Science.gov

Sample records for mbi bending magnets

  1. Electron cooling device without bending magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapa, A. N.; Shemyakin, A. V.

    1993-11-01

    The scheme of an axisymmetric electron cooling device without bending magnets is proposed. Solutions for the most important elements, i.e., a gun and a recuperator, are considered. The main characteristics of the recuperator of the Faraday cup type having a reflector and a gun with a ring emitter are explored. In the gun, the beam is formed, the diameter of which is 40 mm and the dimension of a disturbance region is several millimeters.

  2. Structural analysis of suerconducting bending magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Meuser, R.B.

    1980-05-01

    Mechanical stresses, displacements, and the effects of displacements upon aberrations of the magnetic field in the aperture have been calculated for a class of superconducting bending-magnet configurations. The analytical model employed for the coil is one in which elements are free to slide without restraint upon each other, and upon the surrounding structure. Coil configurations considered range from an idealized one in which the current density varies as cosine theta to more realistic ones consisting of regions of uniform current density. With few exceptions, the results for the more realistic coils closely match those of the cos theta coil.

  3. Sorting of bending magnets for the SSRF booster

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Jie; Liu, Gui-Min; Li, Hao-Hu; Zhang, Man-Zhou

    2008-04-01

    The Shanghai Synchrotron Radiation Facility (SSRF)booster ring, a full energy injector for the storage ring, is deigned to accelerate the electron beam energy from 150 MeV to 3.5 GeV that demands high extraction efficiency at the extraction energy with low beam loss rate when electrons are ramping. Closed orbit distortion (COD) caused by bending magnet field uniformity errors which affects the machine performance harmfully could be effectively reduced by bending magnet location sorting. Considering the affections of random errors in measurement, both ideal sorting and realistic sorting are studied based on measured bending magnet field uniformity errors and one reasonable combination of bending magnets which can reduce the horizontal COD by a factor of 5 is given as the final installation sequence of the booster bending magnets in this paper. Supported by SSRF Project

  4. Light bending by nonlinear electrodynamics under strong electric and magnetic field

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Taekoon E-mail: tlee@kunsan.ac.kr

    2011-11-01

    We calculate the bending angles of light under the strong electric and magnetic fields by a charged black hole and a magnetized neutron star according to the nonlinear electrodynamics of Euler-Heisenberg interaction. The bending angle of light by the electric field of charged black hole is computed from geometric optics and a general formula is derived for light bending valid for any orientation of the magnetic dipole. The astronomical significance of the light bending by magnetic field of a neutron star is discussed.

  5. Bioeconomy Initiative at MBI International

    SciTech Connect

    Kleff, Susanne, Ph.D.

    2011-11-30

    Di-carboxylic acids have the potential to replace petrochemicals used in the polymer industry (Werpy and Petersen, 2004). MBI developed a process for the production of succinic acid using a proprietary organism. During this work MBI assessed the feasibility to produce other carboxylic acids either using A. succinogenes or other organisms. The development of recombinant A. succinogenes strain derivatives for a mono-carboxylic acid through over-expression of enzymatic activities was successful. Fermentations achieved titers of 58 g/L for this organic acid. Recombinant strains that produced the same acid, but a different stereoisomer, reached titers of 10 g/L. Attempts to increase the titers for this isomer as well as other organic acids were unsuccessful. MBI is looking for commercial partners to pursue the development of recombinant A. succinogenes strains for the production of other organic acids. Attempts to develop recombinant strains of A. succinogenes for fumaric acid production through introduction of various antisense RNA constructs were unsuccessful. Alternative suitable organisms were evaluated and Rhizopus oryzae, a natural fumaric acid producer with potential for process improvements, was selected. A novel fermentation and one-step recovery process was developed that allowed capture of IP, produced titers of >80 g/L with a productivity of 1.8 g/L-h and 57% (g/g glucose) yield. The process was scaled to 2000 L pilot scale. The economic analysis projected a production cost of 72 c/lb. Recycling and re-use of the base was demonstrated and incorporated into the process. The ability of the organism to produce fumaric acid from other carbon sources and biomass hydrolysate was demonstrated. The production of other organic acids was evaluated and techno-economic de-risking roadmap documents were prepared.

  6. Three-dimensional magnetic field analysis of superconducting 180 degrees bending magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Nakata, J.; Nakajima, M.; Hosokawa, T.; Kitayama, T. )

    1990-03-01

    To design the superconducting 180{degrees} bending magnets for compact electron storage rings used in SOR lithography, large-scale 3-dimensional (3-D) magnetic field analyses were performed. Three types of magnets, -- air core, iron yoke, and iron pole -- were minutely computed. Optimizing the coil positions and iron yoke configurations, were found the proper parameters for obtaining wide good field regions along the electron orbit, for all three types. This paper discusses how the iron yoke type was minutely studied an very low liquid helium consumption, wide good field regions that were not changed from low to high field, very low stray fields around the magnet and good tracking controllability could be obtained.

  7. Applications of circularly polarized photons at the ALS with a bend magnet source

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1992-02-01

    The purpose of this workshop is to focus attention on, and to stimulate the scientific exploitation of, the natural polarization properties of bend-magnet synchrotron radiation at the ALS -- for research in biology, materials science, physics, and chemistry. The topics include: The Advanced Light Source; Magnetic Circular Dichroism and Differential Scattering on Biomolecules; Tests of Fundamental Symmetries; High {Tc} Superconductivity; Photoemission from Magnetic and Non-magnetic Solids; Studies of Highly Correlated Systems; and Instrumentation for Photon Transport and Polarization Measurements.

  8. Textile artificial magnetic conductor jacket for transmission enhancement between antennas under bending and wetness measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamardin, Kamilia; Rahim, Mohamad Kamal A.; Hall, Peter S.; Samsuri, Noor Asmawati; Latef, Tarik Abdul; Ullah, Mohammad Habib

    2016-04-01

    Textile artificial magnetic conductor (AMC) waveguide jacket for transmission enhancement between on-body antennas is proposed. Transmission characteristics between antennas with different orientations and placements are studied. Significant transmission enhancement is observed for all tested positions. Bending and wetness measurements are also conducted. Bending is found not to give significant effect to the antennas and AMC performance, while wetness yields severe performance distortion. However, the original performance is retrieved once the antennas and AMC dried. The proposed AMC jacket will act as a new approach for efficient wearable body-centric communications.

  9. Solar wind magnetic field bending of Jovian dust trajectories.

    PubMed

    Zook, H A; Grün, E; Baguhl, M; Hamilton, D P; Linkert, G; Liou, J; Forsyth, R; Phillips, J L

    1996-11-29

    From September 1991 to October 1992, the cosmic dust detector on the Ulysses spacecraft recorded 11 short bursts, or streams, of dust. These dust grains emanated from the jovian system, and their trajectories were strongly affected by solar wind magnetic field forces. Analyses of the on-board measurements of these fields, and of stream approach directions, show that stream-associated dust grain masses are of the order of 10(-18) gram and dust grain velocities exceed 200 kilometers per second. These masses and velocities are, respectively, about 10(3) times less massive and 5 to 10 times faster than earlier reported. PMID:8929405

  10. Advantages of a Synchrotron Bending Magnet as the Sample Illuminator for a Wide-field X-ray Microscope

    SciTech Connect

    Feser, M.; Howells, M. R.; Kirz, J.; Rudati, J.; Yun, W.

    2012-09-01

    In our paper the choice between bending magnets and insertion devices as sample illuminators for a hard X-ray full-field microscope is investigated. An optimized bending-magnet beamline design is presented. Its imaging speed is very competitive with the performance of similar microscopes installed currently at insertion-device beamlines. The fact that imaging X-ray microscopes can accept a large phase space makes them very well suited to the output characteristics of bending magnets which are often a plentiful and paid-for resource. There exist opportunities at all synchrotron light sources to take advantage of this finding to build bending-magnet beamlines that are dedicated to transmission X-ray microscope facilities. We expect that demand for such facilities will increase as three-dimensional tomography becomes routine and advanced techniques such as mosaic tomography and XANES tomography (taking three-dimensional tomograms at different energies to highlight elemental and chemical differences) become more widespread.

  11. Curvature-Induced Bunch Self-Interaction for an Energy-Chirped Bunch in Magnetic Bends

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Rui

    2008-02-01

    Within the realm of classical electrodynamics, the curvature-induced bunch collective interaction in magnetic bends can be studied using effective forces in the canonical formulation of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) effect. As an application of this canonical formulation, in this paper, for an electron distribution moving ultrarelativistically in a bending system, the dynamics of the particles in the distribution is derived from the Hamiltonian of the particles in terms of the bunch internal coordinates. The consequent Vlasov equation manifests explicitly how the phase-space distribution is perturbed by the effective CSR forces. In particular, we study the impact of an initial linear energy chirp of the bunch on the behavior of the effective longitudinal CSR force, which arises due to the modification of the retardation relation as a result of the energy-chirping- induced longitudinal-horizontal correlation of the bunch distribution (bunch tilt) in dispersive regions. Our study demonstrates clearly the time delay (or retardation) of the behavior of the effective longitudinal CSR force on a bunch in responding to the change of the bunch length in a magnetic bend. Our result also shows that the effective longitudinal CSR force for a bunch under full compression can have sensitive dependence on the transverse position of the test particle in the bunch for certain parameter regimes.

  12. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z.

    1997-04-01

    Growing interest in utilizing circular polarization prompted the design of bend-magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source, covering the 30-1500 eV spectral region, to include vertical aperturing capabilities for optimizing the collection of circular polarization above and below the orbit plane. After commissioning and early use of the beamline, a multilayer polarimeter was used to characterize the polarization state of the beam as a function of vertical aperture position. This report partially summarizes the polarimetry measurements and compares results with theoretical calculations intended to simulate experimental conditions.

  13. Bending magnet source: A radiation source for X-ray phase contrast tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhal, B. B.; Peele, A. G.; McMahon, P. J.; De Carlo, F.; Nugent, K. A.

    2006-11-01

    The rapid development of electronic data processing and phase retrieval technique for image reconstruction leads to new opportunities in X-ray phase tomography. A range of radiographic and tomographic demonstrations have now been made, typically utilizing the coherent flux from an insertion device at a synchrotron or a micro-focus laboratory source. In this paper we demonstrate that useful results may be obtained using a bending magnet source at a synchrotron. In particular we show that the same beamline can be used to make and characterize a sample made by X-ray lithographic methods.

  14. A 1.5 GeV compact light source with superconducting bending magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.A. ||; Cline, D.B.; Kolonko, J.J. |; Green, M.A.; Johnson, D.E.; Leung, E.M.; Madura, D.D.

    1995-05-01

    This paper describes the design of a compact electron synchrotron light source for producing X-rays for medical imaging, protein crystallography, nano-machining and other uses up to 35 keV. The source will provide synchrotron light from six 6.9 tesla superconducting 60{degree} bending magnet stations. In addition the ring, contains conventional quadrupoles and sextupoles. The light source has a circumference of 26 meters, which permits it to be located in a variety of industrial and medical facilities.

  15. Sub-100-nm negative bend resistance ballistic sensors for high spatial resolution magnetic field detection

    PubMed Central

    Gilbertson, A. M.; Benstock, D.; Fearn, M.; Kormányos, A.; Ladak, S.; Emeny, M. T.; Lambert, C. J.; Ashley, T.; Solin, S. A.; Cohen, L. F.

    2011-01-01

    We report the magnetic field detection properties of ballistic sensors utilizing the negative bend resistance of InSb∕In1−xAlxSb quantum well cross junctions as a function of temperature and geometric size. We demonstrate that the maximum responsivity to magnetic field and its linearity increase as the critical device dimension is reduced. This observation deviates from the predictions of the classical billiard ball model unless significant diffuse boundary scattering is included. The smallest device studied has an active sensor area of 35×35 nm2, with a maximum responsivity of 20 kΩ∕T, and a noise-equivalent field of 0.87μT∕Hz at 100 K. PMID:21383870

  16. Suite of three protein crystallography beamlines with single superconducting bend magnet as the source

    SciTech Connect

    MacDowell, Alastair A.; Celestre, Richard S.; Howells, Malcolm; McKinney, Wayne; Krupnick, James; Cambie, Daniella; Domning, Edward E; Duarte, Robert M.; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W.; Cork, Carl W.; Earnest, Thomas N.; Dickert, Jeffery; Meigs, George; Ralston, Corie; Holton, James M.; Alber, Thomas; Berger, James M.; Agard, David A.; Padmore, Howard A.

    2004-08-01

    At the Advanced Light Source (ALS), three protein crystallography (PX) beamlines have been built that use as a source one of the three 6 Tesla single pole superconducting bending magnets (superbends) that were recently installed in the ring. The use of such single pole superconducting bend magnets enables the development of a hard x-ray program on a relatively low energy 1.9 GeV ring without taking up insertion device straight sections. The source is of relatively low power, but due to the small electron beam emittance, it has high brightness. X-ray optics are required to preserve the brightness and to match the illumination requirements for protein crystallography. This was achieved by means of a collimating premirror bent to a plane parabola, a double crystal monochromator followed by a toroidal mirror that focuses in the horizontal direction with a 2:1 demagnification. This optical arrangement partially balances aberrations from the collimating and toroidal mirrors such that a tight focused spot size is achieved. The optical properties of the beamline are an excellent match to those required by the small protein crystals that are typically measured. The design and performance of these new beamlines are described.

  17. Some closed-form solutions of the temperature field due to bending magnet and undulator heating in APS

    SciTech Connect

    Sheng, I.C.; Nian, T.

    1993-07-01

    Several temperature field solutions due to bending magnet and undulator x-ray heating are developed and presented in this paper. The Gaussian power distribution is simulated as the bending magnet whereas a Guassian-parabolic type of power distribution is used for the undulator/wiggler heating. The heating on a two-dimensional plane, three-dimensional block, thin disk, infinite wedge plane, infinite wedge block, and beryllium-copper composite are analyzed. Parametric studies are also included to determine the optimized temperature.

  18. Commissioning of horizontal-bend superconducting magnet for Jefferson Lab's 11-GeV super high momentum spectrometer

    DOE PAGES

    Sun, Eric; Brindza, Paul D.; Lassiter, Steven R.; Fowler, Mike J.; Fenker, Howard C.; DeKamp, Jon C.

    2016-03-02

    Commissioning characteristics of the Superconducting High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) Horizontal Bend (HB) magnet was presented. Pre-commissioning peer review of the magnet uncovered issues with eddy currents in the thermal shield, resulting in additional testing and modeling of the magnet. A three-stage test plan was discussed. A solution of using a small dump resistor and a warm thermal shield was presented. Analyses illustrated that it was safe to run the magnet to full test current. As a result, the HB magnet was successfully cooled to 4 K and reached its maximum test current of 4000 A.

  19. Directly water-cooled crystal development for SPring-8 bending magnet beamlines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takeshita, Kunikazu; Goto, Shunji; Ishikawa, Tetsuya

    2007-09-01

    The directly water-cooled first crystal of the SPring-8 standard monochromator for bending magnet beamlines has been developed. Thanks to the bonding technique, the performance of the new crystal has been improved without decreasing the cooling efficiency. The finite element analyses show the deformation of the crystal by the hydraulic pressure and by the crystal clamping is negligible small, which were dominated for the previous crystal. Both Si(111) and Si(311) crystal were evaluated in SPring-8 beamlines, the deformation induced while the bonding process is comparable to the thermal deformation. and long-term endurance test shows the lifetime of the O-ring becomes long because they are not on the direct path of the SR beam. Although the overall performance is insufficient, much improvement was shown.

  20. X-ray phase contrast tomography with a bending magnet source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peele, A. G.; De Carlo, F.; McMahon, P. J.; Dhal, B. B.; Nugent, K. A.

    2005-08-01

    X-ray radiography and x-ray tomography are important tools for noninvasive characterization of materials. Historically, the contrast mechanism used with these techniques has been absorption. However, for any given sample there are x-ray energies for which absorption contrast is poor. Alternatively, when good contrast can be obtained, radiation damage from an excessive dose may become an issue. Consequently, phase-contrast methods have in recent years been implemented at both synchrotron and laboratory facilities. A range of radiographic and tomographic demonstrations have now been made, typically utilizing the coherent flux from an insertion device at a synchrotron or a microfocus laboratory source. In this paper we demonstrate that useful results may be obtained using a bending magnet source at a synchrotron. In particular we show that the same beamline can be used to make and characterize a sample made by x-ray lithographic methods.

  1. Bending of Layer-by-Layer Films Driven by an External Magnetic Field

    PubMed Central

    Miyazaki, Celina M.; Riul, Antonio; Dos Santos, David S.; Ferreira, Mariselma; Constantino, Carlos J. L.; Pereira-da-Silva, Marcelo A.; Paupitz, Ricardo; Galvão, Douglas S.; Oliveira, Osvaldo N.

    2013-01-01

    We report on optimized architectures containing layer-by-layer (LbL) films of natural rubber latex (NRL), carboxymethyl-chitosan (CMC) and magnetite (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (MNPs) deposited on flexible substrates, which could be easily bent by an external magnetic field. The mechanical response depended on the number of deposited layers and was explained semi-quantitatively with a fully atomistic model, where the LbL film was represented as superposing layers of hexagonal graphene-like atomic arrangements deposited on a stiffer substrate. The bending with no direct current or voltage being applied to a supramolecular structure containing biocompatible and antimicrobial materials represents a proof-of-principle experiment that is promising for tissue engineering applications in biomedicine. PMID:23797657

  2. Suppression of microbunching instability using bending magnets in free-electron-laser linacs.

    PubMed

    Qiang, Ji; Mitchell, Chad E; Venturini, Marco

    2013-08-01

    The microbunching instability driven by collective effects of the beam inside an accelerator can significantly degrade the final electron beam quality for free electron laser (FEL) radiation. In this Letter, we propose an inexpensive scheme to suppress such an instability in accelerators for next generation FEL light sources. Instead of using an expensive device such as a laser heater or RF deflecting cavities, this scheme uses longitudinal mixing associated with the transverse spread of the beam through bending magnets inside the accelerator transport system to suppress the instability. The final uncorrelated energy spread increases roughly by the current compression factor, which is important in seeded FEL schemes in order to achieve high harmonic short-wavelength x-ray radiation.

  3. Goos-Hänchen effect and bending of spin wave beams in thin magnetic films

    SciTech Connect

    Gruszecki, P. Krawczyk, M.; Romero-Vivas, J.; Dadoenkova, Yu. S.; Dadoenkova, N. N.; Lyubchanskii, I. L.

    2014-12-15

    For magnon spintronic applications, the detailed knowledge of spin wave (SW) beam dispersion, transmission (reflection) of SWs passing through (reflected from) interfaces, or borders or the scattering of SWs by inhomogeneities is crucial. These wave properties are decisive factors on the usefulness of a particular device. Here, we demonstrate, using micromagnetic simulations supported by an analytical model, that the Goos-Hänchen (GH) shift exists for SW reflecting from thin film edge and that with the effect becomes observable. We show that this effect will exist for a broad range of frequencies in the dipole-exchange range, with the magnetization degree of pinning at the film edge as the crucial parameter, whatever its nature. Moreover, we have also found that the GH effect can be accompanied or even dominating by a bending of the SW beam due to the inhomogeneity of the internal magnetic field. This inhomogeneity, created by demagnetizing field taking place at the film edge, causes gradual change of SWs refractive index. The refraction of the SW beams by the non-uniformity of the magnetic field enables the exploration of graded index magnonics and metamaterial properties for the transmission and processing of information at nanoscale.

  4. Advantages of a synchrotron bending magnet as the sample illuminator for a wide-field X-ray microscope.

    PubMed

    Feser, M; Howells, M R; Kirz, J; Rudati, J; Yun, W

    2012-09-01

    In this paper the choice between bending magnets and insertion devices as sample illuminators for a hard X-ray full-field microscope is investigated. An optimized bending-magnet beamline design is presented. Its imaging speed is very competitive with the performance of similar microscopes installed currently at insertion-device beamlines. The fact that imaging X-ray microscopes can accept a large phase space makes them very well suited to the output characteristics of bending magnets which are often a plentiful and paid-for resource. There exist opportunities at all synchrotron light sources to take advantage of this finding to build bending-magnet beamlines that are dedicated to transmission X-ray microscope facilities. It is expected that demand for such facilities will increase as three-dimensional tomography becomes routine and advanced techniques such as mosaic tomography and XANES tomography (taking three-dimensional tomograms at different energies to highlight elemental and chemical differences) become more widespread.

  5. The Superconducting Horizontal Bend Magnet for the Jefferson Lab's 11 GeV/c Super High Momentum Spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    S. Chouhan, J. DeKamp, A. Zeller, P. Brindza, S. Lassiter, M. Fowler, E. Sun

    2010-06-01

    A collaboration between NSCL and Jlab has developed the reference design and coil winding for Jlab's Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) horizontal bend magnet. A warm iron ??C?? type superferric dipole magnet will bend the 12 GeV/c particles horizontally by 3?? to allow the SHMS to reach angles as low as 5.5??. This requires an integral field strength of up to 2.1 T.m. The major challenges are the tight geometry, high and unbalanced forces and a required low fringe field in primary beam path. A coil design based on flattened SSC Rutherford cable that provides a large current margin and commercially available fiberglass prepreg epoxy tape has been developed. A complete test coil has been wound and will be cold tested. This paper present the modified magnet design includes coil forces, coil restraint system and fringe field. In addition, coil properties, quench calculations and the full mechanical details are also presented.

  6. Polarization measurement and vertical aperture optimization for obtaining circularly polarized bend-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Kortright, J.B.; Rice, M.; Hussain, Z.

    1995-10-01

    Using multilayer linear polarizers, we have studied the polarization state of radiation from bend magnet beamline 9.3.2 at Advanced Light Source as function of vertical oping angle at photon energies 367 and 722 eV. Both a fine slit and a coarse semi-aperture were stepped across the beam to accept different parts of the vertical radiation fan. Polarimetry yields the degree of linear polarization directly and the degree of circular polarization indirectly assuming an immeasurably small amount of unpolarized radiation based on close agreement of theory and experiment for linear polarization. Results are in good agreement with theoretical calculations, with departures from theory owing to uncertainty in effective aperture of the measured beam. The narrow 0.037 mrad aperture on the orbit plane transmits a beam whose degree of linear polarization exceeds 0.99 at these energies. The wide semi-aperture blocking the beam from above and below transmits a beam with a max figure of merit, given by the square root of flux times degree of circular polarization, when the aperture edge is on the orbit plane thus blocking only half of the total available flux.

  7. Bending strain-tunable magnetic anisotropy in Co2FeAl Heusler thin film on KaptonxAE

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gueye, M.; Wague, B. M.; Zighem, F.; Belmeguenai, M.; Gabor, M. S.; Petrisor, T.; Tiusan, C.; Mercone, S.; Faurie, D.

    2014-08-01

    Bending effect on the magnetic anisotropy in 20 nm Co2FeAl Heusler thin film grown on Kapton® has been studied by ferromagnetic resonance and glued on curved sample carrier with various radii. The results reported in this Letter show that the magnetic anisotropy is drastically changed in this system by bending the thin films. This effect is attributed to the interfacial strain transmission from the substrate to the film and to the magnetoelastic behavior of the Co2FeAl film. Moreover, two approaches to determine the in-plane magnetostriction coefficient of the film, leading to a value that is close to λCFA= 14 × 10-6, have been proposed.

  8. Justification for the development of a bending magnet beamline at sector 10 at the APS.

    SciTech Connect

    Kemner, K. M.; Biosciences Division

    2006-09-18

    The long-planned and much-needed merger of EnviroCAT into the Materials Research Collaborative Access Team (MR-CAT) will provide dedicated state-of-the-art facilities that are critical to research on a broad range of issues in environmental sciences. These CATs will focus on developing a bending magnet (BM) beamline for x-ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) and micro x-ray analysis of environmental samples through integration with existing insertion device (ID) capabilities in XAFS, micro x-ray analysis, and x-ray scattering. In addition, the expanded MR-CAT will serve as the hub of personnel and laboratory infrastructure support for molecular environmental science and biogeochemical science at the Advanced Photon Source (APS). In conjunction with the merger of EnviroCAT into MR-CAT, the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will become a member institution of MR-CAT, joining the present members (University of Notre Dame, Illinois Institute of Technology, University of Florida, British Petroleum, and Argonne's Chemical Engineering and Biosciences Division). The motivation for blending capabilities meeting the needs of EnviroCAT users into the MR-CAT facilities is the explosion of synchrotron-radiation-based research in the field known as molecular environmental science (MES). This research is driven largely by the need to remediate contaminated environmental materials and to understand the scientific foundations that govern contaminant transport in the environment. Synchrotron radiation is playing a crucial role in solving environmental science problems by offering x-ray-based analytical techniques for detailed molecular- and atomic-level studies of these systems. This document focuses on the scientific justification for developing a specific type of BM beamline capability at Sector 10 for XAFS and micro x-ray analysis to support the growing MES community. However, the modification of Sector 10 will meet other future needs by providing (1) an existing undulator

  9. Design and Fabrication of the Superconducting Horizontal Bend Magnet for the Super High Momentum Spectrometer at Jefferson Lab

    SciTech Connect

    Chouhan, Shailendra S.; DeKamp, Jon; Burkhart, E. E,; Bierwagen, J.; Song, H.; Zeller, Albert F.; Brindza, Paul D.; Lassiter, Steven R.; Fowler, Michael J.; Sun, Qiuli

    2015-06-01

    A collaboration exists between NSCL and JLab to design and build JLab's Super High Momentum Spectrometer (SHMS) horizontal bend magnet that allows the bending of the 12 GeV/c particles horizontally by 3° to allow SHMS to reach angles as low as 5.5°. Two full size coils have been wound and are cold tested for both magnetic and structural properties. Each coil is built from 90 layers of single-turn SSC outer conductor cable. An initial test coil with one third the turns was fabricated to demonstrate that the unique saddle shape with fully contoured ends could be wound with Rutherford superconducting cable. Learned lessons during the trial winding were integrated into the two complete full-scale coils that are now installed in the helium vessel. The fabrication of the iron yoke, cold mass, and thermal shield is complete, and assembly of the vacuum vessel is in progress. This paper presents the process and progress along with the modified magnet design to reduce the fringe field in the primary beam region and also includes the impact of the changes on coil forces and coil restraint system.

  10. Relaxation of bending stresses and the reversibility of residual stresses in amorphous soft magnetic alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Kekalo, I. B.; Mogil’nikov, P. S.

    2015-06-15

    The reversibility of residual bending stresses is revealed in ribbon samples of cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys Co{sub 69}Fe{sub 3.7}Cr{sub 3.8}Si{sub 12.5}B{sub 11} and Fe{sub 57}Co{sub 31}Si{sub 2.9}B{sub 9.1}: the ribbons that are free of applied stresses and bent under the action of residual stresses become completely or incompletely straight upon annealing at the initial temperatures. The influence of annealing on the relaxation of bending stresses is studied. Preliminary annealing is found to sharply decrease the relaxation rate of bending stresses, and the initial stage of fast relaxation of these stresses is absent. Complete straightening of preliminarily annealed ribbons is shown to occur at significantly higher temperatures than that of the initial ribbons. Incomplete straightening of the ribbons is explained by the fact that bending stresses relaxation at high annealing temperatures proceeds due to both reversible anelastic deformation and viscous flow, which is a fully irreversible process. Incomplete reversibility is also caused by irreversible processes, such as the release of excess free volume and clustering (detected by small-angle X-ray scattering). The revealed differences in the relaxation processes that occur in the cobalt- and iron-based amorphous alloys are discussed in terms of different atomic diffusion mobilities in these alloys.

  11. MX1: a bending-magnet crystallography beamline serving both chemical and macromolecular crystallography communities at the Australian Synchrotron

    PubMed Central

    Cowieson, Nathan Philip; Aragao, David; Clift, Mark; Ericsson, Daniel J.; Gee, Christine; Harrop, Stephen J.; Mudie, Nathan; Panjikar, Santosh; Price, Jason R.; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Williamson, Rachel; Caradoc-Davies, Tom

    2015-01-01

    MX1 is a bending-magnet crystallography beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The beamline delivers hard X-rays in the energy range from 8 to 18 keV to a focal spot at the sample position of 120 µm FWHM. The beamline endstation and ancillary equipment facilitate local and remote access for both chemical and biological macromolecular crystallography. Here, the design of the beamline and endstation are discussed. The beamline has enjoyed a full user program for the last seven years and scientific highlights from the user program are also presented. PMID:25537608

  12. MX1: a bending-magnet crystallography beamline serving both chemical and macromolecular crystallography communities at the Australian Synchrotron.

    PubMed

    Cowieson, Nathan Philip; Aragao, David; Clift, Mark; Ericsson, Daniel J; Gee, Christine; Harrop, Stephen J; Mudie, Nathan; Panjikar, Santosh; Price, Jason R; Riboldi-Tunnicliffe, Alan; Williamson, Rachel; Caradoc-Davies, Tom

    2015-01-01

    MX1 is a bending-magnet crystallography beamline at the 3 GeV Australian Synchrotron. The beamline delivers hard X-rays in the energy range from 8 to 18 keV to a focal spot at the sample position of 120 µm FWHM. The beamline endstation and ancillary equipment facilitate local and remote access for both chemical and biological macromolecular crystallography. Here, the design of the beamline and endstation are discussed. The beamline has enjoyed a full user program for the last seven years and scientific highlights from the user program are also presented.

  13. An ion-optical design study of a carbon-ion rotating gantry with a superconducting final bending magnet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokor, J.; Pavlovič, M.

    2016-03-01

    Ion-optical designs of an isocentric ion gantry with a compact curved superconducting final bending magnet are presented. The gantry is designed for transporting carbon-therapy beams with nominal kinetic energy of 400 MeV/u, which corresponds to the penetration range of C6+ beam in water of about 28 cm. In contrast to other existing designs, we present a "hybrid" beam transport system containing a single superconducting element - the last bending magnet. All other elements are based on conventional warm technology. Ion-optical properties of such a hybrid system are investigated in case of transporting non-symmetric (i.e. different emittance patterns in the horizontal and vertical plane) beams. Different conditions for transporting the non-symmetric beams are analyzed aiming at finding the optimal, i.e. the most compact, gantry version. The final gantry layout is presented including a 2D parallel scanning. The ion-optical and scanning properties of the final gantry design are described, discussed and illustrated by computer simulations performed by WinAGILE.

  14. Focusing, collimation and flux throughput at the IMCA-CAT bending-magnet beamline at the Advanced Photon Source.

    PubMed

    Koshelev, Irina; Huang, Rong; Graber, Timothy; Meron, Mati; Muir, J Lewis; Lavender, William; Battaile, Kevin; Mulichak, Anne M; Keefe, Lisa J

    2009-09-01

    The IMCA-CAT bending-magnet beamline was upgraded with a collimating mirror in order to achieve the energy resolution required to conduct high-quality multi- and single-wavelength anomalous diffraction (MAD/SAD) experiments without sacrificing beamline flux throughput. Following the upgrade, the bending-magnet beamline achieves a flux of 8 x 10(11) photons s(-1) at 1 A wavelength, at a beamline aperture of 1.5 mrad (horizontal) x 86 microrad (vertical), with energy resolution (limited mostly by the intrinsic resolution of the monochromator optics) deltaE/E = 1.5 x 10(-4) (at 10 kV). The beamline operates in a dynamic range of 7.5-17.5 keV and delivers to the sample focused beam of size (FWHM) 240 microm (horizontally) x 160 microm (vertically). The performance of the 17-BM beamline optics and its deviation from ideally shaped optics is evaluated in the context of the requirements imposed by the needs of protein crystallography experiments. An assessment of flux losses is given in relation to the (geometric) properties of major beamline components.

  15. Warps, bending and density waves excited by rotating magnetized stars: results of global 3D MHD simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romanova, M. M.; Ustyugova, G. V.; Koldoba, A. V.; Lovelace, R. V. E.

    2013-03-01

    We report results of the first global three-dimensional (3D) magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations of the waves excited in an accretion disc by a rotating star with a dipole magnetic field misaligned from the star's rotation axis (which is aligned with the disc axis). The main results are the following. (1) If the magnetosphere of the star corotates approximately with the inner disc, then we observe a strong one-armed bending wave (a warp). This warp corotates with the star and has a maximum amplitude between corotation radius and the radius of the vertical resonance. The disc's centre of mass can deviate from the equatorial plane up to the distance of zw ≈ 0.1r. However, the effective height of the warp can be larger, hw ≈ 0.3r, due to the finite thickness of the disc. Stars with a range of misalignment angles excite warps. However, the amplitude of the warps is larger for misalignment angles between 15° and 60°. The location and amplitude of the warp do not depend on viscosity, at least for relatively small values of the standard alpha-parameter, up to 0.08. (2) If the magnetosphere rotates slower than the inner disc, then a bending wave is excited at the disc-magnetosphere boundary, but does not form a large-scale warp. Instead, persistent, high-frequency oscillations become strong at the inner region of the disc. These are (a) trapped density waves which form inside the radius where the disc angular velocity has a maximum, and (b) inner bending waves which appear in the case of accretion through magnetic Rayleigh-Taylor instability. These two types of waves are connected with the inner disc and their frequencies will vary with accretion rate. Bending oscillations at lower frequencies are also excited including global oscillations of the disc. In cases where the simulation region is small, slowly precessing warp forms with the maximum amplitude at the vertical resonance. The present simulations are applicable to young stars, cataclysmic variables and

  16. 40 CFR 180.1128 - Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1128 Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption from the requirement of... biofungicide Bacillus subtilis MBI 600 in or on all food commodities, including residues resulting from...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1128 - Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption... FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1128 Bacillus subtilis MBI 600; exemption from the requirement of... biofungicide Bacillus subtilis MBI 600 in or on all food commodities, including residues resulting from...

  18. Beamline 9.3.2 - a high-resolution, bend-magnet beamline with circular polarization capability

    SciTech Connect

    Moler, E.J.; Hussain, Z.; Howells, M.R.

    1997-04-01

    Beamline 9.3.2 is a high resolution, SGM beamline on an ALS bending magnet with access to photon energies from 30-1500 eV. Features include circular polarization capability, a rotating chamber platform that allows switching between experiments without breaking vacuum, an active feedback system that keeps the beam centered on the entrance slit of the monochromator, and a bendable refocusing mirror. The beamline optics consist of horizontally and vertically focussing mirrors, a Spherical Grating Monochromator (SGM) with movable entrance and exit slits, and a bendable refocussing mirror. In addition, a movable aperature has been installed just upstream of the vertically focussing mirror which can select the x-rays above or below the plane of the synchrotron storage ring, allowing the user to select circularly or linearly polarized light. Circularly polarized x-rays are used to study the magnetic properties of materials. Beamline 9.3.2 can supply left and right circularly polarized x-rays by a computer controlled aperture which may be placed above or below the plane of the synchrotron storage ring. The degree of linear and circular polarization has been measured and calibrated.

  19. An Electrolyte-Free Conducting Polymer Actuator that Displays Electrothermal Bending and Flapping Wing Motions under a Magnetic Field.

    PubMed

    Uh, Kyungchan; Yoon, Bora; Lee, Chan Woo; Kim, Jong-Man

    2016-01-20

    Electroactive materials that change shape in response to electrical stimulation can serve as actuators. Electroactive actuators of this type have great utility in a variety of technologies, including biomimetic artificial muscles, robotics, and sensors. Electroactive actuators developed to date often suffer from problems associated with the need to use electrolytes, slow response times, high driving voltages, and short cycle lifetimes. Herein, we report an electrolyte-free, single component, polymer electroactive actuator, which has a fast response time, high durability, and requires a low driving voltage (<5 V). The process employed for production of this material involves wet-spinning of a preorganized camphorsulfonic acid (CSA)-doped polyaniline (PANI) gel, which generates long, flexible, and conductive (∼270 S/cm) microfibers. Reversible bending motions take place upon application of an alternating current (AC) to the PANI polymer. This motion, promoted by a significantly low driving voltage (<0.5 V) in the presence of an external magnetic field, has a very large swinging speed (9000 swings/min) that lies in the range of those of flies and bees (1000-15000 swings/min) and is fatigue-resistant (>1000000 cycles). PMID:26717199

  20. Theoretical analysis of the background intensity distribution in X-ray Birefringence Imaging using synchrotron bending-magnet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Sutter, John P. Dolbnya, Igor P.; Collins, Stephen P.; Harris, Kenneth D. M.; Edwards-Gau, Gregory R.; Palmer, Benjamin A.

    2015-04-28

    In the recently developed technique of X-ray Birefringence Imaging, molecular orientational order in anisotropic materials is studied by exploiting the birefringence of linearly polarized X-rays with energy close to an absorption edge of an element in the material. In the experimental setup, a vertically deflecting high-resolution double-crystal monochromator is used upstream from the sample to select the appropriate photon energy, and a horizontally deflecting X-ray polarization analyzer, consisting of a perfect single crystal with a Bragg reflection at Bragg angle of approximately 45°, is placed downstream from the sample to measure the resulting rotation of the X-ray polarization. However, if the experiment is performed on a synchrotron bending-magnet beamline, then the elliptical polarization of the X-rays out of the electron orbit plane affects the shape of the output beam. Also, because the monochromator introduces a correlation between vertical position and photon energy to the X-ray beam, the polarization analyzer does not select the entire beam, but instead selects a diagonal stripe, the slope of which depends on the Bragg angles of the monochromator and the polarization analyzer. In the present work, the final background intensity distribution is calculated analytically because the phase space sampling methods normally used in ray traces are too inefficient for this setup. X-ray Birefringence Imaging data measured at the Diamond Light Source beamline B16 agree well with the theory developed here.

  1. A Beamline for High-Pressure Studies at the Advanced Light Sourcewith a Superconducting Bending Magnet as the Source

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, Martin; MacDowell, Alastair A.; Caldwell, Wendel A.; Cambie, Daniella; Celestre, Richard S.; Domning, Edward E.; Duarte,Robert M.; Gleason, Arianna E.; Glossinger, James M.; Kelez, Nicholas; Plate, David W.; Yu, Tony; Zaug, Joeseph M.; Padmore, Howard A.; Jeanloz,Raymond; Alivisatos, A. Paul; Clark, Simon M.

    2005-06-30

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on Beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 Tesla superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful x-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of: a plane parabola collimating mirror (M1), followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with a Si(111) crystals (E/DE {approx}7000) and a W/B4C multilayers (E/DE {approx} 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror (M2) with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detectors (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second end station dedicated for in situ laser-heating on one hand and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic as well as polychromatic techniques.

  2. A BEAMLINE FOR HIGH PRESSURE STUDIES AT THE ADVANCED LIGHT SOURCE WITH A SUPERCONDUCTING BENDING MAGNET AS THE SOURCE

    SciTech Connect

    Kunz, M; MacDowell, A A; Caldwell, W A; Cambie, D; Celestre, R S; Domning, E E; Duarte, R M; Gleason, A; Glossinger, J; Kelez, N; Plate, D W; Yu, T; Zaug, J M; Padmore, H A; Jeanloz, R; Alivisatos, A P; Clark, S M

    2005-04-19

    A new facility for high-pressure diffraction and spectroscopy using diamond anvil high-pressure cells has been built at the Advanced Light Source on Beamline 12.2.2. This beamline benefits from the hard X-radiation generated by a 6 Tesla superconducting bending magnet (superbend). Useful x-ray flux is available between 5 keV and 35 keV. The radiation is transferred from the superbend to the experimental enclosure by the brightness preserving optics of the beamline. These optics are comprised of: a plane parabola collimating mirror (M1), followed by a Kohzu monochromator vessel with a Si(111) crystals (E/{Delta}E {approx} 7000) and a W/B{sub 4}C multilayer (E/{Delta}E {approx} 100), and then a toroidal focusing mirror (M2) with variable focusing distance. The experimental enclosure contains an automated beam positioning system, a set of slits, ion chambers, the sample positioning goniometry and area detectors (CCD or image-plate detector). Future developments aim at the installation of a second end station dedicated for in situ laser-heating on one hand and a dedicated high-pressure single-crystal station, applying both monochromatic as well as polychromatic techniques.

  3. Passive, achromatic, nearly isochronous bending system

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David R.; Yunn, Byung C.

    2004-05-18

    A particle beam bending system having a geometry that applies active bending only beyond the chord of the orbit for any momentum component. Using this bending configuration, all momentum components emerge dispersed in position only; all trajectories are parallel by construction. Combining a pair of such bends with reflective symmetry produces a bend cell that is, by construction, achromatic to all orders. By the particular choice of 45.degree. individual bends, a pair of such achromats can be used as the basis of a 180.degree. recirculation arc. Other rational fractions of a full 180.degree. bend serve equally well (e.g., 2 bends/cell.times.90.degree./bend.times.1 cell /arc; 2 bends/cell.times.30.degree./bend.times.3 cells/arc, etc), as do combinations of multiple bending numerologies (e.g., 2 bends/cell.times.22.5.degree./bend.times.2 cells+2 bends/cell.times.45.degree./bend.times.1 cell). By the choice of entry pole face rotation of the first magnet and exit pole face rotation of the second magnet (with a value to be determined from the particular beam stability requirements imposed by the choice of bending angle and beam properties to be used in any particular application), desirable focusing properties can be introduced and beam stability can be insured.

  4. eMBI: Boosting Gene Expression-based Clustering for Cancer Subtypes.

    PubMed

    Chang, Zheng; Wang, Zhenjia; Ashby, Cody; Zhou, Chuan; Li, Guojun; Zhang, Shuzhong; Huang, Xiuzhen

    2014-01-01

    Identifying clinically relevant subtypes of a cancer using gene expression data is a challenging and important problem in medicine, and is a necessary premise to provide specific and efficient treatments for patients of different subtypes. Matrix factorization provides a solution by finding checker-board patterns in the matrices of gene expression data. In the context of gene expression profiles of cancer patients, these checkerboard patterns correspond to genes that are up- or down-regulated in patients with particular cancer subtypes. Recently, a new matrix factorization framework for biclustering called Maximum Block Improvement (MBI) is proposed; however, it still suffers several problems when applied to cancer gene expression data analysis. In this study, we developed many effective strategies to improve MBI and designed a new program called enhanced MBI (eMBI), which is more effective and efficient to identify cancer subtypes. Our tests on several gene expression profiling datasets of cancer patients consistently indicate that eMBI achieves significant improvements in comparison with MBI, in terms of cancer subtype prediction accuracy, robustness, and running time. In addition, the performance of eMBI is much better than another widely used matrix factorization method called nonnegative matrix factorization (NMF) and the method of hierarchical clustering, which is often the first choice of clinical analysts in practice. PMID:25374455

  5. Liquid-metal-cooled, curved-crystal monochromator for Advanced Photon Source bending-magnet beamline 1-BM

    SciTech Connect

    Brauer, S.; Rodricks, B.; Assoufid, L.; Beno, M.A.; Knapp, G.S.

    1996-06-01

    The authors describe a horizontally focusing curved-crystal monochromator that invokes a 4-point bending scheme and a liquid-metal cooling bath. The device has been designed for dispersive diffraction and spectroscopy in the 5--20 keV range, with a predicted focal spot size of {le} 100 {micro}m. To minimize thermal distortions and thermal equilibration time, the 355 x 32 x 0.8 mm crystal will be nearly half submerged in a bath of Ga-In-Sn-Zn alloy. The liquid metal thermally couples the crystal to the water-cooled Cu frame, while permitting the required crystal bending. Calculated thermal profiles and anticipated focusing properties are discussed.

  6. Stress-anneal-induced magnetic anisotropy in highly textured Fe-Ga and Fe-Al magnetostrictive strips for bending-mode vibrational energy harvesters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Jung Jin; Na, Suok-Min; Raghunath, Ganesh; Flatau, Alison B.

    2016-05-01

    Magnetostrictive Fe-Ga and Fe-Al alloys are promising materials for use in bending-mode vibrational energy harvesters. For this study, 50.8 mm × 5.0 mm × 0.5 mm strips of Fe-Ga and Fe-Al were cut from 0.50-mm thick rolled sheet. An atmospheric anneal was used to develop a Goss texture through an abnormal grain growth process. The anneal lead to large (011) grains that covered over 90% of sample surface area. The resulting highly-textured Fe-Ga and Fe-Al strips exhibited saturation magnetostriction values (λsat = λ∥ - λ⊥) of ˜280 ppm and ˜130 ppm, respectively. To maximize 90° rotation of magnetic moments during bending of the strips, we employed compressive stress annealing (SA). Samples were heated to 500°C, and a 100-150 MPa compressive stress was applied while at 500°C for 30 minutes and while being cooled. The effectiveness of the SA on magnetic moment rotation was inferred by comparing post-SA magnetostriction with the maximum possible yield of rotated magnetic moments, which is achieved when λ∥ = λsat and λ⊥ = 0. The uniformity of the SA along the sample length and the impact of the SA on sensing/energy harvesting performance were then assessed by comparing pre- and post-SA bending-stress-induced changes in magnetization at five different locations along the samples. The SA process with a 150 MPa compressive load improved Fe-Ga actuation along the sample length from 170 to 225 ppm (from ˜60% to within ˜80% of λsat). The corresponding sensing/energy harvesting performance improved by as much as a factor of eight in the best sample, however the improvement was not at all uniform along the sample length. The SA process with a 100 MPa compressive load improved Fe-Al actuation along the sample length from 60 to 73 ppm (from ˜46% to ˜56% of λsat, indicating only a marginally effective SA and suggesting the need for modification of the SA protocol. In spite of this, the SA was effective at improving the sensing/energy harvesting

  7. A finite element analysis of room temperature silicon crystals for the Advanced Photon Source bending-magnet and insertion-device beams

    SciTech Connect

    Assoufid, L.; Lee, W.K.; Mills, D.M.

    1994-08-01

    The third generation of synchrotron radiation sources, such as the Advanced Photon Source (APS), will provide users with a high brilliance x-ray beam with high power and power densities. In many cases, the first optical component to intercept the x-ray beam is a silicon-crystal monochromator. Due to extreme heat loading, the photon throughput and brilliance will be severely degraded if the monochromator is not properly designed (or cooled). This document describes a series of finite element analyses performed on room temperature silicon for the three standard APS sources, namely, the bending magnet, Wiggler A, and Undulator A. The modeling is performed with the silicon cooled directly with water or liquid gallium through rectangular channels. The temperature distributions and thermally induced deformations are presented.

  8. The time-resolved and extreme conditions XAS (TEXAS) facility at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline BM23.

    PubMed

    Mathon, O; Beteva, A; Borrel, J; Bugnazet, D; Gatla, S; Hino, R; Kantor, I; Mairs, T; Munoz, M; Pasternak, S; Perrin, F; Pascarelli, S

    2015-11-01

    BM23 is the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline at the ESRF, replacing the former BM29 beamline in the framework of the ESRF upgrade. Its mission is to serve the whole XAS user community by providing access to a basic service in addition to the many specialized instruments available at the ESRF. BM23 offers high signal-to-noise ratio EXAFS in a large energy range (5-75 keV), continuous energy scanning for quick-EXAFS on the second timescale and a micro-XAS station delivering a spot size of 4 µm × 4 µm FWHM. It is a user-friendly facility featuring a high degree of automation, online EXAFS data reduction and a flexible sample environment.

  9. The time-resolved and extreme conditions XAS (TEXAS) facility at the European Synchrotron Radiation Facility: the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline BM23

    PubMed Central

    Mathon, O.; Beteva, A.; Borrel, J.; Bugnazet, D.; Gatla, S.; Hino, R.; Kantor, I.; Mairs, T.; Munoz, M.; Pasternak, S.; Perrin, F.; Pascarelli, S.

    2015-01-01

    BM23 is the general-purpose EXAFS bending-magnet beamline at the ESRF, replacing the former BM29 beamline in the framework of the ESRF upgrade. Its mission is to serve the whole XAS user community by providing access to a basic service in addition to the many specialized instruments available at the ESRF. BM23 offers high signal-to-noise ratio EXAFS in a large energy range (5–75 keV), continuous energy scanning for quick-EXAFS on the second timescale and a micro-XAS station delivering a spot size of 4 µm × 4 µm FWHM. It is a user-friendly facility featuring a high degree of automation, online EXAFS data reduction and a flexible sample environment. PMID:26524321

  10. Magnetic engineering of stable rod-shaped stem cell aggregates: circumventing the pitfall of self-bending.

    PubMed

    Du, V; Fayol, D; Reffay, M; Luciani, N; Bacri, J-C; Gay, C; Wilhelm, C

    2015-02-01

    A current challenge for tissue engineering while restoring the function of diseased or damaged tissue is to customize the tissue according to the target area. Scaffold-free approaches usually yield spheroid shapes with the risk of necrosis at the center due to poor nutrient and oxygen diffusion. Here, we used magnetic forces developed at the cellular scale by miniaturized magnets to create rod-shaped aggregates of stem cells that subsequently matured into a tissue-like structure. However, during the maturation process, the tissue-rods spontaneously bent and coiled into sphere-like structures, triggered by the increasing cell-cell adhesion within the initially non-homogeneous tissue. Optimisation of the intra-tissular magnetic forces successfully hindered the transition, in order to produce stable rod-shaped stem cells aggregates. PMID:25580701

  11. Discursive Modes and Their Pedagogical Functions in Model-Based Inquiry (MBI) Classrooms

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Campbell, Todd; Oh, Phil Seok; Neilson, Drew

    2012-01-01

    This research investigated the emergent discursive modes and their pedagogical functions found in model-based inquiry (MBI) science classrooms. A sample of four high school physics classrooms was video-recorded and analysed using a newly established discourse mode analysis framework. Qualitative methods were employed to identify the most salient…

  12. CSR IMPEDANCE DUE TO A BEND MAGNET OF FINITE LENGTH WITH A VACUUM CHAMBER OF RECTANGULAR CROSS SECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.; Kotelnikov, I.A.; /Novosibirsk State U.

    2009-06-05

    We study the impedance due to coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) generated by a short bunch of charged particles passing through a dipole magnet of finite length in a vacuum chamber of a given cross section. Our method represents a further development of the previous studies: we decompose the electromagnetic field of the beam over the eigenmodes of the toroidal chamber and derive a system of equations for the expansion coefficients in the series. We illustrate our general method by calculating the CSR impedance of a beam moving in a toroidal vacuum chamber of rectangular cross section.

  13. High resolution soft x-ray bending magnet beamline 9.3.2 with circularly polarized radiation capability at the Advanced Light Source

    SciTech Connect

    Hussain, Z.; Heimann, P.A.; McKinney, W.; Padmore, H.A.; Huff, W.R.A.; Kellar, S.A.; Moler, E.J. |; Fadley, C.S. |; Shirley, D.A.

    1995-08-01

    Bending magnet beamline 9.3.2 at the Advanced Light Source (ALS) was designed for high resolution spectroscopy in the soft x-ray energy region, covering a range from 30 eV to 1500 eV with three gratings. The monochromator itself is a standard fixed included angle 55 m spherical grating monochromator and was originally used at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL) as a prototype for later insertion device based monochromators for the ALS. For operations at the ALS, the toroidal pre-mirror used at SSRL to vertically focus onto the entrance slit and horizontally focus onto the exit slit was replaced by two separate crossed mirrors (Kirkpatrick-Baez configuration). Circularly polarized radiation is obtained by inserting a water-cooled movable aperture in front of the vertically focusing mirror to allow selecting the beam either above or below the horizontal plane. To maintain a stable beam intensity through the entrance slit, the photocurrent signals from the upper and lower jaws of the entrance slit are utilized to set a feedback loop with the vertically deflecting mirror Piezoelectric drive. The beamline end station has a rotatable platform (through 60{degree}) that accommodates two experimental chambers, enabling the synchrotron radiation to be directed to either one without breaking vacuum.

  14. Reversal bending fatigue testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Tan, Ting

    2014-10-21

    Embodiments for apparatuses for testing reversal bending fatigue in an elongated beam are disclosed. Embodiments are configured to be coupled to first and second end portions of the beam and to apply a bending moment to the beam and create a pure bending condition in an intermediate portion of the beam. Embodiments are further configured to cyclically alternate the direction of the bending moment applied to the beam such that the intermediate portion of the beam cyclically bends in opposite directions in a pure bending condition.

  15. The small protein MbiA interacts with MreB and modulates cell shape in Caulobacter crescentus.

    PubMed

    Yakhnina, Anastasiya A; Gitai, Zemer

    2012-09-01

    In Caulobacter crescentus, the actin homologue MreB is critical for cell shape maintenance. Despite the central importance of MreB for cell morphology and viability, very little is known about MreB-interacting factors. Here, we use an overexpression approach to identify a novel MreB interactor, MbiA. MbiA interacts with MreB in both biochemical and genetic assays, colocalizes with MreB throughout the cell cycle, and relies on MreB for its localization. MbiA overexpression mimics the loss of MreB function, severely perturbing cell morphology, inhibiting growth and inducing cell lysis. Additionally, mbiA deletion shows a synthetic growth phenotype with a hypomorphic allele of the MreB interactor RodZ, suggesting that these two MreB-interacting proteins either have partially redundant functions or participate in the same functional complex. Our work thus establishes MbiA as a novel cell shape regulator that appears to function through regulating MreB, and opens avenues for discovery of more MreB-regulating factors by showing that overexpression screens are a valuable tool for uncovering potentially redundant cell shape effectors.

  16. Microhole Tubing Bending Report

    DOE Data Explorer

    Oglesby, Ken

    2012-01-01

    A downhole tubing bending study was made and is reported herein. IT contains a report and 2 excel spreadsheets to calculate tubing bending and to estimate contact points of the tubing to the drilled hole wall (creating a new support point).

  17. Discovering Gee's Bend Quilts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Johnson, Ann

    2008-01-01

    Gee's Bend is a small community near Selma, Alabama where cotton plantations filled the land before the Civil War. After the war, the freed slaves of the plantations worked as tenant farmers and founded an African-American community. In 2002, the women of this community brought international attention and acclaim to Gee's Bend through the art of…

  18. Occipital bending in depression.

    PubMed

    Maller, Jerome J; Thomson, Richard H S; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Anderson, Rodney; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2014-06-01

    There are reports of differences in occipital lobe asymmetry within psychiatric populations when compared with healthy control subjects. Anecdotal evidence and enlarged lateral ventricles suggests that there may also be a different pattern of curvature whereby one occipital lobe wraps around the other, termed 'occipital bending'. We investigated the prevalence of occipital bending in 51 patients with major depressive disorder (males mean age = 41.96 ± 14.00 years, females mean age = 40.71 ± 12.41 years) and 48 age- and sex-matched healthy control subjects (males mean age = 40.29 ± 10.23 years, females mean age = 42.47 ± 14.25 years) and found the prevalence to be three times higher among patients with major depressive disorder (18/51, 35.3%) when compared with control subjects (6/48, 12.5%). The results suggest that occipital bending is more common among patients with major depressive disorder than healthy subjects, and that occipital asymmetry and occipital bending are separate phenomena. Incomplete neural pruning may lead to the cranial space available for brain growth being restricted, or ventricular enlargement may exacerbate the natural occipital curvature patterns, subsequently causing the brain to become squashed and forced to 'wrap' around the other occipital lobe. Although the clinical implications of these results are unclear, they provide an impetus for further research into the relevance of occipital bending in major depression disorder.

  19. Dispersion suppressors with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    Dispersion suppressors of two main types are usually used. In one the cell quadrupole focussing structure is the same as in normal cells but some of the dipoles are replaced by drifts. In the other, the quadrupole strengths and/or spacings are different from those of the normal cells, but the bending is about the same as it is in the cells. In SSC designs to date, dispersion suppressors of the former type have been used, consisting of two cells with bending equivalent to one. In this note a suppressor design with normal bending and altered focussing is presented. The advantage of this scheme is that circumference is reduced. The disadvantages are that additional special quadrupoles must be provided (however, they need not be adjustable), and the maximum beta values within them are about 30% higher than the cell maxima.

  20. Design parameters for a 7.2 tesla bending magnet for a 1.5 GeV compact light source

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Madura, D.

    1995-06-01

    This report describes the design for a 7.2 tesla superconducting dipole magnet for a compact synchrotron light source. The proposed magnet is a Vobly type modified picture frame dipole that has the flux returned through unsaturated iron. In this magnet, The iron in the pole pieces is highly saturated, Separately powered coils around the pole pieces are used to direct the flux lines until the flux can be returned through the unsaturated iron. The proposed dipole will develop a uniform field over a region that is 80 mm high by 130 mm wide over a range of central induction from 0.4 T to almost 8 T. Each dipole for the compact light source will have a magnetic length of about 0.38 meters.

  1. Design parameters for a 7.2 tesla bending magnet for a 1.5 GeV compact light source

    SciTech Connect

    Green, M.A.; Madura, D.

    1996-07-01

    This report describes the design for a 7.2 tesla superconducting dipole magnet for a compact synchrotron light source. The proposed magnet is a Vobly type modified picture frame dipole that has the flux returned through unsaturated iron. In this magnet, the iron in the pole pieces is highly saturated. Separately powered coils around the pole pieces are used to direct the flux lines until the flux can be returned through the unsaturated iron. The proposed dipole will develop a uniform field over a region that is 80 mm high by 130 mm wide over a range of central induction from 0.4 T to almost 8 T. Each dipole for the compact light source will have a magnetic length of about 0.38 meters.

  2. Remarkable anti-trichomonas vaginalis activity of plants traditionally used by the Mbyá-Guarani indigenous group in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Brandelli, Clara Lia Costa; Vieira, Patrícia de Brum; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2013-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a flagellate protozoan, is the causative agent of trichomonosis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Taking into account the increased prevalence of metronidazole-resistant isolates, alternative drugs are essential for the successful treatment. Natural products are the source of most new drugs, and popular wisdom about the use of medicinal plants is a powerful tool in this search. In this study, the activity of 10 medicinal plants extensively used in daily life by Mbyá-Guarani indigenous group was evaluated against seven different T. vaginalis isolates. Among the aqueous extracts tested, Verbena sp. (Guachu ka'a in Mbyá-Guarani language) and Campomanesia xanthocarpa (Guavira in Mbyá-Guarani language) showed the highest activity against T. vaginalis with MIC value of 4.0 mg/mL reaching 100% of efficacy against the parasite. The kinetic growth assays showed that the extracts promoted complete growth abolishment after 4 h of incubation. In addition, the extracts tested did not promote a significant hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes. Our results show for the first time the potential activity of Verbena sp. and C. xanthocarpa against T. vaginalis. In addition, this study demonstrates that indigenous knowledge is an important source of new prototype antiprotozoal agents. PMID:23865068

  3. Remarkable Anti-Trichomonas vaginalis Activity of Plants Traditionally Used by the Mbyá-Guarani Indigenous Group in Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Brandelli, Clara Lia Costa; Vieira, Patrícia de Brum; Macedo, Alexandre José; Tasca, Tiana

    2013-01-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis, a flagellate protozoan, is the causative agent of trichomonosis, the most common nonviral sexually transmitted disease worldwide. Taking into account the increased prevalence of metronidazole-resistant isolates, alternative drugs are essential for the successful treatment. Natural products are the source of most new drugs, and popular wisdom about the use of medicinal plants is a powerful tool in this search. In this study, the activity of 10 medicinal plants extensively used in daily life by Mbyá-Guarani indigenous group was evaluated against seven different T. vaginalis isolates. Among the aqueous extracts tested, Verbena sp. (Guachu ka'a in Mbyá-Guarani language) and Campomanesia xanthocarpa (Guavira in Mbyá-Guarani language) showed the highest activity against T. vaginalis with MIC value of 4.0 mg/mL reaching 100% of efficacy against the parasite. The kinetic growth assays showed that the extracts promoted complete growth abolishment after 4 h of incubation. In addition, the extracts tested did not promote a significant hemolytic activity against human erythrocytes. Our results show for the first time the potential activity of Verbena sp. and C. xanthocarpa against T. vaginalis. In addition, this study demonstrates that indigenous knowledge is an important source of new prototype antiprotozoal agents. PMID:23865068

  4. [Factorial structure and psychometric criteria of the German translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory--Student Version by Schaufeli et al. (MBI-SS)].

    PubMed

    Gumz, Antje; Erices, Rainer; Brähler, Elmar; Zenger, Markus

    2013-02-01

    The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) is the most commonly used instrument in research on burnout. For the German translation of the MBI student version (MBI-SS), the postulated 3-factorial structure of the questionnaire could be confirmed using confirmatory analyses. The internal consistencies of the scales can be classified as good. First findings underline the construct validity of the questionnaire. As expected, burnout was associated with psychic and somatic complaints as well as with experienced social support. Couples reported higher "Efficiency" levels. Academic studies became less important with increasing duration. Time pressure during the last month was correlated with "Exhaustion". The presented findings on factorial structure and validity speak for the applicability of MBI-SS for research projects on students of German institutes of higher education. PMID:23408302

  5. [Factorial structure and psychometric criteria of the German translation of the Maslach Burnout Inventory--Student Version by Schaufeli et al. (MBI-SS)].

    PubMed

    Gumz, Antje; Erices, Rainer; Brähler, Elmar; Zenger, Markus

    2013-02-01

    The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) is the most commonly used instrument in research on burnout. For the German translation of the MBI student version (MBI-SS), the postulated 3-factorial structure of the questionnaire could be confirmed using confirmatory analyses. The internal consistencies of the scales can be classified as good. First findings underline the construct validity of the questionnaire. As expected, burnout was associated with psychic and somatic complaints as well as with experienced social support. Couples reported higher "Efficiency" levels. Academic studies became less important with increasing duration. Time pressure during the last month was correlated with "Exhaustion". The presented findings on factorial structure and validity speak for the applicability of MBI-SS for research projects on students of German institutes of higher education.

  6. Bending and torquing accuracy of the bending art system (BAS).

    PubMed

    Fischer-Brandies, H; Orthuber, W; Pohle, L; Sellenrieck, D

    1996-02-01

    With the bending art system (BAS) the computerized production of individual arch wires has become possible. The BAS consists of an intraoral camera, a computer program and a bending machine producing the archwire by consecutive bending and twisting procedures. This study examines the accuracy of the bending machine when using 0.016" x 0.016" and 0.016" x 0.022" steel wire of rectangular cross-section. Bending angles ranging from 6 degrees to 54 degrees, and torsion angles ranging from 2 degrees to 35 degrees were tested; also the minimum distance between these individual operations was determined. The bent pieces of wire were analysed in a 3D-coordinate gauging system. The 0.016" x 0.016" steel wire showed a mean measuring error of 0.62 degree in bending procedures and of 0.72 degree in torsion procedures, whereas the 0.016" x 0.022" steel wire showed an error of 0.87 degree with edgewise bendings and of 0.86 degree with torsions. To ensure this accuracy a minimum distance of 0.5 mm to 0.7 mm, depending on which kind of bending combination is used, between bending and torsion is required. The error could be reduced even further if a more constant wire material and a more accurate calibration of the bending machine were used. All in all the precision of the bending machine meets the clinical requirements. PMID:8626166

  7. Evaluating the Psychometric Properties of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS) among Italian Nurses: How Many Factors Must a Researcher Consider?

    PubMed Central

    Loera, Barbara; Converso, Daniela; Viotti, Sara

    2014-01-01

    Background The Maslach Burnout Inventory (MBI) is the mainstream measure for burnout. However, its psychometric properties have been questioned, and alternative measurement models of the inventory have been suggested. Aims Different models for the number of items and factors of the MBI-HSS, the version of the Inventory for the Human Service sector, were tested in order to identify the most appropriate model for measuring burnout in Italy. Methods The study dataset consisted of a sample of 925 nurses. Ten alternative models of burnout were compared using confirmatory factor analysis. The psychometric properties of items and reliability of the MBI-HSS subscales were evaluated. Results Item malfunctioning may confound the MBI-HSS factor structure. The analysis confirmed the factorial structure of the MBI-HSS with a three-dimensional, 20-item assessment. Conclusions The factorial structure underlying the MBI-HSS follows Maslach’s definition when items are reduced from the original 22 to a 20-item set. Alternative models, either with fewer items or with an increased number of latent dimensions in the burnout structure, do not yield better results to justify redefining the item set or theoretically revising the syndrome construct. PMID:25501716

  8. MHD bending waves in a current sheet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Musielak, Z. E.; Suess, S. T.

    1986-01-01

    Transverse MHD bending waves are considered in an isothermal and compressible two-dimensional current sheet of finite thickness in which the magnetic field changes direction and strength. The general form of the wave equation is obtained. It is shown that rotation of the magnetic field across the current sheet prevents the existence of singular points so that continuous spectrum solutions and the concomitant wave decay disappear. Instead, normal modes exist and closed integral solution for arbitrary current sheet structure are found. The results are discussed in terms of small-scale waves on the heliospheric current sheet.

  9. Phase trombones with bending

    SciTech Connect

    Courant, E.D.; Garren, A.

    1985-10-01

    The phase shifting trombones considered up to now for SSC application consisted of sets of evenly spaced quadrupoles separated by drift spaces. One such trombone was placed between a dispersion suppressor and a crossing insertion, so that the trombone had zero dispersion. With such trombones, it is possible to change {beta}{sup *} at constant tune, or to change the tunes by several units without altering the cell phase advances in the arcs. An objection to the above type of phase trombone is that it adds to the circumference, since no bending is included. This objection may or may not be valid depending on the potential usefulness of the drift spaces in them. In this note the authors show an alternative trombone design in which dipoles are included between the quadrupoles as in the normal arc cells. Since these trombones have dispersion, they are placed at the ends of the arcs, to be followed in turn by the dispersion suppressors and crossing insertions.

  10. Tunable characteristics of bending resonance frequency in magnetoelectric laminated composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Li, Ping; Wen, Yu-Mei; Zhu, Yong

    2013-07-01

    As the magnetoelectric (ME) effect in piezoelectric/magnetostrictive laminated composites is mediated by mechanical deformation, the ME effect is significantly enhanced in the vicinity of resonance frequency. The bending resonance frequency (fr) of bilayered Terfenol-D/PZT (MP) laminated composites is studied, and our analysis predicts that (i) the bending resonance frequency of an MP laminated composite can be tuned by an applied dc magnetic bias (Hdc) due to the ΔE effect; (ii) the bending resonance frequency of the MP laminated composite can be controlled by incorporating FeCuNbSiB layers with different thicknesses. The experimental results show that with Hdc increasing from 0 Oe (1 Oe=79.5775 A/m) to 700 Oe, the bending resonance frequency can be shifted in a range of 32.68 kHz <= fr <= 33.96 kHz. In addition, with the thickness of the FeCuNbSiB layer increasing from 0 μm to 90 μm, the bending resonance frequency of the MP laminated composite gradually increases from 33.66 kHz to 39.18 kHz. This study offers a method of adjusting the strength of dc magnetic bias or the thicknesses of the FeCuNbSiB layer to tune the bending resonance frequency for ME composite, which plays a guiding role in the ME composite design for real applications.

  11. Hysteresis of the resonance frequency of magnetostrictive bending cantilevers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Löffler, Michael; Kremer, Ramona; Sutor, Alexander; Lerch, Reinhard

    2015-05-01

    Magnetostrictive bending cantilevers are applicable for wirelessly measuring physical quantities such as pressure and strain. Exploiting the ΔE-effect, the resonance frequency of the cantilevers is shifted because of a change in the magnetic biasing field. The biasing field, in turn, depends on the applied pressure or strain, respectively. With a view to the application as a reliable sensor, maximum sensitivity but minimum hysteresis in the biasing field/resonance frequency dependence is preferred. In this contribution, monomorph bending cantilevers fabricated using magnetostrictive Fe49Co49V2 and Metglas 2605SA1 are investigated regarding their applicability for future sensors. For this purpose, the biasing field-dependent polarization of the magnetostrictive materials and bending of the cantilevers are determined. Furthermore, a setup to magnetically bias the cantilevers and determine the bending resonance frequency is presented. Here, the resonance frequency is identified by measuring the impulse response employing a laser Doppler vibrometer. The measurement results reveal that cantilevers made of Fe49Co49V2 possess a distinct hysteretic behaviour at low magnetic biasing field magnitudes. This is ascribed to the polarization and bending hysteresis. Cantilevers fabricated using Metglas 2605SA1 feature a lower resonance frequency shift compared to cantilevers with Fe49Co49V2, which would result in a lower sensitivity of the sensor. However, their resonance frequency hysteresis is almost negligible.

  12. Sheet Bending using Soft Tools

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinke, J.

    2011-05-01

    Sheet bending is usually performed by air bending and V-die bending processes. Both processes apply rigid tools. These solid tools facilitate the generation of software for the numerical control of those processes. When the lower rigid die is replaced with a soft or rubber tool, the numerical control becomes much more difficult, since the soft tool deforms too. Compared to other bending processes the rubber backed bending process has some distinct advantages, like large radius-to-thickness ratios, applicability to materials with topcoats, well defined radii, and the feasibility of forming details (ridges, beads). These advantages may give the process exclusive benefits over conventional bending processes, not only for industries related to mechanical engineering and sheet metal forming, but also for other disciplines like Architecture and Industrial Design The largest disadvantage is that also the soft (rubber) tool deforms. Although the tool deformation is elastic and recovers after each process cycle, the applied force during bending is related to the deformation of the metal sheet and the deformation of the rubber. The deformation of the rubber interacts with the process but also with sheet parameters. This makes the numerical control of the process much more complicated. This paper presents a model for the bending of sheet materials using a rubber lower die. This model can be implemented in software in order to control the bending process numerically. The model itself is based on numerical and experimental research. In this research a number of variables related to the tooling and the material have been evaluated. The numerical part of the research was used to investigate the influence of the features of the soft lower tool, like the hardness and dimensions, and the influence of the sheet thickness, which also interacts with the soft tool deformation. The experimental research was focused on the relation between the machine control parameters and the most

  13. ACHRO: A program to help design achromatic bends

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoi, D.

    1993-03-01

    ACHRO is a very simple 2000-line. FORTRAN code that provides help for the designer of the achromatic bend. Given a beam momentum, the program calculates the required drift lengths and dipole parameters which it will apply to any one of several different types of achromats. The types of achromats that the code helps to design include the Enge dual-270,`` the Brown 2-dipole, the Leboutet 3-dipole, and the Enge 4-dipole, as well as the periodic systems which can be designed to any order in symmetric, nonsymmetric and stair-step varieties. Given the dimensions into which a bend must fit, ACHRO will calculate the geometrical parameters in an X-Y plane for a single or multiple achromat, and for achromatic ``S-bend`` configurations where possible. ACHRO makes it very easy to optimize a bend with respect to drift lengths and magnet parameters by allowing the user to change parameter values and see the resulting calculation. Used in conjunction with a beam-transport code, ACHRO makes it possible for a designer to consider various types of achromatic bends in the same beamline layout in order to compare important bend characteristics such as dispersion, Isochronicity, sensitivity, geometric and chromatic aberrations, aperture requirements, space for diagnostics, etc., all of which are largely a function of the geometry and the type of achromat selected.

  14. ACHRO: A program to help design achromatic bends

    SciTech Connect

    Rusthoi, D.

    1993-01-01

    ACHRO is a very simple 2000-line. FORTRAN code that provides help for the designer of the achromatic bend. Given a beam momentum, the program calculates the required drift lengths and dipole parameters which it will apply to any one of several different types of achromats. The types of achromats that the code helps to design include the Enge dual-270,'' the Brown 2-dipole, the Leboutet 3-dipole, and the Enge 4-dipole, as well as the periodic systems which can be designed to any order in symmetric, nonsymmetric and stair-step varieties. Given the dimensions into which a bend must fit, ACHRO will calculate the geometrical parameters in an X-Y plane for a single or multiple achromat, and for achromatic S-bend'' configurations where possible. ACHRO makes it very easy to optimize a bend with respect to drift lengths and magnet parameters by allowing the user to change parameter values and see the resulting calculation. Used in conjunction with a beam-transport code, ACHRO makes it possible for a designer to consider various types of achromatic bends in the same beamline layout in order to compare important bend characteristics such as dispersion, Isochronicity, sensitivity, geometric and chromatic aberrations, aperture requirements, space for diagnostics, etc., all of which are largely a function of the geometry and the type of achromat selected.

  15. Bending fracture in carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wen-Shyong; Lu, Hsin-Fang

    2008-12-10

    A novel approach was adopted to incur bending fracture in carbon nanotubes (CNTs). Expanded graphite (EG) was made by intercalating and exfoliating natural graphite flakes. The EG was deposited with nickel particles, from which CNTs were grown by chemical vapor deposition. The CNTs were tip-grown, and their roots were fixed on the EG flakes. The EG flakes were compressed, and many CNTs on the surface were fragmented due to the compression-induced bending. Two major modes of the bending fracture were observed: cone-shaped and shear-cut. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were used to examine the crack growth within the graphene layers. The bending fracture is characterized by two-region crack growth. An opening crack first appears around the outer-tube due to the bending-induced tensile stress. The crack then branches to grow along an inclined direction toward the inner-tube due to the presence of the shear stress in between graphene layers. An inner-tube pullout with inclined side surface is formed. The onset and development of the crack in these two regions are discussed. PMID:21730690

  16. Method for uniformly bending conduits

    DOEpatents

    Dekanich, S.J.

    1984-04-27

    The present invention is directed to a method for bending metal tubing through various radii while maintaining uniform cross section of the tubing. The present invention is practical by filling the tubing to a sufficient level with water, freezing the water to ice and bending the ice-filled tubing in a cooled die to the desired radius. The use of the ice as a filler material provides uniform cross-sectional bends of the tubing and upon removal of the ice provides an uncontaminated interior of the tubing which will enable it to be used in its intended application without encountering residual contaminants in the tubing due to the presence of the filler material.

  17. Compaction managed mirror bend achromat

    DOEpatents

    Douglas, David

    2005-10-18

    A method for controlling the momentum compaction in a beam of charged particles. The method includes a compaction-managed mirror bend achromat (CMMBA) that provides a beamline design that retains the large momentum acceptance of a conventional mirror bend achromat. The CMMBA also provides the ability to tailor the system momentum compaction spectrum as desired for specific applications. The CMMBA enables magnetostatic management of the longitudinal phase space in Energy Recovery Linacs (ERLs) thereby alleviating the need for harmonic linearization of the RF waveform.

  18. The statistical difference between bending arcs and regular polar arcs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kullen, A.; Fear, R. C.; Milan, S. E.; Carter, J. A.; Karlsson, T.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, the Polar UVI data set by Kullen et al. (2002) of 74 polar arcs is reinvestigated, focusing on bending arcs. Bending arcs are typically faint and form (depending on interplanetary magnetic field (IMF) By direction) on the dawnside or duskside oval with the tip of the arc splitting off the dayside oval. The tip subsequently moves into the polar cap in the antisunward direction, while the arc's nightside end remains attached to the oval, eventually becoming hook-shaped. Our investigation shows that bending arcs appear on the opposite oval side from and farther sunward than most regular polar arcs. They form during By-dominated IMF conditions: typically, the IMF clock angle increases from 60 to 90° about 20 min before the arc forms. Antisunward plasma flows from the oval into the polar cap just poleward of bending arcs are seen in Super Dual Auroral Radar Network data, indicating dayside reconnection. For regular polar arcs, recently reported characteristics are confirmed in contrast to bending arcs. This includes plasma flows along the nightside oval that originate close to the initial arc location and a significant delay in the correlation between IMF By and initial arc location. In our data set, the highest correlations are found with IMF By appearing at least 1-2 h before arc formation. In summary, bending arcs are distinctly different from regular arcs and cannot be explained by existing polar arc models. Instead, these results are consistent with the formation mechanism described in Carter et al. (2015), suggesting that bending arcs are caused by dayside reconnection.

  19. Superconducting Bi2Te: Pressure-induced universality in the (Bi2)m(Bi2Te3)n series

    DOE PAGES

    Stillwell, Ryan L.; Jeffries, Jason R.; Jenei, Zsolt; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.

    2016-03-09

    Using high-pressure magnetotransport techniques we have discovered superconductivity in Bi2Te, a member of the infinitely adaptive (Bi2)m(Bi2Te3)n series, whose end members, Bi and Bi2Te3, can be tuned to display topological surface states or superconductivity. Bi2Te has a maximum Tc = 8.6 K at P = 14.5 GPa and goes through multiple high pressure phase transitions, ultimately collapsing into a bcc structure that suggests a universal behavior across the series. High-pressure magnetoresistance and Hall measurements suggest a semi-metal to metal transition near 5.4 GPa, which accompanies the hexagonal to intermediate phase transition seen via x-ray diffraction measurements. In addition, the linearitymore » of Hc2 (T) exceeds the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg limit, even in the extreme spin-orbit scattering limit, yet is consistent with other strong spin-orbit materials. Furthermore, considering these results in combination with similar reports on strong spin-orbit scattering materials seen in the literature, we suggest the need for a new theory that can address the unconventional nature of their superconducting states.« less

  20. [Intestinal parasitosis in Mbyá-Guaraní populations from Misiones Province, Argentina: epidemiological and nutritional aspects].

    PubMed

    Navone, Graciela Teresa; Gamboa, María Inés; Oyhenart, Evelia Edith; Orden, Alicia Bibiana

    2006-05-01

    Intestinal parasite infestation in indigenous Mbyá-Guaraní communities in Misiones, Argentina, was described and associated with nutritional status and environmental and cultural factors. The results were compared with those from Takuapí, a neighboring indigenous population, and the nearest urban population, Aristóbulo del Valle. The Ritchie, Willis, and Kato Katz techniques were used to analyze the stool samples. Anthropometric parameters were analyzed and earth samples processed. From a total sample of 296 individuals analyzed in the four populations, 100 (87.7%), 63 (88.7%), 49 (96.1%), and 50 (82%) were infested in Kaaguy Poty, Yvy Pytá, Takuapí, and Aristóbulo del Valle, respectively. 84% of infested individuals had multiple parasites. The 43% of the individuals presented malnutrition, and 87% of these were infested. There was an association between use of latrines and Giardia lamblia (p < 0.01); open-air defecation, lack of footwear, and hookworms (p < 0.01); and housing type and total helminthes (p < 0.01). Earth samples were contaminated with parasites. The results suggest the relationship between environmental contamination and high prevalence of intestinal parasites in these human populations.

  1. Hormonal regulation of gravitropic bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, X.; Cui, D.; Xu, X.; Hu, L.; Cai, W.

    Gravitropic bending is an important subject in the research of plant Recent data support the basics of the Cholodny-Went hypothesis indicating that differential growth in gravitropism is due to redistribution of auxin to the lower sides of gravistimulated roots but little is known regarding the molecular details of such effects So we carried a series of work surround the signals induced by auxin end center We found the endogenous signaling molecules nitric oxide NO and cGMP mediate responses to gravistimulation in primary roots of soybean Glycine max Horizontal orientation of soybean roots caused the accumulation of both NO and cGMP in the primary root tip Fluorescence confocal microcopy revealed that the accumulation of NO was asymmetric with NO concentrating in the lower side of the root Auxin induced NO accumulation in root protoplasts and asymmetric NO accumulation in root tips Gravistimulation NO and auxin also induced the accumulation of cGMP a response inhibited by removal of NO or by inhibitors of guanylyl cyclase compounds that also reduced gravitropic bending Asymmetric NO accumulation and gravitropic bending were both inhibited by an auxin transport inhibitor and the inhibition of bending was overcome by treatment with NO or 8-bromo-cGMP a cell-permeable analog of cGMP These data indicate that auxin-induced NO and cGMP mediate gravitropic curvature in soybean roots From Hu et al Plant Physiol 2005 137 663-670 The asymmetric distribution of auxin plays a fundamental role in plant gravitropic bending

  2. The bifactor model of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS)--an alternative measurement model of burnout.

    PubMed

    Mészáros, V; Adám, Sz; Szabó, M; Szigeti, R; Urbán, R

    2014-02-01

    The purpose of the present study was to examine the construct validity of the Hungarian language version of the Maslach Burnout Inventory-Human Services Survey (MBI-HSS). A sample of 653 healthcare professionals (420 physicians and 233 nurses and nursing assistants) completed the MBI-HSS. A series of confirmatory factor analyses showed that a hierarchical bifactor model including a global burnout factor and three specific factors of emotional exhaustion, depersonalization and reduced personal accomplishment had the closest fit to the data, compared with an alternative second-order three-factor hierarchical model as well as to non-hierarchical one-factor, two-factor, three-factor, four-factor and five-factor models. However, only the global burnout factor and the specific personal accomplishment factor explained a considerable unique proportion of variance in observed scores. Our study confirms the validity of the MBI-HSS and suggests an alternative structural model, which may contribute to further understanding of the burnout construct.

  3. Bend ductility of tungsten heavy alloys

    SciTech Connect

    Gurwell, W.E.; Garnich, M.R.; Dudder, G.B.; Lavender, C.A.

    1992-11-01

    A bend ductility test is used to indicate the formability of tungsten heavy alloys sheet. The primary test bends a notchless Charpy impact specimen to a bend angle of approximately 100C. This can be augmented by a bend-completion test. Finite element modeling as well as strain-gaged bend specimens elucidate the strain distribution in the specimen as a function of material thickness and bend angle. The bend ductilities of 70%W, 807.W and 90%W alloys are characterized. As expected, decreasing thickness or tungsten content enhances bend ductility. Oxidation is not detrimental; therefore, controlled atmosphere is not required for cooling. The potentially detrimental effects of mechanical working (e.g., rolling, roller-leveling, grit blasting, and peening) and machining (e.g., cutting and sanding) are illustrated.

  4. Vision loss with bending over.

    PubMed

    Lee, Michele D; Odel, Jeffrey G; Rudich, Danielle S; Ritch, Robert; Moster, Mark L

    2015-01-01

    A 66-year-old African American man presented with episodic transient visual loss triggered by bending forward. The initial examination did not suggest intraocular pathology and the patient was nearly sent for vascular evaluation given his cardiovascular risk factors. Fundus photographs taken during an episode of visual loss suggested an intraocular process, however. Gonioscopy revealed a microhyphema causing a "snow globe" effect in the anterior chamber, most likely related to recent bleb manipulation in the affected eye.

  5. MBiO{sub 2}Cl (M=Sr, Ba) as novel photocatalysts: Synthesis, optical property and photocatalytic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Huang, Hongwei Wang, Shuobo; Zhang, Yihe Han, Xu

    2015-02-15

    Novel quaternary photocatalysts MBiO{sub 2}Cl (M=Sr, Ba) have been successfully developed for efficient photodecomposition of RhB. Their photocatalytic mechanism was also investigated. - Highlights: • Two Bi-based compounds SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl were explored as photocatalysts. • They were successfully synthesized by a solid-state reaction. • RhB can be effectively photodecomposed by SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl under UV light. • ·OH radicals serving as active species play important roles in degradation process. - Abstract: Two Bi-based compounds SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl were successfully synthesized by a solid-state reaction and investigated as new photocatalysts for the first time. Their microstructures and optical properties were characterized by XRD, SEM and DRS. The band gaps of SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl were separately determined to be 3.52 and 3.71 eV, and their E{sub CB} and E{sub VB} were also estimated. The photocatalytic activities of the as-prepared samples were evaluated by photodecomposition of rhodamine B (RhB) in aqueous solution. The results revealed that both SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl can be used as effective photocatalysts under UV irradiation, and SrBiO{sub 2}Cl exhibits a higher photocatalytic activity than BaBiO{sub 2}Cl, which was also verified by the PL spectra. Terephthalic acid photoluminescence probing technique (TA-PL) demonstrated that ·OH radicals serving as active species play an important role in photooxidative degradation of RhB over SrBiO{sub 2}Cl and BaBiO{sub 2}Cl. Moreover, a larger amount of ·OH radicals generation was observed over SrBiO{sub 2}Cl, which is in agreement with its higher photocatalytic activity.

  6. Bending of electromagnetic waves in all-dielectric particle array waveguides

    SciTech Connect

    Savelev, Roman S.; Filonov, Dmitry S.; Kapitanova, Polina V.; Krasnok, Alexander E.; Belov, Pavel A.; Miroshnichenko, Andrey E.; Kivshar, Yuri S.

    2014-11-03

    We propose and demonstrate experimentally an alternative approach for realizing subwavelength photonic structures, exploiting the waveguiding properties of chains of high-index dielectric disks with both electric and magnetic dipole resonances. We reveal that the electromagnetic energy can be efficiently guided through sharp corners by means of the mode polarization conversion at waveguide bends. We confirm experimentally the guidance through a 90° bend in the microwave frequency range.

  7. Dynamic hysteretic sensing model of bending-mode Galfenol transducer

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Shuying Zheng, Jiaju; Sang, Jie; Zhang, Pengfei; Wang, Bowen; Huang, Wenmei

    2015-05-07

    A dynamic hysteretic sensing model has been developed to predict the dynamic responses of the magnetic induction, the stress, and the output voltage for a bending-mode Galfenol unimorph transducer subjected simultaneously to acceleration and bias magnetic field. This model is obtained by coupling the hysteretic Armstrong model and the structural dynamic model of the Galfenol unimorph beam. The structural dynamic model of the beam is founded based on the Euler-Bernouli beam theory, the nonlinear constitutive equations, and the Faraday law of electromagnetic induction. Comparisons between the calculated and measured results show the model can describe dynamic nonlinear voltage characteristics of the device, and can predict hysteretic behaviors between the magnetic induction and the stress. Moreover, the model can effectively analyze the effects of the bias magnetic field, the acceleration amplitude, and frequency on the root mean square voltage of the device.

  8. Fish-skeleton visualization of bending actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakshatharan, Sunjai; Punning, Andres; Assi, Siim; Johanson, Urmas; Aabloo, Alvo

    2016-04-01

    We present a novel experimental method for qualitative visualization and quantitative characterization of the time-dependent behavior of bending ionic electroactive polymer actuators. The thin fibers, attached to the actuator, represent the surface normal at the given points of the bending actuator. The structure, formed by the skeleton of many adjacent fibers, amplifies the visual overview about the whole actuator. The four coordinates formed by four tips of two fibers enable determining the axial as well as the bending strains of a bending actuator.

  9. Multilevel light bending in nanoplasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El Sherif, Mohamed H.; Ahmed, Osman S.; Bakr, Mohamed H.; Swillam, Mohamed A.

    2014-03-01

    Nanoplasmonic optical interconnects is proposed to mitigate challenges facing electronics integration. It provides fast and miniaturized data channel that overcome the diffraction limit. We present a three dimensional plasmonic coupler that vertically bends the light to multilevel circuit configurations. It exploits light guiding in nanoscale plasmonic slot waveguides (PSWs). A triangularly-shaped plasmonic slot waveguide rotator is introduced to attain such coupling with good efficiency over a wide bandwidth. Using this approach, light propagating in a horizontal direction is easily converted and coupled to propagate in the vertical direction and vice versa. The proposed configuration is further extended to the design of a multilayer power divider/combiner with ultra-compact footprint that guides the light to multiple channels. A detailed study of the triangular rotator is demonstrated with the analysis of multiple configurations. This structure is suitable for efficient coupling and splitting in multilevel nano circuit environment.

  10. Medicinal Plants Used by a Mbyá-Guarani Tribe Against Infections: Activity on KPC-Producing Isolates and Biofilm-Forming Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Brandelli, Clara Lia Costa; Ribeiro, Vanessa Bley; Zimmer, Karine Rigon; Barth, Afonso Luís; Tasca, Tiana; Macedo, Alexandre José

    2015-11-01

    The traditional use of medicinal plants for treatment of infectious diseases by an indigenous Mbyá-Guarani tribe from South Brazil was assessed by evaluating the antibiotic and antibiofilm activities against relevant bacterial pathogens. Aqueous extracts from 10 medicinal plants were prepared according to indigenous Mbyá-Guarani traditional uses. To evaluate antibiotic (OD600) and antibiofilm (crystal violet method) activities, Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853, Staphylococcus epidermidis ATCC 35984 and seven multi-drug resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing bacterial clinical isolates were challenged with the extracts. Furthermore, the susceptibility profile of KPC-producing bacteria and the ability of these isolates to form biofilm were evaluated. The plants Campomanesia xanthocarpa, Maytenus ilicifolia, Bidens pilosa and Verbena sp. showed the best activity against bacterial growth and biofilm formation. The majority of KPC-producing isolates, which showed strong ability to form biofilm and a multidrug resistance profile, was inhibited by more than 50% by some extracts. The Enterobacter cloacae (KPC 05) clinical isolate was the only one resistant to all extracts. This study confirms the importance of indigenous traditional medicinal knowledge and describes for the first time the ability of these plants to inhibit biofilm formation and/or bacterial growth of multi-drug resistant KPC-producing isolates. PMID:26749812

  11. Effects of repetitive bending on the magnetoresistance of a flexible spin-valve

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, J.-H.; Kwak, W.-Y.; Cho, B. K.; Choi, H. Y.; Kim, G. H.

    2015-05-07

    A positive magnetostrictive single layer (CoFe) and top-pinned spin-valve structure with positive magnetostrictive free (NiFe) and pinned (CoFe) layers were deposited on flexible polyethylene terephthalate film to investigate the changes in the magnetic properties in flexible environments, especially with a repetitive bending process. It was found that the stress, applied by repetitive bending, changes significantly the magnetic anisotropy of both layers in a single and spin-valve structure depending on the direction of applied stress. The changes in magnetic anisotropy were understood in terms of the inverse magnetostriction effect (the Villari effect) and the elastic recovery force from the flexibility of the polymer substrate. Repetitive bending with tensile stress transverse (or parallel) to the magnetic easy axis was found to enhance (or reduce) the magnetic anisotropy and, consequently, the magnetoresistance ratio of a spin-valve. The observed effects of bending stress in this study should be considered for the practical applications of electro-magnetic devices, especially magneto-striction sensor.

  12. Effects of repetitive bending on the magnetoresistance of a flexible spin-valve

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwon, J.-H.; Kwak, W.-Y.; Choi, H. Y.; Kim, G. H.; Cho, B. K.

    2015-05-01

    A positive magnetostrictive single layer (CoFe) and top-pinned spin-valve structure with positive magnetostrictive free (NiFe) and pinned (CoFe) layers were deposited on flexible polyethylene terephthalate film to investigate the changes in the magnetic properties in flexible environments, especially with a repetitive bending process. It was found that the stress, applied by repetitive bending, changes significantly the magnetic anisotropy of both layers in a single and spin-valve structure depending on the direction of applied stress. The changes in magnetic anisotropy were understood in terms of the inverse magnetostriction effect (the Villari effect) and the elastic recovery force from the flexibility of the polymer substrate. Repetitive bending with tensile stress transverse (or parallel) to the magnetic easy axis was found to enhance (or reduce) the magnetic anisotropy and, consequently, the magnetoresistance ratio of a spin-valve. The observed effects of bending stress in this study should be considered for the practical applications of electro-magnetic devices, especially magneto-striction sensor.

  13. Restorying the Self: Bending toward Textual Justice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thomas, Ebony Elizabeth; Stornaiuolo, Amy

    2016-01-01

    In this essay, Ebony Elizabeth Thomas and Amy Stornaiuolo explore new trends in reader response for a digital age, particularly the phenomenon of bending texts using social media. They argue that bending is one form of "restorying," a process by which people reshape narratives to represent a diversity of perspectives and experiences that…

  14. Bending of light in conformal Weyl gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2010-06-01

    We reexamine the bending of light issue associated with the metric of the static, spherically symmetric solution of Weyl gravity discovered by Mannheim and Kazanas (1989). To this end we employ the procedure used recently by Rindler and Ishak to obtain the bending angle of light by a centrally concentrated spherically symmetric matter distribution in a Schwarzschild-de Sitter background. In earlier studies the term γr in the metric led to the paradoxical result of a bending angle proportional to the photon impact parameter, when using the usual formalism appropriate to asymptotically flat space-times. However, employing the approach of light bending of Rindler and Ishak we show that the effects of this term are in fact insignificant, with the discrepancy between the two procedures attributed to the definition of the bending angle between the asymptotically flat and nonflat spaces.

  15. Wire and Cable Cold Bending Test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Colozza, Anthony

    2010-01-01

    One of the factors in assessing the applicability of wire or cable on the lunar surface is its flexibility under extreme cold conditions. Existing wire specifications did not address their mechanical behavior under cold, cryogenic temperature conditions. Therefore tests were performed to provide this information. To assess this characteristic 35 different insulated wire and cable pieces were cold soaked in liquid nitrogen. The segments were then subjected to bending and the force was recorded. Any failure of the insulation or jacketing was also documented for each sample tested. The bending force tests were performed at room temperature to provide a comparison to the change in force needed to bend the samples due to the low temperature conditions. The results from the bending tests were plotted and showed how various types of insulated wire and cable responded to bending under cold conditions. These results were then used to estimate the torque needed to unroll the wire under these low temperature conditions.

  16. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  17. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  18. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  19. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  20. 49 CFR 192.315 - Wrinkle bends in steel pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. 192.315 Section 192... Transmission Lines and Mains § 192.315 Wrinkle bends in steel pipe. (a) A wrinkle bend may not be made on steel... wrinkle bend on steel pipe must comply with the following: (1) The bend must not have any sharp kinks....

  1. 49 CFR 195.212 - Bending of pipe.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Bending of pipe. 195.212 Section 195.212... PIPELINE Construction § 195.212 Bending of pipe. (a) Pipe must not have a wrinkle bend. (b) Each field bend must comply with the following: (1) A bend must not impair the serviceability of the pipe. (2)...

  2. Gravitropic bending of fruit bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hock, Bertold

    Fruit bodies of basidiomycetes exhibit a unique mechanism of gravitropic bending, related to their specific architecture. The gravisensitive region of the stipe directly below the cap coincides with the bending zone. The hyphae of this region are equipped with the ability to generate positional information and translate it into differential growth. A model is introduced with the fundamental characteristics of agent-based modeling as it is applied in robotics and artificial intelligence. The hyphae are equivalent to autonomous decision-making agents on the basis of a simple set of rules. Repetitive interactions between the agents, i.e. the hyphae, permit the correct adjustment of the fruit body independent from its relative position in space. This model is based on the following structural as well as biochemical data derived from the basidiomycete Flammulina velutipes. A statolith-mediated mechanism in each individual hypha of the gravisensitive region accounts for graviperception. Cell nuclei with a density of 1.22 g cm-3 are considered the most likely candidates for gravity-induced sedimentation (statoliths). The number of nuclei in this zone is increased from 2 to up to 10 individual nuclei within each hyphal compartment. The nuclei are suspended in a web of actin filaments anchored in the plasma membrane. Any shift from the vertical position is converted into a change in the gravitational pull exerted on the plasma membrane. This leads to a functional distinction of the upper and lower flanks of each hypha. Each hypha is equipped with the ability to generate and amplify a positional signal perpendicular to the axis of the gravisensitive zone. This signal coordinates different hyphal extension of the upper and lower flank of the stipe: upper flank hyphae grow slower than lower flank hyphae. Hyphal growth requires continued turgor pressure and depends on the expansion of the vacuolar compartment. This vacuolation is conspicuously increased in lower flank

  3. Bend Properties of Sapphire Fibers at Elevated Temperatures. 1; Bend Survivability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morscher, Gregory N.; Sayir, Haluk

    1995-01-01

    The effect of temperature on the bend radius that a c-axis-oriented sapphire fiber can withstand was determined for fibers of various diameter. Bend stress rupture tests were performed for times of 1-100 h and temperatures of 300-1700 C. Fibers would survive the bend test undeformed, would fracture or would deform. The bend survival radius was determined to be the radius above which no fibers fractured or deformed for a given time-temperature treatment. It was found that the ability of fibers to withstand curvature decreases substantially with time and increasing temperature and that fibers of smaller diameter (46-83 micron) withstood smaller bend radii than would be expected from just a difference in fiber diameter when compared with the bend results of the fibers of large diameter (144 micron). This was probably due to different flaw populations, causing high temperature bend failure for the tested sapphire fibers of different diameters.

  4. A flexible sensor measuring displacement and bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishijima, Takashi; Yamamoto, Akio; Higuchi, Toshiro

    2009-04-01

    This paper proposes a new sensor that is capable of measuring both linear displacement and bending. The sensor is designed to be used with an electrostatic film motor that features mechanical flexibility, but can also be used as an independent sensor. The sensor employs three-phase electrodes both in sliding and stationary parts and estimates displacement and bending from the change of the capacitance between the electrodes. The paper describes an equivalent capacitance-network model for the sensor. Based on the model, sensing principles for both displacement and bending are presented and analyzed. The analyses are experimentally verified using a prototype sensor. The experimental results show that the prototype sensor could measure both displacement and bending with little interference between them.

  5. Initial Ares I Bending Filter Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jang, Jiann-Woei; Bedrossian, Nazareth; Hall, Robert; Norris, H. Lee; Hall, Charles; Jackson, Mark

    2007-01-01

    The Ares-I launch vehicle represents a challenging flex-body structural environment for control system design. Software filtering of the inertial sensor output will be required to ensure control system stability and adequate performance. This paper presents a design methodology employing numerical optimization to develop the Ares-I bending filters. The filter design methodology was based on a numerical constrained optimization approach to maximize stability margins while meeting performance requirements. The resulting bending filter designs achieved stability by adding lag to the first structural frequency and hence phase stabilizing the first Ares-I flex mode. To minimize rigid body performance impacts, a priority was placed via constraints in the optimization algorithm to minimize bandwidth decrease with the addition of the bending filters. The bending filters provided here have been demonstrated to provide a stable first stage control system in both the frequency domain and the MSFC MAVERIC time domain simulation.

  6. Thermal static bending of deployable interlocked booms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Staugaitis, C. L.; Predmore, R. E.

    1973-01-01

    Metal ribbons processed with a heat-forming treatment are enabled to form tubelike structures when deployed from a roll. Deployable booms of this have been utilized for gravity-gradient stabilization on the RAE, ATS, and Nimbus D satellites. An experimental thermal-mechanics test apparatus was developed to measure the thermal static bending and twist of booms up to 3 meters long. The apparatus was calibrated by using the correlation between calculated and observed thermal bending of a seamless tube. Thermal static bending values of 16 interlocked deployable booms were observed to be within a factor of 2.5 of the values calculated from seamless-tube theory. Out-of-Sun-plane thermal bending was caused by complex heat transfer across the interlocked seam. Significant thermal static twisting was not observed.

  7. Turbulent flow analysis on bend and downstream of the bend for different curvature ratio

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdhury, Rana Roy; Biswas, Suranjan; Alam, Md. Mahbubul; Islam, A. K. M. Sadrul

    2016-07-01

    A CFD analysis on the bend and downstream of the bend has been carried out for turbulent flow through 90 degree bend pipe with different curvature ratios using standard k-epsilon turbulence model. Numerical results are compared with the existing experimental results, and then a detailed study has been performed to investigate the flow characteristics. For different curvature ratios, the static pressure distributions along inner, outer wall and pressure loss factor with different Reynolds number is analyzed. The obtained results show that pressure distribution and pressure loss factor are dependent for different Reynolds number and curvature ratio throughout the bend. Again, It is observed that the disturbance of the flow due to bend exists for a downstream distance of 50D from the central plane of the bend.

  8. The "bends" and neurogenic bladder dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Elliott, D S; Mutchnik, S; Boone, T B

    2001-02-01

    Decompression sickness (the "bends") is a well-known risk of scuba diving. The pathophysiology and treatment is well documented. In the urologic data, no reference to the development of a neurogenic bladder as a result of an episode of the bends was found. We present the evaluation and management of a previously asymptomatic man who developed detrusor hyperreflexia after an episode of decompression sickness. Urologists in coastal communities should be aware of the potential risk of the development of neurogenic bladder.

  9. A transparent bending-insensitive pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungwon; Reuveny, Amir; Reeder, Jonathan; Lee, Sunghoon; Jin, Hanbit; Liu, Qihan; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke; Suo, Zhigang; Someya, Takao

    2016-05-01

    Measuring small normal pressures is essential to accurately evaluate external stimuli in curvilinear and dynamic surfaces such as natural tissues. Usually, sensitive and spatially accurate pressure sensors are achieved through conformal contact with the surface; however, this also makes them sensitive to mechanical deformation (bending). Indeed, when a soft object is pressed by another soft object, the normal pressure cannot be measured independently from the mechanical stress. Here, we show a pressure sensor that measures only the normal pressure, even under extreme bending conditions. To reduce the bending sensitivity, we use composite nanofibres of carbon nanotubes and graphene. Our simulations show that these fibres change their relative alignment to accommodate bending deformation, thus reducing the strain in individual fibres. Pressure sensitivity is maintained down to a bending radius of 80 μm. To test the suitability of our sensor for soft robotics and medical applications, we fabricated an integrated sensor matrix that is only 2 μm thick. We show real-time (response time of ∼20 ms), large-area, normal pressure monitoring under different, complex bending conditions. PMID:26809055

  10. A transparent bending-insensitive pressure sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Sungwon; Reuveny, Amir; Reeder, Jonathan; Lee, Sunghoon; Jin, Hanbit; Liu, Qihan; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke; Suo, Zhigang; Someya, Takao

    2016-05-01

    Measuring small normal pressures is essential to accurately evaluate external stimuli in curvilinear and dynamic surfaces such as natural tissues. Usually, sensitive and spatially accurate pressure sensors are achieved through conformal contact with the surface; however, this also makes them sensitive to mechanical deformation (bending). Indeed, when a soft object is pressed by another soft object, the normal pressure cannot be measured independently from the mechanical stress. Here, we show a pressure sensor that measures only the normal pressure, even under extreme bending conditions. To reduce the bending sensitivity, we use composite nanofibres of carbon nanotubes and graphene. Our simulations show that these fibres change their relative alignment to accommodate bending deformation, thus reducing the strain in individual fibres. Pressure sensitivity is maintained down to a bending radius of 80 μm. To test the suitability of our sensor for soft robotics and medical applications, we fabricated an integrated sensor matrix that is only 2 μm thick. We show real-time (response time of ∼20 ms), large-area, normal pressure monitoring under different, complex bending conditions.

  11. Bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps.

    PubMed

    Ikebe, K; Kibi, M; Ono, T; Nokubi, T

    1993-12-01

    The purpose of this study is to examine the bending profiles of composite resin coating cast clasps. The cobalt-chromium alloy cast clasps were made using tapered wax pattern. Silane coupling method (Silicoater MD, Kulzer Co.) was used to attach composite resin to metal surface. The breakage and the bending rigidity of composite resin coating clasps were evaluated. Results were as follows: 1) After the repeated bending test to the tips of clasp arm at 10,000 times in 0.25 mm deflection, neither crack on composite resin surface nor separation at resin/metal interface was observed in any specimen. 2) There was no significant difference in the bending rigidity of clasp arms between before and after composite resin coating. From these results, it was demonstrated that the composite resin coating cast clasp was available in clinical cases and coating with composite resin had little influence on the bending rigidity of clasp arms. Therefore, it was suggested that our clasp designing and fabricating system to control the bending rigidity of clasp arms could be applied to composite resin coating clasps. PMID:8935086

  12. A transparent bending-insensitive pressure sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sungwon; Reuveny, Amir; Reeder, Jonathan; Lee, Sunghoon; Jin, Hanbit; Liu, Qihan; Yokota, Tomoyuki; Sekitani, Tsuyoshi; Isoyama, Takashi; Abe, Yusuke; Suo, Zhigang; Someya, Takao

    2016-05-01

    Measuring small normal pressures is essential to accurately evaluate external stimuli in curvilinear and dynamic surfaces such as natural tissues. Usually, sensitive and spatially accurate pressure sensors are achieved through conformal contact with the surface; however, this also makes them sensitive to mechanical deformation (bending). Indeed, when a soft object is pressed by another soft object, the normal pressure cannot be measured independently from the mechanical stress. Here, we show a pressure sensor that measures only the normal pressure, even under extreme bending conditions. To reduce the bending sensitivity, we use composite nanofibres of carbon nanotubes and graphene. Our simulations show that these fibres change their relative alignment to accommodate bending deformation, thus reducing the strain in individual fibres. Pressure sensitivity is maintained down to a bending radius of 80 μm. To test the suitability of our sensor for soft robotics and medical applications, we fabricated an integrated sensor matrix that is only 2 μm thick. We show real-time (response time of ∼20 ms), large-area, normal pressure monitoring under different, complex bending conditions.

  13. Magnetic chicane for terahertz management

    DOEpatents

    Benson, Stephen; Biallas, George Herman; Douglas, David; Jordan, Kevin Carl; Neil, George R.; Michelle D. Shinn; Willams, Gwyn P.

    2010-12-28

    The introduction of a magnetic electron beam orbit chicane between the wiggler and the downstream initial bending dipole in an energy recovering Linac alleviates the effects of radiation propagated from the downstream bending dipole that tend to distort the proximate downstream mirror of the optical cavity resonator.

  14. Form of developing bends in reactivated sperm flagella.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, S F

    1976-02-01

    1. Dark-field, multiple-exposure photographs of reactivated tritonated sea urchin sperm flagella swimming under a variety of conditions were analysed. 2. The length, radius and subtended angle of bends increased during bend development. The pattern of development was essentially the same under all conditions observed. 3. The angles of the two bends nearest the base tend to increase at the same rate, cancelling one another, so that the development of new bends causes little if any net microtubular sliding. 4. The direction of microtubular sliding within a bend is initially in the same direction as that within the preceding bend, and reverses as the bend develops.

  15. MAGNETS

    DOEpatents

    Hofacker, H.B.

    1958-09-23

    This patent relates to nmgnets used in a calutron and more particularly to means fur clamping an assembly of magnet coils and coil spacers into tightly assembled relation in a fluid-tight vessel. The magnet comprises windings made up of an assembly of alternate pan-cake type coils and spacers disposed in a fluid-tight vessel. At one end of the tank a plurality of clamping strips are held firmly against the assembly by adjustable bolts extending through the adjacent wall. The foregoing arrangement permits taking up any looseness which may develop in the assembly of coils and spacers.

  16. Photonic crystal fiber interferometric vector bending sensor.

    PubMed

    Villatoro, Joel; Minkovich, Vladimir P; Zubia, Joseba

    2015-07-01

    A compact and highly sensitive interferometric bending sensor (inclinometer) capable of distinguishing the bending or inclination orientation is demonstrated. The device operates in reflection mode and consists of a short segment of photonic crystal fiber (PCF) inserted in conventional single-mode optical fiber (SMF). A microscopic collapsed zone in the PCF-SMF junction allows the excitation and recombination of core modes, hence, to build a mode interferometer. Bending on the device induces asymmetric refractive index changes in the PCF core as well as losses. As a result, the effective indices and intensities of the interfering modes are altered, which makes the interference pattern shift and shrink. The asymmetric index changes in the PCF make our device capable of distinguishing the bending orientation. The sensitivity of our sensor is up to 1225 pm/degree and it can be used to monitor small bending angles (±2°). We believe that the attributes of our sensor make it appealing in a number of applications. PMID:26125380

  17. Tunable thermoelectric properties in bended graphene nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang-Ning, Pan; Jun, He; Mao-Fa, Fang

    2016-07-01

    The ballistic thermoelectric properties in bended graphene nanoribbons (GNRs) are systematically investigated by using atomistic simulation of electron and phonon transport. We find that the electron resonant tunneling effect occurs in the metallic-semiconducting linked ZZ-GNRs (the bended GNRs with zigzag edge leads). The electron-wave quantum interference effect occurs in the metallic-metallic linked AA-GNRs (the bended GNRs with armchair edge leads). These different physical mechanisms lead to the large Seebeck coefficient S and high electron conductance in bended ZZ-GNRs/AA-GNRs. Combined with the reduced lattice thermal conduction, the significant enhancement of the figure of merit ZT is predicted. Moreover, we find that the ZTmax (the maximum peak of ZT) is sensitive to the structural parameters. It can be conveniently tuned by changing the interbend length of bended GNRs. The magnitude of ZT ranges from the 0.15 to 0.72. Geometry-controlled ballistic thermoelectric effect offers an effective way to design thermoelectric devices such as thermocouples based on graphene. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 61401153) and the Natural Science Foundation of Hunan Province, China (Grant Nos. 2015JJ2050 and 14JJ3126).

  18. Robotic Arm Comprising Two Bending Segments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehling, Joshua S.; Difler, Myron A.; Ambrose, Robert O.; Chu, Mars W.; Valvo, Michael C.

    2010-01-01

    The figure shows several aspects of an experimental robotic manipulator that includes a housing from which protrudes a tendril- or tentacle-like arm 1 cm thick and 1 m long. The arm consists of two collinear segments, each of which can be bent independently of the other, and the two segments can be bent simultaneously in different planes. The arm can be retracted to a minimum length or extended by any desired amount up to its full length. The arm can also be made to rotate about its own longitudinal axis. Some prior experimental robotic manipulators include single-segment bendable arms. Those arms are thicker and shorter than the present one. The present robotic manipulator serves as a prototype of future manipulators that, by virtue of the slenderness and multiple- bending capability of their arms, are expected to have sufficient dexterity for operation within spaces that would otherwise be inaccessible. Such manipulators could be especially well suited as means of minimally invasive inspection during construction and maintenance activities. Each of the two collinear bending arm segments is further subdivided into a series of collinear extension- and compression-type helical springs joined by threaded links. The extension springs occupy the majority of the length of the arm and engage passively in bending. The compression springs are used for actively controlled bending. Bending is effected by means of pairs of antagonistic tendons in the form of spectra gel spun polymer lines that are attached at specific threaded links and run the entire length of the arm inside the spring helix from the attachment links to motor-driven pulleys inside the housing. Two pairs of tendons, mounted in orthogonal planes that intersect along the longitudinal axis, are used to effect bending of each segment. The tendons for actuating the distal bending segment are in planes offset by an angle of 45 from those of the proximal bending segment: This configuration makes it possible to

  19. Superconducting B i2Te : Pressure-induced universality in the (Bi2) m(Bi2Te3 ) n series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stillwell, Ryan L.; Jenei, Zsolt; Weir, Samuel T.; Vohra, Yogesh K.; Jeffries, Jason R.

    2016-03-01

    Using high-pressure magnetotransport techniques we have discovered superconductivity in B i2Te , a member of the infinitely adaptive (Bi2) m(Bi2Te3 ) n series, whose end members, Bi and B i2T e3 , can be tuned to display topological surface states or superconductivity. B i2Te has a maximum Tc=8.6 K at P =14.5 GPa and goes through multiple high-pressure phase transitions, ultimately collapsing into a bcc structure that suggests a universal behavior across the series. High-pressure magnetoresistance and Hall measurements suggest a semimetal to metal transition near 5.4 GPa, which accompanies the hexagonal to intermediate phase transition seen via x-ray diffraction measurements. In addition, the linearity of Hc 2(T ) exceeds the Werthamer-Helfand-Hohenberg limit, even in the extreme spin-orbit scattering limit, yet is consistent with other strong spin-orbit materials. Considering these results in combination with similar reports on strong spin-orbit scattering materials seen in the literature, we suggest the need for a new theory that can address the unconventional nature of their superconducting states.

  20. Interdisciplinary Invitations: Exploring Gee's Bend Quilts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Rebecca; Whitin, Phyllis; Whitin, David

    2012-01-01

    Engaging with the quilts of Gee's Bend offers a rich opportunity for students in grades four through eight to develop appreciation for pattern, rhythm, and innovation while learning about history, entrepreneurship, and political activism. By easily accessing print, film, and Internet resources teachers can include these vibrant quilts and…

  1. Aerosol deposition in bends with turbulent flow

    SciTech Connect

    McFarland, A.R.; Gong, H.; Wente, W.B.

    1997-08-01

    The losses of aerosol particles in bends were determined numerically for a broad range of design and operational conditions. Experimental data were used to check the validity of the numerical model, where the latter employs a commercially available computational fluid dynamics code for characterizing the fluid flow field and Lagrangian particle tracking technique for characterizing aerosol losses. Physical experiments have been conducted to examine the effect of curvature ratio and distortion of the cross section of bends. If it curvature ratio ({delta} = R/a) is greater than about 4, it has little effect on deposition, which is in contrast with the recommendation given in ANSI N13.1-1969 for a minimum curvature ratio of 10. Also, experimental results show that if the tube cross section is flattened by 25% or less, the flattening also has little effect on deposition. Results of numerical tests have been used to develop a correlation of aerosol penetration through a bend as a function of Stokes number (Stk), curvature ratio ({delta}) and the bend angle ({theta}). 17 refs., 10 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Age of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Clague, D.A.

    1976-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age data on alkalic and tholeiitic basalts from Diakakuji and Kinmei Seamounts in the vicinity of the Hawaiian-Emperor bend indicate that these volcanoes are about 41 and 39 m.y. old, respectively. Combined with previously published age data on Yuryaku and Ko??ko Seamounts, the new data indicate that the best age for the bend is 42.0 ?? 1.4 m.y. Petrochemical data indicate that the volcanic rocks recovered from bend seamounts are indistinguishable from Hawaiian volcanic rocks, strengthening the hypothesis that the Hawaiian-Emperor bend is part of the Hawaiian volcanic chain. 40Ar/39Ar total fusion ages on altered whole-rock basalt samples are consistent with feldspar ages and with 40Ar/39Ar incremental heating data and appear to reflect the crystallization ages of the samples even though conventional K-Ar ages are significantly younger. The cause of this effect is not known but it may be due to low-temperature loss of 39Ar from nonretentive montmorillonite clays that have also lost 40Ar. ?? 1976.

  3. Probing the elastic limit of DNA bending

    PubMed Central

    Le, Tung T.; Kim, Harold D.

    2014-01-01

    Sharp bending of double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) plays an essential role in genome structure and function. However, the elastic limit of dsDNA bending remains controversial. Here, we measured the opening rates of small dsDNA loops with contour lengths ranging between 40 and 200 bp using single-molecule Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer. The relationship of loop lifetime to loop size revealed a critical transition in bending stress. Above the critical loop size, the loop lifetime changed with loop size in a manner consistent with elastic bending stress, but below it, became less sensitive to loop size, indicative of softened dsDNA. The critical loop size increased from ∼60 bp to ∼100 bp with the addition of 5 mM magnesium. We show that our result is in quantitative agreement with the kinkable worm-like chain model, and furthermore, can reproduce previously reported looping probabilities of dsDNA over the range between 50 and 200 bp. Our findings shed new light on the energetics of sharply bent dsDNA. PMID:25122748

  4. Resonant coupling in trenched bend-insensitive optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Ren, Guobin; Lin, Zhen; Zheng, Siwen; Jian, Shuisheng

    2013-03-01

    We report in this Letter the resonant coupling mechanism in bending trenched bend-insensitive fiber (BIF). It is found that among the trench parameters, the core-trench distance is predominant for optimized BIF design. We reveal that resonant coupling is an intrinsic characteristic of bending trenched BIF, and resonant coupling between the fiber core and the innermost cladding would limit the ultimate bending loss of BIF under tight bend. Resonant coupling is also present in double-trenched BIF, and would impair its bending performance.

  5. Electrostatic contribution to the bending of DNA.

    PubMed

    Sivolob, A; Khrapunov, S N

    1997-09-01

    A model is derived that accounts for the short-range electrostatic contribution to the bending of DNA molecule in solution and in complexes with proteins in terms of the non-linear Poisson-Boltzmann equation. We defined that the short-range electrostatic interactions depend on the changes of the polyion surface charge density under deformation, while the long-range interactions depend on the bending-induced changes in distances between each two points along the polyion axis. After an appropriate simplification of the Poisson-Boltzmann equation, the short-range term is calculated separately giving the lower limit for the electrostatic contribution to the DNA persistence length. The result is compared with the theoretical approaches developed earlier [M. Fixman, J. Chem. Phys. 76 (1982) 6346; M. Le Bret, J. Chem. Phys. 76 (1982) 6243] and with the experimental data. The conclusion is made that the results of Fixman-Le Bret, which took into account both types of the electrostatic interactions for a uniformly bent polyion, give the upper limit for the electrostatic persistence length at low ionic strength, and the actual behavior of the DNA persistence length lies between two theoretical limits. Only the short-range term is significant at moderate-to-high ionic strength where our results coincide with the predictions of Fixman-Le Bret. The bending of DNA on the protein surface that is accompanied by an asymmetric neutralization of the DNA charge is also analyzed. In this case, the electrostatic bending energy gives a significant favorite contribution to the total bending energy of DNA. Important implications to the mechanisms of DNA-protein interactions, particularly in the nucleosome particle, are discussed.

  6. Structural basis of stable bending in DNA containing An tracts. Different types of bending.

    PubMed

    Chuprina, V P; Abagyan, R A

    1988-08-01

    Structural determinants of DNA bending of different types have been studied by theoretical conformational analysis of duplexes. Their terminal parts were fixed either in an ordinary low-energy B-like conformation or in "anomalous" conformations with a narrowed minor groove typical of An tracts. The anomalous conformations had different negative tilt angles (up to about zero), different propeller twists and minor groove widths. Calculations have been performed for DNA fragments AnTm, TnAm, AnGCTm, AnCGTm, TmGCAn, TmCGAn which are the models of the junction of two anomalous structures on An and Tm tracts. On the AT step of the AnTm fragment the minor groove can be easily narrowed so that a whole unbent fragment of anomalous structure is formed on AnTm. According to our energy estimates, there should not be any reliable bending on AnTm. In contrast, in all other cases there was a pronounced roll-like bending into the major groove in the chemical symmetry region. Calculations of the junction between the anomalous and ordinary B-like structure for GnTm and CnAm have shown that there is an equilibrium bending with a tilt component towards the chain having the anomalous structure at the 5'-end. From our calculations it is impossible to determine precisely the direction of bending, though it can be suggested that the roll component of bending might be directed towards the major groove. The anomalous structure is the main reason of bending; alternations of pyrimidines and purines can modulate the value and the direction of equilibrium bending (only the value in the case of self-complementary fragments).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  7. Characteristics of Bending Parts of Metal Plates Using Ultrasonic Bending Systems with a Vibration Punch and a Vibration Die

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsujino, Jiromaru; Ueoka, Tetsugi; Takiguchi, Kazuhiro; Satoh, Hajime; Takahashi, Kazumitsu

    1993-05-01

    Characteristics of ultrasonic vibration bending of pure aluminum and anticorrosive aluminum plates of 2.0 to 3.0 mm thickness are studied using a 19 kHz longitudinal vibration punch and a 27 kHz vibration die. With ultrasonic vibration, the springback angle decreases to zero under sufficient vibration amplitude, bending angle increases and marked improvement of bending surface condition is obtained. Hardness of the specimen and elongation of the bending surface decrease, and roughness of the bending surface is decreased by vibration. Radius of curvature of the bending part increased to about double that without vibration.

  8. Interaction of low-frequency axisymmetric ultrasonic guided waves with bends in pipes of arbitrary bend angle and general bend radius.

    PubMed

    Verma, Bhupesh; Mishra, Tarun Kumar; Balasubramaniam, Krishnan; Rajagopal, Prabhu

    2014-03-01

    The use of ultrasonic guided waves for the inspection of pipes with elbow and U-type bends has received much attention in recent years, but studies for more general bend angles which may also occur commonly, for example in cross-country pipes, are limited. Here, we address this topic considering a general bend angle φ, a more general mean bend radius R in terms of the wavelength of the mode studied and pipe thickness b. We use 3D Finite Element (FE) simulation to understand the propagation of fundamental axisymmetric L(0,2) mode across bends of different angles φ. The effect of the ratio of the mean bend radius to the wavelength of the mode studied, on the transmission and reflection of incident wave is also considered. The studies show that as the bend angle is reduced, a progressively larger extent of mode-conversion affects the transmission and velocity characteristics of the L(0,2) mode. However the overall message on the potential of guided waves for inspection and monitoring of bent pipes remains positive, as bends seem to impact mode transmission only to the extent of 20% even at low bend angles. The conclusions seem to be valid for different typical pipe thicknesses b and bend radii. The modeling approach is validated by experiments and discussed in light of physics of guided waves.

  9. Probe of local impurity states by bend resistance measurements in graphene cross junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, J.; Li, J. Y.; Kang, N.; Lin, Li; Peng, Hailin; Liu, Zhongfan; Xu, H. Q.

    2016-06-01

    We report on low-temperature transport measurements on four-terminal cross junction devices fabricated from high-quality graphene grown by chemical vapor deposition. At high magnetic fields, the bend resistance reveals pronounced peak structures at the quantum Hall plateau transition, which can be attributed to the edge state transport through the junctions. We further demonstrate that the bend resistance is drastically affected by the presence of local impurity states in the junction regions, and exhibits an unusual asymmetric behavior with respect to the magnetic field direction. The observations can be understood in a model taking into account the combination of the edge transport and an asymmetric scatterer. Our results demonstrate that a graphene cross junction may serve as a sensitive probe of local impurity states in graphene at the nanoscale.

  10. Oscillatory bending of a poroelastic beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Dajun; Cowin, Stephen C.

    1994-10-01

    An analytical solution of the oscillatory axial and bending loading of a poroelastic beam is presented. The pore pressure behavior in the beam is explored as a function of frequency of the applied load, the ratio of the bending to axial applied loading, and the leakage at the top and bottom of the beam. The conditions under which the pore pressure carries its largest fraction of the total applied loading are determined. The solution is illustrated using the values of the material parameters appropriate for living bone, which is a poroelastic medium. At high frequencies, in the free leakage case, our results are consistent with the notion that the percentage of the applied load carried by the pore fluid pressure is equal to the porosity of the medium.

  11. Monoclinal bending of strata over laccolithic intrusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koch, F.G.; Johnson, A.M.; Pollard, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    Sedimentary strata on top of some laccolithic intrusions are nearly horizontal and little deformed, but are bent into steeply dipping monoclinal flexures over the peripheries of these intrusions. This form of bending is not explained by previous theories of laccolithic intrusion, which predict either horizontal undeformed strata over the center and faulted strata around the periphery, or strata bent continuously into a dome. However, a slight generalization of these theories accomodates the observed form and contains the previous forms as special cases. A critical assumption is that the strength of contacts within a multilayered overburden is overcome locally by layer-parallel shear. If this strength is less than the strength of the layers themselves, then layers over the center remain bonded together and display negligible bending, whereas layers over the periphery slip over one another and are readily bent into a monoclinal flexure. ?? 1981.

  12. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  13. Molecular Origin of Model Membrane Bending Rigidity

    SciTech Connect

    Kurtisovski, Erol; Taulier, Nicolas; Waks, Marcel; Ober, Raymond; Urbach, Wladimir

    2007-06-22

    The behavior of the bending modulus {kappa} of bilayers in lamellar phases was studied by Small Angle X-ray Scattering technique for various nonionic C{sub i}E{sub j} surfactants. The bilayers are either unswollen and dispersed in water or swollen by water and dispersed in dodecane. For unswollen bilayers, the values of {kappa} decrease with both an increase in the area per surfactant molecule and in the polar head length. They increase when the aliphatic chain length increases at constant area per surfactant molecule. Whereas for water-swollen membranes, the values of {kappa} decrease as the content of water increases converging to the value of the single monolayer bending modulus. Such a behavior results from the decoupling of the fluctuations of the two surfactant membrane monolayers. Our results emphasize the determinant contribution of the surfactant conformation to {kappa}.

  14. Effect of confinements: Bending in Paramecium

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eddins, Aja; Yang, Sung; Spoon, Corrie; Jung, Sunghwan

    2012-02-01

    Paramecium is a unicellular eukaryote which by coordinated beating of cilia, generates metachronal waves which causes it to execute a helical trajectory. We investigate the swimming parameters of the organism in rectangular PDMS channels and try to quantify its behavior. Surprisingly a swimming Paramecium in certain width of channels executes a bend of its flexible body (and changes its direction of swimming) by generating forces using the cilia. Considering a simple model of beam constrained between two walls, we predict the bent shapes of the organism and the forces it exerts on the walls. Finally we try to explain how bending (by sensing) can occur in channels by conducting experiments in thin film of fluid and drawing analogy to swimming behavior observed in different cases.

  15. Monitoring thermoplastic composites under cyclic bending tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boccardi, Simone; Meola, Carosena; Carlomagno, Giovanni Maria; Simeoli, Giorgio; Acierno, Domenico; Russo, Pietro

    2016-05-01

    This work is concerned with the use of infrared thermography to visualize temperature variations linked to thermo-elastic effects developing over the surface of a specimen undergoing deflection under bending tests. Several specimens are herein considered, which involve change of matrix and/or reinforcement. More specifically, the matrix is either a pure polypropylene, or a polypropylene added with a certain percentage of compatibilizing agent; the reinforcement is made of glass, or jute. Cyclic bending tests are carried out by the aid of an electromechanical actuator. Each specimen is viewed, during deflection, from one surface by an infrared imaging device. As main finding the different specimens display surface temperature variations which depend on the type of material in terms of both matrix and reinforcement.

  16. Mindfulness in Motion (MIM): An Onsite Mindfulness Based Intervention (MBI) for Chronically High Stress Work Environments to Increase Resiliency and Work Engagement.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Maryanna; Steinberg, Beth; Duchemin, Anne-Marie

    2015-07-01

    A pragmatic mindfulness intervention to benefit personnel working in chronically high-stress environments, delivered onsite during the workday, is timely and valuable to employee and employer alike. Mindfulness in Motion (MIM) is a Mindfulness Based Intervention (MBI) offered as a modified, less time intensive method (compared to Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction), delivered onsite, during work, and intends to enable busy working adults to experience the benefits of mindfulness. It teaches mindful awareness principles, rehearses mindfulness as a group, emphasizes the use of gentle yoga stretches, and utilizes relaxing music in the background of both the group sessions and individual mindfulness practice. MIM is delivered in a group format, for 1 hr/week/8 weeks. CDs and a DVD are provided to facilitate individual practice. The yoga movement is emphasized in the protocol to facilitate a quieting of the mind. The music is included for participants to associate the relaxed state experienced in the group session with their individual practice. To determine the intervention feasibility/efficacy we conducted a randomized wait-list control group in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). ICUs represent a high-stress work environment where personnel experience chronic exposure to catastrophic situations as they care for seriously injured/ill patients. Despite high levels of work-related stress, few interventions have been developed and delivered onsite for such environments. The intervention is delivered on site in the ICU, during work hours, with participants receiving time release to attend sessions. The intervention is well received with 97% retention rate. Work engagement and resiliency increase significantly in the intervention group, compared to the wait-list control group, while participant respiration rates decrease significantly pre-post in 6/8 of the weekly sessions. Participants value institutional support, relaxing music, and the instructor as pivotal to program success

  17. Genetic analysis of six communities of Mbyá-Guaraní inhabiting northeastern Argentina by means of nuclear and mitochondrial polymorphic markers.

    PubMed

    Sala, Andrea; Argüelles, Carina F; Marino, Miguel E; Bobillo, Cecilia; Fenocchio, Alberto; Corach, Daniel

    2010-08-01

    Autosomal STRs, Y-chromosome markers, and mitochondrial DNA sequences were investigated in six Mbyá-Guaraní villages (Fortín M'Bororé, Yryapu, Tabay, Kaaguy Poty, Jejy, and Yaboti), all of them settled within the province of Misiones, northeastern Argentina. One hundred twenty-one unrelated individuals were analyzed. The study involved typing fifteen autosomal STRs, nine Y-chromosome STRs, and four biallele loci in the nonrecombinant region of the Y chromosome, sequencing the mtDNA of hypervariable regions I and II, and detecting the 9-bp ins/del in region V of mtDNA. All autosomal STRs were in Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium. The four major native American mtDNA haplogroups were represented in the sample. Haplogroups A2 and D1 exhibited the highest frequencies (40.5% and 36.0%, respectively), and haplogroups B2 and C1 appeared to be less frequent (17.5% and 6.0%, respectively). The native American haplogroup Q1a3a was observed in a relevant proportion (88.8%). In addition, a nine-STR Y-chromosome haplo-type (DYS19*13, DYS389I*14, DYS389II*31, DYS390*24, DYS391*11, DYS392*14, DYS393*11, DYS385A*14, DYS385B*16) exhibited a frequency of more than 36%. Our results indicate that the analyzed Argentinean Guaraní individuals are genetically more closely related to Guaraní from Brazil [genetic distance (Δµ)(2) = 0.48] than to other related tribes that are geographically closer. Statistical approaches based on autosomal data do not support the hypothesis of genetic drift previously proposed; however, this apparent discrepancy might be due to the lack of sensitivity of the autosomal markers used here. PMID:21082911

  18. Mindfulness in Motion (MIM): An Onsite Mindfulness Based Intervention (MBI) for Chronically High Stress Work Environments to Increase Resiliency and Work Engagement

    PubMed Central

    Klatt, Maryanna; Steinberg, Beth; Duchemin, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    A pragmatic mindfulness intervention to benefit personnel working in chronically high-stress environments, delivered onsite during the workday, is timely and valuable to employee and employer alike. Mindfulness in Motion (MIM) is a Mindfulness Based Intervention (MBI) offered as a modified, less time intensive method (compared to Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction), delivered onsite, during work, and intends to enable busy working adults to experience the benefits of mindfulness. It teaches mindful awareness principles, rehearses mindfulness as a group, emphasizes the use of gentle yoga stretches, and utilizes relaxing music in the background of both the group sessions and individual mindfulness practice. MIM is delivered in a group format, for 1 hr/week/8 weeks. CDs and a DVD are provided to facilitate individual practice. The yoga movement is emphasized in the protocol to facilitate a quieting of the mind. The music is included for participants to associate the relaxed state experienced in the group session with their individual practice. To determine the intervention feasibility/efficacy we conducted a randomized wait-list control group in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). ICUs represent a high-stress work environment where personnel experience chronic exposure to catastrophic situations as they care for seriously injured/ill patients. Despite high levels of work-related stress, few interventions have been developed and delivered onsite for such environments. The intervention is delivered on site in the ICU, during work hours, with participants receiving time release to attend sessions. The intervention is well received with 97% retention rate. Work engagement and resiliency increase significantly in the intervention group, compared to the wait-list control group, while participant respiration rates decrease significantly pre-post in 6/8 of the weekly sessions. Participants value institutional support, relaxing music, and the instructor as pivotal to program success

  19. Mindfulness in Motion (MIM): An Onsite Mindfulness Based Intervention (MBI) for Chronically High Stress Work Environments to Increase Resiliency and Work Engagement.

    PubMed

    Klatt, Maryanna; Steinberg, Beth; Duchemin, Anne-Marie

    2015-01-01

    A pragmatic mindfulness intervention to benefit personnel working in chronically high-stress environments, delivered onsite during the workday, is timely and valuable to employee and employer alike. Mindfulness in Motion (MIM) is a Mindfulness Based Intervention (MBI) offered as a modified, less time intensive method (compared to Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction), delivered onsite, during work, and intends to enable busy working adults to experience the benefits of mindfulness. It teaches mindful awareness principles, rehearses mindfulness as a group, emphasizes the use of gentle yoga stretches, and utilizes relaxing music in the background of both the group sessions and individual mindfulness practice. MIM is delivered in a group format, for 1 hr/week/8 weeks. CDs and a DVD are provided to facilitate individual practice. The yoga movement is emphasized in the protocol to facilitate a quieting of the mind. The music is included for participants to associate the relaxed state experienced in the group session with their individual practice. To determine the intervention feasibility/efficacy we conducted a randomized wait-list control group in Intensive Care Units (ICUs). ICUs represent a high-stress work environment where personnel experience chronic exposure to catastrophic situations as they care for seriously injured/ill patients. Despite high levels of work-related stress, few interventions have been developed and delivered onsite for such environments. The intervention is delivered on site in the ICU, during work hours, with participants receiving time release to attend sessions. The intervention is well received with 97% retention rate. Work engagement and resiliency increase significantly in the intervention group, compared to the wait-list control group, while participant respiration rates decrease significantly pre-post in 6/8 of the weekly sessions. Participants value institutional support, relaxing music, and the instructor as pivotal to program success

  20. Big Bend National Park, TX, USA, Mexico

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    The Sierra del Carmen of Mexico, across the Rio Grande River from Big Bend National Park, TX, (28.5N, 104.0W) is centered in this photo. The Rio Grande River bisects the scene; Mexico to the east, USA to the west. The thousand ft. Boquillas limestone cliff on the Mexican side of the river changes colors from white to pink to lavender at sunset. This severely eroded sedimentary landscape was once an ancient seabed later overlaid with volcanic activity.

  1. Forming and Bending of Metal Foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nebosky, Paul; Tyszka, Daniel; Niebur, Glen; Schmid, Steven

    2004-06-01

    This study examines the formability of a porous tantalum foam, known as trabecular metal (TM). Used as a bone ingrowth surface on orthopedic implants, TM is desirable due to its combination of high strength, low relative density, and excellent osteoconductive properties. This research aims to develop bend and stretch forming as a cost-effective alternative to net machining and EDM for manufacturing thin parts made of TM. Experimentally, bending about a single axis using a wiping die was studied by observing cracking and measuring springback. It was found that die radius and clearance strongly affect the springback properties of TM, while punch speed, embossings, die radius and clearance all influence cracking. Depending on the various combinations of die radius and clearance, springback factor ranged from .70-.91. To examine the affect of the foam microstructure, bending also was examined numerically using a horizontal hexagonal mesh. As the hexagonal cells were elongated along the sheet length, elastic springback decreased. This can be explained by the earlier onset of plastic hinging occurring at the vertices of the cells. While the numerical results matched the experimental results for the case of zero clearance, differences at higher clearances arose due to an imprecise characterization of the post-yield properties of tantalum. By changing the material properties of the struts, the models can be modified for use with other open-cell metallic foams.

  2. Dependence of the Perpendicular Residual Leakage Magnetic Flux Density on Fatigue Damage in an Austenitic Stainless Steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oka, M.; Yakushiji, T.; Tsuchida, Y.; Enokizono, M.

    2003-03-01

    In order to estimate the amount of plane bending fatigue damage in an austenitic stainless steel (SUS304), we were investigating the relationship between plane bending fatigue damage and the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density caused by martensitic structure induced by plane bending fatigue. A specimen such as SUS304 had been excited in a constant external magnetic field perpendicularly to measure dependence of the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density on plane bending fatigue damage accurately. The Z component of the magnetic flux density at 1 mm above a specimen is measured by using a thin-film flux-gate (FG) magnetic sensor. Residual magnetization is caused by partial martensitic structure in an austenitic stainless steel induced by cyclic bending stress. From our experiments, we can evaluate dependence of the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density on plane bending fatigue damage and know the relationship between growth of a crack and the perpendicular residual leakage magnetic flux density.

  3. 78 FR 4465 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-01-22

    ... COMMISSION PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Combined License Application for Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant; Exemption 1.0... Approvals for Nuclear Power Plants.'' This reactor is to be identified as Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant... (RCOL) application for UniStar's Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant, Unit 3 (CCNPP3). The NRC...

  4. Dynamics of DNA bending/unbending in complex with DNA-bending protein IHF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ansari, Anjum; Vivas, Paula; Kuznetsov, Serguei

    2007-03-01

    Kinetics of conformational changes in proteins and DNA that lead to precise recognition of specific DNA binding sites are difficult to observe with the limited time-resolution of stop-flow and single-molecule techniques. Here we use a ˜10 ns laser T-jump apparatus to probe the kinetics of a ˜35-bp DNA substrate bound to E. coli Integration Host Factor (IHF) and end-labeled with a FRET pair. These T-jump measurements, in combination with stop-flow, provide the first direct observation of the DNA bending/unbending kinetics in a protein-DNA complex (Sugimura and Crothers, PNAS, in press; Kuznetsov et al., PNAS, in press). The rates and activation energy of DNA bending are similar to that of a single A:T base pair opening inside uncomplexed DNA, suggesting that spontaneous thermal disruption in base-pairing nucleated at an A:T site may be sufficient to overcome the free energy barrier needed to partially bend/kink DNA. An unusual salt dependence of the binding affinity observed previously for IHF/DNA complex, and explained in terms of DNA binding coupled with disruption of a network of salt bridges within the protein (Holbrook et al., 2001, JMB, 310, 379), is reflected in the salt dependence of the observed bending rates. These results suggest that salt-dependent protein conformational changes may be playing a role in the DNA bending process.

  5. Recent developments in bend-insensitive and ultra-bend-insensitive fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, David; de Montmorillon, Louis-Anne; Provost, Lionel; Montaigne, Nelly; Gooijer, Frans; Aldea, Eugen; Jensma, Jaap; Sillard, Pierre

    2010-02-01

    Designed to overcome the limitations in case of extreme bending conditions, Bend- and Ultra-Bend-Insensitive Fibers (BIFs and UBIFs) appear as ideal solutions for use in FTTH networks and in components, pigtails or patch-cords for ever demanding applications such as military or sensing. Recently, however, questions have been raised concerning the Multi-Path-Interference (MPI) levels in these fibers. Indeed, they are potentially subject to interferences between the fundamental mode and the higher-order mode that is also bend resistant. This MPI is generated because of discrete discontinuities such as staples, bends and splices/connections that occur on distance scales that become comparable to the laser coherent length. In this paper, we will demonstrate the high MPI tolerance of all-solid single-trench-assisted BIFs and UBIFs. We will present the first comprehensive study combining theoretical and experimental points of view to quantify the impact of fusion splices on coherent MPI. To be complete, results for mechanical splices will also be reported. Finally, we will show how the single-trench- assisted concept combined with the versatile PCVD process allows to tightly control the distributions of fibers characteristics. Such controls are needed to massively produce BIFs and to meet the more stringent specifications of the UBIFs.

  6. Permanent bending and alignment of ZnO nanowires.

    PubMed

    Borschel, Christian; Spindler, Susann; Lerose, Damiana; Bochmann, Arne; Christiansen, Silke H; Nietzsche, Sandor; Oertel, Michael; Ronning, Carsten

    2011-05-01

    Ion beams can be used to permanently bend and re-align nanowires after growth. We have irradiated ZnO nanowires with energetic ions, achieving bending and alignment in different directions. Not only the bending of single nanowires is studied in detail, but also the simultaneous alignment of large ensembles of ZnO nanowires. Computer simulations reveal how the bending is initiated by ion beam induced damage. Detailed structural characterization identifies dislocations to relax stresses and make the bending and alignment permanent, even surviving annealing procedures.

  7. Tunable waveguide bends with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhao-xian; Chen, Ze-guo; Ming, Yang; Wu, Ying; Lu, Yan-qing

    2016-02-01

    We design tunable waveguide bends filled with graphene-based anisotropic metamaterials to achieve a nearly perfect bending effect. The anisotropic properties of the metamaterials can be described by the effective medium theory. The nearly perfect bending effect is demonstrated by finite element simulations of various structures with different bending curvatures and shapes. This effect is attributed to zero effective permittivity along the direction of propagation and matched effective impedance at the interfaces between the bending part and the dielectric waveguides. We envisage that the design will be applicable in the far-infrared and terahertz frequency ranges owing to the tunable dielectric responses of graphene.

  8. Design of a 90{degree} overmoded waveguide bend

    SciTech Connect

    Nantista, C.; Kroll, N.M.; Nelson, E.M.

    1993-04-01

    A design for a 90{degree} bend for the TE{sub 01} mode in over-moded circular waveguide is presented. A pair of septa, symmetrically placed perpendicular to the plane of the bend, are adiabatically introduced into the waveguide before the bend and removed after it. Introduction of the curvature excites five propagating modes in the curved section. The finite element field solver YAP is used to calculate the propagation constants of these modes in the bend, and the guide diameter, septum depth, septum thickness, and bend radius are set so that the phase advances of all five modes through the bend are equal modulo 2{pi}. To a good approximation these modes are expected to recombine to form a pure mode at the end of the bend.

  9. Cricket antennae shorten when bending (Acheta domesticus L.)

    PubMed Central

    Loudon, Catherine; Bustamante, Jorge; Kellogg, Derek W.

    2014-01-01

    Insect antennae are important mechanosensory and chemosensory organs. Insect appendages, such as antennae, are encased in a cuticular exoskeleton and are thought to bend only between segments or subsegments where the cuticle is thinner, more flexible, or bent into a fold. There is a growing appreciation of the dominating influence of folds in the mechanical behavior of a structure, and the bending of cricket antennae was considered in this context. Antennae will bend or deflect in response to forces, and the resulting bending behavior will affect the sensory input of the antennae. In some cricket antennae, such as in those of Acheta domesticus, there are a large number (>100) of subsegments (flagellomeres) that vary in their length. We evaluated whether these antennae bend only at the joints between flagellomeres, which has always been assumed but not tested. In addition we questioned whether an antenna undergoes a length change as it bends, which would result from some patterns of joint deformation. Measurements using light microscopy and SEM were conducted on both male and female adult crickets (Acheta domesticus) with bending in four different directions: dorsal, ventral, medial, and lateral. Bending occurred only at the joints between flagellomeres, and antennae shortened a comparable amount during bending, regardless of sex or bending direction. The cuticular folds separating antennal flagellomeres are not very deep, and therefore as an antenna bends, the convex side (in tension) does not have a lot of slack cuticle to “unfold” and does not lengthen during bending. Simultaneously on the other side of the antenna, on the concave side in compression, there is an increasing overlap in the folded cuticle of the joints during bending. Antennal shortening during bending would prevent stretching of antennal nerves and may promote hemolymph exchange between the antenna and head. PMID:25018734

  10. RACETRACK MAGNET DESIGNS AND TECHNOLOGIES.

    SciTech Connect

    GUPTA, R.

    2006-04-03

    This paper presents a review of racetrack coil magnet designs and technologies for high field magnets that can be used in LHC upgrade. The designs presented here allow both ''Wind & React'' and ''React & Wind'' technologies as they are based on flat racetrack coils with large bend radii. Test results of the BNL 10.3 T ''React & Wind'' common coil magnet are also presented. A possible use of High Temperature Superconductors (HTS) in future high field accelerator magnets is examined.

  11. Quasi-static characterization and modeling of the bending behavior of single crystal galfenol for magnetostrictive sensors and actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Datta, Supratik

    2009-12-01

    Iron-gallium alloys (Galfenol) are structural magnetostrictive materials that exhibit high free-strain at low magnetic fields, high stress-sensitivity and useful thermo-mechanical properties. Galfenol, like smart materials in general, is attractive for use as a dynamic actuator and/or sensor material and can hence find use in active shape and vibration control, real-time structural health monitoring and energy harvesting applications. Galfenol possesses significantly higher yield strength and greater ductility than most smart materials, which are generally limited to use under compressive loads. The unique structural attributes of Galfenol introduce opportunities for use of a smart material in applications that involve tension, bending, shear or torsion. A principal motivation for the research presented in this dissertation is that bending and shear loads lead to development of non-uniform stress and magnetic fields in Galfenol which introduce significantly more complexity to the considerations to be modeled, compared to modeling of purely axial loads. This dissertation investigates the magnetostrictive response of Galfenol under different stress and magnetic field conditions which is essential for understanding and modeling Galfenol's behavior under bending, shear or torsion. Experimental data are used to calculate actuator and sensor figures of merit which can aid in design of adaptive structures. The research focuses on the bending behavior of Galfenol alloys as well as of laminated composites having Galfenol attached to other structural materials. A four-point bending test under magnetic field is designed, built and conducted on a Galfenol beam to understand its performance as a bending sensor. An extensive experimental study is conducted on Galfenol-Aluminum laminated composites to evaluate the effect of magnetic field, bending moment and Galfenol-Aluminum thickness ratio on actuation and sensing performance. A generalized recursive algorithm is presented for

  12. Design of a multi-bend achromat lattice for 3 GeV synchrotron light source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Eun-San

    2016-03-01

    We present a lattice design for a low-emittance and high-brilliance 3 GeV synchrotron light source that has been widely investigated in the world. We show the design results for a MBA (Multi-Bend Achromat) lattice with an emittance of 1.3 nm and 282.4 m circumference. Each cell has 5 bending magnets that consist of outer two with bending angle of 4.5° and inner three with bending angle of 7°. The lattice is designed to be flexible and consists of 12 straight sections in which one straight section has a length of 5.9 m. We have studied the dynamic aperture in the lattice with machine errors. It is shown that the designed low-emittance lattice provides sufficient dynamic aperture after COD correction. We present the results of variations of emittance, energy spread and dynamic aperture due to in-vacuum undulators in the straight sections. We performed particle tracking after the beam injection to investigate the efficiency of the injection scheme. We show the designed results of an injection scheme that shows the space allocation in injection section and the particle motions of injected beam. Our designed lattice provides a good optimization in terms of the emittance and brilliance as a light source for 3 GeV energy and circumference of 28 m.

  13. Calculation of muscle forces during normal gait under consideration of femoral bending moments.

    PubMed

    Lutz, Frederick; Mastel, Roland; Runge, Martin; Stief, Felix; Schmidt, André; Meurer, Andrea; Witte, Hartmut

    2016-09-01

    This paper introduces a new approach for computing lower extremity muscle forces by incorporating equations that consider "bone structure" and "prevention of bending by load reduction" into existing optimization algorithms. Lower extremity muscle and joint forces, during normal gait, were calculated and compared using two different optimization approaches. We added constraint equations that prevent femoral bending loads to an existing approach that considers "minimal total muscular force". Gait parameters such as kinematics, ground reaction forces, and surface electromyographic activation patterns were examined using standardized gait analysis. A subject-specific anatomic model of the lower extremities, obtained from magnetic resonance images of a healthy male, was used for the simulations. Finite element analysis was used to calculate femoral loads. The conventional method of calculating muscle forces leads to higher rates of femoral bending and structural stress than the new approach. Adding equations with structural subject-specific parameters in our new approach resulted in reduced femoral stress patterns. These findings show that our new approach improves the accuracy of femoral stress and strain simulations. Structural overloads caused by bending can be avoided during inverse calculation of muscle forces.

  14. Enamel Insulated Copper Wire in Electric Motors: Sliding Behavior and Possible Damage Mechanisms During Die Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Demiri, Albion

    This study investigates the sliding friction and the forming behaviour of enamel insulated copper wire during the die-forming process. It also aims to determine potential damage mechanisms to the wire during bending process for electric motor coils. In this investigation a wire-bending machine was designed and built in order to simulate the wire forming process in a laboratory scale. Bending angle of the wire and the bending radii were used to control the strain on the wire surface. The effect of speed on COF was investigated for different speeds of of 1, 5, 10, 15, and 20mm/s. A positive correlation was observed between the COF and the testing speed. Additionally, the effect of strain on COF was studied for 2% and 23% to determine its influence on the COF. A general trend was observed of decreased COF with increased strain in wires. Finally, the ability of the enamel coating to resist external damage and wire strain was investigated by tensile testing of pre-scratched magnet wire. The results showed that wire enamel can withstand significant surface damage prior to breach and failure. The insulating polymer coating failed under the scratch tests at 20N load using a Rockwell indenter and at 5N load using a 90° conical steel indenter. Additional tests, such as tensile testing, scratch testing and reciprocating friction testing, were used to characterize the mechanical and tribological properties of the enamel insulated copper wire.

  15. Bending and buckling of wet paper

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Minhee; Kim, Seungho; Kim, Ho-Young; Mahadevan, L.

    2016-04-01

    Flat paper stained with water buckles and wrinkles as it swells and deforms out of the original plane. Here we quantify the geometry and mechanics of a strip of paper that swells when it imbibes water from a narrow capillary. Characterizing the hygroexpansive nature of paper shows that thickness-wise swelling is much faster than in-plane water imbibition, leading to a simple picture for the process by which the strip of paper bends out of the plane. We model the out-of-plane deformation using a quasi-static theory and show that our results are consistent with quantitative experiments.

  16. Great Bend tornadoes of August 30, 1974

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Umenhofer, T. A.; Fujita, T. T.; Dundas, R.

    1977-01-01

    Photogrammetric analyses of movies and still pictures taken of the Great Bend, Kansas Tornado series have been used to develop design specifications for nuclear power plants and facilities. A maximum tangential velocity of 57 m/sec and a maximum vertical velocity of 27 m/sec are determined for one suction vortex having a translational velocity of 32 m/sec. Three suction vortices with radii in the 20 to 30 m range are noted in the flow field of one tornado; these suction vortices apparently form a local convergence of inflow air inside the outer portion of the tornado core.

  17. Self-bending symmetric cusp beams

    SciTech Connect

    Gong, Lei; Liu, Wei-Wei; Lu, Yao; Li, Yin-Mei; Ren, Yu-Xuan

    2015-12-07

    A type of self-bending symmetric cusp beams with four accelerating intensity maxima is theoretically and experimentally presented. Distinguished from the reported regular polygon beams, the symmetric cusp beams simultaneously exhibit peculiar features of natural autofocusing and self-acceleration during propagation. Further, such beams take the shape of a fine longitudinal needle-like structure at the focal region and possess the strong ability of self-healing over obstacles. All these intriguing properties were verified experimentally. Particularly, the spatial profile of the reconstructed beam exhibits spatially sculpted optical structure with four siamesed curved arms. Thus, we anticipate that the structured beam will benefit optical guiding and optofluidics in surprising ways.

  18. Anomalous bending effect in photonic crystal fibers

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Haohua; Jiang, Zhi; Marks, Daniel. L.; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    An unexpected transmission loss up to 50% occurs to intense femtosecond pulses propagating along an endlessly single-mode photonic crystal fiber over a length of 1 m. A specific leaky-fiber mode gains amplification along the fiber at the expense of the fundamental fiber mode through stimulated four-wave mixing and Raman scattering, leading to this transmission loss. Bending near the fiber entrance dissipates the propagating seed of this leaky mode, preventing the leaky mode amplification and therefore enhancing the transmission of these pulses. PMID:18542666

  19. Bending of light in quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N E J; Donoghue, John F; Holstein, Barry R; Planté, Ludovic; Vanhove, Pierre

    2015-02-13

    We consider the scattering of lightlike matter in the presence of a heavy scalar object (such as the Sun or a Schwarzschild black hole). By treating general relativity as an effective field theory we directly compute the nonanalytic components of the one-loop gravitational amplitude for the scattering of massless scalars or photons from an external massive scalar field. These results allow a semiclassical computation of the bending angle for light rays grazing the Sun, including long-range ℏ contributions. We discuss implications of this computation, in particular, the violation of some classical formulations of the equivalence principle.

  20. Bending of light in quantum gravity.

    PubMed

    Bjerrum-Bohr, N E J; Donoghue, John F; Holstein, Barry R; Planté, Ludovic; Vanhove, Pierre

    2015-02-13

    We consider the scattering of lightlike matter in the presence of a heavy scalar object (such as the Sun or a Schwarzschild black hole). By treating general relativity as an effective field theory we directly compute the nonanalytic components of the one-loop gravitational amplitude for the scattering of massless scalars or photons from an external massive scalar field. These results allow a semiclassical computation of the bending angle for light rays grazing the Sun, including long-range ℏ contributions. We discuss implications of this computation, in particular, the violation of some classical formulations of the equivalence principle. PMID:25723201

  1. Force production during maximal effort bend sprinting: Theory vs reality.

    PubMed

    Churchill, S M; Trewartha, G; Bezodis, I N; Salo, A I T

    2016-10-01

    This study investigated whether the "constant limb force" hypothesis can be applied to bend sprinting on an athletics track and to understand how force production influences performance on the bend compared with the straight. Force and three-dimensional video analyses were conducted on seven competitive athletes during maximal effort sprinting on the bend (radius 37.72 m) and straight. Left step mean peak vertical and resultant force decreased significantly by 0.37 body weight (BW) and 0.21 BW, respectively, on the bend compared with the straight. Right step force production was not compromised in the same way, and some athletes demonstrated substantial increases in these variables on the bend. More inward impulse during left (39.9 ± 6.5 Ns) than right foot contact (24.7 ± 5.8 Ns) resulted in 1.6° more turning during the left step on the bend. There was a 2.3% decrease in velocity from straight to bend for both steps. The constant limb force hypothesis is not entirely valid for maximal effort sprinting on the bend. Also, the force requirements of bend sprinting are considerably different to straight-line sprinting and are asymmetrical in nature. Overall, bend-specific strength and technique training may improve performance during this portion of 200- and 400-m races.

  2. Multifiber optical bend sensor to aid colonoscope navigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kesner, Jessica E.; Gavalis, Robb M.; Wong, Peter Y.; Cao, Caroline G. L.

    2011-12-01

    A colonoscopy's near-blind navigation process frequently causes disorientation for the scope operator, leading to harm for the patient. Navigation can be improved if real-time colonoscope shape, location, and orientation information is provided by a shape-tracking aid, such as a fiber optic bend sensor. Fiber optic bend sensors provide advantages over conventional electromechanical shape-trackers, including low cost and ease of integration. However, current fiber optic bend sensors lack either the ability to detect both bending direction and curvature, or the ability to detect multiple localized bends. An inexpensive multifiber bend sensor was developed to aid users in navigation during colonoscopy. The bend sensor employs active-cladding optical fibers modified with fluorescent quantum dots, bandpass filters, and a complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor imager as key components. Results from three-fiber sensors demonstrate the bend sensor's ability to measure curvature (error of 0.01 mm), direction (100% accuracy), and location (predetermined distance) of a bend in the fiber bundle. Comparison with spectroscopy data further confirmed the accuracy of the bending direction measurement for a three-fiber sensor. Future work includes improvements in fiber manufacturing to increase sensor sensitivity and consistency. An expanded 31 fiber bundle would be needed to track the full length of a colonoscope.

  3. Superconducting flat tape cable magnet

    DOEpatents

    Takayasu, Makoto

    2015-08-11

    A method for winding a coil magnet with the stacked tape cables, and a coil so wound. The winding process is controlled and various shape coils can be wound by twisting about the longitudinal axis of the cable and bending following the easy bend direction during winding, so that sharp local bending can be obtained by adjusting the twist pitch. Stack-tape cable is twisted while being wound, instead of being twisted in a straight configuration and then wound. In certain embodiments, the straight length should be half of the cable twist-pitch or a multiple of it.

  4. Direct observation of DNA bending/unbending kinetics in complex with DNA-bending protein IHF

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Serguei V.; Sugimura, Sawako; Vivas, Paula; Crothers, Donald M.; Ansari, Anjum

    2006-01-01

    Regulation of gene expression involves formation of specific protein–DNA complexes in which the DNA is often bent or sharply kinked. Kinetics measurements of DNA bending when in complex with the protein are essential for understanding the molecular mechanism that leads to precise recognition of specific DNA-binding sites. Previous kinetics measurements on several DNA-bending proteins used stopped-flow techniques that have limited time resolution of few milliseconds. Here we use a nanosecond laser temperature-jump apparatus to probe, with submillisecond time resolution, the kinetics of bending/unbending of a DNA substrate bound to integration host factor (IHF), an architectural protein from Escherichia coli. The kinetics are monitored with time-resolved FRET, with the DNA substrates end-labeled with a FRET pair. The temperature-jump measurements, in combination with stopped-flow measurements, demonstrate that the binding of IHF to its cognate DNA site involves an intermediate state with straight or, possibly, partially bent DNA. The DNA bending rates range from ≈2 ms−1 at ≈37°C to ≈40 ms−1 at ≈10°C and correspond to an activation energy of ≈14 ± 3 kcal/mol. These rates and activation energy are similar to those of a single A:T base pair opening inside duplex DNA. Thus, our results suggest that spontaneous thermal disruption in base-paring, nucleated at an A:T site, may be sufficient to overcome the free energy barrier needed to partially bend/kink DNA before forming a tight complex with IHF. PMID:17124171

  5. Bending strain tolerance of MgB2 superconducting wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kováč, P.; Hušek, I.; Melišek, T.; Kulich, M.; Kopera, L.

    2016-04-01

    This work describes the strain tolerance of MgB2 superconductors subjected to variable bending stresses. Bending of MgB2 wire was done at room temperature in different modes: (i) direct bending of straight annealed samples to variable diameters and by (ii) indirect bending by straightening of bent and annealed samples. I c-bending strain characteristics of samples made by in situ PIT and by the internal magnesium diffusion (IMD) process were measured at 4.2 K. The results show a good agreement between the direct and indirect bending mode, which allows easier estimation of limits important for the winding process of MgB2 superconductors with brittle filaments. A comparison of MgB2 wires made by in situ PIT and IMD processes showed improved strain tolerance for IMD due to better grain connectivity the low annealing temperature, which does not appear to reduce the mechanical strength of sheath material.

  6. Flexible magnetic filaments as micromechanical sensors.

    PubMed

    Goubault, C; Jop, P; Fermigier, M; Baudry, J; Bertrand, E; Bibette, J

    2003-12-31

    We propose a new micromechanical approach to probe bending rigidity at molecular scale. Long flexible filaments made of magnetic colloids and linkers are shown to adopt under magnetic field a hairpin configuration. Measuring the hairpin curvature as a function of the field intensity and the linker length from diffracted light allows us to deduce the linker bending rigidity kappa. The technique is presented for two types of linkers: a spontaneously adsorbing polymer and a grafted biomolecular.

  7. The mechanics of gravitropic bending in leafy dicot stems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Salisbury, F. B.; Mueller, W. J.; Blotter, P. T.; Harris, C. S.; White, R. G.; Gillespie, L. S.; Sliwinski, J. E.

    1982-01-01

    The mechanism of the gravitropic bending in stems of the cocklebur and castor bean are investigated. The results of these experiments demonstrate the quick stopping of growth and the increased tensions on the upper layer of a horizontal stem. It is suggested that bending apparently occurs as the resistance of the upper surface layers is extended to the inner cells below. A model of stem bending is developed which can explain the asymmetry of the stem-cell response.

  8. Bending response of single layer MoS2.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Si; Cao, Guoxin

    2016-03-11

    Using molecular mechanics (or dynamics) simulations, three different approaches, including the targeted molecular mechanics, four-point bending and nanotube methods, are employed to investigate the bending response of single layer MoS2 (SLMoS2), among which four-point bending is the most accurate approach to determine the bending stiffness according to the continuum theory. It is found that when the bending curvature radius is large enough (e.g. >4 nm), three approaches will give the same bending stiffness of SLMoS2 and the bending behavior is isotropic for SLMoS2, whereas the nanotube method with small tubes (e.g. <4 nm) cannot give the correct bending stiffness. Compared with the reported result from the MoS2 nanotube calculated by density functional theory, the revised Stillinger-Weber (SW) and reactive empirical bond-order (REBO) potentials can give the reasonable bending stiffness of SLMoS2 (8.7-13.4 eV) as well as the effective deformed conformation. In addition, since the Mo-S bond deformation of SLMoS2 under bending is similar to that under in-plane tension/compression, the continuum bending theory can quite accurately predict the bending stiffness of SLMoS2 if a reasonable thickness of SLMoS2 is given. For SLMoS2, the reasonable thickness should be larger than the distance between its two S atomic planes and lower than the distance between two Mo atomic planes of bulk MoS2 crystal, e.g. 0.375-0.445 nm. PMID:26861930

  9. BEND3 mediates transcriptional repression and heterochromatin organization.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abid; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-01-01

    Transcription repression plays a central role in gene regulation. Transcription repressors utilize diverse strategies to mediate transcriptional repression. We have recently demonstrated that BEND3 (BANP, E5R and Nac1 domain) protein represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component. We discuss the role of BEND3 as a global regulator of gene expression and propose a model whereby BEND3 associates with chromatin remodeling complexes to modulate gene expression and heterochromatin organization.

  10. BEND3 mediates transcriptional repression and heterochromatin organization

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Abid; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-01-01

    Transcription repression plays a central role in gene regulation. Transcription repressors utilize diverse strategies to mediate transcriptional repression. We have recently demonstrated that BEND3 (BANP, E5R and Nac1 domain) protein represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component. We discuss the role of BEND3 as a global regulator of gene expression and propose a model whereby BEND3 associates with chromatin remodeling complexes to modulate gene expression and heterochromatin organization. PMID:26507581

  11. Compliance measurements of chevron notched four point bend specimen

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony; Bubsey, Raymond; Ghosn, Louis J.

    1994-01-01

    The experimental stress intensity factors for various chevron notched four point bend specimens are presented. The experimental compliance is verified using the analytical solution for a straight through crack four point bend specimen and the boundary integral equation method for one chevron geometry. Excellent agreement is obtained between the experimental and analytical results. In this report, stress intensity factors, loading displacements and crack mouth opening displacements are reported for different crack lengths and different chevron geometries, under four point bend loading condition.

  12. BEND3 mediates transcriptional repression and heterochromatin organization.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abid; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-01-01

    Transcription repression plays a central role in gene regulation. Transcription repressors utilize diverse strategies to mediate transcriptional repression. We have recently demonstrated that BEND3 (BANP, E5R and Nac1 domain) protein represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component. We discuss the role of BEND3 as a global regulator of gene expression and propose a model whereby BEND3 associates with chromatin remodeling complexes to modulate gene expression and heterochromatin organization. PMID:26507581

  13. Transient Pinning and Pulling: A Mechanism for Bending Microtubules

    PubMed Central

    Kent, Ian A.; Rane, Parag S.; Dickinson, Richard B.; Ladd, Anthony J. C.; Lele, Tanmay P.

    2016-01-01

    Microtubules have a persistence length of the order of millimeters in vitro, but inside cells they bend over length scales of microns. It has been proposed that polymerization forces bend microtubules in the vicinity of the cell boundary or other obstacles, yet bends develop even when microtubules are polymerizing freely, unaffected by obstacles and cell boundaries. How these bends are formed remains unclear. By tracking the motions of microtubules marked by photobleaching, we found that in LLC-PK1 epithelial cells local bends develop primarily by plus-end directed transport of portions of the microtubule contour towards stationary locations (termed pinning points) along the length of the microtubule. The pinning points were transient in nature, and their eventual release allowed the bends to relax. The directionality of the transport as well as the overall incidence of local bends decreased when dynein was inhibited, while myosin inhibition had no observable effect. This suggests that dynein generates a tangential force that bends microtubules against stationary pinning points. Simulations of microtubule motion and polymerization accounting for filament mechanics and dynein forces predict the development of bends of size and shape similar to those observed in cells. Furthermore, simulations show that dynein-generated bends at a pinning point near the plus end can cause a persistent rotation of the tip consistent with the observation that bend formation near the tip can change the direction of microtubule growth. Collectively, these results suggest a simple physical mechanism for the bending of growing microtubules by dynein forces accumulating at pinning points. PMID:26974838

  14. PERMEABILITY OF SALTSTONE MEASUREMENT BY BEAM BENDING

    SciTech Connect

    Harbour, J; Tommy Edwards, T; Vickie Williams, V

    2008-01-30

    One of the goals of the Saltstone variability study is to identify (and, quantify the impact of) the operational and compositional variables that control or influence the important processing and performance properties of Saltstone mixes. A performance property for Saltstone mixes that is important but not routinely measured is the liquid permeability or saturated hydraulic conductivity of the cured Saltstone mix. The value for the saturated hydraulic conductivity is an input into the Performance Assessment for the SRS Z-Area vaults. Therefore, it is important to have a method available that allows for an accurate and reproducible measurement of permeability quickly and inexpensively. One such method that could potentially meet these requirements for the measurement of saturated hydraulic conductivity is the technique of beam bending, developed by Professor George Scherer at Princeton University. In order to determine the feasibility of this technique for Saltstone mixes, a summer student, David Feliciano, was hired to work at Princeton under the direction of George Scherer. This report details the results of this study which demonstrated the feasibility and applicability of the beam bending method to measurement of permeability of Saltstone samples. This research effort used samples made at Princeton from a Modular Caustic side solvent extraction Unit based simulant (MCU) and premix at a water to premix ratio of 0.60. The saturated hydraulic conductivities for these mixes were measured by the beam bending technique and the values determined were of the order of 1.4 to 3.4 x 10{sup -9} cm/sec. These values of hydraulic conductivity are consistent with independently measured values of this property on similar MCU based mixes by Dixon and Phifer. These values are also consistent with the hydraulic conductivity of a generic Saltstone mix measured by Langton in 1985. The high water to premix ratio used for Saltstone along with the relatively low degree of hydration for

  15. Static Fatigue of Optical Fibers in Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roberts, D.; Cuellar, E.; Middleman, L.; Zucker, J.

    1987-02-01

    While delayed fracture, or static fatigue, of optical fibers is well known, it is not well understood, and the prediction of the time to failure under a given set of conditions can be problematic. Unlike short term fracture, which is quite well understood and quantified in terms of the theory of linear elastic fracture mechanics, the long term strength remains empirical. The goal of this study is to determine the design criteria for optical fibers subjected to long term applied mechanical loads. One difficulty in making lifetime predictions, as pointed out by Matthewson (Reference 1) and others, is that predictions made from data taken in tension and in bending do not agree. Another difficulty is the statistical nature of the fracture of glass. In making lifetime predictions it becomes important therefore that one (a) have ample data for statistical analysis and (b) have data for the loading configuration of interest. This is the purpose of our work. Since there is less data available in bending, and since several applications (such as wiring in aircraft and missiles) require bending, the data are taken in that configuration. The most significant finding in our work so far is the very large difference in static fatigue behavior between buffer coatings. Chandan and Kalish (Reference 2) and others have reported static fatigue curves, log (time to failure) versus log (applied stress), which are not linear, but rather bimodal. Our study confirms this result, but so far only for acrylate coated fibers. Silicone coated fibers show unimodal behavior. That is, the log (time to failure) versus log (applied stress) curve is linear, at least on the time scale studied so far. Data for acrylate coated fibers at 80°C in water are linear only for time scales of about one day, where a pronounced "knee" is observed. Data for silicone coated fibers under the same conditions are linear up to at least 6 months. Longer time scale tests and tests on fibers with other buffer materials

  16. Swirl switching in turbulent flow through 90° pipe bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carlsson, C.; Alenius, E.; Fuchs, L.

    2015-08-01

    Turbulent flow through 90° pipe bends, for four different curvatures, has been investigated using large eddy simulations. In particular, the origin of the so-called swirl switching phenomenon, which is a large scale oscillation of the flow after the bend, has been studied for different bend curvature ratios. A classification of the phenomenon into a high and a low frequency switching, with two distinct physical origins, is proposed. While the high frequency switching stems from modes formed at the bend, and becomes increasingly important for sharp curvatures, the low frequency switching originates from very-large-scale motions created in the upstream pipe flow.

  17. Fatigue life prediction in bending from axial fatigue information

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manson, S. S.; Muralidharan, U.

    1982-01-01

    Bending fatigue in the low cyclic life range differs from axial fatigue due to the plastic flow which alters the linear stress-strain relation normally used to determine the nominal stresses. An approach is presented to take into account the plastic flow in calculating nominal bending stress (S sub bending) based on true surface stress. These functions are derived in closed form for rectangular and circular cross sections. The nominal bending stress and the axial fatigue stress are plotted as a function of life (N sub S) and these curves are shown for several materials of engineering interest.

  18. A low bending loss multimode fiber transmission system.

    PubMed

    Donlagic, Denis

    2009-11-23

    This paper presents a high bend tolerant multimode optical fiber transmission system that is compatible with standard 50 microm graded index multimode fiber, in terms of achievable bandwidth and interconnectivity losses. When the 10 loops of the proposed bend resistive multimode fiber were wrapped around a cylinder of 1.5 mm radius, bend losses below -0.2 dB were achieved in case of experimentally produced fiber. Furthermore, when the section of the proposed bend resistive fiber was inserted between two sections of a standard 50 microm graded index multimode fiber, the total experimental measured loss proved to be below -0.15 dB. PMID:19997454

  19. Design study of a low-emittance lattice with a five-bend achromat

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Lin; Kim, Eun-San

    2016-04-01

    The multi-bend achromat (MBA) lattice, which can provide a small horizontal emittance in the subnanometer range, shows promise for future storage-ring-based light-source facilities. We present the linear and the nonlinear properties of an optical design and the results of its optimization. The MBA lattice is designed as a five-bend achromat, and an emittance of 0.270 nm rad is achieved. The energy and the circumference of the designed ring are 3 GeV and 499.3 m, respectively. We investigated an injection system with a single-pulsed sextupole magnet in the storage ring. We describe the space allocation in the injection section and the particle dynamics of the injected beam. The investigation shows that our design exhibits a very low emittance and a sufficient dynamic aperture, and provides a suitable injection scheme for a 3-GeV light source.

  20. R&D ERL: Magnetic measurements of the ERL magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Jain, A.

    2010-08-01

    The magnet system of ERL consists of G5 solenoids, 6Q12 quadrupoles with 0.58 T/m gradient, 3D60 dipoles with 0.4 T central field, 15 and 30 degree Z-bend injection line dipole/quadrupole combined function magnets, and extraction line magnets. More details about the magnets can be found in a report by G. Mahler. Field quality in all the 6Q12 quadrupoles, 3D60 dipoles and the injection line magnets has been measured with either a rotating coil, or a Hall probe mapper. This report presents the results of these magnetic measurements.

  1. Pure bending of a solid cone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renton, J. D.

    1997-05-01

    The problems of torsion, axial loading and shear of a solid cone were solved around the turn of the century by Michell and Föppl. Surprisingly, no solution to the problem of the elastic response of a cone to the only other possible resultant applied to its apex seems to have been published until now. The method used here is based on certain theoretical considerations related to the author's work on generalizing the engineering theory of beams. This means that the result is derived rather than being the result of a trial-and-error process. A comparison is made with the usual engineering theory as modified for variable bending stiffness. The two analyses give the same results at the limit as the cone angle tends to zero.

  2. Floating objects with finite resistance to bending.

    PubMed

    Vella, Dominic

    2008-08-19

    We consider the equilibrium flotation of a thin, flexible cylinder at the interface between a liquid and a gas. In particular, we determine the maximum load that such a cylinder can support without sinking. We find that as the length of such a cylinder increases the maximum load at first increases. However, the maximum load reaches a plateau when the length of the cylinder is comparable to the elastocapillary length, which is determined by a balance between the bending of the cylinder and surface tension. We then consider the implications of our analysis for the walking on water of both arthropods and man-made robots. In particular, we show that the legs of water striders are typically slightly shorter than this 'optimal' length, suggesting that elastocapillary effects may act as a selection pressure.

  3. Strength tests of thin-walled elliptic duralumin cylinders in pure bending and in combined pure bending and torsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lundquist, Eugene E; Stowell, Elbridge Z

    1942-01-01

    An analysis is presented of the results of tests made by the Massachusetts Institute of Technology and by the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics on an investigation of the strength of thin-walled circular and elliptic cylinders in pure bending and in combined torsion and bending. In each of the loading conditions, the bending moments were applied in the plane of the major axis of the ellipse.

  4. Light bending in f(T) gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruggiero, Matteo Luca

    2016-05-01

    In the framework of f(T) gravity, we focus on a weak-field and spherically symmetric solution for the Lagrangian f(T) = T + αT2, where α is a small constant which parametrizes the departure from general relativity (GR). In particular, we study the propagation of light and obtain the correction to the general relativistic bending angle. Moreover, we discuss the impact of this correction on some gravitational lensing observables, and evaluate the possibility of constraining the theory parameter α by means of observations. In particular, on taking into account the astrometric accuracy in the Solar System, we obtain that |α|≤ 1.85 × 105m2; this bound is looser than those deriving from the analysis of Solar System dynamics, e.g. |α|≤ 5 × 10-1m2 [L. Iorio, N. Radicella and M. L. Ruggiero, J. Cosmol. Astropart. Phys. 1508 (2015) 021, arXiv:1505.06996 [gr-qc].], |α|≤ 1.8 × 104m2 [L. Iorio and E. N. Saridakis, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 427 (2012) 1555, arXiv:1203.5781 [gr-qc].] or |α|≤ 1.2 × 102m2 [Y. Xie and X. M. Deng, Mon. Not. R. Astron. Soc. 433 (2013) 3584, arXiv:1312.4103 [gr-qc].]. However, we suggest that, since the effect only depends on the impact parameter, better constraints could be obtained by studying light bending from planetary objects.

  5. 36 CFR 7.41 - Big Bend National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Big Bend National Park. 7.41 Section 7.41 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.41 Big Bend National Park. (a) Fishing; closed...

  6. 36 CFR 7.41 - Big Bend National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Big Bend National Park. 7.41 Section 7.41 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.41 Big Bend National Park. (a) Fishing; closed...

  7. 36 CFR 7.41 - Big Bend National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Big Bend National Park. 7.41 Section 7.41 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.41 Big Bend National Park. (a) Fishing; closed...

  8. 36 CFR 7.41 - Big Bend National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Big Bend National Park. 7.41 Section 7.41 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.41 Big Bend National Park. (a) Fishing; closed...

  9. 36 CFR 7.41 - Big Bend National Park.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Big Bend National Park. 7.41 Section 7.41 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR SPECIAL REGULATIONS, AREAS OF THE NATIONAL PARK SYSTEM § 7.41 Big Bend National Park. (a) Fishing; closed...

  10. Functional state of the axonemal dyneins during flagellar bend propagation.

    PubMed Central

    Woolley, D M; Vernon, G G

    2002-01-01

    When mouse spermatozoa swim in media of high viscosity, additional waves of bending are superimposed on the primary traveling wave. The additional (secondary) waves are relatively small in scale and high in frequency. They originate in the proximal part of the interbend regions. The initiation of secondary bending happens only in distal parts of the flagellum. The secondary waves propagate along the interbends and then tend to die out as they encounter the next-most-distal bend of the primary wave, if that bend exceeds a certain angle. The principal bends of the primary wave, being of greater angle than the reverse bends, strongly resist invasion by the secondary waves; when a principal bend of the primary wave propagates off the flagellar tip, the secondary wave behind it suddenly increases in amplitude. We claim that the functional state of the dynein motors in relation to the primary wave can be deduced from their availability for recruitment into secondary wave activity. Therefore, only the dyneins in bends are committed functionally to the maintenance and propagation of the flagellar wave; dyneins in interbend regions are not functionally committed in this way. We equate functional commitment with tension-generating activity, although we argue that the regions of dynein thus engaged nevertheless permit sliding displacements between the doublets. PMID:12324433

  11. A rotary ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducers.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2010-10-01

    A rotary ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducers is proposed. In each transducer, two orthogonal bending vibrations are superimposed and an elliptical trajectory is generated at the driving foot. Typical output of the prototype is a no-load speed of 58 rpm and maximum torque of 9·5 Nm under an exciting voltage of 200 V(rms).

  12. View north of tube bending shop in boilermakers department located ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    View north of tube bending shop in boilermakers department located in southeast corner of the structural shop building (building 57). The computer controlled tube bender can be programmed to bend boiler tubing to nearly any required configuration - Naval Base Philadelphia-Philadelphia Naval Shipyard, Structure Shop, League Island, Philadelphia, Philadelphia County, PA

  13. The Stability of Orthotropic Elliptic Cylinders in Pure Bending

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heck, O S

    1937-01-01

    The theoretical critical bending stress of elliptic cylindrical shells is determined on the assumption of infinite shell length and absence of local instability phenomena. The results of the tests on isotropic elliptic cylindrical shells stressed in bending are compared with the theoretical results. The practical applicability of the theory is discussed.

  14. BENDING SHOP & OVEN. United Engineering Co., Alameda, California. Plan, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    BENDING SHOP & OVEN. United Engineering Co., Alameda, California. Plan, two elevations, sections, and details. Alben Froberg, Architect, Oakland, California. Sheet no. 1 of 1. Various scales. December 15, 1941. pencil on tracing paper - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Bending Shop & Oven, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  15. In vivo measurement of bending stiffness in fracture healing

    PubMed Central

    Hente, Reiner; Cordey, Jacques; Perren, Stephan M

    2003-01-01

    Background Measurement of the bending stiffness a healing fracture represents a valid variable in the assessment of fracture healing. However, currently available methods typically have high measurement errors, even for mild pin loosening. Furthermore, these methods cannot provide actual values of bending stiffness, which precludes comparisons among individual fractures. Thus, even today, little information is available with regards to the fracture healing pattern with respect to actual values of bending stiffness. Our goals were, therefore: to develop a measurement device that would allow accurate and sensitive measurement of bending stiffness, even in the presence of mild pin loosening; to describe the course of healing in individual fractures; and help to evaluate whether the individual pattern of bending stiffness can be predicted at an early stage of healing. Methods A new measurement device has been developed to precisely measure the bending stiffness of the healing fracture by simulating four-point-bending. The system was calibrated on aluminum models and intact tibiae. The influence of pin loosening on measurement error was evaluated. The system was tested at weekly intervals in an animal experiment to determine the actual bending stiffness of the fracture. Transverse fractures were created in the right tibia of twelve sheep, and then stabilized with an external fixator. At ten weeks, bending stiffness of the tibiae were determined in a four-point-bending test device to validate the in-vivo-measurement data. Results In-vivo bending stiffness can be measured accurately and sensitive, even in the early phase of callus healing. Up to a bending stiffness of 10 Nm/degree, measurement error was below 3.4% for one pin loose, and below 29.3% for four pins loose, respectively. Measurement of stiffness data over time revealed a significant logarithmic increase between the third and seventh weeks, whereby the logarithmic rate of change among sheep was similar, but

  16. Ultrasensitive vector bending sensor based on multicore optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Villatoro, Joel; Van Newkirk, Amy; Antonio-Lopez, Enrique; Zubia, Joseba; Schülzgen, Axel; Amezcua-Correa, Rodrigo

    2016-02-15

    In this Letter, we demonstrate a compellingly simple directional bending sensor based on multicore optical fibers (MCF). The device operates in reflection mode and consists of a short segment of a three-core MCF that is fusion spliced at the distal end of a standard single mode optical fiber. The asymmetry of our MCF along with the high sensitivity of the supermodes of the MCF make the small bending on the MCF induce drastic changes in the supermodes, their excitation, and, consequently, on the reflected spectrum. Our MCF bending sensor was found to be highly sensitive (4094  pm/deg) to small bending angles. Moreover, it is capable of distinguishing multiple bending orientations. PMID:26872200

  17. Bending Properties of Nickel Electrodes for Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad A.; Wilson, Richard M.; Keller, Dennis; Corner, Ralph

    1995-01-01

    Recent changes in manufacturing have resulted in nickel-hydrogen batteries that fail prematurely by electrical shorting, This failure is believed to be a result of a blistering problem in the nickel electrodes. In this study the bending properties of nickel electrodes are investigated in an attempt to correlate the bending properties of the electrode with its propensity to blister. Nickel electrodes from three different batches of material were tested in both the as-received and impregnated forms. The effects of specimen curvature and position within the electrode on the bending strength were studied, and within-electrode and batch-to-batch variations were addressed. Two color-imaging techniques were employed to differentiate between the phases within the electrodes. These techniques aided in distinguishing the relative amounts of nickel hyroxide surface loading on each electrode, thereby relating surface loading to bend strength. Bend strength was found to increase with the amount of surface loading.

  18. Enhanced bending-resonance magnetoelectric response in end-bonding magnetostrictive/piezoelectric heterostructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Jinshuan; Lu, Caijiang; Xu, Changbao; Gao, Jipu; Gui, Junguo; Lin, Chenhui

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we present a magnetoelectric (ME) heterostructure made by attaching two magnetostrictive Nickel (Ni) plates at the two free ends of a piezoelectric Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 (PZT) plate. With this configuration, the Ni and the PZT plates vibrate more freely due to the absence of an interfacial epoxy layer, which results in a larger bending deformation of the PZT plate. The Ni and the PZT plates couple to each other by mechanical magnetic forces, instead of shear forces. In addition, the two Ni plates act as proof masses for the PZT plate, which can reduce the bending resonant frequency ( f r) the of PZT plate. The experimental results demonstrate that the bendingresonance ME voltage coefficient ( aME,r) is 2.82 times larger than that of the traditional bilayer laminate Ni/PZT. As the length of the Ni plates (L) increases, the fr decreases and can be shifted in a range of 34.6 kHz ≤ fr ≤ 61.02 kHz. The maximum aME,r of 49.84 V/cm Oe is observed at dc bias magnetic field H dc = 158 Oe when L = 18 mm. This heterostructure is of interest for high-sensitive dc magnetic-field sensors, ME transducers.

  19. Large Deformation Dynamic Bending of Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derian, E. J.; Hyer, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the large deformation response of composite beams subjected to a dynamic axial load. The beams were loaded with a moderate eccentricity to promote bending. The study was primarily experimental but some finite element results were obtained. Both the deformation and the failure of the beams were of interest. The static response of the beams was also studied to determine potential differences between the static and dynamic failure. Twelve different laminate types were tested. The beams tested were 23 in. by 2 in. and generally 30 plies thick. The beams were loaded dynamically with a gravity-driven impactor traveling at 19.6 ft/sec and quasi-static tests were conducted on identical beams in a displacement controlled manner. For laminates of practical interest, the failure modes under static and dynamic loadings were identical. Failure in most of the laminate types occurred in a single event involving 40% to 50% of the plies. However, failure in laminates with 300 or 150 off-axis plies occurred in several events. All laminates exhibited bimodular elastic properties. The compressive flexural moduli in some laminates was measured to be 1/2 the tensile flexural modulus. No simple relationship could be found among the measured ultimate failure strains of the different laminate types. Using empirically determined flexural properties, a finite element analysis was reasonably accurate in predicting the static and dynamic deformation response.

  20. Large Deformation Dynamic Bending of Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Derian, E. J.; Hyer, M. W.

    1986-01-01

    Studies were conducted on the large deformation response of composite beams subjected to a dynamic axial load. The beams were loaded with a moderate eccentricity to promote bending. The study was primarily experimental but some finite element results were obtained. Both the deformation and the failure of the beams were of interest. The static response of the beams was also studied to determine potential differences between the static and dynamic failure. Twelve different laminate types were tested. The beams were loaded dynamically with a gravity driven impactor traveling at 19.6 ft/sec and quasi-static tests were conducted on identical beams in a displacement controlled manner. For laminates of practical interest, the failure modes under static and dynamic loadings were identical. Failure in most of the laminate types occurred in a single event involving 40% to 50% of the plies. However, failure in laminates with 30 deg or 15 deg off-axis plies occured in several events. All laminates exhibited bimodular elastic properties. Using empirically determined flexural properties, a finite element analysis was reasonably accurate in predicting the static and dynamic deformation response.

  1. Bending response of polymer electrolyte actuator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Onishi, Kazuo; Sewa, Shingo; Asaka, Kinji; Fujiwara, Naoko; Oguro, Keisuke

    2000-06-01

    To induce bending motion in a perfluorinated polymer electrolyte by electric stimuli in water or saline solution, plating with metal is required. To fabricate electrodes, a perfluorocarboxylic acid membrane was soaked in Au(III) di- chloro phenanthroline complex solution, and then any adsorbed Au(III) cation complex was reduced in aqueous sodium sulfite. Optimizing the motion response depends on control of the chemical plating procedure. By sequential adsorption/reduction cycling, a suitable pair of gold electrodes with a fractal-like structure have been grown. We illustrate the advantage of optimizing the interfacial area between electrode and membrane to enhance deformation response. To achieve this, gold deposits in the film are accumulated by sequential adsorption/reduction plating cycles. Actuator displacement increased with the number of plating gold deposition cycles up to roughly 6 times, but showed no clear improvement beyond. It is believed that with excessive plating, the interfacial area begins to decrease and/or the hardness of the electrode increases, thus countering any improvement in electrical conductance. Displacement rates were proportional to current. This high interfacial area between the electrodes and polymer electrolyte leads to larger deformation. The measured deformation progressively improves with cycling. Its motional response and versatility are illustrated by some examples.

  2. Bending strength of delaminated aerospace composites.

    PubMed

    Kinawy, Moustafa; Butler, Richard; Hunt, Giles W

    2012-04-28

    Buckling-driven delamination is considered among the most critical failure modes in composite laminates. This paper examines the propagation of delaminations in a beam under pure bending. A pre-developed analytical model to predict the critical buckling moment of a thin sub-laminate is extended to account for propagation prediction, using mixed-mode fracture analysis. Fractography analysis is performed to distinguish between mode I and mode II contributions to the final failure of specimens. Comparison between experimental results and analysis shows agreement to within 5 per cent in static propagation moment for two different materials. It is concluded that static fracture is almost entirely driven by mode II effects. This result was unexpected because it arises from a buckling mode that opens the delamination. For this reason, and because of the excellent repeatability of the experiments, the method of testing may be a promising means of establishing the critical value of mode II fracture toughness, G(IIC), of the material. Fatigue testing on similar samples showed that buckled delamination resulted in a fatigue threshold that was over 80 per cent lower than the static propagation moment. Such an outcome highlights the significance of predicting snap-buckling moment and subsequent propagation for design purposes.

  3. Occipital bending (Yakovlevian torque) in bipolar depression.

    PubMed

    Maller, Jerome J; Anderson, Rodney; Thomson, Richard H; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey V; Daskalakis, Zafiris J; Fitzgerald, Paul B

    2015-01-30

    Differing levels of occipital lobe asymmetry and enlarged lateral ventricles have been reported within patients with bipolar disorder (BD) compared with healthy controls, suggesting different rates of occipital bending (OB). This may exert pressure on subcortical structures, such as the hippocampus, reduced among psychiatric patients. We investigated OB prevalence in 35 patients with BD and 36 healthy controls, and ventricular and occipital volumes. Prevalence was four times higher among BD patients (12/35 [34.3%]) than in control subjects (3/36 [8.3%]), as well as larger lateral ventricular volumes (LVVs). Furthermore, we found OB to relate to left-to-right ventricular and occipital lobe volume (OLV) ratios. Those with OB also had reduced left-to-right hippocampal volume ratios. The results suggest that OB is more common among BD patients than healthy subjects, and prevalent in both BD Type I and Type II patients. We posit that anomalies in neural pruning or ventricular enlargement may precipitate OB, consequently resulting in one occipital lobe twisting around the other. Although the clinical implications of these results are unclear, the study suggests that asymmetrical ventricular volume matched with a pattern of oppositely asymmetrical occipital volume is related to OB and may be a marker of psychiatric illness.

  4. ZERODUR: bending strength data for etched surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hartmann, Peter; Leys, Antoine; Carré, Antoine; Kerz, Franca; Westerhoff, Thomas

    2014-07-01

    In a continuous effort since 2007 a considerable amount of new data and information has been gathered on the bending strength of the extremely low thermal expansion glass ceramic ZERODUR®. By fitting a three parameter Weibull distribution to the data it could be shown that for homogenously ground surfaces minimum breakage stresses exist lying much higher than the previously applied design limits. In order to achieve even higher allowable stress values diamond grain ground surfaces have been acid etched, a procedure widely accepted as strength increasing measure. If surfaces are etched taking off layers with thickness which are comparable to the maximum micro crack depth of the preceding grinding process they also show statistical distributions compatible with a three parameter Weibull distribution. SCHOTT has performed additional measurement series with etch solutions with variable composition testing the applicability of this distribution and the possibility to achieve further increase of the minimum breakage stress. For long term loading applications strength change with time and environmental media are important. The parameter needed for prediction calculations which is combining these influences is the stress corrosion constant. Results from the past differ significantly from each other. On the basis of new investigations better information will be provided for choosing the best value for the given application conditions.

  5. Atmospheric Refractive Electromagnetic Wave Bending and Propagation Delay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mangum, Jeffrey G.; Wallace, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    In this tutorial we summarize the physics and mathematics behind refractive electromagnetic wave bending and delay. Refractive bending and delay through the Earth's atmosphere at both radio/millimetric and optical/IR wavelengths are discussed, but with most emphasis on the former, and with Atacama Large Millimeter Array (ALMA) applications in mind. As modern astronomical measurements often require subarcsecond position accuracy, care is required when selecting refractive bending and delay algorithms. For the spherically-uniform model atmospheres generally used for all refractive bending and delay algorithms, positional accuracies lsim1'' are achievable when observing at zenith angles lsim75°. A number of computationally economical approximate methods for atmospheric refractive bending and delay calculation are presented, appropriate for astronomical observations under these conditions. For observations under more realistic atmospheric conditions, for zenith angles lsim75°, or when higher positional accuracy is required, more rigorous refractive bending and delay algorithms must be employed. For accurate calculation of the refractive bending, we recommend the Auer and Standish method, using numerical integration to ray-trace through a two-layer model atmosphere, with an atmospheric model determination of the atmospheric refractivity. For the delay calculation we recommend numerical integration through a model atmosphere.

  6. Earthquakes, Segments, Bends, and Fault-Face Geology: Correlations Within the San Andreas System, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jachens, R. C.; Simpson, R. W.; Thurber, C. H.; Murray, J. R.

    2006-12-01

    Three-dimensional geologic maps of regions surrounding parts of the San Andreas Fault system reveal correlations between fault face geology and both short- and long-term behavior of the faults. The Loma Prieta fault segment that ruptured during the 1989 M6.9 earthquake, as defined by its aftershocks, closely corresponds to the subsurface reach (80 km long) where a large body of Logan gabbro is truncated at the fault, as defined by its magnetic anomaly. This Jurassic ophiolitic gabbro and its related rocks occupy an unusual fault-bounded basement block within Salinaa, a largely Cretaceous granitic terrane SW of the San Andreas Fault. The along-fault reach of the Logan gabbro also coincides with essentially the entire Santa Cruz Mountains left-bend in the San Andreas Fault. Rejecting a chance coincidence, the position of the Logan gabbro with respect to the left bend implies that the bend is fixed relative to Salinia and that the block NE of the San Andreas Fault has been forced to negotiate around the bend as the blocks moved past each other. Thus the basement rocks of the Logan block appear to define (control?) the Loma Prieta segment in terms both of short-term behavior (earthquakes) and long-term behavior (restraining bend fault geometry). The Parkfield segment of the San Andreas Fault also closely corresponds to a characteristic geologic unit in the NE face of the fault, the greenstone-rich Permanente terrane of the Franciscan Complex. The along-fault subsurface extent of the Permanente terrane at the fault face, as inferred from a recent 3D tomographic wavespeed model, corresponds to the reach filled by the aftershocks of the 2004 Parkfield earthquake. Furthermore, the 2004 co-seismic slip inferred from geodetic observations also coincides with the Permanente terrane at the fault face. To test whether these observations are directly related to the presence of the Permanente terrane along the fault face, we looked at fault behavior at the location of its offset

  7. Stored Energy of Plastic Deformation in Tube Bending Processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śloderbach, Z.; Pająk, J.

    2013-03-01

    The paper presents an aproximate analytic method for determination of the stored energy of plastic deformation during cold bending of metal tubes at bending machines. Calculations were performed for outer points of the tube layers subjected to tension and compression (the points of maximum strains). The percentage of stored energy related to the plastic strain work was determined and the results were presented in graphs. The influence and importance of the stored energy of plastic deformation on the service life of pipeline bends are discussed.

  8. Nonlocal membrane bending: a reflection, the facts and its relevance.

    PubMed

    Svetina, S; Žekš, B

    2014-06-01

    About forty years ago it was realized that phospholipid membranes, because they are composed of two layers, exhibit particular, and specific mechanical properties. This led to the concept of nonlocal membrane bending, often called area difference elasticity. We present a short history of the development of the concept, followed by arguments for a proper definition of the corresponding elastic constant. The effects of the nonlocal bending energy on vesicle shape are explained. It is demonstrated that lipid vesicles, cells and cellular aggregates exhibit phenomena that can only be described in a complete manner by considering nonlocal bending.

  9. Buffers affect the bending rigidity of model lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Bouvrais, Hélène; Duelund, Lars; Ipsen, John H

    2014-01-14

    In biophysical and biochemical studies of lipid bilayers the influence of the used buffer is often ignored or assumed to be negligible on membrane structure, elasticity, or physical properties. However, we here present experimental evidence, through bending rigidity measurements performed on giant vesicles, of a more complex behavior, where the buffering molecules may considerably affect the bending rigidity of phosphatidylcholine bilayers. Furthermore, a synergistic effect on the bending modulus is observed in the presence of both salt and buffer molecules, which serves as a warning to experimentalists in the data interpretation of their studies, since typical lipid bilayer studies contain buffer and ion molecules.

  10. Damage Analysis of Rectangular Section Composite Beam under Pure Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yiping; Xiao, Fan; Liu, Zejia; Tang, Liqun; Fang, Daining

    2013-02-01

    Laminated composite beams are commonly used in engineering applications involving macro to nano structures. Based on the assumption that plain sections remain plain after deformation, this paper analyzes stress distributions in cross-ply laminated composite beams with rectangular cross-sections, and formulates the basic damage equations through Kachanov's damage definition and Janson's failure criterion. The location of the neutral axis and the ultimate bending moment are obtained for pure bending cases. The effect of the elastic modulus of the two layers on the damage evolution is analyzed; a reasonable damage composite beam model is proposed to predict the ultimate bending moment.

  11. Propagating director bend fluctuations in nematic liquid crystals.

    PubMed

    Humpert, Anja; Allen, Michael P

    2015-01-16

    We show, by molecular simulation, that for a range of standard, coarse-grained, nematic liquid crystal models, the director bend fluctuation is a propagating mode. This is in contrast to the generally accepted picture of nematic hydrodynamics, in which all the director modes (splay, twist, bend, and combinations thereof) are overdamped. By considering the various physical parameters that enter the equations of nematodynamics, we propose an explanation of this effect and conclude that propagating bend fluctuations may be observable in some experimental systems.

  12. Superconducting energy storage magnet

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boom, Roger W. (Inventor); Eyssa, Yehia M. (Inventor); Abdelsalam, Mostafa K. (Inventor); Huang, Xianrui (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A superconducting magnet is formed having composite conductors arrayed in coils having turns which lie on a surface defining substantially a frustum of a cone. The conical angle with respect to the central axis is preferably selected such that the magnetic pressure on the coil at the widest portion of the cone is substantially zero. The magnet structure is adapted for use as an energy storage magnet mounted in an earthen trench or tunnel where the strength the surrounding soil is lower at the top of the trench or tunnel than at the bottom. The composite conductor may be formed having a ripple shape to minimize stresses during charge up and discharge and has a shape for each ripple selected such that the conductor undergoes a minimum amount of bending during the charge and discharge cycle. By minimizing bending, the working of the normal conductor in the composite conductor is minimized, thereby reducing the increase in resistance of the normal conductor that occurs over time as the conductor undergoes bending during numerous charge and discharge cycles.

  13. Advantages of customer/supplier involvement in the upgrade of River Bend`s IST program

    SciTech Connect

    Womack, R.L.; Addison, J.A.

    1996-12-01

    At River Bend Station, IST testing had problems. Operations could not perform the test with the required repeatability; engineering could not reliably trend test data to detect degradation; licensing was heavily burdened with regulatory concerns; and maintenance could not do preventative maintenance because of poor prediction of system health status. Using Energy`s Total Quality principles, it was determined that the causes were: lack of ownership, inadequate test equipment usage, lack of adequate procedures, and lack of program maintenance. After identifying the customers and suppliers of the IST program data, Energy management put together an upgrade team to address these concerns. These customers and suppliers made up the IST upgrade team. The team`s mission was to supply River Bend with a reliable, functional, industry correct and user friendly IST program. The IST program in place went through a verification process that identified and corrected over 400 individual program discrepancies. Over 200 components were identified for improved testing methods. An IST basis document was developed. The operations department was trained on ASME Section XI testing. All IST tests have been simplified and shortened, due to heavy involvement by operations in the procedure development process. This significantly reduced testing time, resulting in lower cost, less dose and greater system availability.

  14. 49 CFR 192.313 - Bends and elbows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... bending mandrel; or (ii) The pipe is 12 inches (305 millimeters) or less in outside diameter or has a... millimeters) or more in diameter unless the arc length, as measured along the crotch, is at least 1 inch (25 millimeters)....

  15. 49 CFR 192.313 - Bends and elbows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... bending mandrel; or (ii) The pipe is 12 inches (305 millimeters) or less in outside diameter or has a... millimeters) or more in diameter unless the arc length, as measured along the crotch, is at least 1 inch (25 millimeters)....

  16. 49 CFR 192.313 - Bends and elbows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... bending mandrel; or (ii) The pipe is 12 inches (305 millimeters) or less in outside diameter or has a... millimeters) or more in diameter unless the arc length, as measured along the crotch, is at least 1 inch (25 millimeters)....

  17. 49 CFR 192.313 - Bends and elbows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... bending mandrel; or (ii) The pipe is 12 inches (305 millimeters) or less in outside diameter or has a... millimeters) or more in diameter unless the arc length, as measured along the crotch, is at least 1 inch (25 millimeters)....

  18. 49 CFR 192.313 - Bends and elbows.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... bending mandrel; or (ii) The pipe is 12 inches (305 millimeters) or less in outside diameter or has a... millimeters) or more in diameter unless the arc length, as measured along the crotch, is at least 1 inch (25 millimeters)....

  19. Bending properties of carbon nanotubes encapsulating solid nanowires.

    PubMed

    Danailov, D; Keblinski, P; Nayak, S; Ajayan, P M

    2002-10-01

    Using empirical potentials and atomistic simulations, we model three-point bend tests of single-walled carbon nanotubes encapsulating metal nanowires. The presence of a metal nanowire inside the nanotube greatly suppresses the tube-buckling instability. Increasing tube diameter leads to an increase in the bending strength; however, in contrast to hollow tubes, there is no decrease in the maximum deflection before buckling. Analysis of the principal bending vibrational mode shows a lowering of the frequency, associated with increased tube inertia. Remarkably, metal-filled tubes exhibit strong damping of oscillations whereas unfilled single-walled and multiwalled tubes show no damping. Our studies demonstrate the benefits of filling tubes with solids to modify bending strength and flexibility, suggesting applications for nanotube-based elements in micromechanical devices or nanoprobes.

  20. An analytical study on the bending of prismatic SMA beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ostadrahimi, Alireza; Arghavani, Jamal; Poorasadion, Saeid

    2015-12-01

    In this study, an analytical solution is presented for pure bending of shape memory alloy (SMA) beams with symmetric cross section as well as symmetric behavior in tension and compression. To this end, a three-dimensional constitutive equation is reduced to one-dimensional form and employed to study the bending response of SMA beams at high (pseudo-elasticity) and low (shape memory effect) temperatures. An analytical expression for bending stress as well as polynomial approximation for shear stress and deflection are obtained. Derived equations for bending are employed to analyze an SMA beam with rectangular cross section and results are compared with those of the finite element method. The results of this work show good agreement when compared with experimental data and finite element results. Furthermore, the existence of several zero-stress fibers during unloading of SMA beams at low temperature is demonstrated.

  1. Active vibration control of structures undergoing bending vibrations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    An active vibration control subassembly for a structure (such as a jet engine duct or a washing machine panel) undergoing bending vibrations caused by a source (such as the clothes agitator of the washing machine) independent of the subassembly. A piezoceramic actuator plate is vibratable by an applied electric AC signal. The plate is connected to the structure such that vibrations in the plate induced by the AC signal cause canceling bending vibrations in the structure and such that the plate is compressively pre-stressed along the structure when the structure is free of any bending vibrations. The compressive prestressing increases the amplitude of the canceling bending vibrations before the critical tensile stress level of the plate is reached. Preferably, a positive electric DC bias is also applied to the plate in its poling direction.

  2. VIEW OF NORTHWEST BEND IN BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING WEST ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF NORTHWEST BEND IN BIRCH CIRCLE. VIEW FACING WEST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  3. Bending Properties of Nickel Electrodes for Nickel-Hydrogen Batteries

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lerch, Brad A.; Wilson, Richard M.; Keller, Dennis; Corner, Ralph

    1996-01-01

    Recent changes in manufacturing have resulted in nickel-hydrogen batteries that fail prematurely by electrical shorting. This failure is believed to be a result of a blistering problem in the nickel electrodes. In this study, the bending properties of nickel electrodes are investigated in an attempt to correlate the bending properties of the electrode with its propensity to blister. Nickel electrodes from three different batches of material were tested in both the as-received and impregnated forms. The effects of specimen curvature and position within the electrode on the bending strength were studied, and within-electrode and batch-to-batch variations were addressed. Bend strength was found to increase with the amount of surface loading.

  4. 9. NORTH SIDE, FROM A BOAT. THE TWO BENDING SHOP ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    9. NORTH SIDE, FROM A BOAT. THE TWO BENDING SHOP AND OVEN BUILDINGS ARE VISIBLE AT THE RIGHT. - United Engineering Company Shipyard, Engineering Building, 2900 Main Street, Alameda, Alameda County, CA

  5. Theory of bending waves with applications to disk galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Mark, J.W.K.

    1982-01-01

    A theory of bending waves is surveyed which provides an explanation for the required amplification of the warp in the Milky Way. It also provides for self-generated warps in isolated external galaxies. The shape of observed warps and partly their existence in isolated galaxies are indicative of substantial spheroidal components. The theory also provides a plausible explanation for the bending of the inner disk (<2 kpc) of the Milky Way.

  6. Bending strength studies on hot-pressed silicon carbide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kriegesmann, J.

    1984-01-01

    The 4-point bending strength of 4 grades of hot-pressed SiC was determined at different temperatures. With a transgranular mode of fracture the values for bending strength are retained up to high temperatures. For intergranular fracture the decrease of strength is governed by subcritical crack growth. The intergranular fracture is caused by a high content of silicate glassy phase at the grain boundaries of hot-pressed SiC.

  7. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    An analytical, parametric study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers or edge effects in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated thin cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize and quantify the effects of laminate orthotropy and laminate anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general and encompassing manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all the laminate constructions considered, the results show that the differences between results that were obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that in some cases neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and in other cases it results in an overestimation.

  8. Bending Boundary Layers in Laminated-Composite Circular Cylindrical Shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nemeth, Michael P.; Smeltzer, Stanley S., III

    2000-01-01

    A study of the attenuation of bending boundary layers in balanced and unbalanced, symmetrically and unsymmetrically laminated cylindrical shells is presented for nine contemporary material systems. The analysis is based on the linear Sanders-Koiter shell equations and specializations to the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations and Donnell's equations are included. Two nondimensional parameters are identified that characterize the effects of laminate orthotropy and anisotropy on the bending boundary-layer decay length in a very general manner. A substantial number of structural design technology results are presented for a wide range of laminated-composite cylinders. For all laminates considered, the results show that the differences between results obtained with the Sanders-Koiter shell equations, the Love-Kirchhoff shell equations, and Donnell's equations are negligible. The results also show that the effect of anisotropy in the form of coupling between pure bending and twisting has a negligible effect on the size of the bending boundary-layer decay length of the balanced, symmetrically laminated cylinders considered. Moreover, the results show that coupling between the various types of shell anisotropies has a negligible effect on the calculation of the bending boundary-layer decay length in most cases. The results also show that, in some cases, neglecting the shell anisotropy results in underestimating the bending boundary-layer decay length and, in other cases, results in an overestimation.

  9. A cylindrical standing wave ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yingxiang; Chen, Weishan; Liu, Junkao; Shi, Shengjun

    2011-07-01

    A cylindrical standing wave ultrasonic motor using bending vibration transducer was proposed in this paper. The proposed stator contains a cylinder and a bending vibration transducer. The two combining sites between the cylinder and the transducer locate at the adjacent wave loops of bending vibration of the transducer and have a distance that equal to the half wave length of bending standing wave excited in the cylinder. Thus, the bending mode of the cylinder can be excited by the bending vibration of the transducer. Two circular cone type rotors are pressed in contact to the end rims of the teeth, and the preload between the rotors and stator is accomplished by a spring and nut system. The working principle of the proposed motor was analyzed. The motion trajectories of teeth were deduced. The stator was designed and analyzed with FEM. A prototype motor was fabricated and measured. Typical output of the prototype is no-load speed of 165rpm and maximum torque of 0.45Nm at an exciting voltage of 200V(rms).

  10. Bending spring rate investigation of nanopipette for cell injection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Yajing; Zhang, Zhenhai; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-04-01

    Bending of nanopipette tips during cell penetration is a major cause of cell injection failure. However, the flexural rigidity of nanopipettes is little known due to their irregular structure. In this paper, we report a quantitative method to estimate the flexural rigidity of a nanopipette by investigating its bending spring rate. First nanopipettes with a tip size of 300 nm are fabricated from various glass tubes by laser pulling followed by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. Then the bending spring rate of the nanopipettes is investigated inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Finally, a yeast cell penetration test is performed on these nanopipettes, which have different bending spring rates. The results show that nanopipettes with a higher bending spring rate have better cell penetration capability, which confirms that the bending spring rate may well reflect the flexural rigidity of a nanopipette. This method provides a quantitative parameter for characterizing the mechanical property of a nanopipette that can be potentially taken as a standard specification in the future. This general method can also be used to estimate other one-dimensional structures for cell injection, which will greatly benefit basic cell biology research and clinical applications.

  11. Bending of Light in Modified Gravity at Large Distances

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the bending of light in a recent model for gravity at large distances containing a Rindler type acceleration proposed by Grumiller. We consider the static, spherically symmetric metric with cosmological constant and Rindler-like term 2ar presented in this model, and we use the procedure by Rindler and Ishak. to obtain the bending angle of light in this metric. Earlier work on light bending in this model by Carloni, Grumiller, and Preis, using the method normally employed for asymptotically flat space-times, led to a conflicting result (caused by the Rindler-like term in the metric) of a bending angle that increases with the distance of closest approach r(sub 0) of the light ray from the centrally concentrated spherically symmetric matter distribution. However, when using the alternative approach for light bending in nonasymptotically flat space-times, we show that the linear Rindler-like term produces a small correction to the general relativistic result that is inversely proportional to r(sub 0). This will in turn affect the bounds on Rindler acceleration obtained earlier from light bending and casts doubts on the nature of the linear term 2ar in the metric

  12. Bending spring rate investigation of nanopipette for cell injection.

    PubMed

    Shen, Yajing; Zhang, Zhenhai; Fukuda, Toshio

    2015-04-17

    Bending of nanopipette tips during cell penetration is a major cause of cell injection failure. However, the flexural rigidity of nanopipettes is little known due to their irregular structure. In this paper, we report a quantitative method to estimate the flexural rigidity of a nanopipette by investigating its bending spring rate. First nanopipettes with a tip size of 300 nm are fabricated from various glass tubes by laser pulling followed by focused ion beam (FIB) milling. Then the bending spring rate of the nanopipettes is investigated inside a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Finally, a yeast cell penetration test is performed on these nanopipettes, which have different bending spring rates. The results show that nanopipettes with a higher bending spring rate have better cell penetration capability, which confirms that the bending spring rate may well reflect the flexural rigidity of a nanopipette. This method provides a quantitative parameter for characterizing the mechanical property of a nanopipette that can be potentially taken as a standard specification in the future. This general method can also be used to estimate other one-dimensional structures for cell injection, which will greatly benefit basic cell biology research and clinical applications.

  13. Nonlinear Curvature Expressions for Combined Flapwise Bending, Chordwise Bending, Torsion and Extension of Twisted Rotor Blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kvaternik, R. G.; Kaza, K. R. V.

    1976-01-01

    The nonlinear curvature expressions for a twisted rotor blade or a beam undergoing transverse bending in two planes, torsion, and extension were developed. The curvature expressions were obtained using simple geometric considerations. The expressions were first developed in a general manner using the geometrical nonlinear theory of elasticity. These general nonlinear expressions were then systematically reduced to four levels of approximation by imposing various simplifying assumptions, and in each of these levels the second degree nonlinear expressions were given. The assumptions were carefully stated and their implications with respect to the nonlinear theory of elasticity as applied to beams were pointed out. The transformation matrices between the deformed and undeformed blade-fixed coordinates, which were needed in the development of the curvature expressions, were also given for three of the levels of approximation. The present curvature expressions and transformation matrices were compared with corresponding expressions existing in the literature.

  14. Coupled bending-bending-torsion flutter of a mistuned cascade with nonuniform blades

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaza, K. R. V.; Kielb, R. E.

    1982-01-01

    A set of aeroelastic equations describing the motion of an arbitrarily mistuned cascade with flexible, pretwisted, nonuniform blades is developed using an extended Hamilton's principle. The derivation of the equations has its basis in the geometric nonlinear theory of elasticity in which the elongations and shears are negligible compared to unity. A general expression for foreshortening of a blade is derived and is explicity used in the formulation. The blade aerodynamic loading in the subsonic and supersonic flow regimes is obtained from two dimensional, unsteady, cascade theories. The aerodynamic, inertial and structural coupling between the bending (in two planes) and torsional motions of the blade is included. The equations are used to investigate the aeroelastic stability and to quantify the effect of frequency mistuning on flutter in turbofans. Results indicate that a moderate amount of intentional mistuning has enough potential to alleviate flutter problems in unshrouded, high aspect ratio turbofans.

  15. On CD-AFM bias related to probe bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ukraintsev, V. A.; Orji, N. G.; Vorburger, T. V.; Dixson, R. G.; Fu, J.; Silver, R. M.

    2012-03-01

    Critical Dimension AFM (CD-AFM) is a widely used reference metrology. To characterize modern semiconductor devices, very small and flexible probes, often 15 nm to 20 nm in diameter, are now frequently used. Several recent publications have reported on uncontrolled and significant probe-to-probe bias variation during linewidth and sidewall angle measurements [1,2]. Results obtained in this work suggest that probe bending can be on the order of several nanometers and thus potentially can explain much of the observed CD-AFM probe-to-probe bias variation. We have developed and experimentally tested one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) models to describe the bending of cylindrical probes. An earlier 1D bending model reported by Watanabe et al. [3] was refined. Contributions from several new phenomena were considered, including: probe misalignment, diameter variation near the carbon nanotube tip (CNT) apex, probe bending before snapping, distributed van der Waals-London force, etc. The methodology for extraction of the Hamaker probe-surface interaction energy from experimental probe bending data was developed. To overcome limitations of the 1D model, a new 2D distributed force (DF) model was developed. Comparison of the new model with the 1D single point force (SPF) model revealed about 27 % difference in probe bending bias between the two. A simple linear relation between biases predicted by the 1D SPF and 2D DF models was found. This finding simplifies use of the advanced 2D DF model of probe bending in various CD-AFM applications. New 2D and three-dimensional (3D) CDAFM data analysis software is needed to take full advantage of the new bias correction modeling capabilities.

  16. [Relationship between hardness, abrasion and bending strength of UV-polymerizable adhesives].

    PubMed

    Reinhardt, K J; Vahl, J

    1978-04-01

    These experiments were undertaken to explore the influence of hardening on bending and bending strength of photopolymerisable adhesives. It was shown that light sources at present in use only influence the bending strength to a small degree but enable 40% variation in bending. The use of more intensive light sources not yet in commercial use led to further improvements. PMID:274282

  17. How do spin waves pass through a bend?

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xiangjun; Yu, Yongli; Li, Shuwei; Huang, Xiaohong

    2013-01-01

    Spin-wave devices hold great promise to be used in future information processing. Manipulation of spin-wave propagation inside the submicrometer waveguides is at the core of promoting the practical application of these devices. Just as in today's silicon-based chips, bending of the building blocks cannot be avoided in real spin-wave circuits. Here, we examine spin-wave transport in bended magnonic waveguides at the submicron scale using micromagnetic simulations. It is seen that the impact of the bend is relevant to the frequency of the passing spin wave. At the lowest frequencies, the spin wave continuously follows the waveguide in the propagation process. At the higher frequencies, however the bend acts as a mode converter for the passing spin wave, causing zigzag-like propagation path formed in the waveguide behind the bend. Additionally, we demonstrate a logic-NOT gate based on such a waveguide, which could be combined to perform logic-NAND operation. PMID:24129823

  18. Model for photoinduced bending of slender molecular crystals.

    PubMed

    Nath, Naba K; Pejov, Ljupčo; Nichols, Shane M; Hu, Chunhua; Saleh, Na'il; Kahr, Bart; Naumov, Panče

    2014-02-19

    The growing realization that photoinduced bending of slender photoreactive single crystals is surprisingly common has inspired researchers to control crystal motility for actuation. However, new mechanically responsive crystals are reported at a greater rate than their quantitative photophysical characterization; a quantitative identification of measurable parameters and molecular-scale factors that determine the mechanical response has yet to be established. Herein, a simple mathematical description of the quasi-static and time-dependent photoinduced bending of macroscopic single crystals is provided. This kinetic model goes beyond the approximate treatment of a bending crystal as a simple composite bilayer. It includes alternative pathways for excited-state decay and provides a more accurate description of the bending by accounting for the spatial gradient in the product/reactant ratio. A new crystal form (space group P21/n) of the photoresponsive azo-dye Disperse Red 1 (DR1) is analyzed within the constraints of the aforementioned model. The crystal bending kinetics depends on intrinsic factors (crystal size) and external factors (excitation time, direction, and intensity).

  19. Automated methods for estimation of sperm flagellar bending parameters.

    PubMed

    Brokaw, C J

    1984-01-01

    Parameters to describe flagellar bending patterns can be obtained by a microcomputer procedure that uses a set of parameters to synthesize model bending patterns, compares the model bending patterns with digitized and filtered data from flagellar photographs, and uses the Simplex method to vary the parameters until a solution with minimum root mean square differences between the model and the data is found. Parameters for Chlamydomonas bending patterns have been obtained from comparison of shear angle curves for the model and the data. To avoid the determination of the orientation of the basal end of the flagellum, which is required for calculation of shear angles, parameters for sperm flagella have been obtained by comparison of curves of curvature as a function of length for the model and for the data. A constant curvature model, modified from that originally used for Chlamydomonas flagella, has been used for obtaining parameters from sperm flagella, but the methods can be applied using other models for synthesizing the model bending patterns.

  20. Theoretical and experimental investigation of magnetoelectric effect for bending-tension coupled modes in magnetostrictive-piezoelectric layered composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasanyan, D.; Gao, J.; Wang, Y.; Viswan, R.; Li, M.; Shen, Y.; Li, J.; Viehland, D.

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we discuss a theoretical model with experimental verification for the resonance enhancement of magnetoelectric (ME) interactions at frequencies corresponding to bending-tension oscillations. A dynamic theory of arbitrary laminated magneto-elasto-electric bars was constructed. The model included bending and longitudinal vibration effects for predicting ME coefficients in laminate bar composite structures consisting of magnetostrictive, piezoelectric, and pure elastic layers. The thickness dependence of stress, strain, and magnetic and electric fields within a sample are taken into account, as such the bending deformations should be considered in an applied magnetic or electric field. The frequency dependence of the ME voltage coefficients has obtained by solving electrostatic, magnetostatic, and elastodynamic equations. We consider boundary conditions corresponding to free vibrations at both ends. As a demonstration, our theory for multilayer ME composites was then applied to ferromagnetic-ferroelectric bilayers, specifically Metglas-PZT ones. A theoretical model is presented for static (low-frequency) ME effects in such bilayers. We also performed experiments for these Metglas-PZT bilayers and analyzed the influence of Metglas geometry (length and thickness) and Metglas/PZT volume fraction on the ME coefficient. The frequency dependence of the ME coefficient is also presented for different geometries (length, thickness) of Metglas. The theory shows good agreement with experimental data, even near the resonance frequency.

  1. Platonic Scattering Cancellation for Bending Waves in a Thin Plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, M.; Chen, P.-Y.; Bağcı, H.; Enoch, S.; Guenneau, S.; Alù, A.

    2014-04-01

    We propose an ultra-thin elastic cloak to control the scattering of bending waves in isotropic heterogeneous thin plates. The cloak design makes use of the scattering cancellation technique applied, for the first time, to the biharmonic operator describing the propagation of bending waves in thin plates. We first analyze scattering from hard and soft cylindrical objects in the quasistatic limit, then we prove that the scattering of bending waves from an object in the near and far-field regions can be suppressed significantly by covering it with a suitably designed coating. Beyond camouflaging, these findings may have potential applications in protection of buildings from earthquakes and isolating structures from vibrations in the motor vehicle industry.

  2. Contact and Bending Durability Calculation for Spiral-Bevel Gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vijayakar, Sandeep

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this project is to extend the capabilities of the gear contact analysis solver Calyx, and associated packages Transmission3D, HypoidFaceMilled, HypoidFaceHobbed. A calculation process for the surface durability was implemented using the Dowson-Higginson correlation for fluid film thickness. Comparisons to failure data from NASA's Spiral Bevel Gear Fatigue rig were carried out. A bending fatigue calculation has been implemented that allows the use of the stress-life calculation at each individual fillet point. The gears in the NASA test rig did not exhibit any bending fatigue failure, so the bending fatigue calculations are presented in this report by using significantly lowered strength numbers.

  3. Simulated Single Tooth Bending of High Temperature Alloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handschuh, Robert, F.; Burke, Christopher

    2012-01-01

    Future unmanned space missions will require mechanisms to operate at extreme conditions in order to be successful. In some of these mechanisms, very high gear reductions will be needed to permit very small motors to drive other components at low rotational speed with high output torque. Therefore gearing components are required that can meet the mission requirements. In mechanisms such as this, bending fatigue strength capacity of the gears is very important. The bending fatigue capacity of a high temperature, nickel-based alloy, typically used for turbine disks in gas turbine engines and two tool steel materials with high vanadium content, were compared to that of a typical aerospace alloy-AISI 9310. Test specimens were fabricated by electro-discharge machining without post machining processing. Tests were run at 24 and at 490 C. As test temperature increased from 24 to 490 C the bending fatigue strength was reduced by a factor of five.

  4. Flood characteristics of the Buffalo River at Tyler Bend, Arkansas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Neely, Braxtel L.

    1987-01-01

    The Buffalo River is located in the Ozark Mountains in north-central Arkansas. Tyler Bend is on the Buffalo River about 1.5 miles upstream from U.S. Highway 65. The National Park Service is developing several recreational park sites along this scenic river. The magnitude, frequency, duration and velocities of floods are primary factors needed for establishing guidelines for developing facilities and managing park sites. The Park Service plans to develop park facilities at Tyler Bend and needs flood information at this site. This report provides information on the 100-, 75-, 50-, 30-, 20-, 10-, and 5-year floods on the Buffalo River at Tyler Bend. It was prepared by the U.S. Geological Survey in cooperation with the National Park Service and is based on data collected during the December 1982 flood, gaging station data for the Buffalo River near St. Joe, Arkansas and a Statewide flood-frequency report. (Lantz-PTT)

  5. Photoreceptor-mediated bending towards UV-B in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Vandenbussche, Filip; Tilbrook, Kimberley; Fierro, Ana Carolina; Marchal, Kathleen; Poelman, Dirk; Van Der Straeten, Dominique; Ulm, Roman

    2014-06-01

    Plants reorient their growth towards light to optimize photosynthetic light capture--a process known as phototropism. Phototropins are the photoreceptors essential for phototropic growth towards blue and ultraviolet-A (UV-A) light. Here we detail a phototropic response towards UV-B in etiolated Arabidopsis seedlings. We report that early differential growth is mediated by phototropins but clear phototropic bending to UV-B is maintained in phot1 phot2 double mutants. We further show that this phototropin-independent phototropic response to UV-B requires the UV-B photoreceptor UVR8. Broad UV-B-mediated repression of auxin-responsive genes suggests that UVR8 regulates directional bending by affecting auxin signaling. Kinetic analysis shows that UVR8-dependent directional bending occurs later than the phototropin response. We conclude that plants may use the full short-wavelength spectrum of sunlight to efficiently reorient photosynthetic tissue with incoming light.

  6. Flow resistance of ice slurry in bends and elbow pipes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezgoda-Żelasko, B.; Żelasko, J.

    2014-08-01

    The present paper covers the flow of ice slurry made of a 10.6% ethanol solution through small-radius bends and elbow pipes. The paper presents the results of experimental research on the flow resistances of Bingham-fluid ice slurry in bends and elbows. The research, performed for three pipe diameters and a relative bend radius of 1<=D/di<=2, has made it possible to take into consideration the influence of friction resistances as well the of the flow geometry on the total local resistance coefficients. The study attempts to make the local resistance coefficient dependent on the Dean number defined for a generalized Reynolds number according to Metzner-Reade

  7. [Effect of bending on shot peened and polished osteosynthesis plates].

    PubMed

    Starker, M; Fröhling, M; Hirsch, T

    1991-03-01

    Shot peening can increase the fatigue strength of commercially available surgical plates made of 1.4435 alloy by 40% even in a corrosive environment. Our investigations show that residual stresses resulting from shot peening are reduced by additional bending of the plates. In such plates smaller tensile residual stresses were found than after polishing of the plates. Bending of polished plates results in considerable tensile residual stresses. The hardening achieved by shot peening is not reduced by bending. As the fatigue strength of soft materials depends mainly on the hardening and less on the residual stresses, only little influence of the changed residual stresses on the fatigue strength can be expected. Shot peening of surgical implants thus means an improvement in quality. PMID:2054460

  8. Platonic Scattering Cancellation for Bending Waves in a Thin Plate

    PubMed Central

    Farhat, M.; Chen, P.-Y.; Bağcı, H.; Enoch, S.; Guenneau, S.; Alù, A.

    2014-01-01

    We propose an ultra-thin elastic cloak to control the scattering of bending waves in isotropic heterogeneous thin plates. The cloak design makes use of the scattering cancellation technique applied, for the first time, to the biharmonic operator describing the propagation of bending waves in thin plates. We first analyze scattering from hard and soft cylindrical objects in the quasistatic limit, then we prove that the scattering of bending waves from an object in the near and far-field regions can be suppressed significantly by covering it with a suitably designed coating. Beyond camouflaging, these findings may have potential applications in protection of buildings from earthquakes and isolating structures from vibrations in the motor vehicle industry. PMID:24844801

  9. Bends in Hotspot Tracks: Kinematic observations and geodynamic models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tarduno, J. A.; Bunge, H.-P.; Sleep, N.; Hansen, U.

    2009-04-01

    Bends in volcanic hotspot lineaments, best represented by the large 60 degree turn in the Hawaiian-Emperor chain, were once thought to record solely changes in plate motion. Several lines of geophysical inquiry, including paleomagnetism and plate-circuit analyses, now suggest that a change in the locus of upwelling in the mantle induced by mantle dynamics causes bends in hotspot tracks. Deep flow near the core-mantle boundary may have played a role in the Hawaiian-Emperor bend. However, we suggest that capture of a plume by a ridge, followed by changes in sub-Pacific mantle flow can better explain the observations. Ridge capture of plumes may be enhanced in the Pacific Ocean basin because of its history of rapidly spreading ridges, distant from the complicating effects of continents. We explore how ridge capture may resolve apparent discrepancies between the Hawaiian-Emperor chain and other hotspots of the Pacific Ocean basin.

  10. Nonrigid registration of carotid ultrasound and MR images using a "twisting and bending" model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nanayakkara, Nuwan D.; Chiu, Bernard; Samani, Abbas; Spence, J. David; Parraga, Grace; Samarabandu, Jagath; Fenster, Aaron

    2008-03-01

    Atherosclerosis at the carotid bifurcation resulting in cerebral emboli is a major cause of ischemic stroke. Most strokes associated with carotid atherosclerosis can be prevented by lifestyle/dietary changes and pharmacological treatments if identified early by monitoring carotid plaque changes. Plaque composition information from magnetic resonance (MR) carotid images and dynamic characteristics information from 3D ultrasound (US) are necessary for developing and validating US imaging tools to identify vulnerable carotid plaques. Combining these images requires nonrigid registration to correct the non-linear miss-alignments caused by relative twisting and bending in the neck due to different head positions during the two image acquisitions sessions. The high degree of freedom and large number of parameters associated with existing nonrigid image registration methods causes several problems including unnatural plaque morphology alteration, computational complexity, and low reliability. Our approach was to model the normal movement of the neck using a "twisting and bending model" with only six parameters for nonrigid registration. We evaluated our registration technique using intra-subject in-vivo 3D US and 3D MR carotid images acquired on the same day. We calculated the Mean Registration Error (MRE) between the segmented vessel surfaces in the target image and the registered image using a distance-based error metric after applying our "twisting bending model" based nonrigid registration algorithm. We achieved an average registration error of 1.33+/-0.41mm using our nonrigid registration technique. Visual inspection of segmented vessel surfaces also showed a substantial improvement of alignment with our non-rigid registration technique.

  11. Bending of light in modified gravity at large distances

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sultana, Joseph; Kazanas, Demosthenes

    2012-04-01

    We discuss the bending of light in a recent model for gravity at large distances containing a Rindler-type acceleration proposed by Grumiller [Phys. Rev. Lett. 105, 211303 (2010)10.1103/PhysRevLett.105.211303PRLTAO0031-9007]. We consider the static, spherically symmetric metric with cosmological constant Λ and Rindler-like term 2ar presented in this model, and we use the procedure by Rindler and Ishak [W. Rindler and M. Ishak, Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 76, 043006 (2007).10.1103/PhysRevD.76.043006] to obtain the bending angle of light in this metric. Earlier work on light bending in this model by Carloni, Grumiller, and Preis [Phys. Rev. DPRVDAQ1550-7998 83, 124024 (2011)10.1103/PhysRevD.83.124024], using the method normally employed for asymptotically flat space-times, led to a conflicting result (caused by the Rindler-like term in the metric) of a bending angle that increases with the distance of closest approach r0 of the light ray from the centrally concentrated spherically symmetric matter distribution. However, when using the alternative approach for light bending in nonasymptotically flat space-times, we show that the linear Rindler-like term produces a small correction to the general relativistic result that is inversely proportional to r0. This will in turn affect the bounds on Rindler acceleration obtained earlier from light bending and casts doubts on the nature of the linear term 2ar in the metric.

  12. Bending of the looping heart: differential growth revisited.

    PubMed

    Shi, Yunfei; Yao, Jiang; Xu, Gang; Taber, Larry A

    2014-08-01

    In the early embryo, the primitive heart tube (HT) undergoes the morphogenetic process of c-looping as it bends and twists into a c-shaped tube. Despite intensive study for nearly a century, the physical forces that drive looping remain poorly understood. This is especially true for the bending component, which is the focus of this paper. For decades, experimental measurements of mitotic rates had seemingly eliminated differential growth as the cause of HT bending, as it has commonly been thought that the heart grows almost exclusively via hyperplasia before birth and hypertrophy after birth. Recently published data, however, suggests that hypertrophic growth may play a role in looping. To test this idea, we developed finite-element models that include regionally measured changes in myocardial volume over the HT. First, models based on idealized cylindrical geometry were used to simulate the bending process in isolated hearts, which bend without the complicating effects of external loads. With the number of free parameters in the model reduced to the extent possible, stress and strain distributions were compared to those measured in embryonic chick hearts that were isolated and cultured for 24 h. The results show that differential growth alone yields results that agree reasonably well with the trends in our data, but adding active changes in myocardial cell shape provides closer quantitative agreement with stress measurements. Next, the estimated parameters were extrapolated to a model based on realistic 3D geometry reconstructed from images of an actual chick heart. This model yields similar results and captures quite well the basic morphology of the looped heart. Overall, our study suggests that differential hypertrophic growth in the myocardium (MY) is the primary cause of the bending component of c-looping, with other mechanisms possibly playing lesser roles.

  13. Fis-protein induces rod-like DNA bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chi-Cheng; Lin, Ching-Fong; Gao, Quan-Ze; Yang, Wei-Zen; Lim, Tsong-Shin; Yang, Li-Ling; Yen, Chi-Fu; Chang, Wei-Hau; Yuan, Hanna S.; Sheu, Sheh-Yi; Yang, Dah-Yen; Fann, Wunshain

    2010-11-01

    Fis protein can bend DNA chain with length much shorter than its persistence length. We applied single-molecule fluorescence resonance energy transfer method to probe these conformational changes. A broad distribution of end-to-end distances correlates well with the molecular dynamics simulation. The flexibility of DNA upon Fis binding is attributed to the breakages of hydrogen bonds between base pairs. DNA kinks at specific sites, instead of continuous bending. The loosening of DNA structures might have biological implications for the functions of Fis-proteins as transcription cofactors.

  14. Bending of solitons in weak and slowly varying inhomogeneous plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Mukherjee, Abhik Janaki, M. S. Kundu, Anjan

    2015-12-15

    The bending of solitons in two dimensional plane is presented in the presence of weak and slowly varying inhomogeneous ion density for the propagation of ion acoustic soliton in unmagnetized cold plasma with isothermal electrons. Using reductive perturbation technique, a modified Kadomtsev-Petviashvili equation is obtained with a chosen unperturbed ion density profile. The exact solution of the equation shows that the phase of the solitary wave gets modified by a function related to the unperturbed inhomogeneous ion density causing the soliton to bend in the two dimensional plane, while the amplitude of the soliton remains constant.

  15. Effects of rim thickness on spur gear bending stress

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bibel, G. D.; Reddy, S. K.; Savage, M.; Handschuh, R. F.

    1991-01-01

    Thin rim gears find application in high-power, light-weight aircraft transmissions. Bending stresses in thin rim spur gear tooth fillets and root areas differ from the stresses in solid gears due to rim deformations. Rim thickness is a significant design parameter for these gears. To study this parameter, a finite element analysis was conducted on a segment of a thin rim gear. The rim thickness was varied and the location and magnitude of the maximum bending stresses reported. Design limits are discussed and compared with the results of other researchers.

  16. How protein-making machine bends without breaking

    SciTech Connect

    2011-01-01

    Scientists from several institutions including the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. They derived atomic-scale resolution structures of the cell's protein-making machine, the ribosome, at key stages of its job. The ability to bend but not break comes from this hinge within transfer RNA, which allows it to bend as much as 70 degrees when it passes through the ribosome during protein synthesis. The structures, developed primarily at Berkeley Lab's Advanced Light Source, reveal that the ribosome's ability to rotate an incredible amount without falling apart is due to the never-before-seen springiness of molecular widgets that hold it together.

  17. Review of a Few Selected Theories of Plates in Bending

    PubMed Central

    Vijayakumar, Kaza

    2014-01-01

    The author's recent investigations on plate theories form the basis to review development of plate theories. In spite of several review articles on plate theories reported in the literature, the present work is essentially due to Jemielita's inspiring article (1993). It is shown that methods of analysis based on vertical displacement as domain variable deal with solution of associated torsion problem in bending of plates. It is essential to use vertical displacement as face variable instead of domain variable in proper analysis of bending problems. PMID:27355028

  18. Origin of bending in uncoated microcantilever - Surface topography?

    SciTech Connect

    Lakshmoji, K.; Prabakar, K.; Tripura Sundari, S. Jayapandian, J.; Tyagi, A. K.; Sundar, C. S.

    2014-01-27

    We provide direct experimental evidence to show that difference in surface topography on opposite sides of an uncoated microcantilever induces bending, upon exposure to water molecules. Examination on opposite sides of the microcantilever by atomic force microscopy reveals the presence of localized surface features on one side, which renders the induced stress non-uniform. Further, the root mean square inclination angle characterizing the surface topography shows a difference of 73° between the opposite sides. The absence of deflection in another uncoated microcantilever having similar surface topography confirms that in former microcantilever bending is indeed induced by differences in surface topography.

  19. Solution structure of an A-tract DNA bend.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, D; Herbert, K; Zhang, X; Pologruto, T; Lu, P; Polgruto, T

    2001-03-01

    The solution structure of a DNA dodecamer d(GGCAAAAAACGG)/d(CCGTTTTTTGCC) containing an A-tract has been determined by NMR spectroscopy with residual dipolar couplings. The structure shows an overall helix axis bend of 19 degrees in a geometry consistent with solution and gel electrophoresis experiments. Fourteen degrees of the bending occurs in the GC regions flanking the A-tract. The remaining 5 degrees is spread evenly over its six AT base-pairs. The A-tract is characterized by decreasing minor groove width from the 5' to the 3' direction along the A strand. This is a result of propeller twist in the AT pairs and the increasing negative inclination of the adenine bases at the 3' side of the run of adenine bases. The four central thymine bases all have negative inclination throughout the A-tract with an average value of -6.1 degrees. Although this negative inclination makes the geometry of the A-tract different from all X-ray structures, the proton on N6 of adenine and the O4 of thymine one step down the helix are within distance to form bifurcated hydrogen bonds. The 5' bend of 4 degrees occurs at the junction between the GC flank and the A-tract through a combination of tilt and roll. The larger 3' bend, 10 degrees, occurs in two base steps: the first composed of tilt, -4.1 degrees, and the second a combination of tilt, -4.2 degrees, and roll, 6.0 degrees. This second step is a direct consequence of the change in inclination between an adjacent cytosine base, which has an inclination of -12 degrees, and the next base, a guanine, which has 3 degrees inclination. This bend is a combination of tilt and roll. The large change in inclination allows the formation of a hydrogen bond between the protons of N4 of the 3' cytosine and the O6 of the next 3' base, a guanine, stabilizing the roll component in the bend. These structural features differ from existing models for A-tract bends.For comparison, we also determined the structure of the control sequence, d

  20. Elastostatic bending of a bimaterial plate with a circular interface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogbonna, Nkem

    2015-08-01

    The elastostatic bending of an arbitrarily loaded bimaterial plate with a circular interface is analysed. It is shown that the deflections in the composite solid are directly related to the deflection in the corresponding homogeneous material by integral and differential operators. It is further shown that, by a simple transformation of elastic constants, the Airy stress function induced in the composite by a stretching singularity can be deduced from the deflection induced by a bending singularity. This result is significant for reduction of mathematical labour and for systematic construction of solutions for more complex structures with circular geometry.

  1. Preliminary survey of the mayflies (Ephemeroptera) and caddisflies (Trichoptera) of Big Bend Ranch State Park and Big Bend National Park

    PubMed Central

    Baumgardner, David E.; Bowles, David E.

    2005-01-01

    The mayfly (Insecta: Ephemeroptera) and caddisfly (Insecta: Trichoptera) fauna of Big Bend National Park and Big Bend Ranch State Park are reported based upon numerous records. For mayflies, sixteen species representing four families and twelve genera are reported. By comparison, thirty-five species of caddisflies were collected during this study representing seventeen genera and nine families. Although the Rio Grande supports the greatest diversity of mayflies (n=9) and caddisflies (n=14), numerous spring-fed creeks throughout the park also support a wide variety of species. A general lack of data on the distribution and abundance of invertebrates in Big Bend National and State Park is discussed, along with the importance of continuing this type of research. PMID:17119610

  2. Flow studies of highly loaded coal-water mixtures around bends and across horizontal sections. [Pressure loss with 90-degree bends and sweep bends

    SciTech Connect

    Wildman, D.J.; Ekmann, J.M.

    1984-01-01

    From the data taken in the flow loop, it appears that the coal-water mixtures (CWMs) prepared at PETC bracket the range of flow characteristics anticipated for commercial CWMs. Furthermore, the lower concentration slurries (55 wt % and 60 wt %) show nonhomogeneous behavior as a function of particle size and mixture velocity. Preliminary analysis of the pressure loss data around bends indicate 90-degree elbows are more efficient for the 60 wt % CWMS prepared with beneficiated coal, whereas the sweep bends yield lower pressure gradients for 65 wt % CWMs prepared with the same coal. The model developed for horizontal homogenous-nonhomogeneous laminar flow adequately predicts the pressure losses measured in the loop facility. The nonhomogeneous portion of the flow is restricted to a height of twenty percent of the pipe diameter. The accuracy of the model depends heavily on viscosity-shear-rate data measured in the rheology laboratory. The nonhomogenous flow pressure gradient is calculated via the Durand-Condolios equation. The homogeneous flow pressure gradient is calculated using the classical laminar flow equation. The model developed for sweep bends satisfactorily predicts the pressure losses measured. The revised model predicted the measured pressure losses with an index of determination of 0.95. The model consists of revising the pressure loss equation of Ito to include a parameter that is a function of the Reynolds number. 11 refs.

  3. Theory of using magnetic deflections to combine charged particle beams

    SciTech Connect

    Steckbeck, Mackenzie K.; Doyle, Barney Lee

    2014-09-01

    Several radiation effects projects in the Ion Beam Lab (IBL) have recently required two disparate charged particle beams to simultaneously strike a single sample through a single port of the target chamber. Because these beams have vastly different mass–energy products (MEP), the low-MEP beam requires a large angle of deflection toward the sample by a bending electromagnet. A second electromagnet located further upstream provides a means to compensate for the small angle deflection experienced by the high-MEP beam during its path through the bending magnet. This paper derives the equations used to select the magnetic fields required by these two magnets to achieve uniting both beams at the target sample. A simple result was obtained when the separation of the two magnets was equivalent to the distance from the bending magnet to the sample, and the equations is given by: Bs= 1/2(rc/rs) Bc, where Bs and Bc are the magnetic fields in the steering and bending magnet and rc/rs is the ratio of the radii of the bending magnet to that of the steering magnet. This result is not dependent upon the parameters of the high MEP beam, i.e. energy, mass, charge state. Therefore, once the field of the bending magnet is set for the low-MEP beam, and the field in the steering magnet is set as indicted in the equation, the trajectory path of any high-MEP beam will be directed into the sample.

  4. Reduction of Beam Emittance of Pep-X Using Quadruple Bend Achromat Cell

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Min-Huey; Cai, Yunhai; Hettel, Robert; Nosochkov, Yuri; /SLAC

    2009-05-26

    SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory is studying an option of building a high brightness synchrotron light source machine, PEP-X, in the existing PEP-II tunnel [1, 2]. By replacing 6 arcs of FODO cells of PEPII High Energy Ring (HER) with two arcs of DBA and four arcs of TME and installation of 89.3 m long damping wiggler an ultra low beam emittance of 0.14 nm-rad (including intra-beam scattering) at 4.5 GeV is achieved. In this paper we study the possibility to further reduce the beam emittance by releasing the constraint of the dispersion free in the DBA straight. The QBA (Quadruple Bend Achromat) cell is used to replace the DBA. The ratio of outer and inner bending angle is optimized. The dispersion function in the non-dispersion straight is controlled to compromise with lower emittance and beam size at the dispersion straight. An undulator of period length 23 mm, maximum magnetic field of 1.053 T, and total periods of 150 is used to put in the 30 straights to simulate the effects of these IDs on the beam emittance and energy spread. The brightness including all the ID effects is calculated and compared to the original PEP-X design.

  5. Integration of a photonic crystal polarization beam splitter and waveguide bend.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wanhua; Xing, Mingxin; Ren, Gang; Johnson, Steven G; Zhou, Wenjun; Chen, Wei; Chen, Lianghui

    2009-05-11

    In this work, we present the design of an integrated photonic-crystal polarization beam splitter (PC-PBS) and a low-loss photonic-crystal 60 degrees waveguide bend. Firstly, the modal properties of the PC-PBS and the mechanism of the low-loss waveguide bend are investigated by the two-dimensional finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method, and then the integration of the two devices is studied. It shows that, although the individual devices perform well separately, the performance of the integrated circuit is poor due to the multi-mode property of the PC-PBS. By introducing deformed airhole structures, a single-mode PC-PBS is proposed, which significantly enhance the performance of the circuit with the extinction ratios remaining above 20 dB for both transverse-electric (TE) and transverse-magnetic (TM) polarizations. Both the specific result and the general idea of integration design are promising in the photonic crystal integrated circuits in the future.

  6. Bending-induced mode non-degeneracy and coupling in chalcogenide negative curvature fibers.

    PubMed

    Wei, Chengli; Menyuk, Curtis R; Hu, Jonathan

    2016-05-30

    We study bend loss in chalcogenide negative curvature fibers with different polarizations, different tube wall thicknesses, and different bend directions relative to the mode polarization. The coupling between the core mode and tube modes induces bend loss peaks in the two non-degenerate modes at the same bend radius. There is as much as a factor of 28 difference between the losses of the two polarization modes. The fiber with a larger tube wall thickness, corresponding to a smaller inner tube diameter, can sustain a smaller bend radius. The bend loss is sensitive to the bend direction when coupling occurs between the core mode and tube modes. A bend loss of 0.2 dB/m at a bend radius of 16 cm, corresponding to 0.2 dB/turn, can be achieved in a chalcogenide negative curvature fiber. PMID:27410139

  7. Bend sweep angle and Reynolds number effects on hemodynamics of s-shaped arteries.

    PubMed

    Niazmand, H; Rajabi Jaghargh, E

    2010-09-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effects of the Reynolds number and the bend sweep angle on the blood flow patterns of S-shaped bends. The numerical simulations of steady flows in S-shaped bends with sweep angles of 45 degrees , 90 degrees , and 135 degrees are performed at Reynolds numbers of 125, 500, and 960. Hemodynamic characteristics such as secondary flows, vorticity, and axial velocity profiles are analyzed in detail. Flow patterns in S-shaped bends are strongly dependent on both Reynolds number and bend sweep angle, which can be categorized into three groups based on the first bend secondary flow effects on the transverse flow of the second bend. For low Reynolds numbers and any sweep angles, secondary flows in the second bend eliminate the first bend effects in the early sections of the second bend and therefore the axial velocity profile is consistent with the bend curvature, while for high Reynolds numbers depending on the bend sweep angles the secondary vortex pattern of the first bend may persist partially or totally throughout the second bend leading to a four-vortex secondary structure. Moreover, an interesting flow feature observed at the Reynolds number of 960 is that the secondary flow asymmetrical behavior occurred around the second bend exit and along the outflow straight section. This symmetry-breaking phenomenon which has not been reported in the previous studies is shown to be more pronounced in the 90 degrees S-shaped bend as compared to other models considered here. The probability of flow separation as one of the important flow features contributing to the onset and development of arterial wall diseases is also studied. It is observed that the second bend outer wall of gentle bends with sweep angles from 20 degrees to 30 degrees at high enough Reynolds numbers are prone to flow separation.

  8. 'It's still bending': verbal suggestion and alleged psychokinetic ability.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Richard; Greening, Emma

    2005-02-01

    Some alleged psychics appear to be able to deform metallic objects, such as keys and cutlery, by thought alone. This paper describes two studies that examined whether one aspect of these demonstrations could be created by verbal suggestion. In the first study, participants were shown a videotape in which a fake psychic placed a bent key on a table. Participants in one condition heard the fake psychic suggest that the key was continuing to bend, whilst those in the other condition did not. Participants in the suggestion condition were significantly more likely to report that the key continued to bend. These findings were replicated in the second study. In addition, participants who reported that the key continued to bend displayed a significantly higher level of confidence in their testimony than others, and were significantly less likely to recall that the fake psychic had suggested the continued bending of the key. Neither experiment revealed any differences between participants who expressed a prior belief in the paranormal compared with those who did not. The paper discusses the implications of these results for the psychology of suggestion and the assessment of eyewitness testimony for anomalous events.

  9. Tension bending ratcheting tests of 304 stainless steel

    SciTech Connect

    Larson, L.D.; Jones, D.P.; Rapp, D.G.

    1996-12-31

    This paper discusses results of an experimental program conducted to investigate the strain ratcheting behavior of 304 stainless steel under various combinations of applied membrane load and displacement controlled cyclic bending strain. Tests were performed on uniaxial specimens at temperatures of 70 F (21 C) and 550 F (288 C). Bending strain, ratchet strain and axial displacement of the specimens were monitored throughout the tests. Membrane stress to monotonic yield stress ratios of 2/3, 1/2, and 1/3 were tested with pseudo-elastic bending stress to yield stress ratios ranging from 1.4 to 10.7. Test output was in the form of plots of cumulative axial membrane strain versus cycles up to the point of shakedown, i.e., the point at which no additional progressive strain was observed. Shakedown was demonstrated in the 500 F tests but not the room temperature tests. The 550 F results are shown in terms of shakedown membrane strain versus equivalent bending stress ratio for each of the tested membrane stress ratios. The cyclic and monotonic stress-strain curves for the test materials are presented to enable the use of various models for predicting the ratcheting and shakedown behavior. The results may be used to develop improved ratcheting and shakedown rules permitting a relaxation of the traditional ratcheting rules in the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel Code.

  10. 'It's still bending': verbal suggestion and alleged psychokinetic ability.

    PubMed

    Wiseman, Richard; Greening, Emma

    2005-02-01

    Some alleged psychics appear to be able to deform metallic objects, such as keys and cutlery, by thought alone. This paper describes two studies that examined whether one aspect of these demonstrations could be created by verbal suggestion. In the first study, participants were shown a videotape in which a fake psychic placed a bent key on a table. Participants in one condition heard the fake psychic suggest that the key was continuing to bend, whilst those in the other condition did not. Participants in the suggestion condition were significantly more likely to report that the key continued to bend. These findings were replicated in the second study. In addition, participants who reported that the key continued to bend displayed a significantly higher level of confidence in their testimony than others, and were significantly less likely to recall that the fake psychic had suggested the continued bending of the key. Neither experiment revealed any differences between participants who expressed a prior belief in the paranormal compared with those who did not. The paper discusses the implications of these results for the psychology of suggestion and the assessment of eyewitness testimony for anomalous events. PMID:15826327

  11. 10. MOVABLE BED SEDIMENTATION MODELS. DOGTOOTH BEND MODEL (MODEL SCALE: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    10. MOVABLE BED SEDIMENTATION MODELS. DOGTOOTH BEND MODEL (MODEL SCALE: 1' = 400' HORIZONTAL, 1' = 100' VERTICAL), AND GREENVILLE BRIDGE MODEL (MODEL SCALE: 1' = 360' HORIZONTAL, 1' = 100' VERTICAL). - Waterways Experiment Station, Hydraulics Laboratory, Halls Ferry Road, 2 miles south of I-20, Vicksburg, Warren County, MS

  12. 78 FR 34553 - Amendment of Class E Airspace; Bend, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-10

    ...., Renton, WA, 98057; telephone (425) 203-4537. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: History On March 1, 2013, the FAA... Bend, OR (78 FR 13843). Interested parties were invited to participate in this rulemaking effort by... a ``significant rule'' under DOT Regulatory Policies and Procedures (44 FR 11034; February 26,...

  13. Modelling of root growth and bending in two dimensions.

    PubMed

    Zieschang, H E; Brain, P; Barlow, P W

    1997-02-01

    A special co-ordinate system is developed for modelling the gravitropic bending of plant roots. It is based on the Local Theory of Curves in differential geometry and describes, in one dimension, growth events that may actually occur in two, or even three, dimensions. With knowledge of the spatial distributions of relative elemental growth rates (RELELs) for the upper and lower flanks of a gravistimulated root, and also their temporal dependencies, it is possible to compute the development of curvature along the root and hence describe the time-course of gravitropic bending. In addition, the RELEL distributions give information about the velocity field and the basipetal displacement of points along the root's surface. According to the Fundamental Theorem of Local Curve Theory, the x and y co-ordinates of the root in its bending plane are then determined from the associated values of local curvature and local velocity. With the aid of this model, possible mathematical growth functions that correspond to biological mechanisms involved in differential growth can be tested. Hence, the model can help not only to distinguish the role of various physiological or biophysical parameters in the bending process, but also to validate hypotheses that make assumptions concerning their relative importance. However, since the model is constructed at the level of the organ and treats the root as a fluid continuum, none of the parameters relate to cellular behaviour; the parameters must instead necessarily apply to properties that impinge on the behaviour of the external boundary of the root. PMID:11536796

  14. Fresh-stem bending of silver fir and Norway spruce.

    PubMed

    Lundström, Tor; Stoffel, Markus; Stöckli, Veronika

    2008-03-01

    The bending and growth characteristics of large fresh stems from four silver fir (Abies alba Mill.) and three Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst.) trees were studied. Twenty logs taken from different stem heights were subjected to four-point bending tests. From the bending test records, we calculated stress-strain curves, which accounted for detailed log taper, shear deformation and self weight. From these curves we determined, among other parameters, the modulus of elasticity (MOE), the modulus of rupture (MOR) and the work absorbed in bending (W). No significant differences were found between species for the wood properties examined. Values of MOE, MOR and W generally decreased with stem height, with MOR in the range of 43 to 59 MPa and MOE ranging from 10.6 to 15.6 GPa. These MOE values are twice or more those reported for stems of young Sitka spruce (Picea sitchensis (Bong.) Carr.) trees. Based on the radial growth properties measured in discs from the logs, we calculated predicted values of MOE and MOR for the stem cross section. The predictions of MOE were precise, whereas those of MOR were approximate because of a complex combination of different failure mechanisms. Methods to test and calculate MOE, MOR and W for the stems of living trees are discussed with the aim of improving analyses of tree biomechanics and assessments of forest stability protection.

  15. 2. VIEW OF CENTRAL BEND OF LOWER DIAGONAL NO. 1 ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    2. VIEW OF CENTRAL BEND OF LOWER DIAGONAL NO. 1 DRAIN, LOOKING 2932 EAST OF NORTH. - Truckee-Carson Irrigation District, Lower Diagonal No. 1 Drain, Bounded by West Gate Road & Weapons Delivery Road, Naval Air Station Fallon, Fallon, Churchill County, NV

  16. A Second Look at Brian Simon's "Bending the Rules"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cox, Sue

    2016-01-01

    In this article the author revisits an important book: Brian Simon's "Bending the Rules: the Baker reform of education." Written by a key figure in the history of the journal FORUM as well as in the history of education, Simon's book documented the features of the Education Reform Bill of 1987 (the precursor to the Education Reform Act…

  17. Design and development of a MEMS capacitive bending strain sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aebersold, J.; Walsh, K.; Crain, M.; Martin, M.; Voor, M.; Lin, J.-T.; Jackson, D.; Hnat, W.; Naber, J.

    2006-05-01

    The design, modeling, fabrication and testing of a MEMS-based capacitive bending strain sensor utilizing a comb drive is presented. This sensor is designed to be integrated with a telemetry system that will monitor changes in bending strain to assist with the diagnosis of spinal fusion. ABAQUS/CAE finite-element analysis (FEA) software was used to predict sensor actuation, capacitance output and avoid material failure. Highly doped boron silicon wafers with a low resistivity were fabricated into an interdigitated finger array employing deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) to create 150 µm sidewalls with 25 µm spacing between the adjacent fingers. The sensor was adhered to a steel beam and subjected to four-point bending to mechanically change the spacing between the interdigitated fingers as a function of strain. As expected, the capacitance output increased as an inverse function of the spacing between the interdigitated fingers. At the unstrained state, the capacitive output was 7.56 pF and increased inversely to 17.04 pF at 1571 µɛ of bending strain. The FEA and analytical models were comparable with the largest differential of 0.65 pF or 6.33% occurring at 1000 µɛ. Advantages of this design are a dice-free process without the use of expensive silicon-on-insulator (SOI) wafers.

  18. VIEW OF BEND IN CEDAR DRIVE WITH 603 CEDAR DRIVE ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF BEND IN CEDAR DRIVE WITH 603 CEDAR DRIVE ON RIGHT. VIEW FACING NORTHEAST - Camp H.M. Smith and Navy Public Works Center Manana Title VII (Capehart) Housing, Intersection of Acacia Road and Brich Circle, Pearl City, Honolulu County, HI

  19. Cumberland Extension entering Magnolia Bend in West Virginia. After passing ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Cumberland Extension entering Magnolia Bend in West Virginia. After passing over the Third Potomac and C&O Canal Crossing, the line curves over the former B&O Railroad at Bridge No. 1363, First B&O Crossing in foreground, looking northeast. - Western Maryland Railway, Cumberland Extension, Pearre to North Branch, from WM milepost 125 to 160, Pearre, Washington County, MD

  20. Bending strength model for internal spur gear teeth

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Savage, Michael; Rubadeux, K. L.; Coe, H. H.

    1995-01-01

    Internal spur gear teeth are normally stronger than pinion teeth of the same pitch and face width since external teeth are smaller at the base. However, ring gears which are narrower have an unequal addendum or are made of a material with a lower strength than that of the meshing pinion may be loaded more critically in bending. In this study, a model for the bending strength of an internal gear tooth as a function of the applied load pressure angle is presented which is based on the inscribed Lewis constant strength parabolic beam. The bending model includes a stress concentration factor and an axial compression term which are extensions of the model for an external gear tooth. The geometry of the Lewis factor determination is presented, the iteration to determine the factor is described, and the bending strength J factor is compared to that of an external gear tooth. This strength model will assist optimal design efforts for unequal addendum gears and gears of mixed materials.

  1. Water-rich bending faults at the Middle America Trench

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naif, Samer; Key, Kerry; Constable, Steven; Evans, Rob L.

    2015-09-01

    The portion of the Central American margin that encompasses Nicaragua is considered to represent an end-member system where multiple lines of evidence point to a substantial flux of subducted fluids. The seafloor spreading fabric of the incoming Cocos plate is oriented parallel to the trench such that flexural bending at the outer rise optimally reactivates a dense network of normal faults that extend several kilometers into the upper mantle. Bending faults are thought to provide fluid pathways that lead to serpentinization of the upper mantle. While geophysical anomalies detected beneath the outer rise have been interpreted as broad crustal and upper mantle hydration, no observational evidence exists to confirm that bending faults behave as fluid pathways. Here we use seafloor electromagnetic data collected across the Middle America Trench (MAT) offshore of Nicaragua to create a comprehensive electrical resistivity image that illuminates the infiltration of seawater along bending faults. We quantify porosity from the resistivity with Archie's law and find that our estimates for the abyssal plain oceanic crust are in good agreement with independent observations. As the Cocos crust traverses the outer rise, the porosity of the dikes and gabbros progressively increase from 2.7% and 0.7% to 4.8% and 1.7%, peaking within 20 km of the trench axis. We conclude that the intrusive crust subducts twice as much pore water as previously thought, significantly raising the flux of fluid to the seismogenic zone and the mantle wedge.

  2. Anomalous magnetoresistance in magnetized topological insulator cylinders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2015-05-01

    The close coupling between the spin and momentum degrees of freedom in topological insulators (TIs) presents the opportunity for the control of one to manipulate the other. The momentum can, for example, be confined on a curved surface and the spin influenced by applying a magnetic field. In this work, we study the surface states of a cylindrical TI magnetized in the x direction perpendicular to the cylindrical axis lying along the z direction. We show that a large magnetization leads to an upwards bending of the energy bands at small |kz| . The bending leads to an anomalous magnetoresistance where the transmission between two cylinders magnetized in opposite directions is higher than when the cylinders are magnetized at intermediate angles with respect to each other.

  3. Anomalous magnetoresistance in magnetized topological insulator cylinders

    SciTech Connect

    Siu, Zhuo Bin; Jalil, Mansoor B. A.

    2015-05-07

    The close coupling between the spin and momentum degrees of freedom in topological insulators (TIs) presents the opportunity for the control of one to manipulate the other. The momentum can, for example, be confined on a curved surface and the spin influenced by applying a magnetic field. In this work, we study the surface states of a cylindrical TI magnetized in the x direction perpendicular to the cylindrical axis lying along the z direction. We show that a large magnetization leads to an upwards bending of the energy bands at small |k{sub z}|. The bending leads to an anomalous magnetoresistance where the transmission between two cylinders magnetized in opposite directions is higher than when the cylinders are magnetized at intermediate angles with respect to each other.

  4. 77 FR 36012 - PPL Bell Bend, LLC; Bell Bend Nuclear Power Plant Combined License Application; Notice of Intent...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-15

    ... published in the Federal Register on January 6, 2009 (74 FR 470). On March 30, 2012, PPL submitted a revised... FR 55546; September 12, 2008). III. Discussion The purpose of this notice is to inform the public... layout, to prepare an EIS as part of the review of the Bell Bend COL application. Possible...

  5. 75 FR 71666 - Bend/Ft. Rock Ranger District; Deschutes National Forest; Deschutes County, OR; West Bend...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... Vegetation Management Project EIS AGENCY: Forest Service, USDA. ACTION: Notice of Intent To Prepare an... analysis has been initiated that takes a landscape approach to managing the vegetation to meet objectives.... Forested vegetation within the West Bend project area is outside of the Historic Range of Variability...

  6. Development of finite element analysis method for three-dimensional hot bending and direct quench (3DQ) process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kubota, Hiroaki; Tomizawa, Atsushi; Yamamoto, Kenji; Okada, Nobuhiro

    2013-05-01

    The automotive industry has been focusing on developing lighter vehicles to improve fuel economy and crash safety. In order to meet these requirements, Three Dimensional Hot Bending and Direct Quench (3DQ) Technology has been developed, which enables a manufacturer to form hollow tubular automotive parts with a tensile strength of 1,470 MPa or over. 3DQ is a type of consecutive forming that allows bending and quenching at the same time, with a tube feeding device, an induction heater, a cooling device, and a bending device. In this research, a coupled thermomechanical-metallurgical finite element analysis (FEA) method has been developed to investigate the deformation behavior and to predict the forming capability of 3DQ. In the developed FEA procedure, the temperature distribution was calculated with electro magnetic and heat transfer analysis, and the flow stress was defined by transformation models and linear mixture rule. An experimental formula was used to track the ferrite-austenite transformation, and a Koistinen-Marburger relationship was employed to describe austenite-martensite change. The simulated results were compared with the experimental measurements, and the effectiveness of the developed FEA method was confirmed. Furthermore, the deformation characteristics of 3DQ, such as the wrinkling limit and the thickness change, were investigated, and simple equations to describe them were proposed.

  7. Influence of Additional Tensile Force on Springback of Tube Under Rotary Draw Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    E, Daxin; Guan, Zhiping; Chen, Jisheng

    2012-11-01

    According to the characteristics of tube under rotary draw bending, the formulae were derived to calculate the springback angles of tubes subjected to combined bending and additional tension. Especially, as the neutral layer (NL) moves to the inner concave surface of the bend, the analytical values agree very well with the experimental results. The analysis shows that the additional tensile force causes the movement of the NL toward the bending center and makes the deformation behavior under rotary draw bending or numerically controlled (NC) bending different with that under pure bending, and also it could enlarge the springback angle if taking the movement of the NL into consideration. In some range, the springback angle would increase slightly with larger wall thickness/diameter ratio and decrease with wall thinning. The investigation could provide reference for the analysis of rotary draw bending, the design of NC tube bender and the related techniques.

  8. Effect of ball geometry on endurance limit in bending of drilled balls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Munson, H. E.

    1975-01-01

    Four designs of drilled (cylindrically hollow) balls were tested for resistance to bending fatigue. Bending fatigue has been demonstrated to be a limiting factor in previous evaluations of the drilled ball concept. A web reinforced drilled ball was most successful in resisting bending fatigue. Another design of through drilled design, involving a heavier wall than the standard reference ball, also showed significant improvement in resistance to bending fatigue.

  9. Resonant and nonresonant transmission through waveguide bends in a planar photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, S.; Benisty, H.; Rattier, M.; Weisbuch, C.; Qiu, M.; Karlsson, A.; Smith, C. J. M.; Houdré, R.; Oesterle, U.

    2001-10-01

    We have measured the near-infrared transmission spectra of 60° bends defined in two-dimensional photonic crystal waveguides consisting of three missing rows. Two limit cases are studied: a basic nonresonant bend and a bend built around a resonant lozenge cavity, which is found to exhibit peaked transmission. Finite-difference-time-domain simulations show very good agreement with the data allowing general design issues for efficient bends to be discussed.

  10. Surface effect on the elastic behavior of static bending nanowires.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Lilley, Carmen M

    2008-07-01

    The surface effect from surface stress and surface elasticity on the elastic behavior of nanowires in static bending is incorporated into Euler-Bernoulli beam theory via the Young-Laplace equation. Explicit solutions are presented to study the dependence of the surface effect on the overall Young's modulus of nanowires for three different boundary conditions: cantilever, simply supported, and fixed-fixed. The solutions indicate that the cantilever nanowires behave as softer materials when deflected while the other structures behave like stiffer materials as the nanowire cross-sectional size decreases for positive surface stresses. These solutions agree with size dependent nanowire overall Young's moduli observed from static bending tests by other researchers. This study also discusses possible reasons for variations of nanowire overall Young's moduli observed.

  11. Electrical bending actuation of gold-films with nanotextured surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwan, K. W.; Gao, P.; Martin, C. R.; Ngan, A. H. W.

    2015-01-01

    An actuating material system comprising a gold-film with nanotextured surface was fabricated. Using electroless gold plating onto a substrate of porous anodized aluminum oxide, a thin film of gold with a high density of short gold nanofibers on its surface was made. When one end of such a film was connected to an ion generator, bending was achieved upon electrical charging in air. Experiments showed that the free end of an 8 mm film could be displaced by more than 1.6 mm with a bending strain of 0.08%. In contrast with other types of thin-film artificial muscle materials, the present Au-film did not require any electrolyte to function. With the relatively easy fabrication method, this nanotextured film shows promising actuation behavior in air.

  12. Surface effect on the elastic behavior of static bending nanowires.

    PubMed

    He, Jin; Lilley, Carmen M

    2008-07-01

    The surface effect from surface stress and surface elasticity on the elastic behavior of nanowires in static bending is incorporated into Euler-Bernoulli beam theory via the Young-Laplace equation. Explicit solutions are presented to study the dependence of the surface effect on the overall Young's modulus of nanowires for three different boundary conditions: cantilever, simply supported, and fixed-fixed. The solutions indicate that the cantilever nanowires behave as softer materials when deflected while the other structures behave like stiffer materials as the nanowire cross-sectional size decreases for positive surface stresses. These solutions agree with size dependent nanowire overall Young's moduli observed from static bending tests by other researchers. This study also discusses possible reasons for variations of nanowire overall Young's moduli observed. PMID:18510370

  13. Bending and buckling behavior analysis of foamed metal circular plate.

    PubMed

    Fan, Jian Ling; Ma, Lian Sheng; Zhang, Lu; De Su, Hou

    2016-01-01

    This paper establishes a density gradient model along the thickness direction of a circular plate made of foamed material. Based on the first shear deformation plate theory, the result is deduced that the foamed metal circular plate with graded density along thickness direction yields axisymmetric bending problem under the action of uniformly distributed load, and the analytical solution is obtained by solving the governing equation directly. The analyses on two constraint conditions of edge radial clamping and simply supported show that the density gradient index and external load may affect the axisymmetric bending behavior of the plate. Then, based on the classical plate theory, the paper analyzes the behavior of axisymmetric buckling under radial pressure applied on the circular plate. Shooting method is used to obtain the critical load, and the effects of gradient nature of material properties and boundary conditions on the critical load of the plate are analyzed. PMID:27339281

  14. Bending response of Kevlar 49/epoxy beams and rings

    SciTech Connect

    Reedy, E.D. Jr.; Guess, T.R.

    1988-01-01

    Kevlar 49/epoxy laminates often exhibit substantial material nonlinearity when subjected to bending. A unidirectionally reinforced Kevlar 49 lamina is nearly linear elastic to failure in tension, however, in fiber-directed compression, it responds in a perfectly plastic-like manner once a compressive strength of roughly 20% of its tensile ultimate strength is exceeded. This combined linear tensile/nonlinear compressive behavior is the source of Kevlar 49/epoxy's flexural nonlinearity. Since Kevlar 49 reinforced laminates can often carry bending loads well above those needed to cause initial compressive yield, it is desirable to be able to predict the post-yield flexural response. In this presentation, analyses that utilize a simple idealization of compressive yielding are described and calculated results for Kevlar 49 reinforced beams and rings are compared with available data. 2 refs., 3 figs.

  15. Fatigue Testing of TBC on Structural Steel by Cyclic Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Musalek, Radek; Kovarik, Ondrej; Medricky, Jan; Curry, Nicholas; Bjorklund, Stefan; Nylen, Per

    2015-01-01

    For applications with variable loading, fatigue performance of coated parts is of utmost importance. In this study, fatigue performance of conventional structural steel coated with thermal barrier coating (TBC) was evaluated in cyclic bending mode by "SF-Test" device. Testing was carried out at each stage of the TBC preparation process, i.e., for as-received and grit-blasted substrates, as well as for samples with Ni-based bond-coat and complete TBC: bond-coat with YSZ-based top-coat. Comparison of results obtained for different loading amplitudes supplemented by fractographic analysis enabled identification of dominating failure mechanisms and demonstrated applicability of the high-frequency resonant bending test for evaluation of fatigue resistance alteration at each stage of the TBC deposition process.

  16. The bending of cell sheets--from folding to rolling.

    PubMed

    Keller, Ray; Shook, David

    2011-01-01

    The bending of cell sheets plays a major role in multicellular embryonic morphogenesis. Recent advances are leading to a deeper understanding of how the biophysical properties and the force-producing behaviors of cells are regulated, and how these forces are integrated across cell sheets during bending. We review work that shows that the dynamic balance of apical versus basolateral cortical tension controls specific aspects of invagination of epithelial sheets, and recent evidence that tissue expansion by growth contributes to neural retinal invagination in a stem cell-derived, self-organizing system. Of special interest is the detailed analysis of the type B inversion in Volvox reported in BMC Biology by Höhn and Hallmann, as this is a system that promises to be particularly instructive in understanding morphogenesis of any monolayered spheroid system. PMID:22206439

  17. Bending stresses due to torsion in cantilever box beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, Paul

    1935-01-01

    The paper beings with a brief discussion on the origin of the bending stresses in cantilever box beams under torsion. A critical survey of existing theory is followed by a summary of design formulas; this summary is based on the most complete solution published but omits all refinements considered unnecessary at the present state of development. Strain-gage tests made by NACA to obtained some experimental verification of the formulas are described next. Finally, the formulas are applied to a series of box beams previously static-tested by the U.S. Army Air Corps; the results show that the bending stresses due to torsion are responsible to a large extent for the free-edge type of failure frequently experienced in these tests.

  18. Interaction between bending and tension forces in bilayer membranes.

    PubMed Central

    Secomb, T W

    1988-01-01

    A theoretical analysis is presented of the bending mechanics of a membrane consisting of two tightly-coupled leaflets, each of which shears and bends readily but strongly resists area changes. Structures of this type have been proposed to model biological membranes such as red blood cell membrane. It is shown that when such a membrane is bent, anisotropic components of resultant membrane tension (shear stresses) are induced, even when the tension in each leaflet is isotropic. The induced shear stresses increase as the square of the membrane curvature, and become significant for moderate curvatures (when the radius of curvature is much larger than the distance between the leaflets). This effect has implications for the analysis of shape and deformation of freely suspended and flowing red blood cells. PMID:3224154

  19. DNA bending by hexamethylene-tethered ammonium ions.

    PubMed Central

    Strauss, J K; Roberts, C; Nelson, M G; Switzer, C; Maher, L J

    1996-01-01

    DNA is bent when complexed with certain proteins. We are exploring the hypothesis that asymmetric neutralization of phosphate charges will cause the DNA double helix to collapse toward the neutralized face. We have previously shown that DNA spontaneously bends toward one face of the double helix when it is partially substituted with neutral methylphosphonate linkages. We have now synthesized DNA duplexes in which cations are tethered by hexamethylene chains near specific phosphates. Electrophoretic phasing experiments demonstrate that tethering six ammonium ions on one helical face causes DNA to bend by approximately 5 degrees toward that face, in qualitative agreement with predictions. Ion pairing between tethered cations and DNA phosphates provides a new model for simulating the electrostatic consequences of phosphate neutralization by proteins. Images Fig. 4 Fig. 7 PMID:8790362

  20. Elastoswellability: Will it bend or will it buckle?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holmes, Douglas; Pandey, Anupam

    2013-03-01

    Soft mechanical structures such as biological tissues and gels exhibit motion, instabilities, and large morphological changes when subjected to external stimuli. Swelling is a robust approach for inducing structural change as it occurs naturally in humid environments and can be easily adapted for industrial design. Small volumes of fluid that interact favorably with a material can cause large, dramatic, and geometrically nonlinear deformations including beam bending, plate buckling, and surface wrinkling. In this talk we address an overarching question regarding swelling-induced deformations: will the structural change occur globally, or will it be confined to the material's surface? We introduce a materials and geometry defined transition point that describes a fluid-structure's characteristic ``elastoswellability'' lengthscale. By locally swelling unconstrained slender beams and plates with solvents of varying solubility, we identify a transition between local surface wrinkling and global structural bending.

  1. Mechanical bending behaviour of composite T-beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silva, A.; Travassos, J.; de Freitas, M. M.; Mota Soares, C. M.

    A study of the design and mechanical behavior of co-cured T-beams subjected to very high loading is presented. The T-beams were made by press molding from pre-pregs of uni-directional glass or carbon fiber and glass fabric reinforced high performant epoxy matrix. Each type of beam was instrumented with strain gauges in the web and flange in order to carry out experimental four point bending tests. Analytical and numerical studies were also performed to compare experimental versus numerical and analytical results and to establish the suitability of a simplified bending theory for statically determinate composite beams constructed from laminated composite panels. The maximum carrying loads in the beam layers were evaluated experimentally and analytically using the Tsai-Wu failure criterion. Results showing the suitability of the simplified beam theory are presented and discussed.

  2. Plastic Optical Fiber Displacement Sensor Based on Dual Cycling Bending

    PubMed Central

    Kuang, Jao-Hwa; Chen, Pao-Chuan; Chen, Yung-Chuan

    2010-01-01

    In this study, a high sensitivity and easy fabricated plastic optical fiber (POF) displacement sensor is proposed. A POF specimen subjected to dual cyclic bending is used to improve the sensitivity of the POF displacement sensor. The effects of interval between rollers, relative displacement and number of rollers on the sensitivity of the displacement sensor are analyzed both experimentally and numerically. A good agreement between the experimental measurements and numerical calculations is obtained. The results show that the interval between rollers affects sensitivity most significantly than the other design parameters. Based on the experimental data, a linear equation is derived to estimate the relationship between the power loss and the relative displacement. The difference between the estimated results and the experimental results is found to be less than 8%. The results also show that the proposed POF displacement sensor based on dual cyclic bending can be used to detect displacement accurately. PMID:22163465

  3. Bending and Torsion Load Alleviator With Automatic Reset

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    delaFuente, Horacio M. (Inventor); Eubanks, Michael C. (Inventor); Dao, Anthony X. (Inventor)

    1996-01-01

    A force transmitting load alleviator apparatus and method are provided for rotatably and pivotally driving a member to be protected against overload torsional and bending (moment) forces. The load alleviator includes at least one bias spring to resiliently bias cam followers and cam surfaces together and to maintain them in locked engagement unless a predetermined load is exceeded whereupon a center housing is pivotal or rotational with respect to a crown assembly. This pivotal and rotational movement results in frictional dissipation of the overload force by an energy dissipator. The energy dissipator can be provided to dissipate substantially more energy from the overload force than from the bias force that automatically resets the center housing and crown assembly to the normally fixed centered alignment. The torsional and bending (moment) overload levels can designed independently of each other.

  4. A new set of bending Td symmetry coordinates for MX4 molecules.

    PubMed

    Schmidling, David

    2013-12-15

    The conventional set of Td symmetry coordinates for the bending modes of MX4 molecules can lead to ambiguous geometries when displacements from equilibrium are large. It is proposed here to use internal coordinates that are haversines of the bending angles divided by their sum. The A1 representation becomes a constant, enabling recovery of the bending angles unambiguously, analytically, and without approximation.

  5. 46 CFR 56.80-15 - Heat treatment of bends and formed components.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... reference; see 46 CFR 56.01-2) may be used without a postheat treatment. (e) For other materials the heat... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Heat treatment of bends and formed components. 56.80-15... PIPING SYSTEMS AND APPURTENANCES Bending and Forming § 56.80-15 Heat treatment of bends and...

  6. 33 CFR 3.65-20 - Sector North Bend Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Sector North Bend Search and... CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-20 Sector North Bend Search and Rescue... Sector North Bend's Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone start at a point 45°12.0′ N. latitude,...

  7. 33 CFR 3.65-20 - Sector North Bend Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 33 Navigation and Navigable Waters 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Sector North Bend Search and... CAPTAIN OF THE PORT ZONES Thirteenth Coast Guard District § 3.65-20 Sector North Bend Search and Rescue... Sector North Bend's Search and Rescue Mission Coordinator Zone start at a point 45°12.0′ N. latitude,...

  8. Geomorpho-tectonic evolution of the Jamaican restraining bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domínguez-González, Leomaris; Andreani, Louis; Stanek, Klaus P.; Gloaguen, Richard

    2015-01-01

    This work applies recent advances in tectonic geomorphology in order to understand the geomorphic evolution of the Jamaican restraining bend located along the Caribbean-Gonâve-North American plate boundary. We propose a classification of landscapes according to their erosional stages. The approach is mainly based on the combination of two DEM-based geomorphic indices: the hypsometric integral which highlights elevated surfaces, and the surface roughness which increases when the relief is incised by the drainage network. River longitudinal profiles were also analyzed as the drainage network responds quickly to base-level change triggered by external forcing such as tectonics. Anomalies in river profiles (knickpoints and convex segments) were mapped using stream length-gradient (SL) and normalized steepness (ksn) indices. The results provide new insights for understanding the complex evolution of the Jamaican restraining bend. Three main morphotectonic regions were identified in Jamaica: (1) the Blue Mountain-Wagwater unit located at the eastern tip of the island, (2) the Jamaican highlands plateau which covers most of the northern and central areas and (3) the tilted block province located along the southern part of Jamaica. Each region has a specific morphological signature which marks a different stage in the Late Miocene to present evolution of the Jamaican restraining bend. The evolution of the bend is mainly associated with the western propagation of major E-trending strike-slip faults and NW-trending thrusts. In the western and central parts of Jamaica the present-day motion between the Caribbean plate and the Gonâve microplate is broadly distributed along several structures, while in the easternmost part of the island this motion seems to be almost completely accommodated along the Blue Mountain range and the Plantain-Garden Fault.

  9. New triangular and quadrilateral plate-bending finite elements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Narayanaswami, R.

    1974-01-01

    A nonconforming plate-bending finite element of triangular shape and associated quadrilateral elements are developed. The transverse displacement is approximated within the element by a quintic polynomial. The formulation takes into account the effects of transverse shear deformation. Results of the static and dynamic analysis of a square plate, with edges simply supported or clamped, are compared with exact solutions. Good accuracy is obtained in all calculations.

  10. Bending rigid molecular rods: formation of oligoproline macrocycles.

    PubMed

    Scully, Conor C G; Rai, Vishal; Poda, Gennadiy; Zaretsky, Serge; Burns, Darcy C; Houliston, R Scott; Lou, Tiantong; Yudin, Andrei K

    2012-12-01

    Bent but not broken: cyclic oligoprolines are accessed in a reaction that effectively bends rigid oligoproline peptides (see scheme; TBDMS=tert-butyldimethylsilyl). The stitching is accomplished during macrocyclization enabled by aziridine aldehydes and isocyanides. Molecular modeling studies suggest that electrostatic attraction between the termini of the linear peptide is pivotal for macrocyclization. The macrocycles were studied by circular dichroism with a polyproline II structure being observed in larger macrocycles.

  11. Bending stresses in spherically hollow ball bearing and fatigue experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Coe, H. H.; Parker, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Spherically hollow balls of 21.7, 50.0, and 56.5 percent mass reduction were operated in ball bearings and in a five-ball fatigue tester with differing outcomes. Available theoretical and experimental treatments of stresses in spherically hollow balls are reviewed and compared. Bending stresses are estimated for these spherically hollow balls to better understand the differences in ball bearing and fatigue test experience.

  12. Bending stresses in spherically hollow ball bearing and fatigue experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nypan, L. J.; Coe, H. H.; Parker, R. J.

    1975-01-01

    Spherically hollow balls of 21.7, 50.0 and 56.5 per cent mass reduction have been operated in ball bearings and in a 5-ball fatigue tester with differing outcomes. Available theoretical and experimental treatments of stresses in spherically hollow balls are reviewed and compared. Bending stresses are estimated for these spherically hollow balls to better understand the differences in ball bearing and fatigue test experience.

  13. Sensitivity analysis of static resistance of slender beam under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valeš, Jan

    2016-06-01

    The paper deals with statical and sensitivity analyses of resistance of simply supported I-beams under bending. The resistance was solved by geometrically nonlinear finite element method in the programme Ansys. The beams are modelled with initial geometrical imperfections following the first eigenmode of buckling. Imperfections were, together with geometrical characteristics of cross section, and material characteristics of steel, considered as random quantities. The method Latin Hypercube Sampling was applied to evaluate statistical and sensitivity resistance analyses.

  14. A tool for measuring the bending length in thin wires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenzini, M.; Cagnoli, G.; Cesarini, E.; Losurdo, G.; Martelli, F.; Piergiovanni, F.; Vetrano, F.; Viceré, A.

    2013-03-01

    Great effort is currently being put into the development and construction of the second generation, advanced gravitational wave detectors, Advanced Virgo and Advanced LIGO. The development of new low thermal noise suspensions of mirrors, based on the experience gained in the previous experiments, is part of this task. Quasi-monolithic suspensions with fused silica wires avoid the problem of rubbing friction introduced by steel cradle arrangements by directly welding the wires to silica blocks bonded to the mirror. Moreover, the mechanical loss level introduced by silica (ϕfs ˜ 10-7 in thin fused silica wires) is by far less than the one associated with steel. The low frequency dynamical behaviour of the suspension can be computed and optimized, provided that the wire bending shape under pendulum motion is known. Due to the production process, fused silica wires are thicker near the two ends (necks), so that analytical bending computations are very complicated. We developed a tool to directly measure the low frequency bending parameters of fused silica wires, and we tested it on the wires produced for the Virgo+ monolithic suspensions. The working principle and a set of test measurements are presented and explained.

  15. Bending strength and holding power of tibial locking screws.

    PubMed

    Lin, J; Lin, S J; Chiang, H; Hou, S M

    2001-04-01

    The bending strength and holding power of two types of specially designed tibial locking devices, a both-ends-threaded screw and an unthreaded bolt, were studied and compared with four types of commercially available tibial interlocking screws: Synthes, Howmedica, Richards, and Osteo AG. To test bending strength, the devices were inserted into a high molecular weight polyethylene tube and loaded at their midpoint by a materials testing machine to simulate a three point bending test. Single loading yielding strength and cyclic loading fatigue life were measured. To test holding power, the devices were inserted into tubes made of polyurethane foam, and their tips were loaded axially to measure pushout strength. The devices were tested with two different densities of foam materials and two different sizes of pilot holes. Insertion torque and stripping torque of the screws were measured first. Pushout tests were performed with each screw inserted with a tightness equal to 60% of its stripping torque. Test results showed that the yielding strength and the fatigue life were related closely to the inner diameter of the screws. The stripping torque predicted the pushout strength more reliably than did the insertion torque. All tested devices showed greater holding power in the foam with the higher density and with the smaller pilot holes. The both-ends-threaded screw had the highest pushout strength and a satisfactory fatigue strength. The unthreaded bolt had the highest fatigue strength but only fair holding power. Clinical studies of the use of these two types of locking devices are worthwhile.

  16. Simulation of bended planar waveguides for optical bus-couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lorenz, Lukas; Nieweglowski, Krzysztof; Wolter, Klaus-Jürgen; Bock, Karlheinz

    2016-04-01

    In our work an optical bus-coupler is proposed, which enables easy bidirectional connection between two waveguides without interrupting the bus using a core-to-core coupling principle. With bended waveguides the coupling ratio can be tuned by adjusting the overlap area of the two cores. In order to ensure large overlap areas at short coupling lengths, the waveguides have rectangular cross sections. To examine the feasibility of this coupling concept a simulation was performed, which is presented in this paper. Due to multimode waveguides, used in short range data communication, a non-sequential ray tracing simulation is reasonable. Simulations revealed that the bending of the waveguide causes a redistribution of the energy within the core. Small radii push the main energy to the outer region of the core increasing the coupling efficiency. On the other hand, at excessive lowered bend radii additional losses occur (due to a coupling into the cladding), which is why an optimum has to be found. Based on the simulation results it is possible to derive requirements and design rules for the coupling element.

  17. How a short double-stranded DNA bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shin, Jaeoh; Lee, O.-Chul; Sung, Wokyung

    2015-04-01

    A recent experiment using fluorescence microscopy showed that double-stranded DNA fragments shorter than 100 base pairs loop with the probabilities higher by the factor of 102-106 than predicted by the worm-like chain (WLC) model [R. Vafabakhsh and T. Ha, Science 337, 1101(2012)]. Furthermore, the looping probabilities were found to be nearly independent of the loop size. The results signify a breakdown of the WLC model for DNA mechanics which works well on long length scales and calls for fundamental understanding for stressed DNA on shorter length scales. We develop an analytical, statistical mechanical model to investigate what emerges to the short DNA under a tight bending. A bending above a critical level initiates nucleation of a thermally induced bubble, which could be trapped for a long time, in contrast to the bubbles in both free and uniformly bent DNAs, which are either transient or unstable. The trapped bubble is none other than the previously hypothesized kink, which releases the bending energy more easily as the contour length decreases. It leads to tremendous enhancement of the cyclization probabilities, in a reasonable agreement with experiment.

  18. Mechanical properties of orthodontic wires in tension, bending, and torsion.

    PubMed

    Drake, S R; Wayne, D M; Powers, J M; Asgar, K

    1982-09-01

    The mechanical properties of three sizes of stainless steel (SS), nickel-titanium (NT), and titanium-molybdenum (TM) orthodontic wires were studied in tension, bending, and torsion. The wires (0.016 inch, 0.017 by 0.025 inch, and 0.019 by 0.025 inch) were tested in the as-received condition. Tensile testing and stiffness testing machines along with a torsional instrument were used. Mean values and standard deviations of properties were computed. The data were analyzed statistically by analysis of variance using a factorial design. Means were ranked by a Tukey interval calculated at the 95 percent level of confidence. In tension, the stainless steel wires had the least maximum elastic strain or springback, whereas the titanium-molybdenum wires had the most. Higher values of springback indicate the capacity for an increased range of activation clinically. In bending and torsion, the stainless steel wires had the least stored energy at a fixed moment, whereas the nickel-titanium wires had the most. Spring rates in bending and torsion, however, were highest for stainless steel wires and lowest for nickel-titanium wires. A titanium-molybdenum teardrop closing loop delivered less than one half the force of a comparable stainless steel loop for similar activations. PMID:6961793

  19. Electro-active material (EAM) based bend sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    LaComb, Ronald; LaComb, Julie

    2010-04-01

    The capability to accurately estimate strain and orientation of cables in an undersea environment is important for a multitude of applications. One way to estimate the positional location of a submersed cable is to utilize a network of distributed bend sensors providing inputs to a curve fitting algorithm. In this work commercially available bend sensors are characterized for small deflections. In addition proto-type devices are presented which can potentially improve device sensitivity. Commercially available bend sensors are based upon electro-active materials and variable resistance materials. Electro-active materials (EAM) are known for their actuator functionality but certain EAMs are capable of sensing as well. New advances in materials such as Ionic Polymer Metal Composites (IPMC) are proving suitable for quasi-static sensor applications. These sensors are low power, conformal and produce directionally dependent output voltages which are linearly proportional to deflection, with voltage polarity representative of the deflection direction. IPMCs are capable of being morphed for increased sensitivity. Variable resistivity sensors are based on smart epoxy polymer and carbon loaded inks. These sensors are inexpensive and conformal and unlike EAMs provide static measurements.

  20. How two-dimensional bending can extraordinarily stiffen thin sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pini, V.; Ruz, J. J.; Kosaka, P. M.; Malvar, O.; Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J.

    2016-07-01

    Curved thin sheets are ubiquitously found in nature and manmade structures from macro- to nanoscale. Within the framework of classical thin plate theory, the stiffness of thin sheets is independent of its bending state for small deflections. This assumption, however, goes against intuition. Simple experiments with a cantilever sheet made of paper show that the cantilever stiffness largely increases with small amounts of transversal curvature. We here demonstrate by using simple geometric arguments that thin sheets subject to two-dimensional bending necessarily develop internal stresses. The coupling between the internal stresses and the bending moments can increase the stiffness of the plate by several times. We develop a theory that describes the stiffness of curved thin sheets with simple equations in terms of the longitudinal and transversal curvatures. The theory predicts experimental results with a macroscopic cantilever sheet as well as numerical simulations by the finite element method. The results shed new light on plant and insect wing biomechanics and provide an easy route to engineer micro- and nanomechanical structures based on thin materials with extraordinary stiffness tunability.

  1. How two-dimensional bending can extraordinarily stiffen thin sheets

    PubMed Central

    Pini, V.; Ruz, J. J.; Kosaka, P. M.; Malvar, O.; Calleja, M.; Tamayo, J.

    2016-01-01

    Curved thin sheets are ubiquitously found in nature and manmade structures from macro- to nanoscale. Within the framework of classical thin plate theory, the stiffness of thin sheets is independent of its bending state for small deflections. This assumption, however, goes against intuition. Simple experiments with a cantilever sheet made of paper show that the cantilever stiffness largely increases with small amounts of transversal curvature. We here demonstrate by using simple geometric arguments that thin sheets subject to two-dimensional bending necessarily develop internal stresses. The coupling between the internal stresses and the bending moments can increase the stiffness of the plate by several times. We develop a theory that describes the stiffness of curved thin sheets with simple equations in terms of the longitudinal and transversal curvatures. The theory predicts experimental results with a macroscopic cantilever sheet as well as numerical simulations by the finite element method. The results shed new light on plant and insect wing biomechanics and provide an easy route to engineer micro- and nanomechanical structures based on thin materials with extraordinary stiffness tunability. PMID:27403938

  2. Polarization sensitive beam bending using a spatially variant photonic crystal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Digaum, Jennefir L.; Pazos, Javier; Rumpf, Raymond; Chiles, Jeff; Fathpour, Sasan; Thomas, Jeremy N.; Kuebler, Stephen M.

    2015-02-01

    A spatially-variant photonic crystal (SVPC) that can control the spatial propagation of electromagnetic waves in three dimensions with high polarization sensitivity was fabricated and characterized. The geometric attributes of the SVPC lattice were spatially varied to make use of the directional phenomena of self-collimation to tightly bend an unguided beam coherently through a 90 degree angle. Both the lattice spacing and the fill factor of the SVPC were maintained to be nearly constant throughout the structure. A finite-difference frequency-domain computational method confirms that the SVPC can self-collimate and bend light without significant diffuse scatter caused by the bend. The SVPC was fabricated using multi-photon direct laser writing in the photo-polymer SU-8. Mid-infrared light having a vacuum wavelength of λ0 = 2.94 μm was used to experimentally characterize the SVPCs by scanning the sides of the structure with optical fibers and measuring the intensity of light emanating from each face. Results show that the SVPC is capable of directing power flow of one polarization through a 90-degree turn, confirming the self-collimating and polarization selective light-guiding properties of the structures.

  3. Measuring the bending of asymmetric planar EAP structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weiss, Florian M.; Zhao, Xue; Thalmann, Peter; Deyhle, Hans; Urwyler, Prabitha; Kovacs, Gabor; Müller, Bert

    2013-04-01

    The geometric characterization of low-voltage dielectric electro-active polymer (EAP) structures, comprised of nanometer thickness but areas of square centimeters, for applications such as artificial sphincters requires methods with nanometer precision. Direct optical detection is usually restricted to sub-micrometer resolution because of the wavelength of the light applied. Therefore, we propose to take advantage of the cantilever bending system with optical readout revealing a sub-micrometer resolution at the deflection of the free end. It is demonstrated that this approach allows us to detect bending of rather conventional planar asymmetric, dielectric EAP-structures applying voltages well below 10 V. For this purpose, we built 100 μm-thin silicone films between 50 nm-thin silver layers on a 25 μm-thin polyetheretherketone (PEEK) substrate. The increase of the applied voltage in steps of 50 V until 1 kV resulted in a cantilever bending that exhibits only in restricted ranges the expected square dependence. The mean laser beam displacement on the detector corresponded to 6 nm per volt. The apparatus will therefore become a powerful mean to analyze and thereby improve low-voltage dielectric EAP-structures to realize nanometer-thin layers for stack actuators to be incorporated into artificial sphincter systems for treating severe urinary and fecal incontinence.

  4. Bending-induced Symmetry Breaking of Lithiation in Germanium Nanowires

    SciTech Connect

    Gu, Meng; Yang, Hui; Perea, Daniel E.; Zhang, Jiguang; Zhang, Sulin; Wang, Chong M.

    2014-08-01

    From signal transduction of living cells to oxidation and corrosion of metals, mechanical stress intimately couples with chemical reactions, regulating these biological and physiochemical processes. The coupled effect is particularly evident in electrochemical lithiation/delithiation cycling of high-capacity electrodes, such as silicon (Si), where on one hand lithiation-generated stress mediates lithiation kinetics, and on the other electrochemical reaction rate regulates stress generation and mechanical failure of the electrodes. Here we report for the first time the evidence on the controlled lithiation in germanium nanowires (GeNWs) through external bending. Contrary to the symmetric core-shell lithiation in free-standing GeNWs, we show bending GeNWs breaks the lithiation symmetry, speeding up lithaition at the tensile side while slowing down at the compressive side of the GeNWs. The bending-induced symmetry breaking of lithiation in GeNWs is further corroborated by chemomechanical modeling. In the light of the coupled effect between lithiation kinetics and mechanical stress in the electrochemical cycling, our findings shed light on strain/stress engineering of durable high-rate electrodes and energy harvesting through mechanical motion.

  5. Fiber-optic bending sensor for cochlear implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Enbang; Yao, Jianquan

    2006-09-01

    Cochlear implantation has been proved as a great success in treating profound sensorineural deafness in both children and adults. Cochlear electrode array implantation is a complex and delicate surgical process. Surgically induced damage to the inner wall of the scala tympani could happen if the insertion angle of the electrode is incorrect and an excessive insertion force is applied to the electrode. This damage could lead to severe degeneration of the remaining neural elements. It is therefore of vital importance to monitor the shape and position of the electrode during the implantation surgery. In this paper, we report a fiber-optic bending sensor which can be integrated with the electrode and used to guide the implantation process. The sensor consists of a piece of optical fiber. The end of the fiber is coated with aluminum layer to form a mirror. Bending the fiber with the electrode introduces loss to the light transmitting in the fiber. By detecting the power of the reflected light, we can detennine the bending happened to the fiber, and consequently measure the curved shape of the electrode. Experimental results show that the proposed fiber sensor is a promising technique to make in-situ monitoring of the shape and position of the electrode during the implantation process.

  6. How two-dimensional bending can extraordinarily stiffen thin sheets.

    PubMed

    Pini, V; Ruz, J J; Kosaka, P M; Malvar, O; Calleja, M; Tamayo, J

    2016-01-01

    Curved thin sheets are ubiquitously found in nature and manmade structures from macro- to nanoscale. Within the framework of classical thin plate theory, the stiffness of thin sheets is independent of its bending state for small deflections. This assumption, however, goes against intuition. Simple experiments with a cantilever sheet made of paper show that the cantilever stiffness largely increases with small amounts of transversal curvature. We here demonstrate by using simple geometric arguments that thin sheets subject to two-dimensional bending necessarily develop internal stresses. The coupling between the internal stresses and the bending moments can increase the stiffness of the plate by several times. We develop a theory that describes the stiffness of curved thin sheets with simple equations in terms of the longitudinal and transversal curvatures. The theory predicts experimental results with a macroscopic cantilever sheet as well as numerical simulations by the finite element method. The results shed new light on plant and insect wing biomechanics and provide an easy route to engineer micro- and nanomechanical structures based on thin materials with extraordinary stiffness tunability.

  7. Ethnic Differences in Bending Stiffness of the Ulna and Tibia

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arnaud, S. B.; Liang, M. T. C.; Bassin, S.; Braun, W.; Dutto, D.; Plesums, K.; Huvnh, H. T.; Cooper, D.; Wong, N.

    2004-01-01

    There is considerable information about the variations in bone mass associated with different opportunity to compare a mechanical property of bone in young college women of Caucasian, Hispanic and Asian descent who gave informed consent to participate in an exercise study. The subjects were sedentary, in good health, eumenorrheic, non-smokers and had body mass indices (BMI) less than 30. Measurements acquired were body weight, kg, and height, cm, calcaneal and wrist bone density, g/square cm (PIXI, Lunar GE) and bending stiffness (EI, Nm(exp 2)) in the ulna and tibia. E1 was determined non-invasively with an instrument called the Mechanical Response Tissue Analyzer (MRTA) that delivers a vibratory stimulus to the center of the ulna or tibia and analyzes the response curve based on the equation E1 = k(sub b) L(exp 3)/48 where k, is lateral bending stiffness, L is the length of the bone, E is Young's modulus of elasticity and I, the bending moment of inertia. The error of the test (CV) based on measurements of an aluminum rod with a known E1 was 4.8%, of calcaneal BMD, 0.54%, and of wrist bone density, 3.45%.

  8. Combined bending and torsional fatigue of woven roving GRP

    SciTech Connect

    Aboul Wafa, M.N.; Hamdy, A.H.; El-Midany, A.A.

    1997-04-01

    A study of biaxial fatigue of woven roving glass reinforced polyester (GRP) subjected to in-phase and out-of-phase cyclic bending and torsional moments is presented. To evaluate failure theories for this material, tests were conducted on two fiber orientations [0, 90] and [45, {minus}45] tubes. The results showed that for [0, 90] composites the S-N curves in pure bending and in pure torsion are sufficient to predict life. For [45, {minus}45] tubes, the value of the normal stress interaction component of the strength tensor, H{sub 12}, has to be obtained. If the ratio of the global flexural stress amplitude, A, to the accompanied global shear stress, B, is less than 2, the value of H{sub 12} may be taken as presented by Tsai-Hahn theory. But, if A/B {ge} 2, the value of H{sub 12} has to be obtained from [45, {minus}45] pure bending S-N curve, since the failure mode is a combination of interfacial shear and matrix failure. The out-of-phase loading results showed that the life of the specimens at high stress levels is less than that for the in-phase loading with the same peak values A and B.

  9. Biomorphodynamic modelling of inner bank advance in migrating meander bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zen, Simone; Zolezzi, Guido; Toffolon, Marco; Gurnell, Angela M.

    2016-07-01

    We propose a bio-morphodynamic model at bend cross-sectional scale for the lateral migration of river meander bends, where the two banks can migrate separately as a result of the mutual interaction between river flow, sediments and riparian vegetation, particularly at the interface between the permanently wet channel and the advancing floodplain. The model combines a non-linear analytical model for the morphodynamic evolution of the channel bed, a quasi-1D model to account for flow unsteadiness, and an ecological model describing riparian vegetation dynamics. Simplified closures are included to estimate the feedbacks among vegetation, hydrodynamics and sediment transport, which affect the morphology of the river-floodplain system. Model tests reveal the fundamental role of riparian plants in generating bio-morphological patterns at the advancing floodplain margin. Importantly, they provide insight into the biophysical controls of the 'bar push' mechanism and into its role in the lateral migration of meander bends and in the temporal variations of the active channel width.

  10. How two-dimensional bending can extraordinarily stiffen thin sheets.

    PubMed

    Pini, V; Ruz, J J; Kosaka, P M; Malvar, O; Calleja, M; Tamayo, J

    2016-01-01

    Curved thin sheets are ubiquitously found in nature and manmade structures from macro- to nanoscale. Within the framework of classical thin plate theory, the stiffness of thin sheets is independent of its bending state for small deflections. This assumption, however, goes against intuition. Simple experiments with a cantilever sheet made of paper show that the cantilever stiffness largely increases with small amounts of transversal curvature. We here demonstrate by using simple geometric arguments that thin sheets subject to two-dimensional bending necessarily develop internal stresses. The coupling between the internal stresses and the bending moments can increase the stiffness of the plate by several times. We develop a theory that describes the stiffness of curved thin sheets with simple equations in terms of the longitudinal and transversal curvatures. The theory predicts experimental results with a macroscopic cantilever sheet as well as numerical simulations by the finite element method. The results shed new light on plant and insect wing biomechanics and provide an easy route to engineer micro- and nanomechanical structures based on thin materials with extraordinary stiffness tunability. PMID:27403938

  11. Optimal Recursive Digital Filters for Active Bending Stabilization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Orr, Jeb S.

    2013-01-01

    In the design of flight control systems for large flexible boosters, it is common practice to utilize active feedback control of the first lateral structural bending mode so as to suppress transients and reduce gust loading. Typically, active stabilization or phase stabilization is achieved by carefully shaping the loop transfer function in the frequency domain via the use of compensating filters combined with the frequency response characteristics of the nozzle/actuator system. In this paper we present a new approach for parameterizing and determining optimal low-order recursive linear digital filters so as to satisfy phase shaping constraints for bending and sloshing dynamics while simultaneously maximizing attenuation in other frequency bands of interest, e.g. near higher frequency parasitic structural modes. By parameterizing the filter directly in the z-plane with certain restrictions, the search space of candidate filter designs that satisfy the constraints is restricted to stable, minimum phase recursive low-pass filters with well-conditioned coefficients. Combined with optimal output feedback blending from multiple rate gyros, the present approach enables rapid and robust parametrization of autopilot bending filters to attain flight control performance objectives. Numerical results are presented that illustrate the application of the present technique to the development of rate gyro filters for an exploration-class multi-engined space launch vehicle.

  12. Dynamics of shear velocity layer with bent magnetic field lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galinsky, V. L.; Sonnerup, B. U. Ö.

    A fully three-dimensional, magnetohydro-dynamic simulation of velocity-sheared plasma flow in an ambient transverse magnetic field with bent magnetic field lines has been performed. “Ionospheric-like” boundary conditions were used for closing field-aligned currents, the two ionospheres being represented by conducting plates with constant resistivity. Compared to the standard plane 2D case with a uniform transverse magnetic field, the growth rate of the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability drops significantly as bending increases. Under conditions representative of the Earth's low latitude boundary layer, the instability may be suppressed completely by the magnetic field-line tension if the field-line bending is sufficiently strong. For weak bending, a combination of the tearing mode instability and the Kelvin-Helmholtz instability leads to the formation of localized 3D current/vortex tubes, the ionospheric foot prints of which are possible models of the auroral bright spots observed by the Viking satellite.

  13. Charge and Strain Control of Interface Magnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzsimmons, M. R.; Dumesnil, K.; Jaouen, N.; Maroutian, T.; Agnus, G.; Tonnerre, J.-M.; Kirby, B.; Fohtung, E.; Holladay, B.; Fullerton, E. E.; Shpyrko, O.; Sinha, S. K.; Wang, Q.; Chen, A.; Jia, Q. X.

    2015-03-01

    We studied the influence of an electric field applied to an La0.67Sr0.33MnO3 (LSMO) layer in a LSMO/Pb(Zr0.2Ti0.8) O3 (PZT)/Nb-doped SrTiO3 (STO) heterostructure by measuring its magnetization depth profile using resonant x-ray magnetic reflectivity. The saturation magnetization of the ferromagnetically-ordered LSMO was not affected by the direction of the polarization of the PZT. However, the ferromagnetic thickness and magnetization of the LSMO film at remanence were reduced for hole-charge accumulation at the LSMO/PZT interface. To understand the independent roles of strain and hole-doping, we performed neutron scattering experiments of La0.8Sr0.2MnO3 films grown on Nb-doped STO in which bending strain (via 4-point bending jig) or electric field (via parallel plate capacitor) was applied to the films. We observed that bending strain affects the saturation magnetization of the LSMO film, whereas electric field affects the remanent magnetization of the film. These observations suggest strain may be a more effective means to control magnetism than charge. This work has benefited from use of CINT(LANL), NIST Center for Neutron Research and the Synchrotron SOLEIL and funding from LANL/LDRD program, DOE-BES (UCSD) and DOD (NMSU).

  14. Dynamic characteristics of the rotor in a magnetically suspended control moment gyroscope with active magnetic bearing and passive magnetic bearing.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jiqiang; Xiang, Biao; Zhang, Yongbin

    2014-07-01

    For a magnetically suspended control moment gyroscope, stiffness and damping of magnetic bearing will influence modal frequency of a rotor. In this paper the relationship between modal frequency and stiffness and damping has been investigated. The mathematic calculation model of axial passive magnetic bearing (PMB) stiffness is developed. And PID control based on internal model control is introduced into control of radial active magnetic bearing (AMB), considering the radial coupling of axial PMB, a mathematic calculation model of stiffness and damping of radial AMB is established. According to modal analysis, the relationship between modal frequency and modal shapes is achieved. Radial vibration frequency is mainly influenced by stiffness of radial AMB; however, when stiffness increases, radial vibration will disappear and a high frequency bending modal will appear. Stiffness of axial PMB mainly affects the axial vibration mode, which will turn into high-order bending modal. Axial PMB causes bigger influence on torsion modal of the rotor.

  15. Bending elasticity of charged surfactant layers: the effect of mixing.

    PubMed

    Bergström, L Magnus

    2006-08-01

    Expressions have been derived from which the spontaneous curvature (H(0)), bending rigidity (k(c)), and saddle-splay constant (k(c)) of mixed monolayers and bilayers may be calculated from molecular and solution properties as well as experimentally available quantities such as the macroscopic hydrophobic-hydrophilic interfacial tension. Three different cases of binary surfactant mixtures have been treated in detail: (i) mixtures of an ionic and a nonionic surfactant, (ii) mixtures of two oppositely charged surfactants, and (iii) mixtures of two ionic surfactants with identical headgroups but different tail volumes. It is demonstrated that k(c)H(0), k(c), and k(c) for mixtures of surfactants with flexible tails may be subdivided into one contribution that is due to bending properties of an infinitely thin surface as calculated from the Poisson-Boltzmann mean field theory and one contribution appearing as a result of the surfactant film having a finite thickness with the surface of charge located somewhat outside the hydrophobic-hydrophilic interface. As a matter of fact, the picture becomes completely different as finite layer thickness effects are taken into account, and as a result, the spontaneous curvature is extensively lowered whereas the bending rigidity is raised. Furthermore, an additional contribution to k(c) is present for surfactant mixtures but is absent for k(c)H(0) and k(c). This contribution appears as a consequence of the minimization of the free energy with respect to the composition of a surfactant layer that is open in the thermodynamic sense and must always be negative (i.e., k(c) is generally found to be brought down by the process of mixing two or more surfactants). The magnitude of the reduction of k(c) increases with increasing asymmetry between two surfactants with respect to headgroup charge number and tail volume. As a consequence, the bending rigidity assumes the lowest values for layers formed in mixtures of two oppositely charged

  16. In situ transmission electron microscopy of individual carbon nanotetrahedron/ribbon structures in bending

    SciTech Connect

    Kohno, Hideo; Masuda, Yusuke

    2015-05-11

    When the direction of flattening of a carbon nanotube changes during growth mediated by a metal nanoparticle, a carbon nanotetrahedron is formed in the middle of the carbon nanoribbon. We report the bending properties of the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure using a micro-manipulator system in a transmission electron microscope. In many cases, bending occurs at an edge of the carbon nanotetrahedron. No significant change is observed in the tetrahedron's shape during bending, and the bending is reversible and repeatable. Our results show that the carbon nanotetrahedron/nanoribbon structure has good durability against mechanical bending.

  17. Accurate Determination of Torsion and Pure Bending Moment for Viscoelastic Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yun-Che; Ko, Chih-Chin; Shiau, Li-Ming

    Measurements of time-dependent material properties in the context of linear viscoelasticity, at a given frequency and temperature, require accurate determination of both loading and deformation that are subjected to the testing materials. A pendulum-type viscoelastic spectroscopy is developed to experimentally measure loss tangent and the magnitude of dynamic modulus of solid materials. The mechanical system of the device is based on the behavior of the cantilever beam, and torsion and pure bending moment are generated from the interaction between a permanent magnet and the Helmholtz coils. The strength of the magnetic interactions may be determined with a material with known mechanical properties, such as aluminum 6061T4 alloy. The sensitivity of the torque measurement is on the order of one micro N-m level. With the high accurate torque measurement and deformation detection from a laser-based displacement measurement system, viscoelastic properties of materials can be experimentally measured in different frequency regimes. Sinusoidal driving signals are adopted for measuring complex modulus in the sub-resonant regime, and dc bias driving for creep tests in the low frequency limit. At structural resonant frequencies, the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) method or Lorentzian curve fitting method is adopted to extract material properties. The completion of determining material properties in the wide frequency spectrum may help to identify the deformation mechanisms of the material and to create better models for simulation work.

  18. Design of a Cosine-theta Dipole Magnet Wound with Coated Conductors Considering their Deformation at Coil ends During Winding Process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amemiya, Naoyuki; Miyahara, Hidetoshi; Ogitsu, Toru; Kurusu, Tsutomu

    By using differential geometry, we modeled the three-dimensional shapes of the coil ends of cosine-theta magnets while considering local edge-wise bend, local flat-wise bend, and torsion of coated conductors. We focus on the feasibility of winding coil ends against the stress caused by bending. We discussed the feasibility of winding based on two assumptions to form coil ends: all turns of coated conductors are free from edge-wise bend; faces of all turns of coated conductors are completely parallel. Using the first assumption, we designed a cosine-theta dipole magnet wound with coated conductors.

  19. Geologic map of Big Bend National Park, Texas

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Turner, Kenzie J.; Berry, Margaret E.; Page, William R.; Lehman, Thomas M.; Bohannon, Robert G.; Scott, Robert B.; Miggins, Daniel P.; Budahn, James R.; Cooper, Roger W.; Drenth, Benjamin J.; Anderson, Eric D.; Williams, Van S.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this map is to provide the National Park Service and the public with an updated digital geologic map of Big Bend National Park (BBNP). The geologic map report of Maxwell and others (1967) provides a fully comprehensive account of the important volcanic, structural, geomorphological, and paleontological features that define BBNP. However, the map is on a geographically distorted planimetric base and lacks topography, which has caused difficulty in conducting GIS-based data analyses and georeferencing the many geologic features investigated and depicted on the map. In addition, the map is outdated, excluding significant data from numerous studies that have been carried out since its publication more than 40 years ago. This report includes a modern digital geologic map that can be utilized with standard GIS applications to aid BBNP researchers in geologic data analysis, natural resource and ecosystem management, monitoring, assessment, inventory activities, and educational and recreational uses. The digital map incorporates new data, many revisions, and greater detail than the original map. Although some geologic issues remain unresolved for BBNP, the updated map serves as a foundation for addressing those issues. Funding for the Big Bend National Park geologic map was provided by the United States Geological Survey (USGS) National Cooperative Geologic Mapping Program and the National Park Service. The Big Bend mapping project was administered by staff in the USGS Geology and Environmental Change Science Center, Denver, Colo. Members of the USGS Mineral and Environmental Resources Science Center completed investigations in parallel with the geologic mapping project. Results of these investigations addressed some significant current issues in BBNP and the U.S.-Mexico border region, including contaminants and human health, ecosystems, and water resources. Funding for the high-resolution aeromagnetic survey in BBNP, and associated data analyses and

  20. On the bending algorithms for soft objects in flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guckenberger, Achim; Schraml, Marcel P.; Chen, Paul G.; Leonetti, Marc; Gekle, Stephan

    2016-10-01

    One of the most challenging aspects in the accurate simulation of three-dimensional soft objects such as vesicles or biological cells is the computation of membrane bending forces. The origin of this difficulty stems from the need to numerically evaluate a fourth order derivative on the discretized surface geometry. Here we investigate six different algorithms to compute membrane bending forces, including regularly used methods as well as novel ones. All are based on the same physical model (due to Canham and Helfrich) and start from a surface discretization with flat triangles. At the same time, they differ substantially in their numerical approach. We start by comparing the numerically obtained mean curvature, the Laplace-Beltrami operator of the mean curvature and finally the surface force density to analytical results for the discocyte resting shape of a red blood cell. We find that none of the considered algorithms converges to zero error at all nodes and that for some algorithms the error even diverges. There is furthermore a pronounced influence of the mesh structure: Discretizations with more irregular triangles and node connectivity present serious difficulties for most investigated methods. To assess the behavior of the algorithms in a realistic physical application, we investigate the deformation of an initially spherical capsule in a linear shear flow at small Reynolds numbers. To exclude any influence of the flow solver, two conceptually very different solvers are employed: the Lattice-Boltzmann and the Boundary Integral Method. Despite the largely different quality of the bending algorithms when applied to the static red blood cell, we find that in the actual flow situation most algorithms give consistent results for both hydrodynamic solvers. Even so, a short review of earlier works reveals a wide scattering of reported results for, e.g., the Taylor deformation parameter. Besides the presented application to biofluidic systems, the investigated

  1. Composite Bending Box Section Modal Vibration Fault Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werlink, Rudy

    2002-01-01

    One of the primary concerns with Composite construction in critical structures such as wings and stabilizers is that hidden faults and cracks can develop operationally. In the real world, catastrophic sudden failure can result from these undetected faults in composite structures. Vibration data incorporating a broad frequency modal approach, could detect significant changes prior to failure. The purpose of this report is to investigate the usefulness of frequency mode testing before and after bending and torsion loading on a composite bending Box Test section. This test article is representative of construction techniques being developed for the recent NASA Blended Wing Body Low Speed Vehicle Project. The Box section represents the construction technique on the proposed blended wing aircraft. Modal testing using an impact hammer provides an frequency fingerprint before and after bending and torsional loading. If a significant structural discontinuity develops, the vibration response is expected to change. The limitations of the data will be evaluated for future use as a non-destructive in-situ method of assessing hidden damage in similarly constructed composite wing assemblies. Modal vibration fault detection sensitivity to band-width, location and axis will be investigated. Do the sensor accelerometers need to be near the fault and or in the same axis? The response data used in this report was recorded at 17 locations using tri-axial accelerometers. The modal tests were conducted following 5 independent loading conditions before load to failure and 2 following load to failure over a period of 6 weeks. Redundant data was used to minimize effects from uncontrolled variables which could lead to incorrect interpretations. It will be shown that vibrational modes detected failure at many locations when skin de-bonding failures occurred near the center section. Important considerations are the axis selected and frequency range.

  2. Reversible Bending Fatigue Testing on Zry-4 Surrogate Rods

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Jy-An John; Wang, Hong; Bevard, Bruce Balkcom; Howard, Rob L

    2014-01-01

    Testing high-burnup spent nuclear fuel (SNF) presents many challenges in areas such as specimen preparation, specimen installation, mechanical loading, load control, measurements, data acquisition, and specimen disposal because these tasks are complicated by the radioactivity of the test specimens. Research and comparison studies conducted at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) resulted in a new concept in 2010 for a U-frame testing setup on which to perform hot-cell reversible bending fatigue testing. Subsequently, the three-dimensional finite element analysis and the engineering design of components were completed. In 2013 the ORNL team finalized the upgrade of the U-frame testing setup and the integration of the U-frame setup into a Bose dual linear motor test bench to develop a cyclic integrated reversible-bending fatigue tester (CIRFT). A final check was conducted on the CIRFT test system in August 2013, and the CIRFT was installed in the hot cell in September 2013 to evaluate both the static and dynamic mechanical response of SNF rods under simulated loads. The fatigue responses of Zircaloy-4 (Zry-4) cladding and the role of pellet pellet and pellet clad interactions are critical to SNF vibration integrity, but such data are not available due to the unavailability of an effective testing system. While the deployment of the developed CIRFT test system in a hot cell will provide the opportunity to generate the data, the use of a surrogate rod has proven quite effective in identifying the underlying deformation mechanism of an SNF composite rod under an equivalent loading condition. This paper presents the experimental results of using surrogate rods under CIRFT reversible cyclic loading. Specifically, monotonic and cyclic bending tests were conducted on surrogate rods made of a Zry-4 tube and alumina pellet inserts, both with and without an epoxy bond.

  3. Particle deposition in ventilation ducts: Connectors, bends anddeveloping flow

    SciTech Connect

    Sippola, Mark R.; Nazaroff, William W.

    2004-03-01

    In ventilation duct flow the turbulent flow profile is commonly disturbed or not fully developed and these conditions are likely to influence particle deposition to duct surfaces. Particle deposition rates at eight S-connectors, in two 90{sup o} duct bends and in two ducts where the turbulent flow profile was not fully developed were measured in a laboratory duct system with both galvanized steel and internally insulated ducts with hydraulic diameters of 15.2 cm. In the steel duct system, experiments with nominal particle diameters of 1, 3, 5, 9 and 16 {micro}m were conducted at each of three nominal air speeds: 2.2, 5.3 and 9.0 m/s. In the insulated duct system, deposition of particles with nominal diameters of 1, 3, 5, 8 and 13 {micro}m was measured at nominal air speeds of 2.2, 5.3 and 8.8 m/s. Fluorescent techniques were used to directly measure the deposition velocities of monodisperse fluorescent particles to duct surfaces. Deposition at S-connectors, in bends and in straight ducts with developing turbulence was often greater than deposition in straight ducts with fully developed turbulence for equal particle sizes, air speeds and duct surface orientations. Deposition rates at all locations were found to increase with an increase in particle size or air speed. High deposition rates at S-connectors resulted from impaction and these rates were nearly independent of the orientation of the S-connector. Deposition rates in the two 90{sup o} bends differed by more than an order of magnitude in some cases, probably because of the difference in turbulence conditions at the bend inlets. In straight steel ducts where the turbulent flow profile was developing, the deposition enhancement relative to fully developed turbulence generally increased with air speed and decreased with downstream distance from the duct inlet. This enhancement was greater at the duct ceiling and wall than at the duct floor. In insulated ducts, deposition enhancement was less pronounced overall

  4. Wake-induced bending of two-dimensional plasma crystals

    SciTech Connect

    Röcker, T. B. Ivlev, A. V. Zhdanov, S. K.; Morfill, G. E.; Couëdel, L.

    2014-07-15

    It is shown that the wake-mediated interactions between microparticles in a two-dimensional plasma crystal affect the shape of the monolayer, making it non-flat. The equilibrium shape is calculated for various distributions of the particle number density in the monolayer. For typical experimental conditions, the levitation height of particles in the center of the crystal can be noticeably smaller than at the periphery. It is suggested that the effect of wake-induced bending can be utilized in experiments, to deduce important characteristics of the interparticle interaction.

  5. Determining a bends-preventing pressure for a space suit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krutz, R. W., Jr.; Webb, J. T.; Dixon, G. A.

    1989-01-01

    Research conducted to determine the proper pressure for preventing bends during EVA without preoxygenation is examined. Male and female subjects with different breathing gas mixtures and pressures are studied in order to define the pressure. Visual and auditory Doppler ultrasonic signals are utilized to monitor intravascular gas bubbles. The workload, which simulates EVA, consists of a handturned bicycle ergometer, a torque wrench operation, and a rope pull. The experimental data reveal that the minimum space suit pressure needed to prevent decompression sickness is 9.5 psi.

  6. Side cracked plated subject to combined direct and bending forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Srawley, J. E.; Gross, B.

    1975-01-01

    The opening mode stress intensity factor and the associated crack mouth displacement are comprehensively treated using planar boundary collocation results supplemented by end point values from the literature. Data are expressed in terms of dimensionless coefficients of convenient form which are each functions of two dimensionless parameters, the relative crack length, and a load combination parameter which uniquely characterizes all possible combinations of tension or compression with bending or counterbending. Accurate interpolation expressions are provided which cover the entire ranges of both parameters. Application is limited to specimens with ratios of effective half-height to width not less than unity.

  7. The effect of bending on the stresses in adhesive joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yuceoglu, U.; Updike, D. P.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of stress distribution in adhesive joints where two orthotropic plates are bonded through a flexible adhesive layer is analyzed. It is shown that the effect of bending of the adherends on the stresses in the adhesive layer is very significant. The transverse shear deformations of the adherends appear to have little influence on the adhesive layer stresses. The maximum transverse normal stress in the adhesive is shown to be larger than the maximum longitudinal shear stress. The method of solution is applied to several examples of specific joint geometries and material combinations, and is proven to be applicable to other related problems.

  8. Bending modulus of bidisperse particle rafts: Local and collective contributions.

    PubMed

    Petit, Pauline; Biance, Anne-Laure; Lorenceau, Elise; Planchette, Carole

    2016-04-01

    The bending modulus of air-water interfaces covered by a monolayer of bidisperse particles is probed experimentally under quasistatic conditions via the compression of the monolayer, and under dynamical conditions studying capillary-wave propagation. Simple averaging of the modulus obtained solely with small or large particles fails to describe our data. Indeed, as observed in other configurations for monodisperse systems, bidisperse rafts have both a granular and an elastic character: chain forces and collective effects must be taken into account to fully understand our results.

  9. Cumulative sperm whale bone damage and the bends.

    PubMed

    Moore, Michael J; Early, Greg A

    2004-12-24

    Diving mosasaurs, plesiosaurs, and humans develop dysbaric osteonecrosis from end-artery nitrogen embolism ("the bends") in certain bones. Sixteen sperm whales from calves to large adults showed a size-related development of osteonecrosis in chevron and rib bone articulations, deltoid crests, and nasal bones. Occurrence in animals from the Pacific and Atlantic oceans over 111 years made a pathophysiological diagnosis of dysbarism most likely. Decompression avoidance therefore may constrain diving behavior. This suggests why some deep-diving mammals show periodic shallow-depth activity and why gas emboli are found in animals driven to surface precipitously by acoustic stressors such as mid-frequency sonar systems.

  10. Workshop proceedings: U-bend tube cracking in steam generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shoemaker, C. E.

    1981-06-01

    A design to reduce the rate of tube failure in high pressure feedwater heaters, a number of failed drawn and stress relieved Monel 400 U-bend tubes removed from three high pressure feedwater heaters was examined. Steam extracted from the turbine is used to preheat the boiler feedwater in fossil fuel fired steam plants to improve thermal efficiency. This is accomplished in a series of heaters between the condenser hot well and the boiler. The heaters closest to the boiler handle water at high pressure and temperature. Because of the severe service conditions, high pressure feedwater heaters are frequently tubed with drawn and stress relieved Monel 400.

  11. Evaluation of spinal instrumentation rod bending characteristics for in-situ contouring.

    PubMed

    Noshchenko, Andriy; Xianfeng, Yao; Armour, Grant Alan; Baldini, Todd; Patel, Vikas V; Ayers, Reed; Burger, Evalina

    2011-07-01

    Bending characteristics were studied in rods used for spinal instrumentation at in-situ contouring conditions. Five groups of five 6 mm diameter rods made from: cobalt alloy (VITALLIUM), titanium-aluminum-vanadium alloy (SDI™), β-titanium alloy (TNTZ), cold worked stainless steel (STIFF), and annealed stainless steel (MALLEABLE) were studied. The bending procedure was similar to that typically applied for in-situ contouring in the operating room and included two bending cycles: first--bending to 21-24° under load with further release of loading for 10 min, and second--bending to 34-37° at the previously bent site and release of load for 10 min. Applied load, bending stiffness, and springback effect were studied. Statistical evaluation included ANOVA, correlation and regression analysis. TNTZ and SDI™ rods showed the highest (p < 0.05) springback at both bending cycles. VITALLIUM and STIFF rods showed mild springback (p < 0.05). The least (p < 0.05) springback was observed in the MALLEABLE rods. Springback significantly correlated with the bend angle under load (p < 0.001). To reach the necessary bend angle after unloading, over bending should be 37-40% of the required angle in TNTZ and SDI™ rods, 27-30% in VITALLIUM and STIFF rods, and around 20% in MALLEABLE rods. PMID:21563305

  12. Bend insensitive graded index multimode polymer optical waveguides fabricated using the Mosquito method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, Asami; Ishigure, Takaaki

    2015-02-01

    We fabricate low-loss graded index (GI) circular core multimode polymer optical waveguides with 90o bending and demonstrate low bending loss even if the bend radius is as small as 1 mm. In the several fabrication methods for GI-core polymer waveguides already proposed, we adopt the "Mosquito method" that utilize a microdispenser because the Mosquito method makes it possible to fabricate waveguides directly on board at desired places on a printed circuit board, and to draw various patterns of cores including curves. However, in the waveguides including such curved cores, the additional transmission loss due to the bending (bending loss) is a concern. Thus, we characterize the fabricated GI-core polymer waveguides with bending: using two kinds of cladding monomer with different refractive indexes for fabricating waveguides with bending. We found when the NA of waveguides was as high as 0.35, no additional loss due to bending was observed even if the bending radius is as small as 1 mm. The core diameter of the fabricated waveguides is 50 μm, and it is possible to further decrease the bending loss in the waveguides with smaller core diameter. Furthermore, utilizing the Mosquito method, we fabricate waveguides with not only horizontally curved cores but also vertically curved ones. Waveguides with vertically curved cores could make it possible to realize three-dimensionally optical wiring applicable to on-board optical interconnects.

  13. DNA bending propensity in the presence of base mismatches: implications for DNA repair.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Monika; Predeus, Alexander V; Mukherjee, Shayantani; Feig, Michael

    2013-05-23

    DNA bending is believed to facilitate the initial recognition of the mismatched base for repair. The repair efficiencies are dependent on both the mismatch type and neighboring nucleotide sequence. We have studied bending of several DNA duplexes containing canonical matches: A:T and G:C; various mismatches: A:A, A:C, G:A, G:G, G:T, C:C, C:T, and T:T; and a bis-abasic site: X:X. Free-energy profiles were generated for DNA bending using umbrella sampling. The highest energetic cost associated with DNA bending is observed for canonical matches while bending free energies are lower in the presence of mismatches, with the lowest value for the abasic site. In all of the sequences, DNA duplexes bend toward the major groove with widening of the minor groove. For homoduplexes, DNA bending is observed to occur via smooth deformations, whereas for heteroduplexes, kinks are observed at the mismatch site during strong bending. In general, pyrimidine:pyrimidine mismatches are the most destabilizing, while purine:purine mismatches lead to intermediate destabilization, and purine:pyrimidine mismatches are the least destabilizing. The ease of bending is partially correlated with the binding affinity of MutS to the mismatch pairs and subsequent repair efficiencies, indicating that intrinsic DNA bending propensities are a key factor of mismatch recognition.

  14. A Novel Low-Cost, Large Curvature Bend Sensor Based on a Bowden-Cable.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Useok; Cho, Kyu-Jin

    2016-06-24

    Bend sensors have been developed based on conductive ink, optical fiber, and electronic textiles. Each type has advantages and disadvantages in terms of performance, ease of use, and cost. This study proposes a new and low-cost bend sensor that can measure a wide range of accumulated bend angles with large curvatures. This bend sensor utilizes a Bowden-cable, which consists of a coil sheath and an inner wire. Displacement changes of the Bowden-cable's inner wire, when the shape of the sheath changes, have been considered to be a position error in previous studies. However, this study takes advantage of this position error to detect the bend angle of the sheath. The bend angle of the sensor can be calculated from the displacement measurement of the sensing wire using a Hall-effect sensor or a potentiometer. Simulations and experiments have shown that the accumulated bend angle of the sensor is linearly related to the sensor signal, with an R-square value up to 0.9969 and a root mean square error of 2% of the full sensing range. The proposed sensor is not affected by a bend curvature of up to 80.0 m(-1), unlike previous bend sensors. The proposed sensor is expected to be useful for various applications, including motion capture devices, wearable robots, surgical devices, or generally any device that requires an affordable and low-cost bend sensor.

  15. A Novel Low-Cost, Large Curvature Bend Sensor Based on a Bowden-Cable

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Useok; Cho, Kyu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Bend sensors have been developed based on conductive ink, optical fiber, and electronic textiles. Each type has advantages and disadvantages in terms of performance, ease of use, and cost. This study proposes a new and low-cost bend sensor that can measure a wide range of accumulated bend angles with large curvatures. This bend sensor utilizes a Bowden-cable, which consists of a coil sheath and an inner wire. Displacement changes of the Bowden-cable’s inner wire, when the shape of the sheath changes, have been considered to be a position error in previous studies. However, this study takes advantage of this position error to detect the bend angle of the sheath. The bend angle of the sensor can be calculated from the displacement measurement of the sensing wire using a Hall-effect sensor or a potentiometer. Simulations and experiments have shown that the accumulated bend angle of the sensor is linearly related to the sensor signal, with an R-square value up to 0.9969 and a root mean square error of 2% of the full sensing range. The proposed sensor is not affected by a bend curvature of up to 80.0 m−1, unlike previous bend sensors. The proposed sensor is expected to be useful for various applications, including motion capture devices, wearable robots, surgical devices, or generally any device that requires an affordable and low-cost bend sensor. PMID:27347959

  16. A Novel Low-Cost, Large Curvature Bend Sensor Based on a Bowden-Cable.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Useok; Cho, Kyu-Jin

    2016-01-01

    Bend sensors have been developed based on conductive ink, optical fiber, and electronic textiles. Each type has advantages and disadvantages in terms of performance, ease of use, and cost. This study proposes a new and low-cost bend sensor that can measure a wide range of accumulated bend angles with large curvatures. This bend sensor utilizes a Bowden-cable, which consists of a coil sheath and an inner wire. Displacement changes of the Bowden-cable's inner wire, when the shape of the sheath changes, have been considered to be a position error in previous studies. However, this study takes advantage of this position error to detect the bend angle of the sheath. The bend angle of the sensor can be calculated from the displacement measurement of the sensing wire using a Hall-effect sensor or a potentiometer. Simulations and experiments have shown that the accumulated bend angle of the sensor is linearly related to the sensor signal, with an R-square value up to 0.9969 and a root mean square error of 2% of the full sensing range. The proposed sensor is not affected by a bend curvature of up to 80.0 m(-1), unlike previous bend sensors. The proposed sensor is expected to be useful for various applications, including motion capture devices, wearable robots, surgical devices, or generally any device that requires an affordable and low-cost bend sensor. PMID:27347959

  17. Sensor enabled closed-loop bending control of soft beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Case, Jennifer C.; White, Edward L.; Kramer, Rebecca K.

    2016-04-01

    Control of soft-bodied systems is challenging, as the absence of rigidity typically implies distributed deformations and infinite degrees-of-freedom. In this paper, we demonstrate closed-loop control of three elastomer beams that vary in bending stiffness. The most stiff beam is comprised of a single prismatic structure made from a single elastomer. In the next beam, increased flexibility is introduced via an indentation in the elastomer, forming a joint. The most flexible beam uses a softer elastomer in the joint section, along with an indentation. An antagonistic pair of actuators bend the joint while a pair of liquid-metal-embedded strain sensors provide angle feedback to a control loop. We were able to achieve control of the system with a proportional-integral-derivative control algorithm. The procedure we demonstrate in this work is not dependent on actuator and sensor choice and could be applied to to other hardware systems, as well as more complex multi-joint robotic structures in the future.

  18. Weakly Charged Cationic Nanoparticles Induce DNA Bending and Strand Separation

    SciTech Connect

    Railsback, Justin; Singh, Abhishek; Pearce, Ryan; McKnight, Timothy E; Collazo, Ramon; Sitar, Zlatko; Yingling, Yaroslava; Melechko, Anatoli Vasilievich

    2012-01-01

    The understanding of interactions between double stranded (ds) DNA and charged nanoparticles will have a broad bearing on many important applications from drug delivery [ 1 4 ] to DNAtemplated metallization. [ 5 , 6 ] Cationic nanoparticles (NPs) can bind to DNA, a negatively charged molecule, through a combination of electrostatic attraction, groove binding, and intercalation. Such binding events induce changes in the conformation of a DNA strand. In nature, DNA wraps around a cylindrical protein assembly (diameter and height of 6 nm) [ 7 ] with an 220 positive charge, [ 8 ] creating the complex known as chromatin. Wrapping and bending of DNA has also been achieved in the laboratory through the binding of highly charged species such as molecular assemblies, [ 9 , 10 ] cationic dendrimers, [ 11 , 12 ] and nanoparticles. [ 13 15 ] The charge of a nanoparticle plays a crucial role in its ability to induce DNA structural changes. If a nanoparticle has a highly positive surface charge density, the DNA is likely to wrap and bend upon binding to the nanoparticle [ 13 ] (as in the case of chromatin). On the other hand, if a nanoparticle is weakly charged it will not induce dsDNA compaction. [ 9 , 10 , 15 ] Consequently, there is a transition zone from extended to compact DNA conformations which depends on the chemical nature of the nanoparticle and occurs for polycations with charges between 5 and 10. [ 9 ] While the interactions between highly charged NPs and DNA have been extensively studied, the processes that occur within the transition zone are less explored.

  19. Optical guiding and beam bending in free-electron lasers

    SciTech Connect

    Scharlemann, E.T.

    1987-01-01

    The electron beam in a free-electron laser (FEL) can act as an optical fiber, guiding or bending the optical beam. The refractive and gain effects of the bunched electron beam can compensate for diffraction, making possible wigglers that are many Rayleigh ranges (i.e., characteristic diffraction lengths) long. The origin of optical guiding can be understood by examining gain and refractive guiding in a fiber with a complex index of refraction, providing a mathematical description applicable also to the FEL, with some extensions. In the exponential gain regime of the FEL, the electron equations of motion must be included, but a self-consistent description of exponential gain with diffraction fully included becomes possible. The origin of the effective index of refraction of an FEL is illustrated with a simple example of bunched, radiating dipoles. Some of the properties of the index of refraction are described. The limited experimental evidence for optical beam bending is summarized. The evidence does not yet provide conclusive proof of the existence of optical guiding, but supports the idea. Finally, the importance of refractive guiding for the performance of a high-gain tapered-wiggler FEL amplifier is illustrated with numerical simulations.

  20. The first ANDES elements: 9-DOF plate bending triangles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Militello, Carmelo; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1991-01-01

    New elements are derived to validate and assess the assumed natural deviatoric strain (ANDES) formulation. This is a brand new variant of the assumed natural strain (ANS) formulation of finite elements, which has recently attracted attention as an effective method for constructing high-performance elements for linear and nonlinear analysis. The ANDES formulation is based on an extended parametrized variational principle developed in recent publications. The key concept is that only the deviatoric part of the strains is assumed over the element whereas the mean strain part is discarded in favor of a constant stress assumption. Unlike conventional ANS elements, ANDES elements satisfy the individual element test (a stringent form of the patch test) a priori while retaining the favorable distortion-insensitivity properties of ANS elements. The first application of this formulation is the development of several Kirchhoff plate bending triangular elements with the standard nine degrees of freedom. Linear curvature variations are sampled along the three sides with the corners as gage reading points. These sample values are interpolated over the triangle using three schemes. Two schemes merge back to conventional ANS elements, one being identical to the Discrete Kirchhoff Triangle (DKT), whereas the third one produces two new ANDES elements. Numerical experiments indicate that one of the ANDES element is relatively insensitive to distortion compared to previously derived high-performance plate-bending elements, while retaining accuracy for nondistorted elements.

  1. Composite failure prediction of π-joint structures under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Hong-mei; Yuan, Shen-fang

    2012-03-01

    In this article, the composite -joint is investigated under bending loads. The "L" preform is the critical component regarding composite -joint failure. The study is presented in the failure detection of a carbon fiber composite -joint structure under bending loads using fiber Bragg grating (FBG) sensor. Firstly, based on the general finite element method (FEM) software, the 3-D finite element (FE) model of composite -joint is established, and the failure process and every lamina failure load of composite -joint are investigated by maximum stress criteria. Then, strain distributions along the length of FBG are extracted, and the reflection spectra of FBG are calculated according to the strain distribution. Finally, to verify the numerical results, a test scheme is performed and the experimental spectra of FBG are recorded. The experimental results indicate that the failure sequence and the corresponding critical loads of failure are consistent with the numerical predictions, and the computational error of failure load is less than 6.4%. Furthermore, it also verifies the feasibility of the damage detection system.

  2. Bending mechanics of the red-eared slider turtle carapace.

    PubMed

    Achrai, Ben; Bar-On, Benny; Wagner, H Daniel

    2014-02-01

    The turtle shell is a natural shield that possesses complex hierarchical structure, giving rise to superior mechanical properties. The keratin-covered boney top (dorsal) part of the shell, termed carapace, is composed of rigid sandwich-like ribs made of a central foam-like interior flanked by two external cortices. The ribs are attached to one another in a 3-D interdigitated manner at soft unmineralized collagenous sutures. This unique structural combination promotes sophisticated mechanical response upon predator attacks. In the present study mechanical bending tests were performed to examine the static behavior of the red-eared slider turtle carapace, in different orientations and from various locations, as well as from whole-rib and sub-layer regions. In addition, the suture properties were evaluated as well and compared with those of the rib. A simplified classical analysis was used here to rationalize the experimental results of the whole rib viewed as a laminated composite. The measured strength (~300MPa) and bending modulus (~7-8.5GPa) of the rib were found to be of the same order of magnitude as the strength and modulus of the cortices. The theoretical prediction of the ribs' moduli, predicted in terms of the individual sub-layers moduli, agreed well with the experimental results. The suture regions were found to be more compliant and weaker than the ribs, but comparatively tough, likely due to the interlocking design of the boney zigzag elements. PMID:24333673

  3. Overall Thermal Performance of Flexible Piping Under Simulated Bending Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, S. D.; Demko, J. A.; Thompson, Karen (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Flexible, vacuum-insulated transfer lines for low-temperature applications have higher thermal losses than comparable rigid lines. Typical flexible piping construction uses corrugated tubes, inner and outer, with a multilayer insulation (MLI) system in the annular space. Experiments on vacuum insulation systems in a flexible geometry were conducted at the Cryogenics Test Laboratory of NASA Kennedy Space Center. The effects of bending were simulated by causing the inner tube to be eccentric with the outer tube. The effects of spacers were simulated in a controlled way by inserting spacer tubes for the length of the cylindrical test articles. Two material systems, standard MLI and a layered composite insulation (LCI), were tested under the full range of vacuum levels using a liquid nitrogen boiloff calorimeter to determine the apparent thermal conductivity (k-value). The results indicate that the flexible piping under simulated bending conditions significantly degrades the thermal performance of the insulation system. These data are compared to standard MLI for both straight and flexible piping configurations. The definition of an overall k-value for actual field installations (k(sub oafi)) is described for use in design and analysis of cryogenic piping systems.

  4. Dynamic bending compensation while focusing through a multimode fiber.

    PubMed

    Farahi, Salma; Ziegler, David; Papadopoulos, Ioannis N; Psaltis, Demetri; Moser, Christophe

    2013-09-23

    Multimode fiber endoscopes have recently been shown to provide sub-micrometer resolution, however, imaging through a multimode fiber is highly sensitive to bending. Here we describe the implementation of a coherent beacon source placed at the distal tip of the multimode fiber, which can be used to compensate for the effects of bending. In the first part of this paper, we show that a diffraction limited focused spot can be generated at the distal tip of the multimode fiber using the beacon. In the second part, we demonstrate focusing even when the fiber is bent by dynamically compensating for it. The speckle pattern at the proximal fiber end, generated by the beacon source placed at its distal end, is highly dependent on the fiber conformation. We experimentally show that by intensity correlation, it is possible to identify the fiber conformation and maintain a focus spot while the fiber is bent over a certain range. Once the fiber configuration is determined, previously calibrated phase patterns could be stored for each fiber conformation and used to scan the distal spot and perform imaging.

  5. Inertia and Double Bending of Light from Equivalence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuler, Robert L., Jr.

    2010-01-01

    Careful examination of light paths in an accelerated reference frame, with use of Special Relativity, can account fully for the observed bending of light in a gravitational field, not just half of it as reported in 1911. This analysis also leads to a Machian formulation of inertia similar to the one proposed by Einstein in 1912 and later derived from gravitational field equations in Minkowsky Space by Sciama in 1953. There is a clear inference from equivalence that there is some type of inertial mass increase in a gravitational field. It is the purpose of the current paper to suggest that equivalence provides a more complete picture of gravitational effects than previously thought, correctly predicting full light bending, and that since the theory of inertia is derivable from equivalence, any theory based on equivalence must take account of it. Einstein himself clearly was not satisfied with the status of inertia in GRT, as our quotes have shown. Many have tried to account for inertia and met with less than success, for example Davidson s integration of Sciama s inertia into GRT but only for a steady state cosmology [10], and the Machian gravity theory of Brans and Dicke [11]. Yet Mach s idea hasn t gone away, and now it seems that it cannot go away without also disposing of equivalence.

  6. Bending continuous structures with SMAs: a novel robotic fish design.

    PubMed

    Rossi, C; Colorado, J; Coral, W; Barrientos, A

    2011-12-01

    In this paper, we describe our research on bio-inspired locomotion systems using deformable structures and smart materials, concretely shape memory alloys (SMAs). These types of materials allow us to explore the possibility of building motor-less and gear-less robots. A swimming underwater fish-like robot has been developed whose movements are generated using SMAs. These actuators are suitable for bending the continuous backbone of the fish, which in turn causes a change in the curvature of the body. This type of structural arrangement is inspired by fish red muscles, which are mainly recruited during steady swimming for the bending of a flexible but nearly incompressible structure such as the fishbone. This paper reviews the design process of these bio-inspired structures, from the motivations and physiological inspiration to the mechatronics design, control and simulations, leading to actual experimental trials and results. The focus of this work is to present the mechanisms by which standard swimming patterns can be reproduced with the proposed design. Moreover, the performance of the SMA-based actuators' control in terms of actuation speed and position accuracy is also addressed.

  7. Various Fatigue Testing of Polycrystalline Silicon Microcantilever Beam in Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong; Hocheng; Hung, Jeng-Nan; Guu, Yunn-Horng

    2008-06-01

    With the vast potential of micro-electro-mechanical systems (MEMS) technology, the reliability is essential for the successful applications of microdevices. Polycrystalline silicon is one of the most often used structural materials in microdevices. Tension testing for fatigue life of this material has been investigated since past years. This paper presents a micro-actuator-based bending testing system as well as a MTS Tytron250 micro-tensile-force testing machine to study the fatigue of microbeams in bending. The polycrystalline silicon microcantilever beams are fabricated on silicon wafer. The influence of various dimensions and stress on the fatigue endurance is studied when an external force is loaded on the microcantilever beam. The flexural strength of beams are calculated by the ANSYS. Based on the experimental results and ANSYS analysis, it shows that the longer specimen reduces the stresses when the displacement, width and thickness are kept the same. When the width varies, the larger width results in higher stresses. The fatigue life lies between 9.1 ×105-1.53 ×107 cycles in use of the testing machine. For microactuator testing experiment, the fatigue life persists up to million cycles without failure. The obtained results are compared with the references of different testing methods.

  8. Bending characteristics of dual-hole PM-PCF based on LP01 and LP11 modal interference

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xuan; Liu, Feng; Gao, Meng-yuan; Tan, Ai-ling; Fu, Xing-hu; Bi, Wei-hong

    2016-03-01

    The bending characteristics of dual-hole polarization maintaining photonic crystal fiber (PM-PCF) are demonstrated in this paper. The modal interference is induced by the LP01 mode and LP11 mode propagating in a single PM-PCF with the same polarization direction. Simulation results demonstrate that the bending radius induces the phase difference between LP01 mode and LP11 mode, which leads to the change of light interference intensity on the fiber output facet. The relationship between bending radius and normalized interference intensity with three different bending angles is discussed, where the bending angle is defined as the angle between hole axis and the x axis. The bending sensitivity is obtained to be about -188.78/m around the bending radius of 1.5 cm with the bending angle of 90°. The bending characteristics can contribute for online bending detection in widespread areas.

  9. Accelerator Magnet Plugging By Metal Oxides: A Theoretical Investigation, Remediation, and Preliminary Results

    SciTech Connect

    William W. Rust

    2003-05-01

    The Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility has experienced magnet overheating at high power. Overheating is caused by cooling water passages becoming plugged and is a direct result of the Dean Effect deposition of corrosion products suspended in the water. Salving simplified dynamic model equations of the flow in the magnet tubing bends yielded a relationship for plugging rate as a function of particle size, concentration, velocity, channel width and bend radius. Calculated deposition rates using data from a previous study are promising. Remediation has consisted of submicron filtration, magnet cleaning, and dissolved oxygen removal. Preliminary results are good: no accelerator outages have been attributed to magnet plugging since the remediation has been completed.

  10. Permanent dipole magnets for the 8 GeV transfer line at FNAL

    SciTech Connect

    Glass, H.D.; Brown, B.C.; Foster, G.W.; Fowler, W.B.; Haggard, J.E.

    1997-06-01

    The transfer line that will serve to transport 8 GeV protons from the Booster to the new Fermilab Main Injector has been built using permanent magnets. A total of 46 horizontal bend dipoles and 5 vertical bend dipoles were built for this beamline; 67 gradient magnets were also built. The magnets were built using magnetized strontium ferrite bricks. Thermal compensation of these bricks was effected by use of a nickel-iron alloy. The dipole magnets were built with a mean integrated strength of 0.56954 T-m, and an rms spread of 0.06%. The magnets were thermally cycled from 20{degrees}C to 0{degrees}C to condition the ferrite against irreversible thermal losses, and the compensation was measured with a flipcoil. The magnet strength was adjusted by varying the number of bricks installed at the magnet ends. Details of the assembly process and a summary of magnetic measurements are presented here.

  11. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-01

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  12. Dynamic vs static bending rigidities for DNA and M13 virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schurr, J. M.; Song, Lu; Kim, Ug-Sung

    1991-05-01

    A recently developed theory for weakly bending rods provides a means to estimate the dynamic bending rigidities of filamentous macromolecules from transient electro-optic and dynamic light scattering experiments. This theory is applied to analyze transient electric dichroisrn data from Prschke''s laboratory and transient electric birefringence data from Eden''s laboratory for DNA restriction fragments with 95 to 250 bp and also to analyze dynamic light scattering data for M13 virus. Surprisingly the dynamic bending rigidity of DNA is about three times the consensus static value inferred from its equilibrium persistence length. This implies that the bending potential of DNA is non-simple and/or biased. In contrast the dynamic and static bending rigidities of M13 virus are nearly identical so its bending potential is simple and unbiased. 1.

  13. Finite element residual stress analysis of induction heating bended ferritic steel piping

    SciTech Connect

    Kima, Jong Sung; Kim, Kyoung-Soo; Oh, Young-Jin; Chang, Hyung-Young; Park, Heung-Bae

    2014-10-06

    Recently, there is a trend to apply the piping bended by induction heating process to nuclear power plants. Residual stress can be generated due to thermo-mechanical mechanism during the induction heating bending process. It is well-known that the residual stress has important effect on crack initiation and growth. The previous studies have focused on the thickness variation. In part, some studies were performed for residual stress evaluation of the austenitic stainless steel piping bended by induction heating. It is difficult to find the residual stresses of the ferritic steel piping bended by the induction heating. The study assessed the residual stresses of induction heating bended ferriticsteel piping via finite element analysis. As a result, it was identified that high residual stresses are generated on local outersurface region of the induction heating bended ferritic piping.

  14. Springback control in sheet metal bending by laser-assisted bending: Experimental analysis, empirical and neural network modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gisario, A.; Barletta, M.; Conti, C.; Guarino, S.

    2011-12-01

    The present investigation deals with the control of springback phenomena in the bending process of aluminium sheets by hybrid forming process. Metal substrates were pre-bent to nominal shapes on a built-ad-hoc mould after being constrained on it. Then, they were post-treated by high power diode laser to prevent the deformation of the pre-bent sheets after the release of the constraints. The extent of springback phenomena were estimated by measuring the difference between the nominal bending angles and those achieved on the unconstrained substrates after laser post-treatments. Analytical models, aimed at predicting the springback by varying the setting of the operational parameters of the forming process, were developed. Neural network solutions were also proposed to improve the matching between experimental and numerical data, with the Multi-Layer Perceptrons trained by Back-Propagation algorithm being the fittest one. On this basis, a control modulus very useful to practitioners for automation and simulation purposes was built-on.

  15. Use of Generalized Mass in the Interpretation of Dynamic Response of BENDING-TORSION Coupled Beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ESLIMY-ISFAHANY, S. H. R.; BANERJEE, J. R.

    2000-11-01

    The interpretation of mode shapes and dynamic response of bending-torsion coupled beams is assessed by using the concept of generalized mass. In the first part of this investigation, the free vibratory motion of bending-torsion coupled beams is studied in detail. The conventional method of interpreting the normal modes of vibration consisting of bending displacements and torsional rotations is shown to be inadequate and replaced by an alternative method which is focussed on the constituent parts of the generalized mass arising from bending and torsional displacements. Basically, the generalized mass in a particular mode is identified and examined in terms of bending, torsion and bending-torsion coupling effects. It is demonstrated that the contribution of individual components in the expression of the generalized mass of a normal mode is a much better indicator in characterizing a coupled mode. It is also shown that the usually adopted criteria of plotting bending displacement and torsional rotations to describe a coupled mode can be deceptive and misleading. In the second part of the investigation, attention is focussed on the dynamic response characteristics of bending-torsion coupled beams when subjected to random bending or torsional loads. A normal mode approach is used to establish the total response. The input random excitation is assumed to be stationary and ergodic so that with the linearity assumption, the output spectrum of the response is obtained by using the frequency response function. The contribution of each normal mode to the overall response is isolated. Particular emphasis is placed on bending-induced torsional response and torsion-induced bending response. A number of case studies involving different types of bending-torsion coupled beams with Cantilever end conditions are presented. The limitations of existing methods of modal interpretation are highlighted, and an insight into the mode selection for response analysis is provided.

  16. Magnetic fish-robot based on multi-motion control of a flexible magnetic actuator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Shin, Kyoosik; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a biologically inspired fish-robot driven by a single flexible magnetic actuator with a rotating magnetic field in a three-axis Helmholtz coil. Generally, magnetic fish-robots are powered by alternating and gradient magnetic fields, which provide a single motion such as bending the fish-robot's fins. On the other hand, a flexible magnetic actuator driven by an external rotating magnetic field can create several gaits such as the bending vibration, the twisting vibration, and their combination. Most magnetic fish-like micro-robots do not have pectoral fins on the side and are simply propelled by the tail fin. The proposed robot can swim and perform a variety of maneuvers with the addition of pectoral fins and control of the magnetic torque direction. In this paper, we find that the robot's dynamic actuation correlates with the magnetic actuator and the rotating magnetic field. The proposed robot is also equipped with new features, such as a total of six degrees of freedom, a new control method that stabilizes posture, three-dimensional swimming, a new velocity control, and new turning abilities. PMID:22550128

  17. Magnetic fish-robot based on multi-motion control of a flexible magnetic actuator.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sung Hoon; Shin, Kyoosik; Hashi, Shuichiro; Ishiyama, Kazushi

    2012-09-01

    This paper presents a biologically inspired fish-robot driven by a single flexible magnetic actuator with a rotating magnetic field in a three-axis Helmholtz coil. Generally, magnetic fish-robots are powered by alternating and gradient magnetic fields, which provide a single motion such as bending the fish-robot's fins. On the other hand, a flexible magnetic actuator driven by an external rotating magnetic field can create several gaits such as the bending vibration, the twisting vibration, and their combination. Most magnetic fish-like micro-robots do not have pectoral fins on the side and are simply propelled by the tail fin. The proposed robot can swim and perform a variety of maneuvers with the addition of pectoral fins and control of the magnetic torque direction. In this paper, we find that the robot's dynamic actuation correlates with the magnetic actuator and the rotating magnetic field. The proposed robot is also equipped with new features, such as a total of six degrees of freedom, a new control method that stabilizes posture, three-dimensional swimming, a new velocity control, and new turning abilities.

  18. Effect of Centrifugal Transverse Wakefield for Microbunch in Bend

    SciTech Connect

    Stupakov, G.V.; /SLAC

    2006-03-22

    We calculate centrifugal force for a short bunch in vacuum moving in a circular orbit and estimate the emittance growth of the beam in a bend due to this force. Many of the basic features of the coherent synchrotron radiation (CSR) of short bunches and its effect on beam dynamics in accelerators are now well established. The effect is usually described in terms of the longitudinal force, or wakefield, that causes the energy loss in the beam, and also redistributes the energy between the particles by accelerating the head and decelerating the tail of the bunch. Coherent radiation becomes most important for short bunches and high currents. More subtle features of CSR such as transition effect due to the entrance to and exit from the bend, CSR force in the undulator, and shielding due to the close metallic boundaries have been also studied. Much less is known about the transverse force in a short bunch moving on a circular orbit. The problem has been treated in several papers beginning from R. Talman's work, who pointed out that the centrifugal force of a rotating bunch can result in a noticeable tune shift of betatron oscillations. Later, an important correction to the Talman paper has been added, where it was shown that due to the energy variation in the bunch, the effect of the transverse force proportional to R{sup -1} is canceled, and the residual effect is of the order of R{sup -2}, that is much smaller than originally predicted. Recently, however, Derbenev and Shiltsev found the centrifugal force of the order of R{sup -1} that differs from Talman's result by a logarithmic factor only. Taking into account the existing controversy in the literature, in this paper, we consider the transverse force in a bunch based on simple physical arguments, starting from a dc beam. We will derive the centrifugal force for a relativistic coasting beam in vacuum, and then generalize the result for a short bunch, and estimate its effect on the emittance growth in a bend

  19. Calculation of bending losses for highly confined modes of optical waveguides with transformation optics.

    PubMed

    Han, Zhanghua; Zhang, Pu; Bozhevolnyi, Sergey I

    2013-06-01

    We revisited the fundamental problem of bending loss calculation in optical waveguide theory using transformation optics (TOs). Due to the fact that TOs is based on the form invariance property of Maxwell equations, this new approach provides more accurate calculation of waveguide bending loss compared to the conventional refractive index conformal mapping method, especially for small bending radii typical for plasmonic waveguides or photonic waveguides with high-index contrast. We believe our results provide a simple yet reliable way of bending loss calculation for highly confined optical (including plasmonic) waveguides.

  20. Bending of metal-filled carbon nanotube under electron beam irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Misra, Abha

    2012-03-15

    Electron beam irradiation induced, bending of Iron filled, multiwalled carbon nanotubes is reported. Bending of both the carbon nanotube and the Iron contained within the core was achieved using two approaches with the aid of a high resolution electron microscope (HRTEM). In the first approach, bending of the nanotube structure results in response to the irradiation of a pristine kink defect site, while in the second approach, disordered sites induce bending by focusing the electron beam on the graphite walls. The HRTEM based in situ observations demonstrate the potential for using electron beam irradiation to investigate and manipulate the physical properties of confined nanoscale structures.

  1. Effects of Bending Radii on the Characteristics of Flexible Organic Solar Cells Investigated by Impedance Analysis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hoonbae; Ye, Donghyun; Won, Beomhee; Yu, SeGi; Jung, Donggeun

    2016-05-01

    Flexible organic solar cells (OSCs) were fabricated on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO)/poly(ethylene terephthalate) (PET) substrate and were subjected to bending tests with various bending radii. We observed that the photovoltaic properties of the OSCs precipitously deteriorated at a bending radius ≤ 0.75 cm. In order to investigate the effects of the bending test, the changes in the surface morphology and the sheet resistance of the ITO-coated PET samples were investigated, and the photovoltaic properties of bent and unbent OSCs were evaluated. Thereafter, equivalent circuits for the OSCs were assumed and the change in their parameters, such as resistance and capacitance, was observed. PMID:27483935

  2. Continuous Curvilinear Capsulorhexis in Cataract Surgery Using a Modified 3-Bend Cystotome.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Yuan; Gao, Jian-Hua

    2015-01-01

    We modified a 2-bend cystotome for continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis (CCC) in manual or phacoemulsification cataract surgery to improve the safety and ease of performance. A 26G needle was converted into a cystotome with 3 bends. In this retrospective study, the performance of modified 3-bend cystotome was compared with conventional 2-bend cystotome. During cataract surgery, in the 3-bend cystotome group, mean completion time of CCC was shorter, mean times of viscoelastic agent supplement were less, and CCC success rate was higher than that in 2-bend group. Complication incidence, such as postoperative transient corneal edema and irreparable V-shaped tear, was also lower in 3-bend group. No posterior capsular rupture or no other complication was observed in either group. A polymethyl methacrylate intraocular lens or a hydrogel intraocular lens was implanted in the capsular bag in all eyes. We conclude that it is safe and efficient to accomplish a CCC using the 3-bend cystotome due to its ability to sustain the anterior chamber depth (ACD) and keep the posterior lip intact. Using the 3-bend cystotome also allowed for an adequate view into the anterior chamber from lack of wound deformation. PMID:26509078

  3. Design of a Variable Thickness Plate to Focus Bending Waves

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schiller, Noah H.; Lin, Sz-Chin Steven; Cabell, Randolph H.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2012-01-01

    This paper describes the design of a thin plate whose thickness is tailored in order to focus bending waves to a desired location on the plate. Focusing is achieved by smoothly varying the thickness of the plate to create a type of lens, which focuses structural-borne energy. Damping treatment can then be positioned at the focal point to efficiently dissipate energy with a minimum amount of treatment. Numerical simulations of both bounded and unbounded plates show that the design is effective over a broad frequency range, focusing traveling waves to the same region of the plate regardless of frequency. This paper also quantifies the additional energy dissipated by local damping treatment installed on a variable thickness plate relative to a uniform plate.

  4. DNA bending potentials for loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, M.; Wocjan, T.; Langowski, J.; Smith, J. C.

    2012-02-01

    Nucleosome repositioning is a fundamental process in gene function. DNA elasticity is a key element of loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning. Two analytical models for DNA elasticity have been proposed: the linear sub-elastic chain (SEC), which allows DNA kinking, and the worm-like chain (WLC), with a harmonic bending potential. In vitro studies have shown that nucleosomes reposition in a discontiguous manner on a segment of DNA and this has also been found in ground-state calculations with the WLC analytical model. Here we study using Monte Carlo simulation the dynamics of DNA loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning at physiological temperatures using the SEC and WLC potentials. At thermal energies both models predict nearest-neighbor repositioning of nucleosomes on DNA, in contrast to the repositioning in jumps observed in experiments. This suggests a crucial role of DNA sequence in nucleosome repositioning.

  5. Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin Method for Bending Problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, Dawn R.; Raju, Ivatury S.

    2002-01-01

    Recent literature shows extensive research work on meshless or element-free methods as alternatives to the versatile Finite Element Method. One such meshless method is the Meshless Local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method. In this report, the method is developed for bending of beams - C1 problems. A generalized moving least squares (GMLS) interpolation is used to construct the trial functions, and spline and power weight functions are used as the test functions. The method is applied to problems for which exact solutions are available to evaluate its effectiveness. The accuracy of the method is demonstrated for problems with load discontinuities and continuous beam problems. A Petrov-Galerkin implementation of the method is shown to greatly reduce computational time and effort and is thus preferable over the previously developed Galerkin approach. The MLPG method for beam problems yields very accurate deflections and slopes and continuous moment and shear forces without the need for elaborate post-processing techniques.

  6. Bending a beam by a generalized ideal elastomeric gel

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Shengqiang

    2015-01-01

    A hybrid beam with a gel layer bonded on the top of an elastic non-swellable substrate has been commonly adopted to make various sensors and actuators. Usually, different models need to be developed for the hybrid beam when different gels are used in the system. In this article, based on the generalized ideal elastomeric gel model, we formulate a unified relationship between the swelling of hydrogels and the bending curvature of the elastic beam, which is independent of specific swelling mechanisms of gels. We further illustrate that the equations derived in the article can be used to validate the ideal elastomeric gel model and measure the elasticity of polymer networks of the gels. PMID:25792965

  7. High-pressure sensor using piezoelectric bending resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Xiaoqi; Sherrit, Stewart; Takano, Nobuyuki

    2016-04-01

    A novel design of pressure sensor based on piezoelectric bending resonator is described in this paper. The resonator is isolated from and mechanically coupled to the surrounding fluid using a sealed enclosure. The pressure applied to the enclosure induces a compressive stress to the resonator and reduces its resonance frequency. In principle the mechanism allows for achieving large resonance frequency shifts close to 100% of the resonance frequency. A high-pressure sensor based on the mechanism was designed for down-hole pressure monitoring in oil wells. The sensor is potentially remotely-readable via the transmission of an electromagnetic signal down a waveguide formed by the pipes in the oil well. The details of the pressure sensor design and verification by FE analysis and initial test results of a preliminary prototype are presented in this paper.

  8. Automated Wing Twist And Bending Measurements Under Aerodynamic Load

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burner, A. W.; Martinson, S. D.

    1996-01-01

    An automated system to measure the change in wing twist and bending under aerodynamic load in a wind tunnel is described. The basic instrumentation consists of a single CCD video camera and a frame grabber interfaced to a computer. The technique is based upon a single view photogrammetric determination of two dimensional coordinates of wing targets with a fixed (and known) third dimensional coordinate, namely the spanwise location. The measurement technique has been used successfully at the National Transonic Facility, the Transonic Dynamics Tunnel, and the Unitary Plan Wind Tunnel at NASA Langley Research Center. The advantages and limitations (including targeting) of the technique are discussed. A major consideration in the development was that use of the technique must not appreciably reduce wind tunnel productivity.

  9. Local Deplanation Of Double Reinforced Beam Cross Section Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baltov, Anguel; Yanakieva, Ana

    2015-12-01

    Bending of beams, double reinforced by means of thin composite layers, is considered in the study. Approximate numerical solution is proposed, considering transitional boundary areas, where smooth quadratic transition of the elasticity modulus and deformations take place. Deplanation of the cross section is also accounted for in the areas. Their thickness is found equalizing the total stiffness of the cross section and the layer stiffness. Deplanation of the cross section of the transitional area is determined via the longitudinal deformation in the reinforcing layer, accounting for the equilibrium between the internal and the external moment, generated by the longitudinal stresses in the cross section. A numerical example is given as an illustration demonstrating model's plausibility. The model allows the design and the calculation of recycled concrete beams double reinforced by means of thin layers. The approach is in agreement with modern design of nearly zero energy buildings (NZEB).

  10. Spring-back of flexible roll forming bending process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Kim, D. H.; Jung, D. W.

    2015-12-01

    Simulations are now widely used in the field of roll forming because of their convenience. Simulations provide a low cost, secure and fast analysis tool. Flexible roll forming provides the desired shapes with a one time forming process. For roll forming, the velocity of the sheet and friction are important factors to attain an ideal shape. Because it is a complicated process, simulations provide a better understanding of the roll forming process. Simulations were peformed using ABAQUS software linked to elastic-plastic modules which we developed taking into account of interactions between these fields [1]. The application of this method makes it possible to highlight the strain-stress and mechanical behaviour laws and the spring-back. Thus, the flexible roll forming and bending process can bewell described by the simulation software and guide the actual machine.

  11. Transitioning of power flow in beam models with bends

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hambric, Stephen A.

    1990-01-01

    The propagation of power flow through a dynamically loaded beam model with 90 degree bends is investigated using NASTRAN and McPOW. The transitioning of power flow types (axial, torsional, and flexural) is observed throughout the structure. To get accurate calculations of the torsional response of beams using NASTRAN, torsional inertia effects had to be added to the mass matrix calculation section of the program. Also, mass effects were included in the calculation of BAR forces to improve the continuity of power flow between elements. The importance of including all types of power flow in an analysis, rather than only flexural power, is indicated by the example. Trying to interpret power flow results that only consider flexural components in even a moderately complex problem will result in incorrect conclusions concerning the total power flow field.

  12. Method of testing gear wheels in impact bending

    SciTech Connect

    Tikhonov, A.K.; Palagin, Y.M.

    1995-05-01

    Chemicothermal treatment processes are widely used in engineering to improve the working lives of important components, of which the most common is nitrocementation. That process has been applied at the Volga Automobile Plant mainly to sprockets in gear transmissions, which need high hardness and wear resistance in the surfaces with relatively ductile cores. Although various forms of chemicothermal treatment are widely used, there has been no universal method of evaluating the strengths of gear wheels. Standard methods of estimating strength ({sigma}{sub u}, {sigma}{sub t}, {sigma}{sub b}, and hardness) have a major shortcoming: They can determine only the characteristics of the cores for case-hardened materials. Here we consider a method of impact bending test, which enables one to evaluate the actual strength of gear teeth.

  13. Fully articulated four-point-bend loading fixture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calomino, Anthony M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A fully articulated four-point bend loading fixture for Modulus of Rupture (MOR) and fracture toughness specimens utilizes an upper loading plate in combination with a lower loading plate. The lower plate has a pair of spring loaded ball bearings which seat in V-shaped grooves located in the upper plate. The ball bearings are carried in the arms of the lower plate. A load is applied to the specimen through steel rollers, one large roller and one smaller roller each located on both the upper and lower plates. The large rollers have needle roller bearings which enable a single loading roller to rotate relative to the plate to which it is attached.

  14. Small bending and stretching of sandwich-type shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reissner, Eric

    1950-01-01

    A theory has been developed for small bending and stretching of sandwich-type shells. This theory is an extension of the known theory of homogeneous thin elastic shells. It was found that two effects are important in the present problem, which are not normally of importance in the theory of curved shells: (1) the effect of transverse shear deformation and (2) the effect of transverse normal stress deformation. The first of these two effects has been known to be of importance in the theory of plates and beams. The second effect was found to occur in a manner which is typical for shells and has no counterpart in flat-plate theory. The general results of this report have been applied to the solution of problems concerning flat plates, circular rings, circular cylindrical shells, and spherical shells. In each case numerical examples have been given, illustrating the magnitude of the effects of transverse shear and normal stress deformation.

  15. Bending-torsion flutter of a highly swept advanced turboprop

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mehmed, O.; Kaza, K. R. V.; Lubomski, J. F.; Kielb, R. E.

    1981-01-01

    Experimental and analytical results are presented for a bending-torsion flutter phenomena encountered during wind-tunnel testing of a ten-bladed, advanced, high-speed propeller (turboprop) model with thin airfoil sections, high blade sweep, low aspect ratio, high solidity and transonic tip speeds. Flutter occurred at free-stream Mach numbers of 0.6 and greater and when the relative tip Mach number (based on vector sum of axial and tangential velocities) reached a value of about one. The experiment also included two- and five-blade configurations. The data indicate that aerodynamic cascade effects have a strong destabilizing influence on the flutter boundary. The data was correlated with analytical results which include aerodynamic cascade effects and good agreement was found.

  16. Solving the Beam Bending Problem with an Unilateral Winkler Foundation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machalová, Jitka; Netuka, Horymír

    2011-09-01

    Our work is going to deal with the bending of a beam resting on an unilateral elastic foundation and develops further the ideas from the article [5]. In some cases the beam has fixed connection with the foundation. Such problems are linear. However there are applications where the beam is not connected with the foundation. This so-called unilateral case represents an interesting nonlinear problem and cannot be solved by easy means. We propose here first a new formulation of this problem which is based upon the idea of a decomposition. This way we can convert the usual variational formulation of our problem to a saddle-point formulation. In the second part of this paper we will deal with a numerical solution using the finite element method. The system of equations for the saddle point is nonlinear and nondifferentiable. It can be handled by the transformation to a complementarity problem which is solved by the nonsmooth Newton method.

  17. Study on Thickness Effect of Three-Point-Bend Specimen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikuchi, Masanori; Ishihara, Takehito

    The thickness effect of a three-point-bend (3PB) specimen on dimple fracture behavior is studied experimentally and numerically. At first, fracture toughness tests were conducted using 3PB specimens of different thicknesses. Fracture toughness values and R-curves are obtained, and the thickness effect is discussed. Using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), dimple fracture surfaces are observed precisely. It is found that the thickness effect appears clearly in the void growth process. Finite element (FEM) analyses are conducted based on these experimental data. Using Gurson’s constitutive equation, the nucleation and growth of voids during the dimple fracture process are simulated. The distribution patterns of stress triaxiality and the crack growth process are obtained. The results show a good agreement with experimental ones qualitatively. The effects of specimen thickness on R-curves are explained well on the basis of these numerical simulations.

  18. Geometrically nonlinear bending analysis of laminated composite plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, Padmanav; Singh, B. N.

    2010-10-01

    In this work, a transverse bending of shear deformable laminated composite plates in Green-Lagrange sense accounting for the transverse shear and large rotations are presented. Governing equations are developed in the framework of higher order shear deformation theory. All higher order terms arising from nonlinear strain-displacement relations are included in the formulation. The present plate theory satisfies zero transverse shear strains conditions at the top and bottom surfaces of the plate in von-Karman sense. A C0 isoparametric finite element is developed for the present nonlinear model. Numerical results for the laminated composite plates of orthotropic materials with different system parameters and boundary conditions are found out. The results are also compared with those available in the literature. Some new results with different parameters are also presented.

  19. Acoustic emission monitoring of recycled aggregate concrete under bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsoumani, A. A.; Barkoula, N.-M.; Matikas, T. E.

    2015-03-01

    The amount of construction and demolition waste has increased considerably over the last few years, making desirable the reuse of this waste in the concrete industry. In the present study concrete specimens are subjected at the age of 28 days to four-point bending with concurrent monitoring of their acoustic emission (AE) activity. Several concrete mixtures prepared using recycled aggregates at various percentages of the total coarse aggregate and also a reference mix using natural aggregates, were included to investigate their influence of the recycled aggregates on the load bearing capacity, as well as on the fracture mechanisms. The results reveal that for low levels of substitution the influence of using recycled aggregates on the flexural strength is negligible while higher levels of substitution lead into its deterioration. The total AE activity, as well as the AE signals emitted during failure, was related to flexural strength. The results obtained during test processing were found to be in agreement with visual observation.

  20. DNA bending potentials for loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning

    SciTech Connect

    Langowski, Jorg

    2012-01-01

    Nucleosome repositioning is a fundamental process in gene function. DNA elasticity is a key element of loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning. Two analytical models for DNA elasticity have been proposed: the linear sub-elastic chain (SEC), which allows DNA kinking, and the worm-like chain (WLC), with a harmonic bending potential. In vitro studies have shown that nucleosomes reposition in a discontiguous manner on a segment of DNA and this has also been found in ground-state calculations with the WLC analytical model. Here we study using Monte Carlo simulation the dynamics of DNA loop-mediated nucleosome repositioning at physiological temperatures using the SEC and WLC potentials. At thermal energies both models predict nearest-neighbor repositioning of nucleosomes on DNA, in contrast to the repositioning in jumps observed in experiments. This suggests a crucial role of DNA sequence in nucleosome repositioning.

  1. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization of the matrix and the fibers.

  2. Atomic insight into copper nanostructures nucleation on bending graphene.

    PubMed

    He, Yezeng; Li, Hui; Li, Yunfang; Zhang, Kun; Jiang, Yanyan; Bian, Xiufang

    2013-06-21

    Some findings in heterogeneous nucleation that the structural features of a growing crystal are usually inherited from the heterogeneous nucleus, although attracting more and more attention, are not yet well understood. Here we report numerical simulations of copper nucleation on bending graphene (BG) to explore the microscopic details of how the curved surface influences the freezing structure of the liquid metal. The simulation result clearly shows that copper atoms become layered at the solid-liquid interface in a "C"-shaped pattern resembling the BG. This kind of shape control decays with increasing distance from the wall and the outmost layers transform into twin crystal composed of two fcc wedges. It is found that the final structures have striking correlations with the curvature radius, central angle and arc length of the BG. Our study would provide an opportunity for comprehensive and satisfactory understanding of the heterogeneous nucleation on curved surfaces.

  3. Bending induced self-organized switchable gratings on polymeric substrates.

    PubMed

    Parra-Barranco, Julian; Oliva-Ramirez, Manuel; Gonzalez-Garcia, Lola; Alcaire, Maria; Macias-Montero, Manuel; Borras, Ana; Frutos, Fabian; Gonzalez-Elipe, Agustin R; Barranco, Angel

    2014-08-13

    We present a straightforward procedure of self-surface patterning with potential applications as large area gratings, invisible labeling, optomechanical transducers, or smart windows. The methodology is based in the formation of parallel micrometric crack patterns when polydimethylsiloxane foils coated with tilted nanocolumnar SiO2 thin films are manually bent. The SiO2 thin films are grown by glancing angle deposition at room temperature. The results indicate that crack spacing is controlled by the film nanostructure independently of the film thickness and bending curvature. They also show that the in-plane microstructural anisotropy of the SiO2 films due to column association perpendicular to the growth direction determines the anisotropic formation of parallel cracks along two main axes. These self-organized patterned foils are completely transparent and work as customized reversible diffraction gratings under mechanical activation. PMID:25007108

  4. Bending Fatigue of Carburized Steel at Very Long Lives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nelson, D. V.; Long, Z.

    2016-01-01

    The bending fatigue behavior of two carburized steels is investigated for lives between approximately 105 and 108 cycles. Cracks are observed to start at sub-surface inclusions and develop features on fracture surfaces resembling "fish eyes" in appearance. This type of sub-surface cracking tends to govern fatigue strength at long lives. Previous studies of "fish eye" fatigue in carburized steel have been relatively few and have mainly considered failures originating at depths beneath a carburized case, where compressive residual stresses are minimal and hardness values approach those in the core. This study provides fatigue data for cracks originating within cases at various depths where compressive residual stresses are substantial and hardness is much higher than in the core. Fatigue strength is predicted by a simple model, accounting for the influence of residual stresses and hardness values at the different depths at which cracks started. Predictions of fatigue strength are compared with data generated in this study.

  5. Polyelectrolyte gels as bending actuators: modeling and numerical simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallmersperger, Thomas; Keller, Karsten; Attaran, Abdolhamid

    2013-04-01

    Polyelectrolyte gels are ionic electroactivematerials. They have the ability to react as both, sensors and actuators. As actuators they can be used e.g. as artificial muscles or drug delivery control; as sensors they may be used for measuring e.g. pressure, pH or other ion concentrations in the solution. In this research both, anionic and cationic polyelectrolyte gels placed in aqueous solution with mobile anions and cations are investigated. Due to external stimuli the polyelectrolyte gels can swell or shrink enormously by the uptake or delivery of solvent. In the present research a coupled multi-field problem within a continuum mechanics framework is proposed. The modeling approach introduces a set of equations governing multiple fields of the problem, including the chemical field of the ionic species, the electrical field and the mechanical field. The numerical simulation is performed by using the Finite Element Method. Within the study some test cases will be carried out to validate our model. In the works by Gülch et al., the application of combined anionic-cationic gels as grippers was shown. In the present research for an applied electric field, the change of the concentrations and the electric potential in the complete polymer is simulated by the given formulation. These changes lead to variations in the osmotic pressure resulting in a bending of different polyelectrolyte gels. In the present research it is shown that our model is capable of describing the bending behavior of anionic or cationic gels towards the different electrodes (cathode or anode).

  6. Sensitivity analysis of channel-bend hydraulics influenced by vegetation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bywater-Reyes, S.; Manners, R.; McDonald, R.; Wilcox, A. C.

    2015-12-01

    Alternating bars influence hydraulics by changing the force balance of channels as part of a morphodynamic feedback loop that dictates channel geometry. Pioneer woody riparian trees recruit on river bars and may steer flow, alter cross-stream and downstream force balances, and ultimately change channel morphology. Quantifying the influence of vegetation on stream hydraulics is difficult, and researchers increasingly rely on two-dimensional hydraulic models. In many cases, channel characteristics (channel drag and lateral eddy viscosity) and vegetation characteristics (density, frontal area, and drag coefficient) are uncertain. This study uses a beta version of FaSTMECH that models vegetation explicitly as a drag force to test the sensitivity of channel-bend hydraulics to riparian vegetation. We use a simplified, scale model of a meandering river with bars and conduct a global sensitivity analysis that ranks the influence of specified channel characteristics (channel drag and lateral eddy viscosity) against vegetation characteristics (density, frontal area, and drag coefficient) on cross-stream hydraulics. The primary influence on cross-stream velocity and shear stress is channel drag (i.e., bed roughness), followed by the near-equal influence of all vegetation parameters and lateral eddy viscosity. To test the implication of the sensitivity indices on bend hydraulics, we hold calibrated channel characteristics constant for a wandering gravel-bed river with bars (Bitterroot River, MT), and vary vegetation parameters on a bar. For a dense vegetation scenario, we find flow to be steered away from the bar, and velocity and shear stress to be reduced within the thalweg. This provides insight into how the morphodynamic evolution of vegetated bars differs from unvegetated bars.

  7. Measurement of Kirchhoff's stress intensity factors in bending plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bäcker, D.; Kuna, M.; Häusler, C.

    2014-03-01

    A measurement method of the stress intensity factors defined by KIRCHHOFF's theory for a crack in a bending plate is shown. For this purpose, a thin piezoelectric polyvinylidene fluoride film (PVDF) is attached to the surface of the cracked plate. The measured electrical voltages are coupled with the load type and the crack tip position relative to the sensor film. Stress intensity factors and the crack tip position can be determined by solving the non-linear inverse problem based on the measured signals. To guarantee solvability of the problem, more measuring electrodes on the film have to be taken in to account. To the developed sensor concept the KIRCHHOFF's plate theory has been applied. In order to connect the electrical signals and the stress intensity factors the stresses near the crack tip have to be written in eigenfunctions (see WILLIAMS [1]). The presented method was verified by means of the example of a straight crack of the length 2a in an infinite isotropic plate under all- side bending. It was found that the positioning of the electrodes is delimited by two radii. On one hand, the measurement points should not be too close to the crack tip. In this area, the Kirchhoff's plate theory cannot be used effectively. On the other hand, the measuring electrodes should be placed at a smaller distance to each other and not too far from the crack tip regarding the convergence radius of the WILLIAMS series expansion. Test calculations on a straight crack in an infinite isotropic plate showed the general applicability of the measurement method.

  8. Band offsets and band bending at heterovalent semiconductor interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frey, A.; Bass, U.; Mahapatra, S.; Schumacher, C.; Geurts, J.; Brunner, K.

    2010-11-01

    We present a comprehensive study of band offsets and band bending at heterovalent semiconductor heterointerfaces. A perfectly abrupt heterovalent interface is usually thermodynamically unstable, and atomic intermixing of materials with different numbers of valence electrons causes large variations in band offsets and local doping density, depending on the spatial arrangement of atoms at the interface. The studied prototypical II-VI/III-V semiconductor interfaces are n -doped ZnSe/GaAs (001) heterostructures with varied composition profiles close to the interface, which were realized by molecular-beam epitaxy with different amounts of Zn or Se predeposited on n -GaAs prior to n -ZnSe layer growth. The samples are characterized by temperature-dependent electrical transport across the interface, electrochemical capacitance-voltage profiling, Raman spectroscopy, and high-resolution x-ray diffraction. We find that the potential barrier in the conduction band at a Zn-rich n -ZnSe/ n -GaAs interface is as high as 550 meV and it gradually decreases with Se predeposition down to about 70 meV. A large depletion region at the heterointerface, about 50 nm wide, is assigned to significant intermixing of acceptor-type atoms, resulting in an effective electron deficit of 1.5×1013cm-2 . The depletion width and the acceptor density around the interface are nearly independent from the growth start procedure. Se predeposition, however, partially shifts the depletion region at the heterointerface from GaAs into ZnSe, compared to Zn predeposition. The results are discussed on the basis of a band-bending model accounting for variable band offsets, interface state density and atomic interdiffusion profiles depending on growth start.

  9. Soft tissue artifact evaluation of the cervical spine in motion patterns of flexion and lateral bending: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jiajia; Lui, Zhongwen; Qian, Zhihui; Ren, Luquan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Soft tissue artifact (STA) is increasingly becoming a focus of research as the skin marker method is widely employed in motion capture technique. At present, medical imaging methods provide reliable ways to investigate the cervical STA. Among these approaches, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly preferred tool because of its low radiation. Methods. In the study, the 3D spatial location of vertebral landmarks and corresponding skin markers of the spinous processes of the second (C2), fifth (C5), and sixth (C6) cervical levels during flexion and lateral bending were investigated. A series of static postures were scanned using MRI. Skin deformation was obtained by the Mimics software. Results. Results shows that during flexion, the maximum skin deformation occurs at C6, in the superior-inferior (Z) direction. Upon lateral bending, the maximum skin displacement occurs at C2 level, in the left-right (Y) direction. The result presents variability of soft tissue in the terms of direction and magnitude, which is consistent with the prevailing opinion. Discussion. The results testified variability of cervical STA. Future studies involving large ranges of subject classification, such as age, sex, height, gravity, and etc. should be performed to completely verify the existing hypothesis on human cervical skin deformation.

  10. Soft tissue artifact evaluation of the cervical spine in motion patterns of flexion and lateral bending: a preliminary study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jiajia; Lui, Zhongwen; Ren, Luquan

    2016-01-01

    Background. Soft tissue artifact (STA) is increasingly becoming a focus of research as the skin marker method is widely employed in motion capture technique. At present, medical imaging methods provide reliable ways to investigate the cervical STA. Among these approaches, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is a highly preferred tool because of its low radiation. Methods. In the study, the 3D spatial location of vertebral landmarks and corresponding skin markers of the spinous processes of the second (C2), fifth (C5), and sixth (C6) cervical levels during flexion and lateral bending were investigated. A series of static postures were scanned using MRI. Skin deformation was obtained by the Mimics software. Results. Results shows that during flexion, the maximum skin deformation occurs at C6, in the superior–inferior (Z) direction. Upon lateral bending, the maximum skin displacement occurs at C2 level, in the left–right (Y) direction. The result presents variability of soft tissue in the terms of direction and magnitude, which is consistent with the prevailing opinion. Discussion. The results testified variability of cervical STA. Future studies involving large ranges of subject classification, such as age, sex, height, gravity, and etc. should be performed to completely verify the existing hypothesis on human cervical skin deformation. PMID:27069821

  11. Calculation of the transverse kicks generated by the bends of a hollow electron lens

    SciTech Connect

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-03-25

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam in high-energy accelerators. They were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for abort-gap clearing, beam-beam compensation, and halo scraping. A beam-beam compensation scheme based upon electron lenses is currently being implemented in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work is in support of a conceptual design of hollow electron beam scraper for the Large Hadron Collider. It also applies to the implementation of nonlinear integrable optics with electron lenses in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator at Fermilab. We consider the axial asymmetries of the electron beam caused by the bends that are used to inject electrons into the interaction region and to extract them. A distribution of electron macroparticles is deposited on a discrete grid enclosed in a conducting pipe. The electrostatic potential and electric fields are calculated using numerical Poisson solvers. The kicks experienced by the circulating beam are estimated by integrating the electric fields over straight trajectories. These kicks are also provided in the form of interpolated analytical symplectic maps for numerical tracking simulations, which are needed to estimate the effects of the electron lens imperfections on proton lifetimes, emittance growth, and dynamic aperture. We outline a general procedure to calculate the magnitude of the transverse proton kicks, which can then be generalized, if needed, to include further refinements such as the space-charge evolution of the electron beam, magnetic fields generated by the electron current, and longitudinal proton dynamics.

  12. HYDRODYNAMICS AND SEDIMENT TRANSPORT IN LOWER MISSISSIPPI RIVER MEANDER BENDS (LOUISIANA): IMPLICATIONS FOR LARGE SEDIMENT DIVERSIONS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allison, M. A.; McCorquodale, A.; Meselhe, E. A.

    2009-12-01

    Field data collection and numerical modeling is being conducted in the lower Mississippi River in the region of a meander bend at Myrtle Grove, LA (river km 96 above Head of Passes) in support of a proposed large water and sediment diversion (1,130-2,830 cms) for coastal wetland restoration. Field studies in October 2008, April and May 2009, at discharges ranging from 11,000-21,000 cms, examined the role of bend dynamics on sediment transport through this reach relative to control sites further downriver and USGS monitoring stations upriver. Suspended loads and grain size character measured by ADCP (velocities and backscatter), isokinetic point sampler (P-63), and optical sensors (LISST, OBS, transmissometer) indicate that during the rising-to-high discharge phase, sand lifting off from the downstream edge of the lateral bar upriver of the bend augments that carried from further upriver, and is entrained in the upper 10-25m of the water column. This excess suspended sand is advected around the bend before concentrations are reduced to background levels over the lateral bar downstream of the bend. Bedload transport rates measured by repeat swath bathymetric mapping of migrating dunes are comparable upstream of the bend, downstream, and in the control sites. However, no bedforms are observed in the bend thalweg (up to 60 m deep) supporting the dominance of suspended sand transport in the bend. Both 1D (HEC-RAS and HEC6-T) and 3D (Flow3D) numerical hydrodynamic and sediment transport modeling is underway to simulate this process and the large-scale eddy present in the bend that generates upriver transport along the inside of the meander bend at all observed discharges. Our preliminary results suggest that the outside of meander bends might be an appropriate site for sediment diversions that draw near-surface water from this sediment-rich layer.

  13. Twist, tilt, and orientational order at the nematic to twist-bend nematic phase transition of 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane: A dielectric, 2H NMR, and calorimetric study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robles-Hernández, Beatriz; Sebastián, Nerea; de la Fuente, M. Rosario; López, David O.; Diez-Berart, Sergio; Salud, Josep; Ros, M. Blanca; Dunmur, David A.; Luckhurst, Geoffrey R.; Timimi, Bakir A.

    2015-12-01

    The nature of the nematic-nematic phase transition in the liquid crystal dimer 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane (CB9CB) has been investigated using techniques of calorimetry, dynamic dielectric response measurements, and 2H NMR spectroscopy. The experimental results for CB9CB show that, like the shorter homologue CB7CB, the studied material exhibits a normal nematic phase, which on cooling undergoes a transition to the twist-bend nematic phase (NTB), a uniaxial nematic phase, promoted by the average bent molecular shape, in which the director tilts and precesses describing a conical helix. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry has been used to analyze the nature of the NTB-N phase transition, which is found to be weakly first order, but close to tricritical. Additionally broadband dielectric spectroscopy and 2H magnetic resonance studies have revealed information on the structural characteristics of the recently discovered twist-bend nematic phase. Analysis of the dynamic dielectric response in both nematic phases has provided an estimate of the conical angle of the heliconical structure for the NTB phase. Capacitance measurements of the electric-field realignment of the director in initially planar aligned cells have yielded values for the splay and bend elastic constants in the high temperature nematic phase. The bend elastic constant is small and decreases with decreasing temperature as the twist-bend phase is approached. This behavior is expected theoretically and has been observed in materials that form the twist-bend nematic phase. 2H NMR measurements characterize the chiral helical twist identified in the twist-bend nematic phase and also allow the determination of the temperature dependence of the conical angle and the orientational order parameter with respect to the director.

  14. Twist, tilt, and orientational order at the nematic to twist-bend nematic phase transition of 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane: A dielectric, (2)H NMR, and calorimetric study.

    PubMed

    Robles-Hernández, Beatriz; Sebastián, Nerea; de la Fuente, M Rosario; López, David O; Diez-Berart, Sergio; Salud, Josep; Ros, M Blanca; Dunmur, David A; Luckhurst, Geoffrey R; Timimi, Bakir A

    2015-12-01

    The nature of the nematic-nematic phase transition in the liquid crystal dimer 1″,9″-bis(4-cyanobiphenyl-4'-yl) nonane (CB9CB) has been investigated using techniques of calorimetry, dynamic dielectric response measurements, and (2)H NMR spectroscopy. The experimental results for CB9CB show that, like the shorter homologue CB7CB, the studied material exhibits a normal nematic phase, which on cooling undergoes a transition to the twist-bend nematic phase (N(TB)), a uniaxial nematic phase, promoted by the average bent molecular shape, in which the director tilts and precesses describing a conical helix. Modulated differential scanning calorimetry has been used to analyze the nature of the N(TB)-N phase transition, which is found to be weakly first order, but close to tricritical. Additionally broadband dielectric spectroscopy and (2)H magnetic resonance studies have revealed information on the structural characteristics of the recently discovered twist-bend nematic phase. Analysis of the dynamic dielectric response in both nematic phases has provided an estimate of the conical angle of the heliconical structure for the N(TB) phase. Capacitance measurements of the electric-field realignment of the director in initially planar aligned cells have yielded values for the splay and bend elastic constants in the high temperature nematic phase. The bend elastic constant is small and decreases with decreasing temperature as the twist-bend phase is approached. This behavior is expected theoretically and has been observed in materials that form the twist-bend nematic phase. (2)H NMR measurements characterize the chiral helical twist identified in the twist-bend nematic phase and also allow the determination of the temperature dependence of the conical angle and the orientational order parameter with respect to the director.

  15. Thermal management for LLNL/UC/SSRL bending magnet beamline VIII at Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory

    SciTech Connect

    Berglin, E.J.; Younger, F.C.

    1986-05-01

    All the important heat loads on the elements of Beamline VIII are cataloged. The principal elements are identified and their heat loads tabulated for various loading scenarios. The expected heat loads are those from normal operations including the anticipated performance improvements planned for the SPEAR ring and from abnormal operations due to positional perturbations of the electron beam. (LEW)

  16. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS... Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig EC03OC91.070...

  17. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS... Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig EC03OC91.070...

  18. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS... Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig EC03OC91.070...

  19. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS... Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig EC03OC91.070...

  20. 16 CFR Figure 1 to Part 1512 - Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Bicycle Front Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig 1 Figure 1 to Part 1512 Commercial Practices CONSUMER PRODUCT SAFETY COMMISSION FEDERAL HAZARDOUS... Fork Cantilever Bending Test Rig EC03OC91.070...

  1. Transformation optical design of a bending waveguide by use of isotropic materials.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiaojiong; Lin, Zhifang; Chen, Huanyang; Chan, C T

    2009-11-01

    Based on the effective medium theory, we designed a simplified transformation media bending waveguide by use of only three kinds of isotropic material in an alternating layered structure. The design can be used to guide incoming waves smoothly along the bending part of a waveguide with slight distortions. Numerical simulations are performed to illustrate its functionality.

  2. Flow structure and channel morphology at a natural confluent meander bend

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riley, James D.; Rhoads, Bruce L.

    2012-08-01

    Previous experimental, field, and modeling studies of confluence dynamics have focused mainly on junctions formed by straight channels. In contrast, natural rivers often meander and tributaries can enter meandering rivers on the outside of bends to form a junction planform known as a confluent meander bend. In this study, field measurements of three-dimensional velocity components and bed topography at a confluent meander bend reveal a complex hydrodynamic environment that responds to changes in momentum-flux ratio, while channel morphology remains relatively stable. Flow from the tributary deflects high-velocity flow and helical motion in the curving main river toward the inside of the bend, inducing bed scour and inhibiting point-bar development. The high junction angle forces the tributary flow to abruptly realign to the orientation of the downstream channel, initiating a counter-rotating helical cell over the outer portion of the bend. Two surface-convergent helical cells persist through the downstream channel, where the combined flows accelerate as the channel cross-sectional area is constricted by a bar along the downstream junction corner, precluding flow separation. Long-term stability of its planform suggests that this confluent meander bend represents a quasi-stable channel configuration. Overall, patterns of flow and channel morphology are quite different from typical patterns in most meander bends, but are generally consistent with a conceptual model of confluent meander bends derived from previous laboratory experiments and numerical modeling.

  3. 75 FR 42119 - Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: High Desert Museum, Bend, OR

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-20

    ... National Park Service Notice of Intent to Repatriate Cultural Items: High Desert Museum, Bend, OR AGENCY... cultural items in the possession of the High Desert Museum, Bend, OR, that meet the definition of... notice. In 1990, Native American cultural items were donated to the High Desert Museum by the Roger...

  4. Reversible Bending Behaviors of Photomechanical Soft Actuators Based on Graphene Nanocomposites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dong; Jiang, Weitao; Liu, Hongzhong; Zhao, Tingting; Lei, Biao; Li, Yonghao; Yin, Lei; Shi, Yongsheng; Chen, Bangdao; Lu, Bingheng

    2016-01-01

    Photomechanical nanocomposites embedded with light-absorbing nanoparticles show promising applications in photoresponsive actuations. Near infrared (nIR)-responsive nanocomposites based photomechanical soft actuators can offer lightweight functional and underexploited entry into soft robotics, active optics, drug delivery, etc. A novel graphene-based photomechanical soft actuators, constituted by Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/graphene-nanoplatelets (GNPs) layer (PDMS/GNPs) and pristine PDMS layer, have been constructed. Due to the mismatch of coefficient of thermal expansion of two layers induced by dispersion of GNPs, controllable and reversible bendings response to nIR light irradiation are observed. Interestingly, two different bending behaviors are observed when the nIR light comes from different sides, i.e., a gradual single-step photomechanical bending towards PDMS/GNPs layer when irradiation from PDMS side, while a dual-step bending (finally bending to the PDMS/GNPs side but with an strong and fast backlash at the time of light is on/off) when irradiation from PDMS/GNPs side. The two distinctive photomechanical bending behaviors are investigated in terms of heat transfer and thermal expansion, which reveals that the distinctive bending behaviors can be attributed to the differences in temperature gradients along the thickness when irradiation from different sides. In addition, the versatile photomechanical bending properties will provide alternative way for drug-delivery, soft robotics and microswitches, etc. PMID:27265380

  5. Reversible Bending Behaviors of Photomechanical Soft Actuators Based on Graphene Nanocomposites.

    PubMed

    Niu, Dong; Jiang, Weitao; Liu, Hongzhong; Zhao, Tingting; Lei, Biao; Li, Yonghao; Yin, Lei; Shi, Yongsheng; Chen, Bangdao; Lu, Bingheng

    2016-01-01

    Photomechanical nanocomposites embedded with light-absorbing nanoparticles show promising applications in photoresponsive actuations. Near infrared (nIR)-responsive nanocomposites based photomechanical soft actuators can offer lightweight functional and underexploited entry into soft robotics, active optics, drug delivery, etc. A novel graphene-based photomechanical soft actuators, constituted by Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/graphene-nanoplatelets (GNPs) layer (PDMS/GNPs) and pristine PDMS layer, have been constructed. Due to the mismatch of coefficient of thermal expansion of two layers induced by dispersion of GNPs, controllable and reversible bendings response to nIR light irradiation are observed. Interestingly, two different bending behaviors are observed when the nIR light comes from different sides, i.e., a gradual single-step photomechanical bending towards PDMS/GNPs layer when irradiation from PDMS side, while a dual-step bending (finally bending to the PDMS/GNPs side but with an strong and fast backlash at the time of light is on/off) when irradiation from PDMS/GNPs side. The two distinctive photomechanical bending behaviors are investigated in terms of heat transfer and thermal expansion, which reveals that the distinctive bending behaviors can be attributed to the differences in temperature gradients along the thickness when irradiation from different sides. In addition, the versatile photomechanical bending properties will provide alternative way for drug-delivery, soft robotics and microswitches, etc. PMID:27265380

  6. Reversible Bending Behaviors of Photomechanical Soft Actuators Based on Graphene Nanocomposites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Dong; Jiang, Weitao; Liu, Hongzhong; Zhao, Tingting; Lei, Biao; Li, Yonghao; Yin, Lei; Shi, Yongsheng; Chen, Bangdao; Lu, Bingheng

    2016-06-01

    Photomechanical nanocomposites embedded with light-absorbing nanoparticles show promising applications in photoresponsive actuations. Near infrared (nIR)-responsive nanocomposites based photomechanical soft actuators can offer lightweight functional and underexploited entry into soft robotics, active optics, drug delivery, etc. A novel graphene-based photomechanical soft actuators, constituted by Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)/graphene-nanoplatelets (GNPs) layer (PDMS/GNPs) and pristine PDMS layer, have been constructed. Due to the mismatch of coefficient of thermal expansion of two layers induced by dispersion of GNPs, controllable and reversible bendings response to nIR light irradiation are observed. Interestingly, two different bending behaviors are observed when the nIR light comes from different sides, i.e., a gradual single-step photomechanical bending towards PDMS/GNPs layer when irradiation from PDMS side, while a dual-step bending (finally bending to the PDMS/GNPs side but with an strong and fast backlash at the time of light is on/off) when irradiation from PDMS/GNPs side. The two distinctive photomechanical bending behaviors are investigated in terms of heat transfer and thermal expansion, which reveals that the distinctive bending behaviors can be attributed to the differences in temperature gradients along the thickness when irradiation from different sides. In addition, the versatile photomechanical bending properties will provide alternative way for drug-delivery, soft robotics and microswitches, etc.

  7. PROPOSAL OF THE DYNAMIC ANALYSIS TECHNIQUE CONSIDERING INTERACTION BETWEEN BENDING AND TORSION AND NONLINEAR TORSION

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otsuka, Hisanori; Hattori, Masahiro

    When the structures, for example arch bridges are subjected bending moments and torsional moments, the strength and rigidity of the members decline compared to those of pure bending or torsion load condition. However, any analysis soft don't consider interrelation between bending and torsion ,and effects of torsional moments have not been considered severely in seismic design. In this study, the authors proposed analysis technique considering interaction between bending and torsion to estimate torsional moments severely, and formulized the analysis tools for this technique. These are interaction curve, skeleton for combined load, hysteresis for torsion. Moreover, the authors analyzed a RC arch bridge using this method, and inspected the validity of comparing the results obtained equivalent linear analysis about torsion and nonlinear torsional analysis not considering the interaction between bending and torsion.

  8. Experimental method for determination of bending and torsional rigidities of advanced composite laminates

    SciTech Connect

    Maeda, Takenori

    1995-11-01

    This paper presents an experimental method for the determination of the bending and torsional rigidities of advanced fiber composite laminates with the aid of laser holographic interferometry. The proposed method consists of a four-point bending test and a resonance test. The bending rigidity ratio (D{sub 12}/D{sub 22}) can be determined from the fringe patterns of the four-point bending test. The bending rigidities (D{sub 11} and D{sub 22}) and the torsional rigidity (D{sub 66}) are calculated from the natural frequencies of cantilever plates of the resonance test. The test specimens are carbon/epoxy cross-ply laminates. The adequacy of the experimental method is confirmed by comparing the measured rigidities with the theoretical values obtained from classical lamination theory (CLT) by using the measured tensile properties. The results show that the present method can be used to evaluate the rigidities of orthotropic laminates with reasonably good accuracy.

  9. Effects of Cross-Sectional Ovalization on Springback and Strain Distribution of Circular Tubes Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yafei; E, Daxin

    2011-12-01

    Springback and cross-sectional ovalization are two important defects in the bending formation of tubular parts. In this article, an analytic model considering ovalization is presented to calculate the springback and tangential strain in tube bending. Compared with the calculation neglecting ovalization, the proposed model could better predict the trends of springback angle over bending radius ratio and wall thickness ratio. Moreover, calculation of the tangential strain indicates that the bending deformation is more severe in the middle than at the ends of a bent tube. Through comparison of the results of this model and the calculations neglecting ovalization, it is shown that the effects of ovalization on springback are negligible only if the bending radius ratio and the wall thickness ratio are large enough. Also, the influence of ovalization differs a lot from one material to another.

  10. The Effect of Element Formulation on the Prediction of Boost Effects in Numerical Tube Bending

    SciTech Connect

    Bardelcik, A.; Worswick, M.J.

    2005-08-05

    This paper presents advanced FE models of the pre-bending process to investigate the effect of element formulation on the prediction of boost effects in tube bending. Tube bending experiments are conducted with 3'' (OD) IF (Interstitial-Free) steel tube on a fully instrumented Eagle EPT-75 servo-hydraulic mandrel-rotary draw tube bender. Experiments were performed in which the bending boost was varied at three levels and resulted in consistent trends in the strain and thickness distribution within the pre-bent tubes. A numerical model of the rotary draw tube bender was used to simulate pre-bending of the IF tube with the three levels of boost from the experiments. To examine the effect of element formulation on the prediction of boost, the tube was modeled with shell and solid elements. Both models predicted the overall strain and thickness results well, but showed different trends in each of the models.

  11. Effect of Forming Speed on Plastic Bending of Adhesively Bonded Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Michihiro; Yoshida, Fusahito

    Using highly ductile acrylic adhesive, the present authors proposed a new technique of plastic bending of adhesively bonded sheet metals. In this process, the suppression of large transverse shear deformation occurring in the adhesive layer, which in some cases would induce the geometrical imperfection (so-called ‘gull-wing bend') and the delamination of the sheet, is one of the most important technical issues. In the present work, the effect of forming speed on bending deformation was investigated. From experimental observations in V-bending experiments of adhesively bonded aluminium sheets, as well as the corresponding numerical simulations which consider the viscoplasticity nature of the adhesive resin, it was found that the large shear deformation and ‘gull-wing bend' are successfully suppressed by high-speed forming since the deformation resistance of the adhesive resin becomes higher at a high strain rate.

  12. Isotope effect in normal-to-local transition of acetylene bending modes

    DOE PAGES

    Ma, Jianyi; Xu, Dingguo; Guo, Hua; Tyng, Vivian; Kellman, Michael E.

    2012-01-01

    The normal-to-local transition for the bending modes of acetylene is considered a prelude to its isomerization to vinylidene. Here, such a transition in fully deuterated acetylene is investigated using a full-dimensional quantum model. It is found that the local benders emerge at much lower energies and bending quantum numbers than in the hydrogen isotopomer HCCH. This is accompanied by a transition to a second kind of bending mode called counter-rotator, again at lower energies and quantum numbers than in HCCH. These transitions are also investigated using bifurcation analysis of two empirical spectroscopic fitting Hamiltonians for pure bending modes, which helpsmore » to understand the origin of the transitions semiclassically as branchings or bifurcations out of the trans and normal bend modes when the latter become dynamically unstable. The results of the quantum model and the empirical bifurcation analysis are in very good agreement.« less

  13. The Titan -1:0 Nodal Bending Wave in Saturn's Ring C.

    PubMed

    Rosen, P A; Lissauer, J J

    1988-08-01

    The most prominent oscillatory feature observed in the Voyager 1 radio occultation of Saturn's rings is identified as a one-armed spiral bending wave excited by Titan's -1:0 nodal inner vertical resonance. Ring partides in a bending wave move in coherently inclined orbits, warping the local mean plane of the rings. The Titan -1:0 wave is the only known bending wave that propagates outward, away from Saturn, and the only spiral wave yet observed in which the wave pattern rotates opposite to the orbital direction of the ring particles. It is also the first bending wave identified in ring C. Modeling the observed feature with existing bending wave theory gives a surface mass density of approximately 0.4 g/cm(2) outside the wave region and a local ring thickness of [unknown]5 meters, and suggests that surface mass density is not constant in the wave region.

  14. Asynchronous bends in Pacific seamount trails: a case for extensional volcanism?

    PubMed

    Koppers, Anthony A P; Staudigel, Hubert

    2005-02-11

    The Gilbert Ridge and Tokelau Seamounts are the only seamount trails in the Pacific Ocean with a sharp 60 degrees bend, similar to the Hawaii-Emperor bend (HEB). These two bends should be coeval with the 47-million-year-old HEB if they were formed by stationary hot spots, and assuming Pacific plate motion only. New 40Ar/39Ar ages indicate that the bends in the Gilbert Ridge and Tokelau seamount trail were formed much earlier than the HEB at 67 and 57 million years ago, respectively. Such asynchronous bends cannot be reconciled with the stationary hot spot paradigm, possibly suggesting hot spot motion or magmatism caused by short-term local lithospheric extension.

  15. Dependence of photoinduced bending behavior of diarylethene crystals on irradiation wavelength of ultraviolet light.

    PubMed

    Kitagawa, Daichi; Tanaka, Rika; Kobatake, Seiya

    2015-11-01

    The dependence of the photoinduced bending behavior of diarylethene crystals on the ultraviolet light irradiation wavelength was investigated. When irradiated with 365 nm light, a crystal of 1,2-bis(5-methyl-2-phenyl-4-thiazolyl)perfluorocyclopentene (1a) bends toward the incident light. On the other hand, when irradiated with 380 nm light, the crystal of 1a first bends away from the light source and then bends toward the incident light. To explain this bending behavior, we propose a comprehensive mechanism based on the depth of the photochromic reaction from the crystal surface. This mechanism is successfully supported by the change of cell parameters associated with the photochromic reaction upon irradiation with 380 nm light, which was determined by in situ X-ray crystallographic analysis.

  16. Comparison of bending stiffness of six different colours of copolymer polypropylene.

    PubMed

    Ross, R S; Greig, R J; Convery, P

    1999-04-01

    This paper compares the bending stiffness of 5 different colours of copolymer polypropylene (CCP) with that of natural copolymer polypropylene (NCP). Flesh coloured and natural sheets are supplied thicker than other pigmented sheet. The bending stiffness of a specimen may be defined as EI, i.e. the product of E, Young's modulus of elasticity and I, the 2nd moment of area. Strips of "as supplied" (AS) and "post-draped" (PD) specimen were clamped and subjected to bending to assess the effect of pigmentation on bending characteristics. The gradient of the graph of bending deflection delta versus bending moment enables EI to be estimated. The process of thermoforming polypropylene reduces EI, the bending stiffness. However, the manual draping and vacuum procedure introduces so many variables that it is difficult to quantify the effect of pigmentation. The E of a bent specimen may be estimated from the gradient of the graph of deltaI versus bending moment. In the case of AS sheet, the effect of pigmentation on E is inconclusive. PD specimens indicate a significant reduction in E due to thermoforming. This was verified by an electron-microscope study of AS and PD specimens. Draping an ankle-foot orthosis (AFO) results in a non-uniform wall thickness. The results of this study with respect to the effects of pigmentation on the bending stiffness of AFOs are inconclusive. More detailed studies require to be completed in order to confirm which factors are responsible for this non-uniformity in wall thickness and consequent variation in bending stiffness. PMID:10355646

  17. MAGNETIC MEASUREMENT OF THE 10 KW, IR FEL 180 DEGREE DIPOLE

    SciTech Connect

    Kenneth Baggett; George Biallas; Donald Bullard; Jeffery Dail; David Douglas; Tommy Hiatt; Michael Mccrea

    2003-05-01

    A family of large bending dipoles has been magnetically measured to support the 10 kW IR-FEL upgrade. This upgrade will allow for a wider wavelength range and an increase in the machine energy to operate between 80 MeV/c and 210 MeV/c. The dipole magnets allow the beam to bend 180 degrees over a 1 meter radius. The requirements for these magnets include varying field strengths, large horizontal apertures and parts in 10,000 field homogeneity as well as setability of core and integrated field. This paper will describe the process involved in measuring and achieving these requirements.

  18. Coupling of Carbon Dioxide Stretch and Bend Vibrations Reveals Thermal Population Dynamics in an Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Chiara H; Kramer, Patrick L; Yamada, Steven A; Nishida, Jun; Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-01-28

    The population relaxation of carbon dioxide dissolved in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EmimNTf2) was investigated using polarization-selective ultrafast infrared pump-probe spectroscopy and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy. Due to the coupling of the bend with the asymmetric stretch, excitation of the asymmetric stretch of a molecule with a thermally populated bend leads to an additional peak, a hot band, which is red-shifted from the main asymmetric absorption band by the combination band shift. This hot band peak exchanges population with the main peak through the gain and loss of bend excitation quanta. The isotropic pump-probe signal originating from the unexcited bend state displays a fast, relatively small amplitude, initial growth followed by a longer time scale exponential decay. The signal is analyzed over its full time range using a kinetic model to determine both the vibrational lifetime (the final decay) and rate constant for the loss of the bend energy. This bend relaxation manifests as the fast initial growth of the stretch/no bend signal because the hot band (stretch with bend) is "over pumped" relative to the ground state equilibrium. The nonequilibrium pumping occurs because the hot band has a larger transition dipole moment than the stretch/no bend peak. The system is then prepared, utilizing an acousto-optic mid-infrared pulse shaper to cut a hole in the excitation pulse spectrum, such that the hot band is not pumped. The isotropic pump-probe signal from the stretch/no bend state is altered because the initial excited state population ratio has changed. Instead of a growth due to relaxation of bend quanta, a fast initial decay is observed because of thermal excitation of the bend. Fitting this curve gives the rate constant for thermal excitation of the bend and the lifetime, which agree with those determined in the pump-probe experiments without frequency

  19. Coupling of Carbon Dioxide Stretch and Bend Vibrations Reveals Thermal Population Dynamics in an Ionic Liquid.

    PubMed

    Giammanco, Chiara H; Kramer, Patrick L; Yamada, Steven A; Nishida, Jun; Tamimi, Amr; Fayer, Michael D

    2016-01-28

    The population relaxation of carbon dioxide dissolved in the room temperature ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis(trifluoromethylsulfonyl)imide (EmimNTf2) was investigated using polarization-selective ultrafast infrared pump-probe spectroscopy and two-dimensional infrared (2D IR) spectroscopy. Due to the coupling of the bend with the asymmetric stretch, excitation of the asymmetric stretch of a molecule with a thermally populated bend leads to an additional peak, a hot band, which is red-shifted from the main asymmetric absorption band by the combination band shift. This hot band peak exchanges population with the main peak through the gain and loss of bend excitation quanta. The isotropic pump-probe signal originating from the unexcited bend state displays a fast, relatively small amplitude, initial growth followed by a longer time scale exponential decay. The signal is analyzed over its full time range using a kinetic model to determine both the vibrational lifetime (the final decay) and rate constant for the loss of the bend energy. This bend relaxation manifests as the fast initial growth of the stretch/no bend signal because the hot band (stretch with bend) is "over pumped" relative to the ground state equilibrium. The nonequilibrium pumping occurs because the hot band has a larger transition dipole moment than the stretch/no bend peak. The system is then prepared, utilizing an acousto-optic mid-infrared pulse shaper to cut a hole in the excitation pulse spectrum, such that the hot band is not pumped. The isotropic pump-probe signal from the stretch/no bend state is altered because the initial excited state population ratio has changed. Instead of a growth due to relaxation of bend quanta, a fast initial decay is observed because of thermal excitation of the bend. Fitting this curve gives the rate constant for thermal excitation of the bend and the lifetime, which agree with those determined in the pump-probe experiments without frequency

  20. Bending Flexibility of Actin Filaments during Motor-Induced Sliding

    PubMed Central

    Vikhorev, Petr G.; Vikhoreva, Natalia N.; Månsson, Alf

    2008-01-01

    Muscle contraction and other forms of cell motility occur as a result of cyclic interactions between myosin molecules and actin filaments. Force generation is generally attributed to ATP-driven structural changes in myosin, whereas a passive role is ascribed to actin. However, some results challenge this view, predicting structural changes in actin during motor activity, e.g., when the actin filaments slide on a myosin-coated surface in vitro. Here, we analyzed statistical properties of the sliding filament paths, allowing us to detect changes of this type. It is interesting to note that evidence for substantial structural changes that led to increased bending flexibility of the filaments was found in phalloidin-stabilized, but not in phalloidin-free, actin filaments. The results are in accordance with the idea that a high-flexibility structural state of actin is a prerequisite for force production, but not the idea that a low-to-high flexibility transition of the actin filament should be an important component of the force-generating step per se. Finally, our data challenge the general view that phalloidin-stabilized filaments behave as native actin filaments in their interaction with myosin. This has important implications, since phalloidin stabilization is a routine procedure in most studies of actomyosin function. PMID:18835897

  1. Anisotropic effects on ultrasonic guided waves propagation in composite bends.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xudong; Ratassepp, Madis; Rajagopal, Prabhu; Fan, Zheng

    2016-12-01

    Ultrasonic guided waves have proven to be attractive to the long-range testing of composite laminates. As complex-shaped composite components are increasingly incorporated in high-performance structures, understanding of both anisotropic and geometric effects on guided waves propagation is needed to evaluate their suitability for the non-destructive testing (NDT) of such complex structures. This paper reports the Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) simulations revealing the capability of energy confinement carried by two types of guided modes in 90° carbon fiber/epoxy (CF/EP) bends. Existence of the phenomenon is cross-validated by both 3D Finite Element (FE) modeling and experimental measurements. The physics of such energy trapping effect is explained in view of geometric variation and anisotropic properties, and the frequency effect on the extent of energy concentration is discussed. Finally, the feasibility of using such confined guided waves for rapid inspection of bent composite plate structures is also discussed. PMID:27518426

  2. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    PubMed Central

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin. PMID:27255427

  3. Flexural bending of southern Tibet in a retro foreland setting

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Erchie; Kamp, Peter J. J.; Xu, Ganqing; Hodges, Kip V.; Meng, Kai; Chen, Lin; Wang, Gang; Luo, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The highest elevation of the Tibetan Plateau, lying 5,700 m above sea level, occurs within the part of the Lhasa block immediately north of the India-Tibet suture zone (Yarlung Zangbo suture zone, YZSZ), being 700 m higher than the maximum elevation of more northern parts of the plateau. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain this differentially higher topography and the rock uplift that led to it, invoking crustal compression or extension. Here we present the results of structural investigations along the length of the high elevation belt and suture zone, which rather indicate flexural bending of the southern margin of the Lhasa block (Gangdese magmatic belt) and occurrence of an adjacent foreland basin (Kailas Basin), both elements resulting from supra-crustal loading of the Lhasa block by the Zangbo Complex (Indian plate rocks) via the Great Counter Thrust. Hence we interpret the differential elevation of the southern margin of the plateau as due originally to uplift of a forebulge in a retro foreland setting modified by subsequent processes. Identification of this flexural deformation has implications for early evolution of the India-Tibet continental collision zone, implying an initial (Late Oligocene) symmetrical architecture that subsequently transitioned into the present asymmetrical wedge architecture. PMID:26174578

  4. Flexural bending of southern Tibet in a retro foreland setting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erchie; Kamp, Peter J J; Xu, Ganqing; Hodges, Kip V; Meng, Kai; Chen, Lin; Wang, Gang; Luo, Hui

    2015-07-15

    The highest elevation of the Tibetan Plateau, lying 5,700 m above sea level, occurs within the part of the Lhasa block immediately north of the India-Tibet suture zone (Yarlung Zangbo suture zone, YZSZ), being 700 m higher than the maximum elevation of more northern parts of the plateau. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain this differentially higher topography and the rock uplift that led to it, invoking crustal compression or extension. Here we present the results of structural investigations along the length of the high elevation belt and suture zone, which rather indicate flexural bending of the southern margin of the Lhasa block (Gangdese magmatic belt) and occurrence of an adjacent foreland basin (Kailas Basin), both elements resulting from supra-crustal loading of the Lhasa block by the Zangbo Complex (Indian plate rocks) via the Great Counter Thrust. Hence we interpret the differential elevation of the southern margin of the plateau as due originally to uplift of a forebulge in a retro foreland setting modified by subsequent processes. Identification of this flexural deformation has implications for early evolution of the India-Tibet continental collision zone, implying an initial (Late Oligocene) symmetrical architecture that subsequently transitioned into the present asymmetrical wedge architecture.

  5. Effect of Solder Joint Length on Fracture Under Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, Saeed; Nourani, Amir; Spelt, Jan K.

    2016-01-01

    Fracture tests were conducted on copper-solder-copper joints of various lengths using double-cantilever-beam (DCB) specimens under mode I loading conditions. The thickness and length of the solder joints were large enough to neglect any anisotropy associated with the solder microstructure. It was found that the critical strain energy release rate at crack initiation, G ci, was insensitive to the length of the solder joint; however, for joints shorter than a characteristic length which was a function of the thickness and the mechanical properties of the solder layer and the substrates, the fracture load increased with increasing solder joint length. A sandwich model was developed for the analysis of the stress and strain in solder joints, taking into account the influence of both the bending deformation and the shear deformation of the substrates on the solder joint stresses. Consistent with the experimental results, it was found that solder joints longer than the characteristic length have a maximum peel stress that remains unchanged with joint length, causing the joint strength to become independent of the joint length. A closed-form analytical solution was developed for the characteristic length of DCB specimens under mode I loading. The experimental results were in good agreement with the analytical model and with finite element results. The generality of the G ci failure criterion was demonstrated by comparing the experimental results and the fracture load predictions of mode I DCB solder joints with different lengths.

  6. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hermans, Rodolfo I.; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A.; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-06-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin.

  7. Turbulent flow in a 180 deg bend: Modeling and computations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kaul, Upender K.

    1989-01-01

    A low Reynolds number k-epsilon turbulence model was presented which yields accurate predictions of the kinetic energy near the wall. The model is validated with the experimental channel flow data of Kreplin and Eckelmann. The predictions are also compared with earlier results from direct simulation of turbulent channel flow. The model is especially useful for internal flows where the inflow boundary condition of epsilon is not easily prescribed. The model partly derives from some observations based on earlier direct simulation results of near-wall turbulence. The low Reynolds number turbulence model together with an existing curvature correction appropriate to spinning cylinder flows was used to simulate the flow in a U-bend with the same radius of curvature as the Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) Turn-Around Duct (TAD). The present computations indicate a space varying curvature correction parameter as opposed to a constant parameter as used in the spinning cylinder flows. Comparison with limited available experimental data is made. The comparison is favorable, but detailed experimental data is needed to further improve the curvature model.

  8. Prediction and Theory Evaluation: The Case of Light Bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brush, Stephen G.

    1989-12-01

    Is a theory that makes successful predictions of new facts better than one that does not? Does a fact provide better evidence for a theory if it was not known before being deduced from the theory? These questions can be answered by analyzing historical cases. Einstein's successful prediction of gravitational light bending from his general theory of relativity has been presented as an important example of how ``real'' science works (in contrast to alleged pseudosciences like psychoanalysis). But, while this success gained favorable publicity for the theory, most scientists did not give it any more weight than the deduction of the advance of Mercury's perihelion (a phenomenon known for several decades). The fact that scientists often use the word ``prediction'' to describe the deduction of such previously known facts suggests that novelty may be of little importance in evaluating theories. It may even detract from the evidential value of a fact, until it is clear that competing theories cannot account for the new fact.

  9. Bending fatigue study of nickel-titanium Gates Glidden drills.

    PubMed

    Luebke, Neill H; Brantley, William A; Alapati, Satish B; Mitchell, John C; Lausten, Leonard L; Daehn, Glenn S

    2005-07-01

    ProFile nickel-titanium Gates Glidden drills were tested in bending fatigue to simulate clinical conditions. Ten samples each in sizes #1 through #6 were placed in a device that deflected the drill head 4 mm from the axis. The drill head was placed inside a ball bearing fixture, which allowed it to run free at 4000 rpm, and the total number of revolutions was recorded until failure. Fracture surfaces were examined with a scanning electron microscope to determine the initiation site and nature of the failure process. Mean +/- SD for the number of revolutions to failure for the drill sizes were: #1: 1826.3 +/- 542.5; #2: 5395.7 +/- 2581.5; #3: 694.4 +/- 516.8; #4: 261.0 +/- 138.0; #5: 49.6 +/- 14.9; #6: 195.9 +/- 78.5. All drills failed in a ductile mode, and fracture initiation sites appeared to be coincident with machining grooves or other flaws, suggesting the need for improved manufacturing procedures.

  10. Flexural bending of southern Tibet in a retro foreland setting.

    PubMed

    Wang, Erchie; Kamp, Peter J J; Xu, Ganqing; Hodges, Kip V; Meng, Kai; Chen, Lin; Wang, Gang; Luo, Hui

    2015-01-01

    The highest elevation of the Tibetan Plateau, lying 5,700 m above sea level, occurs within the part of the Lhasa block immediately north of the India-Tibet suture zone (Yarlung Zangbo suture zone, YZSZ), being 700 m higher than the maximum elevation of more northern parts of the plateau. Various mechanisms have been proposed to explain this differentially higher topography and the rock uplift that led to it, invoking crustal compression or extension. Here we present the results of structural investigations along the length of the high elevation belt and suture zone, which rather indicate flexural bending of the southern margin of the Lhasa block (Gangdese magmatic belt) and occurrence of an adjacent foreland basin (Kailas Basin), both elements resulting from supra-crustal loading of the Lhasa block by the Zangbo Complex (Indian plate rocks) via the Great Counter Thrust. Hence we interpret the differential elevation of the southern margin of the plateau as due originally to uplift of a forebulge in a retro foreland setting modified by subsequent processes. Identification of this flexural deformation has implications for early evolution of the India-Tibet continental collision zone, implying an initial (Late Oligocene) symmetrical architecture that subsequently transitioned into the present asymmetrical wedge architecture. PMID:26174578

  11. Bending and breathing modes of the Galactic disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Widrow, Lawrence M.; Barber, Jarrett; Chequers, Matthew H.; Cheng, Edward

    2014-05-01

    We explore the hypothesis that a passing satellite or dark matter subhalo has excited coherent oscillations of the Milky Way's stellar disc in the direction perpendicular to the Galactic mid-plane. This work is motivated by recent observations of spatially dependent bulk vertical motions within ˜2 kpc of the Sun. A satellite can transfer a fraction of its orbital energy to the disc stars as it plunges through the Galactic mid-plane, thereby heating and thickening the disc. Bulk motions arise during the early stages of such an event when the disc is still in an unrelaxed state. We present simple toy-model calculations and simulations of disc-satellite interactions, which show that the response of the disc depends on the relative velocity of the satellite. When the component of the satellite's velocity perpendicular to the disc is small compared with that of the stars, the perturbation is pre-dominantly a bending mode. Conversely, breathing and higher order modes are excited when the vertical velocity of the satellite is larger than that of the stars. We argue that the compression and rarefaction motions seen in three different surveys are in fact breathing-mode perturbations of the Galactic disc.

  12. Praying Mantis Bending Core Breakoff and Retention Mechanism

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Badescu, Mircea; Sherrit, Stewart; Bar-Cohen, Yoseph; Bao, Xiaoqi; Lindermann, Randel A.

    2011-01-01

    Sampling cores requires the controlled breakoff of the core at a known location with respect to the drill end. An additional problem is designing a mechanism that can be implemented at a small scale, yet is robust and versatile enough to be used for a variety of core samples. The new design consists of a set of tubes (a drill tube, an outer tube, and an inner tube) and means of sliding the inner and outer tubes axially relative to each other. Additionally, a sample tube can be housed inside the inner tube for storing the sample. The inner tube fits inside the outer tube, which fits inside the drill tube. The inner and outer tubes can move axially relative to each other. The inner tube presents two lamellae with two opposing grabbing teeth and one pushing tooth. The pushing tooth is offset axially from the grabbing teeth. The teeth can move radially and their motion is controlled by the outer tube. The outer tube presents two lamellae with radial extrusions to control the inner tube lamellae motion. In breaking the core, the mechanism creates two support points (the grabbing teeth and the bit tip) and one push point. The core is broken in bending. The grabbing teeth can also act as a core retention mechanism. The praying mantis that is disclosed herein is an active core breaking/retention mechanism that requires only one additional actuator other than the drilling actuator. It can break cores that are attached to the borehole bottom as

  13. Optical diffraction for measurements of nano-mechanical bending.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Rodolfo I; Dueck, Benjamin; Ndieyira, Joseph Wafula; McKendry, Rachel A; Aeppli, Gabriel

    2016-01-01

    We explore and exploit diffraction effects that have been previously neglected when modelling optical measurement techniques for the bending of micro-mechanical transducers such as cantilevers for atomic force microscopy. The illumination of a cantilever edge causes an asymmetric diffraction pattern at the photo-detector affecting the calibration of the measured signal in the popular optical beam deflection technique (OBDT). The conditions that avoid such detection artefacts conflict with the use of smaller cantilevers. Embracing diffraction patterns as data yields a potent detection technique that decouples tilt and curvature and simultaneously relaxes the requirements on the illumination alignment and detector position through a measurable which is invariant to translation and rotation. We show analytical results, numerical simulations and physiologically relevant experimental data demonstrating the utility of the diffraction patterns. We offer experimental design guidelines and quantify possible sources of systematic error in OBDT. We demonstrate a new nanometre resolution detection method that can replace OBDT, where diffraction effects from finite sized or patterned cantilevers are exploited. Such effects are readily generalized to cantilever arrays, and allow transmission detection of mechanical curvature, enabling instrumentation with simpler geometry. We highlight the comparative advantages over OBDT by detecting molecular activity of antibiotic Vancomycin. PMID:27255427

  14. Four-point-bend fatigue of AA 2026 aluminum alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, J. X.; Zhai, T.; Garratt, M. D.; Bray, G. H.

    2005-09-01

    High-cycle fatigue tests were carried out on a newly developed high-strength AA 2026 Al alloy, which was in the form of extrusion bars with square and rectangular cross sections, using a self-aligning four-point-bend rig at room temperature, 15 Hz, and R = 0.1, in lab air. The fatigue strength of the square and rectangular bars was measured to be 85 and 90 pct of their yield strength, respectively, more than twice that of the predecessor to the 2026 alloy (the AA 2024 Al alloy). Fatigue cracks were found to be always initiated at large Θ' (Al7Cu2(Fe,Mn)) particles and to propagate predominantly in a crystallographic mode in the AA 2026 alloy. The fatigue fractographies of the square and rectangular extrusion bars were found to be markedly different, due to their different grain structures (fibril and layered, respectively). Fracture steps on the crack face were found in both of these extrusion bars. Since the 2026 alloy was purer in terms of Fe and Si content, it contained much less coarse particles than in a 2024 alloy. This partially accounted for the superior fatigue strength of the 2026 alloy.

  15. Localized bending and heating at Enceladus' south pole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beuthe, M.

    2015-10-01

    Since the discovery in 2005 of geysers at the southpole of Enceladus, this midsize moon of Saturn has become famous as the most active icy world in the solar system and as a potential harbor for microbial life. All data gathered during flybys by the Cassini probe point to the existence of a subsurface ocean maintained by tidal heating in the icy crust. This explanation, however, is in conflict with geophysical models which only account for a tenth of the heat output. Such models are based on an approach designed for larger satellites, for which elastic effects are weaker and lateral inhomogeneities are less prominent. By contrast, lateral variations of interior structure are probably the key to understand Enceladus' geological activity. We will test the hypothesis that tidal dissipation is greatly enhanced by local bending of a thinner crust in the south polar region. More generally, we plan to develop a new and faster method to compute tidal dis-sipation in small bodies with lateral heterogeneities,consisting in modeling the crust as a two-dimensional spherical shell with variable thickness or rigidity and with depth-dependent rheology.

  16. Magneto-electric interactions at bending resonance in an asymmetric multiferroic composite: Theory and experiment on the influence of electrode position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sreenivasulu, G.; Qu, P.; Petrov, V. M.; Qu, Hongwei; Srinivasan, G.

    2015-05-01

    In magnetostrictive-piezoelectric bilayers the strength of mechanical strain mediated magneto-electric (ME) interactions shows a resonance enhancement at bending modes. Such composites when operating under frequency modulation at bending resonance have very high ME sensitivity and are of importance for ultrasensitive magnetometers. This report provides an avenue for further enhancement in the ME sensitivity by strategic positioning of the electrodes in the bilayer. We discuss the theory and measurements on the dependence of ME coupling on the position of electrodes in a lead zirconate titanate-permendur bilayer. Samples of effective length L with full electrodes and partial electrodes of length l = L/3 are studied. A five-fold increase in ME voltage coefficient (MEVC) at bending resonance and a 75% increase in low-frequency MEVC are measured as the partial electrode position is moved from the free-end to clamped-end of the bilayer. When the partial electrode is close to the clamped end, the low-frequency and resonance MEVC are 22% and 45% higher, respectively, than for fully electroded bilayer. According to the model discussed here these observations could be attributed to non-uniform stress along the sample length under flexural deformation. Such deformations are stronger at the free-end than at the clamped-end, thereby reducing the stress produced by applied magnetic fields and a reduction in MEVC. Estimates of MEVC are in good agreement with the data.

  17. Time-resolved energy spectrum measurement of a linear induction accelerator with the magnetic analyzer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yuan; Jiang, Xiao-Guo; Yang, Guo-Jun; Chen, Si-Fu; Zhang, Zhuo; Wei, Tao; Li, Jin

    2015-01-01

    We recently set up a time-resolved optical beam diagnostic system. Using this system, we measured the high current electron beam energy in the accelerator under construction. This paper introduces the principle of the diagnostic system, describes the setup, and shows the results. A bending beam line was designed using an existing magnetic analyzer with a 300 mm-bending radius and a 60° bending angle at hard-edge approximation. Calculations show that the magnitude of the beam energy is about 18 MeV, and the energy spread is within 2%. Our results agree well with the initial estimates deduced from the diode voltage approach.

  18. Molecular dynamics simulation of DNA base-pair opening by sharp bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cong, Peiwen; Dai, Liang; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.; Yan, Jie

    2013-03-01

    Many biological processes require sharp bending of DNA. According to worm-like chain model, the bending energy dominates the free energy cost of those processes containing DNA loops shorter than 40 nm, such as DNA wrapping around histones, Lac repressor looping and virus DNA packaging. However, several recent experimental observations suggest that the WLC model s not applicable under tight bending conditions. In full atom molecular dynamics simulations, a double stranded, 20 base-pairs DNA fragment is forced to bend by an external spring. It is found that one or two AT-rich regions are disrupted for sufficiently small end-to-end distance. The disrupted DNA base-pairs separate and usually stack with the neighbouring base-pairs to form a defect. It is shown that these defects are more bendable than the bending rigidity of the duplex in the regular B-form. The simulation suggests a curvature dependent, non-harmonic bending elasticity of the DNA backbone is necessary to describe the DNA conformation under tight bending conditions.

  19. Elbow- and hinge-bending motions of IgG: Dielectric response and dynamic feature.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Yagihara, Shin

    2016-09-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) is a Y-shaped globular protein consisting of two Fab segments connecting to an Fc segment with a flexible hinge region, in which the Fab segments show secondary flexibility at an "elbow" region. In the present work, the hinge-bending and elbow-bending motions of aqueous solutions of IgG by microwave dielectric measurements below the freezing point of bulk water was observed. The presence of unfreezable water around the macromolecules reduced the effects of steric hindrance normally generated by ice and enabled the intramolecular motions of IgG. At the same time, the overall IgG molecule rotation was restricted by ice. Papain digestion and reduction of the disulfide linkage at the hinge region was used to generate Fab and Fc fragments. In solutions of these fragments, the dielectric relaxation process of the hinge-bending motion was absent, although the elbow-bending motion remained. Three relaxation processes were observed for papain-digested IgG. The high, middle, and low frequency processes were attributed to unfrozen water, local peptide motions cooperating with bound water, and the elbow-bending motion, respectively. In the case of the intact IgG, an additional relaxation process due to the hinge-bending motion was observed at frequencies lower than that of the elbow-bending motion. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Biopolymers 105: 626-632, 2016. PMID:27018805

  20. Flooding characteristics of gas-liquid two-phase flow in a horizontal U bend pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Sakaguchi, T.; Hosokawa, S.; Fujii, Y.

    1995-09-01

    For next-generation nuclear reactors, hybrid safety systems which consist of active and passive safety systems have been planned. Steam generators with horizontal U bend pipelines will be used as one of the passive safety systems. It is required to clarify flow characteristics, especially the onset of flooding, in the horizontal U bend pipelines in order to examine their safety. Flooding in vertical pipes has been studied extensively. However, there is little study on flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines. It is supposed that the onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipelines is different from that in vertical pipes. On the other hand, liquid is generated due to condensation of steam in pipes of the horizontal steam generators at the loss of coolant accident because the steam generators will be used as a condenser of a cooling system of steam from the reactor. It is necessary to simulate this situation by the supply of water at the middle of horizontal pipe. In the present paper, experiments were carried out using a horizontal U bend pipeline with a liquid supply section in the midway of pipeline. The onset of flooding in the horizontal U bend pipeline was measured. Effects of the length of horizontal pipe and the radius of U bend on the onset of flooding were discussed.

  1. Mechanics of the eukaryotic flagellar axoneme: Evidence for structural distortion during bending.

    PubMed

    Lesich, Kathleen A; dePinho, Tania G; Pelle, Dominic W; Lindemann, Charles B

    2016-05-01

    The sliding doublet mechanism is the established explanation that allows us to understand the process of ciliary and flagellar bending. In this study, we apply the principles of the sliding doublet mechanism to analyze the mechanics of the counterbend phenomenon in sea urchin sperm flagella. When a passive, vanadate-treated, flagellum is forced into a bend with a glass microprobe, the portion of the flagellum distal to the probe exhibits a bend of opposite curvature (counterbend) to the imposed bend. This phenomenon was shown to be caused by the induction of inter-doublet shear and is dependent on the presence of an inter-doublet shear resistance. Here we report that in sea urchin flagella there is systematically less shear induced in the distal flagellum than is predicted by the sliding doublet mechanism, if we follow the assumption that the diameter of the flagellum is uniform. To account for the reduced shear that is observed, the likeliest and most direct interpretation is that the portion of the axoneme that is forced to bend undergoes substantial compression of the axoneme in the bending plane. A compression of 30-50 nm would be sufficient to account for the shear reduction from a bend of 2 radians. A compression of this magnitude would require considerable flexibility in the axoneme structure. This would necessitate that the radial spokes and/or the central pair apparatus are easily compressed by transverse stress. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27001352

  2. Elastic bending modulus of single-layer molybdenum disulfide (MoS2): finite thickness effect.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jin-Wu; Qi, Zenan; Park, Harold S; Rabczuk, Timon

    2013-11-01

    We derive, from an empirical interaction potential, an analytic formula for the elastic bending modulus of single-layer MoS2 (SLMoS2). By using this approach, we do not need to define or estimate a thickness value for SLMoS2, which is important due to the substantial controversy in defining this value for two-dimensional or ultrathin nanostructures such as graphene and nanotubes. The obtained elastic bending modulus of 9.61 eV in SLMoS2 is significantly higher than the bending modulus of 1.4 eV in graphene, and is found to be within the range of values that are obtained using thin shell theory with experimentally obtained values for the elastic constants of SLMoS2. This increase in bending modulus as compared to monolayer graphene is attributed, through our analytic expression, to the finite thickness of SLMoS2. Specifically, while each monolayer of S atoms contributes 1.75 eV to the bending modulus, which is similar to the 1.4 eV bending modulus of monolayer graphene, the additional pairwise and angular interactions between out of plane Mo and S atoms contribute 5.84 eV to the bending modulus of SLMoS2. PMID:24084656

  3. Ares-I Bending Filter Design using a Constrained Optimization Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Charles; Jang, Jiann-Woei; Hall, Robert; Bedrossian, Nazareth

    2008-01-01

    The Ares-I launch vehicle represents a challenging flex-body structural environment for control system design. Software filtering of the inertial sensor output is required to ensure adequate stable response to guidance commands while minimizing trajectory deviations. This paper presents a design methodology employing numerical optimization to develop the Ares-I bending filters. The design objectives include attitude tracking accuracy and robust stability with respect to rigid body dynamics, propellant slosh, and flex. Under the assumption that the Ares-I time-varying dynamics and control system can be frozen over a short period of time, the bending filters are designed to stabilize all the selected frozen-time launch control systems in the presence of parameter uncertainty. To ensure adequate response to guidance command, step response specifications are introduced as constraints in the optimization problem. Imposing these constrains minimizes performance degradation caused by the addition of the bending filters. The first stage bending filter design achieves stability by adding lag to the first structural frequency to phase stabilize the first flex mode while gain stabilizing the higher modes. The upper stage bending filter design gain stabilizes all the flex bending modes. The bending filter designs provided here have been demonstrated to provide stable first and second stage control systems in both Draper Ares Stability Analysis Tool (ASAT) and the MSFC MAVERIC 6DOF nonlinear time domain simulation.

  4. Mechanics of the eukaryotic flagellar axoneme: Evidence for structural distortion during bending.

    PubMed

    Lesich, Kathleen A; dePinho, Tania G; Pelle, Dominic W; Lindemann, Charles B

    2016-05-01

    The sliding doublet mechanism is the established explanation that allows us to understand the process of ciliary and flagellar bending. In this study, we apply the principles of the sliding doublet mechanism to analyze the mechanics of the counterbend phenomenon in sea urchin sperm flagella. When a passive, vanadate-treated, flagellum is forced into a bend with a glass microprobe, the portion of the flagellum distal to the probe exhibits a bend of opposite curvature (counterbend) to the imposed bend. This phenomenon was shown to be caused by the induction of inter-doublet shear and is dependent on the presence of an inter-doublet shear resistance. Here we report that in sea urchin flagella there is systematically less shear induced in the distal flagellum than is predicted by the sliding doublet mechanism, if we follow the assumption that the diameter of the flagellum is uniform. To account for the reduced shear that is observed, the likeliest and most direct interpretation is that the portion of the axoneme that is forced to bend undergoes substantial compression of the axoneme in the bending plane. A compression of 30-50 nm would be sufficient to account for the shear reduction from a bend of 2 radians. A compression of this magnitude would require considerable flexibility in the axoneme structure. This would necessitate that the radial spokes and/or the central pair apparatus are easily compressed by transverse stress. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Enhanced film conductance of silver nanowire-based flexible transparent & conductive networks by bending

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Xingda; Yang, Bingchu; Zhang, Xiang; Zhou, Conghua

    2015-07-01

    Bending is usually used to test durability of flexible transparent and conductive films. Due to the large stress incurred by this technique, bending has always been observed to deteriorate conductance of electrodes such as indium tin oxide film. In contrast, we here demonstrate that bending could be used to improve conductance of silver nanowire-based flexible transparent and conductive films. The enhanced conductance is due to improved contact between nanowires, which was favored by the hydrogen bond formed between residential polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) on silver nanowire and TiOx nanoparticles pre-coated on the substrate. The enhanced conductance was found to be affected by bending direction; bending towards the substrate not only yielded quicker decrease in sheet resistance, but also showed better film conductance than bending towards the nanowires. Then, with assistance of surface modification of substrate and ultra-long silver nanowires (averaged at 124 μm, maximum at 438 μm), optoelectronic performance of 90.2% (transmittance at 550 nm) and 12.5 Ω sq-1 (sheet resistance) has been achieved by bending. Such performance was better than commercialized flexible ITO films, and even competed with that obtained from thermal annealing at temperature of 200 °C. Moreover, Fourier transfer infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy study showed strong coordination between C=O (heterocyclic ring of PVP) and silver atoms, showing obvious capping behavior of PVP on silver nanowires.

  6. Feature guided waves (FGW) in fiber reinforced composite plates with 90° transverse bends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xudong; Ratassepp, Madis; Fan, Zheng; Manogharan, Prabhakaran; Rajagopal, Prabhu

    2016-02-01

    Fiber reinforced composite materials have been increasingly used in high performance structures such as aircraft and large wind turbine blades. 90◦ composite bends are common in reinforcing structural elements, which are prone to defects such as delamination, crack, fatigue, etc. Current techniques are based on local inspection which makes the whole bend area scanning time consuming and tedious. This paper explores the feasibility of using feature guided waves (FGW) for rapid screening of 90◦ composite laminated bends. In this study, the behavior of the bend-guided wave in the anisotropic composite material is investigated through modal studies by applying the Semi-Analytical Finite Element (SAFE) method, also 3D Finite Element (FE) simulations are performed to visualize the results and to obtain cross validation. To understand the influence of the anisotropy, three-dimensional dispersion surfaces of the guided modes in flat laminated plates are obtained, showing the dependence of the phase velocity with the frequency and the fiber orientation. S H0-like and S 0-like bend-guided modes are identified with energy concentrated in the bend region, limiting energy radiation into adjacent plates and thus achieving increased inspection length. Finally, parametric studies are carried out to further investigate the properties of these two bend-guided modes, demonstrating the variation of the group velocity, the energy concentration, and the attenuation with the frequency.

  7. Probing a label-free local bend in DNA by single molecule tethered particle motion.

    PubMed

    Brunet, Annaël; Chevalier, Sébastien; Destainville, Nicolas; Manghi, Manoel; Rousseau, Philippe; Salhi, Maya; Salomé, Laurence; Tardin, Catherine

    2015-06-23

    Being capable of characterizing DNA local bending is essential to understand thoroughly many biological processes because they involve a local bending of the double helix axis, either intrinsic to the sequence or induced by the binding of proteins. Developing a method to measure DNA bend angles that does not perturb the conformation of the DNA itself or the DNA-protein complex is a challenging task. Here, we propose a joint theory-experiment high-throughput approach to rigorously measure such bend angles using the Tethered Particle Motion (TPM) technique. By carefully modeling the TPM geometry, we propose a simple formula based on a kinked Worm-Like Chain model to extract the bend angle from TPM measurements. Using constructs made of 575 base-pair DNAs with in-phase assemblies of one to seven 6A-tracts, we find that the sequence CA6CGG induces a bend angle of 19° ± 4°. Our method is successfully compared to more theoretically complex or experimentally invasive ones such as cyclization, NMR, FRET or AFM. We further apply our procedure to TPM measurements from the literature and demonstrate that the angles of bends induced by proteins, such as Integration Host Factor (IHF) can be reliably evaluated as well.

  8. Bio-inspired bending actuator for controlling conical nose shape using piezoelectric patches.

    PubMed

    Na, Tae-Won; Jung, Jin-Young; Oh, Ii-Kwon

    2014-10-01

    In this paper, a bio-inspired bending actuator was designed and fabricated using piezoelectric patches and cantilever-shaped beam for controlling nose shape. The aim of this study is to investigate the use of the bending actuator. PZT and single crystal PMN-PT actuators were used to generate translational strain and shear stress. The piezoelectric patches were attached on the clamped cantilever beam to convert their translational strains to bending motion of the beam. First, finite element analysis was performed to identify and to make an accurate estimate of the feasibility on the bending actuation by applying various voltages and frequencies. Based on the results of the FEM analysis, the experiments were also performed. Static voltages and dynamic voltages with various frequencies were applied to the bending actuators with PZTs and PMN-PTs, and the rotation angles of the nose connected to the top of bending actuators were measured, respectively. As the results, the bending actuator using PMN-PT patches showed better performances in all cases. With the increases of signal frequency and input voltage, the rotation angle also found to be increased. Especially at the frequency of 5 Hz and input voltage of 600 V, the nose generated the maximum rotation angle of 3.15 degree. PMID:25942810

  9. The investigation of guided wave propagation around a pipe bend using an analytical modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Sanderson, R M; Hutchins, D A; Billson, D R; Mudge, P J

    2013-03-01

    Guided wave inspection has the advantage of providing full volumetric coverage of tens of meters of pipe from a single test location. However, guided wave behavior is complex and there are many factors to consider such as the numerous possible vibrational modes and multiple reflections. The guided wave inspection technique is potentially valuable for pipelines that cannot be inspected with internal "pigs." However, in situations such as this, there are often bends in the pipe and the presence of the bend is known to distort the received signals. In order to address this issue, a study has been carried out that uses a combination of finite element analysis and experimentation to understand the behavior of guided waves in pipe bends. In addition to this, an analytical modeling methodology is put forward that uses basic information from finite element models of pipe bends to create a computationally fast solution to a potentially infinite number of scenarios. The analytical model can be used to both predict the effects of pipe bends on a range of signals and undo the distortion caused by pipe bends. Examples of this are given and compared to finite element results for flaws beyond pipe bends.

  10. Permanent magnet flowmeter having improved output terminal means

    DOEpatents

    August, Charles; Myers, Harry J.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is an improved permanent magnet flowmeter capable of withstanding bending stresses in the direction of induced emf signals. The flowmeter includes a unique terminal arrangement integrally formed with the flowmeter by trepanning opposing wall sections of the flowmeter body. The terminal arrangement provides increased flowmeter sensitivity by increasing the strength of the induced emf signals.

  11. Permanent-magnet flowmeter having improved output-terminal means

    DOEpatents

    August, C.; Myers, H.J.

    1981-10-26

    Disclosed is an improved permanent magnet flowmeter capable of withstanding bending stresses in the direction of induced emf signals. The flowmeter includes a unique terminal arrangement integrally formed with the flowmeter by trepanning opposing wall sections of the flowmeter body. The terminal arrangement provides increased flowmeter sensitivity by increasing the strength of the induced emf signals.

  12. Planar textile antennas with artificial magnetic conductor for body-centric communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamardin, Kamilia; Rahim, Mohamad Kamal A.; Hall, Peter S.; Samsuri, Noor Asmawati; Latef, Tarik Abdul; Ullah, Mohammad Habib

    2016-04-01

    Two textile antennas namely diamond dipole and coplanar waveguide (CPW) monopole are designed to test the proposed textile artificial magnetic conductor (AMC). Performance comparison including return loss, radiation pattern, and gain between the two antennas above AMC is observed. Results show gain improvement with reduced backlobes when having AMC. Bending and wetness measurements are also conducted. Bending is found not to cause performance disruption, while wetness influences performance distortion. However, once the antennas and AMC dried out, the original performance is retrieved.

  13. Band bending at ferroelectric surfaces and interfaces investigated by x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Apostol, Nicoleta Georgiana

    2014-11-24

    This work reports on the use of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy to quantify band bending at ferroelectric free surfaces and at their interfaces with metals. Surfaces exhibiting out-of-plane ferroelectric polarization are characterized by a band bending, due to the formation of a dipole layer at the surface, composed by the uncompensated polarization charges (due to ionic displacement) and to the depolarization charge sheet of opposite sign, composed by mobile charge carriers, which migrate near surface, owing to the depolarization electric field. To this surface band bending due to out-of-plane polarization states, metal-semiconductor Schottky barriers must be considered additionally when ferroelectrics are covered by metal layers. It is found that the net band bending is not always an algebraic sum of the two effects discussed above, since sometimes the metal is able to provide additional charge carriers, which are able to fully compensate the surface charge of the ferroelectric, up to the vanishing of the ferroelectric band bending. The two cases which will be discussed in more detail are Au and Cu deposited by molecular beam epitaxy on PbZr{sub 0.2}Ti{sub 0.8}O{sub 3}(001) single crystal thin layers, prepared by pulsed laser deposition. Gold forms unconnected nanoparticles, and their effect on the band bending is the apparition of a Schottky band bending additional to the band bending due to the out-of-plane polarization. Copper, starting with a given thickness, forms continuous metal layers connected to the ground of the system, and provide electrons in sufficient quantity to compensate the band bending due to the out-of-plane polarization.

  14. Effect of Time Dependent Bending of Current Sheets in Response to Generation of Plasma Jets and Reverse Currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frank, Anna

    Magnetic reconnection is a basis for many impulsive phenomena in space and laboratory plasmas accompanied by effective transformation of magnetic energy. Reconnection processes usually occur in relatively thin current sheets (CSs), which separate magnetic fields of different or opposite directions. We report on recent observations of time dependent bending of CSs, which results from plasma dynamics inside the sheet. The experiments are carried out with the CS-3D laboratory device (Institute of General Physics RAS, Moscow) [1]. The CS magnetic structure with an X line provides excitation of the Hall currents and plasma acceleration from the X line to both side edges [2]. In the presence of the guide field By the Hall currents give rise to bending of the sheet: the peripheral regions located away from the X line are deflected from CS middle plane (z=0) in the opposite directions ±z [3]. We have revealed generation of reverse currents jy near the CS edges, i.e. the currents flowing in the opposite direction to the main current in the sheet [4]. There are strong grounds to believe that reverse currents are generated by the outflow plasma jets [5], accelerated inside the sheet and penetrated into the regions with strong normal magnetic field component Bz [4]. An impressive effect of sudden change in the sign of the CS bend has been disclosed recently, when analyzing distributions of plasma density [6] and current away from the X line, in the presence of the guide field By. The CS configuration suddenly becomes opposite from that observed at the initial stage, and this effect correlates well with generation of reverse currents. Consequently this effect can be related to excitation of the reverse Hall currents owing to generation of reverse currents jy in the CS. Hence it may be concluded that CSs may exhibit time dependent vertical z-displacements, and the sheet geometry depends on excitation of the Hall currents, acceleration of plasma jets and generation of reverse

  15. 77 FR 58354 - Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District; Oregon; Withdrawal of Notice for Preparation of an Environmental...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-20

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Forest Service Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District; Oregon; Withdrawal of Notice for... Bend-Fort Rock Ranger District and FHWA are withdrawing their intent to prepare an Environmental Impact... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Amy Tinderholt, Project Leader, Bend- Fort Rock Ranger District,...

  16. MAGNETS FOR A MUON STORAGE RING.

    SciTech Connect

    PARKER, B.; ANERELLA, M.; GHOSH, A.; GUPTA, R.; HARRISON, M.; SCHMALZLE, J.; SONDERICKER, J.; WILLEN, E.

    2002-06-18

    We present a new racetrack coil magnet design, with an open midplane gap, that keeps decay particles in a neutrino factory muon storage ring from directly hitting superconducting coils. The structure is very compact because coil ends overlap middle sections top and bottom for skew focusing optics. A large racetrack coil bend radius allows ''react and wind'' magnet technology to be used for brittle Nb{sub 3}Sn superconductors. We describe two versions: Design-A, a magnet presently under construction and Design-B, a further iterated concept that achieves the higher magnetic field quality specified in the neutrino factory feasibility Study-II report. For Design-B reverse polarity and identical end design of consecutive long and short coils offers theoretically perfect magnet end field error cancellation. These designs avoid the dead space penalty from coil ends and interconnect regions (a large fraction in machines with short length but large aperture magnets) and provide continuous bending or focusing without interruption. The coil support structure and cryostat are carefully optimized.

  17. Laser assisted die bending: a new application of high power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuöcker, D.; Schumi, T.; Spitzer, O.; Bammer, F.; Schuöcker, G.; Sperrer, G.

    2015-02-01

    Nowadays high power lasers are mainly used for cutting of sheet metals, for welding, hardening and rapid prototyping. In the forming of sheet metals as bending or deep drawing lasers are not used. Nevertheless a few years ago a new application of high power lasers has been invented, where bending of materials that break at room temperature becomes possible by heating them along the bending edge with high power lasers thus allowing their treatment without cracks and rupture. For this purpose a large number of diode lasers are arranged in the bottom tool of a bending machine (a V-shaped die) which heat up the initially flat sheet metal during the bending process what is performed by pressing it into the die with a knife shaped upper tool where due to the laser heating the material is softened and thus cracks are avoided. For the technical realization of the new process of laser assisted die bending, modules equipped with numerous laser diodes and a total beam power of 2,5 kW are used. The light emitted by these modules enters a tool with a length of 15cm and is deflected towards the workpiece. By using ten of these modules with adjacent dies and by integrating those in a bending press a bending edge of sheet metals with a length of 1500mm can be realized. Such a bending press with laser assistance also needs energization with a power of practically 50kW, a respective water flow, a heat exchanger system and also a control for all functions of this system. Special measures have also been developed to avoid radiating of those tools that are not covered by a workpiece in the case of bending edges shorter than the full length of the bending tools whereas individual short circuiting of diode modules can be performed. Specific measures to ensure a safe operation without any harm to the operational person have been realized. Exploitation of the bending process has been carried out for titanium, where material thicknesses up to 3mm have been bent successfully.

  18. The importance of jet bending in gamma-ray AGNs—revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Graham, P. J.; Tingay, S. J.

    2014-04-01

    We investigate the hypothesis that γ-ray-quiet active galactic nuclei (AGNs) have a greater tendency for jet bending than γ-ray-loud AGNs, revisiting the analysis of Tingay et al. We perform a statistical analysis using a large sample of 351 radio-loud AGNs along with γ-ray identifications from the Fermi Large Area Telescope (LAT). Our results show no statistically significant differences in jet-bending properties between γ-ray-loud and γ-ray-quiet populations, indicating that jet bending is not a significant factor for γ-ray detection in AGNs.

  19. Waveguiding and bending modes in a plasma photonic crystal bandgap device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Cappelli, M. A.

    2016-06-01

    Waveguiding and bending modes are investigated in a fully tunable plasma photonic crystal. The plasma device actively controls the propagation of free space electromagnetic waves in the S to X band of the microwave spectrum. An array of discharge plasma tubes form a square crystal lattice exhibiting a well-defined bandgap, with individual active switching of the plasma elements to allow for waveguiding and bending modes to be generated dynamically. We show, through simulations and experiments, the existence of transverse electric (TE) mode waveguiding and bending modes.

  20. Bending elasticity of vesicle membranes studied by Monte Carlo simulations of vesicle thermal shape fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Penič, Samo; Iglič, Aleš; Bivas, Isak; Fošnarič, Miha

    2015-07-01

    The membrane bending stiffness of nearly spherical lipid vesicles can be deduced from the analysis of their thermal shape fluctuations. The theoretical basis of this analysis [Milner and Safran, Phys. Rev. A: At., Mol., Opt. Phys., 1987, 36, 4371-4379] uses the mean field approximation. In this work we apply Monte Carlo simulations and estimate the error in the determination of the bending stiffness due to the approximations applied in the theory. It is less than 10%. The method presented in this work can also be used to determine the changes of the bending stiffness of biological membranes due to their chemical and/or structural modifications.

  1. DYNAMIC BEHAVIOR OF BURIED BEND WITH THRUST RESTRAINT IN LIQUEFYING GROUND

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawabata, Toshinori; Sawada, Yutaka; Mohri, Yoshiyuki; Ling, Hoe I.

    In this study, a shaking table test was carried out in order to discuss the dynamic behavior for the bend of pressure pipeline with a concrete block and thrust restraints using geogrids or gravels in liquefying ground. As a result, it was revealed that the concrete block was largely moved and the relative displacement between the bend and the adjacent pipe became large. On the other hand, it was proved that geogrids and gravels were very effective for the lateral resistance in liquefying ground. In addition, the relative displacement was small because of the same difference between the bend and the adjacent pipe.

  2. Digital Method of Analyzing the Bending Stiffness of Non-Crimp Fabrics

    SciTech Connect

    Soteropoulos, Dimitri; Fetfatsidis, Konstantine; Sherwood, James A.; Langworthy, Joanna

    2011-05-04

    A digital-analytical method for characterizing the bending behavior of NCFs (Non-Crimp Fabrics) is developed. The study is based on a hanging fabric loaded to a known displacement. The image of the deformed fabric is captured digitally, and then analyzed to describe the deformed shape of the beam using x-y coordinates. The bending stiffness of the fabric is then determined through an iterative method using a finite element method (ABAQUS). This effective bending stiffness is of importance in the formation of wave defects in NCFs during manufacturing processes such as thermoforming, vacuum assisted resin transfer molding, and compression molding.

  3. Second-order infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles

    SciTech Connect

    Sabitov, I Kh

    2014-12-31

    We study infinitesimal bendings of surfaces of revolution with flattening at the poles. We begin by considering the minimal possible smoothness class C{sup 1} both for surfaces and for deformation fields. Conditions are formulated for a given harmonic of a first-order infinitesimal bending to be extendable into a second order infinitesimal bending. We finish by stating a criterion for nonrigidity of second order for closed surfaces of revolution in the analytic class. We also give the first concrete example of such a nonrigid surface. Bibliography: 15 entries.

  4. Effects of Temperature and Forming Speed on Plastic Bending of Adhesively Bonded Sheet Metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takiguchi, Michihiro; Yoshida, Tetsuya; Yoshida, Fusahito

    This paper deals with the temperature and rate-dependent elasto-viscoplasticity behaviour of a highly ductile acrylic adhesive and its effect on plastic bending of adhesively bonded sheet metals. Tensile lap shear tests of aluminium single-lap joints were performed at various temperature of 10-40°C at several tensile speeds. Based on the experimental results, a new constitutive model of temperature and rate-dependent elasto-viscoplasticity of the adhesive is presented. From V-bending experiments and the corresponding numerical simulation, it was found that the gull-wing bend is suppressed by high-speed forming at a lower temperature.

  5. Analysis of supersonic stall bending flutter in axial-flow compressor by actuator disk theory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamczyk, J. J.

    1978-01-01

    An analytical model was developed for predicting the onset of supersonic stall bending flutter in axial-flow compressors. The analysis is based on two-dimensional, compressible, unsteady actuator disk theory. It is applied to a rotor blade row by considering a cascade of airfoils. The effects of shock waves and flow separation are included in the model. Calculations show that the model predicts the onset, in an unshrouded rotor, of a bending flutter mode that exhibits many of the characteristics of supersonic stall bending flutter. The validity of the analysis for predicting this flutter mode is demonstrated.

  6. Injury tolerance and moment response of the knee joint to combined valgus bending and shear loading.

    PubMed

    Bose, Dipan; Bhalla, Kavi S; Untaroiu, Costin D; Ivarsson, B Johan; Crandall, Jeff R; Hurwitz, Shepard

    2008-06-01

    Valgus bending and shearing of the knee have been identified as primary mechanisms of injuries in a lateral loading environment applicable to pedestrian-car collisions. Previous studies have reported on the structural response of the knee joint to pure valgus bending and lateral shearing, as well as the estimated injury thresholds for the knee bending angle and shear displacement based on experimental tests. However, epidemiological studies indicate that most knee injuries are due to the combined effects of bending and shear loading. Therefore, characterization of knee stiffness for combined loading and the associated injury tolerances is necessary for developing vehicle countermeasures to mitigate pedestrian injuries. Isolated knee joint specimens (n=40) from postmortem human subjects were tested in valgus bending at a loading rate representative of a pedestrian-car impact. The effect of lateral shear force combined with the bending moment on the stiffness response and the injury tolerances of the knee was concurrently evaluated. In addition to the knee moment-angle response, the bending angle and shear displacement corresponding to the first instance of primary ligament failure were determined in each test. The failure displacements were subsequently used to estimate an injury threshold function based on a simplified analytical model of the knee. The validity of the determined injury threshold function was subsequently verified using a finite element model. Post-test necropsy of the knees indicated medial collateral ligament injury consistent with the clinical injuries observed in pedestrian victims. The moment-angle response in valgus bending was determined at quasistatic and dynamic loading rates and compared to previously published test data. The peak bending moment values scaled to an average adult male showed no significant change with variation in the superimposed shear load. An injury threshold function for the knee in terms of bending angle and shear

  7. Experimental Observations of a Stitched Composite with a Notch Subjected to Combined Bending and Tension Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palmer, Susan O.; Nettles, Alan T.; Poe, C. C.

    1998-01-01

    A series of tests was conducted to support development of an analytical model for predicting the failure strains of stitched warp-knit carbon/epoxy composite materials with through-thicknesss damage in the form of a crack-like notch. Measurements of strain near notch tips, crack opening displacement (COD), and applied load were monitored in all tests. The out-of-plane displacement at the center of the notch was also measured when the specimen was subjected to bending. Three types of loading were applied: pure bending, pure tension, and combined bending and tension.

  8. Experimental Determination of High-Order Bending Elastic Constants of Lipid Bilayers.

    PubMed

    Toscano-Flores, Liliana G; Jacinto-Méndez, Damián; Carbajal-Tinoco, Mauricio D

    2016-06-30

    We present a method to describe the formation of small lipid vesicles in terms of three bending elastic constants that can be experimentally measured. Our method combines a general expression of the elastic free energy of the bilayer and the thermodynamic description of molecular aggregation. The resulting model requires the size distribution of liposomes, which is determined from the X-ray scattered intensity spectra of vesicular dispersions. By using two different preparation methods, we studied a series of vesicular solutions made of distinct lipids and we obtained their corresponding bending elastic constants that are consistent with known bending rigidities. PMID:27267752

  9. A Temperature Sensor Based on a Polymer Optical Fiber Macro-Bend

    PubMed Central

    Moraleda, Alberto Tapetado; García, Carmen Vázquez; Zaballa, Joseba Zubia; Arrue, Jon

    2013-01-01

    The design and development of a plastic optical fiber (POF) macrobend temperature sensor is presented. The sensor has a linear response versus temperature at a fixed bend radius, with a sensitivity of 1.92·10−3 (°C)−1. The sensor system used a dummy fiber-optic sensor for reference purposes having a resolution below 0.3 °C. A comprehensive experimental analysis was carried out to provide insight into the effect of different surrounding media on practical macro-bend POF sensor implementation. Experimental results are successfully compared with bend loss calculations. PMID:24077323

  10. Noninvasive assessment of ulnar bending stiffness in women.

    PubMed

    McCabe, F; Zhou, L J; Steele, C R; Marcus, R

    1991-01-01

    The load-carrying capacity of cortical bone is closely related to its geometry and to its fundamental material properties, including mineral content (BMC). Together these determine the bending stiffness EI, where I is the cross-sectional moment of inertia and E is Young's modulus of elasticity. To assess the relationship of BMC and bone width (BW) to EI in healthy women, we used mechanical response tissue analysis (MRTA), a noninvasive method that involves analysis of tissue responses to ulnar vibration. A total of 48 healthy women were enrolled into an older (64 +/- 1y, n = 25) and a younger (25 +/- 0.6y, n = 23) group. BMC and BW of the dominant ulna were measured by single-photon absorptiometry (SPA). EI was determined by MRTA. BMC (0.75 +/- 0.02 versus 0.63 +/- 0.02 g/cm), BMC/BW (0.75 +/- 0.02 versus 0.63 +/- 0.02 g/cm2), and EI (27.7 +/- 1.3 versus 21.3 +/- 1.1 N.m2) were significantly greater (p less than 0.005) in the young subjects. BW did not change with age (1.00 +/- 0.01 versus 1.01 +/- 0.01 cm). In young women, simple correlations of BMC and BW with EI were both significant. By multiple regression analysis only BW independently predicted EI (EI = -0.35 + 39.1 x BMC, R2 = 0.52). In older women BMC and BW correlated with EI, but in multiple regression only BMC was significant (EI = -34.5 + 62.1 x BW; R2 = 0.45). When this analysis of older women included only those whose BMC values were within 2 SD of the young mean, BMC remained the only significant predictor of EI.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. The viscoelastic effect in bending bucky-gel actuators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kruusamäe, Karl; Mukai, Ken; Sugino, Takushi; Asaka, Kinji

    2014-03-01

    Electromechanically active polymers (EAP) are considered a good actuator candidate for a variety of reasons, e.g. they are soft, easy to miniaturize and operate without audible noise. The main structural component in EAPs is, as the name states, a type of deformable polymer. As polymers are known to exhibit a distinct mechanical response, the nature of polymer materials should never be neglected when characterizing and modeling the performance of EAP actuators. Bucky-gel actuators are a subtype of EAPs where ion-containing polymer membrane acts as an electronically insulating separator between two electrodes of carbon nanotubes and ionic liquid. In many occasions, the electrodes also contain polymer for the purpose of binding it together. Therefore, mechanically speaking, bucky-gel actuators are composite structures with layers of different mechanical nature. The viscoelastic response and the shape change property are perhaps the most characteristic effects in polymers. These effects are known to have high dependence on factors such as the type of polymer, the concentration of additives and the structural ratio of different layers. At the same time, most reports about optimization of EAP actuators describe the alteration of electromechanical performance dependent on the same factors. In this paper, the performance of bucky-gel actuators is measured as a function between the output force and bending deflection. It is observed that effective stiffness of these actuators depends on the input voltage. This finding is also supported by dynamic mechanical analysis which demonstrates that the viscoelastic response of bucky-gel laminate depends on both frequency and temperature. Moreover, the dynamic mechanical analysis reveals that in the range of standard operation temperatures, tested samples were in their glass transition region, which made it possible to alter their shape by using mechanical fixing. The mechanical fixity above 90% was obtained when high

  12. Canine size, shape, and bending strength in primates and carnivores.

    PubMed

    Plavcan, J Michael; Ruff, Christopher B

    2008-05-01

    Anthropoid primates are well known for their highly sexually dimorphic canine teeth, with males possessing canines that are up to 400% taller than those of females. Primate canine dimorphism has been extensively documented, with a consensus that large male primate canines serve as weapons for intrasexual competition, and some evidence that large female canines in some species may likewise function as weapons. However, apart from speculation that very tall male canines may be relatively weak and that seed predators have strong canines, the functional significance of primate canine shape has not been explored. Because carnivore canine shape and size are associated with killing style, this group provides a useful comparative baseline for primates. We evaluate primate maxillary canine tooth size, shape and relative bending strength against body size, skull size, and behavioral and demographic measures of male competition and sexual selection, and compare them to those of carnivores. We demonstrate that, relative to skull length and body mass, primate male canines are on average as large as or larger than those of similar sized carnivores. The range of primate female canine sizes embraces that of carnivores. Male and female primate canines are generally as strong as or stronger than those of carnivores. Although we find that seed-eating primates have relatively strong canines, we find no clear relationship between male primate canine strength and demographic or behavioral estimates of male competition or sexual selection, in spite of a strong relationship between these measures and canine crown height. This suggests either that most primate canines are selected to be very strong regardless of variation in behavior, or that primate canine shape is inherently strong enough to accommodate changes in crown height without compromising canine function.

  13. Analysis and design of short, iron-free dipole magnets

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, A.R.

    1981-10-21

    Iron-free, dipole magnets are used extensively as steering magnets to correct for the bending, induced by extraneous magnetic fields, of particle beams that are being transported in vacuum. Generally, the dipoles are long enough that the space occupied by the end conductors is small compared to the overall magnet length. In a recent application, however, this criteria did not apply. This has motivated a reanalysis of the characteristics of a system of small aspect ratio (length/diameter) dipoles that are spaced at relatively large axial distances.

  14. Dynamic formation and magnetic support of loop or arcade prominences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanhoven, Gerard; Mok, Y.; Drake, J. F.

    1992-01-01

    The results of model dynamic simulations of the formation and support of a narrow prominence at the apex of a coronal magnetic loop or arcade are described. The condensation process proceeds via an initial radiative cooling and pressure drop, and a secondary siphon flow from the dense chromospheric ends. The antibuoyancy effect as the prominence forms causes a bending of a confining magnetic field, which propagates toward the semirigid ends of the magnetic loop. Thus, a wide magnetic 'hammock' or well (of a normal polarity Kippenhahn-Schlueter type) is formed, which supports the prominence at or near the field apex.

  15. Late Cenozoic paleomagnetism and chronology of Andean basins of Bolivia: Evidence for possible oroclinal bending

    SciTech Connect

    MacFadden, B.J. ); Anaya, F.; Perez, H. ); Naeser, C.W. ); Zeitler, P.K. ); Campbell, K.E. Jr. )

    1990-07-01

    New paleomagnetic and radioisotopic data are reported from two late Tertiary high-elevation, non-marine basins in the eastern Cordillera of Bolivia. (1) Quebrada Honda, located at 22{degree}S lat., consists of a 300 m thick section containing abundant Santacrucian or Friasian (middle Miocene) fossil mammals. This locality is constrained by mean {sup 40}K/{sup 40}Ar ages of 12.83 {plus minus} 0.11 Ma and 11.96 {plus minus} 0.11 Ma, and the local magnetostratigraphy is correlated to chrons C5AA through C5A on the Magnetic Polarity Time Scale (MPTS). The fossil mammals from Quebrada Honda have an extrapolated age of about 13.0 to 12.7 Ma. (2) Micana, located at 17{degree}S lat., consists of a 205 m thick section containing late Miocene fossil mammals, including a megatheriid sloth and the tiny mesothere Microtypotherium cf. M. choquecotense. The locality is constrained by a fission-track age determination of 6.9 {plus minus} 1.1 Ma, and the local magnetostratigraphy is correlated to Chron 7 on the MPTS. The fossil mammals from this section have an extrapolated age of about 7.3 to 7.4 Ma. In conjunction with two other published data sets (Ocros, 13{degree}S, and Salla, 17{degree}S), these late Tertiary Andean localities indicate counterclockwise rotation at 13{degree}S, negligible rotation at 17{degree}S, and clockwise rotation at 22{degree}S. These data could represent local small-block rotations on a scale greater than about 6 km{sup 2}. However, these data are also consistent with a model of late Neogene bending of the Bolivian Orocline.

  16. Reconciliation and interpretation of the Big Bend National Park light extinction source apportionment: results from the Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational Study--part II.

    PubMed

    Pitchford, Marc L; Schichtel, Bret A; Gebhart, Kristi A; Barna, Michael G; Malm, William C; Tombach, Ivar H; Knipping, Eladio M

    2005-11-01

    The recently completed Big Bend Regional Aerosol and Visibility Observational (BRAVO) Study focused on particulate sulfate source attribution for a 4-month period from July through October 1999. A companion paper in this issue by Schichtel et al. describes the methods evaluation and results reconciliation of the BRAVO Study sulfate attribution approaches. This paper summarizes the BRAVO Study extinction budget assessment and interprets the attribution results in the context of annual and multiyear causes of haze by drawing on long-term aerosol monitoring data and regional transport climatology, as well as results from other investigations. Particulate sulfates, organic carbon, and coarse mass are responsible for most of the haze at Big Bend National Park, whereas fine particles composed of light-absorbing carbon, fine soils, and nitrates are relatively minor contributors. Spring and late summer through fall are the two periods of high-haze levels at Big Bend. Particulate sulfate and carbonaceous compounds contribute in a similar magnitude to the spring haze period, whereas sulfates are the primary cause of haze during the late summer and fall period. Atmospheric transport patterns to Big Bend vary throughout the year, resulting in a seasonal cycle of different upwind source regions contributing to its haze levels. Important sources and source regions for haze at Big Bend include biomass smoke from Mexico and Central America in the spring and African dust during the summer. Sources of sulfur dioxide (SO2) emissions in Mexico, Texas, and in the Eastern United States all contribute to Big Bend haze in varying amounts over different times of the year, with a higher contribution from Mexican sources in the spring and early summer, and a higher contribution from U.S. sources during late summer and fall. Some multiple-day haze episodes result from the influence of several source regions, whereas others are primarily because of emissions from a single source region.

  17. A progress report on the Malaga Bend Experimental Salinity Alleviation Project, Eddy County, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cox, E.R.; Havens, J.S.

    1965-01-01

    At Malaga Bend on the Pecos River in Eddy County, New Mexico, a brine aquifer about 1950 feet below the stream channel has a pressure head about 10 feet above the river bed. This aquifer normally discharges about 430 tons of dissolved minerals daily into the river of which about 370 tons was sodium chloride. The Malaga Bend Experimental Salinity Alleviation Project, authorized by the U.S. Congress in 1958, Public Law 85-333,is an attempt to determine if the salinity content of the Pecos River below Malaga Bend can be decreased by reducing the inflow of saline water into the river at Malaga Bend by pumping from the brine aquifer. Construction for the project was supervised by the Bureau of Reclamation, and the collection of data and its interpretation were the responsibility cooperatively of the U. S. Geological Survey and the Pecos River Commission.

  18. Temperature dependence of light power propagation in bending plastic optical fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Ning; Teng, Chuanxin; Zheng, Jie; Wang, Guanjun; Zhang, Minjuan; Wang, Zhibin

    2016-09-01

    This study investigates the effect of temperature variation on the light power propagation in bending plastic optical fiber (POF). The transmittance of bending POFs with curvature radius of 2-30 mm and turns of 1/4, 1/2, 1, and 2 are measured over temperature of 20-70 °C. The temperature dependent loss of the bending POF is obtained. It is found that the temperature dependent loss of the bending POF changes with curvature radius and turns. The temperature effect reaches the highest value of 0.011 dB/°C with 2 turns, and is less than 0.002 dB/°C with curvature radius greater than 25 mm.

  19. Promoters responsive to DNA bending: a common theme in prokaryotic gene expression.

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Martín, J; Rojo, F; de Lorenzo, V

    1994-01-01

    The early notion of DNA as a passive target for regulatory proteins has given way to the realization that higher-order DNA structures and DNA-protein complexes are at the basis of many molecular processes, including control of promoter activity. Protein binding may direct the bending of an otherwise linear DNA, exacerbate the angle of an intrinsic bend, or assist the directional flexibility of certain sequences within prokaryotic promoters. The important, sometimes essential role of intrinsic or protein-induced DNA bending in transcriptional regulation has become evident in virtually every system examined. As discussed throughout this article, not every function of DNA bends is understood, but their presence has been detected in a wide variety of bacterial promoters subjected to positive or negative control. Nonlinear DNA structures facilitate and even determine proximal and distal DNA-protein and protein-protein contacts involved in the various steps leading to transcription initiation. PMID:8078436

  20. Energy losses in thermally cycled optical fibers constrained in small bend radii

    SciTech Connect

    Guild, Eric; Morelli, Gregg

    2012-09-23

    High energy laser pulses were fired into a 365μm diameter fiber optic cable constrained in small radii of curvature bends, resulting in a catastrophic failure. Q-switched laser pulses from a flashlamp pumped, Nd:YAG laser were injected into the cables, and the spatial intensity profile at the exit face of the fiber was observed using an infrared camera. The transmission of the radiation through the tight radii resulted in an asymmetric intensity profile with one half of the fiber core having a higher peak-to-average energy distribution. Prior to testing, the cables were thermally conditioned while constrained in the small radii of curvature bends. Single-bend, double-bend, and U-shaped eometries were tested to characterize various cable routing scenarios.