Science.gov

Sample records for mcmurry reaction conditions

  1. New para-para stilbenophanes: synthesis by McMurry coupling, conformational analysis and inhibition of tubulin polymerisation.

    PubMed

    Álvarez, Raquel; López, Vilmarí; Mateo, Carmen; Medarde, Manuel; Peláez, Rafael

    2011-03-14

    The synthesis of a new family of methoxy-substituted [2.7]- and [2.8]paracyclophanes linked by 3-oxapentamethylene-1,5-dioxy and hexamethylene-1,6-dioxy bridges has been carried out by using the McMurry methodology. Related indole compounds were also synthesised. Olefin-to-diol ratios depended on the bridge length, the structure of the aromatic ring and the reaction conditions. Macrocyclisation, the methoxy substituents and the presence of a rigid indole moiety restricted the conformational equilibria, as observed by NMR spectroscopy and according to theoretical calculations. The synthesised compounds display micromolar tubulin polymerisation inhibitory activity. The conformational implications on the tubulin polymerisation inhibitory activity derived from the macrocyclisation when compared with combretastatins, closely related stilbenes, are also discussed.

  2. 'GREENER' CHEMICAL SYNTHESES USING ALTERNATE REACTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave (MW) irradiation in conjunction with water as reaction media has proven to be a greener chemical approach for expeditious N-alkylation reactions of amines and hydrazines wherein the reactions under mildly basic conditions afford tertiary amines and double N-alkylation t...

  3. Expert system for predicting reaction conditions: the Michael reaction case.

    PubMed

    Marcou, G; Aires de Sousa, J; Latino, D A R S; de Luca, A; Horvath, D; Rietsch, V; Varnek, A

    2015-02-23

    A generic chemical transformation may often be achieved under various synthetic conditions. However, for any specific reagents, only one or a few among the reported synthetic protocols may be successful. For example, Michael β-addition reactions may proceed under different choices of solvent (e.g., hydrophobic, aprotic polar, protic) and catalyst (e.g., Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, Lewis base, etc.). Chemoinformatics methods could be efficiently used to establish a relationship between the reagent structures and the required reaction conditions, which would allow synthetic chemists to waste less time and resources in trying out various protocols in search for the appropriate one. In order to address this problem, a number of 2-classes classification models have been built on a set of 198 Michael reactions retrieved from literature. Trained models discriminate between processes that are compatible and respectively processes not feasible under a specific reaction condition option (feasible or not with a Lewis acid catalyst, feasible or not in hydrophobic solvent, etc.). Eight distinct models were built to decide the compatibility of a Michael addition process with each considered reaction condition option, while a ninth model was aimed to predict whether the assumed Michael addition is feasible at all. Different machine-learning methods (Support Vector Machine, Naive Bayes, and Random Forest) in combination with different types of descriptors (ISIDA fragments issued from Condensed Graphs of Reactions, MOLMAP, Electronic Effect Descriptors, and Chemistry Development Kit computed descriptors) have been used. Models have good predictive performance in 3-fold cross-validation done three times: balanced accuracy varies from 0.7 to 1. Developed models are available for the users at http://infochim.u-strasbg.fr/webserv/VSEngine.html . Eventually, these were challenged to predict feasibility conditions for ∼50 novel Michael reactions from the eNovalys database (originally

  4. Expert system for predicting reaction conditions: the Michael reaction case.

    PubMed

    Marcou, G; Aires de Sousa, J; Latino, D A R S; de Luca, A; Horvath, D; Rietsch, V; Varnek, A

    2015-02-23

    A generic chemical transformation may often be achieved under various synthetic conditions. However, for any specific reagents, only one or a few among the reported synthetic protocols may be successful. For example, Michael β-addition reactions may proceed under different choices of solvent (e.g., hydrophobic, aprotic polar, protic) and catalyst (e.g., Brønsted acid, Lewis acid, Lewis base, etc.). Chemoinformatics methods could be efficiently used to establish a relationship between the reagent structures and the required reaction conditions, which would allow synthetic chemists to waste less time and resources in trying out various protocols in search for the appropriate one. In order to address this problem, a number of 2-classes classification models have been built on a set of 198 Michael reactions retrieved from literature. Trained models discriminate between processes that are compatible and respectively processes not feasible under a specific reaction condition option (feasible or not with a Lewis acid catalyst, feasible or not in hydrophobic solvent, etc.). Eight distinct models were built to decide the compatibility of a Michael addition process with each considered reaction condition option, while a ninth model was aimed to predict whether the assumed Michael addition is feasible at all. Different machine-learning methods (Support Vector Machine, Naive Bayes, and Random Forest) in combination with different types of descriptors (ISIDA fragments issued from Condensed Graphs of Reactions, MOLMAP, Electronic Effect Descriptors, and Chemistry Development Kit computed descriptors) have been used. Models have good predictive performance in 3-fold cross-validation done three times: balanced accuracy varies from 0.7 to 1. Developed models are available for the users at http://infochim.u-strasbg.fr/webserv/VSEngine.html . Eventually, these were challenged to predict feasibility conditions for ∼50 novel Michael reactions from the eNovalys database (originally

  5. Microwave reactions under continuous flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Baxendale, Ian R; Hayward, John J; Ley, Steven V

    2007-12-01

    Microwave chemistry has already impacted significantly on the everyday synthesis of organic molecules. The adoption and integration of this liberating technology has permitted a resurrection of many synthetic transformations that were previously considered too extreme in their conditions (temperatures, pressures, reaction times) to be synthetically useful. Furthermore, whole arrays of additional chemical transformations have been devised under microwave heating that allow access to more diverse chemical architectures via more expedient routes. Continuous flow processing of chemical intermediates taking advantage of the unique heating mechanism and characteristics of microwave irradiation will certainly be the next evolutionary step forward in this area. The synergistic combination afforded by the simultaneous application of these two core processing tools will enhance still further the synthetic capabilities of tomorrow's chemists. This short review aims to highlight the current developments and future potential offered by continuous flow microwave mediated synthesis.

  6. Accelerated glass reaction under PCT conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Bradley, C.R.

    1992-01-01

    Static leach tests similar to PCT (Product Consistency Test) were performed for up to 2 years to assess long-term reaction behavior of high-level nuclear waste glasses similar to those at Defense Waste Processing Facility. These tests show the reaction rate to decrease with the reaction time from an initially high rate to a low rate, but then to accelerate to a higher rate after reaction times of about 1 year, depending on glass surface area/leachant volume ratio used. Solution concentrations of soluble glass components increase as the reaction is accelerated, while release of other glass components into solution is controlled by secondary phases. Net result is that transformation of glass to stable phases is accelerated while the solution becomes enriched in soluble components not effectively contained in secondary phases. Rate becomes linear in time after the acceleration and may be similar to the initial forward rate. A current model of glass reaction predicts that the glass reaction will be accelerated upon the formation of secondary phases which lower the silicic acid solution concentration. These tests show total Si concentration to increase upon reaction acceleration, however, which may be due to the slightly higher pH attained with the acceleration. The sudden change in the reaction rate is likely due to secondary phase formation. 17 refs, 2 tabs, 3 figs.

  7. Accelerated glass reaction under PCT conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Ebert, W.L.; Bates, J.K.; Buck, E.C.; Bradley, C.R.

    1992-12-31

    Static leach tests similar to PCT (Product Consistency Test) were performed for up to 2 years to assess long-term reaction behavior of high-level nuclear waste glasses similar to those at Defense Waste Processing Facility. These tests show the reaction rate to decrease with the reaction time from an initially high rate to a low rate, but then to accelerate to a higher rate after reaction times of about 1 year, depending on glass surface area/leachant volume ratio used. Solution concentrations of soluble glass components increase as the reaction is accelerated, while release of other glass components into solution is controlled by secondary phases. Net result is that transformation of glass to stable phases is accelerated while the solution becomes enriched in soluble components not effectively contained in secondary phases. Rate becomes linear in time after the acceleration and may be similar to the initial forward rate. A current model of glass reaction predicts that the glass reaction will be accelerated upon the formation of secondary phases which lower the silicic acid solution concentration. These tests show total Si concentration to increase upon reaction acceleration, however, which may be due to the slightly higher pH attained with the acceleration. The sudden change in the reaction rate is likely due to secondary phase formation. 17 refs, 2 tabs, 3 figs.

  8. GREEN CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS THROUGH CATALYSIS AND ALTERNATE REACTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Green chemical synthesis through catalysis and alternate reaction conditions

    Encompassing green chemistry techniques and methodologies, we have initiated several projects at the National Risk Management Research laboratory that focus on the design and development of chemic...

  9. High explosive violent reaction (HEVR) from slow heating conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, A.S.

    1999-03-01

    The high explosives (HEs) developed and used at the Los Alamos National Laboratory are designed to be insensitive to impact and thermal insults under all but the most extreme conditions. Nevertheless, violent reactions do occasionally occur when HE is involved in an accident. The HE response is closely dependent on the type of external stimulus that initiates the reaction. For example, fast heating of conventional HE will probably result in fairly benign burning, while long-term, slow heating of conventional HE is more likely to produce an HEVR that will do much more damage to the immediate surroundings. An HEVR (High Explosive Violent Reaction) can be defined as the rapid release of energy from an explosive that ranges from slightly faster than a deflagration (very rapid burning) to a reaction that approaches a detonation. A number of thermal analyses have been done to determine slow heat/cook-off conditions that produce HE self-heating that can build up to a catastrophic runaway reaction. The author specifies the conditions that control reaction violence, describes experiments that produced an HEVR, describes analyses done to determine a heating rate threshold for HEVR, and lists possible HEVR situations.

  10. Reversible Hydrolysis Reaction with the Spore Photoproduct under Alkaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Adhikari, Surya; Lin, Gengjie; Li, Lei

    2016-09-16

    DNA lesions may reduce the electron density at the nucleobases, making them prone to further modifications upon the alkaline treatment. The dominant DNA photolesion found in UV-irradiated bacterial endospores is a thymine dimer, 5-thyminyl-5,6-dihydrothymine, i.e., the spore photoproduct (SP). Here we report a stepwise addition/elimination reaction in the SP hydrolysis product under strong basic conditions where a ureido group is added to the carboxyl moiety to form a cyclic amide, regenerating SP after eliminating a hydroxide ion. Direct amidation of carboxylic acids by reaction with amines in the presence of a catalyst is well documented; however, it is very rare for an amidation reaction to occur without activation. This uncatalyzed SP reverse reaction in aqueous solution is even more surprising because the carboxyl moiety is not a good electrophile due to the negative charge it carries. Examination of the base-catalyzed hydrolyses of two other saturated pyrimidine lesions, 5,6-dihydro-2'-deoxyuridine and pyrimidine (6-4) pyrimidone photoproduct, reveals that neither reaction is reversible even though all three hydrolysis reactions may share the same gem-diol intermediate. Therefore, the SP structure where the two thymine residues maintain a stacked conformation likely provides the needed framework enabling this highly unusual carboxyl addition/elimination reaction. PMID:27537985

  11. Parametric effects of glass reaction under unsaturated conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Bates, J.K.; Gerding, T.J.; Woodland, A.B.

    1989-11-01

    Eventual liquid water contact of high-level waste glass stored under the unsaturated conditions anticipated at the Yucca Mountain site will be by slow intrusion of water into a breached container/canister assembly. The water flow patterns under these unsaturated conditions will vary, and the Unsaturated Test method has been developed by the YMP to study glass reaction. The results from seven different sets of tests done to investigate the effect of systematically varying parameters, such as glass composition, composition and degree of sensitization of 304L stainless steel, water input volume, and the interval of water contact are discussed. Glass reaction has been monitored over a period of five years, and the parametric effects can result in up to a ten-fold variance in the degree of glass reaction.

  12. Reactions of animals and people under conditions of brief weightlessness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kitayev-Smik, L. A.

    1975-01-01

    It has been shown that under brief weightlessness sensory reactions arise in a number of people, mainly those under these conditions for the first time, in the form of spatial and visual illusions, motor excitation, in which tonic and motor components can be distinguished, and vestibular-vegetative disturbances (nausea, vomiting, etc.). In repeated flights with creation of weightlessness, a decrease in the extent of expression and, then, disappearance of these reactions occurred in a significant majority of those studied. Experiments in weightlessness with the vision cut off and with the absence of vestibular functions in the subjects confirm the hypothesis that spatial conceptions of people in weightlessness depend on predominance of gravireceptor or visual afferent signals under these conditions.

  13. Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions in Peristaltic Flow with Convective Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Hayat, Tasawar; Tanveer, Anum; Yasmin, Humaira; Alsaedi, Ahmed

    2014-01-01

    This article addresses the effects of homogeneous-heterogeneous reactions in peristaltic transport of Carreau fluid in a channel with wall properties. Mathematical modelling and analysis have been carried out in the presence of Hall current. The channel walls satisfy the more realistic convective conditions. The governing partial differential equations along with long wavelength and low Reynolds number considerations are solved. The results of temperature and heat transfer coefficient are analyzed for various parameters of interest. PMID:25460608

  14. Effects of Meteorological Conditions on Reactions to Noise Exposure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Kevin P. (Technical Monitor); Fields, James M.

    2004-01-01

    More than 80,000 residents' responses to transportation noise at different times of year provide the best, but imprecise, statistical estimates of the effects of season and meteorological conditions on community response to noise. Annoyance with noise is found to be slightly statistically significantly higher in the summer than in the winter in a seven-year study in the Netherlands. Analyses of 41 other surveys drawn from diverse countries, climates, and times of year find noise annoyance is increased by temperature, and may be increased by more sunshine, less precipitation, and reduced wind speeds. Meteorological conditions on the day of the interview or the immediately preceding days do not appear to have any more effect on reactions than do the conditions over the immediately preceding weeks or months.

  15. MICROWAVE-ACCELERATED MULTICOMPONENT REACTIONS UNDER SOLVENT-FREE CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The application of microwave-accelerated solventless synthetic protocols in multicomponent (MCC) reactions will be exemplified by several condensation and cyclization reactions including the rapid one-pot assembly of valuable heterocyclic compounds from in situ generated intermed...

  16. Impact of reaction conditions on grafting acrylamide onto starch

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We have explored the radical initiated graft polymerization reaction of acrylamide onto starch where the solvent, concentration, temperature and reaction times were varied. We have found that the morphology of the resulting grafted polymer is dramatically different and is dependent on the reaction c...

  17. Construction of functional group reactivity database under various reaction conditions automatically extracted from reaction database in a synthesis design system.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Akio; Okamoto, Hideho; Bersohn, Malcolm

    2010-03-22

    To be able to estimate the reactivity of functional groups under certain reaction conditions, we have stored three types of data: (1) data of change or destruction of the functional groups by the conditions of the reaction conditions; (2) data showing no influence of the reaction conditions on the functional groups; and (3) data showing the relative reactivity of two functional groups in the presence of certain reaction conditions. These three types of data, considered together, form entities that are referenced as "interaction data". These interaction data are used in a synthesis design system called SYNSUP. A new module in our system has been constructed that automatically generates interaction data from the reaction databases. From 15 265 reactions in the database, our program selected 2763 useful reactions with yields of > or =90% and one functional group change. From these useful reactions, data regarding 465 interferences, 815 cases of inert functional groups (under the reaction conditions), and 62 relative rate data could be extracted. In addition, with the use of multiple relative rate datasets, the reactivity of more than two functional groups could be deduced.

  18. Regimes of chemical reaction waves initiated by nonuniform initial conditions for detailed chemical reaction models.

    PubMed

    Liberman, M A; Kiverin, A D; Ivanov, M F

    2012-05-01

    Regimes of chemical reaction wave propagation initiated by initial temperature nonuniformity in gaseous mixtures, whose chemistry is governed by chain-branching kinetics, are studied using a multispecies transport model and a detailed chemical model. Possible regimes of reaction wave propagation are identified for stoichiometric hydrogen-oxygen and hydrogen-air mixtures in a wide range of initial pressures and temperature levels, depending on the initial non-uniformity steepness. The limits of the regimes of reaction wave propagation depend upon the values of the spontaneous wave speed and the characteristic velocities of the problem. It is shown that one-step kinetics cannot reproduce either quantitative neither qualitative features of the ignition process in real gaseous mixtures because the difference between the induction time and the time when the exothermic reaction begins significantly affects the ignition, evolution, and coupling of the spontaneous reaction wave and the pressure wave, especially at lower temperatures. We show that all the regimes initiated by the temperature gradient occur for much shallower temperature gradients than predicted by a one-step model. The difference is very large for lower initial pressures and for slowly reacting mixtures. In this way the paper provides an answer to questions, important in practice, about the ignition energy, its distribution, and the scale of the initial nonuniformity required for ignition in one or another regime of combustion wave propagation.

  19. Uranium plasma emission at gas-core reaction conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, M. D.; Jalufka, N. W.; Hohl, F.; Lee, J. H.

    1976-01-01

    The results of uranium plasma emission produced by two methods are reported. For the first method a ruby laser was focused on the surface of a pure U-238 sample to create a plasma plume with a peak plasma density of about 10 to the 20th power/cu cm and a temperature of about 38,600 K. The absolute intensity of the emitted radiation, covering the range from 300 to 7000 A was measured. For the second method, the uranium plasma was produced in a 20 kilovolt, 25 kilojoule plasma-focus device. The 2.5 MeV neutrons from the D-D reaction in the plasma focus are moderated by polyethylene and induce fissions in the U-235. Spectra of both uranium plasmas were obtained over the range from 30 to 9000 A. Because of the low fission yield the energy input due to fissions is very small compared to the total energy in the plasma.

  20. Achieving Chemical Equilibrium: The Role of Imposed Conditions in the Ammonia Formation Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tellinghuisen, Joel

    2006-01-01

    Under conditions of constant temperature T and pressure P, chemical equilibrium occurs in a closed system (fixed mass) when the Gibbs free energy G of the reaction mixture is minimized. However, when chemical reactions occur under other conditions, other thermodynamic functions are minimized or maximized. For processes at constant T and volume V,…

  1. New short strategy for the synthesis of the dibenz[b,f]oxepin scaffold.

    PubMed

    Moreno, David R R; Giorgi, Giorgio; Salas, Cristian O; Tapia, Ricardo A

    2013-11-29

    In this report a short and efficient synthesis of the dibenz[b,f]oxepin framework through intramolecular SNAr and McMurry reactions is described. The diaryl ethers required for the McMurry reaction have been obtained in good yields under microwave-assisted conditions of the reaction of salicylaldehydes with fluorobenzaldehydes without catalysts. Application of an intramolecular McMurry reaction to the synthesized diarylethers using TiCl4/Zn in THF gave the target dibenzo[b,f]oxepin system in 53%-55% yields.

  2. Characteristics of uranium carbonitride microparticles synthesized using different reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, Chinthaka M; Lindemer, Terrence; Voit, Stewart L; Hunt, Rodney Dale; Besmann, Theodore M; Terrani, Kurt A; Snead, Lance Lewis

    2014-11-01

    Three sets of different experimental conditions by changing the cover gases during the sample preparation were tested to synthesize uranium carbonitride (UC1-xNx) microparticles. In the first two sets of experiments using (N2 to N2-4%H2 to Ar) and (Ar to N2 to Ar) environments, single phase UC1-xNx was synthesized. When reducing environments (Ar-4%H2 to N2-4%H2 to Ar-4%H2) were utilized, theoretical densities up to 97% of single phase UC1-xNx kernels were obtained. Physical and chemical characteristics such as density, phase purity, and chemical compositions of the synthesized UC1-xNx materials for the diferent experimental conditions used are provided. In-depth analysis of the microstrutures of UC1-xNx has been carried out and is discussed with the objective of large batch fabrication of high density UC1-xNx kernels.

  3. Kinetics of OH + CO reaction under atmospheric conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, A. J.; Wine, P. H.; Ravishankara, A. R.

    1986-01-01

    A pulsed laser photolysis-pulsed laser-induced fluorescence technique is used to directly measure the temperature, pressure, and H2O concentration dependence on k1 in air. K1 is found to increase linearly with increasing pressure at pressures of not greater than 1 atm, and the pressure dependence of k1 at 299 K is the same in N2 buffer gas as in O2 buffer gas. The rate constant in the low-pressure limit and the slope of the k1 versus pressure dependence are shown to be the same at 262 K as at 299 K. The present results significantly reduce the current atmospheric model uncertainties in the temperature dependence under atmospheric conditions, in the third body efficiency of O2, and in the effect of water vapor on k1.

  4. Reaction behaviors of glycine under super- and subcritical water conditions.

    PubMed

    Alargov, Dimitar K; Deguchi, Shigeru; Tsujii, Kaoru; Horikoshi, Koki

    2002-02-01

    The influence of temperature and pressure on the dimerization and decomposition of glycine under simulated hydrothermal system conditions was studied by injecting a glycine solution into water in the sub- and supercritical state. The experiments at five different temperatures of supplied water--250, 300, 350, 374, and 400 degrees C--were performed at 22.2 and 40.0 MPa. At 350 degrees C, experiments under 15.0-40.0 MPa were conducted. Diglycine, triglycine (trace), diketopiperazine, and an unidentified product with a high molecular mass (433 Da) were the main products of oligomerization. The results show that temperature and pressure influence the extent of dimerization and decomposition of glycine. The maximum of dimers formation was observed at 350 and 375 degrees C at 22.2 and 40.0 MPa, respectively, and coincided with a high rate of glycine decomposition. Glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, as well as other amino acids, were obtained by injecting a mixture of formaldehyde and ammonia. The results support the oligomerization and synthesis of amino acids in a submarine hydrothermal system. PMID:11889913

  5. Reaction Behaviors of Glycine under Super- and Subcritical Water Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alargov, Dimitar K.; Deguchi, Shigeru; Tsujii, Kaoru; Horikoshi, Koki

    2002-02-01

    The influence of temperature and pressure on the dimerization and decomposition of glycine under simulated hydrothermal system conditions was studied by injecting a glycine solution into water in the sub- and supercritical state. The experiments at five different temperatures of supplied water - 250, 300, 350, 374, and 400 °C - were performed at 22.2 and 40.0 MPa. At 350 °C, experiments under 15.0-40.0 MPa were conducted. Diglycine, triglycine (trace), diketopiperazine, and an unidentified product with a high molecular mass (433 Da) were the main products of oligomerization. The results show that temperature and pressure influence the extent of dimerization and decomposition of glycine. The maximum of dimers formation was observed at 350 and 375 °C at 22.2 and 40.0 MPa, respectively, and coincided with a high rate of glycine decomposition. Glycine, alanine, aspartic acid, as well as other amino acids, were obtained by injecting a mixture of formaldehyde and ammonia. The results support the oligomerization and synthesis of amino acids in a submarine hydrothermal system.

  6. Intramolecular Schmidt reaction involving primary azidoalcohols under nonacidic conditions: synthesis of indolizidine (-)-167B.

    PubMed

    Kapat, Ajoy; Nyfeler, Erich; Giuffredi, Guy T; Renaud, Philippe

    2009-12-16

    A powerful intramolecular Schmidt reaction starting from primary azidoalcohols is reported. This approach involves a nonacidic activation of the alcohol via triflation. The synthetic potential offered by the mild reaction conditions is demonstrated by a highly selective synthesis of (-)-indolizidine 167B. PMID:19928759

  7. Formation of phenol under conditions of the reaction of oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid

    SciTech Connect

    Kalinovsky, I.O.; Leshcheva, A.N.; Pogorelov, V.V.; Gelbshtein, A.I.

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes conditions for the oxidation of benzene to phenol. It is shown that a reaction mixture of water, carbon monoxide, and oxygen are essential to the oxidation. The oxidation is a side reaction found to occur during the oxidative carbonylation of benzene to benzoic acid in a medium of trifluoroacetic acid.

  8. Impact of reaction conditions on architecture and rheological properties of starch graft polyacrylamide polymers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    We carried out experiments examining the impact that solvent selection and reaction conditions have on the radical initiated graft polymerization reaction of acrylamide onto starch. We have also evaluated the rheological properties the starch graftpolyacrylamide product when a gel is formed in water...

  9. Optimized Reaction Conditions for Amide Bond Formation in DNA-Encoded Combinatorial Libraries.

    PubMed

    Li, Yizhou; Gabriele, Elena; Samain, Florent; Favalli, Nicholas; Sladojevich, Filippo; Scheuermann, Jörg; Neri, Dario

    2016-08-01

    DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries are increasingly being used as tools for the discovery of small organic binding molecules to proteins of biological or pharmaceutical interest. In the majority of cases, synthetic procedures for the formation of DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries incorporate at least one step of amide bond formation between amino-modified DNA and a carboxylic acid. We investigated reaction conditions and established a methodology by using 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide, 1-hydroxy-7-azabenzotriazole and N,N'-diisopropylethylamine (EDC/HOAt/DIPEA) in combination, which provided conversions greater than 75% for 423/543 (78%) of the carboxylic acids tested. These reaction conditions were efficient with a variety of primary and secondary amines, as well as with various types of amino-modified oligonucleotides. The reaction conditions, which also worked efficiently over a broad range of DNA concentrations and reaction scales, should facilitate the synthesis of novel DNA-encoded combinatorial libraries.

  10. [Characteristics of the formation of conditioned defense reactions in monkeys in a primatological chair].

    PubMed

    Karamian, A I; Sollertinskaia, T N; Iliukha, V A

    1987-01-01

    Rate of reactions in motor conditioned electro-defensive reflexes and different kinds of internal inhibition, such as acute extinction, differentiation and delay with different retardations, were studied on monkeys in primatological chair. Specificity in formation of conditioned reactions was studied with simultaneous recording of vegetative (respiration and heart rate) and motor conditioned reactions. It has been established, that forming of vegetative and motor components of defensive reflex does not proceed synchronously. At first (2-4 trials) vegetative reactions appear, such as increase of heart and respiration rates. Conditioned motor reactions (legs' jerks) appear later, after 4-9 trials. It has been shown that in monkeys in the primatological chair we have a possibility to form all kinds of negative conditioned defensive reactions: acute extinction, differentiation, delay. Formation of delay inhibition with retardation of 90 s leads to neurotic disorders. But they last only for short periods and disappear after breaks in work. The obtained data are discussed from evolutionary point of view, with a comparative study of specificity of higher nervous activity formation among lower organized vertebrates and with consideration of processes of excitation and inhibition in evolution.

  11. Three-phase slug flow in microchips can provide beneficial reaction conditions for enzyme liquid-liquid reactions.

    PubMed

    Cech, Jiří; Přibyl, Michal; Snita, Dalimil

    2013-01-01

    Here, we introduce a solution to low stability of a two-phase slug flow with a chemical reaction occurring at the phase interface in a microfluidic reactor where substantial merging of individual reacting slugs results in the loss of uniformity of the flow. We create a three-phase slug flow by introducing a third fluid phase into the originally two-phase liquid-liquid slug flow, which generates small two-phase liquid slugs separated by gas phase. Introduction of the third phase into our system efficiently prevents merging of slugs and provides beneficial reaction conditions, such as uniform flow pattern along the whole reaction capillary, interfacial area with good reproducibility, and intensive water-oil interface renewal. We tested the three-phase flow on an enzyme hydrolysis of soybean oil and compared the reaction conversion with those from unstable two-phase slug flows. We experimentally confirmed that the three-phase slug flow arrangement provides conversions and pressure drops comparable or even better with two-phase liquid-liquid arrangements.

  12. In-situ Scanning Transmission X-ray Microscopy of catalytic materials under reaction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Smit, Emiel; Creemer, J. Fredrik; Zandbergen, Henny W.; Weckhuysen, Bert M.; de Groot, Frank M. F.

    2009-11-01

    In-situ Scanning X-ray Transmission Microscopy (STXM) allows the measurement of the soft X-ray absorption spectra with 10 to 30 nm spatial resolution under realistic reaction conditions. We show that STXM-XAS in combination with a micromachined nanoreactor can image a catalytic system under relevant reaction conditions, and provide detailed information on the morphology and composition of the catalyst material. The nanometer resolution combined with powerful chemical speciation by XAS and the ability to image materials under realistic conditions opens up new opportunities to study many chemical processes.

  13. Role of (α ,n ) reactions under r -process conditions in neutrino-driven winds reexamined

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohr, Peter

    2016-09-01

    Background: The astrophysical r -process occurs in an explosive astrophysical event under extremely neutron-rich conditions, leading to (n ,γ )-(γ ,n ) equilibrium along isotopic chains which peaks around neutron separation energies of a few MeV. Nuclei with larger Z are usually produced by β- decay, but under certain conditions also α -induced reactions may become relevant for the production of nuclei with Z +2 . Purpose: The uncertainties of the reaction rates of these α -induced reactions are discussed within the statistical model. As an example, α -induced (α ,n ) and (α ,x n ) reaction cross sections for the neutron-rich 86Se nucleus are studied in detail. Method: In a first step, the relevance of (α ,n ) and (α ,x n ) reactions is analyzed. Next the uncertainties are determined from a variation of the α -nucleus potential which is the all-dominant parameter for the astrophysical Z →Z +2 reaction rate. Results: It is found that the r -process flow towards nuclei with larger Z is essentially influenced only by the α -nucleus potential whereas the other ingredients of the statistical model play a very minor role. This finding is based on the fact that the flow towards larger Z depends on the sum over all (α ,x n ) cross sections, which is practically identical to the total α -induced reaction cross section. Conclusions: α -nucleus potentials play an important role under certain r -process conditions because the flow towards larger Z depends sensitively on the total α -induced reaction cross section. The uncertainty of the reaction rate is about a factor of two to three at higher temperatures and exceeds one order of magnitude at very low temperatures.

  14. Tribological reactions of perfluoroalkyl polyether oils with stainless steel under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, Shigeyuki; Morales, Wilfredo

    1989-01-01

    The reaction between three types of commercial perfluoroalkyl polyether (PFPE) oils and stainless steel 440C was investigated experimentally during sliding under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at room temperature. It is found that the tribological reaction of PFPE is mainly affected by the activity of the mechanically formed fresh surfaces of metals rather than the heat generated at the sliding contacts. The fluorides formed on the wear track act as a boundary layer, reducing the friction coefficient.

  15. Very efficient, reusable copper catalyst for carbene transfer reactions under biphasic conditions using ionic liquids.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Pilar; Caballero, Ana; Díaz-Requejo, M Mar; Nicasio, M Carmen; Pérez, Pedro J

    2006-02-16

    [reaction: see text] The complex {[HC(3,5-Me(2)pz)(3)]Cu(NCMe)}BF(4) catalyzes the transfer of the :CHCO(2)Et unit from ethyl diazoacetate to several saturated and unsaturated substrates with very high yields and under biphasic conditions using the ionic liquid [bmim][PF(6)] and hexane as the reaction medium. The catalyst has been tested for several cycles of recovery and reuse without any loss of activity.

  16. Recent progress in transition-metal-catalyzed reduction of molecular dinitrogen under ambient reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Nishibayashi, Yoshiaki

    2015-10-01

    This paper describes our recent progress in catalytic nitrogen fixation by using transition-metal-dinitrogen complexes as catalysts. Two reaction systems for the catalytic transformation of molecular dinitrogen into ammonia and its equivalent such as silylamine under ambient reaction conditions have been achieved by the molybdenum-, iron-, and cobalt-dinitrogen complexes as catalysts. Many new findings presented here may provide new access to the development of economical nitrogen fixation in place of the Haber-Bosch process. PMID:26131967

  17. A stronger necessary condition for the multistationarity of chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Soliman, Sylvain

    2013-11-01

    Biochemical reaction networks grow bigger and bigger, fed by the high-throughput data provided by biologists and bred in open repositories of models allowing merging and evolution. Nevertheless, since the available data is still very far from permitting the identification of the increasing number of kinetic parameters of such models, the necessity of structural analyses for describing the dynamics of chemical networks appears stronger every day. Using the structural information, notably from the stoichiometric matrix, of a biochemical reaction system, we state a more strict version of the famous Thomas' necessary condition for multistationarity. In particular, the obvious cases where Thomas' condition was trivially satisfied, mutual inhibition due to a multimolecular reaction and mutual activation due to a reversible reaction, can now easily be ruled out. This more strict condition shall not be seen as some version of Thomas' circuit functionality for the continuous case but rather as related and complementary to the whole domain of the structural analysis of (bio)chemical reaction systems, as pioneered by the chemical reaction network theory.

  18. Onset conditions for gas phase reaction and nucleation in the CVD of transition metal oxides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collins, J.; Rosner, D. E.; Castillo, J.

    1992-01-01

    A combined experimental/theoretical study is presented of the onset conditions for gas phase reaction and particle nucleation in hot substrate/cold gas CVD of transition metal oxides. Homogeneous reaction onset conditions are predicted using a simple high activation energy reacting gas film theory. Experimental tests of the basic theory are underway using an axisymmetric impinging jet CVD reactor. No vapor phase ignition has yet been observed in the TiCl4/O2 system under accessible operating conditions (below substrate temperature Tw = 1700 K). The goal of this research is to provide CVD reactor design and operation guidelines for achieving acceptable deposit microstructures at the maximum deposition rate while simultaneously avoiding homogeneous reaction/nucleation and diffusional limitations.

  19. Macromolecular crowding conditions enhance glycation and oxidation of whey proteins in ultrasound-induced Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana

    2015-06-15

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) can promote Maillard reaction (MR). Macromolecular crowding conditions accelerate reactions and stabilise protein structure. The aim of this study was to investigate if combined application of ultrasound and macromolecular crowding can improve efficiency of MR. The presence of crowding agent (polyethylene glycol) significantly increased ultrasound-induced whey protein (WP) glycation by arabinose. An increase in glycation efficiency results only in slight change of WP structure. Macromolecular crowding intensifies oxidative modifications of WP, as well as formation of amyloid-like structures by enhancement of MR. Solubility at different pH, thermal stability and antioxidative capacity of glycated WP were increased, especially in the presence of crowding agent, compared to sonicated nonglycated proteins. The application of HIUS under crowding conditions can be a new approach for enhancement of reactions in general, enabling short processing time and mild conditions, while preserving protein structure and minimising protein aggregation.

  20. Macromolecular crowding conditions enhance glycation and oxidation of whey proteins in ultrasound-induced Maillard reaction.

    PubMed

    Perusko, Marija; Al-Hanish, Ayah; Cirkovic Velickovic, Tanja; Stanic-Vucinic, Dragana

    2015-06-15

    High intensity ultrasound (HIUS) can promote Maillard reaction (MR). Macromolecular crowding conditions accelerate reactions and stabilise protein structure. The aim of this study was to investigate if combined application of ultrasound and macromolecular crowding can improve efficiency of MR. The presence of crowding agent (polyethylene glycol) significantly increased ultrasound-induced whey protein (WP) glycation by arabinose. An increase in glycation efficiency results only in slight change of WP structure. Macromolecular crowding intensifies oxidative modifications of WP, as well as formation of amyloid-like structures by enhancement of MR. Solubility at different pH, thermal stability and antioxidative capacity of glycated WP were increased, especially in the presence of crowding agent, compared to sonicated nonglycated proteins. The application of HIUS under crowding conditions can be a new approach for enhancement of reactions in general, enabling short processing time and mild conditions, while preserving protein structure and minimising protein aggregation. PMID:25660883

  1. Critical ignition conditions in exothermically reacting systems for arbitrary reaction kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filimonov, Valeriy Yu.; Koshelev, Konstantin B.

    2016-08-01

    In this work, a universal method for determination of the critical ignition conditions taking into account the reactant consumption is proposed. Based on the analysis of the phase trajectories equation, the equation for maximal temperatures of exothermic reactions was obtained. In this case, the asymptotic criterion of ignition is determined by the impossibility of slow reaction mode realization with low value of maximum temperature. The method allows demarcating the regions of low- and high-temperature modes of exothermic reactions and to establish the criteria of transition to the region of high-temperature modes. The corresponding parametric diagrams can be characterized as the bifurcation ones (bistability). It was found that the region of thermal explosion (TE) existence is bounded by the classical TE conditions from below and by the degeneration conditions from above. The comparison of analytical calculation results with the results of numerical calculation gives a satisfactory agreement.

  2. Iron nitrosyl hemoglobin formation from the reaction of hydroxylamine and hemoglobin under physiological conditions.

    PubMed

    Lockamy, Virginia L; Shields, Howard; Kim-Shapiro, Daniel B; King, S Bruce

    2004-11-01

    Sickle cell disease patients receiving hydroxyurea (HU) therapy have shown increases in the production of nitric oxide (NO) metabolites, which include iron nitrosyl hemoglobin (HbNO), nitrite, and nitrate. However, the exact mechanism by which HU forms HbNO in vivo is not understood. Previous studies indicate that the reaction of oxyhemoglobin (oxyHb) or deoxyhemoglobin (deoxyHb) with HU are too slow to account for in vivo HbNO production. In this study, we show that the reaction of methemoglobin (metHb) with HU to form HbNO could potentially be fast enough to account for in vivo HbNO formation but competing reactions of either excess oxyHb or deoxyHb during the reaction reduces the likelihood that HbNO will be produced from the metHb-HU reaction. Using electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy we have detected measurable amounts of HbNO and metHb during the reactions of oxyHb, deoxyHb, and metHb with excess hydroxylamine (HA). We also demonstrate HbNO and metHb formation from the reactions of excess oxyHb, deoxyHb, or metHb and HA, conditions that are more likely to mimic those in vivo. These results indicate that the reaction of hydroxylamine with hemoglobin produces HbNO and lend chemical support for a potential role for hydroxylamine in the in vivo metabolism of hydroxyurea.

  3. Experimental Studies of Hydrogenation and Other Reactions on Surfaces Under Astrophysically Relevant Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vidali, Gianfranco

    1998-01-01

    The goal of our project is to study hydrogen recombination reactions on solid surfaces under conditions that are relevant in astrophysics. Laboratory experiments were conducted using low-flux, cold atomic H and D beams impinging on a sample kept under ultra high vacuum conditions. Realistic analogues of interstellar dust grains were used. Our results show that current models for hydrogen recombination reactions have to be modified to take into account the role of activated diffusion of H on surfaces even at low temperature.

  4. Michael addition reactions for the modification of gold nanoparticles facilitated by hyperbaric conditions.

    PubMed

    Hartlen, Kurtis D; Ismaili, Hossein; Zhu, Jun; Workentin, Mark S

    2012-01-10

    The chemical interfacial modification of organic solvent soluble 2.4 ± 0.5 nm maleimide-modified monolayer protected gold nanoparticles (2-C(12)AuNPs) with primary or secondary amines via Michael addition reactions is demonstrated. Michael addition reactions between 2-C(12)AuNPs and primary or secondary amines at ambient temperature and pressure and under the conditions where the AuNP is soluble and stable are possible albeit sluggish, often taking days to weeks to go to completion. The rates and efficacies of the these same reactions are drastically increased at hyperbaric pressure conditions (11 000 atm) with no observed adverse effect to the gold nanoparticle stability. The resulting Michael addition adducts (3-C(12)AuNPs) formed from 2-C(12)AuNPs and the corresponding amines were characterized by TEM and by comparison of the (1)H NMR spectra of the 3-C(12)AuNPs with those of model reactions of the same amines with N-dodecylmaleimide, 2. The Michael addition reactions occur more readily with 2 rather than 2-C(12)AuNPs, consistent with the local environment of the latter imposing additional steric or other barriers to the reaction. The use of hyperbaric conditions makes the reaction of the organic solvent soluble 2-C(12)AuNP via Michael addition a viable interfacial modification process that is otherwise impractical. The results also suggest that it is a useful protocol for facilitating Michael addition reactions generally in solution at low temperatures.

  5. Carboxymethylation of Cassava Starch in Different Solvents and Solvent-Water Mixtures: Optimization of Reaction Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nwokocha, Louis M.; Ogunmola, Gabiel B.

    The influence of reaction medium on carboxymethylation process was investigated by treating cassava starch with sodium monochloroacetate in different solvents and solvent-water mixtures under alkaline conditions. The amount of carboxyl groups introduced into the starch moiety was determined titrimetrically and used to calculate the Degree of Substitution (DS) and Reaction Efficiency (RE). The results showed that carboxymethylation is significantly affected by the nature of reaction medium at p<0.05. Carboxymethylation in different solvent-water mixtures showed that aqueous 80% n-propanol offered the best medium for carboxymethylation. Optimization of reaction conditions in aqueous 80% n-propanol showed that the best condition for carboxymethylation was at starch-liquor ratio of 1:3, NaOH/reagent molar ratio of 4.0 and reagent-starch molar ratio of 0.35. An increase in temperature was required to effect the reaction at shorter time. At 55°C the highest values of DS and RE achieved in 0.5 h would require three hours to achieve the same values of DS and RE at 45°C.

  6. Periodate oxidation of 4-O-methylglucuronoxylans: Influence of the reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Chemin, Maud; Rakotovelo, Alex; Ham-Pichavant, Frédérique; Chollet, Guillaume; Da Silva Perez, Denilson; Petit-Conil, Michel; Cramail, Henri; Grelier, Stéphane

    2016-05-20

    This work aims at studying the sodium periodate oxidation of 4-O-methylglucuronoxylans (MGX) in different experimental conditions for a control of the oxidation degree. A series of sodium periodate oxidation reactions were conducted at three NaIO4/xylose molar ratios: 0.05, 0.20 and 1.00. The effects of xylan molar mass, xylan concentration and reaction temperature on the reaction rate have been evaluated by UV/visible spectroscopy at 0.20 NaIO4/xylose ratio. No depolymerization is observed at 0.05 ratio while depolymerization occurs at 0.20 and is even complete at 1.00 NaIO4/xylose ratio. An increase of the reaction temperature - up to 80 °C - leads to an increase of the oxidation rate with no effect on the depolymerization. At high xylan concentrations, the oxidation rate increases but promotes chains aggregation.

  7. Periodate oxidation of 4-O-methylglucuronoxylans: Influence of the reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Chemin, Maud; Rakotovelo, Alex; Ham-Pichavant, Frédérique; Chollet, Guillaume; Da Silva Perez, Denilson; Petit-Conil, Michel; Cramail, Henri; Grelier, Stéphane

    2016-05-20

    This work aims at studying the sodium periodate oxidation of 4-O-methylglucuronoxylans (MGX) in different experimental conditions for a control of the oxidation degree. A series of sodium periodate oxidation reactions were conducted at three NaIO4/xylose molar ratios: 0.05, 0.20 and 1.00. The effects of xylan molar mass, xylan concentration and reaction temperature on the reaction rate have been evaluated by UV/visible spectroscopy at 0.20 NaIO4/xylose ratio. No depolymerization is observed at 0.05 ratio while depolymerization occurs at 0.20 and is even complete at 1.00 NaIO4/xylose ratio. An increase of the reaction temperature - up to 80 °C - leads to an increase of the oxidation rate with no effect on the depolymerization. At high xylan concentrations, the oxidation rate increases but promotes chains aggregation. PMID:26917372

  8. Review and analysis of high temperature chemical reactions and the effect of non-equilibrium conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, R. E.

    1986-01-01

    Chemical reactions at high temperatures have been considered extensively because of their importance to the heating effects on re-entry of space vehicles. Data on these reactions however, are not abundant and even when found there are discrepancies in data collected by various investigators. In particular, data for recombination reactions are calculated from the dissociation reactions or vice versa through the equilibrium constant. This involves the use of the principle of detailed balancing. This principle is discussed in reference to conditions where it is valid as well as to those where it is not valid. Related topics that merit further study or for which applicable information was available are briefly mentioned in an appendix to this report.

  9. Using Group-Inquiry to Study Differing Reaction Conditions in the E2 Elimination of Cyclohexyl Halides

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Long, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    In this experiment, students individually conduct one of several variations of an E2 dehydrohalogenation reaction on a cyclohexyl halide substrate for 30 min, which is sufficient only for a partial reaction to occur. The variations examine reaction conditions including different leaving groups, decreased reaction temperature, or reduced base…

  10. [Optimization of reaction conditions for RAPD analysis of freshwater planarians in China].

    PubMed

    Zhang, He Cai; Chen, Guang Wen; Li, Yu Chang; Xu, Cun Shuan

    2004-08-01

    Using the Genomic DNA purification kit, the total DNA of the freshwater planarian was extracted and developed one single band through 0.8% agarose gel electrophoresis with OD260/OD280 between 1.5 and 2.2, which could satisfy the requirements of RAPD and PCR on DNA. With the extracted DNA template, we tested experimental conditions that might affect RAPD results including annealing temperature, concentrations of template DNA, primer, Mg2+ and dNTPs. Through comparision we found that it was necessary and important to optimize the experimental conditions for producing stable and repeatable RAPD results. The optimized reaction conditions of RAPD for freshwater planarian in 25 microl reaction volume were as follows: 20 ng template DNA, 37 degrees C annealing temperature, 0.2 micromol/L primer, 2.0 mmol/L Mg2+ and 200 micromol/L dNTPs.

  11. Kinetics of diamond-silicon reaction under high pressure-high temperature conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pantea, Cristian

    In this dissertation work, the kinetics of the reaction between diamond and silicon at high pressure-high temperature conditions was investigated. This study was motivated by the extremely limited amount of information related to the kinetics of the reaction in diamond-silicon carbide composites formation. It was found that the reaction between diamond and melted silicon and the subsequent silicon carbide formation is a two-stage process. The initial stage is a result of direct reaction of melted silicon with carbon atoms from the diamond surface, the phase boundary reaction. Further growth of SiC is much more complicated and when the outer surfaces of diamond crystals are covered with the silicon carbide layer it involves diffusion of carbon and silicon atoms through the SiC layer. The reaction takes place differently for the two regions of stability of carbon. In the graphite-stable region, the reaction between diamond and melted silicon is associated with the diamond-to-graphite phase transition, while in the diamond-stable region there is no intermediary step for the reaction. The data obtained at HPHT were fitted by the Avrami-Erofeev equation. It was found that the reaction is isotropic, the beta-SiC grown on different faces of the diamond crystals showing the same reaction rate, and that the controlling mechanism for the reaction is the diffusion. In the graphite-stable region the activation energy, 402 kJ/mol is slightly higher than in the diamond-stable region, 260 kJ/mol, as the reaction between diamond and melted silicon is associated with the diamond-to-graphite phase transition, which has higher activation energy. In the diamond-stable region, the calculated activation energy is higher for micron size diamond powders (≈260 kJ/mol), while for nanocrystalline diamond powders a lower value of 170 kJ/mol was obtained. This effect was attributed to nanocrystalline structure and strained bonds within grain boundaries in SiC formed from nanosize diamond

  12. Method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport, and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions

    DOEpatents

    McGrail, Bernard P.; Martin, Paul F.; Lindenmeier, Clark W.

    1999-01-01

    The present invention is a method and apparatus for measuring coupled flow, transport and reaction processes under liquid unsaturated flow conditions. The method and apparatus of the present invention permit distinguishing individual precipitation events and their effect on dissolution behavior isolated to the specific event. The present invention is especially useful for dynamically measuring hydraulic parameters when a chemical reaction occurs between a particulate material and either liquid or gas (e.g. air) or both, causing precipitation that changes the pore structure of the test material.

  13. Reversible Reshaping of Supported Metal Nanoislands Under Reaction Conditions in a Minimalistic Lattice Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korobov, A.

    2016-05-01

    The shape of (nano)islands is among significant factors of the catalytic activity of supported catalysts. A lattice model of the reshaping under reaction conditions is suggested and studied by means of kinetic Monte Carlo simulations. It is rooted in experimental findings and is simplified as far as possible to still demonstrate reversible compact—ramified shape transitions. This simple model with complex behavior demonstrates several reshaping regimes and is considered as a possible sub-network of more realistic networks of heterogeneous catalytic reactions.

  14. Direct Formation of Oxocarbenium Ions under Weakly Acidic Conditions: Catalytic Enantioselective Oxa-Pictet-Spengler Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chenfei; Chen, Shawn B; Seidel, Daniel

    2016-07-27

    Two catalysts, an amine HCl salt and a bisthiourea, work in concert to enable the generation of oxocarbenium ions under mild conditions. The amine catalyst generates an iminium ion of sufficient electrophilicity to enable 1,2-attack by an alcohol. Catalyst turnover is achieved by amine elimination with concomitant formation of an oxocarbenium intermediate. The bisthiourea catalyst accelerates all of the steps of the reaction and controls the stereoselectivity via anion binding/ion pair formation. This new concept was applied to direct catalytic enantioselective oxa-Pictet-Spengler reactions of tryptophol with aldehydes. PMID:27396413

  15. Direct Formation of Oxocarbenium Ions under Weakly Acidic Conditions: Catalytic Enantioselective Oxa-Pictet-Spengler Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Chenfei; Chen, Shawn B; Seidel, Daniel

    2016-07-27

    Two catalysts, an amine HCl salt and a bisthiourea, work in concert to enable the generation of oxocarbenium ions under mild conditions. The amine catalyst generates an iminium ion of sufficient electrophilicity to enable 1,2-attack by an alcohol. Catalyst turnover is achieved by amine elimination with concomitant formation of an oxocarbenium intermediate. The bisthiourea catalyst accelerates all of the steps of the reaction and controls the stereoselectivity via anion binding/ion pair formation. This new concept was applied to direct catalytic enantioselective oxa-Pictet-Spengler reactions of tryptophol with aldehydes.

  16. Contaminant transport in soil with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangyao; Fu, Bojie; Zhan, Hongbin; Ma, Ying

    2013-05-01

    Predicting the fate and movement of contaminant in soils and groundwater is essential to assess and reduce the risk of soil contamination and groundwater pollution. Reaction processes of contaminant often decreased monotonously with depth. Time-dependent input sources usually occurred at the inlet of natural or human-made system such as radioactive waste disposal site. This study presented a one-dimensional convection-dispersion equation (CDE) for contaminant transport in soils with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent inlet boundary conditions, and derived its analytical solution. The adsorption coefficient and degradation rate were represented as sigmoidal functions of soil depth. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) and concentration profiles obtained from CDE with depth-dependent and constant reaction coefficients were compared, and a constant effective reaction coefficient, which was calculated by arithmetically averaging the depth-dependent reaction coefficient, was proposed to reflect the lumped depth-dependent reaction effect. With the effective adsorption coefficient and degradation rate, CDE could produce similar BTCs and concentration profiles as those from CDE with depth-dependent reactions in soils with moderate chemical heterogeneity. In contrast, the predicted concentrations of CDE with fitted reaction coefficients at a certain depth departed significantly from those of CDE with depth-dependent reactions. Parametric analysis was performed to illustrate the effects of sinusoidally and exponentially decaying input functions on solute BTCs. The BTCs and concentration profiles obtained from the solutions for finite and semi-infinite domain were compared to investigate the effects of effluent boundary condition. The finite solution produced higher concentrations at the increasing limb of the BTCs and possessed a higher peak concentration than the semi-infinite solution which had a slightly long tail. Furthermore, the finite solution gave

  17. Contaminant transport in soil with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent boundary conditions.

    PubMed

    Gao, Guangyao; Fu, Bojie; Zhan, Hongbin; Ma, Ying

    2013-05-01

    Predicting the fate and movement of contaminant in soils and groundwater is essential to assess and reduce the risk of soil contamination and groundwater pollution. Reaction processes of contaminant often decreased monotonously with depth. Time-dependent input sources usually occurred at the inlet of natural or human-made system such as radioactive waste disposal site. This study presented a one-dimensional convection-dispersion equation (CDE) for contaminant transport in soils with depth-dependent reaction coefficients and time-dependent inlet boundary conditions, and derived its analytical solution. The adsorption coefficient and degradation rate were represented as sigmoidal functions of soil depth. Solute breakthrough curves (BTCs) and concentration profiles obtained from CDE with depth-dependent and constant reaction coefficients were compared, and a constant effective reaction coefficient, which was calculated by arithmetically averaging the depth-dependent reaction coefficient, was proposed to reflect the lumped depth-dependent reaction effect. With the effective adsorption coefficient and degradation rate, CDE could produce similar BTCs and concentration profiles as those from CDE with depth-dependent reactions in soils with moderate chemical heterogeneity. In contrast, the predicted concentrations of CDE with fitted reaction coefficients at a certain depth departed significantly from those of CDE with depth-dependent reactions. Parametric analysis was performed to illustrate the effects of sinusoidally and exponentially decaying input functions on solute BTCs. The BTCs and concentration profiles obtained from the solutions for finite and semi-infinite domain were compared to investigate the effects of effluent boundary condition. The finite solution produced higher concentrations at the increasing limb of the BTCs and possessed a higher peak concentration than the semi-infinite solution which had a slightly long tail. Furthermore, the finite solution gave

  18. A proposed abiotic reaction scheme for hydroxylamine and monochloramine under chloramination relevant drinking water conditions.

    PubMed

    Wahman, David G; Speitel, Gerald E; Machavaram, Madhav V

    2014-09-01

    Drinking water monochloramine (NH2Cl) use may promote ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB). AOB use (i) ammonia monooxygenase for biological ammonia (NH3) oxidation to hydroxylamine (NH2OH) and (ii) hydroxylamine oxidoreductase for NH2OH oxidation to nitrite. NH2Cl and NH2OH may react, providing AOB potential benefits and detriments. The NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction would benefit AOB by removing the disinfectant (NH2Cl) and releasing their growth substrate (NH3), but the NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction would also provide a possible additional inactivation mechanism besides direct NH2Cl reaction with cells. Because biological NH2OH oxidation supplies the electrons required for biological NH3 oxidation, the NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction provides a direct mechanism for NH2Cl to inhibit NH3 oxidation, starving the cell of reductant by preventing biological NH2OH oxidation. To investigate possible NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction implications on AOB, an understanding of the underlying abiotic reaction is first required. The present study conducted a detailed literature review and proposed an abiotic NH2Cl/NH2OH reaction scheme (RS) for chloramination relevant drinking water conditions (μM concentrations, air saturation, and pH 7-9). Next, RS literature based kinetics and end-products were evaluated experimentally between pHs 7.7 and 8.3, representing (i) the pH range for future experiments with AOB and (ii) mid-range pHs typically found in chloraminated drinking water. In addition, a (15)N stable isotope experiment was conducted to verify nitrous oxide and nitrogen gas production and their nitrogen source. Finally, the RS was slightly refined using the experimental data and an AQUASIM implemented kinetic model. A chloraminated drinking water relevant RS is proposed and provides the abiotic reaction foundation for future AOB biotic experiments.

  19. Correlation changes in EEG, conditioned and behavioral reactions with various degrees of oxygen insufficiency

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agadzhanyan, N. A.; Zakharova, I. N.; Kalyuzhnyy, L. V.; Dvorzhak, I. I.; Moravek, M.; Tsmiral, Y. I.

    1974-01-01

    The dynamics of change in bioelectric activity of the brain during acute hypoxia are studied for the time that working capacity and active consciousness are preserved, and to establish the correlation between EEG changes and behavioral reactions under oxygen starvation. Changes in body functions and behavioral disturbances are related to the degree of oxygen saturation in the blood, to bioelectric activity of the brain, and to an increase in conditioned reflexes. The capacity for adequate reaction to external signals and for coordinated psychomotor activity after loss of consciousness returns to man after 30 seconds. Repeated effects of hypoxia produce changes in the physiological reactions of the body directed toward better adaptation to changing gaseous environments.

  20. Reservoir-Condition Pore-Scale Imaging of Reaction in Carbonates using Synchrotron Fast Tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menke, H. P.; Andrew, M. G.; Bijeljic, B.; Blunt, M. J.

    2015-12-01

    Carbon capture and storage in carbonate reservoirs is essential for mitigating climate change. Supercritical CO2 mixed with host brine is acidic and can dissolve the surrounding pore structure and change flow dynamics. However, the type, speed, and magnitude of the dissolution are dependent on both the reactive transport properties of the pore-fluid and the intrinsic properties of the rock. Understanding how changes in the pore structure, chemistry, and flow properties affect dissolution is vital for successful predictive modelling both on the pore-scale and for up-scaled reservoir simulations. Reaction in carbonates has been studied at the pore-scale but has never been imaged dynamically in situ. We present an experimental method whereby both lab-based benchtop instruments and 'Pink Beam' synchrotron radiation are used in X-ray microtomography to investigate pore structure changes during supercritical CO2 injection at reservoir conditions. Three types of pure limestone rock with broadly varying rock topology were imaged under the same reservoir conditions. Flow-rate and brine acidity was varied in successive experiments by half an order of magnitude to gain insight into the impact of flow, transport, and physical heterogeneity. The images were binarized and the magnitude of dissolution was identified on a voxel-by-voxel basis to extract pore-by-pore dissolution data. The impact of dissolution on flow characteristics was studied by computing the evolution of the pore-scale velocity fields with a flow solver. We found that increasing rock heterogeneity increased channelized flow [Figure 1] through preferential pathways and that higher flow rate increased total dissolution. Additionally, decreasing reaction rate lowered overall reaction rate and made axial flow less uniform. Experimentally measured reaction rates in real rocks are at least an order of magnitude lower when compared to batch experiments. We provide evidence that this can be due to transport limitations

  1. Experimental study of the reaction of methane with petroleum hydrocarbons in geological conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Gold, T.; Gordon, B.E.; Streett, W.; Bilson, E.; Patnaik, P.

    1986-11-01

    In order to assess the possible role of methane in petroleum formation, they studied the reaction of methane with liquid hydrocarbons representing the three main classes of compounds dominant in crude oil. The experimental reaction conditions simulated those of a geological setting for petroleum formations, at 1000 atm and 150-250/sup 0/C in the presence of montmorillonite, a natural clay catalyst. Since they expected very slow reaction rates and thus low yields, we used /sup 14/C labeled methane to trace the reaction products. They report here the detection of ethylbenzene and ethyltoluene formed by the interaction of methane with benzene and toluene, respectively. Instead of methylation of benzene, predominantly C/sub 2/ addition occurred, although very small amounts of products corresponding to C/sub 1/ addition were also detected. They propose that catalytic dissociation of methane occurred, forming ethylene which participated in a Friedel-Crafts type alkylation process of the aromatic ring on the catalyst surface. In addition to ring alkylation, side reactions such as polymerization of unsaturates (ethylene, acetylene) appeared to have occurred on the catalyst surface. The nature of these polymers is yet to be determined.

  2. Experimental study of the reaction of methane with petroleum hydrocarbons in geological conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gold, Thomas; Gordon, Benjamin E.; Streett, William; Bilson, Elizabeth; Patnaik, Pradyot

    1986-11-01

    In order to assess the possible role of methane in petroleum formation, we studied the reaction of methane with liquid hydrocarbons representing the three main classes of compounds dominant in crude oil. The experimental reaction conditions simulated those of a geological setting for petroleum formations, at 1000 atm and 150-250°C in the presence of montmorillonite, a natural clay catalyst. Since we expected very slow reaction rates and thus low yields, we used 14C labeled methane to trace the reaction products. We report here the detection of ethylbenzene and ethyltoluene formed by the interaction of methane with benzene and toluene, respectively. Instead of methylation of benzene, predominantly C 2 addition occurred, although very small amounts of products corresponding to C 1 addition were also detected. We propose that catalytic dissociation of methane occurred, forming ethylene which participated in a Friedel-Crafts type alkylation process of the aromatic ring on the catalyst surface. In addition to ring alkylation, side reactions such as polymerization of unsaturates (ethylene, acetylene) appeared to have occurred on the catalyst surface. The nature of these polymers is yet to be determined.

  3. High-pressure matrix isolation of heterogeneous condensed phase chemical reactions under extreme conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, Jane K.; Russell, T. P.

    1995-03-01

    A new technique which combines high-pressure and thermal-shock conditions with low-temperature matrix isolation in a gem anvil cell is presented. This serves to partially quench or arrest the reaction sequence of an energetic material. New chemical species are observed which indicate that intermediates are trapped in addition to final products. This combination of high pressure and low temperature helps elucidate the complicated reaction pathways in the deflagration to detonation regime. We have applied this technique to hexanitrohexaazaisowurtzitane (HNIW, chemical name: 2,4,6,8,10,12-hexanitro-2,4,6,8,10,12-hexaazatetracyclo[5.5.0.0 5,9.0 3,11]dodecane). Products are identified using infrared spectroscopy and comparisons are made to previously reported data taken under thermal, ambient pressure conditions.

  4. Conditions for calibration of an isothermal titration calorimeter using chemical reactions.

    PubMed

    Sgarlata, Carmelo; Zito, Valeria; Arena, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    The reaction of protonation of 2-amino-2-(hydroxymethyl)-1,3-propanediol (TRIS) is a suitable one for the calibration of isothermal titration calorimeter (ITC), providing that experimental conditions are appropriately chosen. The conditions and methods for handling experimental data from a nanowatt-ITC are discussed. Also, the binding of Ba(2+) to 18-Crown-6 is successfully used to check the accuracy and precision of the chemical calibration performed with TRIS. This latter reaction has the additional advantage that the data can also be used for a check on the determination of the value of a binding constant. The anomaly of the first injection in ITC is analyzed and, by combining calorimetric and spectroscopic measurements, it is shown that it mainly results from a backlash effect of the syringe plunger rather than from a diffusion effect. PMID:23196751

  5. The kinetics of dolomite reaction rim growth under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helpa, V.; Rybacki, E.; Morales, L. G.; Abart, R.; Dresen, G. H.

    2013-12-01

    During burial and exhumation, rocks are simultaneously exposed to metamorphic reactions and tectonic stresses. Therefore, the reaction rate of newly formed minerals may depend on chemical and mechanical driving forces. Here, we investigate the reaction kinetics of dolomite (CaMg[CO3]2) rim growth by solid-state reactions experiments on oriented calcite (CaCO3) and magnesite (MgCO3) single crystals under isostatic and non-isostatic pressure conditions. Cylindrical samples of 3-5 mm length and 7 mm diameter were drilled and polished perpendicular to the rhombohedral cleavage planes of natural clear crystals. The tests were performed using a Paterson-type deformation apparatus at P = 400 MPa confining pressure, temperatures, T, between 750 and 850°C, and reaction durations, t, of 2 - 146 h to calculate the kinetic parameters of dolomite rim growth under isostatic stress conditions. For non-isostatic reaction experiments we applied in addition differential stresses, σ, up to 40 MPa perpendicular to the contact interface at T = 750°C for 4 - 171 h duration, initiating minor inelastic deformation of calcite. The thickness of the resulting dolomite reaction rims increases linearly with the square root of time, indicating a diffusion-controlled reaction. The rims consist of two different textural domains. Granular dolomite grains (≈ 2 -5 μm grain size) form next to calcite and elongated palisade-shaped grains (1-6 μm diameter) grow perpendicular to the magnesite interface. Texture measurements with the electron backscatter diffraction technique indicate that the orientations of dolomite grains are mainly influenced by the orientation of the calcite educt crystal, in particular in the granular rim. To some extent, the texture of dolomite palisades is also influenced by the orientation of magnesite. The thickness of the two individual layers increases with temperature. At 400 MPa isostatic pressure, T = 750°C and t = 29 hours, a 5 μm thick granular dolomite layer

  6. Study on the reaction kinetics in pulsed RF discharges under RIE conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggerman, Jacobus Antonius Gijsbertus

    1993-10-01

    In the present-day electronics industry, reactive ion etching (RIE) is a technique widely used to etch thin films anisotropically. The subject of this thesis is the determination of (reaction) kinetics of rf discharges under RIE conditions. Special attention is given to determining quantitatively the rise and decay of densities and energy distributions of plasma particles. A production-type RIE reactor was used for all experiments. In chapter 2 the ion density is determined by LIF spectroscopy in a model (N2) discharge under RIE conditions. Chapter 3 concerns energy-flux density measurements on the various parts of the etch reactor in contact with a 30 Pa nitrogen rf discharge. Chapter 4 concerns the etch mechanism of various organic polymers in oxygen and argon of discharges under RIE conditions studied by performing energy-flux density and ion-flux density measurements on the powered electrode. The polymers of interest are a novolac-based photoresist, polyimide and polymethylmethacrylate (PMMA). The density and the reaction kinetics of ground-state methylidyne (CH radical) are determined by LIF in order to determine whether small molecules in addition to atoms are sputtered from the polymer surface. In chapter 5 a model is set up in which diffusion of CH from the substrate into the gas phase and chemical reactions in the gas phase are taken into account.

  7. Search for reaction conditions and catalyst for selective prebiotic formation of Aldopentoses from Glycolaldehyde and Formaldehyde

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delidovich, Irina; Taran, Oxana; Parmon, Valentin; Gromov, Nikolay

    2012-07-01

    Formation of organic compounds from simple precursors appears to have been one of the first steps from geochemistry towards modern biochemistry. The Earth lagoons, hydrothermal springs, cosmic dust, meteorites, protoplanetary disk, etc. has been considered as the possible ``reactors'' in which the prebiotic synthesis could have taken place. The finding of reactions and reaction conditions which allow to produce the high yields of the biologically relevant substances from simple compounds could help us to verify different hypothesis of plausible prebotic conditions. In this work we have studied the formation of vitally important sugars, namely aldopentoses (ribose, xylose, lyxose and arabinose), from glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde over catalysts. Aldopentoses nowadays play the important roles as the components of polysaccharides, glycosides, nucleic acids and ATP. Glycolaldehyde is the simplest monosaccharide, which was found in the interstellar space [1], where it could be generated as a result of several processes, for instance, condensation of formaldehyde under UV-radiation [2]. In this work the peculiarities of interaction between glycolaldehyde and formaldehyde in the presence of soluble (phosphate and borate buffers) and solid (minerals apatite and montmorillonites) catalysts were studied. The dependences of composition of the reaction products on the catalyst nature, molar ratio of substrates, pH value of reaction mixture were revealed. The yields of aldopentoses amount to ca. 60-65% in the presence of borate catalyst under optimized reaction conditions. Borate acts not only as a catalyst, but also as the stabilizer of active intermediates and aldopentoses from side reactions [3]. Borates are present in some mineral and clays (serpentine, montmorillonite etc.) and in water of Cityhot springs (Geyser valley, placeKamchatka) in rather high concentrations. Therefore catalysis by borates could be considered as plausible prebotic condition. Acknowledgements. We

  8. Influence of Catalyst Structure and Reaction Conditions on Anti- vs. Syn-Aminopalladation Pathways in Pd-Catalyzed Alkene Carboamination Reactions of N-Allyl Sulfamides

    PubMed Central

    Fornwald, Ryan M.; Fritz, Jonathan A.

    2014-01-01

    The Pd-catalyzed coupling of N-allyl sulfamides with aryl and alkenyl triflates to afford cyclic sulfamide products is described. In contrast to other known Pd-catalyzed alkene carboamination reactions, these transformations may be selectively induced to occur by way of either anti- or syn-aminopalladation mechanistic pathways by modifying catalyst structure and reaction conditions. PMID:24938206

  9. Hydraulic Fracturing Fluid Reaction with Shale in Experiments at Unconventional Gas Reservoir Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paukert, A. N.; Hakala, A.; Jarvis, K. B.

    2015-12-01

    Despite the marked increase in hydraulic fracturing for unconventional natural gas production over the past decade, reactions between hydraulic fracturing fluids (HFF) and shale reservoirs remain poorly reported in the scientific literature. Shale-HFF interaction could cause mineral dissolution, releasing matter from the shale, or mineral precipitation that degrades reservoir permeability. Furthermore, data are limited on whether scale inhibitors are effective at preventing mineral precipitation and whether these inhibitors adversely affect reservoir fluid chemistry and permeability. To investigate HFF-rock interaction within shale reservoirs, we conducted flow-through experiments exposing Marcellus Shale to synthetic HFF at reservoir conditions (66oC, 20MPa). Outcrop shale samples were cored, artificially fractured, and propped open with quartz sand. Synthetic HFFs were mixed with chemical additives similar to those used for Marcellus Shale gas wells in Ohio and Southwestern Pennsylvania (FracFocus.org). We evaluated differences between shale reactions with HFF made from natural freshwater and reactions with HFF made from synthetic produced water (designed to simulate produced water that is diluted and re-used for subsequent hydraulic fracturing). We also compared reactions with HFFs including hydrochloric acid (HCl) to represent the initial acid stage, and HFFs excluding HCl. Reactions were determined through changes in fluid chemistry and X-ray CT and SEM imaging of the shale before and after experiments. Results from experiments with HFF containing HCl showed dissolution of primary calcite, as expected. Experiments using HFF made from synthetic produced water had significant mineral precipitation, particularly of barium and calcium sulfates. X-ray CT images from these experiments indicate precipitation of minerals occurred either along the main fracture or within smaller splay fractures, depending on fluid composition. These experiments suggest that HFF

  10. Consistency between kinetics and thermodynamics: general scaling conditions for reaction rates of nonlinear chemical systems without constraints far from equilibrium.

    PubMed

    Vlad, Marcel O; Popa, Vlad T; Ross, John

    2011-02-01

    We examine the problem of consistency between the kinetic and thermodynamic descriptions of reaction networks. We focus on reaction networks with linearly dependent (but generally kinetically independent) reactions for which only some of the stoichiometric vectors attached to the different reactions are linearly independent. We show that for elementary reactions without constraints preventing the system from approaching equilibrium there are general scaling relations for nonequilibrium rates, one for each linearly dependent reaction. These scaling relations express the ratios of the forward and backward rates of the linearly dependent reactions in terms of products of the ratios of the forward and backward rates of the linearly independent reactions raised to different scaling powers; the scaling powers are elements of the transformation matrix, which relates the linearly dependent stoichiometric vectors to the linearly independent stoichiometric vectors. These relations are valid for any network of elementary reactions without constraints, linear or nonlinear kinetics, far from equilibrium or close to equilibrium. We show that similar scaling relations for the reaction routes exist for networks of nonelementary reactions described by the Horiuti-Temkin theory of reaction routes where the linear dependence of the mechanistic (elementary) reactions is transferred to the overall (route) reactions. However, in this case, the scaling conditions are valid only at the steady state. General relationships between reaction rates of the two levels of description are presented. These relationships are illustrated for a specific complex reaction: radical chlorination of ethylene.

  11. Optimized extract preparation methods and reaction conditions for improved yeast cell-free protein synthesis.

    PubMed

    Hodgman, C Eric; Jewett, Michael C

    2013-10-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a powerful platform technology to help satisfy the growing demand for simple, affordable, and efficient protein production. In this article, we describe a novel CFPS platform derived from the popular bio-manufacturing organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By developing a streamlined crude extract preparation protocol and optimizing the CFPS reaction conditions we were able to achieve active firefly luciferase synthesis yields of 7.7 ± 0.5 µg mL(-1) with batch reactions lasting up to 2 h. This duration of synthesis is the longest ever reported for a yeast CFPS batch reaction. Furthermore, by removing extraneous processing steps and eliminating expensive reagents from the cell-free reaction, we have increased relative product yield (µg protein synthesized per $ reagent cost) over an alternative commonly used method up to 2000-fold from ∼2 × 10(-4) to ∼4 × 10(-1)  µg $(-1) , which now puts the yeast CPFS platform on par with other eukaryotic CFPS platforms commercially available. Our results set the stage for developing a yeast CFPS platform that provides for high-yielding and cost-effective expression of a variety of protein therapeutics and protein libraries.

  12. Effect of hydrothermal reaction time and alkaline conditions on the electrochemical properties of reduced graphene oxide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vermisoglou, E. C.; Giannakopoulou, T.; Romanos, G.; Giannouri, M.; Boukos, N.; Lei, C.; Lekakou, C.; Trapalis, C.

    2015-12-01

    Reduced graphene oxide sheets (rGO) were prepared by hydrothermal treatment of aqueous dispersions of graphite oxide (GtO) applied for short (4 h) and prolonged reaction times (19-24 h). The effect of process duration as well as the alkaline conditions (pH ∼10) by addition of K2CO3 on the quality characteristics of the produced rGO materials was investigated. Both reduction and exfoliation occurred during this process as it was evidenced by FTIR and XRD data. SEM, TEM and HRTEM microscopy displayed highly exfoliated rGO materials. XPS verified that the re-establishment of the conjugated graphene network is more extensive for prolonged times of hydrothermal processing in accordance to Raman spectroscopy measurements. The sample produced under alkaline conditions bore fewer defects and almost 5 times higher BET surface area (∼181 m2/g) than the sample with no pH adjustment (∼34 m2/g) for the same hydrothermal reaction time (19 h), attributed to the developed microporosity. The specific capacitance of this material estimated by electrochemical impedance using three-electrode cell and KCl aqueous solution as an electrolyte was ∼400-500 F/g. When EDLC capacitors were fabricated from rGO materials the electrochemical testing in organic electrolyte i.e. TEABF4 in PC, revealed that the shortest hydrothermal reaction time (4 h) was more efficient resulting in capacitance around 60 F/g.

  13. Organocatalytic acetylation of starch: effect of reaction conditions on DS and characterisation of esterified granules.

    PubMed

    Tupa, Maribel Victoria; Ávila Ramírez, Jhon Alejandro; Vázquez, Analía; Foresti, María Laura

    2015-03-01

    Starch acetates with varying degree of substitution (DS) were prepared by a novel solvent-free organocatalytic methodology. The acetylation protocol involved a non-toxic biobased α-hydroxycarboxylic acid as catalyst, and proceeded with high efficiency in absence of solvents. The effect of reaction conditions including reaction temperature (90-140 °C), catalyst load (0-2.3 g/g starch), acetic anhydride/starch weight ratio (6.5-13.5 g/g), and starch moisture content (0.6-14.8%) on the DS of the esters was evaluated. The analysis performed showed that the increase of temperature and catalyst concentration resulted in higher DS values, and evidenced a beneficial contribution of native starch moisture content on the substitution level achieved. Variation of reaction conditions allowed starch esters to be obtained with DS in the 0.03-2.93 range. Starch esters were characterised in terms of morphology, chemical structure, thermal properties, and distribution in polar/non polar liquid systems. PMID:25306348

  14. Specificity of psychomotor reactions in the conditions of support deprivation including effects of countermeasures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nichiporuk, Igor; Ivanov, Oleg

    Activity of the cosmonaut demands high level of psychomotor reactions (PMR) which can vary during space flight under the influences of psychophysiological state’s variability and unusual inhabitancy that causes the necessity of PMR estimation’s inclusion into quality monitoring of capacity for work (CW). A main objective of research was a study of features of visual-motor reactions (VMR) and elements of CW of the person within simulation of microgravity effects via 7-day dry immersion (DI) in healthy male-volunteers 20-35 years old. The experimental data were received which testified to peculiarities of VMR and recognition of simple figures of main colors of a visible spectrum (red, green, blue, the RGB-standard) in the conditions of the DI characterized by support deprivation and decreased proprioceptive afferentation - in a control series and in a series with use of mioelectrostimulation as a countermeasure.

  15. Temperature-dependent reaction-rate expression for oxygen recombination at Shuttle entry conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zoby, E. V.; Simmonds, A. L.; Gupta, R. N.

    1984-01-01

    A temperature-dependent oxygen surface reaction-rate coefficient has been determined from experimental STS-2 heating and wall temperature data at altitudes of 77.91 km, 74.98 km, and 71.29 km. The coefficient is presented in an Arrhenius form and is shown to be less temperature dependent than previous results. Finite-rate viscous-shock-layer heating rates based on this present expression have been compared with predicted heating rates using the previous rate coefficients and with experimental heating data obtained over an extensive range of STS-2 and STS-3 entry conditions. A substantial improvement is obtained in comparison of experimental data and predicted heating rates using the present oxygen reaction-rate expression.

  16. Effect of reaction conditions on phenol removal by polymerization and precipitation using Coprinus cinereus peroxidase.

    PubMed

    Masuda, M; Sakurai, A; Sakakibara, M

    2001-03-01

    The quantitative relationships between removal efficiency of phenol and reaction conditions were investigated using Coprinus cinereus peroxidase. The most effective ratio of hydrogen peroxide to phenol was nearly 1/1 (mol/mol) at an adequate enzyme dose. 12.2 U of the enzyme was needed to remove 1 mg of phenol when our peroxidase preparation was used. At an insufficient peroxidase dose, the optimum pH value was 9.0, and lowering the reaction temperature led to the improvement of removal efficiency. At an excess peroxidase dose, almost 100% removal of phenol was obtained over a wide range of pH (5-9) and temperature (0-60 degrees C). Despite the presence of culture medium components, it was shown that Coprinus cinereus peroxidase had the same phenol polymerization performance as horseradish peroxidase or Arthromyces ramosus peroxidase.

  17. Long-term behavior of reaction-diffusion equations with nonlocal boundary conditions on rough domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gal, Ciprian G.; Warma, Mahamadi

    2016-08-01

    We investigate the long term behavior in terms of finite dimensional global and exponential attractors, as time goes to infinity, of solutions to a semilinear reaction-diffusion equation on non-smooth domains subject to nonlocal Robin boundary conditions, characterized by the presence of fractional diffusion on the boundary. Our results are of general character and apply to a large class of irregular domains, including domains whose boundary is Hölder continuous and domains which have fractal-like geometry. In addition to recovering most of the existing results on existence, regularity, uniqueness, stability, attractor existence, and dimension, for the well-known reaction-diffusion equation in smooth domains, the framework we develop also makes possible a number of new results for all diffusion models in other non-smooth settings.

  18. A Molecular Dynamics Study of Chemical Reactions of Solid Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate at Extreme Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, C J; Manaa, M R; Fried, L E

    2006-05-30

    We have carried out density functional based tight binding (DFTB) molecular dynamics (MD) simulation to study energetic reactions of solid Pentaerythritol Tetranitrate (PETN) at conditions approximating the Chapman-Jouguet (CJ) detonation state. We found that the initial decomposition of PETN molecular solid is characterized by uni-molecular dissociation of the NO{sub 2}groups. Interestingly, energy release from this powerful high explosive was found to proceed in several stages. The large portion of early stage energy release was found to be associated with the formation of H{sub 2}O molecules within a few picoseconds of reaction. It took nearly four times as long for majority of CO{sub 2} products to form, accompanied by a slow oscillatory conversion between CO and CO{sub 2}. The production of N{sub 2} starts after NO{sub 2} loses its oxygen atoms to hydrogen or carbon atoms to form H{sub 2}O or CO. We identified many intermediate species that emerge and contribute to reaction kinetics, and compared our simulation with a thermo-chemical equilibrium calculation. In addition, a detailed chemical kinetics of formation of H{sub 2}O, CO, and CO{sub 2} were developed. Rate constants of formations of H{sub 2}O, CO{sub 2} and N{sub 2} were reported.

  19. The Pt(111)/electrolyte interface under oxygen reduction reaction conditions: an electrochemical impedance spectroscopy study.

    PubMed

    Bondarenko, Alexander S; Stephens, Ifan E L; Hansen, Heine A; Pérez-Alonso, Francisco J; Tripkovic, Vladimir; Johansson, Tobias P; Rossmeisl, Jan; Nørskov, Jens K; Chorkendorff, Ib

    2011-03-01

    The Pt(111)/electrolyte interface has been characterized during the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in 0.1 M HClO(4) using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The surface was studied within the potential region where adsorption of OH* and O* species occur without significant place exchange between the adsorbate and Pt surface atoms (0.45-1.15 V vs RHE). An equivalent electric circuit is proposed to model the Pt(111)/electrolyte interface under ORR conditions within the selected potential window. This equivalent circuit reflects three processes with different time constants, which occur simultaneously during the ORR at Pt(111). Density functional theory (DFT) calculations were used to correlate and interpret the results of the measurements. The calculations indicate that the coadsorption of ClO(4)* and Cl* with OH* is unlikely. Our analysis suggests that the two-dimensional (2D) structures formed in O(2)-free solution are also formed under ORR conditions. PMID:21244087

  20. Reaction of perfluoroalkylpolyethers (PFPE) with 440C steel in vacuum under sliding conditions at room temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mori, Shigeyuki; Morales, Wilfredo

    1989-01-01

    Reactions of perfluoroalkylpolyethers (PFPE: Fomblin, Demnum and Krytox) were studied during the sliding contact of stainless steel specimens under ultrahigh vacuum conditions. All three fluids reacted with the steel specimens during sliding. Fomblin, which has acetal linkages, decomposed under the sliding conditions generating gaseous products, (COF2 and fluorinated carbons) which were detected by a quadrupole mass spectrometer. Gaseous products were not detected for the Demnum and Krytox fluids. The amount of gaseous products from Fomblin increased with increasing sliding speed. At the end of the sliding experiments, the wear scar and deposits on the specimens were examined by small spot size XPS. The oxide layer on the specimen surface was removed during sliding, and metal fluorides were formed on the worn surface. The surface of the wear scar and deposits were covered with adsorbed PFPE. Based on these results, it was concluded that the decomposition reaction on Fomblin was initiated by contacting the fluid with a fresh metal surface which was formed during sliding.

  1. Chemoselective Oxidation of Benzyl, Amino, and Propargyl Alcohols to Aldehydes and Ketones under Mild Reaction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, C B Rajashekar; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara; Naidu, Shivaji

    2015-01-01

    Catalytic oxidation reactions often suffer from drawbacks such as low yields and poor selectivity. Particularly, selective oxidation of alcohols becomes more difficult when a compound contains more than one oxidizable functional group. In order to deliver a methodology that addresses these issues, herein we report an efficient, aerobic, chemoselective and simplified approach to oxidize a broad range of benzyl and propargyl alcohols containing diverse functional groups to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Optimal yields were obtained at room temperature using 1 mmol substrate, 10 mol % copper(I) iodide, 10 mol % 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP), and 1 mol % 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) in acetonitrile, under an oxygen balloon. The catalytic system can be applied even when sensitive and oxidizable groups such as alkynes, amines, and phenols are present; starting materials and products containing such groups were found to be stable under the developed conditions. PMID:25969806

  2. Chemoselective Oxidation of Benzyl, Amino, and Propargyl Alcohols to Aldehydes and Ketones under Mild Reaction Conditions.

    PubMed

    Reddy, C B Rajashekar; Reddy, Sabbasani Rajasekhara; Naidu, Shivaji

    2015-04-01

    Catalytic oxidation reactions often suffer from drawbacks such as low yields and poor selectivity. Particularly, selective oxidation of alcohols becomes more difficult when a compound contains more than one oxidizable functional group. In order to deliver a methodology that addresses these issues, herein we report an efficient, aerobic, chemoselective and simplified approach to oxidize a broad range of benzyl and propargyl alcohols containing diverse functional groups to their corresponding aldehydes and ketones in excellent yields under mild reaction conditions. Optimal yields were obtained at room temperature using 1 mmol substrate, 10 mol % copper(I) iodide, 10 mol % 4-dimethylaminopyridine (DMAP), and 1 mol % 2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine 1-oxyl (TEMPO) in acetonitrile, under an oxygen balloon. The catalytic system can be applied even when sensitive and oxidizable groups such as alkynes, amines, and phenols are present; starting materials and products containing such groups were found to be stable under the developed conditions. PMID:25969806

  3. Atomic-Scale Observations of Catalyst Structures under Reaction Conditions and during Catalysis.

    PubMed

    Tao, Franklin Feng; Crozier, Peter A

    2016-03-23

    Heterogeneous catalysis is a chemical process performed at a solid-gas or solid-liquid interface. Direct participation of catalyst atoms in this chemical process determines the significance of the surface structure of a catalyst in a fundamental understanding of such a chemical process at a molecular level. High-pressure scanning tunneling microscopy (HP-STM) and environmental transmission electron microscopy (ETEM) have been used to observe catalyst structure in the last few decades. In this review, instrumentation for the two in situ/operando techniques and scientific findings on catalyst structures under reaction conditions and during catalysis are discussed with the following objectives: (1) to present the fundamental aspects of in situ/operando studies of catalysts; (2) to interpret the observed restructurings of catalyst and evolution of catalyst structures; (3) to explore how HP-STM and ETEM can be synergistically used to reveal structural details under reaction conditions and during catalysis; and (4) to discuss the future challenges and prospects of atomic-scale observation of catalysts in understanding of heterogeneous catalysis. This Review focuses on the development of HP-STM and ETEM, the in situ/operando characterizations of catalyst structures with them, and the integration of the two structural analytical techniques for fundamentally understanding catalysis.

  4. In-situ observations of catalytic surface reactions with soft x-rays under working conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toyoshima, Ryo; Kondoh, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Catalytic chemical reactions proceeding on solid surfaces are an important topic in fundamental science and industrial technologies such as energy conversion, pollution control and chemical synthesis. Complete understanding of the heterogeneous catalysis and improving its efficiency to an ultimate level are the eventual goals for many surface scientists. Soft x-ray is one of the prime probes to observe electronic and structural information of the target materials. Most studies in surface science using soft x-rays have been performed under ultra-high vacuum conditions due to the technical limitation, though the practical catalytic reactions proceed under ambient pressure conditions. However, recent developments of soft x-ray based techniques operating under ambient pressure conditions have opened a door to the in-situ observation of materials under realistic environments. The near-ambient-pressure x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (NAP-XPS) using synchrotron radiation enables us to observe the chemical states of surfaces of condensed matters under the presence of gas(es) at elevated pressures, which has been hardly conducted with the conventional XPS technique. Furthermore, not only the NAP-XPS but also ambient-pressure compatible soft x-ray core-level spectroscopies, such as near-edge absorption fine structure (NEXAFS) and x-ray emission spectroscopy (XES), have been significantly contributing to the in-situ observations. In this review, first we introduce recent developments of in-situ observations using soft x-ray techniques and current status. Then we present recent new findings on catalytically active surfaces using soft x-ray techniques, particularly focusing on the NAP-XPS technique. Finally we give a perspective on the future direction of this emerging technique.

  5. Controlled release of volatiles under mild reaction conditions: from nature to everyday products.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Andreas

    2007-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds serve in nature as semiochemicals for communication between species, and are often used as flavors and fragrances in our everyday life. The quite limited longevity of olfactive perception has led to the development of pro-perfumes or pro-fragrances--ideally nonvolatile and odorless fragrance precursors which release the active volatiles by bond cleavage. Only a limited amount of reaction conditions, such as hydrolysis, temperature changes, as well as the action of light, oxygen, enzymes, or microorganisms, can be used to liberate the many different chemical functionalities. This Review describes the controlled chemical release of fragrances and discusses additional challenges such as precursor stability during product storage as well as some aspects concerning toxicity and biodegradability. As the same systems can be applied in different areas of research, the scope of this Review covers fragrance delivery as well as the controlled release of volatiles in general.

  6. Influence of home cooking conditions on Maillard reaction products in beef.

    PubMed

    Trevisan, Aurea Juliana Bombo; de Almeida Lima, Daniele; Sampaio, Geni Rodrigues; Soares, Rosana Aparecida Manólio; Markowicz Bastos, Deborah Helena

    2016-04-01

    The influence of home cooking methods on the generation of Maillard reaction products (MRP) in beef was investigated. Grilling and frying hamburgers to an internal temperature below 90 °C mainly generated furosine. When the temperature reached 90 °C and 100 °C, furosine content decreased by 36% and fluorescent compounds increased by up to 98%. Baking meat at 300 °C, the most severe heat treatment studied, resulted in the formation of carboxymethyllysine. Boiling in water caused very low MRP formation. Acrylamide concentrations in grilled, fried or baked meat were extremely low. Home cooking conditions leading to low MRP generation and pleasant colours were obtained and could be used to guide diabetic and chronic renal patients on how to reduce their carboxymethyllysine intake.

  7. Effects of reaction conditions on cellulose structures synthesized in vitro by bacterial cellulose synthases.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Paavo A; Sugiyama, Junji; Imai, Tomoya

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose was synthesized by cellulose synthases extracted from the Komagataeibacter xylinus (formerly known as Gluconacetobacter xylinus). The effects of temperature and centrifugation of the reaction solution on the synthesis products were investigated. Cellulose with number-average degree of polymerization (DPn) roughly in the range 60-80 and cellulose II crystal structure was produced under all conditions. The amount of cellulose varied with temperature and centrifugation, and the centrifugation at 2000 × g also slightly reduced the DPn. Cellulose production was maximal around the temperature 35 °C and without centrifugation. At higher temperatures and during centrifugation at 2000 × g the proteins started to denature, causing differences also in the morphology of the cellulosic aggregates, as seen with electron microscopy. These observations serve as a basis for discussions about the factors affecting the structure formation and chain length of in vitro synthesized cellulose. PMID:26572398

  8. Application of click chemistry conditions for 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine determination through Fenton and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Cappella, Paolo; Pulici, Maurizio; Gasparri, Fabio

    2015-01-05

    Mixtures of ascorbate and copper used in certain click chemistry experimental conditions act as oxidizing agents, catalyzing the formation of reactive oxygen species through Fenton and related reactions. Hydroxyl radicals act as chemical nucleases, introducing DNA strand breaks that can be exploited for BrdU immunostaining in place of acid denaturation. This procedure is readily applicable to high content analysis and flow cytometry assays, and provides results comparable to click chemistry EdU cycloaddition and classical BrdU immunodetection. Importantly, this approach allows preservation of labile epitopes such as phosphoproteins. This unit describes an optimized method that successfully employs Fenton chemistry for simultaneous detection of phosphoproteins and BrdU in intact cells.

  9. Effects of reaction conditions on cellulose structures synthesized in vitro by bacterial cellulose synthases.

    PubMed

    Penttilä, Paavo A; Sugiyama, Junji; Imai, Tomoya

    2016-01-20

    Cellulose was synthesized by cellulose synthases extracted from the Komagataeibacter xylinus (formerly known as Gluconacetobacter xylinus). The effects of temperature and centrifugation of the reaction solution on the synthesis products were investigated. Cellulose with number-average degree of polymerization (DPn) roughly in the range 60-80 and cellulose II crystal structure was produced under all conditions. The amount of cellulose varied with temperature and centrifugation, and the centrifugation at 2000 × g also slightly reduced the DPn. Cellulose production was maximal around the temperature 35 °C and without centrifugation. At higher temperatures and during centrifugation at 2000 × g the proteins started to denature, causing differences also in the morphology of the cellulosic aggregates, as seen with electron microscopy. These observations serve as a basis for discussions about the factors affecting the structure formation and chain length of in vitro synthesized cellulose.

  10. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  11. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily. PMID:27370473

  12. Development of a reaction cell for in-situ/operando studies of surface of a catalyst under a reaction condition and during catalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Luan; Tao, Franklin Feng

    2016-06-01

    Tracking surface chemistry of a catalyst during catalysis is significant for fundamental understanding of catalytic performance of the catalyst since it allows for establishing an intrinsic correlation between surface chemistry of a catalyst at its working status and its corresponding catalytic performance. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy can be used for in-situ studies of surfaces of different materials or devices in a gas. To simulate the gaseous environment of a catalyst in a fixed-bed a flowing gaseous environment of reactants around the catalyst is necessary. Here, we report the development of a new flowing reaction cell for simulating in-situ study of a catalyst surface under a reaction condition in gas of one reactant or during catalysis in a mixture of reactants of a catalytic reaction. The homemade reaction cell is installed in a high vacuum (HV) or ultrahigh vacuum (UHV) environment of a chamber. The flowing gas in the reaction cell is separated from the HV or UHV environment through well sealings at three interfaces between the reaction cell and X-ray window, sample door and aperture of front cone of an energy analyzer. Catalyst in the cell is heated through infrared laser beam introduced through a fiber optics interfaced with the reaction cell through a homemade feedthrough. The highly localized heating on the sample holder and Au-passivated internal surface of the reaction cell effectively minimizes any unwanted reactions potentially catalyzed by the reaction cell. The incorporated laser heating allows a fast heating and a high thermal stability of the sample at a high temperature. With this cell, a catalyst at 800 °C in a flowing gas can be tracked readily.

  13. Neutrality condition and response law for nonlinear reaction-diffusion equations, with application to population genetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlad, Marcel Ovidiu; Moran, Federico; Tsuchiya, Masa; Cavalli-Sforza, L. Luca; Oefner, Peter J.; Ross, John

    2002-06-01

    We study a general class of nonlinear macroscopic evolution equations with ``transport'' and ``reaction'' terms which describe the dynamics of a species of moving individuals (atoms, molecules, quasiparticles, organisms, etc.). We consider that two types of individuals exist, ``not marked'' and ``marked,'' respectively. We assume that the concentrations of both types of individuals are measurable and that they obey a neutrality condition, that is, the kinetic and transport properties of the ``not marked'' and ``marked'' individuals are identical. We suggest a response experiment, which consists in varying the fraction of ``marked'' individuals with the preservation of total fluxes, and show that the response of the system can be represented by a linear superposition law even though the underlying dynamics of the system is in general highly nonlinear. The linear response law is valid even for large perturbations and is not the result of a linearization procedure but rather a necessary consequence of the neutrality condition. First, we apply the response theorem to chemical kinetics, where the ``marked species'' is a molecule labeled with a radioactive isotope and there is no kinetic isotope effect. The susceptibility function of the response law can be related to the reaction mechanism of the process. Secondly we study the geographical distribution of the nonrecurrent, nonreversible neutral mutations of the nonrecombining portion of the Y chromosome from human populations and show that the fraction of mutants at a given point in space and time obeys a linear response law of the type introduced in this paper. The theory may be used for evaluating the geographic position and the moment in time where and when a mutation originated.

  14. Chemical and Physical Reactions of Wellbore Cement under CO2 Storage Conditions: Effects of Cement Additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutchko, B. G.; Strazisar, B. R.; Huerta, N.; Lowry, G. V.; Dzombak, D. A.; Thaulow, N.

    2008-12-01

    Sequestration of CO2 into geologic formations requires long-term storage and low leakage rates to be effective. Active and abandoned wells in candidate storage formations must be evaluated as potential leakage points. Wellbore integrity is an important part of an overall integrated assessment program being developed at NETL to assess potential risks at CO2 storage sites. Such a program is needed for ongoing policy and regulatory decisions for geologic carbon sequestration. The permeability and integrity of the cement in the well is a primary factor affecting its ability to prevent leakage. Cement must be able to maintain low permeability over lengthy exposure to reservoir conditions in a CO2 injection and storage scenario. Although it is known that cement may be altered by exposure to CO2, the results of ongoing research indicate that cement curing conditions, fluid properties, and cement additives play a significant role in the rate of alteration and reaction. The objective of this study is to improve understanding of the factors affecting wellbore cement integrity for large-scale geologic carbon sequestration projects. Due to the high frequency use of additives (pozzolan) in wellbore cement, it is also essential to understand the reaction of these cement-pozzolan systems upon exposure to CO2 under sequestration conditions (15.5 MPa and 50°C). Laboratory experiments were performed to determine the physical and chemical changes, as well as the rate of alteration of commonly used pozzolan-cement systems under simulated sequestration reservoir conditions, including both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine. The rate of alteration of the cement-pozzolan systems is considerably faster than with neat cement. However, the alteration of physical properties is much less significant with the pozzolanic blends. Permeability of a carbonated pozzolanic cement paste remains sufficiently small to block significant vertical migration of CO2 in a wellbore. All of the

  15. A more robust model of the biodiesel reaction, allowing identification of process conditions for significantly enhanced rate and water tolerance.

    PubMed

    Eze, Valentine C; Phan, Anh N; Harvey, Adam P

    2014-03-01

    A more robust kinetic model of base-catalysed transesterification than the conventional reaction scheme has been developed. All the relevant reactions in the base-catalysed transesterification of rapeseed oil (RSO) to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) were investigated experimentally, and validated numerically in a model implemented using MATLAB. It was found that including the saponification of RSO and FAME side reactions and hydroxide-methoxide equilibrium data explained various effects that are not captured by simpler conventional models. Both the experiment and modelling showed that the "biodiesel reaction" can reach the desired level of conversion (>95%) in less than 2min. Given the right set of conditions, the transesterification can reach over 95% conversion, before the saponification losses become significant. This means that the reaction must be performed in a reactor exhibiting good mixing and good control of residence time, and the reaction mixture must be quenched rapidly as it leaves the reactor.

  16. A more robust model of the biodiesel reaction, allowing identification of process conditions for significantly enhanced rate and water tolerance.

    PubMed

    Eze, Valentine C; Phan, Anh N; Harvey, Adam P

    2014-03-01

    A more robust kinetic model of base-catalysed transesterification than the conventional reaction scheme has been developed. All the relevant reactions in the base-catalysed transesterification of rapeseed oil (RSO) to fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) were investigated experimentally, and validated numerically in a model implemented using MATLAB. It was found that including the saponification of RSO and FAME side reactions and hydroxide-methoxide equilibrium data explained various effects that are not captured by simpler conventional models. Both the experiment and modelling showed that the "biodiesel reaction" can reach the desired level of conversion (>95%) in less than 2min. Given the right set of conditions, the transesterification can reach over 95% conversion, before the saponification losses become significant. This means that the reaction must be performed in a reactor exhibiting good mixing and good control of residence time, and the reaction mixture must be quenched rapidly as it leaves the reactor. PMID:24508659

  17. Volatile-refractory element reactions and breakdown of refractory oxides under conditions of a giant impact

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tschauner, O. D.; Ma, C.

    2015-12-01

    Whereas much or most of the highly volatile elements reside in atmosphere and oceans, understanding the global budget of these elements requires knowledge about their abundance in the Earth's interior. One piece of this puzzle is the early history of the Earth where large impacts, notably giant impacts, provided conditions where both volatile and refractory elements were mixed on atomic scale in extremely hot dense fluids. Carbides and nitrides that have recently been found in mantle rock are possible remnants of such large scale dynamic pressure-temperature conditions. In particular carbides and nitrides of lithophile refractory elements like Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta may remain in the mantle for extended time and contribute to the mantle geochemical budget of these elements as well as that of C and N. In a first step towards testing such a hypothesis, we conducted a series of shock experiments. Deflagration of C-N-O-H compounds was triggered by shockwaves. The resulting reaction wave front propagated into aggregates of refractory minerals like zircon, baddeleyite, rutile. This fluid-solid mix was subjected to shock compression to shock pressures of 20-50 GPa and temperatures in the range of 0.5-1.104 K by means of reverberating shock. Recovered sample material was analyzed by synchrotron X-ray diffraction and by EPMA.

  18. Optimization of reaction conditions for the electroleaching of manganese from low-grade pyrolusite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xing-ran; Liu, Zuo-hua; Fan, Xing; Lian, Xin; Tao, Chang-yuan

    2015-11-01

    In the present study, a response surface methodology was used to optimize the electroleaching of Mn from low-grade pyrolusite. Ferrous sulfate heptahydrate was used in this reaction as a reducing agent in sulfuric acid solutions. The effect of six process variables, including the mass ratio of ferrous sulfate heptahydrate to pyrolusite, mass ratio of sulfuric acid to pyrolusite, liquid-to-solid ratio, current density, leaching temperature, and leaching time, as well as their binary interactions, were modeled. The results revealed that the order of these factors with respect to their effects on the leaching efficiency were mass ratio of ferrous sulfate heptahydrate to pyrolusite > leaching time > mass ratio of sulfuric acid to pyrolusite > liquid-to-solid ratio > leaching temperature > current density. The optimum conditions were as follows: 1.10:1 mass ratio of ferrous sulfate heptahydrate to pyrolusite, 0.9:1 mass ratio of sulfuric acid to pyrolusite, liquid-to-solid ratio of 0.7:1, current density of 947 A/m2, leaching time of 180 min, and leaching temperature of 73°C. Under these conditions, the predicted leaching efficiency for Mn was 94.1%; the obtained experimental result was 95.7%, which confirmed the validity of the model.

  19. Simplified models of transport and reactions in conditions of CO2 storage in saline aquifers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suchodolska, Katarzyna; Labus, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    Simple hydrogeochemical models may serve as tools of preliminary assessment of CO2 injection and sequestraton impact on the aquifer and cap-rocks. In order to create models of reaction and transport in conditions of CO2 injection and storage, the TOUGHREACT simulator, and the Geochemist's Workbench software were applied. The chemical composition of waters for kinetic transport models based on the water - rock equilibrium calculations. Analyses of reaction and transport of substances during CO2 injection and storage period were carried out in three scenarios: one-dimensional radial model, and two-dimensional model of CO2 injection and sequestration, and one-dimensional model of aquifer - cap-rock interface. Modeling was performed in two stages. The first one simulated the immediate changes in the aquifer and insulating rocks impacted by CO2 injection (100 days in case of reaction model and 30 years in transport and reaction model), the second - enabled assessment of long-term effects of sequestration (20000 years). Reactions' quality and progress were monitored and their effects on formation porosity and sequestration capacity in form of mineral, residual and free phase of CO2 were calculated. Calibration of numerical models (including precipitation of secondary minerals, and correction of kinetics parameters) describing the initial stage of injection, was based on the experimental results. Modeling allowed to evaluate the pore space saturation with gas, changes in the composition and pH of pore waters, relationships between porosity and permeability changes and crystallization or dissolution minerals. We assessed the temporal and spatial extent of crystallization processes, and the amount of carbonates trapping. CO2 in mineral form. The calculated sequestration capacity of analyzed formations reached n·100 kg/m3 for the: dissolved phase - CO(aq), gas phase - CO2(g) and mineral phase, but as much as 101 kg/m3 for the supercritical phase - SCCO2. Processes of gas

  20. Kinetics of the reaction between hydrogen and sulfur under high-temperature Claus furnace conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Dowling, N.I.; Hyne, J.B. ); Brown, D.M. )

    1990-12-01

    The reaction H{sub 2} + (1/2)S{sub 2} {r equilibrium}H{sub 2}S has been studied as a function of temperature and residence time over the ranges 602--1290{degrees}C and 0.03--1.5 s in the absence of a catalyst. This paper shows that the combination of H{sub 2} and elemental sulfur vapor under the high-temperature conditions typical of a Claus sulfur recovery unit proceeds via a reversible homogeneous gas-phase reaction that is first order in both H{sub 2} and sulfur concentration and follows the rate law {minus}d(H{sub 2})/dt = k{sub 1}(H{sub 2})(S{sub 2}) {minus} k{sub 2}(H{sub 2}S) with a second-order recombination rate constant k{sub 1} = 1 {minus} 1 {times} 10{sup 3} atm{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1} (A{sub 1} = (4.3 {plus minus} 0.2) {times} 10{sup 6} atm{sup {minus}1} s{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}H{sub 1} = 26 {plus minus} 1 kcal/mol) and first-order decomposition rate constant k{sub 2} = 4 {times} 10{sup {minus}4} {minus} 70 s{sup {minus}1} (A{sub 2} = (3.6 {plus minus} 1) {times} 10{sup 8} s{sup {minus}1}; {Delta}H{sub 2} = 48 {plus minus} 1 kcal/mol) over the temperature range studied. These findings can be used to exploit opportunities in acid gas processing, such as effecting improved efficiencies for O{sub 2} usage in oxygen- blown Claus units and maximizing H{sub 2} content in the tail gas.

  1. Atomistic theory of Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal particles under reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Runhai; Liu, Jin-Xun; Li, Wei-Xue

    2013-02-01

    Understanding Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal particles under operating conditions has been of central importance in the study of sintering and dispersion of heterogeneous catalysts for long-term industrial implementation. To achieve a quantitative description of these complicated processes, an atomistic and generic theory taking into account the reaction environment, particle size and morphology, and metal-support interaction is developed. It includes (1) energetics of supported metal particles, (2) formation of monomers (both the metal adatoms and metal-reactant complexes) on supports, and (3) corresponding sintering rate equations and total activation energies, in the presence of reactants at arbitrary temperature and pressure. The thermodynamic criteria for the reactant assisted Ostwald ripening and induced disintegration are formulated, and the influence of reactants on sintering kinetics and redispersion are mapped out. Most energetics and kinetics barriers in the theory can be obtained conveniently by first-principles theory calculations. This allows for the rapid exploration of sintering and disintegration of supported metal particles in huge phase space of structures and compositions under various reaction environments. General strategies of suppressing the sintering of the supported metal particles and facilitating the redispersions of the low surface area catalysts are proposed. The theory is applied to TiO(2)(110) supported Rh particles in the presence of carbon monoxide, and reproduces well the broad temperature, pressure, and particle size range over which the sintering and redispersion occurred in such experiments. The result also highlights the importance of the metal-carbonyl complexes as monomers for Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal catalysts in the presence of CO. PMID:23272702

  2. Atomistic theory of Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal particles under reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Runhai; Liu, Jin-Xun; Li, Wei-Xue

    2013-02-01

    Understanding Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal particles under operating conditions has been of central importance in the study of sintering and dispersion of heterogeneous catalysts for long-term industrial implementation. To achieve a quantitative description of these complicated processes, an atomistic and generic theory taking into account the reaction environment, particle size and morphology, and metal-support interaction is developed. It includes (1) energetics of supported metal particles, (2) formation of monomers (both the metal adatoms and metal-reactant complexes) on supports, and (3) corresponding sintering rate equations and total activation energies, in the presence of reactants at arbitrary temperature and pressure. The thermodynamic criteria for the reactant assisted Ostwald ripening and induced disintegration are formulated, and the influence of reactants on sintering kinetics and redispersion are mapped out. Most energetics and kinetics barriers in the theory can be obtained conveniently by first-principles theory calculations. This allows for the rapid exploration of sintering and disintegration of supported metal particles in huge phase space of structures and compositions under various reaction environments. General strategies of suppressing the sintering of the supported metal particles and facilitating the redispersions of the low surface area catalysts are proposed. The theory is applied to TiO(2)(110) supported Rh particles in the presence of carbon monoxide, and reproduces well the broad temperature, pressure, and particle size range over which the sintering and redispersion occurred in such experiments. The result also highlights the importance of the metal-carbonyl complexes as monomers for Ostwald ripening and disintegration of supported metal catalysts in the presence of CO.

  3. A Knoevenagel Initiated Annulation Reaction Using Room Temperature or Microwave Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cook, A. Gilbert

    2007-01-01

    An experiment is presented that has the student execute a Knoevenagel initiated annulation reaction. The reaction can be carried out either through use of a microwave reactor or by allowing the mixture to stand at room temperature for two days. The student is then challenged to identify the reaction product through a guided prelab exercise of the…

  4. Influence of reaction conditions on the properties of solution-processed Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qu, Yongtao; Zoppi, Guillaume; Miles, Robert W.; Beattie, Neil S.

    2014-12-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals were fabricated by hot injection of sulphur into a solution of metallic precursors. By careful control of the reaction conditions it was possible to control the elemental composition of the nanocrystals such that they are suitable for earth abundant photovoltaic absorbers. When the reaction temperature increased from 195 °C to 240 °C the energy band gap of the nanocrystals decreased from 1.65 eV to 1.39 eV. This variation is explained by the identification of a mixed wurtzite-kesterite phase at lower reaction temperatures and secondary phase Cu2SnS3 at higher temperatures. Moreover, the existence of wurtzite structure depends critically on the reaction cooling rate. The reaction time was also found to have a strong effect on the nanocrystals which became increasingly copper poor and zinc rich as the reaction evolved. As the reaction time increase from 15 min to 60 min, the energy band gap increased from 1.42 eV to 1.84 eV. This variation is discussed in terms of the sample doping. The results demonstrate the importance of optimizing the reaction conditions to produce high quality Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals.

  5. Optimization of reaction conditions by RSM and structure characterization of sulfated locust bean gum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Ting; Tian, Jia; Liu, Wenxi; Jing, Fan; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-12-19

    Sulfated derivatives of galactomannan from locust bean gum (LBG) with the degree of substitution (DS) of 0.34-1.07 were synthesized using chlorosulfonic acid/pyridine (CSA/Py) method. Box-Behnken design (BBD) of response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the reaction conditions. Results of FT-IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that SO3H groups were widely present in sulfated LBG (SLBG). (13)C NMR result revealed that sulfation had occurred and C-6 substitution was predominant in SLBG. All sulfated samples showed a decrease in Mw and more broad molar mass distribution in size exclusion chromatography combined with laser light scattering (SEC-LLS) analysis. Results of MW - [Formula: see text] showed a decrease in fractal dimension (df) value. Laser light scattering results also showed a conformation transition from a compact chain conformation of branched clusters to a random coil conformation of SLBG. Compared to LBG and SLBG with low DS and molecular weight, SLBG2 exhibited an internal structure of random coil with a DS of 1.07. DS and molecular weight had great influence on its conformation in aqueous solution. Our results confirmed that the degradation of polysaccharide and SO3H groups improved significantly the stiffness of the chains due to the electrostatic effect.

  6. Optimization of reaction conditions by RSM and structure characterization of sulfated locust bean gum.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junlong; Yang, Ting; Tian, Jia; Liu, Wenxi; Jing, Fan; Yao, Jian; Zhang, Ji; Lei, Ziqiang

    2014-12-19

    Sulfated derivatives of galactomannan from locust bean gum (LBG) with the degree of substitution (DS) of 0.34-1.07 were synthesized using chlorosulfonic acid/pyridine (CSA/Py) method. Box-Behnken design (BBD) of response surface methodology (RSM) was employed to optimize the reaction conditions. Results of FT-IR and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) indicated that SO3H groups were widely present in sulfated LBG (SLBG). (13)C NMR result revealed that sulfation had occurred and C-6 substitution was predominant in SLBG. All sulfated samples showed a decrease in Mw and more broad molar mass distribution in size exclusion chromatography combined with laser light scattering (SEC-LLS) analysis. Results of MW - [Formula: see text] showed a decrease in fractal dimension (df) value. Laser light scattering results also showed a conformation transition from a compact chain conformation of branched clusters to a random coil conformation of SLBG. Compared to LBG and SLBG with low DS and molecular weight, SLBG2 exhibited an internal structure of random coil with a DS of 1.07. DS and molecular weight had great influence on its conformation in aqueous solution. Our results confirmed that the degradation of polysaccharide and SO3H groups improved significantly the stiffness of the chains due to the electrostatic effect. PMID:25263904

  7. Mechanochemical Strecker Reaction: Access to α-Aminonitriles and Tetrahydroisoquinolines under Ball-Milling Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hernández, José G; Turberg, Mathias; Schiffers, Ingo; Bolm, Carsten

    2016-10-01

    A mechanochemical version of the Strecker reaction for the synthesis of α-aminonitriles was developed. The milling of aldehydes, amines, and potassium cyanide in the presence of SiO2 gave the corresponding α-aminonitriles in good to high yields. The high efficiency of the mechanochemical Strecker-type multicomponent reaction allowed the one-pot synthesis of tetrahydroisoquinolines after a subsequent internal N-alkylation reaction.

  8. Experimental studies of gas-aerosol reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Anand

    1991-05-01

    The aqueous phase oxidation of SO2 by H2O2 is believed to the principle mechanism for atmospheric sulfate formation in cloud droplets. However, no studies in noncloud aerosol systems have been reported. The objective is to quantify the importance of the noncloud liquid phase reactions of SO2 by H2O2 in the atmosphere. Growth rates of submicron droplets exposed to SO2 and H2O2 were measured using the tandem differential mobility analyzer (TDMA) technique (Rader and McMurry, 1986). The technique uses differential mobility analyzers (DMA's) to generate monodisperse particles and to measure particle size after the reaction. To facilitate submicron monodisperse droplet production with the DMA, a low-ion-concentration charter capable of generating singly charged particles up to 1.0 microns was developed and experimentally evaluated. The experiments were performed using dry and deliquesced (NH4)2SO4 particles with SO2 and H2O2 concentrations from 0-860 ppb and 0-150 ppb, respectively. No growth was observed for dry particles. For droplets greater than or equal to 0.3 microns, the fractional diameter growth was independent of particle size and for droplets less than or equal to 0.2 microns, it decreased as particle size decreased. The observed decrease is due to NH3 evaporation. As ammonia evaporates, droplet pH decreases causing the oxidation rate to decrease, leading to a lower growth rate. To predict the size-dependent growth rates, a theoretical model was developed using solution thermodynamics, gas/particle equilibrium, and chemical kinetics. The experimental and theoretical results are in reasonable agreement. For dry (NH4)2SO4 particles exposed to SO2, H2O2, NH3, and H2O vapor, surface reaction-controlled growth was observed. Particle growth was very sensitive to particle composition. No growth was observed for Polystyrene latex particles, whereas (NH4)2SO4 particles doped with catalysts (Fe(2+), Fe(3+), Mn(2+) and Cu(2+)) in a molar ratio of 1:500 grew slower than

  9. The Aldol Addition and Condensation: The Effect of Conditions on Reaction Pathway

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crouch, R. David; Richardson, Amie; Howard, Jessica L.; Harker, Rebecca L.; Barker, Kathryn H.

    2007-01-01

    The reaction of a ketone and an aldehyde in aqueous Na[subscript 2]CO[subscript 2] is described. This experiment is performed in the absence of strong bases or organic solvents and offers the opportunity for students to observe the critical role that reaction temperature and base strength have in determining the product of the base-mediated…

  10. Constrained approximation of effective generators for multiscale stochastic reaction networks and application to conditioned path sampling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cotter, Simon L.

    2016-10-01

    Efficient analysis and simulation of multiscale stochastic systems of chemical kinetics is an ongoing area for research, and is the source of many theoretical and computational challenges. In this paper, we present a significant improvement to the constrained approach, which is a method for computing effective dynamics of slowly changing quantities in these systems, but which does not rely on the quasi-steady-state assumption (QSSA). The QSSA can cause errors in the estimation of effective dynamics for systems where the difference in timescales between the "fast" and "slow" variables is not so pronounced. This new application of the constrained approach allows us to compute the effective generator of the slow variables, without the need for expensive stochastic simulations. This is achieved by finding the null space of the generator of the constrained system. For complex systems where this is not possible, or where the constrained subsystem is itself multiscale, the constrained approach can then be applied iteratively. This results in breaking the problem down into finding the solutions to many small eigenvalue problems, which can be efficiently solved using standard methods. Since this methodology does not rely on the quasi steady-state assumption, the effective dynamics that are approximated are highly accurate, and in the case of systems with only monomolecular reactions, are exact. We will demonstrate this with some numerics, and also use the effective generators to sample paths of the slow variables which are conditioned on their endpoints, a task which would be computationally intractable for the generator of the full system.

  11. Conditions for diffusion-limited and reaction-limited recombination in nanostructured solar cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ansari-Rad, Mehdi; Anta, Juan A.; Arzi, Ezatollah

    2014-04-07

    The performance of Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSC) and related devices made of nanostructured semiconductors relies on a good charge separation, which in turn is achieved by favoring charge transport against recombination. Although both processes occur at very different time scales, hence ensuring good charge separation, in certain cases the kinetics of transport and recombination can be connected, either in a direct or an indirect way. In this work, the connection between electron transport and recombination in nanostructured solar cells is studied both theoretically and by Monte Carlo simulation. Calculations using the Multiple-Trapping model and a realistic trap distribution for nanostructured TiO{sub 2} show that for attempt-to-jump frequencies higher than 10{sup 11}–10{sup 13} Hz, the system adopts a reaction limited (RL) regime, with a lifetime which is effectively independent from the speed of the electrons in the transport level. For frequencies lower than those, and depending on the concentration of recombination centers in the material, the system enters a diffusion-limited regime (DL), where the lifetime increases if the speed of free electrons decreases. In general, the conditions for RL or DL recombination depend critically on the time scale difference between recombination kinetics and free-electron transport. Hence, if the former is too rapid with respect to the latter, the system is in the DL regime and total thermalization of carriers is not possible. In the opposite situation, a RL regime arises. Numerical data available in the literature, and the behavior of the lifetime with respect to (1) density of recombination centers and (2) probability of recombination at a given center, suggest that a typical DSC in operation stays in the RL regime with complete thermalization, although a transition to the DL regime may occur for electrolytes or hole conductors where recombination is especially rapid or where there is a larger dispersion of energies of

  12. Kinetics of CaO-H{sub 2}S reaction at high temperature under pressurized conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukata, M.; Ando, H.; Ueyama, K.; Hosoda, S.

    1999-07-01

    Kinetic study of H{sub 2} absorption with calcined limestone was performed under pressurized conditions (up to 20 atm) by means of a self-made pressurized thermobalance mainly consisting of a quartz spring balance and a pressure vessel. The adsorption of 200--4,200 ppm (mainly 1000 ppm) of H{sub 2}S was carried out with calcined limestone (710--1,000 {micro}m) at 1,023--1,223 K and 1--20 atm. The effect of pressure on the kinetics of H{sub 2}S adsorption was investigated. The film resistance of mass transfer was negligible when the total gas velocity was 0.53 m/s (10 SLM). The rate of H{sub 2}S adsorption decreased with increasing total pressure (H{sub 2}S pressure was kept at 0.004 atm). The level of conversion of CaO to CaS was 87% at 1 atm and 38% at 20 atm after 5 h of reaction. The used limestone samples were characterized with SEM and EDAX. Based on the SEM and EDAX observations on the cross section of limestone particles, a CaS layer was clearly developed from the surface to the interior in the progress of sulfidation in all cases. Although the authors applied the conventional shrinking-core models with different rate-determining steps for analyzing the H{sub 2}S adsorption kinetics, these SCM models failed to explain the sulfidation behavior in the early stage of sulfidation at higher pressures. Thus, they developed empirical equations to express the sulfidation behavior in the wide ranges of the solid conversion and the total pressure. Equations developed in this study can predict the sulfidation kinetics at higher pressure well.

  13. State-to-state quantum dynamics of O + O2 isotope exchange reactions reveals nonstatistical behavior at atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhigang; Liu, Lan; Lin, Shi Ying; Schinke, Reinhard; Guo, Hua; Zhang, Dong H

    2010-01-12

    The O + O(2) exchange reaction is a prerequisite for the formation of ozone in Earth's atmosphere. We report here state-to-state differential and integral cross sections for several O + O(2) isotope-exchange reactions obtained by dynamically exact quantum scattering calculations at collision energies relevant to atmospheric conditions. These reactions are shown to be highly nonstatistical, evidenced by dominant forward scattering and deviation of the integral cross section from the statistical limit. Mechanistic analyses revealed that the nonstatistical channel is facilitated by short-lived osculating resonances. The theoretical results provided an in-depth interpretation of a recent molecular beam experiment of the exchange reaction and shed light on the initial step of ozone recombination.

  14. Methods for quantifying the influences of pressure and temperature variation on metal hydride reaction rates measured under isochoric conditions.

    PubMed

    Voskuilen, Tyler G; Pourpoint, Timothée L

    2013-11-01

    Analysis techniques for determining gas-solid reaction rates from gas sorption measurements obtained under non-constant pressure and temperature conditions often neglect temporal variations in these quantities. Depending on the materials in question, this can lead to significant variations in the measured reaction rates. In this work, we present two new analysis techniques for comparison between various kinetic models and isochoric gas measurement data obtained under varying temperature and pressure conditions in a high pressure Sievert system. We introduce the integral pressure dependence method and the temperature dependence factor as means of correcting for experimental variations, improving model-measurement fidelity, and quantifying the effect that such variations can have on measured reaction rates. We use measurements of hydrogen absorption in LaNi5 and TiCrMn to demonstrate the effect of each of these methods and show that their use can provide quantitative improvements in interpretation of kinetics measurements.

  15. Kinetics of the unimolecular reaction of CH2OO and the bimolecular reactions with the water monomer, acetaldehyde and acetone under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Berndt, Torsten; Kaethner, Ralf; Voigtländer, Jens; Stratmann, Frank; Pfeifle, Mark; Reichle, Patrick; Sipilä, Mikko; Kulmala, Markku; Olzmann, Matthias

    2015-08-14

    Stabilized Criegee Intermediates (sCIs) have been identified as oxidants of atmospheric trace gases such as SO2, NO2, carboxylic acids or carbonyls. The atmospheric sCI concentrations, and accordingly their importance for trace gas oxidation, are controlled by the rate of the most important loss processes, very likely the unimolecular reactions and the reaction with water vapour (monomer and dimer) ubiquitously present at high concentrations in the troposphere. In this study, the rate coefficients of the unimolecular reaction of the simplest sCI, formaldehyde oxide, CH2OO, and its bimolecular reaction with the water monomer have been experimentally determined at T = (297 ± 1) K and at atmospheric pressure by using a free-jet flow system. CH2OO was produced by the reaction of ozone with C2H4, and CH2OO concentrations were probed indirectly by detecting H2SO4 after titration with SO2. Time-resolved experiments yield a rate coefficient of the unimolecular reaction of k(uni) = (0.19 ± 0.07) s(-1), a value that is supported by quantum-chemical and statistical rate theory calculations as well as by additional measurements performed under CH2OO steady-state conditions. A rate coefficient of k(CH2OO+H2O) = (3.2 ± 1.2) × 10(-16) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) has been determined for sufficiently low H2O concentrations (<10(15) molecule cm(-3)) that allow separation from the CH2OO reaction with the water dimer. In order to evaluate the accuracy of the experimental approach, the rate coefficients of the reactions with acetaldehyde and acetone were reinvestigated. The obtained rate coefficients k(CH2OO+acetald) = (1.7 ± 0.5) × 10(-12) and k(CH2OO+acetone) = (3.4 ± 0.9) × 10(-13) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) are in good agreement with literature data.

  16. Dynamics of morphological manifestations of reactions of the organism under conditions of hypergravitation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knyazeva, G. D.; Podymov, V. K.; Savina, Y. A.

    1975-01-01

    The dynamics of the reaction of the hypothalamus-hypophysis-adrenal system to g-forces of 4 G's magnitude reveal a phasal nature of the adaptational system, dependent both on duration of force and position of the body.

  17. Merging Photoredox with Palladium Catalysis: Decarboxylative ortho-Acylation of Acetanilides with α-Oxocarboxylic Acids under Mild Reaction Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chao; Li, Pinhua; Zhu, Xianjin; Wang, Lei

    2015-12-18

    A room temperature decarboxylative ortho-acylation of acetanilides with α-oxocarboxylic acids has been developed via a novel Eosin Y with Pd dual catalytic system. This dual catalytic reaction shows a broad substrate scope and good functional group tolerance, and an array of ortho-acylacetanilides can be afforded in high yields under mild conditions.

  18. Manganese Triazacyclononane Oxidation Catalysts Grafted under Reaction Conditions on Solid Co-Catalytic Supports

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenfeldt, Nicholas J.; Ni, Zhenjuan; Korinda, Andrew W.; Meyer, Randall J.; Notestein, Justin M.

    2012-01-23

    Manganese complexes of 1,4,7-trimethyl-1,4,7-triazacyclononane (tmtacn) are highly active and selective alkene oxidation catalysts with aqueous H{sub 2}O{sub 2}. Here, carboxylic acid-functionalized SiO{sub 2} simultaneously immobilizes and activates these complexes under oxidation reaction conditions. H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and the functionalized support are both necessary to transform the inactive [(tmtacn)Mn{sup IV}({mu}-O)3Mn{sup IV}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+} into the active, dicarboxylate-bridged [(tmtacn)Mn{sup III}({mu}-O)({mu}-RCOO){sub 2}Mn{sup III}(tmtacn)]{sup 2+}. This transformation is assigned on the basis of comparison of diffuse reflectance UV-visible spectra to known soluble models, assignment of oxidation state by Mn K-edge X-ray absorption near-edge spectroscopy, the dependence of rates on the acid/Mn ratios, and comparison of the surface structures derived from density functional theory with extended X-ray absorption fine structure. Productivity in cis-cyclooctene oxidation to epoxide and cis-diol with 2-10 equiv of solid cocatalytic supports is superior to that obtained with analogous soluble valeric acid cocatalysts, which require 1000-fold excess to reach similar levels at comparable times. Cyclooctene oxidation rates are near first order in H{sub 2}O{sub 2} and near zero order in all other species, including H{sub 2}O. These observations are consistent with a mechanism of substrate oxidation following rate-limiting H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation on the hydrated, supported complex. This general mechanism and the observed alkene oxidation activation energy of 38 {+-} 6 kJ/mol are comparable to H{sub 2}O{sub 2} activation by related soluble catalysts. Undesired decomposition of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} is not a limiting factor for these solid catalysts, and as such, productivity remains high up to 25 C and initial H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentration of 0.5 M, increasing reactor throughput. These results show that immobilized carboxylic acids can be utilized and understood

  19. Reaction condition optimization and kinetic investigation of roasting zinc oxide ore using (NH4)2SO4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Hong-mei; Shen, Xiao-yi; Sun, Yi; Liu, Yan; Zhai, Yu-chun

    2016-10-01

    An orthogonal test was used to optimize the reaction conditions of roasting zinc oxide ore using (NH4)2SO4. The optimized reaction conditions are defined as an (NH4)2SO4/zinc molar ratio of 1.4:1, a roasting temperature of 440°C, and a thermostatic time of 60 min. The molar ratio of (NH4)2SO4/zinc is the most predominant factor and the roasting temperature is the second significant factor that governs the zinc extraction. Thermogravimetric-differential thermal analysis was used for (NH4)2SO4 and zinc mixed in a molar ratio of 1.4:1 at the heating rates of 5, 10, 15, and 20 K·min-1. Two strong endothermic peaks indicate that the complex chemical reactions occur at approximately 290°C and 400°C. XRD analysis was employed to examine the transformations of mineral phases during roasting process. Kinetic parameters, including reaction apparent activation energy, reaction order, and frequency factor, were calculated by the Doyle-Ozawa and Kissinger methods. Corresponding to the two endothermic peaks, the kinetic equations were obtained.

  20. In situ characterization of catalysts and membranes in a microchannel under high-temperature water gas shift reaction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavusoglu, G.; Dallmann, F.; Lichtenberg, H.; Goldbach, A.; Dittmeyer, R.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    Microreactor technology with high heat transfer in combination with stable catalysts is a very attractive approach for reactions involving major heat effects such as methane steam reforming and to some extent, also the high temperature water gas shift (WGS) reaction. For this study Rh/ceria catalysts and an ultrathin hydrogen selective membrane were characterized in situ in a microreactor specially designed for x-ray absorption spectroscopic measurements under WGS conditions. The results of these experiments can serve as a basis for further development of the catalysts and membranes.

  1. Textured catalysts, methods of making textured catalysts, and methods of catalyzing reactions conducted in hydrothermal conditions

    DOEpatents

    Werpy, Todd [West Richland, WA; Wang, Yong [Richland, WA

    2003-12-30

    A textured catalyst having a hydrothermally-stable support, a metal oxide and a catalyst component is described. Methods of conducting aqueous phase reactions that are catalyzed by a textured catalyst are also described. The invention also provides methods of making textured catalysts and methods of making chemical products using a textured catalyst.

  2. Dynamic three-dimensional pore-scale imaging of reaction in a carbonate at reservoir conditions.

    PubMed

    Menke, Hannah P; Bijeljic, Branko; Andrew, Matthew G; Blunt, Martin J

    2015-04-01

    Quantifying CO2 transport and average effective reaction rates in the subsurface is essential to assess the risks associated with underground carbon capture and storage. We use X-ray microtomography to investigate dynamic pore structure evolution in situ at temperatures and pressures representative of underground reservoirs and aquifers. A 4 mm diameter Ketton carbonate core is injected with CO2-saturated brine at 50 °C and 10 MPa while tomographic images are taken at 15 min intervals with a 3.8 μm spatial resolution over a period of 2(1/2) h. An approximate doubling of porosity with only a 3.6% increase in surface area to volume ratio is measured from the images. Pore-scale direct simulation and network modeling on the images quantify an order of magnitude increase in permeability and an appreciable alteration of the velocity field. We study the uniform reaction regime, with dissolution throughout the core. However, at the pore scale, we see variations in the degree of dissolution with an overall reaction rate which is approximately 14 times lower than estimated from batch measurements. This work implies that in heterogeneous rocks, pore-scale transport of reactants limits dissolution and can reduce the average effective reaction rate by an order of magnitude. PMID:25738415

  3. Kinetics and Mechanism of the Reaction of Hydoxyl Radicals with Acetonitrile under Atmospheric Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hynes, A. J.; Wine, P. H.

    1997-01-01

    The pulsed laser photolysis-pulsed laser induced fluorescence technique has been employed to determine absolute rate coefficients for the reaction OH + CH3CN (1) and its isotopic variants, OH + CD3CN (2), OD + CH3CN (3), and OD + CD3CN (4). Reactions 1 and 2 were studied as a function of pressure and temperature in N2, N2/O2, and He buffer gases. In the absence of O2 all four reactions displayed well-behaved kinetics with exponential OH decays and pseudo-first rate constants which were proportional to substrate concentration. Data obtained in N2 over the range 50-700 Torr at 298 K are consistent with k(sub 1), showing a small pressure dependence. The Arrhenius expression obtained by averaging data at all pressures in k(sub 1)(T) = (1.1(sup +0.5)/(sub -0.3)) x 10(exp -12) exp[(-1130 +/- 90)/T] cu cm /(molecule s). The kinetics of reaction 2 are found to be pressure dependent with k(sub 2) (298 K) increasing from (1.21 +/- 0.12) x 10(exp -14) to (2.16 +/- 0.11) x 10(exp -14) cm(exp 3)/ (molecule s) over the pressure range 50-700 Torr of N2 at 298 K. Data at pressures greater than 600 Torr give k(sub 2)(T) = (9.4((sup +13.4)(sub -5.0))) x 10(exp -13) exp[(-1180 +/- 250)/T] cu cm/(molecule s). The rates of reactions 3 and 4 are found to be independent of pressure over the range 50-700 Torr of N2 with 298 K rate coefficient given by k(sub 3) =(3.18 +/- 0.40) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/(molecule s) and k(sub 4) = (2.25 +/-0.28) x 10(exp -14) cu cm/(molecule s). In the presence of O2 each reaction shows complex (non-pseudo-first-order) kinetic behavior and/or an apparent decrease in the observed rate constant with increasing [O2], indicating the presence of significant OH or OD regeneration. Observation of regeneration of OH in (2) and OD in (3) is indicative of a reaction channel which proceeds via addition followed by reaction of the adduct, or one of its decomposition products, with O2. The observed OH and OD decay profiles have been modeled by using a simple mechanistic

  4. Population dynamics, information transfer, and spatial organization in a chemical reaction network under spatial confinement and crowding conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellesia, Giovanni; Bales, Benjamin B.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate, via Brownian dynamics simulations, the reaction dynamics of a generic, nonlinear chemical network under spatial confinement and crowding conditions. In detail, the Willamowski-Rossler chemical reaction system has been "extended" and considered as a prototype reaction-diffusion system. Our results are potentially relevant to a number of open problems in biophysics and biochemistry, such as the synthesis of primitive cellular units (protocells) and the definition of their role in the chemical origin of life and the characterization of vesicle-mediated drug delivery processes. More generally, the computational approach presented in this work makes the case for the use of spatial stochastic simulation methods for the study of biochemical networks in vivo where the "well-mixed" approximation is invalid and both thermal and intrinsic fluctuations linked to the possible presence of molecular species in low number copies cannot be averaged out.

  5. Kinetic and products study of the gas-phase reaction of Lewisite with ozone under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haitao; Zhang, Yuanpeng; Guo, Xiaodi; Shao, Yusheng; Gao, Runli; Liang, Dejian; Sun, Hao

    2016-02-01

    The rate constant for the gas-phase reaction of O3 and Lewisite was studied in air using the smog chamber technique. The experiments were carried out under pseudo-first-order reaction conditions with [O3]≪[Lewisite]. The observed rate constant of O3 with Lewisite was (7.83 ± 0.38) × 10(-19)cm(3)/(molecule·sec) at 298 ± 2K. Lewisite was discussed in terms of reactivity with O3 and its relationship with the ionization potential. Our results show that the rate constant for the gas-phase reaction of O3 with Lewisite is in line with the trend of the rate constants of O3 with haloalkenes. PMID:26969539

  6. General reaction conditions for the palladium-catalyzed vinylation of aryl chlorides with potassium alkenyltrifluoroborates.

    PubMed

    Alacid, Emilio; Nájera, Carmen

    2009-11-01

    Activated and deactivated aryl and heteroaryl chlorides are efficiently cross-coupled with potassium vinyl- and alkenyltrifluoroborates using 4-hydroxyacetophenone oxime derived palladacycle as precatalyst in 1 to 3 mol % Pd loading, Binap as ligand, and Cs(2)CO(3) as base in DMF at 120 degrees C. The reactions can also be performed using Pd(OAc)(2) as Pd(0) source, although with lower efficiency. Bidentate ligands such as Binap and dppp can be used, the former being the best choice. Only in the case of deactivated aryl chlorides should the reaction temperature be increased to 160 degrees C to achieve good yields. The corresponding cross-coupled compounds, such as styrenes, stilbenes, and alkenylarenes, are obtained in good yields and with high regio- and diastereoselectivity.

  7. Effect of method of heterogenization of ephedrine and reaction conditions on the enantioselectivity of Michael additions

    SciTech Connect

    Krotov, V.V.; Staroverov, S.M.; Nesterenko, P.N.; Lisichkin. G.V.

    1987-11-10

    A series of heterogeneous catalysts for asymmetric Michael additions was synthesized based on ephedrine chemically bound to the surface of silica. The length of the hydrocarbon chain binding the active center to the support surface affects the sign of rotation of the reaction product from the asymmetric addition of thiophenol to benzylideneacetophenone. Grafting ephedrine to the silica surface via a short hydrocarbon chain results in a change in the configuration of the reaction product. Silanol groups on the silica surface are involved in the transition state, as evidenced by data obtained using silica which has been exhaustively treated with trimethylchlorosilane. The absolute specific rotation of 1,3-diphenyl-3-thiophenylpropan-1-one has been established.

  8. Synthesis of SF5CF2-Containing Enones and Instability of This Group in Specific Chemical Environments and Reaction Conditions.

    PubMed

    Dudziński, Piotr; Matsnev, Andrej V; Thrasher, Joseph S; Haufe, Günter

    2016-06-01

    The chemistry of the SF5CF2 moiety has been scarcely investigated. In this report, we present synthetic pathways to a variety of SF5CF2-substituted compounds starting from vinyl ethers and SF5CF2C(O)Cl. In specific chemical environments and under particular reaction conditions, the SF5CF2 moiety is unstable in downstream products resulting in the elimination of the SF5(-) anion and its decomposition to SF4 and F(-). Surprisingly, the formed F(-) can attack the intermediate difluorovinyl moiety to form trifluoromethyl substituted products. This appears to happen when an intermediate neighboring group participation involving a double bond is possible. Under slightly different conditions, the reaction stops at the stage of a difluorovinyl compound.

  9. A study of different indicators of Maillard reaction with whey proteins and different carbohydrates under adverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Graciela E; Naranjo, Gabriela B; Malec, Laura S

    2017-01-15

    This study examined different indicators of each stage of Maillard reaction under adverse storage conditions in a system with whey proteins and lactose or glucose. The analysis of lysine loss by the o-phthaldialdehyde method can be considered a good indicator of the early stage, showing considerable differences in reactivity when systems with mono and disaccharides were analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a sensitive method for evaluating the extent of glycosylation of the native proteins, providing valuable information when the loss of lysine was not significant. The estimation of the Amadori compound from the determination of total 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde would have correlate well with reactive lysine content if the advanced stages of the reaction had not been reached. For assessing the occurrence of the intermediate and final stages, the measurement of free 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde and color, proved not to be suitable for storage conditions.

  10. A study of different indicators of Maillard reaction with whey proteins and different carbohydrates under adverse storage conditions.

    PubMed

    Leiva, Graciela E; Naranjo, Gabriela B; Malec, Laura S

    2017-01-15

    This study examined different indicators of each stage of Maillard reaction under adverse storage conditions in a system with whey proteins and lactose or glucose. The analysis of lysine loss by the o-phthaldialdehyde method can be considered a good indicator of the early stage, showing considerable differences in reactivity when systems with mono and disaccharides were analyzed. Capillary electrophoresis proved to be a sensitive method for evaluating the extent of glycosylation of the native proteins, providing valuable information when the loss of lysine was not significant. The estimation of the Amadori compound from the determination of total 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde would have correlate well with reactive lysine content if the advanced stages of the reaction had not been reached. For assessing the occurrence of the intermediate and final stages, the measurement of free 5-hydroxymethyl-2-furfuraldehyde and color, proved not to be suitable for storage conditions. PMID:27542493

  11. Reaction norm model to describe environmental sensitivity across first lactation in dairy cattle under tropical conditions.

    PubMed

    Bignardi, Annaiza Braga; El Faro, Lenira; Pereira, Rodrigo Junqueira; Ayres, Denise Rocha; Machado, Paulo Fernando; de Albuquerque, Lucia Galvão; Santana, Mário Luiz

    2015-10-01

    Reaction norm models have been widely used to study genotype by environment interaction (G × E) in animal breeding. The objective of this study was to describe environmental sensitivity across first lactation in Brazilian Holstein cows using a reaction norm approach. A total of 50,168 individual monthly test day (TD) milk yields (10 test days) from 7476 complete first lactations of Holstein cattle were analyzed. The statistical models for all traits (10 TDs and for 305-day milk yield) included the fixed effects of contemporary group, age of cow (linear and quadratic effects), and days in milk (linear effect), except for 305-day milk yield. A hierarchical reaction norm model (HRNM) based on the unknown covariate was used. The present study showed the presence of G × E in milk yield across first lactation of Holstein cows. The variation in the heritability estimates implies differences in the response to selection depending on the environment where the animals of this population are evaluated. In the average environment, the heritabilities for all traits were rather similar, in range from 0.02 to 0.63. The scaling effect of G × E predominated throughout most of lactation. Particularly during the first 2 months of lactation, G × E caused reranking of breeding values. It is therefore important to include the environmental sensitivity of animals according to the phase of lactation in the genetic evaluations of Holstein cattle in tropical environments. PMID:26143280

  12. Reaction pathways towards the formation of dolomite-analogues at ambient conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pimentel, Carlos; Pina, Carlos M.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper we present results of a study of the crystallisation behaviour of the dolomite-analogues norsethite and PbMg(CO3)2 at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. Whereas precipitation of norsethite was previously obtained by mixing solutions (Hood et al., 1974; Pimentel and Pina, 2014a,b), we report, for the first time, the synthesis of PbMg(CO3)2 by using the same method. The formation of both phases was promoted by ageing slurries for periods of time ranging from a few days (norsethite) up to 6 months (PbMg(CO3)2). The crystallisation of both norsethite and PbMg(CO3)2 occurs by sequences of dissolution-precipitation reactions involving several amorphous and crystalline precursor phases, which were identified and characterised by X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. Depending on the initial composition and Ba:Mg and Pb:Mg ratios in the slurries, different precursors and reaction kinetics were observed. This demonstrates the existence of different reaction pathways towards the formation of the investigated dolomite-analogues. Our experimental results provide new insights into the possible mechanisms of formation of dolomite and other double carbonates in nature.

  13. Prompt HO2 formation following the reaction of OH with aromatic compounds under atmospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Nehr, Sascha; Bohn, Birger; Wahner, Andreas

    2012-06-21

    The secondary formation of HO(2) radicals following OH + aromatic hydrocarbon reactions in synthetic air under normal pressure and temperature was investigated in the absence of NO after pulsed production of OH radicals. OH and HO(x) (=OH + HO(2)) decay curves were recorded using laser-induced fluorescence after gas-expansion. The prompt HO(2) yields (HO(2) formed without preceding NO reactions) were determined by comparison to results obtained with CO as a reference compound. This approach was recently introduced and applied to the OH + benzene reaction and was extended here for a number of monocyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. The measured HO(2) formation yields are as follows: toluene, 0.42 ± 0.11; ethylbenzene, 0.53 ± 0.10; o-xylene, 0.41 ± 0.08; m-xylene, 0.27 ± 0.06; p-xylene, 0.40 ± 0.09; 1,2,3-trimethylbenzene, 0.31 ± 0.06; 1,2,4-trimethylbenzene, 0.37 ± 0.09; 1,3,5-trimethylbenzene, 0.29 ± 0.08; hexamethylbenzene, 0.32 ± 0.08; phenol, 0.89 ± 0.29; o-cresol, 0.87 ± 0.29; 2,5-dimethylphenol, 0.72 ± 0.12; 2,4,6-trimethylphenol, 0.45 ± 0.13. For the alkylbenzenes HO(2) is the proposed coproduct of phenols, epoxides, and possibly oxepins formed in secondary reactions with O(2). In most product studies the only quantified coproducts were phenols whereas only a few studies reported yields of epoxides. Oxepins have not been observed so far. Together with the yields of phenols from other studies, the HO(2) yields determined in this work set an upper limit to the combined yields of epoxides and oxepins that was found to be significant (≤0.3) for all investigated alkylbenzenes except m-xylene. For the hydroxybenzenes the currently proposed HO(2) coproducts are dihydroxybenzenes. For phenol and o-cresol the determined HO(2) yields are matching the previously reported dihydroxybenzene yields, indicating that these are the only HO(2) forming reaction channels. For 2,5-dimethylphenol and 2,4,6-trimethylphenol no complementary product studies are available.

  14. An effective rate equation approach to reaction kinetics in small volumes: Theory and application to biochemical reactions in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grima, R.

    2010-07-01

    Chemical master equations provide a mathematical description of stochastic reaction kinetics in well-mixed conditions. They are a valid description over length scales that are larger than the reactive mean free path and thus describe kinetics in compartments of mesoscopic and macroscopic dimensions. The trajectories of the stochastic chemical processes described by the master equation can be ensemble-averaged to obtain the average number density of chemical species, i.e., the true concentration, at any spatial scale of interest. For macroscopic volumes, the true concentration is very well approximated by the solution of the corresponding deterministic and macroscopic rate equations, i.e., the macroscopic concentration. However, this equivalence breaks down for mesoscopic volumes. These deviations are particularly significant for open systems and cannot be calculated via the Fokker-Planck or linear-noise approximations of the master equation. We utilize the system-size expansion including terms of the order of Ω-1/2 to derive a set of differential equations whose solution approximates the true concentration as given by the master equation. These equations are valid in any open or closed chemical reaction network and at both the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. In the limit of large volumes, the effective mesoscopic rate equations become precisely equal to the conventional macroscopic rate equations. We compare the three formalisms of effective mesoscopic rate equations, conventional rate equations, and chemical master equations by applying them to several biochemical reaction systems (homodimeric and heterodimeric protein-protein interactions, series of sequential enzyme reactions, and positive feedback loops) in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions. In all cases, we find that the effective mesoscopic rate equations can predict very well the true concentration of a chemical species. This provides a useful method by which one can quickly determine the regions of

  15. An effective rate equation approach to reaction kinetics in small volumes: theory and application to biochemical reactions in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions.

    PubMed

    Grima, R

    2010-07-21

    Chemical master equations provide a mathematical description of stochastic reaction kinetics in well-mixed conditions. They are a valid description over length scales that are larger than the reactive mean free path and thus describe kinetics in compartments of mesoscopic and macroscopic dimensions. The trajectories of the stochastic chemical processes described by the master equation can be ensemble-averaged to obtain the average number density of chemical species, i.e., the true concentration, at any spatial scale of interest. For macroscopic volumes, the true concentration is very well approximated by the solution of the corresponding deterministic and macroscopic rate equations, i.e., the macroscopic concentration. However, this equivalence breaks down for mesoscopic volumes. These deviations are particularly significant for open systems and cannot be calculated via the Fokker-Planck or linear-noise approximations of the master equation. We utilize the system-size expansion including terms of the order of Omega(-1/2) to derive a set of differential equations whose solution approximates the true concentration as given by the master equation. These equations are valid in any open or closed chemical reaction network and at both the mesoscopic and macroscopic scales. In the limit of large volumes, the effective mesoscopic rate equations become precisely equal to the conventional macroscopic rate equations. We compare the three formalisms of effective mesoscopic rate equations, conventional rate equations, and chemical master equations by applying them to several biochemical reaction systems (homodimeric and heterodimeric protein-protein interactions, series of sequential enzyme reactions, and positive feedback loops) in nonequilibrium steady-state conditions. In all cases, we find that the effective mesoscopic rate equations can predict very well the true concentration of a chemical species. This provides a useful method by which one can quickly determine the

  16. Sensory characteristics and consumer acceptability of beef stock containing glutathione Maillard reaction products prepared at various conditions.

    PubMed

    Kwon, G Y; Hong, J H; Kim, Y S; Lee, S M; Kim, K O

    2011-01-01

    The sensory characteristics and consumer acceptability of beef soup samples containing 9 types of glutathione Maillard reaction products (GMRPs) were investigated to examine the effects of the GMRPs produced under different reaction conditions on the flavor of the beef soup. The sensory characteristics of the beef stocks were examined using descriptive analysis. In consumer testing, 50 consumers evaluated the overall acceptability and flavor intensities of beef odor, salty taste, beef flavor, and seasoning flavor in the beef soup samples. It was found that the reaction conditions, including sugar type and pH, affected the sensory characteristics of the beef stock containing the GMRPs. The samples containing the GMRPs reacted at pH 7 were characterized with strong beef flavor, chestnut flavor, and cooked rice flavor. However, the GMRP reacted with xylose at pH 7 (XM7) was significantly stronger in beef-related sensory characteristics than the GMRPs reacted with glucose or fructose at pH 7 (GM7 and FM7). The samples containing the GMRPs reacted at pH 3 had strong acid-related attributes whereas the GMRPs reacted at pH 11 exhibited strong sulfur-related attributes and a bitter taste. Overall, the beef soup containing XM7, which was perceived as having a strong beef odor and flavor, was rated the highest consumer acceptability score. This suggests that XM7 has feasibility as a flavor enhancer. To elucidate its effectiveness further, it is required to apply XM7 in various food systems at varying levels and to compare its flavor enhancing effects with other flavor enhancers such as monosodium L-glutamate in future studies. Practical Application: This study characterized sensory attributes of glutathione Maillard reaction products (GMRPs) reacted under various conditions and evaluated their potential as a flavor enhancer by examining consumer acceptability of beef stock containing the GMRPs. This study showed that the GMRP reacted with xylose at pH 7 had strong 71 beef

  17. Influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of acidic, neutral and basic polysaccharides.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qing-Chi; Zhao, Xia; Pu, Jiang-Hua; Luan, Xiao-Hong

    2016-06-01

    Monosaccharide composition analysis is important for structural characterization of polysaccharides. To investigate the influences of acidic reaction and hydrolytic conditions on monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides, we chose alginate, starch, chitosan and chondroitin sulfate as representative of acidic, neutral, basic and complex polysaccharides to compare the release degree of monosaccharides under different hydrolytic conditions. The hydrolysis stability of 10 monosaccharide standards was also explored. Results showed that the basic sugars were hard to release but stable, the acidic sugars (uronic acids) were easy to release but unstable, and the release and stability of neutral sugars were in between acidic and basic sugars. In addition, the hydrolysis process was applied to monosaccharide composition analysis of Hippocampus trimaculatus polysaccharide and the appropriate hydrolytic condition was accorded with that of the above four polysaccharides. Thus, different hydrolytic conditions should be used for the monosaccharide composition analysis of polysaccharides based on their structural characteristics. PMID:27083372

  18. Dissolution and precipitation reactions in human tooth enamel under weak acid conditions.

    PubMed

    Borggreven, J M; Driessens, F C; van Dijk, J W

    1986-01-01

    Slices of enamel were demineralized in weak acid solutions at pH 5. The solutions were analysed for Ca, P, Na and Mg. A substantial increase of the Ca/P ratio in the solution after about 6 h of demineralization was ascribed to brushite formation. The ratios of liberated Ca/Na, P/Na, Ca/Mg and P/Mg were always lower than the correspondent ratios in sound enamel. It was concluded that precipitation of brushite, and a preferential dissolution of Na and Mg compounds from the enamel both play a role in the dissolution-precipitation reactions in dental enamel during acid attack.

  19. Evolution of fracture permeability of ultramafic rocks at hydrothermal conditions: An experimental study on serpentinization reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farough, A.; Moore, D. E.; Lockner, D. A.; Lowell, R. P.

    2014-12-01

    Serpentinization of ultramafic rocks, during which olivine and pyroxene minerals are replaced by serpentine, magnetite, brucite and talc, is associated with hydrothermal activity at slow and ultraslow mid-ocean ridges. Serpentinization reactions affect hydrothermal fluid circulation by changing permeability of the oceanic crust. To advance our understanding of the evolution of permeability accompanying serpentinization reactions, we performed a series of flow-through experiments at a temperature of 260˚C, a confining pressure of 50 MPa, and a pore pressure of 20±2 MPa on cylindrical cores of ultramafic rocks (18 mm in diameter and 23 mm length) containing a single through-going tensile fracture. Pore fluid flow was in one direction and was collected routinely for chemical analysis. A 7.5 mm thick layer of the same rock, crushed and sieved (0.18-1.0 mm) was placed on the inlet end of the sample to produce a reactive heated reservoir for the pore fluid before entering the fracture. Multiple peridotite samples were tested, to investigate the effect of mineral assemblage on fluid-rock interaction and permeability. The initial effective permeability of the samples varied between 10-(15-18)m2, and it decreased by about 2 orders of magnitude in 7-10 days, showing that serpentinization reactions result in an initially rapid decrease in permeability. The best fit equation for the observed rate of change in permeability (k) is in the form of dk/dt=Ae-0.01t, where A is a constant and t is time. This result suggests that the rate of serpentine formation is largely controlled by the initial permeability rather than the properties of the reacting rock. Assuming flow between parallel plates, we find the effective crack width decreases by approximately 2 orders of magnitude during the experiments. The fluid chemistry and mineralogy data support the occurrence of serpentinization reactions. The early peak and monotonic decrease in the concentration of Mg, and Si in pore fluid

  20. Solubility and Reaction Rates of Aluminum Solid Phases Under Geothermal Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Benezeth, P.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.J.; Anovitz, L.M.

    2000-05-28

    Experimental studies involving equilibrium solubility and dissolution/precipitation rates were initiated on aluminum hydroxide phases prevalent under geothermal reservoir conditions. A large capacity, hydrogen-electrode concentration cell (HECC) was constructed specifically for this purpose.

  1. Housing conditions influence cortical and behavioural reactions of sheep in response to videos showing social interactions of different valence.

    PubMed

    Vögeli, Sabine; Wolf, Martin; Wechsler, Beat; Gygax, Lorenz

    2015-05-01

    Mood, as a long-term affective state, is thought to modulate short-term emotional reactions in animals, but the details of this interplay have hardly been investigated experimentally. Apart from a basic interest in this affective system, mood is likely to have an important impact on animal welfare, as bad mood may taint all emotional experience. In the present study about mood - emotion interaction, 29 sheep were kept under predictable, stimulus-rich or unpredictable, stimulus-poor housing conditions, to induce different mood states. In an experiment, the animals were confronted with video sequences of social interactions of conspecifics showing agonistic interactions, ruminating or tolerantly co-feeding as stimuli of different valences. Emotional reactions were assessed by measuring frontal brain activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy and by recording behavioral reactions. Attentiveness of the sheep decreased from videos showing agonistic interactions to ruminating sheep to those displaying co-feeding sheep. Seeing agonistic interactions was also associated with a deactivation of the frontal cortex, specifically in animals living under predictable, stimulus-rich housing conditions. These sheep generally showed less attentiveness and locomotor activity and they had their ears in a forward position less often and in a backward position more often than the sheep from the unpredictable, stimulus-poor conditions. Housing conditions influenced how the sheep behaved, which can either be thought to be mediated by mood or by the animals' previous experience with stimulus-richness in their housing conditions. Frontal cortical activity may not depend on valence only, but also on the perceptual channel through which the stimuli were perceived. PMID:25680678

  2. Housing conditions influence cortical and behavioural reactions of sheep in response to videos showing social interactions of different valence.

    PubMed

    Vögeli, Sabine; Wolf, Martin; Wechsler, Beat; Gygax, Lorenz

    2015-05-01

    Mood, as a long-term affective state, is thought to modulate short-term emotional reactions in animals, but the details of this interplay have hardly been investigated experimentally. Apart from a basic interest in this affective system, mood is likely to have an important impact on animal welfare, as bad mood may taint all emotional experience. In the present study about mood - emotion interaction, 29 sheep were kept under predictable, stimulus-rich or unpredictable, stimulus-poor housing conditions, to induce different mood states. In an experiment, the animals were confronted with video sequences of social interactions of conspecifics showing agonistic interactions, ruminating or tolerantly co-feeding as stimuli of different valences. Emotional reactions were assessed by measuring frontal brain activity using functional near-infrared spectroscopy and by recording behavioral reactions. Attentiveness of the sheep decreased from videos showing agonistic interactions to ruminating sheep to those displaying co-feeding sheep. Seeing agonistic interactions was also associated with a deactivation of the frontal cortex, specifically in animals living under predictable, stimulus-rich housing conditions. These sheep generally showed less attentiveness and locomotor activity and they had their ears in a forward position less often and in a backward position more often than the sheep from the unpredictable, stimulus-poor conditions. Housing conditions influenced how the sheep behaved, which can either be thought to be mediated by mood or by the animals' previous experience with stimulus-richness in their housing conditions. Frontal cortical activity may not depend on valence only, but also on the perceptual channel through which the stimuli were perceived.

  3. Palladium-Catalyzed α-Arylation of Zinc Enolates of Esters: Reaction Conditions and Substrate Scope

    PubMed Central

    Hama, Takuo; Ge, Shaozhong; Hartwig, John F.

    2013-01-01

    The intermolecular α-arylation of esters by palladium-catalyzed coupling of aryl bromides with zinc enolates of esters is reported. Reactions of three different types of zinc enolates have been developed. α-Arylation of esters occurs in high yields with isolated Reformatsky reagents, with Reformatsky reagents generated from α-bromo esters and activated zinc, and with zinc enolates generated by quenching lithium enolates of esters with zinc chloride. The use of zinc enolates, instead of alkali metal enolates, greatly expands the scope of the arylation of esters. The reactions occur at room temperature or at 70 °C with bromoarenes containing cyano, nitro, ester, keto, fluoro, enolizable hydrogen, hydroxyl or amino functionality and with bromopyridines. The scope of esters encompasses acyclic acetates, propionates, and isobutyrates, α-alkoxyesters, and lactones. The arylation of zinc enolates of esters was conducted with catalysts bearing the hindered pentaphenylferrocenyl di-tert-butylphosphine (Q-phos) or the highly reactive dimeric Pd(I) complex {[P(t-Bu)3]PdBr}2. PMID:23931445

  4. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D.; Tulk, Christopher A.; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J.; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; et al

    2016-08-25

    Acetonitrile (CH3CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. In this study, it is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH···N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp2 and sp3more » bonded carbon. Lastly, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst.« less

  5. Polymerization of Acetonitrile via a Hydrogen Transfer Reaction from CH3 to CN under Extreme Conditions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Haiyan; Li, Kuo; Cody, George D; Tulk, Christopher A; Dong, Xiao; Gao, Guoying; Molaison, Jamie J; Liu, Zhenxian; Feygenson, Mikhail; Yang, Wenge; Ivanov, Ilia N; Basile, Leonardo; Idrobo, Juan-Carlos; Guthrie, Malcolm; Mao, Ho-Kwang

    2016-09-19

    Acetonitrile (CH3 CN) is the simplest and one of the most stable nitriles. Reactions usually occur on the C≡N triple bond, while the C-H bond is very inert and can only be activated by a very strong base or a metal catalyst. It is demonstrated that C-H bonds can be activated by the cyano group under high pressure, but at room temperature. The hydrogen atom transfers from the CH3 to CN along the CH⋅⋅⋅N hydrogen bond, which produces an amino group and initiates polymerization to form a dimer, 1D chain, and 2D nanoribbon with mixed sp(2) and sp(3) bonded carbon. Finally, it transforms into a graphitic polymer by eliminating ammonia. This study shows that applying pressure can induce a distinctive reaction which is guided by the structure of the molecular crystal. It highlights the fact that very inert C-H can be activated by high pressure, even at room temperature and without a catalyst. PMID:27561179

  6. Hot-Fire Testing of 100 LB(sub F) LOX/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine at Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, William M.; Kleinhenz, Julie E.

    2010-01-01

    Liquid oxygen/liquid methane (LO2/LCH4 ) has recently been viewed as a potential green propulsion system for both the Altair ascent main engine (AME) and reaction control system (RCS). The Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development Project (PCAD) has been tasked by NASA to develop these green propellant systems to enable safe and cost effective exploration missions. However, experience with LO2/LCH4 as a propellant combination is limited, so testing of these systems is critical to demonstrating reliable ignition and performance. A test program of a 100 lb f reaction control engine (RCE) is underway at the Altitude Combustion Stand (ACS) of the NASA Glenn Research Center, with a focus on conducting tests at altitude conditions. These tests include a unique propellant conditioning feed system (PCFS) which allows for the inlet conditions of the propellant to be varied to test warm to subcooled liquid propellant temperatures. Engine performance, including thrust, c* and vacuum specific impulse (I(sub sp,vac)) will be presented as a function of propellant temperature conditions. In general, the engine performed as expected, with higher performance at warmer propellant temperatures but better efficiency at lower propellant temperatures. Mixture ratio effects were inconclusive within the uncertainty bands of data, but qualitatively showed higher performance at lower ratios.

  7. Glyoxal uptake on ammonium sulphate seed aerosol: reaction products and reversibility of uptake under dark and irradiated conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galloway, M. M.; Chhabra, P. S.; Chan, A. W. H.; Surratt, J. D.; Flagan, R. C.; Seinfeld, J. H.; Keutsch, F. N.

    2008-12-01

    Chamber studies of glyoxal uptake onto neutral ammonium sulphate aerosol were performed under dark and irradiated conditions to gain further insight into processes controlling glyoxal uptake onto ambient aerosol. Organic fragments from glyoxal dimers and trimers were observed within the aerosol under dark and irradiated conditions; glyoxal oligomer formation and overall organic growth were found to be reversible under dark conditions. Analysis of high-resolution time-of-flight aerosol mass spectra provides evidence for irreversible formation of carbon-nitrogen (C-N) compounds in the aerosol. These compounds are likely to be imidazoles formed by reaction of glyoxal with the ammonium sulphate seed. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first time C-N compounds resulting from condensed phase reactions with ammonium sulphate seed have been detected in aerosol. Organosulphates were not detected under dark conditions. However, active oxidative photochemistry, similar to that found in cloud processing, was found to occur within aerosol during irradiated experiments. Organosulphates, carboxylic acids, and organic esters were identified within the aerosol. Our study suggests that both C-N compound formation and photochemical processes should be considered in models of secondary organic aerosol formation via glyoxal.

  8. Reaction Norms in Natural Conditions: How Does Metabolic Performance Respond to Weather Variations in a Small Endotherm Facing Cold Environments?

    PubMed Central

    Petit, Magali; Vézina, François

    2014-01-01

    Reaction norms reflect an organisms' capacity to adjust its phenotype to the environment and allows for identifying trait values associated with physiological limits. However, reaction norms of physiological parameters are mostly unknown for endotherms living in natural conditions. Black-capped chickadees (Poecile atricapillus) increase their metabolic performance during winter acclimatization and are thus good model to measure reaction norms in the wild. We repeatedly measured basal (BMR) and summit (Msum) metabolism in chickadees to characterize, for the first time in a free-living endotherm, reaction norms of these parameters across the natural range of weather variation. BMR varied between individuals and was weakly and negatively related to minimal temperature. Msum varied with minimal temperature following a Z-shape curve, increasing linearly between 24°C and −10°C, and changed with absolute humidity following a U-shape relationship. These results suggest that thermal exchanges with the environment have minimal effects on maintenance costs, which may be individual-dependent, while thermogenic capacity is responding to body heat loss. Our results suggest also that BMR and Msum respond to different and likely independent constraints. PMID:25426860

  9. The necessary and sufficient conditions of therapeutic personality change: Reactions to Rogers' 1957 article.

    PubMed

    Samstag, Lisa Wallner

    2007-09-01

    Carl Rogers' article (see record 2007-14639-002) on the necessary and sufficient conditions for personality change has had a significant impact on the field of psychotherapy and psychotherapy research. He emphasized the client as arbiter of his or her own subjective experience and tested his hypothesized therapist-offered conditions of change using recorded sessions. This aided in demystifying the therapeutic process and led to a radical shift in the listening stance of the therapist. I briefly outline my views regarding the influence of the ideas presented in this work, describe the intellectual and cultural context of the times, and discuss a number of ways in which the therapist-offered conditions for psychological transformation are neither necessary nor sufficient. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved).

  10. The necessary and sufficient conditions of therapeutic personality change: Reactions to Rogers' 1957 article.

    PubMed

    Samstag, Lisa Wallner

    2007-09-01

    Carl Rogers' article (see record 2007-14639-002) on the necessary and sufficient conditions for personality change has had a significant impact on the field of psychotherapy and psychotherapy research. He emphasized the client as arbiter of his or her own subjective experience and tested his hypothesized therapist-offered conditions of change using recorded sessions. This aided in demystifying the therapeutic process and led to a radical shift in the listening stance of the therapist. I briefly outline my views regarding the influence of the ideas presented in this work, describe the intellectual and cultural context of the times, and discuss a number of ways in which the therapist-offered conditions for psychological transformation are neither necessary nor sufficient. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2010 APA, all rights reserved). PMID:22122256

  11. Solubility and Reaction Rates of Aluminum Solid Phases Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Benezeth, P.; Palmer, D.A.; Wesolowski, D.

    1999-11-14

    Experimental studies involving equilibrium solubility and dissolution/precipitation rates were initiated on boehmite (AIOOH) using a hydrogen-electrode concentration cell (HECC). This cell provides continuous, accurate in situ pH measurements of solid/solution mixtures to 295 C with provision for either removing solution samples for analysis of the metal content, or adding either of two titrants. This cell has been recently used to measure the solubility of minerals such as brucite; boehmite, zincite, arid magnetite. The ability to perturb pH, isothermally by addition of acidic or basic titrant opens the door for studies of the kinetics of dissolution/precipitation, even for relatively fast reactions. By monitoring the change in pH, with time, detailed kinetic information can be obtained without the need for sampling.

  12. The effect of reaction conditions on formation of wet precipitated calcium phosphates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chen; Cao, Peng

    2015-03-01

    The precipitation process discussed in the present study involves the addition of alkaline solutions to an acidic calcium phosphate suspension. Several parameters (pH, pH buffer reagent, ageing and stirring) were investigated. The synthesized powders were calcined at 1000°C for 1 h in air, in order to study the thermal stability and crystalline phase compositions. X-ray diffraction (XRD) and ESEM analysis were used for sample characterization. It is found that all these processing parameters affect the crystalline phases evolved and resultant microstructures. Phase evolution occurred at an elevated pH level. The pH buffer reagent would affect both the phase composition and microstructure. Ageing was essential for the phase maturation. Stirring accelerated the reaction process by providing a homogeneous medium for precipitation.

  13. Reaction Weakening of Dunite in Friction Experiments at Hydrothermal Conditions and Its Relevance to Subduction Zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, D. E.; Lockner, D. A.

    2014-12-01

    To improve our understanding of processes occurring in the mantle wedge near the downdip limit of seismicity in subduction zones, we conducted triaxial friction tests on dunite gouge at temperatures in the range 200-350°C, 50 MPa fluid pressure and 100 MPa effective normal stress. Dunite, quartzite, and granite forcing blocks were used respectively to approximate changing rock/fluid chemistry with decreasing distance above the subduction thrust. All experiments were characterized by an initial increase in frictional strength to a peak value, followed by a decrease associated with shearing-enhanced alteration of the dunite gouge. Reaction products and the extent of weakening varied with the chemical environment. In the dunite-block experiments, strength gradually declined from the peak value to a coefficient of friction, µ ~ 0.5-0.6, consistent with the frictional strength of serpentine that formed on the shear surfaces from alteration of the gouge. Interaction of dunite gouge with quartzite and granite driving blocks resulted in significantly greater weakening, to μ ~ 0.3, at temperatures of 250°C and higher. Talc and serpentine partly replaced dunite gouge sheared between quartzite blocks, and metastable saponitic smectite clays crystallized in dunite sheared between granite blocks, as a result of fluid-assisted chemical exchange with the minerals in the wall rocks. These results suggest that rapid and substantial weakening can occur in the mantle wedge immediately overlying the subducting slab. Whichever the chemical environment, attainment of peak strength typically was accompanied by oscillatory slip with small stress drops that gradually was replaced by stable slip with increasing displacement. This oscillatory behavior in some ways resembles the tremor events that have been reported near the forearc mantle corner in subduction zones, and it may indicate the possible involvement of mineral reactions in some instances of tremor.

  14. Acetylation of bacterial cellulose catalyzed by citric acid: Use of reaction conditions for tailoring the esterification extent.

    PubMed

    Ávila Ramírez, Jhon Alejandro; Gómez Hoyos, Catalina; Arroyo, Silvana; Cerrutti, Patricia; Foresti, María Laura

    2016-11-20

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanoribbons were partially acetylated by a simple direct solvent-free route catalyzed by citric acid. The assay of reaction conditions within chosen intervals (i.e. esterification time (0.5-7h), catalyst content (0.08-1.01mmol/mmol AGU), and temperature (90-140°C)), illustrated the flexibility of the methodology proposed, with reaction variables which can be conveniently manipulated to acetylate BC to the required degree of substitution (DS) within the 0.20-0.73 interval. Within this DS interval, characterization results indicated a surface-only process in which acetylated bacterial cellulose with tunable DS, preserved fibrous structure and increased hydrophobicity could be easily obtained. The feasibility of reusing the catalyst/excess acylant in view of potential scale-up was also illustrated.

  15. Acetylation of bacterial cellulose catalyzed by citric acid: Use of reaction conditions for tailoring the esterification extent.

    PubMed

    Ávila Ramírez, Jhon Alejandro; Gómez Hoyos, Catalina; Arroyo, Silvana; Cerrutti, Patricia; Foresti, María Laura

    2016-11-20

    Bacterial cellulose (BC) nanoribbons were partially acetylated by a simple direct solvent-free route catalyzed by citric acid. The assay of reaction conditions within chosen intervals (i.e. esterification time (0.5-7h), catalyst content (0.08-1.01mmol/mmol AGU), and temperature (90-140°C)), illustrated the flexibility of the methodology proposed, with reaction variables which can be conveniently manipulated to acetylate BC to the required degree of substitution (DS) within the 0.20-0.73 interval. Within this DS interval, characterization results indicated a surface-only process in which acetylated bacterial cellulose with tunable DS, preserved fibrous structure and increased hydrophobicity could be easily obtained. The feasibility of reusing the catalyst/excess acylant in view of potential scale-up was also illustrated. PMID:27561540

  16. Active sites in Cu-SSZ-13 deNOx catalyst under reaction conditions: a XAS/XES perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lomachenko, Kirill A.; Borfecchia, Elisa; Bordiga, Silvia; Soldatov, Alexander V.; Beato, Pablo; Lamberti, Carlo

    2016-05-01

    Cu-SSZ-13 is a highly active catalyst for the NH3-assisted selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of the harmful nitrogen oxides (NOx, x=1, 2). Since the catalytically active sites for this reaction are mainly represented by isolated Cu ions incorporated into the zeolitic framework, element-selective studies of Cu local environment are crucial to fully understand the enhanced catalytic properties of this material. Herein, we highlight the recent advances in the characterization of the most abundant Cu-sites in Cu-SSZ-13 upon different reaction-relevant conditions made employing XAS and XES spectroscopies, complemented by computational analysis. A concise review of the most relevant literature is also presented.

  17. Influence of HCl on the homogeneous reactions of CO and NO in postcombustion conditions -- A kinetic modeling study

    SciTech Connect

    Mueller, C.; Kilpinen, P.; Hupa, M.

    1998-06-01

    Several fuels used in industrial furnaces contain high amounts of chlorine. These fuels include high chlorine coals and various waste products, like municipal and hazardous wastes and spent liquors from wood pulping processes. The influence of hydrogen chloride on homogeneous gas-phase reactions of carbon monoxide and nitric oxide was studied in typical postcombustion conditions of industrial furnaces using detailed kinetic modeling. A well-established reaction mechanism (203 reactions) describing the oxidation of moist CO, as well as of NH{sub 3} and HCN was extended by a recently published subset of 36 reactions for the oxidation of HCl. Validation of modeling predictions was achieved in that the effect of HCl on the CO burnout showed excellent agreement with available independent laboratory data. The modeling results led to the conclusion that the presence of HCl (100--600 ppmv) has a strong effect on the CO oxidation at low temperatures of approximately 1,023 K. The effect is dependent on the H{sub 2}O concentration and the presence of NO. Very interestingly, at high concentrations of H{sub 2}O (7 vol %) and without any NO, HCl led to a totally unexpected acceleration of the CO burnout at residence times longer than 0.5 s. Around and above 1,123 K the influence of HCl on the CO burnout was found to be very small for all conditions investigated. Furthermore, it was predicted that in the presence of ammonia, HCl extends the temperature window for NO reduction, particularly on the low temperature side.

  18. Condensation Reactions and Formation of Amides, Esters, and Nitriles Under Hydrothermal Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rushdi, Ahmed I.; Simoneit, Bernd R. T.

    2004-06-01

    Hydrothermal pyrolysis experiments were performed to assess condensation (dehydration) reactions to amide, ester, and nitrile functionalities from lipid precursors. Beside product formation, organic compound alteration and stability were also evaluated. Mixtures of nonadecanoic acid, hexadecanedioic acid, or hexadecanamide with water, ammonium bicarbonate, and oxalic acid were heated at 300°C for 72 h. In addition, mixtures of ammonium bicarbonate and oxalic acid solutions were used to test the abiotic formation of organic nitrogen compounds at the same temperature. The resulting products were condensation compounds such as amides, nitriles, and minor quantities of N-methylalkyl amides, alkanols, and esters. Mixtures of alkyl amide in water or oxalic acid yielded mainly hydrolysis and dehydration products, and with ammonium bicarbonate and oxalic acid the yield of condensation products was enhanced. The synthesis experiments with oxalic acid and ammonium bicarbonate solutions yielded homologous series of alkyl amides, alkyl amines, alkanes, and alkanoic acids, all with no carbon number predominances. These organic nitrogen compounds are stable and survive under the elevated temperatures of hydrothermal fluids.

  19. Lipid synthesis under hydrothermal conditions by Fischer-Tropsch-type reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McCollom, T. M.; Ritter, G.; Simoneit, B. R.

    1999-01-01

    Ever since their discovery in the late 1970's, mid-ocean-ridge hydrothermal systems have received a great deal of attention as a possible site for the origin of life on Earth (and environments analogous to mid-ocean-ridge hydrothermal systems are postulated to have been sites where life could have originated or Mars and elsewhere as well). Because no modern-day terrestrial hydrothermal systems are free from the influence of organic compounds derived from biologic processes, laboratory experiments provide the best opportunity for confirmation of the potential for organic synthesis in hydrothermal systems. Here we report on the formation of lipid compounds during Fischer-Tropsch-type synthesis from aqueous solutions of formic acid or oxalic acid. Optimum synthesis occurs in stainless steel vessels by heating at 175 degrees C for 2-3 days and produces lipid compounds ranging from C2 to > C35 which consist of n-alkanols, n-alkanoic acids, n-alkenes, n-alkanes and alkanones. The precursor carbon sources used are either formic acid or oxalic acid, which disproportionate to H2, CO2 and probably CO. Both carbon sources yield the same lipid classes with essentially the same ranges of compounds. The synthesis reactions were confirmed by using 13C labeled precursor acids.

  20. A novel endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase releases specific N-glycans depending on different reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Le Parc, Annabelle; Karav, Sercan; Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega De Moura; Frese, Steven A; Liu, Yan; Mills, David A; Block, David E; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Milk glycoproteins are involved in different functions and contribute to different cellular processes, including adhesion and signaling, and shape the development of the infant microbiome. Methods have been developed to study the complexities of milk protein glycosylation and understand the role of N-glycans in protein functionality. Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoBI-1) isolated from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 is a recently isolated heat-stable enzyme that cleaves the N-N'-diacetyl chitobiose moiety found in the N-glycan core. The effects of different processing conditions (pH, temperature, reaction time, and enzyme/protein ratio) were evaluated for their ability to change EndoBI-1 activity on bovine colostrum whey glycoproteins using advanced mass spectrometry. This study shows that EndoBI-1 is able to cleave a high diversity of N-glycan structures. Nano-LC-Chip-Q-TOF MS data also revealed that different reaction conditions resulted in different N-glycan compositions released, thus modifying the relative abundance of N-glycan types. In general, more sialylated N-glycans were released at lower temperatures and pH values. These results demonstrated that EndoBI-1 is able to release a wide variety of N-glycans, whose compositions can be selectively manipulated using different processing conditions. PMID:26101185

  1. A Novel Endo-β-N-Acetylglucosaminidase Releases Specific N-Glycans Depending on Different Reaction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    De Moura Bell, Juliana Maria Leite Nobrega; Frese, Steven A.; Liu, Yan; Mills, David A.; Block, David E.; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Milk glycoproteins are involved in different functions and contribute to different cellular processes, including adhesion and signaling, and shape the development of the infant micro-biome. Methods have been developed to study the complexities of milk protein glycosylation and understand the role of N-glycans in protein functionality. Endo-β-N-acetylglucosaminidase (EndoBI-1) isolated from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697 is a recently isolated heat-stable enzyme that cleaves the N-N′-diacetyl chitobiose moiety found in the N-glycan core. The effects of different processing conditions (pH, temperature, reaction time, and enzyme/protein ratio) were evaluated for their ability to change EndoBI-1 activity on bovine colostrum whey glycoproteins using advanced mass spectrometry. This study shows that EndoBI-1 is able to cleave a high diversity of N-glycan structures. Nano-LC-Chip–Q-TOF MS data also revealed that different reaction conditions resulted in different N-glycan compositions released, thus modifying the relative abundance of N-glycan types. In general, more sialylated N-glycans were released at lower temperatures and pH values. These results demonstrated that EndoBI-1 is able to release a wide variety of N-glycans, whose compositions can be selectively manipulated using different processing conditions. PMID:26101185

  2. Optimisation of the reaction conditions for the production of cross-linked starch with high resistant starch content.

    PubMed

    Kahraman, Kevser; Koksel, Hamit; Ng, Perry K W

    2015-05-01

    The optimum reaction conditions (temperature and pH) for the preparation of cross-linked (CL) corn and wheat starches with maximum resistant starch (RS) content were investigated by using response surface methodology (RSM). According to the preliminary results, five levels were selected for reaction temperature (38-70 °C) and pH (10-12) in the main study. RS contents of the CL corn and wheat starch samples increased with increasing temperature and pH, and pH had a greater influence on RS content than had temperature. The maximum RS content (with a maximum p value of 0.4%) was obtained in wheat starch cross-linked at 38 °C and pH 12. In the case of CL corn starch, the optimum condition was 70 °C and pH 12. CL corn and wheat starch samples were also produced separately under the optimum conditions and their RS contents were 80.4% and 83.9%, respectively. These results were also in agreement with the values predicted by RSM.

  3. Stability and Bifurcation in a Delayed Reaction-Diffusion Equation with Dirichlet Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Shangjiang; Ma, Li

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we study the dynamics of a diffusive equation with time delay subject to Dirichlet boundary condition in a bounded domain. The existence of spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solution is investigated by applying Lyapunov-Schmidt reduction. The existence of Hopf bifurcation at the spatially nonhomogeneous steady-state solution is derived by analyzing the distribution of the eigenvalues. The direction of Hopf bifurcation and stability of the bifurcating periodic solution are also investigated by means of normal form theory and center manifold reduction. Moreover, we illustrate our general results by applications to the Nicholson's blowflies models with one- dimensional spatial domain.

  4. The effect of preparation conditions on the structure and mechanical properties of reaction-sintered silicon nitride

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heinrich, J.

    1980-01-01

    The microstructure of reaction sintered silicon nitride (RSSN) was changed over a wide range by varying the grain density, grain size of the silicon starting powder, nitriding conditions, and by introducing artificial pores. The influence of single microstructural parameters on mechanical properties like room temperature strength, creep behavior, and resistance to thermal shock was investigated. The essential factors influencing these properties were found to be total porosity, pore size distribution, and the fractions of alpha and beta Si3N4. In view of high temperature engineering applications of RSSN, potentials for optimizing the material's properties by controlled processing are discussed.

  5. Reaction Kinetics of Primary Rock-forming Minerals under Ambient Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brantley, S. L.

    2003-12-01

    Mineral dissolution kinetics influence such phenomena as development of soil fertility, amelioration of the effects of acid rain, formation of karst, acid mine drainage, transport and sequestration of contaminants, sequestration of carbon dioxide at depth in the earth, ore deposition, and metamorphism. On a global basis, mineral weathering kinetics are also involved in the long-term sink for CO2 in the atmosphere:CaSiO3+CO2=CaCO3+SiO2(1)MgSiO3+CO2=MgCO3+SiO2(2)These reactions (Urey, 1952) describe the processes that balance the volcanic and metamorphic CO2 production to maintain relatively constant levels of atmospheric CO2 over 105-106 yr timescales. In these equations, Ca- and MgSiO3 represent all calcium- and magnesium-containing silicates. Calcium- and magnesium-silicates at the Earth's surface are predominantly plagioclase feldspars, Ca-Mg-pyroxenes, amphiboles, and phyllosilicates, Ca-Mg orthosilicates. Although dissolution of the other main rock-forming mineral class, carbonate minerals, does not draw down CO2 from the atmosphere over geologic timescales, carbonate dissolution is globally important in controlling river and ground water chemistry.Despite the importance of mineral dissolution, field weathering rates are generally observed to be up to five orders of magnitude slower than laboratory dissolution rates (White, 1995), and the reason for this discrepancy remains a puzzle. For example, mean lifetimes of 1 mm spheres of rock-forming minerals calculated from measured rate data following Lasaga (1984) are much smaller than the mean half-life of sedimentary rocks (600 My, Garrels and Mackenzie, 1971). As pointed out by others ( Velbel, 1993a), the order of stability of minerals calculated from measured dissolution kinetics ( Table 1) generally follow weathering trends observed in the field (e.g., Goldich, 1938) with some exceptions. Some have suggested that quantitative prediction of field rates will be near-impossible, although such rate trends may be

  6. Biodiesel production from various oils under supercritical fluid conditions by Candida antartica lipase B using a stepwise reaction method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Ho; Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Kang, Jeong Won; Park, Chulhwan; Tae, Bumseok; Kim, Seung Wook

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we evaluate the effects of various reaction factors, including pressure, temperature, agitation speed, enzyme concentration, and water content to increase biodiesel production. In addition, biodiesel was produced from various oils to establish the optimal enzymatic process of biodiesel production. Optimal conditions were determined to be as follows: pressure 130 bar, temperature 45 degrees C, agitation speed 200 rpm, enzyme concentration 20%, and water contents 10%. Among the various oils used for production, olive oil showed the highest yield (65.18%) upon transesterification. However, when biodiesel was produced using a batch system, biodiesel conversion yield was not increased over 65%; therefore, a stepwise reaction was conducted to increase biodiesel production. When a reaction medium with an initial concentration of methanol of 60 mmol was used and adjusted to maintain this concentration of methanol every 1.5 h during biodiesel production, the conversion yield of biodiesel was 98.92% at 6 h. Finally, reusability was evaluated using immobilized lipase to determine if this method was applicable for industrial biodiesel production. When biodiesel was produced repeatedly, the conversion rate was maintained at over 85% after eight reuses. PMID:19132555

  7. Gas-phase reaction of methyl isothiocyanate and methyl isocyanate with hydroxyl radicals under static relative rate conditions.

    PubMed

    Lu, Zhou; Hebert, Vincent R; Miller, Glenn C

    2014-02-26

    Gaseous methyl isothiocyanate (MITC), the principal breakdown product of the soil fumigant metam sodium (sodium N-methyldithiocarbamate), is an inhalation exposure concern to persons living near treated areas. Inhalation exposure also involves gaseous methyl isocyanate (MIC), a highly reactive and toxic transformation product of MITC. In this work, gas-phase hydroxyl (OH) radical reaction rate constants of MITC and MIC have been determined using a static relative rate technique under controlled laboratory conditions. The rate constants obtained are 15.36 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for MITC and 3.62 × 10(-12) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1) for MIC. The average half-lives of MITC and MIC in the atmosphere are estimated to be 15.7 and 66.5 h, respectively. The molar conversion of MITC to MIC for OH radical reactions is 67% ± 8%, which indicates that MIC is the primary product of the MITC-OH reaction in the gas phase.

  8. Biodiesel production from various oils under supercritical fluid conditions by Candida antartica lipase B using a stepwise reaction method.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Ho; Kwon, Cheong Hoon; Kang, Jeong Won; Park, Chulhwan; Tae, Bumseok; Kim, Seung Wook

    2009-05-01

    In this study, we evaluate the effects of various reaction factors, including pressure, temperature, agitation speed, enzyme concentration, and water content to increase biodiesel production. In addition, biodiesel was produced from various oils to establish the optimal enzymatic process of biodiesel production. Optimal conditions were determined to be as follows: pressure 130 bar, temperature 45 degrees C, agitation speed 200 rpm, enzyme concentration 20%, and water contents 10%. Among the various oils used for production, olive oil showed the highest yield (65.18%) upon transesterification. However, when biodiesel was produced using a batch system, biodiesel conversion yield was not increased over 65%; therefore, a stepwise reaction was conducted to increase biodiesel production. When a reaction medium with an initial concentration of methanol of 60 mmol was used and adjusted to maintain this concentration of methanol every 1.5 h during biodiesel production, the conversion yield of biodiesel was 98.92% at 6 h. Finally, reusability was evaluated using immobilized lipase to determine if this method was applicable for industrial biodiesel production. When biodiesel was produced repeatedly, the conversion rate was maintained at over 85% after eight reuses.

  9. Role of choline and glycine betaine in the formation of N,N-dimethylpiperidinium (mepiquat) under Maillard reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Bessaire, Thomas; Tarres, Adrienne; Stadler, Richard H; Delatour, Thierry

    2014-01-01

    This study is the first to examine the role of choline and glycine betaine, naturally present in some foods, in particular in cereal grains, to generate N,N-dimethylpiperidinium (mepiquat) under Maillard conditions via transmethylation reactions involving the nucleophile piperidine. The formation of mepiquat and its intermediates piperidine - formed by cyclisation of free lysine in the presence of reducing sugars - and N-methylpiperidine were monitored over time (240°C, up to 180 min) using high-resolution mass spectrometry in a model system comprised of a ternary mixture of lysine/fructose/alkylating agent (choline or betaine). The reaction yield was compared with data recently determined for trigonelline, a known methylation agent present naturally in coffee beans. The role of choline and glycine betaine in nucleophilic displacement reactions was further supported by experiments carried out with stable isotope-labelled precursors (¹³C- and deuterium-labelled). The results unequivocally demonstrated that the piperidine ring of mepiquat originates from the carbon chain of lysine, and that either choline or glycine betaine furnishes the N-methyl groups. The kinetics of formation of the corresponding demethylated products of both choline and glycine betaine, N,N-demethyl-2-aminoethanol and N,N-dimethylglycine, respectively, were also determined using high-resolution mass spectrometry. PMID:25333319

  10. Correlation of Impact Conditions, Interface Reactions, Microstructural Evolution, and Mechanical Properties in Kinetic Spraying of Metals: A Review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jaeick; Lee, Changhee

    2016-09-01

    In the past, most studies into kinetic spraying technology focused on basic research, but a large portion of current research is devoted to industrial applications of the technology. To advance, however, studies about industrial applications of kinetic spraying require profound understanding of the scientific foundations of the kinetic spray process. Nevertheless, no one has yet provided a well-organized summary of the correlations among impact conditions, interface reactions, microstructural evolution, and mechanical properties across the whole field of kinetic spraying technology. This paper provides such an overview of these correlations for kinetic spraying of metals. For each correlation, the interactions between the given conditions and the material properties of the metal feedstock powder are the most influential. These interactions are so complicated that it is difficult to systematically classify all cases into certain types. Nonetheless, we try to explain and summarize the critical factors and their roles in each relationship.

  11. Malonic acid concentration as a control parameter in the kinetic analysis of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction under batch conditions.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Slavica M; Anić, Slobodan R; Cupić, Zeljko D; Pejić, Natasa D; Kolar-Anić, Ljiljana Z

    2008-11-28

    The influence of the initial malonic acid concentration [MA]0 (8.00 x 10(-3) < or = [MA]0 < or = 4.30 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)) in the presence of bromate (6.20 x 10(-2) mol dm(-3)), bromide (1.50 x 10(-5) mol dm(-3)), sulfuric acid (1.00 mol dm(-3)) and cerium sulfate (2.50 x 10(-3) mol dm(-3)) on the dynamics and the kinetics of the Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reactions was examined under batch conditions at 30.0 degrees C. The kinetics of the BZ reaction was analyzed by the earlier proposed method convenient for the examinations of the oscillatory reactions. In the defined region of parameters where oscillograms with only large-amplitude relaxation oscillations appeared, the pseudo-first order of the overall malonic acid decomposition with a corresponding rate constant of 2.14 x 10(-2) min(-1) was established. The numerical results on the dynamics and kinetics of the BZ reaction, carried out by the known skeleton model including the Br2O species, were in good agreement with the experimental ones. The already found saddle node infinite period (SNIPER) bifurcation point in transition from a stable quasi-steady state to periodic orbits and vice versa is confirmed by both experimental and numerical investigations of the system under consideration. Namely, the large-amplitude relaxation oscillations with increasing periods between oscillations in approaching the bifurcation points at the beginning and the end of the oscillatory domain, together with excitability of the stable quasi-steady states in their vicinity are obtained.

  12. Reactions of 2-(pyrrol-1-yl)benzyl radicals and related species under flash vacuum pyrolysis conditions.

    PubMed

    Cadogan, J I G; Clark, Bernard A J; Ford, Daniel; Macdonald, Ranald J; Macpherson, Andrew D; McNab, Hamish; Nicolson, Iain S; Reed, David; Sommerville, Craig C

    2009-12-21

    2-(Pyrrol-1-yl)phenoxyl, aminyl, thiophenoxyl and benzyl radicals 2a-2d, respectively, were generated in the gas-phase under flash vacuum pyrolysis conditions. In all cases except the phenoxyl, cyclisation took place providing acceptable synthetic routes to the fused heterocycles 11, 14 and 15, respectively. Only sigmatropic rearrangement products were isolated, in low yields, from the phenoxyl 2a. The pyrrolo[1,2-a]benzimidazole 11 adopts the 1H-tautomer exclusively in chloroform solution. Electrophilic substitution reactions of pyrrolo[2,1-b]benzothiophene 14 were studied, including protonation, deuterium exchange, Vilsmeier formylation and reaction with dimethyl acetylenedicarboxylate. 2-(2,5-Diarylpyrrol-1-yl)thiophenoxyl, phenoxyl and aminyl radicals 23a-f, were also generated in the gas-phase under similar conditions. The thiophenoxyls 23a/b gave extremely complex pyrolysate mixtures in which primary cyclisation products were formed by attack of the radical at the pyrrrole ring and attack at the ipso-, ortho- and meta- positions of the aryl ring. Secondary pyrolysis products were obtained by specific sigmatropic shifts of the N-aryl group. The 2,5-di(thien-2-yl)thiophenoxyl radical 23c gave the pyrrolobenzothiazole 31c as the only cyclisation product in low yield. FVP of the phenoxyl and aminyl radical generators 26d and 26f, respectively, gave 3-arylpyrrolo[1,2-f]phenanthridines 46d and 46f, respectively, by a hydrogen transfer-cyclisation mechanism.

  13. Adaptive locomotor training on an end-effector gait robot: evaluation of the ground reaction forces in different training conditions.

    PubMed

    Tomelleri, Christopher; Waldner, Andreas; Werner, Cordula; Hesse, Stefan

    2011-01-01

    The main goal of robotic gait rehabilitation is the restoration of independent gait. To achieve this goal different and specific patterns have to be practiced intensively in order to stimulate the learning process of the central nervous system. The gait robot G-EO Systems was designed to allow the repetitive practice of floor walking, stair climbing and stair descending. A novel control strategy allows training in adaptive mode. The force interactions between the foot and the ground were analyzed on 8 healthy volunteers in three different conditions: real floor walking on a treadmill, floor walking on the gait robot in passive mode, floor walking on the gait robot in adaptive mode. The ground reaction forces were measured by a Computer Dyno Graphy (CDG) analysis system. The results show different intensities of the ground reaction force across all of the three conditions. The intensities of force interactions during the adaptive training mode are comparable to the real walking on the treadmill. Slight deviations still occur in regard to the timing pattern of the forces. The adaptive control strategy comes closer to the physiological swing phase than the passive mode and seems to be a promising option for the treatment of gait disorders. Clinical trials will validate the efficacy of this new option in locomotor therapy on the patients.

  14. Hydrothermal processing of duckweed: effect of reaction conditions on product distribution and composition.

    PubMed

    Duan, Peigao; Chang, Zhoufan; Xu, Yuping; Bai, Xiujun; Wang, Feng; Zhang, Lei

    2013-05-01

    Influences of operating conditions such as temperature (270-380 °C), time (10-120 min), reactor loading (0.5-5.5 g), and K2CO3 loading (0-50 wt.%) on the product (e.g. crude bio-oil, water soluble, gas and solid residue) distribution from the hydrothermal processing of duckweed were determined. Of the four variables, temperature and K2CO3 loading were always the most influential factors to the relative amount of each component. The presence of K2CO3 is unfavorable for the production of bio-oil and gas. Hydrothermal processing duckweed produces a bio-oil that is enriched in carbon and hydrogen and has reduced levels of O compared with the original duckweed feedstock. The higher heating values of the bio-oil were estimated within the range of 32-36 MJ/kg. Major bio-oil constituents include ketones and their alkylated derivatives, alcohols, heterocyclic nitrogen-containing compounds, saturated fatty acids and hydrocarbons. The gaseous products were mainly CO2 and H2, with lesser amounts of CH4 and CO.

  15. Investigation of influence of hypomagnetic conditions closely similar to interplanetary magnetic filed on behavioral and vegetative reactions of higher mammals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivova, Natalie; Trukhanov, Kiril; Zamotshina, Tatyana; Zaeva, Olga; Khodanovich, Marina; Misina, Tatyana; Tukhvatulin, Ravil; Suhko, Valery

    To study the influence of long being under reduced magnetic field on behavioral and vegetative reactions of higher mammals the white rat males were put into the 700-1000 times reduced geomagnetic field (50-70 nT) for 25 days. Such field was obtained by using automatic compensation of the horizontal and vertical components of the GMF at a frequencies up to 10 Hz by means of solenoids of the experimental magnetic system. Control animals were located in the same room under usual laboratory GMF conditions (52 uT). Two days before the experiment the behavioral reactions were studied in the "open field" by means of a set of tests, characterizing the level of emotionality, moving and orientational-investigative activities of the animals under conditions of unimpeded behavior. 60 white underbred rat males with the initial body mass of 200 g were divided into three clusters. Animals with average indices were selected for the experiment. We have judged behavioral reaction disturbances of the rats under hypomagnetic conditions using videotape recordings carried out in the entire course of the chronic experiment. According to the obtained results during the period of maximum activity (from 230 to 330 a.m.) the number of interrelations between the individuals increased appreciably for experimental rats including interrelations with aggressive character. This was real during all 25 days of observation. We observed a certain dynamics of this index differed from that of the control group. We have also analyzed the final period of observation from the 21th to the 25th days. In this period we studied the 24 hours' dynamics of interrelations which were noted during 5 minutes in every hour around the clock. In the control group the number of interrelation was at a constantly low level. For experimental animals the number of interrelations was higher in the night hours than in the day ones. Moreover it exceeded the similar indexes observed from the 1st to the 20th day. For example from

  16. Synthesis and Characterization of AlCl3 Impregnated Molybdenum Oxide as Heterogeneous Nano-Catalyst for the Friedel-Crafts Acylation Reaction in Ambient Condition.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Arvind H; Chinnappan, Amutha; Hiremath, Vishwanath; Seo, Jeong Gil

    2015-10-01

    Aluminum trichloride (AlCl3) impregnated molybdenum oxide heterogeneous nano-catalyst was prepared by using simple impregnation method. The prepared heterogeneous catalyst was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM imaging, and EDX mapping. The catalytic activity of this protocol was evaluated as heterogeneous catalyst for the Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction at room temperature. The impregnated MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst showed tremendous catalytic activity in Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction under solvent-free and mild reaction condition. As a result, 84.0% yield of acyl product with 100% consumption of reactants in 18 h reaction time at room temperature was achieved. The effects of different solvents system with MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst in acylation reaction was also investigated. By using optimized reaction condition various acylated derivatives were prepared. In addition, the catalyst was separated by simple filtration process after the reaction and reused several times. Therefore, heterogeneous MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst was found environmentally benign catalyst, very convenient, high yielding, and clean method for the Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction under solvent-free and ambient reaction condition. PMID:26726496

  17. Synthesis and Characterization of AlCl3 Impregnated Molybdenum Oxide as Heterogeneous Nano-Catalyst for the Friedel-Crafts Acylation Reaction in Ambient Condition.

    PubMed

    Jadhav, Arvind H; Chinnappan, Amutha; Hiremath, Vishwanath; Seo, Jeong Gil

    2015-10-01

    Aluminum trichloride (AlCl3) impregnated molybdenum oxide heterogeneous nano-catalyst was prepared by using simple impregnation method. The prepared heterogeneous catalyst was characterized by powder X-ray diffraction, FT-IR spectroscopy, solid-state NMR spectroscopy, SEM imaging, and EDX mapping. The catalytic activity of this protocol was evaluated as heterogeneous catalyst for the Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction at room temperature. The impregnated MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst showed tremendous catalytic activity in Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction under solvent-free and mild reaction condition. As a result, 84.0% yield of acyl product with 100% consumption of reactants in 18 h reaction time at room temperature was achieved. The effects of different solvents system with MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst in acylation reaction was also investigated. By using optimized reaction condition various acylated derivatives were prepared. In addition, the catalyst was separated by simple filtration process after the reaction and reused several times. Therefore, heterogeneous MoO4(AlCl2)2 catalyst was found environmentally benign catalyst, very convenient, high yielding, and clean method for the Friedel-Crafts acylation reaction under solvent-free and ambient reaction condition.

  18. Green chemistry: a facile synthesis of polyfunctionally substituted thieno[3,4-c]pyridinones and thieno[3,4-d]pyridazinones under neat reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaydi, Khadijah M; Borik, Rita M; Mekheimer, Ramadan A; Elnagdi, Mohamed H

    2010-06-01

    A facile, solvent free, ecofriendly approach for the synthesis of pyridine-2,6-diones 4a-d, pyridazinone derivatives 8a-c and thienoazines 6 and 9 is herein described employing neat reaction conditions under both microwave and ultrasound irradiations. This solventless methodology is environmentally benign as it completely eliminates the use of solvent from the reaction procedure. PMID:20064736

  19. Green chemistry: a facile synthesis of polyfunctionally substituted thieno[3,4-c]pyridinones and thieno[3,4-d]pyridazinones under neat reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Al-Zaydi, Khadijah M; Borik, Rita M; Mekheimer, Ramadan A; Elnagdi, Mohamed H

    2010-06-01

    A facile, solvent free, ecofriendly approach for the synthesis of pyridine-2,6-diones 4a-d, pyridazinone derivatives 8a-c and thienoazines 6 and 9 is herein described employing neat reaction conditions under both microwave and ultrasound irradiations. This solventless methodology is environmentally benign as it completely eliminates the use of solvent from the reaction procedure.

  20. Aggregates of a hetero-oligophenylene derivative as reactors for the generation of palladium nanoparticles: a potential catalyst in the Sonogashira coupling reaction under aerial conditions.

    PubMed

    Walia, Preet Kamal; Pramanik, Subhamay; Bhalla, Vandana; Kumar, Manoj

    2015-12-18

    The utilization of Pd nanoparticles stabilized by aggregates of hetero-oligophenylene derivative 3 as an excellent catalyst in a copper/amine free Sonogashira coupling reaction under aerial conditions at room temperature has been demonstrated. PMID:26460180

  1. Size Reproducibility of Gadolinium Oxide Based Nanomagnetic Particles for Cellular Magnetic Resonance Imaging: Effects of Functionalization, Chemisorption and Reaction Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Riyahi-Alam, Sadjad; Haghgoo, Soheila; Gorji, Ensieh; Riyahi-Alam, Nader

    2015-01-01

    We developed biofunctionalized nanoparticles with magnetic properties by immobilizing diethyleneglycol (DEG) on Gd2O3, and PEGilation of small particulate gadolinium oxide (SPGO) with two methoxy-polyethyleneglycol-silane (mPEG-Silane 550 and 2000 Da) using a new supervised polyol route, described recently. In conjunction to the previous study to achieve a high quality synthesis and increase in the product yield of nanoparticles; assessment of the effects of functionalization, chemisorption and altered reaction conditions, such as NaOH concentration, temperature, reaction time and their solubility, on size reproducibility were determined as the goals of this study. Moreover, the effects of centrifugation, filtration and dialysis of the solution on the nono magnetic particle size values and their stability against aggregation have been evaluated. Optimization of reaction parameters led to strong coating of magnetic nanoparticles with the ligands which increases the reproducibility of particle size measurements. Furthermore, the ligand-coated nanoparticles showed enhanced colloidal stability as a result of the steric stabilization function of the ligands grafted on the surface of particles. The experiments showed that DEG and mPEG-silane (550 and 2000 Dalton) are chemisorbed on the particle surfaces of Gd2O3 and SPGO which led to particle sizes of 5.9 ± 0.13 nm, 51.3 ± 1.46 nm and 194.2 ± 22.1 nm, respectively. The small size of DEG-Gd2O3 is acceptably below the cutoff of 6nm, enabling easy diffusion through lymphatics and filtration from kidney, and thus provides a great deal of potential for further in-vivo and in-vitro application PMID:25561907

  2. Real-Time Optical Monitoring of Flow Kinetics and Gas Phase Reactions Under High-Pressure OMCVD Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dietz, N.; McCall, S.; Bachmann, K. J.

    2001-01-01

    This contribution addresses the real-time optical characterization of gas flow and gas phase reactions as they play a crucial role for chemical vapor phase depositions utilizing elevated and high pressure chemical vapor deposition (HPCVD) conditions. The objectives of these experiments are to validate on the basis of results on real-time optical diagnostics process models simulation codes, and provide input parameter sets needed for analysis and control of chemical vapor deposition at elevated pressures. Access to microgravity is required to retain high pressure conditions of laminar flow, which is essential for successful acquisition and interpretation of the optical data. In this contribution, we describe the design and construction of the HPCVD system, which include access ports for various optical methods of real-time process monitoring and to analyze the initial stages of heteroepitaxy and steady-state growth in the different pressure ranges. To analyze the onset of turbulence, provisions are made for implementation of experimental methods for in-situ characterization of the nature of flow. This knowledge will be the basis for the design definition of experiments under microgravity, where gas flow conditions, gas phase and surface chemistry, might be analyzed by remote controlled real-time diagnostics tools, developed in this research project.

  3. A relevant coupled particle-tracking solution for network reaction and multirate mass transfer under heterogeneous conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henri, Christopher; Fernàndez-Garcia, Daniel

    2013-04-01

    Considering complex physical and reactive processes is necessary to a trustable plume behavior prediction. However, complexity is often synonym of inefficiency and numerical problem for existing model. We present an efficient particle method to simulate plumes evolution moved by advection-dispersion and affected by network reactions and multirate-mass transfer processes under heterogeneous spatial conditions. The stochastic approach is based on the derivation of the probability that a particle being at a certain position, specie and mobility zone will move into another specie and/or zone. Transport processes are fully coupled with reactions. The particle method is free of numerical dispersion and overcomes the inherent numerical problems stemming from the incorporation of heterogeneities into reactive transport codes based on Eulerian approaches. Even if the method aims to be universal, we show that analytical solutions can be provided for the simpler cases, which may improve consequently the model efficiency. Illustratively, we apply our method to model the sequential degradation of chlorinated solvents (PCE ⇒ TCE ⇒ DCE ⇒ VC ⇒ 0) into a finely discretized field and show how spatially variable coefficients of hydraulic permeability, bio-decay and mass transfer affect the spatial and temporal behavior of the four reactive plumes.

  4. Stress response in Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 under starvation conditions: adaptive reactions at a low population density.

    PubMed

    Petrova, Olga; Gorshkov, Vladimir; Daminova, Amina; Ageeva, Marina; Moleleki, Lucy N; Gogolev, Yuri

    2014-01-01

    The adaptive reactions of plant pathogenic bacterium Pectobacterium atrosepticum SCRI1043 under starvation conditions were studied. The main emphasis was given to the peculiarities of stress responses depending on the bacterial population densities. When bacteria were subjected to starvation at high population densities (10(7)-10(9) CFU ml(-1)), their adaptive reactions conformed to the conventional conception of bacterial adaptation related to autolysis of part of the population, specific modification of cell ultrastructure, activation of expression of stress responsive genes and acquiring cross protection against other stress factors. In contrast, at low initial population densities (10(3)-10(5) CFU ml(-1)), as described in our recent work, the cell density increased due to multiple cell division despite the absence of exogenous growth substrate. Here we present data that demonstrate that such unconventional behavior is part of a stress response, which provides increased stress tolerance while retaining virulence. Cell morphology and gene expression in high- and low-cell-density starving Pba cultures were compared. Our investigation demonstrates the existence of alternative adaptive strategies enabling pathogenic bacteria to cope with a variety of stress factors, including starvation, especially necessary when residing outside of their host.

  5. Synthesis of cellulose triacetate from cotton cellulose by using NIS as a catalyst under mild reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    El Nemr, Ahmed; Ragab, Safaa; El Sikaily, Amany; Khaled, Azza

    2015-10-01

    This research discusses the acetylation of cotton cellulose with acetic anhydride without solvents. The acetylation was done in the presence of different amounts of N-Iodosuccinimide (NIS) as a catalyst; this took place under mild reaction conditions. The extent of acetylation was measured by the weight percent gain (WPG) that varied from 24.71 to 71.83%. Cotton cellulose acetates, with the degree of substitution (DS) that ranged from 0.89 to 2.84, were prepared in one step. The cellulose triacetate, with a degree of substitution (DS) 2.84, was obtained. The WPG and DS were easily controlled by changing the reaction duration (1-5h), and the concentration of the catalyst (0.05 g, 0.075 g and 0.10 g for 1g of cellulose) in 25 ml of acetic anhydride. NIS was recognized as a novel and more successful catalyst for the acetylation of hydroxyl groups in cotton cellulose. Formation of the acetates and the calculation of the degree of substitution were performed by FT-IR, Raman, and (1)H NMR.

  6. ACCURATE TIME-DEPENDENT WAVE PACKET STUDY OF THE H{sup +}+LiH REACTION AT EARLY UNIVERSE CONDITIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Aslan, E.; Bulut, N.; Castillo, J. F.; Banares, L.; Aoiz, F. J.; Roncero, O.

    2012-11-01

    The dynamics and kinetics of the H{sup +} + LiH reaction have been studied using a quantum reactive time-dependent wave packet (TDWP) coupled-channel quantum mechanical method on an ab initio potential energy surface at conditions of the early universe. The total reaction probabilities for the H{sup +} + LiH(v = 0, j = 0) {yields} H{sup +} {sub 2} + Li process have been calculated from 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV up to 1 eV for total angular momenta J from 0 to 110. Using a Langevin model, integral cross sections have been calculated in that range of collision energies and extrapolated for energies below 5 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup -3} eV. The calculated rate constants are found to be nearly independent of temperature in the 10-1000 K interval with a value of Almost-Equal-To 10{sup -9} cm{sup 3} s{sup -1}, which is in good agreement with estimates used in evolutionary models of the early universe lithium chemistry.

  7. Chemoselective O-acylation of hydroxyamino acids and amino alcohols under acidic reaction conditions: History, scope and applications

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Summary Amino acids, whether natural, semisynthetic or synthetic, are among the most important and useful chiral building blocks available for organic chemical synthesis. In principle, they can function as inexpensive, chiral and densely functionalized starting materials. On the other hand, the use of amino acid starting materials routinely necessitates protective group chemistry, and in reality, large-scale preparations of even the simplest side-chain derivatives of many amino acids often become annoyingly strenuous due to the necessity of employing protecting groups, on one or more of the amino acid functionalities, during the synthetic sequence. However, in the case of hydroxyamino acids such as hydroxyproline, serine, threonine, tyrosine and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine (DOPA), many O-acyl side-chain derivatives are directly accessible via a particularly expedient and scalable method not commonly applied until recently. Direct acylation of unprotected hydroxyamino acids with acyl halides or carboxylic anhydrides under appropriately acidic reaction conditions renders possible chemoselective O-acylation, furnishing the corresponding side-chain esters directly, on multigram-scale, in a single step, and without chromatographic purification. Assuming a certain degree of stability under acidic reaction conditions, the method is also applicable for a number of related compounds, such as various amino alcohols and the thiol-functional amino acid cysteine. While the basic methodology underlying this approach has been known for decades, it has evolved through recent developments connected to amino acid-derived chiral organocatalysts to become a more widely recognized procedure for large-scale preparation of many useful side-chain derivatives of hydroxyamino acids and related compounds. Such derivatives are useful in peptide chemistry and drug development, as amino acid amphiphiles for asymmetric catalysis, and as amino acid acrylic precursors for preparation of

  8. Reaction and transport in wellbore interfaces under CO2 storage conditions: Experiments simulating debonded cement-casing interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolterbeek, T. K.; Peach, C. J.; Spiers, C. J.

    2013-12-01

    Debonding-defects at the interfaces between wellbore casing and cement are widely recognized as providing potential pathways for CO2 escape from geological storage systems. This study addresses how chemical reaction between CO2, cement and steel may affect the transport properties of such defects under near-static conditions, representative for early stages in leakage pathway development, prior to the formation of a fully connected defect network. Debonded cement-steel interfaces were simulated by constructing composite samples, containing a spacer-imposed gap. These were reacted with CO2 and water, brine or a solution pre-saturated with cement. Each sample was subjected to 7 sequential batch reaction runs, namely 6 runs of 5 days duration, followed by a single extended run, of 42 days, to study long-term effects. The reaction runs were conducted at 80°C and 14 MPa applied CO2-pressure. Permeability was measured after each run and microstructural analyses were performed after completion of the experiment. We investigated two ranges in gap-width, namely 50-120 μm (denoted SA samples) and 270-350 μm (LA samples). Reaction-induced permeability changes were limited and less than 1 order in all samples, and occurred in the early stage of testing. Corrosion product or scale (mainly Fe-carbonates, with minor Fe-hydroxides) formed extensively within the open gap, on the surfaces of both the casing steel and cement. Lack of calcium carbonates in these areas suggests the corrosion scale which formed on the cement surface produced a significant reduction in cement carbonation rate, similar to the decrease in corrosion rate observed when these precipitates create a protective film on steel surfaces only. CaCO3 precipitation occurred extensively on the cement side at locations beneath the spacers used to create the gap between the cement and steel plates, where corrosion scale did not form. Our results imply that healing of debonding defects at casing-cement interfaces in

  9. Charge distribution analysis of catalysts under simulated reaction conditions. Final report, October 1, 1993--June 30, 1995

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, F.

    1996-02-01

    A new technique has been developed to measure mobile charge carriers in dielectric materials, insulators and catalysts. The technique, Charge Distribution Analysis, is based on the measurement of the dielectric polarization in an electric field gradient, contact-free, at 0 Hertz under minimum perturbation conditions. The measured parameter is the force F{sup +-} experienced by the sample in a gradient of reversible polarity. CDA allows to determine the sign of the majority charge carriers and the density of surface charges which may be correlated to the chemical or catalytic activity. Throughout this work a microbalance has been used as a force-sensing device. CDA can be applied to any dielectric material, compact or porous, in inert or reactive and corrosive gas environments. To conduct CDA experiments under simulated reaction conditions that are relevant to coal liquefaction research, e.g. in reactive and in part chemically corrosive atmospheres, several modifications were introduced to the current design. In particular, the stainless steel sample chamber and furnace/electrode assembly were built, and the gas flow system was redesigned. The CDA instrument was equipped with new data acquisition capabilities. Tests were performed in inert gases and in reactive and corrosive atmosphere between ambient temperature and 500{degrees}C on iron oxide and partially sulfidized iron oxide catalysts as well as on pyrite (FeS{sub 2}) single crystals.

  10. Quantum dynamics of the Eley-Rideal hydrogen formation reaction on graphite at typical interstellar cloud conditions.

    PubMed

    Casolo, Simone; Martinazzo, Rocco; Bonfanti, Matteo; Tantardini, Gian Franco

    2009-12-31

    Eley-Rideal formation of hydrogen molecules on graphite, as well as competing collision induced processes, are investigated quantum dynamically at typical interstellar cloud conditions, focusing in particular on gas-phase temperatures below 100 K, where much of the chemistry of the so-called diffuse clouds takes place on the surface of bare carbonaceous dust grains. Collisions of gas-phase hydrogen atoms with both chemisorbed and physisorbed species are considered using available potential energy surfaces (Sha et al., J. Chem. Phys.2002 116, 7158), and state-to-state, energy-resolved cross sections are computed for a number of initial vibrational states of the hydrogen atoms bound to the surface. Results show that (i) product molecules are internally hot in both cases, with vibrational distributions sharply peaked around few (one or two) vibrational levels, and (ii) cross sections for chemisorbed species are 2-3x smaller than those for physisorbed ones. In particular, we find that H(2) formation cross sections out of chemically bound species decrease steadily when the temperature drops below approximately 1000 K, and this is likely due to a quantum reflection phenomenon. This suggests that such Eley-Rideal reaction is all but efficient in the relevant gas-phase temperature range, even when gas-phase H atoms happen to chemisorb barrierless to the surface as observed, e.g., for forming so-called para dimers. Comparison with results from classical trajectory calculations highlights the need of a quantum description of the dynamics in the astrophysically relevant energy range, whereas preliminary results of an extensive first-principles investigation of the reaction energetics reveal the importance of the adopted substrate model.

  11. The Combination of Salt Induced Peptide Formation Reaction and Clay Catalysis: A Way to Higher Peptides under Primitive Earth Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rode, Bernd M.; Son, Hoang L.; Suwannachot, Yuttana; Bujdak, Juraj

    1999-05-01

    Two reactions with suggested prebiotic relevance for peptide evolution, the saltinduced peptide formation reaction and the peptide chain elongation/stabilization on clay minerals have been combined in experimental series starting from dipeptides and dipeptide/amino acid mixtures. The results show that both reactions can take place simultaneously in the same reaction environment and that the presence of mineral catalysts favours the formation of higher oligopeptides. These findings lend further support to the relevance of these reactions for peptide evolution on the primitive earth. The detailed effects of the specific clay mineral depend both on the nature of the mineral and the reactants in solution.

  12. Selection of reference genes for quantitative reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction normalization in Brassica napus under various stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zheng; Chen, Yu; Fang, Hedi; Shi, Haifeng; Chen, Keping; Zhang, Zhiyan; Tan, Xiaoli

    2014-10-01

    Data normalization is essential for reliable output of quantitative real-time reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays, as the unsuitable choice of reference gene(s), whose expression might be influenced by exogenous treatments in plant tissues, could cause misinterpretation of results. To date, no systematic studies on reference genes have been performed in stressed Brassica napus. In this study, we investigated the expression variations of nine candidate reference genes in 40 samples of B. napus leaves subjected to various exogenous treatments. Parallel analyses by geNorm and NormFinder revealed that optimal reference genes differed across the different sets of samples. The best-ranked reference genes were PP2A and TIP41 for salt stress, TIP41 and ACT7 for heavy metal (Cr(6+)) stress, PP2A and UBC21 for drought stress, F-box and SAND for cold stress, F-box and ZNF for salicylic acid stress, TIP41, ACT7, and PP2A for methyl jasmonate stress, TIP41 and ACT7 for abscisic acid stress, and TIP41, UBC21, and PP2A for Sclerotinia sclerotiorum stress. Two newly employed reference genes, TIP41 and PP2A, showed better performances, suggesting their suitability in multiple conditions. To further validate the suitability of the reference genes, the expression patterns of BnWRKY40 and BnMKS1 were studied in parallel. This study is the first systematic analysis of reference gene selection for qRT-PCR normalization in B. napus, an agriculturally important crop, under different stress conditions. The results will contribute toward more accurate and widespread use of qRT-PCR in gene analysis of the genus Brassica. PMID:24770781

  13. Emissions of volatile organic compounds from Quercus ilex L. measured by Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry under different environmental conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holzinger, R.; Sandoval-Soto, L.; Rottenberger, S.; Crutzen, P. J.; Kesselmeier, J.

    2000-08-01

    Volatile organic compound (VOC) emissions of the Mediterranean holm oak (Quercus ilex L.) were investigated using a fast Proton Transfer Reaction Mass Spectrometry (PTR-MS) instrument for analysis. This technique is able to measure compounds with a proton affinity higher than water with a high time resolution of 1 s per compound. Hence nearly all VOCs can be detected on-line. We could clearly identify the emission of methanol, acetaldehyde, ethanol, acetone, acetic acid, isoprene, monoterpenes, toluene, and C10-benzenes. Some other species could be tentatively denominated. Among these are the masses 67 (cyclo pentadiene), mass 71 (tentatively attributed to methyl vinyl ketone (MVK) and metacrolein (MACR)), 73 (attributed to methyl ethyl ketone (MEK)), 85 (C6H12 or hexanol), and 95 (vinylfuran or phenol). The emissions of all these compounds (identified as well as nonidentified) together represent 99% of all masses detected and account for a carbon loss of 0.7-2.9% of the net photosynthesis. Of special interest was a change in the emission behavior under changing environmental conditions such as flooding or fast light/dark changes. Flooding of the root system caused an increase of several VOCs between 60 and 2000%, dominated by the emission of ethanol and acetaldehyde, which can be explained by the well described production of ethanol under anoxic conditions of the root system and the recently described subsequent transport and partial oxidation to acetaldehyde within the green leaves. However, ethanol emissions were dominant. Additionally, bursts of acetaldehyde with lower ethanol emission were also found under fast light/dark changes. These bursts are not understood.

  14. Highly Regio- and Stereoselective Diels-Alder Cycloadditions via Two-Step and Multicomponent Reactions Promoted by Infrared Irradiation under Solvent-Free Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Flores-Conde, Maria Ines; Reyes, Leonor; Herrera, Rafael; Rios, Hulme; Vazquez, Miguel A.; Miranda, Rene; Tamariz, Joaquin; Delgado, Francisco

    2012-01-01

    Infrared irradiation promoted the Diels-Alder cycloadditions of exo-2-oxazolidinone dienes 1–3 with the Knoevenagel adducts 4–6, as dienophiles, leading to the synthesis of new 3,5-diphenyltetrahydrobenzo[d]oxazol-2-one derivatives (7, 9, 11 and 13–17), under solvent-free conditions. These cycloadditions were performed with good regio- and stereoselectivity, favoring the para-endo cycloadducts. We also evaluated the one-pot three-component reaction of active methylene compounds 20, benzaldehydes 21 and exo-2-oxazolidinone diene 2 under the same reaction conditions. A cascade Knoevenagel condensation/Diels-Alder cycloaddition reaction was observed, resulting in the final adducts 13–16 in similar yields. These procedures are environmentally benign, because no solvent and no catalyst were employed in these processes. The regioselectivity of these reactions was rationalized by Frontier Molecular Orbital (FMO) calculations. PMID:22489113

  15. Ethanol Conversion to Hydrocarbons on HZSM-5: Effect of Reaction Conditions and Si/Al Ratio on the Product Distributions

    SciTech Connect

    Ramasamy, Karthikeyan K.; Wang, Yong

    2014-11-17

    The Conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbon over HZSM-5 zeolite with different Si/Al ratios was investigated under various reaction conditions. The catalyst with a higher Si/Al ratio (low acid density) deactivated faster and generated more unsaturated compounds at a similar time-on-stream. Temperature affects the catalytic activity with respect to liquid hydrocarbon generation and the hydrocarbon product composition. At lower temperatures (~300°C), the catalyst deactivated faster with respect to the liquid hydrocarbon formation. Higher temperatures (~400°C) reduced the formation of liquid range hydrocarbons and formed more gaseous fractions. Weight hourly space velocity was also found to affect product selectivity with higher weight hourly space velocity leading to a higher extent of ethylene formation. The experimental results were analyzed in terms of the product composition and the coke content with respect to catalyst time-on-stream and compared with the catalyst lifetime with respect to the variables tested on the conversion of ethanol to hydrocarbon.

  16. The Influence of Sorbent Properties and Reaction Conditions on Attrition of Limestone by Impact Loading in Fluidized Beds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scala, Fabrizio; Salatino, Piero

    The extent of attrition associated with impact loading was studied for five different limestones pre-processed in fluidized bed under different reaction conditions. The experimental procedure was based on the measurement of the amount and the particle size distribution of the debris generated upon impact of sorbent samples against a target at velocities between 10 and 45 m/s. The effect of calcination, sulfation and calcination/re-carbonation on impact damage was assessed. Fragmentation by impact loading of the limestones was significant and increased with the impact velocity. Lime samples displayed the largest propensity to undergo impact damage, followed by sulfated, re-carbonated and raw limestones. Fragmentation of the sulfated samples followed a partem typical of the failure of brittle materials. On the other hand, the behavior of lime samples better conformed to a disintegration failure mode, with extensive generation of very fine fragments. Raw limestone and re-carbonated lime samples followed either of the two patterns depending on the sorbent nature. The extent of particle fragmentation increased after multiple impacts, but the incremental amount of fragments generated upon one impact decreased with the number of successive impacts.

  17. CO2 reaction with hydrated class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions: effects of flyash admixtures.

    PubMed

    Kutchko, Barbara G; Strazisar, Brian R; Huerta, Nicolas; Lowry, Gregory V; Dzombak, David A; Thaulow, Niels

    2009-05-15

    The rate and mechanism of reaction of pozzolan-amended Class H cement exposed to both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine were determined under geologic sequestration conditions to assess the potential impact of cement degradation in existing, wells on CO2 storage integrity. The pozzolan additive chosen, Type F flyash, is the most common additive used in cements for well sealing in oil-gas field operations. The 35:65 and 65:35 (v/v) pozzolan-cement blends were exposed to supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine and underwent cement carbonation. Extrapolation of the carbonation rate for the 35:65 case suggests a penetration depth of 170-180 mm for both the CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2 after 30 years. Despite alteration in both pozzolan systems, the reacted cement remained relatively impermeable to fluid flow after exposure to brine solution saturated with CO2, with values well below the American Petroleum Institute recommended maximum well cement permeability of 200 microD. Analyses of 50: 50 pozzolan-cement cores from a production well in a sandstone reservoir exhibited carbonation and low permeability to brine solution saturated with CO2, which are consistent with our laboratory findings.

  18. CO{sub 2} reaction with hydrated class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions: effects of flyash admixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Barbara G. Kutchko; Brian R. Strazisar; Nicolas Huerta; Gregory V. Lowry; David A. Dzombak; Niels Thaulow

    2009-05-15

    The rate and mechanism of reaction of pozzolan-amended Class H cement exposed to both supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-saturated brine were determined under geologic sequestration conditions to assess the potential impact of cement degradation in existing wells on CO{sub 2} storage integrity. The pozzolan additive chosen, Type F flyash, a by-product of coal combustion, is the most common additive used in cements for well sealing in oil-gas field operations. The 35:65 and 65:35 (v/v) pozzolan-cement blends were exposed to supercritical CO{sub 2} and CO{sub 2}-saturated brine and underwent cement carbonation. Extrapolation of the carbonation rate for the 35:65 case suggests a penetration depth of 170-180 mm for both the CO{sub 2}-saturated brine and supercritical CO{sub 2} after 30 years. Despite alteration in both pozzolan systems, the reacted cement remained relatively impermeable to fluid flow after exposure to brine solution saturated with CO{sub 2}, with values well below the American Petroleum Institute recommended maximum well cement permeability of 200 {mu}D. Analyses of 50:50 pozzolan-cement cores from a production well in a sandstone reservoir exhibited carbonation and low permeability to brine solution saturated with CO{sub 2}, which are consistent with our laboratory findings. 16 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  19. CO2 Reaction with Hydrated Class H Well Cement under Geologic Sequestration Conditions: Effects of Flyash Admixtures

    SciTech Connect

    Kutchko, Barbara G.; Strazisar, Brian R.; Huerta, Nicolas; Lowry, Gregory V.; Dzombak, David A.; Thaulow, Niels

    2009-05-15

    The rate and mechanism of reaction of pozzolan-amended Class H cement exposed to both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine were determined under geologic sequestration conditions to assess the potential impact of cement degradation in existing wells on CO2 storage integrity. The pozzolan additive chosen, Type F flyash, is the most common additive used in cements for well sealing in oil-gas field operations. The 35:65 and 65:35 (v/v) pozzolancement blends were exposed to supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine and underwent cement carbonation. Extrapolation of the carbonation rate for the 35:65 case suggests a penetration depth of 170-180 mm far both the CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2 after 30 years. Despite alteration in both pozzolan systems, the reacted cement remained relatively impermeable to fluid flow after exposure to brine solution saturated with CO2, with values well below the American Petroleum Institute recommended maximum well cement permeability of 200 mu D. Analyses of 50:50 pozzolan-cement cores from a production well in a sandstone reservoir exhibited carbonation and low permeability to brine solution saturated with CO2, which are consistent with our laboratory findings.

  20. In-Cylinder Reaction Chemistry and Kinetics During Negative Valve Overlap Fuel Injection Under Low-Oxygen Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kalaskar, Vickey B; Szybist, James P; Splitter, Derek A; Pihl, Josh A; Gao, Zhiming; Daw, C Stuart

    2013-01-01

    Fuel injection into the negative valve overlap (NVO) period is a common method for controlling combustion phasing in homogeneous charge compression ignition (HCCI) as well as other forms of advanced combustion. During this event, at least a portion of the fuel hydrocarbons can be converted to products containing significant levels of H2 and CO, as well as other short chain hydrocarbons by means of thermal cracking, water-gas shift, and partial oxidation reactions, depending on the availability of oxygen and the time-temperature-pressure history. The resulting products alter the autoignition properties of the combined fuel mixture for HCCI. Fuel-rich chemistry in a partial oxidation environment is also relevant to other high efficiency engine concepts (e.g., the dedicated EGR (D-EGR) concept from SWRI). In this study, we used a unique 6-stroke engine cycle to experimentally investigate the chemistry of a range of fuels injected during NVO under low oxygen conditions. Fuels investigated included iso-octane, iso-butanol, ethanol, and methanol. Products from NVO chemistry were highly dependent on fuel type and injection timing, with iso-octane producing less than 1.5% hydrogen and methanol producing more than 8%. We compare the experimental trends with CHEMKIN (single zone, 0-D model) predictions using multiple kinetic mechanisms available in the current literature. Our primary conclusion is that the kinetic mechanisms investigated are unable to accurately predict the magnitude and trends of major species we observed.

  1. Isolation of lipase producing thermophilic bacteria: optimization of production and reaction conditions for lipase from Geobacillus sp.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Akshita; Kumar, Rakesh; Gupta, Reena

    2012-12-01

    Lipases catalyze the hydrolysis and the synthesis of esters formed from glycerol and long chain fatty acids. Lipases occur widely in nature, but only microbial lipases are commercially significant. In the present study, thirty-two bacterial strains, isolated from soil sample of a hot spring were screened for lipase production. The strain TS-4, which gave maximum activity, was identified as Geobacillus sp. at MTCC, IMTECH, Chandigarh. The isolated lipase producing bacteria were grown on minimal salt medium containing olive oil. Maximal quantities of lipase were produced when 30 h old inoculum was used at 10% (v/v) in production medium and incubated in shaking conditions (150 rpm) for 72 h. The optimal temperature and pH for the bacterial growth and lipase production were found to be 60°C and 9.5, respectively. Maximal enzyme production resulted when mustard oil was used as carbon source and yeast extract as sole nitrogen source at a concentration of 1% (v/v) and 0.15% (w/v), respectively. The different optimized reaction parameters were temperature 65°C, pH 8.5, incubation time 10 min and substrate p-nitrophenyl palmitate. The Km and Vmax values of enzyme were found to be 14 mM and 17.86 μmol ml-1min-1, respectively, with p-nitrophenyl palmitate as substrate. All metal ions studied (1 mM) increased the lipase activity. PMID:23195552

  2. CO2 reaction with hydrated class H well cement under geologic sequestration conditions: effects of flyash admixtures.

    PubMed

    Kutchko, Barbara G; Strazisar, Brian R; Huerta, Nicolas; Lowry, Gregory V; Dzombak, David A; Thaulow, Niels

    2009-05-15

    The rate and mechanism of reaction of pozzolan-amended Class H cement exposed to both supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine were determined under geologic sequestration conditions to assess the potential impact of cement degradation in existing, wells on CO2 storage integrity. The pozzolan additive chosen, Type F flyash, is the most common additive used in cements for well sealing in oil-gas field operations. The 35:65 and 65:35 (v/v) pozzolan-cement blends were exposed to supercritical CO2 and CO2-saturated brine and underwent cement carbonation. Extrapolation of the carbonation rate for the 35:65 case suggests a penetration depth of 170-180 mm for both the CO2-saturated brine and supercritical CO2 after 30 years. Despite alteration in both pozzolan systems, the reacted cement remained relatively impermeable to fluid flow after exposure to brine solution saturated with CO2, with values well below the American Petroleum Institute recommended maximum well cement permeability of 200 microD. Analyses of 50: 50 pozzolan-cement cores from a production well in a sandstone reservoir exhibited carbonation and low permeability to brine solution saturated with CO2, which are consistent with our laboratory findings. PMID:19544912

  3. Suzuki Coupling Reactions Catalyzed by PdO Dispersed on Dealuminated Y Zeolite in Air under Ambient Conditions.

    PubMed

    Okumura, Kazu; Mushiake, Takumi; Matsui, Yu; Ishii, Akira

    2015-06-01

    Suzuki coupling reactions are performed using PdO loaded on dealuminated Y (USY) zeolite. The reaction between bromobenzene and phenylboronic acid is complete in 15 min at room temperature in air, with a turnover number of 1300. The reaction can be repeated at least five times by using 1 wt % Pd. Inductively coupled plasma analysis does not reveal the dissolution of Pd from products, even if the reaction is repeated up to four times. Pd K-edge extended X-ray absorption fine structure analysis reveals the presence of molecular-like PdO and a mixture of Pd(0) -PdO before and after the reaction, respectively. This is probably because Pd stabilized by Al sites is present at the II sites of the Y-type zeolite, as estimated using first-principles calculations. Conversely, Pd species change to PdO clusters after repeated reactions in air using the thermally treated sample.

  4. Optimization of reaction conditions to fabricate nano-silver using Couroupita guianensis Aubl. (leaf & fruit) and its enhanced larvicidal effect.

    PubMed

    Vimala, R T V; Sathishkumar, Gnanasekar; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaperumal

    2015-01-25

    Currently bioactive principles of plants and their nanoproducts have been extensively studied in agriculture and medicine. In this study Couroupita guianensis Aubl. leaf and fruit extracts were selected for rapid and cost-effective synthesis of silver nanoparticles (leaf-LAgNPs and fruit-FAgNPs). Various physiological conditions such as temperature, pH, concentration of metal ions, stoichiometric proportion of reaction mixture and reaction time showed influence on the size, dispersity and synthesis rate of AgNPs. Generation of AgNPs was initially confirmed with the surface plasmon vibrations at 420 nm in UV-visible spectrophotometer. The results recorded from X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Transmission electron microscope (TEM) supports the biosynthesis of cubic crystalline LAgNPs & FAgNPs with the size ranges between 10-45 nm and 5-15 nm respectively. Surface chemistry of synthesized AgNPs was studied with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), it reveals that water soluble phenolic compounds present in the extracts act as reducing and stabilizing agent. Leaf, fruit extracts and synthesized AgNPs were evaluated against IV instar larvae of Aedes aegypti (Diptera; Culicidae). Furthermore, different extracts and synthesized AgNPs showed dose dependent larvicidal effect against A. aegypti after 24h of treatment. Compare to all extracts such as ethyl acetate (leaf; LC50 - 44.55 ppm and LC90 - 318.39 ppm & fruit; LC50 - 49.96 ppm and LC90 - 568.84 ppm respectively) and Methanol (leaf; LC50 - 85.75 ppm and LC90 - 598.63 ppm & fruit; LC50 - 67.78 ppm and LC90 - 714.45 ppm respectively) synthesized AgNPs showed extensive mortality rate (LAgNPs; LC50 - 2.1 ppm and LC90 - 5.59 ppm & FAgNPs; LC50 - 2.09 ppm and LC90 - 5.7 ppm). Hence, this study proves that C. guianensis is a potential bioresource for stable, reproducible nanoparticle synthesis (AgNPs) and also can be used as an efficient mosquito control agent.

  5. Optimization of reaction conditions to fabricate nano-silver using Couroupita guianensis Aubl. (leaf & fruit) and its enhanced larvicidal effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vimala, R. T. V.; Sathishkumar, Gnanasekar; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaperumal

    2015-01-01

    Currently bioactive principles of plants and their nanoproducts have been extensively studied in agriculture and medicine. In this study Couroupita guianensis Aubl. leaf and fruit extracts were selected for rapid and cost-effective synthesis of silver nanoparticles (leaf-LAgNPs and fruit-FAgNPs). Various physiological conditions such as temperature, pH, concentration of metal ions, stoichiometric proportion of reaction mixture and reaction time showed influence on the size, dispersity and synthesis rate of AgNPs. Generation of AgNPs was initially confirmed with the surface plasmon vibrations at 420 nm in UV-visible spectrophotometer. The results recorded from X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Transmission electron microscope (TEM) supports the biosynthesis of cubic crystalline LAgNPs & FAgNPs with the size ranges between 10-45 nm and 5-15 nm respectively. Surface chemistry of synthesized AgNPs was studied with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), it reveals that water soluble phenolic compounds present in the extracts act as reducing and stabilizing agent. Leaf, fruit extracts and synthesized AgNPs were evaluated against IV instar larvae of Aedes aegypti (Diptera; Culicidae). Furthermore, different extracts and synthesized AgNPs showed dose dependent larvicidal effect against A. aegypti after 24 h of treatment. Compare to all extracts such as ethyl acetate (leaf; LC50 - 44.55 ppm and LC90 - 318.39 ppm & fruit; LC50 - 49.96 ppm and LC90 - 568.84 ppm respectively) and Methanol (leaf; LC50 - 85.75 ppm and LC90 - 598.63 ppm & fruit; LC50 - 67.78 ppm and LC90 - 714.45 ppm respectively) synthesized AgNPs showed extensive mortality rate (LAgNPs; LC50 - 2.1 ppm and LC90 - 5.59 ppm & FAgNPs; LC50 - 2.09 ppm and LC90 - 5.7 ppm). Hence, this study proves that C. guianensis is a potential bioresource for stable, reproducible nanoparticle synthesis (AgNPs) and also can be used as an efficient mosquito control agent.

  6. Optimization of reaction conditions to fabricate nano-silver using Couroupita guianensis Aubl. (leaf & fruit) and its enhanced larvicidal effect.

    PubMed

    Vimala, R T V; Sathishkumar, Gnanasekar; Sivaramakrishnan, Sivaperumal

    2015-01-25

    Currently bioactive principles of plants and their nanoproducts have been extensively studied in agriculture and medicine. In this study Couroupita guianensis Aubl. leaf and fruit extracts were selected for rapid and cost-effective synthesis of silver nanoparticles (leaf-LAgNPs and fruit-FAgNPs). Various physiological conditions such as temperature, pH, concentration of metal ions, stoichiometric proportion of reaction mixture and reaction time showed influence on the size, dispersity and synthesis rate of AgNPs. Generation of AgNPs was initially confirmed with the surface plasmon vibrations at 420 nm in UV-visible spectrophotometer. The results recorded from X-ray diffractometer (XRD) and Transmission electron microscope (TEM) supports the biosynthesis of cubic crystalline LAgNPs & FAgNPs with the size ranges between 10-45 nm and 5-15 nm respectively. Surface chemistry of synthesized AgNPs was studied with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), it reveals that water soluble phenolic compounds present in the extracts act as reducing and stabilizing agent. Leaf, fruit extracts and synthesized AgNPs were evaluated against IV instar larvae of Aedes aegypti (Diptera; Culicidae). Furthermore, different extracts and synthesized AgNPs showed dose dependent larvicidal effect against A. aegypti after 24h of treatment. Compare to all extracts such as ethyl acetate (leaf; LC50 - 44.55 ppm and LC90 - 318.39 ppm & fruit; LC50 - 49.96 ppm and LC90 - 568.84 ppm respectively) and Methanol (leaf; LC50 - 85.75 ppm and LC90 - 598.63 ppm & fruit; LC50 - 67.78 ppm and LC90 - 714.45 ppm respectively) synthesized AgNPs showed extensive mortality rate (LAgNPs; LC50 - 2.1 ppm and LC90 - 5.59 ppm & FAgNPs; LC50 - 2.09 ppm and LC90 - 5.7 ppm). Hence, this study proves that C. guianensis is a potential bioresource for stable, reproducible nanoparticle synthesis (AgNPs) and also can be used as an efficient mosquito control agent. PMID:25062056

  7. Determining the conditions for changes of the three-phase reaction type in a V‒Zr‒Cr system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lutsyk, V. I.; Vorob'eva, V. P.; Shodorova, S. Ya.

    2015-12-01

    A 3D computer model of the T- x- y diagram for a V-Zr-Cr system is constructed, in which the possibilities of both two- and three-polymorphic modifications of compound ZrCr2 participating in invariant reactions is considered. The temperature and concentration borders of eutectic-peritectic transitions in the three-phase regions on the corresponding surfaces of two-phase reactions are determined (upon degeneration of a three-phase reaction into a two-phase reaction in the presence of the third phase).

  8. Combined temperature-programmed reaction and in-situ x-ray scattering studies of size-selected silver clusters under realistic reaction conditions in the epoxidation of propene.

    SciTech Connect

    Vajda, S.; Lee, S.; Sell, K.; Barke, I.; Kleibert, A.; von Oeynhausen, V.; Meiwes-Broer, K. H.; Rodriguez, A. F.; Elam, J. W.; Pellin, M. M.; Lee, B.; Seifert, S.; Winans, R. W.; Yale Univ.; Univ. Rostock; Swiss Light Source

    2009-09-28

    The catalytic activity and dynamical shape changes in size-selected nanoclusters at work are studied under realistic reaction conditions by using a combination of simultaneous temperature-programmed reaction with in situ grazing-incidence small angle x-ray scattering. This approach allows drawing a direct correlation between nanocatalyst size, composition, shape, and its function under realistic reaction conditions for the first time. The approach is illustrated in a chemical industry highly relevant selective partial oxidation of propene on a monodisperse silver nanocatalyst. The shape of the catalyst undergoes rapid change already at room temperature upon the exposure to the reactants, followed by a complex evolution of shape with increasing temperature. Acrolein formation is observed around 50 C while the formation of the propylene oxide exhibits a sharp onset at 80 C and is leveling off at 150 C. At lower temperatures acrolein is produced preferentially to propylene oxide; at temperatures above 100 C propylene oxide is favored.

  9. Effect of reaction conditions on methyl red degradation mediated by boron and nitrogen doped TiO2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galenda, A.; Crociani, L.; Habra, N. El; Favaro, M.; Natile, M. M.; Rossetto, G.

    2014-09-01

    Nowadays the employment of renewable and sustainable energy sources, and solar light as main option, becomes an urgent need. Photocatalytic processes received great attention in wastewater treatment due to their cheapness, environmental compatibility and optimal performances. Despite the general low selectivity of the photocatalysts, an accurate optimisation of the operational parameters needs to be carried out in order to maximise the process yield. Because of this reason, the present contribution aims to deepen either the knowledge in boron and/or nitrogen doped TiO2-based systems and their employment in methyl red removal from aqueous solutions. The samples were obtained by coprecipitation and characterised by XRD, SEM, BET specific surface area, UV-vis and XPS techniques. The catalytic activity was for the first time carefully evaluated with respect to methyl red photodegradation in different conditions as a function of working pH, counter-ions and pre-adsorption time. An ad-hoc study was performed on the importance of the pre-adsorption of the dye, suggesting that an extended adsorption is useless for the catalyst photoactivity, while a partial coverage is preferable. The photocatalytic tests demonstrate the positive influence of boron doping in photo-activated reactions and the great importance of the operational parameters with respect to the simple methyl red bleaching rather than the overall pollutant mineralisation. It is proved, indeed, that different working pH, acidifying means and substrate pre-adsorption time can enhance or limit the catalyst performances with respect to the complete pollutant degradation rather than its partial breakage.

  10. Impact of age and obstacles on navigation precision and reaction time during blind navigation in dual-task conditions.

    PubMed

    Richer, Natalie; Paquet, Nicole; Lajoie, Yves

    2014-03-01

    Navigation without vision is a skill that is often employed in our daily lives, such as walking in the dark at night. Navigating without vision to a remembered target has previously been studied. However, little is known about the impact of age or obstacles on the attentional demands of a blind navigation task. This study examined the impacts of age and obstacles on reaction time (RT) and navigation precision during blind navigation in dual-task conditions. The aims were to determine the effects of age, obstacles, and auditory stimulus location on RT and navigation precision in a blind navigation task. Ten healthy young adults (24.5±2.5 years) and ten healthy older adults (69.5±2.9 years) participated in the study. Participants were asked to walk to a target located 8m ahead. In half the trials, the path was obstructed with hanging obstacles. Participants performed this task in the absence of vision, while executing a discrete RT task. Results demonstrated that older adults presented increased RT, linear distance travelled (LDT), and obstacle contact; that obstacle presence significantly increased RT compared to trials with no obstacles; and that an auditory stimulus emitted early versus late in the path increased LDT. Results suggest that the attentional demands of blind navigation are higher in older than young adults, as well as when obstacles are present. Furthermore, navigation precision is affected by age and when participants are distracted by the secondary task early in navigation, presumably because the secondary task interferes with path estimation.

  11. Molecular studies of model surfaces of metals from single crystals to nanoparticles under catalytic reaction conditions. Evolution from prenatal and postmortem studies of catalysts.

    PubMed

    Somorjai, Gabor A; Aliaga, Cesar

    2010-11-01

    Molecular level studies of metal crystal and nanoparticle surfaces under catalytic reaction conditions at ambient pressures during turnover were made possible by the use of instruments developed at the University of California at Berkeley. Sum frequency generation vibrational spectroscopy (SFGVS), owing to its surface specificity and sensitivity, is able to identify the vibrational features of adsorbed monolayers of molecules. We identified reaction intermediates, different from reactants and products, under reaction conditions and for multipath reactions on metal single crystals and nanoparticles of varying size and shape. The high-pressure scanning tunneling microscope (HP-STM) revealed the dynamics of a catalytically active metallic surface by detecting the mobility of the adsorbed species during catalytic turnover. It also demonstrated the reversible and adsorbate-driven surface restructuring of platinum when exposed to molecules such as CO and ethylene. Ambient pressure X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (AP-XPS) detected the reversible changes of surface composition in rhodium-palladium, platinum-palladium, and other bimetallic nanoparticles as the reactant atmosphere changed from oxidizing to reducing. It was found that metal nanoparticles of less than 2 nm in size are present in higher oxidation states, which alters and enhances their catalytic activity. The catalytic nanodiode (CND) confirmed that a catalytic reaction-induced current flow exists at oxide-metal interfaces, which correlates well with the reaction turnover.

  12. Can a single water molecule really affect the HO2 + NO2 hydrogen abstraction reaction under tropospheric conditions?

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianlei; Wang, Rui; Chen, Hao; Min, Suotian; Wang, Zhiyin; Zhao, Caibin; Xu, Qiong; Jin, Lingxia; Wang, Wenliang; Wang, Zhuqing

    2015-06-14

    The effect of a single water molecule on the HO2 + NO2 hydrogen abstraction reaction has been investigated by employing B3LYP and CCSD(T) theoretical approaches with the aug-cc-pVTZ basis set. The reaction without water has three types of reaction channels on both singlet and triplet potential energy surfaces, depending on how the HO2 radical approaches NO2. These correspond to the formation of trans-HONO + O2, cis-HONO + O2 and HNO2 + O2. Our calculated results show that triplet reaction channels are favorable and their total rate constant, at 298 K, is 2.01 × 10(-15) cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), which is in good agreement with experimental values. A single water molecule affects each one of these triplet reaction channels in the three different reactions of H2O···HO2 + NO2, HO2···H2O + NO2 and NO2···H2O + HO2, depending on the way the water interacts. Interestingly, the water molecule in these reactions not only acts as a catalyst giving the same products as the naked reaction, but also as a reactant giving the product of HONO2 + H2O2. The total rate constant of the H2O···HO2 + NO2 reaction is estimated to be slower than the naked reaction by 6 orders of magnitude at 298 K. However, the total rate constants of the HO2···H2O + NO2 and NO2···H2O + HO2 reactions are faster than the naked reaction by 4 and 3 orders of magnitude at 298 K, respectively. Their total effective rate constant is predicted to be 1.2 times that of the corresponding total rate constant without water at 298 K, which is in agreement with the prediction reported by Li et al. (science, 2014, 344, 292-296).

  13. Two reaction regimes in the oxidation of larger cationic tantalum clusters (Tan(+), n = 13-40) under multi-collision conditions.

    PubMed

    Neuwirth, D; Eckhard, J F; Visser, B R; Tschurl, M; Heiz, U

    2016-03-21

    The reaction of cationic tantalum clusters (Tan(+), n = 13-40) with molecular oxygen is studied under multi-collision conditions and at different temperatures. Consecutive reaction proceeds in several steps upon subsequent attachment of O2. All cluster sizes exhibit fast reaction with oxygen and form a characteristic final reaction product. The time-dependent product analysis enables the fitting to a kinetic model with the extraction of all the rate constants. Determined rate constants reveal the existence of two different regimes, which are interpreted as a change in the reaction mechanism. Based on the temperature-dependent reaction behavior, it is proposed that the reaction changes from a dissociative to a molecular adsorption of oxygen on the clusters. It is found that both regimes appear for all cluster sizes, but the transition takes place at different intermediate oxides TanOx(+). In general it is observed that transition occurs later for larger clusters, which is attributed to an increased cluster surface. PMID:26924176

  14. Determination of the in vivo NAD:NADH ratio in Saccharomyces cerevisiae under anaerobic conditions, using alcohol dehydrogenase as sensor reaction.

    PubMed

    Bekers, K M; Heijnen, J J; van Gulik, W M

    2015-08-01

    With the current quantitative metabolomics techniques, only whole-cell concentrations of NAD and NADH can be quantified. These measurements cannot provide information on the in vivo redox state of the cells, which is determined by the ratio of the free forms only. In this work we quantified free NAD:NADH ratios in yeast under anaerobic conditions, using alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH) and the lumped reaction of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and 3-phosphoglycerate kinase as sensor reactions. We showed that, with an alternative accurate acetaldehyde determination method, based on rapid sampling, instantaneous derivatization with 2,4 diaminophenol hydrazine (DNPH) and quantification with HPLC, the ADH-catalysed oxidation of ethanol to acetaldehyde can be applied as a relatively fast and simple sensor reaction to quantify the free NAD:NADH ratio under anaerobic conditions. We evaluated the applicability of ADH as a sensor reaction in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, grown in anaerobic glucose-limited chemostats under steady-state and dynamic conditions. The results found in this study showed that the cytosolic redox status (NAD:NADH ratio) of yeast is at least one order of magnitude lower, and is thus much more reduced, under anaerobic conditions compared to aerobic glucose-limited steady-state conditions. The more reduced state of the cytosol under anaerobic conditions has major implications for (central) metabolism. Accurate determination of the free NAD:NADH ratio is therefore of importance for the unravelling of in vivo enzyme kinetics and to judge accurately the thermodynamic reversibility of each redox reaction.

  15. The catalytic effect of water, water dimers and water trimers on H2S + (3)O2 formation by the HO2 + HS reaction under tropospheric conditions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianlei; Yang, Chen; Feng, Xukai; Kang, Jiaxin; Song, Liang; Lu, Yousong; Wang, Zhiyin; Xu, Qiong; Wang, Wenliang; Wang, Zhuqing

    2016-06-29

    In this article, the reaction mechanisms of H2S + (3)O2 formation by the HO2 + HS reaction without and with catalyst X (X = H2O, (H2O)2 and (H2O)3) have been investigated theoretically at the CCSD(T)/6-311++G(3df,2pd)//B3LYP/6-311+G(2df,2p) level of theory, coupled with rate constant calculations by using conventional transition state theory. Our results show that in the presence of catalyst X (X = H2O, (H2O)2 and (H2O)3) into the channel of H2S + (3)O2 formation, the reactions between the SH radical and HO2(H2O)n (n = 1-3) complexes are more favorable than the corresponding reactions of the HO2 radical with HS(H2O)n (n = 1-3) complexes due to the lower barrier of the former reactions and the higher concentrations of HO2(H2O)n (n = 1-3) complexes. Meanwhile, the catalytic effect of water, water dimers and water trimers is mainly taken from the contribution of a single water vapor molecule, since the total effective rate constant of HO2H2O + HS and H2OHO2 + HS reactions was, respectively, larger by 7-9 and 9-12 orders of magnitude than that of SH + HO2(H2O)2 and SH + HO2(H2O)3 reactions. Besides, the enhancement factor of water vapor is only 0.37% at 240 K, while at high temperatures, such as 425 K, the positive water vapor effect is enhanced up to 38.00%, indicating that at high temperatures the positive water effect is obvious under atmospheric conditions. Overall, these results show how water and water clusters catalyze the gas phase reactions under atmospheric conditions.

  16. Mechanistic Studies Lead to Dramatically Improved Reaction Conditions for the Cu-Catalyzed Asymmetric Hydroamination of Olefins.

    PubMed

    Bandar, Jeffrey S; Pirnot, Michael T; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-11-25

    Enantioselective copper(I) hydride (CuH)-catalyzed hydroamination has undergone significant development over the past several years. To gain a general understanding of the factors governing these reactions, kinetic and spectroscopic studies were performed on the CuH-catalyzed hydroamination of styrene. Reaction profile analysis, rate order assessment, and Hammett studies indicate that the turnover-limiting step is regeneration of the CuH catalyst by reaction with a silane, with a phosphine-ligated copper(I) benzoate as the catalyst resting state. Spectroscopic, electrospray ionization mass spectrometry, and nonlinear effect studies are consistent with a monomeric active catalyst. With this insight, targeted reagent optimization led to the development of an optimized protocol with an operationally simple setup (ligated copper(II) precatalyst, open to air) and short reaction times (<30 min). This improved protocol is amenable to a diverse range of alkene and alkyne substrate classes. PMID:26522837

  17. HIGHLY DIASTEREOSELECTIVE MICHAEL REACTION UNDER SOLVENT-FREE CONDITIONS USING MICROWAVES: CONJUGATE ADDITION OF FLAVANONE TO ITS CHALCONE PRECURSOR

    EPA Science Inventory

    Microwave-assisted reaction of 2'-hydroxychalcones in the presence of DBU resulted in the formation of hitherto unknown dimers by conjugate addition of the intermediate cyclic ketone to the starting enone.

  18. CATALYST-FREE REACTIONS UNDER SOLVENT-FEE CONDITIONS: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF HETEROCYCLIC HYDRAZONES BELOW THE MELTING POINT OF NEAT REACTANTS: JOURNAL ARTICLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    NRMRL-CIN-1437 Jeselnik, M., Varma*, R.S., Polanc, S., and Kocevar, M. Catalyst-free Reactions under Solvent-fee Conditions: Microwave-assisted Synthesis of Heterocyclic Hydrazones below the Melting Point of Neat Reactants. Published in: Chemical Communications 18:1716-1717 (200...

  19. DATA COLLECTION CONSTRAINTS FOR THE USE OF LENGTH HETEROGENEITY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (LH-PCR) AS AN INDICATOR OF STREAM SANITARY AND ECOLOGICAL CONDITION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This study is part of a larger project for the development of bacterial indicators of stream sanitary and ecological condition. Here we report preliminary research on the use of Length Heterogeneity Polymerase Chain Reaction (LH-PCR), which discriminates among 16S rRNA genes bas...

  20. Manganese(III) Acetate-Promoted Cross-Coupling Reaction of Benzothiazole/Thiazole Derivatives with Organophosphorus Compounds under Ball-Milling Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Liang; Wang, Jun-Jie; Wang, Guan-Wu

    2016-07-01

    The first solvent-free manganese(III) acetate-promoted reaction of benzothiazole/thiazole derivatives with organophosphorus compounds including phosphine oxides, phosphinate ester, and phosphonate diester has been efficiently developed under ball-milling conditions, providing a highly efficient and green protocol to structurally diverse C2-phosphonylated benzothiazole/thiazole derivatives with remarkable functional group tolerance and excellent yields. PMID:27248000

  1. Optimization of reaction conditions for enzymatic viscosity reduction and hydrolysis of wheat arabinoxylan in an industrial ethanol fermentation residue.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Hanne R; Pedersen, Sven; Meyer, Anne S

    2006-01-01

    This study examined enzyme-catalyzed viscosity reduction and evaluated the effects of substrate dry matter concentration on enzymatic degradation of arabinoxylan in a fermentation residue, "vinasse", resulting from industrial ethanol manufacture on wheat. Enzymatic catalysis was accomplished with a 50:50 mixture of an enzyme preparation from Humicola insolens, Ultraflo L, and a cellulolytic enzyme preparation from Trichoderma reesei, Celluclast 1.5 L. This enzyme mixture was previously shown to exhibit a synergistic action on arabinoxylan degradation. The viscosity of vinasse decreased with increased enzyme dosage and treatment time at pH 5, 50 degrees C, 5 wt % vinasse dry matter. After 24 h of enzymatic treatment, 76-84%, 75-80%, and 43-47%, respectively, of the theoretically maximal arabinose, xylose, and glucose releases were achieved, indicating that the viscosity decrease was a result of enzyme-catalyzed hydrolysis of arabinoxylan, beta-glucan, and cellulose. In designed response surface experiments, the optimal enzyme reaction conditions with respect to pH and temperature of the vinasse, the vinasse supernatant (mainly soluble material), and the vinasse sediment (mainly insoluble substances) varied from pH 5.2-6.4 and 41-49 degrees C for arabinose release and from pH 4.9-5.3 and 42-46 degrees C for xylose release. Even though only limited hydrolysis of the arabinoxylan in the vinasse sediment fraction was obtained, the results indicated that the same enzyme activities acted on the arabinoxylan in the different vinasse fractions irrespective of the state of solubility of the substrate material. The levels of liberated arabinose and xylose increased with increased dry matter concentration during enzymatic hydrolysis in the vinasse and the vinasse supernatant, but at the same time, increased substrate dry matter concentrations gave corresponding linear decreases in the hydrolytic efficiency as evaluated from levels of monosaccharide release per weight unit dry

  2. Sonication effect on the reaction of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene with sodium sulfide in liquid-liquid multi-site phase-transfer catalysis condition - kinetic study.

    PubMed

    Abimannan, Pachaiyappan; Selvaraj, Varathan; Rajendran, Venugopal

    2015-03-01

    The synthesis of di-p-tolylsulfane from the reaction of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene (BMB) with sodium sulfide was carried out using a multi-site phase-transfer catalyst (MPTC) viz., 1,4-dihexyl-1,4-diazoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octanium dibromide and ultrasonic irradiation in a liquid-liquid reaction condition. The overall reaction rate is greatly enhanced when catalyzed by multi-site phase-transfer catalyst (MPTC) combined with sonication (40 kHz, 300 W) in a batch reactor than catalyzed by MPTC without sonication. Effects on the reaction due to various operating conditions, such as agitation speed, different ultrasound frequencies, different phase-transfer catalysts, different organic solvents, the amount of MPTC, temperature, amount of sodium sulfide, effect of sodium hydroxide, volume of n-hexane and the concentration of 4-bromo-1-methylbenzene. The reaction obeys a pseudo first-order rate law and a suitable mechanism was proposed based on the experimental observation.

  3. Universal reaction mechanism of boronic acids with diols in aqueous solution: kinetics and the basic concept of a conditional formation constant.

    PubMed

    Furikado, Yuki; Nagahata, Tomomi; Okamoto, Takuya; Sugaya, Tomoaki; Iwatsuki, Satoshi; Inamo, Masahiko; Takagi, Hideo D; Odani, Akira; Ishihara, Koji

    2014-10-01

    To establish a detailed reaction mechanism for the condensation between a boronic acid, RB(OH)2, and a diol, H2L, in aqueous solution, the acid dissociation constants (Ka(BL)) of boronic acid diol esters (HBLs) were determined based on the well-established concept of conditional formation constants of metal complexes. The pKa values of HBLs were 2.30, 2.77, and 2.00 for the reaction systems, 2,4-difluorophenylboronic acid and chromotropic acid, 3-nitrophenylboronic acid and alizarin red S, and phenylboronic acid and alizarin red S, respectively. A general and precise reaction mechanism of RB(OH)2 with H2L in aqueous solution, which can serve as a universal reaction mechanism for RB(OH)2 and H2L, was proposed on the basis of (a) the relative kinetic reactivities of the RB(OH)2 and its conjugate base, that is, the boronate ion, toward H2L, and (b) the determined pKa values of HBLs. The use of the conditional formation constant, K', based on the main reaction: RB(OH)2 + H2L (K1)⇌ RB(L)(OH)(-) + H3O(+) instead of the binding constant has been proposed for the general reaction of uncomplexed boronic acid species (B') with uncomplexed diol species (L') to form boronic acid diol complex species (esters, BL') in aqueous solution at pH 5-11: B' + L' (K')⇌ BL'. The proposed reaction mechanism explains perfectly the formation of boronic acid diol ester in aqueous solution.

  4. Total synthesis of cephalosporolide E via a tandem radical/polar crossover reaction. The use of the radical cations under nonoxidative conditions in total synthesis.

    PubMed

    Cortezano-Arellano, Omar; Quintero, Leticia; Sartillo-Piscil, Fernando

    2015-03-01

    The present work reports the first example of the use of the chemistry of radical cations under nonoxidative conditions in total synthesis. Using a late-stage tandem radical/polar crossover reaction, a highly stereoselective total synthesis of cephalosporolide E (which is typically obtained admixed with cephalosporolide F) was accomplished. The reaction of a phthalimido derivative with triphenyltin radical in refluxing toluene engenders a contact ion-pair (radical cation) that leads, in the first instance, to the cephalosporolide F, which is transformed into the cephalosporolide E via a stereocontrolled spiroketal isomerization promoted by the diphenylphosphate acid that is formed during the tandem transformation.

  5. Spectral Quasi-linearization Method for Homogeneous-Heterogeneous Reactions on Nonlinear Convection Flow of Micropolar Fluid Saturated Porous Medium with Convective Boundary Condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    RamReddy, Chetteti; Pradeepa, Teegala

    2016-05-01

    Based on the nonlinear variation of density with temperature (NDT) in the buoyancy term, the mixed convection flow along a vertical plate of a micropolar fluid saturated porous medium is considered. In addition, the effect of homogeneous-heterogeneous reaction and convective boundary condition has been taken into account. Using lie scaling group transformations, the similarity representation is attained for the system of partial differential equations, prior to being solved by a spectral quasilinearization method. The results show that in the presence of aiding and opposing flow situations, both the species concentration and mass transfer rate decreases when the strength of homogeneous and heterogeneous reaction parameters are enhanced.

  6. A reaction cell with sample laser heating for in situ soft X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies under environmental conditions.

    PubMed

    Escudero, Carlos; Jiang, Peng; Pach, Elzbieta; Borondics, Ferenc; West, Mark W; Tuxen, Anders; Chintapalli, Mahati; Carenco, Sophie; Guo, Jinghua; Salmeron, Miquel

    2013-05-01

    A miniature (1 ml volume) reaction cell with transparent X-ray windows and laser heating of the sample has been designed to conduct X-ray absorption spectroscopy studies of materials in the presence of gases at atmospheric pressures. Heating by laser solves the problems associated with the presence of reactive gases interacting with hot filaments used in resistive heating methods. It also facilitates collection of a small total electron yield signal by eliminating interference with heating current leakage and ground loops. The excellent operation of the cell is demonstrated with examples of CO and H2 Fischer-Tropsch reactions on Co nanoparticles.

  7. How Pragmatic Interpretations Arise from Conditionals: Profiling the Affirmation of the Consequent Argument with Reaction Time and EEG Measures

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonnefond, Mathilde; Van der Henst, Jean-Baptiste; Gougain, Marion; Robic, Suzanne; Olsen, Matthew D.; Weiss, Oshri; Noveck, Ira

    2012-01-01

    Conditional reasoning consists in combining a conditional premise with a categorical premise and inferring a conclusion from them. Two well-known conditional arguments are Modus Ponens (MP: "If P then Q; P//"therefore Q), which is logically valid and Affirmation of the Consequent (AC: "If P then Q; Q//"therefore "P"), which is not. The latter is…

  8. LENGTH-HETEROGENEITY POLYMERASE CHAIN REACTION (LH-PCR) AS AN INDICATOR OF STREAM SANITARY AND ECOLOGICAL CONDITION: OPTIMAL SAMPLE SIZE AND HOLDING CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The use of coliform plate count data to assess stream sanitary and ecological condition is limited by the need to store samples at 4oC and analyze them within a 24-hour period. We are testing LH-PCR as an alternative tool to assess the bacterial load of streams, offering a cost ...

  9. Regio- and Chemoselective Kumada-Tamao-Corriu Reaction of Aryl Alkyl Ethers Catalyzed by Chromium Under Mild Conditions.

    PubMed

    Cong, Xuefeng; Tang, Huarong; Zeng, Xiaoming

    2015-11-18

    Acting as an environmentally benign synthetic tool, the cross-coupling reactions with aryl ethers via C-O bond activation have attracted broad interest. However, the functionalizations of C-O bonds are mainly limited to nickel catalysis, and selectivity has long been a prominent challenge when several C-O bonds are present in the one molecule. We report here the first chromium-catalyzed selective cross-coupling reactions of aryl ethers with Grignard reagents by the cleavage of C-O(alkyl) bonds. Diverse transformations were achieved using simple, inexpensive chromium(II) precatalyst combining imino auxiliary at room temperature. It offers a new avenue for buildup functionalized aromatic aldehydes with high efficiency and selectivity. PMID:26469380

  10. Microwave-Assisted Condensation Reactions of Acetophenone Derivatives and Activated Methylene Compounds with Aldehydes Catalyzed by Boric Acid under Solvent-Free Conditions.

    PubMed

    Brun, Elodie; Safer, Abdelmounaim; Carreaux, François; Bourahla, Khadidja; L'helgoua'ch, Jean-Martial; Bazureau, Jean-Pierre; Villalgordo, Jose Manuel

    2015-06-23

    We here disclosed a new protocol for the condensation of acetophenone derivatives and active methylene compounds with aldehydes in the presence of boric acid under microwave conditions. Implementation of the reaction is simple, healthy and environmentally friendly owing to the use of a non-toxic catalyst coupled to a solvent-free procedure. A large variety of known or novel compounds have thus been prepared, including with substrates bearing acid or base-sensitive functional groups.

  11. Scaling Hyporheic Flow and Biogeochemical Reactions across a Wide Range of Flow and Sediment Conditions in Aquatic Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, J. W.; O'Connor, B. L.

    2008-12-01

    Aquatic ecosystems are strongly influenced by advective transport from surface water into shallow sediments of the hyporheic zone. The delivery of energy and nutrient-rich materials to microbially and geochemically reactive sediment stimulates high rates of biogeochemical reactions that influence the overall metabolism of the ecosystem as well as influencing the chemistry of downstream receiving waters. Predicting hyporheic flow is difficult because of the potential involvement of many physical processes, including diffusion, shear, bedform-scale advective pumping, bed mobility and bioturbation, turbulence penetration, and head potential- driven groundwater exchange. We used published data from carefully controlled laboratory flume experiments to develop a scaling relationship that predicts hyporheic exchange based on physical descriptors (e.g. shear stress velocity, roughness height, and sediment permeability) that summarize fluid- flow and sediment characteristics. We tested the scaling relationship's predictions by comparing them with more time and labor intensive measurements of solute and reactive tracer transport made in situ in hyporheic zones. In situ measurements were acquired using the USGS MINIPOINT sampler, which allows detailed subsurface measurements without significant disturbance of sediment or the ambient surface or subsurface water fluxes. Fieldwork was undertaken in several streams that varied widely in surface water flow velocities, grain type, median grain size, sediment porosity, sediment organic content, sediment hydraulic conductivity, and groundwater specific discharge. The comparison generally supported the predictive capability of the scaling relationship in complex field settings. The value of the scaling relationship is also indicated for improving rate measurements of biogeochemical reactions in hyporheic zones (e.g. oxygen uptake, denitrification, and manganese oxidation), as well as for estimating the cumulative influence of

  12. Rapid and efficient copper-catalyzed Finkelstein reaction of (hetero)aromatics under continuous-flow conditions.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mao; Ichikawa, Saki; Buchwald, Stephen L

    2015-01-01

    A general, rapid, and efficient method for the copper-catalyzed Finkelstein reaction of (hetero)aromatics has been developed using continuous flow to generate a variety of aryl iodides. The described method can tolerate a broad spectrum of functional groups, including N-H and O-H groups. Additionally, in lieu of isolation, the aryl iodide solutions were used in two distinct multistep continuous-flow processes (amidation and Mg-I exchange/nucleophilic addition) to demonstrate the flexibility of this method.

  13. Encouraging conceptual change: the use of bridging analogies in the teaching of action reaction forces and the `at rest' condition in physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bryce, Tom; MacMillan, Kenneth

    2005-06-01

    The qualitative study described in this paper examined the effectiveness of bridging analogies intended to bring about conceptual change as part of a constructivist approach to teaching about action reaction forces in the ‘at rest’ condition in physics. Twenty-one 15-year-old students were involved in the investigation with subgroups previously exposed to different information regarding forces, weight and the accepted cause of the reaction force, in simple physical arrangements, including objects on tables. In-depth ‘think aloud’ interviews were used to track each student’s conceptual status as they worked with bridging analogies and transcript coding was carried out using open and axial coding (as in a grounded theory methodology). The findings showed that the bridging analogies were effective in engaging students with the idea of action reaction forces; students were adept in mapping each of the analogies to the target concept and using them to generate and refine their causal theories for the reaction force. There was evidence to suggest that, for some students, bridging analogies were more effective in bringing about conceptual change than didactic teaching. Their use extends beyond illustrative purposes and supports the development of meta-cognitive skills.

  14. Dynamic transformation of small Ni particles during methanation of CO2 under fluctuating reaction conditions monitored by operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mutz, B.; Carvalho, H. W. P.; Kleist, W.; Grunwaldt, J.-D.

    2016-05-01

    A 10 wt.-% Ni/Al2O3 catalyst with Ni particles of about 4 nm was prepared and applied in the methanation of CO2 under dynamic reaction conditions. Fast phase transformations between metallic Ni, NiO and NiCO3 were observed under changing reaction atmospheres using operando X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS). Removing H2 from the feed gas and, thus, simulating a H2 dropout during the methanation reaction led to oxidation of the active sites. The initial reduced state of the Ni particles could not be recovered under methanation atmosphere (H2/CO2 = 4); this was only possible with an effective reactivation step applying H2 at increased temperatures. Furthermore, the cycling of the gas atmospheres resulted in a steady deactivation of the catalyst. Operando XAS is a powerful tool to monitor these changes and the behavior of the catalyst under working conditions to improve the understanding of the catalytic processes and deactivation phenomena.

  15. Externally controlled pressure and temperature microreactor for in situ x-ray diffraction, visual and spectroscopic reaction investigations under supercritical and subcritical conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenbacher, Jason; McKelvy, Michael; Chizmeshya, Andrew V.G.; Wolf, George H.

    2005-01-01

    A microreactor has been developed for in situ, spectroscopic investigations of materials and reaction processes with full external pressure and temperature control from ambient conditions to 400 deg. C and 310 bar. The sample chamber is in direct contact with an external manifold, whereby gases, liquids or fluids can be injected and their activities controlled prior to and under investigation conditions. The microreactor employs high strength, single crystal moissanite windows which allow direct probe beam interaction with a sample to investigate in situ reaction processes and other materials properties. The relatively large volume of the cell, along with full optical accessibility and external temperature and pressure control, make this reaction cell well suited for experimental investigations involving any combination of gas, fluid, and solid interactions. The microreactor's capabilities are demonstrated through an in situ x-ray diffraction study of the conversion of a meta-serpentine sample to magnesite under high pressure and temperature. Serpentine is one of the mineral candidates for the implementation of mineral carbonation, an intriguing carbon sequestration candidate technology.

  16. Externally controlled pressure and temperature microreactor for in situ x-ray diffraction, visual and spectroscopic reaction investigations under supercritical and subcritial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Diefenbacher, J.; McKelvy, M.; Chizemeshya, A.V.; Wolf, G.H.

    2010-07-13

    A microreactor has been developed for in situ, spectroscopic investigations of materials and reaction processes with full external pressure and temperature control from ambient conditions to 400 C and 310 bar. The sample chamber is in direct contact with an external manifold, whereby gases, liquids or fluids can be injected and their activities controlled prior to and under investigation conditions. The microreactor employs high strength, single crystal moissanite windows which allow direct probe beam interaction with a sample to investigate in situ reaction processes and other materials properties. The relatively large volume of the cell, along with full optical accessibility and external temperature and pressure control, make this reaction cell well suited for experimental investigations involving any combination of gas, fluid, and solid interactions. The microreactor's capabilities are demonstrated through an in situ x-ray diffraction study of the conversion of a meta-serpentine sample to magnesite under high pressure and temperature. Serpentine is one of the mineral candidates for the implementation of mineral carbonation, an intriguing carbon sequestration candidate technology.

  17. Protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis using inverse substrates: the influence of reaction conditions on the trypsin acyl transfer efficiency.

    PubMed

    Schellenberger, V; Jakubke, H D; Zapevalova, N P; Mitin, Y V

    1991-06-01

    Benzyloxycarbonyl-L-alanine p-guanidinophenyl ester behaves as a trypsin "inverse substrate," i.e., a cationic center is included in the leaving group instead of being in the acyl moiety. Using this substrate as an acyl donor, trypsin catalyzes the synthesis of peptide bonds that cannot be split by this enzyme. An optimal acyl transfer efficiency was achieved between pH 8 and 9 at 30 degrees C.The addition of as much as 50% cosolvent was shown to be of minor influence on the acyl transfer efficiency, whereas the reaction velocity decreases by more than one order of magnitude. The efficiency of H-Leu-NH(2) and H-Val-NH(2) in deacylation is almost the same for "inverse" and normal type substrates. PMID:18600704

  18. Impact of Flight Enthalpy, Fuel Simulant, and Chemical Reactions on the Mixing Characteristics of Several Injectors at Hypervelocity Flow Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drozda, Tomasz G.; Baurle, Robert A.; Drummond, J. Philip

    2016-01-01

    The high total temperatures or total enthalpies required to duplicate the high-speed flight conditions in ground experiments often place stringent requirements on the material selection and cooling needs for the test articles and intrusive flow diagnostic equipment. Furthermore, for internal flows, these conditions often complicate the use of nonintrusive diagnostics that need optical access to the test section and interior portions of the flowpath. Because of the technical challenges and increased costs associated with experimentation at high values of total enthalpy, an attempt is often made to reduce it. This is the case for the Enhanced Injection and Mixing Project (EIMP) currently underway in the Arc-Heated Scramjet Test Facility at the NASA Langley Research Center. The EIMP aims to investigate supersonic combustion ramjet (scramjet) fuel injection and mixing physics, improve the understanding of underlying physical processes, and develop enhancement strategies and functional relationships between mixing performance and losses relevant to flight Mach numbers greater than 8. The experiments will consider a "direct-connect" approach and utilize a Mach 6 nozzle to simulate the combustor entrance flow of a scramjet engine. However, while the value of the Mach number is matched to that expected at the combustor entrance in flight, the maximum value of the total enthalpy for these experiments is limited by the thermal-structural limits of the uncooled experimental hardware. Furthermore, the fuel simulant is helium, not hydrogen. The use of "cold" flows and non-reacting mixtures of fuel simulants for mixing experiments is not new and has been extensively utilized as a screening technique for scramjet fuel injectors. In this study, Reynolds-averaged simulations are utilized (RAS) to systematically verify the implicit assumptions used by the EIMP. This is accomplished by first performing RAS of mixing for two injector configurations at planned nominal experimental

  19. An experimental study on evolution of fracture permeability and rate of water-rock reactions in ultramafic rocks at hydrothermal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farough, A.; Lowell, R. P.

    2015-12-01

    We have performed experiments on the evolution of fracture permeability during serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. The experiments were performed using a flow-through triaxial machine on samples of ultramafic rocks with a well-mated through-going tensile fracture at hydrothermal conditions at effective pressure of 30 MPa and temperature of 260°C. By determining the flow rate under a pore pressure gradient during the experiments and assuming a cubic law relating fracture aperture and permeability, the results showed that fracture permeability decreased by one to two orders of magnitude during the 200 to 340 hour experiments. Electron microprobe data and SEM images indicated the formation of needle-shaped crystals of serpentine composition along the walls of the fracture. Assuming the dissolution and precipitation reactions occur simultaneously along the fracture walls we found that the rate of transformation at the beginning of the experiments is ~10-4-5 (molm-2hr-1) and decreases monotonically for about an order of magnitude towards the end of experiments. The rate of transformation is converted to rate of reaction of 10-5-7 s-1 at the beginning of the experiments, which is in agreement with estimates of Martin and Fyfe, [1970] of the rate of serpentinization reactions. The results suggest that the reaction rate slowed with increasing time as available reactive surface area decreased. The results also indicate that the water-rock reactions were the main mechanism contributing to the reduction in fracture aperture and cubic law is a reasonable first approximation for understanding evolution of fracture permeability. The experimental results suggest that the fracture network in long-lived hydrothermal circulation systems can be sealed rapidly as a result of mineral precipitation, and generation of new permeability resulting from a combination of tectonic and crystallization-induced stresses is required to maintain fluid circulation.

  20. Modeling Enterococcus densities measured by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and membrane filtration using environmental conditions at four Great Lakes beaches.

    PubMed

    Telech, Justin W; Brenner, Kristen P; Haugland, Rich; Sams, Elizabeth; Dufour, Alfred P; Wymer, Larry; Wade, Timothy J

    2009-11-01

    Data collected by the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) during the summer months of 2003 and 2004 at four US Great Lakes beaches were analyzed using linear regression analysis to identify relationships between meteorological, physical water characteristics, and beach characteristics data and the fecal indicator bacteria, Enterococcus. Water samples were analyzed for Enterococcus densities by quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) and membrane filtration (MF). This paper investigates the ability of regression models to accurately predict Enterococcus densities above or below a threshold value, using environmental data on a beach-by-beach basis for both methods. The ability to create statistical models for real-time water quality analysis would allow beach managers to make more accurate decisions regarding beach safety. Results from linear regression models indicate that environmental factors explain more of the variability in Enterococcus densities measured by MF than Enterococcus densities measured by qPCR. Results also show that models for both methods did not perform well at predicting occurrences in which water quality levels exceeded a threshold.

  1. A multi-scale model of the oxygen reduction reaction on highly active graphene nanosheets in alkaline conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vazquez-Arenas, Jorge; Ramos-Sanchez, Guadalupe; Franco, Alejandro A.

    2016-10-01

    A multi-scale model based on a mean field approach, is proposed to describe the ORR mechanism on N-GN catalysts in alkaline media. The model implements activation energies calculated with Density Functional Theory (DFT) at the atomistic level, and scales up them into a continuum framework describing the cathode/electrolyte interface at the mesoscale level. The model also considers mass and momentum transports arising in the region next to the rotating electrode for all ionic species and O2; correction of potential drop and electrochemical double-layer capacitance. Most fitted parameters describing the kinetics of ORR elementary reactions are sensitive in the multi-scale model, which results from the incorporation of activation energies using the mean field method, unlike single-scale modelling Errors in the deviations from activation energies are found to be moderate, except for the elementary step (2) related to the formation of O2ads, which can be assigned to the inherent DFT limitations. The consumption of O2ads to form OOHads is determined as the rate-determining step as a result of its highest energy barrier (163.10 kJ mol-1) in the system, the largest error obtained for the deviation from activation energy (28.15%), and high sensitivity. This finding is confirmed with the calculated surface concentration and coverage of electroactive species.

  2. Reactions during the calcination of a limestone under different atmospheres at fluidized bed combustion conditions: A fixed bed reactor study

    SciTech Connect

    Acke, F.; Lindqvist, O.

    1997-12-31

    Calcined limestones have been shown to provide surfaces in a boiler that have importance for heterogeneous reactions such as the direct decomposition of NH{sub 3} to N{sub 2}, and NO reduction by CO and H{sub 2}. When calcination takes place under an NH{sub 3} atmosphere, formation of HCN and HCNO has also been observed. This work concerns a comparison of the calcination process of a natural limestone under NO or NH{sub 3} atmospheres and the influence of the presence of CO, O{sub 2} and SO{sub 2} on the calcination behavior. Results indicate not fully oxidized phases or impurities to be responsible for the NO reduction during calcination. The results for the HCN and HNCO formation are not that conclusive, although steady state experiments over calcined limestone surfaces in a NH{sub 3} and CO, or CO{sub 2} atmosphere reveal a lot of information such as the importance of CO{sub 2} in the HNCO formation.

  3. Optimisation of ICPMS collision/reaction cell conditions for the simultaneous removal of argon based interferences of arsenic and selenium in water samples.

    PubMed

    Darrouzès, Jérôme; Bueno, Maïté; Lespès, Gaëtane; Holeman, Michel; Potin-Gautier, Martine

    2007-03-30

    The optimisation of ICPMS collision/reaction cell conditions for the simultaneous analysis of arsenic and selenium is described. A mixture of 3.8mL min(-1) of H(2) and 0.5mL min(-1) of He was found to be suitable for the removal of both ArAr(+) and ArCl(+) interferences. Detection limits down to 30ng (element) L(-1) in total analysis, and between 81 and 230ng (element) L(-1) in speciation analysis were achieved in chloride matrix (1gL(-1) NaCl). After validation, the method was applied to commercially available mineral waters.

  4. EEG correlation and impulse activity of neuronal populations of individual structures of the cat brain during elaboration and reproduction of motor and alimentary reactions in instrumental conditioned reflexes.

    PubMed

    Vasilevskiĭ, N N; Katinas, V Ia; Popova, L A; Ur'iash, V V

    1976-01-01

    Stable changes in EEG and spike activity of neuronal populations in different brain formations were studied on models of instrumental conditioned reflexes: motor and motor alimentary. A depencence has been established of the EEG amplitude-frequency parameters in the motor and striate cortical zones and the hippocampus on definite changes of unit spike activity in these areas. Simultaneous recording of the EEG and the spike activity of neuronal populations helps to elucidate the neurophysiological nature of individual rhythms of bio-electrical activity. Learned animals exhibit a stable reproduction of the spatial-temporal EEG patterns and motor alimentary reactions when automatic presentation of reinforcement is changed over to an arbitrary one.

  5. Reaction and transport in debonded wellbore casing-cement interfaces under CO2 storage conditions: From batch reaction tests to flow-through experiments on the 2m length scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolterbeek, Tim; Peach, Colin; Spiers, Chris

    2014-05-01

    Debonding at interfaces between wellbore casing and cement is widely recognized as providing potential pathways for leakage from CO2 storage systems. This study addresses how the transport properties of such debonding-defects are affected by chemical reaction between cement, steel and CO2-bearing fluids. Our first set of experiments investigates near-static conditions, representative for stages prior to the formation of a fully connected defect network. Debonded cement-steel interfaces were simulated by constructing composite samples containing a spacer-imposed gap. Each sample was reacted with CO2 and an aqueous fluid, at 80°C and 14 MPa applied CO2 pressure, in seven sequential batch reaction runs (cumulative duration: 72 days). Permeability was measured after each run and microstructural analyses were performed after completion of the experiment. Reaction-induced permeability changes were limited, being less than one order of magnitude for all samples. Corrosion scale (Fe-carbonate, minor Fe-hydroxide) formed within the gap, on the surfaces of both the steel and cement. Here, the observed lack of Ca-carbonates suggests this corrosion scale produced a significant reduction in cement carbonation, similar to the decrease in corrosion rate observed when corrosion scale forms a protective film on steel. In contrast, Ca-carbonate did precipitate on the cement at locations beneath the spacers used to create the gap between the cement and steel plates, where corrosion scale did not form. Overall, the thin corrosion scale films on the cement surfaces seem to inhibit release of Ca from the cement into the gap and impede the precipitation of Ca- carbonates, which in other studies was found to promote sealing in fractured cement. Our batch reaction results imply that in local debonding-defects where corrosion scale development is insufficient to produce sealing, the scale's retarding effect on further reaction has the potential to maintain an open interfacial pathway

  6. The ReactorSTM: atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy under high-pressure, high-temperature catalytic reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Herbschleb, C T; van der Tuijn, P C; Roobol, S B; Navarro, V; Bakker, J W; Liu, Q; Stoltz, D; Cañas-Ventura, M E; Verdoes, G; van Spronsen, M A; Bergman, M; Crama, L; Taminiau, I; Ofitserov, A; van Baarle, G J C; Frenken, J W M

    2014-08-01

    To enable atomic-scale observations of model catalysts under conditions approaching those used by the chemical industry, we have developed a second generation, high-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM): the ReactorSTM. It consists of a compact STM scanner, of which the tip extends into a 0.5 ml reactor flow-cell, that is housed in a ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The STM can be operated from UHV to 6 bars and from room temperature up to 600 K. A gas mixing and analysis system optimized for fast response times allows us to directly correlate the surface structure observed by STM with reactivity measurements from a mass spectrometer. The in situ STM experiments can be combined with ex situ UHV sample preparation and analysis techniques, including ion bombardment, thin film deposition, low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of Au(111) and atom-row resolution on Pt(110), both under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions.

  7. Model predictions of realgar precipitation by reaction of As(III) with synthetic mackinawite under anoxic conditions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gallegos, T.J.; Han, Y.-S.; Hayes, K.F.

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates the removal of As(III) from solution using mackinawite, a nanoparticulate reduced iron sulfide. Mackinawite suspensions (0.1-40 g/L) effectively lower initial concentrations of 1.3 ?? 10 -5 M As(III) from pH 5-10, with maximum removal occurring under acidic conditions. Based on Eh measurements, it was found that the redox state of the system depended on the mackinawite solids concentration and pH. Higher initial mackinawite concentrations and alkaline pH resulted in a more reducing redox condition. Given this, the pH edge data were modeled thermodynamically using pe (-log[e-]) as a fitting parameter and linear pe-pH relationships within the range of measured Eh values as a function of pH and mackinawite concentration. The model predicts removal of As(III) from solution by precipitation of realgar with the formation of secondary oxidation products, greigite or a mixed-valence iron oxide phase, depending on pH. This study demonstrates that mackinawite is an effective sequestration agent for As(III) and highlights the importance of incorporating redox into models describing the As-Fe-S-H2O system. ?? 2008 American Chemical Society.

  8. The Impact of Non-Enzymatic Reactions and Enzyme Promiscuity on Cellular Metabolism during (Oxidative) Stress Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Piedrafita, Gabriel; Keller, Markus A; Ralser, Markus

    2015-01-01

    Cellular metabolism assembles in a structurally highly conserved, but functionally dynamic system, known as the metabolic network. This network involves highly active, enzyme-catalyzed metabolic pathways that provide the building blocks for cell growth. In parallel, however, chemical reactivity of metabolites and unspecific enzyme function give rise to a number of side products that are not part of canonical metabolic pathways. It is increasingly acknowledged that these molecules are important for the evolution of metabolism, affect metabolic efficiency, and that they play a potential role in human disease—age-related disorders and cancer in particular. In this review we discuss the impact of oxidative and other cellular stressors on the formation of metabolic side products, which originate as a consequence of: (i) chemical reactivity or modification of regular metabolites; (ii) through modifications in substrate specificity of damaged enzymes; and (iii) through altered metabolic flux that protects cells in stress conditions. In particular, oxidative and heat stress conditions are causative of metabolite and enzymatic damage and thus promote the non-canonical metabolic activity of the cells through an increased repertoire of side products. On the basis of selected examples, we discuss the consequences of non-canonical metabolic reactivity on evolution, function and repair of the metabolic network. PMID:26378592

  9. The ReactorSTM: Atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy under high-pressure, high-temperature catalytic reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Herbschleb, C. T.; Tuijn, P. C. van der; Roobol, S. B.; Navarro, V.; Bakker, J. W.; Liu, Q.; Stoltz, D.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Verdoes, G.; Spronsen, M. A. van; Bergman, M.; Crama, L.; Taminiau, I.; Frenken, J. W. M.; Ofitserov, A.; Baarle, G. J. C. van

    2014-08-15

    To enable atomic-scale observations of model catalysts under conditions approaching those used by the chemical industry, we have developed a second generation, high-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM): the ReactorSTM. It consists of a compact STM scanner, of which the tip extends into a 0.5 ml reactor flow-cell, that is housed in a ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The STM can be operated from UHV to 6 bars and from room temperature up to 600 K. A gas mixing and analysis system optimized for fast response times allows us to directly correlate the surface structure observed by STM with reactivity measurements from a mass spectrometer. The in situ STM experiments can be combined with ex situ UHV sample preparation and analysis techniques, including ion bombardment, thin film deposition, low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of Au(111) and atom-row resolution on Pt(110), both under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions.

  10. The ReactorSTM: Atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy under high-pressure, high-temperature catalytic reaction conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herbschleb, C. T.; van der Tuijn, P. C.; Roobol, S. B.; Navarro, V.; Bakker, J. W.; Liu, Q.; Stoltz, D.; Cañas-Ventura, M. E.; Verdoes, G.; van Spronsen, M. A.; Bergman, M.; Crama, L.; Taminiau, I.; Ofitserov, A.; van Baarle, G. J. C.; Frenken, J. W. M.

    2014-08-01

    To enable atomic-scale observations of model catalysts under conditions approaching those used by the chemical industry, we have developed a second generation, high-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM): the ReactorSTM. It consists of a compact STM scanner, of which the tip extends into a 0.5 ml reactor flow-cell, that is housed in a ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The STM can be operated from UHV to 6 bars and from room temperature up to 600 K. A gas mixing and analysis system optimized for fast response times allows us to directly correlate the surface structure observed by STM with reactivity measurements from a mass spectrometer. The in situ STM experiments can be combined with ex situ UHV sample preparation and analysis techniques, including ion bombardment, thin film deposition, low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of Au(111) and atom-row resolution on Pt(110), both under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions.

  11. The ReactorSTM: atomically resolved scanning tunneling microscopy under high-pressure, high-temperature catalytic reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Herbschleb, C T; van der Tuijn, P C; Roobol, S B; Navarro, V; Bakker, J W; Liu, Q; Stoltz, D; Cañas-Ventura, M E; Verdoes, G; van Spronsen, M A; Bergman, M; Crama, L; Taminiau, I; Ofitserov, A; van Baarle, G J C; Frenken, J W M

    2014-08-01

    To enable atomic-scale observations of model catalysts under conditions approaching those used by the chemical industry, we have developed a second generation, high-pressure, high-temperature scanning tunneling microscope (STM): the ReactorSTM. It consists of a compact STM scanner, of which the tip extends into a 0.5 ml reactor flow-cell, that is housed in a ultra-high vacuum (UHV) system. The STM can be operated from UHV to 6 bars and from room temperature up to 600 K. A gas mixing and analysis system optimized for fast response times allows us to directly correlate the surface structure observed by STM with reactivity measurements from a mass spectrometer. The in situ STM experiments can be combined with ex situ UHV sample preparation and analysis techniques, including ion bombardment, thin film deposition, low-energy electron diffraction and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The performance of the instrument is demonstrated by atomically resolved images of Au(111) and atom-row resolution on Pt(110), both under high-pressure and high-temperature conditions. PMID:25173272

  12. Experimental Investigation of Augmented Spark Ignition of a LO2/LCH4 Reaction Control Engine at Altitude Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kleinhenz, Julie; Sarmiento, Charles; Marshall, William

    2012-01-01

    The use of nontoxic propellants in future exploration vehicles would enable safer, more cost-effective mission scenarios. One promising green alternative to existing hypergols is liquid methane (LCH4) with liquid oxygen (LO2). A 100 lbf LO2/LCH4 engine was developed under the NASA Propulsion and Cryogenic Advanced Development project and tested at the NASA Glenn Research Center Altitude Combustion Stand in a low pressure environment. High ignition energy is a perceived drawback of this propellant combination; so this ignition margin test program examined ignition performance versus delivered spark energy. Sensitivity of ignition to spark timing and repetition rate was also explored. Three different exciter units were used with the engine s augmented (torch) igniter. Captured waveforms indicated spark behavior in hot fire conditions was inconsistent compared to the well-behaved dry sparks. This suggests that rising pressure and flow rate increase spark impedance and may at some point compromise an exciter s ability to complete each spark. The reduced spark energies of such quenched deliveries resulted in more erratic ignitions, decreasing ignition probability. The timing of the sparks relative to the pressure/flow conditions also impacted the probability of ignition. Sparks occurring early in the flow could trigger ignition with energies as low as 1 to 6 mJ, though multiple, similarly timed sparks of 55 to 75 mJ were required for reliable ignition. Delayed spark application and reduced spark repetition rate both correlated with late and occasional failed ignitions. An optimum time interval for spark application and ignition therefore coincides with propellant introduction to the igniter.

  13. A carborane-derivative "click" reaction under heterogeneous conditions for the synthesis of a promising lipophilic MRI/GdBNCT agent.

    PubMed

    Toppino, Antonio; Bova, Maria Elena; Geninatti Crich, Simonetta; Alberti, Diego; Diana, Eliano; Barge, Alessandro; Aime, Silvio; Venturello, Paolo; Deagostino, Annamaria

    2013-01-01

    In this study, the Huisgen reaction has been used to functionalise a carborane cage with a lipophilic moiety and a 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,4,7,10-tetraacetic acid (DOTA) ligand to obtain a new Gd boron neutron-capture therapy (BNCT)/magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent. The introduction of the triazole units has been accomplished under both heterogeneous conditions, by the use of a Cu-supported ionic-liquid catalyst, and homogeneous conditions. The ability of the Gd complex of the synthesised ligand to form stable adducts with low-density lipoproteins (LDLs) has been evaluated and then MRI has been performed on tumour melanoma cells incubated in the presence of a Gd-complex/LDL imaging probe. It has been concluded that the high amount of intracellular boron necessary to perform BNCT can be reached even in the presence of a relatively low-boron-containing LDL concentration. PMID:23154917

  14. Chemical Reactions of Portland Cement with Aqueous CO2 and Their Impacts on Cement's Mechanical Properties under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyun; Lim, Yun Mook; Flores, Katharine M; Kranjc, Kelly; Jun, Young-Shin

    2015-05-19

    To provide information on wellbore cement integrity in the application of geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS), chemical and mechanical alterations were analyzed for cement paste samples reacted for 10 days under GCS conditions. The reactions were at 95 °C and had 100 bar of either N2 (control condition) or CO2 contacting the reaction brine solution with an ionic strength of 0.5 M adjusted by NaCl. Chemical analyses showed that the 3.0 cm × 1.1 cm × 0.3 cm samples were significantly attacked by aqueous CO2 and developed layer structures with a total attacked depth of 1220 μm. Microscale mechanical property analyses showed that the hardness and indentation modulus of the carbonated layer were 2-3 times greater than for the intact cement, but those in the portlandite-dissolved region decreased by ∼50%. The strength and elastic modulus of the bulk cement samples were reduced by 93% and 84%, respectively. The properties of the microscale regions, layer structure, microcracks, and swelling of the outer layers combined to affect the overall mechanical properties. These findings improve understanding of wellbore integrity from both chemical and mechanical viewpoints and can be utilized to improve the safety and efficiency of CO2 storage.

  15. A Laboratory Test Setup for in Situ Measurements of the Dielectric Properties of Catalyst Powder Samples under Reaction Conditions by Microwave Cavity Perturbation: Set up and Initial Tests

    PubMed Central

    Dietrich, Markus; Rauch, Dieter; Porch, Adrian; Moos, Ralf

    2014-01-01

    The catalytic behavior of zeolite catalysts for the ammonia-based selective catalytic reduction (SCR) of nitrogen oxides (NOX) depends strongly on the type of zeolite material. An essential precondition for SCR is a previous ammonia gas adsorption that occurs on acidic sites of the zeolite. In order to understand and develop SCR active materials, it is crucial to know the amount of sorbed ammonia under reaction conditions. To support classical temperature-programmed desorption (TPD) experiments, a correlation of the dielectric properties with the catalytic properties and the ammonia sorption under reaction conditions appears promising. In this work, a laboratory test setup, which enables direct measurements of the dielectric properties of catalytic powder samples under a defined gas atmosphere and temperature by microwave cavity perturbation, has been developed. Based on previous investigations and computational simulations, a resonator cavity and a heating system were designed, installed and characterized. The resonator cavity is designed to operate in its TM010 mode at 1.2 GHz. The first measurement of the ammonia loading of an H-ZSM-5 zeolite confirmed the operating performance of the test setup at constant temperatures of up to 300 °C. It showed how both real and imaginary parts of the relative complex permittivity are strongly correlated with the mass of stored ammonia. PMID:25211199

  16. Chemical Reactions of Portland Cement with Aqueous CO2 and Their Impacts on Cement's Mechanical Properties under Geologic CO2 Sequestration Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Qingyun; Lim, Yun Mook; Flores, Katharine M; Kranjc, Kelly; Jun, Young-Shin

    2015-05-19

    To provide information on wellbore cement integrity in the application of geologic CO2 sequestration (GCS), chemical and mechanical alterations were analyzed for cement paste samples reacted for 10 days under GCS conditions. The reactions were at 95 °C and had 100 bar of either N2 (control condition) or CO2 contacting the reaction brine solution with an ionic strength of 0.5 M adjusted by NaCl. Chemical analyses showed that the 3.0 cm × 1.1 cm × 0.3 cm samples were significantly attacked by aqueous CO2 and developed layer structures with a total attacked depth of 1220 μm. Microscale mechanical property analyses showed that the hardness and indentation modulus of the carbonated layer were 2-3 times greater than for the intact cement, but those in the portlandite-dissolved region decreased by ∼50%. The strength and elastic modulus of the bulk cement samples were reduced by 93% and 84%, respectively. The properties of the microscale regions, layer structure, microcracks, and swelling of the outer layers combined to affect the overall mechanical properties. These findings improve understanding of wellbore integrity from both chemical and mechanical viewpoints and can be utilized to improve the safety and efficiency of CO2 storage. PMID:25893278

  17. Formation of 6-methyl-1,4-dihydronaphthalene in the reaction of the p-tolyl radical with 1,3-butadiene under single-collision conditions.

    PubMed

    Parker, Dorian S N; Dangi, Beni B; Kaiser, Ralf I; Jamal, Adeel; Ryazantsev, Mikhail; Morokuma, Keiji

    2014-12-26

    Crossed molecular beam reactions of p-tolyl (C7H7) plus 1,3-butadiene (C4H6), p-tolyl (C7H7) plus 1,3-butadiene-d6 (C4D6), and p-tolyl-d7 (C7D7) plus 1,3-butadiene (C4H6) were carried out under single-collision conditions at collision energies of about 55 kJ mol(-1). 6-Methyl-1,4-dihydronaphthalene was identified as the major reaction product formed at fractions of about 94% with the monocyclic isomer (trans-1-p-tolyl-1,3-butadiene) contributing only about 6%. The reaction is initiated by barrierless addition of the p-tolyl radical to the terminal carbon atom of the 1,3-butadiene via a van der Waals complex. The collision complex isomerizes via cyclization to a bicyclic intermediate, which then ejects a hydrogen atom from the bridging carbon to form 6-methyl-1,4-dihydronaphthalene through a tight exit transition state located about 27 kJ mol(-1) above the separated products. This is the dominant channel under the present experimental conditions. Alternatively, the collision complex can also undergo hydrogen ejection to form trans-1-p-tolyl-1,3-butadiene; this is a minor contributor to the present experiment. The de facto barrierless formation of a methyl-substituted aromatic hydrocarbons by dehydrogenation via a single event represents an important step in the formation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and their partially hydrogenated analogues in combustion flames and the interstellar medium. PMID:25407848

  18. Formation and reactions of singlet oxygen, O[sub 2]([sup 1][Delta]g), under atmospheric conditions

    SciTech Connect

    deSilva, M.S.W.

    1993-01-01

    Singlet molecular oxygen, O[sub 2]([sup 1][Delta][sub g]), plays a significant role in photochemical air pollution as a reactive and a deleterious oxidant. Gas phase O[sub 2]([sup 1][Delta][sub g]) formation by homogeneous photosensitization at atmospheric pressure was studied using a variety of compounds found in the atmosphere. The formation of O[sub 2]([sup 1][Delta][sub g]) was demonstrated by observing its 1.27 [mu]m emission using a liquid nitrogen-cooled germanium photodiode detector, and by performing chemical trapping studies with 2,3-dimethyl-2-butene (TME) and quenching studies with triethylamine (TEA). The factors affecting O[sub 2]([sup 1][Delta][sub g]) formation included sensitizer concentration, gas composition (%N[sub 2]/%O[sub 2]), total gas flow rate, irradiation wavelength, and light intensity. The disappearance of seven polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) adsorbed on zeolite particles was studied under simulated atmospheric conditions. Benzo[ghi]perylene, chrysene, and benzo[e]pyrene were less susceptible to photooxidation than benz[a]anthracene (B[a]A), pyrene, dibenz[ah]anthracene, and benzo[a]pyrene. The disappearance of B[a]A in the presence of light and air involved a self-sensitized photooxidation with the formation of O[sub 2]([sup 1][Delta][sub g]) as a major process. These studies were directed at identifying viable processes for forming atmospheric O[sub 2]([sup 1][Delta][sub g]) and deleterious substances that might be formed when environmental pollutants react with O[sub 2]([sup 1][Delta][sub g]).

  19. Catalytic reduction of NO by CO over rhodium catalysts. 2. Effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed under reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Kondarides, D.I.; Chafik, T.; Verykios, X.E.

    2000-04-01

    The effect of oxygen on the nature, population, and reactivity of surface species formed during reduction of NO by CO over Rh/TiO{sub 2} catalysts has been examined employing FTIR and transient MS techniques. It has been found that the activity of Rh is hindered by accumulation of surface oxygen originating from NO decomposition and gas-phase oxygen in the feed. Adsorbed CO and reduced TiO{sub 2{minus}x} species in the vicinity of Rh particles act as oxygen atom scavengers and, under fuel-rich conditions, remove atomic oxygen from the surface and restore the catalytic properties. Results of the present study provide additional evidence that production of N{sub 2} is related to dissociation of adsorbed Rh-NO{sup {minus}} while production of N{sub 2}O is related to the presence of Rh(NO){sub 2}. The presence of reduced RH{sup 0} sites is necessary for the formation of both reduction products. In the absence of oxygen in the feed, surface isocyanate species are also observed under reaction conditions. Their formation requires the presence of adjacent Rh{sup 0}-CO and reduced Rh{sup 0} sites. Although these species are favored under conditions in which NO conversion to reduction products is observed, there is no evidence that they are catalytically active species.

  20. The propensity for schedule-induced polydipsia is related to differences in conditioned avoidance behaviour and in defense reactions in a defeat test.

    PubMed

    Dantzer, R; Terlouw, C; Tazi, A; Koolhaas, J M; Bohus, B; Koob, G F; Le Moal, M

    1988-01-01

    In line with previous research showing that animals predisposed to develop schedule-induced polydipsia when submitted to intermittent distribution of food show differential behavioural and neurochemical characteristics, the present experiments investigated the nature of defense reactions to aversive situations in rats that do or do not develop schedule-induced polydipsia. It was found that rats that engage in excessive drinking during intermittent feeding display more rapid active avoidance learning in a 2-way shuttle-box and show less freezing when confronted with an aggressive resident male in a defeat test than those that do not develop schedule-induced polydipsia. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that individual differences in the propensity to exhibit oral consummatory activities in conditions of mild stress are related to the ability to shift behavioural programmes in response to external stimulation. PMID:3174839

  1. Simulation of blast-furnace raceway conditions in a wire-mesh reactor: interference by the reactions of molybdenum mesh and initial results

    SciTech Connect

    Long Wu; N. Paterson; D.R. Dugwell; R. Kandiyoti

    2006-12-15

    A novel trapped air injection system has been built for a wire-mesh reactor to enable tests with short exposure times to air that are intended to simulate typical residence times in blast-furnace raceways. Initial tests have shown that the molybdenum wire-mesh sample-holder reacts with O{sub 2} under conditions intended for this work. By varying the proportions of solid MoO{sub 2} (weight gain), vapor phase oxides (weight loss) may form, depending on reaction conditions. Oxide formation pathways thus become relevant to coal weight loss determinations during experiments. If, in addition to solid MoO{sub 2} formation, significant formation of vapor phase oxides occurs, then the weight change is more complicated to understand and the impact on the O{sub 2} concentration cannot be unravelled. Furthermore, it turns out that O{sub 2}-scavenging by the mesh affects the amount of O{sub 2} that is available to react with the coal sample. It was concluded that it is only possible to conduct reliable tests under conditions which the favor the formation of solid MoO{sub 2} only, as this leads to a quantifiable weight gain. Its impact can then be accounted for in the evaluation of the experimental weight change. In the case of MoO{sub 2} formation, the impact of the mesh oxidation on the amount of O{sub 2} available to react with the sample can also be estimated. It has been found that the wire-mesh reactor, equipped with the trapped air injection system, can be used to obtain valid data at up to 1600{sup o} C and 0.5 MPa. This pressure is similar to that of the blast-furnace raceway, but the temperature is several hundred degrees lower. However, preliminary tests have shown that useful kinetic data on the extents of reaction can be obtained with the equipment, provided it is operated under conditions that minimize the formation of vapor phase Mo oxides. 18 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  2. Co-formation of hydroperoxides and ultra-fine particles during the reactions of ozone with a complex VOC mixture under simulated indoor conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Zhihua; Weschler, Charles J.; Han, In-Kyu; Zhang, Junfeng (Jim)

    In this study we examined the co-formation of hydrogen peroxide and other hydroperoxides (collectively presented as H 2O 2*) as well as submicron particles, including ultra-fine particles (UFP), resulting from the reactions of ozone (O 3) with a complex mixture of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) under simulated indoor conditions. The VOC mixture contained 23 compounds, including two terpenes ( d-limonene and α-pinene), two unsaturated alkenes (1-decene and 1-octene), and 19 other saturated organic compounds. These compounds are commonly found in indoor air but their concentrations were higher than typical indoor levels. When O 3 was added to a 25-m 3 controlled environmental facility (CEF) containing the 23 VOC mixture, both H 2O 2* and submicron particles were formed. The 2-h average concentration of H 2O 2* was 1.89±0.30 ppb, and the average total particle number concentration was 46,000±12,000 particles cm -3. A small increase of UFP (0.02-0.1 μm) occurred 5 min after the O 3 addition (17 min after the VOC addition) and a sharp increase of UFP occurred 13 min after the O 3 addition, suggesting homogeneous nucleation. The delayed onset of this event might reflect the time required to achieve saturated concentrations of the condensable organics. When the 2 terpenes were removed from the O 3/23 VOCs mixture, no H 2O 2* or particles were formed, indicating that the reactions of O 3 with the two terpenes were the key processes contributing to the formation of H 2O 2* and submicron particles in the O 3/23 VOCs system. The present study confirmed the findings of a previous study carried out in a real-world office and generated new findings regarding co-formation of UFP. Through a comparative analysis of H 2O 2* yields under different reaction conditions, this study demonstrates that VOCs co-present with the terpenes and O 3 may play a role in producing H 2O 2*.

  3. The impact of raw materials and baking conditions on Maillard reaction products, thiamine, folate, phytic acid and minerals in white bread.

    PubMed

    Helou, Cynthia; Gadonna-Widehem, Pascale; Robert, Nathalie; Branlard, Gérard; Thebault, Jacques; Librere, Sarah; Jacquot, Sylvain; Mardon, Julie; Piquet-Pissaloux, Agnès; Chapron, Sophie; Chatillon, Antoine; Niquet-Léridon, Céline; Tessier, Frédéric J

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a white bread with improved nutrient contents and reduced levels of potentially harmful Maillard reaction products such as N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). Assays were carried out through a full factorial experimental design allowing the simultaneous analysis of four factors at two levels: (1) wheat flour extraction rates (ash content: 0.60%-0.72%), (2) leavening agents (bakers' yeast - bakers' yeast and sourdough), (3) prebaking and (4) baking conditions (different sets of time and temperature). The baking conditions affected HMF and CML as well as certain mineral contents. A reduced baking temperature along with a prolonged heat treatment was found to be favourable for reducing both the CML (up to 20%) and HMF concentrations (up to 96%). The presence of sourdough decreased the formation of CML (up to 28%), and increased the apparent amounts of calcium (up to 8%) and manganese (up to 17.5%) probably through acidification of the dough. The extraction rate of flours as well as interactions between multiple factors also affected certain mineral content. However, compounds like folate, thiamine, copper, zinc, iron and phytic acid were not affected by any of the factors studied.

  4. Process optimization of deposition conditions of PbS thin films grown by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method using response surface methodology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yücel, Ersin; Yücel, Yasin; Beleli, Buse

    2015-07-01

    In this study, lead sulfide (PbS) thin films were synthesized by a successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR) method with different pH, dipping time and dipping cycles. Response surface methodology (RSM) and central composite design (CCD) were successfully used to optimize the PbS films deposition parameters and understand the significance and interaction of the factors affecting the film quality. 5-level-3-factor central composite design was employed to evaluate the effects of the deposition parameters (pH, dipping time and dipping cycles) on the response (the optical band gap of the films). Data obtained from RSM were subjected to the analysis of variance (ANOVA) and analyzed using a second order polynomial equation. The optimal conditions for the PbS films deposition have been found to be: pH of 9.1, dipping time of 10 s and dipping cycles of 10 cycles. The predicted band gap of PbS film was 2.13 eV under the optimal conditions. Verification experiment (2.24 eV) confirmed the validity of the predicted model. The film structures were characterized by X-ray diffractometer (XRD). Morphological properties of the films were studied with a scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The optical properties of the films were investigated using a UV-visible spectrophotometer.

  5. Reaction mechanism for the aqueous-phase mineral carbonation of heat-activated serpentine at low temperatures and pressures in flue gas conditions.

    PubMed

    Pasquier, Louis-César; Mercier, Guy; Blais, Jean-François; Cecchi, Emmanuelle; Kentish, Sandra

    2014-05-01

    Mineral carbonation is known as one of the safest ways to sequester CO2. Nevertheless, the slow kinetics and low carbonation rates constitute a major barrier for any possible industrial application. To date, no studies have focused on reacting serpentinite with a relatively low partial pressure of CO2 (pCO2) close to flue gas conditions. In this work, finely ground and heat-treated serpentinite [Mg3Si2O5(OH)4] extracted from mining residues was reacted with a 18.2 vol % CO2 gas stream at moderate global pressures to investigate the effect on CO2 solubility and Mg leaching. Serpentinite dissolution rates were also measured to define the rate-limiting step. Successive batches of gas were contacted with the same serpentinite to identify surface-limiting factors using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analysis. Investigation of the serpentinite carbonation reaction mechanisms under conditions close to a direct flue gas treatment showed that increased dissolution rates could be achieved relative to prior work, with an average Mg dissolution rate of 3.55 × 10(-11) mol cm(-2) s(-1). This study provides another perspective of the feasibility of applying a mineral carbonation process to reduce industrial greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions from large emission sources.

  6. The impact of raw materials and baking conditions on Maillard reaction products, thiamine, folate, phytic acid and minerals in white bread.

    PubMed

    Helou, Cynthia; Gadonna-Widehem, Pascale; Robert, Nathalie; Branlard, Gérard; Thebault, Jacques; Librere, Sarah; Jacquot, Sylvain; Mardon, Julie; Piquet-Pissaloux, Agnès; Chapron, Sophie; Chatillon, Antoine; Niquet-Léridon, Céline; Tessier, Frédéric J

    2016-06-15

    The aim of this study was to develop a white bread with improved nutrient contents and reduced levels of potentially harmful Maillard reaction products such as N(ε)-carboxymethyllysine (CML) and 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF). Assays were carried out through a full factorial experimental design allowing the simultaneous analysis of four factors at two levels: (1) wheat flour extraction rates (ash content: 0.60%-0.72%), (2) leavening agents (bakers' yeast - bakers' yeast and sourdough), (3) prebaking and (4) baking conditions (different sets of time and temperature). The baking conditions affected HMF and CML as well as certain mineral contents. A reduced baking temperature along with a prolonged heat treatment was found to be favourable for reducing both the CML (up to 20%) and HMF concentrations (up to 96%). The presence of sourdough decreased the formation of CML (up to 28%), and increased the apparent amounts of calcium (up to 8%) and manganese (up to 17.5%) probably through acidification of the dough. The extraction rate of flours as well as interactions between multiple factors also affected certain mineral content. However, compounds like folate, thiamine, copper, zinc, iron and phytic acid were not affected by any of the factors studied. PMID:26974195

  7. Free energy distribution and hydrothermal mineral precipitation in Hadean submarine alkaline vent systems: Importance of iron redox reactions under anoxic conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibuya, Takazo; Russell, Michael J.; Takai, Ken

    2016-02-01

    Thermodynamic calculations of mixing between hypothetical seawater and hydrothermal fluid in the Hadean deep ocean were carried out to predict saturation states of mineral precipitates and redox reactions that could occur in Hadean submarine alkaline hydrothermal systems associated with the serpentinization of ultramafic rocks. In the calculations, the seawater was assumed to be weakly acidic (pH = 5.5) and to include carbon dioxide, ferrous iron and silica, with or without nitrate, while the Hadean hydrothermal fluid was assumed to be highly alkaline (pH = 11) and to contain abundant molecular hydrogen, methane and bisulfide, based on the Archean geologic record, the modern low-temperature alkaline hydrothermal vent fluid (Lost City field), and experimental and theoretical considerations. The modeling indicates that potential mineral precipitates in the mixing zone (hydrothermal chimney structures) could consist mainly of iron sulfides but also of ferrous serpentine and brucite, siderite, and ferric iron-bearing minerals such as goethite, hematite and/or magnetite as minor phases. The precipitation of ferric iron-bearing minerals suggests that chemical iron oxidation would be made possible by pH shift even under anoxic condition. In the mixing zone, comprising an inorganic barrier precipitated at the interface of the two contrasting solutions, various redox reactions release free energy with the potential to drive endergonic reactions, assuming the involvement of coupling inorganic protoenzymes. Hydrogenotrophic methanogenesis and acetogenesis - long considered the most ancient forms of biological energy metabolisms - are able to achieve higher maximum energy yield (>0.5 kJ/kg hydrothermal fluid) than those in the modern serpentinization-associated seafloor hydrothermal systems (e.g., Kairei field). Furthermore, the recently proposed methanotrophic acetogenesis pathway was also thermodynamically investigated. It is known that methanotrophic acetogenesis would

  8. Solvent-free cross-dehydrogenative coupling reactions under high speed ball-milling conditions applied to the synthesis of functionalized tetrahydroisoquinolines.

    PubMed

    Su, Weike; Yu, Jingbo; Li, Zhenhua; Jiang, Zhijiang

    2011-11-01

    Solvent-free reaction using a high-speed ball milling technique has been first applied to cross-dehydrogenative coupling (CDC) reactions between tetrahydroisoquinolines and three types of pronucleophiles such as nitroalkanes, alkynes, and indoles. All coupling products were obtained in good yields at short reaction times (no more than 40 min). When alkynes and indoles were used as pronucleophile, the reactions can be catalyzed efficiently by recoverable copper balls without any additional metal catalyst. PMID:21961457

  9. Impact of reaction conditions on the simultaneous production of polysaccharides and bio-oil from heterotrophically grown Chlorella sorokiniana by a unique sequential hydrothermal liquefaction process.

    PubMed

    Miao, Chao; Chakraborty, Moumita; Chen, Shulin

    2012-04-01

    A two-step sequential hydrothermal liquefaction (SEQHTL) model for simultaneous extraction of polysaccharide at the first step followed by bio-oil in the second was established. The effects of reaction temperature, residence time, and biomass/water ratio on the product distribution of each SEQHTL step were evaluated. Maximum yield (32wt.%) of polysaccharides was obtained at 160°C, 20min and 1:9 biomass/water ratio. Considering the operation cost and bio-oil yield (>30%); 240°C, 20min and 1:9 biomass/water ratio was preferred as ideal SEQHTL condition for bio-oil extraction. SEQHTL always produced ∼5% more bio-oil and ∼50% less bio-char than direct hydrothermal liquefaction (DHTL). Free fatty acid content of the bio-oils exhibited a sharp decrease with increase in temperature. Comparative analysis of the energy input and net energy balance showed that SEQHTL requires ∼15% less MJ/kg bio-oil than DHTL. Energy recovery rate for SEQHTL is nearly 4% higher than the DHTL.

  10. Kinetics of stabilised Criegee intermediates derived from alkene ozonolysis: reactions with SO2, H2O and decomposition under boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Newland, Mike J; Rickard, Andrew R; Alam, Mohammed S; Vereecken, Luc; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William J

    2015-02-14

    The removal of SO2 in the presence of alkene-ozone systems has been studied for ethene, cis-but-2-ene, trans-but-2-ene and 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene, as a function of humidity, under atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on relative humidity for all four alkene-ozone systems confirming a significant reaction for stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCI) with H2O. The observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with relative rate constants, k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2), of 3.3 (±1.1) × 10(-5) for CH2OO, 26 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, 33 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene, and 8.7 (±2.5) × 10(-5) for (CH3)2COO derived from 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene. The relative rate constants for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) are -2.3 (±3.5) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH2OO, 13 (±43) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, -14 (±31) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene and 63 (±14) × 10(11) cm(-3) for (CH3)2COO. Uncertainties are ±2σ and represent combined systematic and precision components. These values are derived following the approximation that a single SCI is present for each system; a more comprehensive interpretation, explicitly considering the differing reactivity for syn- and anti-SCI conformers, is also presented. This yields values of 3.5 (±3.1) × 10(-4) for k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2) of anti-CH3CHOO and 1.2 (±1.1) × 10(13) for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) of syn-CH3CHOO. The reaction of the water dimer with CH2OO is also considered, with a derived value for k(CH2OO + (H2O)2)/k(CH2OO + SO2) of 1.4 (±1.8) × 10(-2). The observed SO2 removal rate constants, which technically represent upper limits, are consistent with decomposition being a significant, structure dependent, sink in the atmosphere for syn-SCI.

  11. Kinetics of stabilised Criegee intermediates derived from alkene ozonolysis: reactions with SO2, H2O and decomposition under boundary layer conditions.

    PubMed

    Newland, Mike J; Rickard, Andrew R; Alam, Mohammed S; Vereecken, Luc; Muñoz, Amalia; Ródenas, Milagros; Bloss, William J

    2015-02-14

    The removal of SO2 in the presence of alkene-ozone systems has been studied for ethene, cis-but-2-ene, trans-but-2-ene and 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene, as a function of humidity, under atmospheric boundary layer conditions. The SO2 removal displays a clear dependence on relative humidity for all four alkene-ozone systems confirming a significant reaction for stabilised Criegee intermediates (SCI) with H2O. The observed SO2 removal kinetics are consistent with relative rate constants, k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2), of 3.3 (±1.1) × 10(-5) for CH2OO, 26 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, 33 (±10) × 10(-5) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene, and 8.7 (±2.5) × 10(-5) for (CH3)2COO derived from 2,3-dimethyl-but-2-ene. The relative rate constants for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) are -2.3 (±3.5) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH2OO, 13 (±43) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from cis-but-2-ene, -14 (±31) × 10(11) cm(-3) for CH3CHOO derived from trans-but-2-ene and 63 (±14) × 10(11) cm(-3) for (CH3)2COO. Uncertainties are ±2σ and represent combined systematic and precision components. These values are derived following the approximation that a single SCI is present for each system; a more comprehensive interpretation, explicitly considering the differing reactivity for syn- and anti-SCI conformers, is also presented. This yields values of 3.5 (±3.1) × 10(-4) for k(SCI + H2O)/k(SCI + SO2) of anti-CH3CHOO and 1.2 (±1.1) × 10(13) for k(SCI decomposition)/k(SCI + SO2) of syn-CH3CHOO. The reaction of the water dimer with CH2OO is also considered, with a derived value for k(CH2OO + (H2O)2)/k(CH2OO + SO2) of 1.4 (±1.8) × 10(-2). The observed SO2 removal rate constants, which technically represent upper limits, are consistent with decomposition being a significant, structure dependent, sink in the atmosphere for syn-SCI. PMID:25562069

  12. Effect of continuous irradiation with terahertz electromagnetic waves of the NO frequency range on behavioral reactions of male albino rats under stress conditions.

    PubMed

    Kirichuk, V F; Antipova, O N; Krylova, Ya A

    2014-06-01

    We studied the effect of terahertz waves (NO frequency range, 150.176-150.664 GHz) on stress-induced variations in behavioral reactions of male albino rats during hypokinetic stress. THz irradiation was followed by partial or complete normalization of behavioral reactions of male albino rats after hypokinetic stress. The most significant effect was observed after continuous irradiation for 30 min.

  13. Fe-N-Doped Carbon Capsules with Outstanding Electrochemical Performance and Stability for the Oxygen Reduction Reaction in Both Acid and Alkaline Conditions.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Guillermo A; Preuss, Kathrin; Marinovic, Adam; Jorge, Ana Belen; Mansor, Noramalina; Brett, Dan J L; Fuertes, Antonio B; Sevilla, Marta; Titirici, Maria-Magdalena

    2016-06-28

    High surface area N-doped mesoporous carbon capsules with iron traces exhibit outstanding electrocatalytic activity for the oxygen reduction reaction in both alkaline and acidic media. In alkaline conditions, they exhibit more positive onset (0.94 V vs RHE) and half-wave potentials (0.83 V vs RHE) than commercial Pt/C, while in acidic media the onset potential is comparable to that of commercial Pt/C with a peroxide yield lower than 10%. The Fe-N-doped carbon catalyst combines high catalytic activity with remarkable performance stability (3500 cycles between 0.6 and 1.0 V vs RHE), which stems from the fact that iron is coordinated to nitrogen. Additionally, the newly developed electrocatalyst is unaffected by the methanol crossover effect in both acid and basic media, contrary to commercial Pt/C. The excellent catalytic behavior of the Fe-N-doped carbon, even in the more relevant acid medium, is attributable to the combination of chemical functions (N-pyridinic, N-quaternary, and Fe-N coordination sites) and structural properties (large surface area, open mesoporous structure, and short diffusion paths), which guarantees a large number of highly active and fully accessible catalytic sites and rapid mass-transfer kinetics. Thus, this catalyst represents an important step forward toward replacing Pt catalysts with cheaper alternatives. In this regard, an alkaline anion exchange membrane fuel cell was assembled with Fe-N-doped mesoporous carbon capsules as the cathode catalyst to provide current and power densities matching those of a commercial Pt/C, which indicates the practical applicability of the Fe-N-carbon catalyst.

  14. Storage conditions of blood samples and primer selection affect the yield of cDNA polymerase chain reaction products of hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed Central

    Cuypers, H T; Bresters, D; Winkel, I N; Reesink, H W; Weiner, A J; Houghton, M; van der Poel, C L; Lelie, P N

    1992-01-01

    We have noticed that suboptimal specimen processing and storage conditions may cause false-negative results in the detection of hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in plasma or serum. To establish the influence of specimen handling in a serological laboratory on the rate of detection of HCV RNA by the cDNA polymerase chain reaction (cDNA-PCR), we tested routine serum samples and fresh-frozen plasma samples from the same bleeding from confirmed anti-HCV-positive blood donors. When primers from the NS3/NS4 region were used, HCV RNA was detected in fresh-frozen plasma from 67% of the donors, whereas positive results were obtained with only 50% of the serum samples that had been subjected to routine serological procedures. Analysis of the same samples with primers from the highly conserved 5'-terminal region (5'-TR) revealed an HCV RNA detection rate of 92% for both the routine and the fresh-frozen samples. However, the yield of the amplification product in routine samples was strongly reduced compared with that in fresh-frozen plasma. Comparison of both primer sets for cDNA-PCR showed that the 5'-TR primer set was 10- to 100-fold more effective in detecting HCV RNA. We also analyzed the effect of storage of whole EDTA-blood and serum at room temperature and at 4 degrees C on the yield of the amplification product. A rapid decline in detectable HCV RNA of 3 to 4 log units was observed within 14 days when whole blood and serum were stored at room temperature. By contrast, no perceptible reduction in the cDNA-PCR signal was found in freshly prepared serum stored at 4 degrees C. Images PMID:1333489

  15. Formation of HNCO from carbon monoxide and atomic nitrogen in their fundamental states. Investigation of the reaction pathway in conditions relevant to the interstellar medium.

    PubMed

    Nourry, Sendres; Zins, Emilie-Laure; Krim, Lahouari

    2015-01-28

    As a simple molecule containing the four main atoms essential for life as we know it, isocyanic acid can be considered as a prebiotic molecule. As such, the understanding of reaction mechanisms leading to its formation is fundamental. Isocyanic acid is present in different physical environments in the medium. Previous studies have suggested that, in water-containing ices, on the surface of dust grains, HNCO may be formed from N and CO in their fundamental states. To further investigate the reaction process, herein we investigate this reaction by means of the matrix-isolation technique. PMID:25501292

  16. The reactions of N-methylformamide and N,N-dimethylformamide with OH and their photo-oxidation under atmospheric conditions: experimental and theoretical studies.

    PubMed

    Bunkan, Arne Joakim C; Hetzler, Jens; Mikoviny, Tomáš; Wisthaler, Armin; Nielsen, Claus J; Olzmann, Matthias

    2015-03-14

    The reactions of OH radicals with CH3NHCHO (N-methylformamide, MF) and (CH3)2NCHO (N,N-dimethylformamide, DMF) have been studied by experimental and computational methods. Rate coefficients were determined as a function of temperature (T = 260-295 K) and pressure (P = 30-600 mbar) by the flash photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence technique. OH radicals were produced by laser flash photolysis of 2,4-pentanedione or tert-butyl hydroperoxide under pseudo-first order conditions in an excess of the corresponding amide. The rate coefficients obtained show negative temperature dependences that can be parameterized as follows: kOH+MF = (1.3 ± 0.4) × 10(-12) exp(3.7 kJ mol(-1)/(RT)) cm(3) s(-1) and kOH+DMF = (5.5 ± 1.7) × 10(-13) exp(6.6 kJ mol(-1)/(RT)) cm(3) s(-1). The rate coefficient kOH+MF shows very weak positive pressure dependence whereas kOH+DMF was found to be independent of pressure. The Arrhenius equations given, within their uncertainty, are valid for the entire pressure range of our experiments. Furthermore, MF and DMF smog-chamber photo-oxidation experiments were monitored by proton-transfer-reaction time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Atmospheric MF photo-oxidation results in 65% CH3NCO (methylisocyanate), 16% (CHO)2NH, and NOx-dependent amounts of CH2[double bond, length as m-dash]NH and CH3NHNO2 as primary products, while DMF photo-oxidation results in around 35% CH3N(CHO)2 as primary product and 65% meta-stable (CH3)2NC(O)OONO2 degrading to NOx-dependent amounts of CH3N[double bond, length as m-dash]CH2 (N-methylmethanimine), (CH3)2NNO (N-nitroso dimethylamine) and (CH3)2NNO2 (N-nitro dimethylamine). The potential for nitramine formation in MF photo-oxidation is comparable to that of methylamine whereas the potential to form nitrosamine and nitramine in DMF photo-oxidation is larger than for dimethylamine. Quantum chemistry supported atmospheric degradation mechanisms for MF and DMF are presented. Rate coefficients and initial branching ratios

  17. Heterogeneous reaction of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide on ambient aerosol particles under dry and humid conditions: kinetics, mechanism and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q. Q.; Huang, L. B.; Liang, H.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D.; Chen, Z. M.

    2015-06-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides play important roles in the cycle of oxidants and the formation of secondary aerosols in the atmosphere. Recent field observations have suggested that the budget of peroxyacetic acid (PAA, CH3C(O)OOH) is potentially related to the aerosol phase processes, especially to secondary aerosol formation. Here, we present the first laboratory measurements of the uptake coefficient of gaseous PAA and H2O2 onto ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) as a function of relative humidity (RH) at 298 K. The results show that the PM2.5, which was collected in an urban area, can take up PAA and H2O2 at the uptake coefficient (γ) of 10-4, and both γPAA and γH2O2 increase with increasing RH. The value of γPAA at 90 % RH is 5.4 ± 1.9 times that at 3 % RH, whereas γH2O2 at 90 % RH is 2.4 ± 0.5 times that at 3 % RH, which suggests that PAA is more sensitive to the RH variation than H2O2 is. Considering the larger Henry's law constant of H2O2 than that of PAA, the smaller RH sensitivity of the H2O2 uptake coefficient suggests that the enhanced uptake of peroxide compounds on PM2.5 under humid conditions is dominated by chemical processes rather than dissolution. Considering that mineral dust is one of the main components of PM2.5 in Beijing, we also determined the uptake coefficients of gaseous PAA and H2O2 on authentic Asian Dust storm (ADS) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. Compared to ambient PM2.5, ADS shows a similar γ value and RH dependence in its uptake coefficient for PAA and H2O2, while ATD gives a negative dependence on RH. The present study indicates that, in addition to the mineral dust in PM2.5, other components (e.g., soluble inorganic salts) are also important to the uptake of peroxide compounds. When the heterogeneous reaction of PAA on PM2.5 is considered, its atmospheric lifetime is estimated to be 3.0 h on haze days and 7.1 h on non-haze days, values that are in good agreement with the field observations.

  18. Heterogeneous reaction of peroxyacetic acid and hydrogen peroxide on ambient aerosol particles under dry and humid conditions: kinetics, mechanism and implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Q. Q.; Huang, L. B.; Liang, H.; Zhao, Y.; Huang, D.; Chen, Z. M.

    2015-02-01

    Hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and organic peroxides play important roles in the cycle of oxidants and the formation of secondary aerosols in the atmosphere. Recent field observations suggest that peroxyacetic acid (PAA, CH3C(O)OOH) is one of the most important organic peroxides in the atmosphere, whose budget is potentially related to the aerosols. Here we present the first laboratory measurements of the uptake coefficient of gaseous PAA and H2O2 onto the ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) as a function of relative humidity (RH) at 298 K. The results show that the PM2.5, which was collected in an urban area, can take up PAA and H2O2 at the uptake coefficient (γ) of 10-4, and both γPAA and γH2O2 increase with increasing RH. However, γPAA is more sensitive to the RH variation than is γH2O2, which indicates that the enhanced uptake of peroxide compounds on PM2.5 under humid conditions is dominated by chemical processes rather than dissolution. Considering that mineral dust is one of the main components of PM2.5, we also determined the uptake coefficients of gaseous PAA and H2O2 on authentic Asian Dust Storm (ADS) and Arizona Test Dust (ATD) particles. Compared to ambient PM2.5, ADS shows a similar γ value and RH dependence in its uptake coefficient for PAA and H2O2, while ATD gives a negative dependence on RH. The present study indicates that in addition to the mineral dust in PM2.5, other components (e.g., inorganic soluble salts) are also important to the uptake of peroxide compounds. When the heterogeneous reaction of PAA on PM2.5 is considered, its atmospheric lifetime is estimated to be 3.3 h on haze days and 7.6 h on non-haze days, values which agree well with the field observed result.

  19. Bench- and Pilot-Scale Studies of Reaction and Regeneration of Ni-Mg-K/Al2O3 for Catalytic Conditioning of Biomass-Derived Syngas

    SciTech Connect

    Magrini-Bair, K. A.; Jablonski, W. S.; Parent, Y. O.; Yung, M. M.

    2012-05-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) is collaborating with both industrial and academic partners to develop technologies to help enable commercialization of biofuels produced from lignocellulosic biomass feedstocks. The focus of this paper is to report how various operating processes, utilized in-house and by collaborators, influence the catalytic activity during conditioning of biomass-derived syngas. Efficient cleaning and conditioning of biomass-derived syngas for use in fuel synthesis continues to be a significant technical barrier to commercialization. Multifunctional, fluidizable catalysts are being developed to reform undesired tars and light hydrocarbons, especially methane, to additional syngas, which can improve utilization of biomass carbon. This approach also eliminates both the need for downstream methane reforming and the production of an aqueous waste stream from tar scrubbing. This work was conducted with NiMgK/Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalysts. These catalysts were assessed for methane reforming performance in (i) fixed-bed, bench-scale tests with model syngas simulating that produced by oak gasification, and in pilot-scale, (ii) fluidized tests with actual oak-derived syngas, and (iii) recirculating/regenerating tests using model syngas. Bench-scale tests showed that the catalyst could be completely regenerated over several reforming reaction cycles. Pilot-scale tests using raw syngas showed that the catalyst lost activity from cycle to cycle when it was regenerated, though it was shown that bench-scale regeneration by steam oxidation and H{sub 2} reduction did not cause this deactivation. Characterization by TPR indicates that the loss of a low temperature nickel oxide reduction feature is related to the catalyst deactivation, which is ascribed to nickel being incorporated into a spinel nickel aluminate that is not reduced with the given activation protocol. Results for 100 h time-on-stream using a recirculating/regenerating reactor suggest

  20. Relative rate coefficient measurements of OH radical reactions with (Z)-2-hexen-1-ol and (E)-3-hexen-1-ol under simulated atmospheric conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peirone, Silvina A.; Barrera, Javier A.; Taccone, Raúl A.; Cometto, Pablo M.; Lane, Silvia I.

    2014-03-01

    The relative rate technique was used to determine the rate coefficients of the reactions of OH radicals with (Z)-2-hexen-1-ol (k1), and (E)-3-hexen-1-ol (k2), at (296 ± 2) K and (750 ± 10) Torr of N2 or pure air. The reactions were investigated using a 200 L Teflon reaction chamber and a gas chromatograph coupled with flame-ionization detection. The following rate coefficients were derived, in units of cm3 mol-1 s-1: k1 = (1.1 ± 0.4) × 10-10 and k2 = (0.8 ± 0.1) × 10-10. This is the first experimental determination of k1 and k2. A comparison between the experimental rate coefficients (kexp) and the calculated rate coefficients using the structure-activity relationship (SAR) method (kSAR), for the reaction of different unsaturated alcohols with OH radicals is presented. The atmospheric lifetimes of the studied alcohols were estimated considering the rate coefficients of their reactions with OH and NO3 radicals. The radiative efficiencies (REs) were obtained from the infrared spectra of the two hexenols and the global warming potentials (GWPs) were then estimated. Atmospheric implications of the alcohols emission are briefly discussed.

  1. MOF catalysis of Fe(II)-to-Fe(III) reaction for an ultrafast and one-step generation of the Fe2O3@MOF composite and uranium(vi) reduction by iron(ii) under ambient conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yang Yang; Li, Jian Qiang; Yan, Chang Sheng; Gao, Heng Ya; Zhou, Jian Ping; Gong, Le Le; Luo, Ming Biao; Zhang, Le; Meng, Pan Pan; Luo, Feng

    2016-08-01

    Herein, we demonstrate that Zn-MOF-74 enables the ultrafast and one-step generation of the Fe2O3@MOF composite once Zn-MOF-74 contacts with FeSO4 solution. This unique reaction can be further applied in catalysis of U(vi) reduction by Fe(ii) under ambient conditions. The results provide a highly renovated strategy for U(vi) reduction by Fe(ii) just under ambient conditions, which completely subvert all established methods about U(vi) reduction by Fe(ii) in which O2- and CO2-free conditions are absolutely required.

  2. Aqueous Suzuki Coupling Reactions of Basic Nitrogen-Containing Substrates in the Absence of Added Base and Ligand: Observation of High Yields under Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Gelbaum, Carol; Fisk, Jason S; Holden, Bruce; Jaganathan, Arvind; Whiteker, Gregory T; Pollet, Pamela; Liotta, Charles L

    2016-09-16

    A series of aqueous heterogeneous Suzuki coupling reactions of substrates containing basic nitrogen centers with phenylboronic acid in the absence of added base and ligand is presented. High yields of products were obtained by employing aryl bromides containing aliphatic 1°, 2°, and 3° amine substituents, and good to high yields were obtained by employing a variety of substituted bromopyridines. In the former series, the pH of the aqueous phase changed from basic to acidic during the course of the reaction, while in the latter series the aqueous phase was on the acidic side of the pH scale throughout the entire course of reaction. A mechanistic interpretation for these observations, which generally preserves the oxo palladium catalytic cycle widely accepted in the literature, is presented. PMID:27559749

  3. Aqueous Suzuki Coupling Reactions of Basic Nitrogen-Containing Substrates in the Absence of Added Base and Ligand: Observation of High Yields under Acidic Conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhao; Gelbaum, Carol; Fisk, Jason S; Holden, Bruce; Jaganathan, Arvind; Whiteker, Gregory T; Pollet, Pamela; Liotta, Charles L

    2016-09-16

    A series of aqueous heterogeneous Suzuki coupling reactions of substrates containing basic nitrogen centers with phenylboronic acid in the absence of added base and ligand is presented. High yields of products were obtained by employing aryl bromides containing aliphatic 1°, 2°, and 3° amine substituents, and good to high yields were obtained by employing a variety of substituted bromopyridines. In the former series, the pH of the aqueous phase changed from basic to acidic during the course of the reaction, while in the latter series the aqueous phase was on the acidic side of the pH scale throughout the entire course of reaction. A mechanistic interpretation for these observations, which generally preserves the oxo palladium catalytic cycle widely accepted in the literature, is presented.

  4. Green synthesis of Pd/CuO nanoparticles by Theobroma cacao L. seeds extract and their catalytic performance for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and phosphine-free Heck coupling reaction under aerobic conditions.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahzadeh, Mahmoud; Sajadi, S Mohammad; Rostami-Vartooni, Akbar; Bagherzadeh, Mojtaba

    2015-06-15

    We report the green synthesis of palladium/CuO nanoparticles (Pd/CuO NPs) using Theobroma cacao L. seeds extract and their catalytic activity for the reduction of 4-nitrophenol and Heck coupling reaction under aerobic conditions. The catalyst was characterized using the powder XRD, TEM, EDS, UV-vis and FT-IR. This method has the advantages of high yields, elimination of surfactant, ligand and homogeneous catalysts, simple methodology and easy work up. The catalyst can be recovered from the reaction mixture and reused several times without any significant loss of catalytic activity.

  5. Connecting the dots: Semi-analytical and random walk numerical solutions of the diffusion–reaction equation with stochastic initial conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Paster, Amir; Bolster, Diogo; Benson, David A.

    2014-04-15

    We study a system with bimolecular irreversible kinetic reaction A+B→∅ where the underlying transport of reactants is governed by diffusion, and the local reaction term is given by the law of mass action. We consider the case where the initial concentrations are given in terms of an average and a white noise perturbation. Our goal is to solve the diffusion–reaction equation which governs the system, and we tackle it with both analytical and numerical approaches. To obtain an analytical solution, we develop the equations of moments and solve them approximately. To obtain a numerical solution, we develop a grid-less Monte Carlo particle tracking approach, where diffusion is modeled by a random walk of the particles, and reaction is modeled by annihilation of particles. The probability of annihilation is derived analytically from the particles' co-location probability. We rigorously derive the relationship between the initial number of particles in the system and the amplitude of white noise represented by that number. This enables us to compare the particle simulations and the approximate analytical solution and offer an explanation of the late time discrepancies. - Graphical abstract:.

  6. Connecting the dots: Semi-analytical and random walk numerical solutions of the diffusion-reaction equation with stochastic initial conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paster, Amir; Bolster, Diogo; Benson, David A.

    2014-04-01

    We study a system with bimolecular irreversible kinetic reaction A+B→∅ where the underlying transport of reactants is governed by diffusion, and the local reaction term is given by the law of mass action. We consider the case where the initial concentrations are given in terms of an average and a white noise perturbation. Our goal is to solve the diffusion-reaction equation which governs the system, and we tackle it with both analytical and numerical approaches. To obtain an analytical solution, we develop the equations of moments and solve them approximately. To obtain a numerical solution, we develop a grid-less Monte Carlo particle tracking approach, where diffusion is modeled by a random walk of the particles, and reaction is modeled by annihilation of particles. The probability of annihilation is derived analytically from the particles' co-location probability. We rigorously derive the relationship between the initial number of particles in the system and the amplitude of white noise represented by that number. This enables us to compare the particle simulations and the approximate analytical solution and offer an explanation of the late time discrepancies.

  7. CATALYST-FREE REACTIONS UNDER SOLVENT-FEE CONDITIONS: MICROWAVE-ASSISTED SYNTHESIS OF HETEROCYCLIC HYDRAZONES BELOW THE MELTING POINT OF NEAT REACTANTS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The reaction of neat 5- or 8-oxobenzopyran-2(1H)-ones with a variety of aromatic and heteroaromatic hydrazines are remarkable accelerated upon irradiation in a household microwave oven in the absence of any catalyst, solid support or solvent thus providing an environmentally frie...

  8. Optimization of reaction conditions in selective oxidation of styrene over fine crystallite spinel-type CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} complex oxide catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Pardeshi, Satish K.; Pawar, Ravindra Y.

    2010-05-15

    The CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel-type catalyst was synthesized by citrate gel method and well characterized by thermogravimetric analysis, atomic absorption spectroscopy, Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy. The crystallization temperature of the spinel particle prepared by citrate gel method was 600 {sup o}C which was lower than that of ferrite prepared by other methods. CaFe{sub 2}O{sub 4} catalysts prepared by citrate gel method show better activity for styrene oxidation in the presence of dilute H{sub 2}O{sub 2} (30%) as an oxidizing agent. In this reaction the oxidative cleavage of carbon-carbon double bond of styrene takes place selectively with 38 {+-} 2 mol% conversion. The major product of the reaction is benzaldehyde up to 91 {+-} 2 mol% and minor product phenyl acetaldehyde up to 9 {+-} 2 mol%, respectively. The products obtained in the styrene oxidation reaction were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectroscopy. The influence of the catalyst, reaction time, temperature, amount of catalyst, styrene/H{sub 2}O{sub 2} molar ratio and solvents on the conversion and product distribution were studied.

  9. Reaction mechanism and optimal conditions for preparation of high-quality vanadium oxide films by organic sol-gel for optoelectronic applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Minghui; Wen, Yuejiang; Xu, Xiangdong; Wang, Meng; He, Qiong; Jiang, Yadong; Dai, Zelin; Gu, Yu; Chen, Zhegeng

    2016-03-01

    Although vanadium oxides (VO x ) are important functional materials for academic research and industrial applications, the reaction mechanism of VO x prepared by organic sol-gel remains unclear. In order to investigate this mechanism, VO x organic sols were reacted at different temperatures, by which various VO x thin films were prepared. The products were systematically characterized by infrared spectroscopy, Raman spectroscopy, UV-vis spectroscopy, thermogravimetric analysis, scanning electron microscopy, x-ray diffraction, and a high resistance meter. Results reveal that vanadium alkoxides are created through an alcoholysis reaction of V2O5 powder and isobutyl alcohol, and then a condensation reaction of the vanadium alkoxides leads to the formation of VO x networks. The as-prepared sols are strongly temperature-dependent, causing different chemical structures and physical properties for the resulting VO x films. Particularly, a moderate temperature of 110 °C prompts both alcoholysis and condensation reactions, and thus the VO x films that are produced by the sol reacted at 110 °C possess a low resistivity of 23 Ω cm, a high temperature coefficient resistance (TCR) of  -3.2% K-1, and a low average transmittance of 54% in 580-1100 nm, compared with those prepared by the sols reacted at lower or higher temperatures. Therefore, 110 °C is a desirable sol temperature for producing VO x films serving as high-quality bolometric materials for uncooled infrared detectors. This work discloses not only the reaction mechanism of VO x films prepared by organic sol-gel, but also the route to yield desirable VO x films for optoelectronic applications.

  10. Mn(2+)-mediated homogeneous Fenton-like reaction of Fe(III)-NTA complex for efficient degradation of organic contaminants under neutral conditions.

    PubMed

    Li, Yifan; Sun, Jianhui; Sun, Sheng-Peng

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we report a novel Mn(2+)-mediated Fenton-like process based on Fe(III)-NTA complex that is super-efficient at circumneutral pH range. Kinetics experiments showed that the presence of Mn(2+) significantly enhanced the effectiveness of Fe(III)-NTA complex catalyzed Fenton-like reaction. The degradation rate constant of crotamiton (CRMT), a model compound, by the Fe(III)- NTA_Mn(2+) Fenton-like process was at least 1.6 orders of magnitude larger than that in the absence of Mn(2+). Other metal ions such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+), Co(2+) and Cu(2+) had no impacts or little inhibitory effect on the Fe(III)-NTA complex catalyzed Fenton-like reaction. The generation of hydroxyl radical (HO) and superoxide radical anion (O2(-)) in the Fe(III)-NTA_Mn(2+) Fenton-like process were suggested by radicals scavenging experiments. The degradation efficiency of CRMT was inhibited significantly (approximately 92%) by the addition of HO scavenger 2-propanol, while the addition of O2(-) scavenger chloroform resulted in 68% inhibition. Moreover, the results showed that other chelating agents such as EDTA- and s,s-EDDS-Fe(III) catalyzed Fenton-like reactions were also enhanced significantly by the presence of Mn(2+). The mechanism involves an enhanced generation of O2(-) from the reactions of Mn(2+)-chelates with H2O2, indirectly promoting the generation of HO by accelerating the reduction rate of Fe(III)-chelates to Fe(II)- chelates.

  11. Measurement of mutation and repair in mammalian cells/action of specific mutagens and antimutagens/genome exposure reaction in cancer and other disease conditions. Final subcontract report, April 1, 1996- March 31, 1996

    SciTech Connect

    Puck, T.T.

    1996-09-01

    This is the final report for the project dealing with the the measurement of mutation and repair in mammalian cells, action of specific mutagens and antimutagens, and genome exposure reaction in cancer and other disease conditions. The overall objectives of this research are threefold: to develop and improve methodology for measurement of mutation and repair in mammalian cells and to apply it to measurement of the effectiveness of mutagens, antimutagens, and other molecules to as to achieve greater power in prevention of cancer and genetic disease; to analyze theoretically and experimentally the action of specific mutagens and antimutagens; and to investigate the role of genome exposure reaction in cancer and other disease conditions to secure improve preventive and treatment modalities.

  12. Studies in Reaction to Disability. XII: Structure of Attitudes toward the Physically Disabled; Disability Factor Scales--Amputation, Blindness, Cosmetic Conditions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siller, Jerome; And Others

    To describe and to develop instruments to measure attitudes toward amputees, the blind, and those with cosmetic conditions, three groups of subjects responded to one of three large pools of items tapping attitudes toward the three disability conditions. Three new groups of about 500 subjects of diverse demographic characteristics were given one of…

  13. [The effect of the transmembrane potential level on the dynamic extinction of the amplitude of the synaptic reactions in the snail under potential-fixation conditions].

    PubMed

    Gusev, P V

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this work was to describe a contribution of postsynaptic membrane in synaptic plasticity. To solve this problem the influence of the level of transmembrane potential on the dynamics of transmembrane synaptic current amplitude was studied during rhythmical stimulation of the nerve. It was shown that with increase of transmembrane potential value the slope of the function of transmembrane current decrease became steeper. It was also shown that with higher stimulation frequency the influence of transmembrane holding potential upon the dynamics of synaptic reaction increased. The data obtained can be considered as an evidence to the contribution of postsynaptic membrane in synaptic plasticity.

  14. Initial inhomogeneity-induced crazy-clock behavior in the iodate-arsenous acid reaction in a buffered medium under stirred batch conditions.

    PubMed

    Valkai, László; Csekő, György; Horváth, Attila K

    2015-09-14

    It is unambiguously demonstrated that in the case of an autocatalytic reaction, initial inhomogeneities induced by the imperfectly mixed part of the overall volume may result in a serious irreproducibility of the individual kinetic runs. A statistically meaningful number of repetitions, however, gives rise to a reproducible cumulative probability distribution curve often referred to as a support of the stochastic feature. The iodate-arsenous acid reaction being autocatalytic with respect to both iodide and hydrogen ions displays clock behavior. However, the time lag necessary for the appearance of iodine, even in buffered solution, varies in an apparently random manner. Careful analysis of the variation of the different parameters like stirring rate, overall volume, geometry of the reactor and the way of mixing the reactants led us to conclude that the fate of the individual samples is determined at the initial stage when the reacting system is per se inhomogeneous. The place, the size of the so-called ignition volume, where the reacting system is imperfectly stirred, as well as the residence time spent there by the imperfectly mixed reactants all seem to depend on external factors. PMID:26239390

  15. Ultra sensitive firefly luciferase-based protein-protein interaction assay (FlimPIA) attained by hinge region engineering and optimized reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Kurihara, Makoto; Ohmuro-Matsuyama, Yuki; Ayabe, Keiichi; Yamashita, Takahiro; Yamaji, Hideki; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Detecting and assaying protein-protein interactions are significant research procedures in biology and biotechnology. We recently reported a novel assay to detect protein-protein interaction, i.e. firefly luminescent intermediate-based protein-protein interaction assay (FlimPIA) using two mutant firefly luciferases (Flucs), which complement each other's deficient half reaction. This assay detects neighboring of two mutant Flucs, namely, a "Donor" that catalyzes the adenylation of firefly luciferin to produce a luciferyl-adenylate intermediate, and an "Acceptor" that catalyzes the subsequent light emitting reaction. However, its rather high background signal, derived from the remaining adenylation activity of the Acceptor, has limited its usefulness. To reduce this background signal, we introduced a mutation (R437K) into the hinge region of the Acceptor, while maintaining the oxidative activity. Interestingly, the signal/background (S/B) ratio of the assay was markedly improved by the addition of coenzyme A and reduction of the ATP concentration, probably due to reduced inhibition by dehydroluciferyl-adenylate formed during the catalysis and an increased ATP-based Km value of the Acceptor, respectively. As a result, a significantly improved maximal S/B ratio from 2.5 to ∼40 was attained, which promises wider use of the assay in in vitro diagnostics, drug discovery, and expanding our knowledge of various biological phenomena.

  16. Drug Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... or diabetes. But medicines can also cause unwanted reactions. One problem is interactions, which may occur between ... more serious. Drug allergies are another type of reaction. They can be mild or life-threatening. Skin ...

  17. Role of anions and reaction conditions in the preparation of uranium(VI), neptunium(VI), and plutonium(VI) borates.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuao; Villa, Eric M; Diwu, Juan; Alekseev, Evgeny V; Depmeier, Wulf; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E

    2011-03-21

    U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) borates with the formula AnO(2)[B(8)O(11)(OH)(4)] (An = U, Np, Pu) have been prepared via the reactions of U(VI) nitrate, Np(VI) perchlorate, or Pu(IV) or Pu(VI) nitrate with molten boric acid. These compounds are all isotypic and consist of a linear actinyl(VI) cation, AnO(2)(2+), surrounded by BO(3) triangles and BO(4) tetrahedra to create an AnO(8) hexagonal bipyramidal environment. The actinyl bond lengths are consistent with actinide contraction across this series. The borate anions bridge between actinyl units to create sheets. Additional BO(3) triangles and BO(4) tetrahedra extend from the polyborate layers and connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional chiral framework structure. UV-vis-NIR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the hexavalent oxidation state in all three compounds. Bond-valence parameters are developed for Np(VI).

  18. Role of Anions and Reaction Conditions in the Preparation of Uranium(VI), Neptunium(VI), and Plutonium(VI) Borates

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2011-02-03

    U(VI), Np(VI), and Pu(VI) borates with the formula AnO2[B8O11(OH)4] (An = U, Np, Pu) have been prepared via the reactions of U(VI) nitrate, Np(VI) perchlorate, or Pu(IV) or Pu(VI) nitrate with molten boric acid. These compounds are all isotypic and consist of a linear actinyl(VI) cation, AnO22+, surrounded by BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedra to create an AnO8 hexagonal bipyramidal environment. The actinyl bond lengths are consistent with actinide contraction across this series. The borate anions bridge between actinyl units to create sheets. Additional BO3 triangles and BO4 tetrahedra extend from the polyborate layers and connect these sheets together to form a three-dimensional chiral framework structure. UV-vis-NIR absorption and fluorescence spectroscopy confirms the hexavalent oxidation state in all three compounds. Bond-valence parameters are developed for Np(VI).

  19. Investigations on the Reaction of C3 and C6 α-Dicarbonyl Compounds with Hydroxytyrosol and Related Compounds under Competitive Conditions.

    PubMed

    Navarro, Marta; Atzenbeck, Lisa; Pischetsrieder, Monika; Morales, Francisco J

    2016-08-17

    α-Dicarbonyl compounds are intermediates in reactions that lead to the formation of potentially harmful advanced glycation end-products. Carbonyl-trapping capacities of antiglycative substances have been traditionally limited to C2 and C3 α-dicarbonyl structures. Glyoxal (GO)-, methylglyoxal (MGO)-, 3-deoxyglucosone (3-DG)-, 3-deoxygalactosone (3-DGal)-, 3,4-dideoxyglucoson-3-ene-, and glucosone-trapping capacities of hydroxytyrosol (HT), hydroxytyrosol acetate (HTA), and 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) in simple (phenolic/dicarbonyl) and competitive model systems (phenolic/dicarbonyl1/dicarbonyl2) were investigated. HT and HTA were more effective for MGO than 3-DG and 3-DGal. Furthermore, DOPAC exerted higher trapping capacity than HT and HTA for C3 and C6 α-dicarbonyl compounds. In the competitive systems, HT-related substances did not show preference for trapping 3-DG or 3-DGal and behaved as in the simple systems. In the presence of MGO, however, HT-related substances were more effective for trapping MGO than C6 structures. The results demonstrate the C6 α-dicarbonyl-trapping capacities of HT, HTA, and DOPAC, with DOPAC exerting the highest activity. PMID:27476321

  20. Rate Constants for the Reactions of OH with CO, NO and NO2, and of HO2 with NO2 in the Presence of Water Vapour at Lower-Tropospheric Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rolletter, Michael; Fuchs, Hendrik; Novelli, Anna; Ehlers, Christian; Hofzumahaus, Andreas

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that the chemistry of gaseous nitrous acid (HONO) in the lower troposphere is not fully understood. Aside from heterogenous reactions, the daytime HONO formation in the gas-phase is not well understood (Li et al., Science, 2014). For a better understanding of HONO in the gas-phase, we have reinvestigated the reaction rate constants of important tropospheric reactions of the HOx radical family (OH and HO2) with nitrogen oxides at realistic conditions of the lower troposphere (at ambient temperature/pressure and in humid air). In this study we apply a direct pump and probe technique with high accuracy, using small radical concentrations to avoid secondary chemistry. Pulsed laser photolysis/laser-induced fluorescence (LP/LIF) was used to investigate the reaction rate constants of OH with CO, NO, NO2, and HO2 with NO2 in synthetic air at different water vapor concentrations (up to 5 x 1017 molecules cm-3). Photolysis of ozone in the presence of gaseous water was the source of OH. The reactions took place in a flow-tube at room temperature and atmospheric pressure. The chemical decay of the radicals was monitored by laser-induced fluorescence detection in a low-pressure cell, which sampled air continuously from the end of the flow-tube. Knowing the reactant concentrations subsequently allowed to calculate the bimolecular reaction rate constants at 1 atm from the pseudo-first-order decays. In order to observe HO2 reactions, OH was converted into HO2 with an excess of CO in the flow-tube. The newly measured rate constants for OH with CO, NO and NO2 agree very well with current recommendations by NASA/JPL and IUPAC and have an improved accuracy (uncertainty < 5%). These rate coefficients are independent of the presence of water vapour. The measured rate constant of HO2 with NO2 was found to depend significantly on the water-vapour concentration (probably due to formation of HO2*H2O complexes) and to exceed current recommendations by NASA/JPL and

  1. CO2 Reaction Induced Wettability Alteration and its Impacts on CO2 Storage: Pore to Core Scale Reservoir Condition Experimental Studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T. K.; Kim, Y.; Jung, J.; Kim, T.; Dong, W.

    2013-12-01

    Wettability of the mineral surfaces plays an important role in subsurface multiphase flow and transport. Wettability affects the capillary pressure-saturation (Pc- S) relations, relative permeability (kr) of each fluid phase, and relative phase occupancy in reservoir pores. Although wettability issues have been studied extensively in other fields, significant knowledge gaps remain when applying the existing understanding to geological carbon sequestration; due largely to the unique physical-chemical properties of supercritical (sc) CO2 relative to other common non-wetting fluids such as air and oil. Here, we report our recent progress on wettability alteration upon reaction with CO2 and the resulting differences in capillary trapping of CO2 versus air. (1) Pore Scale Studies. There are conflict predictions in the literature concerning the effect of wettability on capillary trapping; some find that larger contact angles lead to lower capillary trapping while others have found opposite behavior. We hypothesized that spontaneous imbibition becomes energetically unfavorable with decreased wettability, so that increased residual trapping of scCO2 should occur during the post-injection inbibition stage. We developed a laboratory high-pressure and elevated temperature microscopic-micromodel system that is capable of controlling fine scale capillary pressure of scCO2-brine, and enabled us to conduct imbibition under controlled capillary pressures at the pore scale. We found that the de-wetting enhanced scCO2 capillary trapping is significant. These results suggest that scCO2 reaction induced dewetting can result in higher degrees of CO2 residual trapping in the post-injection stage than previously predicted. (2) Core Scale Studies. Capillary scaling is used routinely to predict Pc(S) relations for scCO2-brine systems at field scale, based on relations measured with air-water or mercury porosimetry. However, scaling-based predictions for CO2-brine systems have not been

  2. Role of chemical composition in the enhanced catalytic activity of Pt-based alloyed ultrathin nanowires for the hydrogen oxidation reaction under alkaline conditions

    DOE PAGES

    Megan E. Scofield; Wong, Stanislaus S.; Zhou, Yuchen; Yue, Shiyu; Wang, Lei; Su, Dong; Tong, Xiao; Vukmirovic, Miomir B.; Adzic, Radoslav R.

    2016-05-19

    With the increased interest in the development of hydrogen fuel cells as a plausible alternative to internal combustion engines, recent work has focused on creating alkaline fuel cells (AFC), which employ an alkaline environment. Working in alkaline as opposed to acidic media yields a number of tangible benefits, including (i) the ability to use cheaper and plentiful precious-metal-free catalysts, due to their increased stability, (ii) a reduction in the amount of degradation and corrosion of Pt-based catalysts, and (iii) a longer operational lifetime for the overall fuel cell configuration. However, in the absence of Pt, no catalyst has achieved activitiesmore » similar to those of Pt. Herein, we have synthesized a number of crystalline ultrathin PtM alloy nanowires (NWs) (M = Fe, Co, Ru, Cu, Au) in order to replace a portion of the costly Pt metal without compromising on activity while simultaneously adding in metals known to exhibit favorable synergistic ligand and strain effects with respect to the host lattice. In fact, our experiments confirm theoretical insights about a clear and correlative dependence between measured activity and chemical composition. We have conclusively demonstrated that our as-synthesized alloy NW catalysts yield improved hydrogen oxidation reaction (HOR) activities as compared with a commercial Pt standard as well as with our as-synthesized Pt NWs. The Pt7Ru3 NW system, in particular, quantitatively achieved an exchange current density of 0.493 mA/cm2, which is higher than the corresponding data for Pt NWs alone. In addition, the HOR activities follow the same expected trend as their calculated hydrogen binding energy (HBE) values, thereby confirming the critical importance and correlation of HBE with the observed activities.« less

  3. Studying Biological Rhythms of Person's Skin-galvanic Reaction and Dynamics of Light Transmission by Isomeric Substance in Space Flight Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glushko, Vladimir

    2004-01-01

    Intensity and amplitude of human functional systems and human most important organs are wavelike, rhythmic by nature. These waves have constant periodicity, phase and amplitude. The mentioned characteristics can vary, however their variations have a pronounced reiteration in the course of time. This indicates a hashing of several wave processes and their interference. Stochastic changes in wave processes characteristics of a human organism are explained either by 'pulsations' associated with hashing (superposition) of several wave processes and their interference, or by single influence of environmental physical factors on a human organism. Human beings have respectively periods of higher and lower efficiency, state of health and so on, depending not only of environmental factors, but also of 'internal' rhythmic factor. Sometimes peaks and falls periodicity of some or other characteristics is broken. Disturbance of steady-state biological rhythms is usually accompanied by reduction of activity steadiness of the most important systems of a human organism. In its turn this has an effect on organism's adaptation to changing living conditions as well as on general condition and efficiency of a human being. The latter factor is very important for space medicine. Biological rhythmology is a special branch of biology and medicine, it studies rhythmic activity mechanisms of organs, their systems, individuals and species. Appropriate researches were also carried out in space medicine.

  4. Unsteady MHD Mixed Convection Slip Flow of Casson Fluid over Nonlinearly Stretching Sheet Embedded in a Porous Medium with Chemical Reaction, Thermal Radiation, Heat Generation/Absorption and Convective Boundary Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Ullah, Imran; Bhattacharyya, Krishnendu; Shafie, Sharidan; Khan, Ilyas

    2016-01-01

    Numerical results are presented for the effect of first order chemical reaction and thermal radiation on mixed convection flow of Casson fluid in the presence of magnetic field. The flow is generated due to unsteady nonlinearly stretching sheet placed inside a porous medium. Convective conditions on wall temperature and wall concentration are also employed in the investigation. The governing partial differential equations are converted to ordinary differential equations using suitable transformations and then solved numerically via Keller-box method. It is noticed that fluid velocity rises with increase in radiation parameter in the case of assisting flow and is opposite in the case of opposing fluid while radiation parameter has no effect on fluid velocity in the forced convection. It is also seen that fluid velocity and concentration enhances in the case of generative chemical reaction whereas both profiles reduces in the case of destructive chemical reaction. Further, increase in local unsteadiness parameter reduces fluid velocity, temperature and concentration. Over all the effects of physical parameters on fluid velocity, temperature and concentration distribution as well as on the wall shear stress, heat and mass transfer rates are discussed in detail. PMID:27776174

  5. In situ formation of the amino sugars 1-amino-1-deoxy-fructose and 2-amino-2-deoxy-glucose under Maillard reaction conditions in the absence of ammonia.

    PubMed

    Nashalian, Ossanna; Yaylayan, Varoujan A

    2016-04-15

    Replacing amino acids with their binary metal complexes during the Maillard reaction can initiate various processes, including the oxidative degradation of their glucose conjugates, generating 1-amino-1-deoxy-fructose and its derivatives. These reactive amino sugars are not easily accessible under Maillard reaction conditions and are only formed in the presence of ammonia. To explore the generality of this observation and to study in particular the ability of fructose to generate glucosamine, the amino acid-metal complexes were heated in aqueous solutions with three aldohexoses and two ketohexoses at 110°C for 2 h and the dry residues were analysed by ESI/qTOF/MS/MS. All the sugars generated relatively intense ions at [M+H](+) 180 (C6H14NO5); those ions originating from ketohexoses exhibited MS/MS fragmentations identical to glucosamine and those originating form aldohexoses showed ions identical to fructosamine. Furthermore, the amino sugars were found to form fructosazine, react with other sugars and undergo dehydration reactions.

  6. [Fe(III)(F(20)-tpp)Cl] is an effective catalyst for nitrene transfer reactions and amination of saturated hydrocarbons with sulfonyl and aryl azides as nitrogen source under thermal and microwave-assisted conditions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yungen; Che, Chi-Ming

    2010-09-10

    [Fe(III)(F(20)-tpp)Cl] (F(20)-tpp=meso-tetrakis(pentafluorophenyl)porphyrinato dianion) is an effective catalyst for imido/nitrene insertion reactions using sulfonyl and aryl azides as nitrogen source. Under thermal conditions, aziridination of aryl and alkyl alkenes (16 examples, 60-95 % yields), sulfimidation of sulfides (11 examples, 76-96 % yields), allylic amidation/amination of α-methylstyrenes (15 examples, 68-83 % yields), and amination of saturated C--H bonds including that of cycloalkanes and adamantane (eight examples, 64-80 % yields) can be accomplished by using 2 mol % [Fe(III)(F(20)-tpp)Cl] as catalyst. Under microwave irradiation conditions, the reaction time of aziridination (four examples), allylic amination (five examples), sulfimidation (two examples), and amination of saturated C--H bonds (three examples) can be reduced by up to 16-fold (24-48 versus 1.5-6 h) without significantly affecting the product yield and substrate conversion.

  7. Gene Expression Reaction Norms Unravel the Molecular and Cellular Processes Underpinning the Plastic Phenotypes of Alternanthera Philoxeroides in Contrasting Hydrological Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Lexuan; Geng, Yupeng; Yang, Hongxing; Hu, Yonghong; Yang, Ji

    2015-01-01

    Alternanthera philoxeroides is an amphibious invasive weed that can colonize both aquatic and terrestrial habitats. Individuals growing in different habitats exhibit extensive phenotypic variation but little genetic differentiation. Little is known about the molecular basis underlying environment-induced phenotypic changes. Variation in transcript abundance in A. philoxeroides was characterized throughout the time-courses of pond and upland treatments using RNA-Sequencing. Seven thousand eight hundred and five genes demonstrated variable expression in response to different treatments, forming 11 transcriptionally coordinated gene groups. Functional enrichment analysis of plastically expressed genes revealed pathway changes in hormone-mediated signaling, osmotic adjustment, cell wall remodeling, and programmed cell death, providing a mechanistic understanding of the biological processes underlying the phenotypic changes in A. philoxeroides. Both transcriptional modulation of environmentally sensitive loci and environmentally dependent control of regulatory loci influenced the plastic responses to the environment. Phenotypic responses and gene expression patterns to contrasting hydrological conditions were compared between A. philoxeroides and its alien congener Alternanthera pungens. The terricolous A. pungens displayed limited phenotypic plasticity to different treatments. It was postulated based on gene expression comparison that the interspecific variation in plasticity between A. philoxeroides and A. pungens was not due to environmentally-mediated changes in hormone levels but to variations in the type and relative abundance of different signal transducers and receptors expressed in the target tissue. PMID:26617628

  8. Heterogeneous reactions of particulate matter-bound PAHs and NPAHs with NO3/N2O5, OH radicals, and O3 under simulated long-range atmospheric transport conditions: reactivity and mutagenicity.

    PubMed

    Jariyasopit, Narumol; Zimmermann, Kathryn; Schrlau, Jill; Arey, Janet; Atkinson, Roger; Yu, Tian-Wei; Dashwood, Roderick H; Tao, Shu; Simonich, Staci L Massey

    2014-09-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of ambient particulate matter (PM)-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-PAHs (NPAHs) with NO3/N2O5, OH radicals, and O3 were studied in a laboratory photochemical chamber. Ambient PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected from Beijing, China, and Riverside, California, and exposed under simulated atmospheric long-range transport conditions for O3 and OH and NO3 radicals. Changes in the masses of 23 PAHs and 20 NPAHs, as well as the direct and indirect-acting mutagenicity of the PM (determined using the Salmonella mutagenicity assay with TA98 strain), were measured prior to and after exposure to NO3/N2O5, OH radicals, and O3. In general, O3 exposure resulted in the highest relative degradation of PM-bound PAHs with more than four rings (benzo[a]pyrene was degraded equally well by O3 and NO3/N2O5). However, NPAHs were most effectively formed during the Beijing PM exposure to NO3/N2O5. In ambient air, 2-nitrofluoranthene (2-NF) is formed from the gas-phase NO3 radical- and OH radical-initiated reactions of fluoranthene, and 2-nitropyrene (2-NP) is formed from the gas-phase OH radical-initiated reaction of pyrene. There was no formation of 2-NF or 2-NP in any of the heterogeneous exposures, suggesting that gas-phase formation of NPAHs did not play an important role during chamber exposures. Exposure of Beijing PM to NO3/N2O5 resulted in an increase in direct-acting mutagenic activity which was associated with the formation of mutagenic NPAHs. No NPAH formation was observed in any of the exposures of the Riverside PM. This was likely due to the accumulation of atmospheric degradation products from gas-phase reactions of volatile species onto the surface of PM collected in Riverside prior to exposure in the chamber, thus decreasing the availability of PAHs for reaction.

  9. Heterogeneous Reactions of Particulate Matter-Bound PAHs and NPAHs with NO3/N2O5, OH Radicals, and O3 under Simulated Long-Range Atmospheric Transport Conditions: Reactivity and Mutagenicity

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The heterogeneous reactions of ambient particulate matter (PM)-bound polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and nitro-PAHs (NPAHs) with NO3/N2O5, OH radicals, and O3 were studied in a laboratory photochemical chamber. Ambient PM2.5 and PM10 samples were collected from Beijing, China, and Riverside, California, and exposed under simulated atmospheric long-range transport conditions for O3 and OH and NO3 radicals. Changes in the masses of 23 PAHs and 20 NPAHs, as well as the direct and indirect-acting mutagenicity of the PM (determined using the Salmonella mutagenicity assay with TA98 strain), were measured prior to and after exposure to NO3/N2O5, OH radicals, and O3. In general, O3 exposure resulted in the highest relative degradation of PM-bound PAHs with more than four rings (benzo[a]pyrene was degraded equally well by O3 and NO3/N2O5). However, NPAHs were most effectively formed during the Beijing PM exposure to NO3/N2O5. In ambient air, 2-nitrofluoranthene (2-NF) is formed from the gas-phase NO3 radical- and OH radical-initiated reactions of fluoranthene, and 2-nitropyrene (2-NP) is formed from the gas-phase OH radical-initiated reaction of pyrene. There was no formation of 2-NF or 2-NP in any of the heterogeneous exposures, suggesting that gas-phase formation of NPAHs did not play an important role during chamber exposures. Exposure of Beijing PM to NO3/N2O5 resulted in an increase in direct-acting mutagenic activity which was associated with the formation of mutagenic NPAHs. No NPAH formation was observed in any of the exposures of the Riverside PM. This was likely due to the accumulation of atmospheric degradation products from gas-phase reactions of volatile species onto the surface of PM collected in Riverside prior to exposure in the chamber, thus decreasing the availability of PAHs for reaction. PMID:25119270

  10. Anthemis xylopoda flowers aqueous extract assisted in situ green synthesis of Cu nanoparticles supported on natural Natrolite zeolite for N-formylation of amines at room temperature under environmentally benign reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Nasrollahzadeh, Mahmoud; Sajadi, S Mohammad; Hatamifard, Arezo

    2015-12-15

    Zeolites, which are nontoxic, abundant, and cheap, are very promising supports for the design and preparation of new and environmentally benign catalysts. In this study, Cu nanoparticles (NPs) were immobilized on the surface of natural Natrolite zeolite by Anthemis xylopoda flowers aqueous extract as a reducing and stabilizing agent. Afterward, the catalytic performance of the prepared catalyst was investigated for N-formylation of amines at room temperature under environmentally benign reaction conditions. The catalyst could be reused at least 5 times without any decrease in activity. The advantages of the present protocol include the use of green catalyst, easy isolation of the products, reusability of catalyst, absence of nontoxic reagents, and excellent yield of the products.

  11. FACILITATED CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS UNDER ALTERNATE REACTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical research in the late 1990's witnessed a paradigm shift towards "environmentally-friendly chemistry" more popularly known as "green chemistry" due to the increasing environmental concerns and legislative requirements to curb the release of chemical waste into the atmo...

  12. Green chemistry approaches to the synthesis of 5-alkoxycarbonyl-4-aryl-3,4- dihydropyrimidin-2(1H)-ones by a three-component coupling of one-pot condensation reaction: comparison of ethanol, water, and solvent-free conditions.

    PubMed

    Bose, D Subhas; Fatima, Liyakat; Mereyala, Hari Babu

    2003-01-24

    A general and practical green chemistry route to the Biginelli cyclocondensation reaction using cerium(III) chloride as the catalyst (25% mol) is described under three different sets of reaction conditions. This method provides an efficient and much improved modification of original Biginelli reaction reported in 1893, in terms of high yields, short reaction times, and simple work-up procedure, and it has the ability to tolerate a wide variety of substitutions in all three components, which is lacking in existing procedures. PMID:12530887

  13. Ab initio chemical kinetics for SiH2 + Si2H6 and SiH3 + Si2H5 reactions and the related unimolecular decomposition of Si3H8 under a-Si/H CVD conditions.

    PubMed

    Raghunath, P; Lin, M C

    2013-10-24

    The kinetics and mechanisms for SiH2 + Si2H6 and SiH3 + Si2H5 reactions and the related unimolecular decomposition of Si3H8 have been investigated by ab initio molecular orbital theory based on the QCISD(T)/CBS//QCISD/6-311++G(d,p) method in conjunction with quantum statistical variational Rice-Ramsperger-Kassel-Marcus (RRKM) calculations. For the barrierless radical association processes, their variational transition states have been characterized by the CASPT2//CASSCF method. The species involved in the study are known to coexist under CVD conditions. The results show that the association reaction of SiH2 and Si2H6 producing Si3H8 occurs by insertion via its lowest-energy path forming a loose hydrogen-bonding molecular complex with 8.3 kcal/mol binding energy; the reaction is exothermic by 55.0 kcal/mol. The chemically activated Si3H8 adduct can fragment by several paths, producing SiH4 + SiH3SiH (-0.7 kcal/mol), Si(SiH3)2 + H2 (-1.4 kcal/mol), and SiH3SiH2SiH + H2 (-1.4 kcal/mol). The predicted enthalpy changes as given agree well with available thermochemical data. Three other decomposition channels of Si3H8 occurring by Si-H or Si-Si breaking were found to be highly endothermic, and the reactions take place without a well-defined barrier. The heats of formation of Si3H8, SiH2SiH, Si2H4, i-Si3H7, n-Si3H7, Si(SiH3)2, and SiH3SiH2SiH have been predicted and found to be in close agreement with those available data in the literature. The product branching rate constants for SiH2 + Si2H6 and SiH3 + Si2H5 reactions and the thermal unimolecular decomposition of Si3H8 for all low-energy paths have been calculated with multichannel variational RRKM theory covering varying P,T conditions typically employed in PECVD and Cat-CVD processes for hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si/H) film growth. The results were also found to be in good agreement with available kinetic data. Our kinetic results may be employed to model and control very large-area a-Si/H film growth for a

  14. Myeloid and lymphoid chimerism after T-cell-depleted bone marrow transplantation: evaluation of conditioning regimens using the polymerase chain reaction to amplify human minisatellite regions of genomic DNA.

    PubMed

    Mackinnon, S; Barnett, L; Bourhis, J H; Black, P; Heller, G; O'Reilly, R J

    1992-12-15

    Determining both myeloid and lymphoid chimerism after T-cell-depleted allogeneic bone marrow transplantation (BMT) could be helpful in the understanding of the biology of engraftment and could provide a rational method of assessing the ability of different conditioning regimens to promote engraftment. We prospectively investigated the role of different pretransplant conditioning regimens in 29 leukemic patients post-BMT by assessing myeloid and T-cell chimerism using a rapid and sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Minisatellites are hypervariable regions of DNA consisting of tandem repeats of a core nucleotide sequence, and allelic polymorphism results from differences in the number of the repeats. We used this variation to distinguish between donor and recipient cells post-BMT. Seventeen patients (9 sibling and 8 unrelated donors) received conditioning with hyperfractionated total body irradiation (TBI), thiotepa, and cyclophosphamide (Cy). Of the other 12 patients (all sibling donors), 11 received TBI plus Cy plus another agent: VP16, carboplatinum, or AZQ. One patient received TBI plus thiotepa plus VP16. All but one of the patients studied received marrow from HLA-identical donors. PCR analysis confirmed donor lymphoid engraftment within 8 days of transplant in six of six patients studied. All granulocyte DNA was of donor origin within the first 4 weeks of transplant, regardless of the conditioning regimen. The day +28 T cells were exclusively of donor origin in 14 of 17 patients who received TBI plus thiotepa plus Cy, but were mixed chimeric in 10 of 12 patients who received other conditioning regimens (P < .001). Early graft rejection was seen in one unrelated transplant recipient conditioned with TBI plus thiotepa plus Cy. Late graft failure was observed in 3 of 12 patients with mixed T-cell chimerism and in none of 16 patients with full donor chimerism at day +28. However, 5 of 16 patients who had complete T-cell chimerism at day +28 developed

  15. Dissociable effects of AMPA-induced lesions of the vertical limb diagonal band of Broca on performance of the 5-choice serial reaction time task and on acquisition of a conditional visual discrimination.

    PubMed

    Muir, J L; Bussey, T J; Everitt, B J; Robbins, T W

    1996-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the role of the cholinergic innervation of the cingulate cortex in visual attentional function and acquisition of a visual conditional discrimination task. Following AMPA (alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methyl-4-isoxazolepropionic acid) lesions of the vertical limb diagonal band of Broca (VDB) which provides the main cholinergic projection to cingulate cortex, animals were not significantly impaired on the 5-choice serial reaction time task. This task, which provides a continuous performance test of visual attention, has previously been shown to be sensitive to AMPA lesions of the nucleus basalis magnocellularis (nbM). In contrast to the results obtained for visual attentional function, lesions of the VDB did significantly affect the acquisition of a visual conditional discrimination. While showing a significant facilitation in the early learning stage of acquiring this task animals with lesions of the VDB were significantly impaired during the late stages of learning this task. This late learning deficit was not the result of the animals being unable to learn the task due to the presence of the lesion throughout task acquisition as the results of a second experiment revealed that when animals were pre-trained to 70% accuracy on the task and then lesioned, the impairment in late learning was still apparent. In light of the results presented in the accompanying paper (Bussey et al., Behav. Brain Res., 1996), these results suggest that the early learning effects may be due to cholinergic denervation of the anterior cingulate cortex while the late learning effects may be due to denervation of the posterior cingulate cortex. Taken together with previous work indicating a role for the nbM cholinergic system in visual attentional function, these results suggest a role for the cholinergic innervation of the cingulate cortex in conditional learning but not for continuous attentional performance.

  16. Title: Elucidation of Environmental Fate of Artificial Sweeteners (Aspartame, Acesulfame K and Saccharin) by Determining Bimolecular Rate Constants with Hydroxyl Radical at Various pH and Temperature Conditions and Possible Reaction By-Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teraji, T.; Arakaki, T.; Suzuka, T.

    2012-12-01

    Use of artificial sweeteners in beverages and food has been rapidly increasing because of their non-calorie nature. In Japan, aspartame, acesulfame K and sucralose are among the most widely used artificial sweeteners. Because the artificial sweeteners are not metabolized in human bodies, they are directly excreted into the environment without chemical transformations. We initiated a study to better understand the fate of artificial sweeteners in the marine environment. The hydroxyl radical (OH), the most potent reactive oxygen species, reacts with various compounds and determines the environmental oxidation capacity and the life-time of many compounds. The steady-state OH concentration and the reaction rate constants between the compound and OH are used to estimate the life-time of the compound. In this study, we determine the bimolecular rate constants between aspartame, acefulfame K and saccharin and OH at various pH and temperature conditions using a competition kinetics technique. We use hydrogen peroxide as a photochemical source of OH. Bimolecular rate constant we obtained so far for aspartame was (2.6±1.2)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 3.0 and (4.9±2.3)×109 M-1 s-1 at pH = 5.5. Little effect was seen by changing the temperatures between 15 and 40 oC. Activation energy (Ea) was calculated to be -1.0 kJ mol-1 at pH = 3.0, +8.5 kJ mol-1 at pH = 5.5, which could be regarded as zero. We will report bimolecular rate constants at different pHs and temperatures for acesulfame K and saccharin, as well. Possible reaction by-products for aspartame will be also reported. We will further discuss the fate of aspartame in the coastal environment.

  17. Fundamental reaction pathways during coprocessing

    SciTech Connect

    Stock, L.M.; Gatsis, J.G.

    1992-12-01

    The objective of this research was to investigate the fundamental reaction pathways in coal petroleum residuum coprocessing. Once the reaction pathways are defined, further efforts can be directed at improving those aspects of the chemistry of coprocessing that are responsible for the desired results such as high oil yields, low dihydrogen consumption, and mild reaction conditions. We decided to carry out this investigation by looking at four basic aspects of coprocessing: (1) the effect of fossil fuel materials on promoting reactions essential to coprocessing such as hydrogen atom transfer, carbon-carbon bond scission, and hydrodemethylation; (2) the effect of varied mild conditions on the coprocessing reactions; (3) determination of dihydrogen uptake and utilization under severe conditions as a function of the coal or petroleum residuum employed; and (4) the effect of varied dihydrogen pressure, temperature, and residence time on the uptake and utilization of dihydrogen and on the distribution of the coprocessed products. Accomplishments are described.

  18. "Greening up" the Suzuki Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aktoudianakis, Evangelos; Chan, Elton; Edward, Amanda R.; Jarosz, Isabel; Lee, Vicki; Mui, Leo; Thatipamala, Sonya S.; Dicks, Andrew P.

    2008-01-01

    This article describes the rapid, green synthesis of a biaryl compound (4-phenylphenol) via a Pd(0)-catalyzed Suzuki cross-coupling reaction in water. Mild reaction conditions and operational simplicity makes this experiment especially amenable to both mid- and upper-level undergraduates. The methodology exposes students to purely aqueous…

  19. Medications and Drug Allergic Reactions

    MedlinePlus

    ... Drug Guide Conditions Dictionary Just for Kids Library School Tools Videos Virtual Allergist Education & Training Careers in ... reaction to a medication. These include: genetics, body chemistry, frequent drug exposure or the presence of an ...

  20. Nanoparticle Reactions on Chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Köhler, J. M.; Kirner, Th.; Wagner, J.; Csáki, A.; Möller, R.; Fritzsche, W.

    The handling of heterogenous systems in micro reactors is difficult due to their adhesion and transport behaviour. Therefore, the formation of precipitates and gas bubbles has to be avoided in micro reaction technology, in most cases. But, micro channels and other micro reactors offer interesting possibilities for the control of reaction conditions and transport by diffusion and convection due to the laminar flow caused by small Reynolds numbers. This can be used for the preparation and modification of objects, which are much smaller than the cross section of microchannels. The formation of colloidal solutions and the change of surface states of nano particles are two important tasks for the application of chip reactors in nanoparticle technology. Some concepts for the preparation and reaction of nanoparticles in modular chip reactor arrangements will be discussed.

  1. Section i: Thermodynamic Properties of Hydrocarbon Radicals, Peroxy Hydrocarbon and Peroxy Chlorohydrocarbon Molecules and Radicals. Section II. Kinetics and Reaction Mechanisms For: (1) Chloroform Pyrolysis and Oxidation; (2) Benzene and Toluene Oxidation Under Atmospheric Conditions.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lay, Tsan-Horng

    1995-01-01

    Alkyl radicals are important active intermediates in gas phase photochemistry and combustion reaction systems. With the exception of a limited number of the most elementary radicals, accurate thermodynamic properties of alkyl radicals are either not available or only rough estimations exist. An H atom Bond Increment approach is developed and a data base is derived, for accurately estimating thermodynamic properties (Delta H_{f }^circ298, S ^circ298 and Cp(T)) for generic classes of hydrocarbon radical species. Reactions of alkyl radicals with molecular oxygen are one of the major reaction paths for these radicals in atmospheric photochemistry, oxidation of hydrocarbon liquids and combustion process. Alkyl hydroperoxides are subsequently formed through the alkyl peroxy radicals reactions with varied chemical species present in the reaction system. Thermodynamic properties of the alkyl hydroperoxides and related radicals are therefore frequently required in gas phase modeling and kinetic studies on these systems. The thermodynamic properties of alkyl hydroperoxides, alkyl peroxy radicals and hydroperoxyl-1-ethyl radicals including the species with fluorine and chlorine substituents on the alpha-carbon are evaluated using molecular orbital calculations. Chloroform is used as a model chlorocarbon system with high Cl/H ratio to investigate thermal decomposition processes of chlorocarbons in oxidative and pyrolytic reaction environments. A detailed reaction mechanism is developed to describe the important features of products and reagent loss and is shown to predict the experimental data well. Reaction pathways and rate constants are developed for CCl _3, CCl_2 and rm C_2Cl_3 radical addition to O_2 and combination with O, OH HO_2 and ClO. The reversible addition reaction of OH radical with benzene to form the hydroxyl-2,4-cyclohexadienyl (benzene -OH) adduct and the subsequent reactions of this benzene -OH adduct with O_2 are important initial steps for the

  2. Proton Transfer Reaction Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometric (PTR-TOF-MS) determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) emitted from a biomass fire developed under stable nocturnal conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brilli, Federico; Gioli, Beniamino; Ciccioli, Paolo; Zona, Donatella; Loreto, Francesco; Janssens, Ivan A.; Ceulemans, Reinhart

    2014-11-01

    Combustion of solid and liquid fuels is the largest source of potentially toxic volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which can strongly affect health and the physical and chemical properties of the atmosphere. Among combustion processes, biomass burning is one of the largest at global scale. We used a Proton Transfer Reaction “Time-of-Flight” Mass Spectrometer (PTR-TOF-MS), which couples high sensitivity with high mass resolution, for real-time detection of multiple VOCs emitted by burned hay and straw in a barn located near our measuring station. We detected 132 different organic ions directly attributable to VOCs emitted from the fire. Methanol, acetaldehyde, acetone, methyl vinyl ether (MVE), acetic acid and glycolaldehyde dominated the VOC mixture composition. The time-course of the 25 most abundant VOCs, representing ∼85% of the whole mixture of VOCs, was associated with that of carbon monoxide (CO), carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) emissions. The strong linear relationship between the concentrations of pyrogenic VOC and of a reference species (i.e. CO) allowed us to compile a list of emission ratios (ERs) and emission factors (EFs), but values of ER (and EF) were overestimated due to the limited mixing of the gases under the stable (non-turbulent) nocturnal conditions. In addition to the 25 most abundant VOCs, chemical formula and concentrations of the residual, less abundant VOCs in the emitted mixture were also estimated by PTR-TOF-MS. Furthermore, the evolution of the complex combustion process was described on the basis of the diverse types of pyrogenic gases recorded.

  3. A 3D-RISM-SCF method with dual solvent boxes for a highly polarized system: application to 1,6-anhydrosugar formation reaction of phenyl α- and β-D-glucosides under basic conditions.

    PubMed

    Aono, Shinji; Hosoya, Takashi; Sakaki, Shigeyoshi

    2013-05-01

    One of the difficulties in application of the usual reference interaction site model self-consistent field (RISM-SCF) method to a highly polarized and bulky system arises from the approximate evaluation of electrostatic potential (ESP) with pure point charges. To improve this ESP evaluation, the ESP near a solute is directly calculated with a solute electronic wavefunction, that distant from a solute is approximately calculated with solute point charges, and they are connected with a switching function. To evaluate the fine solvation structure near the solute by incorporating the long-range solute-solvent Coulombic interaction with low computational cost, we introduced the dual solvent box protocol; one small box with the fine spacing is employed for the first and the second solvation shells and the other large box with the normal spacing is employed for long-range solute-solvent interaction. The levoglucosan formation from phenyl α- and β-d-glucosides under basic conditions is successfully inspected by this 3D-RISM-SCF method at the MP2 and SCS-MP2 levels, though the 1D-RISM-SCF could not be applied to this reaction due to the presence of highly polarized and bulky species. This 3D-RISM-SCF calculation reproduces the experimentally reported higher reactivity of the β-anomer. The 3D-RISM-SCF-calculated activation free energy for the β-anomer is closer to the experimental value than the PCM-calculated one. Interestingly, the solvation effect increases the difference in reactivity between these two anomers. The reason is successfully elucidated with 3D-RISM-SCF-calculated microscopic solvation structure and decomposition analysis of solute-solvent interaction.

  4. Infant Defensive Reactions to Visual Occlusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adamson, Lauren; Tronick, Edward

    This paper describes the initial organization of the infant's reaction to having his vision occluded by an opaque cloth; traces the development of this reaction over the first six months; and probes the role the occlusion of vision plays in provoking the reaction. Fifty videotaped sessions of infants during two conditions - eyes covered with an…

  5. Incidents of chemical reactions in cell equipment

    SciTech Connect

    Baldwin, N.M.; Barlow, C.R.

    1991-12-31

    Strongly exothermic reactions can occur between equipment structural components and process gases under certain accident conditions in the diffusion enrichment cascades. This paper describes the conditions required for initiation of these reactions, and describes the range of such reactions experienced over nearly 50 years of equipment operation in the US uranium enrichment program. Factors are cited which can promote or limit the destructive extent of these reactions, and process operations are described which are designed to control the reactions to minimize equipment damage, downtime, and the possibility of material releases.

  6. Extension of a Kinetic-Theory Approach for Computing Chemical-Reaction Rates to Reactions with Charged Particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liechty, Derek S.; Lewis, Mark J.

    2010-01-01

    Recently introduced molecular-level chemistry models that predict equilibrium and nonequilibrium reaction rates using only kinetic theory and fundamental molecular properties (i.e., no macroscopic reaction rate information) are extended to include reactions involving charged particles and electronic energy levels. The proposed extensions include ionization reactions, exothermic associative ionization reactions, endothermic and exothermic charge exchange reactions, and other exchange reactions involving ionized species. The extensions are shown to agree favorably with the measured Arrhenius rates for near-equilibrium conditions.

  7. Catalytic Organometallic Reactions of Ammonia

    PubMed Central

    Klinkenberg, Jessica L.

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, ammonia had rarely succumbed to catalytic transformations with homogeneous catalysts, and the development of such reactions that are selective for the formation of single products under mild conditions has encountered numerous challenges. However, recently developed catalysts have allowed several classes of reactions to create products with nitrogen-containing functional groups from ammonia. These reactions include hydroaminomethylation, reductive amination, alkylation, allylic substitution, hydroamination, and cross-coupling. This Minireview describes examples of these processes and the factors that control catalyst activity and selectivity. PMID:20857466

  8. Diamine Ligands in Copper-Catalyzed Reactions

    PubMed Central

    Surry, David S.

    2012-01-01

    The utility of copper-mediated cross-coupling reactions has been significantly increased by the development of mild reaction conditions and the ability to employ catalytic amounts of copper. The use of diamine-based ligands has been important in these advances and in this review we discuss these systems, including the choice of reaction conditions and applications in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, natural products and designed materials. PMID:22384310

  9. Unusual transition in quartzite dislocation creep regimes and crystal slip systems in the aureole of the Eureka Valley-Joshua Flat-Beer Creek pluton, California: a case for anhydrous conditions created by decarbonation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Sven S.; Law, Richard D.

    2004-06-01

    . Decarbonation reactions in marble layers interbedded with the inner aureole quartzites and calc-silicate assemblages in the inner aureole quartzites may have produced high XCO 2 (water absent) fluids during deformation. The presence of high XCO 2 fluid is inferred from the prograde assemblage of quartz+calcite (and not wollastonite)+diopside±K-feldspar in the inner aureole quartzites. We suggest that it was these "dry" conditions that suppressed prism [ c] slip and regime 3 recrystallization in the inner aureole and resulted in < a> slip and regime 2 recrystallization, which would normally be associated with lower deformation temperatures. In contrast, the prograde assemblage in the pelite-dominated outer part of the aureole is biotite+K-feldspar. These "wet" pelitic assemblages indicate fluids dominated by water in the outer part of the aureole and promoted prism [ c] slip and regime 3 recrystallization. Because other variables could also have caused the spatial inversion of c-axis fabrics and recrystallization mechanisms, we briefly review those variables known to cause a transition in slip systems and dislocation creep regimes in quartz. Our conclusions are based on a small number of samples, and therefore, the unusual development of crystal fabrics and microstructures in the aureole to the EJB pluton suggests that further study is needed on the effect of fluid composition on crystal slip system activity and recrystallization mechanisms in naturally deformed rocks.

  10. Unraveling reaction pathways and specifying reaction kinetics for complex systems.

    PubMed

    Vinu, R; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    Many natural and industrial processes involve a complex set of competing reactions that include several different species. Detailed kinetic modeling of such systems can shed light on the important pathways involved in various transformations and therefore can be used to optimize the process conditions for the desired product composition and properties. This review focuses on elucidating the various components involved in modeling the kinetics of pyrolysis and oxidation of polymers. The elementary free radical steps that constitute the chain reaction mechanism of gas-phase/nonpolar liquid-phase processes are outlined. Specification of the rate coefficients of the various reaction families, which is central to the theme of kinetics, is described. Construction of the reaction network on the basis of the types of end groups and reactive moieties in a polymer chain is discussed. Modeling frameworks based on the method of moments and kinetic Monte Carlo are evaluated using illustrations. Finally, the prospects and challenges in modeling biomass conversion are addressed.

  11. A Study on the Base–Catalyzed Reverse Vinylogous Aldol Reaction of (4aβ,5β)-4,4a,5,6,7,8-Hexahydro-5-hydroxy-1,4a-dimethylnaphthalen-2(3H)-one under Robinson Annulation Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Payette, Joshua N.; Honda, Tadashi; Yoshizawa, Hidenori; Favaloro, Frank G.; Gribble, Gordon W.

    2008-01-01

    We have proposed a pathway of the base–catalyzed reverse vinylogous aldol reaction of (−)-(4aβ,5β)-4,4a,5,6,7,8-hexahydro-5-hydroxy-1,4a-dimethylnaphthalen-2(3H)-one ((−)-8) under Robinson annulation conditions. For confirmation, 4-(2,6-dimethyl-3-oxocyclohex-1-enyl)butanal (11) and 4-(2,6-dimethyl-5-oxocyclohex-1-enyl)butanal (12), both of which potentially produce enolate I, were synthesized regioselectively. Unexpectedly, 11 gave a complex mixture including only a trace amount of (±)-8 (less than 5% yield) under these basic conditions. To the contrary, 12 cleanly afforded (±)-8 in 66% yield. This result provides evidence for our proposed mechanism of the above reaction. PMID:16388674

  12. Nonequilibrium thermodynamics and a fluctuation theorem for individual reaction steps in a chemical reaction network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pal, Krishnendu; Das, Biswajit; Banerjee, Kinshuk; Gangopadhyay, Gautam

    2015-09-01

    We have introduced an approach to nonequilibrium thermodynamics of an open chemical reaction network in terms of the propensities of the individual elementary reactions and the corresponding reverse reactions. The method is a microscopic formulation of the dissipation function in terms of the relative entropy or Kullback-Leibler distance which is based on the analogy of phase space trajectory with the path of elementary reactions in a network of chemical process. We have introduced here a fluctuation theorem valid for each opposite pair of elementary reactions which is useful in determining the contribution of each sub-reaction on the nonequilibrium thermodynamics of overall reaction. The methodology is applied to an oligomeric enzyme kinetics at a chemiostatic condition that leads the reaction to a nonequilibrium steady state for which we have estimated how each step of the reaction is energy driven or entropy driven to contribute to the overall reaction.

  13. Stability of sharp reaction fronts in porous rocks and implications for non-sharp reaction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wangen, Magnus

    2014-05-01

    The flow of reactive fluids in the subsurface, like for instance acids, may create reaction fronts. A sharp reaction front is an idealization of the narrow zone where the reaction takes place. Narrow reaction zones are studied with a one-component reaction transport model, where a first order reaction changes the porosity. The porosity field is coupled to the permeability field, where an increasing porosity leads to an increasing permeability. Therefore, the reaction has a feed-back on the flow field. We have derived 1D approximate solutions for the change in concentration and porosity across the reaction zone. These solutions are used to derive a condition for reaction fronts to be narrow. The condition gives a minimum reaction rate necessary for 90% of the reaction to be restricted to the given area. Sharp fronts are idealizations of narrow fronts that are more amendable for analytical treatment. A condition has recently been derived for the stability of sharp reaction fronts in homogeneous porous medium using linear stability analysis. The condition gives that a perturbation of a flat reaction front of any wave-length becomes unstable if the permeability behind the front increases. The front instability grows faster for short wave lengths than for long wave lengths. Similarly, the perturbations of the front will die out if the permeability behind the front decreases, and short wave length perturbations will die out faster than long wave length perturbations. It is a condition that applies for both 2D and 3D porous media. Numerical experiments are shown that demonstrate the front stability criterion, when the fronts are narrow, but not sharp. The sharp front approximation turns out to be useful for the interpretation of reactions that are not sufficiently fast to give narrow reaction zones, when the reaction alters the porosity- and the permeability fields. Dissolution is an important example of reactions that increase the porosity and therefore the permeability

  14. Experimental Study of Serpentinization Reactions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cohen, B. A.; Brearley, A. J.; Ganguly, J.; Liermann, H.-P.; Keil, K.

    2004-01-01

    Current carbonaceous chondrite parent-body thermal models [1-3] produce scenarios that are inconsistent with constraints on aqueous alteration conditions based on meteorite mineralogical evidence, such as phase stability relationships within the meteorite matrix minerals [4] and isotope equilibration arguments [5, 6]. This discrepancy arises principally because of the thermal runaway effect produced by silicate hydration reactions (here loosely called serpentinization, as the principal products are serpentine minerals), which are so exothermic as to produce more than enough heat to melt more ice and provide a self-sustaining chain reaction. One possible way to dissipate the heat of reaction is to use a very small parent body [e.g., 2] or possibly a rubble pile model. Another possibility is to release this heat more slowly, which depends on the alteration reaction path and kinetics.

  15. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Phaneuf, Christopher R; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D Curtis; Holst, Gregory L; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R

    2015-07-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously-each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  16. Thermally multiplexed polymerase chain reaction

    PubMed Central

    Phaneuf, Christopher R.; Pak, Nikita; Saunders, D. Curtis; Holst, Gregory L.; Birjiniuk, Joav; Nagpal, Nikita; Culpepper, Stephen; Popler, Emily; Shane, Andi L.; Jerris, Robert; Forest, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Amplification of multiple unique genetic targets using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is commonly required in molecular biology laboratories. Such reactions are typically performed either serially or by multiplex PCR. Serial reactions are time consuming, and multiplex PCR, while powerful and widely used, can be prone to amplification bias, PCR drift, and primer-primer interactions. We present a new thermocycling method, termed thermal multiplexing, in which a single heat source is uniformly distributed and selectively modulated for independent temperature control of an array of PCR reactions. Thermal multiplexing allows amplification of multiple targets simultaneously—each reaction segregated and performed at optimal conditions. We demonstrate the method using a microfluidic system consisting of an infrared laser thermocycler, a polymer microchip featuring 1 μl, oil-encapsulated reactions, and closed-loop pulse-width modulation control. Heat transfer modeling is used to characterize thermal performance limitations of the system. We validate the model and perform two reactions simultaneously with widely varying annealing temperatures (48 °C and 68 °C), demonstrating excellent amplification. In addition, to demonstrate microfluidic infrared PCR using clinical specimens, we successfully amplified and detected both influenza A and B from human nasopharyngeal swabs. Thermal multiplexing is scalable and applicable to challenges such as pathogen detection where patients presenting non-specific symptoms need to be efficiently screened across a viral or bacterial panel. PMID:26339317

  17. Catalysis of Photochemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Albini, A.

    1986-01-01

    Offers a classification system of catalytic effects in photochemical reactions, contrasting characteristic properties of photochemical and thermal reactions. Discusses catalysis and sensitization, examples of catalyzed reactions of excepted states, complexing ground state substrates, and catalysis of primary photoproducts. (JM)

  18. Concordant chemical reaction networks and the Species-Reaction Graph.

    PubMed

    Shinar, Guy; Feinberg, Martin

    2013-01-01

    In a recent paper it was shown that, for chemical reaction networks possessing a subtle structural property called concordance, dynamical behavior of a very circumscribed (and largely stable) kind is enforced, so long as the kinetics lies within the very broad and natural weakly monotonic class. In particular, multiple equilibria are precluded, as are degenerate positive equilibria. Moreover, under certain circumstances, also related to concordance, all real eigenvalues associated with a positive equilibrium are negative. Although concordance of a reaction network can be decided by readily available computational means, we show here that, when a nondegenerate network's Species-Reaction Graph satisfies certain mild conditions, concordance and its dynamical consequences are ensured. These conditions are weaker than earlier ones invoked to establish kinetic system injectivity, which, in turn, is just one ramification of network concordance. Because the Species-Reaction Graph resembles pathway depictions often drawn by biochemists, results here expand the possibility of inferring significant dynamical information directly from standard biochemical reaction diagrams.

  19. Intramolecular anodic olefin coupling reactions: using competition studies to probe the mechanism of oxidative cyclization reactions.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hai-Chao; Moeller, Kevin D

    2010-04-16

    A competition experiment was designed so that the relative rates of anodic cyclization reactions under various electrolysis conditions can be determined. Reactions with ketene dithioacetal and enol ether-based substrates that use lithium methoxide as a base were shown to proceed through radical cation intermediates that were trapped by a sulfonamide anion. Results for the oxidative coupling of a vinyl sulfide with a sulfonamide anion using the same conditions were consistent with the reaction proceeding through a nitrogen-radical.

  20. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests.

    PubMed

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-27

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  1. Reaction Coordinates and Mechanistic Hypothesis Tests

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peters, Baron

    2016-05-01

    Reaction coordinates are integral to several classic rate theories that can (a) predict kinetic trends across conditions and homologous reactions, (b) extract activation parameters with a clear physical interpretation from experimental rates, and (c) enable efficient calculations of free energy barriers and rates. New trajectory-based rare events methods can provide rates directly from dynamical trajectories without a reaction coordinate. Trajectory-based frameworks can also generate ideal (but abstract) reaction coordinates such as committors and eigenfunctions of the master equation. However, rates and mechanistic insights obtained from trajectory-based methods and abstract coordinates are not readily generalized across simulation conditions or reaction families. We discuss methods for identifying physically meaningful reaction coordinates, including committor analysis, variational transition state theory, Kramers-Langer-Berezhkovskii-Szabo theory, and statistical inference methods that can use path sampling data to screen, mix, and optimize thousands of trial coordinates. Special focus is given to likelihood maximization and inertial likelihood maximization approaches.

  2. An Analysis of the Algebraic Method for Balancing Chemical Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, John A.

    1997-01-01

    Analyzes the algebraic method for balancing chemical reactions. Introduces a third general condition that involves a balance between the total amount of oxidation and reduction. Requires the specification of oxidation states for all elements throughout the reaction. Describes the general conditions, the mathematical treatment, redox reactions, and…

  3. Effect the conditions of the acid-thermal modification of clinoptilolite have on the catalytic properties of palladium-copper complexes anchored on it in the reaction of carbon monoxide oxidation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rakitskaya, T. L.; Kiose, T. A.; Ennan, A. A.; Golubchik, K. O.; Oleksenko, L. P.; Gerasiova, V. G.

    2016-06-01

    The dependence of the physicochemical and structural-adsorption properties of natural and acid-thermal modified clinoptilolite, and of Pd(II)-Cu(II) catalysts based on them, on the duration of acid-thermal modification is investigated. The samples under study are described via XRD and thermal gravimetric (DTG and DTA) analysis, IR, DR UV-Vis, EPR spectroscopy, and water vapor adsorption. Values of both the specific surface area ( S sp) and pH of aqueous suspensions are determined. The resulting catalysts are tested in the reaction of low-temperature carbon monoxide oxidation with air oxygen. A conclusion is drawn about the nature of surface bimetallic Pd(II)-Cu(II) complexes. The greatest catalytic activity is shown by complexes based on clinoptilolite and modified with 3 M HNO3 for 0.5 and 1 h.

  4. Platinum-cobalt catalysts for the oxygen reduction reaction in high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells - Long term behavior under ex-situ and in-situ conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schenk, Alexander; Grimmer, Christoph; Perchthaler, Markus; Weinberger, Stephan; Pichler, Birgit; Heinzl, Christoph; Scheu, Christina; Mautner, Franz-Andreas; Bitschnau, Brigitte; Hacker, Viktor

    2014-11-01

    Platinum cobalt catalysts (Pt-Co) have attracted much interest as cathode catalysts for proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) due to their high activity toward oxygen reduction reaction (ORR). Many of the reported catalysts show outstanding performance in ex-situ experiments. However, the laborious synthesis protocols of these Pt-Co catalysts disable an efficient and economic production of membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). We present an economic, flexible and continuous Pt-M/C catalyst preparation method as part of a large scale membrane electrode assembly manufacturing. In comparison, the as-prepared Pt-Co/C based high temperature (HT)-PEM MEA showed an equal performance to a commercially available HT-PEM MEA during 600 h of operation under constant load, although the commercial one had a significantly higher Pt loading at the cathode.

  5. Organic synthesis by quench reactions.

    PubMed

    Park, W K; Hochstim, A R

    1975-01-01

    The effects of chemical quench reactions on the formation of organic compounds at a water surface under simulated primordial earth conditions were investigated for the study of chemical evolution. A mixture of gaseous methane and ammonia over a water surface was exposed to an arc discharge between an electrode and the water surface. This discharge served as a source of dissociated, ionized and excited atomic and molecular species. Various organic molecules were formed in the gaseous, aqueous, and solid states by a subsequent quenching of these reactive species on the water surface. The effects of these water-surface quench reactions were assessed by comparing the amounts of synthesized molecules to the amounts which formed during the discharge of an arc above the water level. The results showed that: (1) the water-surface quench reaction permitted faster rates of formation of an insoluble solid and (2) the quench discharge yielded twice as much amino acids and 17 times more insoluble solids by weight than the other discharge. The highest yield of amino acids with the quench reaction was 9 x 10-7 molecules per erg of input energy. These observations indicate that quench reactions on the oceans, rain, and clouds that would have followed excitation by lightning and shock waves may have played an important role in the prebiotic milieu. Furthermore, the possibility exists that quench reactions can be exploited for the synthesis of organic compounds on a larger scale from simple starting materials.

  6. Chromosomal Conditions

    MedlinePlus

    ... 150 babies is born with a chromosomal condition. Down syndrome is an example of a chromosomal condition. Because ... all pregnant women be offered prenatal tests for Down syndrome and other chromosomal conditions. A screening test is ...

  7. Clinical Pearls: Leprosy Reactions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jane; Boggild, Andrea K

    2016-09-01

    Leprosy reactions are acute inflammatory episodes that occur in the setting of Mycobacterium leprae infection. Precipitants of reactions can be pharmacologic and nonpharmacologic. Both type 1 and type 2 reactions typically occur before and during leprosy treatment but may also occur after treatment has been completed. Reactions cause morbidity due to nerve damage, and prompt corticosteroid therapy is warranted to minimize nerve damage due to reactions.

  8. Multicomponent reactions of cyclobutanones.

    PubMed

    Pirrung, Michael C; Wang, Jianmei

    2009-04-17

    Cyclobutanones are essentially unknown as reactants in isonitrile-based multicomponent reactions. Ugi reactions of cyclobutanone and Passerini reactions of tetramethylcyclobutane-1,3-dione have been performed in this work. These reactions are significantly enhanced by being conducted in water, a subject of recent interest whose basis is still in question but whose effects are beyond doubt. The Ugi reaction of cyclobutanone has been used in a brief synthesis of an aspartame analogue.

  9. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jakob; Kleidon, Axel; Dittrich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha) and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks.

  10. Thermodynamics of random reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Jakob; Kleidon, Axel; Dittrich, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Reaction networks are useful for analyzing reaction systems occurring in chemistry, systems biology, or Earth system science. Despite the importance of thermodynamic disequilibrium for many of those systems, the general thermodynamic properties of reaction networks are poorly understood. To circumvent the problem of sparse thermodynamic data, we generate artificial reaction networks and investigate their non-equilibrium steady state for various boundary fluxes. We generate linear and nonlinear networks using four different complex network models (Erdős-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, Watts-Strogatz, Pan-Sinha) and compare their topological properties with real reaction networks. For similar boundary conditions the steady state flow through the linear networks is about one order of magnitude higher than the flow through comparable nonlinear networks. In all networks, the flow decreases with the distance between the inflow and outflow boundary species, with Watts-Strogatz networks showing a significantly smaller slope compared to the three other network types. The distribution of entropy production of the individual reactions inside the network follows a power law in the intermediate region with an exponent of circa -1.5 for linear and -1.66 for nonlinear networks. An elevated entropy production rate is found in reactions associated with weakly connected species. This effect is stronger in nonlinear networks than in the linear ones. Increasing the flow through the nonlinear networks also increases the number of cycles and leads to a narrower distribution of chemical potentials. We conclude that the relation between distribution of dissipation, network topology and strength of disequilibrium is nontrivial and can be studied systematically by artificial reaction networks. PMID:25723751

  11. Innovative effect of illite on improved microbiological conversion of L-tyrosine to 3,4 dihydroxy phenyl L-alanine (L-DOPA) by Aspergillus oryzae ME2 under acidic reaction conditions.

    PubMed

    Sikander, Ali; Ikram-ul-Haq

    2006-11-01

    In the present investigation, the previous ultraviolet irradiated mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae UV-7 was further improved in terms of 3,4 dihydroxy phenyl L-alanine (L-DOPA) activity after chemical mutagenesis through 1-methyl 3-nitro 1-nitroso guanidine (MNNG = 250-1500 microg/ml) treatment (0-30 min). Among several mutant variants, the one that produced a larger amount of L-DOPA from L-tyrosine was designated to as ME2 and it was made 2-deoxy-D-glucose-resistant by growing it at various concentrations of 2 dg (0.01-0.025 %, w/v) in Vogel's agar medium. Relatively better production of L-DOPA (> 0.60 mg/ml) was obtained when 2.0% (w/v) glucose was used as a carbon source in the mycelium production medium and the tyrosinase activity increased constitutively (1.08 mg/ml), which resulted in a greater production of L-DOPA. At optimum pH0 (pH 6.0) and reaction time (60 min), more than 65% sugar was utilized for cell mass formation. The maximum conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA (0.428 mg/ml) was achieved 60 min after the biochemical reaction. Mould mycelium was used for microbiological conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA because tyrosinases, beta-carboxylases, and tyrosine hydroxylases are intracellular enzymes. The effect of illite (1.0 x 10(6)-6.0 x 10(6) M) on biochemical conversion of L-tyrosine to L-DOPA by Aspergillus oryzae ME(2 )was also carried out. Best results of L-DOPA biosynthesis were observed when the concentration of illite was 3.5 x 10(-6) M (1.686 mg/ml L-DOPA produced with 1.525 mg/ml consumption of L-tyrosine). It was noted that the addition of illite not only increased enzyme activity but also enhanced the permeability of cell membrane to facilitate the secretion of enzymes into the reaction broth. The comparison of kinetic parameters showed the ability of mutant to yield L-DOPA (i.e., Yp/x 7.360 +/- 0.04 mg/mg). When the culture grown on various illite concentrations was monitored for Qp, Qs, and qp, there was significant enhancement (p < 0

  12. Competitive Deprotonation and Superoxide [O2 -•] Radical-Anion Adduct Formation Reactions of Carboxamides under Negative-Ion Atmospheric-Pressure Helium-Plasma Ionization (HePI) Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Isra; Pinto, Spencer; Weisbecker, Carl; Attygalle, Athula B.

    2016-03-01

    Carboxamides bearing an N-H functionality are known to undergo deprotonation under negative-ion-generating mass spectrometric conditions. Herein, we report that N-H bearing carboxamides with acidities lower than that of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O•) preferentially form superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•) adducts, rather than deprotonate, when they are exposed to the glow discharge of a helium-plasma ionization source. For example, the spectra of N-alkylacetamides show peaks for superoxide radical-anion (O2 -•) adducts. Conversely, more acidic amides, such as N-alkyltrifluoroacetamides, preferentially undergo deprotonation under similar experimental conditions. Upon collisional activation, the O2 -• adducts of N-alkylacetamides either lose the neutral amide or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O•) to generate the superoxide radical-anion ( m/z 32) or the deprotonated amide [ m/z (M - H)-], respectively. For somewhat acidic carboxamides, the association between the two entities is weak. Thus, upon mildest collisional activation, the adduct dissociates to eject the superoxide anion. Superoxide-adduct formation results are useful for structure determination purposes because carboxamides devoid of a N-H functionality undergo neither deprotonation nor adduct formation under HePI conditions.

  13. Continuity and change?: Exploring reactions to a guided self-management intervention in a randomised controlled trial for IBS with reference to prior experience of managing a long term condition

    PubMed Central

    Rogers, Anne; Lee, Victoria; Kennedy, Anne

    2007-01-01

    Self-care interventions are promoted as effective strategies for improving the quality of life and health outcomes for individuals with long-term health conditions. Outcome measures used in evaluations using Randomised Controlled Trials (RCTs) are not designed to consider patients' prior management strategies and experience of illness. Yet the experience of illness literature suggests that adjusting to living with chronic illness, together with broader contextual influences, are likely to be relevant to understanding responses to self-management initiatives. Using group and individual interview data we attempt to illuminate the transposition of IBS from a condition unsatisfactorily managed by medicine to one successfully managed within the life worlds of individuals. If routine embedding of complex interventions depends on the accomplishment of integration and workability in patients' everyday lives then the design and evaluation of such interventions should view participation as part of a process of continuity as well as change. Responses to formal self-management can be extended beyond psychological and other quantitatively measured outcomes. A useful addendum to trial outcomes for self-management education is an understanding of change as being inextricably linked to people's previous attempts to, and experience of, managing long-term conditions. We suggest that the benefits of understanding the prior experience of managing illness and contact with health services include the acceptability and workability of complex interventions in patients' everyday lives. PMID:17316438

  14. Competitive Deprotonation and Superoxide [O₂⁻•)] Radical-Anion Adduct Formation Reactions of Carboxamides under Negative-Ion Atmospheric-Pressure Helium-Plasma Ionization (HePI) Conditions.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Isra; Pinto, Spencer; Weisbecker, Carl; Attygalle, Athula B

    2016-03-01

    Carboxamides bearing an N-H functionality are known to undergo deprotonation under negative-ion-generating mass spectrometric conditions. Herein, we report that N-H bearing carboxamides with acidities lower than that of the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O(•)) preferentially form superoxide radical-anion (O2(-•)) adducts, rather than deprotonate, when they are exposed to the glow discharge of a helium-plasma ionization source. For example, the spectra of N-alkylacetamides show peaks for superoxide radical-anion (O2(-•)) adducts. Conversely, more acidic amides, such as N-alkyltrifluoroacetamides, preferentially undergo deprotonation under similar experimental conditions. Upon collisional activation, the O2(-•) adducts of N-alkylacetamides either lose the neutral amide or the hydroperoxyl radical (HO-O(•)) to generate the superoxide radical-anion (m/z 32) or the deprotonated amide [m/z (M - H)(-)], respectively. For somewhat acidic carboxamides, the association between the two entities is weak. Thus, upon mildest collisional activation, the adduct dissociates to eject the superoxide anion. Superoxide-adduct formation results are useful for structure determination purposes because carboxamides devoid of a N-H functionality undergo neither deprotonation nor adduct formation under HePI conditions. PMID:26545766

  15. Adsorption Isotherms and Surface Reaction Kinetics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lobo, L. S.; Bernardo, C. A.

    1974-01-01

    Explains an error that occurs in calculating the conditions for a maximum value of a rate expression for a bimolecular reaction. The rate expression is derived using the Langmuir adsorption isotherm to relate gas pressures and corresponding surface coverages. (GS)

  16. Reaction theory for exotic nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Bonaccorso, Angela

    2014-05-09

    Exotic nuclei are usually defined as those with unusual N/Z ratios. They can be found in the crust of neutron stars enbedded in a sea of electrons or created in laboratory by fragmentation of a primary beam (in-flight method) or of the target (ISOL method). They are extremely important for nuclear astrophysics, see for example Ref.[1]. Furthermore by studying them we can check the limits of validity of nuclear reaction and structure models. This contribution will be devoted to the understanding of how by using reaction theory and comparing to the data we can extract structure information. We shall discuss the differences between the mechanisms of transfer and breakup reactions, an we will try to explain how nowadays it is possible to do accurate spectroscopy in extreme conditions.

  17. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    PubMed Central

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2016-01-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results. PMID:25768640

  18. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  19. Reaction rates for mesoscopic reaction-diffusion kinetics.

    PubMed

    Hellander, Stefan; Hellander, Andreas; Petzold, Linda

    2015-02-01

    The mesoscopic reaction-diffusion master equation (RDME) is a popular modeling framework frequently applied to stochastic reaction-diffusion kinetics in systems biology. The RDME is derived from assumptions about the underlying physical properties of the system, and it may produce unphysical results for models where those assumptions fail. In that case, other more comprehensive models are better suited, such as hard-sphere Brownian dynamics (BD). Although the RDME is a model in its own right, and not inferred from any specific microscale model, it proves useful to attempt to approximate a microscale model by a specific choice of mesoscopic reaction rates. In this paper we derive mesoscopic scale-dependent reaction rates by matching certain statistics of the RDME solution to statistics of the solution of a widely used microscopic BD model: the Smoluchowski model with a Robin boundary condition at the reaction radius of two molecules. We also establish fundamental limits on the range of mesh resolutions for which this approach yields accurate results and show both theoretically and in numerical examples that as we approach the lower fundamental limit, the mesoscopic dynamics approach the microscopic dynamics. We show that for mesh sizes below the fundamental lower limit, results are less accurate. Thus, the lower limit determines the mesh size for which we obtain the most accurate results.

  20. Assessment of reaction-rate predictions of a collision-energy approach for chemical reactions in atmospheric flows.

    SciTech Connect

    Gallis, Michail A.; Bond, Ryan Bomar; Torczynski, John Robert

    2010-06-01

    A recently proposed approach for the Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method to calculate chemical-reaction rates is assessed for high-temperature atmospheric species. The new DSMC model reproduces measured equilibrium reaction rates without using any macroscopic reaction-rate information. Since it uses only molecular properties, the new model is inherently able to predict reaction rates for arbitrary non-equilibrium conditions. DSMC non-equilibrium reaction rates are compared to Park's phenomenological nonequilibrium reaction-rate model, the predominant model for hypersonic-flow-field calculations. For near-equilibrium conditions, Park's model is in good agreement with the DSMC-calculated reaction rates. For far-from-equilibrium conditions, corresponding to a typical shock layer, significant differences can be found. The DSMC predictions are also found to be in very good agreement with measured and calculated non-equilibrium reaction rates, offering strong evidence that this is a viable and reliable technique to predict chemical reaction rates.

  1. Effect of sample pooling and transport conditions on the clinical sensitivity of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis in preputial samples from bulls.

    PubMed

    García-Guerra, Alvaro; Waldner, Cheryl L; Pellegrino, Andrea; Macdonald, Nicole; Chaban, Bonnie; Hill, Janet E; Hendrick, Steven H

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of bovine genital campylobacteriosis (BGC) presents significant challenges, as traditional methods lack sensitivity when prolonged transport of samples is required. Assays of preputial samples by means of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provide good sensitivity and high throughput capabilities. However, there is limited information on the acceptable duration of transport and temperature during transport of samples. In addition, the use of pooled samples has proven to be a valuable strategy for the diagnosis of other venereal diseases in cattle. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effect of sample pooling and of transport time and temperature on the clinical sensitivity of a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis in preputial samples from beef bulls. Eight infected bulls and 176 virgin yearling bulls were used as the source of samples. The qPCR sensitivity was comparable for unpooled samples and pools of 5 samples, whereas sensitivity was decreased for pools of 10 samples. Sensitivity for the various pool sizes improved with repeated sampling. For shorter-term transport (2 and 48 h), sensitivity was greatest when the samples were stored at 4°C and 30°C, whereas for longer-term transport (96 h) sensitivity was greatest when the samples were stored at -20°C. The creation of pools of 5 samples is therefore a good option to decrease costs when screening bulls for BGC with the qPCR assay of direct preputial samples. Ideally the samples should be stored at 4°C and arrive at the laboratory within 48 h of collection, but when that is not possible freezing at -20°C could minimize the loss of sensitivity.

  2. Hexacoordinate Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts with pH-responsive N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) and N-donor ligands for ROMP reactions in non-aqueous, aqueous and emulsion conditions.

    PubMed

    Balof, Shawna L; Nix, K Owen; Olliff, Matthew S; Roessler, Sarah E; Saha, Arpita; Müller, Kevin B; Behrens, Ulrich; Valente, Edward J; Schanz, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Three new ruthenium alkylidene complexes (PCy3)Cl2(H2ITap)Ru=CHSPh (9), (DMAP)2Cl2(H2ITap)Ru=CHPh (11) and (DMAP)2Cl2(H2ITap)Ru=CHSPh (12) have been synthesized bearing the pH-responsive H2ITap ligand (H2ITap = 1,3-bis(2',6'-dimethyl-4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazol-2-ylidene). Catalysts 11 and 12 are additionally ligated by two pH-responsive DMAP ligands. The crystal structure was solved for complex 12 by X-ray diffraction. In organic, neutral solution, the catalysts are capable of performing standard ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions with standard substrates. The ROMP with complex 11 is accelerated in the presence of two equiv of H3PO4, but is reduced as soon as the acid amount increased. The metathesis of phenylthiomethylidene catalysts 9 and 12 is sluggish at room temperature, but their ROMP can be dramatically accelerated at 60 °C. Complexes 11 and 12 are soluble in aqueous acid. They display the ability to perform RCM of diallylmalonic acid (DAMA), however, their conversions are very low amounting only to few turnovers before decomposition. However, both catalysts exhibit outstanding performance in the ROMP of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and mixtures of DCPD with cyclooctene (COE) in acidic aqueous microemulsion. With loadings as low as 180 ppm, the catalysts afforded mostly quantitative conversions of these monomers while maintaining the size and shape of the droplets throughout the polymerization process. Furthermore, the coagulate content for all experiments stayed <2%. This represents an unprecedented efficiency in emulsion ROMP based on hydrophilic ruthenium alkylidene complexes.

  3. Hexacoordinate Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts with pH-responsive N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) and N-donor ligands for ROMP reactions in non-aqueous, aqueous and emulsion conditions

    PubMed Central

    Balof, Shawna L; Nix, K Owen; Olliff, Matthew S; Roessler, Sarah E; Saha, Arpita; Müller, Kevin B; Behrens, Ulrich; Valente, Edward J

    2015-01-01

    Summary Three new ruthenium alkylidene complexes (PCy3)Cl2(H2ITap)Ru=CHSPh (9), (DMAP)2Cl2(H2ITap)Ru=CHPh (11) and (DMAP)2Cl2(H2ITap)Ru=CHSPh (12) have been synthesized bearing the pH-responsive H2ITap ligand (H2ITap = 1,3-bis(2’,6’-dimethyl-4’-dimethylaminophenyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazol-2-ylidene). Catalysts 11 and 12 are additionally ligated by two pH-responsive DMAP ligands. The crystal structure was solved for complex 12 by X-ray diffraction. In organic, neutral solution, the catalysts are capable of performing standard ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions with standard substrates. The ROMP with complex 11 is accelerated in the presence of two equiv of H3PO4, but is reduced as soon as the acid amount increased. The metathesis of phenylthiomethylidene catalysts 9 and 12 is sluggish at room temperature, but their ROMP can be dramatically accelerated at 60 °C. Complexes 11 and 12 are soluble in aqueous acid. They display the ability to perform RCM of diallylmalonic acid (DAMA), however, their conversions are very low amounting only to few turnovers before decomposition. However, both catalysts exhibit outstanding performance in the ROMP of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and mixtures of DCPD with cyclooctene (COE) in acidic aqueous microemulsion. With loadings as low as 180 ppm, the catalysts afforded mostly quantitative conversions of these monomers while maintaining the size and shape of the droplets throughout the polymerization process. Furthermore, the coagulate content for all experiments stayed <2%. This represents an unprecedented efficiency in emulsion ROMP based on hydrophilic ruthenium alkylidene complexes. PMID:26664616

  4. Effect of sample pooling and transport conditions on the clinical sensitivity of a real-time polymerase chain reaction assay for Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis in preputial samples from bulls

    PubMed Central

    García-Guerra, Alvaro; Waldner, Cheryl L.; Pellegrino, Andrea; Macdonald, Nicole; Chaban, Bonnie; Hill, Janet E.; Hendrick, Steven H.

    2016-01-01

    The diagnosis of bovine genital campylobacteriosis (BGC) presents significant challenges, as traditional methods lack sensitivity when prolonged transport of samples is required. Assays of preputial samples by means of real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) provide good sensitivity and high throughput capabilities. However, there is limited information on the acceptable duration of transport and temperature during transport of samples. In addition, the use of pooled samples has proven to be a valuable strategy for the diagnosis of other venereal diseases in cattle. The objectives of the present study were to determine the effect of sample pooling and of transport time and temperature on the clinical sensitivity of a real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay for Campylobacter fetus subsp. venerealis in preputial samples from beef bulls. Eight infected bulls and 176 virgin yearling bulls were used as the source of samples. The qPCR sensitivity was comparable for unpooled samples and pools of 5 samples, whereas sensitivity was decreased for pools of 10 samples. Sensitivity for the various pool sizes improved with repeated sampling. For shorter-term transport (2 and 48 h), sensitivity was greatest when the samples were stored at 4°C and 30°C, whereas for longer-term transport (96 h) sensitivity was greatest when the samples were stored at −20°C. The creation of pools of 5 samples is therefore a good option to decrease costs when screening bulls for BGC with the qPCR assay of direct preputial samples. Ideally the samples should be stored at 4°C and arrive at the laboratory within 48 h of collection, but when that is not possible freezing at −20°C could minimize the loss of sensitivity. PMID:26733730

  5. Hexacoordinate Ru-based olefin metathesis catalysts with pH-responsive N-heterocyclic carbene (NHC) and N-donor ligands for ROMP reactions in non-aqueous, aqueous and emulsion conditions.

    PubMed

    Balof, Shawna L; Nix, K Owen; Olliff, Matthew S; Roessler, Sarah E; Saha, Arpita; Müller, Kevin B; Behrens, Ulrich; Valente, Edward J; Schanz, Hans-Jörg

    2015-01-01

    Three new ruthenium alkylidene complexes (PCy3)Cl2(H2ITap)Ru=CHSPh (9), (DMAP)2Cl2(H2ITap)Ru=CHPh (11) and (DMAP)2Cl2(H2ITap)Ru=CHSPh (12) have been synthesized bearing the pH-responsive H2ITap ligand (H2ITap = 1,3-bis(2',6'-dimethyl-4'-dimethylaminophenyl)-4,5-dihydroimidazol-2-ylidene). Catalysts 11 and 12 are additionally ligated by two pH-responsive DMAP ligands. The crystal structure was solved for complex 12 by X-ray diffraction. In organic, neutral solution, the catalysts are capable of performing standard ring-opening metathesis polymerization (ROMP) and ring closing metathesis (RCM) reactions with standard substrates. The ROMP with complex 11 is accelerated in the presence of two equiv of H3PO4, but is reduced as soon as the acid amount increased. The metathesis of phenylthiomethylidene catalysts 9 and 12 is sluggish at room temperature, but their ROMP can be dramatically accelerated at 60 °C. Complexes 11 and 12 are soluble in aqueous acid. They display the ability to perform RCM of diallylmalonic acid (DAMA), however, their conversions are very low amounting only to few turnovers before decomposition. However, both catalysts exhibit outstanding performance in the ROMP of dicyclopentadiene (DCPD) and mixtures of DCPD with cyclooctene (COE) in acidic aqueous microemulsion. With loadings as low as 180 ppm, the catalysts afforded mostly quantitative conversions of these monomers while maintaining the size and shape of the droplets throughout the polymerization process. Furthermore, the coagulate content for all experiments stayed <2%. This represents an unprecedented efficiency in emulsion ROMP based on hydrophilic ruthenium alkylidene complexes. PMID:26664616

  6. Mathematical model to predict drivers' reaction speeds.

    PubMed

    Long, Benjamin L; Gillespie, A Isabella; Tanaka, Martin L

    2012-02-01

    Mental distractions and physical impairments can increase the risk of accidents by affecting a driver's ability to control the vehicle. In this article, we developed a linear mathematical model that can be used to quantitatively predict drivers' performance over a variety of possible driving conditions. Predictions were not limited only to conditions tested, but also included linear combinations of these tests conditions. Two groups of 12 participants were evaluated using a custom drivers' reaction speed testing device to evaluate the effect of cell phone talking, texting, and a fixed knee brace on the components of drivers' reaction speed. Cognitive reaction time was found to increase by 24% for cell phone talking and 74% for texting. The fixed knee brace increased musculoskeletal reaction time by 24%. These experimental data were used to develop a mathematical model to predict reaction speed for an untested condition, talking on a cell phone with a fixed knee brace. The model was verified by comparing the predicted reaction speed to measured experimental values from an independent test. The model predicted full braking time within 3% of the measured value. Although only a few influential conditions were evaluated, we present a general approach that can be expanded to include other types of distractions, impairments, and environmental conditions. PMID:22431214

  7. Mathematical model to predict drivers' reaction speeds.

    PubMed

    Long, Benjamin L; Gillespie, A Isabella; Tanaka, Martin L

    2012-02-01

    Mental distractions and physical impairments can increase the risk of accidents by affecting a driver's ability to control the vehicle. In this article, we developed a linear mathematical model that can be used to quantitatively predict drivers' performance over a variety of possible driving conditions. Predictions were not limited only to conditions tested, but also included linear combinations of these tests conditions. Two groups of 12 participants were evaluated using a custom drivers' reaction speed testing device to evaluate the effect of cell phone talking, texting, and a fixed knee brace on the components of drivers' reaction speed. Cognitive reaction time was found to increase by 24% for cell phone talking and 74% for texting. The fixed knee brace increased musculoskeletal reaction time by 24%. These experimental data were used to develop a mathematical model to predict reaction speed for an untested condition, talking on a cell phone with a fixed knee brace. The model was verified by comparing the predicted reaction speed to measured experimental values from an independent test. The model predicted full braking time within 3% of the measured value. Although only a few influential conditions were evaluated, we present a general approach that can be expanded to include other types of distractions, impairments, and environmental conditions.

  8. A Lewis acid-promoted Pinner reaction

    PubMed Central

    Pfaff, Dominik; Nemecek, Gregor

    2013-01-01

    Summary Carbonitriles and alcohols react in a Lewis acid-promoted Pinner reaction to carboxylic esters. Best results are obtained with two equivalents of trimethylsilyl triflate as Lewis acid. Good yields are achieved with primary alcohols and aliphatic or benzylic carbonitriles, but the straightforward synthesis of acrylates and benzoates starting with acrylonitrile and benzonitrile, respectively, is similarly possible. Phenols are not acylated under these reaction conditions. The method has been used for the first total synthesis of the natural product monaspilosin. In the reaction of benzyl alcohols variable amounts of amides are formed in a Ritter-type side reaction. PMID:23946857

  9. Carbon-Fixing Reactions of Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Summaryplantcell;28/7/tpc.116.tt0716/FIG1F1fig1Photosynthesis in plants converts the energy of sunlight into chemical energy. Although photosynthesis involves many proteins and catalytic processes, it often is described as two sets of reactions, the light-dependent reactions and the carbon-fixing reactions. This lesson introduces the core biochemistry of the carbon-fixing reactions of photosynthesis, as well as its variations, C4 and CAM. Finally, it addresses how and why plants are affected by rising atmospheric CO2 levels, and research efforts to increase photosynthetic efficiency in current and future conditions.

  10. Carbon-Fixing Reactions of Photosynthesis.

    PubMed

    2016-07-01

    Summaryplantcell;28/7/tpc.116.tt0716/FIG1F1fig1Photosynthesis in plants converts the energy of sunlight into chemical energy. Although photosynthesis involves many proteins and catalytic processes, it often is described as two sets of reactions, the light-dependent reactions and the carbon-fixing reactions. This lesson introduces the core biochemistry of the carbon-fixing reactions of photosynthesis, as well as its variations, C4 and CAM. Finally, it addresses how and why plants are affected by rising atmospheric CO2 levels, and research efforts to increase photosynthetic efficiency in current and future conditions. PMID:27493209

  11. Knoevenagel Reaction of Unprotected Sugars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherrmann, Marie-Christine

    The Knoevenagel reaction of unprotected sugars was investigated in the 1950s using zinc chloride as promoter. The so-called Garcia Gonzalez reaction had been almost forgotten for 50 years, until the emergence of new water tolerant catalysts having Lewis acid behavior. The reaction was thus reinvestigated and optimal conditions have been found to prepare trihydroxylated furan derivatives from pentose or β-tetrahydrofuranylfuran from hexoses with non-cyclic β-keto ester or β-diketones. Other valuable compounds such as β-linked tetrahydrobenzofuranyl glycosides or hydroxyalkyl-3,3,6,6,-tetramethyl-3,4,5,6,7,9-hexahydro-1H-xanthene-1,8(2H)-dione can be obtained using cyclic β-dicarbonylic derivatives. Apart from one report in the 1950s, the Knoevenagel reaction of unprotected carbohydrate in basic condition has been studied only in the mid-1980s to prepare C-glycosyl barbiturates from barbituric acids and, later on, from non-cyclic β-diketones, β-C-glycosidic ketones. The efficient method exploited to prepare such compounds has found an industrial development in cosmetics.

  12. Idiosyncratic allergic reaction to textured saline implants.

    PubMed

    Sabbagh, W H; Murphy, R X; Kucirka, S J; Okunski, W J

    1996-04-01

    In the literature, multiple conditions, including hematomas, self-limited cutaneous eruptions, and generalized systemic complaints, have been attributed to breast implants. We report the first case of idiosyncratic allergic reaction to the textured surface of a mammary prosthesis. The reaction was documented by patch testing of the textured surface compared with smooth-surface silicone controls. Symptoms resolved with removal of the implants and have not recurred after insertion of smooth-walled implants. Whereas the physiology of this condition remains unclear at this time, it is important to recognize the possibility of a delayed hypersensitivity reaction when considering reconstruction with a textured breast implant.

  13. What is a "DNA-Compatible" Reaction?

    PubMed

    Malone, Marie L; Paegel, Brian M

    2016-04-11

    DNA-encoded synthesis can generate vastly diverse screening libraries of arbitrarily complex molecules as long as chemical reaction conditions do not compromise DNA's informational integrity, a fundamental constraint that "DNA-compatible" reaction development does not presently address. We devised DNA-encoded reaction rehearsal, an integrated analysis of reaction yield and impact on DNA, to acquire these key missing data. Magnetic DNA-functionalized sensor beads quantitatively report the % DNA template molecules remaining viable for PCR amplification after exposure to test reaction conditions. Analysis of solid-phase bond forming (e.g., Suzuki-Miyaura cross-coupling, reductive amination) and deprotection reactions (e.g., allyl esters, silyl ethers) guided the definition and optimization of DNA-compatible reaction conditions (>90% yield, >30% viable DNA molecules), most notably in cases that involved known (H(+), Pd) and more obscure (Δ, DMF) hazards to DNA integrity. The data provide an empirical yet mechanistically consistent and predictive framework for designing successful DNA-encoded reaction sequences for combinatorial library synthesis. PMID:26971959

  14. Microscale Thermite Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arnaiz, Francisco J.; Aguado, Rafael; Arnaiz, Susana

    1998-01-01

    Describes the adaptation of thermite (aluminum with metal oxides) reactions from whole-class demonstrations to student-run micro-reactions. Lists detailed directions and possible variations of the experiment. (WRM)

  15. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction can be provoked by skin contact with poison plants, chemicals and animal scratches, as well as by ... dust, nuts and shellfish, may also cause allergic reaction. Medications such as penicillin and other antibiotics are ...

  16. Allergic reactions (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Allergic reaction is a sensitivity to a specific substance, called an allergen, that is contacted through the skin, inhaled into the lungs, swallowed or injected. The body's reaction to an allergen can be mild, such as ...

  17. Microfluidic chemical reaction circuits

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Chung-cheng; Sui, Guodong; Elizarov, Arkadij; Kolb, Hartmuth C.; Huang, Jiang; Heath, James R.; Phelps, Michael E.; Quake, Stephen R.; Tseng, Hsian-rong; Wyatt, Paul; Daridon, Antoine

    2012-06-26

    New microfluidic devices, useful for carrying out chemical reactions, are provided. The devices are adapted for on-chip solvent exchange, chemical processes requiring multiple chemical reactions, and rapid concentration of reagents.

  18. Continuous detonation reaction engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lange, O. H.; Stein, R. J.; Tubbs, H. E.

    1968-01-01

    Reaction engine operates on the principles of a controlled condensed detonation rather than on the principles of gas expansion. The detonation results in reaction products that are expelled at a much higher velocity.

  19. Modeling the enzyme kinetic reaction.

    PubMed

    Atangana, Abdon

    2015-09-01

    The Enzymatic control reactions model was presented within the scope of fractional calculus. In order to accommodate the usual initial conditions, the fractional derivative used is in Caputo sense. The methodologies of the three analytical methods were used to derive approximate solution of the fractional nonlinear system of differential equations. Two methods use integral operator and the other one uses just an integral. Numerical results obtained exhibit biological behavior of real world problem.

  20. Catalytic diastereoselective petasis reactions.

    PubMed

    Muncipinto, Giovanni; Moquist, Philip N; Schreiber, Stuart L; Schaus, Scott E

    2011-08-22

    Multicomponent Petasis reactions: the first diastereoselective Petasis reaction catalyzed by chiral biphenols that enables the synthesis of syn and anti β-amino alcohols in pure form has been developed. The reaction exploits a multicomponent approach that involves boronates, α-hydroxy aldehydes, and amines. PMID:21751322

  1. Time- and space-resolved high energy operando X-ray diffraction for monitoring the methanol to hydrocarbons reaction over H-ZSM-22 zeolite catalyst in different conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Campo, Pablo; Slawinski, Wojciech Andrzej; Henry, Reynald; Erichsen, Marius Westgård; Svelle, Stian; Beato, Pablo; Wragg, David; Olsbye, Unni

    2016-06-01

    The conversion of methanol to hydrocarbons (MTH) over H-ZSM-22 was studied by operando time- and space-resolved X-ray diffraction (XRD) at 370-385 °C and WHSV = 2 g/g h at the Swiss-Norwegian Beamline at ESRF. The performance of a commercial H-ZSM-22 sample was compared before and after acid-base treatment, and with and without propanol co-feed, respectively. N2 adsorption, Scanning Electron Microscopy and propyl amine desorption experiments showed that acid-base treatment led to enhanced accessibility of acid sites, mainly due to the formation of mesopores between agglomerated H-ZSM-22 crystals. The catalytic set-up allowed us to simultaneously observe the catalyst activity and unit cell volume variations by time- and space-resolved HXRD in operando conditions. The expansion of the unit cell and final flattening at different positions in the catalytic bed matched very nicely with the catalytic activity gradients. Different scenarios provided different behaviors and gave insights in the effect of morphology and co-feed process on the activity in the MTH process. This technique is the only one which has so far been able to provide direct evidence of the behavior of the species inside the catalytic reactor.

  2. Unraveling reaction pathways and specifying reaction kinetics for complex systems.

    PubMed

    Vinu, R; Broadbelt, Linda J

    2012-01-01

    Many natural and industrial processes involve a complex set of competing reactions that include several different species. Detailed kinetic modeling of such systems can shed light on the important pathways involved in various transformations and therefore can be used to optimize the process conditions for the desired product composition and properties. This review focuses on elucidating the various components involved in modeling the kinetics of pyrolysis and oxidation of polymers. The elementary free radical steps that constitute the chain reaction mechanism of gas-phase/nonpolar liquid-phase processes are outlined. Specification of the rate coefficients of the various reaction families, which is central to the theme of kinetics, is described. Construction of the reaction network on the basis of the types of end groups and reactive moieties in a polymer chain is discussed. Modeling frameworks based on the method of moments and kinetic Monte Carlo are evaluated using illustrations. Finally, the prospects and challenges in modeling biomass conversion are addressed. PMID:22468596

  3. Lithium cell reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clark, W.; Dampier, F.; Lombardi, A.; Cole, T.

    1983-12-01

    The objectives of this program were: (1) investigate reactions occurring in the Li/SOCl2 cell for a range of specified test conditions and (2) perform detailed analyses for impurities present in cell components, assess the impact of each impurity on cell performance and safety and recommend concentration limits for detrimental impurities. The products of the reduction of SOCl2 were investigated using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV) and constant current coulometry in dimethylformamide (DMF) supporting electrolyte. Voltammetric analysis after 50 to 100% of the SOCl2 had been reduced on platinum or glassy carbon cathodes showed no signs of significant quantities of unstable intermediates with lifetimes from 0.1 to 48 hours. Quantitative infrared spectroscopy demonstrated that substantial amounts of SO2 are absorbed on Shawinigan carbon from 1.8M LiAlCl4/SOCl2-SO solutions. Chemical analyses of the reagents and cell components used in Li/SOCl2 cell construction were carried out as well as cell discharge tests to determine the impact of key impurities on cell performance.

  4. Diastereoselective Ugi reaction of chiral 1,3-aminoalcohols derived from an organocatalytic Mannich reaction

    PubMed Central

    Caputo, Samantha; Basso, Andrea; Moni, Lisa; Riva, Renata; Rocca, Valeria

    2016-01-01

    Summary Enantiomerically pure β-aminoalcohols, produced through an organocatalytic Mannich reaction, were subjected to an Ugi multicomponent reaction under classical or Lewis acid-promoted conditions with diastereoselectivities ranging from moderate to good. This approach represents a step-economical path to enantiomerically pure, polyfunctionalized peptidomimetics endowed with three stereogenic centers, allowing the introduction of five diversity inputs. PMID:26877816

  5. Noncanonical reactions of flavoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Sobrado, Pablo

    2012-01-01

    Enzymes containing flavin cofactors are predominantly involved in redox reactions in numerous cellular processes where the protein environment modulates the chemical reactivity of the flavin to either transfer one or two electrons. Some flavoenzymes catalyze reactions with no net redox change. In these reactions, the protein environment modulates the reactivity of the flavin to perform novel chemistries. Recent mechanistic and structural data supporting novel flavin functionalities in reactions catalyzed by chorismate synthase, type II isopentenyl diphosphate isomerase, UDP-galactopyranose mutase, and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate synthase are presented in this review. In these enzymes, the flavin plays either a direct role in acid/base reactions or as a nucleophile or electrophile. In addition, the flavin cofactor is proposed to function as a "molecular scaffold" in the formation of UDP-galactofuranose and alkyl-dihydroxyacetonephosphate by forming a covalent adduct with reaction intermediates.

  6. Anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin.

    PubMed Central

    Stricker, B. H.; Slagboom, G.; Demaeseneer, R.; Slootmaekers, V.; Thijs, I.; Olsson, S.

    1988-01-01

    During 1981 to mid-1988 three cases of anaphylactic shock after treatment with the quinolone derivative cinoxacin were reviewed by the Netherlands Centre for Monitoring of Adverse Reactions to Drugs and 17 cases of an anaphylactic type of reaction notified to the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for International Drug Monitoring. In five out of six patients for whom data were available the reaction began shortly after taking a single capsule of a second or next course of treatment. Cinoxacin is related to nalidixic acid, and one patient previously treated with that agent subsequently had an anaphylactoid reaction to cinoxacin and later developed a skin reaction to nalidixic acid. There were no deaths, and patients treated as an emergency with plasma expanders or with adrenaline and corticosteroids generally recovered promptly and uneventfully. In view of the potentially fatal consequences of anaphylactic reactions to cinoxacin and other quinolones doctors should take care when prescribing these drugs. PMID:3147004

  7. Reaction spreading on graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burioni, Raffaella; Chibbaro, Sergio; Vergni, Davide; Vulpiani, Angelo

    2012-11-01

    We study reaction-diffusion processes on graphs through an extension of the standard reaction-diffusion equation starting from first principles. We focus on reaction spreading, i.e., on the time evolution of the reaction product M(t). At variance with pure diffusive processes, characterized by the spectral dimension ds, the important quantity for reaction spreading is found to be the connectivity dimension dl. Numerical data, in agreement with analytical estimates based on the features of n independent random walkers on the graph, show that M(t)˜tdl. In the case of Erdös-Renyi random graphs, the reaction product is characterized by an exponential growth M(t)˜eαt with α proportional to ln, where is the average degree of the graph.

  8. No Evidence of Reaction Time Slowing in Autism Spectrum Disorder

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferraro, F. Richard

    2016-01-01

    A total of 32 studies comprising 238 simple reaction time and choice reaction time conditions were examined in individuals with autism spectrum disorder (n?=?964) and controls (n?=?1032). A Brinley plot/multiple regression analysis was performed on mean reaction times, regressing autism spectrum disorder performance onto the control performance as…

  9. Two-Body and Three-Body Atomic Recombination Reactions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alvarino, Jose M.; Martinez, E.

    1983-01-01

    Discusses how, in some circumstances, a two-body reaction (association in absence of a third body) is the only possible association, and how reactions proceed in this case. Taking competition between two/three-body reactions into account, considers relative importance of such combinations and conditions under which the former can be competitive.…

  10. Nuclear reaction studies

    SciTech Connect

    Alexander, J.M.; Lacey, R.A.

    1994-11-01

    Research focused on the statistical and dynamical properties of ``hot`` nuclei formed in symmetric heavy-ion reactions. Theses included ``flow`` measurements and the mechanism for multifragment disassembly. Model calculations are being performed for the reactions C+C, Ne+Al, Ar+Sc, Kr+Nb, and Xe+La. It is planned to study {sup 40}Ar reactions from 27 to 115 MeV/nucleon. 2 figs., 41 refs.

  11. Immune reaction to propanidid.

    PubMed

    Christmas, D

    1984-05-01

    An adverse reaction to the intravenous anaesthetic agent propanidid is described in which the main features were hypotension, facial erythema, and abdominal pain. Changes in serum complement levels and differential white cell counts indicate that this was an immune reaction mediated by the classical complement pathway. The immune reaction apparently involved antibodies other than those of the IgE (reagin) class, and circumstantial evidence suggests that it was specific to propanidid rather than to the entire formulation or to Cremophor EL.

  12. The smallest chemical reaction system with bistability

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, Thomas

    2009-01-01

    Background Bistability underlies basic biological phenomena, such as cell division, differentiation, cancer onset, and apoptosis. So far biologists identified two necessary conditions for bistability: positive feedback and ultrasensitivity. Results Biological systems are based upon elementary mono- and bimolecular chemical reactions. In order to definitely clarify all necessary conditions for bistability we here present the corresponding minimal system. According to our definition, it contains the minimal number of (i) reactants, (ii) reactions, and (iii) terms in the corresponding ordinary differential equations (decreasing importance from i-iii). The minimal bistable system contains two reactants and four irreversible reactions (three bimolecular, one monomolecular). We discuss the roles of the reactions with respect to the necessary conditions for bistability: two reactions comprise the positive feedback loop, a third reaction filters out small stimuli thus enabling a stable 'off' state, and the fourth reaction prevents explosions. We argue that prevention of explosion is a third general necessary condition for bistability, which is so far lacking discussion in the literature. Moreover, in addition to proving that in two-component systems three steady states are necessary for bistability (five for tristability, etc.), we also present a simple general method to design such systems: one just needs one production and three different degradation mechanisms (one production, five degradations for tristability, etc.). This helps modelling multistable systems and it is important for corresponding synthetic biology projects. Conclusion The presented minimal bistable system finally clarifies the often discussed question for the necessary conditions for bistability. The three necessary conditions are: positive feedback, a mechanism to filter out small stimuli and a mechanism to prevent explosions. This is important for modelling bistability with simple systems and for

  13. Sleeve reaction chamber system

    DOEpatents

    Northrup, M. Allen; Beeman, Barton V.; Benett, William J.; Hadley, Dean R.; Landre, Phoebe; Lehew, Stacy L.; Krulevitch, Peter A.

    2009-08-25

    A chemical reaction chamber system that combines devices such as doped polysilicon for heating, bulk silicon for convective cooling, and thermoelectric (TE) coolers to augment the heating and cooling rates of the reaction chamber or chambers. In addition the system includes non-silicon-based reaction chambers such as any high thermal conductivity material used in combination with a thermoelectric cooling mechanism (i.e., Peltier device). The heat contained in the thermally conductive part of the system can be used/reused to heat the device, thereby conserving energy and expediting the heating/cooling rates. The system combines a micromachined silicon reaction chamber, for example, with an additional module/device for augmented heating/cooling using the Peltier effect. This additional module is particularly useful in extreme environments (very hot or extremely cold) where augmented heating/cooling would be useful to speed up the thermal cycling rates. The chemical reaction chamber system has various applications for synthesis or processing of organic, inorganic, or biochemical reactions, including the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and/or other DNA reactions, such as the ligase chain reaction.

  14. A new tandem reaction of benzyne: one-pot synthesis of aryl amines containing anthracene.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chunsong; Zhang, Yuhong

    2007-03-01

    [reaction: see text] The reaction of benzyne with N-substituted imidazoles affords a novel way to prepare arylamines containing anthracene under very mild conditions. This transformation is assumed to proceed via a tandem reaction involving a Diels-Alder reaction and an intermolecular nucleophilic coupling reaction.

  15. Prebiotic condensation reactions using cyanamide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sherwood, E.; Nooner, D. W.; Eichberg, J.; Epps, D. E.; Oro, J.

    1978-01-01

    Condensation reactions in cyanamide, 4-amino-5-imidazole-carboxamide and cyanamide, imidazole systems under dehydrating conditions at moderate temperatures (60 to 100 deg C) were investigated. The cyanamide, imidazole system was used for synthesis of palmitoylglycerols from ammonium palmitate and glycerol. With the addition of deoxythymidine to the former system, P1, P2-dideoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate was obtained; the same cyanamide, 4-amino-5-imidazole-carboxamide system was used to synthesize deoxythymidine oligonucleotides using deoxythymidine 5 prime-phosphate and deoxythymidine 5 prime-triphosphate, and peptides using glycine, phenylalanine or isoleucine with adenosine 5 prime-triphosphate. The pH requirements for these reactions make their prebiotic significance questionable; however, it is conceivable that they could occur in stable pockets of low interlayer acidity in a clay such as montmorillonite.

  16. Mukaiyama Aldol Reactions in Aqueous Media

    PubMed Central

    Kitanosono, Taku; Kobayashi, Shū

    2013-01-01

    Mukaiyama aldol reactions in aqueous media have been surveyed. While the original Mukaiyama aldol reactions entailed stoichiometric use of Lewis acids in organic solvents under strictly anhydrous conditions, Mukaiyama aldol reactions in aqueous media are not only suitable for green sustainable chemistry but are found to produce singular phenomena. These findings led to the discovery of a series of water-compatible Lewis acids such as lanthanide triflates in 1991. Our understanding on these beneficial effects in the presence of water will be deepened through the brilliant examples collected in this review. 1 Introduction 2 Rate Enhancement by Water in the Mukaiyama Aldol Reaction 3 Lewis Acid Catalysis in Aqueous or Organic Solvents 3.1 Water-Compatible Lewis Acids 4 Lewis-Base Catalysis in Aqueous or Organic Solvents 5 The Mukaiyama Aldol Reactions in 100% Water 6 Asymmetric Catalysts in Aqueous Media and Water 7 Conclusions and Perspective PMID:24971045

  17. Tandem Catalysis Utilizing Olefin Metathesis Reactions.

    PubMed

    Zieliński, Grzegorz K; Grela, Karol

    2016-07-01

    Since olefin metathesis transformation has become a favored synthetic tool in organic synthesis, more and more distinct non-metathetical reactions of alkylidene ruthenium complexes have been developed. Depending on the conditions applied, the same olefin metathesis catalysts can efficiently promote isomerization reactions, hydrogenation of C=C double bonds, oxidation reactions, and many others. Importantly, these transformations can be carried out in tandem with olefin metathesis reactions. Through addition of one portion of a catalyst, a tandem process provides structurally advanced products from relatively simple substrates without the need for isolation of the intermediates. These aspects not only make tandem catalysis very attractive from a practical point of view, but also open new avenues in (retro)synthetic planning. However, in the literature, the term "tandem process" is sometimes used improperly to describe other types of multi-reaction sequences. In this Concept, a number of examples of tandem catalysis involving olefin metathesis are discussed with an emphasis on their synthetic value.

  18. Catalytic Conia-ene and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Hack, Daniel; Blümel, Marcus; Chauhan, Pankaj; Philipps, Arne R; Enders, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Since its initial inception, the Conia-ene reaction, known as the intramolecular addition of enols to alkynes or alkenes, has experienced a tremendous development and appealing catalytic protocols have emerged. This review fathoms the underlying mechanistic principles rationalizing how substrate design, substrate activation, and the nature of the catalyst work hand in hand for the efficient synthesis of carbocycles and heterocycles at mild reaction conditions. Nowadays, Conia-ene reactions can be found as part of tandem reactions, and the road for asymmetric versions has already been paved. Based on their broad applicability, Conia-ene reactions have turned into a highly appreciated synthetic tool with impressive examples in natural product synthesis reported in recent years. PMID:26031492

  19. Cascade enzymatic reactions for efficient carbon sequestration.

    PubMed

    Xia, Shunxiang; Zhao, Xueyan; Frigo-Vaz, Benjamin; Zheng, Wenyun; Kim, Jungbae; Wang, Ping

    2015-04-01

    Thermochemical processes developed for carbon capture and storage (CCS) offer high carbon capture capacities, but are generally hampered by low energy efficiency. Reversible cascade enzyme reactions are examined in this work for energy-efficient carbon sequestration. By integrating the reactions of two key enzymes of RTCA cycle, isocitrate dehydrogenase and aconitase, we demonstrate that intensified carbon capture can be realized through such cascade enzymatic reactions. Experiments show that enhanced thermodynamic driving force for carbon conversion can be attained via pH control under ambient conditions, and that the cascade reactions have the potential to capture 0.5 mol carbon at pH 6 for each mole of substrate applied. Overall it manifests that the carbon capture capacity of biocatalytic reactions, in addition to be energy efficient, can also be ultimately intensified to approach those realized with chemical absorbents such as MEA.

  20. Catalytic Conia-ene and related reactions.

    PubMed

    Hack, Daniel; Blümel, Marcus; Chauhan, Pankaj; Philipps, Arne R; Enders, Dieter

    2015-10-01

    Since its initial inception, the Conia-ene reaction, known as the intramolecular addition of enols to alkynes or alkenes, has experienced a tremendous development and appealing catalytic protocols have emerged. This review fathoms the underlying mechanistic principles rationalizing how substrate design, substrate activation, and the nature of the catalyst work hand in hand for the efficient synthesis of carbocycles and heterocycles at mild reaction conditions. Nowadays, Conia-ene reactions can be found as part of tandem reactions, and the road for asymmetric versions has already been paved. Based on their broad applicability, Conia-ene reactions have turned into a highly appreciated synthetic tool with impressive examples in natural product synthesis reported in recent years.

  1. Ruthenium nanocatalysis on redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Veerakumar, Pitchaimani; Ramdass, Arumugam; Rajagopal, Seenivasan

    2013-07-01

    Nanoparticles have generated intense interest over the past 20 years due to their high potential applications in different areas such as catalysis, sensors, nanoscale electronics, fuel and solar cells and optoelectronics. As the large fractions of metal atoms are exposed to the surface, the use of metal nanoparticles as nanocatalysts allows mild reaction conditions and high catalytic efficiency in a large number of chemical transformations. They have emerged as sustainable heterogeneous catalysts and catalyst supports alternative to conventional materials. This review focuses on the synthesis, characterization and catalytic role of ruthenium nanoparticles (RuNPs) on the redox reactions of heteroatom containing organic compounds with the green reagent H2O2, a field that has attracted immense interest among the chemical, materials and industrial communities. We intend to present a broad overview of Ru nanocatalysts for redox reactions with an emphasis on their performance, stability and reusability. The growth in the chemistry of organic sulfoxides and N-oxides during last decade was due to their importance as synthetic intermediates for the production of a wide range of chemically and biologically active molecules. Thus design of efficient methods for the synthesis of sulfoxides and N-oxides becomes important. This review concentrates on the catalysis of RuNPs on the H2O2 oxidation of organic sulfides to sulfoxides and amines to N-oxides. The deoxygenation reactions of sulfoxides to sulfides and reduction of nitro compounds to amines are fundamental reactions in both chemistry and biology. Here, we also highlight the catalysis of metal nanoparticles on the deoxygenation of sulfoxides and sulfones and reduction of nitro compounds with particular emphasis on the mechanistic aspects.

  2. Impact of THM reaction rates for astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamia, L.; Spitaleri, C.; Tognelli, E.; Degl'Innocenti, S.; Pizzone, R. G.; Moroni, P. G. Prada; Puglia, S. M. R.; Romano, S.; Sergi, M. L.

    2015-10-01

    Burning reaction S(E)-factor determinations are among the key ingredients for stellar models when one has to deal with energy generation evaluation and the genesis of the elements at stellar conditions. To by pass the still present uncertainties in extrapolating low-energies values, S(E)-factor measurements for charged-particle induced reactions involving light elements have been made available by devote Trojan Horse Method (THM) experiments. The recent results are here discussed together with their impact in astrophysics.

  3. Applications of Reaction Rate

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cunningham, Kevin

    2007-01-01

    This article presents an assignment in which students are to research and report on a chemical reaction whose increased or decreased rate is of practical importance. Specifically, students are asked to represent the reaction they have chosen with an acceptable chemical equation, identify a factor that influences its rate and explain how and why it…

  4. Chemical Reaction Problem Solving.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veal, William

    1999-01-01

    Discusses the role of chemical-equation problem solving in helping students predict reaction products. Methods for helping students learn this process must be taught to students and future teachers by using pedagogical skills within the content of chemistry. Emphasizes that solving chemical reactions should involve creative cognition where…

  5. Oscillating Chemical Reactions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, M. D.; And Others

    1975-01-01

    Describes several oscillating chemical reactions which can be used in undergraduate chemistry laboratories. In one such reaction, ferroin oscillates from red (reducing solution) to blue (oxidizing solution) for about an hour at a frequency which can readily be shown to depend on such factors as the temperature, type of solvent, and concentration…

  6. REUSABLE REACTION VESSEL

    DOEpatents

    Soine, T.S.

    1963-02-26

    This patent shows a reusable reaction vessel for such high temperature reactions as the reduction of actinide metal chlorides by calcium metal. The vessel consists of an outer metal shell, an inner container of refractory material such as sintered magnesia, and between these, a bed of loose refractory material impregnated with thermally conductive inorganic salts. (AEC)

  7. Hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst

    DOEpatents

    Subbaraman, Ram; Stamenkovic, Vojislav; Markovic, Nenad; Tripkovic, Dusan

    2016-02-09

    Systems and methods for a hydrogen evolution reaction catalyst are provided. Electrode material includes a plurality of clusters. The electrode exhibits bifunctionality with respect to the hydrogen evolution reaction. The electrode with clusters exhibits improved performance with respect to the intrinsic material of the electrode absent the clusters.

  8. Clock Reaction: Outreach Attraction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carpenter, Yuen-ying; Phillips, Heather A.; Jakubinek, Michael B.

    2010-01-01

    Chemistry students are often introduced to the concept of reaction rates through demonstrations or laboratory activities involving the well-known iodine clock reaction. For example, a laboratory experiment involving thiosulfate as an iodine scavenger is part of the first-year general chemistry laboratory curriculum at Dalhousie University. With…

  9. Oscillating Reactions: Two Analogies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Petruševski, Vladimir M.; Stojanovska, Marina I.; Šoptrajanov, Bojan T.

    2007-01-01

    Oscillating chemical reactions are truly spectacular phenomena, and demonstrations are always appreciated by the class. However, explaining such reactions to high school or first-year university students is problematic, because it may seem that no acceptable explanation is possible unless the students have profound knowledge of both physical…

  10. Nuclear Reaction Data Centers

    SciTech Connect

    McLane, V.; Nordborg, C.; Lemmel, H.D.; Manokhin, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    The cooperating Nuclear Reaction Data Centers are involved in the compilation and exchange of nuclear reaction data for incident neutrons, charged particles and photons. Individual centers may also have services in other areas, e.g., evaluated data, nuclear structure and decay data, reactor physics, nuclear safety; some of this information may also be exchanged between interested centers. 20 refs., 1 tab.

  11. Characteristics of vestibulosensory reactions studied by experimental caloric test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kapranov, V. Z.

    1980-01-01

    Vestibulo-sensory reactions were studied in 135 workers who were in contact with nitroethers, by the method of an experimental caloric test. The response vestibulo-sensory reactions were recorded by means of an electroencephalograph. The changes in the sensory reaction depended on the duration of the workers' contact with toxic agents. A study of illusion reactions by the labyrinth calorization widens diagnostic possibilities in the examination of functional condition of the vestibular analyser considerably.

  12. Fractal reaction kinetics.

    PubMed

    Kopelman, R

    1988-09-23

    Classical reaction kinetics has been found to be unsatisfactory when the reactants are spatially constrained on the microscopic level by either walls, phase boundaries, or force fields. Recently discovered theories of heterogeneous reaction kinetics have dramatic consequences, such as fractal orders for elementary reactions, self-ordering and self-unmixing of reactants, and rate coefficients with temporal "memories." The new theories were needed to explain the results of experiments and supercomputer simulations of reactions that were confined to low dimensions or fractal dimensions or both. Among the practical examples of "fractal-like kinetics" are chemical reactions in pores of membranes, excitation trapping in molecular aggregates, exciton fusion in composite materials, and charge recombination in colloids and clouds.

  13. Charge distribution analysis of catalysts under simulated reaction conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Freund, F.

    1992-01-01

    Charge Distribution Analysis (CDA) is a technique for measuring mobile charge carriers in dielectric materials. CDA is based on dielectric polarization in an electric field gradient. The CDA apparatus is now under construction. 3 figs.

  14. GREENER ORGANIC SYNTHESES USING ALTERNATIVE REACTION CONDITIONS AND MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diverse nature of chemical entities requires various green' strategic pathways in our quest towards attaining sustainability. A solvent-free approach that involves microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants (undiluted) catalyzed by the surfaces of less-expensive and recyclable...

  15. ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLIER SYNTHESIS USING ALTERNATIVE REACTION CONDITIONS AND MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diverse nature of chemical universe requires various 'greener' strategic pathways in our quest towards attaining sustainability. A solvent-free approach that involves microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants (undiluted) catalyzed by the surfaces of less-expensive and recycla...

  16. GREENER CHEMICAL SYNTHESES USING ALTERNATIVE REACTION CONDITIONS AND MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    A solvent-free approach that involves microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants (undiluted) catalyzed by the surfaces of recyclable mineral supports such as alumina, silica, clay, or 'doped' surfaces is presented which is applicable to a wide range of cleavage, condensation, cycl...

  17. EFFICIENT CHEMICAL TRANSFORMATIONS USING ALTERNATIVE REACTION CONDITIONS AND MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The diverse nature of chemical entities requires various green' strategic pathways in our quest towards attaining sustainability. A solvent-free approach that involves microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants (undiluted) catalyzed by the surfaces of less-expensive and recyclable...

  18. CHEMICAL SYNTHESIS USING 'GREENER' ALTERNATIVE REACTION CONDITIONS AND MEDIA

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical research during the last decade has witnessed a paradigm shift towards "environmentally-friendly chemistry" more popularly known as "green chemistry" due to the increasing environmental concerns and legislative requirements to curb the release of chemical waste into ...

  19. ENVIRONMENTALLY FRIENDLIER SYNTHESES USING MICROWAVES AND ALTERNATIVE REACTION CONDITIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    A solvent-free approach that involves microwave (MW) exposure of neat reactants (undiluted) catalyzed by the surfaces of less-expensive and recyclable mineral supports such as alumina, silica, clay, or doped surfaces is presented which is applicable to a wide range of cleavage, c...

  20. Continuum Response and Reaction in Neutron-Rich Be Nuclei

    SciTech Connect

    Nakatsukasa, Takashi; Ueda, Manabu; Yabana, Kazuhiro

    2004-02-27

    We study E1 resonances, breakup and fusion reactions for weakly bound Be nuclei. The absorbing-boundary condition (ABC) is used to describe both the outgoing and incoming boundary conditions. The neutron continuum plays important roles in response and reaction of neutron drip-line nuclei.

  1. Biochemical reaction engineering for redox reactions.

    PubMed

    Wandrey, Christian

    2004-01-01

    Redox reactions are still a challenge for biochemical engineers. A personal view for the development of this field is given. Cofactor regeneration was an obstacle for quite some time. The first technical breakthrough was achieved with the system formate/formate dehydrogenase for the regeneration of NADH2. In cases where the same enzyme could be used for chiral reduction as well as for cofactor regeneration, isopropanol as a hydrogen source proved to be beneficial. The coproduct (acetone) can be removed by pervaporation. Whole-cell reductions (often yeast reductions) can also be used. By proper biochemical reaction engineering, it is possible to apply these systems in a continuous way. By cloning a formate dehydrogenase and an oxidoreductase "designer bug" can be obtained where formate is used instead of glucose as the hydrogen source. Complex sequences of redox reactions can be established by pathway engineering with a focus on gene overexpression or with a focus on establishing non-natural pathways. The success of pathway engineering can be controlled by measuring cytosolic metabolite concentrations. The optimal exploitation of such systems calls for the integrated cooperation of classical and molecular biochemical engineering.

  2. Enhancing chemical reactions

    DOEpatents

    Morrey, John R.

    1978-01-01

    Methods of enhancing selected chemical reactions. The population of a selected high vibrational energy state of a reactant molecule is increased substantially above its population at thermal equilibrium by directing onto the molecule a beam of radiant energy from a laser having a combination of frequency and intensity selected to pump the selected energy state, and the reaction is carried out with the temperature, pressure, and concentrations of reactants maintained at a combination of values selected to optimize the reaction in preference to thermal degradation by transforming the absorbed energy into translational motion. The reaction temperature is selected to optimize the reaction. Typically a laser and a frequency doubler emit radiant energy at frequencies of .nu. and 2.nu. into an optical dye within an optical cavity capable of being tuned to a wanted frequency .delta. or a parametric oscillator comprising a non-centrosymmetric crystal having two indices of refraction, to emit radiant energy at the frequencies of .nu., 2.nu., and .delta. (and, with a parametric oscillator, also at 2.nu.-.delta.). Each unwanted frequency is filtered out, and each desired frequency is focused to the desired radiation flux within a reaction chamber and is reflected repeatedly through the chamber while reactants are fed into the chamber and reaction products are removed therefrom.

  3. NEUTRONIC REACTION SYSTEM

    DOEpatents

    Wigner, E.P.

    1963-09-01

    A nuclear reactor system is described for breeding fissionable material, including a heat-exchange tank, a high- and a low-pressure chamber therein, heat- exchange tubes connecting these chambers, a solution of U/sup 233/ in heavy water in a reaction container within the tank, a slurry of thorium dioxide in heavy water in a second container surrounding the first container, an inlet conduit including a pump connecting the low pressure chamber to the reaction container, an outlet conduit connecting the high pressure chamber to the reaction container, and means of removing gaseous fission products released in both chambers. (AEC)

  4. Surface catalyzed mercury transformation reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varanasi, Patanjali

    Mercury is a known pollutant that has detrimental effect on human health and environment. The anthropogenic emissions of mercury account for 10 to 30% of worldwide mercury emissions. There is a need to control/reduce anthropogenic mercury emissions. Many mercury control technologies are available but their effectiveness is dependent on the chemical form of mercury, because different chemical forms of mercury have different physical and chemical properties. Mercury leaves the boiler in its elemental form but goes through various transformations in the post-combustion zone. There is a need to understand how fly ash and flue gas composition affect speciation, partitioning, and reactions of mercury under the full range of post-combustion zone conditions. This knowledge can then be used to predict the chemical transformation of mercury (elemental, oxidized or particulate) in the post combustion zone and thus help with the control of mercury emissions from coal-burning power plants. To accomplish this goal present study was conducted using five coal fly ashes. These ashes were characterized and their catalytic activity was compared under selected reaction conditions in a fixed bed reactor. Based on the results from these fly ash experiments, three key components (carbon, iron oxide and calcium oxide) were chosen. These three components were then used to prepare model fly ashes. Silica/alumina was used as a base for these model fly ashes. One, two or three component model fly ashes were then prepared to investigate mercury transformation reactions. The third set of experiments was performed with five different oxidation catalysts to further understand the mercury oxidation process. Based on the results of these three studies the key components were predicted for different fly ash compositions under variety of flue gas conditions. A fixed bed reactor system was used to conduct this study. In all the experiments, the inlet concentration of Hg0(g) was maintained at 35 mug

  5. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, L.A. Jr.; Hearn, D.; Jones, E.M. Jr.

    1993-03-02

    A liquid phase process is described for oligomerization of C[sub 4] and C[sub 5] isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C[sub 1] to C[sub 6] alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120 to 300 F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  6. Autocatalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    The persistence conjecture is a long-standing open problem in chemical reaction network theory. It concerns the behavior of solutions to coupled ODE systems that arise from applying mass-action kinetics to a network of chemical reactions. The idea is that if all reactions are reversible in a weak sense, then no species can go extinct. A notion that has been found useful in thinking about persistence is that of "critical siphon." We explore the combinatorics of critical siphons, with a view toward the persistence conjecture. We introduce the notions of "drainable" and "self-replicable" (or autocatalytic) siphons. We show that: Every minimal critical siphon is either drainable or self-replicable; reaction networks without drainable siphons are persistent; and nonautocatalytic weakly reversible networks are persistent. Our results clarify that the difficulties in proving the persistence conjecture are essentially due to competition between drainable and self-replicable siphons. PMID:25245394

  7. Contact reactions to food.

    PubMed

    Killig, Claudia; Werfel, Thomas

    2008-05-01

    Cutaneous adverse reactions to foods, spices, and food additives can occur both in occupational and nonoccupational settings in those who grow, handle, prepare, or cook food. Because spices are also utilized in cosmetics and perfumes, other exposures are encountered that can result in adverse cutaneous reactions. This article describes the reaction patterns that can occur upon contact with foods, including irritant contact dermatitis and allergic contact dermatitis. The ingestion of culprit foods by sensitized individuals can provoke a generalized eczematous rash, referred to as systemic contact dermatitis. Other contact reactions to food include contact urticaria and protein contact dermatitis provoked by high-molecular-weight food proteins often encountered in patients with atopic dermatitis. Phototoxic and photoallergic contact dermatitis are also considered.

  8. Reactor for exothermic reactions

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jr., Lawrence A.; Hearn, Dennis; Jones, Jr., Edward M.

    1993-01-01

    A liquid phase process for oligomerization of C.sub.4 and C.sub.5 isoolefins or the etherification thereof with C.sub.1 to C.sub.6 alcohols wherein the reactants are contacted in a reactor with a fixed bed acid cation exchange resin catalyst at an LHSV of 5 to 20, pressure of 0 to 400 psig and temperature of 120.degree. to 300.degree. F. Wherein the improvement is the operation of the reactor at a pressure to maintain the reaction mixture at its boiling point whereby at least a portion but less than all of the reaction mixture is vaporized. By operating at the boiling point and allowing a portion of the reaction mixture to vaporize, the exothermic heat of reaction is dissipated by the formation of more boil up and the temperature in the reactor is controlled.

  9. Autocatalysis in reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Deshpande, Abhishek; Gopalkrishnan, Manoj

    2014-10-01

    The persistence conjecture is a long-standing open problem in chemical reaction network theory. It concerns the behavior of solutions to coupled ODE systems that arise from applying mass-action kinetics to a network of chemical reactions. The idea is that if all reactions are reversible in a weak sense, then no species can go extinct. A notion that has been found useful in thinking about persistence is that of "critical siphon." We explore the combinatorics of critical siphons, with a view toward the persistence conjecture. We introduce the notions of "drainable" and "self-replicable" (or autocatalytic) siphons. We show that: Every minimal critical siphon is either drainable or self-replicable; reaction networks without drainable siphons are persistent; and nonautocatalytic weakly reversible networks are persistent. Our results clarify that the difficulties in proving the persistence conjecture are essentially due to competition between drainable and self-replicable siphons.

  10. An Illuminating Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Matthews, Catherine E.

    1996-01-01

    Describes the use of carbide lights as an excellent mechanism for introducing or reviewing many basic chemistry concepts including elements and compounds, endothermic and exothermic reactions, physical and chemical changes, and balancing chemical equations. (JRH)

  11. Iodine Clock Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mitchell, Richard S.

    1996-01-01

    Describes a combination of solutions that can be used in the study of kinetics using the iodine clock reaction. The combination slows down degradation of the prepared solutions and can be used successfully for several weeks. (JRH)

  12. Response reactions: equilibrium coupling.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Eufrozina A; Nagypal, Istvan

    2006-06-01

    It is pointed out and illustrated in the present paper that if a homogeneous multiple equilibrium system containing k components and q species is composed of the reactants actually taken and their reactions contain only k + 1 species, then we have a unique representation with (q - k) stoichiometrically independent reactions (SIRs). We define these as coupling reactions. All the other possible combinations with k + 1 species are the coupled reactions that are in equilibrium when the (q - k) SIRs are in equilibrium. The response of the equilibrium state for perturbation is determined by the coupling and coupled equilibria. Depending on the circumstances and the actual thermodynamic data, the effect of coupled equilibria may overtake the effect of the coupling ones, leading to phenomena that are in apparent contradiction with Le Chatelier's principle. PMID:16722770

  13. Translated chemical reaction networks.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Matthew D

    2014-05-01

    Many biochemical and industrial applications involve complicated networks of simultaneously occurring chemical reactions. Under the assumption of mass action kinetics, the dynamics of these chemical reaction networks are governed by systems of polynomial ordinary differential equations. The steady states of these mass action systems have been analyzed via a variety of techniques, including stoichiometric network analysis, deficiency theory, and algebraic techniques (e.g., Gröbner bases). In this paper, we present a novel method for characterizing the steady states of mass action systems. Our method explicitly links a network's capacity to permit a particular class of steady states, called toric steady states, to topological properties of a generalized network called a translated chemical reaction network. These networks share their reaction vectors with their source network but are permitted to have different complex stoichiometries and different network topologies. We apply the results to examples drawn from the biochemical literature.

  14. Untoward penicillin reactions

    PubMed Central

    Guthe, T.; Idsöe, O.; Willcox, R. R.

    1958-01-01

    The literature on untoward reactions following the administration of penicillin is reviewed. These reactions, including a certain number of deaths which have been reported, are of particular interest to health administrations and to WHO in view of the large-scale programmes for controlling the treponematoses which are now under way—programmes affecting millions of people in many parts of the world. The most serious problems are anaphylactic sensitivity phenomena and superinfection or cross-infection with penicillin-resistant organisms, and the reactions involved range in intensity from the mildest to the fatal; the incidence of the latter is estimated at 0.1-0.3 per million injections. The authors point out that with increasing use of penicillin, more persons are likely to become sensitized and the number of reactions can therefore be expected to rise. The best prevention against such an increase is the restriction of the unnecessary use of penicillin. PMID:13596877

  15. Chemisorption And Precipitation Reactions

    EPA Science Inventory

    The transport and bioavailability of chemical components within soils is, in part, controlled by partitioning between solids and solution. General terms used to describe these partitioning reactions include chemisorption and precipitation. Chemisorption is inclusive of the suit...

  16. Oxygen evolution reaction catalysis

    DOEpatents

    Haber, Joel A.; Jin, Jian; Xiang, Chengxiang; Gregoire, John M.; Jones, Ryan J.; Guevarra, Dan W.; Shinde, Aniketa A.

    2016-09-06

    An Oxygen Evolution Reaction (OER) catalyst includes a metal oxide that includes oxygen, cerium, and one or more second metals. In some instances, the cerium is 10 to 80 molar % of the metals in the metal oxide and/or the catalyst includes two or more second metals. The OER catalyst can be included in or on an electrode. The electrode can be arranged in an oxygen evolution system such that the Oxygen Evolution Reaction occurs at the electrode.

  17. Possibility of the nonenzymatic browning (Maillard) reaction in the ISM.

    PubMed

    Jalbout, Abraham F; Shipar, M Abul Haider

    2008-04-01

    The possibility of the occurrence of the nonenzymatic browning reaction in the gaseous phase in the interstellar medium has been investigated by using Density Functional Theory computations. Mechanisms for the reactions between formaldehyde (Fald) + glycine (Gly), Fald + NH(3) and Fald + methylamine (MeAm) have been proposed, and the possibility of the formation of different compounds in the proposed mechanisms has been evaluated through calculating the Gibb's free energy changes for different steps of the reaction, by following the total mass balance. The Fald + Gly reaction under basic conditions is found as the most favorable for producing 1-methyl-amino methene or 1-methyl-amino methelene (MAM). The reaction under acidic conditions is found to be the least favorable for producing MAM. The Fald + NH(3) reaction is found to be plausible for the production of MeAm, which can participate by reaction with Fald, resulting in the formation of MAM. PMID:18188676

  18. Possibility of the Nonenzymatic Browning (Maillard) Reaction in the ISM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jalbout, Abraham F.; Shipar, M. Abul Haider

    2008-04-01

    The possibility of the occurrence of the nonenzymatic browning reaction in the gaseous phase in the interstellar medium has been investigated by using Density Functional Theory computations. Mechanisms for the reactions between formaldehyde ( Fald) + glycine ( Gly), Fald + NH 3 and Fald + methylamine ( MeAm) have been proposed, and the possibility of the formation of different compounds in the proposed mechanisms has been evaluated through calculating the Gibb's free energy changes for different steps of the reaction, by following the total mass balance. The Fald + Gly reaction under basic conditions is found as the most favorable for producing 1-methyl-amino methene or 1-methyl-amino methelene ( MAM). The reaction under acidic conditions is found to be the least favorable for producing MAM. The Fald + NH 3 reaction is found to be plausible for the production of MeAm, which can participate by reaction with Fald, resulting in the formation of MAM.

  19. Cosmetic tattoo pigment reaction.

    PubMed

    Greywal, Tanya; Cohen, Philip R

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundCutaneous reactions to tattoos are most commonly granulomatous or lichenoid.PurposeWe describe a woman who developed a lymphocytic reaction following a cosmetic tattoo procedure with black dye. The reaction occurred not only at the site of the tattoos (eyebrows and eyelash lines), but also in non-tattooed skin (bilateral malar cheeks).Methods and MaterialsWe reviewed PubMed for the following terms: cosmetic, dye, granuloma, granulomatous, lichenoid, lymphocytic, perivascular, pigment, pseudolymphoma, reaction, and tattoo. We also reviewed papers containing these terms and their references.ResultsHistopathologic examination of the left eyebrow and left cheek punch biopsies showed predominantly a perivascular lymphocytic reaction secondary to exogenous tattoo pigment.ConclusionsPerivascular lymphocytic reaction is an uncommonly described complication of tattooing. Our patient had an atypical presentation since she had no prior tattoos, became symptomatic only a few days after the procedure, reacted to black dye, and involved skin both within and outside the confines of the tattoos. Her symptoms and lesions resolved after treatment with systemic and topical corticosteroids and oral antihistamines. PMID:27617722

  20. Winning Conditions?

    PubMed

    Green, Esther; Moody, Lesley

    2015-01-01

    The authors of the paper, "The Patient Experience in Ontario 2020: What is Possible?", framed both the current state as well as the future of what patient experience might look like in five years. To ensure intention is catalyzed into meaningful change to improve experience and outcomes, we suggest four winning conditions. The first is to change the language; patients are people too, irrespective of their disease or illness; person-centred is inclusive language and ought to be the focus. The second condition is focused on leaders who play a critical role to establish, build and embed person-centred within the organization. The third and fourth winning conditions are building the evidence base and using effective and meaningful engagement, moving beyond advice, to partnership, respectively. Person-centred care is not the flavour of the month, it is here to stay. Ontarians are important actors in the system not only as users of the system but owners as well. To those who might argue that it is costly to do this work, what are the costs to not engage? Are we satisfied not only as administrators, and clinicians, but as patients at some point, to maintain the status quo? PMID:26888319

  1. Dynamical properties of Discrete Reaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Paulevé, Loïc; Craciun, Gheorghe; Koeppl, Heinz

    2014-07-01

    Reaction networks are commonly used to model the dynamics of populations subject to transformations that follow an imposed stoichiometry. This paper focuses on the efficient characterisation of dynamical properties of Discrete Reaction Networks (DRNs). DRNs can be seen as modeling the underlying discrete nondeterministic transitions of stochastic models of reaction networks. In that sense, a proof of non-reachability in a given DRN has immediate implications for any concrete stochastic model based on that DRN, independent of the choice of kinetic laws and constants. Moreover, if we assume that stochastic kinetic rates are given by the mass-action law (or any other kinetic law that gives non-vanishing probability to each reaction if the required number of interacting substrates is present), then reachability properties are equivalent in the two settings. The analysis of two types of global dynamical properties of DRNs is addressed: irreducibility, i.e., the ability to reach any discrete state from any other state; and recurrence, i.e., the ability to return to any initial state. Our results consider both the verification of such properties when species are present in a large copy number, and in the general case. The necessary and sufficient conditions obtained involve algebraic conditions on the network reactions which in most cases can be verified using linear programming. Finally, the relationship of DRN irreducibility and recurrence with dynamical properties of stochastic and continuous models of reaction networks is discussed.

  2. Idiosyncratic adverse reactions to antiepileptic drugs.

    PubMed

    Zaccara, Gaetano; Franciotta, Diego; Perucca, Emilio

    2007-07-01

    Idiosyncratic drug reactions may be defined as adverse effects that cannot be explained by the known mechanisms of action of the offending agent, do not occur at any dose in most patients, and develop mostly unpredictably in susceptible individuals only. These reactions are generally thought to account for up to 10% of all adverse drug reactions, but their frequency may be higher depending on the definition adopted. Idiosyncratic reactions are a major source of concern because they encompass most life-threatening effects of antiepileptic drugs (AEDs), as well as many other reactions requiring discontinuation of treatment. Based on the underlying mechanisms, idiosyncratic reactions can be differentiated into (1) immune-mediated hypersensitivity reactions, which may range from benign skin rashes to serious conditions such as drug-related rash with eosinophilia and systemic symptoms; (2) reactions involving unusual nonimmune-mediated individual susceptibility, often related to abnormal production or defective detoxification of reactive cytotoxic metabolites (as in valproate-induced liver toxicity); and (3) off-target pharmacology, whereby a drug interacts directly with a system other than that for which it is intended, an example being some types of AED-induced dyskinesias. Although no AED is free from the potential of inducing idiosyncratic reactions, the magnitude of risk and the most common manifestations vary from one drug to another, a consideration that impacts on treatment choices. Serious consequences of idiosyncratic reactions can be minimized by knowledge of risk factors, avoidance of specific AEDs in subpopulations at risk, cautious dose titration, and careful monitoring of clinical response.

  3. Children's understanding of psychogenic bodily reactions.

    PubMed

    Notaro, P C; Gelman, S A; Zimmerman, M A

    2001-01-01

    One hundred twenty-eight children in preschool through fifth grade (range = 4,3-11,4) and 76 adults serving as a comparison group participated in two studies that examined how children reason about psychogenic bodily reactions, that is, ailments or nonconscious physiological responses with origins in the mind (e.g., stress-induced headache). Psychogenic bodily reactions provide an opportunity to study how children integrate knowledge between the domains of bodily response and psychology. In Study 1, participants were asked whether various familiar psychogenic bodily reactions were possible (e.g., can someone get a tummyache from worrying?). In Study 2, participants were presented with a novel domain (hypothetical "aliens" from outer space) and were asked whether various unfamiliar bodily conditions (e.g., toes swelling) could arise from various physical or psychological causes. As predicted, adults typically reported that psychogenic bodily reactions were possible, and that unfamiliar bodily conditions could result from either psychological or physical causes. In contrast, young children typically denied that psychogenic bodily reactions could occur and predicted that unfamiliar bodily conditions resulted from physical causes only. The results support a developmental path: younger children view psychogenic bodily responses as wholly physical, but with age, view them as both physical and psychological phenomena.

  4. TRIMOLECULAR REACTIONS OF URANIUM HEXAFLUORIDE WITH WATER

    SciTech Connect

    Westbrook, M.; Becnel, J.; Garrison, S.

    2010-02-25

    The hydrolysis reaction of uranium hexafluoride (UF{sub 6}) is a key step in the synthesis of uranium dioxide (UO{sub 2}) powder for nuclear fuels. Mechanisms for the hydrolysis reactions are studied here with density functional theory and the Stuttgart small-core scalar relativistic pseudopotential and associated basis set for uranium. The reaction of a single UF{sub 6} molecule with a water molecule in the gas phase has been previously predicted to proceed over a relatively sizeable barrier of 78.2 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}, indicating this reaction is only feasible at elevated temperatures. Given the observed formation of a second morphology for the UO{sub 2} product coupled with the observations of rapid, spontaneous hydrolysis at ambient conditions, an alternate reaction pathway must exist. In the present work, two trimolecular hydrolysis mechanisms are studied with density functional theory: (1) the reaction between two UF{sub 6} molecules and one water molecule, and (2) the reaction of two water molecules with a single UF{sub 6} molecule. The predicted reaction of two UF{sub 6} molecules with one water molecule displays an interesting 'fluorine-shuttle' mechanism, a significant energy barrier of 69.0 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} to the formation of UF{sub 5}OH, and an enthalpy of reaction ({Delta}H{sub 298}) of +17.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}. The reaction of a single UF{sub 6} molecule with two water molecules displays a 'proton-shuttle' mechanism, and is more favorable, having a slightly lower computed energy barrier of 58.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1} and an exothermic enthalpy of reaction ({Delta}H{sub 298}) of -13.9 kJ {center_dot} mol{sup -1}. The exothermic nature of the overall UF{sub 6} + 2 {center_dot} H{sub 2}O trimolecular reaction and the lowering of the barrier height with respect to the bimolecular reaction are encouraging; however, the sizable energy barrier indicates further study of the UF{sub 6} hydrolysis reaction mechanism is

  5. Computational analysis of the mechanism of chemical reactions in terms of reaction phases: hidden intermediates and hidden transition States.

    PubMed

    Kraka, Elfi; Cremer, Dieter

    2010-05-18

    (A(n,s) < 0) the curving of the path, and thus the structural changes of the reaction complex. URVA can show the mechanism of a reaction expressed in terms of reaction phases, revealing the sequence of chemical processes in the reaction complex and making it possible to determine those electronic factors that control the mechanism and energetics of the reaction. The magnitude of adiabatic curvature coupling coefficients is related to strength and polarizability of the bonds being broken. Transient points along the reaction path are associated with hidden intermediates and hidden transition states, which can be converted into real intermediates and transition states when the reaction conditions or the substitution pattern of the reaction complex are appropriately changed. Accordingly, URVA represents a theoretical tool with tremendous experimental potential, offering the chemist the ability to assert greater control over reactions.

  6. Enantioselective aldol reactions with masked fluoroacetates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saadi, Jakub; Wennemers, Helma

    2016-03-01

    Despite the growing importance of organofluorines as pharmaceuticals and agrochemicals, the stereoselective introduction of fluorine into many prominent classes of natural products and chemotherapeutic agents is difficult. One long-standing unsolved challenge is the enantioselective aldol reaction of fluoroacetate to enable access to fluorinated analogues of medicinally relevant acetate-derived compounds, such as polyketides and statins. Herein we present fluoromalonic acid halfthioesters as biomimetic surrogates of fluoroacetate and demonstrate their use in highly stereoselective aldol reactions that proceed under mild organocatalytic conditions. We also show that the methodology can be extended to formal aldol reactions with fluoroacetaldehyde and consecutive aldol reactions. The synthetic utility of the fluorinated aldol products is illustrated by the synthesis of a fluorinated derivative of the top-selling drug atorvastatin. The results show the prospects of the method for the enantioselective introduction of fluoroacetate to access a wide variety of highly functionalized fluorinated compounds.

  7. Integrating reaction and analysis: investigation of higher-order reactions by cryogenic trapping

    PubMed Central

    Stockinger, Skrollan

    2013-01-01

    Summary A new approach for the investigation of a higher-order reaction by on-column reaction gas chromatography is presented. The reaction and the analytical separation are combined in a single experiment to investigate the Diels–Alder reaction of benzenediazonium-2-carboxylate as a benzyne precursor with various anthracene derivatives, i.e. anthracene, 9-bromoanthracene, 9-anthracenecarboxaldehyde and 9-anthracenemethanol. To overcome limitations of short reaction contact times at elevated temperatures a novel experimental setup was developed involving a cooling trap to achieve focusing and mixing of the reactants at a defined spot in a fused-silica capillary. This trap functions as a reactor within the separation column in the oven of a gas chromatograph. The reactants are sequentially injected to avoid undefined mixing in the injection port. An experimental protocol was developed with optimized injection intervals and cooling times to achieve sufficient conversions at short reaction times. Reaction products were rapidly identified by mass spectrometric detection. This new approach represents a practical procedure to investigate higher-order reactions at an analytical level and it simultaneously provides valuable information for the optimization of the reaction conditions. PMID:24062850

  8. Accelerated Chemical Reactions and Organic Synthesis in Leidenfrost Droplets.

    PubMed

    Bain, Ryan M; Pulliam, Christopher J; Thery, Fabien; Cooks, R Graham

    2016-08-22

    Leidenfrost levitated droplets can be used to accelerate chemical reactions in processes that appear similar to reaction acceleration in charged microdroplets produced by electrospray ionization. Reaction acceleration in Leidenfrost droplets is demonstrated for a base-catalyzed Claisen-Schmidt condensation, hydrazone formation from precharged and neutral ketones, and for the Katritzky pyrylium into pyridinium conversion under various reaction conditions. Comparisons with bulk reactions gave intermediate acceleration factors (2-50). By keeping the volume of the Leidenfrost droplets constant, it was shown that interfacial effects contribute to acceleration; this was confirmed by decreased reaction rates in the presence of a surfactant. The ability to multiplex Leidenfrost microreactors, to extract product into an immiscible solvent during reaction, and to use Leidenfrost droplets as reaction vessels to synthesize milligram quantities of product is also demonstrated.

  9. Immediate reaction to clarithromycin.

    PubMed

    Gangemi, S; Ricciardi, L; Fedele, R; Isola, S; Purello-D'Ambrosio, F

    2001-01-01

    We present the case of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin had during a drug challenge test. Personal allergic history was negative for respiratory allergies and positive for adverse drug reactions to general and regional anesthesia and to ceftriaxone. After the administration of 1/4 of therapeutic dose of clarithromycin the patient showed dyspnea, cough and bronchospasm in all the lung fields. The positivity of the test was confirmed by the negativity to the administration of placebo. The quickness and the clinical characteristic of the adverse reaction suggest a pathogenic mechanism of immediate-type hypersensitivity. On reviewing the literature we have found no reports of bronchospastic reaction to clarithromycin. Macrolides are a class of antibiotics mainly used in the last years in place of beta-lactams because of a broad spectrum of action and a low allergic power. In fact, there are few reports on allergic reactions to these molecules. Clarithromycin is one of the latest macrolides, characterised by the presence of a 14-carbon-atom lactone ring as erythromycin, active on a wide spectrum of pathogens.

  10. Role of microbes in the smectite-to-illite reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kim, Jinwook; Dong, Hailiang; Seabaugh, Jennifer; Newell, Steven W.; Eberl, Dennis D.

    2004-01-01

    Temperature, pressure, and time have been thought to control the smectite-to-illite (S-I) reaction, an important diagenetic process used for petroleum exploration. We demonstrated that microorganisms can promote the S-I reaction by dissolving smectite through reduction of structural Fe(III) at room temperature and 1 atmosphere within 14 days. This reaction typically requires conditions of 300 degrees to 350 degrees C, 100 megapascals, and 4 to 5 months in the absence of microbial activity. These results challenge the conventional concept of the S-I reaction and of reaction kinetic models.

  11. Role of Microbes in the Smectite-to-Illite Reaction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kim, J.; Dong, H.; Seabaugh, J.; Newell, S.W.; Eberl, D.D.

    2004-01-01

    Temperature, pressure, and time have been thought to control the smectiteto-illite (S-I) reaction, an important diagenetic process used for petroleum exploration. We demonstrated that microorganisms can promote the S-I reaction by dissolving smectite through reduction of structural FE(III) at room temperature and 1 atmosphere within 14 days. This reaction typically requires conditions of 300?? to 350??C, 100 megapascals, and 4 to 5 months in the absence of microbial activity. These results challenge the conventional concept of the S-I reaction and of reaction kinetic models.

  12. Capture reactions on C-14 in nonstandard big bang nucleosynthesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiescher, Michael; Gorres, Joachim; Thielemann, Friedrich-Karl

    1990-01-01

    Nonstandard big bang nucleosynthesis leads to the production of C-14. The further reaction path depends on the depletion of C-14 by either photon, alpha, or neutron capture reactions. The nucleus C-14 is of particular importance in these scenarios because it forms a bottleneck for the production of heavier nuclei A greater than 14. The reaction rates of all three capture reactions at big bang conditions are discussed, and it is shown that the resulting reaction path, leading to the production of heavier elements, is dominated by the (p, gamma) and (n, gamma) rates, contrary to earlier suggestions.

  13. Organocatalytic aza-Michael/retro-aza-Michael reaction: pronounced chirality amplification in aza-Michael reaction and racemization via retro-aza-Michael reaction.

    PubMed

    Cai, Yong-Feng; Li, Li; Luo, Meng-Xian; Yang, Ke-Fang; Lai, Guo-Qiao; Jiang, Jian-Xiong; Xu, Li-Wen

    2011-05-01

    A detailed experimental investigation of an aza-Michael reaction of aniline and chalcone is presented. A series of Cinchona alkaloid-derived organocatalysts with different functional groups were prepared and used in the aza-Michael and retro-aza-Michael reaction. There was an interesting finding that a complete reversal of stereoselectivity when a benzoyl group was introduced to the cinchonine and cinchonidine. The chirality amplification vs. time proceeds in the quinine-derived organocatalyst containing silicon-based bulky group, QN-TBS, -catalyzed aza-Michael reaction under solvent-free conditions. In addition, we have demonstrated for the first time that racemization was occurred in suitable solvents under mild conditions due to retro-aza-Michael reaction of the Michael adduct of aniline with chalcone. These indicate the equilibrium of retro-aza-Michael reaction and aza-Michael reaction produce the happening of chirality amplification in aza-Michael reaction and racemization via retro-aza-Michael reaction under different conditions, which would be beneficial to the development of novel chiral catalysts for the aza-Michael reactions.

  14. Hydrogenation-dehydrogenation reactions of polycyclic aromatics

    SciTech Connect

    Dutta, R.P.; Schobert, H.H.

    1995-12-31

    An understanding of the hydrogenation/dehydrogenation of polycyclic aromatic compounds is an important step in producing cycloalkanes from coal. Coal fragments released during depolymerization of coal tend to be aromatic in nature and therefore they need to be hydrogenated to produce desirable compounds. If these compounds can be hydrogenated to some extent during the depolymerization stage, a more efficient liquefaction process can be achieved. Studies at Penn State and other laboratories have shown that coal can be converted to over 95% oils. If the reaction conditions can be fine-tuned, a better quality product can be obtained. To obtain an understanding of how coal fragments would behave under various conditions, model compounds have been used in this investigation. Naphthalene, phenanthrene, pyrene and chrysene were subjected to various catalytic hydrogenation conditions. These included three temperatures and reaction times varying from 1 minute to 2 hours. Trends in the product compositions were analyzed and kinetic/thermodynamic data were compared for the various compounds. Once hydrogenation of the compounds has been optimized, the next most important factor that needs to be addressed is how do we avoid dehydrogenation reactions taking place. To understand this, some of the products from each compound that were hydrogenated were subjected to dehydrogenation conditions. This was achieved by heating the compounds under nitrogen for various reaction times and temperatures. Trends in the product composition were followed and analyzed, along with comparisons of kinetic data for each of the hydroaromatic dehydrogenations.

  15. Effective Analysis of Reaction Time Data

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whelan, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Most analyses of reaction time (RT) data are conducted by using the statistical techniques with which psychologists are most familiar, such as analysis of variance on the sample mean. Unfortunately, these methods are usually inappropriate for RT data, because they have little power to detect genuine differences in RT between conditions. In…

  16. Chemical reactions at aqueous interfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecitis, Chad David

    2009-12-01

    Interfaces or phase boundaries are a unique chemical environment relative to individual gas, liquid, or solid phases. Interfacial reaction mechanisms and kinetics are often at variance with homogeneous chemistry due to mass transfer, molecular orientation, and catalytic effects. Aqueous interfaces are a common subject of environmental science and engineering research, and three environmentally relevant aqueous interfaces are investigated in this thesis: 1) fluorochemical sonochemistry (bubble-water), 2) aqueous aerosol ozonation (gas-water droplet), and 3) electrolytic hydrogen production and simultaneous organic oxidation (water-metal/semiconductor). Direct interfacial analysis under environmentally relevant conditions is difficult, since most surface-specific techniques require relatively `extreme' conditions. Thus, the experimental investigations here focus on the development of chemical reactors and analytical techniques for the completion of time/concentration-dependent measurements of reactants and their products. Kinetic modeling, estimations, and/or correlations were used to extract information on interfacially relevant processes. We found that interfacial chemistry was determined to be the rate-limiting step to a subsequent series of relatively fast homogeneous reactions, for example: 1) Pyrolytic cleavage of the ionic headgroup of perfluorooctanesulfonate (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) adsorbed to cavitating bubble-water interfaces during sonolysis was the rate-determining step in transformation to their inorganic constituents carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, and fluoride; 2) ozone oxidation of aqueous iodide to hypoiodous acid at the aerosol-gas interface is the rate-determining step in the oxidation of bromide and chloride to dihalogens; 3) Electrolytic oxidation of anodic titanol surface groups is rate-limiting for the overall oxidation of organics by the dichloride radical. We also found chemistry unique to the interface, for example: 1

  17. Adverse reactions to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Dogra, A; Minocha, Y C; Kaur, S

    2003-01-01

    Adverse reaction to cosmetics constitute a small but significant number of cases of contact dermatitis with varied appearances. These can present as contact allergic dermatitis, photodermatitis, contact irritant dermatitis, contact urticaria, hypopigmentation, hyperpigmentation or depigmentation, hair and nail breakage. Fifty patients were included for the study to assess the role of commonly used cosmetics in causing adverse reactions. It was found that hair dyes, lipsticks and surprisingly shaving creams caused more reaction as compared to other cosmetics. Overall incidence of contact allergic dermatitis seen was 3.3% with patients own cosmetics. Patch testing was also done with the basic ingredients and showed positive results in few cases where casual link could be established. It is recommended that labeling of the cosmetics should be done to help the dermatologists and the patients to identify the causative allergen in cosmetic preparation.

  18. Delayed drug hypersensitivity reactions.

    PubMed

    Pichler, Werner J

    2003-10-21

    Immune reactions to small molecular compounds, such as drugs, can cause a variety of diseases involving the skin, liver, kidney, and lungs. In many drug hypersensitivity reactions, drug-specific CD4+ and CD8+ T cells recognize drugs through their alphabeta T-cell receptors in an MHC-dependent way. Drugs stimulate T cells if they act as haptens and bind covalently to peptides or if they have structural features that allow them to interact with certain T-cell receptors directly. Immunohistochemical and functional studies of drug-reactive T cells in patients with distinct forms of exanthema reveal that distinct T-cell functions lead to different clinical phenotypes. In maculopapular exanthema, perforin-positive and granzyme B-positive CD4+ T cells kill activated keratinocytes, while a large number of cytotoxic CD8+ T cells in the epidermis is associated with formation of vesicles and bullae. Drug-specific T cells also orchestrate inflammatory skin reactions through the release of various cytokines (for example, interleukin-5, interferon) and chemokines (such as interleukin-8). Activation of T cells with a particular function seems to lead to a specific clinical picture (for example, bullous or pustular exanthema). Taken together, these data allow delayed hypersensitivity reactions (type IV) to be further subclassified into T-cell reactions, which through the release of certain cytokines and chemokines preferentially activate and recruit monocytes (type IVa), eosinophils (type IVb), or neutrophils (type IVd). Moreover, cytotoxic functions by either CD4+ or CD8+ T cells (type IVc) seem to participate in all type IV reactions.

  19. Minimal conditions for protocell stationary growth.

    PubMed

    Bigan, Erwan; Steyaert, Jean-Marc; Douady, Stéphane

    2015-01-01

    We show that self-replication of a chemical system encapsulated within a membrane growing from within is possible without any explicit feature such as autocatalysis or metabolic closure, and without the need for their emergence through complexity. We use a protocell model relying upon random conservative chemical reaction networks with arbitrary stoichiometry, and we investigate the protocell's capability for self-replication, for various numbers of reactions in the network. We elucidate the underlying mechanisms in terms of simple minimal conditions pertaining only to the topology of the embedded chemical reaction network. A necessary condition is that each moiety must be fed, and a sufficient condition is that each siphon is fed. Although these minimal conditions are purely topological, by further endowing conservative chemical reaction networks with thermodynamically consistent kinetics, we show that the growth rate tends to increase on increasing the Gibbs energy per unit molecular weight of the nutrient and on decreasing that of the membrane precursor. PMID:25951201

  20. Operant Conditioning

    PubMed Central

    Staddon, J. E. R.; Cerutti, D. T.

    2005-01-01

    Operant behavior is behavior “controlled” by its consequences. In practice, operant conditioning is the study of reversible behavior maintained by reinforcement schedules. We review empirical studies and theoretical approaches to two large classes of operant behavior: interval timing and choice. We discuss cognitive versus behavioral approaches to timing, the “gap” experiment and its implications, proportional timing and Weber's law, temporal dynamics and linear waiting, and the problem of simple chain-interval schedules. We review the long history of research on operant choice: the matching law, its extensions and problems, concurrent chain schedules, and self-control. We point out how linear waiting may be involved in timing, choice, and reinforcement schedules generally. There are prospects for a unified approach to all these areas. PMID:12415075

  1. Sprint starts and the minimum auditory reaction time.

    PubMed

    Pain, Matthew T G; Hibbs, Angela

    2007-01-01

    The simple auditory reaction time is one of the fastest reaction times and is thought to be rarely less than 100 ms. The current false start criterion in a sprint used by the International Association of Athletics Federations is based on this assumed auditory reaction time of 100 ms. However, there is evidence, both anecdotal and from reflex research, that simple auditory reaction times of less than 100 ms can be achieved. Reaction time in nine athletes performing sprint starts in four conditions was measured using starting blocks instrumented with piezoelectric force transducers in each footplate that were synchronized with the starting signal. Only three conditions were used to calculate reaction times. The pre-motor and pseudo-motor time for two athletes were also measured across 13 muscles using surface electromyography (EMG) synchronized with the rest of the system. Five of the athletes had mean reaction times of less than 100 ms in at least one condition and 20% of all starts in the first two conditions had a reaction time of less than 100 ms. The results demonstrate that the neuromuscular-physiological component of simple auditory reaction times can be under 85 ms and that EMG latencies can be under 60 ms. PMID:17127583

  2. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, P.A.

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  3. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1984-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  4. Velocity pump reaction turbine

    DOEpatents

    House, Palmer A.

    1982-01-01

    An expanding hydraulic/two-phase velocity pump reaction turbine including a dual concentric rotor configuration with an inter-rotor annular flow channel in which the inner rotor is mechanically driven by the outer rotor. In another embodiment, the inner rotor is immobilized and provided with gas recovery ports on its outer surface by means of which gas in solution may be recovered. This velocity pump reaction turbine configuration is capable of potential energy conversion efficiencies of up to 70%, and is particularly suited for geothermal applications.

  5. Pot-in-pot reactions: Heterogenization of homogeneous reaction processes for otherwise impossible cascades

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thuo, Martin

    Many excellent examples of homogeneous catalysts have been developed that elegantly and efficiently catalyze one reaction. Although the use of catalysts is ubiquitous in chemical synthesis, reactions must be carried out sequentially; else the catalysts/reagents may poison one another or require incompatible reaction conditions. These limitations make synthesis of vital molecules a tedious, expensive, and wasteful process. The process of multi-step synthesis is also not environmentally benign based on the sheer volume of waste generated per step. To overcome some of these limitations, catalysts have been site-isolated from each other therefore facilitating several steps in one reaction pot. However, available site-isolation methods have major shortcomings. Therefore, a general approach that works with already known chemistry and catalysts---without the need for further modification, is desired. This thesis reports a new approach to catalyst site-isolation. We exploited the advantages of both heterogeneous and homogeneous processes to develop new cascade reaction sequences by employing polydimethylsiloxane thimbles as selective semi-permeable walls. These thimbles allow small organic molecules to diffuse through while retaining polar reagents and/or organometallic catalysts. A felicitous choice of reaction conditions led to the development of pot-in-pot reactions, a new concept in organic catalysis. To demonstrate how dynamic this new techniques is, we performed 2- and 3-step cascade reactions. This new approach circumvents the need to isolate intermediates, therefore enabling synthesis of otherwise challenging molecules. The genesis of our work was the occlusion of an organometallic catalyst in polydimethylsiloxane to perform catalysis in water. Also, by simply occluding the catalyst in a polymer matrix, it was possible to dictate whether the catalyst gave a metathesis or an isomerization product. Since the work summarized herein demonstrates site-isolation of a

  6. Elucidation of the chemical structure and determination of the production conditions for a bioactive Maillard reaction product, [5-(5,6-dihydro-4H-pyridin-3-ylidenemethyl)furan-2-yl]methanol, isolated from a glucose-lysine heated mixture.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xiu-Min; Chen, Gang; Chen, Hongwen; Zhang, Yilin; Kitts, David D

    2015-02-18

    We previously isolated a bioactive molecule, named F3-A, from an aqueous glucose (Glc) and lysine (Lys) Maillard reaction (MR) model system. Herein, F3-A was verified as [5-(5,6-dihydro-4H-pyridin-3-ylidenemethyl)furan-2-yl]methanol (5) and was subsequently synthesized for confirmation of bioactivity. Using Taguchi and factorial designs, we determined that the conditions which best increased the yield of F3-A were at pH 6 with a sugar:amino acid ratio of 2:1 and heating time of 12 h at 100 °C. The MR mixtures containing glucose produced highest yield, compared to fructose, lactose, and sucrose. Both the F3-A recovered from Glc-Lys MR mixture and the synthesized product exhibited significant (P < 0.05), dose dependent, nitric oxide (NO) inhibitory activity in Caco-2 cells that was comparable to aminoguanidine (AG) and pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate (PDTC), respectively. Finally, an additional inhibitory effect of F3-A was determined when coincubated with AG in cytokine-induced Caco-2 cells. This bioactivity points to a potential role in preventing intestinal inflammation.

  7. Reactions of butadiyne. 1: The reaction with hydrogen atoms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwanebeck, W.; Warnatz, J.

    1984-01-01

    The reaction of hydrogen (H) atoms with butadiene (C4H2) was studied at room temperature in a pressure range between w mbar and 10 mbar. The primary step was an addition of H to C4H2 which is in its high pressure range at p 1 mbar. Under these conditions the following addition of a second H atom lies in the transition region between low and high pressure range. Vibrationally excited C4H4 can be deactivated to form buten-(1)-yne-(3)(C4H4) or decomposes into two C2H2 molecules. The rate constant at room temperature for primary step is given. The second order rate constant for the consumption of buten-(1)-yne-(3) is an H atom excess at room temperature is given.

  8. α-Regioselective Barbier Reaction of Carbonyl Compounds and Allyl Halides Mediated by Praseodymium.

    PubMed

    Wu, San; Li, Ying; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-09-01

    The first utility of praseodymium as a mediating metal in the Barbier reaction of carbonyl compounds with allyl halides was reported in this paper. In contrast to the traditional metal-mediated or catalyzed Barbier reactions, exclusive α-adducts were obtained in this one-pot reaction with a broad scope of substrates and feasible reaction conditions.

  9. α-Regioselective Barbier Reaction of Carbonyl Compounds and Allyl Halides Mediated by Praseodymium.

    PubMed

    Wu, San; Li, Ying; Zhang, Songlin

    2016-09-01

    The first utility of praseodymium as a mediating metal in the Barbier reaction of carbonyl compounds with allyl halides was reported in this paper. In contrast to the traditional metal-mediated or catalyzed Barbier reactions, exclusive α-adducts were obtained in this one-pot reaction with a broad scope of substrates and feasible reaction conditions. PMID:27490708

  10. Chain Reaction Polymerization.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McGrath, James E.

    1981-01-01

    The salient features and importance of chain-reaction polymerization are discussed, including such topics as the thermodynamics of polymerization, free-radical polymerization kinetics, radical polymerization processes, copolymers, and free-radical chain, anionic, cationic, coordination, and ring-opening polymerizations. (JN)

  11. Quinoprotein-catalysed reactions.

    PubMed Central

    Anthony, C

    1996-01-01

    This review is concerned with the structure and function of the quinoprotein enzymes, sometimes called quinoenzymes. These have prosthetic groups containing quinones, the name thus being analogous to the flavoproteins containing flavin prosthetic groups. Pyrrolo-quinoline quinone (PQQ) is non-covalently attached, whereas tryptophan tryptophylquinone (TTQ), topaquinone (TPQ) and lysine tyrosylquinone (LTQ) are derived from amino acid residues in the backbone of the enzymes. The mechanisms of the quinoproteins are reviewed and related to their recently determined three-dimensional structures. As expected, the quinone structures in the prosthetic groups play important roles in the mechanisms. A second common feature is the presence of a catalytic base (aspartate) at the active site which initiates the reactions by abstracting a proton from the substrate, and it is likely to be involved in multiple reactions in the mechanism. A third common feature of these enzymes is that the first part of the reaction produces a reduced prosthetic group; this part of the mechanism is fairly well understood. This is followed by an oxidative phase involving electron transfer reactions which remain poorly understood. In both types of dehydrogenase (containing PQQ and TTQ), electrons must pass from the reduced prosthetic group to redox centres in a second recipient protein (or protein domain), whereas in amine oxidases (containing TPQ or LTQ), electrons must be transferred to molecular oxygen by way of a redox-active copper ion in the protein. PMID:9003352

  12. Reaction product imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Chandler, D.W.

    1993-12-01

    Over the past few years the author has investigated the photochemistry of small molecules using the photofragment imaging technique. Bond energies, spectroscopy of radicals, dissociation dynamics and branching ratios are examples of information obtained by this technique. Along with extending the technique to the study of bimolecular reactions, efforts to make the technique as quantitative as possible have been the focus of the research effort. To this end, the author has measured the bond energy of the C-H bond in acetylene, branching ratios in the dissociation of HI, the energetics of CH{sub 3}Br, CD{sub 3}Br, C{sub 2}H{sub 5}Br and C{sub 2}H{sub 5}OBr dissociation, and the alignment of the CD{sub 3} fragment from CD{sub 3}I photolysis. In an effort to extend the technique to bimolecular reactions the author has studied the reaction of H with HI and the isotopic exchange reaction between H and D{sub 2}.

  13. Chemical Reactions at Surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Michael Henderson and Nancy Ryan Gray

    2010-04-14

    Chemical reactions at surfaces underlie some of the most important processes of today, including catalysis, energy conversion, microelectronics, human health and the environment. Understanding surface chemical reactions at a fundamental level is at the core of the field of surface science. The Gordon Research Conference on Chemical Reactions at Surfaces is one of the premiere meetings in the field. The program this year will cover a broad range of topics, including heterogeneous catalysis and surface chemistry, surfaces in environmental chemistry and energy conversion, reactions at the liquid-solid and liquid-gas interface, electronic materials growth and surface modification, biological interfaces, and electrons and photons at surfaces. An exciting program is planned, with contributions from outstanding speakers and discussion leaders from the international scientific community. The conference provides a dynamic environment with ample time for discussion and interaction. Attendees are encouraged to present posters; the poster sessions are historically well attended and stimulate additional discussions. The conference provides an excellent opportunity for junior researchers (e.g. graduate students or postdocs) to present their work and interact with established leaders in the field.

  14. Adverse reactions to cosmetics.

    PubMed

    Gendler, E

    1987-06-01

    Adverse reactions to cosmetics can be irritant or allergic and are most often caused by fragrances or preservatives. Preservatives include formaldehyde, formaldehyde releasers, and parabens. Other agents that cause allergy are paraphenylenediamine in hair dyes and toluene sulfonamide formaldehyde resin in nail polishes.

  15. A Principal's Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zaretsky, Lindy

    2004-01-01

    This article presents a principal's reaction to Catherine Marshall and Michael Ward's article on research on social justice and training for leadership. The author applauds Marshall and Ward's efforts to address what is undoubtedly among the most fundamentally important issues facing principals today. Marshall and Ward illuminate the importance of…

  16. Family reaction to homicide.

    PubMed

    Burgess, A N

    1975-04-01

    This pilot study identifies a two-phased syndrome experienced by families of homicide victims. The crisis phase consists of an acute grief process, including immediate reactions to the homicide, the funeral details, and police investigations. The long-term reorganization phase includes the psychological issues of bereavement and the socio-legal issues of the criminal justice process. PMID:1146971

  17. Reactions to Others' Intimacy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neufeldt, David E.; Olinger, Evanelle J.

    Research using behavioral measures has indicated that men react less positively to the touch of a same sex individual than women, that both men and women react more positively to the touch of an opposite sex individual than to the touch of a same sex individual, and that men and women do not differ in their reactions to opposite sex touch. This…

  18. Introducing the Wittig Reaction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armstead, D. E. F.

    1979-01-01

    An experiment is described which provides a simple example of the application of the Wittig reaction to the synthesis of unsaturated compounds. The experiment was designed with British HNC chemistry students in mind, but it is also suitable as a project-type exercise for final year GCE A-level students. (Author/BB)

  19. Polymerase chain reaction system

    DOEpatents

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.; Stratton, Paul L.; Hadley, Dean R.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Belgrader, Phil; Meyer, Peter L.

    2004-03-02

    A portable polymerase chain reaction DNA amplification and detection system includes one or more chamber modules. Each module supports a duplex assay of a biological sample. Each module has two parallel interrogation ports with a linear optical system. The system is capable of being handheld.

  20. Exocharmic Reactions up Close

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ramette, R. W.

    2007-01-01

    The exocharmic reactions that can be observed microscopically are discussed. The students can discover the optimal concentration of an acidic lead nitrate solution, so that a crystal of potassium iodide, nudged to the edge of a drop, results in glinting golden hexagons of lead iodide.

  1. Reaction and Response.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Armento, Beverly J.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Provides a reaction by three economic educators to an article by Raymond C. Miller calling for the elimination of economics. Contends that traditional economics does not necessarily lead to the degradation of the environment. Argues that economics should not promote any set of social values. (CFR)

  2. Reaction Formulation: A Bibliography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pedrini, D. T.; Pedrini, Bonnie C.

    Reaction formation was studied by Sigmund Freud. This defense mechanism may be related to repression, substitution, reversal, and compensation (or over-compensation). Alfred Adler considered compensation a basic process in his individual psychology. Anna Freud discussed some defense mechanisms, and Bibring, Dwyer, Huntington, and Valenstein…

  3. The aromatic ene reaction

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Dawen; Hoye, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    The ene reaction is a pericyclic process in which an alkene having an allylic hydrogen atom (the ene donor) reacts with a second unsaturated species (the enophile) to form a new product with a transposed π-bond. The aromatic ene reaction, in which the alkene component is embedded in an aromatic ring, has only been reported in a few (four) instances and has proceeded in low yield (≤6%). Here we show efficient aromatic ene reactions in which a thermally generated aryne engages a pendant m-alkylarene substituent to produce a dearomatized isotoluene, itself another versatile but rare reactive intermediate. Our experiments were guided by computational studies that revealed structural features conducive to the aromatic ene process. We proceeded to identify a cascade comprising three reactions: (i) hexadehydro-Diels-Alder (for aryne generation), (ii) intramolecular aromatic ene, and (iii) bimolecular Alder ene. The power of this cascade is evident from the structural complexity of the final products, the considerable scope, and the overall efficiency of these multi-stage, reagent- and byproduct-free, single-pot transformations. PMID:24345944

  4. Enantioselective Vinylogous Organocascade Reactions.

    PubMed

    Hepburn, Hamish B; Dell'Amico, Luca; Melchiorre, Paolo

    2016-08-01

    Cascade reactions are powerful tools for rapidly assembling complex molecular architectures from readily available starting materials in a single synthetic operation. Their marriage with asymmetric organocatalysis has led to the development of novel techniques, which are now recognized as reliable strategies for the one-pot enantioselective synthesis of stereochemically dense molecules. In recent years, even more complex synthetic challenges have been addressed by applying the principle of vinylogy to the realm of organocascade catalysis. The key to the success of vinylogous organocascade reactions is the unique ability of the chiral organocatalyst to transfer reactivity to a distal position without losing control on the stereo-determining events. This approach has greatly expanded the synthetic horizons of the field by providing the possibility of forging multiple stereocenters in remote positions from the catalyst's point of action with high selectivity, while simultaneously constructing multiple new bonds. This article critically describes the developments achieved in the field of enantioselective vinylogous organocascade reactions, charting the ideas, the conceptual advances, and the milestone reactions that have been essential for reaching highly practical levels of synthetic efficiency. PMID:27256039

  5. [Ligase chain reaction (LCR)].

    PubMed

    Yamanishi, K; Yasuno, H

    1993-06-01

    Ligase chain reaction (LCR) is a ligation-mediated amplification technique of a target DNA sequence using oligonucleotides and thermostable ligase. LCR is useful for the detection of known DNA sequences and point mutations in a limited amount of DNA. We introduce the principle, development, and protocol of this simple and convenient technique for DNA analysis.

  6. Oscillatory reactions on single crystal surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imbihl, R.

    1993-12-01

    Heterogeneous catalytic reactions exhibit under certain conditions kinetic oscillations which have been investigated both with polycrystalline materials and with single crystal surfaces as catalysts. The present paper reviews single-crystal experiments conducted under isothermal, low pressure conditions ( p < 10 -3 mbar). Two different reaction systems have been investigated: catalytic CO oxidation on various Pt and Pd orientations and catalytic NO reduction on Pt(100) using CO, H 2, or NH 3 as the reducing agent. The different reaction systems exhibit a wide variety of interesting phenomena which are well-known in nonlinear dynamics, for example, such as spatiotemporal pattern formation, the existence of Turing structures and the appearance of deterministic chaos, and chemical turbulence. The mechanistic steps leading to the observed phenomena have been investigated and appropriate mathematical models have been formulated and analyzed using bifurcation theory. The driving force for the rate oscillations has been shown to result from structural changes of the substrate in the case of catalytic CO oxidation on Pt surfaces, subsurface oxygen formation in the case of catalytic CO oxidation on Pd surfaces, and in the chemical reaction network described by a vacancy model in the case of the NO reduction reactions.

  7. Tritium labelled alkenes via the Shapiro reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Saljoughian, Manouchehr; Morimoto, Hiromi; Than, Chit; Williams, P.G.

    1995-12-31

    The authors report a simple synthesis of a variety of tritiated alkenes with high specific activity. The labelling steps involved in situ generation of the vinyllithium derivatives of the intermediate trisylhydrazone at low temperature, followed by quenching with high specific activity Tritiated water as an electrophile to generate the final tritiated alkenes. Several ketonic precursors with cyclopentanone and cyclohexanone rings, {alpha},{beta}-unsaturated and large ring cyclic ketones were selected and the corresponding trisylhydrazone derivatives were prepared. The Shapiro reaction conditions were optimized to work at a millimolar scale using deuteriated water as the electrophile. The successful reaction conditions were finally applied to the tritiation reactions. The chemical and radiochemical purity, and the specific radioactivity of the reaction products were determined by radio-hplc, gas chromatography and liquid scintillation counting as well as tritium NMR spectroscopy. The stereochemistry and specificity of tritium labelling was also established with tritium NMR spectroscopy. Application of different organolithium bases and the reaction mechanisms will be discussed.

  8. Photoneutron reactions in astrophysics

    SciTech Connect

    Varlamov, V. V. Ishkhanov, B. S.; Orlin, V. N.; Peskov, N. N.; Stopani, K. A.

    2014-12-15

    Among key problems in nuclear astrophysics, that of obtaining deeper insight into the mechanism of synthesis of chemical elements is of paramount importance. The majority of heavy elements existing in nature are produced in stars via radiative neutron capture in so-called s- and r processes, which are, respectively, slow and fast, in relation to competing β{sup −}-decay processes. At the same time, we know 35 neutron-deficient so-called bypassed p-nuclei that lie between {sup 74}Se and {sup 196}Hg and which cannot originate from the aforementioned s- and r-processes. Their production is possible in (γ, n), (γ, p), or (γ, α) photonuclear reactions. In view of this, data on photoneutron reactions play an important role in predicting and describing processes leading to the production of p-nuclei. Interest in determining cross sections for photoneutron reactions in the threshold energy region, which is of particular importance for astrophysics, has grown substantially in recent years. The use of modern sources of quasimonoenergetic photons obtained in processes of inverse Compton laser-radiation scattering on relativistic electronsmakes it possible to reveal rather interesting special features of respective cross sections, manifestations of pygmy E1 and M1 resonances, or the production of nuclei in isomeric states, on one hand, and to revisit the problem of systematic discrepancies between data on reaction cross sections from experiments of different types, on the other hand. Data obtained on the basis of our new experimental-theoretical approach to evaluating cross sections for partial photoneutron reactions are invoked in considering these problems.

  9. Chemical reactions in perfume ageing.

    PubMed

    Blakeway, J M; Frey, M L; Lacroix, S; Salerno, M S

    1987-10-01

    Summary The interactions between a typical range of perfume materials, alcohol, water, air, elevated temperatures and daylight have been studied. The changes of composition, acidity, peroxide content and the formation of new molecules were followed. The stabilizing effects of UV absorbers, antioxidants and sequestering agents were examined; - the formation of acid reaction products was accelerated by air, temperature, daylight and the presence of natural products; - peroxide formation was accelerated by heat and light and the presence of air; as the acidity increased, the peroxides decomposed; - the acetalization of other aldehydes was accelerated by temperature and daylight and the presence of natural products up to 40% of certain aldehydes may be converted into acetals after 3 months at 37 degrees C; - many stereoisomerizations occur, e.g., transisoeugenol is converted up to 10% into the cis isomer after 3 months at 37 degrees C and 58% in daylight; - evaluation of antioxidants UV absorbers and sequestering agents showed a significant protection against deterioration only by EDTA dipotassium salt; - ethanol was converted into acetaldehyde and its diethylacetal by peroxides present and formed on ageing up to 0.08%. Natural products accelerated this formation; - the reaction between benzoyl peroxide and ethanol was shown to yield up to 63% of acetaldehyde+diethyl acetal whilst di-t-butyl peroxide gave only 23% under the same conditions. These results go some way to explaining odour changes in perfume ageing.

  10. Water-gas shift reaction

    SciTech Connect

    Newsome, D.S.

    1980-01-01

    A review covers the industrial applications of the water-gas shift reaction in hydrogen manufacturing, removing CO from ammonia synthesis feeds, and detoxifying town gas; and the catalyst characteristics, reaction kinetics, and reaction mechanisms of the water-gas shift reactions catalyzed by iron-based, copper-based, or sulfided cobalt-molybdenum catalysts.

  11. What Is a Reaction Rate?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitz, Guy

    2005-01-01

    The definition of reaction rate is derived and demonstrations are made for the care to be taken while using the term. Reaction rate can be in terms of a reaction property, the extent of reaction and thus it is possible to give a definition applicable in open and closed systems.

  12. Inorganic Reaction Mechanisms. Part I

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooke, D. O.

    1976-01-01

    Provides a collection of data on the mechanistic aspects of inorganic chemical reactions. Wherever possible includes procedures for classroom demonstration or student project work. The material covered includes gas phase reactions, reactions in solution, mechanisms of electron transfer, the reaction between iron III and iodine, and hydrolysis. (GS)

  13. A reversible nanoconfined chemical reaction.

    PubMed

    Nielsen, Thomas K; Bösenberg, Ulrike; Gosalawit, Rapee; Dornheim, Martin; Cerenius, Yngve; Besenbacher, Flemming; Jensen, Torben R

    2010-07-27

    Hydrogen is recognized as a potential, extremely interesting energy carrier system, which can facilitate efficient utilization of unevenly distributed renewable energy. A major challenge in a future "hydrogen economy" is the development of a safe, compact, robust, and efficient means of hydrogen storage, in particular, for mobile applications. Here we report on a new concept for hydrogen storage using nanoconfined reversible chemical reactions. LiBH4 and MgH2 nanoparticles are embedded in a nanoporous carbon aerogel scaffold with pore size Dmax approximately 21 nm and react during release of hydrogen and form MgB2. The hydrogen desorption kinetics is significantly improved compared to bulk conditions, and the nanoconfined system has a high degree of reversibility and stability and possibly also improved thermodynamic properties. This new scheme of nanoconfined chemistry may have a wide range of interesting applications in the future, for example, within the merging area of chemical storage of renewable energy.

  14. Parallelization of photocatalytic gas-producing reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khnayzer, Rony S.; Martin, Douglas R.; Codding, Charles L.; Castellano, Felix N.

    2015-03-01

    High-throughput screening has been widely utilized in the pharmaceutical and manufacturing industry targeting the development of new molecules and materials for numerous applications. To enable more rapid progress in photocatalytic water-splitting reactions, the construction of high-throughput combinatorial photoreactors enabling the parallel optimization of relevant compositions under varieties of experimental conditions seems appropriate. This contribution describes a 16-photoreactor apparatus permitting the kinetic evaluation of photocatalytic gas-producing reactions using head-space pressure, gas chromatography, and mass spectrometry operating in parallel, illustrated with molecular-based homogeneous photocatalytic H2-generating compositions.

  15. Chemical reactions of organic compounds on clay surfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Soma, Yuko; Soma, Mitsuyuki )

    1989-11-01

    Chemical reactions of organic compounds including pesticides at the interlayer and exterior surfaces of clay minerals and with soil organic matter are reviewed. Representative reactions under moderate conditions possibly occurring in natural soils are described. Attempts have been made to clarify the importance of the chemical nature of molecules, their structures and their functional groups, and the Broensted or Lewis acidity of clay minerals.

  16. Kinetics of a Substitution Reaction of Sulfitopentaaminecobalt(III).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Lynne

    1988-01-01

    Describes a laboratory experiment to determine the rate law for a substitution reaction of a transition metal. Derives the corresponding rate law from the accepted mechanism for the reaction using the steady state approximation and determines the conditions under which the two agree. (CW)

  17. Chromium-Catalyzed Asymmetric Dearomatization Addition Reactions of Halomethyl Heteroarenes.

    PubMed

    Tian, Qingshan; Bai, Jing; Chen, Bin; Zhang, Guozhu

    2016-04-15

    The first asymmetric dearomatization addition reaction of halomethyl arenes including benzofuran and benzothiophene was enabled by chromium catalysis. A variety of aldehydes served as suitable electrophiles under mild reaction conditions. Molecular complexities are quickly increased in a highly diastereo- and enantioselective manner.

  18. Reactions to dietary tartrazine.

    PubMed

    David, T J

    1987-02-01

    Double blind challenges with tartrazine and benzoic acid were performed in hospital in 24 children whose parents gave a definite history of a purely behavioural immediate adverse reaction to one of these substances. The patients, whose ages ranged from 1.6 to 12.4 years, were on a diet that avoided these items, and in all there was a clear history that any lapse of the diet caused an obvious adverse behavioural reaction within two hours. In no patient was any change in behaviour noted either by the parents or the nursing staff after the administration of placebo or active substances. Twenty two patients returned to a normal diet without problems, but the parents of two children insisted on continuing the diet. While popular belief has it that additives may have harmful behavioural effects, objective verification is required to prevent overdiagnosis. PMID:3548601

  19. Dearomatization through Halofunctionalization Reactions.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xiao-Wei; Zheng, Chao; You, Shu-Li

    2016-08-16

    Recent advances in dearomatization through halofunctionalization reactions are summarized in this Minireview. Two general categories of strategies are currently employed in this field. On one hand, the reaction can be initiated with electrophilic halogenation at an alkyne or alkene moiety. The resulting halonium ion intermediate is then captured by a pendant aromatic ring at the ipso position, affording the dearomatization product. On the other hand, electrophilic halogenation can directly take place at a substituted arene, and the final dearomatization product is furnished by deprotonation or intramolecular nucleophilic trap. Highly enantioselective variants have been realized in the latter case by organocatalysis or transition metal catalysis. By applying these methods, various valuable halogenated polycyclic molecular architectures have been obtained from readily available starting materials. PMID:27377184

  20. Concordant Chemical Reaction Networks

    PubMed Central

    Shinar, Guy; Feinberg, Martin

    2015-01-01

    We describe a large class of chemical reaction networks, those endowed with a subtle structural property called concordance. We show that the class of concordant networks coincides precisely with the class of networks which, when taken with any weakly monotonic kinetics, invariably give rise to kinetic systems that are injective — a quality that, among other things, precludes the possibility of switch-like transitions between distinct positive steady states. We also provide persistence characteristics of concordant networks, instability implications of discordance, and consequences of stronger variants of concordance. Some of our results are in the spirit of recent ones by Banaji and Craciun, but here we do not require that every species suffer a degradation reaction. This is especially important in studying biochemical networks, for which it is rare to have all species degrade. PMID:22659063