Science.gov

Sample records for maximum permissible concentration

  1. 30 CFR 57.5039 - Maximum permissible concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum permissible concentration. 57.5039... Maximum permissible concentration. Except as provided by standard § 57.5005, persons shall not be exposed to air containing concentrations of radon daughters exceeding 1.0 WL in active workings....

  2. 30 CFR 57.5039 - Maximum permissible concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Maximum permissible concentration. 57.5039... Maximum permissible concentration. Except as provided by standard § 57.5005, persons shall not be exposed to air containing concentrations of radon daughters exceeding 1.0 WL in active workings....

  3. 30 CFR 57.5039 - Maximum permissible concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Maximum permissible concentration. 57.5039... Maximum permissible concentration. Except as provided by standard § 57.5005, persons shall not be exposed to air containing concentrations of radon daughters exceeding 1.0 WL in active workings....

  4. 30 CFR 57.5039 - Maximum permissible concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum permissible concentration. 57.5039... Maximum permissible concentration. Except as provided by standard § 57.5005, persons shall not be exposed to air containing concentrations of radon daughters exceeding 1.0 WL in active workings....

  5. 30 CFR 57.5039 - Maximum permissible concentration.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum permissible concentration. 57.5039... Maximum permissible concentration. Except as provided by standard § 57.5005, persons shall not be exposed to air containing concentrations of radon daughters exceeding 1.0 WL in active workings....

  6. Criteria and methods for establishing maximum permissible concentrations of air pollution

    PubMed Central

    Rjazanov, V. A.

    1965-01-01

    The article describes experience in the USSR in establishing standards for air pollution control. The author emphasizes that health considerations must be the main criterion in deciding permissible concentrations, which constitute the “hygienic” standards ultimately to be achieved. Economic and technological reasons may dictate temporary “sanitary” standards, which modify the requirements for a limited period. “Technological” standards relate to the economic and technological consequences of air pollution and do not concern health. The maximum permissible concentrations of toxic substances used in toxicology and industrial hygiene are not sufficiently stringent for general use, and control standards are therefore based on the results of tests carried out on animals and human subjects. Tests on animals show that certain concentrations of toxic substances cause functional changes (e.g., in higher nervous activity, cholinesterase activity, and excretion of coproporphyrin) as well as a number of protective adaptational reactions. The results are used to establish maximum permissible concentrations of pollutants within a 24-hour period. Tests on human volunteers provide a basis for determining the maximum average concentrations at a given time. Reactions to odorous substances give the olfactory threshold and the level of concentration causing respiratory and visual reflexes, as well as subsensory effects such as changes in light sensitivity and in the activity of the cerebral cortex. Morbidity statistics also provide evidence of harmful pollution, but cannot serve as a basis for establishing maximum permissible concentrations, which should aim not only at preventing illness but also at avoiding pathological and adaptational reactions. PMID:14315711

  7. [The validation of the maximum permissible concentration of pyromellitic dianhydride in the atmosphere].

    PubMed

    Sokolov, S M; Filonov, V P; Amvros'ev, P A; Drobenia, V V

    1997-01-01

    The maximum allowable concentration (MAC) of pyromellitic acid dianhydride (PMAD) in the ambient air was substabtiated by physiological, hematological, and physiological methods. The inhalation of this substance by animals reduced their body weight, erythrocytic osmotic resistance, enhanced animals' sensitization. The mean daily MAC of PMAD was found to be 0.01 mg/m3. PMAD was considered to be Hazard Class 2.

  8. Maximum permissible voltage of YBCO coated conductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, J.; Lin, B.; Sheng, J.; Xu, J.; Jin, Z.; Hong, Z.; Wang, D.; Zhou, H.; Shen, X.; Shen, C.

    2014-06-01

    Superconducting fault current limiter (SFCL) could reduce short circuit currents in electrical power system. One of the most important thing in developing SFCL is to find out the maximum permissible voltage of each limiting element. The maximum permissible voltage is defined as the maximum voltage per unit length at which the YBCO coated conductors (CC) do not suffer from critical current (Ic) degradation or burnout. In this research, the time of quenching process is changed and voltage is raised until the Ic degradation or burnout happens. YBCO coated conductors test in the experiment are from American superconductor (AMSC) and Shanghai Jiao Tong University (SJTU). Along with the quenching duration increasing, the maximum permissible voltage of CC decreases. When quenching duration is 100 ms, the maximum permissible of SJTU CC, 12 mm AMSC CC and 4 mm AMSC CC are 0.72 V/cm, 0.52 V/cm and 1.2 V/cm respectively. Based on the results of samples, the whole length of CCs used in the design of a SFCL can be determined.

  9. An evaluation of the external radiation exposure dosimetry and calculation of maximum permissible concentration values for airborne materials containing 18F, 15O, 13N, 11C and 133Xe.

    PubMed

    Piltingsrud, H V; Gels, G L

    1985-11-01

    To better understand the dose equivalent (D.E.) rates produced by airborne releases of gaseous positron-emitting radionuclides under various conditions of cloud size, a study of the external radiation exposure dosimetry of these radionuclides, as well as negatron, gamma and x-ray emitting 133Xe, was undertaken. This included a calculation of the contributions to D.E. as a function of cloud radii, at tissue depths of 0.07 mm (skin), 3 mm (lens of eye) and 10 mm (whole body) from both the particulate and photon radiations emitted by these radionuclides. Estimates of maximum permissible concentration (MPC) values were also calculated based on the calculated D.E. rates and current regulations for personnel radiation protection (CFR84). Three continuous air monitors, designed for use with 133Xe, were evaluated for applications in monitoring air concentrations of the selected positron emitters. The results indicate that for a given radionuclide and for a cloud greater than a certain radius, personnel radiation dosimeters must respond acceptably to only the photon radiations emitted by the radionuclide to provide acceptable personnel dosimetry. For clouds under that radius, personnel radiation dosimeters must also respond acceptably to the positron or negatron radiations to provide acceptable personnel dosimetry. It was found that two out of the three air concentration monitors may be useful for monitoring air concentrations of the selected positron emitters.

  10. 5 CFR 890.1015 - Minimum and maximum length of permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Minimum and maximum length of permissive debarments. 890.1015 Section 890.1015 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED... Imposed Against Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1015 Minimum and maximum length...

  11. Theoretical maximum concentration factors for solar concentrators

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, R.O.; Duran, J.C.

    1984-11-01

    The theoretical maximum concentration factors are determined for different definitions of the factor for two-dimensional and three-dimensional solar concentrators that are valid for any source with nonuniform intensity distribution. Results are obtained starting from those derived by Winston (1970) for Lambertian sources. In particular, maximum concentration factors for three models of the solar-disk intensity distribution are calculated. 12 references.

  12. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... of Florida Oranges and Tangelos Standards for Internal Quality of Common Sweet Oranges (citrus... solids. For determining the grade of juice, the maximum permissible anhydrous citric acid content in...

  13. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... of Florida Oranges and Tangelos Standards for Internal Quality of Common Sweet Oranges (citrus... solids. For determining the grade of juice, the maximum permissible anhydrous citric acid content in...

  14. 7 CFR 51.1178 - Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible for corresponding total soluble solids.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ...) United States Standards for Grades of Florida Oranges and Tangelos Standards for Internal Quality of Common Sweet Oranges (citrus Sinensis (l) Osbeck) § 51.1178 Maximum anhydrous citric acid permissible...

  15. 5 CFR 890.1015 - Minimum and maximum length of permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... debarments. 890.1015 Section 890.1015 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE REGULATIONS (CONTINUED) FEDERAL EMPLOYEES HEALTH BENEFITS PROGRAM Administrative Sanctions Imposed Against Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1015 Minimum and maximum length of...

  16. An analysis of crud contribution to the maximum permissible release rates for reactor spent fuel shipments

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, R.P.; Sanders, T.L.; Einziger, R.E.; Malinauskas, A.P.; Mings, W.J.

    1988-01-08

    The Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is sponsoring a program to develop standardized methodologies for evaluating spent fuel source terms and demonstrating compliance of spent fuel shipping packages to the federal containment requirements. An important subtask of the program is the evaluation of the neutron-activated corrosion-product deposits (i.e., ''crud'') on irradiated fuel rod surfaces and the determination of the contribution of these ''crud'' deposits to the total activity available for release from cask containment. During transportation, crud may spall from the fuel rods, disperse and become suspended in the cavity medium (gas or liquid), and could be the major contributor to the total source term. An analysis of all available data on crud deposit activity concentration distributions, composition, spallation properties, particle size distribution, and crud friability was conducted for various light-water-reactor fuels for selected burnups and decay times. Assuming that crud is the only source of activity release, the maximum permissible leakage rates were estimated using these data for seven types of truck and rail shipping casks containing 1-year-cooled and 10-year-cooled spent fuel. The details and results of this analysis are presented in this paper. 2 refs.

  17. Free Radical Oxidation in Rat Myocardium after Maximum Permissible Hepatic Resection.

    PubMed

    Ermolaev, P A; Khramykh, T P; Barskaya, L O

    2016-03-01

    Free radical oxidation in rat myocardial homogenate was studied by chemiluminescent assay during the early terms after maximum permissible liver resection. During this period, activation of free radical oxidation was biphasic. The critical terms characterized by dramatic intensification of free radical oxidation in the myocardium are the first hour and the first day after surgery. The period from 3 to 12 h after surgery, in which the indices of chemiluminescence decrease, can be tentatively termed as the period of "putative wellbeing". Normalization of the free radical oxidation processes in the myocardium occurred by day 7 after surgery.

  18. Maximum permissible load for Kiso horses trotting over a short, straight course.

    PubMed

    Matsuura, Akihiro; Inoue, Sota; Irimajiri, Mami; Hodate, Koichi

    2017-08-24

    This study aimed to determine the load-bearing capacity of trotting Kiso horses using gait analysis. Ten Kiso horses with a height at withers of 128 cm were included. Their riders were fitted with a marker (70 mm in diameter placed on their chest) recorded by two digital DVD cameras while trotting along a short, straight course. In total, eight tests were performed for each horse: the first with a 70 kg load; six with randomly loaded weights ranging 80-130 kg; and then a final test again with a 70 kg load. Three-dimensional movement of the marker was analyzed using a motion capture system. The time series of vertical displacement of the marker underwent spectrum analysis by the maximum entropy method, and the autocorrelation coefficient was calculated. The first two peaks of the autocorrelation were defined as symmetry and regularity, and their sum was defined as stability. Regularity in the 120 kg test (0.54) was lower than that in the first 70 kg test (0.61), and stability in the 120 kg test (1.31) was lower than that in the first 70 kg test (1.42). We concluded that the maximum permissible load for a trotting Kiso horse is < 120 kg, which represents 31% of its bodyweight. © 2017 Japanese Society of Animal Science.

  19. An improved maximum permissible exposure meter for safety assessments of laser radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corder, D. A.; Evans, D. R.; Tyrer, J. R.

    1997-12-01

    Current interest in laser radiation safety requires demonstration that a laser system has been designed to prevent exposure to levels of laser radiation exceeding the Maximum Permissible Exposure. In some simple systems it is possible to prove this by calculation, but in most cases it is preferable to confirm calculated results with a measurement. This measurement may be made with commercially available equipment, but there are limitations with this approach. A custom designed instrument is presented in which the full range of measurement issues have been addressed. Important features of the instrument are the design and optimisation of detector heads for the measurement task, and consideration of user interface requirements. Three designs for detector head are presented, these cover the majority of common laser types. Detector heads are designed to optimise the performance of relatively low cost detector elements for this measurement task. The three detector head designs are suitable for interfacing to photodiodes, low power thermopiles and pyroelectric detectors. Design of the user interface was an important aspect of the work. A user interface which is designed for the specific application minimises the risk of user error or misinterpretation of the measurement results. A palmtop computer was used to provide an advanced user interface. User requirements were considered in order that the final implement was well matched to the task of laser radiation hazard audits.

  20. Radiation safety. The maximum permissible exposure levels: our knowledge of the hazards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliney, D. H.

    1989-08-01

    Many different agencies and standards organizations have proposed laser safety standards and personnel exposure limits (ELs), or maximum permissible exposure (MPE) levels. Safety standards may be limited in scope to codes of practice, to occupational ELs, to laser product safety, or to a combination of these three factors. Initially, in the 1960s, attention was drawn to setting ELs; however, as greater experience accumulated in the use of lasers and some accident experience had been gained, safety procedures were developed. It became clear by 1971, after the first decade of laser use, that detailed hazard evaluation of each laser environment was too complex for most users, and a scheme of hazard classification evolved. Today, most countries follow a scheme of four major hazard classifications as defined in Document WS 825 of the International Electrotechnical Commission (IEC). The classifications and the associated accessible emission limits (AELs) were based upon the ELs. The EL and AEL values today are in surprisingly good agreement worldwide. There exists a greater range of safety requirements for the user for each class of laser. The current MPEs (that is, ELs) and their basis are highlighted in this presentation.

  1. Maximum Permissible Amounts of Radioisotopes in the Human Body and Maximum Permissible Concentrations in Air and Water

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1953-03-20

    Cook, Lt. Col. U. S. Atomic Energy Commission: K. Z. Morgan and Shields Warren. U. S. Navy: C. F. Behrens, Rear Adm. U. S. Public Health Service: H...ray must have an enery of about 7.5 Mev to penetrate the epidermal protective layer of skin about the body, which has a minimum thickness of about...Chemistry 174, 905-914 (July 1948). Cpl. Cooper L. F., E. M. Barber, and H. S. Mitchell, Nutrition in Health and Disease (1941) J. P. Lippincott

  2. Maximum Permissible Body Burdens and Maximum Permissible Concentrations of Radionuclides in Air and in Water for Occupational Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1959-06-05

    Radiological Protection , Act, Radiologica 49, 49-495 (1957); or British J. Radiol- Meeting of the Main Commission and Committee Chairmen of the International Com...2.00 45 Testing of Measuring Equipment.----------------------- 1. 50 416 Code for Protection Against Lightning-------------------.45 -. 48...Phosphorus-32 and Iodine-131 for Medical Users---------------------. 15 -50 X-ray Protection Design------------------------------ .20 -61 Radiological

  3. An analysis of crud contribution to the maximum permissible release rates for reactor spent-fuel shipments

    SciTech Connect

    Sandoval, R.P.; Sanders, T.L.; Einziger, R.E.; Malinauskas, A.P.; Mings, W.J.

    1988-01-01

    Through The Cask Systems Development Project Office at the US Department of Energy (DOE) in Idaho, the DOE Office of Civilian Radioactive Waste Management is sponsoring a program at Sandia National Laboratories to develop standardized methodologies for evaluating spent-fuel shipping packages to the federal containment requirements. An important subtask of the program is the evaluation of the neutron-activated corrosion-product deposits (i.e., crud) on irradiated fuel rod surfaces and the determination of the contribution of these crud deposits to the total activity available for release from cask containment. During transportation, cured may spall from the fuel rods, disperse, and become suspended in the cavity medium (gas or liquid) and could be the major contributor to the total source term. An analysis of all available data on crud deposit activity, concentration distributions, composition, spallation properties, particle size distribution, and crud friability was conducted for various light ware reactor fuels for selected burnups and decay items. Assuming that crud is the only source of activity release, the maximum permissible leakage rates were estimated using these data for seven types of truck and rail shipping casks containing 1- and 10-yr-cooled spent fuel. The details and results of this analysis are presented in this paper.

  4. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Airborne Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.

    2008-01-01

    The enclosed table lists official spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs), which are guideline values set by the NASA/JSC Toxicology Group in cooperation with the National Research Council Committee on Toxicology (NRCCOT). These values should not be used for situations other than human space flight without careful consideration of the criteria used to set each value. The SMACs take into account a number of unique factors such as the effect of space-flight stress on human physiology, the uniform good health of the astronauts, and the absence of pregnant or very young individuals. Documentation of the values is given in a 5 volume series of books entitled "Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants" published by the National Academy Press, Washington, D.C. These books can be viewed electronically at http://books.nap.edu/openbook.php?record_id=9786&page=3. Short-term (1 and 24 hour) SMACs are set to manage accidental releases aboard a spacecraft and permit risk of minor, reversible effects such as mild mucosal irritation. In contrast, the long-term SMACs are set to fully protect healthy crewmembers from adverse effects resulting from continuous exposure to specific air pollutants for up to 1000 days. Crewmembers with allergies or unusual sensitivity to trace pollutants may not be afforded complete protection, even when long-term SMACs are not exceeded. Crewmember exposures involve a mixture of contaminants, each at a specific concentration (C(sub n)). These contaminants could interact to elicit symptoms of toxicity even though individual contaminants do not exceed their respective SMACs. The air quality is considered acceptable when the toxicity index (T(sub grp)) for each toxicological group of compounds is less than 1, where T(sub grp), is calculated as follows: T(sub grp) = C(sub 1)/SMAC(sub 1) + C(sub 2/SMAC(sub 2) + ...+C(sub n)/SMAC(sub n).

  5. Laser selection based on maximum permissible exposure limits for visible and middle-near infrared repetitively pulsed lasers.

    SciTech Connect

    Augustoni, Arnold L.

    2004-03-01

    The Maximum Permissible Exposure (MPE) is central to laser hazard analysis and is in general a function of the radiant wavelength. The selection of a laser for a particular application may allow for flexibility in the selection of the radiant wavelength. This flexibility would allow the selection of a particular laser based on the MPE and the hazards associated with that radiant wavelength. The Calculations of the MPEs for various laser wavelength ranges are presented. Techniques for determining eye safe viewing distances for both aided and unaided viewing and the determination of flight hazard distances are presented as well.

  6. [Maximum permissible levels of asbestos and other natural minerals with fibrous structure--necessity of verification].

    PubMed

    Woźniak, H; Wiecek, E

    1991-01-01

    MACs of asbestos are from 2 to 20 times higher in Poland than in other Western Europe countries. The analysis of occupational diseases reported between 1983 and 1988 among workers of asbestos-cement plants has showed that Polish MAC values do not protect people from work-related asbestosis. Asbestosis was frequently diagnosed in workers employed at mining and processing of nickel ore containing admixtures of fibrous antigorite. The risk of asbestosis in workers of a nickel++ metallurgical plant was 8 times higher that in those employed at an asbestos-cement plant. In an animal study, fibrogenic, carcinogenic and mutagenic activity of antigorite was similar to the biological aggressiveness of crocidolite. Based on own studies and literature data, the following MACs for asbestos and other natural fibrous minerals were established: a) for dusts containing asbestos and other fibrous minerals except crocidolite and fibrous antigorite, total dust concentration equals 1 mg/m3 and concentration of fibres longer than 5 microns = 0.5 fibre/cm3 b) for dusts containing crocidolite and fibrous antigorite total dust concentration = 0.5 mg/m3 and concentration of fibres longer than 5 microns = 0.2 fibre/cm3.

  7. Temporary Blinding Limits versus Maximum Permissible Exposure - A Paradigm Change in Risk Assessment for Visible Optical Radiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reidenbach, Hans-Dieter

    Safety considerations in the field of laser radiation have traditionally been restricted to maximum permissible exposure levels defined as a function of wavelength and exposure duration. But in Europe according to the European Directive 2006/25/EC on artificial optical radiation the employer has to include in his risk assessment indirect effects from temporary blinding. Whereas sufficient knowledge on various deterministic risks exists, only sparse quantitative data is available for the impairment of visual functions due to temporary blinding from visible optical radiation. The consideration of indirect effects corresponds to a paradigm change in risk assessment when situations have to be treated, where intrabeam viewing of low-power laser radiation is likely or other non-coherent visible radiation might influence certain visual tasks. In order to obtain a sufficient basis for the assessment of certain situations, investigations of the functional relationships between wavelength, exposure time and optical power and the resulting interference on visual functions have been performed and the results are reported. The duration of a visual disturbance is thus predictable. In addition, preliminary information on protective measures is given.

  8. Impact of a proposed change in the maximum permissible dose limit for neutrons to radiation-protection programs at DOE facilities

    SciTech Connect

    Murphy, B.L.

    1981-09-01

    The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) has issued a statement advising that it is considering lowering the maximum permissible dose for neutrons. This action would present substantive problems to radiation protection programs at DOE facilities where a potential for neutron exposure exists. In addition to altering administrative controls, a lowering of the maximum permissible dose for neutrons will require advances in personnel neutron dosimetry systems, and neutron detection and measurement instrumentation. Improvement in the characterization of neutron fields and spectra at work locations will also be needed. DOE has initiated research and development programs in these areas. However, problems related to the control of personnel neutron exposure have yet to be resolved and investigators are encouraged to continue collaboration with both United States and international authorities.

  9. Effects of permissible maximum-contamination levels of VOC mixture in water on total DNA, antioxidant gene expression, and sequences of ribosomal DNA of Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Doganlar, Oguzhan; Doganlar, Zeynep Banu; Tabakcioglu, Kiymet

    2015-10-01

    In this study, we aimed to investigate the mutagenic and carcinogenic potential of a volatile organic compound (VOC) mixture with references to the response of D.melanogaster using selected antioxidant gene expressions, RAPD assay and base-pair change of ribosomal 18S, and the internal transcribed spacer, ITS2 rDNA gene sequences. For this purpose, Drosophila melanogaster Oregon R, reared under controlled conditions on artificial diets, were treated with the mixture of thirteen VOCs, which are commonly found in water in concentrations of 10, 20, 50, and 75 ppb for 1 and 5 days. In the random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) assay, band changes were clearly detected, especially at the 50 and 75 ppb exposure levels, for both treatment periods, and the band profiles exhibited clear differences between the treated and untreated flies with changes in band intensity and the loss/appearance of bands. Quantitative real-time PCR (qRT-PCR) analysis of Mn-superoxide dismutase (Mn-SOD), catalase (CAT) and glutathione-synthetase (GS) expressions demonstrated that these markers responded significantly to VOC-induced oxidative stress. Whilst CAT gene expressions increased linearly with increasing concentrations of VOCs and treatment times, the 50- and 75-ppb treatments caused decreases in GS expressions compared to the control at 5 days. Treatment with VOCs at both exposure times, especially in high doses, caused gene mutation of the 18S and the ITS2 ribosomal DNA. According to this research, we thought that the permissible maximum-contamination level of VOCs can cause genotoxic effect especially when mixed.

  10. Spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations for selected airborne contaminants, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMAC's) for contaminants, and to review SMAC's for various spacecraft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee on Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMAC's for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMAC's for 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the first 11 SMAC reports that have been reviewed for their application of the guidelines developed in the first phase of this activity and approved by the subcommittee.

  11. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is aware of the potential toxicological hazards to humans that might be associated with prolonged spacecraft missions. Despite major engineering advances in controlling the atmosphere within spacecraft, some contamination of the air appears inevitable. NASA has measured numerous airborne contaminants during space missions. As the missions increase in duration and complexity, ensuring the health and well-being of astronauts traveling and working in this unique environment becomes increasingly difficult. As part of its efforts to promote safe conditions aboard spacecraft, NASA requested the National Research Council (NRC) to develop guidelines for establishing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for contaminants, and to review SMACs for various space-craft contaminants to determine whether NASA's recommended exposure limits are consistent with the guidelines recommended by the subcommittee. In response to NASA's request, the NRC organized the Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants within the Committee On Toxicology (COT). In the first phase of its work, the subcommittee developed the criteria and methods for preparing SMACs for spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee's report, entitled Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants, was published in 1992. The executive summary of that report is reprinted as Appendix A of this volume. In the second phase of the study, the Subcommittee on Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations reviewed reports prepared by NASA scientists and contractors recommending SMACs for approximately 35 spacecraft contaminants. The subcommittee sought to determine whether the SMAC reports were consistent with the 1992 guidelines. Appendix B of this volume contains the SMAC reports for 12 chemical contaminants that have been reviewed for

  12. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    To protect space crews from air contaminants, NASA requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide guidance for developing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) and review NASA's development of exposure guidelines for specific chemicals. The NRC convened the Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines to address this task. The committee published Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants (NRC 1992). The reason for the review of chemicals in Volume 5 is that many of them have not been examined for more than 10 years, and new research necessitates examining the documents to ensure that they reflect current knowledge. New knowledge can be in the form of toxicologic data or in the application of new approaches for analysis of available data. In addition, because NASA anticipates longer space missions beyond low Earth orbit, SMACs for 1,000-d exposures have also been developed.

  13. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants. Volume 5

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    To protect space crews from air contaminants, NASA requested that the National Research Council (NRC) provide guidance for developing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) and review NASA's development of exposure guidelines for specific chemicals. The NRC convened the Committee on Spacecraft Exposure Guidelines to address this task. The committee published Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants (NRC 1992). The reason for the review of chemicals in Volume 5 is that many of them have not been examined for more than 10 years, and new research necessitates examining the documents to ensure that they reflect current knowledge. New knowledge can be in the form of toxicologic data or in the application of new approaches for analysis of available data. In addition, because NASA anticipates longer space missions beyond low Earth orbit, SMACs for 1,000-d exposures have also been developed.

  14. Maximum Ground-Level Concentrations with Downwash-Analysis.

    PubMed

    Bowman, W Alan

    2000-03-01

    Equations derived previously for critical downwind distance x , wind speed u , and plume rise z , the values that produce maximum ground-level concentrations (MGLC) Xc under downwash conditions, have been solved. Tables of %c, xc, uc, and zc, and graphs of the relationships among uc and zc for a range of stack heights hs, and building heights hb, are presented. Results for two types of sources- a turbine and a reciprocating engine-are discussed. Some comparisons are made to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) SCREEN3 model.

  15. Maximum ground-level concentrations with downwash--analysis.

    PubMed

    Bowman, W A

    2000-03-01

    Equations derived previously for critical downwind distance xc' wind speed uc' and plume rise zc' the values that produce maximum ground-level concentrations (MGLC) chi c under downwash conditions, have been solved. Tables of chi c' xc' uc' and zc' and graphs of the relationships among uc and zc, for a range of stack heights hs' and building heights hb' are presented. Results for two types of sources--a turbine and a reciprocating engine--are discussed. Some comparisons are made to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) SCREEN3 model.

  16. Dependence of maximum concentration from chemical accidents on release duration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanna, Steven; Chang, Joseph

    2017-01-01

    Chemical accidents often involve releases of a total mass, Q, of stored material in a tank over a time duration, td, of less than a few minutes. The value of td is usually uncertain because of lack of knowledge of key information, such as the size and location of the hole and the pressure and temperature of the chemical. In addition, it is rare that eyewitnesses or video cameras are present at the time of the accident. For inhalation hazards, serious health effects (such as damage to the respiratory system) are determined by short term averages (<1 min) of concentrations, C. It is intuitively obvious that, for a ground level source and with all conditions the same (e.g., the same mass Q released), the maximum C near the source will be larger for a shorter than a longer release duration, td. This paper investigates the variation with downwind distance, x, of the ratio of maximum C for two time durations of release. Some simplified formulas for dispersion from finite duration releases are presented based on dimensional analysis. A primary dimensionless number of importance is the ratio of the release duration, td, to the travel time tt = x/u, at distance, x, where u is wind speed. Examples of applications to pressurized liquefied chlorine releases from tanks are given, focusing on scenarios from the Jack Rabbit I (JR I) field experiment. The analytical calculations and the predictions of the SLAB dense gas dispersion model agree that the ratio of maximum C for two different td's is greatest (as much as a factor of ten) near the source. At large distances (beyond a few km for the JR I scenarios), where tt exceeds both td's, the ratio of maximum C approaches unity.

  17. Maximum permissible exposure of the retina in the human eye in optical coherence tomography systems using a confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy platform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rees, Sian; Dobre, George

    2014-01-01

    When using scanning laser ophthalmoscopy to produce images of the eye fundus, maximum permissible exposure (MPE) limits must be considered. These limits are set out in international standards such as the National Standards Institute ANSI Z136.1 Safe Use of Lasers (USA) and BS EN 60825-1: 1994 (UK) and corresponding Euro norms but these documents do not explicitly consider the case of scanned beams. Our study aims to show how MPE values can be calculated for the specific case of retinal scanning by taking into account an array of parameters, such as wavelength, exposure duration, type of scanning, line rate and field size, and how each set of initial parameters results in MPE values that correspond to thermal or photochemical damage to the retina.

  18. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... concentrations. 35.204 Section 35.204 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL..., and strontium-85 concentrations. (a) A licensee may not administer to humans a radiopharmaceutical... radiopharmaceutical shall measure the molybdenum-99 concentration of the first eluate after receipt of a generator to...

  19. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... concentrations. 35.204 Section 35.204 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL..., and strontium-85 concentrations. (a) A licensee may not administer to humans a radiopharmaceutical... radiopharmaceutical shall measure the molybdenum-99 concentration of the first eluate after receipt of a generator to...

  20. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... concentrations. 35.204 Section 35.204 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL..., and strontium-85 concentrations. (a) A licensee may not administer to humans a radiopharmaceutical... radiopharmaceutical shall measure the molybdenum-99 concentration of the first eluate after receipt of a generator to...

  1. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... concentrations. 35.204 Section 35.204 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL..., and strontium-85 concentrations. (a) A licensee may not administer to humans a radiopharmaceutical... radiopharmaceutical shall measure the molybdenum-99 concentration of the first eluate after receipt of a generator to...

  2. 10 CFR 35.204 - Permissible molybdenum-99, strontium-82, and strontium-85 concentrations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... concentrations. 35.204 Section 35.204 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION MEDICAL USE OF BYPRODUCT MATERIAL..., and strontium-85 concentrations. (a) A licensee may not administer to humans a radiopharmaceutical... radiopharmaceutical shall measure the molybdenum-99 concentration of the first eluate after receipt of a generator to...

  3. Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) for Predicting Annual Maximum and Annual Maximum Moving-Average Concentrations of Atrazine in Streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stone, Wesley W.; Gilliom, Robert J.; Crawford, Charles G.

    2008-01-01

    Regression models were developed for predicting annual maximum and selected annual maximum moving-average concentrations of atrazine in streams using the Watershed Regressions for Pesticides (WARP) methodology developed by the National Water-Quality Assessment Program (NAWQA) of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS). The current effort builds on the original WARP models, which were based on the annual mean and selected percentiles of the annual frequency distribution of atrazine concentrations. Estimates of annual maximum and annual maximum moving-average concentrations for selected durations are needed to characterize the levels of atrazine and other pesticides for comparison to specific water-quality benchmarks for evaluation of potential concerns regarding human health or aquatic life. Separate regression models were derived for the annual maximum and annual maximum 21-day, 60-day, and 90-day moving-average concentrations. Development of the regression models used the same explanatory variables, transformations, model development data, model validation data, and regression methods as those used in the original development of WARP. The models accounted for 72 to 75 percent of the variability in the concentration statistics among the 112 sampling sites used for model development. Predicted concentration statistics from the four models were within a factor of 10 of the observed concentration statistics for most of the model development and validation sites. Overall, performance of the models for the development and validation sites supports the application of the WARP models for predicting annual maximum and selected annual maximum moving-average atrazine concentration in streams and provides a framework to interpret the predictions in terms of uncertainty. For streams with inadequate direct measurements of atrazine concentrations, the WARP model predictions for the annual maximum and the annual maximum moving-average atrazine concentrations can be used to characterize

  4. 40 CFR 227.27 - Limiting permissible con-cen-tra-tion (LPC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... for initial mixing as provided in § 227.29, does not exceed applicable marine water quality criteria; or, when there are no applicable marine water quality criteria, (2) That concentration of waste or... to appropriate sensitive marine organisms in a bioassay carried out in accordance with approved...

  5. 40 CFR 227.27 - Limiting permissible con-cen-tra-tion (LPC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... for initial mixing as provided in § 227.29, does not exceed applicable marine water quality criteria; or, when there are no applicable marine water quality criteria, (2) That concentration of waste or... to appropriate sensitive marine organisms in a bioassay carried out in accordance with approved...

  6. 40 CFR 227.27 - Limiting permissible con-cen-tra-tion (LPC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... for initial mixing as provided in § 227.29, does not exceed applicable marine water quality criteria; or, when there are no applicable marine water quality criteria, (2) That concentration of waste or... to appropriate sensitive marine organisms in a bioassay carried out in accordance with approved...

  7. 40 CFR 227.27 - Limiting permissible con-cen-tra-tion (LPC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... for initial mixing as provided in § 227.29, does not exceed applicable marine water quality criteria; or, when there are no applicable marine water quality criteria, (2) That concentration of waste or... to appropriate sensitive marine organisms in a bioassay carried out in accordance with approved...

  8. Nested aplanats for practical maximum-performance solar concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldstein, Alex; Feuermann, Daniel; Conley, Gary D.; Gordon, Jeffrey M.

    2011-08-01

    Dual-mirror aplanats provide efficient, ultracompact, high-irradiance solar concentration and were recently developed for concentrator photovoltaics. However, inherent limitations place the focus inside the optic. This mandates a terminal dielectric concentrator to extract concentrated sunlight to the solar cell outside the optic, and an optical bond to the cell. Can a modified design strategy site the focus outside the optic (eliminating the need for an extractor and optical bond) without compromising concentrator compactness, low shading losses, or pragmatic manufacturability We show how judiciously nested dual-mirror aplanats can satisfy all these objectives, with raytrace simulations confirming performance tantamount to the best conventional aplanats.

  9. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Maximum Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Maximum Concentration of Constituents... Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection Constituent concentration 1 Maximum Arsenic 0.05 Barium... satisfied by a concentration of 0.044 milligrams per liter (0.044 mg/l). For conditions of other than...

  10. 40 CFR Table 1 to Subpart A of... - Maximum Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum Concentration of Constituents... Concentration of Constituents for Groundwater Protection Constituent concentration 1 Maximum Arsenic 0.05 Barium... satisfied by a concentration of 0.044 milligrams per liter (0.044 mg/l). For conditions of other than...

  11. [Hygienic substantiation of maximum permissible concentrations of oil products in the soils of the Republic of Belarus].

    PubMed

    Rubin, V M; Il'yukova, I I; Kremko, L M; Prismotrov, Yu A; Samsonova, A S; Volod'ko, I K; Lukashev, O V

    2013-01-01

    Oil products are the one out of major pollutants in soil. For reduction of the technogenic load on human beings and performing preventive measures in the Republic of Belarus differentiated hygienic rate setting for oil products in the soil have been scientifically substantiated for follows different categories of Lands: agricultural lands, defense lands, lands for recreation, historical and cultural purpose, forest lands, lands of water fund, reserve lands--50 mg/kg; settlements sand, garden housing and dacha cooperatives,--100 mg/kg; industrial, transport, communication, energy, defense and other appointments lands--500 mg/kg.

  12. Permission Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    The prevailing practice in public schools is to routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities that pose potential for liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered to be neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. The following case and the…

  13. Permission Forms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    The prevailing practice in public schools is to routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities that pose potential for liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered to be neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. The following case and the…

  14. Permissive hypercapnia.

    PubMed

    Thome, Ulrich H; Carlo, Waldemar A

    2002-10-01

    Although lifesaving, mechanical ventilation can result in lung injury and contribute to the development of bronchopulmonary dysplasia. The most critical determinants of lung injury are tidal volume and end-inspiratory lung volume. Permissive hypercapnia offers to maintain gas exchange with lower tidal volumes and thus decrease lung injury. Further physiologic benefits include improved oxygen delivery and neuroprotection, the latter through both avoidance of accidental hypocapnia, which is associated with a poor neurologic outcome, and direct cellular effects. Clinical trials in adults with acute respiratory failure indicated improved survival and reduced incidence of organ failure in subjects managed with low tidal volumes and permissive hypercapnia. Retrospective studies in low birth weight infants found an association of bronchopulmonary dysplasia with low PaCO(2). Randomized clinical trials of low birth weight infants did not achieve sufficient statistical power to demonstrate a reduction of BPD by permissive hypercapnia, but strong trends indicated the possibility of important benefits without increased adverse events. Herein, we review the mechanisms leading to lung injury, the physiologic effects of hypercapnia, the dangers of hypocapnia, and the available clinical data.

  15. [Verification of Polish regulations of maximum permissible intensities in electromagnetic fields by the Commission for Bioelectromagnetic Issues of the Polish Radiation Research Society].

    PubMed

    Zmyślony, Marek; Kubacki, Roman; Aniołczyk, Halina; Kieliszek, Jarosław; Trzaska, Hubert; Bieńkowski, Paweł; Krawczyk, Andrzej; Szmigielski, Stanisław

    2005-01-01

    Experts in the field of bioelectromagnetism have reported a growing need to verify Polish regulations on the protection against electromagnetic fields (EMF) in the 0-300 GHz range, especially in their maximal permissible intensities (MPI). There is a general belief that Polish standards do not fully comply with recommendations and directives of the European Union (EU) and that Polish regulations on the border values for environmental and occupational exposure to EMF are not harmonized. To this end, the Commission for Bioelectromagnetic Issues have been set up in the Polish Radiation Research Society. Following a through analysis of standards binding in Poland and EU, the Commission set about working on verified MPI values for EMF. This paper presents some comments of the Commission members, stressing the complexity of this undertaking.

  16. Evaluation of the maximum permissible level of low-intensity electromagnetic radiation at mobile connection frequency (1 GHz) by changes in motor activity of Spirostomum Ambiguum.

    PubMed

    Sarapultseva, E I; Igolkina, J V; Litovchenko, A V

    2009-04-01

    Electromagnetic radiation at the mobile connection frequency (1 GHz) at maximum energy flow density (10 microW/cm(2)) permitted in Russia causes serious functional disorders in the studied unicellular hydrobionts infusoria Spirostomum ambiguum: reduction of their spontaneous motor activity. The form of biological reaction is uncommon: the effect is threshold, overall, and does not depend on the duration of microwave exposure.

  17. Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Groundwater Concentrations for Basement Fill Model. Zion Station Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Terry

    2016-02-22

    The objectives of this report are; To present a simplified conceptual model for release from the buildings with residual subsurface structures that can be used to provide an upper bound on contaminant concentrations in the fill material; Provide maximum water concentrations and the corresponding amount of mass sorbed to the solid fill material that could occur in each building for use in dose assessment calculations; Estimate the maximum concentration in a well located outside of the fill material; and Perform a sensitivity analysis of key parameters.

  18. Guidelines for developing spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations for Space Station contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) is preparing to launch a manned space station by the year 1996. Because of concerns about the health, safety, and functioning abilities of the crews, NASA has requested that the National Research Council (NRC) through the Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology (BEST) provide advice on toxicological matters for the space-station program. The Subcommittee on Guidelines for Developing Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Space Station Contaminants was established by the Committee on Toxicology (COT) to address NASA's concerns. Spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMAC's) are defined as the maximum concentrations of airborne substances (such as gas, vapor, or aerosol) that will not cause adverse health effects, significant discomfort, or degradation in crew performance.

  19. Double-tailored nonimaging reflector optics for maximum-performance solar concentration.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Alex; Gordon, Jeffrey M

    2010-09-01

    A nonimaging strategy that tailors two mirror contours for concentration near the étendue limit is explored, prompted by solar applications where a sizable gap between the optic and absorber is required. Subtle limitations of this simultaneous multiple surface method approach are derived, rooted in the manner in which phase space boundaries can be tailored according to the edge-ray principle. The fundamental categories of double-tailored reflective optics are identified, only a minority of which can pragmatically offer maximum concentration at high collection efficiency. Illustrative examples confirm that acceptance half-angles as large as 30 mrad can be realized at a flux concentration of approximately 1000.

  20. Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) for C3 to C8 Aliphatic Saturated Aldehydes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Langford, Shannon D.

    2007-01-01

    Spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations (SMACs) for C3 to C8, straight-chain, aliphatic aldehydes have been previously assessed and have been documented in volume 4 of Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for Selected Airborne Contaminants (James, 2000). These aldehydes as well as associated physical properties are shown in Table 1. The C3 to C8 aliphatic aldehydes can enter the habitable compartments and contaminate breathing air of spacecraft by several routes including incomplete oxidation of alcohols in the Environmental Control and Life Support System (ECLSS) air revitalization subsystem, as a byproduct of human metabolism, through materials off-gassing, or during food preparation. These aldehydes have been detected in the atmosphere of manned space vehicles in the past. Analysis performed by NASA of crew cabin air samples from the Russian Mir Space Station revealed the presence of C3 to C8 aldehydes at concentrations peaking at approximately 0.1 mg/cu m.

  1. Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Groundwater Concentrations for Basement Fill Model. Zion Station Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Terry

    2014-12-02

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in order to establish a new water treatment plant. There is some residual radioactive particles from the plant which need to be brought down to levels so an individual who receives water from the new treatment plant does not receive a radioactive dose in excess of 25 mrem/y⁻¹. The objectives of this report are: (a) To present a simplified conceptual model for release from the buildings with residual subsurface structures that can be used to provide an upper bound on contaminant concentrations in the fill material; (b) Provide maximum water concentrations and the corresponding amount of mass sorbed to the solid fill material that could occur in each building for use in dose assessment calculations; (c) Estimate the maximum concentration in a well located outside of the fill material; and (d) Perform a sensitivity analysis of key parameters.

  2. Maximum Urine Concentrating Capability in a Mathematical Model of the Inner Medulla of the Rat Kidney

    PubMed Central

    Marcano, Mariano; Layton, Anita T.; Layton, Harold E.

    2009-01-01

    In a mathematical model of the urine concentrating mechanism of the inner medulla of the rat kidney, a nonlinear optimization technique was used to estimate parameter sets that maximize the urine-to-plasma osmolality ratio (U/P) while maintaining the urine flow rate within a plausible physiologic range. The model, which used a central core formulation, represented loops of Henle turning at all levels of the inner medulla and a composite collecting duct (CD). The parameters varied were: water flow and urea concentration in tubular fluid entering the descending thin limbs and the composite CD at the outer-inner medullary boundary; scaling factors for the number of loops of Henle and CDs as a function of medullary depth; location and increase rate of the urea permeability profile along the CD; and a scaling factor for the maximum rate of NaCl transport from the CD. The optimization algorithm sought to maximize a quantity E that equaled U/P minus a penalty function for insufficient urine flow. Maxima of E were sought by changing parameter values in the direction in parameter space in which E increased. The algorithm attained a maximum E that increased urine osmolality and inner medullary concentrating capability by 37.5% and 80.2%, respectively, above base-case values; the corresponding urine flow rate and the concentrations of NaCl and urea were all within or near reported experimental ranges. Our results predict that urine osmolality is particularly sensitive to three parameters: the urea concentration in tubular fluid entering the CD at the outer-inner medullary boundary, the location and increase rate of the urea permeability profile along the CD, and the rate of decrease of the CD population (and thus of surface area) along the cortico-medullary axis. PMID:19915926

  3. Assessing atmospheric concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) by evergreen Rhododendron maximum next to a contaminated stream

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dang, Viet D.; Walters, David; Lee, Cindy M.

    2016-01-01

    Conifers are often used as an “air passive sampler”, but few studies have focused on the implication of broadleaf evergreens to monitor atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In this study, we used Rhododendron maximum (rhododendron) growing next to a contaminated stream to assess atmospheric PCB concentrations. The study area was located in a rural setting and approximately 2 km downstream of a former Sangamo-Weston (S-W) plant. Leaves from the same mature shrubs were collected in late fall 2010, and winter and spring 2011. PCBs were detected in the collected leaves suggesting that rhododendron can be used as air passive samplers in rural areas where active sampling is impractical. Estimated ΣPCB (47 congeners) concentrations in the atmosphere decreased from fall 2010 to spring 2011 with concentration means at 3990, 2850, and 931 pg m-3 in fall 2010, winter 2011, and spring 2011, respectively. These results indicate that the atmospheric concentrations at this location continue to be high despite termination of active discharge from the former S-W plant. Leaves had a consistent pattern of high concentrations of tetra- and penta-CBs similar to the congener distribution in polyethylene (PE) passive samplers deployed in the water column suggesting that volatilized PCBs from the stream were the primary source of contaminants in rhododendron leaves.

  4. Assessing atmospheric concentration of polychlorinated biphenyls by evergreen Rhododendron maximum next to a contaminated stream.

    PubMed

    Dang, Viet D; Walters, David M; Lee, Cindy M

    2016-09-01

    Conifers are often used as an air passive sampler, but few studies have focused on the implication of broadleaf evergreens to monitor atmospheric semivolatile organic compounds such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs). In the present study, the authors used Rhododendron maximum (rhododendron) growing next to a contaminated stream to assess atmospheric PCB concentrations. The present study area was located in a rural setting and approximately 2 km downstream of a former capacitor plant. Leaves from the same mature shrubs were collected in late fall 2010 and winter and spring 2011. Polychlorinated biphenyls were detected in the collected leaves, suggesting that rhododendron can be used as air passive samplers in rural areas where active sampling is impractical. Estimated ΣPCB (47 congeners) concentrations in the atmosphere decreased from fall 2010 to spring 2011 with concentration means at 3990 pg m(-3) , 2850 pg m(-3) , and 931 pg m(-3) in fall 2010, winter 2011, and spring 2011, respectively. These results indicate that the atmospheric concentrations at this location continue to be high despite termination of active discharge from the former industrial source. Leaves had a consistent pattern of high concentrations of tetra-CBs and penta-CBs similar to the congener distribution in polyethylene passive samplers deployed in the water column, suggesting that volatilized PCBs from the stream were the primary source of contaminants in rhododendron leaves. Environ Toxicol Chem 2016;35:2192-2198. © 2016 SETAC. © 2016 SETAC.

  5. Research to Support the Determination of Spacecraft Maximum Acceptable Concentrations of Potential Atmospheric Contaminants

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, John L.

    1997-01-01

    In many ways, the typical approach to the handling of bibliographic material for generating review articles and similar manuscripts has changed little since the use of xerographic reproduction has become widespread. The basic approach is to collect reprints of the relevant material and place it in folders or stacks based on its dominant content. As the amount of information available increases with the passage of time, the viability of this mechanical approach to bibliographic management decreases. The personal computer revolution has changed the way we deal with many familiar tasks. For example, word processing on personal computers has supplanted the typewriter for many applications. Similarly, spreadsheets have not only replaced many routine uses of calculators but have also made possible new applications because the cost of calculation is extremely low. Objective The objective of this research was to use personal computer bibliographic software technology to support the determination of spacecraft maximum acceptable concentration (SMAC) values. Specific Aims The specific aims were to produce draft SMAC documents for hydrogen sulfide and tetrachloroethylene taking maximum advantage of the bibliographic software.

  6. Setting Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for 1 hour or 24 hour contingency exposures to airborne chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Hector D.; Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Since the early years of the manned space program, NASA has developed and used exposure limits called Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) to help protect astronauts from airborne toxicants. Most of these SMACS are based on an exposure duration of 7 days, since this is the duration of a 'typical' mission. A set of 'contingency SMACs' is also being developed for scenarios involving brief (1-hour or 24- hour) exposures to relatively high levels of airborne toxicants from event-related 'contingency' releases of contaminants. The emergency nature of contingency exposures dictates the use of different criteria for setting exposure limits. The NASA JSC Toxicology Group recently began a program to document the rationales used to set new SMACs and plans to review the older, 7-day SMACs. In cooperation with the National Research Council's Committee on Toxicology, a standard procedure has been developed for researching, setting, and documenting SMAC values.

  7. Setting Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations for 1 hour or 24 hour contingency exposures to airborne chemicals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Garcia, Hector D.; Limero, Thomas F.; James, John T.

    1992-01-01

    Since the early years of the manned space program, NASA has developed and used exposure limits called Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) to help protect astronauts from airborne toxicants. Most of these SMACS are based on an exposure duration of 7 days, since this is the duration of a 'typical' mission. A set of 'contingency SMACs' is also being developed for scenarios involving brief (1-hour or 24- hour) exposures to relatively high levels of airborne toxicants from event-related 'contingency' releases of contaminants. The emergency nature of contingency exposures dictates the use of different criteria for setting exposure limits. The NASA JSC Toxicology Group recently began a program to document the rationales used to set new SMACs and plans to review the older, 7-day SMACs. In cooperation with the National Research Council's Committee on Toxicology, a standard procedure has been developed for researching, setting, and documenting SMAC values.

  8. A Comparison of Muscle Activity in Concentric and Counter Movement Maximum Bench Press

    PubMed Central

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Ettema, Gertjan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the kinematics and muscle activation patterns of regular free-weight bench press (counter movement) with pure concentric lifts in the ascending phase of a successful one repetition maximum (1-RM) attempt in the bench press. Our aim was to evaluate if diminishing potentiation could be the cause of the sticking region. Since diminishing potentiation cannot occur in pure concentric lifts, the occurrence of a sticking region in this type of muscle actions would support the hypothesis that the sticking region is due to a poor mechanical position. Eleven male participants (age 21.9 ± 1.7 yrs, body mass 80.7 ± 10.9 kg, body height 1.79 ± 0.07 m) conducted 1-RM lifts in counter movement and in pure concentric bench presses in which kinematics and EMG activity were measured. In both conditions, a sticking region occurred. However, the start of the sticking region was different between the two bench presses. In addition, in four of six muscles, the muscle activity was higher in the counter movement bench press compared to the concentric one. Considering the findings of the muscle activity of six muscles during the maximal lifts it was concluded that the diminishing effect of force potentiation, which occurs in the counter movement bench press, in combination with a delayed muscle activation unlikely explains the existence of the sticking region in a 1-RM bench press. Most likely, the sticking region is the result of a poor mechanical force position. PMID:24235985

  9. A comparison of muscle activity in concentric and counter movement maximum bench press.

    PubMed

    van den Tillaar, Roland; Ettema, Gertjan

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the kinematics and muscle activation patterns of regular free-weight bench press (counter movement) with pure concentric lifts in the ascending phase of a successful one repetition maximum (1-RM) attempt in the bench press. Our aim was to evaluate if diminishing potentiation could be the cause of the sticking region. Since diminishing potentiation cannot occur in pure concentric lifts, the occurrence of a sticking region in this type of muscle actions would support the hypothesis that the sticking region is due to a poor mechanical position. Eleven male participants (age 21.9 ± 1.7 yrs, body mass 80.7 ± 10.9 kg, body height 1.79 ± 0.07 m) conducted 1-RM lifts in counter movement and in pure concentric bench presses in which kinematics and EMG activity were measured. In both conditions, a sticking region occurred. However, the start of the sticking region was different between the two bench presses. In addition, in four of six muscles, the muscle activity was higher in the counter movement bench press compared to the concentric one. Considering the findings of the muscle activity of six muscles during the maximal lifts it was concluded that the diminishing effect of force potentiation, which occurs in the counter movement bench press, in combination with a delayed muscle activation unlikely explains the existence of the sticking region in a 1-RM bench press. Most likely, the sticking region is the result of a poor mechanical force position.

  10. Bacterial maximum non-inhibitory and minimum inhibitory concentrations of different water activity depressing solutes.

    PubMed

    Cebrián, G; Arroyo, C; Mañas, P; Condón, S

    2014-10-01

    The NaCl MNICs (maximum non-inhibitory concentrations) and MICs (minimum inhibitory concentrations) for growth of various strains of six bacterial species were determined and then compared with those obtained for seven other solutes. The influence of prior growth conditions on the MNICs and MICs was also evaluated. No significant changes on the MNICs and MICs were found among the strains studied within each species. Among all factors investigated, only growth phase -for Gram-negatives- and growth at high NaCl concentrations led to a change in the NaCl MNICs. Species could be classified depending on its NaCl MNICs and MICs (in decreasing order) as follows: Staphylococcus aureus, Listeria monocytogenes, Cronobacter sakazakii, Enterococcus faecium, Escherichia coli and Salmonella Typhimurium. Similar results were obtained for KCl, LiCl, and sodium acetate, but not for the remaining solutes investigated (sucrose, glycerol, MgCl2 and CaCl2). Results obtained indicate that, in general, Gram-negatives showed lower MNICs and MICs than Gram-positives for all the solutes, S. aureus being the most solute tolerant microorganism. When compared on a molar basis, glycerol showed the highest MNICs and MICs for all the microorganisms -except for S. aureus- and LiCl the lowest ones. NaCl MNICs and MICs were not significantly different from those of KCl when compared on a molar basis. Therefore, the inhibitory action of NaCl could not be linked to the specific action of Na(+). Results also showed that the Na(+) tolerance of some species was Cl(-) dependent whereas for others it was not, and that factors others than aw-decrease contribute to the inhibitory action of LiCl, CaCl2 and MgCl2.

  11. Getting the MAX out of Computational Models: The Prediction of Unbound-Brain and Unbound-Plasma Maximum Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Mente, Scot; Doran, Angela; Wager, Travis T

    2012-06-14

    The objective of this work was to establish that unbound maximum concentrations may be reasonably predicted from a combination of computed molecular properties assuming subcutaneous (SQ) dosing. Additionally, we show that the maximum unbound plasma and brain concentrations may be projected from a mixture of in vitro absorption, distribution, metabolism, excretion experimental parameters in combination with computed properties (volume of distribution, fraction unbound in microsomes). Finally, we demonstrate the utility of the underlying equations by showing that the maximum total plasma concentrations can be projected from the experimental parameters for a set of compounds with data collected from clinical research.

  12. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  13. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  14. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  15. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test Concentration Ranges, Number of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specifications Pollutant Concentration...

  16. Metaproteome of the viral concentrates from the deep chlorophyll maximum of the South China Sea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Zhang-Xian; Chen, Feng; Zhang, Shu-Feng; Wang, Ming-Hua; Zhang, Hao; Kong, Ling-Fen; Dai, Min-Han; Hong, Hua-Sheng; Lin, Lin; Wang, Da-Zhi

    2016-04-01

    Viral concentrates (VCs) have been commonly used for studying viral diversity, viral metagenomics and virus-host interactions in the natural ecosystem. However, the protein characteristics of VCs have not been explored. Here, we applied shotgun proteomics to characterize the proteins of VCs collected from the oligotrophic deep chlorophyll maximum of the South China Sea. We found that 34% of the identified proteins were assigned to the viruses, mainly being those of SAR11 related bacteria, cyanobacteria and picophytoeukaryotes. The remaining 66% were non-viral proteins mostly originating from diverse bacteria, such as SAR324, SAR11 and the Alteromonadales, and were functionally dominated by transport, translation, sulfur metabolism and one-carbon metabolism. Among the non-viral proteins, 28% were extracellular proteins and 10% were identified exclusively in the VCs, suggesting that non-viral entities might exist in the VCs. This study demonstrated that metaproteomics provides a valuable avenue to explore not only the diversity and structure of a viral community but also the novel ecological functions affiliated with microbes in the natural environment.

  17. Toxicological approach to setting spacecraft maximum allowable concentrations for carbon monoxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wong, K. L.; Limero, T. F.; James, J. T.

    1992-01-01

    The Spacecraft Maximum Allowable Concentrations (SMACs) are exposure limits for airborne chemicals used by NASA in spacecraft. The aim of these SMACs is to protect the spacecrew against adverse health effects and performance decrements that would interfere with mission objectives. Because of the 1 and 24 hr SMACs are set for contingencies, minor reversible toxic effects that do not affect mission objectives are acceptable. The 7, 30, or 180 day SMACs are aimed at nominal operations, so they are established at levels that would not cause noncarcinogenic toxic effects and more than one case of tumor per 1000 exposed individuals over the background. The process used to set the SMACs for carbon monoxide (CO) is described to illustrate the approach used by NASA. After the toxicological literature on CO was reviewed, the data were summarized and separated into acute, subchronic, and chronic toxicity data. CO's toxicity depends on the formation of carboxyhemoglobin (COHb) in the blood, reducing the blood's oxygen carrying capacity. The initial task was to estimate the COHb levels that would not produce toxic effects in the brain and heart.

  18. Capture zone delineation methodology based on the maximum concentration: Preventative groundwater well protection areas for heat exchange fluid mixtures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okkonen, Jarkko; Neupauer, Roseanna M.

    2016-05-01

    Capture zones of water supply wells are most often delineated based on travel times of water or solute to the well, with the assumption that if the travel time is sufficiently large, the concentration of chemical at the well will not exceed the drinking water standards. In many situations, the likely source concentrations or release masses of contamination from the potential sources are unknown; therefore, the exact concentration at the well cannot be determined. In situations in which the source mass can be estimated with some accuracy, the delineation of the capture zone should be based on the maximum chemical concentration that can be expected at the well, rather than on an arbitrary travel time. We present a new capture zone delineation methodology that is based on this maximum chemical concentration. The method delineates capture zones by solving the adjoint of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation and relating the adjoint state and the known release mass to the expected chemical concentration at the well. We demonstrate the use of this method through a case study in which soil heat exchange systems are potential sources of contamination. The heat exchange fluid mixtures contain known fluid volumes and chemical concentrations; thus, in the event of a release, the release mass of the chemical is known. We also demonstrate the use of a concentration basis in quantifying other measures of well vulnerability including exposure time and time to exceed a predefined threshold concentration at the well.

  19. Truncation of the secondary concentrator (CPC) between maximum performances and economical requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Segal, A.; Epstein, M.

    2009-08-01

    A central solar plant, based on beam-down optics, is composed of a field of heliostats, a tower reflector and a ground receiver. The tower reflector is an optical system comprises of a quadric surface mirror (hyperboloid), where its upper focal point coincides with the aim point of a heliostat field and its lower focal point is located at a specified height, coinciding with the entrance plane of the ground receiver. The optics of a tower reflector requires the use of ground secondary concentrator, composed of a cluster of CPCs, because the quadric surface mirror always magnifies the sun image. There is an intrinsic correlation between the tower reflector position and its size on one hand, and the geometry, dimensions and reflective area of the secondary concentrator on the other hand; both are related to the heliostat field reflective area. Obviously, when one wishes to have a smaller tower reflector by placing it closer to the upper focal point, the image created at the lower focus will be larger, resulting in a larger secondary ground concentrator. The present work analyses the ways for a substantial decrease of the size of the ground concentrator cluster (and, implicit, the concentrators area) via truncation, without significant sacrifice of the performance, although some increase of the optical losses is inevitable. This offers a method for cost effective design of future central solar plants utilizing the beam down optics.

  20. Sewage pre-concentration for maximum recovery and reuse at decentralized level.

    PubMed

    Diamantis, V; Verstraete, W; Eftaxias, A; Bundervoet, B; Siegfried, V; Melidis, P; Aivasidis, A

    2013-01-01

    Pre-concentration of municipal wastewater by chemically enhanced primary treatment (CEPT) was studied under controlled laboratory conditions. Both iron and aluminium-based coagulants were examined at gradually increasing concentrations (0.23, 0.35, 0.70 and 1.05 mmol/L). The CEPT sludge generated from different coagulation experiments was digested in batch anaerobic reactors, while the supernatant was tested in a dead-end microfiltration setup. The results of the study show that biogas yield was dramatically decreased (from 0.40 to 0.10 m(3)/kg chemical oxygen demand of influent) with increasing coagulant dose. In contrast, supernatant filterability was improved. Based on the laboratory results, a conceptual design was produced for a community of 2000 inhabitant equivalents (IE), using CEPT technology (at low coagulant dose) with anaerobic digestion of the concentrates. According to this, the capital and operational costs were 0.11 and 0.09 €/m(3), respectively. The biogas generated is used for digester heating and the overall process is energy self-sufficient. At a small-scale and in private applications, CEPT technology is preferably operated at higher coagulant dose, followed by membrane filtration for water reuse. Accordingly, sewage purification and reuse is possible without implementing aerobic biological processes.

  1. 40 CFR Table C-1 to Subpart C of... - Test Concentration Ranges, Number of Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Measurements Required, and Maximum Discrepancy Specification C Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53 Protection of... Reference Methods Pt. 53, Subpt. C, Table C-1 Table C-1 to Subpart C of Part 53—Test Concentration Ranges... 0.25 to 0.35 2 2 .03 Total 7 8 Effective Date Note: At 75 FR 35601, June 22, 2010, table C-1...

  2. Maximum-biomass concentration prediction for Bifidobacteria in the pH-controlled fed-batch culture.

    PubMed

    Cui, S M; Zhao, J X; Liu, X M; Chen, Y Q; Zhang, H; Chen, W

    2016-03-01

    Our objective was to systematically study the relationship between maximum biomass concentration of different Bifidobacteria and total-acid anions accumulation, and develop a prediction equation for the maximum biomass concentration in the fed-batch culture at pH-controlled 7·0. The accumulation of acid anions and the consumption of nutrients of various strains were evaluated. In addition, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of acid anions on a range of strains were examined at pH 7·0. The inhibition of acid anions, which had the same MIC as sodium chloride, was due to the osmotic pressure under pH 7·0 conditions. Moreover, the concentration of total-acid anions completely inhibiting each strain in the fed-batch culture at pH-controlled 7·0 had no significant differences with the MIC of acid anions for the corresponding strains. The osmotic pressures under two conditions were not significantly different. Finally, the maximum biomass concentration of Bifidobacteria was found to be closely related to biomass yield per unit of acid anion produced (YX/P ) and MIC (C) which were needed for the prediction, and different strains exhibited marked correlation (P ˂ 0·01, R = 0·985). An equation for the prediction of the maximum biomass concentration was developed as follows: Xmax -X0  = (0·71 ± 0·03)·YX/P ·C. This study provides further insights into the inhibition of Bifidobacteria by dissociated acid anions (the dissociated form) at pH 7·0. The high correlation between different strains suggested that the equation established in this paper is appropriate for different strains of Bifidobacteria. The prediction equation could be used to guide practical production in the preparation of materials, the control of the end of fermentation and production plans for further products such as freeze-dried powder of Bifidobacteria or food fermentation. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  3. Relevance, Derogation and Permission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolpe, Audun

    We show that a recently developed theory of positive permission based on the notion of derogation is hampered by a triviality result that indicates a problem with the underlying full-meet contraction operation. We suggest a solution that presupposes a particular normal form for codes of norms, adapted from the theory of relevance through propositional letter sharing. We then establish a correspondence between contractions on sets of norms in input/output logic (derogations), and AGM-style contractions on sets of formulae, and use it as a bridge to migrate results on propositional relevance from the latter to the former idiom. Changing the concept accordingly we show that positive permission now incorporates a relevance requirement that wards off triviality.

  4. Fewer fluctuations, higher maximum concentration and better motor response of levodopa with catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibition.

    PubMed

    Muhlack, Siegfried; Herrmann, Lennard; Salmen, Stephan; Müller, Thomas

    2014-11-01

    Catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibitor addition to levodopa/carbidopa formulations improves motor symptoms and reduces levodopa fluctuations in patients with Parkinson's disease. Objectives were to investigate the effects of entacapone and tolcapone on plasma behaviour of levodopa, its metabolite 3-O-methyldopa and on motor impairment. 22 patients orally received levodopa/carbidopa first, then levodopa/carbidopa/entacapone and finally levodopa/carbidopa plus tolcapone within a 4.5 h interval twice. Maximum concentration, time to maximum level and bioavailability of levodopa did not differ between all conditions each with 200 mg levodopa application as a whole. Catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibition caused less fluctuations and higher baseline levels of levodopa after the first intake and less 3-O-methyldopa appearance. The maximum levodopa concentrations were higher after the second levodopa intake, particularly with catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibition. The motor response to levodopa was better with catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibition than without, tolcapone was superior to entacapone. More continuous levodopa brain delivery and lower 3-O-methyldopa bioavailability caused a better motor response during catechol-O-methyltransferase inhibition.

  5. Fuzzy control of ethanol concentration and its application to maximum glutathione production in yeast fed-batch culture

    SciTech Connect

    Alfafara, C.G.; Miura, Keigo; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shioya, Suteaki; Suga, Kenichi ); Suzuki, Kazuyuki )

    1993-02-20

    A fuzzy logic controller (FLC) for the control of ethanol concentration was developed and utilized to realize the maximum production of glutathione (GSH) in yeast fed-batch culture. A conventional fuzzy controller, which uses the control error and its rate of change in the premise part of the linguistic rules, worked well when the initial error of ethanol concentration was small. However, when the initial error was large, controller overreaction resulted in an overshoot. An improved fuzzy controller was obtained to avoid controller overreaction by diagnostic determination of glucose emergency states', and then appropriate emergency control actions were implemented. The emergency control action was obtained by the use of weight coefficients and modification of linguistic rules to decrease the overreaction of the controller when the fermentation was in the emergency state. The improved fuzzy controller was able to control a constant ethanol concentration under conditions of large initial error.

  6. TiO2 dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC): linear relationship of maximum power point and anthocyanin concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmadian, Radin

    2010-09-01

    This study investigated the relationship of anthocyanin concentration from different organic fruit species and output voltage and current in a TiO2 dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) and hypothesized that fruits with greater anthocyanin concentration produce higher maximum power point (MPP) which would lead to higher current and voltage. Anthocyanin dye solution was made with crushing of a group of fresh fruits with different anthocyanin content in 2 mL of de-ionized water and filtration. Using these test fruit dyes, multiple DSSCs were assembled such that light enters through the TiO2 side of the cell. The full current-voltage (I-V) co-variations were measured using a 500 Ω potentiometer as a variable load. Point-by point current and voltage data pairs were measured at various incremental resistance values. The maximum power point (MPP) generated by the solar cell was defined as a dependent variable and the anthocyanin concentration in the fruit used in the DSSC as the independent variable. A regression model was used to investigate the linear relationship between study variables. Regression analysis showed a significant linear relationship between MPP and anthocyanin concentration with a p-value of 0.007. Fruits like blueberry and black raspberry with the highest anthocyanin content generated higher MPP. In a DSSC, a linear model may predict MPP based on the anthocyanin concentration. This model is the first step to find organic anthocyanin sources in the nature with the highest dye concentration to generate energy.

  7. New methodology to estimate Arctic sea ice concentration from SMOS combining brightness temperature differences in a maximum-likelihood estimator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gabarro, Carolina; Turiel, Antonio; Elosegui, Pedro; Pla-Resina, Joaquim A.; Portabella, Marcos

    2017-08-01

    Monitoring sea ice concentration is required for operational and climate studies in the Arctic Sea. Technologies used so far for estimating sea ice concentration have some limitations, for instance the impact of the atmosphere, the physical temperature of ice, and the presence of snow and melting. In the last years, L-band radiometry has been successfully used to study some properties of sea ice, remarkably sea ice thickness. However, the potential of satellite L-band observations for obtaining sea ice concentration had not yet been explored. In this paper, we present preliminary evidence showing that data from the Soil Moisture Ocean Salinity (SMOS) mission can be used to estimate sea ice concentration. Our method, based on a maximum-likelihood estimator (MLE), exploits the marked difference in the radiative properties of sea ice and seawater. In addition, the brightness temperatures of 100 % sea ice and 100 % seawater, as well as their combined values (polarization and angular difference), have been shown to be very stable during winter and spring, so they are robust to variations in physical temperature and other geophysical parameters. Therefore, we can use just two sets of tie points, one for summer and another for winter, for calculating sea ice concentration, leading to a more robust estimate. After analysing the full year 2014 in the entire Arctic, we have found that the sea ice concentration obtained with our method is well determined as compared to the Ocean and Sea Ice Satellite Application Facility (OSI SAF) dataset. However, when thin sea ice is present (ice thickness ≲ 0.6 m), the method underestimates the actual sea ice concentration. Our results open the way for a systematic exploitation of SMOS data for monitoring sea ice concentration, at least for specific seasons. Additionally, SMOS data can be synergistically combined with data from other sensors to monitor pan-Arctic sea ice conditions.

  8. Basement Fill Model Evaluation of Maximum Radionuclide Concentrations for Initial Suite of Radionuclides. Zion Station Restoration Project

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, Terry

    2014-12-10

    ZionSolutions is in the process of decommissioning the Zion Nuclear Power Plant in order to establish a new water treatment plant. There is some residual radioactive particles from the plant which need to be brought down to levels so an individual who receives water from the new treatment plant does not receive a radioactive dose in excess of 25 mrem/y⁻¹ as specified in 10 CFR 20 Subpart E. The objectives of this report are: (a) To present a simplified conceptual model for release from the buildings with residual subsurface structures that can be used to provide an upper bound on radionuclide concentrations in the fill material and the water in the interstitial spaces of the fill. (b) Provide maximum water concentrations and the corresponding amount of mass sorbed to the solid fill material that could occur in each building for use by ZSRP in selecting ROCs for detailed dose assessment calculations.

  9. Semi-empirical model of the maximum electron concentration in the ionosphere: Comparison with data from Toluca (México)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arriagada, Manuel; Cipagauta, Carolina; Foppiano, Alberto

    2013-05-01

    A simple semi-empirical model to determine the maximum electron concentration in the ionosphere (NmF2) for South American locations is used to calculate NmF2 for a northern hemisphere station in the same longitude sector. NmF2 is determined as the sum of two terms, one related to photochemical and diffusive processes and the other one to transport mechanisms. The model gives diurnal variations of NmF2 representative for winter, summer and equinox conditions, during intervals of high and low solar activity. Model NmF2 results are compared with ionosonde observations made at Toluca-México (19.3°N; 260°E). Differences between model results and observations are similar to those corresponding to comparisons with South American observations. It seems that further improvement of the model could be made by refining the latitude dependencies of coefficients used for the transport term.

  10. 40 CFR Table I-10 to Subpart I of... - Maximum Field Detection Limits Applicable to Fluorinated GHG Concentration Measurements for Stack...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Maximum Field Detection Limits Applicable to Fluorinated GHG Concentration Measurements for Stack Systems I Table I-10 to Subpart I of Part... Subpart I of Part 98—Maximum Field Detection Limits Applicable to Fluorinated GHG...

  11. A Procedure for Inter-Comparing the Skill of Regional-Scale Air Quality Model Simulations of Daily Maximum 8-Hour Ozone Concentrations

    EPA Science Inventory

    An operational model evaluation procedure is described to quantitatively assess the relative skill among several regionalscale air quality models simulating various percentiles of the cumulative frequency distribution of observed daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations. Bootstrap ...

  12. 10 CFR 850.22 - Permissible exposure limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible exposure limit. 850.22 Section 850.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.22... concentration of beryllium greater than the permissible exposure limit established in 29 CFR 1910.1000, as...

  13. 10 CFR 850.22 - Permissible exposure limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible exposure limit. 850.22 Section 850.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.22... concentration of beryllium greater than the permissible exposure limit established in 29 CFR 1910.1000, as...

  14. 10 CFR 850.22 - Permissible exposure limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible exposure limit. 850.22 Section 850.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.22... concentration of beryllium greater than the permissible exposure limit established in 29 CFR 1910.1000, as...

  15. 10 CFR 850.22 - Permissible exposure limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible exposure limit. 850.22 Section 850.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.22... concentration of beryllium greater than the permissible exposure limit established in 29 CFR 1910.1000, as...

  16. 10 CFR 850.22 - Permissible exposure limit.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible exposure limit. 850.22 Section 850.22 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY CHRONIC BERYLLIUM DISEASE PREVENTION PROGRAM Specific Program Requirements § 850.22... concentration of beryllium greater than the permissible exposure limit established in 29 CFR 1910.1000, as...

  17. Appropriate maximum holding times for analysis of total suspended solids concentration in water samples taken from open-channel waterways.

    PubMed

    Oudyn, Frederik W; Lyons, David J; Pringle, M J

    2012-01-01

    Many scientific laboratories follow, as standard practice, a relatively short maximum holding time (within 7 days) for the analysis of total suspended solids (TSS) in environmental water samples. In this study we have subsampled from bulk water samples stored at ∼4 °C in the dark, then analysed for TSS at time intervals up to 105 days after collection. The nonsignificant differences in TSS results observed over time demonstrates that storage at ∼4 °C in the dark is an effective method of preserving samples for TSS analysis, far past the 7-day standard practice. Extending the maximum holding time will ease the pressure on sample collectors and laboratory staff who until now have had to determine TSS within an impractically short period.

  18. Effect of maximum torque according to the permanent magnet configuration of a brushless dc motor with concentrated winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kab-Jae; Kim, Sol; Lee, Ju; Oh, Jae-Eung

    2003-05-01

    A brushless dc (BLDC) motor, which has a permanent magnet (PM) component, is a potential candidate for hybrid or electric vehicle applications. Minimizing the BLDC motor size is an important requirement for application. This requirement is usually satisfied by adopting a high performance permanent magnet or improved winding methods. The PM configuration is also a critical point in design. This article presents the effect of the PM configuration on motor performance, especially the maximum torque. Four representative BLDC motor types are analytically investigated under the condition that the volume of the PM and magnetic material is constant. An embedded interior permanent magnet motor has the best torque performance the maximum torque of which is more than 1.5 times larger than that of the surface mounted permanent magnet motor. The performance of back electromotive force, instantaneous torques is also investigated.

  19. Managing clinical research permissions electronically

    PubMed Central

    Sanderson, Iain C; Obeid, Jihad S; Madathil, Kapil Chalil; Gerken, Katherine; Fryar, Katrina; Rugg, Daniel; Alstad, Colin E; Alexander, Randall; Brady, Kathleen T; Gramopadhye, Anand K; Moskowitz, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Background One mechanism to increase participation in research is to solicit potential research participants’ general willingness to be recruited into clinical trials. Such research permissions and consents typically are collected on paper upon patient registration. We describe a novel method of capturing this information electronically. Purpose The objective is to enable the collection of research permissions and informed consent data electronically to permit tracking of potential research participants’ interest in current and future research involvement and to provide a foundation for facilitating the research workflow. Methods The project involved systematic analysis focused on key areas, including existing business practices, registration processes, and permission collection workflows, and ascertaining best practices for presenting consent information to users via tablet technology and capturing permissions data. Analysis was followed by an iterative software development cycle with feedback from subject matter experts and users. Results An initial version of the software was piloted at one institution in South Carolina for a period of 1 year, during which consents and permission were collected during 2524 registrations of patients. The captured research permission data were transmitted to a clinical data warehouse. The software was later released as an open-source package that can be adopted for use by other institutions. Limitations There are significant ethical, legal, and informatics challenges that must be addressed at an institution to deploy such a system. We have not yet assessed the long-term impact of the system on recruitment of patients to clinical trials. Conclusions We propose that by improving the ability to track willing potential research participants, we can improve recruitment into clinical trials and, in the process, improve patient education by introducing multimedia to informed consent documents. PMID:23785065

  20. Electronic reserves: copyright and permissions

    PubMed Central

    Graves, Karen J.

    2000-01-01

    Electronic reserves present a new service option for libraries to provide needed materials during hours that the library is not open and to user groups located some distance from library collections. Possible changes to current copyright law and publishers permissions policies have delayed the development of electronic reserves in many libraries. This paper reviews the current state of electronic reserves materials in the publishing and library communities and presents the results of a survey of publishers to determine permissions policies for electronic materials. Issues of concern to both libraries and publishers are discussed. PMID:10658960

  1. Electronic reserves: copyright and permissions.

    PubMed

    Graves, K J

    2000-01-01

    Electronic reserves present a new service option for libraries to provide needed materials during hours that the library is not open and to user groups located some distance from library collections. Possible changes to current copyright law and publishers permissions policies have delayed the development of electronic reserves in many libraries. This paper reviews the current state of electronic reserves materials in the publishing and library communities and presents the results of a survey of publishers to determine permissions policies for electronic materials. Issues of concern to both libraries and publishers are discussed.

  2. Justification of permissible doses of radiation during prolonged space flights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grigoryev, Y. G.; Abel, K.; Varteres, V.; Nilolov, N.; Karpfel, Z.; Prislichka, M.

    1974-01-01

    Maximum permissible radiation doses for astronauts are reported based on chronic radiation experiments with dogs and actual measurements during space flights. Observed were clinical conditions, peripheral blood and marrow, the state of the cardiovascular system, higher nervous activity, the state of the vestibular analyzer, the organ of vision, spermatogenic function and the ability to reproduce, the state of immunity and a number of biological indices in blood and tissues. The following maximum permissible doses are determined as preliminary values: 1 year of flight - 200 rem; 2 years of flight - 250 rem; 3 years of flight - 275 rem.

  3. When Permission Forms Work Best

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    Public schools routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities of potential liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. This article presents a case involving a student who sustained bicycle injuries…

  4. When Permission Forms Work Best

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zirkel, Perry A.

    2005-01-01

    Public schools routinely require permission or release forms for field trips and other activities of potential liability. The legal status of such forms varies, but they are generally considered neither rock-solid protection nor legally valueless in terms of immunity. This article presents a case involving a student who sustained bicycle injuries…

  5. Permissive hypofiltration: an alternative view

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    If permissive hypercapnia is used in the context of protective ventilation for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, it must be highlighted that the alveoli in these patients are still exposed to significant stress. Similarly, early renal replacement therapy is not necessarily a protective therapy for acute kidney injury and loop diuretics are not necessarily harmful. It is conceivable that early initiation of 'protective' low-dose (10 ml/kg/h) continuous renal replacement therapy with zero balanced ultrafiltration in association with administration of (high dose) diuretics may help to rest the kidneys while ensuring preservation of urine output. PMID:23136903

  6. Permissive hypofiltration: an alternative view.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Zaccaria; Romagnoli, Stefano; Emma, Francesco

    2012-11-08

    If permissive hypercapnia is used in the context of protective ventilation for patients with acute respiratory distress syndrome, it must be highlighted that the alveoli in these patients are still exposed to significant stress. Similarly, early renal replacement therapy is not necessarily a protective therapy for acute kidney injury and loop diuretics are not necessarily harmful. It is conceivable that early initiation of 'protective' low-dose (10 ml/kg/h) continuous renal replacement therapy with zero balanced ultrafiltration in association with administration of (high dose) diuretics may help to rest the kidneys while ensuring preservation of urine output.

  7. Concentration, clay mineral composition and Coulter counter size distribution of suspended sediment in the turbidity maximum of the Jiaojiang river estuary, Zhejiang, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, B. G.; Eisma, D.; Xie, Q. Ch.; Kalf, J.; Li, Y.; Xia, X.

    1999-09-01

    Measurements of current velocities, concentrations of suspended matter and Coulter counter size distributions of the suspended matter during the tidal cycle at the surface, at mid-depth and near to the bottom were carried out during spring and neap tide in the Jiaojiang river estuary, Zhejiang, China. The results indicate that a lutocline was present during most of the tidal cycle, except during the highest tides when the suspended-matter concentrations were approximately uniform over the entire water depth. Suspended-matter concentrations showed a relation with maximum flow velocities in the surface water and with increasing flow velocities in the bottom water, with regular deposition and resuspension during the tidal cycle. The clay mineral composition of the suspended matter indicated that most of the suspended matter was supplied by the Chang Jiang river. There was probably also some local supply and local sorting. The suspended-matter particle size, measured with a Coulter counter, became larger (with a larger standard deviation) when the suspended-matter concentration increased, and smaller when the suspended-matter concentration decreased. Size sorting during the tidal cycle indicated deflocculation and reflocculation processes; break-up of about 10 to 20% of the flocs in suspension is sufficient to produce the shift in the Coulter counter size distributions observed. This led to the conclusion that the trend in the smectite concentration in the estuary was the result of local sorting of smectite-containing particles after floc break-up.

  8. Particulate organic matter higher concentrations, terrestrial sources and losses in bottom waters of the turbidity maximum, Delaware Estuary, U.S.A.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermes, Anna L.; Sikes, Elisabeth L.

    2016-10-01

    The pathway and fate of land-derived suspended particulate organic matter (POM) as it passes through estuaries remains a poorly constrained component of coastal carbon dynamics. The δ13C of bulk POC (particulate organic carbon; δ13C-POC) and n-alkane biomarkers were used to assess the proportion of algal- and land- (vascular plant) derived POM through the Delaware Estuary, on five cruises in 2010-2011. We found that POC was highly correlated with suspended sediment concentrations (SSC). Higher SSC was present in bottom waters, causing bottom waters to have consistently higher concentrations of POC than surface waters, with the bottom waters of the estuarine turbidity maximum (ETM) exhibiting maximum POC concentrations for all seasons and flow regimes. Algal-derived POM seasonally affected the δ13C-POC and n-alkane geochemical signatures of surface waters, whereas bottom waters were dominated by vascular plant-derived POM. δ13C-POC results suggested a gradual loss in vascular plant-derived POM between the riverine and marine endmember stations. In contrast, n-alkane concentrations peaked in bottom waters of the ETM at 2-5 times surface water concentrations. Indices of the relative proportions of n-alkanes and n-alkanes as a proportion of total POC had their levels decrease considerably downstream of the ETM. These biomarker analyses suggest enhanced loss of land-derived material across the ETM and that the ETM acts as a geochemical filter for vascular plant-derived POM in a classic well mixed estuary.

  9. Selection of suitable mineral acid and its concentration for biphasic dilute acid hydrolysis of the sodium dithionite delignified Prosopis juliflora to hydrolyze maximum holocellulose.

    PubMed

    Naseeruddin, Shaik; Desai, Suseelendra; Venkateswar Rao, L

    2016-02-01

    Two grams of delignified substrate at 10% (w/v) level was subjected to biphasic dilute acid hydrolysis using phosphoric acid, hydrochloric acid and sulfuric acid separately at 110 °C for 10 min in phase-I and 121 °C for 15 min in phase-II. Combinations of acid concentrations in two phases were varied for maximum holocellulose hydrolysis with release of fewer inhibitors, to select the suitable acid and its concentration. Among three acids, sulfuric acid in combination of 1 & 2% (v/v) hydrolyzed maximum holocellulose of 25.44±0.44% releasing 0.51±0.02 g/L of phenolics and 0.12±0.002 g/L of furans, respectively. Further, hydrolysis of delignified substrate using selected acid by varying reaction time and temperature hydrolyzed 55.58±1.78% of holocellulose releasing 2.11±0.07 g/L and 1.37±0.03 g/L of phenolics and furans, respectively at conditions of 110 °C for 45 min in phase-I & 121 °C for 60 min in phase-II. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Calculated maximum Hl ground-level concentrations downwind from launch pad aborts of the space shuttle and Titan 3 C vehicles at Kennedy Space Center

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dumbauld, R. K.; Bjorklund, J. R.

    1972-01-01

    A quantitative assessment is described of the potential environmental hazard posed by the atmospheric release of HCl resulting from the burning of solid propellant during two hypothetical on-pad aborts of the Titan 3 C and space shuttle vehicles at Kennedy Space Center. In one pad-abort situation, it is assumed that the cases of the two solid-propellant engines are ruptured and the burning propellant falls to the ground in the immediate vicinity of the launch pad where it continues to burn for 5 minutes. In the other pad-abort situation considered, one of the two solid engines on each vehicle is assumed to ignite and burn at the normal rate while the vehicle remains on the launch pad. Calculations of maximum HCl ground-level concentration for the above on-pad abort situations were made using the computerized NASA/MSFC multilayer diffusion models in conjunction with appropriate meteorological and source inputs. Three meteorological regimes are considered-fall, spring, and afternoon sea-breeze. Source inputs for the hazard calculations were developed. The principal result of the calculations is that maximum ground-level HCl concentrations at distances greater than 1 kilometer from the launch pad are less than 3 parts per million in all cases considered.

  11. Measurement of absolute concentrations of individual compounds in metabolite mixtures by gradient-selective time-zero 1H-13C HSQC with two concentration references and fast maximum likelihood reconstruction analysis.

    PubMed

    Hu, Kaifeng; Ellinger, James J; Chylla, Roger A; Markley, John L

    2011-12-15

    Time-zero 2D (13)C HSQC (HSQC(0)) spectroscopy offers advantages over traditional 2D NMR for quantitative analysis of solutions containing a mixture of compounds because the signal intensities are directly proportional to the concentrations of the constituents. The HSQC(0) spectrum is derived from a series of spectra collected with increasing repetition times within the basic HSQC block by extrapolating the repetition time to zero. Here we present an alternative approach to data collection, gradient-selective time-zero (1)H-(13)C HSQC(0) in combination with fast maximum likelihood reconstruction (FMLR) data analysis and the use of two concentration references for absolute concentration determination. Gradient-selective data acquisition results in cleaner spectra, and NMR data can be acquired in both constant-time and non-constant-time mode. Semiautomatic data analysis is supported by the FMLR approach, which is used to deconvolute the spectra and extract peak volumes. The peak volumes obtained from this analysis are converted to absolute concentrations by reference to the peak volumes of two internal reference compounds of known concentration: DSS (4,4-dimethyl-4-silapentane-1-sulfonic acid) at the low concentration limit (which also serves as chemical shift reference) and MES (2-(N-morpholino)ethanesulfonic acid) at the high concentration limit. The linear relationship between peak volumes and concentration is better defined with two references than with one, and the measured absolute concentrations of individual compounds in the mixture are more accurate. We compare results from semiautomated gsHSQC(0) with those obtained by the original manual phase-cycled HSQC(0) approach. The new approach is suitable for automatic metabolite profiling by simultaneous quantification of multiple metabolites in a complex mixture.

  12. 21 CFR 610.17 - Permissible combinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permissible combinations. 610.17 Section 610.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.17 Permissible combinations...

  13. 21 CFR 610.17 - Permissible combinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2011-04-01 2010-04-01 true Permissible combinations. 610.17 Section 610.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.17 Permissible combinations...

  14. 47 CFR 101.703 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.703 Section 101.703 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Common Carrier Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave Service § 101.703 Permissible...

  15. 47 CFR 101.703 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.703 Section 101.703 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Common Carrier Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave Service § 101.703 Permissible...

  16. 47 CFR 27.802 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.802 Section 27.802 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.802 Permissible communications. Licensees in...

  17. 47 CFR 27.802 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.802 Section 27.802 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.802 Permissible communications. Licensees in...

  18. 47 CFR 27.802 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.802 Section 27.802 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.802 Permissible communications. Licensees in...

  19. 47 CFR 27.802 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.802 Section 27.802 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.802 Permissible communications. Licensees in...

  20. 47 CFR 27.802 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.802 Section 27.802 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1.4 GHz Band § 27.802 Permissible communications. Licensees in...

  1. 47 CFR 27.2 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.2 Section 27.2 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES General Information § 27.2 Permissible communications. (a) Miscellaneous...

  2. 46 CFR 565.8 - Special permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 9 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Special permission. 565.8 Section 565.8 Shipping FEDERAL MARITIME COMMISSION REGULATIONS AND ACTIONS TO ADDRESS RESTRICTIVE FOREIGN MARITIME PRACTICES CONTROLLED CARRIERS § 565.8 Special permission. Section 8(d) of the Shipping Act of 1984 (46 U.S.C. 40501(e...

  3. 47 CFR 90.1205 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1205 Section 90.1205... § 90.1205 Permissible operations. (a) Unattended and continuous operation is permitted. (b) Voice, data and video operations are permitted. (c) Aeronautical mobile operations are prohibited....

  4. 47 CFR 27.902 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.902 Section 27.902 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1670-1675 MHz Band § 27.902 Permissible communications....

  5. 47 CFR 27.902 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.902 Section 27.902 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1670-1675 MHz Band § 27.902 Permissible communications....

  6. 47 CFR 27.902 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.902 Section 27.902 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1670-1675 MHz Band § 27.902 Permissible communications....

  7. 47 CFR 27.902 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.902 Section 27.902 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1670-1675 MHz Band § 27.902 Permissible communications....

  8. 47 CFR 27.902 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible communications. 27.902 Section 27.902 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES MISCELLANEOUS WIRELESS COMMUNICATIONS SERVICES 1670-1675 MHz Band § 27.902 Permissible communications....

  9. 12 CFR 28.4 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... the FRB's Regulation K, 12 CFR part 211. (c) Foreign operations guarantees. A national bank may... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible activities. 28.4 Section 28.4 Banks... Foreign Operations of National Banks § 28.4 Permissible activities. (a) General. Subject to the applicable...

  10. 12 CFR 28.4 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... the FRB's Regulation K, 12 CFR part 211. (c) Foreign operations guarantees. A national bank may... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible activities. 28.4 Section 28.4 Banks... Foreign Operations of National Banks § 28.4 Permissible activities. (a) General. Subject to the applicable...

  11. 12 CFR 28.4 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... the FRB's Regulation K, 12 CFR part 211. (c) Foreign operations guarantees. A national bank may... 12 Banks and Banking 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible activities. 28.4 Section 28.4 Banks... Foreign Operations of National Banks § 28.4 Permissible activities. (a) General. Subject to the applicable...

  12. 21 CFR 610.17 - Permissible combinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Permissible combinations. 610.17 Section 610.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.17 Permissible combinations...

  13. 21 CFR 610.17 - Permissible combinations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 7 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permissible combinations. 610.17 Section 610.17 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) BIOLOGICS GENERAL BIOLOGICAL PRODUCTS STANDARDS General Provisions § 610.17 Permissible combinations...

  14. Determination and validation of an aquatic Maximum Acceptable Concentration-Environmental Quality Standard (MAC-EQS) value for the agricultural fungicide azoxystrobin.

    PubMed

    Rodrigues, Elsa Teresa; Pardal, Miguel Ângelo; Gante, Cristiano; Loureiro, João; Lopes, Isabel

    2017-02-01

    The main goal of the present study was to determine and validate an aquatic Maximum Acceptable Concentration-Environmental Quality Standard (MAC-EQS) value for the agricultural fungicide azoxystrobin (AZX). Assessment factors were applied to short-term toxicity data using the lowest EC50 and after the Species Sensitivity Distribution (SSD) method. Both ways of EQS generation were applied to a freshwater toxicity dataset for AZX based on available data, and to marine toxicity datasets for AZX and Ortiva(®) (a commercial formulation of AZX) obtained by the present study. A high interspecific variability in AZX sensitivity was observed in all datasets, being the copepoda Eudiaptomus graciloides (LC50,48h = 38 μg L(-1)) and the gastropod Gibbula umbilicalis (LC50,96h = 13 μg L(-1)) the most sensitive freshwater and marine species, respectively. MAC-EQS values derived using the lowest EC50 (≤0.38 μg L(-1)) were more protective than those derived using the SSD method (≤3.2 μg L(-1)). After comparing the MAC-EQS values estimated in the present study to the smallest AA-EQS available, which protect against the occurrence of prolonged exposure of AZX, the MAC-EQS values derived using the lowest EC50 were considered overprotective and a MAC-EQS of 1.8 μg L(-1) was validated and recommended for AZX for the water column. This value was derived from marine toxicity data, which highlights the importance of testing marine organisms. Moreover, Ortiva affects the most sensitive marine species to a greater extent than AZX, and marine species are more sensitive than freshwater species to AZX. A risk characterization ratio higher than one allowed to conclude that AZX might pose a high risk to the aquatic environment. Also, in a wider conclusion, before new pesticides are approved, we suggest to improve the Tier 1 prospective Ecological Risk Assessment by increasing the number of short-term data, and apply the SSD approach, in order to ensure the safety of

  15. Maximum Jailbreak

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singleton, B.

    First formulated one hundred and fifty years ago by the heretical scholar Nikolai Federov, the doctrine of cosmism begins with an absolute refusal to treat the most basic factors conditioning life on Earth ­ gravity and death ­ as necessary constraints on action. As manifest through the intoxicated cheers of its early advocates that humans should storm the heavens and conquer death, cosmism's foundational gesture was to conceive of the earth as a trap. Its duty was therefore to understand the duty of philosophy, economics and design to be the creation of means to escape it. This could be regarded as a jailbreak at the maximum possible scale, a heist in which the human species could steal itself from the vault of the Earth. After several decades of relative disinterest new space ventures are inspiring scientific, technological and popular imaginations, this essay explores what kind of cosmism might be constructed today. In this paper cosmism's position as a means of escape is both reviewed and evaluated by reflecting on the potential of technology that actually can help us achieve its aims and also through the lens and state-ofthe-art philosophy of accelerationism, which seeks to outrun modern tropes by intensifying them.

  16. 12 CFR 28.4 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... approval process, if any, a national bank may engage in any activity in a foreign country that is: (1) Permissible for a national bank in the United States; and (2) Usual in connection with the business of banking in the country where it transacts business. (b) Additional activities. In addition to its...

  17. 12 CFR 28.4 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... approval process, if any, a national bank may engage in any activity in a foreign country that is: (1) Permissible for a national bank in the United States; and (2) Usual in connection with the business of banking in the country where it transacts business. (b) Additional activities. In addition to its...

  18. 7 CFR 29.39 - Permissive inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissive inspection. 29.39 Section 29.39 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  19. 45 CFR 1638.4 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... as outreach, public service announcements, maintaining an ongoing presence in a courthouse to provide... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible activities. 1638.4 Section 1638.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION...

  20. 45 CFR 1638.4 - Permissible activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... as outreach, public service announcements, maintaining an ongoing presence in a courthouse to provide... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible activities. 1638.4 Section 1638.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION...

  1. 15 CFR 240.3 - Permissible sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STANDARDS FOR BARRELS BARRELS AND OTHER CONTAINERS FOR LIME § 240.3 Permissible sizes. Lime in barrels shall be packed only in barrels containing 280 pounds or 180 pounds, net weight. For the purposes of this section the word “barrel” is defined as a cylindrical or...

  2. 15 CFR 240.3 - Permissible sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STANDARDS FOR BARRELS BARRELS AND OTHER CONTAINERS FOR LIME § 240.3 Permissible sizes. Lime in barrels shall be packed only in barrels containing 280 pounds or 180 pounds, net weight. For the purposes of this section the word “barrel” is defined as a cylindrical or...

  3. 15 CFR 240.3 - Permissible sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STANDARDS FOR BARRELS BARRELS AND OTHER CONTAINERS FOR LIME § 240.3 Permissible sizes. Lime in barrels shall be packed only in barrels containing 280 pounds or 180 pounds, net weight. For the purposes of this section the word “barrel” is defined as a cylindrical or...

  4. 15 CFR 240.3 - Permissible sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STANDARDS FOR BARRELS BARRELS AND OTHER CONTAINERS FOR LIME § 240.3 Permissible sizes. Lime in barrels shall be packed only in barrels containing 280 pounds or 180 pounds, net weight. For the purposes of this section the word “barrel” is defined as a cylindrical or...

  5. 15 CFR 240.3 - Permissible sizes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... STANDARDS AND TECHNOLOGY, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE STANDARDS FOR BARRELS BARRELS AND OTHER CONTAINERS FOR LIME § 240.3 Permissible sizes. Lime in barrels shall be packed only in barrels containing 280 pounds or 180 pounds, net weight. For the purposes of this section the word “barrel” is defined as a cylindrical or...

  6. 47 CFR 101.511 - Permissible services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... authorization. (b) Stations may render any kind of digital communications service consistent with the Commission... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.511 Permissible services....

  7. 47 CFR 95.1209 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Medical Device Radiocommunication Service (MedRadio) § 95.1209 Permissible... a medical implant device or medical body-worn device that has been implanted or placed on the person... that is not included with a medical implant or medical body-worn device. Wireless retransmission...

  8. 47 CFR 90.1305 - Permissible operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible operations. 90.1305 Section 90.1305 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PRIVATE LAND... operations. Use of the 3650-3700 MHz band must be consistent with the allocations for this band as set...

  9. 7 CFR 29.56 - Permissive inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissive inspection. 29.56 Section 29.56 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing..., handling, conditioning, or packing of such tobacco. Special tests and services may be performed...

  10. 7 CFR 29.39 - Permissive inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissive inspection. 29.39 Section 29.39 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO...

  11. 7 CFR 29.39 - Permissive inspection.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissive inspection. 29.39 Section 29.39 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO...

  12. 47 CFR 101.511 - Permissible services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.511 Permissible services. (a... authorization. (b) Stations may render any kind of digital communications service consistent with the...

  13. 47 CFR 101.511 - Permissible services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.511 Permissible services. (a... authorization. (b) Stations may render any kind of digital communications service consistent with the...

  14. 47 CFR 101.511 - Permissible services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.511 Permissible services. (a... authorization. (b) Stations may render any kind of digital communications service consistent with the...

  15. 47 CFR 101.511 - Permissible services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES 24 GHz Service and Digital Electronic Message Service § 101.511 Permissible services. (a... authorization. (b) Stations may render any kind of digital communications service consistent with the...

  16. 18 CFR 341.14 - Special permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ....14 Section 341.14 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY REGULATORY COMMISSION... requested waiver. If the application requests permission to make changes in joint tariffs, it must state... refund, until the Commission has had a full 30-day review period in which to process the filing....

  17. 47 CFR 101.1307 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.1307 Section 101.1307 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems General Provisions § 101.1307...

  18. 47 CFR 101.703 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.703 Section 101.703 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Common Carrier Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave Service § 101.703...

  19. 47 CFR 101.1307 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.1307 Section 101.1307 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems General Provisions § 101.1307...

  20. 47 CFR 101.1307 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.1307 Section 101.1307 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multiple Address Systems General Provisions § 101.1307...

  1. 47 CFR 101.703 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.703 Section 101.703 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Common Carrier Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave Service § 101.703...

  2. 47 CFR 101.703 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible communications. 101.703 Section 101.703 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Common Carrier Fixed Point-to-Point Microwave Service § 101.703...

  3. 47 CFR 95.1009 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible communications. 95.1009 Section 95.1009 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1009...

  4. 47 CFR 95.1009 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible communications. 95.1009 Section 95.1009 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1009...

  5. 47 CFR 95.1009 - Permissible communications.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible communications. 95.1009 Section 95.1009 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES PERSONAL RADIO SERVICES Low Power Radio Service (LPRS) General Provisions § 95.1009...

  6. 47 CFR 78.11 - Permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 78.11 Permissible service. (a) CARS stations are authorized to relay... systems or other eligible systems. LDS stations are authorized to relay television broadcast and...

  7. 47 CFR 78.11 - Permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 78.11 Permissible service. (a) CARS stations are authorized to relay... systems or other eligible systems. LDS stations are authorized to relay television broadcast and...

  8. 47 CFR 78.11 - Permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 78.11 Permissible service. (a) CARS stations are authorized to relay... systems or other eligible systems. LDS stations are authorized to relay television broadcast and...

  9. 47 CFR 78.11 - Permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 78.11 Permissible service. (a) CARS stations are authorized to relay... systems or other eligible systems. LDS stations are authorized to relay television broadcast and...

  10. 47 CFR 78.11 - Permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) BROADCAST RADIO SERVICES CABLE TELEVISION RELAY SERVICE Applications and Licenses § 78.11 Permissible service. (a) CARS stations are authorized to relay... systems or other eligible systems. LDS stations are authorized to relay television broadcast and...

  11. 36 CFR 264.12 - Use without permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Symbol § 264.12 Use without permission... Monument may depict the official Monument symbol without special permission from Forest Service officials. ...

  12. 36 CFR 264.12 - Use without permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Symbol § 264.12 Use without permission... Monument may depict the official Monument symbol without special permission from Forest Service officials. ...

  13. The knocking characteristics of fuels in relation to maximum permissible performance of aircraft engines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rothrock, A M; Biermann, Arnold E

    1939-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the relationship of various engine factors to knock in preignition in an aircraft engine. From this analysis and from the available experimental data, a method of evaluating the knocking characteristics of the fuel in an aircraft-engine cylinder is suggested.

  14. A weighted method for reducing measurement uncertainty below that which results from maximum permissible error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiora, Józef; Kozyra, Andrzej; Wiora, Alicja

    2016-03-01

    According to recent findings, it is possible to computationally determine a measurement result (value and uncertainty), using a special measurement method, in which this uncertainty is less than that assessed directly from experiments using Type B evaluation. The method works well only if the quantity is additive and its uncertainty is constant, i.e. independent of the measurement value. In the paper, a generalisation is made that also allows for the application of similar reasoning to quantities with variable uncertainties. The generalisation is obtained thanks to the replacement of the least squares optimisation, used in the derivation of the first method, with the weighted least squares. Examples with models of quantities that have variable uncertainties are described to show circumstances where improvements are significant. It can be said that the method described always improves uncertainties of additive quantities, but the improvement is not always significant. Suggestions to obtain the best improvement are given according to the analysis performed. A real laboratory experiment of a resistance measurement, with its uncertainty dominated by current measurement, was conducted to show how the method works.

  15. VVal-79 Maximum Permissible Tissue Tension Table for Thalmann Algorithm Support of Air Diving

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-01

    22 Figure 18. Total decompression stop times (in-water and chamber ) in air SurDO2 schedules prescribed by the Thalmann Algorithm with VVal-77...Total decompression stop times (in-water and chamber ) in air SurDO2 schedules prescribed by the Thalmann Algorithm with VVal-77 and VVal-79, in...stop times (including both in-water and chamber stops) in air with surface decompression using oxygen (SurDO2) schedules prescribed by the Thalmann

  16. An investigation of dynamic surface tension, critical micelle concentration, and aggregation number of three nonionic surfactants using NMR, time-resolved fluorescence quenching, and maximum bubble pressure tensiometry.

    PubMed

    Kjellin, U R Mikael; Reimer, Johan; Hansson, Per

    2003-06-15

    Several physicochemical properties have been determined for N-dodecyllactobionamide (LABA), maltose 6'-O-dodecanoate (C12-maltose ester), and tetra(ethylene oxide) dodecyl amide (TEDAd). The increase in the flexibility of the sugar headgroup, enabling more possible molecular conformations, reduces the minimum area/molecule at the liquid-vapor interface obtained at the critical micelle concentration (cmc). The obtained cmc's were 0.35 mM (LABA), 0.3 mM (C12-maltose ester), and 0.5 mM (TEDAd). The monomer diffusion coefficient decreased with the molecular weight and increasing headgroup flexibility of the sugar headgroup, and values were in the range from 3.1 x 10(-10) to 3.6 x 10(-10) m2/s. The micelle diffusion coefficients (0.46 x 10(-10) to 0.68 x 10(-10) m2/s) indicated that the TEDAd micelles deviated most from spherical shape. The micelle aggregation numbers determined by time-resolved fluorescence quenching (TRFQ) were estimated to be 120+/-10 (LABA), 90+/-10 (C12-maltose ester), and 130+/-10 (TEDAd). The dynamic surface tension measurements show that the adsorption of TEDAd onto the liquid-vapor interface at short surface lifetimes is diffusion-limited, whereas an adsorption barrier is present for the sugar surfactants. The analysis of the dynamic surface tension data above the cmc shows that the rate of demicellization is faster for TEDAd than for the two sugar-based surfactants.

  17. 5 CFR 890.1022 - Contesting proposed permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contesting proposed permissive debarments. 890.1022 Section 890.1022 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Against Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1022 Contesting proposed permissive...

  18. 5 CFR 890.1014 - Notice of proposed permissive debarment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Notice of proposed permissive debarment. 890.1014 Section 890.1014 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Against Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1014 Notice of proposed permissive...

  19. 5 CFR 890.1014 - Notice of proposed permissive debarment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Notice of proposed permissive debarment. 890.1014 Section 890.1014 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Against Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1014 Notice of proposed permissive...

  20. 5 CFR 890.1022 - Contesting proposed permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Contesting proposed permissive debarments. 890.1022 Section 890.1022 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL... Against Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1022 Contesting proposed permissive...

  1. 25 CFR 169.4 - Permission to survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permission to survey. 169.4 Section 169.4 Indians BUREAU... Permission to survey. Anyone desiring to obtain permission to survey for a right-of-way across individually... to cover twice the estimated damages which may be sustained as a result of the survey. With...

  2. 25 CFR 169.4 - Permission to survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permission to survey. 169.4 Section 169.4 Indians BUREAU... Permission to survey. Anyone desiring to obtain permission to survey for a right-of-way across individually... to cover twice the estimated damages which may be sustained as a result of the survey. With...

  3. 25 CFR 169.4 - Permission to survey.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permission to survey. 169.4 Section 169.4 Indians BUREAU... Permission to survey. Anyone desiring to obtain permission to survey for a right-of-way across individually... to cover twice the estimated damages which may be sustained as a result of the survey. With...

  4. A Comparison of Authoritarian and Permissive Wording of Hypnotic Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Robert B.; Church, Jay K.

    The authoritarian/permissive dimension of hypnosis refers to the manner in which hypnotic suggestions are phrased. In the authoritarian mode suggestions imply the subject is under control of the hypnotist; permissive suggestions are phrased to emphasize the subject's own thinking. To compare the permissive suggestions of the Creative Imagination…

  5. 33 CFR 401.68 - Explosives Permission Letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Explosives Permission Letter. 401..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.68 Explosives Permission Letter. (a) A Seaway Explosives Permission Letter is required for an explosive vessel in...

  6. 33 CFR 401.68 - Explosives Permission Letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Explosives Permission Letter. 401..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.68 Explosives Permission Letter. (a) A Seaway Explosives Permission Letter is required for an explosive vessel in...

  7. 33 CFR 401.68 - Explosives Permission Letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Explosives Permission Letter. 401..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.68 Explosives Permission Letter. (a) A Seaway Explosives Permission Letter is required for an explosive vessel in...

  8. 33 CFR 401.68 - Explosives Permission Letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Explosives Permission Letter. 401..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.68 Explosives Permission Letter. (a) A Seaway Explosives Permission Letter is required for an explosive vessel in...

  9. 33 CFR 401.68 - Explosives permission letter.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 3 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Explosives permission letter. 401..., DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION SEAWAY REGULATIONS AND RULES Regulations Dangerous Cargo § 401.68 Explosives permission letter. (a) A Seaway Explosives Permission Letter is required for an explosive vessel in...

  10. 5 CFR 890.1011 - Bases for permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bases for permissive debarments. 890.1011 Section 890.1011 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1011 Bases for permissive debarments. (a)...

  11. 5 CFR 890.1011 - Bases for permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bases for permissive debarments. 890.1011 Section 890.1011 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1011 Bases for permissive debarments. (a)...

  12. 5 CFR 890.1011 - Bases for permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bases for permissive debarments. 890.1011 Section 890.1011 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1011 Bases for permissive debarments. (a)...

  13. A Comparison of Authoritarian and Permissive Wording of Hypnotic Suggestions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle, Robert B.; Church, Jay K.

    The authoritarian/permissive dimension of hypnosis refers to the manner in which hypnotic suggestions are phrased. In the authoritarian mode suggestions imply the subject is under control of the hypnotist; permissive suggestions are phrased to emphasize the subject's own thinking. To compare the permissive suggestions of the Creative Imagination…

  14. 30 CFR 75.503 - Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment...-General § 75.503 Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. The operator of each coal mine shall maintain in permissible condition all electric face equipment required by §§ 75.500, 75.501, 75.504 to be...

  15. 30 CFR 75.503 - Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment...-General § 75.503 Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. The operator of each coal mine shall maintain in permissible condition all electric face equipment required by §§ 75.500, 75.501, 75.504 to be...

  16. 30 CFR 75.503 - Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment...-General § 75.503 Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. The operator of each coal mine shall maintain in permissible condition all electric face equipment required by §§ 75.500, 75.501, 75.504 to be...

  17. 30 CFR 75.503 - Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment...-General § 75.503 Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. The operator of each coal mine shall maintain in permissible condition all electric face equipment required by §§ 75.500, 75.501, 75.504 to be...

  18. 30 CFR 75.503 - Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment...-General § 75.503 Permissible electric face equipment; maintenance. The operator of each coal mine shall maintain in permissible condition all electric face equipment required by §§ 75.500, 75.501, 75.504 to be...

  19. Role-based access control permissions

    DOEpatents

    Staggs, Kevin P.; Markham, Thomas R.; Hull Roskos, Julie J.; Chernoguzov, Alexander

    2017-04-25

    Devices, systems, and methods for role-based access control permissions are disclosed. One method includes a policy decision point that receives up-to-date security context information from one or more outside sources to determine whether to grant access for a data client to a portion of the system and creates an access vector including the determination; receiving, via a policy agent, a request by the data client for access to the portion of the computing system by the data client, wherein the policy agent checks to ensure there is a session established with communications and user/application enforcement points; receiving, via communications policy enforcement point, the request from the policy agent, wherein the communications policy enforcement point determines whether the data client is an authorized node, based upon the access vector received from the policy decision point; and receiving, via the user/application policy enforcement point, the request from the communications policy enforcement point.

  20. Drink-driving and perceptions of legally permissible alcohol use.

    PubMed

    Kypri, Kypros; Stephenson, Shaun

    2005-09-01

    The leading cause of death for young people in developed countries is road traffic crashes, a large proportion of which are attributable to drink-driving. The aims of the study were to estimate the prevalence of drink-driving and drink-riding in a sample of New Zealand university students, and to identify potential risk factors, in particular, students' perceptions of legally permissible consumption before driving. Participants were 1,564 survey respondents (82% response, mean age = 20.5 years) who were asked to indicate whether they had driven after having "perhaps too much to drink to be able to drive safely," if they had been a passenger in a vehicle "where the driver had perhaps too much to drink to be able to drive safely," and how many standard drinks they could consume in one hour and legally drive a car. An estimated blood alcohol concentration was computed and compared with legal limits. Drink-driving (past four weeks) was reported by 3.4% of women and 8.4% of men. Drink-riding (past four weeks) was reported by 7.0% of women and 11.5% of men. Estimated blood alcohol concentrations from students' reports of how much they could drink in one hour and be below the legal limit of 0.08 g/ml, showed that most respondents dramatically underestimated permissible consumption; only 5.8% overestimated it. This may be a case where misperception of a public health message serves the public good. Further reductions in drink-driving/riding will require attention to transport needs, more visible enforcement of existing legislation, and modification of youth drinking behavior.

  1. Establishment of hepatitis E virus infection-permissive and -non-permissive human hepatoma PLC/PRF/5 subclones.

    PubMed

    Shiota, Tomoyuki; Li, Tian-Cheng; Yoshizaki, Sayaka; Kato, Takanobu; Wakita, Takaji; Ishii, Koji

    2015-02-01

    PLC/PRF/5 cells show limited permissiveness, meaning that almost all subclones are permissive; however, some subclones do not exhibit permissiveness for hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection. In this study, the single-cell cloning of PLC/PRF/5 was performed and heterogeneous subclones characterized. Notably, the efficiency of intracellular virus replication did not correlate with the permissiveness for HEV infection. However, as well as binding permissive subclones, virus-like particles bound non-permissive subclones on various levels, suggesting that these subclones have some deficiencies in the attachment and entry steps of infection. Our data would be useful for investigating the HEV life cycle. © 2014 The Societies and Wiley Publishing Asia Pty Ltd.

  2. Perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling and risky behaviors in adolescents.

    PubMed

    Leeman, Robert F; Patock-Peckham, Julie A; Hoff, Rani A; Krishnan-Sarin, Suchitra; Steinberg, Marvin A; Rugle, Loreen J; Potenza, Marc N

    2014-06-01

    Perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling may relate to adolescents' engagement in various risky behaviors. To examine this possibility, we analyzed data from a high-school based risk-behavior survey to assess relationships between perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling and adolescent gambling behavior, substance use and related problems. We also evaluated predictions that relationships between perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling and risky behaviors would be particularly strong amongst adolescents reporting high sensation-seeking or impulsivity. High-school students (n = 2,805) provided data on risky behaviors, perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling, impulsivity and sensation-seeking. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships with gambling and alcohol, cigarette and marijuana use. Perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling related significantly to adolescent gambling, all substance-use behaviors as well as alcohol and drug problems. There were significant parental-permissiveness-by-sensation-seeking interactions in multiple models. Relationships between perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling and alcohol-use frequency were particularly strong among those with high sensation-seeking. This relationship also applied to gambling and heavy cigarette smoking, albeit to a lesser extent. Impulsivity related strongly to drug problems among those who perceived their parents to be more and less permissive toward gambling. These findings support the relevance of perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling to adolescent risky behaviors. Parenting perceived as less permissive toward gambling appeared to have protective effects on gambling, alcohol and cigarette use, even among those with high sensation-seeking. Reducing parental permissiveness toward gambling may be a valuable intervention goal, particularly for parents of sensation-seeking adolescents.

  3. Perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling and risky behaviors in adolescents

    PubMed Central

    LEEMAN, ROBERT F.; PATOCK-PECKHAM, JULIE A.; HOFF, RANI A.; KRISHNAN-SARIN, SUCHITRA; STEINBERG, MARVIN A.; RUGLE, LOREEN J.; POTENZA, MARC N.

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims: Perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling may relate to adolescents’ engagement in various risky behaviors. To examine this possibility, we analyzed data from a high-school based risk-behavior survey to assess relationships between perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling and adolescent gambling behavior, substance use and related problems. We also evaluated predictions that relationships between perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling and risky behaviors would be particularly strong amongst adolescents reporting high sensation-seeking or impulsivity. Methods: High-school students (n = 2,805) provided data on risky behaviors, perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling, impulsivity and sensation-seeking. Bivariate and logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine relationships with gambling and alcohol, cigarette and marijuana use. Results: Perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling related significantly to adolescent gambling, all substance-use behaviors as well as alcohol and drug problems. There were significant parental-permissiveness-by-sensation-seeking interactions in multiple models. Relationships between perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling and alcohol-use frequency were particularly strong among those with high sensation-seeking. This relationship also applied to gambling and heavy cigarette smoking, albeit to a lesser extent. Impulsivity related strongly to drug problems among those who perceived their parents to be more and less permissive toward gambling. Discussion and conclusions: These findings support the relevance of perceived parental permissiveness toward gambling to adolescent risky behaviors. Parenting perceived as less permissive toward gambling appeared to have protective effects on gambling, alcohol and cigarette use, even among those with high sensation-seeking. Reducing parental permissiveness toward gambling may be a valuable intervention goal

  4. 46 CFR 197.515 - Permissible exposure limits (PELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible exposure limits (PELs). 197.515 Section 197.515 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.515 Permissible exposure limits (PELs). The...

  5. 46 CFR 197.515 - Permissible exposure limits (PELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible exposure limits (PELs). 197.515 Section 197.515 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.515 Permissible exposure limits (PELs). The...

  6. 46 CFR 197.515 - Permissible exposure limits (PELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible exposure limits (PELs). 197.515 Section 197.515 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.515 Permissible exposure limits (PELs). The...

  7. 46 CFR 197.515 - Permissible exposure limits (PELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible exposure limits (PELs). 197.515 Section 197.515 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.515 Permissible exposure limits (PELs). The...

  8. 46 CFR 197.515 - Permissible exposure limits (PELs).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible exposure limits (PELs). 197.515 Section 197.515 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY AND HEALTH STANDARDS GENERAL PROVISIONS Benzene § 197.515 Permissible exposure limits (PELs). The...

  9. 25 CFR 212.48 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 212.48 Section 212.48 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF ALLOTTED LANDS FOR MINERAL DEVELOPMENT Rents, Royalties, Cancellations, and Appeals § 212.48 Permission to start operations. The provisions of § 211.48 of...

  10. 12 CFR 1412.5 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 1412.5 Section 1412.5 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.5 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A System institution may agree...

  11. 12 CFR 1412.5 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 1412.5 Section 1412.5 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.5 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A System institution may agree...

  12. 12 CFR 750.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 750.4 Section 750.4 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.4 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a)...

  13. 12 CFR 1412.5 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 1412.5 Section 1412.5 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.5 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A System institution may agree...

  14. 12 CFR 359.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 359.4 Section 359.4 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.4 Permissible golden parachute...

  15. 47 CFR 15.707 - Permissible channels of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible channels of operation. 15.707... Television Band Devices § 15.707 Permissible channels of operation. (a) All TVBDs are permitted to operate available channels in the frequency bands 512-608 MHz (TV channels 21-36) and 614-698 MHz (TV channels...

  16. 30 CFR 75.1103-7 - Electrical components; permissibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electrical components; permissibility... Protection § 75.1103-7 Electrical components; permissibility requirements. The electrical components of each... dust when the electrical power is deenergized as required by § 75.313, but these components shall be...

  17. 30 CFR 75.500 - Permissible electric equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible electric equipment. 75.500 Section... AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.500 Permissible electric equipment. On and after March 30, 1971: (a) All junction or distribution boxes used for...

  18. 30 CFR 75.500 - Permissible electric equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permissible electric equipment. 75.500 Section... AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.500 Permissible electric equipment. On and after March 30, 1971: (a) All junction or distribution boxes used for...

  19. 30 CFR 75.1103-7 - Electrical components; permissibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electrical components; permissibility... Protection § 75.1103-7 Electrical components; permissibility requirements. The electrical components of each... dust when the electrical power is deenergized as required by § 75.313, but these components shall be...

  20. 5 CFR 890.1011 - Bases for permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 890.1011 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1011 Bases for permissive debarments. (a) Licensure actions. OPM may debar a health care provider to whom the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 8902a(c)(1) apply....

  1. 5 CFR 890.1011 - Bases for permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Section 890.1011 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED) CIVIL SERVICE... Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1011 Bases for permissive debarments. (a) Licensure actions. OPM may debar a health care provider to whom the provisions of 5 U.S.C. 8902a(c)(1) apply....

  2. 25 CFR 227.20 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 227.20 Section 227.20 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.20 Permission...

  3. 25 CFR 227.20 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 227.20 Section 227.20 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.20 Permission...

  4. 25 CFR 225.32 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 225.32 Section 225.32 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS OIL AND GAS, GEOTHERMAL, AND SOLID MINERALS AGREEMENTS Minerals Agreements § 225.32 Permission to start operations. (a) No...

  5. 25 CFR 225.32 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Permission to start operations. 225.32 Section 225.32 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS OIL AND GAS, GEOTHERMAL, AND SOLID MINERALS AGREEMENTS Minerals Agreements § 225.32 Permission to start operations. (a) No...

  6. 25 CFR 225.32 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 225.32 Section 225.32 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS OIL AND GAS, GEOTHERMAL, AND SOLID MINERALS AGREEMENTS Minerals Agreements § 225.32 Permission to start operations. (a) No...

  7. 25 CFR 225.32 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 225.32 Section 225.32 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS OIL AND GAS, GEOTHERMAL, AND SOLID MINERALS AGREEMENTS Minerals Agreements § 225.32 Permission to start operations. (a) No...

  8. 25 CFR 225.32 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 225.32 Section 225.32 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS OIL AND GAS, GEOTHERMAL, AND SOLID MINERALS AGREEMENTS Minerals Agreements § 225.32 Permission to start operations. (a) No...

  9. 47 CFR 101.1013 - Permissible communications services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Permissible communications services. 101.1013 Section 101.1013 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1013 Permissible...

  10. 30 CFR 75.1103-7 - Electrical components; permissibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electrical components; permissibility... Protection § 75.1103-7 Electrical components; permissibility requirements. The electrical components of each... dust when the electrical power is deenergized as required by § 75.313, but these components shall...

  11. 30 CFR 75.500 - Permissible electric equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permissible electric equipment. 75.500 Section... AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.500 Permissible electric equipment. On and after March 30, 1971: (a) All junction or distribution boxes used...

  12. 30 CFR 75.1103-7 - Electrical components; permissibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electrical components; permissibility... Protection § 75.1103-7 Electrical components; permissibility requirements. The electrical components of each... dust when the electrical power is deenergized as required by § 75.313, but these components shall...

  13. 30 CFR 75.500 - Permissible electric equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible electric equipment. 75.500 Section... AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.500 Permissible electric equipment. On and after March 30, 1971: (a) All junction or distribution boxes used...

  14. 30 CFR 75.1103-7 - Electrical components; permissibility requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electrical components; permissibility... Protection § 75.1103-7 Electrical components; permissibility requirements. The electrical components of each... dust when the electrical power is deenergized as required by § 75.313, but these components shall...

  15. 42 CFR 433.66 - Permissible provider-related donations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible provider-related donations. 433.66... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.66 Permissible provider-related donations. (a) General rule... provider-related donations without a reduction in FFP, only in accordance with the requirements of...

  16. 47 CFR 15.707 - Permissible channels of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible channels of operation. 15.707 Section 15.707 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Television Band Devices § 15.707 Permissible channels of operation. (a) All TVBDs are permitted to operate in...

  17. 45 CFR 1639.4 - Permissible representation of eligible clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible representation of eligible clients. 1639.4 Section 1639.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION WELFARE REFORM § 1639.4 Permissible representation of eligible clients. Recipients may represent...

  18. 45 CFR 1639.4 - Permissible representation of eligible clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible representation of eligible clients. 1639.4 Section 1639.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION WELFARE REFORM § 1639.4 Permissible representation of eligible clients. Recipients may represent...

  19. 45 CFR 1639.4 - Permissible representation of eligible clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible representation of eligible clients. 1639.4 Section 1639.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION WELFARE REFORM § 1639.4 Permissible representation of eligible clients. Recipients may represent...

  20. 45 CFR 1639.4 - Permissible representation of eligible clients.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible representation of eligible clients. 1639.4 Section 1639.4 Public Welfare Regulations Relating to Public Welfare (Continued) LEGAL SERVICES CORPORATION WELFARE REFORM § 1639.4 Permissible representation of eligible clients. Recipients may represent...

  1. 12 CFR 703.13 - Permissible investment activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible investment activities. 703.13... INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.13 Permissible investment activities. (a) Regular way settlement and... funds transactions. (c) Investment repurchase transaction. A Federal credit union may enter into an...

  2. 12 CFR 703.13 - Permissible investment activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible investment activities. 703.13... INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.13 Permissible investment activities. (a) Regular way settlement and... funds transactions. (c) Investment repurchase transaction. A Federal credit union may enter into an...

  3. 12 CFR 703.13 - Permissible investment activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible investment activities. 703.13... INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.13 Permissible investment activities. (a) Regular way settlement and... funds transactions. (c) Investment repurchase transaction. A Federal credit union may enter into an...

  4. 12 CFR 703.13 - Permissible investment activities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible investment activities. 703.13... INVESTMENT AND DEPOSIT ACTIVITIES § 703.13 Permissible investment activities. (a) Regular way settlement and... funds transactions. (c) Investment repurchase transaction. A Federal credit union may enter into an...

  5. 12 CFR 750.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 750.4... GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.4 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A Federally insured credit union may agree to make or may make a golden parachute payment if: (1) NCUA, with...

  6. 12 CFR 359.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 359.4... GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.4 Permissible golden parachute payments... may make a golden parachute payment if and to the extent that: (1) The appropriate federal banking...

  7. 12 CFR 750.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 750.4... GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.4 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A Federally insured credit union may agree to make or may make a golden parachute payment if: (1) NCUA, with...

  8. 12 CFR 359.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 359.4... GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.4 Permissible golden parachute payments... may make a golden parachute payment if and to the extent that: (1) The appropriate federal banking...

  9. 12 CFR 1412.6 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 1412.6 Section 1412.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.6 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A System institution may make or agree...

  10. 12 CFR 1412.6 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 10 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 1412.6 Section 1412.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.6 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A System institution may make or agree...

  11. 12 CFR 359.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 359.4... GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.4 Permissible golden parachute payments... may make a golden parachute payment if and to the extent that: (1) The appropriate federal banking...

  12. 12 CFR 1412.6 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 1412.6 Section 1412.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.6 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A System institution may make or agree...

  13. 12 CFR 750.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 750.5 Section 750.5 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.5 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A...

  14. 12 CFR 359.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 359.5 Section 359.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.5 Permissible indemnification payments...

  15. 12 CFR 359.4 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 359.4... GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.4 Permissible golden parachute payments... may make a golden parachute payment if and to the extent that: (1) The appropriate federal banking...

  16. 12 CFR 750.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 750.5 Section 750.5 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.5 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A...

  17. 12 CFR 1412.5 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 1412.5 Section 1412.5 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.5 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A System institution may agree to...

  18. 12 CFR 750.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 750.5 Section 750.5 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 750.5 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A...

  19. 12 CFR 1412.6 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 1412.6 Section 1412.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.6 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A System institution may make or agree...

  20. 12 CFR 1412.5 - Permissible golden parachute payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible golden parachute payments. 1412.5 Section 1412.5 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.5 Permissible golden parachute payments. (a) A System institution may agree to...

  1. 12 CFR 1412.6 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 9 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 1412.6 Section 1412.6 Banks and Banking FARM CREDIT SYSTEM INSURANCE CORPORATION GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 1412.6 Permissible indemnification payments. (a) A System institution may make or agree...

  2. 12 CFR 359.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 359.5 Section 359.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.5 Permissible indemnification payments...

  3. 12 CFR 359.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 359.5 Section 359.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.5 Permissible indemnification payments...

  4. 12 CFR 359.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible indemnification payments. 359.5 Section 359.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.5 Permissible indemnification payments...

  5. 30 CFR 75.1703-1 - Permissible lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible lamps. 75.1703-1 Section 75.1703-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1703-1 Permissible lamps. Lamps...

  6. 30 CFR 75.1703-1 - Permissible lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permissible lamps. 75.1703-1 Section 75.1703-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1703-1 Permissible lamps. Lamps...

  7. 30 CFR 75.1703-1 - Permissible lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible lamps. 75.1703-1 Section 75.1703-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1703-1 Permissible lamps. Lamps...

  8. 30 CFR 75.1703-1 - Permissible lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permissible lamps. 75.1703-1 Section 75.1703-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1703-1 Permissible lamps. Lamps...

  9. 30 CFR 75.1703-1 - Permissible lamps.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permissible lamps. 75.1703-1 Section 75.1703-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Miscellaneous § 75.1703-1 Permissible lamps. Lamps...

  10. 40 CFR 1611.3 - Scope of permissible testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 33 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Scope of permissible testimony. 1611.3 Section 1611.3 Protection of Environment CHEMICAL SAFETY AND HAZARD INVESTIGATION BOARD TESTIMONY BY EMPLOYEES IN LEGAL PROCEEDINGS § 1611.3 Scope of permissible testimony. (a) The statute creating the CSB, 42...

  11. 25 CFR 227.20 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 227.20 Section 227.20 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.20 Permission to...

  12. 25 CFR 227.20 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 227.20 Section 227.20 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.20 Permission to...

  13. 46 CFR 170.255 - Class 1 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 1 doors; permissible locations. 170.255 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.255 Class 1 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, Class 1 doors within...

  14. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Class 2 doors; permissible locations. 170.260 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.260 Class 2 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, a Class 2 door is...

  15. 46 CFR 170.260 - Class 2 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class 2 doors; permissible locations. 170.260 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.260 Class 2 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, a Class 2 door is...

  16. 46 CFR 170.255 - Class 1 doors; permissible locations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Class 1 doors; permissible locations. 170.255 Section... STABILITY REQUIREMENTS FOR ALL INSPECTED VESSELS Watertight Bulkhead Doors § 170.255 Class 1 doors; permissible locations. (a) Except as provided in paragraphs (b) and (c) of this section, Class 1 doors within...

  17. 47 CFR 15.707 - Permissible channels of operation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible channels of operation. 15.707 Section 15.707 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL RADIO FREQUENCY DEVICES Television Band Devices § 15.707 Permissible channels of operation. (a) All TVBDs are permitted to...

  18. 30 CFR 62.130 - Permissible exposure level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permissible exposure level. 62.130 Section 62.130 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH REGULATIONS OCCUPATIONAL NOISE EXPOSURE § 62.130 Permissible exposure level. (a) The mine operator must assure...

  19. 25 CFR 227.20 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Permission to start operations. 227.20 Section 227.20 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF CERTAIN LANDS IN WIND RIVER INDIAN RESERVATION, WYOMING, FOR OIL AND GAS MINING Operations § 227.20 Permission to...

  20. 47 CFR 61.17 - Applications for special permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Section 61.17 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) COMMON CARRIER SERVICES... permission must be addressed to “Secretary, Federal Communications Commission, Washington, DC 20554.” The..., if an issuing carrier applies for special permission to revise joint tariffs, the application...

  1. 24 CFR 58.75 - Permissible bases for objections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permissible bases for objections. 58.75 Section 58.75 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... RESPONSIBILITIES Release of Funds for Particular Projects § 58.75 Permissible bases for objections. HUD (or...

  2. 24 CFR 58.75 - Permissible bases for objections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permissible bases for objections. 58.75 Section 58.75 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... RESPONSIBILITIES Release of Funds for Particular Projects § 58.75 Permissible bases for objections. HUD (or...

  3. 24 CFR 58.75 - Permissible bases for objections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permissible bases for objections. 58.75 Section 58.75 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... RESPONSIBILITIES Release of Funds for Particular Projects § 58.75 Permissible bases for objections. HUD (or...

  4. 24 CFR 58.75 - Permissible bases for objections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permissible bases for objections. 58.75 Section 58.75 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... RESPONSIBILITIES Release of Funds for Particular Projects § 58.75 Permissible bases for objections. HUD (or...

  5. 24 CFR 58.75 - Permissible bases for objections.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Permissible bases for objections. 58.75 Section 58.75 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and... RESPONSIBILITIES Release of Funds for Particular Projects § 58.75 Permissible bases for objections. HUD (or...

  6. 25 CFR 213.30 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2012-04-01 2011-04-01 true Permission to start operations. 213.30 Section 213.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.30 Permission to start...

  7. 25 CFR 213.30 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 213.30 Section 213.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.30 Permission to start...

  8. 25 CFR 213.30 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 213.30 Section 213.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.30 Permission to start...

  9. 25 CFR 213.30 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 213.30 Section 213.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.30 Permission to start...

  10. 25 CFR 213.30 - Permission to start operations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permission to start operations. 213.30 Section 213.30 Indians BUREAU OF INDIAN AFFAIRS, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR ENERGY AND MINERALS LEASING OF RESTRICTED LANDS OF MEMBERS OF FIVE CIVILIZED TRIBES, OKLAHOMA, FOR MINING Operations § 213.30 Permission to start...

  11. Improving ozone modeling in complex terrain at a fine grid resolution - Part II: Influence of schemes in MM5 on daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations and RRFs (Relative Reduction Factors) for SIPs in the non-attainment areas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yunhee; Fu, Joshua S.; Miller, Terry L.

    2010-06-01

    Part II presents a comprehensive evaluation of CMAQ for August of 2002 on twenty-one sensitivity simulations (detailed in Part I) in MM5 to investigate the model performance for O 3 SIPs (State Implementation Plans) in the complex terrain. CMAQ performance was quite consistent with the results of MM5, meaning that accurate meteorological fields predicted in MM5 as an input resulted in good model performance of CMAQ. In this study, PBL scheme plays a more important role than its land surface models (LSMs) for the model performance of CMAQ. Our results have shown that the outputs of CMAQ on eighteen sensitivity simulations using two different nudging coefficients for winds (2.5 and 4.5 × 10 -4 s -1, respectively) tend to under predict daily maximum 8-h ozone concentrations at valley areas except the TKE PBL sensitivity simulations (ETA M-Y PBL scheme with Noah LSMs and 5-layer soil model and Gayno-Seaman PBL) using 6.0 × 10 -4 s -1 with positive MB (Mean Bias). At mountain areas, none of the sensitivity simulations has presented over predictions for 8-h O 3, due to relatively poor meteorological model performance. When comparing 12-km and 4-km grid resolutions for the PX simulation in CMAQ statistics analysis, the CMAQ results at 12-km grid resolution consistently show under predictions of 8-h O 3 at both of valley and mountain areas and particularly, it shows relatively poor model performance with a 15.1% of NMB (Normalized Mean Bias). Based on our sensitivity simulations, the TKE PBL sensitivity simulations using a maximum value (6 × 10 -4) among other sensitivity simulations yielded better model performance of CMAQ at all areas in the complex terrain. As a result, the sensitivity of RRFs to the PBL scheme may be considerably significant with about 1-3 ppb in difference in determining whether the attainment test is passed or failed. Furthermore, we found that the result of CMAQ model performance depending on meteorological variations is affected on estimating

  12. 12 CFR 347.115 - Permissible activities for a foreign branch of an insured state nonmember bank.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.115 Permissible... documents, if: (1) The guarantee or agreement specifies a maximum monetary liability; and (2) To the extent... applying any legal lending limits. (b) Government obligations. Engage in the following types...

  13. A concept of dynamic permission mechanism on android

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aron, Lukas; Hanacek, Petr

    2016-02-01

    This paper discuss the main security topic in mobile security area and this topic is protect user against the leakage of data. This work primarily contains the proposal of concept of dynamic permission mechanism for Android operating system. This mechanism deals with assignment or enforcement permissions to the application according to files that the application works with. Application has set of permissions that can use, but if the user opens confident files the application permissions should change its permission set and there should not be possible leakage of this secret data. The permissions set should be stricter according to opened confidential file or more open (without restriction) if the file is not secret file. The concept proposes the solution for protecting this data leakage. Idea covers rule that user should be avoided of change this permissions himself, but this behavior should be dynamic, automatic and independent. This proposal is mainly aimed to Android operating system, but the concept can be applied to other mobile platforms with some implementation changes.

  14. 50 CFR 217.172 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... Neptune Liquefied Natural Gas Facility Off Massachusetts § 217.172 Permissible methods of taking. (a... the Letter of Authorization (hereinafter “Neptune”) may incidentally, but not intentionally,...

  15. Asking relatives for permission for a post mortem examination.

    PubMed Central

    Sherwood, S. J.; Start, R. D.

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses the possible aims, benefits, and also the content, format and timing of training in one specific aspect of clinical practice; how to request permission for post mortems. PMID:7596929

  16. 50 CFR 216.252 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... MAMMALS Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Conducting Precision Strike Weapon Missions in the Gulf of Mexico § 216.252 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of Authorization issued pursuant to...

  17. 50 CFR 216.252 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... MAMMALS Taking Marine Mammals Incidental to Conducting Precision Strike Weapon Missions in the Gulf of Mexico § 216.252 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of Authorization issued pursuant to...

  18. 50 CFR 218.232 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) Sonar § 218.232 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of.... This annual per-stock cap of 12 percent applies regardless of the number of SURTASS LFA sonar...

  19. 50 CFR 218.232 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) Sonar § 218.232 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of.... This annual per-stock cap of 12 percent applies regardless of the number of SURTASS LFA sonar...

  20. 50 CFR 218.232 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... Low Frequency Active (SURTASS LFA) Sonar § 218.232 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under Letters of.... This annual per-stock cap of 12 percent applies regardless of the number of SURTASS LFA sonar...

  1. A Biomedical Research Permissions Ontology: Cognitive and Knowledge Representation Considerations.

    PubMed

    Obeid, Jihad; Gabriel, Davera; Sanderson, Iain

    2010-12-01

    In designing a comprehensive mechanism for managing informed consents and permissions for biomedical research involving human participants, a significant effort is dedicated to the development of standardized classification of these consents and permissions. In this paper, we describe the considerations and implications of this effort that should be addressed during the development of a Biomedical Research Permissions Ontology (RPO). It is hoped that this standardization will allow disparate research institutions to pool research data and associated consents and permissions in order to facilitate collaborative translational research projects across multiple institutions and subsequent new breakthroughs in medicine while providing: 1) essential built in protections for privacy and confidentiality of research participants and 2) a mechanism for insuring that researchers adhere to patient's intent whether to participate in research or not.

  2. 50 CFR 217.13 - Permissible methods of taking.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... at Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary, CA § 217.13 Permissible methods of taking. (a) Under LOAs... Level B Harassment: (1) Harbor seal (Phoca vitulina)—1,150 (an average of 230 annually) (2) California...

  3. Maximally Permissive Composition of Actors in Ptolemy II

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-03-20

    Maximally Permissive Composition of Actors in Ptolemy II Marten Lohstroh Electrical Engineering and Computer Sciences University of California at...3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2013 to 00-00-2013 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Maximally Permissive Composition of Actors in Ptolemy II 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...addresses the problem of handling dynamic data, in the statically typed, actor-oriented modeling environment called Ptolemy II. It explores the possibilities

  4. Child assent and parental permission in pediatric research.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Wilma C; Reynolds, William; Nelson, Robert M

    2003-01-01

    Since children are considered incapable of giving informed consent to participate in research, regulations require that both parental permission and the assent of the potential child subject be obtained. Assent and permission are uniquely bound together, each serving a different purpose. Parental permission protects the child from assuming unreasonable risks. Assent demonstrates respect for the child and his developing autonomy. In order to give meaningful assent, the child must understand that procedures will be performed, voluntarily choose to undergo the procedures, and communicate this choice. Understanding the elements of informed consent has been the paradigm for assessing capacity to give assent. This method leaves the youngest, least cognitively mature children vulnerable to waiver of assent and forced research participation. Voluntariness can also be compromised by the influence of authority figures who can exert undue influence and coerce children to participate in research. This paper discusses factors that may influence the decision to give assent/permission, potential parent-child conflict in the assent/permission process and how it is resolved, and potential parental undue influence on research participation. These issues are illustrated with quotations drawn from a larger qualitative study of parental permission and child assent (data not presented). We suggest a developmental approach, viewing assent as a continuum ranging from mere affirmation in the youngest children to the equivalent of the informed consent process in the mature adolescent.

  5. Critical analysis of the maximum non inhibitory concentration (MNIC) method in quantifying sub-lethal injury in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells exposed to either thermal or pulsed electric field treatments.

    PubMed

    Kethireddy, V; Oey, I; Jowett, Tim; Bremer, P

    2016-09-16

    Sub-lethal injury within a microbial population, due to processing treatments or environmental stress, is often assessed as the difference in the number of cells recovered on non-selective media compared to numbers recovered on a "selective media" containing a predetermined maximum non-inhibitory concentration (MNIC) of a selective agent. However, as knowledge of cell metabolic response to injury, population diversity and dynamics increased, the rationale behind the conventional approach of quantifying sub-lethal injury must be scrutinized further. This study reassessed the methodology used to quantify sub-lethal injury for Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells (≈ 4.75 Log CFU/mL) exposed to either a mild thermal (45°C for 0, 10 and 20min) or a mild pulsed electric field treatment (field strengths of 8.0-9.0kV/cm and energy levels of 8, 14 and 21kJ/kg). Treated cells were plated onto either Yeast Malt agar (YM) or YM containing NaCl, as a selective agent at 5-15% in 1% increments. The impact of sub-lethal stress due to initial processing, the stress due to selective agents in the plating media, and the subsequent variation of inhibition following the treatments was assessed based on the CFU count (cell numbers). ANOVA and a generalised least squares model indicated significant effects of media, treatments, and their interaction effects (P<0.05) on cell numbers. It was shown that the concentration of the selective agent used dictated the extent of sub-lethal injury recorded owing to the interaction effects of the selective component (NaCl) in the recovery media. Our findings highlight a potential common misunderstanding on how culture conditions impact on sub-lethal injury. Interestingly for S. cerevisiae cells the number of cells recovered at different NaCl concentrations in the media appears to provide valuable information about the mode of injury, the comparative efficacy of different processing regimes and the inherent degree of resistance within a population. This

  6. Statistical Features of Nighttime Enhancements in the Electron Concentration in the F2 Layer Maximum of the Midlatitude Ionosphere in the 23 and 24th cycles of solar activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhumabayev, Beibit; Yakovets, Artur; Gordienko, Galina; Litvinov, Yuriy

    2016-04-01

    On the basis of the vertical sounding of the ionosphere in Alma-Ata (76 deg 55'E, 43 deg 15'N) during 2000-2014, the analysis of the occurrence probability of the nighttime electron concentration enhancements in the maximum of the F2-layer (NmF2) was performed. A comparison of parameters of very large enhancements observed in Irkutsk and Alma-Ata simultaneously was conducted. During the period considered overall 2272 observation sessions were carried out, and in 1430 sessions, enhancements of NmF2 were observed. The entire data (2000-2014) were divided into two subarrays. The first one (2000-2003 and 2011-2014) corresponded to high solar activity, when the annual average Wolf numbers exceeded 50 (W> 50). The second subarray (2004-2010) corresponded to the low solar activity, when the annual average Wolf numbers were less than 50 (W <50). Statistics of enhancement parameters was submitted for individual months and seasons: winter (December, January, February), spring (March, April, May), summer (June, July, August) and autumn (September, October, November). There is a distinct seasonal dependence of the occurrence probability of enhancement appearance. The same features of the distributions for the high and low solar activity are the high occurrence probability near to 90% in January, February and November, December. In addition, a rapid decrease in the probability occurs from February to March, and a gradual increase from September to December. An evident maximum of the occurrence probability in the summer months takes place for high solar activity, while for the low activity the summer months are characterized by the minimum occurrence. It is shown that the distribution of enhancement durations regardless of the level of solar activity have the same features. In winter and autumn, duration distributed over a wide range, with most of the enhancements lies in the range of 1 to 5 hours. For spring and summer months (April-August) the duration of the main part of the

  7. Air radon concentration decrease in a waste water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Juste, B; Ortiz, J; Verdú, G; Martorell, S

    2015-06-01

    (222)Rn is a naturally occurring gas created from the decay of (226)Ra. The long-term health risk of breathing radon is lung cancer. One particular place where indoor radon concentrations can exceed national guidelines is in wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) where treatment processes may contribute to ambient airborne concentrations. The aim of this paper was to study the radon concentration decrease after the application of corrective measures in a Spanish WWTP. According to first measures, air radon concentration exceeded International Commission Radiologica1 Protection (ICRP) normative (recommends intervention between 400 and 1000 Bq m(-3)). Therefore, the WWTP improved mechanical forced ventilation to lower occupational exposure. This measure allowed to increase the administrative controls, since the limitation of workers access to the plant changed from 2 h d(-1) (considering a maximum permissible dose of 20 mSv y(-1) averaged over 5 y) to 7 h d(-1). © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Maximum power tracking

    SciTech Connect

    O'Sullivan, G.

    1983-03-01

    By definition, a maximum power tracking device causes the photovoltaic array to operate on the locus of maximum power points within a specified accuracy. There are limitations to the application of maximum power tracking. A prerequisite is that the load be capable of absorbing all of the power availble at all times. Battery chargers, electrical heaters, water pumps, and most significantly, returning power to the utility grid, are prime examples of applications that are adaptable to maximum power tracking. Maximum power tracking is available to either dc or ac loads. An inverter equipped with a means of changing input voltage by controlling its input impedance can deliver maximum power to ac loads. The inverter can be fixed or variable frequency and fixed or variable voltage, but must be compatible with the ac load. The discussion includes applications, techniques, and cost factors.

  9. Maximum thrust mode evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orme, John S.; Nobbs, Steven G.

    1995-01-01

    Measured reductions in acceleration times which resulted from the application of the F-15 performance seeking control (PSC) maximum thrust mode during the dual-engine test phase is presented as a function of power setting and flight condition. Data were collected at altitudes of 30,000 and 45,000 feet at military and maximum afterburning power settings. The time savings for the supersonic acceleration is less than at subsonic Mach numbers because of the increased modeling and control complexity. In addition, the propulsion system was designed to be optimized at the mid supersonic Mach number range. Recall that even though the engine is at maximum afterburner, PSC does not trim the afterburner for the maximum thrust mode. Subsonically at military power, time to accelerate from Mach 0.6 to 0.95 was cut by between 6 and 8 percent with a single engine application of PSC, and over 14 percent when both engines were optimized. At maximum afterburner, the level of thrust increases were similar in magnitude to the military power results, but because of higher thrust levels at maximum afterburner and higher aircraft drag at supersonic Mach numbers the percentage thrust increase and time to accelerate was less than for the supersonic accelerations. Savings in time to accelerate supersonically at maximum afterburner ranged from 4 to 7 percent. In general, the maximum thrust mode has performed well, demonstrating significant thrust increases at military and maximum afterburner power. Increases of up to 15 percent at typical combat-type flight conditions were identified. Thrust increases of this magnitude could be useful in a combat situation.

  10. Short-circuit protection of intercomponent cables on 3 phase, alternating current, permissible mining equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Carey, W.L.

    1995-05-01

    Magnetic and thermal magnetic circuit breakers are used to provide short-circuit protection for intercomponent cables on permissible mining equipment. Limits are needed for the circuit breaker settings which will adequately protect intercomponent cables under a short-circuit fault condition. Calculations reveal that the maximum allowable settings for large ampacity power cables are limited by the minimum available short-circuit currents while the maximum settings for small control cables are limited by the amount of current the cable can withstand. When the available short-circuit current is greater than the current the cable can withstand, no circuit breaker setting is practical. The use of some small control cables with large trailing cables will be eliminated from future approvals due to large available short-circuit currents. Present approvals would not be affected. A computer program is available from the Approval and Certification Center to calculate circuit breaker settings.

  11. Permissible radionuclide loading for organic ion exchange resins from nuclear power plants

    SciTech Connect

    MacKenzie, D.R.; Lin, M.; Barletta, R.E.

    1983-10-01

    A questionnaire on the use of ion exchange resins in nuclear power plants was sent to all operating reactors in the US. Responses were received from 23 of the 48 utilities approached. Information was sought concerning the amounts of radionuclides held by the resins, and the effects of its radiation on the resins both during operation and after removal from service. Relevant information from the questionnaires is summarized and discussed. Available literature on the effects of ionizing radiation on organic ion exchange resins has been reviewed. On the basis of published data on damage to resins by radiation, the technical rationale is given to support NRC's draft branch technical position on a maximum permissible radionuclide loading. It is considered advisable to formulate the rule in terms of a delivered dose rather than a curie loading. A maximum permissible dose of 10/sup 8/ rad is chosen because, while it is large enough that a measurable amount of damage will be done to the resin, it is small enough that the damage will be negligible at a power plant or disposal site. A test procedure has been written which a generator could use to qualify a specific resin for service at a higher dose than permitted by the general rule.

  12. Permission to Speak: A Novel Formal Foundation for Access Control

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-06-21

    NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University of Pennsylvania,Computer and Information Science ,Philadelphia,PA,19104 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER... science • Uniform treatment of access control and conformance – Access control is verification of permissions – Conformance is satisfaction of

  13. 40 CFR 1611.3 - Scope of permissible testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... EMPLOYEES IN LEGAL PROCEEDINGS § 1611.3 Scope of permissible testimony. (a) The statute creating the CSB, 42... expert opinion testimony of CSB employees, which may be reflected in the views of the CSB expressed in... employees as experts to give opinion testimony would impose a significant administrative burden on the CSB's...

  14. 49 CFR 835.3 - Scope of permissible testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... SAFETY BOARD TESTIMONY OF BOARD EMPLOYEES § 835.3 Scope of permissible testimony. (a) Section 701(e) of... litigation. The purposes of these sections would be defeated if expert opinion testimony of Board employees...' opinions in its deliberations. Furthermore, the use of Board employees as experts to give opinion testimony...

  15. 12 CFR 1703.35 - Scope of permissible testimony.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Scope of permissible testimony. 1703.35 Section 1703.35 Banks and Banking OFFICE OF FEDERAL HOUSING ENTERPRISE OVERSIGHT, DEPARTMENT OF HOUSING AND URBAN DEVELOPMENT OFHEO ORGANIZATION AND FUNCTIONS RELEASE OF INFORMATION Testimony and Production of...

  16. 47 CFR 74.731 - Purpose and permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... danger, to local public service announcements and to seeking or acknowledging financial support deemed... being rebroadcast. When transmitting originations concerning financial support or public service... 47 Telecommunication 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Purpose and permissible service. 74.731...

  17. 12 CFR 705.4 - Permissible uses of loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... members, including new or expanded share draft or credit card programs; (b) Partnership arrangements with... 705.4 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT REVOLVING LOAN FUND ACCESS FOR CREDIT UNIONS § 705.4 Permissible uses of loan funds...

  18. 12 CFR 705.4 - Permissible uses of loan funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... members, including new or expanded share draft or credit card programs; (b) Partnership arrangements with... 705.4 Banks and Banking NATIONAL CREDIT UNION ADMINISTRATION REGULATIONS AFFECTING CREDIT UNIONS COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT REVOLVING LOAN FUND ACCESS FOR CREDIT UNIONS § 705.4 Permissible uses of loan funds...

  19. Minimum permissible leakage resistance established for instrumentation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Perrin, J. L.

    1966-01-01

    Mathematical formulas are used to determine if, and to what extent, an instrumentation system that has been exposed to the elements should be dried out to restore minimum permissible leakage resistance to ground. Formulas are also derived and used for an intermediate number of systems that are exposed to moisture penetration.

  20. 12 CFR 359.5 - Permissible indemnification payments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Section 359.5 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY GOLDEN PARACHUTE AND INDEMNIFICATION PAYMENTS § 359.5 Permissible indemnification payments... conditions delineated in paragraph (a) of this section have been met. If independent legal counsel...

  1. 47 CFR 101.1013 - Permissible communications services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible communications services. 101.1013 Section 101.1013 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1013...

  2. 14 CFR 399.35 - Special tariff permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Special tariff permission. (a) Definition. As used in this section, to grant STP means to approve a... Board to grant STP for tariffs that state lower fares, rates, or charges and any rules affecting only those lower fares, rates, or charges, except that: (1) The Board will not grant STP to match a tariff...

  3. 46 CFR 71.55-1 - Permission required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Repairs and Alterations § 71.55-1 Permission required. (a) No repairs or alterations affecting the safety of the vessel with regard to the hull, machinery, or equipment, shall be made without the...

  4. 46 CFR 71.55-1 - Permission required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Repairs and Alterations § 71.55-1 Permission required. (a) No repairs or alterations affecting the safety of the vessel with regard to the hull, machinery, or equipment, shall be made without the...

  5. 46 CFR 71.55-1 - Permission required.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) PASSENGER VESSELS INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION Repairs and Alterations § 71.55-1 Permission required. (a) No repairs or alterations affecting the safety of the vessel with regard to the hull, machinery, or equipment, shall be made without the...

  6. 12 CFR 211.10 - Permissible activities abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ...; (11) Organizing, sponsoring, and managing a mutual fund, if the fund's shares are not sold or distributed in the United States or to U.S. residents and the fund does not exercise managerial control over... securities held in order to hedge bank permissible equity derivatives contracts shall not be included....

  7. Permissive hypercapnia to decrease lung injury in ventilated preterm neonates.

    PubMed

    Thome, Ulrich H; Ambalavanan, Namasivayam

    2009-02-01

    Lung injury in ventilated premature infants occurs primarily through the mechanism of volutrauma, often due to the combination of high tidal volumes in association with a high end-inspiratory volume and occasionally end-expiratory alveolar collapse. Tolerating a higher level of arterial partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PaCO2) is considered as 'permissive hypercapnia' and when combined with the use of low tidal volumes may reduce volutrauma and lead to improved pulmonary outcomes. Permissive hypercapnia may also protect against hypocapnia-induced brain hypoperfusion and subsequent periventricular leukomalacia. However, extreme hypercapnia may be associated with an increased risk of intracranial hemorrhage. It may therefore be important to avoid large fluctuations in PaCO2 values. Recent randomized clinical trials in preterm infants have demonstrated that mild permissive hypercapnia is safe, but clinical benefits are modest. The optimal PaCO2 goal in clinical practice has not been determined, and the available evidence does not currently support a general recommendation for permissive hypercapnia in preterm infants.

  8. Parental permission and child assent in research on children.

    PubMed

    Roth-Cline, Michelle; Nelson, Robert M

    2013-09-01

    Grounded on the ethical principle of respect for persons, parental permission and child assent function together to protect the child and to foster the development of the child's self-determination. Although both parental permission and child assent involve the same components of information sharing, comprehension, and voluntariness, how these three components are understood and operationalized should differ depending on the developmental level of the child. For example, the amount of information that a child must comprehend to provide meaningful and developmentally appropriate child assent (or dissent) should be allowed to vary with the age and maturity of the child. By understanding child assent together with the important protections of parental permission, child assent does not need to be burdened with the same informational and process requirements. As a result, the age (as a proxy for developmental stage) at which a child is deemed capable of assent would be lower (i.e., 5 to 7 years old). By assuming a lack of capacity, the potential arises to dishonor and disregard a child's wishes by failing to solicit meaningful assent or dissent. Further research needs to be done on how best to obtain truly informed and voluntary parental permission and child assent for research participation.

  9. 47 CFR 74.731 - Purpose and permissible service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... EXPERIMENTAL RADIO, AUXILIARY, SPECIAL BROADCAST AND OTHER PROGRAM DISTRIBUTIONAL SERVICES Low Power TV, TV Translator, and TV Booster Stations § 74.731 Purpose and permissible service. (a) Television broadcast... locally generated radio frequency signal similar to that of a TV broadcast station and modulated with...

  10. 47 CFR 101.1407 - Permissible operations for MVDDS.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible operations for MVDDS. 101.1407 Section 101.1407 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Multichannel Video Distribution and Data Service Rules for the 12.2-12.7...

  11. 12 CFR 211.10 - Permissible activities abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INTERNATIONAL BANKING OPERATIONS (REGULATION K) International Operations of U.S. Banking Organizations § 211.10... part in organizations engaged in activities that are not permissible for joint ventures do not exceed...), unless authorized by the Board; (18) Providing futures commission merchant services (including...

  12. 34 CFR 300.208 - Permissive use of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Local Educational Agency Eligibility § 300.208 Permissive use of funds. (a) Uses... used for the following activities: (1) Services and aids that also benefit nondisabled children. For... a regular class or other education-related setting to a child with a disability in accordance...

  13. 34 CFR 300.208 - Permissive use of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Local Educational Agency Eligibility § 300.208 Permissive use of funds. (a) Uses... used for the following activities: (1) Services and aids that also benefit nondisabled children. For... a regular class or other education-related setting to a child with a disability in accordance...

  14. 34 CFR 300.208 - Permissive use of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Local Educational Agency Eligibility § 300.208 Permissive use of funds. (a) Uses... used for the following activities: (1) Services and aids that also benefit nondisabled children. For... a regular class or other education-related setting to a child with a disability in accordance...

  15. 34 CFR 300.208 - Permissive use of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Local Educational Agency Eligibility § 300.208 Permissive use of funds. (a) Uses... used for the following activities: (1) Services and aids that also benefit nondisabled children. For... a regular class or other education-related setting to a child with a disability in accordance...

  16. 34 CFR 300.208 - Permissive use of funds.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... CHILDREN WITH DISABILITIES Local Educational Agency Eligibility § 300.208 Permissive use of funds. (a) Uses... used for the following activities: (1) Services and aids that also benefit nondisabled children. For... a regular class or other education-related setting to a child with a disability in accordance...

  17. 24 CFR 4.26 - Permissible and impermissible disclosures.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 24 Housing and Urban Development 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permissible and impermissible disclosures. 4.26 Section 4.26 Housing and Urban Development Office of the Secretary, Department of Housing and Urban Development HUD REFORM ACT Prohibition of Advance Disclosure of Funding Decisions §...

  18. 36 CFR 264.12 - Use without permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Use without permission. 264.12 Section 264.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Symbol § 264.12 Use without...

  19. 36 CFR 264.12 - Use without permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Use without permission. 264.12 Section 264.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Symbol § 264.12 Use without...

  20. 36 CFR 264.12 - Use without permission.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Use without permission. 264.12 Section 264.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROPERTY MANAGEMENT Mount St. Helens National Volcanic Monument Symbol § 264.12 Use without...

  1. Permissible performance limits of regression analyses in method comparisons.

    PubMed

    Haeckel, Rainer; Wosniok, Werner; Al Shareef, Nadera

    2011-11-01

    Method comparisons are indispensable tools for the extensive validation of analytic procedures. Laboratories often only want to know whether an established procedure (x-method) can be replaced by another one (y-method) without interfering with diagnostic purposes. Then split patients' samples are analyzed more or less simultaneously with both procedures designed to measure the same quantity. The measured values are usually presented graphically as a scatter or difference plots. The two methods are considered to be equivalent (comparable) if the data pairs scatter around the line of equality (x=y line) within permissible equivalence lines. It is proposed to derive these limits of permissible imprecision limits which are based on false-positive error rates. If all data pairs are within the limits, both methods lead to comparable false error rates. If one or more data pairs are outside the permissible equivalence limits, the x-method cannot simply be replaced by the y-method and further studies are required. The discordance may be caused either by aberrant values (outliers), non-linearity, bias or a higher variation of e.g., the y-values. The spread around the line of best fit can detect possible interferences if more than 1% of the data pairs are outside permissible spread lines in a scatter plot. Because bias between methods and imprecision can be inter-related, both require specific examinations for their identification.

  2. 47 CFR 101.1013 - Permissible communications services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Permissible communications services. 101.1013 Section 101.1013 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1013...

  3. 47 CFR 101.1013 - Permissible communications services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible communications services. 101.1013 Section 101.1013 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1013...

  4. 47 CFR 101.1013 - Permissible communications services.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible communications services. 101.1013 Section 101.1013 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION (CONTINUED) SAFETY AND SPECIAL RADIO SERVICES FIXED MICROWAVE SERVICES Local Multipoint Distribution Service § 101.1013...

  5. 30 CFR 62.130 - Permissible exposure level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permissible exposure level. 62.130 Section 62.130 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH... must use all feasible engineering and administrative controls to reduce the miner's noise exposure to...

  6. 30 CFR 62.130 - Permissible exposure level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible exposure level. 62.130 Section 62.130 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH... must use all feasible engineering and administrative controls to reduce the miner's noise exposure to...

  7. 30 CFR 62.130 - Permissible exposure level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible exposure level. 62.130 Section 62.130 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH... must use all feasible engineering and administrative controls to reduce the miner's noise exposure to...

  8. 30 CFR 62.130 - Permissible exposure level.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permissible exposure level. 62.130 Section 62.130 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR UNIFORM MINE HEALTH... must use all feasible engineering and administrative controls to reduce the miner's noise exposure to...

  9. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  10. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  11. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  12. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  13. 30 CFR 75.501-2 - Permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...-driven mine equipment, except low horsepower rock dusting equipment, that employs an electric current... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment. 75.501-2... SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General §...

  14. 26 CFR 1.422-5 - Permissible provisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...) INCOME TAXES Certain Stock Options § 1.422-5 Permissible provisions. (a) General rule. An option that otherwise qualifies as an incentive stock option does not fail to be an incentive stock option merely... this section. (b) Cashless exercise. (1) An option does not fail to be an incentive stock option...

  15. 12 CFR 211.10 - Permissible activities abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... part in organizations engaged in activities that are not permissible for joint ventures do not exceed...) Use of internal hedging models. After providing 30 days' prior written notice to the Board the investor may use an internal hedging model that: (1) Nets long and short positions in the same security...

  16. 12 CFR 211.10 - Permissible activities abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... part in organizations engaged in activities that are not permissible for joint ventures do not exceed...) Use of internal hedging models. After providing 30 days' prior written notice to the Board the investor may use an internal hedging model that: (1) Nets long and short positions in the same security...

  17. 12 CFR 211.10 - Permissible activities abroad.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible activities abroad. 211.10 Section 211.10 Banks and Banking FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM BOARD OF GOVERNORS OF THE FEDERAL RESERVE SYSTEM... operations abroad: (1) Commercial and other banking activities; (2) Financing, including commercial financing...

  18. Modeling and Enhancing Android’s Permission System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-25

    providers store data and are the main way to share data between applications. Each provider exposes a public URI that uniquely identifies its data set...5 holds. Proof sketch of Prop. 6 Here the data structure ∆ at each node stores forbidden permissions at the time the node is created. Given the call...reviewing instructions, searching existing data sources, gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of

  19. Structure and specificity of a permissive bacterial C-prenyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Elshahawi, Sherif I; Cao, Hongnan; Shaaban, Khaled A; Ponomareva, Larissa V; Subramanian, Thangaiah; Farman, Mark L; Spielmann, H Peter; Phillips, George N; Thorson, Jon S; Singh, Shanteri

    2017-04-01

    This study highlights the biochemical and structural characterization of the L-tryptophan C6 C-prenyltransferase (C-PT) PriB from Streptomyces sp. RM-5-8. PriB was found to be uniquely permissive to a diverse array of prenyl donors and acceptors including daptomycin. Two additional PTs also produced novel prenylated daptomycins with improved antibacterial activities over the parent drug.

  20. Maximum likelihood signature estimation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Walker, H. F.

    1975-01-01

    Maximum-likelihood estimates are discussed which are based on an unlabeled sample of observations, of unknown parameters in a mixture of normal distributions. Several successive approximation procedures for obtaining such maximum-likelihood estimates are described. These procedures, which are theoretically justified by the local contractibility of certain maps, are designed to take advantage of good initial estimates of the unknown parameters. They can be applied to the signature extension problem, in which good initial estimates of the unknown parameters are obtained from segments which are geographically near the segments from which the unlabeled samples are taken. Additional problems to which these methods are applicable include: estimation of proportions and adaptive classification (estimation of mean signatures and covariances).

  1. The Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sutton, C.

    1980-07-01

    The objectives, instruments, operation and spacecraft design for the Solar Maximum Mission are discussed. The satellite, first in a series of Multi-Mission Modular Spacecraft, was launched on February 14, 1980, to take advantage of the current maximum in the solar activity cycle to study solar flares at wavelengths from the visible to the gamma-ray. The satellite carries six instruments for the simultaneous study of solar flares, namely the coronagraph/polarimeter, X-ray polychromator, ultraviolet spectrometer and polarimeter, hard X-ray imaging spectrometer, hard X-ray burst spectrometer and gamma-ray spectrometer, and an active cavity radiometer for the accurate determination of the solar constant. In contrast to most satellite operations, Solar Maximum Mission investigators work together for the duration of the flight, comparing data obtained by the various instruments and planning observing programs daily on the basis of flare predictions and indicators. Thus far into the mission, over 50 data sets on reasonably large flares have been obtained, and important observations of coronal transients, magnetic fields in the transition region, flare time spectra, and material emitting X-rays between flares have been obtained.

  2. Extensive Transcription Analysis of the Hyposoter didymator Ichnovirus Genome in Permissive and Non-Permissive Lepidopteran Host Species

    PubMed Central

    Dorémus, Tristan; Cousserans, François; Gyapay, Gabor; Jouan, Véronique; Milano, Patricia; Wajnberg, Eric; Darboux, Isabelle; Cônsoli, Fernando Luis; Volkoff, Anne-Nathalie

    2014-01-01

    Ichnoviruses are large dsDNA viruses that belong to the Polydnaviridae family. They are specifically associated with endoparasitic wasps of the family Ichneumonidae and essential for host parasitization by these wasps. We sequenced the Hyposoter didymator Ichnovirus (HdIV) encapsidated genome for further analysis of the transcription pattern of the entire set of HdIV genes following the parasitization of four different lepidopteran host species. The HdIV genome was found to consist of at least 50 circular dsDNA molecules, carrying 135 genes, 98 of which formed 18 gene families. The HdIV genome had general features typical of Ichnovirus (IV) genomes and closely resembled that of the IV carried by Hyposoter fugitivus. Subsequent transcriptomic analysis with Illumina technology during the course of Spodoptera frugiperda parasitization led to the identification of a small subset of less than 30 genes with high RPKM values in permissive hosts, consisting with these genes encoding crucial virulence proteins. Comparisons of HdIV expression profiles between host species revealed differences in transcript levels for given HdIV genes between two permissive hosts, S. frugiperda and Pseudoplusia includens. However, we found no evident intrafamily gene-specific transcription pattern consistent with the presence of multigenic families within IV genomes reflecting an ability of the wasps concerned to exploit different host species. Interestingly, in two non-permissive hosts, Mamestra brassiccae and Anticarsia gemmatalis (most of the parasitoid eggs were eliminated by the host cellular immune response), HdIV genes were generally less strongly transcribed than in permissive hosts. This suggests that successful parasitism is dependent on the expression of given HdIV genes exceeding a particular threshold value. These results raise questions about the mecanisms involved in regulating IV gene expression according to the nature of the lepidopteran host species encountered. PMID

  3. WHITE MATTER INTEGRITY IN TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY: EFFECTS OF PERMISSIBLE FIBER TURNING ANGLE

    PubMed Central

    Dennis, Emily L.; Jin, Yan; Kernan, Claudia; Babikian, Talin; Mink, Richard; Babbitt, Christopher; Johnson, Jeffrey; Giza, Christopher C.; Asarnow, Robert F.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2015-01-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is the leading cause of death and disability in children. Diffusion weighted imaging (DWI) methods have been shown to be especially sensitive to white matter abnormalities in TBI. We used our newly developed autoMATE algorithm (automated multi-atlas tract extraction) to map altered WM integrity in TBI. Even so, tractography methods include a free parameter that limits the maximum permissible turning angles for extracted fibers, with little investigation of how this may affect statistical group comparisons. Here, we examined WM integrity calculated over a range of fiber turning angles to determine to what extent this parameter affects our ability to detect group differences. Fiber turning angle threshold has a subtle, but sometimes significant, effect on the differences we were able to detect between TBI and healthy children. PMID:26413206

  4. The Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chipman, E. G.

    1981-03-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft, launched on 1980 February 14, carries seven instruments for the study of solar flares and other aspects of solar activity. These instruments observe in spectral ranges from gamma-rays through the visible, using imaging, spectroscopy, and high-time-resolution light curves to study flare phenomena. In addition, one instrument incorporates an active cavity radiometer for accurate measurement of the total solar radiant output. This paper reviews some of the most important current observational and theoretical questions of solar flare physics and indicates the ways in which the experiments on SMM will be able to attack these questions. The SMM observing program is described.

  5. The Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chipman, E. G.

    1981-01-01

    The Solar Maximum Mission spacecraft, launched on 1980 February 14, carries seven instruments for the study of solar flares and other aspects of solar activity. These instruments observe in spectral ranges from gamma-rays through the visible, using imaging, spectroscopy, and high-time-resolution light curves to study flare phenomena. In addition, one instrument incorporates an active cavity radiometer for accurate measurement of the total solar radiant output. This paper reviews some of the most important current observational and theoretical questions of solar flare physics and indicates the ways in which the experiments on SMM will be able to attack these questions. The SMM observing program is described.

  6. On Maximum FODO Acceptance

    SciTech Connect

    Batygin, Yuri Konstantinovich

    2014-12-24

    This note illustrates maximum acceptance of FODO quadrupole focusing channel. Acceptance is the largest Floquet ellipse of a matched beam: A = $\\frac{a^2}{β}$$_{max}$ where a is the aperture of the channel and βmax is the largest value of beta-function in the channel. If aperture of the channel is restricted by a circle of radius a, the s-s acceptance is available for particles oscillating at median plane, y=0. Particles outside median plane will occupy smaller phase space area. In x-y plane, cross section of the accepted beam has a shape of ellipse with truncated boundaries.

  7. The maximum oxygen intake*

    PubMed Central

    Shephard, Roy J.; Allen, C.; Benade, A. J. S.; Davies, C. T. M.; di Prampero, P. E.; Hedman, R.; Merriman, J. E.; Myhre, K.; Simmons, R.

    1968-01-01

    Lack of cardiorespiratory fitness may well contribute to the increasing prevalence of degenerative cardiovascular disease throughout the world. As a first step towards co-ordinated and internationally comparable investigation of this problem, methods of measuring the reference standard of cardiorespiratory fitness—the maximum oxygen intake, (V̇o2)max—were compared by an international working party that met in Toronto in the summer of 1967. Repeated testing of 24 subjects showed that the (V̇o2)max was greatest on the treadmill, 3.4% smaller in a stepping test, and 6.6% smaller during use of a bicycle ergometer. There were also parallel differences in cardiac stroke volume. Uphill treadmill running was recommended for the laboratory measurement of (V̇o2)max, and stepping or bicycle exercise for field studies. A discontinuous series of maximum tests caused some improvement in the fitness of subjects, and a “continuous” test (with small increases in load at 2-min intervals) was preferred. PMID:5303329

  8. The last glacial maximum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clark, P.U.; Dyke, A.S.; Shakun, J.D.; Carlson, A.E.; Clark, J.; Wohlfarth, B.; Mitrovica, J.X.; Hostetler, S.W.; McCabe, A.M.

    2009-01-01

    We used 5704 14C, 10Be, and 3He ages that span the interval from 10,000 to 50,000 years ago (10 to 50 ka) to constrain the timing of the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM) in terms of global ice-sheet and mountain-glacier extent. Growth of the ice sheets to their maximum positions occurred between 33.0 and 26.5 ka in response to climate forcing from decreases in northern summer insolation, tropical Pacific sea surface temperatures, and atmospheric CO2. Nearly all ice sheets were at their LGM positions from 26.5 ka to 19 to 20 ka, corresponding to minima in these forcings. The onset of Northern Hemisphere deglaciation 19 to 20 ka was induced by an increase in northern summer insolation, providing the source for an abrupt rise in sea level. The onset of deglaciation of the West Antarctic Ice Sheet occurred between 14 and 15 ka, consistent with evidence that this was the primary source for an abrupt rise in sea level ???14.5 ka.

  9. Parental feeding practices predict authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive parenting styles.

    PubMed

    Hubbs-Tait, Laura; Kennedy, Tay Seacord; Page, Melanie C; Topham, Glade L; Harrist, Amanda W

    2008-07-01

    Our goal was to identify how parental feeding practices from the nutrition literature link to general parenting styles from the child development literature to understand how to target parenting practices to increase effectiveness of interventions. Stand-alone parental feeding practices could be targeted independently. However, parental feeding practices linked to parenting styles require interventions treating underlying family dynamics as a whole. To predict parenting styles from feeding practices and to test three hypotheses: restriction and pressure to eat are positively related whereas responsibility, monitoring, modeling, and encouraging are negatively related to an authoritarian parenting style; responsibility, monitoring, modeling, and encouraging are positively related whereas restriction and pressure to eat are negatively related to an authoritative parenting style; a permissive parenting style is negatively linked with all six feeding practices. Baseline data of a randomized-controlled intervention study. Two hundred thirty-nine parents (93.5% mothers) of first-grade children (134 boys, 105 girls) enrolled in rural public schools. Parental responses to encouraging and modeling questionnaires and the Child Feeding Questionnaire, as well as parenting styles measured by the Parenting Styles and Dimensions Questionnaire. Correlation and regression analyses. Feeding practices explained 21%, 15%, and 8% of the variance in authoritative, authoritarian, and permissive parenting, respectively. Restriction, pressure to eat, and monitoring (negative) significantly predicted an authoritarian style (Hypothesis 1); responsibility, restriction (negative), monitoring, and modeling predicted an authoritative style (Hypothesis 2); and modeling (negative) and restriction significantly predicted a permissive style (Hypothesis 3). Parental feeding practices with young children predict general parenting styles. Interventions that fail to address underlying parenting styles

  10. Permissiveness toward tobacco sponsorship undermines tobacco control support in Africa.

    PubMed

    Ayo-Yusuf, Olalekan A; Olutola, Bukola G; Agaku, Israel T

    2016-06-01

    School personnel, who are respected members of the community, may exert significant influence on policy adoption. This study assessed the impact of school personnel's permissiveness toward tobacco industry sponsorship activities on their support for complete bans on tobacco advertisements, comprehensive smoke-free laws and increased tobacco prices. Representative data were obtained from the Global School Personnel Survey for 29 African countries (n = 17 929). Adjusted prevalence ratios (aPR) were calculated using multi-variable Poisson regression models to assess the impact of permissiveness toward tobacco sponsorship activities on support for tobacco control policies (p < 0.05). The median of prevalence of support for different tobacco control policies among all countries was as follows: complete ban on tobacco advertisements (84.9%); comprehensive smoke-free laws (92.4%) and tobacco price increases (80.8%). School personnel who believed that the tobacco industry should be allowed to sponsor school events were significantly less likely to support complete bans on tobacco advertisements [aPR = 0.89; 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.84-0.95] and comprehensive smoke-free laws (aPR = 0.95; 95% CI 0.92-0.98). In contrast, support for complete tobacco advertisement bans was more likely among those who believed that the tobacco industry encourages youths to smoke (aPR = 1.27; 95% CI 1.17-1.37), and among those who taught about health sometimes (aPR = 1.06; 95% CI 1.01-1.11) or a lot (aPR = 1.05; 95% CI 1.01-1.10) compared with those who did not teach about health at all. These findings underscore the need to educate school personnel on tobacco industry's strategies to undermine tobacco control policies. This may help to build school personnel support for laws intended to reduce youth susceptibility, experimentation and established use of tobacco products. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Automated Verification of Specifications with Typestates and Access Permissions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siminiceanu, Radu I.; Catano, Nestor

    2011-01-01

    We propose an approach to formally verify Plural specifications based on access permissions and typestates, by model-checking automatically generated abstract state-machines. Our exhaustive approach captures all the possible behaviors of abstract concurrent programs implementing the specification. We describe the formal methodology employed by our technique and provide an example as proof of concept for the state-machine construction rules. The implementation of a fully automated algorithm to generate and verify models, currently underway, provides model checking support for the Plural tool, which currently supports only program verification via data flow analysis (DFA).

  12. Identification of cell lines permissive for human coronavirus NL63.

    PubMed

    Schildgen, Oliver; Jebbink, Maarten F; de Vries, Michel; Pyrc, Krzysztov; Dijkman, Ronald; Simon, Arne; Müller, Andreas; Kupfer, Bernd; van der Hoek, Lia

    2006-12-01

    Six cell lines routinely used in laboratories were tested for permissiveness to the infection with the newly identified human coronavirus NL63. Two monkey epithelial cell lines, LLC-MK2 and Vero-B4, showed a cytopathic effect (CPE) and clear viral replication, whereas no CPE or replication was observed in human lung fibroblasts MRC-5s. In Rhabdomyosarcoma cells, Madin-Darby-Canine-kidney cells and in an undefined monkey kidney cell line some replication was observed but massive exponential rise in virus yield lacked The results will lead to an improved routine diagnostic algorithm for the detection of the human coronavirus NL63.

  13. Structure and Specificity of a Permissive Bacterial C-Prenyltransferase

    PubMed Central

    Elshahawi, Sherif I.; Cao, Hongnan; Shaaban, Khaled A.; Ponomareva, Larissa V.; Subramanian, Thangaiah; Farman, Mark L.; Spielmann, H. Peter; Phillips, George N.; Thorson, Jon S.; Singh, Shanteri

    2016-01-01

    This study highlights the biochemical and structural characterization of the L-tryptophan C-6 C-prenyltransferase PriB from Streptomyces sp. RM-5-8. PriB was found to be uniquely permissive to a diverse array of prenyl donors and acceptors including the antibiotic daptomycin (Cubicin®). This study also highlights two additional PTs (FgaPT2 and CdpNPT) as catalysts for daptomycin prenylation where novel prenylated daptomycins also displayed improved antibacterial activities over the parent drug. PMID:28166207

  14. Evaluation of a disposable diesel exhaust filter for permissible mining machines

    SciTech Connect

    Ambs, J.L.; Cantrell, B.K.; Watts, W.F.; Olson, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    The US Bureau of Mines (USBM) Diesel Research Program emphasizes the development and evaluation of emission control devices to reduce exposure of miners to diesel exhaust pollutants. Studies by the USBM have shown that diesel exhaust aerosol (DEA) contributes a substantial portion of the respirable aerosol in underground coal mines using diesel equipment not equipped with emission controls. The USBM and the Donaldson Co., Inc., Minneapolis, MN, have developed a low-temperature, disposable diesel exhaust filter (DDEF) for use on permissible diesel haulage vehicles equipped with waterbath exhaust conditioners. These were evaluated in three underground mines to determine their effectiveness in reducing DEA concentrations. The DDEF reduced DEA concentrations from 70 to 90% at these mines. The usable life of the filter ranged from 10 to 32 h, depending on factors that affect DEA output, such as mine altitude, engine type, and duty-cycle. Cost per filter is approximately $40.

  15. Evaluation of a disposable diesel exhaust filter for permissible mining machines. Report of investigations/1994

    SciTech Connect

    Ambs, J.L.; Cantrell, B.K.; Watts, W.F.; Olson, K.S.

    1994-01-01

    The U.S. Bureau of Mines (USBM) Diesel Research Program emphasizes the development and evaluation of emission control devices to reduce exposure of miners to diesel exhaust pollutants. Studies by the USBM have shown that diesel exhaust aerosol (DEA) contributes a substantial portion of the respirable aerosol in underground coal mining using diesel equipment not equipped with emission controls. The USBM and the Donaldson Co., Inc., Minneapolis, MN, have developed a low-temperature, disposable diesel exhaust filter (DDEF) for use on permissible diesel haulage vehicles equipped with waterban exhaust conditioners. These were evaluated in three underground mines to determine their effectiveness in reducing DEA concentrations. The DDEF reduced DEA concentrations from 70 to 90 pct at these mines. The usable life of the filter ranged from 10 to 32 h, depending on factors that affect DEA output, such as mine altitude, engine type, and duty-cycle. Cost per filter is approximately $40.

  16. 19 CFR 122.66 - Clearance or permission to depart denied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ...; DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AIR COMMERCE REGULATIONS Clearance of Aircraft and Permission To Depart § 122.66 Clearance or permission to depart denied. If advance electronic air cargo information is not received as...

  17. Building and evaluating an ontology-based tool for reasoning about consent permission.

    PubMed

    Grando, Adela; Schwab, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Given the lack of mechanisms for specifying, sharing and checking the compliance of consent permissions, we focus on building and testing novel approaches to address this gap. In our previous work, we introduced a "permission ontology" to capture in a precise, machine-interpretable form informed consent permissions in research studies. Here we explain how we built and evaluated a framework for specifying subject's permissions and checking researcher's resource request in compliance with those permissions. The framework is proposed as an extension of an existing policy engine based on the eXtensible Access Control Markup Language (XACML), incorporating ontology-based reasoning. The framework is evaluated in the context of the UCSD Moores Cancer Center biorepository, modeling permissions from an informed consent and a HIPAA form. The resulting permission ontology and mechanisms to check subject's permission are implementation and institution independent, and therefore offer the potential to be reusable in other biorepositories and data warehouses.

  18. The Solar Maximum Mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Simnett, G. M.

    The scientific goals, instrumentation and operation, and results from the Solar Maximum Mission are described. The spacecraft was launched to observe the peak of the solar cycle and the impulsive phase of large flares. Instrumentation included a gamma ray spectrometer, X ray burst spectrometer, imaging spectrometer, and polychromator, a UV spectrometer and polarimeter, a coronagraph/polarimeter, and an active cavity radiometer for measurements at wavelengths ranging from the Hα line at 6563 A up to the gamma ray region of the spectrum. Command programs were prepared one day in advance by each team for its instrument, and limited readjustment was available in real-time. The spacecraft was equipped to, and did, point the instruments at one region for an expected flare build-up, and maintain that heading for an extended period of time through the appearance, development, and demise of the flare.

  19. Concentrations of trace elements in Pacific and Atlantic salmon

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khristoforova, N. K.; Tsygankov, V. Yu.; Boyarova, M. D.; Lukyanova, O. N.

    2015-09-01

    Concentrations of Hg, As, Cd, Pb, Zn, and Cu were analyzed in the two most abundant species of Pacific salmon, chum and pink salmon, caught in the Kuril Islands at the end of July, 2013. The concentrations of toxic elements (Hg, As, Pb, Cd) in males and females of these species are below the maximum permissible concentrations for seafood. It was found that farmed filleted Atlantic salmon are dominated by Zn and Cu, while muscles of wild salmon are dominated by Pb. Observed differences are obviously related to peculiar environmental geochemical conditions: anthropogenic impact for Atlantic salmon grown in coastal waters and the influence of the natural factors volcanism and upwelling for wild salmon from the Kuril waters.

  20. 20 CFR 416.1321 - Suspension for not giving us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Suspension for not giving us permission to....1321 Suspension for not giving us permission to contact financial institutions. (a) If you don't give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about you...

  1. 20 CFR 416.207 - You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false You do not give us permission to contact... Benefits for Which You Are Otherwise Eligible § 416.207 You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions. (a) To be eligible for SSI payments you must give us permission to contact any...

  2. 20 CFR 416.207 - You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false You do not give us permission to contact... Benefits for Which You Are Otherwise Eligible § 416.207 You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions. (a) To be eligible for SSI payments you must give us permission to contact any...

  3. 20 CFR 416.1321 - Suspension for not giving us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Suspension for not giving us permission to....1321 Suspension for not giving us permission to contact financial institutions. (a) If you don't give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about you...

  4. 20 CFR 416.1321 - Suspension for not giving us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Suspension for not giving us permission to....1321 Suspension for not giving us permission to contact financial institutions. (a) If you don't give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about you...

  5. 20 CFR 416.207 - You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false You do not give us permission to contact... Benefits for Which You Are Otherwise Eligible § 416.207 You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions. (a) To be eligible for SSI payments you must give us permission to contact any...

  6. 20 CFR 416.207 - You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false You do not give us permission to contact... Benefits for Which You Are Otherwise Eligible § 416.207 You do not give us permission to contact financial institutions. (a) To be eligible for SSI payments you must give us permission to contact any...

  7. 20 CFR 416.1321 - Suspension for not giving us permission to contact financial institutions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Suspension for not giving us permission to....1321 Suspension for not giving us permission to contact financial institutions. (a) If you don't give us permission to contact any financial institution and request any financial records about you...

  8. Religiosity and Premarital Sexual Permissiveness: A Response to the Reiss-Heltsley and Broderick Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppel, Howard J., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    When religiosity among college students was measured by Faulkner and DeJong's 5-D Scale of Religiosity" and the Reiss scale was used to measure permissiveness, the expected stronger relationship between religiosity and permissiveness in groups with traditions of low sexual permissiveness than in groups with traditions of high sexual…

  9. Religiosity and Premarital Sexual Permissiveness: A Response to the Reiss-Heltsley and Broderick Debate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ruppel, Howard J., Jr.

    1970-01-01

    When religiosity among college students was measured by Faulkner and DeJong's 5-D Scale of Religiosity" and the Reiss scale was used to measure permissiveness, the expected stronger relationship between religiosity and permissiveness in groups with traditions of low sexual permissiveness than in groups with traditions of high sexual…

  10. 30 CFR 75.505 - Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... permissible electric face equipment. 75.505 Section 75.505 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.505 Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face... was required to use permissible electric face equipment and to maintain such equipment in a...

  11. 30 CFR 75.505 - Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... permissible electric face equipment. 75.505 Section 75.505 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.505 Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face... was required to use permissible electric face equipment and to maintain such equipment in a...

  12. 30 CFR 75.505 - Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... permissible electric face equipment. 75.505 Section 75.505 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.505 Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face... was required to use permissible electric face equipment and to maintain such equipment in a...

  13. 30 CFR 75.505 - Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... permissible electric face equipment. 75.505 Section 75.505 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.505 Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face... was required to use permissible electric face equipment and to maintain such equipment in a...

  14. 30 CFR 75.505 - Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... permissible electric face equipment. 75.505 Section 75.505 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH... Electrical Equipment-General § 75.505 Mines classed gassy; use and maintenance of permissible electric face... was required to use permissible electric face equipment and to maintain such equipment in a...

  15. Larval diet affects mosquito development and permissiveness to Plasmodium infection

    PubMed Central

    Linenberg, Inbar; Christophides, George K.; Gendrin, Mathilde

    2016-01-01

    The larval stages of malaria vector mosquitoes develop in water pools, feeding mostly on microorganisms and environmental detritus. Richness in the nutrient supply to larvae influences the development and metabolism of larvae and adults. Here, we investigated the effects of larval diet on the development, microbiota content and permissiveness to Plasmodium of Anopheles coluzzii. We tested three fish diets often used to rear mosquitoes in the laboratory, including two pelleted diets, Dr. Clarke’s Pool Pellets and Nishikoi Fish Pellets, and one flaked diet, Tetramin Fish-Flakes. Larvae grow and develop faster and produce bigger adults when feeding on both types of pellets compared with flakes. This correlates with a higher microbiota load in pellet-fed larvae, in agreement with the known positive effect of the microbiota on mosquito development. Larval diet also significantly influences the prevalence and intensity of Plasmodium berghei infection in adults, whereby Nishikoi Fish Pellets-fed larvae develop into adults that are highly permissive to parasites and survive longer after infection. This correlates with a lower amount of Enterobacteriaceae in the midgut microbiota. Together, our results shed light on the influence of larval feeding on mosquito development, microbiota and vector competence; they also provide useful data for mosquito rearing. PMID:27910908

  16. Economics and Maximum Entropy Production

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, R. D.

    2003-04-01

    Price differentials, sales volume and profit can be seen as analogues of temperature difference, heat flow and work or entropy production in the climate system. One aspect in which economic systems exhibit more clarity than the climate is that the empirical and/or statistical mechanical tendency for systems to seek a maximum in production is very evident in economics, in that the profit motive is very clear. Noting the common link between 1/f noise, power laws and Self-Organized Criticality with Maximum Entropy Production, the power law fluctuations in security and commodity prices is not inconsistent with the analogy. There is an additional thermodynamic analogy, in that scarcity is valued. A commodity concentrated among a few traders is valued highly by the many who do not have it. The market therefore encourages via prices the spreading of those goods among a wider group, just as heat tends to diffuse, increasing entropy. I explore some empirical price-volume relationships of metals and meteorites in this context.

  17. Airborne asbestos concentration from brake changing does not exceed permissible exposure limit.

    PubMed

    Blake, Charles L; Van Orden, Drew R; Banasik, Marek; Harbison, Raymond D

    2003-08-01

    The use in the past, and to a lesser extent today, of chrysotile asbestos in automobile brake systems causes health concerns among professional mechanics. Therefore, we conducted four separate tests in order to evaluate an auto mechanic's exposure to airborne asbestos fibers while performing routine brake maintenance. Four nearly identical automobiles from 1960s having four wheel drum brakes were used. Each automobile was fitted with new replacement asbestos-containing brake shoes and then driven over a predetermined public road course for about 2253 km. Then, each car was separately brought into a repair facility; the brakes removed and replaced with new asbestos-containing shoes. The test conditions, methods, and tools were as commonly used during the 1960s. The mechanic was experienced in brake maintenance, having worked in the automobile repair profession beginning in the 1960s. Effects of three independent variables, e.g., filing, sanding, and arc grinding of the replacement brake shoe elements, were tested. Personal and area air samples were collected and analyzed for the presence of fibers, asbestos fibers, total dust, and respirable dust. The results indicated a presence in the air of only chrysotile asbestos and an absence of other types of asbestos. Airborne chrysotile fiber exposures for each test remained below currently applicable limit of 0.1 fiber/ml (eight-hour time-weighted average).

  18. 40 CFR 227.27 - Limiting permissible con-cen-tra-tion (LPC).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... not cause unreasonable acute or chronic toxicity or other sublethal adverse effects based on bioassay... conditions representing the extremes of environmental stress at the disposal site. Bioassays on phytoplankton...

  19. Generalized Maximum Entropy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Stutz, John

    2005-01-01

    A long standing mystery in using Maximum Entropy (MaxEnt) is how to deal with constraints whose values are uncertain. This situation arises when constraint values are estimated from data, because of finite sample sizes. One approach to this problem, advocated by E.T. Jaynes [1], is to ignore this uncertainty, and treat the empirically observed values as exact. We refer to this as the classic MaxEnt approach. Classic MaxEnt gives point probabilities (subject to the given constraints), rather than probability densities. We develop an alternative approach that assumes that the uncertain constraint values are represented by a probability density {e.g: a Gaussian), and this uncertainty yields a MaxEnt posterior probability density. That is, the classic MaxEnt point probabilities are regarded as a multidimensional function of the given constraint values, and uncertainty on these values is transmitted through the MaxEnt function to give uncertainty over the MaXEnt probabilities. We illustrate this approach by explicitly calculating the generalized MaxEnt density for a simple but common case, then show how this can be extended numerically to the general case. This paper expands the generalized MaxEnt concept introduced in a previous paper [3].

  20. The maximum drag reduction asymptote

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choueiri, George H.; Hof, Bjorn

    2015-11-01

    Addition of long chain polymers is one of the most efficient ways to reduce the drag of turbulent flows. Already very low concentration of polymers can lead to a substantial drag and upon further increase of the concentration the drag reduces until it reaches an empirically found limit, the so called maximum drag reduction (MDR) asymptote, which is independent of the type of polymer used. We here carry out a detailed experimental study of the approach to this asymptote for pipe flow. Particular attention is paid to the recently observed state of elasto-inertial turbulence (EIT) which has been reported to occur in polymer solutions at sufficiently high shear. Our results show that upon the approach to MDR Newtonian turbulence becomes marginalized (hibernation) and eventually completely disappears and is replaced by EIT. In particular, spectra of high Reynolds number MDR flows are compared to flows at high shear rates in small diameter tubes where EIT is found at Re < 100. The research leading to these results has received funding from the People Programme (Marie Curie Actions) of the European Union's Seventh Framework Programme (FP7/2007-2013) under REA grant agreement n° [291734].

  1. Robot Lies in Health Care: When Is Deception Morally Permissible?

    PubMed

    Matthias, Andreas

    2015-06-01

    Autonomous robots are increasingly interacting with users who have limited knowledge of robotics and are likely to have an erroneous mental model of the robot's workings, capabilities, and internal structure. The robot's real capabilities may diverge from this mental model to the extent that one might accuse the robot's manufacturer of deceiving the user, especially in cases where the user naturally tends to ascribe exaggerated capabilities to the machine (e.g. conversational systems in elder-care contexts, or toy robots in child care). This poses the question, whether misleading or even actively deceiving the user of an autonomous artifact about the capabilities of the machine is morally bad and why. By analyzing trust, autonomy, and the erosion of trust in communicative acts as consequences of deceptive robot behavior, we formulate four criteria that must be fulfilled in order for robot deception to be morally permissible, and in some cases even morally indicated.

  2. Designing babies: morally permissible ways to modify the human genome.

    PubMed

    Agar, Nicholas

    1995-01-01

    My focus in this paper is the question of the moral acceptability of attempts to modify the human genome. Much of the debate in this area has revolved around the distinction between supposedly therapeutic modification on the one hand, and eugenic modification on the other. In the first part of the paper I reject some recent arguments against genetic engineering. In the second part I seek to distinguish between permissible and impermissible forms of intervention in such a way that does not appeal to the therapeutic/eugenic distinction. If I am right much of what we would intuitively call eugenic intervention will be morally acceptable. Central to my argument is an asymmetry in the way genetic engineers can influence a person's capacities on the one hand and life-goals on the other. Forms of genetic intervention that have a high probability of producing a mismatch of life-goals and capacities will be ruled out.

  3. Maximally permissive controller synthesis for time Petri nets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heidari, Parisa; Boucheneb, Hanifa

    2013-03-01

    This article proposes a fully forward on-the-fly algorithm to synthesise safety/reachability controllers for real time systems. Given a time Petri net (TPN) with controllable and uncontrollable transitions and a safety/reachability property, the control consists of limiting the firing intervals of controllable transitions to satisfy the property of interest. This algorithm, based on the state class graph method, computes on-the-fly the reachable state classes of the TPN while collecting progressively firing subintervals to be avoided so that to satisfy the property. It does not need to compute controllable predecessors and then split state classes as it is the case for other approaches based on exploration of state space of the system (backward and forward approaches). Moreover, in the category of state-dependent controllers based on the restriction of firing intervals, the algorithm, proposed here, synthesises maximally permissive controllers.

  4. Flat high concentration devices

    SciTech Connect

    Minano, J.C.; Gonzalez, J.C.; Zanesco, I.

    1994-12-31

    During the last five years new concentrators achieving the theoretical maximum acceptance-angle-concentration product have appeared. In addition, some of these concentrators are very compact (concentrator depth/aperture diameter smaller than 1/3). The feasibility of these concentrators for photovoltaic applications is studied. It is concluded that these concentrators may be useful for high concentration cells (irradiance for maximum efficiency greater than 800 suns) if these cells have a small size (diameter smaller than 5 mm). The concentrators may provide for this case an acceptance angle of {approx} {+-}2.7 degrees with concentration factor around 1,000x and a concentrator depth 10 times the cell diameter. Instantaneous direct insolation and ambient temperature measurements of Madrid and a thermal model of the heat sink is used to calculate the annual electric energy output with which different concentration factors are compared. Concentration of 1,000x is close to the one giving the maximum annual electrical output.

  5. Pulmonary Evaluation of Permissible Exposure Limit of Syntroleum S-8 Synthetic Jet Fuel in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Simon S.; Thomas, Alana; Barbaris, Brian; Lantz, R. Clark; Witten, Mark L.

    2009-01-01

    No current studies have systematically examined pulmonary health effects associated with Syntroleum S-8 synthetic jet fuel (S-8). In order to gain an understanding about the threshold concentration in which lung injury is observed, C57BL/6 male mice were nose-only exposed to S-8 for 1 h/day for 7 days at average concentrations of 0 (control), 93, 352, and 616 mg/m3. Evaluation of pulmonary function, airway epithelial barrier integrity, and pathohistology was performed 24 h after the final exposures. Significant decreases were detected in expiratory lung resistance and total lung compliance of the 352 mg/m3 group, for which no clear concentration-dependent alterations could be determined. No significant changes in respiratory permeability were exhibited, indicating that there was no loss of epithelial barrier integrity following S-8 exposure. However, morphological examination and morphometric analysis of distal lung tissue, by using transmission electron microscopy, revealed cellular damage in alveolar type II epithelial cells, with significant increases in volume density of lamellar bodies/vacuoles at 352 and 616 S-8 mg/m3. Moreover, terminal bronchiolar Clara injury, as evidenced by apical membrane blebs, was observed at relatively low concentrations, suggesting if this synthetic jet fuel is utilized, the current permissible exposure limit of 350 mg/m3 for hydrocarbon fuels should cautiously be applied. PMID:19357071

  6. An Ethics of Permission: A Response to the California End of Life Option Act.

    PubMed

    Nelson, Craig

    2016-01-01

    An ethics of permission can be helpful in framing a response to the ethical differences surrounding the California End of Life Option Act. Law does not define morality, and reaching a moral understanding demands thorough reflection. An ethics of permission examines the ethical demands of a permissive law for both clinician and patient. Serving the good of the patient, respecting professional conscience, and following the law are three ethical elements. Although developing an ethics of permission includes these three elements, these elements do not exhaust all the moral implications involved. An ethics of permission also includes the importance of exercising professional tolerance in the honoring of clinicians who choose to participate or refuse to participate. In addition, an ethics of permission also provides insight in implementing just and fair behavior among medical professionals.

  7. An Ethics of Permission: A Response to the California End of Life Option Act

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Craig

    2016-01-01

    An ethics of permission can be helpful in framing a response to the ethical differences surrounding the California End of Life Option Act. Law does not define morality, and reaching a moral understanding demands thorough reflection. An ethics of permission examines the ethical demands of a permissive law for both clinician and patient. Serving the good of the patient, respecting professional conscience, and following the law are three ethical elements. Although developing an ethics of permission includes these three elements, these elements do not exhaust all the moral implications involved. An ethics of permission also includes the importance of exercising professional tolerance in the honoring of clinicians who choose to participate or refuse to participate. In addition, an ethics of permission also provides insight in implementing just and fair behavior among medical professionals. PMID:27541320

  8. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth

    PubMed Central

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A.; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-01-01

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)−/− mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apcmin+/− mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial–mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the “field change” milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth. PMID:27226307

  9. Pseudorabies virus infection inhibits autophagy in permissive cells in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mingxia; Hou, Linlin; Tang, Yan-dong; Liu, Yonggang; Wang, Shujie; Wang, Jingfei; Shen, Nan; An, Tongqing; Tian, Zhijun; Cai, Xuehui

    2017-01-01

    A large number of studies have demonstrated that autophagy is involved in the infection processes of different pathogens. Autophagy is now recognized as an essential component of innate and adaptive immunity. Several herpesviruses have developed various strategies to evade this antiviral mechanism. Pseudorabies virus (PRV) is a swine herpesvirus with a broad host range that causes devastating disease in infected pigs. In this study, we described the interaction between PRV and autophagy for the first time. PRV infection had a dual effect on the cell autophagy response; during the early period of infection, PRV virions induced autophagy without viral replication, and with viral protein expression, PRV reduced the basal level of autophagy in several permissive cells. We observed that inhibit the level of autophagy could increase the titer of infectious PRV. We also found that the conserved alphaherpesvirus US3 tegument protein may reduce the level of autophagy via activation of the AKT/mTOR pathways in PRV infected cells. These findings suggest that autophagy likely contributes to clearance of PRV, and that the virus has evolved strategies to antagonize this pathway. PMID:28059118

  10. Permissive hypercapnia--role in protective lung ventilatory strategies.

    PubMed

    Laffey, John G; O'Croinin, Donall; McLoughlin, Paul; Kavanagh, Brian P

    2004-03-01

    "Permissive hypercapnia" is an inherent element of accepted protective lung ventilation. However, there are no clinical data evaluating the efficacy of hypercapnia per se, independent of ventilator strategy. In the absence of such data, it is necessary to determine whether the potential exists for an active role for hypercapnia, distinct from the demonstrated benefits of reduced lung stretch. In this review, we consider four key issues. First, we consider the evidence that protective lung ventilatory strategies improve survival and we explore current paradigms regarding the mechanisms underlying these effects. Second, we examine whether hypercapnic acidosis may have effects that are additive to the effects of protective ventilation. Third, we consider whether direct elevation of CO(2), in the absence of protective ventilation, is beneficial or deleterious. Fourth, we address the current evidence regarding the buffering of hypercapnic acidosis in ARDS. These perspectives reveal that the potential exists for hypercapnia to exert beneficial effects in the clinical context. Direct administration of CO(2) is protective in multiple models of acute lung and systemic injury. Nevertheless, several specific concerns remain regarding the safety of hypercapnia. At present, protective ventilatory strategies that involve hypercapnia are clinically acceptable, provided the clinician is primarily targeting reduced tidal stretch. There are insufficient clinical data to suggest that hypercapnia per se should be independently induced, nor do outcome data exist to support the practice of buffering hypercapnic acidosis. Rapidly advancing basic scientific investigations should better delineate the advantages, disadvantages, and optimal use of hypercapnia in ARDS.

  11. Growth hormone is permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

    PubMed

    Chesnokova, Vera; Zonis, Svetlana; Zhou, Cuiqi; Recouvreux, Maria Victoria; Ben-Shlomo, Anat; Araki, Takako; Barrett, Robert; Workman, Michael; Wawrowsky, Kolja; Ljubimov, Vladimir A; Uhart, Magdalena; Melmed, Shlomo

    2016-06-07

    Growth hormone (GH) excess in acromegaly is associated with increased precancerous colon polyps and soft tissue adenomas, whereas short-stature humans harboring an inactivating GH receptor mutation do not develop cancer. We show that locally expressed colon GH is abundant in conditions predisposing to colon cancer and in colon adenocarcinoma-associated stromal fibroblasts. Administration of a GH receptor (GHR) blocker in acromegaly patients induced colon p53 and adenomatous polyposis coli (APC), reversing progrowth GH signals. p53 was also induced in skin fibroblasts derived from short-statured humans with mutant GHR. GH-deficient prophet of pituitary-specific positive transcription factor 1 (Prop1)(-/-) mice exhibited induced colon p53 levels, and cross-breeding them with Apc(min+/-) mice that normally develop intestinal and colon tumors resulted in GH-deficient double mutants with markedly decreased tumor number and size. We also demonstrate that GH suppresses p53 and reduces apoptosis in human colon cell lines as well as in induced human pluripotent stem cell-derived intestinal organoids, and confirm in vivo that GH suppresses colon mucosal p53/p21. GH excess leads to decreased colon cell phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN), increased cell survival with down-regulated APC, nuclear β-catenin accumulation, and increased epithelial-mesenchymal transition factors and colon cell motility. We propose that GH is a molecular component of the "field change" milieu permissive for neoplastic colon growth.

  12. Follicle Depletion Provides a Permissive Environment for Ovarian Carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ying; Cai, Kathy Qi; Smith, Elizabeth R.; Yeasky, Toni M.; Moore, Robert; Ganjei-Azar, Parvin; Klein-Szanto, Andres J.; Godwin, Andrew K.; Hamilton, Thomas C.

    2016-01-01

    We modeled the etiology of postmenopausal biology on ovarian cancer risk using germ cell-deficient white-spotting variant (Wv) mice, incorporating oncogenic mutations. Ovarian cancer incidence is highest in peri- and postmenopausal women, and epidemiological studies have established the impact of reproductive factors on ovarian cancer risk. Menopause as a result of ovarian follicle depletion is thought to contribute to higher cancer risk. As a consequence of follicle depletion, female Wv mice develop ovarian tubular adenomas, a benign epithelial tumor corresponding to surface epithelial invaginations and papillomatosis frequently found in postmenopausal human ovaries. Lineage tracing using MISR2-Cre indicated that the tubular adenomas that developed in Wv mice were largely derived from the MISR2 lineage, which marked only a fraction of ovarian surface and oviduct epithelial cells in wild-type tissues. Deletion of p27, either heterozygous or homozygous, was able to convert the benign tubular adenomas into more proliferative tumors. Restricted deletion of p53 in Wv/Wv mice by either intrabursal injection of adenoviral Cre or inclusion of the MISR2-Cre transgene also resulted in augmented tumor growth. This finding suggests that follicle depletion provides a permissive ovarian environment for oncogenic transformation of epithelial cells, presenting a mechanism for the increased ovarian cancer risk in postmenopausal women. PMID:27354067

  13. Recombinant pestivirus E2 glycoproteins prevent viral attachment to permissive and non permissive cells with different efficiency.

    PubMed

    Asfor, A S; Wakeley, P R; Drew, T W; Paton, D J

    2014-08-30

    Bovine viral diarrhoea virus (BVDV) is an economically important animal pathogen, which like other pestiviruses has similar molecular biological features to hepaciviruses, including human Hepatitis C virus. The pestivirus E2 glycoproteins are the major target for virus-neutralising antibodies, as well as playing a role in receptor binding and host range restriction. In this study, recombinant E2 glycoproteins (rE2) derived from three different pestivirus species were examined for their inhibitory effects on pestivirus infectivity in cell culture. Histidine-tagged rE2 glycoproteins of BVDV type 2 strain 178003, BVDV type 1 strain Oregon C24V and CSFV strain Alfort 187 were produced in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells and purified under native conditions. The ability of rE2 glycoprotein to inhibit the infection of permissive cells by both homologous and heterologous virus was compared, revealing that the inhibitory effects of rE2 glycoproteins correlated with the predicted similarity of the E2 structures in the recombinant protein and the test virus. This result suggests that the sequence and structure of E2 are likely to be involved in the host specificity of pestiviruses at their point of uptake into cells.

  14. Maximum-biomass prediction of homofermentative Lactobacillus.

    PubMed

    Cui, Shumao; Zhao, Jianxin; Liu, Xiaoming; Chen, Yong Q; Zhang, Hao; Chen, Wei

    2016-07-01

    Fed-batch and pH-controlled cultures have been widely used for industrial production of probiotics. The aim of this study was to systematically investigate the relationship between the maximum biomass of different homofermentative Lactobacillus and lactate accumulation, and to develop a prediction equation for the maximum biomass concentration in such cultures. The accumulation of the end products and the depletion of nutrients by various strains were evaluated. In addition, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) of acid anions for various strains at pH 7.0 were examined. The lactate concentration at the point of complete inhibition was not significantly different from the MIC of lactate for all of the strains, although the inhibition mechanism of lactate and acetate on Lactobacillus rhamnosus was different from the other strains which were inhibited by the osmotic pressure caused by acid anions at pH 7.0. When the lactate concentration accumulated to the MIC, the strains stopped growing. The maximum biomass was closely related to the biomass yield per unit of lactate produced (YX/P) and the MIC (C) of lactate for different homofermentative Lactobacillus. Based on the experimental data obtained using different homofermentative Lactobacillus, a prediction equation was established as follows: Xmax - X0 = (0.59 ± 0.02)·YX/P·C.

  15. The influence of some blasting techniques on the probability of ignition of firedamp by permissible explosives.

    PubMed

    Sanchidrián, J A; López, L M; Segarra, P

    2008-07-15

    The ignition of firedamp by permissible explosives is assessed by means of gallery testing conducted by the Bruceton up-and-down method. Six test series were made in order to analyze the influence of several blasting practices in long-holes coal blasting, namely: use of slotted PVC pipes, detonating cord, salt cartridges and double (top and bottom) initiation. The parameters of the distributions of the probability of ignition are determined by the maximum likelihood method; normal, logistic, lognormal and Weibull distributions have been used. Confidence bands for the probability points are obtained both from the asymptotic standard errors of the parameters and by a bootstrap-like technique. The four distributions used give similar results in a rather ample probability range; discrepancies in the probability points are within 2% and in the confidence limits within 10% in a range of probability [0.1, 0.9] in most of the cases. The use of detonating cord is found to affect significantly the probability of ignition; the double initiation does also have an influence though not statistically significant at a 95% level; the use of salt cartridges, in the amount tested, has little effect in the ignition probability; the use of PVC pipe shows no effect.

  16. On the Problem of Permissible Covariance and Variogram Models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christakos, George

    1984-02-01

    The covariance and variogram models (ordinary or generalized) are important statistical tools used in various estimation and simulation techniques which have been recently applied to diverse hydrologic problems. For example, the efficacy of kriging, a method for interpolating, filtering, or averaging spatial phenomena, depends, to a large extent, on the covariance or variogram model chosen. The aim of this article is to provide the users of these techniques with convenient criteria that may help them to judge whether a function which arises in a particular problem, and is not included among the known covariance or variogram models, is permissible as such a model. This is done by investigating the properties of the candidate model in both the space and frequency domains. In the present article this investigation covers stationary random functions as well as intrinsic random functions (i.e., nonstationary functions for which increments of some order are stationary). Then, based on the theoretical results obtained, a procedure is outlined and successfully applied to a number of candidate models. In order to give to this procedure a more practical context, we employ "stereological" equations that essentially transfer the investigations to one-dimensional space, together with approximations in terms of polygonal functions and Fourier-Bessel series expansions. There are many benefits and applications of such a procedure. Polygonal models can be fit arbitrarily closely to the data. Also, the approximation of a particular model in the frequency domain by a Fourier-Bessel series expansion can be very effective. This is shown by theory and by example.

  17. Permissive and restricted virus infection of murine embryonic stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Wash, Rachael; Calabressi, Sabrina; Franz, Stephanie; Griffiths, Samantha J.; Goulding, David; Tan, E-Pien; Wise, Helen; Digard, Paul; Haas, Jürgen; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2012-01-01

    Recent RNA interference (RNAi) studies have identified many host proteins that modulate virus infection, but small interfering RNA ‘off-target’ effects and the use of transformed cell lines limit their conclusiveness. As murine embryonic stem (mES) cells can be genetically modified and resources exist where many and eventually all known mouse genes are insertionally inactivated, it was reasoned that mES cells would provide a useful alternative to RNAi screens. Beyond allowing investigation of host–pathogen interactions in vitro, mES cells have the potential to differentiate into other primary cell types, as well as being used to generate knockout mice for in vivo studies. However, mES cells are poorly characterized for virus infection. To investigate whether ES cells can be used to explore host–virus interactions, this study characterized the responses of mES cells following infection by herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) and influenza A virus. HSV-1 replicated lytically in mES cells, although mES cells were less permissive than most other cell types tested. Influenza virus was able to enter mES cells and express some viral proteins, but the replication cycle was incomplete and no infectious virus was produced. Knockdown of the host protein AHCYL1 in mES cells reduced HSV-1 replication, showing the potential for using mES cells to study host–virus interactions. Transcriptional profiling, however, indicated the lack of an efficient innate immune response in these cells. mES cells may thus be useful to identify host proteins that play a role in virus replication, but they are not suitable to determine factors that are involved in innate host defence. PMID:22815272

  18. Concentrations of thiocyanate and goitrin in human plasma, their precursor concentrations in brassica vegetables, and associated potential risk for hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Felker, Peter; Bunch, Ronald; Leung, Angela M

    2016-04-01

    Brassica vegetables are common components of the diet and have beneficial as well as potentially adverse health effects. Following enzymatic breakdown, some glucosinolates in brassica vegetables produce sulforaphane, phenethyl, and indolylic isothiocyanates that possess anticarcinogenic activity. In contrast, progoitrin and indolylic glucosinolates degrade to goitrin and thiocyanate, respectively, and may decrease thyroid hormone production. Radioiodine uptake to the thyroid is inhibited by 194 μmol of goitrin, but not by 77 μmol of goitrin. Collards, Brussels sprouts, and some Russian kale (Brassica napus) contain sufficient goitrin to potentially decrease iodine uptake by the thyroid. However, turnip tops, commercial broccoli, broccoli rabe, and kale belonging to Brassica oleracae contain less than 10 μmol of goitrin per 100-g serving and can be considered of minimal risk. Using sulforaphane plasma levels following glucoraphanin ingestion as a surrogate for thiocyanate plasma concentrations after indole glucosinolate ingestion, the maximum thiocyanate contribution from indole glucosinolate degradation is estimated to be 10 μM, which is significantly lower than background plasma thiocyanate concentrations (40-69 μM). Thiocyanate generated from consumption of indole glucosinolate can be assumed to have minimal adverse risks for thyroid health. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the International Life Sciences Institute. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Last Glacial Maximum Salinity Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, K.; Spivack, A. J.

    2016-12-01

    It has been previously demonstrated that salinity can be reconstructed from sediment porewater. The goal of our study is to reconstruct high precision salinity during the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). Salinity is usually determined at high precision via conductivity, which requires a larger volume of water than can be extracted from a sediment core, or via chloride titration, which yields lower than ideal precision. It has been demonstrated for water column samples that high precision density measurements can be used to determine salinity at the precision of a conductivity measurement using the equation of state of seawater. However, water column seawater has a relatively constant composition, in contrast to porewater, where variations from standard seawater composition occur. These deviations, which affect the equation of state, must be corrected for through precise measurements of each ion's concentration and knowledge of apparent partial molar density in seawater. We have developed a density-based method for determining porewater salinity that requires only 5 mL of sample, achieving density precisions of 10-6 g/mL. We have applied this method to porewater samples extracted from long cores collected along a N-S transect across the western North Atlantic (R/V Knorr cruise KN223). Density was determined to a precision of 2.3x10-6 g/mL, which translates to salinity uncertainty of 0.002 gms/kg if the effect of differences in composition is well constrained. Concentrations of anions (Cl-, and SO4-2) and cations (Na+, Mg+, Ca+2, and K+) were measured. To correct salinities at the precision required to unravel LGM Meridional Overturning Circulation, our ion precisions must be better than 0.1% for SO4-/Cl- and Mg+/Na+, and 0.4% for Ca+/Na+, and K+/Na+. Alkalinity, pH and Dissolved Inorganic Carbon of the porewater were determined to precisions better than 4% when ratioed to Cl-, and used to calculate HCO3-, and CO3-2. Apparent partial molar densities in seawater were

  20. Permissible Emission Limit Estimation via Iterative Back-Calculation: Case of Assaluyeh Energy Zone, Southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Khajehpour, Hossein; Saboohi, Yadollah; Tsatsaronis, George

    2017-08-16

    In this research work, an environmental policy procedure for setting a cap on emissions, as a crucial step in any total emission control system, has been provided and evaluated. It is shown that general regulations on emission intensities and rates do not guarantee that ambient air quality standards are met in intense industrial zones. Local emission limits are necessary to meet ambient air quality standards in these zones. To that end, we used dispersion simulators to back-calculate pollutant concentration thresholds for a large and intense energy system in the Assaluyeh region of southern Iran. Verified modeling results indicate 218 days of pollutant concentration threshold exceedance in Assaluyeh in a simulated year. Back-calculation to assess the total permissible emission level indicates the need for 68% reduction in total emission to meet ambient air quality standards. We then used the model to help identify effective control strategies including emission reductions and appropriate timing of specific operations. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  1. 12 CFR 714.2 - What are the permissible leasing arrangements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What are the permissible leasing arrangements... CREDIT UNIONS LEASING § 714.2 What are the permissible leasing arrangements? (a) You may engage in direct leasing. In direct leasing, you purchase personal property from a vendor, becoming the owner of...

  2. 12 CFR 714.2 - What are the permissible leasing arrangements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What are the permissible leasing arrangements... CREDIT UNIONS LEASING § 714.2 What are the permissible leasing arrangements? (a) You may engage in direct leasing. In direct leasing, you purchase personal property from a vendor, becoming the owner of...

  3. 12 CFR 714.2 - What are the permissible leasing arrangements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 7 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What are the permissible leasing arrangements... CREDIT UNIONS LEASING § 714.2 What are the permissible leasing arrangements? (a) You may engage in direct leasing. In direct leasing, you purchase personal property from a vendor, becoming the owner of...

  4. 10 CFR 707.17 - Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. 707.17 Section 707.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.17 Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. Actions available to DOE...

  5. 10 CFR 707.17 - Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. 707.17 Section 707.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.17 Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. Actions available to DOE...

  6. 10 CFR 707.17 - Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. 707.17 Section 707.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.17 Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. Actions available to DOE...

  7. 10 CFR 707.17 - Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. 707.17 Section 707.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.17 Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. Actions available to DOE...

  8. 10 CFR 707.17 - Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. 707.17 Section 707.17 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY WORKPLACE SUBSTANCE ABUSE PROGRAMS AT DOE SITES Procedures § 707.17 Permissible actions in the event of contractor noncompliance. Actions available to DOE...

  9. Permissive Parenting and Mental Health in College Students: Mediating Effects of Academic Entitlement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Alison L.; Hirsch, Jameson K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Student mental health may suffer due to unreasonable expectations associated with academic entitlement; permissive parenting may be one source of these expectations. The authors examined the role of academic entitlement as a mediator of the relationship between permissive parenting and psychological functioning. Participants:…

  10. 12 CFR 238.54 - Permissible bank holding company activities of savings and loan holding companies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... Board has promulgated pursuant to section 4(c) of the Bank Holding Company Act are permissible for... of satisfactory or above prior to January 1, 2008, or a composite rating of “1” or “2” thereafter, in... going concern; or (2) The activity is permissible under authority other than section 10(c)(2)(F)(i)...

  11. E-Reserves Permissions and the Copyright Clearance Center: Process, Efficiency, and Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holobar, J. Christopher; Marshall, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the process of requesting copyright permissions through the Copyright Clearance Center's (CCC) pay-per-use service for electronic course reserves at the Penn State University Libraries in 2008. The authors investigate the efficiency of this process as a function of the percentage of permission requests successfully mediated by…

  12. 36 CFR 223.12 - Permission to cut, damage, or destroy trees without advertisement.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... destroy trees without advertisement. 223.12 Section 223.12 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST... § 223.12 Permission to cut, damage, or destroy trees without advertisement. Permission may be granted to cut, damage, or destroy trees, portions of trees, or other forest products on National Forest...

  13. 12 CFR 347.105 - Permissible financial activities outside the United States.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Permissible financial activities outside the United States. 347.105 Section 347.105 Banks and Banking FEDERAL DEPOSIT INSURANCE CORPORATION REGULATIONS AND STATEMENTS OF GENERAL POLICY INTERNATIONAL BANKING § 347.105 Permissible financial activities...

  14. Building and evaluating an ontology-based tool for reasoning about consent permission

    PubMed Central

    Grando, Adela; Schwab, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Given the lack of mechanisms for specifying, sharing and checking the compliance of consent permissions, we focus on building and testing novel approaches to address this gap. In our previous work, we introduced a “permission ontology” to capture in a precise, machine-interpretable form informed consent permissions in research studies. Here we explain how we built and evaluated a framework for specifying subject’s permissions and checking researcher’s resource request in compliance with those permissions. The framework is proposed as an extension of an existing policy engine based on the eXtensible Access Control Markup Language (XACML), incorporating ontology-based reasoning. The framework is evaluated in the context of the UCSD Moores Cancer Center biorepository, modeling permissions from an informed consent and a HIPAA form. The resulting permission ontology and mechanisms to check subject’s permission are implementation and institution independent, and therefore offer the potential to be reusable in other biorepositories and data warehouses. PMID:24551354

  15. Parental Permission to Date and Its Relationship to Drug Use and Suicidal Thoughts among Adolescents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wright, Loyd S.

    1982-01-01

    Found early permission to date related to: feelings of being confident, independent, and tired; good relationship with mother; reported drinking and drug abuse problems; and frequent drug use. Found late permission related to feelings of being unsure, dependent, and refreshed; poor relationship with mother; maternal overstrictness; and serious…

  16. 5 CFR 890.1013 - Deciding whether to propose a permissive debarment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Deciding whether to propose a permissive debarment. 890.1013 Section 890.1013 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT (CONTINUED... Imposed Against Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1013 Deciding whether to propose...

  17. 5 CFR 890.1012 - Time limits for OPM to initiate permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Time limits for OPM to initiate permissive debarments. 890.1012 Section 890.1012 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Sanctions Imposed Against Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1012 Time limits for OPM...

  18. 5 CFR 890.1012 - Time limits for OPM to initiate permissive debarments.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Time limits for OPM to initiate permissive debarments. 890.1012 Section 890.1012 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT... Sanctions Imposed Against Health Care Providers Permissive Debarments § 890.1012 Time limits for OPM...

  19. 42 CFR 433.68 - Permissible health care-related taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Permissible health care-related taxes. 433.68... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.68 Permissible health care-related taxes. (a) General rule. A State may receive health care-related taxes, without a reduction in FFP, only in accordance with...

  20. 47 CFR 74.831 - Scope of service and permissible transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scope of service and permissible transmissions... Power Auxiliary Stations § 74.831 Scope of service and permissible transmissions. The license for a low power auxiliary station authorizes the transmission of cues and orders to production personnel...

  1. 47 CFR 74.831 - Scope of service and permissible transmissions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope of service and permissible transmissions... Power Auxiliary Stations § 74.831 Scope of service and permissible transmissions. The license for a low power auxiliary station authorizes the transmission of cues and orders to production personnel...

  2. 42 CFR 433.68 - Permissible health care-related taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Permissible health care-related taxes. 433.68 Section 433.68 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.68 Permissible health care-related taxes. (a) General rule....

  3. 42 CFR 433.68 - Permissible health care-related taxes.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Permissible health care-related taxes. 433.68 Section 433.68 Public Health CENTERS FOR MEDICARE & MEDICAID SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Requirements State Financial Participation § 433.68 Permissible health care-related taxes. (a) General rule....

  4. 36 CFR 223.7 - Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas. 223.7 Section 223.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS General Provisions § 223.7 Permission for free use of timber outside free-use...

  5. 36 CFR 223.7 - Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas. 223.7 Section 223.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS General Provisions § 223.7 Permission for free use of timber outside free-use...

  6. 36 CFR 223.7 - Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas. 223.7 Section 223.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS General Provisions § 223.7 Permission for free use of timber outside free-use...

  7. 36 CFR 223.7 - Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas. 223.7 Section 223.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas. Similar material may be cut outside of a free-use...

  8. 36 CFR 223.7 - Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permission for free use of timber outside free-use areas. 223.7 Section 223.7 Parks, Forests, and Public Property FOREST SERVICE... FOREST BOTANICAL PRODUCTS General Provisions § 223.7 Permission for free use of timber outside free-use...

  9. 20 CFR 369.3 - Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... the seal. 369.3 Section 369.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.3 Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal. Requests for written permission to use the seal of the Railroad Retirement...

  10. 20 CFR 369.3 - Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... seal. 369.3 Section 369.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.3 Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal. Requests for written permission to use the seal of the Railroad Retirement...

  11. 20 CFR 369.3 - Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... the seal. 369.3 Section 369.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.3 Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal. Requests for written permission to use the seal of the Railroad Retirement...

  12. 20 CFR 369.3 - Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... the seal. 369.3 Section 369.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.3 Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal. Requests for written permission to use the seal of the Railroad Retirement...

  13. 20 CFR 369.3 - Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... seal. 369.3 Section 369.3 Employees' Benefits RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD INTERNAL ADMINISTRATION, POLICY AND PROCEDURES USE OF THE SEAL OF THE RAILROAD RETIREMENT BOARD § 369.3 Procedures for obtaining permission to use the seal. Requests for written permission to use the seal of the Railroad Retirement...

  14. 19 CFR 122.66 - Clearance or permission to depart denied.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Clearance or permission to depart denied. 122.66 Section 122.66 Customs Duties U.S. CUSTOMS AND BORDER PROTECTION, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY... Clearance or permission to depart denied. If advance electronic air cargo information is not received...

  15. 18 CFR 35.4 - Permission to become effective is not approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Permission to become effective is not approval. 35.4 Section 35.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... AND TARIFFS Application § 35.4 Permission to become effective is not approval. The fact that...

  16. 18 CFR 35.4 - Permission to become effective is not approval.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Permission to become effective is not approval. 35.4 Section 35.4 Conservation of Power and Water Resources FEDERAL ENERGY... AND TARIFFS Application § 35.4 Permission to become effective is not approval. The fact that...

  17. The Affectional Component of Sexual Permissiveness: A Factor-Analytic Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    White, Kathleen M.; Houlihan, John

    1978-01-01

    The Reiss Premarital Sexual Permissiveness Scale was administered to 51 male and 54 female undergraduates. Factor analysis revealed three major factors: intercourse with affection, kissing with affection, and nonaffectional sexual activity. It is suggested that permissiveness be defined as lack of affection. (Author)

  18. 14 CFR 221.123 - Re-use of Special Tariff Permission when tariff is rejected.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Re-use of Special Tariff Permission when... Statutory Notice § 221.123 Re-use of Special Tariff Permission when tariff is rejected. If a tariff... be used in a tariff issued in lieu of such rejected tariff provided that such re-use is not...

  19. 26 CFR 1.414(w)-1 - Permissible withdrawals from eligible automatic contribution arrangements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 5 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Permissible withdrawals from eligible automatic..., Stock Bonus Plans, Etc. § 1.414(w)-1 Permissible withdrawals from eligible automatic contribution... to make a withdrawal of default elective contributions from an eligible automatic contribution...

  20. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric face equipment; requirements for...-General § 75.506 Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility. (a) Electric-driven mine equipment and accessories manufactured on or after March 30, 1973, will be permissible electric...

  1. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric face equipment; requirements for...-General § 75.506 Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility. (a) Electric-driven mine equipment and accessories manufactured on or after March 30, 1973, will be permissible electric...

  2. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric face equipment; requirements for...-General § 75.506 Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility. (a) Electric-driven mine equipment and accessories manufactured on or after March 30, 1973, will be permissible electric...

  3. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric face equipment; requirements for...-General § 75.506 Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility. (a) Electric-driven mine equipment and accessories manufactured on or after March 30, 1973, will be permissible electric...

  4. 30 CFR 75.506 - Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric face equipment; requirements for...-General § 75.506 Electric face equipment; requirements for permissibility. (a) Electric-driven mine equipment and accessories manufactured on or after March 30, 1973, will be permissible electric...

  5. 12 CFR 714.2 - What are the permissible leasing arrangements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What are the permissible leasing arrangements... CREDIT UNIONS LEASING § 714.2 What are the permissible leasing arrangements? (a) You may engage in direct leasing. In direct leasing, you purchase personal property from a vendor, becoming the owner of...

  6. Permissive Parenting and Mental Health in College Students: Mediating Effects of Academic Entitlement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barton, Alison L.; Hirsch, Jameson K.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Student mental health may suffer due to unreasonable expectations associated with academic entitlement; permissive parenting may be one source of these expectations. The authors examined the role of academic entitlement as a mediator of the relationship between permissive parenting and psychological functioning. Participants:…

  7. The Impact of the Shared Permissive Feeding Environment on Low-income Preschool Children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To gain insight into parental feeding problems and strategies, this study investigated the impact of permissive feeding styles (FS) on overweight status of low-income preschool children and described the shared permissive feeding environment by examining characteristics of the parent (emotional affe...

  8. 30 CFR 77.1902-1 - Permissible diesel-powered equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible diesel-powered equipment. 77.1902-1 Section 77.1902-1 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE... COAL MINES Slope and Shaft Sinking § 77.1902-1 Permissible diesel-powered equipment. Diesel-powered...

  9. E-Reserves Permissions and the Copyright Clearance Center: Process, Efficiency, and Cost

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holobar, J. Christopher; Marshall, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    This study examines the process of requesting copyright permissions through the Copyright Clearance Center's (CCC) pay-per-use service for electronic course reserves at the Penn State University Libraries in 2008. The authors investigate the efficiency of this process as a function of the percentage of permission requests successfully mediated by…

  10. Optimal Inventory Planning under Permissible Delay in Payments When a Larger Order Quantity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Kuang-Hua; Huang, Hung-Fu; Tu, Yu-Cheng; Huang, Yung-Fu

    In the previous related studies, the inventory replenishment problems under permissible delay in payments are independent of the order quantity. In this study, the restrictive assumption of the trade credit independent of the order quantity is relaxed. This study discusses the inventory policies under permissible delay in payments when a larger order quantity.

  11. 33 CFR 149.510 - How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation? 149.510 Section 149.510 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation General § 149.510 How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation? (a...

  12. 33 CFR 149.510 - How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation? 149.510 Section 149.510 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation General § 149.510 How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation? (a...

  13. 33 CFR 149.510 - How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation? 149.510 Section 149.510 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation General § 149.510 How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation? (a...

  14. 33 CFR 149.510 - How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation? 149.510 Section 149.510 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation General § 149.510 How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation? (a...

  15. 33 CFR 149.510 - How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 2 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation? 149.510 Section 149.510 Navigation and Navigable Waters COAST GUARD... EQUIPMENT Aids to Navigation General § 149.510 How do I get permission to establish an aid to navigation? (a...

  16. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and...

  17. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and...

  18. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and...

  19. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams..., DEPARTMENT OF LABOR COAL MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH MANDATORY SAFETY STANDARDS-UNDERGROUND COAL MINES Electrical Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and...

  20. 12 CFR 714.2 - What are the permissible leasing arrangements?

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 6 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What are the permissible leasing arrangements... CREDIT UNIONS LEASING § 714.2 What are the permissible leasing arrangements? (a) You may engage in direct leasing. In direct leasing, you purchase personal property from a vendor, becoming the owner of...

  1. 30 CFR 75.506-1 - Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Electric face equipment; permissible condition... Equipment-General § 75.506-1 Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, electric face equipment which meets the requirements...

  2. 30 CFR 75.506-1 - Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Electric face equipment; permissible condition... Equipment-General § 75.506-1 Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, electric face equipment which meets the requirements...

  3. 30 CFR 75.506-1 - Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Electric face equipment; permissible condition... Equipment-General § 75.506-1 Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, electric face equipment which meets the requirements...

  4. 30 CFR 75.506-1 - Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Electric face equipment; permissible condition... Equipment-General § 75.506-1 Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, electric face equipment which meets the requirements...

  5. 30 CFR 75.506-1 - Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Electric face equipment; permissible condition... Equipment-General § 75.506-1 Electric face equipment; permissible condition; maintenance requirements. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, electric face equipment which meets the requirements...

  6. 30 CFR 75.501 - Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 30 Mineral Resources 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams... Equipment-General § 75.501 Permissible electric face equipment; coal seams above water table. On and after March 30, 1974, all electric face equipment, other than equipment referred to in paragraph (b) of § 75...

  7. 40 CFR 60.694 - Permission to use alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Permission to use alternative means of emission limitation. 60.694 Section 60.694 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for VOC Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.694 Permission to use...

  8. 40 CFR 60.694 - Permission to use alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Permission to use alternative means of emission limitation. 60.694 Section 60.694 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for VOC Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.694 Permission to use...

  9. 40 CFR 60.694 - Permission to use alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Permission to use alternative means of emission limitation. 60.694 Section 60.694 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for VOC Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.694 Permission to use...

  10. 40 CFR 60.694 - Permission to use alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Permission to use alternative means of emission limitation. 60.694 Section 60.694 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for VOC Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.694 Permission to use...

  11. 40 CFR 60.694 - Permission to use alternative means of emission limitation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Permission to use alternative means of emission limitation. 60.694 Section 60.694 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... Performance for VOC Emissions From Petroleum Refinery Wastewater Systems § 60.694 Permission to use...

  12. Gas exchange and the coagulation system of the blood during the effect on the body of high concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosh, L.; Agadzhanyan, N. A.; Davydov, G. A.; Rybakov, B. K.; Sergiyenko, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    Maximum permissible concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide in a controlled atmosphere were determined by evaluating their effects on human gas exchange, blood coagulation, and tolerances to acute hypoxia, acceleration, and physical loads. It was found that functional disturbances depend on the concentration of respiratory gases and the length of stay in an altered atmosphere. By changing the atmospheric composition and by bringing the gaseous environment into accordance with the work and rest regimen and energy expenditures, the general reactivity of the body changes favorably.

  13. Gas exchange and the coagulation system of the blood during the effect on the body of high concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palosh, L.; Agadzhanyan, N. A.; Davydov, G. A.; Rybakov, B. K.; Sergiyenko, A. S.

    1974-01-01

    Maximum permissible concentrations of oxygen and carbon dioxide in a controlled atmosphere were determined by evaluating their effects on human gas exchange, blood coagulation, and tolerances to acute hypoxia, acceleration, and physical loads. It was found that functional disturbances depend on the concentration of respiratory gases and the length of stay in an altered atmosphere. By changing the atmospheric composition and by bringing the gaseous environment into accordance with the work and rest regimen and energy expenditures, the general reactivity of the body changes favorably.

  14. Cell Development obeys Maximum Fisher Information

    PubMed Central

    Frieden, B. Roy; Gatenby, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic cell development has been optimized by natural selection to obey maximal intracellular flux of messenger proteins. This, in turn, implies maximum Fisher information on angular position about a target nuclear pore complex (NPR). The cell is simply modeled as spherical, with cell membrane (CM) diameter 10μm and concentric nuclear membrane (NM) diameter 6μm. The NM contains ≈ 3000 nuclear pore complexes (NPCs). Development requires messenger ligands to travel from the CM-NPC-DNA target binding sites. Ligands acquire negative charge by phosphorylation, passing through the cytoplasm over Newtonian trajectories toward positively charged NPCs (utilizing positive nuclear localization sequences). The CM-NPC channel obeys maximized mean protein flux F and Fisher information I at the NPC, with first-order δI = 0 and approximate 2nd-order δ2I ≈ 0 stability to environmental perturbations. Many of its predictions are confirmed, including the dominance of protein pathways of from 1–4 proteins, a 4nm size for the EGFR protein and the flux value F ≈1016 proteins/m2-s. After entering the nucleus, each protein ultimately delivers its ligand information to a DNA target site with maximum probability, i.e. maximum Kullback-Liebler entropy HKL. In a smoothness limit HKL → IDNA/2, so that the total CM-NPC-DNA channel obeys maximum Fisher I. Thus maximum information → non-equilibrium, one condition for life. PMID:23747917

  15. Permissible Exposure Level for Lunar Dusts: Gaps are Closing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, John T.; Lam, Chiu-Wing; Scully Robert; Santana, Patricia; Cooper, Bonnie; McKay, David; Zeidler-Erdely, Patti C.; Castranova, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Space faring nations plan to return human explorers to the moon within the next decade. Experience during the Apollo flights suggests that lunar dust will invariably get into the habitat where the finest portion (less than 5 micrometers) could be inhaled by the crew before it is cleared from the atmosphere. NASA is developing a database from which a 6-month, episodic exposure standard for lunar dust can be set. Three kinds of moon dust were prepared from a parent sample of Apollo 14 regolith #14003,96. Our goal was to prepare each type of dust sample with a mean diameter less than 2 m, which is suitable for instillation into the lungs of rats. The three samples were prepared as follows: separation from the parent sample using a fluidized bed, grinding using a jet mill grinder, or grinding with a ball-mill grinder. Grinding simulated restoration of surface activation of dust expected to occur at the surface of the moon on native lunar dust. We used two grinding methods because they seemed to produce different modes of activation. The effects of grinding were preserved by maintaining the dust in ultra-pure nitrogen until immediately before it was placed in suspension for administration to rats. The dust was suspended in physiological saline with 10% Survanta, a lung surfactant. Rats were given intratrachael instillations of the dust suspension at three doses. In addition to the three moon dusts (A, C and E), we instilled the same amount of a negative control (TiO2, B) and a highly-toxic, positive control (quartz, D). These additional mineral dusts were selected because they have well-established and very different permissible exposure levels (PELs). Our goal was to determine where lunar dusts fit between these extremes, and then estimate a PEL for each lunar dust. We evaluated many indices of toxicity to the lung. The figure shows the changes in lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), a marker of cell death, for the five dusts. Benchmark dose software (Version 2.1.2) from the

  16. Permissive nicotine regulation as a complement to traditional tobacco control

    PubMed Central

    Sumner, Walton

    2005-01-01

    Background Cigarette smoking takes a staggering toll on human health and attracts considerable public health attention, yet real solutions seem distant. The 2004 Family Smoking Prevention and Tobacco Control Act (US Senate bill S2461) would have given the US Food and Drug Administration limited authority to regulate cigarettes to "protect the public health." However, such legislation is unlikely to substantially reduce smoking or related deaths. Discussion The past 500 years of tobacco control efforts demonstrate that nicotine prohibition is a practical impossibility for numerous reasons, state revenue being one of the most ominous. The FDA already has regulatory authority over pharmaceutical grade nicotine products, and requires pharmacists to dispense the most addictive of these only with prescriptions. Meanwhile, every corner store can sell far more addictive and dangerous cigarettes to any adult. The FDA could immediately increase competition between cigarettes and clean nicotine products by approving available nicotine products for over-the-counter sales to adults. Similarly permissive regulation of cigarettes and addictive nicotine products will reduce tobacco use and improve smokers' health, but increase nicotine use in the population. Fortunately, restricted youth access and accurate labeling of nicotine's absolute risks will dissuade many non-smokers from experimenting with it, while accurate depiction of its risks relative to cigarette smoking will encourage many smokers to switch. The FDA could take a series of small steps that might ultimately replace a large proportion of cigarette smoking with equally addictive nicotine products, without risking serious public health setbacks. Vaccine, methadone, and injury prevention policies establish relevant public health precedents. Summary Cigarettes, or an equally addictive alternative, will be a permanent and common product in most societies. Regulations restricting only the safest addictive nicotine products

  17. OECD Maximum Residue Limit Calculator

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    With the goal of harmonizing the calculation of maximum residue limits (MRLs) across the Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, the OECD has developed an MRL Calculator. View the calculator.

  18. Arctic Sea Ice Maximum 2011

    NASA Image and Video Library

    AMSR-E Arctic Sea Ice: September 2010 to March 2011: Scientists tracking the annual maximum extent of Arctic sea ice said that 2011 was among the lowest ice extents measured since satellites began ...

  19. Observational research with adolescents: a framework for the management of the parental permission

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Waiving parent permission can be an option in some epidemiological and social research with adolescents. However, exemptions have not been uniformly considered or applied. Our aim is to critically assess the different factors that could be taken into account when making decisions about waiving active parental permission in observational research with adolescents. Discussion In some cases alternatives to parental permission could be applied to protect the rights of both adolescents and parents and also to assure the benefits to adolescents as a group that can come from appropriately conducted studies. However, the criteria of ensuring minimal risk can be difficult to define and apply and a distinction between harm and discomfort is reviewed. Waiving active parental permission could be acceptable when the risk of harm is minimal; when the research questions are related to an activity for which adolescents are not legally considered to be children; when the risk of harm or discomfort may increase if parental permission is required; and when risk of discomfort is low because the questionnaire is not potentially offensive for some adolescents and/or for some parents. Summary Stringent rules concerning parental permission in some studies could be detrimental to adolescents. A framework and a decision tree guide are proposed to help researchers and Research Ethics Committees in their decisions on whether active parental permission must be obtained. PMID:23286743

  20. Observational research with adolescents: a framework for the management of the parental permission.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Canela, Miguel; Lopez-del Burgo, Cristina; Carlos, Silvia; Calatrava, Maria; Beltramo, Carlos; Osorio, Alfonso; de Irala, Jokin

    2013-01-03

    Waiving parent permission can be an option in some epidemiological and social research with adolescents. However, exemptions have not been uniformly considered or applied. Our aim is to critically assess the different factors that could be taken into account when making decisions about waiving active parental permission in observational research with adolescents. In some cases alternatives to parental permission could be applied to protect the rights of both adolescents and parents and also to assure the benefits to adolescents as a group that can come from appropriately conducted studies. However, the criteria of ensuring minimal risk can be difficult to define and apply and a distinction between harm and discomfort is reviewed. Waiving active parental permission could be acceptable when the risk of harm is minimal; when the research questions are related to an activity for which adolescents are not legally considered to be children; when the risk of harm or discomfort may increase if parental permission is required; and when risk of discomfort is low because the questionnaire is not potentially offensive for some adolescents and/or for some parents. Stringent rules concerning parental permission in some studies could be detrimental to adolescents. A framework and a decision tree guide are proposed to help researchers and Research Ethics Committees in their decisions on whether active parental permission must be obtained.