the role social media has today.

  5. A PACS maturity model: a systematic meta-analytic review on maturation and evolvability of PACS in the hospital enterprise.

    PubMed

    van de Wetering, Rogier; Batenburg, Ronald

    2009-02-01

    With PACS and medical imaging technology maturing, the importance of organizational maturity and effective deployment of PACS in the hospital enterprise are becoming significant. The objective of this paper is twofold. Firstly, PACS literature on maturity and evolvability in the hospital enterprise is analyzed, resulting in an overview of the relevant developments concerning maturity of PACS. Secondly, this paper looks at the development of a maturity model for PACS technology. Using structured search queries, we identified 34 papers reporting relevant aspects of maturity and evolvability of PACS. From the results of a meta-analytic review on PACS maturity and evolvability, we propose a model--the PACS maturity model (PMM)--that describes five levels of PACS maturity and the corresponding process focus. We argue that this model can help hospitals to gain insights into their (strategic) objectives for growth and maturity with regard to PACS, the electronic patient record (EPR) and other health information systems. Moreover, the proposed model can be applied as a valuable tool for organizational assessments, monitoring and benchmarking purposes. Hence, the PMM contributes to an integral alignment model for PACS technology.

  6. Smart Grid Interoperability Maturity Model Beta Version

    SciTech Connect

    Widergren, Steven E.; Drummond, R.; Giroti, Tony; Houseman, Doug; Knight, Mark; Levinson, Alex; longcore, Wayne; Lowe, Randy; Mater, J.; Oliver, Terry V.; Slack, Phil; Tolk, Andreas; Montgomery, Austin

    2011-12-02

    The GridWise Architecture Council was formed by the U.S. Department of Energy to promote and enable interoperability among the many entities that interact with the electric power system. This balanced team of industry representatives proposes principles for the development of interoperability concepts and standards. The Council provides industry guidance and tools that make it an available resource for smart grid implementations. In the spirit of advancing interoperability of an ecosystem of smart grid devices and systems, this document presents a model for evaluating the maturity of the artifacts and processes that specify the agreement of parties to collaborate across an information exchange interface. You are expected to have a solid understanding of large, complex system integration concepts and experience in dealing with software component interoperation. Those without this technical background should read the Executive Summary for a description of the purpose and contents of the document. Other documents, such as checklists, guides, and whitepapers, exist for targeted purposes and audiences. Please see the www.gridwiseac.org website for more products of the Council that may be of interest to you.

  7. Capability maturity models for offshore organisational management.

    PubMed

    Strutt, J E; Sharp, J V; Terry, E; Miles, R

    2006-12-01

    The goal setting regime imposed by the UK safety regulator has important implications for an organisation's ability to manage health and safety related risks. Existing approaches to safety assurance based on risk analysis and formal safety assessments are increasingly considered unlikely to create the step change improvement in safety to which the offshore industry aspires and alternative approaches are being considered. One approach, which addresses the important issue of organisational behaviour and which can be applied at a very early stage of design, is the capability maturity model (CMM). The paper describes the development of a design safety capability maturity model, outlining the key processes considered necessary to safety achievement, definition of maturity levels and scoring methods. The paper discusses how CMM is related to regulatory mechanisms and risk based decision making together with the potential of CMM to environmental risk management.

  8. Cost Modeling Techniques for Design Maturity. [of reentry vehicles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ruhland, E. W.

    1974-01-01

    Cost modeling techniques and factors which either add to or subtract from these estimates are examined. The most important factors for increasing costs are interfacing subsystems, subsystem design and software maturity. Cost decrease depends on hardware, software, and support equipment availability. A cost modeling analysis for reentry shield and aerodynamic decelerator subsystems of a reentry vehicle is presented. Integration problems for the subsystems are also discussed.

  9. Integrating fluorescence and interactance measurements to improve apple maturity assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noh, Hyun Kwon; Lu, Renfu

    2006-10-01

    Fluorescence and reflectance (or interactance) are promising techniques for measuring fruit quality and condition. Our previous research showed that a hyperspectral imaging technique integrating fluorescence and reflectance could improve predictions of selected quality parameters compared to single sensing techniques. The objective of this research was to use a low cost spectrometer for rapid acquisition of fluorescence and interactance spectra from apples and develop an algorithm integrating the two types of data for predicting skin and flesh color, fruit firmness, starch index, soluble solids content, and titratable acid. Experiments were performed to measure UV light induced transient fluorescence and interactance spectra from 'Golden Delicious' apples that were harvested over a period of four weeks during the 2005 harvest season. Standard destructive tests were performed to measure maturity parameters from the apples. Principal component (PC) analysis was applied to the interactance and fluorescence data. A back-propagation feedforward neural network with the inputs of PC data was used to predict individual maturity parameters. Interactance mode was consistently better than fluorescence mode in predicting the maturity parameters. Integrating interactance and fluorescence improved predictions of all parameters except flesh chroma; values of the correlation coefficient for firmness, soluble solids content, starch index, and skin and flesh hue were 0.77, 0.77, 0.89, 0.99, and 0.96 respectively, with the corresponding standard errors of 6.93 N, 0.90%, 0.97 g/L, 0.013 rad, and 0.013 rad. These results represented 4.1% to 23.5% improvements in terms of standard error, in comparison with the better results from the two single sensing methods. Integrating interactance and fluorescence can better assess apple maturity and quality.

  10. The AGU Data Management Maturity Model Initiative

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    In September 2014, the AGU Board of Directors approved two initiatives to help the Earth and space sciences community address the growing challenges accompanying the increasing size and complexity of data. These initiatives are: 1) Data Science Credentialing: development of a continuing education and professional certification program to help scientists in their careers and to meet growing responsibilities and requirements around data science; and 2) Data Management Maturity (DMM) Model: development and implementation of a data management maturity model to assess process maturity against best practices, and to identify opportunities in organizational data management processes. Each of these has been organized within AGU as an Editorial Board and both Boards have held kick off meetings. The DMM model Editorial Board will recommend strategies for adapting and deploying a DMM model to the Earth and space sciences create guidance documents to assist in its implementation, and provide input on a pilot appraisal process. This presentation will provide an overview of progress to date in the DMM model Editorial Board and plans for work to be done over the upcoming year.

  11. Maturation modeling in Otway Basin, Australia

    SciTech Connect

    Middleton, M.F.; Falvey, D.A.

    1983-02-01

    The Otway basin is a Jurassic to Pliocene sedimentary basin formed on the southern Australian continental margin. Its formation is associated with rifting and breakup of the Australian and Antarctic plates. Lithospheric cooling and contraction have probably produced post-breakup subsidence. Either lithospheric stretching or deep crustal metamorphism may have produced pre-breakup subsidence. These mechanisms have identifiable thermal histories. Organic diagenesis (specifically the reflectance of vitrinite in oil) is empirically determined by the thermal and depositional history of an organic sediment. Thus, the stages of hydrocarbon maturity of Otway basin sediments can be modeled. Depositional history is determined from ''geohistory analysis'' and thermal history depends on the subsidence mechanism applied to the basin. A paleo-heat-flow history derived from the deep crustal metamorphism model of subsidence produces a maturation profile with depth that is consistent with observed vitrinite reflectance data, although organic diagenesis modeling is relatively insensitive to precise details of thermal history. Depositional and maturation history modeling for the present day, 20 Ma ago, 40 Ma ago, and 60 Ma ago is applied to a seismic profile across the southern Australian continental shelf in the Otway basin as a demonstration of the projection backward in time of sedimentation and organic diagenesis.

  12. Maturity Models 101: A Primer for Applying Maturity Models to Smart Grid Security, Resilience, and Interoperability

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-11-01

    Quality Is Free: The Art of Making Quality Certain. Mentor, 1980. [ Deming 1952] Deming , W. Edwards. Elementary Principles of the Statistical...evaluate software contractors. Humphrey based this framework on the earlier Quality Management Maturity Grid developed by Philip B. Crosby in his book... Quality Is Free: The Art of Making Quality Certain [Crosby 1980]. In the late 1980s and early 1990s, the SEI developed the Capability Maturity Model

  13. Policy Assessment for the Software Process Maturity Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-08-01

    Institute (SEI) software process maturity model . The results of this analysis will be used by DARPA and SWAP to formulate a DoD-wide policy associated with...mandating SEI’s process maturity model . This document presents the analysis, focusing on a) implementation issues associated with mandating software...effectiveness of process maturity, and c) a comparison of the maturity model and methods with similar techniques. Based on the analysis, we conclude

  14. Using Data Maturity Metrics to Help Insure Scientific Integrity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, J. J.

    2016-12-01

    In the past few years, the full and open sharing of data and other artifacts of research in the geophysics have become mandatory. These include commitments from scientific societies, calls from international organizations, and in the United States, Executive Orders and legislation for open data. Unfortunately, these calls for open data have had, at best, mixed results. Audits by publishers indicate most who do not comply with are unaware of the policies or simply ignore them. A recent high profile publication on global warming resulted in repeated demands of `all data' from Congress and a prolonged back and forth on what `all data' meant. The emerging field of Data Management Maturity is making substantial progress on quantifying the elements needed to fully document, and making open and accessible, geophysical data sets. The proposed metrics have been culled from best practices for observational data sets and these metrics have been applied to a number of geophysical disciplines. A case study applying this metric to climate change indicators will be presented. It is recommended that U.S. Agencies and scientific societies formally adopt data maturity metrics to help ensure a consistent approach to ensure open data and scientific integrity.

  15. Sex Differences in a Causal Model of Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Suzanne

    1989-01-01

    Studied sex differences among high school students (N=318) in career development process to determine whether sex differences exist in way six independent variables interact in career maturity causal model of career maturity and to compare each variable's effect on career maturity. Results suggest significant sex differences consistent with…

  16. Sex Differences in a Causal Model of Career Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    King, Suzanne

    1989-01-01

    Studied sex differences among high school students (N=318) in career development process to determine whether sex differences exist in way six independent variables interact in career maturity causal model of career maturity and to compare each variable's effect on career maturity. Results suggest significant sex differences consistent with…

  17. The Dell Experience: From Maturity Model Assessment to Strategic Planning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenquist, Deborah

    1997-01-01

    Suggests that strategic planning can help an organization mature and become more effective. Aims for strategic planning with a benchmarking objective, beginning with the information process-maturity model, assessing strengths and weaknesses, and identifying opportunities for process maturation. Finds all components of the reporting structure now…

  18. Development and Implementation of a Program Management Maturity Model

    SciTech Connect

    Hartwig, Laura; Smith, Matt

    2008-12-15

    In 2006, Honeywell Federal Manufacturing & Technologies (FM&T) announced an updatedvision statement for the organization. The vision is “To be the most admired team within the NNSA [National Nuclear Security Administration] for our relentless drive to convert ideas into the highest quality products and services for National Security by applying the right technology, outstanding program management and best commercial practices.” The challenge to provide outstanding program management was taken up by the Program Management division and the Program Integration Office (PIO) of the company. This article describes how Honeywell developed and deployed a program management maturity model to drive toward excellence.

  19. Correlation between Quality Management Metric and People Capability Maturity Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-09-01

    was evaluated with respect to its conformance with an established people capability maturity model (P-CMM). The survey elements of the QMM were...mapped to the processes described in the maturity model . The analysis indicates a high level of conformance of the QMM with the P-CMM. The results of... maturity model , the results can then be used to identify processes that need improvement to increase the likelihood of program success. Future work includes

  20. Healthcare quality maturity assessment model based on quality drivers.

    PubMed

    Ramadan, Nadia; Arafeh, Mazen

    2016-04-18

    Purpose - Healthcare providers differ in their readiness and maturity levels regarding quality and quality management systems applications. The purpose of this paper is to serve as a useful quantitative quality maturity-level assessment tool for healthcare organizations. Design/methodology/approach - The model proposes five quality maturity levels (chaotic, primitive, structured, mature and proficient) based on six quality drivers: top management, people, operations, culture, quality focus and accreditation. Findings - Healthcare managers can apply the model to identify the status quo, quality shortcomings and evaluating ongoing progress. Practical implications - The model has been incorporated in an interactive Excel worksheet that visually displays the quality maturity-level risk meter. The tool has been applied successfully to local hospitals. Originality/value - The proposed six quality driver scales appear to measure healthcare provider maturity levels on a single quality meter.

  1. Customer-Provider Strategic Alignment: A Maturity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luftman, Jerry; Brown, Carol V.; Balaji, S.

    This chapter presents a new model for assessing the maturity of a ­customer-provider relationship from a collaborative service delivery perspective: the Customer-Provider Strategic Alignment Maturity (CPSAM) Model. This model builds on recent research for effectively managing the customer-provider relationship in IT service outsourcing contexts and a validated model for assessing alignment across internal IT service units and their business customers within the same organization. After reviewing relevant literature by service science and information systems researchers, the six overarching components of the maturity model are presented: value measurements, governance, partnership, communications, human resources and skills, and scope and architecture. A key assumption of the model is that all of the components need be addressed to assess and improve customer-provider alignment. Examples of specific metrics for measuring the maturity level of each component over the five levels of maturity are also presented.

  2. Process Tailoring and the Software Capability Maturity Model(sm).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-01

    the software industry. It is composed of two volumes: the Capability Maturity Model for Software, and the Key Practices of the Capability Maturity ... Model . The key practices of the SW-OMM are expressed in terms that reflect normal practices of organizations that work on large, government contracts

  3. Adverse Effect of Superovulation Treatment on Maturation, Function and Ultrastructural Integrity of Murine Oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Myungook; Ahn, Jong Il; Lee, Ah Ran; Ko, Dong Woo; Yang, Woo Sub; Lee, Gene; Ahn, Ji Yeon; Lim, Jeong Mook

    2017-01-01

    Regular monitoring on experimental animal management found the fluctuation of ART outcome, which showed a necessity to explore whether superovulation treatment is responsible for such unexpected outcome. This study was subsequently conducted to examine whether superovulation treatment can preserve ultrastructural integrity and developmental competence of oocytes following oocyte activation and embryo culture. A randomized study using mouse model was designed and in vitro development (experiment 1), ultrastructural morphology (experiment 2) and functional integrity of the oocytes (experiment 3) retrieved after PMSG/hCG injection (superovulation group) or not (natural ovulation; control group) were evaluated. In experiment 1, more oocytes were retrieved following superovulation than following natural ovulation, but natural ovulation yielded higher (p < 0.0563) maturation rate than superovulation. The capacity of mature oocytes to form pronucleus and to develop into blastocysts in vitro was similar. In experiment 2, a notable (p < 0.0186) increase in mitochondrial deformity, characterized by the formation of vacuolated mitochondria, was detected in the superovulation group. Multivesicular body formation was also increased, whereas early endosome formation was significantly decreased. No obvious changes in other microorganelles, however, were detected, which included the formation and distribution of mitochondria, cortical granules, microvilli, and smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum. In experiment 3, significant decreases in mitochondrial activity, ATP production and dextran uptake were detected in the superovulation group. In conclusion, superovulation treatment may change both maturational status and functional and ultrastuctural integrity of oocytes. Superovulation effect on preimplantation development can be discussed. PMID:28756654

  4. Adverse Effect of Superovulation Treatment on Maturation, Function and Ultrastructural Integrity of Murine Oocytes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myungook; Ahn, Jong Il; Lee, Ah Ran; Ko, Dong Woo; Yang, Woo Sub; Lee, Gene; Ahn, Ji Yeon; Lim, Jeong Mook

    2017-08-01

    Regular monitoring on experimental animal management found the fluctuation of ART outcome, which showed a necessity to explore whether superovulation treatment is responsible for such unexpected outcome. This study was subsequently conducted to examine whether superovulation treatment can preserve ultrastructural integrity and developmental competence of oocytes following oocyte activation and embryo culture. A randomized study using mouse model was designed and in vitro development (experiment 1), ultrastructural morphology (experiment 2) and functional integrity of the oocytes (experiment 3) retrieved after PMSG/hCG injection (superovulation group) or not (natural ovulation; control group) were evaluated. In experiment 1, more oocytes were retrieved following superovulation than following natural ovulation, but natural ovulation yielded higher (p < 0.0563) maturation rate than superovulation. The capacity of mature oocytes to form pronucleus and to develop into blastocysts in vitro was similar. In experiment 2, a notable (p < 0.0186) increase in mitochondrial deformity, characterized by the formation of vacuolated mitochondria, was detected in the superovulation group. Multivesicular body formation was also increased, whereas early endosome formation was significantly decreased. No obvious changes in other microorganelles, however, were detected, which included the formation and distribution of mitochondria, cortical granules, microvilli, and smooth and rough endoplasmic reticulum. In experiment 3, significant decreases in mitochondrial activity, ATP production and dextran uptake were detected in the superovulation group. In conclusion, superovulation treatment may change both maturational status and functional and ultrastuctural integrity of oocytes. Superovulation effect on preimplantation development can be discussed.

  5. Affinity maturation of antibodies requires integrity of the adult thymus.

    PubMed

    AbuAttieh, Mouhammed; Bender, Diane; Liu, Esther; Wettstein, Peter; Platt, Jeffrey L; Cascalho, Marilia

    2012-02-01

    The generation of B-cell responses to proteins requires a functional thymus to produce CD4(+) T cells which helps in the activation and differentiation of B cells. Because the mature T-cell repertoire has abundant cells with the helper phenotype, one might predict that in mature individuals, the generation of B-cell memory would proceed independently of the thymus. Contrary to that prediction, we show here that the removal of the thymus after the establishment of the T-cell compartment or sham surgery without removal of the thymus impairs the affinity maturation of antibodies. Because removal or manipulation of the thymus did not decrease the frequency of mutation of the Ig variable heavy chain exons encoding antigen-specific antibodies, we conclude that the thymus controls affinity maturation of antibodies in the mature individual by facilitating the selection of B cells with high-affinity antibodies.

  6. Modeling Carbon Export Out of Mature Peach Leaves.

    PubMed Central

    Moing, A.; Escobar-Gutierrez, A.; Gaudillere, J. P.

    1994-01-01

    The characteristics of sorbitol and sucrose export out of mature leaves in seedlings of peach (Prunus persica L. Batsch cv GF 305) were investigated by simulating carbon fluxes through the leaf. Three treatments were employed: a control treatment and two treatments modifying leaf export, the latter using either shading or girdling. Photosynthesis and 14C partitioning into sorbitol and sucrose were measured during carbohydrate pool buildup at the beginning of the photoperiod, and the export rate of sorbitol and sucrose was modeled using a PSPICE (Simulation Program with Integrated Circuit Emphasis) simulator. The simulation allowed prediction of the resulting sorbitol and sucrose contents, which were compared to experimental carbohydrate contents. The apparent Km for sorbitol and sucrose phloem loading, estimated by carbon flux modeling, was 6.6 and 4 mol m-3, respectively. The predicted export capacity of the leaf, characterized by the estimated Vmax values for phloem loading of sorbitol and sucrose, was similar to the photosynthetic carbon flux measured under the leaf growth conditions. This export capacity was enhanced in plants in which all leaves except those studied were shaded. The mature leaf had a higher storage capacity for sorbitol than for sucrose in control plants, especially in the girdled treatment. Sucrose content appears to be tightly regulated. PMID:12232352

  7. Capability Maturity Model (Trademark) Integration (CMMI (Service Mark)), Version 1.1. CMMI (Service Mark) for Software Engineering (CMMI-SW, V1.1)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-08-19

    include the following tools : [PA163.EL106] • Spreadsheet programs • Estimating models • Project planning and scheduling packages CMMI-SW, v1.1...process descriptions, and process implementation support tools ). The term “process assets” is used to indicate that these artifacts are developed...Following established plans and process descriptions • Providing adequate resources (including funding, people, and tools ) CMMI-SW, v1.1 Continuous

  8. A model-independent view of the mature organization

    SciTech Connect

    Hanna, M.; Langston, D.

    1996-12-31

    Over the last 10 years, industry has been dealing with the issues of process and organizational maturity. This focus on process is driven by the success that manufacturing organizations have had implementing the management principles of W. Edwards Deming and Joseph M. Juran. The organizational-maturity focus is driven by organizations striving to be ISO 9000 compliant or to achieve a specific level on one of the maturity models. Unfortunately, each of the models takes a specific view into what is a very broad arena. That is to say, each model addresses only a specific subset of the characteristics of maturity. This paper attempts to extend beyond these specific views to answer the general question, What is a mature organization and its relationship to Quantitative management and statistical process control?

  9. NATO NEC C2 Maturity Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    This broader construct demands greater agility on the part of both military and non-military leadership and organisations. Therefore, agility must be...the situation; • infrastructure (availability, quality); • clarity, unity of intent (purpose), and strategy ; • nature of effects space (PMESII...in time, energy , and resources needed for higher levels of C2 maturity is clear from the analysis in these experiences. From the perspective of the

  10. Thermal and hydrocarbon maturation models for coastal California

    SciTech Connect

    Heasler, H.P.; Surdam, R.C.

    1985-02-01

    Hydrocarbon maturation models for coastal California must consider thermal and geochemical constraints imposed by plate tectonics, diagenetic reactions, and the sedimentation history of the region. Plate tectonism drastically effects the thermal history of California basins in many ways. Initially, temperatures in the crust of coastal California are suppressed during subduction of the Farallon plate. With the passage of the Mendocino triple junction, subduction ceases and a void is created into which asthenosphere moves. This elevates temperatures in the basins in a complex manner depending on the time of passage of the Mendocino triple junction and the location of a specific basin. Finite-difference numerical models were developed to approximate the thermal effects of subduction and lithospheric upwelling. Diagenetic reactions and sedimentation history affect both the maturation model and thermal history of a basin. Diagenetic reactions through time in the Miocene Monterey Formation may change thermal conductivity values by 70%. Facies changes also have an important effect on sediment thermal conductivity and hence sediment temperatures. Maturation models indicate varying levels of maturity depending on the method used. Models using the Time Temperature Index of Lopatin indicate the lowest level of maturity. Tissot and Espitalie's method, which uses multiple activation energies and varying constants for the kerogen types, results in an intermediate level of maturity. The highest level of maturity results in an intermediate level of maturity. The highest level of maturity results from the use of the Tissot and Espitalie method modified by using a single activation energy of 178.69 kJ mole/sup -1/ and a constant of 4.92 x 10/sup 13/ hour/sup -1/ as reported by M.D. Lewan for shale from the Phosphoria Formation.

  11. Migration, integration and maturation of photoreceptor precursors following transplantation in the mouse retina.

    PubMed

    Warre-Cornish, Katherine; Barber, Amanda C; Sowden, Jane C; Ali, Robin R; Pearson, Rachael A

    2014-05-01

    Retinal degeneration leading to loss of photoreceptors is a major cause of untreatable blindness. Recent research has yielded definitive evidence for restoration of vision following the transplantation of rod photoreceptors in murine models of blindness, while advances in stem cell biology have enabled the generation of transplantable photoreceptors from embryonic stem cells. Importantly, the amount of visual function restored is dependent upon the number of photoreceptors that migrate correctly into the recipient retina. The developmental stage of the donor cells is important for their ability to migrate; they must be immature photoreceptor precursors. Little is known about how and when donor cell migration, integration, and maturation occurs. Here, we have performed a comprehensive histological analysis of the 6-week period following rod transplantation in mice. Donor cells migrate predominately as single entities during the first week undergoing a stereotyped sequence of morphological changes in their translocation from the site of transplantation, through the interphotoreceptor matrix and into the recipient retina. This includes initial polarization toward the outer nuclear layer (ONL), followed by formation of an apical attachment and rudimentary segment during migration into the ONL. Strikingly, acquisition of a nuclear architecture typical of mature rods was accelerated compared with normal development and a feature of migrating cells. Once within the ONL, precursors formed synaptic-like structures and outer segments in accordance with normal maturation. The restoration of visual function mediated by transplanted photoreceptors correlated with the later expression of rod α-transducin, achieving maximal function by 5 weeks.

  12. Functional Interactions between Newborn and Mature Neurons Leading to Integration into Established Neuronal Circuits.

    PubMed

    Boulanger-Weill, Jonathan; Candat, Virginie; Jouary, Adrien; Romano, Sebastián A; Pérez-Schuster, Verónica; Sumbre, Germán

    2017-06-19

    From development up to adulthood, the vertebrate brain is continuously supplied with newborn neurons that integrate into established mature circuits. However, how this process is coordinated during development remains unclear. Using two-photon imaging, GCaMP5 transgenic zebrafish larvae, and sparse electroporation in the larva's optic tectum, we monitored spontaneous and induced activity of large neuronal populations containing newborn and functionally mature neurons. We observed that the maturation of newborn neurons is a 4-day process. Initially, newborn neurons showed undeveloped dendritic arbors, no neurotransmitter identity, and were unresponsive to visual stimulation, although they displayed spontaneous calcium transients. Later on, newborn-labeled neurons began to respond to visual stimuli but in a very variable manner. At the end of the maturation period, newborn-labeled neurons exhibited visual tuning curves (spatial receptive fields and direction selectivity) and spontaneous correlated activity with neighboring functionally mature neurons. At this developmental stage, newborn-labeled neurons presented complex dendritic arbors and neurotransmitter identity (excitatory or inhibitory). Removal of retinal inputs significantly perturbed the integration of newborn neurons into the functionally mature tectal network. Our results provide a comprehensive description of the maturation of newborn neurons during development and shed light on potential mechanisms underlying their integration into a functionally mature neuronal circuit. Copyright © 2017 The Author(s). Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Methodology Investigation of Software Maturity Model Validation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-11-13

    Cassondra Renfro provided helpful coments in the review of the report. I SEcTON 1. SUMALR 1.1 BACIRUND. Software h~s become a major part of Comuand...example, is that each software fault that is discovered is either corrected or not counted again. Brooks and Motley’s Models, on the other hand, assume...Between Error Occurrence ERROR COUNT MODELS 1 The Generalized Poisson Model 2 The Non - Homogeneous Poisson Model 3 The Brooks and Motley Model 4 The

  14. Software maturity model applied to SDI. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Springsteen, B.

    1991-09-01

    The Strategic Defense Initiative Organization (SDIO) is undertaking initiatives to mitigate software risks and to stimulate the DoD contractor community to improve its software practices. To that end, IDA assessed the Software Engineering Institute's (SEI) software process maturity model and developed an implementation plan for its use within the SDI program. Under this plan, SDI element programs will use the SEI method to select software contractors with mature practices and to monitor contracts after they have been awarded. This document describes the SEI maturity model and the experience of contractors and government agencies. It also explains SDIO's plans to implement the model program-wide and the benefits and lessons learned from using the model on two contracts.

  15. Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for Software Process Improvements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ling, Robert Y.

    2000-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the Avionic Systems Division's implementation of the Capability Maturity Model (CMM) for improvements in the software development process. The presentation reviews the process involved in implementing the model and the benefits of using CMM to improve the software development process.

  16. Demonstrating the improvement of predictive maturity of a computational model

    SciTech Connect

    Hemez, Francois M; Unal, Cetin; Atamturktur, Huriye S

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate an improvement of predictive capability brought to a non-linear material model using a combination of test data, sensitivity analysis, uncertainty quantification, and calibration. A model that captures increasingly complicated phenomena, such as plasticity, temperature and strain rate effects, is analyzed. Predictive maturity is defined, here, as the accuracy of the model to predict multiple Hopkinson bar experiments. A statistical discrepancy quantifies the systematic disagreement (bias) between measurements and predictions. Our hypothesis is that improving the predictive capability of a model should translate into better agreement between measurements and predictions. This agreement, in turn, should lead to a smaller discrepancy. We have recently proposed to use discrepancy and coverage, that is, the extent to which the physical experiments used for calibration populate the regime of applicability of the model, as basis to define a Predictive Maturity Index (PMI). It was shown that predictive maturity could be improved when additional physical tests are made available to increase coverage of the regime of applicability. This contribution illustrates how the PMI changes as 'better' physics are implemented in the model. The application is the non-linear Preston-Tonks-Wallace (PTW) strength model applied to Beryllium metal. We demonstrate that our framework tracks the evolution of maturity of the PTW model. Robustness of the PMI with respect to the selection of coefficients needed in its definition is also studied.

  17. ARTICULAR CARTILAGE TENSILE INTEGRITY: MODULATION BY MATRIX DEPLETION IS MATURATION-DEPENDENT

    PubMed Central

    Asanbaeva, Anna; Tam, Johnny; Schumacher, Barbara L.; Klisch, Stephen M.; Masuda, Koichi; Sah, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Articular cartilage function depends on the molecular composition and structure of its extracellular matrix (ECM). The collagen network (CN) provides cartilage with tensile integrity, but must also remodel during growth. Such remodeling may depend on matrix molecules interacting with the CN to modulate the tensile behavior of cartilage. The objective of this study was to determine the effects of increasingly selective matrix depletion on tensile properties of immature and mature articular cartilage, and thereby establish a framework for identifying molecules involved in CN remodeling. Depletion of immature cartilage with guanidine, chondroitinase ABC, chondroitinase AC, and Streptomyces hyaluronidase markedly increased tensile integrity, while the integrity of mature cartilage remained unaltered after depletion with guanidine. The enhanced tensile integrity after matrix depletion suggests that certain ECM components of immature matrix serve to inhibit CN interactions and may act as modulators of physiological alterations of cartilage geometry and tensile properties during growth/maturation. PMID:18394422

  18. The informatics capability maturity of integrated primary care centres in Australia.

    PubMed

    Liaw, Siaw-Teng; Kearns, Rachael; Taggart, Jane; Frank, Oliver; Lane, Riki; Tam, Michael; Dennis, Sarah; Walker, Christine; Russell, Grant; Harris, Mark

    2017-09-01

    Integrated primary care requires systems and service integration along with financial incentives to promote downward substitution to a single entry point to care. Integrated Primary Care Centres (IPCCs) aim to improve integration by co-location of health services. The Informatics Capability Maturity (ICM) describes how well health organisations collect, manage and share information; manage eHealth technology, implementation, change, data quality and governance; and use "intelligence" to improve care. Describe associations of ICM with systems and service integration in IPCCs. Mixed methods evaluation of IPCCs in metropolitan and rural Australia: an enhanced general practice, four GP Super Clinics, a "HealthOne" (private-public partnership) and a Community Health Centre. Data collection methods included self-assessed ICM, document review, interviews, observations in practice and assessment of electronic health record data. Data was analysed and compared across IPCCs. The IPCCs demonstrated a range of funding models, ownership, leadership, organisation and ICM. Digital tools were used with varying effectiveness to collect, use and share data. Connectivity was problematic, requiring "work-arounds" to communicate and share information. The lack of technical, data and software interoperability standards, clinical coding and secure messaging were barriers to data collection, integration and sharing. Strong leadership and governance was important for successful implementation of robust and secure eHealth systems. Patient engagement with eHealth tools was suboptimal. ICM is positively associated with integration of data, systems and care. Improved ICM requires a health workforce with eHealth competencies; technical, semantic and software standards; adequate privacy and security; and good governance and leadership. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Porosity and Cell Preseeding Influence Electrospun Scaffold Maturation and Meniscus Integration In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ionescu, Lara C.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospinning generates fibrous scaffolds ideal for engineering soft orthopedic tissues. By modifying the electrospinning process, scaffolds with different structural organization and content can be generated. For example, fibers can be aligned in a single direction, or the porosity of the scaffold can be modified through the use of multi-jet electrospinning and the removal of sacrificial fibers. In this work, we investigated the role of fiber alignment and scaffold porosity on construct maturation and integration within in vitro meniscus defects. Further, we explored the effect of preseeding expanded meniscus fibrochondrocytes (MFCs) onto the scaffold at a high density before in vitro repair. Our results demonstrate that highly porous electropun scaffolds integrate better with a native tissue and mature to a greater extent than low-porosity scaffolds, while scaffold alignment does not influence integration or maturation. The addition of expanded MFCs to scaffolds before in vitro repair improved integration with the native tissue, but did not influence maturation. In contrast, preculture of these same scaffolds for 1 month before repair decreased integration with the native tissue, but resulted in a more mature scaffold compared to implantation of cellular scaffolds or acellular scaffolds. This work will inform scaffold selection in future in vivo studies by identifying the ideal scaffold and seeding methods for meniscus tissue engineering. PMID:22994398

  20. Porosity and cell preseeding influence electrospun scaffold maturation and meniscus integration in vitro.

    PubMed

    Ionescu, Lara C; Mauck, Robert L

    2013-02-01

    Electrospinning generates fibrous scaffolds ideal for engineering soft orthopedic tissues. By modifying the electrospinning process, scaffolds with different structural organization and content can be generated. For example, fibers can be aligned in a single direction, or the porosity of the scaffold can be modified through the use of multi-jet electrospinning and the removal of sacrificial fibers. In this work, we investigated the role of fiber alignment and scaffold porosity on construct maturation and integration within in vitro meniscus defects. Further, we explored the effect of preseeding expanded meniscus fibrochondrocytes (MFCs) onto the scaffold at a high density before in vitro repair. Our results demonstrate that highly porous electropun scaffolds integrate better with a native tissue and mature to a greater extent than low-porosity scaffolds, while scaffold alignment does not influence integration or maturation. The addition of expanded MFCs to scaffolds before in vitro repair improved integration with the native tissue, but did not influence maturation. In contrast, preculture of these same scaffolds for 1 month before repair decreased integration with the native tissue, but resulted in a more mature scaffold compared to implantation of cellular scaffolds or acellular scaffolds. This work will inform scaffold selection in future in vivo studies by identifying the ideal scaffold and seeding methods for meniscus tissue engineering.

  1. Cultivating Knowledge Sharing through the Relationship Management Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Valerie A.; Hatzakis, Tally; Lycett, Mark; Macredie, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the development of the relationship management maturity model (RMMM), the output of an initiative aimed at bridging the gap between business units and the IT organisation. It does this through improving and assessing knowledge sharing between business and IT staff in Finco, a large financial…

  2. Cultivating Knowledge Sharing through the Relationship Management Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Valerie A.; Hatzakis, Tally; Lycett, Mark; Macredie, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to present the development of the relationship management maturity model (RMMM), the output of an initiative aimed at bridging the gap between business units and the IT organisation. It does this through improving and assessing knowledge sharing between business and IT staff in Finco, a large financial…

  3. Case Study and Maturity Model for Business Process Management Implementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohloff, Michael

    This paper presents the implementation of Business Process Management in a large international company. The business case illustrates the main objectives and approach taken with the BPM initiative. It introduces a process management maturity assessment which was developed to assess the implementation of Business Process Management and the achievements. The maturity model is based on nine categories which comprehensively cover all aspects which impact the success of Business Process Management. Some findings of the first assessment cycle are pinpointed to illustrate the benefits and best practice exchange as a result of the assessment.

  4. Converting Maturing Nuclear Sites to Integrated Power Production Islands

    DOE PAGES

    Solbrig, Charles W.

    2011-01-01

    Nuclear islands, which are integrated power production sites, could effectively sequester and safeguard the US stockpile of plutonium. A nuclear island, an evolution of the integral fast reactor, utilizes all the Transuranics (Pu plus minor actinides) produced in power production, and it eliminates all spent fuel shipments to and from the site. This latter attribute requires that fuel reprocessing occur on each site and that fast reactors be built on-site to utilize the TRU. All commercial spent fuel shipments could be eliminated by converting all LWR nuclear power sites to nuclear islands. Existing LWR sites have the added advantage ofmore » already possessing a license to produce nuclear power. Each could contribute to an increase in the nuclear power production by adding one or more fast reactors. Both the TRU and the depleted uranium obtained in reprocessing would be used on-site for fast fuel manufacture. Only fission products would be shipped to a repository for storage. The nuclear island concept could be used to alleviate the strain of LWR plant sites currently approaching or exceeding their spent fuel pool storage capacity. Fast reactor breeding ratio could be designed to convert existing sites to all fast reactors, or keep the majority thermal.« less

  5. Sperm chromatin maturity and integrity correlated to zygote development in ICSI program.

    PubMed

    Asmarinah; Syauqy, Ahmad; Umar, Liya Agustin; Lestari, Silvia Werdhy; Mansyur, Eliza; Hestiantoro, Andon; Paradowszka-Dogan, Agnieszka

    2016-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate sperm chromatin maturity and integrity of that injected into good-quality oocytes in an in vitro fertilization-intra cytoplasmic sperm injection (IVF-ICSI) program. A cut-off value of sperm chromatin maturity and integrity was developed as a function of their correlation to the zygote development, i.e., embryo formation and cleavage rate. The study assessed sperm chromatin maturity using aniline blue (AB) staining, whereas toluidine blue (TB) staining was used to assess sperm chromatin integrity. Ejaculates from 59 patients undergoing ICSI and 46 fertile normozoospermic donors for determination of normal values of sperm chromatin status were used in this study. Embryo formation and cleavage rates were observed for the period of 3 days after ICSI. There was a significant difference in the percentage of sperm with mature chromatin between ejaculate from ICSI patients and fertile donor (p=0.020); while there was no significant difference in sperm chromatin integrity of both samples (p=0.120). There was no significant correlation between sperm chromatin maturity and either embryo formation or cleavage rate; as well as sperm chromatin integrity to both parameters of zygote development (p>0.05). Furthermore, we found that the cut-off value of sperm chromatin maturity and integrity of the fertile normozoospermic ejaculates were 87.2% and 80.2%, respectively. Using the cut-offs, we found that low sperm chromatin maturity at the level of <87% correlated significantly with the cleavage rate of the zygote (p=0.022; r=0.371); whereas poor sperm chromatin integrity at the level of <80% correlated with embryo formation (p=0.048; r=0,485). In conclusion, this study showed that poor maturity and integrity of sperm chromatin (AB<87% and TB<80%, respectively), could affect zygote development following ICSI. AB: aniline blue; CMA3: chromomycin A3; ICSI: intra cytoplasmic sperm injection; IVF: in vitro fertilization; PBS: phosphate buffer saline; SPSS

  6. Adolescent Emotional Maturation through Divergent Models of Brain Organization

    PubMed Central

    Oron Semper, Jose V.; Murillo, Jose I.; Bernacer, Javier

    2016-01-01

    In this article we introduce the hypothesis that neuropsychological adolescent maturation, and in particular emotional management, may have opposing explanations depending on the interpretation of the assumed brain architecture, that is, whether a componential computational account (CCA) or a dynamic systems perspective (DSP) is used. According to CCA, cognitive functions are associated with the action of restricted brain regions, and this association is temporally stable; by contrast, DSP argues that cognitive functions are better explained by interactions between several brain areas, whose engagement in specific functions is temporal and context-dependent and based on neural reuse. We outline the main neurobiological facts about adolescent maturation, focusing on the neuroanatomical and neurofunctional processes associated with adolescence. We then explain the importance of emotional management in adolescent maturation. We explain the interplay between emotion and cognition under the scope of CCA and DSP, both at neural and behavioral levels. Finally, we justify why, according to CCA, emotional management is understood as regulation, specifically because the cognitive aspects of the brain are in charge of regulating emotion-related modules. However, the key word in DSP is integration, since neural information from different brain areas is integrated from the beginning of the process. Consequently, although the terms should not be conceptually confused, there is no cognition without emotion, and vice versa. Thus, emotional integration is not an independent process that just happens to the subject, but a crucial part of personal growth. Considering the importance of neuropsychological research in the development of educational and legal policies concerning adolescents, we intend to expose that the holistic view of adolescents is dependent on whether one holds the implicit or explicit interpretation of brain functioning. PMID:27602012

  7. Adolescent Emotional Maturation through Divergent Models of Brain Organization.

    PubMed

    Oron Semper, Jose V; Murillo, Jose I; Bernacer, Javier

    2016-01-01

    In this article we introduce the hypothesis that neuropsychological adolescent maturation, and in particular emotional management, may have opposing explanations depending on the interpretation of the assumed brain architecture, that is, whether a componential computational account (CCA) or a dynamic systems perspective (DSP) is used. According to CCA, cognitive functions are associated with the action of restricted brain regions, and this association is temporally stable; by contrast, DSP argues that cognitive functions are better explained by interactions between several brain areas, whose engagement in specific functions is temporal and context-dependent and based on neural reuse. We outline the main neurobiological facts about adolescent maturation, focusing on the neuroanatomical and neurofunctional processes associated with adolescence. We then explain the importance of emotional management in adolescent maturation. We explain the interplay between emotion and cognition under the scope of CCA and DSP, both at neural and behavioral levels. Finally, we justify why, according to CCA, emotional management is understood as regulation, specifically because the cognitive aspects of the brain are in charge of regulating emotion-related modules. However, the key word in DSP is integration, since neural information from different brain areas is integrated from the beginning of the process. Consequently, although the terms should not be conceptually confused, there is no cognition without emotion, and vice versa. Thus, emotional integration is not an independent process that just happens to the subject, but a crucial part of personal growth. Considering the importance of neuropsychological research in the development of educational and legal policies concerning adolescents, we intend to expose that the holistic view of adolescents is dependent on whether one holds the implicit or explicit interpretation of brain functioning.

  8. eHealth interoperability evaluation using a maturity model.

    PubMed

    Guédria, Wded; Bouzid, Hanan; Bosh, Guido; Naudet, Yannick; Chen, David

    2012-01-01

    To further improve individual health and well-being, access to high quality and safe services, eHealth interoperability is a fundamental prerequisite. A mature interoperability between health systems will support health services organization and delivery, and improve citizens' awareness of how to prevent disease and preserve good health. Within this context, health institutions have to solve interoperability problems or prevent them to appear, and if possible avoid them before they occur by adapting good practices toward interoperability. This paper proposes an evaluation of the potential health interoperability using the MMEI methodology (Maturity Model for Enterprise Interoperability). It discusses how the MMEI model can be used to help institutions to avoid interoperability problems. A use case for a particular hospital is more closely examined.

  9. OUTSHORE Maturity Model: Assistance for Software Offshore Outsourcing Decisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkiö, Juho; Betz, Stafanie; Oberweis, Andreas

    Offshore outsourcing software development (OOSD) is increasingly being used by the Software Industry. OOSD is a specific variant of Geographically Distributed Software Developmentdistributed software development (GDSD). Compared to the traditional mode of software development (i.e., in-house) GDSD is more edgy and puts at risk the attainment of the expected results. Although the failure of an offshore outsourcing software project may be caused by a variety of factors, one major complication is geographical distance. Consequently we argue that risk avoidance in outshore software development should be undertaken well in advance of the development launch. This could be done by testing the offshore outsourcing relevance of each software project and then the offshore outsourcing company involved. With this in mind we have developed the OUTSHORE Maturity Modeloutshore maturity model - OMM.

  10. The Integrated Medical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerstman, Eric; Minard, Charles; Saile, Lynn; Freiere deCarvalho, Mary; Myers, Jerry; Walton, Marlei; Butler, Douglas; Iyengar, Sriram; Johnson-Throop, Kathy; Baumann, David

    2010-01-01

    The goals of the Integrated Medical Model (IMM) are to develop an integrated, quantified, evidence-based decision support tool useful to crew health and mission planners and to help align science, technology, and operational activities intended to optimize crew health, safety, and mission success. Presentation slides address scope and approach, beneficiaries of IMM capabilities, history, risk components, conceptual models, development steps, and the evidence base. Space adaptation syndrome is used to demonstrate the model's capabilities.

  11. Integrated Modeling Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mosier, Gary; Stone, Paul; Holtery, Christopher

    2006-01-01

    The Integrated Modeling Environment (IME) is a software system that establishes a centralized Web-based interface for integrating people (who may be geographically dispersed), processes, and data involved in a common engineering project. The IME includes software tools for life-cycle management, configuration management, visualization, and collaboration.

  12. Structural model integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallerstein, D. V.; Lahey, R. S.; Haggenmacher, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Many of the practical aspects and problems of ensuring the integrity of a structural model are discussed, as well as the steps which have been taken in the NASTRAN system to assure that these checks can be routinely performed. Model integrity as used applies not only to the structural model but also to the loads applied to the model. Emphasis is also placed on the fact that when dealing with substructure analysis, all of the checking procedures discussed should be applied at the lowest level of substructure prior to any coupling.

  13. Structural model integrity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallerstein, D. V.; Lahey, R. S.; Haggenmacher, G. W.

    1977-01-01

    Many of the practical aspects and problems of ensuring the integrity of a structural model are discussed, as well as the steps which have been taken in the NASTRAN system to assure that these checks can be routinely performed. Model integrity as used applies not only to the structural model but also to the loads applied to the model. Emphasis is also placed on the fact that when dealing with substructure analysis, all of the checking procedures discussed should be applied at the lowest level of substructure prior to any coupling.

  14. Model of white oak flower survival and maturation

    Treesearch

    David R. Larsen; Robert A. Cecich

    1997-01-01

    A stochastic model of oak flower dynamics is presented that integrates a number of factors which appear to affect the oak pistillate flower development process. The factors are modeled such that the distribution of the predicted flower populations could have come from the same distribution as the observed flower populations. Factors included in the model are; the range...

  15. Maturation history modeling of Sufyan Depression, northwest Muglad Basin, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ying; Liu, Luofu; An, Fuli; Wang, Hongmei; Pang, Xiongqi

    2016-08-01

    The Sufyan Depression is located in the northwest of Muglad Basin and is considered as a favorable exploration area by both previous studies and present oil shows. In this study, 16 wells are used or referred, the burial history model was built with new seismic, logging and well data, and the thermal maturity (Ro, %) of proved AG source rocks was predicted based on heat flow calculation and EASY %Ro modeling. The results show that the present heat flow range is 36 mW/m2∼50 mW/m2 (average 39 mW/m2) in 13 wells and 15 mW/m2∼55 mW/m2 in the whole depression. Accordingly, the geothermal gradient is 20 °C/km∼26 °C/km and 12 °C/km∼30 °C/km, respectively. The paleo-heat flow has three peaks, namely AG-3 period, lower Bentiu period and Early Paleogene, with the value decreases from the first to the last, which is corresponding to the tectonic evolution history. Corresponding to the heat flow distribution feature, the AG source rocks become mature earlier and have higher present marurity in the south area. For AG-2_down and AG-3_up source rocks that are proved to be good-excellent, most of them are mature with Ro as 0.5%-1.1%. But they can only generate plentiful oil and gas to charge reservoirs in the middle and south areas where their Ro is within 0.7%-1.1%, which is consistent with the present oil shows. Besides, the oil shows from AG-2_down reservoir in the middle area of the Sufyan Depression are believed to be contributed by the underlying AG-3_up source rock or the source rocks in the south area.

  16. Development of a fourth generation predictive capability maturity model.

    SciTech Connect

    Hills, Richard Guy; Witkowski, Walter R.; Urbina, Angel; Rider, William J.; Trucano, Timothy Guy

    2013-09-01

    The Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM) is an expert elicitation tool designed to characterize and communicate completeness of the approaches used for computational model definition, verification, validation, and uncertainty quantification associated for an intended application. The primary application of this tool at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has been for physics-based computational simulations in support of nuclear weapons applications. The two main goals of a PCMM evaluation are 1) the communication of computational simulation capability, accurately and transparently, and 2) the development of input for effective planning. As a result of the increasing importance of computational simulation to SNLs mission, the PCMM has evolved through multiple generations with the goal to provide more clarity, rigor, and completeness in its application. This report describes the approach used to develop the fourth generation of the PCMM.

  17. Towards an Encompassing Maturity Model for the Management of Hospital Information Systems.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, João Vidal; Rocha, Álvaro; Vasconcelos, José

    2015-09-01

    Maturity models are tools that favour the management of organizations, including their information systems management task, and hospital organizations are no exception. In the present paper we put forth a preliminary investigation aimed at the development of an encompassing maturity model for the management of hospital information systems. The development of this model is justified to the extent that current maturity models in the field of hospital information systems management are still in an early development stage, and especially because they are poorly detailed, do not provide tools to determine the maturity stage nor structure the characteristics of maturity stages according to different influencing factors.

  18. Creativity, Spirituality, and Transcendence: Paths to Integrity and Wisdom in the Mature Self. Publications in Creativity Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melvin E., Ed.; Cook-Greuter, Susanne R., Ed.

    This book contains 11 papers on creativity, spirituality, and transcendence as paths to integrity and wisdom in the mature self. The book begins with the paper "Introduction--Creativity in Adulthood: Personal Maturity and Openness to Extraordinary Sources of Inspiration" (Susanne R. Cook-Greuter, Melvin E. Miller). The next four papers,…

  19. Creativity, Spirituality, and Transcendence: Paths to Integrity and Wisdom in the Mature Self. Publications in Creativity Research.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Melvin E., Ed.; Cook-Greuter, Susanne R., Ed.

    This book contains 11 papers on creativity, spirituality, and transcendence as paths to integrity and wisdom in the mature self. The book begins with the paper "Introduction--Creativity in Adulthood: Personal Maturity and Openness to Extraordinary Sources of Inspiration" (Susanne R. Cook-Greuter, Melvin E. Miller). The next four papers,…

  20. The Integrated Medical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Butler, Douglas J.; Kerstman, Eric

    2010-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the goals and approach for the Integrated Medical Model (IMM). The IMM is a software decision support tool that forecasts medical events during spaceflight and optimizes medical systems during simulations. It includes information on the software capabilities, program stakeholders, use history, and the software logic.

  1. An Integrated Model Recontextualized

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    O'Meara, KerryAnn; Saltmarsh, John

    2016-01-01

    In this commentary, authors KerryAnn O'Meara and John Saltmarsh reflect on their 2008 "Journal of Higher Education Outreach and Engagement" article "An Integrated Model for Advancing the Scholarship of Engagement: Creating Academic Homes for the Engaged Scholar," reprinted in this 20th anniversary issue of "Journal of…

  2. Towards a theory of PACS deployment: an integrative PACS maturity framework.

    PubMed

    van de Wetering, Rogier; Batenburg, Ronald

    2014-06-01

    Owing to large financial investments that go along with the picture archiving and communication system (PACS) deployments and inconsistent PACS performance evaluations, there is a pressing need for a better understanding of the implications of PACS deployment in hospitals. We claim that there is a gap in the research field, both theoretically and empirically, to explain the success of the PACS deployment and maturity in hospitals. Theoretical principles are relevant to the PACS performance; maturity and alignment are reviewed from a system and complexity perspective. A conceptual model to explain the PACS performance and a set of testable hypotheses are then developed. Then, structural equation modeling (SEM), i.e. causal modeling, is applied to validate the model and hypotheses based on a research sample of 64 hospitals that use PACS, i.e. 70 % of all hospitals in the Netherlands. Outcomes of the SEM analyses substantiate that the measurements of all constructs are reliable and valid. The PACS alignment-modeled as a higher-order construct of five complementary organizational dimensions and maturity levels-has a significant positive impact on the PACS performance. This result is robust and stable for various sub-samples and segments. This paper presents a conceptual model that explains how alignment in deploying PACS in hospitals is positively related to the perceived performance of PACS. The conceptual model is extended with tools as checklists to systematically identify the improvement areas for hospitals in the PACS domain. The holistic approach towards PACS alignment and maturity provides a framework for clinical practice.

  3. Adapting to the Fist Semester of College: A Test of Heath's Model of Maturing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Lawrence K.

    1987-01-01

    Investigated the relationship between the psychological maturity of freshmen (N=82) entering college and their success in adapting to the challenges of the first semester of college. Results provided some support for Heath model of maturing, particularly for females; females' level of psychological maturity was related to success in adapting to…

  4. Vocational Maturity in Adulthood: Toward Turning a Model into a Measure.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Super, Donald E.; Kidd, Jennifer M.

    1979-01-01

    It is postulated that adult vocational maturity needs to be assessed because of the changing developmental tasks encountered during the course of careers. Super's proposed adult vocational maturity model is examined for the promise that it offers and the problems that arise in developing a multidimensional measure of vocational maturity. (Author)

  5. Convergence: maturation and integration in the course of a religious conversion.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Mariam

    2002-01-01

    The process of religious conversion has not been the focus of psychoanalytic understanding. This article examines one conversion narrative, a spiritual autobiography, in which, the author asserts, evidence can be found that the conversion described involved a process of maturation of the subject's internal god-representation, with an integration of maternal and paternal aspects of that internal object representation. Such a process as one aspect of a religious conversion, has implications for psychoanalytic work with religious patients, including the necessity of acknowledging the psychological and deeply believed reality of God for religious patients.

  6. [Maturation, separation and social integration. Some developmental psychology aspects of childhood sports].

    PubMed

    Günter, Michael

    2002-04-01

    The unfolding of motorical and social experiences with one's own body is a core element of ego-development and identity in childhood and adolescence. This paper describes essential elements of this process in different age stages. Especially in adolescence, the maturational and separational development are determined by the complex interaction between integration into the peer group and separation from adults, between search for appreciation and oppositional tendencies. On the one hand sport plays an important role for many adolescents during this process. On the other hand adolescent conflicts have a great impact on practising sport. These considerations are illustrated by two case vignettes.

  7. Petroleum maturation modelling, Abu Gabra Sharaf area, Muglad Basin, Sudan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohamed, Abdalla Y.; Pearson, Michael J.; Ashcroft, William A.; Whiteman, A. J.

    2002-08-01

    Structural and maturation studies in the northwest of the Muglad Basin, Sudan showed a thick sedimentary section up to 9000 m in the deep sub-basins and an average of about 6000 m in the Sharaf-Abu Gabra Ridge. The isopach map of the Lower Cretaceous Abu Gabra-Sharaf formations, which contain source rocks, showed a thickness of sedimentary section between 2000 and 5000 m. The burial history showed high subsidence rates during the first rifting phase with relatively low subsidence rates during the following two phases in this part of the basin. Significant erosion of the sedimentary section occurred in the ridge area during Miocene and Cenomanian-Albian times. The geothermal gradients in the modelled wells range between 18 and 27.5 °C/km corresponding to the relatively wide range of present day heat flow of between 37 and 63 mW/m 2, averaging 50 mW/m 2. Heat flow history curves consistent with vitrinite reflectance data were adopted with elevated high heat flow (75 mW/m 2) during the first rifting phase followed by minor peaks (average 60 mW/m 2) during the second and the third rifting phases. Application of a kinetic vitrinite maturation model resulted in a present day oil window between 2000 and 4500 m. The source rock of the Abu Gabra (AG) and Sharaf (SH) formations, which has an average total organic carbon of 1.0% and hydrogen index (HI) of 280, was modelled for hydrocarbon generation. The section was divided into four layers; AG-1 (Albian), AG-2 (Aptian), SH-1 (Barremian) and SH-2 (Neocomian). Conditions for hydrocarbon generation are present throughout the Sharaf formation and in AG-2. The generation model suggests an average generation amount of 4 mgHC/g rock in the lower three modelled layers with a timing range between 120 Ma and the present. Total calculated oil volume is about 370 US billion bbls and the expected volume expelled and migrated (40%) is 150 US billion bbls. The total gas expelled and migrated (90%) is 1600 US trillion cu ft. Retention of

  8. Integrated Modeling Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    Management , UCLA. Federgruen, A. and Zipkin , P. (1984), ’A Combined Vehicle Routing and Inventory Allocation Problem’, Operations Research 32(5), 1019-1037...Completion Based Inventory Systems: Optimal Policies for Repair Kits and Spare Machines," Management Science, 31:6 (June 1985). WMSI Working Paper 318. 210...Reprint No. 238 Computer Science in Economics and Management 2 (1989), pp. 3-15 AD-A215 219 INTEGRATED MODELING SYSTEMS by Arthur M. Geoffrion DTIC0

  9. Evaluation of organizational maturity based on people capacity maturity model in medical record wards of Iranian hospitals.

    PubMed

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H; Tavakoli, Nahid; Shams, Assadollah; Hatampour, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    People capacity maturity model (PCMM) is one of the models which focus on improving organizational human capabilities. The aim of this model's application is to increase people ability to attract, develop, motivate, organize and retain the talents needed to organizational continuous improvement. In this study, we used the PCMM for investigation of organizational maturity level in medical record departments of governmental hospitals and determination strengths and weaknesses of their staff capabilities. This is an applied research and cross sectional study in which data were collected by questionnaires to investigation of PCMM model needs in medical record staff of governmental hospitals at Isfahan, Iran. We used the questionnaire which has been extracted from PCMM model and approved its reliability with Cronbach's Alpha 0.96. Data collected by the questionnaire was analyzed based on the research objectives using SPSS software and in accordance with research questions descriptive statistics were used. Our findings showed that the mean score of medical record practitioners, skill and capability in governmental hospitals was 35 (62.5%) from maximum 56 (100%). There is no significant relevance between organizational maturity and medical record practitioners, attributes. Applying PCMM model is caused increasing staff and manager attention in identifying the weaknesses in the current activities and practices, so it will result in improvement and developing processes.

  10. Evaluation of organizational maturity based on people capacity maturity model in medical record wards of Iranian hospitals

    PubMed Central

    Yarmohammadian, Mohammad H.; Tavakoli, Nahid; Shams, Assadollah; Hatampour, Farzaneh

    2014-01-01

    Context: People capacity maturity model (PCMM) is one of the models which focus on improving organizational human capabilities. Aims: The aim of this model's application is to increase people ability to attract, develop, motivate, organize and retain the talents needed to organizational continuous improvement. Settings and Design: In this study, we used the PCMM for investigation of organizational maturity level in medical record departments of governmental hospitals and determination strengths and weaknesses of their staff capabilities. Materials and Methods: This is an applied research and cross sectional study in which data were collected by questionnaires to investigation of PCMM model needs in medical record staff of governmental hospitals at Isfahan, Iran. We used the questionnaire which has been extracted from PCMM model and approved its reliability with Cronbach's Alpha 0.96. Statistical Analysis Used: Data collected by the questionnaire was analyzed based on the research objectives using SPSS software and in accordance with research questions descriptive statistics were used. Results: Our findings showed that the mean score of medical record practitioners, skill and capability in governmental hospitals was 35 (62.5%) from maximum 56 (100%). There is no significant relevance between organizational maturity and medical record practitioners, attributes. Conclusions: Applying PCMM model is caused increasing staff and manager attention in identifying the weaknesses in the current activities and practices, so it will result in improvement and developing processes. PMID:25077147

  11. Kinetic model of sucrose accumulation in maturing sugarcane culm tissue.

    PubMed

    Uys, Lafras; Botha, Frederik C; Hofmeyr, Jan-Hendrik S; Rohwer, Johann M

    2007-01-01

    Biochemically, it is not completely understood why or how commercial varieties of sugarcane (Saccharum officinarum) are able to accumulate sucrose in high concentrations. Such concentrations are obtained despite the presence of sucrose synthesis/breakdown cycles (futile cycling) in the culm of the storage parenchyma. Given the complexity of the process, kinetic modelling may help to elucidate the factors governing sucrose accumulation or direct the design of experimental optimisation strategies. This paper describes the extension of an existing model of sucrose accumulation (Rohwer, J.M., Botha, F.C., 2001. Analysis of sucrose accumulation in the sugar cane culm on the basis of in vitro kinetic data. Biochem. J. 358, 437-445) to account for isoforms of sucrose synthase and fructokinase, carbon partitioning towards fibre formation, and the glycolytic enzymes phosphofructokinase (PFK), pyrophosphate-dependent PFK and aldolase. Moreover, by including data on the maximal activity of the enzymes as measured in different internodes, a growth model was constructed that describes the metabolic behaviour as sugarcane parenchymal tissue matures from internodes 3-10. While there was some discrepancy between modelled and experimentally determined steady-state sucrose concentrations in the cytoplasm, steady-state fluxes showed a better fit. The model supports a hypothesis of vacuolar sucrose accumulation against a concentration gradient. A detailed metabolic control analysis of sucrose synthase showed that each isoform has a unique control profile. Fructose uptake by the cell and sucrose uptake by the vacuole had a negative control on the futile cycling of sucrose and a positive control on sucrose accumulation, while the control profile for neutral invertase was reversed. When the activities of these three enzymes were changed from their reference values, the effects on futile cycling and sucrose accumulation were amplified. The model can be run online at the JWS Online

  12. Integrated development and maturation of the hearing system. A critical review article.

    PubMed

    Fisch, L

    1983-08-01

    The understanding of development and maturation of the auditory system is essential for many reasons, including the practical aspects of auditory behaviour, testing, and teaching a hearing-impaired child to communicate effectively. The study of maturation of the auditory system is gaining increasing importance also because it should help us to interpret correctly certain aspects of auditory behaviour in infants. When studying the auditory system we should not be concerned solely with development of function in isolation; the emphasis is on integrated development. Understanding a process of integrated development enables us to understand the peculiarities of auditory behaviour in infants. Sound became the raw material of human language for good reasons. It is the only medium which made it possible to transmit efficiently complex information encoded in human language. Phylogenetically, hearing in vertebrates is a late development, and because of this, in certain unfavourable circumstances the hearing system is more vulnerable than other phylogenetically older systems. Within the auditory system, high-frequency hearing is also phylogenetically a late development, and therefore more vulnerable to certain unfavourable metabolic influences. In all species there is a 'best frequency' range, usually the one which is most vital for communication. In humans the best frequency range is the one which is most important for transmitting speech sounds. This is already noticeable in newborn and very young infants, that is, we can obtain the best reactions in the frequencies which are important for speech. Higher sensitivity for perception of patterns is already developed in newborn and young infants (and acquires a special significance). Direction detection and localisation of sound source develops gradually. It is fully developed only when the auditory pathway matures and when the function is well integrated with the maturing motor system. The ears of the young are more

  13. Smart Grid Maturity Model: A Vision for the Future of Smart Grid

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-24

    2011 Carnegie Mellon University SEI Technologies Forum Twitter: #SEIVirtualForum Smart Grid Maturity Model : A Vision for...the Future of Smart Grid David W. White Smart Grid Maturity Model Project Manager White is a member of the Resilient Enterprise Management (REM...infrastructure protection, and smart grid deployment. He is the project manager and a core member of the development team for the SEI Smart Grid Maturity Model (SGMM

  14. Maturity Models of Healthcare Information Systems and Technologies: a Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Carvalho, João Vidal; Rocha, Álvaro; Abreu, António

    2016-06-01

    The maturity models are instruments to facilitate organizational management, including the management of its information systems function. These instruments are used also in hospitals. The objective of this article is to identify and compare the maturity models for management of information systems and technologies (IST) in healthcare. For each maturity model, it is identified the methodology of development and validation, as well as the scope, stages and their characteristics by dimensions or influence factors. This study resulted in the need to develop a maturity model based on a holistic approach. It will include a comprehensive set of influencing factors to reach all areas and subsystems of health care organizations.

  15. Integrated Assessment Model Evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, S. J.; Clarke, L.; Edmonds, J. A.; Weyant, J. P.

    2012-12-01

    Integrated assessment models of climate change (IAMs) are widely used to provide insights into the dynamics of the coupled human and socio-economic system, including emission mitigation analysis and the generation of future emission scenarios. Similar to the climate modeling community, the integrated assessment community has a two decade history of model inter-comparison, which has served as one of the primary venues for model evaluation and confirmation. While analysis of historical trends in the socio-economic system has long played a key role in diagnostics of future scenarios from IAMs, formal hindcast experiments are just now being contemplated as evaluation exercises. Some initial thoughts on setting up such IAM evaluation experiments are discussed. Socio-economic systems do not follow strict physical laws, which means that evaluation needs to take place in a context, unlike that of physical system models, in which there are few fixed, unchanging relationships. Of course strict validation of even earth system models is not possible (Oreskes etal 2004), a fact borne out by the inability of models to constrain the climate sensitivity. Energy-system models have also been grappling with some of the same questions over the last quarter century. For example, one of "the many questions in the energy field that are waiting for answers in the next 20 years" identified by Hans Landsberg in 1985 was "Will the price of oil resume its upward movement?" Of course we are still asking this question today. While, arguably, even fewer constraints apply to socio-economic systems, numerous historical trends and patterns have been identified, although often only in broad terms, that are used to guide the development of model components, parameter ranges, and scenario assumptions. IAM evaluation exercises are expected to provide useful information for interpreting model results and improving model behavior. A key step is the recognition of model boundaries, that is, what is inside

  16. A Maturity Model for Assessing the Use of ICT in School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solar, Mauricio; Sabattin, Jorge; Parada, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an ICT-based and capability-driven model for assessing ICT in education capabilities and maturity of schools. The proposed model, called ICTE-MM (ICT in School Education Maturity Model), has three elements supporting educational processes: information criteria, ICT resources, and leverage domains. Changing the traditional…

  17. A Maturity Model for Assessing the Use of ICT in School Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Solar, Mauricio; Sabattin, Jorge; Parada, Victor

    2013-01-01

    This article describes an ICT-based and capability-driven model for assessing ICT in education capabilities and maturity of schools. The proposed model, called ICTE-MM (ICT in School Education Maturity Model), has three elements supporting educational processes: information criteria, ICT resources, and leverage domains. Changing the traditional…

  18. The Impact of Maturity Stage on Cell Membrane Integrity and Enzymatic Browning Reactions in High Pressure Processed Peaches (Prunus persica).

    PubMed

    Techakanon, Chukwan; Gradziel, Thomas M; Zhang, Lu; Barrett, Diane M

    2016-09-28

    Fruit maturity is an important factor associated with final product quality, and it may have an effect on the level of browning in peaches that are high pressure processed (HPP). Peaches from three different maturities, as determined by firmness (M1 = 50-55 N, M2 = 35-40 N, and M3 = 15-20 N), were subjected to pressure levels at 0.1, 200, and 400 MPa for 10 min. The damage from HPP treatment results in loss of fruit integrity and the development of browning during storage. Increasing pressure levels of HPP treatment resulted in greater damage, particularly in the more mature peaches, as determined by shifts in transverse relaxation time (T2) of the vacuolar component and by light microscopy. The discoloration of peach slices of different maturities processed at the same pressure was comparable, indicating that the effect of pressure level is greater than that of maturity in the development of browning.

  19. Scleraxis is required for maturation of tissue domains for proper integration of the musculoskeletal system

    PubMed Central

    Yoshimoto, Yuki; Takimoto, Aki; Watanabe, Hitomi; Hiraki, Yuji; Kondoh, Gen; Shukunami, Chisa

    2017-01-01

    Scleraxis (Scx) is a basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor that is expressed persistently in tendons/ligaments, but transiently in entheseal cartilage. In this study, we generated a novel ScxCre knock-in (KI) allele, by in-frame replacement of most of Scx exon 1 with Cre recombinase (Cre), to drive Cre expression using Scx promoter and to inactivate the endogenous Scx. Reflecting the intensity and duration of endogenous expression, Cre-mediated excision occurs in tendinous and ligamentous tissues persistently expressing Scx. Expression of tenomodulin, a marker of mature tenocytes and ligamentocytes, was almost absent in tendons and ligaments of ScxCre/Cre KI mice lacking Scx to indicate defective maturation. In homozygotes, the transiently Scx-expressing entheseal regions such as the rib cage, patella cartilage, and calcaneus were small and defective and cartilaginous tuberosity was missing. Decreased Sox9 expression and phosphorylation of Smad1/5 and Smad3 were also observed in the developing entheseal cartilage, patella, and deltoid tuberosity of ScxCre/Cre KI mice. These results highlighted the functional importance of both transient and persistent expression domains of Scx for proper integration of the musculoskeletal components. PMID:28327634

  20. Glacial integrative modelling.

    PubMed

    Ganopolski, Andrey

    2003-09-15

    Understanding the mechanisms of past climate changes requires modelling of the complex interaction between all major components of the Earth system: atmosphere, ocean, cryosphere, lithosphere and biosphere. This paper reviews attempts at such an integrative approach to modelling climate changes during the glacial age. In particular, the roles of different factors in shaping glacial climate are compared based on the results of simulations with an Earth-system model of intermediate complexity, CLIMBER-2. It is shown that ice sheets, changes in atmospheric compositions, vegetation cover, and reorganization of the ocean thermohaline circulation play important roles in glacial climate changes. Another example of this approach is the modelling of two major types of abrupt glacial climate changes: Dansgaard-Oeschger and Heinrich events. Our results corroborate some of the early proposed mechanisms, which relate abrupt climate changes to the internal instability of the ocean thermohaline circulation and ice sheets. At the same time, it is shown that realistic representation of the temporal evolution of the palaeoclimatic background is crucial to simulate observed features of the glacial abrupt climate changes.

  1. Effects of melatonin on oocyte maturation in PCOS mouse model.

    PubMed

    Nikmard, Fatemeh; Hosseini, Elham; Bakhtiyari, Mehrdad; Ashrafi, Mahnaz; Amidi, Fardin; Aflatoonian, Reza

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of oocyte in vitro maturation is generation of mature oocytes that could support future development. Efforts have been made to enhance oocyte developmental competence by developing optimal culture conditions. The present study is conducted to determine melatonin effects on quality of polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS) oocytes when it has been added during in vitro maturation, and immature oocytes were cultured in defined conditioned medium with and without different melatonin concentrations. Melatonin could significantly improve nuclear maturation of PCOS oocytes (81.1% vs. 56.3%, P < 0.05 were achieved with 10(-6) mol/L concentration). Cleavage rate was significantly higher in 10(-5) mol/L concentration compared to untreated oocytes in PCOS (54% vs. 35%, respectively) and it was significantly higher with 10(-6) mol/L concentration in the control group, 55% versus 38%, compared to untreated oocytes. This study showed that melatonin has the potential to induce oocyte nuclear maturation and guarantee fertilization potential. © 2016 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  2. Software Acquisition Capability Maturity Model (SA-CMMsm) Version 1.01.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    ultimate goal and what is required to achieve that goal. Additionally, progress toward achieving the goal must be measurable. A capability maturity model provides...a framework needed to facilitate the desired improvement. The Software Acquisition Capability Maturity Model (SA-CMM) has been developed to provide such a framework.

  3. A Maturity Model: Does It Provide a Path for Online Course Design?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neuhauser, Charlotte

    2004-01-01

    Maturity models are successfully used by organizations attempting to improve their processes, products, and delivery. As more faculty include online course design and teaching, a maturity model of online course design may serve as a tool in planning and assessing their courses for improvement based on best practices. This article presents such a…

  4. Software Acquisition Capability Maturity Model (SA-CMM) Version 1.02

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    measurable. A capability maturity model provides the framework needed to facilitate the desired improvement. The Software Acquisition Capability Maturity ... Model (SA-CMM) has been developed to provide such a framework. This new version incorporates change requests that have been received, as well as the

  5. Integrated Medical Model Overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, J.; Boley, L.; Foy, M.; Goodenow, D.; Griffin, D.; Keenan, A.; Kerstman, E.; Melton, S.; McGuire, K.; Saile, L.; hide

    2015-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) Project represents one aspect of NASA's Human Research Program (HRP) to quantitatively assess medical risks to astronauts for existing operational missions as well as missions associated with future exploration and commercial space flight ventures. The IMM takes a probabilistic approach to assessing the likelihood and specific outcomes of one hundred medical conditions within the envelope of accepted space flight standards of care over a selectable range of mission capabilities. A specially developed Integrated Medical Evidence Database (iMED) maintains evidence-based, organizational knowledge across a variety of data sources. Since becoming operational in 2011, version 3.0 of the IMM, the supporting iMED, and the expertise of the IMM project team have contributed to a wide range of decision and informational processes for the space medical and human research community. This presentation provides an overview of the IMM conceptual architecture and range of application through examples of actual space flight community questions posed to the IMM project.

  6. Integration of Posttranscriptional Gene Networks into Metabolic Adaptation and Biofilm Maturation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Paul F.; Lo, Tricia L.; Quenault, Tara; Dagley, Michael J.; Bellousoff, Matthew; Powell, David R.; Beilharz, Traude H.; Traven, Ana

    2015-01-01

    The yeast Candida albicans is a human commensal and opportunistic pathogen. Although both commensalism and pathogenesis depend on metabolic adaptation, the regulatory pathways that mediate metabolic processes in C. albicans are incompletely defined. For example, metabolic change is a major feature that distinguishes community growth of C. albicans in biofilms compared to suspension cultures, but how metabolic adaptation is functionally interfaced with the structural and gene regulatory changes that drive biofilm maturation remains to be fully understood. We show here that the RNA binding protein Puf3 regulates a posttranscriptional mRNA network in C. albicans that impacts on mitochondrial biogenesis, and provide the first functional data suggesting evolutionary rewiring of posttranscriptional gene regulation between the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and C. albicans. A proportion of the Puf3 mRNA network is differentially expressed in biofilms, and by using a mutant in the mRNA deadenylase CCR4 (the enzyme recruited to mRNAs by Puf3 to control transcript stability) we show that posttranscriptional regulation is important for mitochondrial regulation in biofilms. Inactivation of CCR4 or dis-regulation of mitochondrial activity led to altered biofilm structure and over-production of extracellular matrix material. The extracellular matrix is critical for antifungal resistance and immune evasion, and yet of all biofilm maturation pathways extracellular matrix biogenesis is the least understood. We propose a model in which the hypoxic biofilm environment is sensed by regulators such as Ccr4 to orchestrate metabolic adaptation, as well as the regulation of extracellular matrix production by impacting on the expression of matrix-related cell wall genes. Therefore metabolic changes in biofilms might be intimately linked to a key biofilm maturation mechanism that ultimately results in untreatable fungal disease. PMID:26474309

  7. Refining King and Baxter Magolda's Model of Intercultural Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Rosemary J.; Shim, Woojeong; King, Patricia M.; Baxter Magolda, Marcia B.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined 110 intercultural experiences from 82 students attending six colleges and universities to explore how students' interpretations of their intercultural experiences reflected their developmental capacities for intercultural maturity. Our analysis of students' experiences confirmed as well as refined and expanded King and Baxter…

  8. Refining King and Baxter Magolda's Model of Intercultural Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perez, Rosemary J.; Shim, Woojeong; King, Patricia M.; Baxter Magolda, Marcia B.

    2015-01-01

    This study examined 110 intercultural experiences from 82 students attending six colleges and universities to explore how students' interpretations of their intercultural experiences reflected their developmental capacities for intercultural maturity. Our analysis of students' experiences confirmed as well as refined and expanded King and Baxter…

  9. ISO 9000 and/or Systems Engineering Capability Maturity Model?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gholston, Sampson E.

    2002-01-01

    For businesses and organizations to remain competitive today they must have processes and systems in place that will allow them to first identify customer needs and then develop products/processes that will meet or exceed the customers needs and expectations. Customer needs, once identified, are normally stated as requirements. Designers can then develop products/processes that will meet these requirements. Several functions, such as quality management and systems engineering management are used to assist product development teams in the development process. Both functions exist in all organizations and both have a similar objective, which is to ensure that developed processes will meet customer requirements. Are efforts in these organizations being duplicated? Are both functions needed by organizations? What are the similarities and differences between the functions listed above? ISO 9000 is an international standard of goods and services. It sets broad requirements for the assurance of quality and for management's involvement. It requires organizations to document the processes and to follow these documented processes. ISO 9000 gives customers assurance that the suppliers have control of the process for product development. Systems engineering can broadly be defined as a discipline that seeks to ensure that all requirements for a system are satisfied throughout the life of the system by preserving their interrelationship. The key activities of systems engineering include requirements analysis, functional analysis/allocation, design synthesis and verification, and system analysis and control. The systems engineering process, when followed properly, will lead to higher quality products, lower cost products, and shorter development cycles. The System Engineering Capability Maturity Model (SE-CMM) will allow companies to measure their system engineering capability and continuously improve those capabilities. ISO 9000 and SE-CMM seem to have a similar objective, which

  10. ISO 9000 and/or Systems Engineering Capability Maturity Model?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gholston, Sampson E.

    2002-01-01

    For businesses and organizations to remain competitive today they must have processes and systems in place that will allow them to first identify customer needs and then develop products/processes that will meet or exceed the customers needs and expectations. Customer needs, once identified, are normally stated as requirements. Designers can then develop products/processes that will meet these requirements. Several functions, such as quality management and systems engineering management are used to assist product development teams in the development process. Both functions exist in all organizations and both have a similar objective, which is to ensure that developed processes will meet customer requirements. Are efforts in these organizations being duplicated? Are both functions needed by organizations? What are the similarities and differences between the functions listed above? ISO 9000 is an international standard of goods and services. It sets broad requirements for the assurance of quality and for management's involvement. It requires organizations to document the processes and to follow these documented processes. ISO 9000 gives customers assurance that the suppliers have control of the process for product development. Systems engineering can broadly be defined as a discipline that seeks to ensure that all requirements for a system are satisfied throughout the life of the system by preserving their interrelationship. The key activities of systems engineering include requirements analysis, functional analysis/allocation, design synthesis and verification, and system analysis and control. The systems engineering process, when followed properly, will lead to higher quality products, lower cost products, and shorter development cycles. The System Engineering Capability Maturity Model (SE-CMM) will allow companies to measure their system engineering capability and continuously improve those capabilities. ISO 9000 and SE-CMM seem to have a similar objective, which

  11. A Quality Framework for Continuous Improvement of e-Learning: The e-Learning Maturity Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marshall, Stephen

    2010-01-01

    The E-Learning Maturity Model (eMM) is a quality improvement framework designed to help institutional leaders assess their institution's e-learning maturity. This paper reviews the eMM, drawing on examples of assessments conducted in New Zealand, Australia, the UK and the USA to show how it helps institutional leaders assess and compare their…

  12. An Investigation into the Contruct Validity of Crites' Career Maturity Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvi, Sabir A.; Khan, Sar B.

    1983-01-01

    Investigated 142, 114, 112, and 71 students from grades 9, 10, 11, and 12, respectively, to examine career maturity. Found intercorrelations among the Career Maturity Inventory (CMI) Attitude Scale and five parts of the CMI Competence Test to be more consistent with Crites' model than those reported by others. (Author/HLM)

  13. An Investigation into the Contruct Validity of Crites' Career Maturity Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvi, Sabir A.; Khan, Sar B.

    1983-01-01

    Investigated 142, 114, 112, and 71 students from grades 9, 10, 11, and 12, respectively, to examine career maturity. Found intercorrelations among the Career Maturity Inventory (CMI) Attitude Scale and five parts of the CMI Competence Test to be more consistent with Crites' model than those reported by others. (Author/HLM)

  14. Development of Systems Engineering Maturity Models and Management Tools

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-21

    Readiness Assessment – A systematic, metrics-based process that assesses the maturity of critical technology elements ( CTEs ), including sustainment...Critical Technology Elements ( CTEs ). These will be evaluated and scored in the SRL. 3. Identify the Non-critical Technology Elements (NTEs). These...that are CTEs in the development of the system. These will be the elements that will need to be evaluated, rated, and compiled in the SRL assessment

  15. ICoNOs MM: The IT-Enabled Collaborative Networked Organizations Maturity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santana Tapia, Roberto

    The focus of this paper is to introduce a comprehensive model for assessing and improving maturity of business-IT alignment (B-ITa) in collaborative networked organizations (CNOs): the ICoNOs MM. This two dimensional maturity model (MM) addresses five levels of maturity as well as four domains to which these levels apply: partnering structure, information system (IS) architecture, process architecture and coordination. The model can be used to benchmark and support continuous improvement of B-ITa process areas in CNOs.

  16. Branes and integrable lattice models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yagi, Junya

    2017-01-01

    This is a brief review of my work on the correspondence between four-dimensional 𝒩 = 1 supersymmetric field theories realized by brane tilings and two-dimensional integrable lattice models. I explain how to construct integrable lattice models from extended operators in partially topological quantum field theories, and elucidate the correspondence as an application of this construction.

  17. Integrated modeling for the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Michael; Wilhelm, Rainer; Baier, Horst; Koehler, Bertrand

    2003-02-01

    Within the scope of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) project, a set of software tools for integrated modeling of ground- and space-based stellar interferometers has been developed. Integrated modeling aims at time-dependent system analysis combining different technical disciplines (optics, mechanical structure, control system with sensors and actuators, environmental disturbances). The main components of the software are BeamWarrior, a tool for creation of dynamic optical models, and SMI (Structural Modeling Interface), which generates linear state-space models from finite element models of a mechanical structure. Based on these tools, models of the various subsystems (e.g. telescope, delay line, beam combiner) can be created in the relevant technical disciplines (e.g. optics, structure). All subsystem models are integrated into the Matlab/Simulink environment for dynamic control system simulations. The output of the dynamic model is a complete description of the time-dependent electromagnetic field in each interferometer arm. This output serves as input to an instrument model simulating the creation of interference fringes. This paper shows the application of the integrated modeling concept to the VLTI. The architecture of a Simulink-based integrated model with its main components, telescope structures, optics and control loops, is presented. Disturbance models for wind load, seismic ground excitation and atmospheric turbulence are included. Beam combination is performed using a simplified model of the VINCI instrument. Results of closed-loop dynamic simulations are presented.

  18. Integrability of the Rabi Model

    SciTech Connect

    Braak, D.

    2011-09-02

    The Rabi model is a paradigm for interacting quantum systems. It couples a bosonic mode to the smallest possible quantum model, a two-level system. I present the analytical solution which allows us to consider the question of integrability for quantum systems that do not possess a classical limit. A criterion for quantum integrability is proposed which shows that the Rabi model is integrable due to the presence of a discrete symmetry. Moreover, I introduce a generalization with no symmetries; the generalized Rabi model is the first example of a nonintegrable but exactly solvable system.

  19. Integrated Computational Model Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    specific material properties. 15. SUBJECT TERMS alloy design, microstructure, mechanical properties, fatigue behavior, crack growth behavior...microstructure, processing, constitution, or alloy might not be correct. A critical piece of ICME is the “integration.” For years materials laboratories...experimental techniques. These four areas are explained in more detail below. Alloy Selection Processing Microstructure Lifing Properties Life Prediction Risk

  20. Integrated Models in Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butler-Por, Nava

    1979-01-01

    Examines educational change in Israeli junior high schools which was intended to integrate ethnic, social, and ability groups into a single national entity. Topics discussed include peer tutoring, busing, tutorial work given by gifted students to slow learners, and student motivation. Journal availability: see SO 507 297. (DB)

  1. Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) Version 1.2 Overview

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10 . SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 12. DISTRIBUTION...taught by Shewhart, Juran , Deming, and Humphrey). • Belief in this premise is visible worldwide in quality movements in manufacturing and service...industries (e.g., ISO standards). 7 SEI Presentation (Full Color) Author, Date © 2007 Carnegie Mellon University Quality Leverage Points While process is

  2. A Systems Engineering Capability Maturity Model, Version 1.1,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-11-01

    Integrate Disciplines 4.42 PA 05: Integrate System 4.47 PA 06: Understand Customer Needs and Expectations 4-53 PA 07: Verify and Validate System...contractually negotiated market areas are often determined by how efficiently an organization translates customer needs into a product that effectively meets...solving process that is used to • transform customer needs and requirements into a life-cycle balanced solution set of system product and process designs

  3. Mechanisms of Hierarchical Cortical Maturation

    PubMed Central

    Chomiak, Taylor; Hu, Bin

    2017-01-01

    Cortical information processing is structurally and functionally organized into hierarchical pathways, with primary sensory cortical regions providing modality specific information and associative cortical regions playing a more integrative role. Historically, there has been debate as to whether primary cortical regions mature earlier than associative cortical regions, or whether both primary and associative cortical regions mature simultaneously. Identifying whether primary and associative cortical regions mature hierarchically or simultaneously will not only deepen our understanding of the mechanisms that regulate brain maturation, but it will also provide fundamental insight into aspects of adolescent behavior, learning, neurodevelopmental disorders and computational models of neural processing. This mini-review article summarizes the current evidence supporting the sequential and hierarchical nature of cortical maturation, and then proposes a new cellular model underlying this process. Finally, unresolved issues associated with hierarchical cortical maturation are also addressed. PMID:28959187

  4. Modeling timelines for translational science in cancer; the impact of technological maturation

    PubMed Central

    McNamee, Laura M.; Ledley, Fred D.

    2017-01-01

    This work examines translational science in cancer based on theories of innovation that posit a relationship between the maturation of technologies and their capacity to generate successful products. We examined the growth of technologies associated with 138 anticancer drugs using an analytical model that identifies the point of initiation of exponential growth and the point at which growth slows as the technology becomes established. Approval of targeted and biological products corresponded with technological maturation, with first approval averaging 14 years after the established point and 44 years after initiation of associated technologies. The lag in cancer drug approvals after the increases in cancer funding and dramatic scientific advances of the 1970s thus reflects predictable timelines of technology maturation. Analytical models of technological maturation may be used for technological forecasting to guide more efficient translation of scientific discoveries into cures. PMID:28346525

  5. Modeling timelines for translational science in cancer; the impact of technological maturation.

    PubMed

    McNamee, Laura M; Ledley, Fred D

    2017-01-01

    This work examines translational science in cancer based on theories of innovation that posit a relationship between the maturation of technologies and their capacity to generate successful products. We examined the growth of technologies associated with 138 anticancer drugs using an analytical model that identifies the point of initiation of exponential growth and the point at which growth slows as the technology becomes established. Approval of targeted and biological products corresponded with technological maturation, with first approval averaging 14 years after the established point and 44 years after initiation of associated technologies. The lag in cancer drug approvals after the increases in cancer funding and dramatic scientific advances of the 1970s thus reflects predictable timelines of technology maturation. Analytical models of technological maturation may be used for technological forecasting to guide more efficient translation of scientific discoveries into cures.

  6. Integrative structure modeling with IMP.

    PubMed

    Webb, Benjamin; Viswanath, Shruthi; Bonomi, Massimiliano; Pellarin, Riccardo; Greenberg, Charles H; Saltzberg, Daniel; Sali, Andrej

    2017-09-28

    Building models of a biological system that are consistent with the myriad data available is one of the key challenges in biology. Modeling the structure and dynamics of macromolecular assemblies, for example, can give insights into how biological systems work, evolved, might be controlled, and even designed. Integrative structure modeling casts the building of structural models as a computational optimization problem, for which information about the assembly is encoded into a scoring function that evaluates candidate models. Here, we describe our open source software suite for integrative structure modeling, Integrative Modeling Platform (IMP) (https://integrativemodeling.org), and demonstrate its use. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  7. Integrated Workforce Modeling System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moynihan, Gary P.

    2000-01-01

    There are several computer-based systems, currently in various phases of development at KSC, which encompass some component, aspect, or function of workforce modeling. These systems may offer redundant capabilities and/or incompatible interfaces. A systems approach to workforce modeling is necessary in order to identify and better address user requirements. This research has consisted of two primary tasks. Task 1 provided an assessment of existing and proposed KSC workforce modeling systems for their functionality and applicability to the workforce planning function. Task 2 resulted in the development of a proof-of-concept design for a systems approach to workforce modeling. The model incorporates critical aspects of workforce planning, including hires, attrition, and employee development.

  8. Microscopic morphology and the origins of the membrane maturation model of Golgi apparatus function.

    PubMed

    James Morré, D; Mollenhauer, Hilton H

    2007-01-01

    The membrane maturation (flow differentiation) model of Golgi apparatus function embodies concepts of saccule formation at one face of the Golgi apparatus from membranes derived from endoplasmic reticulum and utilization of saccules in vesicle formation at the opposite face for delivery to the plasma membrane as existing saccules are displaced from one position within the stack to another. Derivation of the model came almost entirely from light and electron microscopy. Especially important were observations that passage through the Golgi apparatus was accompanied by differentiation of membranes from endoplasmic reticulum-like to plasma membrane-like across the polarity axis of the stacked saccules. The concept of coparticipation of endoplasmic reticulum and/or nuclear envelope, transition, and secretory vesicles and other pre- and post-Golgi apparatus structures through the operation of an integrated endomembrane system was essential to the model. Dynamic aspects confirmed initially by autoradiographing and cell fractionation studies have been corroborated in newer approaches of fluorescent labeling and with living cells.

  9. Integrating Social-Contextual and Intrapersonal Mechanisms of “Maturing Out”: Joint Influences of Familial-Role Transitions and Personality Maturation on Problem-Drinking Reductions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Matthew R.; Ellingson, Jarrod M.; Sher, Kenneth J.

    2015-01-01

    Background “Maturing out” of problem drinking is associated with both role transitions (e.g., getting married) and personality development. However, little is known concerning how these two mechanisms jointly influence problem-drinking desistance. This study investigated whether salutary effects of role transitions and personality occur at different points in young-adult development and whether they mediate one another’s effects. Methods Participants were initially recruited as first-year undergraduates, with family history of alcoholism overrepresented by design (N=489; Sher et al., 1991). Using four waves of data at roughly ages 21, 25, 29, and 34, cross-lagged panel models estimated prospective relations among familial-role transitions (marriage or parenthood), personality (disinhibition, conscientiousness, and neuroticism), and problem drinking. Results Mixed support was found for the prediction of roles being more strongly associated with earlier maturing out of problem drinking and personality being more strongly associated with later maturing out. Regarding mediation, no evidence was found for the expectation that role effects would be mediated by personality. However, results did support mediation of personality effects by role transitions. Specifically, lower disinhibition and higher conscientiousness in emerging adulthood predicted role adoption, which, in turn, predicted later problem-drinking reductions. Family history of alcoholism also distally influenced these mediation processes. Conclusions The differential timing of role and personality effects is consistent with the notion of decreasing contextual influences and increasing intrapersonal influences across development. In light of role incompatibility theory, results suggest that, over the course of development, the association of familial roles with problem drinking may increasingly reflect problem-drinking effects on role entry (i.e., role selection) and decreasingly reflect role entry

  10. Integrating Social-Contextual and Intrapersonal Mechanisms of "Maturing Out": Joint Influences of Familial-Role Transitions and Personality Maturation on Problem-Drinking Reductions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Matthew R; Ellingson, Jarrod M; Sher, Kenneth J

    2015-09-01

    "Maturing out" of problem drinking is associated with both role transitions (e.g., getting married) and personality development. However, little is known concerning how these 2 mechanisms jointly influence problem-drinking desistance. This study investigated whether salutary effects of role transitions and personality occur at different points in young-adult development and whether they mediate one another's effects. Participants were initially recruited as first-year undergraduates, with family history of alcoholism overrepresented by design (N = 489). Using 4 waves of data at roughly ages 21, 25, 29, and 34, cross-lagged panel models estimated prospective relations among familial-role transitions (marriage or parenthood), personality (disinhibition, conscientiousness, and neuroticism), and problem drinking. Mixed support was found for the prediction of roles being more strongly associated with earlier maturing out of problem drinking and personality being more strongly associated with later maturing out. Regarding mediation, no evidence was found for the expectation that role effects would be mediated by personality. However, results did support mediation of personality effects by role transitions. Specifically, lower disinhibition and higher conscientiousness in emerging adulthood predicted role adoption, which, in turn, predicted later problem-drinking reductions. Family history of alcoholism also distally influenced these mediation processes. The differential timing of role and personality effects is consistent with the notion of decreasing contextual influences and increasing intrapersonal influences across development. In light of role incompatibility theory, results suggest that, over the course of development, the association of familial roles with problem drinking may increasingly reflect problem-drinking effects on role entry (i.e., role selection) and decreasingly reflect role entry effects on problem drinking (i.e., role socialization). As emerging

  11. Integrable discrete PT symmetric model.

    PubMed

    Ablowitz, Mark J; Musslimani, Ziad H

    2014-09-01

    An exactly solvable discrete PT invariant nonlinear Schrödinger-like model is introduced. It is an integrable Hamiltonian system that exhibits a nontrivial nonlinear PT symmetry. A discrete one-soliton solution is constructed using a left-right Riemann-Hilbert formulation. It is shown that this pure soliton exhibits unique features such as power oscillations and singularity formation. The proposed model can be viewed as a discretization of a recently obtained integrable nonlocal nonlinear Schrödinger equation.

  12. A Multi-Stage Maturity Model for Long-Term IT Outsourcing Relationship Success

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luong, Ming; Stevens, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    The Multi-Stage Maturity Model for Long-Term IT Outsourcing Relationship Success, a theoretical stages-of-growth model, explains long-term success in IT outsourcing relationships. Research showed the IT outsourcing relationship life cycle consists of four distinct, sequential stages: contract, transition, support, and partnership. The model was…

  13. Direct integration transmittance model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kunde, V. G.; Maguire, W. C.

    1973-01-01

    A transmittance model was developed for the 200-2000/cm region for interpretation of high spectral resolution measurements of laboratory absorption and of planetary thermal emission. The high spectral resolution requires transmittances to be computed monochromatically by summing the contribution of individual molecular absorption lines. A magnetic tape atlas of H2O,O3, and CO2 molecular line parameters serves as input to the transmittance model with simple empirical representations used for continuum regions wherever suitable laboratory data exist. The theoretical formulation of the transmittance model and the computational procedures used for the evaluation of the transmittances are discussed. Application is demonstrated of the model to several homogenous path laboratory absorption examples.

  14. Requirement for Microglia for the Maintenance of Synaptic Function and Integrity in the Mature Retina

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xu; Zhao, Lian; Zhang, Jun; Fariss, Robert N.; Ma, Wenxin; Kretschmer, Friedrich; Wang, Minhua; Qian, Hao hua; Badea, Tudor C.; Diamond, Jeffrey S.; Gan, Wen-Biao; Roger, Jerome E.

    2016-01-01

    Microglia, the principal resident immune cell of the CNS, exert significant influence on neurons during development and in pathological situations. However, if and how microglia contribute to normal neuronal function in the mature uninjured CNS is not well understood. We used the model of the adult mouse retina, a part of the CNS amenable to structural and functional analysis, to investigate the constitutive role of microglia by depleting microglia from the retina in a sustained manner using genetic methods. We discovered that microglia are not acutely required for the maintenance of adult retinal architecture, the survival of retinal neurons, or the laminar organization of their dendritic and axonal compartments. However, sustained microglial depletion results in the degeneration of photoreceptor synapses in the outer plexiform layer, leading to a progressive functional deterioration in retinal light responses. Our results demonstrate that microglia are constitutively required for the maintenance of synaptic structure in the adult retina and for synaptic transmission underlying normal visual function. Our findings on constitutive microglial function are relevant in understanding microglial contributions to pathology and in the consideration of therapeutic interventions that reduce or perturb constitutive microglial function. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Microglia, the principal resident immune cell population in the CNS, has been implicated in diseases in the brain and retina. However, how they contribute to the everyday function of the CNS is unclear. Using the model of the adult mouse retina, we examined the constitutive role of microglia by depleting microglia from the retina. We found that in the absence of microglia, retinal neurons did not undergo overt cell death or become structurally disorganized in their processes. However, connections between neurons called synapses begin to break down, leading to a decreased ability of the retina to transmit light responses

  15. Evolutionistic or revolutionary paths? A PACS maturity model for strategic situational planning.

    PubMed

    van de Wetering, Rogier; Batenburg, Ronald; Lederman, Reeva

    2010-07-01

    While many hospitals are re-evaluating their current Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS), few have a mature strategy for PACS deployment. Furthermore, strategies for implementation, strategic and situational planning methods for the evolution of PACS maturity are scarce in the scientific literature. Consequently, in this paper we propose a strategic planning method for PACS deployment. This method builds upon a PACS maturity model (PMM), based on the elaboration of the strategic alignment concept and the maturity growth path concept previously developed in the PACS domain. First, we review the literature on strategic planning for information systems and information technology and PACS maturity. Secondly, the PMM is extended by applying four different strategic perspectives of the Strategic Alignment Framework whereupon two types of growth paths (evolutionistic and revolutionary) are applied that focus on a roadmap for PMM. This roadmap builds a path to get from one level of maturity and evolve to the next. An extended method for PACS strategic planning is developed. This method defines eight distinctive strategies for PACS strategic situational planning that allow decision-makers in hospitals to decide which approach best suits their hospitals' current situation and future ambition and what in principle is needed to evolve through the different maturity levels. The proposed method allows hospitals to strategically plan for PACS maturation. It is situational in that the required investments and activities depend on the alignment between the hospital strategy and the selected growth path. The inclusion of both strategic alignment and maturity growth path concepts make the planning method rigorous, and provide a framework for further empirical research and clinical practice.

  16. An atomic model of HIV-1 capsid-SP1 reveals structures regulating assembly and maturation.

    PubMed

    Schur, Florian K M; Obr, Martin; Hagen, Wim J H; Wan, William; Jakobi, Arjen J; Kirkpatrick, Joanna M; Sachse, Carsten; Kräusslich, Hans-Georg; Briggs, John A G

    2016-07-29

    Immature HIV-1 assembles at and buds from the plasma membrane before proteolytic cleavage of the viral Gag polyprotein induces structural maturation. Maturation can be blocked by maturation inhibitors (MIs), thereby abolishing infectivity. The CA (capsid) and SP1 (spacer peptide 1) region of Gag is the key regulator of assembly and maturation and is the target of MIs. We applied optimized cryo-electron tomography and subtomogram averaging to resolve this region within assembled immature HIV-1 particles at 3.9 angstrom resolution and built an atomic model. The structure reveals a network of intra- and intermolecular interactions mediating immature HIV-1 assembly. The proteolytic cleavage site between CA and SP1 is inaccessible to protease. We suggest that MIs prevent CA-SP1 cleavage by stabilizing the structure, and MI resistance develops by destabilizing CA-SP1.

  17. Modelling the cooking doneness via integrating sensory evaluation and kinetics.

    PubMed

    Li, Jingpeng; Deng, Li; Jin, Zhengyu; Yan, Yong

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the current work was to develop a novel method to model and quantitatively determine cooking doneness via integrating sensory evaluation and kinetics based on the maturity value (M value) which was redefined. The well-done food was first selected from a series of samples with different M values by sensory evaluation, the average termination maturity values (AMT values) were obtained in accordance with the weighted M values of the selected doneness samples. Among, the changes of M values were assumed to be accorded with the first-order reaction kinetic model and a specific zM value was set as well. The zM value was then obtained due to the rationality of the hypothesis, which was validated by rigorous data analysis. Results showed that maturity time values (MT values) were existing and stable for specific types of materials and a specific population. Quantitative determination of the degree of doneness has profound significance in industrial production.

  18. Integrated Modeling Systems,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-01

    Structured Modeling, Ph.D. Thesis, Graduate School of Management , UCLA. Federgruen, A. and P. Zipkin 򒾀>. "A Combined Vehicle Routing and Inventory ...C-O 570 i1 ’. 33 %xESTEN MANAGEMENT SCIENCE INSTITUTE Lnvcrsitv of California. Los Angles WESTERN MANAGEMENT SCIENCE INSTITUTE University of...Chuan Tsai. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation , the Office of Naval Research, and the Naval Personnel R&D Center. The views

  19. Integrated modeling for the VLTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muller, Michael; Wilhelm, Rainer C.; Baier, Horst J.; Koch, Franz

    2004-07-01

    Within the scope of the Very Large Telescope Interferometer (VLTI) project, ESO has developed a software package for integrated modeling of single- and multi-aperture optical telescopes. Integrated modeling is aiming at time-dependent system analysis combining different technical disciplines (optics, mechanical structure, control system with sensors and actuators, environmental disturbances). This allows multi-disciplinary analysis and gives information about cross-coupling effects for system engineering of complex stellar interferometers and telescopes. At the moment the main components of the Integrated Modeling Toolbox are BeamWarrior, a numerical tool for optical analysis of single- and multi-aperture telescopes, and the Structural Modeling Interface, which allows to generate Simulink blocks with reduced size from Finite Element Models of a telescope structure. Based on these tools, models of the various subsystems (e.g. telescope, delay line, beam combiner, atmosphere) can be created in the appropriate disciplines (e.g. optics, structure, disturbance). All subsystem models are integrated into the Matlab/Simulink environment for dynamic control system simulations. The basic output of the model is a complete description of the time-dependent electromagnetic field in each interferometer arm. Alternatively, a more elaborated output can be created, such as an interference fringe pattern at the focus of a beam combining instrument. The concern of this paper is the application of the modeling concept to large complex telescope systems. The concept of the Simulink-based integrated model with the main components telescope structure, optics and control loops is presented. The models for wind loads and atmospheric turbulence are explained. Especially the extension of the modeling approach to a 50 - 100 m class telescope is discussed.

  20. A structure for maturing intelligent tutoring system student models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holmes, Willard M.

    1990-01-01

    A special structure is examined for evolving a detached model of the user of an intelligent tutoring system. Tutoring is used in the context of education and training devices. A detached approach to populating the student model data structure is examined in the context of the need for time dependent reasoning about what the student knows about a particular concept in the domain of interest. This approach, to generating a data structure for the student model, allows an inference engine separate from the tutoring strategy determination to be used. This methodology has advantages in environments requiring real-time operation.

  1. Integrating Models and Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Womebarger, Amy

    2011-01-01

    For the past ten years, the coronal loops community has held bi-annual workshops to discuss the analysis of coronal loop observations and the latest efforts to model the loop structures. During this time, several heating scenarios have been proposed to explain loop observations. These heating scenarios rely on different heating frequencies, locations, and durations, as well as different loop sub-structure. Often the scenarios are developed to explain an observation, hence all heating scenarios match some observational criteria. The key to discriminating between the competing heating scenarios is to first identify the distinguishing observables. For instance, both effectively steady and nanoflare-heating scenarios can produce quasi-steady intensities. Observing quasi-steady intensities, then, does not help determine which heating scenario is most likely. These heating scenarios may, however, predict different velocities or different emission measure distributions. In this talk, I will discuss a few of the expected observations for some simple heating scenarios. I will ask the modeling community to calculate similar observations for the different heating scenarios to generate a standard list of expected observations. After the community develops this list, comparisons with actual loop observations can then distinguish the most likely heating scenario.

  2. Separations and safeguards model integration.

    SciTech Connect

    Cipiti, Benjamin B.; Zinaman, Owen

    2010-09-01

    Research and development of advanced reprocessing plant designs can greatly benefit from the development of a reprocessing plant model capable of transient solvent extraction chemistry. This type of model can be used to optimize the operations of a plant as well as the designs for safeguards, security, and safety. Previous work has integrated a transient solvent extraction simulation module, based on the Solvent Extraction Process Having Interaction Solutes (SEPHIS) code developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, with the Separations and Safeguards Performance Model (SSPM) developed at Sandia National Laboratory, as a first step toward creating a more versatile design and evaluation tool. The goal of this work was to strengthen the integration by linking more variables between the two codes. The results from this integrated model show expected operational performance through plant transients. Additionally, ORIGEN source term files were integrated into the SSPM to provide concentrations, radioactivity, neutron emission rate, and thermal power data for various spent fuels. This data was used to generate measurement blocks that can determine the radioactivity, neutron emission rate, or thermal power of any stream or vessel in the plant model. This work examined how the code could be expanded to integrate other separation steps and benchmark the results to other data. Recommendations for future work will be presented.

  3. Understanding through seeing - the role of seismic in an integrated study of a mature Nigerian field

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, M.

    1996-12-31

    The impact of integration of both data and disciplines is presented in the case of an Nigerian field, with particular emphasis on the central role of seismic data: A pre-requisite for any seismic interpretation is a reliable well-to-seismic tie. Due to log data availability and quality, this match was only achieved by generating synthetic seismograms based on acoustic impedance models. The seismic time interpretation was guided by the geological framework following sequence stratigraphical principles. Depth conversion and evaluation of volumetric uncertainties were based on all data. The resulting STOIIP estimates have been compared to the volumes derived independently from production data. It then became possible to explain apparent mismatches seen in some reservoirs by modifying the best-estimate volumes within the uncertainties and by comparison with analogue reservoirs Channel-like amplitude features encountered in shallow reservoirs helped to explain variable production performance and consequently to identify appraisal and development opportunities. Some of the deeper, shoreface sands seem to behave in a more tank-like manner. This is not only confirmed by recent RST-logs, but also by seismic flatspots. The flatspots are conformable to structure and reflect the remaining oil distribution. These results highlight the value of continuous integration of data and disciplines to the petroleum engineering study.

  4. Understanding through seeing - the role of seismic in an integrated study of a mature Nigerian field

    SciTech Connect

    Hartung, M.

    1996-01-01

    The impact of integration of both data and disciplines is presented in the case of an Nigerian field, with particular emphasis on the central role of seismic data: A pre-requisite for any seismic interpretation is a reliable well-to-seismic tie. Due to log data availability and quality, this match was only achieved by generating synthetic seismograms based on acoustic impedance models. The seismic time interpretation was guided by the geological framework following sequence stratigraphical principles. Depth conversion and evaluation of volumetric uncertainties were based on all data. The resulting STOIIP estimates have been compared to the volumes derived independently from production data. It then became possible to explain apparent mismatches seen in some reservoirs by modifying the best-estimate volumes within the uncertainties and by comparison with analogue reservoirs Channel-like amplitude features encountered in shallow reservoirs helped to explain variable production performance and consequently to identify appraisal and development opportunities. Some of the deeper, shoreface sands seem to behave in a more tank-like manner. This is not only confirmed by recent RST-logs, but also by seismic flatspots. The flatspots are conformable to structure and reflect the remaining oil distribution. These results highlight the value of continuous integration of data and disciplines to the petroleum engineering study.

  5. The development and use of a molecular model for soybean maturity groups.

    PubMed

    Langewisch, Tiffany; Lenis, Julian; Jiang, Guo-Liang; Wang, Dechun; Pantalone, Vince; Bilyeu, Kristin

    2017-05-30

    Achieving appropriate maturity in a target environment is essential to maximizing crop yield potential. In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], the time to maturity is largely dependent on developmental response to dark periods. Once the critical photoperiod is reached, flowering is initiated and reproductive development proceeds. Therefore, soybean adaptation has been attributed to genetic changes and natural or artificial selection to optimize plant development in specific, narrow latitudinal ranges. In North America, these regions have been classified into twelve maturity groups (MG), with lower MG being shorter season than higher MG. Growing soybean lines not adapted to a particular environment typically results in poor growth and significant yield reductions. The objective of this study was to develop a molecular model for soybean maturity based on the alleles underlying the major maturity loci: E1, E2, and E3. We determined the allelic variation and diversity of the E maturity genes in a large collection of soybean landraces, North American ancestors, Chinese cultivars, North American cultivars or expired Plant Variety Protection lines, and private-company lines. The E gene status of accessions in the USDA Soybean Germplasm Collection with SoySNP50K Beadchip data was also predicted. We determined the E allelic combinations needed to adapt soybean to different MGs in the United States (US) and discovered a strong signal of selection for E genotypes released in North America, particularly the US and Canada. The E gene maturity model proposed will enable plant breeders to more effectively transfer traits into different MGs and increase the overall efficiency of soybean breeding in the US and Canada. The powerful yet simple selection strategy for increasing soybean breeding efficiency can be used alone or to directly enhance genomic prediction/selection schemes. The results also revealed previously unrecognized aspects of artificial selection in soybean imposed by

  6. A Focus Area Maturity Model for a Statewide Master Person Index

    PubMed Central

    Duncan, Jeffrey; Xu, Wu; Narus, Scott P.; Clyde, Stephen; Nangle, Barry; Thornton, Sid; Facelli, Julio

    2013-01-01

    Objective: The sharing of personally identifiable information across organizational boundaries to facilitate patient identification in Utah presents significant policy challenges. Our objective was to create a focus area maturity model to describe and evaluate our progress in developing a policy framework to support a statewide master person index (sMPI) for healthcare and public health operations and research in Utah. Materials and Methods: We used various artifacts, including minutes from policy guidance committee meetings over a span of 18 months, a report from Utah’s Digital Health Services Commission, and a draft technical requirements document to retrospectively analyze our work and create a focus area maturity model describing the domain of policy needed to support the sMPI. We then used our model to assess our progress and future goals. Conclusions: The focus area maturity model provides an orderly path that can guide the complex process of developing a functional statewide master person index among diverse, autonomous partners. While this paper focuses on our experience in Utah, we believe that the arguments for using a focus area maturity model to guide the development of state or regional MPIs is of general interest. PMID:23923093

  7. A focus area maturity model for a statewide master person index.

    PubMed

    Duncan, Jeffrey; Xu, Wu; Narus, Scott P; Clyde, Stephen; Nangle, Barry; Thornton, Sid; Facelli, Julio

    2013-01-01

    The sharing of personally identifiable information across organizational boundaries to facilitate patient identification in Utah presents significant policy challenges. Our objective was to create a focus area maturity model to describe and evaluate our progress in developing a policy framework to support a statewide master person index (sMPI) for healthcare and public health operations and research in Utah. We used various artifacts, including minutes from policy guidance committee meetings over a span of 18 months, a report from Utah's Digital Health Services Commission, and a draft technical requirements document to retrospectively analyze our work and create a focus area maturity model describing the domain of policy needed to support the sMPI. We then used our model to assess our progress and future goals. The focus area maturity model provides an orderly path that can guide the complex process of developing a functional statewide master person index among diverse, autonomous partners. While this paper focuses on our experience in Utah, we believe that the arguments for using a focus area maturity model to guide the development of state or regional MPIs is of general interest.

  8. Maturity Matrices for Quality of Model- and Observation-Based Climate Data Records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Höck, Heinke; Kaiser-Weiss, Andrea; Kaspar, Frank; Stockhause, Martina; Toussaint, Frank; Lautenschlager, Michael

    2015-04-01

    In the field of Software Engineering the Capability Maturity Model is used to evaluate and improve software development processes. The application of a Maturity Matrix is a method to assess the degree of software maturity. This method was adapted to the maturity of Earth System data in scientific archives. The application of such an approach to Climate Data Records was first proposed in the context of satellite-based climate products and applied by NOAA and NASA. The European FP7 project CORE-CLIMAX suggested and tested extensions of the approach in order to allow the applicability to additional climate datasets, e.g. based on in-situ observations as well as model-based reanalysis. Within that project the concept was applied to products of satellite- and in-situ based datasets. Examples are national ground-based data from Germany as an example for typical products of a national meteorological service, the EUMETSAT Satellite Application Facility Network, the ESA Climate Change Initiative, European Reanalysis activities (ERA-CLIM) and international in situ-based climatologies such as GPCC, ECA&D, BSRN, HadSST. Climate models and their related output have some additional characteristics that need specific consideration in such an approach. Here we use examples from the World Data Centre for Climate (WDCC) to discuss the applicability. The WDCC focuses on climate data products, specifically those resulting from climate simulations. Based on these already existing Maturity Matrix models, WDCC developed a generic Quality Assessment System for Earth System data. A self-assessment is performed using a maturity matrix evaluating the data quality for five maturity levels with respect to the criteria data and metadata consistency, completeness, accessibility and accuracy. The classical goals of a quality assessment system in a data processing workflow are: (1) to encourage data creators to improve quality to reach the next quality level, (2) enable data consumers to decide

  9. 3D thermal history and maturity modelling of the Levant Basin and Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daher, Samer Bou; Ducros, Mathieu; Michel, Pauline; Nader, Fadi H.; Littke, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    The gas discoveries recorded in the Levant Basin in the last decade have redirected the industrial and academic communities' interest to this frontier basin and its surroundings. The reported gas in Miocene reservoirs has been assumed to be derived from biogenic sources, although little data has been published so far. The thickness of the sedimentary column and the presence of direct hydrocarbon indicators (DHI) observed in the seismic data suggest the presence of promising prospective thermogenic petroleum systems in deeper intervals in the Levant Basin and along its Margin. In this study we present a large scale 3D thermal history and maturity model of the Levant Basin and Margin, integrating all available calibration data, source rock information collected from onshore Lebanon, and published data. In the first part we will present the main input and assumptions that were made in terms of thicknesses, lithologies, and boundary conditions. In the second part we will discuss the analysed source rocks, their petroleum generation potential and their kinetics. In the third part we will present modelling results including depth maps for key isotherms in addition to transformation ratio and vitrinite reflectance maps for proven and speculative source rocks at different time steps. This will provide a comprehensive assessment of the potential thermogenic petroleum systems in the study area, and allow us to illustrate and discuss the differences between the basinal, marginal, and onshore part of the study area as well as the potential of the northern vis a vis the southern offshore Levant Basin. This model will also allow us to analyse the sensitivity of the system to the various poorly constrained parameters in frontier basins (e.g. crustal thickness, rifting phases, lithologies) and thus identify the most critical data to be collected for future exploration and de-risking strategies.

  10. Multisensory Bayesian Inference Depends on Synapse Maturation during Training: Theoretical Analysis and Neural Modeling Implementation.

    PubMed

    Ursino, Mauro; Cuppini, Cristiano; Magosso, Elisa

    2017-03-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies suggest that in multisensory conditions, the brain performs a near-optimal Bayesian estimate of external events, giving more weight to the more reliable stimuli. However, the neural mechanisms responsible for this behavior, and its progressive maturation in a multisensory environment, are still insufficiently understood. The aim of this letter is to analyze this problem with a neural network model of audiovisual integration, based on probabilistic population coding-the idea that a population of neurons can encode probability functions to perform Bayesian inference. The model consists of two chains of unisensory neurons (auditory and visual) topologically organized. They receive the corresponding input through a plastic receptive field and reciprocally exchange plastic cross-modal synapses, which encode the spatial co-occurrence of visual-auditory inputs. A third chain of multisensory neurons performs a simple sum of auditory and visual excitations. The work includes a theoretical part and a computer simulation study. We show how a simple rule for synapse learning (consisting of Hebbian reinforcement and a decay term) can be used during training to shrink the receptive fields and encode the unisensory likelihood functions. Hence, after training, each unisensory area realizes a maximum likelihood estimate of stimulus position (auditory or visual). In cross-modal conditions, the same learning rule can encode information on prior probability into the cross-modal synapses. Computer simulations confirm the theoretical results and show that the proposed network can realize a maximum likelihood estimate of auditory (or visual) positions in unimodal conditions and a Bayesian estimate, with moderate deviations from optimality, in cross-modal conditions. Furthermore, the model explains the ventriloquism illusion and, looking at the activity in the multimodal neurons, explains the automatic reweighting of auditory and visual inputs

  11. (Br-SCMM) Brazilian Smart City Maturity Model: A Perspective from the Health Domain.

    PubMed

    Afonso, Ricardo Alexandre; dos Santos Brito, Kellyton; Holanda do Nascimento, Clóvis; Campos da Costa, Luciana; Álvaro, Alexandre; Cardoso Garcia, Vinicius

    2015-01-01

    The term definition "Smart City" still allows various interpretations, and this causes some difficulty in establishing parameters to measure how smart the cities can be. This paper presents a Maturity Model that uses a set of minimum domains and indicators that aim to encourage cities of different sizes to identify their potential and improve processes and public policies.

  12. Using a Capability Maturity Model to Build on the Generational Approach to Student Engagement Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, K.; Clarke, J.; Stoodley, I.; Creagh, T.

    2015-01-01

    The generational approach to conceptualising first-year student learning behaviour has made a useful contribution to understanding student engagement. It has an explicit focus on student behaviour and we suggest that a Capability Maturity Model interpretation may provide a complementary extension of that understanding as it builds on the…

  13. Using a Capability Maturity Model to Build on the Generational Approach to Student Engagement Practices

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, K.; Clarke, J.; Stoodley, I.; Creagh, T.

    2015-01-01

    The generational approach to conceptualising first-year student learning behaviour has made a useful contribution to understanding student engagement. It has an explicit focus on student behaviour and we suggest that a Capability Maturity Model interpretation may provide a complementary extension of that understanding as it builds on the…

  14. Piloting a Process Maturity Model as an e-Learning Benchmarking Method

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petch, Jim; Calverley, Gayle; Dexter, Hilary; Cappelli, Tim

    2007-01-01

    As part of a national e-learning benchmarking initiative of the UK Higher Education Academy, the University of Manchester is carrying out a pilot study of a method to benchmark e-learning in an institution. The pilot was designed to evaluate the operational viability of a method based on the e-Learning Maturity Model developed at the University of…

  15. Zif268/egr1 gene controls the selection, maturation and functional integration of adult hippocampal newborn neurons by learning.

    PubMed

    Veyrac, Alexandra; Gros, Alexandra; Bruel-Jungerman, Elodie; Rochefort, Christelle; Kleine Borgmann, Felix B; Jessberger, Sebastian; Laroche, Serge

    2013-04-23

    New neurons are continuously added to the dentate gyrus of the adult mammalian brain. During the critical period of a few weeks after birth when newborn neurons progressively mature, a restricted fraction is competitively selected to survive in an experience-dependent manner, a condition for their contribution to memory processes. The mechanisms that control critical stages of experience-dependent functional incorporation of adult newborn neurons remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a unique transcriptional regulator of the functional integration of newborn neurons, the inducible immediate early gene zif268/egr1. We show that newborn neurons in zif268-KO mice undergo accelerated death during the critical period of 2-3 wk around their birth and exhibit deficient neurochemical and morphological maturation, including reduced GluR1 expression, increased NKCC1/KCC2b chloride cotransporter ratio, altered dendritic development, and marked spine growth defect. Investigating responsiveness of newborn neurons to activity-dependent expression of zif268 in learning, we demonstrate that in the absence of zif268, training in a spatial learning task during this critical period fails to recruit newborn neurons and promote their survival, leading to impaired long-term memory. This study reveals a previously unknown mechanism for the control of the selection, functional maturation, and experience-dependent recruitment of dentate gyrus newborn neurons that depends on the inducible immediate early gene zif268, processes that are critical for their contribution to hippocampal-dependent long-term memory.

  16. Zif268/egr1 gene controls the selection, maturation and functional integration of adult hippocampal newborn neurons by learning

    PubMed Central

    Veyrac, Alexandra; Gros, Alexandra; Bruel-Jungerman, Elodie; Rochefort, Christelle; Kleine Borgmann, Felix B.; Jessberger, Sebastian; Laroche, Serge

    2013-01-01

    New neurons are continuously added to the dentate gyrus of the adult mammalian brain. During the critical period of a few weeks after birth when newborn neurons progressively mature, a restricted fraction is competitively selected to survive in an experience-dependent manner, a condition for their contribution to memory processes. The mechanisms that control critical stages of experience-dependent functional incorporation of adult newborn neurons remain largely unknown. Here, we identify a unique transcriptional regulator of the functional integration of newborn neurons, the inducible immediate early gene zif268/egr1. We show that newborn neurons in zif268-KO mice undergo accelerated death during the critical period of 2–3 wk around their birth and exhibit deficient neurochemical and morphological maturation, including reduced GluR1 expression, increased NKCC1/KCC2b chloride cotransporter ratio, altered dendritic development, and marked spine growth defect. Investigating responsiveness of newborn neurons to activity-dependent expression of zif268 in learning, we demonstrate that in the absence of zif268, training in a spatial learning task during this critical period fails to recruit newborn neurons and promote their survival, leading to impaired long-term memory. This study reveals a previously unknown mechanism for the control of the selection, functional maturation, and experience-dependent recruitment of dentate gyrus newborn neurons that depends on the inducible immediate early gene zif268, processes that are critical for their contribution to hippocampal-dependent long-term memory. PMID:23569253

  17. Integrated modeling: a look back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briggs, Clark

    2015-09-01

    This paper discusses applications and implementation approaches used for integrated modeling of structural systems with optics over the past 30 years. While much of the development work focused on control system design, significant contributions were made in system modeling and computer-aided design (CAD) environments. Early work appended handmade line-of-sight models to traditional finite element models, such as the optical spacecraft concept from the ACOSS program. The IDEAS2 computational environment built in support of Space Station collected a wider variety of existing tools around a parametric database. Later, IMOS supported interferometer and large telescope mission studies at JPL with MATLAB modeling of structural dynamics, thermal analysis, and geometric optics. IMOS's predecessor was a simple FORTRAN command line interpreter for LQG controller design with additional functions that built state-space finite element models. Specialized language systems such as CAESY were formulated and prototyped to provide more complex object-oriented functions suited to control-structure interaction. A more recent example of optical modeling directly in mechanical CAD is used to illustrate possible future directions. While the value of directly posing the optical metric in system dynamics terms is well understood today, the potential payoff is illustrated briefly via project-based examples. It is quite likely that integrated structure thermal optical performance (STOP) modeling could be accomplished in a commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) tool set. The work flow could be adopted, for example, by a team developing a small high-performance optical or radio frequency (RF) instrument.

  18. A maturity model for assessing the completeness of climate data records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bates, John J.; Privette, Jeffrey L.

    2012-10-01

    The demand for climate information, with long observational records spanning decades to centuries and the information's broad application for decision making across many socioeconomic sectors, requires that geophysicists adopt more rigorous processes for the sustained production of climate data records (CDRs). Such processes, methods, and standards are more typically found in the systems engineering community and have not generally been adopted in the climate science community. We propose the use of a maturity matrix for climate data records that characterizes the process of moving from a basic research product (e.g., raw data and initial product) to a sustained and routinely generated product (e.g., a quality-controlled homogenized data set). This model of increasing product and process maturity is similar to NASA's technical readiness levels for flight hardware and instrumentation and the software industry's capability maturity model. Over time, engineers who have worked on many projects developed a set of best practices that identified the processes required to optimize cost, schedule, and risk. In the NASA maturity model, they identified steps in technology readiness, denoted as the technology readiness level (TRL). TRL 1 occurs when basic research has taken the first steps toward application. TRL 9 is when a technology has been fully proven to work consistently for the intended purpose and is operational.

  19. Organellar genome copy number variation and integrity during moderate maturation of roots and leaves of maize seedlings.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jin; Li, Xiu-Qing

    2015-11-01

    Little information is available about organellar genome copy numbers and integrity in plant roots, although it was reported recently that the plastid and mitochondrial genomes were damaged under light, resulting in non-functional fragments in green seedling leaves in a maize line. In the present study, we investigated organellar genome copy numbers and integrity, after assessing the cellular ploidy, in seedling leaves and roots of two elite maize (Zea mays) cultivars using both long-fragment polymerase chain reaction (long-PCR) and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR, a type of short-PCR). Since maize leaf and root cells are mainly diploid according to chromosome number counting and the literature, the DNA amount ratio between the organellar genomes and the nuclear genome could be used to estimate average organellar genome copy numbers per cell. In the present study, both long-PCR and qPCR analyses found that green leaves had dramatically more plastid DNA and less mitochondrial DNA than roots had in both cultivars. The similarity in results from long-PCR and qPCR suggests that green leaves and roots during moderate maturation have largely intact plastid and mitochondrial genomes. The high resolution of qPCR led to the detection of an increase in copies in the plastid genome and a decrease in copies in the analyzed mitochondrial sub-genomes during the moderate maturation of seedling leaves and roots. These results suggest that green seedling leaves and roots of these two maize cultivars during moderate maturation had essentially intact organellar genomes, an increased copy number of the plastid genome, and decreased copy numbers of certain mitochondrial sub-genomes.

  20. Applying the High Reliability Health Care Maturity Model to Assess Hospital Performance: A VA Case Study.

    PubMed

    Sullivan, Jennifer L; Rivard, Peter E; Shin, Marlena H; Rosen, Amy K

    2016-09-01

    The lack of a tool for categorizing and differentiating hospitals according to their high reliability organization (HRO)-related characteristics has hindered progress toward implementing and sustaining evidence-based HRO practices. Hospitals would benefit both from an understanding of the organizational characteristics that support HRO practices and from knowledge about the steps necessary to achieve HRO status to reduce the risk of harm and improve outcomes. The High Reliability Health Care Maturity (HRHCM) model, a model for health care organizations' achievement of high reliability with zero patient harm, incorporates three major domains critical for promoting HROs-Leadership, Safety Culture, and Robust Process Improvement ®. A study was conducted to examine the content validity of the HRHCM model and evaluate whether it can differentiate hospitals' maturity levels for each of the model's components. Staff perceptions of patient safety at six US Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) hospitals were examined to determine whether all 14 HRHCM components were present and to characterize each hospital's level of organizational maturity. Twelve of the 14 components from the HRHCM model were detected; two additional characteristics emerged that are present in the HRO literature but not represented in the model-teamwork culture and system-focused tools for learning and improvement. Each hospital's level of organizational maturity could be characterized for 9 of the 14 components. The findings suggest the HRHCM model has good content validity and that there is differentiation between hospitals on model components. Additional research is needed to understand how these components can be used to build the infrastructure necessary for reaching high reliability.

  1. An integrated workflow to assess the remaining potential of mature hydrocarbon basins: a case study from Northwest Germany (Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous, Lower Saxony Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfang, Björn; Aigner, Thomas; Munsterman, Dirk K.; Irmen, Anton

    2017-04-01

    Mature hydrocarbon provinces require a high level of geological understanding in order to extend the lives of producing fields, to replace reserves through smaller targets and to reduce the risks of exploring for more and more subtle hydrocarbon traps. Despite a large number of existing wells in the area studied in this paper, the depositional environments and the stratigraphic architecture were still poorly known. In order to improve the geological understanding, we propose a workflow to assess the remaining reservoir potential of mature hydrocarbon areas, integrating cores, cuttings, well-logs, biostratigraphy and seismic data. This workflow was developed for and is exemplified with the northwest of the Lower Saxony Basin (LSB), a mature hydrocarbon province in northwest Germany, but can be applied in a similar fashion to other areas. Systematic integration of lithofacies analysis, chrono- and sequence stratigraphy, combined with electrofacies analysis and modern digital methods like neural network-based lithology determination and 3D facies modelling provides a high-resolution understanding of the spatial facies and reservoir architecture in the study area. Despite widely correlatable litho-units in the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous in the LSB, complex heterogeneous sedimentary systems can be found in the basin's marginal parts. Two new play types were determined in the study area, showing a remaining potential for stratigraphic hydrocarbon traps. The results of this exploration scale study also provide the basis for re-evaluations on a field development scale. On a basin scale, this study may encourage further data acquisition and re-evaluations to discover previously unknown reservoirs.

  2. An integrated workflow to assess the remaining potential of mature hydrocarbon basins: a case study from Northwest Germany (Upper Jurassic/Lower Cretaceous, Lower Saxony Basin)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seyfang, Björn; Aigner, Thomas; Munsterman, Dirk K.; Irmen, Anton

    2016-06-01

    Mature hydrocarbon provinces require a high level of geological understanding in order to extend the lives of producing fields, to replace reserves through smaller targets and to reduce the risks of exploring for more and more subtle hydrocarbon traps. Despite a large number of existing wells in the area studied in this paper, the depositional environments and the stratigraphic architecture were still poorly known. In order to improve the geological understanding, we propose a workflow to assess the remaining reservoir potential of mature hydrocarbon areas, integrating cores, cuttings, well-logs, biostratigraphy and seismic data. This workflow was developed for and is exemplified with the northwest of the Lower Saxony Basin (LSB), a mature hydrocarbon province in northwest Germany, but can be applied in a similar fashion to other areas. Systematic integration of lithofacies analysis, chrono- and sequence stratigraphy, combined with electrofacies analysis and modern digital methods like neural network-based lithology determination and 3D facies modelling provides a high-resolution understanding of the spatial facies and reservoir architecture in the study area. Despite widely correlatable litho-units in the Upper Jurassic and Lower Cretaceous in the LSB, complex heterogeneous sedimentary systems can be found in the basin's marginal parts. Two new play types were determined in the study area, showing a remaining potential for stratigraphic hydrocarbon traps. The results of this exploration scale study also provide the basis for re-evaluations on a field development scale. On a basin scale, this study may encourage further data acquisition and re-evaluations to discover previously unknown reservoirs.

  3. Defined Engineered Human Myocardium With Advanced Maturation for Applications in Heart Failure Modeling and Repair.

    PubMed

    Tiburcy, Malte; Hudson, James E; Balfanz, Paul; Schlick, Susanne; Meyer, Tim; Chang Liao, Mei-Ling; Levent, Elif; Raad, Farah; Zeidler, Sebastian; Wingender, Edgar; Riegler, Johannes; Wang, Mouer; Gold, Joseph D; Kehat, Izhak; Wettwer, Erich; Ravens, Ursula; Dierickx, Pieterjan; van Laake, Linda W; Goumans, Marie Jose; Khadjeh, Sara; Toischer, Karl; Hasenfuss, Gerd; Couture, Larry A; Unger, Andreas; Linke, Wolfgang A; Araki, Toshiyuki; Neel, Benjamin; Keller, Gordon; Gepstein, Lior; Wu, Joseph C; Zimmermann, Wolfram-Hubertus

    2017-05-09

    Advancing structural and functional maturation of stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes remains a key challenge for applications in disease modeling, drug screening, and heart repair. Here, we sought to advance cardiomyocyte maturation in engineered human myocardium (EHM) toward an adult phenotype under defined conditions. We systematically investigated cell composition, matrix, and media conditions to generate EHM from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes and fibroblasts with organotypic functionality under serum-free conditions. We used morphological, functional, and transcriptome analyses to benchmark maturation of EHM. EHM demonstrated important structural and functional properties of postnatal myocardium, including: (1) rod-shaped cardiomyocytes with M bands assembled as a functional syncytium; (2) systolic twitch forces at a similar level as observed in bona fide postnatal myocardium; (3) a positive force-frequency response; (4) inotropic responses to β-adrenergic stimulation mediated via canonical β1- and β2-adrenoceptor signaling pathways; and (5) evidence for advanced molecular maturation by transcriptome profiling. EHM responded to chronic catecholamine toxicity with contractile dysfunction, cardiomyocyte hypertrophy, cardiomyocyte death, and N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide release; all are classical hallmarks of heart failure. In addition, we demonstrate the scalability of EHM according to anticipated clinical demands for cardiac repair. We provide proof-of-concept for a universally applicable technology for the engineering of macroscale human myocardium for disease modeling and heart repair from embryonic and induced pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes under defined, serum-free conditions. © 2017 American Heart Association, Inc.

  4. Comparing two causal models of career maturity for hearing-impaired adolescents.

    PubMed

    King, S

    1990-01-01

    Conte (1983) suggested that existing theories of career development are inadequate for disabled populations because they fail to take into consideration the special life events and characteristics of people with a disability. The purpose of this study was to determine if Conte's reservations about contemporary theories could be supported by data. To this end, two causal models of career development were developed: one with five variables unique to the experience of the hearing impaired and the other without. Using data collected from 71 hearing-impaired adolescents, path analyses were conducted and the two models were compared for their ability to explain variance in career maturity. The results suggest that, although the second model may be more descriptive of the career development process for the deaf, it is no more powerful than the first in explaining variance in career maturity.

  5. The integrated environmental control model

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, E.S.; Berkenpas, M.B.; Kalagnanam, J.R.

    1995-11-01

    The capability to estimate the performance and cost of emission control systems is critical to a variety of planning and analysis requirements faced by utilities, regulators, researchers and analysts in the public and private sectors. The computer model described in this paper has been developed for DOe to provide an up-to-date capability for analyzing a variety of pre-combustion, combustion, and post-combustion options in an integrated framework. A unique capability allows performance and costs to be modeled probabilistically, which allows explicit characterization of uncertainties and risks.

  6. Dynamic model for predicting survival of mature larvae of Tribolium confusum during facility heat treatments.

    PubMed

    Boina, Dhana Raj; Subramanyam, Bhadriraju; Alavi, Sajid

    2008-06-01

    Structural heat treatment, a viable alternative to methyl bromide fumigation, involves raising the ambient temperature of food-processing facilities between 50 and 60 degrees C by using gas, electric, or steam heaters, and holding these elevated temperatures for 24 h or longer to kill stored-product insects. A dynamic model was developed to predict survival of mature larvae, which is the most heat-tolerant stage of the confused flour beetle, Tribolium confusum (Jacquelin du Val), at elevated temperatures between 46 and 60 degrees C. The model is based on two nonlinear relationships: 1) logarithmic survival of T. confusum mature larvae as a function of time, and 2) logarithmic reduction in larval survival as a function of temperature. The dynamic model was validated with nine independent data sets collected during actual facility heat treatments conducted on two separate occasions at the Kansas State University pilot flour and feed mills. The rate of increase of temperature over time varied among the nine locations where mature larvae of T. confusum were exposed, and the approximate heating rates during the entire heat treatment ranged from 1.1 to 13.2 degrees C/h. The absolute deviation in the predicted number of larvae surviving the heat treatment was within 3-7% of the actual observed data. Comparison of the absolute deviation in the time taken for equivalent larval survival showed that the model predictions were within 2-6% of the observed data. The dynamic model can be used to predict survival of mature larvae of T. confusum during heat treatments of food-processing facilities based on time-dependent temperature profiles obtained at any given location.

  7. Cotangent Models for Integrable Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiesenhofer, Anna; Miranda, Eva

    2017-03-01

    We associate cotangent models to a neighbourhood of a Liouville torus in symplectic and Poisson manifolds focusing on b-Poisson/ b-symplectic manifolds. The semilocal equivalence with such models uses the corresponding action-angle theorems in these settings: the theorem of Liouville-Mineur-Arnold for symplectic manifolds and an action-angle theorem for regular Liouville tori in Poisson manifolds (Laurent- Gengoux et al., IntMath Res Notices IMRN 8: 1839-1869, 2011). Our models comprise regular Liouville tori of Poisson manifolds but also consider the Liouville tori on the singular locus of a b-Poisson manifold. For this latter class of Poisson structures we define a twisted cotangent model. The equivalence with this twisted cotangent model is given by an action-angle theorem recently proved by the authors and Scott (Math. Pures Appl. (9) 105(1):66-85, 2016). This viewpoint of cotangent models provides a new machinery to construct examples of integrable systems, which are especially valuable in the b-symplectic case where not many sources of examples are known. At the end of the paper we introduce non-degenerate singularities as lifted cotangent models on b-symplectic manifolds and discuss some generalizations of these models to general Poisson manifolds.

  8. Designing and implementing maturity models in hospitals: An experience report from 5 years of research.

    PubMed

    Blondiau, André; Mettler, Tobias; Winter, Robert

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, a wide range of generic and domain-specific maturity models have been developed in order to improve organizational design and learning of healthcare organizations. While many of these studies describe methods on how to measure dedicated aspects of a healthcare organization's "maturity," little evidence exists on how to effectively implement and deploy them into practice. This article therefore delineates the encountered challenges during the design and implementation of three maturity models for distinct improvement areas in hospitals. On the one hand, this study's findings may serve as basis for refining existing maturity model design approaches. On the other hand, it may facilitate further research in domain-specific organizational design with maturity models. © The Author(s) 2015.

  9. Pentraxins coordinate excitatory synapse maturation and circuit integration of parvalbumin interneurons

    PubMed Central

    Pelkey, Kenneth A.; Barksdale, Elizabeth; Craig, Michael T.; Yuan, Xiaoqing; Sukumaran, Madhav; Vargish, Geoffrey A.; Mitchell, Robert M.; Wyeth, Megan S.; Petralia, Ronald S.; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Karlsson, Rose-Marie; Cameron, Heather A.; Murata, Yasunobu; Colonnese, Matthew T.; Worley, Paul F.; McBain, Chris J.

    2015-01-01

    Circuit computation requires precision in the timing, extent, and synchrony of principal cell (PC) firing that is largely enforced by parvalbumin-expressing, fast-spiking interneurons (PVFSIs). To reliably coordinate network activity PVFSIs exhibit specialized synaptic and membrane properties that promote efficient afferent recruitment such as expression of high-conductance, rapidly gating, GluA4-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). We found that PVFSIs upregulate GluA4 during the second postnatal week coincident with increases in the AMPAR clustering proteins NPTX2 and NPTXR. Moreover, GluA4 is dramatically reduced in NPTX2−/−/NPTXR−/− mice with consequent reductions in PVFSI AMPAR function. Early postnatal NPTX2−/−/NPTXR−/− mice exhibit delayed circuit maturation with a prolonged critical period permissive for giant depolarizing potentials. Juvenile NPTX2−/−/NPTXR−/− mice display reduced feedforward inhibition yielding a circuit deficient in rhythmogenesis and prone to epileptiform discharges. Our findings demonstrate an essential role for NPTXs in controlling network dynamics highlighting potential therapeutic targets for disorders with inhibition/excitation imbalances such as schizophrenia. PMID:25754824

  10. Pentraxins coordinate excitatory synapse maturation and circuit integration of parvalbumin interneurons.

    PubMed

    Pelkey, Kenneth A; Barksdale, Elizabeth; Craig, Michael T; Yuan, Xiaoqing; Sukumaran, Madhav; Vargish, Geoffrey A; Mitchell, Robert M; Wyeth, Megan S; Petralia, Ronald S; Chittajallu, Ramesh; Karlsson, Rose-Marie; Cameron, Heather A; Murata, Yasunobu; Colonnese, Matthew T; Worley, Paul F; McBain, Chris J

    2015-03-18

    Circuit computation requires precision in the timing, extent, and synchrony of principal cell (PC) firing that is largely enforced by parvalbumin-expressing, fast-spiking interneurons (PVFSIs). To reliably coordinate network activity, PVFSIs exhibit specialized synaptic and membrane properties that promote efficient afferent recruitment such as expression of high-conductance, rapidly gating, GluA4-containing AMPA receptors (AMPARs). We found that PVFSIs upregulate GluA4 during the second postnatal week coincident with increases in the AMPAR clustering proteins NPTX2 and NPTXR. Moreover, GluA4 is dramatically reduced in NPTX2(-/-)/NPTXR(-/-) mice with consequent reductions in PVFSI AMPAR function. Early postnatal NPTX2(-/-)/NPTXR(-/-) mice exhibit delayed circuit maturation with a prolonged critical period permissive for giant depolarizing potentials. Juvenile NPTX2(-/-)/NPTXR(-/-) mice display reduced feedforward inhibition yielding a circuit deficient in rhythmogenesis and prone to epileptiform discharges. Our findings demonstrate an essential role for NPTXs in controlling network dynamics highlighting potential therapeutic targets for disorders with inhibition/excitation imbalances such as schizophrenia.

  11. Coconut water of different maturity stages ameliorates inflammatory processes in model of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Sadia Saleem; Najam, Rahila

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Coconut water is a natural beverage that is a part of daily diet of many people. This study was designed to explore the anti-inflammatory activity of coconut water of different maturation stages (young and mature) with rat paw edema model of inflammation using plethysmometer. Methodology: For this study, albino rats were selected and divided into four equal groups (10 rats in each group). Group 1 was set as control and administered distilled water 1 ml orally; Groups 2 and 3 were treated with young and mature coconut water, respectively, at 4 ml/100 g dose orally. Group 4 was treated with the standard drug (ibuprofen) at 400 mg/70 kg. 0.1 ml of 1% w/v acetic acid was administered in the subplantar tissue of rat paw 30 min after oral treatments of groups. Plethysmometer was used to measure rat paw edema. Results: Results revealed that both coconut water possess significant anti-inflammatory activity (P < 0.001). In comparison to control, percent inhibition by young coconut water was 20.22%, 35.13%, 42.52%, and 36% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of acetic acid administration, respectively. However, maximum percent inhibition (42.52%) was observed in the second phase of the inflammatory process. On the other hand, percent inhibition by mature coconut water was 18.80%, 25.94%, 24.13%, and 18.66% at 1, 2, 3, and 4 h of acetic acid administration, respectively. However, maximum percent inhibition (25.94%) was observed in the first phase of the inflammatory process. Conclusions: This study strongly suggests the use of young coconut water for potent anti-inflammatory effect and mature coconut water for moderate anti-inflammatory effect. PMID:27366350

  12. An Integrated Vehicle Modeling Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Totah, Joseph J.; Kinney, David J.; Kaneshige, John T.; Agabon, Shane

    1999-01-01

    This paper describes an Integrated Vehicle Modeling Environment for estimating aircraft geometric, inertial, and aerodynamic characteristics, and for interfacing with a high fidelity, workstation based flight simulation architecture. The goals in developing this environment are to aid in the design of next generation intelligent fight control technologies, conduct research in advanced vehicle interface concepts for autonomous and semi-autonomous applications, and provide a value-added capability to the conceptual design and aircraft synthesis process. Results are presented for three aircraft by comparing estimates generated by the Integrated Vehicle Modeling Environment with known characteristics of each vehicle under consideration. The three aircraft are a modified F-15 with moveable canards attached to the airframe, a mid-sized, twin-engine commercial transport concept, and a small, single-engine, uninhabited aerial vehicle. Estimated physical properties and dynamic characteristics are correlated with those known for each aircraft over a large portion of the flight envelope of interest. These results represent the completion of a critical step toward meeting the stated goals for developing this modeling environment.

  13. Integrity modelling of tropospheric delay models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rózsa, Szabolcs; Bastiaan Ober, Pieter; Mile, Máté; Ambrus, Bence; Juni, Ildikó

    2017-04-01

    The effect of the neutral atmosphere on signal propagation is routinely estimated by various tropospheric delay models in satellite navigation. Although numerous studies can be found in the literature investigating the accuracy of these models, for safety-of-life applications it is crucial to study and model the worst case performance of these models using very low recurrence frequencies. The main objective of the INTegrity of TROpospheric models (INTRO) project funded by the ESA PECS programme is to establish a model (or models) of the residual error of existing tropospheric delay models for safety-of-life applications. Such models are required to overbound rare tropospheric delays and should thus include the tails of the error distributions. Their use should lead to safe error bounds on the user position and should allow computation of protection levels for the horizontal and vertical position errors. The current tropospheric model from the RTCA SBAS Minimal Operational Standards has an associated residual error that equals 0.12 meters in the vertical direction. This value is derived by simply extrapolating the observed distribution of the residuals into the tail (where no data is present) and then taking the point where the cumulative distribution has an exceedance level would be 10-7.While the resulting standard deviation is much higher than the estimated standard variance that best fits the data (0.05 meters), it surely is conservative for most applications. In the context of the INTRO project some widely used and newly developed tropospheric delay models (e.g. RTCA MOPS, ESA GALTROPO and GPT2W) were tested using 16 years of daily ERA-INTERIM Reanalysis numerical weather model data and the raytracing technique. The results showed that the performance of some of the widely applied models have a clear seasonal dependency and it is also affected by a geographical position. In order to provide a more realistic, but still conservative estimation of the residual

  14. Integrated Resource Planning Model (IRPM)

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, T. B.

    2010-04-01

    The Integrated Resource Planning Model (IRPM) is a decision-support software product for resource-and-capacity planning. Users can evaluate changing constraints on schedule performance, projected cost, and resource use. IRPM is a unique software tool that can analyze complex business situations from a basic supply chain to an integrated production facility to a distributed manufacturing complex. IRPM can be efficiently configured through a user-friendly graphical interface to rapidly provide charts, graphs, tables, and/or written results to summarize postulated business scenarios. There is not a similar integrated resource planning software package presently available. Many different businesses (from government to large corporations as well as medium-to-small manufacturing concerns) could save thousands of dollars and hundreds of labor hours in resource and schedule planning costs. Those businesses also could avoid millions of dollars of revenue lost from fear of overcommitting or from penalties and lost future business for failing to meet promised delivery by using IRPM to perform what-if business-case evaluations. Tough production planning questions that previously were left unanswered can now be answered with a high degree of certainty. Businesses can anticipate production problems and have solutions in hand to deal with those problems. IRPM allows companies to make better plans, decisions, and investments.

  15. Organizational effectiveness: toward an integrated model for schools of nursing.

    PubMed

    Baker, C M; Reising, D L; Johnson, D R; Stewart, R L; Baker, S D

    1997-01-01

    Assessing the quality of academic institutions involves much more than the opinions of peers or experts. Examination of the organizational effectiveness of schools of nursing has been neglected. Current emphasis on assessing educational outcomes has diverted attention from the construct, organizational effectiveness, and more comprehensive theory-driven approaches to evaluation. This review of the organizational effectiveness literature focuses on the major assessment models: goal attainment, human relations, open systems, internal processes, culture, and life cycle. Attention is given to the influence of organizational maturation on an integrated model of organizational effectiveness. Selected macrolevel studies of schools of nursing are examined, and an agenda for nursing research is proposed.

  16. Altered postnatal maturation of striatal GABAergic interneurons in a phenotypic animal model of dystonia.

    PubMed

    Bode, Christoph; Richter, Franziska; Spröte, Christine; Brigadski, Tanja; Bauer, Anne; Fietz, Simone; Fritschy, Jean-Marc; Richter, Angelika

    2017-01-01

    GABAergic disinhibition has been suggested to play a critical role in the pathophysiology of several basal ganglia disorders, including dystonia, a common movement disorder. Previous studies have shown a deficit of striatal GABAergic interneurons (IN) in the dt(sz) mutant hamster, one of the few phenotypic animal models of dystonia. However, mechanisms underlying this deficit are largely unknown. In the present study, we investigated the migration and maturation of striatal IN during postnatal development (18days of age) and at age of highest severity of dystonia (33days of age) in this hamster model. In line with previous findings, the density of GAD67-positive IN and the level of parvalbumin mRNA, a marker for fast spiking GABAergic IN, were lower in the dt(sz) mutant than in control hamsters. However, an unaltered density of Nkx2.1 labeled cells and Nkx2.1 mRNA level suggested that the migration of GABAergic IN into the striatum was not retarded. Therefore, different factors that indicate maturation of GABAergic IN were determined. While mRNA of the KCC2 cation/chloride transporters and the cytosolic carboanhydrase VII, used as markers for the so called GABA switch, as well as BDNF were unaltered, we found a reduced number of IN expressing the alpha1 subunit of the GABAA-receptor (37.5%) in dt(sz) hamsters at an age of 33days, but not after spontaneous remission of dystonia at an age of 90days. Since IN shift expression from alpha2 to alpha1 subunits during postnatal maturation, this result together with a decreased parvalbumin mRNA expression suggest a delayed maturation of striatal GABAergic IN in this animal model, which might underlie abnormal neuronal activity and striatal plasticity.

  17. Photoreceptor precursors derived from three-dimensional embryonic stem cell cultures integrate and mature within adult degenerate retina.

    PubMed

    Gonzalez-Cordero, Anai; West, Emma L; Pearson, Rachael A; Duran, Yanai; Carvalho, Livia S; Chu, Colin J; Naeem, Arifa; Blackford, Samuel J I; Georgiadis, Anastasios; Lakowski, Jorn; Hubank, Mike; Smith, Alexander J; Bainbridge, James W B; Sowden, Jane C; Ali, Robin R

    2013-08-01

    Irreversible blindness caused by loss of photoreceptors may be amenable to cell therapy. We previously demonstrated retinal repair and restoration of vision through transplantation of photoreceptor precursors obtained from postnatal retinas into visually impaired adult mice. Considerable progress has been made in differentiating embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in vitro toward photoreceptor lineages. However, the capability of ESC-derived photoreceptors to integrate after transplantation has not been demonstrated unequivocally. Here, to isolate photoreceptor precursors fit for transplantation, we adapted a recently reported three-dimensional (3D) differentiation protocol that generates neuroretina from mouse ESCs. We show that rod precursors derived by this protocol and selected via a GFP reporter under the control of a Rhodopsin promoter integrate within degenerate retinas of adult mice and mature into outer segment-bearing photoreceptors. Notably, ESC-derived precursors at a developmental stage similar to postnatal days 4-8 integrate more efficiently compared with cells at other stages. This study shows conclusively that ESCs can provide a source of photoreceptors for retinal cell transplantation.

  18. Adaptive Urban Dispersion Integrated Model

    SciTech Connect

    Wissink, A; Chand, K; Kosovic, B; Chan, S; Berger, M; Chow, F K

    2005-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for understanding the three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from contaminant releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). Utilization of the most accurate urban models, based on fully three-dimensional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) that solve the Navier-Stokes equations with incorporated turbulence models, presents many challenges. We address two in this work; first, a fast but accurate way to incorporate the complex urban terrain, buildings, and other structures to enforce proper boundary conditions in the flow solution; second, ways to achieve a level of computational efficiency that allows the models to be run in an automated fashion such that they may be used for emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We have developed a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability based on FEM3MP (Gresho and Chan 1998, Chan and Stevens 2000), a CFD model from Lawrence Livermore National Lab. The integrated capability incorporates fast embedded boundary mesh generation for geometrically complex problems and full three-dimensional Cartesian adaptive mesh refinement (AMR). Parallel AMR and embedded boundary gridding support are provided through the SAMRAI library (Wissink et al. 2001, Hornung and Kohn 2002). Embedded boundary mesh generation has been demonstrated to be an automatic, fast, and efficient approach for problem setup. It has been used for a variety of geometrically complex applications, including urban applications (Pullen et al. 2005). The key technology we introduce in this work is the application of AMR, which allows the application of high-resolution modeling to certain important features, such as individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features). It also allows the urban scale model to be readily interfaced with coarser resolution meso or regional scale models. This talk

  19. Evaluation of deltamethrin kinetics and dosimetry in the maturing rat using a PBPK model

    SciTech Connect

    Tornero-Velez, Rogelio; Mirfazaelian, Ahmad; Kim, Kyu-Bong; Anand, Sathanandam S.; Kim, Hyo J.; Haines, Wendy T.; Bruckner, James V.; Fisher, Jeffrey W.

    2010-04-15

    Immature rats are more susceptible than adults to the acute neurotoxicity of pyrethroid insecticides like deltamethrin (DLM). A companion kinetics study (Kim et al., in press) revealed that blood and brain levels of the neuroactive parent compound were inversely related to age in rats 10, 21, 40 and 90 days old. The objective of the current study was to modify a physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) model of DLM disposition in the adult male Sprague-Dawley rat (Mirfazaelian et al., 2006), so blood and target organ dosimetry could be accurately predicted during maturation. Age-specific organ weights and age-dependent changes in the oxidative and hydrolytic clearance of DLM were modeled with a generalized Michaelis-Menten model for growth and the summary equations incorporated into the PBPK model. The model's simulations compared favorably with empirical DLM time-courses in plasma, blood, brain and fat for the four age-groups evaluated (10, 21, 40 and 90 days old). PND 10 pups' area under the 24-h brain concentration time curve (AUC{sub 0-24h}) was 3.8-fold higher than that of the PND 90 adults. Our maturing rat PBPK model allows for updating with age- and chemical-dependent parameters, so pyrethroid dosimetry can be forecast in young and aged individuals. Hence, this model provides a methodology for risk assessors to consider age-specific adjustments to oral Reference Doses on the basis of PK differences.

  20. The mare model for follicular maturation and reproductive aging in the woman.

    PubMed

    Carnevale, E M

    2008-01-01

    Reproductive aging and assisted reproduction are becoming progressively more relevant in human medicine. Research with human subjects is limited in many aspects, and consequently animal models may have considerable utility. Such models have provided insight into follicular function, oocyte maturation, and reproductive aging. However, models are often selected based on factors other than physiological or functional similarities. Although the mare has received limited attention as a model for reproduction in women, comparisons between these species indicate that the mare has many attributes of a good model. As the mare ages, cyclic and hormonal changes parallel those of older women. The initial sign of reproductive aging in both species is a shortening of the reproductive cycle with elevated concentrations of FSH. Subsequently, cycles become longer with intermittent ovulations and elevated concentrations of FSH and LH. Reproduction ceases with failure of follicular growth and elevated gonadotropins, apparently because of ovarian failure. In the older woman and mare, oocytes have been maintained in meiotic arrest for decades -- approximately four to five for the woman and two to three for the mare; in both species, reduced oocyte quality is the end factor identified in age-associated infertility. After induction of oocyte maturation in vivo, the timeline to ovulation is the same for the mare and woman, suggesting a comparable sequence of events. The mare's anatomy, long follicular phase and single dominant follicle provide a foundation for studies in oocyte and follicular development. The aim of this review is to evaluate the mare as an animal model to study age-associated changes in reproduction and to improve our understanding of oocyte and follicular maturation in vivo.

  1. Longitudinal field test assessment in a Basque soccer youth academy: a multilevel modeling framework to partition effects of maturation.

    PubMed

    Bidaurrazaga-Letona, I; Carvalho, H M; Lekue, J A; Santos-Concejero, J; Figueiredo, A J; Gil, S M

    2015-03-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the effect of age on short-term performance indicators applying multilevel regression modeling, and whether changes induced by age were affected by maturation. The study applied a mixed longitudinal approach with 8 measurement points over a period of 4 years. Anthropometry, predicted adult stature, countermovement jump, 15-m sprint and agility test from 38 under-11 young soccer players were considered. Early maturing players were 3% taller compared to late maturers. A substantial effect of age was present in all performance indicators (P<0.05). Parameters showed improvements in performance, even when accounting for interindividual variation in somatic maturity. Vertical jump tended to be stable in early maturers during the first year, presenting an exponential increase thereafter (16%, P<0.05). Additionally, early maturing boys had lower vertical jump scores but a substantial higher rate of development with age (3% per year). Performance tends to plateau during the first 3 years following the improvements in agility (9.1%, P<0.05). In the running tests, early maturers had better performances (19%, P<0.05), while a higher rate of improvement of 1% was observed for the late maturers. Young soccer players should be expected to have substantial improvements in short-term performance, influenced by independent variation between players in maturity status. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  2. Modelling phenolic and technological maturities of grapes by means of the multivariate relation between organoleptic and physicochemical properties.

    PubMed

    Meléndez, E; Ortiz, M C; Sarabia, L A; Íñiguez, M; Puras, P

    2013-01-25

    The ripeness of grapes at the harvest time is one of the most important parameters for obtaining high quality red wines. Traditionally the decision of harvesting is to be taken only after analysing sugar concentration, titratable acidity and pH of the grape juice (technological maturity). However, these parameters only provide information about the pulp ripeness and overlook the real degree of skins and seeds maturities (phenolic maturity). Both maturities, technological and phenolic, are not simultaneously reached, on the contrary they tend to separate depending on several factors: grape variety, cultivar, adverse weather conditions, soil, water availability and cultural practices. Besides, this divergence is increasing as a consequence of the climate change (larger quantities of CO(2), less rain, and higher temperatures). 247 samples collected in vineyards representative of the qualified designation of origin Rioja from 2007 to 2011 have been analysed. Samples contain the four grape varieties usual in the elaboration of Rioja wines ('tempranillo', 'garnacha', 'mazuelo' and 'graciano'). The present study is the first systematic investigation on the maturity of grapes that includes the organoleptic evaluation of the degree of grapes maturity (sugars/acidity maturity, aromatic maturity of the pulp, aromatic maturity of the skins and tannins maturity) together with the values of the physicochemical parameters (probable alcohol degree, total acidity, pH, malic acid, K, total index polyphenolics, anthocyans, absorbances at 420, 520 and 620 nm, colour index and tartaric acid) determined over the same samples. A varimax rotation of the latent variables of a PLS model between the physicochemical variables and the mean of four sensory variables allows identifying both maturities. Besides, the position of the samples in the first plane defines the effect that the different factors exert on both phenolic and technological maturities. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All

  3. A maturity model to deliver a national shared medications system, options, practice, and pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Bainbridge, Michael; Pearce, Christopher; Taggart, Richard

    2013-01-01

    In July 2012 Australia launched the Personally Controlled electronic Health Record (PCEHR). This structured record allows health related information to be shared between providers as well as between providers and consumers. The next big challenge in delivering value for consumers is to use the medicines information distributed throughout the record in a way that allows better medications management at all levels. This poster points to the design and usability challenges being dealt with in that process during a national roll out and proposes a maturity model to accelerate the delivery of shared medication records. It is suggested that this model will have relevance in other jurisdictions.

  4. Streamlining the Pipeline for Generation of Recombinant Affinity Reagents by Integrating the Affinity Maturation Step

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Renhua; Gorman, Kevin T.; Vinci, Chris R.; Dobrovetsky, Elena; Gräslund, Susanne; Kay, Brian K.

    2015-01-01

    Often when generating recombinant affinity reagents to a target, one singles out an individual binder, constructs a secondary library of variants, and affinity selects a tighter or more specific binder. To enhance the throughput of this general approach, we have developed a more integrated strategy where the “affinity maturation” step is part of the phage-display pipeline, rather than a follow-on process. In our new schema, we perform two rounds of affinity selection, followed by error-prone PCR on the pools of recovered clones, generation of secondary libraries, and three additional rounds of affinity selection, under conditions of off-rate competition. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by generating low nanomolar fibronectin type III (FN3) monobodies to five human proteins: ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme E2 R1 (CDC34), COP9 signalosome complex subunit 5 (COPS5), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 5 (MAP2K5), Splicing factor 3A subunit 1 (SF3A1) and ubiquitin carboxyl-terminal hydrolase 11 (USP11). The affinities of the resulting monobodies are typically in the single-digit nanomolar range. We demonstrate the utility of two binders by pulling down the targets from a spiked lysate of HeLa cells. This integrated approach should be applicable to directed evolution of any phage-displayed affinity reagent scaffold. PMID:26437402

  5. B-Cell Depletion Reduces the Maturation of Cerebral Cavernous Malformations in Murine Models.

    PubMed

    Shi, Changbin; Shenkar, Robert; Zeineddine, Hussein A; Girard, Romuald; Fam, Maged D; Austin, Cecilia; Moore, Thomas; Lightle, Rhonda; Zhang, Lingjiao; Wu, Meijing; Cao, Ying; Gunel, Murat; Louvi, Angeliki; Rorrer, Autumn; Gallione, Carol; Marchuk, Douglas A; Awad, Issam A

    2016-06-01

    Cerebral cavernous malformations (CCMs) are relatively common vascular malformations, characterized by increased Rho kinase (ROCK) activity, vascular hyper-permeability and the presence of blood degradation products including non-heme iron. Previous studies revealed robust inflammatory cell infiltration, selective synthesis of IgG, in situ antigen driven B-cell clonal expansion, and deposition of immune complexes and complement proteins within CCM lesions. We aimed to evaluate the impact of suppressing the immune response on the formation and maturation of CCM lesions, as well as lesional iron deposition and ROCK activity. Two murine models of heterozygous Ccm3 (Pdcd10), which spontaneously develop CCM lesions with severe and milder phenotypes, were either untreated or received anti-mouse BR3 to deplete B cells. Brains from anti-mouse BR3-treated mice exhibited significantly fewer mature CCM lesions and smaller lesions compared to untreated mice. B cell depletion halted the progression of lesions into mature stage 2 lesions but did not prevent their genesis. Non-heme iron deposition and ROCK activity was decreased in lesions of B cell depleted mice. This represents the first report of the therapeutic benefit of B-cell depletion in the development and progression of CCMs, and provides a proof of principle that B cells play a critical role in CCM lesion genesis and maturation. These findings add biologics to the list of potential therapeutic agents for CCM disease. Future studies would characterize the putative antigenic trigger and further define the mechanism of immune response in the lesions.

  6. Determination of fruit maturity and its prediction model based on the pericarp index of absorbance difference (IAD) for peaches

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Binbin; Peng, Bin; Zhang, Chunhua; Song, Zhizhong

    2017-01-01

    Harvest maturity is closely related to peach fruit quality and has a very important effect on the fresh fruit market. Unfortunately, at present, it is difficult to determine the maturity level of peach fruits by artificial methods. The objectives of this study were to develop quadratic polynomial regression models using near-infrared spectroscopy that could determine the peel color difference, fruit firmness, soluble solids content (SSC), soluble sugar, organic acid components, and their relationships with the absorbance of chlorophyll (index of absorbance difference, IAD) in late maturing ‘Xiahui 8’ peach and ‘Xiaguang’ nectarine fruits. The analysis was based on data for fruits at veraison, fruits at harvesting maturity, and all fruits. The results showed that firmness has the highest correlation coefficient with IAD. Prediction models for fruit maturity were established between firmness and the IAD of the two cultivars using the quadratic polynomial regression method. Further variance analysis on the one degree term and quadratic term of each equation showed that every partial regression coefficient reached a significant or extremely significant level. No significant difference was observed between estimated and observed values after regression prediction. The regression equations seem to fit well. Other peach and nectarine varieties were used to test the feasibility of maturity prediction by this method, and it was found that maturity was successfully predicted in all the samples. The result indicated that the IAD can be used as an index to predict peach fruit maturity. PMID:28505165

  7. Determination of fruit maturity and its prediction model based on the pericarp index of absorbance difference (IAD) for peaches.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Binbin; Peng, Bin; Zhang, Chunhua; Song, Zhizhong; Ma, Ruijuan

    2017-01-01

    Harvest maturity is closely related to peach fruit quality and has a very important effect on the fresh fruit market. Unfortunately, at present, it is difficult to determine the maturity level of peach fruits by artificial methods. The objectives of this study were to develop quadratic polynomial regression models using near-infrared spectroscopy that could determine the peel color difference, fruit firmness, soluble solids content (SSC), soluble sugar, organic acid components, and their relationships with the absorbance of chlorophyll (index of absorbance difference, IAD) in late maturing 'Xiahui 8' peach and 'Xiaguang' nectarine fruits. The analysis was based on data for fruits at veraison, fruits at harvesting maturity, and all fruits. The results showed that firmness has the highest correlation coefficient with IAD. Prediction models for fruit maturity were established between firmness and the IAD of the two cultivars using the quadratic polynomial regression method. Further variance analysis on the one degree term and quadratic term of each equation showed that every partial regression coefficient reached a significant or extremely significant level. No significant difference was observed between estimated and observed values after regression prediction. The regression equations seem to fit well. Other peach and nectarine varieties were used to test the feasibility of maturity prediction by this method, and it was found that maturity was successfully predicted in all the samples. The result indicated that the IAD can be used as an index to predict peach fruit maturity.

  8. Predictive Maturity of Multi-Scale Simulation Models for Fuel Performance

    SciTech Connect

    Atamturktur, Sez; Unal, Cetin; Hemez, Francois; Williams, Brian; Tome, Carlos

    2015-03-16

    The project proposed to provide a Predictive Maturity Framework with its companion metrics that (1) introduce a formalized, quantitative means to communicate information between interested parties, (2) provide scientifically dependable means to claim completion of Validation and Uncertainty Quantification (VU) activities, and (3) guide the decision makers in the allocation of Nuclear Energy’s resources for code development and physical experiments. The project team proposed to develop this framework based on two complimentary criteria: (1) the extent of experimental evidence available for the calibration of simulation models and (2) the sophistication of the physics incorporated in simulation models. The proposed framework is capable of quantifying the interaction between the required number of physical experiments and degree of physics sophistication. The project team has developed this framework and implemented it with a multi-scale model for simulating creep of a core reactor cladding. The multi-scale model is composed of the viscoplastic self-consistent (VPSC) code at the meso-scale, which represents the visco-plastic behavior and changing properties of a highly anisotropic material and a Finite Element (FE) code at the macro-scale to represent the elastic behavior and apply the loading. The framework developed takes advantage of the transparency provided by partitioned analysis, where independent constituent codes are coupled in an iterative manner. This transparency allows model developers to better understand and remedy the source of biases and uncertainties, whether they stem from the constituents or the coupling interface by exploiting separate-effect experiments conducted within the constituent domain and integral-effect experiments conducted within the full-system domain. The project team has implemented this procedure with the multi- scale VPSC-FE model and demonstrated its ability to improve the predictive capability of the model. Within this

  9. Systems Security Engineering Capability Maturity Model SSE-CMM Model Description Document

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-04-01

    DOD85 Department of Defense, “Department of Defense Trusted Computer System Evaluation Criteria,” DOD 5200.28-STD, December 1985. GAMBEL93 Gambel, Daniel ...Systems Engineering Symposium, July 1996. HOSY95 Hosy, H.; Roussely , B., “Industrial Maturity and Information Technology Security,” Proceedings of the

  10. Integrated Urban Dispersion Modeling Capability

    SciTech Connect

    Kosovic, B; Chan, S T

    2003-11-03

    Numerical simulations represent a unique predictive tool for developing a detailed understanding of three-dimensional flow fields and associated concentration distributions from releases in complex urban settings (Britter and Hanna 2003). The accurate and timely prediction of the atmospheric dispersion of hazardous materials in densely populated urban areas is a critical homeland and national security need for emergency preparedness, risk assessment, and vulnerability studies. The main challenges in high-fidelity numerical modeling of urban dispersion are the accurate prediction of peak concentrations, spatial extent and temporal evolution of harmful levels of hazardous materials, and the incorporation of detailed structural geometries. Current computational tools do not include all the necessary elements to accurately represent hazardous release events in complex urban settings embedded in high-resolution terrain. Nor do they possess the computational efficiency required for many emergency response and event reconstruction applications. We are developing a new integrated urban dispersion modeling capability, able to efficiently predict dispersion in diverse urban environments for a wide range of atmospheric conditions, temporal and spatial scales, and release event scenarios. This new computational fluid dynamics capability includes adaptive mesh refinement and it can simultaneously resolve individual buildings and high-resolution terrain (including important vegetative and land-use features), treat complex building and structural geometries (e.g., stadiums, arenas, subways, airplane interiors), and cope with the full range of atmospheric conditions (e.g. stability). We are developing approaches for seamless coupling with mesoscale numerical weather prediction models to provide realistic forcing of the urban-scale model, which is critical to its performance in real-world conditions.

  11. ENDOGENOUS SIGNALING THROUGH α7-CONTAINING NICOTINIC RECEPTORS PROMOTES MATURATION AND INTEGRATION OF ADULTBORN NEURONS IN THE HIPPOCAMPUS

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Nolan R.; Fernandes, Catarina C.; Halff, Andrew W.; Berg, Darwin K.

    2010-01-01

    Neurogenesis in the dentate gyrus occurs throughout adult mammalian life and is essential for proper hippocampal function. Early in their development, adultborn neurons express homomeric α7-containing nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (α7-nAChRs) and receive direct cholinergic innervation. We show here that functional α7-nAChRs are necessary for normal survival, maturation, and integration of adultborn neurons in the dentate gyrus. Stereotaxic retroviral injection into the dentate gyrus of wildtype and α7-knockout (α7KO) male and female mice was used to label and birthdate adultborn neurons for morphological and electrophysiological measures; BrdU injections were used to quantify cell survival. In α7KO mice, we find that adultborn neurons develop with truncated, less complex dendritic arbors, and display GABAergic postsynaptic currents with immature kinetics. The neurons also have a prolonged period of GABAergic depolarization characteristic of an immature state. In this condition they receive fewer spontaneous synaptic currents and are more prone to die during the critical period when adultborn neurons are normally integrated into behaviorally relevant networks. Even those adultborn neurons that survive the critical period retain long-term dendritic abnormalities in α7KO mice. Interestingly, local infection with retroviral constructs to knockdown α7-mRNA mimics the α7KO phenotype, demonstrating that the relevant α7-nAChR signaling is cell-autonomous. The results indicate a profound role for α7-nAChRs in adult neurogenesis and predict that α7-nAChR loss will cause progressive impairment in hippocampal circuitry and function over time as fewer neurons are added to the dentate gyrus and those that are added integrate less well. PMID:20592195

  12. INTEGRATED HYDROGEN STORAGE SYSTEM MODEL

    SciTech Connect

    Hardy, B

    2007-11-16

    Hydrogen storage is recognized as a key technical hurdle that must be overcome for the realization of hydrogen powered vehicles. Metal hydrides and their doped variants have shown great promise as a storage material and significant advances have been made with this technology. In any practical storage system the rate of H2 uptake will be governed by all processes that affect the rate of mass transport through the bed and into the particles. These coupled processes include heat and mass transfer as well as chemical kinetics and equilibrium. However, with few exceptions, studies of metal hydrides have focused primarily on fundamental properties associated with hydrogen storage capacity and kinetics. A full understanding of the complex interplay of physical processes that occur during the charging and discharging of a practical storage system requires models that integrate the salient phenomena. For example, in the case of sodium alanate, the size of NaAlH4 crystals is on the order of 300nm and the size of polycrystalline particles may be approximately 10 times larger ({approx}3,000nm). For the bed volume to be as small as possible, it is necessary to densely pack the hydride particles. Even so, in packed beds composed of NaAlH{sub 4} particles alone, it has been observed that the void fraction is still approximately 50-60%. Because of the large void fraction and particle to particle thermal contact resistance, the thermal conductivity of the hydride is very low, on the order of 0.2 W/m-{sup o}C, Gross, Majzoub, Thomas and Sandrock [2002]. The chemical reaction for hydrogen loading is exothermic. Based on the data in Gross [2003], on the order of 10{sup 8}J of heat of is released for the uptake of 5 kg of H{sub 2}2 and complete conversion of NaH to NaAlH{sub 4}. Since the hydride reaction transitions from hydrogen loading to discharge at elevated temperatures, it is essential to control the temperature of the bed. However, the low thermal conductivity of the hydride

  13. Eco-genetic model to explore fishing-induced ecological and evolutionary effects on growth and maturation schedules.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hui-Yu; Höök, Tomas O

    2009-08-01

    Eco-genetic individual-based models involve tracking the ecological dynamics of simulated individual organisms that are in part characterized by heritable parameters. We developed an eco-genetic individual-based model to explore ecological and evolutionary interactions of fish growth and maturation schedules. Our model is flexible and allows for exploration of the effects of heritable growth rates (based on von Bertalanffy and biphasic growth patterns), heritable maturation schedules (based on maturation reaction norm concepts), or both on individual- and population-level traits. In baseline simulations with rather simple ecological trade-offs and over a relatively short time period (<200 simulation years), simulated male and female fish evolve differential genetic growth and maturation. Further, resulting patterns of genetically determined growth and maturation are influenced by mortality rate and density-dependent processes, and maturation and growth parameters interact to mediate the evolution of one another. Subsequent to baseline simulations, we conducted experimental simulations to mimic fisheries harvest with two size-limits (targeting large or small fish), an array of fishing mortality rates, and assuming a deterministic or stochastic environment. Our results suggest that fishing with either size-limit may induce considerable changes in life-history trait expression (maturation schedules and growth rates), recruitment, and population abundance and structure. However, targeting large fish would cause more adverse genetic effects and may lead to a population less resilient to environmental stochasticity.

  14. Eco-genetic model to explore fishing-induced ecological and evolutionary effects on growth and maturation schedules

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hui-Yu; Höök, Tomas O

    2009-01-01

    Eco-genetic individual-based models involve tracking the ecological dynamics of simulated individual organisms that are in part characterized by heritable parameters. We developed an eco-genetic individual-based model to explore ecological and evolutionary interactions of fish growth and maturation schedules. Our model is flexible and allows for exploration of the effects of heritable growth rates (based on von Bertalanffy and biphasic growth patterns), heritable maturation schedules (based on maturation reaction norm concepts), or both on individual- and population-level traits. In baseline simulations with rather simple ecological trade-offs and over a relatively short time period (<200 simulation years), simulated male and female fish evolve differential genetic growth and maturation. Further, resulting patterns of genetically determined growth and maturation are influenced by mortality rate and density-dependent processes, and maturation and growth parameters interact to mediate the evolution of one another. Subsequent to baseline simulations, we conducted experimental simulations to mimic fisheries harvest with two size-limits (targeting large or small fish), an array of fishing mortality rates, and assuming a deterministic or stochastic environment. Our results suggest that fishing with either size-limit may induce considerable changes in life-history trait expression (maturation schedules and growth rates), recruitment, and population abundance and structure. However, targeting large fish would cause more adverse genetic effects and may lead to a population less resilient to environmental stochasticity. PMID:25567890

  15. Ethanol exposure during neurogenesis induces persistent effects on neural maturation: evidence from an ex vivo model of fetal cerebral cortical neuroepithelial progenitor maturation.

    PubMed

    Camarillo, Cynthia; Miranda, Rajesh C

    2008-01-01

    Ethanol is a significant neuroteratogen. We previously used fetal cortical-derived neurosphere cultures as an ex vivo model of the second trimester ventricular neuroepithelium, and showed that ethanol directly induced fetal stem and progenitor cell proliferation and maturation without inducing death. However, ethanol is defined as a teratogen because of its capacity to persistently disrupt neural maturation beyond a specific exposure period. We therefore utilized a simplified neuronal maturation paradigm to examine the immediate and persistent changes in neuronal migration following ethanol exposure during the phase of neuroepithelial proliferation. Our data indicate that mRNA transcripts for migration-associated genes RhoA, Paxillin (Pxn), and CDC42 were immediately induced following ethanol exposure, whereas dynein light chain, LC8-type 1 (DYNLL1), and growth-associated protein (Gap)-43 were suppressed. With the exception of Gap43, ethanol did not induce persistent changes in the other mRNAs, suggesting that ethanol had an activational, rather than organizational, impact on migration-associated mRNAs. However, despite this lack of persistent effects on these mRNAs, ethanol exposure during the proliferation period significantly increased subsequent neuronal migration. Moreover, differentiating neurons, pretreated with ethanol during the proliferation phase, exhibited reduced neurite branching and an increased length of primary neurites, indicating a persistent destabilization of neuronal maturation. Collectively, our data indicate that ethanol-exposed proliferating neuroepithelial precursors exhibit subsequent differentiation-associated increases in migratory behavior, independent of mRNA transcript levels. These data help explain the increased incidence of cerebral cortical neuronal heterotopias associated with the fetal alcohol syndrome.

  16. Identifying Weaknesses for Chilean E-Government Implementation in Public Agencies with Maturity Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solar, Mauricio; Astudillo, Hernán; Valdes, Gonzalo; Iribarren, Marcelo; Concha, Gastón

    Evaluating readiness of individual public agencies to execute specific e-Government programs and directives is a key ingredient for wider e-Government deployment and success. This article describes how the eGov-MM model was used to over 30 many Chilean public agencies and to identify specific areas in which each of them should focus improvement efforts. eGov-MM is a capability maturity model, patterned on similar models from the IT and organizational domains; it recognizes 4 leverage domains, 17 key domain areas (KDA) and 54 critical variables, identifies capability levels for each critical variable and KDA and proposes a synthetic maturity level for institutions. The 9-agencies pilot study and the 30-agencies massive study indicate that, in Chile today, the best developed areas are IT-related and mirror exactly those that are pre-requisites for the goals of the 5-years Digital Strategy, and the least evaluated are related to internal processes and human capital management.

  17. A practical model for sunlight disinfection of a subtropical maturation pond.

    PubMed

    Dahl, N W; Woodfield, P L; Lemckert, C J; Stratton, H; Roiko, A

    2017-01-01

    Maturation ponds are a type of waste stabilisation pond (WSP) designed to reduce carbon, nutrients and pathogens in the final stages of a WSP wastewater treatment system. In this study, a one-dimensional plug-flow pond model is proposed to predict temperature and E. coli concentration distributions and overall pond disinfection performance. The model accounts for the effects of vertical mixing and ultraviolet light-dependent die-off rate kinetics. Measurements of radiation, wind-speed, humidity and air temperature are recorded for model inputs and good agreement with measured vertical temperature distributions and outlet E. coli concentrations is found in an operational, subtropical maturation pond. Measurements and the model both show a diurnal pattern of stratification during daylight hours and natural convective mixing at night on days corresponding to low wind speeds, strong heat input from solar radiation and clear night skies. In the evenings, the thermal stratification is shown to collapse due to surface energy loss via longwave radiation which triggers top-down natural convective mixing. The disinfection model is found to be sensitive to the choice of die-off kinetics. The diurnal mixing pattern is found to play a vital role in the disinfection process by ensuring that pathogens are regularly transported to the near-surface layer where ultraviolet light penetration is effective. The model proposed in this paper offers clear advantages to pond designers by including geographical specific, time-varying boundary conditions and accounting for the important physical aspects of vertical mixing and sunlight inactivation processes, yet is computationally straightforward. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. An Integrated Bayesian Model for DIF Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soares, Tufi M.; Goncalves, Flavio B.; Gamerman, Dani

    2009-01-01

    In this article, an integrated Bayesian model for differential item functioning (DIF) analysis is proposed. The model is integrated in the sense of modeling the responses along with the DIF analysis. This approach allows DIF detection and explanation in a simultaneous setup. Previous empirical studies and/or subjective beliefs about the item…

  19. MG53 is dispensable for T-tubule maturation but critical for maintaining T-tubule integrity following cardiac stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Caimei; Chen, Biyi; Wang, Yihui; Guo, Ang; Tang, Yiqun; Khataei, Tahsin; Shi, Yun; Kutschke, William J; Zimmerman, Kathy; Weiss, Robert M; Liu, Jie; Benson, Christopher J; Hong, Jiang; Ma, Jianjie; Song, Long-Sheng

    2017-08-16

    The cardiac transverse (T)-tubule membrane system is the safeguard for cardiac function and undergoes dramatic remodeling in response to cardiac stress. However, the mechanism by which cardiomyocytes repair damaged T-tubule network remains unclear. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that MG53, a muscle-specific membrane repair protein, antagonizes T-tubule damage to protect against maladaptive remodeling and thereby loss of excitation-contraction coupling and cardiac function. Using MG53-knockout (MG53-KO) mice, we first established that deficiency of MG53 had no impact on maturation of the T-tubule network in developing hearts. Additionally, MG53 ablation did not influence T-tubule integrity in unstressed adult hearts as late as 10months of age. Following left ventricular pressure overload-induced cardiac stress, MG53 protein levels were increased by approximately three-fold in wild-type mice, indicating that pathological stress induces a significant upregulation of MG53. MG53-deficient mice had worsened T-tubule disruption and pronounced dysregulation of Ca(2+) handling properties, including decreased Ca(2+) transient amplitude and prolonged time to peak and decay. Moreover, MG53 deficiency exacerbated cardiac hypertrophy and dysfunction and decreased survival following cardiac stress. Our data suggest MG53 is not required for T-tubule development and maintenance in normal physiology. However, MG53 is essential to preserve T-tubule integrity and thereby Ca(2+) handling properties and cardiac function under pathological cardiac stress. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Minimal Model of Plankton Systems Revisited with Spatial Diffusion and Maturation Delay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jiantao; Tian, Jianjun Paul; Wei, Junjie

    2016-03-01

    This study revisits the minimal model for a plankton ecosystem proposed by Scheffer with spatial diffusion of plankton and the delay of the maturation period of herbivorous zooplankton. It deepens our understanding of effects of the nutrients and the predation of fish upon zooplankton on the dynamical patterns of the plankton system and also presents new phenomena induced by the delay with spatial diffusion. When the nutrient level is sufficient low, the zooplankton population collapses and the phytoplankton population reaches its carrying capacity. Mathematically, the global stability of the boundary equilibrium is proved. As the nutrient level increases, the system switches to coexistent equilibria or oscillations depending on the maturation period of zooplankton and the predation rate of fish on herbivorous zooplankton. Under an eutrophic condition, there is a unique coexistent homogeneous equilibrium, and the equilibrium density of phytoplankton increases, while the equilibrium density of herbivorous zooplankton decreases as the fish predation rate on herbivorous zooplankton is increasing. The study shows that the system will never collapses under the eutrophic condition unless the fish predation rate approaches infinite. The study also finds a functional bifurcation relation between the delay parameter of the maturation period of herbivorous zooplankton and the fish predation rate on herbivorous zooplankton that, above a critical value of the fish predation rate, the system stays at the coexistent equilibrium, and below that value, the system switches its dynamical patterns among stable and unstable equilibria and oscillations. The oscillations emerge from Hopf bifurcations, and a detailed mathematical analysis about the Hopf bifurcations is carried out to give relevant ecological predications.

  1. Modeling integrated biomass gasification business concepts

    Treesearch

    Peter J. Ince; Ted Bilek; Mark A. Dietenberger

    2011-01-01

    Biomass gasification is an approach to producing energy and/or biofuels that could be integrated into existing forest product production facilities, particularly at pulp mills. Existing process heat and power loads tend to favor integration at existing pulp mills. This paper describes a generic modeling system for evaluating integrated biomass gasification business...

  2. An improved radiative transfer model for estimating mineral abundance of immature and mature lunar soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dawei; Li, Lin; Sun, Ying

    2015-06-01

    An improved Hapke's radiative transfer model (RTM) is presented to estimate mineral abundance for both immature and mature lunar soils from the Lunar Soil Characterization Consortium (LSCC) dataset. Fundamental to this improved Hapke's model is the application of an alternative equation to describe the effects of larger size submicroscopic metallic iron (SMFe) (>50 nm) in the interior of agglutinitic glass that mainly darken the host material, contrasting to the darkening and reddening effects of smaller size SMFe (<50 nm) residing in the rims of mineral grains. Results from applying a nonlinear inversion procedure to the improved Hapke's RTM show that the average mass fraction of smaller and larger size SMFe in lunar soils was estimated to be 0.30% and 0.31% respectively, and the particle size distribution of soil samples is all within their measured range. Based on the derived mass fraction of SMFe and particle size of the soil samples, abundances of end-member components composing lunar soil samples were derived via minimizing the difference between measured and calculated spectra. The root mean square error (RMSE) between the fitted and measured spectra is lower than 0.01 for highland samples and 0.005 for mare samples. This improved Hapke's model accurately estimates abundances of agglutinitic glass (R-squared = 0.88), pyroxene (R-squared = 0.69) and plagioclase (R-squared = 0.95) for all 57 samples used in this study including both immature and mature lunar soils. However, the improved Hapke's RTM shows poor performance for quantifying abundances of olivine, ilmenite and volcanic glass. Improving the model performance for estimation of these three end-member components is the central focus for our future work.

  3. Calcium Balance in Mature Rats Exposed to a Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Navidi, Meena; Evans, J.; Looft-Wilson, R.; Wolinsky, I.; Arnaud, S. B.; Hargens, Alan R. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    Depressed intestinal calcium absorption (Ca abs.) and lower circulating 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25-D) are associated with less positive calcium balance in young 200 g rats exposed to skeletal unloading by hind-limb suspension than controls (C) . To determine the effect of the space flight model on calcium balance in mature rats, we exposed 6 mo. old males weighing 492 +/- 12g to the model for 4 weeks (S) and compared Ca in the diet, urine, feces and 1,25-D in S and C. Rats were fed diets containing sufficient Ca to satisfy metabolic needs, but not to cause deficiency (0.1%). At the end of 4 weeks, there was a 5 percent weight loss in S, but not in C; and no differences in dietary, urine (UCa) or fecal Ca (FCa) in S and C. Net Ca abs. (0.1 vs 2.7 %), 1,25-D (50 +/- 16 vs 47 +/- 14 pg/ml) and Ca balances (-1.8 +/- 4 vs -1.0 +/- 2.9 mg/d) were similar in C and S. UCa loss was added to the model by inducing calciuria with 8% salt diets (HiNa). A 4-fold increase in UCa in C and S was transiently higher in S than C after 1 week. After 4 weeks, loss in BW was greater in S than C, Ca abs was higher in C than S (32 +/- 10 vs 3.5 +/- 16%, p less than .05), 1,25-D greater in S than C (98 +/- 15 vs 79 +/- 14 pg/ml p less than .05) and Ca balance less in S than C (-5.2 +/- 4 vs -1.7 +/- 2 mg/d, p less than .05). Ca balance in the mature rat is unaffected by the space flight model unless calciuria intervenes and reveals the failure of the intestine to enhance Ca abs. and compensate for UCa loss.

  4. Calcium Balance in Mature Rats Exposed to a Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolinsky, Ira

    1996-01-01

    Negative calcium balances are seen in humans during spaceflight and bed rest, an analog of space flight. Due to the infrequency and costliness of space flight and the difficulties, cost, and restraints in using invasive procedures in bed rest studies, several ground based animal models of space flight have been employed. The most useful and well developed of these models is hind limb unloading in the rat. In this model the hind limbs are non-weight bearing (unloaded) but still mobile; there is a cephalad fluid shift similar to that seen in astronauts in flight; the animals are able to feed, groom and locomote using their front limbs; the procedure is reversible; and, importantly, the model has been validated by comparison to space flight. Several laboratories have studied calcium balance using rats in hind limb unweighting. Roer and Dillaman used young male rats to study calcium balance in this model for 25 days. They found no differences in dietary calcium intake, percent calcium absorption, urinary and fecal excretion, hence indicating no differences in calcium balance between control and unloaded rats. In another study, employing 120 day old females, rats' hind limbs were unloaded for 28 days. While negative calcium balances were observed during a 25 day recovery period no balance measurements were possible during unweighting since the researchers did not employ appropriate metabolic cages. In a recent study from this laboratory, using 200 g rats in the space flight model for two weeks, we found depressed intestinal calcium absorption and increased fecal calcium excretion (indicating less positive calcium balances) and lower circulating 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. The above studies indicate that there remains a dearth of information on calcium balance during the hind limb unloading rat space flight model, especially in mature rats, whose use is a better model for planned manned space flight than juvenile or growing animals. With the aid of a newly designed

  5. Calcium Balance in Mature Rats Exposed to a Space Flight Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wolinsky, Ira

    1996-01-01

    Negative calcium balances are seen in humans during spaceflight and bed rest, an analog of space flight. Due to the infrequency and costliness of space flight and the difficulties, cost, and restraints in using invasive procedures in bed rest studies, several ground based animal models of space flight have been employed. The most useful and well developed of these models is hind limb unloading in the rat. In this model the hind limbs are non-weight bearing (unloaded) but still mobile; there is a cephalad fluid shift similar to that seen in astronauts in flight; the animals are able to feed, groom and locomote using their front limbs; the procedure is reversible; and, importantly, the model has been validated by comparison to space flight. Several laboratories have studied calcium balance using rats in hind limb unweighting. Roer and Dillaman used young male rats to study calcium balance in this model for 25 days. They found no differences in dietary calcium intake, percent calcium absorption, urinary and fecal excretion, hence indicating no differences in calcium balance between control and unloaded rats. In another study, employing 120 day old females, rats' hind limbs were unloaded for 28 days. While negative calcium balances were observed during a 25 day recovery period no balance measurements were possible during unweighting since the researchers did not employ appropriate metabolic cages. In a recent study from this laboratory, using 200 g rats in the space flight model for two weeks, we found depressed intestinal calcium absorption and increased fecal calcium excretion (indicating less positive calcium balances) and lower circulating 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D. The above studies indicate that there remains a dearth of information on calcium balance during the hind limb unloading rat space flight model, especially in mature rats, whose use is a better model for planned manned space flight than juvenile or growing animals. With the aid of a newly designed

  6. Measuring stages of health in all policies on a local level: the applicability of a maturity model.

    PubMed

    Storm, Ilse; Harting, Janneke; Stronks, Karien; Schuit, Albertine J

    2014-02-01

    Many local governments are trying to establish health in all polices (HiAP), but no sensitive tool is available to measure HiAP growth processes. This study explores the applicability of a general maturity model to classify stages of HiAP and to characterize its manifestations and conditions. Based on other maturity models we have developed a maturity model for HiAP (MM-HiAP), which consists of six maturity levels and 14 corresponding key characteristics. This model was applied to assess HiAP growth processes within 16 municipalities in the Netherlands. We used municipal policies on health inequalities as a case. Empirical data was gathered based on document analysis, a questionnaire and interviews. Using this model we were able to classify HiAP growth processes by several characteristics, such as the recognition of the importance of HiAP (Stage I; four municipalities), HiAP described in policy documents and collaboration with sectors present (Stage II; seven municipalities), concrete collaboration agreements and structural consultations forms (Stage III; four municipalities), and a broad, shared vision on HiAP (Stage IV; two municipalities). Examples of necessary conditions were sufficient support and resources. This study shows that it is possible to apply a maturity model to classify stages of HiAP in municipalities. Use of the MM-HiAP as a formal measuring instrument depends on further operationalization and validation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. An Instructional Model for Integrating the Calculator.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Donna F.; White, Arthur L.

    1987-01-01

    The design, selection, and organization of instructional materials that integrate calculators are described in relation to a model based on movement and representational level. Instructional resources and advantages of the model are described. (MNS)

  8. Morphological and functional maturation of Leydig cells: from rodent models to primates.

    PubMed

    Teerds, Katja J; Huhtaniemi, Ilpo T

    2015-01-01

    Leydig cells (LC) are the sites of testicular androgen production. Development of LC occurs in the testes of most mammalian species as two distinct growth phases, i.e. as fetal and pubertal/adult populations. In primates there are indications of a third neonatal growth phase. LC androgen production begins in embryonic life and is crucial for the intrauterine masculinization of the male fetal genital tract and brain, and continues until birth after which it rapidly declines. A short post-natal phase of LC activity in primates (including human) termed 'mini-puberty' precedes the period of juvenile quiescence. The adult population of LC evolves, depending on species, in mid- to late-prepuberty upon reawakening of the hypothalamic-pituitary-testicular axis, and these cells are responsible for testicular androgen production in adult life, which continues with a slight gradual decline until senescence. This review is an updated comparative analysis of the functional and morphological maturation of LC in model species with special reference to rodents and primates. Pubmed, Scopus, Web of Science and Google Scholar databases were searched between December 2012 and October 2014. Studies published in languages other than English or German were excluded, as were data in abstract form only. Studies available on primates were primarily examined and compared with available data from specific animal models with emphasis on rodents. Expression of different marker genes in rodents provides evidence that at least two distinct progenitor lineages give rise to the fetal LC (FLC) population, one arising from the coelomic epithelium and the other from specialized vascular-associated cells along the gonad-mesonephros border. There is general agreement that the formation and functioning of the FLC population in rodents is gonadotrophin-responsive but not gonadotrophin-dependent. In contrast, although there is in primates some controversy on the role of gonadotrophins in the formation of

  9. Integrated Multidimensional Maturity Assessments Predicting the High-risk Occurrence of Peak Angle Velocity During Puberty in Progressive Female Idiopathic Scoliosis.

    PubMed

    Shi, Benlong; Mao, Saihu; Xu, Leilei; Sun, Xu; Zhu, Zezhang; Qian, Bangping; Liu, Zhen; Cheng, Jack Chun Yiu; Qiu, Yong

    2017-05-01

    and closed triradiate cartilages were found at PAV in all the girls. The logistic regression model revealed that the following variables contributed significantly to high-risk occurrence of PAV: chronologic age between 11 and 13 years [odds ratio (OR)=3.961; 95% confidence interval (CI), 1.023-15.342], Risser 0 (OR=14.261; 95% CI, 1.167-65.528), closed triradiate cartilage (OR=6.590; 95% CI, 1.612-26.943), DSA scores between 400 and 500 (OR=6.042; 95% CI, 1.282-28.482), HV>6 cm/y (OR=5.711; 95% CI, 1.105-29.526), Cobb angle of main curve >30 degrees (OR=5.492; 95% CI, 1.151-26.207) and SLV>20 mm/y (OR=5.973; 95% CI, 1.546-23.071). Integrated multidimensional maturity assessments, defined as chronologic age between 11 and 13 years, modified Risser 0, DSA scores between 400 and 500, HV>6 cm/y, and SLV>20 mm/y, combined with preexisting scoliotic curve >30 degrees, were prone to increase the risk of entering the rapid curve acceleration phase in progressive IS girls.

  10. Pretreatment of in vitro matured bovine oocytes with docetaxel before vitrification: Effects on cytoskeleton integrity and developmental ability after warming.

    PubMed

    Chasombat, Jakkhaphan; Nagai, Takashi; Parnpai, Rangsun; Vongpralub, Thevin

    2015-10-01

    The stabilization of spindle fibersis important for successful vitrification of bovine oocytes because microtubules and other cytoskeleton fibers (CSF) can be damaged during vitrification, resulting in failure of fertilization after thawing. Docetaxel, a stabilizing agent, could potentially reduce CSF damage of bovine oocytes induced during vitrification. However, there have been no reports on the effects of docetaxel on their vitrification. Experiment 1 was conducted to investigate the effects of various doses of docetaxel (0.0, 0.05, 0.5, 5.0 and 50 μM) in preincubation medium of in vitro matured (IVM) bovine oocytes on their developmental ability after in vitro fertilization (IVF). The results show that 0.05 μM docetaxel had no adverse effect on embryo development, while docetaxel at a concentration of ⩾0.5 μM inhibited development. Experiments 2 and 3 were conducted to investigate the effects of preincubation of IVM bovine oocytes with 0.05 μM docetaxel for 30 min prior to vitrification-warming on CSF integrity (Experiment 2), and on oocyte survival and viability after IVF (Experiment 3). When preincubated with 0.05 μM docetaxel for 30 min before vitrification, post-thawed oocytes had less CSF damage and higher survival rates compared with those untreated with docetaxel before vitrification. Surviving oocytes also had higher rates of cleavage and development to the blastocyst stage after IVF. In conclusion, preincubation of IVM bovine oocytes with 0.05 μM docetaxel for 30 min before vitrification was effective at preventing CSF damage during vitrification, and improving oocyte viability after warming and subsequent cleavage and blastocyst formation after IVF.

  11. Transmembrane Signal Transduction in Oocyte Maturation and Fertilization: Focusing on Xenopus laevis as a Model Animal

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Ken-ichi

    2014-01-01

    Fertilization is a cell biological phenomenon of crucial importance for the birth of new life in a variety of multicellular and sexual reproduction species such as algae, animal and plants. Fertilization involves a sequence of events, in which the female gamete “egg” and the male gamete “spermatozoon (sperm)” develop, acquire their functions, meet and fuse with each other, to initiate embryonic and zygotic development. Here, it will be briefly reviewed how oocyte cytoplasmic components are orchestrated to undergo hormone-induced oocyte maturation and sperm-induced activation of development. I then review how sperm-egg membrane interaction/fusion and activation of development in the fertilized egg are accomplished and regulated through egg coat- or egg plasma membrane-associated components, highlighting recent findings and future directions in the studies using Xenopus laevis as a model experimental animal. PMID:25546390

  12. Mature red blood cells: from optical model to inverse light-scattering problem

    PubMed Central

    Gilev, Konstantin V.; Yurkin, Maxim A.; Chernyshova, Ekaterina S.; Strokotov, Dmitry I.; Chernyshev, Andrei V.; Maltsev, Valeri P.

    2016-01-01

    We propose a method for characterization of mature red blood cells (RBCs) morphology, based on measurement of light-scattering patterns (LSPs) of individual RBCs with the scanning flow cytometer and on solution of the inverse light-scattering (ILS) problem for each LSP. We considered a RBC shape model, corresponding to the minimal bending energy of the membrane with isotropic elasticity, and constructed an analytical approximation, which allows rapid simulation of the shape, given the diameter and minimal and maximal thicknesses. The ILS problem was solved by the nearest-neighbor interpolation using a preliminary calculated database of 250,000 theoretical LSPs. For each RBC in blood sample we determined three abovementioned shape characteristics and refractive index, which also allows us to calculate volume, surface area, sphericity index, spontaneous curvature, hemoglobin concentration and content. PMID:27446656

  13. Maturation delay for the predators can enhance stable coexistence for a class of prey-predator models.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Malay; Takeuchi, Yasuhiro

    2017-01-07

    Maturation time delay for the predators is introduced in prey-predator models to implicitly model the stage-structure of predators. Most of the prey-predator models with maturation delay are known to exhibit destabilization of coexistence steady-state. Discrete time delay induced destabilization is a common finding, however, this is due to the introduction of time delay with lack of ecological justification. The main objective of the present work is to show the stabilizing role of maturation delay for a class of delayed prey-predator model. To be specific, we consider prey-predator models with strong and weak Allee effects in prey growth and Michaelis-Menten type functional response. We provide ecological justification for the introduction of maturation delay parameter in predator's growth equation. We obtain the conditions for stable and oscillatory coexistence of prey and their specialist predator in case of strong as well as weak Allee effect for non-delayed and delayed models. Apart from the analytical results for the models under consideration, we perform extensive numerical simulations to construct the relevant bifurcation diagrams. Our analytical and supportive numerical findings reveal that delay is not always a destabilizing factor rather the stable coexistence in the presence of time delay depends upon the formulation of the delayed model. The biological implications of the current investigation are provided in the conclusion section. We also explain the validity of obtained results for other types of prey-predator models with a specialist predator.

  14. Naturally Engineered Maturation of Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Scuderi, Gaetano J.; Butcher, Jonathan

    2017-01-01

    Ischemic heart disease remains one of the most prominent causes of mortalities worldwide with heart transplantation being the gold-standard treatment option. However, due to the major limitations associated with heart transplants, such as an inadequate supply and heart rejection, there remains a significant clinical need for a viable cardiac regenerative therapy to restore native myocardial function. Over the course of the previous several decades, researchers have made prominent advances in the field of cardiac regeneration with the creation of in vitro human pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte tissue engineered constructs. However, these engineered constructs exhibit a functionally immature, disorganized, fetal-like phenotype that is not equivalent physiologically to native adult cardiac tissue. Due to this major limitation, many recent studies have investigated approaches to improve pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocyte maturation to close this large functionality gap between engineered and native cardiac tissue. This review integrates the natural developmental mechanisms of cardiomyocyte structural and functional maturation. The variety of ways researchers have attempted to improve cardiomyocyte maturation in vitro by mimicking natural development, known as natural engineering, is readily discussed. The main focus of this review involves the synergistic role of electrical and mechanical stimulation, extracellular matrix interactions, and non-cardiomyocyte interactions in facilitating cardiomyocyte maturation. Overall, even with these current natural engineering approaches, pluripotent stem cell-derived cardiomyocytes within three-dimensional engineered heart tissue still remain mostly within the early to late fetal stages of cardiomyocyte maturity. Therefore, although the end goal is to achieve adult phenotypic maturity, more emphasis must be placed on elucidating how the in vivo fetal microenvironment drives cardiomyocyte maturation. This

  15. Which model better fits the role of aire in the establishment of self-tolerance: the transcription model or the maturation model?

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Mitsuru; Nishikawa, Yumiko; Nishijima, Hitoshi; Morimoto, Junko; Matsumoto, Minoru; Mouri, Yasuhiro

    2013-01-01

    The discovery of Aire-dependent transcriptional control of many tissue-restricted self-antigen (TRA) genes in thymic epithelial cells in the medulla (medullary thymic epithelial cells, mTECs) has raised the intriguing question of how the single Aire gene can influence the transcription of such a large number of TRA genes within mTECs. From a mechanistic viewpoint, there are two possible models to explain the function of Aire in this action. In the first model, TRAs are considered to be the direct target genes of Aire's transcriptional activity. In this scenario, the lack of Aire protein within cells would result in the defective TRA gene expression, while the maturation program of mTECs would be unaffected in principle. The second model hypothesizes that Aire is necessary for the maturation program of mTECs. In this case, we assume that the mTEC compartment does not mature normally in the absence of Aire. If acquisition of the properties of TRA gene expression depends on the maturation status of mTECs, a defect of such an Aire-dependent maturation program in Aire-deficient mTECs can also result in impaired TRA gene expression. In this brief review, we will focus on these two contrasting models for the roles of Aire in controlling the expression of TRAs within mTECs.

  16. Mobile Technology Integrated Pedagogical Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khan, Arshia

    2014-01-01

    Integrated curricula and experiential learning are the main ingredients to the recipe to improve student learning in higher education. In the academic computer science world it is mostly assumed that this experiential learning takes place at a business as an internship experience. The intent of this paper is to schism the traditional understanding…

  17. MOS integrated circuit fault modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three digital simulation techniques for MOS integrated circuit faults were examined. These techniques embody a hierarchy of complexity bracketing the range of simulation levels. The digital approaches are: transistor-level, connector-switch-attenuator level, and gate level. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Failure characteristics are also described.

  18. MOS integrated circuit fault modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sievers, M.

    1985-01-01

    Three digital simulation techniques for MOS integrated circuit faults were examined. These techniques embody a hierarchy of complexity bracketing the range of simulation levels. The digital approaches are: transistor-level, connector-switch-attenuator level, and gate level. The advantages and disadvantages are discussed. Failure characteristics are also described.

  19. Integration of Mature Adipocytes to Build-Up a Functional Three-Layered Full-Skin Equivalent

    PubMed Central

    Huber, Birgit; Link, Antonia; Linke, Kirstin; Gehrke, Sandra A.; Winnefeld, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Large, deep full-thickness skin wounds from high-graded burns or trauma are not able to reepithelialize sufficiently, resulting in scar formation, mobility limitations, and cosmetic deformities. In this study, in vitro-constructed tissue replacements are needed. Furthermore, such full-skin equivalents would be helpful as in vivo-like test systems for toxicity, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical testing. Up to date, no skin equivalent is available containing the underlying subcutaneous fatty tissue. In this study, we composed a full-skin equivalent and evaluated three different media for the coculture of mature adipocytes, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes. Therefore, adipocyte medium was supplemented with ascorbyl-2-phosphate and calcium chloride, which are important for successful epidermal stratification (Air medium). This medium was further supplemented with two commercially available factor combinations often used for the in vitro culture of keratinocytes (Air-HKGS and Air-KGM medium). We showed that in all media, keratinocytes differentiated successfully to build a stratified epidermal layer and expressed cytokeratin 10 and 14. Perilipin A-positive adipocytes could be found in all tissue models for up to 14 days, whereas adipocytes in the Air-HKGS and Air-KGM medium seemed to be smaller. Adipocytes in all tissue models were able to release adipocyte-specific factors, whereas the supplementation of keratinocyte-specific factors had a slightly negative effect on adipocyte functionality. The permeability of the epidermis of all models was comparable since they were able to withstand a deep penetration of cytotoxic Triton X in the same manner. Taken together, we were able to compose functional three-layered full-skin equivalents by using the Air medium. PMID:27334067

  20. Integration of Mature Adipocytes to Build-Up a Functional Three-Layered Full-Skin Equivalent.

    PubMed

    Huber, Birgit; Link, Antonia; Linke, Kirstin; Gehrke, Sandra A; Winnefeld, Marc; Kluger, Petra J

    2016-08-01

    Large, deep full-thickness skin wounds from high-graded burns or trauma are not able to reepithelialize sufficiently, resulting in scar formation, mobility limitations, and cosmetic deformities. In this study, in vitro-constructed tissue replacements are needed. Furthermore, such full-skin equivalents would be helpful as in vivo-like test systems for toxicity, cosmetic, and pharmaceutical testing. Up to date, no skin equivalent is available containing the underlying subcutaneous fatty tissue. In this study, we composed a full-skin equivalent and evaluated three different media for the coculture of mature adipocytes, fibroblasts, and keratinocytes. Therefore, adipocyte medium was supplemented with ascorbyl-2-phosphate and calcium chloride, which are important for successful epidermal stratification (Air medium). This medium was further supplemented with two commercially available factor combinations often used for the in vitro culture of keratinocytes (Air-HKGS and Air-KGM medium). We showed that in all media, keratinocytes differentiated successfully to build a stratified epidermal layer and expressed cytokeratin 10 and 14. Perilipin A-positive adipocytes could be found in all tissue models for up to 14 days, whereas adipocytes in the Air-HKGS and Air-KGM medium seemed to be smaller. Adipocytes in all tissue models were able to release adipocyte-specific factors, whereas the supplementation of keratinocyte-specific factors had a slightly negative effect on adipocyte functionality. The permeability of the epidermis of all models was comparable since they were able to withstand a deep penetration of cytotoxic Triton X in the same manner. Taken together, we were able to compose functional three-layered full-skin equivalents by using the Air medium.

  1. Open source integrated modeling environment Delta Shell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, G.; Baart, F.; Jagers, B.; van Putten, H.

    2012-04-01

    In the last decade, integrated modelling has become a very popular topic in environmental modelling since it helps solving problems, which is difficult to model using a single model. However, managing complexity of integrated models and minimizing time required for their setup remains a challenging task. The integrated modelling environment Delta Shell simplifies this task. The software components of Delta Shell are easy to reuse separately from each other as well as a part of integrated environment that can run in a command-line or a graphical user interface mode. The most components of the Delta Shell are developed using C# programming language and include libraries used to define, save and visualize various scientific data structures as well as coupled model configurations. Here we present two examples showing how Delta Shell simplifies process of setting up integrated models from the end user and developer perspectives. The first example shows coupling of a rainfall-runoff, a river flow and a run-time control models. The second example shows how coastal morphological database integrates with the coastal morphological model (XBeach) and a custom nourishment designer. Delta Shell is also available as open-source software released under LGPL license and accessible via http://oss.deltares.nl.

  2. Experimental vs. modeled water use in mature Norway spruce (Picea abies) exposed to elevated CO(2).

    PubMed

    Leuzinger, Sebastian; Bader, Martin K-F

    2012-01-01

    Rising levels of atmospheric CO(2) have often been reported to reduce plant water use. Such behavior is also predicted by standard equations relating photosynthesis, stomatal conductance, and atmospheric CO(2) concentration, which form the core of dynamic global vegetation models (DGVMs). Here, we provide first results from a free air CO(2) enrichment (FACE) experiment with naturally growing, mature (35 m) Picea abies (L.) (Norway spruce) and compare them to simulations by the DGVM LPJ-GUESS. We monitored sap flow, stem water deficit, stomatal conductance, leaf water potential, and soil moisture in five 35-40 m tall CO(2)-treated (550 ppm) trees over two seasons. Using LPJ-GUESS, we simulated this experiment using climate data from a nearby weather station. While the model predicted a stable reduction of transpiration of between 9% and 18% (at concentrations of 550-700 ppm atmospheric CO(2)), the combined evidence from various methods characterizing water use in our experimental trees suggest no changes in response to future CO(2) concentrations. The discrepancy between the modeled and the experimental results may be a scaling issue: while dynamic vegetation models correctly predict leaf-level responses, they may not sufficiently account for the processes involved at the canopy and ecosystem scale, which could offset the first-order stomatal response.

  3. Diamondoid hydrocarbons as a molecular proxy for thermal maturity and oil cracking: Geochemical models from hydrous pyrolysis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wei, Z.; Moldowan, J.M.; Zhang, S.; Hill, R.; Jarvie, D.M.; Wang, Hongfang; Song, F.; Fago, F.

    2007-01-01

    A series of isothermal hydrous pyrolysis experiments was performed on immature sedimentary rocks and peats of different lithology and organic source input to explore the generation of diamondoids during the thermal maturation of sediments. Oil generation curves indicate that peak oil yields occur between 340 and 360 ??C, followed by intense oil cracking in different samples. The biomarker maturity parameters appear to be insensitive to thermal maturation as most of the isomerization ratios of molecular biomarkers in the pyrolysates have reached their equilibrium values. Diamondoids are absent from immature peat extracts, but exist in immature sedimentary rocks in various amounts. This implies that they are not products of biosynthesis and that they may be generated during diagenesis, not just catagenesis and cracking. Most importantly, the concentrations of diamondoids are observed to increase with thermal stress, suggesting that they can be used as a molecular proxy for thermal maturity of source rocks and crude oils. Their abundance is most sensitive to thermal exposure above temperatures of 360-370 ??C (R0 = 1.3-1.5%) for the studied samples, which corresponds to the onset of intense cracking of other less stable components. Below these temperatures, diamondoids increase gradually due to competing processes of generation and dilution. Calibrations were developed between their concentrations and measured vitrinite reflectance through hydrous pyrolysis maturation of different types of rocks and peats. The geochemical models obtained from these methods may provide an alterative approach for determining thermal maturity of source rocks and crude oils, particularly in mature to highly mature Paleozoic carbonates. In addition, the extent of oil cracking was quantified using the concentrations of diamondoids in hydrous pyrolysates of rocks and peats, verifying that these hydrocarbons are valuable indicators of oil cracking in nature. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights

  4. In vitro acute exposure to DEHP affects oocyte meiotic maturation, energy and oxidative stress parameters in a large animal model.

    PubMed

    Ambruosi, Barbara; Uranio, Manuel Filioli; Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Pocar, Paola; Martino, Nicola Antonio; Paternoster, Maria Stefania; Amati, Francesca; Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena

    2011-01-01

    Phthalates are ubiquitous environmental contaminants because of their use in plastics and other common consumer products. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the most abundant phthalate and it impairs fertility by acting as an endocrine disruptor. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of in vitro acute exposure to DEHP on oocyte maturation, energy and oxidative status in the horse, a large animal model. Cumulus cell (CC) apoptosis and oxidative status were also investigated. Cumulus-oocyte complexes from the ovaries of slaughtered mares were cultured in vitro in presence of 0.12, 12 and 1200 µM DEHP. After in vitro maturation (IVM), CCs were removed and evaluated for apoptosis (cytological assessment and TUNEL) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Oocytes were evaluated for nuclear chromatin configuration. Matured (Metaphase II stage; MII) oocytes were further evaluated for cytoplasmic energy and oxidative parameters. DEHP significantly inhibited oocyte maturation when added at low doses (0.12 µM; P<0.05). This effect was related to increased CC apoptosis (P<0.001) and reduced ROS levels (P<0.0001). At higher doses (12 and 1200 µM), DEHP induced apoptosis (P<0.0001) and ROS increase (P<0.0001) in CCs without affecting oocyte maturation. In DEHP-exposed MII oocytes, mitochondrial distribution patterns, apparent energy status (MitoTracker fluorescence intensity), intracellular ROS localization and levels, mt/ROS colocalization and total SOD activity did not vary, whereas increased ATP content (P<0.05), possibly of glycolytic origin, was found. Co-treatment with N-Acetyl-Cysteine reversed apoptosis and efficiently scavenged excessive ROS in DEHP-treated CCs without enhancing oocyte maturation. In conclusion, acute in vitro exposure to DEHP inhibits equine oocyte maturation without altering ooplasmic energy and oxidative stress parameters in matured oocytes which retain the potential to be fertilized and develop into embryos

  5. Carbon carry capacity and carbon sequestration potential in China based on an integrated analysis of mature forest biomass.

    PubMed

    Liu, YingChun; Yu, GuiRui; Wang, QiuFeng; Zhang, YangJian; Xu, ZeHong

    2014-12-01

    Forests play an important role in acting as a carbon sink of terrestrial ecosystem. Although global forests have huge carbon carrying capacity (CCC) and carbon sequestration potential (CSP), there were few quantification reports on Chinese forests. We collected and compiled a forest biomass dataset of China, a total of 5841 sites, based on forest inventory and literature search results. From the dataset we extracted 338 sites with forests aged over 80 years, a threshold for defining mature forest, to establish the mature forest biomass dataset. After analyzing the spatial pattern of the carbon density of Chinese mature forests and its controlling factors, we used carbon density of mature forests as the reference level, and conservatively estimated the CCC of the forests in China by interpolation methods of Regression Kriging, Inverse Distance Weighted and Partial Thin Plate Smoothing Spline. Combining with the sixth National Forest Resources Inventory, we also estimated the forest CSP. The results revealed positive relationships between carbon density of mature forests and temperature, precipitation and stand age, and the horizontal and elevational patterns of carbon density of mature forests can be well predicted by temperature and precipitation. The total CCC and CSP of the existing forests are 19.87 and 13.86 Pg C, respectively. Subtropical forests would have more CCC and CSP than other biomes. Consequently, relying on forests to uptake carbon by decreasing disturbance on forests would be an alternative approach for mitigating greenhouse gas concentration effects besides afforestation and reforestation.

  6. Integrative modeling of the cardiac ventricular myocyte

    PubMed Central

    Winslow, Raimond L.; Cortassa, Sonia; O'Rourke, Brian; Hashambhoy, Yasmin L.; Rice, John Jeremy; Greenstein, Joseph L.

    2011-01-01

    Cardiac electrophysiology is a discipline with a rich 50-year history of experimental research coupled with integrative modeling which has enabled us to achieve a quantitative understanding of the relationships between molecular function and the integrated behavior of the cardiac myocyte in health and disease. In this paper, we review the development of integrative computational models of the cardiac myocyte. We begin with a historical overview of key cardiac cell models that helped shape the field. We then narrow our focus to models of the cardiac ventricular myocyte and describe these models in the context of their subcellular functional systems including dynamic models of voltage-gated ion channels, mitochondrial energy production, ATP-dependent and electrogenic membrane transporters, intracellular Ca dynamics, mechanical contraction, and regulatory signal transduction pathways. We describe key advances and limitations of the models as well as point to new directions for future modeling research. PMID:20865780

  7. Maturity associated variance in physical activity and health-related quality of life in adolescent females: a mediated effects model.

    PubMed

    Smart, Joan E Hunter; Cumming, Sean P; Sherar, Lauren B; Standage, Martyn; Neville, Helen; Malina, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    This study tested a mediated effects model of psychological and behavioral adaptation to puberty within the context of physical activity (PA). Biological maturity status, physical self-concept, PA, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL) were assessed in 222 female British year 7 to 9 pupils (mean age = 12.7 years, SD = .8). Structural equation modeling using maximum likelihood estimation and bootstrapping procedures supported the hypothesized model. Maturation status was inversely related to perceptions of sport competence, body attractiveness, and physical condition; and indirectly and inversely related to physical self-worth, PA, and HRQoL. Examination of the bootstrap-generated bias-corrected confidence intervals representing the direct and indirect paths between suggested that physical self-concept partially mediated the relations between maturity status and PA, and maturity status and HRQoL. Evidence supports the contention that perceptions of the physical self partially mediate relations maturity, PA, and HRQoL in adolescent females.

  8. Delta Shell: Integrated Modeling by Example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donchyts, G.; Jagers, B.; Baart, F.; Geer, P. V.

    2011-12-01

    We present the integrated modeling environment Delta Shell. It supports the full workflow of integrated environmental modeling: setup, configuration, simulation, analysis and reporting of results. Many components of the environment can be reused independently, allowing development of scientific, geospatial and other applications focused on data analysis, editing, visualization and storage. One of the unique features is that the Delta Shell environment integrates models from many different fields, such as hydrodynamics, hydrology, morphology, ecology, water quality, geospatial and decision support systems. This integration is possible due to flexible general data types, lightweight model coupling framework, the plugin system and the inclusion of a number of high quality open source components. Here we will use the open source morphological model XBeach as an example showing how to integrate models into the Delta Shell environment. Integration of XBeach adds a graphical interface which can be used to make testing coastal safety for complicated coastal areas easier. By using this example, we give an overview of the modeling framework and its possibilities. To increase the usability, the model is integrated with a coastal profile data set covering the whole coast of the Netherlands. This gives the end user a system to easily use the model for scanning the safety of the Dutch coast. The reuse of the components of the environment individually or combined is encouraged. They are available as separate components and have minimal or no dependencies on other components. This includes libraries to work with scientific multidimensional data, geospatial data (in particular geospatial coverages: values of some quantities defined on a spatial domain), editors, visualisation of time-dependent data and the modeling framework (projects, data linking, workflow management, model integration). Most components and the XBeach example are available as open source.

  9. An Analysis of Career Maturity among Korean Youths Using Latent Growth Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bae, Sung-Man

    2017-01-01

    This study examined the developmental trajectories of career maturity among Korean youths between late adolescence and mid-20s, and explored how career-counseling experiences, academic achievement, household income, parental involvement, and gender affected their career maturity. We used the 2,362 Youth Panel data collected between 2008-2014 by…

  10. The development and use of a molecular model for soybean maturity groups

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Achieving appropriate maturity in a target environment is essential to maximizing crop yield potential. In soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.], the time to maturity is largely dependent on developmental response to dark periods. Once the critical photoperiod is reached, flowering is initiated and rep...

  11. Rhetorical Maturity and Perry's Model of Intellectual Development: A Study of College Students' Writing and Thinking.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Nancy S.

    A study was conducted to investigate the relationship between the intellectual maturity of college students and evidence of rhetorical maturity in their writing--specifically, why some students write better than others, since general language abilities cannot account for all the differences between good and poor writing. By focusing on college…

  12. Model Identification of Integrated ARMA Processes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stadnytska, Tetiana; Braun, Simone; Werner, Joachim

    2008-01-01

    This article evaluates the Smallest Canonical Correlation Method (SCAN) and the Extended Sample Autocorrelation Function (ESACF), automated methods for the Autoregressive Integrated Moving-Average (ARIMA) model selection commonly available in current versions of SAS for Windows, as identification tools for integrated processes. SCAN and ESACF can…

  13. Social Ecological Model Analysis for ICT Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagami, Jason

    2013-01-01

    ICT integration of teacher preparation programmes was undertaken by the Australian Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) project in all 39 Australian teacher education institutions and highlighted the need for guidelines to inform systemic ICT integration approaches. A Social Ecological Model (SEM) was used to positively inform integration…

  14. Social Ecological Model Analysis for ICT Integration

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zagami, Jason

    2013-01-01

    ICT integration of teacher preparation programmes was undertaken by the Australian Teaching Teachers for the Future (TTF) project in all 39 Australian teacher education institutions and highlighted the need for guidelines to inform systemic ICT integration approaches. A Social Ecological Model (SEM) was used to positively inform integration…

  15. An integrated communications demand model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doubleday, C. F.

    1980-11-01

    A computer model of communications demand is being developed to permit dynamic simulations of the long-term evolution of demand for communications media in the U.K. to be made under alternative assumptions about social, economic and technological trends in British Telecom's business environment. The context and objectives of the project and the potential uses of the model are reviewed, and four key concepts in the demand for communications media, around which the model is being structured are discussed: (1) the generation of communications demand; (2) substitution between media; (3) technological convergence; and (4) competition. Two outline perspectives on the model itself are given.

  16. Jamaica Integrated National Energy Planning Model

    SciTech Connect

    Macal, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    The Jamaica Integrated National Energy Planning (JINEP) Model was developed by Argonne National Laboratory under contract to the Jamaica Ministry of Mining, Energy, and Tourism. JINEP is a comprehensive model of the energy-producing sector and the major energy consuming sectors of Jamaica. The JINEP Model is an application of a modelling system, the Integrated Demand and Energy Supply (IDES) Model, that was previously developed at Argonne for the purpose of analyzing energy systems of developing countries. IDES is based on several years of experience in analyzing energy planning issues characteristic of developing countries.

  17. The Integrated Model Development Environment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-02-01

    IMDE)," was designed to support the Productivity Improvements in Simulation Modeling (PRISM) project. The objective of PRISM is to enhance the Air...Office of Primary Responsibility OT&E Operational Test and Evaluation PRISM Productivity Improvements in Simulation Modeling SAFORs Semi-Automated Forces

  18. Integrated Environmental Modeling: Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation discusses the need for microbial assessments and presents a road map associated with quantitative microbial risk assessments, through an integrated environmental modeling approach. A brief introduction and the strengths of the current knowledge are illustrated. W...

  19. Integrated Environmental Modeling: Quantitative Microbial Risk Assessment

    EPA Science Inventory

    The presentation discusses the need for microbial assessments and presents a road map associated with quantitative microbial risk assessments, through an integrated environmental modeling approach. A brief introduction and the strengths of the current knowledge are illustrated. W...

  20. Microcounselling Supervision: An Innovative Integrated Supervision Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Russell-Chapin, Lori A.; Ivey, Allen E.

    2004-01-01

    This article introduces a new integrated model of counselling supervision entitled the Microcounselling Supervision Model (MSM). This type of supervision is designed for supervisors and supervisees who favor eclecticism and work from multiple theoretical orientations. MSM successfully combines skills from various theories and supervision models by…

  1. Criteria and model for assessing and improving information technology maturity within maintenance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kans, M.; Ehsanifard, K.; Moniri, A.

    2012-05-01

    Maintenance optimization and decision-making processes have been both influenced considerably by Information Technology (IT) developments mainly by increasing data availability. The decision-making process in its turn has affected systems trustworthiness positively. Therefore, theoretically speaking it could be said that Maintenance Management Information technology (MMIT) has the potential to provide applicable solutions for many of the maintenance management problems. Nevertheless, this potential has been hardly experienced in practice because of the mismatch between the level of IT maturity in the organizations and their selected MMIT solutions. To fill this gap this paper suggests a number of criteria which are crucial in decision making for selecting a MMIT application. The criteria are formed based on previous findings utilising an extensive literature review. A model is further developed for this purpose which is also tested on a case company active in power generation in Sweden. The model proved to be helpful when taking further improvement steps for reaching high utilization of IT in maintenance.

  2. Are skeletally mature female rats a suitable model to study osteoporosis?

    PubMed

    Netto, Claudia Cardoso; Vieira, Vivian Cristine Correia; Marinheiro, Lizanka Paola Figueiredo; Agellon, Sherry; Weiler, Hope; Maróstica, Mário Roberto

    2012-06-01

    To analyze if female Wistar rats at 56 weeks of age are a suitable model to study osteoporosis. Female rats with 6 and 36 weeks of age (n = 8 per group) were kept over a 20-week period and fed a diet for mature rodents complete in terms of Ca, phosphorous, and vitamin D. Excised femurs were measured for bone mass using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, morphometry, and biomechanical properties. The following serum markers of bone metabolism were analyzed: parathyroid hormone (PTH), osteocalcin (OC), osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor Κappa B ligand (RANKL), C-terminal peptides of type I collagen (CTX-I), total calcium, and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity. Rats at 56 weeks of age showed important bone metabolism differences when compared with the younger group, such as, highest diaphysis energy to failure, lowest levels of OC, CTX-I, and ALP, and elevated PTH, even with adequate dietary Ca. Rats at 26-week-old rats may be too young to study age-related bone loss, whereas the 56-week-old rats may be good models to represent the early stages of age-related changes in bone metabolism.

  3. Modelling of parameters for optimization of maturity in composting trimming residues.

    PubMed

    Bueno, P; Yañez, R; Rivera, A; Díaz, M J

    2009-12-01

    In this paper, changes in physico-chemical parameters during trimmings residue composting (cation exchange capacity, germination index, self-heated, NH(4)/NO(3) ratio and C(FA)/C(HA) ratio) in relation to environmental composting parameters (time, aeration, moisture and particle size) of the composting process were studied. A central composite experimental design was used to obtain the polynomial model for each dependent variable. Results of the modelling showed that among the studied range, moisture was the highest influenced parameter in maturity evaluation, with respect to aeration and particle size. An exception was found for CEC evolution. In this parameter, the highest influence was found for particle size. Moreover, a product with acceptable chemical properties entails operating at medium moisture content (55%) and medium-to-high particle size (3-5 cm). Moderate to low aeration (0.2 m(3) air kg(-1) d(-1)) would be the best compromise to composting this residue, due to the scarce statistical influence of this independent variable.

  4. Altered adult hippocampal neuronal maturation in a rat model of fetal alcohol syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gil-Mohapel, Joana; Boehme, Fanny; Patten, Anna; Cox, Adrian; Kainer, Leah; Giles, Erica; Brocardo, Patricia S; Christie, Brian R

    2011-04-12

    Exposure to ethanol during pregnancy can be devastating to the developing nervous system, leading to significant central nervous system dysfunction. The hippocampus, one of the two brain regions where neurogenesis persists into adulthood, is particularly sensitive to the teratogenic effects of ethanol. In the present study, we tested a rat model of fetal alcohol syndrome (FAS) with ethanol administered via gavage throughout all three trimester equivalents. Subsequently, we assessed cell proliferation, as well as neuronal survival, and differentiation in the dentate gyrus of the hippocampus of adolescent (35 days old), young adult (60 days old) and adult (90 days old) Sprague-Dawley rats. Using both extrinsic (bromodeoxyuridine) and intrinsic (Ki-67) markers, we observed no significant alterations in cell proliferation and survival in ethanol-exposed animals when compared with their pair-fed and ad libitum controls. However, we detected a significant increase in the number of new immature neurons in animals that were exposed to ethanol throughout all three trimester equivalents. This result might reflect a compensatory mechanism to counteract the deleterious effects of prenatal ethanol exposure or an ethanol-induced arrest of the neurogenic process at the early neuronal maturation stages. Taken together these results indicate that exposure to ethanol during the period of brain development causes a long-lasting dysregulation of the neurogenic process, a mechanism that might contribute, at least in part, to the hippocampal deficits that have been reported in rodent models of FAS.

  5. Seismo-thermo-mechanical modeling of mature and immature transform faults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Preuss, Simon; Gerya, Taras; van Dinther, Ylona

    2016-04-01

    Transform faults (TF) are subdivided into continental and oceanic ones due to their markedly different tectonic position, structure, surface expression, dynamics and seismicity. Both continental and oceanic TFs are zones of rheological weakness, which is a pre-requisite for their existence and long-term stability. Compared to subduction zones, TFs are typically characterized by smaller earthquake magnitudes as both their potential seismogenic width and length are reduced. However, a few very large magnitude (Mw>8) strike-slip events were documented, which are presumably related to the generation of new transform boundaries and/or sudden reactivation of pre-existing fossil structures. In particular, the 11 April 2012 Sumatra Mw 8.6 earthquake is challenging the general concept that such high magnitude events only occur at megathrusts. Hence, the processes of TF nucleation, propagation and their direct relation to the seismic cycle and long-term deformation at both oceanic and continental transforms needs to be investigated jointly to overcome the restricted direct observations in time and space. To gain fundamental understanding of involved physical processes the numerical seismo-thermo-mechanical (STM) modeling approach, validated in a subduction zone setting (Van Dinther et al. 2013), will be adapted for TFs. A simple 2D plane view model geometry using visco-elasto-plastic material behavior will be adopted. We will study and compare seismicity patterns and evolution in two end member TF setups, each with strain-dependent and rate-dependent brittle-plastic weakening processes: (1) A single weak and mature transform fault separating two strong plates (e.g., in between oceanic ridges) and (2) A nucleating or evolving (continental) TF system with disconnected predefined faults within a plate subjected to simple shear deformation (e.g., San Andreas Fault system). The modeling of TFs provides a first tool to establish the STM model approach for transform faults in a

  6. The refined biomimetic NeuroDigm GEL™ model of neuropathic pain in a mature rat

    PubMed Central

    Hannaman, Mary R.; Fitts, Douglas A.; Doss, Rose M.; Weinstein, David E.; Bryant, Joseph L.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Many humans suffering with chronic neuropathic pain have no objective evidence of an etiological lesion or disease. Frequently their persistent pain occurs after the healing of a soft tissue injury. Based on clinical observations over time, our hypothesis was that after an injury in mammals the process of tissue repair could cause chronic neural pain. Our objectives were to create the delayed onset of neuropathic pain in rats with minimal nerve trauma using a physiologic hydrogel, and characterize the rats’ responses to known analgesics and a targeted biologic. Methods: In mature male Sprague Dawley rats (age 9.5 months) a percutaneous implant of tissue-derived hydrogel was placed in the musculofascial tunnel of the distal tibial nerve. Subcutaneous morphine (3 mg/kg), celecoxib (10 mg/kg), gabapentin (25 mg/kg) and duloxetine (10 mg/kg) were each screened in the model three times each over 5 months after pain behaviors developed. Sham and control groups were used in all screenings. A pilot study followed in which recombinant human erythropoietin (200 units) was injected by the GEL™ neural procedure site. Results: The GEL group gradually developed mechanical hypersensitivity lasting months. Morphine, initially effective, had less analgesia over time. Celecoxib produced no analgesia, while gabapentin and duloxetine at low doses demonstrated profound analgesia at all times tested. The injected erythropoietin markedly decreased bilateral pain behavior that had been present for over 4 months, p ≤ 0.001. Histology of the GEL group tibial nerve revealed a site of focal neural remodeling, with neural regeneration, as found in nerve biopsies of patients with neuropathic pain. Conclusion: The refined NeuroDigm GEL™ model induces a neural response resulting in robust neuropathic pain behavior. The analgesic responses in this model reflect known responses of humans with neuropathic pain. The targeted recombinant human erythropoietin at the ectopic neural

  7. Analysis of the 918th Contracting Battalion and 410th Contracting Support Brigade Utilizing the Contract Management Maturity Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited 12b. DISTRIBUTION CODE 13. ABSTRACT (maximum 200 words) The purpose of this research ...CONTRACTING BATTALION AND 410TH CONTRACTING SUPPORT BRIGADE UTILIZING THE CONTRACT MANAGEMENT MATURITY MODEL ABSTRACT The purpose of this research is...2 C. RESEARCH QUESTIONS

  8. Small-Maturity Asymptotics for the At-The-Money Implied Volatility Slope in Lévy Models

    PubMed Central

    Gerhold, Stefan; Gülüm, I. Cetin; Pinter, Arpad

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We consider the at-the-money (ATM) strike derivative of implied volatility as the maturity tends to zero. Our main results quantify the behaviour of the slope for infinite activity exponential Lévy models including a Brownian component. As auxiliary results, we obtain asymptotic expansions of short maturity ATM digital call options, using Mellin transform asymptotics. Finally, we discuss when the ATM slope is consistent with the steepness of the smile wings, as given by Lee’s moment formula. PMID:27660537

  9. Integrated dynamics modeling for supercavitating vehicle systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Seonhong; Kim, Nakwan

    2015-06-01

    We have performed integrated dynamics modeling for a supercavitating vehicle. A 6-DOF equation of motion was constructed by defining the forces and moments acting on the supercavitating body surface that contacted water. The wetted area was obtained by calculating the cavity size and axis. Cavity dynamics were determined to obtain the cavity profile for calculating the wetted area. Subsequently, the forces and moments acting on each wetted part-the cavitator, fins, and vehicle body-were obtained by physical modeling. The planing force-the interaction force between the vehicle transom and cavity wall-was calculated using the apparent mass of the immersed vehicle transom. We integrated each model and constructed an equation of motion for the supercavitating system. We performed numerical simulations using the integrated dynamics model to analyze the characteristics of the supercavitating system and validate the modeling completeness. Our research enables the design of high-quality controllers and optimal supercavitating systems.

  10. Integrating systems biology models and biomedical ontologies

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Systems biology is an approach to biology that emphasizes the structure and dynamic behavior of biological systems and the interactions that occur within them. To succeed, systems biology crucially depends on the accessibility and integration of data across domains and levels of granularity. Biomedical ontologies were developed to facilitate such an integration of data and are often used to annotate biosimulation models in systems biology. Results We provide a framework to integrate representations of in silico systems biology with those of in vivo biology as described by biomedical ontologies and demonstrate this framework using the Systems Biology Markup Language. We developed the SBML Harvester software that automatically converts annotated SBML models into OWL and we apply our software to those biosimulation models that are contained in the BioModels Database. We utilize the resulting knowledge base for complex biological queries that can bridge levels of granularity, verify models based on the biological phenomenon they represent and provide a means to establish a basic qualitative layer on which to express the semantics of biosimulation models. Conclusions We establish an information flow between biomedical ontologies and biosimulation models and we demonstrate that the integration of annotated biosimulation models and biomedical ontologies enables the verification of models as well as expressive queries. Establishing a bi-directional information flow between systems biology and biomedical ontologies has the potential to enable large-scale analyses of biological systems that span levels of granularity from molecules to organisms. PMID:21835028

  11. A Multistep Maturity Model for the Implementation of Electronic and Computable Diagnostic Clinical Prediction Rules (eCPRs).

    PubMed

    Corrigan, Derek; McDonnell, Ronan; Zarabzadeh, Atieh; Fahey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    The use of Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs) has been advocated as one way of implementing actionable evidence-based rules in clinical practice. The current highly manual nature of deriving CPRs makes them difficult to use and maintain. Addressing the known limitations of CPRs requires implementing more flexible and dynamic models of CPR development. We describe the application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to provide a platform for the derivation and dissemination of CPRs derived through analysis and continual learning from electronic patient data. We propose a multistep maturity model for constructing electronic and computable CPRs (eCPRs). The model has six levels - from the lowest level of CPR maturity (literaturebased CPRs) to a fully electronic and computable service-oriented model of CPRs that are sensitive to specific demographic patient populations. We describe examples of implementations of the core model components - focusing on CPR representation, interoperability, electronic dissemination, CPR learning, and user interface requirements. The traditional focus on derivation and narrow validation of CPRs has severely limited their wider acceptance. The evolution and maturity model described here outlines a progression toward eCPRs consistent with the vision of a learning health system (LHS) - using central repositories of CPR knowledge, accessible open standards, and generalizable models to avoid repetition of previous work. This is useful for developing more ambitious strategies to address limitations of the traditional CPR development life cycle. The model described here is a starting point for promoting discussion about what a more dynamic CPR development process should look like.

  12. An Integrated Model of Outplacement Counseling.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aquilanti, Tara M.; Leroux, Janice

    1999-01-01

    The Aquilanti Integrated Model of Outplacement was developed from various aspects of existing grief and career theories. It comprises many practical elements that are present in the other models as well personal experience and knowledge of career counseling. It involves four phases: loss, grieving, and transition; personal development; job search;…

  13. An introduction to Space Weather Integrated Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhong, D.; Feng, X.

    2012-12-01

    The need for a software toolkit that integrates space weather models and data is one of many challenges we are facing with when applying the models to space weather forecasting. To meet this challenge, we have developed Space Weather Integrated Modeling (SWIM) that is capable of analysis and visualizations of the results from a diverse set of space weather models. SWIM has a modular design and is written in Python, by using NumPy, matplotlib, and the Visualization ToolKit (VTK). SWIM provides data management module to read a variety of spacecraft data products and a specific data format of Solar-Interplanetary Conservation Element/Solution Element MHD model (SIP-CESE MHD model) for the study of solar-terrestrial phenomena. Data analysis, visualization and graphic user interface modules are also presented in a user-friendly way to run the integrated models and visualize the 2-D and 3-D data sets interactively. With these tools we can locally or remotely analysis the model result rapidly, such as extraction of data on specific location in time-sequence data sets, plotting interplanetary magnetic field lines, multi-slicing of solar wind speed, volume rendering of solar wind density, animation of time-sequence data sets, comparing between model result and observational data. To speed-up the analysis, an in-situ visualization interface is used to support visualizing the data 'on-the-fly'. We also modified some critical time-consuming analysis and visualization methods with the aid of GPU and multi-core CPU. We have used this tool to visualize the data of SIP-CESE MHD model in real time, and integrated the Database Model of shock arrival, Shock Propagation Model, Dst forecasting model and SIP-CESE MHD model developed by SIGMA Weather Group at State Key Laboratory of Space Weather/CAS.

  14. Distinct ribosome maturation defects in yeast models of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joseph B; Farrar, Jason E; Arceci, Robert J; Liu, Johnson M; Ellis, Steven R

    2010-01-01

    Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome are inherited bone marrow failure syndromes linked to defects in ribosome synthesis. The purpose of this study was to determine whether yeast models for Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome differed in the mechanism by which ribosome synthesis was affected. Northern blotting, pulse-chase analysis, and polysome profiling were used to study ribosome synthesis in yeast models. Localization of 60S ribosomal subunits was assessed using RPL25eGFP. Relative to wild-type controls, each disease model showed defects in 60S subunit maturation, but with distinct underlying mechanisms. In the model of Diamond-Blackfan anemia, 60S subunit maturation was disrupted at a relatively early stage with abortive complexes subject to rapid degradation. 5S ribosomal RNA, unlike other large subunit ribosomal RNA in this model, accumulated as an extra-ribosomal species. In contrast, subunit maturation in the Shwachman-Diamond syndrome model was affected at a later step, giving rise to relatively stable pre-60S particles with associated 5S ribosomal RNA retained in the nucleus. Conclusions These differences between the yeast Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome models have implications for signaling mechanisms linking abortive ribosome assembly to cell fate decisions and may contribute to the divergent clinical presentations of Diamond-Blackfan anemia and Shwachman-Diamond syndrome.

  15. Modeling for System Integration Studies (Presentation)

    SciTech Connect

    Orwig, K. D.

    2012-05-01

    This presentation describes some the data requirements needed for grid integration modeling and provides real-world examples of such data and its format. Renewable energy integration studies evaluate the operational impacts of variable generation. Transmission planning studies investigate where new transmission is needed to transfer energy from generation sources to load centers. Both use time-synchronized wind and solar energy production and load as inputs. Both examine high renewable energy penetration scenarios in the future.

  16. MMM: A toolbox for integrative structure modeling.

    PubMed

    Jeschke, Gunnar

    2017-08-11

    Structural characterization of proteins and their complexes may require integration of restraints from various experimental techniques. MMM (Multiscale Modeling of Macromolecules) is a Matlab-based open-source modeling toolbox for this purpose with a particular emphasis on distance distribution restraints obtained from electron paramagnetic resonance experiments on spin-labelled proteins and nucleic acids and their combination with atomistic structures of domains or whole protomers, small-angle scattering data, secondary structure information, homology information, and elastic network models. MMM does not only integrate various types of restraints, but also various existing modeling tools by providing a common graphical user interface to them. The types of restraints that can support such modeling and the available model types are illustrated by recent application examples. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  17. Integrated radionuclide release: tests and model development (integrated testing)

    SciTech Connect

    Viani, B

    1995-08-07

    The Department of Energy's Yucca Mountain Site Characterization Project (YMP) is evaluating a site at Yucca Mountain, Nevada as a potential repository for the disposal of high-level nuclear waste. Credible bounding estimates of the type, concentration, and nature of the radionuclides that might potentially escape the engineered barrier system/near field environment (EBS/NFE) (i.e., the source term) are necessary prerequisites to assessing the expected performance of a po- tential repository. Estimating the source term will require a combination of experimental and modeling tasks that are designed to assess the release of radionclides from the waste form and their transport through and interaction with the components of the EBS/NFE. The Integrated Radionuclidc Release: Tests and Model Development activity (Integrated Testing) at Lawrence Liver-more National Laboratory (LLNL) is an experimental and modeling activity that is specifically concerned with radionuclide transport through and interaction with the compo- nents of the EBS/NFE. As such, this activity is the link b!etween waste-form degradation activities and far-field transport activities. Performance analysis of the EBS/NFE subsystem is an important component of the total system performance analyses (TSPA) that will be used to evaluate reposi- tory performance.

  18. International summit on integrated environmental modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gaber, Noha; Geller, Gary; Glynn, Pierre; Laniak, Gerry; Voinov, Alexey; Whelan, Gene; Roger, Moore; Hughes, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    This report describes the International Summit on Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM), held in Reston, VA, on 7th-9th December 2010. The meeting brought together 57 scientists and managers from leading US and European government and non-governmental organizations, universities and companies together with international organizations convened over a number of years, including: the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) workshop on Collaborative Approaches to Integrated Modeling: Better Integration for Better Decisionmaking (December, 2008); the AGU Fall Meeting, San Francisco (December 2009); and the International Congress on Environmental Modeling and Software (July 2010). From these meetings there is now recognition that many separate communities are involved in developing IEM. The aim of the Summit was to bring together two key groupings, the US and Europe, with the intention of creating a community open to all.

  19. Interrelationship of Career Choice Competencies and Career Choice Attitudes of Ninth-Grade Pupils: Testing Hypotheses Derived from Crites' Model of Career Maturity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Westbrook, Bert W.

    1976-01-01

    Presents the results of a study examining whether the two dimensions of Career Choice Attitudes and Career Choice Competencies are interrelated as hypothesized in the Crites model of career maturity. To test six associational hypotheses derived from the Crites model three career maturity instruments were administered to ninth-grade pupils (N=90).…

  20. Integrated Modelling - the next steps (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. V.

    2010-12-01

    Integrated modelling (IM) has made considerable advances over the past decade but it has not yet been taken up as an operational tool in the way that its proponents had hoped. The reasons why will be discussed in Session U17. This talk will propose topics for a research and development programme and suggest an institutional structure which, together, could overcome the present obstacles. Their combined aim would be first to make IM into an operational tool useable by competent public authorities and commercial companies and, in time, to see it evolve into the modelling equivalent of Google Maps, something accessible and useable by anyone with a PC or an iphone and an internet connection. In a recent study, a number of government agencies, water authorities and utilities applied integrated modelling to operational problems. While the project demonstrated that IM could be used in an operational setting and had benefit, it also highlighted the advances that would be required for its widespread uptake. These were: greatly improving the ease with which models could be a) made linkable, b) linked and c) run; developing a methodology for applying integrated modelling; developing practical options for calibrating and validating linked models; addressing the science issues that arise when models are linked; extending the range of modelling concepts that can be linked; enabling interface standards to pass uncertainty information; making the interface standards platform independent; extending the range of platforms to include those for high performance computing; developing the concept of modelling components as web services; separating simulation code from the model’s GUI, so that all the results from the linked models can be viewed through a single GUI; developing scenario management systems so that that there is an audit trail of the version of each model and dataset used in each linked model run. In addition to the above, there is a need to build a set of integrated

  1. In Vitro Acute Exposure to DEHP Affects Oocyte Meiotic Maturation, Energy and Oxidative Stress Parameters in a Large Animal Model

    PubMed Central

    Sardanelli, Anna Maria; Pocar, Paola; Martino, Nicola Antonio; Paternoster, Maria Stefania; Amati, Francesca; Dell'Aquila, Maria Elena

    2011-01-01

    Phthalates are ubiquitous environmental contaminants because of their use in plastics and other common consumer products. Di-(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP) is the most abundant phthalate and it impairs fertility by acting as an endocrine disruptor. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of in vitro acute exposure to DEHP on oocyte maturation, energy and oxidative status in the horse, a large animal model. Cumulus cell (CC) apoptosis and oxidative status were also investigated. Cumulus-oocyte complexes from the ovaries of slaughtered mares were cultured in vitro in presence of 0.12, 12 and 1200 µM DEHP. After in vitro maturation (IVM), CCs were removed and evaluated for apoptosis (cytological assessment and TUNEL) and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels. Oocytes were evaluated for nuclear chromatin configuration. Matured (Metaphase II stage; MII) oocytes were further evaluated for cytoplasmic energy and oxidative parameters. DEHP significantly inhibited oocyte maturation when added at low doses (0.12 µM; P<0.05). This effect was related to increased CC apoptosis (P<0.001) and reduced ROS levels (P<0.0001). At higher doses (12 and 1200 µM), DEHP induced apoptosis (P<0.0001) and ROS increase (P<0.0001) in CCs without affecting oocyte maturation. In DEHP-exposed MII oocytes, mitochondrial distribution patterns, apparent energy status (MitoTracker fluorescence intensity), intracellular ROS localization and levels, mt/ROS colocalization and total SOD activity did not vary, whereas increased ATP content (P<0.05), possibly of glycolytic origin, was found. Co-treatment with N-Acetyl-Cysteine reversed apoptosis and efficiently scavenged excessive ROS in DEHP-treated CCs without enhancing oocyte maturation. In conclusion, acute in vitro exposure to DEHP inhibits equine oocyte maturation without altering ooplasmic energy and oxidative stress parameters in matured oocytes which retain the potential to be fertilized and develop into embryos

  2. Maturation- and sex-sensitive depression of hippocampal excitatory transmission in a rat schizophrenia model.

    PubMed

    Patrich, Eti; Piontkewitz, Yael; Peretz, Asher; Weiner, Ina; Attali, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Schizophrenia is associated with behavioral and brain structural abnormalities, of which the hippocampus appears to be one of the most consistent region affected. Previous studies performed on the poly I:C model of schizophrenia suggest that alterations in hippocampal synaptic transmission and plasticity take place in the offspring. However, these investigations yielded conflicting results and the neurophysiological alterations responsible for these deficits are still unclear. Here we performed for the first time a longitudinal study examining the impact of prenatal poly I:C treatment and of gender on hippocampal excitatory neurotransmission. In addition, we examined the potential preventive/curative effects of risperidone (RIS) treatment during the peri-adolescence period. Excitatory synaptic transmission was determined by stimulating Schaffer collaterals and monitoring fiber volley amplitude and slope of field-EPSP (fEPSP) in CA1 pyramidal neurons in male and female offspring hippocampal slices from postnatal days (PNDs) 18-20, 34, 70 and 90. Depression of hippocampal excitatory transmission appeared at juvenile age in male offspring of the poly I:C group, while it expressed with a delay in female, manifesting at adulthood. In addition, a reduced hippocampal size was found in both adult male and female offspring of poly I:C treated dams. Treatment with RIS at the peri-adolescence period fully restored in males but partly repaired in females these deficiencies. A maturation- and sex-dependent decrease in hippocampal excitatory transmission occurs in the offspring of poly I:C treated pregnant mothers. Pharmacological intervention with RIS during peri-adolescence can cure in a gender-sensitive fashion early occurring hippocampal synaptic deficits.

  3. Integrable Deformations of T -Dual σ Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsato, Riccardo; Wulff, Linus

    2016-12-01

    We present a method to deform (generically non-Abelian) T duals of two-dimensional σ models, which preserves classical integrability. The deformed models are identified by a linear operator ω on the dualized subalgebra, which satisfies the 2-cocycle condition. We prove that the so-called homogeneous Yang-Baxter deformations are equivalent, via a field redefinition, to our deformed models when ω is invertible. We explain the details for deformations of T duals of principal chiral models, and present the corresponding generalization to the case of supercoset models.

  4. Integrated facilities modeling using QUEST and IGRIP

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, K.R.; Haan, E.R.

    1995-08-01

    A QUEST model and associated detailed IGRIP models were developed and used to simulate several workcells in a proposed Plutonium Storage Facility (PSF). The models are being used by team members assigned to the program to improve communication and to assist in evaluating concepts and in performing trade-off studies which will result in recommendations and a final design. The model was designed so that it could be changed easily. The added flexibility techniques used to make changes easily are described in this paper in addition to techniques for integrating the QUEST and IGRIP products. Many of these techniques are generic in nature and can be applied to any modeling endeavor.

  5. An integrative model of organizational safety behavior.

    PubMed

    Cui, Lin; Fan, Di; Fu, Gui; Zhu, Cherrie Jiuhua

    2013-06-01

    This study develops an integrative model of safety management based on social cognitive theory and the total safety culture triadic framework. The purpose of the model is to reveal the causal linkages between a hazardous environment, safety climate, and individual safety behaviors. Based on primary survey data from 209 front-line workers in one of the largest state-owned coal mining corporations in China, the model is tested using structural equation modeling techniques. An employee's perception of a hazardous environment is found to have a statistically significant impact on employee safety behaviors through a psychological process mediated by the perception of management commitment to safety and individual beliefs about safety. The integrative model developed here leads to a comprehensive solution that takes into consideration the environmental, organizational and employees' psychological and behavioral aspects of safety management. Copyright © 2013 National Safety Council and Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. CTBT integrated verification system evaluation model supplement

    SciTech Connect

    EDENBURN,MICHAEL W.; BUNTING,MARCUS; PAYNE JR.,ARTHUR C.; TROST,LAWRENCE C.

    2000-03-02

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia's Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, ''top-level,'' modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM's unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, in sound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection), location accuracy, and identification capability of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system's performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. The original IVSEM report, CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model, SAND97-25 18, described version 1.2 of IVSEM. This report describes the changes made to IVSEM version 1.2 and the addition of identification capability estimates that have been incorporated into IVSEM version 2.0.

  7. Data and Model Integration Promoting Interdisciplinarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koike, T.

    2014-12-01

    It is very difficult to reflect accumulated subsystem knowledge into holistic knowledge. Knowledge about a whole system can rarely be introduced into a targeted subsystem. In many cases, knowledge in one discipline is inapplicable to other disciplines. We are far from resolving cross-disciplinary issues. It is critically important to establish interdisciplinarity so that scientific knowledge can transcend disciplines. We need to share information and develop knowledge interlinkages by building models and exchanging tools. We need to tackle a large increase in the volume and diversity of data from observing the Earth. The volume of data stored has exponentially increased. Previously, almost all of the large-volume data came from satellites, but model outputs occupy the largest volume in general. To address the large diversity of data, we should develop an ontology system for technical and geographical terms in coupling with a metadata design according to international standards. In collaboration between Earth environment scientists and IT group, we should accelerate data archiving by including data loading, quality checking and metadata registration, and enrich data-searching capability. DIAS also enables us to perform integrated research and realize interdisciplinarity. For example, climate change should be addressed in collaboration between the climate models, integrated assessment models including energy, economy, agriculture, health, and the models of adaptation, vulnerability, and human settlement and infrastructure. These models identify water as central to these systems. If a water expert can develop an interrelated system including each component, the integrated crisis can be addressed by collaboration with various disciplines. To realize this purpose, we are developing a water-related data- and model-integration system called a water cycle integrator (WCI).

  8. Maturity and Activity of Faults in a Backarc Region of Southwest Japan Inferred From Integration of Topography, Paleoseismology, Coseismic Slip and Fault Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiyama, Y.; Fusejima, Y.; Miyashita, Y.; Kobayashi, K.; Miyawaki, A.

    2005-12-01

    Back arc region of southwest Japan (San_fin district) is characterized by relatively low strain rate and sparse distribution of major active faults with high slip rate. The San_fin district, however, has been frequently hit by _gmedium-sized_h damaging earthquakes since the historical age, including the recent 2000 western Tottori earthquake (Mw 6.6). Our integrated study of topography, paleoseismology, coseismic slip and fault rocks revealed that the 2000 western Tottori earthquake was produced by a fault system with low maturity and low activity, but long history at least since the Miocene. The low maturity is indicated by narrow shear zones (several mm to cm wide) and poor traceability (several ten to hundred meters long) of their topographic expressions. We think that the low maturity of the fault system caused sporadic occurrence of coseismic surface ruptures only within a 6-km-long area, which is far smaller than the seismologically estimated ca. 20-km-long source fault. Trenching survey identified a preceding rupture event around 28 ka, and post-earthquake geodetic survey revealed 70 cm to 1 m coseismic slip. Based on the data, average slip rate of the fault system responsible for the 2000 earthquake is estimated to be less than 0.1 mm/y. Fault rock study has showed that NW-striking mesoscopic faults in Paleogene granite are distributed more densely in the aftershock area than the outside area. Cataclasites are characteristically distributed within the aftershock area, and a large number of Miocene andesite dikes have intruded into the granite in the fault-controlling NW direction. The facts indicate that the fault system responsible for the 2000 western Tottori earthquake has a long formation history at least since Miocene time. Inoue et al. (2002) have revealed that a 4-km-long parallel fault located about 2 km west of the aftershock zone ruptured between AD 770 and 1260, suggesting the relation of this event to the AD 880 historical earthquake. Our

  9. Integrated odour modelling for sewage treatment works.

    PubMed

    Gostelow, P; Parsons, S A; Lovell, M

    2004-01-01

    Odours from sewage treatment works are a significant source of environmental annoyance. There is a need for tools to assess the degree of annoyance caused, and to assess strategies for mitigation of the problem. This is the role of odour modelling. Four main stages are important in the development of an odour problem. Firstly, the odorous molecules must be formed in the liquid phase. They must then transfer from the liquid to the gaseous phase. They are then transported through the atmosphere to the population surrounding the odour source, and are then perceived and assessed by that population. Odour modelling as currently practised tends to concentrate on the transportation of odorants through the atmosphere, with the other areas receiving less attention. Instead, odour modelling should consider each stage in an integrated manner. This paper describes the development of integrated odour models for annoyance prediction. The models describe the liquid-phase transformations and emission of hydrogen sulphide from sewage treatment processes. Model output is in a form suitable for integration with dispersion models, the predictions of which can in turn be used to indicate the probability of annoyance. The models have been applied to both hypothetical and real sewage treatment works cases. Simulation results have highlighted the potential variability of emission rates from sewage treatment works, resulting from flow, quality and meteorological variations. Emission rate variations can have significant effects on annoyance predictions, which is an important finding, as they are usually considered to be fixed and only meteorological variations are considered in predicting the odour footprint. Areas for further development of integrated odour modelling are discussed, in particular the search for improved links between analytical and sensory measurements, and a better understanding of dose/response relationships for odour annoyance.

  10. Effect of different manganese concentrations during in vitro maturation of bovine oocytes on DNA integrity of cumulus cells and subsequent embryo development.

    PubMed

    Anchordoquy, J P; Anchordoquy, J M; Sirini, M A; Mattioli, G; Picco, S J; Furnus, C C

    2013-12-01

    Manganese (Mn) is a trace element present in forages and cereals, and its concentration depends on soil status. Manganese deficiency in cattle, goats and ewes not only impairs oestrous cycle but reduces calf birth weight. The achievement of the first oestrus is delayed, and more attempts are necessary to obtain a successful conception. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of the availability of supplemental Mn during IVM on DNA damage of cumulus cells and total glutathione (GSH) content in oocytes and cumulus cells. The effect of supplementary Mn during IVM on subsequent embryo development was also studied. The results reported here indicate (i) DNA damage in cumulus cells decreased with 0, 2, 5 and 6 ng/ml Mn supplementation during IVM (p < 0.05). (ii) Intracellular GSH-GSSG content increased (p < 0.01) with different Mn concentrations in oocytes and cumulus cells. Also, cumulus cell number per cumulus oocyte-complexes (COC) did not differ either before or after IVM. (iii) Addition of Mn to maturation medium resulted in similar cleavage rates (p > 0.05) at 0, 2, 5 and 6 ng/ml Mn. However, subsequent embryo development to blastocyst stage was significantly higher (p < 0.01) in oocytes matured with 5 and 6 ng/ml Mn. (iv) There was also an increase (p < 0.05) in mean cell number per blastocyst obtained from oocytes matured with 5 and 6 ng/ml respect to zero Mn (IVM alone) and 2 ng/ml Mn. This study provides evidence that optimal embryo development to the blastocyst stage was partially dependent on the presence of Mn during IVM. Moreover, the availability of Mn during oocyte maturation ensures 'normal' intracellular GSH content in COCs and protects DNA integrity of cumulus cells.

  11. Designing a District Model to Promote Curriculum Integration.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickard, Dawn; And Others

    1994-01-01

    The Bloomfield Hills (Michigan) Curriculum Development Model is designed to foster curriculum integration and community collaboration. Unique features include curriculum integration by linking discipline-based outcomes with broad, interdisciplinary "common learnings"; implementation of various curriculum integration models; compatibility…

  12. Integration of Dynamic Models in Range Operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bardina, Jorge; Thirumalainambi, Rajkumar

    2004-01-01

    This work addresses the various model interactions in real-time to make an efficient internet based decision making tool for Shuttle launch. The decision making tool depends on the launch commit criteria coupled with physical models. Dynamic interaction between a wide variety of simulation applications and techniques, embedded algorithms, and data visualizations are needed to exploit the full potential of modeling and simulation. This paper also discusses in depth details of web based 3-D graphics and applications to range safety. The advantages of this dynamic model integration are secure accessibility and distribution of real time information to other NASA centers.

  13. International Summit on Integrated Environmental Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the International Summit on Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM), held in Washington, DC 7th-9th December 2010. The meeting brought together 57 scientists and managers from leading US and European government and non-governmental organizations, universitie...

  14. An Integrative Model of Suicidal Ideation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, M. David

    1990-01-01

    Presents an integrative path model that details relationships among several demographic variables, life stress, depression, hopelessness, social support, and suicidal ideation of 737 college students. Found negative life stress to be a significant predictor of both depression and hopelessness. Depression proved to be a better predictor of suicidal…

  15. Systems biology and integrative physiological modelling.

    PubMed

    Hester, Robert L; Iliescu, Radu; Summers, Richard; Coleman, Thomas G

    2011-03-01

    Over the last 10 years, 'Systems Biology' has focused on the integration of biology and medicine with information technology and computation. The current challenge is to use the discoveries of the last 20 years, such as genomics and proteomics, to develop targeted therapeutical strategies. These strategies are the result of understanding the aetiologies of complex diseases. Scientists predict the data will make personalized medicine rapidly available. However, the data need to be considered as a highly complex system comprising multiple inputs and feedback mechanisms. Translational medicine requires the functional and conceptual linkage of genetics to proteins, proteins to cells, cells to organs, organs to systems and systems to the organism. To help understand the complex integration of these systems, a mathematical model of the entire human body, which accurately links the functioning of all organs and systems together, could provide a framework for the development and testing of new hypotheses that will be important in clinical outcomes. There are several efforts to develop a 'Human Physiome', with the strengths and weaknesses of each being presented here. The development of a 'Human Model', with verification, documentation and validation of the underlying and integrative responses, is essential to provide a usable environment. Future development of a 'Human Model' requires integrative physiologists working in collaboration with other scientists, who have expertise in all areas of human biology, to develop the most accurate and usable human model.

  16. International Summit on Integrated Environmental Modeling

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes the International Summit on Integrated Environmental Modeling (IEM), held in Washington, DC 7th-9th December 2010. The meeting brought together 57 scientists and managers from leading US and European government and non-governmental organizations, universitie...

  17. Rethinking School Bullying: Towards an Integrated Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Roz; Smith, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    What would make anti-bullying initiatives more successful? This book offers a new approach to the problem of school bullying. The question of what constitutes a useful theory of bullying is considered and suggestions are made as to how priorities for future research might be identified. The integrated, systemic model of school bullying introduced…

  18. Rethinking School Bullying: Towards an Integrated Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dixon, Roz; Smith, Peter K.

    2011-01-01

    What would make anti-bullying initiatives more successful? This book offers a new approach to the problem of school bullying. The question of what constitutes a useful theory of bullying is considered and suggestions are made as to how priorities for future research might be identified. The integrated, systemic model of school bullying introduced…

  19. Fingernail Injuries and NASA's Integrated Medical Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kerstman, Eric; Butler, Doug

    2008-01-01

    The goal of space medicine is to optimize both crew health and performance. Currently, expert opinion is primarily relied upon for decision-making regarding medical equipment and supplies flown in space. Evidence-based decisions are preferred due to mass and volume limitations and the expense of space flight. The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) is an attempt to move us in that direction!

  20. The model of the controllable radiation source for stimulation of growth and maturing of fruits of cultivated plants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shkavro, Anastasia I.; Peretyagin, Vladimir S.; Gorbunova, Elena V.; Chertov, Aleksandr N.; Korotaev, Valery V.

    2017-02-01

    The description of the LED optical-electronic lighting system of plants for stimulation of growth and maturing of fruits of different cultures is provided in this work. Also the results of experimental research on the selection of components are presented. The results of energy calculations and 3D modeling of the distribution of the radiation fluxes generated from the source are included. Moreover, the design of optoelectronic plant lighting system layout was proposed.

  1. Data and model integration for hydrologic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castronova, A. M.; Gichamo, T.; Arrieta, F. J.; Johnson, R.

    2015-12-01

    As research studies grow in size and in scope, the use of component integration frameworks becomes a more common modeling practice. These software systems provide mechanisms for sharing data among disparate computational modules during simulation runtime, to collectively solve a given problem. This functionality is particularly desirable when modeling cross-disciplinary systems such as climate science and watershed hydrology. Many hydrologic models rely on weather parameters, which may be observed in the field or estimated by other models, to drive simulation. While much of this data is readily available, the method by which it is integrated into coupled hydrologic simulations is not a trivial process, especially when dealing with large data stores. This work investigates modes of integration for large datasets within coupled hydrologic models. The approach is demonstrated by incorporating publicly available observation data as well as preprocessed datasets within a coupled modeling framework. We present this work and demonstrate how the methodology can be leveraged to simulate watershed-scale hydrologic systems.

  2. Integrable extended van der Waals model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giglio, Francesco; Landolfi, Giulio; Moro, Antonio

    2016-10-01

    Inspired by the recent developments in the study of the thermodynamics of van der Waals fluids via the theory of nonlinear conservation laws and the description of phase transitions in terms of classical (dissipative) shock waves, we propose a novel approach to the construction of multi-parameter generalisations of the van der Waals model. The theory of integrable nonlinear conservation laws still represents the inspiring framework. Starting from a macroscopic approach, a four parameter family of integrable extended van der Waals models is indeed constructed in such a way that the equation of state is a solution to an integrable nonlinear conservation law linearisable by a Cole-Hopf transformation. This family is further specified by the request that, in regime of high temperature, far from the critical region, the extended model reproduces asymptotically the standard van der Waals equation of state. We provide a detailed comparison of our extended model with two notable empirical models such as Peng-Robinson and Soave's modification of the Redlich-Kwong equations of state. We show that our extended van der Waals equation of state is compatible with both empirical models for a suitable choice of the free parameters and can be viewed as a master interpolating equation. The present approach also suggests that further generalisations can be obtained by including the class of dispersive and viscous-dispersive nonlinear conservation laws and could lead to a new type of thermodynamic phase transitions associated to nonclassical and dispersive shock waves.

  3. Nonlinear integral equations for the sausage model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Changrim; Balog, Janos; Ravanini, Francesco

    2017-08-01

    The sausage model, first proposed by Fateev, Onofri, and Zamolodchikov, is a deformation of the O(3) sigma model preserving integrability. The target space is deformed from the sphere to ‘sausage’ shape by a deformation parameter ν. This model is defined by a factorizable S-matrix which is obtained by deforming that of the O(3) sigma model by a parameter λ. Clues for the deformed sigma model are provided by various UV and IR information through the thermodynamic Bethe ansatz (TBA) analysis based on the S-matrix. Application of TBA to the sausage model is, however, limited to the case of 1/λ integer where the coupled integral equations can be truncated to a finite number. In this paper, we propose a finite set of nonlinear integral equations (NLIEs), which are applicable to generic value of λ. Our derivation is based on T-Q relations extracted from the truncated TBA equations. For a consistency check, we compute next-leading order corrections of the vacuum energy and extract the S-matrix information in the IR limit. We also solved the NLIE both analytically and numerically in the UV limit to get the effective central charge and compared with that of the zero-mode dynamics to obtain exact relation between ν and λ. Dedicated to the memory of Petr Petrovich Kulish.

  4. A Multistep Maturity Model for the Implementation of Electronic and Computable Diagnostic Clinical Prediction Rules (eCPRs)

    PubMed Central

    Corrigan, Derek; McDonnell, Ronan; Zarabzadeh, Atieh; Fahey, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The use of Clinical Prediction Rules (CPRs) has been advocated as one way of implementing actionable evidence-based rules in clinical practice. The current highly manual nature of deriving CPRs makes them difficult to use and maintain. Addressing the known limitations of CPRs requires implementing more flexible and dynamic models of CPR development. We describe the application of Information and Communication Technology (ICT) to provide a platform for the derivation and dissemination of CPRs derived through analysis and continual learning from electronic patient data. Model Components: We propose a multistep maturity model for constructing electronic and computable CPRs (eCPRs). The model has six levels – from the lowest level of CPR maturity (literaturebased CPRs) to a fully electronic and computable service-oriented model of CPRs that are sensitive to specific demographic patient populations. We describe examples of implementations of the core model components – focusing on CPR representation, interoperability, electronic dissemination, CPR learning, and user interface requirements. Conclusion: The traditional focus on derivation and narrow validation of CPRs has severely limited their wider acceptance. The evolution and maturity model described here outlines a progression toward eCPRs consistent with the vision of a learning health system (LHS) – using central repositories of CPR knowledge, accessible open standards, and generalizable models to avoid repetition of previous work. This is useful for developing more ambitious strategies to address limitations of the traditional CPR development life cycle. The model described here is a starting point for promoting discussion about what a more dynamic CPR development process should look like. PMID:26290890

  5. Final Pre-40S Maturation Depends on the Functional Integrity of the 60S Subunit Ribosomal Protein L3

    PubMed Central

    García-Gómez, Juan J.; Rosado, Iván V.; Tollervey, David; Kressler, Dieter; de la Cruz, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    Ribosomal protein L3 is an evolutionarily conserved protein that participates in the assembly of early pre-60S particles. We report that the rpl3[W255C] allele, which affects the affinity and function of translation elongation factors, impairs cytoplasmic maturation of 20S pre-rRNA. This was not seen for other mutations in or depletion of L3 or other 60S ribosomal proteins. Surprisingly, pre-40S particles containing 20S pre-rRNA form translation-competent 80S ribosomes, and translation inhibition partially suppresses 20S pre-rRNA accumulation. The GTP-dependent translation initiation factor Fun12 (yeast eIF5B) shows similar in vivo binding to ribosomal particles from wild-type and rpl3[W255C] cells. However, the GTPase activity of eIF5B failed to stimulate processing of 20S pre-rRNA when assayed with ribosomal particles purified from rpl3[W255C] cells. We conclude that L3 plays an important role in the function of eIF5B in stimulating 3′ end processing of 18S rRNA in the context of 80S ribosomes that have not yet engaged in translation. These findings indicate that the correct conformation of the GTPase activation region is assessed in a quality control step during maturation of cytoplasmic pre-ribosomal particles. PMID:24603549

  6. Development of a novel ex vivo porcine skin explant model for the assessment of mature bacterial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Yang, Qingping; Phillips, Priscilla L; Sampson, Edith M; Progulske-Fox, Ann; Jin, Shouguang; Antonelli, Patrick; Schultz, Gregory S

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms have been proposed to be a major factor contributing to the failure of chronic wounds to heal because of their increased tolerance to antimicrobial agents and the prolonged inflammation they cause. Phenotypic characteristics of bacterial biofilms vary depending on the substratum to which they attach, the nutritional environment, and the microorganisms within the biofilm community. To develop an ex vivo biofilm model that more closely mimics biofilms in chronic skin wounds, we developed an optimal procedure to grow mature biofilms on a central partial-thickness wound in 12-mm porcine skin explants. Chlorine gas produced optimal sterilization of explants while preserving histological properties of the epidermis and dermis. Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Staphylococcus aureus developed mature biofilms after 3 days that had dramatically increased tolerance to gentamicin and oxacillin (∼100× and 8,000× minimal inhibitory concentration, respectively) and to sodium hypochlorite (0.6% active chlorine). Scanning electron microscopy and confocal microscopy verified extensive exopolymeric biofilm structures on the explants. Despite a significant delay, a ΔlasI quorum-sensing mutant of P. aeruginosa developed biofilm as antibiotic-tolerant as wild-type after 3 days. This ex vivo model simulates growth of biofilms on skin wounds and provides an accurate model to assess effects of antimicrobial agents on mature biofilms. © 2013 by the Wound Healing Society.

  7. FACETS -- Infrastructure for Integrated Fusion Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shasharina, Svetlana; Cary, John; Carlsson, Johan; Hakim, Ammar; Kruger, Scott; Miah, Mahmood; Pletzer, Alexander; Vadlamani, Srinath; Wade-Stein, David; Balay, Satish; McInnes, Lois; Zhang, Hong; Candy, Jeff; Fahey, Mark; Cohen, Ron; Epperly, Tom; Rognlien, Tom; Estep, Don; Pankin, Alexei; Malony, Allen; Morris, Alan; Shende, Sameer; Indireshkumar, Keshavamurthy; McCune, Douglas; Pigarov, Alexander

    2009-11-01

    It is desirable that an infrastructure for integrated fusion modeling has support for: legacy and new components used interchangeably; consistent management of components lifecycle; allocating parallel resources consistent with the nature of participating components and the problem scope; components written in multiple programming languages; composition of sequentially and concurrently executing components respecting dependencies; tight and loose coupling of components; testing and validation of separate and integrated components; and use of multiple platforms from desktops to LCFs. In this poster we will describe the status of the FACETS with respect to these features.

  8. Paradox of integration-A computational model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krawczyk, Małgorzata J.; Kułakowski, Krzysztof

    2017-02-01

    The paradoxical aspect of integration of a social group has been highlighted by Blau (1964). During the integration process, the group members simultaneously compete for social status and play the role of the audience. Here we show that when the competition prevails over the desire of approval, a sharp transition breaks all friendly relations. However, as was described by Blau, people with high status are inclined to bother more with acceptance of others; this is achieved by praising others and revealing her/his own weak points. In our model, this action smooths the transition and improves interpersonal relations.

  9. Toward Teacher Maturity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickle, Judy

    1985-01-01

    The essence of teacher maturity can be synthesized into personal, professional, and process domains. Although overlapping, these categories add a multidimensional approach to the search for what is good in teaching and provide a model for professional development. (MT)

  10. An overview of the model integration process: From pre-integration assessment to testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integration of models requires linking models which can be developed using different tools, methodologies, and assumptions. We performed a literature review with the aim of improving our understanding of model integration process, and also presenting better strategies for buildin...

  11. An overview of the model integration process: From pre-integration assessment to testing

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integration of models requires linking models which can be developed using different tools, methodologies, and assumptions. We performed a literature review with the aim of improving our understanding of model integration process, and also presenting better strategies for buildin...

  12. An Integrated Ecological Modeling System for Assessing ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    We demonstrate a novel, spatially explicit assessment of the current condition of aquatic ecosystem services, with limited sensitivity analysis for the atmospheric contaminant mercury. The Integrated Ecological Modeling System (IEMS) forecasts water quality and quantity, habitat suitability for aquatic biota, fish biomasses, population densities, productivities, and contamination by methylmercury across headwater watersheds. We applied this IEMS to the Coal River Basin (CRB), West Virginia (USA), an 8-digit hydrologic unit watershed, by simulating a network of 97 stream segments using the SWAT watershed model, a watershed mercury loading model, the WASP water quality model, the PiSCES fish community estimation model, a fish habitat suitability model, the BASS fish community and bioaccumulation model, and an ecoservices post-processer. Model application was facilitated by automated data retrieval and model setup and updated model wrappers and interfaces for data transfers between these models from a prior study. This companion study evaluates baseline predictions of ecoservices provided for 1990 – 2010 for the population of streams in the CRB and serves as a foundation for future model development. Published in the journal, Ecological Modeling. Highlights: • Demonstrate a spatially-explicit IEMS for multiple scales. • Design a flexible IEMS for

  13. Developmental Control of Oocyte Maturation and Egg Activation in Metazoan Models

    PubMed Central

    Von Stetina, Jessica R.; Orr-Weaver, Terry L.

    2011-01-01

    Production of functional eggs requires meiosis to be coordinated with developmental signals. Oocytes arrest in prophase I to permit oocyte differentiation, and in most animals, a second meiotic arrest links completion of meiosis to fertilization. Comparison of oocyte maturation and egg activation between mammals, Caenorhabditis elegans, and Drosophila reveal conserved signaling pathways and regulatory mechanisms as well as unique adaptations for reproductive strategies. Recent studies in mammals and C. elegans show the role of signaling between surrounding somatic cells and the oocyte in maintaining the prophase I arrest and controlling maturation. Proteins that regulate levels of active Cdk1/cyclin B during prophase I arrest have been identified in Drosophila. Protein kinases play crucial roles in the transition from meiosis in the oocyte to mitotic embryonic divisions in C. elegans and Drosophila. Here we will contrast the regulation of key meiotic events in oocytes. PMID:21709181

  14. A Software Process Framework for the SEI Capability Maturity Model: Repeatable Level

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-06-01

    Vilfredo Pareto , that most effects I come from relatively few causes, i.e., 80% of the effects come from 20% of the possible causes. peer review - A review...to the next maturity level. Using the Pareto principle [Juran88b], the CMM prescribes the "vital few" key process areas to focus on depending on an...or interfacing with the individuals responsible for performing in the topic area. (See train for contrast.) Pareto analysis - The analysis of defects

  15. Mechanistic Studies and Modeling Reveal the Origin of Differential Inhibition of Gag Polymorphic Viruses by HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zeyu; Cantone, Joseph; Lu, Hao; Nowicka-Sans, Beata; Protack, Tricia; Yuan, Tian; Yang, Hong; Liu, Zheng; Drexler, Dieter; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Meanwell, Nicholas A; Cockett, Mark; Krystal, Mark; Lataillade, Max; Dicker, Ira B

    2016-11-01

    HIV-1 maturation inhibitors (MIs) disrupt the final step in the HIV-1 protease-mediated cleavage of the Gag polyprotein between capsid p24 capsid (CA) and spacer peptide 1 (SP1), leading to the production of infectious virus. BMS-955176 is a second generation MI with improved antiviral activity toward polymorphic Gag variants compared to a first generation MI bevirimat (BVM). The underlying mechanistic reasons for the differences in polymorphic coverage were studied using antiviral assays, an LC/MS assay that quantitatively characterizes CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics of virus like particles (VLPs) and a radiolabel binding assay to determine VLP/MI affinities and dissociation kinetics. Antiviral assay data indicates that BVM does not achieve 100% inhibition of certain polymorphs, even at saturating concentrations. This results in the breakthrough of infectious virus (partial antagonism) regardless of BVM concentration. Reduced maximal percent inhibition (MPI) values for BVM correlated with elevated EC50 values, while rates of HIV-1 protease cleavage at CA/SP1 correlated inversely with the ability of BVM to inhibit HIV-1 Gag polymorphic viruses: genotypes with more rapid CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics were less sensitive to BVM. In vitro inhibition of wild type VLP CA/SP1 cleavage by BVM was not maintained at longer cleavage times. BMS-955176 exhibited greatly improved MPI against polymorphic Gag viruses, binds to Gag polymorphs with higher affinity/longer dissociation half-lives and exhibits greater time-independent inhibition of CA/SP1 cleavage compared to BVM. Virological (MPI) and biochemical (CA/SP1 cleavage rates, MI-specific Gag affinities) data were used to create an integrated semi-quantitative model that quantifies CA/SP1 cleavage rates as a function of both MI and Gag polymorph. The model outputs are in accord with in vitro antiviral observations and correlate with observed in vivo MI efficacies. Overall, these findings may be useful to further understand antiviral

  16. Mechanistic Studies and Modeling Reveal the Origin of Differential Inhibition of Gag Polymorphic Viruses by HIV-1 Maturation Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Zeyu; Cantone, Joseph; Lu, Hao; Protack, Tricia; Yuan, Tian; Yang, Hong; Liu, Zheng; Drexler, Dieter; Regueiro-Ren, Alicia; Meanwell, Nicholas A.; Cockett, Mark; Krystal, Mark; Lataillade, Max; Dicker, Ira B.

    2016-01-01

    HIV-1 maturation inhibitors (MIs) disrupt the final step in the HIV-1 protease-mediated cleavage of the Gag polyprotein between capsid p24 capsid (CA) and spacer peptide 1 (SP1), leading to the production of infectious virus. BMS-955176 is a second generation MI with improved antiviral activity toward polymorphic Gag variants compared to a first generation MI bevirimat (BVM). The underlying mechanistic reasons for the differences in polymorphic coverage were studied using antiviral assays, an LC/MS assay that quantitatively characterizes CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics of virus like particles (VLPs) and a radiolabel binding assay to determine VLP/MI affinities and dissociation kinetics. Antiviral assay data indicates that BVM does not achieve 100% inhibition of certain polymorphs, even at saturating concentrations. This results in the breakthrough of infectious virus (partial antagonism) regardless of BVM concentration. Reduced maximal percent inhibition (MPI) values for BVM correlated with elevated EC50 values, while rates of HIV-1 protease cleavage at CA/SP1 correlated inversely with the ability of BVM to inhibit HIV-1 Gag polymorphic viruses: genotypes with more rapid CA/SP1 cleavage kinetics were less sensitive to BVM. In vitro inhibition of wild type VLP CA/SP1 cleavage by BVM was not maintained at longer cleavage times. BMS-955176 exhibited greatly improved MPI against polymorphic Gag viruses, binds to Gag polymorphs with higher affinity/longer dissociation half-lives and exhibits greater time-independent inhibition of CA/SP1 cleavage compared to BVM. Virological (MPI) and biochemical (CA/SP1 cleavage rates, MI-specific Gag affinities) data were used to create an integrated semi-quantitative model that quantifies CA/SP1 cleavage rates as a function of both MI and Gag polymorph. The model outputs are in accord with in vitro antiviral observations and correlate with observed in vivo MI efficacies. Overall, these findings may be useful to further understand antiviral

  17. Practical Application of the Data Stewardship Maturity Model for NOAA's OneStop Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ritchey, N. A.; Peng, G.; Jones, P. R.; Milan, A.; Casey, K. S.

    2016-12-01

    Assessing the current stewardship maturity state of datasets is an important part of ensuring and improving the way datasets are documented, preserved, stewarded, and disseminated to users. It is a critical step towards meeting U.S. federal regulations, organizational requirements, and user needs, especially in the area of data quality.The Data Stewardship Maturity Matrix (DSMM) developed in partnership with NOAA's National Centers of Environmental Information (NCEI) and the Cooperative Institute for Climate and Satellites-North Carolina (CICS-NC) provides a uniform framework for consistent assessment within the context of data management and it includes key components related to data quality and documentation of the quality. This DSMM was used to assess stewardship maturity of datasets archived within NCEI supporting NOAA's OneStop Data Discovery and Access Framework Project. Additionally the DSMM assessment results were implemented in ISO 19115 within the dataset metadata record and will be used for relevancy ranking within OneStop.This presentation will demonstrate the application of the DSMM to NOAA's OneStop datasets including the tools developed to assist the consistent application of the DSMM and communicate the results and an overview of how the DSMM results were implemented in the standard dataset metadata.

  18. Integrated UV fluorescence/DIAL model

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferson, K.J.

    1994-06-01

    Current SNL CALIOPE modeling efforts have produced an initial model that addresses DIAL issues of wavelength, hardware design parameters, range evaluation, etc. Although this model is producing valuable results and will be used to support the planning and evaluations necessary for the first ground field experiment, it is expected to have limitations with the complex science issues that affect the CALIOPE program. In particular, the multi-dimensional effects of atmospheric turbulence, plume dynamics, speckle, etc., may be significant issues and must be evaluated in detail as the program moves to the detection of liquids and solids, longer ranges, and elevated platform environments. The goal of the integrated UV fluorescence/DIAL modeling effort is to build upon the knowledge obtained in developing and exercising the initial model to adequately support the future activities of this program. This paper will address the development of the integrated UV model, issues and limiting assumptions that may be needed in order to address the-complex phenomena involved, limits of expected performance, and the potential use of this model.

  19. An integrated network model of psychotic symptoms.

    PubMed

    Looijestijn, Jasper; Blom, Jan Dirk; Aleman, André; Hoek, Hans W; Goekoop, Rutger

    2015-12-01

    The full body of research on the nature of psychosis and its determinants indicates that a considerable number of factors are relevant to the development of hallucinations, delusions, and other positive symptoms, ranging from neurodevelopmental parameters and altered connectivity of brain regions to impaired cognitive functioning and social factors. We aimed to integrate these factors in a single mathematical model based on network theory. At the microscopic level this model explains positive symptoms of psychosis in terms of experiential equivalents of robust, high-frequency attractor states of neural networks. At the mesoscopic level it explains them in relation to global brain states, and at the macroscopic level in relation to social-network structures and dynamics. Due to the scale-free nature of biological networks, all three levels are governed by the same general laws, thereby allowing for an integrated model of biological, psychological, and social phenomena involved in the mediation of positive symptoms of psychosis. This integrated network model of psychotic symptoms (INMOPS) is described together with various possibilities for application in clinical practice. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. CTBT Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model

    SciTech Connect

    Edenburn, M.W.; Bunting, M.L.; Payne, A.C. Jr.

    1997-10-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a computer based model called IVSEM (Integrated Verification System Evaluation Model) to estimate the performance of a nuclear detonation monitoring system. The IVSEM project was initiated in June 1994, by Sandia`s Monitoring Systems and Technology Center and has been funded by the US Department of Energy`s Office of Nonproliferation and National Security (DOE/NN). IVSEM is a simple, top-level, modeling tool which estimates the performance of a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty (CTBT) monitoring system and can help explore the impact of various sensor system concepts and technology advancements on CTBT monitoring. One of IVSEM`s unique features is that it integrates results from the various CTBT sensor technologies (seismic, infrasound, radionuclide, and hydroacoustic) and allows the user to investigate synergy among the technologies. Specifically, IVSEM estimates the detection effectiveness (probability of detection) and location accuracy of the integrated system and of each technology subsystem individually. The model attempts to accurately estimate the monitoring system`s performance at medium interfaces (air-land, air-water) and for some evasive testing methods such as seismic decoupling. This report describes version 1.2 of IVSEM.

  1. Uncertainty quantification's role in modeling and simulation planning, and credibility assessment through the predictive capability maturity model

    SciTech Connect

    Rider, William J.; Witkowski, Walter R.; Mousseau, Vincent Andrew

    2016-04-13

    The importance of credible, trustworthy numerical simulations is obvious especially when using the results for making high-consequence decisions. Determining the credibility of such numerical predictions is much more difficult and requires a systematic approach to assessing predictive capability, associated uncertainties and overall confidence in the computational simulation process for the intended use of the model. This process begins with an evaluation of the computational modeling of the identified, important physics of the simulation for its intended use. This is commonly done through a Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT). Then an assessment of the evidence basis supporting the ability to computationally simulate these physics can be performed using various frameworks such as the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM). Several critical activities follow in the areas of code and solution verification, validation and uncertainty quantification, which will be described in detail in the following sections. The subject matter is introduced for general applications but specifics are given for the failure prediction project. In addition, the first task that must be completed in the verification & validation procedure is to perform a credibility assessment to fully understand the requirements and limitations of the current computational simulation capability for the specific application intended use. The PIRT and PCMM are tools used at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to provide a consistent manner to perform such an assessment. Ideally, all stakeholders should be represented and contribute to perform an accurate credibility assessment. PIRTs and PCMMs are both described in brief detail below and the resulting assessments for an example project are given.

  2. Uncertainty quantification's role in modeling and simulation planning, and credibility assessment through the predictive capability maturity model

    DOE PAGES

    Rider, William J.; Witkowski, Walter R.; Mousseau, Vincent Andrew

    2016-04-13

    The importance of credible, trustworthy numerical simulations is obvious especially when using the results for making high-consequence decisions. Determining the credibility of such numerical predictions is much more difficult and requires a systematic approach to assessing predictive capability, associated uncertainties and overall confidence in the computational simulation process for the intended use of the model. This process begins with an evaluation of the computational modeling of the identified, important physics of the simulation for its intended use. This is commonly done through a Phenomena Identification Ranking Table (PIRT). Then an assessment of the evidence basis supporting the ability to computationallymore » simulate these physics can be performed using various frameworks such as the Predictive Capability Maturity Model (PCMM). Several critical activities follow in the areas of code and solution verification, validation and uncertainty quantification, which will be described in detail in the following sections. The subject matter is introduced for general applications but specifics are given for the failure prediction project. In addition, the first task that must be completed in the verification & validation procedure is to perform a credibility assessment to fully understand the requirements and limitations of the current computational simulation capability for the specific application intended use. The PIRT and PCMM are tools used at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) to provide a consistent manner to perform such an assessment. Ideally, all stakeholders should be represented and contribute to perform an accurate credibility assessment. PIRTs and PCMMs are both described in brief detail below and the resulting assessments for an example project are given.« less

  3. Dual integral porosity shallow water model for urban flood modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guinot, Vincent; Sanders, Brett F.; Schubert, Jochen E.

    2017-05-01

    With CPU times 2 to 3 orders of magnitude smaller than classical shallow water-based models, the shallow water equations with porosity are a promising tool for large-scale modelling of urban floods. In this paper, a new model formulation called the Dual Integral Porosity (DIP) model is presented and examined analytically and computationally with a series of benchmark tests. The DIP model is established from an integral mass and momentum balance whereby both porosity and flow variables are defined separately for control volumes and boundaries, and a closure scheme is introduced to link control volume- and boundary-based flow variables. Previously developed Integral Porosity (IP) models were limited to a single set of flow variables. A new transient momentum dissipation model is also introduced to account for the effects of sub-grid scale wave action on porosity model solutions, effects which are validated by fine-grid solutions of the classical shallow-water equations and shown to be important for achieving similarity in dam-break solutions. One-dimensional numerical test cases show that the proposed DIP model outperforms the IP model, with significantly improved wave propagation speeds, water depths and discharge calculations. A two-dimensional field scale test case shows that the DIP model performs better than the IP model in mapping the floods extent and is slightly better in reproducing the anisotropy of the flow field when momentum dissipation parameters are calibrated.

  4. An integrated data model for reservoir simulation

    SciTech Connect

    Aydelotte, S.R.

    1994-02-01

    This paper describes the capability of the Epicenter data model to manage reservoir-simulation information, including the spatial model used to describe the properties of the earth and the product-flow network mode used to describe production performance. In addition to data values, the data model describes data creation and quality and provides a reliable means of understanding the source. To use the data model, reservoir-simulation applications need to be rewritten to conform to the data-model nomenclature and conventions. While this is a significant task, the benefit to reservoir simulation practitioners and vendors includes integration of technical applications (such as mapping, well logging, and geophysical interpretation systems), data portability (allowing Vendor A's simulator to use data prepared by Vendor B's preprocessor), and interpretability such as using a third-party optimization package to conduct a series of simulations.

  5. The Integrated Landscape Modeling partnership - Current status and future directions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mushet, David M.; Scherff, Eric J.

    2016-01-28

    The Integrated Landscape Modeling (ILM) partnership is an effort by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) and U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) to identify, evaluate, and develop models to quantify services derived from ecosystems, with a focus on wetland ecosystems and conservation effects. The ILM partnership uses the Integrated Valuation of Ecosystem Services and Tradeoffs (InVEST) modeling platform to facilitate regional quantifications of ecosystem services under various scenarios of land-cover change that are representative of differing conservation program and practice implementation scenarios. To date, the ILM InVEST partnership has resulted in capabilities to quantify carbon stores, amphibian habitat, plant-community diversity, and pollination services. Work to include waterfowl and grassland bird habitat quality is in progress. Initial InVEST modeling has been focused on the Prairie Pothole Region (PPR) of the United States; future efforts might encompass other regions as data availability and knowledge increase as to how functions affecting ecosystem services differ among regions.The ILM partnership is also developing the capability for field-scale process-based modeling of depressional wetland ecosystems using the Agricultural Policy/Environmental Extender (APEX) model. Progress was made towards the development of techniques to use the APEX model for closed-basin depressional wetlands of the PPR, in addition to the open systems that the model was originally designed to simulate. The ILM partnership has matured to the stage where effects of conservation programs and practices on multiple ecosystem services can now be simulated in selected areas. Future work might include the continued development of modeling capabilities, as well as development and evaluation of differing conservation program and practice scenarios of interest to partner agencies including the USDA’s Farm Service Agency (FSA) and Natural Resources Conservation Service (NRCS). When

  6. Ontological Modeling for Integrated Spacecraft Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wicks, Erica

    2011-01-01

    Current spacecraft work as a cooperative group of a number of subsystems. Each of these requiresmodeling software for development, testing, and prediction. It is the goal of my team to create anoverarching software architecture called the Integrated Spacecraft Analysis (ISCA) to aid in deploying the discrete subsystems' models. Such a plan has been attempted in the past, and has failed due to the excessive scope of the project. Our goal in this version of ISCA is to use new resources to reduce the scope of the project, including using ontological models to help link the internal interfaces of subsystems' models with the ISCA architecture.I have created an ontology of functions specific to the modeling system of the navigation system of a spacecraft. The resulting ontology not only links, at an architectural level, language specificinstantiations of the modeling system's code, but also is web-viewable and can act as a documentation standard. This ontology is proof of the concept that ontological modeling can aid in the integration necessary for ISCA to work, and can act as the prototype for future ISCA ontologies.

  7. The Integrated Airport Competition Model, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, J.; Essers, I.; Bakker, D.; Cohn, N.; Kroes, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses recent model development by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) and Hague Consulting Group (HCG) concerning long-distance travel, Long-distance travel demand is growing very quickly and raising a great deal of economic and policy issues. There is increasing competition among the main Western European airports, and smaller, regional airports are fighting for market share. New modes of transport, such as high speed rail, arc also coming into the picture and affect the mode split for medium distance transport within Europe. Developments such as these are demanding the attention of policy makers and a tool is required for their analysis. For DGCA, Hague Consulting Group has developed a model system to provide answers to the policy questions posed by these expected trends, and to identify areas where policy makers can influence the traveller choices. The development of this model system, the Integrated Airport Competition Model/Integral Luchthaven Competitive Model (ILCM), began in 1992. Since that time the sub-models, input data and user interface have been expanded, updated and improved. HCG and DGCA have transformed the ILCM from a prototype into an operational forecasting tool.

  8. The Integrated Airport Competition Model, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, J.; Essers, I.; Bakker, D.; Cohn, N.; Kroes, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses recent model development by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) and Hague Consulting Group (HCG) concerning long-distance travel, Long-distance travel demand is growing very quickly and raising a great deal of economic and policy issues. There is increasing competition among the main Western European airports, and smaller, regional airports are fighting for market share. New modes of transport, such as high speed rail, arc also coming into the picture and affect the mode split for medium distance transport within Europe. Developments such as these are demanding the attention of policy makers and a tool is required for their analysis. For DGCA, Hague Consulting Group has developed a model system to provide answers to the policy questions posed by these expected trends, and to identify areas where policy makers can influence the traveller choices. The development of this model system, the Integrated Airport Competition Model/Integral Luchthaven Competitive Model (ILCM), began in 1992. Since that time the sub-models, input data and user interface have been expanded, updated and improved. HCG and DGCA have transformed the ILCM from a prototype into an operational forecasting tool.

  9. Plant design: Integrating Plant and Equipment Models

    SciTech Connect

    Sloan, David; Fiveland, Woody; Zitney, S.E.; Osawe, Maxwell

    2007-08-01

    Like power plant engineers, process plant engineers must design generating units to operate efficiently, cleanly, and profitably despite fluctuating costs for raw materials and fuels. To do so, they increasingly create virtual plants to enable evaluation of design concepts without the expense of building pilot-scale or demonstration facilities. Existing computational models describe an entire plant either as a network of simplified equipment models or as a single, very detailed equipment model. The Advanced Process Engineering Co-Simulator (APECS) project (Figure 5) sponsored by the U.S. Department of Energy's National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) seeks to bridge the gap between models by integrating plant modeling and equipment modeling software. The goal of the effort is to provide greater insight into the performance of proposed plant designs. The software integration was done using the process-industry standard CAPE-OPEN (Computer Aided Process Engineering–Open), or CO interface. Several demonstration cases based on operating power plants confirm the viability of this co-simulation approach.

  10. Preserved seminiferous tubule integrity with spermatogonial survival and induction of Sertoli and Leydig cell maturation after long-term organotypic culture of prepubertal human testicular tissue.

    PubMed

    de Michele, F; Poels, J; Weerens, L; Petit, C; Evrard, Z; Ambroise, J; Gruson, D; Wyns, C

    2017-01-01

    Is an organotypic culture system able to provide the appropriate testicular microenvironment for in-vitro maturation of human immature testicular tissue (ITT)? Our organotypic culture system provided a microenvironment capable of preserving seminiferous tubule (ST) integrity and Leydig cell (LC) functionality and inducing Sertoli cell (SC) maturation. Cryopreservation of human ITT is a well-established strategy to preserve fertility in prepubertal boys affected by cancer, with a view for obtaining sperm. While spermatogenesis in mice has been replicated in organotypic culture, yielding reproductively efficient spermatozoa, this process has not yet been achieved in humans. The aim of this study was to in vitro mature frozen-thawed ITT. To this end, 1 mm(3) tissue fragments from three prepubertal patients aged 2 (P1), 11 (P2) and 12 (P3) years were placed in organotypic culture for 139 days. Culture media, supplemented with either testosterone or hCG, were compared. ST integrity and tissue viability were assessed by histological score and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) levels in supernatants. Spermatogonia (SG), proliferating cells and proliferating SG were identified by the use of MAGE-A4 and Ki67 immunohistochemical markers. Glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) was used as a marker of SC functionality, while SC maturation was evaluated by androgen receptor (AR), anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) immunohistochemistry (IHC) and AMH immunoenzymatic assay. LC functionality was determined by testosterone levels in supernatants and by 3β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (3β-HSD) IHC. Apoptosis was studied by IHC with active caspases 3 and 8 and by TUNEL (terminal deoxynubocleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling) analysis. Tissue viability was preserved, as demonstrated by the decrease in and stabilization of LDH release, and evolution of ST scoring, with the percentage of well-preserved STs showing no statistical differences during culture in either

  11. Integrated modeling of advanced optical systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Hugh C.; Needels, Laura; Levine, B. Martin

    1993-01-01

    This poster session paper describes an integrated modeling and analysis capability being developed at JPL under funding provided by the JPL Director's Discretionary Fund and the JPL Control/Structure Interaction Program (CSI). The posters briefly summarize the program capabilities and illustrate them with an example problem. The computer programs developed under this effort will provide an unprecedented capability for integrated modeling and design of high performance optical spacecraft. The engineering disciplines supported include structural dynamics, controls, optics and thermodynamics. Such tools are needed in order to evaluate the end-to-end system performance of spacecraft such as OSI, POINTS, and SMMM. This paper illustrates the proof-of-concept tools that have been developed to establish the technology requirements and demonstrate the new features of integrated modeling and design. The current program also includes implementation of a prototype tool based upon the CAESY environment being developed under the NASA Guidance and Control Research and Technology Computational Controls Program. This prototype will be available late in FY-92. The development plan proposes a major software production effort to fabricate, deliver, support and maintain a national-class tool from FY-93 through FY-95.

  12. Approximated integrability of the Dicke model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Relaño, A.; Bastarrachea-Magnani, M. A.; Lerma-Hernández, S.

    2016-12-01

    A very approximate second integral of motion of the Dicke model is identified within a broad energy region above the ground state, and for a wide range of values of the external parameters. This second integral, obtained from a Born-Oppenheimer approximation, classifies the whole regular part of the spectrum in bands, coming from different semi-classical energy surfaces, and labelled by its corresponding eigenvalues. Results obtained from this approximation are compared with exact numerical diagonalization for finite systems in the superradiant phase, obtaining a remarkable accord. The region of validity of our approach in the parameter space, which includes the resonant case, is unveiled. The energy range of validity goes from the ground state up to a certain upper energy where chaos sets in, and extends far beyond the range of applicability of a simple harmonic approximation around the minimal energy configuration. The upper energy validity limit increases for larger values of the coupling constant and the ratio between the level splitting and the frequency of the field. These results show that the Dicke model behaves like a two-degree-of-freedom integrable model for a wide range of energies and values of the external parameters.

  13. Integrated Modelling in CRUCIAL Science Education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahura, Alexander; Nuterman, Roman; Mukhamedzhanova, Elena; Nerobelov, Georgiy; Sedeeva, Margarita; Suhodskiy, Alexander; Mostamandy, Suleiman; Smyshlyaev, Sergey

    2017-04-01

    The NordForsk CRUCIAL project (2016-2017) "Critical steps in understanding land surface - atmosphere interactions: from improved knowledge to socioeconomic solutions" as a part of the Pan-Eurasian EXperiment (PEEX; https://www.atm.helsinki.fi/peex) programme activities, is looking for a deeper collaboration between Nordic-Russian science communities. In particular, following collaboration between Danish and Russian partners, several topics were selected for joint research and are focused on evaluation of: (1) urbanization processes impact on changes in urban weather and climate on urban-subregional-regional scales and at contribution to assessment studies for population and environment; (2) effects of various feedback mechanisms on aerosol and cloud formation and radiative forcing on urban-regional scales for better predicting extreme weather events and at contribution to early warning systems, (3) environmental contamination from continues emissions and industrial accidents for better assessment and decision making for sustainable social and economic development, and (4) climatology of atmospheric boundary layer in northern latitudes to improve understanding of processes, revising parameterizations, and better weather forecasting. These research topics are realized employing the online integrated Enviro-HIRLAM (Environment - High Resolution Limited Area Model) model within students' research projects: (1) "Online integrated high-resolution modelling of Saint-Petersburg metropolitan area influence on weather and air pollution forecasting"; (2) "Modeling of aerosol impact on regional-urban scales: case study of Saint-Petersburg metropolitan area"; (3) "Regional modeling and GIS evaluation of environmental pollution from Kola Peninsula sources"; and (4) "Climatology of the High-Latitude Planetary Boundary Layer". The students' projects achieved results and planned young scientists research training on online integrated modelling (Jun 2017) will be presented and

  14. Nicotine-induced Disturbances of Meiotic Maturation in Cultured Mouse Oocytes: Alterations of Spindle Integrity and Chromosome Alignment.

    PubMed

    Zenzes, Maria Teresa; Bielecki, Ryszard

    2004-09-15

    We investigated whether nicotine exposure in vitro of mouse oocytes affects spindle and chromosome function during meiotic maturation (M-I and M-II). Oocytes in germinal vesicle (GV) stage were cultured in nicotine for 8 h or for 16 h, to assess effects in M-I and in metaphase II (M-II). The latter culture setting used the three protocols: 8 h nicotine then 8 h medium (8N + 8M); 16 h nicotine (16N); 8 h medium then 8 h nicotine (8M + 8N). Non-toxic concentrations of nicotine at 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10.0 mmol/L were used. Spindle-chromosome configurations were analyzed with wide-field optical sectioning microscopy. In 8 h cultures, nicotine exposure resulted in dose-related increased proportions of M-I oocytes with defective spindle-chromosome configurations. A dose-related delayed entry into anaphase I was also detected. In 16 h cultures, nicotine exposure for the first 8 h (8N + 8M), or for 16 h (16N), resulted in dose- and time-related increased proportions of oocytes arrested in M-I (10 mmol/L; 8 h: 53.2%, controls 9.6%; 16 h: 87.6%, controls 8.5%). Defects in M-I spindles and chromosomes caused M-I arrest leading to dose-related decreased proportions of oocytes that reached metaphase-II (10 mmol/L 8 h: 46.8%, controls 90.4%;16 h: 12.4%, controls 91.5%). A delayed anaphase-I affected the normal timing of M-II, leading to abnormal oocytes with dispersed chromosomes, or with double spindles and no polar body. Nicotine exposure during the second 8 h (8M + 8N) resulted in dose-related, increased proportions of M-II oocytes with defective spindles and chromosomes (10 mmol/L: 42.9%, controls 2.0%). Nicotine has no adverse effects on GV break down, but induces spindle and chromosome defects compromising oocyte meiotic maturation and development.

  15. An integrated neuromechanical model of insect locomotion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kukillaya, Raghavendra

    We develop a biologically-plausible feedforward neuromechanical model for running insects that includes a simplified hexapedal leg geometry with agonist-antagonist muscle pairs actuating each leg joint. It is driven by a neural network modeling the central pattern generator (CPG) and the motoneurons which activate the muscles. This final goal is achieved in three stages. First, a relatively simple mechanical hexapedal model is constructed in which the joint torques are produced via actuated linear torsional springs with constant stiffness. In the second stage, this system is upgraded to a muscle-actuated hexapedal model in which each joint is actuated by a pair of agonist-antagonist Hill-type muscles. Muscles are driven by stylized action potentials that are characteristic of fast motoneurons, and modeled using an activation function and nonlinear length and shortening velocity dependence. In the final stage, the full neuromechanical model is obtained by integrating the above muscle-actuated hexapedal model with a CPG-motoneuron complex, feedforward input to the muscles now being supplied by action potentials from motoneurons. Restricting to dynamics in the horizontal plane and neglecting leg masses, we reduce the model (at each stage) to three degrees of freedom describing translational and yawing motions of the body. Collectively for all the models, parameter values are based on measurements from depressor motoneurons and muscles, and observations of kinematics and dynamics of the cockroach Blaberus discoidalis. Specifically, actuation inputs for the mechanical and muscle-actuated models are chosen to approximately achieve joint torques that are consistent with measured ground reaction forces. This is done by optimizing the time-dependent torque-free joint angles in the first model, and by optimizing motoneuronal outputs and muscle force levels in the second and third models. We show that the model (at each stage) has stable double-tripod gaits over the animal

  16. Use of pleopod morphology to determine sexual dimorphism and maturity in hermit crabs: Isocheles sawayai as a model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fantucci, Marina Zilio; Biagi, Renata; Mantelatto, Fernando Luis

    2009-06-01

    In the Anomura, studies on growth patterns are infrequent, possibly because the heterogeneity of the group, especially in terms of morphology, makes it difficult to construct generalized growth models. Particularly hermit crabs are an interesting group to evaluate aspects of growth, because of their unique body. Isocheles sawayai, a hermit crab found only in the western Atlantic Ocean, poorly known with respect to its sexual dimorphism and maturity, was investigated here based on morphometry. Monthly collections (July 2001 through June 2003) were made from a shrimp fishing boat in the Caraguatatuba region on the northern coast of the state of São Paulo, Brazil. The specimens were measured and weighed, and had their sex checked. Throughout the sampling period, 374 specimens of I. sawayai were collected (11.23% nonovigerous females, 6.69% ovigerous females, 79.41% males and 2.67% intersexes). The size at which morphological sexual maturity was reached by both sexes ranged from 4.0 to 4.3 mm shield length, according to the relative growth and the size of the smallest ovigerous female. Sexual dimorphism was shown by males, which were significantly larger than females, and by differences in growth pattern between the sexes, especially for relationships that involved the pleopods, which is related to their different functions in males and females. The present study is one of the first to use pleopod morphometry to determine sexual maturity and dimorphism in hermit crabs, especially for species with intersexuality such as I. sawayai.

  17. Geohistory and thermal maturation in the Cherokee Basin (Mid-Continent, U.S.A.): results from modeling

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Forster, A.; Merriam, D.F.; Hoth, P.

    1998-01-01

    The Cherokee basin in southeastern Kansas contains a stratigraphic section consisting mostly of Permian-Pennsylvanian alternating clastics and thin carbonates overlying carbonates of Mississippian and Cambrian-Ordovician age on a Precambrian crytalline basement. Based on a conceptual model of events of deposition, nondeposition, and erosion, a burial history model for (1) noncompaction, and a series of models for (2) compaction are computed for a borehole location in the south-central part of the basin. The models are copled with the calculation of nonsteady-state geothermal conditions. Maximum temperatures during basin evolution of about 70??C at the base of the organic-rich Pennsylvanian are predicted by our models, assuming pure heat conduction and a heat flow from the basement of 60 m W/m2. The maturation of organic matter as indicated by three different vitrinite reflectance (Ro) models is on the order og 0.3-0.5% Ro for Pennsylvanian rocks and 0.6% Ro for the Devonian-Mississippian Cattanooga Shale. Vitrinite reflectance was measured on subsurface smaples from three wells. The measured values correlate in the upper part of the sequence with modeled data, but diverge slightly in the Lower Pennsylvanian and Cattanooga Shale. The differences in maturation may be a result of differing local geological conditions within the basin. The relatively high Ro-depth gradients observed in one borehole may be explained by conditions in the Teeter oil field, which is a typical plains-type anticline that has been affected by fluid flow through vertical faults. Higher Ro values correlate positively with the grade of sulfidfe mineralization in the sediment, which may be a hint of fluid impact. The high Ro values relative to the shallow depth of the Mississippian and the Chattanooga Shale in the Brown well are on the order of Ro values modeled for the same stratigraphic units at present-day greater depths and may reflect uplift of the Ozark dome, located further east, affecting

  18. Lunar iron and optical maturity mapping: Results from partial least squares modeling of Chang'E-1 IIM data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Lingzhi; Ling, Zongcheng; Zhang, Jiang; Li, Bo; Chen, Jian; Wu, Zhongchen; Liu, Jianzhong

    2016-12-01

    Iron and optical maturity (OMAT) are two key geological marks of the Moon that closely related to its geochemical evolution and interactions between surface and space environment. We apply Partial Least Squares (PLS) regression to Chang'E-1 Imaging Interferometer (IIM) (32 bands between 480 and 960 nm) in mapping lunar global FeO and OMAT, and the FeO and OMAT values are derived based on reasonable spectral parameters (absorbance, band ratios, TiO2 and maturity sensitive parameters, etc.). After been calibrated by the FeO map from Lunar Prospector Gamma-Ray Spectrometer (LP-GRS), the global FeO map derived from PLS modeling shows a quantitatively more reasonable result consistent with previous remote sensing results (LP) as well as lunar feldspathic meteorite studies and Chang'E-3 landing site. Based on the new FeO map by Chang'E-1, we discover a compositional inhomogeneity across lunar highland regions, which has not been suggested by previous datasets (e.g., Clementine UVVIS). Furthermore, we suggest that at least part of the FeO enrichments in highlands would be caused by mixing of highland and mare materials. The IIM derived OMAT map does not suggest a dichotomy of the lunar highlands and mare regions, implying the compositional differences between those two terrains have been suppressed. We further check the maturity effect for the young mare basalts (<3.0 Ga), and find that (1) the OMAT values of the young basaltic units with medium and high FeO and TiO2 show a linear decrease with ages; (2) units with ultrahigh-FeO (>20 wt%) and ultrahigh-TiO2 (>10 wt%) tend to have greater OMAT values and vary little with ages; (3) this may be due to the distinct optical maturity effects of ultramafic minerals (i.e., ultrahigh Fe and Ti) and/or the spectral blue shifts of abundant ilmenite.

  19. A stage-structured predator-prey model with distributed maturation delay and harvesting.

    PubMed

    Al-Omari, J F M

    2015-01-01

    A stage-structured predator-prey system with distributed maturation delay and harvesting is investigated. General birth and death functions are used. The local stability of each feasible equilibria is discussed. By using the persistence theory, it is proven that the system is permanent if the coexistence equilibrium exists. By using Lyapunov functional and LaSalle invariant principle, it is shown that the trivial equilibrium is globally stable when the other equilibria are not feasible, and that the boundary equilibrium is globally stable if the coexistence equilibrium does not exist. Finally, sufficient conditions are derived for the global stability of the coexistence equilibrium.

  20. Integrated Model for E-Learning Acceptance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramadiani; Rodziah, A.; Hasan, S. M.; Rusli, A.; Noraini, C.

    2016-01-01

    E-learning is not going to work if the system is not used in accordance with user needs. User Interface is very important to encourage using the application. Many theories had discuss about user interface usability evaluation and technology acceptance separately, actually why we do not make it correlation between interface usability evaluation and user acceptance to enhance e-learning process. Therefore, the evaluation model for e-learning interface acceptance is considered important to investigate. The aim of this study is to propose the integrated e-learning user interface acceptance evaluation model. This model was combined some theories of e-learning interface measurement such as, user learning style, usability evaluation, and the user benefit. We formulated in constructive questionnaires which were shared at 125 English Language School (ELS) students. This research statistics used Structural Equation Model using LISREL v8.80 and MANOVA analysis.

  1. Sparse model selection via integral terms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaeffer, Hayden; McCalla, Scott G.

    2017-08-01

    Model selection and parameter estimation are important for the effective integration of experimental data, scientific theory, and precise simulations. In this work, we develop a learning approach for the selection and identification of a dynamical system directly from noisy data. The learning is performed by extracting a small subset of important features from an overdetermined set of possible features using a nonconvex sparse regression model. The sparse regression model is constructed to fit the noisy data to the trajectory of the dynamical system while using the smallest number of active terms. Computational experiments detail the model's stability, robustness to noise, and recovery accuracy. Examples include nonlinear equations, population dynamics, chaotic systems, and fast-slow systems.

  2. Terminal modeling of hardened integrated circuits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kleiner, C. T.; Haas, R.; Peacock, M.; Mandel, G.; Messenger, G. C.; Weakley, D.; Demartino, V.

    1981-12-01

    Kleiner et al. (1979) have reported modeling and test verification techniques used to develop medium-scale, dielectrically isolated integrated circuits (DIIC). The current investigation is concerned with the approaches employed in modeling the new circuits for applications studied by design and radiation hardening engineers. The described technique improves significantly the cost-effective application of computer programs such as SYSCAP II. The terminal model offers the designer of radiation-hardened electronic circuits a method for evaluating the effects of radiation transients on single or multiple piece-part response at the circuit board level. Although the models presented were intended for TREE design and analysis, it is possible to extend the technique to EMP and SGEMP evaluations.

  3. RG stability of integrable fishnet models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mamroud, Ohad; Torrents, Genís

    2017-06-01

    We address the question of perturbative consistency in the scalar fishnet models presented by Caetano, Gürdoğan and Kazakov [1, 2]. We argue that their 3-dimensional ϕ 6 fishnet model becomes perturbatively stable under renormalization in the large N limit, in contrast to what happens in their 4-dimensional ϕ 4 fishnet model, in which double trace terms are known to be generated by the RG flow. We point out that there is a direct way to modify this second theory that protects it from such corrections. Additionally, we observe that the 6-dimensional ϕ 3 Lagrangian that spans an hexagonal integrable scalar fishnet is consistent at the perturbative level as well. The nontriviality and simplicity of this last model is illustrated by computing the anomalous dimensions of its tr ϕ i ϕ j operators to all perturbative orders.

  4. Sexual maturity in growing dinosaurs does not fit reptilian growth models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Andrew H.; Werning, Sarah

    2008-01-01

    Recent histological studies suggest relatively rapid growth in dinosaurs. However, the timing of reproductive maturity (RM) in dinosaurs is poorly known because unambiguous indicators of RM are rare. One exception is medullary bone (MB), which is an ephemeral bony tissue that forms before ovulation in the marrow cavities of birds as a calcium source for eggshelling. Recently, MB also was described in a single specimen of the saurischian dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex. Here, we report two other occurrences of MB: in another saurischian dinosaur, Allosaurus, and in the ornithischian dinosaur Tenontosaurus. We show by counting lines of arrested growth and performing growth curve reconstructions that Tenontosaurus, Allosaurus, and Tyrannosaurus were reproductively mature by 8, 10, and 18 years, respectively. RM in these dinosaurs coincided with a transition from growth acceleration to deceleration. It also far precedes predictions based on the growth rates of living reptiles scaled to similar size. Despite relatively rapid growth, dinosaurs were similar to reptiles in that RM developed before reaching asymptotic size. However, this reproductive strategy also occurs in medium- to large-sized mammals and correlates with a strategy of prolonged multiyear growth. RM in actively growing individuals suggests that these dinosaurs were born relatively precocial and experienced high adult mortality. The origin of the modern avian reproductive strategy in ornithuran birds likely coincided with their extreme elevations in growth rate and truncations to growth duration. PMID:18195356

  5. Sexual maturity in growing dinosaurs does not fit reptilian growth models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew H; Werning, Sarah

    2008-01-15

    Recent histological studies suggest relatively rapid growth in dinosaurs. However, the timing of reproductive maturity (RM) in dinosaurs is poorly known because unambiguous indicators of RM are rare. One exception is medullary bone (MB), which is an ephemeral bony tissue that forms before ovulation in the marrow cavities of birds as a calcium source for eggshelling. Recently, MB also was described in a single specimen of the saurischian dinosaur Tyrannosaurus rex. Here, we report two other occurrences of MB: in another saurischian dinosaur, Allosaurus, and in the ornithischian dinosaur Tenontosaurus. We show by counting lines of arrested growth and performing growth curve reconstructions that Tenontosaurus, Allosaurus, and Tyrannosaurus were reproductively mature by 8, 10, and 18 years, respectively. RM in these dinosaurs coincided with a transition from growth acceleration to deceleration. It also far precedes predictions based on the growth rates of living reptiles scaled to similar size. Despite relatively rapid growth, dinosaurs were similar to reptiles in that RM developed before reaching asymptotic size. However, this reproductive strategy also occurs in medium- to large-sized mammals and correlates with a strategy of prolonged multiyear growth. RM in actively growing individuals suggests that these dinosaurs were born relatively precocial and experienced high adult mortality. The origin of the modern avian reproductive strategy in ornithuran birds likely coincided with their extreme elevations in growth rate and truncations to growth duration.

  6. Examining the process of de novo gene birth: an educational primer on "integration of new genes into cellular networks, and their structural maturation".

    PubMed

    Frietze, Seth; Leatherman, Judith

    2014-03-01

    New genes that arise from modification of the noncoding portion of a genome rather than being duplicated from parent genes are called de novo genes. These genes, identified by their brief evolution and lack of parent genes, provide an opportunity to study the timeframe in which emerging genes integrate into cellular networks, and how the characteristics of these genes change as they mature into bona fide genes. An article by G. Abrusán provides an opportunity to introduce students to fundamental concepts in evolutionary and comparative genetics and to provide a technical background by which to discuss systems biology approaches when studying the evolutionary process of gene birth. Basic background needed to understand the Abrusán study and details on comparative genomic concepts tailored for a classroom discussion are provided, including discussion questions and a supplemental exercise on navigating a genome database.

  7. Visualization tools: Models, representations and knowledge integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Brian John

    Learning science requires students to make inferences and draw conclusions about concepts that are abstract, invisible or otherwise difficult to imagine. Scientific visualization is one way to make science and scientific thinking more visible to students. This dissertation investigates how visualization can be utilized for science education by studying how students integrate information from visualizations into their thinking. For this study, I developed a series of computer visualizations depicting thermodynamic phenomena. Thermodynamics is a topic that is both fundamental for several branches of science and difficult for many students to master (Linn & Songer, 1991). The design of the visualizations was learner centered. Pilot studies suggested that a dot-density representation of temperature would present a visual analogy of temperature as a measure of heat energy density. Energy density is a powerful model that can help students explain everyday heating and cooling phenomena. Dot-density computer visualizations were introduced into a public middle school science class studying thermodynamics (N = 178). Half of the students used the visualizations, while the other half served as a control. Interviews, classwork and tests were collected from the students in order to determine how the visualizations affected students' learning. Although there were not significant differences in the posttests for the groups, the classwork during the semester showed that the visualizations did affect how students envisioned heat and temperature. Students could often apply the energy density model in their reasoning during visualization activities, but when the visualizations were unavailable, many students applied less useful models. The interviews illustrated several difficulties that students had in learning from the visualizations. Some students interpreted the visualizations to support their existing conceptions of heat. Other students needed to have a visualization present to

  8. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS) Program. Mapping of Cleanroom Against the CMM: Capability Maturity Model for Software Detailed Mapping to Cleanroom Software Engineering Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-02-23

    Capability Maturity Model (SW-CMM) for Software, v 1.1. The evaluation of the CSE process for compliance against the SW-CNM was performed using Software Process Framework (SPF) and the source document.

  9. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable System (STARS) Program. Mapping of Cleanroom Against the CMM: Capability Maturity Model for Software Detailed Mapping to Cleanroom Software Engineering Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-02-23

    Capability Maturity Model (SW-CMM) for Software, v 1.1. The evaluation of the CSE process for compliance against the SW-CMM was performed using Software Process Framework (SPF) and the source document.

  10. The Gold Coast Integrated Care Model

    PubMed Central

    Connor, Martin; Cooper, Helen

    2016-01-01

    This article outlines the development of the Australian Gold Coast Integrated Care Model based on the elements identified in contemporary research literature as essential for successful integration of care between primary care, and acute hospital services. The objectives of the model are to proactively manage high risk patients with complex and chronic conditions in collaboration with General Practitioners to ultimately reduce presentations to the health service emergency department, improve the capacity of specialist outpatients, and decrease planned and unplanned admission rates. Central to the model is a shared care record which is maintained and accessed by staff in the Coordination Centre. We provide a process map outlining the care protocols from initial assessment to care of the patient presenting for emergency care. The model is being evaluated over a pilot three year proof of concept phase to determine economic and process perspectives. If found to be cost-effective, acceptable to patients and professionals and as good as or better than usual care in terms of outcomes, the strategic intent is to scale the programme beyond the local health service. PMID:28435415

  11. Dynamic Data Integration Using Streamline Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta-Gupta, A.

    2002-12-01

    Recent developments in petroleum reservoir characterization and in the management of uncertainty have lead to the ability of the industry to routinely generate large multimillion-cell detailed geologic models. Reconciling such high-resolution models to dynamic reservoir behavior (transient pressure and tracer response, multiphase production history) still remains an outstanding challenge because of the high computational costs associated with the solution of large inverse problems. Streamline-based flow simulation models can offer significant potential in this regard. In this presentation we will exploit an analogy between streamlines and seismic ray tracing to develop an efficient formalism for dynamic data integration into high-resolution subsurface models. Utilizing concepts from the asymptotic ray theory in seismic and diffusive electromagnetic imaging, we will generalize the streamline approach to incorporate transient pressure, tracer and multiphase production response during subsurface characterization. Data integration will be carried out in a manner analogous to seismic tomography and waveform imaging by first matching the `arrival time' and then the `amplitude' of the production response. Several field examples from the oil field and environmental applications will demonstrate the practical feasibility of the approach.

  12. Rubredoxin-related Maturation Factor Guarantees Metal Cofactor Integrity during Aerobic Biosynthesis of Membrane-bound [NiFe] Hydrogenase*

    PubMed Central

    Fritsch, Johannes; Siebert, Elisabeth; Priebe, Jacqueline; Zebger, Ingo; Lendzian, Friedhelm; Teutloff, Christian; Friedrich, Bärbel; Lenz, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    The membrane-bound [NiFe] hydrogenase (MBH) supports growth of Ralstonia eutropha H16 with H2 as the sole energy source. The enzyme undergoes a complex biosynthesis process that proceeds during cell growth even at ambient O2 levels and involves 14 specific maturation proteins. One of these is a rubredoxin-like protein, which is essential for biosynthesis of active MBH at high oxygen concentrations but dispensable under microaerobic growth conditions. To obtain insights into the function of HoxR, we investigated the MBH protein purified from the cytoplasmic membrane of hoxR mutant cells. Compared with wild-type MBH, the mutant enzyme displayed severely decreased hydrogenase activity. Electron paramagnetic resonance and infrared spectroscopic analyses revealed features resembling those of O2-sensitive [NiFe] hydrogenases and/or oxidatively damaged protein. The catalytic center resided partially in an inactive Niu-A-like state, and the electron transfer chain consisting of three different Fe-S clusters showed marked alterations compared with wild-type enzyme. Purification of HoxR protein from its original host, R. eutropha, revealed only low protein amounts. Therefore, recombinant HoxR protein was isolated from Escherichia coli. Unlike common rubredoxins, the HoxR protein was colorless, rather unstable, and essentially metal-free. Conversion of the atypical iron-binding motif into a canonical one through genetic engineering led to a stable reddish rubredoxin. Remarkably, the modified HoxR protein did not support MBH-dependent growth at high O2. Analysis of MBH-associated protein complexes points toward a specific interaction of HoxR with the Fe-S cluster-bearing small subunit. This supports the previously made notion that HoxR avoids oxidative damage of the metal centers of the MBH, in particular the unprecedented Cys6[4Fe-3S] cluster. PMID:24448806

  13. Integrated identification, modeling and control with applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Guojun

    This thesis deals with the integration of system design, identification, modeling and control. In particular, six interdisciplinary engineering problems are addressed and investigated. Theoretical results are established and applied to structural vibration reduction and engine control problems. First, the data-based LQG control problem is formulated and solved. It is shown that a state space model is not necessary to solve this problem; rather a finite sequence from the impulse response is the only model data required to synthesize an optimal controller. The new theory avoids unnecessary reliance on a model, required in the conventional design procedure. The infinite horizon model predictive control problem is addressed for multivariable systems. The basic properties of the receding horizon implementation strategy is investigated and the complete framework for solving the problem is established. The new theory allows the accommodation of hard input constraints and time delays. The developed control algorithms guarantee the closed loop stability. A closed loop identification and infinite horizon model predictive control design procedure is established for engine speed regulation. The developed algorithms are tested on the Cummins Engine Simulator and desired results are obtained. A finite signal-to-noise ratio model is considered for noise signals. An information quality index is introduced which measures the essential information precision required for stabilization. The problems of minimum variance control and covariance control are formulated and investigated. Convergent algorithms are developed for solving the problems of interest. The problem of the integrated passive and active control design is addressed in order to improve the overall system performance. A design algorithm is developed, which simultaneously finds: (i) the optimal values of the stiffness and damping ratios for the structure, and (ii) an optimal output variance constrained stabilizing

  14. Integrated Hydrosystem Modeling of the California Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davison, J. H.; Hwang, H. T.; Sudicky, E. A.; Mallia, D.; Lin, J. C.

    2015-12-01

    The Western United States is facing one of the worst droughts on record. Climate change projections predict warmer temperatures, higher evapotranspiration rates, and no foreseeable increase in precipitation. California, in particular, has supplemented their decreased surface water supplies by mining deep groundwater. However, this supply of groundwater is limited, especially with reduced recharge. These combined factors place California's water-demanding society at dire risk. In an effort to quantify California's risks, we present a fully integrated water cycle model that captures the dynamics of the subsurface, land surface, and atmospheric domains over the entire California basin. Our water cycle model combines HydroGeoSphere (HGS), a 3-D control-volume finite element model that accommodates variably-saturated subsurface and surface water flow with evapotranspiration processes to the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model, a 3-D finite difference nonhydrostatic mesoscale atmospheric simulator. The two-way coupling within our model, referred to as HGS-WRF, tightly integrates the water cycling processes by passing precipitation and potential evapotranspiration data from WRF to HGS, while exchanging actual evapotranspiration and soil saturation data from HGS to WRF. Furthermore, HGS-WRF implements a flexible coupling method that allows each model to use a unique mesh while maintaining mass conservation within and between domains. Our simulation replicated field measured evapotranspiration fluxes and showed a strong correlation between the soil saturation (depth to groundwater table) and latent heat fluxes. Altogether, the HGS-WRF California basin model is currently the most complete water resource simulation framework as it combines groundwater, surface water, the unsaturated zone, and the atmosphere into one coupled system.

  15. Hypnosis, suggestion, and suggestibility: an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Lynn, Steven Jay; Laurence, Jean-Roch; Kirsch, Irving

    2015-01-01

    This article elucidates an integrative model of hypnosis that integrates social, cultural, cognitive, and neurophysiological variables at play both in and out of hypnosis and considers their dynamic interaction as determinants of the multifaceted experience of hypnosis. The roles of these variables are examined in the induction and suggestion stages of hypnosis, including how they are related to the experience of involuntariness, one of the hallmarks of hypnosis. It is suggested that studies of the modification of hypnotic suggestibility; cognitive flexibility; response sets and expectancies; the default-mode network; and the search for the neurophysiological correlates of hypnosis, more broadly, in conjunction with research on social psychological variables, hold much promise to further understanding of hypnosis.

  16. Performance of an INTEGRAL spectrometer model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jean, P.; Naya, J. E.; vonBallmoos, P.; Vedrenne, G.; Teegarden, B.

    1997-01-01

    Model calculations for the INTEGRAL spectrometer (SPI) onboard the future INTErnational Gamma Ray Astrophysics Laboratory (INTEGAL) are presented, where the sensitivity for narrow lines is based on estimates of the background level and the detection efficiency. The instrumental background rates are explained as the sum of various components that depend on the cosmic ray intensity and the spectrometer characteristics, such as the mass distribution around the Ge detectors, the passive material, the characteristics of the detector system and the background reduction techniques. Extended background calculations were performed with Monte Carlo simulations and using semi-empirical and calculated neutron and proton cross sections. In order to improve the INTEGRAL spectrometer sensitivity, several designs and background reduction techniques were compared for an instrument with a fixed detector volume.

  17. Modelling of maturation, expulsion and accumulation of bacterial methane within Ravneš Member (Pliocene age), Croatia onshore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetković, Marko

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial methane is a dominant hydrocarbon component in the Northern Croatia's Adriatic offshore proven hydrocarbon reservoirs. As onshore reserves are declining the potential of shallow gas accumulation, analogue to the Adriatic ones, are being tested. A part of the Lonja Formation (Pliocene Pleistocene and Holocene), the Ravneš Member (Early Pliocene age) is analysed for its maturation and expulsion regarding bacterial methane as potential source and reservoir rocks, especially as it is thermally immature. Two approaches were used for the initial lithology modelling processes - the convergent interpolation and sequential Gaussian simulation. Possibility for trapping and forming of accumulations was also modelled. Results show that selected member has a large source rock potential for bacterial methane with a total volume of 411.53 × 109 m3 for the Convergent interpolation model and 520.56 × 109 m3 for the sequential Gaussian simulation model of expulsed bacterial methane

  18. Multidimensional integrable models of gravitation and cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivashchuk, V. D.; Melnikov, V. N.

    Review of the motivation and main results in multidimentional gravitation and cosmology is presented. Special attention is devoted to results within the model with scalar fields and fields of forms in the billiard approach for obtaining cosmological solutions with branes and integrable configurations with fluxand black branes. In case of the quantum billiard with branes it is shown that the basis solutions for wave functions vanish in the limit of the formation of billiard walls (i.e., at the singularity) for the D = 11 model which mimics the D = 11 supergravitational cosmology. Another fruitful approach - to multidimensional gravity with higher derivatives is mentioned, which leads to a unified description of inflation and the present accelerated expansion of the Universe. Some of these models explain possible spatial and temporal variations of the fine structure and the gravitational constants.

  19. Integrated modeling of the Euro50

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Torben E.; Browne, Michael T.; Enmark, Anita; Moraru, Dan; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Riewaldt, Holger

    2004-07-01

    The Euro50 is a proposed 50 m optical and infrared telescope. It will have thousands of control loops to keep the optics aligned under influence of wind, gravity and thermal loads. Cross-disciplinary integrated modeling is used to study the overall performance of the Euro50. A sub-model of the mechanical structure originates from finite element modeling. The optical performance is determined using ray tracing, both non-linear and linearized. The primary mirror segment alignment control system is modeled with the 618 segments taken as rigid bodies. Adaptive optics is included using a layered model of the atmosphere and sub-models of the wavefront sensor, reconstructor and controller. The deformable mirror is, so far, described by a simple influence function and a second order dynamical transfer function but more detailed work is in progress. The model has been implemented using Matlab/Simulink on individual computers but it will shortly be implemented on a Beowulf cluster within a trusted network. Communication routines between Matlab on the cluster processors have been written and are being benchmarked. Representative results from the simulations are shown.

  20. Multistage integration model for human egomotion perception.

    PubMed

    Zacharias, G L; Miao, A X; Warren, R

    1995-01-01

    Human computational vision models that attempt to account for the dynamic perception of egomotion and relative depth typically assume a common three-stage process: first, compute the optical flow field based on the dynamically changing image; second, estimate the egomotion states based on the flow; and third, estimate the relative depth/shape based on the egomotion states and possibly on a model of the viewed surface. We propose a model more in line with recent work in human vision, employing multistage integration. Here the dynamic image is first processed to generate spatial and temporal image gradients that drive a mutually interconnected state estimator and depth/shape estimator. The state estimator uses the image gradient information in combination with a depth/shape estimate of the viewed surface and an assumed model of the viewer's dynamics to generate current state estimates; in tandem, the depth/shape estimator uses the image gradient information in combination with the viewer's state estimate and assumed shape model to generate current depth/shape estimates. In this paper, we describe the model and compare model predictions with empirical data.

  1. The development and calibration of a physical model to assist in optimising the hydraulic performance and design of maturation ponds.

    PubMed

    Aldana, G J; Lloyd, B J; Guganesharajah, K; Bracho, N

    2005-01-01

    A physical and a computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model (HYDRO-3D) were developed to simulate the effects of novel maturation pond configurations, and critical environmental factors (wind speed and direction) on the hydraulic efficiency (HE) of full-scale maturation ponds. The aims of the study were to assess the reliability of the physical model and convergence with HYDRO-3D, as tools for assessing and predicting best hydraulic performance of ponds. The physical model of the open ponds was scaled to provide a similar nominal retention time (NRT) of 52 hours. Under natural conditions, with a variable prevailing westerly wind opposite to the inlet, a rhodamine tracer study on the full-scale prototype pond produced a mean hydraulic retention time (MHRT) of 18.5 hours (HE = 35.5%). Simulations of these wind conditions, but with constant wind speed and direction in both the physical model and HYDRO-3D, produced a higher MHRT of 21 hours in both models and an HE of 40.4%. In the absence of wind tracer studies in the open pond physical model revealed incomplete mixing with peak concentrations leaving the model in several hours, but an increase in MHRT to 24.5-28 hours (HE = 50.2-57.1%). Although wind blowing opposite to the inlet flow increases dispersion (mixing), it reduced hydraulic performance by 18-25%. Much higher HE values were achieved by baffles (67-74%) and three channel configurations (69-92%), compared with the original open pond configuration. Good agreement was achieved between the two models where key environmental and flow parameters can be controlled and set, but it is difficult to accurately simulate full-scale works conditions due to the unpredictability of natural hourly and daily fluctuation in these parameters.

  2. Stem Cell-Derived Photoreceptor Transplants Differentially Integrate Into Mouse Models of Cone-Rod Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Santos-Ferreira, Tiago; Völkner, Manuela; Borsch, Oliver; Haas, Jochen; Cimalla, Peter; Vasudevan, Praveen; Carmeliet, Peter; Corbeil, Denis; Michalakis, Stylianos; Koch, Edmund; Karl, Mike O; Ader, Marius

    2016-06-01

    Preclinical studies on photoreceptor transplantation provided evidence for restoration of visual function with pluripotent stem cells considered as a potential source for sufficient amounts of donor material. Adequate preclinical models representing retinal disease conditions of potential future patients are needed for translation research. Here we compared transplant integration in mouse models with mild (prominin1-deficient; Prom1-/-) or severe (cone photoreceptor function loss 1/rhodopsin-deficient double-mutant; Cpfl1/Rho-/-) cone-rod degeneration. For photoreceptor transplant production, we combined the mouse embryonic stem cell retinal organoid system with rhodopsin-driven GFP cell labeling by recombinant adeno-associated virus (AAV). Organoid-derived photoreceptors were enriched by CD73-based magnetic-activated cell sorting (MACS) and transplanted subretinally into wild-type, Prom1-/- and Cpfl1/Rho-/- hosts. The survival, maturation, and synapse formation of donor cells was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Retinal organoids yielded high photoreceptor numbers that were further MACS-enriched to 85% purity. Grafted photoreceptors survived in the subretinal space of all mouse models. Some cells integrated into wild-type as well as Prom1-/- mouse retinas and acquired a mature morphology, expressing rod and synaptic markers in close proximity to second-order neurons. In contrast, in the novel Cpfl1/Rho-/- model with complete photoreceptor degeneration, transplants remained confined to the subretinal space, expressed rod-specific but only reduced synaptic markers, and did not acquire mature morphology. Comparison of photoreceptor grafts in preclinical models with incomplete or complete photoreceptor loss, showed differential transplant success with effective and impaired integration, respectively. Thus, Cpfl1/Rho-/- mice represent a potential benchmark model resembling patients with severe retinal degeneration to optimize photoreceptor replacement therapies.

  3. Paleocene-Eocene Data Model Integration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shellito, Cindy; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Kiehl, J.

    2007-08-01

    National Center for Atmospheric Research Workshop on Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum Data-Model Integration, 31 May to 1 June 2007, Santa Fe, New Mexico The warming at the Paleocene-Eocene boundary about 55 million years ago is the subject of intense research, as it has the potential to inform us about the effects of warming on the global ecosystem. Despite many years of research, many questions remain regarding the specifics and dynamics of this transitionally warm period known as the Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM). The proposed source of this warming is a large increase in methane, carbon dioxide, or both, possibly from volcanic activity, methane hydrates buried along the continental slopes, and methane emissions from wetlands. Global climate models adapted with Eocene geography and high greenhouse gas levels have so far been unable to reproduce the warm climate of the high latitudes depicted by proxy data from this time. The integration of proxy data derived from the geologic and fossil record with model output is also a challenge, and requires cooperation of scientists from a broad array of disciplines.

  4. Synaptic Maturation at Cortical Projections to the Lateral Amygdala in a Mouse Model of Rett Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Gambino, Frédéric; Khelfaoui, Malik; Poulain, Bernard; Bienvenu, Thierry; Chelly, Jamel; Humeau, Yann

    2010-01-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neuro-developmental disorder caused by loss of function of Mecp2 - methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 - an epigenetic factor controlling DNA transcription. In mice, removal of Mecp2 in the forebrain recapitulates most of behavioral deficits found in global Mecp2 deficient mice, including amygdala-related hyper-anxiety and lack of social interaction, pointing a role of Mecp2 in emotional learning. Yet very little is known about the establishment and maintenance of synaptic function in the adult amygdala and the role of Mecp2 in these processes. Here, we performed a longitudinal examination of synaptic properties at excitatory projections to principal cells of the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) in Mecp2 mutant mice and their wild-type littermates. We first show that during animal life, Cortico-LA projections switch from a tonic to a phasic mode, whereas Thalamo-LA synapses are phasic at all ages. In parallel, we observed a specific elimination of Cortico-LA synapses and a decrease in their ability of generating presynaptic long term potentiation. In absence of Mecp2, both synaptic maturation and synaptic elimination were exaggerated albeit still specific to cortical projections. Surprisingly, associative LTP was unaffected at Mecp2 deficient synapses suggesting that synaptic maintenance rather than activity-dependent synaptic learning may be causal in RTT physiopathology. Finally, because the timing of synaptic evolution was preserved, we propose that some of the developmental effects of Mecp2 may be exerted within an endogenous program and restricted to synapses which maturate during animal life. PMID:20625482

  5. Synaptic maturation at cortical projections to the lateral amygdala in a mouse model of Rett syndrome.

    PubMed

    Gambino, Frédéric; Khelfaoui, Malik; Poulain, Bernard; Bienvenu, Thierry; Chelly, Jamel; Humeau, Yann

    2010-07-02

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neuro-developmental disorder caused by loss of function of Mecp2--methyl-CpG-binding protein 2--an epigenetic factor controlling DNA transcription. In mice, removal of Mecp2 in the forebrain recapitulates most of behavioral deficits found in global Mecp2 deficient mice, including amygdala-related hyper-anxiety and lack of social interaction, pointing a role of Mecp2 in emotional learning. Yet very little is known about the establishment and maintenance of synaptic function in the adult amygdala and the role of Mecp2 in these processes. Here, we performed a longitudinal examination of synaptic properties at excitatory projections to principal cells of the lateral nucleus of the amygdala (LA) in Mecp2 mutant mice and their wild-type littermates. We first show that during animal life, Cortico-LA projections switch from a tonic to a phasic mode, whereas Thalamo-LA synapses are phasic at all ages. In parallel, we observed a specific elimination of Cortico-LA synapses and a decrease in their ability of generating presynaptic long term potentiation. In absence of Mecp2, both synaptic maturation and synaptic elimination were exaggerated albeit still specific to cortical projections. Surprisingly, associative LTP was unaffected at Mecp2 deficient synapses suggesting that synaptic maintenance rather than activity-dependent synaptic learning may be causal in RTT physiopathology. Finally, because the timing of synaptic evolution was preserved, we propose that some of the developmental effects of Mecp2 may be exerted within an endogenous program and restricted to synapses which maturate during animal life.

  6. Integrated pollutant removal: modeling and experimentation

    SciTech Connect

    Ochs, Thomas L.; Oryshchyn, Danylo B.; Summers, Cathy A.

    2005-01-01

    Experimental and computational work at the Albany Research Center, USDOE is investigating an integrated pollutant removal (IPR) process which removes all pollutants from flue gas, including SOX, NOX, particulates, CO2, and Hg. In combination with flue gas recirculation, heat recovery, and oxy-fuel combustion, the process produces solid, gas, and liquid waste streams. The gas exhaust stream comprises O2 and N2. Liquid streams contain H2O, SOX, NOX, and CO2. Computer modeling and low to moderate pressure experimentation are defining system chemistry with respect to SOX and H2O as well as heat and mass transfer for the IPR process.

  7. TOWARD EFFICIENT RIPARIAN RESTORATION: INTEGRATING ECONOMIC, PHYSICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper integrates economic, biological, and physical models to determine the efficient combination and spatial allocation of conservation efforts for water quality protection and salmonid habitat enhancement in the Grande Ronde basin, Oregon. The integrated modeling system co...

  8. TOWARD EFFICIENT RIPARIAN RESTORATION: INTEGRATING ECONOMIC, PHYSICAL, AND BIOLOGICAL MODELS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper integrates economic, biological, and physical models to determine the efficient combination and spatial allocation of conservation efforts for water quality protection and salmonid habitat enhancement in the Grande Ronde basin, Oregon. The integrated modeling system co...

  9. Integrated research in constitutive modelling at elevated temperatures, part 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haisler, W. E.; Allen, D. H.

    1986-01-01

    Topics covered include: numerical integration techniques; thermodynamics and internal state variables; experimental lab development; comparison of models at room temperature; comparison of models at elevated temperature; and integrated software development.

  10. Integrated Modeling of Complex Optomechanical Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andersen, Torben; Enmark, Anita

    2011-09-01

    Mathematical modeling and performance simulation are playing an increasing role in large, high-technology projects. There are two reasons; first, projects are now larger than they were before, and the high cost calls for detailed performance prediction before construction. Second, in particular for space-related designs, it is often difficult to test systems under realistic conditions beforehand, and mathematical modeling is then needed to verify in advance that a system will work as planned. Computers have become much more powerful, permitting calculations that were not possible before. At the same time mathematical tools have been further developed and found acceptance in the community. Particular progress has been made in the fields of structural mechanics, optics and control engineering, where new methods have gained importance over the last few decades. Also, methods for combining optical, structural and control system models into global models have found widespread use. Such combined models are usually called integrated models and were the subject of this symposium. The objective was to bring together people working in the fields of groundbased optical telescopes, ground-based radio telescopes, and space telescopes. We succeeded in doing so and had 39 interesting presentations and many fruitful discussions during coffee and lunch breaks and social arrangements. We are grateful that so many top ranked specialists found their way to Kiruna and we believe that these proceedings will prove valuable during much future work.

  11. The Integrated Airport Competition Model, 1998

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veldhuis, J.; Essers, I.; Bakker, D.; Cohn, N.; Kroes, E.

    1999-01-01

    This paper addresses recent model development by the Directorate General of Civil Aviation (DGCA) and Hague Consulting Group (HCG) concerning long-distance travel. Long-distance travel demand is growing very quickly and raising a great deal of economic and policy issues. There is increasing competition among the main Western European airports, and smaller, regional airports are fighting for market share. New modes of transport, such as high speed rail, are also coming into the picture and affect the mode split for medium distance transport within Europe. Developments such as these are demanding the attention of policy makers and a tool is required for their analysis. For DGCA, Hague Consulting Group has developed a model system to provide answers to the policy questions posed by these expected trends, and to identify areas where policy makers can influence the traveller choices. The development of this model system, the Integrated Airport Competition Model/integraal Luchthaven Competitie Model (ILCM), began in 1992. Since that time the sub-models, input data and user interface have been expanded, updated and improved. HCG and DGCA have transformed the ILCM from a prototype into an operational forecasting tool.

  12. INTEGRATED SPEED ESTIMATION MODEL FOR MULTILANE EXPREESSWAYS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, Sungjoon; Oguchi, Takashi

    In this paper, an integrated speed-estimation model is developed based on empirical analyses for the basic sections of intercity multilane expressway un der the uncongested condition. This model enables a speed estimation for each lane at any site under arb itrary highway-alignment, traffic (traffic flow and truck percentage), and rainfall conditions. By combin ing this model and a lane-use model which estimates traffic distribution on the lanes by each vehicle type, it is also possible to es timate an average speed across all the lanes of one direction from a traffic demand by vehicle type under specific highway-alignment and rainfall conditions. This model is exp ected to be a tool for the evaluation of traffic performance for expressways when the performance me asure is travel speed, which is necessary for Performance-Oriented Highway Planning and Design. Regarding the highway-alignment condition, two new estimators, called effective horizo ntal curvature and effective vertical grade, are proposed in this paper which take into account the influence of upstream and downstream alignment conditions. They are applied to the speed-estimation model, and it shows increased accuracy of the estimation.

  13. A Population Model of Integrative Cardiovascular Physiology

    PubMed Central

    Pruett, William A.; Husband, Leland D.; Husband, Graham; Dakhlalla, Muhammad; Bellamy, Kyle; Coleman, Thomas G.; Hester, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    We present a small integrative model of human cardiovascular physiology. The model is population-based; rather than using best fit parameter values, we used a variant of the Metropolis algorithm to produce distributions for the parameters most associated with model sensitivity. The population is built by sampling from these distributions to create the model coefficients. The resulting models were then subjected to a hemorrhage. The population was separated into those that lost less than 15 mmHg arterial pressure (compensators), and those that lost more (decompensators). The populations were parametrically analyzed to determine baseline conditions correlating with compensation and decompensation. Analysis included single variable correlation, graphical time series analysis, and support vector machine (SVM) classification. Most variables were seen to correlate with propensity for circulatory collapse, but not sufficiently to effect reasonable classification by any single variable. Time series analysis indicated a single significant measure, the stressed blood volume, as predicting collapse in situ, but measurement of this quantity is clinically impossible. SVM uncovered a collection of variables and parameters that, when taken together, provided useful rubrics for classification. Due to the probabilistic origins of the method, multiple classifications were attempted, resulting in an average of 3.5 variables necessary to construct classification. The most common variables used were systemic compliance, baseline baroreceptor signal strength and total peripheral resistance, providing predictive ability exceeding 90%. The methods presented are suitable for use in any deterministic mathematical model. PMID:24058546

  14. Developing Metrics in Systems Integration (ISS Program COTS Integration Model)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lueders, Kathryn

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews some of the complications in developing metrics for systems integration. Specifically it reviews a case study of how two programs within NASA try to develop and measure performance while meeting the encompassing organizational goals.

  15. Treatment of pathological gambling - integrative systemic model.

    PubMed

    Mladenović, Ivica; Lažetić, Goran; Lečić-Toševski, Dušica; Dimitrijević, Ivan

    2015-03-01

    Pathological gambling was classified under impulse control disorders within the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) (WHO 1992), but the most recent Diagnostic and Statistical Manual, 5th edition (DSM-V), (APA 2013), has recognized pathological gambling as a first disorder within a new diagnostic category of behavioral addictions - Gambling disorder. Pathological gambling is a disorder in progression, and we hope that our experience in the treatment of pathological gambling in the Daily Hospital for Addictions at The Institute of Mental Health, through the original "Integrative - systemic model" would be of use to colleagues, dealing with this pathology. This model of treatment of pathological gambling is based on multi-systemic approach and it primarily represents an integration of family and cognitive-behavioral therapy, with traces of psychodynamic, existential and pharmacotherapy. The model is based on the book "Pathological gambling - with self-help manual" by Dr Mladenovic and Dr Lazetic, and has been designed in the form of a program that lasts 10 weeks in the intensive phase, and then continues for two years in the form of "extended treatment" ("After care"). The intensive phase is divided into three segments: educational, insight with initial changes and analysis of the achieved changes with the definition of plans and areas that need to be addressed in the extended treatment. "Extended treatment" lasts for two years in the form of group therapy, during which there is a second order change of the identified patient, but also of other family members. Pathological gambling has been treated in the form of systemic-family therapy for more than 10 years at the Institute of Mental Health (IMH), in Belgrade. For second year in a row the treatment is carried out by the modern "Integrative-systemic model". If abstinence from gambling witihin the period of one year after completion of the intensive phase of treatment is taken as the main criterion of

  16. Applying Forecast Models from the Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehmeyr, M.; Baker, D. N.; Millward, G.; Odstrcil, D.

    2007-12-01

    The Center for Integrated Space Weather Modeling (CISM) has developed three forecast models (FMs) for the Sun-Earth chain. They have been matured by various degrees toward the operational stage. The Sun-Earth FM suite comprises empirical and physical models: the Planetary Equivalent Amplitude (AP-FM), the Solar Wind (SW- FM), and the Geospace (GS-FM) models. We give a brief overview of these forecast models and touch briefly on the associated validation studies. We demonstrate the utility of the models: AP-FM supporting the operations of the AIM (Aeronomy of Ice in the Mesosphere) mission soon after launch; SW-FM providing assistance with the interpretation of the STEREO beacon data; and GS-FM combining model and observed data to characterize the aurora borealis. We will then discuss space weather tools in a more general sense, point out where the current capabilities and shortcomings are, and conclude with a look forward to what areas need improvement to facilitate better real-time forecasts.

  17. Collagen scaffold meniscus implant integration in a canine model: a histological analysis.

    PubMed

    Hansen, Robert; Bryk, Eli; Vigorita, Vincent

    2013-12-01

    In the situation of an irreparable meniscus tear, an implant comparable to a normal meniscus is an attractive option. Using a canine model, we assessed the early and late histologic response to a tissue engineered meniscal collagen scaffold (CS). All animals received bilateral arthrotomies, and all joints receiving the CS had an 80% resection of the meniscus. Animals were sacrificed at 3 and 6 weeks, and 12, 13, and 17 months. The CS/tissue complex and host meniscal rim were sectioned for histologic examination with specific focus on the extracellular matrix, angiogenesis, cellular resorption of the scaffold, scaffold appearance, and CS/Host integration. Early histologic samples (3-6 weeks) revealed active angiogenesis and fibrin clots evolving into cellular granulation type tissue. At 12 months, a mature fibrochondrocytic matrix was depositing with gradations of dissolution and integration of the CS implant. Maturing CS/host integration was observed at 18 months. Active cellular resorption of the implant decreased over time. Four cases showed a mild non-specific chronic inflammation and one additional case showed inflammatory engulfment of the scaffold with giant cells at 3 weeks. No evidence of infection either clinically or histologically was observed at any time point. Overall, this histologic analysis demonstrated the active integration of a meniscal like cartilage into a tissue engineered biological scaffold in a canine model.

  18. Resolving model parameter values from carbon and nitrogen stock measurements in a wide range of tropical mature forests using nonlinear inversion and regression trees

    Treesearch

    Shuguang Liua; Pamela Anderson; Guoyi Zhoud; Boone Kauffman; Flint Hughes; David Schimel; Vicente Watson; Joseph. Tosi

    2008-01-01

    Objectively assessing the performance of a model and deriving model parameter values from observations are critical and challenging in landscape to regional modeling. In this paper, we applied a nonlinear inversion technique to calibrate the ecosystem model CENTURY against carbon (C) and nitrogen (N) stock measurements collected from 39 mature tropical forest sites in...

  19. Coastal Ecosystem Integrated Compartment Model (ICM): Modeling Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meselhe, E. A.; White, E. D.; Reed, D.

    2015-12-01

    The Integrated Compartment Model (ICM) was developed as part of the 2017 Coastal Master Plan modeling effort. It is a comprehensive and numerical hydrodynamic model coupled to various geophysical process models. Simplifying assumptions related to some of the flow dynamics are applied to increase the computational efficiency of the model. The model can be used to provide insights about coastal ecosystems and evaluate restoration strategies. It builds on existing tools where possible and incorporates newly developed tools where necessary. It can perform decadal simulations (~ 50 years) across the entire Louisiana coast. It includes several improvements over the approach used to support the 2012 Master Plan, such as: additional processes in the hydrology, vegetation, wetland and barrier island morphology subroutines, increased spatial resolution, and integration of previously disparate models into a single modeling framework. The ICM includes habitat suitability indices (HSIs) to predict broad spatial patterns of habitat change, and it provides an additional integration to a dynamic fish and shellfish community model which quantitatively predicts potential changes in important fishery resources. It can be used to estimate the individual and cumulative effects of restoration and protection projects on the landscape, including a general estimate of water levels associated with flooding. The ICM is also used to examine possible impacts of climate change and future environmental scenarios (e.g. precipitation, Eustatic sea level rise, subsidence, tropical storms, etc.) on the landscape and on the effectiveness of restoration projects. The ICM code is publically accessible, and coastal restoration and protection groups interested in planning-level modeling are encouraged to explore its utility as a computationally efficient tool to examine ecosystem response to future physical or ecological changes, including the implementation of restoration and protection strategies.

  20. Modeling the effect of temperature and wetness on Guignardia pseudothecium maturation and ascospore release in citrus orchards.

    PubMed

    Fourie, Paul; Schutte, Tian; Serfontein, Suzel; Swart, Fanus

    2013-03-01

    Ascospores are the most important inoculum source of citrus black spot (CBS), caused by Guignardia citricarpa, but pseudothecium maturation and ascospore release are inadequately studied. Guignardia ascospore trapping and concomitant weather data were obtained for three localities over three seasons (July to March 2006 to 2009) in the Limpopo province of South Africa. Degree-days accumulated until first seasonal ascospore discharge (>10°C with 1 July as biofix) (DDtemp), and DDtemp accumulated on rainy (rainfall >0.1 mm) (DDrain) and moist days (vapor pressure deficit <5 hPa) (DDvpd) were used in two Gompertz models to predict onset of ascospore release: a temperature model [Event = exp(-exp(-(-2.725 + 0.004 × DDtemp)))] and a temperature/moisture model [Event = exp(-exp(- (-3.238 + 0.008 × DDvpd + 0.004 × DDtemp - 0.009 × DDrain)))] (R(2) = 0.608 and 0.658, respectively). Both models predicted a delay in pseudothecium maturation in climates with colder winters and springs. A Gompertz equation was also used to predict the proportion of Guignardia ascospores trapped (PAT) per season from DDtemp data accumulated on wet or moist days (DDwet2) from the first seasonal ascospore discharge [PAT = exp(-4.096 × exp(-0.005 × DDwet2); R(2) = 0.908]. The PAT model predicted lag phases and 7-day peaks in ascospore release patterns with reasonable accuracy. These models can be used to predict the onset and dynamics of ascospore release in climatically diverse regions.

  1. Industrial ecology in integrated assessment models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pauliuk, Stefan; Arvesen, Anders; Stadler, Konstantin; Hertwich, Edgar G.

    2017-01-01

    Technology-rich integrated assessment models (IAMs) address possible technology mixes and future costs of climate change mitigation by generating scenarios for the future industrial system. Industrial ecology (IE) focuses on the empirical analysis of this system. We conduct an in-depth review of five major IAMs from an IE perspective and reveal differences between the two fields regarding the modelling of linkages in the industrial system, focussing on AIM/CGE, GCAM, IMAGE, MESSAGE, and REMIND. IAMs ignore material cycles and recycling, incoherently describe the life-cycle impacts of technology, and miss linkages regarding buildings and infrastructure. Adding IE system linkages to IAMs adds new constraints and allows for studying new mitigation options, both of which may lead to more robust and policy-relevant mitigation scenarios.

  2. Learning models for multi-source integration

    SciTech Connect

    Tejada, S.; Knoblock, C.A.; Minton, S.

    1996-12-31

    Because of the growing number of information sources available through the internet there are many cases in which information needed to solve a problem or answer a question is spread across several information sources. For example, when given two sources, one about comic books and the other about super heroes, you might want to ask the question {open_quotes}Is Spiderman a Marvel Super Hero?{close_quotes} This query accesses both sources; therefore, it is necessary to have information about the relationships of the data within each source and between sources to properly access and integrate the data retrieved. The SIMS information broker captures this type of information in the form of a model. All the information sources map into the model providing the user a single interface to multiple sources.

  3. Dietetic Internship: Evaluation of an Integrated Model.

    PubMed

    Lordly, Daphne J.; Travers, Kim D.

    1998-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to utilize graduate and employer perceptions of outcomes of the Mount Saint Vincent University (MSVU) Co-operative Education (Co-op) Dietetics program to determine if an integrated model was an acceptable alternate method of dietetic education. Acceptable alternate was defined as: "facilitating achievement of entry level competence for dietetic practice". A self-administered, validated and piloted questionnaire was utilized to collect qualitative and quantitative information concerning employability, professional preparedness and program outcomes. Surveys were mailed to all program graduates (1989-1993) (n=24) and their first employers (n=19). Response rates were 96% and 89% respectively. Close-ended questions were analyzed quantitatively by determining frequency distributions. Data were also subjected to Chi-square to identify dependent factors. Qualitative responses to open-ended questions were analyzed by thematic content analysis. Results revealed all graduates were employed by six months after graduation. Competency development, a component of professional preparedness, was rated as average or above average by the majority of graduates and employers. Analysis of open-ended responses indicated that the introduction of experience while students were establishing theoretical foundations was perceived as beneficial. An integration of qualitative findings led to the development of a model depicting how professional competency development, readiness for practice, a realistic approach to dietetic practice and a high standard of practice were developed within an evolving personal and contextual framework. Socialization and mentoring opportunities, evaluation processes and the integration of theory and practice influenced professional development. In conclusion, both employer and graduate responses indicated overall program satisfaction suggesting that the Co-op program is an acceptable alternate method of dietetic education.

  4. Performance of an integrated network model

    PubMed Central

    Lehmann, François; Dunn, David; Beaulieu, Marie-Dominique; Brophy, James

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the changes in accessibility, patients’ care experiences, and quality-of-care indicators following a clinic’s transformation into a fully integrated network clinic. Design Mixed-methods study. Setting Verdun, Que. Participants Data on all patient visits were used, in addition to 2 distinct patient cohorts: 134 patients with chronic illness (ie, diabetes, arteriosclerotic heart disease, or both); and 450 women between the ages of 20 and 70 years. Main outcome measures Accessibility was measured by the number of walk-in visits, scheduled visits, and new patient enrolments. With the first cohort, patients’ care experiences were measured using validated serial questionnaires; and quality-of-care indicators were measured using biologic data. With the second cohort, quality of preventive care was measured using the number of Papanicolaou tests performed as a surrogate marker. Results Despite a negligible increase in the number of physicians, there was an increase in accessibility after the clinic’s transition to an integrated network model. During the first 4 years of operation, the number of scheduled visits more than doubled, nonscheduled visits (walk-in visits) increased by 29%, and enrolment of vulnerable patients (those with chronic illnesses) at the clinic remained high. Patient satisfaction with doctors was rated very highly at all points of time that were evaluated. While the number of Pap tests done did not increase with time, the proportion of patients meeting hemoglobin A1c and low-density lipoprotein guideline target levels increased, as did the number of patients tested for microalbuminuria. Conclusion Transformation to an integrated network model of care led to increased efficiency and enhanced accessibility with no negative effects on the doctor-patient relationship. Improvements in biologic data also suggested better quality of care. PMID:27521410

  5. Advancing Cybersecurity Capability Measurement Using the CERT(registered trademark)-RMM Maturity Indicator Level Scale

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-01

    Institute at permission@sei.cmu.edu. * These restrictions do not apply to U.S. government entities. CERT® and CMMI ® are registered marks of Carnegie...Attributes 4 1.3.4 Appraisal and Scoring Methods 5 1.3.5 Improvement Roadmaps 5 2 Introducing the Maturity Indicator Level (MIL) Concept 6 2.1...CERT®-RMM v1.2) utilizes the maturity architecture (levels and descriptions) as provided in the Capability Maturity Model Integration ( CMMI

  6. Ion Exchange Distribution Coefficient Tests and Computer Modeling at High Ionic Strength Supporting Technetium Removal Resin Maturation

    SciTech Connect

    Nash, Charles A.; Hamm, L. Larry; Smith, Frank G.; McCabe, Daniel J.

    2014-12-19

    The primary treatment of the tank waste at the DOE Hanford site will be done in the Waste Treatment and Immobilization Plant (WTP) that is currently under construction. The baseline plan for this facility is to treat the waste, splitting it into High Level Waste (HLW) and Low Activity Waste (LAW). Both waste streams are then separately vitrified as glass and poured into canisters for disposition. The LAW glass will be disposed onsite in the Integrated Disposal Facility (IDF). There are currently no plans to treat the waste to remove technetium, so its disposition path is the LAW glass. Due to the water solubility properties of pertechnetate and long half-life of 99Tc, effective management of 99Tc is important to the overall success of the Hanford River Protection Project mission. To achieve the full target WTP throughput, additional LAW immobilization capacity is needed, and options are being explored to immobilize the supplemental LAW portion of the tank waste. Removal of 99Tc, followed by off-site disposal, would eliminate a key risk contributor for the IDF Performance Assessment (PA) for supplemental waste forms, and has potential to reduce treatment and disposal costs. Washington River Protection Solutions (WRPS) is developing some conceptual flow sheets for supplemental LAW treatment and disposal that could benefit from technetium removal. One of these flowsheets will specifically examine removing 99Tc from the LAW feed stream to supplemental immobilization. To enable an informed decision regarding the viability of technetium removal, further maturation of available technologies is being performed. This report contains results of experimental ion exchange distribution coefficient testing and computer modeling using the resin SuperLig® 639a to selectively remove perrhenate from high ionic strength simulated LAW. It is advantageous to operate at higher concentration in order to treat the waste

  7. Knowledge Management as an Indication of Organizational Maturity in Project Management: An Enhancement of the OPM3(c) Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dedrick A.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation reviews the knowledge management's role in organizational maturity in project management. It draws a direct linked between organizational maturity knowledge channels both informal and then formal and organizational project management maturity. The study uses a mixed method approach through online and telephone surveys that draws…

  8. Knowledge Management as an Indication of Organizational Maturity in Project Management: An Enhancement of the OPM3(c) Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Dedrick A.

    2010-01-01

    This dissertation reviews the knowledge management's role in organizational maturity in project management. It draws a direct linked between organizational maturity knowledge channels both informal and then formal and organizational project management maturity. The study uses a mixed method approach through online and telephone surveys that draws…

  9. Advances in NLTE Modeling for Integrated Simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Scott, H A; Hansen, S B

    2009-07-08

    The last few years have seen significant progress in constructing the atomic models required for non-local thermodynamic equilibrium (NLTE) simulations. Along with this has come an increased understanding of the requirements for accurately modeling the ionization balance, energy content and radiative properties of different elements for a wide range of densities and temperatures. Much of this progress is the result of a series of workshops dedicated to comparing the results from different codes and computational approaches applied to a series of test problems. The results of these workshops emphasized the importance of atomic model completeness, especially in doubly excited states and autoionization transitions, to calculating ionization balance, and the importance of accurate, detailed atomic data to producing reliable spectra. We describe a simple screened-hydrogenic model that calculates NLTE ionization balance with surprising accuracy, at a low enough computational cost for routine use in radiation-hydrodynamics codes. The model incorporates term splitting, {Delta}n = 0 transitions, and approximate UTA widths for spectral calculations, with results comparable to those of much more detailed codes. Simulations done with this model have been increasingly successful at matching experimental data for laser-driven systems and hohlraums. Accurate and efficient atomic models are just one requirement for integrated NLTE simulations. Coupling the atomic kinetics to hydrodynamics and radiation transport constrains both discretizations and algorithms to retain energy conservation, accuracy and stability. In particular, the strong coupling between radiation and populations can require either very short timesteps or significantly modified radiation transport algorithms to account for NLTE material response. Considerations such as these continue to provide challenges for NLTE simulations.

  10. Capability Maturity Model Integration (CMMI) V1.3 and Architecture-Centric Engineering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-17

    Process, Storage, Processor, Communication 20 CMMI V1.3 and Architecture-Centric Engineering © 2011 Carnegie Mellon University RESPONSE MEASURE...ENVIRONMENTSOURCE Example Quality Attribute Scenario ResponseStimulus Artifact: Process, Storage, Processor, Communication A “performance” scenario: A...or selecting the architecture • documenting and communicating the architecture • analyzing or evaluating the architecture • implementing the system

  11. Three Quality Journeys - Capability Maturity Model Integration, Baldrige Performance Excellence Program, and ISO 9000 Series

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-26

    quality management practices. ISO 9001 :2008 has been implemented by over a million organizations in 176 countries. 14 Three Quality Journeys...University I S O 9 0 0 0 Initial Release of ISO 9000:1987 9001 :2000 amended to 9001 :2008 – quality management requirements 9004:2000 amended...clarifications of 9001 and 9004 occurred in 2008 and 2009, respectively o ISO 9001 :2000 - eight quality

  12. Using the Information Orientation Maturity Model to Increase the Effectiveness of the Core MBA IS Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aytes, Kregg; Beachboard, John

    2007-01-01

    Although information systems are an integral part of every modern organization, IS faculty often struggle to show MBA students the value of the core IS course in the MBA curriculum. This is also evidenced by the fact that some business schools do not have an IS course in the core MBA curriculum. MBA courses often use case analyses to provide…

  13. Using the Information Orientation Maturity Model to Increase the Effectiveness of the Core MBA IS Course

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aytes, Kregg; Beachboard, John

    2007-01-01

    Although information systems are an integral part of every modern organization, IS faculty often struggle to show MBA students the value of the core IS course in the MBA curriculum. This is also evidenced by the fact that some business schools do not have an IS course in the core MBA curriculum. MBA courses often use case analyses to provide…

  14. Quantifying and modelling tissue maturation in the living human fetal brain.

    PubMed

    Studholme, Colin; Rousseau, François

    2014-02-01

    Recent advances in medical imaging are beginning to allow us to quantify brain tissue maturation in the growing human brain prior to normal term age, and are beginning to shed new light on early human brain growth. These advances compliment the work already done in cellular level imaging in animal and post mortem studies of brain development. The opportunities for collaborative research that bridges the gap between macroscopic and microscopic windows on the developing brain are significant. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of the current research into MR imaging of the living fetal brain with the aim of motivating improved interfaces between the two fields. The review begins with a description of faster MRI techniques that are capable of freezing motion of the fetal head during the acquisition of a slice, and how these have been combined with advanced post-processing algorithms to build 3D images from motion scattered slices. Such rich data has motivated the development of techniques to automatically label developing tissue zones within MRI data allowing their quantification in 3D and 4D within the normally growing fetal brain. These methods have provided the basis for later work that has created the first maps of tissue growth rate and cortical folding in normally developing brains in-utero. These measurements provide valuable findings that compliment those derived from post-mortem anatomy, and additionally allow for the possibility of larger population studies of the influence of maternal environmental and genes on early brain development.

  15. Integrating wetland connectivity into models for watershed ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Geographically isolated wetlands (GIW), or wetlands embedded in uplands, exist along a spatial and temporal hydrologic connectivity continuum to downstream waters. Via these connections and disconnections, GIWs provide numerous hydrological, biogeochemical, and biological functions linked to human health and watershed-scale ecosystem services. Often, a clear demonstration of these functions and the individual and cumulative effects of GIWs on downstream waters is required for their protection or restoration. Measurements alone are typically too resource intensive to do this. In this presentation, we discuss the use of various modeling approaches to quantify the hydrologic connectivity of GIWs and their associated watershed-scale cumulative effects. Our goal is to improve the science behind understanding the functions and connectivity of GIWs via models that are complemented with various types of novel data. We synthesize what is meant by GIW connectivity and its broad significance to science and decision-making. We further discuss case studies that provide insights to diverse modeling approaches, with varying levels of complexity, for how to estimate GIW connectivity and associated watershed-scale impacts to hydrology. We finally provide insights to the key opportunities and priorities for integrating GIW connectivity into the next generation of models. Geographically isolated wetlands (GIW), or wetlands embedded in uplands, exist along a spatial and temporal h

  16. Reversed item bias: an integrative model.

    PubMed

    Weijters, Bert; Baumgartner, Hans; Schillewaert, Niels

    2013-09-01

    In the recent methodological literature, various models have been proposed to account for the phenomenon that reversed items (defined as items for which respondents' scores have to be recoded in order to make the direction of keying consistent across all items) tend to lead to problematic responses. In this article we propose an integrative conceptualization of three important sources of reversed item method bias (acquiescence, careless responding, and confirmation bias) and specify a multisample confirmatory factor analysis model with 2 method factors to empirically test the hypothesized mechanisms, using explicit measures of acquiescence and carelessness and experimentally manipulated versions of a questionnaire that varies 3 item arrangements and the keying direction of the first item measuring the focal construct. We explain the mechanisms, review prior attempts to model reversed item bias, present our new model, and apply it to responses to a 4-item self-esteem scale (N = 306) and the 6-item Revised Life Orientation Test (N = 595). Based on the literature review and the empirical results, we formulate recommendations on how to use reversed items in questionnaires.

  17. An integrated modeling method for wind turbines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fadaeinedjad, Roohollah

    To study the interaction of the electrical, mechanical, and aerodynamic aspects of a wind turbine, a detailed model that considers all these aspects must be used. A drawback of many studies in the area of wind turbine simulation is that either a very simple mechanical model is used with a detailed electrical model, or vice versa. Hence the interactions between electrical and mechanical aspects of wind turbine operation are not accurately taken into account. In this research, it will be shown that a combination of different simulation packages, namely TurbSim, FAST, and Simulink can be used to model the aerodynamic, mechanical, and electrical aspects of a wind turbine in detail. In this thesis, after a review of some wind turbine concepts and software tools, a simulation structure is proposed for studying wind turbines that integrates the mechanical and electrical components of a wind energy conversion device. Based on the simulation structure, a comprehensive model for a three-bladed variable speed wind turbine with doubly-fed induction generator is developed. Using the model, the impact of a voltage sag on the wind turbine tower vibration is investigated under various operating conditions such as power system short circuit level, mechanical parameters, and wind turbine operating conditions. It is shown how an electrical disturbance can cause more sustainable tower vibrations under high speed and turbulent wind conditions, which may disrupt the operation of pitch control system. A similar simulation structure is used to model a two-bladed fixed speed wind turbine with an induction generator. An extension of the concept is introduced by adding a diesel generator system. The model is utilized to study the impact of the aeroelastic aspects of wind turbine (i.e. tower shadow, wind shears, yaw error, turbulence, and mechanical vibrations) on the power quality of a stand-alone wind-diesel system. Furthermore, an IEEE standard flickermeter model is implemented in a

  18. Integrating Visualizations into Modeling NEST Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Nowke, Christian; Zielasko, Daniel; Weyers, Benjamin; Peyser, Alexander; Hentschel, Bernd; Kuhlen, Torsten W.

    2015-01-01

    Modeling large-scale spiking neural networks showing realistic biological behavior in their dynamics is a complex and tedious task. Since these networks consist of millions of interconnected neurons, their simulation produces an immense amount of data. In recent years it has become possible to simulate even larger networks. However, solutions to assist researchers in understanding the simulation's complex emergent behavior by means of visualization are still lacking. While developing tools to partially fill this gap, we encountered the challenge to integrate these tools easily into the neuroscientists' daily workflow. To understand what makes this so challenging, we looked into the workflows of our collaborators and analyzed how they use the visualizations to solve their daily problems. We identified two major issues: first, the analysis process can rapidly change focus which requires to switch the visualization tool that assists in the current problem domain. Second, because of the heterogeneous data that results from simulations, researchers want to relate data to investigate these effectively. Since a monolithic application model, processing and visualizing all data modalities and reflecting all combinations of possible workflows in a holistic way, is most likely impossible to develop and to maintain, a software architecture that offers specialized visualization tools that run simultaneously and can be linked together to reflect the current workflow, is a more feasible approach. To this end, we have developed a software architecture that allows neuroscientists to integrate visualization tools more closely into the modeling tasks. In addition, it forms the basis for semantic linking of different visualizations to reflect the current workflow. In this paper, we present this architecture and substantiate the usefulness of our approach by common use cases we encountered in our collaborative work. PMID:26733860

  19. Bone fracture toughness and strength correlate with collagen cross-link maturity in a dose-controlled lathyrism mouse model

    PubMed Central

    McNerny, Erin M. B.; Gong, Bo; Morris, Michael D.; Kohn, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Collagen cross-linking is altered in many diseases of bone, and enzymatic collagen cross-links are important to bone quality as evidenced by losses of strength following lysyl oxidase inhibition (lathyrism). We hypothesized that cross-links also contribute directly to bone fracture toughness. A mouse model of lathyrism using subcutaneous injection of up to 500mg/kg β-aminopropionitrile (BAPN) was developed and characterized (60 animals across 4 dosage groups). Three weeks of 150 or 350 mg/kg BAPN treatment in young growing mice significantly reduced cortical bone fracture toughness, strength, and pyridinoline cross-link content. Ratios reflecting relative cross-link maturity were positive regressors of fracture toughness (HP/[DHLNL+HLNL] r2=0.208, p<0.05; [HP+LP]/[DHNL+HLNL] r2=0.196, p<0.1), whereas quantities of mature pyridinoline cross-links were significant positive regressors of tissue strength (lysyl pyridinoline r2=0.159, p=0.014; hydroxylysyl pyridinoline r2=0.112, p<0.05). Immature and pyrrole cross-links, which were not significantly reduced by BAPN, did not correlate with mechanical properties. The effect of BAPN treatment on mechanical properties was dose specific, with the greatest impact found at the intermediate (350mg/kg) dose. Calcein labeling was used to define locations of new bone formation, allowing for the identification of regions of normally cross-linked (preexisting) and BAPN treated (newly formed, cross-link-deficient) bone. Raman spectroscopy revealed spatial differences due to relative tissue age and effects of cross-link inhibition. Newly deposited tissues had lower mineral/matrix, carbonate/phosphate and Amide I cross-link (matrix maturity) ratios compared to preexisting tissues. BAPN treatment did not affect mineral measures, but significantly increased the cross-link (matrix maturity) ratio compared to newly formed control tissue. Our study reveals that spatially localized effects of short term BAPN cross-link inhibition can alter

  20. Vertical profiling and modelling of E. coli decay in a shallow maturation pond operating in a tropical climate.

    PubMed

    Dias, Daniel F C; Sperling, Marcos von

    2017-03-23

    Maturation ponds are excellent natural treatment systems for disinfecting domestic wastewater from pathogenic bacteria because of great sunlight exposure through depth and high pH and DO values within its environment, all of which are important factors for disinfection. E. coli removal is higher closer to the surface of the pond and proceeds to decrease due to the limited amount of sunlight penetrating through deeper depths. In order to quantify the decay coefficients (Kb) of E. coli in a shallow maturation pond, quartz vessels were used to create isolated batch experiments and submerged at different depths inside the pond during different periods of the day (morning and afternoon). Kb values ranged from 0.48 to 0.28 h(-1) considering different depths and both periods. A dark control vessel was also used to quantify dark decay rates (Kd) at the same depth and periods as the quartz vessels, and ranged from 0.14 to 0.04 h(-1). Environmental variables did not show to influence overall disinfection. Two models for estimating final E. coli concentrations were proposed considering the kinetic coefficients obtained in the batch experiments and the dispersed flow regime for continuous-flow ponds and resulted in very good fittings with monitoring data and demonstrated the vertical profiling of E. coli concentration.

  1. Quantifying and Modelling Tissue Maturation in the Living Human Fetal Brain

    PubMed Central

    Studholme, Colin; Rousseau, François

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in medical imaging are beginning to allow us to quantify brain tissue maturation in the growing human brain prior to normal term age, and are beginning to shed new light on early human brain growth. These advances compliment the work already done in cellular level imaging in animal and post mortem studies of brain development. The opportunities for collaborative research that bridges the gap between macroscopic and microscopic windows on the developing brain are significant. The aim of this paper is to provide a review of the current research into MR imaging of the living fetal brain with the aim of motivating improved interfaces between the two fields. The review begins with a description of faster MRI techniques that are capable of freezing motion of the fetal head during the acquisition of a slice, and how these have been combined with advanced post-processing algorithms to build 3D images from motion scattered slices. Such rich data has motivated the development of techniques to automatically label developing tissue zones within MRI data allowing their quantification in 3D and 4D within the normally growing fetal brain. These methods have provided the basis for later work that has created the first maps of tissue growth rate and cortical folding in normally developing brains in-utero. These measurements provide valuable findings that compliment those derived from post-mortem anatomy, and additionally allow for the possibility of larger population studies of the influence of maternal environmental and genes on early brain development. PMID:23831076

  2. Approaches to Process Performance Modeling: A Summary from the SEI Series of Workshops on CMMI High Maturity Measurement and Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-01-01

    Prediction Model 22  Table 5:  Parametric Cost Models vs . Process Performance Models 54  Table 6:   Uncertainty / Range Size of Parameter Values 57  Table 7...Systems • Lynn Penn and Pete McLoone, Lockheed Martin Information Systems and Global Services • Jim Perry, BAE Armament Systems • David M. Raffo...Lockheed Martin Information Systems and Global Services • Neal Mackertich and Michael Campo, Raytheon Integrated Defense Systems • Raymond Kile

  3. Schizophrenia: an integrated sociodevelopmental-cognitive model

    PubMed Central

    Howes, Oliver D; Murray, Robin M

    2014-01-01

    Schizophrenia remains a major burden1. The dopamine (DA) and neurodevelopmental hypotheses attempt to explain the pathogenic mechanisms and origins of the disorder respectively2-4. Recently an alternative, the cognitive model, has gained popularity5. However the first two theories have not been satisfactorily integrated, and the most influential iteration of the cognitive model makes no mention of DA, neurodevelopment, or indeed the brain5. Here we show that developmental alterations secondary to variant genes, early hazards to the brain and childhood adversity, sensitise the DA system, and result in excessive presynaptic DA synthesis and DA release. Social adversity biases the cognitive schema that the individual uses to interpret experiences towards paranoid interpretations. Subsequent stress results in dysregulated DA release, causing the misattribution of salience to stimuli, which are then misinterpreted by the biased cognitive processes. The resulting paranoia and hallucinations in turn cause further stress, and eventually repeated DA dysregulation hard-wires the psychotic beliefs. Finally we consider the implications of this model for understanding and treating schizophrenia. PMID:24315522

  4. Schizophrenia: an integrated sociodevelopmental-cognitive model.

    PubMed

    Howes, Oliver D; Murray, Robin M

    2014-05-10

    Schizophrenia remains a major burden on patients and society. The dopamine hypothesis attempts to explain the pathogenic mechanisms of the disorder, and the neurodevelopmental hypothesis the origins. In the past 10 years an alternative, the cognitive model, has gained popularity. However, the first two theories have not been satisfactorily integrated, and the most influential iteration of the cognitive model makes no mention of dopamine, neurodevelopment, or indeed the brain. In this Review we show that developmental alterations secondary to variant genes, early hazards to the brain, and childhood adversity sensitise the dopamine system, and result in excessive presynaptic dopamine synthesis and release. Social adversity biases the cognitive schema that the individual uses to interpret experiences towards paranoid interpretations. Subsequent stress results in dysregulated dopamine release, causing the misattribution of salience to stimuli, which are then misinterpreted by the biased cognitive processes. The resulting paranoia and hallucinations in turn cause further stress, and eventually repeated dopamine dysregulation hardwires the psychotic beliefs. Finally, we consider the implications of this model for understanding and treatment of schizophrenia. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Limitations of Western Medicine and Models of Integration Between Medical Systems.

    PubMed

    Attena, Francesco

    2016-05-01

    This article analyzes two major limitations of Western medicine: maturity and incompleteness. From this viewpoint, Western medicine is considered an incomplete system for the explanation of living matter. Therefore, through appropriate integration with other medical systems, in particular nonconventional approaches, its knowledge base and interpretations may be widened. This article presents possible models of integration of Western medicine with homeopathy, the latter being viewed as representative of all complementary and alternative medicine. To compare the two, a medical system was classified into three levels through which it is possible to distinguish between different medical systems: epistemological (first level), theoretical (second level), and operational (third level). These levels are based on the characterization of any medical system according to, respectively, a reference paradigm, a theory on the functioning of living matter, and clinical practice. The three levels are consistent and closely consequential in the sense that from epistemology derives theory, and from theory derives clinical practice. Within operational integration, four models were identified: contemporary, alternative, sequential, and opportunistic. Theoretical integration involves an explanation of living systems covering simultaneously the molecular and physical mechanisms of functioning living matter. Epistemological integration provides a more thorough and comprehensive explanation of the epistemic concepts of indeterminism, holism, and vitalism to complement the reductionist approach of Western medicine; concepts much discussed by Western medicine while lacking the epistemologic basis for their emplacement. Epistemologic integration could be reached with or without a true paradigm shift and, in the latter, through a model of fusion or subsumption.

  6. Learning Transfer Principles in a Comprehensive Integration Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boitel, Craig; Farkas, Kathleen; Fromm, Laurentine; Hokenstad, M. C.

    2009-01-01

    In this article, the authors propose a comprehensive integration model (CIM) based on learning transfer principles that promote integration by systematically and multidimensionally linking coursework with field education. This model improves the integration of classroom and field instruction by specifying how content in each course and in the…

  7. Virus maturation.

    PubMed

    Delgui, Laura R; Rodríguez, José F

    2013-01-01

    The formation of infectious virus particles is a highly complex process involving a series of sophisticated molecular events. In most cases, the assembly of virus structural elements results in the formation of immature virus particles unable to initiate a productive infection. Accordingly, for most viruses the final stage of the assembly pathway entails a set of structural transitions and/or biochemical modifications that transform inert precursor particles into fully infectious agents. In this chapter, we review the most relevant maturation mechanisms involved in the generation of infectious virions for a wide variety of viruses.

  8. The anchor integration model: A descriptive model of anchoring effects.

    PubMed

    Turner, Brandon M; Schley, Dan R

    2016-11-01

    Few experimental effects in the psychology of judgment and decision making have been studied as meticulously as the anchoring effect. Although the existing literature provides considerable insight into the psychological processes underlying anchoring effects, extant theories up to this point have only generated qualitative predictions. While these theories have been productive in advancing our understanding of the underlying anchoring process, they leave much to be desired in the interpretation of specific anchoring effects. In this article, we introduce the Anchor Integration Model (AIM) as a descriptive tool for the measurement and quantification of anchoring effects. We develop two versions the model: one suitable for assessing between-participant anchoring effects, and another for assessing individual differences in anchoring effects. We then fit each model to data from two experiments, and demonstrate the model's utility in describing anchoring effects. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Strategy and the Learning Organization: A Maturity Model for the Formation of Strategy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kenny, John

    2006-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a theoretical model for strategic change that links learning in an organization to the strategic process. Design/methodology/approach: The model was developed from a review of literature covering a range of areas including: management, strategic planning, psychology of learning and organizational learning. The process of…

  10. Alternative field representations and integral equations for modeling inhomogeneous dielectrics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volakis, John L.

    1992-01-01

    New volume and volume-surface integral equations are presented for modeling inhomogeneous dielectric regions. The presented integral equations result in more efficient numerical implementations and should, therefore, be useful in a variety of electromagnetic applications.

  11. Integrated Meteorology and Chemistry Modeling: Evaluation and Research Needs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade several online integrated atmospheric chemical-transport and meteorology modeling systems with varying levels of interactions among different atmospheric processes have been developed. A variety of approaches to meteorology-chemistry integration with differe...

  12. Integrated Meteorology and Chemistry Modeling: Evaluation and Research Needs

    EPA Science Inventory

    Over the past decade several online integrated atmospheric chemical-transport and meteorology modeling systems with varying levels of interactions among different atmospheric processes have been developed. A variety of approaches to meteorology-chemistry integration with differe...

  13. Approximately Integrable Linear Statistical Models in Non-Parametric Estimation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-01

    OTIC I EL COPY Lfl 0n Cf) NAPPROXIMATELY INTEGRABLE LINEAR STATISTICAL MODELS IN NON- PARAMETRIC ESTIMATION by B. Ya. Levit University of Maryland...Integrable Linear Statistical Models in Non- Parametric Estimation B. Ya. Levit Sumnmary / The notion of approximately integrable linear statistical models...models related to the study of the "next" order optimality in non- parametric estimation . It appears consistent to keep the exposition at present at the

  14. Another day older and deeper in therapy: Can the Dynamic-Maturational Model offer a way out?

    PubMed

    Wilkinson, Simon R

    2010-07-01

    Patients referred to adolescent psychiatric units have often been in contact with services for many years. When assessing for admission we consider why the previous approaches might have failed and how milieu therapy might be more effective as the priority treatment. We propose that the information provided by an adolescent's Transition to Adulthood Attachment Interview (TAAI) and the parents' Adult Attachment Interviews (AAI) leads to an especially productive case formulation. The Dynamic-Maturational Model of attachment and adaptation (DMM) uniquely provides a detailed understanding of an extended range of Type A and Type C strategies with modifiers that are useful for planning the milieu therapy, individual and family work. In addition, this case presentation illustrates the usefulness of understanding the phenomenon of "intruded negative affect".

  15. Integrated model of the Carlina Telescope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enmark, Anita; Andersen, Torben; Owner-Petersen, Mette; Chakraborty, Rijuparna; Labeyrie, Antoine

    2011-09-01

    The Carlina hypertelescope is a planned sparse aperture 100 m telescope with pupil densification. The telescope has a spherical primary with segments located in a valley between mountains, and additional optical elements in a gondola suspended in eight cables some 100 m above the primary mirror. The resolution is about 1.2×10-3 arcsec. It is imperative that the position and attitude of the gondola be maintained within tight tolerances during observation and star tracking. The present design has servo-controlled winches on the ground for control of the gondola via the cables. An integrated model of the system, including optics, cables, gondola, position and attitude control system, and wind disturbances has been set up. The structural and control models are linear. Calculations in the frequency domain and simulations in the time domain show that the performance of the telescope with the present design seems adequate for short exposures. However, for long-exposure operation, the gondola stability should be improved by about two orders of magnitude. Recommendations are given on possible approaches for performance improvement.

  16. Integrated soft sensor model for flow control.

    PubMed

    Aijälä, G; Lumley, D

    2006-01-01

    Tighter discharge permits often require wastewater treatment plants to maximize utilization of available facilities in order to cost-effectively reach these goals. Important aspects are minimizing internal disturbances and using available information in a smart way to improve plant performance. In this study, flow control throughout a large highly automated wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) was implemented in order to reduce internal disturbances and to provide a firm foundation for more advanced process control. A modular flow control system was constructed based on existing instrumentation and soft sensor flow models. Modules were constructed for every unit process in water treatment and integrated into a plant-wide model. The flow control system is used to automatically control recirculation flows and bypass flows at the plant. The system was also successful in making accurate flow estimations at points in the plant where it is not possible to have conventional flow meter instrumentation. The system provides fault detection for physical flow measuring devices. The module construction allows easy adaptation for new unit processes added to the treatment plant.

  17. An integrated model of Plasmodium falciparum dynamics.

    PubMed

    McKenzie, F Ellis; Bossert, William H

    2005-02-07

    The within-host and between-host dynamics of malaria are linked in myriad ways, but most obviously by gametocytes, the parasite blood forms transmissible from human to mosquito. Gametocyte dynamics depend on those of non-transmissible blood forms, which stimulate immune responses, impeding transmission as well as within-host parasite densities. These dynamics can, in turn, influence antigenic diversity and recombination between genetically distinct parasites. Here, we embed a differential-equation model of parasite-immune system interactions within each of the individual humans represented in a discrete-event model of Plasmodium falciparum transmission, and examine the effects of human population turnover, parasite antigenic diversity, recombination, and gametocyte production on the dynamics of malaria. Our results indicate that the local persistence of P. falciparum increases with turnover in the human population and antigenic diversity in the parasite, particularly in combination, and that antigenic diversity arising from meiotic recombination in the parasite has complex differential effects on the persistence of founder and progeny genotypes. We also find that reductions in the duration of individual human infectivity to mosquitoes, even if universal, produce population-level effects only if near-absolute, and that, in competition, the persistence and prevalence of parasite genotypes with gametocyte production concordant with data exceed those of genotypes with higher gametocyte production. This new, integrated approach provides a framework for investigating relationships between pathogen dynamics within an individual host and pathogen dynamics within interacting host and vector populations.

  18. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  19. Molecular Modeling and Dynamics Simulation Analysis of KATNAL1 for Identification of Novel Inhibitor of Sperm Maturation.

    PubMed

    Sarma, Kishore; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Bora, Sudipta Sankar; Dehury, Budheswar; Parida, Pratap; Das, Saurav; Das, Robin; Dohutia, Chandrajit; Nath, Sangeeta; Deb, Bibhas; Modi, Mahendra K

    2017-01-01

    Hormone based birth control often causes various side effects. A recent study revealed that temporary infertility without changing hormone levels can be attained by inhibiting Katanin p60 ATPase-containing subunit A-like 1 protein (KATNAL1) which is critical for sperm maturation in the testes. This study aimed at attaining the most energetically stable three dimensional (3D) structure of KATNAL1 protein using comparative modeling followed by screening of a ligand library of known natural spermicidal compounds for their binding affinity with KATNAL1. This in turn may inhibit the development of mature sperm in the seminiferous epithelium. A series of computational techniques were used for building the 3D structure of KATNAL1 which was further optimized by molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. For revealing the ATP binding mode of KATNAL1, docking study was carried out using the optimized model obtained from the MD simulation. The docking study was also employed to test the binding efficiency of the ligand library. Molecular docking study confirmed the ATP binding of KATNAL1 with various hydrophobic and hydrogen bond interactions. Binding efficiency of the ligand library suggested that calotropin, a cardenolide of Calotropis procera showed the highest binding efficiency against the target protein without toxicity. MD simulation of the docked complex validated the results of the docking study. This study revealed the ATP binding mode of KATNAL1 and identified calotropin as a potential lead molecule against it showing high binding efficiency with good bioavailability and no mutagenicity. Further in vitro and in vivo bioassay of calotropin could facilitate the development of novel non-hormonal male-specific contraceptive in near future. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  20. The Maturing of Hormesis as a Credible Dose-Response Model

    PubMed Central

    Calabrese, Edward J.

    2003-01-01

    Hormesis is a dose-response phenomenon that has received little recognition, credibility and acceptance as evidenced by its absence from major toxicological/risk assessment texts, governmental regulatory dose-response modeling for risk assessment, and non-visibility in major professional toxicological society national meetings. This paper traces the historical evolution of the hormetic dose-response hypothesis, why this model is not only credible but also more common than the widely accepted threshold model in direct comparative evaluation, and how the toxicological community made a critical error in rejecting hormesis, a rejection sustained over 70 years. PMID:19330138

  1. Integrated core-log petrofacies analysis in the construction of a reservoir geomodel: A case study of a mature Mississippian carbonate reservoir using limited data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bhattacharya, S.; Doveton, J.H.; Carr, T.R.; Guy, W.R.; Gerlach, P.M.

    2005-01-01

    Small independent operators produce most of the Mississippian carbonate fields in the United States mid-continent, where a lack of integrated characterization studies precludes maximization of hydrocarbon recovery. This study uses integrative techniques to leverage extant data in an Osagian and Meramecian (Mississippian) cherty carbonate reservoir in Kansas. Available data include petrophysical logs of varying vintages, limited number of cores, and production histories from each well. A consistent set of assumptions were used to extract well-level porosity and initial saturations, from logs of different types and vintages, to build a geomodel. Lacking regularly recorded well shut-in pressures, an iterative technique, based on material balance formulations, was used to estimate average reservoir-pressure decline that matched available drillstem test data and validated log-analysis assumptions. Core plugs representing the principal reservoir petrofacies provide critical inputs for characterization and simulation studies. However, assigning plugs among multiple reservoir petrofacies is difficult in complex (carbonate) reservoirs. In a bottom-up approach, raw capillary pressure (Pc) data were plotted on the Super-Pickett plot, and log- and core-derived saturation-height distributions were reconciled to group plugs by facies, to identify core plugs representative of the principal reservoir facies, and to discriminate facies in the logged interval. Pc data from representative core plugs were used for effective pay evaluation to estimate water cut from completions, in infill and producing wells, and guide-selective perforations for economic exploitation of mature fields. The results from this study were used to drill 22 infill wells. Techniques demonstrated here can be applied in other fields and reservoirs. Copyright ?? 2005. The American Association of Petroleum Geologists. All rights reserved.

  2. Design of a component-based integrated environmental modeling framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated environmental modeling (IEM) includes interdependent science-based components (e.g., models, databases, viewers, assessment protocols) that comprise an appropriate software modeling system. The science-based components are responsible for consuming and producing inform...

  3. Design of a component-based integrated environmental modeling framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated environmental modeling (IEM) includes interdependent science-based components (e.g., models, databases, viewers, assessment protocols) that comprise an appropriate software modeling system. The science-based components are responsible for consuming and producing inform...

  4. Integrated Space Asset Management Database and Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    MacLeod, Todd; Gagliano, Larry; Percy, Thomas; Mason, Shane

    2015-01-01

    Effective Space Asset Management is one key to addressing the ever-growing issue of space congestion. It is imperative that agencies around the world have access to data regarding the numerous active assets and pieces of space junk currently tracked in orbit around the Earth. At the center of this issues is the effective management of data of many types related to orbiting objects. As the population of tracked objects grows, so too should the data management structure used to catalog technical specifications, orbital information, and metadata related to those populations. Marshall Space Flight Center's Space Asset Management Database (SAM-D) was implemented in order to effectively catalog a broad set of data related to known objects in space by ingesting information from a variety of database and processing that data into useful technical information. Using the universal NORAD number as a unique identifier, the SAM-D processes two-line element data into orbital characteristics and cross-references this technical data with metadata related to functional status, country of ownership, and application category. The SAM-D began as an Excel spreadsheet and was later upgraded to an Access database. While SAM-D performs its task very well, it is limited by its current platform and is not available outside of the local user base. Further, while modeling and simulation can be powerful tools to exploit the information contained in SAM-D, the current system does not allow proper integration options for combining the data with both legacy and new M&S tools. This paper provides a summary of SAM-D development efforts to date and outlines a proposed data management infrastructure that extends SAM-D to support the larger data sets to be generated. A service-oriented architecture model using an information sharing platform named SIMON will allow it to easily expand to incorporate new capabilities, including advanced analytics, M&S tools, fusion techniques and user interface for

  5. Integrated Medical Model Verification, Validation, and Credibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walton, Marlei; Kerstman, Eric; Foy, Millennia; Shah, Ronak; Saile, Lynn; Boley, Lynn; Butler, Doug; Myers, Jerry

    2014-01-01

    The Integrated Medical Model (IMM) was designed to forecast relative changes for a specified set of crew health and mission success risk metrics by using a probabilistic (stochastic process) model based on historical data, cohort data, and subject matter expert opinion. A probabilistic approach is taken since exact (deterministic) results would not appropriately reflect the uncertainty in the IMM inputs. Once the IMM was conceptualized, a plan was needed to rigorously assess input information, framework and code, and output results of the IMM, and ensure that end user requests and requirements were considered during all stages of model development and implementation. METHODS: In 2008, the IMM team developed a comprehensive verification and validation (VV) plan, which specified internal and external review criteria encompassing 1) verification of data and IMM structure to ensure proper implementation of the IMM, 2) several validation techniques to confirm that the simulation capability of the IMM appropriately represents occurrences and consequences of medical conditions during space missions, and 3) credibility processes to develop user confidence in the information derived from the IMM. When the NASA-STD-7009 (7009) was published, the IMM team updated their verification, validation, and credibility (VVC) project plan to meet 7009 requirements and include 7009 tools in reporting VVC status of the IMM. RESULTS: IMM VVC updates are compiled recurrently and include 7009 Compliance and Credibility matrices, IMM VV Plan status, and a synopsis of any changes or updates to the IMM during the reporting period. Reporting tools have evolved over the lifetime of the IMM project to better communicate VVC status. This has included refining original 7009 methodology with augmentation from the NASA-STD-7009 Guidance Document. End user requests and requirements are being satisfied as evidenced by ISS Program acceptance of IMM risk forecasts, transition to an operational model and

  6. Integrated exposure modeling: a model using GIS and GLM.

    PubMed

    Holford, Theodore R; Ebisu, Keita; McKay, Lisa A; Gent, Janneane F; Triche, Elizabeth W; Bracken, Michael B; Leaderer, Brian P

    2010-01-15

    Traffic exhaust is a source of air contaminants that have adverse health effects. Quantification of traffic as an exposure variable is complicated by aerosol dispersion related to variation in layout of roads, traffic density, meteorology, and topography. A statistical model is presented that uses Geographic Information Systems (GIS) technology to incorporate variables into a generalized linear model that estimates distribution of traffic-related pollution. Exposure from a source is expressed as an integral of a function proportional to average daily traffic and a nonparametric dispersion function, which takes the form of a step, polynomial, or spline model. The method may be applied using standard regression techniques for fitting generalized linear models. Modifiers of pollutant dispersion such as wind direction, meteorology, and landscape features can also be included. Two examples are given to illustrate the method. The first employs data from a study in which NO(2) (a known pollutant from automobile exhaust) was monitored outside of 138 Connecticut homes, providing a model for estimating NO(2) exposure. In the second example, estimated levels of nitrogen dioxide (NO(2)) from the model, as well as a separate spatial model, were used to analyze traffic-related health effects in a study of 761 infants.

  7. Human induced pluripotent stem cells can reach complete terminal maturation: in vivo and in vitro evidence in the erythropoietic differentiation model

    PubMed Central

    Kobari, Ladan; Yates, Frank; Oudrhiri, Noufissa; Francina, Alain; Kiger, Laurent; Mazurier, Christelle; Rouzbeh, Shaghayegh; El-Nemer, Wassim; Hebert, Nicolas; Giarratana, Marie-Catherine; François, Sabine; Chapel, Alain; Lapillonne, Hélène; Luton, Dominique; Bennaceur-Griscelli, Annelise; Douay, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Background Human induced pluripotent stem cells offer perspectives for cell therapy and research models for diseases. We applied this approach to the normal and pathological erythroid differentiation model by establishing induced pluripotent stem cells from normal and homozygous sickle cell disease donors. Design and Methods We addressed the question as to whether these cells can reach complete erythroid terminal maturation notably with a complete switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin. Sickle cell disease induced pluripotent stem cells were differentiated in vitro into red blood cells and characterized for their terminal maturation in terms of hemoglobin content, oxygen transport capacity, deformability, sickling and adherence. Nucleated erythroblast populations generated from normal and pathological induced pluripotent stem cells were then injected into non-obese diabetic severe combined immunodeficiency mice to follow the in vivo hemoglobin maturation. Results We observed that in vitro erythroid differentiation results in predominance of fetal hemoglobin which rescues the functionality of red blood cells in the pathological model of sickle cell disease. We observed, in vivo, the switch from fetal to adult hemoglobin after infusion of nucleated erythroid precursors derived from either normal or pathological induced pluripotent stem cells into mice. Conclusions These results demonstrate that human induced pluripotent stem cells: i) can achieve complete terminal erythroid maturation, in vitro in terms of nucleus expulsion and in vivo in terms of hemoglobin maturation; and ii) open the way to generation of functionally corrected red blood cells from sickle cell disease induced pluripotent stem cells, without any genetic modification or drug treatment. PMID:22733021

  8. An Integrated Model of Training Evaluation and Effectiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarez, Kaye; Salas, Eduardo; Garofano, Christina M.

    2004-01-01

    A decade of training evaluation and training effectiveness research was reviewed to construct an integrated model of training evaluation and effectiveness. This model integrates four prior evaluation models and results of 10 years of training effectiveness research. It is the first to be constructed using a set of strict criteria and to…

  9. Empirical models of height integrated conductivities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallis, D. D.; Budzinski, E. E.

    1981-01-01

    Two-dimensional distributions of the height-integrated Pedersen and Hall conductivities have been computed for latitudes poleward of 60 deg invariant representative of two Kp activity levels. Average precipitating fluxes of electrons with energies of 0.15, 1.27, 9.65, and greater than 22 keV obtained by the energetic particle detector of Isis 2 during 1971-1974 are used as input to a Rees-type computation. The assumption of equilibrium conditions and a recombination rate profile permit calculation of electron density profiles and conductivity profiles. Calculations are performed at 300 grid points, specifically 12 local times and 25 latitudes from 60 to 84 deg invariant latitude. The models include ionization due to galactic EUV and other background sources that produces base conductivities as well as solar photon ionization through an empirical fit to Chatanika radar observations. Substantial modulation of the conductivities is found to result from longitudinal variation of the magnitude of the earth's magnetic field.

  10. STRAW - An Integrated Mobility and Traffic Model for VANETs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    STRAW - An Integrated Mobility and Traffic Model for VANETs David R. Choffnes Fabiàn E. Bustamante drchoffnes...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2005 to 00-00-2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE STRAW - An Integrated Mobility and Traffic Model for VANETs 5a. CONTRACT...STRAW - An Integrated Mobility and Traffic Model for VANETs David R. Choffnes Fabián E. Bustamante Department of Computer Science Northwestern

  11. Radiolysis Model Formulation for Integration with the Mixed Potential Model

    SciTech Connect

    Buck, Edgar C.; Wittman, Richard S.

    2014-07-10

    The U.S. Department of Energy Office of Nuclear Energy (DOE-NE), Office of Fuel Cycle Technology has established the Used Fuel Disposition Campaign (UFDC) to conduct the research and development activities related to storage, transportation, and disposal of used nuclear fuel (UNF) and high-level radioactive waste. Within the UFDC, the components for a general system model of the degradation and subsequent transport of UNF is being developed to analyze the performance of disposal options [Sassani et al., 2012]. Two model components of the near-field part of the problem are the ANL Mixed Potential Model and the PNNL Radiolysis Model. This report is in response to the desire to integrate the two models as outlined in [Buck, E.C, J.L. Jerden, W.L. Ebert, R.S. Wittman, (2013) “Coupling the Mixed Potential and Radiolysis Models for Used Fuel Degradation,” FCRD-UFD-2013-000290, M3FT-PN0806058

  12. Key Practices of the Capability Maturity Model, Version 1.1

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    most significant to least significant. Pareto analysis is based on the principle, named after the 19th-century economist Vilfredo Pareto , that most...validating process measurement data; and - applying basic quantitative methods and analysis techniques (e.g., estimation models, Pareto diagrams, and control...and deciding what actions to take as a result of the analysis. Examples of analysis techn’ques include: - Pareto diagrams, - control charts, - trend

  13. Integrated Belowground Greenhouse Gas Flux Modeling (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davidson, E. A.; Savage, K. E.

    2013-12-01

    Soil greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions play a significant role as biotic feedbacks to climate change. However, these complex processes, involving C, N, and O2 substrates and inhibitors, interactions with plant processes, and environmental influences of temperature, moisture, and gas transport, remain challenging to simulate in process models. Because CO2, CH4, and N2O production and consumption processes are inter-linked through common substrates and the contrasting effects of O2 as either an essential substrate or a potential inhibitor, the simulation of fluxes of any one gas must be consistent with mechanistic simulations and observations of fluxes of the other gases. Simulating the fluxes of one gas alone is a simpler task, but simulating all three gases simultaneously would provide multiple constraints and would afford greater confidence that the most important mechanisms are aptly simulated. A case in point is the challenge of resolving the apparent paradox of observed simultaneous CO2 production by aerobic respiration, CH4 uptake (oxidation), CH4 production, and N2O uptake (reduction) in the same soil profile. Consumption of atmospheric N2O should occur only under reducing conditions, and yet we have observed uptake of atmospheric CH4 (oxidation) and N2O (reduction) simultaneously. One of the great challenges of numerical modeling is determining the appropriate level of complexity when representing the most important environmental controllers. Ignoring complexity, such as simulating microbial processes with only simple Q10 functions, often results in poor model performance, because soil moisture and substrate supply can also be important factors. On the other hand, too much complexity, while perhaps mechanistically compelling, may result in too many poorly constrained parameters. Here we explore a parsimonious modeling framework for consistently integrated mechanistic and mathematical representation of the biophysical processes of belowground GHG production and

  14. A dynamic model of metabolizable energy utilization in growing and mature cattle. II. Metabolizable energy utilization for gain.

    PubMed

    Williams, C B; Jenkins, T G

    2003-06-01

    Component models were developed to predict the net efficiency of ME utilization for gain in cattle and to predict daily gain using recovered energy as the input. These models were integrated into a single model to predict daily gain from ME available for gain. One component model predicts the net efficiency of ME utilization for gain using constant partial net efficiencies of 0.2 and 0.75 for ME retention as protein and fat, respectively. This model predicts net efficiency of ME utilization for gain as a function of the ratio of the energy recovered in protein to the total energy recovered. The other component model predicts daily gain as a function of recovered energy and is represented by a system of ordinary differential equations that are numerically integrated on a daily basis. This model was developed by reformulating the equations in a published body composition model that uses daily gain to predict composition of gain since recovered energy is a function of gain and composition of gain. The equations in the two component models interact in that net efficiency is used to predict recovered energy from ME for gain, and in turn, recovered energy is used to predict gain in empty BW, which determines net efficiency through composition of gain. The numeric integration procedure provides an iterative solution for net efficiency. Simulated response of net efficiency for Hereford x Angus steers at 400 kg of empty BW decreased from 0.57 to 0.52 on diets with ME densities of 3.1 and 2.6 Mcal/kg of DM, and restricting the lower-quality diet to 75% of ad libitum intake resulted in a simulated net efficiency of 0.47. These responses in net efficiency were shown to be a result of composition of gain, with leaner gains resulting in lower net efficiencies.

  15. Models of integration of oncology and palliative care.

    PubMed

    Hui, David; Bruera, Eduardo

    2015-07-01

    Palliative care aims to improve cancer patients' quality of life through expert symptom management, psychosocial and spiritual care, patient-clinician communication, facilitation of complex decision making, and end-of-life care planning. Over the past few years, there has been increasing interest and evidence to support integration of oncology and palliative care. However, it remains unclear how best to promote integration. The goal of this review is to examine contemporary conceptual models and clinical approaches to integrate oncology and palliative care. Narrative review. Conceptual models are useful to help stakeholders understand the rationale for integration, to compare the risks and benefits among different practices, and to define a vision towards integration. We will review four major conceptual models of integration, including (I) the time-based model which emphasizes on integration based on chronological criterion; (II) the provider-based (palli-centric) model which discusses primary, secondary and tertiary palliative care; (III) the issue-based (onco-centric) model which illustrates the advantages and disadvantages of the solo practice, congress and integrated care approaches; and (IV) the system-based (patient-centric) model which emphasizes automatic referral based on clinical events. Clinical models provide actual data on the feasibility, efficacy and effectiveness of integration in specific settings. The evidence and challenges related to selected clinical models in integrating oncology and palliative care, such as outpatient palliative care clinics and embedded clinics will be discussed. There are multiple conceptual models and clinical models to promote integration. Further research is needed to inform best practices for integration at different healthcare settings.

  16. Leaving aside fully continuous modelling paradigms as a next step in the maturation of hydrology?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Baets, B.; Baetens, J.

    2012-12-01

    Typically, models of environmental processes in general, and hydrological processes in particular are based upon some well-known partial differential equation (PDE) that allows for describing the dependent variable of interest (e.g. volumetric water content, hydraulic head, etc. ) across a given region through time, and which is derived by writing down the appropriate mass balance for a given control volume whereupon this algebraic equation is transformed into its differential form through a limiting process in which the control volume becomes infinitesimally small. Unfortunately, for most problem settings, the majority of these PDEs, such as the Richards and Navier--Stokes equation, cannot be solved analytically and one is forced to rely upon numerical methods for retrieving an approximate solution of the governing PDE. For that purpose, numerous methods, often problem-specific, have been developed, among which the finite difference method (FDM) and the finite element method (FEM) are the most frequently used, and which share the common feature that they abandon the PDE as such and rely instead on its discretized counterpart (i.e. a difference equation) . Hence, the classical methodology that involves the derivation of a PDE from a (set of) mass balance equation(s) that is thereupon discretized so that it can be solved numerically is unmistakably a roundabout one. Indeed, the efforts that have been spent to the development of a compact equation are largely undone once it is to be used in practice since this requires its discretization when relying on the FDM or FEM. Moreover, it is beyond question that every numerical method brings along approximation errors. In order to avoid this detour, two alternative approaches have been exploited in hydrology, one of which only very recently. Firstly, utter discrete dynamical systems that are commonly known as cellular automata (CAs) have been proposed in eighties for mimicking hydrological processes. Using this construct

  17. Integrated modelling requires mass collaboration (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, R. V.

    2009-12-01

    add, “and are the plans sustainable?” To return to the present, although, it is now possible to ask the first question and obtain an answer through linked modelling; we are still at a very early stage and the associated uncertainties are large. The process of linking and running linked systems is not yet the simple, reliable process needed for widespread uptake. At this point, it is useful to look back over the development process which has taken us from paper maps to GIS and Google Maps; it was the result of tens of thousands of PhD and MSc projects over forty years. During the development of the OpenMI, it was quickly appreciated that to transform integrated modelling from something possible in a research lab to something that had the ease of use and reliability of Google Maps would require a similar process but on a far greater scale; one far larger than any single organisation or state could support. A dramatic change to the research and development process would be needed. Using the OpenMI Association’s strategy as an example, the presentation will describe how through openness, sharing and mass collaboration made possible by inexpensive communications and computing power and adoption of a minimum set of standards, the innovation and enterprise of thousands of individuals across the world can be brought to bear upon the problems.

  18. A Qualitative Model of the Differentiation Network in Chondrocyte Maturation: A Holistic View of Chondrocyte Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Kerkhofs, Johan; Leijten, Jeroen; Bolander, Johanna; Luyten, Frank P.; Post, Janine N.; Geris, Liesbet

    2016-01-01

    Differentiation of chondrocytes towards hypertrophy is a natural process whose control is essential in endochondral bone formation. It is additionally thought to play a role in several pathophysiological processes, with osteoarthritis being a prominent example. We perform a dynamic analysis of a qualitative mathematical model of the regulatory network that directs this phenotypic switch to investigate the influence of the individual factors holistically. To estimate the stability of a SOX9 positive state (associated with resting/proliferation chondrocytes) versus a RUNX2 positive one (associated with hypertrophy) we employ two measures. The robustness of the state in canalisation (size of the attractor basin) is assessed by a Monte Carlo analysis and the sensitivity to perturbations is assessed by a perturbational analysis of the attractor. Through qualitative predictions, these measures allow for an in silico screening of the effect of the modelled factors on chondrocyte maintenance and hypertrophy. We show how discrepancies between experimental data and the model’s results can be resolved by evaluating the dynamic plausibility of alternative network topologies. The findings are further supported by a literature study of proposed therapeutic targets in the case of osteoarthritis. PMID:27579819

  19. Authentic Integration: A Model for Integrating Mathematics and Science in the Classroom

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Treacy, Páraic; O'Donoghue, John

    2014-01-01

    Attempts at integrating mathematics and science have been made previously but no definitive, widely adopted teaching model has been developed to date. Research suggests that hands-on, practical, student-centred tasks should form a central element when designing an effective model for the integration of mathematics and science. Aided by this…

  20. Integrated Human Futures Modeling in Egypt

    SciTech Connect

    Passell, Howard D.; Aamir, Munaf Syed; Bernard, Michael Lewis; Beyeler, Walter E.; Fellner, Karen Marie; Hayden, Nancy Kay; Jeffers, Robert Fredric; Keller, Elizabeth James Kistin; Malczynski, Leonard A.; Mitchell, Michael David; Silver, Emily; Tidwell, Vincent C.; Villa, Daniel; Vugrin, Eric D.; Engelke, Peter; Burrow, Mat; Keith, Bruce

    2016-01-01

    The Integrated Human Futures Project provides a set of analytical and quantitative modeling and simulation tools that help explore the links among human social, economic, and ecological conditions, human resilience, conflict, and peace, and allows users to simulate tradeoffs and consequences associated with different future development and mitigation scenarios. In the current study, we integrate five distinct modeling platforms to simulate the potential risk of social unrest in Egypt resulting from the Grand Ethiopian Renaissance Dam (GERD) on the Blue Nile in Ethiopia. The five platforms simulate hydrology, agriculture, economy, human ecology, and human psychology/behavior, and show how impacts derived from development initiatives in one sector (e.g., hydrology) might ripple through to affect other sectors and how development and security concerns may be triggered across the region. This approach evaluates potential consequences, intended and unintended, associated with strategic policy actions that span the development-security nexus at the national, regional, and international levels. Model results are not intended to provide explicit predictions, but rather to provide system-level insight for policy makers into the dynamics among these interacting sectors, and to demonstrate an approach to evaluating short- and long-term policy trade-offs across different policy domains and stakeholders. The GERD project is critical to government-planned development efforts in Ethiopia but is expected to reduce downstream freshwater availability in the Nile Basin, fueling fears of negative social and economic impacts that could threaten stability and security in Egypt. We tested these hypotheses and came to the following preliminary conclusions. First, the GERD will have an important short-term impact on water availability, food production, and hydropower production in Egypt, depending on the short- term reservoir fill rate. Second, the GERD will have a very small impact on

  1. Shared mental models of integrated care: aligning multiple stakeholder perspectives.

    PubMed

    Evans, Jenna M; Baker, G Ross

    2012-01-01

    Health service organizations and professionals are under increasing pressure to work together to deliver integrated patient care. A common understanding of integration strategies may facilitate the delivery of integrated care across inter-organizational and inter-professional boundaries. This paper aims to build a framework for exploring and potentially aligning multiple stakeholder perspectives of systems integration. The authors draw from the literature on shared mental models, strategic management and change, framing, stakeholder management, and systems theory to develop a new construct, Mental Models of Integrated Care (MMIC), which consists of three types of mental models, i.e. integration-task, system-role, and integration-belief. The MMIC construct encompasses many of the known barriers and enablers to integrating care while also providing a comprehensive, theory-based framework of psychological factors that may influence inter-organizational and inter-professional relations. While the existing literature on integration focuses on optimizing structures and processes, the MMIC construct emphasizes the convergence and divergence of stakeholders' knowledge and beliefs, and how these underlying cognitions influence interactions (or lack thereof) across the continuum of care. MMIC may help to: explain what differentiates effective from ineffective integration initiatives; determine system readiness to integrate; diagnose integration problems; and develop interventions for enhancing integrative processes and ultimately the delivery of integrated care. Global interest and ongoing challenges in integrating care underline the need for research on the mental models that characterize the behaviors of actors within health systems; the proposed framework offers a starting point for applying a cognitive perspective to health systems integration.

  2. Effect of Mature Blood-Stage Plasmodium Parasite Sequestration on Pathogen Biomass in Mathematical and In Vivo Models of Malaria

    PubMed Central

    Khoury, David S.; Cromer, Deborah; Best, Shannon E.; James, Kylie R.; Kim, Peter S.; Engwerda, Christian R.; Haque, Ashraful

    2014-01-01

    Parasite biomass and microvasculature obstruction are strongly associated with disease severity and death in Plasmodium falciparum-infected humans. This is related to sequestration of mature, blood-stage parasites (schizonts) in peripheral tissue. The prevailing view is that schizont sequestration leads to an increase in pathogen biomass, yet direct experimental data to support this are lacking. Here, we first studied parasite population dynamics in inbred wild-type (WT) mice infected with the rodent species of malaria, Plasmodium berghei ANKA. As is commonly reported, these mice became moribund due to large numbers of parasites in multiple tissues. We then studied infection dynamics in a genetically targeted line of mice, which displayed minimal tissue accumulation of parasites. We constructed a mathematical model of parasite biomass dynamics, incorporating schizont-specific host clearance, both with and without schizont sequestration. Combined use of mathematical and in vivo modeling indicated, first, that the slowing of parasite growth in the genetically targeted mice can be attributed to specific clearance of schizonts from the circulation and, second, that persistent parasite growth in WT mice can be explained solely as a result of schizont sequestration. Our work provides evidence that schizont sequestration could be a major biological process driving rapid, early increases in parasite biomass during blood-stage Plasmodium infection. PMID:24144725

  3. Modeling the response of mature Pinus ponderosa Laws. to tropospheric ozone: Effects of genotypic variability

    SciTech Connect

    Constable, J.V.H.; Taylor, G.E. Jr. ); Weinstein, D.A.; Laurence, J.A. )

    1994-06-01

    Regionally distributed pollutants (e.g., tropospheric ozone and CO[sub 2]) can influence the growth of terrestrial plants. The mosaic of genotypes in natural populations makes it difficult to predict the ecological consequences of pollutants throughout a species' distribution. We simulated the response of Pinus ponderosa Laws to ambient, sub-ambient and above-ambient troposopheric O[sub 3] for 3 years using TREGRO, a physiologically based three growth model. Parameters controlling growth and carbon allocation were obtained from the literature and were varied to simulate intravarietal and intervarietal genotypes (western var. Ponderosa and eastern var. Scopulorum) of Ponderosa Pine. Parameter differences between the varieties include physiology, carbon allocation and phenoloy. Ozone altered 3 year biomass gain (+6% to 61%) and fine root to leaf mass ratio ([minus]8% to [minus]14%) in spite of a small effect on photosynthesis ([<=] 10%). Overall, O[sub 3] caused growth differences between varieties to be reduced. The reduction in growth differences between genotypes due to ozone has consequences for regional identification of populations sensitive to the effects of tropospheric ozone.

  4. From Source to Sink: Integration and Alteration of Oxygen Isotope Signals during the Transfer from Precipitation to Leaf Water, Leaf Sugars, Twig Phloem Sugars into the Stem Phloem Sugars of Four Mature European Tree Species

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brinkmann, N.; Werner, R. A.; Buchmann, N. C.; Kahmen, A.

    2014-12-01

    Stable oxygen isotope ratios (δ18O) of stem cellulose record physiological and ecohydrological information and are increasingly being used for the reconstruction of past environments. Studies that have investigated the environmental and physiological drivers of δ18O values in tree ring cellulose have typically focused either on the source of the signal, e.g. the leaf and the water therein, or on the sink, e.g. the cellulose in the stem. In contrast, hardly any research has investigated the transfer of the δ18O signal from precipitation, to soil water, xylem water, leaf water, leaf sugars, phloem sugars all the way to cellulose in the tree ring. As such, critical uncertainties remain regarding the seasonal integration and precision by which precipitation and leaf water δ18O signals are recorded in the tree ring cellulose δ18O values. In our talk, we will present a unique three year dataset that shows the seasonal variation of δ18O values in precipitation, soil water, xylem water, leaf water, leaf sugars, twig and stem phloem sugars for four common European tree species, which are growing in a mature temperature Swiss mixed broadleaf/evergreen forest. This dataset allows us to assess, (i) to what degree the substantial seasonal variation in precipitation δ18O values influences the δ18O values of tree ring cellulose and (ii) if physiological and environmental δ18O signals imprinted on the tree's leaf water δ18O values and the assimilates formed therein are altered on their way downstream to the tree stem. The new insight that we provide into the integration and possible alteration of δ18O signals along the leaf-stem pathway will contribute significantly to a better understanding of the environmental and physiological signals that can be obtained from tree ring δ18O chronologies. In addition it will be relevant for the incorporation and parameterization of tree ring isotope models into dynamic global vegetation models.

  5. Marketing and Languages: An Integrative Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCall, Ian

    1988-01-01

    A framework is proposed for an integrated course in which knowledge of a language is consciously related to the processes of interpersonal communication and the cultural aspects of marketing and negotiation. (Editor)

  6. Neural and Cognitive Modeling with Networks of Leaky Integrator Units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graben, Peter beim; Liebscher, Thomas; Kurths, Jürgen

    After reviewing several physiological findings on oscillations in the electroencephalogram (EEG) and their possible explanations by dynamical modeling, we present neural networks consisting of leaky integrator units as a universal paradigm for neural and cognitive modeling. In contrast to standard recurrent neural networks, leaky integrator units are described by ordinary differential equations living in continuous time. We present an algorithm to train the temporal behavior of leaky integrator networks by generalized back-propagation and discuss their physiological relevance. Eventually, we show how leaky integrator units can be used to build oscillators that may serve as models of brain oscillations and cognitive processes.

  7. Modelling and Assessing Air-Surface Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-01

    2011), Qu?c City , Qu?c, Canada, June 21-23, 2011. U.S. Government or Federal Rights License. 14. ABSTRACT Air-Surface Integration (ASI) is an...structure capability and identifies socio-technical issues in the ASI system for capability designers . 15. SUBJECT TERMS 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF...for capability designers . 1. Introduction Air Surface Integration (ASI) has been conducted by forces in a variety of operations dating back to

  8. Maturation-Based Model of Arrhythmogenic Right Ventricular Dysplasia Using Patient-Specific Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jian-Yan; Wei, Chuan-Yu; Shah, Khooshbu; Wong, Johnson; Wang, Cheng; Chen, Huei-Sheng Vincent

    2015-01-01

    Cellular reprogramming of somatic cells to patient-specific induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) enables in-vitro modeling of human cardiac disorders for pathogenic and therapeutic investigations. However, using iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes (iPSC-CMs) to model an adult-onset heart disease remains challenging because of the uncertainty regarding the ability of relatively immature iPSC-CMs to fully recapitulate adult disease phenotypes. Arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia (ARVD) is an inherited cardiomyopathy characterized by pathological fibrofatty infiltration and cardiomyocyte (CM) loss predominantly in the right ventricle (RV), leading to heart failure and lethal arrhythmias. Over 50% of affected individuals have desmosome gene mutations, most commonly inPKP2encoding plakophilin-2. Using Yamanaka's pluripotent factors, we generated iPSC lines from ARVD patients withPKP2mutations. We first developed a method to induce metabolic maturation of iPSC-CMs and showed that induction of adult-like metabolic energetics from an embryonic/glycolytic state is essential to model an adult-onset cardiac disease using patient-specific iPSCs. Furthermore, we showed that coactivation of normal peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-α and abnormal PPARγ pathways in ARVD iPSC-CMs resulted in exaggerated CM lipogenesis, CM apoptosis, Na(+)channel downregulation and defective intracellular calcium handling, recapitulating the pathological signatures of ARVD. Using this model, we revealed novel pathogenic insights that metabolic derangement in an adult-like metabolic milieu underlies ARVD pathologies, enabling us to propose novel disease-modifying therapeutic strategies.

  9. Neonatal Maturation of Paracetamol (Acetaminophen) Glucuronidation, Sulfation, and Oxidation Based on a Parent-Metabolite Population Pharmacokinetic Model.

    PubMed

    Cook, Sarah F; Stockmann, Chris; Samiee-Zafarghandy, Samira; King, Amber D; Deutsch, Nina; Williams, Elaine F; Wilkins, Diana G; Sherwin, Catherine M T; van den Anker, John N

    2016-11-01

    This study aimed to model the population pharmacokinetics of intravenous paracetamol and its major metabolites in neonates and to identify influential patient characteristics, especially those affecting the formation clearance (CLformation) of oxidative pathway metabolites. Neonates with a clinical indication for intravenous analgesia received five 15-mg/kg doses of paracetamol at 12-h intervals (<28 weeks' gestation) or seven 15-mg/kg doses at 8-h intervals (≥28 weeks' gestation). Plasma and urine were sampled throughout the 72-h study period. Concentration-time data for paracetamol, paracetamol-glucuronide, paracetamol-sulfate, and the combined oxidative pathway metabolites (paracetamol-cysteine and paracetamol-N-acetylcysteine) were simultaneously modeled in NONMEM 7.2. The model incorporated 259 plasma and 350 urine samples from 35 neonates with a mean gestational age of 33.6 weeks (standard deviation 6.6). CLformation for all metabolites increased with weight; CLformation for glucuronidation and oxidation also increased with postnatal age. At the mean weight (2.3 kg) and postnatal age (7.5 days), CLformation estimates (bootstrap 95% confidence interval; between-subject variability) were 0.049 L/h (0.038-0.062; 62 %) for glucuronidation, 0.21 L/h (0.17-0.24; 33 %) for sulfation, and 0.058 L/h (0.044-0.078; 72 %) for oxidation. Expression of individual oxidation CLformation as a fraction of total individual paracetamol clearance showed that, on average, fractional oxidation CLformation increased <15 % when plotted against weight or postnatal age. The parent-metabolite model successfully characterized the pharmacokinetics of intravenous paracetamol and its metabolites in neonates. Maturational changes in the fraction of paracetamol undergoing oxidation were small relative to between-subject variability.

  10. Modeling the Maturation of Grip Selection Planning and Action Representation: Insights from Typical and Atypical Motor Development

    PubMed Central

    Fuelscher, Ian; Williams, Jacqueline; Wilmut, Kate; Enticott, Peter G.; Hyde, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the purported association between developmental changes in grip selection planning and improvements in an individual’s capacity to represent action at an internal level [i.e., motor imagery (MI)]. Participants were groups of healthy children aged 6–7 years and 8–12 years respectively, while a group of adolescents (13–17 years) and adults (18–34 years) allowed for consideration of childhood development in the broader context of motor maturation. A group of children aged 8–12 years with probable DCD (pDCD) was included as a reference group for atypical motor development. Participants’ proficiency to generate and/or engage internal action representations was inferred from performance on the hand rotation task, a well-validated measure of MI. A grip selection task designed to elicit the end-state comfort (ESC) effect provided a window into the integrity of grip selection planning. Consistent with earlier accounts, the efficiency of grip selection planning followed a non-linear developmental progression in neurotypical individuals. As expected, analysis confirmed that these developmental improvements were predicted by an increased capacity to generate and/or engage internal action representations. The profile of this association remained stable throughout the (typical) developmental spectrum. These findings are consistent with computational accounts of action planning that argue that internal action representations are associated with the expression and development of grip selection planning across typical development. However, no such association was found for our sample of children with pDCD, suggesting that individuals with atypical motor skill may adopt an alternative, sub-optimal strategy to plan their grip selection compared to their same-age control peers. PMID:26903915

  11. Modeling the Maturation of Grip Selection Planning and Action Representation: Insights from Typical and Atypical Motor Development.

    PubMed

    Fuelscher, Ian; Williams, Jacqueline; Wilmut, Kate; Enticott, Peter G; Hyde, Christian

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the purported association between developmental changes in grip selection planning and improvements in an individual's capacity to represent action at an internal level [i.e., motor imagery (MI)]. Participants were groups of healthy children aged 6-7 years and 8-12 years respectively, while a group of adolescents (13-17 years) and adults (18-34 years) allowed for consideration of childhood development in the broader context of motor maturation. A group of children aged 8-12 years with probable DCD (pDCD) was included as a reference group for atypical motor development. Participants' proficiency to generate and/or engage internal action representations was inferred from performance on the hand rotation task, a well-validated measure of MI. A grip selection task designed to elicit the end-state comfort (ESC) effect provided a window into the integrity of grip selection planning. Consistent with earlier accounts, the efficiency of grip selection planning followed a non-linear developmental progression in neurotypical individuals. As expected, analysis confirmed that these developmental improvements were predicted by an increased capacity to generate and/or engage internal action representations. The profile of this association remained stable throughout the (typical) developmental spectrum. These findings are consistent with computational accounts of action planning that argue that internal action representations are associated with the expression and development of grip selection planning across typical development. However, no such association was found for our sample of children with pDCD, suggesting that individuals with atypical motor skill may adopt an alternative, sub-optimal strategy to plan their grip selection compared to their same-age control peers.

  12. THE EPA MULTIMEDIA INTEGRATED MODELING SYSTEM SOFTWARE SUITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA is developing a Multimedia Integrated Modeling System (MIMS) framework that will provide a software infrastructure or environment to support constructing, composing, executing, and evaluating complex modeling studies. The framework will include (1) common software ...

  13. Integrated Modeling for Environmental Assessment of Ecosystem Services

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses environmental models to inform rulemaking and policy decisions at multiple spatial and temporal scales. In this study, several sophisticated modeling technologies are seamlessly integrated to facilitate a baseline assessment of the re...

  14. THE EPA MULTIMEDIA INTEGRATED MODELING SYSTEM SOFTWARE SUITE

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. EPA is developing a Multimedia Integrated Modeling System (MIMS) framework that will provide a software infrastructure or environment to support constructing, composing, executing, and evaluating complex modeling studies. The framework will include (1) common software ...

  15. Integrated Modeling for Environmental Assessment of Ecosystem Services

    EPA Science Inventory

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency uses environmental models to inform rulemaking and policy decisions at multiple spatial and temporal scales. In this study, several sophisticated modeling technologies are seamlessly integrated to facilitate a baseline assessment of the re...

  16. Modelling hydrothermal venting in volcanic sedimentary basins: Impact on hydrocarbon maturation and paleoclimate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iyer, Karthik; Schmid, Daniel W.; Planke, Sverre; Millett, John

    2017-06-01

    Vent structures are intimately associated with sill intrusions in sedimentary basins globally and are thought to have been formed contemporaneously due to overpressure generated by gas generation during thermogenic breakdown of kerogen or boiling of water. Methane and other gases generated during this process may have driven catastrophic climate change in the geological past. In this study, we present a 2D FEM/FVM model that accounts for 'explosive' vent formation by fracturing of the host rock based on a case study in the Harstad Basin, offshore Norway. Overpressure generated by gas release during kerogen breakdown in the sill thermal aureole causes fracture formation. Fluid focusing and overpressure migration towards the sill tips results in vent formation after only few tens of years. The size of the vent depends on the region of overpressure accessed by the sill tip. Overpressure migration occurs in self-propagating waves before dissipating at the surface. The amount of methane generated in the system depends on TOC content and also on the type of kerogen present in the host rock. Generated methane moves with the fluids and vents at the surface through a single, large vent structure at the main sill tip matching first-order observations. Violent degassing takes place within the first couple of hundred years and occurs in bursts corresponding to the timing of overpressure waves. The amount of methane vented through a single vent is only a fraction (between 5 and 16%) of the methane generated at depth. Upscaling to the Vøring and Møre Basins, which are a part of the North Atlantic Igneous Province, and using realistic host rock carbon content and kerogen values results in a smaller amount of methane vented than previously estimated for the PETM. Our study, therefore, suggests that the negative carbon isotope excursion (CIE) observed in the fossil record could not have been caused by intrusions within the Vøring and Møre Basins alone and that a contribution

  17. An overview of the model integration process: From pre ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Integration of models requires linking models which can be developed using different tools, methodologies, and assumptions. We performed a literature review with the aim of improving our understanding of model integration process, and also presenting better strategies for building integrated modeling systems. We identified five different phases to characterize integration process: pre-integration assessment, preparation of models for integration, orchestration of models during simulation, data interoperability, and testing. Commonly, there is little reuse of existing frameworks beyond the development teams and not much sharing of science components across frameworks. We believe this must change to enable researchers and assessors to form complex workflows that leverage the current environmental science available. In this paper, we characterize the model integration process and compare integration practices of different groups. We highlight key strategies, features, standards, and practices that can be employed by developers to increase reuse and interoperability of science software components and systems. The paper provides a review of the literature regarding techniques and methods employed by various modeling system developers to facilitate science software interoperability. The intent of the paper is to illustrate the wide variation in methods and the limiting effect the variation has on inter-framework reuse and interoperability. A series of recommendation

  18. Theory and Practice: An Integrative Model Linking Class and Field

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lesser, Joan Granucci; Cooper, Marlene

    2006-01-01

    Social work has evolved over the years taking on the challenges of the times. The profession now espouses a breadth of theoretical approaches and treatment modalities. We have developed a model to help graduate social work students master the skill of integrating theory and social work practice. The Integrative Model has five components: (l) The…

  19. An overview of the model integration process: From pre ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Integration of models requires linking models which can be developed using different tools, methodologies, and assumptions. We performed a literature review with the aim of improving our understanding of model integration process, and also presenting better strategies for building integrated modeling systems. We identified five different phases to characterize integration process: pre-integration assessment, preparation of models for integration, orchestration of models during simulation, data interoperability, and testing. Commonly, there is little reuse of existing frameworks beyond the development teams and not much sharing of science components across frameworks. We believe this must change to enable researchers and assessors to form complex workflows that leverage the current environmental science available. In this paper, we characterize the model integration process and compare integration practices of different groups. We highlight key strategies, features, standards, and practices that can be employed by developers to increase reuse and interoperability of science software components and systems. The paper provides a review of the literature regarding techniques and methods employed by various modeling system developers to facilitate science software interoperability. The intent of the paper is to illustrate the wide variation in methods and the limiting effect the variation has on inter-framework reuse and interoperability. A series of recommendation

  20. Wnt4, a pleiotropic signal for controlling cell polarity, basement membrane integrity, and antimüllerian hormone expression during oocyte maturation in the female follicle.

    PubMed

    Prunskaite-Hyyryläinen, Renata; Shan, Jingdong; Railo, Antti; Heinonen, Krista M; Miinalainen, Ilkka; Yan, Wenying; Shen, Bairong; Perreault, Claude; Vainio, Seppo J

    2014-04-01

    Wnt4 is a key signal that channels the developmental fate of the indifferent mammalian gonad toward the ovary, but whether Wnt4 has later roles during ovary development remains unknown. To investigate this, we inactivated the Wnt4 gene by crossing Amhr2Cre and doxycycline-inducible Rosa(rtTA)-knock-in Cre mice with mice carrying a floxed Wnt4 allele and used a novel Wnt4(mCherry)-knock-in mouse. In these models, ovarian folliculogenesis was compromised, and female fertility was severely reduced, and Wnt4 deficiency eventually led to premature ovarian failure. These anomalies were associated with cell polarity defects in the follicle. Within the follicle, laminin and type IV collagen assembled ectopic basement membrane-like structures, the cell adherens junction components N-cadherin and β-catenin lost their polarized expression pattern, and expression of the gap junction protein connexin 43 was reduced by ~30% when compared with that of the controls. Besides these changes, expression of antimüllerian hormone (Amh) was inhibited in the absence of Wnt4 signaling in vivo. Consistent with this, Wnt4 signaling up-regulated Amh gene expression in KK1 cells in vitro. Thus, Wnt4 signaling is necessary during maturation of the ovarian follicles, where it coordinates expression of Amh, cell survival, and polarized organization of the follicular cells.

  1. Multivariate modelling of density, strength, and stiffness from near infared for mature, juvenile, and pith wood of longleaf pine (Pinus Palustris)

    Treesearch

    Brian K. Via; Todd F. Shupe; Leslie H. Groom; Michael Stine; Chi-Leung So

    2003-01-01

    In manufacturing, monitoring the mechanical properties of wood with near infrared spectroscopy (NIR) is an attractive alternative to more conventional methods. However, no attention has been given to see if models differ between juvenile and mature wood. Additionally, it would be convenient if multiple linear regression (MLR) could perform well in the place of more...

  2. GLIMPSE: An integrated assessment model-based tool for ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Dan Loughlin will describe the GCAM-USA integrated assessment model and how that model is being improved and integrated into the GLIMPSE decision support system. He will also demonstrate the application of the model to evaluate the emissions and health implications of hypothetical state-level renewable electricity standards. Introduce the GLIMPSE project to state and regional environmental modelers and analysts. Presented as part of the State Energy and Air Quality Group Webinar Series, which is organized by NESCAUM.

  3. Authentic Integration: a model for integrating mathematics and science in the classroom

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treacy, Páraic; O'Donoghue, John

    2014-07-01

    Attempts at integrating mathematics and science have been made previously but no definitive, widely adopted teaching model has been developed to date. Research suggests that hands-on, practical, student-centred tasks should form a central element when designing an effective model for the integration of mathematics and science. Aided by this research, the author created a new model entitled 'Authentic Integration' which caters for the specific needs of integration of mathematics and science. This model requires that each lesson be based around a rich task which relates to the real world and ensures that hands-on group work, inquiry, and discussion are central to the lesson. It was found that Authentic Integration, when applied in four Irish post-primary schools, positively affected pupil understanding. The teachers who completed the intervention displayed a very positive attitude towards the approach, intimating that they would continue to implement the practice in their classrooms.

  4. Integrated Space Asset Management Database and Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagliano, L.; MacLeod, T.; Mason, S.; Percy, T.; Prescott, J.

    The Space Asset Management Database (SAM-D) was implemented in order to effectively track known objects in space by ingesting information from a variety of databases and performing calculations to determine the expected position of the object at a specified time. While SAM-D performs this task very well, it is limited by technology and is not available outside of the local user base. Modeling and simulation can be powerful tools to exploit the information contained in SAM-D. However, the current system does not allow proper integration options for combining the data with both legacy and new M&S tools. A more capable data management infrastructure would extend SAM-D to support the larger data sets to be generated by the COI. A service-oriented architecture model will allow it to easily expand to incorporate new capabilities, including advanced analytics, M&S tools, fusion techniques and user interface for visualizations. Based on a web-centric approach, the entire COI will be able to access the data and related analytics. In addition, tight control of information sharing policy will increase confidence in the system, which would encourage industry partners to provide commercial data. SIMON is a Government off the Shelf information sharing platform in use throughout DoD and DHS information sharing and situation awareness communities. SIMON providing fine grained control to data owners allowing them to determine exactly how and when their data is shared. SIMON supports a micro-service approach to system development, meaning M&S and analytic services can be easily built or adapted. It is uniquely positioned to fill this need as an information-sharing platform with a proven track record of successful situational awareness system deployments. Combined with the integration of new and legacy M&S tools, a SIMON-based architecture will provide a robust SA environment for the NASA SA COI that can be extended and expanded indefinitely. First Results of Coherent Uplink from a

  5. Impact of the Maturation of Human Primary Bone-Forming Cells on Their Behavior in Acute or Persistent Staphylococcus aureus Infection Models

    PubMed Central

    Josse, Jérôme; Guillaume, Christine; Bour, Camille; Lemaire, Flora; Mongaret, Céline; Draux, Florence; Velard, Frédéric; Gangloff, Sophie C.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the most frequently involved pathogens in bacterial infections such as skin abscess, pneumonia, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, and implant-associated infection. As for bone homeostasis, it is partly altered during infections by S. aureus by the induction of various responses from osteoblasts, which are the bone-forming cells responsible for extracellular matrix synthesis and its mineralization. Nevertheless, bone-forming cells are a heterogeneous population with different stages of maturation and the impact of the latter on their responses toward bacteria remains unclear. We describe the impact of S. aureus on two populations of human primary bone-forming cells (HPBCs) which have distinct maturation characteristics in both acute and persistent models of interaction. Cell maturation did not influence the internalization and survival of S. aureus inside bone-forming cells or the cell death related to the infection. By studying the expression of chemokines, cytokines, and osteoclastogenic regulators by HPBCs, we observed different profiles of chemokine expression according to the degree of cell maturation. However, there was no statistical difference in the amounts of proteins released by both populations in the presence of S. aureus compared to the non-infected counterparts. Our findings show that cell maturation does not impact the behavior of HPBCs infected with S. aureus and suggest that the role of bone-forming cells may not be pivotal for the inflammatory response in osteomyelitis. PMID:27446812

  6. Integrability of the η-deformed Neumann-Rosochatius model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arutyunov, Gleb; Heinze, Martin; Medina-Rincon, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    An integrable deformation of the well-known Neumann-Rosochatius system is studied by considering generalised bosonic spinning solutions on the η-deformed \\text{Ad}{{\\text{S}}5}× {{\\text{S}}5} background. For this integrable model we construct a 4× 4 Lax representation and a set of integrals of motion that ensures its Liouville integrability. These integrals of motion correspond to the deformed analogues of the Neumann-Rosochatius integrals and generalise the previously found integrals for the η-deformed Neumann and {{≤ft(\\text{Ad}{{\\text{S}}5}× {{\\text{S}}5}\\right)}η} geodesic systems. Finally, we briefly comment on consistent truncations of this model.

  7. Modelling cyanobacteria: from metabolism to integrative models of phototrophic growth.

    PubMed

    Steuer, Ralf; Knoop, Henning; Machné, Rainer

    2012-03-01

    Cyanobacteria are phototrophic microorganisms of global importance and have recently attracted increasing attention due to their capability to convert sunlight and atmospheric CO(2) directly into organic compounds, including carbon-based biofuels. The utilization of cyanobacteria as a biological chassis to generate third-generation biofuels would greatly benefit from an increased understanding of cyanobacterial metabolism and its interplay with other cellular processes. In this respect, metabolic modelling has been proposed as a way to overcome the traditional trial and error methodology that is often employed to introduce novel pathways. In particular, flux balance analysis and related methods have proved to be powerful tools to investigate the organization of large-scale metabolic networks-with the prospect of predicting modifications that are likely to increase the yield of a desired product and thereby to streamline the experimental progress and avoid futile avenues. This contribution seeks to describe the utilization of metabolic modelling as a research tool to understand the metabolism and phototrophic growth of cyanobacteria. The focus of the contribution is on a mathematical description of the metabolic network of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and its analysis using constraint-based methods. A particular challenge is to integrate the description of the metabolic network with other cellular processes, such as the circadian clock, the photosynthetic light reactions, carbon concentration mechanism, and transcriptional regulation-aiming at a predictive model of a cyanobacterium in silico.

  8. Alterations of neocortical development and maturation in autism: insight from valproic acid exposure and animal models of autism.

    PubMed

    Chomiak, Taylor; Hu, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a behaviourally defined brain disorder affecting approximately 1 in 88 children. Many pathological studies have shown that ASD is frequently associated with grey and white matter changes that can be described by their deviations from the normal trajectory of cortical maturation. For example, during the early (i.e. <2 years) postnatal period there is marked and selective tissue overgrowth in the higher-order temporal and frontal networks involved in emotional, social, and communication functions. In this focused review we first summarize some basic principles of neocortical neural organization and how they are disrupted in ASD. We will then highlight some of the potential mechanisms by which the normal developmental trajectory and organization of neocortical networks can be altered based on animal studies of valproic acid, a teratogen widely used in animal models of ASD. We argue that the trajectory of postnatal cerebral neocortex development may be influenced by several cellular and molecular mechanisms that may all converge to produce a neuropathology characterized by premature or accelerated neuronal growth. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Competing ecosystem model hypotheses for the CO2 response of a nutrient and water limited mature woodland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duursma, R.; Medlyn, B. E.; Zaehle, S.; De Kauwe, M. G.; Gimeno, T.; Drake, J.; Macdonald, C.; Singh, B.; Mishurov, M.; Pak, B. C.; Walker, A. P.; Yang, X.; Ellsworth, D.

    2013-12-01

    The long-term response of ecosystems to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentration (eCa) is modulated by the interactions with nutrient cycling and water availability. Here, we set out to evaluate alternative hypotheses for the response of a nutrient and water limited woodland to eCa, using a diverse set of ecosystem models. The EucFACE experiment was established in late 2012 in western Sydney, in a Eucalyptus-dominated native woodland. It is the only FACE site worldwide in mature native woodland. The site is characterized by extremely low nutrient availability (particularly P), frequent occurrence of extended dry periods, and low leaf area index (LAI = ca. 1 m2 m-2). We applied seven ecosystem models to predict, in advance of the experiment, the eCa response of vegetation growing at the EucFACE site. The seven models (GDAY, OCN, SDGVM, CLM4-CN, CLM4-CNP, LPJ-GUESS and CABLE2.0) all include water limitation and nearly all include nutrient limitation. The models embody a range of alternative hypotheses for the effects of eCa on vegetation. The aim was to use the models to quantify the outcomes of these competing hypotheses, and generate focussed questions that can help to guide research at the EucFACE. All models were run with available site inputs, and a historic weather dataset split into a sequence of ';wet' and ';dry' years. We focused on the responses of net primary production (NPP), total evapotranspiration (ET) and water-use efficiency (WUE) to eCa, and the interaction with water availability. The models differed in their predictions of the response of net primary productivity (NPP) to eCa. The hypotheses embedded in the models range from no nutrient limitation to growth, in which case the model predicts a sustained eCa effect on productivity, through to complete nutrient limitation, in which case the model predicts no eCa effect at all. The key processes that would allow us to distinguish among the competing hypotheses were identified as N and P mineralisation

  10. Additive-dominance genetic model analyses for late-maturity alpha-amylase activity in a bread wheat factorial crossing population.

    PubMed

    Rasul, Golam; Glover, Karl D; Krishnan, Padmanaban G; Wu, Jixiang; Berzonsky, William A; Ibrahim, Amir M H

    2015-12-01

    Elevated level of late maturity α-amylase activity (LMAA) can result in low falling number scores, reduced grain quality, and downgrade of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) class. A mating population was developed by crossing parents with different levels of LMAA. The F2 and F3 hybrids and their parents were evaluated for LMAA, and data were analyzed using the R software package 'qgtools' integrated with an additive-dominance genetic model and a mixed linear model approach. Simulated results showed high testing powers for additive and additive × environment variances, and comparatively low powers for dominance and dominance × environment variances. All variance components and their proportions to the phenotypic variance for the parents and hybrids were significant except for the dominance × environment variance. The estimated narrow-sense heritability and broad-sense heritability for LMAA were 14 and 54%, respectively. High significant negative additive effects for parents suggest that spring wheat cultivars 'Lancer' and 'Chester' can serve as good general combiners, and that 'Kinsman' and 'Seri-82' had negative specific combining ability in some hybrids despite of their own significant positive additive effects, suggesting they can be used as parents to reduce LMAA levels. Seri-82 showed very good general combining ability effect when used as a male parent, indicating the importance of reciprocal effects. High significant negative dominance effects and high-parent heterosis for hybrids demonstrated that the specific hybrid combinations; Chester × Kinsman, 'Lerma52' × Lancer, Lerma52 × 'LoSprout' and 'Janz' × Seri-82 could be generated to produce cultivars with significantly reduced LMAA level.

  11. Development of Multisensory Integration Approach Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, S. Prasanna; Nathan, B. Sami

    2016-01-01

    Every teacher expects optimum level of processing in mind of them students. The level of processing is mainly depends upon memory process. Most of the students have retrieval difficulties on past learning. Memory difficulties directly related to sensory integration. In these circumstances the investigator made an attempt to construct Multisensory…

  12. Integration Models for Indigenous Public Health Curricula

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coombe, Leanne; Lee, Vanessa; Robinson, Priscilla

    2017-01-01

    All graduates of Master of Public Health (MPH) programmes in Australia are expected to achieve a core set of Indigenous public health competencies designed to train "judgement safe practitioners". A curriculum framework document was developed alongside the competencies to assist programme providers to integrate appropriate Indigenous…

  13. A Model for an Integrated Learning Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Sickle, Shaila; Mehs, Doreen

    Fort Lewis College (Colorado) developed a 17 credit, multidisciplinary learning program for first-time freshmen. The Integrated Learning Program (ILP) meets several of the college's general education requirements, is issue-oriented, and is taught by a team of five faculty members. The goals of the program include getting students to learn how to…

  14. A Model Academic Integrated Information Center.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adams, Carl; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Discusses three configurations that were developed for the Integrated Information Center (IIC) at the University of Minnesota. These configurations--basic, intermediate, and advanced--represent increasing sophistication of support capabilities, increasing costs, and possible stages of implementation, depending on the requirements of the academic…

  15. The dynamics of multimodal integration: The averaging diffusion model.

    PubMed

    Turner, Brandon M; Gao, Juan; Koenig, Scott; Palfy, Dylan; L McClelland, James

    2017-03-08

    We combine extant theories of evidence accumulation and multi-modal integration to develop an integrated framework for modeling multimodal integration as a process that unfolds in real time. Many studies have formulated sensory processing as a dynamic process where noisy samples of evidence are accumulated until a decision is made. However, these studies are often limited to a single sensory modality. Studies of multimodal stimulus integration have focused on how best to combine different sources of information to elicit a judgment. These studies are often limited to a single time point, typically after the integration process has occurred. We address these limitations by combining the two approaches. Experimentally, we present data that allow us to study the time course of evidence accumulation within each of the visual and auditory domains as well as in a bimodal condition. Theoretically, we develop a new Averaging Diffusion Model in which the decision variable is the mean rather than the sum of evidence samples and use it as a base for comparing three alternative models of multimodal integration, allowing us to assess the optimality of this integration. The outcome reveals rich individual differences in multimodal integration: while some subjects' data are consistent with adaptive optimal integration, reweighting sources of evidence as their relative reliability changes during evidence integration, others exhibit patterns inconsistent with optimality.

  16. Development of model for analysing respective collections of intended hematopoietic stem cells and harvests of unintended mature cells in apheresis for autologous hematopoietic stem cell collection.

    PubMed

    Hequet, O; Le, Q H; Rodriguez, J; Dubost, P; Revesz, D; Clerc, A; Rigal, D; Salles, G; Coiffier, B

    2014-04-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) required to perform peripheral hematopoietic autologous stem cell transplantation (APBSCT) can be collected by processing several blood volumes (BVs) in leukapheresis sessions. However, this may cause granulocyte harvest in graft and decrease in patient's platelet blood level. Both consequences may induce disturbances in patient. One apheresis team's current purpose is to improve HSC collection by increasing HSC collection and prevent increase in granulocyte and platelet harvests. Before improving HSC collection it seemed important to know more about the way to harvest these types of cells. The purpose of our study was to develop a simple model for analysing respective collections of intended CD34+ cells among HSC (designated here as HSC) and harvests of unintended platelets or granulocytes among mature cells (designated here as mature cells) considering the number of BVs processed and factors likely to influence cell collection or harvest. For this, we processed 1, 2 and 3 BVs in 59 leukapheresis sessions and analysed corresponding collections and harvests with a referent device (COBE Spectra). First we analysed the amounts of HSC collected and mature cells harvested and second the evolution of the respective shares of HSC and mature cells collected or harvested throughout the BV processes. HSC collections and mature cell harvests increased globally (p<0.0001) and their respective shares remained stable throughout the BV processes (p non-significant). We analysed the role of intrinsic (patient's features) and extrinsic (features before starting leukapheresis sessions) factors in collections and harvests, which showed that only pre-leukapheresis blood levels (CD34+cells and platelets) influenced both cell collections and harvests (CD34+cells and platelets) (p<0.001) and shares of HSC collections and mature unintended cells harvests (p<0.001) throughout the BV processes. Altogether, our results suggested that the main factors likely

  17. A Vertically Integrated Manpower Management Model for Military Veterinary Services

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-07-01

    MANAGEMENT MODEL FOR MILITARY VETERINARY SERVICES 12 PERSONAL AUWOR(S)a ThTomas a anzaro 1~T1P OF RPORT13b. TIME COVERED 14. DATE OF REPORT (YearMonth, Dy...identify by block number) This study was conducted to develop a model for vertically integrating the existing military Veterinary Service manpower...management systems. Current manpower databases were examined and integrated into a proposed manpower management model . The advantages and disadvantages

  18. Very Large Optical Telescope (VLOT) integrated model enhancements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, Jennifer; Roberts, Scott C.; Fitzsimmons, Joeleff; Pazder, John; Veran, Jean-Pierre; Herriot, Glen; Smith, Malcolm J.

    2004-09-01

    The integrated modeling tools for Canada's 20-meter telescope model, VLOT, have advanced significantly in the last year. Specifically, the flexibility of the tool and the pre-processing and post-processing functions have been enhanced. Also, closed loop control of the primary mirror and feeding the optical displacements through an adaptive optics tool, have been developed. This paper details the enhancements made to the tool and discusses the future challenges of the integrated modeling team.

  19. Integration models: multicultural and liberal approaches confronted

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janicki, Wojciech

    2012-01-01

    European societies have been shaped by their Christian past, upsurge of international migration, democratic rule and liberal tradition rooted in religious tolerance. Boosting globalization processes impose new challenges on European societies, striving to protect their diversity. This struggle is especially clearly visible in case of minorities trying to resist melting into mainstream culture. European countries' legal systems and cultural policies respond to these efforts in many ways. Respecting identity politics-driven group rights seems to be the most common approach, resulting in creation of a multicultural society. However, the outcome of respecting group rights may be remarkably contradictory to both individual rights growing out from liberal tradition, and to reinforced concept of integration of immigrants into host societies. The hereby paper discusses identity politics upturn in the context of both individual rights and integration of European societies.

  20. Multimedia-modeling integration development environment

    SciTech Connect

    Pelton, Mitchell A.; Hoopes, Bonnie L.

    2002-09-02

    There are many framework systems available; however, the purpose of the framework presented here is to capitalize on the successes of the Framework for Risk Analysis in Multimedia Environmental Systems (FRAMES) and Multi-media Multi-pathway Multi-receptor Risk Assessment (3MRA) methodology as applied to the Hazardous Waste Identification Rule (HWIR) while focusing on the development of software tools to simplify the module developer?s effort of integrating a module into the framework.

  1. Integration of stochastic models by minimizing alpha-divergence.

    PubMed

    Amari, Shun-ichi

    2007-10-01

    When there are a number of stochastic models in the form of probability distributions, one needs to integrate them. Mixtures of distributions are frequently used, but exponential mixtures also provide a good means of integration. This letter proposes a one-parameter family of integration, called alpha-integration, which includes all of these well-known integrations. These are generalizations of various averages of numbers such as arithmetic, geometric, and harmonic averages. There are psychophysical experiments that suggest that alpha-integrations are used in the brain. The alpha-divergence between two distributions is defined, which is a natural generalization of Kullback-Leibler divergence and Hellinger distance, and it is proved that alpha-integration is optimal in the sense of minimizing alpha-divergence. The theory is applied to generalize the mixture of experts and the product of experts to the alpha-mixture of experts. The alpha-predictive distribution is also stated in the Bayesian framework.

  2. An Integrative Model for Teaching Research Design.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Packard, Richard D.; Dereshiwsky, Mary I.

    This paper presents a model which illustrates the cyclical and interactive nature of the basic elements of the research design process. Rather than presenting each research design component in isolation, the model emphasizes their interrelationships. A brief discussion is presented on each of the following components of the model: (1) the "words"…

  3. The HSG procedure for modelling integrated urban wastewater systems.

    PubMed

    Muschalla, D; Schütze, M; Schroeder, K; Bach, M; Blumensaat, F; Gruber, G; Klepiszewski, K; Pabst, M; Pressl, A; Schindler, N; Solvi, A-M; Wiese, J

    2009-01-01

    Whilst the importance of integrated modelling of urban wastewater systems is ever increasing, there is still no concise procedure regarding how to carry out such modelling studies. After briefly discussing some earlier approaches, the guideline for integrated modelling developed by the Central European Simulation Research Group (HSG - Hochschulgruppe) is presented. This contribution suggests a six-step standardised procedure to integrated modelling. This commences with an analysis of the system and definition of objectives and criteria, covers selection of modelling approaches, analysis of data availability, calibration and validation and also includes the steps of scenario analysis and reporting. Recent research findings as well as experience gained from several application projects from Central Europe have been integrated in this guideline.

  4. [Evaluating the maturity of IT-supported clinical imaging and diagnosis using the Digital Imaging Adoption Model : Are your clinical imaging processes ready for the digital era?

    PubMed

    Studzinski, J

    2017-06-01

    The Digital Imaging Adoption Model (DIAM) has been jointly developed by HIMSS Analytics and the European Society of Radiology (ESR). It helps evaluate the maturity of IT-supported processes in medical imaging, particularly in radiology. This eight-stage maturity model drives your organisational, strategic and tactical alignment towards imaging-IT planning. The key audience for the model comprises hospitals with imaging centers, as well as external imaging centers that collaborate with hospitals. The assessment focuses on different dimensions relevant to digital imaging, such as software infrastructure and usage, workflow security, clinical documentation and decision support, data exchange and analytical capabilities. With its standardised approach, it enables regional, national and international benchmarking. All DIAM participants receive a structured report that can be used as a basis for presenting, e.g. budget planning and investment decisions at management level.

  5. An integrated development environment for PMESII model authoring, integration, validation, and debugging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pioch, Nicholas J.; Lofdahl, Corey; Sao Pedro, Michael; Krikeles, Basil; Morley, Liam

    2007-04-01

    To foster shared battlespace awareness in Air Operations Centers supporting the Joint Forces Commander and Joint Force Air Component Commander, BAE Systems is developing a Commander's Model Integration and Simulation Toolkit (CMIST), an Integrated Development Environment (IDE) for model authoring, integration, validation, and debugging. CMIST is built on the versatile Eclipse framework, a widely used open development platform comprised of extensible frameworks that enable development of tools for building, deploying, and managing software. CMIST provides two distinct layers: 1) a Commander's IDE for supporting staff to author models spanning the Political, Military, Economic, Social, Infrastructure, Information (PMESII) taxonomy; integrate multiple native (third-party) models; validate model interfaces and outputs; and debug the integrated models via intuitive controls and time series visualization, and 2) a PMESII IDE for modeling and simulation developers to rapidly incorporate new native simulation tools and models to make them available for use in the Commander's IDE. The PMESII IDE provides shared ontologies and repositories for world state, modeling concepts, and native tool characterization. CMIST includes extensible libraries for 1) reusable data transforms for semantic alignment of native data with the shared ontology, and 2) interaction patterns to synchronize multiple native simulations with disparate modeling paradigms, such as continuous-time system dynamics, agent-based discrete event simulation, and aggregate solution methods such as Monte Carlo sampling over dynamic Bayesian networks. This paper describes the CMIST system architecture, our technical approach to addressing these semantic alignment and synchronization problems, and initial results from integrating Political-Military-Economic models of post-war Iraq spanning multiple modeling paradigms.

  6. Collaborative Research Partners: Technology Integration Model That Supports Learning Communities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Denise; Sasser, Stephanie; Linduska, Steve; Murphy, Vaughn; Grether, Cheryl

    This research project examined an innovative technology integration model that includes the design, development, implementation, and assessment of the use and integration of technology by inservice and preservice teachers. Personnel from a school district, an area education agency, and a college of education work collaboratively to provide the…

  7. The Berlin-White Integrated Science and Mathematics Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berlin, Donna F.; White, Arthur L.

    1994-01-01

    Discusses six aspects of the Berlin-White Integrated Science and Mathematics Model developed to address the need for a definition of the integration of science and mathematics education. These aspects are ways of learning; ways of knowing; process and thinking skills; content knowledge; attitudes and perceptions; and teaching strategies. (MKR)

  8. Quantification of net ecosystem exchange sampling within two mature boreal aspen stands using airborne LiDAR and a flux footprint model: Scaling to MODIS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chasmer, L. E.; Kljun, N.; Hopkinson, C.; Petrone, R. M.; Milne, T.; Giroux, K.; Black, T. A.; Devito, K. J.; Canadian Carbon Program; Head Project

    2010-12-01

    Exchanges of CO2 and H2O are often measured by eddy covariance within relatively homogeneous ecosystems, where the spatial variability of vegetation structural characteristics and ground surface topography are relatively non-varying. Therefore, scalars transported from source/sink areas are representative of site average characteristics, regardless of wind direction and atmospheric turbulence. Despite relatively high confidence in the efficacy of measured exchanges within homogeneous ecosystems (barring meteorological and technical problems, etc.), site representativeness of the larger area may be questionable. For example, ecosystems represented by eddy covariance are often more heterogeneous than those measured. On the other hand, deployment of eddy covariance within sites containing variable land cover types may be prone to biased site averages if sampling does not represent similar landscape characteristics within the region. By combining remote sensing data, estimates of source/sink areas, and net ecosystem exchanges (NEE), vegetation and topographical characteristics associated with the frequency of sampling may be quantified. Sample frequency may then be used to classify and scale fluxes to the larger region. The following study integrates a flux footprint model parameterisation with three-dimensional characteristics of the ground, understory, and canopy measured using airborne Light Detection and Ranging (LiDAR) and NEE within two contrasting mature boreal aspen/mixed ecosystems. The objectives of the study are to 1) quantify the frequency distribution of source/sink contributions of CO2 to eddy covariance; 2) classify canopy, understory and topographical characteristics of the footprint climatology to quantify biases in NEE; 3) determine the dominance of sites (e.g. their representativeness) within the larger basin; 4) Evaluate the effectiveness of eddy covariance placement for MODIS product validation.

  9. Applying Model Checking to Generate Model-Based Integration Tests from Choreography Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wieczorek, Sebastian; Kozyura, Vitaly; Roth, Andreas; Leuschel, Michael; Bendisposto, Jens; Plagge, Daniel; Schieferdecker, Ina

    Choreography models describe the communication protocols between services. Testing of service choreographies is an important task for the quality assurance of service-based systems as used e.g. in the context of service-oriented architectures (SOA). The formal modeling of service choreographies enables a model-based integration testing (MBIT) approach. We present MBIT methods for our service choreography modeling approach called Message Choreography Models (MCM). For the model-based testing of service choreographies, MCMs are translated into Event-B models and used as input for our test generator which uses the model checker ProB.

  10. Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration stakeholder involvement model

    SciTech Connect

    Kaupanger, R.M.; Kostelnik, K.M.; Milam, L.M.

    1994-04-01

    The Buried Waste Integrated Demonstration (BWID) is a program funded by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Office of Technology Development. BWID supports the applied research, development, demonstration, and evaluation of a suite of advanced technologies that together form a comprehensive remediation system for the effective and efficient remediation of buried waste. Stakeholder participation in the DOE Environmental Management decision-making process is critical to remediation efforts. Appropriate mechanisms for communication with the public, private sector, regulators, elected officials, and others are being aggressively pursued by BWID to permit informed participation. This document summarizes public outreach efforts during FY-93 and presents a strategy for expanded stakeholder involvement during FY-94.

  11. NREL Wind Integrated System Design and Engineering Model

    SciTech Connect

    Ning, S. Andrew; Scott, George; Graf, Peter

    2013-09-30

    NREL_WISDEM is an integrated model for wind turbines and plants developed In python based on the open source software OpenMDAO. NREL_WISDEM is a set of wrappers for various wind turbine and models that integrate pre-existing models together into OpenMDAO. It is organized into groups each with their own repositories including Plant_CostSE. Plant_EnergySE, Turbine_CostSE and TurbineSE. The wrappers are designed for licensed and non-licensed models though in both cases, one has to have access to and install the individual models themselves before using them in the overall software platform.

  12. Development of the Integrated Communication Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ho, Hua-Kuo

    2008-01-01

    Human communication is a critical issue in personal life. It also should be the indispensable core element of general education curriculum in universities and colleges. Based on literature analysis and the author's clinical observation, the importance of human communication, functions of model, and often seen human communication models were…

  13. Human Systems Integration (HSI) Tradeoff Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-01

    while the SURVIAC model development team observed. The users evaluated the functionality and usability of the model in understanding the goal of HSI...Initiated: From scenario initiation 9. Time Completed: Results screen 10. Section 3: Usability /Tasks Walkthrough Please read the instructions...From scenario initiation 19. Time Completed: Results screen 20. Section 3: Usability /Tasks Walkthrough Please read the instructions below

  14. Integrative systems modeling and multi-objective optimization

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents a number of algorithms, tools, and methods for utilizing multi-objective optimization within integrated systems modeling frameworks. We first present innovative methods using a genetic algorithm to optimally calibrate the VELMA and SWAT ecohydrological ...

  15. Integrative systems modeling and multi-objective optimization

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation presents a number of algorithms, tools, and methods for utilizing multi-objective optimization within integrated systems modeling frameworks. We first present innovative methods using a genetic algorithm to optimally calibrate the VELMA and SWAT ecohydrological ...

  16. Integrated Main Propulsion System Performance Reconstruction Process/Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lopez, Eduardo; Elliott, Katie; Snell, Steven; Evans, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The Integrated Main Propulsion System (MPS) Performance Reconstruction process provides the MPS post-flight data files needed for postflight reporting to the project integration management and key customers to verify flight performance. This process/model was used as the baseline for the currently ongoing Space Launch System (SLS) work. The process utilizes several methodologies, including multiple software programs, to model integrated propulsion system performance through space shuttle ascent. It is used to evaluate integrated propulsion systems, including propellant tanks, feed systems, rocket engine, and pressurization systems performance throughout ascent based on flight pressure and temperature data. The latest revision incorporates new methods based on main engine power balance model updates to model higher mixture ratio operation at lower engine power levels.

  17. An Integrative-Interactive Conceptual Model for Curriculum Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Al-Ibrahim, Abdul Rahman H.

    1982-01-01

    The Integrative-Interactive Conceptual Model for Curriculum Development calls for curriculum reform and innovation to be cybernetic so that all aspects of curriculum planning get adequate attention. (CJ)

  18. A Model for Integrating Genetics into Nursing Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zamerowski, Suzanne Tracey

    2000-01-01

    Describes essential components for including genetics into undergraduate nursing education: a required basic science course in genetics and a model curriculum that integrates genetics content into nursing courses. (SK)

  19. Integrated environmental modeling: A vision and roadmap for the future

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated environmental modeling (IEM) is inspired by modern environmental problems, decisions, and policies and enabled by transdisciplinary science and computer capabilities that allow the environment to be considered in a holistic way. The problems are characterized by the ex...

  20. ARTEMIS. Ares Real Time Environment for Modeling, Integrating, and Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, David; Hughes, Ryan

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the ARTEMIS (Ares Real Time Environment for Modeling, Integration, and Simulation) for Ares hardware testing. It includes information on the ARTEMIS organization, SIL architecture, and I/O layer.

  1. Integrated environmental modeling: A vision and roadmap for the future

    EPA Science Inventory

    Integrated environmental modeling (IEM) is inspired by modern environmental problems, decisions, and policies and enabled by transdisciplinary science and computer capabilities that allow the environment to be considered in a holistic way. The problems are characterized by the ex...

  2. An Integration and Evaluation Framework for ESPC Coupled Models

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    Models PI: Ben Kirtman University of Miami – RSMAS Atmospheric Sciences 4600 Rickenbacker Causeway Miami, FL 33149 Phone: (305) 421-4046...annual report. 7 ESPC Testbed: Interactive ensemble Initial prototype of multi- model interactive ensemble coupling infrastructure. Initial...get HYCOM integrated. Enhanced the interactive ensemble so that multiple atmosphere, land and ice component models can be simultaneously coupled

  3. Toward Integration: An Instructional Model of Science and Academic Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Cecilia; Weinburgh, Molly; Malloy, Robert; Smith, Kathy Horak; Marshall, Jenesta Nettles

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors outline an instructional model that can be used to optimize science and language learning in the classroom. The authors have developed the 5R instructional model (Weinburgh & Silva, 2010) to support teachers as they integrate academic language into content instruction. The model combines five strategies already…

  4. Transitioning Back to Mainstream Education: The Flexible Integration Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cumming, Therese M.; Strnadová, Iva

    2017-01-01

    The implementation of a transition model, the flexible integration model, was investigated in a school in Sydney, Australia, using an exploratory single case study design (Rowley, 2002). It is a person-centred model designed to assist students in transitioning from a special school for students with emotional and behavioural disabilities to…

  5. An Integrated Model of Information Literacy, Based upon Domain Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Gary B.; Lathey, Johnathan W.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. Grounded in Alexander's model of domain learning, this study presents an integrated micro-model of information literacy. It is predicated upon the central importance of domain learning for the development of the requisite research skills by students. Method. The authors reviewed previous models of information literacy and…

  6. EnergyPlus Air Source Integrated Heat Pump Model

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Bo; Adams, Mark B.; New, Joshua Ryan

    2016-03-30

    This report summarizes the development of the EnergyPlus air-source integrated heat pump model. It introduces its physics, sub-models, working modes, and control logic. In addition, inputs and outputs of the new model are described, and input data file (IDF) examples are given.

  7. Toward Integration: An Instructional Model of Science and Academic Language

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silva, Cecilia; Weinburgh, Molly; Malloy, Robert; Smith, Kathy Horak; Marshall, Jenesta Nettles

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the authors outline an instructional model that can be used to optimize science and language learning in the classroom. The authors have developed the 5R instructional model (Weinburgh & Silva, 2010) to support teachers as they integrate academic language into content instruction. The model combines five strategies already…

  8. Computer Integrated Manufacturing: Physical Modelling Systems Design. A Personal View.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baker, Richard

    A computer-integrated manufacturing (CIM) Physical Modeling Systems Design project was undertaken in a time of rapid change in the industrial, business, technological, training, and educational areas in Australia. A specification of a manufacturing physical modeling system was drawn up. Physical modeling provides a flexibility and configurability…

  9. An Integrative Model for College and University Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Janaro, Ralph E.; Bommer, Michael R. W.

    2005-01-01

    A strategic planning model for colleges and universities is presented which integrates competitive benchmarking and an adaptation of Hill's manufacturing strategy model. Hill's model is altered to focus on student-winners and is used to design programs of study and supporting services. Benchmarking is used as a key component of the planning…

  10. Modeling the Association between Sexual Maturation, Transmissible Risk, and Peer Relationships During Childhood and Adolescence on Development of Substance Use Disorder in Young Adulthood

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Michelle S.; Tarter, Ralph; Kirisci, Levent; Clark, Duncan B.

    2013-01-01

    Background This prospective study investigated pubertal timing and transmissible risk in relation to affiliation with deviant peers on the development of substance use disorder (SUD). Methods Participants were boys (N = 500) ascertained through proband fathers with (N = 250) and without (N = 250) DSM-III-R lifetime diagnosis of SUD who were prospectively tracked from age 10–12 to 22. Transmissible liability index (TLI), Tanner stage, peer delinquency, and substance use were measured at ages 10–12 and 16. SUD diagnosis during early adulthood was determined. Results Structural equation modeling revealed two pathways in which transmissible risk and sexual maturation influenced development of SUD. In the first pathway, transmissible risk was correlated with and prospectively predicted affiliation with deviant peers and substance use presaging SUD. In the second pathway, advanced sexual maturation positively predicted affiliation with deviant peers and substance use, which in turn predicted SUD. However, transmissible risk was not associated with pubertal development. Conclusions These findings indicate that advanced sexual maturation and transmissible risk constitute unrelated facets of SUD liability; however, both factors bias development toward SUD via affiliation with deviant peers. Scientific Significance Youth with advanced sexual maturation and/or transmissible risk for SUD are at higher risk for developing SUD. Additional research is needed to determine if addressing these risk factors will contribute to advancements in SUD prevention. PMID:23952893

  11. Harvesting on a stage-structured single population model with mature individuals in a polluted environment and pulse input of environmental toxin.

    PubMed

    Jiao, Jianjun; Yang, Xiaosong; Chen, Lansun

    2009-09-01

    In the natural world, there are many species whose individual members have a life history that they take them with two distinct stages: immaturity and maturity. In particular, we have in mind mammalian populations and some amphibious animals. We improve the assumption of a single population as a whole. It is assumed that the immature individuals and mature individuals are divided by a fixed period. This paper concentrates on the study of a stage-structured single population model with mature individuals in a polluted environment and pulse input of environmental toxin at fixed moments. Furthermore, the mature individuals are harvested continuously. We show that the population goes extinct if the harvesting rate is beyond a critical threshold. Conditions for the extended permanence of the population are also examined. From the biological point of view, it is easy to protect species by controlling the harvesting amount, impulsive period of the exogenous input of toxin and toxin impulsive input amount, etc. Our results provide reasonable tactics for biological resource management.

  12. Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Modeling of Integrated Functional Materials

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    Award Number: W81XWH-10-2-0101 TITLE: Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Modeling of Integrated Functional Materials PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR...SUBTITLE Design, Fabrication, Characterization and Modeling of Integrated Functional Materials 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W81XWH-10-2-0101 5c. PROGRAM...mobile refrigeration. These technological advances are critically dependent on the development of new and currently non-existing materials . This

  13. Integrative Modeling of Electrical Properties of Pacemaker Cardiac Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grigoriev, M.; Babich, L.

    2016-06-01

    This work represents modeling of electrical properties of pacemaker (sinus) cardiac cells. Special attention is paid to electrical potential arising from transmembrane current of Na+, K+ and Ca2+ ions. This potential is calculated using the NaCaX model. In this respect, molar concentration of ions in the intercellular space which is calculated on the basis of the GENTEX model is essential. Combined use of two different models allows referring this approach to integrative modeling.

  14. Development and Integration of Control System Models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Young K.

    1998-01-01

    The computer simulation tool, TREETOPS, has been upgraded and used at NASA/MSFC to model various complicated mechanical systems and to perform their dynamics and control analysis with pointing control systems. A TREETOPS model of Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility - Imaging (AXAF-1) dynamics and control system was developed to evaluate the AXAF-I pointing performance for Normal Pointing Mode. An optical model of Shooting Star Experiment (SSE) was also developed and its optical performance analysis was done using the MACOS software.

  15. Integrated Control Modeling for Propulsion Systems Using NPSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parker, Khary I.; Felder, James L.; Lavelle, Thomas M.; Withrow, Colleen A.; Yu, Albert Y.; Lehmann, William V. A.

    2004-01-01

    The Numerical Propulsion System Simulation (NPSS), an advanced engineering simulation environment used to design and analyze aircraft engines, has been enhanced by integrating control development tools into it. One of these tools is a generic controller interface that allows NPSS to communicate with control development software environments such as MATLAB and EASY5. The other tool is a linear model generator (LMG) that gives NPSS the ability to generate linear, time-invariant state-space models. Integrating these tools into NPSS enables it to be used for control system development. This paper will discuss the development and integration of these tools into NPSS. In addition, it will show a comparison of transient model results of a generic, dual-spool, military-type engine model that has been implemented in NPSS and Simulink. It will also show the linear model generator s ability to approximate the dynamics of a nonlinear NPSS engine model.

  16. Toward “optimal” integration of terrestrial biosphere models

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalm, Christopher R.; Huntzinger, Deborah N.; Fisher, Joshua B.; Michalak, Anna M.; Bowman, Kevin; Ciais, Philippe; Cook, Robert; El-Masri, Bassil; Hayes, Daniel; Huang, Maoyi; Ito, Akihiko; Jain, Atul; King, Anthony W.; Lei, Huimin; Liu, Junjie; Lu, Chaoqun; Mao, Jiafu; Peng, Shushi; Poulter, Benjamin; Ricciuto, Daniel; Schaefer, Kevin; Shi, Xiaoying; Tao, Bo; Tian, Hanqin; Wang, Weile; Wei, Yaxing; Yang, Jia; Zeng, Ning

    2015-06-10

    Multimodel ensembles (MME) are commonplace in Earth system modeling. Here we perform MME integration using a 10-member ensemble of terrestrial biosphere models (TBMs) from the Multiscale synthesis and Terrestrial Model Intercomparison Project (MsTMIP). We contrast optimal (skill based for present-day carbon cycling) versus naive (one model-one vote) integration. MsTMIP optimal and naive mean land sink strength estimates (-1.16 versus -1.15 Pg C per annum respectively) are statistically indistinguishable. This holds also for grid cell values and extends to gross uptake, biomass, and net ecosystem productivity. TBM skill is similarly indistinguishable. The added complexity of skill-based integration does not materially change MME values. This suggests that carbon metabolism has predictability limits and/or that all models and references are misspecified. Finally, resolving this issue requires addressing specific uncertainty types (initial conditions, structure, and references) and a change in model development paradigms currently dominant in the TBM community.

  17. Integrative change model in psychotherapy: Perspectives from Indian thought

    PubMed Central

    Manickam, L. S. S

    2013-01-01

    Different psychotherapeutic approaches claim positive changes in patients as a result of therapy. Explanations related to the change process led to different change models. Some of the change models are experimentally oriented whereas some are theoretical. Apart from the core models of behavioral, psychodynamic, humanistic, cognitive and spiritually oriented models there are specific models, within psychotherapy that explains the change process. Integrative theory of a person as depicted in Indian thought provides a common ground for the integration of various therapies. Integrative model of change based on Indian thought, with specific reference to psychological concepts in Upanishads, Ayurveda, Bhagavad Gita and Yoga are presented. Appropriate psychological tools may be developed in order to help the clinicians to choose the techniques that match the problem and the origin of the dimension. Explorations have to be conducted to develop more techniques that are culturally appropriate and clinically useful. Research has to be initiated to validate the identified concepts. PMID:23858275

  18. WILDFIRE EMISSION MODELING: INTEGRATING BLUESKY AND SMOKE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric chemical transport models are used to simulate historic meteorological episodes for developing air quality management strategies. Wildland fire emissions need to be characterized accurately to achieve these air quality management goals. The temporal and spatial esti...

  19. WILDFIRE EMISSION MODELING: INTEGRATING BLUESKY AND SMOKE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Atmospheric chemical transport models are used to simulate historic meteorological episodes for developing air quality management strategies. Wildland fire emissions need to be characterized accurately to achieve these air quality management goals. The temporal and spatial esti...

  20. Constructing an Integrated Model for Professional Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clark, W. Bruce

    1994-01-01

    Presents a conceptual framework for a model of professional education based on an interdisciplinary approach developed at the University of Calgary. Highlights include professional growth; experts' behavior; mentorship; professional knowledge base; elaboration theory; and fuzzy logic. (Contains 21 references.) (LRW)