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Sample records for maxillary artery

  1. Bypass of the maxillary artery to proximal middle cerebral artery.

    PubMed

    Ma, Lin; Ren, He-cheng; Huang, Ying

    2015-03-01

    The objective of this work was to explore the feasibility of bypass between the maxillary artery (MA) and proximity of middle cerebral artery (MCA). Ten fixed and perfused adult cadaver heads were dissected bilaterally, 20 sides in total. The superficial temporal artery and its 2 branches were dissected, and outer diameters were measured. The MA and its branch were exposed as well as deep temporal artery; outer diameter of MA was measured. The lengths between the external carotid artery, internal carotid artery, maxillary artery, and proximal middle cerebral artery were measured. Ten healthy adults as targets (20 sides), inner diameter and blood flow dynamic parameters of the common carotid artery, external carotid artery, internal carotid artery, maxillary artery, superficial temporal artery, and its 2 branches were done with ultrasound examination. The mean outer diameter of MA (2.60 ± 0.20 mm) was larger than that of the temporal artery trunk (1.70 ± 0.30 mm). The mean lengths of graft vessels between the internal carotid artery, external carotid artery, and the bifurcation section of MCA (171.00 ± 2.70 and 162.40 ± 2.60 mm) were longer than the mean lengths of graft vessels between MA and MCA bifurcation section (61.70 ± 1.50 mm). In adults, the mean blood flow of the second part of MA (62.70 ± 13.30 mL/min) was more than that of the 2 branches of the superficial temporal artery (15.90 ± 3.70 mL/min and 17.70 ± 4.10 ml/min). Bypass between the maxillary artery and proximity of middle cerebral artery is feasible. It is a kind of effective high flow bypass with which the graft vessel is shorter and straighter than the bypass between internal carotid artery or external carotid artery and proximity of middle cerebral artery.

  2. The History and Evolution of Internal Maxillary Artery Bypass.

    PubMed

    Wang, Long; Cai, Li; Lu, Shuaibin; Qian, Hai; Lawton, Michael T; Shi, Xiang'en

    2018-05-01

    Internal maxillary artery (IMA) bypass has gained momentum in the last 5 years for the treatment of complex cerebrovascular disorders and skull base tumors. However, some issues regarding this treatment modality have been proposed. As one of the most experienced neurosurgical teams to perform internal maxillary artery bypass in the world (>100 clinical cases), we reviewed the literature in aspects of basic anatomy of maxillary artery with its variations to the lateral pterygoid muscle, initial anastomosis modalities, and subsequent exposure techniques in cadaver studies, preoperative arterial evaluation methods, optimal interposed graft selections, and surgical outcome in the management of complex aneurysms, skull base tumors, and steno-occlusive disorders. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Pseudoaneurysm of the internal maxillary artery secondary to subcondylar fracture: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Moro, Alessandro; Todaro, Mattia; Pedicelli, Alessandro; Alexandre, Andrea; Pelo, Sandro; Doneddu, Piero; Gasparini, Giulio; Garagiola, Umberto; D'Amato, Giuseppe; Saponaro, Gianmarco

    2018-04-01

    Pseudoaneurysms are an uncommon complication of mandibular condylar-subcondylar fractures; however, if present, their recognition and management is mandatory to avoid life-threatening situations. The authors report a case of internal maxillary artery pseudoaneurysm rupture that occurred after an open reduction and internal fixation of a mandibular subcondylar fracture, along with a review of the literature.

  4. Minimally Invasive Exposure of the Maxillary Artery at the Anteromedial Infratemporal Fossa.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez Rubio, Roberto; Kola, Olivia; Tayebi Meybodi, Ali; Tabani, Halima; Feng, Xuequan; Burkhardt, Jan-Karl; Yousef, Sonia; Lawton, Michael T; Benet, Arnau

    2018-04-12

    The maxillary artery (MA) has been described as a reliable donor for extracranial-intracranial high-flow bypass. Existing techniques to harvest MA require brain retraction and drilling of the middle fossa (with or without a zygomatic osteotomy), carrying the potential risks of venous bleeding, injury to the branches of the maxillary or mandibular nerves, muscular transection, or temporomandibular junction disorders. To describe a novel technique to expose the MA without bony drilling and with minimal impact to surrounding structures. A conventional curvilinear incision was performed in 10 cadaveric specimens, prior to elevating the scalp to expose the zygomatic root and lateral orbital rim. The sphenozygomatic suture was followed to the anterolateral edge of the inferior orbital fissure (IOF) to locate and harvest the pterygoid segment of the MA. Topographic anatomy was assessed using surrounding landmarks and 3D Cartesian coordinates to define the surgical area. The number of visible MA branches and their lengths were recorded. The MA was successfully exposed in all specimens. This approach allowed 6 branches of MA to be exposed. The average length of exposure was 23.3 ± 8.3 mm and the average surgical area was 2.8 ± 0.9 cm2. The IOF was 11.5 ± 4.2 mm from the MA. Our technique provides landmarks to identify the distal pterygoid segment of MA as a donor for extracranial-intracranial bypasses without the need for additional craniectomies. Clear anatomical landmarks, including the sphenozygomatic suture, anterolateral edge of IOF, infraorbital artery, and the pterygomaxillary fissure defined a trajectory to efficiently localize the MA with minimal risk to surrounding structures.

  5. [The use of superselective embolization of the maxillary artery in treatment of bleedings in the Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome].

    PubMed

    Kantor, Ireneusz; Winiarski, Michał; Jurkiewicz, Dariusz; Osiecki, Mirosław; Brzozowski, Krzysztof

    2005-01-01

    Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome is a rare genetically determined disorder that affects blood vessels throughout the body and results in a tendency for bleeding. Authors describe the case of superselective embolization of the left maxillary artery with polyvinyl alcohol particles in a patient with the Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome hospitalized and treated in the Department of Otolaryngology and the Department of Radiology of the Military Institute in Warszawa, Poland due to persistent, severe and difficult to manage nasal bleeding. After the procedure had been performed patient condition improved and frequency and severity of nasal bleeding significantly diminished. Authors conclude that superselective embolization of the maxillary artery in a patient with Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome is safe and effective and can be a valuable alternative to the maxillary artery or the carotis externa artery ligation. Authors also describe other methods of nasal bleeding management: laser photocoagulation, argon plasma coagulation, nasal dermoplasty and pharmacological treatment. Authors indicate that treating patients with Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome is a diagnostic and therapeutic challenge for a physician and surgeon that require special approach to a patient due to difficult to manage symptoms. Patients with Rendu-Osler-Weber syndrome should be treated in a hospital setting due to access to diagnostic imaging techniques that can be helpful in revealing possible life threatening conditions.

  6. Internal Maxillary Artery Preoperative Embolization Using n-Butyl Cyanoacrylate and Pushable Coils for Temporomandibular Joint Ankylosis Surgery.

    PubMed

    Alderazi, Yazan J; Shastri, Darshan; Wessel, John; Mathew, Melvin; Kass-Hout, Tareq; Aziz, Shahid R; Prestigiacomo, Charles J; Gandhi, Chirag D

    2017-05-01

    Temporomandibular joint (TMJ) ankylosis causes disability through impaired digestion, mastication, speech, and appearance. Surgical treatment increases range of motion with resultant functional improvement. However, substantial perioperative blood loss can occur (up to 3 L) if the internal maxillary artery (IMAX) is injured as it traverses the ankylotic mass. Achieving hemostasis is difficult because of limited proximal IMAX access and poor visualization. Our aim is to investigate the technical feasibility and preliminary safety of preoperative IMAX embolization in patients undergoing TMJ ankylosis surgery. Case series using chart reviews of 2 patients who underwent preoperative embolization before TMJ ankylosis surgery. Both patients were women (28 and 51 years old) who had severely restricted mouth opening. Embolization was performed using general anesthesia with nasal intubation on the same day of TMJ surgery. Both patients underwent bilateral IMAX embolization using pushable coils (Vortex, Boston Scientific) of distal IMAX followed by n-butyl-cyanoacrylate (Trufill, Cordis) embolization from coil mass up to proximal IMAX. There were no complications from the embolization procedures. Both patients had normal neurologic examination results. TMJ surgery occurred with minimal operative blood loss (≤300 mL for each surgery). Maximum postoperative mouth opening was 35 mm and 34 mm, respectively. One patient had a postoperative TMJ wound infection that was managed with antibiotics. Preoperative IMAX embolization before TMJ ankylosis surgery is technically feasible with encouraging preliminary safety. There were no complications from the embolization procedures and surgeries occurred with low volumes of blood loss. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The incidence of late neck recurrence in N0 maxillary sinus squamous cell carcinomas after superselective intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy without prophylactic neck irradiation.

    PubMed

    Sakashita, Tomohiro; Homma, Akihiro; Hatakeyama, Hiromitsu; Kano, Satoshi; Mizumachi, Takatsugu; Furusawa, Jun; Yoshida, Daisuke; Fujima, Noriyuki; Onimaru, Rikiya; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiko; Yasuda, Koichi; Shirato, Hiroki; Fukuda, Satoshi

    2014-10-01

    The efficacy of elective neck irradiation (ENI) for patients with N0 carcinoma of the maxillary sinus has been controversial. The purpose of our study was to investigate the incidence of late neck recurrence and the mortality rate from regional disease in patients with N0 maxillary sinus cancer after superselective cisplatin infusion and concomitant radiotherapy (RADPLAT) without ENI. We retrospectively analyzed 48 patients with N0 maxillary sinus cancer who underwent RADPLAT. Chemotherapy consisted of 100-120 mg/m(2) superselective intra-arterial cisplatin administered at a median rate of four times weekly. Concurrent radiation therapy was administered at a median dose of 65 Gy without ENI. Late neck recurrence was observed in 8.3% (4/48). Three patients underwent salvage neck dissection and survived without any evidence of disease. The remaining patient did not undergo neck dissection due to coexistence with distant metastasis, and he died of regional disease. The mortality rate from regional disease was calculated to be 2% (1/48). The incidence of late neck recurrence was not frequent, and the mortality rate from regional disease was low. Salvage neck dissection was considered to be feasible for patients with late neck recurrence. When definitive radiotherapy and concomitant chemotherapy are applied, it is considered that ENI is not required for cases of N0 maxillary sinus cancer.

  8. A computed tomography study in the location of greater palatine artery in South Indian population for maxillary osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    Packiaraj, I.; Retnakumar, K.; Anusuya, G. Sai; Rajambigai, M. Aarti; Baskaran, M.; Devadoss, Vimal Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The greater palatine artery is one of the important feeding vessel to the maxilla. The surgeon should know the surgical anatomy of greater palatine artery to avoid trauma in maxilla which leads to ischemic problems. Aim: The CT evaluation of the distance between Pyriform aperture and the greater palatine foramen in various ages of both sexes. Result: The distance varies according to sex and age which are measured by CT and standardised. Discussion: The lateral nasal osteotomy can be done upto 25 mm depth, instead of 20 mm. Conclusion: By this study it shows that the lateral nasal wall osteotomy can be performed without injury to greater palatine artery. PMID:27829768

  9. Rapidly Progressive Maxillary Atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Elkhatib, Ahmad; McMullen, Kyle; Hachem, Ralph Abi; Carrau, Ricardo L; Mastros, Nicholas

    2017-07-01

    Report of a patient with rapidly progressive maxillary atelectasis documented by sequential imaging. A 51-year-old man, presented with left periorbital and retro-orbital pain associated with left nasal obstruction. An initial computed tomographic (CT) scan of the paranasal sinuses failed to reveal any significant abnormality. A subsequent CT scan, indicated for recurrence of symptoms 11 months later, showed significant maxillary atelectasis. An uncinectomy, maxillary antrostomy, and anterior ethmoidectomy resulted in a complete resolution of the symptoms. Chronic maxillary atelectasis is most commonly a consequence of chronic rhinosinusitis. All previous reports have indicated a chronic process but lacked documentation of the course of the disease. This report documents a patient of rapidly progressive chronic maxillary atelectasis with CT scans that demonstrate changes in the maxillary sinus (from normal to atelectatic) within 11 months.

  10. Maxillary orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Richard E; Ochs, Mark W

    2014-11-01

    Maxillary surgery to correct dentofacial deformity has been practiced for almost 100 years. Significant advances have made maxillary surgery a safe and efficient means of correcting midface deformities. Anesthetic techniques, specifically hypotensive anesthesia, have allowed for safer working conditions. Landmark studies have proven manipulation and segmentalization of the maxilla is safe and allowed this surgery to become a mainstay in corrective jaw surgery. This article provides an overview of surgical techniques and considerations as they pertain to maxillary surgery for orthognathic surgery. Segmental surgery, openbite closure, vertical excess, grafting, and a technology update are discussed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Pediatric maxillary fractures.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jack; Dinsmore, Robert; Mar, Philip; Bhatt, Kirit

    2011-07-01

    Pediatric craniofacial structures differ from those of adults in many ways. Because of these differences, management of pediatric craniofacial fractures is not the same as those in adults. The most important differences that have clinical relevance are the mechanical properties, craniofacial anatomy, healing capacity, and dental morphology. This article will review these key differences and the management of pediatric maxillary fractures. From the mechanical properties' perspective, pediatric bones are much more resilient than adult bones; as such, they undergo plastic deformation and ductile failure. From the gross anatomic perspective, the relative proportion of the cranial to facial structures is much larger for the pediatric patients and the sinuses are not yet developed. The differences related to dentition and dental development are more conical crowns, larger interdental spaces, and presence of permanent tooth buds in the pediatric population. The fracture pattern, as a result of all the above, does not follow the classic Le Fort types. The maxillomandibular fixation may require circum-mandibular wires, drop wires, or Ivy loops. Interfragmentary ligatures using absorbable sutures play a much greater role in these patients. The use of plates and screws should take into consideration the future development with respect to growth centers and the location of the permanent tooth buds. Pediatric maxillary fractures are not common, require different treatments, and enjoy better long-term outcomes.

  12. Maxillary Hypoplasia With Congenital Oligodontia Treated by Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mishima, Sayaka; Yamaguchi, Takako; Watanabe, Takuma; Komatani, Toru; Nakao, Kazumasa; Takahashi, Katsu; Bessho, Kazuhisa

    2018-02-27

    It is known that congenitally missing teeth can often cause differences in craniofacial morphology; however, there are few reported cases of orthognathic surgical treatment for these patients. Herein, the authors report a rare case of maxillary hypoplasia with congenital oligodontia treated by maxillary distraction osteogenesis with internal device. A 17-year-old male presenting with multiple tooth agenesis and maxillary recession was referred to our hospital for orthognathic surgical treatment. Preoperative simulation surgery was performed using Full-Color 3-dimensional salt model. After surgery, improvement in maxillary recession and occlusal stability was observed. This report demonstrates the advantages of the method used herein, which includes reduction in operating time with increase in the safety of the procedure.

  13. Vector alignment in maxillary distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Uckan, Sina; Arman, Ayca; Bayram, Burak; Celik, Erkan

    2006-09-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is an alternative treatment of cleft patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia. The aim of this paper is to present the combined surgical/orthodontic treatment of a cleft lip and palate patient and to evaluate the maxillary distraction procedure and the distraction vector in high Le Fort I osteotomy.

  14. [Maxillary cementoblastoma. A case report].

    PubMed

    Slimani, F; Elbouihi, M; Oukerroum, A; Lazreqh, H; Mahtar, M; Karkouri, M; Abdelouafi, A; Benjelloun, A; Chekkoury-Idrissi, A

    2009-01-01

    Cementoblastoma is a rare benign odontogenic neoplasm. Its cause is unknown. It represents less 6 % of all odontogenic tumors. The aim of our work is to present a rare case of maxillary cementoblastoma involving an included central incisor. A 32-year old man consulted for a left maxillary swelling to projection under nostril. A panoramic radiographic examination revealed an included tooth 21 with a radiopaque lesion around its root. The computed tomography revealed the included tooth 21 with a process around its root. This process is well-defined, high-dense and is surrounded by a radiolucent halo. The treatment should consist of complete removal of the lesion with the tooth 21. Histological examination concluded to the diagnosis of a cementoblastoma. The cementoblastoma occurs most frequently in young persons and predominantly among men. The mandibular premolar and molar are the more frequently reached. The maxillary localization remains rare. This tumor occurs around the roots of the posterior and lower teeth. Radiographically, the lesion is well-defined and attached to the root of the tooth, radiopaque dense and surrounded by a radiolucent halo. The cementoblastoma evolves slowly and has the tendency to blow the cortical. The prognosis is good.

  15. Skeletal response to maxillary protraction with and without maxillary expansion: a finite element study.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pawan; Valiathan, Ashima; Adhikari, Raviraj

    2009-06-01

    The purpose of this finite element study was to evaluate biomechanically 2 treatment modalities-maxillary protraction alone and in combination with maxillary expansion-by comparing the displacement of various craniofacial structures. Two 3-dimensional analytical models were developed from sequential computed tomography scan images taken at 2.5-mm intervals of a dry young skull. AutoCAD software (2004 version, Autodesk, San Rafael, Calif) and ANSYS software (version 10, Belcan Engineering Group, Cincinnati, Ohio) were used. The model consisted of 108,799 solid 10 node 92 elements, 193,633 nodes, and 580,899 degrees of freedom. In the first model, maxillary protraction forces were simulated by applying 1 kg of anterior force 30 degrees downward to the palatal plane. In the second model, a 4-mm midpalatal suture opening and maxillary protraction were simulated. Forward displacement of the nasomaxillary complex with upward and forward rotation was observed with maxillary protraction alone. No rotational tendency was noted when protraction was carried out with 4 mm of transverse expansion. A tendency for anterior maxillary constriction after maxillary protraction was evident. The amounts of displacement in the frontal, vertical, and lateral directions with midpalatal suture opening were greater compared with no opening of the midpalatal suture. The forward and downward displacements of the nasomaxillary complex with maxillary protraction and maxillary expansion more closely approximated the natural growth direction of the maxilla. Displacements of craniofacial structures were more favorable for the treatment of skeletal Class III maxillary retrognathia when maxillary protraction was used with maxillary expansion. Hence, biomechanically, maxillary protraction combined with maxillary expansion appears to be a superior treatment modality for the treatment of maxillary retrognathia than maxillary protraction alone.

  16. Topographic analysis of maxillary premolars and molars and maxillary sinus using cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Yoshimine, Shin-Ichiro; Nishihara, Kazuhide; Nozoe, Etsuro; Yoshimine, Masako; Nakamura, Norifumi

    2012-12-01

    This study evaluated the anatomical characteristics of the maxillary premolars and molars and the maxillary sinus using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) for dental implant treatment. Ten linear items and 1 angular item on 30 sites in 30 patients were measured on 3-dimensional computed tomography images using CBCT. The vertical relationship between the maxillary sinus and the maxillary molars was classified into 5 categories. The horizontal thickness of the buccal alveolar bone was thinnest on the maxillary first premolars, and the horizontal thickness of the palatal alveolar bone was thickest on the maxillary second molars. Type II was most common on the maxillary first molars. The internal angle at the maxillary premolars was significantly greater than that at the maxillary molars. The internal angle and vertical distance between the apex of the roots and the maxillary sinus floor showed a positive correlation on the maxillary first premolars (P = 0.003). For the selection of an appropriate approach on dental implant treatment, the evaluation of maxillary premolars and molars using of CBCT can be recommended.

  17. Surgical landmarks of the nasopharyngeal internal carotid using the maxillary swing approach: A cadaveric study.

    PubMed

    Simon, François; Vacher, Christian; Herman, Philippe; Verillaud, Benjamin

    2016-07-01

    Surgery of the paranasopharyngeal space is very hazardous due to the position of the internal carotid artery, which is surrounded by soft tissue with few anatomical landmarks. Fresh cadaveric study. In this study, we used the maxillary swing procedure to have a broad view of the internal carotid artery using an anterior approach. We sought to establish surgical landmarks, make measurements, and compare them to other imagery and cadaveric studies in the literature. We performed the maxillary swing procedure in 10 subjects (six female and four male, mean deceased age 81 years). The internal carotid artery was found to be in the same sagittal plane as the lateral pterygoid plate, the foramen ovale, and the eustachian tube isthmus. It was always located behind the stylopharyngeal fascia and immediately lateral to the longus capitis muscle. The artery was measured on average 10.7 mm from the pharyngeal recess, 7.3 mm from the eustachian tube isthmus, and 22.8 mm from the torus tubarius. The eustachian tube isthmus, the longus capitis muscle, and the stylopharyngeal fascia are the main surgical landmarks of the internal carotid artery. The artery can also be found in an oblique sagittal plane including the eustachian tube isthmus, the foramen ovale, and the lateral pterygoid plate. The pharyngeal recess remains a very dangerous area, only millimeters away from the carotid artery. NA Laryngoscope, 126:1562-1566, 2016. © 2016 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  18. Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion in adults.

    PubMed

    Pogrel, M A; Kaban, L B; Vargervik, K; Baumrind, S

    1992-01-01

    Twelve adults with maxillary width discrepancy of greater than 5 mm were treated by surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. The procedure consisted of bilateral zygomatic buttress and midpalatal osteotomies combined with the use of a tooth-borne orthopedic device postoperatively. Mean palatal expansion of 7.5 mm (range of 6 to 13 mm), measured in the first molar region, was achieved within 3 weeks in all patients. Expansion remained stable during the 12-month study period, with a mean relapse for the entire group of 0.88 +/- 0.48 mm. Morbidity was limited to mild postoperative discomfort. The results of this preliminary study indicated that surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion is a safe, simple, and reliable procedure for achieving a permanent increase in skeletal maxillary width in adults. Further study is necessary to document the three-dimensional movements of the maxillary segments and long-term stability of the skeletal and dental changes.

  19. Changes in speech following maxillary distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Guyette, T W; Polley, J W; Figueroa, A; Smith, B E

    2001-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe changes in articulation and velopharyngeal function following maxillary distraction osteogenesis. This is a descriptive, post hoc clinical report comparing the performance of patients before and after maxillary distraction. The independent variable was maxillary distraction while the dependent variables were resonance, articulation errors, and velopharyngeal function. The data were collected at a tertiary health care center in Chicago. The data from pre- and postoperative evaluations of 18 maxillary distraction patients were used. The outcome measures were severity of hypernasality and hyponasality, velopharyngeal orifice size as estimated using the pressure-flow technique, and number and type of articulation errors. At the long-term follow-up, 16.7% exhibited a significant increase in hypernasality. Seventy-five percent of patients with preoperative hyponasality experienced improved nasal resonance. Articulation improved in 67% of patients by the 1-year follow-up. In a predominately cleft palate population, the risk for velopharyngeal insufficiency following maxillary distraction is similar to the risk observed in Le Fort I maxillary advancement. Patients being considered for maxillary distraction surgery should receive pre- and postoperative speech evaluations and be counseled about risks for changes in their speech.

  20. Clinical and radiographic evaluation of maxillary central incisors exposure in patients undergoing maxillary advancement

    PubMed Central

    Trento, Guilherme dos Santos; Bernabé, Felipe Bueno Rosettti; da Costa, Delson João; Rebellato, Nelson Luis Barbosa; Klüppel, Leandro Eduardo; Scariot, Rafaela

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Patients with dentofacial deformities may undergo orthodontic or orthodontic-surgical treatment. Both modalities can affect esthetics. Objective: This study aims to evaluate clinical and radiographic changes in exposure of maxillary central incisors occurring after orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement. Methods: A total of 17 patients who underwent orthognathic surgery for maxillary advancement between September, 2010 and July, 2011 were selected. Exposure of maxillary central incisors was evaluated clinically and by lateral cephalograms. Measurements were taken one week before and three months after surgery. Data were paired in terms of sex, age, nasolabial angle, height and thickness of the upper lip, the amount of maxillary advancement, clinical exposure and inclination of maxillary central incisor by statistical tests (CI 95%). Results: After maxillary advancement, incisor clinical exposure had increased even with relaxed lips and under forced smile. Moreover, there was a mean increase of 23.33% revealed by lateral cephalograms. There was an inverse correlation between upper lip thickness and incisors postsurgical exposure revealed by radiographic images (p = 0.002). Conclusions: Significant changes in the exposure of maxillary central incisors occur after maxillary advancement, under the influence of some factors, especially lip thickness. PMID:26691970

  1. Maxillary second molar extractions in orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wilson; Wong, Ricky Wing-Kit; Ikegami, Tomio; Hägg, Urban

    2008-01-01

    This article is a review of the rationales, indications, methods, and effects of orthodontic treatment with maxillary second molar extractions. In addition to the patient's malocclusion, specific considerations about the status and position of the maxillary second and third molars should be taken into account. In recent years, the development of temporary anchorage devices, in addition to extraoral traction and intraoral distalization appliances, has become another armamentarium in the distalization of the maxillary posterior teeth, which may affect the selection of teeth to be extracted from second to third molars. In conclusion, extraction of maxillary second molars is a viable option in selected cases at present, but it is important to understand the indications and limitations of this treatment choice.

  2. Mucous retention cyst of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Ruprecht, A; Batniji, S; el-Neweihi, E

    1986-12-01

    The mucous retention cyst is not a rare phenomenon. The incidence of dental patients was determined. Of 1685 patient radiographs reviewed, 44 (2.6%) had one or more mucous retention cysts in the maxillary sinuses.

  3. [Radiographic study of maxillary sinus associated with molars in adult].

    PubMed

    Hu, Zhi; Sun, Daming; Zhou, Quansheng; Wang, Yuli; Gu, Jingcheng; Han, Yaohua

    2014-12-01

    to explore the relationship between the maxillary sinus volume and the amount of alveolar bone, and the effect of molar loss upon the maxillary sinus was further analyzed,by measuring adult maxillary sinus volume, sinus ridge distance, and calculating the gasification coefficient of maxillary sinus. One hundred and ninety cases (361 maxillary sinus) with CT examinations were collected, they were divided into group A and group B, 121 cases (242 maxillary sinus) of normal subjects served as group A, 42 cases (65 maxillary sinus) with molar part off were B group, in which 31 maxillary sinus with a molar loss were group B1,22 maxillary sinus with two molar loss were B2 group,12 maxillary sinus with three molar loss (one molar remains) were B3 group, 27 cases (54 maxillary sinus) with upper teeth off were C group. Bymeasureing the maxillary sinus volume, sinus ridge distance and the size of the maxillary sinus, calculating the gasification coefficient, we analyzed the relationship between maxillary volume and sinus ridge distance, and comparatively analyzed the differences among the three groups in the size, gasification coefficient, volume of maxillary sinus and sinus ridge distance. In the normal group,the volume of maxillary sinus and sinus ridge distance had a correlation coefficient of -0. 63,(P< 0.05); Sinus ridge distance in group A was larger than the other two groups (P<0.05), and larger in B group than in C group (P<0. 05), anteroposterior maxillary sinus diameter and reft-right diameter in C group was greater than in A group and B group(P<0.05), group C gasification coeffiecent was less than A group and B group (P<0. 05). The volume of maxillary sinus is negatively correlated with the amont of alveolar bone; Upper teeth's shedding promotes maxillary sinus deformation; Maxiuary sinus volume has a tendency to decrease.

  4. Maxillary Sinusitis Caused by Actinomucor elegans

    PubMed Central

    Davel, Graciela; Featherston, Patricia; Fernández, Anibal; Abrantes, Ruben; Canteros, Cristina; Rodero, Laura; Sztern, Carlos; Perrotta, Diego

    2001-01-01

    We report the first case of maxillary sinusitis caused by Actinomucor elegans in an 11-year-old patient. Histopathological and mycological examinations of surgical maxillary sinuses samples showed coenocytic hyphae characteristic of mucoraceous fungi. The fungi recovered had stolons and rhizoids, nonapophyseal and globose sporangia, and whorled branched sporangiophores and was identified as A. elegans. After surgical cleaning and chemotherapy with amphotericin B administered intravenously and by irrigation, the patient became asymptomatic and the mycological study results were negative. PMID:11158140

  5. Maxillary first molar with five canals

    PubMed Central

    Umer, Fahad

    2014-01-01

    Root canal treatment is a technically demanding procedure especially in the case of maxillary first molar where the anatomy is extremely variable. Failure to recognise and treat these variations may lead to unpredictable outcomes. This case report describes non-surgical endodontic treatment of a maxillary first molar with two palatal and two mesiobuccal canals. It also highlights the need for good anatomical knowledge of root canal morphology and its variations in order to achieve consistently successful results. PMID:25239993

  6. [Stimulation and evaluation on maxillary distraction osteogenesis using CASSOS 2001].

    PubMed

    Zhu, Min; Qiu, Wei-liu; Tang, You-sheng; Li, Qing-yun

    2002-09-01

    To simulate maxillary distraction osteogenesis and evaluate the change of soft and hard tissue before and after treatment, using Computer-Assisted Simulation System for Orthognathic Surgery( CASSOS 2001). A fourteen-year-old boy with severe maxillary hypoplasia, due to unilateral cleft lip and palate, was analysed by cephalometric analysis. The simulations of maxillary distraction osteogenesis (Le Fort I osteotomy and Le Fort II osteotomy) were re-analysed. After the treatment, cephalometric analysis was preformed again. The data were compared. The maxillary hypoplasia was well treated using maxillary distraction osteogenesis; Compared with Le fort I osteotomy, more satisfactory results can be obtained by Le fort I distraction osteogenesis. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is a better way to treat severe maxillary hypoplasia with operated CLP than maxillary osteotomy. CASSOS 2001 can help surgeons and patients on simulation and evaluation of maxillary distraction osteogenesis, and on decision of treatment plan.

  7. Maxillary advancement using distraction osteogenesis with intraoral device.

    PubMed

    Takigawa, Yoko; Uematsu, Setsuko; Takada, Kenji

    2010-11-01

    This article describes the surgical orthodontic treatment of maxillary hypoplasia in a patient with cleft lip and palate using maxillary distraction osteogenesis with internal maxillary distractors. Maxillary advancement was performed to correct the retrusive maxillary facial profile and Class III malocclusion. Rotational movement of the distraction segment was made to correct the upper dental midline. Although maxillary advancement was insufficient because of unexpected breakage of the intraoral distractor after completion of the distraction, skeletal traction with a face mask compensated for the shortage. Successful esthetic improvement and posttreatment occlusal stability were achieved with no discernible relapse after 2 years of retention.

  8. Maxillary unicystic ameloblastoma: a case report.

    PubMed

    Agani, Zana; Hamiti-Krasniqi, Vjosa; Recica, Jehona; Loxha, Mergime Prekazi; Kurshumliu, Fisnik; Rexhepi, Aida

    2016-10-18

    Ameloblastoma is a benign epithelial odontogenic tumor. It is often aggressive and destructive, with the capacity to attain great size, erode bone and invade adjacent structures. Unicystic ameloblastoma is a rare odontogenic lesion, with clinical, radiographic and gross features of jaw cysts. The lesion histologically shows typical ameloblastomatous epithelium lining part of the cyst cavity with or without and/or mural tumor growth. Unicystic ameloblastoma usually presents in posterior mandibular ramus region, while it is rare and atypical in posterior maxillary region. . We report a case of 16 year old Kosovar male, Albanian ethnicity, who presented with a swelling located in right maxillary region. Clinical examination revealed a painless swelling extending from the maxillary right central incisor to the maxillary right first molar tooth. Panoramic radiograph disclosed a well corticated unilocular radiolucent lesion approximately 5 × 5 cm in diameter which was in contact with the roots of the teeth present inferiorly and with the maxillary sinus superiorly. Maxillary right canine impaction was noted and unerupted lateral incisor tooth was present inside the radiolucency. Preoperative diagnosis of the lesion was made as dentigerous cyst based on the age of the patient, location of the swelling, clinical and radiographic findings, but the unicystic ameloblastoma was also taken into consideration. The patient was treated by surgical enucleation of the lesion and extraction of lateral incisor tooth which was present inside the lesion. The histopathological examination of the lesion revealed confirmed finding for unicystic ameloblastoma mural form. No recurrence was observed in 1 year follow-up. Maxillary region is considered a rare and atypical location for unicystic ameloblastoma. We emphasize the importance of differential diagnosis of an odontogenic lesion with common clinical and radiological features that will impact the treatment planning and follow up

  9. Coronary Arteries

    MedlinePlus

    ... its own vascular system, called coronary circulation. The aorta (the main blood supplier to the body) branches ... blood to the rest of the body. Tags: aorta , arteries , blood , coronary arteries , coronary artery , coronary artery ...

  10. [Radiologic picture of maxillary sinus aspergilloma].

    PubMed

    Kaczmarek, I; Bilska, J; Osmola, K; Nowaczyk, M T

    2010-06-01

    Mycotic infection of paranasal sinus could be the etiological factor of chronic sinusitis. The increase in number of fungal sinusitis cases have been reported recently among nonimmunocompromised patient after endodontic treatment of maxillary teeth. Nonspecific clinical signs and incorrect radiologic pictures interpretation as well as loss of therapeutic standards seems to be the cause of false negative diagnosis and difficulties in treatment of fungal sinusitis. Clinical and radiological picture of maxillary sinus aspergillosis was described in this paper. In the period of 2006-2009 in the Department of Maxillo-Facial Surgery 19 patient with fungal maxillary sinusitis was treated. The endodontic treatment of maxillary teeth of the related side was performed previously in 80% examined cases. In 2 cases there were immunocompromised patients with immunosuppressive treatment. In 16 cases patients were referred to our Department due to metallic foreign body of the maxillary sinus. Routine diagnostic radiological imaging was performed in each case: paranasal sinus view--Water's view and panoramic radiograph (orthopantomograph). In 4 cases imaging was extended with computer tomography (CT) visualization. The surgical treatment was performed in each case. The final diagnosis was puted on histopathological examination and fungal culture. In 16 cases of analysed group histopathological examination and fungal culture revealed aspergilosis. In 2 cases fungal culture was negative, but histopathology slices confirm presence of hyphae of Aspergillus. In 1 case the root canal sealer was found in the maxillary sinus. In none case invasive form of aspergillosis was confirmed. In all cases Water's view of paranasal sinuses and ortopantomograph showed partially or totally clouded sinus with well-defined, single or multifocal radiopaque object similar to metallic foreign body. Characteristic finding in CT imaging was well-defined radiodence concretions that have been attributed to

  11. A subperiosteal maxillary implant causing severe osteolysis.

    PubMed

    Maï, Nguyen Tan; Jean-Baptiste, Caruhel; Hossein, Khonsari Roman

    2018-06-22

    Subperiosteal implant denture therapy was initially introduced in 1942 in Sweden and was then used worldwide for the treatment of fully edentulous maxillary or mandibular arches with advanced bone atrophy. Most authors describe decent success rates for mandibular subperiosteal implants in cases with major bone atrophy but follow-up studies for maxillary subperiosteal implants are not available. Here, we report a case of severe maxillary osteolysis secondary to the placement of a subperiosteal in-house implant. Subperiosteal implants are rarely used today but patients still carrying these devices with severe complications can be challenging to manage. New technical advances, including the use of surgical planification and additive manufacturing, may lead to a new interest in subperiosteal implants. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  12. Periodontal evaluation in patients undergoing maxillary expansion.

    PubMed

    Carmen, M; Marcella, P; Giuseppe, C; Roberto, A

    2000-09-01

    Maxillary transverse diameter expansion is a treatment various authors have claimed is related to the development of gingival recession on the teeth of the upper arch. The aim of the present study was to compare such an incidence in two different groups of patients: those treated with surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion and orthopedic expansion, respectively. Both treatments achieved the goal of expanding the transverse dimension (5.3 and 4.4 mm, respectively), but a significant difference was shown by the chi 2 test for the incidence of gingival recession of premolar/molar upper teeth, more than double for the latter than for the former. Therefore, surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion seems to be an orthodontically effective procedure, safer than the orthopedic treatment regarding the possible development of mucogingival problems.

  13. Management of Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia with Anterior Maxillary Distraction: Our Experience.

    PubMed

    Chacko, Tojan; Vinod, Sankar; Mani, Varghese; George, Arun; Sivaprasad, K K

    2014-12-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a common developmental problem in cleft lip and palate deformities. Since 1970s these deformities have traditionally been corrected by means of orthognathic surgery. Management of skeletal deformities in the maxillofacial region has been an important challenge for maxillofacial surgeons and orthodontists. Distraction osteogenesis is a surgical technique that uses body's own repairing mechanisms for optimal reconstruction of the tissues. We present four cases of anterior maxillary distraction osteogenesis with tooth borne distraction device-Hyrax, which were analyzed retrospectively for the efficacy of the tooth borne device-Hyrax and skeletal stability of distracted anterior maxillary segment.

  14. Three-dimensional analysis of maxillary changes associated with facemask and rapid maxillary expansion compared with bone anchored maxillary protraction

    PubMed Central

    Hino, Claudia Toyama; Cevidanes, Lucia H. S.; Nguyen, Tung T.; De Clerck, Hugo J.; Franchi, Lorenzo; McNamara, James A.

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Our objectives in this study were to evaluate in 3 dimensions the growth and treatment effects on the midface and the maxillary dentition produced by facemask therapy in association with rapid maxillary expansion (RME/FM) compared with bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP). Methods Forty-six patients with Class III malocclusion were treated with either RME/FM (n = 21) or BAMP (n = 25). Three-dimensional models generated from cone-beam computed tomographic scans, taken before and after approximately 1 year of treatment, were registered on the anterior cranial base and measured using color-coded maps and semitransparent overlays. Results The skeletal changes in the maxilla and the right and left zygomas were on average 2.6 mm in the RME/FM group and 3.7 mm in the BAMP group; these were different statistically. Seven RME/FM patients and 4 BAMP patients had a predominantly vertical displacement of the maxilla. The dental changes at the maxillary incisors were on average 3.2 mm in the RME/FM group and 4.3 mm in the BAMP group. Ten RME/FM patients had greater dental compensations than skeletal changes. Conclusions This 3-dimensional study shows that orthopedic changes can be obtained with both RME/FM and BAMP treatments, with protraction of the maxilla and the zygomas. Approximately half of the RME/FM patients had greater dental than skeletal changes, and a third of the RME/FM compared with 17% of the BAMP patients had a predominantly vertical maxillary displacement. PMID:24182587

  15. Metronomic palliative chemotherapy in maxillary sinus tumor

    PubMed Central

    Patil, Vijay M.; Noronh, Vanita; Joshi, Amit; Karpe, Ashay; Talreja, Vikas; Chandrasekharan, Arun; Dhumal, Sachin; Prabhash, Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Background: Metronomic chemotherapy consisting of methotrexate and celecoxib recently has shown promising results in multiple studies in head and neck cancers. However, these studies have not included patients with maxillary sinus primaries. Hence, the role of palliative metronomic chemotherapy in patients with maxillary sinus carcinoma that is not amenable to radical therapy is unknown. Methods: This was a retrospective analysis of carcinoma maxillary sinus patients who received palliative metronomic chemotherapy between August 2011 and August 2014. The demographic details, symptomatology, previous treatment details, indication for palliative chemotherapy, response to therapy, and overall survival (OS) details were extracted. SPSS version 16 was used for analysis. Descriptive statistics have been performed. Survival analysis was done by Kaplan–Meier method. Results: Five patients had received metronomic chemotherapy. The median age was 60 years (range 37–64 years). The proportion of patients surviving at 6 months, 12 months, and 18 months were 40%, 40%, and 20%, respectively. The estimated median OS was 126 days (95% confidence interval 0–299.9 days). The estimated median survival in patients with an event-free period after the last therapy of <6 months was 45 days, whereas it was 409 days in patients with an event-free period postlast therapy above 6 months (P = 0.063). Conclusion: Metronomic chemotherapy in carcinoma maxillary sinus holds promise. It has activity similar to that seen in head and neck cancers and needs to be evaluated further in a larger cohort of patients. PMID:27275447

  16. Destructive Fibrosarcoma of the Maxillary Sinus.

    PubMed

    Ekinci, Adnan; Karataş, Duran; Yetiş, Abdurrahman; Erenler, Behice Hande; Ozcan, Muge

    2018-05-01

    Paranasal fibrosarcoma of nasal cavity and paranasal sinuses is a very rare malignant tumor. It is usually presented with nasal obstruction and epistaxis. In this clinical report, clinical symptoms, pathogenesis, and treatment principles of a paranasal fibrosarcoma originating from the right maxillary sinus and obstructing the right nasal passage are discussed.A 55-year-old male patient was admitted to the authors clinic with complaints of nasal obstruction and epistaxis lasting for 2 years. Anterior rhinoscopy revealed a mass lesion which obstructed the right nasal passage and caused frequent epistaxis. An opacity consistent with soft tissue lesion which was originated from the right maxillary sinus and filled the right nasal passage was observed in paranasal tomography. Magnetic resonance imaging revealed that the mass lesion was contrasted. Tumor was seen to erode orbital floor, and lateral and anterior walls of the maxillary sinus. Biopsy result was reported as papilloma. The patient was treated with Denker approach as anterior wall of the maxillary sinus was eroded by the tumor lesion and the mass lesion was excised. The patient received postoperative radiotherapy as pathological diagnosis was reported as paranasal fibrosarcoma.

  17. The effect of the presence of the accessory maxillary ostium on the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Yenigun, Alper; Fazliogullari, Zeliha; Gun, Cihat; Uysal, Ismihan Ilknur; Nayman, Alaaddin; Karabulut, Ahmet Kagan

    2016-12-01

    This study was conducted to investigate the presence of the accessory maxillary ostium and its effects on the maxillary sinus, and the concurrent occurrence of morphological variations of neighboring anatomical structures. This study was performed in a tertiary referral center. This is a cross-sectional retrospective study that evaluated coronal CTs of patients to determine the frequency of the accessory maxillary ostium and investigated any simultaneous morphological variations in neighboring anatomical structures. The presence of the accessory maxillary ostium (AMO) plus any concurrent morphological variations of neighboring structures were investigated in 377 patients, with 754 sides. AMO was found to be present in 19.1 % (72/377) of the patients. A concurrent mucus retention cyst was found to be statistically significant on both sides (right side: p = 0.00, left side: p = 0.00), as well as mucosal thickening (right side: p = 0.00, left side: p = 0.00), and maxillary sinusitis (right side: p = 0.04, left side: p = 0.03). No other concurrent variations of statistical significance were detected in the neighboring structures. Our study demonstrated that with the presence of AMO, the likelihood of encountering a mucus retention cyst (48.6 %) had an approximately threefold increase, and that of encountering mucosal thickening (43.0 %) and maxillary sinusitis (29.1 %) had a twofold increase.

  18. Maxillary distraction complications in cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Jeblaoui, Y; Morand, B; Brix, M; Lebeau, J; Bettega, G

    2010-06-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients often present with a class III malocclusion in connection with a three dimensional maxillary hypoplasia. Twenty-five to 60% of these patients need maxillary advancement. Two solutions are possible: orthognathic surgery and maxillary distraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complications of maxillary distraction in CLP patients. Data was collected from the records of patients treated in our surgery unit between 2000 and 2007. Among the eight patients (four male and four female), five presented with a bilateral CLP, two with a unilateral CLP, and one with a unilateral cleft lip associated to a soft palate cleft. The average age at surgery was 17 years. All underwent a Le Fort I osteotomy with a pterygomaxillary disjunction. An external distractor was used for the first two patients and an internal distractor for the six following patients. After a seven-day latency, activation was implemented at a rate of 1mm twice a day. The average period of consolidation was four months. Maxillary advancement ranged between 7 and 19mm, with an average of 12.6mm. The average follow-up was four years. Complications were noted in seven patients: one intra-operative hemorrhage, one avulsion of a tooth anchored at the pterygoid process during osteotomy, three cases of device dysfunction, two cases of significant pain during activation, one loosening of the orthodontic arch in an external system, two cases of labial ulceration, and one maxillary sinusitis due to migration of a wisdom tooth. Complications of maxillary distraction in CLP patients were very frequent. Most were related to the device and did not interfere with the final result. This must be taken into account when indicating distraction and choosing the device. Two types of complications can occur during distraction: those related to the osteotomy and those related to the device. The complications related to the osteotomy are linked to the cicatricial ground of previous

  19. [Maxillary distraction complications in cleft patients].

    PubMed

    Jeblaoui, Y; Morand, B; Brix, M; Lebeau, J; Bettega, G

    2008-09-01

    Cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients often present with a class III malocclusion in connection with a three dimensional maxillary hypoplasia. Twenty-five to 60% of these patients require a maxillary advancement. Two solutions are possible: orthognathic surgery and maxillary distraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the complications of the maxillary distraction in CLP patients. Data was collected from the records of patients treated at our Surgery Unit between 2000 and 2007. Among the eight patients (four male and four female), five presented a bilateral CLP, two a unilateral CLP and one a unilateral cleft lip associated to a soft palate cleft. The average age at surgery was 17 years old. All had a Le Fort I osteotomy with a pterygomaxillary disjunction. The first two patients had external distractors and the six following internal ones. After a seven-day latency, activation was led to the rate of 1mm per day twice. The period of consolidation was four months on average. The maxillary advancement varied between 7 and 19 mm with an average of 12.6mm. The average follow-up was four years. We encountered difficulties and/or complications in seven patients: one intraoperatively haemorrhage, one avulsion of a tooth fixed at the pterygoid process during the osteotomy, three device failures, two cases of significant pains during activation, one dissociation of the dental anchorage of an external system, two labial ulcerations and one maxillary sinusitis by migration of the 18. Difficulties of maxillary distraction in CLP patients are very frequent. The majority is related to the distractors and did not interfere with the final result. But this frequency must be taken into account in the indication and in the choice of the material. Two types of complications can occur during distraction: those related to the osteotomy and those related to the material. The complications related to the osteotomy are in connection with the cicatricial ground of the CLP. They are

  20. Volumetric analysis of chronic maxillary atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Lin, Giant C; Sedaghat, Ahmad R; Bleier, Benjamin S; Holbrook, Eric H; Busaba, Nicolas Y; Yoon, Michael K; Gray, Stacey T

    2015-01-01

    The relationship between orbit and maxillary sinus volumes in patients with chronic maxillary atelectasis (CMA), commonly known as silent sinus syndrome if enophthalmos is present, is poorly understood. A retrospective review of 22 patients who underwent endoscopic sinus surgery (ESS) for CMA from 2005 to 2013 was performed. Computed tomography (CT) images were analyzed using OsiriX 5.8.2 software for volumetric analysis of the orbit and maxillary sinus at presentation and after surgical treatment with ESS. Pretreatment mean orbit volumes on the diseased side (DS) and the contralateral side (CS) were 29.22 and 26.50 mL, respectively (p < 0.001); mean sinus volumes on the DS and CS were 8.51 and 17.20 mL, respectively (p < 0.001); and pretreatment mean midorbit heights (MOHs) on the DS and CS were 3.39 cm and 3.07 cm, respectively (p < 0.001). The percent decrease in sinus volume on the DS compared to that on the CS did not correlate significantly with the percent orbit-volume increase. Enophthalmos was present in nine (41%) patients, and diplopia was present in three (14%) patients. The measured degree of increased orbit volume and decreased sinus volume secondary to CMA did not significantly predict the presence of enophthalmos at presentation. Seven patients underwent sinus CT more than 6 months after ESS. In these patients, orbit volume on the DS decreased from 29.67 to 27.52 mL (p = 0.005), and sinus volume on the DS increased from 9.78 to 11.84 mL (p = 0.08). Volumetric analysis is a powerful and novel method for objectively demonstrating the degree of orbit expansion and maxillary sinus contraction seen with CMA. Spontaneous maxillary sinus expansion and a decrease in orbit volume can occur after ESS, but post-ESS volumes do not return to the normal volume of the CS.

  1. Arterial stick

    MedlinePlus

    ... venous blood) mainly in its content of dissolved gases . Testing arterial blood shows the makeup of the ... arteries. Blood samples are mainly taken to measure gases in the arteries. Abnormal results may point to ...

  2. Implant-supported maxillary overdentures retained with milled bars: maxillary anterior versus maxillary posterior concept--a retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Krennmair, Gerald; Krainhöfner, Martin; Piehslinger, Eva

    2008-01-01

    The aim of the present retrospective investigation was to evaluate implant-supported maxillary overdentures using either anterior (group 1) or posterior (group 2) maxillary implant placement. Maxillary overdentures were planned with support by either 4 implants placed in the maxillary anterior region (group 1) or 6 to 8 implants placed in augmented maxillary posterior regions (group 2, bilateral sinus augmentation) and anchored either on an anterior or on 2 bilaterally placed milled bars. Cumulative implant survival rate, peri-implant conditions (marginal bone loss, pocket depth, Plaque Index, Gingival Index, Bleeding Index, and Calculus Index) and the incidence and type of prosthodontic maintenance were assessed and compared for the 2 groups. In addition, the cumulative survival rate for implants placed in grafted regions was compared with that of implants placed in nongrafted regions. Thirty-four patients (16 for group 1 and 18 for group 2) with 179 implants were available for follow-up examination after a mean period of 42.1 +/- 20.1 months. Four initially placed implants failed to osseointegrate and were replaced, but no further losses were seen during the loading period, for a 5-year cumulative implant survival rate of 978%. No differences in implant survival rates were seen between either the group-1 (98.4%) and group-2 (97.4%) concepts or nongrafted (98.0%) and grafted (97.5%) implants. The peri-implant parameters showed a healthy soft tissue, good oral hygiene, and an acceptable degree of peri-implant marginal bone loss. The rigid fixation of all overdentures was associated with a low incidence of prosthodontic maintenance, without any significant differences between the 2 groups. In well-planned overdenture treatment programs, a high survival rate and excellent peri-implant conditions can be achieved for implants placed in the anterior or posterior maxilla. Rigid anchorage of maxillary overdentures either on an extended anterior milled bar or on 2

  3. Assessment of vertical changes during maxillary expansion using quad helix or bonded rapid maxillary expander.

    PubMed

    Conroy-Piskai, Cara; Galang-Boquiren, Maria Therese S; Obrez, Ales; Viana, Maria Grace Costa; Oppermann, Nelson; Sanchez, Flavio; Edgren, Bradford; Kusnoto, Budi

    2016-11-01

    To determine if there is a significantly different effect on vertical changes during phase I palatal expansion treatment using a quad helix and a bonded rapid maxillary expander in growing skeletal Class I and Class II patients. This retrospective study looked at 2 treatment groups, a quad helix group and a bonded rapid maxillary expander group, before treatment (T1) and at the completion of phase I treatment (T2). Each treatment group was compared to an untreated predicted growth model. Lateral cephalograms at T1 and T2 were traced and analyzed for changes in vertical dimension. No differences were found between the treatment groups at T1, but significant differences at T2 were found for convexity, lower facial height, total facial height, facial axis, and Frankfort Mandibular Plane Angle (FMA) variables. A comparison of treatment groups at T2 to their respective untreated predicted growth models found a significant difference for the lower facial height variable in the quad helix group and for the upper first molar to palatal plane (U6-PP) variable in the bonded expander group. Overall, both the quad helix expander and the bonded rapid maxillary expander showed minimal vertical changes during palatal expansion treatment. The differences at T2 suggested that the quad helix expander had more control over skeletal vertical measurements. When comparing treatment results to untreated predicted growth values, the quad helix expander appeared to better maintain lower facial height and the bonded rapid maxillary expander appeared to better maintain the maxillary first molar vertical height.

  4. Ophthalmic manifestations of maxillary sinus mucoceles.

    PubMed

    Ormerod, L D; Weber, A L; Rauch, S D; Feldon, S E

    1987-08-01

    Mucoceles involving any of the paranasal sinuses may present with ophthalmic disturbances. Maxillary antral mucoceles can encroach on the inferior orbit with ocular displacement and compression, proptosis or enophthalmos, lower lid distortion, tethering of extraocular muscles, and ptosis. Periocular pain, erosion of the inferior orbital rim, infraorbital nerve compression, epiphora, and inner canthal swellings are other important presentations. Postoperative mucoceles may involve only a portion of the antrum. Five illustrative cases are presented.

  5. Maxillary reconstruction: Current concepts and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Subramania; Thankappan, Krishnakumar

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary reconstruction is still an evolving art when compared to the reconstruction of the mandible. The defects of maxilla apart from affecting the functions of the speech, swallowing and mastication also cause cosmetic disfigurement. Rehabilitation of the form and function in patients with maxillary defects is either by using an obturator prosthesis or by a surgical reconstruction. Literature is abundant with a variety of reconstructive methods. The classification systems are also varied, with no universal acceptance of any one of them. The oncologic safety of these procedures is still debated, and conclusive evidence in this regard has not emerged yet. Management of the orbit is also not yet addressed properly. Tissue engineering, that has been hyped to be one of the possible solutions for this vexing reconstructive problem, has not come out with reliable and reproducible results so far. This review article discusses the rationale and oncological safety of the reconstructing the maxillary defects, critically analyzes the classification systems, offers the different reconstructive methods and touches upon the controversies in this subject. The management of the retained and exenterated orbit associated with maxillectomy is reviewed. The surgical morbidity, complications and the recent advances in this field are also looked into. An algorithm, based on our experience, is presented. PMID:24987199

  6. A Novel External Carotid Arterial Sheath System for Intra-arterial Infusion Chemotherapy of Head and Neck Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ii, Noriko; Fuwa, Nobukazu; Toyomasu, Yutaka; Takada, Akinori; Nomura, Miwako; Kawamura, Tomoko; Sakuma, Hajime; Nomoto, Yoshihito

    2017-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe a novel system for treating advanced head and neck cancer consisting of an external carotid arterial sheath (ECAS) and a microcatheter to inject drugs retrogradely into multiple feeding arteries through the superficial temporal artery (STA). Four consecutive patients with head and neck cancer that had more than one feeding artery were enrolled in this study. The ECAS was made of polyurethane and surface-coated with heparin resin to prevent thrombus formation, allowing it to remain in place for a prolonged period of time. The ECAS was inserted through the STA, and its tip was placed between the maxillary artery and facial artery. The tumor-feeding arteries were selected using a hooked-shaped microcatheter through the ECAS. A total of 13 target arteries were selected in the four patients. The microcatheter inserted via the ECAS was used to catheterize ten arteries (five lingual arteries and five facial arteries). The remaining three lingual arteries were directly selected by the catheter without ECAS. All of the target arteries were able to be catheterized superselectively. The technical success rate was 100%. Vascular occlusion, which might have been caused by the ECAS, was observed in one patient. No neurologic toxicities occurred. This ECAS system is a new approach for retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy that covers the entire tumor with anticancer drugs. It has the potential to increase the effectiveness of therapy for advanced head and neck cancer. Level 4, Case Series.

  7. Salvage rapid maxillary expansion for the relapse of maxillary transverse expansion after Le Fort I with parasagittal osteotomy

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary transverse deficiency is one of the most common deformities among occlusal discrepancies. Typical surgical methods are segmental Le Fort I osteotomy and surgically-assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME). This patient underwent a parasagittal split with a Le Fort I osteotomy to correct transverse maxillary deficiency. During follow-up, early transverse relapse occurred and rapid maxillary expansion (RME) application with removal of the fixative plate on the constricted side was able to regain the dimension again. RME application may be appropriate salvage therapy for such a case. PMID:25922822

  8. Maxillary Anterior Segmental Distraction Osteogenesis to Correct Maxillary Deficiencies in a Patient With Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Kageyama-Iwata, Asuka; Haraguchi, Seiji; Iida, Seiji; Aikawa, Tomonao; Yamashiro, Takashi

    2017-07-01

    This report describes a case of successful orthodontic treatment using maxillary anterior segmental distraction osteogenesis with an internal maxillary distractor and bilateral sagittal split ramus osteotomy in a girl with cleft lip and palate. A 16-year-old girl with unilateral cleft lip and palate exhibited midface retrusion because of growth inhibition of the maxillary complex and mandibular excess. After the presurgical orthodontic treatment, 6.0-mm advancement of the maxillary anterior segment and 4.0-mm set back of the mandible were performed. After a retention period, the patient's midface convexity was greatly improved and the velopharyngeal competence was preserved without relapse.

  9. Arterial management.

    DOT National Transportation Integrated Search

    2004-04-01

    In many major metropolitan areas, the freeway system is : functioning at or beyond the capacity for which it was : designed. Many drivers are choosing to use arterial streets : instead. The resulting stress on the arterial systems creates : gridlock ...

  10. Infratemporal fossa fat enlargement in chronic maxillary atelectasis.

    PubMed

    Kohn, Jocelyne C; Rootman, Daniel B; Xu, Dongdong; Goldberg, Robert A

    2013-08-01

    To describe the radiographic findings in chronic maxillary atelectasis and analyse the volume changes of the affected maxillary sinus, orbit, nasal vault and infratemporal fossa. Case series of all patients with diagnosis of chronic maxillary atelectasis presenting between January 2000 and August 2012 who underwent full oculoplastic and orbital evaluation including standardised photography and CT or MRI. Two-dimensional imaging features and volumetric changes were assessed. Affected and unaffected sides were compared. Demographic data, clinical presentation, Hertel measurements, photographic and radiological findings were analysed. 22 patients (64% men) met the inclusion criteria. Mean relative enophthalmos was 2.1 mm and mean hypoglobus was 1.8 mm. The most common radiographic findings were sinus opacification (91%), uncinate process retraction/middle meatus increase (91%), orbit enlargement (100%), ipsilateral septum deviation (64%) and infratemporal fossa fat enlargement (100%). Infratemporal fossa fat area and volume were significantly larger in the affected side (p<0.01). Additionally, ipsilateral orbit (p<0.01) and nasal vault volume (p<0.01) were similarly increased. Maxillary sinus volume correlated significantly only with infratemporal fossa fat enlargement (p<0.05). There is a significant increase in the infratemporal fossa fat, nasal and orbital volume corresponding to a decrease in maxillary sinus size in chronic maxillary atelectasis. Chronic maxillary atelectasis is associated with redistribution of volume between the maxillary sinus and the surrounding infratemporal fossa, orbit and nasal cavity.

  11. Maxillary sinus volume in patients with impacted canines.

    PubMed

    Oz, Aslihan Zeynep; Oz, Abdullah Alper; El, Hakan; Palomo, Juan Martin

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the maxillary sinus volumes in unilaterally impacted canine patients and to compare the volumetric changes that occur after the eruption of canines to the dental arch using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Pre- (T0) and posttreatment (T1) CBCT records of 30 patients were used to calculate maxillary sinus volumes between the impacted and erupted canine sides. The InVivoDental 5.0 program was used to measure the volume of the maxillary sinuses. The distance from impacted canine cusp tip to the target point on the palatal plane was also measured. Right maxillary sinus volume was statistically significantly smaller compared to that of the left maxillary sinus when the canine was impacted on the right side at T0. According to the T1 measurements there was no significant difference between the mean volumes of the impaction side and the contralateral side. The distance from the canine tip to its target point on the palatal plane were 17.17 mm, and the distance from the tip to the target point was 15.14 mm for the left- and right-side impacted canines, respectively, and there was a significant difference between the mean amount of change of both sides of maxillary sinuses after treatment of impacted canines. Orthodontic treatment of impacted canines created a significant increase in maxillary sinus volume when the impacted canines were closer with respect to the maxillary sinus.

  12. Aspergillus in endodontic infection near the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Gomes, Cinthya Cristina; Pinto, Larissa Christina Costa; Victor, Fernanda Loretti; Silva, Erlange Andrade Borges da; Ribeiro, Apoena de Aguiar; Sarquis, Maria Inês de Moura; Camões, Isabel Coelho Gomes

    2015-01-01

    Diseases of the maxillary sinus have been associated with dental roots near the maxillary sinus that have undergone endodontic treatment. To investigate the presence of filamentous fungi in patients with dental roots near the maxillary sinus who had apical periodontitis treated endodontically, and to alert practitioners that this could be a possible avenue of contamination of the sinus in patients who develop maxillary sinus infection. Cross-sectional study in 60 palatal roots of the first maxillary molars near the maxillary sinus, that underwent endodontic treatment for apical periodontitis. After removal of the filling material, dentin shavings were collected and placed in test tubes containing Sabouraud dextrose agar and chloramphenicol. The phenotype was determined by macroscopic and microscopic examination of the colonies. For polymerase chain reaction, the primers ITS-5 and ITS-4 were used. The sequences obtained were compared with those deposited at GenBank using the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool program. Filamentous fungi were isolated from 6 of 60 canals (10%): Aspergillus niger (6.7%), Aspergillus versicolor (1.6%), and Aspergillus fumigatus (1.6%). Root canals near the maxillary sinus with endodontic treatment and apical periodontitis may exhibit positive cultures for filamentous fungi. Interested professionals should be alert, because these microorganisms have pathogenic characteristics that can cause disease of odontogenic origin in the maxillary sinus. Copyright © 2015 Associação Brasileira de Otorrinolaringologia e Cirurgia Cérvico-Facial. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  13. Multimodal Chemosensory Integration through the Maxillary Palp in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Shiraiwa, Takashi

    2008-01-01

    Drosophila melanogaster has an olfactory organ called the maxillary palp. It is smaller and numerically simpler than the antenna, and its specific role in behavior has long been unclear. Because of its proximity to the mouthparts, I explored the possibility of a role in taste behavior. Maxillary palp was tuned to mediate odor-induced taste enhancement: a sucrose solution was more appealing when simultaneously presented with the odorant 4-methylphenol. The same result was observed with other odors that stimulate other types of olfactory receptor neuron in the maxillary palp. When an antennal olfactory receptor was genetically introduced in the maxillary palp, the fly interpreted a new odor as a sweet-enhancing smell. These results all point to taste enhancement as a function of the maxillary palp. It also opens the door for studying integration of multiple senses in a model organism. PMID:18478104

  14. Maxillary molar intrusion with micro-implant anchorage (MIA).

    PubMed

    Park, Hyo-Sang; Jang, Bong-Kyu; Kyung, Hee-Moon

    2005-11-01

    Intrusion of the maxillary molars is difficult to accomplish using traditional methods of anchorage. To describe methods of maxillary molar intrusion with the aid of micro-implants. Micro-implants provide stable intra-oral anchorage and enable the maxillary molars to be intruded without the usual side effects. Three adult patients are presented showing how micro-implants can be used to intrude the maxillary molars. In the first patient micro-implants were placed in the alveolar process between the second premolar and first molar, in the second patient micro-implants were placed in the palatal alveolar process between the first and second molars, and in the third patient a micro-implant was placed in the palate paramedially. A transpalatal bar was used to prevent bucco- or linguoversion of the molars during intrusion. The maxillary molars can be intruded with intra-oral anchorage derived from microscrew implants.

  15. Maxillary molar distalization with first class appliance

    PubMed Central

    Ramesh, Namitha; Palukunnu, Biswas; Ravindran, Nidhi; Nair, Preeti P

    2014-01-01

    Non-extraction treatment has gained popularity for corrections of mild-to-moderate class II malocclusion over the past few decades. The distalization of maxillary molars is of significant value for treatment of cases with minimal arch discrepancy and mild class II molar relation associated with a normal mandibular arch and acceptable profile. This paper describes our experience with a 16-year-old female patient who reported with irregularly placed upper front teeth and unpleasant smile. The patient was diagnosed to have angles class II malocclusion with moderate maxillary anterior crowding, deep bite of 4 mm on a skeletal class II base with an orthognathic maxilla and retrognathic mandible and normal growth pattern. She presented an ideal profile and so molar distalization was planned with the first-class appliance. Molars were distalised by 8 mm on the right and left quadrants and class I molar relation achieved within 4 months. The space gained was utilised effectively to align the arch and establish a class I molar and canine relation. PMID:24577171

  16. Orthodontic treatment of palatally impacted maxillary canines.

    PubMed

    Olive, Richard J

    2002-11-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the feasibility of treating children with impacted maxillary canines by orthodontic treatment alone. The subjects were 28 children (mean age: 13.5 years, range 11.4-16.1 years) with between them 32 palatally impacted canines. The overlying primary canines were extracted between 0 and 42 months before the start of appliance treatment to open space in the arches for the impacted teeth. No other surgical procedures were carried out prior to the start of appliance treatment. Appliance treatment was deferred for at least six months if an impacted canine was the main reason for treatment, otherwise treatment was commenced according to the needs of the patient. In 94% of the cases, the severity of impaction lessened following extraction of the overlying primary canines and orthodontic treatment. The deepest impactions tended to occur in the oldest children. The majority (75%) of the canines emerged following orthodontic treatment to create space for them in the arch; the remainder were surgically exposed. Appliance treatment tended to take longer in children with the deepest impactions. It is concluded that fixed appliance treatment to create space for a palatally impacted canine is an effective management option for children with impacted maxillary canines.

  17. Complications of misdiagnosis of maxillary canine ectopic eruption.

    PubMed

    Garib, Daniela Gamba; Janson, Guilherme; Baldo, Taiana de Oliveira; dos Santos, Patrícia Bittencourt Dutra

    2012-08-01

    Ectopic eruption of maxillary canines can be associated with root resorption of adjacent teeth. This case report describes and discusses an interesting case of a 15-year-old girl with a Class III malocclusion and an impacted maxillary canine. Because of the unfavorable position of the ectopic canine and the severe root resorption of the maxillary left central and lateral incisors, the treatment options included extraction of the maxillary permanent canines. The mandibular first premolars were extracted to compensate for the Class III malocclusion. A panoramic radiograph taken earlier in the mixed dentition already indicated a possible eruption disturbance of the maxillary left permanent canine. The importance of early diagnosis of maxillary canine ectopic eruption is highlighted in this case report. The early identification of radiographic signs of an ectopic pathway of eruption should be followed by deciduous canine extraction to prevent canine retention and maxillary incisor root resorption. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The arteries of brain base in species of Bovini tribe.

    PubMed

    Zdun, Maciej; Frąckowiak, Hieronim; Kiełtyka-Kurc, Agata; Kowalczyk, Karolina; Nabzdyk, Maria; Timm, Anita

    2013-11-01

    Studies were conducted on 78 preparations of head and brain arteries in four species of Bos genus, that is in domestic cattle (N = 59), including 22 foetuses (CRL 36.5-78.5 cm), in banteng (Bos javanicus, N = 3), yak (Bos mutus f. grunniens, N = 2), American bison (Bison bison, N = 4), and European bison (Bison bonasus, N = 10). The comparative analysis permitted to demonstrate a similar pattern of brain base arteries in the studied animals. In the studied species, blood vessels of the arterial circle of the brain were found to form by bifurcation of intracranial segments of inner carotid arteries, which protruded from the paired rostral epidural rete mirabile. In Bovidae arterial circle of the brain was supplied with blood mainly by maxillary artery through the blood vessels of the paired rostral epidural rete mirabile. The unpaired caudal epidural rete mirabile was participating in blood supply to the arterial circle of the brain from vertebral and occipital arteries. It manifested character of a taxonomic trait for species of Bos and Bison genera. Basilar artery in all the examined animals manifested a variable diameter, with preliminary portion markedly narrowed, which prevented its participation in blood supply to the arterial circle of the brain. The results and taxonomic position of the species made the authors to suggest a hypothesis that a similar arterial pattern on the brain base might be present also in other species, not included in this analysis. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The use of internal maxillary distraction for maxillary hypoplasia: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Van Sickels, Joseph E; Madsen, Mathew J; Cunningham, Larry L; Bird, Douglas

    2006-12-01

    Distraction osteogenesis is a useful alternative to advance the maxilla in complicated cases of maxillary hypoplasia. The purpose of this article is to review the workup, experience, and preliminary results with the use of internal distraction osteogenesis for maxillary hypoplasia at one teaching institution. Over a 5-year period, more than 300 patients with craniofacial and dentofacial defects have undergone oral and maxillofacial surgery at our center to correct their skeletal discrepancies. Of these, 10 have had maxillary distraction osteogenesis done with internal distractors. Follow-up of 6 months or more was available for 8 patients. Stereolithographic models were used to bend distractors prior to surgery in 6 patients. Latency prior to the start of distraction was 3 to 7 days and varied with the age of the patient. Distraction occurred at approximately 1 mm per day with an average distraction length of 8.5 mm (range, 6-10 mm). Excellent occlusal results were obtained in 5 patients. Major complications including nonunion and failure to achieve acceptable occlusal results were observed in 3 patients. Minor complications including pain and loosening of the distracter devices were observed in 2 patients, but did not appear to affect the esthetic and functional results. Distraction osteogenesis is a useful alternative to traditional orthognathic surgery to treat maxillary hypoplasia. Internal distractions are attractive to patients, but are more difficult to place and can cause discomfort to patients when trying to achieve an ideal primary vector of distraction. Stereolithographic models can help with placement of the device. Changes in design of distractors may help with patient discomfort.

  20. Introduction of a new removable adjustable intraoral maxillary distraction system for correction of maxillary hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Figueroa, Alvaro A; Polley, John W; Figueroa, Alexander L

    2009-09-01

    Distraction osteogenesis has become a treatment alternative to treat severe craniofacial skeletal dysplasias. A rigid external distraction device has been successfully used to advance the maxilla as well as the maxillary, orbital, and forehead complex (monobloc) in children as young as 2 years, adolescents, and adults. For this severe group of patients, the technique has been found to be simpler and safer than traditional surgical methods. Maxillary and midfacial advancement through distraction has been found to be extremely stable in the patients in whom the technique was used.The authors introduce an intraoral distractor for those patients requiring a moderate maxillary advancement. The advantages of the device include ease of insertion, vector adjustability, reactivation capabilities, and no need for second procedure for its removal.The above approaches have provided predictable and stable results. A detailed description of the device, necessary orthodontic and surgical procedures, case reports, and cephalometric outcomes are presented. The techniques can be applied alone or as an adjunct to traditional orthognathic and craniofacial surgical procedures.

  1. Breakage of internal maxillary distractor: considerable complication of maxillary distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Aikawa, Tomonao; Iida, Seiji; Isomura, Emiko T; Namikawa, Mari; Matsuoka, Yudai; Yamada, Chiaki; Yamamoto, Taku; Takigawa, Yoko

    2008-07-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis using intraoral distractors is now one of the standard treatments of maxillary retrusion. This report shows 2 cases of breakage of this internal maxillary distractor in patients with cleft lip and palate; one was observed during the distraction period and the other was during the retention period. The first case required a rotational movement of the distraction segment, and this movement caused the laterally dislocation of the posterior part of the distractor, where the distractor suffered some mechanical forces by mouth opening. In the latter case, breakage of distractor was observed on the radiographs taken 3 months after distraction and this complication may have been caused by mechanical force by occlusion and mastication. Both breakages were found at the joint of the anchorage plate and the extension rod, which has some flexibility for adjusting the plate to the bone surface. Therefore, surgeons should pay special attention for this mechanical weak area in this distractor not only during the advancement period, but also during the retention period and should avoid unnecessary frequent bending for adopting the bone surface, which directly weakens the joint.

  2. Three-dimensional assessment of maxillary changes associated with bone anchored maxillary protraction

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tung; Cevidanes, Lucia; Cornelis, Marie A.; Heymann, Gavin; de Paula, Leonardo K.; De Clerck, Hugo

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Bone-anchored maxillary protraction has been shown to be an effective treatment modality for the correction of Class III malocclusions. The purpose of this study was to evaluate 3-dimensional changes in the maxilla, the surrounding hard and soft tissues, and the circummaxillary sutures after bone-anchored maxillary protraction treatment. Methods Twenty-five consecutive skeletal Class III patients between the ages of 9 and 13 years (mean, 11.10 ± 1.1 years) were treated with Class III intermaxillary elastics and bilateral miniplates (2 in the infrazygomatic crests of the maxilla and 2 in the anterior mandible). Cone-beam computed tomographs were taken before initial loading and 1 year out. Three-dimensional models were generated from the tomographs, registered on the anterior cranial base, superimposed, and analyzed by using color maps. Results The maxilla showed a mean forward displacement of 3.7 mm, and the zygomas and the maxillary incisors came forward 3.7 and 4.3 mm, respectively. Conclusions This treatment approach produced significant orthopedic changes in the maxilla and the zygomas in growing Class III patients. PMID:22133943

  3. Maxillary First Molars with 2 Distobuccal Canals: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Fogel, Howard M; Cunha, Rodrigo Sanches

    2017-11-01

    An appreciation of the anatomic complexity of the root canal system is essential at every step of endodontic treatment. Endodontic treatment of teeth with unusual root canal anatomy presents a unique challenge. Eight patients underwent nonsurgical root canal treatment of 3-rooted maxillary first molars in a specialty endodontic private practice. Four cases of Weine type II and 4 cases of Weine type III canal configurations in the distobuccal root of maxillary first molars were presented.This article highlighted an uncommon anatomic variation of 2 canals in the distobuccal root of the maxillary first molar. Copyright © 2017 American Association of Endodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Maxillary premolar resorption by canines: three case reports.

    PubMed

    Cooke, M E; Nute, S J

    2005-05-01

    Three unusual cases of maxillary premolar root resorption are reported. Three teenage patients were referred to the orthodontic department for management of ectopic maxillary canines. Radiographic examination revealed unilateral premolar root resorption in all three patients. This represents an unusual finding. Whereas the prevalence of maxillary lateral incisor root resorption secondary to palatally ectopic canines has been reported, the prevalence of premolar root resorption is unknown. This report discusses the findings in the context of the available literature. The postulated aetiology and the need for early diagnosis are highlighted.

  5. Morphologic study of the maxillary molars. Part II: Internal anatomy.

    PubMed

    Pécora, J D; Woelfel, J B; Sousa Neto, M D; Issa, E P

    1992-01-01

    The internal anatomy of three hundred and seventy (370) decalcified and cleared human maxillary molars was studied. Seventy-five percent of the first molars, 58% of the second molars and 68% of the third molars studied presented three (3) root canals and 25% of the first molars, 42% of the second molars and 32% of the third molars presented four (4) root canals. The authors observed that the incidence of two root canals in the mesiobuccal root was higher in second maxillary molars than in first maxillary molars.

  6. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction for correction of maxillary hypoplasia and dental crowding in cleft palate patients: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Wang, X-X; Wang, X; Li, Z-L; Yi, B; Liang, C; Jia, Y-L; Zou, B-S

    2009-12-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) to correct maxillary hypoplasia and severe dental crowding in cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients, 7 patients (average age 16.4 years) with maxillary hypoplasia, shortened maxillary dental arch length and severe anterior dental crowding secondary to CLP were selected for this study. After anterior maxillary segmental osteotomy, 3 patients were treated using bilateral internal distraction devices, and 4 patients were treated using rigid external distraction devices. Photographs and radiographs were taken to review the improvement in facial profile and occlusion after distraction. An average 10.25 mm anterior maxillary advancement was obtained in all patients after 10-23 days of distraction and 9-16 weeks of consolidation. The sella-nasion-point A (SNA) angle increased from 69.5 degrees to 79.6 degrees. Midface convexity was greatly improved and velopharyngeal competence was preserved. The maxillary dental arch length was greatly increased by 10.1 mm (P<0.01). Dental crowding and malocclusion were corrected by orthodontic treatment. These results show that AMSD can effectively correct the hypoplastic maxilla and severe dental crowding associated with CLP by increasing the midface convexity and dental arch length while preserving velopharyngeal function, and dental crowding can be corrected without requiring tooth extraction.

  7. Autogenous transplantation of maxillary and mandibular molars.

    PubMed

    Reich, Peter P

    2008-11-01

    Autogenous tooth transplantation has been used as a predictable surgical approach to correct malocclusion and replace edentulous areas. This article focuses on the surgical approach and technique for molar transplantation. Thirty-two patients aged between 11 and 25 years underwent 44 autogenous molar transplantations. The procedure involved transplantation of impacted or newly erupted third molars into the extraction sockets of nonrestorable molars and surgical removal and replacement of horizontally impacted molars into their proper vertical alignment. Five basic procedural concepts were applied: 1) atraumatic extraction, avoiding disruption of the root sheath and root buds; 2) apical contouring of bone at the transplantation site and maxillary sinus lift via the Summers osteotome technique, when indicated, for maxillary molars; 3) preparation of a 4-wall bony socket; 4) avoidance of premature occlusal interferences; and 5) stabilization of the tooth with placement of a basket suture. All 32 patients successfully underwent the planned procedure. To date, 2 patients have had localized infection that resulted in loss of the transplant. The remaining 42 transplants remain asymptomatic and functioning, with a mean follow-up period of 19 months. No infection, ankylosis, loss of the transplant, or root resorption has been noted. In addition, endodontic therapy has not been necessary on any transplanted teeth. Autogenous tooth transplantation has been discussed and described in the literature previously, with a primary focus on cuspid and bicuspid transplantation. The molar transplant is infrequently discussed in today's literature, possibly because of the preponderance of titanium dental implants. Autogenous molar transplantation is a viable procedure with low morbidity and excellent functional and esthetic outcomes. This report shows the successful transplantation of 42 of 44 molars in 32 patients with a mean follow-up period of 19 months.

  8. A minipig model of maxillary distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Papadaki, Maria E; Troulis, Maria J; Glowacki, Julie; Kaban, Leonard B

    2010-11-01

    To establish a porcine model for maxillary distraction osteogenesis and to document the sequence of bone formation in the zone of advancement. Female Yucatan minipigs (n = 9) in the mixed dentition stage underwent modified Le Fort I osteotomy through a vestibular incision under general anesthesia. A unidirectional, semiburied Le Fort I distraction device was fixed across the osteotomy. The distraction protocol was 0-day latency, 1-mm/d rate for 12 days, and 24 days of fixation. Maxillary specimens (n = 9) were harvested and divided in half at the end of distraction (n = 6 sides), midfixation (n = 6), and the end of fixation (n = 6). Clinical stability, volume, and radiographic density across the zone of advancement were graded on semiquantitative scales. Specimens were stained with hematoxylin and eosin and examined with light microscopy. Animals tolerated the operation, the distraction and fixation periods. There were no infections and no devices failed. At the end of the distraction period, bone trabeculae were present at the periphery and fibrous tissues, and vessels, preosteoblasts, and osteoblasts were present in the center of the zone of advancement. Islands of chondrocyte-like cells appeared in 1 specimen each at midfixation and the end of fixation. At the end of fixation, clinical stability and radiographic density were graded 3/3 and bone formation was complete across the advancement zone in all specimens. A model for Le Fort I distraction osteogenesis was established. Intramembranous bone formation was the predominant mechanism of healing in the zone of advancement. Latency was not necessary for bone formation in this minipig model. Copyright © 2010 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Tooth-Borne Anterior Maxillary Distraction for Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia: Our Experience With 147 Patients.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Sunil; Selvaraj, Dhivakar; Khandeparker, Rakshit V; Seelan, Nikkie S; Richardson, Shweta

    2016-12-01

    To evaluate the results of anterior maxillary distraction for its efficacy and long-term stability in the management of cleft maxillary hypoplasia in a large series of patients with a long-term follow-up extending to 4 years. One hundred sixty-four patients at least 10 years old with cleft maxillary hypoplasia who presented to the authors' unit from January 2009 through October 2014 were evaluated retrospectively, irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and amount of advancement needed. Anterior maxillary distraction using a tooth-borne distractor appliance was carried out in all patients and all patients were followed up to 4 years (range, 1 to 4 yr) to evaluate the stability of the procedure and to document any relapse using digitalized lateral cephalograms taken before distraction, immediately after distraction (T2), and at the last follow-up visit (T3; range, 1 to 4 yr). Seventeen patients were subsequently lost to follow-up; therefore, a complete set of records was available for 147 patients. In a subset of 50 patients, perceptual speech assessment was carried out preoperatively and 6 months postoperatively by 2 speech pathologists using the Perkins scoring system that allowed the evaluation of 5 parameters (velopharyngeal insufficiency, resonance, nasal air emission, articulation, and intelligibility). None of these patients underwent speech therapy during the course of evaluation. The development of complications intra- or postoperatively was noted. The data were tabulated and analyzed. An advancement ranging from 4.0 to 13.1 mm (mean, 9.42 mm) was achieved in all patients. One hundred forty patients (95.23%) showed stable results on lateral cephalograms and when T2 values were compared with T3 values. Seven patients (4.76%) exhibited skeletal relapse in various linear and angular measurements assessed on lateral cephalograms. At 6-month follow-up, improvements of 62% (n = 31), 64% (n = 32), 50% (n = 25), 68% (n = 34), and 70% (n

  10. Bilateral maxillary fused second and third molars: a rare occurrence.

    PubMed

    Liang, Rui-Zhen; Wu, Jin-Tao; Wu, You-Nong; Smales, Roger J; Hu, Ming; Yu, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Dong

    2012-12-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis and endodontic therapy of maxillary fused second and third molars, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 31-year-old Chinese male, with no contributory medical or family/social history, presented with throbbing pain in the maxillary right molar area following an unsuccessful attempted tooth extraction. Clinical examination revealed what appeared initially to be a damaged large extra cusp on the buccal aspect of the distobuccal cusp of the second molar. However, CBCT revealed that a third molar was fused to the second molar. Unexpectedly, the maxillary left third molar also was fused to the second molar, and the crown of an unerupted supernumerary fourth molar was possibly also fused to the apical root region of the second molar. Operative procedures should not be attempted without adequate radiographic investigation. CBCT allowed the precise location of the root canals of the right maxillary fused molar teeth to permit successful endodontic therapy, confirmed after 6 months.

  11. Le Fort I Maxillary Advancement Using Distraction Osteogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Patrick D.; Harshbarger, Raymond J.

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of maxillary hypoplasia has traditionally involved conventional Le Fort I osteotomies and advancement. Advancements of greater than 10 mm risk significant relapse. This risk is greater in the cleft lip and palate population, whose anatomy and soft tissue scarring from prior procedures contributes to instability of conventional maxillary advancement. Le Fort I advancement with distraction osteogenesis has emerged as viable, stable treatment modality correction of severe maxillary hypoplasia in cleft, syndromic, and noncleft patients. In this article, the authors provide a review of current data and recommendations concerning Le Fort I advancement with distraction osteogenesis. In addition, they outline their technique for treating severe maxillary hypoplasia with distraction osteogenesis using internal devices. PMID:25383054

  12. Oncologic profile of maxillary odontogenic myxoma: A rare case.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Reena Radhikaprasad

    2013-07-01

    Odontogenic myxoma (OM) is an ectomesenchyme derived neoplasm, almost exclusively found in jaws. This article presents a maxillary OM with a brief review of the molecular and proteomic antecedents of OMs, capturing its histopathogenesis.

  13. Sex Determination of Adult Human Maxillary Sinuses on Panoramic Radiographs

    PubMed Central

    Leao de Queiroz, Cristhiane; Terada, Andrea Sayuri Silveira Dias; Dezem, Thais Uenoyama; Gomes de Araújo, Lais; Galo, Rodrigo; Oliveira-Santos, Christiano

    2016-01-01

    Absract The purpose of this study was to evaluate dimensions of adult human maxillary sinuses on panoramic radiographs and their possible application on the sex determination for forensic purposes. The sample comprised 64 database panoramic radiographs from individuals aged 20 years or older (32 male and 32 female subjects), with complete permanent dentition (or absence of third molars). One examiner measured the width and height of the right and left maxillary sinuses using the software Image J 1.47v (National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, USA). Measurements were repeated to calculate intra-observer agreement. Chi-Square test, Kappa, ANOVA and T-Student were used for results analysis for p≤ 0.05. Intra-observer agreement with correlation Kappa ranged between 0.38 and 0.96. For female subjects, the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus were 28.7856mm and 44.6178mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 27.7163mm for height and 45.1850mm for width. Male subjects were found to have the mean height and width of the left maxillary sinus 30.9981mm and 48.7753mm, respectively. And right maxillary sinus was 30.7403mm for height and 48.5753mm for width. There was a statistically significant difference in the height and width of maxillary sinuses between males and females. It can be concluded that maxillary sinuses height and width on panoramic radiographs can be used to determine the gender of adult human subjects. PMID:27847394

  14. Development of the maxillary sinus in infants and children.

    PubMed

    Bhushan, Bharat; Rychlik, Karen; Schroeder, James W

    2016-12-01

    To examine the age related volume change of the maxillary sinus in children by measuring the change of the height, weight, and depth using computed tomography (CT). Children <18 years of age who underwent a CT Scan of the sinuses for reasons other than sinus related issues were included in the study. 139 patients were included (68 females and 71 Males) and the mean age of the patients was 9.6 ± 5.4 years. The cohort was divided into three groups based on their ages - Age <6 years (n = 45), age between 6 and 12 years (n = 44) and age > 12 years (n = 50). Patients in each age group demonstrated an increase in their Maxillary sinus height (p<0.001). Patients < 6years of age and between 6 and 12 years of age had a significant increase in their maxillary sinus width and depth (p < 0.001). The maxillary sinus width, depth and volume did not increase significantly after the age of 12 years in these patients. We demonstrated periods of significant size increase of the maxillary sinuses as determined by different dimensions in children at various ages. The height of the maxillary sinus has steady growth from birth to at least the age of 18 years. The width and depth increase up to 12 years of age. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Jagged1 is essential for osteoblast development during maxillary ossification

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Cynthia R.; Yuasa, Masato; Schoenecker, Jonathan; Goudy, Steven L.

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia occurs due to insufficient maxillary intramembranous ossification, leading to poor dental occlusion, respiratory obstruction and cosmetic deformities. Conditional deletion of Jagged1 (Jag1) in cranial neural crest (CNC) cells using Wnt1-cre; Jagged1f/f (Jag1CKO) led to maxillary hypoplasia characterized by intrinsic differences in bone morphology and density using μCT evaluation. Jag1CKO maxillas had altered collagen deposition, delayed ossification, and reduced expression of early and late determinants of osteoblast development during maxillary ossification. In vitro bone cultures on Jag1CKO mouse embryonic maxillary mesenchymal (MEMM) cells demonstrated decreased mineralization that was also associated with diminished induction of osteoblast determinants. BMP receptor expression was dysregulated in the Jag1CKO MEMM cells suggesting that these cells were unable to respond to BMP-induced differentiation. JAG1-Fc rescued in vitro mineralization and osteoblast gene expression changes. These data suggest that JAG1 signaling in CNC-derived MEMM cells is required for osteoblast development and differentiation during maxillary ossification. PMID:24491691

  16. Does Andrews facial analysis predict esthetic sagittal maxillary position?

    PubMed

    Resnick, Cory M; Daniels, Kimberly M; Vlahos, Maryann

    2018-04-01

    Cephalometric analyses have limited utility in planning maxillary sagittal position for orthognathic surgery. In Six Elements of Orofacial Harmony, Andrews quantified maxillary position relative to forehead projection and angulation and proposed an ideal relationship. The purpose of this study was to investigate the ability of this technique to predict esthetic sagittal maxillary position. Survey study including a male and female with straight facial profiles, normal maxillary incisor angulations, and Angle's Class I. Maxillary position was modified on lateral photographs to create 5 images for each participant with incisor-goal anterior limit line (GALL) distances of -4, -2, 0, +2, and +4 mm. A series of health care professionals and laypeople were asked to rate each photo in order of attractiveness. A total of 100 complete responses were received. Incisor-GALL distances of +4 mm (41%) and +2 mm (40%) were most commonly considered "most esthetic" for the female volunteer (P < .001). For the male volunteer, there were 2 peak "most esthetic" responses: incisor-GALL distances of 0 mm (37%) and -4 mm (32%) (P < .001). Respondents considered maxillary incisor position 2 to 4 mm anterior to GALL most attractive in a woman and 0 to 4 mm posterior to GALL most esthetic in a man. Using these modified target distances, this analysis may be useful for orthognathic surgery planning. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Perceptual Speech Assessment After Anterior Maxillary Distraction in Patients With Cleft Maxillary Hypoplasia.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Sunil; Seelan, Nikkie S; Selvaraj, Dhivakar; Khandeparker, Rakshit V; Gnanamony, Sangeetha

    2016-06-01

    To assess speech outcomes after anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) in patients with cleft-related maxillary hypoplasia. Fifty-eight patients at least 10 years old with cleft-related maxillary hypoplasia were included in this study irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and amount of required advancement. AMD was carried out in all patients using a tooth-borne palatal distractor by a single oral and maxillofacial surgeon. Perceptual speech assessment was performed by 2 speech language pathologists preoperatively, before placement of the distractor device, and 6 months postoperatively using the scoring system of Perkins et al (Plast Reconstr Surg 116:72, 2005); the system evaluates velopharyngeal insufficiency (VPI), resonance, nasal air emission, articulation errors, and intelligibility. The data obtained were tabulated and subjected to statistical analysis using Wilcoxon signed rank test. A P value less than .05 was considered significant. Eight patients were lost to follow-up. At 6-month follow-up, improvements of 62% (n = 31), 64% (n = 32), 50% (n = 25), 68% (n = 34), and 70% (n = 35) in VPI, resonance, nasal air emission, articulation, and intelligibility, respectively, were observed, with worsening of all parameters in 1 patient (2%). The results for all tested parameters were highly significant (P ≤ .001). AMD offers a substantial improvement in speech for all 5 parameters of perceptual speech assessment. Copyright © 2016 The American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Validity of palatal superimposition of 3-dimensional digital models in cases treated with rapid maxillary expansion and maxillary protraction headgear

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jin-Il; Jost-Brinkmann, Paul-Georg; Choi, Dong-Soon; Jang, In-San

    2012-01-01

    Objective The purpose of this study was to evaluate the validity of the 3-dimensional (3D) superimposition method of digital models in patients who received treatment with rapid maxillary expansion (RME) and maxillary protraction headgear. Methods The material consisted of pre- and post-treatment maxillary dental casts and lateral cephalograms of 30 patients, who underwent RME and maxillary protraction headgear treatment. Digital models were superimposed using the palate as a reference area. The movement of the maxillary central incisor and the first molar was measured on superimposed cephalograms and 3D digital models. To determine whether any difference existed between the 2 measuring techniques, intra-class correlation (ICC) and Bland-Altman plots were analyzed. Results The measurements on the 3D digital models and cephalograms showed a very high correlation in the antero-posterior direction (ICC, 0.956 for central incisor and 0.941 for first molar) and a moderate correlation in the vertical direction (ICC, 0.748 for central incisor and 0.717 for first molar). Conclusions The 3D model superimposition method using the palate as a reference area is as clinically reliable for assessing antero-posterior tooth movement as cephalometric superimposition, even in cases treated with orthopedic appliances, such as RME and maxillary protraction headgear. PMID:23173116

  19. Analgesic effects of maxillary and inferior alveolar nerve blocks in cats undergoing dental extractions.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Joana; Chebroux, Alexandre; Martinez-Taboada, Fernando; Leece, Elizabeth A

    2015-02-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the analgesic effects of maxillary and/or inferior alveolar nerve blocks with lidocaine and bupivacaine in cats undergoing dental extractions. Twenty-nine cats were enrolled. Using an adapted composite pain scale, cats were pain scored before the dental procedure and 30 mins, and 1, 2 and 4 h after isoflurane disconnection. Cats were sedated with buprenorphine (20 µg/kg), medetomidine (10 µg/kg) and acepromazine (20 µg/kg) intramuscularly. Anaesthesia was induced using alfaxalone (1-2 mg/kg) intravenously and maintained with isoflurane in oxygen. Each cat was randomly assigned to receive maxillary and/or inferior alveolar nerve blocks or no nerve blocks prior to dental extractions. Each nerve block was performed using lidocaine (0.25 mg/kg) and bupivacaine (0.25 mg/kg). Heart rate, systolic arterial blood pressure, respiratory rate, end tidal carbon dioxide and isoflurane vaporiser settings were recorded 5 mins before and after the dental extractions, and the difference calculated. Group mean differences (mean ± SD) for heart rate (-9.7 ± 10.6 vs 7.6 ± 9.5 beats/min [nerve block vs control group, respectively], P <0.0001), systolic arterial blood pressure (-10.33 ± 18.44 vs 5.21 ± 15.23 mmHg, P = 0.02) and vaporiser settings (-0.2 ± 0.2 vs 0.1 ± 0.4, P = 0.023) were significantly different between groups. The control group had higher postoperative pain scores (median [interquartile range]) at 2 h (3 [1.75-4.00] vs 1 [0-2], P = 0.008) and 4 h (4 [2-6] vs 2 [1-2], P = 0.006) after the dental extractions. Maxillary and inferior alveolar nerve blocks with lidocaine and bupivacaine administered prior to dental extractions resulted in a reduction in heart rate and blood pressure while allowing for a reduction in isoflurane. Cats receiving nerve blocks had lower postoperative pain scores than the group without nerve blocks. © ISFM and AAFP 2014.

  20. Delayed Implants Outcome in Maxillary Molar Region.

    PubMed

    Crespi, Roberto; Capparè, Paolo; Crespi, Giovanni; Gastaldi, Giorgio; Gherlone, Enrico F

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess bone volume changes in maxillary molar regions after delayed implants placement. Patients presented large bone defects after tooth extractions. Reactive soft tissue was left into the defects. No grafts were used. Cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scans were performed before tooth extractions, at implant placement (at 3 months from extraction) and 3 years after implant placement, bone volume measurements were assessed. Bucco-lingual width showed a statistically significant decrease (p = .013) at implant placement, 3 months after extraction. Moreover, a statistically significant increase (p < .01) was measured 3 years after implant placement. No statistically significant differences (p > .05) were found between baseline values (before extraction) and at 3 years from implant placement. Vertical dimension showed no statistically significant differences (p > .05) at implant placement, 3 months after extraction. Statistically significant differences (p < .0001) were found between baseline values (before extraction) and at 3 months from implant placement as well as between implant placement values and 3 years later. CT scans presented successful outcome of delayed implants placed in large bone defects at 3-year follow-up. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. A bioarcheological study of maxillary sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Charlotte A

    2007-06-01

    Maxillary sinusitis was studied as an indicator of poor air quality. Seven skeletal samples were examined from North America, England, and Nubia, and selected to represent different geographic locations, environments, and subsistence economies. Frequency rates varied from 17.2 to 51.5% of individuals affected with one or both sinuses preserved. Hardin Village had the highest frequency (51.5%), followed by the Aleuts (42.9%), "Illinois" (38.6%), Indian Knoll (38.5%), Kulubnarti (21.8%), Christchurch, Spitalfields (18.0%), and "South Dakota" (17.2%). Male frequencies ranged from 16.7 to 36.7%, but the female frequency ranged more widely from 18.0 to 76.5%. At most sites female rates exceeded male. The effect of urban and rural environment on sinusitis occurrence, and also subsistence economy, biological sex, and social status were explored, and comparative sites also considered; urban agricultural sites had a mean frequency of 48.5%, rural agricultural sites had a mean frequency of 45.0%, and hunter-gatherer sites had a mean frequency of 40.0%. In the urban sites male and female frequencies were near equal, but in the rural agricultural and hunter-gatherer sites female frequencies exceeded male frequencies. Dental disease was not found to have much impact on sinusitis frequency. The importance of the link between poor air quality and respiratory health is highlighted in clinical studies in both developed and developing countries, but also in bioarcheological studies.

  2. Arterial embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... This can result in damage or tissue death ( necrosis ). Arterial emboli often occur in the legs and ... sloughing) of skin Skin erosion ( ulcer ) Tissue death (necrosis; skin is dark and damaged) Symptoms of a ...

  3. Penetration of flomoxef into human maxillary and mandibular bones.

    PubMed

    Igawa, H H; Sugihara, T; Yoshida, T; Kawashima, K; Ohura, T

    1995-09-01

    Penetration of flomoxef into the maxillary and mandibular bones was assayed clinically to provide data about its usefulness for the prevention of postoperative infection after maxillofacial surgery. Twenty-one patients undergoing maxillofacial surgery at our department were given flomoxef 2 g dissolved in 20 ml of physiological saline intravenously over 3 minutes during operation, and the serum, maxillary and mandibular concentrations were measured 1, 3, and 6 hours after injection by the band culture method using Escherichia coli 7437 as the indicator strain. The mean concentrations were 53.4, 16.1, and 2.6 micrograms/ml, respectively, in the serum, 17.6, 7.8, and 1.0 micrograms/g in maxillary bone, and 16.4, 4.2, and 0.9 micrograms/g in mandibular bone. The mean bone:serum ratios at 1, 3, and 6 hours were 33.0%, 48.2%, and 36.8%, respectively, for maxillary bone, and 30.7%, 26.2%, and 35.7% for mandibular bone. When compared with previously reported data on the bone:serum ratios in jaw of various other intravenous antibiotics, our results show that penetration of flomoxef into maxillary and mandibular bone is extremely high. As all the intramaxillary and intramandibular concentrations exceed its MIC80 values against clinical isolates of bacteria frequently isolated in cases of infection in the oral and maxillofacial region, it is apparent that one intravenous shot of flomoxef 2 g allows penetration of the drug into the maxillary and mandibular bones at effective concentrations. Flomoxef is therefore potentially useful for the prevention and treatment of infections in the oral and maxillofacial region, as it has excellent penetration into the maxillary and mandibular bones.

  4. Zygomatico-maxillary Reconstruction with Computer-aided Manufacturing of a Free DCIA Osseous Flap and Intraoral Anastomoses.

    PubMed

    Roy, Andrée-Anne; Efanov, Johnny I; Mercier-Couture, Geneviève; Chollet, André; Borsuk, Daniel E

    2017-02-01

    Craniomaxillofacial reconstruction using virtual surgical planning, computer-aided manufacturing, and new microsurgical techniques optimizes patient-specific and defect-directed reconstruction. A 3D customized free deep circumflex iliac artery (DCIA) flap with intraoral anastomoses was performed on a 23-year-old man with a posttraumatic right zygomatico-maxillary defect with failure of alloplastic implant reconstruction. An osseous iliac crest flap was sculpted based on a customized 3D model of the mirror image of the patient's unaffected side to allow for perfect fit to the zygomatico-maxillary defect. An intraoral dissection of the facial artery and vein was performed within the right cheek mucosa and allowed for end-to-end microvascular anastomoses. 3D preoperative planning and customized free DCIA osseous flap combined with an intraoral microsurgical technique provided restoration of facial esthetics and function without visible scars. In cases where zygomatico-malar reconstruction by alloplastic material fails, a customized free DCIA osseous flap can be designed by virtual surgical planning to restore facial appearance and function.

  5. Mandibular fracture patterns consistent with posterior maxillary fractures involving the posterior maxillary sinus, pterygoid plate or both: CT characteristics.

    PubMed

    Imai, T; Sukegawa, S; Kanno, T; Fujita, G; Yamamoto, N; Furuki, Y; Michizawa, M

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of posterior maxillary fractures involving the posterior maxillary sinus wall, pterygoid plate or both, unrelated to major midface fractures in patients with mandibular fractures, and to characterize associated fractures. A CT study was performed in patients with mandibular fractures to identify posterior maxillary fractures. Patients aged under 16 years, those with mandibular fractures involving only dentoalveolar components and those with concurrent major midfacial fractures were excluded. 13 (6.7%) of 194 patients with mandibular fractures also had posterior maxillary fractures (case group). The injury pattern correlated with the external force directed to the lateral side of the mandible (p < 0.001), alcohol consumption (p = 0.049), the presence of multifocal fractures (p = 0.002) and the fracture regions in the symphysis/parasymphysis (p = 0.001) and the angle/ramus (p = 0.001). No significant difference between the case and non-case groups was seen for age, sex or cause of trauma. Non-displaced fractures in the ipsilateral posterior mandible occurred with significant frequency (p = 0.001) when the posterior maxillary fractures involved only the sinus. Mandibular fractures accompanied by posterior maxillary fractures are not rare. The finding of a unilateral posterior maxillary fracture on CT may aid the efficient radiological examination of the mandible based on possible patterns of associated fractures, as follows: in the ipsilateral posterior region as a direct fracture when the impact is a medially directed force, and in the symphysis/parasymphysis or contralateral condylar neck as an indirect fracture.

  6. Mandibular fracture patterns consistent with posterior maxillary fractures involving the posterior maxillary sinus, pterygoid plate or both: CT characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Sukegawa, S; Kanno, T; Fujita, G; Yamamoto, N; Furuki, Y; Michizawa, M

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: The aim of this study was to determine the incidence of posterior maxillary fractures involving the posterior maxillary sinus wall, pterygoid plate or both, unrelated to major midface fractures in patients with mandibular fractures, and to characterize associated fractures. Methods: A CT study was performed in patients with mandibular fractures to identify posterior maxillary fractures. Patients aged under 16 years, those with mandibular fractures involving only dentoalveolar components and those with concurrent major midfacial fractures were excluded. Results: 13 (6.7%) of 194 patients with mandibular fractures also had posterior maxillary fractures (case group). The injury pattern correlated with the external force directed to the lateral side of the mandible (p < 0.001), alcohol consumption (p = 0.049), the presence of multifocal fractures (p = 0.002) and the fracture regions in the symphysis/parasymphysis (p = 0.001) and the angle/ramus (p = 0.001). No significant difference between the case and non-case groups was seen for age, sex or cause of trauma. Non-displaced fractures in the ipsilateral posterior mandible occurred with significant frequency (p = 0.001) when the posterior maxillary fractures involved only the sinus. Conclusions: Mandibular fractures accompanied by posterior maxillary fractures are not rare. The finding of a unilateral posterior maxillary fracture on CT may aid the efficient radiological examination of the mandible based on possible patterns of associated fractures, as follows: in the ipsilateral posterior region as a direct fracture when the impact is a medially directed force, and in the symphysis/parasymphysis or contralateral condylar neck as an indirect fracture. PMID:24336313

  7. Maxillary Sinus Dimensions Decrease as Age and Tooth Loss Increase.

    PubMed

    Velasco-Torres, Miguel; Padial-Molina, Miguel; Avila-Ortiz, Gustavo; García-Delgado, Raúl; OʼValle, Francisco; Catena, Andrés; Galindo-Moreno, Pablo

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the correlation between patient-dependent variables and dimensional variations of the maxillary sinus. In this cross-sectional study, a total of 394 individual cone-beam computed tomography scans were evaluated by one calibrated examiner to measure the total volume of the maxillary sinus, the distance between the medial and the lateral walls at 5, 10, and 15 mm vertically from the sinus floor, the height of septa (if present), and the height of the maxillary sinus cavity from both the alveolar crest and the sinus floor to the meatus. Recorded patient-dependent variables were age, gender, and edentulism status. Total maxillary sinus volume was significantly smaller in completely and partially edentulous patients than in dentate subjects. This finding was influenced by age, as older patients exhibited less volume, regardless of gender and edentulism status. Age showed an indirect correlation with the distance to the meatus, the sinus volume, and the mediolateral dimensions. Additionally, the prevalence of accessory meatus in this population was 29.19%. The dimensions of the maxillary sinus are influenced by age and edentulism status being reduced by aging and tooth loss.

  8. [Evolution of maxillary sinus surgery in a university hospital].

    PubMed

    Waizel-Haiat, Salomón; Solano-Mendoza, María del Carmen; Vargas-Aguayo, Alejandro Martin

    2012-01-01

    Maxillary sinus surgery has been evolving and, due to advances in technology, endoscopic surgery is widely used in the maxillary sinus for multiple pathologies that 15 years ago were treated through open approaches. For this reason, we conducted an observational descriptive study. We reviewed the clinical records of patients with pathology involving the maxillary sinus and who were surgically treated from January 2008 to December 2009, type of disease, surgical approach used, presence of complications, pre- and postoperative score according to the Lund-Mackay scale, and resolution (or not) of symptoms. We compared these results with a previous study carried out in 1994 in our hospital. We found a total of 177 patients with maxillary sinus-related pathology, of whom 46 patients were excluded. In 131 patients we found a clear predominance of chronic rhinosinusitis without polyps as a pre-surgical diagnosis. We used four different approaches: endoscopic (88.5%), combined approach (5.5%), sublabial expanded (4.5%) and Caldwell Luc (1.5%); 41% of the patients received 0 points on the postoperative Lund-Mackay scale. Surgery of the maxillary sinus in our hospital has evolved considerably; the endoscopic approach was used as a surgical treatment in >90% of patients with a low percentage of complications.

  9. Transnasal endoscopic medial maxillectomy in recurrent maxillary sinus inverted papilloma.

    PubMed

    Kamel, Reda H; Abdel Fattah, Ahmed F; Awad, Ayman G

    2014-12-01

    Maxillary sinus inverted papilloma entails medial maxillectomy and is associated with high incidence of recurrence. To study the impact of prior surgery on recurrence rate after transnasal endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Eighteen patients with primary and 33 with recurrent maxillary sinus inverted papilloma underwent transnasal endoscopic medial maxillectomy. Caldwell-Luc operation was the primary surgery in 12 patients, transnasal endoscopic resection in 20, and midfacial degloving technique in one. The follow-up period ranged between 2 to 19.5 years with an average of 8.8 years. Recurrence was detected in 8/51 maxillary sinus inverted papilloma patients (15.7 %), 1/18 of primary cases (5.5 %), 7/33 of recurrent cases (21.2 %); 3/20 of the transnasal endoscopic resection group (15%) and 4/12 of the Caldwell-Luc group (33.3%). Redo transnasal endoscopic medial maxillectomy was followed by a single recurrence in the Caldwell-Luc group (25%), and no recurrence in the other groups. Recurrence is more common in recurrent maxillary sinus inverted papilloma than primary lesions. Recurrent maxillary sinus inverted papilloma after Caldwell-Luc operation has higher incidence of recurrence than after transnasal endoscopic resection.

  10. Unilateral maxillary molar distalization with zygoma-gear appliance.

    PubMed

    Kilkis, Dogan; Bayram, Mehmet; Celikoglu, Mevlut; Nur, Metin

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this study was to present the orthodontic treatment of a 15-year-old boy with a unilateral maxillary molar distalization system, called the zygoma-gear appliance. It consisted of a zygomatic anchorage miniplate, an inner bow, and a Sentalloy closed coil spring (GAC International, Bohemia, NY). A distalizing force of 350 g was used during the distalization period. The unilateral Class II malocclusion was corrected in 5 months with the zygoma-gear appliance. The maxillary left first molar showed distalization of 4 mm with an inclination of 3°. The maxillary premolars moved distally with the help of the transseptal fibers. In addition, there were slight decreases in overjet (-0.5 mm) and maxillary incisor inclination (-1°), indicating no anchorage loss from the zygoma-gear appliance. Preadjusted fixed appliances (0.022 × 0.028-in, MBT system; 3M Unitek, Monrovia, Calif) were placed in both arches to achieve leveling and alignment. After 14 months of unilateral distalization with the zygoma-gear appliance and fixed appliances, Class I molar and canine relationships were established with satisfactory interdigitation of the posterior teeth. Acceptable overjet and overbite were also achieved. This article shows that this new system, the zygoma-gear appliance, can be used for unilateral maxillary molar distalization without anchorage loss. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Posterior Open Bite Due to Failure of Maxillary Molar Eruption.

    PubMed

    Yasumura, Toshihiko; Sueishi, Kenji

    2016-01-01

    Posterior open bite can cause problems with occlusion. It arises from systemic or local factors such as physical or functional interference, ankylosis, and failure of eruption. Primary failure of eruption (PFE) is a rare condition that is difficult to differentiate from ankylosis and requires complex treatment strategies. Here we report a 12-year-old girl who was referred to our hospital by her dentist for re-evaluation of eruption failure of the left maxillary secondary premolar and first and second molars with congenitally missing maxillary lateral teeth. The maxillary first molar was extracted for a therapeutic diagnosis. The left maxillary secondary premolar and second molar reacted well to subsequent orthodontic treatment. Auto-transplantation of the mandibular premolar to the maxil-lary arch was carried out to achieve optimal overjet, overbite, and occlusion. The active treatment period spanned 4 years and 1 month. Assessment of the patient's medical and dental history, prior trauma, and clinical conditions resulted in a therapeutic diagnosis of PFE. Satisfactory orthodontic treatment results were achieved.

  12. New fixation method for maxillary distraction osteogenesis using locking attachments.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Eduardo Yugo; Buranastidporn, Boonsiva; Ishii, Masatoshi

    2006-10-01

    The external traction hooks of the intraoral splint used in the rigid external distraction (RED) system for maxillary distraction osteogenesis interfere with the surgical procedures. The purpose of this study is to introduce an innovative splint fixation method for maxillary distraction osteogenesis with Locking Attachments and evaluate their advantages, such as reduction of operating time compared with the traditional intraoral splint method. Retrospective comparison of operative times of maxillary Le Fort I osteotomy procedures was carried out with the traditional protocol using the intraoral splint cemented to the maxillary dentition (n = 14), and a removable intraoral splint that is inserted postsurgically (n = 14). Operative procedure times were compared and analyzed statistically using the data extracted from the surgical records. There were no complications inserting the removable splint postsurgically, including pain, discomfort, or time-consuming procedure. Stable and secure splint fixation was obtained before the distraction procedure and the desired treatment goals were obtained in all patients. The total operative procedure times were significantly reduced in the Locking Attachments group by 24% to 41% (approximately 65 minutes) compared with earlier operations involving the conventional splints (P < .05). Maxillary distraction osteogenesis with the Locking Attachments is a highly effective fixation approach to manage severe hypoplastic maxilla, eliminating lip constraints resulting from scarring and allowing for easier, more deliberate and careful dissection. The use of the Locking Attachments is reliable in craniofacial surgery and has proved to be advantageous in the reduction of the operating time and surgical risks.

  13. Antibiotics for acute maxillary sinusitis in adults.

    PubMed

    Ahovuo-Saloranta, Anneli; Rautakorpi, Ulla-Maija; Borisenko, Oleg V; Liira, Helena; Williams, John W; Mäkelä, Marjukka

    2014-02-11

    Sinusitis is one of the most common diagnoses among adults in ambulatory care, accounting for 15% to 21% of all adult outpatient antibiotic prescriptions. However, the role of antibiotics for sinusitis is controversial. To assess the effects of antibiotics in adults with acute maxillary sinusitis by comparing antibiotics with placebo, antibiotics from different classes and the side effects of different treatments. We searched CENTRAL 2013, Issue 2, MEDLINE (1946 to March week 3, 2013), EMBASE (1974 to March 2013), SIGLE (OpenSIGLE, later OpenGrey (accessed 15 January 2013)), reference lists of the identified trials and systematic reviews of placebo-controlled studies. We also searched for ongoing trials via ClinicalTrials.gov and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP). We imposed no language or publication restrictions. Randomised controlled trials (RCTs) comparing antibiotics with placebo or antibiotics from different classes for acute maxillary sinusitis in adults. We included trials with clinically diagnosed acute sinusitis, confirmed or not by imaging or bacterial culture. Two review authors independently screened search results, extracted data and assessed trial quality. We calculated risk ratios (RRs) for differences between intervention and control groups in whether the treatment failed or not. All measures are presented with 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We conducted the meta-analyses using either the fixed-effect or random-effects model. In meta-analyses of the placebo-controlled studies, we combined data across antibiotic classes. Primary outcomes were clinical failure rates at 7 to 15 days and 16 to 60 days follow-up. We used GRADEpro to assess the quality of the evidence. We included 63 studies in this updated review; nine placebo-controlled studies involving 1915 participants (seven of the studies clearly conducted in primary care settings) and 54 studies comparing different classes of antibiotics (10 different comparisons

  14. Management of unerupted maxillary deciduous central incisor: a case report.

    PubMed

    Shakra, Karam Abu

    2014-01-01

    Failure of eruption of primary teeth can be considered rare, especially in maxillary anterior teeth. The problem can be either mechanical obstruction of eruption or a failure of the eruption mechanism. This case report presents failure of eruption of the maxillary right deciduous central incisor in a 4-year-old girl. The unerupted primary tooth was removed surgically. The histological finding revealed fibroma with reactive giant cells. Periodic follow-up visits were advised to monitor the developing dentition and to ensure enough space for the permanent incisor. How to cite this article: Shakra KA. Management of Unerupted Maxillary Deciduous Central Incisor: A Case Report. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2014;7(1):58-60.

  15. Maxillary Chronic Osteomyelitis Caused by Domestic Violence: A Diagnostic Challenge

    PubMed Central

    Oliveira, Tamyris Inácio; de Carli, Marina Lara; Ribeiro Junior, Noé Vital; Pereira, Alessandro Antônio Costa; Tatakis, Dimitris N.; Hanemann, João Adolfo Costa

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary osteomyelitis is a rare condition defined as inflammation of the bone primarily caused by odontogenic bacteria, with trauma being the second leading cause. The present report documents a rare case of maxillary osteomyelitis in a 38-year-old female who was the victim of domestic violence approximately a year prior to presentation. Intraoral examination revealed a lesion appearing as exposed bony sequestrum, with significant destruction of gingiva and alveolar mucosa in the maxillary right quadrant, accompanied by significant pain, local edema, and continued purulence. Teeth numbers 11, 12, 13, 14, and 15 were mobile, not responsive to percussion, and nonvital. Treatment included antibiotic therapy for seven days followed by total enucleation of the necrotic bone tissue and extraction of the involved teeth. Microscopic findings confirmed the clinical diagnosis of chronic suppurative osteomyelitis. Six months postoperatively, the treated area presented complete healing and there was no sign of recurrence of the lesion. PMID:25610667

  16. Mucus retention cyst of the maxillary sinus: the endoscopic approach.

    PubMed

    Hadar, T; Shvero, J; Nageris, B I; Yaniv, E

    2000-06-01

    To present our experience of endoscopic surgery for symptomatic mucus retention cyst of the maxillary sinus. Retrospective study. Teaching hospital, Israel. 60 patients with 65 symptomatic cysts of the maxillary sinus who were operated on endoscopically. Only patients with large cysts that filled at least 50% of the sinus space were included. A rigid nasal endoscope was used in all cases; most of the cysts were removed through the natural sinus ostium. Cysts recurred in only two patients during the first postoperative year. There were no complications from the procedure. The endoscopic approach to the treatment of maxillary sinus cyst is associated with a low rate of recurrence (3% in this study) and no complications, and we recommend it as the surgical procedure of choice. Copyright 2000 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

  17. Aberration in the palatal root of the maxillary first molar

    PubMed Central

    Rajalbandi, Sandeep; Shingte, Sandhya Narayan; Sundaresh, K J; Mallikarjuna, Rachappa

    2013-01-01

    Thorough knowledge of root canal morphology is essential for the endodontic therapy. Variations in the root and root canal morphology, especially in multirooted teeth, are a constant challenge for diagnosis and management. The dentist needs to be familiar with the various root canal configurations and their variations for successful endodontic therapy. There are rare variations in canal number and configuration in maxillary molars, which could affect treatment outcome. Two lingual root structures are occasionally found on human permanent maxillary molars. One of these is the normal lingual root, which is always present, the other is a supernumerary structure which can be located either mesiolingually (radix mesiolingualis) or distolingually (radix distolingualis). The purpose of this paper is to review the literature and to demonstrate a case report which describes the successful non-surgical endodontic management of an unusual maxillary first molar with four separate roots and four canals. PMID:23632609

  18. Orthodontically induced eruption of a horizontally impacted maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Rizzatto, Susana Maria Deon; de Menezes, Luciane Macedo; Allgayer, Susiane; Batista, Eraldo Luiz; Freitas, Maria Perpétua Mota; Loro, Raphael Carlos Drumond

    2013-07-01

    This case report presents the clinical features and periodontal findings in a patient with a horizontally impacted maxillary central incisor that had been exposed and aligned after a closed-eruption surgical technique. By combining 3 treatment stages-maxillary expansion, crown exposure surgery, and induced eruption-the horizontally impacted incisor was successfully moved into proper position. The patient finished treatment with a normal and stable occlusion between the maxillary and mandibular arches, and an adequate width of attached gingiva, even in the area surrounding the crown. The 5-year follow-up of stability and periodontal health demonstrated esthetic and functional outcomes after orthodontically induced tooth eruption. Clinical evaluation showed that the treated central incisor had periodontal clinical variables related to visible plaque, bleeding on probing, width of attached gingiva, and crown length that resembled the contralateral incisor. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Camouflage treatment for class III malocclusion combined with traction of an impacted maxillary central incisor.

    PubMed

    Closs, Luciane Quadrado; Mundstock, Karina Santos; Ribeiro, Darlene Santos; Reston, Eduardo Galia; Silva, Aurelício Novaes

    2010-01-01

    This case report describes the treatment of a patient with an unerupted maxillary left central incisor, class III malocclusion with crossbite of the maxillary posterior teeth and lateral open bite. Treatment consisted of rapid maxillary expansion followed by anterior space opening, maxillary protraction and traction of the unerupted teeth with a light force system. Favorable results were obtained in terms of correcting incisor position and class III malocclusion. The results achieved remained stable throughout a 4-year retention period.

  20. An analysis of maxillary anterior teeth: facial and dental proportions.

    PubMed

    Hasanreisoglu, Ufuk; Berksun, Semih; Aras, Kerem; Arslan, Ilker

    2005-12-01

    The size and form of the maxillary anterior teeth are important in achieving pleasing dental and facial esthetics. However, little scientific data have been defined as criteria for evaluating these morphological features. This study analyzed the clinical crown dimensions of maxillary anterior teeth to determine whether consistent relationships exist between tooth width and several facial measurements in a subset of the Turkish population. Full-face and anterior tooth images of 100 Turkish dental students viewed from the front and engaged in maximum smiling were recorded with digital photography under standardized conditions. Gypsum casts of the maxillary arches of the subjects were also made. The dimensions of the anterior teeth, the occurrence of the golden ratio, the difference between the actual and perceived sizes, and the relationship between the anterior teeth and several facial measurements by gender were analyzed using the information obtained from both the computer images and the casts. One-sample, 2-sample, and paired t tests, and repeated-measures analysis of variance and Duncan multiple-range tests were performed to analyze the data (alpha=.05). The dimensions of the central incisors (P<.05) and canines (P<.01) varied by gender. The existence of the so-called "golden proportion" for the maxillary anterior teeth as a whole was not found. Significant differences emerged when the mean ratios between various perceived widths were compared with their ideal golden ratios (P<.01). Proportional relationships between the bizygomatic width and the width of the central incisor, and the intercanine distance and the interalar width in women were observed. The maxillary central incisor and canine dimensions of men were greater than those of women in the Turkish population studied, with the canines showing the greatest gender variation. Neither a golden proportion nor any other recurrent proportion for all anterior teeth was determined. Bizygomatic width and interalar

  1. Orthodontic management of bilateral maxillary canine-first premolar transposition and bilateral agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors: a case report.

    PubMed

    Di Palma, Elena; Di Giuseppe, Biagio; Tepedino, Michele; Chimenti, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary canine-first premolar transposition (Mx.C.P1) is an uncommon dental positional anomaly that may create many orthodontic problems from both esthetic and functional points of view. In this report we show the orthodontic management of a case of Mx.C.P1 associated with bilateral maxillary lateral incisor agenesis and unilateral mandibular second premolar agenesis The patient was treated with a multibracket appliance and the extraction of the lower premolar. treatment was completed without the need for any prosthetic replacement.

  2. Three-dimensional evaluation of nasal and pharyngeal airway after Le Fort I maxillary distraction osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Gokce, S M; Gorgulu, S; Karacayli, U; Gokce, H S; Battal, B

    2015-04-01

    The aims of this study were to evaluate volumetric changes in the nasal cavity (NC) and pharyngeal airway space (PAS) after Le Fort I maxillary distraction osteogenesis (MDO) using a three-dimensional (3D) simulation program, and to determine the effects of MDO on respiratory function during sleep with polysomnography (PSG). 3D computed tomography images were obtained and analyzed before surgery (T0) and at a mean 8.2 ± 1.2 months postsurgery (T1) (SimPlant-OMS software) for 11 male patients (mean age 25.3 ± 5.9 years) with severe skeletal class III anomalies related to maxillary retrognathia. The simulation of osteotomies and placement of distractors were performed on stereolithographic 3D models. NC and PAS were segmented separately on these models for comparison of changes between T0 and T1. PSG including the apnoea-hypopnoea index (AHI), sleep efficiency, sleep stages (weakness, stages 1-4, and rapid eye movement (REM)), and mean lowest arterial O2 saturation were obtained at T0 and T1 to investigate changes in respiratory function during sleep. MDO was successful in all cases as planned on the models; the average forward movement at A point was 10.2mm. Increases in NC and PAS volume after MDO were statistically significant. These increases resulted in significant improvement in sleep quality. PSG parameters changed after MDO; AHI and sleep stages weakness, 1, and 2 decreased, whereas REM, stages 3 and 4, sleep efficiency, and mean O2 saturation increased. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Clinical and biological analysis in graftless maxillary sinus lift.

    PubMed

    Parra, Marcelo; Olate, Sergio; Cantín, Mario

    2017-08-01

    Maxillary sinus lift for dental implant installation is a well-known and versatile technique; new techniques are presented based on the physiology of intrasinus bone repair. The aim of this review was to determine the status of graftless maxillary sinus lift and analyze its foundations and results. A search was conducted of the literature between 1995 and 2015 in the Medline, ScienceDirect, and SciELO databases using the keywords "maxillary sinus lift," "blood clot," "graftless maxillary sinus augmentation," and "dental implant placement." Ten articles were selected for our analysis of this technique and its results. Despite the limited information, cases that were followed for at least six months and up to four years had a 90% success rate. Published techniques included a lateral window, elevation of the sinus membrane, drilling and dental implant installation, descent of the membrane with variations in the installation of the lateral wall access and suturing. The physiology behind this new bone formation response and the results of the present research were also discussed. We concluded that this is a promising and viable technique under certain inclusion criteria.

  4. Long-term results of surgically-assisted maxillary protraction.

    PubMed

    Nevzatoğlu, Sirin; Küçükkeleş, Nazan

    2014-05-01

    The long-term treatment results of surgically-assisted facemask therapy were assessed by a comparison of the immediate protraction effects with those seen at five years review. Nine patients treated with a corticotomy-assisted maxillary protraction protocol were recalled five years following protraction. Cephalometric films taken before treatment (T0), immediately after maxillary protraction (T1) and five years after treatment (T2) were compared. The short-term results of surgically-assisted facemask therapy showed significant skeletal and soft tissue changes. After five years, the profile and dental relationships were well maintained and a cephalometric analysis revealed a stable vertical increase but only partially maintained soft tissue changes with loss of sagittal advancement. There was significant upper incisor proclination providing dental camouflage. Patients who are treated with corticotomy-assisted maxillary advancement should be very carefully selected. Assessment criteria include a low mandibular plane angle Class III patients who have severe maxillary retrognathism unable to be treated by conventional orthopaedic correction alone; patients who have almost completed growth and missed the chance of earlier orthopaedic correction, as well as patients who are not willing to accept bimaxillary orthognathic surgery, may be successfully treated.

  5. Treatment of ectopic eruption of maxillary permanent first molars.

    PubMed

    Taloumis, L J; Allinder, J R

    1993-01-01

    A review of treatment of the ectopic maxillary permanent first molar is presented; prevalence and possible etiologies of the condition are explained. A step-by-step procedure for correctly diagnosing and treating the problem is suggested. A case is described in which diagnosis and treatment followed the principles outlined.

  6. [Restoration of speech function in oncological patients with maxillary defects].

    PubMed

    Matiakin, E G; Chuchkov, V M; Akhundov, A A; Azizian, R I; Romanov, I S; Chuchkov, M V; Agapov, V V

    2009-01-01

    Speech quality was evaluated in 188 patients with acquired maxillary defects. Prosthetic treatment of 29 patients was preceded by pharmacopsychotherapy. Sixty three patients had lessons with a logopedist and 66 practiced self-tuition based on the specially developed test. Thirty patients were examined for the quality of speech without preliminary preparation. Speech quality was assessed by auditory and spectral analysis. The main forms of impaired speech quality in the patients with maxillary defects were marked rhinophonia and impaired articulation. The proposed analytical tests were based on a combination of "difficult" vowels and consonants. The use of a removable prostheses with an obturator failed to correct the affected speech function but created prerequisites for the formation of the correct speech stereotype. Results of the study suggest the relationship between the quality of speech in subjects with maxillary defects and their intellectual faculties as well as the desire to overcome this drawback. The proposed tests are designed to activate the neuromuscular apparatus responsible for the generation of the speech. Lessons with a speech therapist give a powerful emotional incentive to the patients and promote their efforts toward restoration of speaking ability. Pharmacopsychotherapy and self-control are another efficacious tools for the improvement of speech quality in patients with maxillary defects.

  7. Bilateral maxillary fused second and third molars: a rare occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Rui-Zhen; Wu, Jin-Tao; Wu, You-Nong; Smales, Roger J; Hu, Ming; Yu, Jin-Hua; Zhang, Guang-Dong

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the diagnosis and endodontic therapy of maxillary fused second and third molars, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). A 31-year-old Chinese male, with no contributory medical or family/social history, presented with throbbing pain in the maxillary right molar area following an unsuccessful attempted tooth extraction. Clinical examination revealed what appeared initially to be a damaged large extra cusp on the buccal aspect of the distobuccal cusp of the second molar. However, CBCT revealed that a third molar was fused to the second molar. Unexpectedly, the maxillary left third molar also was fused to the second molar, and the crown of an unerupted supernumerary fourth molar was possibly also fused to the apical root region of the second molar. Operative procedures should not be attempted without adequate radiographic investigation. CBCT allowed the precise location of the root canals of the right maxillary fused molar teeth to permit successful endodontic therapy, confirmed after 6 months. PMID:23222992

  8. Assessment of maxillary position. Implant vs cephalometric methods.

    PubMed

    Verayannont, Panisha; Hägg, Urban; Wong, Ricky W K; McGrath, Colman; Yeung, Shadow

    2010-09-01

    To compare changes in maxillary position assessed from a maxillary implant and three cephalometric methods based on linear measurements. Series of tracings of the maxilla obtained around puberty from an implant study were analyzed. The displacement of the implant was used to determine the direction and amount of "actual" maxillary growth. Displacement of point A was measured according to three cephalometric methods. The values obtained from absolute, horizontal, and vertical displacement of point A by three cephalometric methods and by the implant method were compared. Results showed that estimation of displacement of the maxilla by three cephalometric methods (point A) was significantly larger than that of the implant method in all directions. The average difference in the horizontal plane was 0.7 mm, 1.2 mm, and 1.6 mm, respectively; the average difference in the vertical plane was 2.2 mm, 2.5 mm, and 3.6 mm, respectively. Estimations of changes in maxillary position by the implant method and by cephalometric methods were not proportional. All three cephalometric methods overestimated changes in the position of the maxilla.

  9. Extraction of Maxillary Central Incisors: An Orthodontic-Restorative Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Hedayati, Zohreh; Zare, Maryam; Bahramnia, Fateme

    2014-01-01

    Malformed central incisors with poor prognosis could be candidates for extraction especially in crowded dental arches. This case report refers to a 12-year-old boy who suffered from malformed upper central incisors associated with severe attrition. Upper lateral incisors were positioned palatally and canines were rotated and positioned in the high buccal area. The patient had class II malocclusion and space deficiency in both dental arches. Due to incisal wear and malformed short maxillary central incisors and the need for root canal therapy with a major crown build-up, these teeth were extracted. The maxillary lateral incisors were substituted. Thus the maxillary canines were substituted for lateral incisors and the first premolars were substituted for canines. In the lower dental arch the first bicuspids were extracted. Composite resin build-up was performed on the maxillary lateral incisors and canines. This allowed for the crowding and the malocclusion to be corrected. Subsequent gingivectomy improved the patient's gingival margins and smile esthetics one month after orthodontic therapy. PMID:25400954

  10. Accuracy of maxillary positioning after standard and inverted orthognathic sequencing.

    PubMed

    Ritto, Fabio G; Ritto, Thiago G; Ribeiro, Danilo Passeado; Medeiros, Paulo José; de Moraes, Márcio

    2014-05-01

    This study aimed to compare the accuracy of maxillary positioning after bimaxillary orthognathic surgery, using 2 sequences. A total of 80 cephalograms (40 preoperative and 40 postoperative) from 40 patients were analyzed. Group 1 included radiographs of patients submitted to conventional sequence, whereas group 2 patients were submitted to inverted sequence. The final position of the maxillary central incisor was obtained after vertical and horizontal measurements of the tracings, and it was compared with what had been planned. The null hypothesis, which stated that there would be no difference between the groups, was tested. After applying the Welch t test for comparison of mean differences between maxillary desired and achieved position, considering a statistical significance of 5% and a 2-tailed test, the null hypothesis was not rejected (P > .05). Thus, there was no difference in the accuracy of maxillary positioning between groups. Conventional and inverted sequencing proved to be reliable in positioning the maxilla after LeFort I osteotomy in bimaxillary orthognathic surgeries. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Clinical and biological analysis in graftless maxillary sinus lift

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Maxillary sinus lift for dental implant installation is a well-known and versatile technique; new techniques are presented based on the physiology of intrasinus bone repair. The aim of this review was to determine the status of graftless maxillary sinus lift and analyze its foundations and results. A search was conducted of the literature between 1995 and 2015 in the Medline, ScienceDirect, and SciELO databases using the keywords “maxillary sinus lift,” “blood clot,” “graftless maxillary sinus augmentation,” and “dental implant placement.” Ten articles were selected for our analysis of this technique and its results. Despite the limited information, cases that were followed for at least six months and up to four years had a 90% success rate. Published techniques included a lateral window, elevation of the sinus membrane, drilling and dental implant installation, descent of the membrane with variations in the installation of the lateral wall access and suturing. The physiology behind this new bone formation response and the results of the present research were also discussed. We concluded that this is a promising and viable technique under certain inclusion criteria. PMID:28875135

  12. Treatment of maxillary cleft palate: Distraction osteogenesis vs. orthognathic surgery

    PubMed Central

    Rachmiel, Adi; Even-Almos, Michal; Aizenbud, Dror

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to compare the treatment of hypoplastic, retruded maxillary cleft palate using distraction osteogenesis vs. orthognathic surgery in terms of stability and relapse, growth after distraction and soft tissue profile changes. Materials and Methods: The cleft patients showed anteroposterior maxillary hypoplasia with class III malocclusion and negative overjet resulting in a concave profile according to preoperative cephalometric measurements, dental relationship, and soft tissue analysis. The patients were divided in two groups of treatment : S0 eventeen were treated by orthognathic Le Fort I osteotomy fixed with four mini plates and 2 mm screws, and 19 were treated by maxillary distraction osteogenesis with rigid extraoral devices (RED) connected after a Le Fort I osteotomy. The rate of distraction was 1 mm per day to achieve Class I occlusion with slight overcorrection and to create facial profile convexity. Following a 10 week latency period the distraction devices were removed. Results: In the RED group the maxilla was advanced an average of 15.80 mm. The occlusion changed from class III to class I. The profile of the face changed from concave to convex. At a 1-year follow up the results were stable. The mean orthognathic movement was 8.4 mm. Conclusion: In mild maxillary deficiency a one stage orthognathic surgery is preferable. However, in patients requiring moderate to large advancements with significant structural deficiencies of the maxilla or in growing patients the distraction technique is preferred. PMID:23483803

  13. Maxillary sinusitis from Microascus cinereus and Aspergillus repens.

    PubMed

    Aznar, C; de Bievre, C; Guiguen, C

    1989-02-01

    Microascus was associated with Aspergillus repens in a left maxillary sinus. Tissue contained septale filaments of two types, conidia, ostiolate perithecia containing ascospores corresponding to Microascus cinereus which was identified by culture. The abundance of sexual fructifications in the tissue indicates that pathogenicity is due to Microascus cinereus.

  14. Odontometric analysis of permanent maxillary first molar in gender determination.

    PubMed

    Shireen, Ayesha; Ara, Syeda Arshiya

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to assess the sex determination potential from mesiodistal (MD) and buccolingual (BL) dimensions of permanent maxillary first molar. The study was conducted in the Department of Oral Medicine and Radiology, Al-Badar Rural Dental College and Hospital, Gulbarga, Karnataka, on 600 subjects (300 male and 300 female), aged 17-25 years. The subjects were selected based on the inclusion and exclusion criteria set forth for the study. After obtaining informed consent, the intraoral measurements of MD and BL dimensions on casts of the first maxillary molars were taken using digital vernier caliper with resolution of 0.01 mm. The data obtained were subjected to statistical analysis using paired and unpaired t -test to compare MD and BL dimensions between males and females. P ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. The mean MD width of the first maxillary molar was 10.60 ± 0.6644 mm (right) and 10.60 ± 0.6644 mm (left) in males and 10.40 ± 0.6255 mm (right) and 10.40 ± 0.6255 mm (left) in females. The mean BL width of the first maxillary molar was 11.60 ± 1.2227 mm (right) and 11.60 ± 1.2227 mm (left) in males and 11.20 ± 0.8440 mm (right) and 11.20 ± 0.8440 mm (left) in females. The differences between males and females in MD and BL dimensions measured were statistically significant ( P < 0.05). Right and left MD dimensions exhibited sexual dimorphism of 1.92% and right and left BL dimensions exhibited sexual dimorphism of 3.57%. The MD and BL dimensions of the maxillary first molars may be used as an aid in sex discrimination.

  15. [Predictability of maxillary distraction with the trans-sinusoidal distractor].

    PubMed

    Nadjmi, N

    2004-02-01

    This work was conducted to evaluate a new maxillary distractor with an activating system introduced into the maxilary sinus. Fourteen patients age 8 to 55 Years with severe maxillary and midfacial hypoplasia were treated in our center. A trans-sinusoidal maxillary distractor (TS-MD, developed by Dr. N. Nadjmi in cooperation with Martin, Tuttlingen, Germany) was placed intra-orally at each side of the maxilla. The distraction vector was predicted with devoted software (Medicim N.V Belgium), and was transferred to the patients using stereolithographic models and individual templates. A high Lefort I type osteotomy was performed. Forward maxillary movement at distractor level varied from 7 to 22 mm. Soft and hard tIssue formation resulted in complete healing across the distraction gaps. The maxillary movements and new bone formation in the sagittal, horizontal, and vertical planes could be predicted and achieved. Distractors were designed to allow clockwise rotation of the maxilla during the distraction phase allowing the correction of the anterior open-bite in all patients with this skeletal deformity. The distractors were almost completely submerged, and could be left in place as long as necessary to avoid relapse. The TS-MD distractor has the advantage of good tolerance since the most voluminous part is placed within the maxilary sinus. Implantation via an exclusively oral approach is a further advantage. The devise does not interfere with the patient's social life and does not require alveolodental fixation. The TS-MD distractor can also aleviate the need for bone grafting in cases with major advancement. Correct position of the vector is crucial but one-sided catch-up distraction is possible.

  16. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction in the treatment of severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongliang; Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Zhang, Jianfei; Wang, Minjiao; Shen, Steve Guofang; Yu, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) is an effective surgical procedure in the treatment of maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate. Its unique advantage of preserving velopharyngeal function makes this procedure widely applied. In this study, the application of AMSD was described and its long-term stability was explored. Eight patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP were included in this study. They were treated with AMSD using rigid external distraction (RED) device. Cephalometric analysis was performed twice at three time points for evaluation: before surgery (T1), after distraction (T2), and 2 years after treatment (T3). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the differences statistically. All the distractions completed smoothly, and maxilla was distracted efficiently. The value of SNA, NA-FH, Ptm-A, U1-PP, overjet and PP (ANS-PNS) increased significantly after the AMSD procedure (P < 0.05), with the mean overjet increased by 14.28 mm. However, comparison of cephalometric analysis between T2 and T3 showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Changes of palatopharyngeal depth and soft palatal length were insignificant. AMSD with RED device provided an effective way to correct maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP, extended the palatal and arch length, avoided damage on velopharyngeal closure function and reduced the relapse rate. It is a promising and valuable technique in this potentially complicated procedure. PMID:26629107

  17. Anterior maxillary segmental distraction in the treatment of severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongliang; Dai, Jiewen; Si, Jiawen; Zhang, Jianfei; Wang, Minjiao; Shen, Steve Guofang; Yu, Hongbo

    2015-01-01

    Anterior maxillary segmental distraction (AMSD) is an effective surgical procedure in the treatment of maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate. Its unique advantage of preserving velopharyngeal function makes this procedure widely applied. In this study, the application of AMSD was described and its long-term stability was explored. Eight patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP were included in this study. They were treated with AMSD using rigid external distraction (RED) device. Cephalometric analysis was performed twice at three time points for evaluation: before surgery (T1), after distraction (T2), and 2 years after treatment (T3). One-way analysis of variance was used to assess the differences statistically. All the distractions completed smoothly, and maxilla was distracted efficiently. The value of SNA, NA-FH, Ptm-A, U1-PP, overjet and PP (ANS-PNS) increased significantly after the AMSD procedure (P < 0.05), with the mean overjet increased by 14.28 mm. However, comparison of cephalometric analysis between T2 and T3 showed no significant difference (P > 0.05). Changes of palatopharyngeal depth and soft palatal length were insignificant. AMSD with RED device provided an effective way to correct maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP, extended the palatal and arch length, avoided damage on velopharyngeal closure function and reduced the relapse rate. It is a promising and valuable technique in this potentially complicated procedure.

  18. Comparative evaluation of maxillary protraction with or without skeletal anchorage.

    PubMed

    Sar, Cağla; Arman-Özçırpıcı, Ayça; Uçkan, Sina; Yazıcı, A Canan

    2011-05-01

    The aim of this prospective clinical study was to evaluate the skeletal, dentoalveolar, and soft-tissue effects of maxillary protraction with miniplates compared with conventional facemask therapy and an untreated Class III control group. Forty-five subjects who were in prepubertal or pubertal skeletal growth periods were included in the study and divided into 3 groups of 15 patients each. All subjects had skeletal and dental Class III malocclusions with maxillary deficiency, vertically normal growth pattern, anterior crossbite, Angle Class III molar relationship, normal or increased overbite, and retrusive nasomaxillary complex. Before maxillary protraction, rapid maxillary expansion with a bonded appliance was performed in both treatment groups. In the first group (MP+FM), consisting of 5 girls and 10 boys (mean age, 10.91 years), facemasks were applied from 2 titanium miniplates surgically placed laterally to the apertura piriformis regions of the maxilla. The second group (FM) of 7 girls and 8 boys (mean age, 10.31 years) received maxillary protraction therapy with conventional facemasks applied from hooks of the rapid maxillary expansion appliance. The third group of 8 girls and 7 boys (mean age, 10.05 years) was the untreated control group. Lateral cephalometric films were obtained at the beginning and end of treatment or observation in all groups and analyzed according to a structural superimposition method. Measurements were evaulated statistically with Wilcoxon and Kruskal-Wallis tests. Treatment periods were 6.78 and 9.45 months in the MP+FM and FM groups, respectively, and the observation period in the control group was 7.59 months. The differences were significant between the 3 groups (P <0.05) and the MP+FM and FM groups (P <0.001). The maxilla moved forward for 2.3 mm in the MP+FM group and 1.83 mm in the FM group with maxillary protraction. The difference was significant between 2 groups (P <0.001). The protraction rates were 0.45 mm per month in the

  19. Skeletal anchorage for orthodontic correction of severe maxillary protrusion after previous orthodontic treatment.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Eiji; Nishi-Sasaki, Akiko; Hasegawa, Takuro; Nishio, Clarice; Kawai, Nobuhiko; Tanne, Kazuo

    2008-01-01

    The correction of a severe maxillary protrusion in an adult by distal movement of the maxillary molars has been one of the most difficult biomechanical problems in orthodontics. This article reports on the treatment of an adult case of severe maxillary protrusion and a large overjet treated with a skeletal anchorage system. A female patient, age 22 years and 3 months, complained of the difficulty of lip closure due to severe maxillary protrusion with a gummy smile. Overjet and overbite were +7.6 mm and -0.9 mm, respectively. She had a history of orthodontic treatment in which her maxillary first premolars were extracted. In order to conduct distal movement of the maxillary molars, anchor plates were placed in the zygomatic process. After achieving a Class I molar relationship, retraction and intrusion of the maxillary incisors were performed. After a 2-year treatment, an acceptable occlusion was achieved with a Class I molar relationship. Her convex facial profile with upper lip protrusion was considerably improved, and the lips showed less tension in lip closure. After a 2-year retention period, an acceptable occlusion was maintained without recurrence of maxillary protrusion, indicating a stability of the occlusion. The result of this treatment indicated that skeletal anchorage is of great importance as a remedy for achieving intrusion and retraction of the maxillary incisors in cases of severe maxillary protrusion with a patient who had previous orthodontic treatment.

  20. Blood-flow change and recovery of sensibility in the maxillary dental pulp during and after maxillary distraction: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kiyoshi; Sato, Masaru; Omura, Ken

    2004-11-01

    To examine the change in blood flow and recovery of sensibility in the maxillary dental pulp during and after maxillary distraction. The subjects included 5 patients undergoing high Le Fort I osteotomy and maxillary distraction (D-group) and a reference group of 14 patients who underwent a common single-segment Le Fort I osteotomy, 1-stage maxillary advancement, and mandibular setback surgery (C-group). Eleven (D-group) and 54 (C-group) maxillary incisors were assessed preoperatively and at 1-7 days, 14 days, and 3 months postoperatively. Pulpal blood flow (PBF) was measured by laser Doppler flowmetry, and pulpal sensibility (PS) was investigated by electrodiagnostics. From postoperative days 1 to 5 (the latency period), the PBF tended to be higher in the D-group than in the C-group. From day 6 to 3 months postoperatively (during and after maxillary distraction), the PBF values of the 2 groups were similar. The PS remained negative up to 14 days postoperatively in both groups. However, at 3 months after the operation, a higher proportion (90.9%) of teeth in the D-group was positive for PS. These results suggest that maxillary distraction is a favorable technique for maintenance of PBF and recovery of PS in the maxillary teeth after surgery.

  1. Maxillary bone epithelial cyst in an adult miniature schnauzer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Tien; Tasi, Wen-Chih; Hu, Chun-Kun; Lin, Nien-Ting; Huang, Pei-Yun; Yeh, Lih-Seng

    2008-09-01

    Maxillary bone epithelial cyst is rare in dogs. A 5-year-old, spayed female miniature schnauzer developed a swelling below the nasal canthus of left eye. Plain radiograph demonstrated a 1.5 cm diameter of radiolucent lesion on the maxillary bone anteroventral to the eye, and contrast dacryocystorhinography confirmed an obstructed nasolarcrimal duct. The swelling showed poor response to antibiotic treatment but responded well to oral prednisolone. Exploratory surgery revealed a cyst-like structure filled with brown serous fluid. Histopathological examination of the removed cyst revealed a double cuboidal epithelial cyst. The dog recovered rapidly after surgery, and the swelling had not recurred for a 36-month follow-up. It is the first case of periorbital bone epithelial cyst reported in an adult miniature schnauzer.

  2. The Palatal Window for Treating an Incompletely Augmented Maxillary Sinus.

    PubMed

    Florio, Salvatore; Suzuki, Takanori; Cho, Sang-Choon

    2017-04-01

    Maxillary sinus augmentation through a lateral window is reported as one of the most predictable bone augmentation procedures before implant placement. The elevation of the membrane represents a delicate and crucial step that allows the creation of the space for the bone graft material. If the elevation is not completed, the regenerated bone might be inadequate for the implant placement. In this case, a new intervention will be necessary to complete the bone augmentation. Reaccessing from a lateral window, however, would be challenging due to thickness of the buccal boney wall because of the first grafting procedure; therefore, a different approach has to be used. The aim of this case report is to present the palatal window technique for treating incompletely augmented maxillary sinus. The detailed step-by-step diagnostic and surgical procedures are described, and the advantages and limitations of the technique are discussed through a review of the literature.

  3. Maxillary Swelling as the First Evidence of Multiple Myeloma

    PubMed Central

    Kasamatsu, Atsushi; Kimura, Yasushi; Tsujimura, Hideki; Kanazawa, Harusachi; Koide, Nao; Miyamoto, Isao; Endo-Sakamoto, Yosuke; Shiiba, Masashi; Tanzawa, Hideki; Uzawa, Katsuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a malignant neoplasm of plasma cells characterized by proliferation of a single clone of abnormal immunoglobulin-secreting plasma cells. Since the amount of hemopoietic bone marrow is decreased in the maxilla, oral manifestations of multiple myeloma are less common in the maxilla than in the mandible. We report the case of 33-year-old Japanese man who presented with a mass in the right maxillary alveolar region. Computed tomography and magnetic resonance images showed a soft tissue mass in the right maxilla eroding the anterior and lateral walls of the maxillary sinus and extending into the buccal space. The biopsy results, imaging, and laboratory investigations led to the diagnosis of multiple myeloma. This case report suggests that oral surgeons and dentists should properly address oral manifestations as first indications of multiple myeloma. PMID:26640721

  4. Endodontic treatment of a maxillary central incisor with two roots.

    PubMed

    Maghsoudlou, Amir; Jafarzadeh, Hamid; Forghani, Maryam

    2013-03-01

    This clinical report presents a rare case of maxillary central incisor with two separate roots. Unusual morphology of the roots and root canals may exist in any tooth. Recognition of the dental anatomy and its variations is necessary for successful endodontic therapy. It is well known that maxillary incisors are usually single-rooted teeth. The root canals were instrumented with conventional hand files and Gates Glidden and obturated by using the lateral technique. Recall radiograph after 1 year shows the healing process of the preoperative apical periodontitis. Clinicians should be aware of unexpected root canal morphology when performing root canal therapy. The present case demonstrated the importance of accurate preoperative radiograph and adequate access preparation.

  5. Maxillary sinus floor extension and posterior tooth inclination in adolescent patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion treated with maxillary first molar extractions.

    PubMed

    Livas, Christos; Halazonetis, Demetrios J; Booij, Johan Willem; Pandis, Nikolaos; Tu, Yu-Kang; Katsaros, Christos

    2013-04-01

    Our objective was to investigate potential associations between maxillary sinus floor extension and inclination of maxillary second premolars and second molars in patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion whose orthodontic treatment included maxillary first molar extractions. The records of 37 patients (18 boys, 19 girls; mean age, 13.2 years; SD, 1.62 years) treated between 1998 and 2004 by 1 orthodontist with full Begg appliances were used in this study. Inclusion criteria were white patients with Class II Division 1 malocclusion, sagittal overjet of ≥4 mm, treatment plan including extraction of the maxillary first permanent molars, no missing teeth, and no agenesis. Maxillary posterior tooth inclination and lower maxillary sinus area in relation to the palatal plane were measured on lateral cephalograms at 3 time points: at the start and end of treatment, and on average 2.5 years posttreatment. Data were analyzed for the second premolar and second molar inclinations by using mixed linear models. The analysis showed that the second molar inclination angle decreased by 7° after orthodontic treatment, compared with pretreatment values, and by 11.5° at the latest follow-up, compared with pretreatment. There was evidence that maxillary sinus volume was negatively correlated with second molar inclination angle; the greater the volume, the smaller the inclination angle. For premolars, inclination increased by 15.4° after orthodontic treatment compared with pretreatment, and by 8.1° at the latest follow-up compared with baseline. The volume of the maxillary sinus was not associated with premolar inclination. We found evidence of an association between maxillary second molar inclination and surface area of the lower sinus in patients treated with maxillary first molar extractions. Clinicians who undertake such an extraction scheme in Class II patients should be aware of this potential association and consider appropriate biomechanics to control root

  6. Masticatory efficiency after rehabilitation of acquired maxillary and mandibular defects

    PubMed Central

    Vijayaraghavan, N. Vasantha; Ramesh, Ganesh; Thareja, Amit; Patil, Seema

    2015-01-01

    The effect of oral cancer with its therapeutic intervention involves significant facial and functional disabilities. It is customary to rehabilitate these patients by surgical or prosthetic means. Studies have been done to assess mastication and other functions after rehabilitation. A review of these studies for assessing masticatory function has been done under separate sections for maxillary and mandibular defects. Different masticatory tests are mentioned. Further scope for research has been highlighted. PMID:26392731

  7. Sealing maxillary titanium obturators with removable flexible caps.

    PubMed

    Reitemeier, Bernd; Schaal, Wolfgang; Wolf, Annette; Walter, Michael

    2016-03-01

    Maxillary obturator prostheses with hollow metal obturators can be made of titanium to reduce weight. To prevent perforation of the hollow obturator during modifications, the obturator is slightly undersized and covered with a replaceable cap. This cap is made of a soft copolymer to facilitate uncomplicated modifications in the resection area and to improve function. Copyright © 2016 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Coronary artery disease

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  11. Removal of an Upper Third Molar from the Maxillary Sinus

    PubMed Central

    Amorim, Klinger de Souza; da Silva, Vanessa Tavares; da Cunha, Rafael Soares; Souto, Maria Luisa Silveira; São Mateus, Carla Rocha; Souza, Liane Maciel de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary sinus or antrum is the largest of the paranasal sinuses. It is located in the maxillary bone and has a proximity to the apexes of upper molars and premolars, which allows it to form a direct link between the sinus and the oral cavity. Dislocation of a foreign body or tooth to the interior of a paranasal sinus is a situation that can occur as a result of car accidents, firearm attacks, or iatrogenic in surgical procedures. Therefore, it is necessary to know how to treat this kind of situation. This study's objective is to report the case of a 23-year-old female patient, leucoderma, who sought treatment from the Surgical Unit at the Dental Faculty of the Federal University of Sergipe. She had a history of pain and edema in the right side of the genian region and two failed attempts at removing dental unit (DU) 18. The extraoral clinical exam revealed intense edema of the left hemiface with signs of infection, excoriation of the labial commissure, hematoma, a body temperature of 39°C, and a limited ability to open her mouth. The patient was medicated and treated surgically. The tooth was removed from the maxillary sinus with caution, as should have been done initially. PMID:25705524

  12. Multimodal airway evaluation in growing patients after rapid maxillary expansion.

    PubMed

    Fastuca, R; Meneghel, M; Zecca, P A; Mangano, F; Antonello, M; Nucera, R; Caprioglio, A

    2015-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the airway volume of growing patients combining a morphological approach using cone beam computed tomography associated with functional data obtained by polysomnography examination after rapid maxillary expansion treatment. 22 Caucasian patients (mean age 8.3±0.9 years) undergoing rapid maxillary expansion with Haas type expander banded on second deciduous upper molars were enrolled for this prospective study. Cone beam computed tomography scans and polysomnography exams were collected before placing the appliance (T0) and after 12 months (T1). Image processing with airway volume computing and analyses of oxygen saturation and apnoea/hypopnoea index were performed. Airway volume, oxygen saturation and apnea/hypopnea index underwent significant increase over time. However, no significant correlation was seen between their increases. The rapid maxillary expansion treatment induced significant increases in the total airway volume and respiratory performance. Functional respiratory parameters should be included in studies evaluating the RME treatment effects on the respiratory performance.

  13. Maxillary advancement for mandibular prognathism: indications and rationale.

    PubMed

    Rosen, H M

    1991-05-01

    The surgical correction of mandibular prognathism has traditionally involved posterior repositioning of the mandibular body. This treatment approach corrects the skeletal disproportion at the expense of reducing facial skeletal volume and can unpredictably result in inadequately supported soft tissues with loss of skeletal definition. In an effort to avoid these sequelae of mandibular reduction, 18 patients diagnosed as having mandibular prognathism were treated with maxillary advancement surgery at the Le Fort I level. Mean patient SNB angle was 85.2 degrees, as compared with a normal 79 +/- 3 degrees. Maxillae were documented to be in normal position relative to both cranial base and Frankfort horizontal. The mean maxillary advancement was 6.9 mm, with a range of 4.5 to 8.8 mm. All patients required genioplasty to reduce vertical chin height and/or to laterally shift the chin. At the time of follow-up (mean 16.2 months), all patients retained cephalometric data suggestive of enlarged mandibles and excessive anterior facial divergence. However, maxillomandibular harmony and facial convexity had been restored without sacrificing skeletal volume. Treatment results demonstrated these faces to be skeletally well proportioned despite lower face protrusion that was beyond "normal." Postoperative appearances were characterized by a well-supported soft-tissue envelope and a highlighted skeletal foundation, creating angular, well-defined lower faces. These findings support the credibility of maxillary advancement as the procedure of choice in selected individuals with mandibular prognathism. Indications and an aesthetic rationale for this surgical approach are presented.

  14. [Piezosurgery for surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion under local anesthesia].

    PubMed

    Sun, Hao; Li, Biao; Sun, Hao; Liu, Zhixu; Wang, Xudong

    2014-08-01

    This study evaluates piezosurgery for surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) under local anesthesia. SARME was performed on adults with maxillary transverse deficiency under local anesthesia with a piezosurgical device. Fourteen patients (six males and eight females) underwent lateral maxillary osteotomies, midpalatal osteotomies, and bilateral pterygomaxillary disjunction. The feelings of patients during the operation were determined through questionnaires. All patients underwent SARME in the out-patient operating room. The surgical procedures were completed under local anesthesia. All patients exhibited satisfactory tolerance. Ultrasonic bone-cutting surgery was recently introduced as a feasible alternative to the conventional tools of cranio-maxillofacial surgery for its technical characteristics of precision and safety. The device used was unique in that cutting action occurred when the tool was employed on mineralized tissues, but stoped on soft tissues. The results of the questionnaires showed that eight (57.14%) patients felt a mild sensation of ultrasonic vibration, tweleve (85.7 1%) felt mild tolerable pain and tooth soreness during surgery, and eleven (78.57%) felt little fear and hardly heard the ultrasonic sound. Preoperative and postoperative six months later measurements showed an evident effect of expansion. Piezosurgery enabled patients to undergo all the steps of SARME under local anesthesia, but more cases and longer follow-up are needed to verif ' the results.

  15. [Cone-beam CT evaluation of nasomaxillary complex and upper airway following rapid maxillary expansion].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Qi, Suqing; Wang, Hongwei; Ren, Sufeng; Ban, Jiandong

    2015-07-01

    To evaluate the naso-maxillary complex width and pharyngeal airway volume changes after rapid maxillary expansion (RME). Thirty-five patients were selected (18 males, 17 females, mean age, 12.1 ± 1.1 years). All patients underwent orthodontic treatment with Hyrax palatal expanders. Cone-beam CT (CBCT) scan was taken before treatment (T0), 16 days (T1) and three months (T3) after RME. Naso-maxillary complex width and pharyngeal airway volume were measured. After treatment the width of piriform aperture and maxillary width were significantly increased compared with that before treatment (P < 0.05). Three months after RME, no statistical difference was found in maxillary width compared with that before treatment. The nasopharyngeal volume significantly increased by 29.9% compared with that before treatment (P < 0.05), and the volume remained relatively stable after three months. RME resulted in a significant increase in the naso-maxillary complex width and nasopharyngeal volume.

  16. Microscope-aided endodontic treatment of maxillary first premolars with three roots: a case series.

    PubMed

    Karumaran, C S; Gunaseelan, R; Krithikadatta, J

    2011-01-01

    Maxillary premolars have a highly variable root canal morphology. However, the presence of three roots is a rare occurrence. This clinical article describes the unusual anatomy detected in maxillary premolars during routine endodontic treatment using microscope. The diagnosis and clinical management of maxillary first premolars with three roots and canals using radiographic interpretation, access cavity modification and visual enhancement with operative microscopes is discussed in the article.

  17. Position and Eruption of Permanent Maxillary Canines in Cases of Maxillary Lateral Incisor Agenesis in Mixed Dentition.

    PubMed

    Lamas, Cátia; Lavall, Asela; Pinho, Teresa

    2018-01-01

    Assess whether the permanent maxillary canine (MC) has a natural tendency to erupt mesially in children with maxillary lateral incisors agenesis (MLIA), compared to children without agenesis. This retrospective, observational, cross-sectional study consisted of children between 5 and 12 years old divided into three groups: the first group with unilateral MLIA, in which an intraindividual analysis was performed, the second group presented bilateral MLIA, and the third group with patients without agenesis. These last two groups were matched for comparison interindividual, being pared by sex and maturation of the MC. The canine position in the horizontal sector showed a clear mesial positioning of the MC on the agenesis side in individuals with unilateral MLIA (group 1) when compared with the counter lateral side; and in individuals with bilateral MLIA (Group 2) compared with control Individuals without agenesis (group 3). Even with the maintenance of this deciduous tooth in the dental arch, the MC keeps its tendency to mesial eruption. There is a greater tendency for mesial angulation of the maxillary canine in patients with MLIA, regardless of the presence or absence of deciduous lateral incisor.

  18. Aberrant growth of maxillary canine teeth in male babirusa (genus Babyrousa).

    PubMed

    Macdonald, Alastair A

    2018-04-01

    A worldwide survey of babirusa skulls curated in museum and private collections located 431 that were from adult males and had retained at least one maxillary canine tooth. Eighty-three of these skulls were identified as exhibiting aberrant maxillary canine tooth growth. Twenty-four of the skulls represented babirusa from Buru and the Sula Islands, and forty-five skulls represented babirusa from Sulawesi and the Togian Islands. The remaining series of fourteen babirusa skulls originally came from zoo animals. Fifteen skulls showed anomalous alveolar and tooth rotation in a median plane. Twenty-nine skulls had maxillary canine teeth that did not grow symmetrically towards the median plane of the cranium. Fourteen skulls showed evidence that the tips of one or both maxillary canine teeth had eroded the nasal bones. Twenty-one skulls had maxillary canine teeth that had eroded the frontal bones. The teeth of two skulls had eroded a parietal bone. One skull had two maxillary canines arising from an adjacent pair of alveoli on the left side of the cranium. Three skulls exhibited alveoli with no formed maxillary canine teeth in them. Analysis suggested that approximately 12% of the adult male babirusa in the wild experience erosion of the cranial bony tissues as a result of maxillary canine tooth growth. There was no skeletal evidence that maxillary canine teeth penetrate the eye. Crown Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  19. Recurrent keratocystic odontogenic tumor of right maxillary sinus involving the right infraorbital rim.

    PubMed

    Maruthamuthu, Karthikeyan; Vasupradha, G; Dineshshankar, Janardhanam; Balaji, Abishek Rajaram

    2017-01-01

    Keratocystic odontogenic tumor (KCOT) is a benign odontogenic tumor with an aggressive behavior and high recurrence rate. The most common site of predilection is the posterior mandible. In contrast, KCOTs occurring in the maxillary region are relatively rare. However, the maxillary involvement poses a greater and increased threat, due to proximity to vital structures such as maxillary sinus, orbital floor, and infratemporal fossa. This report presents such a case of KCOT involving the maxillary sinus eroding the floor of the orbit and provides an account of the factors that need to be considered during management.

  20. The morphological interaction between the nasal cavity and maxillary sinuses in living humans.

    PubMed

    Holton, Nathan; Yokley, Todd; Butaric, Lauren

    2013-03-01

    To understand how variation in nasal architecture accommodates the need for effective conditioning of respired air, it is necessary to assess the morphological interaction between the nasal cavity and other aspects of the nasofacial skeleton. Previous studies indicate that the maxillary sinuses may play a key role in accommodating climatically induced nasal variation such that a decrease in nasal cavity volume is associated with a concomitant increase in maxillary sinus volume. However, due to conflicting results in previous studies, the precise interaction of the nasal cavity and maxillary sinuses, in humans, is unclear. This is likely due to the prior emphasis on nasal cavity size, whereas arguably, nasal cavity shape is more important with regard to the interaction with the maxillary sinuses. Using computed tomography scans of living human subjects (N=40), the goal of this study is to assess the interaction between nasal cavity form and maxillary sinus volume in European- and African-derived individuals with differences in nasal cavity morphology. First, we assessed whether there is an inverse relationship between nasal cavity and maxillary sinus volumes. Next, we examined the relationship between maxillary sinus volume and nasal cavity shape using multivariate regression. Our results show that there is a positive relationship between nasal cavity and maxillary sinus volume, indicating that the maxillary sinuses do not accommodate variation in nasal cavity size. However, maxillary sinus volume is significantly correlated with variation in relative internal nasal breadth. Thus, the maxillary sinuses appear to be important for accommodating nasal cavity shape rather than size. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Computed tomography-based volumetric tool for standardized measurement of the maxillary sinus

    PubMed Central

    Giacomini, Guilherme; Pavan, Ana Luiza Menegatti; Altemani, João Mauricio Carrasco; Duarte, Sergio Barbosa; Fortaleza, Carlos Magno Castelo Branco; Miranda, José Ricardo de Arruda

    2018-01-01

    Volume measurements of maxillary sinus may be useful to identify diseases affecting paranasal sinuses. However, literature shows a lack of consensus in studies measuring the volume. This may be attributable to different computed tomography data acquisition techniques, segmentation methods, focuses of investigation, among other reasons. Furthermore, methods for volumetrically quantifying the maxillary sinus are commonly manual or semiautomated, which require substantial user expertise and are time-consuming. The purpose of the present study was to develop an automated tool for quantifying the total and air-free volume of the maxillary sinus based on computed tomography images. The quantification tool seeks to standardize maxillary sinus volume measurements, thus allowing better comparisons and determinations of factors that influence maxillary sinus size. The automated tool utilized image processing techniques (watershed, threshold, and morphological operators). The maxillary sinus volume was quantified in 30 patients. To evaluate the accuracy of the automated tool, the results were compared with manual segmentation that was performed by an experienced radiologist using a standard procedure. The mean percent differences between the automated and manual methods were 7.19% ± 5.83% and 6.93% ± 4.29% for total and air-free maxillary sinus volume, respectively. Linear regression and Bland-Altman statistics showed good agreement and low dispersion between both methods. The present automated tool for maxillary sinus volume assessment was rapid, reliable, robust, accurate, and reproducible and may be applied in clinical practice. The tool may be used to standardize measurements of maxillary volume. Such standardization is extremely important for allowing comparisons between studies, providing a better understanding of the role of the maxillary sinus, and determining the factors that influence maxillary sinus size under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:29304130

  2. Long- and short-term effects of headgear traction with and without the maxillary second molars.

    PubMed

    Shpack, Nir; Brosh, Tamar; Mazor, Yoav; Shapinko, Yoav; Davidovitch, Moshe; Sarig, Rachel; Reimann, Susanne; Bourauel, Christoph; Vardimon, Alexander D

    2014-10-01

    A quantitative assessment of maxillary first molar distalization with and without the maxillary second molar (M2) was carried out. Fifty-six cervical headgear patients undergoing fixed appliance orthodontic treatment were divided into 2 groups: before (G - M2) and after (G + M2) eruption of the maxillary second molars (ages, 11.87 ± 1.20, and 13.05 ± 1.55 years, respectively). The tightness of the dental contact point (TDCP) and the space between the second premolar and the maxillary first molar were measured at 6 levels of headgear force (0-15 N) at 3 intervals 6 months apart (T0, T1, T2). Relationships were found between space and TDCP, time, and presence or absence of the maxillary second molar at T1 and T2 (P <0.001). The TDCP decreased and space increased with increase in initial headgear force. An increase in initial force beyond 6 to 9 N did not significantly increase the initial maxillary first molar distalization. The G - M2 TDCP and space measurements were similar to those of G + M2 at T2 with the eruption of the maxillary second molar. From T0 to T1, maxillary first molar distalization was greater in G - M2. In comparison with our previous headgear-alone study, initial distalization with a fully bonded appliance was reduced by 4-fold. Headgear therapy is more effective before the eruption of the maxillary second molar. Once it erupts, the distalization pace of the maxillary first molar is reduced, but it can nevertheless be pursued at a slower pace when the maxillary second molar is present. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Influence of reinforcement on strains within maxillary implant overdentures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshihito; Gonda, Tomoya; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of reinforcement of an embedded cast on the strains within maxillary implant overdentures. A maxillary edentulous model with implants placed bilaterally in the canine positions, dome-shaped copings, and experimental overdentures was fabricated. Rosette-type strain gauges were attached in the canine positions and at three points along the midline of the polished surface of the denture and connected to the sensor interface controlled by a personal computer. Experimental dentures with five different reinforcements were tested: without reinforcement; with a cast cobalt-chrome reinforcement over the residual ridge and the tops of the copings; with the same reinforcement from first molar to first molar, over the residual ridge and the tops of the copings; with the same reinforcement over the residual ridge and the sides of the copings; and with the same reinforcement from first molar to first molar, over the residual ridge and the sides of the copings. A vertical occlusal load of 49 N was applied to the first premolar and then to the first molar, and the strains were measured and compared by analysis of variance. In both loading situations, significantly less strain was recorded in dentures with reinforcement than in those without reinforcement. When the first premolar was loaded on dentures with and without palatal reinforcement at the first premolars, the strains on the denture with reinforcement over the tops of the copings were significantly lower than on the denture with reinforcement over the sides of the copings at the canine position. Cast reinforcement over the residual ridge and the top of copings embedded in an acrylic base reduced the strain from occlusal stress on maxillary implant overdentures.

  4. Internal maxillary distraction with a new bimalar device.

    PubMed

    Kahn, David M; Broujerdi, Joseph; Schendel, Stephen A

    2008-04-01

    Distraction osteogenesis of the Le Fort I segment is advocated for patients who require significant advancement of the maxilla or who have a soft tissue envelope compromised by scar tissue. We present a technique for maxillary distraction using an interconnecting intraoral device anchored to the malar prominences above the osteotomy and either the maxilla and/or the dentition below the level of the osteotomy. Ten patients with nonsyndromic cleft lip and palate, mean age of 18, underwent Le Fort I maxillary distraction osteogenesis for management of maxillary hypoplasia. A Le Fort I osteotomy is performed and a Spectrum Intraoral Midface Multi-Vector Distractor (OsteoMed, Addison, TX) is placed leaving a 1 mm to 2 mm distraction gap. After a 2 to 4 day latency period, distraction begins at a rate of 1 mm a day. Once the desired occlusion is achieved the device is left in place for a minimum of 2 months for consolidation. Preoperative Sella-Nasion-A point measurements from lateral cephalograms averaged 74 degrees (range, 70-76 degrees). Postoperative Sella-Nasion-A point averaged 81 degrees (range, 75-89 degrees). Preoperative overjet averaged -7.4 mm (range, -3 to -13 mm). Postoperative overjet averaged 2.6 mm (range, 1-3 mm). Average distraction was 9 mm (range, 6-16 mm). The average vertical movement was 7.2 mm in an inferior direction (range, 0-15 mm). The results remained stable at a follow-up of 30 months. We report on distraction of the Le Fort I segment using an internal device. The device design allows the forces of distraction to be shared across a larger surface area delivering a uniform and reliable vector of distraction with increased stability.

  5. Maxillary sinus marrow hyperplasia in sickle cell anemia.

    PubMed

    Fernandez, M; Slovis, T L; Whitten-Shurney, W

    1995-11-01

    Marrow hyperplasia is a sequela of sickle cell anemia (SCA) and may be seen in the skull in children after 5 years of age [1]. The facial bones, except for the mandible and orbits, are usually not involved [1-3]. We report an unusual case of a 28-month-old black boy with SCA who presented with extensive marrow hyperplasia of the maxillary sinuses in addition to severe calvarial and mandibular changes. The imaging characteristics on CT (similar to other sites of marrow hyperplasia) and MR (low signal on both T1 and T2 sequences) should aid in making the correct diagnosis.

  6. Coronary artery to pulmonary artery fistula.

    PubMed

    Dadkhah-Tirani, Heidar; Salari, Arsalan; Shafighnia, Shora; Hosseini, Seyed Fazel; Naghdipoor, Misa

    2013-01-01

    Male, 69 FINAL DIAGNOSIS: Coronary artery to pulmonary artery fistula Symptoms: Chest pain Medication: - Clinical Procedure: Echocardiography • angiography • surgical intervention Specialty: Cardiology • Cardiac Surgery. Rare disease. A coronary artery fistula is an abnormal communication between a coronary artery and one of the cardiac chambers or a great vessel, so bypassing the myocardial capillary network. They are usually discovered incidentally upon coronary angiography. Clinical manifestations are variable depending on the type of fistula, the severity of shunt, site of shunt, and presence of other cardiac condition. We report a 69-year-old man without any previous medical history, who was admitted to our hospital with chest pain. The electrocardiogram (ECG) showed a sinus rhythm with ST depression in V2 to V6 precordial leads. Coronary angiography revealed a coronary artery fistula from left anterior descending coronary artery (LAD) to the main pulmonary artery, right coronary artery blockage and significant stenoses on the LAD and left circumflex artery (LCX). Surgical treatment was chosen because of the total occlusion of the right coronary artery and to relieve of pain to improve quality of life.

  7. Airflow and temperature distribution inside the maxillary sinus: a computational fluid dynamics simulation.

    PubMed

    Zang, Hongrui; Liu, Yingxi; Han, Demin; Zhang, Luo; Wang, Tong; Sun, Xiuzhen; Li, Lifeng

    2012-06-01

    The airflow velocity and flux in maxillary sinuses were much lower than those in the nasal cavity, and the temperature in maxillary sinuses was much higher than the temperature in the middle meatus. With the increase of maximum diameter of the ostium, the above indices changed little. The purpose of the paper was to investigate, first, the flow and temperature distribution inside normal maxillary sinus in inspiration, and second, flow and temperature alteration with the increase of maximum ostium diameter. Three-dimensional models with nasal cavities and bilateral maxillary sinuses were constructed for computational fluid dynamics analysis. Virtual surgeries were implemented for the maxillary ostium, the maximum diameters of which were 8, 10, 12, and 15 mm, respectively. The finite volume method was used for numerical simulation. The indices of velocity, pressure, vector, and temperature were processed and compared between models. The airflow velocity in maxillary sinuses (average velocity 0.062 m/s) was much lower than that in the middle meatus (average velocity 3.26 m/s). With the increase of ostium diameter, airflow characteristics distributed in the maxillary sinuses changed little. The normal temperature in the maxillary sinus remained almost constant at 34°C and changed little with the increase of ostium diameter.

  8. Severe incisor resorption by impacted maxillary canines: case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Nute, S J

    2004-11-01

    This paper reviews the literature relating to incisor resorption caused by impacted maxillary canines, and describes the presentation and management of a patient with unusually severe early resorption. This case highlights the need for careful monitoring of maxillary canine eruption for all paediatric patients.

  9. The edentulous mandible opposing maxillary natural teeth: treatment considerations utilizing implant overdentures.

    PubMed

    Winkler, S; Monasky, G E

    1993-01-01

    The restoration of the edentulous mandible opposing all or part of the maxillary natural dentition with implant overdentures is described. There are many situations in which the maxillary teeth opposing an edentulous mandible can and should be retained. Mandibular implant overdentures can be utilized as long as health considerations, morphologic features of the resorbed mandible, and maxillomandibular jaw relationships are satisfactory.

  10. "Maxillary lateral incisor partial anodontia sequence": a clinical entity with epigenetic origin.

    PubMed

    Consolaro, Alberto; Cardoso, Maurício Almeida; Consolaro, Renata Bianco

    2017-01-01

    The relationship between maxillary lateral incisor anodontia and the palatal displacement of unerupted maxillary canines cannot be considered as a multiple tooth abnormality with defined genetic etiology in order to be regarded as a "syndrome". Neither were the involved genes identified and located in the human genome, nor was it presumed on which chromosome the responsible gene would be located. The palatal maxillary canine displacement in cases of partial anodontia of the maxillary lateral incisor is potentially associated with environmental changes caused by its absence in its place of formation and eruption, which would characterize an epigenetic etiology. The lack of the maxillary lateral incisor in the canine region means removing one of the reference guides for the eruptive trajectory of the maxillary canine, which would therefore, not erupt and /or impact on the palate. Consequently, and in sequence, it would lead to malocclusion, maxillary atresia, transposition, prolonged retention of the deciduous canine and resorption in the neighboring teeth. Thus, we can say that we are dealing with a set of anomalies and multiple sequential changes known as sequential development anomalies or, simply, sequence. Once the epigenetics and sequential condition is accepted for this clinical picture, it could be called "Maxillary Lateral Incisor Partial Anodontia Sequence."

  11. Treatment effects of quad-helix on the eruption pattern of maxillary second molars.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Yoshiki; Shundo, Isao; Endo, Toshiya

    2012-07-01

    To evaluate the effects of quad-helix treatment on the eruption pattern of maxillary second molars in patients with maxillary incisor crowding. The lateral cephalograms of 40 consecutively treated patients in the early mixed-dentition group (treatment group) were examined in comparison with those of the same number of untreated patients with a similar form of malocclusion (control group). The cephalograms of the treated patients were taken at the start (T0) and at the end (T1) of treatment, and those of the untreated patients were also taken at about the same time as T0 and T1. The mean ages at T0 and T1 in the two groups were about the same. Distal tipping and movement and impeded extrusion of the maxillary first molars were notable in the treatment group compared with the control group. The actual treatment changes with the use of the quad-helix found expression in distal tipping and impeded vertical eruption of maxillary second molars. The more the maxillary first molars were tipped distally and the less the maxillary first molars extruded, the more the vertical eruption of the maxillary second molars was impeded. Quad-helix treatment gives rise to spontaneous distal tipping and impeded vertical eruption of the maxillary second molars.

  12. Relationship between formation/eruption of maxillary teeth and skeletal pattern of maxilla.

    PubMed

    Suda, Naoto; Hiyama, Shigetoshi; Kuroda, Takayuki

    2002-01-01

    Previous reports have indicated that formation and eruption of the maxillary teeth, especially the molars, are delayed in skeletal Class III patients compared with Class I and Class II patients. However, the relationship between the formation/eruption of maxillary teeth and the skeletal pattern of the maxilla is not yet clear. To examine this relationship, we studied 81 skeletal Class III Japanese patients (mean age, 8.8 years). The sample was divided into 2 groups: a maxillary retrusion (MR) group, characterized by a small SNA angle and a short palatal length, and a control group in which those values were in the normal range for patients of Japanese descent. There was no significant difference in the rate of formation for the maxillary and mandibular teeth between the 2 groups. The eruption of the maxillary second molars was delayed in the MR group compared with the control group. There were no significant differences between the 2 groups for any other teeth. A multiple-regression analysis was carried out to examine whether the skeletal pattern of the maxilla is a useful indicator for predicting the eruption of the maxillary teeth. The results showed that palatal length and chronologic age were significant independent (explanatory) variables for predicting eruption of the maxillary second molars. These findings indicated that the skeletal pattern of the maxilla is a useful indicator for predicting the timing of maxillary molar eruption when considering treatment of skeletal Class III malocclusions.

  13. Maxillary lateral incisor partial anodontia sequence”: a clinical entity with epigenetic origin

    PubMed Central

    Consolaro, Alberto; Cardoso, Maurício Almeida; Consolaro, Renata Bianco

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The relationship between maxillary lateral incisor anodontia and the palatal displacement of unerupted maxillary canines cannot be considered as a multiple tooth abnormality with defined genetic etiology in order to be regarded as a “syndrome”. Neither were the involved genes identified and located in the human genome, nor was it presumed on which chromosome the responsible gene would be located. The palatal maxillary canine displacement in cases of partial anodontia of the maxillary lateral incisor is potentially associated with environmental changes caused by its absence in its place of formation and eruption, which would characterize an epigenetic etiology. The lack of the maxillary lateral incisor in the canine region means removing one of the reference guides for the eruptive trajectory of the maxillary canine, which would therefore, not erupt and /or impact on the palate. Consequently, and in sequence, it would lead to malocclusion, maxillary atresia, transposition, prolonged retention of the deciduous canine and resorption in the neighboring teeth. Thus, we can say that we are dealing with a set of anomalies and multiple sequential changes known as sequential development anomalies or, simply, sequence. Once the epigenetics and sequential condition is accepted for this clinical picture, it could be called “Maxillary Lateral Incisor Partial Anodontia Sequence.” PMID:29364376

  14. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate patients with skeletal anchorage.

    PubMed

    Minami, Katsuhiro; Mori, Yoshihide; Tae-Geon, Kwon; Shimizu, Hidetaka; Ohtani, Miyuki; Yura, Yoshiaki

    2007-03-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis with the rigid external distraction (RED) system has been used to treat cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia. We introduce maxillary distraction osteogenesis for CLP patients with skeletal anchorage adapted on a stereolithographic model. Six maxillary deficiency CLP patients treated according to our CLP treatment protocol had undergone maxillary distraction osteogenesis. In all patients, computed tomography (CT) images were recorded preoperatively, and the data were transferred to a workstation. Three-dimensional skeletal structures were reconstructed with CT data sets, and a stereolithographic model was produced. On the stereolithographic model, miniplates were adapted to the surface of maxilla beside aperture piriforms. The operation performed involved a high Le Fort I osteotomy with pterygomaxillary disjunction. Miniplates were fixed to the maxillary segment with three or four screws and used for anchorage of the RED system. Retraction of the maxillary segment was initiated after 1 week. The accuracy of the stereolithographic models was enough to adapt the miniplates so that there was no need to readjust the plates during surgery. Postoperative cephalometric analysis showed that the direction of the retraction was almost parallel to the palatal plane, and dental compensation did not occur. We performed maxillary distraction osteogenesis with skeletal anchorage adapted on the stereolithographic models. Excellent esthetic outcome and skeletal advancement were achieved without dentoalveolar compensations.

  15. Rapid maxillary distraction protocol utilizing the halo distraction system and rigid internal fixation.

    PubMed

    Baker, Stephen B; Reid, Russell R; Burkey, Brooke; Bartlett, Scott P

    2007-09-01

    To shorten head frame wear time associated with external halo distraction (HD), we have adapted a protocol for maxillary distraction with the halo system that integrates plate fixation. All patients had a history of cleft lip and/or palate and maxillary retrusion > or = 8 mm. Five patients treated with this protocol and followed for at least 1 year were included in this study. The protocol included a 3-day latency period, variable maxillary distraction, and removal of the halo device with simultaneous rigid internal fixation. Two patients had a variable period of maxillomandibular fixation (MMF), which maintained the maxillary advancement and idealized intercuspal position while permitting further callus maturation. Cephalographs were obtained preoperatively, immediately following distractor removal, and 1 year after rigid internal fixation. The mean age at time of surgery was 18.7 years. The maxillary deficiency ranged from 8 to 15 mm (mean = 10.6 mm). All five patients demonstrated excellent occlusion. Cephalometric analysis 1-year post rigid internal fixation revealed minimal (<1 mm) skeletal relapse. Rapid maxillary distraction followed by MMF to maintain maxillary advancement may reduce halo device wear to 1 to 2 weeks. MMF optimizes occlusion by forcing the maxillary teeth into maximal intercuspal position. Rigid fixation is not only associated with less long-term relapse compared to nonrigid forms of fixation, but also minimizes the incidence of nonunion. This treatment protocol provides the advancement possible with distraction osteogenesis and the accuracy of orthognathic surgery, thereby minimizing external head frame wear.

  16. Impact of the Distance of Maxillary Advancement on Horizontal Relapse After Orthognathic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Fahradyan, Artur; Wolfswinkel, Erik M; Clarke, Noreen; Park, Stephen; Tsuha, Michaela; Urata, Mark M; Hammoudeh, Jeffrey A; Yamashita, Dennis-Duke R

    2018-04-01

    The maxillary horizontal relapse following Le Fort I advancement has been estimated to be 10% to 50%. This retrospective review examines the direct association between the amounts of maxillary advancement and relapse. We hypothesize that the greater the advancement, the greater the relapse amount. Patients with class III skeletal malocclusion underwent maxillary advancement with either a Le Fort I or a Le Fort I with simultaneous mandibular setback (bimaxillary surgery) from 2008 to 2015. Patients were assessed for a history of cleft lip or cleft palate. Patients with known syndromes were excluded. Cephalometric analysis was performed to compare surgical and postsurgical changes. Of 136 patients, 47.1% were males and 61.8% had a history of cleft. The mean surgery age was 18.9 (13.8-23) years and 53.7% underwent a bimaxillary procedure. A representative subgroup of 35 patients had preoperative, immediate postoperative, and an average of 1-year postoperative lateral cephalograms taken. The mean maxillary advancement was 6.3 mm and the horizontal relapse was 1.8 mm, indicating a 28.6% relapse. A history of cleft and amount of maxillary advancement were directly correlated, whereas bone grafting of the maxillary osteotomy sites was inversely correlated with the amount of relapse ( P < .05). Our data suggest positive correlation between amount of maxillary advancement and horizontal relapse as well as a positive correlation between history of cleft and horizontal relapse. Bone grafting of the maxillary osteotomy sites has a protective effect on the relapse.

  17. Is the Maxillary Sinus Really Suitable in Sex Determination? A Three-Dimensional Analysis of Maxillary Sinus Volume and Surface Depending on Sex and Dentition.

    PubMed

    Möhlhenrich, Stephan Christian; Heussen, Nicole; Peters, Florian; Steiner, Timm; Hölzle, Frank; Modabber, Ali

    2015-11-01

    The morphometric analysis of maxillary sinus was recently presented as a helpful instrument for sex determination. The aim of the present study was to examine the volume and surface of the fully dentate, partial, and complete edentulous maxillary sinus depending on the sex. Computed tomography data from 276 patients were imported in DICOM format via special virtual planning software, and surfaces (mm) and volumes (mm) of maxillary sinuses were measured. In sex-specific comparisons (women vs men), statistically significant differences for the mean maxillary sinus volume and surface were found between fully dentate (volume, 13,267.77 mm vs 16,623.17 mm, P < 0.0001; surface, 3480.05 mm vs 4100.83 mm, P < 0.0001) and partially edentulous (volume, 10,577.35 mm vs 14,608.10 mm, P = 0.0002; surface, 2980.11 mm vs 3797.42 mm, P < 0.0001) or complete edentulous sinuses (volume, 11,200.99 mm vs 15,382.29 mm, P < 0.0001; surface, 3118.32 mm vs 3877.25 mm, P < 0.0001). For males, the statistically different mean values were calculated between fully dentate and partially edentulous (volume, P = 0.0022; surface, P = 0.0048) maxillary sinuses. Between the sexes, no differences were only measured for female and male partially dentate fully edentulous sinuses (2 teeth missing) and between partially edentulous sinuses in women and men (1 teeth vs 2 teeth missing). With a corresponding software program, it is possible to analyze the maxillary sinus precisely. The dentition influences the volume and surface of the pneumatic maxillary sinus. Therefore, sex determination is possible by analysis of the maxillary sinus event through the increase in pneumatization.

  18. Maxillary growth after maxillary protraction: Appliance in conjunction with presurgical orthopedics, gingivoperiosteoplasty, and Furlow palatoplasty for complete bilateral cleft lip and palate patients with protruded premaxilla.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Shinji; Hirakawa, Takashi; Fukawa, Toshihiko; Maegawa, Jiro

    2015-06-01

    In bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP) with premaxillary protrusion, a good outcome with adequate maxillary development is difficult to achieve. The purpose of this article is to evaluate the maxillary growth after using presurgical orthopedics (PSO), gingivoperiosteoplasty (GPP), Furlow palatoplasty, and maxillary protraction appliance (MPA) for BCLP with premaxillary protrusion. Seven patients with complete BCLP with premaxillary protrusion were treated by PSO, cheiloplasty, GPP, and Furlow palatoplasty. MPA was used as part of the protocol for 6 months to 1 year for postoperative retardation of maxillary growth cases. Maxillary growth was evaluated by cephalometric analysis at 4 and 10 years of age, and bone formation at the alveolar cleft was evaluated by computed tomography (CT) imaging at 5 years of age. At 4 years of age, three of seven patients had apparent retardation of maxillary growth. The maxillary growth at 10 years of age was equivalent to the average value of normal Japanese after using MPA in three cases. At 5 years of age, only two of seven patients showed sufficient bone formation at the alveolar cleft to avoid alveolar bone grafting (ABG). Subsequently, ABG was performed in five patients. Although three of seven patients had apparent crossbite at 4 years of age, the maxillary growth of all patients at 10 years of age was approximately equivalent to the average value of normal Japanese after using MPA. A treatment protocol based on PSO, GPP, Furlow palatoplasty, and MPA may be an option, but long-term growth is unknown. Copyright © 2015 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Clinical effectiveness of late maxillary protraction in cleft lip and palate: a methods paper

    PubMed Central

    Lee, MK; Lane, C; Azeredo, F; Landsberger, M; Kapadia, H; Sheller, B; Yen, SL

    2017-01-01

    Objectives A prospective parallel cohort trial was conducted to compare outcomes of patients treated with maxillary protraction vs. LeFort 1 maxillary advancement surgery. Setting and Sample Population The primary site for the clinical trial is Children’s Hospital Los Angeles; the satellite test site is Seattle Children’s Hospital. All patients have isolated cleft lip and palate and a skeletal Class III malocclusion. Material & Methods A total of 50 patients, ages 11–14 will be recruited for the maxillary protraction cohort. The maxillary surgery cohort consists of 50 patients, ages 16–21, who will undergo LeFort 1 maxillary advancement surgery. Patients with additional medical or cognitive handicaps were excluded from the study. Results Current recruitment of patients is on track to complete the study within the proposed recruitment period. Conclusion This observational trial is collecting information that will examine dental, skeletal, financial, and quality of life issues from both research cohorts. PMID:28643931

  20. A new anatomically based nomenclature for the roots and root canals-part 1: maxillary molars.

    PubMed

    Kottoor, Jojo; Albuquerque, Denzil Valerian; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2012-01-01

    Numerous terminologies have been employed in the dental literature to describe the roots and root canal systems of maxillary molars. This multiplicity in naming of roots and canals makes the reader susceptible to misinterpretation and confusion. No consensus thus far has been arrived at for defining the names of roots and root canals in maxillary molars, including their various morphological aberrations. The anatomical relation of roots and their root canals were identified and were subsequently named based on definite sets of criteria. A new method for identification and naming of roots and root canal anatomy in maxillary molars, based on their root and canal relationship, was formulated and is presented in this paper. The nomenclature makes certain essential modifications to the traditional approach to accommodate naming of the various aberrations presented in the maxillary molars. A simple, yet extensive, nomenclature system has been proposed that appropriately names the internal and external morphology of maxillary molars.

  1. Three-dimensional alterations in pharyngeal airway and maxillary sinus volumes in Class III maxillary deficiency subjects undergoing orthopedic facemask treatment.

    PubMed

    Pamporakis, Paschalis; Nevzatoğlu, Şirin; Küçükkeleş, Nazan

    2014-07-01

    To assess short-term alterations in the volume of pharyngeal airway space and maxillary sinuses associated with rapid maxillary expansion (RME) and facemask (FM) use in growing Class III maxillary-deficient patients. Twenty-two patients (14 girls, eight boys) treated with the RME/FM and having pretreatment and posttreatment cone beam-computed tomographic scans were identified from the archives of the Marmara University, Department of Orthodontics. According to the protraction force that was used, they were divided into two groups: a group with 400 g protraction force (12 subjects) and a group with 800 g protraction force (10 subjects). Mean age for the study group was 10 years. All patients were diagnosed with normal/low vertical growth pattern, maxillary deficiency, and normal mandible. No control group was available for this study. For each patient, a hyrax expansion screw with acrylic cap splint was constructed and RME was performed for 10 days. On the seventh day, protraction with a FM started. The results showed a statistically significant increase in the volume of maxillary sinuses after treatment, which was related to the growth. On the other hand, the increase in the volume of pharyngeal airway was not statistically significant. RME/FM treatment did not affect at all the volume of maxillary sinuses and actually inhibited the normal expected increase of the volume of the pharynx when compared with a control group comprising normal individuals.

  2. [Finite element study of maxillary Le Fort-I osteotomy with rigid internal fixation].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Sun, Geng-Lin; Wu, Wei; Xu, Chong-Tao; Wang, Peng-Lin

    2010-05-01

    To study the biomechanical characteristic of maxillary Le fort- I osteotomy with rigid internal fixation (RIF) , so as to choose best fixation method. The 3-dimensional finite element models of maxillary Le Fort-I osteotomy with 9 kinds of RIF methods were established. Then the models were divided into three groups to calculate the stress distribution of the maxilla and the displacement of bone segment under 3 kinds of occlusion condition. The fixation stability of the different RIF methods was evaluated. Under the incisor occlusion condition, the stress of the cranio maxillary complex transmits mainly along the nasal-maxillary buttress. Under the premolar and molar occlusion condition, the stress transmits along the alveolar process first, then turns to the nasal-maxillary and zygomatic-maxillary buttress. The focused stress position of the internal fixation system is at the connection between the screws and the plate and at the plate near the osteotomy line. Under the premolar occlusion condition, the displacement of bone segment with different RIF methods was (in a decreasing order) 0.396509 mm (with bio-absorbable plate), 0.148393 mm (with micro-plate ), 0.078436 mm (with mini-plate) in group 1; 0.188791 mm (fixing at the nasal-maxillary buttress), 0.121718 mm (fixing at the zygomatic-maxillary buttress), 0.078436 mm (fixing at the both buttress) in group 2; 0.091023 mm (with straight plate), 0.078436 mm (with L shape plate), 0.072450 mm (with Y shape plate), 0.065617 mm (with T shape plate) in group 3. The fixation stability of using the bio-absorbable plate in Le Fort-I osteotomy is less stable than using the titanium plate. Fixing at the zygomatic-maxillary buttress is more stable than at the naso-maxillary buttress. The fixation stability is different by using different shapes of plates.

  3. Correlation between Maxillary Canine Calcification and Skeletal Maturation.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sushil; Roy, Abhishek Singha; Garg, Ankit; Hamid, Saeed Bin; Tyagi, Sumit; Kumar, Atish

    2017-05-01

    Skeletal maturation assessment has a great role in many health professions especially in Orthodontics & Dentofacial Orthopedics. Functional appliances have proved to be more effective when used at the peak of mandibular growth, rather than before. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether the calcification stages of permanent maxillary canine are useful to assess skeletal maturity. In this cross-sectional study, samples were derived from panoramic radiographs and lateral cephalograms of 300 subjects (137 males and 163 females) with their age ranging from 9 to 18 years. Dental maturity {Demirjian Index (DI)} and skeletal maturity {Cervical Stages (CS)} were assessed from radiographs. The Pearson chi-square test (χ 2 ) and Sakoda adjusted Pearson contingency coefficient (C*) were calculated to determine the correlation between DI and CS. A highly significant association (C* = 0.851, p <.001for males and 0.879, p <.001 for females) was found between DI and CS. DI stage E coincided with CS2 (pre-peak of pubertal growth spurt) & DI stage F coincided with CS3 (peak of pubertal growth spurt) for all the subjects. DI stage H corresponded to CS5 and CS6 (end of peak of pubertal growth spurt). A highly significant association was found between DI and CS. Maxillary canine DI stages could be useful to assess skeletal maturity.

  4. Root canal morphology of South Asian Indian maxillary molar teeth

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Shishir; Pawar, Mansing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective was to study the root canal morphology of South Asian Indian Maxillary molars using a tooth clearing technique. Materials and Methods: Hundred teeth each comprising of first, second, and third molars collected from different dental schools and clinics in India were subjected to standard dye penetration, decalcification and clearing procedure before being studied. Results: The first molar mesiobuccal roots exhibited 69% Type I, 24% Type II, 4% Type IV, 2% Type V, and 1% exhibited a Vertuccis Type VIII canal anatomy. In the group with three separate roots the second molar mesiobuccal roots in exhibited 80.6% Type I, 15.3% Type II, 2.7% Type IV, and 1.4% Type V canal anatomy while the third molars mesiobuccal roots exhibited 57.4% Type I, 32% Type II, 2.1% Type III, 8.5% Type IV, 1% had a Type V canal anatomy in the similar group. Conclusion: A varied root canal anatomy was seen in the mesiobuccal root canal of the maxillary molars. PMID:25713497

  5. [An adjustable distractor for transverse maxillary distraction osteogenesis].

    PubMed

    Leyder, P; Wycisk, G; Quilichini, J

    2013-06-01

    The posterior skeletal widening in conventional distractions (Surgical Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion) is often modest, in contrast with a predominant anterior expansion. Until recently, it was not possible to consider transverse palatal distraction osteogenesis and Le Fort I impaction or advancement in the same procedure, as the osteosynthesis plates impeded maxillary anterior opening. We developed new sliding osteosynthesis plates allowing to perform an advancement or impaction Le Fort I osteotomy associated with a low-resistance bipartite palatal distraction osteogenesis. We had for aim to describe the device and to determine its clinical applications. This new palatal distractor is made up of two independent stainless steel jacks allowing for an adjustable distraction in the anterior or posterior area as needed. Bone-borne and tooth-borne versions are available. This new distractor can be adjusted sagittally. The distraction can be angular or parallel, and the distraction mode can be modified during post-operative distraction. This device should be adapted to all clinical presentations. It can be used in combination with sliding osteosynthesis to perform a Le Fort 1 osteotomy and at the same time a complete correction of vertical, horizontal, and sagittal deficiencies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. Carotid Artery Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... the artery walls may signal the development of cardiovascular disease. top of page Who should consider carotid artery ... high blood pressure diabetes smoking high cholesterol known cardiovascular disease The American Heart Association guidelines also state that ...

  7. Coronary Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the most common type of heart disease. It is the leading cause of death in the United States in both men and women. CAD happens when the arteries that supply blood to ...

  8. Coronary artery fistula

    MedlinePlus

    Congenital heart defect - coronary artery fistula; Birth defect heart - coronary artery fistula ... attaches to one of the chambers of the heart (the atrium or ventricle) or another blood vessel ( ...

  9. Traumatic Axillary Artery Dissection with Radial Artery Embolism

    SciTech Connect

    Chung, Hwan-Hoon; Cha, Sang Hoon, E-mail: shcha123@naver.com; Cho, Sung Bum

    This report describes a case of pathologically proven traumatic arterial dissection, presenting as complete occlusion of the axillary artery with radial artery embolism. Occlusion of the axillary artery by traumatic dissection mimicked transection and radial artery embolism mimicked congenital absence of the radial artery on the initial angiogram, but these were correctly diagnosed with the following sonogram.

  10. Combined treatment with headgear and the Frog appliance for maxillary molar distalization: a randomized controlled trial

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the efficiency of the Frog appliance (FA) alone or in combination with headgear for distalizing the maxillary molars. Methods Fifty patients (25 males and 25 females) aged 12.6 - 16.7 years who received treatment for Class II malocclusion at the Orthodontic Clinic of Al-Baath University were selected for this study and randomly divided into 2 equal groups. Maxillary molar distalization was achieved using the FA alone (group 1) or a combination of the FA with high-pull headgear worn at night (group 2). Lateral cephalograms were obtained before and after treatment. Results The maxillary molars moved distally by 5.51 and 5.93 mm in groups 1 and 2, respectively. Distal movements were associated with axial tipping by 4.96° and 1.25°, and with loss of anchorage by mesial movement of the second maxillary premolars by 2.70 and 0.90 mm in groups 1 and 2, respectively. The combined use of the FA and nighttime high-pull headgear decreased the distalization time and improved the ratio of maxillary molar distalization movement relative to the overall opening space between the first maxillary molars and second premolars. Conclusions The FA can effectively distalize the maxillary molars, this distalization associates with some unfavorable changes. Nighttime use of high-pull headgear combined with the FA can reduce these unfavorable changes and improve treatment outcomes. PMID:23671835

  11. Distal movement of maxillary molars in nongrowing patients with the skeletal anchorage system.

    PubMed

    Sugawara, Junji; Kanzaki, Reiko; Takahashi, Ichiro; Nagasaka, Hiroshi; Nanda, Ravindra

    2006-06-01

    It is now possible to predictably move maxillary molars distally in nongrowing patients with the skeletal anchorage system (SAS) and to improve malocclusions without having to extract the premolars and regardless of the patient's compliance. The purposes of this study were to investigate the amount of distal movement of the maxillary first molars, the type of movement, the difference between actual and predicted amounts of distalization, and the relationship between the amount of distalization and age. Twenty-five nongrowing patients (22 female, 3 male) successfully treated with the SAS were the subjects in this study. The amount and the type of distalization, the difference between predicted and resulting amounts of distalization, and the relationship between the patient's age and the amount of distalization were analyzed with wide-opening cephalometric radiographs. The average amount of distalization of the maxillary first molars was 3.78 mm at the crown level and 3.20 mm at the root level. The amount of distalization at the crown level was significantly correlated with the average value of treatment goals (3.60 mm). The maxillary molars were predictably distalized in accordance with the individualized treatment goals without regard to patient age and extraction of the third or second molars. The SAS is a viable noncompliance modality to move maxillary molars for distally correcting maxillary protrusions and malocclusions characterized by maxillary incisor crowding.

  12. Maxillary sinusitis and periapical abscess following periodontal therapy: a case report using three-dimensional evaluation.

    PubMed

    Huang, Chih-Hao; Brunsvold, Michael A

    2006-01-01

    Maxillary sinusitis may develop from the extension of periodontal disease. In this case, reconstructed three-dimensional images from multidetector spiral computed tomographs were helpful in evaluating periodontal bony defects and their relationship with the maxillary sinus. A 42-year-old woman in good general health presented with a chronic deep periodontal pocket on the palatal and interproximal aspects of tooth #14. Probing depths of the tooth ranged from 2 to 9 mm, and it exhibited a Class 1 mobility. Radiographs revealed a close relationship between the root apex and the maxillary sinus. The patient's periodontal diagnosis was localized severe chronic periodontitis. Treatment of the tooth consisted of cause-related therapy, surgical exploration, and bone grafting. A very deep circumferential bony defect at the palatal root of tooth #14 was noted during surgery. After the operation, the wound healed without incidence, but 10 days later, a maxillary sinusitis and periapical abscess developed. To control the infection, an evaluation of sinus and alveolus using computed tomographs was performed, systemic antibiotics were prescribed, and endodontic treatment was initiated. Two weeks after surgical treatment, the infection was relieved with the help of antibiotics and endodontic treatment. Bilateral bony communications between the maxillary sinus and periodontal bony defect of maxillary first molars were shown on three-dimensional computed tomographs. The digitally reconstructed images added valuable information for evaluating the periodontal defects. Three-dimensional images from spiral computed tomographs (CT) aided in evaluating and treating the close relationship between maxillary sinus disease and adjacent periodontal defects.

  13. Drainage of the maxillary sinus: a comparative anatomy study in humans and goats.

    PubMed

    Ford, Rebecca L; Barsam, Alon; Velusami, Prabhu; Ellis, Harold

    2011-02-01

    The maxillary sinuses are the most frequently infected paranasal sinuses in humans. It has been suggested that infection occurs relatively commonly in the maxillary sinuses owing to the position of their ostia high on their superomedial walls, which may be suboptimal for natural drainage. This may represent evolutionary lag, whereby the ostia remained in a quadrupedal position as bipedal humans evolved from their primate ancestors. This study examined the hypothesis that drainage of the maxillary sinus is optimal in the quadrupedal position. The drainage of the human maxillary sinus and an analogous quadruped, the goat, was examined and compared in the upright, quadrupedal, and intermediate positions. Department of Anatomy, King's College London. Cadaveric human and goat maxillary sinuses were filled with saline in each position and the volume at which saline overflowed through the ostia was noted. Volume at which spontaneous drainage occurred through ostia. The volume of saline instilled before drainage was maximal in the upright position and reduced with each increase in anterior tilt, with drainage occurring most easily at 90° for both human and goat sinuses. Drainage was significantly better in the quadrupedal head position than upright in both species (p < .01). This study demonstrated that human maxillary sinuses exhibit better passive drainage through their ostia when tilted anteriorly to mimic a quadrupedal head position. This may be an example of an evolutionary lag phenomenon and could be one etiologic factor in the prevalence of maxillary sinusitis in humans.

  14. Bilateral en-masse distalization of maxillary posterior teeth with skeletal anchorage: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Noorollahian, Saeed; Alavi, Shiva; Shirban, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: The aim of this study was to introduce a new method for bilateral distal movement of the entire maxillary posterior segment. Case report: A 17-year-old girl with Class I skeletal malocclusion (end-to-end molar relationships, deviated midline and space deficiency for left maxillary canine) was referred for orthodontic treatment. She did not accept maxillary first premolars extraction. A modified Hyrax appliance (Dentaurum Ispringen, Germany) was used for bilateral distalization of maxillary posterior teeth simultaneously. Expansion vector was set anteroposteriorly. Posterior legs of Hyrax were welded to first maxillary molar bands. All posterior teeth on each side consolidated with a segment of 0.017 × 0.025-in stainless steel wire from the buccal side. Anterior legs of Hyrax were bent into eyelet form and attached to the anterior palate with two mini-screws (2 × 10 mm) (Jeil Medical Corporation Seoul, South Korea). Hyrax opening rate was 0.8 mm per month. Lateral cephalometric radiographs were used to evaluate the extent of distal movement. 3.5-mm distalization of posterior maxillary teeth was achieved in five months. Results: A nearly bodily distal movement without anchorage loss was obtained. Conclusion: The mini-screw-supported modified Hyrax appliance was found to be helpful for achieving en-masse distal movement of maxillary posterior teeth. PMID:27409657

  15. Preoperative Cleft Lip Measurements and Maxillary Growth in Patients With Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Antonarakis, Gregory S; Tompson, Bryan D; Fisher, David M

    2016-11-01

    Maxillary growth in patients with cleft lip and palate is highly variable. The authors' aim was to investigate associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and maxillary growth determined cephalometrically in patients with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate (cUCLP). Retrospective cross-sectional study. Children with cUCLP. Preoperative cleft lip measurements were made at the time of primary cheiloplasty and available for each patient. Maxillary growth was evaluated on lateral cephalometric radiographs taken prior to any orthodontic treatment and alveolar bone grafting (8.5 ± 0.7 years). The presence of associations between preoperative cleft lip measurements and cephalometric measures of maxillary growth was determined using regression analyses. In the 58 patients included in the study, the cleft lateral lip element was deficient in height in 90% and in transverse width in 81% of patients. There was an inverse correlation between cleft lateral lip height and transverse width with a β coefficient of -0.382 (P = .003). Patients with a more deficient cleft lateral lip height displayed a shorter maxillary length (β coefficient = 0.336; P = .010), a less protruded maxilla (β coefficient = .334; P = .008), and a shorter anterior maxillary height (β coefficient = 0.306; P = .020) than those with a less deficient cleft lateral lip height. Patients with cUCLP present with varying degrees of lateral lip hypoplasia. Preoperative measures of lateral lip deficiency are related to later observed deficiencies of maxillary length, protrusion, and height.

  16. Perpendicular serial maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Ylikontiola, Leena P.; Sándor, George K.; Harila, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    Background: Cleft lip and palate patients often have a retruded maxilla with a severely narrowed deficient maxillary arch. This report aims to describe the management of severe maxillary retrusion and constriction in cleft lip and palate patients using distraction osteogenesis applied in serial sequence in two directions perpendicular to each other. Materials and Methods: Two adult male cleft lip and palate patients were treated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis in two stages. In the first stage, surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion with a tooth-borne device was performed to significantly expand the maxillary arch in the transverse dimension. After the teeth were orthodontically aligned, the horizontal distraction of the maxilla was made by two internal maxillary distraction devices. Results: In the first patient, the maxilla was initially widened by 11 mm and then distracted forward by 20 mm. Despite the breakage of the shaft of one of the two distractors at the end of distraction, a satisfactory occlusion was found at the time of distractor device removal. The maxillary position has remained stable through 8 years of follow-up. In the second patient, the palate was widened by 14 mm and the maxilla was distracted forward by 22 mm. The maxillary position has remained stable through 3 years of follow-up. Conclusion: Sequential serial distraction of maxilla in two planes perpendicular to each other is a safe and stable approach for the treatment of cleft lip and palate patients with severe transverse and anteroposterior discrepancies. PMID:26981462

  17. Transpalatal distraction for the management of maxillary constriction in pediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Adolphs, Nicolai; Ernst, Nicole; Hoffmeister, Bodo; Raguse, Jan-Dirk

    2015-01-01

    The management of severe maxillary constriction can be challenging. For that purpose surgically assisted maxillary expansion by transpalatal distraction (TPD) can typically be recommended after skeletal maturity. However in selected cases bone borne transpalatal distraction devices can contribute to improve maxillary constriction considerably earlier already during mixed dentition. To assess the possibility of bone borne transpalatal distraction in pediatric patients. Clinical paper. Since 2010 TPD has been applied to six pediatric patients during mixed dentition when severe maxillary constriction was present and conventional orthodontic widening has already failed. Individually selected devices (Surgitec, Belgium) were inserted in general anaesthesia and distraction was performed according to well known parameters. Maxillary constriction could be improved in all six patients without any drawbacks by bone borne devices during mixed dentition. Skeletal conditions were obviously improved for subsequent orthodontic or orthognathic therapy without functional impairment. Follow-up is up to 36 months after device removal. Transpalatal Distraction is recommendable in selected pediatric patients if massive growth disturbance is present or has to be expected. TPD allows for individually adapted maxillary expansion by selection and positioning of appropriate devices in combination with intraoperative testing of maxillary movements and controlled bone removal.

  18. Perpendicular serial maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Ylikontiola, Leena P; Sándor, George K; Harila, Virpi

    2015-01-01

    Cleft lip and palate patients often have a retruded maxilla with a severely narrowed deficient maxillary arch. This report aims to describe the management of severe maxillary retrusion and constriction in cleft lip and palate patients using distraction osteogenesis applied in serial sequence in two directions perpendicular to each other. Two adult male cleft lip and palate patients were treated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis in two stages. In the first stage, surgically assisted rapid palatal expansion with a tooth-borne device was performed to significantly expand the maxillary arch in the transverse dimension. After the teeth were orthodontically aligned, the horizontal distraction of the maxilla was made by two internal maxillary distraction devices. In the first patient, the maxilla was initially widened by 11 mm and then distracted forward by 20 mm. Despite the breakage of the shaft of one of the two distractors at the end of distraction, a satisfactory occlusion was found at the time of distractor device removal. The maxillary position has remained stable through 8 years of follow-up. In the second patient, the palate was widened by 14 mm and the maxilla was distracted forward by 22 mm. The maxillary position has remained stable through 3 years of follow-up. Sequential serial distraction of maxilla in two planes perpendicular to each other is a safe and stable approach for the treatment of cleft lip and palate patients with severe transverse and anteroposterior discrepancies.

  19. An Analysis of Maxillary Anterior Teeth Dimensions for the Existence of Golden Proportion: Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Sandeep, Nalla; Satwalekar, Parth; Srinivas, Siva; Reddy, Chandra Sekhar; Reddy, G Ramaswamy; Reddy, B Anantha

    2015-09-01

    Appearance of the face is a great concern to everyone, as it is a significant part of self-image. The study analyzed the clinical crown dimensions of the maxillary anterior teeth with respect to their apparent mesiodistal widths, width-to-height ratio to determine whether golden proportion existed among the South Indian population. A total of 240 dentulous subjects were chosen for the study (120 males and 120 females) age ranging between 18 and 28 years. Full face and anterior teeth images of the subjects were made on specially designed device resembling a face-bow, mounted onto the wall under a standard light source. The width and height of the maxillary central incisors were measured on the stone casts using a digital caliper. The mean perceived maxillary lateral incisor to central incisor width ratio was 0.67 in males and 0.703 in females. The mean perceived maxillary canine to lateral incisor width ratio was 0.744 in males and 0.714 in females. The mean width-to-height ratio of the maxillary central incisor was 79.49% in males and 79.197% in females. The golden proportion was not found between perceived mesiodistal widths of maxillary central and lateral incisors and nor between perceived mesiodistal widths of maxillary lateral incisors and canines. In the majority of subjects, the width-to-height ratio of maxillary central incisor was within 75-80%. There are no statistically significant differences in maxillary anterior teeth proportions between males and females. The results may serve as guidelines for treatment planning in restorative dentistry and periodontal surgery.

  20. Patient satisfaction with maxillary 3-implant overdentures using different attachment systems opposing mandibular 2-implant overdentures.

    PubMed

    Al-Zubeidi, Mohammed I; Alsabeeha, Nabeel H M; Thomson, W Murray; Payne, Alan G T

    2012-05-01

    Patient-based outcomes with maxillary overdentures on a minimum number of implants, opposing mandibular 2-implant overdentures are not evident in the literature. To evaluate patient's satisfaction with maxillary 3-implant overdentures, opposing mandibular 2-implant overdentures, using two different attachment systems over the first 2 years of service. Forty participants wearing mandibular 2-implant overdentures for 3 years were randomly allocated to one of two similar implant system groups to receive maxillary 3-implant overdentures. Twenty participants were allocated to splinted and unsplinted attachment system treatment groups for each system. Patient satisfaction with pre-treatment complete maxillary dentures, with maxillary 3-implant overdentures at baseline and annually for 2 years, was measured using visual analogue scale questionnaires and the oral health impact profiles. Palatal coverage of the maxillary overdentures was reduced at the first annual recall. Data showed significant improvement in pain reduction, comfort, stability, and function variables of the visual analogue scale after treatment. Analysis by prosthodontic design using visual analogue scale showed no significant difference. The total oral health impact profile-14 scores after treatment for all participants, regardless of prosthodontic design, were significantly lower (more satisfied). The overall oral health impact profile-20E score at baseline was significantly higher (more satisfied) compared with pre-treatment conventional maxillary dentures. No significant changes were observed in the first or second years compared with baseline results. Twenty-two participants (84.6%) preferred reduced palatal coverage, regardless of prosthodontic design, after 1 year. Twenty participants (76.9%) still preferred reduced palatal coverage at the end of the second year. The provision of maxillary 3-implant overdentures to oppose mandibular 2-implant overdentures significantly improve levels of patient

  1. Dentoskeletal features in individuals with ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar

    PubMed Central

    Rozzi, Matteo; Cardoni, Giulia; Ricchiuti, Maria Rosaria; Cozza, Paola

    2015-01-01

    Objective The aim of the study was to analyze the prevalence and distribution of ectopic eruption of the permanent maxillary first molar (EEM) in individuals scheduled for orthodontic treatment and to investigate the association of EEM with dental characteristics, maxillary skeletal features, crowding, and other dental anomalies. Methods A total of 1,317 individuals were included and randomly divided into two groups. The first 265 subjects were included as controls, while the remaining 1,052 subjects included the sample from which the final experimental EEM group was derived. The mesiodistal (M-D) crown width of the deciduous maxillary second molar and permanent maxillary first molar, maxillary arch length (A-PML), maxillomandibular transverse skeletal relationships (anterior and posterior transverse interarch discrepancies, ATID and PTID), maxillary and mandibular tooth crowding, and the presence of dental anomalies were recorded for each subject, and the statistical significance of differences in these parameters between the EEM and control groups was determined using independent sample t-tests. Chi-square tests were used to compare the prevalence of other dental anomalies between the two groups. Results The prevalence of maxillary EEM was 2.5%. The M-D crown widths, ATID and PTID, and tooth crowding were significantly greater, while A-PML was significantly smaller, in the EEM group than in the control group. Only two subjects showed an association between EEM and maxillary lateral incisor anomalies, which included agenesis in one and microdontia in the other. Conclusions EEM may be a risk factor for maxillary arch constriction and severe tooth crowding. PMID:26258065

  2. Comparative study of different osteotomy modalities in maxillary distraction osteogenesis for cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Yu, Hongbo; Wang, Xudong; Fang, Bing; Shen, Steve Guofang

    2012-11-01

    Conventional maxillary distraction osteogenesis and anterior maxillary segmental distraction were applied in the treatment of severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft clip and palate. The aim of the present study was to compare the difference between these 2 osteotomy modalities used for rigid external distraction. Ten patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP were enrolled in our study. They were randomly divided into 2 groups. Conventional maxillary distraction osteogenesis was performed in 5 patients and anterior maxillary segmental distraction in 5 patients. The preoperative and postoperative lateral cephalograms were compared, and cephalometric analysis was performed. The independent sample t test was used to evaluate the differences between the 2 groups. All patients healed uneventfully, and the maxillae moved forward satisfactorily. The sella-nasion-point A angles, nasion-point A-Frankfort horizontal plane angles, overjets, and 0-meridian to subnasale distances had increased significantly after distraction osteogenesis. Significant differences were found in the changes in palatal length between the 2 groups (P < .05). A mean increase of 7.50 mm in palatal length was found in the anterior maxillary segmental distraction group. No significant difference in the changes in palatopharyngeal depth or soft palatal length was found. With the ability of increasing the palatal and arch length, avoiding changes in palatopharyngeal depth, and preserving palatopharyngeal closure function, anterior maxillary segmental distraction has great value in the treatment of maxillary hypoplasia secondary to CLP. It is a promising and valuable technique in this potentially complicated procedure. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Orthodontic Treatment of Maxillary Incisors with Severe Root Resorption Caused by Bilateral Canine Impaction in a Class II Division 1 Patient.

    PubMed

    Chang, Na-Young; Park, Jae Hyun; Lee, Mi-Young; Cho, Jin-Woo; Cho, Jin-Hyoung; An, Ki-Yong; Chae, Jong-Moon

    2016-01-01

    This case report shows the successful alignment of bilateral impacted maxillary canines. A 12-year-old male with the chief complaint of the protrusion of his maxillary anterior teeth happened to have bilateral maxillary canine impaction on the labial side of his maxillary incisors. Four maxillary incisors showed severe root resorption because of the impacted canines. The patient was diagnosed as skeletal Class II malocclusion with proclined maxillary incisors. The impacted canine was carefully retracted using sectional buccal arch wires to avoid further root resorption of the maxillary incisors. To distalize the maxillary dentition, two palatal miniscrews were used. After 25 months of treatment, the maxillary canines were well aligned without any additional root resorption of the maxillary incisors.

  4. Surgical-orthodontic treatment of Class I malocclusion with maxillary vertical excess--a case report.

    PubMed

    Kiran, Jyothi; Isaac, Anish; Shanthraj, Ravis; Madannagowda, Shivalinga

    2012-01-01

    This article describes the treatment of an adult male with vertical maxillary excess, excessive gingival display on smiling, a convex profile, proclined upper and lower incisors, and crowded lower anteriors with severe lip incompetence. The therapy included stages: (1) Pre surgical orthodontics- leveling and aligning of the maxillary and mandibular arch with closure of all extraction spaces. (2) Surgical phase-Lefort I osteotomy for superior maxillary impaction, 5 mm of anterior and 3 mm of posterior impaction ofmaxilla was done. (3) Post surgical orthodontics for finishing and detailing. The treatment lasted 16 months; improved facial esthetics significantly; and resulted in a normal occlusion, overjet, and overbite.

  5. Piezoelectric surgery in maxillary sinus floor elevation with hydraulic pressure for xenograft and simultaneous implant placement.

    PubMed

    Li, Juanjuan; Lee, Kyungmo; Chen, Haohua; Ou, Guomin

    2013-11-01

    Because of the low bone quality in the posterior maxilla, edentulism in this area often results in a resorbed osseous structure and a pneumatized maxillary sinus, which makes dental implant surgery in the posterior maxilla a challenge. Two main surgical approaches are available for the sinus lift procedure: lateral and crestal. Improvement of the maxillary sinus floor elevation technique and increase in predictability are desirable. This article describes an innovative approach to maxillary sinus floor elevation with piezoelectric surgery and hydraulic pressure for xenograft and simultaneous implant placement in situations with insufficient residual alveolar bone. Copyright © 2013 Editorial Council for the Journal of Prosthetic Dentistry. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Combined orthodontic-restorative management of maxillary central incisors lost following traumatic injury: a case report.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Padhraig S; Seehra, Jadbinder; Dibiase, Andrew T

    2011-01-01

    A history of traumatic dental injury to the maxillary central incisors during preadolescence or adolescence is common and may result in premature loss. Treatment options include prosthetic implant replacement, autotransplantation, and orthodontic space closure with direct composite recontouring. This case report describes the treatment of an adolescent girl who presented with a crowded Class I malocclusion complicated by a history of trauma to the maxillary central incisors. The treatment plan consisted of orthodontic space closure following loss of both maxillary central incisors and mandibular premolars. This case highlights that orthodontic space closure can be a valuable treatment option in selected Class I crowded and Class II uncrowded malocclusions, producing predictable and efficient results.

  7. Two-rooted maxillary first molars with two canals: a case series.

    PubMed

    Shakouie, Sahar; Mokhtari, Hadi; Ghasemi, Negin; Gholizadeh, Seddigheh

    2013-01-01

    Thorough understanding of the anatomic and internal morphology of a root canal system is absolutely essential for the success of endodontic treatment. Since permanent maxillary first molars have shown variation in internal anatomy, morphology, this tooth has been reviewed extensively. Presence of two canals in a two-rooted maxillary first molar has rarely been reported in studies describing tooth and root canal anatomies. In this report, three cases are presented, which involve the root canal treatment of maxillary first molars with fusion of the two buccal roots.

  8. Five years experience with a new intraoral maxillary distraction device (RID).

    PubMed

    Picard, Arnaud; Diner, Patrick A; Galliani, Eva; Tomat, Catherine; Vazquez, Ma rie Paule; Carls, Friedrich P

    2011-10-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is well established for the treatment of severe retromaxilla. We report our experience since 2004 of the treatment of 19 patients using a new intraoral maxillary distraction device. Maxillary advancement was successful in all patients with mean advancement of 9.6mm (range 4-17) measured at a point in lateral cephalograms. The new device limited surgical exposure and the amount of materials implanted, and improved control in every phase of the distraction. It was psychologically accepted by patients and was more comfortable than existing devices. Copyright © 2010 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Maxillary canine impactions related to impacted central incisors: two case reports.

    PubMed

    Bayram, Mehmet; Ozer, Mete; Sener, Ismail

    2007-09-01

    The purpose of this case report is to describe the combined surgical and orthodontic treatment of two cases with an impacted maxillary central incisor and canine in the same quadrant and to discuss the causal relationship between them. The most common causes of canine impactions are usually the result of one or more factors such as a long path of eruption, tooth size-arch length discrepancies, abnormal position of the tooth bud, prolonged retention or early loss of the deciduous canine, trauma, the presence of an alveolar cleft, ankylosis, cystic or neoplastic formation, dilaceration of the root, supernumerary teeth, and odontomas. Although impaction of the maxillary central incisor is almost as prevalent as impacted canines its etiology is different. The principal factors involved in causing the anomaly are supernumerary teeth, odontomas, and trauma. Case #1: A 10.5-year-old girl in the early mixed dentition stage presented with a chief complaint of the appearance of her anterior teeth. She had a Class I skeletal pattern and a history of trauma to the maxillary central incisors at age five with premature exfoliation. Radiographs revealed an impacted upper right central incisor in the region of the nasal floor, delayed eruption of the maxillary permanent central incisor, and the adjacent lateral incisor was inclined toward the edentulous space. Treatment was done in two stages consisting of surgical exposure and traction of the impacted central incisor and fixed orthodontic treatment. Case #2: An 11.5-year-old girl presented for orthodontic treatment with the chief complaint of an unerupted tooth and the appearance of her upper anterior teeth. She was in the late mixed dentition period with a Class III skeletal pattern along with an anterior cross-bite with some maxillary transverse deficiency. The maxillary right canine and central incisor were absent, but the maxillary right deciduous canine was still present. Treatment included arch expansion followed by

  10. Severe maxillary osteomyelitis in a Gray Wolf (Canis lupus)

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Barber-Meyer, Shannon

    2012-01-01

    Dental injuries to or abnormalities in functionally important teeth and associated bones in predators may significantly reduce the ability to kill and consume prey (Lazar et al. 2009). This impairment is likely exacerbated in coursing predators, such as Gray Wolves, that bite and hold onto fleeing and kicking prey with their teeth. Damage to carnassials (upper fourth premolar, P4, and lower first molar, M1) and associated bones in Gray Wolves may especially inhibit the consumption of prey because these teeth slice meat and crush bone. Here I report maxillary osteomyelitis involving the carnassials in a wild Gray Wolf from northeastern Minnesota of such severity that I hypothesize it ultimately caused the Gray Wolf to starve to death.

  11. [A maxillary premolar reconstruction with a glass fiber reinforced post].

    PubMed

    Viţalariu, Anca Mihaela; Antohe, Magda; Bahrim, Delia; Tatarciuc, Monica

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents the case of a 37 years old female patient who needed a reconstruction of an endodontic treated' second maxillary premolar. The patient presented large areas of occlusal abrasion caused by bruxism, therefore the solution consisted of a reconstruction with a non-metallic post reinforced with glass fibers. In such cases, the excessive occlusal forces developed by bruxism can produce a radicular fracture if the tooth would be reconstructed with a rigid metallic post. The glass-fiber reinforced post has some important qualities, which render it more suitable in most clinical cases: it is easy to use; has the ability to bond with restorative resins; decreases the risk of tooth fracture and provides better esthetics.

  12. A Rare Occurrence of Geminated-Taloned Maxillary Lateral Incisor

    PubMed Central

    Kayal, Vizhi G

    2012-01-01

    ABSTRACT The talon cusp is a developmental anomaly characterized by the presence of an accessory cusp like structure projecting from the cingulum area of the anterior teeth. Gemination is an anomaly caused by a single tooth germ that attempted to divide during its development. These developmental anomalies may cause clinical problems including esthetic impairment, pain, caries and tooth crowding. Co-occurrence of two anomalies in a teeth is rare. This paper presents an unusual case of talon cusp on geminated permanent lateral incisor. How to cite this article: Neeraja R, Kayal VG. A Rare Occurrence of Geminated-Taloned Maxillary Lateral Incisor. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):136-138. PMID:25206153

  13. Mucormycosis (Mucor fungus ball) of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hang Sun; Yang, Hoon Shik; Kim, Kyung Soo

    2014-01-01

    A fungus ball is an extramucosal fungal proliferation that completely fills one or more paranasal sinuses and usually occurs as a unilateral infection. It is mainly caused by Aspergillus spp in an immunocompetent host, but some cases of paranasal fungal balls reportedly have been caused by Mucor spp. A Mucor fungus ball is usually found in the maxillary sinus and/or the sphenoid sinus and may be black in color. Patients with mucormycosis, or a Mucor fungal ball infection, usually present with facial pain or headache. On computed tomography, there are no pathognomonic findings that are conclusive for a diagnosis of mucormycosis. In this article we report a case of mucormycosis in a 56-year-old woman and provide a comprehensive review of the literature on the "Mucor fungus ball." To the best of our knowledge, 5 case reports (8 patients) have been published in which the fungus ball was thought to be caused by Mucor spp.

  14. Gingival health associated with porcelain veneers on maxillary incisors.

    PubMed

    Reid, J S; Kinane, D F; Adonogianaki, E

    1991-12-01

    The possible detrimental effect of acid-etched resin-bonded prostheses and porcelain veneers on plaque accumulation and gingival health is currently disputed. Some workers recommend no tooth preparation prior to veneering whilst others recommend tooth preparation to prevent adverse gingival soft tissue reactions. In order to test the possible gingival effects of veneers placed without tooth preparation, this study was set up to compare gingival health on veneered and non-veneered maxillary incisors within the same individual during periods of normal tooth cleaning and of no tooth cleaning. No significant differences were noted in plaque or gingival indices, or in gingival crevicular fluid volume, between the 72 veneered and non-veneered sites during either study period. The results of this study suggest that placing porcelain veneers on unprepared teeth does not increase the risk of gingivitis.

  15. Postretention stability after orthodontic closure of maxillary interincisor diastemas

    PubMed Central

    de MORAIS, Juliana Fernandes; de FREITAS, Marcos Roberto; de FREITAS, Karina Maria Salvatore; JANSON, Guilherme; CASTELLO BRANCO, Nuria

    2014-01-01

    Anterior spaces may interfere with smile attractiveness and compromise dentofacial harmony. They are among the most frequent reasons why patients seek orthodontic treatment. However, midline diastema is commonly cited as a malocclusion with high relapse incidence by orthodontists. Objectives This study aimed to evaluate the stability of maxillary interincisor diastemas closure and the association of their relapse and interincisor width, overjet, overbite and root parallelism. Material and Methods Sample comprised 30 patients with at least a pretreatment midline diastema of 0.5 mm or greater after eruption of the maxillary permanent canines. Dental casts and panoramic radiographs were taken at pretreatment, posttreatment and postretention. Results Before treatment, midline diastema width was 1.52 mm (SD=0.88) and right and left lateral diastema widths were 0.55 mm (SD=0.56) and 0.57 mm (SD=0.53), respectively. According to repeated measures analysis of variance, only midline diastema demonstrated significant relapse. In the overall sample the average relapse of midline diastema was 0.49 mm (SD=0.66), whilst the unstable patients showed a mean space reopening of 0.78 mm (SD=0.66). Diastema closure in the area between central and lateral incisors showed great stability. Multivariate correlation tests showed that only initial diastema width (β=0.60) and relapse of overjet (β=0.39) presented association with relapse of midline diastema. Conclusions Midline diastema relapse was statistically significant and occurred in 60% of the sample, while lateral diastemas closure remained stable after treatment. Only initial diastema width and overjet relapse showed association with relapse of midline diastema. There was no association between relapse of interincisor diastema and root parallelism. PMID:24918661

  16. Maxillary arch dimensions associated with acoustic parameters in prepubertal children.

    PubMed

    Hamdan, Abdul-Latif; Khandakji, Mohannad; Macari, Anthony Tannous

    2018-04-18

    To evaluate the association between maxillary arch dimensions and fundamental frequency and formants of voice in prepubertal subjects. Thirty-five consecutive prepubertal patients seeking orthodontic treatment were recruited (mean age = 11.41 ± 1.46 years; range, 8 to 13.7 years). Participants with a history of respiratory infection, laryngeal manipulation, dysphonia, congenital facial malformations, or history of orthodontic treatment were excluded. Dental measurements included maxillary arch length, perimeter, depth, and width. Voice parameters comprising fundamental frequency (f0_sustained), Habitual pitch (f0_count), Jitter, Shimmer, and different formant frequencies (F1, F2, F3, and F4) were measured using acoustic analysis prior to initiation of any orthodontic treatment. Pearson's correlation coefficients were used to measure the strength of associations between different dental and voice parameters. Multiple linear regressions were computed for the predictions of different dental measurements. Arch width and arch depth had moderate significant negative correlations with f0 ( r = -0.52; P = .001 and r = -0.39; P = .022, respectively) and with habitual frequency ( r = -0.51; P = .0014 and r = -0.34; P = .04, respectively). Arch depth and arch length were significantly correlated with formant F3 and formant F4, respectively. Predictors of arch depth included frequencies of F3 vowels, with a significant regression equation ( P-value < .001; R 2 = 0.49). Similarly, fundamental frequency f0 and frequencies of formant F3 vowels were predictors of arch width, with a significant regression equation ( P-value < .001; R 2 = 0.37). There is a significant association between arch dimensions, particularly arch length and depth, and voice parameters. The formant most predictive of arch depth and width is the third formant, along with fundamental frequency of voice.

  17. Jet pump assisted artery

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for priming an arterial heat pump is reported; the procedure also has a means for maintaining the pump in a primed state. This concept utilizes a capillary driven jet pump to create the necessary suction to fill the artery. Basically, the jet pump consists of a venturi or nozzle-diffuser type constriction in the vapor passage. The throat of this venturi is connected to the artery. Thus vapor, gas, liquid, or a combination of the above is pumped continuously out of the artery. As a result, the artery is always filled with liquid and an adequate supply of working fluid is provided to the evaporator of the heat pipe.

  18. The Shape of the Maxillary Central Incisors and Its Correlation with Maxillary Anterior Papillary Display: A Clinical Study.

    PubMed

    Nichani, Ashish S; Ahmed, Arshia Zainab; Ranganath, V

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to define shapes of maxillary central incisors and determine their relationship with the visual display of interdental papillae during smiling. A sample of 100 patients aged 20 to 25 years were recruited. Photographs were taken and gingival angle, crown width (CW), crown length (CL), contact surface (CS), CW/CL ratio, CS/CL ratio, gingival smile line (GSL), and interdental smile line (ISL) were measured. The data showed an increase in GA leading to an increase in CW and CS/CL ratio. Women showed a higher percentage of papillary display compared with men. This study reinforces the proposed hypothesis that the shape of the teeth and papilla affect the periodontium.

  19. A comparison of postnatal arterial patterns in a growth series of giraffe (Artiodactyla: Giraffa camelopardalis)

    PubMed Central

    Gignac, Paul M.; Hieronymus, Tobin L.; Witmer, Lawrence M.

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all living artiodactyls (even-toed ungulates) possess a derived cranial arterial pattern that is highly distinctive from most other mammals. Foremost among a suite of atypical arterial configurations is the functional and anatomical replacement of the internal carotid artery with an extensive, subdural arterial meshwork called the carotid rete. This interdigitating network branches from the maxillary artery and is housed within the cavernous venous sinus. As the cavernous sinus receives cooled blood draining from the nasal mucosa, heat rapidly dissipates across the high surface area of the rete to be carried away from the brain by the venous system. This combination yields one of the most effective mechanisms of selective brain cooling. Although arterial development begins from the same embryonic scaffolding typical of mammals, possession of a rete is typically accompanied by obliteration of the internal carotid artery. Among taxa with available ontogenetic data, the point at which the internal carotid obliterates is variable throughout development. In small-bodied artiodactyls, the internal carotid typically obliterates prior to parturition, but in larger species, the vessel may remain patent for several years. In this study, we use digital anatomical data collection methods to describe the cranial arterial patterns for a growth series of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), from parturition to senescence. Giraffes, in particular, have unique cardiovascular demands and adaptations owing to their exceptional body form and may not adhere to previously documented stages of cranial arterial development. We find the carotid arterial system to be conserved between developmental stages and that obliteration of the giraffe internal carotid artery occurs prior to parturition. PMID:26925324

  20. A comparison of postnatal arterial patterns in a growth series of giraffe (Artiodactyla: Giraffa camelopardalis).

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Haley D; Gignac, Paul M; Hieronymus, Tobin L; Witmer, Lawrence M

    2016-01-01

    Nearly all living artiodactyls (even-toed ungulates) possess a derived cranial arterial pattern that is highly distinctive from most other mammals. Foremost among a suite of atypical arterial configurations is the functional and anatomical replacement of the internal carotid artery with an extensive, subdural arterial meshwork called the carotid rete. This interdigitating network branches from the maxillary artery and is housed within the cavernous venous sinus. As the cavernous sinus receives cooled blood draining from the nasal mucosa, heat rapidly dissipates across the high surface area of the rete to be carried away from the brain by the venous system. This combination yields one of the most effective mechanisms of selective brain cooling. Although arterial development begins from the same embryonic scaffolding typical of mammals, possession of a rete is typically accompanied by obliteration of the internal carotid artery. Among taxa with available ontogenetic data, the point at which the internal carotid obliterates is variable throughout development. In small-bodied artiodactyls, the internal carotid typically obliterates prior to parturition, but in larger species, the vessel may remain patent for several years. In this study, we use digital anatomical data collection methods to describe the cranial arterial patterns for a growth series of giraffe (Giraffa camelopardalis), from parturition to senescence. Giraffes, in particular, have unique cardiovascular demands and adaptations owing to their exceptional body form and may not adhere to previously documented stages of cranial arterial development. We find the carotid arterial system to be conserved between developmental stages and that obliteration of the giraffe internal carotid artery occurs prior to parturition.

  1. Correction of complete maxillary crossbite with severe crowding using Hyrax expansion and fixed appliance.

    PubMed

    Wangsrimongkol, Tasanee; Manosudprasit, Montian; Pisek, Poonsak; Leelasinjaroen, Pornnapha

    2013-09-01

    An 18-year-old Thai man who presented with a secondary cleft palate, maxillary hypoplasia and severe crowding was treated by rapid maxillary expansion and fixed orthodontic appliances. Initial assessment found skeletal Class III malrelationship and dental Class II malocclusion with anterior and bilateral posterior crossbites. Camouflage orthodontic treatment was planned using a rapid maxillary expansion appliance and correcting crowding with extraction all four premolar teeth. A Hyrax appliance and vertical loop arch wire were placed for maxillary arch expansion of 9.5 mms at first molars and canines, and 5.5 mms at the premolars and obtained positive overjet. Both acceptable skeletal and soft tissue relationships and satisfactory occlusion were produced. After 14 months of postoperative follow-up, the occlusal result was stable and no skeletal reversals could be detected.

  2. Dental anomalies in an orthodontic patient population with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

    PubMed

    Citak, Mehmet; Cakici, Elif Bahar; Benkli, Yasin Atakan; Cakici, Fatih; Bektas, Bircan; Buyuk, Suleyman Kutalmış

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of dental anomalies in a subpopulation of orthodontic patients with agenesis of maxillary lateral incisors (MLI). The material of the present study included the records of the 1964 orthodontic patients. Panoramic radiographs and dental casts were used to analyze other associated eight dental anomalies, including agenesis of other teeth, dens invaginatus, dens evaginatus, peg shaped MLI, taurodontism, pulp stone, root dilaceration and maxillary canine impaction. Out of the 1964 patients examined, 90 were found to have agenesis of MLI, representing a prevalence of 4.6%. The most commonly found associated-anomalies were agenesis of other teeth (23.3%), peg-shaped MLIs (15.6%), taurodontism (42.2%), and dilacerated teeth (18.9%). Permanent tooth agenesis, taurodontism, peg-shaped maxillary lateral incisor, and root dilacerations are frequently associated with maxillary lateral incisor agenesis.

  3. C-shaped root canal in a maxillary first molar: a case report.

    PubMed

    Yilmaz, Z; Tuncel, B; Serper, A; Calt, S

    2006-02-01

    This case report presents an unusual C-shaped root canal system in a maxillary first molar tooth. Although C-shaped root canals are most frequently seen in the mandibular second molar, they may also appear in maxillary molars. A literature search revealed only a few case reports of C-shaped root canal systems in maxillary molars. The present case describes a C-shaped canal in the buccal root of a maxillary first molar. The endodontic access cavity displayed two canal orifices, one leading to the canal system in the buccal root, the other into the palatal root canal system. In the buccal root, what appeared to be the mesial and distal canals joined to form a single C-shaped canal. --Careful examination of radiographs and the internal anatomy of teeth is essential.-- The location and morphology of root canals should be identified at high magnification under the microscope.

  4. A novel anchorage technique for transnasal traction in rigid external maxillary distraction.

    PubMed

    Varol, A; Basa, S

    2013-12-01

    We describe an effective technique for anchorage of transnasal traction in the management of maxillary rotation during external distraction. Copyright © 2012 The British Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Distraction Osteogenesis Maxillary Expansion (DOME) for Adult Obstructive Sleep Apnea Patients with High Arched Palate.

    PubMed

    Liu, Stanley Yung-Chuan; Guilleminault, Christian; Huon, Leh-Kiong; Yoon, Audrey

    2017-08-01

    A narrow maxilla with high arched palate characterizes a phenotype of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) patients that is associated with increased nasal resistance and posterior tongue displacement. Current maxillary expansion techniques for adults are designed to correct dentofacial deformity. We describe distraction osteogenesis maxillary expansion (DOME) tailored to adult patients with OSA with narrow nasal floor and high arched palate without soft tissue redundancy. DOME is performed with placement of maxillary expanders secured by mini-implants along the midpalatal suture. This minimizes the maxillary osteotomies necessary to re-create sutural separation for reliable expansion at the nasal floor and palatal vault. We report the safety and efficacy profile of the first 20 patients at Stanford who underwent DOME.

  6. A rare occurrence of supplementary maxillary lateral incisors and a detailed review on supernumerary teeth

    PubMed Central

    Chalakkal, Paul; Krishnan, Ramesh; De Souza, Neil; Da Costa, Godwin Clovis

    2018-01-01

    This article highlights a rare occurrence of nonsyndromic supplemental maxillary lateral incisors in a 11-year-old boy. It also includes a detailed literature review of supernumerary teeth. PMID:29731581

  7. Cervical Carotid and Circle of Willis Arterial Anatomy of Macaque Monkeys: A Comparative Anatomy Study

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Nishant; Lee, John J.; Perlmutter, Joel S.; Derdeyn, Colin P.

    2009-01-01

    Macaque monkeys are used in many research applications, including cerebrovascular investigations. However, detailed catalogs of the relevant vascular anatomy are scarce. We present our experience with macaque vessel patterns as determined by digital subtraction angiography of 34 different monkeys. METHODS AND MATERIALS: We retrospectively analyzed digital subtraction angiograms obtained during experimental internal carotid artery catheterization and subsequent injection of 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). Results were catalogued according to vascular distribution and variants observed. RESULTS: Macaque monkeys have a bovine aortic arch. The carotid vessels generally bifurcate, but are occasionally observed to divide into three vessels. The external carotid gives rise primarily to two trunks: an occipital branch and a common vessel that subsequently gives off the lingual, facial, and superior thyroid arteries. The internal maxillary artery may be present as a terminal branch of the external carotid or as a branch of the occipital artery. The internal carotid artery is similar in course to that of the human. The anterior circle of Willis was intact in all monkeys in our study. Its primary difference from that of the human is the union of the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries as a single (azygous) median vessel. CONCLUSIONS: Macaque cervical carotid and circle of Willis arterial anatomy differs from humans in a couple of specific patterns. Knowledge of these differences and similarities between human and macaque anatomy is important in developing endovascular macaque models of human diseases, such as ischemic stroke. PMID:19434671

  8. Cone beam computed tomography analysis of dentoalveolar changes immediately after maxillary expansion

    PubMed Central

    Domann, Carin Elizabeth; Kau, Chung How; English, Jeryl D.; Xia, James J.; Souccar, Nada M.; Lee, Robert P.

    2015-01-01

    Aim Rapid maxillary expansion (RME) splits the midpalatal suture to correct maxillary transverse discrepancies and increase the arch perimeter. The goal of this paper is to evaluate the immediate effects of RME with Hyrax appliances on the dentoalveolar complex using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). Methods Twenty-eight patients (19 females and 9 males) requiring maxillary expansion therapy were included (mean age, 14.1 years; range, 13 to 20 years). CBCT images were taken at T1 (before maxillary expansion) and T2 (immediately after expansion) as part of clinical records. Maxillary arch width, posterior segment angulation, and buccal bone thickness at the level of the first premolar and first molar were evaluated. Paired t tests determined statistical significance (P < .05). Results The mean ± SD amount of expansion achieved was 4.7788 ± 2.8474 mm for the maxillary premolars and 4.6943 ± 3.2198 mm for the molars. Significant tipping of the palatal roots of the maxillary right and left premolars as well as that for the maxillary left molar was observed. When present, the thickness of the buccal plate decreased on all observed roots. Conclusion There is a significant increase in interpremolar and intermolar distance with RME. The increase in root angulation suggests that the movement is more tipping than translation. The thickness of the buccal plate decreases immediately after RME. Therefore, the level of inflammation should be closely monitored to avoid periodontal destruction. There is a need to define standardized reference planes and comparable methodology to achieve compatible results among studies. PMID:22022691

  9. Supernumerary Teeth in the Maxillary Anterior Region: The Dilemma of Early Versus Late Surgical Intervention.

    PubMed

    Sarne, Ofer; Shapira, Yehoshua; Blumer, Sigalit; Finkelstein, Tamar; Schonberger, Shirley; Bechor, Naomi; Shpack, Nir

    Supernumerary teeth are the most common developmental dental anomalies in the maxillary anterior region causing interference to the developing permanent incisors resulting in poor dental and facial esthetics. Two different opinions regarding the timing for surgical removal of the supernumerary teeth are presented. In this case report, three brothers with supernumerary teeth in the maxillary anterior region are presented, their surgical and orthodontic management and outcome are discussed.

  10. Dual odontogenic origins develop at the early stage of rat maxillary incisor development.

    PubMed

    Kriangkrai, Rungarun; Iseki, Sachiko; Eto, Kazuhiro; Chareonvit, Suconta

    2006-03-01

    Developmental process of rat maxillary incisor has been studied through histological analysis and investigation of tooth-related gene expression patterns at initial tooth development. The tooth-related genes studied here are fibroblast growth factor-8 (Fgf-8), pituitary homeobox gene-2 (Pitx-2), sonic hedgehog (Shh), muscle segment homeobox-1 (Msx-1), paired box-9 (Pax-9) and bone morphogenetic protein-4 (Bmp-4). The genes are expressed in oral epithelium and/or ectomesenchyme at the stage of epithelial thickening to the early bud stage of tooth development. Both the histological observation and tooth-related gene expression patterns during early stage of maxillary incisor development demonstrate that dual odontogenic origins aligned medio-laterally in the medial nasal process develop, subsequently only single functional maxillary incisor dental placode forms. The cascade of tooth-related gene expression patterns in rat maxillary incisor studied here is quite similar to those of the previous studies in mouse mandibular molar, even though the origins of oral epithelium and ectomesenchyme involved in development of maxillary incisor and mandibular molar are different. Thus, we conclude that maxillary incisor and mandibular molar share a similar signaling control of Fgf-8, Pitx-2, Shh, Msx-1, Pax-9 and Bmp-4 genes at the stage of oral epithelial thickening to the early bud stage of tooth development.

  11. Risk factors associated with oroantral perforation during surgical removal of maxillary third molar teeth.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Takumi; Tachibana, Akira; Takeda, Daisuke; Iwata, Eiji; Arimoto, Satomi; Sakakibara, Akiko; Akashi, Masaya; Komori, Takahide

    2016-12-01

    The relationship between radiographic findings and the occurrence of oroantral perforation is controversial. Few studies have quantitatively analyzed the risk factors contributing to oroantral perforation, and no study has reported multivariate analysis of the relationship(s) between these various factors. This retrospective study aims to fill this void. Various risk factors for oroantral perforation during maxillary third molar extraction were investigated by univariate and multivariate analysis. The proximity of the roots to the maxillary sinus floor (root-sinus [RS] classification) was assessed using panoramic radiography and classified as types 1-5. The relationship between the maxillary second and third molars was classified according to a modified version of the Archer classification. The relative depth of the maxillary third molar in the bone was classified as class A-C, and its angulation relative to the long axis of the second molar was also recorded. Performance of an incision (OR 5.16), mesioangular tooth angulation (OR 6.05), and type 3 RS classification (i.e., significant superimposition of the roots of all posterior maxillary teeth with the sinus floor; OR 10.18) were all identified as risk factors with significant association to an outcome of oroantral perforation. To our knowledge, this is the first multivariate analysis of the risk factors for oroantral perforation during surgical extraction of the maxillary third molar. This RS classification may offer a new predictive parameter for estimating the risk of oroantral perforation.

  12. The effects of uncinectomy and natural ostial dilatation on maxillary sinus ventilation: a clinical experimental study.

    PubMed

    Kutluhan, Ahmet; Şalvız, Mehti; Bozdemir, Kazım; Kanbak, Orhan; Ulu, Mustafa; Yalçıner, Gökhan; Bilgen, Akif Sinan

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of uncinectomy without sinusotomy and natural ostial dilatation on maxillary sinus ventilation in chronic rhinosinusitis. Twenty patients with chronic rhinosinusitis were included in this study. The patients were randomly divided into two groups. Group 1 consisted of patients with uncinectomy (n = 10), while group 2 was made up of patients treated with natural ostial dilatation (n = 10). The CO(2) tension and pressure levels of the maxillary sinus during inspiration and expiration phases were obtained and compared before and after the procedures within and between the groups. The mean CO(2) tension levels in both groups were significantly decreased after the procedures. The mean maxillary sinus pressure during inspiration was significantly decreased to a negative value after uncinectomy; however, no significant change was observed during expiration. There were no significant changes in maxillary sinus pressures after natural ostial dilatation procedure. Both uncinectomy and natural ostial dilatation seem to be equally effective in decreasing maxillary sinus pCO(2) levels. The effects of decreased maxillary sinus pressure during inspiration after uncinectomy on mucociliary clearance and development mechanisms of chronic rhinosinusitis seem to be worth investigating.

  13. Incomplete mobilization of the maxilla resulting in failed maxillary distraction: a case report.

    PubMed

    Alkan, Alper; Inal, Samet; Baş, Burcu; Ozer, Mete

    2007-12-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis has become an accepted alternative method in the treatment of patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia in craniofacial syndromes and cleft-related deformities. Insufficient distraction, undesirable soft tissue changes, and occurrence of defective distraction vectors are among the potential complications of intraoral maxillary distraction osteogenesis. A 2-stage procedure combining maxillary advancement by distraction technique with genioplasty and mandibular setback surgery was planned to correct jaw deformities in a 22-year-old patient with severe maxillary retrusion, mandibular prognathism, and excessive lower facial height. In the first stage, osteotomies were performed and maxilla was lightly mobilized after down-fracture. Distractors were placed to the maxilla intraorally. During activation period, the maxilla rotated in a clockwise direction, producing a discrepancy between the planned and the actual vectors. Complete distraction was unsatisfactory and the complication was due to surgical technique. This case report presents the failure of maxillary distraction due to incomplete mobilization of the maxilla. Treatment of the case was achieved by the conventional osteotomy techniques at final operation. The maxilla was successfully advanced to the desired position producing good occlusion and an improved facial profile.

  14. [Effects of maxillary distraction osteogenesis on the velopharyngeal configuration of cleft palate patients].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-xia; Wang, Xing; Yi, Biao; Li, Zi-li; Liang, Cheng

    2005-12-18

    To study the effects of internal maxillary distraction osteogenesis(DO) on the velopharyngeal configuration of cleft palate patients. Ten patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate patients (7 males and 3 females, average age 20.1 years old) had undertaken high step LeFort I osteotomy, and internal maxillary distraction devices were applied to advance the maxilla. Before surgery, when DO was completed and 6 months after DO was completed, oriented lateral cephalograms at rest position of each patient were taken, and 6 measure indexes of velopharyngeal configuration were collected and analyzed. All patients had successfully accomplished maxillary DO and the maxilla had been averagely advanced 11.3 mm. PNS-PhW, C-PhW, UL and ANS-PNS-T had all significantly increased, and UD had significantly decreased when DO was completed and 6 months after DO was completed as compared with pre-surgery. No significant linear correlation was found between maxilla advancement distance and velopharyngeal configuration changes. Correction of maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft palate surgery by using internal maxillary DO can increase the velopharyngeal cavity depth, and may impair velopharyngeal competence, but the compensatory changes of velopharyngeal soft tissue can alleviate this impairment to certain extent.

  15. Variation in Size and Form between Left and Right Maxillary Central Incisor Teeth.

    PubMed

    Vadavadagi, Suneel V; Hombesh, M N; Choudhury, Gopal Krishna; Deshpande, Sumith; Anusha, C V; Murthy, D Kiran

    2015-02-01

    To compare the variation in size of left and right maxillary central incisors for male patients (using digital calipers of 0.01 mm accuracy). To compare the variation in size of left and right maxillary central incisors for female patients (using digital calipers of 0.01 mm accuracy). To find out the difference between the maxillary central incisors of men and women. Its clinical applicability if difference exists. A total of 70 dental students of PMNM Dental College and Hospital were selected. Of 70 dental students, 40 male and 30 female were selected. Impressions were made for all subjects, using irreversible hydrocolloid (Algitex, manufacturer DPI, Batch-T-8804) using perforated stock metal trays. The mesiodistal crown width and cervical width were measured for each incisor and recorded separately for left and right teeth. The length was measured for each incisor and recorded separately for left and right maxillary central incisor using digitec height caliper. The mean value of maximum crown length of maxillary left central incisor of male was greater in length compared with maxillary right central incisor. Mean value of maximum crown length for male patient right and left side was greater compared with maximum crown length of female patient. When compared the dimensions of teeth between two sex, male group shows larger values to female group.

  16. Gingival zenith positions and levels of the maxillary anterior dentition.

    PubMed

    Chu, Stephen J; Tan, Jocelyn H-P; Stappert, Christian F J; Tarnow, Dennis P

    2009-01-01

    The location of the gingival zenith in a medial-lateral position relative to the vertical tooth axis of the maxillary anterior teeth remains to be clearly defined. In addition, the apex of the free gingival margin of the lateral incisor teeth relative to the gingival zeniths of the adjacent proximal teeth remains undetermined. Therefore, this investigation evaluated two clinical parameters: (1) the gingival zenith position (GZP) from the vertical bisected midline (VBM) along the long axis of each individual maxillary anterior tooth; and (2) the gingival zenith level (GZL) of the lateral incisors in an apical-coronal direction relative to the gingival line joining the tangents of the GZP of the adjacent central incisor and canine teeth under healthy conditions. A total of 240 sites in 20 healthy patients (13 females, 7 males) with an average age of 27.7 years were evaluated. The inclusion patient criteria were absence of periodontal disease, gingival recession, or gingival hypertrophy as well as teeth without loss of interdental papillae, spacing, crowding, existing restorations, and incisal attrition. GZP dimensions were measured with calibrated digital calipers for each individual tooth and within each tooth group in a medial-lateral direction from the VBM. GZLs were measured in an apical-coronal direction from a tangent line drawn on the diagnostic casts from the GZPs of the adjacent teeth. This study demonstrated that all central incisors displayed a distal GZP from the VBM, with a mean average of 1 mm. Lateral incisors showed a deviation of the gingival zenith by a mean of 0.4 mm. In 97.5% of the canine population, the GZP was centralized along the long axis of the canine. The mean distance of the contour of the gingival margin in an apical-coronal direction of the lateral incisors (GZL) relative to gingival line joining the tangent of the adjacent central and canine GZPs was approximately 1 mm. This investigation revealed a GZP mean value of 1 mm distal from

  17. Duplicated middle cerebral artery

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Jesus; Machado, Calixto; Scherle, Claudio; Hierro, Daniel

    2009-01-01

    Duplicated middle cerebral artery (DMCA) is an anomalous vessel arising from the internal carotid artery. The incidence DMCA is relatively law, and an association between this anomaly and cerebral aneurysms has been documented. There is a controversy whether DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is an important fact to consider in aneurysm surgery. We report the case of a 34-year-old black woman who suffered a subarachnoid hemorrhage and the angiography a left DMCA, and an aneurysm in an inferior branch of the main MCA. The DMCA and the MCA had perforating arteries. The aneurysm was clipped without complications. The observation of perforating arteries in our patient confirms that the DMCA may have perforating arteries. This is very important to be considered in cerebral aneurysms surgery. Moreover, the DMCA may potentially serve as a collateral blood supply to the MCA territory in cases of MCA occlusion. PMID:22140405

  18. Is Le Fort I Osteotomy Associated With Maxillary Sinusitis?

    PubMed

    Nocini, Pier Francesco; D'Agostino, Antonio; Trevisiol, Lorenzo; Favero, Vittorio; Pessina, Mattia; Procacci, Pasquale

    2016-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to investigate the association between Le Fort I osteotomy and the anatomic, radiologic, and symptomatic modifications of the maxillary sinus. Subjects who had undergone Le Fort I osteotomy from January 2008 to December 2013 were enrolled in a retrospective cohort study. The eligibility criteria were the availability of a cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan taken before and 12 to 24 months after the procedure. The exclusion criteria were the unavailability of CBCT scans, the use of tobacco, and previous orthognathic procedures. The primary predictor variable was time (pre-vs postoperative). The primary outcome variables were the sinus volume, mucosal thickening, iatrogenic alterations in the sinus anatomy, and rhinosinusitis symptoms, evaluated using the Sino-Nasal Outcome 20-item Test (SNOT-20). Descriptive statistics were computed for each variable, and paired analyses were used to compare the pre- and postoperative values. The data from 64 subjects (mean age 27; 59.4% were female; median follow-up 32.4 months, range 13 to 66 months) were studied. Postoperatively, 1.6% of the sample (0% preoperatively) had moderate-to-severe and 15.6% (3.1% preoperatively) had mild-to-moderate sinusitis symptoms. The rest of the sample presented with mild to no symptoms. The increase in the SNOT scores after surgery was statistically significant (P = .016). Radiologic evidence of postoperative inflammatory processes affecting the paranasal sinuses was found in 27.3% of the sinuses (9.4% preoperatively). The postoperative Lund-Mackay scores were significantly greater (P = .0005). A 19% decrease was found in the mean postoperative sinus volume, with a 37% incidence of iatrogenic injury. The study results indicate that Le Fort I osteotomies can have an important impact on sinus health. The postoperative radiologic evidence of maxillary sinus inflammatory processes and the incidence of rhinosinusitis symptoms and iatrogenic damage in these

  19. Comparison of maxillary anterior tooth width and facial dimensions of 3 ethnicities.

    PubMed

    Parciak, Ewa C; Dahiya, Ankur T; AlRumaih, Hamad S; Kattadiyil, Mathew T; Baba, Nadim Z; Goodacre, Charles J

    2017-10-01

    As the cosmetic demands of patients increase, determining the appropriate dimensions of the maxillary anterior teeth has become increasingly relevant. The relationship between facial measurements and tooth size provide guidance for maxillary anterior tooth size selection. However, most publications on this topic have focused on the white population, and more data for tooth sizes and their proportions in other ethnicities are needed. The purpose of this observational study was to investigate the relationship between the mesiodistal dimensions of the 6 maxillary anterior teeth and the bizygomatic width, interpupillary distance, intercanthal distance, interalar width, and intercommissural width of individuals of Asian, African-American, and white ethnicities. Standardized digital images of 360 participants (120 Asian, 120 African-American, and 120 white) were used to measure facial segments. Individual dimensions of the 6 maxillary anterior teeth were measured using stone casts with digital sliding caliper. The combined width of the 6 maxillary anterior teeth on a straight line corresponded to the sum of the anterior tooth width. The means and standard deviations from descriptive measurements were calculated and analyzed for face and maxillary anterior tooth ratios and correlations. Statistical analysis was done using the Kruskal-Wallis procedure to compare facial and tooth parameters among the 3 ethnicities. Appropriate post hoc comparisons that adjusted for multiple testing were conducted when warranted (α=.05). The Spearman rho correlation, a nonparametric correlate of the Pearson correlation, was used to associate the facial and tooth parameters within the strata of sex and ethnicity. No consistent ratios were found among the examined facial dimensions and the mesiodistal dimensions of the 6 maxillary anterior teeth among the 3 ethnicities, except for the central incisor width-to-bizygomatic width ratio. No correlations were found between the facial dimensions

  20. Three-dimensional computed topography analysis of a patient with an unusual anatomy of the maxillary second and third molars.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jin; Li, Yan; Yang, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Wei; Meng, Yan

    2011-10-01

    We present a case of a patient with rare anatomy of a maxillary second molar with three mesiobuccal root canals and a maxillary third molar with four separate roots, identified using multi-slice computed topography (CT) and three-dimensional reconstruction techniques. The described case enriched/might enrich our knowledge about possible anatomical aberrations of maxillary molars. In addition, we demonstrate the role of multi-slice CT as an objective tool for confirmatory diagnosis and successful endodontic management.

  1. Alveolar bone changes after asymmetric rapid maxillary expansion.

    PubMed

    Akin, Mehmet; Baka, Zeliha Muge; Ileri, Zehra; Basciftci, Faruk Ayhan

    2015-09-01

    To quantitatively evaluate the effects of asymmetric rapid maxillary expansion (ARME) on cortical bone thickness and buccal alveolar bone height (BABH), and to determine the formation of dehiscence and fenestration in the alveolar bone surrounding the posterior teeth, using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The CBCT records of 23 patients with true unilateral posterior skeletal crossbite (10 boys, 14.06 ± 1.08 years old, and 13 girls, 13.64 ± 1.32 years old) who had undergone ARME were selected from our clinic archives. The bonded acrylic ARME appliance, including an occlusal stopper, was used on all patients. CBCT records had been taken before ARME (T1) and after the 3-month retention period (T2). Axial slices of the CBCT images at 3 vertical levels were used to evaluate the buccal and palatal aspects of the canines, first and second premolars, and first molars. Paired samples and independent sample t-tests were used for statistical comparison. The results suggest that buccal cortical bone thickness of the affected side was significantly more affected by the expansion than was the unaffected side (P < .05). ARME significantly reduced the BABH of the canines (P < .01) and the first and second premolars (P < .05) on the affected side. ARME also increased the incidence of dehiscence and fenestration on the affected side. ARME may quantitatively decrease buccal cortical bone thickness and height on the affected side.

  2. Peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour of the maxillary gingiva.

    PubMed

    de Lima, Ana Paula; Kitakawa, Dárcio; Almeida, Janete Dias; Brandão, Adriana Aigotti Haberbeck; Anbinder, Ana Lia

    2012-08-23

    Odontogenic tumors are lesions that are derived from remnants of the components of the developing tooth germ. The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor or calcifying odontogenic cyst is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin that is characterized by an ameloblastoma-like epithelium and ghost cells. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor may be centrally or peripherally located, and its ghost cells may exhibit calcification, as first described by Gorlin in 1962. Most peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors are located in the anterior gingiva of the mandible or maxilla. Authors report a rare case of a peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor of the maxillary gingiva. A 39-year-old male patient presented with a fibrous mass on the attached buccal gingiva of the upper left cuspid teeth. It was 0.7-cm-diameter, painless and it was clinically diagnosed as a peripheral ossifying fibroma. After an excisional biopsy, the diagnosis was peripheric calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. The patient was monitored for five years following the excision, and no recurrence was detected. All biopsy material must be sent for histological examination. If the histological examination of gingival lesions with innocuous appearance is not performed, the frequency of peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and other peripheral odontogenic tumors may be underestimated.

  3. Peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumour of the maxillary gingiva

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Odontogenic tumors are lesions that are derived from remnants of the components of the developing tooth germ. The calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor or calcifying odontogenic cyst is a benign cystic neoplasm of odontogenic origin that is characterized by an ameloblastoma-like epithelium and ghost cells. Calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor may be centrally or peripherally located, and its ghost cells may exhibit calcification, as first described by Gorlin in 1962. Most peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumors are located in the anterior gingiva of the mandible or maxilla. Case presentation Authors report a rare case of a peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor of the maxillary gingiva. A 39-year-old male patient presented with a fibrous mass on the attached buccal gingiva of the upper left cuspid teeth. It was 0.7-cm-diameter, painless and it was clinically diagnosed as a peripheral ossifying fibroma. After an excisional biopsy, the diagnosis was peripheric calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor. The patient was monitored for five years following the excision, and no recurrence was detected. Conclusions All biopsy material must be sent for histological examination. If the histological examination of gingival lesions with innocuous appearance is not performed, the frequency of peripheral calcifying cystic odontogenic tumor and other peripheral odontogenic tumors may be underestimated. PMID:22917449

  4. Haemangiopericytoma of the maxillary gingiva: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Petrone, Giovanna; Perrotti, Vittoria; Fioroni, Massimiliano; Rubini, Corrado; Piattelli, Adriano

    2005-08-01

    Haemangiopericytoma (HPC) represents approximately 3% of all tumours in the head and neck. This tumour is a soft tissue tumour derived from mesenchymal cells with pericytic differentiation. We present the clinicopathological findings of a case. A 69-year-old man was referred to our Department for a mass located on the right pre-molar maxillary gingiva; this mass caused problems during chewing, but was otherwise asymptomatic. Clinical examination revealed a nodular, pink lesion, 3.5 cm in diameter, which was lined with normal mucosa. The lesion was mobile in relation to the deep and superficial tissues. Microscopic analysis of the neoplasm showed a vascular rich pattern, constituted by vessels covered with flat endothelium and surrounded by abundant spindly cells. On the basis of these histological and immunohistochemical findings, the final diagnosis was HPC. HPC is an uncommon vascular tumour for which the biological behaviour is difficult to predict. In our patient, no recurrences or distant metastases were present at a 4 years follow-up.

  5. Professional and lay people perceptions of anterior maxillary esthetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roslan, Husniyati; Lillywhite, Graeme

    2016-12-01

    Achieving esthetic outcomes with implant-based restorations in the esthetic zone is a challenge due to the difficulty in replacing lost papillae. This study aimed to assess the influence of contact point position on the overall perception of esthetics as assessed by dental professionals and lay people. A cross-sectional study using self-administered questionnaire was distributed among 300 prosthodontists, general dentists and lay people in the United Kingdom. The questionnaire consisted of photographic images of a smile, intentionally altered using image manipulation software. Variations in contact length between maxillary central incisors were created to mimic the clinical situation when missing teeth were replaced with implant-supported crowns. These images were rated using VAS. One-way and two-way ANOVAs, and Tukey's test were used to analyze the data. The overall response rate by the three groups was 72%. Lay people and general dentists were more critical than prosthodontists in all VAS ratings (p < 0.000). Overall, all the groups perceived that the esthetic value reduced as the contact point increased in its length.

  6. Measurement of Distraction Force in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients During Le Fort I Maxillary Advancement With Rigid External Distraction.

    PubMed

    Sawada, Hiromi; Ogawa, Takuya; Kataoka, Keiichi; Baba, Yoshiyuki; Moriyama, Keiji

    2017-03-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a mainstream surgical technique for patients who have severe maxillary hypoplasia associated with craniofacial syndromes and cleft-related deformities. However, limited information about the biomechanical aspects of maxillary DO is available limiting broad utilization and improvements to the procedure. The objective of this study was to analyze force levels during the active distraction process and to investigate the relationship between distraction force and maxillary movement during Le Fort I maxillary DO using a rigid external distraction (RED) system. Microtension gauges were integrated into the distraction wires on each side of the RED system. Six patients with cleft lip and palate aged 12.8 to 23.5 years underwent strain gauge measurements during maxillary advancement with DO using an RED system. Lateral cephalograms were taken to measure maxillary horizontal, vertical, and linear movements after DO. The average linear maxillary movement was 11.2 mm (range 8.5-15.9 mm). The applied forces ranged from 13.4 to 26.8 N. The distance of maxillary movement was proportional to the distraction force. The measurement of distraction forces during DO provides important information with which to establish appropriate protocols. Patients requiring more advancement may require more distraction force. However, other factors such as scarring, patient anatomy, surgical freedom of the osteotomized maxilla, and the like, may affect the required force during DO with the RED system.

  7. Relationship between the maxillary transverse dimension and palatally displaced canines: A cone-beam computed tomographic study.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wei-Hsin; Radfar, Rebecca; Chung, Chun-Hsi

    2015-05-01

    To examine the relationship between palatally displaced maxillary canines (PDC) and the maxillary transverse dimension using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Thirty-three patients (11 males and 22 females, mean age 18.2 years) with PDC were matched to 66 patients (22 males and 44 females, mean age 18.1 years) without PDC (control) by gender, age, and posterior occlusion. A CBCT image was taken on all the patients prior to any orthodontic treatment. For each patient the maxillary basal bone widths and interdental widths at the maxillary first molars and first and second premolars were measured on axial and coronal sections of CBCT images. In addition, the presence of permanent tooth agenesis and the widths of maxillary incisors were recorded. Similar maxillary transverse dimensions, both skeletally and dentally, were found between the PDC and control groups. In the PDC group, the number of patients with permanent tooth agenesis was six times higher than in the control group. In addition, the maxillary lateral incisors on PDC-affected sides were smaller than those of control group (P < .05). The maxillary transverse dimension, both skeletally and dentally, had no effect on the occurrence of PDC. The higher prevalence of permanent tooth agenesis was found in the PDC group. Moreover, the mean mesiodistal width of maxillary lateral incisors in the PDC group was significantly smaller than in the control group (P < .05).

  8. An easy access to retrieve dental implants displaced into the maxillary sinus: the bony window technique.

    PubMed

    Biglioli, Federico; Chiapasco, Matteo

    2014-12-01

    To present the authors' experience concerning the removal of dental implants displaced in the maxillary sinus via an intraoral approach consisting of the creation of a bony window pedicled to the maxillary sinus membrane. Thirty-six systemically healthy patients, presenting with oral implants displaced into the maxillary sinus, but with no signs of acute or chronic sinusitis, were consecutively treated between 2002 and 2012 via an intraoral approach with the bony window technique. Removal of oral implants from the maxillary sinus was achieved in all patients, and postoperative recovery was uneventful in all of them. Computed tomographies performed after surgery showed no signs of residual sinus infection in all patients and a complete ossification of the bony window margins. Twelve of the 36 treated patients were treated with a sinus grafting procedure 12-18 months after in the same areas previously treated with the bone lid technique. Seventeen implants were placed in the grafted areas 6-9 months later and, after a further waiting period needed for osseointegration, the treated patients were rehabilitated with implant-supported prostheses. The survival rate of implants was 100%, and no complications related to the sinuses and implants were recorded. Results from this study seem to demonstrate that the bony window technique is a safe and easy way to remove oral implants from the maxillary sinus under local anesthesia. The surgical access is hardly visible 6-12 months after surgery, and maxillary sinuses appeared free from residual pathology in all treated patients. Finally, this procedure allows a second-stage sinus grafting procedure via a lateral approach as in a previously untreated maxillary sinus, thus allowing an implant-supported prosthetic restoration. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Analysis of the width ratio and wear rate of maxillary anterior teeth in the Korean population.

    PubMed

    Oh, Yeon-Ah; Yang, Hong-So; Park, Sang-Won; Lim, Hyun-Pil; Yun, Kwi-Dug; Park, Chan

    2017-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the width ratio of maxillary anterior teeth according to age in the Korean population and to evaluate the maxillary central incisor width-to-length (W/L) ratio, given differences in age and gender. Ninety-three Korean adults were divided into 3 groups (n = 31) by age. Group I was 20 - 39 years old, Group II was 40 - 59 years old, and Group III was over 60 years of age. After taking an impression and a cast model of the maxillary arch, the anterior teeth width ratio and central incisor W/L ratio were calculated from standard digital images of the cast models using a graph paper with a digital single lens reflex (DSLR) camera. The calculated ratios were compared among all groups and central incisor W/L ratio were analyzed according to age and gender. All comparative data were statistically analyzed with one-sample t-tests, one-way ANOVAs with Tukey tests, and independent t-tests. No significant differences in maxillary anterior teeth ratios were found among the age groups. The maxillary central incisor W/L ratios in Group III were the greatest and were significantly higher than those in the other groups. The central incisor W/L ratio of men was higher than that of women in Group II. Maxillary anterior teeth width ratios were similar in all age groups in the Korean population. The maxillary central incisor was observed as worn teeth in the group over 60 years of age, and a significant difference between genders was found in 40 to 50 year olds.

  10. Palatal Injection for the Removal of Maxillary Teeth: Current Practice Among Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons.

    PubMed

    Badenoch-Jones, Emma K; David, Michael; Lincoln, Trent

    2017-07-01

    Conventional teaching regarding palatal injection for the removal of maxillary teeth dictates the administration of buccal and palatal injections. Recently, some investigators have questioned the necessity of the palatal injection, suggesting that contemporary local anesthetics might diffuse sufficiently across the buccopalatal cortical bone distance. It has been suggested that because the buccopalatal cortical bone distance increases anteriorly to posteriorly in the maxilla, the success of maxillary extractions with buccal injection only might be related to the anteroposterior position of the tooth. Evidence from clinical trials has only recently become available. Since 2006, 15 clinical trials that examined outcomes of maxillary tooth extractions performed with buccal injection of local anesthetic only have been published. However, there are limited data available on the clinical practice of surgeons. An online survey was sent to 276 full members of the Canadian Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Respondents were asked about their use of palatal injection for the removal of maxillary teeth under local anesthesia, including how often they administer a palatal injection for maxillary extractions in each region of the maxilla. Ninety-two responses were received (33%). Most practitioners deliver a palatal injection for every maxillary tooth extraction under local anesthesia. However, there is a substantial number who do not always administer a palatal injection (ie, they give it "most of the time," "occasionally," or "never"). This number decreased in a linear fashion anteriorly to posteriorly in the maxilla (incisors, 17 of 89; canines, 16 of 88; premolars, 13 of 88; first and second molars, 10 of 89; third molars, 10 of 88). Some surgeons who do not always administer a palatal injection for extraction of maxillary teeth under local anesthesia. The number is larger for anterior compared with posterior teeth. Copyright © 2017 American Association of

  11. Maxillary complete denture outcome with two-implant supported mandibular overdentures. A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Rutkunas, Vygandas; Mizutani, Hiroshi; Peciuliene, Vytaute; Bendinskaite, Ruta; Linkevicius, Tomas

    2008-01-01

    Research data regarding maxillary complete denture outcome with two-implant supported mandibular overdentures are not consistent. Considering multiple publications on implant supported mandibular overdentures, it was decided to summarize currently present evidence on the maxillary complete dentures opposed by implant-supported mandibular overdentures, and analyze factors that could potentially influence the outcomes. The articles from 1985 to 2007 related to the topic were identified in the online MEDLINE/Pubmed and other databases and manually. Primary articles were scanned, and irrelevant studies were excluded from the further review process. Potentially relevant titles and abstracts were provisionally included for consideration on the basis of full text articles. Full text articles were obtained from on-line and printed sources. The data from the studies were extracted and reviewed. The study has failed to identify any prospective satisfying inclusion/exclusion criteria RCT reporting on maxillary bone resorption. The number of maxillary complete denture relining incidences per patient was constantly increasing during the 10-year period. Maxillary complete denture remake incidences comprised 16-33 % of the number of patients followed during the 10-year period. Comparing patient satisfaction with upper dentures at the baseline and after two years, no decrease in satisfaction was noticed. There is no evidence that maxillary ridge resorption is accelerated with certain types of two-implant supported mandibular overdenture attachments. Most common complication for the maxilla - prosthetic maintenance. There is a risk of decreased patient satisfaction with bar-supported mandibular overdenture. Further studies are needed to provide evidence for the maxillary complete denture outcome with two-implant supported mandibular overdentures.

  12. Use of repeat anterior maxillary distraction to correct residual midface hypoplasia in cleft patients

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Objectives The study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of performing a second, repeat anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) to treat residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia. Materials and Methods Five patients between the ages of 12 to 15 years with a history of AMD and with residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia were included in the study. Inclusion was irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and the amount of advancement needed. Repeat AMD was executed in these patients 4 to 5 years after the primary AMD procedure to correct the cleft maxillary hypoplasia that had developed since the initial procedure. Orthopantomogram (OPG) and lateral cephalograms were taken for evaluation preoperatively, immediately after distraction, after consolidation, and one year postoperatively. The data obtained was tabulated and a Mann Whitney U-test was used for statistical comparisons. Results At the time of presentation, a residual maxillary hypoplasia was observed with a well maintained distraction gap on the OPG which ruled out the occurrence of a relapse. Favorable movement of the segments without any resistance was seen in all patients. Mean maxillary advancement of 10.56 mm was achieved at repeat AMD. Statistically significant increases in midfacial length, SNA angle, and nasion perpendicular to point A distance was achieved (P=0.012, P=0.011, and P=0.012, respectively). Good profile was achieved for all patients. Minimal transient complications, for example anterior open bite and bleeding episodes, were managed. Conclusion Addressing the problem of cleft maxillary hypoplasia at an early age (12–15 years) is beneficial for the child. Residual hypoplasia may develop in some patients, which may require additional corrective procedures. The results of our study show that AMD can be repeated when residual deformity develops with the previous procedure having no negative impact on the results of the repeat procedure. PMID:29333371

  13. Use of repeat anterior maxillary distraction to correct residual midface hypoplasia in cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Richardson, Sunil; Krishna, Shreya; Bansal, Avi

    2017-12-01

    The study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of performing a second, repeat anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) to treat residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia. Five patients between the ages of 12 to 15 years with a history of AMD and with residual cleft maxillary hypoplasia were included in the study. Inclusion was irrespective of gender, type of cleft lip and palate, and the amount of advancement needed. Repeat AMD was executed in these patients 4 to 5 years after the primary AMD procedure to correct the cleft maxillary hypoplasia that had developed since the initial procedure. Orthopantomogram (OPG) and lateral cephalograms were taken for evaluation preoperatively, immediately after distraction, after consolidation, and one year postoperatively. The data obtained was tabulated and a Mann Whitney U-test was used for statistical comparisons. At the time of presentation, a residual maxillary hypoplasia was observed with a well maintained distraction gap on the OPG which ruled out the occurrence of a relapse. Favorable movement of the segments without any resistance was seen in all patients. Mean maxillary advancement of 10.56 mm was achieved at repeat AMD. Statistically significant increases in midfacial length, SNA angle, and nasion perpendicular to point A distance was achieved ( P =0.012, P =0.011, and P =0.012, respectively). Good profile was achieved for all patients. Minimal transient complications, for example anterior open bite and bleeding episodes, were managed. Addressing the problem of cleft maxillary hypoplasia at an early age (12-15 years) is beneficial for the child. Residual hypoplasia may develop in some patients, which may require additional corrective procedures. The results of our study show that AMD can be repeated when residual deformity develops with the previous procedure having no negative impact on the results of the repeat procedure.

  14. Cleft-Related Orthognathic Surgery Based on Maxillary Vertical Lengthening of the Anterior Facial Height.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Woo Shik; Jeong, Hyung Hwa; Kwon, Soon Man; Koh, Kyung S; Choi, Jong Woo

    2018-03-01

    The conventional approach during orthognathic surgery for cleft-related deformities has focused largely on restoration of maxilla retrusion, using the maxillary advancement as a standard treatment objective. However, the authors thought that maxillary vertical shortening and deficient incisor show could be additional key elements of cleft-related deformities. Although slight vertical lengthening can be obtained with only maxillary advancement, it would not be enough to obtain satisfactory aesthetic results in terms of the anterior facial height. The authors hypothesized that vertical deficiency and anteroposterior maxillary retrusion exists in cleft-related deformities. Therefore, orthognathic surgery including intentional vertical lengthening and advancement would be better than the conventional simple advancement. A new approach was used to treat consecutive patients with dentofacial deformities between December of 2007 and December of 2016. Patients with cleft-related dentofacial deformities were included in the study. Forty-one patients with cleft-related dentofacial deformities were included. The distance from the nasion to the incisor tip was 76.70 mm; the angle of the lines connecting the sella, nasion, and point A was 74.03 degrees; and the incisor show was 1.02 mm. Corresponding measurements in 40 patients without clefts were 81.57 mm, 80.08 degrees, and 3.38 mm, respectively. Postoperatively, the average vertical lengthening achieved was 0.88 mm in the simple maxillary advancement group and 7.65 mm in the intentional vertical lengthening accompanied by maxillary advancement group. The authors' results suggest that simultaneous maxillary vertical lengthening with horizontal advancement is a viable approach to orthognathic surgery for cleft-related deformities, given the long-term stability of outcomes demonstrated in this study. Therapeutic, III.

  15. Cervical carotid and circle of willis arterial anatomy of macaque monkeys: a comparative anatomy study.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Nishant; Lee, John J; Perlmutter, Joel S; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2009-07-01

    Macaque monkeys are used in many research applications, including cerebrovascular investigations. However, detailed catalogs of the relevant vascular anatomy are scarce. We present our experience with macaque vessel patterns as determined by digital subtraction angiography of 34 different monkeys. We retrospectively analyzed digital subtraction angiograms obtained during experimental internal carotid artery (ICA) catheterization and subsequent injection of 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Results were catalogued according to vascular distribution and variants observed. Macaque monkeys have a bovine aortic arch. The carotid vessels generally bifurcate, but are occasionally observed to divide into three vessels. The external carotid gives rise primarily to two trunks: an occipital branch and a common vessel that subsequently gives off the lingual, facial, and superior thyroid arteries. The internal maxillary artery may be present as a terminal branch of the external carotid or as a branch of the occipital artery. The ICA is similar in course to that of the human. The anterior circle of Willis was intact in all monkeys in our study. Its primary difference from that of the human is the union of the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries as a single (azygous) median vessel. Macaque cervical carotid and circle of Willis arterial anatomy differs from humans in a couple of specific patterns. Knowledge of these differences and similarities between human and macaque anatomy is important in developing endovascular macaque models of human diseases, such as ischemic stroke.

  16. Renal arteries (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... then injected into the renal artery through the catheter, and images of the vessels of the kidney are taken. The test is a useful aid in evaluating kidney function and diagnosing any narrowing of the arteries, blood clots, tumors or aneurysms.

  17. Genetics in Arterial Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Rutsch, Frank; Nitschke, Yvonne; Terkeltaub, Robert

    2011-01-01

    Artery calcification reflects an admixture of factors such as ectopic osteochondral differentiation with primary host pathological conditions. We review how genetic factors, as identified by human genome-wide association studies, and incomplete correlations with various mouse studies, including knockout and strain analyses, fit into “pieces of the puzzle” in intimal calcification in human atherosclerosis, and artery tunica media calcification in aging, diabetes mellitus, and chronic kidney disease. We also describe in sharp contrast how ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 serve as “cogs in a wheel” of arterial calcification. Specifically, each is a minor component in the function of a much larger network of factors that exert balanced effects to promote and suppress arterial calcification. For the network to normally suppress spontaneous arterial calcification, the “cogs” ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 must be present and in working order. Monogenic ENPP1, CD73, and ABCC6 deficiencies each drive a molecular pathophysiology of closely related but phenotypically different diseases (generalized arterial calcification of infancy (GACI), pseudoxan-thoma elasticum (PXE) and arterial calcification caused by CD73 deficiency (ACDC)), in which premature onset arterial calcification is a prominent but not the sole feature. PMID:21852556

  18. Carotid Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... brain (cerebrovascular disease). Like the heart, the brain’s cells need a constant supply of oxygen-rich blood. This blood supply is delivered to the brain by the 2 large carotid arteries in the front of your neck and by 2 smaller vertebral arteries at the back of your ...

  19. Arterial Pressure Analog.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heusner, A. A.; Tracy, M. L.

    1980-01-01

    Describes a simple hydraulic analog which allows students to explore some physical aspects of the cardiovascular system and provides them with a means to visualize and conceptualize these basic principles. Simulates the behavior of arterial pressure in response to changes in heart rate, stroke volume, arterial compliance, and peripheral…

  20. Coronary artery disease (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... through these arteries is critical for the heart. Coronary artery disease usually results from the build-up of fatty material and plaque, a condition called atherosclerosis. As the ... blood to the heart can slow or stop, causing chest pain (stable ...

  1. Coronary artery stent (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open. ... with a balloon catheter and expands when the balloon is inflated. The stent is then left there to help keep the artery open.

  2. Peripheral Artery Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... narrow or block the arteries and limit the flow of oxygen-rich blood to your body. Risk Factors Peripheral artery disease (P.A.D.) affects millions of people in the United States. The disease is more common in blacks than ...

  3. Carotid Artery Stenting

    PubMed Central

    2018-01-01

    Carotid artery stenosis is relatively common and is a significant cause of ischemic stroke, but carotid revascularization can reduce the risk of ischemic stroke in patients with significant symptomatic stenosis. Carotid endarterectomy has been and remains the gold standard treatment to reduce the risk of carotid artery stenosis. Carotid artery stenting (CAS) (or carotid artery stent implantation) is another method of carotid revascularization, which has developed rapidly over the last 30 years. To date, the frequency of use of CAS is increasing, and clinical outcomes are improving with technical advancements. However, the value of CAS remains unclear in patients with significant carotid artery stenosis. This review article discusses the basic concepts and procedural techniques involved in CAS. PMID:29171201

  4. Viscoelastic dynamic arterial response.

    PubMed

    Charalambous, Haralambia P; Roussis, Panayiotis C; Giannakopoulos, Antonios E

    2017-10-01

    Arteries undergo large deformations under applied intraluminal pressure and may exhibit small hysteresis due to creep or relaxation process. The mechanical response of arteries depends, among others, on their topology along the arterial tree. Viscoelasticity of arterial tissues, which is the topic investigated in this study, is mainly a characteristic mechanical response of arteries that are located away from the heart and have increased smooth muscle cells content. The arterial wall viscosity is simulated by adopting a generalized Maxwell model and the method of internal variables, as proposed by Bonet and Holzapfel et al. The total stresses consist of elastic long-term stresses and viscoelastic stresses, requiring an iterative procedure for their calculation. The cross-section of the artery is modeled as a circular ring, consisting of a single homogenized layer, under a time-varying blood pressure. Two different loading approximations for the aortic pressure vs time are considered. A novel numerical method is developed in order to solve the controlling integro-differential equation. A large number of numerical investigations are performed and typical response time-profiles are presented in pictorial form. Results suggest that the viscoelastic arterial response is mainly affected by the ratio of the relaxation time to the characteristic time of the response and by the pressure-time approximation. Numerical examples, based on data available in the literature, are conducted. The investigation presented in this study reveals the effect of each material parameter on the viscoelastic arterial response. Thus, a better understanding of the behavior of viscoelastic arteries is achieved. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Arterial supply, venous drainage and collateral circulation in the nose of the anaesthetized dog.

    PubMed Central

    Lung, M A; Wang, J C

    1987-01-01

    1. In pentobarbitone-anaesthetized dogs, nasal blood flows were measured with electromagnetic flow sensors. 2. The terminal internal maxillary artery was found to supply 22 +/- 2.2 ml min-1 (one side) to the nasal mucosa via the sphenopalatine and major palatine branches; the artery was found to receive multiple supply routes from common carotid, vertebral and subclavian arteries. 3. Nasal mucosa was found to receive collateral flow from contralateral terminal internal maxillary artery (about 5 to 10% of normal flow) and branches of subclavian arteries (about 36% of normal flow). 4. Nasal mucosa was found to have two venous systems: the low-flow (12 +/- 1.0 ml min-1; both sides) and low-pressure (7 +/- 0.6 mmHg) sphenopalatine veins draining the posterior nasal cavity and the high-flow (30 +/- 1.4 ml min-1; both sides) and high-pressure (17 +/- 1.0 mmHg) dorsal nasal veins draining the anterior nasal cavity. 5. PO2 of nasal venous blood was found to range from 62 +/- 2.9 mmHg to 65 +/- 3.4 mmHg. During nitrogen challenge to the nose, the sphenopalatine venous PO2 dropped to 35 +/- 3.0 mmHg while the dorsal nasal venous PO2 remained unchanged, suggesting that the sphenopalatine veins were responsible for draining capillary flow and dorsal nasal veins arteriovenous anastomotic flow as well. 6. Microscopic examination of the vascular casts confirmed that arteriovenous anastomoses were located only in the anterior nasal cavity. Images Fig. 5 Plate 1 Plate 2 PMID:3443958

  6. Mathematical beta function formulation for maxillary arch form prediction in normal occlusion population.

    PubMed

    Mina, Morteza; Borzabadi-Farahani, Ali; Tehranchi, Azita; Nouri, Mahtab; Younessian, Farnaz

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the dental arch curvature in subjects with normal occlusion in an Iranian population and propose a beta function formula to predict maxillary arch form using the mandibular intermolar widths (IMW) and intermolar depths (IMD). The materials used were study casts of 54 adolescents with normal occlusion and mean age of 14.1 years (25 males, 29 females, age range 12-16 years). Curve-fitting analyses were carried out and the curves passing through the facial-axis point of the canines, premolars, first molars, and the incisal edges of the anterior teeth were studied using a 3D laser scanner. Using the measured IMW and IMD of the dental arches at the maxillary and mandibular first molar region, a beta function formula proposed for predicting maxillary arch form. The accuracy of the proposed formula was assessed on 10 randomly selected dental casts. The mean (SD) of the maxillary and mandibular IMW and IMD were 57.92 (4.75), 54.19 (5.31), and 31.59 (2.90) and 28.10 (2.59) mm, respectively. There was no gender dimorphism (P > 0.05) for both variables (IMW, IMD). There was a strong positive association (n = 10, Pearson r = 0.98, P < 0.05) between the measured (actual) maxillary arch length and proposed arch length derived from generated formula. The goodness of fit (whole arch) for the proposed beta function formula, using adjusted r square measure and root mean square in 10 patients averaged 0.97 and 1.49 mm, respectively. The corresponding figures for the maxillary anterior arch (canine to canine) were 0.90 and 0.92 mm, respectively. The proposed beta function formula used for predicting maxillary arch form based on two mandibular measures (IMW, IMD) was found to have a high accuracy for maxillary arch prediction in the Iranian population and may be used as a guide to fabricate customized arch wires or as an aid in maxillary reconstructive surgery.

  7. The effects of fixed and removable face masks on maxillary deficiencies in growing patients.

    PubMed

    Jamilian, Abdolreza; Showkatbakhsh, Rahman; Taban, Tannaz

    2012-01-01

    To compare the effects of two different types of face masks in the treatment of Class III malocclusions with maxillary deficiency in growing patients. Forty-three patients (21 boys and 22 girls) with maxillary deficiencies were selected. Twenty-one patients (10 boys and 11 girls) with a mean age of 8.9 ± 1.4 years were treated with maxillary removable appliances and face masks. Twenty-two patients (10 boys and 12 girls) with a mean age of 9.3 ± 1.2 years were treated with maxillary fixed appliances and face masks. Lateral cephalograms obtained at the beginning and end of the study were analyzed. Paired t tests and Wilcoxon tests showed that SNA and ANB significantly increased in both groups. The Mann-Whitney test showed that there were no statistically significant differences between the two groups except for U1-SN, which increased by 6.2 ± 7.1 degrees in the removable face mask group and 11.1 ± 6.9 degrees in the fixed face mask group (P < .02). Both treatment modalities were successful in moving the maxilla forward. However, the maxillary incisors had more labial inclination in the fixed appliance group.

  8. The influence of varying maxillary lateral incisor dimensions on perceived smile aesthetics.

    PubMed

    Bukhary, S M N; Gill, D S; Tredwin, C J; Moles, D R

    2007-12-22

    The aim of this study was to determine the influence of varying the dimensions of the maxillary lateral incisors on perceived smile aesthetics. Clinical study. Postgraduate dental teaching hospital. A photograph of a female smile displaying only the lips and teeth was digitally altered. First, the width of the maxillary lateral incisors, in proportion to the central incisor, was altered at 5% intervals to produce six images (52%, 57%, 62% [the 'golden proportion'], 67%, 72% and 77%). In a second group, the length of the lateral incisor was altered at 0.5 mm increments to produce five images with the lateral incisor 0.5 mm, 1 mm, 1.5 mm, 2 mm and 2.5 mm shorter than the adjacent central incisor. The photos were ranked from 'most attractive' to 'least attractive' by 41 hypodontia patients, 46 non-hypodontia 'control' patients and 30 dentists. The 67% followed by the 72% lateral-to-central width proportions were the 'most preferred' by all groups. A maxillary lateral incisor that is 1-1.5 mm shorter than the central incisor was the 'most popular' maxillary lateral incisor length. The very short and very long maxillary lateral incisor was consistently perceived as 'least attractive'. There is no evidence to suggest that the golden proportion should be considered the ideal aesthetic standard when creating space for the replacement of missing lateral incisors.

  9. Three-dimensional evaluation of upper airway following rapid maxillary expansion: a CBCT study.

    PubMed

    El, Hakan; Palomo, Juan Martin

    2014-03-01

    To evaluate, by using cone beam computed tomography, the skeletal, dental, oropharyngeal (OP) airway volume, and nasal passage (NP) volume changes that occur after rapid maxillary expansion (RME). Two groups were selected, each with 35 patients (15 males, 20 females), an RME group (mean age, 14.02 ± 1.46 years) and a control group (mean age, 14.10 ± 1.44 years). The RME group consisted of patients with maxillary constriction who were treated with Hyrax palatal expanders, and the control group comprised age- and sex-matched patients who underwent comprehensive orthodontic treatment without the use of a rapid maxillary expander. All of the transverse skeletal (medial orbital width, lateral nasal width, maxillary width, and mandibular width) and interdental (intermolar, interpremolar, and intercanine) parameters were significantly enlarged in the RME group. A statistically significant increase in airway variables was seen in both groups between pretreatment (T0) and final records (T1). The mean increase of NP airway volume for the RME group (1719.9 ± 1510.7 mm(3)) was twofold compared with the control group (813.6 ± 1006.7 mm(3)), and no intergroup significant difference was found for the OP volume. Rapid maxillary expansion creates a significant increase in nasal passage airway volume but no significant change in the oropharyngeal airway volume.

  10. The microbiome of the maxillary sinus and middle nasal meatus in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Ivanchenko, O A; Karpishchenko, S A; Kozlov, R S; Krechikova, O I; Otvagin, I V; Sopko, O N; Piskunov, G Z; Lopatin, A S

    2016-03-01

    This multicenter study was focused on the identification of the microorganisms inhabiting the maxillary sinus and middle nasal meatus in chronic rhinosinusitis. 112 middle meatus swabs and 112 maxillary sinus aspirates from 103 patients were available for culture. A total of 244 strains of microorganisms representing more than 50 families were identified in the maxillary sinus and middle nasal meatus (164 and 80, respectively). These included 154 (63.0%) strains of aerobic bacteria from 32 species and 90 (37.0%) strains of anaerobic bacteria from 23 species. Aerobes were more common than anaerobes in both the nasal cavity (78.7% vs. 21.3%) and in the maxillary sinus (55.2% vs. 44.8%). Species of Streptococci (28.8%) and Prevotella (17.8%) were the most common findings in the maxillary sinus aspirates. S. pneumonia, H. influenza, and S. aureus were relatively rare, and found in only 6.7%, 5.4%, and 8.9% of the samples, respectively. The results obtained suggest that common upper airway pathogens do not play a major role in the pathogenesis of chronic rhinosinusitis. The microbiome of inflamed sinonasal mucosa is extremely diverse and involves exotic species of bacteria that, to date, have not been considered as potential inhabitants of the paranasal sinuses.

  11. Three-dimensional CAD/CAM imaging of the maxillary sinus in ageing process.

    PubMed

    Lovasova, Kvetuse; Kachlik, David; Rozpravkova, Mirela; Matusevska, Maria; Ferkova, Jana; Kluchova, Darina

    2018-04-05

    During the physiological ageing process atrophy of the alveolar bone appears in vertical direction. This bone resorption causes pushing the limits of the maxillary sinus at the expense of a degraded bone. The sinus volume increases due to the facial development in children and adolescents or during the ageing process due to the loss of teeth and bone mass. The main aim of this study is to determine the sinus shape and sinus floor morphology related to age. Human adult male and female cadaveric heads (aged 37 to 83 years) with different dental status were used. The three-dimensional CAD/CAM software was used to scan the solid impressions of the maxillary sinus to visualize the real sinus shape and sinus floor. Subsequently, other findings are shown in tables and evaluated graphically. The maxillary sinus morphology, its relationship to the nasal cavity, the sub sinus alveolar bone height, displacement of the lowest and highest points of sinus, and the sinus relationship to the roots of the upper teeth were studied and evaluated. Some septa, crests, and the prominent infraorbital canal were also found in the area of the sinus floor. This paper provides a unique view on the maxillary sinus and its changes during the ageing process with preserved topographical relations in a representative sample of the Slovak population. The visualization of the maxillary sinus anatomy is necessary in the diagnosis and treatment plans for dental implants and during current surgical procedures. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  12. [Maxillary advancement osteotomy with sequelae cleft lip and palate: Dilemma between occlusion and aesthetic profile].

    PubMed

    Vigneron, A; Morand, B; Lafontaine, V; Lesne, V; Lesne, C; Bettega, G

    2015-11-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a common sequela of cleft lip and palate. Its surgical treatment consists in a maxillary advancement by distraction or by conventional orthognathic surgery but morphological results are unpredictable. Our goal in this study was to see if the esthetical results (on the lip and the nose) of maxillary advancement were correlated to the preservation of lateral incisor space of the cleft side. This retrospective study included 38 patients operated between 2002 and 2013. Unilateral clefts were studied independently from bilateral clefts. Profile aesthetics was evaluated independently and subjectively by two surgeons and scored on an 8-point scale. The result was classified as "good" if the score was superior or equal to 6. The score was correlated to the following parameters: amount of maxillary advancement, upper incisor axis, preservation of the missing lateral incisor space. In the "good result" group, the space of the lateral incisor was less often preserved. The nasolabial angle was more open and the upper central incisor axis more vertical. These results were more pronounced in bilateral clefts, but also found in unilateral clefts. Under reservation of the subjective evaluation and of the small number of patients, it seemed that lateral incisor space closure improved the profile of patients treated by maxillary advancement for cleft lip and palate sequelae. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  13. Can electromagnetic-navigated maxillary positioning replace occlusional splints in orthognathic surgery? A clinical pilot study.

    PubMed

    Berger, Moritz; Nova, Igor; Kallus, Sebastian; Ristow, Oliver; Freudlsperger, Christian; Eisenmann, Urs; Dickhaus, Hartmut; Engel, Michael; Hoffmann, Jürgen; Seeberger, Robin

    2017-10-01

    Because of the inaccuracy of intermaxillary splints in orthognathic surgery, intraoperative guidance via a real time navigation system might represent a suitable method for enhancing the precision of maxillary positioning. Therefore, in this clinical trial, maxillary repositioning after Le Fort I osteotomy was guided splintless by an electromagnetic navigation system. Conservatively planned maxillary reposition in each of 5 patients was transferred to a novel software module of the electromagnetic navigation system. Intraoperatively, after Le Fort I osteotomy, the software guided the maxilla to the targeted position. Accuracy was evaluated by pre- and postoperative cone beam computer tomography imaging (the vectorial distance of the incisal marker points was measured in three dimensions) and compared with that of a splint transposed control group. The repositioning of the maxilla guided by the electromagnetic navigation system was intuitive and simple to accomplish. The achieved maxillary position with a deviation of 0.7 mm on average to the planned position was equally accurate compared with that of the splint transposed control group of 0.5 mm (p > 0.05). The data of this clinical study display good accuracy for splintless electromagnetic-navigated maxillary positioning. Nevertheless, this method does not surpass the splint-encoded gold standard with regard to accuracy. Future investigations will be necessary to show the full potential of electromagnetic navigation in orthognathic surgery. Copyright © 2017 European Association for Cranio-Maxillo-Facial Surgery. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Transverse maxillary deficit and its influence on the cervical vertebrae maturation index.

    PubMed

    Cossellu, G; Farronato, G; Nicotera, O; Biagi, R

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate whether a transverse maxillary deficit can cause an alteration of vertebral development and therefore of the skeletal maturation comparing the cervical maturation stages index with the hand-wrist index. For the study were selected 200 patients aged 7-14 years, equally distributed by gender and divided into 100 study subjects with maxillary deficit and 100 controls without maxillary deficit. The skeletal maturation index (SM according to Fishman) was evaluated and compared with the hand-wrist x-rays and the cervical vertebrae maturation (CVM according to Hassel and Farmann). Forty-one per cent of the subjects in the test group show a discrepancy between CVM and SM. Among these 73% (30 subjects) present an advanced stage of CVM compared with the corresponding SM. Only 16% of the subjects in the control group show a discrepancy between CVM and SM. Among these 69% (11 subjects) appear in an advanced CVM stage. The analysis of the CVM stage in subjects with transverse maxillary deficit appears to be altered compared with the SM identified through a hand-wrist x-ray. In the case of individuals with transverse maxillary deficit it is advisable to use also a hand-wrist x-ray, thus not relying only on CVM for the evaluation of the skeletal growth stages.

  15. Volumetric analysis of maxillary sinuses of Zulu and European crania by helical, multislice computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, C L

    2004-11-01

    The volumes of the maxillary sinuses are of interest to surgeons operating endoscopically as variation in maxillary sinus volume may mean variation in anatomical landmarks. Other surgical disciplines, such as dentistry, maxillo-facial surgery and plastic surgery, may benefit from this information. To compare the maxillary sinus volumes of dried crania from cadavers of European and Zulu descent, with respect to ethnic group and gender. Helical, multislice computed tomography (CT) was performed using 1-mm coronal slices. The area for each slice was obtained by tracing the outline of each slice. The CT machine calculated a volume by totalling the slices for each sinus. Ethnic and gender variations were found in the different groups. It was found that European crania had significantly larger antral volumes than Zulu crania and men had larger volumes than women. Race and gender interaction was also assessed, as was maxillary sinus side. A variation in maxillary sinus volume between different ethnic groups and genders exists, and surgeons operating in this region should be aware of this.

  16. Role of Modified Endoscopic Medial Maxillectomy in Persistent Chronic Maxillary Sinusitis

    PubMed Central

    Thulasidas, Ponnaiah; Vaidyanathan, Venkatraman

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Functional endoscopic sinus surgery has a long-term high rate of success for symptomatic improvement in patients with medically refractory chronic rhinosinusitis. As the popularity of the technique continues to grow, however, so does the population of patients with postsurgical persistent sinus disease, especially in those with a large window for ventilation and drainage. In addition, chronic infections of the sinuses especially fungal sinusitis have a higher incidence of recurrence even though a wide maxillary ostium had been performed earlier. This subset of patients often represents a challenge to the otorhinolaryngologist. Objectives To identify the patients with chronic recalcitrant maxillary sinusitis and devise treatment protocols for this subset of patients. Methods A retrospective review was done of all patients with persistent maxillary sinus disease who had undergone modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy between 2009 and 2012. We studied patient demographics, previous surgical history, and follow-up details and categorized the types of endoscopic medial maxillectomies performed in different disease situations. Results We performed modified endoscopic medial maxillectomies in 37 maxillary sinuses of 24 patients. The average age was 43.83 years. Average follow-up was 14.58 months. All patients had good disease control in postoperative visits with no clinical evidence of recurrences. Conclusion Modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy appears to be an effective surgery for treatment of chronic, recalcitrant maxillary sinusitis. PMID:25992084

  17. Influence of Palatal Coverage and Implant Distribution on Denture Strain in Maxillary Implant Overdentures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshihito; Gonda, Tomoya; Tomita, Akiko; Mizuno, Yoko; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    As maxillary implant overdentures are being increasingly used in clinical practice, prosthodontic complications related to these dentures are also reported more often. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of palatal coverage and implant distribution on the shear strain of maxillary implant overdentures. A maxillary edentulous model with implants inserted in the anterior, premolar, and molar areas was fabricated. Two kinds of experimental overdentures, with and without palatal coverage, were also fabricated, and two strain gauges were attached at the midline of the labial and palatal sides. A vertical occlusal load of 98 N was applied through a mandibular complete denture, and the shear strain in each denture was compared by analysis of variance (P = .05). In all situations, the shear strain in palateless dentures was significantly higher than in dentures with palate on both sides (P < .05). In dentures with palate, the shear strain was lower when anterior implants were present. Palateless maxillary implant overdentures exhibited much higher strain than overdentures with palate regardless of the implant distribution; this may cause more prosthodontic and implant complications. The most favorable configuration to prevent complications in maxillary implant overdentures was palatal coverage that was supported by more than four widely distributed implants.

  18. Radiographic assessment of dental anomalies in patients with ectopic maxillary canines.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Helle Budtz; Artmann, Lone; Larsen, Helle Juul; Kjaer, Inger

    2009-03-01

    The aetiology of palatally and labially located ectopic maxillary canines is multifactorial. Accordingly, early prediction of this eruptional disturbance is in most cases not possible. The purpose of this study was to analyse dental deviations in cases with either palatal or labial ectopic canines. Panoramic and intra-oral radiographs from 50 patients with palatally located (38 females and 12 males) and 19 patients with labially located ectopic canines (11 females and 8 males), aged 10 years, 2 months-18 years, 1 month, were analysed. Dental deviations registered were crown and root malformations, agenesis, and eruption deviations. Registrations were performed in the maxillary incisor field and in the dentition in general. The study documented that palatally as well as labially located ectopic canines can occur in dentitions without other dental deviations. Dental deviations occurred in approximately two-thirds of all cases, more often in females and in cases with palatally located canines. More than half of the females with palatally located canines had deviations in the maxillary incisors and in the dentition in general. Dental deviations may be considered a risk factor for maxillary canine ectopia. Early identification of patients at risk and appropriate interceptive treatment may reduce ectopic eruption of maxillary canines.

  19. "TuNa-saving" endoscopic medial maxillectomy: a surgical technique for maxillary inverted papilloma.

    PubMed

    Pagella, Fabio; Pusateri, Alessandro; Matti, Elina; Avato, Irene; Zaccari, Dario; Emanuelli, Enzo; Volo, Tiziana; Cazzador, Diego; Citraro, Leonardo; Ricci, Giampiero; Tomacelli, Giovanni Leo

    2017-07-01

    The maxillary sinus is the most common site of sinonasal inverted papilloma. Endoscopic sinus surgery, in particular endoscopic medial maxillectomy, is currently the gold standard for treatment of maxillary sinus papilloma. Although a common technique, complications such as stenosis of the lacrimal pathway and consequent development of epiphora are still possible. To avoid these problems, we propose a modification of this surgical technique that preserves the head of the inferior turbinate and the nasolacrimal duct. A retrospective analysis was performed on patients treated for maxillary inverted papilloma in three tertiary medical centres between 2006 and 2014. Pedicle-oriented endoscopic surgery principles were applied and, in select cases where the tumour pedicle was located on the anterior wall, a modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy was carried out as described in this paper. From 2006 to 2014 a total of 84 patients were treated. A standard endoscopic medial maxillectomy was performed in 55 patients (65.4%), while the remaining 29 (34.6%) had a modified technique performed. Three recurrences (3/84; 3.6%) were observed after a minimum follow-up of 24 months. A new surgical approach for select cases of maxillary sinus inverted papilloma is proposed in this paper. In this technique, the endoscopic medial maxillectomy was performed while preserving the head of the inferior turbinate and the nasolacrimal duct ("TuNa-saving"). This technique allowed for good visualization of the maxillary sinus, good oncological control and a reduction in the rate of complications.

  20. Quantitative evaluation of maxillary bone deformation by computed tomography in patients with leprosy

    PubMed Central

    Kondo, Osamu; Suzuki, Koichi; Aoki, Yoshinori; Ishii, Norihisa

    2018-01-01

    Background Facial deformation as a sequela of leprosy is caused not only by a saddle nose but also by regression of the maxilla, as well documented in paleopathological observations of excavated skeletal remains of patients with leprosy. However, maxillary changes in living patients have been evaluated only by the subjective visual grading. Here, we attempted to evaluate maxillary bone deformation in patients with leprosy using three-dimensional computed tomography (3D-CT). Methods Three-dimensional images centered on the maxilla were reconstructed using multiplanar reconstruction methods in former patients with leprosy (n = 10) and control subjects (n = 5); the anterior-posterior length of the maxilla (MA-P) was then measured. The difference between the MA-P of the patients and those of controls was evaluated after compensating for individual skull size. These findings were also compared with those from previous paleopathological studies. Findings Three former patients with lepromatous leprosy showed marked atrophy of the maxilla at the prosthion (-8.6, -11.1 and -17.9 mm) which corresponded with the visual appearance of the maxillary deformity, and these results were consistent with paleopathological findings of excavated skeletal remains. Additionally, the precise bone defects of the maxilla could be individually calculated for accurate reconstructive surgery. Interpretation We have successfully illustrated maxillary bone deformities in living patients with leprosy. This study also confirmed the maxillary regression described in paleopathological studies. PMID:29522533

  1. Effect of Attachment Type on Denture Strain in Maxillary Implant Overdentures: Part 1. Overdenture with Palate.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshihito; Gonda, Tomoya; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    This study examined the effects of attachments on strain in maxillary implant overdentures supported by two or four implants. A maxillary edentulous model with implants inserted into anterior, premolar, and molar areas was fabricated, and three types of unsplinted attachments-ball, locator, and magnet-were set on the implants distributed under various conditions. Maxillary experimental dentures were fabricated, and two strain gauges were attached at the anterior midline on the labial and palatal sides. A vertical occlusal load of 98 N was applied and shear strain of the dentures was measured. On both sides, magnet attachments resulted in the lowest shear strain, while ball attachments resulted in the highest shear strain under most conditions. However, differences in shear strain among the three attachment types were not significant when supported by four implants, especially molar implants. Shear strain of the maxillary implant overdenture was lowest when using magnet attachments. Magnet attachments mounted on four implants are recommended to prevent denture complications when using maxillary implant overdentures.

  2. Jaw In A Day™ – State of the Art in Maxillary Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Runyan, Christopher M.; Sharma, Vishal; Staffenberg, David A.; Levine, Jamie P.; Brecht, Lawrence E.; Wexler, Leonard H.; Hirsch, David L.

    2017-01-01

    Background Reconstruction of maxillary defects following tumor extirpation is challenging because of combined aesthetic and functional roles of the maxilla. One-stage reconstruction combining osseous free flaps with immediate osseointegrated implants are becoming the standard for mandibular defects, and have similar potential for maxillary reconstruction. Methods A woman with maxillary Ewing’s sarcoma successfully treated at age nine with neoadjuvant chemotherapy, right hemi-maxillectomy and obturator prosthetic reconstruction presented for definitive reconstruction, complaining of poor obturator fit and hypernasality. Her reconstruction was computer-simulated by a multi-disciplinary team, consisting of left hemi-Lefort I advancement and right maxillary reconstruction with a free fibula flap with immediate osseointegrated implants and dental prosthesis. Results Full dental restoration, midface projection and oral fistula corrections were achieved in one operative stage using this approach. Conclusions This case demonstrates a successful approach for maxillary reconstruction using computer-planned orthognathic surgery with free fibula reconstruction and immediate osseointegrated implants with dental prosthesis. PMID:28005762

  3. Protocols for Late Maxillary Protraction in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles

    PubMed Central

    Yen, Stephen L-K

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the protocols used at Childrens Hospital Los Angeles (CHLA) to protract the maxilla during early adolescence. It is a modification of techniques introduced by Eric Liou with his Alternate Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Constriction (ALT-RAMEC) technique. The main differences between the CHLA protocol and previous maxillary protraction protocols are the age the protraction is attempted, the sutural loosening by alternating weekly expansion with constriction and the use of Class III elastics to support and redirect the protraction by nightly facemask wear. The CHLA protocol entirely depends on patient compliance and must be carefully taught and monitored. In a cooperative patient, the technique can correct a Class III malocclusion that previously would have been treated with LeFort 1 maxillary advancement surgery. Thus, it is not appropriate for patients requiring 2 jaw surgeries to correct mandibular prognathism, occlusal cants or facial asymmetry. The maxillary protraction appears to work by a combination of skeletal advancement, dental compensation and rotation of the occlusal planes. Microscrew/microimplant/temporary anchorage devices have been used with these maxillary protraction protocols to assist in expanding the maxilla, increasing skeletal anchorage during protraction, limiting dental compensations and reducing skeletal relapse. PMID:21765629

  4. Use of anterior maxillary distraction osteogenesis in two cleft lip and palate patients

    PubMed Central

    Srivastava, Dhirendra; Ghassemi, Alireza; Ghassemi, Mehrangiz; Showkatbakhsh, Rahman; Jamilian, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) has become a mainstream surgical technique for patients with jaw deformities. The aim of this study was to report the effect of DO done by a hyrax screw incorporated in an acrylic plate in the treatment of two maxillary deficient cases with cleft lip and palate. Two patients, a 24-year-old female and a 29-year-old male who suffered from maxillary deficiency and cleft lip and palate, were treated by DO. After making vertical cuts between the premolars on both sides and horizontal cuts similar to Le Fort 1, a hyrax screw was mounted on an acrylic plate for the slow anteroposterior expansion of maxillary arch. The expansion was achieved by turning the hyrax screw 0.8 mm per day after the latency period. Treatment was discontinued after achieving satisfactory over jet and occlusion. This study showed that anterior maxillary distraction is a reliable technique for correction of midfacial deformity arising out of cleft lip and palate. Incidences of complications are negligible compared to total maxillary distraction. PMID:26668459

  5. The correction of maxillary defciency with internal distraction devices: a multidisciplinary approach.

    PubMed

    Oz, A Alper; Ozer, Mete; Eroglu, Lütfi; Ozdemir, Oguz Suleyman

    2013-09-01

    The purpose of this case report is to present the orthodontic, surgical and restorative treatments in the case of an operated cleft lip and palate and severe maxillary defciency in a 14-year-old female patient. Only orthodontic treatment could be ineffcient for cleft lip and palate patients characterized with maxillary hypoplasia. Orthodontic and surgical treatment shows suffcient results, especially with severe skeletal defciency. A cleft lip and palate patient required complex multidisciplinary treatment to preserve health and restore esthetics. Dental leveling and alignment of the maxillary and mandibular teeth were provided before the surgery. Maxillary advancement and clockwise rotation of the maxillary-mandibular complex was applied by a Le Fort 1 osteotomy with two internal distraction devices. After the active treatment including orthodontic treatment and orthognathic surgery, upper full mouth ceramic restoration was applied. This report shows the efficiency of internal distraction devices in cleft lip palate patients and exemplifes the multidisciplinary care required for such diffcult cases. Clinical signifcance: Stable improved occlusion and skeletal relations were observed after a follow-up examination period of 12 months.

  6. Effect of maxillary distraction osteogenesis on velopharyngeal function: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Harada, Kiyoshi; Ishii, Yoshimasa; Ishii, Masatoshi; Imaizumi, Humiko; Mibu, Michiko; Omura, Ken

    2002-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine preoperative and postoperative changes of velopharyngeal function in cleft patients who underwent maxillary distraction osteogenesis using the Rigid External Distraction System. Six cleft patients followed for a minimum of 12 months after maxillary distraction were examined. Plain and contrast lateral-cephalograms were obtained preoperatively and postoperatively, and speech evaluation was performed by the same authorized speech therapist at the same time points. The mean distraction amount at the anterior nasal spine was 11.7 mm (range, 7.4 mm - 15.0 mm). Both the nasopharyngeal depth and velar length increased after maxillary distraction, but the need ratio (nasopharyngeal depth/velar length) also increased after distraction. Although scores for velopharyngeal closure dropped a few points after maxillary distraction, the rating for hypernasality remained unchanged in all patients but the patient whose distraction amount was 15.0 mm. These results suggest that maxillary distraction of less than 15 mm may not markedly affect velopharyngeal function in cleft patients.

  7. Trans-sinusal maxillary distraction for correction of midfacial hypoplasia: long-term clinical results.

    PubMed

    Nadjmi, N; Schutyser, F; Van Erum, R

    2006-10-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis is indicated in severe angle class III malocclusions, and severe maxillary hypoplasia among some cleft patients and other craniofacial deformities. Twenty patients, aged 8-48 years (mean 17.8+/-10.5 SD) with maxillary and midfacial hypoplasia were treated. The follow-up period was 13-65 months (mean 35+/-16.3 SD). A trans-sinusal maxillary distractor was placed intraorally at each side of the maxilla. The distraction vector was predicted using specialist software, and was transferred to the patients using stereolithographic models and individual templates. A (high) Le Fort I type osteotomy was performed. The amount of activation varied from 8 to 17.5 mm (mean 13.1+/-2.9 SD). Soft and hard tissue formation resulted in complete healing across the distraction gaps. The distractors are almost completely submerged, and can be left in place as long as necessary to avoid relapse. Wit's appraisal was used to measure the stability of the long-term distraction results. Results up to 5 years after distraction showed considerable maxillary advancement with long-term stability. Ongoing growth of the facial skeleton must be considered when distraction osteogenesis is chosen in growing patients.

  8. Use of anterior maxillary distraction osteogenesis in two cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Dhirendra; Ghassemi, Alireza; Ghassemi, Mehrangiz; Showkatbakhsh, Rahman; Jamilian, Abdolreza

    2015-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) has become a mainstream surgical technique for patients with jaw deformities. The aim of this study was to report the effect of DO done by a hyrax screw incorporated in an acrylic plate in the treatment of two maxillary deficient cases with cleft lip and palate. Two patients, a 24-year-old female and a 29-year-old male who suffered from maxillary deficiency and cleft lip and palate, were treated by DO. After making vertical cuts between the premolars on both sides and horizontal cuts similar to Le Fort 1, a hyrax screw was mounted on an acrylic plate for the slow anteroposterior expansion of maxillary arch. The expansion was achieved by turning the hyrax screw 0.8 mm per day after the latency period. Treatment was discontinued after achieving satisfactory over jet and occlusion. This study showed that anterior maxillary distraction is a reliable technique for correction of midfacial deformity arising out of cleft lip and palate. Incidences of complications are negligible compared to total maxillary distraction.

  9. Speech intelligibility enhancement after maxillary denture treatment and its impact on quality of life.

    PubMed

    Knipfer, Christian; Riemann, Max; Bocklet, Tobias; Noeth, Elmar; Schuster, Maria; Sokol, Biljana; Eitner, Stephan; Nkenke, Emeka; Stelzle, Florian

    2014-01-01

    Tooth loss and its prosthetic rehabilitation significantly affect speech intelligibility. However, little is known about the influence of speech deficiencies on oral health-related quality of life (OHRQoL). The aim of this study was to investigate whether speech intelligibility enhancement through prosthetic rehabilitation significantly influences OHRQoL in patients wearing complete maxillary dentures. Speech intelligibility by means of an automatic speech recognition system (ASR) was prospectively evaluated and compared with subjectively assessed Oral Health Impact Profile (OHIP) scores. Speech was recorded in 28 edentulous patients 1 week prior to the fabrication of new complete maxillary dentures and 6 months thereafter. Speech intelligibility was computed based on the word accuracy (WA) by means of an ASR and compared with a matched control group. One week before and 6 months after rehabilitation, patients assessed themselves for OHRQoL. Speech intelligibility improved significantly after 6 months. Subjects reported a significantly higher OHRQoL after maxillary rehabilitation with complete dentures. No significant correlation was found between the OHIP sum score or its subscales to the WA. Speech intelligibility enhancement achieved through the fabrication of new complete maxillary dentures might not be in the forefront of the patients' perception of their quality of life. For the improvement of OHRQoL in patients wearing complete maxillary dentures, food intake and mastication as well as freedom from pain play a more prominent role.

  10. Exophthalmos associated to orbital zygomatic mucocele and complex maxillary malformation in a puppy

    PubMed Central

    Cirla, Alessandro; Rondena, Marco; Bertolini, Giovanna; Barsotti, Giovanni

    2017-01-01

    A case of exophthalmos due to zygomatic mucocele in a puppy with ipsilateral segmental maxillary atrophy is reported. A 7-month-old, mixed breed, male dog suffered the sudden-onset of unilateral painful exophthalmos and a gradual swelling of the right temporal region. A compressing, right retrobulbar mass was observed by ultrasound. Computed tomography revealed a large multiloculated cyst-like lesion of the right zygomatic gland projecting into the orbital space, thus displacing the eyeball. The ipsilateral molar part of the maxillary bone was underdeveloped, besides showing crowded, abnormal, multiple, unerupted maxillary molar teeth in the caudal maxillary region. Modified lateral orbitotomy and a selective caudal maxillary bone access were performed. The cyst-like lesion was removed and the zygomatic gland and the wall was collected for histology, which confirmed the mucocele. Clinical and imaging examinations six months after surgery showed neither recurrence of the mucocele nor ocular abnormalities. A possible common pathogenic mechanism involving these two conditions could be hypothesized. PMID:28884074

  11. Dimensional changes of upper airway after rapid maxillary expansion: a prospective cone-beam computed tomography study.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yoon; Koenig, Lisa J; Pruszynski, Jessica E; Bradley, Thomas G; Bosio, Jose A; Liu, Dawei

    2013-04-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to use cone-beam computed tomography to assess the dimensional changes of the upper airway in orthodontic patients with maxillary constriction treated by rapid maxillary expansion. Fourteen orthodontic patients (mean age, 12.9 years; range, 9.7-16 years) were recruited. The patients with posterior crossbite and constricted maxilla were treated with rapid maxillary expansion as the initial part of their comprehensive orthodontic treatments. Before and after rapid maxillary expansion cone-beam computed tomography scans were taken to measure the retropalatal and retroglossal airway changes in terms of volume, and sagittal and cross-sectional areas. The transverse expansions by rapid maxillary expansion were assessed between the midlingual alveolar bone plates at the maxillary first molar and first premolar levels. The measurements of the before and after rapid maxillary expansion scans were compared by using paired t tests with the Bonferroni adjustment for multiple comparisons. After rapid maxillary expansion, significant and equal amounts of 4.8 mm of expansion were observed at the first molar (P = 0.0000) and the first premolar (P = 0.0000) levels. The width increase at the first premolar level (20.0%) was significantly greater than that at the first molar level (15.0%) (P = 0.035). As the primary outcome variable, the cross-sectional airway measured from the posterior nasal spine to basion level was the only parameter showing a significant increase of 99.4 mm(2) (59.6%) after rapid maxillary expansion (P = 0.0004). These results confirm the findings of previous studies of the effect of rapid maxillary expansion on the maxilla. Additionally, we found that only the cross-sectional area of the upper airway at the posterior nasal spine to basion level significantly gains a moderate increase after rapid maxillary expansion. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Outcomes of flapless crestal maxillary sinus elevation under hydraulic pressure.

    PubMed

    Bensaha, Tarik

    2012-01-01

    Sinus elevation through the crestal approach has become a routine procedure for implant placement in the posterior edentulous maxilla. The combination of flapless surgery and crestal sinus elevation with simultaneous placement of implants is an attractive surgical approach for implant grafting in the posterior maxilla, but its efficacy and safety have seldom been studied. The aim of this study is to evaluate retrospectively the outcomes of flapless crestal sinus floor elevation using piezosurgery and a hydraulic sinus elevation system with simultaneous implant placement. Between October 2009 and August 2010, flapless implant surgery using a crestal approach, accompanied by simultaneous hydraulic sinus elevation and grafting, was performed. Patients were followed up clinically and with intraoral and panoramic radiographs. Any postoperative complications, including swelling, discomfort, infection, fractures, and implant loss, were recorded, and sinus bone gain was measured. Thirty-one sinuses were elevated and 35 implants were placed. Patients were a mean of 41.2 ± 6.69 years old, and 45% were women. The sinus was elevated to 7 to 15 mm, and no membrane perforations were noted. The mean follow-up period was 21 weeks. The mean bone gain under the maxillary sinus was 12.03 ± 2.1 mm, and all implants displayed primary stability with a mean insertion torque ≥ 15 Ncm. No postoperative discomfort, swelling, hematoma, infection, or bone fenestration was noted. One patient experienced prolonged edema in the lower eyelid region, and another lost an implant. In this retrospective analysis, flapless crestal sinus floor elevation was safe and effective, decreasing surgical discomfort and trauma and early implant failures.

  13. The maxillary second molar - anatomical variations (case report).

    PubMed

    Beshkenadze, E; Chipashvili, N

    2015-01-01

    To be acquainted with dental anatomical specificity is of great importance for dental endodontic treatment algorithm. The subject of present publication is 2 clinical cases of upper second molars, detailed characterization of, which is considered very important for enrichment of anatomical knowledge about dental anatomical variations. In one case, the reason for admission to the clinic of a 38-year-old woman was complains as of esthetic character as well as functional misbalance (disturbance of chewing function due to the damage of orthopedic construction). The patient indicated to the existence of coronary defects of large size aesthetic discomforts, damage and discolouration of old orthopedic construction (denture) in maxillary right molar area. According to the data obtained after clinical and visiographical examinations, chronic periodontitis of 17 teeth was identified as a result of incomplete endodontic treatment. According to the data obtained after clinical and visiographical examinations, the diagnosis of chronic periodontitis of 17 teeth was identified, tooth 17 with 2 roots and 2 canals. In the second clinical case, the reason for admission to the clinic of a 39-year-old woman was severe pain in the upper right molar area. The patient indicated to the caries on the tooth 17. After completion of proper survey clinical and visiographical examinations, acute pulpitis (K04.00) - with three roots and 4 canals was diagnosed. In both cases after the proper examinations and agreement with the patients a treatment plan envisaging: 17 teeth endodontic treatment, filling of caries defects and their preparation on one hand for orthopedic construction (denture) and on the other hand for restoration of anatomical integrity by light-cured composite, was scheduled. The present study is designed to prevent complications of endodontic treatment of the second molar, to optimize diagnosis and treatment algorithm, once again proving reliable information indicating to the

  14. Stability after Cleft Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis or Conventional Orthognathic Surgery.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Kristian; Svenstrup, Martin; Pedersen, Thomas Klit; Küseler, Annelise; Jensen, John; Nørholt, Sven Erik

    2015-01-01

    To compare stability of maxillary advancements in patients with cleft lip and palate following distraction osteogenesis or orthognathic surgery. 1) cleft lip and palate, 2) advancement > 8 mm. Eleven patients comprised the distraction osteogenesis group (DOG). Seven patients comprised the orthognathic treatment group (CONVG). Skeletal and soft tissue points were traced on lateral cephalograms: T1 (preoperatively), T2 (after surgery), T3 (follow-up). Group differences were analyzed using Students t-test. At T1-T2, advancement of 6.98 mm (P = 0.002) was observed in DOG. Horizontal overjet increased 11.62 mm (P = 0.001). A point-nasion-B point (ANB) angle increased 8.82° (P = 0.001). Aesthetic plane to upper lip was reduced 5.44 mm (P = 0.017) and the naso-labial angle increased 16.6° (P = 0.001). Vertical overbite (VOB) increased 2.27 mm (P = 0.021). In T2-T3, no significant changes were observed in DOG. In T1-T2, horizontal overjet increased 8.45 mm (P = 0.02). The ANB angle, 9.33° (P = 0.009) in CONVG. At T2-T3, VOB increased, 2.35 mm (P = 0.046), and the ANB angle reduced, 3.83° (P = 0.003). In T2-T3, no parameters changed in CONVG. At follow-up (T3), VOB increased in CONVG compared with DOG, (P = 0.01). Vertical position of A point differed between the groups (P = 0.04). No significant intergroup differences between soft tissue parameters occurred. Distraction osteogenesis resulted in a stable position of the maxilla and movement upwards in vertical plane, however in case of orthognathic treatment sagittal relapse and a continued postoperatively downward movement was registered.

  15. Stability after Cleft Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis or Conventional Orthognathic Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Svenstrup, Martin; Pedersen, Thomas Klit; Küseler, Annelise; Jensen, John; Nørholt, Sven Erik

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives To compare stability of maxillary advancements in patients with cleft lip and palate following distraction osteogenesis or orthognathic surgery. Material and Methods Inclusion criteria: 1) cleft lip and palate, 2) advancement > 8 mm. Eleven patients comprised the distraction osteogenesis group (DOG). Seven patients comprised the orthognathic treatment group (CONVG). Skeletal and soft tissue points were traced on lateral cephalograms: T1 (preoperatively), T2 (after surgery), T3 (follow-up). Group differences were analyzed using Students t-test. Results At T1-T2, advancement of 6.98 mm (P = 0.002) was observed in DOG. Horizontal overjet increased 11.62 mm (P = 0.001). A point-nasion-B point (ANB) angle increased 8.82° (P = 0.001). Aesthetic plane to upper lip was reduced 5.44 mm (P = 0.017) and the naso-labial angle increased 16.6° (P = 0.001). Vertical overbite (VOB) increased 2.27 mm (P = 0.021). In T2-T3, no significant changes were observed in DOG. In T1-T2, horizontal overjet increased 8.45 mm (P = 0.02). The ANB angle, 9.33° (P = 0.009) in CONVG. At T2-T3, VOB increased, 2.35 mm (P = 0.046), and the ANB angle reduced, 3.83° (P = 0.003). In T2-T3, no parameters changed in CONVG. At follow-up (T3), VOB increased in CONVG compared with DOG, (P = 0.01). Vertical position of A point differed between the groups (P = 0.04). No significant intergroup differences between soft tissue parameters occurred. Conclusions Distraction osteogenesis resulted in a stable position of the maxilla and movement upwards in vertical plane, however in case of orthognathic treatment sagittal relapse and a continued postoperatively downward movement was registered. PMID:26229581

  16. Radiation therapy of carcinoma of the maxillary antrum (in Japanese)

    SciTech Connect

    Matsuura, S.; Taketa, C.; Ono, I.

    1973-06-01

    The total number of 187 cases with carcinoma of the maxillary antrum treated at National Cancer Center from 1962 to 1971 were divided into two groups. Group A (1962 to 1966) consisted of 90 cases, of which 72.2% received mainly radiotherapy with dose over 6000 rad. Group B (1967 to 1972) consisted of 97 cases, of which patients irradiated with over 6000 rad was 21.6% and intraarterial infusion of 5-FU was combined. As the injuries after irradiation, 48 cases developed radiation cataract. Advanced disturbances of visual acuity by cataract was caused by the radiation with over 4000 rad in aboutmore » two-thirds of them within 2yrs and in one third within 3to 5 yrs. In 13 patients with shielding of the eyeball from the beginning, no complications of the eyes were found except in one patient. In the injuries of the bone and the soft tissue, the fragments of the bones irradiated with high doses were easily infected and were incurable when osteomyelitis was complicated. Five cases in the over5-year survival cases showed third-degree injuries of the tissue from external irradiation with over 6000 rad. The 3-year crude survival rate of A and B group was 51.6 and 46.0% respectively, and the 5-year crude survival rate in the whole was 42.2%. Adequate combination of radiotherapy, intraarterial infusion for chemotherapy, and surgery are now under study. At present, the dose of 5-Fu was tentatively determined at 3000 mg and the radiation was 4000 rad. For the improvement of therapeutic results, programmings with plans of radiotherapy of each case and the managements of the detailed information on personal history are now under preparation as a radiotherapy using electric computer. (JA)« less

  17. Atypical anatomy of maxillary second premolar with three roots and four canals

    PubMed Central

    Izaz, Shaik; Mandava, Pragna; Bolla, Nagesh; Dasari, Bhargavi

    2017-01-01

    Knowledge and understanding the anatomical configuration of individual tooth play a significant role in success of endodontic treatment, in addition to through debridement and obturation of the canals. The canal anatomy of maxillary second premolar has been studied extensively, and the presence of a significant variety of multirooted canals is relatively rare in it. A 27-year-old female reported with a chief complaint of pain in her upper right posterior region for 10 days. On intraoral hard tissue examination, ill-defined access preparation was seen in maxillary right second premolar with exposed pulp. An intraoral periapical radiograph reveals radiolucency involving the pulp space and varied morphology in the same tooth. The occurrence of three roots with four canals in the maxillary second premolar is rare and not documented in the literature so far. This case report describes the nonsurgical endodontic management of such varied anatomical configuration using cone beam computed tomography as an evaluating diagnostic tool. PMID:29386789

  18. The Use of Recombinant Human Platelet-Derived Growth Factor for Maxillary Sinus Augmentation.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Atsushi; Sarmiento, Hector; Alqahtani, Mohammed Saad; Llobell, Arturo; Fiorellini, Joseph P

    The maxillary sinus augmentation procedure has become a predictable treatment to regenerate bone for implant placement. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of recombinant human platelet-derived growth factor BB (rhPDGF-BB) combined with a deproteinized cancellous bovine bone graft for sinus augmentation. The lateral window approach was used for maxillary sinuses with minimal residual bone. After a healing period of 4 months, dental implants were placed and then restored following a 2-month osseointegration period. The result demonstrated increased bone height and ISQ values and a 100% survival rate. This study indicates that the addition of rhPDGF-BB to deproteinized cancellous bovine bone accelerated the healing period in maxillary sinuses with minimal native bone.

  19. Dens invaginatus with necrotic pulp in a right maxillary lateral incisor with preserved vitality.

    PubMed

    Alessandro, Lanza; Fabrizio, Di Francesco; Gennaro, De Marco; Dario, Di Stasio; Eugenio, Guidetti; Letizia, Perillo; Luigi, Femiano; Felice, Femiano

    2018-01-01

    Dens invaginatus (DI) is a dental malformation occurring in several morphologic types. Consequently, treatment of teeth affected by DI can get complicated because of the complex root canal anatomy. The aim is to describe how to manage a rare report of a DI with necrotic pulp held within the vital pulp of a maxillary lateral incisor. Oral fistula was found on the buccal mucosa of the apex of the vital maxillary lateral incisor with a DI having necrotic pulp. Endodontic treatment of the maxillary lateral incisor and of the tract canal of DI was realized. Clinical disappearance of oral sinus tract was observed after 10 days. On the contrary, the disappearance of radiolucent area occurred after 6 months. A proper and prompt diagnosis is necessary to carry out effective prevention protocols or prevent consequences generating nonrecoverable endo-perio diseases.

  20. Maxillary second molar impaction in the adjacent ectopic third molar: Report of five rare cases

    PubMed Central

    Souki, Bernardo Q.; Cheib, Paula L.; de Brito, Gabriela M.; Pinto, Larissa S. M. C.

    2015-01-01

    Maxillary second molar impaction in the adjacent ectopic third molar is a rare condition that practitioners might face in the field of pediatric dentistry and orthodontics. The early diagnosis and extraction of the adjacent ectopic third molar have been advocated, and prior research has reported a high rate of spontaneous eruption following third molar removal. However, some challenges in the daily practice are that the early diagnosis of this type of tooth impaction is difficult with conventional radiographic examination, and sometimes the early surgical removal of the maxillary third molar must be postponed because of the risks of damaging the second molar. The objective of this study is to report a case series of five young patients with maxillary second molar impaction and to discuss the difficulty of early diagnosis with the conventional radiographic examination, and unpredictability of self-correction. PMID:26321848

  1. Maxillary implant-retained partial overdenture with Dolder bar attachment: a clinical report.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeongil; Buhite, Robert J; Monaco, Edward A

    2015-03-01

    This article describes a technique for maintaining a maxillary Kennedy III partial removable dental prosthesis design in a patient who had non-restorable failing abutments by replacing the abutments with dental implants. Two implants were placed immediately after extraction of the abutment teeth in the anterior maxilla. After the implants were fully integrated, a Dolder bar attachment was fitted onto the implants. A new maxillary partial removable dental prosthesis was fabricated using the implants and the remaining natural teeth as abutments to restore function and esthetics. With the aid of dental implants, this Kennedy III maxillary removable dental prosthesis design could provide additional retention and support by promoting cross-arch stability and tissue, implant and tooth support. The patient's satisfaction was significantly increased.

  2. Transverse maxillary and mandibular growth during and after bionator therapy: study with metallic implants.

    PubMed

    Monini, André da Costa; Júnior, Luiz Gonzaga Gandini; Maia, Luiz Guilherme Martins; Pinto, Ary dos Santos

    2013-01-01

    This study evaluated posteroanterior cephalograms before and after treatment and long term follow-up of Class II division 1 patients treated with bionator. The objective was to demonstrate the transverse growth of maxilla and mandible during and after bionator therapy. Measurement of transverse dimensions between posterior maxillary and mandibular implants, as well as the distances between the buccal, gonial and antegonial points were recorded. Measurements were analyzed at three periods: T1 - before bionator therapy, T2 - after bionator therapy and T3 - 5.74 years after T2. There was statistically significant transverse increase due to growth and/or treatment for all variables, except for the distance between the anterior maxillary implants. During the study period only the anterior maxillary area did not show transverse growth.

  3. [The effect of modified Nance arch on treating maxillary impacted canine transposed with first premolar].

    PubMed

    Xu, Qing-chao; Sun, Hao; Lin, Yan; Wang, Xiu-ying; Hu, Rong-dang

    2015-10-01

    To explore the effect of modified Nance arch on treating maxillary canine-first premolar transposition cases, in which the anchorage and force direction were discussed. Modified Nance arch was applied to 5 cases with maxillary impacted canine-first premolar transposition. First, a lingual knot button was bonded on the surface of the canine crown. Modified Nance arch was decorated with a hook that moved horizontally and buccally. Then the location of the hook was gradually adjusted in order to move the canine cross the root of the first premolar and move the canine to the right position. At last the canine was moved downward by straight wire appliance. Five maxillary transposed canines were fully erupted in their right position, with normal pulp activity and gingival morphology. No obvious root resorption was detected. The mean treatment time was 30 months. Modified Nance arch has advantages in treating canine-first premolar transposition.

  4. An unusual exostotic lesion of the maxillary sinus from Roman Lincoln.

    PubMed

    Kendall, Ross; Kendall, Ellen J; Macleod, Iain; Gowland, Rebecca; Beaumont, Julia

    2015-12-01

    This report provides a differential diagnosis of an exostotic bony lesion within the left maxillary sinus of a Romano-British (3rd to 4th century AD) adult male from Newport, Lincoln. Macroscopic, radiographic, and cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) analyses suggest that the lesion is likely of odontogenic origin. The overall size of the lesion and areas of sclerosis and radiolucency, together with its hypothesised odontogenic origin, suggest that the lesion represents a chronic exostotic osteomyelitic reaction to the presence of odontogenic bacteria. While modern case studies of odontogenic maxillary sinus osteomyelitis are noteworthy, published cases of this condition are extremely rare in an archaeological context and may be underreported due to the enclosed nature of the sinuses. Such infections may have serious implications for individual and population health, and non-destructive investigation should be considered in cases where significant maxillary caries are present. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Endoscopic Modified Medial Maxillectomy for Fungal Ball of the Hypoplastic Maxillary Sinus With Bony Hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Nomura, Kazuhiro; Ikushima, Hiroyuki; Ozawa, Daiki; Shimizu, Yuichi; Arakawa, Kazuya; Suzuki, Jun; Hidaka, Hiroshi; Katori, Yukio; Ohyama, Kenji

    2018-05-01

    Sinus fungal ball is defined as noninvasive chronic rhino-sinusitis with a clump of mold in the paranasal sinuses, typically affecting the maxillary sinus. Fairly good outcomes of endoscopic surgery have been reported where the ball is removed through the antrostomy. However, the affected sinus tends to have a smaller cavity and thicker bony walls. As such, it is often challenging to maintain a window size that is sufficient to control possible recurrence. The endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy procedure was applied to a 61-year old and a 70-year old female patient with maxillary sinus fungal ball. Using this method, we created a much larger inferior meatal antrostomy without difficulty. The window provided us with an endoscopic view of the whole sinus and complete eradication of the lesion. Endoscopic modified medial maxillectomy is useful as a surgical procedure for maxillary sinus fungal ball and should be considered for better outcomes.

  6. Maxillary first molar with an O-shaped root morphology: report of a case.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yooseok; Kim, Yemi; Roh, Byoung-Duck

    2013-12-01

    This case report is to present a maxillary first molar with one O-shaped root, which is an extended C-shaped canal system. Patient with chronic apical periodontitis in maxillary left first molar underwent replantation because of difficulty in negotiating all canals. Periapical radiographs and cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) were taken. All roots were connected and fused to one root, and all canals seemed to be connected to form an O-shape. The apical 3 mm of the root were resected and retrograde filled with resin-modified glass ionomer. Intentional replantation as an alternative treatment could be considered in a maxillary first molar having an unusual O-shaped root.

  7. In-depth morphological study of mesiobuccal root canal systems in maxillary first molars: review

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Seok-Woo; Lee, Jong-Ki; Lee, Yoon

    2013-01-01

    A common failure in endodontic treatment of the permanent maxillary first molars is likely to be caused by an inability to locate, clean, and obturate the second mesiobuccal (MB) canals. Because of the importance of knowledge on these additional canals, there have been numerous studies which investigated the maxillary first molar MB root canal morphology using in vivo and laboratory methods. In this article, the protocols, advantages and disadvantages of various methodologies for in-depth study of maxillary first molar MB root canal morphology were discussed. Furthermore, newly identified configuration types for the establishment of new classification system were suggested based on two image reformatting techniques of micro-computed tomography, which can be useful as a further 'Gold Standard' method for in-depth morphological study of complex root canal systems. PMID:23493453

  8. Perioperative incidents associated with internal maxillary distraction osteogenesis: a retrospective study of 20 patients.

    PubMed

    Kristian, Andersen; Erik, Nørholt Sven; Annelise, Küseler; John, Jensen; Klit, Pedersen Thomas

    2012-12-01

    This retrospective study aimed to assess the frequency and distribution of incidents encountered during the perioperative period of maxillary distraction with internal devices. The perioperative period was defined as the period between device placement and removal. Records of 20 patients treated during 2004-2011 with internal maxillary distraction osteogenesis were examined. Incidents were registered in terms of severity and need of intervention. Eighty percent of the patients experienced minor incidents, of which the most frequent were pain during activation and infections; 80% of these experienced ≥1 hard and soft tissue-related incidents, and 20% ≥1 device-related incidents. All incidents were solved with minimal or no intervention. Maxillary distraction using internal devices is a safe treatment with only minor incidents in the perioperative period. Preoperative planning and good cooperation are essential for preventing postoperative incidents. Prophylactic antibiotic treatment during the distraction period may be indicated. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Segmental maxillary distraction with a novel device for closure of a wide alveolar cleft

    PubMed Central

    Bousdras, Vasilios A.; Liyanage, Chandra; Mars, Michael; Ayliffe, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of a wide alveolar cleft with initial application of segmental distraction osteogenesis is reported, in order to minimise cleft size prior to secondary alveolar bone grafting. The lesser maxillary segment was mobilised with osteotomy at Le Fort I level and, a novel distractor, facilitated horizontal movement of the dental/alveolar segment along the curvature of the maxillary dental arch. Following a latency period of 4 days distraction was applied for 7 days at a rate of 0.5 mm twice daily. Radiographic, ultrasonographic and clinical assessment revealed new bone and soft tissue formation 8 weeks after completion of the distraction phase. Overall the maxillary segment did move minimising the width of the cleft, which allowed successful closure with a secondary alveolar bone graft. PMID:24987601

  10. Segmental maxillary distraction with a novel device for closure of a wide alveolar cleft.

    PubMed

    Bousdras, Vasilios A; Liyanage, Chandra; Mars, Michael; Ayliffe, Peter R

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of a wide alveolar cleft with initial application of segmental distraction osteogenesis is reported, in order to minimise cleft size prior to secondary alveolar bone grafting. The lesser maxillary segment was mobilised with osteotomy at Le Fort I level and, a novel distractor, facilitated horizontal movement of the dental/alveolar segment along the curvature of the maxillary dental arch. Following a latency period of 4 days distraction was applied for 7 days at a rate of 0.5 mm twice daily. Radiographic, ultrasonographic and clinical assessment revealed new bone and soft tissue formation 8 weeks after completion of the distraction phase. Overall the maxillary segment did move minimising the width of the cleft, which allowed successful closure with a secondary alveolar bone graft.

  11. DYSTROPHIC CALCIFICATION OF MAXILLARY SINUS IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS WITH LIVER TRANSPLANTATION AND PIGMENTATION OF DENTAL ORGAN

    PubMed Central

    de Macedo, Adriana Furtado; Costa, Claudio; Mattar, Regina Helena Guedes da Motta; de Azevedo, Ramiro Anthero

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: To report a case of severe dystrophic calcification in maxillary sinus of a child with liver transplantation and dental organs pigmented by hyperbilirubinemia. Case description: female patient, 12 years old, with liver transplantation performed at the age of 7 due to extrahepatic biliary atresia (EHBA). The patient was receiving the immunosuppressant tacrolimus (2 mg daily). Intraoral clinical exam showed tooth green pigmentation by bilirubin. Cone-beam volumetric computed tomography (CT) was performed to verify radiographic density of pigmented dental elements. Hounsfield scale measurement did not show changes in radiographic density of dental structures. However, CT scan showed intense dystrophic calcification in the maxillary sinus region. Comments: CT scan indicated relevant radiographic findings, with radiopacity of the maxillary sinus due to fungal or non-fungal sinusitis. This case report highlights the presence of radiographic image associated with acute infectious processes that could compromise the systemic state of immunosuppressed patients. PMID:29166493

  12. Maxillary Arch Dimensions and Spectral Characteristics of Children with Cleft Lip and Palate Who Produce Middorsum Palatal Stops

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajac, David J.; Cevidanes, Lucia; Shah, Sonam; Haley, Katarina L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study was twofold: (a) to determine maxillary arch dimensions of children with repaired cleft lip and palate (CLP) who produced middorsum palatal stops and (b) to describe some spectral characteristics of middorsum palatal stops. Method: Maxillary arch width, length, and height dimensions and first spectral moments of…

  13. Dental Items of Interest: The Case of Delphic Sibyl by Michelangelo: Solitary Median Maxillary Central Incisor or Mesiodens.

    PubMed

    Perciaccante, Antonio; Coralli, Alessia

    2015-01-01

    A case of an anomaly in the maxillary dental arch on "Delphic Sibyl," a fresco by Michelangelo is reported. An accurate analysis of this fresco shows a single incisor tooth is present precisely in the midline. We hypothesize that it may be a case of solitary median maxillary central incisor (SMMCI) and discuss the differential diagnosis with another similar anomaly--the mesiodens.

  14. Comparison between rapid and mixed maxillary expansion through an assessment of arch changes on dental casts.

    PubMed

    Grassia, Vincenzo; d'Apuzzo, Fabrizia; Jamilian, Abdolreza; Femiano, Felice; Favero, Lorenzo; Perillo, Letizia

    2015-01-01

    Aim of this retrospective observational study was to compare upper and lower dental changes in patients treated with Rapid Maxillary Expansion (RME) and Mixed Maxillary Expansion (MME), assessed by dental cast analysis. Treatment groups consisted of 42 patients: the RME group (n = 21) consisted of 13 female and 8 male subjects with the mean age of 8.8 years ± 1.37 at T0 and 9.6 years ± 1.45 at T1; the MME group (n = 21) consisted of 12 female and 9 male patients with a mean age of 8.9 years ± 2.34 at T0 and 10.5 years ± 2.08 at T1. The upper and lower arch analysis was performed on four dental bilateral landmarks, on upper and lower casts; also upper and lower arch depths were measured. The groups were compared using independent sample t-test to estimate dental changes in upper and lower arches. Before expansion treatment (T0), the groups were similar for all examined variables (p>0.05). In both RME and MME group, significant increments in all the variables for maxillary and mandibular arch widths were observed after treatment. No significant differences in maxillary and mandibular arch depths were observed at the end of treatment in both groups. An evaluation of the changes after RME and MME (T1) showed statistically significant differences in mandibular arch depth (p<0.001) and maxillary intercanine widths (p<0.05). Differences in maxillary arch depth and arch width measurements were not significant. RME and MME can be considered two effective treatment options to improve transverse arch dimensions and gain space in the dental arches. A greater lower arch expansion was observed in the MME group, which might be attributed to the "lip bumper effects" observed in the MME protocol.

  15. Evaluation of maxillary anterior teeth and their relation to the golden proportion in Malaysian population.

    PubMed

    Al-Marzok, Maan Ibrahim; Majeed, Kais Raad Abdul; Ibrahim, Ibrahim Khalil

    2013-01-24

    The maxillary anterior teeth are important in achieving pleasing dental aesthetics. Various methods are used to measure the size and form of them, including the golden proportion between their perceived widths, and the width-to-height ratio, referred to as the golden standard. The purpose of this study was conducted to evaluate whether consistent relationships exist between tooth width and height of the clinical crown dimensions; and to investigate the occurrence of the golden proportion of the maxillary anterior teeth. Dental casts of the maxillary arches were made in this cross-sectional study from MAHSA University College students who met the inclusion criteria. The 49 participants represented the Malaysian population main ethnics. The dimensions of the anterior teeth and the perceived width of anterior teeth viewed from front were measured using a digital caliper. Comparison of the perceived width ratio of lateral to central incisor and canine to lateral incisor with the golden proportion of 0.618 revealed there were a significant statistical difference (p < 0.05). The statistical difference was significant for the width-to-height ratio of central incisors to the golden standard of 80%. There was no significant difference in the comparison among ethnic groups for the golden proportion and the golden standard. The golden proportion was not found to exist between the perceived widths of maxillary anterior teeth. No golden standard were detected for the width-to-height proportions of maxillary incisors. Specific population characteristics and perception of beauty must be considered. However, ethnicity has no association with the proportions of maxillary anterior teeth.

  16. Maxillary hypoplasia in the cleft patient: contribution of orthodontic dental space closure to orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Lee, Justine C; Slack, Ginger C; Walker, Ryann; Graves, Lindsay; Yen, Sandra; Woo, Jessica; Ambaram, Rishal; Martz, Martin G; Kawamoto, Henry K; Bradley, James P

    2014-02-01

    Cleft lip and palate surgery in the developing child is known to be associated with maxillary hypoplasia. However, the effects of nonsurgical manipulations on maxillary growth have not been well investigated. The authors present the contribution of orthodontic dental space closure with canine substitution to maxillary hypoplasia and the need for orthognathic surgery. Cleft lip/palate and cleft palate patients older than 15 years of age were reviewed for dental anomalies, orthodontic canine substitution, and Le Fort I advancement. Skeletal relationships of the maxilla to the skull base (SNA), mandible (ANB), and facial height were determined on lateral cephalograms. Logistic regression analyses were performed to estimate odds ratios. Ninety-five patients were reviewed (mean age, 18.1 years). In 65 patients with congenitally missing teeth, 55 percent with patent dental spaces required Le Fort I advancement. In contrast, 89 percent who underwent canine substitution required Le Fort I advancement (p = 0.004). Canine substitution is associated with a statistically significant increase in maxillary retrognathia when compared with dental space preservation on lateral cephalograms (mean SNA, 75.2 and 79.0, respectively; p = 0.006). Adjusting for missing dentition, logistic regression analyses demonstrated that canine substitution is an independent predictor for orthognathic surgery (OR, 6.47) and maxillary retrusion defined by SNA < 78 (OR, 8.100). The coordination of orthodontia and surgery is essential to cleft care. The authors report a strong association between orthodontic cleft closure using canine substitution with maxillary hypoplasia and subsequent Le Fort I advancement, and suggest systematic criteria for management of cleft-related dental agenesis. Therapeutic, III.

  17. Effectiveness of TAD-anchored maxillary protraction in late mixed dentition.

    PubMed

    Feng, Xiaoxia; Li, Jianhua; Li, Yu; Zhao, Zhihe; Zhao, Sen; Wang, Jue

    2012-11-01

    To evaluate the effectiveness of temporary anchorage device (TAD)-anchored maxillary protraction (MP) in terms of the skeletal and dentoalveolar changes and to compare it with traditional tooth-anchored MP. A computerized literature search for relative randomized controlled trials and prospective controlled trials was performed in PubMed, MEDLINE, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Embase, CNKI, and Google Scholar, complemented with manual search. Data extraction and quality assessment were carried out by two reviewers independently. Meta-analysis was followed when possible; otherwise, description was done. Forty articles were found, among which four trials were qualified for meta-analysis. The results showed that there was significant difference between TAD-anchored MP and untreated control in terms of maxillary advancement (weighted mean differences (WMD) 3.08 mm; 95% CI: 1.61 to approximately 4.56; P < .0001), but there were no consistent points in terms of mandibular rotation. Also, there were significant differences between both treatment patterns regarding maxillary advancement (WMD 1.41 mm; 95% CI: 0.47 to approximately 2.35; P  =  .003), mandibular rotation (WMD -1.39°, 95% CI: -2.47 to approximately -0.31; P  =  .01), proclination of maxillary incisors (WMD -2.29°; 95% CI: -4.41 to approximately -0.17; P  =  .03), and extrusion of maxillary molars (WMD -1.68 mm; 95% CI: -2.51 to approximately -0.85; P < .0001). According to the present results, TAD-anchored MP might have a greater maxillary advancement effect and might reduce skeletal and dental side effects, compared with tooth-anchored MP.

  18. The microbiology of ethmoid and maxillary sinuses in patients with chronic sinusitis.

    PubMed

    Aral, Murat; Keles, Erol; Kaygusuz, Irfan

    2003-01-01

    To investigate aerob-anaerob microorganisms growth in maxillary and ethmoid sinuses by evaluating aspiration materials from patients with chronic sinusitis. The study was performed prospectively, and there were 31 patients (23 men, 8 women; mean age, 31.4+/-14.15, between 18-65 years) who had endoscopic sinus surgery because of chronic sinusitis. During the operation, when the maxillary sinus ostium and ethmoid sinus were opened, readily aspirated materials from sinuses were evaluated regarding aerob and anaerob bacteria. Nose and throat swap samples were collected preoperatively to determine the upper respiratory tract flora and also to understand the relationship between the flora and the microorganisms aspirated from sinuses. Total aerob bacteria count, which was isolated from preoperative nasal swab cultures, was 36, and aerob-anaerob bacteria count that included cultures taken from maxillary and ethmoid sinuses during the functional endoscopic sinus surgery was 42. For each 2 samples, the most common isolated aerob bacteria were coagulase (-) staphylococci. Microorganisms were isolated in 87.0% of 27 patients, in which cultures taken from maxillary and ethmoid sinuses during the functional endoscopic sinus surgery were included. It is determined that the isolated aerob bacteria rate was 90.4%, and the isolated anaerob bacteria rate was 14.2%. All of the 6 samples in which anaerob bacteria isolated were all maxillary sinus aspiration materials. Microorganisms that isolated from the nose and the sinuses were similar with the rate of 25.8%, and microorganisms that isolated from the throat cultures and sinuses were similar with the rate of 22.5%. This study reveals the aerob and anaerob microbiology of the maxillary and ethmoid sinuses so the treatment of chronic sinusitis will be easier.

  19. Mycotic pulmonary artery aneurysm following pulmonary artery banding.

    PubMed

    Kumar, R V; Roughneen, P T; de Leval, M R

    1994-01-01

    A neonate with situs inversus, transposition of the great arteries, ventricular septal defect, criss-cross ventricles and hypoplastic right ventricle underwent pulmonary artery banding at the age of 7 days. The course was complicated by septicaemia and subsequently the development of an aneurysm of the pulmonary artery. Serratia marcessans was grown from the band site. The pulmonary artery aneurysm was resected and the pulmonary artery was repaired. The literature is reviewed with the emphasis on diagnosis, natural history and surgical management.

  20. Multiple Giant Coronary Artery Aneurysms

    PubMed Central

    Marla, Rammohan; Ebel, Rachel; Crosby, Marcus; Almassi, G. Hossein

    2009-01-01

    Coronary artery aneurysms are rare, and giant coronary artery aneurysms are even rarer. We describe a patient who had giant coronary aneurysms of the right, left circumflex, and left anterior descending coronary arteries. The aneurysms were successfully treated with surgical intervention. To the best of our knowledge, ours is the 1st report of giant aneurysms involving all 3 major coronary arteries. PMID:19568397

  1. [Endarterectomy of the coronary arteries].

    PubMed

    Fischer, V; Simkovic, I; Holoman, M; Verchvodko, P; Janotík, P; Galbánek, J; Hulman, M; Kostelnicák, J; Jurco, R; Slezák, J

    1992-02-01

    The authors analyze 50 patients with endarterectomy of the coronary arteries during the periods of 1972-1974 and 1988-1990. The results of endarterectomy of the right and left coronary artery provide evidence of its justification in indicated cases whereby contrary to some departments the results of endarterectomy of the left coronary artery are comparable with endarterectomy of the right coronary artery.

  2. Screening for Carotid Artery Stenosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... build up and harden the arteries, limiting the flow of blood to the brain. Facts About Carotid Artery Stenosis Carotid artery stenosis is one of many risk factors for stroke, a leading cause of death and disability in the United States. However, carotid artery stenosis is uncommon—about ½ ...

  3. Rehabilitation of the dominance of maxillary central incisors with refractory porcelain veneers requiring minimal tooth preparation.

    PubMed

    da Cunha, Leonardo Fernandes; Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Saab, Rafaella; Mushashe, Amanda Mahammad; Correr, Gisele Maria

    2015-01-01

    Central dominance is an important element of an esthetic smile. Color, form, and size have been suggested as tools for assessing the dominance of maxillary teeth. A spectrophotometer can be used to determine the value, hue, and chroma. Correct sizing of restorations according to the central incisor dominance principle improves not only esthetics but also aspects of occlusion, such as anterior guidance. Refractory porcelain systems can effectively restore the color, shape, emergence profile, and incisal translucency. This report illustrates the esthetic and occlusal rehabilitation of the dominance of maxillary central incisors using fabricated minimal thickness refractory porcelain veneers.

  4. Management of a congenitally missing maxillary central incisor. A case study.

    PubMed

    Tichler, Howard M; Abraham, Jenny E

    2007-03-01

    When a maxillary lateral incisor is missing, often the treatment options can be clearly defined, that is, substitute an adjacent tooth for the missing one; open the space for an implant, a bonded bridge or fixed bridge. When a maxillary central incisor is missing and the space for the tooth is absent, the treatment choices become complicated, especially in a growing child. There must be multi-disciplinary coordination among the restorative dentist, the oral surgeon or periodontist, and the orthodontist to obtain the optimum result. At the initiation of treatment, this information must be relayed and the treatment plan agreed upon by the patient or the parents of the patient.

  5. Bilateral presence of two root canals in maxillary central incisors: A rare case study.

    PubMed

    Kavitha, M; Gokul, Kannan; Ramaprabha, B; Lakshmi, Amudha

    2014-04-01

    Success in root canal treatment is achieved after thorough cleaning and shaping followed by complete obturation of the canal system. Therefore, endodontic therapy requires specific and complete knowledge of the internal and external dental anatomy, and its variations in presentation. The internal anatomy of the maxillary central incisor is well-known and usually presents one root canal system. This case report describes an endodontic treatment of traumatized both maxillary central incisors with two canal systems. Knowledge of dental anatomy is fundamental for proper endodontic practice. When root canal treatment is performed, the clinician should be aware that both external and internal anatomy may be abnormal.

  6. Restoration of the maxillary arch using implants, natural teeth and the Konus crown: a case study.

    PubMed

    Sethi, A; Sochor, P

    1994-03-01

    Restoring the maxillary arch by using a suprastructure retained by a Konus crown means that the patient can remove the crown for oral hygiene. This construction enables large embrasure spaces to be avoided without compromising phonetics, that is, without adversely affecting the patient's speech. It also enables the dental surgeon to monitor the tooth and implant abutments and the soft tissues around them. In this article we demonstrate successful restoration of the maxillary arch by the use of Konus crowns on a combination of implants and natural teeth.

  7. Endodontic management of maxillary first molar with atypical canal morphology: Report of three cases

    PubMed Central

    Sherwani, Osama Adeel Khan; Kapoor, Bhumika; Sharma, Rajat; Mishra, Surendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary first molar with three roots and 3–4 canals is a common occurrence. However, extreme variations in their canal morphology have been reported ranging from one single canal and one root to as many as eight root canals. This article presents three cases of successful endodontic management of maxillary first molars with atypical canal morphologies, thus highlighting the fact that variations do occur and an endodontist should always be aware of aberrancies in root canal system apart from the knowledge of normal root canal anatomy. PMID:27994427

  8. Characteristics of Teeth: A Review of Size, Shape, Composition, and Appearance of Maxillary Anterior Teeth.

    PubMed

    McGowan, Steve

    2016-03-01

    Although digital technologies play an increasingly integral role in dentistry, there remains a need for dental professionals to understand the fundamentals of tooth anatomy, form, occlusion, and color science. In this article, the size, shape, composition, and appearance of maxillary anterior teeth will be discussed from esthetic and functional perspectives. A total of 600 extracted maxillary incisors were studied: 200 each of central incisors, lateral incisors, and cuspids. The purpose of the article is to exhibit and discuss factors that make teeth unique and diverse. Understanding these aspects of teeth aids dental professionals in more effectively creating realistic and highly esthetic restorations for patients.

  9. Pharyngeal airway changes associated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis in adult cleft lip and palate patients.

    PubMed

    Aksu, Muge; Taner, Tülin; Sahin-Veske, Pınar; Kocadereli, Ilken; Konas, Ersoy; Mavili, Mehmet Emin

    2012-02-01

    To investigate 1) the changes in pharyngeal airway sizes associated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis and 2) the correlations between maxillary skeletal variables and the pharyngeal airway in adult patients with cleft lip and palate. The study was carried out in 14 adult subjects with cleft lip and palate. Predistraction records were taken at a mean age of 22.7 ± 4.6 years. All patients had placement of a rigid external distraction device (RED I; KLS Martin, Tuttlingen, Germany) after Le Fort I osteotomy. Lateral cephalograms were assessed before surgery and at short-term follow-up (8.0 ± 6.4 months). The cephalometric skeletal and pharyngeal airway variables were statistically evaluated by use of the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Spearman ρ correlation was performed to check the correlations between maxillary skeletal and pharyngeal variables. The maxillary movement was 8.7 mm (P < .01). The maxillary depth angle (+7.9°) and effective maxillary length (9.4 mm) increased significantly (P < .01) after distraction, whereas the palatal plane angle remained unchanged. Anterior nasal spine (8.2 mm) and Posterior nasal spine (6.9 mm) moved anteriorly. The overjet increased (9.5 mm) significantly (P < .01). Posterior, superoposterior, and middle airway spaces increased significantly, with mean differences of 7.5 mm, 5.1 mm, and 3.3 mm, respectively. The soft palate moved anteriorly, with the greatest movement at its superior point. Significant positive correlations were observed for the posterior and superoposterior airway spaces and maxillary movement. PNS changes showed the highest correlation with posterior airway changes. The significant anterior movement of the maxilla resulted in significant increases in posterior, superoposterior, and middle airway spaces. The posterior airway space showed the highest significant positive correlation with the movement of PNS. The posterior and superoposterior airway spaces also showed significant positive correlations with

  10. Multiple supernumerary teeth associated with an impacted maxillary central incisor: Surgical and orthodontic management

    PubMed Central

    Yeluri, Ramakrishna; Hegde, Manjunath; Baliga, Sudhindra; Munshi, Autar Krishen

    2012-01-01

    Various anomalies in the size, shape, number, structure and eruption of the teeth are often observed clinical conditions. Supernumerary teeth can be found in almost any region of the dental arch, and most of the times they are asymptomatic, and are routinely found during radiographic evaluation. The most common cause of impacted maxillary incisors is the presence of the supernumerary teeth. This paper describes a case of multiple supernumerary teeth associated with an impacted permanent maxillary central incisor in an 11-year old child along with its surgical and orthodontic management. PMID:22919229

  11. Mesenteric artery ischemia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood to the intestines run directly from the aorta, the main artery from the heart. Hardening of ... clots most often come from the heart or aorta. These clots are more commonly seen in people ...

  12. Retinal artery occlusion

    MedlinePlus

    ... they are rarely used. Breathing in (inhaling) a carbon dioxide-oxygen mixture. This treatment causes the arteries ... PA: Lippincott Williams & Wilkins; 2013:vol 3;chap 14. Yanoff M, Cameron D. Diseases of the visual ...

  13. Peripheral Arterial Disease

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral arterial disease (PAD) happens when there is a narrowing of the blood vessels outside of your heart. The cause of ... smoking. Other risk factors include older age and diseases like diabetes, high blood cholesterol, high blood pressure, ...

  14. Carotid artery disease

    MedlinePlus

    Here's what you can do to help prevent carotid artery disease and stroke: Quit smoking. Follow a healthy, low-fat diet. Do not drink more than 1 to 2 alcoholic drinks a day. Do not use recreational drugs. ...

  15. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? To understand pulmonary hypertension (PH) it helps to understand how blood ows throughout your body. While the heart is one organ, it ...

  16. Coronary Artery Bypass

    MedlinePlus

    ... 000 procedures performed each year in the United States. Arteries can become clogged over time by the buildup of fatty plaque. Bypass surgery improves the blood flow to the heart with a new route or “ ...

  17. Coronary Artery Fistula

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    man with a single episode of vague sub- sternal chest pain was referred for evaluation of possible coronary artery disease. His medical history was...significant for hypertension and type-II diabetes mellitus. The patient had no prior history of thoracic trauma or surgery. During an exercise...Figure 1A; oblique, Figure 1B), the left circumflex artery was identified by its black central lumen and noted to arise normally from the left main

  18. Organ Preservation With Daily Concurrent Chemoradiotherapy Using Superselective Intra-Arterial Infusion via a Superficial Temporal Artery for T3 and T4 Head and Neck Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Mitsudo, Kenji, E-mail: mitsudo@yokohama-cu.ac.j; Shigetomi, Toshio; Fujimoto, Yasushi

    Purpose: To evaluate the therapeutic results and rate of organ preservation in patients with advanced head and neck cancer treated with superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy via a superficial temporal artery and daily concurrent radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between April 2002 and March 2006, 30 patients with T3 or T4a squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck underwent intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy. Treatment consisted of superselective intra-arterial infusions (docetaxel, total 60 mg/m{sup 2}; cisplatin, total 150 mg/m{sup 2}) and daily concurrent radiotherapy (total, 60 Gy) for 6 weeks. Results: The median follow-up for all patients was 46.2 months (range, 10-90 months). The medianmore » follow-up for living patients was 49.7 months (range, 36-90 months). After intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy was administered, primary site complete response was achieved in 30 (100%) of 30 cases. Seven patients (23.3%) died. Using the Kaplan-Meier method, 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year survival rates were 96.7%, 83.1%, and 70.2%, respectively, while 1-year, 3-year, and 5-year local control rates were 83.3%, 79.7%, and 73.0%, respectively. Grade 3 or 4 mucositis occurred in 20 cases (66.7%). Grade 3 toxicities included dysphagia in 20 cases (66.7%), dermatitis in 6 cases (20%), nausea/vomiting in 2 cases (6.7%), and neutropenia and thrombocytopenia in 1 case (3.3%). No osteoradionecrosis of mandible and maxillary bones developed during follow-up. Conclusions: Intra-arterial chemoradiotherapy using a superficial temporal artery provided good overall survival and local control rates. This combination chemoradiotherapy approach can preserve organs and minimize functional disturbance, thus contributing to patients' quality of life.« less

  19. Nasal base, maxillary, and infraorbital implants--alloplastic.

    PubMed

    Hinderer, U T

    1991-01-01

    patients with maxillonasal dysplasia or Binder's syndrome, after trauma, with excessive septum and nasal spine resections, and in nasal-maxillary sequels in cleft patients. In case of dental malocclusion, orthognathic surgery is the technique of choice. A prototype implant is available in two sizes, to be inserted through a lateral incision at the base of the columella. In 108 patients two implants have been partially removed. After the first month the patient is usually well adapted to the foreign body.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 400 WORDS)

  20. Novel Three-Dimensional Understanding of Maxillary Cleft Distraction.

    PubMed

    Vaughan, Stephen Michael; Kau, Chung How; Waite, Peter Daniel

    2016-09-01

    To set forth a universal standard methodology for quantifying volumetric and linear changes in the craniofacial complex, utilizing three-dimensional data captured from a cleft-lip palate patient who underwent rigid external device (RED) distraction. Cone beam computed tomography images of a 14-year-old patient were captured using a Kodak 9500 (Atlanta, GA) Cone Beam system device and a stereophotogrammetric system (3dMDface(TM) Atlanta, GA). The subject was a nonsyndromic unilateral cleft-lip palate patient who received RED distraction as part of maxillary advancement in conjunction with orthodontic treatment. Preop (T1) and postop (T2) images were superimposed using Invivo 5.2.3 (San Jose, CA) software. Volumetric rendering of the airway, bone, and soft tissues, as well as linear measurements were analyzed. Each measurement was captured 10 times to ensure reliability and reproducibility of methodology. Data from T1 to T2 revealed mean differences as follows: airway total volume +5250 mm, minimum cross-sectional area +67.84 mm; bone +1719 mm, soft tissue +44,432 mm. Mean of linear measurements: Pronasale 1.98 mm, Subnasale 3.35 mm, Labial superius 10.79 mm, Labial inferius 4.13 mm, Right alare 5.71 mm, Right cheilion 7.83 mm, Left alare 4.97 mm, Left cheilion 5.50 mm, Pogonion 3.01 mm, B-point 2.49 mm, U1-U1 9.77 mm, and L1-L1 0.00 mm. P values are <0.001 for each analysis. This paper represents a novel and innovative way to look at prepost RED distractions in a three-dimensional format. A universal standard analysis of the craniofacial complex can be implemented using the techniques and method outlined in this study.

  1. Fetal and neo-natal maxillary ontogeny in extant humans and the utility of prenatal maxillary morphology in predicting ancestral affiliation

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Christina L.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The midface of extant H. sapiens is known to undergo shape changes through fetal and neo-natal ontogeny; however, little work has been done to quantify these shape changes. Further, while midfacial traits which vary in frequency between populations of extant humans are presumed to develop prenatally, patterns of population-specific variation maxillary shape across ontogeny are not well documented. Only one study of fetal ontogeny which included specific discussion of the midface has taken a 3D geometric morphometric approach, and that study was limited to one population (Japanese). The present research project seeks to augment our understanding of fetal maxillary growth patterns, most especially in terms of intraspecific variation. Materials and Methods Three-dimensional coordinate landmark data were collected on the right maxillae of 102 fetal and neo-natal individuals from three groups (Euro-American, African-American, “Mixed Ancestry”). Results Shape changes were seen mainly in the lateral wall of the piriform aperture, the anterior nasal spine, and the subnasal alveolar region. The greatest difference across age groups (2nd Trimester, 3rd Trimester, Neonates) was between the second and third trimester. Euro-Americans and African-Americans clustered by population and differences in midfacial morphology related to ancestry could be discerned as early as the second trimester (p=0.002), indicating that population variation in maxillary morphology appears very early in ontogeny. Discussion The midface is a critical region of the skull for assessing ancestry and these results indicate that maxillary morphology may be useful for estimating ancestry for prenatal individuals as young as the second trimester. PMID:27412693

  2. The Effects of Maxillary Protraction with or without Rapid Maxillary Expansion and Age Factors in Treating Class III Malocclusion: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Wei; Qu, Hong-Chen; Yu, Mo; Zhang, Yang

    2015-01-01

    We conducted a comprehensive meta-analysis of 12 studies to examine whether maxillary protraction face mask associated with rapid maxillary expansion (FM/RME) could be an effective treatment for Class III malocclusion and to evaluate the effect of timing on treatment response. Patients with a maxillary deficiency who were treated with FM with or without RME were compared with those who had an untreated Class III malocclusion. In both treatment groups, forward displacement of the maxilla and skeletal changes were found to be statistically significant. In addition, posterior rotation of the mandible and increased facial height were more evident in the FM group compared with the control group. However, no significant differences were observed between the early treatment groups and late treatment groups. The results indicated that both FM/RME and FM therapy produced favorable skeletal changes for correcting anterior crossbite, and the curative time was not affected by the presence of deciduous teeth, early mixed dentition or late mixed dentition in the patient. PMID:26068221

  3. Generation and evaluation of 3D digital casts of maxillary defects based on multisource data registration: A pilot clinical study.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hongqiang; Ma, Qijun; Hou, Yuezhong; Li, Man; Zhou, Yongsheng

    2017-12-01

    Digital techniques are not clinically applied for 1-piece maxillary prostheses containing an obturator and removable partial denture retained by the remaining teeth because of the difficulty in obtaining sufficiently accurate 3-dimensional (3D) images. The purpose of this pilot clinical study was to generate 3D digital casts of maxillary defects, including the defective region and the maxillary dentition, based on multisource data registration and to evaluate their effectiveness. Twelve participants with maxillary defects were selected. The maxillofacial region was scanned with spiral computer tomography (CT), and the maxillary arch and palate were scanned using an intraoral optical scanner. The 3D images from the CT and intraoral scanner were registered and merged to form a 3D digital cast of the maxillary defect containing the anatomic structures needed for the maxillary prosthesis. This included the defect cavity, maxillary dentition, and palate. Traditional silicone impressions were also made, and stone casts were poured. The accuracy of the digital cast in comparison with that of the stone cast was evaluated by measuring the distance between 4 anatomic landmarks. Differences and consistencies were assessed using paired Student t tests and the intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC). In 3 participants, physical resin casts were produced by rapid prototyping from digital casts. Based on the resin casts, maxillary prostheses were fabricated by using conventional methods and then evaluated in the participants to assess the clinical applicability of the digital casts. Digital casts of the maxillary defects were generated and contained all the anatomic details needed for the maxillary prosthesis. Comparing the digital and stone casts, a paired Student t test indicated that differences in the linear distances between landmarks were not statistically significant (P>.05). High ICC values (0.977 to 0.998) for the interlandmark distances further indicated the high

  4. Rheological approaches of arteries.

    PubMed

    Bauer, R D

    1984-01-01

    A fundamental problem of haemodynamics lies in the description of the rheological properties of arteries. The time and history dependency of stress and strain, the nonlinearity of the stress-radius relationship, and the activity of vascular smooth muscle complicate or even prevent a complete mathematical characterization of the arterial wall mechanics. Due to this nonlinearity, dynamic investigations were hitherto performed in excised arteries in vitro by means of small sinusoidal changes of stress and radius at different stress levels in a wide frequency range. To allow an analysis of the dynamic rheological properties of arteries in vivo, we have developed a procedure which permits the separate determination of the elastic, the viscous, and the inertial forces acting on the arterial wall. The stress can be subdivided into an elastic stress which is a function of radius (r), a viscous stress which is a function of dr/dt, and an inertial stress which is a function of d2r/dt2. These stresses are formulated as polynomials. Under cyclic loading and unloading, hysteresis loops appear in the stress-radius diagrams of arteries. Since the elastic stress-radius diagram must be free from any loop, the coefficients of the viscous and the inertial stress can be found by a fitting procedure, using the criterion of loop elimination. Investigations were performed on exposed canine arteries in vivo. The main result was that the elastic stress-radius curve was markedly nonlinear at greater pulse pressures. The viscous wall behaviour, too, was nonlinear and depended mainly on the square of the vessel radius.

  5. Distalization of Maxillary First Permanent Molar by Pendulum Appliance in Mixed Dentition Period

    PubMed Central

    Shetty, Prakashchandra; Anandakrishna, Latha; Rawat, Anuradha

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Mesial drifting of molar teeth in maxillary arch is corrected by movement of the molars distally. In addition to traditional distal movement techniques, such as extraoral force application and removable appliances, various intra-arch devices have been introduced since 1980s. These intra-arch appliances have nearly eliminated the need for patient cooperation. Case report The purpose of this paper is to report a case of 10-year-old male patient with loss of space in maxillary molar teeth treated by intra-arch appliance-pendulum appliance by distalization of maxillary first permanent molar teeth. Distaliza-tion of the permanent molar teeth helped in proper eruption of second premolar teeth without any extensive treatment procedures. Conclusion In the present case report, the treatment of developing malocclusion was corrected by utilizing the concept of interceptive orthodontics. Hence, correction of space loss in mixed dentition period using pendulum appliance can eliminate the fixed orthodontic therapy. How to cite this article Paranna S, Shetty P, Anandakrishna L, Rawat A. Distalization of Maxillary First Permanent Molar by Pendulum Appliance in Mixed Dentition Period. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(3):299-301. PMID:29104393

  6. Distalization of Maxillary First Permanent Molar by Pendulum Appliance in Mixed Dentition Period.

    PubMed

    Paranna, Sujatha; Shetty, Prakashchandra; Anandakrishna, Latha; Rawat, Anuradha

    2017-01-01

    Mesial drifting of molar teeth in maxillary arch is corrected by movement of the molars distally. In addition to traditional distal movement techniques, such as extraoral force application and removable appliances, various intra-arch devices have been introduced since 1980s. These intra-arch appliances have nearly eliminated the need for patient cooperation. The purpose of this paper is to report a case of 10-year-old male patient with loss of space in maxillary molar teeth treated by intra-arch appliance-pendulum appliance by distalization of maxillary first permanent molar teeth. Distaliza-tion of the permanent molar teeth helped in proper eruption of second premolar teeth without any extensive treatment procedures. In the present case report, the treatment of developing malocclusion was corrected by utilizing the concept of interceptive orthodontics. Hence, correction of space loss in mixed dentition period using pendulum appliance can eliminate the fixed orthodontic therapy. Paranna S, Shetty P, Anandakrishna L, Rawat A. Distalization of Maxillary First Permanent Molar by Pendulum Appliance in Mixed Dentition Period. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2017;10(3):299-301.

  7. Evaluation of selected speech parameters after prosthesis supply in patients with maxillary or mandibular defects.

    PubMed

    Müller, Rainer; Höhlein, Andreas; Wolf, Annette; Markwardt, Jutta; Schulz, Matthias C; Range, Ursula; Reitemeier, Bernd

    2013-01-01

    Ablative surgery of oropharyngeal tumors frequently leads to defects in the speech organs, resulting in impairment of speech up to the point of unintelligibility. The aim of the present study was the assessment of selected parameters of speech with and without resection prostheses. The speech sounds of 22 patients suffering from maxillary and mandibular defects were recorded using a digital audio tape (DAT) recorder with and without resection prostheses. Evaluation of the resonance and the production of the sounds /s/, /sch/, and /ch/ was performed by 2 experienced speech therapists. Additionally, the patients completed a non-standardized questionnaire containing a linguistic self-assessment. After prosthesis supply, the number of patients with rhinophonia aperta decreased from 7 to 2 while the number of patients with intelligible speech increased from 2 to 20. Correct production of the sounds /s/, /sch/, and /ch/ increased from 2 to 13 patients. A significant improvement of the evaluated parameters could be observed only in patients with maxillary defects. The linguistic self-assessment showed a higher satisfaction in patients with maxillary defects. In patients with maxillary defects due to ablative tumor surgery, an increase in speech performance and intelligibility is possible by supplying resection prostheses. © 2013 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg.

  8. A new Strategy to Improve Drug Delivery to the Maxillary Sinuses: The Frequency Sweep Acoustic Airflow.

    PubMed

    El Merhie, Amira; Navarro, Laurent; Delavenne, Xavier; Leclerc, Lara; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2016-05-01

    Enhancement of intranasal sinus deposition involves nebulization of a drug superimposed by an acoustic airflow. We investigated the impact of fixed frequency versus frequency sweep acoustic airflow on the improvement of aerosolized drug penetration into maxillary sinuses. Fixed frequency and frequency sweep acoustic airflow were generated using a nebulizing system of variable frequency. The effect of sweep cycle and intensity variation was studied on the intranasal sinus deposition. We used a nasal replica created from CT scans using 3D printing. Sodium fluoride and gentamicin were chosen as markers. Studies performed using fixed frequency acoustic airflow showed that each of maxillary sinuses of the nasal replica required specific frequency for the optimal aerosol deposition. Intranasal sinus drug deposition experiments under the effect of the frequency sweep acoustic airflow showed an optimal aerosol deposition into both maxillary sinus of the nasal replica. Studies on the effect of the duration of the sweep cycle showed that the shorter the cycle the better the deposition. We demonstrate the benefit of frequency sweep acoustic airflow on drug deposition into maxillary sinuses. However further in vivo studies have to be conducted since delivery rates cannot be obviously determined from a nasal replica.

  9. The maxillary palp of aedes aegypti, a model of multisensory integration

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Female yellow-fever mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti, are obligate blood-feeders and vectors of the pathogens that cause dengue fever, yellow fever and Chikungunya. This feeding behavior concludes a series of multisensory events guiding the mosquito to its host from a distance. The antennae and maxillary...

  10. Late temporal lobe necrosis after conventional radiotherapy for carcinoma of maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Kanakamedala, Madhava R; Mahta, Ali; Liu, Jianlin; Kesari, Santosh

    2012-12-01

    Cerebral radiation necrosis is a serious late complication after conventional radiotherapy that can present with focal neurologic deficits or with more generalized signs and symptoms of increased intracranial pressure, depending on the location. The incidence and severity of radionecrosis are dose-volume dependent. We report a case of cerebral radiation necrosis 5 years after radiotherapy for a maxillary sinus carcinoma.

  11. The Effects of Surgical Rapid Maxillary Expansion (SRME) on Vowel Formants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sari, Emel; Kilic, Mehmet Akif

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of surgical rapid maxillary expansion (SRME) on vowel production. The subjects included 12 patients, whose speech were considered perceptually normal, that had undergone surgical RME for expansion of a narrow maxilla. They uttered the following Turkish vowels, ([a], [[epsilon

  12. Toward smart Nebulization: Engineering acoustic airflow to penetrate maxillary sinuses in chronic rhinosinusitis.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, Shima Jowhari; Navarro, Laurent; Leclerc, Lara; Hodin, Sophie; Pourchez, Jérémie

    2018-07-30

    Treating chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) by nebulization requires an airflow capable to deliver medication to deep target sites beyond the nasal valve. Fixed frequency acoustic airflow technology is currently available, mainly as post-surgical therapy, but still have not been able to realize the full potential of direct nose to paranasal sinuses delivery. Reported herein are the application of frequency sweep acoustic airflow and the optimization of its frequency range, sweep cycle duration and intensity. The resonant frequencies of the model's maxillary sinuses can be estimated using the Helmholtz resonator theory. Results indicated a resonant frequency of 479 Hz for the right maxillary sinus and one of 849 Hz for the left maxillary sinus. The highest intrasinus deposition within the experiments are from sweep cycle duration of 1 s, intensity of 80 dB, and frequency range of 100-850 Hz. The optimal range of frequency determined from experiments is in good agreement with the corresponding frequency range obtained from the Helmholtz resonator theory. Results reveal a significantly enhanced maxillary sinus drug deposition. This technique affords the potential of treating CRS. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. The implications of different lateral wall thicknesses on surgical access to the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Lim, Ee Lian; Ngeow, Wei Cheong; Lim, Daniel

    2017-11-27

    The objective of this study was to measure the topographic thickness of the lateral wall of the maxillary sinus in selected Asian populations. Measurements were made on the lateral walls of maxillary sinuses recorded using CBCT in a convenient sample of patients attending an Asian teaching hospital. The points of measurement were the intersections between the axes along the apices of the canine, first premolar, and second premolar and along the mesiobuccal and distobuccal apices of the first and second molars and horizontal planes 10 mm, 20 mm, 30 mm and 40 mm beneath the orbital floor. The CBCT images of 109 patients were reviewed. The mean age of the patients was 33.0 (SD 14.8) years. Almost three quarters (71.8%) of the patients were male. The mean bone thickness decreased beginning at the 10-mm level and continuing to 40 mm below the orbital floor. Few canine regions showed encroachment of the maxillary sinus. The thickness of the buccal wall gradually increased from the canine region (where sinus encroachment of the canine region was present) to the first molar region, after which it decreased to the thickness observed at the canine region. The buccal wall of the maxillary sinus became thicker anteroposteriorly, except in the region of the second molar, and thinner superoinferiorly. These changes will affect the approach used to osteotomize the lateral sinus wall for oral surgery and for the sinus lift procedure.

  14. Alveolar ridge and maxillary sinus augmentation using rhBMP-2: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Rubens Moreno de; Spin-Neto, Rubens; Marcantonio Junior, Elcio; Pereira, Luís Antônio Violin Dias; Wikesjö, Ulf M E; Susin, Cristiano

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate clinical and safety data for recombinant human bone morphogenetic protein-2 (rhBMP-2) in an absorbable collagen sponge (ACS) carrier when used for alveolar ridge/maxillary sinus augmentation in humans. Clinical studies/case series published 1980 through June 2012 using rhBMP-2/ACS were searched. Studies meeting the following criteria were considered eligible for inclusion: >10 subjects at baseline and maxillary sinus or alveolar ridge augmentation not concomitant with implant placement. Seven of 69 publications were eligible for review. rhBMP-2/ACS yielded clinically meaningful bone formation for maxillary sinus augmentation that would allow placement of regular dental implants without consistent differences between rhBMP-2 concentrations. Nevertheless, the statistical analysis showed that sinus augmentation following autogenous bone graft was significantly greater (mean bone height: 1.6 mm, 95% CI: 0.5-2.7 mm) than for rhBMP-2/ACS (rhBMP-2 at 1.5 mg/mL). In extraction sockets, rhBMP-2/ACS maintained alveolar ridge height while enhancing alveolar ridge width. Safety reports did not represent concerns for the proposed indications. rhBMP-2/ACS appears a promising alternative to autogenous bone grafts for alveolar ridge/maxillary sinus augmentation; dose and carrier optimization may expand its efficacy, use, and clinical application. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. Adjustable selective maxillary expansion combined with maxillomandibular surgery: A case report.

    PubMed

    Leyder, Patrick; Altounian, Gérard; Chardain, Jacques; Quilichini, Julien

    2015-09-01

    Surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion (SARME) is usually considered the gold standard for maxillary transverse expansion in adults. However, a second surgical procedure is needed in cases of associated sagittal or vertical discrepancies. We describe the use of two new innovative devices for the correction of discrepancies in all dimensions during a single surgical procedure, thus reducing treatment duration. We report the case of a 21-year-old female patient, referred to our department for skeletal Class III malocclusion associated with right-side laterognathism and transverse maxillary deficiency. The patient underwent one-stage surgery, using sliding osteosynthesis plates and an adjustable bone-borne distractor. Pre-surgical orthodontics consisted in leveling and aligning the mandibular arch; maxillary leveling was initiated 3 months before surgery. Postoperative palatal distraction combined with orthodontic finishing enabled complete correction of dental and bony discrepancies after 3 months. In our experience, treatment of transverse, sagittal and vertical discrepancies has been possible in a single surgical procedure, using two innovative techniques: sliding osteosynthesis and an adjustable bone distractor. Two years post-surgery, the correction is stable in all dimensions. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  16. Effect of Maxillary Osteotomy on Speech in Cleft Lip and Palate: Perceptual Outcomes of Velopharyngeal Function

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pereira, Valerie J.; Sell, Debbie; Tuomainen, Jyrki

    2013-01-01

    Background: Abnormal facial growth is a well-known sequelae of cleft lip and palate (CLP) resulting in maxillary retrusion and a class III malocclusion. In 10-50% of cases, surgical correction involving advancement of the maxilla typically by osteotomy methods is required and normally undertaken in adolescence when facial growth is complete.…

  17. Spectral analysis of /s/ sound with changing angulation of the maxillary central incisors.

    PubMed

    Runte, Christoph; Tawana, Djafar; Dirksen, Dieter; Runte, Bettina; Lamprecht-Dinnesen, Antoinette; Bollmann, Friedhelm; Seifert, Eberhard; Danesh, Gholamreza

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the study was to measure the influence of the maxillary central incisors free from adaptation phenomena using spectral analysis. The maxillary dentures of 18 subjects were duplicated. The central incisors were fixed in a pivoting appliance so that their position could be changed from labial to palatal direction. A mechanical push/pull cable enabled the incisor section to be handled extraorally. Connected to the control was a sound generator producing a sinus wave whose frequency was related to the central incisor angulation. This acoustic signal was recorded on one channel of a digital tape recorder. After calibration of the unit, the denture duplicate was inserted into the subject's mouth, and the signal of the /s/ sounds subsequently produced by the subject was recorded on the second channel during alteration of the inclination angle simultaneously with the generator signal. Spectral analysis was performed using a Kay Speech-Lab 4300B. Labial displacement in particular produced significant changes in spectral characteristics, with the lower boundary frequency of the /s/ sound being raised and the upper boundary frequency being reduced. Maxillary incisor position influences /s/ sound production. Displacement of the maxillary incisors must be considered a cause of immediate changes in /s/ sound distortion. Therefore, denture teeth should be placed in the original tooth position as accurately as possible. Our results also indicate that neuromuscular reactions are more important for initial speech sound distortions than are aerodynamic changes in the anterior speech sound-producing areas.

  18. Maxillary sinus floor elevation via crestal approach: the evolution of the hydraulic pressure technique.

    PubMed

    Lopez, Michele Antonio; Andreasi Bassi, Mirko; Confalone, Luca; Carinci, Francesco

    2014-01-01

    The current study describes an innovative protocol for the surgical maxillary sinus augmentation via a crestal approach that uses hydraulic pressure to lift the Schneiderian membrane and simultaneously fill the subantral space with a biomaterial for bone regeneration (nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite in aqueous solution). The technique in question combines the advantages of large amounts of grafted biomaterial with reduced trauma, high precision, and predictability.

  19. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Analysis in 3D Position of Maxillary Denture

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Ying; Yang, Hua; Li, Ping; Xiong, Jiangyan; Chen, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The dynamic correlation between teeth and denture morphology as well as the morphological positions needs to be explored. Methodology 63 adult patients with skeletal class III malocclusions that met the inclusion criteria were enrolled and imaged with Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT), and Digital Imaging and Communications in Medicine (DICOM) data were collected. The torque angle and axial inclination were measured and analyzed for the corona, root, and entire body of every tooth on the maxilla. Results There is a statistically significant difference between the coronal axial inclination/coronal torque angle for the skeletal class III malocclusion cases and Andrew’s six keys of occlusion. On the sagittal plane of the maxillary denture (except that the secondary molar is inclined medial-distally), the remaining teeth are inclined towards the labia with slightly larger angles compared to the normal occlusion. In the coronal direction, the maxillary anterior teeth tend to have a corona that inclines medial-distally, whereas the posterior teeth have a buccal inclination compared to the normal occlusion. Conclusion Sagittal and transversal compensations prevail in maxillary dentures; for the camouflaged treatment design for skeletal class III, there is limited scope of sagittal and transversal movements on the maxillary denture. PMID:29104942

  20. Transposition of maxillary canine to central incisor site: aetiology, treatment options and case report.

    PubMed

    Ali, Zohaib; Jaisinghani, Aneel C; Waring, David; Malik, Ovais

    2014-09-01

    Dental transposition is relatively infrequent anomaly of the developing dentition. This article focuses on canine transposition and explores the aetiology, diagnosis and treatment of this challenging anomaly. Specifically, the management of a case of canine transposition involving an unerupted maxillary central incisor is described. © 2014 British Orthodontic Society.

  1. Maxillary dental arch dimensions in 6-year-old children with articulatory speech disorders.

    PubMed

    Heliövaara, Arja

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate maxillary dental arch dimensions in 6-year-old children with articulatory speech disorders and to compare their dental arch dimensions with age- and sex-matched controls without speech disorders. Fifty-two children (15 girls) with errors in the articulation of the sounds /r/, /s/ or /l/ were compared retrospectively with age- and sex-matched controls from dental casts taken at a mean age of 6.4 years (range 5.0-8.4). All children with articulatory speech disorders had been referred to City of Helsinki Health Care, Dental Care Department by a phoniatrician or a speech therapist in order to get oral-motor activators (removable palatal plates) to be used in their speech therapy. A χ2-test and paired Student's t tests were used in the statistical analyses. The children with articulatory speech disorders had similar maxillary dental arch widths but smaller maxillary dental arch length than the controls. This small series suggests that 6-year-old children with articulatory speech disorders may have decreased maxillary dental arch length. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Maxillary first molar with aberrant canal configuration: a report of 3 cases.

    PubMed

    Poorni, Saravanan; Kumar, Anil; Indira, Rajamani

    2008-12-01

    The prognosis for endodontic treatment in teeth exhibiting morphological aberrations is unfavorable if the clinician fails to recognize extra root canals. This report demonstrates 3 clinical cases of maxillary first molars that presented 2 canals in the palatal root merging at the apical third (Vertucci's type II canal morphology), a pattern that is rare and seldom encountered.

  3. Effect of accessory ostia on maxillary sinus ventilation: a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) study.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Jian Hua; Lee, Heow Pueh; Lim, Kian Meng; Gordon, Bruce R; Wang, De Yun

    2012-08-15

    We evaluated, by CFD simulation, effects of accessory ostium (AO) on maxillary sinus ventilation. A three-dimensional nasal model was constructed from an adult CT scan with two left maxillary AOs (sinus I) and one right AO (sinus II), then compared to an identical control model with all AOs sealed (sinuses III and IV). Transient simulations of quiet inspiration and expiration at 15 L/min, and nasal blow at 48 L/min, were calculated for both models using low-Reynolds-number turbulent analysis. At low flows, ventilation rates in sinuses with AOs (I ≈ 0.46 L/min, II ≈ 0.54 L/min), were both more than a magnitude higher than sinuses without AOs (II I ≈ 0.019 L/min, IV ≈ 0.020 L/min). Absence of AO almost completely prevented sinus ventilation. Increased ventilation of sinuses with AOs is complex. Under high flow conditions mimicking nose blowing, in sinuses II, III, and IV, the sinus flow rate increased. In contrast, the airflow direction through sinus I reversed between inspiration and expiration, while it remained almost constant throughout the respiration cycle in sinus II. CFD simulation demonstrated that AOs markedly increase maxillary sinus airflow rates and alter sinus air circulation patterns. Whether these airflow changes impact maxillary sinus physiology or pathophysiology is unknown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Effect of Crown Angulation of Maxillary Incisor on Effective Arch Perimeter.

    PubMed

    Jain, Megha; Vyas, Matrishva; Singh, Johar Rajvinder

    2017-06-01

    It has been postulated that crown angulation and inclination has potential space implication within the arch. With the insight of space implication of the axial relations of teeth, cases of genuine tooth size discrepancies can be dealt with improved stability. This in vitro study was designed to investigate and quantify the influence of angulation and inclination of maxillary incisors on the effective arch perimeter. Acrylic teeth were arranged over typhodont frame with spaced maxillary anterior segment. Known value of tip and torque in increments were incorporated to maxillary incisors through bracket positioning and corresponding consumption of the interdental spaces were measured using coordinate measuring machine. Study revealed that increase in maxillary incisor crown angulation by 1o results in consumption of approximately 0.012 mm of arch perimeter. Similarly, there is a consumption of 0.021 mm of arch perimeter with each degree increase in labial crown inclination. The knowledge of the space implication can be included in the space analysis during the orthodontic treatment planning. Depending upon the amount of space discrepancy, an accurate degree of required alteration in the axial relation of one or more teeth can be planned.

  5. Effect of Crown Angulation of Maxillary Incisor on Effective Arch Perimeter

    PubMed Central

    Vyas, Matrishva; Singh, Johar Rajvinder

    2017-01-01

    Introduction It has been postulated that crown angulation and inclination has potential space implication within the arch. With the insight of space implication of the axial relations of teeth, cases of genuine tooth size discrepancies can be dealt with improved stability. Aim This in vitro study was designed to investigate and quantify the influence of angulation and inclination of maxillary incisors on the effective arch perimeter. Materials and Methods Acrylic teeth were arranged over typhodont frame with spaced maxillary anterior segment. Known value of tip and torque in increments were incorporated to maxillary incisors through bracket positioning and corresponding consumption of the interdental spaces were measured using coordinate measuring machine. Results Study revealed that increase in maxillary incisor crown angulation by 1o results in consumption of approximately 0.012 mm of arch perimeter. Similarly, there is a consumption of 0.021 mm of arch perimeter with each degree increase in labial crown inclination. Conclusion The knowledge of the space implication can be included in the space analysis during the orthodontic treatment planning. Depending upon the amount of space discrepancy, an accurate degree of required alteration in the axial relation of one or more teeth can be planned. PMID:28764302

  6. Direct Resin Composite Restoration of Maxillary Central Incisors with Fractured Tooth Fragment Reattachment: Case Report.

    PubMed

    Szmidt, Monika; Górski, Maciej; Barczak, Katarzyna; Buczkowska-Radlińska, Jadwiga

    This article presents a clinical protocol to reconstruct two accidentally damaged maxillary central incisors using composite resin material and a fractured tooth component. A patient was referred to the clinic with fracture of the two maxillary central incisors. Clinical examination revealed that both teeth were fractured in the middle third of the crown and that the fractures involved enamel and dentin with no pulp exposure. The patient had also suffered a lower lip laceration. When the lip was evaluated, a fractured fragment of the maxillary right central incisor was found inside the wound. The missing part of the tooth was replaced via adhesive attachment. Due to the damage of the fractured part of the maxillary left central incisor, direct composite restoration of this tooth was performed. With the advent of adhesive dentistry, the process of fragment reattachment has become simplified and more reliable. This procedure provides improved function, is faster to perform, and provides long-lasting effects, indicating that reattachment of a coronal fragment is a realistic alternative to placement of conventional resin composite restorations.

  7. Endoscopic partial medial maxillectomy with mucosal flap for maxillary sinus mucoceles.

    PubMed

    Durr, Megan L; Goldberg, Andrew N

    2014-01-01

    To describe a technique of endoscopic medial maxillectomy with mucosal flap for postoperative maxillary sinus mucoceles and to present a case series of subjects who underwent this procedure. This case series includes four subjects with postoperative maxillary sinus mucoceles who underwent resection via endoscopic partial medial maxillectomy with a mucosal flap. We will discuss the clinical presentation, imaging characteristics, operative details, and outcomes. Four subjects are included in this study. The average age at the time of medial maxillectomy was 52 years (range 35-65 years). Three subjects (75%) were female. One subject (25%) had bilateral postoperative maxillary sinus mucoceles. Two subjects (50%) had unilateral right sided mucoceles, and the remaining subject had a unilateral left sided mucocele. All subjects had a history of multiple sinus procedures for chronic sinusitis including Caldwell-Luc procedures ipsilateral to the postoperative mucocele. All subjects underwent endoscopic medial maxillectomy without complication and were symptom free at the last follow up appointment, average 24 months (range 3-71 months) after medial maxillectomy. For postoperative maxillary sinus mucoceles in locations that are difficult to access via the middle meatus antrostomy, we recommend endoscopic medial maxillectomy with mucosal flap. Our preliminary experience with four subjects demonstrates complete resolution of symptoms after this procedure. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Impaction of Maxillary Central Incisors: Surgical and Orthodontic Treatment--Case Report.

    PubMed

    Knop, Luegya Amorim Henriques; Shintcovsk, Ricardo Lima; Gandini, Luiz Gonzaga; Parsekian, Lidia; Pinto, Ary Santos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to report two clinical cases, which was performed with surgical exposure and orthodontic traction of a maxillary central incisors. Light forces were used during the orthodontic treatment applied on rigid wires as anchorage. It was noted that teeth presented adequate clinical crown height and gingival contours.

  9. Orthodontic Management with Traction and Asymmetric Extraction for Multiple Impacted Permanent Maxillary Teeth - A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Niu, Qiannan; Zhang, Liang; Dai, Juan; Li, Feifei; Feng, Xue

    2016-01-01

    Multiple impacted teeth are a rare eruption disturbance that increases the case complexity. In this article, we described a 13-year-old boy whose 5 permanent maxillary teeth were not erupted although their root formation was complete. The orthodontic treatment with traction and asymmetric extraction was performed to achieve a significantly improved functional and esthetic result.

  10. Modified SARME (Surgically Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion) in Conjunction with Orthodontic Treatment-A Case Report.

    PubMed

    Dahiya, Sagar; Chitra, Prasad; Rao, Sadam Srinivas; Bindra, Sukhvinder

    2015-10-01

    Transverse maxillary hypoplasia or maxillary constriction in conjunction with unilateral or bilateral posterior cross bites is a common finding in cleft palate patients. These situations are also commonly encountered in adults who have not had recourse to orthodontic treatment in childhood. In adults, after ossification of the mid palatal suture is complete, the accepted means of correcting transverse skeletal discrepancies is by Surgically Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion (SARME). The disadvantage of this technique in the Indian scenario is reduced patient acceptance and increased treatment costs. Le Fort-I down fracture and mid palatal suture sectioning requires hospitalization and increases morbidity. A case of a 21-year-old non-cleft male who presented with Class I malocclusion with transverse skeletal discrepancy and bilateral posterior cross bites is presented. A modified SAARME technique was performed without pterygomaxillary disjunction, as an outpatient procedure. The results obtained were satisfactory and the desired amount of transverse skeletal correction was achieved. The patient was discharged the same day. The technique can be used to successfully treat a large number of patients in India with maxillary skeletal transverse problems with increased predictability, reduced costs and morbidity and higher rates of acceptance.

  11. Influence of Palatal Coverage and Implant Distribution on Implant Strain in Maxillary Implant Overdentures.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Toshihito; Gonda, Tomoya; Mizuno, Yoko; Fujinami, Yozo; Maeda, Yoshinobu

    2016-01-01

    Maxillary implant overdentures are often used in clinical practice. However, there is no agreement or established guidelines regarding prosthetic design or optimal implant placement configuration. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of palatal coverage and implant number and distribution in relation to impact strain under maxillary implant overdentures. A maxillary edentulous model with implants and experimental overdentures with and without palatal coverage was fabricated. Four strain gauges were attached to each implant, and they were positioned in the anterior, premolar, and molar areas. A vertical occlusal load of 98 N was applied through a mandibular complete denture, and the implant strains were compared using one-way analysis of variance (P = .05). The palatolabial strain was much higher on anterior implants than on other implants in both denture types. Although there was no significant difference between the strain under dentures with and without palatal coverage, palateless dentures tended to result in higher implant strain than dentures with palatal coverage. Dentures supported by only two implants registered higher strain than those supported by four or six implants. Implants under palateless dentures registered higher strain than those under dentures with palatal coverage. Anterior implants exhibited higher palatolabial strain than other implants regardless of palatal coverage and implant configuration; it is therefore recommended that maxillary implant overdentures should be supported by six implants with support extending to the distal end of the arch.

  12. Early headgear effects on the eruption pattern of the maxillary canines.

    PubMed

    Silvola, Anna-Sofia; Arvonen, Päivi; Julku, Johanna; Lähdesmäki, Raija; Kantomaa, Tuomo; Pirttiniemi, Pertti

    2009-05-01

    To test the null hypothesis that early headgear (HG) treatment has no effect on the eruption pattern of the maxillary canines in the early mixed dentition. Sixty-eight children (40 boys and 28 girls) with a Class II tendency in occlusion and moderate crowding of the dental arches were randomized into two groups. HG treatment was initiated immediately in the first group. In the second group only minor interceptive procedures were performed during the first follow-up period of 2 years. Orthopantomograms were taken at the baseline, three times at 1-year intervals, and after growth at the age of 16. Eruption geometry was performed. The space from the maxillary first molar to the lateral incisor was measured on the dental casts. The inclination of the maxillary canine in relation to the midline appeared to be significantly more vertically oriented on the right side in the HG group 1 and 2 years after starting the HG therapy (P = .0098 and P = .0003, respectively). The inclination in relation to the lateral incisors was smaller in the HG group bilaterally after 1 year and 2 years of HG treatment, and on the right side after 3 years of treatment. The hypothesis is rejected. Early HG treatment significantly affects the inclination of the maxillary canine during eruption. The strongest influence was seen after 2 years of HG use, more prominently in the right-side canine.

  13. Evidence from tooth surface morphology for a posterior maxillary origin of the proteroglyph gang

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Jackson, K.; Fritts, T.H.

    1995-01-01

    Although the front-fanged venom delivery system of the Elapidae is believed to be derived from an aglyphous or opisthoglyphous colubroid ancestor, opinion is divided as to the end of the maxilla on which the proteroglyph fang originated. This study was undertaken to determine whether the evolutionary precursor of the proteroglyph fang was (a) a grooved posterior fang which migrated anteriorly, or (b) an enlarged anterior tooth which secondarily developed a groove for the conduction of venom. The surface morphology of the maxillary teeth of colubrid genera was examined using scanning electron microscopy. Ridges present on the lingual and labial surfaces of anterior maxillary teeth and on the anterior and posterior surfaces of posterior maxillary teeth were identified as morphological markers of potential value in distinguishing the anterior and posterior maxillary teeth of colubrid snakes, and in determining the origin of the proteroglyph fang. Patterns of ridges on the surfaces of elapid fangs examined were found to be consistent with the hypothesis that the evolutionary precursor of the proteroglyph fang was an opisthoglyph fang which migrated anteriorly.

  14. Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients with Rigid External Distraction System

    PubMed Central

    Alkhouri, Shadi; Waite, Peter D.; Davis, Matthew B.; Lamani, Ejvis; Kau, Chung How

    2017-01-01

    Aim: Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a treatment option for patients with maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate (CLP). Purpose: The aim of this study is to present a technique for maxillary DO using Le Fort I osteotomy with rigid external distraction (RED) system. Subjects and Methods: The patient presented in this paper was an Asian female with CLP aged 13 years and 6 months. She presented with severe midfacial deficiency with a Class III dental malocclusion with a negative overjet and concave facial profile. Cone-beam computed tomography images were recorded preoperatively and the operation performed involved a high Le Fort I osteotomy. The appliance fabricated was banded to upper first molars used for anchorage of the RED system. Distraction of the maxilla was initiated after 7-day latency period. Results: Postoperative cephalometric analysis showed maxillary advancement anteriorly and superiorly, the total distraction treatment period was 10 days. The maxillary advancement was 10.5 mm and the SNA angle increased from 67.5° to 77.9°. Furthermore, the ANB angle changed from −9.8° to 1.6° and the occlusion changed from Class III to Class I. The profile of the face changed from concave to convex and a much better esthetic result was achieved. Conclusion: The study suggests RED system to be a reliable alternative procedure for the treatment of midfacial hypoplasia with or without cleft. Furthermore, it minimizes the risk of the surgical procedure and shortens the operating time. PMID:28713737

  15. Transantral distraction devices in correction of severe maxillary deformity in cleft patients.

    PubMed

    Shokirov, Shokhruh; Wangerin, Konrad

    2011-01-01

    Maxillary advancement by Le Fort I osteotomy in cleft patients has an average relapse of about 40-60 percent. With extraoral distraction devices it is possible to obtain an almost unlimited advancement of the upper jaw. Due to the social problems the retention period is normally reduced to some monthes. A relapse of 10-25 % can be seen in these cases. Le Fort I internal distraction osteogenesis offers an alternative to one-step orthognathic advancement, with advantages of gradual lengthening through scar and earlier treatment in growing patients. The objective of this study was to present our experience in the treatment of maxillary deficiency in cleft patients using transantral internal distraction devices. The distraction procedure was successfully accomplished in seventeen patients. For all the seventeen patients maxillary distraction device designed by Konrad Wangerin was used. The distraction distances were 8 to 24 mm. Preoperative, postoperative, and follow-up (12 and 24 months) lateral cephalogram measurements were compared including angular and linear changes. A good new bone was found that was formed in distraction pitch between lines of osteotomy. After distraction of median facial zone, occlusion and profile of soft tissues were considerably improved. All patients after postoperative time required final orthodontic treatment and their final occlusal relationships were satisfactory. The transantral distraction device is a new option for the treatment of severe maxillary hypoplasia in cleft patients.

  16. Treatment of Severe Maxillary Hypoplasia With Combined Orthodontics and Distraction Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lucchese, Alessandra; Albertini, Paolo; Asperio, Paolo; Manuelli, Maurizio; Gastaldi, Giorgio

    2018-01-05

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a technique that allows the generation of new bone in a gap between 2 vascularized bone surfaces in response to the application of graduated tensile stress across the bone gap.Distraction osteogenesis has become a routine treatment of choice to correct skeletal deformities and severe bone defects in the craniofacial complex over the past decade. Distraction osteogenesis has been successfully chosen in lengthening the maxilla and the mandible; in the maxilla and recently in the mandible, the jawbones have been distracted and widened transversely to relieve severe anterior dental crowding and transverse discrepancies between the dental arches.Distraction osteogenesis for maxillary advancement started in 1993 and is now widely used, especially in patients with skeletal Class III malocclusion caused by maxillary hypoplasia.The aim of this study was to present the efficiency of combined orthodontic and DO in the severe maxillary hypoplasia.A 35-year-old Italian man presented to our clinical practice with the chief complaint of esthetic and functionally problems because of skeletal Class III malocclusion with anterior crossbite.Considering that the severity of the skeletal discrepancy is remarkable but compensated by the DO potential, the combined orthodontic and DO treatment was considered adequate, like less invasive and equally effective.It was obtained a good alignment with the upper and lower arch dental alveolar maxillary advancement that allowed to correct the sagittal relationships.The patient was satisfied for the treatment results and had considerable improvement in his self-esteem.

  17. Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis in Unilateral Cleft Lip and Palate Patients with Rigid External Distraction System.

    PubMed

    Alkhouri, Shadi; Waite, Peter D; Davis, Matthew B; Lamani, Ejvis; Kau, Chung How

    2017-01-01

    Distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a treatment option for patients with maxillary hypoplasia secondary to cleft lip and palate (CLP). The aim of this study is to present a technique for maxillary DO using Le Fort I osteotomy with rigid external distraction (RED) system. The patient presented in this paper was an Asian female with CLP aged 13 years and 6 months. She presented with severe midfacial deficiency with a Class III dental malocclusion with a negative overjet and concave facial profile. Cone-beam computed tomography images were recorded preoperatively and the operation performed involved a high Le Fort I osteotomy. The appliance fabricated was banded to upper first molars used for anchorage of the RED system. Distraction of the maxilla was initiated after 7-day latency period. Postoperative cephalometric analysis showed maxillary advancement anteriorly and superiorly, the total distraction treatment period was 10 days. The maxillary advancement was 10.5 mm and the SNA angle increased from 67.5° to 77.9°. Furthermore, the ANB angle changed from -9.8° to 1.6° and the occlusion changed from Class III to Class I. The profile of the face changed from concave to convex and a much better esthetic result was achieved. The study suggests RED system to be a reliable alternative procedure for the treatment of midfacial hypoplasia with or without cleft. Furthermore, it minimizes the risk of the surgical procedure and shortens the operating time.

  18. Maxillary movement in distraction osteogenesis using internal devices in cleft palate patients.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Daisuke; Omura, Susumu; Ozaki, Shusaku; Shimazaki, Kazuo; Fukuyama, Eiji; Tohnai, Iwai; Torikai, Katsuyuki

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this cephalometric study was to compare the actual movement with the planned movement of the maxilla by using internal maxillary distraction in cleft lip and palate patients. Twelve patients, including eight with unilateral and four with bilateral cleft lip and palate, underwent maxillary advancement with internal maxillary distractors. Lateral cephalometric radiographs obtained preoperatively, predistraction, and postdistraction were used for analysis. The movement of the maxilla, angular change of the internal devices and rotation of the mandible were measured at each stage, and the planned vector of advancement predicted from the placement vector of the distractors was compared with the actual vector. Internal maxillary distractors were rotated in a clockwise direction during the distraction period. The angular change of the distractors was 7.7°. The amount of actual advancement at anterior nasal spine with distraction was 6.3 mm, which represented about 70% of the distance of activation of distraction. The actual advanced vector at anterior nasal spine was 9.7° smaller than the planned vector. The mandible underwent a clockwise rotation of 3.5°. In the internal distraction technique, the maxilla was advanced inferiorly to the planned vector and with a slight clockwise rotation. These results are useful for surgical planning when using internal distractors.

  19. Treatment Options for Class III Malocclusion in Growing Patients with Emphasis on Maxillary Protraction

    PubMed Central

    Azamian, Zeinab; Shirban, Farinaz

    2016-01-01

    It is very difficult to diagnose and treat Class III malocclusion. This type of malocclusion involves a number of cranial base and maxillary and mandibular skeletal and dental compensation components. In Class III malocclusion originating from mandibular prognathism, orthodontic treatment in growing patients is not a good choice and in most cases orthognathic surgery is recommended after the end of growth. Approximately 30–40% of Class III patients exhibit some degree of maxillary deficiency; therefore, devices can be used for maxillary protraction for orthodontic treatment in early mixed dentition. In cases in which dental components are primarily responsible for Class III malocclusion, early therapeutic intervention is recommended. An electronic search was conducted using the Medline database (Entrez PubMed), the Cochrane Collaboration Oral Health Group Database of Clinical Trials, Science Direct, and Scopus. In this review article, we described the treatment options for Class III malocclusion in growing patient with an emphasis on maxillary protraction. It seems that the most important factor for treatment of Class III malocclusion in growing patient is case selection. PMID:27144056

  20. Long-term follow-up of early cleft maxillary distraction.

    PubMed

    Park, Young-Wook; Kwon, Kwang-Jun; Kim, Min-Keun

    2016-12-01

    Most of cleft lip and palate patients have the esthetic and functional problems of midfacial deficiencies due to innate developmental tendency and scar tissues from repeated operations. In these cases, maxillary protraction is required for the harmonious facial esthetics and functional occlusion. A 7-year old boy had been diagnosed as severe maxillary constriction due to unilateral complete cleft lip and palate. The author tried to correct the secondary deformity by early distraction osteogenesis with the aim of avoiding marked psychological impact from peers of elementary school. From 1999 to 2006, repeated treatments, which consisted of Le Fort I osteotomy and face mask distraction, and complementary maxillary protraction using miniplates were performed including orthodontics. But, final facial profile was not satisfactory, which needs compromising surgery. The result of this study suggests that if early distraction treatment is performed before facial skeletal growth is completed, an orthognathic surgery or additional distraction may be needed later. Maxillofacial plastic and reconstructive surgeons should notify this point when they plan early distraction treatment for cleft maxillary deformity.

  1. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis using Le Fort I osteotomy without intraoperative down-fracture.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, K; Mitsugi, M; Takahashi, T

    2006-06-01

    The aim of this study is to present a technique for maxillary distraction osteogenesis using Le Fort I osteotomy without down-fracture. Six cleft-related patients suffering from severe midfacial deficiency were treated with maxillary distraction osteogenesis. The RED II system was chosen as the extraoral device and the Leipzig retention plate system to anchor the maxillary segment. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis was successful in all cases. Cephalometric and clinical evaluation after an average follow-up period of 1 year showed stable results with respect to skeletal and dental relationships. The SNA angle increased from 72.3 degrees to 81.4 degrees and the ANB angle increased by 11.0 degrees immediately after removing the distraction device. After 1 year, the sagittal bone gain remained and the SNA angle had decreased by 0.8 degrees . This technique seems to minimize the risk of the surgical procedure and shorten the operation time. It may become an alternative method for the treatment of patients with severe midfacial hypoplasia.

  2. Anesthetic efficacy of the intraosseous injection in maxillary and mandibular teeth.

    PubMed

    Coggins, R; Reader, A; Nist, R; Beck, M; Meyers, W J

    1996-06-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the anesthetic efficacy of the intraosseous injection as a primary technique in human maxillary and mandibular teeth. Forty subjects received two sets of intraosseous injections with 1.8 ml of 2% lidocaine with 1:100,000 epinephrine at two successive appointments. The experimental teeth consisted of 40 groups of maxillary and mandibular first molars and lateral incisors. Each experimental tooth and adjacent teeth were tested with an electric pulp tester at 4-minute cycles for 60 minutes. Anesthetic success was defined as no subject response to the maximum output of the pulp tester (80 reading) for two consecutive readings. Anesthetic success occurred in 75% of mandibular first molars, in 93% of maxillary first molars, in 78% of mandibular lateral incisors, and in 90% of maxillary lateral incisors. Overall, for the intraosseous injection onset was immediate, the duration of pulpal anesthesia steadily declined over the 60 minutes, there was a 78% incidence of subjective increase in heart rate, the majority of the subjects had no pain or mild pain with perforation and solution deposition, and 3% of the subjects had slow healing perforation sites. The results of this study indicate that the intraosseous injection may provide pulpal anesthesia in 75% to 93% of noninflamed teeth as a primary technique. However, the duration of pulpal anesthesia declines steadily over an hour.

  3. Orthodontic management of congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors: a case report.

    PubMed

    Paduano, Sergio; Cioffi, Iacopo; Rongo, Roberto; Cupo, Antonello; Bucci, Rosaria; Valletta, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a woman, aged 15 years, with permanent dentition, brachyfacial typology, with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. Multibracket straightwire fixed appliance was used to open the space for dental implant placement, and treat the impaired occlusion. The missing lateral incisors were substituted with oral implants.

  4. Orthodontic Management of Congenitally Missing Maxillary Lateral Incisors: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Rongo, Roberto; Cupo, Antonello; Valletta, Rosa

    2014-01-01

    This case report describes the orthodontic treatment of a woman, aged 15 years, with permanent dentition, brachyfacial typology, with congenitally missing maxillary lateral incisors. Multibracket straightwire fixed appliance was used to open the space for dental implant placement, and treat the impaired occlusion. The missing lateral incisors were substituted with oral implants. PMID:24711929

  5. Evaluation of palatal plate thickness of maxillary prosthesis on phonation- a comparative clinical study.

    PubMed

    Zakkula, Srujana; B, Sreedevi; Anne, Gopinadh; Manne, Prakash; Bindu O, Swetha Hima; Atla, Jyothi; Deepthi, Sneha; Chaitanya A, Krishna

    2014-04-01

    Prosthodontic treatment involves clinical procedures which influence speech performance directly or indirectly. Prosthetic rehabilitation of missing teeth with partial or complete maxillary removable dentures influences the individual voice characteristics like Phonation, resonance etc. To evaluate the effect of Acrylic palatal plate thickness (1mm-3mm) of maxillary prosthesis on phonation. Twelve subjects were selected randomly between the age group of 20-25 years who have full complement of teeth and have no speech problems. Speech evaluation was done under four experimental conditions i.e. Without any experimental acrylic palatal plate (control), with experimental acrylic palatal plates of thickness 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm respectively. The speech material for phonation test consisted of Vowels sounds /a/, /i/, and /o/. Speech analysis to assess phonation was done using digital acoustic analysis (PRAAT software). The obtained results were statistically analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Tukey's multiple post-hoc for comparison of four experimental conditions with respect to different vowel sounds. Mean harmonics to noise ratio (HNR) values obtained for all the Experimental conditions did not show significant difference (p>0.05). In conclusion, an increase in the thickness of the acrylic palatal plate of maxillary prosthesis for about 1 mm - 3mm in complete or partial maxillary removable dentures resulted in no significant effect on phonation of vowel sounds /a/, /i/ and /o/. Increasing the thickness of the palatal plate from 1 mm to 3 mm has not shown any significant effect on the phonation.

  6. Maxillary molars with morphologic variations of the palatal root canals: a report of four cases.

    PubMed

    Holderrieth, Silke; Gernhardt, Christian Ralf

    2009-07-01

    The purpose of this article was to show the importance of the knowledge of the anatomy of root canals. Unusual root and root canal morphologies associated with both buccal roots of upper molars have been recorded in several studies in the literature. However, scientific information focusing on variations of the palatal root is rare. In this report, four cases are presented involving the root canal treatment of maxillary first and second molars with unusual morphologic configurations of the palatal root canals. During root canal treatment, type IV and V configurations as defined by Vertucci of the palatal canals of two first and two second maxillary molars were identified. After mechanical instrumentation, the canals were obturated. Radiologic and clinical re-evaluation showed no signs of inflammation. This report describes and discusses the possibility of different root and canal variations of the maxillary molars from a clinical point of view. Anatomic variations can occur in any tooth, and palatal roots of maxillary first and second molars are no exception. Therefore, careful examination of radiographs and internal anatomy of teeth is essential.

  7. Extraction of maxillary canines: Esthetic perceptions of patient smiles among dental professionals and laypeople.

    PubMed

    Thiruvenkatachari, Badri; Javidi, Hanieh; Griffiths, Sarah Elizabeth; Shah, Anwar A; Sandler, Jonathan

    2017-10-01

    Maxillary canines are generally considered important both cosmetically and functionally. Most claims on the importance of maxillary canines, however, have been based on expert opinions and clinician-based studies. There are no scientific studies in the literature reporting on their cosmetic importance or how laypeople perceive a smile treated by maxillary canine extractions. Our objective was to investigate whether there is any difference in the perceptions of patients' smiles treated by extracting either maxillary canines or first premolars, as judged by orthodontists, dentists, and laypeople. This retrospective study included 24 participants who had unilateral or bilateral extraction of maxillary permanent canines and fixed appliances in the maxillary and mandibular arches to comprehensively correct the malocclusion, selected from orthodontic patients treated at Chesterfield Royal Hospital NHS trust in the United Kingdom over the last 20 years. The control group of patients had extraction of maxillary first premolars followed by fixed appliances and finished to an extremely high standard judged by the requirement that they had been submitted for the Membership in Orthodontics examination. The finished Peer Assessment Rating scores for this group were less than 5. The end-of-treatment frontal extraoral smiling and frontal intraoral views were presented for both groups. The photographs were blinded for extraction choice and standardized for size and brightness using computer software (Adobe Photoshop CC version 14.0; Adobe Systems, San Jose, Calif). The work file was converted to an editable pdf file and e-mailed to the assessors. The assessor panel consisted of 30 members (10 orthodontists, 10 dentists, and 10 laypeople), who were purposely selected. The measures were rated on a 10-point Likert scale. The attractiveness ratings were not statistically significantly different between the canine extraction and premolar extraction groups, with a mean difference of 0

  8. Prevalence and distribution of dental anomalies: a comparison between maxillary and mandibular tooth agenesis.

    PubMed

    Al-Abdallah, Mariam; AlHadidi, Abeer; Hammad, Mohammad; Al-Ahmad, Hazem; Saleh, Raja'

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the pattern and prevalence of associated dental anomalies between maxillary and mandibular tooth agenesis (hypodontia). A sample of 3315 dental patients, aged 8.6 to 25.4 years, was surveyed for tooth agenesis (excluding third molars): 106 subjects were diagnosed with maxillary hypodontia (group 1) and 70 with mandibular hypodontia (group 2). Both groups were examined for the following dental anomalies: retained deciduous molars, infraocclusion of deciduous molars, impaction, microdontia of maxillary lateral incisors, supernumerary teeth, transposition, transmigration, and ectopic eruption of the permanent molars. For statistical testing, the chi-square test (P <0.05) was used to compare the occurrences of these anomalies among the groups. We found that 77.5% of the patients in the mandibular hypodontia group had at least 1 dental anomaly compared with 49.5% in the maxillary hypodontia group (P <0.0001). The only dental anomaly with a significantly increased prevalence in the maxillary hypodontia group compared with the mandibular hypodontia group was microdontia of the maxillary lateral incisors (groups 1, 46.7%; group 2, 12.9%; P <0.0001). On the other hand, the prevalences of retained deciduous molars (group 1, 9.4%; group 2, 60.0%), infraoccluded deciduous molars (group 1, 0.9%; group 2, 7.1%), and impacted teeth (group 1, 22.6%; group 2, 38.6%) were significantly higher in the mandibular hypodontia group. The prevalences of supernumerary teeth, transposition, transmigration, and ectopic eruption of permanent molars were low and not significantly different between the groups. Tooth agenesis isolated to the maxilla is frequently associated with microdontia of the maxillary lateral incisors, whereas tooth agenesis isolated to the mandible is frequently associated with retained deciduous molars, infraoccluded deciduous molars, and impacted teeth. The results of this study may provide additional evidence supporting the field

  9. Long-term skeletal stability after maxillary advancement with distraction osteogenesis in nongrowing patients.

    PubMed

    Kanno, Takahiro; Mitsugi, Masaharu; Hosoe, Michi; Sukegawa, Shintaro; Yamauchi, Kensuke; Furuki, Yoshihiko

    2008-09-01

    We assessed the long-term skeletal stability of the repositioned maxilla, midface in patients who underwent maxillary advancement using distraction osteogenesis (DO). The study included 19 nongrowing patients with maxillary hypoplasia with a Class III relationship, a normally developed mandible, and follow-up after DO exceeding 2 years. Eleven men and 8 women participated, with a mean age at treatment of 20.7 years (range 15.4-33.4 years). Twelve patients had midfacial hypoplasia associated with a cleft lip and palate (CLP), and 7 patients had developed noncleft-related hypoplasia. The surgical treatment included our modified Le Fort I osteotomy in combination with intraoral (5 cases) or extraoral (14 cases) distraction devices. Distraction was started after a latency period of 5 to 7 days and continued until the proper convexity was obtained. After active distraction, a 3- to 4-week period of retention was allowed, followed by rigid internal fixation (IF) with or without distractor removal. Lateral cephalometric films before midfacial distraction (T0), after IF with or without distractor removal (T1), 6 months after T1 (T2), and 2 or more years (mean 2.8 years) after T1 (T3) were analyzed. The maxillary A-point in the Frankfort horizontal reference plane was used to assess the skeletal changes in the maxillary position (x, y) at each time point (T1-T3). In addition, we analyzed the differences in the devices and techniques. Midfacial DO was successful in all cases, resulting in a mean change obtained at point A of 10.3 mm (8.4 mm horizontally, 4.7 mm inferiorly). Point A underwent a moderate amount of skeletal relapse at T2 [0.4 mm (5%) horizontally and 0.6 mm (13%) superiorly], with a mean of 8% (0.6 mm) horizontally and 19% (1.0 mm) superiorly over the mean 2.8-year (2.0-4.8 years) follow-up. After long-term follow-up, the maxillary advancement with DO was stable in both CLP and non-CLP patients with maxillary hypoplasia. In addition, our original technique

  10. Mucosal Cysts of the Maxillary Sinus in Solid Organ Transplant Population: Computerised Tomography Follow-Up Results

    PubMed Central

    Aydın, Erdinç; Yerli, Hasan; Tanrıkulu, Suna; Hizal, Evren

    2013-01-01

    Background: The clinical significance of maxillary sinus mucosal cysts in liver and kidney transplant recipients remains unclear. Aim: To investigate the course of maxillary mucosal cysts in liver and kidney transplantation patients. Study Design: Retrospective clinical study Methods: Paranasal sinus computed tomography scans of 169 renal and 43 hepatic transplant recipients were reviewed. The incidence, size and growth characteristics of maxillary mucosal cysts in the renal and hepatic transplant population were noted. Results: Overall incidence of maxillary sinus mucosal cyst in transplantation patients was found to be 24.5%, with a male to female ratio of 2:1 (p<0.05). Follow-up views of 26 patients showed that the size of the cysts increased in 19, decreased in 4, and remained the same in 3 patients. Mean growth rate of the cysts was calculated to be 6.30 ± 7.02 mm2 per month. Most of the cysts were located on the inferior wall of the maxillary sinus. Conclusion: Incidence of the maxillary mucosal cysts in renal and hepatic transplant recipients does not differ from general population, but these cysts have a greater tendency to grow. Specific measures are not needed for isolated, asymptomatic maxillary mucosal cysts in transplant populations. PMID:25207125

  11. [Biomechanical study of internal midface distraction after different types of maxillary osteotomy in patients with cleft lip and palate].

    PubMed

    Hou, Min; Shi, Guang-Yu; Pu, Li-Chen; Song, Da-Li; Zhang, Xi-Zhong; Liu, Chun-Ming

    2009-09-01

    To investigate the biomechanical changes of internal midface distraction after different types of maxillary osteotomy in patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP). 3-D finite element (FEM) analysis was used. 3-D models of Le Fort I, II, III osteotomy and soft tissue were established. Based on the new pattern of internal midface distractor, the distraction of maxillary complex was simulated to advance 10 mm anteriorly. The mechanical change was studied. The maxillary complex in CLP were advanced after distraction. Constriction of alveolar crest and palate occurred in Le Fort I osteotomy, but not in Le Fort II and III osteotomy. The maxillary complex was moved anteriorly en bloc after Le Fort III osteotomy, but some degree of rotation of maxillary complex was observed during the distraction after Le Fort I and II osteotomy. In vertical direction, the maxillary complex had more counterclockwise rotation after Le Fort II osteotomy. 3-D FEM analysis can be used for the study of internal distraction. It can reflect the maxillary movement and provide the theory basis for preoperative design.

  12. Soft Tissue Changes in Cleft Lip and Palate Patients: Anterior Maxillary Distraction versus Conventional Le-Fort I Osteotomy.

    PubMed

    Markose, Eldho; Paulose, Joby; Paul, Eldho T

    2013-12-01

    The purpose of the study was to compare the soft tissue changes after maxillary advancement in patients with maxillary deficiency associated with cleft lip and palate (CLP) by two approaches-anterior maxillary distraction (AMD) and advancement LeFort I osteotomy (ALO). Twenty patients with maxillary hypoplasia associated with cleft lip and palate who had undergone either LeFort I osteotomy or distraction osteogenesis with maxillary advancement were included in this study. Lateral cephalogram taken at various intervals of time were used to evaluate soft tissue and hard tissue changes over time. In both groups, vertical as well as horizontal changes in pronasale was well observed. A substantial increase in nasal parameters was noted in case of AMD group in comparison to ALO. Though maxillary advancement was evident in both the groups, a significant and consistent change was observed in AMD. Significant vertical and horizontal changes were seen with respect to subnasale and labrale superius in AMD group. Soft tissue as well as hard tissue relapse was greater in ALO group than AMD group. Significant soft tissue and hard tissue changes were clearly observed in both the groups, but the treatment results were more consistent in cases treated with AMD. Hence AMD could be considered as a better treatment of choice in cases of maxillary hypoplasia associated with cleft lip and palate.

  13. Mechanical design in arteries.

    PubMed

    Shadwick, R E

    1999-12-01

    The most important mechanical property of the artery wall is its non-linear elasticity. Over the last century, this has been well-documented in vessels in many animals, from humans to lobsters. Arteries must be distensible to provide capacitance and pulse-smoothing in the circulation, but they must also be stable to inflation over a range of pressure. These mechanical requirements are met by strain-dependent increases in the elastic modulus of the vascular wall, manifest by a J-shaped stress-strain curve, as typically exhibited by other soft biological tissues. All vertebrates and invertebrates with closed circulatory systems have arteries with this non-linear behaviour, but specific tissue properties vary to give correct function for the physiological pressure range of each species. In all cases, the non-linear elasticity is a product of the parallel arrangement of rubbery and stiff connective tissue elements in the artery wall, and differences in composition and tissue architecture can account for the observed variations in mechanical properties. This phenomenon is most pronounced in large whales, in which very high compliance in the aortic arch and exceptionally low compliance in the descending aorta occur, and is correlated with specific modifications in the arterial structure.

  14. Retrospective study of root canal configurations of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone beam computed tomography Part- I

    PubMed Central

    Rawtiya, Manjusha; Somasundaram, Pavithra; Wadhwani, Shefali; Munuga, Swapna; Agarwal, Manish; Sethi, Priyank

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The aim of this study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) analysis. Materials and Methods: CBCT images of 116 maxillary third molars were observed, and data regarding the number of roots, the number of canals, and Vertucci's Classification in each root was statistically evaluated. Results: Majority of Maxillary third molars had three roots (55.2%) and three canals (37.9%). Most MB root (43.8%), DB root (87.5%), and palatal root (100%) of maxillary third molars had Vertucci Type I. Mesiobuccal root of three-rooted maxillary third molars had Vertucci Type I (43.8%) and Type IV (40.6%) configuration. Overall prevalence of C-shaped canals in maxillary third molars was 3.4%. Conclusion: There was a high prevalence of three-rooted maxillary molars with three canals. PMID:27011747

  15. Retrospective study of root canal configurations of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone beam computed tomography Part- I.

    PubMed

    Rawtiya, Manjusha; Somasundaram, Pavithra; Wadhwani, Shefali; Munuga, Swapna; Agarwal, Manish; Sethi, Priyank

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the root and canal morphology of maxillary third molars in Central India population using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) analysis. CBCT images of 116 maxillary third molars were observed, and data regarding the number of roots, the number of canals, and Vertucci's Classification in each root was statistically evaluated. Majority of Maxillary third molars had three roots (55.2%) and three canals (37.9%). Most MB root (43.8%), DB root (87.5%), and palatal root (100%) of maxillary third molars had Vertucci Type I. Mesiobuccal root of three-rooted maxillary third molars had Vertucci Type I (43.8%) and Type IV (40.6%) configuration. Overall prevalence of C-shaped canals in maxillary third molars was 3.4%. There was a high prevalence of three-rooted maxillary molars with three canals.

  16. The impact of kiddy dentures on maxillary arch growth.

    PubMed

    Shih, Wen-Yu; Wu, Fu-Ya

    2016-09-01

    Kiddy dentures are used to restore the self-confidence, chewing function, and pronunciation of children or when a care provider is concerned about the loss of incisor teeth. However, most studies to date have investigated normal dental arch development, and only a few have explored the effect of kiddy dentures on upper arch development. Fourteen Taiwanese children (7 male and 7 female) who were wearing kiddy dentures due to the loss of their upper anterior teeth were enrolled in this study. Inclusion criteria were the premature loss of maxillary incisors, the patient wearing kiddy dentures with both upper primary first molars as abutments, and the patient having complete records allowing a full longitudinal clinical follow-up. Dental casts were obtained immediately (T1), at 6 months (T2), and at 12 months (T3) after delivery of the kiddy dentures. The measured parameters included intercanine width (ICW, C1 to C2), interfirst molar width (IDW, D1 to D2), and intersecond molar width (IEW, E1 to E2). All the measurements were performed by one experienced examiner using a vernier caliper. The mean ages of the enrolled children for the periods T1, T2, and T3 were 43.8 ± 8.3 months, 50.6 ± 8.5 months, and 56.7 ± 8.4 months, respectively. There was no significant difference in gender when ICW, IDW, and IEW were compared. The mean changes in ICW values were 23.6 ± 6.2 mm, 24.2 ± 5.9 mm, and 24.6 ± 6.4 mm for T1, T2, and T3, respectively. There were statistically significant differences between T1 and T2, T2 and T3, and T1 and T3 for ICW (p < 0.05). The mean changes in IDW were 25.7 ± 8.4 mm, 25.8 ± 9.0 mm, and 25.8 ± 9.1 mm for T1, T2, and T3, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference between T1 and T2, T2 and T3, and T1 and T3. The mean changes in IEW were 30.6 ± 10.1 mm, 31.2 ± 8.8 mm, and 31.3 ± 8.2 mm for T1, T2, and T3, respectively. There was statistical significance between T1 and T2 or T1 and

  17. Slow versus rapid maxillary expansion in bilateral cleft lip and palate: a CBCT randomized clinical trial.

    PubMed

    de Almeida, Araci Malagodi; Ozawa, Terumi Okada; Alves, Arthur César de Medeiros; Janson, Guilherme; Lauris, José Roberto Pereira; Ioshida, Marilia Sayako Yatabe; Garib, Daniela Gamba

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this "two-arm parallel" trial was to compare the orthopedic, dental, and alveolar bone plate changes of slow (SME) and rapid (RME) maxillary expansions in patients with complete bilateral cleft lip and palate (BCLP). Forty-six patients with BCLP and maxillary arch constriction in the late mixed dentition were randomly and equally allocated into two groups. Computer-generated randomization was used. Allocation was concealed with sequentially, numbered, sealed, opaque envelopes. The SME and RME groups comprised patients treated with quad-helix and Haas/Hyrax-type expanders, respectively. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) exams were performed before expansion and 4 to 6 months post-expansion. Nasal cavity width, maxillary width, alveolar crest width, arch width, palatal cleft width, inclination of posterior teeth, alveolar crest level, and buccal and lingual bone plate thickness were assessed. Blinding was applicable for outcome assessment only. Interphase and intergroup comparisons were performed using paired t tests and t tests, respectively (p < 0.05). SME and RME similarly promoted significant increase in all the maxillary transverse dimensions at molar and premolar regions with a decreasing expanding effect from the dental arch to the nasal cavity. Palatal cleft width had a significant increase in both groups. Significant buccal inclination of posterior teeth was only observed for RME. Additionally, both expansion procedures promoted a slight reduction of the alveolar crest level and the buccal bone plate thickness. No difference was found between the orthopedic, dental, and alveolar bone plate changes of SME and RME in children with BCLP. Both appliances produced significant skeletal transverse gains with negligible periodontal bone changes. Treatment time for SME, however, was longer than the observed for RME. SME and RME can be similarly indicated to correct maxillary arch constriction in patients with BCLP in the mixed dentition.

  18. The incidence of periodontal defects distal to the maxillary second molar after impacted third molar extraction.

    PubMed

    Coleman, Michael; McCormick, Adam; Laskin, Daniel M

    2011-02-01

    This study assessed the incidence of periodontal defects on the distal aspect of maxillary second molars after extraction of impacted maxillary third molars. Subjects enrolled in this institutional review board-approved prospective study consisted of healthy young patients having extraction of at least 1 asymptomatic impacted maxillary third molar adjacent to a second molar. Preoperative periodontal probing data were collected from 4 sites (midbuccal, distobuccal, midpalatal, and distopalatal) on each adjacent second molar, and a similar probing examination was performed at a mean of 6 months postoperatively. All subjects were treated under general anesthesia or conscious sedation by upper-level residents in the outpatient clinic. Twenty subjects with a total of 38 impacted maxillary third molars were treated. There were 9 male subjects (45%) and 11 female subjects (55%), with a mean age of 17 years (range, 14-22 years). The mean follow-up interval was 6 months, with a range of 3 to 15 months. Of the 152 probing sites measured, 92 (61%) decreased, 56 (37%) remained unchanged, and only 4 (2.6%) increased. A decrease in probing depth of 1 mm was found in 35 (23%) of the sites, a decrease of 2 mm was seen in 32 (21%), and 25 (16%) decreased by 3 mm or more. Of the 152 sites probed, 4 (2.6%) increased by 1 or 2 mm. Extraction of the impacted maxillary third molar does not result in significant periodontal defects on the distal aspect of the adjacent second molar, and in many cases it results in an improvement of the probing depths on these teeth. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Midfacial Changes Through Anterior Maxillary Distraction Osteogenesis in Patients With Cleft Lip and Palate.

    PubMed

    Kanzaki, Hiroyuki; Imai, Yoshimichi; Nakajo, Tetsu; Daimaruya, Takayoshi; Sato, Akimitsu; Tachi, Masahiro; Nunomura, Youhei; Itagaki, Yusuke; Nishimura, Kazuaki; Kochi, Shoko; Igarashi, Kaoru

    2017-06-01

    Maxillary hypoplasia is a major issue in cleft lip and palate patients, and predictable surgical maxillary advancement is required. In the present study, the changes and stability of the maxilla and soft tissue profile achieved after the application of anterior maxillary distraction osteogenesis (AMDO) using intraoral expander in unilateral cleft lip and palate and isolated cleft palate patients were investigated by comparing to the Le Fort I osteotomy (LFI) and maxillary distraction osteogenesis (DO) with rigid external distraction (RED) system.Ten patients who underwent orthognathic treatment with AMDO were examined (AMDO group). Changes in the positions of soft and hard tissue landmarks were calculated from the lateral cephalograms taken before the distraction, at the end of the distraction, and 1 year after the surgery. They were compared with the changes in 7 other unilateral cleft lip and palate patients who underwent LFI (LFI group) and 6 others who underwent DO with RED (RED group).The mean maxillary advancement of the AMDO group was similar to that of the RED group, judged by the change of point A. During DO, the AMDO group showed less clockwise rotation of mandible compared to the RED group. The soft tissue advancement of the upper lip and nose in the AMDO group was similar to that in the RED group, which was significantly larger than that in the LFI group.Our results indicate that AMDO can be surgical option to cleft lip and palate patients with less invasive but excellent improvement in both midfacial skeletal and soft tissue similar to DO-RED.

  20. Radiological and clinical difficulties in the management of chronic maxillary sinusitis in β Thalassemic paediatric patients.

    PubMed

    Di Mauro, R; Greco, L; Melis, M; Manenti, G; Floris, R; Giacomini, P G; Di Girolamo, M; Di Girolamo, S

    2016-05-01

    Beta thalassemia is a blood dyscrasia that caused a marked expansion of active marrow spaces and extramedullary haematopoiesis results. In these patients various alterations and abnormalities affects different body areas, including increased risk of sinusitis. The marrow expansion in the facial bones results in delay in pneumatisation of the sinuses, overgrowth of the maxillae, and forward displacement of the upper incisors with skeletal deformities. In current literature, maxillary sinuses are not deeply evaluated by CT scan studies in these kind of patients. The aim of our study was to investigate the presence of maxillary sinuses abnormalities by the use of CT in patients with beta-thalassemia major and to compare these findings with a control group free from this disease. A retrospective analysis of 22 paediatric patients with beta-thalassemia major and 22 control subjects without sinonasal diseases was performed. CT was done using a 64-multidetector-row CT scanner without contrast injection, obtained in axial plane using thin-slice technique. Evaluated parameters were: bone thickness of the lateral and anterior wall, density and volume of the maxillary sinuses. Significant difference was found between the study group and control group in the evaluation of all the parameters examined. The maxillary sinus of β thalassemic patients was smaller respect of controls, the bone was more dense and thick in the side and anterior wall. Beta-thalassemic patients have a relative risk of 2.87 to develop a maxillary sinusitis. In these patients there is an increased incidence of sinonasal infections due to the abnormal development of cranio facial skeleton. These bone alterations might confuse the physicians and lead to an increased rate of sinusitis diagnoses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Impacted maxillary canines and root resorption of adjacent teeth: A retrospective observational study.

    PubMed

    Guarnieri, R; Cavallini, C; Vernucci, R; Vichi, M; Leonardi, R; Barbato, E

    2016-11-01

    The prevalence of impacted maxillary canine is reported to be between 1% and 3%. The lack of monitoring and the delay in the treatment of the impacted canine can cause different complications such as: displacement of adjacent teeth, loss of vitality of neighbouring teeth, shortening of the dental arch, follicular cysts, canine ankylosis, recurrent infections, recurrent pain, internal resorption of the canine and the adjacent teeth, external resorption of the canine and the adjacent teeth, combination of these factors. An appropriate diagnosis, accurate predictive analysis and early intervention are likely to prevent such undesirable effects. The objective is to evaluate, by means of a retrospective observational study, the possibility of carrying out a predictive analysis of root resorption adjacent to the impacted canines by means of orthopantomographs, so as to limit the prescription of additional 3D radiography. 120 subjects with unilateral or bilateral maxillary impacted canine were examined and 50 patients with 69 impacted maxillary canine (22 male, 28 female; mean age: 11.7 years) satisfied the inclusion criteria of the study. These patients were subjected to a basic clinical and radiographic investigation (orthopantomographs and computerized tomography). All panoramic films were viewed under standardized conditions for the evaluation of two main variables: maxillary canine angulations (a, b, g angles) and the overlapping between the impacted teeth and the lateral incisor (Analysis of Lindauer). Binary logistic regression was used to estimate the likelihood of resorbed lateral incisors depending on sector location and angle measurements. Results indicated that b angle has the greatest influence on the prediction of root resorption (predictive value of b angle = 76%). If β angle <18° and Lindauer = I, the probability of resorption is 0.06. Evaluation of b angle and superimposition lateral incisor/impacted canine analysed on orthopantomographs could be one of

  2. Morphometric analysis of developing crowns of maxillary primary second molars and permanent first molars in humans.

    PubMed

    Peretz, B; Nevis, N; Smith, P

    1998-07-01

    The purpose of this study was firstly to characterize the changes occurring in size and form of the mineralizing maxillary second primary molar and first permanent molar crowns, and secondly to determine if similar changes in size and form characterize enamel apposition in the crowns of these teeth. Twenty-five primary second molars and 20 maxillary permanent first molars at various stages of development, found in archaeological excavations in Israel, were examined for a number of measured variables using image analyser software. Teeth were divided into two groups according to their stage of development: stage I included all teeth at an early stage of development in which mesiobuccal-cusp height was less than 5 mm for the primary molar and 5.9 mm for the permanent molar; stage 2 included all teeth in later stages of development where mesiobuccal-cusp height was greater than these values. In the primary molar, a significant increase was found between the two stages in almost all variables. Significant correlations were also found between all intercusp distances and the external variables. Strong correlations between height of the mesiobuccal cusp and all external and internal variables were noted in stage 1, but fewer in stage 2. In the permanent tooth, no increase was observed in intercusp distances and very few correlations were found between and among the variables. The results suggest that a change in the shape of the maxillary primary second molar occurs during formation, with the lingual cusp tips moving lingually and distally, and the distobuccal cusp tips moving distally. No change occurs in the shape of the maxillary permanent first molar during crown formation. Growth of the maxillary primary second and permanent first molar crowns occurs in 'bursts' of development.

  3. Mandibular effects of maxillary distraction osteogenesis in cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Doucet, J-C; Herlin, C; Bigorre, M; Bäumler, C; Subsol, G; Captier, G

    2014-06-01

    Maxillary distraction osteogenesis (DO) is a reliable treatment for severe maxillary deficiency in cleft lip and palate (CLP). The objective was to analyze its long-term effects on the mandible. A retrospective study of 24 CLP treated with maxillary DO using the Polley and Figueroa technique was done; patients were followed for more than 4 years. Preoperative (T0), 6-12 months postoperative (T1), and ≥ 4 years postoperative (T2) cephalometric radiographs were evaluated. A classical cephalometric analysis was used to assess treatment stability, and a Procrustes superimposition method was used to assess local changes in the shape of the mandible. The mean age of patients at T0 was 15.4 ± 4.1 years. SNA increased at T1 and T2 (P < 0.001), with no significant relapse between T1 and T2, indicating stability at 1 year after treatment (T0 = 72.4 ± 5.3°; T1 = 81.3 ± 6.2°; T2 = 79.9 ± 6.1°). SNB, facial angle, gonial angle, and symphyseal angle remained stable. Long-term analysis of the mandible demonstrated a minimal counter-clockwise rotation of the body (mandibular plane = -0.2 ± 3.2°) and ramus (-0.6 ± 4.3°). Maxillary DO in CLP had no significant effect on the shape or rotation of the mandible. The maxillary advancement remained stable after 1 year. Copyright © 2014 International Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A simple mechanism for measuring and adjusting distraction forces during maxillary advancement.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Eduardo Yugo; Suzuki, Boonsiva

    2009-10-01

    Direct measurement of distraction forces on the craniofacial skeleton has never been reported. The present report describes the development of a method of assessing and adjusting traction forces applied through maxillary distraction osteogenesis. A simple mechanism to measure and adjust tension force during maxillary distraction osteogenesis was developed and connected bilaterally to the traction screws of a rigid external distraction device. Measurements were carried out before and after activation using a Shimpo (Nidec-Shimpo America Corporation, Itasca, IL) force gauge in 4 patients (2 with unilateral cleft lip and/or palate, 1 with bilateral cleft lip and palate, and 1 with noncleft) during the distraction process. Activation was performed twice a day at a rate of 1 mm/day. The average maximum force applied throughout the distraction period was 42.5 N (range 16.4 to 65.3 N), with increments, after activation, averaging 10.5 N (range 7.9 to 15.7 N). In patients with unilateral cleft lip and/or palate, distraction forces on the larger segment were 65.1% higher than on the lesser segment. A differential pattern of forces was also observed in the patients with asymmetric noncleft. However, the differential forces between lateral segments were not observed in the patient with bilateral cleft lip and palate. During the activation period, distraction forces progressively increased, whereas the amount of maxillary movement decreased. Pain and discomfort were reported with high forces. Through this mechanism, direct measurement and adjustment of distraction forces during maxillary advancement was possible. The unbalanced pattern of forces observed in patients with cleft suggests the necessity of individual adjustments for controlling pain and clinical symptoms. Accordingly, assessment of distraction forces during maxillary distraction osteogenesis is extremely helpful in understanding the biomechanics of the distraction process.

  5. Superficial Femoral Artery Intervention by Single Transpedal Arterial Access.

    PubMed

    Amoroso, Nicholas S; Shah, Sooraj; Liou, Michael; Ratcliffe, Justin; Lala, Moinakhtar; Diwan, Ravi; Huang, Yili; Rosero, Hugo; Coppola, John; Bertrand, Olivier F; Kwan, Tak W

    2015-11-01

    Atherosclerotic disease of the superficial femoral artery (SFA) is frequently seen and can be treated with percutaneous interventions, traditionally via femoral artery access. There are limited reports of transpedal artery access for peripheral artery interventions, but none to date describing routine primary transpedal artery approach for SFA stenting. In this preliminary study, we report 4 patients who underwent successful endovascular SFA stenting using a single transpedal artery access via a new ultra-low profile 6 Fr sheath (Glidesheath Slender; Terumo Corporation). All patients underwent successful SFA stenting without complication. Procedure time varied from 51 to 72 minutes. The mean contrast amount used was 56 mL; mean fluoroscopy time was 21 minutes; mean radiation dose was 91 mGy. At 1-month follow-up, duplex ultrasonography showed that all pedal arteries had remained patent. Transpedal artery approach as a primary approach to SFA stenting appears feasible and safe. Comparative trials with standard percutaneous femoral approach are warranted.

  6. Endovascular uterine artery interventions

    PubMed Central

    Das, Chandan J; Rathinam, Deepak; Manchanda, Smita; Srivastava, D N

    2017-01-01

    Percutaneous vascular embolization plays an important role in the management of various gynecologic and obstetric abnormalities. Transcatheter embolization is a minimally invasive alternative procedure to surgery with reduced morbidity and mortality, and preserves the patient's future fertility potential. The clinical indications for transcatheter embolization are much broader and include many benign gynecologic conditions, such as fibroid, adenomyosis, and arteriovenous malformations (AVMs), as well as intractable bleeding due to inoperable advanced-stage malignancies. The most well-known and well-studied indication is uterine fibroid embolization. Uterine artery embolization (UAE) may be performed to prevent or treat bleeding associated with various obstetric conditions, including postpartum hemorrhage (PPH), placental implantation abnormality, and ectopic pregnancy. Embolization of the uterine artery or the internal iliac artery also may be performed to control pelvic bleeding due to coagulopathy or iatrogenic injury. This article discusses these gynecologic and obstetric indications for transcatheter embolization and reviews procedural techniques and outcomes. PMID:29379246

  7. The incidence and morphology of maxillary sinus septa in dentate and edentulous maxillae: a cadaveric study with a brief review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Wabale, Rajendra Namdeo; Siddiqui, Abu Ubaida; Farooqui, Mujjebuddeen Samsudeen

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to determine the incidence, location, and orientation of maxillary sinus septa in formalin embalmed cadavers. Materials and Methods The study was conducted on 210 cadaveric heads available in our department. After taking the mid-sagittal section the specimens were opened from the medial aspect and the sinus cavity was explored for the presence of maxillary sinus septa, their anatomical plane, location and dimensions. Results The mean linear distance between maxillary sinus floor and its anatomical ostium was 26.76±5.21 mm and 26.91±4.96 mm on right and left side, respectively. A total of 59 maxillary sinus septa (28.1%) were observed in 210 maxillary specimens. Septae were most common, 33 septa (55.9%), in the middle region (between first and second molar tooth) of the sinus cavity. The maxillary sinus membrane (Schneiderian membrane) adhered tightly to the maxillary sinus and over the septae. Significantly more maxillary sinus septa were observed in edentulous maxillae in comparison to the dentate upper jaw. Conclusion Knowledge of location of maxillary sinus ostium is mandatory for the rhinologist for drainage of secretions in maxillary sinusitis. The morphological details of maxillary sinus septa, particularly their location and anatomical planes, will guide dentists in performance of safe implant surgeries. The maxillary antrum septa of category I and II may complicate the procedure of inversion of bone plate and elevation of sinus membrane during maxillary augmentation surgeries. The category III septa observed in the sagittal plane were embedded by one of the branches of the infraorbital nerve in it, and if accidentally cut will lead to infraorbital nerve palsy in maxillary sinus surgeries. PMID:25741466

  8. Mid-maxillary distraction osteogenesis of cleft patients using a special custom-made tooth-borne device.

    PubMed

    Dias, D K; De Silva, H L; Senadeera, W M

    2011-09-01

    A relatively new approach to maxillary advancement by maxillary distraction using a combined surgical and modified orthodontic technique is described. This protocol and the technique have been used for the past 3 years (2006 to 2009) on more than 60 patients, aged between 14-29 years. Distraction of between 7 and 18 mm has been achieved, creating class 1 or mild class 2 arch relationships in cleft lip and cleft palate patients who had class 3 arch relationship compounded by significant maxillary retrusion. The technique is simple, inexpensive and less time consuming.

  9. Splenic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Tcbc-Rj, Rui Antônio Ferreira; Ferreira, Myriam Christina Lopes; Ferreira, Daniel Antônio Lopes; Ferreira, André Gustavo Lopes; Ramos, Flávia Oliveira

    2016-01-01

    Splenic artery aneurysms - the most common visceral artery aneurysms - are found most often in multiparous women and in patients with portal hypertension. Indications for treatment of splenic artery aneurysm or pseudoaneurysm include specific symptoms, female gender and childbearing age, presence of portal hypertension, planned liver transplantation, a pseudoaneurysm of any size, and an aneurysm with a diameter of more than 2.5cm. Historically, the treatment of splenic artery aneurysm has been surgical ligation of the splenic artery, ligation of the aneurysm, or aneurysmectomy with or without splenectomy, depending on the aneurysm location. There are other percutaneous interventional techniques. The authors present a case of a splenic artery aneurysm in a 51-year-old woman, detected incidentally. RESUMO Aneurismas da artéria esplênica - os aneurismas arteriais viscerais mais comuns - são encontrados mais frequentemente em mulheres multíparas e em pacientes com hipertensão portal. As indicações para o seu tratamento incluem sintomas específicos, sexo feminino e idade fértil, presença de hipertensão portal, paciente em fila de transplante hepático, um pseudoaneurisma de qualquer tamanho, e um aneurisma com um diâmetro superior a 2,5cm. Historicamente, o tratamento do aneurisma da artéria esplênica tem sido a ligadura cirúrgica da artéria esplênica, a ligadura do aneurisma ou a aneurismectomia, com ou sem esplenectomia, dependendo do local do aneurisma. Existem outras técnicas intervencionistas percutâneas. Os autores apresentam o caso de um aneurisma de artéria esplênica em uma mulher de 51 anos de idade, diagnosticado incidentalmente.

  10. Carotid artery and lower cranial nerve exposure with increasing surgical complexity to the parapharyngeal space.

    PubMed

    Lemos-Rodriguez, Ana M; Sreenath, Satyan B; Rawal, Rounak B; Overton, Lewis J; Farzal, Zainab; Zanation, Adam M

    2017-03-01

    To investigate the extent of carotid artery exposure attained, including the identification of the external carotid branches and lower cranial nerves in five sequential external approaches to the parapharyngeal space, and to provide an anatomical algorithm. Anatomical study. Six latex-injected adult cadaver heads were dissected in five consecutive approaches: transcervical approach with submandibular gland removal, posterior extension of the transcervical approach, transcervical approach with parotidectomy, parotidectomy with lateral mandibulotomy, and parotidectomy with mandibulectomy. The degree of carotid artery exposure attained, external carotid branches, and lower cranial nerves visualized was documented. The transcervical approach exposed 1.5 cm (Standard Deviation (SD) 0.5) of internal carotid artery (ICA) and 1.25 cm (SD 0.25) of external carotid artery (ECA). The superior thyroid and facial arteries and cranial nerve XII and XI were identified. The posterior extension exposed 2.9 cm (SD 0.7) of ICA and 2.7 cm (SD 1.0) of ECA. Occipital and ascending pharyngeal arteries were visualized. The transparotid approach exposed 4.0 cm (SD 1.1) of ICA and 3.98 cm (SD 1.8) of ECA. Lateral mandibulotomy exposed the internal maxillary artery, cranial nerve X, the sympathetic trunk, and 4.6 cm (SD 2.4) of ICA. Mandibulectomy allowed for complete ECA exposure, cranial nerve IX, lingual nerve, and 6.9 cm (SD 1.3) of ICA. Approaches for the parapharyngeal space must be based on anatomic and biological patient factors. This study provides a guide for the skull base surgeon for an extended approach based on the desired anatomic exposure. N/A. Laryngoscope, 127:585-591, 2017. © 2017 The American Laryngological, Rhinological and Otological Society, Inc.

  11. Combination of rare right arterial variation with anomalous origins of the vertebral artery, aberrant subclavian artery and persistent trigeminal artery. A case report.

    PubMed

    Ishihara, H; San Millán Ruíz, D; Abdo, G; Asakura, F; Yilmaz, H; Lovblad, K O; Rüfenacht, D A

    2011-09-01

    A 32-year-old woman hospitalized for subarachnoid hemorrhage showed rare arterial variation on the right side with anomalous origins of the vertebral artery, aberrant subclavian artery and persistent trigeminal artery. Angiography showed the right vertebral artery to originate from the right common carotid artery, the right subclavian artery to arise separately from the descending aorta, and persistent trigeminal artery on the right side. The possible embryonic mechanism of this previously unreported variant combination is discussed.

  12. Effect of maxillary protraction with alternating rapid palatal expansion and constriction vs expansion alone in maxillary retrusive patients: a single-center, randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weitao; Zhou, Yanheng; Wang, Xuedong; Liu, Dawei; Zhou, Shaonan

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this randomized controlled trial was to investigate the effects of facemask protraction combined with alternating rapid palatal expansion and constriction (RPE/C) vs rapid palatal expansion (RPE) alone in the early treatment of maxillary retrusive patients. Patients with a midface deficiency were recruited and randomly allocated into either the control group (RPE) or the intervention group (RPE/C). Eligibility criteria included the following: age 7 to 13 years old, Class III malocclusion, anterior crossbite, ANB less than 0°, Wits appraisal less than -2 mm, A-Np less than 0 mm, and no cleft of lip or palate. The primary outcome was the degree of maxillary forward movement after treatment. The secondary outcomes were the changes of the other cephalometric variables after treatment and the treatment time. Simple randomization was carried out using a random number table at the beginning of the study. Envelopes containing the grouping information were used to ensure allocation concealment from the researchers. Blinding was applicable for cephalometric analysis only. Hyrax palatal expanders and facemask maxillary protraction were used in all patients. Patients in the RPE group were treated with rapid palatal expansion for 1 week. Patients in the RPE/C group were treated with RPE/C for 7 weeks. The expansion or constriction rate was 1 mm per day. Cephalometric analysis with traditional cephalometric measurements and an x-y coordinate system were used to compare the pretreatment and posttreatment cephalometric radiographs. Independent t tests were used to compare the data between the 2 groups. A total of 44 patients were randomized to either the RPE group or the RPE/C group in a 1:1 ratio. One subject in the RPE group was lost to follow-up during the treatment. Per-protocol analysis was used. All the other 43 patients reached the treatment completion criteria and were analyzed (RPE group: n = 21; RPE/C group: n = 22). The average protraction time was 10

  13. [Comparison of treatment results between implant anchorage and traditional intraoral anchorage in patients with maxillary protrusion].

    PubMed

    Ma, Ning; Li, Wei-Ran; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Zheng, Xu

    2016-08-01

    To compare the treatment effects in patients with maxillary protrusion between implant anchorage and traditional intraoral anchorage. Thirty patients with maxillary protrusion treated with bilateral maxillary first premolars extractions and high anchorage were selected. They were randomly divided into implant anchorage group and traditional intraoral anchorage group. Each group had 15 cases. The casts and the cephalograms were obtained before treatment (T1) and after treatment (T2). Three-dimensional model analysis was used to compare the teeth movements between the two groups and cephalometric analysis was used to compare the changes of skeletal and soft tissues. The differences were analyzed with SPSS 17.0 software package. In the implant anchorage group, the upper central incisors were retracted by (6.661±1.328) mm and intruded by (0.129±1.815) mm. In the traditional intraoral anchorage group, the upper central incisors were retracted by (5.788±2.009) mm and extruded by (2.623±1.776) mm. There was no significant difference between the two groups in sagittal movement (P>0.05), but there was significant difference in vertical movement (P<0.05). In the implant anchorage group, the upper first molars were protracted by (0.608±1.045) mm, intruded by (0.608±1.045) mm and moved palatally by (0.477±0.904) mm. In the traditional intraoral anchorage group, the upper first molars were protracted by (1.503±0.945) mm, extruded by (0.072±0.690) mm and moved palatally by (0.883±0.752)mm. There was significant difference between the two groups in sagittal movement and vertical movement (P<0.05), but there was no significant difference in horizontal movement(P>0.05). There was no significant difference between the two groups in the changes of cephalometric measurements of skeletal and soft tissues (P>0.05). Implant anchorage may be superior in vertical control of the maxillary incisors and also superior in sagittal and vertical control of the maxillary molars to

  14. Virtual Surgical Planning in Precise Maxillary Reconstruction With Vascularized Fibular Graft After Tumor Ablation.

    PubMed

    Wang, You-Yuan; Fan, Song; Zhang, Han-Qing; Lin, Zhao-Yu; Ye, Jian-Tao; Li, Jin-Song

    2016-06-01

    Reconstruction of maxillary and midfacial defects due to tumor ablation is challenging to conventional operation. The purposes of this study are to evaluate the precise 3-dimensional position of the fibular flap in reconstruction of maxillary defects assisted by virtual surgical planning and to assess the postoperative outcomes compared with conventional surgery. We retrospectively reviewed 18 consecutive patients who underwent maxillary reconstruction with a vascularized fibular flap assisted by virtual surgical planning after maxillary or midfacial tumor ablation. Conventional surgery was performed in another 15 patients. Proplan CMF surgical planning (Materialise, Leuven, Belgium) was performed preoperatively in the virtual planning group. Fibular flaps were harvested and underwent osteotomy assisted by prefabricated cutting guides, and the maxilla and midface were resected and reconstructed assisted by the prefabricated cutting guides and templates in the virtual planning group. The operative time and fibular flap positions were evaluated in the 2 groups. Postoperative fibular positions of the maxillary reconstruction were compared with virtual plans in the virtual planning group. The postoperative facial appearance and occlusal function were assessed. The operations were performed successfully without complications. The ischemia time and total operative time were shorter in the virtual planning group than those in the conventional surgery group (P < .05). High precision of the cutting guides and templates was found on both the fibula and maxilla in the virtual planning group. The positions of the fibular flaps, including the vertical and horizontal positions, were more accurate in the virtual planning group than those in the conventional surgery group (P < .05). Bone-to-bone contact between the maxilla and fibular segments was more precise in the virtual planning group (P < .05). Postoperative computed tomography scans showed excellent contour of the fibular

  15. Randomized clinical trial comparing control of maxillary anchorage with 2 retraction techniques.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tian-Min; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Oh, Hee Soo; Boyd, Robert L; Korn, Edward L; Baumrind, Sheldon

    2010-11-01

    The objective of this pilot randomized clinical trial was to investigate the relative effectiveness of anchorage conservation of en-masse and 2-step retraction techniques during maximum anchorage treatment in patients with Angle Class I and Class II malocclusions. Sixty-four growing subjects (25 boys, 39 girls; 10.2-15.9 years old) who required maximum anchorage were randomized to 2 treatment techniques: en-masse retraction (n = 32) and 2-step retraction (n = 32); the groups were stratified by sex and starting age. Each patient was treated by a full-time clinic instructor experienced in the use of both retraction techniques at the orthodontic clinic of Peking University School of Stomatology in China. All patients used headgear, and most had transpalatal appliances. Lateral cephalograms taken before treatment and at the end of treatment were used to evaluate treatment-associated changes. Differences in maxillary molar mesial displacement and maxillary incisor retraction were measured with the before and after treatment tracings superimposed on the anatomic best fit of the palatal structures. Differences in mesial displacement of the maxillary first molar were compared between the 2 treatment techniques, between sexes, and between different starting-age groups. Average mesial displacement of the maxillary first molar was slightly less in the en-masse group than in the 2-step group (mean, -0.36 mm; 95% CI, -1.42 to 0.71 mm). The average mesial displacement of the maxillary first molar for both treatment groups pooled (n = 63, because 1 patient was lost to follow-up) was 4.3 ± 2.1 mm (mean ± standard deviation). Boys had significantly more mesial displacement than girls (mean difference, 1.3 mm; P <0.03). Younger adolescents had significantly more mesial displacement than older adolescents (mean difference, 1.3 mm; P <0.02). Average mesial displacement of the maxillary first molar with 2-step retraction was slightly greater than that for en-masse retraction, but the

  16. Effects of zygoma-gear appliance for unilateral maxillary molar distalization: A prospective clinical study.

    PubMed

    Kilkis, Dogan; Celikoglu, Mevlut; Nur, Metin; Bayram, Mehmet; Candirli, Celal

    2016-12-01

    The aim of the study was to evaluate the dentoskeletal effects of the zygoma-gear appliance used for unilateral maxillary molar distalization in patients with Class II subdivision malocclusion. This prospective clinical study consisted of 21 patients (9 boys, 12 girls; mean age, 15.68 ± 2.18 years) with unilateral Class II malocclusion treated using the unilateral zygoma-gear appliance supported by a zygomatic miniplate inserted on the Class II malocclusion side. The dentoskeletal effects of the system were evaluated using cephalometric lateral and panoramic films with a paired t test. The mean amount of distalization for the maxillary first molar was found to be 5.31 ± 2.46 mm (P <0.001) in 0.45 ± 0.12 years, showing an amount of 0.98 mm of distalization per month. It was also accompanied by a slight intrusion (0.76 ± 2.85 mm; P >0.05) and distal tipping (6.39° ± 5.39°; P <0.001) of the maxillary molars. The maxillary premolar also spontaneously moved distally 1.63 ± 1.90 mm (P <0.01) with distal tipping (4.05° ± 3.47°; P <0.001). Moreover, the inclination of the maxillary incisors and overjet were decreased (-1.59° ± 1.45°, P <0.001; and -0.29 ± 0.63 mm, P <0.05; respectively) showing no anchorage loss. No statistically significant changes were found for the skeletal and soft tissue measurements (P >0.05). The zygoma-gear appliance system is an effective method for unilateral maxillary molar distalization. Copyright © 2016 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Endodontic management of maxillary first molar with seven root canals diagnosed using Cone Beam Computed Tomography scanning

    PubMed Central

    Raghavendra, Srinidhi Surya; Hindlekar, Ajit Narayan; Desai, Niranjan Nanasaheb; Vyavahare, Nishant Kishor; Napte, Bandu Devrao

    2014-01-01

    The main objective of root canal treatment is thorough cleaning and shaping of the entire pulp space and its complete filling with an inert filling material. A major cause of post-treatment disease is the inability to locate, debride or adequately fill all canals of the root canal system. The form, configuration, and number of root canals in the maxillary first molars have been discussed for more than half a century. Maxillary first molars commonly present with three roots and three canals, with a second mesiobuccal canal (MB2) also present. With the advent of improved magnification there are reports of multiple root canals in the maxillary first molars. Nonsurgical endodontic therapy of a left maxillary first molar with three roots and seven root canals was successfully performed under a dental operating microscope. The diagnosis of multiple root canals was confirmed with the help of Cone Beam Computed Tomography (CBCT) images. PMID:25565745

  18. The use of maxillary sinus dimensions in gender determination: a thin-slice multidetector computed tomography assisted morphometric study.

    PubMed

    Ekizoglu, Oguzhan; Inci, Ercan; Hocaoglu, Elif; Sayin, Ibrahim; Kayhan, Fatma Tulin; Can, Ismail Ozgur

    2014-05-01

    Gender determination is an important step in identification. For gender determination, anthropometric evaluation is one of the main forensic evaluations. In the present study, morphometric analysis of maxillary sinuses was performed to determine gender. For morphometric analysis, coronal and axial paranasal sinus computed tomography (CT) scan with 1-mm slice thickness was used. For this study, 140 subjects (70 women and 70 men) were enrolled (age ranged between 18 and 63). The size of each subject's maxillary sinuses was measured in anteroposterior, transverse, cephalocaudal, and volume directions. In each measurement, the size of the maxillary sinus is significantly small in female gender (P < 0.001). When discrimination analysis was performed, the accuracy rate was detected as 80% for women and 74.3% for men with an overall rate of 77.15%. With the use of 1-mm slice thickness CT, morphometric analysis of maxillary sinuses will be helpful for gender determination.

  19. Management of a maxillary first molar having atypical anatomy of two roots diagnosed using cone beam computed tomography.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Sarang; Mittal, Meenu; Passi, Deepak; Grover, Shibani

    2015-01-01

    Most often, a clinician working on maxillary first molar when anticipates an aberration thinks of an extra canal but rarely does he preempt fewer canals. Maxillary first molar is a tooth, which has been extensively reviewed with respect to its external and internal morphology. Abundant literature related to its anatomy is available, but reports on incidence of two roots and two root canals in maxillary first molar are very limited. Here, a case of maxillary first molar is presented that had two roots: one palatal root with Type I canal configuration and one bulbous fused buccal root with Type V canal configuration; a unique root and canal configuration not seen in any of the earlier reported cases. Diagnosis of root canal aberrancy and subsequently, accurate management of the tooth was greatly facilitated by cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) scan. The relevance of CBCT in improving treatment prognosis is greatly emphasized in this report.

  20. Arterial switch: translocation of the intramural coronary artery.

    PubMed

    Asou, T; Karl, T R; Pawade, A; Mee, R B

    1994-02-01

    Translocation of an intramural coronary artery is one of the most challenging problems in anatomic correction of transposition of the great arteries. Of 259 patients undergoing arterial switch procedure for transposition of the great arteries in our hospital, 12 (4.6%) were found to have intramural coronary arteries. The diagnosis was made intraoperatively in all patients. There were five different types of intramural coronary anatomy noted, with ostial stenosis present in half. The operative technique consisted of detachment of the posterior commissure of the aortic valve and unroofing of the intramural segment of the coronary artery by excision of a triangular portion of internal aortic wall. The coronary arteries were excised as a single disc, which was divided into two cuffs. The arterial switch was then performed in the usual fashion. The posterior commissure of the aortic valve was resuspended to the pericardial patch used to reconstruct the neopulmonary artery sinus. There were no operative or late deaths over a follow-up of 328 patient-months. Postoperatively, no patient showed ischemic changes on electrocardiogram or abnormal wall motion on echocardiogram. We believe that intramural coronary arteries can be managed satisfactorily with this technique, and that arterial switch will be possible in all cases.

  1. A retrospective study comparing the loss of anchorage following the extraction of maxillary first or second premolars during orthodontic treatment with fixed appliances in adolescent patients.

    PubMed

    Haque, Samantha; Sandler, Jonathan; Cobourne, Martyn T; Bassett, Paul; DiBiase, Andrew T

    2017-12-01

    This retrospective study assessed the difference in anchorage loss using 3D superimposition of study models between cases treated with extraction of maxillary first premolars and maxillary second premolars carried out in orthodontic specialist practice. Sixty subjects who have undergone extractions of either maxillary first or second premolars as part of their orthodontic treatment were selected. Eligibility criteria included patients with a Class I, mild Class II or III malocclusions, mild-to-moderate crowding with no anchorage reinforcement. Pre- and post-treatment maxillary dental study cases were scanned using a surface laser scanner to produced 3D digital images which were superimposed using areas of stability on the anterior hard palate. Anchorage loss was measured by the mesial movement of the maxillary first permanent molar. The mean mesial movement for the maxillary first molars, when adjusted for confounding factors was 4.7 mm (SD 1.6) in the maxillary first premolar extraction group and 4.6 mm (SD 1.6) in the maxillary second premolar extraction group. There is no difference in anchorage loss when comparing the extraction of the maxillary first premolars to the extraction maxillary second premolars.

  2. Functional Characterization of the Octenol Receptor Neuron on the Maxillary Palps of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-06-30

    Functional Characterization of the Octenol Receptor Neuron on the Maxillary Palps of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti Alan J. Grant, Joseph C...Dickens JC (2011) Functional Characterization of the Octenol Receptor Neuron on the Maxillary Palps of the Yellow Fever Mosquito, Aedes aegypti . PLoS...palps. Both sexes of mosquitoes possess basiconic sensilla that contain three neurons; in Aedes aegypti these sensilla number about 35 in females and 21

  3. The occurrence of paraesthesia of the maxillary division of the trigeminal nerve after dental local anaesthetic use: a case report.

    PubMed

    Moorthy, Advan; Stassen, Leo F A

    2015-01-01

    Paraesthesia can be a complication of surgical intervention. Its occurrence after dental local anaesthetic use is a rare event in general dental practice. Reported cases have mainly described its presentation for the mandibular division of the trigeminal nerve with very few reports for the maxillary division of this nerve. This report describes a case of paraesthesia in the maxillary region following local anaesthetic use prior to removal of an upper molar tooth.

  4. Maxillary first molar with three buccal roots evaluated with cone-beam computed tomography: a rare case report.

    PubMed

    Kottoor, Jojo; Nandini, Suresh; Velmurugan, Natanasabapathy

    2012-01-01

    This case report describes the nonsurgical endodontic management of a maxillary first molar with the unusual morphology of three separate buccal roots. An accurate assessment of this morphology was made with the help of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). This report also describes the varied root morphology associated with maxillary first molars and the role of CBCT as a diagnostic tool for managing these complex cases successfully.

  5. Biometric ratio in estimating widths of maxillary anterior teeth derived after correlating anthropometric measurements with dental measurements.

    PubMed

    Kini, Ashwini Y; Angadi, Gangadhar S

    2013-06-01

    To correlate dental measurements i.e. combined mesiodistal width of six maxillary anterior teeth with facial measurements i.e. inner canthal distance, interpupillary distance and intercommissural width and acquire a biometric ratio to serve as a preliminary guide in selection of the maxillary anterior teeth. In the absence of pre-extraction records, the resultant denture can lead to patient dissatisfaction towards the aesthetic appeal of their dentures. The maxillary anterior teeth play a pivotal role in denture aesthetics. Various techniques and biometric ratios have been described in literature for selection of the maxillary anteriors. This study derives a biometric ratio for the same, obtained after correlating anthropometric measurements with dental measurements. Two standardized digital photographs of the face were generated; one, when the facial muscles were relaxed and the other, when the subject was smiling; thereby, revealing the maxillary anterior teeth upto the canine tip. Inner canthal distance, interpupillary distance, intercommissural distance, distance between the tips of the maxillary canines and distance between the distal surfaces of the canines were measured. On the cast, the distance between tips of maxillary canines and distance between distal surfaces of maxillary canines were noted. The data was analysed using Spearman's rank correlation coefficient. A high correlation was found between the intercommissural measurement with distance between the tips of the canines on the photograph and between the tips of the canines on the cast with the interpupillary distance, giving a biometric ratio of 1:1.35 and 1:1.41 respectively. The least correlation was between the inner canthal distance and the tips of the canines measured on the photograph. Extra oral anthropometric measurements of the interpupillary distances and the intercommissural distances with the help of standardised photographs can help us determine the combined widths of the anterior

  6. Distalization of maxillary arch and correction of Class II with mini-implants: A report of two cases

    PubMed Central

    Tekale, Pawankumar Dnyandeo; Vakil, Ketan K.; Vakil, Jeegar K.; Gore, Ketan A.

    2015-01-01

    This article reports the successful use of mini-screws in the maxilla to treat two patients of age 21-year and 17-year-old girls. Both the patients had a skeletal Class II malocclusion with protrusive maxillary teeth and angels Class II mal-occlusion. Temporary anchorage devices (TADs) in the posterior dental region between maxillary second premolar and maxillary first molar teeth on both sides were used as anchorage for the retraction and intrusion of her maxillary anterior teeth. Those appliances, combined with a compensatory curved maxillary archwire, eliminated spacing, deep bite, forwardly placed and proclined upper front teeth and the protrusive profile, corrected the molar relationship from Class II to Class I. With no extra TADs in the anterior region for intrusion, the treatment was workable and simple. The patient received a satisfactory occlusion and an attractive smile. This technique requires minimal compliance and is particularly useful for correcting Class II patients with protrusive maxillary front teeth and dental deep bite. PMID:26097360

  7. Immediate impact of rapid maxillary expansion on upper airway dimensions and on the quality of life of mouth breathers.

    PubMed

    Izuka, Edna Namiko; Feres, Murilo Fernando Neuppmann; Pignatari, Shirley Shizue Nagata

    2015-01-01

    To assess short-term tomographic changes in the upper airway dimensions and quality of life of mouth breathers after rapid maxillary expansion (RME). A total of 25 mouth breathers with maxillary atresia and a mean age of 10.5 years old were assessed by means of cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) and a standardized quality of life questionnaire answered by patients' parents/legal guardians before and immediately after rapid maxillary expansion. Rapid maxillary expansion resulted in similar and significant expansion in the width of anterior (2.8 mm, p < 0.001) and posterior nasal floor (2.8 mm, p < 0.001). Although nasopharynx and nasal cavities airway volumes significantly increased (+1646.1 mm3, p < 0.001), oropharynx volume increase was not statistically significant (+1450.6 mm3, p = 0.066). The results of the quality of life questionnaire indicated that soon after rapid maxillary expansion, patients' respiratory symptoms significantly decreased in relation to their initial respiratory conditions. It is suggested that RME produces significant dimensional increase in the nasal cavity and nasopharynx. Additionally, it also positively impacts the quality of life of mouth-breathing patients with maxillary atresia.

  8. A comparative analysis of salivary factors and maxillary denture retention in different arch forms: An in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Shekhar, Abhishek; Das, Samiran; Bhattacharyya, Jayanta; Goel, Preeti; Majumdar, Sayan; Ghosh, Soumitra

    2018-01-01

    This study aims to find the effect of change in different salivary factors before and after complete denture insertion and to measure the maxillary denture retention in different arch forms. Thirty completely edentulous individuals (10 each of square, tapered, and ovoid arch form of maxilla) belonging to the age group of 40-70 years were selected. Salivary factors (flow, density, pH, viscosity, and total protein) were evaluated before and after denture insertion. Retention of maxillary denture was measured in all the different arch forms. Student's independent sample's t -test was applied. The correlation was analyzed by Pearson's correlation analysis. While mean flow rate and pH of saliva increased, mean viscosity, total protein, and density of saliva decreased after maxillary complete denture insertion. A positive correlation was found between retention and total maxillary basal surface area. Retention value was found to be greatest in square type and least in tapered type. Complete denture acts as a mechanical stimulant thus increasing flow rate and pH immediately after complete denture insertion. Density, total protein, and viscosity of saliva decreased after complete denture insertion which may be due to increase in water content of saliva. The retention of maxillary complete denture does not seem to depend on the rate of change of the salivary factors, before and after complete denture insertion. Total basal surface area and maxillary denture retention values were highest in square arch form and least in tapered arch form.

  9. Root Cause Analysis: An Examination of Odontogenic Origins of Acute Maxillary Sinusitis in Both Immunocompetent & Immunocompromised Patients.

    PubMed

    McCarty, Jennifer L; David, Ryan M; Lensing, Shelly Y; Samant, Rohan S; Kumar, Manoj; Van Hemert, Rudy L; Angtuaco, Edgardo J C; Fitzgerald, Ryan T

    Dental and periodontal diseases represent important but often overlooked causes of acute sinusitis. Our goal was to examine the prevalence of potential odontogenic sources of acute maxillary sinusitis according to immune status and their associations with sinusitis. A retrospective review of maxillofacial computed tomography studies from 2013 to 2014 was performed. Each maxillary sinus and its ipsilateral dentition were evaluated for findings of acute sinusitis and dental/periodontal disease. Eighty-four patients (24 immunocompetent, 60 immunocompromised) had 171 maxillary sinuses that met inclusion criteria for acute maxillary sinusitis. Inspection of dentition revealed oroantral fistula in 1%, periapical lucencies in 16%, and projecting tooth root(s) in 71% of cases. Immunocompromised patients were more likely to have bilateral sinusitis than immunocompetent patients (67% vs 33%, P = 0.005). A paired case-control analysis in a subset of patients with unilateral maxillary sinusitis (n = 39) showed a higher prevalence of periapical lucency in association with sinuses that had an air fluid level-29% of sinuses with a fluid level had periapical lucency compared with 12% without sinus fluid (P = 0.033). Potential odontogenic sources of acute maxillary sinusitis are highly prevalent in both immunocompetent and immunocompromised patients, although the 2 patient populations demonstrate no difference in the prevalence of these potential odontogenic sources. Periapical lucencies were found to be associated with an ipsilateral sinus fluid level. Increased awareness of the importance of dental and periodontal diseases as key components of maxillofacial computed tomography interpretation would facilitate a more appropriate and timely treatment.

  10. The Relationship between Dental Follicle Width and Maxillary Impacted Canines' Descriptive and Resorptive Features Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography.

    PubMed

    Dağsuyu, İlhan Metin; Okşayan, Rıdvan; Kahraman, Fatih; Aydın, Mehmet; Bayrakdar, İbrahim Şevki; Uğurlu, Mehmet

    2017-01-01

    To assess the relationship between dental follicle width and maxillary impacted canines' descriptive and resorptive features with three-dimensional (3D) cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). The study comprised 102 patients with cone-beam computed tomography 3D images and a total of 140 impacted canines. The association between maxillary impacted canine dental follicle width and the variables of gender, impaction side (right and left), localization of impacted canine (buccal, central, and palatal), and resorption of the adjacent laterals was compared. Measurements were analyzed with Student's t -test, Kruskal-Wallis test, and Mann-Whitney U statistical test. According to gender, no statistically significant differences were found in the follicle size of the maxillary impacted canine between males and females ( p > 0.05). Widths of the follicles were determined for the right and left impaction sides, and no statistically significant relation was found ( p > 0.05). There were statistically significant differences between root resorption degrees of lateral incisors and maxillary impacted canine follicle width ( p < 0.05). Statistically significant higher follicle width values were present in degree 2 (mild) resorption than in degree 1 (no) and degree 3 (moderate) resorption samples ( p < 0.05). No significant correlation was found between follicle width and the variables of gender, impaction side, and localization of maxillary impacted canines. Our study could not confirm that increased dental follicle width of the maxillary impacted canines exhibited more resorption risk for the adjacent lateral incisors.

  11. Velopharyngeal changes after maxillary distraction in cleft patients using a rigid external distraction device: A retrospective study.

    PubMed

    Taha, Mahasen; Elsheikh, Yasser M

    2016-11-01

     To evaluate early and late velopharyngeal changes in cleft lip and palate (CLP) patients after use of the Rigid External Distractor (RED) device and to correlate these changes to the amount of maxillary advancement.  Thirty Class III CLP patients were included in the study. Maxillary advancement was performed using the RED device in combination with titanium miniplates and screws for anchorage. Lateral cephalograms, nasometer, and nasopharyngoscope records were taken before distraction, immediately after distraction, and 1 year after distraction. A paired t-test was used to detect differences at P < .05.  SNA angle and A point and ANS to Y axis were significantly increased after maxillary distraction (P  =  .0001). Statistically significant increases in nasopharyngeal and oropharyngeal depths, velar angle, and need ratio were also found (P  =  .0001). Nasalance scores showed a significant increase (P  =  .008 for nasal text and .044 for oral text). A significant positive correlation was observed between the amount of maxillary advancement and the increase in nasopharyngeal depth and hypernasality (P  =  .012 and .026, respectively).  Nasopharyngeal function was deteriorated after maxillary advancement in CLP patients. There was a significant positive correlation between the amount of maxillary advancement and the increase in nasopharyngeal depth and hypernasality.

  12. Long-term results of maxillary distraction osteogenesis in nongrowing cleft: 5-years experience using internal device.

    PubMed

    Hirjak, D; Reyneke, J P; Janec, J; Beno, M; Kupcova, I

    2016-01-01

    Patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP) related deformities frequently have maxillary hypoplasia in all dimensions. These patients usually present with class III malocclusions, retruded midfaces and narrow hard palates. The skeletal problems can be treated by means of Le Fort I maxillary procedures. Surgical and orthodontic correction of severe maxillary hypoplasia, as often seen in CLP patients, has however proved to be challenging. The magnitude of the advancement is often hampered and the post operative stability significantly affected by palatal soft tissue scarring. The slow distraction of bone and the histogenic abilities of distraction osteogenesis (DO) have made it an atractive alternative treatment option for the management of maxillary hypoplasia in these patients. This paper presents the treatment results of 15 nongrowing CLP patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia treated by means of intra oral distraction. The mean anterior distraction of the maxillas was 12.7 mm (9-15.0 mm). The long-term cephalometric and clinical evaluation after a minimum of 60 months (mean follow-up 71 months) proved to be stable. The treatment results revealed, that distraction osteogenesis in nongrowing CLP patients with severe maxillary hypoplasia proved to be a predictable and stable option (Tab. 2, Fig. 3, Ref. 26).

  13. One-step transversal palatal distraction and maxillary repositioning: technical considerations, advantages, and long-term stability.

    PubMed

    Cortese, Antonio; Savastano, Mauro; Savastano, Germano; Claudio, Pier Paolo

    2011-09-01

    Transversal maxillary hypoplasia in adolescence is a frequently seen pathology, which can be treated with a combination of surgery and orthodontic treatment to widen the maxilla in skeletally matured patients.We evaluated the advantages of a new surgical technique: Le Fort I distraction osteogenesis using a bone-borne device. Because relapse is one of the main problems in surgical maxillary expansion, long-term stability of this new technique was evaluated. Data from 4 adult patients with maxillary restriction, class III malocclusion, or maxillary malposition were collected preoperatively, 4 months after distraction, and 5 years after distraction. Measurements were recorded on dental models to detect palatal expansion at dental level; cephalograms by lateral and posteroanterior plane were analyzed to detect maxillary movements. Maxillary measurements were substantially stable 5 years after distractions. Only minor dental movements occurred at the dental analysis after 5 years related to a lack of orthodontic contention without any compromise of the dental result (no crossbite relapse and class I stability). Le Fort I with down-fracture for expansion and repositioning by bone-borne distractor device can [corrected] be used to simultaneously widen, advance, and vertically reposition the maxilla without causing healing problems, particularly using a rigid distraction device. Long-term stability can be achieved; however, further studies with a larger number of patients will be necessary for better evaluation.

  14. Three-Dimensional Image Fusion of 18F-Fluorodeoxyglucose-Positron Emission Tomography/Computed Tomography and Contrast-Enhanced Computed Tomography for Computer-Assisted Planning of Maxillectomy of Recurrent Maxillary Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Defect Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yao; Zhang, Wen-Bo; Liu, Xiao-Jing; Guo, Chuan-Bin; Yu, Guang-Yan; Peng, Xin

    2017-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe new technology assisted by 3-dimensional (3D) image fusion of 18 F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG)-positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and contrast-enhanced CT (CECT) for computer planning of a maxillectomy of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma and defect reconstruction. Treatment of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma usually includes tumor resection and free flap reconstruction. FDG-PET/CT provided images of regions of abnormal glucose uptake and thus showed metabolic tumor volume to guide tumor resection. CECT data were used to create 3D reconstructed images of vessels to show the vascular diameters and locations, so that the most suitable vein and artery could be selected during anastomosis of the free flap. The data from preoperative maxillofacial CECT scans and FDG-PET/CT imaging were imported into the navigation system (iPlan 3.0; Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany). Three-dimensional image fusion between FDG-PET/CT and CECT was accomplished using Brainlab software according to the position of the 2 skulls simulated in the CECT image and PET/CT image, respectively. After verification of the image fusion accuracy, the 3D reconstruction images of the metabolic tumor, vessels, and other critical structures could be visualized within the same coordinate system. These sagittal, coronal, axial, and 3D reconstruction images were used to determine the virtual osteotomy sites and reconstruction plan, which was provided to the surgeon and used for surgical navigation. The average shift of the 3D image fusion between FDG-PET/CT and CECT was less than 1 mm. This technique, by clearly showing the metabolic tumor volume and the most suitable vessels for anastomosis, facilitated resection and reconstruction of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma. We used 3D image fusion of FDG-PET/CT and CECT to successfully accomplish resection and reconstruction of recurrent maxillary squamous cell carcinoma

  15. [CONE BEAM COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY IN DIAGNOSTICS OF ODONTOGENIC MAXILLARY SINUSITIS (CASE REPORTS)].

    PubMed

    Demidova, E; Khurdzidze, G

    2017-06-01

    Diagnostic studies performed by cone beam computed tomography Morita 3D made possible to obtain high resolution images of hard tissues of upper jawbone and maxillary sinus, to detect bony tissue defects, such as odontogenic cysts, cystogranulomas and granulomas. High-resolution and three dimensional tomographic image reconstructions allowed for optimal and prompt determination of the scope of surgical treatment and planning of effective conservative treatment regimen. Interactive diagnostics helped to estimate cosmetic and functional results of surgical treatment, to prevent the occurrence of surgical complications, and to evaluate the efficacy of conservative treatment. The obtained data contributed to determination of particular applications of cone beam computed tomography in the diagnosis of odontogenic maxillary sinusitis, detection of specific defects with cone beam tomography as the most informative method of diagnosis; as well as to determination of weak and strong sides, and helped to offer mechanisms of x-ray diagnostics to dental surgeons and ENT specialists.

  16. Maxillary and Mandibular First Premolars Showing Three-Cusp Pattern: An Unusual Presentation

    PubMed Central

    Kotrashetti, Vijayalakshmi; Nayak, Aarati; Patil, Viraj; Kulkarni, Mayuri; Somannavar, Pradeep

    2013-01-01

    Dental anatomy is the study of morphology of various teeth in human dentitions. The application of dental anatomy in clinical practice is important, and dentist should have a thorough knowledge regarding the morphology of the teeth. At times as a result of genetic variation, environmental factors, diet of an individual and race, variations in the morphology of the teeth can be observed. These variations have been extensively studied by the researcher in the field of anthropology to define a particular race. The most commonly observed changes include peg-shaped laterals, shovel-shaped incisors, and extra cusp on molar. Common variations documented with regard to maxillary and mandibular first premolars are the variation in the number of roots. But the variations with respect to crown morphology are few. We report a first documented unusual presentation of maxillary and mandibular first premolars with three-cusps pattern in a female patient. PMID:23476817

  17. Rehabilitation of maxillary arch with attachment-retained mesh-reinforced single complete denture

    PubMed Central

    Vamsi Krishna, C H; Rao, A Kaleshwar; Sekhar, N Chandra; Shastry, Y Mahadev

    2014-01-01

    Fabrication of conventional complete dentures was one of the most commonly advised treatment options to mange edentulous patients since many years. One of the commonly encountered challenging tasks in prosthodontics is a clinical situation in which patients have maxillary completely edentulous arches opposing mandibular natural dentition. This situation can be effectively managed by retaining some of the natural teeth as overdenture abutments. Tooth supported overdenture retained by attachments will improve retention, support and stability, and reduces rate of ridge resorption along with psychological benefits to the patients by providing tactile sensation. The present case report describes management of patients with edentulous maxillary arch opposing natural mandibular dentition-rehabilitated attachment-retained mesh-reinforced overdenture. PMID:24574522

  18. Rehabilitation of maxillary arch with attachment-retained mesh-reinforced single complete denture.

    PubMed

    Vamsi Krishna, C H; Rao, A Kaleshwar; Sekhar, N Chandra; Shastry, Y Mahadev

    2014-02-26

    Fabrication of conventional complete dentures was one of the most commonly advised treatment options to mange edentulous patients since many years. One of the commonly encountered challenging tasks in prosthodontics is a clinical situation in which patients have maxillary completely edentulous arches opposing mandibular natural dentition. This situation can be effectively managed by retaining some of the natural teeth as overdenture abutments. Tooth supported overdenture retained by attachments will improve retention, support and stability, and reduces rate of ridge resorption along with psychological benefits to the patients by providing tactile sensation. The present case report describes management of patients with edentulous maxillary arch opposing natural mandibular dentition-rehabilitated attachment-retained mesh-reinforced overdenture.

  19. Chronic sinusitis and woodworking as risk factors for cancer of the maxillary sinus in northeast Japan.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, H; Hozawa, J; Saito, H; Murai, K; Hirata, H; Takasaka, T; Togawa, K; Konno, A; Kimura, Y; Kikuchi, A

    1989-01-01

    In the period 1983 to 1985, 66 patients presented to six Japanese university hospitals with squamous cell carcinoma of the maxillary sinus. Using self-administered questionnaires, a case-control study was conducted to examine history of nasal diseases, occupational exposures, and other possible risk factors for this disease. For each patient, two controls were selected from the general population, matched to the patient by sex, age (+/- 5 years), and district of residence. A history of chronic sinusitis was associated with a 2.3-fold increase in risk (p = 0.05). A high relative risk was also observed in males with an occupational history of woodworking or joinery, particularly when these jobs involved sanding or lathing practices (RR = 7.5, p = 0.02). No association between cigarette smoking and maxillary sinus cancer was observed in this study and no evidence was found that indoor air pollution in the home is involved in cancer development.

  20. Orthodontic movement of a maxillary incisor through the midpalatal suture: a case report.

    PubMed

    Garib, Daniela Gamba; Janson, Guilherme; dos Santos, Patrícia Bittencourt Dutra; de Oliveira Baldo, Taiana; de Oliveira, Gabriela Ulian; Ishikiriama, Sérgio Kiyoshi

    2012-03-01

    Orthodontic space closure is a treatment alternative when a maxillary central incisor is missing. The objective of this report was to present an unusual treatment in which a right maxillary central incisor was moved through the midpalatal suture to replace the absent contralateral tooth. The biologic aspects and clinical appearance of the recontoured lateral and central incisors were analyzed. The position of the examined teeth and the appearance of the surrounding soft tissues were satisfactory; however, the upper midline frenulum deviated to the left. The incisor was successfully moved with no obvious detrimental effects as observed on the final radiographs. In the radiographic and tomographic examinations, the midline suture seemed to have followed the tooth movement. The patient expressed satisfaction with the results. It was concluded that orthodontic movement of the central incisor to replace a missing contralateral tooth is a valid treatment option, and the achievement of an esthetic result requires an interdisciplinary approach, including restorative dentistry and periodontics.

  1. Morphometric analysis of treatment effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction in growing Class III patients

    PubMed Central

    De Clerck, H. J.; Cevidanes, L. H.; Franchi, L.

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the present morphometric investigation was to evaluate the effects of bone-anchored maxillary protraction (BAMP) in the treatment of growing patients with Class III malocclusion. The shape and size changes in the craniofacial configuration of a sample of 26 children with Class III malocclusions consecutively treated with the BAMP protocol were compared with a matched sample of 15 children with untreated Class III malocclusions. All subjects in the two groups were at a prepubertal stage of skeletal development at time of first observation. Average duration of treatment was 14 months. Significant treatment-induced modifications involved both the maxilla and the mandible. The most evident deformation consisted of marked forward displacement of the maxillary complex with more moderate favourable effects in the mandible. Deformations in the vertical dimension were not detected. The significant deformations were associated with significant differences in size in the group treated with the BAMP protocol. PMID:21187527

  2. Endodontic treatment of a maxillary second molar with developmental anomaly: a case report.

    PubMed

    Asgary, Saeed

    2007-01-01

    Fusion is a rare occurrence in molar teeth. The purpose of this rare case presentation is to describe the nonsurgical endodontic treatment of maxillary molar. A 28-year-old patient was referred for endodontic treatment of her chronic apical abscess of right maxillary second molar. In the clinical examination, a sinus tract adjacent to involved tooth and a small crown of supernumerary tooth fused to the buccal surface of the molar at gingival margin was observed. Endodontic treatment was decided for the involved molar for functional reason. Recall examination, a year after completion of endodontic and restorative treatments, showed the tooth was clinically asymptomatic and there was no radiographic lucency around the apical region.

  3. Reconstruction of a Post Traumatic Anterior Maxillary Defect by Transport Distraction Osteogenesis.

    PubMed

    Rajkumar, K; Neelakandan, R S; Devadoss, Pradeep; Bandyopadhyay, T K

    2017-03-01

    Rehabilitation of segmental defects of maxilla presents a reconstructive challenge to obtain an ideal osseous form and height with adequate soft tissue investment. Though variety of prosthetic and surgical reconstructive options like the use of vascularized and non vascularized bone grafts are available they produce less than optimal results. Bone transport distraction is a reliable procedure in various maxillofacial bony defect reconstruction techniques. We describe herein a technique of maxillary bone transport distraction using an indigenously designed, custom made trifocal transport distractor performed in a post traumatic avulsive defect of the anterior maxilla. Transport distraction was successful for anterior maxillary alveolar bony regeneration, with excellent soft tissue cover and vestibular depth, which also helped close an oroantral/oronasal fistula.

  4. Dens invaginatus in primary maxillary molar: a rare case report and review of literature.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Arpana V; Bansal, Abhinav; Kulkarni, Vinaya Kumar; Dhar, Reema Sharma

    2012-05-01

    Dens invaginatus is a rare developmental anomaly. It is unusual to find this anomaly in primary dentition. Diagnosis of this dens invaginatus is important due to possible pulpal involvement. Not only that, simultaneous presence of other dental anomaly may require long-term treatment planning. Dens invaginatus can be detected clinically in the tooth presenting unusual crown morphology or radiographically as radiopacity within tooth. This article describes one of the first case reports of dens invaginatus in primary maxillary second molar in a 5-year-old female patient. How to cite this article: Bansal AV, Bansal A, Kulkarni VK, Dhar RS. Dens Invaginatus in Primary Maxillary Molar: A Rare Case Report and Review of Literature. Int J Clin Pediatr Dent 2012;5(2):139-141.

  5. Stable region for maxillary dental cast superimposition in adults, studied with the aid of stable miniscrews.

    PubMed

    Chen, G; Chen, S; Zhang, X Y; Jiang, R P; Liu, Y; Shi, F H; Xu, T M

    2011-05-01

    To identify a stable and reproducible reference region to superimpose serial maxillary dental models in adult extraction cases. Fifteen adult volunteers were enrolled. To reduce protrusion, bilateral maxillary first premolars were extracted in all volunteers. Each volunteer received six miniscrews, including two loaded miniscrews used to retract anterior teeth and four unloaded miniscrews. Impressions for maxillary models were taken at T1 (1 week after miniscrew placement) and T2 (17 months later). Dental models were created and then scanned using a laser scanner. Stability of the miniscrews was evaluated, and dental models were registered using stationary miniscrews. The palatal region, where deviation was within 0.5 mm in all subjects, was determined to be the stable region. Reproducibility of the new palatal region for 3D digital model superimposition was evaluated. Deviation of the medial 2/3 of the palatal region between the third rugae and the line in contact with the distal surface of the bilateral maxillary first molars was within 0.5 mm. Tooth movement of 15 subjects was measured to evaluate the validity of the new 3D superimposition method. Displacements were 8.18 ± 2.94 mm (central incisor) and 2.25 ± 0.73 mm (first molar) measured by miniscrew superimposition, while values of 7.81 ± 2.53 mm (central incisor) and 2.29 ± 1.03 mm (first molar) were measured using the 3D palatal vault regional superimposition method; no significant difference was observed. The medial 2/3 of the third rugae and the regional palatal vault dorsal to it is a stable region to register 3D digital models for evaluation of orthodontic tooth movement in adult patients. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  6. Management of the maxillary cancer patient--what the general dentist should know.

    PubMed

    Karunagaran, Sanjay; Markose, Sony C; Paprocki, Gregory J

    2013-01-01

    Maxillary defects are created following surgical treatment of patients with benign and malignant neoplasms, trauma or congenital defects. The size of these defects influences the degree of debilitation. This patient lacks the conventional support, stability and retention when fabrication of the prosthesis is planned. The prosthesis that is used to close this palatal defect is called the hollow bulb obturator. CLINICAL OUTCOMES: It improves speech, deglutition, esthetics and function for the patient.

  7. Evaluation of skeletal maturity using maxillary canine, mandibular second and third molar calcification stages.

    PubMed

    Trakinienė, Giedrė; Smailienė, Dalia; Kučiauskienė, Ainė

    2016-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate whether the calcification stages of maxillary canine, mandibular second molar, and mandibular third molar can be used for assessment of growth phase. The study group consisted of 274 subjects. Pre-treatment digital panoramic and lateral cephalometric radiographs of the patients were analysed. The patients' age was ranging from 7 to 19 years. Right maxillary canine, mandibular second molar and third molar were used as a sample. The teeth mineralization was assessed using modification of Gleiser and Hunt method. The skeletal maturation was assessed by the cervical vertebrae maturation (CVM) method. A significant association was found between CVM stage 2 and maxillary canine (UC) stage 4, mandibular second molar (LM2) stage 4, and mandibular third molar (LM3) stage 1. CVM stage 3 corresponded with UC stage 5, LM2 stage 5, LM3 stage 2. CVM stage 4 matched with UC stage 5, LM2 stage 6 and LM3 stage 3. The highest correlations between CVM and calcification stages were in the group of the maxillary canine (r = 0.812, P < 0.01) and mandibular second molar (r = 0.824, P < 0.01). Limitation of our study was that the study sample was not very big and the distribution value in the groups was very high, so it was impossible to check more statistical parameters. The calcification stages of UC, LM2, and LM3 as indicators of skeletal maturity could be clinically used with caution, until this method is verified with a larger sample group. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Orthodontic Society. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. The genetics of shovel shape in maxillary central incisors in man.

    PubMed

    Blanco, R; Chakraborty, R

    1976-03-01

    From dental casts of 94 parent-offspring and 127 full-sib pairs, sampled from two Chilean populations, shovelling indices are computed to measure the degree of shovelling of maxillary central incisors quantitatively. Genetic correlations are computed to determine the role of genetic factors in explaining the variation in this trait. Assuming only hereditary factors to be responsible for the transmission of shovel shape, 68% of total variability is ascribed to the additive effect of genes.

  9. A Retrospective Analysis of Dental Implants Replacing Failed Implants in Grafted Maxillary Sinus: A Case Series.

    PubMed

    Manor, Yifat; Chaushu, Gavriel; Lorean, Adi; Mijiritzky, Eithan

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate the survival rate of dental implants replacing failed implants in grafted maxillary sinuses using the lateral approach vs nongrafted posterior maxillae. A retrospective analysis was conducted to study the survival of secondary dental implants inserted in the posterior maxilla in previously failed implant sites between the years 2000 and 2010. The study group consisted of patients who had also undergone maxillary sinus augmentation, and the control group consisted of patients in whom implants in the posterior maxilla had failed. Clinical and demographic data were analyzed using a structured form. Seventy-five patients with a total of 75 replaced implants were included in the study. The study group comprised 40 patients and the control group, 35 patients. None of the replaced implants in the study group failed, resulting in an overall survival of 100%; three replaced implants in the control group failed (92% survival). The main reason for the primary implant removal was lack of osseointegration (35 [87.5%] of 40 study group implants and 23 [65.7%] of 35 control group implants [P = .027]). The difference between the groups with regard to the timing of primary implant failure was statistically significant. The study group had more early failures of the primary implant than did the control group (77% vs 62%; P = .038). Dental implants replaced in the posterior maxilla had a high survival rate. A higher rate of survival was found in augmented maxillary sinus sites. Within the limits of the present study, it can be concluded that previous implant failures in the grafted maxillary sinus should not discourage practitioners from a second attempt.

  10. Management of geminated maxillary lateral incisor using cone beam computed tomography as a diagnostic tool.

    PubMed

    James, Elizabeth Prabha; Johns, Dexton Antony; Johnson, Ki; Maroli, Ramesh Kumar

    2014-05-01

    Geminated teeth are consequences of developmental anomalies leading to joined elements, due to incomplete attempt of one tooth germ to divide into two. This case report describes successful endodontic treatment of an unaesthetic geminated permanent maxillary lateral incisor tooth and its esthetic rehabilitation using all ceramic crowns. Newer imaging technique like cone beam computed tomography was taken for the better understanding of the complicated root canal morphology.

  11. The Maxillary Palp of Aedes aegypti, a Model of Multisensory Integration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    organization is similar to the maxillary palps of Drosophila melanogaster (de Bruyne et al., 1999; Stocker, 1994). The microtrichia are distributed...and sample quality was determined at 260 nm/280 nm. For Next-Generation Sequencing , RNA samples were sent to the Genomic Services Lab at Hudson Alpha... the Genomic Services Lab at Hudson Alpha Institute for Biotechnology for Illumina sequencing and data analyses. This work was sup- ported in part by a

  12. Maxillary gap at 11-13 weeks' gestation: marker of cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Chaoui, R; Orosz, G; Heling, K S; Sarut-Lopez, A; Nicolaides, K H

    2015-12-01

    To describe a new sign of cleft lip and palate (CLP), the maxillary gap, which is visible in the mid-sagittal plane of the fetal face used routinely for measurement of nuchal translucency thickness. This was a retrospective study of stored images of the mid-sagittal view of the fetal face at 11-13 weeks' gestation in 86 cases of CLP and 86 normal controls. The images were examined to determine if a maxillary gap was present, in which case its size was measured. In 37 (43.0%) cases of CLP the defect was isolated and in 49 (57.0%) there were additional fetal defects. In the isolated CLP group, the diagnosis of facial cleft was made in the first trimester in nine (24.3%) cases and in the second trimester in 28 (75.7%). In the group with additional defects, the diagnosis of facial cleft was made in the first trimester in 46 (93.9%) cases and in the second trimester in three (6.1%). A maxillary gap was observed in 96% of cases of CLP with additional defects, in 65% of those with isolated CLP and in 7% of normal fetuses. There was a large gap (>1.5 mm) or complete absence of signals from the maxilla in the midline in 69% of cases of CLP with additional defects, in 35% of those with isolated CLP and in none of the normal controls. The maxillary gap is a new simple marker of possible CLP, which could increase the detection rate of CLP, especially in isolated cases. Copyright © 2015 ISUOG. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Maxillary canine-first premolar bilateral transposition in a Class III patient: A case report.

    PubMed

    Potrubacz, Maciej Iancu; Tepedino, Michele; Chimenti, Claudio

    2016-05-01

    Tooth transposition is a rare dental anomaly that often represents a challenge for the clinician. The case of a girl with skeletal Class III malocclusion and concomitant maxillary canine-first premolar bilateral transposition, followed from 7 to 17 years of age, is presented. After a first phase of treatment aimed at resolving the Class III malocclusion, the transposition was maintained and the case finalized with a multibracket appliance.

  14. Miniscrew implant-supported maxillary canine retraction with and without corticotomy-facilitated orthodontics.

    PubMed

    Aboul-Ela, Shadw Mohammed Badr El-Din; El-Beialy, Amr Ragab; El-Sayed, Karim Mohamed Fawzy; Selim, Essam Mohamed Nassef; El-Mangoury, Nagwa Helmy; Mostafa, Yehya Ahmed

    2011-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to clinically evaluate miniscrew implant-supported maxillary canine retraction with corticotomy-facilitated orthodontics. The sample consisted of 13 adult patients (5 men, 8 women; mean age, 19 years) exhibiting Class II Division 1 malocclusion with increased overjet requiring the therapeutic extraction of the maxillary first premolars, with subsequent retraction of the maxillary canines. Corticotomy-facilitated orthodontics was randomly assigned to 1 side of the maxillary arch at the canine-premolar region, and the other side served as the control. By using miniscrews as anchorage, canine retraction was initiated via closed nickel-titanium coil springs applying 150 g of force per side. The following variables were examined over a 4-month follow-up period: rate of tooth movement, molar anchorage loss, plaque index, gingival index, probing depth, attachment loss, and gingival recession. The average daily rate of canine retraction was significantly higher on the corticotomy than the control side by 2 times during the first 2 months after the corticotomy surgery. This rate of tooth movement declined to only 1.6 times higher in the third month and 1.06 times higher by the end of the fourth month. No molar anchorage loss occurred during canine retraction on either the operated or the nonoperated side. There was no statistically significant difference between preoperative and postoperative measurements of plaque index, probing depth, attachment loss, and gingival recession. Corticotomy-facilitated orthodontics can be a feasible treatment modality for adults seeking orthodontic treatment with reduced treatment times. Copyright © 2011 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Alveolar bone level changes in maxillary expansion treatments assessed through CBCT.

    PubMed

    Pham, Vi; Lagravère, Manuel O

    2017-03-01

    Determine changes in alveolar bone levels during expansion treatments as assessed through cone-beam computer tomography (CBCT). Sixty-one patients from Edmonton, Canada, with maxillary transverse deficiencies were split into three groups. One group was treated with a bone-anchored expander, another group was treated with a tooth-borne maxillary expander (Hyrax) and one group was untreated. CBCTs were obtained from each patient at two time points (initialT 1 and at removal of appliance after 6 months T 2 ). CBCTs were analyzed using AVIZO software and landmarks were placed on different dental and skeletal structures. Intra-examiner reliability for landmarks was done by randomly selecting 10 images and measuring each landmark 3 times, 1 week apart. Descriptive statistics, intraclass correlation coefficients (ICC) and ANOVA analysis were used to determine if there were changes to the alveolar bone levels and if these changes were statistically significant within each group. Landmarks reliability showed an ICC of at least 0.99 with a 95% confidence interval and a mean measurement error of at least 0.2067mm. Descriptive statistics show that changes in alveolar bone levels were less than 1mm for all three groups and therefore clinically insignificant. Changes between groups were not statistically different (P<0.05) from one another with the exception of 8 distances. However, since the distances were small, they were not considered clinically significant. Alveolar bone level changes were similar in maxillary expansion treatments and in the control group. The effects of maxillary expansion treatments on alveolar bone levels are not clinically significant. Copyright © 2016 CEO. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Single-rooted maxillary first molar with a single canal: endodontic retreatment.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Francisco; Cisneros-Cabello, Rafael; Aranguren, José Luis; Estévez, Roberto; Velasco-Ortega, Eugenio; Segura-Egea, Juan José

    2008-12-01

    This case report presents an unusual root canal system in a maxillary first molar tooth: a single canal in a single root. The endodontic access cavity displayed only 1 canal orifice. This case demonstrated that: 1) clinicians must have adequate knowledge about root canal morphology and its variations; 2) the location and morphology of root canals should be identified radiologically before the root canal treatment; and 3) careful examination of radiographs and the internal anatomy of teeth is essential.

  17. Maxillary distraction osteogenesis at Le Fort-I level induces bone apposition at infraorbital rim.

    PubMed

    Rattan, Vidya; Jena, Ashok Kumar; Singh, Satinder Pal; Utreja, Ashok Kumar

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate whether there is any remodeling of bone at infraorbital rim following maxillary distraction osteogenesis (DO) at Le Fort-I level. Twelve adult subjects in the age range of 17-21 years with complete unilateral cleft lip and palate underwent advancement of the maxilla by DO. The effect of maxillary DO on the infraorbital rim remodeling was evaluated from lateral cephalograms recorded prior to the DO (T0), at the end of DO (T1), and at least 2-years after the DO (T2) by Walker's analysis. The ANOVA and two-tailed t test were used and probability value (P value) 0.05 was considered as statistically significant level. There was anterior movement of maxilla by 9.22 ± 3.27 mm and 7.67 ± 3.99 mm at the end of immediate (T1) and long-term (T2) follow-up of maxillary DO, respectively. The Walker's analysis showed 1.49 ± 1.22 mm and 2.31 ± 1.81 mm anterior movement of the infraorbital margin (Orbitale point) at the end of T1 and T2, respectively (P < 0.01). This apposition of bone at the infraorbital rim region further improved the facial profile of these patients. The advancement of maxilla by distraction osteogenesis at Le Fort-I level induced significant bone apposition at infraorbital rim. Patients with mild midface hypoplasia who would otherwise may be candidates for osteotomy at Le Fort-II or Le Fort-III level may benefit from maxillary distraction at Le Fort-I level.

  18. Reconstruction of the premaxilla by segmental distraction osteogenesis for maxillary retrusion in cleft lip and palate.

    PubMed

    Kim, Bong Chul; Lee, Sang-Hwy; Park, Kyung-Ran; Jung, Young-Soo; Yi, Choong-Kook

    2014-03-01

    We present a strategy to target one of the main areas causing retruded maxilla, the premaxillary region for patients with cleft lip and palate (CLP). Advancement of the premaxilla by distraction osteogenesis is attempted, and the retruded anterior maxilla, the collapsed dental space, and the arch shape are sufficiently improved. This strategy also prevents deterioration of the velopharyngeal incompetency function. The procedure seems to be a good option for the treatment of maxillary retrusion and malocclusion for CLP.

  19. Knowledge of orthodontic tooth movement through the maxillary sinus: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wentian; Xia, Kai; Huang, Xinqi; Cen, Xiao; Liu, Qing; Liu, Jun

    2018-05-23

    To investigate the feasibility, safety and stability of current interventions for moving teeth through the maxillary sinus (MTTMS) by performing a systematic review of the literature. The electronic databases PubMed, Embase, CENTRAL, Web of Science, CBM, CNKI and SIGLE were searched without a language restriction. The primary outcomes were parameters related to orthodontic treatment, including orthodontic protocols, magnitude of forces, type of tooth movement, duration and rate of tooth movement, and remolding of alveolar bone and the maxillary sinus floor. The secondary outcomes were safety and stability, including root resorption, perforation of the sinus floor, loss of pulp vitality and periodontal health and relapse. Nine case reports with 25 teeth were included and systematically analyzed. Fifty to two hundred g of force was applied to move teeth through the maxillary sinus. Bodily movement was accomplished, but initial tipping was observed in 7 cases. The rate was 0.6-0.7 mm/month for molar intrusion and 0.16-1.17 and 0.05-0.16 mm/month for mesial-distal movement of premolars and molars, respectively. Bone formation and remolding of the sinus floor occurred in 7 cases. Root resorption within 6 to 30 months was observed in 3 cases, while no cases of perforation of the sinus floor, loss of pulp vitality, periodontal health impairment or relapse were reported. At the present stage, no evidence-based protocol could be recommended to guide MTTMS. The empirical application of constant and light to moderate forces (by TAD, segment and multibrackets) to slowly move teeth through or into the maxillary sinus in adults appears to be practical and secure. Bodily movement was accomplished, but teeth appear to be easily tipped initially, potentially resulting in root resorption. However, this conclusion should be interpreted with caution as the currently available evidence is based on only a few case reports or case series and longitudinal or controlled studies are

  20. External apical root resorption in maxillary incisors in orthodontic patients: associated factors and radiographic evaluation

    PubMed Central

    Patanaporn, Virush; Janhom, Apirum; Korwanich, Narumanus

    2012-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the incidence and degree of external apical root resorption of maxillary incisors after orthodontic treatment and to evaluate particular associated factors related to external apical root resorption. Materials and Methods The records and maxillary incisor periapical radiographs of 181 patients were investigated. Crown and root lengths were measured and compared on the pre- and post-treatment periapical radiographs. Crown length was measured from the center of the incisal edge to the midpoint of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Root length was measured from the CEJ midpoint to the root apex. A correction factor for the enlargement difference was used to calculate root resorption. Results The periapical radiographs of 564 teeth showed that the average root resorption was 1.39±1.27 (8.24±7.22%) and 1.69±1.14 mm (10.16±6.78%) for the maxillary central and lateral incisors, respectively. The results showed that the dilacerated or pointed roots, maxillary premolar extraction cases, and treatment duration were highly significant factors for root resorption (p<0.001). Allergic condition was a significant factor at p<0.01. Age at the start of treatment, large overjet, and history of facial trauma were also factors significantly associated with root resorption (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in root resorption among the factors of gender, overbite, tongue-thrusting habit, types of malocclusion, and types of bracket. Conclusion These results suggested that orthodontic treatment should be carefully performed in pre-treatment extraction patients who have pointed or dilacerated roots and need long treatment duration. PMID:23071964

  1. External apical root resorption in maxillary incisors in orthodontic patients: associated factors and radiographic evaluation.

    PubMed

    Nanekrungsan, Kamonporn; Patanaporn, Virush; Janhom, Apirum; Korwanich, Narumanus

    2012-09-01

    This study was performed to evaluate the incidence and degree of external apical root resorption of maxillary incisors after orthodontic treatment and to evaluate particular associated factors related to external apical root resorption. The records and maxillary incisor periapical radiographs of 181 patients were investigated. Crown and root lengths were measured and compared on the pre- and post-treatment periapical radiographs. Crown length was measured from the center of the incisal edge to the midpoint of the cemento-enamel junction (CEJ). Root length was measured from the CEJ midpoint to the root apex. A correction factor for the enlargement difference was used to calculate root resorption. The periapical radiographs of 564 teeth showed that the average root resorption was 1.39±1.27 (8.24±7.22%) and 1.69±1.14 mm (10.16±6.78%) for the maxillary central and lateral incisors, respectively. The results showed that the dilacerated or pointed roots, maxillary premolar extraction cases, and treatment duration were highly significant factors for root resorption (p<0.001). Allergic condition was a significant factor at p<0.01. Age at the start of treatment, large overjet, and history of facial trauma were also factors significantly associated with root resorption (p<0.05). There was no statistically significant difference in root resorption among the factors of gender, overbite, tongue-thrusting habit, types of malocclusion, and types of bracket. These results suggested that orthodontic treatment should be carefully performed in pre-treatment extraction patients who have pointed or dilacerated roots and need long treatment duration.

  2. Apical root resorption of incisors after orthodontic treatment of impacted maxillary canines: a radiographic study.

    PubMed

    Brusveen, Elin Marie Gravdal; Brudvik, Pongsri; Bøe, Olav Egil; Mavragani, Maria

    2012-04-01

    The purpose of the study was to evaluate impacted maxillary canines as risk factor for orthodontic apical root resorption. The sample comprised 66 patients treated with fixed appliances. Thirty-two patients with a unilateral impacted maxillary canine, which was distanced from the roots of the incisors at a preliminary phase of treatment before bonding, formed the impaction group, and 34 patients without impactions served as the controls. Root shortening was calculated by using pretreatment and posttreatment intraoral radiographs. Inclination of the eruption path of the impacted canine relative to the midline, axis of the lateral incisor, and nasal line, root development, and the medial and vertical positions of the impacted tooth were recorded on orthopantomograms and lateral cephalometric films. The follicle/tooth ratio was evaluated by using periapical radiographs. No significant difference in apical resorption of the maxillary incisors was detected between the impaction and control groups, or between the incisors of the impacted and contralateral sides in the same subject. Likewise, no difference in the severity of root resorption was found between the incisors of impacted side alone and the incisors of the control group. Mesial and vertical inclinations of the impacted canines were negatively related to a lateral incisor's root resorption. No correlations were found between resorption and medial or vertical position of the crown of the canine. The follicle/tooth ratio was significantly related to the mesial inclination of the impacted canine, but not to root resorption. An impacted maxillary canine, after being distanced from the incisor roots, does not seem to be a risk factor for apical root resorption during orthodontic treatment. Copyright © 2012 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prevalence of an unusual hypoplastic defect of the permanent maxillary lateral incisor in great apes.

    PubMed

    Hannibal, Darcy L

    2017-02-01

    In this article, I describe a previously unreported maxillary lateral incisor defect (MLID) of the enamel in great apes and evaluate potential general causes (genetic, systemic stress, or localized disturbance), as well as examine differences in prevalence among the represented taxa. This defect occurred only on the labial surface of the maxillary lateral incisor and extended from the cervical-mesial quarter of the crown to the mesial edge of the cementoenamel junction (CEJ). The study sample consisted of 136 great ape specimens, including 41 gorillas, 25 chimpanzees, and 70 orangutans from the Smithsonian's National Museum of Natural History great ape collection. I used logistic regression to assess the prevalence of this defect in the sample and a binomial probability test for bilaterality. This defect of the maxillary lateral incisor is the second most common defect I observed in the study sample (30.1% of individuals affected), and was more likely to occur in individuals with linear enamel hypoplasia (LEH) and pit defects than those without these defects. Among specimens with both maxillary lateral incisors present, the defect was mostly bilateral. Pan and Pongo were significantly more likely to exhibit the defect than Gorilla. Between Pongo species, Pongo pygmaeus was significantly more likely to exhibit the defect than Pongo abelii. Between subspecies of Gorilla, although Gorilla gorilla gorilla exhibited the defect and Gorilla gorilla beringei did not, the difference was not significant. No sex differences were evident in this sample. The prevalence of this defect indicates it is not hereditary. The bilateral trend indicates a systemic cause, although the high inter-tooth specificity suggests a local disturbance and a combination of both is possible. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Evaluation of maxillary growth: is there any difference using relief incision during palatoplasty?

    PubMed

    Maluf, Ivan; Doro, Ubiratan; Fuchs, Taíse; dos Santos, Diego Esteves; dos Santos Sacomam, Franserg; da Silva Freitas, Renato; Roca, Guilherme Berto

    2014-05-01

    Scar retraction due to exposed bone in palatoplasty is the leading cause of constricted maxilla. Modern techniques have focused on minimizing the effects of scarring by reducing the exposure of the bone area. The objective of the study was to compare the palatal mucoperiosteal detachment with minimal lateral incision, followed by their synthesis, with the maintenance of lateral areas for relaxation (similar to the von Langenbeck technique) and evaluate the transversal development of the maxilla. A prospective, randomized study was conducted, in which the molding of the dental arch of 14 pigs in 2 stages (at 1 month and 5 months) was performed. The pigs were divided into 3 groups: group 1 underwent lateral incision of the palate for mucoperiosteal detachment and maintenance of bone exposure; group 2 underwent mucoperiosteal palatal detachment with lateral access and no bone exposure; and group 3, the control animals, did not undergo any surgical procedures. Measurements of the dental arches were compared between the groups to assess differences in the development of the maxillary transverse diameter. There were no animals lost during the study. Group 1 showed greater growth restriction of the transverse diameter of the maxilla (36%) when compared with groups 2 (56%) and 3 (59%). Groups 2 and 3 showed similar transverse maxillary development, with no statistical difference. The technique of mucoperiosteal detachment without lateral relief incision has the advantage of reducing future morbidity of a constricted maxilla. This study demonstrated that the technique described can reduce rates of maxillary underdevelopment, a significant complication inherent in the procedure for palatoplasty. The lateral incisions reduce maxillary growth by approximately 20% as compared with this technique. Level II of evidence.

  5. Evaluation of Palatal Plate Thickness of Maxillary Prosthesis on Phonation- A Comparative Clinical Study

    PubMed Central

    B, Sreedevi; Anne, Gopinadh; Manne, Prakash; Bindu O, Swetha Hima; Atla, Jyothi; Deepthi, Sneha; Chaitanya A, Krishna

    2014-01-01

    Background: Prosthodontic treatment involves clinical procedures which influence speech performance directly or indirectly. Prosthetic rehabilitation of missing teeth with partial or complete maxillary removable dentures influences the individual voice characteristics like Phonation, resonance etc. Aim: To evaluate the effect of Acrylic palatal plate thickness (1mm-3mm) of maxillary prosthesis on phonation. Materials and Methods: Twelve subjects were selected randomly between the age group of 20-25 years who have full complement of teeth and have no speech problems. Speech evaluation was done under four experimental conditions i.e. Without any experimental acrylic palatal plate (control), with experimental acrylic palatal plates of thickness 1 mm, 2 mm and 3 mm respectively. The speech material for phonation test consisted of Vowels sounds /a/, /i/, and /o/. Speech analysis to assess phonation was done using digital acoustic analysis (PRAAT software). The obtained results were statistically analyzed by One-way ANOVA and Tukey’s multiple post-hoc for comparison of four experimental conditions with respect to different vowel sounds. Results: Mean harmonics to noise ratio (HNR) values obtained for all the Experimental conditions did not show significant difference (p>0.05). In conclusion, an increase in the thickness of the acrylic palatal plate of maxillary prosthesis for about 1 mm - 3mm in complete or partial maxillary removable dentures resulted in no significant effect on phonation of vowel sounds /a/, /i/ and /o/. Conclusion: Increasing the thickness of the palatal plate from 1 mm to 3 mm has not shown any significant effect on the phonation. PMID:24959508

  6. Predicted Versus Attained Surgical Correction of Maxillary Advancement Surgery Using Cone Beam Computed Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    significant differences, one of the most important was the evident edema in the post-surgical CBCTs that were taken within four months of surgery . v... surgery limited to LeFort I maxillary advancement, in conjunction with pre- and post-surgical orthodontics, at Joint Base San Antonio – Lackland Air...Advancement Surgery Using CBCT 7. Intended publication/meeting: Requirement for Masters in Oral Biology 8. "Required by" date: 01-July-2016 9. Date of

  7. Embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma in the maxillary sinus with orbital involvement in a pediatric patient: Case report

    PubMed Central

    de Melo, Ana Carolina Rodrigues; Lyra, Tácio Candeia; Ribeiro, Isabella Lima Arrais; da Paz, Alexandre Rolim; Bonan, Paulo Rogério Ferreti; de Castro, Ricardo Dias; Valença, Ana Maria Gondim

    2017-01-01

    This report presents a case of embryonal rhabdomyosarcoma (eRMS) located in the left maxillary sinus and invading the orbital cavity in a ten-year-old male patient who was treated at a referral hospital. The images provided from the computed tomography showed a heterogeneous mass with soft-tissue density, occupying part of the left half of the face inside the maxillary sinus, and infiltrating and destroying the bone structure of the maxillary sinus, left orbit, ethmoidal cells, nasal cavity, and sphenoid sinus. An analysis of the histological sections revealed an undifferentiated malignant neoplasm infiltrating the skeletal muscle tissue. The immunohistochemical analysis was positive for the antigens: MyoD1, myogenin, desmin, and Ki67 (100% positivity in neoplastic cells), allowing the identification of the tumour as an eRMS. The treatment protocol included initial chemotherapy followed by radiotherapy and finally surgery. The total time of the treatment was nine months, and in 18-mo of follow-up period did not show no local recurrences and a lack of visual impairment. PMID:29291204

  8. Assessing bone volume for orthodontic miniplate fixation below the maxillary frontal process.

    PubMed

    Präger, T M; Brochhagen, H G; Mischkowski, R; Jost-Brinkmann, P-G; Müller-Hartwich, R

    2014-09-01

    The maxillary bone below the frontal process is used for orthodontic anchorage; indications have included skeletally anchored protraction of the maxilla for treating Class III malocclusions or the intrusion of teeth in patients with a deep bite. This study was conducted to assess the condition of bone before cortically implanting miniplates in that area of the maxilla. A total of 51 thin-sliced computed tomography scans of 51 fully-dentate adult patients (mean age 24.0 ± 8.1 years; 27 men and 24 women) obtained prior to third-molar osteotomy were evaluated. Study parameters included total bone thickness, thickness of the facial cortical plate, and width of the nasal maxillary buttress. All these parameters were measured at different vertical levels. The bone volume adjacent to the piriform aperture was most pronounced at the basal level and decreased progressively toward more cranial levels. The basal bone structure had a mean total thickness of 7.8 mm, facial cortical plate thickness of 1.9 mm, and nasal maxillary buttress width of 9.2 mm. At 16 mm cranial to the aperture base, these values fell to 5.6 mm, 1.3 mm, and 5.8 mm, respectively. These bone measurements suggest that screws 7 mm in length can be inserted at the base level of the piriform aperture and screws 5 mm long at the cranial end of the bone.

  9. Orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors: a 3D finite element method study

    PubMed Central

    Saga, Armando Yukio; Maruo, Hiroshi; Argenta, Marco André; Maruo, Ivan Toshio; Tanaka, Orlando Motohiro

    2016-01-01

    Objective: In orthodontic treatment, intrusion movement of maxillary incisors is often necessary. Therefore, the objective of this investigation is to evaluate the initial distribution patterns and magnitude of compressive stress in the periodontal ligament (PDL) in a simulation of orthodontic intrusion of maxillary incisors, considering the points of force application. Methods: Anatomic 3D models reconstructed from cone-beam computed tomography scans were used to simulate maxillary incisors intrusion loading. The points of force application selected were: centered between central incisors brackets (LOAD 1); bilaterally between the brackets of central and lateral incisors (LOAD 2); bilaterally distal to the brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 3); bilaterally 7 mm distal to the center of brackets of lateral incisors (LOAD 4). Results and Conclusions: Stress concentrated at the PDL apex region, irrespective of the point of orthodontic force application. The four load models showed distinct contour plots and compressive stress values over the midsagittal reference line. The contour plots of central and lateral incisors were not similar in the same load model. LOAD 3 resulted in more balanced compressive stress distribution. PMID:27007765

  10. Non-intrusive optical study of gas and its exchange in human maxillary sinuses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Persson, L.; Andersson, M.; Svensson, T.; Cassel-Engquist, M.; Svanberg, K.; Svanberg, S.

    2007-07-01

    We demonstrate a novel non-intrusive technique based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy to investigate human maxillary sinuses in vivo. The technique relies on the fact that free gases have much sharper absorption features (typical a few GHz) than the surrounding tissue. Molecular oxygen was detected at 760 nm. Volunteers have been investigated by injecting near-infrared light fibre-optically in contact with the palate inside the mouth. The multiply scattered light was detected externally by a handheld probe on and around the cheek bone. A significant signal difference in oxygen imprint was observed when comparing volunteers with widely different anamnesis regarding maxillary sinus status. Control measurements through the hand and through the cheek below the cheekbone were also performed to investigate any possible oxygen offset in the setup. These provided a consistently non-detectable signal level. The passages between the nasal cavity and the maxillary sinuses were also non-intrusively optically studied, to the best of our knowledge for the first time. These measurements provide information on the channel conductivity which may prove useful in facial sinus diagnostics. The results suggest that a clinical trial together with an ear-nose-throat (ENT) clinic should be carried out to investigate the clinical use of the new technique.

  11. Health of periodontal tissues and resorption status after orthodontic treatment of impacted maxillary canines.

    PubMed

    Oz, A Z; Ciger, S

    2018-03-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the changes of incisor root resorption associated with impacted maxillary canines and health of periodontal tissues around maxillary canines erupted with orthodontic treatment. Twenty patients with a unilateral palatally impacted maxillary canine were included in the study. Cone-beam computed tomography images taken before and after orthodontic treatment were compared with the contralateral canines serving as control teeth. Root resorption was present in 10% of central and 40% of lateral incisors before treatment. After treatment, the incidence of resorption decreased. The thickness of the buccal bone surrounding the impacted canines was similar to that surrounding the contralateral canines, except in the apical area. Periodontal pocket depth and alveolar bone loss were greater for the impacted canine teeth than for the contralateral canines. Incisor root resorption associated with impacted canine teeth showed signs of repair after orthodontic treatment. Slight differences related to periodontal health were found between the previously impacted teeth and contralateral canine teeth.

  12. Observation of maxillary incisive canal using dry skulls between Hellman's dental age IA and IIIC.

    PubMed

    Naitoh, Munetaka; Arikawa, Tomoko; Nishiyama, Wataru; Gotoh, Kenichi; Nawa, Hiroyuki; Fukuta, Osamu; Ariji, Eiichiro

    2015-01-01

    The maxillary incisive canals were observed in childhood from infancy to school-aged children to clarify their development. Cone-beam computed tomography was performed to investigate 44 dry child skulls. Two-dimensional images of various planes in the maxillary incisive canal were reconstructed on a computer using 3-dimensional visualization and measurement software. Then, antero-posterior angulation, and antero-posterior and lateral axes of the maxillary incisive canal were measured at the inferior and middle levels. The mean difference of angulation between the inferior and middle levels was 2.3 degrees in IIC, and 11.1 degrees in IIIC. The mean ratio of the lateral axis to antero-posterior axis at the middle level was 2.54 in IIC, and 1.93 in IIIC. In conclusion, it was antero-posteriorly straight from IA to IIC, and, after IIIA, it curved at the middle level. The cross-sectional shape in IIC was depressed with a larger lateral axis.

  13. Olfactory channels associated with the Drosophila maxillary palp mediate short- and long-range attraction

    PubMed Central

    Dweck, Hany KM; Ebrahim, Shimaa AM; Khallaf, Mohammed A; Koenig, Christopher; Farhan, Abu; Stieber, Regina; Weißflog, Jerrit; Svatoš, Aleš; Grosse-Wilde, Ewald

    2016-01-01

    The vinegar fly Drosophila melanogaster is equipped with two peripheral olfactory organs, antenna and maxillary palp. The antenna is involved in finding food, oviposition sites and mates. However, the functional significance of the maxillary palp remained unknown. Here, we screened the olfactory sensory neurons of the maxillary palp (MP-OSNs) using a large number of natural odor extracts to identify novel ligands for each MP-OSN type. We found that each type is the sole or the primary detector for a specific compound, and detects these compounds with high sensitivity. We next dissected the contribution of MP-OSNs to behaviors evoked by their key ligands and found that MP-OSNs mediate short- and long-range attraction. Furthermore, the organization, detection and olfactory receptor (Or) genes of MP-OSNs are conserved in the agricultural pest D. suzukii. The novel short and long-range attractants could potentially be used in integrated pest management (IPM) programs of this pest species. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14925.001 PMID:27213519

  14. Effect of Royal Jelly on new bone formation in rapid maxillary expansion in rats.

    PubMed

    Özan, Fatih; Çörekçi, Bayram; Toptaş, Orçun; Halicioğlu, Koray; Irgin, Celal; Yilmaz, Fahri; Hezenci, Yasin

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of long and short term systemic usage of royal jelly on bone formation in the expanded maxillary suture in a rat model. Twenty eight Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 4 equal groups: Control (C); Only Expansion (OE), Royal Jelly (RJ) group, Royal Jelly was given to rats by oral gavage only during the expansion and retention period; Royal Jelly plus Nursery (RJN) group, Royal Jelly was given to rats by oral gavage during their nursery phase of 40 days and during the retention period. After the 5 day expansion period was completed, the rats underwent 12 days of mechanical retention. All rats were sacrificed in same time. Histological examination was performed to determine the number of osteoclasts, number of osteoblasts, number of capillaries, inflammatory cell infiltration, and new bone formation. New bone formation, number of osteoclasts, number of osteoblasts, and the number of capillaries in the expanded maxillary sutures were higher in the RJ and RJN groups than in the other groups. Statistical analysis also demonstrated that new bone formation and the number of osteoblasts was also highest in the RJN group. The systemic administration of Royal Jelly in conjunction with rapid maxillary expansion may increase the quality of regenerated bone.

  15. Submorphotypes of the maxillary first molar and their effects on alignment and rotation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hong-Kyun; Kwon, Ho Beom; Hyun, Hong-Keun; Jung, Min-Ho; Han, Seong Ho; Park, Young-Seok

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the shape differences in maxillary first molars with orthographic measurements using 3-dimensional virtual models to assess whether there is variability in morphology that could affect the alignment results when treated by straight-wire appliance systems. A total of 175 maxillary first molars with 4 cusps were selected for classification. With 3-dimensional laser scanning and reconstruction software, virtual casts were constructed. After performing several linear and angular measurements on the virtual occlusal plane, the teeth were clustered into 2 groups by the method of partitioning around medoids. To visualize the 2 groups, occlusal polygons were constructed using the average data of these groups. The resultant 2 clusters showed statistically significant differences in the measurements describing the cusp locations and the buccal and lingual outlines. The rotation along the centers made the 2 cluster polygons look similar, but there was a difference in the direction of the midsagittal lines. There was considerable variability in morphology according to 2 clusters in the population of this study. The occlusal polygons showed that the outlines of the 2 clusters were similar, but the midsagittal line directions and inner geometries were different. The difference between the morphologies of the 2 clusters could result in occlusal contact differences, which might be considered for better alignment of the maxillary posterior segment. Copyright © 2014 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Eruption of the permanent maxillary canines in relation to mandibular second molar maturity.

    PubMed

    Perinetti, Giuseppe; Callovi, Marilena; Salgarello, Stefano; Biasotto, Matteo; Contardo, Luca

    2013-07-01

    To evaluate the timing of spontaneous maxillary canine eruption in relation to stages of mandibular second molar maturation. Potential confounding effects from such factors as age, growth phase, and facial features were also explored. A sample of 106 healthy subjects (48 females and 58 males; age range, 9.4-14.3 years) with both permanent maxillary canines during the final phase of intraoral eruption were included. Mandibular second molar maturation (stages E to H) was assessed according to the method of Demirjian. Skeletal maturity was determined using the cervical vertebral maturational (CVM) method. Facial vertical and sagittal relationships were evaluated by recording the Sella-Nasion/mandibular plane (SN/MP) angle and the ANB angle. An ordered multiple logistic regression was run to evaluate adjusted correlation of each parameter with the mandibular second molar maturational stage. Overall, the prevalence of the different second molar maturational stages was 36.8%, 37.8%, and 27.4% for stages E, F and G, respectively. According to the regression model, this relation was not influenced by sex, CVM stage, SN/MP angle, and ANB angle. Irrespective of sex, growth phase, and facial features, the maturational stage of the mandibular second molar may be a reliable indicator for the timing of spontaneous eruption of the maxillary canine.

  17. Geometric analysis of maxillary first premolar prepared by two nickel-titanium rotary instruments.

    PubMed

    Al-Sudani, Dina; Almalki, Majed; Al-Shahrani, Saad; Ahlquist, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The present study was conducted with the aim of evaluating and comparing the shaping ability of two Nickel-titanium rotary instruments, with two disparate design features, on root canal geometry of extracted human maxillary first premolars using microcomputed tomography. Twenty four bifurcated maxillary first premolars were divided into two groups and embedded in a rubber-based impression material. Both groups were submitted to micro-computed tomography before and after canal preparation (buccal and palatal) with either ProFile Vortex or Revo-S rotary instruments. Images were reconstructed and cross-sections corresponding to a distance 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 7 mm from the anatomical apex were selected for canal transportation analysis. Volume changes were also measured. The degree and direction of canal transportation were non-significant for both instruments. Statistically significant differences were observed only between levels in the buccal canal in both groups. There was no significant difference between the two rotary systems in regards to the volume of dentin removed. Our findings showed that ProFile Vortex and Revo-S instruments respected the original root canal anatomy and behaved similarly. ProFile Vortex rotary systems produced with innovative process were concluded to shape the upper maxillary premolar by leading minimal canal transportation, similar to Revo-S, rotary systems produced from traditional process.

  18. Partitioning the components of maxillary tooth displacement by the comparison of data from three cephalometric superimpositions.

    PubMed

    Baumrind, S; Ben-Bassat, Y; Bravo, L A; Curry, S; Korn, E L

    1996-01-01

    Using roentgenographic cephalograms from a sample of subjects with metallic implants, appropriately superimposed tracings were used to distinguish developmental and treatment-associated displacements of the maxillary central incisor and first molar associated "local" changes within the periodontium from "secondary" changes which reflect sutural and appositional growth at more distant osseous loci. Tracings were superimposed on anterior cranial base (ACB), on the maxillary implants only (IMP_MAX), and according to the best fit of maxillary anatomic structures without reference to the implants (A_MAX). Using the IMP_MAX superimposition, one could measure total local displacement at any landmark taking into consideration the effects of all appositional and resorptive changes on the superior and anterior surfaces of the palate, whereas using the A_MAX superimposition one could measure local displacement without consideration of surface appositional and resorptive changes. If the second of these measurements were subtracted from the first, the result would be a direct measurement of the effects of surface appositional and resorptive changes as they are expressed at that particular landmark. This strategy has enabled us to quantify and report the amount of accommodation which occurs at the location of each dental landmark in association with the resorptive and appositional changes which occur through time on the superior and anterior surfaces of the hard palate.

  19. Morphology of the Physiological Apical Foramen in Maxillary and Mandibular First Molars

    PubMed Central

    Abarca, J.; Zaror, C.; Monardes, H.; Hermosilla, V.; Muñoz, C.; Cantin, M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Information regarding the anatomy of the physiological apical foramen is limited. Knowing its diameter and shapes contributes to clinical work, specifically to the cleaning and shaping of the apical third. The aim of this ex vivo study was to determine the minimum and maximum diameters and shape of the physiological apical foramen in the roots of maxillary and mandibular first molars. A descriptive study was conducted on 89 recently extracted first molars. Roots 3–5 mm from the apex were sectioned and prepared for analysis at 40× magnification. The minimum and maximum diameters of each physiological foramen were measured using the program Motic Images plus 2.0 ML. The shape of the foramina, classified as round, oval or irregular, was determined by the difference between the maximum and minimum diameters. A total of 174 physiological foramina were analyzed. The average of the minimum and maximum diameters was between 0.24–0.33 mm in maxillary first molars and between 0.25–0.33 mm in mandibular first molars. In maxillary molars, the most common shape of the foramen was oval (50%), then irregular (32%), then round (18%). In mandibular molars, the oval shape was also the most frequent (59%), followed by irregular (23%) and round (18%). The findings of this study regarding the morphology of physiological apical foramina in first molars make it easier for the operator to choose the appropriately-sized instruments to perform endodontic therapy successfully. PMID:25937698

  20. Morphology of the Physiological Apical Foramen in Maxillary and Mandibular First Molars.

    PubMed

    Abarca, J; Zaror, C; Monardes, H; Hermosilla, V; Muñoz, C; Cantin, M

    2014-06-01

    Information regarding the anatomy of the physiological apical foramen is limited. Knowing its diameter and shapes contributes to clinical work, specifically to the cleaning and shaping of the apical third. The aim of this ex vivo study was to determine the minimum and maximum diameters and shape of the physiological apical foramen in the roots of maxillary and mandibular first molars. A descriptive study was conducted on 89 recently extracted first molars. Roots 3-5 mm from the apex were sectioned and prepared for analysis at 40× magnification. The minimum and maximum diameters of each physiological foramen were measured using the program Motic Images plus 2.0 ML. The shape of the foramina, classified as round, oval or irregular, was determined by the difference between the maximum and minimum diameters. A total of 174 physiological foramina were analyzed. The average of the minimum and maximum diameters was between 0.24-0.33 mm in maxillary first molars and between 0.25-0.33 mm in mandibular first molars. In maxillary molars, the most common shape of the foramen was oval (50%), then irregular (32%), then round (18%). In mandibular molars, the oval shape was also the most frequent (59%), followed by irregular (23%) and round (18%). The findings of this study regarding the morphology of physiological apical foramina in first molars make it easier for the operator to choose the appropriately-sized instruments to perform endodontic therapy successfully.

  1. [Trauma induced left maxillary sinus dislocation of eyeball--a case report].

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Liu, Cuiping; Cui, Liping

    2013-01-01

    Patient male, 27 year old. Left facial and head trauma for 6 hours, due to motor vehicle accident. Patient state of mind was clear at arrival to hospital. Body temperature: 36C; Pulse: 80 Time/Minute; Breath: 20 Time/Minute; Blood pressure: 120/80 mm Hg. An irregular, horizontal laceration at arch of left eyebrow, approximately 8-10 cm. A laceration on left wing of nose skin, approximately 1 cm. A laceration also under lower eyelid skin of right eye, approximately 2 cm. Left blepharedema and enophthalmos. Orbital and nasal sinuses CT indications:contusion and laceration of the left frontal lobe of brain; fracture of the left orbital frontal, ethmoid, sphenoid bone, left nasal, maxillary sinus and zygoma with soft tissue contusion and laceration; the left eyeball and optic nerve sunk into the maxillary sinus (See figure 1). (1) Multiple orbital fractures; (2) Left maxillary sinus dislocation of eyeball; (3) The left frontal lobe contusion and laceration of brain.

  2. Alteration of maxillary and mandibular growth of adult patients with unoperated isolated cleft palate.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yunqiang; Wu, Yeke; Gu, Yifei; Yang, Qijian; Shi, Bing; Zheng, Qian; Wang, Yan

    2013-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of cleft palate itself on the growth of maxilla and mandible. Fifty-two adult female patients with unoperated isolated cleft palate and 52 adult female individuals with normal occlusion were included in our study. Computer software was used for lateral cephalometry measurement. Manual measurement was performed for dental cast measurements, and sample t test analysis was applied to analyze the differences between the 2 groups using SPSS 17.0. The sella-nasion-subspinale point angle, subspinale-nasion-supramentale point angle, and maxillary arch length of the cleft group were significantly smaller than those of the control group (P < 0.01). Both maxillary and mandibular posterior dental arch widths of the cleft group were significantly larger compared with the control group (P < 0.01), whereas the sella-nasion-supramentale point angle, mandible arch length, palate height, and palate shelf inclination did not differ between the 2 groups. The measurements did not differ between the submucosal cleft and the overt cleft patients. Cleft palate itself has adverse effects on the maxilla growth with shorter maxillary arch length and wider posterior dental arch width.

  3. Full arch rehabilitation in severe maxillary atrophy with palatal approach implant placement: a case report

    PubMed Central

    BASSI, M. ANDREASI; LOPEZ, M.A.; ANDRISANI, C.; ORMANIER, Z.; GARGARI, M.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Purpose The edentulous severely atrophic maxilla, as consequence of alveolar bone resorption and pneumatisation of the maxillary sinus, represents a serious limitation to the implant rehabilitation. Implants insertion via palatal approach (PA), in combination with relatively minimally invasive techniques aimed at increasing bone volume without the use of autologous bone harvesting is a valid alternative among the options for the rehabilitation of the upper jaw. Clinical case In a 70-year-old female, with a severe maxillary atrophy, 6 spiral taper implants were placed with the PA, combined with the bilateral transcrestal elevation of both the sinus floors and nasal cavities; a further GBR, with resorbable pericardium membrane covering a termoplastic allograft associated to a xenograft, was performed. The second stage was performed after 6 months. Implant prosthetic functionalization was carried out in 4 months by placing the removable prosthesis in direct contact with the healing cup screws. After that period the case was finalized with a hybrid prosthesis. Clinical and radiographic follow-ups were carried out at 6 months and at one year after prosthetic finalization, during which no pathological signs were recorded. Conclusions The PA implant insertion described by the Authors, combined with bone augmentation procedures, performed in the same stage, may represent a valid and reliable solution to rehabilitate maxillary edentulous patients. PMID:28042439

  4. Sinus floor elevation from a maxillary molar tooth extraction socket in a patient with chronic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tözüm, Tolga F; Dursun, Erhan; Tulunoglu, Ibrahim

    2009-03-01

    The compromised nature of the residual interradicular bone after extraction of periodontally hopeless maxillary molars often requires a sinus elevation procedure to ideally place the implants to accept future prosthesis. Maxillary sinus elevation surgery is a procedure used to increase the volume of bone mass so that dental implants can be placed. This article documents a sinus floor elevation technique through an extraction socket in a 65-year-old white male with chronic inflammation to increase the bone mass after the extraction of a periodontally involved maxillary molar tooth. Computerized tomography revealed an increased thickness of the sinus membrane, which was attributed to possible chronic sinus inflammation and periodontal inflammation. After consultation with the Department of Otolaryngology, it was diagnosed as chronic inflammation without any contraindication for sinus elevation surgery or implant placement. One month after the extraction, the sinus floor elevation surgery was performed through the extraction socket, and implants were placed 4 months later. An uneventful healing was noted after 6 months of osseointegration; two porcelain-fused-to-metal crowns were fabricated. Clinical follow-up took place every 3 months for 3 years, and successful healing was achieved. The patient was satisfied with the esthetic and functional results of the oral rehabilitation. Sinus floor elevation through an extraction socket without any residual bone, followed by dental implant placement, provided successful functional results and acceptable stability.

  5. Quality of life in advanced maxillary sinus cancer after radical versus conservative maxillectomy.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liting; Liu, Dan; Guo, Qiyun; Shen, Bin

    2013-07-01

    A study of patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer who underwent radical or conservative maxillectomy was performed to show the differences between the 2 groups in patients' survival rate and quality of life (QOL). A total of 61 advanced maxillary sinus cancer patients from Weifang People's Hospital in China were traced: 27 radical maxillectomy and 34 conservative maxillectomy. Survival rate was compared between the 2 groups. Quality of life assessments were performed at the time of preoperation as well as 6, 12, and 18 months after the operation. Measures included the University of Washington-QOL scale (UW-QOL) and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. The UW-QOL scale scores of the composite score, appearance, activity, recreation, swallowing, speech, and chewing in the conservative surgical group were much higher than those in the radical surgical group. However, there is no big difference in total survival rate between these 2 groups. Also, no significant difference can be seen in the scores of pain, employment, and shoulder between the 2 groups. At the 6-month follow-up, the radical maxillectomy had more effects on anxiety than the conservative maxillectomy, while they are almost equally effective on depression. The 12-month and 18-month follow-ups showed that the radical maxillectomy made a greater impact on both anxiety and depression than the conservative maxillectomy. Conservative maxillectomy is more effective than radical maxillectomy to preserve the QOL of patients with advanced maxillary sinus cancer.

  6. Modification of endoscopic medial maxillectomy: a novel approach for inverted papilloma of the maxillary sinus.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, A; Pal, S; Srivastava, A; Saha, S

    2015-02-01

    To describe modification to endoscopic medial maxillectomy for treating extensive Krouse stage II or III inverted papilloma of the nasal and maxillary sinus. Ten patients with inverted papilloma arising from the nasoantral area underwent diagnostic nasal endoscopy, contrast-enhanced computed tomography scanning of the paranasal sinus and pre-operative biopsy of the nasal mass. They were all managed using endoscopic medial maxillectomy and followed up for seven months to three years without recurrence. Most patients were aged 41-60 years at presentation, and most were male. Presenting symptoms were nasal obstruction, mass in the nasal cavity and epistaxis. In each case, computed tomography imaging showed a mass involving the nasal cavity and maxillary sinus, with bony remodelling. The endoscopic medial maxillectomy approach was modified by making an incision in the pyriform aperture and removing part of the anterolateral wall of the maxilla bone en bloc. Modified endoscopic medial maxillectomy providing full access to the maxillary and ethmoid sinuses is described in detail. This effective, reproducible technique is associated with reduced operative time and morbidity.

  7. Dental anomalies associated with buccally- and palatally-impacted maxillary canines.

    PubMed

    Sajnani, Anand K; King, Nigel M

    2014-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the association of both buccally- and palatally-impacted canines with other dental anomalies. This retrospective study was conducted on a population of 533 southern Chinese children and adolescents who had impacted maxillary canines that had been treated in the Paediatric Dentistry and Orthodontics Clinic, Prince Philip Dental Hospital, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong. Descriptions of the impacted canine and other associated anomalies were obtained from the case notes and radiographs. Clinical photographs and study casts were used, where available. A total of 253 (47.5%) patients with impacted maxillary canines were diagnosed with other dental anomalies. Microdontia was the most frequently-occurring anomaly reported in these patients, with the maxillary lateral incisor the most commonly affected tooth. Other odontogenic anomalies that were associated with both buccally- and palatally-impacted canines included hypodontia, supernumerary teeth, transposition of other teeth, enamel hypoplasia, other impacted teeth, and dens invaginatus. Both buccally- and palatally-impacted canines were found to be associated with other odontogenic anomalies. © 2013 Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  8. Developmental Disturbances of a Maxillary Central Incisor due to Trauma to Its Predecessor: A Case Report

    PubMed Central

    Karataş, Merve Safa; Sönmez, Işıl Şaroğlu

    2013-01-01

    Objective To report the effects of a primary tooth trauma on the underlying permanent tooth germ. Clinical Presentation and Intervention A 12-year-old girl was referred to our clinic with a complaint of poor aesthetic appearance. The crown of the permanent maxillary left central tooth exhibited an increased clinical crown height with an ‘enamel hyperplasia’ in the cervical third and had hypoplastic enamel with yellowish-brown discoloration extending from the middle third to the incisal edge. Radiographic examination revealed that the permanent maxillary left central tooth had abnormal root morphology with root dilaceration. The patient revealed a history of trauma at the age of 4 years. An aesthetic restoration with light-curing resin composite was performed on the vestibular surface of the maxillary left permanent central tooth. Conclusion Sequelae of a primary tooth trauma on the permanent tooth were restored. We recommend that parents should be aware of the consequences of untreated trauma to a primary tooth. Educational and preventive programmes on dental trauma are required to educate parents about emergency knowledge and sequelae of dental trauma. PMID:23689528

  9. [Autotransplantation of a maxillary incisor and orthodontic care: a case study].

    PubMed

    Charpentier, Valentine; Makaremi, Masrour; Brondeau, François de

    2017-12-01

    Severely impacted teeth with atypical root anatomy do not respond well to orthodontic traction after surgical exposure. Consequently, they are often removed, but replacing them with dental prostheses can prove difficult in patients who are still growing. Thus, autotransplantation seems to be the only way to preserve a natural tooth and the alveolar bone. An upper central incisor impacted in the region of the nasal cavities with an open apex was diagnosed in an 8.5-year-old female patient. The tooth displayed a curved root pressed against the maxillary cortical bone preventing orthodontic traction treatment. Through this clinical case involving autotransplantation of a maxillary incisor report and a review of the literature, this article explores the indications and exposes the different stages of this orthodontic-surgical protocol. In this case, autotransplantation enabled restoration of maxillary arch continuity. After two years of orthodontic treatment, the bone reconstruction of the extraction site was very satisfactory. The benefits of this technique and the precautions to be taken are discussed as well as the various protocols. The increasing success rate of this surgical procedure makes it possible to consider it as a protocol for the future. © EDP Sciences, SFODF, 2017.

  10. Retention period after treatment of posterior crossbite with maxillary expansion: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Costa, Julia Garcia; Galindo, Thaís Magalhães; Mattos, Claudia Trindade; Cury-Saramago, Adriana de Alcantara

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this systematic review was to evaluate the duration of the retention period in growing patients undergoing maxillary expansion and its relation with posterior crossbite stability. Search strategies were executed for electronic databases Cochrane Library, Web of Science, PubMed and Scopus, which were completed on January 15, 2016. The inclusion criteria included randomized, prospective or retrospective controlled trials in growing subjects with posterior crossbite; treated with maxillary expanders; retention phase after expansion; post-retention phase of at least 6 months. The exclusion criteria were anterior crossbite, craniofacial anomalies, surgery or another orthodontic intervention; case reports; author's opinions articles, thesis, literature reviews and systematic reviews. The risk of bias of selected articles was assessed with Cochrane risk of bias tool for RCTs and Downs and Black checklist for non-RCTs. A total of 156 titles/abstracts was retrieved, 44 full-texts were examined, and 6 articles were selected and assessed for their methodological quality. The retention period after maxillary expansion ranged between 4 weeks and 16 months. Fixed (acrylic plate, Haas, Hyrax and quad-helix) or removable (Hawley and Hawley expander) appliances were used for retention. Six months of retention with either fixed or removable appliances seem to be enough to avoid relapse or to guarantee minimal changes in a short-term follow-up.

  11. Within-Subject Comparison of Maxillary Implant-Supported Overdentures with and without Palatal Coverage.

    PubMed

    Zembic, Anja; Tahmaseb, Ali; Wismeijer, Daniel

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare patient-reported outcomes for maxillary implant-supported overdentures with and without palatal coverage. Twenty-one maxillary edentulous patients (six women, 15 men) were included. In total, 42 implants were inserted in the anterior maxilla. All patients received implant-supported overdentures on two retentive anchors with palatal coverage for 2 months. Thereafter, patient satisfaction was assessed by means of questionnaires capturing the oral health impact profile (OHIP) on functional limitation, physical pain, psychological discomfort, physical, psychological and social disability, and handicap. Additionally, cleaning ability, general satisfaction, speech, comfort, esthetics, stability, and chewing ability were rated. Subsequently, palatal coverage was reduced, and the patients wore the overdentures for another 2 months. Patient satisfaction was obtained in the same way as above, and the evaluated parameters were compared for the two overdenture designs. There were no significant differences between implant-supported overdentures with and without palatal coverage for any of the OHIP domains. The evaluation of additional parameters revealed significantly higher patient satisfaction for esthetics (mean difference 8.8 mm ± 24.6) and taste (mean difference 28.4 mm ± 29.9) without palatal coverage, p < .01. Within the limits of this study, maxillary overdentures supported by two implants were equally satisfactory with and without palatal coverage. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Periodontal Tissues, Maxillary Jaw Bone, and Tooth Regeneration Approaches: From Animal Models Analyses to Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Batool, Fareeha; Strub, Marion; Petit, Catherine; Bugueno, Isaac Maximiliano; Bornert, Fabien; Clauss, François; Kuchler-Bopp, Sabine; Benkirane-Jessel, Nadia

    2018-01-01

    This review encompasses different pre-clinical bioengineering approaches for periodontal tissues, maxillary jaw bone, and the entire tooth. Moreover, it sheds light on their potential clinical therapeutic applications in the field of regenerative medicine. Herein, the electrospinning method for the synthesis of polycaprolactone (PCL) membranes, that are capable of mimicking the extracellular matrix (ECM), has been described. Furthermore, their functionalization with cyclosporine A (CsA), bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2), or anti-inflammatory drugs’ nanoreservoirs has been demonstrated to induce a localized and targeted action of these molecules after implantation in the maxillary jaw bone. Firstly, periodontal wound healing has been studied in an induced periodontal lesion in mice using an ibuprofen-functionalized PCL membrane. Thereafter, the kinetics of maxillary bone regeneration in a pre-clinical mouse model of surgical bone lesion treated with BMP-2 or BMP-2/Ibuprofen functionalized PCL membranes have been analyzed by histology, immunology, and micro-computed tomography (micro-CT). Furthermore, the achievement of innervation in bioengineered teeth has also been demonstrated after the co-implantation of cultured dental cell reassociations with a trigeminal ganglia (TG) and the cyclosporine A (CsA)-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) scaffold in the jaw bone. The prospective clinical applications of these different tissue engineering approaches could be instrumental in the treatment of various periodontal diseases, congenital dental or cranio-facial bone anomalies, and post-surgical complications. PMID:29772691

  13. Diagnostic methods for assessing maxillary skeletal and dental transverse deficiencies: A systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Sawchuk, Dena; Currie, Kris; Vich, Manuel Lagravere; Palomo, Juan Martin

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the accuracy and reliability of the diagnostic tools available for assessing maxillary transverse deficiencies. Methods An electronic search of three databases was performed from their date of establishment to April 2015, with manual searching of reference lists of relevant articles. Articles were considered for inclusion if they reported the accuracy or reliability of a diagnostic method or evaluation technique for maxillary transverse dimensions in mixed or permanent dentitions. Risk of bias was assessed in the included articles, using the Quality Assessment of Diagnostic Accuracy Studies tool-2. Results Nine articles were selected. The studies were heterogeneous, with moderate to low methodological quality, and all had a high risk of bias. Four suggested that the use of arch width prediction indices with dental cast measurements is unreliable for use in diagnosis. Frontal cephalograms derived from cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) images were reportedly more reliable for assessing intermaxillary transverse discrepancies than posteroanterior cephalograms. Two studies proposed new three-dimensional transverse analyses with CBCT images that were reportedly reliable, but have not been validated for clinical sensitivity or specificity. No studies reported sensitivity, specificity, positive or negative predictive values or likelihood ratios, or ROC curves of the methods for the diagnosis of transverse deficiencies. Conclusions Current evidence does not enable solid conclusions to be drawn, owing to a lack of reliable high quality diagnostic studies evaluating maxillary transverse deficiencies. CBCT images are reportedly more reliable for diagnosis, but further validation is required to confirm CBCT's accuracy and diagnostic superiority. PMID:27668196

  14. An in vitro study of mesiobuccal root thickness of maxillary first molars.

    PubMed

    Mohammadzadeh Akhlaghi, Nahid; Ravandoust, Yasaman; Najafi, Mohammad; Dadresanfar, Bahareh

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the internal anatomy of root canal system can significantly influence outcomes of root canal treatment. The aim of this in vitro study was to measure the thickness of mesiobuccal root at different levels in maxillary first molars. In this cross-sectional study, forty extracted human maxillary first molars were radiographed; accordingly, the mesial and distal root thicknesses of mesiobuccal (MB) roots were measured at four parallel horizontal levels. The samples were sectioned at the measured levels and then sections were scanned and saved in the computer. Buccal (B), Palatal (P), Mesial (M) and Distal (D) aspects of root thicknesses in single-canalled roots were measured. In two-canalled mesiobuccal roots, Distobuccal (DB) and Distopalatal (DP) aspects were evaluated alongside other measurements. Average radicular thickness in each aspect and each level was compared using ANOVA and t-test. A total of 25 had two canals and 15 had one canal in MB root. In single-canalled roots M and D aspects were the thinnest whereas in two-canalled samples, the thicknesses of DP and DB aspects were significantly less than others (P<0.001). The B and P had the greatest thicknesses in all the samples. The results showed that special attention should be paid to "danger zone" areas of mesiobuccal maxillary first molar roots in order to avoid technical mishaps.

  15. Morphological evaluation of maxillary second molars with fused roots: a micro-CT study.

    PubMed

    Ordinola-Zapata, R; Martins, J N R; Bramante, C M; Villas-Boas, M H; Duarte, M H; Versiani, M A

    2017-12-01

    To evaluate the internal and external morphologies of fused-rooted maxillary second molars by means of micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) analysis. A total of 100 fused-rooted maxillary second molars from a Brazilian subpopulation were divided into six groups according to the root morphology. The samples were scanned at a resolution of 19.6 μm and evaluated with regard to the external morphology of the roots, the root canal configuration, the percentage frequency of C-shaped canals and isthmuses, as well as the morphology of the root canal system at 1, 2 and 3 mm from the anatomical apex of the fused roots. The most prevalent root canal fusions were type 1, mesiobuccal root fused with distobuccal root (32%), followed by type 3, DB root fused with P root (27%), and type 4, MB root fused with DB root, and P root fused with MB or DB roots (21%). The prevalence of C-shaped root canal systems were 22%. Depending on the type of root fusion, the percentage frequency of isthmuses in the apical level varied from 9.3% to 42.8%, whilst the presence of apical deltas ranged from 18.5% to 57.1% of teeth. The root canal system of maxillary second molars with fused roots may have a high incidence of merging canals, isthmuses, apical deltas and C-shaped configurations. © 2017 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. The Palatal Approach to Distraction Osteogenesis of the Anterior Maxillary Alveolus.

    PubMed

    Bell, Robert E

    2015-07-01

    This report describes the palatal approach to gain access for osteodistraction of the anterior maxilla to improve the vector of force during distraction. This case report illustrates a novel approach to anterior maxillary osteodistraction. The palatal approach allows the maxillary segment to be moved anteriorly and inferiorly. This is in contrast to the buccal approach, in which the palatal tissue creates a vector of force toward the palate. The vascular pedicle for the transport segment is the labial mucosa and musculature. In the present case, the alveolar segment was advanced 3.6 mm anteriorly and 12.2 mm inferiorly as measured by pre- and postoperative computed tomograms. This patient with a large vertical alveolar defect and high smile line had successful restoration with dental implants. The result has been stable for 14 months. In this case, the palatal approach to the anterior maxillary osteotomy was shown to be an effective method of reconstructing a large vertical anterior defect. Copyright © 2015 American Association of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Removable splint with locking attachments for maxillary distraction osteogenesis with the RED system.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, E Y; Suzuki, B

    2007-12-01

    The external traction hooks of the intraoral splint used to control traction forces applied to the maxilla with the rigid external distraction system represent a major barrier to surgical procedures. The purpose of this article is to introduce a removable intraoral splint with locking attachments that can be placed post-surgically immediately before distraction, facilitating surgery and consequently reducing the operative time. Fifteen cleft lip and palate patients underwent maxillary distraction osteogenesis using a rigid external distraction device in combination with the proposed removable splint that was fixed onto the maxillary teeth to provide anchorage. Initial records showed severe maxillary hypoplasia and negative overjet. The removable splint was fabricated using 1.5-mm diameter stainless-steel rigid orthodontic wires soldered to the locking attachments (Y&B Products LP, Chiang Mai, Thailand), making possible its placement post-surgically. Stable splint fixation was achieved prior to the distraction procedure and the desired treatment goals were reached. No complications inserting or removing the splint post-surgically, including pain or discomfort, were observed. The use of the removable splint with locking attachments has proved to be a highly effective fixation approach to manage the severely hypoplastic maxilla, eliminating lip constraints resulting from scarring, and allowing for easier, more deliberate and careful dissection.

  18. Odor Coding in the Maxillary Palp of the Malaria Vector Mosquito Anopheles gambiae

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Tan; Qiu, Yu Tong; Wang, Guirong; Kwon, Jae Young; Rutzler, Michael; Kwon, Hyung-Wook; Pitts, R. Jason; van Loon, Joop J.A.; Takken, Willem; Carlson, John R.; Zwiebel, Laurence J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background Many species of mosquitoes, including the major malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, utilize carbon dioxide (CO2) and 1-octen-3-ol as olfactory cues in host-seeking behaviors that underlie their vectorial capacity. However, the molecular and cellular basis of such olfactory responses remains largely unknown. Results Here, we use molecular and physiological approaches coupled with systematic functional analyses to define the complete olfactory sensory map of the An. gambiae maxillary palp, an olfactory appendage that mediates the detection of these compounds. In doing so, we identify three olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) that are organized in stereotyped triads within the maxillary-palp capitate-peg-sensillum population. One ORN is CO2-responsive and characterized by the coexpression of three receptors that confer CO2 responses, whereas the other ORNs express characteristic odorant receptors (AgORs) that are responsible for their in vivo olfactory responses. Conclusions Our results describe a complete and highly concordant map of both the molecular and cellular olfactory components on the maxillary palp of the adult female An. gambiae mosquito. These results also facilitate the understanding of how An. gambiae mosquitoes sense olfactory cues that might be exploited to compromise their ability to transmit malaria. PMID:17764944

  19. Improving mechanical properties of maxillary complete dentures through a bioinspired engineering design.

    PubMed

    White, James A P; Bond, Ian P; Jagger, Daryll C

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated how ribbed design features, including palatal rugae, may be used to significantly improve the structural performance of a maxillary denture under load. A computer-aided design model of a generic maxillary denture, incorporating various rib features, was created and imported into a finite element analysis program. The denture and ribbed features were assigned the material properties of standard denture acrylic resin, and load was applied in two different ways: the first simulating a three-point flexural bend of the posterior section and the second simulating loading of the entire palatal region. To investigate the combined use of ribbing and reinforcement, the same simulations were repeated with the ribbed features having a Young modulus two orders of magnitude greater than denture acrylic resin. For a prescribed load, total displacements of tracking nodes were compared to those of a control denture (without ribbing) to assess relative denture rigidity. When subjected to flexural loading, an increase in rib depth was seen to result in a reduction of both the transverse displacement of the last molar and vertical displacement at the centerline. However, ribbed features assigned the material properties of denture acrylic resin require a depth that may impose on speech and bolus propulsion before significant improvements are observed. The use of ribbed features, when made from a significantly stiffer material (eg, fiber-reinforced polymer) and designed to mimic palatal rugae, offer an acceptable method of providing significant improvements in rigidity to a maxillary denture under flexural load.

  20. Arterial aging: pathophysiological principles.

    PubMed

    O'Rourke, Michael F

    2007-11-01

    In the nineteenth century, prior to the introduction of the cuff sphygmomanometer, arteriosclerosis (stiffening of arteries) was recognized by clinicians and by life insurance companies as an indicator of vascular aging and cardiovascular risk, even in asymptomatic individuals. Through the twentieth century, views on aging came to focus on values of systolic and diastolic pressure and on obstructive atherosclerotic disease. Such focus deflected attention from the primary aging change which occurs in all societies, and is represented by stiffening and dilation of the proximal aorta. This review emphasizes the cushioning function of elastic arteries - principally the aorta - and how in youth this results in optimal interaction with the heart, and optimal steady flow through peripheral resistance vessels. Aortic stiffening with age is principally due to fatigue and fracture of elastin lamellae, with transfer of stress to stiffer collagenous components. Stiffening increases left ventricular load and myocardial blood requirement, but limits the capacity for blood supply during diastole. Consequences are cardiac failure and predisposition to ischaemia. The second, under-appreciated effect of aortic stiffening is transmission of flow pulsations downstream into vasodilated organs, principally brain and kidney, where pulsatile energy is dissipated and fragile microvessels are damaged. This accounts for micro infarcts and microhaemorrhages, with specialized cell damage, cognitive decline and renal failure. The aging process can be best monitored by change in the arterial pressure wave rather than by reliance on the cuff sphygmomanometer. This reintroduces the approaches by clinicians and life insurance examiners of the nineteenth century, endorses modern treatments for established disease, and holds the promise of detecting premature arterial degeneration, and better applying lifestyle measures and vasoactive medications to modify the aging process.

  1. Combined percutaneous and transarterial devascularisation of juvenile nasopharyngeal angiofibroma with protection of internal carotid artery: A modification of the technique

    PubMed Central

    Mahmoud, Ehab; Nyberg, Christoffer; Ekberg, Tomas

    2015-01-01

    Juvenile nasal angiofibroma (JNA) is a hypervascularised, benign, but locally aggressive tumour that grows in the posterior, upper part of the nasal cavity and invades surrounding anatomical structures. The treatment of choice is surgical removal, but complete resection of the tumour can be hampered because of profuse perioperative bleeding. Preoperative embolisation of the tumour has been proposed as an effective method for prevention of perioperative bleeding, thereby shortening of the time of the operation. In this report of five cases, we describe successful preoperative devascularisation of the tumour by applying a modified method of direct intratumoural injection of the liquid embolic agent Onyx combined with protection of the internal carotid artery. The control of bleeding during the embolisation and occlusion of the maxillary or sphenopalatine artery was achieved by using a bi-luminal balloon catheter. Such use of the dual-lumen catheter in treatment of JNA has not been reported so far in the medical literature. PMID:25991005

  2. Unilateral advancement of the maxillary minor segment by distraction osteogenesis in patients with repaired unilateral cleft lip and palate: report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Kuroe, Kazuto; Iino, Shoichiro; Shomura, Kenji; Okubo, Akiro; Sugihara, Kazumasa; Ito, Gakuji

    2003-05-01

    Collapse of the maxillary minor segment with lateral crossbite is a common feature in patients with repaired unilateral cleft lip/palate because of maxillary alveolar bony defect and palatal scar tissue. Distraction osteogenesis (DOG) is an effective technique of lengthening and augmentation for bone and gingiva. This case report describes the effects of unilateral advancement of the maxillary minor segment by DOG in two patients with the repaired unilateral cleft lip/palate.

  3. Coronary Artery Anomalies in Animals

    PubMed Central

    Scansen, Brian A.

    2017-01-01

    Coronary artery anomalies represent a disease spectrum from incidental to life-threatening. Anomalies of coronary artery origin and course are well-recognized in human medicine, but have received limited attention in veterinary medicine. Coronary artery anomalies are best described in the dog, hamster, and cow though reports also exist in the horse and pig. The most well-known anomaly in veterinary medicine is anomalous coronary artery origin with a prepulmonary course in dogs, which limits treatment of pulmonary valve stenosis. A categorization scheme for coronary artery anomalies in animals is suggested, dividing these anomalies into those of major or minor clinical significance. A review of coronary artery development, anatomy, and reported anomalies in domesticated species is provided and four novel canine examples of anomalous coronary artery origin are described: an English bulldog with single left coronary ostium and a retroaortic right coronary artery; an English bulldog with single right coronary ostium and transseptal left coronary artery; an English bulldog with single right coronary ostium and absent left coronary artery with a prepulmonary paraconal interventricular branch and an interarterial circumflex branch; and a mixed-breed dog with tetralogy of Fallot and anomalous origin of all coronary branches from the brachiocephalic trunk. Coronary arterial fistulae are also described including a coronary cameral fistula in a llama cria and an English bulldog with coronary artery aneurysm and anomalous shunting vessels from the right coronary artery to the pulmonary trunk. These examples are provided with the intent to raise awareness and improve understanding of such defects. PMID:29056679

  4. [Comparative anatomical study of the ventral brain arteries of the Pudu pudu (Molina, 1782) with those of the cow].

    PubMed

    Schweitzer-Delaunoy, W

    1997-06-01

    Comparative anatomical study of the ventral brain arteries of the Pudú pudu (Molina, 1782) with those of the cow. A comparison using the corrosion method was made between Pudú pudu (Molina, 1782) ventral brain arteries and those of the cow. The Pudú's Rete mirabile epidurale rostrale (Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria, 1994) is ventrally formed by branches of the A. maxillaris, and caudally formed by the A. vertebralis. The Hypophysis is surrounded by the Rete mirabile rostrale. The lateral parts are rostrally joined to that gland by a thin vascular bridge and caudally by thick arteries. The Pudú's Circulus arteriosus cerebri asymmetrical, that is, on the right side the A. cerebri rostralis ends in the A. cerebri media. The left-side A. cerebri rostralis irrigates every rostral portion of the encephalon. In the cow, practically the same arteries come out of the Circulus arteriosus cerebri, which is not asymmetrical. The A. cerebri caudalis comes first out of the A. communicans caudalis and then the branches for the Pons, and finally the A. cerebelli rostralis. In this species, there are arterial blocks that are not present in Pudú.

  5. Impact of beta thalassemia on maxillary sinuses and sino-nasal passages: A case control study.

    PubMed

    Ragab, Ahmed; Ragab, Seham Mohammed; Shawki, Mohammed

    2015-12-01

    Skeletal changes among beta (β) thalassemia children are well documented, but without available data regarding sino-nasal passages alterations. The authors investigated the maxillary sinuses and sino-nasal passages changes in β-thalassemia children and correlated such changes with the amount of transfused red cells and the erythroid marrow activity. Clinical analyses including otorhinolaryngical examination (ORL) were obtained in twenty β-thalassemia children and 20 matched healthy controls. Hemoglobin (Hb), serum ferritin, soluble transferrin receptor (sTfR) levels and bone mineral density of the lumbar spine (BMD ls) were assayed. The two groups were analyzed for the CT image parameters: bone thickness, anterior and posterior choanae diameters, extramedullary hematopoiesis and chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) RESULTS: Nasal congestion/obstruction was identified in 14 (70%) children. Eight patients (40%) had criteria of chronic rhinosinusitis. In comparison with the normal controls, the increase in the roof, floor, medial, anterior, lateral and posterior maxillary bony walls thickness was significantly higher (1.26, 2.46, 2.6, 2.9, 3.23 and 5.34-folds, respectively). The mean posterior choanae horizontal, vertical diameters and their surface area were significantly reduced in the patients compared to the controls. The mean anterior maxillary wall bone thickness directly correlated with sTfR (P=0.047) while that of the posterior wall correlated inversely with Hb level (P=0.013). The mean vertical posterior choanae diameter had positive correlation with the amount of transfused red cells (P=0.001) and negative correlation with sTfR (P=0.001). The Hounsfield unit of maxillary sinus wall had direct relation with BMDls (P=0.003) CONCLUSIONS: Thalassemia children are at risk of different folds increase of maxillary sinuses walls thicknesses utmost at posterior and lateral walls. Other sino-nasal morbidities include diminished posterior choanal diameter, nasal obstruction

  6. Evaluation of maxillary molar distalization with the distal jet: a comparison with other contemporary methods.

    PubMed

    Bolla, Eugenio; Muratore, Filippo; Carano, Aldo; Bowman, S Jay

    2002-10-01

    Maxillary molar distalization is an increasingly popular option for the resolution of Class II malocclusions. This communication describes the effects of one particular molar distalizing appliance, the distal jet, in a sample of 20 consecutively treated and growing subjects (11 females, nine males; mean starting age of 13) and compares these effects with those of similar devices. Pre- and postdistalization cephalometric radiographs and dental models were analyzed to determine the dental and skeletal effects. The distal jet appliances were constructed using a biomechanical couple to direct the distalizing force to the level of the maxillary first molar's center of resistance. The distal jet was the only appliance used during the distalization phase of treatment. Examination of the cephalometric tracings demonstrated that the crowns of the maxillary first molars were distalized an average of 3.2 mm into a Class I molar relationship. In the process, the first molars were tipped distally an average of 3.1 degrees, however, the amount of tipping in each case was influenced by the state of eruption of the second molar. In subjects whose second molars had erupted only to the level of the apical third of the first molar roots, distal tipping was almost twice that seen when the second molar had completed their eruption. Anchorage loss measured at the first premolars averaged 1.3 mm, but the crowns tipped 3.1 degrees distally because of the design of the appliance. The maxillary incisors were proclined an average of 0.6 degrees with minimal effect on the mandibular plane angle and lower facial height. This study suggests that the distal jet appliance effectively moves the maxillary molars distally into a Class I molar relationship with minimal distal tipping, however, some loss of anchorage is to be expected during this process. The distal jet appliance compares favorably with other intraoral distalization devices and with mechanics featuring mandibular protraction for the

  7. Maxillary anterior segmental distraction osteogenesis with 2 different types of distractors.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hye-Young; Hwang, Chung-Ju; Kim, Hee-Jin; Yu, Hyung-Seog; Cha, Jung-Yul

    2012-05-01

    Maxillary anterior segmental distraction osteogenesis (DO) has been the alternative treatment option for patients with midfacial retrusion. To investigate a potentially more effective maxillary anterior segmental DO, a newly designed intraoral alveolar distractor was applied. The objectives of this study were to investigate the skeletal and dental effects of maxillary anterior segmental DO and the relapse pattern. The study was carried out for 8 patients with unilateral cleft lip and palate (mean age, 16 years 7 months). Four patients were treated with an intraoral appliance (IA), and the remaining with a rigid external distractor (RED). Dental and skeletal measurements were obtained for both groups. These measurements were compared for different time points including pre-DO (T1), post-DO (T2), postconsolidation (T3), and 1-year follow-up (T4). Horizontal change of A point was significantly larger after distraction period (T2) in the RED group (mean, 11.0 mm; median, 10.1 mm) than in the IA group (mean, 6.6 mm; median, 7.4 mm) (P < 0.05). Relapse of A point was observed in both RED (mean, -2.3 mm; median, -2.3 mm) and IA groups (mean, -2.6 mm; median, -1.5 mm) at T4. The vertical position of the anterior nasal spine was found to have moved downward in the RED group (mean, 5.5 mm; median, 4.9 mm) but upward in the IA group (mean, -2.5 mm; median, -2.7 mm) after distraction, showing a significant difference between groups (P < 0.05). Axis of upper incisor increased at T2 in the IA group (mean, 10.4 degrees; median, 11.3 degrees), but decreased in the RED group (mean, -10.2 degrees; median, -9.0 degrees) (P < 0.05). It recovered in the RED group at T4. Maxillary anterior segmental DO is effective for the treatment of patients with cleft lip and palate. The alveolar space is regained, and the facial profile is improved without velopharyngeal problems. Superior results are obtained using the RED appliance for maxillary anterior segmental DO relative to the use of the

  8. Change in frequency of the maxillary midline diastema appearing in photographs of Caucasian females in two fashion magazines from 2003 to 2012.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Kylie C; Sherriff, Martyn; Stewart Denize, E

    2014-06-01

    To ascertain if there has been a change in the frequency of appearance of maxillary midline diastema in two leading women's fashion magazines over a decade. Two observers counted the frequency of maxillary midline diastema that appeared in Caucasian female models featured in British Vogue and Glamour (UK). An increase in the frequency of maxillary midline diastema appearing in both publications was observed between 2003 and 2012. This change may indicate an increase in the acceptance of the maxillary midline diastema, which may in turn, influence orthodontic and aesthetic dentistry treatment planning. © 2014 British Orthodontic Society.

  9. Comparison of the intrusion effects on the maxillary incisors between implant anchorage and J-hook headgear.

    PubMed

    Deguchi, Toru; Murakami, Takashi; Kuroda, Shingo; Yabuuchi, Toshinori; Kamioka, Hiroshi; Takano-Yamamoto, Teruko

    2008-05-01

    Recently, miniscrews have been used to provide anchorage during orthodontic treatment, especially for incisor intrusion. Miniscrews during incisor intrusion are commonly used in implant orthodontics. Traditionally, effective incisor intrusion has been accomplished with J-hook headgear. In this study, we compared the effect of incisor intrusion, force vector, and amount of root resorption between implant orthodontics and J-hook headgear. Lateral cephalometric radiographs from 8 patients in the implant group and 10 patients in the J-hook headgear group were analyzed for incisor retraction. The estimated force vector was analyzed in the horizontal and vertical directions in both groups. Root resorption was also measured on periapical radiographs. In the implant group, significant reductions in overjet, overbite, maxillary incisor to palatal plane, and maxillary incisor to upper lip were observed after intrusion of the incisors. In the J-hook headgear group, significant reductions in overjet, overbite, maxillary incisor to upper lip, and maxillary incisor to SN plane were observed after intrusion of the incisors. There were significantly greater reductions in overbite, maxillary incisor to palatal plane, and maxillary incisor to upper lip in the implant group than in the J-hook headgear group. Estimated force analysis resulted in significantly more force in the vertical direction and less in the horizontal direction in the implant group. Furthermore, significantly less root resorption was observed in the implant group compared with the J-hook headgear group. The maxillary incisors were effectively intruded by using miniscrews as orthodontic anchorage without patient cooperation. The amount of root resorption was not affected by activating the ligature wire from the miniscrew during incisor intrusion.

  10. Transverse Expansion and Stability after Segmental Le Fort I Osteotomy versus Surgically Assisted Rapid Maxillary Expansion: a Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Blæhr, Tue Lindberg

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives The objective of the present systematic review was to test the hypothesis of no difference in transverse skeletal and dental arch expansion and relapse after segmental Le Fort I osteotomy versus surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. Material and Methods A MEDLINE (PubMed), Embase and Cochrane library search in combination with a hand-search of relevant journals was conducted by including human studies published in English from January 1, 2000 to June 1, 2016. Results The search provided 130 titles and four studies fulfilled the inclusion criteria. All the included studies were characterized by high risk of bias and meta-analysis was not possible due to considerable variation. Both treatment modalities significantly increase the transverse maxillary skeletal and dental arch width. The transverse dental arch expansion and relapse seems to be substantial higher with tooth-borne surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion compared to segmental Le Fort I osteotomy. The ratio of dental to skeletal relapse was significantly higher in the posterior maxilla with tooth-borne surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion. Moreover, a parallel opening without segment tilting was observed after segmental Le Fort I osteotomy. Conclusions Maxillary transverse deficiency in adults can be treated successfully with both treatment modalities, although surgically assisted rapid maxillary expansion seems more effective when large transverse maxillary skeletal and dental arch expansion is required. However, considering the methodological limitations of the included studies, long-term randomized studies assessing transverse skeletal and dental expansion and relapse with the two treatment modalities are needed before definite conclusions can be provided. PMID:28154745

  11. Evaluation of the rapid and slow maxillary expansion using cone-beam computed tomography: a randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Juliana da S.; Jacob, Helder B.; Locks, Arno; Brunetto, Mauricio; Ribeiro, Gerson L. U.

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT OBJECTIVE: The aim of this randomized clinical trial was to evaluate the dental, dentoalveolar, and skeletal changes occurring right after the rapid maxillary expansion (RME) and slow maxillary expansion (SME) treatment using Haas-type expander. METHODS: All subjects performed cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) before installation of expanders (T1) and right after screw stabilization (T2). Patients who did not follow the research parameters were excluded. The final sample resulted in 21 patients in RME group (mean age of 8.43 years) and 16 patients in SME group (mean age of 8.70 years). Based on the skewness and kurtosis statistics, the variables were judged to be normally distributed and paired t-test and student t-test were performed at significance level of 5%. RESULTS: Intermolar angle changed significantly due to treatment and RME showed greater buccal tipping than SME. RME showed significant changes in other four measurements due to treatment: maxilla moved forward and mandible showed backward rotation and, at transversal level both skeletal and dentoalveolar showed significant changes due to maxillary expansion. SME showed significant dentoalveolar changes due to maxillary expansion. CONCLUSIONS: Only intermolar angle showed significant difference between the two modalities of maxillary expansion with greater buccal tipping for RME. Also, RME produced skeletal maxillary expansion and SME did not. Both maxillary expansion modalities were efficient to promote transversal gain at dentoalveolar level. Sagittal and vertical measurements did not show differences between groups, but RME promoted a forward movement of the maxilla and backward rotation of the mandible. PMID:28658357

  12. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension and Neonatal Arterial Switch Surgery for Correction of Transposition of the Great Arteries.

    PubMed

    Domínguez Manzano, Paula; Mendoza Soto, Alberto; Román Barba, Violeta; Moreno Galdó, Antonio; Galindo Izquierdo, Alberto

    2016-09-01

    There are few reports of the appearance of pulmonary arterial hypertension following arterial switch surgery in the neonatal period to correct transposition of the great arteries. We assessed the frequency and clinical pattern of this complication in our series of patients. Our database was reviewed to select patients with transposition of the great arteries corrected by neonatal arterial switch at our hospital and who developed pulmonary hypertension over time. We identified 2 (1.3%) patients with transposition of the great arteries successfully repaired in the first week of life who later experienced pulmonary arterial hypertension. The first patient was a 7-year-old girl diagnosed with severe pulmonary hypertension at age 8 months who did not respond to medical treatment and required lung transplantation. The anatomic pathology findings were consistent with severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. The second patient was a 24-month-old boy diagnosed with severe pulmonary hypertension at age 13 months who did not respond to medical therapy. Pulmonary hypertension is a rare but very severe complication that should be investigated in all patients with transposition of the great arteries who have undergone neonatal arterial switch, in order to start early aggressive therapy for affected patients, given the poor therapeutic response and poor prognosis involved. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Cardiología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  13. Pulmonary arterial hypertension in pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Običan, Sarah G; Cleary, Kirsten L

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a medical condition characterized by elevated pulmonary arterial pressure and secondary right heart failure. Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a subset of pulmonary hypertension, which is characterized by an underlying disorder of the pulmonary arterial vasculature. Pulmonary hypertension can also occur secondarily to structural cardiac disease, autoimmune disorders, and toxic exposures. Although pregnancies affected by pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension are rare, the pathophysiology exacerbated by pregnancy confers both high maternal and fetal mortality and morbidity. In light of new treatment modalities and the use of a multidisciplinary approach to care, maternal outcomes may be improving. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Anatomical popliteal artery entrapment syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Yong Jae; Kwon, Tae-Won; Gwon, Jun Gyo; Cho, Yong-Pil; Hwang, Seung-Jun; Go, Ki-Young

    2018-05-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze anatomical popliteal artery entrapment syndrome (PAES) and to individualize the treatment of this condition according to the anatomical status of the artery and the adjacent structure. A total of 35 anatomical PAES legs in 23 consecutive patients treated within the Asan Medical Center, Seoul, Korea between 1995 and 2011 were analyzed retrospectively. Anatomical PAES was diagnosed by MRI and/or CT scans of the knee joint, and CT or conventional transfemoral arteriography of the lower extremities. We noted a type II gastrocnemius medial head (GNM) anomaly, a type III GNM anomaly, or an aberrant plantaris muscle in 51.4%, 20%, and 28.6% of PAES legs, respectively. In assessments of the arterial lesions, popliteal or tibial artery occlusion was noted in 19 of 26 symptomatic PAES legs. For cases without popliteal artery lesions, myotomy of the anatomically deranged muscle was performed in 5 of 7 symptomatic and 4 of 9 asymptomatic PAES legs. For occluded popliteal arteries, we performed ten direct repairs of the pathological popliteal artery and 4 femoro-below the knee popliteal bypass surgeries. As a result of the arterial Surgery, 9 direct procedures with myotomy yielded a patent artery, while 3 graft failures were noted in the bypass group. The median follow-up period was 84 months (range, 12-206 months). We recommend that treatment of PAES should be individualized based on pathology, symptoms, and various imaging studies.

  15. Right hepatic artery aneurysm.

    PubMed

    Bernal, Astrid Del Pilar Ardila; Loures, Paulo; Calle, Juan Cristóbal Ospina; Cunha, Beatriz; Córdoba, Juan Camilo

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of an aneurysm of the right hepatic artery and its multidisciplinary management by general surgery, endoscopy and radiology services. Being a case of extremely low incidence, it is important to show its diagnostic and therapeutic approach. RESUMO Relatamos um caso de aneurisma da artéria hepática direita conduzido de forma multidisciplinar pelos Serviços de Cirurgia Geral, Endoscopia e Radiologia. Em se tratando de caso de incidência baixíssima, é importante mostrar o enfoque diagnóstico e terapêutico usado em seu manejo.

  16. Transcatheter Arterial Embolization for Spontaneous Rupture of the Omental Artery

    SciTech Connect

    Matsumoto, Tomohiro, E-mail: t-matsu@koto.kpu-m.ac.jp; Yamagami, Takuji; Morishita, Hiroyuki

    We encountered a rare case of spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. A 25-year-old man without any episode of abdominal trauma or bleeding disorders came to the emergency unit with left upper abdominal pain. Hematoma with extravasation of the greater omentum and a hemoperitoneum was confirmed on abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography. Bleeding from the omental artery was suspected based on these findings. Transcatheter arterial embolization was successfully performed after extravasation of the omental artery, which arises from the left gastroepiploic artery, was confirmed on arteriography. Partial ometectomy was performed 10 days after transcatheter arterial embolization, revealing that the hematoma measuredmore » 10 cm in diameter in the greater omentum. Pathological examination showed rupture of the branch of an omental artery without abnormal findings, such as an aneurysm or neoplasm. Thus, we diagnosed him with spontaneous rupture of the omental artery. The patient recovered and was discharged from the hospital 10 days after the surgery, with a favorable postoperative course.« less

  17. Three-dimensional finite element analysis of the craniomaxillary complex during maxillary protraction with bone anchorage vs conventional dental anchorage.

    PubMed

    Yan, Xiulin; He, Weijun; Lin, Tao; Liu, Jun; Bai, Xiaofeng; Yan, Guangqi; Lu, Li

    2013-02-01

    The aim of this study was to explore the biomechanical effects on the craniomaxillary complex of bone anchorage and dental anchorage during maxillary protraction. We established 2 finite element models. One simulated maxillary protraction with dental anchorage in the maxillary first molars and the other with bone anchorage in the infrazygomatic buttresses of the maxilla. The magnitude of the applied forces was 500 g per side, and the force directions were 0°, 10°, 20°, and 30° forward and downward relative to the occlusal plane. The finite element model of the craniomaxillary complex could displace in an almost translatory manner when the force direction was about 20° in the bone anchorage model and about 30° in the dental anchorage model. The nodes representing the sutures at the back of the maxilla showed greater stress in the bone anchorage model than in the dental anchorage model in the same force direction. It is the opposite at the front of the maxilla. We should determine the direction of applied force according to the anchorage location and skeletal characteristics of patients before maxillary protraction. The dramatic effects of maxillary protraction with bone anchorage can be based on the advantages of bone anchorage, not on the changes in the region of the applied force. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparison of the effects of mini-implant and traditional anchorage on patients with maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yanhua; Xie, Jiye

    2017-03-01

    To compare the treatment effects of mini-implants as anchor units with conventional methods of anchorage reinforcement in maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion patients in terms of skeletal, dental, and soft tissue changes. We searched the databases of the Cochrane Library, PubMed, OVIDSP, CBM, VIP, WanFang Data, and CNKI covering December 1966 to March 2016 for randomized controlled trials (RCTs) and clinical controlled trials that compared the treatment effects of mini-implants with conventional anchorage reinforcement in maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion patients. Literature filtering, data extraction, and methodological quality evaluation were finished independently by two researchers and disagreements were solved by discussion. Meta-analysis was performed when possible; otherwise descriptive assessment was done. Through a predefined search strategy, we finally included 14 eligible studies. Eight outcomes were evaluated in this study: maxillary incisor retraction, maxillary molar movement, U1-SN, SNA, SN-MP, UL-E Plane, NLA and G-Sn-Pg. Mini-implant anchorage was more effective in retracting the anterior teeth, produced less anchorage loss, and had a greater effect on SN-MP for the high-angle patients than did traditional anchorage. Both mini-implants and traditional anchorage underwent decreases in on U1-SN and SNA. More qualified RCTs are required to make reliable recommendations about the anchorage capacity of mini-implant and traditional anchorage in patients with maxillary dentoalveolar protrusion, especially on the UL-E plane, NLA, and G-Sn-Pg.

  19. Effect of remaining coronal structure on the resistance to fracture of crowned endodontically treated maxillary first premolars.

    PubMed