Science.gov

Sample records for maximal muscular vascular

  1. Systemic vascular function is associated with muscular power in adults

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Age-associated loss of muscular strength and muscular power are critical determinants of loss of physical function and progression to disability in older adults. In this study, we examined the association of systemic vascular function and measures of muscle strength and power in older adults. Measu...

  2. Low-intensity exercise, vascular occlusion, and muscular adaptations.

    PubMed

    Teramoto, Masaru; Golding, Lawrence A

    2006-01-01

    The study investigated the effects of low-intensity exercise on muscular fitness when combined with vascular occlusion. Nineteen college male and female students performed two sets of a 5-min step exercise using a 12-inch bench three times per week for 5 weeks. During the step exercise, blood flow to one leg was restricted (vascular occlusion) with a blood pressure cuff, while the other leg was not occluded. Muscular strength of the occluded leg was significantly increased over the nonoccluded leg (p < 0. 05). Muscular endurance and muscle mass were improved after 5 weeks of training (p < 0.05); however, the changes between the two legs were not significantly different (p > 0.05). Exercise with vascular occlusion has the potential to be an alternative form of training to promote muscular strength.

  3. Maximal strength, muscular endurance and inflammatory biomarkers in young adult men.

    PubMed

    Vaara, J P; Vasankari, T; Fogelholm, M; Häkkinen, K; Santtila, M; Kyröläinen, H

    2014-12-01

    The aim was to study associations of maximal strength and muscular endurance with inflammatory biomarkers independent of cardiorespiratory fitness in those with and without abdominal obesity. 686 young healthy men participated (25±5 years). Maximal strength was measured via isometric testing using dynamo-meters to determine maximal strength index. Muscular endurance index consisted of push-ups, sit-ups and repeated squats. An indirect cycle ergometer test until exhaustion was used to estimate maximal aerobic capacity (VO2max). Participants were stratified according to those with (>102 cm) and those without abdominal obesity (<102 cm) based on waist circumference. Inflammatory factors (C-reactive protein, interleukin-6 and tumour necrosis factor alpha) were analysed from serum samples. Maximal strength and muscular endurance were inversely associated with IL-6 in those with (β=-0.49, -0.39, respectively) (p<0.05) and in those without abdominal obesity (β=-0.08, -0.14, respectively) (p<0.05) adjusted for smoking and cardio-respiratory fitness. After adjusting for smoking and cardiorespiratory fitness, maximal strength and muscular endurance were inversely associated with CRP only in those without abdominal obesity (β=-0.11, -0.26, respectively) (p<0.05). This cross-sectional study demonstrated that muscular fitness is inversely associated with C-reactive protein and IL-6 concentrations in young adult men independent of cardiorespi-ratory fitness.

  4. Associations of maximal strength and muscular endurance test scores with cardiorespiratory fitness and body composition.

    PubMed

    Vaara, Jani P; Kyröläinen, Heikki; Niemi, Jaakko; Ohrankämmen, Olli; Häkkinen, Arja; Kocay, Sheila; Häkkinen, Keijo

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of the present study was to assess the relationships between maximal strength and muscular endurance test scores additionally to previously widely studied measures of body composition and maximal aerobic capacity. 846 young men (25.5 ± 5.0 yrs) participated in the study. Maximal strength was measured using isometric bench press, leg extension and grip strength. Muscular endurance tests consisted of push-ups, sit-ups and repeated squats. An indirect graded cycle ergometer test was used to estimate maximal aerobic capacity (V(O2)max). Body composition was determined with bioelectrical impedance. Moreover, waist circumference (WC) and height were measured and body mass index (BMI) calculated. Maximal bench press was positively correlated with push-ups (r = 0.61, p < 0.001), grip strength (r = 0.34, p < 0.001) and sit-ups (r = 0.37, p < 0.001) while maximal leg extension force revealed only a weak positive correlation with repeated squats (r = 0.23, p < 0.001). However, moderate correlation between repeated squats and V(O2)max was found (r = 0.55, p < 0.001) In addition, BM and body fat correlated negatively with muscular endurance (r = -0.25 - -0.47, p < 0.001), while FFM and maximal isometric strength correlated positively (r = 0.36-0.44, p < 0.001). In conclusion, muscular endurance test scores were related to maximal aerobic capacity and body fat content, while fat free mass was associated with maximal strength test scores and thus is a major determinant for maximal strength. A contributive role of maximal strength to muscular endurance tests could be identified for the upper, but not the lower extremities. These findings suggest that push-up test is not only indicative of body fat content and maximal aerobic capacity but also maximal strength of upper body, whereas repeated squat test is mainly indicative of body fat content and maximal aerobic capacity, but not maximal strength of lower extremities.

  5. Athletic differences in the characteristics of the photoplethysmographic pulse shape: effect of maximal oxygen uptake and maximal muscular voluntary contraction.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anran; Yang, Lin; Liu, Chengyu; Cui, Jingxuan; Li, Yao; Yang, Xingxing; Zhang, Song; Zheng, Dingchang

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the athletic differences in the characteristics of the photoplethysmographic (PPG) pulse shape. 304 athletes were enrolled and divided into three subgroups according to a typical sport classification in terms of the maximal oxygen uptake (MaxO2_low, MaxO2_middle and MaxO2_high groups) or the maximal muscular voluntary contraction (MMVC_low, MMVC_middle, and MMVC_high groups). Finger PPG pulses were digitally recorded and then normalized to derive the pulse area, pulse peak time T p , dicrotic notch time T n , and pulse reflection index (RI). The four parameters were finally compared between the three subgroups categorized by MaxO2 or by MMVC. In conclusion, it has been demonstrated by quantifying the characteristics of the PPG pulses in different athletes that MaxO2, but not MMVC, had significant effect on the arterial properties.

  6. The Effects of Multiple-Joint Isokinetic Resistance Training on Maximal Isokinetic and Dynamic Muscle Strength and Local Muscular Endurance

    PubMed Central

    Ratamess, Nicholas A.; Beller, Noah A.; Gonzalez, Adam M.; Spatz, Gregory E.; Hoffman, Jay R.; Ross, Ryan E.; Faigenbaum, Avery D.; Kang, Jie

    2016-01-01

    The transfer of training effects of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training to dynamic exercise performance remain poorly understood. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the magnitude of isokinetic and dynamic one repetition-maximum (1RM) strength and local muscular endurance increases after 6 weeks of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training. Seventeen women were randomly assigned to either an isokinetic resistance training group (IRT) or a non-exercising control group (CTL). The IRT group underwent 6 weeks of training (2 days per week) consisting of 5 sets of 6-10 repetitions at 75-85% of subjects’ peak strength for the isokinetic chest press and seated row exercises at an average linear velocity of 0.15 m s-1 [3-sec concentric (CON) and 3-sec eccentric (ECC) phases]. Peak CON and ECC force during the chest press and row, 1RM bench press and bent-over row, and maximum number of modified push-ups were assessed pre and post training. A 2 x 2 analysis of variance with repeated measures and Tukey’s post hoc tests were used for data analysis. The results showed that 1RM bench press (from 38.6 ± 6.7 to 43.0 ± 5.9 kg), 1RM bent-over row (from 40.4 ± 7.7 to 45.5 ± 7.5 kg), and the maximal number of modified push-ups (from 39.5 ± 13.6 to 55.3 ± 13.1 repetitions) increased significantly only in the IRT group. Peak isokinetic CON and ECC force in the chest press and row significantly increased in the IRT group. No differences were shown in the CTL group for any measure. These data indicate 6 weeks of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training increases dynamic muscle strength and local muscular endurance performance in addition to specific isokinetic strength gains in women. Key points Multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training increases dynamic maximal muscular strength, local muscular endurance, and maximal isokinetic strength in women. Multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training increased 1RM strength in the bench press

  7. The Effects of Multiple-Joint Isokinetic Resistance Training on Maximal Isokinetic and Dynamic Muscle Strength and Local Muscular Endurance.

    PubMed

    Ratamess, Nicholas A; Beller, Noah A; Gonzalez, Adam M; Spatz, Gregory E; Hoffman, Jay R; Ross, Ryan E; Faigenbaum, Avery D; Kang, Jie

    2016-03-01

    The transfer of training effects of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training to dynamic exercise performance remain poorly understood. Thus, the purpose of the present study was to investigate the magnitude of isokinetic and dynamic one repetition-maximum (1RM) strength and local muscular endurance increases after 6 weeks of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training. Seventeen women were randomly assigned to either an isokinetic resistance training group (IRT) or a non-exercising control group (CTL). The IRT group underwent 6 weeks of training (2 days per week) consisting of 5 sets of 6-10 repetitions at 75-85% of subjects' peak strength for the isokinetic chest press and seated row exercises at an average linear velocity of 0.15 m s(-1) [3-sec concentric (CON) and 3-sec eccentric (ECC) phases]. Peak CON and ECC force during the chest press and row, 1RM bench press and bent-over row, and maximum number of modified push-ups were assessed pre and post training. A 2 x 2 analysis of variance with repeated measures and Tukey's post hoc tests were used for data analysis. The results showed that 1RM bench press (from 38.6 ± 6.7 to 43.0 ± 5.9 kg), 1RM bent-over row (from 40.4 ± 7.7 to 45.5 ± 7.5 kg), and the maximal number of modified push-ups (from 39.5 ± 13.6 to 55.3 ± 13.1 repetitions) increased significantly only in the IRT group. Peak isokinetic CON and ECC force in the chest press and row significantly increased in the IRT group. No differences were shown in the CTL group for any measure. These data indicate 6 weeks of multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training increases dynamic muscle strength and local muscular endurance performance in addition to specific isokinetic strength gains in women. Key pointsMultiple-joint isokinetic resistance training increases dynamic maximal muscular strength, local muscular endurance, and maximal isokinetic strength in women.Multiple-joint isokinetic resistance training increased 1RM strength in the bench press (by

  8. Does pre-exercise static stretching inhibit maximal muscular performance? A meta-analytical review.

    PubMed

    Simic, L; Sarabon, N; Markovic, G

    2013-03-01

    We applied a meta-analytical approach to derive a robust estimate of the acute effects of pre-exercise static stretching (SS) on strength, power, and explosive muscular performance. A computerized search of articles published between 1966 and December 2010 was performed using PubMed, SCOPUS, and Web of Science databases. A total of 104 studies yielding 61 data points for strength, 12 data points for power, and 57 data points for explosive performance met our inclusion criteria. The pooled estimate of the acute effects of SS on strength, power, and explosive performance, expressed in standardized units as well as in percentages, were -0.10 [95% confidence interval (CI): -0.15 to -0.04], -0.04 (95% CI: -0.16 to 0.08), and -0.03 (95% CI: -0.07 to 0.01), or -5.4% (95% CI: -6.6% to -4.2%), -1.9% (95% CI: -4.0% to 0.2%), and -2.0% (95% CI: -2.8% to -1.3%). These effects were not related to subject's age, gender, or fitness level; however, they were more pronounced in isometric vs dynamic tests, and were related to the total duration of stretch, with the smallest negative acute effects being observed with stretch duration of ≤ 45 s. We conclude that the usage of SS as the sole activity during warm-up routine should generally be avoided.

  9. Basketball shoe height and the maximal muscular resistance to applied ankle inversion and eversion moments.

    PubMed

    Ottaviani, R A; Ashton-Miller, J A; Kothari, S U; Wojtys, E M

    1995-01-01

    To determine if the height of a basketball shoe alters the maximal inversion and eversion moment that can be actively resisted by the ankle in the frontal plane, we tested 20 healthy, young adult men with no recent ankle injuries. Subjects underwent unipedal functional ankle strength testing under weightbearing conditions at 0 degrees, 16 degrees, and 32 degrees of ankle plantar flexion using a specially designed testing apparatus. Testing was performed with the subject wearing either a low- or a three quarter-top basketball shoe. Shoe height did not significantly affect an individual's ability to actively resist an eversion moment at any angle of ankle plantar flexion. However, tests at 0 degrees of ankle plantar flexion demonstrated that the three quarter-top basketball shoe we tested significantly increased the maximal resistance to an inversion moment by 29.4%. At 16 degrees of ankle plantar flexion, inversion resistance was also significantly improved by 20.4%. These results show that athletic shoe height can significantly increase the active resistance to an inversion moment in moderate ankle plantar flexion. The findings apply to a neutral foot position in the frontal plane, an orientation equivalent to the early phase of a potential ankle sprain.

  10. Baroreflex-mediated heart rate and vascular resistance responses 24 h after maximal exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2003-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Plasma volume, heart rate (HR) variability, and stimulus-response relationships for baroreflex control of forearm vascular resistance (FVR) and HR were studied in eight healthy men after and without performing a bout of maximal exercise to test the hypotheses that acute expansion of plasma volume is associated with 1) reduction in baroreflex-mediated HR response, and 2) altered operational range for central venous pressure (CVP). METHODS: The relationship between stimulus (DeltaCVP) and vasoconstrictive reflex response (DeltaFVR) during unloading of cardiopulmonary baroreceptors was assessed with lower-body negative pressure (LBNP, 0, -5, -10, -15, -20 mm Hg). The relationship between stimulus (Deltamean arterial pressure (MAP)) and cardiac reflex response (DeltaHR) during loading of arterial baroreceptors was assessed with steady-state infusion of phenylephrine (PE) designed to increase MAP by 15 mm Hg alone and during application of LBNP (PE+LBNP) and neck pressure (PE+LBNP+NP). Measurements of vascular volume and autonomic baroreflex responses were conducted on two different test days, each separated by at least 1 wk. On one day, baroreflex response was tested 24 h after graded cycle exercise to volitional exhaustion. On another day, measurement of baroreflex response was repeated with no exercise (control). The order of exercise and control treatments was counterbalanced. RESULTS: Baseline CVP was elevated (P = 0.04) from a control value of 10.5 +/- 0.4 to 12.3 +/- 0.4 mm Hg 24 h after exercise. Average DeltaFVR/DeltaCVP during LBNP was not different (P = 0.942) between the exercise (-1.35 +/- 0.32 pru x mm Hg-1) and control (-1.32 +/- 0.36 pru x mm Hg-1) conditions. However, maximal exercise caused a shift along the reflex response relationship to a higher CVP and lower FVR. HR baroreflex response (DeltaHR/DeltaMAP) to PE+LBNP+NP was lower (P = 0.015) after maximal exercise (-0.43 +/- 0.15 beats x min-1 x mm Hg-1) compared with the control

  11. Effects of vascular occlusion on muscular endurance in dynamic knee extension exercise at different submaximal loads.

    PubMed

    Wernbom, Mathias; Augustsson, Jesper; Thomeé, Roland

    2006-05-01

    Strength training with low load under conditions of vascular occlusion has been proposed as an alternative to heavy-resistance exercise in the rehabilitation setting, when large forces acting upon the musculoskeletal system are unwanted. Little is known, however, about the relative intensity at which occlusion of blood flow significantly reduces dynamic muscular endurance and, hence, when it may increase the training effect. The purpose of this study was to investigate endurance during dynamic knee extension at different loads with and without cuff occlusion. Sixteen subjects (20-45 years of age) with strength-training experience were recruited. At 4 test sessions, the subjects performed unilateral knee extensions to failure with and without a pressure cuff around the thigh at 20, 30, 40, and 50% of their 1 repetition maximum (1RM). The pressure cuff was inflated to 200 mm Hg during exercise with occlusion. Significant differences in the number of repetitions performed were found between occluded and nonoccluded conditions for loads of 20, 30, and 40% of 1RM (p < 0.01) but not for the 50% load (p = 0.465). Thus, the application of a pressure cuff around the thigh appears to reduce dynamic knee extension endurance more at a low load than at a moderate load. These results may have implications regarding when it could be useful to apply a tourniquet in order to increase the rate of fatigue and perhaps also the resulting training effect. However, the short- and long-term safety of training under ischemic conditions needs to be addressed in both healthy and less healthy populations. Furthermore, the high acute pain ratings and the delayed-onset muscle soreness associated with this type of training may limit its potential use to highly motivated individuals.

  12. Relationships between lower limb and trunk discomfort and vascular, muscular and kinetic outcomes during stationary standing work.

    PubMed

    Antle, David M; Côté, Julie N

    2013-04-01

    Standing work is associated with discomfort and symptoms in the trunk and lower limb. However, mechanisms underlying these observations are poorly understood. Moreover, most research on standing-related symptoms has focused on only one region (lower limb or trunk), and has not considered the impact and interactions between vascular, muscular and balance outcomes. We measured foot and soleus blood flow, ankle mean arterial pressure, muscle activity of the plantar and dorsi flexors, gluteus medius and trunk flexors and extensors, center of pressure changes and leg and back discomfort in 18 healthy volunteers performing a repetitive box-folding task for 34 min. Results show significant decreases with time in lower limb muscle activity (p<0.00053), and increases in foot blood flow and center-of-pressure mediolateral sway amplitude (p=0.00066). There were significant time effects on back (p=0.017) and lower limb (p<0.000001) discomfort, the latter significantly correlated (r=0.35) to time-related increases in foot blood volume. No changes were correlated to the increase in back discomfort. Results suggest that the origin of standing-related lower limb discomfort is likely vascular in origin, whereas back discomfort is likely multifactorial, involving muscular, vascular and postural control variables.

  13. Functional and Aesthetic Recovery of Congenital Muscular Torticollis with Intramuscular Stromal Vascular Fraction Enriched Fat Grafting

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Congenital muscular torticollis is a well-known pathological condition caused by the contracture and shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. This condition is manifested by a neck postural deformity often accompanied by some kind of facial asymmetry. Once diagnosed, treatment by early physiotherapy is generally successful in a high percentage of patients if performed during the first year of life. Later, especially after the fourth year, conservative treatment is usually far less effective, and surgical techniques remain the only way to improve neck contour and function. The author reports two cases of adult patients affected by this condition and successfully treated with a novel therapeutic approach consisting of percutaneous myotomies and intramuscular cell-assisted fat grafting. Two cases of adult patients diagnosed with congenital muscular torticollis were analyzed after treatment with percutaneous myotomies and intramuscular fat grafting. The first patient had a history of unsuccessful treatment in infancy with bipolar release of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and was treated with two sessions of fat grafting. The second patient had a history of neglected torticollis and was treated with a single session of cell-assisted fat grafting. In both cases, facial asymmetries were simultaneously treated with the same fat grafting protocol used to treat the muscle. Improvements in muscle function and in face and neck contours were extremely good and stable in both patients. The postoperative course for both patients was uneventful and with a very short and easy recovery when compared with the techniques described to date. Neglected congenital muscular torticollis in adults, or in patients who have not responded adequately to surgical treatment, has been treated safely with percutaneous myotomies and intramuscular fat grafting. The benefit is a scarless technique that provides simultaneous recovery of neck aesthetics and muscle function together with a very

  14. Functional and Aesthetic Recovery of Congenital Muscular Torticollis with Intramuscular Stromal Vascular Fraction Enriched Fat Grafting.

    PubMed

    Monreal, Juan

    2017-01-12

    Congenital muscular torticollis is a well-known pathological condition caused by the contracture and shortening of the sternocleidomastoid muscle. This condition is manifested by a neck postural deformity often accompanied by some kind of facial asymmetry. Once diagnosed, treatment by early physiotherapy is generally successful in a high percentage of patients if performed during the first year of life. Later, especially after the fourth year, conservative treatment is usually far less effective, and surgical techniques remain the only way to improve neck contour and function. The author reports two cases of adult patients affected by this condition and successfully treated with a novel therapeutic approach consisting of percutaneous myotomies and intramuscular cell-assisted fat grafting. Two cases of adult patients diagnosed with congenital muscular torticollis were analyzed after treatment with percutaneous myotomies and intramuscular fat grafting. The first patient had a history of unsuccessful treatment in infancy with bipolar release of the sternocleidomastoid muscle and was treated with two sessions of fat grafting. The second patient had a history of neglected torticollis and was treated with a single session of cell-assisted fat grafting. In both cases, facial asymmetries were simultaneously treated with the same fat grafting protocol used to treat the muscle. Improvements in muscle function and in face and neck contours were extremely good and stable in both patients. The postoperative course for both patients was uneventful and with a very short and easy recovery when compared with the techniques described to date. Neglected congenital muscular torticollis in adults, or in patients who have not responded adequately to surgical treatment, has been treated safely with percutaneous myotomies and intramuscular fat grafting. The benefit is a scarless technique that provides simultaneous recovery of neck aesthetics and muscle function together with a very

  15. Regulation of vascular tone and pulse wave velocity in human muscular conduit arteries: selective effects of nitric oxide donors to dilate muscular arteries relative to resistance vessels.

    PubMed

    Fok, Henry; Jiang, Benyu; Clapp, Brian; Chowienczyk, Phil

    2012-11-01

    Arterial tone in muscular conduit arteries may influence pressure wave reflection through changes in diameter and pulse wave velocity. We examined the relative specificity of vasodilator drugs for radial artery and forearm resistance vessels during intrabrachial arterial infusion. The nitric oxide (NO) donors, nitroglycerine and nitroprusside, and brain natriuretic peptide were compared with the α-adrenergic antagonist phentolamine, calcium-channel antagonist verapamil, and hydralazine. Radial artery diameter was measured by high resolution ultrasound, forearm blood flow by strain gauge plethysmography, and pulse wave velocity by pressure recording cuffs placed over the distal brachial and radial arteries. Norepinephrine was used to constrict the radial artery to generate a greater range of vasodilator tone when examining pulse wave velocity. Despite dilating resistance vasculature, phentolamine and verapamil had little effect on radial artery diameter (mean dilation <9%). By contrast, for comparable actions on resistance vessels, nitroglycerine and nitroprusside but not brain natriuretic peptide had powerful actions to dilate the radial artery (dilations of 31.3 ± 3.6%, 23.6 ± 3.1%, and 9.8 ± 2.0% for nitroglycerine, nitroprusside, and brain natriuretic peptide, respectively). Changes in pulse wave velocity followed those in arterial diameter irrespective of the signaling pathway used to modulate arterial tone (R=-0.89, P<0.05). Basal tone in human muscular arteries is relatively unaffected by α-adrenergic or calcium-channel blockade, but is functionally or directly antagonized by NO donors. The differential response to NO donors suggests that there is potential to manipulate the downstream pathway to confer greater specificity for large arteries with a resultant decrease in pressure wave reflection and systolic blood pressure.

  16. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... depending on the type of muscular dystrophy. Duchenne muscular dystrophy About half of people with muscular dystrophy have ... muscles Muscle pain and stiffness Learning disabilities Becker muscular dystrophy Signs and symptoms are similar to those of ...

  17. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Devices The Search for a Cure en español Distrofia muscular About MD Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a ... muscles and cause different degrees of muscle weakness. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common and the ...

  18. A comparison of two formulas of topical menthol on vascular responses and perceived intensity prior to and follow a bout of maximum voluntary muscular contractions (MVMCs).

    PubMed

    Topp, Robert; Ng, Alex; Cybulski, Alyson; Skelton, Katalin; Papanek, Paula

    2014-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the vascular responses in the brachial artery and perceived intensity of two different formulas of topical menthol gels prior to and following a bout of maximum voluntary muscular contractions (MVMCs). 18 adults completed the same protocol on different days using blinded topical menthol gels (Old Formula and New Formula). Heart rate, brachial artery blood flow (ml/min), vessel diameter and reported intensity of sensation were measured at baseline (T1), at 5 min after application of the gel to the upper arm (T2), and immediately following five MVMCs hand grips (T3). The New Formula exhibited a significant decline in blood flow (-22.6%) between T1 and T2 which was not different than the nonsignificant declines under the Old Formula 1 (-21.8%). Both formulas resulted in a significant increase in perceived intensity of sensation between T1 and T2. Blood flow increased significantly with the New Formula (488%) between T2 and T3 and nonsignificantly with the Old Formula (355%).

  19. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... It Like for Teens With MD? en español Distrofia muscular Aside from seeing the telethon on Labor ... which weakens different muscle groups in various ways: Duchenne (pronounced: due-SHEN) muscular dystrophy (DMD) , the most ...

  20. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    Muscular dystrophy (MD) is a group of more than 30 inherited diseases. They all cause muscle weakness and ... ability to walk. There is no cure for muscular dystrophy. Treatments can help with the symptoms and prevent ...

  1. Muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001190.htm Muscular dystrophy To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited disorders that cause ...

  2. Inhibition of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor A and Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1α Maximizes the Effects of Radiation in Sarcoma Mouse Models Through Destruction of Tumor Vasculature

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hae-June; Yoon, Changhwan; Park, Do Joong; Kim, Yeo-Jung; Schmidt, Benjamin; Lee, Yoon-Jin; Tap, William D.; Eisinger-Mathason, T.S. Karin; Choy, Edwin; Kirsch, David G.; Simon, M. Celeste; and others

    2015-03-01

    Purpose: To examine the addition of genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) to radiation therapy (RT) and vascular endothelial growth factor A (VEGF-A) inhibition (ie trimodality therapy) for soft-tissue sarcoma. Methods and Materials: Hypoxia-inducible factor 1α was inhibited using short hairpin RNA or low metronomic doses of doxorubicin, which blocks HIF-1α binding to DNA. Trimodality therapy was examined in a mouse xenograft model and a genetically engineered mouse model of sarcoma, as well as in vitro in tumor endothelial cells (ECs) and 4 sarcoma cell lines. Results: In both mouse models, any monotherapy or bimodality therapy resulted in tumor growth beyond 250 mm{sup 3} within the 12-day treatment period, but trimodality therapy with RT, VEGF-A inhibition, and HIF-1α inhibition kept tumors at <250 mm{sup 3} for up to 30 days. Trimodality therapy on tumors reduced HIF-1α activity as measured by expression of nuclear HIF-1α by 87% to 95% compared with RT alone, and cytoplasmic carbonic anhydrase 9 by 79% to 82%. Trimodality therapy also increased EC-specific apoptosis 2- to 4-fold more than RT alone and reduced microvessel density by 75% to 82%. When tumor ECs were treated in vitro with trimodality therapy under hypoxia, there were significant decreases in proliferation and colony formation and increases in DNA damage (as measured by Comet assay and γH2AX expression) and apoptosis (as measured by cleaved caspase 3 expression). Trimodality therapy had much less pronounced effects when 4 sarcoma cell lines were examined in these same assays. Conclusions: Inhibition of HIF-1α is highly effective when combined with RT and VEGF-A inhibition in blocking sarcoma growth by maximizing DNA damage and apoptosis in tumor ECs, leading to loss of tumor vasculature.

  3. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dev. Med. Child Neurol. Mar 1995;37(3):260-269. 4. Centers for ... DM1) . The International Myotonic Dystrophy Consortium (IDMC). Neurology. Mar 28 2000;54(6):1218-1221. 5. Harper ...

  4. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... affects about 1 out of every 3,500 boys. (Girls can carry the gene that causes the disease, ... and heart problems. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy affects boys and girls equally. Symptoms usually start when kids are between ...

  5. Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... be affected. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy (LGMD) affects boys and girls equally, weakening muscles in the shoulders and upper ... weakness and poor muscle tone. Occurring in both girls and boys, it can have different symptoms. It varies in ...

  6. Muscular dystrophy - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - muscular dystrophy ... The following organizations are good resources for information on muscular dystrophy : Muscular Dystrophy Association -- www.mdausa.org National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke -- www.ninds.nih. ...

  7. Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Video: Getting an X-ray The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy KidsHealth > For Kids > The Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy ... you know someone who has MD. What Is Muscular Dystrophy? Muscular dystrophy (say: MUS-kyoo-lur DIS-troh- ...

  8. Flexibility and Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liemohn, Wendell

    1988-01-01

    This definition of flexibility and muscular strength also explores their roles in overall physical fitness and focuses on how increased flexibility and muscular strength can help decrease or eliminate lower back pain. (CB)

  9. Diaphragmatic function in advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Beck, Jennifer; Weinberg, Jan; Hamnegård, Carl-Hugo; Spahija, Jadranka; Olofson, Jan; Grimby, Gunnar; Sinderby, Christer

    2006-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess diaphragm electrical activation and diaphragm strength in patients with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy during resting conditions. Eight patients with advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy (age of 25 +/- 2 years) were studied during tidal breathing, maximal inspiratory capacity, maximal sniff inhalations, and magnetic stimulation of the phrenic nerves. Six patients were prescribed home mechanical ventilation (five non-invasive and one tracheotomy). Transdiaphragmatic pressure and diaphragm electrical activation were measured using an esophageal catheter. During tidal breathing (tidal volume 198 +/- 83 ml, breathing frequency 25 +/- 7), inspiratory diaphragm electrical activation was clearly detectable in seven out of eight patients and was 12 +/- 7 times above the noise level, and represented 45 +/- 19% of the maximum diaphragm electrical activation. Mean inspiratory transdiaphragmatic pressure during tidal breathing was 1.5 +/- 1.2 cmH2O, and during maximal sniff was 7.6 +/- 3.6 cmH2O. Twitch transdiaphragmatic pressure deflections could not be detected. This study shows that despite near complete loss of diaphragm strength in advanced Duchenne muscular dystrophy, diaphragm electrical activation measured with an esophageal electrode array remains clearly detectable in all but one patient.

  10. Vascular Cures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  11. Becker muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... and wheelchairs may improve movement and self-care. Genetic counseling may be recommended. Daughters of a man with ... Genetic counseling may be advised if there is a family history of Becker muscular dystrophy.

  12. Myotonic Dystrophy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy Registry

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Myotonic Dystrophy; Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy; Muscular Dystrophy; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 1; Myotonic Dystrophy Type 2; Congenital Myotonic Dystrophy; PROMM (Proximal Myotonic Myopathy); Steinert's Disease; Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

  13. Instructions to Adopt an External Focus Enhance Muscular Endurance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Marchant, David C.; Greig, Matt; Bullough, Jonathan; Hitchen, Daniel

    2011-01-01

    The influence of internal (movement focus) and external (outcome focus) attentional-focusing instructions on muscular endurance were investigated using three exercise protocols with experienced exercisers. Twenty-three participants completed a maximal repetition, assisted bench-press test on a Smith's machine. An external focus of attention…

  14. Evaluation of Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-03-06

    Becker Muscular Dystrophy; Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2A (Calpain-3 Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2B (Miyoshi Myopathy, Dysferlin Deficiency); Limb-Girdle Muscular Dystrophy, Type 2I (FKRP-deficiency)

  15. Learning about Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... form of muscular dystrophy that occurs primarily in boys. It is caused by an alteration (mutation) in ... to date, which encodes the muscle protein, dystrophin. Boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy do not make the ...

  16. Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Yiu, Eppie M; Kornberg, Andrew J

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy, an X-linked disorder, has an incidence of one in 5000 boys and presents in early childhood with proximal muscle weakness. Untreated boys become wheelchair bound by the age of 12 years and die of cardiorespiratory complications in their late teens to early 20s. The use of corticosteroids, non-invasive respiratory support, and active surveillance and management of associated complications have improved ambulation, function, quality of life and life expectancy. The clinical features, investigations and management of Duchenne muscular dystrophy are reviewed, as well as the latest in some of the novel therapies.

  17. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Statland, Jeffrey; Tawil, Rabi

    2014-08-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is a common type of adult muscular dystrophy and is divided into types 1 and 2 based on genetic mutation. Clinically, both FSHD types often show asymmetric and progressive muscle weakness affecting initially the face, shoulder, and arms followed by the distal then proximal lower extremities. Approximately 95% of patients, termed FSHD1, have a deletion of a key number of repetitive elements on chromosome 4q35. The remaining 5%, termed FSHD2, have no deletion on chromosome 4q35. Nevertheless, both types share a common downstream mechanism, making it possible for future disease-directed therapies to be effective for both FSHD types.

  18. Meaning of Muscular Dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... MD Living With MD en español Qué significa distrofia muscular Over Labor Day, just as you're ... grown-up. This article talks about two types: Duchenne and Becker MD. Generally, only boys get Duchenne ...

  19. Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the Classroom What Other Parents Are Reading Your Child's Development (Birth to 3 Years) Feeding Your 1- to 3-Month-Old Feeding Your 4- to 7-Month-Old Feeding Your 8- to 12-Month-Old Feeding Your 1- to 2-Year-Old Spinal ... > For Parents > Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) Print A A A ...

  20. Recapitulation of developing artery muscularization in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Sheikh, Abdul Q; Lighthouse, Janet K; Greif, Daniel M

    2014-03-13

    Excess smooth muscle accumulation is a key component of many vascular disorders, including atherosclerosis, restenosis, and pulmonary artery hypertension, but the underlying cell biological processes are not well defined. In pulmonary artery hypertension, reduced pulmonary artery compliance is a strong independent predictor of mortality, and pathological distal arteriole muscularization contributes to this reduced compliance. We recently demonstrated that embryonic pulmonary artery wall morphogenesis consists of discrete developmentally regulated steps. In contrast, poor understanding of distal arteriole muscularization in pulmonary artery hypertension severely limits existing therapies that aim to dilate the pulmonary vasculature but have modest clinical benefit and do not prevent hypermuscularization. Here, we show that most pathological distal arteriole smooth muscle cells, but not alveolar myofibroblasts, derive from pre-existing smooth muscle. Furthermore, the program of distal arteriole muscularization encompasses smooth muscle cell dedifferentiation, distal migration, proliferation, and then redifferentiation, thereby recapitulating many facets of arterial wall development.

  1. Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Tawil, Rabi

    2008-10-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), a dominantly inherited disorder, is the third most common dystrophy after Duchenne and myotonic muscular dystrophy. No known effective treatments exist for FSHD. The lack of an understanding of the underlying pathophysiology remains an obstacle in the development of targeted therapeutic interventions. The genetic defect is a loss of a critical number of a repetitive element (D4Z4) in the 4q subtelomeric region. The loss of the repeats results in specific changes in chromatin structure, although neither the molecular nor the cellular consequences of this change are known. Nevertheless, these epigenetic changes in chromatin structure offer a potential therapeutic target. This review discusses current management strategies in FSHD as well as potential therapeutic interventions to slow down or reverse the progressive muscle atrophy and weakness.

  2. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  3. Cornerstones in reconstructive plastic surgery: Argentinian development of muscular, myocutaneous, and fasciocutaneous flaps.

    PubMed

    Kostianovsky, A S; Sostaric, N M

    1992-01-01

    This article pays tribute to two Argentinian surgeons whose work has been published in their local journals but is unknown internationally. Goldtraj's pioneering work on the treatment of vascular ulcers of the leg using a muscular flap, presented in 1954, and Spadafora's work on the treatment of tissue defects with myocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps, presented in 1964, are discussed. Both papers deserve a place among the pioneering contributions on the subject of muscular as well as myocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps.

  4. Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-01

    REPORT TYPE Annual 3. DATES COVERED 1 MAR 2011 - 30 APR 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy 5a. CONTRACT...SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES 14. ABSTRACT The goal of this work is to increase the availability of critical mouse models of human muscular dystrophy (MD...3 W81XWH-11-1-0330 Cox, Gregory A 4 4 11 11 12 Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy W81XWH-11-1-0330 Gregory A

  5. Translational Studies of GALGT2 Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    Gene Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Paul T. Martin, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: The Research...Therapy for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1-0416 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Paul T...maximal specific force and force drop during eccentric contractions (Task 3, Milestone 1 and Task 7, Milestone 2) and EDL and TA muscles for

  6. Cardio-Muscular Conditioner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    In the mid-sixties, Gary Graham, a Boeing designer, developed a cardiovascular conditioner for a planned Air Force orbiting laboratory. After the project was cancelled, Graham participated in space station conditioning studies for the Skylab program. Twenty years later, he used this expertise to develop the Shuttle 2000-1, a physical therapy and athletic development conditioner, available through Contemporary Designs. The machine is used by football teams, sports clinics and medical rehabilitation centers. Cardiovascular fitness and muscular strength development are promoted through both kinetic and plyometric exercises.

  7. Independent Association of Muscular Strength and Carotid Intima-Media Thickness in Children.

    PubMed

    Melo, X; Santa-Clara, H; Santos, D A; Pimenta, N M; Minderico, C S; Fernhall, B; Sardinha, L B

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this cross-sectional study was to examine the influence of muscular strength on carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) in children, controlling for the effect of cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF) and central adiposity and to examine if differences among muscular strength tertiles translate to physiological differences. We assessed cIMT of the common carotid artery in 366 children between 11-12 years of age (191 girls). Measures included cIMT assessed with high-resolution ultrasonography, a maximal handgrip strength test, body fat mass and lean mass from DXA and CRF determined using a maximal cycle ergometer test. Association between muscular strength and cIMT adjusted for CRF and central adiposity, as measured by trunk fat, was tested with multiple linear regression analysis. Differences in risk factors among muscular strength groups were tested with ANOVA. The Muscular Strength Index (MSI) was inversely associated with cIMT independently of CRF and central adiposity (p<0.05). The low MSI group had the highest values of cIMT, waist circumference and systolic blood pressure and the lowest CRF (p<0.05). There was an inverse and independent association between muscular strength and cIMT. Low muscular strength was associated with higher levels of cardiovascular disease risk factors in children.

  8. Therapeutic advances in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Leung, Doris G; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies comprise a heterogeneous group of genetic disorders that produce progressive skeletal muscle weakness and wasting. There has been rapid growth and change in our understanding of these disorders in recent years, and advances in basic science are being translated into increasing numbers of clinical trials. This review will discuss therapeutic developments in 3 of the most common forms of muscular dystrophy: Duchenne muscular dystrophy, facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy, and myotonic dystrophy. Each of these disorders represents a different class of genetic disease (monogenic, epigenetic, and repeat expansion disorders), and the approach to therapy addresses the diverse and complex molecular mechanisms involved in these diseases. The large number of novel pharmacologic agents in development with good biologic rationale and strong proof of concept suggests there will be an improved quality of life for individuals with muscular dystrophy. PMID:23939629

  9. Wasting Mechanisms in Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M.; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. PMID:23669245

  10. How To: Maximize Google

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Branzburg, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Google is shaking out to be the leading Web search engine, with recent research from Nielsen NetRatings reporting about 40 percent of all U.S. households using the tool at least once in January 2004. This brief article discusses how teachers and students can maximize their use of Google.

  11. Intramuscular pressure and torque during isometric, concentric and eccentric muscular activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Styf, J.; Ballard, R.; Aratow, M.; Crenshaw, A.; Watenpaugh, D.; Hargens, A. R.

    1995-01-01

    Intramuscular pressures, electromyography (EMG) and torque generation during isometric, concentric and eccentric maximal isokinetic muscle activity were recorded in 10 healthy volunteers. Pressure and EMG activity were continuously and simultaneously measured side by side in the tibialis anterior and soleus muscles. Ankle joint torque and position were monitored continuously by an isokinetic dynamometer during plantar flexion and dorsiflexion of the foot. The increased force generation during eccentric muscular activity, compared with other muscular activity, was not accompanied by higher intramuscular pressure. Thus, this study demonstrated that eccentric muscular activity generated higher torque values for each increment of intramuscular pressure. Intramuscular pressures during antagonistic co-activation were significantly higher in the tibilis anterior muscle (42-46% of maximal agonistic activity) compared with the soleus muscle (12-29% of maximal agonistic activity) and was largely due to active recruitment of muscle fibers. In summary, eccentric muscular activity creates higher torque values with no additional increase of the intramuscular pressure compared with concentric and isometric muscular activity.

  12. Ageing with Muscular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martinsen, Bente; Dreyer, Pia

    2016-01-01

    Background: The demographic development with an ageing population is predicted to be the next global public health challenge. Advances in medicine and the socioeconomic development have reduced mortality and morbidity due to infectious conditions and non-communicable diseases. The increase in longevity will not be restricted to healthy people. Objective: To understand how people with muscular diseases experience ageing. Method: A literature review was conducted using the Matrix Method developed by Garrard (2007). This systematic method was used to identify, describe and interpret studies, irrespective of the methods applied. To avoid the exclusion of important sources, experiences and topics, we chose an integrative approach that accommodates the inclusion of studies with different methodologies. People with MD have gradually extended their life expectancy during the last 30 years. Thus, we reviewed the literature regarding MD and ageing without time limit. Results: We identified three themes: 1) Slowing down early 2) Accepting lifelong deterioration and 3) Striving for normality. Conclusion: People with MD live in a field of tension between a feeling of autonomy and normality and difficulties coping with reduced physical abilities. Getting older accentuates this tension since the physical strength diminishes and it is harder to maintain autonomy. The bodily challenges may coincide with the end of the rehabilitation people living with MD have received. Seemingly, no age-related rehabilitation is offered, and people living with MD are thus at risk of an unnecessarily passive life. PMID:28144383

  13. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... plan for their effective treatment. detect blood clots (deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the major veins of ... What are the limitations of Vascular Ultrasound? Vessels deep in the body are harder to see than ...

  14. Vascular Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack) may increase your risk of developing dementia. Atherosclerosis. This condition occurs when deposits of cholesterol and ... in your arteries and narrow your blood vessels. Atherosclerosis can increase your risk of vascular dementia — and ...

  15. Throwing performance is associated with muscular power.

    PubMed

    Bourdin, M; Rambaud, O; Dorel, S; Lacour, J-R; Moyen, B; Rahmani, A

    2010-07-01

    The aim of the present study was to test the hypothesis that performance in throwing events is associated with muscular characteristics of both upper and lower limbs. Thirty-eight male throwers volunteered to participate. Bench press and half squat tests were conducted on a guided barbell. The barbell displacement signal was recorded using a kinematic system. Maximal power, corresponding optimal velocity and force (P(max)S, V(opt)S, F(opt)S and P(max)BP, V(opt)BP, F(opt)BP for half squat and bench press, respectively) were extrapolated from the power-velocity relationship. Lower limb stiffness (K) was determined during maximal hopping. The results demonstrated that P(max)S and P(max)BP were correlated with each thrower's season's best performance (SBP, R=0.54, P<0.01 and R=0.71, P<0.001, respectively). P(max)S expressed relative to body mass was not correlated with SBP. K was significantly correlated with SBP (R=0.66, P<0.001). The relationship between P (max)BP expressed relative to body mass and SBP remained significant ( R=0.54, P<0.001). The results of the study suggest that high strength and stiffness values for lower limbs and strength and velocity characteristics for upper limbs may be associated with athletic throwing performance.

  16. Muscular strength is associated with self-esteem in college men but not women.

    PubMed

    Ciccolo, Joseph T; SantaBarbara, Nicholas J; Dunsiger, Shira I; Busch, Andrew M; Bartholomew, John B

    2016-12-01

    Muscular strength is a well-known predictor of morbidity and mortality. Similarly, self-esteem is a predictor of health and well-being. The relationship between these two variables, however, is currently unknown. This study examined the cross-sectional relationship between maximal muscular strength (i.e. handgrip and one-repetition-maximum (1-RM) squat) and global self-esteem in 126 college students. Significant correlations were found between both measures of muscular strength and self-esteem. Further analyses revealed that these relationships were only significant for men. Based on these results, additional research is needed to further explore the relationship between muscular strength and self-esteem, especially in other demographic groups and longitudinally.

  17. Bed Rest Muscular Atrophy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greenleaf, John E.

    2000-01-01

    A major debilitating response from prolonged bed rest (BR) is muscle atrophy, defined as a "decrease in size of a part of tissue after full development has been attained: a wasting away of tissue as from disuse, old age, injury or disease". Part of the complicated mechanism for the dizziness, increased body instability, and exaggerated gait in patients who arise immediately after BR may be a result of not only foot pain, but also of muscular atrophy and associated reduction in lower limb strength. Also, there seems to be a close association between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. A discussion of many facets of the total BR homeostatic syndrome has been published. The old adage that use determines form which promotes function of bone (Wolff's law) also applies to those people exposed to prolonged BR (without exercise training) in whom muscle atrophy is a consistent finding. An extreme case involved a 16-year-old boy who was ordered to bed by his mother in 1932: after 50 years in bed he had "a lily-white frame with limbs as thin as the legs of a ladder-back chair". These findings emphasize the close relationship between muscle atrophy and bone atrophy. In addition to loss of muscle mass during deconditioning, there is a significant loss of muscle strength and a decrease in protein synthesis. Because the decreases in force (strength) are proportionately greater than those in fiber size or muscle cross-sectional area, other contributory factors must be involved; muscle fiber dehydration may be important.

  18. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  19. Vascular smooth muscle cell functional contractility depends on extracellular mechanical properties

    PubMed Central

    Steucke, Kerianne E.; Tracy, Paige V.; Hald, Eric S.; Hall, Jennifer L.; Alford, Patrick W.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells’ primary function is to maintain vascular homeostasis through active contraction and relaxation. In diseases such as hypertension and atherosclerosis, this function is inhibited concurrent to changes in the mechanical environment surrounding vascular smooth muscle cells. It is well established that cell function and extracellular mechanics are interconnected; variations in substrate modulus affect cell migration, proliferation, and differentiation. To date, it is unknown how the evolving extracellular mechanical environment of vascular smooth muscle cells affects their contractile function. Here, we have built upon previous vascular muscular thin film technology to develop a variable-modulus vascular muscular thin film that measures vascular tissue functional contractility on substrates with a range of pathological and physiological moduli. Using this modified vascular muscular thin film, we found that vascular smooth muscle cells generated greater stress on substrates with higher moduli compared to substrates with lower moduli. We then measured protein markers typically thought to indicate a contractile phenotype in vascular smooth muscle cells and found that phenotype is unaffected by substrate modulus. These data suggest that mechanical properties of vascular smooth muscle cells’ extracellular environment directly influence their functional behavior and do so without inducing phenotype switching. PMID:26283412

  20. Muscular dystrophy in a dog resembling human becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Baroncelli, A B; Abellonio, F; Pagano, T B; Esposito, I; Peirone, B; Papparella, S; Paciello, O

    2014-05-01

    A 3-year-old, male Labrador retriever dog was presented with clinical signs of progressive exercise intolerance, bilateral elbow extension, rigidity of the forelimbs, hindlimb flexion and kyphosis. Microscopical examination of muscle tissue showed marked variability in myofibre size, replacement of muscle with mature adipose tissue and degeneration/regeneration of muscle fibres, consistent with muscular dystrophy. Immunohistochemical examination for dystrophin showed markedly reduced labelling with monoclonal antibodies specific for the rod domain and the carboxy-terminal of dystrophin, while expression of β-sarcoglycan, γ-sarcoglycan and β-dystroglycan was normal. Immunoblotting revealed a truncated dystrophin protein of approximately 135 kDa. These findings supported a diagnosis of congenital canine muscular dystrophy resembling Becker muscular dystrophy in man.

  1. The Effects of Muscular Fatigue on the Kinetics of Sprint Running.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sprague, Paul; Mann, Ralph V.

    1983-01-01

    To compare the kinematic and kinetic effects of fatigue on the biomechanics of sprint running, male subjects were filmed performing a short maximal exertion sprint and a long fatiguing sprint. Observable differences in the productive muscular activity of the better and the poorer sprinters occurred during the ground-phase of their strides.…

  2. Quantum-Inspired Maximizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zak, Michail

    2008-01-01

    A report discusses an algorithm for a new kind of dynamics based on a quantum- classical hybrid-quantum-inspired maximizer. The model is represented by a modified Madelung equation in which the quantum potential is replaced by different, specially chosen 'computational' potential. As a result, the dynamics attains both quantum and classical properties: it preserves superposition and entanglement of random solutions, while allowing one to measure its state variables, using classical methods. Such optimal combination of characteristics is a perfect match for quantum-inspired computing. As an application, an algorithm for global maximum of an arbitrary integrable function is proposed. The idea of the proposed algorithm is very simple: based upon the Quantum-inspired Maximizer (QIM), introduce a positive function to be maximized as the probability density to which the solution is attracted. Then the larger value of this function will have the higher probability to appear. Special attention is paid to simulation of integer programming and NP-complete problems. It is demonstrated that the problem of global maximum of an integrable function can be found in polynomial time by using the proposed quantum- classical hybrid. The result is extended to a constrained maximum with applications to integer programming and TSP (Traveling Salesman Problem).

  3. Alterations in Strength and Maximal Oxygen Uptake Consequent to Nautilus Circuit Weight Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Messier, Stephen P.; Dill, Mary Elizabeth

    1985-01-01

    The study compared the effects on muscular strength and maximal oxygen uptake of a Nautilus circuit weight training program, a free weight strength training program, and a running program. Nautilus circuit weight training appears to be equally effective for a training period of short duration. (MT)

  4. Spinal muscular atrophy

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease characterized by degeneration of alpha motor neurons in the spinal cord, resulting in progressive proximal muscle weakness and paralysis. Estimated incidence is 1 in 6,000 to 1 in 10,000 live births and carrier frequency of 1/40-1/60. This disease is characterized by generalized muscle weakness and atrophy predominating in proximal limb muscles, and phenotype is classified into four grades of severity (SMA I, SMAII, SMAIII, SMA IV) based on age of onset and motor function achieved. This disease is caused by homozygous mutations of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene, and the diagnostic test demonstrates in most patients the homozygous deletion of the SMN1 gene, generally showing the absence of SMN1 exon 7. The test achieves up to 95% sensitivity and nearly 100% specificity. Differential diagnosis should be considered with other neuromuscular disorders which are not associated with increased CK manifesting as infantile hypotonia or as limb girdle weakness starting later in life. Considering the high carrier frequency, carrier testing is requested by siblings of patients or of parents of SMA children and are aimed at gaining information that may help with reproductive planning. Individuals at risk should be tested first and, in case of testing positive, the partner should be then analyzed. It is recommended that in case of a request on carrier testing on siblings of an affected SMA infant, a detailed neurological examination should be done and consideration given doing the direct test to exclude SMA. Prenatal diagnosis should be offered to couples who have previously had a child affected with SMA (recurrence risk 25%). The role of follow-up coordination has to be managed by an expert in neuromuscular disorders and in SMA who is able to plan a multidisciplinary intervention that includes pulmonary, gastroenterology/nutrition, and orthopedic care. Prognosis depends on the phenotypic

  5. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  6. Vascular Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  7. Exercise and muscular dystrophy: implications and analysis of effects on musculoskeletal and cardiovascular systems.

    PubMed

    Barnabei, Matthew S; Martindale, Joshua M; Townsend, DeWayne; Metzger, Joseph M

    2011-07-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous collection of progressive, inherited diseases of muscle weakness and degeneration. Although these diseases can vary widely in their etiology and presentation, nearly all muscular dystrophies cause exercise intolerance to some degree. Here, we focus on Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), the most common form of muscular dystrophy, as a paradigm for the effects of muscle disease on exercise capacity. First described in the mid-1800s, DMD is a rapidly progressive and lethal muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Dystrophin is a membrane-associated cytoskeletal protein, the loss of which causes numerous cellular defects including mechanical instability of the sarcolemma, increased influx of extracellular calcium, and cell signaling defects. Here, we discuss the physiological basis for exercise intolerance in DMD, focusing on the molecular and cellular defects caused by loss of dystrophin and how these manifest as organ-level dysfunction and reduced exercise capacity. The main focus of this article is the defects present in dystrophin-deficient striated muscle. However, discussion regarding the effects of dystrophin loss on other tissues, including vascular smooth muscle is also included. Collectively, the goal of this article is to summarize the current state of knowledge regarding the mechanistic basis for exercise intolerance in DMD, which may serve as an archetype for other muscular dystrophies and diseases of muscle wasting.

  8. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein, dystrophin. This disease is modeled by a variety of animal models including several fish models, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially t...

  9. Learning about Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes the disorder. Top of page NHGRI Clinical Research on Spinal Muscular Atrophy Currently, NHGRI is not conducting studies on SMA. The National Institutes of Health is conducting clinical trials identified as enrolling individuals with SMA: Quantitative Analysis of SMN1 and SMN2 Gene Based on ...

  10. Wasting mechanisms in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jonghyun; Tajrishi, Marjan M; Ogura, Yuji; Kumar, Ashok

    2013-10-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of more than 30 different clinical genetic disorders that are characterized by progressive skeletal muscle wasting and degeneration. Primary deficiency of specific extracellular matrix, sarcoplasmic, cytoskeletal, or nuclear membrane protein results in several secondary changes such as sarcolemmal instability, calcium influx, fiber necrosis, oxidative stress, inflammatory response, breakdown of extracellular matrix, and eventually fibrosis which leads to loss of ambulance and cardiac and respiratory failure. A number of molecular processes have now been identified which hasten disease progression in human patients and animal models of muscular dystrophy. Accumulating evidence further suggests that aberrant activation of several signaling pathways aggravate pathological cascades in dystrophic muscle. Although replacement of defective gene with wild-type is paramount to cure, management of secondary pathological changes has enormous potential to improving the quality of life and extending lifespan of muscular dystrophy patients. In this article, we have reviewed major cellular and molecular mechanisms leading to muscle wasting in muscular dystrophy. This article is part of a Directed Issue entitled: Molecular basis of muscle wasting.

  11. Developing maximal neuromuscular power: part 2 - training considerations for improving maximal power production.

    PubMed

    Cormie, Prue; McGuigan, Michael R; Newton, Robert U

    2011-02-01

    This series of reviews focuses on the most important neuromuscular function in many sport performances: the ability to generate maximal muscular power. Part 1, published in an earlier issue of Sports Medicine, focused on the factors that affect maximal power production while part 2 explores the practical application of these findings by reviewing the scientific literature relevant to the development of training programmes that most effectively enhance maximal power production. The ability to generate maximal power during complex motor skills is of paramount importance to successful athletic performance across many sports. A crucial issue faced by scientists and coaches is the development of effective and efficient training programmes that improve maximal power production in dynamic, multi-joint movements. Such training is referred to as 'power training' for the purposes of this review. Although further research is required in order to gain a deeper understanding of the optimal training techniques for maximizing power in complex, sports-specific movements and the precise mechanisms underlying adaptation, several key conclusions can be drawn from this review. First, a fundamental relationship exists between strength and power, which dictates that an individual cannot possess a high level of power without first being relatively strong. Thus, enhancing and maintaining maximal strength is essential when considering the long-term development of power. Second, consideration of movement pattern, load and velocity specificity is essential when designing power training programmes. Ballistic, plyometric and weightlifting exercises can be used effectively as primary exercises within a power training programme that enhances maximal power. The loads applied to these exercises will depend on the specific requirements of each particular sport and the type of movement being trained. The use of ballistic exercises with loads ranging from 0% to 50% of one-repetition maximum (1RM) and

  12. Adaptations in muscular activation of the knee extensor muscles with strength training in young and older adults.

    PubMed

    Knight, C A; Kamen, G

    2001-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the extent of muscular activation during maximal voluntary knee extension contractions in old and young individuals and to examine the effects of resistance training on muscular activation in each group. The interpolated twitch technique was used to estimate muscular activation during two pre-training baseline tests, and after two and six weeks of resistance training. Throughout the study, the older group was 30% less strong than the young group (p=0.02). The training protocol was effective in both groups with overall isometric strength gains of 30 and 36% in the older (p=0.01) and young (p<0.01) groups, respectively. 10-RM training loads increased by 66% in the old group (p<0.01) and by 77% in the young group (p<0.01) throughout training. At the first baseline test, a 2% difference in muscular activation between groups (p=0.3) did not explain the large disparity in strength. Muscular activation increased by 2% in both groups throughout training (p<0.01). Despite considerably less muscular strength in the older group, muscular activation was greater than 95% of maximum and appears to be equal in both young and older individuals. Both groups demonstrated similar but small increases in muscular activation throughout training.

  13. Maximally Expressive Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Davis, Elizabeth; Richardson, Lea

    2004-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize tasks into a timeline or schedule. Tasks are logically grouped into containers called models. Models are a collection of related tasks, along with their dependencies and requirements, that when met will produce the desired result. One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiments for the International Space Station. In these experiments, the equipment used is among the most complex hardware ever developed; the information sought is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor; and the procedures are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling International Space Station experiment operations calls for a maximally expressive modeling schema.

  14. Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of facioscapulohumeral type.

    PubMed Central

    Furukawa, T; Toyokura, Y

    1976-01-01

    Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of FSH type affecting a mother and her son and daughter is reported. The relevant literature is reviewed and the relation between this conditon and Kugelberg-Welander (K-W) disease is discussed. Chronic spinal muscular atrophy of FSH type is considered to be a different entity from the eponymous K-W disease. Each type of muscular dystrophy, e.g. limb-girdle, FSH, distal, ocular, or oculopharyngeal type, has its counterpart of nuclear origin. A classification of the chronic spinal muscular atrophies is suggested following the classification of muscular dystrophy. Images PMID:957378

  15. Maximally Expressive Task Modeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Japp, John; Davis, Elizabeth; Maxwell, Theresa G. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize "tasks" into a timeline or schedule. The tasks are defined within the scheduling system in logical containers called models. The dictionary might define a model of this type as "a system of things and relations satisfying a set of rules that, when applied to the things and relations, produce certainty about the tasks that are being modeled." One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiment activities for the Space Station. The equipment used in these experiments is some of the most complex hardware ever developed by mankind, the information sought by these experiments is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor, and the procedures for executing the experiments are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of space station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling space station experiment operations calls for a "maximally expressive" modeling schema. Modeling even the simplest of activities cannot be automated; no sensor can be attached to a piece of equipment that can discern how to use that piece of equipment; no camera can quantify how to operate a piece of equipment. Modeling is a human enterprise-both an art and a science. The modeling schema should allow the models to flow from the keyboard of the user as easily as works of literature flowed from the pen of Shakespeare. The Ground Systems Department at the Marshall Space Flight Center has embarked on an effort to develop a new scheduling engine that is highlighted by a maximally expressive modeling schema. This schema, presented in this paper, is a synergy of technological advances and domain-specific innovations.

  16. Effect of preseason concurrent muscular strength and high-intensity interval training in professional soccer players.

    PubMed

    Wong, Pui-lam; Chaouachi, Anis; Chamari, Karim; Dellal, Alexandre; Wisloff, Ulrik

    2010-03-01

    This study examined the effect of concurrent muscular strength and high-intensity running interval training on professional soccer players' explosive performances and aerobic endurance. Thirty-nine players participated in the study, where both the experimental group (EG, n = 20) and control group (CG, n = 19) participated in 8 weeks of regular soccer training, with the EG receiving additional muscular strength and high-intensity interval training twice per week throughout. Muscular strength training consisted of 4 sets of 6RM (repetition maximum) of high-pull, jump squat, bench press, back half squat, and chin-up exercises. The high-intensity interval training consisted of 16 intervals each of 15-second sprints at 120% of individual maximal aerobic speed interspersed with 15 seconds of rest. EG significantly increased (p < or = 0.05) 1RM back half squat and bench press but showed no changes in body mass. Within-subject improvement was significantly higher (p < or = 0.01) in the EG compared with the CG for vertical jump height, 10-m and 30-m sprint times, distances covered in the Yo-Yo Intermittent Recovery Test and maximal aerobic speed test, and maximal aerobic speed. High-intensity interval running can be concurrently performed with high load muscular strength training to enhance soccer players' explosive performances and aerobic endurance.

  17. Pulmonary vascular disease in a rabbit a high altitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heath, Donald; Williams, David; Rios-Datenz, Jaime; Gosney, John

    1990-03-01

    A male weanling rabbit of the New Zealand White strain, born and living at an altitude of 3800 m in La Paz, Bolivia, developed right ventricular hypertrophy. This was found to be associated with growth of vascular smooth muscle cells in the intima of pulmonary arterioles, and contrasted with muscularization of the walls of pulmonary arterioles, without extension into the intima, found in a healthy, high-altitude control rabbit of the same strain. A low-altitude control showed no such muscularization. It is concluded that alveolar hypoxia, acting directly or through an intermediate agent, is a growth factor for vascular smooth muscle cells in pulmonary arterioles. This is the first report of pulmonary vascular disease due to high altitude in rabbits.

  18. Phase 3 Study of Ataluren in Patients With Nonsense Mutation Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-02

    Muscular Dystrophy, Duchenne; Muscular Dystrophies; Muscular Disorders, Atrophic; Muscular Diseases; Musculoskeletal Diseases; Neuromuscular Diseases; Nervous System Diseases; Genetic Diseases, X-Linked; Genetic Diseases, Inborn

  19. [Fractures in spinal muscular atrophy].

    PubMed

    Febrer, Anna; Vigo, Meritxell; Rodríguez, Natalia; Medina, Julita; Colomer, Jaume; Nascimento, Andrés

    2013-09-01

    Objetivo. Determinar la frecuencia de fracturas en pacientes con atrofia muscular espinal, mecanismo de produccion, edad de aparicion y repercusion funcional. Pacientes y metodos. Se estudian 65 pacientes con atrofia muscular espinal. Se recogen las fracturas diagnosticadas mediante radiografia y se analizan los siguientes parametros: tipo de atrofia muscular espinal, marcha, edad en el momento de la fractura, mecanismo de produccion, localizacion, tratamiento aplicado y repercusion funcional. Resultados. Presentaron fracturas 13 pacientes (20%), con un total de 20 (cuatro presentaron dos o mas fracturas). La edad media fue de 6,35 años. La localizacion fue en su mayoria en el femur y el mecanismo de produccion, en 12 casos por caidas y en 8 por traumatismo menor. No detectamos ninguna fractura vertebral. Todas se trataron de manera conservadora. El unico paciente ambulante que presento una fractura dejo de caminar despues de la inmovilizacion. Conclusiones. La existencia de fracturas en estos pacientes interfiere en su calidad de vida y en el nivel funcional. Es importante la prevencion de las mismas en el manejo del paciente y vigilando la correcta postura en la silla de ruedas con sistemas de sujecion Deberian emprenderse mas estudios sobre la perdida de densidad mineral osea en estos pacientes y su posible relacion con las fracturas.

  20. COPD: maximization of bronchodilation.

    PubMed

    Nardini, Stefano; Camiciottoli, Gianna; Locicero, Salvatore; Maselli, Rosario; Pasqua, Franco; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Pela, Riccardo; Pesci, Alberto; Sebastiani, Alfredo; Vatrella, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    The most recent guidelines define COPD in a multidimensional way, nevertheless the diagnosis is still linked to the limitation of airflow, usually measured by the reduction in the FEV1/FVC ratio below 70%. However, the severity of obstruction is not directly correlated to symptoms or to invalidity determined by COPD. Thus, besides respiratory function, COPD should be evaluated based on symptoms, frequency and severity of exacerbations, patient's functional status and health related quality of life (HRQoL). Therapy is mainly aimed at increasing exercise tolerance and reducing dyspnea, with improvement of daily activities and HRQoL. This can be accomplished by a drug-induced reduction of pulmonary hyperinflation and exacerbations frequency and severity. All guidelines recommend bronchodilators as baseline therapy for all stages of COPD, and long-acting inhaled bronchodilators, both beta-2 agonist (LABA) and antimuscarinic (LAMA) drugs, are the most effective in regular treatment in the clinically stable phase. The effectiveness of bronchodilators should be evaluated in terms of functional (relief of bronchial obstruction and pulmonary hyperinflation), symptomatic (exercise tolerance and HRQoL), and clinical improvement (reduction in number or severity of exacerbations), while the absence of a spirometric response is not a reason for interrupting treatment, if there is subjective improvement in symptoms. Because LABA and LAMA act via different mechanisms of action, when administered in combination they can exert additional effects, thus optimizing (i.e. maximizing) sustained bronchodilation in COPD patients with severe airflow limitation, who cannot benefit (or can get only partial benefit) by therapy with a single bronchodilator. Recently, a fixed combination of ultra LABA/LAMA (indacaterol/glycopyrronium) has shown that it is possible to get a stable and persistent bronchodilation, which can help in avoiding undesirable fluctuations of bronchial calibre.

  1. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  2. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions

    PubMed Central

    Abusara, Ziad; Von Kossel, Markus; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N) produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD), respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off) of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD) on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests. PMID:26807930

  3. In Vivo Dynamic Deformation of Articular Cartilage in Intact Joints Loaded by Controlled Muscular Contractions.

    PubMed

    Abusara, Ziad; Von Kossel, Markus; Herzog, Walter

    2016-01-01

    When synovial joints are loaded, the articular cartilage and the cells residing in it deform. Cartilage deformation has been related to structural tissue damage, and cell deformation has been associated with cell signalling and corresponding anabolic and catabolic responses. Despite the acknowledged importance of cartilage and cell deformation, there are no dynamic data on these measures from joints of live animals using muscular load application. Research in this area has typically been done using confined and unconfined loading configurations and indentation testing. These loading conditions can be well controlled and allow for accurate measurements of cartilage and cell deformations, but they have little to do with the contact mechanics occurring in a joint where non-congruent cartilage surfaces with different material and functional properties are pressed against each other by muscular forces. The aim of this study was to measure in vivo, real time articular cartilage deformations for precisely controlled static and dynamic muscular loading conditions in the knees of mice. Fifty and 80% of the maximal knee extensor muscular force (equivalent to approximately 0.4N and 0.6N) produced average peak articular cartilage strains of 10.5±1.0% and 18.3±1.3% (Mean ± SD), respectively, during 8s contractions. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions (0.5s on, 3.5s off) of 50% and 80% of maximal muscular force produced cartilage strains of 3.0±1.1% and 9.6±1.5% (Mean ± SD) on the femoral condyles of the mouse knee. Cartilage thickness recovery following mechanical compression was highly viscoelastic and took almost 50s following force removal in the static tests.

  4. Age-Related Differences in Muscular Strength and Muscular Endurance among Female Masters Swimmers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dummer, Gail M.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    This study investigated age-related differences in muscular strength and muscular endurance among 73 female masters swimmers aged 24 to 71 years. While an age-related decline in muscular strength was apparent, the results failed to reveal a similar trend for endurance, suggesting that swimming influences endurance more than strength among women.…

  5. Effects of two deep water training programs on cardiorespiratory and muscular strength responses in older adults.

    PubMed

    Kanitz, Ana Carolina; Delevatti, Rodrigo Sudatti; Reichert, Thais; Liedtke, Giane Veiga; Ferrari, Rodrigo; Almada, Bruna Pereira; Pinto, Stephanie Santana; Alberton, Cristine Lima; Kruel, Luiz Fernando Martins

    2015-04-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effects of two deep water training programs on cardiorespiratory and muscular strength responses in older adults. Thirty-four older adults men were placed into two groups: deep water endurance training (ET; n = 16; 66 ± 4 years) and deep water strength prior to endurance training (concurrent training: CT; n = 18; 64 ± 4 years). The training period lasted 12 weeks, with three sessions a week. The resting heart rate and the oxygen uptake at peak (VO2peak) and at the second ventilatory threshold (VO2VT2) were evaluated during a maximal incremental test on a cycle ergometer before and after training. In addition, maximal dynamic strength (one repetition maximum test--1RM) and local muscular resistance (maximum repetitions at 60% 1RM) of the knee extensors and flexors were evaluated. After the training period, the heart rate at rest decreased significantly, while the VO2peak and VO2VT2 showed significant increases in both groups (p<0.05). Only the VO2VT2 resulted in significantly greater values for the ET compared to the CT group after the training (p<0.05). In addition, after training, there was a significant increase in the maximal dynamic strength of the knee extensors and the local muscular endurance of the knee extensors and flexors, with no difference between the groups (p > 0.05). In summary, the two training programs were effective at producing significant improvements in cardiorespiratory and muscular strength responses in older adult men. However, deep water endurance training at high intensities provides increased cardiorespiratory responses compared to CT and results in similar muscular strength responses.

  6. Motor unit reorganization in progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies.

    PubMed

    Szmidt-Sałkowska, Elżbieta; Gaweł, Małgorzata; Lipowska, Marta

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze motor unit reorganization in different types of progressive muscular dystrophies and congenital myopathies. The study population consisted of patients with genetically verified progressive muscular dystrophies: Duchenne (DMD) (n=54), Becker (BMD) (n=30), facio-scapulo-humeral (FSHD) (n=37), and Emery-Dreifuss (E-DD) (n=26). Patients with probable limb-girdle dystrophy (L-GD) (n=58) and congenital myopathies (n=35) were also included in the study. Quantitative EMG recordings were obtained from 469 muscles. Muscle activity at rest and during slight voluntary and maximal muscle contraction was analyzed. The motor unit activity potential (MUAP) duration, amplitude, area, size index (SI), polyphasicity, and the presence of "outliers" were evaluated. Diminished values of MUAP parameters and decreased maximal amplitude of maximal muscle contraction were recorded most frequently in DMD and mainly in the biceps brachii muscles. SI was the most frequently changed EMG parameter. "Outliers" with amplitude below the normal range were recorded more frequently then a decreased mean MUAP amplitude (what could indicate a very high sensitivity of this EMG parameter). Pathological interference pattern was recorded in 34.7% of biceps brachii and in 21.2% of rectus femoris muscles. In FSHD, decreased MUAP duration and SI and pathological interference pattern with low amplitude were recorded most frequently in the tibial anterior and deltoid muscles. The presence of potentials with reduced parameters is a result of decreasing motor unit area (reduced number and size of muscle fibers), while high amplitude potentials recorded in BMD and E-DD could indicate a slow and mild course of disease and muscle regeneration.

  7. Validity of Field Tests of Upper Body Muscular Strength.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pate, Russell, R; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Examined the validity of field tests of elementary students' upper body muscular strength and endurance. Field tests were found to be moderately valid measures of weight-relative muscular strength but not of absolute strength and muscular endurance. (SM)

  8. Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-05-01

    JAX stock 18018: B10ScSn.Cg-Prkdcscid Dmdmdx/J Like human patients who suffer from one of the most common neuromuscular diseases, Duchenne muscular...overt phenotype in BL10.mdx mice. However, the muscle wasting and kyphosis of the D2.mdx mouse is evident at this early adult age. Figure 3...and whe antitative is a very e. Our atic loss X mice train at any re shown ness is total force per eakness ch earlier in, the of

  9. Nutrition Considerations in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Davis, Jillian; Samuels, Emily; Mullins, Lucille

    2015-08-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a serious degenerative muscular disease affecting males. Diagnosis usually occurs in childhood and is confirmed through genetic testing and/or muscle biopsy. Accompanying the disease are several nutrition-related concerns: growth, body composition, energy and protein requirements, constipation, swallowing difficulties, bone health, and complementary medicine. This review article addresses the nutrition aspects of DMD.

  10. Nanolipodendrosome-loaded glatiramer acetate and myogenic differentiation 1 as augmentation therapeutic strategy approaches in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Afzal, Ehsan; Zakeri, Saba; Keyhanvar, Peyman; Bagheri, Meisam; Mahjoubi, Parvin; Asadian, Mahtab; Omoomi, Nogol; Dehqanian, Mohammad; Ghalandarlaki, Negar; Darvishmohammadi, Tahmineh; Farjadian, Fatemeh; Golvajoee, Mohammad Sadegh; Afzal, Shadi; Ghaffari, Maryam; Cohan, Reza Ahangari; Gravand, Amin; Ardestani, Mehdi Shafiee

    2013-01-01

    Backgrond Muscular dystrophies consist of a number of juvenile and adult forms of complex disorders which generally cause weakness or efficiency defects affecting skeletal muscles or, in some kinds, other types of tissues in all parts of the body are vastly affected. In previous studies, it was observed that along with muscular dystrophy, immune inflammation was caused by inflammatory cells invasion – like T lymphocyte markers (CD8+/CD4+). Inflammatory processes play a major part in muscular fibrosis in muscular dystrophy patients. Additionally, a significant decrease in amounts of two myogenic recovery factors (myogenic differentation 1 [MyoD] and myogenin) in animal models was observed. The drug glatiramer acetate causes anti-inflammatory cytokines to increase and T helper (Th) cells to induce, in an as yet unknown mechanism. MyoD recovery activity in muscular cells justifies using it alongside this drug. Methods In this study, a nanolipodendrosome carrier as a drug delivery system was designed. The purpose of the system was to maximize the delivery and efficiency of the two drug factors, MyoD and myogenin, and introduce them as novel therapeutic agents in muscular dystrophy phenotypic mice. The generation of new muscular cells was analyzed in SW1 mice. Then, immune system changes and probable side effects after injecting the nanodrug formulations were investigated. Results The loaded lipodendrimer nanocarrier with the candidate drug, in comparison with the nandrolone control drug, caused a significant increase in muscular mass, a reduction in CD4+/CD8+ inflammation markers, and no significant toxicity was observed. The results support the hypothesis that the nanolipodendrimer containing the two candidate drugs will probably be an efficient means to ameliorate muscular degeneration, and warrants further investigation. PMID:23966782

  11. [Congenital muscular dystrophies in children].

    PubMed

    Scavone-Mauro, Cristina; Barros, Graciela

    2013-09-06

    From the clinical and genetic point of view, congenital muscular dystrophies (CMD) are a heterogenic group of diseases within neuromuscular pathologies. The best known forms are: merosin deficiency CMD, collagen VI deficiency CMD, LMNA-related CMD, selenoprotein-related CMD (SEPN1) and alpha-dystroglycan-related CMD. They present with a broad spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Most of them are transmitted by recessive autosomal inheritance. The initial manifestations very often begin in infancy or in the neonatal period. There are clinical suspicions of the existence of hypotonia and paresis, and they are characterised by a dystrophic pattern in the muscular biopsy (muscle replaced by fibroadipose tissue, with necrosis and cell regeneration). Advances in the understanding of the molecular pathogenesis of CMD have made it possible to make further progress in the classification of the different subtypes. The aim of this review is to comment on the advances made in recent years as regards the classification of CMD in terms of genetics, the proteins involved and their clinical presentation.

  12. [Autosomal recessive limb-girdle muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Caballero, Marta E; Miranda-Duarte, Antonio; Escobar-Cedillo, Rosa E; Villegas-Castrejon, Hilda

    2010-10-16

    Muscular dystrophies are a heterogeneous group of hereditary diseases characterized by loss of muscle and weakness of non neurogenic origin. They are caused by mutations in one or more genes involved in the formation of muscle cells. The discovery of several proteins in the muscle began with the discovery of dystrophin, 130 years after the clinical description of muscular dystrophy. Currently, due to a better understanding of the biology of normal and diseased muscle, has achieved a classification at the molecular level of different types of muscular dystrophies, according to the protein that is affected. This has been particularly important for limb girdle muscular dystrophies, which present clinical features that can lead to confusion with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Moreover, in recent years has encouraged the development of therapies in the near future could provide a solution for restoring the function of the muscle fiber.

  13. Dysregulation of calcium homeostasis in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Illarramendi, Ainara; Toral-Ojeda, Ivan; Aldanondo, Garazi; López de Munain, Adolfo

    2014-10-08

    Muscular dystrophies are a group of diseases characterised by the primary wasting of skeletal muscle, which compromises patient mobility and in the most severe cases originate a complete paralysis and premature death. Existing evidence implicates calcium dysregulation as an underlying crucial event in the pathophysiology of several muscular dystrophies, such as dystrophinopathies, calpainopathies or myotonic dystrophy among others. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most frequent myopathy in childhood, and calpainopathy or LGMD2A is the most common form of limb-girdle muscular dystrophy, whereas myotonic dystrophy is the most frequent inherited muscle disease worldwide. In this review, we summarise recent advances in our understanding of calcium ion cycling through the sarcolemma, the sarcoplasmic reticulum and mitochondria, and its involvement in the pathogenesis of these dystrophies. We also discuss some of the clinical implications of recent findings regarding Ca2+ handling as well as novel approaches to treat muscular dystrophies targeting Ca2+ regulatory proteins.

  14. Vascular permeability, vascular hyperpermeability and angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Janice A.; Benjamin, Laura; Zeng, Huiyan; Dvorak, Ann M.

    2008-01-01

    The vascular system has the critical function of supplying tissues with nutrients and clearing waste products. To accomplish these goals, the vasculature must be sufficiently permeable to allow the free, bidirectional passage of small molecules and gases and, to a lesser extent, of plasma proteins. Physiologists and many vascular biologists differ as to the definition of vascular permeability and the proper methodology for its measurement. We review these conflicting views, finding that both provide useful but complementary information. Vascular permeability by any measure is dramatically increased in acute and chronic inflammation, cancer, and wound healing. This hyperpermeability is mediated by acute or chronic exposure to vascular permeabilizing agents, particularly vascular permeability factor/vascular endothelial growth factor (VPF/VEGF, VEGF-A). We demonstrate that three distinctly different types of vascular permeability can be distinguished, based on the different types of microvessels involved, the composition of the extravasate, and the anatomic pathways by which molecules of different size cross-vascular endothelium. These are the basal vascular permeability (BVP) of normal tissues, the acute vascular hyperpermeability (AVH) that occurs in response to a single, brief exposure to VEGF-A or other vascular permeabilizing agents, and the chronic vascular hyperpermeability (CVH) that characterizes pathological angiogenesis. Finally, we list the numerous (at least 25) gene products that different authors have found to affect vascular permeability in variously engineered mice and classify them with respect to their participation, as far as possible, in BVP, AVH and CVH. Further work will be required to elucidate the signaling pathways by which each of these molecules, and others likely to be discovered, mediate the different types of vascular permeability. PMID:18293091

  15. Physiology of respiratory disturbances in muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Lo Mauro, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a group of inherited myopathies characterised by progressive skeletal muscle wasting, including of the respiratory muscles. Respiratory failure, i.e. when the respiratory system fails in its gas exchange functions, is a common feature in muscular dystrophy, being the main cause of death, and it is a consequence of lung failure, pump failure or a combination of the two. The former is due to recurrent aspiration, the latter to progressive weakness of respiratory muscles and an increase in the load against which they must contract. In fact, both the resistive and elastic components of the work of breathing increase due to airway obstruction and chest wall and lung stiffening, respectively. The respiratory disturbances in muscular dystrophy are restrictive pulmonary function, hypoventilation, altered thoracoabdominal pattern, hypercapnia, dyspnoea, impaired regulation of breathing, inefficient cough and sleep disordered breathing. They can be present at different rates according to the type of muscular dystrophy and its progression, leading to different onset of each symptom, prognosis and degree of respiratory involvement. Key points A common feature of muscular dystrophy is respiratory failure, i.e. the inability of the respiratory system to provide proper oxygenation and carbon dioxide elimination. In the lung, respiratory failure is caused by recurrent aspiration, and leads to hypoxaemia and hypercarbia. Ventilatory failure in muscular dystrophy is caused by increased respiratory load and respiratory muscles weakness. Respiratory load increases in muscular dystrophy because scoliosis makes chest wall compliance decrease, atelectasis and fibrosis make lung compliance decrease, and airway obstruction makes airway resistance increase. The consequences of respiratory pump failure are restrictive pulmonary function, hypoventilation, altered thoracoabdominal pattern, hypercapnia, dyspnoea, impaired regulation of breathing, inefficient cough and

  16. Osteoprotegerin protects against muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Dufresne, Sébastien S; Dumont, Nicolas A; Bouchard, Patrice; Lavergne, Éliane; Penninger, Josef M; Frenette, Jérôme

    2015-04-01

    Receptor-activator of NF-κB, its ligand RANKL, and the soluble decoy receptor osteoprotegerin are the key regulators of osteoclast differentiation and bone remodeling. Although there is a strong association between osteoporosis and skeletal muscle atrophy/dysfunction, the functional relevance of a particular biological pathway that synchronously regulates bone and skeletal muscle physiopathology still is elusive. Here, we show that muscle cells can produce and secrete osteoprotegerin and pharmacologic treatment of dystrophic mdx mice with recombinant osteoprotegerin muscles. (Recombinant osteoprotegerin-Fc mitigates the loss of muscle force in a dose-dependent manner and preserves muscle integrity, particularly in fast-twitch extensor digitorum longus.) Our data identify osteoprotegerin as a novel protector of muscle integrity, and it potentially represents a new therapeutic avenue for both muscular diseases and osteoporosis.

  17. Statistical insights into major human muscular diseases.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Shakti; Kim, Sung-Min; Wang, Yu; Dinasarapu, Ashok Reddy; Subramaniam, Shankar

    2014-07-15

    Muscular diseases lead to muscle fiber degeneration, impairment of mobility, and in some cases premature death. Many of these muscular diseases are largely idiopathic. The goal of this study was to identify biomarkers based on their functional role and possible mechanisms of pathogenesis, specific to individual muscular disease. We analyzed the muscle transcriptome from five major muscular diseases: acute quadriplegic myopathy (AQM), amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), mitochondrial encephalomyopathy, lactic acidosis and stroke-like episodes (MELAS), dermatomyositis (DM) and polymyositis (PM) using pairwise statistical comparison to identify uniquely regulated genes in each muscular disease. The genome-wide information encoded in the transcriptome provided biomarkers and functional insights into dysregulation in each muscular disease. The analysis showed that the dysregulation of genes in forward membrane pathway, responsible for transmitting action potential from neural excitation, is unique to AQM, while the dysregulation of myofibril genes, determinant of the mechanical properties of muscle, is unique to ALS, dysregulation of ER protein processing, responsible for correct protein folding, is unique to DM, and upregulation of immune response genes is unique to PM. We have identified biomarkers specific to each muscular disease which can be used for diagnostic purposes.

  18. Porcine models of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Selsby, Joshua T; Ross, Jason W; Nonneman, Dan; Hollinger, Katrin

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive, fatal, X-linked disease caused by a failure to accumulate the cytoskeletal protein dystrophin. This disease has been studied using a variety of animal models including fish, mice, rats, and dogs. While these models have contributed substantially to our mechanistic understanding of the disease and disease progression, limitations inherent to each model have slowed the clinical advancement of therapies, which necessitates the development of novel large-animal models. Several porcine dystrophin-deficient models have been identified, although disease severity may be so severe as to limit their potential contributions to the field. We have recently identified and completed the initial characterization of a natural porcine model of dystrophin insufficiency. Muscles from these animals display characteristic focal necrosis concomitant with decreased abundance and localization of dystrophin-glycoprotein complex components. These pigs recapitulate many of the cardinal features of muscular dystrophy, have elevated serum creatine kinase activity, and preliminarily appear to display altered locomotion. They also suffer from sudden death preceded by EKG abnormalities. Pig dystrophinopathy models could allow refinement of dosing strategies in human-sized animals in preparation for clinical trials. From an animal handling perspective, these pigs can generally be treated normally, with the understanding that acute stress can lead to sudden death. In summary, the ability to create genetically modified pig models and the serendipitous discovery of genetic disease in the swine industry has resulted in the emergence of new animal tools to facilitate the critical objective of improving the quality and length of life for boys afflicted with such a devastating disease.

  19. Maximal anaerobic power: relationship to anthropometric characteristics during growth.

    PubMed

    Mercier, B; Mercier, J; Granier, P; Le Gallais, D; Préfaut, C

    1992-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of age in relation to anthropometric characteristics upon maximal anaerobic power of legs in sixty-nine young boys aged 11 to 19 years. Maximal anaerobic power (Wmax) was measured by the force-velocity test. Lean body mass (LBM) was determined from all four skin-fold thickness measurements, leg volume (LV) was estimated by anthropometric method, and anthropometric measurements were used to determine total muscular mass (TMM). Wmax increased significantly (F = 44.1, p less than 0.001) between 11 and 19 years and was correlated with LV (r = 0.84) and TMM (r = 0.88). It was most highly correlated with LBM (r = 0.94), which best explained the percentage of the total variance of Wmax (88%). Normalized Wmax (Wmax/LBM) also increased significantly between 11 and 19 years (F = 21.9, p less than 0.001). In conclusion, Wmax determined by the force-velocity test was closely related to anthropometric characteristics, especially LBM, during the growth period. Furthermore, even when corrected for lean body mass, maximal anaerobic power was always found to increase. This suggests that other undetermined factors, in addition to the amount of lean tissue mass, may explain the increase of Wmax during the force-velocity test.

  20. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: current cell therapies

    PubMed Central

    Sienkiewicz, Dorota; Okurowska-Zawada, Bożena; Paszko-Patej, Grażyna; Kawnik, Katarzyna

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a genetically determined X-linked disease and the most common, progressive pediatric muscle disorder. For decades, research has been conducted to find an effective therapy. This review presents current therapeutic methods for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, based on scientific articles in English published mainly in the period 2000 to 2014. We used the PubMed database to identify and review the most important studies. An analysis of contemporary studies of stem cell therapy and the use of granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) in muscular dystrophy was performed. PMID:26136844

  1. Plant Vascular Biology 2013: vascular trafficking.

    PubMed

    Ursache, Robertas; Heo, Jung-Ok; Helariutta, Ykä

    2014-04-01

    About 200 researchers from around the world attended the Third International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2013) held in July 2013 at the Rantapuisto Conference Center, in Helsinki, Finland (http://www.pvb2013.org). The plant vascular system, which connects every organ in the mature plant, continues to attract the interest of researchers representing a wide range of disciplines, including development, physiology, systems biology, and computational biology. At the meeting, participants discussed the latest research advances in vascular development, long- and short-distance vascular transport and long-distance signalling in plant defence, in addition to providing a context for how these studies intersect with each other. The meeting provided an opportunity for researchers working across a broad range of fields to share ideas and to discuss future directions in the expanding field of vascular biology. In this report, the latest advances in understanding the mechanism of vascular trafficking presented at the meeting have been summarized.

  2. Overexpression of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy region gene 1 causes primary defects in myogenic stem cells.

    PubMed

    Xynos, Alexandros; Neguembor, Maria Victoria; Caccia, Roberta; Licastro, Danilo; Nonis, Alessandro; Di Serio, Clelia; Stupka, Elia; Gabellini, Davide

    2013-05-15

    Overexpression of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy region gene 1 (FRG1) in mice, frogs and worms leads to muscular and vascular abnormalities. Nevertheless, the mechanism that follows FRG1 overexpression and finally leads to muscular defects is currently unknown. Here, we show that the earliest phenotype displayed by mice overexpressing FRG1 is a postnatal muscle-growth defect. Long before the development of muscular dystrophy, FRG1 mice also exhibit a muscle regeneration impairment. Ex vivo and in vivo experiments revealed that FRG1 overexpression causes myogenic stem cell activation and proliferative, clonogenic and differentiation defects. A comparative gene expression profiling of muscles from young pre-dystrophic wild-type and FRG1 mice identified differentially expressed genes in several gene categories and networks that could explain the emerging tissue and myogenic stem cell defects. Overall, our study provides new insights into the pathways regulated by FRG1 and suggests that muscle stem cell defects could contribute to the pathology of FRG1 mice.

  3. Reality television and the muscular male ideal.

    PubMed

    Dallesasse, Starla L; Kluck, Annette S

    2013-06-01

    Although researchers have examined the negative effects of viewing reality television (RTV) on women's body image, this research has not been extended to men. Exploring the extent to which RTV depicts men who embody the muscular ideal may enhance our understanding of the potential influence of this media genre. We explored the extent to which RTV depicted men who embodied the muscular ideal using a quantitative content analysis. Based on binomial tests, the primary male cast members of programs airing on networks popular among young adult men during the Fall 2009 broadcast season were more muscular, with lower levels of body fat, than average U.S. men. The chest-to-waist and shoulder-to-waist ratios of these cast members did not differ as a function of program type (i.e., reality drama, endurance, and romance). Young men who view RTV programs included in the present study would be exposed to an unrepresentative muscular ideal.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: Fukuyama congenital muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Fujii T, Aiba H, Toda T. Seizure-genotype relationship in Fukuyama-type congenital muscular dystrophy. Brain Dev. ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually droopy eyelids ( ptosis ), followed by difficulty swallowing (dysphagia). The swallowing difficulties begin with food, but as ... Encyclopedia: Ptosis Health Topic: Muscular Dystrophy Health Topic: Swallowing Disorders Genetic and Rare Diseases Information Center (1 link) ...

  6. How Do People Cope with Muscular Dystrophy?

    MedlinePlus

    ... section. How do people cope with muscular dystrophy (MD)? Although MD presents many challenges in many different aspects of daily life, those with MD enjoy full lives. Advances in drug therapies, physical ...

  7. Targeting latent TGFβ release in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Ceco, Ermelinda; Bogdanovich, Sasha; Gardner, Brandon; Miller, Tamari; DeJesus, Adam; Earley, Judy U; Hadhazy, Michele; Smith, Lucas R; Barton, Elisabeth R; Molkentin, Jeffery D; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2014-10-22

    Latent transforming growth factor-β (TGFβ) binding proteins (LTBPs) bind to inactive TGFβ in the extracellular matrix. In mice, muscular dystrophy symptoms are intensified by a genetic polymorphism that changes the hinge region of LTBP, leading to increased proteolytic susceptibility and TGFβ release. We have found that the hinge region of human LTBP4 was also readily proteolysed and that proteolysis could be blocked by an antibody to the hinge region. Transgenic mice were generated to carry a bacterial artificial chromosome encoding the human LTBP4 gene. These transgenic mice displayed larger myofibers, increased damage after muscle injury, and enhanced TGFβ signaling. In the mdx mouse model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the human LTBP4 transgene exacerbated muscular dystrophy symptoms and resulted in weaker muscles with an increased inflammatory infiltrate and greater LTBP4 cleavage in vivo. Blocking LTBP4 cleavage may be a therapeutic strategy to reduce TGFβ release and activity and decrease inflammation and muscle damage in muscular dystrophy.

  8. [Ceruloplasmin in patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Reyes, J; Holmgren, J; Colombo, M

    1991-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a well defined form of sex linked inherited muscular disease. Approximately 1/3 of cases are the product of a new mutation. We studied 20 patients with this disease and 19 heterozygous females. Ceruloplasmin levels were significantly higher in patients compared to controls. A possible protective role of this enzyme against oxydating agents may help prevent peroxydation of lipids from the smooth muscle cell membrane.

  9. Duchenne muscular dystrophy: the management of scoliosis

    PubMed Central

    Gardner, Adrian C.; Roper, Helen P.; Chikermane, Ashish A.; Tatman, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    This study summaries the current management of scoliosis in patients with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. A literature review of Medline was performed and the collected articles critically appraised. This literature is discussed to give an overview of the current management of scoliosis within Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy. Importantly, improvements in respiratory care, the use of steroids and improving surgical techniques have allowed patients to maintain quality of life and improved life expectancy in this patient group. PMID:27757431

  10. Muscularity as a function of species, sex and age in small mammals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pace, N.; Rahlmann, D. F.; Smith, A. H.

    1984-01-01

    Changes in the body skeletal muscle mass SMM (measured as a function of the ratio between the body creatine mass and the fat-free muscle creatine), and in muscularity (expressed as the ratio of SMM to fat-free body mass) were studied as functions of age, sex, and species in mouse, rat, hamster, guinea pig, and rabbit. Six animals of each sex were examined in eight age cohorts ranging from 1 to 24 months. Both species and age factors affect SMM. Strong sexual dimorphism in the SMM changes with age was displayed by mouse, rat, and guinea pig, whereas the hamster and rabbit were statistically monomorphic. The mouse, rat, and hamster attain a maximal SMM at about 1 year of age, whereas in the guinea pig and rabbit the decrease in SMM starts after 2 years. The value of muscularity reached a peak at age of 2-3 months in all animals of both sexes, with a pronounced difference among the species. The mouse emerged as the most muscular, while the guinea pig the least muscular, of all species.

  11. Muscular loading of joints triggers cellular secretion of PRG4 into the joint fluid.

    PubMed

    Abusara, Z; Krawetz, R; Steele, B; DuVall, M; Schmidt, T; Herzog, W

    2013-04-26

    We developed a novel testing system that allows quantification of joint loading and permits analysis of changes in total protein and PRG4 contents in joint fluid of intact knees in live mice. A sequence of 15 repeat, isometric muscular contractions of "low" intensity (less than 50% of the maximal isometric muscular force), and "high" intensity (greater than 55% of maximal) were applied repeatedly (up to five times with a 15 min rest between contractions) to the mouse knee. Increases in knee joint loading were accompanied with significant increases in total protein (p<0.0001) and PRG4 concentrations in the synovial fluid. Total protein and PRG4 concentrations decreased with repeated "high" intensity loading. However, the addition of cell secretion inhibitors to the knee prior to muscular loading resulted in PRG4 levels that remained below the detection limit for all loading conditions. These results suggest that changes in synovial fluid proteins and PRG4 concentrations upon joint loading are mediated by cells within the joint, and that these changes may be used as quantitative indicators for the intensity and duration of acute joint loading, and might serve as a powerful clinical tool to assess the effectiveness of rehabilitation and prevention exercise programs.

  12. Muscular fatigue: considerations for dance.

    PubMed

    Wyon, Matthew A; Koutedakis, Yiannis

    2013-01-01

    Muscular fatigue can be defined as the failure to maintain an expected power output. It is a multifaceted phenomenon that incorporates metabolic, neural and neuromuscular components, among others. Metabolic causes of fatigue are associated with the ability to maintain energy supply during exercise, the speed at which homeostasis is achieved post-exercise, and the effects of high intensity exercise by-products on the peripheral neuromuscular system. Research has indicated that the central nervous system plays a protective role in preventing catastrophic muscle damage by reducing the intensity and frequency of propagation founded on biofeedback from the muscle cells. The duration and particularly the type of physical activity play a role in the development of muscle fatigue, with impact or weightbearing exercises, such as dance, producing increased symptoms compared to non-impact or non-weightbearing equivalents. The effects of prolonged exercise and the associated increased levels of muscle fatigue that may lead to compromises in neuromuscular propagation need to be considered in dance.

  13. Therapeutics in duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Strober, Jonathan B

    2006-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a fatal disorder affecting approximately 1 in 3,500 live born males, characterized by progressive muscle weakness. Several different strategies are being investigated in developing a cure for this disorder. Until a cure is found, therapeutic and supportive care is essential in preventing complications and improving the afflicted child's quality of life. Currently, corticosteroids are the only class of drug that has been extensively studied in this condition, with controversy existing over the use of these drugs, especially in light of the multiple side effects that may occur. The use of nutritional supplements has expanded in recent years as researchers improve our abilities to use gene and stem cell therapies, which will hopefully lead to a cure soon. This article discusses the importance of therapeutic interventions in children with DMD, the current debate over the use of corticosteroids to treat this disease, the growing use of natural supplements as a new means of treating these boys and provides an update on the current state of gene and stem cell therapies.

  14. Bone and Spinal Muscular Atrophy.

    PubMed

    Vai, Silvia; Bianchi, Maria Luisa; Moroni, Isabella; Mastella, Chiara; Broggi, Francesca; Morandi, Lucia; Arnoldi, Maria Teresa; Bussolino, Chiara; Baranello, Giovanni

    2015-10-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive neuromuscular disease, leading to progressive denervation atrophy in the involved skeletal muscles. Bone status has been poorly studied. We assessed bone metabolism, bone mineral density (BMD) and fractures in 30 children (age range 15-171 months) affected by SMA types 2 and 3. Eighteen children (60%) had higher than normal levels of CTx (bone resorption marker); 25-OH vitamin D was in the lower range of normal (below 20 ng/ml in 9 children and below 12 ng/ml in 2). Lumbar spine BMAD (bone mineral apparent density) Z-score was below -1.5 in 50% of children. According to clinical records, four children had sustained four peripheral fractures; on spine X-rays, we observed 9 previously undiagnosed vertebral fractures in 7 children. There was a significant inverse regression between PTH and 25-OH D levels, and a significant regression between BMC and BMAD values and the scores of motor-functional tests. Even if this study could not establish the pathogenesis of bone derangements in SMA, its main findings - reduced bone density, low 25OH vitamin D levels, increased bone resorption markers and asymptomatic vertebral fractures also in very young patients - strongly suggest that even young subjects affected by SMA should be considered at risk of osteopenia and even osteoporosis and fractures.

  15. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Certification with this new online course from the Society for Vascular Medicine. Learn more. Looking for a ... jobs are listed right now. Copyright © 2016 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Primary vascular access.

    PubMed

    Gibbons, C P

    2006-05-01

    Primary vascular access is usually achievable by a distal autogenous arterio-venous fistula (AVF). This article describes the approach to vascular access planning, the usual surgical options and the factors affecting patency.

  17. Society for Vascular Medicine

    MedlinePlus

    ... Journal Scientific Sessions Website FAQ Copyright © 2017 The Society for Vascular Medicine. All Rights Reserved. Phone: +1- ... page Videos Training Programs Journal Access the Journal Society Communications Patient Information Pages Vascular Medicine Journal CME ...

  18. [Upper limb functional assessment scale for children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and Spinal muscular atrophy].

    PubMed

    Escobar, Raúl G; Lucero, Nayadet; Solares, Carmen; Espinoza, Victoria; Moscoso, Odalie; Olguín, Polín; Muñoz, Karin T; Rosas, Ricardo

    2017-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) causes significant disability and progressive functional impairment. Readily available instruments that assess functionality, especially in advanced stages of the disease, are required to monitor the progress of the disease and the impact of therapeutic interventions.

  19. Maximization, learning, and economic behavior

    PubMed Central

    Erev, Ido; Roth, Alvin E.

    2014-01-01

    The rationality assumption that underlies mainstream economic theory has proved to be a useful approximation, despite the fact that systematic violations to its predictions can be found. That is, the assumption of rational behavior is useful in understanding the ways in which many successful economic institutions function, although it is also true that actual human behavior falls systematically short of perfect rationality. We consider a possible explanation of this apparent inconsistency, suggesting that mechanisms that rest on the rationality assumption are likely to be successful when they create an environment in which the behavior they try to facilitate leads to the best payoff for all agents on average, and most of the time. Review of basic learning research suggests that, under these conditions, people quickly learn to maximize expected return. This review also shows that there are many situations in which experience does not increase maximization. In many cases, experience leads people to underweight rare events. In addition, the current paper suggests that it is convenient to distinguish between two behavioral approaches to improve economic analyses. The first, and more conventional approach among behavioral economists and psychologists interested in judgment and decision making, highlights violations of the rational model and proposes descriptive models that capture these violations. The second approach studies human learning to clarify the conditions under which people quickly learn to maximize expected return. The current review highlights one set of conditions of this type and shows how the understanding of these conditions can facilitate market design. PMID:25024182

  20. Maximization, learning, and economic behavior.

    PubMed

    Erev, Ido; Roth, Alvin E

    2014-07-22

    The rationality assumption that underlies mainstream economic theory has proved to be a useful approximation, despite the fact that systematic violations to its predictions can be found. That is, the assumption of rational behavior is useful in understanding the ways in which many successful economic institutions function, although it is also true that actual human behavior falls systematically short of perfect rationality. We consider a possible explanation of this apparent inconsistency, suggesting that mechanisms that rest on the rationality assumption are likely to be successful when they create an environment in which the behavior they try to facilitate leads to the best payoff for all agents on average, and most of the time. Review of basic learning research suggests that, under these conditions, people quickly learn to maximize expected return. This review also shows that there are many situations in which experience does not increase maximization. In many cases, experience leads people to underweight rare events. In addition, the current paper suggests that it is convenient to distinguish between two behavioral approaches to improve economic analyses. The first, and more conventional approach among behavioral economists and psychologists interested in judgment and decision making, highlights violations of the rational model and proposes descriptive models that capture these violations. The second approach studies human learning to clarify the conditions under which people quickly learn to maximize expected return. The current review highlights one set of conditions of this type and shows how the understanding of these conditions can facilitate market design.

  1. Effects of systemic hypoxia on human muscular adaptations to resistance exercise training.

    PubMed

    Kon, Michihiro; Ohiwa, Nao; Honda, Akiko; Matsubayashi, Takeo; Ikeda, Tatsuaki; Akimoto, Takayuki; Suzuki, Yasuhiro; Hirano, Yuichi; Russell, Aaron P

    2014-06-01

    Hypoxia is an important modulator of endurance exercise-induced oxidative adaptations in skeletal muscle. However, whether hypoxia affects resistance exercise-induced muscle adaptations remains unknown. Here, we determined the effect of resistance exercise training under systemic hypoxia on muscular adaptations known to occur following both resistance and endurance exercise training, including muscle cross-sectional area (CSA), one-repetition maximum (1RM), muscular endurance, and makers of mitochondrial biogenesis and angiogenesis, such as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), citrate synthase (CS) activity, nitric oxide synthase (NOS), vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1), and capillary-to-fiber ratio. Sixteen healthy male subjects were randomly assigned to either a normoxic resistance training group (NRT, n = 7) or a hypoxic (14.4% oxygen) resistance training group (HRT, n = 9) and performed 8 weeks of resistance training. Blood and muscle biopsy samples were obtained before and after training. After training muscle CSA of the femoral region, 1RM for bench-press and leg-press, muscular endurance, and skeletal muscle VEGF protein levels significantly increased in both groups. The increase in muscular endurance was significantly higher in the HRT group. Plasma VEGF concentration and skeletal muscle capillary-to-fiber ratio were significantly higher in the HRT group than the NRT group following training. Our results suggest that, in addition to increases in muscle size and strength, HRT may also lead to increased muscular endurance and the promotion of angiogenesis in skeletal muscle.

  2. Cardiovascular consequences of bed rest: effect on maximal oxygen uptake

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1997-01-01

    Maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max) is reduced in healthy individuals confined to bed rest, suggesting it is independent of any disease state. The magnitude of reduction in VO2max is dependent on duration of bed rest and the initial level of aerobic fitness (VO2max), but it appears to be independent of age or gender. Bed rest induces an elevated maximal heart rate which, in turn, is associated with decreased cardiac vagal tone, increased sympathetic catecholamine secretion, and greater cardiac beta-receptor sensitivity. Despite the elevation in heart rate, VO2max is reduced primarily from decreased maximal stroke volume and cardiac output. An elevated ejection fraction during exercise following bed rest suggests that the lower stroke volume is not caused by ventricular dysfunction but is primarily the result of decreased venous return associated with lower circulating blood volume, reduced central venous pressure, and higher venous compliance in the lower extremities. VO2max, stroke volume, and cardiac output are further compromised by exercise in the upright posture. The contribution of hypovolemia to reduced cardiac output during exercise following bed rest is supported by the close relationship between the relative magnitude (% delta) and time course of change in blood volume and VO2max during bed rest, and also by the fact that retention of plasma volume is associated with maintenance of VO2max after bed rest. Arteriovenous oxygen difference during maximal exercise is not altered by bed rest, suggesting that peripheral mechanisms may not contribute significantly to the decreased VO2max. However reduction in baseline and maximal muscle blood flow, red blood cell volume, and capillarization in working muscles represent peripheral mechanisms that may contribute to limited oxygen delivery and, subsequently, lowered VO2max. Thus, alterations in cardiac and vascular functions induced by prolonged confinement to bed rest contribute to diminution of maximal oxygen uptake

  3. Vascular restoration therapy and bioresorbable vascular scaffold

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yunbing; Zhang, Xingdong

    2014-01-01

    This article describes the evolution of minimally invasive intervention technologies for vascular restoration therapy from early-stage balloon angioplasty in 1970s, metallic bare metal stent and metallic drug-eluting stent technologies in 1990s and 2000s, to bioresorbable vascular scaffold (BVS) technology in large-scale development in recent years. The history, the current stage, the challenges and the future of BVS development are discussed in detail as the best available approach for vascular restoration therapy. The criteria of materials selection, design and processing principles of BVS, and the corresponding clinical trial results are also summarized in this article. PMID:26816624

  4. Multifocal vascular lesions.

    PubMed

    Levin, Laura E; Lauren, Christine T

    2016-09-01

    Multifocal vascular lesions are important to recognize and appropriately diagnose. Generally first noticed on the skin, multifocal vascular lesions may have systemic involvement. Distinguishing among the different types of multifocal vascular lesions is often based on clinical features; however, radiological imaging and/or biopsy are frequently needed to identify distinct features and guide treatment. Knowledge of the systemic associations that can occur with different vascular anomalies may reduce life-threatening complications, such as coagulopathy, bleeding, cardiac compromise, and neurologic sequelae. This review provides a synopsis of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, presentation, workup, and treatment of several well-recognized multifocal vascular tumors and malformations.

  5. Initiation of vascular development.

    PubMed

    Ohashi-Ito, Kyoko; Fukuda, Hiroo

    2014-06-01

    The initiation of vascular development occurs during embryogenesis and the development of lateral organs, such as lateral roots and leaves. Understanding the mechanism underlying the initiation of vascular development has been an important goal of plant biologists. Auxin flow is a crucial factor involved in the initiation of vascular development. In addition, recent studies have identified key factors that regulate the establishment of vascular initial cells in embryos and roots. In this review, we summarize the recent findings in this field and discuss the initiation of vascular development.

  6. Feline Muscular Dystrophy with Dystrophin Deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Carpenter, James L.; Hoffman, Eric P.; Romanul, Flaviu C. A.; Kunkel, Louis M.; Rosales, Remedios K.; Ma, Nancy S. F.; Dasbach, James J.; Rae, John F.; Moore, Frances M.; McAfee, Mary B.; Pearce, Laurie K.

    1989-01-01

    This is the first description of a dystrophin-Deficient muscular dystrophy in domestic cats. The disorder appears to be of X-linked inheritance because it affected both males of a litter of four kittens. Immunoblotting and immunofluorescent detection of dystrophin showed dystrophin present in control cat muscle but no detectable dystrophin in either affected cat. The feline muscular dystrophy was progressive and histopathologically resembled human Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy except for the lack of fat infiltration and the presence of prominent hypertrophy of both muscle fibers and muscles groups in the feline disorder. ImagesFigure 1Figure 2Figure 3Figure 4Figure 5Figure 6Figure 7Figure 8Figure 9 PMID:2683799

  7. Job rotation: Effects on muscular activity variability.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Andres C; Barrero, Lope H

    2017-04-01

    Job rotation strategies have been used for years as an administrative intervention to reduce the risk of musculoskeletal disorders. The benefits of job rotation have been hypothesized to occur via changes in muscular activity variability (MAV). However, the effect of job rotation on MAV has not been fully analyzed in a literature review. A wide search was conducted to identify studies testing the effect of different job rotation strategies on MAV. Twenty-six studies of acceptable quality were included. Several studies on different types of tasks supported the view that job rotation can increase muscular activity variability, particularly with strategies such as alternating tasks and pace changes. However, it remains uncertain whether such variability changes immediately translate into benefits for the worker because little evidence was found that showed simultaneous changes in different muscular groups. Additionally, variability was occasionally achieved at the expense of average activity in the assessed muscles.

  8. Circulating Biomarkers for Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Spitali, Pietro

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common form of muscular dystrophy. Genetic and biochemical research over the years has characterized the cause, pathophysiology and development of the disease providing several potential therapeutic targets and/or biomarkers. High throughput – omic technologies have provided a comprehensive understanding of the changes occurring in dystrophic muscles. Murine and canine animal models have been a valuable source to profile muscles and body fluids, thus providing candidate biomarkers that can be evaluated in patients. This review will illustrate known circulating biomarkers that could track disease progression and response to therapy in patients affected by Duchenne muscular dystrophy. We present an overview of the transcriptomic, proteomic, metabolomics and lipidomic biomarkers described in literature. We show how studies in muscle tissue have led to the identification of serum and urine biomarkers and we highlight the importance of evaluating biomarkers as possible surrogate endpoints to facilitate regulatory processes for new medicinal products. PMID:27858763

  9. Neuro-muscular biopsy in Churg-Strauss syndrome: 24 cases.

    PubMed

    Vital, Anne; Vital, Claude; Viallard, Jean-François; Ragnaud, Jean-Marie; Canron, Marie-Hélène; Lagueny, Alain

    2006-02-01

    Churg-Strauss syndrome (CSS) is a distinctive clinical entity in which systemic vasculitis, associated with eosinophilia, occurs almost exclusively in individuals with adult-onset asthma. The major complications of the condition result from damage to the lungs, heart, and peripheral nerves. Necrotizing vasculitis with eosinophils in the cellular infiltrate, vascular or perivascular infiltration by eosinophils in absence of vessel wall necrosis, extra-vascular eosinophil infiltrates, and vascular or extra-vascular granuloma are histopathological features supportive of CSS. As the peripheral nerve disease often dominates the clinical picture, the peripheral nerve biopsy may be decisive in establishing the diagnosis. In this retrospective study of neuro-muscular biopsies in 24 CSS cases, the authors give an extensive description of neuropathological lesions associated with this disorder. Fifteen patients (62.5%) exhibited eosinophils either in extra-vascular infiltrates or in vessel walls, and 6 of them (25%) had an associated necrotizing vasculitis. Granulomas were found in only 3 cases (12.5%). The clinical diagnosis of CSS was supported in 15 out of the 24 patients (62.5%), in the nerve in 2 cases (8.3%), in the muscle in 8 cases (33.3%), and in both nerve and muscle in 5 others (20.8%).

  10. Multivariate residues and maximal unitarity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Søgaard, Mads; Zhang, Yang

    2013-12-01

    We extend the maximal unitarity method to amplitude contributions whose cuts define multidimensional algebraic varieties. The technique is valid to all orders and is explicitly demonstrated at three loops in gauge theories with any number of fermions and scalars in the adjoint representation. Deca-cuts realized by replacement of real slice integration contours by higher-dimensional tori encircling the global poles are used to factorize the planar triple box onto a product of trees. We apply computational algebraic geometry and multivariate complex analysis to derive unique projectors for all master integral coefficients and obtain compact analytic formulae in terms of tree-level data.

  11. Genetics Home Reference: limb-girdle muscular dystrophy

    MedlinePlus

    ... girdle muscular dystrophy is classified based on its inheritance pattern and genetic cause. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type ... includes forms of the disorder that have an inheritance pattern called autosomal dominant . Mutations in the LMNA gene ...

  12. Advances in gene therapy for muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Abdul-Razak, Hayder; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a recessive lethal inherited muscular dystrophy caused by mutations in the gene encoding dystrophin, a protein required for muscle fibre integrity. So far, many approaches have been tested from the traditional gene addition to newer advanced approaches based on manipulation of the cellular machinery either at the gene transcription, mRNA processing or translation levels. Unfortunately, despite all these efforts, no efficient treatments for DMD are currently available. In this review, we highlight the most advanced therapeutic strategies under investigation as potential DMD treatments. PMID:27594988

  13. Cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a group of heterogeneous genetic diseases characterized by progressive degeneration and weakness of skeletal muscle. Since the discovery of the first muscular dystrophy gene encoding dystrophin, a large number of genes have been identified that are involved in various muscle-wasting and neuromuscular disorders. Human genetic studies complemented by animal model systems have substantially contributed to our understanding of the molecular pathomechanisms underlying muscle degeneration. Moreover, these studies have revealed distinct molecular and cellular mechanisms that link genetic mutations to diverse muscle wasting phenotypes. PMID:23671309

  14. Inspiratory flow reserve in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    De Bruin, P F; Ueki, J; Bush, A; Y Manzur, A; Watson, A; Pride, N B

    2001-06-01

    Patients with advanced muscular dystrophy frequently develop ventilatory failure. Currently respiratory impairment usually is assessed by measuring vital capacity and the mouth pressure generated during a maximal inspiratory maneuver (PI,max), neither of which directly measures ventilatory capacity. We assessed inspiratory flow reserve in 26 boys [mean (SD) age 12.8 (3.8) years] with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) without ventilatory failure and in 28 normal boys [mean (SD) age 12.6 (1.9) years] by analyzing the ratio between the largest inspiratory flow during tidal breathing (V'I,max(t)) and during a forced vital capacity maneuver (V'I,max(FVC), (V'I,max(t)/V'I,maxFVC). We have compared this ratio with the forced vital capacity FVC and PI,max measured at functional residual capacity. Mean PI,max was -90(30)cmH2O, average 112% (range 57-179%) of predicted values in control boys and -31(11)cmH2O, average 40% predicted values in DMD boys (control vs DMD, P < 0.001). FVC was reduced in DMD boys [59(20)% predicted values vs 86(10)% predicted values in controls, P < 0.01]. Absolute V'I,max(FVC) was strongly related to FVC in both control and DMD boys; V'I,max(FVC) (expressed as FVC. s(-1)) was not related to PI,max in either group. The mean V'I,max(t)/V'I,max(FVC); ratio was higher in DMD 0.22 (0.08) than in controls 0.12 (0.03) (P < 0.001) indicating a reduction in inspiratory flow reserve in DMD. Inspiratory flow reserve was within the normal range in 8 of 19 DMD patients with PI,max less than 50% of predicted values. We conclude that measurement of inspiratory flow reserve (V'I,max(t)/V'I,maxFVC ratio) provides a simple and direct assessment of dynamic inspiratory muscle function which is not replicated by static measurement of PI,max or vital capacity and might be useful in assessment of respiratory impairment in boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Follow-up studies are required to establish whether measures of inspiratory flow reserve are of clinical value

  15. Knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization

    PubMed Central

    Cacciatore, Stefano; Luchinat, Claudio; Tenori, Leonardo

    2014-01-01

    Here we describe KODAMA (knowledge discovery by accuracy maximization), an unsupervised and semisupervised learning algorithm that performs feature extraction from noisy and high-dimensional data. Unlike other data mining methods, the peculiarity of KODAMA is that it is driven by an integrated procedure of cross-validation of the results. The discovery of a local manifold’s topology is led by a classifier through a Monte Carlo procedure of maximization of cross-validated predictive accuracy. Briefly, our approach differs from previous methods in that it has an integrated procedure of validation of the results. In this way, the method ensures the highest robustness of the obtained solution. This robustness is demonstrated on experimental datasets of gene expression and metabolomics, where KODAMA compares favorably with other existing feature extraction methods. KODAMA is then applied to an astronomical dataset, revealing unexpected features. Interesting and not easily predictable features are also found in the analysis of the State of the Union speeches by American presidents: KODAMA reveals an abrupt linguistic transition sharply separating all post-Reagan from all pre-Reagan speeches. The transition occurs during Reagan’s presidency and not from its beginning. PMID:24706821

  16. 9 CFR 311.35 - Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. 311.35 Section 311.35 Animals and Animal Products FOOD SAFETY AND INSPECTION SERVICE... PARTS § 311.35 Muscular inflammation, degeneration, or infiltration. (a) If muscular lesions are...

  17. Imaging Pediatric Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Tuyet A.; Krakowski, Andrew C.; Naheedy, John H.; Kruk, Peter G.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are commonly encountered in pediatric and dermatology practices. Most of these lesions are benign and easy to diagnose based on history and clinical exam alone. However, in some cases the diagnosis may not be clear. This may be of particular concern given that vascular anomalies may occasionally be associated with an underlying syndrome, congenital disease, or serious, life-threatening condition. Defining the type of vascular lesion early and correctly is particularly important to determine the optimal approach to management and treatment of each patient. The care of pediatric patients often requires collaboration from a multitude of specialties including pediatrics, dermatology, plastic surgery, radiology, ophthalmology, and neurology. Although early characterization of vascular lesions is important, consensus guidelines regarding the evaluation and imaging of vascular anomalies does not exist to date. Here, the authors provide an overview of pediatric vascular lesions, current classification systems for characterizing these lesions, the various imaging modalities available, and recommendations for appropriate imaging evaluation. PMID:26705446

  18. Tensorial analysis of a Fourier-transform profilometric setup devoted to the evaluation of muscular contractions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanafi, Abdelmalek; Gharbi, Tijani; Cornu, Jean-Yves

    2005-07-01

    We explore the potential use of the Fourier-transform profilometry technique in in vivo studies of muscular contractions through the variation of muscle-group cross sections. Thanks to a tensorial analysis of the technique, a general expression of its sensitivity vector is established. It allows derivation of the expression of the resolution and the limit condition imposed by the spatial sampling of the fringe pattern. Key parameters that maximize the sensitivity are then simulated. A measurement system is accordingly built up and characterized. It is then successfully applied to the evaluation of the deformation of the forearm muscles during grasping exertions.

  19. Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Dichgans, Martin; Leys, Didier

    2017-02-03

    Cerebrovascular disease typically manifests with stroke, cognitive impairment, or both. Vascular cognitive impairment refers to all forms of cognitive disorder associated with cerebrovascular disease, regardless of the specific mechanisms involved. It encompasses the full range of cognitive deficits from mild cognitive impairment to dementia. In principle, any of the multiple causes of clinical stroke can cause vascular cognitive impairment. Recent work further highlights a role of microinfarcts, microhemorrhages, strategic white matter tracts, loss of microstructural tissue integrity, and secondary neurodegeneration. Vascular brain injury results in loss of structural and functional connectivity and, hence, compromise of functional networks within the brain. Vascular cognitive impairment is common both after stroke and in stroke-free individuals presenting to dementia clinics, and vascular pathology frequently coexists with neurodegenerative pathology, resulting in mixed forms of mild cognitive impairment or dementia. Vascular dementia is now recognized as the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, and there is increasing awareness that targeting vascular risk may help to prevent dementia, even of the Alzheimer type. Recent advances in neuroimaging, neuropathology, epidemiology, and genetics have led to a deeper understanding of how vascular disease affects cognition. These new findings provide an opportunity for the present reappraisal of vascular cognitive impairment. We further briefly address current therapeutic concepts.

  20. Complete atrioventricular block in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Orlikowski, D; Nardi, O; Annane, D

    2008-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene on chromosome Xp21.1. It is characterized by progressive muscle wasting and weakness of variable distribution and severity. Heart is involved leading to heart failure. Conduction abnormalities are unusual. We report a case of complete atrio-ventricular block in a DMD patient.

  1. Coaction Effects on a Muscular Endurance Task

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martens, Rainer; Landers, Daniel M.

    1969-01-01

    A common procedure in administering muscular endurance tests is to have several individuals perform the same task at the same time. A very old psychological concept known as social facilitation suggests that an individual's performance may be affected by the presence of others. (CK)

  2. [Muscular metastases. A case report (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Trèves, R; Barruche, D; Desproges-Gotteron, R

    Muscular metastases are exceptionally reported. The authors present a case of crural neuralgia in relation with a localisation in the psoas iliacus of a gastric carcinoma. A review of literature defines the rarity of this facts (156 cases) the etiology (carcinome more often) and the explication who is still obscur.

  3. Visuospatial Attention Disturbance in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Moura, Maria Clara Drummond Soares; do Valle, Luiz Eduardo Ribeiro; Resende, Maria Bernadete Dutra; Pinto, Katia Osternack

    2010-01-01

    Aim: The cognitive deficits present in the Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) are not yet well characterized. Attention, considered to be the brain mechanism responsible for the selection of sensory stimuli, could be disturbed in DMD, contributing, at least partially, to the observed global cognitive deficit. The aim of this study was to…

  4. Prevalence of congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Graziano, Alessandra; Bianco, Flaviana; D'Amico, Adele; Moroni, Isabella; Messina, Sonia; Bruno, Claudio; Pegoraro, Elena; Mora, Marina; Astrea, Guja; Magri, Francesca; Comi, Giacomo P.; Berardinelli, Angela; Moggio, Maurizio; Morandi, Lucia; Pini, Antonella; Petillo, Roberta; Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Minetti, Carlo; Mongini, Tiziana; Ricci, Enzo; Gorni, Ksenija; Battini, Roberta; Villanova, Marcello; Politano, Luisa; Gualandi, Francesca; Ferlini, Alessandra; Muntoni, Francesco; Santorelli, Filippo Maria; Bertini, Enrico; Pane, Marika

    2015-01-01

    Objective: We provide a nationwide population study of patients with congenital muscular dystrophy in Italy. Methods: Cases were ascertained from the databases in all the tertiary referral centers for pediatric neuromuscular disorders and from all the genetic diagnostic centers in which diagnostic tests for these forms are performed. Results: The study includes 336 patients with a point prevalence of 0.563 per 100,000. Mutations were identified in 220 of the 336 (65.5%). The cohort was subdivided into diagnostic categories based on the most recent classifications on congenital muscular dystrophies. The most common forms were those with α-dystroglycan glycosylation deficiency (40.18%) followed by those with laminin α2 deficiency (24.11%) and collagen VI deficiency (20.24%). The forms of congenital muscular dystrophy related to mutations in SEPN1 and LMNA were less frequent (6.25% and 5.95%, respectively). Conclusions: Our study provides for the first time comprehensive epidemiologic information and point prevalence figures for each of the major diagnostic categories on a large cohort of congenital muscular dystrophies. The study also reflects the diagnostic progress in this field with an accurate classification of the cases according to the most recent gene discoveries. PMID:25653289

  5. Natural selection maximizes Fisher information.

    PubMed

    Frank, S A

    2009-02-01

    In biology, information flows from the environment to the genome by the process of natural selection. However, it has not been clear precisely what sort of information metric properly describes natural selection. Here, I show that Fisher information arises as the intrinsic metric of natural selection and evolutionary dynamics. Maximizing the amount of Fisher information about the environment captured by the population leads to Fisher's fundamental theorem of natural selection, the most profound statement about how natural selection influences evolutionary dynamics. I also show a relation between Fisher information and Shannon information (entropy) that may help to unify the correspondence between information and dynamics. Finally, I discuss possible connections between the fundamental role of Fisher information in statistics, biology and other fields of science.

  6. REACTIVE OXYGEN SPECIES IN PULMONARY VASCULAR REMODELING

    PubMed Central

    Aggarwal, Saurabh; Gross, Christine M.; Sharma, Shruti; Fineman, Jeffrey R.; Black, Stephen M.

    2014-01-01

    The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is a complex multifactorial process that involves the remodeling of pulmonary arteries. This remodeling process encompasses concentric medial thickening of small arterioles, neomuscularization of previously nonmuscular capillary-like vessels, and structural wall changes in larger pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arterial muscularization is characterized by vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia and hypertrophy. In addition, in uncontrolled pulmonary hypertension, the clonal expansion of apoptosis-resistant endothelial cells leads to the formation of plexiform lesions. Based upon a large number of studies in animal models, the three major stimuli that drive the vascular remodeling process are inflammation, shear stress and hypoxia. Although, the precise mechanisms by which these stimuli impair pulmonary vascular function and structure are unknown, reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated oxidative damage appears to play an important role. ROS are highly reactive due to their unpaired valence shell electron. Oxidative damage occurs when the production of ROS exceeds the quenching capacity of the anti-oxidant mechanisms of the cell. ROS can be produced from complexes in the cell membrane (nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate-oxidase), cellular organelles (peroxisomes and mitochondria), and in the cytoplasm (xanthine oxidase). Furthermore, low levels of tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) and L-arginine the rate limiting co-factor and substrate for endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), can cause the uncoupling of eNOS, resulting in decreased NO production and increased ROS production. This review will focus on the ROS generation systems, scavenger antioxidants, and oxidative stress associated alterations in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23897679

  7. [Vascular deconditioning (correction of deconditionring) in microgravity: results obtained in the french spationaut during the spatial mission EO 22].

    PubMed

    Louisy, F; Andre-Deshays, C; Schroiff, P; Cauquil, D; Lazerges, M; Lafaye, C; Camus, A L; Fomina, G

    1997-01-01

    First results on changes in vascular physiology in the first french spationaut during the French-russian spatial mission CASSIOPEE are reported in this paper. The data, obtained by Air Plethysmography during flight, evidence at the level of lower limbs alterations of venous filling and emptying characteristics (the latter particularly depending on the muscular pump function of the calf) and of capillary circulation.

  8. Congenital muscular torticollis in infants: ultrasound-assisted diagnosis and evaluation.

    PubMed

    Dudkiewicz, Israel; Ganel, Abraham; Blankstein, Alexander

    2005-01-01

    Ultrasonography is considered the modality of choice for differentiating congenital muscular torticollis from other pathologies in the neck. The authors present their experience with ultrasound examination for the evaluation and management of congenital muscular torticollis. Twenty-six infants, 14 boys and 12 girls, age ranging from 1 to 16 weeks, with torticollis and a palpable mass were examined. Ultrasound showed a well-defined mass in the sternocleidomastoid muscle. The lesions ranged in size from 8 to 15.8 mm on maximal transverse diameter, with length ranging from 13.7 to 45.8 mm. Clinically the torticollis disappeared between 1 to 6 weeks, with complete clinical reduction of the palpated mass between 2 and 8.5 weeks. The ultrasonographic disappearance of the mass was delayed by an average of 2 weeks in comparison to the clinical disappearance of the mass. Ultrasound is advocated for the diagnosis and follow-up of congenital muscular torticollis because it noninvasively provides reliable and dynamic information without sedation.

  9. Muscular activity level during pedalling is not affected by crank inertial load.

    PubMed

    Duc, S; Villerius, V; Bertucci, W; Pernin, J N; Grappe, F

    2005-10-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of gear ratio (GR) and thus crank inertial load (CIL), on the activity levels of lower limb muscles. Twelve competitive cyclists performed three randomised trials with their own bicycle equipped with a SRM crankset and mounted on an Axiom ergometer. The power output ( approximately 80% of maximal aerobic power) and the pedalling cadence were kept constant for each subject across all trials but three different GR (low, medium and high) were indirectly obtained for each trial by altering the electromagnetic brake of the ergometer. The low, medium and high GR (mean +/- SD) resulted in CIL of 44 +/- 3.7, 84 +/- 6.5 and 152 +/- 17.9 kg.m(2), respectively. Muscular activity levels of the gluteus maximus (GM), the vastus medialis (VM), the vastus lateralis (VL), the rectus femoris (RF), the medial hamstrings (MHAM), the gastrocnemius (GAS) and the soleus (SOL) muscles were quantified and analysed by mean root mean square (RMS(mean)). The muscular activity levels of the measured lower limb muscles were not significantly affected when the CIL was increased approximately four fold. This suggests that muscular activity levels measured on different cycling ergometers (with different GR and flywheel inertia) can be compared among each other, as they are not influenced by CIL.

  10. Effects of Varied Versus Constant Loading Zones on Muscular Adaptations in Trained Men.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, B J; Contreras, B; Ogborn, D; Galpin, A; Krieger, J; Sonmez, G T

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of a protocol employing a combination of loading zones vs. one employing a constant medium-repetition loading zone on muscular adaptations in resistance-trained men. 19 trained men (height=176.9±7.0 cm; body mass=83.1±11.8 kg; age=23.3±2.9 years) were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 experimental groups: a constant-rep resistance training (RT) routine (CONSTANT) that trained using 8-12 RM per set, or a varied-rep RT routine (VARIED) that trained with 2-4 RM per set on Day 1, 8-12 RM per set on Day 2, and 20-30 RM on Day 3 for 8 weeks. Results showed that both groups significantly increased markers of muscle strength, muscle thickness, and local muscular endurance, with no differences noted between groups. Effect sizes favored VARIED over CONSTANT condition for elbow flexor thickness (0.72 vs. 0.57), elbow extensor thickness (0.77 vs. 0.48), maximal bench press strength (0.80 vs. 0.57), and upper body muscle endurance (1.91 vs. 1.28). In conclusion, findings indicate that both varied and constant loading approaches can promote significant improvements in muscular adaptations in trained young men.

  11. Cardiovascular, muscular and perceptual contributions to physical fatigue in prevalent kidney transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Chan, Winnie; Jones, David; Bosch, Jos A; McPhee, Jamie; Crabtree, Nicola; McTernan, Philip G; Kaur, Okdeep; Inston, Nicholas; Moore, Sue; McClean, Andrew; Harper, Lorraine; Phillips, Anna C; Borrows, Richard

    2016-03-01

    Physical fatigue is debilitating and common among kidney transplant recipients (KTRs). This study investigated the mechanistic aetiology of physical fatigue in this setting through examinations of muscle mass, muscular and cardiovascular function, and perceived exertion. The incidence of physical fatigue, its association with quality of life (QoL), and the predictors of perceived exertion, were evaluated. This single-centre observational cross-sectional study enrolled 55 KTRs. Muscle mass was quantified using dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry. Muscular function was assessed by jumping mechanography. Cardiovascular function (maximal oxygen consumption and oxygen pulse) was estimated during submaximal exercise testing, with perceived exertion determined using age-adjusted Borg scale-ratings. Physical fatigue was measured using Multi-Dimensional Fatigue Inventory-20. QoL was assessed using Medical Outcomes Study Short Form-36. Demographic, clinical, nutritional, psychosocial and behavioural predictors of perceived exertion were assessed. Of clinical importance, increased perceived exertion was the only independent predictor of physical fatigue (P = 0.001), with no association found between physical fatigue and muscular or cardiovascular parameters. Physical fatigue occurred in 22% of KTRs, and negatively impacted on QoL (P < 0.001). Predictors of heightened perception included anxiety (P < 0.05) and mental fatigue (P < 0.05). Perception is a key determinant of physical fatigue in KTRs, paving the way for future interventions.

  12. Maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes.

    PubMed

    Michel, Christian J; Pellegrini, Marco; Pirillo, Giuseppe

    2016-01-21

    We determine here the number and the list of maximal dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. We prove that there is no maximal dinucleotide circular code having strictly less than 6 elements (maximum size of dinucleotide circular codes). On the other hand, a computer calculus shows that there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with less than 20 elements (maximum size of trinucleotide circular codes). More precisely, there are maximal trinucleotide circular codes with 14, 15, 16, 17, 18 and 19 elements and no maximal trinucleotide circular code having less than 14 elements. We give the same information for the maximal self-complementary dinucleotide and trinucleotide circular codes. The amino acid distribution of maximal trinucleotide circular codes is also determined.

  13. [Circadian fluctuations in the muscular efficiency of athletes: with sleep versus sleep deprivation].

    PubMed

    Callard, D; Gauthier, A; Maffiuletti, N; Davenne, D; Van Hoecke, J

    2000-01-01

    The influence of time of day on muscular performance was studied. From part of the results of two different studies (EAS et EPS), the effects of sleep deprivation were appreciated. Seven times over the 24-h period, developed torque and myoelectric activity were estimated during maximal isometric voluntary contractions using an isokinetic dynamometer: elbow flexion for EAS in standardised sleep, and knee extension for EPS in complete sleep deprivation. The results showed nycthemeral changes in torque in both conditions (p < 0.005), with maximal values recorded at the beginning of night. Although during sleep deprivation (EPS) the rhythm followed neurophysiological factors, during EAS, this rhythm was accounted for by the variations in the contractile state of muscle.

  14. [Vascular factors in glaucoma].

    PubMed

    Mottet, B; Aptel, F; Geiser, M; Romanet, J P; Chiquet, C

    2015-12-01

    The exact pathophysiology of glaucoma is not fully understood. Understanding of the vascular pathophysiology of glaucoma requires: knowing the techniques for measuring ocular blood flow and characterizing the topography of vascular disease and the mechanisms involved in this neuropathy. A decreased mean ocular perfusion pressure and a loss of vascular autoregulation are implicated in glaucomatous disease. Early decrease in ocular blood flow has been identified in primary open-angle glaucoma and normal pressure glaucoma, contributing to the progression of optic neuropathy. The vascular damage associated with glaucoma is present in various vascular territories within the eye (from the ophthalmic artery to the retina) and is characterized by a decrease in basal blood flow associated with a dysfunction of vasoregulation.

  15. Pulmonary vascular lesions in the toxic oil syndrome in Spain.

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Segoviano, P; Esteban, A; Martínez-Cabruja, R

    1983-01-01

    A histological study was made of pulmonary arteries at the necropsies of nine patients who died after the ingestion of denatured rapeseed oil during the epidemic which occurred in Spain in May 1981. Lesions found in the elastic pulmonary arteries were characterised by pronounced intimal proliferation of an oedematous nature, accumulation of large vacuolated cells within the media, and loss of vascular smooth muscle. In muscular pulmonary arteries there was pronounced medial hypertrophy and intimal proliferation, which was so severe in one case that it completely occluded the arterial lumen. Foamy cells were found in the intima. Muscularisation was seen in the walls of pulmonary arterioles. Images PMID:6648850

  16. Safety and Feasibility of High-pressure Transvenous Limb Perfusion With 0.9% Saline in Human Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Zheng; Kocis, Keith; Valley, Robert; Howard, James F; Chopra, Manisha; An, Hongyu; Lin, Weili; Muenzer, Joseph; Powers, William

    2012-01-01

    We evaluated safety and feasibility of the transvenous limb perfusion gene delivery method in muscular dystrophy. A dose escalation study of single limb perfusion with 0.9% saline starting with 5% of limb volume was carried out in adults with muscular dystrophies under intravenous analgesia/anesthesia. Cardiac, vascular, renal, muscle, and nerve functions were monitored. A tourniquet was placed above the knee with inflated pressure of 310 mm Hg. Infusion was carried out with a clinically approved infuser via an intravenous catheter inserted in the saphenous vein with a goal infusion rate of 80 ml/minute. Infusion volume was escalated stepwise to 20% limb volume in seven subjects. No subject complained of any post procedure pain other than due to needle punctures. Safety warning boundaries were exceeded only for transient depression of limb tissue oximetry and transient elevation of muscle compartment pressures; these were not associated with nerve, muscle, or vascular damage. Muscle magnetic resonant imaging (MRI) demonstrated fluid accumulation in muscles of the perfused lower extremity. High-pressure retrograde transvenous limb perfusion with saline up to 20% of limb volume at above infusion parameters is safe and feasible in adult human muscular dystrophy. This study will serve as a basis for future gene transfer clinical trials. PMID:21772257

  17. A maximally supersymmetric Kondo model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Sarah; Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo

    2012-10-01

    We study the maximally supersymmetric Kondo model obtained by adding a fermionic impurity to N=4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. While the original Kondo problem describes a defect interacting with a free Fermi liquid of itinerant electrons, here the ambient theory is an interacting CFT, and this introduces qualitatively new features into the system. The model arises in string theory by considering the intersection of a stack of M D5-branes with a stack of N D3-branes, at a point in the D3 worldvolume. We analyze the theory holographically, and propose a dictionary between the Kondo problem and antisymmetric Wilson loops in N=4 SYM. We perform an explicit calculation of the D5 fluctuations in the D3 geometry and determine the spectrum of defect operators. This establishes the stability of the Kondo fixed point together with its basic thermodynamic properties. Known supergravity solutions for Wilson loops allow us to go beyond the probe approximation: the D5s disappear and are replaced by three-form flux piercing a new topologically non-trivial S3 in the corrected geometry. This describes the Kondo model in terms of a geometric transition. A dual matrix model reflects the basic properties of the corrected gravity solution in its eigenvalue distribution.

  18. Maximizing the optical network capacity

    PubMed Central

    Bayvel, Polina; Maher, Robert; Liga, Gabriele; Shevchenko, Nikita A.; Lavery, Domaniç; Killey, Robert I.

    2016-01-01

    Most of the digital data transmitted are carried by optical fibres, forming the great part of the national and international communication infrastructure. The information-carrying capacity of these networks has increased vastly over the past decades through the introduction of wavelength division multiplexing, advanced modulation formats, digital signal processing and improved optical fibre and amplifier technology. These developments sparked the communication revolution and the growth of the Internet, and have created an illusion of infinite capacity being available. But as the volume of data continues to increase, is there a limit to the capacity of an optical fibre communication channel? The optical fibre channel is nonlinear, and the intensity-dependent Kerr nonlinearity limit has been suggested as a fundamental limit to optical fibre capacity. Current research is focused on whether this is the case, and on linear and nonlinear techniques, both optical and electronic, to understand, unlock and maximize the capacity of optical communications in the nonlinear regime. This paper describes some of them and discusses future prospects for success in the quest for capacity. PMID:26809572

  19. A Maximally Supersymmetric Kondo Model

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Sarah; Kachru, Shamit; Torroba, Gonzalo; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept. /SLAC

    2012-02-17

    We study the maximally supersymmetric Kondo model obtained by adding a fermionic impurity to N = 4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory. While the original Kondo problem describes a defect interacting with a free Fermi liquid of itinerant electrons, here the ambient theory is an interacting CFT, and this introduces qualitatively new features into the system. The model arises in string theory by considering the intersection of a stack of M D5-branes with a stack of N D3-branes, at a point in the D3 worldvolume. We analyze the theory holographically, and propose a dictionary between the Kondo problem and antisymmetric Wilson loops in N = 4 SYM. We perform an explicit calculation of the D5 fluctuations in the D3 geometry and determine the spectrum of defect operators. This establishes the stability of the Kondo fixed point together with its basic thermodynamic properties. Known supergravity solutions for Wilson loops allow us to go beyond the probe approximation: the D5s disappear and are replaced by three-form flux piercing a new topologically non-trivial S3 in the corrected geometry. This describes the Kondo model in terms of a geometric transition. A dual matrix model reflects the basic properties of the corrected gravity solution in its eigenvalue distribution.

  20. Maximal switchability of centralized networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vakulenko, Sergei; Morozov, Ivan; Radulescu, Ovidiu

    2016-08-01

    We consider continuous time Hopfield-like recurrent networks as dynamical models for gene regulation and neural networks. We are interested in networks that contain n high-degree nodes preferably connected to a large number of N s weakly connected satellites, a property that we call n/N s -centrality. If the hub dynamics is slow, we obtain that the large time network dynamics is completely defined by the hub dynamics. Moreover, such networks are maximally flexible and switchable, in the sense that they can switch from a globally attractive rest state to any structurally stable dynamics when the response time of a special controller hub is changed. In particular, we show that a decrease of the controller hub response time can lead to a sharp variation in the network attractor structure: we can obtain a set of new local attractors, whose number can increase exponentially with N, the total number of nodes of the nework. These new attractors can be periodic or even chaotic. We provide an algorithm, which allows us to design networks with the desired switching properties, or to learn them from time series, by adjusting the interactions between hubs and satellites. Such switchable networks could be used as models for context dependent adaptation in functional genetics or as models for cognitive functions in neuroscience.

  1. Vascular Access in Children

    SciTech Connect

    Krishnamurthy, Ganesh Keller, Marc S.

    2011-02-15

    Establishment of stable vascular access is one of the essential and most challenging procedures in a pediatric hospital. Many clinical specialties provide vascular service in a pediatric hospital. At the top of the 'expert procedural pyramid' is the pediatric interventional radiologist, who is best suited and trained to deliver this service. Growing awareness regarding the safety and high success rate of vascular access using image guidance has led to increased demand from clinicians to provide around-the-clock vascular access service by pediatric interventional radiologists. Hence, the success of a vascular access program, with the pediatric interventional radiologist as the key provider, is challenging, and a coordinated multidisciplinary team effort is essential for success. However, there are few dedicated pediatric interventional radiologists across the globe, and also only a couple of training programs exist for pediatric interventions. This article gives an overview of the technical aspects of pediatric vascular access and provides useful tips for obtaining vascular access in children safely and successfully using image guidance.

  2. [Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy in Chile].

    PubMed

    Holmgren, J; Reyes, J; Colombo, M; Blanco, M A

    1992-03-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is one of the best known forms of muscular dystrophy. The incidence in different countries varies from 130 to 390 per million male live births. Becker variety may be considered a mild form of Duchenne dystrophy, with an incidence 10 times lower. A sex linked recessive inheritance is involved in both forms, the affected gene is placed at locus X21. The incidence of both forms in Chile is similar to that reported worldwide, and has been increasing since 1950. Increased CK and LDH levels are confirmed in patients, and overall, they are also higher in female carriers. However only 26% of carriers have increased CK levels and 21% increased LDH levels, compared to normal subjects. Electromyograms show myopathic characteristics in all carrier women. The scope of a prospective clinical, genetic and epidemiologic study currently underway is discussed.

  3. Progress in therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Rebecca J; Bareja, Akshay; Davies, Kay E

    2011-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a devastating muscular dystrophy of childhood. Mutations in the dystrophin gene destroy the link between the internal muscle filaments and the extracellular matrix, resulting in severe muscle weakness and progressive muscle wasting. There is currently no cure and, whilst palliative treatment has improved, affected boys are normally confined to a wheelchair by 12 years of age and die from respiratory or cardiac complications in their twenties or thirties. Therapies currently being developed include mutation-specific treatments, DNA- and cell-based therapies, and drugs which aim to modulate cellular pathways or gene expression. This review aims to provide an overview of the different therapeutic approaches aimed at reconstructing the dystrophin-associated protein complex, including restoration of dystrophin expression and upregulation of the functional homologue, utrophin.

  4. Congenital muscular torticollis: experience of 14 cases.

    PubMed

    Das, B K; Matin, A; Hassan, G Z; Hossain, M Z; Zaman, M A

    2010-10-01

    Congenital Muscular Torticollis (CMT) is a postural deformity of head and neck detected at birth or shortly after birth, primarily resulting from unilateral shortening of Sternocleidomastoid Muscle (SCM). In neonates and infants, patient may cure conservatively by physiotherapy but surgery is the treatment of choice for children and adolescents. There are various techniques of surgery. Here we show our experience regarding management of congenital muscular torticollis. In the present retrospective case series, fourteen patients of congenital muscular torticollis were treated. The cases were enrolled between Nov' 2005 to Oct' 2007 in Bangabandhu Sheikh Mujib Medical University, Gonosasthaya Somaj Vittik Medical College Hospital, Dhaka and different private clinics of Dhaka city of Bangladesh. Neonates and infants were treated conservatively with physiotherapy and others treated surgically by transection of both sternal and clavicular head of SCM under general anesthesia. Operated patients were released on following post operative day with advised to do physiotherapy. Patients age range from 7 days to 15 years of which ten were female and four male. SCM was shortened in all cases (8 on right side and 6 on left side). Eleven were female and three male. Of 14 patients, 2 neonates, 7 infants and 5 were more than 1 year age. There was no associated anomaly. Out of 9 neonates and infants 8 cured conservatively with physiotherapy and another one significantly improved. Six were treated surgically including one failed physiotherapy. Post operative period was uneventful and there was no complication. Results were evaluated clinically and comments of peers. Most of the patient of congenital muscular torticollis can be treated conservatively during infancy. Division of both sternal and clavicular head of SCM is easy and safe surgical technique for the treatment of CMT of older children and adolescents.

  5. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy (Type 0).

    PubMed

    Al Dakhoul, Suleiman

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a rare phenotype of very severe spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in a newborn who presented with reduced fetal movements in utero and significant respiratory distress at birth. The patient was homozygously deleted for exon 7 and exon 8 of the survival motor neuron gene 1. Very severe SMA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory distress at birth, and more research should be dedicated to investigate the genetic determinants of its widely variable phenotypes.

  6. Very severe spinal muscular atrophy (Type 0)

    PubMed Central

    Al Dakhoul, Suleiman

    2017-01-01

    This case report describes a rare phenotype of very severe spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) in a newborn who presented with reduced fetal movements in utero and significant respiratory distress at birth. The patient was homozygously deleted for exon 7 and exon 8 of the survival motor neuron gene 1. Very severe SMA should be considered in the differential diagnosis of respiratory distress at birth, and more research should be dedicated to investigate the genetic determinants of its widely variable phenotypes. PMID:28182029

  7. Vascular anomalies in children.

    PubMed

    Weibel, L

    2011-11-01

    Vascular anomalies are divided in two major categories: tumours (such as infantile hemangiomas) and malformations. Hemangiomas are common benign neoplasms that undergo a proliferative phase followed by stabilization and eventual spontaneous involution, whereas vascular malformations are rare structural anomalies representing morphogenetic errors of developing blood vessels and lymphatics. It is important to properly diagnose vascular anomalies early in childhood because of their distinct differences in morbidity, prognosis and need for a multidisciplinary management. We discuss a number of characteristic clinical features as clues for early diagnosis and identification of associated syndromes.

  8. Cerebral Regulation in Different Maximal Aerobic Exercise Modes

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Flávio O.; dos Anjos, Carlos A. S.; Covolan, Roberto J. M.; Pinheiro, Fabiano A.; St Clair Gibson, Alan; Noakes, Timothy D.; Magalhães, Fernando H.; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2016-01-01

    We investigated cerebral responses, simultaneously with peripheral and ratings of perceived exertion (RPE) responses, during different VO2MAX-matched aerobic exercise modes. Nine cyclists (VO2MAX of 57.5 ± 6.2 ml·kg−1·min−1) performed a maximal, controlled-pace incremental test (MIT) and a self-paced 4 km time trial (TT4km). Measures of cerebral (COX) and muscular (MOX) oxygenation were assessed throughout the exercises by changes in oxy- (O2Hb) and deoxy-hemoglobin (HHb) concentrations over the prefrontal cortex (PFC) and vastus lateralis (VL) muscle, respectively. Primary motor cortex (PMC) electroencephalography (EEG), VL, and rectus femoris EMG were also assessed throughout the trials, together with power output and cardiopulmonary responses. The RPE was obtained at regular intervals. Similar motor output (EMG and power output) occurred from 70% of the duration in MIT and TT4km, despite the greater motor output, muscle deoxygenation (↓ MOX) and cardiopulmonary responses in TT4km before that point. Regarding cerebral responses, there was a lower COX (↓ O2Hb concentrations in PFC) at 20, 30, 40, 50 and 60%, but greater at 100% of the TT4km duration when compared to MIT. The alpha wave EEG in PMC remained constant throughout the exercise modes, with greater values in TT4km. The RPE was maximal at the endpoint in both exercises, but it increased slower in TT4km than in MIT. Results showed that similar motor output and effort tolerance were attained at the closing stages of different VO2MAX-matched aerobic exercises, although the different disturbance until that point. Regardless of different COX responses during most of the exercises duration, activation in PMC was preserved throughout the exercises, suggesting that these responses may be part of a centrally-coordinated exercise regulation. PMID:27458381

  9. Diagnostic approach to the congenital muscular dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Bönnemann, Carsten G.; Wang, Ching H.; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Deconinck, Nicolas; Bertini, Enrico; Ferreiro, Ana; Muntoni, Francesco; Sewry, Caroline; Béroud, Christophe; Mathews, Katherine D.; Moore, Steven A.; Bellini, Jonathan; Rutkowski, Anne; North, Kathryn N.

    2017-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies (CMDs) are early onset disorders of muscle with histological features suggesting a dystrophic process. The congenital muscular dystrophies as a group encompass great clinical and genetic heterogeneity so that achieving an accurate genetic diagnosis has become increasingly challenging, even in the age of next generation sequencing. In this document we review the diagnostic features, differential diagnostic considerations and available diagnostic tools for the various CMD subtypes and provide a systematic guide to the use of these resources for achieving an accurate molecular diagnosis. An International Committee on the Standard of Care for Congenital Muscular Dystrophies composed of experts on various aspects relevant to the CMDs performed a review of the available literature as well as of the unpublished expertise represented by the members of the committee and their contacts. This process was refined by two rounds of online surveys and followed by a three-day meeting at which the conclusions were presented and further refined. The combined consensus summarized in this document allows the physician to recognize the presence of a CMD in a child with weakness based on history, clinical examination, muscle biopsy results, and imaging. It will be helpful in suspecting a specific CMD subtype in order to prioritize testing to arrive at a final genetic diagnosis. PMID:24581957

  10. The actions of atrial natriuretic factor on the vascular wall.

    PubMed

    Vlasuk, G P; Babilon, R W; Nutt, R F; Ciccarone, T M; Winquist, R J

    1987-08-01

    The actions of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) on the vascular wall are diverse and show a profound regional heterogeneity. ANF is a potent relaxant of aortic smooth muscle, a response which is associated with activation of particulate guanylate cyclase and elevation in tissue levels of cyclic GMP. However, many large and small muscular arteries and most veins are unresponsive to the peptide. The regional vascular heterogeneity may be due to an altered distribution of high affinity receptors and (or) alterations in the coupling of receptor activation to elevations in cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Species differences exist in the structural requirements for receptor activation as well as the effects of infused ANF on peripheral resistance. Although the relaxation to ANF in vitro does not require an intact endothelium, endothelial cells contain multiple receptor subtypes for ANF. Differences amongst tissues and (or) species in the receptor profile for ANF may, in part, explain some of heterogeneity in responsiveness to ANF.

  11. Maximal isometric force and muscle cross-sectional area of the forearm in fencers.

    PubMed

    Margonato, V; Roi, G S; Cerizza, C; Galdabino, G L

    1994-12-01

    The maximal isometric force (MIF) of a muscle is directly related to its cross-sectional area (CSA). Strength training produces an increase in muscular force while muscular hypertrophy becomes appreciable at a later time; in asymmetric sports, training causes significant increases in force and muscular mass of the dominant limb of the athlete. The aim of this study was to analyse the differences in muscular force and trophism between the dominant and non-dominant forearms in fencers and in controls. The data of 17 male distance runners (age 21.4 +/- 2.4 years, body mass 74.0 +/- 5.0 kg, height 180 +/- 6 cm) were compared with those of 58 male fencers (age 23.0 +/- 6.7 years, body mass 71.9 +/- 9.3 kg, height 178 +/- 7 cm) drawn from the ranking lists of the National Fencing Committee. They trained for a mean of 11.4 +/- 6.0 (range 2-36) years, commencing at 10.7 +/- 4.5 years of age. Cross-sectional area (muscle plus bone) was estimated in the dominant and non-dominant forearm using a simplified anthropometric method. Maximal isometric force was determined using a mechanical handgrip dynamometer. The differences in CSA and isometric force between the two limbs and between fencers and controls were tested using paired and unpaired Student's t-tests, respectively. Significant differences in CSA and maximal force were observed between the dominant and non-dominant forearm in fencers (both P < 0.001) and in controls (P < 0.005 and P < 0.001, respectively). The fencers showed a greater CSA (P < 0.001) and force (P < 0.001) in the dominant forearm compared with the control group. Furthermore, the differences between the dominant and non-dominant limb of the fencers were significantly greater than the differences between the dominant and non-dominant limb of the controls (P < 0.001 for CSA and P < 0.05 for force). No significant differences in stress ratio (force/CSA) were obtained in either group.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Ways of increasing muscular activity by means of isometric muscular exertion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kovalik, A. V.

    1980-01-01

    The effect of isometric muscular exertion on the human body was investigated by having subjects perform basic movements in a sitting position in the conventional manner with additional muscle tension at 50% maximum force and at maximum force. The pulse, arterial pressure, skin temperature, respiratory rate, minute respiratory volume and electrical activity of the muscles involved were all measured. Performance of the exercises with maximum muscular exertion for 20 sec and without movement resulted in the greatest shifts in these indices; in the conventional manner substantial changes did not occur; and with isometric muscular exertion with 50% maximum force with and without movement, optimal functional shifts resulted. The latter is recommended for use in industrial exercises for the prevention of hypodynamia. Ten exercises are suggested.

  13. Threatened masculinity and muscularity: an experimental examination of multiple aspects of muscularity in men.

    PubMed

    Hunt, Christopher John; Gonsalkorale, Karen; Murray, Stuart B

    2013-06-01

    Two studies examined the threatened masculinity theory of male body dissatisfaction, which posits that threats to masculinity result in increased muscle dissatisfaction. In Study 1, a masculinity threat was followed by tasks examining confidence in physical ability and perceptions of current and ideal body shapes. Results showed that men who experienced a masculinity threat reported lower confidence in their physical ability and perceived themselves as less muscular than men who experienced an affirmation of their masculinity. In Study 2, men were asked to report their intention to increase muscularity and their appearance anxiety following a threat to masculinity. Results showed that men reported lower appearance anxiety and drive for muscularity when their masculinity was threatened than when their masculinity was affirmed. This apparent contradiction can be explained by noting that men may be motivated to deny appearance concerns following a threat to masculinity, as such concerns are equated with femininity.

  14. Calcium intake, vascular calcification, and vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Spence, Lisa A; Weaver, Connie M

    2013-01-01

    Recent research has reported a possible link between calcium supplementation and increased risk of cardiovascular disease and its endpoints in healthy, older adults. To evaluate the current evidence regarding the impact of calcium supplementation on cardiovascular disease risk and to address research gaps, the present review was conducted. Systematic reviews and meta-analyses were included, when available, along with original articles. The articles included in the review were obtained from PubMed using the following search terms: calcium intake, calcium supplementation, cardiovascular disease, myocardial infarction, mortality, and vascular calcification. The majority of the studies reviewed demonstrated no statistically significant adverse or beneficial effect of calcium supplementation on cardiovascular disease or its endpoints. While some studies indicate a possible increased risk, there is a lack of consensus on these findings and a need exists to further elucidate a mechanism. More experimental data are necessary to understand the impact of calcium intake, both levels and sources, on vascular calcification and vascular disease. The use of (41)C kinetic modeling in the Ossabaw swine provides an approach for assessing soft tissue calcification in an atherosclerotic and normal state to address research gaps.

  15. Uterine Vascular Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Abhishek; Srinivas, Amruthashree; Chandrashekar, Babitha Moogali; Vijayakumar, Avinash

    2013-01-01

    Vascular lesions of the uterus are rare; most reported in the literature are arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). Uterine AVMs can be congenital or acquired. In recent years, there has been an increasing number of reports of acquired vascular lesions of the uterus following pregnancy, abortion, cesarean delivery, and curettage. It can be seen from these reports that there is confusion concerning the terminology of uterine vascular lesions. There is also a lack of diagnostic criteria and management guidelines, which has led to an increased number of unnecessary invasive procedures (eg, angiography, uterine artery embolization, hysterectomy for abnormal vaginal bleeding). This article familiarizes readers with various vascular lesions of the uterus and their management. PMID:24340126

  16. Collagen vascular disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... developed these disorders were previously said to have "connective tissue" or "collagen vascular" disease. We now have names ... be used. These include as undifferentiated systemic rheumatic (connective tissue) diseases or overlap syndromes. Images Dermatomyositis, heliotrope eyelids ...

  17. Inflation in maximal gauged supergravities

    SciTech Connect

    Kodama, Hideo; Nozawa, Masato

    2015-05-18

    We discuss the dynamics of multiple scalar fields and the possibility of realistic inflation in the maximal gauged supergravity. In this paper, we address this problem in the framework of recently discovered 1-parameter deformation of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) dyonic gaugings, for which the base point of the scalar manifold corresponds to an unstable de Sitter critical point. In the gauge-field frame where the embedding tensor takes the value in the sum of the 36 and 36’ representations of SL(8), we present a scheme that allows us to derive an analytic expression for the scalar potential. With the help of this formalism, we derive the full potential and gauge coupling functions in analytic forms for the SO(3)×SO(3)-invariant subsectors of SO(4,4) and SO(5,3) gaugings, and argue that there exist no new critical points in addition to those discovered so far. For the SO(4,4) gauging, we also study the behavior of 6-dimensional scalar fields in this sector near the Dall’Agata-Inverso de Sitter critical point at which the negative eigenvalue of the scalar mass square with the largest modulus goes to zero as the deformation parameter s approaches a critical value s{sub c}. We find that when the deformation parameter s is taken sufficiently close to the critical value, inflation lasts more than 60 e-folds even if the initial point of the inflaton allows an O(0.1) deviation in Planck units from the Dall’Agata-Inverso critical point. It turns out that the spectral index n{sub s} of the curvature perturbation at the time of the 60 e-folding number is always about 0.96 and within the 1σ range n{sub s}=0.9639±0.0047 obtained by Planck, irrespective of the value of the η parameter at the critical saddle point. The tensor-scalar ratio predicted by this model is around 10{sup −3} and is close to the value in the Starobinsky model.

  18. Extraglandular and intraglandular vascularization of canine prostate.

    PubMed

    Stefanov, Miroslav

    2004-03-01

    The literature on the vascularization of the canine prostate is reviewed and the clinical significance of prostate morphology is described. Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), combined with improved corrosion casting methods, reveal new morphological details that promise better diagnostics and treatment but also require expansion of clinical nomenclature. A proposal is made for including two previously unnamed veins in Nomina Anatomica Veterinaria (NAV). The canine prostate has two lobes with independent vascularization. Each lobe is supplied through the left and right a. prostatica, respectively. The a. prostatica sprouts three small vessels (cranial, middle, and caudal) towards the prostate gland. A. prostatica is a small-size artery whose wall structure is similar to the arteries of the muscular type. V. prostatica is a small-size valved vein. The canine prostate has capsular, parenchymal, and urethral vascular zones. The surface vessels of the capsule are predominantly veins and the diameter of arterial vessels is larger than that of the veins. The trabecular vessels are of two types: direct and branched. The prostate parenchyma is supplied by branches of the trabecular vessels. The periacinary capillaries are fenestrated and form a net in a circular pattern. The processes of the myoepithelial cells embrace both the acins and the periacinar capillaries. In the prostate ductal system. there are spermatozoa. The prostatic part of the urethra is supplied by an independent branch of a. prostatica. The prostatic urethral part is drained by v. prostatica, the vein of the urethral bulb and the ventral prostate veins. M. urethralis begins as early as the urethral prostatic part. The greater part of the white muscle fibers in m. urethralis suggest an enhanced anaerobic metabolism.

  19. [Complex vascular access].

    PubMed

    Mangiarotti, G; Cesano, G; Thea, A; Hamido, D; Pacitti, A; Segoloni, G P

    1998-03-01

    Availability of a proper vascular access is a basic condition for a proper extracorporeal replacement in end-stage chronic renal failure. However, biological factors, management and other problems, may variously condition their middle-long term survival. Therefore, personal experience of over 25 years has been critically reviewed in order to obtain useful information. In particular "hard" situations necessitating complex procedures have been examined but, if possible, preserving the peripherical vascular features.

  20. Media's influence on the drive for muscularity in undergraduates.

    PubMed

    Cramblitt, Brooke; Pritchard, Mary

    2013-12-01

    Although research has found that body ideals presented by the media influence women's body dissatisfaction, less is known about media's influence on men's body satisfaction. An online survey examining media use, the drive for muscularity, and internalization of appearance and body shape ideals was given to a sample of 311 participants comprised of both men and women. Results indicated (a) the more time men and women reported watching television, the higher their reported drive for muscularity (b) total hours of viewing sports-related, image-focused, and entertainment television related to increased drive for muscularity in women (c) drive for muscularity in men related to watching image-focused television and reading men's health magazines, and (d) internalization of athletic attitudes towards appearance mediated the relationship between total television watched and drive for muscularity in both genders. Clinicians may wish to utilize these findings when treating men and women suffering from drive for muscularity and body dysmorphia.

  1. Vascular Effects of Estrogenic Menopausal Hormone Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Reslan, Ossama M.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2011-01-01

    an appropriate MHT dose, route of administration, and estrogen/progestin combination could maximize the vascular benefits of MHT and minimize other adverse effects, especially if given within a reasonably short time after menopause to women that seek MHT for the relief of menopausal symptoms. PMID:21864249

  2. Vascular compression syndromes.

    PubMed

    Czihal, Michael; Banafsche, Ramin; Hoffmann, Ulrich; Koeppel, Thomas

    2015-11-01

    Dealing with vascular compression syndromes is one of the most challenging tasks in Vascular Medicine practice. This heterogeneous group of disorders is characterised by external compression of primarily healthy arteries and/or veins as well as accompanying nerval structures, carrying the risk of subsequent structural vessel wall and nerve damage. Vascular compression syndromes may severely impair health-related quality of life in affected individuals who are typically young and otherwise healthy. The diagnostic approach has not been standardised for any of the vascular compression syndromes. Moreover, some degree of positional external compression of blood vessels such as the subclavian and popliteal vessels or the celiac trunk can be found in a significant proportion of healthy individuals. This implies important difficulties in differentiating physiological from pathological findings of clinical examination and diagnostic imaging with provocative manoeuvres. The level of evidence on which treatment decisions regarding surgical decompression with or without revascularisation can be relied on is generally poor, mostly coming from retrospective single centre studies. Proper patient selection is critical in order to avoid overtreatment in patients without a clear association between vascular compression and clinical symptoms. With a focus on the thoracic outlet-syndrome, the median arcuate ligament syndrome and the popliteal entrapment syndrome, the present article gives a selective literature review on compression syndromes from an interdisciplinary vascular point of view.

  3. Resident vascular progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Torsney, Evelyn; Xu, Qingbo

    2011-02-01

    Homeostasis of the vessel wall is essential for maintaining its function, including blood pressure and patency of the lumen. In physiological conditions, the turnover rate of vascular cells, i.e. endothelial and smooth muscle cells, is low, but markedly increased in diseased situations, e.g. vascular injury after angioplasty. It is believed that mature vascular cells have an ability to proliferate to replace lost cells normally. On the other hand, recent evidence indicates stem/progenitor cells may participate in vascular repair and the formation of neointimal lesions in severely damaged vessels. It was found that all three layers of the vessels, the intima, media and adventitia, contain resident progenitor cells, including endothelial progenitor cells, mesenchymal stromal cells, Sca-1+ and CD34+ cells. Data also demonstrated that these resident progenitor cells could differentiate into a variety of cell types in response to different culture conditions. However, collective data were obtained mostly from in vitro culture assays and phenotypic marker studies. There are many unanswered questions concerning the mechanism of cell differentiation and the functional role of these cells in vascular repair and the pathogenesis of vascular disease. In the present review, we aim to summarize the data showing the presence of the resident progenitor cells, to highlight possible signal pathways orchestrating cell differentiation toward endothelial and smooth muscle cells, and to discuss the data limitations, challenges and controversial issues related to the role of progenitors. This article is part of a special issue entitled, "Cardiovascular Stem Cells Revisited".

  4. Computing Maximally Supersymmetric Scattering Amplitudes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stankowicz, James Michael, Jr.

    This dissertation reviews work in computing N = 4 super-Yang--Mills (sYM) and N = 8 maximally supersymmetric gravity (mSUGRA) scattering amplitudes in D = 4 spacetime dimensions in novel ways. After a brief introduction and overview in Ch. 1, the various techniques used to construct amplitudes in the remainder of the dissertation are discussed in Ch. 2. This includes several new concepts such as d log and pure integrand bases, as well as how to construct the amplitude using exactly one kinematic point where it vanishes. Also included in this chapter is an outline of the Mathematica package on shell diagrams and numerics.m (osdn) that was developed for the computations herein. The rest of the dissertation is devoted to explicit examples. In Ch. 3, the starting point is tree-level sYM amplitudes that have integral representations with residues that obey amplitude relations. These residues are shown to have corresponding residue numerators that allow a double copy prescription that results in mSUGRA residues. In Ch. 4, the two-loop four-point sYM amplitude is constructed in several ways, showcasing many of the techniques of Ch. 2; this includes an example of how to use osdn. The two-loop five-point amplitude is also presented in a pure integrand representation with comments on how it was constructed from one homogeneous cut of the amplitude. On-going work on the two-loop n-point amplitude is presented at the end of Ch. 4. In Ch. 5, the three-loop four-point amplitude is presented in the d log representation and in the pure integrand representation. In Ch. 6, there are several examples of four- through seven-loop planar diagrams that illustrate how considerations of the singularity structure of the amplitude underpin dual-conformal invariance. Taken with the previous examples, this is additional evidence that the structure known to exist in the planar sector extends to the full theory. At the end of this chapter is a proof that all mSUGRA amplitudes have a pole at

  5. Maximizing TDRS Command Load Lifetime

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, Aaron J.

    2002-01-01

    was therefore the key to achieving this goal. This goal was eventually realized through development of an Excel spreadsheet tool called EMMIE (Excel Mean Motion Interactive Estimation). EMMIE utilizes ground ephemeris nodal data to perform a least-squares fit to inferred mean anomaly as a function of time, thus generating an initial estimate for mean motion. This mean motion in turn drives a plot of estimated downtrack position difference versus time. The user can then manually iterate the mean motion, and determine an optimal value that will maximize command load lifetime. Once this optimal value is determined, the mean motion initially calculated by the command builder tool is overwritten with the new optimal value, and the command load is built for uplink to ISS. EMMIE also provides the capability for command load lifetime to be tracked through multiple TORS ephemeris updates. Using EMMIE, TORS command load lifetimes of approximately 30 days have been achieved.

  6. Comparison of Pulmonary Functions at Onset of Ventilatory Insufficiency in Patients With Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, and Myotonic Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Han Eol; Lee, Jang Woo; Kang, Seong Woong; Choi, Won Ah; Oh, Hyeonjun

    2016-01-01

    Objective To evaluate pulmonary functions of patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), and myotonic muscular dystrophy (MMD) at the onset of ventilatory insufficiency. Methods This retrospective study included ALS, DMD, and MMD patients with regular outpatient clinic follow-up in the Department of Rehabilitation Medicine at Gangnam Severance Hospital before the application of non-invasive positive pressure ventilation (NIPPV). The patients were enrolled from August 2001 to March 2014. If patients experienced ventilatory insufficiency, they were treated with NIPPV, and their pulmonary functions were subsequently measured. Results Ninety-four DMD patients, 41 ALS patients, and 21 MMD patients were included in the study. The mean SpO2 was lower in the MMD group than in the other two groups. The mean forced vital capacity (FVC) in the supine position was approximately low to mid 20% on average in DMD and ALS patients, whereas it was 10% higher in MMD patients. ALS patients showed a significantly lower FVC in the supine position than in the sitting position. Maximal insufflation capacity, unassisted peak cough flow, maximum inspiratory pressure (MIP), and maximum expiratory pressure (MEP) were significantly higher in MMD group than in the other groups. MEP was significantly the lowest in DMD patients, followed by in ALS, and MMD patients, in order. Conclusion Disease-specific values of pulmonary function, including FVC, MEP, and MIP, can be accurately used to assess the onset of ventilatory insufficiency in patients with ALS, DMD, and MMD. PMID:26949672

  7. Specificity of a Maximal Step Exercise Test

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Darby, Lynn A.; Marsh, Jennifer L.; Shewokis, Patricia A.; Pohlman, Roberta L.

    2007-01-01

    To adhere to the principle of "exercise specificity" exercise testing should be completed using the same physical activity that is performed during exercise training. The present study was designed to assess whether aerobic step exercisers have a greater maximal oxygen consumption (max VO sub 2) when tested using an activity specific, maximal step…

  8. Diurnal Variations in Maximal Oxygen Uptake.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McClellan, Powell D.

    A study attempted to determine if diurnal (daily cyclical) variations were present during maximal exercise. The subjects' (30 female undergraduate physical education majors) oxygen consumption and heart rates were monitored while they walked on a treadmill on which the grade was raised every minute. Each subject was tested for maximal oxygen…

  9. Elastic and Muscular Arteries Differ in Structure, Basal NO Production and Voltage-Gated Ca2+-Channels

    PubMed Central

    Leloup, Arthur J. A.; Van Hove, Cor E.; Heykers, Annick; Schrijvers, Dorien M.; De Meyer, Guido R. Y.; Fransen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, the search for mechanisms underlying progressive arterial stiffening and for interventions to avoid or reverse this process has gained much attention. In general, arterial stiffening displays regional variation and is, for example, during aging more prominent in elastic than in muscular arteries. We hypothesize that besides passive also active regulators of arterial compliance [i.e., endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function] differ between these arteries. Hence, it is conceivable that these vessel types will display different time frames of stiffening. To investigate this hypothesis segments of muscular arteries such as femoral and mesenteric arteries and elastic arteries such as the aorta and carotid artery were isolated from female C57Bl6 mice (5–6 months of age, n = 8). Both microscopy and passive stretching of the segments in a myograph confirmed that passive mechanical properties (elastin, collagen) of elastic and muscular arteries were significantly different. Endothelial function, more specifically basal nitric oxide (NO) efficacy, and VSMC function, more specifically L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC)-mediated contractions, were determined by α1-adrenoceptor stimulation with phenylephrine (PE) and by gradual depolarization with elevated extracellular K+ in the absence and presence of eNOS inhibition with L-NAME. PE-mediated isometric contractions significantly increased after inhibition of NO release with L-NAME in elastic, but not in muscular vessel segments. This high basal eNOS activity in elastic vessels was also responsible for shifts of K+ concentration-contraction curves to higher external K+. VGCC-mediated contractions were similarly affected by depolarization with elevated K+ in muscular artery segments or in elastic artery segments in the absence of basal NO. However, K+-induced contractions were inhibited by the VGCC blocker diltiazem with significantly higher sensitivity in the muscular arteries

  10. Elastic and Muscular Arteries Differ in Structure, Basal NO Production and Voltage-Gated Ca(2+)-Channels.

    PubMed

    Leloup, Arthur J A; Van Hove, Cor E; Heykers, Annick; Schrijvers, Dorien M; De Meyer, Guido R Y; Fransen, Paul

    2015-01-01

    In the last decades, the search for mechanisms underlying progressive arterial stiffening and for interventions to avoid or reverse this process has gained much attention. In general, arterial stiffening displays regional variation and is, for example, during aging more prominent in elastic than in muscular arteries. We hypothesize that besides passive also active regulators of arterial compliance [i.e., endothelial and vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function] differ between these arteries. Hence, it is conceivable that these vessel types will display different time frames of stiffening. To investigate this hypothesis segments of muscular arteries such as femoral and mesenteric arteries and elastic arteries such as the aorta and carotid artery were isolated from female C57Bl6 mice (5-6 months of age, n = 8). Both microscopy and passive stretching of the segments in a myograph confirmed that passive mechanical properties (elastin, collagen) of elastic and muscular arteries were significantly different. Endothelial function, more specifically basal nitric oxide (NO) efficacy, and VSMC function, more specifically L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channel (VGCC)-mediated contractions, were determined by α1-adrenoceptor stimulation with phenylephrine (PE) and by gradual depolarization with elevated extracellular K(+) in the absence and presence of eNOS inhibition with L-NAME. PE-mediated isometric contractions significantly increased after inhibition of NO release with L-NAME in elastic, but not in muscular vessel segments. This high basal eNOS activity in elastic vessels was also responsible for shifts of K(+) concentration-contraction curves to higher external K(+). VGCC-mediated contractions were similarly affected by depolarization with elevated K(+) in muscular artery segments or in elastic artery segments in the absence of basal NO. However, K(+)-induced contractions were inhibited by the VGCC blocker diltiazem with significantly higher sensitivity in the muscular

  11. Statistical mechanics of maximal independent sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dall'Asta, Luca; Pin, Paolo; Ramezanpour, Abolfazl

    2009-12-01

    The graph theoretic concept of maximal independent set arises in several practical problems in computer science as well as in game theory. A maximal independent set is defined by the set of occupied nodes that satisfy some packing and covering constraints. It is known that finding minimum and maximum-density maximal independent sets are hard optimization problems. In this paper, we use cavity method of statistical physics and Monte Carlo simulations to study the corresponding constraint satisfaction problem on random graphs. We obtain the entropy of maximal independent sets within the replica symmetric and one-step replica symmetry breaking frameworks, shedding light on the metric structure of the landscape of solutions and suggesting a class of possible algorithms. This is of particular relevance for the application to the study of strategic interactions in social and economic networks, where maximal independent sets correspond to pure Nash equilibria of a graphical game of public goods allocation.

  12. Antioxidants and vascular health.

    PubMed

    Bielli, Alessandra; Scioli, Maria Giovanna; Mazzaglia, Donatella; Doldo, Elena; Orlandi, Augusto

    2015-12-15

    Oxygen free radicals and other reactive oxygen species (ROS) are common products of normal aerobic cellular metabolism, but high levels of ROS lead to oxidative stress and cellular damage. Increased production of ROS favors vascular dysfunction, inducing altered vascular permeability and inflammation, accompanied by the loss of vascular modulatory function, the imbalance between vasorelaxation and vasoconstriction, and the aberrant expression of inflammatory adhesion molecules. Inflammatory stimuli promote oxidative stress generated from the increased activity of mitochondrial nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase, particularly of the Nox4 isoform, with the consequent impairment of mitochondrial β-oxidation. Vascular dysfunction due to the increase in Nox4 activity and ROS overproduction leads to the progression of cardiovascular diseases, diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease, and neurological disorders. Considerable research into the development of effective antioxidant therapies using natural derivatives or new synthetic molecules has been conducted. Antioxidants may prevent cellular damage by reducing ROS overproduction or interfering in reactions that involve ROS. Vitamin E and ascorbic acid are well known as natural antioxidants that counteract lipid peroxidative damage by scavenging oxygen-derived free radicals, thus restoring vascular function. Recently, preliminary studies on natural antioxidants such as goji berries, thymus, rosemary, green tea ginseng, and garlic have been conducted for their efficacy in preventing vascular damage. N-acetyl-cysteine and propionyl-L-carnitine are synthetic compounds that regulate ROS production by replacing endogenous antioxidants in both endothelial and smooth muscle cells. In this review, we consider the molecular mechanisms underlying the generation of oxidative stress-induced vascular dysfunction as well as the beneficial effects of antioxidant therapies.

  13. Vascularization of bioprosthetic valve material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughner, Derek R.; Dunmore-Buyze, Joy; Heenatigala, Dino; Lohmann, Tara; Ellis, Chris G.

    1999-04-01

    Cell membrane remnants represent a probable nucleation site for calcium deposition in bioprosthetic heart valves. Calcification is a primary failure mode of both bovine pericardial and porcine aortic heterograft bioprosthesis but the nonuniform pattern of calcium distribution within the tissue remains unexplained. Searching for a likely cellular source, we considered the possibility of a previously overlooked small blood vessel network. Using a videomicroscopy technique, we examined 5 matched pairs of porcine aortic and pulmonary valves and 14 samples from 6 bovine pericardia. Tissue was placed on a Leitz Metallux microscope and transilluminated with a 75 watt mercury lamp. Video images were obtained using a silicon intensified target camera equipped with a 431 nm interference filter to maximize contrast of red cells trapped in a capillary microvasculature. Video images were recorded for analysis on a Silicon Graphics Image Analysis work station equipped with a video frame grabber. For porcine valves, the technique demonstrated a vascular bed in the central spongiosa at cusp bases with vessel sizes from 6-80 micrometers . Bovine pericardium differed with a more uniform distribution of 7-100 micrometers vessels residing centrally. Thus, small blood vessel endothelial cells provide a potential explanation patterns of bioprosthetic calcification.

  14. [Treatment progress of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD)].

    PubMed

    Smogorzewska, Elzbieta Monika; Weinberg, Kenneth I

    2004-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a common lethal disease for which no effective treatment is currently available. There exists a mouse model of the disease in which the usefulness of gene therapy was established. However, no progress towards human application was made due to the lack of a proper method for gene delivery. During the past several years, researchers acquired data which led them to believe that bone marrow stem cells are capable of generating not only blood cells, but also liver, heart, skin, muscle, and other tissue. Although the term "stem cell plasticity" became very popular, other studies have suggested that bone marrow might contain different types of stem cells that can produce non-hematopoietic cells. For example, mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) in bone marrow give rise to osteocytes, chondrocytes, adipocytes, and skeletal muscle. Recently, researchers have been able to show that transplanted bone marrow cells can contribute to muscle cells in a human patient who was diagnosed with two genetic diseases: severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) and Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The odds of this happening is estimated at one in seven million. The results of studying this patient's medical history were reported by collaborating researchers at Children's Hospital, Los Angeles and Children's Hospital, Boston in an article titled "Long-term persistence of donor nuclei in a Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patient receiving bone marrow transplantation" published in the September 2002 issue of the Journal of Clinical Investigation. This patient was transplanted 15 years ago at Children's Hospital Los Angeles with paternal HLA-haploidentical T cell-depleted bone marrow. He engrafted and became a hematopoietic chimera having T and NK lymphocytes of donor origin. Studies performed on the muscle biopsy from the patient 13 years after transplantation demonstrated that the muscle showed evidence of donor derived nuclei. In addition, analysis of his bone marrow

  15. Exon skipping therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kole, Ryszard; Krieg, Arthur M

    2015-06-29

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is caused mostly by internal deletions in the gene for dystrophin, a protein essential for maintaining muscle cell membrane integrity. These deletions abrogate the reading frame and the lack of dystrophin results in progressive muscle deterioration. DMD patients experience progressive loss of ambulation, followed by a need for assisted ventilation, and eventual death in mid-twenties. By the method of exon skipping in dystrophin pre-mRNA the reading frame is restored and the internally deleted but functional dystrophin is produced. Two oligonucleotide drugs that induce desired exon skipping are currently in advanced clinical trials.

  16. Spinal and Bulbar Muscular Atrophy Overview

    PubMed Central

    Fischbeck, Kenneth H.

    2016-01-01

    Spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy is an X-linked neuromuscular disease caused by an expanded repeat in the androgen receptor gene. The mutant protein is toxic to motor neurons and muscle. The toxicity is ligand-dependent and likely involves aberrant interaction of the mutant androgen receptor with other nuclear factors leading to transcriptional dysregulation. Various therapeutic strategies have been effective in transgenic animal models, and the challenge now is to translate these strategies into safe and effective treatment in patients. PMID:26547319

  17. Multiple muscular variations in the neck, upper extremity, and lower extremity biased toward the left side of a single cadaver.

    PubMed

    Bang, Jong-Ho; Gil, Young-Chun; Yang, Hee-Jun; Jin, Jeong-Doo; Lee, Jae-Ho; Lee, Hye-Yeon

    2015-04-01

    Although numerous reports have found accessory or supernumerary muscles throughout the human body, multiple appearances of these variations biased toward one side of body are rare. We report a 76-yr-old male cadaver with an accessory head of the biceps brachii and palmaris profundus, and a muscular slip between the biceps femoris and semitendinosus on the left side in addition to a bilateral accessory belly of the digastric muscle. No remarkable nervous, vascular, or visceral variation accompanied these variations. An interruption of normal somitogenesis or myogenesis may be a cause of these variations.

  18. Effects of ethnicity on the relationship between vertical jump and maximal power on a cycle ergometer.

    PubMed

    Rouis, Majdi; Coudrat, Laure; Jaafar, Hamdi; Attiogbé, Elvis; Vandewalle, Henry; Driss, Tarak

    2016-06-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the impact of ethnicity on the maximal power-vertical jump relationship. Thirty-one healthy males, sixteen Caucasian (age: 26.3 ± 3.5 years; body height: 179.1 ± 5.5 cm; body mass: 78.1 ± 9.8 kg) and fifteen Afro-Caribbean (age: 24.4 ±2.6 years; body height: 178.9 ± 5.5 cm; body mass: 77.1 ± 10.3 kg) completed three sessions during which vertical jump height and maximal power of lower limbs were measured. The results showed that the values of vertical jump height and maximal power were higher for Afro-Caribbean participants (62.92 ± 6.7 cm and 14.70 ± 1.75 W∙kg-1) than for Caucasian ones (52.92 ± 4.4 cm and 12.75 ± 1.36 W∙kg-1). Moreover, very high reliability indices were obtained on vertical jump (e.g. 0.95 < ICC < 0.98) and maximal power performance (e.g. 0.75 < ICC < 0.97). However, multiple linear regression analysis showed that, for a given value of maximal power, the Afro-Caribbean participants jumped 8 cm higher than the Caucasians. Together, these results confirmed that ethnicity impacted the maximal power-vertical jump relationship over three sessions. In the current context of cultural diversity, the use of vertical jump performance as a predictor of muscular power should be considered with caution when dealing with populations of different ethnic origins.

  19. Effects of ethnicity on the relationship between vertical jump and maximal power on a cycle ergometer

    PubMed Central

    Coudrat, Laure; Jaafar, Hamdi; Attiogbé, Elvis; Vandewalle, Henry; Driss, Tarak

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The aim of this study was to verify the impact of ethnicity on the maximal power-vertical jump relationship. Thirty-one healthy males, sixteen Caucasian (age: 26.3 ± 3.5 years; body height: 179.1 ± 5.5 cm; body mass: 78.1 ± 9.8 kg) and fifteen Afro-Caribbean (age: 24.4 ±2.6 years; body height: 178.9 ± 5.5 cm; body mass: 77.1 ± 10.3 kg) completed three sessions during which vertical jump height and maximal power of lower limbs were measured. The results showed that the values of vertical jump height and maximal power were higher for Afro-Caribbean participants (62.92 ± 6.7 cm and 14.70 ± 1.75 W∙kg-1) than for Caucasian ones (52.92 ± 4.4 cm and 12.75 ± 1.36 W∙kg-1). Moreover, very high reliability indices were obtained on vertical jump (e.g. 0.95 < ICC < 0.98) and maximal power performance (e.g. 0.75 < ICC < 0.97). However, multiple linear regression analysis showed that, for a given value of maximal power, the Afro-Caribbean participants jumped 8 cm higher than the Caucasians. Together, these results confirmed that ethnicity impacted the maximal power-vertical jump relationship over three sessions. In the current context of cultural diversity, the use of vertical jump performance as a predictor of muscular power should be considered with caution when dealing with populations of different ethnic origins. PMID:28149384

  20. [Vascularization of hepatoceliular carcinoma].

    PubMed

    Tumanova, U N; Shchegolev, A I

    2015-01-01

    The paper gives the data available in the literature on vascularization of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Sinusoidal capillarization and unpaired arteries are shown to play an important role in the development and progression of HCC. The density of microvessels detected by immunohistochemical techniques is a morphological indicator of the degree of angiogenic processes. Higher-grade HCC is followed by changes in its vascularization and concurrent with a progressive increase in the proportion of blood entering along the hepatic artery. The morphological indicators of microvessel density are recommended to use as addi- tional criteria for determining the prognosis of the disease, designing targeted anti-angiogenic drugs, and evaluating the efficiency of performed therapy.

  1. Dysphagia in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy Assessed by Validated Questionnaire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Archer, Sally K.; Garrod, Rachel; Hart, Nicholas; Miller, Simon

    2013-01-01

    Background: Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) leads to progressive muscular weakness and death, most typically from respiratory complications. Dysphagia is common in DMD; however, the most appropriate swallowing assessments have not been universally agreed and the symptoms of dysphagia remain under-reported. Aims: To investigate symptoms of…

  2. Contingent muscular tension during a choice reaction task.

    PubMed

    Araki, Masanobu; Choshi, Koji

    2006-06-01

    This study examined the effects of contingent muscular tension on a choice reaction task, and especially, the effects various amounts of muscular tension have on the information processing of choice reaction time. The reactive movement task included a choice reaction task. Ten right-handed healthy men (ages 18 to 19 years) underwent trials with stimulus presentation probabilities of 50% and 20% on the muscular tension task and choice reaction tasks. The conditions for the muscular tension tasks were divided into seven different conditions: 0%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40%, 50%, and 60% of maximum voluntary contraction. On these tasks, subjects performed isometric contraction of the biceps brachii. The choice reaction task was a rapid extension of the left or right knee as a choice reaction. Measures were choice reaction time, movement time, and total reaction time. Analysis indicated that shortening choice reaction time of the left and right feet was observed under 10% muscular tension of maximum strength. Muscular tension appreciably influenced information processing, including choice reaction time. Muscular tension did not affect movement time. Results are discussed with respect to previous research and the optimal muscular tension for best performance.

  3. [Cardiac involvement in Duchenne muscular dystrophy].

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Orlikowski, David; Nardi, Olivier; Annane, Djillali

    2008-04-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked hereditary dystrophinopathy due to the absence of dystrophin, a cytoskeleton protein; it is the most frequent of the dystrophinopathies. DMD affects one newborn boy in 3500. The disease locus is found on the short arm of the X chromosome (Xp21). Dystrophin plays an important role in the maintenance of the cellular architecture and permits signal transduction between the cytoskeleton and the extracellular matrix. Its absence is expressed by peripheral muscular damage, most often at the pelvic girdle, and sometimes associated with pseudohypertrophy of the calf. The disease is very often complicated by cardiac damage that develops towards the end of adolescence, together with restrictive lung disease that will usually end up requiring respiratory support. The prognosis is severe. Doppler examination of the myocardial tissue helps to screen for subclinical myocardial damage. Therapeutic management is multidisciplinary. Medical treatment of cardiac involvement relies on the drugs already proved effective in chronic heart failure. Ongoing research is currently studying gene therapy.

  4. The superhealing MRL background improves muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Mice from the MRL or “superhealing” strain have enhanced repair after acute injury to the skin, cornea, and heart. We now tested an admixture of the MRL genome and found that it altered the course of muscle pathology and cardiac function in a chronic disease model of skeletal and cardiac muscle. Mice lacking γ-sarcoglycan (Sgcg), a dystrophin-associated protein, develop muscular dystrophy and cardiomyopathy similar to their human counterparts with limb girdle muscular dystrophy. With disruption of the dystrophin complex, the muscle plasma membrane becomes leaky and muscles develop increased fibrosis. Methods MRL/MpJ mice were bred with Sgcg mice, and cardiac function was measured. Muscles were assessed for fibrosis and membrane leak using measurements of hydroxyproline and Evans blue dye. Quantitative trait locus mapping was conducted using single nucleotide polymorphisms distinct between the two parental strains. Results Introduction of the MRL genome reduced fibrosis but did not alter membrane leak in skeletal muscle of the Sgcg model. The MRL genome was also associated with improved cardiac function with reversal of depressed fractional shortening and the left ventricular ejection fraction. We conducted a genome-wide analysis of genetic modifiers and found that a region on chromosome 2 was associated with cardiac, diaphragm muscle and abdominal muscle fibrosis. Conclusions These data are consistent with a model where the MRL genome acts in a dominant manner to suppress fibrosis in this chronic disease setting of heart and muscle disease. PMID:23216833

  5. Congenital muscular torticollis: evaluation and classification.

    PubMed

    Tatli, Burak; Aydinli, Nur; Caliskan, Mine; Ozmen, Meral; Bilir, Feride; Acar, Gonul

    2006-01-01

    In this investigation of congenital muscular torticollis, 311 infants treated consecutively for congenital torticollis over an 8-year period (1995-2003) at the Pediatric Neurology Clinic of Istanbul Medical Faculty, Istanbul University, Turkey were reviewed retrospectively. The clinical presentation, associated abnormalities, treatment, and outcomes of the overall group and of subgroups divided according to an ultrasonography-based classification were evaluated. All patients were evaluated using a standard approach: cervical ultrasonography was performed, and the patients were divided into two subgroups. Each group was scanned for other anomalies, and outcomes were compared. The mean age at diagnosis was 2.3 months; patients included in this study were 138 males and 173 females. Two clinical subgroups, comprised of sternomastoid tumors 85% and postural torticollis 15%, were identified. Passive range of motion was the initial treatment recommended for all of the patients. Follow-up data were available for all 311 patients; 95% experienced total resolution and 5% experienced subtotal resolution. We conclude that the majority of children with congenital muscular torticollis experience total resolution of symptoms. The success rate of conservative treatment is primarily dependent on the patients' age at the initiation of exercises and ultrasonographic findings.

  6. Elevated Expression of Moesin in Muscular Dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Pines, Mark; Levi, Oshrat; Genin, Olga; Lavy, Adi; Angelini, Corrado; Allamand, Valérie; Halevy, Orna

    2017-03-01

    Fibrosis is the main complication of muscular dystrophies. We identified moesin, a member of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family, in dystrophic muscles of mice representing Duchenne and congenital muscular dystrophies (DMD and CMD, respectively) and dysferlinopathy, but not in the wild type. High levels of moesin were also observed in muscle biopsy specimens from DMD, Ullrich CMD, and merosin-deficient CMD patients, all of which present high levels of fibrosis. The myofibroblasts, responsible for extracellular matrix protein synthesis, and the macrophages infiltrating the dystrophic muscles were the source of moesin. Moesin-positive cells were embedded within the fibrotic areas between the myofibers adjacent to the collagen type I fibers. Radixin was also synthesized by the myofibroblasts, whereas ezrin colocalized with the myofiber membranes. In animal models and patients' muscles, part of the moesin was in its active phosphorylated form. Inhibition of fibrosis by halofuginone, an antifibrotic agent, resulted in a major decrease in moesin levels in the muscles of DMD and CMD mice. In summary, the results of this study may pave the way for exploiting moesin as a novel target for intervention in MDs, and as part of a battery of biomarkers to evaluate treatment success in preclinical studies and clinical trials.

  7. Upper Girdle Imaging in Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tasca, Giorgio; Monforte, Mauro; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Laschena, Francesco; Ottaviani, Pierfrancesco; Leoncini, Emanuele; Boccia, Stefania; Galluzzi, Giuliana; Pelliccioni, Marco; Masciullo, Marcella; Frusciante, Roberto; Mercuri, Eugenio; Ricci, Enzo

    2014-01-01

    Background In Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD), the upper girdle is early involved and often difficult to assess only relying on physical examination. Our aim was to evaluate the pattern and degree of involvement of upper girdle muscles in FSHD compared with other muscle diseases with scapular girdle impairment. Methods We propose an MRI protocol evaluating neck and upper girdle muscles. One hundred-eight consecutive symptomatic FSHD patients and 45 patients affected by muscular dystrophies and myopathies with prominent upper girdle involvement underwent this protocol. Acquired scans were retrospectively analyzed. Results The trapezius (100% of the patients) and serratus anterior (85% of the patients) were the most and earliest affected muscles in FSHD, followed by the latissimus dorsi and pectoralis major, whilst spinati and subscapularis (involved in less than 4% of the patients) were consistently spared even in late disease stages. Asymmetry and hyperintensities on short-tau inversion recovery (STIR) sequences were common features, and STIR hyperintensities could also be found in muscles not showing signs of fatty replacement. The overall involvement appears to be disease-specific in FSHD as it significantly differed from that encountered in the other myopathies. Conclusions The detailed knowledge of single muscle involvement provides useful information for correctly evaluating patients' motor function and to set a baseline for natural history studies. Upper girdle imaging can also be used as an additional tool helpful in supporting the diagnosis of FSHD in unclear situations, and may contribute with hints on the currently largely unknown molecular pathogenesis of this disease. PMID:24932477

  8. Sleep disordered breathing in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Della Marca, Giacomo; Frusciante, Roberto; Dittoni, Serena; Vollono, Catello; Buccarella, Cristina; Iannaccone, Elisabetta; Rossi, Monica; Scarano, Emanuele; Pirronti, Tommaso; Cianfoni, Alessandro; Mazza, Salvatore; Tonali, Pietro A; Ricci, Enzo

    2009-10-15

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is one of the most frequent forms of muscular dystrophy. The aims of this study were: 1) to evaluate the prevalence of sleep disordered breathing (SDB) in patients with FSHD; 2) to define the sleep-related respiratory patterns in FSHD patients with SDB; and 3) to find the clinical predictors of SDB. Fifty-one consecutive FSHD patients were enrolled, 23 women, mean age 45.7+/-12.3 years (range: 26-72). The diagnosis of FSHD was confirmed by genetic tests. All patients underwent medical and neurological evaluations, subjective evaluation of sleep and full-night laboratory-based polysomnography. Twenty patients presented SDB: 13 presented obstructive apneas, four presented REM related oxygen desaturations and three showed a mixed pattern. Three patients needed positive airways pressure. SDB was not related to the severity of the disease. Body mass index, neck circumference and daytime sleepiness did not allow prediction of SDB. In conclusion, the results suggest a high prevalence of SDB in patients with FSHD. The presence of SDB does not depend on the clinical severity of the disease. SDB is often asymptomatic, and no clinical or physical measure can reliably predict its occurrence. A screening of SDB should be included in the clinical assessment of FSHD.

  9. Social dominance orientation predicts drive for muscularity among British men.

    PubMed

    Swami, Viren; Neofytou, Rudolfos-Valentino; Jablonska, Joanna; Thirlwell, Holly; Taylor, Donna; McCreary, Donald R

    2013-09-01

    The present study tested the hypothesis that men's drive for muscularity would be associated with their valuation of domination, power, status, and aggression over others. A community sample of 359 men from London, UK, completed measures of drive for muscularity, social dominance orientation, right-wing authoritarianism, trait aggression, and need for power, as well as their demographic details. Bivariate correlations showed that greater drive for muscularity was significantly correlated with most of the measures and their subscales. However, in a multiple regression analysis, the only significant predictor of drive for muscularity was support for group-based dominance hierarchies (Adj. R(2)=.17). These results suggest that men's drive for muscularity is associated with a socio-political ideology that favours social dominance.

  10. Consensus statement on standard of care for congenital muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ching H; Bonnemann, Carsten G; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D; Connolly, Anne M; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2010-12-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee.

  11. Consensus Statement on Standard of Care for Congenital Muscular Dystrophies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ching H.; Bonnemann, Carsten G.; Rutkowski, Anne; Sejersen, Thomas; Bellini, Jonathan; Battista, Vanessa; Florence, Julaine M.; Schara, Ulrike; Schuler, Pamela M.; Wahbi, Karim; Aloysius, Annie; Bash, Robert O.; Béroud, Christophe; Bertini, Enrico; Bushby, Kate; Cohn, Ronald D.; Connolly, Anne M.; Deconinck, Nicolas; Desguerre, Isabelle; Eagle, Michelle; Estournet-Mathiaud, Brigitte; Ferreiro, Ana; Fujak, Albert; Goemans, Nathalie; Iannaccone, Susan T.; Jouinot, Patricia; Main, Marion; Melacini, Paola; Mueller-Felber, Wolfgang; Muntoni, Francesco; Nelson, Leslie L.; Rahbek, Jes; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Sewry, Caroline; Storhaug, Kari; Simonds, Anita; Tseng, Brian; Vajsar, Jiri; Vianello, Andrea; Zeller, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    Congenital muscular dystrophies are a group of rare neuromuscular disorders with a wide spectrum of clinical phenotypes. Recent advances in understanding the molecular pathogenesis of congenital muscular dystrophy have enabled better diagnosis. However, medical care for patients with congenital muscular dystrophy remains very diverse. Advances in many areas of medical technology have not been adopted in clinical practice. The International Standard of Care Committee for Congenital Muscular Dystrophy was established to identify current care issues, review literature for evidence-based practice, and achieve consensus on care recommendations in 7 areas: diagnosis, neurology, pulmonology, orthopedics/rehabilitation, gastroenterology/ nutrition/speech/oral care, cardiology, and palliative care. To achieve consensus on the care recommendations, 2 separate online surveys were conducted to poll opinions from experts in the field and from congenital muscular dystrophy families. The final consensus was achieved in a 3-day workshop conducted in Brussels, Belgium, in November 2009. This consensus statement describes the care recommendations from this committee. PMID:21078917

  12. [Dry immersion effects on the mechanisms of metabolic-reflex regulation of hemodynamics during muscular work].

    PubMed

    Bravyĭ, Ia R; Bersenev, E Iu; Missina, S S; Borovik, A S; Sharova, A P; Vinogradova, O L

    2008-01-01

    Effects of 4-d dry immersion on metabolic-reflex regulation of hemodynamics were evaluated during local static work (30% of maximum voluntary effort) of the talocrural extensors. One group of immersed test-subjects received low-frequency electrostimulation of leg muscles to offset the immersion effect on EMG of working muscles. Metabolic-reflex regulation was evaluated through comparison of cardiovascular responses to physical tests with and w/o post-exercise vascular occlusion. Immersion vaguely increased heart rate and reduced systolic arterial pressure in resting subjects; however, it did not have a distinct effect on arterial pressure and HR during muscular work or metabolic-reflex potentiation of hemodynamic shifts.

  13. Hemodynamic Responses to Blood Flow Restriction and Resistance Exercise to Muscular Failure.

    PubMed

    Libardi, Cleiton Augusto; Catai, Aparecida Maria; Miquelini, Maiara; Borghi-Silva, Audrey; Minatel, Vinicius; Alvarez, Ieda Fernanda; Milan-Mattos, Juliana Cristina; Roschel, Hamilton; Tricoli, Valmor; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos

    2017-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare hemodynamic responses between blood flow-restricted resistance exercise (BFR-RE), high-intensity resistance exercise (HI-RE) and low-intensity resistance exercise (LI-RE) performed to muscular failure. 12 men (age: 20±3 years; body mass: 73.5±9 kg; height: 174±6 cm) performed 4 sets of leg press exercises using BFR-RE (30% of 1-RM), HI-RE (80% of 1-RM) and LI-RE (30% of 1-RM) protocols. Systolic (SBP) and diastolic blood pressure (DBP), heart rate (HR), stroke volume (SV), cardiac output (CO) and total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR) were measured on a beat-to-beat continuous basis by a noninvasive photoplethysmographic arterial pressure device. The HI-RE and LI-RE showed higher values (P<0.05) in all of the sets than the BFR-RE for SBP, DBP, HR. Additionally, HI-RE showed higher SBP (4(th) set) and DBP (all sets) (P<0.05) values than the LI-RE. However, the SV, CO and TPR showed significantly greater values for LI-RE compared to HI-RE and BFR-RE (P<0.05). In conclusion, the results of this study indicate that the BFR-RE promotes a lower hemodynamic response compared to the HI-RE and LI-RE performed to muscular failure.

  14. Building the French Muscular Dystrophy Association: the role of doctor/patient interactions.

    PubMed

    Bach, M A

    1998-08-01

    The process of creating the French Muscular Dystrophy Association (AFM) is analysed through the interactions between the medico-scientific community on the one hand, and patients and their families on the other, from the 1950s to 1986. Each stage of its development was characterized by a particular mode of co-operation between lay people and doctors. Starting in 1958, the Association built a close relationship with a single partner, Jean Demos, a paediatrician and biochemist who developed a new vasodilation therapy based on his controversial vascular theory of muscular dystrophy. Around 1966, some AFM members, disappointed by Demos' treatment, decided to collaborate with other specialists, primarily neurologists, but channelled most of their resources in social action. Two other organizations were then created around Dr. Demos: the first (Union de Myopathes de France (UMF) acted as a "grass-roots organization" for maintaining "therapeutic orthodoxy" among patients and supporting his research through political lobbying; the other, composed of a handful of wealthy individuals, raised private funds for his laboratory. In the late 1970s, some UMF members questioned Demos' approach. They united with AFM to form a single association and created a Scientific Council representing all French groups interested in neuromuscular diseases. The co-operation established between these two collective partners proved to be most fruitful for both parties.

  15. Heart and vascular services

    MedlinePlus

    ... MedlinePlus GO GO About MedlinePlus Site Map FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Heart and vascular services URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/ ...

  16. Pathogenesis of Vascular Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Boon, Laurence M.; Ballieux, Fanny; Vikkula, Miikka

    2010-01-01

    Vascular anomalies are localized defects of vascular development. Most of them occur sporadically, i.e. there is no familial history of lesions, yet in a few cases clear inheritance is observed. These inherited forms are often characterized by multifocal lesions that are mainly small in size and increase in number with patient’s age. On the basis of these inherited forms, molecular genetic studies have unraveled a number of inherited mutations giving direct insight into the pathophysiological cause and the molecular pathways that are implicated. Genetic defects have been identified for hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), inherited cutaneomucosal venous malformation (VMCM), glomuvenous malformation (GVM), capillary malformation - arteriovenous malformation (CM-AVM), cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) and some isolated and syndromic forms of primary lymphedema. We focus on these disorders, the implicated mutated genes and the underlying pathogenic mechanisms. We also call attention to the concept of Knudson’s double-hit mechanism to explain incomplete penetrance and the large clinical variation in expressivity of inherited vascular anomalies. This variability renders the making of correct diagnosis of the rare inherited forms difficult. Yet, the identification of the pathophysiological causes and pathways involved in them has had an unprecedented impact on our thinking of their etiopathogenesis, and has opened the doors towards a more refined classification of vascular anomalies. It has also made it possible to develop animal models that can be tested for specific molecular therapies, aimed at alleviating the dysfunctions caused by the aberrant genes and proteins. PMID:21095468

  17. OBESITY AND VASCULAR DYSFUNCTION

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; James, Milinda E.; Goodwill, Adam G.; Frisbee, Jefferson C.

    2008-01-01

    One of the most profound challenges facing public health and public health policy in Western society is the increased incidence and prevalence of both overweight and obesity. While this condition can have significant consequences for patient mortality and quality of life, it can be further exacerbated as overweight/obesity can be a powerful stimulus for the development of additional risk factors for a negative cardiovascular outcome, including increased insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and hypertension. This manuscript will present the effects of systemic obesity on broad issues of vascular function in both afflicted human populations and in the most relevant animal models. Among the topics that will be covered are alterations to vascular reactivity (both dilator and constrictor responses), adaptations in microvascular network and vessel wall structure, and alterations to the patterns of tissue/organ perfusion as a result of the progression of the obese condition. Additionally, special attention will be paid to the contribution of chronic inflammation as a contributor to alterations in vascular function, as well as the role of perivascular adipose tissue in terms of impacting vessel behavior. When taken together, it is clearly apparent that the development of the obese condition can have profound, and frequently difficult to predict, impacts on integrated vascular function. Much of this complexity appears to have its basis in the extent to which other co-morbidities associated with obesity (e.g., insulin resistance) are present and exert contributing effects. PMID:18571908

  18. Nonthrombogenic polymer vascular prosthesis.

    PubMed

    Nojiri, C; Senshu, K; Okano, T

    1995-01-01

    Although many synthetic vascular grafts have been developed and evaluated experimentally or clinically, none of them have met long-term patency when applied as a small diameter vascular substitute. We have recently developed a small caliber vascular graft (3 mm i.d.) using a nonthrombogenic polymer coating. The graft consists of three layered structures: Dacron for the outer layer, polyurethane in the middle layer, and a HEMA/styrene block copolymer (HEMA-st) coating for the inner layer. HEMA-st is an amphiphilic block copolymer composed of 2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate and styrene which has demonstrated improved blood compatibility over existing biomedical polymers in both in vitro and ex vivo experiments. Ten grafts were evaluated in a dog bilateral carotid replacement model. The grafts were electively retrieved at 7, 14, 30, 92, and 372 days after implantation. All grafts were patent without detectable thrombi along the graft length including anastomotic sites. Scanning electron micrographs of retrieved graft lumen showed fairly clean surfaces covered with a homogenous protein-like layer without microthrombi or endothelial cell lining. The thickness of the surface protein layer measured by a transmission electron microscopy was what can be described as monolayer protein adsorption regardless of implantation periods of as much as 372 days. A stable monolayer adsorbed protein layer formed on HEMA-st surfaces demonstrated nonthrombogenic activities in vivo and secure long-term patency of small caliber vascular grafts with the absence of an endothelial cell lining.

  19. Amputation in vascular disease.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, K.

    1980-01-01

    The management of vascular amputees in the Roehampton Limb Surgery Unit since its opening in 1975 is outlined and the results in 167 cases presented. Of the 35 patients over the age of 80, 57% were walking independently at the time of their discharge from the unit. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7377693

  20. Evidence for altered alpha-adrenoreceptor responsiveness after a single bout of maximal exercise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, Victor A.

    2003-01-01

    We studied hemodynamic responses to alpha- and beta-receptor agonists in eight men to test the hypothesis that adrenoreceptor responsiveness is altered within 24 h of the performance of maximal exercise. Adrenoreceptor responsiveness was tested under two experimental conditions (with and without maximal exercise). Adrenoreceptor tests were performed 24 h after each subject performed graded upright cycle ergometry to volitional exhaustion. The 2 test days (experimental conditions) were separated by at least 1 wk, and the order of exercise and no-exercise conditions was counterbalanced. Steady-state graded infusions of phenylephrine (PE) and isoproterenol (Iso) were used to assess alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptor responsiveness, respectively. Slopes calculated from linear regressions between Iso and PE doses and changes in heart rate, blood pressure, and leg vascular resistance for each subject were used as an index of alpha- and beta-adrenoreceptor responsiveness. The slope of the relationship between heart rate and Iso with maximal exercise was 1773 +/- 164 beats x microm-1x kg-1x min-1 compared with 1987 +/- 142 beats x microg-1x kg-1x min-1 without exercise (P = 0.158), whereas the slopes of the relationship between vascular resistance to Iso were -438 +/- 123 peripheral resistance units (PRU) x microg-1x kg-1x min-1 with maximal exercise and -429 +/- 105 x microg-1x kg-1 x min-1 without exercise (P = 0.904). Maximal exercise was associated with greater (P < 0.05) vascular resistance (15.1 +/- 2.8 PRU x microg-1 kg-1x min-1) and mean arterial blood pressure (15.8 +/- 2.1 mmHg. microg-1x kg-1x min-1) responses to PE infusion compared with no exercise (9.0 +/- 2.0 PRU x microg-1 kg-1 x min-1 and 10.9 +/- 2.0 mmHg. microg-1x kg-1x min-1, respectively). These results provide evidence that a single bout of maximal exercise increases alpha1-adrenoreceptor responsiveness within 24 h without affecting beta-cardiac and vascular adrenoreceptor responses.

  1. Vascular wall extracellular matrix proteins and vascular diseases

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Junyan; Shi, Guo-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Extracellular matrix proteins form the basic structure of blood vessels. Along with providing basic structural support to blood vessels, matrix proteins interact with different sets of vascular cells via cell surface integrin or non-integrin receptors. Such interactions induce vascular cell de novo synthesis of new matrix proteins during blood vessel development or remodeling. Under pathological conditions, vascular matrix proteins undergo proteolytic processing, yielding bioactive fragments to influence vascular wall matrix remodeling. Vascular cells also produce alternatively spliced variants that induce vascular cell production of different matrix proteins to interrupt matrix homeostasis, leading to increased blood vessel stiffness; vascular cell migration, proliferation, or death; or vascular wall leakage and rupture. Destruction of vascular matrix proteins leads to vascular cell or blood-borne leukocyte accumulation, proliferation, and neointima formation within the vascular wall; blood vessels prone to uncontrolled enlargement during blood flow diastole; tortuous vein development; and neovascularization from existing pathological tissue microvessels. Here we summarize discoveries related to blood vessel matrix proteins within the past decade from basic and clinical studies in humans and animals — from expression to cross-linking, assembly, and degradation under physiological and vascular pathological conditions, including atherosclerosis, aortic aneurysms, varicose veins, and hypertension. PMID:25045854

  2. [Metabolic and respiratory parameters during muscular exercise in man (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Flandrois, R; Lacour, J R

    1977-01-01

    Muscle can use ATP exclusively as the direct source of energy for contraction. The muscle ATP stores cannot provide more than 1 or 2 kcal of muscular work. tthe energy for resynthetizing ATP is supplied by three processes : the breakdown of creatine phosphate, anaerobic glycolysis and aerobic processes. These three mechanisms are characterized by different inertia, maximal output and capacity. Taking into account the part of aerobic processes in energy production, the physical fitness of an individual is usually expressed by its maximal oxygen uptake (VO2 max.). When the energy requirements cannot be met by aerobic reactions, the subject contracts an oxygen deficit which is compensated for during the recovery period by an oxygen uptake exceeding the rest requirements. During exercise tidal volume and ventilatory frequency are increased. The increase in ventilatory output is directly related to the workload until 75% of the maximal aerobic power is reached. For higher relative workloads the increase in ventilatory output is steeper. This increased ventilation allows the organism to limit the decreases in PaO2 and pH during exercises of high intensity.

  3. NF-kB overexpression and decreased immunoexpression of AR in the muscular layer is related to structural damages and apoptosis in cimetidine-treated rat vas deferens

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cimetidine, histamine H2 receptors antagonist, has caused adverse effects on the male hormones and reproductive tract due to its antiandrogenic effect. In the testes, peritubular myoid cells and muscle vascular cells death has been associated to seminiferous tubules and testicular microvascularization damages, respectively. Either androgen or histamine H2 receptors have been detected in the mucosa and smooth muscular layer of vas deferens. Thus, the effect of cimetidine on this androgen and histamine-dependent muscular duct was morphologically evaluated. Methods The animals from cimetidine group (CMTG; n=5) received intraperitoneal injections of 100 mg/kg b.w. of cimetidine for 50 days; the control group (CG) received saline solution. The distal portions of vas deferens were fixed in formaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. Masson´s trichrome-stained sections were subjected to morphological and the following morphometrical analyzes: epithelial perimeter and area of the smooth muscular layer. TUNEL (Terminal deoxynucleotidyl-transferase mediated dUTP Nick End Labeling) method, NF-kB (nuclear factor kappa B) and AR (androgen receptors) immunohistochemical detection were also carried out. The birefringent collagen of the muscular layer was quantified in picrosirius red-stained sections under polarized light. The muscular layer was also evaluated under Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM). Results In CMTG, the mucosa of vas deferens was intensely folded; the epithelial cells showed numerous pyknotic nuclei and the epithelial perimeter and the area of the muscular layer decreased significantly. Numerous TUNEL-labeled nuclei were found either in the epithelial cells, mainly basal cells, or in the smooth muscle cells which also showed typical features of apoptosis under TEM. While an enhanced NF-kB immunoexpression was found in the cytoplasm of muscle cells, a weak AR immunolabeling was detected in these cells. In CMTG, no significant difference was observed

  4. Effect of resistance exercise training combined with relatively low vascular occlusion.

    PubMed

    Sumide, Takahiro; Sakuraba, Keishoku; Sawaki, Keisuke; Ohmura, Hirotoshi; Tamura, Yoshifumi

    2009-01-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated that a low-intensity resistance exercise, combined with vascular occlusion, results in a marked increase in muscular size and strength. We investigated the optimal pressure for reduction of muscle blood flow with resistance exercise to increase the muscular strength and endurance. Twenty-one subjects were randomly divided into four groups by the different application of vascular occlusion pressure at the proximal of thigh: without any pressure (0-pressure group), with a pressure of 50mmHg (50-pressure group), with a pressure of 150mmHg (150-pressure group), and with a pressure of 250mmHg (250-pressure group). The isokinetic muscle strength at angular velocities of 60 and 180 degrees /s, total muscle work, and the cross-sectional knee extensor muscle area were assessed before and after exercise. Exercise was performed three times a week over an 8-week period at an intensity of approximately 20% of one-repetition maximum for straight leg raising and hip joint adduction and maximum force for abduction training. A significant increase in strength at 180 degrees /s was noted after exercise in all subjects who exercised under vascular occlusion. Total muscle work increased significantly in the 50- and 150-pressure groups (P<0.05, P<0.01, respectively). There was no significant increase in cross-sectional knee extensor muscle area in any groups. In conclusion, resistance exercise with relatively low vascular occlusion pressure is potentially useful to increase muscle strength and endurance without discomfort.

  5. The effect of mechanical extension stimulation combined with epithelial cell sorting on outcomes of implanted tissue-engineered muscular urethras.

    PubMed

    Fu, Qiang; Deng, Chen-Liang; Zhao, Ren-Yan; Wang, Ying; Cao, Yilin

    2014-01-01

    Urethral defects are common and frequent disorders and are difficult to treat. Simple natural or synthetic materials do not provide a satisfactory curative solution for long urethral defects, and urethroplasty with large areas of autologous tissues is limited and might interfere with wound healing. In this study, adipose-derived stem cells were used. These cells can be derived from a wide range of sources, have extensive expansion capability, and were combined with oral mucosal epithelial cells to solve the problem of finding seeding cell sources for producing the tissue-engineered urethras. We also used the synthetic biodegradable polymer poly-glycolic acid (PGA) as a scaffold material to overcome issues such as potential pathogen infections derived from natural materials (such as de-vascular stents or animal-derived collagen) and differing diameters. Furthermore, we used a bioreactor to construct a tissue-engineered epithelial-muscular lumen with a double-layer structure (the epithelial lining and the muscle layer). Through these steps, we used an epithelial-muscular lumen built in vitro to repair defects in a canine urethral defect model (1 cm). Canine urethral reconstruction was successfully achieved based on image analysis and histological techniques at different time points. This study provides a basis for the clinical application of tissue engineering of an epithelial-muscular lumen.

  6. Vascular imaging in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Kalva, Sanjeeva P; Mueller, Peter R

    2008-07-01

    Though a myriad of vascular conditions affect the elderly, atherosclerosis remains the most common vascular disorder, followed by venous thromboembolism and varicose veins. In this article, the authors discuss the imaging of atherosclerosis affecting various vascular territories and pay special attention to the elderly population. The authors also discuss imaging findings of segmental arterial mediolysis, giant cell arteritis, and venous thromboembolism.

  7. Assessing the multiscale architecture of muscular tissue with Q-space magnetic resonance imaging: Review.

    PubMed

    Hoffman, Matthew P; Taylor, Erik N; Aninwene, George E; Sadayappan, Sakthivel; Gilbert, Richard J

    2016-10-02

    Contraction of muscular tissue requires the synchronized shortening of myofibers arrayed in complex geometrical patterns. Imaging such myofiber patterns with diffusion-weighted MRI reveals architectural ensembles that underlie force generation at the organ scale. Restricted proton diffusion is a stochastic process resulting from random translational motion that may be used to probe the directionality of myofibers in whole tissue. During diffusion-weighted MRI, magnetic field gradients are applied to determine the directional dependence of proton diffusion through the analysis of a diffusional probability distribution function (PDF). The directions of principal (maximal) diffusion within the PDF are associated with similarly aligned diffusion maxima in adjacent voxels to derive multivoxel tracts. Diffusion-weighted MRI with tractography thus constitutes a multiscale method for depicting patterns of cellular organization within biological tissues. We provide in this review, details of the method by which generalized Q-space imaging is used to interrogate multidimensional diffusion space, and thereby to infer the organization of muscular tissue. Q-space imaging derives the lowest possible angular separation of diffusion maxima by optimizing the conditions by which magnetic field gradients are applied to a given tissue. To illustrate, we present the methods and applications associated with Q-space imaging of the multiscale myoarchitecture associated with the human and rodent tongues. These representations emphasize the intricate and continuous nature of muscle fiber organization and suggest a method to depict structural "blueprints" for skeletal and cardiac muscle tissue.

  8. Associations of Leukocyte Telomere Length With Aerobic and Muscular Fitness in Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Williams, Dylan M; Buxton, Jessica L; Kantomaa, Marko T; Tammelin, Tuija H; Blakemore, Alexandra I F; Järvelin, Marjo-Riitta

    2017-03-01

    Decline in both telomere length and physical fitness over the life course may contribute to increased risk of several chronic diseases. The relationship between telomere length and aerobic and muscular fitness is not well characterized. We examined whether there are cross-sectional associations of mean relative leukocyte telomere length (LTL) with objective measures of aerobic fitness, muscle strength, and muscle endurance, using data on 31-year-old participants of the Northern Finland Birth Cohort 1966 (n = 4,952-5,205, varying by exposure-outcome analysis). Aerobic fitness was assessed by means of heart rate measurement following a standardized submaximal step test; muscular fitness was assessed by means of a maximal isometric handgrip strength test and a test of lower-back trunk muscle endurance. Longer LTL was associated with higher aerobic fitness and better trunk muscle endurance in models including adjustment for age, sex, body mass index, socioeconomic position, diet, smoking, alcohol consumption, physical activity level, and C-reactive protein. In a sex-stratified analysis, LTL was not associated with handgrip strength in either men or women. LTL may relate to aspects of physical fitness in young adulthood, but replication of these findings is required, along with further studies to help assess directions and causality in these associations.

  9. Comprehensive longitudinal characterization of canine muscular dystrophy by serial NMR imaging of GRMD dogs.

    PubMed

    Thibaud, J-L; Azzabou, N; Barthelemy, I; Fleury, S; Cabrol, L; Blot, S; Carlier, P G

    2012-10-01

    The Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dog is the closest animal counterpart of Duchenne muscular dystrophy in humans and has, for this reason, increasingly been used in preclinical therapeutic trials for this disease. The aim of this study was to describe the abnormalities in canine dystrophic muscle non-invasively, quantitatively, thoroughly and serially by means of NMR imaging. Thoracic and pelvic limbs of five healthy and five GRMD dogs were imaged in a 3T NMR scanner at 2, 4, 6 and 9months of age. Standard and fat-saturated T(1)-, T(2)- and proton-density-weighted images were acquired. A measurement of T(1) and a two-hour kinetic study of muscle enhancement after gadolinium-chelate injection were also performed. Ten out of the 15 indices evaluated differed between healthy and GRMD dogs. The maximal relative enhancement after gadolinium injection and the proton-density-weighted/T(2)-weighted signal ratio were the most discriminating indices. Inter-muscle heterogeneity was found to vary significantly for most of the indices. The body of data that has been acquired here will help in designing and interpreting preclinical trials using dystrophin-deficient dogs.

  10. Congenital muscular torticollis and positional plagiocephaly.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Alice A; Tritasavit, Sophie; Graham, John M

    2014-02-01

    On the basis of observational studies, child health practitioners in primary care settings should consider the diagnosis of congenital muscular torticollis (CMT)in infants with risk factors from birth history for intrauterine malpositioning or constraint (C). On the basis of observational studies, CMT is often associated with other conditions, including positional plagiocephaly and gross motor delays from weakened truncal muscles and/or lack of head control in early infancy (C). On the basis of observational studies, child health practitioners should counsel parents that infants should be on their stomachs frequently whenever they are awake and under direct adult supervision to develop their prone motor skills (C). On the basis of consensus, early identification of CMT(with or without positional plagiocephaly) and prompt referral to a physical therapist experienced in the treatment of CMT should be considered to avoid more costly or invasive treatments, such as cranial orthoses or surgery (D).

  11. [Statin intolerance and associated muscular dysfunctions].

    PubMed

    Boulanger-Piette, Antoine; Bergeron, Jean; Desgreniers, Joël; Côté-Levesque, Michèle; Brassard, Dominic; Joanisse, Denis R; Frenette, Jérôme

    2015-12-01

    Hypercholesterolemia is a major risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The 2012-2013 survey of Canada's public health measures revealed that dyslipidemia was present in 38% of the respondents aged between 18 and 79 years. According to the American College of Cardiology, the American Heart Association, the Canadian Cardiovascular Society and the Canadian Working Group Consensus, statins remain the treatment of choice for dyslipidemia and the reduction of cardiovascular risk. However, concerns and questions persist regarding statins use and safety, potential and harmful muscular side-effects, interactions with exercise, and molecular mechanisms of myotoxicity. The goal of the present review is to provide a clear picture of the clinical situation and to investigate possible mechanisms of statin-induced myopathy. A better understanding of muscle pathology in statin users is absolutely essential to minimize their muscle symptoms and to provide a sound clinical basis for the management of cardiovascular risk.

  12. [Vitamin D: skeletal and muscular effects].

    PubMed

    Thomas, Thierry; Briot, Karine

    2013-10-01

    Insufficient serum levels of 25-hydroxyvitamin D [25(OH)D] is a risk factor for osteoporosis. A new paradigm is emerging with the locally synthesized 1,25(OH)2D within osteoblasts and osteoclasts as the essential pathway for the effects of 25(OH)D in regulating bone remodeling via direct or indirect activation of the specific receptor VDR. Vitamin D has positive effects on fracture risk, muscular function and risk of falls; these effects are observed when serum levels of 25(OH)D are above 30 ng/ml (75 nmol/l). Vitamin D dosing interval may be relevant for reducing the risk of fracture, with evidence suggesting positive effects with short intervals of 3 months or less. It is recommended to maintain an optimal serum level of 25(OH)D when managing patients with osteoporosis or at risk of this bone disease.

  13. Neonatal muscular manifestations in mitochondrial disorders.

    PubMed

    Tulinius, Már; Oldfors, Anders

    2011-08-01

    During the last decade rapid development has occurred in defining nuclear gene mutations causing mitochondrial disease. Some of these newly defined gene mutations cause neonatal or early infantile onset of disease, often associated with severe progressive encephalomyopathy combined with other multi-organ involvement such as cardiomyopathy or hepatopathy and with early death. Findings suggesting myopathy in neonates are hypotonia, muscle weakness and wasting, and arthrogryposis. We aim to describe the clinical findings of patients with mitochondrial disease presenting with muscular manifestations in the neonatal period or in early infancy and in whom the genetic defect has been characterized. The majority of patients with neonatal onset of mitochondrial disease have mutations in nuclear genes causing dysfunction of the mitochondrial respiratory chain, leading to defective oxidative phosphorylation.

  14. Effects of muscular strength on cardiovascular risk factors and prognosis.

    PubMed

    Artero, Enrique G; Lee, Duck-chul; Lavie, Carl J; España-Romero, Vanesa; Sui, Xuemei; Church, Timothy S; Blair, Steven N

    2012-01-01

    Physical fitness is one of the strongest predictors of individual future health status. Together with cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), muscular strength has been increasingly recognized in the pathogenesis and prevention of chronic disease. We review the most recent literature on the effect of muscular strength in the development of cardiovascular disease, with special interest in elucidating its specific benefits beyond those from CRF and body composition. Muscular strength has shown an independent protective effect on all-cause and cancer mortality in healthy middle-aged men, as well as in men with hypertension and patients with heart failure. It has also been inversely associated with age-related weight and adiposity gains, risk of hypertension, and prevalence and incidence of the metabolic syndrome. In children and adolescents, higher levels of muscular fitness have been inversely associated with insulin resistance, clustered cardiometabolic risk, and inflammatory proteins. Generally, the influence of muscular fitness was weakened but remained protective after considering CRF. Also, interestingly, higher levels of muscular fitness seems to some extent counteract the adverse cardiovascular profile of overweight and obese individuals. As many of the investigations have been conducted with non-Hispanic white men, it is important to examine how race/ethnicity and gender may affect these relationships. To conclude, most important effects of resistance training are also summarized, to better understand how higher levels of muscular fitness may result in a better cardiovascular prognosis and survival.

  15. The Vascular Depression Hypothesis: Mechanisms Linking Vascular Disease with Depression

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Warren D.; Aizenstein, Howard J.; Alexopoulos, George S.

    2013-01-01

    The ‘Vascular Depression’ hypothesis posits that cerebrovascular disease may predispose, precipitate, or perpetuate some geriatric depressive syndromes. This hypothesis stimulated much research that has improved our understanding of the complex relationships between late-life depression (LLD), vascular risk factors, and cognition. Succinctly, there are well-established relationships between late-life depression, vascular risk factors, and cerebral hyperintensities, the radiological hallmark of vascular depression. Cognitive dysfunction is common in late-life depression, particularly executive dysfunction, a finding predictive of poor antidepressant response. Over time, progression of hyperintensities and cognitive deficits predicts a poor course of depression and may reflect underlying worsening of vascular disease. This work laid the foundation for examining the mechanisms by which vascular disease influences brain circuits and influences the development and course of depression. We review data testing the vascular depression hypothesis with a focus on identifying potential underlying vascular mechanisms. We propose a disconnection hypothesis, wherein focal vascular damage and white matter lesion location is a crucial factor influencing neural connectivity that contributes to clinical symptomatology. We also propose inflammatory and hypoperfusion hypotheses, concepts that link underlying vascular processes with adverse effects on brain function that influence the development of depression. Testing such hypotheses will not only inform the relationship between vascular disease and depression but also provide guidance on the potential repurposing of pharmacological agents that may improve late-life depression outcomes. PMID:23439482

  16. Aspirin for vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rands, Gianetta; Orrell, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspirin is widely prescribed for patients with a diagnosis of vascular dementia. In a survey of UK geriatricians and psychiatrists 80% of patients with clinical diagnoses of vascular dementia were prescribed aspirin. However, a number of queries remain unanswered. Is there convincing evidence that aspirin benefits patients with vascular dementia? Does aspirin affect cognition and behaviour, or improve prognosis? Does the risk of cerebral or gastric haemorrhage outweigh any benefit? Objectives To assess the randomised trial evidence for efficacy and safety of aspirin in the treatment of vascular dementia. Search methods We searched ALOIS: the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group’s Specialized Register on 12 March 2012 using the terms: aspirin OR “acetylsalicylic acid”. ALOIS contains records of clinical trials identified from monthly searches of a number of major healthcare databases, numerous trial registries and grey literature sources. In addition, relevant websites were searched and some journals were handsearched. Specialists in the field were approached for unpublished material and any publications found were searched for additional references. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of aspirin for vascular dementia were eligible for inclusion. Data collection and analysis Retrieved studies were analysed independently by both review authors. Methodology and results were critically appraised and outcomes scanned included cognition, behavioural change, mortality and institutionalisation. Main results No trials were eligible for inclusion in this review. Authors’ conclusions The most recent search for references to relevant research was carried out in March 2012. No trials were found for inclusion in this systematic review. Low-dose aspirin is frequently used as ‘treatment as normal’ in control groups and as a baseline treatment in pharmacological trials. There is still no good evidence that

  17. Contribution of trunk muscularity on sprint run.

    PubMed

    Kubo, T; Hoshikawa, Y; Muramatsu, M; Iida, T; Komori, S; Shibukawa, K; Kanehisa, H

    2011-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate how the trunk muscularity is related to sprint running performance. In 23 youth soccer players, the cross-sectional images at the mid level of each of L1-L2, L2-L3, L3-L4, L4-L5, and L5-S1 were obtained using magnetic resonance imaging to determine the cross-sectional areas (CSAs) of rectus abdominis, oblique, psoas major, quadratus lumborum and erector spinae muscles. The times taken to sprint over 20 m were measured, and the mean velocity of running was calculated for each of the 2 distances (V (10 m) and V (20 m)) and for the distance from 10 m to 20 m (V (10-20 m)). The CSA values of the 5 slice levels for all muscles except for the quadratus lumborum and those of the 3 slice levels (L1-L2, L2-L3 and L3-L4) for the quadratus lumborum were averaged and expressed relative to the two-third power of body mass (CSA/BM (2/3)). The CSA/BM (2/3) values of the erector spinae and quadratus lumborum were selected as significant contributors to predict V (10 m) ( R(2)=0.450), V (20 m) ( R(2)=0.504) and V (10-20 m) ( R(2)=0.420). The current results indicate that the muscularity of the erector spinae and quadratus lumborum contributes to achieving a high performance in sprint running over distances of less than 20 m.

  18. Respiratory muscle dysfunction in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Santos, Dante Brasil; Boussaid, Ghilas; Stojkovic, Tanya; Orlikowski, David; Letilly, Nadege; Behin, Anthony; Butel, Sandrine; Lofaso, Frédéric; Prigent, Hélène

    2015-08-01

    Respiratory insufficiency in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy has rarely been studied. We compared two age- and sex-matched groups of 29 patients, with and without respiratory dysfunction. Tests in the 29 patients with respiratory dysfunction suggested predominant expiratory muscle dysfunction, leading to ineffective cough in 17 patients. Supine and upright vital capacities were not different (P = 0.76), suggesting absence of diaphragmatic dysfunction. By stepwise regression, only expiratory reserve volume correlated with the Walton and Gardner-Medwin score (R(2) = 0.503; P = 0.001). Compared to controls, patients with respiratory dysfunction had higher values for the Walton and Gardner-Medwin score (6.1 ± 1.9 vs. 3.2 ± 1.2; P <0.0001) and body mass index (26.9 ± 6.0 vs. 22.9 ± 4.0 kg/m(2); P = 0.003) and a smaller number of D4Z4 allele repeats (4.8 ± 1.6 vs. 5.7 ± 1.8; P = 0.05). Mechanical ventilation was required eventually in 20 patients, including 14 who were wheelchair bound. Three patients had acute respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation; 16 patients had poor airway clearance, including 10 with sleep apnea syndrome, responsible in 7 for chronic hypercapnia. Two patients presented isolated severe sleep apnea syndrome. Respiratory dysfunction in facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy is predominantly related to expiratory muscle weakness. Respiratory function and cough effectiveness should especially be monitored in patients with severe motor impairment and high body mass index.

  19. Determination of muscular fatigue in elite runners.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Christine; Thépaut-Mathieu, Chantalle; Vandewalle, Henry

    2005-05-01

    This study analyses the changes in the electromyographic activity (EMG) of six major muscles of the leg during an incremental running test carried out on a treadmill. These muscles, the gluteus maximus (GM), biceps femoris (BF), vastus lateralis (VL), rectus femoris (RF), tibialis anterior (TA) and gastrocnemius (Ga) are known to have quite different functions during running. The aim of this study was to develop a methodology adapted to the analysis of integrated EMG (iEMG) running results, and to test the chronology of the onset of fatigue of the major muscles involved in running. Nine well-trained subjects [VO(2max) 76 (2.9) ml.min(-1).kg(-1)] took part in this study. They completed a running protocol consisting of 4 min stages, incrementally increasing in speed until exhaustion. The EMG signal was recorded during ten bursts of activation analysed separately at 45 s and 3 min 40 s of each stage. During running, consideration of the alteration in stride frequency with either an increase in speed or the onset of fatigue appears to be an indispensable part of the assessment of muscular fatigue. This allows the comparison of muscular activation between the various stage speeds by the use of common working units. Distance seems to be the only working unit that allows this comparison and thus the determination of the appearance of fatigue during running. The biarticular hip-mobilising muscles (RF and BF), which present two different bursts of activation during one running cycle, are the muscles that show the earliest signs of fatigue.

  20. Physical Therapy and Facioscapulohumeral Muscular Dystrophy (FSHD)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Delay secondary complications  Maximize functional abilities  Improve/Maintain quality of life Based on the patient’s needs, the ... the recommendation. Summary I n a self‐reported quality‐of‐life questionnaire for individuals with various neuromuscular ...

  1. Chasing maximal performance: a cautionary tale from the celebrated jumping frogs of Calaveras County.

    PubMed

    Astley, H C; Abbott, E M; Azizi, E; Marsh, R L; Roberts, T J

    2013-11-01

    Maximal performance is an essential metric for understanding many aspects of an organism's biology, but it can be difficult to determine because a measured maximum may reflect only a peak level of effort, not a physiological limit. We used a unique opportunity provided by a frog jumping contest to evaluate the validity of existing laboratory estimates of maximum jumping performance in bullfrogs (Rana catesbeiana). We recorded video of 3124 bullfrog jumps over the course of the 4-day contest at the Calaveras County Jumping Frog Jubilee, and determined jump distance from these images and a calibration of the jump arena. Frogs were divided into two groups: 'rental' frogs collected by fair organizers and jumped by the general public, and frogs collected and jumped by experienced, 'professional' teams. A total of 58% of recorded jumps surpassed the maximum jump distance in the literature (1.295 m), and the longest jump was 2.2 m. Compared with rental frogs, professionally jumped frogs jumped farther, and the distribution of jump distances for this group was skewed towards long jumps. Calculated muscular work, historical records and the skewed distribution of jump distances all suggest that the longest jumps represent the true performance limit for this species. Using resampling, we estimated the probability of observing a given jump distance for various sample sizes, showing that large sample sizes are required to detect rare maximal jumps. These results show the importance of sample size, animal motivation and physiological conditions for accurate maximal performance estimates.

  2. Maximizing Complementary Quantities by Projective Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    M. Souza, Leonardo A.; Bernardes, Nadja K.; Rossi, Romeu

    2017-04-01

    In this work, we study the so-called quantitative complementarity quantities. We focus in the following physical situation: two qubits ( q A and q B ) are initially in a maximally entangled state. One of them ( q B ) interacts with a N-qubit system ( R). After the interaction, projective measurements are performed on each of the qubits of R, in a basis that is chosen after independent optimization procedures: maximization of the visibility, the concurrence, and the predictability. For a specific maximization procedure, we study in detail how each of the complementary quantities behave, conditioned on the intensity of the coupling between q B and the N qubits. We show that, if the coupling is sufficiently "strong," independent of the maximization procedure, the concurrence tends to decay quickly. Interestingly enough, the behavior of the concurrence in this model is similar to the entanglement dynamics of a two qubit system subjected to a thermal reservoir, despite that we consider finite N. However, the visibility shows a different behavior: its maximization is more efficient for stronger coupling constants. Moreover, we investigate how the distinguishability, or the information stored in different parts of the system, is distributed for different couplings.

  3. Genetics and emerging treatments for Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Wein, Nicolas; Alfano, Lindsay; Flanigan, Kevin M

    2015-06-01

    Mutations in the DMD gene result in Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy due to absent or altered expression of the dystrophin protein. The more severe Duchenne muscular dystrophy typically presents around ages 2 to 5 with gait disturbance, and historically has led to the loss of ambulation by age 12. It is important for the practicing pediatrician, however, to be aware of other presenting signs, such as delayed motor or cognitive milestones, or elevated serum transaminases. Becker muscular dystrophy is milder, often presenting after age 5, with ambulation frequently preserved past 20 years and sometimes into late decades.

  4. Vitamin and mineral supplementation effect on muscular activity and cycling efficiency in master athletes.

    PubMed

    Louis, Julien; Hausswirth, Christophe; Bieuzen, François; Brisswalter, Jeanick

    2010-06-01

    The influence of vitamin and mineral complex supplementation on muscular activity and cycling efficiency was examined in elderly endurance-trained master athletes during a heavy cycling trial. Master athletes were randomly assigned in a double-blind process to 1 of 2 treatment groups: antioxidant supplementation (n = 8: As group) or placebo (n = 8: Pl group) for 21 days. After that time, each subject had to perform a 10-min session of cycling on a cycloergometer at a heavy constant intensity. Twenty-four to 48 h after this session, subjects performed an isometric maximal voluntary contraction before and immediately after a fatiguing strength training (leg press exercise) and the same 10-min cycling test after fatigue. Isometric maximal voluntary force (MVF) of knee extensors was assessed before and after fatigue. Electromyographic (EMG) activity of the vastus medialis, the vastus lateralis (VL), and the biceps femoris was recorded with surface EMG. The knee-extensors MVF after the fatiguing exercise was reduced in similar proportions for both groups (As, -10.9%; Pl, -11.3%, p < 0.05). This MVF loss was associated with a significant reduction in EMG frequency parameters for both groups, with a lower decrease for the As group. Muscular activity and cycling efficiency during the cycling bouts were affected by the treatment. Cycling efficiency decreased significantly and the oxygen uptake slow component was higher after the fatiguing exercise for both groups. Furthermore, a decrease in cycling efficiency was associated with an increase in VL activity. However, these changes were significantly lower for the As group. The results of the present study indicate an overall positive effect of vitamin and mineral complex supplementation on cycling efficiency after fatigue, in the endurance-trained elderly.

  5. Influence of rest interval duration on muscular power production in the lower-body power profile.

    PubMed

    Nibali, Maria L; Chapman, Dale W; Robergs, Robert A; Drinkwater, Eric J

    2013-10-01

    There is a paucity of evidence-based support for the allocation of rest interval duration between incremental loads in the assessment of the load-power profile. We examined the effect of rest interval duration on muscular power production in the load-power profile and sought to determine if greater rest is required with increasing load (i.e., variable rest interval). Ten physically trained men completed 4 experimental conditions in a crossover balanced design. Participants performed jump squats across incremental loads (0-60 kg) on 4 occasions, with an allocated recovery interval of 1, 2, 3, or 4 minutes. The mean log-transformed power output at each load was used for comparison between conditions (rest intervals). Unloaded jump squats (0 kg) maximized power output at each condition. The maximal mechanical power output was 66.6 ± 6.5 W·kg (1 minute), 66.2 ± 5.2 W·kg (2 minutes), 67.1 ± 5.9 W·kg (3 minutes), and 66.2 ± 6.5 W·kg (4 minutes). Trivial or unclear differences in power output were observed between rest intervals at each incremental load. As expected, power declined per 10 kg increment in load, the magnitude of decrease was 13.9-14.5% (confidence limits [CL]: ±1.3-2.0%) and 13.4-14.6% (CL: ±2.4-3.9%) for relative peak and mean power, respectively, yet differences in power output between conditions were likely insubstantial. The prescription of rest intervals between loads that are longer than 1 minute have a likely negligible effect on muscular power production in the jump squat incremental load-power profile. Practitioners should select either a 1- to 4-minute rest interval to best accommodate the logistical constraints of their monitoring sessions.

  6. Brain Vascular Imaging Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Laviña, Bàrbara

    2016-01-01

    Recent major improvements in a number of imaging techniques now allow for the study of the brain in ways that could not be considered previously. Researchers today have well-developed tools to specifically examine the dynamic nature of the blood vessels in the brain during development and adulthood; as well as to observe the vascular responses in disease situations in vivo. This review offers a concise summary and brief historical reference of different imaging techniques and how these tools can be applied to study the brain vasculature and the blood-brain barrier integrity in both healthy and disease states. Moreover, it offers an overview on available transgenic animal models to study vascular biology and a description of useful online brain atlases. PMID:28042833

  7. Pelvic Vascular Malformations

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Brian M.; Gipson, Matthew G.; Smith, Mitchell T.

    2013-01-01

    Vascular malformations (VMs) comprise a wide spectrum of lesions that are classified by content and flow characteristics. These lesions, occurring in both focal and diffuse forms, can involve any organ and tissue plane and can cause significant morbidity in both children and adults. Since treatment strategy depends on the type of malformation, correct diagnosis and classification of a vascular lesion are crucial. Slow-flow VMs (venous and lymphatic malformations) are often treated by sclerotherapy, whereas fast-flow lesions (arteriovenous malformations) are generally managed with embolization. In addition, some cases of VMs are best treated surgically. This review will present an overview of VMs in the female pelvis as well as a discussion of endovascular therapeutic techniques. PMID:24436563

  8. Vascular trauma historical notes.

    PubMed

    Rich, Norman M

    2011-03-01

    This article provides a brief historical review of treatment of vascular trauma. Although methods for ligation came into use in the second century, this knowledge was lost during the Dark Ages and did not come back until the Renaissance. Many advances in vascular surgery occurred during the Balkan Wars, World War I, and World War II, although without antibiotics and blood banking, the philosophy of life over limb still ruled. Documenting and repairing both arteries and veins became more common during the Korean and Vietnam conflicts. Increased documentation has revealed that the current conflicts have resulted in more arterial injuries than in previous wars, likely because of improved body armor, improvised explosive device attacks, tourniquet use, and improved medical evacuation time. This brief review emphasizes the great value of mentorship and the legacy of the management of arterial and venous injuries to be passed on.

  9. [Vascular endothelial Barrier Function].

    PubMed

    Ivanov, A N; Puchinyan, D M; Norkin, I A

    2015-01-01

    Endothelium is an important regulator of selective permeability of the vascular wall for different molecules and cells. This review summarizes current data on endothelial barrier function. Endothelial glycocalyx structure, its function and role in the molecular transport and leukocytes migration across the endothelial barrier are discussed. The mechanisms of transcellular transport of macromolecules and cell migration through endothelial cells are reviewed. Special section of this article addresses the structure and function of tight and adherens endothelial junction, as well as their importance for the regulation of paracellular transport across the endothelial barrier. Particular attention is paid to the signaling mechanism of endothelial barrier function regulation and the factors that influence on the vascular permeability.

  10. Plant Vascular Biology 2010

    SciTech Connect

    Ding, Biao

    2014-11-17

    This grant supported the Second International Conference on Plant Vascular Biology (PVB 2010) held July 24-28, 2010 on the campus of Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio. Biao Ding (Ohio State University; OSU) and David Hannapel (Iowa State University; ISU) served as co-chairs of this conference. Biao Ding served as the local organizer. PVB is defined broadly here to include studies on the biogenesis, structure and function of transport systems in plants, under conditions of normal plant growth and development as well as of plant interactions with pathogens. The transport systems cover broadly the xylem, phloem, plasmodesmata and vascular cell membranes. The PVB concept has emerged in recent years to emphasize the integrative nature of the transport systems and approaches to investigate them.

  11. Anaesthesia for vascular emergencies.

    PubMed

    Ellard, L; Djaiani, G

    2013-01-01

    Patients presenting with vascular emergencies including acute aortic syndrome, ruptured thoracic or abdominal aortic aneurysms, thoracic aortic trauma and acute lower limb ischaemia have a high risk of peri-operative morbidity and mortality. Although anatomical suitability is not universal, endovascular surgery may improve mortality and the results of ongoing randomised controlled trials are awaited. Permissive hypotension pre-operatively should be the standard of care with the systolic blood pressure kept to 50-100 mmHg as long as consciousness is maintained. The benefit of local anaesthesia over general anaesthesia is not definitive and this decision should be tailored for a given patient and circumstance. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage for prevention of paraplegia is often impractical in the emergency setting and is not backed by strong evidence; however, it should be considered postoperatively if symptoms develop. We discuss the pertinent anaesthetic issues when a patient presents with a vascular emergency and the impact that endovascular repair has on anaesthetic management.

  12. Lipidome determinants of maximal lifespan in mammals.

    PubMed

    Bozek, Katarzyna; Khrameeva, Ekaterina E; Reznick, Jane; Omerbašić, Damir; Bennett, Nigel C; Lewin, Gary R; Azpurua, Jorge; Gorbunova, Vera; Seluanov, Andrei; Regnard, Pierrick; Wanert, Fanelie; Marchal, Julia; Pifferi, Fabien; Aujard, Fabienne; Liu, Zhen; Shi, Peng; Pääbo, Svante; Schroeder, Florian; Willmitzer, Lothar; Giavalisco, Patrick; Khaitovich, Philipp

    2017-12-01

    Maximal lifespan of mammalian species, even if closely related, may differ more than 10-fold, however the nature of the mechanisms that determine this variability is unresolved. Here, we assess the relationship between maximal lifespan duration and concentrations of more than 20,000 lipid compounds, measured in 669 tissue samples from 6 tissues of 35 species representing three mammalian clades: primates, rodents and bats. We identify lipids associated with species' longevity across the three clades, uncoupled from other parameters, such as basal metabolic rate, body size, or body temperature. These lipids clustered in specific lipid classes and pathways, and enzymes linked to them display signatures of greater stabilizing selection in long-living species, and cluster in functional groups related to signaling and protein-modification processes. These findings point towards the existence of defined molecular mechanisms underlying variation in maximal lifespan among mammals.

  13. An information maximization model of eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Renninger, Laura Walker; Coughlan, James; Verghese, Preeti; Malik, Jitendra

    2005-01-01

    We propose a sequential information maximization model as a general strategy for programming eye movements. The model reconstructs high-resolution visual information from a sequence of fixations, taking into account the fall-off in resolution from the fovea to the periphery. From this framework we get a simple rule for predicting fixation sequences: after each fixation, fixate next at the location that minimizes uncertainty (maximizes information) about the stimulus. By comparing our model performance to human eye movement data and to predictions from a saliency and random model, we demonstrate that our model is best at predicting fixation locations. Modeling additional biological constraints will improve the prediction of fixation sequences. Our results suggest that information maximization is a useful principle for programming eye movements.

  14. Vascular Cambium Development

    PubMed Central

    Nieminen, Kaisa; Blomster, Tiina; Helariutta, Ykä; Mähönen, Ari Pekka

    2015-01-01

    Secondary phloem and xylem tissues are produced through the activity of vascular cambium, the cylindrical secondary meristem which arises among the primary plant tissues. Most dicotyledonous species undergo secondary development, among them Arabidopsis. Despite its small size and herbaceous nature, Arabidopsis displays prominent secondary growth in several organs, including the root, hypocotyl and shoot. Together with the vast genetic resources and molecular research methods available for it, this has made Arabidopsis a versatile and accessible model organism for studying cambial development and wood formation. In this review, we discuss and compare the development and function of the vascular cambium in the Arabidopsis root, hypocotyl, and shoot. We describe the current understanding of the molecular regulation of vascular cambium and compare it to the function of primary meristems. We conclude with a look at the future prospects of cambium research, including opportunities provided by phenotyping and modelling approaches, complemented by studies of natural variation and comparative genetic studies in perennial and woody plant species. PMID:26078728

  15. Caffeine improves muscular performance in elite Brazilian Jiu-jitsu athletes.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Lara, Francisco Javier; Del Coso, Juan; García, Jose Manuel; Portillo, Luis J; Areces, Francisco; Abián-Vicén, Javier

    2016-11-01

    Scientific information about the effects of caffeine intake on combat sport performance is scarce and controversial. The aim of this study was to investigate the effectiveness of caffeine to improve Brazilian Jiu-jitsu (BJJ)-specific muscular performance. Fourteen male and elite BJJ athletes (29.2 ± 3.3 years; 71.3 ± 9.1 kg) participated in a randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled and crossover experiment. In two different sessions, BJJ athletes ingested 3 mg kg(-1) of caffeine or a placebo. After 60 min, they performed a handgrip maximal force test, a countermovement jump, a maximal static lift test and bench-press tests consisting of one-repetition maximum, power-load, and repetitions to failure. In comparison to the placebo, the ingestion of the caffeine increased: hand grip force in both hands (50.9 ± 2.9 vs. 53.3 ± 3.1 kg; respectively p < .05), countermovement jump height (40.6 ± 2.6 vs. 41.7 ± 3.1 cm; p = .02), and time recorded in the maximal static lift test (54.4 ± 13.4 vs. 59.2 ± 11.9 s; p < .01).The caffeine also increased the one-repetition maximum (90.5 ± 7.7 vs. 93.3 ± 7.5 kg; p = .02), maximal power obtained during the power-load test (750.5 ± 154.7 vs. 826.9 ± 163.7 W; p < .01) and mean power during the bench-press exercise test to failure (280.2 ± 52.5 vs. 312.2 ± 78.3 W; p = .04). In conclusion, the pre-exercise ingestion of 3 mg kg(-1) of caffeine increased dynamic and isometric muscular force, power, and endurance strength in elite BJJ athletes. Thus, caffeine might be an effective ergogenic aid to improve physical performance in BJJ.

  16. Noninvasive Characterization of Vascular Tone by Model-Based System Identification in Healthy and Heart Failure Patients.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ya-Li; Yan, Bryan P; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Poon, Carmen C Y

    2015-09-01

    Current markers for heart failure (HF) diagnosis and prognosis are mainly for the evaluation of cardiac functions. Since previous studies have reported that HF patients demonstrated abnormal vascular responses to external stimuli, it is speculated that vascular tone, a measure of activation level of vascular wall, may be able to reflect these abnormalities to assist HF detection. Nevertheless, vascular tone is difficult to be objectively quantified using existing tools. In this study, a vascular tone index was estimated from noninvasive blood pressure and pulse transit time measurements using system identification technique. This method was evaluated in 35 subjects (10 healthy, 13 with HF risk factors and 12 HF patients) in a regular maximal exercise test. It was found that the vascular tone index significantly increased by 24.4 ± 26.6% (p < 0.01) during maximal exercise in the healthy subjects. Moreover, the response was gradually attenuated in the risk-factor and HF groups (15.8 ± 36.5 and 0.9 ± 17.9%, respectively). The results reveal the association between the vascular tone response to maximal exercise and HF disease or risks. To conclude, the proposed method provides a quantitative characterization of vascular tone which may be a useful indicator of the pathological changes of the arteries or the heart.

  17. Singularity structure of maximally supersymmetric scattering amplitudes.

    PubMed

    Arkani-Hamed, Nima; Bourjaily, Jacob L; Cachazo, Freddy; Trnka, Jaroslav

    2014-12-31

    We present evidence that loop amplitudes in maximally supersymmetric (N=4) Yang-Mills theory (SYM) beyond the planar limit share some of the remarkable structures of the planar theory. In particular, we show that through two loops, the four-particle amplitude in full N=4 SYM has only logarithmic singularities and is free of any poles at infinity--properties closely related to uniform transcendentality and the UV finiteness of the theory. We also briefly comment on implications for maximal (N=8) supergravity theory (SUGRA).

  18. Maximal aerobic capacity at several ambient concentrations of carbon monoxide at several altitudes. Research report, April 1984-January 1988

    SciTech Connect

    Horvath, S.M.; Agnew, J.W.; Wagner, J.A.; Bedi, J.F.

    1988-12-01

    To assess the combined effects of altitude and acute carbon monoxide exposure, 11 male and 12 female subjects, all nonsmokers in good health, were given incremental maximal aerobic-capacity tests. Each subject, after attaining the required altitude and ambient carbon monoxide level, performed the maximal aerobic capacity test. Blood samples were drawn at several points in the aerobic capacity test protocol, and analyzed for hemoglobin, hematocrit, plasma proteins, lactates, and carboxyhemoglobin. Carbon-monoxide-carboxyhemoglobin uptake rates were derived from the submaximal workloads. Despite increases in carboxyhemoglobin, no additional significant decreases in maximal aerobic capacity were observed. Immediately prior to and at maximal workloads, carbon monoxide shifted into extravascular spaces and returned to the vascular space within five minutes after exercise stopped.

  19. How Physicians Support Mothers of Children with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fujino, Haruo; Saito, Toshio; Matsumura, Tsuyoshi; Shibata, Saki; Iwata, Yuko; Fujimura, Harutoshi; Shinno, Susumu; Imura, Osamu

    2015-09-01

    Communicating about Duchenne muscular dystrophy and its prognosis can be difficult for affected children and their family. We focused on how physicians provide support to the mothers of children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who have difficulty communicating about the condition with their child. The eligible participants were certified child neurologists of the Japanese Society of Child Neurology. Participants responded to questionnaires consisting of free descriptions of a vignette of a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and a mother. We analyzed 263 responses of the participants. We found 4 themes on advising mothers, involving encouraging communication, family autonomy, supporting family, and considering the child's concerns. These results provide a better understanding of the communication between physicians and family members who need help sharing information with a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. These findings will assist clinical practitioners in supporting families and the affected children throughout the course of their illness.

  20. Efficacy of bipolar release in neglected congenital muscular torticollis patients.

    PubMed

    Seyhan, Nevra; Jasharllari, Lorenc; Keskin, Mustafa; Savacı, Nedim

    2012-06-01

    Surgical correction of the congenital muscular torticollis (CMT) is recommended for patients with unsuccessful conservative treatment. The aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of surgical release of congenital muscular torticollis in neglected cases. We retrospectively evaluated the data of our patients in terms of age, sex, clinical presentation, localization of the lesion, diagnostic tests, and additional abnormalities. The age at operation ranged from 6 to 23 years. Complete muscular release as determined by pre-operative and postoperative range of motion measurements was achieved in all of the patients by bipolar release. In this study, neck motion and head tilt showed marked improvement with surgical treatment in cases with CMT who were admitted to the hospital lately. Congenital muscular torticollis patients can benefit from surgical intervention above the age of 5. Bipolar release is an adequate and complication-free method.

  1. Perspectives of stem cell therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Mirella; Farini, Andrea; Belicchi, Marzia; Parolini, Daniele; Cassinelli, Letizia; Razini, Paola; Sitzia, Clementina; Torrente, Yvan

    2013-09-01

    Muscular dystrophies are heritable and heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders characterized by the primary wasting of skeletal muscle, usually caused by mutations in the proteins forming the link between the cytoskeleton and the basal lamina. As a result of mutations in the dystrophin gene, Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients suffer from progressive muscle atrophy and an exhaustion of muscular regenerative capacity. No efficient therapies are available. The evidence that adult stem cells were capable of participating in the regeneration of more than their resident organ led to the development of potential stem cell treatments for degenerative disorder. In the present review, we describe the different types of myogenic stem cells and their possible use for the progression of cell therapy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  2. Understanding violations of Gricean maxims in preschoolers and adults

    PubMed Central

    Okanda, Mako; Asada, Kosuke; Moriguchi, Yusuke; Itakura, Shoji

    2015-01-01

    This study used a revised Conversational Violations Test to examine Gricean maxim violations in 4- to 6-year-old Japanese children and adults. Participants' understanding of the following maxims was assessed: be informative (first maxim of quantity), avoid redundancy (second maxim of quantity), be truthful (maxim of quality), be relevant (maxim of relation), avoid ambiguity (second maxim of manner), and be polite (maxim of politeness). Sensitivity to violations of Gricean maxims increased with age: 4-year-olds' understanding of maxims was near chance, 5-year-olds understood some maxims (first maxim of quantity and maxims of quality, relation, and manner), and 6-year-olds and adults understood all maxims. Preschoolers acquired the maxim of relation first and had the greatest difficulty understanding the second maxim of quantity. Children and adults differed in their comprehension of the maxim of politeness. The development of the pragmatic understanding of Gricean maxims and implications for the construction of developmental tasks from early childhood to adulthood are discussed. PMID:26191018

  3. [Physiology of muscular exercise in children].

    PubMed

    Fellmann, N; Coudert, J

    1994-09-01

    When compared to adults, muscle mass in children is lower and the relative development of aerobic and anaerobic pathways is different. The main consequences are the following: 1) The aerobic metabolism, evaluated by measurement of maximal oxygen uptake (VO2max), is either the same as in adults or more developed when VO2 max is related to body mass or lean body mass. 2) The maximal anaerobic power developed during force-velocity test and Wingate test is lower than in adults even if it is expressed by total or lean body mass unit. Blood lactate concentration is also lower. This immaturity of the anaerobic metabolism, especially the "lactic pathway" may result from lower anaerobic enzyme activities (lactico-dehydrogenase, phosphofructokinase, etc) and glycogen content. During puberty, "lactic metabolism" starts to develop significantly, simultaneously with muscle mass. It has been suggested that sexual hormones (testosterone in boys, oestrogens in girls) and other factors, such as growth factors, are implicated in this phenomenon. During this period, the aerobic metabolism remains unchanged. In prepubertal children there is neither aerobic nor anaerobic specialization: the highest anaerobic performance is associated with the highest VO2 max. Moreover, it seems that before puberty, bioenergetic profile is not modified by training. 3) Despite a high VO2 max, performance in endurance events is not as high in children as in adults because of a lower running economy. Cardiovascular responses are characterized by higher maximal and infra-maximal heart rates, and lower systolic stroke volume and arterial blood pressures than in adults. During prolonged exercise, the hormonal adaptations for energy substrate utilization is quite different from adults: a lower decrease in insulin and increase in catecholamines and glucagon in response to exercise could be responsible for a less effective regulation of glycemia with a risk of hypoglycemia. Therefore, an adequate carbohydrate

  4. Effects of low-intensity resistance exercise with slow movement and tonic force generation on muscular function in young men.

    PubMed

    Tanimoto, Michiya; Ishii, Naokata

    2006-04-01

    We investigated the acute and long-term effects of low-intensity resistance exercise (knee extension) with slow movement and tonic force generation on muscular size and strength. This type of exercise was expected to enhance the intramuscular hypoxic environment that might be a factor for muscular hypertrophy. Twenty-four healthy young men without experience of regular exercise training were assigned into three groups (n = 8 for each) and performed the following resistance exercise regimens: low-intensity [ approximately 50% of one-repetition maximum (1RM)] with slow movement and tonic force generation (3 s for eccentric and concentric actions, 1-s pause, and no relaxing phase; LST); high-intensity ( approximately 80% 1RM) with normal speed (1 s for concentric and eccentric actions, 1 s for relaxing; HN); low-intensity with normal speed (same intensity as for LST and same speed as for HN; LN). In LST and HN, the mean repetition maximum was 8RM. In LN, both intensity and amount of work were matched with those for LST. Each exercise session consisting of three sets was performed three times a week for 12 wk. In LST and HN, exercise training caused significant (P < 0.05) increases in cross-sectional area determined with MRI and isometric strength (maximal voluntary contraction) of the knee extensors, whereas no significant changes were seen in LN. Electromyographic and near-infrared spectroscopic analyses showed that one bout of LST causes sustained muscular activity and the largest muscle deoxygenation among the three types of exercise. The results suggest that intramuscular oxygen environment is important for exercise-induced muscular hypertrophy.

  5. How to Generate Good Profit Maximization Problems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Lewis

    2014-01-01

    In this article, the author considers the merits of two classes of profit maximization problems: those involving perfectly competitive firms with quadratic and cubic cost functions. While relatively easy to develop and solve, problems based on quadratic cost functions are too simple to address a number of important issues, such as the use of…

  6. Robust Utility Maximization Under Convex Portfolio Constraints

    SciTech Connect

    Matoussi, Anis; Mezghani, Hanen Mnif, Mohamed

    2015-04-15

    We study a robust maximization problem from terminal wealth and consumption under a convex constraints on the portfolio. We state the existence and the uniqueness of the consumption–investment strategy by studying the associated quadratic backward stochastic differential equation. We characterize the optimal control by using the duality method and deriving a dynamic maximum principle.

  7. Maximizing the Spectacle of Water Fountains

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simoson, Andrew J.

    2009-01-01

    For a given initial speed of water from a spigot or jet, what angle of the jet will maximize the visual impact of the water spray in the fountain? This paper focuses on fountains whose spigots are arranged in circular fashion, and couches the measurement of the visual impact in terms of the surface area and the volume under the fountain's natural…

  8. Maximizing the Effective Use of Formative Assessments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riddell, Nancy B.

    2016-01-01

    In the current age of accountability, teachers must be able to produce tangible evidence of students' concept mastery. This article focuses on implementation of formative assessments before, during, and after instruction in order to maximize teachers' ability to effectively monitor student achievement. Suggested strategies are included to help…

  9. Maximal dinucleotide comma-free codes.

    PubMed

    Fimmel, Elena; Strüngmann, Lutz

    2016-01-21

    The problem of retrieval and maintenance of the correct reading frame plays a significant role in RNA transcription. Circular codes, and especially comma-free codes, can help to understand the underlying mechanisms of error-detection in this process. In recent years much attention has been paid to the investigation of trinucleotide circular codes (see, for instance, Fimmel et al., 2014; Fimmel and Strüngmann, 2015a; Michel and Pirillo, 2012; Michel et al., 2012, 2008), while dinucleotide codes had been touched on only marginally, even though dinucleotides are associated to important biological functions. Recently, all maximal dinucleotide circular codes were classified (Fimmel et al., 2015; Michel and Pirillo, 2013). The present paper studies maximal dinucleotide comma-free codes and their close connection to maximal dinucleotide circular codes. We give a construction principle for such codes and provide a graphical representation that allows them to be visualized geometrically. Moreover, we compare the results for dinucleotide codes with the corresponding situation for trinucleotide maximal self-complementary C(3)-codes. Finally, the results obtained are discussed with respect to Crick׳s hypothesis about frame-shift-detecting codes without commas.

  10. DNA solution of the maximal clique problem.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Q; Kaplan, P D; Liu, S; Libchaber, A

    1997-10-17

    The maximal clique problem has been solved by means of molecular biology techniques. A pool of DNA molecules corresponding to the total ensemble of six-vertex cliques was built, followed by a series of selection processes. The algorithm is highly parallel and has satisfactory fidelity. This work represents further evidence for the ability of DNA computing to solve NP-complete search problems.

  11. Maximizing Resource Utilization in Video Streaming Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alsmirat, Mohammad Abdullah

    2013-01-01

    Video streaming has recently grown dramatically in popularity over the Internet, Cable TV, and wire-less networks. Because of the resource demanding nature of video streaming applications, maximizing resource utilization in any video streaming system is a key factor to increase the scalability and decrease the cost of the system. Resources to…

  12. Ehrenfest's Lottery--Time and Entropy Maximization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashbaugh, Henry S.

    2010-01-01

    Successful teaching of the Second Law of Thermodynamics suffers from limited simple examples linking equilibrium to entropy maximization. I describe a thought experiment connecting entropy to a lottery that mixes marbles amongst a collection of urns. This mixing obeys diffusion-like dynamics. Equilibrium is achieved when the marble distribution is…

  13. Why Contextual Preference Reversals Maximize Expected Value

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Contextual preference reversals occur when a preference for one option over another is reversed by the addition of further options. It has been argued that the occurrence of preference reversals in human behavior shows that people violate the axioms of rational choice and that people are not, therefore, expected value maximizers. In contrast, we demonstrate that if a person is only able to make noisy calculations of expected value and noisy observations of the ordinal relations among option features, then the expected value maximizing choice is influenced by the addition of new options and does give rise to apparent preference reversals. We explore the implications of expected value maximizing choice, conditioned on noisy observations, for a range of contextual preference reversal types—including attraction, compromise, similarity, and phantom effects. These preference reversal types have played a key role in the development of models of human choice. We conclude that experiments demonstrating contextual preference reversals are not evidence for irrationality. They are, however, a consequence of expected value maximization given noisy observations. PMID:27337391

  14. Maximizing the Motivated Mind for Emergent Giftedness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rea, Dan

    2001-01-01

    This article explains how the theory of the motivated mind conceptualizes the productive interaction of intelligence, creativity, and achievement motivation and how this theory can help educators to maximize students' emergent potential for giftedness. It discusses the integration of cold-order thinking and hot-chaotic thinking into fluid-adaptive…

  15. A Model of College Tuition Maximization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bosshardt, Donald I.; Lichtenstein, Larry; Zaporowski, Mark P.

    2009-01-01

    This paper develops a series of models for optimal tuition pricing for private colleges and universities. The university is assumed to be a profit maximizing, price discriminating monopolist. The enrollment decision of student's is stochastic in nature. The university offers an effective tuition rate, comprised of stipulated tuition less financial…

  16. Formation Control for the Maxim Mission.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Leitner, Jesse; Gendreau, Keith; Sanner, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    Over the next twenty years, a wave of change is occurring in the spacebased scientific remote sensing community. While the fundamental limits in the spatial and angular resolution achievable in spacecraft have been reached, based on today's technology, an expansive new technology base has appeared over the past decade in the area of Distributed Space Systems (DSS). A key subset of the DSS technology area is that which covers precision formation flying of space vehicles. Through precision formation flying, the baselines, previously defined by the largest monolithic structure which could fit in the largest launch vehicle fairing, are now virtually unlimited. Several missions including the Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), and the Stellar Imager will drive the formation flying challenges to achieve unprecedented baselines for high resolution, extended-scene, interferometry in the ultraviolet and X-ray regimes. This paper focuses on establishing the feasibility for the formation control of the MAXIM mission. The Stellar Imager mission requirements are on the same order of those for MAXIM. This paper specifically addresses: (1) high-level science requirements for these missions and how they evolve into engineering requirements; (2) the formation control architecture devised for such missions; (3) the design of the formation control laws to maintain very high precision relative positions; and (4) the levels of fuel usage required in the duration of these missions. Specific preliminary results are presented for two spacecraft within the MAXIM mission.

  17. Retinal Vascular Changes are a Marker for Cerebral Vascular Diseases.

    PubMed

    Moss, Heather E

    2015-07-01

    The retinal circulation is a potential marker of cerebral vascular disease because it shares origin and drainage with the intracranial circulation and because it can be directly visualized using ophthalmoscopy. Cross-sectional and cohort studies have demonstrated associations between chronic retinal and cerebral vascular disease, acute retinal and cerebral vascular disease, and chronic retinal vascular disease and acute cerebral vascular disease. In particular, certain qualitative features of retinopathy, retinal artery occlusion, and increased retinal vein caliber are associated with concurrent and future cerebrovascular events. These associations persist after accounting for confounding variables known to be disease-causing in both circulations, which supports the potential use of retinal vasculature findings to stratify individuals with regards to cerebral vascular disease risk.

  18. Effects of different volume-equated resistance training loading strategies on muscular adaptations in well-trained men.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Peterson, Mark D; Contreras, Bret; Sonmez, G T; Alvar, Brent A

    2014-10-01

    Regimented resistance training has been shown to promote marked increases in skeletal muscle mass. Although muscle hypertrophy can be attained through a wide range of resistance training programs, the principle of specificity, which states that adaptations are specific to the nature of the applied stimulus, dictates that some programs will promote greater hypertrophy than others. Research is lacking, however, as to the best combination of variables required to maximize hypertophic gains. The purpose of this study was to investigate muscular adaptations to a volume-equated bodybuilding-type training program vs. a powerlifting-type routine in well-trained subjects. Seventeen young men were randomly assigned to either a hypertrophy-type resistance training group that performed 3 sets of 10 repetition maximum (RM) with 90 seconds rest or a strength-type resistance training (ST) group that performed 7 sets of 3RM with a 3-minute rest interval. After 8 weeks, no significant differences were noted in muscle thickness of the biceps brachii. Significant strength differences were found in favor of ST for the 1RM bench press, and a trend was found for greater increases in the 1RM squat. In conclusion, this study showed that both bodybuilding- and powerlifting-type training promote similar increases in muscular size, but powerlifting-type training is superior for enhancing maximal strength.

  19. Prospect of gene therapy for cardiomyopathy in hereditary muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Yongping; Binalsheikh, Ibrahim M.; Leach, Stacey B.; Domeier, Timothy L.; Duan, Dongsheng

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Cardiac involvement is a common feature in muscular dystrophies. It presents as heart failure and/or arrhythmia. Traditionally, dystrophic cardiomyopathy is treated with symptom-relieving medications. Identification of disease-causing genes and investigation on pathogenic mechanisms have opened new opportunities to treat dystrophic cardiomyopathy with gene therapy. Replacing/repairing the mutated gene and/or targeting the pathogenic process/mechanisms using alternative genes may attenuate heart disease in muscular dystrophies. Areas covered Duchenne muscular dystrophy is the most common muscular dystrophy. Duchenne cardiomyopathy has been the primary focus of ongoing dystrophic cardiomyopathy gene therapy studies. Here, we use Duchenne cardiomyopathy gene therapy to showcase recent developments and to outline the path forward. We also discuss gene therapy status for cardiomyopathy associated with limb-girdle and congenital muscular dystrophies, and myotonic dystrophy. Expert opinion Gene therapy for dystrophic cardiomyopathy has taken a slow but steady path forward. Preclinical studies over the last decades have addressed many fundamental questions. Adeno-associated virus-mediated gene therapy has significantly improved the outcomes in rodent models of Duchenne and limb girdle muscular dystrophies. Validation of these encouraging results in large animal models will pave the way to future human trials. PMID:27340611

  20. Outside in: The matrix as a modifier of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Quattrocelli, Mattia; Spencer, Melissa J; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2017-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies are genetic conditions leading to muscle degeneration and often, impaired regeneration. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy is a prototypical form of muscular dystrophy, and like other forms of genetically inherited muscle diseases, pathological progression is variable. Variability in muscular dystrophy can arise from differences in the manner in which the primary mutation impacts the affected protein's function; however, clinical heterogeneity also derives from secondary mutations in other genes that can enhance or reduce pathogenic features of disease. These genes, called genetic modifiers, regulate the pathophysiological context of dystrophic degeneration and regeneration. Understanding the mechanistic links between genetic modifiers and dystrophic progression sheds light on pathologic remodeling, and provides novel avenues to therapeutically intervene to reduce muscle degeneration. Based on targeted genetic approaches and unbiased genomewide screens, several modifiers have been identified for muscular dystrophy, including extracellular agonists of signaling cascades. This review will focus on identification and possible mechanisms of recently identified modifiers for muscular dystrophy, including osteopontin, latent TGFβ binding protein 4 (LTBP4) and Jagged1. Moreover, we will review the investigational approaches that aim to target modifier pathways and thereby counteract dystrophic muscle wasting.

  1. Serial assessment of local peripheral vascular function after eccentric exercise.

    PubMed

    Stacy, Mitchel R; Bladon, Kallie J; Lawrence, Jennifer L; McGlinchy, Sarah A; Scheuermann, Barry W

    2013-12-01

    Muscle damage is a common response to unaccustomed eccentric exercise; however, the effects of skeletal muscle damage on local vascular function and blood flow are poorly understood. This study examined serial local vascular responses to flow-mediated (endothelial-dependent) and nitroglycerin-mediated (endothelial-independent) dilation in the brachial artery after strenuous eccentric exercise and serially assessed resting blood flow. Ten healthy males performed 50 maximal eccentric unilateral arm contractions to induce muscle damage to the biceps brachii. Changes in maximal isometric strength and vascular responses were assessed 1, 24, 48, and 96 h after exercise. Mean blood velocities and arterial diameters, measured with Doppler ultrasound, were used to calculate blood flow and shear stress (expressed as area under the curve). Eccentric exercise resulted in impaired maximal isometric strength for up to 96 h (p < 0.001). Reductions in flow-mediated dilation (before exercise, 9.4% ± 2.6%; 1 h after exercise, 5.1% ± 2.2%) and nitroglycerin responses (before exercise, 26.3% ± 6.5%; 1 h after exercise, 20.7% ± 4.7%) were observed in the 1 h after exercise and remained lower for 96 h (p < 0.05). The shear stress response was attenuated immediately after exercise and remained impaired for 48 h (p < 0.05). Resting blood pressure and muscle blood flow remained similar throughout the study. Results suggest that muscle damage from eccentric exercise leads to impaired local endothelial and vascular smooth muscle function. Lower shear stress after exercise might contribute to the observed reduction in flow-mediated dilation responses, but the mechanism responsible for the attenuated endothelial-independent vasodilation remains unclear.

  2. [Cervical vascular penetrating trauma].

    PubMed

    Etl, S; Hafer, G; Mundinger, A

    2000-01-01

    The case of a 25 year old male with a stab wound of common carotid artery and the internal jugular vein is reported. He was admitted in severe hemorrhagic shock and immediately treated successfully by arterial reconstruction by means of a venous patch. Mild, declining neurological deficits correlated in magnetic resonance imaging with disturbances in the perfusion area of the medial cerebral artery. A survey of the literature shows that the fast repair of the carotid artery is clearly to be given preference to ligature. First can be executed successfully in exceptional emergency cases also by non-carotid surgeons, if basic vascular-surgical techniques are controlled.

  3. Cardiac asynchrony in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Nardi, Olivier; Orlikowski, David; Annane, Djillali

    2013-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene on chromosome Xp21.1. Heart failure is a classical complication in this disease. Little data are available about systolic dyssynchrony in DMD. We sought to assess the prevalence of left ventricular dysfunction and systolic asynchrony in DMD patients using echocardiographic parameters. We performed electrocardiography and echocardiography for adult's patients with DMD. For systolic dyssynchrony assessment, echocardiography-Doppler was performed and completed by tissular Doppler imaging. 48 DMD were included in our study. Age ranged from 20 to 37 years. QRS duration >120 ms was present in 10 patients/48 and 1 patient disclosed a QRS duration >150 ms. Left ventricular (LV) ejection fraction (EF) ranged from 10 to 62 % with a median of 43 %. Inter-ventricular asynchrony was found in 11.9 % of patients with EF < 35 % and in 2.6 % of patients with EF > 35 %. Intra-ventricular asynchrony was present in 6 % of patients with EF < 35 %. We found a high prevalence of LV dysfunction in DMD. Systolic ventricular asynchrony seems frequent particularly in patients with EF < 35 %.

  4. Optimizing Bone Health in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Buckner, Jason L.; Bowden, Sasigarn A.; Mahan, John D.

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness, with eventual loss of ambulation and premature death. The approved therapy with corticosteroids improves muscle strength, prolongs ambulation, and maintains pulmonary function. However, the osteoporotic impact of chronic corticosteroid use further impairs the underlying reduced bone mass seen in DMD, leading to increased fragility fractures of long bones and vertebrae. These serious sequelae adversely affect quality of life and can impact survival. The current clinical issues relating to bone health and bone health screening methods in DMD are presented in this review. Diagnostic studies, including biochemical markers of bone turnover and bone mineral density by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), as well as spinal imaging using densitometric lateral spinal imaging, and treatment to optimize bone health in patients with DMD are discussed. Treatment with bisphosphonates offers a method to increase bone mass in these children; oral and intravenous bisphosphonates have been used successfully although treatment is typically reserved for children with fractures and/or bone pain with low bone mass by DXA. PMID:26124831

  5. Molecular diagnosis of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Nallamilli, Babi Ramesh Reddy; Ankala, Arunkanth; Hegde, Madhuri

    2014-10-01

    Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited neuromuscular disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene (DMD; locus Xp21.2). The mutation spectrum of DMD is unique in that 65% of causative mutations are intragenic deletions, with intragenic duplications and point mutations (along with other sequence variants) accounting for 6% to 10% and 30% to 35%, respectively. The strategy for molecular diagnostic testing for DMD involves initial screening for deletions/duplications using microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH) followed by full-sequence analysis of DMD for sequence variants. Recently, next-generation sequencing (NGS)-based targeted gene analysis has become clinically available for detection of point mutations and other sequence variants (small insertions, deletions, and indels). This unit initially discusses the strategic algorithm for establishing a molecular diagnosis of DMD and later provides detailed protocols of current molecular diagnostic methods for DMD, including array-CGH, PCR-based Sanger sequencing, and NGS-based sequencing assay.

  6. Lipomatous muscular 'dystrophy' of Piedmontese cattle.

    PubMed

    Biasibetti, E; Amedeo, S; Brugiapaglia, A; Destefanis, G; Di Stasio, L; Valenza, F; Capucchio, M T

    2012-11-01

    Lipomatous myopathy is a degenerative muscle pathology characterized by the substitution of muscle cells with adipose tissue, sporadically reported in cattle, pigs, and rarely in sheep, horses and dogs. This study investigated the pathology of this myopathy in 40 muscle samples collected from regularly slaughtered Piedmontese cattle living in Piedmont region (Italy). None of the animals showed clinical signs of muscular disease. Muscle specimens were submitted to histological and enzymatic investigations. Gross pathology revealed a different grade of infiltration of adipose tissue, involving multiple or single muscles. The most affected regions were the ventral abdomen and the shoulders, especially the cutaneous muscles and the muscles of the thoracic group. Morphological staining revealed an infiltration of adipose tissue varying in distribution and severity, changes in muscle fibre size and increased number of fibres with centrally located nuclei, suggesting muscle degeneration-regeneration. Necrosis and non-suppurative inflammatory cells were also seen. Furthermore, proliferation of connective tissue and non-specific myopathic changes were present. Chemical and physical characteristics of the affected tissue were also evaluated. The authors discuss about the aetiopathogenesis and classification of this muscle disorder whose histological lesions were similar to those reported in human dystrophies.

  7. Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy 2A.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, Eduard; Saenz, Amets; Illa, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Limb-girdle muscular dystrophy type 2A (LGMD2A) is caused by mutations in the gene CAPN3 located in the chromosome region 15q15.1-q21.1. To date more than 300 mutations have been described. This gene encodes for a 94-kDa nonlysosomal calcium-dependent cysteine protease and its function in skeletal muscle is not fully understood. It seems that calpain-3 has an unusual zymogenic activation that involves, among other substrates, cytoskeletal proteins. Calpain-3 is thought to interact with titin and dysferlin. Calpain-3 deficiency produces abnormal sarcomeres that lead eventually to muscle fiber death. Hip adductors and gluteus maximus are the earliest clinically affected muscles. No clinical differences have been reported depending on the type of mutation in the CAPN3 gene. The muscle biopsy shows variability of fiber size, interstitial fibrosis, internal nuclei, lobulated fibers, and, in some cases, presence of eosinophils. Recent gene expression profiling studies have shown upregulation of interleukin-32 and immunoglobulin genes, which may explain the eosinophilic infiltration. Two mouse knockout models of CAPN3 have been characterized. There are no curative treatments for this disease. However, experimental therapeutics using mouse models conclude that adeno-associated virus (AAV) vectors seem to be one of the best approaches because of their efficiency and persistency of gene transfer.

  8. Spinal Muscular Atrophy: Current Therapeutic Strategies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiselyov, Alex S.; Gurney, Mark E.

    Proximal spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is an autosomal recessive disorder characterized by death of motor neurons in the spinal cord. SMA is caused by deletion and/or mutation of the survival motor neuron gene (SMN1) on chromosome 5q13. There are variable numbers of copies of a second, related gene named SMN2 located in the proximity to SMN1. Both genes encode the same protein (Smn). Loss of SMN1 and incorrect splicing of SMN2 affect cellular levels of Smn triggering death of motor neurons. The severity of SMA is directly related to the normal number of copies of SMN2 carried by the patient. A considerable effort has been dedicated to identifying modalities including both biological and small molecule agents that increase SMN2 promoter activity to upregulate gene transcription and produce increased quantities of full-length Smn protein. This review summarizes recent progress in the area and suggests potential target product profile for an SMA therapeutic.

  9. Molecular analysis of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD)

    SciTech Connect

    Upadhyaya, M.; Maynard, J.; Osborn, M.

    1994-09-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) is an autosomal dominant disorder characterized by progressive muscle weakness. The disease locus maps to 4q35 and is associated with a de novo DNA rearrangement, detected by a probe p13E-11 (D4F104S1) which maps proximal to the disease locus. An informative distal flanking marker for this condition is still required. Using p13E-11, we have analyzed 35 FSHD families in which the disease is apparently associated with a new mutation. Twenty three of these cases were found to have a smaller rearranged DNA fragment which was not present in either of the parents. Pulsed-field gel analysis of 5 of these families also revealed evidence of DNA deletion. During the course of this study, we identified one case with a DNA rearrangement which was also present in the unaffected mother, but at very low intensity. This finding has been confirmed by pulsed-field gel analysis, and indicates that the mother is probably a gonosomal mosaic. In order to saturate the FSHD region with new DNA markers, a laser microdissection and microcloning technique was used to construct a genomic library from the distal end of chromosome 4. Of the 72 microclones analyzed, 42 mapped into the relevant 4q35 region. 4 sequences were conserved and may be considered potential candidate genes for FSHD. The microclones mapping to 4q35 are under study to identify additional polymorphic markers for the FSHD region.

  10. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  11. Vascular Distribution of Nanomaterials

    PubMed Central

    Stapleton, Phoebe A.; Nurkiewicz, Timothy R.

    2014-01-01

    Once considered primarily occupational, novel nanotechnology innovation and application has led to widespread domestic use and intentional biomedical exposures. With these exciting advances, the breadth and depth of toxicological considerations must also be expanded. The vascular system interacts with every tissue in the body, striving to homeostasis. Engineered nanomaterials (ENM) have been reported to distribute in many different organs and tissues. However, these observations have tended to use approaches requiring tissue homogenization and/or gross organ analyses. These techniques, while effective in establishing presence, preclude an exact determination of where ENM are deposited within a tissue. It is necessary to identify this exact distribution and deposition of ENM throughout the cardiovascular system, with respect to vascular hemodynamics and in vivo/ in vitro ENM modifications taken into account if nanotechnology is to achieve its full potential. Distinct levels of the vasculature will first be described as individual compartments. Then the vasculature will be considered as a whole. These unique compartments and biophysical conditions will be discussed in terms of their propensity to favor ENM deposition. Understanding levels of the vasculature will also be discussed. Ultimately, future studies must verify the mechanisms speculated on and presented herein. PMID:24777845

  12. History of vascular access.

    PubMed

    Dudrick, Stanley J

    2006-01-01

    Milestones in the history of the development of vascular access and the subsequent advances in practical clinical applications of the knowledge, techniques, technology, and experience to the beneficial management of a variety of patients are described. The original achievements are presented and briefly discussed primarily, but not exclusively, in relationship to the successful development of parenteral nutrition (PN). Beginning with the discovery of the circulation of blood, landmark events, resulting from astute observations, experimentation, and ingenious technological advances, are summarized or outlined chronologically over the past 4 centuries, with emphasis on the many recent accomplishments of basic and clinical scientists during the past 6 decades. Brief descriptions of several seminal contributions to safe and effective IV access, management, and therapy acknowledge and recognize the historical highlights that have allowed a complex and potentially hazardous therapeutic modality to evolve into a commonly applied useful adjunct to our current inpatient and outpatient armamentarium. A comprehensive list of references documents the highlights of the development of vascular access for the student of history.

  13. Vascular pattern formation in plants.

    PubMed

    Scarpella, Enrico; Helariutta, Ykä

    2010-01-01

    Reticulate tissue systems exist in most multicellular organisms, and the principles underlying the formation of cellular networks have fascinated philosophers, mathematicians, and biologists for centuries. In particular, the beautiful and varied arrangements of vascular tissues in plants have intrigued mankind since antiquity, yet the organizing signals have remained elusive. Plant vascular tissues form systems of interconnected cell files throughout the plant body. Vascular cells are aligned with one another along continuous lines, and vascular tissues differentiate at reproducible positions within organ environments. However, neither the precise path of vascular differentiation nor the exact geometry of vascular networks is fixed or immutable. Several recent advances converge to reconcile the seemingly conflicting predictability and plasticity of vascular tissue patterns. A control mechanism in which an apical-basal flow of signal establishes a basic coordinate system for body axis formation and vascular strand differentiation, and in which a superimposed level of radial organizing cues elaborates cell patterns, would generate a reproducible tissue configuration in the context of an underlying robust, self-organizing structure, and account for the simultaneous regularity and flexibility of vascular tissue patterns.

  14. [Effect of hypoxia on muscular performance capacity: "living low--training high"].

    PubMed

    Vogt, M; Billeter, R; Hoppeler, H

    2003-07-01

    Altitude training is very popular among endurance athletes. But athletes respond very different on acute altitude exposure and altitude training. There are individual differences in the decrement of maximal oxygen consumption making general advices on the effect of altitude training very difficult. During the last few years different altitude training regimes have been developed. Beside "living high--training low," the concept of "living low--training high" becomes more and more popular. By this regime, athletes train under simulated or natural hypoxic conditions, while recovery time is spent at sea-level. Several studies show that with "living low--training high" maximal oxygen consumption as well as aerobic and anaerobic endurance performance can be improved. Molecular analysis reveal that a transcription factor called Hypoxia-Inducible Factor 1 (HIF-1) acts as a master gene in the regulation of hypoxia-dependent gene expression. In human skeletal muscle "living low-training high" induces the expression of glycolytic enzymes, the angiogenic factor VEGF, myoglobin as well as the increase of capillarity and mitochondrial content in parallel to the induction of the HIF-1 system. In trained human skeletal muscle, these adaptations cause a shift of substrate selection to an increased oxidation of carbohydrates as well as to an improvement of the conditions for transport and utilization of oxygen. Depending on the kind of sports, "living low--training high" can be used to train these muscular adaptations and to increase exercise performance.

  15. Gait biomechanics and hip muscular strength in patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Pohl, Michael B; Patel, Chirag; Wiley, J Preston; Ferber, Reed

    2013-03-01

    A significant number of patients with patellofemoral osteoarthritis (PFOA) have described a history of patellofemoral pain syndrome (PFPS). This leads to speculation that the underpinning mechanical causes of PFPS and PFOA may be similar. Although alterations in gait biomechanics and hip strength have been reported in PFPS, this relationship has not yet been explored in PFOA. Therefore the purpose of this study was compare gait biomechanics and hip muscular strength between PFOA patients and a healthy control group. Fifteen patients with symptomatic, radiographic PFOA and 15 controls participated. All patients underwent a walking gait analysis and maximal hip strength testing. Biomechanical variables of interest included the peak angular values of contra-lateral pelvic drop, hip adduction and hip internal rotation during the stance phase. Hip abduction and external rotation strength were assessed using maximal voluntary isometric contractions. The PFOA group demonstrated significantly lower hip abduction strength compared to controls but no difference in hip external rotation strength. There were no statistical differences between the PFOA and control groups for contra-lateral pelvic drop, hip adduction and hip internal rotation angles during walking. Despite patients with PFOA exhibiting weaker hip abductor muscle strength compared to their healthy counterparts they did not demonstrate alterations in pelvis or hip biomechanics during gait. These preliminary data suggests that weaker hip abductor strength does not result in biomechanical alterations during gait in this population.

  16. Muscular adaptations to short-term low-frequency downhill walking training.

    PubMed

    Maeo, S; Yamamoto, M; Kanehisa, H

    2015-02-01

    This study examined muscular adaptations of knee extensors following short-term low-frequency downhill walking training. 22 young males (training group: TG, n=12; control group: CG, n=10) participated. TG conducted 40-min downhill treadmill walking (load: 10% of body mass, gradient: 28%, velocity: 5 km/h) 1 session/week for 4 weeks. Before and after the intervention, muscle thickness of knee extensors and maximal knee extension torques in eccentric (- 120, - 60, - 30°/s), isometric (0°/s), and concentric (30, 60, 120, 240°/s) conditions were measured. For TG, muscle damage markers were also measured before and up to 72 h following each session. After the intervention, CG did not show any changes in all variables. TG had significant increases in maximal knee extension torques at all angular velocities, with higher relative gains in eccentric torques (+ 24% on average) than isometric (+ 13%) and concentric (+ 12% on average) torques. No changes were found in the muscle thickness. Although considerable muscle damage was observed after the first training session in TG, the magnitudes of changes in all markers following the second to fourth sessions were minimal. These results indicate that even with relatively short-term and low-frequency, downhill walking training can increase the strength capacity of knee extensors, especially in eccentric strength.

  17. Modularity maximization using completely positive programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazdanparast, Sakineh; Havens, Timothy C.

    2017-04-01

    Community detection is one of the most prominent problems of social network analysis. In this paper, a novel method for Modularity Maximization (MM) for community detection is presented which exploits the Alternating Direction Augmented Lagrangian (ADAL) method for maximizing a generalized form of Newman's modularity function. We first transform Newman's modularity function into a quadratic program and then use Completely Positive Programming (CPP) to map the quadratic program to a linear program, which provides the globally optimal maximum modularity partition. In order to solve the proposed CPP problem, a closed form solution using the ADAL merged with a rank minimization approach is proposed. The performance of the proposed method is evaluated on several real-world data sets used for benchmarks community detection. Simulation results shows the proposed technique provides outstanding results in terms of modularity value for crisp partitions.

  18. Maximally discordant mixed states of two qubits

    SciTech Connect

    Galve, Fernando; Giorgi, Gian Luca; Zambrini, Roberta

    2011-01-15

    We study the relative strength of classical and quantum correlations, as measured by discord, for two-qubit states. Quantum correlations appear only in the presence of classical correlations, while the reverse is not always true. We identify the family of states that maximize the discord for a given value of the classical correlations and show that the largest attainable discord for mixed states is greater than for pure states. The difference between discord and entanglement is emphasized by the remarkable fact that these states do not maximize entanglement and are, in some cases, even separable. Finally, by random generation of density matrices uniformly distributed over the whole Hilbert space, we quantify the frequency of the appearance of quantum and classical correlations for different ranks.

  19. Hamiltonian formalism and path entropy maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Sergio; González, Diego

    2015-10-01

    Maximization of the path information entropy is a clear prescription for constructing models in non-equilibrium statistical mechanics. Here it is shown that, following this prescription under the assumption of arbitrary instantaneous constraints on position and velocity, a Lagrangian emerges which determines the most probable trajectory. Deviations from the probability maximum can be consistently described as slices in time by a Hamiltonian, according to a nonlinear Langevin equation and its associated Fokker-Planck equation. The connections unveiled between the maximization of path entropy and the Langevin/Fokker-Planck equations imply that missing information about the phase space coordinate never decreases in time, a purely information-theoretical version of the second law of thermodynamics. All of these results are independent of any physical assumptions, and thus valid for any generalized coordinate as a function of time, or any other parameter. This reinforces the view that the second law is a fundamental property of plausible inference.

  20. Nondecoupling of maximal supergravity from the superstring.

    PubMed

    Green, Michael B; Ooguri, Hirosi; Schwarz, John H

    2007-07-27

    We consider the conditions necessary for obtaining perturbative maximal supergravity in d dimensions as a decoupling limit of type II superstring theory compactified on a (10-d) torus. For dimensions d=2 and d=3, it is possible to define a limit in which the only finite-mass states are the 256 massless states of maximal supergravity. However, in dimensions d>or=4, there are infinite towers of additional massless and finite-mass states. These correspond to Kaluza-Klein charges, wound strings, Kaluza-Klein monopoles, or branes wrapping around cycles of the toroidal extra dimensions. We conclude that perturbative supergravity cannot be decoupled from string theory in dimensions>or=4. In particular, we conjecture that pure N=8 supergravity in four dimensions is in the Swampland.

  1. Experimental implementation of maximally synchronizable networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sevilla-Escoboza, R.; Buldú, J. M.; Boccaletti, S.; Papo, D.; Hwang, D.-U.; Huerta-Cuellar, G.; Gutiérrez, R.

    2016-04-01

    Maximally synchronizable networks (MSNs) are acyclic directed networks that maximize synchronizability. In this paper, we investigate the feasibility of transforming networks of coupled oscillators into their corresponding MSNs. By tuning the weights of any given network so as to reach the lowest possible eigenratio λN /λ2, the synchronized state is guaranteed to be maintained across the longest possible range of coupling strengths. We check the robustness of the resulting MSNs with an experimental implementation of a network of nonlinear electronic oscillators and study the propagation of the synchronization errors through the network. Importantly, a method to study the effects of topological uncertainties on the synchronizability is proposed and explored both theoretically and experimentally.

  2. Profit Maximization Models for Exponential Decay Processes.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-08-01

    assumptions could easily be analyzed in similar fashion. References [1] Bensoussan, A., Hurst , E.G. and Nislund, B., Management Applications of Modern...TVIPe OF r 04PORNT A i M0 CiH O .V9RAE PROFIT MAXIMIZATION .ODELS FOR EXPONENT IAL Technical Report DECAY PROCESSES August 1990 ~~~I. PtA’OR~idNG ONqG

  3. Additive Manufacturing of Vascular Grafts and Vascularized Tissue Constructs.

    PubMed

    Elomaa, Laura; Yang, Yunzhi Peter

    2017-01-10

    There is a great need for engineered vascular grafts among patients with cardiovascular diseases who are in need of bypass therapy and lack autologous healthy blood vessels. In addition, because of the severe worldwide shortage of organ donors, there is an increasing need for engineered vascularized tissue constructs as an alternative to organ transplants. Additive manufacturing (AM) offers great advantages and flexibility of fabrication of cell-laden, multimaterial, and anatomically shaped vascular grafts and vascularized tissue constructs. Various inkjet-, extrusion-, and photocrosslinking-based AM techniques have been applied to the fabrication of both self-standing vascular grafts and porous, vascularized tissue constructs. This review discusses the state-of-the-art research on the use of AM for vascular applications and the key criteria for biomaterials in the AM of both acellular and cellular constructs. We envision that new smart printing materials that can adapt to their environment and encourage rapid endothelialization and remodeling will be the key factor in the future for the successful AM of personalized and dynamic vascular tissue applications.

  4. Muscular factors are of importance in tension-type headache.

    PubMed

    Jensen, R; Bendtsen, L; Olesen, J

    1998-01-01

    Recent studies have indicated that muscular disorders may be of importance for the development of increased pain sensitivity in patients with chronic tension-type headache. The objective of the present study was to investigate this hypothesis by examining the pain perception in tension-type headache with and without muscular disorders defined as increased tenderness. We examined 28 patients with episodic tension-type headache, 28 patients with chronic tension-type headache, and 30 healthy controls. Pericranial myofascial tenderness was recorded with manual palpation, and pressure pain detection and tolerances in cephalic and extracephalic locations with an electronic pressure algometer. In addition, thermal pain sensitivity and electromyographic activity were recorded. The main result was significantly lower pressure pain detection thresholds and tolerances in all the examined locations in patients with chronic tension-type headache with a muscular disorder compared to those without a muscular disorder. There were no such differences in any of the examined locations when the two subgroups of patients with episodic tension-type headache were compared. Thermal pain sensitivity did not differ between patients with and without a muscular disorder, while electromyographic activity levels were significantly higher in patients with chronic tension-type headache with than in those without a muscular disorder. Our results strongly indicate that prolonged nociceptive stimuli from the pericranial myofascial tissue sensitize the central nervous system and, thereby, lead to an increased general pain sensitivity. Muscular factors may, therefore, be of major importance for the conversion of episodic into chronic tension-type headache. The present study complements the understanding of the important interactions between peripheral and central factors in tension-type headache and may lead to a better prevention and treatment of the most prevalent type of headache.

  5. Maximal respiratory pressures among adolescent swimmers.

    PubMed

    Rocha Crispino Santos, M A; Pinto, M L; Couto Sant'Anna, C; Bernhoeft, M

    2011-01-01

    Maximal inspiratory pressures (MIP) and maximal expiratory pressures (MEP) are useful indices of respiratory muscle strength in athletes. The aims of this study were: to describe the strength of the respiratory muscles of Olympic junior swim team, at baseline and after a standard physical training; and to determine if there is a differential inspiratory and expiratory pressure response to the physical training. A cross-sectional study evaluated 28 international-level swimmers with ages ranging from 15 to 17 years, 19 (61 %) being males. At baseline, MIP was found to be lower in females (P = .001). The mean values reached by males and females were: MIP(cmH2O) = M: 100.4 (± 26.5)/F: 67.8 (± 23.2); MEP (cmH2O) = M: 87.4 (± 20.7)/F: 73.9 (± 17.3). After the physical training they reached: MIP (cmH2O) = M: 95.3 (± 30.3)/F: 71.8 (± 35.6); MEP (cmH2O) = M: 82.8 (± 26.2)/F: 70.4 (± 8.3). No differential pressure responses were observed in either males or females. These results suggest that swimmers can sustain the magnitude of the initial maximal pressures. Other studies should be developed to clarify if MIP and MEP could be used as a marker of an athlete's performance.

  6. Formation Control for the MAXIM Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Luquette, Richard J.; Leitner, Jesse; Gendreau, Keith; Sanner, Robert M.

    2004-01-01

    Over the next twenty years, a wave of change is occurring in the space-based scientific remote sensing community. While the fundamental limits in the spatial and angular resolution achievable in spacecraft have been reached, based on today s technology, an expansive new technology base has appeared over the past decade in the area of Distributed Space Systems (DSS). A key subset of the DSS technology area is that which covers precision formation flying of space vehicles. Through precision formation flying, the baselines, previously defined by the largest monolithic structure which could fit in the largest launch vehicle fairing, are now virtually unlimited. Several missions including the Micro-Arcsecond X-ray Imaging Mission (MAXIM), and the Stellar Imager will drive the formation flying challenges to achieve unprecedented baselines for high resolution, extended-scene, interferometry in the ultraviolet and X-ray regimes. This paper focuses on establishing the feasibility for the formation control of the MAXIM mission. MAXIM formation flying requirements are on the order of microns, while Stellar Imager mission requirements are on the order of nanometers. This paper specifically addresses: (1) high-level science requirements for these missions and how they evolve into engineering requirements; and (2) the development of linearized equations of relative motion for a formation operating in an n-body gravitational field. Linearized equations of motion provide the ground work for linear formation control designs.

  7. 219 vascular fellows' perception of the future of vascular surgery.

    PubMed

    Hingorani, Anil P; Ascher, Enrico; Marks, Natalie; Shiferson, Alexander; Puggioni, Alessandra; Tran, Victor; Patel, Nirav; Jacob, Theresa

    2009-01-01

    In an attempt to identify the fellows' concerns about the future of the field of vascular surgery, we conducted a survey consisting of 22 questions at an annual national meeting in March from 2004 to 2007. In order to obtain accurate data, all surveys were kept anonymous. The fellows were asked (1) what type of practice they anticipated they would be in, (2) what the new training paradigm for fellows should be, (3) to assess their expectation of the needed manpower with respect to the demand for vascular surgeons, (4) what were major threats to the future of vascular surgery, (5) whether they had heard of and were in favor of the American Board of Vascular Surgery (ABVS), (6) who should be able to obtain vascular privileges, and (7) about their interest in an association for vascular surgical trainees. Of 273 attendees, 219 (80%) completed the survey. Males made up 87% of those surveyed, and 60% were between the ages of 31 and 35 years. Second-year fellows made up 82% of those surveyed. Those expecting to join a private, academic, or mixed practice made up 35%, 28%, and 20% of the respondents, respectively, with 71% anticipating entering a 100% vascular practice. Forty percent felt that 5 years of general surgery with 2 years of vascular surgery should be the training paradigm, while 45% suggested 3 and 3 years, respectively. A majority, 79%, felt that future demand would exceed the available manpower, while 17% suggested that manpower would meet demand. The major challenges to the future of vascular surgery were felt to be competition from cardiology (82%) or radiology (30%) and lack of an independent board (29%). Seventeen percent were not aware of the ABVS, and only 2% were against it; 71% suggested that vascular privileges be restricted to board-certified vascular surgeons. Seventy-six percent were interested in forming an association for vascular trainees to address the issues of the future job market (67%), endovascular training during fellowship (56

  8. Prolonged head-down tilt exposure reduces maximal cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crandall, C. G.; Shibasaki, M.; Wilson, T. E.; Cui, J.; Levine, B. D.

    2003-01-01

    Cutaneous vasodilation and sweat rate are reduced during a thermal challenge after simulated and actual microgravity exposure. The effects of microgravity exposure on cutaneous vasodilator capacity and on sweat gland function are unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that simulated microgravity exposure, using the 6 degrees head-down tilt (HDT) bed rest model, reduces maximal forearm cutaneous vascular conductance (FVC) and sweat gland function and that exercise during HDT preserves these responses. To test these hypotheses, 20 subjects were exposed to 14 days of strict HDT bed rest. Twelve of those subjects exercised (supine cycle ergometry) at 75% of pre-bed rest heart rate maximum for 90 min/day throughout HDT bed rest. Before and after HDT bed rest, maximal FVC was measured, via plethysmography, by heating the entire forearm to 42 degrees C for 45 min. Sweat gland function was assessed by administering 1 x 10(-6) to 2 M acetylcholine (9 doses) via intradermal microdialysis while simultaneously monitoring sweat rate over the microdialysis membranes. In the nonexercise group, maximal FVC and maximal stimulated sweat rate were significantly reduced after HDT bed rest. In contrast, these responses were unchanged in the exercise group. These data suggest that 14 days of simulated microgravity exposure, using the HDT bed rest model, reduces cutaneous vasodilator and sweating capacity, whereas aerobic exercise training during HDT bed rest preserves these responses.

  9. The burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Landfeldt, Erik; Lindgren, Peter; Bell, Christopher F.; Schmitt, Claude; Guglieri, Michela; Straub, Volker; Lochmüller, Hanns

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to estimate the total cost of illness and economic burden of Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Methods: Patients with DMD from Germany, Italy, United Kingdom, and United States were identified through Translational Research in Europe–Assessment & Treatment of Neuromuscular Diseases registries and invited to complete a questionnaire online together with a caregiver. Data on health care use, quality of life, work status, informal care, and household expenses were collected to estimate costs of DMD from the perspective of society and caregiver households. Results: A total of 770 patients (173 German, 122 Italian, 191 from the United Kingdom, and 284 from the United States) completed the questionnaire. Mean per-patient annual direct cost of illness was estimated at between $23,920 and $54,270 (2012 international dollars), 7 to 16 times higher than the mean per-capita health expenditure in these countries. Indirect and informal care costs were substantial, each constituting between 18% and 43% of total costs. The total societal burden was estimated at between $80,120 and $120,910 per patient and annum, and increased markedly with disease progression. The corresponding household burden was estimated at between $58,440 and $71,900. Conclusions: We show that DMD is associated with a substantial economic burden. Our results underscore the many different costs accompanying a rare condition such as DMD and the considerable economic burden carried by affected families. Our description of the previously unknown economic context of a rare disease serves as important intelligence input to health policy evaluations of intervention programs and novel therapies, financial support schemes for patients and their families, and the design of future cost studies. PMID:24991029

  10. Modeling Spinal Muscular Atrophy in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Mukherjee, Ashim; Kankel, Mark W.; Sen, Anindya; Sridhar, Vasanthi; Fulga, Tudor A.; Hart, Anne C.; Van Vactor, David; Artavanis-Tsakonas, Spyros

    2008-01-01

    Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA), a recessive hereditary neurodegenerative disease in humans, has been linked to mutations in the survival motor neuron (SMN) gene. SMA patients display early onset lethality coupled with motor neuron loss and skeletal muscle atrophy. We used Drosophila, which encodes a single SMN ortholog, survival motor neuron (Smn), to model SMA, since reduction of Smn function leads to defects that mimic the SMA pathology in humans. Here we show that a normal neuromuscular junction (NMJ) structure depends on SMN expression and that SMN concentrates in the post-synaptic NMJ regions. We conducted a screen for genetic modifiers of an Smn phenotype using the Exelixis collection of transposon-induced mutations, which affects approximately 50% of the Drosophila genome. This screen resulted in the recovery of 27 modifiers, thereby expanding the genetic circuitry of Smn to include several genes not previously known to be associated with this locus. Among the identified modifiers was wishful thinking (wit), a type II BMP receptor, which was shown to alter the Smn NMJ phenotype. Further characterization of two additional members of the BMP signaling pathway, Mothers against dpp (Mad) and Daughters against dpp (Dad), also modify the Smn NMJ phenotype. The NMJ defects caused by loss of Smn function can be ameliorated by increasing BMP signals, suggesting that increased BMP activity in SMA patients may help to alleviate symptoms of the disease. These results confirm that our genetic approach is likely to identify bona fide modulators of SMN activity, especially regarding its role at the neuromuscular junction, and as a consequence, may identify putative SMA therapeutic targets. PMID:18791638

  11. Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy: From Diagnosis to Therapy.

    PubMed

    Falzarano, Maria Sofia; Scotton, Chiara; Passarelli, Chiara; Ferlini, Alessandra

    2015-10-07

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked inherited neuromuscular disorder due to mutations in the dystrophin gene. It is characterized by progressive muscle weakness and wasting due to the absence of dystrophin protein that causes degeneration of skeletal and cardiac muscle. The molecular diagnostic of DMD involves a deletions/duplications analysis performed by quantitative technique such as microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (array-CGH), Multiple Ligation Probe Assay MLPA. Since traditional methods for detection of point mutations and other sequence variants require high cost and are time consuming, especially for a large gene like dystrophin, the use of next-generation sequencing (NGS) has become a useful tool available for clinical diagnosis. The dystrophin gene is large and finely regulated in terms of tissue expression, and RNA processing and editing includes a variety of fine tuned processes. At present, there are no effective treatments and the steroids are the only fully approved drugs used in DMD therapy able to slow disease progression. In the last years, an increasing variety of strategies have been studied as a possible therapeutic approach aimed to restore dystrophin production and to preserve muscle mass, ameliorating the DMD phenotype. RNA is the most studied target for the development of clinical strategies and Antisense Oligonucleotides (AONs) are the most used molecules for RNA modulation. The identification of delivery system to enhance the efficacy and to reduce the toxicity of AON is the main purpose in this area and nanomaterials are a very promising model as DNA/RNA molecules vectors. Dystrophinopathies therefore represent a pivotal field of investigation, which has opened novel avenues in molecular biology, medical genetics and novel therapeutic options.

  12. Neuropsychological profile of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Perumal, Anna Roshini; Rajeswaran, Jamuna; Nalini, Atchayaram

    2015-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an inherited myogenic disorder characterized by progressive muscle wasting. DMD is a fatal X-linked recessive disorder with an estimated prevalence of 1 in 3,500 male live births. This disease has long been associated with intellectual impairment. Research has shown that boys with DMD have variable intellectual performance, indicating the presence of specific cognitive deficits. The aim of the study was to use a battery of intelligence, learning, and memory tests to identify a neuropsychological profile in boys with DMD. A total of 22 boys diagnosed with DMD in the age range of 6 to 10 years old were evaluated using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children-Third Edition, Rey's Auditory Verbal Learning Test, and the Memory for Designs Test. The data were interpreted using means, standard deviations, percentages, and percentiles. Normative data were also used for further interpretation. The results showed that boys with DMD had a significantly lower IQ (88.5). Verbal IQ (86.59) was found to be lower than Performance IQ (92.64). There was evidence of impaired performance on the Processing Speed, Freedom From Distractibility, and Verbal Comprehension Indexes. Specific deficits in information processing, complex attention, immediate verbal memory span, verbal working memory, verbal comprehension, vocabulary, visuoconstruction ability, and verbal learning and encoding were observed. However, perceptional organization, general fund of information, abstract reasoning, visual discrimination and acuity, visual learning and memory, and verbal memory were adequate. The neuropsychological findings support the hypothesis that these children have specific cognitive deficits as opposed to a global intellectual deficit.

  13. Civil War vascular injuries.

    PubMed

    Blaisdell, F William

    2005-01-01

    As the result of the insistence of the Surgeon General during the United States Civil War, there was extensive documentation of injuries to major blood vessels and their resulting complications. The specific treatment of vascular injuries during the Civil War was ligation of the injured vessel or amputation. This was before there was any knowledge of the cause and prevention of infection. Overall, the results were dismal, with a mortality rate of nearly 60% for the more than 1000 soldiers treated by arterial ligation. The most important contribution of these medical reports was to define how the injuries should be diagnosed and managed. Many of the principles that developed as the result of this post-war review are as valid today as they were then. Unfortunately, it seems that many of these lessons have had to be relearned by the surgeons who have participated in each of our subsequent military conflicts.

  14. Vascular access for hemodialysis.

    PubMed

    Vanholder, R; Ringoir, S

    1994-04-01

    Indwelling central venous catheters were consecutively used as access for acute and chronic hemodialysis, emergency treatment of pulmonary fluid overload, intoxication and electrolyte disturbances, plasmapheresis, and semiacute continuous dialysis strategies, such as continuous arteriovenous hemofiltration (CAVH). Modification in catheter structure also made it possible to use this access for long-term treatment (e.g., surgically insertable catheters [Hickman], soft large-bore catheters for blind insertion). We discuss the remaining open questions in this field: Which is the insertion site of preference (i.e., subclavian, femoral, or deep jugular)? Should we prefer stiff or soft catheters? Should soft catheters be positioned surgically or is blind insertion by nonsurgeons as adequate? Is it necessary to couple catheter insertion to adjuvant techniques, such as echographic guidance, to reduce complications? Is the currently used polymer structure of the catheters acceptable? Should catheter dialysis be used with single or double vascular access?

  15. Vascularity in the reptilian spectacle.

    PubMed

    Mead, A W

    1976-07-01

    Vascularization of the spectacle or brille of the reptile was demonstrated by biomicroscopy, histology, fluorescein (in vivo), and Microfil silicone rubber (in situ) injections. This unusual vascularity provides new evidence for reassessment of the origin and development of this structure, and a useful tool with which to do so.

  16. Hybrid haemodialysis vascular access salvage.

    PubMed

    Potisek, Maja; Ključevšek, Tomaž; Leskovar, Boštjan

    2017-03-01

    A well-functioning vascular access is essential for successful haemodialysis in patients with end-stage kidney failure. Sometimes, when we have exploited all conventional ways of vascular access salvage, we have to find a unique solution to preserve it.

  17. [Banks of vascular homografts].

    PubMed

    Polvani, G L; Guarino, A; Pompilio, G; Parolari, A; Piccolo, G; Sala, A; Biglioli, P

    2001-01-01

    We define as Banking of the tissues all the procedures that include the finding, preparation, conservation and distribution of the homograft. The vascular homografts are taken and put into a solution of transportation at +4 degrees C and kept at this temperature till their arrival at the Bank. The following step is the dissection of the homograft which will have to be performed as quickly as possible at most 24 hours after the taking in conditions of maximum sterility. At the Italian Homograft Bank at Centro Cardiologico, the vascular homografts are kept at +4 degrees C for 96 hours on average with antibiotics. After a phase of sterilization at +4 degrees C the tissue is frozen according to a homogeneous and controlled thermic decrease and stored at -150 degrees C/-180 degrees C in fumes of liquid nitrogen till the moment of their employment allowing a long term conservation. The aim of all these procedures of cryopreservation is to keep the structural and functional integrity of cells and tissues. The thermic decrease of the tissues must occur so that to avoid all the damages of the cellular vitality and functionality and especially of the tissue structure in toto. In order to limitate these events some cryoprotector agents are employed because they reduce the concentration of the solutes, the cellular dehydration, the formation of micro-macro crystals. Another step to establish if the homograft is proper is the study of bacteriological and viral aspects. The viral screenings are performed on the donor's blood and the bacteriological tests are performed on the tissue and on the liquids. For each phase of the banking a series of information about the donor and about the tissues are recorded and filed both on paper and database so that to grant always a right conduct of the material.

  18. Reference values for lung function tests. II. Maximal respiratory pressures and voluntary ventilation.

    PubMed

    Neder, J A; Andreoni, S; Lerario, M C; Nery, L E

    1999-06-01

    The strength of the respiratory muscles can be evaluated from static measurements (maximal inspiratory and expiratory pressures, MIP and MEP) or inferred from dynamic maneuvers (maximal voluntary ventilation, MVV). Although these data could be suitable for a number of clinical and research applications, no previous studies have provided reference values for such tests using a healthy, randomly selected sample of the adult Brazilian population. With this main purpose, we prospectively evaluated 100 non-smoking subjects (50 males and 50 females), 20 to 80 years old, selected from more than 8,000 individuals. Gender-specific linear prediction equations for MIP, MEP and MVV were developed by multiple regression analysis: age and, secondarily, anthropometric measurements explained up to 56% of the variability of the dependent variables. The most cited previous studies using either Caucasian or non-Caucasian samples systematically underestimated the observed values of MIP (P < 0.05). Interestingly, the self-reported level of regular physical activity and maximum aerobic power correlates strongly with both respiratory and peripheral muscular strength (knee extensor peak torque) (P < 0.01). Our results, therefore, provide a new frame of reference to evaluate the normalcy of some useful indexes of respiratory muscle strength in Brazilian males and females aged 20 to 80.

  19. Muscle fatigue experienced during maximal eccentric exercise is predictive of the plasma creatine kinase (CK) response.

    PubMed

    Hody, S; Rogister, B; Leprince, P; Wang, F; Croisier, J-L

    2013-08-01

    Unaccustomed eccentric exercise may cause skeletal muscle damage with an increase in plasma creatine kinase (CK) activity. Although the wide variability among individuals in CK response to standardized lengthening contractions has been well described, the reasons underlying this phenomenon have not yet been understood. Therefore, this study investigated a possible correlation of the changes in muscle damage indirect markers after an eccentric exercise with the decline in muscle performance during the exercise. Twenty-seven healthy untrained male subjects performed three sets of 30 maximal isokinetic eccentric contractions of the knee extensors. The muscular work was recorded using an isokinetic dynamometer to assess muscle fatigue by means of various fatigue indices. Plasma CK activity, muscle soreness, and stiffness were measured before (pre) and one day after (post) exercise. The eccentric exercise bout induced significant changes of the three muscle damage indirect markers. Large inter-subject variability was observed for all criteria measured. More interestingly, the log (CK(post) /CK(pre)) and muscle stiffness appeared to be closely correlated with the relative work decrease (r = 0.84, r(2)  = 0.70 and r = 0.75, r(2)  = 0.56, respectively). This is the first study to propose that the muscle fatigue profile during maximal eccentric protocol could predict the magnitude of the symptoms associated with muscle damage in humans.

  20. Neurocognitive Profiles in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy and Gene Mutation Site

    PubMed Central

    D’Angelo, Maria Grazia; Lorusso, Maria Luisa; Civati, Federica; Comi, Giacomo Pietro; Magri, Francesca; Del Bo, Roberto; Guglieri, Michela; Molteni, Massimo; Turconi, Anna Carla; Bresolin, Nereo

    2011-01-01

    The presence of nonprogressive cognitive impairment is recognized as a common feature in a substantial proportion of patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. To investigate the possible role of mutations along the dystrophin gene affecting different brain dystrophin isoforms and specific cognitive profiles, 42 school-age children affected with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, subdivided according to sites of mutations along the dystrophin gene, underwent a battery of tests tapping a wide range of intellectual, linguistic, and neuropsychologic functions. Full-scale intelligence quotient was approximately 1 S.D. below the population average in the whole group of dystrophic children. Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the distal portion of the dystrophin gene (involving the 140-kDa brain protein isoform, called Dp140) were generally more severely affected and expressed different patterns of strengths and impairments, compared with patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and mutations located in the proximal portion of the dystrophin gene (not involving Dp140). Patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy and distal mutations demonstrated specific impairments in visuospatial functions and visual memory (which seemed intact in proximally mutated patients) and greater impairment in syntactic processing. PMID:22000308

  1. Intrathecal Injections in Children With Spinal Muscular Atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Swoboda, Kathryn J.; Sethna, Navil; Farrow-Gillespie, Alan; Khandji, Alexander; Xia, Shuting; Bishop, Kathie M.

    2016-01-01

    Nusinersen (ISIS-SMNRx or ISIS 396443) is an antisense oligonucleotide drug administered intrathecally to treat spinal muscular atrophy. We summarize lumbar puncture experience in children with spinal muscular atrophy during a phase 1 open-label study of nusinersen and its extension. During the studies, 73 lumbar punctures were performed in 28 patients 2 to 14 years of age with type 2/3 spinal muscular atrophy. No complications occurred in 50 (68%) lumbar punctures; in 23 (32%) procedures, adverse events were attributed to lumbar puncture. Most common adverse events were headache (n = 9), back pain (n = 9), and post–lumbar puncture syndrome (n = 8). In a subgroup analysis, adverse events were more frequent in older children, children with type 3 spinal muscular atrophy, and with a 21- or 22-gauge needle compared to a 24-gauge needle or smaller. Lumbar punctures were successfully performed in children with spinal muscular atrophy; lumbar puncture–related adverse event frequency was similar to that previously reported in children. PMID:26823478

  2. Congenital segmental spinal muscular atrophy: a case report.

    PubMed

    Savaş, Tülin; Erol, Ilknur; Özkale, Yasemin; Saygi, Semra

    2015-03-01

    Spinal muscular atrophies are genetic disorders in which anterior horn cells in the spinal cord and motor nuclei of the brainstem are progressively lost. We present a patient with arthrogryposis due to congenital spinal muscular atrophy predominantly affecting the upper limbs. Spinal muscular atrophies with onset at birth may be a cause of arthrogryposis. Localized forms of neurogenic arthrogryposis have been divided into cervical and caudal forms. Our case is similar to the cases described by Hageman et al (J Neurol Neurosurg Psychiatry 1993;56:365-368): severe symmetric lower motor neuron deficit in the upper extremities at the time of birth, no history of injury to the cervical spinal cord or the brachial plexus during delivery, and severe muscle wasting suggesting chronic denervation in utero. Because there was improvement of our patient's situation, her disease was also possibly nonprogressive and sporadic. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of a Turkish patient with congenital cervical spinal muscular atrophy. Congenital cervical spinal muscular atrophy affecting predominantly the upper limbs is a relatively rare form of motor neuron disease and should be considered in the differential diagnosis of infants with congenital contractures and severe muscle weakness by wasting mainly confined to the upper limbs.

  3. Inhibition of Prostaglandin D Synthase Suppresses Muscular Necrosis

    PubMed Central

    Mohri, Ikuko; Aritake, Kosuke; Taniguchi, Hidetoshi; Sato, Yo; Kamauchi, Shinya; Nagata, Nanae; Maruyama, Toshihiko; Taniike, Masako; Urade, Yoshihiro

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal muscle wasting disease that is characterized by a deficiency in the protein dystrophin. Previously, we reported that the expression of hematopoietic prostaglandin D synthase (HPGDS) appeared in necrotic muscle fibers from patients with either Duchenne muscular dystrophy or polymyositis. HPGDS is responsible for the production of the inflammatory mediator, prostaglandin D2. In this paper, we validated the hypothesis that HPGDS has a role in the etiology of muscular necrosis. We investigated the expression of HPGDS/ prostaglandin D2 signaling using two different mouse models of muscle necrosis, that is, bupivacaine-induced muscle necrosis and the mdx mouse, which has a genetic muscular dystrophy. We treated each mouse model with the HPGDS-specific inhibitor, HQL-79, and measured both necrotic muscle volume and selected cytokine mRNA levels. We confirmed that HPGDS expression was induced in necrotic muscle fibers in both bupivacaine-injected muscle and mdx mice. After administration of HQL-79, necrotic muscle volume was significantly decreased in both mouse models. Additionally, mRNA levels of both CD11b and transforming growth factor β1 were significantly lower in HQL-79-treated mdx mice than in vehicle-treated animals. We also demonstrated that HQL-79 suppressed prostaglandin D2 production and improved muscle strength in the mdx mouse. Our results show that HPGDS augments inflammation, which is followed by muscle injury. Furthermore, the inhibition of HPGDS ameliorates muscle necrosis even in cases of genetic muscular dystrophy. PMID:19359520

  4. Muscular activity and its relationship to biomechanics and human performance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ariel, Gideon

    1994-01-01

    The purpose of this manuscript is to address the issue of muscular activity, human motion, fitness, and exercise. Human activity is reviewed from the historical perspective as well as from the basics of muscular contraction, nervous system controls, mechanics, and biomechanical considerations. In addition, attention has been given to some of the principles involved in developing muscular adaptations through strength development. Brief descriptions and findings from a few studies are included. These experiments were conducted in order to investigate muscular adaptation to various exercise regimens. Different theories of strength development were studied and correlated to daily human movements. All measurement tools used represent state of the art exercise equipment and movement analysis. The information presented here is only a small attempt to understand the effects of exercise and conditioning on Earth with the objective of leading to greater knowledge concerning human responses during spaceflight. What makes life from nonliving objects is movement which is generated and controlled by biochemical substances. In mammals. the controlled activators are skeletal muscles and this muscular action is an integral process composed of mechanical, chemical, and neurological processes resulting in voluntary and involuntary motions. The scope of this discussion is limited to voluntary motion.

  5. TRIM proteins in therapeutic membrane repair of muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Alloush, Jenna; Weisleder, Noah

    2013-07-01

    Muscular dystrophy represents a major unmet medical need; only palliative treatments exist for this group of debilitating diseases. Because multiple forms of muscular dystrophy arise from compromised sarcolemmal membrane integrity, a therapeutic approach that can target this loss of membrane function could be applicable to a number of these distinct diseases.One promising therapeutic approach involves the process the cell uses to repair injuries to the plasma membrane. Recent discoveries of genes associated with the membrane repair process provide an opportunity to promote this process as a way to treat muscular dystrophy. One such gene is mitsugumin 53 (MG53), a member of the tripartite motif (TRIM) family of proteins (TRIM72), which is an essential component of the membrane repair pathway in muscle. Recent results indicate that MG53/TRIM72 protein can be directly applied as a therapeutic agent to increase membrane repair capacity of many cell types and treat some aspects of the disease in mouse models of muscular dystrophy. There is great potential for the use of recombinant human MG53 in treating muscular dystrophy and other diseases in which compromised membrane integrity contributes to the disease. Other TRIM family proteins may provide additional targets for therapeutic intervention in similar disease states.

  6. Muscular, skeletal, and neural adaptations following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Shields, Richard K

    2002-02-01

    Spinal cord injury is associated with adaptations to the muscular, skeletal, and spinal systems. Experimental data are lacking regarding the extent to which rehabilitative methods may influence these adaptations. An understanding of the plasticity of the muscular, skeletal, and spinal systems after paralysis may be important as new rehabilitative technologies emerge in the 21st century. Moreover, individuals injured today may become poor candidates for future scientific advancements (cure) if their neuromusculoskeletal systems are irreversibly impaired. The primary purpose of this paper is to explore the physiological properties of skeletal muscle as a result of spinal cord injury; secondarily, to consider associated changes at the skeletal and spinal levels. Muscular adaptations include a transformation to faster myosin, increased contractile speeds, shift to the right on the torque-frequency curve, increased fatigue, and enhanced doublet potentiation. These muscular adaptations may be prevented in individuals with acute paralysis and partially reversed in individuals with chronic paralysis. Moreover, the muscular changes may be coordinated with motor unit and spinal circuitry adaptations. Concurrently, skeletal adaptations, as measured by bone mineral density, show extensive loss within the first six months after paralysis. The underlying science governing neuromusculoskeletal adaptations after paralysis will help guide professionals as new rehabilitation strategies evolve in the future.

  7. Delayed bone regeneration is linked to chronic inflammation in murine muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Abou-Khalil, Rana; Yang, Frank; Mortreux, Marie; Lieu, Shirley; Yu, Yan-Yiu; Wurmser, Maud; Pereira, Catia; Relaix, Frédéric; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph S; Colnot, Céline

    2014-02-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) patients exhibit skeletal muscle weakness with continuous cycles of muscle fiber degeneration/regeneration, chronic inflammation, low bone mineral density, and increased risks of fracture. Fragility fractures and associated complications are considered as a consequence of the osteoporotic condition in these patients. Here, we aimed to establish the relationship between muscular dystrophy and fracture healing by assessing bone regeneration in mdx mice, a model of DMD with absence of osteoporosis. Our results illustrate that muscle defects in mdx mice impact the process of bone regeneration at various levels. In mdx fracture calluses, both cartilage and bone deposition were delayed followed by a delay in cartilage and bone remodeling. Vascularization of mdx fracture calluses was also decreased during the early stages of repair. Dystrophic muscles are known to contain elevated numbers of macrophages contributing to muscle degeneration. Accordingly, we observed increased macrophage recruitment in the mdx fracture calluses and abnormal macrophage accumulation throughout the process of bone regeneration. These changes in the inflammatory environment subsequently had an impact on the recruitment of osteoclasts and the remodeling phase of repair. Further damage to the mdx muscles, using a novel model of muscle trauma, amplified both the chronic inflammatory response and the delay in bone regeneration. In addition, PLX3397 treatment of mdx mice, a cFMS (colony stimulating factor receptor 1) inhibitor in monocytes, partially rescued the bone repair defect through increasing cartilage deposition and decreasing the number of macrophages. In conclusion, chronic inflammation in mdx mice contributes to the fracture healing delay and is associated with a decrease in angiogenesis and a transient delay in osteoclast recruitment. By revealing the role of dystrophic muscle in regulating the inflammatory response during bone repair, our results

  8. Vascular surgery: the European perspective.

    PubMed

    Harris, P

    1999-09-01

    Isaac Newton, among others, observed that 'we see so far because we are standing upon the shoulders of giants'. In vascular surgery most of the giants have been European, and this is a heritage which we as Europeans can take pride in and build upon if we chose to do so. As in other areas of life, commitment is essential in order to influence the future. For vascular surgeons in Europe this means active participation in the European scientific societies for vascular surgery and in the UEMS. The main value of the EBSQ.VASC assessments to date has been to expose the uneven standards of training in vascular surgery within the European Union. Only if action follows to address these inequalities will the tactics of the European Board of Vascular Surgery be vindicated.

  9. Caffeine's Vascular Mechanisms of Action

    PubMed Central

    Echeverri, Darío; Montes, Félix R.; Cabrera, Mariana; Galán, Angélica; Prieto, Angélica

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine is the most widely consumed stimulating substance in the world. It is found in coffee, tea, soft drinks, chocolate, and many medications. Caffeine is a xanthine with various effects and mechanisms of action in vascular tissue. In endothelial cells, it increases intracellular calcium stimulating the production of nitric oxide through the expression of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase enzyme. Nitric oxide is diffused to the vascular smooth muscle cell to produce vasodilation. In vascular smooth muscle cells its effect is predominantly a competitive inhibition of phosphodiesterase, producing an accumulation of cAMP and vasodilation. In addition, it blocks the adenosine receptors present in the vascular tissue to produce vasoconstriction. In this paper the main mechanisms of action of caffeine on the vascular tissue are described, in which it is shown that caffeine has some cardiovascular properties and effects which could be considered beneficial. PMID:21188209

  10. Citicoline in vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia after stroke.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sabín, Jose; Román, Gustavo C

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive decline after stroke is more common than stroke recurrence. Stroke doubles the risk of dementia and is a major contributor to vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia. Neuropathological studies in most cases of dementia in the elderly reveal a large load of vascular ischemic brain lesions mixed with a lesser contribution of neurodegenerative lesions of Alzheimer disease. Nonetheless, few pharmacological studies have addressed vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia after stroke. Citicoline has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in acute stroke and has been shown to improve cognition in patients with chronic cerebrovascular disease and in some patients with Alzheimer disease. A recent trial lasting 6 months in patients with first-ever ischemic stroke showed that citicoline prevented cognitive decline after stroke with significant improvement of temporal orientation, attention, and executive function. Experimentally, citicoline exhibits neuroprotective effects and enhances neural repair. Citicoline appears to be a safe and promising alternative to improve stroke recovery and could be indicated in patients with vascular cognitive impairment, vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease with significant cerebrovascular disease.

  11. Maximizing versus satisficing: happiness is a matter of choice.

    PubMed

    Schwartz, Barry; Ward, Andrew; Monterosso, John; Lyubomirsky, Sonja; White, Katherine; Lehman, Darrin R

    2002-11-01

    Can people feel worse off as the options they face increase? The present studies suggest that some people--maximizers--can. Study 1 reported a Maximization Scale, which measures individual differences in desire to maximize. Seven samples revealed negative correlations between maximization and happiness, optimism, self-esteem, and life satisfaction, and positive correlations between maximization and depression, perfectionism, and regret. Study 2 found maximizers less satisfied than nonmaximizers (satisficers) with consumer decisions, and more likely to engage in social comparison. Study 3 found maximizers more adversely affected by upward social comparison. Study 4 found maximizers more sensitive to regret and less satisfied in an ultimatum bargaining game. The interaction between maximizing and choice is discussed in terms of regret, adaptation, and self-blame.

  12. Postactivation Potentiation Biases Maximal Isometric Strength Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Lima, Leonardo Coelho Rabello; Oliveira, Felipe Bruno Dias; Oliveira, Thiago Pires; Assumpção, Claudio de Oliveira; Greco, Camila Coelho; Cardozo, Adalgiso Croscato; Denadai, Benedito Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Postactivation potentiation (PAP) is known to enhance force production. Maximal isometric strength assessment protocols usually consist of two or more maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVCs). The objective of this study was to determine if PAP would influence isometric strength assessment. Healthy male volunteers (n = 23) performed two five-second MVCs separated by a 180-seconds interval. Changes in isometric peak torque (IPT), time to achieve it (tPTI), contractile impulse (CI), root mean square of the electromyographic signal during PTI (RMS), and rate of torque development (RTD), in different intervals, were measured. Significant increases in IPT (240.6 ± 55.7 N·m versus 248.9 ± 55.1 N·m), RTD (746 ± 152 N·m·s−1versus 727 ± 158 N·m·s−1), and RMS (59.1 ± 12.2% RMSMAX  versus 54.8 ± 9.4% RMSMAX) were found on the second MVC. tPTI decreased significantly on the second MVC (2373 ± 1200 ms versus 2784 ± 1226 ms). We conclude that a first MVC leads to PAP that elicits significant enhancements in strength-related variables of a second MVC performed 180 seconds later. If disconsidered, this phenomenon might bias maximal isometric strength assessment, overestimating some of these variables. PMID:25133157

  13. Changes in vascular extracellular matrix composition during decidual spiral arteriole remodeling in early human pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Smith, Samantha D; Choudhury, Ruhul H; Matos, Patricia; Horn, James A; Lye, Stephen J; Dunk, Caroline E; Aplin, John D; Jones, Rebecca L; Harris, Lynda K

    2016-05-01

    Uterine spiral arteriole (SA) remodeling in early pregnancy involves a coordinated series of events including decidual immune cell recruitment, vascular cell disruption and loss, and colonization by placental-derived extravillous trophoblast (EVT). During this process, decidual SA are converted from narrow, muscular vessels into dilated channels lacking vasomotor control. We hypothesized that this extensive alteration in SA architecture must require significant reorganization and/or breakdown of the vascular extracellular matrix (ECM). First trimester decidua basalis (30 specimens) was immunostained to identify spiral arterioles undergoing trophoblast-independent and -dependent phases of remodeling. Serial sections were then immunostained for a panel of ECM markers, to examine changes in vascular ECM during the remodeling process. The initial stages of SA remodeling were characterized by loss of laminin, elastin, fibrillin, collagen types III, IV and VI from the basement membrane, vascular media and/or adventitia, and surrounding decidual stromal cells. Loss of ECM correlated with disruption and disorganization of vascular smooth muscle cells, and the majority of changes occurred prior to extensive colonization of the vessel wall by EVT. The final stages of SA remodeling, characterized by the arrival of EVT, were associated with the increased mural deposition of fibronectin and fibrinoid. This study provides the first detailed analysis of the spatial and temporal loss of ECM from the walls of remodeling decidual SA in early pregnancy.

  14. Electromagnetically induced grating with maximal atomic coherence

    SciTech Connect

    Carvalho, Silvania A.; Araujo, Luis E. E. de

    2011-10-15

    We describe theoretically an atomic diffraction grating that combines an electromagnetically induced grating with a coherence grating in a double-{Lambda} atomic system. With the atom in a condition of maximal coherence between its lower levels, the combined gratings simultaneously diffract both the incident probe beam as well as the signal beam generated through four-wave mixing. A special feature of the atomic grating is that it will diffract any beam resonantly tuned to any excited state of the atom accessible by a dipole transition from its ground state.

  15. Maximizing algebraic connectivity in air transportation networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Peng

    In air transportation networks the robustness of a network regarding node and link failures is a key factor for its design. An experiment based on the real air transportation network is performed to show that the algebraic connectivity is a good measure for network robustness. Three optimization problems of algebraic connectivity maximization are then formulated in order to find the most robust network design under different constraints. The algebraic connectivity maximization problem with flight routes addition or deletion is first formulated. Three methods to optimize and analyze the network algebraic connectivity are proposed. The Modified Greedy Perturbation Algorithm (MGP) provides a sub-optimal solution in a fast iterative manner. The Weighted Tabu Search (WTS) is designed to offer a near optimal solution with longer running time. The relaxed semi-definite programming (SDP) is used to set a performance upper bound and three rounding techniques are discussed to find the feasible solution. The simulation results present the trade-off among the three methods. The case study on two air transportation networks of Virgin America and Southwest Airlines show that the developed methods can be applied in real world large scale networks. The algebraic connectivity maximization problem is extended by adding the leg number constraint, which considers the traveler's tolerance for the total connecting stops. The Binary Semi-Definite Programming (BSDP) with cutting plane method provides the optimal solution. The tabu search and 2-opt search heuristics can find the optimal solution in small scale networks and the near optimal solution in large scale networks. The third algebraic connectivity maximization problem with operating cost constraint is formulated. When the total operating cost budget is given, the number of the edges to be added is not fixed. Each edge weight needs to be calculated instead of being pre-determined. It is illustrated that the edge addition and the

  16. Approximation Algorithms for Free-Label Maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Berg, Mark; Gerrits, Dirk H. P.

    Inspired by air traffic control and other applications where moving objects have to be labeled, we consider the following (static) point labeling problem: given a set P of n points in the plane and labels that are unit squares, place a label with each point in P in such a way that the number of free labels (labels not intersecting any other label) is maximized. We develop efficient constant-factor approximation algorithms for this problem, as well as PTASs, for various label-placement models.

  17. Maximizing results in reconstruction of cheek defects.

    PubMed

    Mureau, Marc A M; Hofer, Stefan O P

    2009-07-01

    The face is exceedingly important, as it is the medium through which individuals interact with the rest of society. Reconstruction of cheek defects after trauma or surgery is a continuing challenge for surgeons who wish to reliably restore facial function and appearance. Important in aesthetic facial reconstruction are the aesthetic unit principles, by which the face can be divided in central facial units (nose, lips, eyelids) and peripheral facial units (cheeks, forehead, chin). This article summarizes established options for reconstruction of cheek defects and provides an overview of several modifications as well as tips and tricks to avoid complications and maximize aesthetic results.

  18. Psychometric properties of Yelland and Tiggemann's Drive for Muscularity Scale.

    PubMed

    Tod, David; Morrison, Todd G; Edwards, Christian

    2012-06-01

    The purpose of the current study was to examine the dimensionality and validity of Yelland and Tiggemann's Drive for Muscularity Scale (YT-DMS). Participants were college students (305 women, M(AGE)=20.15 years, SD=4.00; 356 men, M(AGE)=20.24 years, SD=3.85) who completed the YT-DMS, the Drive for Muscularity Attitudes Questionnaire, the Drive for Leanness Scale, the Drive for Thinness Scale, and a socio-demographic questionnaire. Results indicated the YT-DMS had a stable unidimensional factor structure in both genders, and the pattern of relationships generally supported the measure's criterion and construct validity. These results reveal the YT-DMS has promise, but helps identify possible areas for improvement, such as a greater focus on sampling the content domain associated with the drive for muscularity.

  19. Psychosocial predictors of drive for muscularity in male collegiate athletes.

    PubMed

    Galli, Nick; Petrie, Trent; Reel, Justine J; Greenleaf, Christy; Carter, Jennifer E

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the simultaneous relation of general and sport-specific pressures about body weight and shape, negative affect, and body satisfaction to drive for muscularity (DM) in male collegiate athletes. Participants were 183 male athletes who were drawn from three NCAA Division I institutions and represented 17 different sports. As hypothesized, after controlling for BMI and sport type, sport-specific pressures, negative affect, and body satisfaction were significant predictors, and accounted for 15-34% of the variance in muscularity-oriented body image and muscularity behaviors; general pressures however were not significantly related. These findings offer insight into the personal and social antecedents of DM in male athletes, and serve as a starting point for future research on DM in this population.

  20. Cognitive and Neurobehavioral Profile in Boys With Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Banihani, Rudaina; Smile, Sharon; Yoon, Grace; Dupuis, Annie; Mosleh, Maureen; Snider, Andrea; McAdam, Laura

    2015-10-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a progressive neuromuscular condition that has a high rate of cognitive and learning disabilities as well as neurobehavioral disorders, some of which have been associated with disruption of dystrophin isoforms. Retrospective cohort of 59 boys investigated the cognitive and neurobehavioral profile of boys with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Full-scale IQ of < 70 was seen in 27%; learning disability in 44%, intellectual disability in 19%; attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder in 32%; autism spectrum disorders in 15%; and anxiety in 27%. Mutations affecting Dp260 isoform and 5'untranslated region of Dp140 were observed in 60% with learning disability, 50% intellectual disability, 77% with autism spectrum disorders, and 94% with anxiety. No statistically significant correlation was noted between comorbidities and dystrophin isoforms; however, there is a trend of cumulative loss of dystrophin isoforms with declining full-scale IQ. Enhanced psychology testing to include both cognitive and neurobehavioral disorders is recommended for all individuals with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  1. Effects of yoga practice on muscular endurance in young women.

    PubMed

    Shiraishi, Juliana Costa; Bezerra, Lídia Mara Aguiar

    2016-02-01

    The aim of this study was to verify the effects of a systematized yoga practice on muscular endurance in young women. Twenty six women (24 ± 3.5 years old) participated in six weeks of yoga classes, and twenty one women (25 ± 5.1 years old) participated as the control group. The yoga intervention was composed of eighteen sessions, three times per week, at 1 h per session. The muscular endurance of upper limbs (push-up) and abdominal (sit-up) was assessed through the protocol suggested by Gettman (1989) [1] and Golding, Myers and Sinning (1989) [2] to the maximum repetitions performed in 1 min. To verify the significant differences intra groups and between groups a SPANOVA was performed, and the level of significance was p ≤ 0.05. The findings suggest that yoga provides improvement in upper limb and in abdominal muscular endurance.

  2. Respiratory surveillance of patients with Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Spehrs-Ciaffi, Virginia; Fitting, Jean William; Cotting, Jacques; Jeannet, Pierre-Yves

    2009-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is is the most common form of the childhood muscular dystrophies. It follows a predictable clinical course marked by progressive skeletal muscle weakness, lost of ambulation before teen-age and death in early adulthood secondary to respiratory or cardiac failure. Becker muscular dystrophy is less common and has a milder clinical course but also results in respiratory and cardiac failure.Altough recent advances in respiratory care and new technologies have improved the outlook many patients already received only a traditional non-interventional approach. The aims of this work are: to analyse the pathophysiology and natural history of respiratory function in these diseases, to descript their clinical manifestations, to present the diagnostics tools and to provide recommendations for an adequated respiratory care in this particular population based on the updated literature referenced.

  3. Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy: moving the field forward.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaidy, Samiah; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Mendell, Jerry R

    2014-11-01

    Gene therapy for the muscular dystrophies has evolved as a promising treatment for this progressive group of disorders. Although corticosteroids and/or supportive treatments remain the standard of care for Duchenne muscular dystrophy, loss of ambulation, respiratory failure, and compromised cardiac function is the inevitable outcome. Recent developments in genetically mediated therapies have allowed for personalized treatments that strategically target individual muscular dystrophy subtypes based on disease pathomechanism and phenotype. In this review, we highlight the therapeutic progress with emphasis on evolving preclinical data and our own experience in completed clinical trials and others currently underway. We also discuss the lessons we have learned along the way and the strategies developed to overcome limitations and obstacles in this field.

  4. Preclinical studies for gene therapy of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Odom, Guy L; Banks, Glen B; Schultz, Brian R; Gregorevic, Paul; Chamberlain, Jeffrey S

    2010-09-01

    The muscular dystrophies are a diverse group of genetic disorders without an effective treatment. Because they are caused by mutations in various genes, the most direct way to treat them involves correcting the underlying gene defect (ie, gene therapy). Such a gene therapy approach involves delivering a therapeutic gene cassette to essentially all the muscles of the body in a safe and efficacious manner. The authors describe gene delivery methods using vectors derived from adeno-associated virus that are showing great promise in preclinical studies for treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. It is hoped that variations on these methods might be applicable for most, if not all, of the different types of muscular dystrophy.

  5. Evaluation of muscular stabilization ability during a static workout.

    PubMed

    Staniszewski, Michał; Urbanik, Czesław; Staniszewski, Tadeusz

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this research was to determine the moving and stabilizing functions of selected groups of muscles during the process of static workout. 15 students of the Academy of Physical Education were tested in non-competitive training. Muscular torques achieved during flexing and extending big limb joints were used as the determinant of force. Comparative analysis of torque values achieved in passive stabilization (with support) and muscular stabilization (without support) in elbow and knee joints was carried out. The value of the force applied to the passively stabilizing element in a given measurement during the flexion of elbow and the extension of knee joint was tested. The results of these tests allowed us to learn the value of muscular torques and - after statistical analysis - the relationship between them in particular functions.

  6. Idiopathic intracranial hypertension in a child with Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Weig, Spencer G; Zinn, Matthias M; Howard, James F

    2011-12-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an X-linked, recessively inherited disorder characterized by progressive weakness attributable to the absence of dystrophin expression in muscle. In multiple studies, the chronic administration of corticosteroids slowed the loss of ambulation that develops in mid to late childhood. Corticosteroids, however, frequently produce unacceptable side effects, including Cushingoid appearance and weight gain. Deflazacort, an oxazoline analogue of prednisolone, produces equivalent benefits on muscle with fewer reported Cushingoid side effects. We present a 9-year-old boy with Duchenne muscular dystrophy who developed morbid obesity and subsequent idiopathic intracranial hypertension after 2 years of receiving deflazacort. Although deflazacort is typically thought to produce less obesity than prednisone, severe Cushingoid side effects may occur in some individuals. To our knowledge, this description is the first of idiopathic intracranial hypertension complicating chronic corticosteroid treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  7. Pharmacologic and genetic therapy for childhood muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Escolar, D M; Scacheri, C G

    2001-03-01

    The outstanding advances in the molecular characterization of muscle diseases, including muscular dystrophies, inflammatory myopathies, and ion channel disorders, have resulted in the identification of potential targets for pharmacologic and genetic therapy in the best characterized of these diseases. The most common myopathy in children, Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), is the focus of active pharmacologic clinical trials. Genetic transfer therapy research for this and other dystrophies is rapidly moving forward. However, as new approaches for treatment are being actively investigated, the current modality of treatment for all myopathies is still in the realm of physical medicine and rehabilitation. The focus of this review is on the advances in pharmacologic and genetic therapy research in DMD and limb girdle muscular dystrophies.

  8. Jagged 1 rescues the Duchenne muscular dystrophy phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Natassia M.; Elvers, Ingegerd; Alexander, Matthew S.; Moreira, Yuri B.; Eran, Alal; Gomes, Juliana P.; Marshall, Jamie L.; Karlsson, Elinor K.; Verjovski-Almeida, Sergio; Lindblad-Toh, Kerstin; Kunkel, Louis M.; Zatz, Mayana

    2015-01-01

    Summary Duchenne muscular dystrophy, caused by mutations at the dystrophin gene, is the most common form of Muscular Dystrophy. There is no cure for DMD and current therapeutic approaches to restore dystrophin expression are only partially effective. The absence of dystrophin in muscle results in dysregulation of signaling pathways which could be targets for disease therapy and drug discovery. Previously we identified two exceptional Golden Retriever Muscular Dystrophy (GRMD) dogs that are mildly affected, have functional muscle and normal lifespan despite the complete absence of dystrophin. Now, our data on linkage, whole genome sequencing and transcriptome analyses of these dogs compared to severely affected GRMD and control animals reveal that increased expression of Jagged1 gene, a known regulator of the Notch signaling pathway, is a hallmark of the mild phenotype. Functional analyses demonstrate that Jagged1 overexpression ameliorates the dystrophic phenotype, suggesting that Jagged1 may represent a target for DMD therapy in a dystrophin-independent manner. PMID:26582133

  9. Relationship between the increase of effectiveness indexes and the increase of muscular efficiency with cycling power.

    PubMed

    Zameziati, Karim; Mornieux, Guillaume; Rouffet, David; Belli, Alain

    2006-02-01

    We determined the index of effectiveness (IE), as defined by the ratio of the tangential (effective force) to the total force applied on the pedals, using a new method proposed by Mornieux et al. (J Biomech, 2005), while simultaneously measuring the muscular efficiency during sub-maximal cycling tests of different intensities. This allowed us to verify whether part of the changes in muscular efficiency could be explained by a better orientation of the force applied on the pedals. Ten subjects were asked to perform an incremental test to exhaustion, starting at 100 W and with 30 W increments every 5 min, at 80 rpm. Gross (GE) and net (NE) efficiencies were calculated from the oxygen uptake and W(Ext) measurements. From the three-dimensional force's measurements, it was possible to measure the total force (F(Tot)), including the effective (F(Tang)) and ineffective force (F (Rad + Lat)). IE has been determined as the ratio between F(Tang) and F(Tot), applied on the pedals for three different time intervals, i.e., during the full revolution (IE(360 degrees)), the downstroke phase (IE(180 degrees Desc)) and the upstroke phase (IE(180 degrees Asc)). IE(360 degrees) and IE(180 degrees Asc) were significantly correlated with GE (r = 0.79 and 0.66, respectively) and NE (r = 0.66 and 0.99, respectively). In contrast, IE(180 degrees Desc) was not correlated to GE or to NE. From a mechanical point of view, during the upstroke, the subject was able to reduce the non-propulsive forces applied by an active muscle contraction, contrary to the downstroke phase. As a consequence, the term 'passive phase', which is currently used to characterize the upstroke phase, seems to be obsolete. The IE(180 degrees Asc) could also explain small variations of GE and NE for a recreational group.

  10. Chronic psychological stress impairs recovery of muscular function and somatic sensations over a 96-hour period.

    PubMed

    Stults-Kolehmainen, Matthew A; Bartholomew, John B; Sinha, Rajita

    2014-07-01

    The primary aim of this study was to determine whether chronic mental stress moderates recovery of muscular function and somatic sensations: perceived energy, fatigue, and soreness, in a 4-day period after a bout of strenuous resistance exercise. Undergraduate resistance training students (n = 31; age, 20.26 ± 1.34 years) completed the Perceived Stress Scale and the Undergraduate Stress Questionnaire, a measure of life event stress. At a later visit, they performed an acute heavy-resistance exercise protocol (10 repetition maximum [RM] leg press test plus 6 sets: 80-100% of 10RM). Maximal isometric force (MIF), perceived energy, fatigue, and soreness were assessed in approximately 24-hour intervals after exercise. Recovery data were analyzed with hierarchical linear modeling growth curve analysis. Life event stress significantly moderated linear (p = 0.027) and squared (p = 0.031) recovery of MIF. This relationship held even when the model was adjusted for fitness, workload, and training experience. Perceived energy (p = 0.038), fatigue (p = 0.040), and soreness (p = 0.027) all were moderated by life stress. Mean perceived stress modulated linear and squared recovery of MIF (p < 0.001) and energy (p = 0.004) but not fatigue or soreness. In all analyses, higher stress was associated with worse recovery. Stress, whether assessed as life event stress or perceived stress, moderated the recovery trajectories of muscular function and somatic sensations in a 96-hour period after strenuous resistance exercise. Therefore, under conditions of inordinate stress, individuals may need to be more mindful about observing an appropriate length of recovery.

  11. Potential benefits of exercise on blood pressure and vascular function.

    PubMed

    Pal, Sebely; Radavelli-Bagatini, Simone; Ho, Suleen

    2013-01-01

    Physical activity seems to enhance cardiovascular fitness during the course of the lifecycle, improve blood pressure, and is associated with decreased prevalence of hypertension and coronary heart disease. It may also delay or prevent age-related increases in arterial stiffness. It is unclear if specific exercise types (aerobic, resistance, or combination) have a better effect on blood pressure and vascular function. This review was written based on previous original articles, systematic reviews, and meta-analyses indexed on PubMed from years 1975 to 2012 to identify studies on different types of exercise and the associations or effects on blood pressure and vascular function. In summary, aerobic exercise (30 to 40 minutes of training at 60% to 85% of predicted maximal heart rate, most days of the week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure and reduce augmentation index. Resistance training (three to four sets of eight to 12 repetitions at 10 repetition maximum, 3 days a week) appears to significantly improve blood pressure, whereas combination exercise training (15 minutes of aerobic and 15 minutes of resistance, 5 days a week) is beneficial to vascular function, but at a lower scale. Aerobic exercise seems to better benefit blood pressure and vascular function.

  12. Analysis of the vibration regimes of vascular walls

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kudryashov, A. V.; Rozenblyum, L. A.; Khurlapova, T. V.; Yakhno, V. G.

    1980-11-01

    The theoretical description exposed here can be used for explaining the differences which are sometimes observed between the values of the diastolic pressure derived from direct measurements and those derived from indirect measurements. Nervous and emotional action may alter markedly the mechanical properties of the muscular layer of the wall. In this respect it is important to what side the hysteresis loop in the radiusstress curve will be shifted. If the hysteresis is shifted towards the region of high pressures, then tones will be recorded at higher pi — P l values and, hence, the error in an indirect measurement of the pressure will increase. From this point of view the phenomenon of an "infinite tone" is explained by the dependence of the hysteresis of the radius on the stress on the wall in the pressure range Pdiastvascular wall. The rigidity and the mass of a vascular wall can be estimated from the high-frequency phase of the tone (this phase being determined by the resonance characteristics of the vessel). A check of the clinical value of these parameters requires additional investigations.

  13. Vascular parkinsonism: Deconstructing a syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Vizcarra, Joaquin A.; Lang, Anthony E.; Sethi, Kapil D; Espay, Alberto J.

    2015-01-01

    Progressive ambulatory impairment and abnormal white matter signal on neuroimaging come together under the diagnostic umbrella of vascular parkinsonism. A critical appraisal of the literature, however, suggests that (1) no abnormal structural imaging pattern is specific to vascular parkinsonism; (2) there is poor correlation between brain magnetic resonance imaging hyperintensities and microangiopathic brain disease and parkinsonism from available clinicopathologic data; (3) pure parkinsonism from vascular injury (“definite” vascular parkinsonism) consistently results from ischemic or hemorrhagic strokes involving the substantia nigra and/or nigrostriatal pathway but sparing the striatum itself, the cortex, and the intervening white matter; and (4) many cases reported as vascular parkinsonism may represent pseudovascular parkinsonism (e.g., Parkinson disease or another neurodegenerative parkinsonism such as progressive supranuclear palsy with non-specific neuroimaging signal abnormalities), vascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., akinetic mutism due to bilateral mesial frontal strokes or apathetic depression from bilateral striatal lacunar strokes), or pseudovascular pseudoparkinsonism (e.g., higher-level gait disorders, including normal pressure hydrocephalus with transependimal exudate). These syndromic designations are preferable over vascular parkinsonism until pathology or validated biomarkers confirm the underlying nature and relevance of the leukoaraiosis. PMID:25997420

  14. Vascular access in oncology patients.

    PubMed

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Pittiruti, Mauro; Biffi, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    Adequate vascular access is of paramount importance in oncology patients. It is important in the initial phase of surgical treatment or chemotherapy, as well as in the chronic management of advanced cancer and in the palliative care setting. We present an overview of the available vascular access devices and of the most relevant issues regarding insertion and management of vascular access. Particular emphasis is given to the use of ultrasound guidance as the preferred technique of insertion, which has dramatically decreased insertion-related complications. Vascular access management has considerably improved after the publication of effective guidelines for the appropriate nursing of the vascular device, which has reduced the risk of late complications, such as catheter-related bloodstream infection. However, many areas of clinical practice are still lacking an evidence-based background, such as the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device in each clinical situation, as well as prevention and treatment of thrombosis. We suggest an approach to the choice of the most appropriate vascular access device for the oncology patient, based on the literature available to date.

  15. Vascular Injuries: Trends in Management

    PubMed Central

    Wani, Mohd Lateef; Ahangar, Ab Gani; Ganie, Farooq Ahmad; Wani, Shadab Nabi; Wani, Nasir-ud-din

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Vascular injury presents a great challenge to the emergency resident because these injuries require urgent intervention to prevent loss of life or limb. Sometimes serious vascular injury presents with only subtle or occult signs or symptoms. The patient may present weeks or months after initial injury with symptoms of vascular insufficiency, embolization, pseudoaneurysm, arteriovenous fistula etc. Although the majority of vascular injuries are caused by penetrating trauma from gunshot wounds, stabbing or blast injury, the possibility of vascular injury needs to be considered in patients presenting with displaced long bone fractures, crush injury, prolonged immobilization in a fixed position by tight casts or bandages and various invasive procedures. iatrogenic vascular injuries constitute about 10% of cases in most series; however the incidence is an increasing trend because more endovascular procedures such as angioplasty and cardiac catheterization are being performed routinely. Civilian trauma is more frequently seen in young males. However, it can occur at any age due to road accidents, firearms, bomb blasts and diagnostic procedures. Most of the time, civilian trauma causes less tissue damage. There is an epidemic of vascular injuries in Kashmir valley because of problems in law and order in the past two decades. This review deals with the topic in detail. PMID:24350103

  16. [The future of vascular medicine].

    PubMed

    Kroeger, K; Luther, B

    2014-10-01

    In the future vascular medicine will still have a great impact on health of people. It should be noted that the aging of the population does not lead to a dramatic increase in patient numbers, but will be associated with a changing spectrum of co-morbidities. In addition, vascular medical research has to include the intensive care special features of vascular patients, the involvement of vascular medicine in a holistic concept of fast-track surgery, a geriatric-oriented intensive monitoring and early geriatric rehabilitation. For the future acceptance of vascular medicine as a separate subject area under delimitation of cardiology and radiology is important. On the other hand, the subject is so complex and will become more complex in future specialisations that mixing of surgery and angiology is desirable, with the aim to preserve the vascular surgical knowledge and skills on par with the medical and interventional measures and further develop them. Only large, interdisciplinary guided vascular centres will be able to provide timely diagnosis and therapy, to deal with the growing multi-morbidity of the patient, to perform complex therapies even in an acute emergency and due to sufficient number of cases to present with well-trained and experienced teams. These requirements are mandatory to decrease patients' mortality step by step.

  17. Structural deterioration of tendon collagen in genetic muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Stinson, R H

    1975-08-19

    The structure of gastrocnemius tendons from chickens with genetically induced muscular dystrophy has been studied by low-angle X-ray diffraction. Compared with normal samples there is poor alignment of collagen within the tendons. This difference is quite pronounced at eight weeks when the affected birds are still in comparatively good physical condition. Similar changes have been reported for birds with nutritionally induced muscular dystrophy (Bartlett, M. W., Egelstaff, P. A., Holden, T. M., Stinson, R. H. and Sweeny, P. R. (1973) Biochim. Biophys. Acta 328, 213-220).

  18. Congenital contractural arachnodactyly with neurogenic muscular atrophy: case report.

    PubMed

    Scola, R H; Werneck, L C; Iwamoto, F M; Ribas, L C; Raskin, S; Correa Neto, Y

    2001-06-01

    We report the case of a 3-(1/2)-year-old girl with hypotonia, multiple joint contractures, hip luxation, arachnodactyly, adducted thumbs, dolichostenomelia, and abnormal external ears suggesting the diagnosis of congenital contractural arachnodactyly (CCA). The serum muscle enzymes were normal and the needle electromyography showed active and chronic denervation. The muscle biopsy demonstrated active and chronic denervation compatible with spinal muscular atrophy. Analysis of exons 7 and 8 of survival motor neuron gene through polymerase chain reaction did not show deletions. Neurogenic muscular atrophy is a new abnormality associated with CCA, suggesting that CCA is clinically heterogeneous.

  19. The paradox of muscle hypertrophy in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Kornegay, Joe N; Childers, Martin K; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Nghiem, Peter; Wang, Jiahui; Fan, Zheng; Howard, James F; Schatzberg, Scott J; Dow, Jennifer L; Grange, Robert W; Styner, Martin A; Hoffman, Eric P; Wagner, Kathryn R

    2012-02-01

    Mutations in the dystrophin gene cause Duchenne and Becker muscular dystrophy in humans and syndromes in mice, dogs, and cats. Affected humans and dogs have progressive disease that leads primarily to muscle atrophy. Mdx mice progress through an initial phase of muscle hypertrophy followed by atrophy. Cats have persistent muscle hypertrophy. Hypertrophy in humans has been attributed to deposition of fat and connective tissue (pseudohypertrophy). Increased muscle mass (true hypertrophy) has been documented in animal models. Muscle hypertrophy can exaggerate postural instability and joint contractures. Deleterious consequences of muscle hypertrophy should be considered when developing treatments for muscular dystrophy.

  20. Optimizing Population Variability to Maximize Benefit

    PubMed Central

    Izu, Leighton T.; Bányász, Tamás; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Variability is inherent in any population, regardless whether the population comprises humans, plants, biological cells, or manufactured parts. Is the variability beneficial, detrimental, or inconsequential? This question is of fundamental importance in manufacturing, agriculture, and bioengineering. This question has no simple categorical answer because research shows that variability in a population can have both beneficial and detrimental effects. Here we ask whether there is a certain level of variability that can maximize benefit to the population as a whole. We answer this question by using a model composed of a population of individuals who independently make binary decisions; individuals vary in making a yes or no decision, and the aggregated effect of these decisions on the population is quantified by a benefit function (e.g. accuracy of the measurement using binary rulers, aggregate income of a town of farmers). Here we show that an optimal variance exists for maximizing the population benefit function; this optimal variance quantifies what is often called the “right mix” of individuals in a population. PMID:26650247

  1. Fractional stereo matching using expectation-maximization.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Wei; Chung, Hin Shun; Jia, Jiaya

    2009-03-01

    In our fractional stereo matching problem, a foreground object with a fractional boundary is blended with a background scene using unknown transparencies. Due to the spatially varying disparities in different layers, one foreground pixel may be blended with different background pixels in stereo images, making the color constancy commonly assumed in traditional stereo matching not hold any more. To tackle this problem, in this paper, we introduce a probabilistic framework constraining the matching of pixel colors, disparities, and alpha values in different layers, and propose an automatic optimization method to solve a Maximizing a Posterior (MAP) problem using Expectation-Maximization (EM), given only a short-baseline stereo input image pair. Our method encodes the effect of background occlusion by layer blending without requiring a special detection process. The alpha computation process in our unified framework can be regarded as a new approach by natural image matting, which handles appropriately the situation when the background color is similar to that of the foreground object. We demonstrate the efficacy of our method by experimenting with challenging stereo images and making comparisons with state-of-the-art methods.

  2. Maximal liquid bridges between horizontal cylinders.

    PubMed

    Cooray, Himantha; Huppert, Herbert E; Neufeld, Jerome A

    2016-08-01

    We investigate two-dimensional liquid bridges trapped between pairs of identical horizontal cylinders. The cylinders support forces owing to surface tension and hydrostatic pressure that balance the weight of the liquid. The shape of the liquid bridge is determined by analytically solving the nonlinear Laplace-Young equation. Parameters that maximize the trapping capacity (defined as the cross-sectional area of the liquid bridge) are then determined. The results show that these parameters can be approximated with simple relationships when the radius of the cylinders is small compared with the capillary length. For such small cylinders, liquid bridges with the largest cross-sectional area occur when the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders is approximately twice the capillary length. The maximum trapping capacity for a pair of cylinders at a given separation is linearly related to the separation when it is small compared with the capillary length. The meniscus slope angle of the largest liquid bridge produced in this regime is also a linear function of the separation. We additionally derive approximate solutions for the profile of a liquid bridge, using the linearized Laplace-Young equation. These solutions analytically verify the above-mentioned relationships obtained for the maximization of the trapping capacity.

  3. Maximal liquid bridges between horizontal cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooray, Himantha; Huppert, Herbert E.; Neufeld, Jerome A.

    2016-08-01

    We investigate two-dimensional liquid bridges trapped between pairs of identical horizontal cylinders. The cylinders support forces owing to surface tension and hydrostatic pressure that balance the weight of the liquid. The shape of the liquid bridge is determined by analytically solving the nonlinear Laplace-Young equation. Parameters that maximize the trapping capacity (defined as the cross-sectional area of the liquid bridge) are then determined. The results show that these parameters can be approximated with simple relationships when the radius of the cylinders is small compared with the capillary length. For such small cylinders, liquid bridges with the largest cross-sectional area occur when the centre-to-centre distance between the cylinders is approximately twice the capillary length. The maximum trapping capacity for a pair of cylinders at a given separation is linearly related to the separation when it is small compared with the capillary length. The meniscus slope angle of the largest liquid bridge produced in this regime is also a linear function of the separation. We additionally derive approximate solutions for the profile of a liquid bridge, using the linearized Laplace-Young equation. These solutions analytically verify the above-mentioned relationships obtained for the maximization of the trapping capacity.

  4. Maximizing strain in miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosset, Samuel; Araromi, Oluwaseun; Shea, Herbert

    2015-04-01

    We present a theoretical model to optimise the unidirectional motion of a rigid object bonded to a miniaturized dielectric elastomer actuator (DEA), a configuration found for example in AMI's haptic feedback devices, or in our tuneable RF phase shifter. Recent work has shown that unidirectional motion is maximized when the membrane is both anistropically prestretched and subjected to a dead load in the direction of actuation. However, the use of dead weights for miniaturized devices is clearly highly impractical. Consequently smaller devices use the membrane itself to generate the opposing force. Since the membrane covers the entire frame, one has the same prestretch condition in the active (actuated) and passive zones. Because the passive zone contracts when the active zone expands, it does not provide a constant restoring force, reducing the maximum achievable actuation strain. We have determined the optimal ratio between the size of the electrode (active zone) and the passive zone, as well as the optimal prestretch in both in-plane directions, in order to maximize the absolute displacement of the rigid object placed at the active/passive border. Our model and experiments show that the ideal active ratio is 50%, with a displacement twice smaller than what can be obtained with a dead load. We expand our fabrication process to also show how DEAs can be laser-post-processed to remove carefully chosen regions of the passive elastomer membrane, thereby increasing the actuation strain of the device.

  5. Maximal lactate steady state in Judo

    PubMed Central

    de Azevedo, Paulo Henrique Silva Marques; Pithon-Curi, Tania; Zagatto, Alessandro Moura; Oliveira, João; Perez, Sérgio

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: the purpose of this study was to verify the validity of respiratory compensation threshold (RCT) measured during a new single judo specific incremental test (JSIT) for aerobic demand evaluation. Methods: to test the validity of the new test, the JSIT was compared with Maximal Lactate Steady State (MLSS), which is the gold standard procedure for aerobic demand measuring. Eight well-trained male competitive judo players (24.3 ± 7.9 years; height of 169.3 ± 6.7cm; fat mass of 12.7 ± 3.9%) performed a maximal incremental specific test for judo to assess the RCT and performed on 30-minute MLSS test, where both tests were performed mimicking the UchiKomi drills. Results: the intensity at RCT measured on JSIT was not significantly different compared to MLSS (p=0.40). In addition, it was observed high and significant correlation between MLSS and RCT (r=0.90, p=0.002), as well as a high agreement. Conclusions: RCT measured during JSIT is a valid procedure to measure the aerobic demand, respecting the ecological validity of Judo. PMID:25332923

  6. Optimizing Population Variability to Maximize Benefit.

    PubMed

    Izu, Leighton T; Bányász, Tamás; Chen-Izu, Ye

    2015-01-01

    Variability is inherent in any population, regardless whether the population comprises humans, plants, biological cells, or manufactured parts. Is the variability beneficial, detrimental, or inconsequential? This question is of fundamental importance in manufacturing, agriculture, and bioengineering. This question has no simple categorical answer because research shows that variability in a population can have both beneficial and detrimental effects. Here we ask whether there is a certain level of variability that can maximize benefit to the population as a whole. We answer this question by using a model composed of a population of individuals who independently make binary decisions; individuals vary in making a yes or no decision, and the aggregated effect of these decisions on the population is quantified by a benefit function (e.g. accuracy of the measurement using binary rulers, aggregate income of a town of farmers). Here we show that an optimal variance exists for maximizing the population benefit function; this optimal variance quantifies what is often called the "right mix" of individuals in a population.

  7. Spiders Tune Glue Viscosity to Maximize Adhesion.

    PubMed

    Amarpuri, Gaurav; Zhang, Ci; Diaz, Candido; Opell, Brent D; Blackledge, Todd A; Dhinojwala, Ali

    2015-11-24

    Adhesion in humid conditions is a fundamental challenge to both natural and synthetic adhesives. Yet, glue from most spider species becomes stickier as humidity increases. We find the adhesion of spider glue, from five diverse spider species, maximizes at very different humidities that matches their foraging habitats. By using high-speed imaging and spreading power law, we find that the glue viscosity varies over 5 orders of magnitude with humidity for each species, yet the viscosity at maximal adhesion for each species is nearly identical, 10(5)-10(6) cP. Many natural systems take advantage of viscosity to improve functional response, but spider glue's humidity responsiveness is a novel adaptation that makes the glue stickiest in each species' preferred habitat. This tuning is achieved by a combination of proteins and hygroscopic organic salts that determines water uptake in the glue. We therefore anticipate that manipulation of polymer-salts interaction to control viscosity can provide a simple mechanism to design humidity responsive smart adhesives.

  8. Maximal coherence in a generic basis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Yao; Dong, G. H.; Ge, Li; Li, Mo; Sun, C. P.

    2016-12-01

    Since quantum coherence is an undoubted characteristic trait of quantum physics, the quantification and application of quantum coherence has been one of the long-standing central topics in quantum information science. Within the framework of a resource theory of quantum coherence proposed recently, a fiducial basis should be preselected for characterizing the quantum coherence in specific circumstances, namely, the quantum coherence is a basis-dependent quantity. Therefore, a natural question is raised: what are the maximum and minimum coherences contained in a certain quantum state with respect to a generic basis? While the minimum case is trivial, it is not so intuitive to verify in which basis the quantum coherence is maximal. Based on the coherence measure of relative entropy, we indicate the particular basis in which the quantum coherence is maximal for a given state, where the Fourier matrix (or more generally, complex Hadamard matrices) plays a critical role in determining the basis. Intriguingly, though we can prove that the basis associated with the Fourier matrix is a stationary point for optimizing the l1 norm of coherence, numerical simulation shows that it is not a global optimal choice.

  9. In vivo muscle force and muscle power during near-maximal frog jumps

    PubMed Central

    Leonard, Timothy R.; Kaya, Motoshi; Herzog, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Frogs’ outstanding jumping ability has been associated with a high power output from the leg extensor muscles. Two main theories have emerged to explain the high power output of the frog leg extensor muscles, either (i) the contractile conditions of all leg extensor muscles are optimized in terms of muscle length and speed of shortening, or (ii) maximal power is achieved through a dynamic catch mechanism that uncouples fibre shortening from the corresponding muscle-tendon unit shortening. As in vivo instantaneous power generation in frog hind limb muscles during jumping has never been measured directly, it is hard to distinguish between the two theories. In this study, we determined the instantaneous variable power output of the plantaris longus (PL) of Lithobates pipiens (also known as Rana pipiens), by directly measuring the in vivo force, length change, and speed of muscle and fibre shortening in near maximal jumps. Fifteen near maximal jumps (> 50cm in horizontal distance) were analyzed. High instantaneous peak power in PL (536 ± 47 W/kg) was achieved by optimizing the contractile conditions in terms of the force-length but not the force-velocity relationship, and by a dynamic catch mechanism that decouples fascicle shortening from muscle-tendon unit shortening. We also found that the extra-muscular free tendon likely amplifies the peak power output of the PL by modulating fascicle shortening length and shortening velocity for optimum power output, but not by releasing stored energy through recoiling as the tendon only started recoiling after peak PL power had been achieved. PMID:28282405

  10. NADPH Oxidases in Vascular Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Konior, Anna; Schramm, Agata; Czesnikiewicz-Guzik, Marta

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: Reactive oxygen species (ROS) play a critical role in vascular disease. While there are many possible sources of ROS, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidases play a central role. They are a source of “kindling radicals,” which affect other enzymes, such as nitric oxide synthase endothelial nitric oxide synthase or xanthine oxidase. This is important, as risk factors for atherosclerosis (hypertension, diabetes, hypercholesterolemia, and smoking) regulate the expression and activity of NADPH oxidases in the vessel wall. Recent Advances: There are seven isoforms in mammals: Nox1, Nox2, Nox3, Nox4, Nox5, Duox1 and Duox2. Nox1, Nox2, Nox4, and Nox5 are expressed in endothelium, vascular smooth muscle cells, fibroblasts, or perivascular adipocytes. Other homologues have not been found or are expressed at very low levels; their roles have not been established. Nox1/Nox2 promote the development of endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, and inflammation. Nox4 may have a role in protecting the vasculature during stress; however, when its activity is increased, it may be detrimental. Calcium-dependent Nox5 has been implicated in oxidative damage in human atherosclerosis. Critical Issues: NADPH oxidase-derived ROS play a role in vascular pathology as well as in the maintenance of normal physiological vascular function. We also discuss recently elucidated mechanisms such as the role of NADPH oxidases in vascular protection, vascular inflammation, pulmonary hypertension, tumor angiogenesis, and central nervous system regulation of vascular function and hypertension. Future Directions: Understanding the role of individual oxidases and interactions between homologues in vascular disease is critical for efficient pharmacological regulation of vascular NADPH oxidases in both the laboratory and clinical practice. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 2794–2814. PMID:24180474

  11. Vascular Calcification: Mechanisms of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Calcification

    PubMed Central

    Leopold, Jane A.

    2014-01-01

    Vascular calcification is highly prevalent and, when present, is associated with major adverse cardiovascular events. Vascular smooth muscle cells play an integral role in mediating vessel calcification by undergoing differentiation to osteoblast-like cells and generating matrix vesicles that serve as a nidus for calcium-phosphate deposition in the vessel wall. Once believed to be a passive process, it is now recognized that vascular calcification is a complex and highly regulated process that involves activation of cellular signaling pathways, circulating inhibitors of calcification, genetic factors, and hormones. This review will examine several of the key mechanisms linking vascular smooth muscle cells to vessel calcification that may be targeted to reduce vessel wall mineralization and, thereby, reduce cardiovascular risk. PMID:25435520

  12. Vascular action of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dilip; Scheepens, Arjan

    2009-03-01

    Dietary patterns are widely recognised as contributors to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Endothelial function, the elastic properties of large arteries and the magnitude and timing of wave reflections are important determinants of cardiovascular performance. Several epidemiological studies suggest that the regular consumption of foods and beverages rich in flavonoids is associated with a reduction in the risk of several pathological conditions ranging from hypertension to coronary heart disease, stroke and dementia. The impairment of endothelial function is directly related to ageing and an association between decreased cerebral perfusion and dementia has been shown to exist. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) must be maintained to ensure a constant delivery of oxygen and glucose as well as the removal of waste products. Increasing blood flow is one potential way for improving brain function and the prospect for increasing CBF with dietary polyphenols is extremely promising. The major polyphenols shown to have some of these effects in humans are primarily from cocoa, wine, grape seed, berries, tea, tomatoes (polyphenolics and nonpolyphenolics), soy and pomegranate. There has been a significant paradigm shift in polyphenol research during the last decade. This review summarises our current knowledge in this area and points the way for the development of new types of functional foods targeted to brain health through improving vascular health.

  13. Constructal vascularized structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cetkin, Erdal

    2015-06-01

    Smart features such as self-healing and selfcooling require bathing the entire volume with a coolant or/and healing agent. Bathing the entire volume is an example of point to area (or volume) flows. Point to area flows cover all the distributing and collecting kinds of flows, i.e. inhaling and exhaling, mining, river deltas, energy distribution, distribution of products on the landscape and so on. The flow resistances of a point to area flow can be decreased by changing the design with the guidance of the constructal law, which is the law of the design evolution in time. In this paper, how the flow resistances (heat, fluid and stress) can be decreased by using the constructal law is shown with examples. First, the validity of two assumptions is surveyed: using temperature independent Hess-Murray rule and using constant diameter ducts where the duct discharges fluid along its edge. Then, point to area types of flows are explained by illustrating the results of two examples: fluid networks and heating an area. Last, how the structures should be vascularized for cooling and mechanical strength is documented. This paper shows that flow resistances can be decreased by morphing the shape freely without any restrictions or generic algorithms.

  14. [Aging and retinal vascular diseases].

    PubMed

    Takagi, Hitoshi

    2007-03-01

    Ocular vascular diseases such as diabetic retinopathy, retinal vein occlusion, and age-related macular degeneration, whose population increases along with aging, have become leading causes of severe visual disturbance. Macular edema and serous retinal detachment are associated with abnormal vascular leakage and tractional retinal detachment, and neovascular glaucoma is caused by retinal neovascularization. Such ocular vascular diseases are caused by vascular cell aging and vascular damage associated with lifestyle-related diseases including diabetes mellitus, hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and obesity. In the present study, we investigated molecular mechanisms in such vascular deficiencies using vascular cell biology methodology, and we propose novel strategies for the treatment of such vascular diseases. Along with aging, oxidative stress and physical stress, such as mechanical stretch, continuously and directly insult vascular cells. Such stress induces apoptosis by intracellular signaling through stress kinases in cultured retinal vascular cells. Inhibition of such stress kinases could be an effective treatment to protect the vascular cells against age-related damage. In a retinal vascular developmental model, pericyte loss causes pathology mimicking macular edema and proliferative diabetic retinopathy. Angiopoietin 1 (Ang 1) secreted by pericytes suppresses oxidative stress-induced intracellular signaling through stress kinases linked to cell apoptosis and normalizes such retinal pathology. This suggests that the paracrine action of Ang 1 in the pericytes is necessary to sustain normal retinal vasculature, and that Ang 1-triggered intracellular signaling is useful for the treatment of vascular cell pathology associated with pericyte loss. In diabetic retinopathy and retinal vein occlusion, retinal vessels regress along with retinal vascular cell apoptosis, and the retina becomes ischemic followed by pathological retinal neovascularization. VEGF has been

  15. An Exploration of the Drive for Muscularity in Adolescent Boys and Girls.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCreary, Donald R.; Sasse, Doris K.

    2000-01-01

    Investigated the drive for muscularity among high school adolescents using the Drive for Muscularity Scale. Results indicated that the scale was reliable. High-drive students were mainly boys trying to gain weight and muscle mass. Drive related to poor self-esteem and higher depression levels among boys, but not girls. Drive for muscularity was…

  16. Be careful about abdominal discomfort in adult patients with muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, A; Ritzenthaler, T; Luis, D; Hullin, T; Clair, B; Annane, D; Orlikowski, D

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are genetic muscular disease with disability. Heart failure is a classical complication mainly in Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). We report 2 cases of severe acute heart failure revealed by abdominal discomfort in a patient with DMD and in a patient with gamma-sarcoglycanopathy.

  17. Effects of gravitational stress, hypokinesia and hypodynamia on the structure of the vascular bed of the spleen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nesterenko, N. T.

    1980-01-01

    The effects of two extreme factors, hypokinesia and hypodynamia, on spleen vascular beds were studied on 180 male and female albino rats. Vessels were studied by roentgenography, microroentgenography, clearing of sections and histology. Gravity stress yielded construction of all links of arterial bed and of order 5-7 veins. Large intraorganic vein diameters changed significantly but erratically. Hypokinesia in early phases produced pronounced spleen size reduction. Veins and arteries constricted along entire length. Later hypokinetic stages showed arteries still constricted; veins began to dilate from week 4 of hypokinesia. Sinuosity, uneven contours and varicose dilations of walls in large arteries and veins occurred. Abrupt changes in parenchyma, e.g., atrophy of folliculi, narrowing of lumen of central arteries from thickening of muscular wall. After exposure to hypokinesia followed by gravitational stress, pronounced lesions such as deformation of vascular wall, including rupture, in all vessels of the spleen vascular bed.

  18. Molecular genetics of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD).

    PubMed

    Fisher, J; Upadhyaya, M

    1997-01-01

    Facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD; MIM 158900), is an autosomal dominant neuromuscular disorder. The disease is characterized by the weakness of the muscles of the face, upper-arm and shoulder girdle. The gene for FSHD has been mapped to 4q35 (FSHD1A) and is closely linked to D4F1O4S1, which detects two highly polymorphic loci (located at 4q35 and 10q26), with restriction enzyme EcoRI. The polymorphic EcoRI fragment detected with D4F1O4S1 is composed almost entirely of D4Z4 (3.3 kb) tandem repeats. In FSHD patients a deletion of the integral number of D4Z4 repeats generates a fragment which is usually smaller than 35 kb, whereas in normal controls, the size usually ranges from 50 to 300 kb. These 'small' EcoRI fragments segregate with FSHD in families but appear as de novo deletions in the majority of sporadic cases. Each 3.3 kb repeat contains two homeobox domains neither of which has yet been proven to encode a protein. D4Z4 is located adjacent to the 4q telomere and cross hybridizes to several different regions of the genome. Although D4Z4 probably does not encode a protein with any direct association to FSHD, a clear correlation has been shown between the deletion size at this locus and the age at onset of the disease in FSHD patients. In approximately 5-10% of FSHD families the disease locus is unlinked to 4q35 (locus designated FSHD1B), however, none of the non 4q35 loci for FSHD have yet been chromosomally located. Thus so far, only one gene, FRG1 (FSHD region gene 1) has been identified from the FSHD candidate region on 4q35. The apparent low level of expressed sequences from within this region, the integral deletions of D4Z4 repeats observed in FSHD patients and the close proximity of these repeats to the 4q telomere, all suggest that the disease may be the result of position effect variegation. To date, the molecular diagnosis of FSHD with D4F104S1 has been most secure in those families which are linked to other 4q35 markers. Recent studies

  19. Maximal energy extraction under discrete diffusive exchange

    SciTech Connect

    Hay, M. J.; Schiff, J.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-10-15

    Waves propagating through a bounded plasma can rearrange the densities of states in the six-dimensional velocity-configuration phase space. Depending on the rearrangement, the wave energy can either increase or decrease, with the difference taken up by the total plasma energy. In the case where the rearrangement is diffusive, only certain plasma states can be reached. It turns out that the set of reachable states through such diffusive rearrangements has been described in very different contexts. Building upon those descriptions, and making use of the fact that the plasma energy is a linear functional of the state densities, the maximal extractable energy under diffusive rearrangement can then be addressed through linear programming.

  20. Maximal energy extraction under discrete diffusive exchange

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hay, M. J.; Schiff, J.; Fisch, N. J.

    2015-10-01

    Waves propagating through a bounded plasma can rearrange the densities of states in the six-dimensional velocity-configuration phase space. Depending on the rearrangement, the wave energy can either increase or decrease, with the difference taken up by the total plasma energy. In the case where the rearrangement is diffusive, only certain plasma states can be reached. It turns out that the set of reachable states through such diffusive rearrangements has been described in very different contexts. Building upon those descriptions, and making use of the fact that the plasma energy is a linear functional of the state densities, the maximal extractable energy under diffusive rearrangement can then be addressed through linear programming.

  1. Multipartite maximally entangled states in symmetric scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Guillén, Carlos E.

    2012-08-01

    We consider the class of (N+1)-partite states suitable for protocols where there is a powerful party, the authority, and the other N parties play the same role, namely, the state of their system lies in the symmetric Hilbert space. We show that, within this scenario, there is a “maximally entangled state” that can be transform by a local operations and classical communication protocol into any other state. In addition, we show how to use the protocol efficiently, including the construction of the state, and discuss security issues for possible applications to cryptographic protocols. As an immediate consequence we recover a sequential protocol that implements the 1-to-N symmetric cloning.

  2. Polycrystalline configurations that maximize electrical resistivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nesi, Vincenzo; Milton, Graeme W.

    A lower bound on the effective conductivity tensor of polycrystalline aggregates formed from a single basic crystal of conductivity σ was recently established by Avellaneda. Cherkaev, Lurie and Milton. The bound holds for any basic crystal, but for isotropic aggregates of a uniaxial crystal, the bound is achieved by a sphere assemblage model of Schulgasser. This left open the question of attainability of the bound when the crystal is not uniaxial. The present work establishes that the bound is always attained by a rather large class of polycrystalline materials. These polycrystalline materials, with maximal electrical resistivity, are constructed by sequential lamination of the basic crystal and rotations of itself on widely separated length scales. The analysis is facilitated by introducing a tensor S = 0( 0I + σ) -1 where 0 > 0 is chosen so that Tr S = 1. This tensor s is related to the electric field in the optimal polycrystalline configurations.

  3. Dispatch Scheduling to Maximize Exoplanet Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Samson; McCrady, Nate; MINERVA

    2016-01-01

    MINERVA is a dedicated exoplanet detection telescope array using radial velocity measurements of nearby stars to detect planets. MINERVA will be a completely robotic facility, with a goal of maximizing the number of exoplanets detected. MINERVA requires a unique application of queue scheduling due to its automated nature and the requirement of high cadence observations. A dispatch scheduling algorithm is employed to create a dynamic and flexible selector of targets to observe, in which stars are chosen by assigning values through a weighting function. I designed and have begun testing a simulation which implements the functions of a dispatch scheduler and records observations based on target selections through the same principles that will be used at the commissioned site. These results will be used in a larger simulation that incorporates weather, planet occurrence statistics, and stellar noise to test the planet detection capabilities of MINERVA. This will be used to heuristically determine an optimal observing strategy for the MINERVA project.

  4. Characterizing maximally singular phase-space distributions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sperling, J.

    2016-07-01

    Phase-space distributions are widely applied in quantum optics to access the nonclassical features of radiations fields. In particular, the inability to interpret the Glauber-Sudarshan distribution in terms of a classical probability density is the fundamental benchmark for quantum light. However, this phase-space distribution cannot be directly reconstructed for arbitrary states, because of its singular behavior. In this work, we perform a characterization of the Glauber-Sudarshan representation in terms of distribution theory. We address important features of such distributions: (i) the maximal degree of their singularities is studied, (ii) the ambiguity of representation is shown, and (iii) their dual space for nonclassicality tests is specified. In this view, we reconsider the methods for regularizing the Glauber-Sudarshan distribution for verifying its nonclassicality. This treatment is supported with comprehensive examples and counterexamples.

  5. Robust determination of maximally localized Wannier functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cancès, Éric; Levitt, Antoine; Panati, Gianluca; Stoltz, Gabriel

    2017-02-01

    We propose an algorithm to determine maximally localized Wannier functions (MLWFs). This algorithm, based on recent theoretical developments, does not require any physical input such as initial guesses for the Wannier functions, unlike popular schemes based on the projection method. We discuss how the projection method can fail on fine grids when the initial guesses are too far from MLWFs. We demonstrate that our algorithm is able to find localized Wannier functions through tests on two-dimensional systems, simplified models of semiconductors, and realistic DFT systems by interfacing with the wannier90 code. We also test our algorithm on the Haldane and Kane-Mele models to examine how it fails in the presence of topological obstructions.

  6. Maximally reliable Markov chains under energy constraints.

    PubMed

    Escola, Sean; Eisele, Michael; Miller, Kenneth; Paninski, Liam

    2009-07-01

    Signal-to-noise ratios in physical systems can be significantly degraded if the outputs of the systems are highly variable. Biological processes for which highly stereotyped signal generations are necessary features appear to have reduced their signal variabilities by employing multiple processing steps. To better understand why this multistep cascade structure might be desirable, we prove that the reliability of a signal generated by a multistate system with no memory (i.e., a Markov chain) is maximal if and only if the system topology is such that the process steps irreversibly through each state, with transition rates chosen such that an equal fraction of the total signal is generated in each state. Furthermore, our result indicates that by increasing the number of states, it is possible to arbitrarily increase the reliability of the system. In a physical system, however, an energy cost is associated with maintaining irreversible transitions, and this cost increases with the number of such transitions (i.e., the number of states). Thus, an infinite-length chain, which would be perfectly reliable, is infeasible. To model the effects of energy demands on the maximally reliable solution, we numerically optimize the topology under two distinct energy functions that penalize either irreversible transitions or incommunicability between states, respectively. In both cases, the solutions are essentially irreversible linear chains, but with upper bounds on the number of states set by the amount of available energy. We therefore conclude that a physical system for which signal reliability is important should employ a linear architecture, with the number of states (and thus the reliability) determined by the intrinsic energy constraints of the system.

  7. Does Maximizing Information at the Cut Score Always Maximize Classification Accuracy and Consistency?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wyse, Adam E.; Babcock, Ben

    2016-01-01

    A common suggestion made in the psychometric literature for fixed-length classification tests is that one should design tests so that they have maximum information at the cut score. Designing tests in this way is believed to maximize the classification accuracy and consistency of the assessment. This article uses simulated examples to illustrate…

  8. Anaerobic contribution during maximal anaerobic running test: correlation with maximal accumulated oxygen deficit.

    PubMed

    Zagatto, A; Redkva, P; Loures, J; Kalva Filho, C; Franco, V; Kaminagakura, E; Papoti, M

    2011-12-01

    The aims of this study were: (i) to measure energy system contributions in maximal anaerobic running test (MART); and (ii) to verify any correlation between MART and maximal accumulated oxygen deficit (MAOD). Eleven members of the armed forces were recruited for this study. Participants performed MART and MAOD, both accomplished on a treadmill. MART consisted of intermittent exercise, 20 s effort with 100 s recovery, after each spell of effort exercise. Energy system contributions by MART were also determined by excess post-exercise oxygen consumption, lactate response, and oxygen uptake measurements. MAOD was determined by five submaximal intensities and one supramaximal intensity exercises corresponding to 120% at maximal oxygen uptake intensity. Energy system contributions were 65.4±1.1% to aerobic; 29.5±1.1% to anaerobic a-lactic; and 5.1±0.5% to anaerobic lactic system throughout the whole test, while only during effort periods the anaerobic contribution corresponded to 73.5±1.0%. Maximal power found in MART corresponded to 111.25±1.33 mL/kg/min but did not significantly correlate with MAOD (4.69±0.30 L and 70.85±4.73 mL/kg). We concluded that the anaerobic a-lactic system is the main energy system in MART efforts and this test did not significantly correlate to MAOD.

  9. From entropy-maximization to equality-maximization: Gauss, Laplace, Pareto, and Subbotin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eliazar, Iddo

    2014-12-01

    The entropy-maximization paradigm of statistical physics is well known to generate the omnipresent Gauss law. In this paper we establish an analogous socioeconomic model which maximizes social equality, rather than physical disorder, in the context of the distributions of income and wealth in human societies. We show that-on a logarithmic scale-the Laplace law is the socioeconomic equality-maximizing counterpart of the physical entropy-maximizing Gauss law, and that this law manifests an optimized balance between two opposing forces: (i) the rich and powerful, striving to amass ever more wealth, and thus to increase social inequality; and (ii) the masses, struggling to form more egalitarian societies, and thus to increase social equality. Our results lead from log-Gauss statistics to log-Laplace statistics, yield Paretian power-law tails of income and wealth distributions, and show how the emergence of a middle-class depends on the underlying levels of socioeconomic inequality and variability. Also, in the context of asset-prices with Laplace-distributed returns, our results imply that financial markets generate an optimized balance between risk and predictability.

  10. Vascular access today

    PubMed Central

    Pantelias, Konstantinos; Grapsa, Eirini

    2012-01-01

    The number of patients with chronic kidney disease requiring renal replacement therapy has increased worldwide. The most common replacement therapy is hemodialysis (HD). Vascular access (VA) has a key role for successful treatment. Despite the advances that have taken place in the field of the HD procedure, few things have changed with regards to VA in recent years. Arteriovenous fistula (AVF), polytetrafluoroethylene graft and the cuffed double lumen silicone catheter are the most common used for VA. In the long term, a number of complications may present and more than one VA is needed during the HD life. The most common complications for all of VA types are thrombosis, bleeding and infection, the most common cause of morbidity in these patients. It has been estimated that VA dysfunction is responsible for 20% of all hospitalizations. The annual cost of placing and looking after dialysis VA in the United States exceeds 1 billion dollars per year. A good functional access is also vital in order to deliver adequate HD therapy. It seems that the native AVF that Brescia and Cimino described in 1966 still remains the first choice for VA. The native forearm AVFs have the longest survival and require the fewest interventions. For this reason, the forearm AVF is the first choice, followed by the upper-arm AVF, the arteriovenous graft and the cuffed central venous catheter is the final choice. In conclusion, VA remains the most important issue for patients on HD and despite the technical improvements, a number of problems and complications have to be resolved. PMID:24175244

  11. Drive for muscularity and muscularity-oriented disordered eating in men: the role of set shifting difficulties and weak central coherence.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Scott; Murray, Stuart B; Touyz, Stephen

    2013-09-01

    Set shifting difficulties and weak central coherence are information-processing biases associated with thinness-oriented eating and body image pathology in women. However, little is known about the relationship between these processing biases and muscularity-oriented eating and body image pathology. We investigated whether set shifting and central coherence were uniquely related to the drive for muscularity and muscularity-oriented disordered eating in a sample of 91 male undergraduates. Participants completed the Wisconsin Card Sort Test, the Matching Familiar Figures Task, the Drive for Muscularity scale, and a modified Eating Disorders Examination-Questionnaire. Results indicated that set shifting difficulties and weak central coherence were both uniquely positively associated with the drive for muscularity, and that set shifting difficulties were uniquely positively associated with muscularity-oriented disordered eating. Results are discussed with regard to the male experience of body image and eating pathology, and in regard to muscle dysmorphia.

  12. Cardiomyopathy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy: pathogenesis and therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Fayssoil, Abdallah; Nardi, Olivier; Orlikowski, David; Annane, Djillali

    2010-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is an X-linked recessive disorder caused by the absence of dystrophin, a sarcolemmal protein which links the cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix by interacting with a large number of proteins. Heart failure is a classic complication of this disease. The authors review the pathogenesis and therapeutics of cardiac involvement in DMD.

  13. Neural Issues in the Control of Muscular Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kamen, Gary

    2004-01-01

    During the earliest stages of resistance exercise training, initial muscular strength gains occur too rapidly to be explained solely by muscle-based mechanisms. However, increases in surface-based EMG amplitude as well as motor unit discharge rate provide some insight to the existence of neural mechanisms in the earliest phases of resistance…

  14. Gene therapy for duchenne muscular dystrophy: expectations and challenges.

    PubMed

    Rodino-Klapac, Louise R; Chicoine, Louis G; Kaspar, Brian K; Mendell, Jerry R

    2007-09-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a debilitating X-linked disease with limited treatment options. We examined the possibility of moving forward with gene therapy, an approach that demonstrates promise for treating Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Gene therapy is not limited to replacement of defective genes but also includes strategies using surrogate genes with alternative but effective means of improving cellular function or repairing gene mutations. The first viral-mediated gene transfer for any muscle disease was carried out at Columbus Children's Research Institute and Ohio State University for limb girdle muscular dystrophy type 2D, and the first viral-mediated trial of gene transfer for Duchenne muscular dystrophy is under way at the same institutions. These studies, consisting of intramuscular injection of virus into a single muscle, are limited in scope and represent phase 1 clinical trials with safety as the primary end point. These initial clinical studies lay the foundation for future studies, providing important information about dosing, immunogenicity, and viral serotype in humans. This article highlights the challenges and potential pitfalls as the field advances this treatment modality to clinical reality.

  15. Swallow Characteristics in Patients with Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Phyllis M.; Neel, Amy T.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This prospective investigation evaluates oral weakness and its impact on swallow function, weight, and quality of life in patients with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Method: Intraoral pressure, swallow pressure, and endurance were measured using an Iowa Oral Performance Instrument in participants with OPMD and matched…

  16. Local muscular fatigue and attentional processes in a fencing task.

    PubMed

    Devienne, M F; Audiffren, M; Ripoll, H; Stein, J F

    2000-02-01

    Study of the effects of brief exercise on mental processes by Tomporowski and Ellis (1986) has shown that moderate muscular tension improves cognitive performance while low or high tension does not. Improvements in performance induced by exercise are commonly associated with increase in arousal, while impairments are generally attributed to the effects of muscular or central fatigue. To test two hypotheses, that (1) submaximal muscular exercise would decrease premotor time and increase would increase the attentional and preparatory effects observed in premotor time 9 men, aged 20 to 30 years, performed an isometric test at 50% of their maximum voluntary contraction between blocks of a 3-choice reaction-time fencing task. Analysis showed (1) physical exercise did not improve postexercise premotor time, (2) muscular fatigue induced by isometric contractions did not increase motor time, (3) there was no effect of exercise on attentional and preparatory processes involved in the postexercise choice-RT task. The invalidation of hypotheses was mainly explained by disparity in directional effects across subjects and by use of an exercise that was not really fatiguing.

  17. Congenital nutritional muscular dystrophy in a beef calf.

    PubMed

    Abutarbush, Sameeh M; Radostits, Otto M

    2003-09-01

    A 13-hour-old Aberdeen-Angus was involuntarily recumbent since birth. Congenital nutritional muscular dystrophy was suspected based on clinical findings, increased serum creatine kinase, and decreased serum vitamin E and selenium levels. Recovery followed after supportive therapy and parenteral vitamin E and selenium. Reports of this disease in newborn calves are unusual.

  18. Muscle Weakness and Speech in Oculopharyngeal Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neel, Amy T.; Palmer, Phyllis M.; Sprouls, Gwyneth; Morrison, Leslie

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: We documented speech and voice characteristics associated with oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD). Although it is a rare disease, OPMD offers the opportunity to study the impact of myopathic weakness on speech production in the absence of neurologic deficits in a relatively homogeneous group of speakers. Methods: Twelve individuals…

  19. Phonological Awareness Skills in Young Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Waring, Phoebe; Woodyatt, Gail

    2011-01-01

    Substantial research has detailed the reading deficits experienced by children with Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Although phonological awareness (PA) is vital in reading development, little is known about PA in the DMD population. This pilot study describes the PA abilities of a group of five young children with DMD, comparing the results…

  20. Occupational Potential in a Population with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schkade, Janette K.; And Others

    1987-01-01

    Twenty-five males with Duchenne muscular dystrophy were tested to assess their potential for occupational activity. Tests measured possible sensory deficits, strength, endurance, and fatigue in response to sustained fine motor activity. Results indicate that, within limitations, persons with this diagnosis can engage in activity leading to skill…

  1. The Assessment of Intelligence in Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mearig, Judith S.

    1979-01-01

    Challenges assumptions and research procedures leading to the position that below-average intellectual potential is an integral part of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A study of 58 boys (ages 5 to 18) from urban, suburban, and rural settings indicated IQ range of 59 to 131 and no evidence of significant verbal deficit (reported in earlier studies).…

  2. Dasatinib as a treatment for Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Lipscomb, Leanne; Piggott, Robert W; Emmerson, Tracy; Winder, Steve J

    2016-01-15

    Identification of a systemically acting and universal small molecule therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy would be an enormous advance for this condition. Based on evidence gained from studies on mouse genetic models, we have identified tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan as a key event in the aetiology of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Thus, preventing tyrosine phosphorylation and degradation of β-dystroglycan presents itself as a potential therapeutic strategy. Using the dystrophic sapje zebrafish, we have investigated the use of tyrosine kinase and other inhibitors to treat the dystrophic symptoms in this model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. Dasatinib, a potent and specific Src tyrosine kinase inhibitor, was found to decrease the levels of β-dystroglycan phosphorylation on tyrosine and to increase the relative levels of non-phosphorylated β-dystroglycan in sapje zebrafish. Furthermore, dasatinib treatment resulted in the improved physical appearance of the sapje zebrafish musculature and increased swimming ability as measured by both duration and distance of swimming of dasatinib-treated fish compared with control animals. These data suggest great promise for pharmacological agents that prevent the phosphorylation of β-dystroglycan on tyrosine and subsequent steps in the degradation pathway as therapeutic targets for the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

  3. Poor Facial Affect Recognition among Boys with Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hinton, V. J.; Fee, R. J.; De Vivo, D. C.; Goldstein, E.

    2007-01-01

    Children with Duchenne or Becker muscular dystrophy (MD) have delayed language and poor social skills and some meet criteria for Pervasive Developmental Disorder, yet they are identified by molecular, rather than behavioral, characteristics. To determine whether comprehension of facial affect is compromised in boys with MD, children were given a…

  4. The Child with Muscular Dystrophy in School. Revised.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schock, Nancy C.

    Practical information on children with muscular dystrophy is intended to help parents and teachers facilitate their inclusion in mainstreamed classrooms. Major topics addressed include the following: transportation arrangements; providing full information to the teacher regarding the child's specific abilities and physical limitations;…

  5. Phosphorylation of intact erythrocytes in human muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.M.; Nigro, M.

    1986-04-01

    The uptake of exogenous /sup 32/Pi into the membrane proteins of intact erythrocytes was measured in 8 patients with Duchenne muscular dystrophy. No abnormalities were noted after autoradiographic analysis. This contrasts with earlier results obtained when isolated membranes were phosphorylated with gamma-(/sup 32/P)ATP, and suggests a possible reinterpretation of those experiments.

  6. Muscular Dystrophies at Different Ages: Metabolic and Endocrine Alterations

    PubMed Central

    Cruz Guzmán, Oriana del Rocío; Chávez García, Ana Laura; Rodríguez-Cruz, Maricela

    2012-01-01

    Common metabolic and endocrine alterations exist across a wide range of muscular dystrophies. Skeletal muscle plays an important role in glucose metabolism and is a major participant in different signaling pathways. Therefore, its damage may lead to different metabolic disruptions. Two of the most important metabolic alterations in muscular dystrophies may be insulin resistance and obesity. However, only insulin resistance has been demonstrated in myotonic dystrophy. In addition, endocrine disturbances such as hypogonadism, low levels of testosterone, and growth hormone have been reported. This eventually will result in consequences such as growth failure and delayed puberty in the case of childhood dystrophies. Other consequences may be reduced male fertility, reduced spermatogenesis, and oligospermia, both in childhood as well as in adult muscular dystrophies. These facts all suggest that there is a need for better comprehension of metabolic and endocrine implications for muscular dystrophies with the purpose of developing improved clinical treatments and/or improvements in the quality of life of patients with dystrophy. Therefore, the aim of this paper is to describe the current knowledge about of metabolic and endocrine alterations in diverse types of dystrophinopathies, which will be divided into two groups: childhood and adult dystrophies which have different age of onset. PMID:22701119

  7. Modifying muscular dystrophy through transforming growth factor-β.

    PubMed

    Ceco, Ermelinda; McNally, Elizabeth M

    2013-09-01

    Muscular dystrophy arises from ongoing muscle degeneration and insufficient regeneration. This imbalance leads to loss of muscle, with replacement by scar or fibrotic tissue, resulting in muscle weakness and, eventually, loss of muscle function. Human muscular dystrophy is characterized by a wide range of disease severity, even when the same genetic mutation is present. This variability implies that other factors, both genetic and environmental, modify the disease outcome. There has been an ongoing effort to define the genetic and molecular bases that influence muscular dystrophy onset and progression. Modifier genes for muscle disease have been identified through both candidate gene approaches and genome-wide surveys. Multiple lines of experimental evidence have now converged on the transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) pathway as a modifier for muscular dystrophy. TGF-β signaling is upregulated in dystrophic muscle as a result of a destabilized plasma membrane and/or an altered extracellular matrix. Given the important biological role of the TGF-β pathway, and its role beyond muscle homeostasis, we review modifier genes that alter the TGF-β pathway and approaches to modulate TGF-β activity to ameliorate muscle disease.

  8. Advances in genetic therapeutic strategies for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Guiraud, Simon; Chen, Huijia; Burns, David T.

    2015-01-01

    New Findings What is the topic of this review? This review highlights recent progress in genetically based therapies targeting the primary defect of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. What advances does it highlight? Over the last two decades, considerable progress has been made in understanding the mechanisms underlying Duchenne muscular dystrophy, leading to the development of genetic therapies. These include manipulation of the expression of the gene or related genes, the splicing of the gene and its translation, and replacement of the gene using viral approaches. Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a lethal X‐linked disorder caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. In the absence of the dystrophin protein, the link between the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix is destroyed, and this severely compromises the strength, flexibility and stability of muscle fibres. The devastating consequence is progressive muscle wasting and premature death in Duchenne muscular dystrophy patients. There is currently no cure, and despite exhaustive palliative care, patients are restricted to a wheelchair by the age of 12 years and usually succumb to cardiac or respiratory complications in their late 20s. This review provides an update on the current genetically based therapies and clinical trials that target or compensate for the primary defect of this disease. These include dystrophin gene‐replacement strategies, genetic modification techniques to restore dystrophin expression, and modulation of the dystrophin homologue, utrophin, as a surrogate to re‐establish muscle function. PMID:26140505

  9. Therapeutic Potential of Immunoproteasome Inhibition in Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Farini, Andrea; Sitzia, Clementina; Cassani, Barbara; Cassinelli, Letizia; Rigoni, Rosita; Colleoni, Federica; Fusco, Nicola; Gatti, Stefano; Bella, Pamela; Villa, Chiara; Napolitano, Filomena; Maiavacca, Rita; Bosari, Silvano; Villa, Anna; Torrente, Yvan

    2016-11-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is an inherited fatal genetic disease characterized by mutations in dystrophin gene, causing membrane fragility leading to myofiber necrosis and inflammatory cell recruitment in dystrophic muscles. The resulting environment enriched in proinflammatory cytokines, like IFN-γ and TNF-α, determines the transformation of myofiber constitutive proteasome into the immunoproteasome, a multisubunit complex involved in the activation of cell-mediate immunity. This event has a fundamental role in producing peptides for antigen presentation by MHC class I, for the immune response and also for cytokine production and T-cell differentiation. Here, we characterized for the first time the presence of T-lymphocytes activated against revertant dystrophin epitopes, in the animal model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy, the mdx mice. Moreover, we specifically blocked i-proteasome subunit LMP7, which was up-regulated in dystrophic skeletal muscles, and we demonstrated the rescue of the dystrophin expression and the amelioration of the dystrophic phenotype. The i-proteasome blocking lowered myofiber MHC class I expression and self-antigen presentation to T cells, thus reducing the specific antidystrophin T cell response, the muscular cell infiltrate, and proinflammatory cytokine production, together with muscle force recovery. We suggest that i-proteasome inhibition should be considered as new promising therapeutic approach for Duchenne muscular dystrophy pathology.

  10. The role of stem cells in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Meregalli, Mirella; Farini, Andrea; Colleoni, Federica; Cassinelli, Letizia; Torrente, Yvan

    2012-06-01

    Muscular dystrophies are heterogeneous neuromuscular disorders of inherited origin, including Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Cell-based therapies were used to promote muscle regeneration with the hope that the host cells repopulated the muscle and improved muscle function and pathology. Stem cells were preferable for therapeutic applications, due to their capacity of self-renewal and differentiative potential. In the last years, encouraging results were obtained with adult stem cells to treat muscular dystrophies. Adult stem cells were found into various tissues of the body and they were able to maintain, generate, and replace terminally differentiated cells within their own specific tissue because of cell turnover or tissue injury. Moreover, it became clear that these cells could participate into regeneration of more than just their resident organ. Here, we described multiple types of muscle and non muscle-derived myogenic stem cells, their characterization and their possible use to treat muscular dystrophies. We also underlined that most promising possibility for the management and therapy of DMD is a combination of different approaches, such as gene and stem cell therapy.

  11. Aldosterone and the vascular system.

    PubMed

    Cachofeiro, Victoria; Miana, Maria; de Las Heras, Natalia; Martín-Fernández, Beatriz; Ballesteros, Sandra; Fernández-Tresguerres, Jesús; Lahera, Vicente

    2008-04-01

    Aldosterone can act in different tissues exerting physiological and pathological effects. At the vascular level, aldosterone affects endothelial function since administration of aldosterone impaired endothelium-dependent relaxations. In addition, the administration of mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists ameliorate relaxation to acetylcholine in models of both hypertension and atherosclerosis and in patients with heart failure. A reduction in nitric oxide levels seems to be the main mechanism underlying this effect due to a reduction in its production as well as an increase in its degradation by reactive oxygen species. Aldosterone is a pro-inflammatory factor that can participate in the vascular inflammatory process associated with different pathologies including hypertension through activation of the NFkappaB system, which mediates the vascular production of different cytokines. This mineralocorticoid also participates in the vascular remodeling observed in hypertensive rats since the administration of eplerenone improved the media-to-lumen ratio in these animals. This effect seems to be due to an increase in extracellular matrix. In summary, aldosterone through mineralocorticoid receptors can participate in the vascular damage associated with different pathologies including hypertension through its prooxidant, pro-inflammatory and profibrotic effects that triggered endothelial dysfunction, an inflammatory process and vascular remodeling.

  12. FSHD region gene 1 (FRG1) is crucial for angiogenesis linking FRG1 to facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy-associated vasculopathy.

    PubMed

    Wuebbles, Ryan D; Hanel, Meredith L; Jones, Peter L

    2009-01-01

    The genetic lesion that is diagnostic for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) results in an epigenetic misregulation of gene expression, which ultimately leads to the disease pathology. FRG1 (FSHD region gene 1) is a leading candidate for a gene whose misexpression might lead to FSHD. Because FSHD pathology is most prominent in the musculature, most research and therapy efforts focus on muscle cells. Previously, using Xenopus development as a model, we showed that altering frg1 expression levels systemically leads to aberrant muscle development, illustrating the potential for aberrant FRG1 levels to disrupt the musculature. However, 50-75% of FSHD patients also exhibit retinal vasculopathy and FSHD muscles have increased levels of vascular- and endothelial-related FRG1 transcripts, illustrating an underlying vascular component to the disease. To date, no FSHD candidate gene has been proposed to affect the vasculature. Here, we focus on a role for FRG1 expression in the vasculature. We found that endogenous frg1 is expressed in both the developing and adult vasculature in Xenopus. Furthermore, expression of FRG1 was found to be essential for the development of the vasculature, as a knockdown of FRG1 resulted in decreased angiogenesis and reduced expression of the angiogenic regulator DAB2. Conversely, tadpoles subjected to frg1 overexpression displayed the pro-angiogenic phenotypes of increased blood vessel branching and dilation of blood vessels, and developed edemas, suggesting that their circulation was disrupted. Thus, the systemic upregulation of the FRG1 protein shows the potential for acquiring a disrupted vascular phenotype, providing the first link between a FSHD candidate gene and the vascular component of FSHD pathology. Overall, in conjunction with our previous analysis, we show that FRG1 overexpression is capable of disrupting both the musculature and vasculature, recapitulating the two most prominent features of FSHD.

  13. Plasma volume expansion does not increase maximal cardiac output or VO2 max in lowlanders acclimatized to altitude.

    PubMed

    Calbet, José A L; Rådegran, Göran; Boushel, Robert; Søndergaard, Hans; Saltin, Bengt; Wagner, Peter D

    2004-09-01

    With altitude acclimatization, blood hemoglobin concentration increases while plasma volume (PV) and maximal cardiac output (Qmax) decrease. This investigation aimed to determine whether reduction of Qmax at altitude is due to low circulating blood volume (BV). Eight Danish lowlanders (3 females, 5 males: age 24.0 +/- 0.6 yr; mean +/- SE) performed submaximal and maximal exercise on a cycle ergometer after 9 wk at 5,260 m altitude (Mt. Chacaltaya, Bolivia). This was done first with BV resulting from acclimatization (BV = 5.40 +/- 0.39 liters) and again 2-4 days later, 1 h after PV expansion with 1 liter of 6% dextran 70 (BV = 6.32 +/- 0.34 liters). PV expansion had no effect on Qmax, maximal O2 consumption (VO2), and exercise capacity. Despite maximal systemic O2 transport being reduced 19% due to hemodilution after PV expansion, whole body VO2 was maintained by greater systemic O2 extraction (P < 0.05). Leg blood flow was elevated (P < 0.05) in hypervolemic conditions, which compensated for hemodilution resulting in similar leg O2 delivery and leg VO2 during exercise regardless of PV. Pulmonary ventilation, gas exchange, and acid-base balance were essentially unaffected by PV expansion. Sea level Qmax and exercise capacity were restored with hyperoxia at altitude independently of BV. Low BV is not a primary cause for reduction of Qmax at altitude when acclimatized. Furthermore, hemodilution caused by PV expansion at altitude is compensated for by increased systemic O2 extraction with similar peak muscular O2 delivery, such that maximal exercise capacity is unaffected.

  14. VIP and its homologous increase vascular conductance in certain endocrine and exocrine glands

    SciTech Connect

    Huffman, L.J.; Connors, J.M.; Hedge, G.A. )

    1988-04-01

    The effects of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) and related structural homologues on tissue vascular conductances were investigated in anesthetized male rats. VIP, peptide histidine isoleucine (PHI), secretin, growth hormone-releasing factor (GHRF), gastric inhibitory peptide (GIP), or saline was infused intravenously over 4 min. Tissue blood flows were measured during this time by use of {sup 141}Ce-labeled microspheres. Circulating thyrotropin (TSH), triiodothyronine (T{sub 3}), and thyroxine (T{sub 4}) levels were determined before and at 20 min and 2 h after treatment. Marked increases in thyroid, pancreatic, and salivary gland vascular Cs occurred during peptide infusion with the order of potency correlating with the degree of structural homology to VIP. PHI and secretin produced maximal increases in vascular Cs, which were the same as those obtained with VIP. Circulating TSH, T{sub 3}, and T{sub 4} levels were not different from values in saline-infused rats after peptide treatments that caused striking increases in thyroid vascular C. These observations indicate that the vascular beds of certain endocrine and exocrine glands are responsive to the vasodilatory action of VIP and related homologues with the order of potency corresponding to the degree of structural homology to VIP. These results are also consistent with the proposal that structural homologues of VIP act at the same vascular receptor as VIP. Alternative, the involvement of different vascular receptors, acting through the same mechanism at a level beyond the receptor site, cannot be excluded.

  15. Focal cervical poliopathy causing juvenile muscular atrophy of distal upper extremity: a pathological study.

    PubMed Central

    Hirayama, K; Tomonaga, M; Kitano, K; Yamada, T; Kojima, S; Arai, K

    1987-01-01

    A new clinical entity under the name of "juvenile muscular atrophy of unilateral upper extremity" was first described in 1959. Although about 150 cases in Japan, and several additional cases in other countries, have been clinically reported in the literature, the pathology has remained unknown because of the benign course of the disease. The first necropsy findings are reported, obtained from a patient with this disease, who died of lung cancer at the age of 38, 23 years after the onset of the disease. The lesions existed only in the anterior horns of the spinal cord at C5 approximately T1, particularly marked at C7 and C8, showing shrinkage and necrosis, degeneration of various degrees of large and small nerve cells, and mild gliosis. The pathological findings differ from those of reported cases of spinal vascular disorders, but some circulatory insufficiency in the territory of the spinal cord would seem to be suggested, although the underlying aetiology remains unknown. Images PMID:3559609

  16. Evidence-based guideline summary: Evaluation, diagnosis, and management of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Tawil, Rabi; Kissel, John T.; Heatwole, Chad; Pandya, Shree; Gronseth, Gary; Benatar, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To develop recommendations for the evaluation, diagnosis, prognostication, and treatment of facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) from a systematic review and analysis of the evidence. Methods: Relevant articles were analyzed in accordance with the American Academy of Neurology classification of evidence schemes for diagnostic, prognostic, and treatment studies. Recommendations were linked to the strength of the evidence and other factors. Results and recommendations: Available genetic testing for FSHD type 1 is highly sensitive and specific. Although respiratory insufficiency occurs rarely in FSHD, patients with severe FSHD should have routine pulmonary function testing. Routine cardiac screening is not necessary in patients with FSHD without cardiac symptoms. Symptomatic retinal vascular disease is very rare in FSHD. Exudative retinopathy, however, is potentially preventable, and patients with large deletions should be screened through dilated indirect ophthalmoscopy. The prevalence of clinically relevant hearing loss is not clear. In clinical practice, patients with childhood-onset FSHD may have significant hearing loss. Because undetected hearing loss may impair language development, screening through audiometry is recommended for such patients. Musculoskeletal pain is common in FSHD and treating physicians should routinely inquire about pain. There is at present no effective pharmacologic intervention in FSHD. Available studies suggest that scapular fixation is safe and effective. Surgical scapular fixation might be cautiously offered to selected patients. Aerobic exercise in FSHD appears to be safe and potentially beneficial. On the basis of the evidence, patients with FSHD might be encouraged to engage in low-intensity aerobic exercises. PMID:26215877

  17. What is vascular dementia?

    PubMed

    Kurz, A F

    2001-05-01

    Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and dementia frequently coexist in elderly patients. The question of whether the CVD causes the dementia depends on how 'dementia' is defined. Traditional definitions specified that dementia involved a decline in intellectual ability as a core feature. However, revised definitions have since stipulated two key elements: 1) a global rather than focal neurobehavioural deficit and 2) impairment in activities of daily living (ADL). When applied to CVD, these latter concepts of dementia raise difficulty: Focal cerebrovascular lesions in the cortex generate location-specific neurobehavioural deficits that are part of the dementia syndrome, but, even in combination, do not represent a global intellectual decline. Most cerebrovascular lesions are associated with physical symptoms that make it difficult to evaluate whether cognitive impairments have an independent impact on ADL. The majority of neurobehavioural symptoms in CVD are caused by small-vessel-type subcortical lesions and are dissimilar to those seen in Alzheimer's disease. There are several pathogenetic mechanisms, however, by which large-vessel or small-vessel CVD can cause global cognitive and intellectual impairments, allowing a diagnosis of vascular dementia (VaD): An accumulation of ischaemic lesions in the cortex may produce global intellectual impairment, particularly if they affect important areas of the brain. Single small infarcts, or haemorrhages in strategic subcortical locations, may interfere with specific circuits connecting the prefrontal cortex to the basal ganglia, or with nonspecific thalamocortical projections. This may generate combinations of executive dysfunction, personality change or apathy, which are associated with hypoperfusion and hypometabolism predominantly in frontal cortical areas. Extensive white matter lesions probably affect cognitive function through a loss of axons, producing a functional disconnection of the cortex. This can manifest as

  18. Microdystrophin Ameliorates Muscular Dystrophy in the Canine Model of Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Pan, Xiufang; Hakim, Chady H; Yang, Hsiao T; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Keqing; Terjung, Ronald L; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-01-01

    Dystrophin deficiency results in lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Substituting missing dystrophin with abbreviated microdystrophin has dramatically alleviated disease in mouse DMD models. Unfortunately, translation of microdystrophin therapy has been unsuccessful in dystrophic dogs, the only large mammalian model. Approximately 70% of the dystrophin-coding sequence is removed in microdystrophin. Intriguingly, loss of ≥50% dystrophin frequently results in severe disease in patients. To test whether the small gene size constitutes a fundamental design error for large mammalian muscle, we performed a comprehensive study using 22 dogs (8 normal and 14 dystrophic). We delivered the ΔR2-15/ΔR18-19/ΔR20-23/ΔC microdystrophin gene to eight extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) muscles in six dystrophic dogs using Y713F tyrosine mutant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-9 (2.6 × 1013 viral genome (vg) particles/muscle). Robust expression was observed 2 months later despite T-cell infiltration. Major components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) were restored by microdystrophin. Treated muscle showed less inflammation, fibrosis, and calcification. Importantly, therapy significantly preserved muscle force under the stress of repeated cycles of eccentric contraction. Our results have established the proof-of-concept for microdystrophin therapy in dystrophic muscles of large mammals and set the stage for clinical trial in human patients. PMID:23319056

  19. Microdystrophin ameliorates muscular dystrophy in the canine model of duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Shin, Jin-Hong; Pan, Xiufang; Hakim, Chady H; Yang, Hsiao T; Yue, Yongping; Zhang, Keqing; Terjung, Ronald L; Duan, Dongsheng

    2013-04-01

    Dystrophin deficiency results in lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). Substituting missing dystrophin with abbreviated microdystrophin has dramatically alleviated disease in mouse DMD models. Unfortunately, translation of microdystrophin therapy has been unsuccessful in dystrophic dogs, the only large mammalian model. Approximately 70% of the dystrophin-coding sequence is removed in microdystrophin. Intriguingly, loss of ≥50% dystrophin frequently results in severe disease in patients. To test whether the small gene size constitutes a fundamental design error for large mammalian muscle, we performed a comprehensive study using 22 dogs (8 normal and 14 dystrophic). We delivered the ΔR2-15/ΔR18-19/ΔR20-23/ΔC microdystrophin gene to eight extensor carpi ulnaris (ECU) muscles in six dystrophic dogs using Y713F tyrosine mutant adeno-associated virus (AAV)-9 (2.6 × 10(13) viral genome (vg) particles/muscle). Robust expression was observed 2 months later despite T-cell infiltration. Major components of the dystrophin-associated glycoprotein complex (DGC) were restored by microdystrophin. Treated muscle showed less inflammation, fibrosis, and calcification. Importantly, therapy significantly preserved muscle force under the stress of repeated cycles of eccentric contraction. Our results have established the proof-of-concept for microdystrophin therapy in dystrophic muscles of large mammals and set the stage for clinical trial in human patients.

  20. Evaluation of muscular lesions in connective tissue diseases: thallium 201 muscular scans

    SciTech Connect

    Guillet, G.; Guillet, J.; Sanciaume, C.; Maleville, J.; Geniaux, M.; Morin, P.

    1988-04-01

    We performed thallium 201 muscle scans to assess muscular involvement in 40 patients with different connective tissue diseases (7 with dermatomyositis, 7 with systemic lupus erythematosus, 12 with progressive systemic scleroderma, 2 with calcinosis, Raynaud's phenomenon, esophageal involvement, sclerodactyly, and telangiectasia (CREST) syndrome, 3 with monomelic scleroderma, 6 with morphea, and 3 with Raynaud's disease). Only 12 of these patients complained of fatigability and/or myalgia. Electromyography was performed and serum levels of muscle enzymes were measured in all patients. Comparison of thallium 201 exercise recording with the other tests revealed that scan sensitivity is greater than electromyographic and serum muscle enzymes levels. Thallium 201 scans showed abnormal findings in 32 patients and revealed subclinical lesions in 18 patients, while electromyography findings were abnormal in 25 of these 32 patients. Serum enzyme levels were raised in only 8 patients. Thallium 201 scanning proved to be a useful guide for modifying therapy when laboratory data were conflicting. It was useful to evaluate treatment efficacy. Because our data indicate a 100% positive predictive value, we believe that thallium 201 scanning should be advised for severe systemic connective tissue diseases with discordant test results.

  1. Relationship Between Fatigue Index and Number of Repetition Maxima with Sub-Maximal Loads in Biceps Curl

    PubMed Central

    Pekünlü, Ekim; Atalağ, Ozan

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between the number of repetition maxima to volitional failure (RM) at 60%, 75%, 90% of 1RM and fatigue index (FI), a determinant of the muscular endurance level. Thirty four resistance trained male participants attended two testing sessions. The first session was conducted to assess 1RM load and RM at 60%, 75% and 90% of 1RM in the supine biceps curl (SBC) exercise. In the second session, a FI test protocol consisting of five sets of SBC with 90 s rest between sets was performed to determine FI values. Each set was performed to volitional failure using a sub-maximal load in the range of 15-20RM. Hypothetical high FI and low FI groups (17 participants with the highest and lowest FI values, respectively) were formed for statistical analyses. ANOVA results revealed that RM at 60%, 75%, 90% of 1RM were not significantly different between FI groups when controlled for mean repetition tempo (p=0.11, p=0.38, p=0.13, respectively). Pearson’s correlation coefficients revealed that no significant relationship was present between FI values and RM at 60%, 75%, 90% of 1RM (p=0.40, p=0.46, p=0.14, respectively). In conclusion, the muscular endurance level of participants defined in terms of FI value was not an indicator of RM in SBC. Therefore, athletes with different muscular endurance levels can use similar percentages of 1RM in biceps curl exercise in their training programs when the aim is to elicit training adaptations related to specific RM zones. PMID:24235992

  2. Contemporary Management of Wartime Vascular Trauma

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-06-01

    From the Society for Vascular Surgery Contemporary management of wartime vascular trauma Charles J. Fox, MD,a,b David L. Gillespie, MD,a,b Sean D...injuries. ( J Vasc Surg 2005;41:638-44.)From the time of Hippocrates, the field of vascular surgery has been advanced by the application of lessons...diagnostic and therapeutic approach to the care of the wounded soldier with a vascular injury. From the Department of Surgery , Peripheral Vascular

  3. The other mechanism of muscular referred pain: the "connective tissue" theory.

    PubMed

    Han, Dong-Gyun

    2009-09-01

    Muscular referred pain, that is, pain perceived in a somatic area other than the site of the noxious stimulation, takes place on a specific place to each muscle in constant and predictable pattern. The central hyperexcitability theory focused on spinal cord, the most proper theory at present, can explain well the segmental pattern of referred pain showing delayed onset. But it is hard to explain the non segmental pattern of referred pain areas of superficial-seated or limb girdle and limb muscles. Referred pain areas of limb girdle and limb muscles appear on the skin above a belt of synergistic muscles beyond the segmental areas. In the case of forearm and calf muscles, referred pain shows up on the palm and sole, the point of force application to the outer object. This finding reflects biomechanical relationship between muscle and its referred pain area. From the phylogenetic perspective, aquatic vertebrated animals (e.g. fish) use myoseptum surrounding myomere, connected to skin to keep tensile strength with it for effective swimming. Likewise, in terrestrial vertebrated animals, there are skin parts weakly interconnected with muscles, though the tensile property of nearly all the skin devolutes except the points of action with the outside. These points are dynamic maximal skin tension areas connected with muscles through superficial fascia, in other words, referred pain areas. Referred pain of deep-seated or truncal muscles appears on the trunk segmentally via spinal cord (the central hyperexcitability theory), but superficial-seated or limb girdle and limb muscles elicit referred pain on dynamic maximal skin tension area through connective tissue (the "connective tissue" theory).

  4. [Effect of rehabilitation after myocardial infarction on muscular metabolism. Contribution of phosphorus 31 NMR spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Cottin, Y; Marcer, I; Walker, P; Verges, B; Caillaux, B X; Louis, P; Didier, J P; Casillas, J M; Brunotte, F; Wolf, J E

    1994-06-01

    P 31 NMR spectroscopy is a recent technique which allows a non-invasive and direct analysis of oxidative metabolism and pH changes, an indicator of acidosis due to lactic acid accumulation in the skeletal muscles. The authors investigated oxidative muscular metabolism of the sural triceps in 10 patients after myocardial infarction by performing a study after the acute phase and repeating the study after a programme of physical training. At rest, there were no significant differences. On the other hand, for the same level of maximal effort, the depletion in phosphocreatinine (PCr) and the accumulation of inorganic phosphate (Pi) were significantly lower after physical training: the PCr/PCr + Pi increased from 0.467 +/- 0.179 to 0.538 +/- 0.20 (p < 0.02) and the Pi/PCr ratio decreased from 1.570 +/- 1.440 to 1.181 +/- 1.069 (p < 0.05). The pH at the same level of maximal exercise did not change significantly between the two periods: 6.85 +/- 0.16 vs 6.88 +/- 0.15 (NS). The peak oxygen consumption (VO2) measured during bicycle ergometry increased significantly from 23.4 +/- 10.5 to 28.3 +/- 12.14 ml/min/kg after exercise training (p < 0.01). In addition, a correlation was observed between the improvement of the peripheral parameters (PCr/PCr + Pi) and the increase in VO2 max (r = 0.757, p < 0.01). The authors results confirm the effects of physical training on oxidative metabolisms of the peripheral muscles and its influence on improvement of global performance of coronary patients.

  5. Wound healing: the effect of macrophage and tumour derived angiogenesis factors on skin graft vascularization.

    PubMed Central

    Arnold, F.; West, D.; Kumar, S.

    1987-01-01

    Angiogenic factors prepared from rat Walker 256 mammary carcinoma, (TAF) and activated mouse peritoneal macrophages (MAF), were tested for their ability to stimulate vascularization during healing. They were applied to one of a pair of bilaterally symmetrical, autologous, isotopic, full thickness skin grafts in mice. Blood flow to treated and untreated graft pairs was compared by their uptake of injected 86Rb Cl, at 3 and 7 days after grafting. No difference was detected after treatment with either agent. We conclude that while angiogenic factors are important in vascularization during healing, this normally occurs at a near maximal rate and cannot be further enhanced. PMID:2443156

  6. A Prospective Investigation of Interpersonal Influences on the Pursuit of Muscularity in Late Adolescent Boys and Girls

    PubMed Central

    Shomaker, Lauren B.; Furman, Wyndol

    2010-01-01

    This project examined whether interpersonal pressure to be muscular predicted late adolescents’ pursuit of muscularity. Participants were 199 adolescents (16–19 years), mothers (n=175), and friends (n=159), assessed at two annual times. Pressure to be muscular was assessed with adolescents’, mothers’, and friends’ reports of their relationships. Adolescents reported pressure from fathers and romantic partners, appearance satisfaction, disordered eating, and pursuit of muscularity. Adolescents,’ mothers’, and friends’ reports of pressure related to pursuit of muscularity at both times. Adolescents’ perceptions and mothers’ reports prospectively predicted pursuit of muscularity. Findings highlight the relevance of relationships to pursuit of muscularity in late adolescents. PMID:20348360

  7. Maximal and sub-maximal functional lifting performance at different platform heights.

    PubMed

    Savage, Robert J; Jaffrey, Mark A; Billing, Daniel C; Ham, Daniel J

    2015-01-01

    Introducing valid physical employment tests requires identifying and developing a small number of practical tests that provide broad coverage of physical performance across the full range of job tasks. This study investigated discrete lifting performance across various platform heights reflective of common military lifting tasks. Sixteen Australian Army personnel performed a discrete lifting assessment to maximal lifting capacity (MLC) and maximal acceptable weight of lift (MAWL) at four platform heights between 1.30 and 1.70 m. There were strong correlations between platform height and normalised lifting performance for MLC (R(2) = 0.76 ± 0.18, p < 0.05) and MAWL (R(2) = 0.73 ± 0.21, p < 0.05). The developed relationship allowed prediction of lifting capacity at one platform height based on lifting capacity at any of the three other heights, with a standard error of < 4.5 kg and < 2.0 kg for MLC and MAWL, respectively.

  8. Maximally Expressive Modeling of Operations Tasks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaap, John; Richardson, Lea; Davis, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    Planning and scheduling systems organize "tasks" into a timeline or schedule. The tasks are defined within the scheduling system in logical containers called models. The dictionary might define a model of this type as "a system of things and relations satisfying a set of rules that, when applied to the things and relations, produce certainty about the tasks that are being modeled." One challenging domain for a planning and scheduling system is the operation of on-board experiments for the International Space Station. In these experiments, the equipment used is among the most complex hardware ever developed, the information sought is at the cutting edge of scientific endeavor, and the procedures are intricate and exacting. Scheduling is made more difficult by a scarcity of station resources. The models to be fed into the scheduler must describe both the complexity of the experiments and procedures (to ensure a valid schedule) and the flexibilities of the procedures and the equipment (to effectively utilize available resources). Clearly, scheduling International Space Station experiment operations calls for a "maximally expressive" modeling schema.

  9. Maximizing exosome colloidal stability following electroporation.

    PubMed

    Hood, Joshua L; Scott, Michael J; Wickline, Samuel A

    2014-03-01

    Development of exosome-based semisynthetic nanovesicles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes requires novel approaches to load exosomes with cargo. Electroporation has previously been used to load exosomes with RNA. However, investigations into exosome colloidal stability following electroporation have not been considered. Herein, we report the development of a unique trehalose pulse media (TPM) that minimizes exosome aggregation following electroporation. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and RNA absorbance were employed to determine the extent of exosome aggregation and electroextraction post electroporation in TPM compared to common PBS pulse media or sucrose pulse media (SPM). Use of TPM to disaggregate melanoma exosomes post electroporation was dependent on both exosome concentration and electric field strength. TPM maximized exosome dispersal post electroporation for both homogenous B16 melanoma and heterogeneous human serum-derived populations of exosomes. Moreover, TPM enabled heavy cargo loading of melanoma exosomes with 5nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION5) while maintaining original exosome size and minimizing exosome aggregation as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy. Loading exosomes with SPION5 increased exosome density on sucrose gradients. This provides a simple, label-free means of enriching exogenously modified exosomes and introduces the potential for MRI-driven theranostic exosome investigations in vivo.

  10. Maximal respiratory pressure in healthy Japanese children.

    PubMed

    Tagami, Miki; Okuno, Yukako; Matsuda, Tadamitsu; Kawamura, Kenta; Shoji, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-03-01

    [Purpose] Normal values for respiratory muscle pressures during development in Japanese children have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate respiratory muscle pressures in Japanese children aged 3-12 years. [Subjects and Methods] We measured respiratory muscle pressure values using a manovacuometer without a nose clip, with subjects in a sitting position. Data were collected for ages 3-6 (Group I: 68 subjects), 7-9 (Group II: 86 subjects), and 10-12 (Group III: 64 subjects) years. [Results] The values for respiratory muscle pressures in children were significantly higher with age in both sexes, and were higher in boys than in girls. Correlation coefficients were significant at values of 0.279 to 0.471 for each gender relationship between maximal respiratory pressure and age, height, and weight, respectively. [Conclusion] In this study, we showed pediatric respiratory muscle pressure reference value for each age. In the present study, values for respiratory muscle pressures were lower than Brazilian studies. This suggests that differences in respiratory muscle pressures vary with ethnicity.

  11. Maximally localized Wannier functions: Theory and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marzari, Nicola; Mostofi, Arash A.; Yates, Jonathan R.; Souza, Ivo; Vanderbilt, David

    2012-10-01

    The electronic ground state of a periodic system is usually described in terms of extended Bloch orbitals, but an alternative representation in terms of localized “Wannier functions” was introduced by Gregory Wannier in 1937. The connection between the Bloch and Wannier representations is realized by families of transformations in a continuous space of unitary matrices, carrying a large degree of arbitrariness. Since 1997, methods have been developed that allow one to iteratively transform the extended Bloch orbitals of a first-principles calculation into a unique set of maximally localized Wannier functions, accomplishing the solid-state equivalent of constructing localized molecular orbitals, or “Boys orbitals” as previously known from the chemistry literature. These developments are reviewed here, and a survey of the applications of these methods is presented. This latter includes a description of their use in analyzing the nature of chemical bonding, or as a local probe of phenomena related to electric polarization and orbital magnetization. Wannier interpolation schemes are also reviewed, by which quantities computed on a coarse reciprocal-space mesh can be used to interpolate onto much finer meshes at low cost, and applications in which Wannier functions are used as efficient basis functions are discussed. Finally the construction and use of Wannier functions outside the context of electronic-structure theory is presented, for cases that include phonon excitations, photonic crystals, and cold-atom optical lattices.

  12. Inverting Monotonic Nonlinearities by Entropy Maximization

    PubMed Central

    López-de-Ipiña Pena, Karmele; Caiafa, Cesar F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method for blind inversion of a monotonic nonlinear map applied to a sum of random variables. Such kinds of mixtures of random variables are found in source separation and Wiener system inversion problems, for example. The importance of our proposed method is based on the fact that it permits to decouple the estimation of the nonlinear part (nonlinear compensation) from the estimation of the linear one (source separation matrix or deconvolution filter), which can be solved by applying any convenient linear algorithm. Our new nonlinear compensation algorithm, the MaxEnt algorithm, generalizes the idea of Gaussianization of the observation by maximizing its entropy instead. We developed two versions of our algorithm based either in a polynomial or a neural network parameterization of the nonlinear function. We provide a sufficient condition on the nonlinear function and the probability distribution that gives a guarantee for the MaxEnt method to succeed compensating the distortion. Through an extensive set of simulations, MaxEnt is compared with existing algorithms for blind approximation of nonlinear maps. Experiments show that MaxEnt is able to successfully compensate monotonic distortions outperforming other methods in terms of the obtained Signal to Noise Ratio in many important cases, for example when the number of variables in a mixture is small. Besides its ability for compensating nonlinearities, MaxEnt is very robust, i.e. showing small variability in the results. PMID:27780261

  13. Viral quasispecies assembly via maximal clique enumeration.

    PubMed

    Töpfer, Armin; Marschall, Tobias; Bull, Rowena A; Luciani, Fabio; Schönhuth, Alexander; Beerenwinkel, Niko

    2014-03-01

    Virus populations can display high genetic diversity within individual hosts. The intra-host collection of viral haplotypes, called viral quasispecies, is an important determinant of virulence, pathogenesis, and treatment outcome. We present HaploClique, a computational approach to reconstruct the structure of a viral quasispecies from next-generation sequencing data as obtained from bulk sequencing of mixed virus samples. We develop a statistical model for paired-end reads accounting for mutations, insertions, and deletions. Using an iterative maximal clique enumeration approach, read pairs are assembled into haplotypes of increasing length, eventually enabling global haplotype assembly. The performance of our quasispecies assembly method is assessed on simulated data for varying population characteristics and sequencing technology parameters. Owing to its paired-end handling, HaploClique compares favorably to state-of-the-art haplotype inference methods. It can reconstruct error-free full-length haplotypes from low coverage samples and detect large insertions and deletions at low frequencies. We applied HaploClique to sequencing data derived from a clinical hepatitis C virus population of an infected patient and discovered a novel deletion of length 357±167 bp that was validated by two independent long-read sequencing experiments. HaploClique is available at https://github.com/armintoepfer/haploclique. A summary of this paper appears in the proceedings of the RECOMB 2014 conference, April 2-5.

  14. Network channel allocation and revenue maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamalainen, Timo; Joutsensalo, Jyrki

    2002-09-01

    This paper introduces a model that can be used to share link capacity among customers under different kind of traffic conditions. This model is suitable for different kind of networks like the 4G networks (fast wireless access to wired network) to support connections of given duration that requires a certain quality of service. We study different types of network traffic mixed in a same communication link. A single link is considered as a bottleneck and the goal is to find customer traffic profiles that maximizes the revenue of the link. Presented allocation system accepts every calls and there is not absolute blocking, but the offered data rate/user depends on the network load. Data arrival rate depends on the current link utilization, user's payment (selected CoS class) and delay. The arrival rate is (i) increasing with respect to the offered data rate, (ii) decreasing with respect to the price, (iii) decreasing with respect to the network load, and (iv) decreasing with respect to the delay. As an example, explicit formula obeying these conditions is given and analyzed.

  15. Evolution of correlated multiplexity through stability maximization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dwivedi, Sanjiv K.; Jalan, Sarika

    2017-02-01

    Investigating the relation between various structural patterns found in real-world networks and the stability of underlying systems is crucial to understand the importance and evolutionary origin of such patterns. We evolve multiplex networks, comprising antisymmetric couplings in one layer depicting predator-prey relationship and symmetric couplings in the other depicting mutualistic (or competitive) relationship, based on stability maximization through the largest eigenvalue of the corresponding adjacency matrices. We find that there is an emergence of the correlated multiplexity between the mirror nodes as the evolution progresses. Importantly, evolved values of the correlated multiplexity exhibit a dependence on the interlayer coupling strength. Additionally, the interlayer coupling strength governs the evolution of the disassortativity property in the individual layers. We provide analytical understanding to these findings by considering starlike networks representing both the layers. The framework discussed here is useful for understanding principles governing the stability as well as the importance of various patterns in the underlying networks of real-world systems ranging from the brain to ecology which consist of multiple types of interaction behavior.

  16. Maximizing Exosome Colloidal Stability Following Electroporation

    PubMed Central

    Hood, Joshua L.; Scott, Michael J.; Wickline, Samuel A.

    2014-01-01

    Development of exosome based semi-synthetic nanovesicles for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes requires novel approaches to load exosomes with cargo. Electroporation has previously been used to load exosomes with RNA. However, investigations into exosome colloidal stability following electroporation have not been considered. Herein, we report the development of a unique trehalose pulse media (TPM) that minimizes exosome aggregation following electroporation. Dynamic light scattering (DLS) and RNA absorbance were employed to determine the extent of exosome aggregation and electroextraction post electroporation in TPM compared to common PBS pulse media or sucrose pulse media (SPM). Use of TPM to disaggregate melanoma exosomes post electroporation was dependent on both exosome concentration and electric field strength. TPM maximized exosome dispersal post electroporation for both homogenous B16 melanoma and heterogeneous human serum derived populations of exosomes. Moreover, TPM enabled heavy cargo loading of melanoma exosomes with 5 nm superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION5) while maintaining original exosome size and minimizing exosome aggregation as evidenced by transmission electron microscopy. Loading exosomes with SPION5 increased exosome density on sucrose gradients. This provides a simple, label free means to enrich exogenously modified exosomes and introduces the potential for MRI driven theranostic exosome investigations in vivo. PMID:24333249

  17. Predicting maximal grip strength using hand circumference.

    PubMed

    Li, Ke; Hewson, David J; Duchêne, Jacques; Hogrel, Jean-Yves

    2010-12-01

    The objective of this study was to analyze the correlations between anthropometric data and maximal grip strength (MGS) in order to establish a simple model to predict "normal" MGS. Randomized bilateral measurement of MGS was performed on a homogeneous population of 100 subjects. MGS was measured according to a standardized protocol with three dynamometers (Jamar, Myogrip and Martin Vigorimeter) for both dominant and non-dominant sides. Several anthropometric data were also measured: height; weight; hand, wrist and forearm circumference; hand and palm length. Among these data, hand circumference had the strongest correlation with MGS for all three dynamometers and for both hands (0.789 and 0.782 for Jamar; 0.829 and 0.824 for Myogrip; 0.663 and 0.730 for Vigorimeter). In addition, the only anthropometric variable systematically selected by a stepwise multiple linear regression analysis was also hand circumference. Based on this parameter alone, a predictive regression model presented good results (r(2) = 0.624 for Jamar; r(2) = 0.683 for Myogrip and r(2) = 0.473 for Vigorimeter; all adjusted r(2)). Moreover a single equation was predictive of MGS for both men and women and for both non-dominant and dominant hands. "Normal" MGS can be predicted using hand circumference alone.

  18. Maximal respiratory pressure in healthy Japanese children

    PubMed Central

    Tagami, Miki; Okuno, Yukako; Matsuda, Tadamitsu; Kawamura, Kenta; Shoji, Ryosuke; Tomita, Kazuhide

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] Normal values for respiratory muscle pressures during development in Japanese children have not been reported. The purpose of this study was to investigate respiratory muscle pressures in Japanese children aged 3–12 years. [Subjects and Methods] We measured respiratory muscle pressure values using a manovacuometer without a nose clip, with subjects in a sitting position. Data were collected for ages 3–6 (Group I: 68 subjects), 7–9 (Group II: 86 subjects), and 10–12 (Group III: 64 subjects) years. [Results] The values for respiratory muscle pressures in children were significantly higher with age in both sexes, and were higher in boys than in girls. Correlation coefficients were significant at values of 0.279 to 0.471 for each gender relationship between maximal respiratory pressure and age, height, and weight, respectively. [Conclusion] In this study, we showed pediatric respiratory muscle pressure reference value for each age. In the present study, values for respiratory muscle pressures were lower than Brazilian studies. This suggests that differences in respiratory muscle pressures vary with ethnicity. PMID:28356644

  19. Reflection quasilattices and the maximal quasilattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boyle, Latham; Steinhardt, Paul J.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce the concept of a reflection quasilattice, the quasiperiodic generalization of a Bravais lattice with irreducible reflection symmetry. Among their applications, reflection quasilattices are the reciprocal (i.e., Bragg diffraction) lattices for quasicrystals and quasicrystal tilings, such as Penrose tilings, with irreducible reflection symmetry and discrete scale invariance. In a follow-up paper, we will show that reflection quasilattices can be used to generate tilings in real space with properties analogous to those in Penrose tilings, but with different symmetries and in various dimensions. Here we explain that reflection quasilattices only exist in dimensions two, three, and four, and we prove that there is a unique reflection quasilattice in dimension four: the "maximal reflection quasilattice" in terms of dimensionality and symmetry. Unlike crystallographic Bravais lattices, all reflection quasilattices are invariant under rescaling by certain discrete scale factors. We tabulate the complete set of scale factors for all reflection quasilattices in dimension d >2 , and for all those with quadratic irrational scale factors in d =2 .

  20. Vascular effect of photodynamic therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fyodorov, Svyatoslav N.; Kopayeva, V. G.; Andreev, J. B.; Ponomarev, Gelii V.; Stranadko, Eugeny P.; Suchin, H. M.

    1996-01-01

    Vascular effect of PDT has been studied in patients with corneal vascularized leucomas (10 patients) and in patients with corneal neovascularized transplant (3 patients). For vascularized leucomas the method of photodynamic therapy consisted of the local injection of dimegin (deiteroporphyrin derivative) into the space of the newly-formed vessels under operating microscope (opton) with the microneedle (diameter 200 microns) and corneal irradiation by the operating microscope light. For corneal neovascularized transplant the injection of photogem (hematoporphyrin derivative) intravenously were made with subsequent irradiation by light of dye laser (5 hours after the injection) with light density of 150 mW/cm2 for 15 minutes. In all the cases at the time of irradiation the aggregated blood flow was appeared, followed by blood flow stasis. In postoperative period the vessels disintegrated into separate fragments which disappeared completely after 10 - 15 days. Taking into account the data of light microscopy, the disappearance of the vessels took place as a result of the vascular endothelium lisis along the vascular walls. Neovascularized cornea and newly-formed vessels in tumor stroms have much in common. The vessel alterations study presented in this paper, may serve to specify the mechanism of photodynamic destruction of neovascularized stroma of tumor.

  1. Pediatric Interventional Radiology: Vascular Interventions.

    PubMed

    Kandasamy, Devasenathipathy; Gamanagatti, Shivanand; Gupta, Arun Kumar

    2016-07-01

    Pediatric interventional radiology (PIR) comprises a range of minimally invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures that are performed using image guidance. PIR has emerged as an essential adjunct to various surgical and medical conditions. Over the years, technology has undergone dramatic and continuous evolution, making this speciality grow. In this review, the authors will discuss various vascular interventional procedures undertaken in pediatric patients. It is challenging for the interventional radiologist to accomplish a successful interventional procedure. There are many vascular interventional radiology procedures which are being performed and have changed the way the diseases are managed. Some of the procedures are life saving and have become the treatment of choice in those patients. The future is indeed bright for the practice and practitioners of pediatric vascular and non-vascular interventions. As more and more of the procedures that are currently being performed in adults get gradually adapted for use in the pediatric population, it may be possible to perform safe and successful interventions in many of the pediatric vascular lesions that are otherwise being referred for surgery.

  2. Thermography for skin temperature evaluation during dynamic exercise: a case study on an incremental maximal test in elite male cyclists.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Nicola; Trecroci, Athos; Gargano, Marco; Formenti, Damiano; Bosio, Andrea; Rampinini, Ermanno; Alberti, Giampietro

    2016-12-01

    The use of thermal imaging in monitoring the dynamic of skin temperature during prolonged physical exercise is central to assess athletes' ability to dissipate heat from the skin surface to the environment. In this study, seven elite cyclists completed an incremental maximal cycling test to evaluate their skin temperature response under controlled-environment conditions. Thermal images have been analyzed using a method based on maxima detection (Tmax). Data confirmed a reduction in skin temperature due to vasoconstriction during the exercise, followed by a temperature increment after exhaustion. A characteristic hot-spotted thermal pattern was found over the skin surface in all subjects. This research confirmed also the notable ability by highly trained cyclists to modify skin temperature during an incremental muscular effort. This study gives additional contributions for understanding the capability of the Tmax method applied to the thermoregulatory physiological processes.

  3. Muscular activity may improve in edentulous patients after implant treatment.

    PubMed

    Afrashtehfar, Kelvin I; Schimmel, Martin

    2016-12-01

    Data sourcesMedline via Pubmed and the Cochrane Library were searched from January 1980 to September 2013. This was complemented by a manual search of the magazines Deutsche Zahnaerztliche Zeitung, Quintessenz, Zeitschrift für Zahnärztliche Implantologie, Schweizerische Monatszeitschrift and Implantologie. Additionally, the list of reference s of all selected full-text articles and related reviews were further scrutinised for potential included studies in English or German.Study selectionThree review authors independently searched for clinical trials that assessed the muscular activity in the intervention groups: edentulous patients treated with implant-overdentures (IODs) and implant-supported fixed dental prostheses (ISFDPs) and the comparison groups: dentates and edentulous patients treated with mucosa-borne complete removable dental prostheses (CRDPs).Data extraction and synthesisThe primary outcome was the muscular activity (measured by electromyography [EMG]) in masseter or temporalis muscle of the participants during clenching and chewing. The data extraction of each included study consisted of author, year, age range, treatment, number of participants, number of implants inserted, arch treated, opposite jaw, kind and side of the muscles that were measured. EMG gain or loss (unit measured: volt) was considered by using the effect size. For the meta-analyses only the studies that included masseter muscle measured separately from temporalis were considered. Concerning the side of measurement (right and left side measured together or right and left side measured separately), only the dominant type in each category was included.ResultsSixteen articles, out of the initial 646 retrieved abstracts, were analysed. The muscular activity of edentulous subjects increased after implant support therapy during clenching (effect size [ES]: 2.18 [95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.14, 3.23]) and during chewing (ES: 1.45 [95 % CI: 1.21, 1.69]). In addition, the pooled EMG

  4. The value of respiratory muscle testing in a child with congenital muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Khirani, Sonia; Dabaj, Ivana; Amaddeo, Alessandro; Ramirez, Adriana; Quijano-Roy, Susana; Fauroux, Brigitte

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory muscle testing is often limited to noninvasive volitional tests such as vital capacity and maximal static pressures. We report the case of a 12-year-old boy with congenital muscular dystrophy (CMD) in whom invasive and non-volitional respiratory muscle tests showed an elective diaphragmatic dysfunction with the preservation of expiratory muscle strength. This finding, coupled with a clinical phenotype associating diffuse muscle atrophy with finger hyperlaxity and proximal contractures, strengthened the suspicion of Ullrich CMD. Skin-cultured fibroblasts showed intracellular retention of collagen 6 (COL6), muscle magnetic resonance imaging was typical of COL6 myopathy, and molecular studies identified a COL6 gene mutation (COL6A2 c.954+2T>C). The diagnosis of a diaphragmatic dysfunction led to a sleep study that evidenced periods of hypoxemia which justified nocturnal noninvasive ventilation. This case report highlights the benefit of assessing respiratory muscles, through invasive procedure, to assist in clinical diagnosis and to guide clinical management. PMID:25473580

  5. Identifying Dosage Effect of Light-Emitting Diode Therapy on Muscular Fatigue in Quadriceps.

    PubMed

    Hemmings, Thomas J; Kendall, Kristina L; Dobson, John L

    2017-02-01

    Hemmings, TJ, Kendall, KL, and Dobson, JL. Identifying dosage effect of light-emitting diode therapy on muscular fatigue in quadriceps. J Strength Cond Res 31(2): 395-402, 2017-The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of various dosages of light-emitting diode therapy (LEDT) on muscle fatigue while performing a single-leg extension to exhaustion. A total of 34 recreationally resistance-trained athletes between the ages of 18 and 26 participated in 4 trials. Each trial included pre-exercise/postexercise blood lactate measurements and 2 sets of 3 maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVICs), followed by LEDT on 6 points across the superficial quadriceps. Each randomized trial consisted of a placebo, 30, 60, or 120 seconds on each point on the quadriceps. Three minutes after LEDT, the participants performed an eccentric leg extension with 120% of MVIC until fatigue. There was significant increase in the number of repetitions performed between the placebo treatment and 60 seconds (p = 0.023), as well as placebo and 120 seconds (p = 0.004) of irradiation on each point. There were no significant differences in blood lactate levels between any of the 4 trials. In conclusion, LEDT had a positive effect on performance when irradiating 6 points on the superficial quadriceps for 60 and 120 seconds before an eccentric leg extension.

  6. Muscular endurance repetitions to predict bench press strength in men of different training levels.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, J L; Prinster, J L; Ware, J S; Zimmer, D L; Arabas, J R; Bemben, M G

    1995-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of predicting maximal bench press (BP) strength (1-RM) from relative endurance performance in various groups of men. The subjects included untrained students (n = 35), resistance trained students (n = 28), college wrestlers (n = 21), soccer players (n = 22), football players (n = 51), high school students (n = 35), and resistance-trained middle-aged men (n = 24). Each subject performed a 1-RM test according to the same standard procedure. Within 4-10 days, the subject selected a weight to perform as many repetitions as possible to failure. Six relative endurance prediction equations produced validity coefficients of r = 0.86 to 0.98 in each group and r = 0.82 to 0.98 in the composite group (n = 220). In subjects completing < or = 10 repetitions-to-failure, three equations significantly overpredicted and two significantly underpredicted 1-RM scores. The Brzycki equation was the most accurate. In subjects completing > 10 repetitions to failure, three equations significantly overpredicted and three significantly underpredicted 1-RM scores. While caution should be used when employing relative muscular endurance performance to estimate 1-RM strength in the bench press, the average of two equations may reduce the error.

  7. Pre- versus post-exercise protein intake has similar effects on muscular adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Aragon, Alan; Wilborn, Colin; Urbina, Stacie L.; Hayward, Sara E.; Krieger, James

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the anabolic window theory by investigating muscle strength, hypertrophy, and body composition changes in response to an equal dose of protein consumed either immediately pre- versus post-resistance training (RT) in trained men. Subjects were 21 resistance-trained men (>1 year RT experience) recruited from a university population. After baseline testing, participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 experimental groups: a group that consumed a supplement containing 25 g protein and 1 g carbohydrate immediately prior to exercise (PRE-SUPP) (n = 9) or a group that consumed the same supplement immediately post-exercise (POST-SUPP) (n = 12). The RT protocol consisted of three weekly sessions performed on non-consecutive days for 10 weeks. A total-body routine was employed with three sets of 8–12 repetitions for each exercise. Results showed that pre- and post-workout protein consumption had similar effects on all measures studied (p > 0.05). These findings refute the contention of a narrow post-exercise anabolic window to maximize the muscular response and instead lends support to the theory that the interval for protein intake may be as wide as several hours or perhaps more after a training bout depending on when the pre-workout meal was consumed. PMID:28070459

  8. Pre- versus post-exercise protein intake has similar effects on muscular adaptations.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad Jon; Aragon, Alan; Wilborn, Colin; Urbina, Stacie L; Hayward, Sara E; Krieger, James

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the anabolic window theory by investigating muscle strength, hypertrophy, and body composition changes in response to an equal dose of protein consumed either immediately pre- versus post-resistance training (RT) in trained men. Subjects were 21 resistance-trained men (>1 year RT experience) recruited from a university population. After baseline testing, participants were randomly assigned to 1 of 2 experimental groups: a group that consumed a supplement containing 25 g protein and 1 g carbohydrate immediately prior to exercise (PRE-SUPP) (n = 9) or a group that consumed the same supplement immediately post-exercise (POST-SUPP) (n = 12). The RT protocol consisted of three weekly sessions performed on non-consecutive days for 10 weeks. A total-body routine was employed with three sets of 8-12 repetitions for each exercise. Results showed that pre- and post-workout protein consumption had similar effects on all measures studied (p > 0.05). These findings refute the contention of a narrow post-exercise anabolic window to maximize the muscular response and instead lends support to the theory that the interval for protein intake may be as wide as several hours or perhaps more after a training bout depending on when the pre-workout meal was consumed.

  9. Evidence of muscular adaptations within four weeks of barbell training in women.

    PubMed

    Stock, Matt S; Olinghouse, Kendra D; Drusch, Alexander S; Mota, Jacob A; Hernandez, Jennah M; Akalonu, Chibuzo C; Thompson, Brennan J

    2016-02-01

    We investigated the time course of neuromuscular and hypertrophic adaptations associated with only four weeks of barbell squat and deadlift training. Forty-seven previously untrained women (mean±SD, age=21±3years) were randomly assigned to low volume training (n=15), moderate volume training (n=16), and control (n=16) groups. The low and moderate volume training groups performed two and four sets, respectively, of five repetitions per exercise, twice a week. Testing was performed weekly, and included dual X-ray absorptiometry and vastus lateralis and rectus femoris B-mode ultrasonography. Bipolar surface electromyographic (EMG) signals were detected from the vastus lateralis and biceps femoris during isometric maximal voluntary contractions of the leg extensors. Significant increases in lean mass for the combined gynoid and leg regions for the low (+0.68kg) and moderate volume (+0.47kg) groups were demonstrated within three weeks. Small-to-moderate effect sizes were shown for leg lean mass, vastus lateralis thickness and pennation angle, and peak torque, but EMG amplitude was unaffected. These findings demonstrated rapid muscular adaptations in response to only eight sessions of back squat and deadlift training in women despite the absence of changes in agonist-antagonist EMG amplitude.

  10. Influence of Resistance Training Frequency on Muscular Adaptations in Well-Trained Men.

    PubMed

    Schoenfeld, Brad J; Ratamess, Nicholas A; Peterson, Mark D; Contreras, Bret; Tiryaki-Sonmez, Gul

    2015-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effects of training muscle groups 1 day per week using a split-body routine (SPLIT) vs. 3 days per week using a total-body routine (TOTAL) on muscular adaptations in well-trained men. Subjects were 20 male volunteers (height = 1.76 ± 0.05 m; body mass = 78.0 ± 10.7 kg; age = 23.5 ± 2.9 years) recruited from a university population. Participants were pair matched according to baseline strength and then randomly assigned to 1 of the 2 experimental groups: a SPLIT, where multiple exercises were performed for a specific muscle group in a session with 2-3 muscle groups trained per session (n = 10) or a TOTAL, where 1 exercise was performed per muscle group in a session with all muscle groups trained in each session (n = 10). Subjects were tested pre- and poststudy for 1 repetition maximum strength in the bench press and squat, and muscle thickness (MT) of forearm flexors, forearm extensors, and vastus lateralis. Results showed significantly greater increases in forearm flexor MT for TOTAL compared with SPLIT. No significant differences were noted in maximal strength measures. The findings suggest a potentially superior hypertrophic benefit to higher weekly resistance training frequencies.

  11. Adverse Outcome Pathways for Embryonic Vascular Disruption and Alternative Methods to Identify Chemical Vascular Disruptor

    EPA Science Inventory

    Chemically induced vascular toxicity during embryonic development can result in a wide range of adverse prenatal outcomes. We used information from genetic mouse models linked to phenotypic outcomes and a vascular toxicity knowledge base to construct an embryonic vascular disrupt...

  12. Profound spatial heterogeneity of coronary reserve. Discordance between patterns of resting and maximal myocardial blood flow.

    PubMed

    Austin, R E; Aldea, G S; Coggins, D L; Flynn, A E; Hoffman, J I

    1990-08-01

    We examined the ability of individual regions of the canine left ventricle to increase blood flow relative to baseline rates of perfusion. Regional coronary flow was measured by injecting radioactive microspheres over 90 seconds in seven anesthetized mongrel dogs. Preliminary experiments demonstrated a correlation between the regional distributions of blood flow during asphyxia and pharmacological vasodilatation with adenosine (mean r = 0.75; 192 regions in each of two dogs), both of which resulted in increased coronary flow. Subsequent experiments, during which coronary perfusion pressure was held constant at 80 mm Hg, examined the pattern of blood flow in 384 regions (mean weight, 106 mg) of the left ventricular free wall during resting flow and during maximal coronary flow effected by intracoronary adenosine infusion. We found that resting and maximal flow patterns were completely uncorrelated to each other in a given dog (mean r = 0.06, p = NS; n = 3 dogs). Furthermore, regional coronary reserve, defined as the ratio of maximal to resting flow, ranged from 1.75 (i.e., resting flow was 57% of maximum) to 21.9 (resting flow was 4.5% of maximum). Thus, coronary reserve is spatially heterogeneous and determined by two distinct perfusion patterns: the resting (control) pattern and the maximal perfusion pattern. Normal hearts, therefore, contain small regions that may be relatively more vulnerable to ischemia. This may explain the patchy nature of infarction with hypoxia and at reduced perfusion pressures as well as the difficulty of using global parameters to predict regional ischemia. Despite the wide dispersion of coronary reserve, we found, by autocorrelation analysis, that reserve in neighboring regions (even when separated by a distance of several tissue samples) was significantly correlated. This also applied to patterns of resting myocardial flow. Thus, both resting coronary blood flow and reserve appear to be locally continuous and may define functional

  13. Pulpal vascular changes in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, K

    1992-01-01

    Changes in pulpal vessels in experimentally induced acute and chronic pulpitis in dog tooth were investigated using corrosive resin casts and scanning electron microscopic examination. Following a cavity preparation without water spray, increased permeability of blood vessels occurred in the primary stage of acute pulpitis. This was evidenced by the extravasation of resin from the vessel. This phenomenon was found initially in the venular network as well as in the capillary network located under the dentin. The morphological change was minimal in the vascular network underneath the cavity. This is in contrast to an expanded and tortuous vascular network representing an ulceration which was found around an abscess in chronic pulpitis. Furthermore, formation of vascular loops and AVAlc close to the inflamed region may represent a protective change in the pulp against inflammation.

  14. Laminins and retinal vascular development.

    PubMed

    Edwards, Malia M; Lefebvre, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    The mechanisms controlling vascular development, both normal and pathological, are not yet fully understood. Many diseases, including cancer and diabetic retinopathy, involve abnormal blood vessel formation. Therefore, increasing knowledge of these mechanisms may help develop novel therapeutic targets. The identification of novel proteins or cells involved in this process would be particularly useful. The retina is an ideal model for studying vascular development because it is easy to access, particularly in rodents where this process occurs post-natally. Recent studies have suggested potential roles for laminin chains in vascular development of the retina. This review will provide an overview of these studies, demonstrating the importance of further research into the involvement of laminins in retinal blood vessel formation.

  15. Vascular aging and geriatric patient.

    PubMed

    Nicita-Mauro, V; Maltese, G; Nicita-Mauro, C; Basile, G

    2007-08-01

    Advancing age is associated with changes in structure and function of different segments of the vascular system and is the dominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases. The oxidative stress represents a key event of vascular aging, mainly characterized by endothelium dysfunction and reduced arterial elasticity. Age-related changes include intimal and medial thickening, arterial calcification, increased deposition of matrix substances, thus leading to a reduced compliance and increased wall stiffness, that significantly contributes to an increase in systolic blood pressure. Frail elderly patients, because of their complex clinical presentations and needs, require a special approach: the comprehensive geriatric assessment, a multidimensional process intended to determine medical, psychosocial and functional capabilities and problems in order to develop a plan for treatment and continued care. All physicians, and geriatricians in particular, must, therefore, educate their patients to healthy lifestyle to prevent or delay vascular aging, cardiovascular diseases, and to maintain a good quality of life and increase life expectancy.

  16. Decreased Neprilysin and Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Wick, Marilee J.; Buesing, Erica J.; Wehling, Carol A.; Loomis, Zoe L.; Cool, Carlyne D.; Zamora, Martin R.; Miller, York E.; Colgan, Sean P.; Hersh, Louis B.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Dempsey, Edward C.

    2011-01-01

    Rationale: Studies with genetically engineered mice showed that decreased expression of the transmembrane peptidase neprilysin (NEP) increases susceptibility to hypoxic pulmonary vascular remodeling and hypertension; in hypoxic wild-type mice, expression is decreased early in distal pulmonary arteries, where prominent vascular remodeling occurs. Therefore, in humans with smoke- and hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling, as in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), pulmonary activity/expression of NEP may likewise be decreased. Objectives: To test whether NEP activity and expression are reduced in COPD lungs and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) exposed to cigarette smoke extract or hypoxia and begin to investigate mechanisms involved. Methods: Control and advanced COPD lung lysates (n = 13–14) were analyzed for NEP activity and protein and mRNA expression. As a control, dipeptidyl peptidase IV activity was analyzed. Lung sections were assessed for vascular remodeling and oxidant damage. Human pulmonary arterial SMCs were exposed to cigarette smoke extract, hypoxia, or H2O2, and incubated with antioxidants or lysosomal/proteasomal inhibitors. Measurements and Main Results: COPD lungs demonstrated areas of vascular rarification, distal muscularization, and variable intimal and prominent medial/adventitial thickening. NEP activity was reduced by 76%; NEP protein expression was decreased in alveolar walls and distal vessels; mRNA expression was also decreased. In SMCs exposed to cigarette smoke extract, hypoxia, and H2O2, NEP activity and expression were also reduced. Reactive oxygen species inactivated NEP activity; NEP protein degradation appeared to be substantially induced. Conclusions: Mechanisms responsible for reduced NEP activity and protein expression include oxidative reactions and protein degradation. Maintaining or increasing lung NEP may protect against pulmonary vascular remodeling in response to chronic smoke and hypoxia. PMID:20813891

  17. Standardized Definitions for Hemodialysis Vascular Access

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Timmy; Mokrzycki, Michele; Moist, Louise; Maya, Ivan; Vazquez, Miguel; Lok, Charmaine

    2014-01-01

    Vascular access dysfunction is one of the leading causes of morbidity and mortality among end-stage renal disease patients 1,2. Vascular access dysfunction exists in all 3 types of available accesses: arteriovenous fistulas, arteriovenous grafts, and tunneled catheters. In order to improve clinical research and outcomes in hemodialysis access dysfunction, the development of a multidisciplinary network of collaborative investigators with various areas of expertise, and common standards for terminology and classification in all vascular access types is required. The North American Vascular Access Consortium (NAVAC) is a newly formed multidisciplinary and multicenter network of experts in the area of hemodialysis vascular access, who include nephrologists and interventional nephrologists from the United States and Canada with: (1) a primary clinical and research focus in hemodialysis vascular access dysfunction, (2) national and internationally recognized experts in vascular access, and (3) a history of productivity measured by peer-reviewed publications and funding among members of this consortium. The consortium’s mission is to improve the quality and efficiency in vascular access research, and impact the research in the area of hemodialysis vascular access by conducting observational studies and randomized controlled trials. The purpose of the consortium’s initial manuscript is to provide working and standard vascular access definitions relating to (1) epidemiology, (2) vascular access function, (3) vascular access patency, and (4) complications in vascular accesses relating to each of the vascular access types. PMID:21906166

  18. Vascular Injury in Orthopedic Trauma.

    PubMed

    Mavrogenis, Andreas F; Panagopoulos, George N; Kokkalis, Zinon T; Koulouvaris, Panayiotis; Megaloikonomos, Panayiotis D; Igoumenou, Vasilios; Mantas, George; Moulakakis, Konstantinos G; Sfyroeras, George S; Lazaris, Andreas; Soucacos, Panayotis N

    2016-07-01

    Vascular injury in orthopedic trauma is challenging. The risk to life and limb can be high, and clinical signs initially can be subtle. Recognition and management should be a critical skill for every orthopedic surgeon. There are 5 types of vascular injury: intimal injury (flaps, disruptions, or subintimal/intramural hematomas), complete wall defects with pseudoaneurysms or hemorrhage, complete transections with hemorrhage or occlusion, arteriovenous fistulas, and spasm. Intimal defects and subintimal hematomas with possible secondary occlusion are most commonly associated with blunt trauma, whereas wall defects, complete transections, and arteriovenous fistulas usually occur with penetrating trauma. Spasm can occur after either blunt or penetrating trauma to an extremity and is more common in young patients. Clinical presentation of vascular injury may not be straightforward. Physical examination can be misleading or initially unimpressive; a normal pulse examination may be present in 5% to 15% of patients with vascular injury. Detection and treatment of vascular injuries should take place within the context of the overall resuscitation of the patient according to the established principles of the Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) protocols. Advances in the field, made mostly during times of war, have made limb salvage the rule rather than the exception. Teamwork, familiarity with the often subtle signs of vascular injuries, a high index of suspicion, effective communication, appropriate use of imaging modalities, sound knowledge of relevant technique, and sequence of surgical repairs are among the essential factors that will lead to a successful outcome. This article provides a comprehensive literature review on a subject that generates significant controversy and confusion among clinicians involved in the care of trauma patients. [Orthopedics. 2016; 39(4):249-259.].

  19. Rare flavor processes in Maximally Natural Supersymmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    García, Isabel García; March-Russell, John

    2015-01-01

    We study CP-conserving rare flavor violating processes in the recently proposed theory of Maximally Natural Supersymmetry (MNSUSY). MNSUSY is an unusual supersymmetric (SUSY) extension of the Standard Model (SM) which, remarkably, is untuned at present LHC limits. It employs Scherk-Schwarz breaking of SUSY by boundary conditions upon compactifying an underlying 5-dimensional (5D) theory down to 4D, and is not well-described by softly-broken SUSY, with much different phenomenology than the Minimal Supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM) and its variants. The usual CP-conserving SUSY-flavor problem is automatically solved in MNSUSY due to a residual almost exact U(1) R symmetry, naturally heavy and highly degenerate 1st- and 2nd-generation sfermions, and heavy gauginos and Higgsinos. Depending on the exact implementation of MNSUSY there exist important new sources of flavor violation involving gauge boson Kaluza-Klein (KK) excitations. The spatial localization properties of the matter multiplets, in particular the brane localization of the 3rd generation states, imply KK-parity is broken and tree-level contributions to flavor changing neutral currents are present in general. Nevertheless, we show that simple variants of the basic MNSUSY model are safe from present flavor constraints arising from kaon and B-meson oscillations, the rare decays B s, d → μ + μ -, μ → ēee and μ- e conversion in nuclei. We also briefly discuss some special features of the radiative decays μ → eγ and . Future experiments, especially those concerned with lepton flavor violation, should see deviations from SM predictions unless one of the MNSUSY variants with enhanced flavor symmetries is realized.

  20. [Vascular Calcification - Pathological Mechanism and Clinical Application - . Role of vascular smooth muscle cells in vascular calcification].

    PubMed

    Kurabayashi, Masahiko

    2015-05-01

    Vascular calcification is commonly seen with aging, chronic kidney disese (CKD), diabetes, and atherosclerosis, and is closely associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality. Vascular calcification has long been regarded as the final stage of degeneration and necrosis of arterial wall and a passive, unregulated process. However, it is now known to be an active and tightly regulated process involved with phenotypic transition of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) that resembles bone mineralization. Briefly, calcium deposits of atherosclerotic plaque consist of hydroxyapatite and may appear identical to fully formed lamellar bone. By using a genetic fate mapping strategy, VSMC of the vascular media give rise to the majority of the osteochondrogenic precursor- and chondrocyte-like cells observed in the calcified arterial media of MGP (- / -) mice. Osteogenic differentiation of VSMC is characterized by the expression of bone-related molecules including bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) -2, Msx2 and osteopontin, which are produced by osteoblasts and chondrocytes. Our recent findings are that (i) Runx2 and Notch1 induce osteogenic differentiation, and (ii) advanced glycation end-product (AGE) /receptor for AGE (RAGE) and palmitic acid promote osteogenic differentiation of VSMC. To understand of the molecular mechanisms of vascular calcification is now under intensive research area.

  1. Mechanisms and assessment of statin-related muscular adverse effects.

    PubMed

    Moßhammer, Dirk; Schaeffeler, Elke; Schwab, Matthias; Mörike, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Statin-associated muscular adverse effects cover a wide range of symptoms, including asymptomatic increase of creatine kinase serum activity and life-threatening rhabdomyolysis. Different underlying pathomechanisms have been proposed. However, a unifying concept of the pathogenesis of statin-related muscular adverse effects has not emerged so far. In this review, we attempt to categorize these mechanisms along three levels. Firstly, among pharmacokinetic factors, it has been shown for some statins that inhibition of cytochrome P450-mediated hepatic biotransformation and hepatic uptake by transporter proteins contribute to an increase of systemic statin concentrations. Secondly, at the myocyte membrane level, cell membrane uptake transporters affect intracellular statin concentrations. Thirdly, at the intracellular level, inhibition of the 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A (HMG-CoA) reductase results in decreased intracellular concentrations of downstream metabolites (e.g. selenoproteins, ubiquinone, cholesterol) and alteration of gene expression (e.g. ryanodine receptor 3, glycine amidinotransferase). We also review current recommendations for prescribers.

  2. Biomechanical analysis of the muscular power of martial arts athletes.

    PubMed

    Machado, S M; Osório, R A L; Silva, N S; Magini, M

    2010-06-01

    This study analyzes the performance of knee extension and flexion of Taekwondo and Kickboxing athletes. The power values were extracted through electromyography obtained by an isokinetic dynamometer at 60 degrees per second. These values are resulted from the square of the electromyography signal. The analysis of kick power was made using a modified wavelet algorithm considering values with 95% significance. Both groups presented equivalent power and torque capacity with different training times and experience, on the other hand, the wavelet analysis showed better results in muscular recruitment performance in athletes with more experience, in other words, power is not only performance but also power plus recruitment produces better results. This study uniquely showed that muscular enhancement capacity is not only related to the power capacity of contraction but also to motor coordination.

  3. Muscular dystrophy meets protein biochemistry, the mother of invention.

    PubMed

    Funk, Steven D; Miner, Jeffrey H

    2017-03-01

    Muscular dystrophies result from a defect in the linkage between the muscle fiber cytoskeleton and the basement membrane (BM). Congenital muscular dystrophy type MDC1A is caused by mutations in laminin α2 that either reduce its expression or impair its ability to polymerize within the muscle fiber BM. Defects in this BM lead to muscle fiber damage from the force of contraction. In this issue of the JCI, McKee and colleagues use a laminin polymerization-competent, designer chimeric BM protein in vivo to restore function of a polymerization-defective laminin, leading to normalized muscle structure and strength in a mouse model of MDC1A. Delivery of such a protein to patients could ameliorate many aspects of their disease.

  4. Fibrogenic Cell Plasticity Blunts Tissue Regeneration and Aggravates Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Pessina, Patrizia; Kharraz, Yacine; Jardí, Mercè; Fukada, So-ichiro; Serrano, Antonio L; Perdiguero, Eusebio; Muñoz-Cánoves, Pura

    2015-06-09

    Preservation of cell identity is necessary for homeostasis of most adult tissues. This process is challenged every time a tissue undergoes regeneration after stress or injury. In the lethal Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD), skeletal muscle regenerative capacity declines gradually as fibrosis increases. Using genetically engineered tracing mice, we demonstrate that, in dystrophic muscle, specialized cells of muscular, endothelial, and hematopoietic origins gain plasticity toward a fibrogenic fate via a TGFβ-mediated pathway. This results in loss of cellular identity and normal function, with deleterious consequences for regeneration. Furthermore, this fibrogenic process involves acquisition of a mesenchymal progenitor multipotent status, illustrating a link between fibrogenesis and gain of progenitor cell functions. As this plasticity also was observed in DMD patients, we propose that mesenchymal transitions impair regeneration and worsen diseases with a fibrotic component.

  5. The importance of genetic diagnosis for Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Aartsma-Rus, Annemieke; Ginjaar, Ieke B; Bushby, Kate

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) and Becker muscular dystrophy are caused by mutations in the dystrophin-encoding DMD gene. Large deletions and duplications are most common, but small mutations have been found as well. Having a correct diagnosis is important for family planning and providing proper care to patients according to published guidelines. With mutation-specific therapies under development for DMD, a correct diagnosis is now also important for assessing whether patients are eligible for treatments. This review discusses different mutations causing DMD, diagnostic techniques available for making a genetic diagnosis for children suspected of DMD and the importance of having a specific genetic diagnosis in the context of emerging genetic therapies for DMD. PMID:26754139

  6. Satellite Cells in Muscular Dystrophy - Lost in Polarity.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha C; Chevalier, Fabien P; Rudnicki, Michael A

    2016-06-01

    Recent findings employing the mdx mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) have revealed that muscle satellite stem cells play a direct role in contributing to disease etiology and progression of DMD, the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy. Lack of dystrophin expression in DMD has critical consequences in satellite cells including an inability to establish cell polarity, abrogation of asymmetric satellite stem-cell divisions, and failure to enter the myogenic program. Thus, muscle wasting in dystrophic mice is not only caused by myofiber fragility but is exacerbated by intrinsic satellite cell dysfunction leading to impaired regeneration. Despite intense research and clinical efforts, there is still no effective cure for DMD. In this review we highlight recent research advances in DMD and discuss the current state of treatment and, importantly, how we can incorporate satellite cell-targeted therapeutic strategies to correct satellite cell dysfunction in DMD.

  7. Mindfulness, body image, and drive for muscularity in men.

    PubMed

    Lavender, Jason M; Gratz, Kim L; Anderson, Drew A

    2012-03-01

    Studies have shown that dispositional mindfulness, a construct characterized by awareness and attention to present moment experiences, is associated with body image constructs in women. However, little is known about the relationship between dispositional mindfulness and body image among men. Therefore, this study examined the unique associations between dispositional mindfulness and three body image variables in men: overall appearance evaluation, satisfaction with distinct body areas, and drive for muscularity. Undergraduate men (N=296) completed the Multidimensional Body Self-Relations Questionnaire-Appearance Scales, the Drive for Muscularity Scale, the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale, and the Positive and Negative Affect Schedule. A series of hierarchical regression analyses revealed that mindfulness was uniquely associated with all three body image variables after accounting for body mass index and negative affect. Results are discussed with regard to the potential role of dispositional mindfulness in body dissatisfaction among men.

  8. Spinal muscular atrophy: development and implementation of potential treatments.

    PubMed

    Arnold, W David; Burghes, Arthur H M

    2013-09-01

    In neurodegenerative disorders, effective treatments are urgently needed, along with methods to determine whether treatment worked. In this review, we discuss the rapid progress in the understanding of recessive proximal spinal muscular atrophy and how this is leading to exciting potential treatments of the disease. Spinal muscular atrophy is caused by loss of the survival motor neuron 1 (SMN1) gene and reduced levels of SMN protein. The critical downstream targets of SMN deficiency that result in motor neuron loss are not known. However, increasing SMN levels has a marked impact in mouse models, and these therapeutics are rapidly moving toward clinical trials. Promising preclinical therapies, the varying degree of impact on the mouse models, and potential measures of treatment effect are reviewed. One key issue discussed is the variable outcome of increasing SMN at different stages of disease progression.

  9. Eyeball pseudo-muscular actuators for an android face

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpi, Federico; De Rossi, Danilo

    2005-05-01

    The human attention system is based on the capability of the eye of focusing and tracking. These actions are performed by the eyeball muscle system, as a consequence of visual stimuli. The F.A.C.E. (Facial Automaton for Conveying Emotions) project at our lab concerns the development of an android face endowed with dynamic expressiveness and artificial vision. Aimed at realising an artificial attention system for such an automaton, we present here a study for the development of pseudo-muscular polymer actuators for its eyeballs. The system is based on the mimicry of the muscular architecture of the human eye. In particular, linear actuators made of dielectric elastomers have been designed to replicate actions exerted by the main ocular muscles.

  10. Gene Therapy for Muscular Dystrophies: Progress and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Donghoon

    2010-01-01

    Muscular dystrophies are groups of inherited progressive diseases of the muscle caused by mutations of diverse genes related to normal muscle function. Although there is no current effective treatment for these devastating diseases, various molecular strategies have been developed to restore the expressions of the associated defective proteins. In preclinical animal models, both viral and nonviral vectors have been shown to deliver recombinant versions of defective genes. Antisense oligonucleotides have been shown to modify the splicing mechanism of mesenger ribonucleic acid to produce an internally deleted but partially functional dystrophin in an experimental model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. In addition, chemicals can induce readthrough of the premature stop codon in nonsense mutations of the dystrophin gene. On the basis of these preclinical data, several experimental clinical trials are underway that aim to demonstrate efficacy in treating these devastating diseases. PMID:20944811

  11. Research into Specific Modulators of Vascular Sex Hormone Receptors in the Management of Postmenopausal Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Graciliano R. A.; Barros, Yaskara V. R.; Wells, Amanda K.; Khalil, Raouf A.

    2010-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is more common in men and postmenopausal women than premenopausal women, suggesting vascular benefits of female sex hormones. Studies on the vasculature have identified estrogen receptors ERα, ERβ and a novel estrogen binding membrane protein GPR30, that mediate genomic and/or non-genomic effects. Estrogen promotes endothelium-dependent relaxation by inducing the production/activity of nitric oxide, prostacyclin, and hyperpolarizing factor, and inhibits the mechanisms of vascular smooth muscle contraction including [Ca2+]i, protein kinase C, Rho kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase. Additional effects of estrogen on the cytoskeleton, matrix metalloproteinases and inflammatory factors contribute to vascular remodeling. However, the experimental evidence did not translate into vascular benefits of menopausal hormone therapy (MHT), and the HERS, HERS-II and WHI clinical trials demonstrated adverse cardiovascular events. The discrepancy has been partly related to delayed MHT and potential changes in the vascular ER amount, integrity, affinity, and downstream signaling pathways due to the subjects' age and preexisting CVD. The adverse vascular effects of MHT also highlighted the need of specific modulators of vascular sex hormone receptors. The effectiveness of MHT can be improved by delineating the differences in phramcokinetics and pharmacodynamics of natural, synthetic, and conjugated equine estrogens. Estriol, “hormone bioidenticals” and phytoestrogens are potential estradiol substitutes. The benefits of low dose MHT, and transdermal or vaginal estrogens over oral preparations are being evaluated. Specific ER modulators (SERMs) and ER agonists are being developed to maximize the effects on vascular ERs. Also, the effects of estrogen are being examined in the context of the whole body hormonal environment and the levels of progesterone and androgens. Thus, the experimental vascular benefits of estrogen can be translated to

  12. Megakaryocytes, malignancy and bone marrow vascular niches.

    PubMed

    Psaila, B; Lyden, D; Roberts, I

    2012-02-01

    Dynamic interactions between hematopoietic cells and their specialized bone marrow microenvironments, namely the vascular and osteoblastic 'niches', regulate hematopoiesis. The vascular niche is conducive for thrombopoiesis and megakaryocytes may, in turn, regulate the vascular niche, especially in supporting vascular and hematopoietic regeneration following irradiation or chemotherapy. A role for platelets in tumor growth and metastasis is well established and, more recently, the vascular niche has also been implicated as an area for preferential homing and engraftment of malignant cells. This article aims to provide an overview of the dynamic interactions between cellular and molecular components of the bone marrow vascular niche and the potential role of megakaryocytes in bone marrow malignancy.

  13. Halofuginone promotes satellite cell activation and survival in muscular dystrophies.

    PubMed

    Barzilai-Tutsch, Hila; Bodanovsky, Anna; Maimon, Hadar; Pines, Mark; Halevy, Orna

    2016-01-01

    Halofuginone is a leading agent in preventing fibrosis and inflammation in various muscular dystrophies. We hypothesized that in addition to these actions, halofuginone directly promotes the cell-cycle events of satellite cells in the mdx and dysf(-/-) mouse models of early-onset Duchenne muscular dystrophy and late-onset dysferlinopathy, respectively. In both models, addition of halofuginone to freshly prepared single gastrocnemius myofibers derived from 6-week-old mice increased BrdU incorporation at as early as 18h of incubation, as well as phospho-histone H3 (PHH3) and MyoD protein expression in the attached satellite cells, while having no apparent effect on myofibers derived from wild-type mice. BrdU incorporation was abolished by an inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase, suggesting involvement of this pathway in mediating halofuginone's effects on cell-cycle events. In cultures of myofibers and myoblasts isolated from dysf(-/-) mice, halofuginone reduced Bax and induced Bcl2 expression levels and induced Akt phosphorylation in a time-dependent manner. Addition of an inhibitor of the phosphinositide-3-kinase/Akt pathway reversed the halofuginone-induced cell survival, suggesting this pathway's involvement in mediating halofuginone's effects on survival. Thus, in addition to its known role in inhibiting fibrosis and inflammation, halofuginone plays a direct role in satellite cell activity and survival in muscular dystrophies, regardless of the mutation. These actions are of the utmost importance for improving muscle pathology and function in muscular dystrophies.

  14. Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy: lessons learned and path forward.

    PubMed

    Mendell, Jerry R; Rodino-Klapac, Louise; Sahenk, Zarife; Malik, Vinod; Kaspar, Brian K; Walker, Christopher M; Clark, K Reed

    2012-10-11

    Our Translational Gene Therapy Center has used small molecules for exon skipping and mutation suppression and gene transfer to replace or provide surrogate genes as tools for molecular-based approaches for the treatment of muscular dystrophies. Exon skipping is targeted at the pre-mRNA level allowing one or more exons to be omitted to restore the reading frame. In Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD), clinical trials have been performed with two different oligomers, a 2'O-methyl-ribo-oligonucleoside-phosphorothioate (2'OMe) and a phosphorodiamidate morpholino (PMO). Both have demonstrated early evidence of efficacy. A second molecular approach involves suppression of stop codons to promote readthrough of the DMD gene. We have been able to establish proof of principle for mutation suppression using the aminoglycoside, gentamicin. A safer, orally administered, alternative agent referred to as Ataluren (PTC124) has been used in clinical trials and is currently under consideration for approval by the FDA. Using a gene therapy approach, we have completed two trials and have initiated a third. For DMD, we used a mini-dystrophin transferred in adeno-associated virus (AAV). In this trial an immune response was seen directed against transgene product, a quite unexpected outcome that will help guide further studies. For limb girdle muscular dystrophy 2D (alpha-sarcoglycan deficiency), the transgene was again transferred using AAV but in this study, a muscle specific creatine kinase promoter controlled gene expression that persisted for six months. A third gene therapy trial has been initiated with transfer of the follistatin gene in AAV directly to the quadriceps muscle. Two diseases with selective quadriceps muscle weakness are undergoing gene transfer including sporadic inclusion body myositis (sIBM) and Becker muscular dystrophy (BMD). Increasing the size and strength of the muscle is the goal of this study. Most importantly, no adverse events have been encountered in any of

  15. Muscular pattern in three species of Macrostomum (platyhelminthes, macrostomorpha).

    PubMed

    Adami, Mariana L; Brusa, Francisco; Ronderos, Jorge R; Damborenea, Cristina

    2017-02-01

    Previous studies demonstrated complex architecture of the muscular system of Macrostomum species, especially in the rostrum area and the pharynx. However, little is known about the differences in muscular pattern between species of the genus. This study examines and compares the muscular systems of specimens belonging to three freshwater Macrostomum species (M. quiritium, M. tuba and M. velastylum), labeled with phalloidin-rhodamine and studied by confocal microscopy. Our results agree with the previous descriptions, confirming that the muscular patterns for the body wall, rostrum area, pharynx and caudal region differ among species. The muscles of the body wall follow the typical architecture, but the number of fibers in the species analyzed varies between dorsal and ventral surfaces, ranging from 80 to 100 fibers, this record being higher than previous observations. The arrangement of the fibers in the rostrum is complex, especially in the brain area. Macrostomum tuba and M. quiritium have a set of two muscles crossing at brain level and forming an "X," which is not evident in M. velastylum. We identified five different sets of fibers associated to the pharynx and mouth at ventral, medium and deep levels. These different sets are present in all three species studied. The caudal plate in M. tuba has an additional layer of diagonal fibers in the body wall, which is not evident in the other two species. The muscles of the reproductive system are independent of the body wall musculature in the species analyzed, but connected to the intestinal wall by specific fibers that may serve as an anchor. J. Morphol. 278:264-282, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals,Inc.

  16. Therapy for Duchenne muscular dystrophy: renewed optimism from genetic approaches.

    PubMed

    Fairclough, Rebecca J; Wood, Matthew J; Davies, Kay E

    2013-06-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a devastating progressive disease for which there is currently no effective treatment except palliative therapy. There are several promising genetic approaches, including viral delivery of the missing dystrophin gene, read-through of translation stop codons, exon skipping to restore the reading frame and increased expression of the compensatory utrophin gene. The lessons learned from these approaches will be applicable to many other disorders.

  17. Maximality-Based Structural Operational Semantics for Petri Nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saīdouni, Djamel Eddine; Belala, Nabil; Bouneb, Messaouda

    2009-03-01

    The goal of this work is to exploit an implementable model, namely the maximality-based labeled transition system, which permits to express true-concurrency in a natural way without splitting actions on their start and end events. One can do this by giving a maximality-based structural operational semantics for the model of Place/Transition Petri nets in terms of maximality-based labeled transition systems structures.

  18. RESPIRATORY DYSFUNCTION IN UNSEDATED DOGS WITH GOLDEN RETRIEVER MUSCULAR DYSTROPHY

    PubMed Central

    DeVanna, Justin C.; Kornegay, Joe N.; Bogan, Daniel J.; Bogan, Janet R.; Dow, Jennifer L.; Hawkins, Eleanor C.

    2013-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a well-established model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The value of this model would be greatly enhanced with practical tools to monitor progression of respiratory dysfunction during treatment trials. Arterial blood gas analysis, tidal breathing spirometry, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) were performed to determine if quantifiable abnormalities could be identified in unsedated, untrained, GRMD dogs. Results from 11 dogs with a mild phenotype of GRMD and 11 age-matched carriers were compared. Arterial blood gas analysis was successfully performed in all dogs, spirometry in 21 of 22 (95%) dogs, and RIP in 18 of 20 (90%) dogs. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate concentration were higher in GRMD dogs. Tidal breathing peak expiratory flows were markedly higher in GRMD dogs. Abnormal abdominal motion was present in 7 of 10 (70%) GRMD dogs. Each technique provided objective, quantifiable measures that will be useful for monitoring respiratory function in GRMD dogs during clinical trials while avoiding the influence of sedation on results. Increased expiratory flows and the pattern of abdominal breathing are novel findings, not reported in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and might be a consequence of hyperinflation. PMID:24295812

  19. Muscular dystrophy in PTFR/cavin-1 null mice

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Shi-Ying; Pilch, Paul F.

    2017-01-01

    ice and humans lacking the caveolae component polymerase I transcription release factor (PTRF, also known as cavin-1) exhibit lipo- and muscular dystrophy. Here we describe the molecular features underlying the muscle phenotype for PTRF/cavin-1 null mice. These animals had a decreased ability to exercise, and exhibited muscle hypertrophy with increased muscle fiber size and muscle mass due, in part, to constitutive activation of the Akt pathway. Their muscles were fibrotic and exhibited impaired membrane integrity accompanied by an apparent compensatory activation of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex along with elevated expression of proteins involved in muscle repair function. Ptrf deletion also caused decreased mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption, and altered myofiber composition. Thus, in addition to compromised adipocyte-related physiology, the absence of PTRF/cavin-1 in mice caused a unique form of muscular dystrophy with a phenotype similar or identical to that seen in humans lacking this protein. Further understanding of this muscular dystrophy model will provide information relevant to the human situation and guidance for potential therapies. PMID:28289716

  20. Molecular Signatures of Membrane Protein Complexes Underlying Muscular Dystrophy*

    PubMed Central

    Turk, Rolf; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Smits, Melinda M.; Ng, Brandon H.; Pospisil, Tyler C.; Jones, Kayla S.; Campbell, Kevin P.; Wright, Michael E.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding components of the sarcolemmal dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC) are responsible for a large number of muscular dystrophies. As such, molecular dissection of the DGC is expected to both reveal pathological mechanisms, and provides a biological framework for validating new DGC components. Establishment of the molecular composition of plasma-membrane protein complexes has been hampered by a lack of suitable biochemical approaches. Here we present an analytical workflow based upon the principles of protein correlation profiling that has enabled us to model the molecular composition of the DGC in mouse skeletal muscle. We also report our analysis of protein complexes in mice harboring mutations in DGC components. Bioinformatic analyses suggested that cell-adhesion pathways were under the transcriptional control of NFκB in DGC mutant mice, which is a finding that is supported by previous studies that showed NFκB-regulated pathways underlie the pathophysiology of DGC-related muscular dystrophies. Moreover, the bioinformatic analyses suggested that inflammatory and compensatory mechanisms were activated in skeletal muscle of DGC mutant mice. Additionally, this proteomic study provides a molecular framework to refine our understanding of the DGC, identification of protein biomarkers of neuromuscular disease, and pharmacological interrogation of the DGC in adult skeletal muscle https://www.mda.org/disease/congenital-muscular-dystrophy/research. PMID:27099343

  1. Gene therapy for muscular dystrophy: current progress and future prospects.

    PubMed

    Trollet, Capucine; Athanasopoulos, Takis; Popplewell, Linda; Malerba, Alberto; Dickson, George

    2009-07-01

    Muscular dystrophies refer to a group of inherited disorders characterized by progressive muscle weakness, wasting and degeneration. So far, there is no effective treatment but new gene-based therapies are currently being developed with particular noted advances in using conventional gene replacement strategies, RNA-based approaches, or cell-based gene therapy with a main focus on Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). DMD is the most common and severe form of muscular dystrophy and current treatments are far from adequate. However, genetic and cell-based therapies, in particular exon skipping induced by antisense strategies, and corrective gene therapy via functionally engineered dystrophin genes hold great promise, with several clinical trials ongoing. Proof-of-concept of exon skipping has been obtained in animal models, and most recently in clinical trials; this approach represents a promising therapy for a subset of patients. In addition, gene-delivery-based strategies exist both for antisense-induced reading frame restoration, and for highly efficient delivery of functional dystrophin mini- and micro-genes to muscle fibres in vivo and muscle stem cells ex-vivo. In particular, AAV-based vectors show efficient systemic gene delivery to skeletal muscle directly in vivo, and lentivirus-based vectors show promise of combining ex vivo gene modification strategies with cell-mediated therapies.

  2. COUP-TFII regulates satellite cell function and muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Xin; Tsai, Sophia Y.

    2016-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD) is a severe and progressive muscle-wasting disease caused by mutations in the dystrophin gene. Although dystrophin deficiency in myofiber triggers the disease’s pathological changes, the degree of satellite cell (SC) dysfunction defines disease progression. Here, we have identified chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter–transcription factor II (COUP-TFII) hyperactivity as a contributing factor underlying muscular dystrophy in a dystrophin-deficient murine model of DMD. Ectopic expression of COUP-TFII in murine SCs led to Duchenne-like dystrophy in the muscles of control animals and exacerbated degenerative myopathies in dystrophin-deficient mice. COUP-TFII–overexpressing mice exhibited regenerative failure that was attributed to deficient SC proliferation and myoblast fusion. Mechanistically, we determined that COUP-TFII coordinated a regenerative program through combined regulation of multiple promyogenic factors. Furthermore, inhibition of COUP-TFII preserved SC function and counteracted the muscle weakness associated with Duchenne-like dystrophy in the murine model, suggesting that targeting COUP-TFII is a potential treatment for DMD. Together, our findings reveal a regulatory role of COUP-TFII in the development of muscular dystrophy and open up a potential therapeutic opportunity for managing disease progression in patients with DMD. PMID:27617862

  3. Genetic Engineering of Dystroglycan in Animal Models of Muscular Dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Sciandra, Francesca; Bigotti, Maria Giulia; Giardina, Bruno; Bozzi, Manuela; Brancaccio, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    In skeletal muscle, dystroglycan (DG) is the central component of the dystrophin-glycoprotein complex (DGC), a multimeric protein complex that ensures a strong mechanical link between the extracellular matrix and the cytoskeleton. Several muscular dystrophies arise from mutations hitting most of the components of the DGC. Mutations within the DG gene (DAG1) have been recently associated with two forms of muscular dystrophy, one displaying a milder and one a more severe phenotype. This review focuses specifically on the animal (murine and others) model systems that have been developed with the aim of directly engineering DAG1 in order to study the DG function in skeletal muscle as well as in other tissues. In the last years, conditional animal models overcoming the embryonic lethality of the DG knock-out in mouse have been generated and helped clarifying the crucial role of DG in skeletal muscle, while an increasing number of studies on knock-in mice are aimed at understanding the contribution of single amino acids to the stability of DG and to the possible development of muscular dystrophy.

  4. Muscular activation patterns of the bow arm in recurve archery.

    PubMed

    Ertan, Hayri

    2009-05-01

    In archery shooting, the archer should hold the bow in place using only the pressure produced through drawing back the bowstring. Most coaches discourage the archer from gripping the bow as this is believed to produce a sideways deflecting torque on the bow and arrow during the release. The purpose of this study was to compare the bow hand forearm muscular activation patterns of elite archers with beginners to define the muscular contraction-relaxation strategies in the bow hand forearm muscles during archery shooting and investigate the effects of performance level on these strategies. Electromyographic activity of the M. flexor digitorum superficialis and the M. extensor digitorum of 10 elite and 10 beginner archers were recorded together with a pulse synchronized with the clicker snap. Raw electromyographic records as 1s before and after the clicker pulse were rectified, integrated, and normalized. The data was then averaged for successive shots of each subject and later for both groups of archers. The main difference between the elite and beginner archers was that the elite archers had a greater activation of the M. extensor digitorum, which indicates that they avoid gripping the bow-handle not only relaxing the flexor muscles, but also contracting the extensor muscle groups. This muscular contraction strategy secures the archer to not interfere with the forward movement of the bow, which is the forward acceleration of the bow caused by the pushing power of the bowstring.

  5. Eteplirsen in the treatment of Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Kenji Rowel Q; Maruyama, Rika; Yokota, Toshifumi

    2017-01-01

    Duchenne muscular dystrophy is a fatal neuromuscular disorder affecting around one in 3,500–5,000 male births that is characterized by progressive muscular deterioration. It is inherited in an X-linked recessive fashion and is caused by loss-of-function mutations in the DMD gene coding for dystrophin, a cytoskeletal protein that stabilizes the plasma membrane of muscle fibers. In September 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration granted accelerated approval for eteplirsen (or Exondys 51), a drug that acts to promote dystrophin production by restoring the translational reading frame of DMD through specific skipping of exon 51 in defective gene variants. Eteplirsen is applicable for approximately 14% of patients with DMD mutations. This article extensively reviews and discusses the available information on eteplirsen to date, focusing on pharmacological, efficacy, safety, and tolerability data from preclinical and clinical trials. Issues faced by eteplirsen, particularly those relating to its efficacy, will be identified. Finally, the place of eteplirsen and exon skipping as a general therapeutic strategy in Duchenne muscular dystrophy treatment will be discussed. PMID:28280301

  6. Lipogenesis mitigates dysregulated sarcoplasmic reticulum calcium uptake in muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    Paran, Christopher W; Zou, Kai; Ferrara, Patrick J; Song, Haowei; Turk, John; Funai, Katsuhiko

    2015-12-01

    Muscular dystrophy is accompanied by a reduction in activity of sarco/endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+)-ATPase (SERCA) that contributes to abnormal Ca(2+) homeostasis in sarco/endoplasmic reticulum (SR/ER). Recent findings suggest that skeletal muscle fatty acid synthase (FAS) modulates SERCA activity and muscle function via its effects on SR membrane phospholipids. In this study, we examined muscle's lipid metabolism in mdx mice, a mouse model for Duchenne muscular dystrophy (DMD). De novo lipogenesis was ~50% reduced in mdx muscles compared to wildtype (WT) muscles. Gene expressions of lipogenic and other ER lipid-modifying enzymes were found to be differentially expressed between wildtype (WT) and mdx muscles. A comprehensive examination of muscles' SR phospholipidome revealed elevated phosphatidylcholine (PC) and PC/phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) ratio in mdx compared to WT mice. Studies in primary myocytes suggested that defects in key lipogenic enzymes including FAS, stearoyl-CoA desaturase-1 (SCD1), and Lipin1 are likely contributing to reduced SERCA activity in mdx mice. Triple transgenic expression of FAS, SCD1, and Lipin1 (3TG) in mdx myocytes partly rescued SERCA activity, which coincided with an increase in SR PE that normalized PC/PE ratio. These findings implicate a defect in lipogenesis to be a contributing factor for SERCA dysfunction in muscular dystrophy. Restoration of muscle's lipogenic pathway appears to mitigate SERCA function through its effects on SR membrane composition.

  7. Respiratory dysfunction in unsedated dogs with golden retriever muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed

    DeVanna, Justin C; Kornegay, Joe N; Bogan, Daniel J; Bogan, Janet R; Dow, Jennifer L; Hawkins, Eleanor C

    2014-01-01

    Golden retriever muscular dystrophy (GRMD) is a well-established model of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. The value of this model would be greatly enhanced with practical tools to monitor progression of respiratory dysfunction during treatment trials. Arterial blood gas analysis, tidal breathing spirometry, and respiratory inductance plethysmography (RIP) were performed to determine if quantifiable abnormalities could be identified in unsedated, untrained, GRMD dogs. Results from 11 dogs with a mild phenotype of GRMD and 11 age-matched carriers were compared. Arterial blood gas analysis was successfully performed in all dogs, spirometry in 21 of 22 (95%) dogs, and RIP in 18 of 20 (90%) dogs. Partial pressure of carbon dioxide and bicarbonate concentration were higher in GRMD dogs. Tidal breathing peak expiratory flows were markedly higher in GRMD dogs. Abnormal abdominal motion was present in 7 of 10 (70%) GRMD dogs. Each technique provided objective, quantifiable measures that will be useful for monitoring respiratory function in GRMD dogs during clinical trials while avoiding the influence of sedation on results. Increased expiratory flows and the pattern of abdominal breathing are novel findings, not reported in people with Duchenne muscular dystrophy, and might be a consequence of hyperinflation.

  8. Computational modeling of muscular thin films for cardiac repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böl, Markus; Reese, Stefanie; Parker, Kevin Kit; Kuhl, Ellen

    2009-03-01

    Motivated by recent success in growing biohybrid material from engineered tissues on synthetic polymer films, we derive a computational simulation tool for muscular thin films in cardiac repair. In this model, the polydimethylsiloxane base layer is simulated in terms of microscopically motivated tetrahedral elements. Their behavior is characterized through a volumetric contribution and a chain contribution that explicitly accounts for the polymeric microstructure of networks of long chain molecules. Neonatal rat ventricular cardiomyocytes cultured on these polymeric films are modeled with actively contracting truss elements located on top of the sheet. The force stretch response of these trusses is motivated by the cardiomyocyte force generated during active contraction as suggested by the filament sliding theory. In contrast to existing phenomenological models, all material parameters of this novel model have a clear biophyisical interpretation. The predictive features of the model will be demonstrated through the simulation of muscular thin films. First, the set of parameters will be fitted for one particular experiment documented in the literature. This parameter set is then used to validate the model for various different experiments. Last, we give an outlook of how the proposed simulation tool could be used to virtually predict the response of multi-layered muscular thin films. These three-dimensional constructs show a tremendous regenerative potential in repair of damaged cardiac tissue. The ability to understand, tune and optimize their structural response is thus of great interest in cardiovascular tissue engineering.

  9. The effect of ephedra and caffeine on maximal strength and power in resistance-trained athletes.

    PubMed

    Williams, Andrew D; Cribb, Paul J; Cooke, Matthew B; Hayes, Alan

    2008-03-01

    Caffeine and ephedrine-related alkaloids recently have been removed from International Olympic Committee banned substances lists, whereas ephedrine itself is now permissible at urinary concentrations less than 10 mug.mL. The changes to the list may contribute to an increased use of caffeine and ephedra as ergogenic aids by athletes. Consequently, we sought to investigate the effects of ingesting caffeine (C) or a combination of ephedra and caffeine (C + E) on muscular strength and anaerobic power using a double-blind, crossover design. Forty-five minutes after ingesting a glucose placebo (P: 300 mg), C (300 mg) or C + E (300 mg + 60 mg), 9 resistance-trained male participants were tested for maximal strength by bench press [BP; 1 repetition maximum (1RM)] and latissimus dorsi pull down (LP; 1RM). Subjects also performed repeated repetitions at 80% of 1RM on both BP and LP until exhaustion. After this test, subjects underwent a 30-second Wingate test to determine peak anaerobic cycling power, mean power, and fatigue index. Although subjects reported increased alertness and enhanced mood after supplementation with caffeine and ephedra, there were no significant differences between any of the treatments in muscle strength, muscle endurance, or peak anaerobic power. Our results do not support the contention that supplementation with ephedra or caffeine will enhance either muscle strength or anaerobic exercise performance.

  10. Antagonist mechanical contribution to resultant maximal torque at the ankle joint in young and older men.

    PubMed

    Simoneau, Emilie M; Billot, Maxime; Martin, Alain; Van Hoecke, Jacques

    2009-04-01

    A recorded muscular torque at one joint is a resultant torque corresponding to the participation of both agonist and antagonist muscles. This study aimed to examine the effect of aging on the mechanical contributions of both plantar- and dorsi-flexors to the resultant maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) torques exerted at the ankle joint, in dorsi-flexion (DF) and plantar-flexion (PF). The estimation of isometric agonist and antagonist torques by means of an EMG biofeedback technique was made with nine young (mean age 24 years) and nine older (mean age 80 years) men. While there was a non-significant age-related decline in the measured resultant DF MVC torque (-15%; p=0.06), there was a clear decrease in the estimated agonist MVC torque exerted by the dorsi-flexors (-39%; p=0.001). The DF-to-PF resultant MVC torque ratio was significantly lower in young than in older men (0.25 vs. 0.31; p=0.006), whereas the DF-to-PF agonist MVC torque ratio was no longer different between the two populations (0.38 vs. 0.35; p>0.05). Thus, agonist MVC torques in PF and DF would be similarly affected by aging, which could not be deduced when only resultant torques were examined.

  11. Ischemic preconditioning of the muscle improves maximal exercise performance but not maximal oxygen uptake in humans.

    PubMed

    Crisafulli, Antonio; Tangianu, Flavio; Tocco, Filippo; Concu, Alberto; Mameli, Ombretta; Mulliri, Gabriele; Caria, Marcello A

    2011-08-01

    Brief episodes of nonlethal ischemia, commonly known as "ischemic preconditioning" (IP), are protective against cell injury induced by infarction. Moreover, muscle IP has been found capable of improving exercise performance. The aim of the study was the comparison of standard exercise performances carried out in normal conditions with those carried out following IP, achieved by brief muscle ischemia at rest (RIP) and after exercise (EIP). Seventeen physically active, healthy male subjects performed three incremental, randomly assigned maximal exercise tests on a cycle ergometer up to exhaustion. One was the reference (REF) test, whereas the others were performed after the RIP and EIP sessions. Total exercise time (TET), total work (TW), and maximal power output (W(max)), oxygen uptake (VO(2max)), and pulmonary ventilation (VE(max)) were assessed. Furthermore, impedance cardiography was used to measure maximal heart rate (HR(max)), stroke volume (SV(max)), and cardiac output (CO(max)). A subgroup of volunteers (n = 10) performed all-out tests to assess their anaerobic capacity. We found that both RIP and EIP protocols increased in a similar fashion TET, TW, W(max), VE(max), and HR(max) with respect to the REF test. In particular, W(max) increased by ∼ 4% in both preconditioning procedures. However, preconditioning sessions failed to increase traditionally measured variables such as VO(2max), SV(max,) CO(max), and anaerobic capacity(.) It was concluded that muscle IP improves performance without any difference between RIP and EIP procedures. The mechanism of this effect could be related to changes in fatigue perception.

  12. The relationships of vascular plants.

    PubMed Central

    Kenrick, P

    2000-01-01

    Recent phylogenetic research indicates that vascular plants evolved from bryophyte-like ancestors and that this involved extensive modifications to the life cycle. These conclusions are supported by a range of systematic data, including gene sequences, as well as evidence from comparative morphology and the fossil record. Within vascular plants, there is compelling evidence for two major clades, which have been termed lycophytes (clubmosses) and euphyllophytes (seed plants, ferns, horsetails). The implications of recent phylogenetic work are discussed with reference to life cycle evolution and the interpretation of stratigraphic inconsistencies in the early fossil record of land plants. Life cycles are shown to have passed through an isomorphic phase in the early stages of vascular plant evolution. Thus, the gametophyte generation of all living vascular plants is the product of massive morphological reduction. Phylogenetic research corroborates earlier suggestions of a major representational bias in the early fossil record. Mega-fossils document a sequence of appearance of groups that is at odds with that predicted by cladogram topology. It is argued here that the pattern of appearance and diversification of plant megafossils owes more to changing geological conditions than to rapid biological diversification. PMID:10905613

  13. Platelets can enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Cloutier, Nathalie; Paré, Alexandre; Farndale, Richard W; Schumacher, H Ralph; Nigrovic, Peter A; Lacroix, Steve; Boilard, Eric

    2012-08-09

    Platelets survey blood vessels, searching for endothelial damage and preventing loss of vascular integrity. However, there are circumstances where vascular permeability increases, suggesting that platelets sometimes fail to fulfill their expected function. Human inflammatory arthritis is associated with tissue edema attributed to enhanced permeability of the synovial microvasculature. Murine studies have suggested that such vascular leak facilitates entry of autoantibodies and may thereby promote joint inflammation. Whereas platelets typically help to promote microvascular integrity, we examined the role of platelets in synovial vascular permeability in murine experimental arthritis. Using an in vivo model of autoimmune arthritis, we confirmed the presence of endothelial gaps in inflamed synovium. Surprisingly, permeability in the inflamed joints was abrogated if the platelets were absent. This effect was mediated by platelet serotonin accumulated via the serotonin transporter and could be antagonized using serotonin-specific reuptake inhibitor antidepressants. As opposed to the conventional role of platelets to microvascular leakage, this demonstration that platelets are capable of amplifying and maintaining permeability adds to the rapidly growing list of unexpected functions for platelets.

  14. Peripheral vascular imaging and intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D. ); Orron, D.E. )

    1990-01-01

    This reference addresses the entire clinical approach to the vascular system from the diagnosis of pathology to surgery or interventional radiological management. All diagnostic imaging modalities currently available are included with specific information on how to interpret various results. It features discussions of the latest therapeutic techniques, including laser angioplasty, intravascular stents, and transluminal embolization.

  15. [Vascular access guidelines for hemodialysis].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Hernández, J A; González Parra, E; Julián Gutiérrez, J M; Segarra Medrano, A; Almirante, B; Martínez, M T; Arrieta, J; Fernández Rivera, C; Galera, A; Gallego Beuter, J; Górriz, J L; Herrero, J A; López Menchero, R; Ochando, A; Pérez Bañasco, V; Polo, J R; Pueyo, J; Ruiz, Camps I; Segura Iglesias, R

    2005-01-01

    Quality of vascular access (VA) has a remarkable influence in hemodialysis patients outcomes. Dysfunction of VA represents a capital cause of morbi-mortality of these patients as well an increase in economical. Spanish Society of Neprhology, aware of the problem, has decided to carry out a revision of the issue with the aim of providing help in comprehensión and treatment related with VA problems, and achieving an homogenization of practices in three mayor aspects: to increase arteriovenous fistula utilization as first vascular access, to increment vascular access monitoring practice and rationalise central catheters use. We present a consensus document elaborated by a multidisciplinar group composed by nephrologists, vascular surgeons, interventional radiologysts, infectious diseases specialists and nephrological nurses. Along six chapters that cover patient education, creation of VA, care, monitoring, complications and central catheters, we present the state of the art and propose guidelines for the best practice, according different evidence based degrees, with the intention to provide help at the professionals in order to make aproppiate decissions. Several quality standars are also included.

  16. Vascular lesions in lupus nephritis.

    PubMed

    Grishman, E; Venkataseshan, V S

    1988-05-01

    Three groups of kidney specimens from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) were examined for histologic evidence of vascular lesions in small arteries and arterioles. Group 1 consisted of 24 autopsy kidneys from patients who died before the advent of steroid therapy, and Group 2, of 26 more recent autopsy specimens from patients treated with steroids and/or immunosuppressive drugs. Group 3 comprised 276 renal biopsies. Group 1 showed characteristic subendothelial eosinophilic deposits in small arteries and arterioles of 8 cases; Group 2 showed similar lesions in 5 specimens, while 3 others revealed evidence of resorption of deposits. Deposits were characterized by clumping and were delimited toward the media by a thick basement membrane. Only one case showed necrotizing arteritis resembling polyarteritis nodosa. Group 3 presented vascular deposits in 19 cases and thrombotic microangiopathy in 2. Electron microscopic appearance of some of the deposits is described. Immunofluorescence microscopy showed a mixture of IgG, IgA, and IgM in 7 cases, a finding that was not seen in a group of non-lupus patients with various vascular lesions. Vascular deposits are generally rare in systemic lupus erythematosus, although in autopsies widely scattered involvement of arteries and arterioles was seen in nearly 1/3 of the cases. The deposits were more common in male patients. The evolution of the lesions could be followed through various stages to eventual sclerosis, particularly in patients treated with steroids or immunosuppressants. Some deposits appeared to resolve after treatment. Patients with vascular deposits had more severe glomerular disease and a more serious clinical course. Thrombotic microangiopathy appears to be a secondary phenomenon whose pathogenesis is unknown.

  17. Aerobic interval exercise with an eccentric contraction induces muscular hypertrophy and augmentation of muscular strength in rats.

    PubMed

    Tsumiyama, Wakako; Oki, Sadaaki; Takamiya, Naomi; Umei, Namiko; Shimizu, Michele Eisemann; Ono, Takeya; Otsuka, Akira

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether an aerobic interval exercise using an eccentric contraction would result in skeletal muscular hypertrophy and augmentation of muscular strength in rats. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-one female Wistar rats were used in this study. The rats were randomly divided into three groups. The control group performed no exercise. The aerobic endurance exercise group ran for 90 min. The aerobic interval exercise group ran for a total of 90 minutes in 5 minute bouts separated by 2 minute rest periods. The exercise groups ran on a downhill treadmill incline, once every three days, for a total of twenty sessions. [Results] The muscle wet weights, the muscle fiber cross-section minor axes, and the tetanus tension results of the aerobic endurance and aerobic interval exercise groups were significantly larger than those of the control group. [Conclusion] These results indicate that aerobic interval exercise may be an effective method of inducing hypertrophy and augmenting muscular strength in skeletal muscle.

  18. Drive for muscularity is heightened in body-dissatisfied men who socially compare.

    PubMed

    Bucchianeri, Michaela M; Serrano, Jamie L; Pastula, Adrienne; Corning, Alexandra F

    2014-01-01

    Men's drive for muscularity refers to the degree to which men wish to increase their muscularity. Men who are more extreme in their drive for muscularity face dangerous consequences, such as increased levels of eating pathology and use of performance-enhancing substances. The aim of this study was to predict men's drive for muscularity, and to test whether hypothesized predictive factors vary across age groups. Participants were 226 men ages 18-67. It was hypothesized that body dissatisfaction would predict men's drive for muscularity. More substantively, however, it was hypothesized that having a strong tendency to compare oneself with others would exacerbate the relationship between men's body dissatisfaction and their drive for muscularity. Results of a hierarchical multiple regression analysis supported these hypotheses. Furthermore, this exacerbating effect was present regardless of men's age. Implications for assessment, clinical practice, research, and prevention efforts are discussed.

  19. Drive for muscularity and disordered eating among French adolescent boys: a sociocultural model.

    PubMed

    Rodgers, Rachel F; Ganchou, Camille; Franko, Debra L; Chabrol, Henri

    2012-06-01

    The pursuit of muscularity is an important body image concern among boys which has been described within sociocultural models of risk for eating disorders. This study explored a sociocultural model of disordered eating in which drive for thinness and pursuit of muscularity were both pathways to disordered eating among French adolescent boys. A sample of 146 adolescents completed a questionnaire assessing drive for thinness, drive for muscularity, media-ideal internalization, appearance comparison, and sociocultural pressure. The model was a good fit to the data and both drive for thinness and the pursuit of muscularity were related to disordered eating. Furthermore, internalization and appearance comparison mediated the relationships between pressure to increase muscle and both drive for muscularity and drive for thinness. Longitudinal research could help clarify the role of the pursuit of muscularity in the development of disordered eating and extreme body shape changing behaviors.

  20. The link between stress disorders and autonomic dysfunction in muscular dystrophy

    PubMed Central

    Sabharwal, Rasna

    2014-01-01

    Muscular dystrophy is a progressive disease of muscle weakness, muscle atrophy and cardiac dysfunction. Patients afflicted with muscular dystrophy exhibit autonomic dysfunction along with cognitive impairment, severe depression, sadness, and anxiety. Although the psychological aspects of cardiovascular disorders and stress disorders are well known, the physiological mechanism underlying this relationship is not well understood, particularly in muscular dystrophy. Therefore, the goal of this perspective is to highlight the importance of autonomic dysfunction and psychological stress disorders in the pathogenesis of muscular dystrophy. This article will for the first time—(i) outline autonomic mechanisms that are common to both psychological stress and cardiovascular disorders in muscular dystrophy; (ii) propose therapies that would improve behavioral and autonomic functions in muscular dystrophy. PMID:24523698