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Sample records for mdmx regulates p53-induced

  1. Regulation of MDMX nuclear import and degradation by Chk2 and 14-3-3.

    PubMed

    LeBron, Cynthia; Chen, Lihong; Gilkes, Daniele M; Chen, Jiandong

    2006-03-22

    The MDM2 homolog MDMX is an important regulator of p53 during mouse embryonic development. DNA damage promotes MDMX phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and degradation by MDM2. Here we show that MDMX copurifies with 14-3-3, and DNA damage stimulates MDMX binding to 14-3-3. Chk2-mediated phosphorylation of MDMX on S367 is important for stimulating 14-3-3 binding, MDMX nuclear import by a cryptic nuclear import signal, and degradation by MDM2. Mutation of MDMX S367 inhibits ubiquitination and degradation by MDM2, and prevents MDMX nuclear import. Expression of 14-3-3 stimulates the degradation of phosphorylated MDMX. Chk2 and 14-3-3 cooperatively stimulate MDMX ubiquitination and overcome the inhibition of p53 by MDMX. These results suggest that MDMX-14-3-3 interaction plays a role in p53 response to DNA damage by regulating MDMX localization and stability.

  2. Regulation of MDMX nuclear import and degradation by Chk2 and 14-3-3

    PubMed Central

    LeBron, Cynthia; Chen, Lihong; Gilkes, Daniele M; Chen, Jiandong

    2006-01-01

    The MDM2 homolog MDMX is an important regulator of p53 during mouse embryonic development. DNA damage promotes MDMX phosphorylation, nuclear translocation, and degradation by MDM2. Here we show that MDMX copurifies with 14-3-3, and DNA damage stimulates MDMX binding to 14-3-3. Chk2-mediated phosphorylation of MDMX on S367 is important for stimulating 14-3-3 binding, MDMX nuclear import by a cryptic nuclear import signal, and degradation by MDM2. Mutation of MDMX S367 inhibits ubiquitination and degradation by MDM2, and prevents MDMX nuclear import. Expression of 14-3-3 stimulates the degradation of phosphorylated MDMX. Chk2 and 14-3-3 cooperatively stimulate MDMX ubiquitination and overcome the inhibition of p53 by MDMX. These results suggest that MDMX–14-3-3 interaction plays a role in p53 response to DNA damage by regulating MDMX localization and stability. PMID:16511560

  3. DICER1 regulated let-7 expression levels in p53-induced cancer repression requires cyclin D1

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xin; Tang, Shou-Ching; Xu, Chongwen; Wang, Chenguang; Qin, Sida; Du, Ning; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Yiwen; Li, Xiang; Luo, Gang; Zhou, Jie; Xu, Fei; Ren, Hong

    2015-01-01

    Let-7 miRNAs act as tumour suppressors by directly binding to the 3′UTRs of downstream gene products. The regulatory role of let-7 in downstream gene expression has gained much interest in the cancer research community, as it controls multiple biological functions and determines cell fates. For example, one target of the let-7 family is cyclin D1, which promotes G0/S cell cycle progression and oncogenesis, was correlated with endoribonuclease DICER1, another target of let-7. Down-regulated let-7 has been identified in many types of tumours, suggesting a feedback loop may exist between let-7 and cyclin D1. A potential player in the proposed feedback relationship is Dicer, a central regulator of miRNA expression through sequence-specific silencing. We first identified that DICER1 is the key downstream gene for cyclin D1-induced let-7 expression. In addition, we found that let-7 miRNAs expression decreased because of the p53-induced cell death response, with deregulated cyclin D1. Our results also showed that cyclin D1 is required for Nutlin-3 and TAX-induced let-7 expression in cancer repression and the cell death response. For the first time, we provide evidence that let-7 and cyclin D1 form a feedback loop in regulating therapy response of cancer cells and cancer stem cells, and importantly, that alteration of let-7 expression, mainly caused by cyclin D1, is a sensitive indicator for better chemotherapies response. PMID:25702703

  4. Down-regulation of p53-inducible microRNAs 192, 194 and 215 impairs the p53/MDM2 auto-regulatory loop in multiple myeloma development

    PubMed Central

    Pichiorri, Flavia; Suh, Sung-Suk; Rocci, Alberto; De Luca, Luciana; Taccioli, Cristian; Santhanam, Ramasamy; Wenchao, Zhou; Benson, Don M.; Hofmainster, Craig; Alder, Hansjuerg; Garofalo, Michela; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Volinia, Stefano; Lin, Huey-Jen; Perrotti, Danilo; Kuehl, Michael; Aqeilan, Rami I.; Palumbo, Antonio; Croce, Carlo M.

    2013-01-01

    Summary In multiple myeloma (MM), an incurable B-cell neoplasm, mutation or deletion of p53 is rarely detected at diagnosis. Using small-molecule inhibitors of MDM2, we provide evidence that miR-192, 194 and 215, which are down-regulated in a subset of newly diagnosed MMs, can be transcriptionally activated by p53 and then modulate MDM2 expression. Furthermore, ectopic re-expression of these miRNAs in MM cells increases the therapeutic action of MDM2 inhibitors in vitro and in vivo by enhancing their p53-activating effects. In addition, miR-192 and 215 target the IGF pathway, preventing enhanced migration of plasma cells into bone marrow. The results suggest that these miRNAs are positive regulators of p53 and that their down-regulation plays a key role in MM development. PMID:20951946

  5. A critical role for noncoding 5S rRNA in regulating Mdmx stability.

    PubMed

    Li, Muyang; Gu, Wei

    2011-09-16

    Both p53 and Mdmx are ubiquitinated and degraded by the same E3 ligase Mdm2; interestingly, however, while p53 is rapidly degraded by Mdm2, Mdmx is a stable protein in most cancer cells. Thus, the mechanism by which Mdmx is degraded by Mdm2 needs further elucidation. Here, we identified the noncoding 5S rRNA as a major component of Mdmx-associated complexes from human cells. We show that 5S rRNA acts as a natural inhibitor of Mdmx degradation by Mdm2. RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous 5S rRNA, while not affecting p53 levels, significantly induces Mdmx degradation and, subsequently, activates p53-dependent growth arrest. Notably, 5S rRNA binds the RING domain of Mdmx and blocks its ubiquitination by Mdm2, whereas Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination remains intact. These results provide insights into the differential effects on p53 and Mdmx by Mdm2 in vivo and reveal a critical role for noncoding 5S rRNA in modulating the p53-Mdmx axis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. p53-Induced inflammation exacerbates cardiac dysfunction during pressure overload.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Yohko; Shimizu, Ippei; Katsuumi, Goro; Jiao, Shuang; Suda, Masayoshi; Hayashi, Yuka; Minamino, Tohru

    2015-08-01

    The rates of death and disability caused by severe heart failure are still unacceptably high. There is evidence that the sterile inflammatory response has a critical role in the progression of cardiac remodeling in the failing heart. The p53 signaling pathway has been implicated in heart failure, but the pathological link between p53 and inflammation in the failing heart is largely unknown. Here we demonstrate a critical role of p53-induced inflammation in heart failure. Expression of p53 was increased in cardiac endothelial cells and bone marrow cells in response to pressure overload, leading to up-regulation of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM1) expression by endothelial cells and integrin expression by bone marrow cells. Deletion of p53 from endothelial cells or bone marrow cells significantly reduced ICAM1 or integrin expression, respectively, as well as decreasing cardiac inflammation and ameliorating systolic dysfunction during pressure overload. Conversely, overexpression of p53 in bone marrow cells led to an increase of integrin expression and cardiac inflammation that reduced systolic function. Norepinephrine markedly increased p53 expression in endothelial cells and macrophages. Reducing β2-adrenergic receptor expression in endothelial cells or bone marrow cells attenuated cardiac inflammation and improved systolic dysfunction during pressure overload. These results suggest that activation of the sympathetic nervous system promotes cardiac inflammation by up-regulating ICAM1 and integrin expression via p53 signaling to exacerbate cardiac dysfunction. Inhibition of p53-induced inflammation may be a novel therapeutic strategy for heart failure. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. A critical role for the non-coding 5S rRNA in regulating Mdmx stability

    PubMed Central

    Li, Muyang; Gu, Wei

    2013-01-01

    Summary Both p53 and Mdmx are ubiquitinated and degraded by the same E3 ligase Mdm2; interestingly, however, while p53 is rapidly degraded by Mdm2, Mdmx is a stable protein in most of cancer cells. Thus, the mechanism by which Mdmx is degraded by Mdm2 needs further elucidation. Here, we identified the noncoding 5S rRNA as a major component of Mdmx-associated complexes from human cells. We show that 5S rRNA acts as a natural inhibitor of Mdmx degradation by Mdm2. RNAi-mediated knockdown of endogenous 5S rRNA, while not affecting p53 levels, significantly induces Mdmx degradation and subsequently, activates p53-dependent growth arrest. Notably, 5S rRNA binds the RING domain of Mdmx and blocks its ubiquitination by Mdm2 whereas Mdm2-mediated p53 ubiquitination remains intact. These results provide insights into the differential effects on p53 and Mdmx by Mdm2 in vivo and reveal an critical role of noncoding 5S rRNA in modulating the p53-Mdmx axis. PMID:21925390

  8. A p53-inducible microRNA-34a downregulates Ras signaling by targeting IMPDH

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Hwa-Ryeon; Roe, Jae-Seok; Lee, Ji-Eun; Hwang, In-Young; Cho, Eun-Jung; Youn, Hong-Duk

    2012-02-24

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53 downregulates IMPDH. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer p53-dependent miR-34a transactivation inhibits IMPDH transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-34a-mediated inhibition of IMPDH downregulates GTP-dependent Ras signal. -- Abstract: p53 is a well-known transcription factor that controls cell cycle arrest and cell death in response to a wide range of stresses. Moreover, p53 regulates glucose metabolism and its mutation results in the metabolic switch to the Warburg effect found in cancer cells. Nucleotide biosynthesis is also critical for cell proliferation and the cell division cycle. Nonetheless, little is known about whether p53 regulates nucleotide biosynthesis. Here we demonstrated that p53-inducible microRNA-34a (miR-34a) repressed inosine 5 Prime -monophosphate dehydrogenase (IMPDH), a rate-limiting enzyme of de novo GTP biosynthesis. Treatment with anti-miR-34a inhibitor relieved the expression of IMPDH upon DNA damage. Ultimately, miR-34a-mediated inhibition of IMPDH resulted in repressed activation of the GTP-dependent Ras signaling pathway. In summary, we suggest that p53 has a novel function in regulating purine biosynthesis, aided by miR-34a-dependent IMPDH repression.

  9. Dual function of MDM2 and MDMX toward the tumor suppressors p53 and RB

    PubMed Central

    Hernández-Monge, Jesús; Rousset-Roman, Adriana Berenice; Medina-Medina, Ixaura; Olivares-Illana, Vanesa

    2016-01-01

    The orchestrated crosstalk between the retinoblastoma (RB) and p53 pathways contributes to preserving proper homeostasis within the cell. The deregulation of one or both pathways is a common factor in the development of most types of human cancer. The proto-oncoproteins MDMX and MDM2 are the main regulators of the well- known tumor suppressor p53 protein. Under normal conditions, MDM2 and MDMX inhibit p53, either via repression of its transcriptional activity by protein-protein interaction, or via polyubiquitination as a result of MDM2-E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, for which MDM2 needs to dimerize with MDMX. Under genotoxic stress conditions, both become positive regulators of p53. The ATM-dependent phosphorylation of MDM2 and MDMX allow them to bind p53 mRNA, these interactions promote p53 translation. MDM2 and MDMX are also being revealed as effective regulators of the RB protein. MDM2 is able to degrade RB by two different mechanisms, that is, by ubiquitin dependent and independent pathways. MDMX enhances the ability of MDM2 to bind and degrade RB protein. However, MDMX also seems to stabilize RB through interaction and competition with MDM2. Here, we will contextualize the findings that suggest that the MDM2 and MDMX proteins have a dual function on both p53 and RB. PMID:28050229

  10. Dual function of MDM2 and MDMX toward the tumor suppressors p53 and RB.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Monge, Jesús; Rousset-Roman, Adriana Berenice; Medina-Medina, Ixaura; Olivares-Illana, Vanesa

    2016-09-01

    The orchestrated crosstalk between the retinoblastoma (RB) and p53 pathways contributes to preserving proper homeostasis within the cell. The deregulation of one or both pathways is a common factor in the development of most types of human cancer. The proto-oncoproteins MDMX and MDM2 are the main regulators of the well- known tumor suppressor p53 protein. Under normal conditions, MDM2 and MDMX inhibit p53, either via repression of its transcriptional activity by protein-protein interaction, or via polyubiquitination as a result of MDM2-E3 ubiquitin ligase activity, for which MDM2 needs to dimerize with MDMX. Under genotoxic stress conditions, both become positive regulators of p53. The ATM-dependent phosphorylation of MDM2 and MDMX allow them to bind p53 mRNA, these interactions promote p53 translation. MDM2 and MDMX are also being revealed as effective regulators of the RB protein. MDM2 is able to degrade RB by two different mechanisms, that is, by ubiquitin dependent and independent pathways. MDMX enhances the ability of MDM2 to bind and degrade RB protein. However, MDMX also seems to stabilize RB through interaction and competition with MDM2. Here, we will contextualize the findings that suggest that the MDM2 and MDMX proteins have a dual function on both p53 and RB.

  11. Caspase-dependent degradation of MDMx/MDM4 cell cycle regulatory protein in amyloid β-induced neuronal damage.

    PubMed

    Colacurcio, Daniel J; Zyskind, Jacob W; Jordan-Sciutto, Kelly L; Espinoza, Cagla Akay

    2015-11-16

    MDMx/MDM4 is a negative regulator of the p53 tumor suppressor protein and is necessary for survival in dividing cells. MDMx is also expressed in postmitotic neurons, with prosurvival roles that are independent of its extensively described roles in carcinogenesis. We and others have shown a role for MDMx loss in neuronal death in vitro and in vivo in several neurodegenerative diseases. Further, we have recently shown that MDMx is targeted for proteolytic degradation by calcium-dependent proteases, calpains, in neurons in vitro, and that MDMx overexpression provided partial neuroprotection in a model of HIV-associated neurodegeneration. Here, we assessed whether amyloid β (Aβ)-induced MDMx degradation occurred in Alzheimer's Disease (AD) models. Our data shows an age-dependent reduction in MDMx levels in cholinergic neurons within the cortex of adult mice expressing the swedish mutant of the amyloid precursor protein, APP in the Tg2576 murine model of AD. In vitro, Aβ treatment of primary cortical neurons led to the caspase-dependent MDMx degradation. Our findings suggest that MDMx degradation associated with neuronal death occurs via caspase activation in neurons, and that the progressive loss of MDMx protein represents a potential mechanism of Aβ-induced neuronal death during disease progression in AD.

  12. Functional Interrogation of the N-Terminal Lid of MDMX in p53 Binding via Native Chemical Ligation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xishan; Lu, Weiyue

    2016-01-01

    The homologous proteins MDM2 and MDMX negatively regulate the tumor suppressor protein p53 by antagonizing p53 transactivation activity and targeting p53 for degradation. MDM2 and MDMX bind to p53 via N-terminal p53-binding domains to control the level of p53. The N-terminal regions of MDM2 and MDMX are modified in vivo under stressed conditions, suggesting that modifications to MDM2/MDMX also may affect the p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction. Ample evidence suggests that the MDM2 lid (residues 1-24) is partially structured and significantly reduces its binding affinity with p53 several fold. Since MDM2 and MDMX possess very similar p53-binding domains but different lids, however, the function of the N-terminal lid of MDMX still remains poorly understood. Using a native chemical ligation technique, the p53-binding domain of MDMX, (1-108)MDMX, and its N-terminal lid (residues 1-23) truncated analogue (24-108)MDMX were chemically synthesized. We comparatively characterized their structures by circular dichroism (CD) spectra, and measured their binding affinities with a panel of p53-derived peptide ligands by fluorescence polarization and surface plasmon resonance assays. Our results indicate that, as opposed to the lid of MDM2, the lid of MDMX has little effect on p53-binding, adopts no structural conformation, and has rare auto-inhibitory function. Different lid modifications of MDM2 and MDMX are functionally different with respect to p53 binding, which should be considered when designing dual specific inhibitors of MDM2 and MDMX.

  13. Suppression of p53-inducible gene 3 is significant for glioblastoma progression and predicts poor patient prognosis.

    PubMed

    Quan, Jishu; Li, Yong; Jin, Meihua; Chen, Dunfu; Yin, Xuezhe; Jin, Ming

    2017-03-01

    Glioblastoma is the most malignant and invasive brain tumor with extremely poor prognosis. p53-inducible gene 3, a downstream molecule of the tumor suppressor p53, has been found involved in apoptosis and oxidative stress response. However, the functions of p53-inducible gene 3(PIG3) in cancer are far from clear including glioblastoma. In this study, we found that p53-inducible gene 3 expression was suppressed in glioblastoma tissues compared with normal tissues. And the expression of p53-inducible gene 3 was significantly associated with the World Health Organization grade. Patients with high p53-inducible gene 3 expression have a significantly longer median survival time (15 months) than those with low p53-inducible gene 3 expression (8 months). According to Cox regression analysis, p53-inducible gene 3 was an independent prognostic factor with multivariate hazard ratio of 0.578 (95% confidence interval, 0.352-0.947; p = 0.030) for overall survival. Additionally, gain and loss of function experiments showed that knockdown of p53-inducible gene 3 significantly increased the proliferation and invasion ability of glioblastoma cells while overexpression of p53-inducible gene 3 inhibited the proliferation and invasion ability. The results of in vivo glioblastoma models further confirmed that p53-inducible gene 3 suppression promoted glioblastoma progression. Altogether, our data suggest that high expression of p53-inducible gene 3 is significant for glioblastoma inhibition and p53-inducible gene 3 independently indicates good prognosis in patients, which might be a novel prognostic biomarker or potential therapeutic target in glioblastoma.

  14. Expression of the human tumor suppressor p53 induces cell death in Pichia pastoris.

    PubMed

    Abdelmoula-Souissi, Salma; Mabrouk, Imed; Gargouri, Ali; Mokdad-Gargouri, Raja

    2012-02-01

    The human tumor suppressor p53 is known as guardian of genome because of its involvement in many signals related to cell life or death. In this work, we report that human p53 induces cell death in the yeast Pichia pastoris. We showed a growth inhibition effect, which increased with the p53 protein expression level in recombinant Mut(s) (methanol utilization slow) strain of Pichia. However, no effect of p53 was observed in recombinant strain of Mut(+) (methanol utilization plus) phenotype. Interestingly, human p53 induces cell death in recombinant strains Mut(s) with characteristic markers of apoptosis such as DNA fragmentation, exposure of phosphatidylserine, and reactive oxygen species generation. Taken together, our results strongly suggest that human p53 is biologically active in this heterologous context. Thus, we propose that P. pastoris could be a useful tool to better understand the biological function of human p53.

  15. Validation of MdmX as a therapeutic target for reactivating p53 in tumors

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Daniel; Warr, Matthew R.; Martins, Carla P.; Brown Swigart, Lamorna; Passegué, Emmanuelle; Evan, Gerard I.

    2011-01-01

    MdmX, also known as Mdm4, is a critical negative regulator of p53, and its overexpression serves to block p53 tumor suppressor function in many cancers. Consequently, inhibiting MdmX has emerged as an attractive approach to restoring p53 function in those cancers that retain functional p53. However, the consequences of acute systemic MdmX inhibition in normal adult tissues remain unknown. To determine directly the effects of systemic MdmX inhibition in normal tissues and in tumors, we crossed mdmX−/− mice into the p53ERTAM knockin background. In place of wild-type p53, p53ERTAM knockin mice express a variant of p53, p53ERTAM, that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity. MdmX inhibition was then modeled by restoring p53 function in these MdmX-deficient mice. We show that MdmX is continuously required to buffer p53 activity in adult normal tissues and their stem cells. Importantly, the effects of transient p53 restoration in the absence of MdmX are nonlethal and reversible, unlike transient p53 restoration in the absence of Mdm2, which is ineluctably lethal. We also show that the therapeutic impact of restoring p53 in a tumor model is enhanced in the absence of MdmX, affording a significant extension of life span over p53 restoration in the presence of MdmX. Hence, systemic inhibition of MdmX is both a feasible therapeutic strategy for restoring p53 function in tumors that retain wild-type p53 and likely to be significantly safer than inhibition of Mdm2. PMID:21852537

  16. Systematic Mutational Analysis of Peptide Inhibition of the p53-MDM2/MDMX Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Chong; Pazgier, Marzena; Li, Changqing; Yuan, Weirong; Liu, Min; Wei, Gang; Lu, Wei-Yue; Lu, Wuyuan

    2010-01-01

    Inhibition of the interaction between the tumor suppressor protein p53 and its negative regulators MDM2 and MDMX is of great interest in cancer biology and drug design. We previously reported a potent duodecimal peptide inhibitor, termed PMI (TSFAEYWNLLSP), of the p53-MDM2 and -MDMX interactions. PMI competes with p53 for MDM2 and MDMX binding at an affinity roughly two orders of magnitude higher than that of 17–28p53 (ETFSDLWKLLPE) of the same length; both peptides adopt nearly identical α-helical conformations in the complexes, where the three highlighted hydrophobic residues Phe, Trp and Leu dominate PMI or 17–28p53 binding to MDM2 and MDMX. To elucidate the molecular determinants for PMI activity and specificity, we performed a systematic Ala scanning mutational analysis of PMI and 17–28p53. The binding affinities for MDM2 and MDMX of a total of 35 peptides including 10 truncation analogs were quantified, affording a complete dissection of energetic contributions of individual residues of PMI and 17–28p53 to MDM2 and MDMX association. Importantly, the N8A mutation turned PMI into the most potent dual specific antagonist of MDM2 and MDMX reported to date, registering respective Kd values of 490 pM and 2.4 nM. The co-crystal structure of N8A-PMI-25–109MDM2 was determined at 1.95 Å, affirming that high-affinity peptide binding to MDM2/MDMX necessitates, in addition to optimized inter-molecular interactions, enhanced helix stability or propensity contributed by non-contact residues. The powerful empirical binding data and crystal structures present a unique opportunity for computational studies of peptide inhibition of the p53-MDM2/MDMX interactions. PMID:20226197

  17. p53-inducible long non-coding RNA PICART1 mediates cancer cell proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yu; Lin, Minglin; Bu, Yiwen; Ling, Hongyan; He, Yingchun; Huang, Chenfei; Shen, Yi; Song, Bob; Cao, Deliang

    2017-05-01

    Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) function in the development and progression of cancer, but only a small portion of lncRNAs have been characterized to date. A novel lncRNA transcript, 2.53 kb in length, was identified by transcriptome sequencing analysis, and was named p53-inducible cancer-associated RNA transcript 1 (PICART1). PICART1 was found to be upregulated by p53 through a p53-binding site at -1808 to -1783 bp. In breast and colorectal cancer cells and tissues, PICART1 expression was found to be decreased. Ectopic expression of PICART1 suppressed the growth, proliferation, migration, and invasion of MCF7, MDA-MB-231 and HCT116 cells whereas silencing of PICART1 stimulated cell growth and migration. In these cells, the expression of PICART1 suppressed levels of p-AKT (Thr308 and Ser473) and p-GSK3β (Ser9), and accordingly, β-catenin, cyclin D1 and c-Myc expression were decreased, while p21Waf/cip1 expression was increased. Together these data suggest that PICART1 is a novel p53-inducible tumor-suppressor lncRNA, functioning through the AKT/GSK3β/β-catenin signaling cascade.

  18. Mouse peroxiredoxin V is a thioredoxin peroxidase that inhibits p53-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Y; Kok, K H; Chun, A C; Wong, C M; Wu, H W; Lin, M C; Fung, P C; Kung, H; Jin, D Y

    2000-02-24

    We have identified human and mouse peroxiredoxin V (Prx-V) by virtue of the sequence homologies to yeast peroxisomal antioxidant enzyme PMP20. Prx-V represents the fifth of the six currently known subfamilies of mammalian peroxiredoxins. It is a novel organellar enzyme that has orthologs in bacteria. Biochemically, Prx-V is a thioredoxin peroxidase. One important aspect of p53 function in mammalian cells involves induction of apoptosis likely mediated by redox. We show that overexpression of Prx-V prevented the p53-dependent generation of reactive oxygen species. Likewise, Prx-V inhibited p53-induced apoptosis. Thus, Prx-V is critically involved in intracellular redox signaling. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  19. Distinct patterns of cleavage and translocation of cell cycle control proteins in CD95-induced and p53-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed Central

    Park, Weon Seo; Jung, Kyeong Cheon; Chung, Doo Hyun; Nam, Woo-Dong; Choi, Won Jin; Bae, Youngmee

    2003-01-01

    Apoptotic cell death induced by p53 occurs at a late G1 cell cycle checkpoint termed the restriction (R) point, and it has been proposed that p53-induced apoptosis causes upregulation of CD95. However, as cells with defective in CD95 signaling pathway are still sensitive to p53-induced apoptosis, CD95 cannot be the sole factor resulting in apoptosis. In addition, unlike p53-induced apoptosis, the relationship between CD95-mediated apoptosis and the cell cycle is not clearly understood. It would therefore be worth investigating whether CD95-mediated cell death is pertinent with p53-induced apoptosis in view of cell cycle related molecules. In this report, biochemical analysis showed that etoposide-induced apoptosis caused the induction and the nuclear translocation of effector molecules involved in G1 cell cycle checkpoint. However, there was no such translocation in the case of CD95-mediated death. Thus, although both types of apoptosis involved caspase activation, the cell cycle related proteins responded differently. This argues against the idea that p53-induced apoptosis occurs through the induction of CD95/CD95L expression. PMID:12923319

  20. Epigenetic inactivation of the p53-induced long noncoding RNA TP53 target 1 in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Lagares, Angel; Crujeiras, Ana B.; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Soler, Marta; Setien, Fernando; Goyal, Ashish; Sandoval, Juan; Hashimoto, Yutaka; Martinez-Cardús, Anna; Gomez, Antonio; Heyn, Holger; Moutinho, Catia; Espada, Jesús; Vidal, August; Paúles, Maria; Galán, Maica; Sala, Núria; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Martínez-Iniesta, María; Farré, Lourdes; Villanueva, Alberto; Gross, Matthias; Diederichs, Sven; Guil, Sonia; Esteller, Manel

    2016-01-01

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important regulators of cellular homeostasis. However, their contribution to the cancer phenotype still needs to be established. Herein, we have identified a p53-induced lncRNA, TP53TG1, that undergoes cancer-specific promoter hypermethylation-associated silencing. In vitro and in vivo assays identify a tumor-suppressor activity for TP53TG1 and a role in the p53 response to DNA damage. Importantly, we show that TP53TG1 binds to the multifaceted DNA/RNA binding protein YBX1 to prevent its nuclear localization and thus the YBX1-mediated activation of oncogenes. TP53TG1 epigenetic inactivation in cancer cells releases the transcriptional repression of YBX1-targeted growth-promoting genes and creates a chemoresistant tumor. TP53TG1 hypermethylation in primary tumors is shown to be associated with poor outcome. The epigenetic loss of TP53TG1 therefore represents an altered event in an lncRNA that is linked to classical tumoral pathways, such as p53 signaling, but is also connected to regulatory networks of the cancer cell. PMID:27821766

  1. Epigenetic inactivation of the p53-induced long noncoding RNA TP53 target 1 in human cancer.

    PubMed

    Diaz-Lagares, Angel; Crujeiras, Ana B; Lopez-Serra, Paula; Soler, Marta; Setien, Fernando; Goyal, Ashish; Sandoval, Juan; Hashimoto, Yutaka; Martinez-Cardús, Anna; Gomez, Antonio; Heyn, Holger; Moutinho, Catia; Espada, Jesús; Vidal, August; Paúles, Maria; Galán, Maica; Sala, Núria; Akiyama, Yoshimitsu; Martínez-Iniesta, María; Farré, Lourdes; Villanueva, Alberto; Gross, Matthias; Diederichs, Sven; Guil, Sonia; Esteller, Manel

    2016-11-22

    Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are important regulators of cellular homeostasis. However, their contribution to the cancer phenotype still needs to be established. Herein, we have identified a p53-induced lncRNA, TP53TG1, that undergoes cancer-specific promoter hypermethylation-associated silencing. In vitro and in vivo assays identify a tumor-suppressor activity for TP53TG1 and a role in the p53 response to DNA damage. Importantly, we show that TP53TG1 binds to the multifaceted DNA/RNA binding protein YBX1 to prevent its nuclear localization and thus the YBX1-mediated activation of oncogenes. TP53TG1 epigenetic inactivation in cancer cells releases the transcriptional repression of YBX1-targeted growth-promoting genes and creates a chemoresistant tumor. TP53TG1 hypermethylation in primary tumors is shown to be associated with poor outcome. The epigenetic loss of TP53TG1 therefore represents an altered event in an lncRNA that is linked to classical tumoral pathways, such as p53 signaling, but is also connected to regulatory networks of the cancer cell.

  2. The oncogenic effects of p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3) in colon cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Park, Seon-Joo; Kim, Hong Beum; Kim, Jeeho

    2017-01-01

    The p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), initially identified as a gene downstream of p53, plays an important role in the apoptotic process triggered by p53-mediated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. Recently, several studies have suggested that PIG3 may play a role in various types of cancer. However, the functional significance of PIG3 in cancer remains unclear. Here, we found that PIG3 was highly expressed in human colon cancer cell lines compared to normal colonderived fibroblasts. Therefore, we attempted to elucidate the functional role of PIG3 in colon cancer. PIG3 overexpression increases the colony formation, migration and invasion ability of HCT116 colon cancer cells. Conversely, these tumorigenic abilities were significantly decreased in in vitro studies with PIG3 knockdown HCT116 cells. PIG3 knockdown also attenuated the growth of mouse xenograft tumors. These results demonstrate that PIG3 is associated with the tumorigenic potential of cancer cells, both in vitro and in vivo, and could play a key oncogenic role in colon cancer. PMID:28280421

  3. The Zn-finger domain of MdmX suppresses cancer progression by promoting genome stability in p53-mutant cells

    PubMed Central

    Matijasevic, Z; Krzywicka-Racka, A; Sluder, G; Gallant, J; Jones, S N

    2016-01-01

    The MDMX (MDM4) oncogene is amplified or overexpressed in a significant percentage of human tumors. MDMX is thought to function as an oncoprotein by binding p53 tumor suppressor protein to inhibit p53-mediated transcription, and by complexing with MDM2 oncoprotein to promote MDM2-mediated degradation of p53. However, down-regulation or loss of functional MDMX has also been observed in a variety of human tumors that are mutated for p53, often correlating with more aggressive cancers and a worse patient prognosis. We have previously reported that endogenous levels of MdmX can suppress proliferation and promote pseudo-bipolar mitosis in primary and tumor cells derived from p53-deficient mice, and that MdmX-p53 double deficient mice succumb to spontaneously formed tumors more rapidly than p53-deficient mice. These results suggest that the MdmX oncoprotein may act as a tumor-suppressor in cancers with compromised p53 function. By using orthotopic transplantation and lung colonization assays in mice we now establish a p53-independent anti-oncogenic role for MdmX in tumor progression. We also demonstrate that the roles of MdmX in genome stability and in proliferation are two distinct functions encoded by the separate MdmX protein domains. The central Zn-finger domain suppresses multipolar mitosis and chromosome loss, whereas the carboxy-terminal RING domain suppresses proliferation of p53-deficient cells. Furthermore, we determine that it is the maintenance of genome stability that underlies MdmX role in suppression of tumorigenesis in hyperploid p53 mutant tumors. Our results offer a rationale for the increased metastatic potential of p53 mutant human cancers with aberrant MdmX function and provide a caveat for the application of anti-MdmX treatment of tumors with compromised p53 activity. PMID:27694836

  4. FHL2 mediates p53-induced transcriptional activation through a direct association with HIPK2

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Sang-Wang . E-mail: umsj@sejong.ac.kr

    2006-01-27

    To understand the molecular mechanism underlying HIPK2 regulation of the transcriptional activation by p53, we sought to identify the protein that interacts with HIPK2. From our yeast two-hybrid screen, we found that four and a half LIM domains 2 (FHL2) could bind to the C-terminal half of HIPK2. Further assays in yeast mapped the minimal interaction domain to amino acids 812-907 in HIPK2. The interaction was confirmed using a GST pull-down assay in vitro, and an immunoprecipitation (IP) assay and fluorescence microscopy in vivo. FHL2 alone spread throughout both the cytoplasm and nucleus but was redistributed to dot-like structures in the nucleus when HIPK2 was coexpressed in HEK293 cells. When tethered to the Gal4-responsive promoter through the Gal4 DBD fusion, FHL2 showed autonomous transcriptional activity that was enhanced by wild-type HIPK2, but not by the kinase-defective mutant. In addition, FHL2 increased the p53-dependent transcriptional activation and had an additive effect on the activation when coexpressed with HIPK2, which was again not observed with the kinase-defective mutant of HIPK2. Finally, we found a ternary complex of p53, HIPK2, and FHL2 using IP, and their recruitment to the p53-responsive p21Waf1 promoter in chromatin IP assays. Overall, our findings indicate that FHL2 can also regulate p53 via a direct association with HIPK2.

  5. Mieap, a p53-Inducible Protein, Controls Mitochondrial Quality by Repairing or Eliminating Unhealthy Mitochondria

    PubMed Central

    Kitamura, Noriaki; Nakamura, Yasuyuki; Miyamoto, Yuji; Miyamoto, Takafumi; Kabu, Koki; Yoshida, Masaki; Futamura, Manabu; Ichinose, Shizuko; Arakawa, Hirofumi

    2011-01-01

    Maintenance of healthy mitochondria prevents aging, cancer, and a variety of degenerative diseases that are due to the result of defective mitochondrial quality control (MQC). Recently, we discovered a novel mechanism for MQC, in which Mieap induces intramitochondrial lysosome-like organella that plays a critical role in the elimination of oxidized mitochondrial proteins (designated MALM for Mieap-induced accumulation of lysosome-like organelles within mitochondria). However, a large part of the mechanisms for MQC remains unknown. Here, we report additional mechanisms for Mieap-regulated MQC. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) scavengers completely inhibited MALM. A mitochondrial outer membrane protein NIX interacted with Mieap in a ROS-dependent manner via the BH3 domain of NIX and the coiled-coil domain of Mieap. Deficiency of NIX also completely impaired MALM. When MALM was inhibited, Mieap induced vacuole-like structures (designated as MIV for Mieap-induced vacuole), which engulfed and degraded the unhealthy mitochondria by accumulating lysosomes. The inactivation of p53 severely impaired both MALM and MIV generation, leading to accumulation of unhealthy mitochondria. These results suggest that (1) mitochondrial ROS and NIX are essential factors for MALM, (2) MIV is a novel mechanism for lysosomal degradation of mitochondria, and (3) the p53-Mieap pathway plays a pivotal role in MQC by repairing or eliminating unhealthy mitochondria via MALM or MIV generation, respectively. PMID:21264228

  6. Targeting p53-MDM2-MDMX Loop for Cancer Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qi; Zeng, Shelya X.

    2015-01-01

    The tumor suppressor p53 plays a central role in anti-tumorigenesis and cancer therapy. It has been described as “the guardian of the genome”, because it is essential for conserving genomic stability by preventing mutation, and its mutation and inactivation are highly related to all human cancers. Two important p53 regulators, MDM2 and MDMX, inactivate p53 by directly inhibiting its transcriptional activity and mediating its ubiquitination in a feedback fashion, as their genes are also the transcriptional targets of p53. On account of the importance of the p53-MDM2- MDMX loop in the initiation and development of wild type p53-containing tumors, intensive studies over the past decade have been aiming to identify small molecules or peptides that could specifically target individual protein molecules of this pathway for developing better anti-cancer therapeutics. In this chapter, we review the approaches for screening and discovering efficient and selective MDM2 inhibitors with emphasis on the most advanced synthetic small molecules that interfere with the p53-MDM2 interaction and are currently on Phase I clinical trials. Other therapeutically useful strategies targeting this loop, which potentially improve the prospects of cancer therapy and prevention, will also be discussed briefly. PMID:25201201

  7. Crocetin exploits p53-induced death domain (PIDD) and FAS-associated death domain (FADD) proteins to induce apoptosis in colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ray, Pallab; Guha, Deblina; Chakraborty, Juni; Banerjee, Shuvomoy; Adhikary, Arghya; Chakraborty, Samik; Das, Tanya; Sa, Gaurisankar

    2016-01-01

    Tumor suppressor p53 preserves the genomic integrity by restricting anomaly at the gene level. The hotspots for mutation in half of all colon cancers reside in p53. Hence, in a p53-mutated cellular milieu targeting cancer cells may be achievable by targeting the paralogue(s) of p53. Here we have shown the effectiveness of crocetin, a dietary component, in inducing apoptosis of colon cancer cells with varying p53 status. In wild-type p53-expressing cancer cells, p53 in one hand transactivates BAX and in parallel up-regulates p53-induced death domain protein (PIDD) that in turn cleaves and activates BID through caspase-2. Both BAX and t-BID converge at mitochondria to alter the transmembrane potential thereby leading to caspase-9 and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. In contrast, in functional p53-impaired cells, this phytochemical exploits p53-paralogue p73, which up-regulates FAS to cleave BID through FAS-FADD-caspase-8-pathway. These findings not only underline the phenomenon of functional switch-over from p53 to p73 in p53-impaired condition, but also validate p73 as a promising and potential target for cancer therapy in absence of functional p53. PMID:27622714

  8. 2.6 Å X-ray Crystal Structure of Human p53R2, a p53 Inducible Ribonucleotide Reductase

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Peter; Zhou, Bingsen; Ho, Nam; Yuan, Yate-Ching; Su, Leila; Tsai, Shiou-Chuan; Yen, Yun

    2009-01-01

    Human p53R2 (hp53R2) is a 351 residue p53-inducible ribonucleotide reductase (RNR) small subunit. It shares >80% sequence identity with hRRM2, the small RNR subunit responsible for normal maintenance of the deoxyribonucleotide (dNTP) pool used for DNA replication, which is active during the S-phase in a cell-cycle dependent fashion. But rather than cyclic dNTP synthesis, hp53R2 has been shown to supply dNTPs for DNA repair to cells in G0-G1 in a p53-dependent fashion. The first x-ray crystal structure of hp53R2 is solved to 2.6 Å, in which monomers A and B exhibit mono- and bi-nuclear iron occupancy, respectively. The pronounced structural differences at three regions between hp53R2 and hRRM2 highlight the possible regulatory role in iron assimilation, and help explain previously observed physical and biochemical differences in the mobility and accessibility of the radical-iron center, as well as radical transfer pathways between the two enzymes. The sequence-structure-function correlations that differentiate hp53R2 and hRRM2 are revealed for the first time. Insight gained from this structural work will be used toward the identification of biological function, regulation mechanism and inhibitors selection in RNR small subunits. PMID:19728742

  9. The p53-inducible gene 3 involved in flavonoid-induced cytotoxicity through the reactive oxygen species-mediated mitochondrial apoptotic pathway in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Cheng, Guangdong; Qiu, Hongbin; Zhu, Liling; Ren, Zhongjuan; Zhao, Wei; Zhang, Tao; Liu, Lei

    2015-05-01

    Flavonoids have been reported to exhibit prooxidant cytotoxicity against cancer cells, but the underlying mechanism is still poorly understood. Here we investigated the potential mechanism that p53-inducible gene 3 (PIG3), a NADPH:quinone oxidoreductase, mediated the prooxidant cytotoxicity of flavonoids on human hepatoma HepG2 cells. The results showed that flavonoids (apigenin, luteolin, kaempferol, and quercetin) inhibited the growth of HepG2 cells in a dosage- and time-dependent manner, and induced the morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis in HepG2 cells. We also found that expression of PIG3 was increased markedly in HepG2 cells treated with flavonoids at both mRNA and protein levels, which was accompanied by increased intracellular ROS production and a decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm). All these effects were largely reversed through knockdown of the PIG3 gene in HepG2 cells. Western blotting indicated that flavonoids increased cytochrome c release, upregulated the ratio of Bax/Bcl-2, and activated the caspases-9 and -3. Moreover, knockdown of PIG3 could reverse the changes of these apoptotic-related proteins. These results suggest that PIG3 plays an important role in regulating the prooxidant activity and apoptosis-inducing action of flavonoids on HepG2 cells though the ROS-triggered mitochondrial apoptotic pathway.

  10. Stra6, a retinoic acid-responsive gene, participates in p53-induced apoptosis after DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Carrera, S; Cuadrado-Castano, S; Samuel, J; Jones, G D D; Villar, E; Lee, S W; Macip, S

    2013-01-01

    Stra6 is the retinoic acid (RA)-inducible gene encoding the cellular receptor for holo-retinol binding protein. This transmembrane protein mediates the internalization of retinol, which then upregulates RA-responsive genes in target cells. Here, we show that Stra6 can be upregulated by DNA damage in a p53-dependent manner, and it has an important role in cell death responses. Stra6 expression induced significant amounts of apoptosis in normal and cancer cells, and it was also able to influence p53-mediated cell fate decisions by turning an initial arrest response into cell death. Moreover, inhibition of Stra6 severely compromised p53-induced apoptosis. We also found that Stra6 induced mitochondria depolarization and accumulation of reactive oxygen species, and that it was present not only at the cellular membrane but also in the cytosol. Finally, we show that these novel functions of Stra6 did not require downstream activation of RA signalling. Our results present a previously unknown link between the RA and p53 pathways and provide a rationale to use retinoids to upregulate Stra6, and thus enhance the tumour suppressor functions of p53. This may have implications for the role of vitamin A metabolites in cancer prevention and treatment. PMID:23449393

  11. Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 is a prognostic marker and therapeutic target in bladder transitional cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhi-Peng; Chen, Shu-Yuan; Tian, Ye

    2017-01-01

    Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase (Wip1) is an established oncogene and is associated with development of multiple forms of human cancer. However, the expression and role of Wip1 in human bladder transitional cell carcinoma (TCC) remains to be elucidated. In the present study, immunohistochemistry demonstrated that Wip1 was overexpressed in bladder TCC tissues compared with corresponding normal bladder tissues in 106 bladder TCC cases (P<0.0001). Furthermore, high expression levels of Wip1 were significantly associated with increasing tumor size (P=0.002), pathological grade (P=0.025), clinical T stage (P=0.001) and lymph nodal metastasis (P=0.003). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis identified that patients with high Wip1 expression levels exhibited a lower overall survival time (P<0.0001), and Cox proportional hazards regression model analysis demonstrated that Wip1 expression was an independent prognostic factor in patients with bladder TCC (P=0.025). In addition, downregulation of Wip1 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA in bladder cancer cells inhibited cell proliferation, invasion and migration (P<0.05), along with the upregulation of p53 protein levels (P<0.05). These findings suggest that Wip1 may function as a potential prognostic marker and therapeutic target in bladder cancer. PMID:28356972

  12. Mice deficient for wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 display elevated anxiety- and depression-like behaviors.

    PubMed

    Ruan, C S; Zhou, F H; He, Z Y; Wang, S F; Yang, C R; Shen, Y J; Guo, Y; Zhao, H B; Chen, L; Liu, D; Liu, J; Baune, B T; Xiao, Z C; Zhou, X F

    2015-05-07

    Mood disorders are a severe health burden but molecular mechanisms underlying mood dysfunction remain poorly understood. Here, we show that wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (Wip1) negatively responds to the stress-induced negative mood-related behaviors. Specifically, we show that Wip1 protein but not its mRNA level was downregulated in the hippocampus but not in the neocortex after 4 weeks of chronic unpredictable mild stress (CUMS) in mice. Moreover, the CUMS-responsive WIP1 downregulation in the hippocampus was restored by chronic treatment of fluoxetine (i.p. 20 mg/kg) along with the CUMS procedure. In addition, Wip1 knockout mice displayed decreased exploratory behaviors as well as increased anxiety-like and depression-like behaviors in mice without impaired motor activities under the non-CUMS condition. Furthermore, the Wip1 deficiency-responsive anxiety-like but not depression-like behaviors were further elevated in mice under CUMS. Although limitations like male-alone sampling and multiply behavioral testing exist, the present study suggests a potential protective function of Wip1 in mood stabilization. Copyright © 2015 IBRO. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Discovery of new low-molecular-weight p53-Mdmx disruptors and their anti-cancer activities.

    PubMed

    Uesato, Shinichi; Matsuura, Yoshihiro; Matsue, Saki; Sumiyoshi, Takaaki; Hirata, Yoshiyuki; Takemoto, Suzuho; Kawaratani, Yasuyuki; Yamai, Yusuke; Ishida, Kyoji; Sasaki, Tsutomu; Enari, Masato

    2016-04-15

    Although several p53-Mdm2-binding disruptors have been identified to date, few studies have been published on p53-Mdmx-interaction inhibitors. In the present study, we demonstrated that o-aminothiophenol derivatives with molecular weights of 200-300 selectively inhibited the p53-Mdmx interaction. S-2-Isobutyramidophenyl 2-methylpropanethioate (K-178) (1c) activated p53, up-regulated the expression of its downstream genes such as p21 and Mdm2, and preferentially inhibited the growth of cancer cells with wild-type p53 over those with mutant p53. Furthermore, we found that the S-isobutyryl-deprotected forms 1b and 3b of 1c and S-2-benzamidophenyl 2-methylpropanethioate (K-181) (3c) preferentially inhibited the p53-Mdmx interaction over the p53-Mdm2 interaction, respectively, by using a Flag-p53 and glutathione S-transferase (GST)-fused protein complex (Mdm2, Mdmx, DAPK1, or PPID). In addition, the interaction of p53 with Mdmx was lost by replacing a sulfur atom with an oxygen atom in 1b and 1c. These results suggest that sulfides such as 1b, 3b, 4b, and 5b interfere with the binding of p53-Mdmx, resulting in the dissociation of the two proteins. Furthermore, the results of oral administration experiments using xenografts in nude mice indicated that 1c reduced the volume of tumor masses to 49.0% and 36.6% that of the control at 100 mg/kg and 150 mg/kg, respectively, in 40 days. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. On the interaction mechanisms of a p53 peptide and nutlin with the MDM2 and MDMX proteins

    PubMed Central

    ElSawy, Karim M.; Verma, Chandra S.; Joseph, Thomas L.; Lane, David P.; Twarock, Reidun; Caves, Leo S.D.

    2013-01-01

    The interaction of p53 with its regulators MDM2 and MDMX plays a major role in regulating the cell cycle. Inhibition of this interaction has become an important therapeutic strategy in oncology. Although MDM2 and MDMX share a very high degree of sequence/structural similarity, the small-molecule inhibitor nutlin appears to be an efficient inhibitor only of the p53-MDM2 interaction. Here, we investigate the mechanism of interaction of nutlin with these two proteins and contrast it with that of p53 using Brownian dynamics simulations. In contrast to earlier attempts to examine the bound states of the partners, here we locate initial reaction events in these interactions by identifying the regions of space around MDM2/MDMX, where p53/nutlin experience associative encounters with prolonged residence times relative to that in bulk solution. We find that the initial interaction of p53 with MDM2 is long-lived relative to nutlin, but, unlike nutlin, it takes place at the N- and C termini of the MDM2 protein, away from the binding site, suggestive of an allosteric mechanism of action. In contrast, nutlin initially interacts with MDM2 directly at the clefts of the binding site. The interaction of nutlin with MDMX, however, is very short-lived compared with MDM2 and does not show such direct initial interactions with the binding site. Comparison of the topology of the electrostatic potentials of MDM2 and MDMX and the locations of the initial encounters with p53/nutlin in tandem with structure-based sequence alignment revealed that the origin of the diminished activity of nutlin toward MDMX relative to MDM2 may stem partly from the differing topologies of the electrostatic potentials of the two proteins. Glu25 and Lys51 residues underpin these topological differences and appear to collectively play a key role in channelling nutlin directly toward the binding site on the MDM2 surface and are absent in MDMX. The results, therefore, provide new insight into the mechanism of p53

  15. Shifting p53-induced senescence to cell death by TIS21(/BTG2/Pc3) gene through posttranslational modification of p53 protein.

    PubMed

    Choi, Ok Ran; Ryu, Min Sook; Lim, In Kyoung

    2016-09-01

    Cellular senescence and apoptosis can be regulated by p53 activity, although the underlying mechanism of the switch between the two events remains largely unknown. Cells exposed to cancer chemotherapy can escape to senescence phenotype rather than undergoing apoptosis. By employing adenoviral transduction of p53 or TIS21 genes, we observed shifting of p53 induced-senescence to apoptosis in EJ bladder cancer cells, which express H-RasV12 and mutant p53; transduction of p53 increased H-RasV12 expression along with senescence phenotypes, whereas coexpression with TIS21 (p53+TIS21) induced cell death rather than senescence. The TIS21-mediated switch of senescence to apoptosis was accompanied by nuclear translocation of p53 protein and its modifications on Ser-15 and Ser-46 phosphorylation and acetylations on Lys-120, -320, -373 and -382 residues. Mechanistically, TIS21(/BTG2) regulated posttranslational modification of p53 via enhancing miR34a and Bax expressions as opposed to inhibiting SIRT1 and Bcl2 expression. At the same time, TIS21 increased APAF-1 and p53AIP1 expressions, but inhibited the interaction of p53 with iASPP. In vitro tumorigenicity was significantly reduced in the p53+TIS21 expresser through inhibiting micro-colony proliferation by TIS21. Effect of TIS21 on the regulation of p53 activity was confirmed by knockdown of TIS21 expression by RNA interference. Therefore, we suggest TIS21 expression as an endogenous cell death inducer at the downstream of p53 gene, which might be useful for intractable cancer chemotherapy.

  16. Wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 dephosphorylates histone variant gamma-H2AX and suppresses DNA double strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Moon, Sung-Hwan; Lin, Lin; Zhang, Xinna; Nguyen, Thuy-Ai; Darlington, Yolanda; Waldman, Alan S; Lu, Xiongbin; Donehower, Lawrence A

    2010-04-23

    In response to DNA double strand breaks, the histone variant H2AX at the break site is phosphorylated at serine 139 by DNA damage sensor kinases such as ataxia telangiectasia-mutated, forming gamma-H2AX. This phosphorylation event is critical for sustained recruitment of other proteins to repair the break. After repair, restoration of the cell to a prestress state is associated with gamma-H2AX dephosphorylation and dissolution of gamma-H2AX-associated damage foci. The phosphatases PP2A and PP4 have previously been shown to dephosphorylate gamma-H2AX. Here, we demonstrate that the wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (WIP1) also dephosphorylates gamma-H2AX at serine 139 in vitro and in vivo. Overexpression of WIP1 reduces formation of gamma-H2AX foci in response to ionizing and ultraviolet radiation and blocks recruitment of MDC1 (mediator of DNA damage checkpoint 1) and 53BP1 (p53 binding protein 1) to DNA damage foci. Finally, these inhibitory effects of WIP1 on gamma-H2AX are accompanied by WIP1 suppression of DNA double strand break repair. Thus, WIP1 has a homeostatic role in reversing the effects of ataxia telangiectasia-mutated phosphorylation of H2AX.

  17. Long non-coding RNA NEAT1 is a transcriptional target of p53 and modulates p53-induced transactivation and tumor-suppressor function.

    PubMed

    Idogawa, Masashi; Ohashi, Tomoko; Sasaki, Yasushi; Nakase, Hiroshi; Tokino, Takashi

    2017-03-14

    p53 is one of the most important tumor suppressor genes, and the direct transcriptional targets of p53 must be explored to elucidate its functional mechanisms. Thus far, the p53 targets that have been primarily studied are protein-coding genes. Our previous study revealed that several long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are direct transcriptional targets of p53, and knockdown of specific lncRNAs modulates p53-induced apoptosis. In this study, analysis of next-generation chromatin immunoprecipitation-sequencing (ChIP-seq) data for p53 revealed that the lncRNA NEAT1 is a direct transcriptional target of p53. The suppression of NEAT1 induction by p53 attenuates the inhibitory effect of p53 on cancer cell growth and also modulates gene transactivation, including that of many lncRNAs. Furthermore, low expression of NEAT1 is related to poor prognosis in several cancers. These results indicate that the induction of NEAT1 expression contributes to the tumor-suppressor function of p53 and suggest that p53 and NEAT1 constitute a transcriptional network contributing to various biological functions and tumor suppression.

  18. Chemical inhibition of wild-type p53 induced phosphatase 1 (WIP1/PPM1D) by GSK2830371 potentiates the sensitivity to MDM2 inhibitors in a p53-dependent manner

    PubMed Central

    Esfandiari, Arman; Hawthorne, Thomas A.; Nakjang, Sirintra; Lunec, John

    2016-01-01

    Sensitivity to MDM2 inhibitors is widely different among responsive TP53 wild-type cell lines and tumours. Understanding the determinants of MDM2 inhibitor sensitivity is pertinent for their optimal clinical application. Wild-type p53-inducible phosphatase-1 (WIP1) encoded by PPM1D, is activated, gained/amplified in a range of TP53 wild-type malignancies and is involved in p53 stress response homeostasis. We investigated cellular growth/proliferation of TP53 wild-type and matched mutant/null cell line pairs, differing in PPM1D genetic status, in response to Nutlin-3/RG7388 ± a highly selective WIP1 inhibitor GSK2830371. We also assessed the effects of GSK2830371 on MDM2 inhibitor induced p53Ser15 phosphorylation, p53-mediated global transcriptional activity and apoptosis. The investigated cell line pairs were relatively insensitive to single agent GSK2830371. However, a non-growth inhibitory dose of GSK2830371 markedly potentiated the response to MDM2 inhibitors in TP53 wild-type cell lines, most notably in those harbouring PPM1D activating mutations or copy number gain (up to 5.8-fold decrease in GI50). Potentiation also correlated with significant increase in MDM2 inhibitor induced cell death endpoints which were preceded by a marked increase in a WIP1 negatively regulated substrate, phosphorylated p53Ser15, known to increase p53 transcriptional activity. Microarray-based gene expression analysis showed that the combination treatment increases the subset of early RG7388 induced p53-transcriptional target genes. These findings demonstrate that potent and selective WIP1 inhibition potentiates the response to MDM2 inhibitors in TP53 wild-type cells, particularly those with PPM1D activation or gain, while highlighting the mechanistic importance of p53Ser15 and its potential use as a biomarker for response to this combination regimen. PMID:26832796

  19. Human T-Cell Lymphotropic/Leukemia Virus Type 1 Tax Abrogates p53-Induced Cell Cycle Arrest and Apoptosis through Its CREB/ATF Functional Domain

    PubMed Central

    Mulloy, J. C.; Kislyakova, T.; Cereseto, A.; Casareto, L.; LoMonico, A.; Fullen, J.; Lorenzi, M. V.; Cara, A.; Nicot, C.; Giam, C.-Z.; Franchini, G.

    1998-01-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic/leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) transforms human T cells in vitro, and Tax, a potent transactivator of viral and cellular genes, plays a key role in cell immortalization. Tax activity is mediated by interaction with cellular transcription factors including members of the CREB/ATF family, the NF-κB/c-Rel family, serum response factor, and the coactivators CREB binding protein-p300. Although p53 is usually not mutated in HTLV-1-infected T cells, its half-life is increased and its function is impaired. Here we report that transient coexpression of p53 and Tax results in the suppression of p53 transcriptional activity. Expression of Tax abrogates p53-induced G1 arrest in the Calu-6 cell line and prevents the apoptosis induced by overexpressing p53 in the HeLa/Tat cell line. The Tax mutants M22 and G148V, which selectively activate the CREB/ATF pathway, exert these same biological effects on p53 function. In contrast, the NF-κB-active Tax mutant M47 has no effect on p53 activity in any of these systems. Consistent with the negative effect of Tax on p53, no activity on a p53-responsive promoter was observed upon transfection of HTLV-1-infected T-cell lines. The p53 protein is expressed at high levels in the nucleus, and nuclear extracts of HTLV-1-infected T cells bind constitutively to a DNA oligonucleotide containing the p53 response element, indicating that Tax does not interfere with p53 binding to DNA. Tax is able to suppress the transactivation function of p53 in three different cell lines, and this suppression required Tax-mediated activation of the CREB/ATF, but not the NF-κB/c-Rel, pathway. Tax and the active Tax mutants were able to abrogate the G1 arrest and apoptosis induced by p53, and this effect does not correlate with an altered localization of nuclear p53 or with the disruption of p53-DNA complexes. The suppression of p53 activity by Tax could be important in T-cell immortalization induced by HTLV-1. PMID:9765430

  20. Targeting Mdmx to treat breast cancers with wild-type p53.

    PubMed

    Haupt, S; Buckley, D; Pang, J-M B; Panimaya, J; Paul, P J; Gamell, C; Takano, E A; Lee, Y Ying; Hiddingh, S; Rogers, T-M; Teunisse, A F A S; Herold, M J; Marine, J-C; Fox, S B; Jochemsen, A; Haupt, Y

    2015-07-16

    The function of the tumor suppressor p53 is universally compromised in cancers. It is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers (reviewed). In cases where p53 is not mutated, alternative regulatory pathways inactivate its tumor suppressive functions. This is primarily achieved through elevation in the expression of the key inhibitors of p53: Mdm2 or Mdmx (also called Mdm4) (reviewed). In breast cancer (BrCa), the frequency of p53 mutations varies markedly between the different subtypes, with basal-like BrCas bearing a high frequency of p53 mutations, whereas luminal BrCas generally express wild-type (wt) p53. Here we show that Mdmx is unexpectedly highly expressed in normal breast epithelial cells and its expression is further elevated in most luminal BrCas, whereas p53 expression is generally low, consistent with wt p53 status. Inducible knockdown (KD) of Mdmx in luminal BrCa MCF-7 cells impedes the growth of these cells in culture, in a p53-dependent manner. Importantly, KD of Mdmx in orthotopic xenograft transplants resulted in growth inhibition associated with prolonged survival, both in a preventative model and also in a treatment model. Growth impediment in response to Mdmx KD was associated with cellular senescence. The growth inhibitory capacity of Mdmx KD was recapitulated in an additional luminal BrCa cell line MPE600, which expresses wt p53. Further, the growth inhibitory capacity of Mdmx KD was also demonstrated in the wt p53 basal-like cell line SKBR7 line. These results identify Mdmx growth dependency in wt p53 expressing BrCas, across a range of subtypes. Based on our findings, we propose that Mdmx targeting is an attractive strategy for treating BrCas harboring wt p53.

  1. Targeting Mdmx to treat breast cancers with wild-type p53

    PubMed Central

    Haupt, S; Buckley, D; Pang, J-MB; Panimaya, J; Paul, P J; Gamell, C; Takano, E A; Ying Lee, Y; Hiddingh, S; Rogers, T-M; Teunisse, A F A S; Herold, M J; Marine, J-C; Fox, S B; Jochemsen, A; Haupt, Y

    2015-01-01

    The function of the tumor suppressor p53 is universally compromised in cancers. It is the most frequently mutated gene in human cancers (reviewed). In cases where p53 is not mutated, alternative regulatory pathways inactivate its tumor suppressive functions. This is primarily achieved through elevation in the expression of the key inhibitors of p53: Mdm2 or Mdmx (also called Mdm4) (reviewed). In breast cancer (BrCa), the frequency of p53 mutations varies markedly between the different subtypes, with basal-like BrCas bearing a high frequency of p53 mutations, whereas luminal BrCas generally express wild-type (wt) p53. Here we show that Mdmx is unexpectedly highly expressed in normal breast epithelial cells and its expression is further elevated in most luminal BrCas, whereas p53 expression is generally low, consistent with wt p53 status. Inducible knockdown (KD) of Mdmx in luminal BrCa MCF-7 cells impedes the growth of these cells in culture, in a p53-dependent manner. Importantly, KD of Mdmx in orthotopic xenograft transplants resulted in growth inhibition associated with prolonged survival, both in a preventative model and also in a treatment model. Growth impediment in response to Mdmx KD was associated with cellular senescence. The growth inhibitory capacity of Mdmx KD was recapitulated in an additional luminal BrCa cell line MPE600, which expresses wt p53. Further, the growth inhibitory capacity of Mdmx KD was also demonstrated in the wt p53 basal-like cell line SKBR7 line. These results identify Mdmx growth dependency in wt p53 expressing BrCas, across a range of subtypes. Based on our findings, we propose that Mdmx targeting is an attractive strategy for treating BrCas harboring wt p53. PMID:26181202

  2. MDM4 (MDMX) and its Transcript Variants

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, F; Conza, G. Di; Moretti, F

    2009-01-01

    MDM family proteins are crucial regulators of the oncosuppressor p53. Alterations of their gene status, mainly amplification events, have been frequently observed in human tumors. MDM4 is one of the two members of the MDM family. The human gene is located on chromosome 1 at q32-33 and codes for a protein of 490aa. In analogy to MDM2, besides the full-length mRNA several transcript variants of MDM4 have been identified. Almost all variants thus far described derive from a splicing process, both through canonical and aberrant splicing events. Some of these variants are expressed in normal tissues, others have been observed only in tumor samples. The presence of these variants may be considered a fine tuning of the function of the full-length protein, especially in normal cells. In tumor cells, some variants show oncogenic properties. This review summarizes all the different MDM4 splicing forms thus far described and their role in the regulation of the wild type protein function in normal and tumor cells. In addition, a description of the full-length protein structure with all known interacting proteins thus far identified and a comparison of the MDM4 variant structure with that of full-length protein are presented. Finally, a parallel between MDM4 and MDM2 variants is discussed. PMID:19721810

  3. Tumor suppressor p53 induces miR-15a processing to inhibit neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) in the apoptotic response DNA damage in breast cancer cell

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Zhao, Wei; Wei, Ping; Zuo, Wenshu; Zhu, Shouhui

    2017-01-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the functional role of miR-15a in breast cancer cells in response to DNA damage and to illustrate the possible potential underlying molecular mechanism(s). Human breast cancer cell lines MCF-7 cells and/or MDA-MB-231 cells were pre-treated with or without bleomycin. Cells were transfected with corresponding vectors. qRT-PCR was used to detect the expression of mRNA or miRNA, and immunoprecipitation and immunoblot analysis were performed to explore the status of protein association. Cell apoptosis was analyzed with flow cytometry. The results showed that neuronal apoptosis inhibitory protein (NAIP) was negatively regulated by p53 in MCF-7 cells, and NAIP expression was still high in bleomycin-treated MCF-7 cells. In addition, we observed that miR-15a expression was regulated by p53, and the effects of miR-15a on DNA damage was also mediated by p53. Furthermore, the results revealed that the cell apoptosis was mediated by miR-15a. Taken together, this study reveals that p53 negatively regulates NAIP expression by targeting miR-15a processing from primary into precursor miRNA in breast cancer. PMID:28337296

  4. Copy-number variation of functional galectin genes: studying animal galectin-7 (p53-induced gene 1 in man) and tandem-repeat-type galectins-4 and -9.

    PubMed

    Kaltner, Herbert; Raschta, Anne-Sarah; Manning, Joachim C; Gabius, Hans-Joachim

    2013-10-01

    Galectins are potent adhesion/growth-regulatory effectors with characteristic expression profiles. Understanding the molecular basis of gene regulation in each case requires detailed information on copy number of genes and sequence(s) of their promoter(s). Our report reveals plasticity in this respect between galectins and species. We here describe occurrence of a two-gene constellation for human galectin (Gal)-7 and define current extent of promoter-sequence divergence. Interestingly, cross-species genome analyses also detected single-copy display. Because the regulatory potential will then be different, extrapolations of expression profiles are precluded between respective species pairs. Gal-4 coding in chromosomal vicinity was found to be confined to one gene, whereas copy-number variation also applied to Gal-9. The example of rat Gal-9 teaches the lesson that the presence of multiple bands in Southern blotting despite a single-copy gene constellation is attributable to two pseudogenes. The documented copy-number variability should thus be taken into consideration when studying regulation of galectin genes, in a species and in comparison between species.

  5. Downregulation of p53-inducible microRNAs 192, 194, and 215 impairs the p53/MDM2 autoregulatory loop in multiple myeloma development.

    PubMed

    Pichiorri, Flavia; Suh, Sung-Suk; Rocci, Alberto; De Luca, Luciana; Taccioli, Cristian; Santhanam, Ramasamy; Zhou, Wenchao; Benson, Don M; Hofmainster, Craig; Alder, Hansjuerg; Garofalo, Michela; Di Leva, Gianpiero; Volinia, Stefano; Lin, Huey-Jen; Perrotti, Danilo; Kuehl, Michael; Aqeilan, Rami I; Palumbo, Antonio; Croce, Carlo M

    2010-10-19

    In multiple myeloma (MM), an incurable B cell neoplasm, mutation or deletion of p53 is rarely detected at diagnosis. Using small-molecule inhibitors of MDM2, we provide evidence that miR-192, 194, and 215, which are downregulated in a subset of newly diagnosed MMs, can be transcriptionally activated by p53 and then modulate MDM2 expression. Furthermore, ectopic re-expression of these miRNAs in MM cells increases the therapeutic action of MDM2 inhibitors in vitro and in vivo by enhancing their p53-activating effects. In addition, miR-192 and 215 target the IGF pathway, preventing enhanced migration of plasma cells into bone marrow. The results suggest that these miRNAs are positive regulators of p53 and that their downregulation plays a key role in MM development.

  6. RGC32, a novel p53-inducible gene, is located on centrosomes during mitosis and results in G2/M arrest.

    PubMed

    Saigusa, K; Imoto, I; Tanikawa, C; Aoyagi, M; Ohno, K; Nakamura, Y; Inazawa, J

    2007-02-22

    To identify target genes for the hemizygous deletions of chromosome 13 that are recurrently observed in malignant gliomas, we performed genome-wide DNA copy-number analysis using array-based comparative genomic hybridization and gene expression analysis using an oligonucleotide-array. The response gene to complement 32 (RGC32) at 13q14.11 was identified as a deletion target, and its expression was frequently silenced in glioma cell lines compared with normal brain. Levels of RGC32 mRNA tended to decrease toward higher grades of primary astrocytomas, especially in tumors with mutations of p53. Expression of RGC32 mRNA was dramatically increased by exogenous p53 in a p53-mutant glioma cell line, and also by endogenous p53 in response to DNA damage in p53+/+ colon-cancer cells, but not in isogenic p53-/- cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and reporter assays demonstrated binding of endogenous p53 protein to the promoter region of the RGC32 gene, implying p53-dependent transcriptional activity. Transiently and stably overexpressed RGC32 suppressed the growth of glioma cells, probably owing to induction of G2/M arrest. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed a concentration of RGC32 protein at the centrosome during mitosis. RGC32 formed a protein complex with polo-like kinase 1 and was phosphorylated in vitro. These observations implied a novel mechanism by which p53 might negatively regulate cell-cycle progression by way of this newly identified transcriptional target. Our results provide the first evidence that RGC32 might be a possible tumor-suppressor for glioma, that it is directly induced by p53, and that it mediates the arrest of mitotic progression.

  7. Differential Gene Expression Profiles of Radioresistant Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Cell Lines Established by Fractionated Irradiation: Tumor Protein p53-Inducible Protein 3 Confers Sensitivity to Ionizing Radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Young Sook; Oh, Jung-Hwa; Yoon, Seokjoo; Kwon, Myung-Sang

    2010-07-01

    Purpose: Despite the widespread use of radiotherapy as a local and regional modality for the treatment of cancer, some non-small-cell lung cancers commonly develop resistance to radiation. We thus sought to clarify the molecular mechanisms underlying resistance to radiation. Methods and Materials: We established the radioresistant cell line H460R from radiosensitive parental H460 cells. To identify the radioresistance-related genes, we performed microarray analysis and selected several candidate genes. Results: Clonogenic and MTT assays showed that H460R was 10-fold more resistant to radiation than H460. Microarray analysis indicated that the expression levels of 1,463 genes were altered more than 1.5-fold in H460R compared with parental H460. To evaluate the putative functional role, we selected one interesting gene tumor protein p53-inducible protein 3 (TP53I3), because that this gene was significantly downregulated in radioresistant H460R cells and that it was predicted to link p53-dependent cell death signaling. Interestingly, messenger ribonucleic acid expression of TP53I3 differed in X-ray-irradiated H460 and H460R cells, and overexpression of TP53I3 significantly affected the cellular radiosensitivity of H460R cells. Conclusions: These results show that H460R may be useful in searching for candidate genes that are responsible for radioresistance and elucidating the molecular mechanism of radioresistance.

  8. Probing Origin of Binding Difference of inhibitors to MDM2 and MDMX by Polarizable Molecular Dynamics Simulation and QM/MM-GBSA Calculation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Wang, Jinan; Zhang, Qinggang; Chen, Kaixian; Zhu, Weiliang

    2015-01-01

    Binding abilities of current inhibitors to MDMX are weaker than to MDM2. Polarizable molecular dynamics simulations (MD) followed by Quantum mechanics/molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (QM//MM-GBSA) calculations were performed to investigate the binding difference of inhibitors to MDM2 and MDMX. The predicted binding free energies not only agree well with the experimental results, but also show that the decrease in van der Walls interactions of inhibitors with MDMX relative to MDM2 is a main factor of weaker bindings of inhibitors to MDMX. The analyses of dihedral angles based on MD trajectories suggest that the closed conformation formed by the residues M53 and Y99 in MDMX leads to a potential steric clash with inhibitors and prevents inhibitors from arriving in the deep of MDMX binding cleft, which reduces the van der Waals contacts of inhibitors with M53, V92, P95 and L98. The calculated results using the residue-based free energy decomposition method further prove that the interaction strength of inhibitors with M53, V92, P95 and L98 from MDMX are obviously reduced compared to MDM2. We expect that this study can provide significant theoretical guidance for designs of potent dual inhibitors to block the p53-MDM2/MDMX interactions. PMID:26616018

  9. Lactose binding to human galectin-7 (p53-induced gene 1) induces long-range effects through the protein resulting in increased dimer stability and evidence for positive cooperativity

    PubMed Central

    Ermakova, Elena; Miller, Michelle C; Nesmelova, Irina V; López-Merino, Lara; Berbís, Manuel Alvaro; Nesmelov, Yuri; Tkachev, Yaroslav V; Lagartera, Laura; Daragan, Vladimir A; André, Sabine; Cañada, F Javier; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Solís, Dolores; Gabius, Hans-Joachim; Mayo, Kevin H

    2013-01-01

    The product of p53-induced gene 1 is a member of the galectin family, i.e., galectin-7 (Gal-7). To move beyond structural data by X-ray diffraction, we initiated the study of the lectin by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and circular dichroism spectroscopies, and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. In concert, our results indicate that lactose binding to human Gal-7 induces long-range effects (minor conformational shifts and changes in structural dynamics) throughout the protein that result in stabilization of the dimer state, with evidence for positive cooperativity. Monte Carlo fits of 15N-Gal-7 HSQC titrations with lactose using a two-site model yield K1 = 0.9 ± 0.6 × 103 M−1 and K2 = 3.4 ± 0.8 × 103 M−1. Ligand binding-induced stabilization of the Gal-7 dimer was supported by several lines of evidence: MD-based calculations of interaction energies between ligand-loaded and ligand-free states, gel filtration data and hetero-FRET spectroscopy that indicate a highly reduced tendency for dimer dissociation in the presence of lactose, CD-based thermal denaturation showing that the transition temperature of the lectin is significantly increased in the presence of lactose, and saturation transfer difference (STD) NMR using a molecular probe of the monomer state whose presence is diminished in the presence of lactose. MD simulations with the half-loaded ligand-bound state also provided insight into how allosteric signaling may occur. Overall, our results reveal long-range effects on Gal-7 structure and dynamics, which factor into entropic contributions to ligand binding and allow further comparisons with other members of the galectin family. PMID:23376190

  10. Computational Studies of Difference in Binding Modes of Peptide and Non-Peptide Inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX Based on Molecular Dynamics Simulations

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianzhong; Zhang, Dinglin; Zhang, Yuxin; Li, Guohui

    2012-01-01

    Inhibition of p53-MDM2/MDMX interaction is considered to be a promising strategy for anticancer drug design to activate wild-type p53 in tumors. We carry out molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to study the binding mechanisms of peptide and non-peptide inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. The rank of binding free energies calculated by molecular mechanics generalized Born surface area (MM-GBSA) method agrees with one of the experimental values. The results suggest that van der Waals energy drives two kinds of inhibitors to MDM2/MDMX. We also find that the peptide inhibitors can produce more interaction contacts with MDM2/MDMX than the non-peptide inhibitors. Binding mode predictions based on the inhibitor-residue interactions show that the π–π, CH–π and CH–CH interactions dominated by shape complimentarity, govern the binding of the inhibitors in the hydrophobic cleft of MDM2/MDMX. Our studies confirm the residue Tyr99 in MDMX can generate a steric clash with the inhibitors due to energy and structure. This finding may theoretically provide help to develop potent dual-specific or MDMX inhibitors. PMID:22408446

  11. Targeting RING domains of Mdm2-MdmX E3 complex activates apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, W; Xu, C; Ling, X; Fan, C; Buckley, B P; Chernov, M V; Ellis, L; Li, F; Muñoz, I G; Wang, X

    2015-12-31

    Reactivation of tumor-suppressor p53 for targeted cancer therapy is an attractive strategy for cancers bearing wild-type (WT) p53. Targeting the Mdm2-p53 interface or MdmX ((MDM4), mouse double minute 4)-p53 interface or both has been a focus in the field. However, targeting the E3 ligase activity of Mdm2-MdmX really interesting new gene (RING)-RING interaction as a novel anticancer strategy has never been explored. In this report, we describe the identification and characterization of small molecule inhibitors targeting Mdm2-MdmX RING-RING interaction as a new class of E3 ligase inhibitors. With a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-based E3 activity assay in high-throughput screening of a chemical library, we identified inhibitors (designated as MMRis (Mdm2-MdmX RING domain inhibitors)) that specifically inhibit Mdm2-MdmX E3 ligase activity toward Mdm2 and p53 substrates. MMRi6 and its analog MMRi64 are capable of disrupting Mdm2-MdmX interactions in vitro and activating p53 in cells. In leukemia cells, MMRi64 potently induces downregulation of Mdm2 and MdmX. In contrast to Nutlin3a, MMRi64 only induces the expression of pro-apoptotic gene PUMA (p53 upregulated modulator of apoptosis) with minimal induction of growth-arresting gene p21. Consequently, MMRi64 selectively induces the apoptotic arm of the p53 pathway in leukemia/lymphoma cells. Owing to the distinct mechanisms of action of MMRi64 and Nutlin3a, their combination synergistically induces p53 and apoptosis. Taken together, this study reveals that Mdm2-MdmX has a critical role in apoptotic response of the p53 pathway and MMRi64 may serve as a new pharmacological tool for p53 studies and a platform for cancer drug development.

  12. A Fusion Protein of the p53 Transaction Domain and the p53-Binding Domain of the Oncoprotein MdmX as an Efficient System for High-Throughput Screening of MdmX Inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Chen, Rong; Zhou, Jingjing; Qin, Lingyun; Chen, Yao; Huang, Yongqi; Liu, Huili; Su, Zhengding

    2017-06-27

    In nearly half of cancers, the anticancer activity of p53 protein is often impaired by the overexpressed oncoprotein Mdm2 and its homologue, MdmX, demanding efficient therapeutics to disrupt the aberrant p53-MdmX/Mdm2 interactions to restore the p53 activity. While many potent Mdm2-specific inhibitors have already undergone clinical investigations, searching for MdmX-specific inhibitors has become very attractive, requiring a more efficient screening strategy for evaluating potential scaffolds or leads. In this work, considering that the intrinsic fluorescence residue Trp23 in the p53 transaction domain (p53p) plays an important role in determining the p53-MdmX/Mdm2 interactions, we constructed a fusion protein to utilize this intrinsic fluorescence signal to monitor high-throughput screening of a compound library. The fusion protein was composed of the p53p followed by the N-terminal domain of MdmX (N-MdmX) through a flexible amino acid linker, while the whole fusion protein contained a sole intrinsic fluorescence probe. The fusion protein was then evaluated using fluorescence spectroscopy against model compounds. Our results revealed that the variation of the fluorescence signal was highly correlated with the concentration of the ligand within 65 μM. The fusion protein was further evaluated with respect to its feasibility for use in high-throughput screening using a model compound library, including controls. We found that the imidazo-indole scaffold was a bona fide scaffold for template-based design of MdmX inhibitors. Thus, the p53p-N-MdmX fusion protein we designed provides a convenient and efficient tool for high-throughput screening of new MdmX inhibitors. The strategy described in this work should be applicable for other protein targets to accelerate drug discovery.

  13. Application of Binding Free Energy Calculations to Prediction of Binding Modes and Affinities of MDM2 and MDMX Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hui Sun; Jo, Sunhwan; Lim, Hyun-Suk; Im, Wonpil

    2012-01-01

    Molecular docking is widely used to obtain binding modes and binding affinities of a molecule to a given target protein. Despite considerable efforts, however, prediction of both properties by docking remains challenging mainly due to protein’s structural flexibility and inaccuracy of scoring functions. Here, an integrated approach has been developed to improve the accuracy of binding mode and affinity prediction, and tested for small molecule MDM2 and MDMX antagonists. In this approach, initial candidate models selected from docking are subjected to equilibration MD simulations to further filter the models. Free energy perturbation molecular dynamics (FEP/MD) simulations are then applied to the filtered ligand models to enhance the ability in predicting the near-native ligand conformation. The calculated binding free energies for MDM2 complexes are overestimated compared to experimental measurements mainly due to the difficulties in sampling highly flexible apo-MDM2. Nonetheless, the FEP/MD binding free energy calculations are more promising for discriminating binders from nonbinders than docking scores. In particular, the comparison between the MDM2 and MDMX results suggests that apo-MDMX has lower flexibility than apo-MDM2. In addition, the FEP/MD calculations provide detailed information on the different energetic contributions to ligand binding, leading to a better understanding of the sensitivity and specificity of protein-ligand interactions. PMID:22731511

  14. d-Amino acid mutation of PMI as potent dual peptide inhibitors of p53-MDM2/MDMX interactions.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Chao; Chen, Si; Hu, Honggang; Su, Jiacan; Zou, Yan

    2017-09-07

    According to the previously reported potent dual l-peptide PMI of p53-MDM2/MDMX interactions, a series of d-amino acid mutational PMI analogues, PMI-1-4, with enhanced proteolytic resistence and in vitro tumor cell inhibitory activities were reported, of which Liposome-PMI-1 showed a stronger inhibitory activity against the U87 cell lines than Nutlin-3. This d-amino acid mutation strategy may give a hand for enhancing the potential of peptide drugs. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Discovery of Novel Isatin-Based p53 Inducers

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    A series of isatin Schiff base derivatives were identified during in silico screening of the small molecule library for novel activators of p53. The compounds selected based on molecular docking results were further validated by a high-content screening assay using U2OS human osteosarcoma cells with an integrated EGFP-expressing p53-dependent reporter. The hit compounds activated and stabilized p53, as shown by Western blotting, at higher rates than the well-known positive control Nutlin-3. Thus, the p53-activating compounds identified by this approach represent useful molecular probes for various cancer studies. PMID:26288684

  16. Stapled α-helical peptide drug development: a potent dual inhibitor of MDM2 and MDMX for p53-dependent cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yong S; Graves, Bradford; Guerlavais, Vincent; Tovar, Christian; Packman, Kathryn; To, Kwong-Him; Olson, Karen A; Kesavan, Kamala; Gangurde, Pranoti; Mukherjee, Aditi; Baker, Theresa; Darlak, Krzysztof; Elkin, Carl; Filipovic, Zoran; Qureshi, Farooq Z; Cai, Hongliang; Berry, Pamela; Feyfant, Eric; Shi, Xiangguo E; Horstick, James; Annis, D Allen; Manning, Anthony M; Fotouhi, Nader; Nash, Huw; Vassilev, Lyubomir T; Sawyer, Tomi K

    2013-09-03

    Stapled α-helical peptides have emerged as a promising new modality for a wide range of therapeutic targets. Here, we report a potent and selective dual inhibitor of MDM2 and MDMX, ATSP-7041, which effectively activates the p53 pathway in tumors in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, ATSP-7041 binds both MDM2 and MDMX with nanomolar affinities, shows submicromolar cellular activities in cancer cell lines in the presence of serum, and demonstrates highly specific, on-target mechanism of action. A high resolution (1.7-Å) X-ray crystal structure reveals its molecular interactions with the target protein MDMX, including multiple contacts with key amino acids as well as a role for the hydrocarbon staple itself in target engagement. Most importantly, ATSP-7041 demonstrates robust p53-dependent tumor growth suppression in MDM2/MDMX-overexpressing xenograft cancer models, with a high correlation to on-target pharmacodynamic activity, and possesses favorable pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution properties. Overall, ATSP-7041 demonstrates in vitro and in vivo proof-of-concept that stapled peptides can be developed as therapeutically relevant inhibitors of protein-protein interaction and may offer a viable modality for cancer therapy.

  17. Stapled α−helical peptide drug development: A potent dual inhibitor of MDM2 and MDMX for p53-dependent cancer therapy

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Yong S.; Graves, Bradford; Guerlavais, Vincent; Tovar, Christian; Packman, Kathryn; To, Kwong-Him; Olson, Karen A.; Kesavan, Kamala; Gangurde, Pranoti; Mukherjee, Aditi; Baker, Theresa; Darlak, Krzysztof; Elkin, Carl; Filipovic, Zoran; Qureshi, Farooq Z.; Cai, Hongliang; Berry, Pamela; Feyfant, Eric; Shi, Xiangguo E.; Horstick, James; Annis, D. Allen; Manning, Anthony M.; Fotouhi, Nader; Nash, Huw; Vassilev, Lyubomir T.; Sawyer, Tomi K.

    2013-01-01

    Stapled α−helical peptides have emerged as a promising new modality for a wide range of therapeutic targets. Here, we report a potent and selective dual inhibitor of MDM2 and MDMX, ATSP-7041, which effectively activates the p53 pathway in tumors in vitro and in vivo. Specifically, ATSP-7041 binds both MDM2 and MDMX with nanomolar affinities, shows submicromolar cellular activities in cancer cell lines in the presence of serum, and demonstrates highly specific, on-target mechanism of action. A high resolution (1.7-Å) X-ray crystal structure reveals its molecular interactions with the target protein MDMX, including multiple contacts with key amino acids as well as a role for the hydrocarbon staple itself in target engagement. Most importantly, ATSP-7041 demonstrates robust p53-dependent tumor growth suppression in MDM2/MDMX-overexpressing xenograft cancer models, with a high correlation to on-target pharmacodynamic activity, and possesses favorable pharmacokinetic and tissue distribution properties. Overall, ATSP-7041 demonstrates in vitro and in vivo proof-of-concept that stapled peptides can be developed as therapeutically relevant inhibitors of protein–protein interaction and may offer a viable modality for cancer therapy. PMID:23946421

  18. The alternative translated MDMXp60 isoform regulates MDM2 activity

    PubMed Central

    Tournillon, Anne-Sophie; López, Ignacio; Malbert-Colas, Laurence; Naski, Nadia; Olivares-Illana, Vanesa; Fåhraeus, Robin

    2015-01-01

    Isoforms derived from alternative splicing, mRNA translation initiation or promoter usage extend the functional repertoire of the p53, p63 and p73 genes family and of their regulators MDM2 and MDMX. Here we show cap-independent translation of an N-terminal truncated isoform of hMDMX, hMDMXp60, which is initiated at the 7th AUG codon downstream of the initiation site for full length hMDMXFL at position +384. hMDMXp60 lacks the p53 binding motif but retains the RING domain and interacts with hMDM2 and hMDMXFL. hMDMXp60 shows higher affinity for hMDM2, as compared to hMDMXFL. In vitro data reveal a positive cooperative interaction between hMDMXp60 and hMDM2 and in cellulo data show that low levels of hMDMXp60 promote degradation of hMDM2 whereas higher levels stabilize hMDM2 and prevent hMDM2-mediated degradation of hMDMXFL. These results describe a novel alternatively translated hMDMX isoform that exhibits unique regulatory activity toward hMDM2 autoubiquitination. The data illustrate how the N-terminus of hMDMX regulates its C-terminal RING domain and the hMDM2 activity. PMID:25659040

  19. MDM4 (MDMX) overexpression enhances stabilization of stress-induced p53 and promotes apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mancini, Francesca; Gentiletti, Francesca; D'Angelo, Marco; Giglio, Simona; Nanni, Simona; D'Angelo, Carmen; Farsetti, Antonella; Citro, Gennaro; Sacchi, Ada; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Moretti, Fabiola

    2004-02-27

    Rescue of embryonic lethality in MDM4(-/-) mice through concomitant loss of p53 has revealed a functional partnership between the two proteins. Biochemical studies have suggested that MDM4 may act as a negative regulator of p53 levels and activity. On the other hand, MDM4 overexpression has been reported to stabilize p53 levels and to counteract MDM2-degradative activity. We have investigated the functional role of MDM4 overexpression on cell behavior. In both established and primary cells cultured under stress conditions, overexpression of MDM4 significantly increased p53-dependent cell death, in correlation with enhanced induction of the endogenous p53 protein levels. This phenomenon was associated with induced p53 transcriptional activity and increased levels of the proapoptotic protein, Bax. Further, p53 stabilization was accompanied by decreased association of the protein to its negative regulator, MDM2. These findings reveal a novel role for MDM4 by demonstrating that in non-tumor cells under stress conditions it may act as a positive regulator of p53 activity, mainly by controlling p53 levels. They also indicate a major distinction between the biological consequences of MDM4 and MDM2 overexpression.

  20. p53 induced growth arrest versus apoptosis and its modulation by survival cytokines.

    PubMed

    Liebermann, Dan A; Hoffman, Barbara; Vesely, Diana

    2007-01-15

    The p53 tumor suppressor gene encodes for a transcription factor that plays a seminal role in the response of mammalian cells to physiological and environmental stress. p53 has been implicated as a major mediator of cell cycle arrest and/or apoptosis in the response of mammalian cells to stress stimuli. It appears that several determinants, including cell type, the presence or absence of survival factors in the external environment, the extent of DNA damage, the level of p53 and post-translational modifications, are involved in the choice between cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Ongoing work on the biological functions of the p53 tumor suppressor in different cell types and under various physiological conditions will help to unravel the complex nature of molecular circuits that orchestrate the biological response to p53 activation.

  1. Wild-type p53 induces diverse effects in 32D cells expressing different oncogenes.

    PubMed Central

    Soddu, S; Blandino, G; Scardigli, R; Martinelli, R; Rizzo, M G; Crescenzi, M; Sacchi, A

    1996-01-01

    Expression of exogenous wild-type (wt) p53 in different leukemia cell lines can induce growth arrest, apoptotic cell death, or cell differentiation. The hematopoietic cell lines that have been used so far to study wt p53 functions have in common the characteristic of not expressing endogenous p53. However, the mechanisms involved in the transformation of these cells are different, and the cells are at different stages of tumor progression. It can be postulated that each type of neoplastic cell offers a particular environment in which p53 might generate different effects. To test this hypothesis, we introduced individual oncogenes into untransformed, interleukin-3 (IL-3)-dependent myeloid precursor 32D cells to have a single transforming agent at a time. The effects induced by wt p53 overexpression were subsequently evaluated in each oncogene-expressing 32D derivative. We found that in not fully transformed, v-ras-expressing 32D cells, as already shown for the parental 32D cells, overexpression of the wt p53 gene caused no phenotypic changes and no reduction of the proliferative rate as long as the cells were maintained in their normal culture conditions (presence of IL-3 and serum). An accelerated rate of apoptosis was observed after IL-3 withdrawal. In contrast, in transformed, IL-3-independent 32D cells, wt p53 overexpression induced different effects. The v-abl-transformed cells manifested a reduction in growth rate, while the v-src-transformed cells underwent monocytic differentiation. These results show that the phenotype effects of wt p53 action(s) can vary as a function of the cellular environment. PMID:8552075

  2. p53 Induces skin aging by depleting Blimp1+ sebaceous gland cells.

    PubMed

    Kim, J; Nakasaki, M; Todorova, D; Lake, B; Yuan, C-Y; Jamora, C; Xu, Y

    2014-03-27

    p53 is an important inducer of organismal aging. However, its roles in the aging of skin remain unclear. Here we show that mice with chronic activation of p53 develop an aging phenotype in the skin associated with a reduction of subcutaneous fat and loss of sebaceous gland (SG). The reduction in the fat layer may result from the decrease of mammalian TOR complex 1 (mTORC1) activity accompanied by elevated expression of energy expenditure genes, and possibly as compensatory effects, leading to the elevation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ, an inducer of sebocyte differentiation. In addition, Blimp1(+) sebocytes become depleted concomitantly with an increase in cellular senescence, which can be reversed by PPARγ antagonist (BADGE) treatment. Therefore, our results indicate that p53-mediated aging of the skin involves not only thinning through the loss of subdermal fat, but also xerosis or drying of the skin through declining sebaceous gland activity.

  3. LincRNAs and base modifications of p53 induced by arsenic methylation in workers.

    PubMed

    Wen, Weihua; Lu, Lin; He, Yuefeng; Cheng, Huirong; He, Fang; Cao, Shuqiao; Li, Liang; Xiong, Li; Wu, Tangchun

    2016-02-25

    Arsenic (As) metabolites could induce methylation changes of DNA and base modifications of p53, which play role in the toxicity of As. LincRNAs should play a key regulatory role in the p53 transcriptional response. There were 43 workers producing As trioxide, 36 workers who stopped exposure to As trioxide about 85 days ago, and 24 individuals as control group. Three As species in urine were measured, and primary and secondary methylation indexes, iAs%, MMA% and DMA% were calculated. RT-PCR was performed to detect the expression of 7 LincRNAs and the base modifications of exon 5, 6, 7, and 8 of p53. The concentrations of urinary As were high in workers. Compared to control group, significant changes for 5 LincRNAs in workers producing As trioxide were found (P < 0.05), and there were significant base modifications of p53 in workers came from the two plants (P < 0.05). There exist various correlations between different exon base modifications of p53 and expressions of LincRNAs (P < 0.05). The closely positive correlations between MMA/DMA and MEG3/TUG1/HOTAIR/MALAT1 were found, but negative correlation between DMA/MALAT1 and the base modifications of exon 7 and 8 of p53 were found also (P < 0.05). LincRNAs and base modifications of p53 could be induced by As, MALAT1 and the base modifications of exon 7 and 8 of p53 could play unique roles in epigenic changes. These findings suggest potentially widespread roles of p53 and relative RNAs in arsenic workers, which may be caused by As metabolism. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Mitochondrially targeted wild-type p53 induces apoptosis in a solid human tumor xenograft model

    PubMed Central

    Palacios, Gustavo; Crawford, Howard C.; Vaseva, Angelina; Moll, Ute M.

    2013-01-01

    Classic but also novel roles of p53 are becoming increasingly well characterized. We previously showed that ex vivo retroviral transfer of mitochondrially targeted wild type p53 (mitop53) in the Eμ-myc mouse lymphoma model efficiently induces tumor cell killing in vivo. In an effort to further explore the therapeutic potential of mitop53 for its pro-apoptotic effect in solid tumors, we generated replication-deficient recombinant human Adenovirus type 5 vectors. We show here that adenoviral delivery of mitop53 by intratumoral injection into HCT116 human colon carcinoma xenograft tumors in nude mice is surprisingly effective, resulting in tumor cell death of comparable potency to conventional p53. These apoptotic effects in vivo were confirmed by Ad5-mitop53 mediated cell death of HCT116 cells in culture. Together, these data provide encouragement to further explore the potential for novel mitop53 proteins in cancer therapy to execute the shortest known circuitry of p53 death signaling. PMID:18719383

  5. MDM4 (MDMX) localizes at the mitochondria and facilitates the p53-mediated intrinsic-apoptotic pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mancini, Francesca; Di Conza, Giusy; Pellegrino, Marsha; Rinaldo, Cinzia; Prodosmo, Andrea; Giglio, Simona; D'Agnano, Igea; Florenzano, Fulvio; Felicioni, Lara; Buttitta, Fiamma; Marchetti, Antonio; Sacchi, Ada; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Soddu, Silvia; Moretti, Fabiola

    2009-01-01

    MDM4 is a key regulator of p53, whose biological activities depend on both transcriptional activity and transcription-independent mitochondrial functions. MDM4 binds to p53 and blocks its transcriptional activity; however, the main cytoplasmic localization of MDM4 might also imply a regulation of p53-mitochondrial function. Here, we show that MDM4 stably localizes at the mitochondria, in which it (i) binds BCL2, (ii) facilitates mitochondrial localization of p53 phosphorylated at Ser46 (p53Ser46P) and (iii) promotes binding between p53Ser46P and BCL2, release of cytochrome C and apoptosis. In agreement with these observations, MDM4 reduction by RNA interference increases resistance to DNA-damage-induced apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner and independently of transcription. Consistent with these findings, a significant downregulation of MDM4 expression associates with cisplatin resistance in human ovarian cancers, and MDM4 modulation affects cisplatin sensitivity of ovarian cancer cells. These data define a new localization and function of MDM4 that, by acting as a docking site for p53Ser46P to BCL2, facilitates the p53-mediated intrinsic-apoptotic pathway. Overall, our results point to MDM4 as a double-faced regulator of p53. PMID:19521340

  6. Diaryl- and triaryl-pyrrole derivatives: inhibitors of the MDM2-p53 and MDMX-p53 protein-protein interactions†Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details for compound synthesis, analytical data for all compounds and intermediates. Details for the biological evaluation. Further details for the modeling. Table of combustion analysis data. See DOI: 10.1039/c3md00161jClick here for additional data file.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, Tim J; Ahmed, Shafiq; Coxon, Christopher R; Liu, Junfeng; Lu, Xiaohong; Golding, Bernard T; Griffin, Roger J; Hutton, Claire; Newell, David R; Ojo, Stephen; Watson, Anna F; Zaytzev, Andrey; Zhao, Yan; Lunec, John; Hardcastle, Ian R

    2013-09-21

    Screening identified 2-(3-((4,6-dioxo-2-thioxotetrahydropyrimidin-5(2H)-ylidene)methyl)-2,5-dimethyl-1H-pyrrol-1-yl)-4,5,6,7-tetrahydrobenzo[b]thiophene-3-carbonitrile as an MDM2-p53 inhibitor (IC50 = 12.3 μM). MDM2-p53 and MDMX-p53 activity was seen for 5-((1-(4-chlorophenyl)-2,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrrol-3-yl)methylene)-2-thioxodihydropyrimidine-4,6(1H,5H)-dione (MDM2 IC50 = 0.11 μM; MDMX IC50 = 4.2 μM) and 5-((1-(4-nitrophenyl)-2,5-diphenyl-1H-pyrrol-3-yl)methylene)pyrimidine-2,4,6(1H,3H,5H)-trione (MDM2 IC50 = 0.15 μM; MDMX IC50 = 4.2 μM), and cellular activity consistent with p53 activation in MDM2 amplified cells. Further SAR studies demonstrated the requirement for the triarylpyrrole moiety for MDMX-p53 activity but not for MDM2-p53 inhibition.

  7. p53-independent death and p53-induced protection against apoptosis in fibroblasts treated with chemotherapeutic drugs.

    PubMed Central

    Malcomson, R. D.; Oren, M.; Wyllie, A. H.; Harrison, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    Many recent studies have implicated p53 in the cellular response to injury and induction of cell death by apoptosis. In a rat embryonal fibroblast cell line transformed with c-Ha-ras and a mutant temperature-sensitive p53 (val135), cells were G1 arrested at the permissive temperature of 32 degrees C when overexpressed p53 was in wild-type conformation. In this state cells were resistant to apoptosis induced by etoposide (at up to 50 microM) or bleomycin (15 microU ml-1). Cells at 37 degrees C with overexpressed p53 in mutant conformation were freed from this growth arrest, continued proliferating and showed dose-dependent increases in apoptosis. This death is independent of wild-type p53 function. Control cells containing a non-temperature-sensitive mutant p53 (phe132) were sensitive to both etoposide and bleomycin after 24 h at 32 degrees C and 37 degrees C, indicating that the results are not simply due to temperature effects on pharmacokinetics or DNA damage. Our data show that induction of a stable p53-mediated growth arrest renders these cells much less likely to undergo apoptosis in response to certain anti-cancer drugs, and we conclude that the regulatory role of p53 in apoptosis is influenced by the particular cellular context in which this gene is expressed. PMID:7547247

  8. Glucocorticoid receptor activation inhibits p53-induced apoptosis of MCF10Amyc cells via induction of protein kinase Cε.

    PubMed

    Aziz, Moammir H; Shen, Hong; Maki, Carl G

    2012-08-24

    Glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that can promote apoptosis or survival in a cell-specific manner. Activated GR has been reported to inhibit apoptosis in mammary epithelial cells and breast cancer cells by increasing pro-survival gene expression. In this study, activated GR inhibited p53-dependent apoptosis in MCF10A cells and human mammary epithelial cells that overexpress the MYC oncogene. Specifically, GR agonists hydrocortisone or dexamethasone inhibited p53-dependent apoptosis induced by cisplatin, ionizing radiation, or the MDM2 antagonist Nutlin-3. In contrast, the GR antagonist RU486 sensitized the cells to apoptosis by these agents. Apoptosis inhibition was associated with maintenance of mitochondrial membrane potential, diminished caspase-3 and -7 activation, and increased expression at both the mRNA and protein level of the anti-apoptotic PKC family member PKCε. Knockdown of PKCε via siRNA targeting reversed the protective effect of dexamethasone and restored apoptosis sensitivity. These data provide evidence that activated GR can inhibit p53-dependent apoptosis through induction of the anti-apoptotic factor PKCε.

  9. Endogenous c-Myc is essential for p53-induced apoptosis in response to DNA damage in vivo.

    PubMed

    Phesse, T J; Myant, K B; Cole, A M; Ridgway, R A; Pearson, H; Muncan, V; van den Brink, G R; Vousden, K H; Sears, R; Vassilev, L T; Clarke, A R; Sansom, O J

    2014-06-01

    Recent studies have suggested that C-MYC may be an excellent therapeutic cancer target and a number of new agents targeting C-MYC are in preclinical development. Given most therapeutic regimes would combine C-MYC inhibition with genotoxic damage, it is important to assess the importance of C-MYC function for DNA damage signalling in vivo. In this study, we have conditionally deleted the c-Myc gene in the adult murine intestine and investigated the apoptotic response of intestinal enterocytes to DNA damage. Remarkably, c-Myc deletion completely abrogated the immediate wave of apoptosis following both ionizing irradiation and cisplatin treatment, recapitulating the phenotype of p53 deficiency in the intestine. Consistent with this, c-Myc-deficient intestinal enterocytes did not upregulate p53. Mechanistically, this was linked to an upregulation of the E3 Ubiquitin ligase Mdm2, which targets p53 for degradation in c-Myc-deficient intestinal enterocytes. Further, low level overexpression of c-Myc, which does not impact on basal levels of apoptosis, elicited sustained apoptosis in response to DNA damage, suggesting c-Myc activity acts as a crucial cell survival rheostat following DNA damage. We also identify the importance of MYC during DNA damage-induced apoptosis in several other tissues, including the thymus and spleen, using systemic deletion of c-Myc throughout the adult mouse. Together, we have elucidated for the first time in vivo an essential role for endogenous c-Myc in signalling DNA damage-induced apoptosis through the control of the p53 tumour suppressor protein.

  10. Estrogen receptor alpha (ERα/ESR1) mediates the p53-independent overexpression of MDM4/MDMX and MDM2 in human breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Swetzig, Wendy M.; Wang, Jianmin; Das, Gokul M.

    2016-01-01

    MDM2 and MDM4 are heterodimeric, non-redundant oncoproteins that potently inhibit the p53 tumor suppressor protein. MDM2 and MDM4 also enhance the tumorigenicity of breast cancer cells in in vitro and in vivo models and are overexpressed in primary human breast cancers. Prior studies have characterized Estrogen Receptor Alpha (ERα/ESR1) as a regulator of MDM2 expression and an MDM2- and p53-interacting protein. However, similar crosstalk between ERα and MDM4 has not been investigated. Moreover, signaling pathways that mediate the overexpression of MDM4 in human breast cancer remain to be elucidated. Using the Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) breast invasive carcinoma patient cohort, we have analyzed correlations between ERα status and MDM4 and MDM2 expression in primary, treatment-naïve, invasive breast carcinoma samples. We report that the expression of MDM4 and MDM2 is elevated in primary human breast cancers of luminal A/B subtypes and associates with ERα-positive disease, independently of p53 mutation status. Furthermore, in cell culture models, ERα positively regulates MDM4 and MDM2 expression via p53-independent mechanisms, and these effects can be blocked by the clinically-relevant endocrine therapies fulvestrant and tamoxifen. Additionally, ERα also positively regulates p53 expression. Lastly, we report that endogenous MDM4 negatively regulates ERα expression and forms a protein complex with ERα in breast cancer cell lines and primary human breast tumor tissue. This suggests direct signaling crosstalk and negative feedback loops between ERα and MDM4 expression in breast cancer cells. Collectively, these novel findings implicate ERα as a central component of the p53-MDM2-MDM4 signaling axis in human breast cancer. PMID:26909605

  11. MFS transporters required for multidrug/multixenobiotic (MD/MX) resistance in the model yeast: understanding their physiological function through post-genomic approaches

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Sandra C.; Teixeira, Miguel C.; Dias, Paulo J.; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug/Multixenobiotic resistance (MDR/MXR) is a widespread phenomenon with clinical, agricultural and biotechnological implications, where MDR/MXR transporters that are presumably able to catalyze the efflux of multiple cytotoxic compounds play a key role in the acquisition of resistance. However, although these proteins have been traditionally considered drug exporters, the physiological function of MDR/MXR transporters and the exact mechanism of their involvement in resistance to cytotoxic compounds are still open to debate. In fact, the wide range of structurally and functionally unrelated substrates that these transporters are presumably able to export has puzzled researchers for years. The discussion has now shifted toward the possibility of at least some MDR/MXR transporters exerting their effect as the result of a natural physiological role in the cell, rather than through the direct export of cytotoxic compounds, while the hypothesis that MDR/MXR transporters may have evolved in nature for other purposes than conferring chemoprotection has been gaining momentum in recent years. This review focuses on the drug transporters of the Major Facilitator Superfamily (MFS; drug:H+ antiporters) in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. New insights into the natural roles of these transporters are described and discussed, focusing on the knowledge obtained or suggested by post-genomic research. The new information reviewed here provides clues into the unexpectedly complex roles of these transporters, including a proposed indirect regulation of the stress response machinery and control of membrane potential and/or internal pH, with a special emphasis on a genome-wide view of the regulation and evolution of MDR/MXR-MFS transporters. PMID:24847282

  12. Protein phosphatase Mg2+/Mn2+ dependent 1F promotes smoking-induced breast cancer by inactivating phosphorylated-p53-induced signals

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Shih-Hsin; Lin, Yin-Ching; Huang, Chi-Cheng; Yang, Po-Sheng; Chang, Hui-Wen; Chang, Chien-Hsi; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Chen, Li-Ching; Ho, Yuan-Soon

    2016-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that the activation of α9-nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (α9-nAchR) signaling by smoking promotes breast cancer formation. To investigate the downstream signaling molecules involved in α9-nAChR-induced breast tumorigenesis, we used real-time polymerase chain reactions and Western blotting to assess expression of protein phosphatase Mg2+/Mn2+ dependent 1F (PPM1F), a Ser/Thr protein phosphatase, in human breast cancer samples (n=167). Additionally, stable PPM1F-knockdown and -overexpressing cell lines were established to evaluate the function of PPM1F. The phosphatase activity of PPM1F in nicotine-treated cells was assessed through Western blotting, confocal microscopy, and fluorescence resonance energy transfer. Higher levels of PPM1F were detected in the breast cancer tissues of heavy smokers (n=7, 12.8-fold) greater than of non-smokers (n= 28, 6.3-fold) (**p=0.01). In vitro, nicotine induced PPM1F expression, whereas α9-nAChR knockdown reduced the protein expression of PPM1F. A series of biochemical experiments using nicotine-treated cells suggested that the dephosphorylation of p53 (Ser-20) and BAX (Ser-184) by PPM1F is a critical posttranslational modification, as observed in breast cancer patients who were heavy smokers. These observations indicate that PPM1F may be a mediator downstream of α9-nAChR that activates smoking-induced carcinogenic signals. Thus, PPM1F expression could be used for prognostic diagnosis or inhibited for cancer prevention and therapy. PMID:27769050

  13. Isolation of 10 differentially expressed cDNAs in p53-induced apoptosis: activation of the vertebrate homologue of the drosophila seven in absentia gene.

    PubMed Central

    Amson, R B; Nemani, M; Roperch, J P; Israeli, D; Bougueleret, L; Le Gall, I; Medhioub, M; Linares-Cruz, G; Lethrosne, F; Pasturaud, P; Piouffre, L; Prieur, S; Susini, L; Alvaro, V; Millasseau, P; Guidicelli, C; Bui, H; Massart, C; Cazes, L; Dufour, F; Bruzzoni-Giovanelli, H; Owadi, H; Hennion, C; Charpak, G; Telerman, A

    1996-01-01

    We report the isolation of 10 differentially expressed cDNAs in the process of apoptosis induced by the p53 tamor suppressor. As a global analytical method, we performed a differential display of mRNA between mouse M1 myeloid leukemia cells and derived clone LTR6 cells, which contain a stably transfected temperature-sensitive mutant of p53. At 32 degrees C wild-type p53 function is activated in LTR6 cells, resulting in programmed cell death. Eight genes are activated (TSAP; tumor suppressor activated pathway), and two are inhibited (TSIP, tumor suppressor inhibited pathway) in their expression. None of the 10 sequences has hitherto been recognized as part of the p53 signaling pathway. Three TSAPs are homologous to known genes. TSAP1 corresponds to phospholipase C beta 4. TSAP2 has a conserved domain homologous to a multiple endocrine neoplasia I (ZFM1) candidate gene. TSAP3 is the mouse homologue of the Drosophila seven in absentia gene. These data provide novel molecules involved in the pathway of wild-type p53 activation. They establish a functional link between a homologue of a conserved developmental Drosophila gene and signal transduction in tumor suppression leading to programmed cell death. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:8632996

  14. Characterization of human and mouse peroxiredoxin IV: evidence for inhibition by Prx-IV of epidermal growth factor- and p53-induced reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Wong, C M; Chun, A C; Kok, K H; Zhou, Y; Fung, P C; Kung, H F; Jeang, K T; Jin, D Y

    2000-01-01

    The aim of this study was to identify and characterize human and mouse Prx-IV. We identified mouse peroxiredoxin IV (Prx-IV) by virtue of sequence homology to its human ortholog previously called AOE372. Mouse Prx-IV conserves an amino-terminal presequence coding for signal peptide. The amino acid sequences of mature mouse and human Prx-IV share 97.5% identity. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrates that Prx-IV is more closely related to Prx-I/-II/-III than to Prx-V/-VI. Previously, we mapped the mouse Prx-IV gene to chromosome X by analyzing two sets of multiloci genetic crosses. Here we performed further comparative analysis of mouse and human Prx-IV genomic loci. Consistent with the mouse results, human Prx-IV gene localized to chromosome Xp22.135-136, in close proximity to SAT and DXS7178. A bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) clone containing the complete human Prx-IV locus was identified. The size of 7 exons and the sequences of the splice junctions were confirmed by PCR analysis. We conclude that mouse Prx-IV is abundantly expressed in many tissues. However, we could not detect Prx-IV in the conditioned media of NIH-3T3 and Jurkat cells. Mouse Prx-IV was specifically found in the nucleus-excluded region of cultured mouse cells. Intracellularly, overexpression of mouse Prx-IV prevented the production of reactive oxygen species induced by epidermal growth factor or p53. Taken together, mouse Prx-IV is likely a cytoplasmic or organellar peroxiredoxin involved in intracellular redox signaling.

  15. LZAP Inhibits p38 MAPK (p38) Phosphorylation and Activity by Facilitating p38 Association with the Wild-Type p53 Induced Phosphatase 1 (WIP1)

    PubMed Central

    An, Hanbing; Lu, Xinyuan; Liu, Dan; Yarbrough, Wendell G.

    2011-01-01

    LZAP (Cdk5rap3, C53) is a putative tumor suppressor that inhibits RelA, Chk1 and Chk2 and activates p53. LZAP is lost in a portion of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and experimental loss of LZAP expression is associated with enhanced invasion, xenograft tumor growth and angiogenesis. p38 MAPK can increase or decrease proliferation and cell death depending on cellular context. LZAP has no known enzymatic activity, implying that its biological functions are likely mediated by its protein-protein interactions. To gain further insight into LZAP activities, we searched for LZAP-associated proteins (LAPs). Here we show that the LZAP binds p38, alters p38 cellular localization, and inhibits basal and cytokine-stimulated p38 activity. Expression of LZAP inhibits p38 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent fashion while loss of LZAP enhances phosphorylation and activation with resultant phosphorylation of p38 downstream targets. Mechanistically, the ability of LZAP to alter p38 phosphorylation depended, at least partially, on the p38 phosphatase, Wip1. Expression of LZAP increased both LZAP and Wip1 binding to p38. Taken together, these data suggest that LZAP activity includes inhibition of p38 phosphorylation and activation. PMID:21283629

  16. LZAP inhibits p38 MAPK (p38) phosphorylation and activity by facilitating p38 association with the wild-type p53 induced phosphatase 1 (WIP1).

    PubMed

    An, Hanbing; Lu, Xinyuan; Liu, Dan; Yarbrough, Wendell G

    2011-01-24

    LZAP (Cdk5rap3, C53) is a putative tumor suppressor that inhibits RelA, Chk1 and Chk2 and activates p53. LZAP is lost in a portion of human head and neck squamous cell carcinoma and experimental loss of LZAP expression is associated with enhanced invasion, xenograft tumor growth and angiogenesis. p38 MAPK can increase or decrease proliferation and cell death depending on cellular context. LZAP has no known enzymatic activity, implying that its biological functions are likely mediated by its protein-protein interactions. To gain further insight into LZAP activities, we searched for LZAP-associated proteins (LAPs). Here we show that the LZAP binds p38, alters p38 cellular localization, and inhibits basal and cytokine-stimulated p38 activity. Expression of LZAP inhibits p38 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent fashion while loss of LZAP enhances phosphorylation and activation with resultant phosphorylation of p38 downstream targets. Mechanistically, the ability of LZAP to alter p38 phosphorylation depended, at least partially, on the p38 phosphatase, Wip1. Expression of LZAP increased both LZAP and Wip1 binding to p38. Taken together, these data suggest that LZAP activity includes inhibition of p38 phosphorylation and activation.

  17. p53 induces miR199a-3p to suppress SOCS7 for STAT3 activation and renal fibrosis in UUO

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ruhao; Xu, Xuan; Li, Huiling; Chen, Jinwen; Xiang, Xudong; Dong, Zheng; Zhang, Dongshan

    2017-01-01

    The role of p53 in renal fibrosis has recently been suggested, however, its function remains controversial and the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here, we show that pharmacological and genetic blockade of p53 attenuated renal interstitial fibrosis, apoptosis, and inflammation in mice with unilateral urethral obstruction (UUO). Interestingly, p53 blockade was associated with the suppression of miR-215-5p, miR-199a-5p&3p, and STAT3. In cultured human kidney tubular epithelial cells (HK-2), TGF-β1 treatment induced fibrotic changes, including collagen I and vimentin expression, being associated with p53 accumulation, p53 Ser15 phosphorylation, and miR-199a-3p expression. Inhibition of p53 by pifithrin-α blocked STAT3 activation and the expression of miR-199a-3p, collagen I, and vimentin during TGF-β1 treatment. Over-expression of miR-199a-3p increased TGFβ1-induced collagen I and vimentin expression and restored SOCS7 expression. Furthermore, SOCS7 was identified as a target gene of miR-199a-3p, and silencing of SOCS7 promoted STAT3 activation. ChIp analyses indicated the binding of p53 to the promoter region of miR-199a-3p. Consistently, kidney biopsies from patients with IgA nephropathy and diabetic nephropathy exhibited substantial activation of p53 and STAT3, decreased expression of SOCS7, and increase in profibrotic proteins and miR-199a-3p. Together, these results demonstrate the novel p53/miR-199a-3p/SOCS7/STAT3 pathway in renal interstitial fibrosis. PMID:28240316

  18. Regulation of iron homeostasis by the p53-ISCU pathway

    PubMed Central

    Funauchi, Yuki; Tanikawa, Chizu; Yi Lo, Paulisally Hau; Mori, Jinichi; Daigo, Yataro; Takano, Atsushi; Miyagi, Yohei; Okawa, Atsushi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2015-01-01

    Accumulation of iron in tissues increases the risk of cancer, but iron regulatory mechanisms in cancer tissues are largely unknown. Here, we report that p53 regulates iron metabolism through the transcriptional regulation of ISCU (iron-sulfur cluster assembly enzyme), which encodes a scaffold protein that plays a critical role in Fe-S cluster biogenesis. p53 activation induced ISCU expression through binding to an intronic p53-binding site. Knockdown of ISCU enhanced the binding of iron regulatory protein 1 (IRP1), a cytosolic Fe-S protein, to an iron-responsive element in the 5′ UTR of ferritin heavy polypeptide 1 (FTH1) mRNA and subsequently reduced the translation of FTH1, a major iron storage protein. In addition, in response to DNA damage, p53 induced FTH1 and suppressed transferrin receptor, which regulates iron entry into cells. HCT116 p53+/+ cells were resistant to iron accumulation, but HCT116 p53−/− cells accumulated intracellular iron after DNA damage. Moreover, excess dietary iron caused significant elevation of serum iron levels in p53−/− mice. ISCU expression was decreased in the majority of human liver cancer tissues, and its reduced expression was significantly associated with p53 mutation. Our finding revealed a novel role of the p53-ISCU pathway in the maintenance of iron homeostasis in hepatocellular carcinogenesis. PMID:26560363

  19. Molecular Dynamic Simulation Insights into the Normal State and Restoration of p53 Function

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Ting; Min, Hanyi; Xu, Yong; Chen, Jianzhong; Li, Guohui

    2012-01-01

    As a tumor suppressor protein, p53 plays a crucial role in the cell cycle and in cancer prevention. Almost 50 percent of all human malignant tumors are closely related to a deletion or mutation in p53. The activity of p53 is inhibited by over-active celluar antagonists, especially by the over-expression of the negative regulators MDM2 and MDMX. Protein-protein interactions, or post-translational modifications of the C-terminal negative regulatory domain of p53, also regulate its tumor suppressor activity. Restoration of p53 function through peptide and small molecular inhibitors has become a promising strategy for novel anti-cancer drug design and development. Molecular dynamics simulations have been extensively applied to investigate the conformation changes of p53 induced by protein-protein interactions and protein-ligand interactions, including peptide and small molecular inhibitors. This review focuses on the latest MD simulation research, to provide an overview of the current understanding of interactions between p53 and its partners at an atomic level. PMID:22949826

  20. JMJD6 Promotes Colon Carcinogenesis through Negative Regulation of p53 by Hydroxylation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Feng; He, Lin; Huangyang, Peiwei; Liang, Jing; Si, Wenzhe; Yan, Ruorong; Han, Xiao; Liu, Shumeng; Gui, Bin; Li, Wanjin; Miao, Di; Jing, Chao; Liu, Zhihua; Pei, Fei; Sun, Luyang; Shang, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    Jumonji domain-containing 6 (JMJD6) is a member of the Jumonji C domain-containing family of proteins. Compared to other members of the family, the cellular activity of JMJD6 is still not clearly defined and its biological function is still largely unexplored. Here we report that JMJD6 is physically associated with the tumor suppressor p53. We demonstrated that JMJD6 acts as an α-ketoglutarate– and Fe(II)-dependent lysyl hydroxylase to catalyze p53 hydroxylation. We found that p53 indeed exists as a hydroxylated protein in vivo and that the hydroxylation occurs mainly on lysine 382 of p53. We showed that JMJD6 antagonizes p53 acetylation, promotes the association of p53 with its negative regulator MDMX, and represses transcriptional activity of p53. Depletion of JMJD6 enhances p53 transcriptional activity, arrests cells in the G1 phase, promotes cell apoptosis, and sensitizes cells to DNA damaging agent-induced cell death. Importantly, knockdown of JMJD6 represses p53-dependent colon cell proliferation and tumorigenesis in vivo, and significantly, the expression of JMJD6 is markedly up-regulated in various types of human cancer especially in colon cancer, and high nuclear JMJD6 protein is strongly correlated with aggressive clinical behaviors of colon adenocarcinomas. Our results reveal a novel posttranslational modification for p53 and support the pursuit of JMJD6 as a potential biomarker for colon cancer aggressiveness and a potential target for colon cancer intervention. PMID:24667498

  1. P53/microRNA-34-induced metabolic regulation: new opportunities in anticancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ding-Guo; Zheng, Jun-Nian; Pei, Dong-Sheng

    2014-05-21

    MicroRNA-34 (miR-34) is directly regulated by p53, and its potential tumor suppressive roles have been studied extensively. As a p53-induced microRNA, miR-34 functions as a tumor suppressor by playing a role in cell cycle arrest, apoptosis and metabolic regulation. Among these p53/miR-34 associated processes, apoptosis and cell cycle arrest are known as essential for p53/miR-34-mediated tumor suppression. P53-mediated metabolic processes have been shown to play pivotal roles in cancer cell biology. Recent studies have also identified several miR-34 targets involved in p53/miR-34-induced metabolic regulation. However, correlations among these metabolic targets remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, we summarize the current progress in the field of metabolic regulation by the p53/miR-34 axis and propose future directions for the development of metabolic approaches in anticancer therapy.

  2. p73 regulates DRAM-independent autophagy that does not contribute to programmed cell death.

    PubMed

    Crighton, D; O'Prey, J; Bell, H S; Ryan, K M

    2007-06-01

    Evading programmed cell death is a common event in tumour development. The p53 family member, p73, is a potent inducer of death and a determinant of chemotherapeutic response, but different to p53, is rarely mutated in cancer. Understanding cell death pathways downstream of p53 and p73 is therefore pivotal to understand both the development and treatment of malignant disease. Recently, p53 has been shown to modulate autophagy--a membrane trafficking process, which degrades long-lived proteins and organelles. This requires a p53 target gene, DRAM, and both DRAM and autophagy are critical for p53-mediated death. We report here that TA-p73 also regulates DRAM and autophagy, with different TA-p73 isoforms regulating DRAM and autophagy to varying extents. RNAi knockdown of DRAM, however, revealed that p73's modulation of autophagy is DRAM-independent. Also, p73's ability to induce death, again different to p53, is neither dependent on DRAM nor autophagy. In contrast to TA-p73, deltaN-p73 is a negative regulator of p53-induced and p73-induced autophagy, but does not affect autophagy induced by amino-acid starvation. These studies, therefore, represent not only the first report that p73 modulates autophagy but also highlight important differences in the mechanism by which starvation, p53 and p73 regulate autophagy and how this contributes to programmed cell death.

  3. p53 regulates the mevalonate pathway in human glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Laezza, C; D'Alessandro, A; Di Croce, L; Picardi, P; Ciaglia, E; Pisanti, S; Malfitano, A M; Comegna, M; Faraonio, R; Gazzerro, P; Bifulco, M

    2015-01-01

    The mevalonate (MVA) pathway is an important metabolic pathway implicated in multiple aspects of tumorigenesis. In this study, we provided evidence that p53 induces the expression of a group of enzymes of the MVA pathway including 3′-hydroxy-3′-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase, MVA kinase, farnesyl diphosphate synthase and farnesyl diphosphate farnesyl transferase 1, in the human glioblastoma multiforme cell line, U343 cells, and in normal human astrocytes, NHAs. Genetic and pharmacologic perturbation of p53 directly influences the expression of these genes. Furthermore, p53 is recruited to the gene promoters in designated p53-responsive elements, thereby increasing their transcription. Such effect was abolished by site-directed mutagenesis in the p53-responsive element of promoter of the genes. These findings highlight another aspect of p53 functions unrelated to tumor suppression and suggest p53 as a novel regulator of the MVA pathway providing insight into the role of this pathway in cancer progression. PMID:26469958

  4. BRCA1 regulates PIG3-mediated apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenwen; Luo, Jiayan; Chen, Fengxia; Yang, Fang; Song, Wei; Zhu, Aiyu; Guan, Xiaoxiang

    2015-04-10

    BRCA1 plays a key role in the regulation of p53-dependent target gene transcription activation. Meanwhile, the p53 inducible gene 3 (PIG3) is a downstream target of p53 and is involved in p53-initiated apoptosis. However, little is known about whether BRCA1 can regulate PIG3-mediated apoptosis. Using a tissue microarray containing 149 breast cancer patient samples, we found that BRCA1 and PIG3 expression status were significantly positively correlated (r = 0.678, P < 0.001) and identified a significant positive correlation between high expression of BRCA1 and/or PIG3 and overall survival (OS). Moreover, we reveal that overexpression of BRCA1 significantly increased expression of PIG3 in cells with intact p53, whereas no increase in PIG3 was observed in p53-null MDA-MB-157 cells and p53-depleted HCT116p53-/- cells. Meanwhile, ectopic expression of BRCA1 could not lead to an increase expression level of prohibitin (PHB), which we have previously identified to induce PIG3-mediated apoptosis. Finally, ChIP analysis revealed that PHB can bind to the PIG3 promoter and activate PIG3 transcription independent of p53, although p53 presence did enhance this process. Taken together, our findings suggest that BRCA1 regulates PIG3-mediated apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner, and that PIG3 expression is associated with a better OS in breast cancer patients.

  5. Artemis Is a Negative Regulator of p53 in Response to Oxidative Stress

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaoshan; Zhu, Yaqin; Geng, Liyi; Wang, Haiyong; Legerski, Randy J.

    2009-01-01

    Artemis is a multifunctional phospho-protein with roles in V(D)J recombination, repair of double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end-joining, and regulation of cell cycle checkpoints after DNA damage. Here, we describe a novel function of Artemis as a negative regulator of p53 in response to oxidative stress in both primary cells and cancer cell lines. We show that depletion of Artemis under typical culture conditions (21% oxygen) leads to a spontaneous phosphorylation and stabilization of p53, and resulting cellular G1 arrest and apoptosis. These effects are suppressed by co-depletion of DNA-PKcs, but not ATM, indicating that Artemis is an inhibitor of DNA-PKcs-mediated stabilization of p53. Culturing of cells at 3% oxygen or treatment with an antioxidant abrogated p53 stabilization indicating that oxidative stress is the responsible cellular stimulus. Treatment with IR or hydrogen peroxide did not cause activation of this signaling pathway, while inhibitors of mitochondrial electron transport were effective in reducing its activation. In addition, we show that p53-inducible genes involved in reducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) are upregulated by Artemis depletion. These findings indicate that Artemis and DNA-PKcs participate in a novel, signaling pathway to modulate p53 function in response to oxidative stress produced by mitochondrial respiration. PMID:19398950

  6. Artemis is a negative regulator of p53 in response to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, X; Zhu, Y; Geng, L; Wang, H; Legerski, R J

    2009-06-04

    Artemis is a multifunctional phospho-protein with roles in V(D)J recombination, repair of double-strand breaks by nonhomologous end-joining and regulation of cell-cycle checkpoints after DNA damage. Here, we describe a new function of Artemis as a negative regulator of p53 in response to oxidative stress in both primary cells and cancer cell lines. We show that depletion of Artemis under typical culture conditions (21% oxygen) leads to a spontaneous phosphorylation and stabilization of p53, and resulting cellular G1 arrest and apoptosis. These effects are suppressed by co-depletion of DNA-PKcs, but not ATM, indicating that Artemis is an inhibitor of DNA-PKcs-mediated stabilization of p53. Culturing of cellsat 3% oxygen or treatment with an antioxidant abrogated p53 stabilization, indicating that oxidative stress is the responsible cellular stimulus. Treatment with ionizing radiation or hydrogen peroxide did not cause activation of this signaling pathway, whereas inhibitors of mitochondrial electron transport were effective in reducing its activation. In addition, we show that p53-inducible genes involved in reducing reactive oxygen species are upregulated by Artemis depletion. These findings indicate that Artemis and DNA-PKcs participate in a new, signaling pathway to modulate p53 function in response to oxidative stress produced by mitochondrial respiration.

  7. Regulation of miR-34 Family in Neuronal Development.

    PubMed

    Jauhari, Abhishek; Singh, Tanisha; Singh, Parul; Parmar, Devendra; Yadav, Sanjay

    2017-01-13

    Differentiation of neural stem cells (NSC's) to mature and functional neurons requires coordinated expression of mRNA, microRNAs (miRNAs) and regulatory proteins. Our earlier unbiased miRNA profiling studies have identified miR-200, miR-34 and miR-221/222 as maximally up-regulated miRNA families in differentiating PC12 cells and demonstrated the capability of miR-200 family in inducing neuronal differentiation (J. Neurochem, 2015, 133, 640-652). In present study, we have investigated role of miR-34 family in neuronal differentiation and identified P53 as mediator of nerve growth factor (NGF) induced miR-34a expression in differentiating PC12 cells. Our studies have shown that NGF induced miR-34a, arrests proliferating PC12 cells to G1 phase, which is pre-requisite for neuronal differentiation. Our studies have also shown that increased expression of miR-34a controls the P53 level in differentiated PC12 cells in feedback inhibition manner, which probably prevents differentiated cells from P53 induced apoptosis. Expression profiling of miR-34 family in different neuronal, non-neuronal and developing cells have identified differentiated and aged brain cells as richest source of miR-34, which also indicates that higher expression of miR-34 family helps in maintaining the mature neurons in non-proliferative stage. In conclusion, our studies have shown that miR-34 is brain enriched miRNA family, which up-regulates with neuronal maturation and brain ageing and co-operative regulation of P53 and miR-34a helps in neuronal differentiation by arresting cells in G1 phase.

  8. Tumor suppressor p53 negatively regulates glycolysis stimulated by hypoxia through its target RRAD

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Rui; Liang, Yingjian; Lin, Meihua; Liu, Jia; Chan, Chang S.; Hu, Wenwei; Feng, Zhaohui

    2014-01-01

    Cancer cells display enhanced glycolysis to meet their energetic and biosynthetic demands even under normal oxygen concentrations. Recent studies have revealed that tumor suppressor p53 represses glycolysis under normoxia as a novel mechanism for tumor suppression. As the common microenvironmental stress for tumors, hypoxia drives the metabolic switch from the oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, which is crucial for survival and proliferation of cancer cells under hypoxia. The p53's role and mechanism in regulating glycolysis under hypoxia is poorly understood. Here, we found that p53 represses hypoxia-stimulated glycolysis in cancer cells through RRAD, a newly-identified p53 target. RRAD expression is frequently decreased in lung cancer. Ectopic expression of RRAD greatly reduces glycolysis whereas knockdown of RRAD promotes glycolysis in lung cancer cells. Furthermore, RRAD represses glycolysis mainly through inhibition of GLUT1 translocation to the plasma membrane. Under hypoxic conditions, p53 induces RRAD, which in turn inhibits the translocation of GLUT1 and represses glycolysis in lung cancer cells. Blocking RRAD by siRNA greatly abolishes p53's function in repressing glycolysis under hypoxia. Taken together, our results revealed an important role and mechanism of p53 in antagonizing the stimulating effect of hypoxia on glycolysis, which contributes to p53's function in tumor suppression. PMID:25114038

  9. Tumor suppressor p53 negatively regulates glycolysis stimulated by hypoxia through its target RRAD.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Cen; Liu, Juan; Wu, Rui; Liang, Yingjian; Lin, Meihua; Liu, Jia; Chan, Chang S; Hu, Wenwei; Feng, Zhaohui

    2014-07-30

    Cancer cells display enhanced glycolysis to meet their energetic and biosynthetic demands even under normal oxygen concentrations. Recent studies have revealed that tumor suppressor p53 represses glycolysis under normoxia as a novel mechanism for tumor suppression. As a common microenvironmental stress for tumors, hypoxia drives the metabolic switch from the oxidative phosphorylation to glycolysis, which is crucial for survival and proliferation of cancer cells under hypoxia. The p53's role and mechanism in regulating glycolysis under hypoxia is poorly understood. Here, we found that p53 represses hypoxia-stimulated glycolysis in cancer cells through RRAD, a newly-identified p53 target. RRAD expression is frequently decreased in lung cancer. Ectopic expression of RRAD greatly reduces glycolysis whereas knockdown of RRAD promotes glycolysis in lung cancer cells. Furthermore, RRAD represses glycolysis mainly through inhibition of GLUT1 translocation to the plasma membrane. Under hypoxic conditions, p53 induces RRAD, which in turn inhibits the translocation of GLUT1 and represses glycolysis in lung cancer cells. Blocking RRAD by siRNA greatly abolishes p53's function in repressing glycolysis under hypoxia. Taken together, our results revealed an important role and mechanism of p53 in antagonizing the stimulating effect of hypoxia on glycolysis, which contributes to p53's function in tumor suppression.

  10. Drosophila p53 isoforms differentially regulate apoptosis and apoptosis-induced proliferation.

    PubMed

    Dichtel-Danjoy, M-L; Ma, D; Dourlen, P; Chatelain, G; Napoletano, F; Robin, M; Corbet, M; Levet, C; Hafsi, H; Hainaut, P; Ryoo, H D; Bourdon, J-C; Mollereau, B

    2013-01-01

    Irradiated or injured cells enter apoptosis, and in turn, promote proliferation of surrounding unaffected cells. In Drosophila, apoptotic cells have an active role in proliferation, where the caspase Dronc and p53 induce mitogen expression and growth in the surrounding tissues. The Drosophila p53 gene structure is conserved and encodes at least two protein isoforms: a full-length isoform (Dp53) and an N-terminally truncated isoform (DΔNp53). Historically, DΔNp53 was the first p53 isoform identified and was thought to be responsible for all p53 biological activities. It was shown that DΔNp53 induces apoptosis by inducing the expression of IAP antagonists, such as Reaper. Here we investigated the roles of Dp53 and DΔNp53 in apoptosis and apoptosis-induced proliferation. We found that both isoforms were capable of activating apoptosis, but that they each induced distinct IAP antagonists. Expression of DΔNp53 induced Wingless (Wg) expression and enhanced proliferation in both 'undead cells' and in 'genuine' apoptotic cells. In contrast to DΔNp53, Dp53 did not induce Wg expression in the absence of the endogenous p53 gene. Thus, we propose that DΔNp53 is the main isoform that regulates apoptosis-induced proliferation. Understanding the roles of Drosophila p53 isoforms in apoptosis and in apoptosis-induced proliferation may shed new light on the roles of p53 isoforms in humans, with important implications in cancer biology.

  11. Prosurvival long noncoding RNA PINCR regulates a subset of p53 targets in human colorectal cancer cells by binding to Matrin 3

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Gryder, Berkley; Woods, Wendy S; Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F; Li, Xiao Ling; Jenkins, Lisa M; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Mo, Min; Dasso, Mary; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M; Zhu, Yuelin; Frier, Susan M; Moriarity, Branden S; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Lal, Ashish

    2017-01-01

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered, yet the function of the vast majority remains unclear. Here, we show that a p53-regulated lncRNA which we named PINCR (p53-induced noncoding RNA), is induced ~100-fold after DNA damage and exerts a prosurvival function in human colorectal cancer cells (CRC) in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Targeted deletion of PINCR in CRC cells significantly impaired G1 arrest and induced hypersensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. PINCR regulates the induction of a subset of p53 targets involved in G1 arrest and apoptosis, including BTG2, RRM2B and GPX1. Using a novel RNA pulldown approach that utilized endogenous S1-tagged PINCR, we show that PINCR associates with the enhancer region of these genes by binding to RNA-binding protein Matrin 3 that, in turn, associates with p53. Our findings uncover a critical prosurvival function of a p53/PINCR/Matrin 3 axis in response to DNA damage in CRC cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23244.001 PMID:28580901

  12. Prosurvival long noncoding RNA PINCR regulates a subset of p53 targets in human colorectal cancer cells by binding to Matrin 3.

    PubMed

    Chaudhary, Ritu; Gryder, Berkley; Woods, Wendy S; Subramanian, Murugan; Jones, Matthew F; Li, Xiao Ling; Jenkins, Lisa M; Shabalina, Svetlana A; Mo, Min; Dasso, Mary; Yang, Yuan; Wakefield, Lalage M; Zhu, Yuelin; Frier, Susan M; Moriarity, Branden S; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Perez-Pinera, Pablo; Lal, Ashish

    2017-06-05

    Thousands of long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have been discovered, yet the function of the vast majority remains unclear. Here, we show that a p53-regulated lncRNA which we named PINCR (p53-induced noncoding RNA), is induced ~100-fold after DNA damage and exerts a prosurvival function in human colorectal cancer cells (CRC) in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Targeted deletion of PINCR in CRC cells significantly impaired G1 arrest and induced hypersensitivity to chemotherapeutic drugs. PINCR regulates the induction of a subset of p53 targets involved in G1 arrest and apoptosis, including BTG2, RRM2B and GPX1. Using a novel RNA pulldown approach that utilized endogenous S1-tagged PINCR, we show that PINCR associates with the enhancer region of these genes by binding to RNA-binding protein Matrin 3 that, in turn, associates with p53. Our findings uncover a critical prosurvival function of a p53/PINCR/Matrin 3 axis in response to DNA damage in CRC cells.

  13. p53-Regulated Networks of Protein, mRNA, miRNA, and lncRNA Expression Revealed by Integrated Pulsed Stable Isotope Labeling With Amino Acids in Cell Culture (pSILAC) and Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) Analyses*

    PubMed Central

    Hünten, Sabine; Kaller, Markus; Drepper, Friedel; Oeljeklaus, Silke; Bonfert, Thomas; Erhard, Florian; Dueck, Anne; Eichner, Norbert; Friedel, Caroline C.; Meister, Gunter; Zimmer, Ralf; Warscheid, Bettina; Hermeking, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    We determined the effect of p53 activation on de novo protein synthesis using quantitative proteomics (pulsed stable isotope labeling with amino acids in cell culture/pSILAC) in the colorectal cancer cell line SW480. This was combined with mRNA and noncoding RNA expression analyses by next generation sequencing (RNA-, miR-Seq). Furthermore, genome-wide DNA binding of p53 was analyzed by chromatin-immunoprecipitation (ChIP-Seq). Thereby, we identified differentially regulated proteins (542 up, 569 down), mRNAs (1258 up, 415 down), miRNAs (111 up, 95 down) and lncRNAs (270 up, 123 down). Changes in protein and mRNA expression levels showed a positive correlation (r = 0.50, p < 0.0001). In total, we detected 133 direct p53 target genes that were differentially expressed and displayed p53 occupancy in the vicinity of their promoter. More transcriptionally induced genes displayed occupied p53 binding sites (4.3% mRNAs, 7.2% miRNAs, 6.3% lncRNAs, 5.9% proteins) than repressed genes (2.4% mRNAs, 3.2% miRNAs, 0.8% lncRNAs, 1.9% proteins), suggesting indirect mechanisms of repression. Around 50% of the down-regulated proteins displayed seed-matching sequences of p53-induced miRNAs in the corresponding 3′-UTRs. Moreover, proteins repressed by p53 significantly overlapped with those previously shown to be repressed by miR-34a. We confirmed up-regulation of the novel direct p53 target genes LINC01021, MDFI, ST14 and miR-486 and showed that ectopic LINC01021 expression inhibits proliferation in SW480 cells. Furthermore, KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT mRNAs were confirmed as direct targets of the p53-induced miR-34a, miR-205 and miR-486–5p, respectively. In line with the loss of p53 function during tumor progression, elevated expression of KLF12, HMGB1 and CIT was detected in advanced stages of cancer. In conclusion, the integration of multiple omics methods allowed the comprehensive identification of direct and indirect effectors of p53 that provide new insights and leads into the

  14. Gelsolin negatively regulates the activity of tumor suppressor p53 through their physical interaction in hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells

    SciTech Connect

    An, Joo-Hee; Kim, Jung-Woong; Jang, Sang-Min; Kim, Chul-Hong; Kang, Eun-Jin; Choi, Kyung-Hee

    2011-08-19

    Highlights: {yields} The actin binding protein Gelsolin (GSN) interacts with transcription factor p53. {yields} GSN interacts with transactivation- and DNA binding domains of p53. {yields} GSN represses transactivity of p53 via inhibition of nuclear translocation of p53. {yields} GSN inhibits the p53-mediated apoptosis in hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. -- Abstract: As a transcription factor, p53 modulates several cellular responses including cell-cycle control, apoptosis, and differentiation. In this study, we have shown that an actin regulatory protein, gelsolin (GSN), can physically interact with p53. The nuclear localization of p53 is inhibited by GSN overexpression in hepatocarcinoma HepG2 cells. Additionally, we demonstrate that GSN negatively regulates p53-dependent transcriptional activity of a reporter construct, driven by the p21-promoter. Furthermore, p53-mediated apoptosis was repressed in GSN-transfected HepG2 cells. Taken together, these results suggest that GSN binds to p53 and this interaction leads to the inhibition of p53-induced apoptosis by anchoring of p53 in the cytoplasm in HepG2 cells.

  15. Drosophila p53 isoforms differentially regulate apoptosis and apoptosis-induced proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Dichtel-Danjoy, M-L; Ma, D; Dourlen, P; Chatelain, G; Napoletano, F; Robin, M; Corbet, M; Levet, C; Hafsi, H; Hainaut, P; Ryoo, H D; Bourdon, J-C; Mollereau, B

    2013-01-01

    Irradiated or injured cells enter apoptosis, and in turn, promote proliferation of surrounding unaffected cells. In Drosophila, apoptotic cells have an active role in proliferation, where the caspase Dronc and p53 induce mitogen expression and growth in the surrounding tissues. The Drosophila p53 gene structure is conserved and encodes at least two protein isoforms: a full-length isoform (Dp53) and an N-terminally truncated isoform (DΔNp53). Historically, DΔNp53 was the first p53 isoform identified and was thought to be responsible for all p53 biological activities. It was shown that DΔNp53 induces apoptosis by inducing the expression of IAP antagonists, such as Reaper. Here we investigated the roles of Dp53 and DΔNp53 in apoptosis and apoptosis-induced proliferation. We found that both isoforms were capable of activating apoptosis, but that they each induced distinct IAP antagonists. Expression of DΔNp53 induced Wingless (Wg) expression and enhanced proliferation in both ‘undead cells' and in ‘genuine' apoptotic cells. In contrast to DΔNp53, Dp53 did not induce Wg expression in the absence of the endogenous p53 gene. Thus, we propose that DΔNp53 is the main isoform that regulates apoptosis-induced proliferation. Understanding the roles of Drosophila p53 isoforms in apoptosis and in apoptosis-induced proliferation may shed new light on the roles of p53 isoforms in humans, with important implications in cancer biology. PMID:22898807

  16. The feedback loop of LITAF and BCL6 is involved in regulating apoptosis in B cell non-Hodgkin's-lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Yaoyao; Kuai, Yue; Lei, Lizhen; Weng, Yuanyuan; Berberich-Siebelt, Friederike; Zhang, Xinxia; Wang, Jinjie; Zhou, Yuan; Jiang, Xin; Ren, Guoping; Pan, Hongyang; Mao, Zhengrong; Zhou, Ren

    2016-01-01

    Dysregulation of the apoptotic pathway is widely recognized as a key step in lymphomagenesis. Notably, LITAF was initially identified as a p53-inducible gene, subsequently implicated as a tumor suppressor. Our previous study also showed LITAF to be methylated in 89.5% B-NHL samples. Conversely, deregulated expression of BCL6 is a pathogenic event in many lymphomas. Interestingly, our study found an oppositional expression of LITAF and BCL6 in B-NHL. In addition, LITAF was recently identified as a novel target gene of BCL6. Therefore, we sought to explore the feedback loop between LITAF and BCL6 in B-NHL. Here, our data for the first time show that LITAF can repress expression of BCL6 by binding to Region A (−87 to +65) containing a putative LITAF-binding motif (CTCCC) within the BCL6 promoter. Furthermore, the regulation of BCL6 targets (PRDM1 or c-Myc) by LITAF may be associated with B-cell differentiation. Results also demonstrate that ectopic expression of LITAF induces cell apoptosis, activated by releasing cytochrome c, cleaving PARP and caspase 3 in B-NHL cells whereas knockdown of LITAF robustly protected cells from apoptosis. Interestingly, BCL6, in turn, could reverse cell apoptosis mediated by LITAF. Collectively, our findings provide a novel apoptotic regulatory pathway in which LITAF, as a transcription factor, inhibits the expression of BCL6, which leads to activation of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway and tumor apoptosis. Our study is expected to provide a possible biomarker as well as a target for clinical therapies to promote tumor cell apoptosis. PMID:27764808

  17. Modulation of LSD1 phosphorylation by CK2/WIP1 regulates RNF168-dependent 53BP1 recruitment in response to DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bin; Wang, Jing; Hu, Yuan; Zhao, Hongli; Hou, Wenya; Zhao, Hongchang; Wang, Hailong; Liao, Ji; Xu, Xingzhi

    2015-01-01

    Proper DNA damage response is essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. The E3 ligase RNF168 deficiency fully prevents both the initial recruitment and retention of 53BP1 at sites of DNA damage. In response to DNA damage, RNF168-dependent recruitment of the lysine-specific demethylase LSD1 to the site of DNA damage promotes local H3K4me2 demethylation and ubiquitination of H2A/H2AX, facilitating 53BP1 recruitment to sites of DNA damage. Alternatively, RNF168-mediated K63-linked ubiquitylation of 53BP1 is required for the initial recruitment of 53BP1 to sites of DNA damage and for its function in repair. We demonstrated here that phosphorylation and dephosphorylation of LSD1 at S131 and S137 was mediated by casein kinase 2 (CK2) and wild-type p53-induced phosphatase 1 (WIP1), respectively. LSD1, RNF168 and 53BP1 interacted with each other directly. CK2-mediated phosphorylation of LSD1 exhibited no impact on its interaction with 53BP1, but promoted its interaction with RNF168 and RNF168-dependent 53BP1 ubiquitination and subsequent recruitment to the DNA damage sites. Furthermore, overexpression of phosphorylation-defective mutants failed to restore LSD1 depletion-induced cellular sensitivity to DNA damage. Taken together, our results suggest that LSD1 phosphorylation modulated by CK2/WIP1 regulates RNF168-dependent 53BP1 recruitment directly in response to DNA damage and cellular sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. PMID:25999347

  18. VOLTAGE REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Von Eschen, R.L.; Scheele, P.F.

    1962-04-24

    A transistorized voltage regulator which provides very close voitage regulation up to about 180 deg F is described. A diode in the positive line provides a constant voltage drop from the input to a regulating transistor emitter. An amplifier is coupled to the positive line through a resistor and is connected between a difference circuit and the regulating transistor base which is negative due to the difference in voltage drop across thc diode and the resistor so that a change in the regulator output causes the amplifier to increase or decrease the base voltage and current and incrcase or decrease the transistor impedance to return the regulator output to normal. (AEC)

  19. NORM regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Gray, P.

    1997-02-01

    The author reviews the question of regulation for naturally occuring radioactive material (NORM), and the factors that have made this a more prominent concern today. Past practices have been very relaxed, and have often involved very poor records, the involvment of contractors, and the disposition of contaminated equipment back into commercial service. The rationale behind the establishment of regulations is to provide worker protection, to exempt low risk materials, to aid in scrap recycling, to provide direction for remediation and to examine disposal options. The author reviews existing regulations at federal and state levels, impending legislation, and touches on the issue of site remediation and potential liabilities affecting the release of sites contaminated by NORM.

  20. Temperature regulation.

    PubMed

    Cabanac, M

    1975-01-01

    The general way of looking at short-term temperature regulation has not fundamentaly changed since 1968. Some points nevertheless have been developed and deserve special attention: 1. The influence of water on the skin surface inhibits sweat secretion (55, 106). This fact may be the explanation of sweating fatigue and of discordant conclusions regarding the functioning of the regulator, particularly during exercise in man. 2. Since a large number of studies have shown that appropriate behaviors occur in response to all the stimuli that activate autonomic responses, behavior itself should be considered as an integral part of the thermoregulatory system (1, 2, 16, 18, 19, 21, 23, 25, 31, 32, 34-36, 48, 88, 89, 98, 99, 122, 126, 127, 137). 3. The description of the peripheral input for the control of sweating with regard to mean skin temperature (104) and time dependence (159) has been improved. Among internal temperature sensors those of the spinal cord have been extensively studies (25, 27, 32, 36, 42, 59-63, 71-75, 82, 83, 86, 113-115, 121, 150, 158) and demonstrated to have a sensitivity equal to that of the hypothalamic sensors (73, 75). 4. New hypotheses have been proposed describing the overall mechanism responsible for a constant temperature in the core (58, 96, 97, 135). These stimulating theories have been discussed briefly herein. Mechanisms for the defense against heat and against cold can be dissociated completely from one another. In the same way the control of autonomic responses can be dissociated from the control of behavioral responses. This suggests that temperature regulation is brought about by multiple independent feedback loops. The overall system is well described, in the author's opinion, by the theory of the adjustable set point with proportional control (47).

  1. Regulated Pollutant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the Title V air operating permit regulations. This document is part of the Title V Policy and Guidance Database available at www2.epa.gov/title-v-operating-permits/title-v-operating-permit-policy-and-guidance-document-index. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  2. Regulated Pollutant

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  3. PSD Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  4. Multimedia regulated chemicals

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, C.C.; Huffman, G.L.; Mao, Y.L.

    1999-10-01

    This article examines those chemicals that are listed in either environmental laws or regulations. Its objective is to help readers determine which laws regulate what types of chemicals and which types of chemicals are regulated by what laws. It is multimedia in scope, describing the various chemicals that are regulated in the different media (i.e., air, water, or land).

  5. Combinatorial Gene Regulation Using Auto-Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Hermsen, Rutger; Ursem, Bas; ten Wolde, Pieter Rein

    2010-01-01

    As many as 59% of the transcription factors in Escherichia coli regulate the transcription rate of their own genes. This suggests that auto-regulation has one or more important functions. Here, one possible function is studied. Often the transcription rate of an auto-regulator is also controlled by additional transcription factors. In these cases, the way the expression of the auto-regulator responds to changes in the concentrations of the “input” regulators (the response function) is obviously affected by the auto-regulation. We suggest that, conversely, auto-regulation may be used to optimize this response function. To test this hypothesis, we use an evolutionary algorithm and a chemical–physical model of transcription regulation to design model cis-regulatory constructs with predefined response functions. In these simulations, auto-regulation can evolve if this provides a functional benefit. When selecting for a series of elementary response functions—Boolean logic gates and linear responses—the cis-regulatory regions resulting from the simulations indeed often exploit auto-regulation. Surprisingly, the resulting constructs use auto-activation rather than auto-repression. Several design principles show up repeatedly in the simulation results. They demonstrate how auto-activation can be used to generate sharp, switch-like activation and repression circuits and how linearly decreasing response functions can be obtained. Auto-repression, on the other hand, resulted only when a high response speed or a suppression of intrinsic noise was also selected for. The results suggest that, while auto-repression may primarily be valuable to improve the dynamical properties of regulatory circuits, auto-activation is likely to evolve even when selection acts on the shape of response function only. PMID:20548950

  6. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, L.M.; Strum, M.J.

    1998-12-15

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils is disclosed. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components. 1 fig.

  7. Load regulating expansion fixture

    DOEpatents

    Wagner, Lawrence M.; Strum, Michael J.

    1998-01-01

    A free standing self contained device for bonding ultra thin metallic films, such as 0.001 inch beryllium foils. The device will regulate to a predetermined load for solid state bonding when heated to a bonding temperature. The device includes a load regulating feature, whereby the expansion stresses generated for bonding are regulated and self adjusting. The load regulator comprises a pair of friction isolators with a plurality of annealed copper members located therebetween. The device, with the load regulator, will adjust to and maintain a stress level needed to successfully and economically complete a leak tight bond without damaging thin foils or other delicate components.

  8. Emotion Regulation in Parenthood

    PubMed Central

    Rutherford, Helena J.V.; Wallace, Norah S.; Laurent, Heidemarie K.; Mayes, Linda C.

    2015-01-01

    Emotion regulation, defined as the capacity to influence one’s experience and expression of emotion, is a complex skill now recognized to evolve throughout the lifetime. Here we examine the role of emotion regulation in parenthood, and propose that regulatory function during this period is distinct from the emotion regulation skills acquired and implemented during other periods of life. In this review, we consider the unique demands of caring for a child and recognize that parents have to maintain a regulated state as well as facilitate regulation in their child, especially early in development. We examine neurobiological, hormonal and behavioral shifts during the transition to parenthood that may facilitate parental regulation in response to infant cues. Furthermore, we consider how parents shape emotion regulation in their child, and the clinical implications of regulatory functioning within the parent-child relationship. PMID:26085709

  9. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, J.C.; Dilgard, L.W.

    1995-10-10

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure is disclosed. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes. 10 figs.

  10. Pressure reducing regulator

    DOEpatents

    Whitehead, John C.; Dilgard, Lemoyne W.

    1995-01-01

    A pressure reducing regulator that controls its downstream or outlet pressure to a fixed fraction of its upstream or inlet pressure. The regulator includes a housing which may be of a titanium alloy, within which is located a seal or gasket at the outlet end which may be made of annealed copper, a rod, and piston, each of which may be made of high density graphite. The regulator is insensitive to temperature by virtue of being without a spring or gas sealed behind a diaphragm, and provides a reference for a system in which it is being used. The rod and piston of the regulator are constructed, for example, to have a 1/20 ratio such that when the downstream pressure is less than 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator opens and when the downstream pressure exceeds 1/20 of the upstream pressure the regulator closes.

  11. TOWARD MORE EFFECTIVE REGULATION

    SciTech Connect

    J. GRAF

    2000-06-01

    This paper proposes a model relationship between the operator engaged in a hazardous activity, the regulator of that activity, and the general public. The roles and responsibilities of each entity are described in a way that allows effective communication flow. The role of the regulator is developed using the steam boiler as an example of a hazard subject to regulation; however, the model applies to any regulated activity. In this model the safety analyst has the extremely important role of communicating sometimes difficult technical information to the regulator in a way that the regulator can provide credible assurance to the general public as to the adequacy of the control of the hazardous activity. The conclusion asserts that acceptance of the model, understanding of the roles and responsibilities and definition of who communicates what information to whom will mitigate frustration on the part of each of the three entities.

  12. Novel regulators of spermatogenesis.

    PubMed

    Fok, Kin Lam; Chen, Hao; Ruan, Ye Chun; Chan, Hsiao Chang

    2014-05-01

    Spermatogenesis is a multistep process that supports the production of millions of sperm daily. Understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate spermatogenesis has been a major focus for decades. Yet, the regulators involved in different cellular processes of spermatogenesis remain largely unknown. Human diseases that result in defective spermatogenesis have provided hints on the molecular mechanisms regulating this process. In this review, we have summarized recent findings on the function and signaling mechanisms of several genes that are known to be associated with disease or pathological processes, including CFTR, CD147, YWK-II and CT genes, and discuss their potential roles in regulating different processes of spermatogenesis.

  13. Federal, State, and Local regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, J.M.; Brandenburg, B.L. )

    1991-08-01

    This article is a review of federal, state, and local regulations pertinent treatment of leachate from hazardous materials landfills in California. The topics covered include under federal regulations: pretreatment, whole-effluent toxicity, hazardous waste regulation; under state regulations: hazardous waste regulations, air toxics, environmental quality act; under local regulations: local limits, toxicity-regional water quality board, air emissions and district code.

  14. Child Care Center Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nebraska State Dept. of Health and Human Services, Lincoln.

    This guide enumerates regulations for anyone caring for four or more children, from families other than their own, for compensation and on a regular basis, in the state of Nebraska. The purpose of the regulations is to protect and promote the health and safety of children in child care facilities. The first section of the guide lists specific…

  15. The Right to Regulate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vittek, J. F.

    1972-01-01

    An introduction to the historical and constitutional framework of industry regulation by local and Federal Governments is presented. Problems of the confiscation of private property without due process, government control and the rights and duties of the regulated industry are discussed.

  16. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  17. Plant Growth Regulators.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nickell, Louis G.

    1978-01-01

    Describes the effect of "plant growth regulators" on plants, such as controlling the flowering, fruit development, plant size, and increasing crop yields. Provides a list of plant growth regulators which includes their chemical, common, and trade names, as well as their different use(s). (GA)

  18. Bioethics regulations in Turkey.

    PubMed

    Aydin, E

    1999-10-01

    Although modern technical and scientific developments in medicine are followed closely in Turkey, it cannot be claimed that the same is true in the field of bioethics. Yet, more and more attention is now being paid to bioethics and ethics training in health sciences. In addition, there are also legal regulations in bioethics, some of which are not so new. The objective of these regulations is to provide technical and administrative control. Ethical concerns are rather few. What attracts our attention most in these regulations is the presence of the idea of "consent".

  19. Full-length hdmX transcripts decrease following genotoxic stress

    PubMed Central

    Markey, M; Berberich, SJ

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the mdmX gene is constitutively transcribed, and that MdmX protein activity is instead controlled by cellular localization and DNA damage induced Mdm2-mediated ubiquitination leading to proteasomal degradation. In these studies, we report that the human mdmX (hdmX) mRNA is reproducibly decreased in various human cell lines following treatment with various DNA-damaging agents. Repression of hdmX transcripts is observed in DNAdamaged HCT116 colon cancer cells and in isogenic p53−/− cells, suggesting that this effect is p53-independent. Reduction in the amount of hdmX transcript occurs in both human tumor cell lines and primary human diploid fibroblasts, and results in a significant reduction of HdmX protein. Examination of hdmX promoter activity suggests that damage-induced repression of hdmX mRNA is not significantly impacted by transcription initiation. In contrast, changes in hdmX mRNA splicing appear to partly explain the reduction in full-length hdmX mRNA levels in tumor cell lines with the destabilization of full-length hdmX transcripts, potentially through microRNA miR-34a regulation, also impacting transcript levels. Taken together, this study uncovers previously unrecognized cellular mechanisms by which hdmX mRNA levels are kept low following genotoxic stress. PMID:18711402

  20. HIGH PRESSURE GAS REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Ramage, R.W.

    1962-05-01

    A gas regulator operating on the piston and feedback principle is described. The device is particularly suitable for the delicate regulation of high pressure, i.e., 10,000 psi and above, gas sources, as well as being perfectly adaptable for use on gas supplies as low as 50 psi. The piston is adjustably connected to a needle valve and the movement of the piston regulates the flow of gas from the needle valve. The gas output is obtained from the needle valve. Output pressure is sampled by a piston feedback means which, in turn, regulates the movement of the main piston. When the output is other than the desired value, the feedback system initiates movement of the main piston to allow the output pressure to be corrected or to remain constant. (AEC)

  1. Metabolite turns master regulator

    PubMed Central

    Rabinowitz, Joshua D.; Silhavy, Thomas J.

    2014-01-01

    The phenomenon of catabolite repression enables microorganisms to use their favourite carbon source first. New work reveals α-ketoacids as key effectors of this process, with their levels regulating gene expression. PMID:23925111

  2. Output-Based Regulations: A Handbook for Air Regulators

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This handbook assists air regulators in developing emission regulations that recognize the pollution prevention benefits of CHP, and to assist CHP project owners in understanding and complying with output-based environmental regulations.

  3. In regulation we trust.

    PubMed

    Wiig, Siri; Tharaldsen, Jorunn Elise

    2012-01-01

    The role of trust has been argued to play an increasingly important role in modern, complex, and ambivalent risk societies. Trust within organizational research is anticipated to have a general strategic impact on aspects such as organizational performance, communication and knowledge exchange, and learning from accidents. Trust is also an important aspect related to regulation of risk. Diverse regulatory regimes, their contexts and risks influence regulators use of trust and distrust in regulatory practice. The aim of this paper is to discuss the relationship between risk regulation and trust across diverse risk regulation regimes. By drawing from studies of risk regulation, risk perception, and trust the purpose is to discuss how regulation and trust are linked and used in practice to control risk across system levels in socio-technical systems in high risk industries. This paper provides new knowledge on 1) how functional and dysfunctional trust and distrust are grounded in the empirical realities of high risk industries, 2) how different perspectives on trust and distrust act together and bring new knowledge on how society control risk.

  4. Epigenetic regulation in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Lyko, F; Beisel, C; Marhold, J; Paro, R

    2006-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene transcription relies on molecular marks like DNA methylation or histone modifications. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of epigenetic regulation in the fruit fly Drosophila melanogaster. In the past, DNA methylation research has primarily utilized mammalian model systems. However, several recent landmark discoveries have been made in other organisms. For example, the interaction between DNA methylation and histone methylation was first described in the filamentous fungus Neurospora crassa. Another example is provided by the interaction between epigenetic modifications and the RNA interference (RNAi) machinery that was first reported in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Another organism with great experimental power is the fruit fly Drosophila. Epigenetic regulation by chromatin has been extensively analyzed in the fly and several of the key components have been discovered in this organism. In this chapter, we will focus on three aspects that represent the complexity of epigenetic gene regulation. (1) We will discuss the available data about the DNA methylation system, (2) we will illuminate the interaction between DNA methylation and chromatin regulation, and (3) we will provide an overview over the Polycomb system of epigenetic chromatin modifiers that has proved to be an important paradigm for a chromatin system regulating epigenetic programming.

  5. Worldwide regulations for mycotoxins.

    PubMed

    van Egmond, Hans P

    2002-01-01

    Since the discovery of the aflatoxins in the 1960s, regulations have been established in many countries to protect the consumer from the harmful effects of mycotoxins that may contaminate foodstuffs. Various factors play a role in the decision-making process of setting limits for mycotoxins. These include scientific factors such as the availability of toxicological data, survey data, knowledge about the distribution of mycotoxins in commodities, and analytical methodology. Economical and political factors such as commercial interests and sufficiency of food supply have their impact as well. International enquiry's on existing mycotoxin legislation in foodstuffs and animal feedstuffs have been carried out several times in the 1980s and 1990s and details about tolerances, legal basis, responsible authorities, official protocols of analysis and sampling have been published. Recently a comprehensive update on worldwide regulations was published as FAO Food and Nutrition Paper 64. It appeared that at least 77 countries now have specific regulations for mycotoxins, 13 countries are known to have no specific regulations, whereas no data are available for about 50 countries, many of them in Africa. Over the years, a large diversity in tolerance levels for mycotoxins has remained. Some free trade zones (EU, MERCOSUR) are in the process of harmonizing the limits and regulations for mycotoxins in their respective member states, but it is not likely that worldwide harmonized limits for mycotoxins will soon be within reach.

  6. Appetite regulation: an overview.

    PubMed

    Dhillo, Waljit S

    2007-05-01

    Obesity is a major public health problem associated with morbidity and mortality and continues to increase worldwide. This review focuses on the regions of the brain that are important in appetite regulation and the circulating factors implicated in the control of food intake. The hypothalamus is critical in the regulation of food intake containing neural circuits, which produce a number of peptides that influence food intake. The arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus produces both orexigenic peptides (agouti-related protein and neuropeptide Y) and anorectic peptides (alpha-melanocyte-stimulating hormone and cocaine- and amphetamine-related transcript). The lateral hypothalamus produces the orexigenic peptides (melanin-concentrating hormone and orexins). Other hypothalamic factors recently implicated in appetite regulation include the endocannabinoids, brain-derived neurotrophic factor, nesfatin-1, AMP-activated protein kinase, mammalian target of rapamycin protein, and protein tyrosine phosphatase. Circulating factors that affect food intake mediate their effects by signaling to the hypothalamus and/or brainstem. A number of circulating factors are produced by peripheral organs, for example, leptin by adipose tissue, insulin and pancreatic polypeptide by the pancreas, gut hormones (e.g., ghrelin, obestatin, glucagon-like peptide-1, oxyntomodulin, peptide YY), and triiodothyronine by the thyroid gland. Circulating carbohydrates, lipids, and amino acids also affect appetite regulation. Knowledge regarding appetite regulation has vastly expanded in recent years providing targets for antiobesity drug design.

  7. Mechanisms Regulating Protein Localization.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Nicholas C; Doetsch, Paul W; Corbett, Anita H

    2015-10-01

    Cellular functions are dictated by protein content and activity. There are numerous strategies to regulate proteins varying from modulating gene expression to post-translational modifications. One commonly used mode of regulation in eukaryotes is targeted localization. By specifically redirecting the localization of a pool of existing protein, cells can achieve rapid changes in local protein function. Eukaryotic cells have evolved elegant targeting pathways to direct proteins to the appropriate cellular location or locations. Here, we provide a general overview of these localization pathways, with a focus on nuclear and mitochondrial transport, and present a survey of the evolutionarily conserved regulatory strategies identified thus far. We end with a description of several specific examples of proteins that exploit localization as an important mode of regulation.

  8. Regulating the unregistered.

    PubMed

    Freckelton, Ian

    2008-12-01

    A high proportion of health services is provided by complementary health practitioners who are not subject to formal regulation via a statutory registration scheme. The risk is that such practitioners are not subject to effective forms of professional accountability in relation to services which have the potential to be seriously counter-therapeutic for their clients if they breach fundamental norms of propriety generally accepted within their professions and expected by their clients. Consideration has been given in both South Australia and Victoria to increasing the oversight over complementary health professionals. New South Wales and New Zealand have gone further, bringing such practitioners within the rubric of regulation. The operation of these schemes is reviewed and it is argued that there is a need to ensure that all health practitioners are subject to effective regulation in relation to their adherence to fundamental ethical obligations.

  9. Mechanisms regulating melanogenesis*

    PubMed Central

    Videira, Inês Ferreira dos Santos; Moura, Daniel Filipe Lima; Magina, Sofia

    2013-01-01

    Skin pigmentation is an important human phenotypic trait whose regulation, in spite of recent advances, has not yet been fully understood. The pigment melanin is produced in melanosomes by melanocytes in a complex process called melanogenesis. The melanocyte interacts with endocrine, immune, inflammatory and central nervous systems, and its activity is also regulated by extrinsic factors such as ultraviolet radiation and drugs. We have carried out a review of the current understanding of intrinsic and extrinsic factors regulating skin pigmentation, the melanogenesis stages and related gene defects. We focused on melanocyte-keratinocyte interaction, activation of melanocortin type 1 receptor (MC1-R) by peptides (melanocyte-stimulating hormone and adrenocorticotropic hormone) resulting from proopiomelanocortin (POMC) cleavage, and mechanisms of ultraviolet-induced skin pigmentation. The identification and comprehension of the melanogenesis mechanism facilitate the understanding of the pathogenesis of pigmentation disorders and the development of potential therapeutic options. PMID:23539007

  10. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  11. The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Durosinmi, Brenda Braxton

    2011-01-01

    The Impact of Regulating Social Science Research with Biomedical Regulations Since 1974 Federal regulations have governed the use of human subjects in biomedical and social science research. The regulations are known as the Federal Policy for the Protection of Human Subjects, and often referred to as the "Common Rule" because 18 Federal…

  12. Other-Regulation in Collaborative Groups: Implications for Regulation Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogat, Toni Kempler; Adams-Wiggins, Karlyn R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines variation in other-regulation, conceptualized as efforts by one student to regulate their group's work. This study extends research which has conceptualized other-regulation as temporarily guiding others' conceptual understanding and skill development by broadening the spectrum of other-regulation to include…

  13. Other-Regulation in Collaborative Groups: Implications for Regulation Quality

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rogat, Toni Kempler; Adams-Wiggins, Karlyn R.

    2014-01-01

    The current study examines variation in other-regulation, conceptualized as efforts by one student to regulate their group's work. This study extends research which has conceptualized other-regulation as temporarily guiding others' conceptual understanding and skill development by broadening the spectrum of other-regulation to include…

  14. Environmentally regulated aerospace coatings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morris, Virginia L.

    1995-01-01

    Aerospace coatings represent a complex technology which must meet stringent performance requirements in the protection of aerospace vehicles. Topcoats and primers are used, primarily, to protect the structural elements of the air vehicle from exposure to and subsequent degradation by environmental elements. There are also many coatings which perform special functions, i.e., chafing resistance, rain erosion resistance, radiation and electric effects, fuel tank coatings, maskants, wire and fastener coatings. The scheduled promulgation of federal environmental regulations for aerospace manufacture and rework materials and processes will regulate the emissions of photochemically reactive precursors to smog and air toxics. Aerospace organizations will be required to identify, qualify and implement less polluting materials. The elimination of ozone depleting chemicals (ODC's) and implementation of pollution prevention requirements are added constraints which must be addressed concurrently. The broad categories of operations affected are the manufacture, operation, maintenance, and repair of military, commercial, general aviation, and space vehicles. The federal aerospace regulations were developed around the precept that technology had to be available to support the reduction of organic and air toxic emissions, i.e., the regulations cannot be technology forcing. In many cases, the regulations which are currently in effect in the South Coast Air Quality Management District (SCAQMD), located in Southern California, were used as the baseline for the federal regulations. This paper addresses strategies used by Southern California aerospace organizations to cope with these regulatory impacts on aerospace productions programs. All of these regulatory changes are scheduled for implementation in 1993 and 1994, with varying compliance dates established.

  15. Regulation of Energy Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, George A.

    1985-01-01

    Explains relationships between energy intake and expenditure focusing on the cellular, chemical and neural mechanisms involved in regulation of energy balance. Information is referenced specifically to conditions of obesity. (Physicians may earn continuing education credit by completing an appended test). (ML)

  16. Federal Regulation of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shapiro, Martin

    Fresh light might be shed on problems of federal education policy by treating them not only as problems of intergovernmental relations but of government regulation of enterprise, given that they involve the attempts of a central government to influence the conduct of enterprises that it does not own nor directly operate. Using well-established…

  17. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  18. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-01-01

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics. PMID:28233824

  19. Regulating the New Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Stephen; Goodship, Jo; Holloway, David

    2003-01-01

    This article arises out of a research project that sought to assess the development of regulation within the public sector. It examines the forms and impact of the regulatory systems that now operate within the public sector focusing on the further education sector. The research project developed out of an awareness that the increase in various…

  20. Metabolic regulation of yeast

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiechter, A.

    1982-12-01

    Metabolic regulation which is based on endogeneous and exogeneous process variables which may act constantly or time dependently on the living cell is discussed. The observed phenomena of the regulation are the result of physical, chemical, and biological parameters. These parameters are identified. Ethanol is accumulated as an intermediate product and the synthesis of biomass is reduced. This regulatory effect of glucose is used for the aerobic production of ethanol. Very high production rates are thereby obtained. Understanding of the regulation mechanism of the glucose effect has improved. In addition to catabolite repression, several other mechanisms of enzyme regulation have been described, that are mostly governed by exogeneous factors. Glucose also affects the control of respiration in a third class of yeasts which are unable to make use of ethanol as a substrate for growth. This is due to the lack of any anaplerotic activity. As a consequence, diauxic growth behavior is reduced to a one-stage growth with a drastically reduced cell yield. The pulse chemostat technique, a systematic approach for medium design is developed and medium supplements that are essential for metabolic control are identified.

  1. Regulation and Markets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, Margaret; Wells, Julie

    2007-01-01

    There has been much critical comment in recent years about the tensions between the regulation imposed on public universities and the flexibility needed to compete effectively in international and national markets for students and funding. In the partisan world of politics each side points the finger at the other as the author of "too…

  2. Neuroendocrine regulation of inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Padro, Caroline J.; Sanders, Virginia M.

    2014-01-01

    The interaction between the sympathetic nervous system and the immune system has been documented over the last several decades. In this review, the neuroanatomical, cellular, and molecular evidence for neuroimmune regulation in the maintenance of immune homeostasis will be discussed, as well as the potential impact of neuroimmune dysregulation in health and disease. PMID:24486056

  3. Regulating the Internet

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Byron

    2007-01-01

    The Internet's breakthrough to primetime usage beginning in the mid-1990s evolved in an era of openness. Unfettered access seemed key to Internet development. An important foundation for the 1996 Telecommunications Act was the theory that the telecom industry would work best if it were free of government regulation, a guiding principle that has…

  4. REGULATIONS AND SYLLABUSES, 1968.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Associated Examining Board, Aldershot, Hampshire (England).

    EXAMINATIONS USED IN AWARDING EDUCATIONAL CERTIFICATES TO STUDENTS IN ENGLISH SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN 1968 ARE DESCRIBED IN THIS MANUAL. IT IS WRITTEN PRIMARILY FOR HEADS OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS AND DESCRIBES IN DETAIL THE PROCEDURES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF EXAMINATIONS IN ALL SUBJECT AREAS. EXAMINATIONS MAY BE TAKEN AT THE ORDINARY…

  5. REGULATIONS AND SYLLABUSES 1966.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    JOHNSON, ARTHUR L.; AND OTHERS

    DESCRIBED IN THIS MANUAL ARE EXAMINATIONS USED IN 1966 IN AWARDING EDUCATIONAL CERTIFICATES TO STUDENTS IN ENGLISH SECONDARY SCHOOLS AND ESTABLISHMENTS FOR FURTHER EDUCATION. IT IS WRITTEN PRIMARILY FOR HEADS OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS AND DESCRIBES IN DETAIL THE PROCEDURES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF EXAMINATIONS IN ALL SUBJECT AREAS.…

  6. REGULATIONS AND SYLLABUSES 1967.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Associated Examining Board, Aldershot, Hampshire (England).

    DESCRIBED IN THIS MANUAL ARE EXAMINATIONS USED IN 1967 IN AWARDING EDUCATIONAL CERTIFICATES TO STUDENTS IN ENGLISH SECONDARY SCHOOLS AND ESTABLISHMENTS FOR FURTHER EDUCATION. IT IS WRITTEN PRIMARILY FOR HEADS OF COLLEGES AND SCHOOLS AND DESCRIBES IN DETAIL THE PROCEDURES AND REGULATIONS FOR THE ADMINISTRATION OF EXAMINATIONS IN ALL SUBJECT AREAS.…

  7. Regulation of serum phosphate

    PubMed Central

    Lederer, Eleanor

    2014-01-01

    The regulation of serum phosphate, an acknowledged risk factor for chronic kidney disease and cardiovascular mortality, is poorly understood. The discovery of fibroblast growth factor 23 (FGF23) as a key regulator of renal phosphate handling and activation of vitamin D has revolutionized our comprehension of phosphate homeostasis. Through as yet undetermined mechanisms, circulating and dietary phosphate appear to have a direct effect on FGF23 release by bone cells that, in turn, causes renal phosphate excretion and decreases intestinal phosphate absorption through a decrease in vitamin D production. Thus, the two major phosphaturic hormones, PTH and FGF23, have opposing effects on vitamin D production, placing vitamin D at the nexus of phosphate homeostasis. While our understanding of phosphate homeostasis has advanced, the factors determining regulation of serum phosphate level remain enigmatic. Diet, time of day, season, gender, age and genetics have all been identified as significant contributors to serum phosphate level. The effects of these factors on serum phosphate have major implications for what is understood as ‘normal’ and for studies of phosphate homeostasis and metabolism. Moreover, other hormonal mediators such as dopamine, insulin-like growth factor, and angiotensin II also affect renal handling of phosphate. How the major hormone effects on phosphate handling are regulated and how the effect of these other factors are integrated to yield the measurable serum phosphate are only now beginning to be studied. PMID:24973411

  8. Lightweight Regulated Power Supply

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, C. W.

    1985-01-01

    Power-supply circuit regulates output voltage by adjusting frequency of chopper circuit according to variations. Currently installed in battery charger for electric wheelchair, circuit is well suited to other uses in which light weight is important - for example, in portable computers, radios, and test instruments.

  9. Regulation of Energy Balance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bray, George A.

    1985-01-01

    Explains relationships between energy intake and expenditure focusing on the cellular, chemical and neural mechanisms involved in regulation of energy balance. Information is referenced specifically to conditions of obesity. (Physicians may earn continuing education credit by completing an appended test). (ML)

  10. Nondissipative optimum charge regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rosen, R.; Vitebsky, J. N.

    1970-01-01

    Optimum charge regulator provides constant level charge/discharge control of storage batteries. Basic power transfer and control is performed by solar panel coupled to battery through power switching circuit. Optimum controller senses battery current and modifies duty cycle of switching circuit to maximize current available to battery.

  11. Regulating the New Governance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, Stephen; Goodship, Jo; Holloway, David

    2003-01-01

    This article arises out of a research project that sought to assess the development of regulation within the public sector. It examines the forms and impact of the regulatory systems that now operate within the public sector focusing on the further education sector. The research project developed out of an awareness that the increase in various…

  12. Regulated Gene Therapy.

    PubMed

    Breger, Ludivine; Wettergren, Erika Elgstrand; Quintino, Luis; Lundberg, Cecilia

    2016-01-01

    Gene therapy represents a promising approach for the treatment of monogenic and multifactorial neurological disorders. It can be used to replace a missing gene and mutated gene or downregulate a causal gene. Despite the versatility of gene therapy, one of the main limitations lies in the irreversibility of the process: once delivered to target cells, the gene of interest is constitutively expressed and cannot be removed. Therefore, efficient, safe and long-term gene modification requires a system allowing fine control of transgene expression.Different systems have been developed over the past decades to regulate transgene expression after in vivo delivery, either at transcriptional or post-translational levels. The purpose of this chapter is to give an overview on current regulatory system used in the context of gene therapy for neurological disorders. Systems using external regulation of transgenes using antibiotics are commonly used to control either gene expression using tetracycline-controlled transcription or protein levels using destabilizing domain technology. Alternatively, specific promoters of genes that are regulated by disease mechanisms, increasing expression as the disease progresses or decreasing expression as disease regresses, are also examined. Overall, this chapter discusses advantages and drawbacks of current molecular methods for regulated gene therapy in the central nervous system.

  13. Adaptation with transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Wenjia; Ma, Wenzhe; Xiong, Liyang; Zhang, Mingyue; Tang, Chao

    2017-02-24

    Biochemical adaptation is one of the basic functions that are widely implemented in biological systems for a variety of purposes such as signal sensing, stress response and homeostasis. The adaptation time scales span from milliseconds to days, involving different regulatory machineries in different processes. The adaptive networks with enzymatic regulation (ERNs) have been investigated in detail. But it remains unclear if and how other forms of regulation will impact the network topology and other features of the function. Here, we systematically studied three-node transcriptional regulatory networks (TRNs), with three different types of gene regulation logics. We found that the topologies of adaptive gene regulatory networks can still be grouped into two general classes: negative feedback loop (NFBL) and incoherent feed-forward loop (IFFL), but with some distinct topological features comparing to the enzymatic networks. Specifically, an auto-activation loop on the buffer node is necessary for the NFBL class. For IFFL class, the control node can be either a proportional node or an inversely-proportional node. Furthermore, the tunability of adaptive behavior differs between TRNs and ERNs. Our findings highlight the role of regulation forms in network topology, implementation and dynamics.

  14. Federal Gasoline Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Clean Air Act requires EPA to regulate fuels and fuel additives for use in mobile sources if such fuel, fuel additive or any emission products causes or contributes to air or water pollution that may endanger the public health or welfare.

  15. Photovoltaic power regulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Jaster, D.R.

    1986-02-18

    This patent describes a multi-solar module direct current battery charging arrangement consisting of: a group of solar cells; a reverse current blocking diode; a first relay having an energizing winding; and a set of contacts; the diode, the energizing winding and the solar module connected across the battery; a second relay having a second set of contacts; the first relay contacts operate upon a predetermined current flow through the first relay winding to close the first relay and contacts to operate the second relay. A voltage regulator has a set of contacts. The regulator contacts operate upon the battery reaching a predetermined state of charge as indicated by the voltage level; solar cells and a third relay having a set of contacts; the second relay make contacts, the voltage regulator make contacts, the third relay and the second group of solar cells connected in series; the third relay operated upon the second relay operating indicating the solar cells are functioning, and the voltage regulator operating its associated contacts indicating the batteries require further charging to operate the third relay; and the third relay operated to close the associated contacts to connect the second plurality of solar cells across the battery.

  16. ELECTRON EMISSION REGULATING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Brenholdt, I.R.

    1957-11-19

    >An electronic regulating system is described for controlling the electron emission of a cathode, for example, the cathode in a mass spectrometer. The system incorporates a transformer having a first secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding for the above-mentioned cathode and a second secondary winding load by grid controlled vacuum tubes. A portion of the electron current emitted by the cathode is passed through a network which develops a feedback signal. The system arrangement is completed by using the feedback signal to control the vacuum tubes in the second secondary winding through a regulator tube. When a change in cathode emission occurs, the feedback signal acts to correct this change by adjusting the load on the transformer.

  17. A regulated magnetron pulser

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, C.R.

    1997-09-01

    This paper describes and analysis of a 4.5-kV, 500-mA, regulated current pulser used to drive a Hitachi ZM130 magnetron in a particle-accelerator injector. In this application, precise beam from the injector. A high-voltage triode vacuum tube with active feedback is used to control the magnetron current. Current regulation and accuracy is better than 1%. The pulse width may be varied from as little as 5 {mu}m to cw by varying the width of a gate pulse. The current level can be programmed between 10 and 500 mA. Design of the pulser including circuit simulations, power calculations, and high-voltage issues are discussed.

  18. Regulation of Meiotic Recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory p. Copenhaver

    2011-11-09

    Meiotic recombination results in the heritable rearrangement of DNA, primarily through reciprocal exchange between homologous chromosome or gene conversion. In plants these events are critical for ensuring proper chromosome segregation, facilitating DNA repair and providing a basis for genetic diversity. Understanding this fundamental biological mechanism will directly facilitate trait mapping, conventional plant breeding, and development of genetic engineering techniques that will help support the responsible production and conversion of renewable resources for fuels, chemicals, and the conservation of energy (1-3). Substantial progress has been made in understanding the basal recombination machinery, much of which is conserved in organisms as diverse as yeast, plants and mammals (4, 5). Significantly less is known about the factors that regulate how often and where that basal machinery acts on higher eukaryotic chromosomes. One important mechanism for regulating the frequency and distribution of meiotic recombination is crossover interference - or the ability of one recombination event to influence nearby events. The MUS81 gene is thought to play an important role in regulating the influence of interference on crossing over. The immediate goals of this project are to use reverse genetics to identify mutants in two putative MUS81 homologs in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, characterize those mutants and initiate a novel forward genetic screen for additional regulators of meiotic recombination. The long-term goal of the project is to understand how meiotic recombination is regulated in higher eukaryotes with an emphasis on the molecular basis of crossover interference. The ability to monitor recombination in all four meiotic products (tetrad analysis) has been a powerful tool in the arsenal of yeast geneticists. Previously, the qrt mutant of Arabidopsis, which causes the four pollen products of male meiosis to remain attached, was developed as a facile system

  19. Risk and regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Porter, Joan P.

    1994-12-01

    Regulation of the health care industry and development of drugs, biologics and devices has developed, in part, to ensure public safety. There are numerous forces that promote regulatory efforts and those that work against formal regulatory measures. This presentation provides an overview of the following: What is risk? What is risk assessment? What drives regulatory activity to ensure public safety? What are the issue areas surrounding cost benefit analysis? How is technology helpful in assessing and managing risks? How does health care reform drive new technologies which, in turn, must be assessed for risk and cost/benefit? A force field analysis model of factors contributing to regulatory activities and those that work against the promulgation of regulations is offered.

  20. CNS regulation of appetite.

    PubMed

    Harrold, Joanne A; Dovey, Terry M; Blundell, John E; Halford, Jason C G

    2012-07-01

    This article reviews the regulation of appetite from a biopsychological perspective. It considers psychological experiences and peripheral nutritional systems (both episodic and tonic) and addresses their relationship with the CNS networks that process and integrate their input. Whilst such regulatory aspects of obesity focus on homeostatic control mechanisms, in the modern environment hedonic aspects of appetite are also critical. Enhanced knowledge of the complexity of appetite regulation and the mechanisms that sustain obesity indicate the challenge presented by management of the obesity epidemic. Nonetheless, effective control of appetite expression remains a critical therapeutic target for weight management. Currently, strategies which utilise a combination of agents to target both homeostatic and hedonic control mechanisms represent the most promising approaches. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Central Control of Food Intake'.

  1. Redox regulated peroxisome homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Li, Shuo; Liu, Yu; Ma, Changle

    2014-01-01

    Peroxisomes are ubiquitous organelles present in nearly all eukaryotic cells. Conserved functions of peroxisomes encompass beta-oxidation of fatty acids and scavenging of reactive oxygen species generated from diverse peroxisomal metabolic pathways. Peroxisome content, number, and size can change quickly in response to environmental and/or developmental cues. To achieve efficient peroxisome homeostasis, peroxisome biogenesis and degradation must be orchestrated. We review the current knowledge on redox regulated peroxisome biogenesis and degradation with an emphasis on yeasts and plants. PMID:25545794

  2. Information Security Program Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-01

    Over the High Seas," January 13, 1981 (rr) DoD Directive 5210.41, "Security Criteria and Standards for Pro - tecting Nuclear Weapons," September 12...relevant to operations of nongovernment personnel entrusted with classified information shall be made applicable thereto by con - tracts or other legally...Regulation applies to protection of classified information pro -cessed, stored or used in, or communicated, displayed or dissemi- nated by an automatic

  3. Regulation of biomedical products.

    PubMed

    Gillett, Grant; Saville-Cook, Donald

    2010-05-01

    Two recent decisions, one from Australia and one from Canada, should cause us to examine the ethical issues surrounding the regulation of biomedical products. The protection of vulnerable consumers from variable quality and poorly prepared drugs with uncertain parameters of safety and efficacy is a priority for any community and should not have to be weighed against possible costs based on restrictions of trade. However, the possibility of an environment in which the multinational biomedical industry edges out any other players in the treatment of various illnesses has its own dangers. Not least is the apparent collusion between regulators and industry that ramps up the costs and intensity of licensing and risk management so that only an industry-type budget can sustain the costs of compliance. This has the untoward effect of delivering contemporary health care into the hands of those who make immense fortunes out of it. An approach to regulation that tempers bureaucratic mechanisms with a dose of common sense and realistic evidence-based risk assessment could go a long way in avoiding the Scylla and Charybdis awaiting the clinical world in these troubled waters.

  4. [Sleep: regulation and phenomenology].

    PubMed

    Vecchierini, M-F

    2013-12-01

    This article describes the two-process model of sleep regulation. The 24-hour sleep-wake cycle is regulated by a homeostatic process and an endogenous, 2 oscillators, circadian process, under the influence of external synchronisers. These two processes are partially independent but influence each other, as shown in the two-sleep-process auto-regulation model. A reciprocal inhibition model of two interconnected neuronal groups, "SP on" and "SP off", explains the regular recurrence of paradoxical sleep. Sleep studies have primarily depended on observation of the subject and have determined the optimal conditions for sleep (position, external conditions, sleep duration and need) and have studied the consequences of sleep deprivation or modifications of sleep schedules. Then, electrophysiological recordings permitted the classification of sleep stages according to the observed EEG patterns. The course of a night's sleep is reported on a "hypnogram". The adult subject falls asleep in non-REM sleep (N1), then sleep deepens progressively to stages N2 and N3 with the appearance of spindles and slow waves (N2). Slow waves become more numerous in stage N3. Every 90minutes REM sleep recurs, with muscle atonia and rapid eye movements. These adult sleep patterns develop progressively during the 2 first years of life as total sleep duration decreases, with the reduction of diurnal sleep and of REM sleep. Around 2 to 4 months, spindles and K complexes appear on the EEG, with the differentiation of light and deep sleep with, however, a predominance of slow wave sleep.

  5. Cytokines in sleep regulation.

    PubMed

    Krueger, J M; Takahashi, S; Kapás, L; Bredow, S; Roky, R; Fang, J; Floyd, R; Renegar, K B; Guha-Thakurta, N; Novitsky, S

    1995-01-01

    The central thesis of this essay is that the cytokine network in brain is a key element in the humoral regulation of sleep responses to infection and in the physiological regulation of sleep. We hypothesize that many cytokines, their cellular receptors, soluble receptors, and endogenous antagonists are involved in physiological sleep regulation. The expressions of some cytokines are greatly amplified by microbial challenge. This excess cytokine production during infection induces sleep responses. The excessive sleep and wakefulness that occur at different times during the course of the infectious process results from dynamic changes in various cytokines that occur during the host's response to infectious challenge. Removal of any one somnogenic cytokine inhibits normal sleep, alters the cytokine network by changing the cytokine mix, but does not completely disrupt sleep due to the redundant nature of the cytokine network. The cytokine network operates in a paracrine/autocrine fashion and is responsive to neuronal use. Finally, cytokines elicit their somnogenic actions via endocrine and neurotransmitter systems as well as having direct effects neurons and glia. Evidence in support of these postulates is reviewed in this essay.

  6. Improving CS regulations.

    SciTech Connect

    Nesse, R.J.; Scheer, R.M.; Marasco, A.L.; Furey, R.

    1980-10-01

    President Carter issued Executive Order 12044 (3/28/78) that required all Federal agencies to distinguish between significant and insignificant regulations, and to determine whether a regulation will result in major impacts. This study gathered information on the impact of the order and the guidelines on the Office of Conservation and Solar Energy (CS) regulatory practices, investigated problems encountered by the CS staff when implementing the order and guidelines, and recommended solutions to resolve these problems. Major tasks accomplished and discussed are: (1) legislation, Executive Orders, and DOE Memoranda concerning Federal administrative procedures relevant to the development and analysis of regulations within CS reviewed; (2) relevant DOE Orders and Memoranda analyzed and key DOE and CS staff interviewed in order to accurately describe the current CS regulatory process; (3) DOE staff from the Office of the General Counsel, the Office of Policy and Evaluation, the Office of the Environment, and the Office of the Secretary interviewed to explore issues and problems encountered with current CS regulatory practices; (4) the regulatory processes at five other Federal agencies reviewed in order to see how other agencies have approached the regulatory process, dealt with specific regulatory problems, and responded to the Executive Order; and (5) based on the results of the preceding four tasks, recommendations for potential solutions to the CS regulatory problems developed. (MCW)

  7. Restructuring nuclear regulations.

    PubMed

    Mossman, Kenneth L

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear regulations are a subset of social regulations (laws to control activities that may negatively impact the environment, health, and safety) that concern control of ionizing radiation from radiation-producing equipment and from radioactive materials. The impressive safety record among nuclear technologies is due, in no small part, to the work of radiation safety professionals and to a protection system that has kept pace with the rapid technologic advancements in electric power generation, engineering, and medicine. The price of success, however, has led to a regulatory organization and philosophy characterized by complexity, confusion, public fear, and increasing economic costs. Over the past 20 years, regulatory costs in the nuclear sector have increased more than 250% in constant 1995 U.S. dollars. Costs of regulatory compliance can be reduced sharply, particularly when health and environmental benefits of risk reduction are questionable. Three key regulatory areas should be closely examined and modified to improve regulatory effectiveness and efficiency: a) radiation protection should be changed from a risk-based to dose-based system; b) the U.S. government should adopt the modern metric system (International System of Units), and radiation quantities and units should be simplified to facilitate international communication and public understanding; and c) a single, independent office is needed to coordinate nuclear regulations established by U.S. federal agencies and departments.

  8. Ensembl regulation resources

    PubMed Central

    Zerbino, Daniel R.; Johnson, Nathan; Juetteman, Thomas; Sheppard, Dan; Wilder, Steven P.; Lavidas, Ilias; Nuhn, Michael; Perry, Emily; Raffaillac-Desfosses, Quentin; Sobral, Daniel; Keefe, Damian; Gräf, Stefan; Ahmed, Ikhlak; Kinsella, Rhoda; Pritchard, Bethan; Brent, Simon; Amode, Ridwan; Parker, Anne; Trevanion, Steven; Birney, Ewan; Dunham, Ian; Flicek, Paul

    2016-01-01

    New experimental techniques in epigenomics allow researchers to assay a diversity of highly dynamic features such as histone marks, DNA modifications or chromatin structure. The study of their fluctuations should provide insights into gene expression regulation, cell differentiation and disease. The Ensembl project collects and maintains the Ensembl regulation data resources on epigenetic marks, transcription factor binding and DNA methylation for human and mouse, as well as microarray probe mappings and annotations for a variety of chordate genomes. From this data, we produce a functional annotation of the regulatory elements along the human and mouse genomes with plans to expand to other species as data becomes available. Starting from well-studied cell lines, we will progressively expand our library of measurements to a greater variety of samples. Ensembl’s regulation resources provide a central and easy-to-query repository for reference epigenomes. As with all Ensembl data, it is freely available at http://www.ensembl.org, from the Perl and REST APIs and from the public Ensembl MySQL database server at ensembldb.ensembl.org. Database URL: http://www.ensembl.org PMID:26888907

  9. Flow compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    An apparatus for regulating pressure of treatment fluid during ophthalmic procedures is described. Flow sensing and pressure regulating diaphragms are used to modulate a flow control valve. The pressure regulating diaphragm is connected to the flow control valve to urge the valve to an open position due to pressure being applied to the diaphragm by bias means such as a spring. The flow sensing diaphragm is mechanically connected to the flow control valve and urges it to an opened position because of the differential pressure on the diaphragm generated by a flow of incoming treatment fluid through an orifice in the diaphragm. A bypass connection with a variable restriction is connected in parallel relationship to the orifice to provide for adjusting the sensitivity of the flow sensing diaphragm. A multiple lever linkage system is utilized between the center of the second diaphragm and the flow control valve to multiply the force applied to the valve by the other diaphragm and reverse the direction of the force.

  10. Whither tobacco product regulation?

    PubMed

    McNeill, Ann; Hammond, David; Gartner, Coral

    2012-03-01

    Despite decades of industry innovation and regulatory efforts, the harmfulness of conventional cigarettes has not changed. There are several pitfalls in this area, including the long time lag before health impacts of product regulatory changes become apparent, the danger of consumers deriving false reassurance of lesser harm in the interim period, the lack of relevant expertise and the lack of an internationally agreed and evidence-based strategic approach. Articles 9 and 10 of the Framework Convention on Tobacco Control provide the potential for such a global strategy, and knowledge and research has increased significantly over recent years. However, there are huge opportunity costs in implementing product disclosure and regulatory strategies: most national regulators have very limited human and financial resources, which should be focused on other evidence-based tobacco control interventions. We believe therefore that it is now time to abandon the notion of safe or safer cigarettes while moving consumers towards cleaner nicotine products as soon as possible. In parallel to this, we recommend a number of other strategies be implemented including: reducing the appeal of all tobacco products, forbidding new tobacco products or brand variants being marketed without evidence of reduced harm, appeal or addictiveness, and developing a tobacco industry resourced, but industry independent, Framework Convention on Tobacco Control global repository to assist national regulators in understanding and regulating the products on their markets.

  11. FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates FDA 101: Regulating Biological Products Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... and highly important field. back to top What biological products does FDA regulate? The Center for Biologics ...

  12. REGULATION OF VASCULOGENESIS AND ANGIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulation of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.
    B.D. Abbott
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA
    Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are regulated by a complex, interactive family of receptors and lig...

  13. Using Science for Environmental Regulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists have helped apply environmental aquatic toxicology to develop regulations for EPA over many years. This presentation will highlight some historical changes in the aquatic environment and how EPA has used them to develop regulations for the Clean Water Act.

  14. White paper on occupational regulation.

    PubMed

    Rops, Mickie S

    2004-12-01

    There are many ways that occupations are regulated, with the degree of regulation usually depending on the amount of harm to the public that lack of regulation could bring. Strict regulations, such as mandatory licensure, are established through state law and maintained by a state board. Less strict regulations, such as voluntary credentialing, may be requirements by employers or third-party payers. This white paper reviews the possible approaches ASET could take toward regulation of the practice of electroneurodiagnostic technology: maintain position of neutrality, advocate for no statutory regulation of END, advocate for statutory regulation of END, or advocate for voluntary credentialing. The routes taken by other allied health fields are outlined, with exploration of the advantages and disadvantages of each option, as well as what would be required of ASET in terms of time and other resources to achieve each option. The appendix is a summary of entry requirements of several healthcare professions.

  15. REGULATION OF VASCULOGENESIS AND ANGIOGENESIS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Regulation of vasculogenesis and angiogenesis.
    B.D. Abbott
    Reproductive Toxicology Division, Environmental Protection Agency, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, USA
    Vasculogenesis and angiogenesis are regulated by a complex, interactive family of receptors and lig...

  16. Proteomics of regulated secretory organelles.

    PubMed

    Brunner, Yannick; Schvartz, Domitille; Couté, Yohann; Sanchez, Jean-Charles

    2009-01-01

    Regulated secretory organelles are important subcellular structures of living cells that allow the release in the extracellular space of crucial compounds, such as hormones and neurotransmitters. Therefore, the regulation of biogenesis, trafficking, and exocytosis of regulated secretory organelles has been intensively studied during the last 30 years. However, due to the large number of different regulated secretory organelles, only a few of them have been specifically characterized. New insights into regulated secretory organelles open crucial perspectives for a better comprehension of the mechanisms that govern cell secretion. The combination of subcellular fractionation, protein separation, and mass spectrometry is also possible to study regulated secretory organelles at the proteome level. In this review, we present different strategies used to isolate regulated secretory organelles, separate their protein content, and identify the proteins by mass spectrometry. The biological significance of regulated secretory organelles-proteomic analysis is discussed as well. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Using Science for Environmental Regulation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Scientists have helped apply environmental aquatic toxicology to develop regulations for EPA over many years. This presentation will highlight some historical changes in the aquatic environment and how EPA has used them to develop regulations for the Clean Water Act.

  18. Feeding regulation in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Pool, Allan-Hermann; Scott, Kristin

    2014-01-01

    Neuromodulators play a key role in adjusting animal behavior based on environmental cues and internal needs. Here, we review the regulation of Drosophila feeding behavior to illustrate how neuromodulators achieve behavioral plasticity. Recent studies have made rapid progress in determining molecular and cellular mechanisms that translate the metabolic needs of the fly into changes in neuroendocrine and neuromodulatory states. These neuromodulators in turn promote or inhibit discrete feeding behavioral subprograms. This review highlights the links between physiological needs, neuromodulatory states, and feeding decisions. PMID:24937262

  19. Gastrointestinal hormones regulating appetite

    PubMed Central

    Chaudhri, Owais; Small, Caroline; Bloom, Steve

    2006-01-01

    The role of gastrointestinal hormones in the regulation of appetite is reviewed. The gastrointestinal tract is the largest endocrine organ in the body. Gut hormones function to optimize the process of digestion and absorption of nutrients by the gut. In this capacity, their local effects on gastrointestinal motility and secretion have been well characterized. By altering the rate at which nutrients are delivered to compartments of the alimentary canal, the control of food intake arguably constitutes another point at which intervention may promote efficient digestion and nutrient uptake. In recent decades, gut hormones have come to occupy a central place in the complex neuroendocrine interactions that underlie the regulation of energy balance. Many gut peptides have been shown to influence energy intake. The most well studied in this regard are cholecystokinin (CCK), pancreatic polypeptide, peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), oxyntomodulin and ghrelin. With the exception of ghrelin, these hormones act to increase satiety and decrease food intake. The mechanisms by which gut hormones modify feeding are the subject of ongoing investigation. Local effects such as the inhibition of gastric emptying might contribute to the decrease in energy intake. Activation of mechanoreceptors as a result of gastric distension may inhibit further food intake via neural reflex arcs. Circulating gut hormones have also been shown to act directly on neurons in hypothalamic and brainstem centres of appetite control. The median eminence and area postrema are characterized by a deficiency of the blood–brain barrier. Some investigators argue that this renders neighbouring structures, such as the arcuate nucleus of the hypothalamus and the nucleus of the tractus solitarius in the brainstem, susceptible to influence by circulating factors. Extensive reciprocal connections exist between these areas and the hypothalamic paraventricular nucleus and other energy-regulating centres of the

  20. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1992-01-01

    This report describes accomplishments over the past year on understanding of terpene synthesis in mint plants and sage. Specifically reported are the fractionation of 4-S-limonene synthetase, the enzyme responsible for the first committed step to monoterpene synthesis, along with isolation of the corresponding RNA and DNA cloning of its gene; the localization of the enzyme within the oil glands, regulation of transcription and translation of the synthetase, the pathway to camphor biosynthesis,a nd studies on the early stages and branch points of the isoprenoid pathway.

  1. Epigenetic Regulation in Plants

    PubMed Central

    Pikaard, Craig S.; Mittelsten Scheid, Ortrun

    2014-01-01

    The study of epigenetics in plants has a long and rich history, from initial descriptions of non-Mendelian gene behaviors to seminal discoveries of chromatin-modifying proteins and RNAs that mediate gene silencing in most eukaryotes, including humans. Genetic screens in the model plant Arabidopsis have been particularly rewarding, identifying more than 130 epigenetic regulators thus far. The diversity of epigenetic pathways in plants is remarkable, presumably contributing to the phenotypic plasticity of plant postembryonic development and the ability to survive and reproduce in unpredictable environments. PMID:25452385

  2. Self-regulating valve

    DOEpatents

    Humphreys, D.A.

    1982-07-20

    A variable, self-regulating valve having a hydraulic loss coefficient proportional to a positive exponential power of the flow rate. The device includes two objects in a flow channel and structure which assures that the distance between the two objects is an increasing function of the flow rate. The range of spacing between the objects is such that the hydraulic resistance of the valve is an increasing function of the distance between the two objects so that the desired hydraulic loss coefficient as a function of flow rate is obtained without variation in the flow area.

  3. Variable orifice flow regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Christianson, Rollin C. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A flow regulator for high-pressure fluids at elevated temperatures includes a body having a flow passage extending between inlet and outlet openings. First and second orifice members are arranged in the flow passage so at least one of the orifice members can be moved transversely in relation to the flow passage between one operating position where the two orifice openings are aligned for establishing a maximum flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage and at least one other operating position in which the two openings are moderately misaligned with one another for establishing a predetermined reduced flow rate of fluids flowing through the flow passage.

  4. Applicability of PSD Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This document may be of assistance in applying the New Source Review (NSR) air permitting regulations including the Prevention of Significant Deterioration (PSD) requirements. This document is part of the NSR Policy and Guidance Database. Some documents in the database are a scanned or retyped version of a paper photocopy of the original. Although we have taken considerable effort to quality assure the documents, some may contain typographical errors. Contact the office that issued the document if you need a copy of the original.

  5. Instructional Principles for Self Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ley, Kathryn; Young, Dawn B.

    This study analyzed the growing body of research on self regulation and the distinctive self regulation differences between higher and lower achieving adult learners to identify instructional principles to infuse compensatory support for weak self regulation. The following four principles are proposed: (1) prepare--the instruction should encourage…

  6. Structural and Biochemical Studies of TIGAR (TP53-induced Glycolysis and Apoptosis Regulator)

    SciTech Connect

    Li, H.; Jogl, G

    2009-01-01

    Activation of the p53 tumor suppressor by cellular stress leads to variable responses ranging from growth inhibition to apoptosis. TIGAR is a novel p53-inducible gene that inhibits glycolysis by reducing cellular levels of fructose-2,6-bisphosphate, an activator of glycolysis and inhibitor of gluconeogenesis. Here we describe structural and biochemical studies of TIGAR from Danio rerio. The overall structure forms a histidine phosphatase fold with a phosphate molecule coordinated to the catalytic histidine residue and a second phosphate molecule in a position not observed in other phosphatases. The recombinant human and zebra fish enzymes hydrolyze fructose-2,6-bisphosphate as well as fructose-1,6-bisphosphate but not fructose 6-phosphate in vitro. The TIGAR active site is open and positively charged, consistent with its enzymatic function as bisphosphatase. The closest related structures are the bacterial broad specificity phosphatase PhoE and the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase domain of the bifunctional 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase. The structural comparison shows that TIGAR combines an accessible active site as observed in PhoE with a charged substrate-binding pocket as seen in the fructose-2,6-bisphosphatase domain of the bifunctional enzyme.

  7. PRMT1-Mediated Translation Regulation Is a Crucial Vulnerability of Cancer.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Jessie Hao-Ru; Hubbell-Engler, Benjamin; Adelmant, Guillaume; Huang, Jialiang; Joyce, Cailin E; Vazquez, Francisca; Weir, Barbara A; Montgomery, Philip; Tsherniak, Aviad; Giacomelli, Andrew O; Perry, Jennifer A; Trowbridge, Jennifer; Fujiwara, Yuko; Cowley, Glenn S; Xie, Huafeng; Kim, Woojin; Novina, Carl D; Hahn, William C; Marto, Jarrod A; Orkin, Stuart H

    2017-09-01

    Through an shRNA screen, we identified the protein arginine methyltransferase Prmt1 as a vulnerable intervention point in murine p53/Rb-null osteosarcomas, the human counterpart of which lacks effective therapeutic options. Depletion of Prmt1 in p53-deficient cells impaired tumor initiation and maintenance in vitro and in vivo Mechanistic studies reveal that translation-associated pathways were enriched for Prmt1 downstream targets, implicating Prmt1 in translation control. In particular, loss of Prmt1 led to a decrease in arginine methylation of the translation initiation complex, thereby disrupting its assembly and inhibiting translation. p53/Rb-null cells were sensitive to p53-induced translation stress, and analysis of human cancer cell line data from Project Achilles further revealed that Prmt1 and translation-associated pathways converged on the same functional networks. We propose that targeted therapy against Prmt1 and its associated translation-related pathways offer a mechanistic rationale for treatment of osteosarcomas and other cancers that exhibit dependencies on translation stress response. Cancer Res; 77(17); 4613-25. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  8. Environmental regulations on chlorofluorocarbons

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffman, J.S.; Wells, J.B. )

    1989-05-01

    In August 1988, the US Environmental Protection Agency issued final regulations that implement the Montreal Protocol on Substances that Deplete the Ozone Layer. The regulations require a 50% reduction in consumption of fully halogenated chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs) within 10 years and a freeze on consumption of halons within 4 years. The Montreal Protocol provisions were designed in September 1987 based on the results of a 2-year international series of scientific, technical, and economic workshops. As would be expected, scientific investigations continued during this period. While these investigations suggested that significant global depletion had already occurred, these preliminary findings were not taken into account during negotiations or rulemaking. In March 1988, however, the international Ozone Trends Panel confirmed the findings. Depletion greater than that projected under the Montreal Protocol has already occurred. An early reassessment of the Protocol provisions appears to be inevitable. Restrictions on CFCs will affect the refrigeration and air-conditioning industries. Emerging alternatives to CFCs include newly developed refrigerants, innovative designs, and engineering controls. Key issues in evaluating these alternatives include energy efficiency, capital costs, service to consumers, and compatibility with existing designs.

  9. Effective doses, guidelines & regulations.

    PubMed

    Burch, Michael D

    2008-01-01

    A number of countries have developed regulations or guidelines for cyanotoxins and cyanobacteria in drinking water, and in some cases in water used for recreational activity and agriculture. The main focus internationally has been upon microcystin toxins, produced predominantly by Microcystis aeruginosa. This is because microcystins are widely regarded as the most significant potential source of human injury from cyanobacteria on a world-wide scale. Many international guidelines have taken their lead from the World Health Organization's (WHO) provisional guideline of 1 microg L(-1) for microcystin-LR in drinking-water released in 1998 (WHO 2004). The WHO guideline value is stated as being 'provisional', because it covers only microcystin-LR, for reasons that the toxicology is limited and new data for toxicity of cyanobacterial toxins are being generated. The derivation of this guideline is based upon data that there is reported human injury related to consumption of drinking water containing cyanobacteria, or from limited work with experimental animals. It was also recognised that at present the human evidence for microcystin tumor promotion is inadequate and animal evidence is limited. As a result the guideline is based upon the model of deriving a Tolerable Daily intake (TDI) from an animal study No Observed Adverse Effects Level (NOAEL), with the application of appropriate safety or uncertainty factors. The resultant WHO guideline by definition is the concentration of a toxin that does not result in any significant risk to health of the consumer over a lifetime of consumption. Following the release of this WHO provisional guideline many countries have either adopted it directly (e.g., Czech Republic, France, Japan, Korea, New Zealand, Norway, Poland, Brazil and Spain), or have adopted the same animal studies, TDI and derivation convention to arrive at slight variants based upon local requirements (e.g., Australia, Canada). Brazil currently has the most

  10. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1991-01-01

    During the last grant period, we have completed studies on the key pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism in sage and peppermint, and have, by several lines of evidence, deciphered the rate-limiting step of each pathway. We have at least partially purified and characterized the relevant enzymes of each pathway. We have made a strong case, based on analytical, in vivo, and in vitro studies, that terpene accumulation depends upon the balance between biosynthesis and catabolism, and provided supporting evidence that these processes are developmentally-regulated and very closely associated with senescence of the oil glands. Oil gland ontogeny has been characterized at the ultrastructural level. We have exploited foliar-applied bioregulators to delay gland senescence, and have developed tissue explant and cell culture systems to study several elusive aspects of catabolism. We have isolated pure gland cell clusters and localized monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism within these structures, and have used these preparations as starting materials for the purification to homogeneity of target regulatory'' enzymes. We have thus developed the necessary background knowledge, based on a firm understanding of enzymology, as well as the necessary experimental tools for studying the regulation of monoterpene metabolism at the molecular level. Furthermore, we are now in a position to extend our systematic approach to other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15]-C[sub 30]) produced by oil glands.

  11. Regulations and Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Lydia J.

    2011-07-25

    The purpose of the Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM) is to provide LBNL personnel with a reference to University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL or Laboratory) policies and regulations by outlining normal practices and answering most policy questions that arise in the day-to-day operations of Laboratory organizations. Much of the information in this manual has been condensed from detail provided in LBNL procedure manuals, Department of Energy (DOE) directives, and Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This manual is not intended, however, to replace any of those documents. RPM sections on personnel apply only to employees who are not represented by unions. Personnel policies pertaining to employees represented by unions may be found in their labor agreements. Questions concerning policy interpretation should be directed to the LBNL organization responsible for the particular policy. A link to the Managers Responsible for RPM Sections is available on the RPM home page. If it is not clear which organization is responsible for a policy, please contact Requirements Manager Lydia Young or the RPM Editor.

  12. Regulations and Procedures Manual

    SciTech Connect

    Young, Lydia

    2010-09-30

    The purpose of the Regulations and Procedures Manual (RPM) is to provide Laboratory personnel with a reference to University and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory policies and regulations by outlining the normal practices and answering most policy questions that arise in the day-to-day operations of Laboratory departments. Much of the information in this manual has been condensed from detail provided in Laboratory procedure manuals, Department of Energy (DOE) directives, and Contract DE-AC02-05CH11231. This manual is not intended, however, to replace any of those documents. The sections on personnel apply only to employees who are not represented by unions. Personnel policies pertaining to employees represented by unions may be found in their labor agreements. Questions concerning policy interpretation should be directed to the department responsible for the particular policy. A link to the Managers Responsible for RPM Sections is available on the RPM home page. If it is not clear which department should be called, please contact the Associate Laboratory Director of Operations.

  13. Histamine regulates memory consolidation.

    PubMed

    Passani, Maria Beatrice; Benetti, Fernando; Blandina, Patrizio; Furini, Cristiane R G; de Carvalho Myskiw, Jociane; Izquierdo, Ivan

    2017-08-23

    Recent findings have reasserted the role of histamine in the regulation of memory consolidation first proposed in 1986 in an inhibitory avoidance task in rats. They indicate that histamine is indeed a major regulator of memory consolidation in various tasks, through H2 receptors in the dorsal hippocampus and through H3 receptors in the basolateral amygdala, depending on the task. In the object recognition task, the memory enhancing effect is mediated by the three receptors (H1, H2, H3) in the dorsal hippocampus. In social recognition, the consolidation effect is mediated by H2 receptors in both amygdala and dorsal hippocampus. Data have suggested, in addition, influences on retrieval; this has been best studied in the dorsal hippocampus in step-down inhibitory avoidance task. Depending on the recent history of the conditioned stimulus (i.e., whether it has been recently reinforced or not), histamine acts on hippocampal H1 receptors, facilitating retrieval, or on H2 receptors, inhibiting it. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  14. Translational regulation in nutrigenomics.

    PubMed

    Liu, Botao; Qian, Shu-Bing

    2011-11-01

    The emergence of genome-wide analysis to interrogate cellular DNA, RNA, and protein content has revolutionized the study of the control network that mediates cellular homeostasis. Nutrigenomics addresses the effect of nutrients on gene expression, which provides a basis for understanding the biological activity of dietary components. Translation of mRNAs represents the last step of genetic flow and primarily defines the proteome. Translational regulation is thus critical for gene expression, in particular, under nutrient excess or deficiency. Until recently, it was unclear how the global effects of translational control are influenced by nutrient signaling. An emerging concept of translational reprogramming addresses how to maintain the expression of specific proteins during pathophysiological conditions by translation of selective mRNAs. Here we describe recent advances in our understanding of translational control, nutrient signaling, and their dysregulation in aging and cancer. The mechanistic understanding of translational regulation in response to different nutrient conditions may help identify potential dietary and therapeutic targets to improve human health.

  15. Rapamycin regulates biochemical metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Tucci, Paola; Porta, Giovanni; Agostini, Massimiliano; Antonov, Alexey; Garabadgiu, Alexander Vasilievich; Melino, Gerry; Willis, Anne E

    2013-01-01

    The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) kinase is a master regulator of protein synthesis that couples nutrient sensing to cell growth, and deregulation of this pathway is associated with tumorigenesis. p53, and its less investigated family member p73, have been shown to interact closely with mTOR pathways through the transcriptional regulation of different target genes. To investigate the metabolic changes that occur upon inhibition of the mTOR pathway and the role of p73 in this response primary mouse embryonic fibroblast from control and TAp73−/− were treated with the macrocyclic lactone rapamycin. Extensive gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) analysis were used to obtain a rapamycin-dependent global metabolome profile from control or TAp73−/− cells. In total 289 metabolites involved in selective pathways were identified; 39 biochemical metabolites were found to be significantly altered, many of which are known to be associated with the cellular stress response. PMID:23839040

  16. Trust-based environmental regulation.

    PubMed

    Lange, Bettina; Gouldson, Andy

    2010-10-15

    Within this paper, we examine the contribution that trust-based relationships can make to achieving better-and particularly more effective, efficient and equitable-environmental regulation. While levels of trust in regulators, regulatory processes and outcomes are often discussed, the influence of trust on different actors and on different measures of regulatory performance is poorly understood. Within this paper, we define trust-based environmental regulation as a specific regulatory style that involves openness and cooperation in interaction between regulated, regulators and third-party stakeholders in order to achieve environmental protection objectives. We then discuss the pros and cons of trust relationships between regulators, regulated businesses and citizens for achieving behavioural change towards greater environmental protection. To illustrate the significance of these issues, we then examine three forms of contractual regulatory style where trust relationships are critically important: responsive regulation, self-regulation and environmental agreements. Based on this analysis, we highlight the importance of trust-based relationships, and we argue that one of the greatest contributions of trust-based environmental regulation is to challenge how we think about regulation. Trust is often understood as enabling existing regulatory relationships or in the case of self-regulation as a complement to regulation. However, we argue that the real potential of trust is to open up new ways for participants in regulatory regimes to engage in collective action, to go beyond a perception of regulation as driven by the competing interests of individual actors, and thus, to open up new channels of influence for behavioural change towards greater environmental protection. Our analysis therefore has great relevance for future research and for on-going debates on the future of regulation. Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  17. Bidirectional Pressure-Regulator System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burke, Kenneth; Miller, John R.

    2008-01-01

    A bidirectional pressure-regulator system has been devised for use in a regenerative fuel cell system. The bidirectional pressure-regulator acts as a back-pressure regulator as gas flows through the bidirectional pressure-regulator in one direction. Later, the flow of gas goes through the regulator in the opposite direction and the bidirectional pressure-regulator operates as a pressure- reducing pressure regulator. In the regenerative fuel cell system, there are two such bidirectional regulators, one for the hydrogen gas and another for the oxygen gas. The flow of gases goes from the regenerative fuel cell system to the gas storage tanks when energy is being stored, and reverses direction, flowing from the storage tanks to the regenerative fuel cell system when the stored energy is being withdrawn from the regenerative fuel cell system. Having a single bidirectional regulator replaces two unidirectional regulators, plumbing, and multiple valves needed to reverse the flow direction. The term "bidirectional" refers to both the bidirectional nature of the gas flows and capability of each pressure regulator to control the pressure on either its upstream or downstream side, regardless of the direction of flow.

  18. Pubertal development and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Abreu, Ana Paula; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2016-01-01

    Puberty marks the end of childhood and is a period when individuals undergo physiological and psychological changes to achieve sexual maturation and fertility. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis controls puberty and reproduction and is tightly regulated by a complex network of excitatory and inhibitory factors. This axis is active in the embryonic and early postnatal stages of life and is subsequently restrained during childhood, and its reactivation culminates in puberty initiation. The mechanisms underlying this reactivation are not completely known. The age of puberty onset varies between individuals and the timing of puberty initiation is associated with several health outcomes in adult life. In this Series paper, we discuss pubertal markers, epidemiological trends of puberty initiation over time, and the mechanisms whereby genetic, metabolic, and other factors control secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone to determine initiation of puberty. PMID:26852256

  19. Regulation of Terpene Metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Rodney Croteau

    2004-03-14

    OAK-B135 Research over the last four years has progressed fairly closely along the lines initially proposed, with progress-driven expansion of Objectives 1, 2 and 3. Recent advances have developed from three research thrusts: 1. Random sequencing of an enriched peppermint oil gland cDNA library has given access to a large number of potential pathway and regulatory genes for test of function; 2. The availability of new DNA probes and antibodies has permitted investigation of developmental regulation and organization of terpenoid metabolism; and 3. The development of a transformation system for peppermint by colleagues at Purdue University has allowed direct transgenic testing of gene function and added a biotechnological component to the project. The current status of each of the original research objectives is outlined below.

  20. Regulation of Transcript Elongation

    PubMed Central

    Belogurov, Georgiy A.; Artsimovitch, Irina

    2015-01-01

    Bacteria lack subcellular compartments and harbor a single RNA polymerase that synthesizes both structural and protein-coding RNAs, which are cotranscriptionally processed by distinct pathways. Nascent rRNAs fold into elaborate secondary structures and associate with ribosomal proteins, whereas nascent mRNAs are translated by ribosomes. During elongation, nucleic acid signals and regulatory proteins modulate concurrent RNA-processing events, instruct RNA polymerase where to pause and terminate transcription, or act as roadblocks to the moving enzyme. Communications among complexes that carry out transcription, translation, repair, and other cellular processes ensure timely execution of the gene expression program and survival under conditions of stress. This network is maintained by auxiliary proteins that act as bridges between RNA polymerase, ribosome, and repair enzymes, blurring boundaries between separate information-processing steps and making assignments of unique regulatory functions meaningless. Understanding the regulation of transcript elongation thus requires genome-wide approaches, which confirm known and reveal new regulatory connections. PMID:26132790

  1. Factors regulating microglia activation

    PubMed Central

    Kierdorf, Katrin; Prinz, Marco

    2013-01-01

    Microglia are resident macrophages of the central nervous system (CNS) that display high functional similarities to other tissue macrophages. However, it is especially important to create and maintain an intact tissue homeostasis to support the neuronal cells, which are very sensitive even to minor changes in their environment. The transition from the “resting” but surveying microglial phenotype to an activated stage is tightly regulated by several intrinsic (e.g., Runx-1, Irf8, and Pu.1) and extrinsic factors (e.g., CD200, CX3CR1, and TREM2). Under physiological conditions, minor changes of those factors are sufficient to cause fatal dysregulation of microglial cell homeostasis and result in severe CNS pathologies. In this review, we discuss recent achievements that gave new insights into mechanisms that ensure microglia quiescence. PMID:23630462

  2. Regulation of cholesterol homeostasis.

    PubMed

    van der Wulp, Mariëtte Y M; Verkade, Henkjan J; Groen, Albert K

    2013-04-10

    Hypercholesterolemia is an important risk factor for cardiovascular disease. It is caused by a disturbed balance between cholesterol secretion into the blood versus uptake. The pathways involved are regulated via a complex interplay of enzymes, transport proteins, transcription factors and non-coding RNA's. The last two decades insight into underlying mechanisms has increased vastly but there are still a lot of unknowns, particularly regarding intracellular cholesterol transport. After decades of concentration on the liver, in recent years the intestine has come into focus as an important control point in cholesterol homeostasis. This review will discuss current knowledge of cholesterol physiology, with emphasis on cholesterol absorption, cholesterol synthesis and fecal excretion, and new (possible) therapeutic options for hypercholesterolemia.

  3. Transcription Regulation in Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Gehring, Alexandra M.; Walker, Julie E.

    2016-01-01

    The known diversity of metabolic strategies and physiological adaptations of archaeal species to extreme environments is extraordinary. Accurate and responsive mechanisms to ensure that gene expression patterns match the needs of the cell necessitate regulatory strategies that control the activities and output of the archaeal transcription apparatus. Archaea are reliant on a single RNA polymerase for all transcription, and many of the known regulatory mechanisms employed for archaeal transcription mimic strategies also employed for eukaryotic and bacterial species. Novel mechanisms of transcription regulation have become apparent by increasingly sophisticated in vivo and in vitro investigations of archaeal species. This review emphasizes recent progress in understanding archaeal transcription regulatory mechanisms and highlights insights gained from studies of the influence of archaeal chromatin on transcription. PMID:27137495

  4. Magnetostrictive Pressure Regulating System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richard, James A. (Inventor); Pickens, Herman L. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A magnetostrictive pressure regulating system includes a magnetostrictive valve that incorporates a magnetostrictive actuator with at least one current-carrying coil disposed thereabout. A pressure force sensor, in fluid communication with the fluid exiting the valve, includes (i) a magnetostrictive material, (ii) a magnetic field generator in proximity to the magnetostrictive material for inducing a magnetic field in and surrounding the magnetostrictive material wherein lines of magnetic flux passing through the magnetostrictive material are defined, and (iii) a sensor positioned adjacent to the magnetostrictive material and in the magnetic field for measuring changes in at least one of flux angle and flux density when the magnetostrictive material experiences an applied force that is aligned with the lines of magnetic flux. The pressure of the fluid exiting the valve causes the applied force. A controller coupled to the sensor and to the current-carrying coil adjusts a current supplied to the current-carrying coil based on the changes so-measured.

  5. Redox regulation: an introduction.

    PubMed

    Dietz, Karl-Josef; Scheibe, Renate

    2004-01-01

    The redox-state is a critical determinate of cell function, and any major imbalances can cause severe damage or death. The cellular redox status therefore needs to be sensed and modulated before such imbalances occur. Various redox-active components are involved in these processes, including thioredoxins, glutaredoxins and other thiol/disulphide-containing proteins. The cellular reactions for cytoprotection and for signalling are integrated with physiological redox-reactions in photosynthesis, assimilation and respiration. They also determine the developmental fate of the cell and finally decide on proliferation or cell death. An international workshop on redox regulation, organized by the research initiative FOR 387 of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft, was held in Bielefeld, Germany in 2002. A selection of articles originating from the meeting is printed in this issue of Physiologia Plantarum.

  6. Immune Regulation of Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Disis, Mary L.

    2010-01-01

    Innate and adaptive immune system cells play a major role in regulating the growth of cancer. Although it is commonly thought that an immune response localized to the tumor will inhibit cancer growth, it is clear that some types of inflammation induced in a tumor may also lead to cancer proliferation, invasion, and dissemination. Recent evidence suggests, however, that some patients with cancer can mount an antitumor immune response that has the potential to control or eliminate cancer. Indeed, a so-called “immune response” signature has been described in malignancy that is associated with improved outcomes in several tumor types. Moreover, the presence of specific subsets of T cells, which have the capability to penetrate tumor stroma and infiltrate deep into the parenchyma, identifies patients with an improved prognosis. Immune-based therapies have the potential to modulate the tumor microenvironment by eliciting immune system cells that will initiate acute inflammation that leads to tissue destruction. PMID:20516428

  7. Pubertal development and regulation.

    PubMed

    Abreu, Ana Paula; Kaiser, Ursula B

    2016-03-01

    Puberty marks the end of childhood and is a period when individuals undergo physiological and psychological changes to achieve sexual maturation and fertility. The hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal axis controls puberty and reproduction and is tightly regulated by a complex network of excitatory and inhibitory factors. This axis is active in the embryonic and early postnatal stages of life and is subsequently restrained during childhood, and its reactivation culminates in puberty initiation. The mechanisms underlying this reactivation are not completely known. The age of puberty onset varies between individuals and the timing of puberty initiation is associated with several health outcomes in adult life. In this Series paper, we discuss pubertal markers, epidemiological trends of puberty initiation over time, and the mechanisms whereby genetic, metabolic, and other factors control secretion of gonadotropin-releasing hormone to determine initiation of puberty.

  8. Endocannabinoids in cerebrovascular regulation

    PubMed Central

    Ruisanchez, Éva; Leszl-Ishiguro, Miriam; Sándor, Péter; Pacher, Pál

    2016-01-01

    The cerebral blood flow is tightly regulated by myogenic, endothelial, metabolic, and neural mechanisms under physiological conditions, and a large body of recent evidence indicates that inflammatory pathways have a major influence on the cerebral blood perfusion in certain central nervous system disorders, like hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and vascular dementia. All major cell types involved in cerebrovascular control pathways (i.e., smooth muscle, endothelium, neurons, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, and leukocytes) are capable of synthesizing endocannabinoids and/or express some or several of their target proteins [i.e., the cannabinoid 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) receptors and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel]. Therefore, the endocannabinoid system may importantly modulate the regulation of cerebral circulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in a very complex manner. Experimental data accumulated since the late 1990s indicate that the direct effect of cannabinoids on cerebral vessels is vasodilation mediated, at least in part, by CB1 receptors. Cannabinoid-induced cerebrovascular relaxation involves both a direct inhibition of smooth muscle contractility and a release of vasodilator mediator(s) from the endothelium. However, under stress conditions (e.g., in conscious restrained animals or during hypoxia and hypercapnia), cannabinoid receptor activation was shown to induce a reduction of the cerebral blood flow, probably via inhibition of the electrical and/or metabolic activity of neurons. Finally, in certain cerebrovascular pathologies (e.g., subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as traumatic and ischemic brain injury), activation of CB2 (and probably yet unidentified non-CB1/non-CB2) receptors appear to improve the blood perfusion of the brain via attenuating vascular inflammation. PMID:26825517

  9. [Regulation of terpene metabolism

    SciTech Connect

    Croteau, R.

    1989-11-09

    Terpenoid oils, resins, and waxes from plants are important renewable resources. The objective of this project is to understand the regulation of terpenoid metabolism using the monoterpenes (C[sub 10]) as a model. The pathways of monoterpene biosynthesis and catabolism have been established, and the relevant enzymes characterized. Developmental studies relating enzyme levels to terpene accumulation within the oil gland sites of synthesis, and work with bioregulators, indicate that monoterpene production is controlled by terpene cyclases, the enzymes catalyzing the first step of the monoterpene pathway. As the leaf oil glands mature, cyclase levels decline and monoterpene biosynthesis ceases. Yield then decreases as the monoterpenes undergo catabolism by a process involving conversion to a glycoside and transport from the leaf glands to the root. At this site, the terpenoid is oxidatively degraded to acetate that is recycled into other lipid metabolites. During the transition from terpene biosynthesis to catabolism, the oil glands undergo dramatic ultrastructural modification. Degradation of the producing cells results in mixing of previously compartmentized monoterpenes with the catabolic enzymes, ultimately leading to yield decline. This regulatory model is being applied to the formation of other terpenoid classes (C[sub 15] C[sub 20], C[sub 30], C[sub 40]) within the oil glands. Preliminary investigations on the formation of sesquiterpenes (C[sub 15]) suggest that the corresponding cyclases may play a lesser role in determining yield of these products, but that compartmentation effects are important. From these studies, a comprehensive scheme for the regulation of terpene metabolism is being constructed. Results from this project wail have important consequences for the yield and composition of terpenoid natural products that can be made available for industrial exploitation.

  10. Endocannabinoids in cerebrovascular regulation.

    PubMed

    Benyó, Zoltán; Ruisanchez, Éva; Leszl-Ishiguro, Miriam; Sándor, Péter; Pacher, Pál

    2016-04-01

    The cerebral blood flow is tightly regulated by myogenic, endothelial, metabolic, and neural mechanisms under physiological conditions, and a large body of recent evidence indicates that inflammatory pathways have a major influence on the cerebral blood perfusion in certain central nervous system disorders, like hemorrhagic and ischemic stroke, traumatic brain injury, and vascular dementia. All major cell types involved in cerebrovascular control pathways (i.e., smooth muscle, endothelium, neurons, astrocytes, pericytes, microglia, and leukocytes) are capable of synthesizing endocannabinoids and/or express some or several of their target proteins [i.e., the cannabinoid 1 and 2 (CB1 and CB2) receptors and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 ion channel]. Therefore, the endocannabinoid system may importantly modulate the regulation of cerebral circulation under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in a very complex manner. Experimental data accumulated since the late 1990s indicate that the direct effect of cannabinoids on cerebral vessels is vasodilation mediated, at least in part, by CB1 receptors. Cannabinoid-induced cerebrovascular relaxation involves both a direct inhibition of smooth muscle contractility and a release of vasodilator mediator(s) from the endothelium. However, under stress conditions (e.g., in conscious restrained animals or during hypoxia and hypercapnia), cannabinoid receptor activation was shown to induce a reduction of the cerebral blood flow, probably via inhibition of the electrical and/or metabolic activity of neurons. Finally, in certain cerebrovascular pathologies (e.g., subarachnoid hemorrhage, as well as traumatic and ischemic brain injury), activation of CB2 (and probably yet unidentified non-CB1/non-CB2) receptors appear to improve the blood perfusion of the brain via attenuating vascular inflammation.

  11. TFEB regulates lysosomal proteostasis.

    PubMed

    Song, Wensi; Wang, Fan; Savini, Marzia; Ake, Ashley; di Ronza, Alberto; Sardiello, Marco; Segatori, Laura

    2013-05-15

    Loss-of-function diseases are often caused by destabilizing mutations that lead to protein misfolding and degradation. Modulating the innate protein homeostasis (proteostasis) capacity may lead to rescue of native folding of the mutated variants, thereby ameliorating the disease phenotype. In lysosomal storage disorders (LSDs), a number of highly prevalent alleles have missense mutations that do not impair the enzyme's catalytic activity but destabilize its native structure, resulting in the degradation of the misfolded protein. Enhancing the cellular folding capacity enables rescuing the native, biologically functional structure of these unstable mutated enzymes. However, proteostasis modulators specific for the lysosomal system are currently unknown. Here, we investigate the role of the transcription factor EB (TFEB), a master regulator of lysosomal biogenesis and function, in modulating lysosomal proteostasis in LSDs. We show that TFEB activation results in enhanced folding, trafficking and lysosomal activity of a severely destabilized glucocerebrosidase (GC) variant associated with the development of Gaucher disease (GD), the most common LSD. TFEB specifically induces the expression of GC and of key genes involved in folding and lysosomal trafficking, thereby enhancing both the pool of mutated enzyme and its processing through the secretory pathway. TFEB activation also rescues the activity of a β-hexosaminidase mutant associated with the development of another LSD, Tay-Sachs disease, thus suggesting general applicability of TFEB-mediated proteostasis modulation to rescue destabilizing mutations in LSDs. In summary, our findings identify TFEB as a specific regulator of lysosomal proteostasis and suggest that TFEB may be used as a therapeutic target to rescue enzyme homeostasis in LSDs.

  12. Branded prescription drug fee. Final regulations, temporary regulations, and removal of temporary regulations.

    PubMed

    2014-07-28

    This document contains final regulations that provide guidance on the annual fee imposed on covered entities engaged in the business of manufacturing or importing branded prescription drugs. This fee was enacted by section 9008 of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act, as amended by section 1404 of the Health Care and Education Reconciliation Act of 2010. This document also withdraws the Branded Prescription Drug Fee temporary regulations and contains new temporary regulations regarding the definition of controlled group that apply beginning on January 1, 2015. The final regulations and the new temporary regulations affect persons engaged in the business of manufacturing or importing certain branded prescription drugs. The text of the temporary regulations in this document also serves as the text of proposed regulations set forth in a notice of proposed rulemaking (REG-123286-14) on this subject in the Proposed Rules section in this issue of the Federal Register.

  13. Regulating the regulators: serine/arginine-rich proteins under scrutiny.

    PubMed

    Risso, Guillermo; Pelisch, Federico; Quaglino, Ana; Pozzi, Berta; Srebrow, Anabella

    2012-10-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins are among the most studied splicing regulators. They constitute a family of evolutionarily conserved proteins that, apart from their initially identified and deeply studied role in splicing regulation, have been implicated in genome stability, chromatin binding, transcription elongation, mRNA stability, mRNA export and mRNA translation. Remarkably, this list of SR protein activities seems far from complete, as unexpected functions keep being unraveled. An intriguing aspect that awaits further investigation is how the multiple tasks of SR proteins are concertedly regulated within mammalian cells. In this article, we first discuss recent findings regarding the regulation of SR protein expression, activity and accessibility. We dive into recent studies describing SR protein auto-regulatory feedback loops involving different molecular mechanisms such asunproductive splicing, microRNA-mediated regulation and translational repression. In addition, we take into account another step of regulation of SR proteins, presenting new findings about a variety of post-translational modifications by proteomics approaches and how some of these modifications can regulate SR protein sub-cellular localization or stability. Towards the end, we focus in two recently revealed functions of SR proteins beyond mRNA biogenesis and metabolism, the regulation of micro-RNA processing and the regulation of small ubiquitin-like modifier (SUMO) conjugation. Copyright © 2012 International Union of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  14. ELECTRICAL REGULATING APPARATUS INCLUDING AN IONIC CURRENT REGULATOR

    DOEpatents

    Brackney, H.W.

    1958-08-12

    An apparatus is described for regulating the operation of an electromagmetic charged particle separator lt consists of an electrical circuit for innproving the regulation of the accelerating voltage of a calutron when the ionic current regulator control means is disconnected. The novel circuit arrangement connects the input of the ionic current regulator to a voltage divider. in association with a second voltage regulatora to furnish an accelerating voltage output which remains constant at a mean value instead of zero as has been the practice.

  15. Shame regulation in personality pathology.

    PubMed

    Schoenleber, Michelle; Berenbaum, Howard

    2012-05-01

    Drawing on extant work on shame and emotion regulation, this article proposes that three broad forms of maladaptive shame regulation strategies are fundamental in much of personality pathology: Prevention (e.g., dependence, fantasy), used preemptively, lessens potential for shame; Escape (e.g., social withdrawal, misdirection) reduces current or imminent shame; Aggression, used after shame begins, refocuses shame into anger directed at the self (e.g., physical self-harm) or others (e.g., verbal aggression). This article focuses on the contributions of shame regulation to the development and maintenance of personality pathology, highlighting how various maladaptive shame regulation strategies may lead to personality pathology symptoms, associated features, and dimensions. Consideration is also given to the possible shame-related constructs necessitating emotion regulation (e.g., shame aversion and proneness) and the points in the emotion process when regulation can occur.

  16. Transcriptional regulation during Drosophila spermatogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Cindy; Tarayrah, Lama; Chen, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Drosophila spermatogenesis has become a paradigmatic system for the study of mechanisms that regulate adult stem cell maintenance, proliferation and differentiation. The dramatic cellular differentiation process from germline stem cell (GSC) to mature sperm is accompanied by dynamic changes in gene expression, which are regulated at transcriptional, post-transcriptional (including translational) and post-translational levels. Post-transcriptional regulation has been proposed as a unique feature of germ cells. However, recent studies have provided new insights into transcriptional regulation during Drosophila spermatogenesis. Both signaling pathways and epigenetic mechanisms act to orchestrate the transcriptional regulation of distinct genes at different germ cell differentiation stages. Many of the regulatory pathways that control male gamete differentiation in Drosophila are conserved in mammals. Therefore, studies using Drosophila spermatogenesis will provide insight into the molecular mechanisms that regulate mammalian germ cell differentiation pathways. PMID:23087835

  17. Sustainable regulation of construction.

    PubMed

    2000-11-01

    The seminar examined the role building codes and regulations can have in promoting a more sustainable approach to construction, particularly through their application to non-industrial building materials. A range of building materials such as straw, bamboo, rammed earth, adobe, and cob (a mixture of clay and chopped straw) were described and illustrated by slides to show their building potential. The current codes have a prime concern to protect the health and safety of people from the built environment. They have been developed almost exclusively for mainstream industrial materials and methods of construction, which makes them difficult to use with alternative, indigenous, or non-industrial building materials, even though those materials may be considered more sustainable. The argument was put forward that with only one-third of the world population living in modern industrial buildings today, it is not sustainable to re-house the remaining rapidly expanding population in high technology dwellings. Many of the low technology building materials and methods now used by the majority of people in the world need only incremental improvement to be equal or superior to many of their industrial replacements. Since these can be more sustainable methods of building, there needs to be an acceptance of the use of alternative materials, particularly in the developing parts of the world, where they are being rejected for less sustainable industrial methods. However, many codes make it difficult to use non-industrial materials; indeed, many of the industrial materials would not meet the demands that must be now met if they were now being introduced as new materials. Consequently, there is a need to develop codes to facilitate the use of a wider range of materials than in current use, and research is needed to assist this development. Sustainable regulation should take into account the full range of real impacts that materials and systems have in areas such as resource use and

  18. New EU regulations in endoscopy.

    PubMed

    Wächter, M; Diekjobst, T

    1995-09-01

    As a result of European unification, new regulations valid within the territory of the European Union (EU) have been negotiated and published. As in other medical fields, the Medical Device Directive (MDD) is the most important new regulation and also effects endoscopy. In a transition period until June 1998, the MDD will be transposed into national law by the member states of the EU. Compliance with the MDD and other European regulations is indicated by the CE mark affixed to the product.

  19. Power-MOSFET Voltage Regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Miller, W. N.; Gray, O. E.

    1982-01-01

    Ninety-six parallel MOSFET devices with two-stage feedback circuit form a high-current dc voltage regulator that also acts as fully-on solid-state switch when fuel-cell out-put falls below regulated voltage. Ripple voltage is less than 20 mV, transient recovery time is less than 50 ms. Parallel MOSFET's act as high-current dc regulator and switch. Regulator can be used wherever large direct currents must be controlled. Can be applied to inverters, industrial furnaces photovoltaic solar generators, dc motors, and electric autos.

  20. Metabolic regulation via enzyme filamentation

    PubMed Central

    Aughey, Gabriel N.; Liu, Ji-Long

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Determining the mechanisms of enzymatic regulation is central to the study of cellular metabolism. Regulation of enzyme activity via polymerization-mediated strategies has been shown to be widespread, and plays a vital role in mediating cellular homeostasis. In this review, we begin with an overview of the filamentation of CTP synthase, which forms filamentous structures termed cytoophidia. We then highlight other important examples of the phenomenon. Moreover, we discuss recent data relating to the regulation of enzyme activity by compartmentalization into cytoophidia. Finally, we hypothesize potential roles for enzyme filament formation in the regulation of metabolism, development and disease. PMID:27098510

  1. Load regulating latch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Appleberry, W. T. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A load regulating mechanical latch is described that has a pivotally mounted latch element having a hook-shaped end with a strike roller-engaging laterally open hook for engaging a stationary strike roller. The latch element or hook is pivotally mounted in a clevis end of an elongated latch stem that is adapted for axial movement through an opening in a support plate or bracket mounted to a structural member. A coil spring is disposed over and around the extending latch stem and the lower end of the coil spring engages the support bracket. A thrust washer is removably attached to the other end of the latch stem and engages the other end of the coil spring and compresses the coil spring thereby preloading the spring and the latch element carried by the latch stem. The hook-shaped latch element has a limited degree of axial travel for loading caused by structural distortion which may change the relative positions of the latch element hook and the strike roller. Means are also provided to permit limited tilt of the latch element due to loading of the hook.

  2. NCAM regulates cell motility.

    PubMed

    Prag, Søren; Lepekhin, Eugene A; Kolkova, Kateryna; Hartmann-Petersen, Rasmus; Kawa, Anna; Walmod, Peter S; Belman, Vadym; Gallagher, Helen C; Berezin, Vladimir; Bock, Elisabeth; Pedersen, Nina

    2002-01-15

    Cell migration is required during development of the nervous system. The regulatory mechanisms for this process, however, are poorly elucidated. We show here that expression of or exposure to the neural cell adhesion molecule (NCAM) strongly affected the motile behaviour of glioma cells independently of homophilic NCAM interactions. Expression of the transmembrane 140 kDa isoform of NCAM (NCAM-140) caused a significant reduction in cellular motility, probably through interference with factors regulating cellular attachment, as NCAM-140-expressing cells exhibited a decreased attachment to a fibronectin substratum compared with NCAM-negative cells. Ectopic expression of the cytoplasmic part of NCAM-140 also inhibited cell motility, presumably via the non-receptor tyrosine kinase p59(fyn) with which NCAM-140 interacts. Furthermore, we showed that the extracellular part of NCAM acted as a paracrine inhibitor of NCAM-negative cell locomotion through a heterophilic interaction with a cell-surface receptor. As we showed that the two N-terminal immunoglobulin modules of NCAM, which are known to bind to heparin, were responsible for this inhibition, we presume that this receptor is a heparan sulfate proteoglycan. A model for the inhibitory effect of NCAM is proposed, which involves competition between NCAM and extracellular components for the binding to membrane-associated heparan sulfate proteoglycan.

  3. Regulation of sphingomyelin metabolism.

    PubMed

    Bienias, Kamil; Fiedorowicz, Anna; Sadowska, Anna; Prokopiuk, Sławomir; Car, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Sphingolipids (SFs) represent a large class of lipids playing diverse functions in a vast number of physiological and pathological processes. Sphingomyelin (SM) is the most abundant SF in the cell, with ubiquitous distribution within mammalian tissues, and particularly high levels in the Central Nervous System (CNS). SM is an essential element of plasma membrane (PM) and its levels are crucial for the cell function. SM content in a cell is strictly regulated by the enzymes of SM metabolic pathways, which activities create a balance between SM synthesis and degradation. The de novo synthesis via SM synthases (SMSs) in the last step of the multi-stage process is the most important pathway of SM formation in a cell. The SM hydrolysis by sphingomyelinases (SMases) increases the concentration of ceramide (Cer), a bioactive molecule, which is involved in cellular proliferation, growth and apoptosis. By controlling the levels of SM and Cer, SMSs and SMases maintain cellular homeostasis. Enzymes of SM cycle exhibit unique properties and diverse tissue distribution. Disturbances in their activities were observed in many CNS pathologies. This review characterizes the physiological roles of SM and enzymes controlling SM levels as well as their involvement in selected pathologies of the Central Nervous System, such as ischemia/hypoxia, Alzheimer disease (AD), Parkinson disease (PD), depression, schizophrenia and Niemann Pick disease (NPD). Copyright © 2016 Institute of Pharmacology, Polish Academy of Sciences. Published by Elsevier Urban & Partner Sp. z o.o. All rights reserved.

  4. Phosphorylation regulates mycobacterial proteasome.

    PubMed

    Anandan, Tripti; Han, Jaeil; Baun, Heather; Nyayapathy, Seeta; Brown, Jacob T; Dial, Rebekah L; Moltalvo, Juan A; Kim, Min-Seon; Yang, Seung Hwan; Ronning, Donald R; Husson, Robert N; Suh, Joowon; Kang, Choong-Min

    2014-09-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis possesses a proteasome system that is required for the microbe to resist elimination by the host immune system. Despite the importance of the proteasome in the pathogenesis of tuberculosis, the molecular mechanisms by which proteasome activity is controlled remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that the α-subunit (PrcA) of the M. tuberculosis proteasome is phosphorylated by the PknB kinase at three threonine residues (T84, T202, and T178) in a sequential manner. Furthermore, the proteasome with phosphorylated PrcA enhances the degradation of Ino1, a known proteasomal substrate, suggesting that PknB regulates the proteolytic activity of the proteasome. Previous studies showed that depletion of the proteasome and the proteasome-associated proteins decreases resistance to reactive nitrogen intermediates (RNIs) but increases resistance to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here we show that PknA phosphorylation of unprocessed proteasome β-subunit (pre-PrcB) and α-subunit reduces the assembly of the proteasome complex and thereby enhances the mycobacterial resistance to H2O2 and that H2O2 stress diminishes the formation of the proteasome complex in a PknA-dependent manner. These findings indicate that phosphorylation of the M. tuberculosis proteasome not only modulates proteolytic activity of the proteasome, but also affects the proteasome complex formation contributing to the survival of M. tuberculosis under oxidative stress conditions.

  5. Epigenetic regulation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Drummond, Elaine M; Gibney, Eileen R

    2013-07-01

    Research suggests that 65% of variation in obesity is genetic. However, much of the known genetic associations have little known function and their effect size small, thus the gene-environment interaction, including epigenetic influences on gene expression, is suggested to be an important factor in the susceptibilty to obesity. This review will explore the potential of epigenetic markers to influence expression of genes associated with obesity. Epigenetic changes in utero are known to have direct implications on the phenotype of the offspring. More recently work has focused on how such epigenetic changes continue to regulate risk of obesity from infancy through to adulthood. Work has shown that, for example, hypomethylation of the MC4 gene causes an increase in expression, and has a direct impact on appetite and intake, and thus influences risk of obesity. Similar influences are also seen in other aspects of obesity including inflammation and adiposity. Maternal diet during foetal development has many epigenetic implications, which affect the offspring's risk factors for obesity during childhood and adulthood, and even in subsequent generations. Genes associated with risk of obesity, are susceptible to epigenetic mutations, which have subsequent effects on disease mechanisms, such as appetite and impaired glucose and insulin tolerance.

  6. Mechanisms regulating glioma invasion.

    PubMed

    Paw, Ivy; Carpenter, Richard C; Watabe, Kounosuke; Debinski, Waldemar; Lo, Hui-Wen

    2015-06-28

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive, deadliest, and most common brain malignancy in adults. Despite the advances made in surgical techniques, radiotherapy and chemotherapy, the median survival for GBM patients has remained at a mere 14 months. GBM poses several unique challenges to currently available treatments for the disease. For example, GBM cells have the propensity to aggressively infiltrate/invade into the normal brain tissues and along the vascular tracks, which prevents complete resection of all malignant cells and limits the effect of localized radiotherapy while sparing normal tissue. Although anti-angiogenic treatment exerts anti-edematic effect in GBM, unfortunately, tumors progress with acquired increased invasiveness. Therefore, it is an important task to gain a deeper understanding of the intrinsic and post-treatment invasive phenotypes of GBM in hopes that the gained knowledge would lead to novel GBM treatments that are more effective and less toxic. This review will give an overview of some of the signaling pathways that have been shown to positively and negatively regulate GBM invasion, including, the PI3K/Akt, Wnt, sonic hedgehog-GLI1, and microRNAs. The review will also discuss several approaches to cancer therapies potentially altering GBM invasiveness. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Visibility: science and regulation.

    PubMed

    Watson, John G

    2002-06-01

    The 1999 Regional Haze Rule provides a context for this review of visibility, the science that describes it, and the use of that science in regulatory guidance. The scientific basis for the 1999 regulation is adequate. The deciview metric that tracks progress is an imperfect but objective measure of what people see near the prevailing visual range. The definition of natural visibility conditions is adequate for current planning, but it will need to be refined as visibility improves. Emissions from other countries will set achievable levels above those produced by natural sources. Some natural events, notably dust storms and wildfires, are episodic and cannot be represented by annual average background values or emission estimates. Sulfur dioxide (SO2) emission reductions correspond with lower sulfate (SO4(2-)) concentrations and visibility improvements in the regions where these have occurred. Non-road emissions have been growing more rapidly than emissions from other sources, which have remained stable or decreased since 1970. Simpler models representing transport, limiting precursor pollutants, and gas-to-particle equilibrium should be used to understand where and when emission reductions will be effective, rather than large complex models that have insufficient input and validation measurements. Examples of model-based source attribution show large differences among estimates from various modeling systems and with ambient measurements.

  8. [Ghrelin: beyond hunger regulation].

    PubMed

    Milke García, Maria del Pilar

    2005-01-01

    Man ingests food to mitigate hunger (mediated by physiological and biochemical signals), satisfy appetite (subjective sensation) and because of psychosocial reasons. Satiation biomarkers (stop feeding) are gastric distention and hormones (CCK, GLP-1) and satiety biomarkers (induce feeding) are food-induced thermogenesis, body temperature, glycaemia and also hormones (insulin, leptin and ghrelin). Oxidative metabolism/body composition, tryptophan/serotonin and proinflammatory cytokines are also implicated on hunger physiology. At the present time, ghrelin is the only known circulating orexigenic with potential on hunger/body weight regulation. It is a neuropeptide (endogenous ligand for the GH secretagogue) recently isolated from the oxyntic mucosa and synthesized mainly in the stomach. Its blood concentration depends on diet, hyperglucemia and adiposity/leptin. It is secreted 1-2 hours preprandially and its concentration decreases drastically during the postprandium. Ghrelin acts on the lateral hypothalamus and theoretically inhibits proinflammatory cytokine secretion and antagonizes leptin. Ghrelin physiologically increases food intake and stimulates adipogenesis, gastrointestinal motility and gastric acid secretion, and has other hormonal and cardiovascular functions. Ghrelin blood concentration is reduced in massive obesity, non-alcoholic steatohepatitis, polycystic ovary syndrome, acromegaly, hypogonadism, ageing, short bowel syndrome and rheumatoid arthritis; and increased in primary or secondary anorexia, starvation, chronic liver disease and celiac disease. Cerebral and peritoneal ghrelin administration (rats) and systemic administration (rats and healthy volunteers, cancer patients or patients on peritoneal dialysis) promotes food consumption and increases adiposity, of utmost importance in the treatment of patients with anorexia.

  9. Post-translational regulation enables robust p53 regulation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The tumor suppressor protein p53 plays important roles in DNA damage repair, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis. Due to its critical functions, the level of p53 is tightly regulated by a negative feedback mechanism to increase its tolerance towards fluctuations and disturbances. Interestingly, the p53 level is controlled by post-translational regulation rather than transcriptional regulation in this feedback mechanism. Results We analyzed the dynamics of this feedback to understand whether post-translational regulation provides any advantages over transcriptional regulation in regard to disturbance rejection. When a disturbance happens, even though negative feedback reduces the steady-state error, it can cause a system to become less stable and transiently overshoots, which may erroneously trigger downstream reactions. Therefore, the system needs to balance the trade-off between steady-state and transient errors. Feedback control and adaptive estimation theories revealed that post-translational regulation achieves a better trade-off than transcriptional regulation, contributing to a more steady level of p53 under the influence of noise and disturbances. Furthermore, post-translational regulation enables cells to respond more promptly to stress conditions with consistent amplitude. However, for better disturbance rejection, the p53- Mdm2 negative feedback has to pay a price of higher stochastic noise. Conclusions Our analyses suggest that the p53-Mdm2 feedback favors regulatory mechanisms that provide the optimal trade-offs for dynamic control. PMID:23992617

  10. 75 FR 68217 - Acquisition Regulation: Agency Supplementary Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-05

    ... Acquisition Regulation (DEAR) on DOE Management and Operating Contracts to make changes to conform to the... does not alter substantive rights or obligations under current law. DATES: Effective Date: December 6... Regulations, Part 970--DOE Management and Operating Contracts to conform it to the FAR. None of today's...

  11. 78 FR 31551 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Commerce Patent Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-24

    ... Regulation; Submission for OMB Review; Commerce Patent Regulations AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DOD... approved information collection requirement concerning Department of Commerce patent regulations. A notice... Collection 9000- 0095, Commerce Patent Regulations, by any of the following methods: Regulations.gov :...

  12. Synthesis and Optimization of New 3,6-Disubstitutedindole Derivatives and Their Evaluation as Anticancer Agents Targeting the MDM2/MDMx Complex.

    PubMed

    Rezk, Mohamed Salah; Abdel-Halim, Mohammad; Keeton, Adam; Franklin, Derek; Bauer, Matthias; Boeckler, Frank Michael; Engel, Matthias; Hartmann, Rolf Wolfgang; Zhang, Yanping; Piazza, Gary Anthony; Abadi, Ashraf Hassan

    2016-01-01

    Twelve derivatives of the general formula 3-substituted-6-chloroindoles were synthesized and tested for their growth inhibitory effects versus p53(+/+) colorectal cancer HCT116 and its p53 knockout isogenic cells; colorectal cancer cell p53(-/-) SW480; the lung cancer cell line p53(-/-) H1299; mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF) p53(+/+) and its p53 knockout isogenic cells. The compounds were also evaluated for their ability to induce p53 nuclear translocation and binding to murine double minute 2 (MDM2) and murine double minute 4 (MDM4). Of these, compound 5a was the most active in inhibiting the growth of cells, with selectivity towards the p53(+/+) cell lines, and it showed stronger binding to MDM4 rather than MDM2. The activity profile of compound 5a is strongly similar to that of Nutlin-3.

  13. Glucocorticoid Regulation of Reproduction.

    PubMed

    Geraghty, Anna C; Kaufer, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that stress, measured by increased glucocorticoid secretion, leads to profound reproductive dysfunction. In times of stress, glucocorticoids activate many parts of the fight or flight response, mobilizing energy and enhancing survival, while inhibiting metabolic processes that are not necessary for survival in the moment. This includes reproduction, an energetically costly procedure that is very finely regulated. In the short term, this is meant to be beneficial, so that the organism does not waste precious energy needed for survival. However, long-term inhibition can lead to persistent reproductive dysfunction, even if no longer stressed. This response is mediated by the increased levels of circulating glucocorticoids, which orchestrate complex inhibition of the entire reproductive axis. Stress and glucocorticoids exhibits both central and peripheral inhibition of the reproductive hormonal axis. While this has long been recognized as an issue, understanding the complex signaling mechanism behind this inhibition remains somewhat of a mystery. What makes this especially difficult is attempting to differentiate the many parts of both of these hormonal axes, and new neuropeptide discoveries in the last decade in the reproductive field have added even more complexity to an already complicated system. Glucocorticoids (GCs) and other hormones within the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis (as well as contributors in the sympathetic system) can modulate the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis at all levels-GCs can inhibit release of GnRH from the hypothalamus, inhibit gonadotropin synthesis and release in the pituitary, and inhibit testosterone synthesis and release from the gonads, while also influencing gametogenesis and sexual behavior. This chapter is not an exhaustive review of all the known literature, however is aimed at giving a brief look at both the central and peripheral effects of glucocorticoids on the reproductive function.

  14. The Universities and Federal Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, John C.

    The impact of increasing federal regulation on American universities is discussed based on an informal survey of senior academic and administrative officials in 13 public and private universities. As government regulation is becoming more intensive and compliance more resource- and time-consuming, government is perceived as having little…

  15. Teachers' Regulation of the Classroom.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muir, William K., Jr.

    The nature of teachers' control in classrooms is explored in order: to understand the tension created when noneducators superimpose their rules on the regime of teachers at work and to learn something of a general nature about the antagonism between regulators and those they regulate. Teachers' regulatory powers are based on coercion, exchange, or…

  16. Frequency-controlled voltage regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mclyman, W. T.

    1980-01-01

    Converting input ac to higher frequency reduce size and weight and makes possible unique kind of regulation. Since conversion frequency is above range of human hearing, supply generated on audible noise. It also exploits highfrequency conversion features to regulate its output voltage in novel way. Circuit is inherently short-circuit proof.

  17. Regulated proteolysis in light signaling.

    PubMed

    Hoecker, Ute

    2005-10-01

    Photoreceptors regulate many aspects of development throughout the life cycle of a plant. Recent advances have demonstrated the importance of ubiquitin-mediated proteolysis in the control of development by light. Both some of the photoreceptors themselves and, in particular, transcription factors that are involved in transducing the light signal are subject to regulated ubiquitination and subsequent degradation by the 26S proteasome.

  18. Gravity and body mass regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, L. E.; Horwitz, B. A.; Fuller, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    The effects of altered gravity on body mass, food intake, energy expenditure, and body composition are examined. Metabolic adjustments are reviewed in maintenance of energy balance, neural regulation, and humoral regulation are discussed. Experiments with rats indicate that genetically obese rats respond differently to hypergravity than lean rats.

  19. Team Regulation, Regulation of Social Activities or Co-Regulation: Different Labels for Effective Regulation of Learning in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saab, Nadira

    2012-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) is an approach to learning in which learners can actively and collaboratively construct knowledge by means of interaction and joint problem solving. Regulation of learning is especially important in the domain of CSCL. Next to the regulation of task performance, the interaction between learners who…

  20. Deceptive Business Practices: Federal Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    Federal regulations to prevent deceptive advertising seek to balance the advertiser's freedom of speech with protection of the consumer. This paper discusses what the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) has done to regulate advertising and evaluates the adequacy of its controls. The commission uses cease-and-desist orders, affirmative disclosure,…

  1. Regulating Pornography: A Public Dilemma.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thompson, Margaret E.; And Others

    1990-01-01

    Examines attitudes toward sex and pornography by means of a telephone survey of Dane County, Wisconsin, adults. Describes survey questions about sexual attitudes, perceived effects of pornography, and pornography regulation. Concludes that adults who feel more strongly that pornography has negative effects are more opposed to its regulation. (SG)

  2. NIPF Landowner's view of regulation.

    Treesearch

    Rebecca L. Johnson; Ralph J. Alig; Eric Moore; Robert J. Moulton

    1997-01-01

    As awareness and concern regarding the environmental consequences of forest practices have increased, new or amended forest regulations have been placed on nonindustrial private forestlands (NIPF) in the Pacific Northwest (Salazar and Cubbage 1990; Quigley 1992). Debates over whether forest practice regulations are providing public benefits or preventing public harm...

  3. Team Regulation, Regulation of Social Activities or Co-Regulation: Different Labels for Effective Regulation of Learning in CSCL

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saab, Nadira

    2012-01-01

    Computer-supported collaborative learning (CSCL) is an approach to learning in which learners can actively and collaboratively construct knowledge by means of interaction and joint problem solving. Regulation of learning is especially important in the domain of CSCL. Next to the regulation of task performance, the interaction between learners who…

  4. Design for pressure regulating components

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wichmann, H.

    1973-01-01

    The design development for Pressure Regulating Components included a regulator component trade-off study with analog computer performance verification to arrive at a final optimized regulator configuration for the Space Storable Propulsion Module, under development for a Jupiter Orbiter mission. This application requires the pressure regulator to be capable of long-term fluorine exposure. In addition, individual but basically identical (for purposes of commonality) units are required for separate oxidizer and fuel pressurization. The need for dual units requires improvement in the regulation accuracy over present designs. An advanced regulator concept was prepared featuring redundant bellows, all metallic/ceramic construction, friction-free guidance of moving parts, gas damping, and the elimination of coil springs normally used for reference forces. The activities included testing of actual size seat/poppet components to determine actual discharge coefficients and flow forces. The resulting data was inserted into the computer model of the regulator. Computer simulation of the propulsion module performance over two mission profiles indicated satisfactory minimization of propellant residual requirements imposed by regulator performance uncertainties.

  5. Affect and Self-Regulation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malmivuori, Marja-Liisa

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents affect as an essential aspect of students' self-reflection and self-regulation. The introduced concepts of self-system and self-system process stress the importance of self-appraisals of personal competence and agency in affective responses and self-regulation in problem solving. Students are viewed as agents who constantly…

  6. The Universities and Federal Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crowley, John C.

    The impact of increasing federal regulation on American universities is discussed based on an informal survey of senior academic and administrative officials in 13 public and private universities. As government regulation is becoming more intensive and compliance more resource- and time-consuming, government is perceived as having little…

  7. Strategic automation of emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Gallo, Inge Schweiger; Keil, Andreas; McCulloch, Kathleen C; Rockstroh, Brigitte; Gollwitzer, Peter M

    2009-01-01

    As implementation intentions are a powerful self-regulation tool for thought and action (meta-analysis by P. M. Gollwitzer & P. Sheeran, 2006), the present studies were conducted to address their effectiveness in regulating emotional reactivity. Disgust- (Study 1) and fear- (Study 2) eliciting stimuli were viewed under 3 different self-regulation instructions: the goal intention to not get disgusted or frightened, respectively, this goal intention furnished with an implementation intention (i.e., an if-then plan), and a no-self-regulation control group. Only implementation-intention participants succeeded in reducing their disgust and fear reactions as compared to goal-intention and control participants. In Study 3, electrocortical correlates (using dense-array electroencephalography) revealed differential early visual activity in response to spider slides in ignore implementation-intention participants, as reflected in a smaller P1. Theoretical and applied implications of the present findings for emotion regulation via implementation intentions are discussed.

  8. Regulation of GMOs in China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yinliang

    2008-12-01

    Genetically modified organisms (GMOs) are created by biotechnology to serve people with much benefit while may impose risks to ecological environment and human health and therefore need careful regulation. During the past two decades, GMOs have been well developed in China and so has their corresponding regulation. This paper reviews and comments the multiple aspects of mainly the agricultural GMOs, including their safety assessment, control measures, trade activities, import, labels, and GM food, which have been prescribed by the corresponding laws, regulations and administrative measures. It is held that till present a framework for regulation of agricultural GMOs and GM food has been established basically in China, while a more comprehensive system for regulation of all kinds of GMOs and all kinds of related activities is still needed at present and in the future.

  9. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation

    DOEpatents

    Church, George M.; Mali, Prashant G.; Esvelt, Kevin M.

    2016-02-23

    Methods of modulating expression of a target nucleic acid in a cell are provided including introducing into the cell a first foreign nucleic acid encoding one or more RNAs complementary to DNA, wherein the DNA includes the target nucleic acid, introducing into the cell a second foreign nucleic acid encoding a nuclease-null Cas9 protein that binds to the DNA and is guided by the one or more RNAs, introducing into the cell a third foreign nucleic acid encoding a transcriptional regulator protein or domain, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein, and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain are expressed, wherein the one or more RNAs, the nuclease-null Cas9 protein and the transcriptional regulator protein or domain co-localize to the DNA and wherein the transcriptional regulator protein or domain regulates expression of the target nucleic acid.

  10. Regulating chemicals: law, science, and the unbearable burdens of regulation.

    PubMed

    Silbergeld, Ellen K; Mandrioli, Daniele; Cranor, Carl F

    2015-03-18

    The challenges of regulating industrial chemicals remain unresolved in the United States. The Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) of 1976 was the first legislation to extend coverage to the regulation of industrial chemicals, both existing and newly registered. However, decisions related to both law and science that were made in passing this law inevitably rendered it ineffectual. Attempts to fix these shortcomings have not been successful. In light of the European Union's passage of innovative principles and requirements for chemical regulation, it is no longer possible to deny the opportunity and need for reform in US law and practice.

  11. Precipitated silica as flow regulator.

    PubMed

    Müller, Anne-Kathrin; Ruppel, Joanna; Drexel, Claus-Peter; Zimmermann, Ingfried

    2008-08-07

    Flow regulators are added to solid pharmaceutical formulations to improve the flow properties of the powder mixtures. The primary particles of the flow regulators exist in the form of huge agglomerates which are broken down into smaller aggregates during the blending process. These smaller aggregates adsorb at the surface of the solid's grains and thus diminish attractive Van-der-Waals-forces by increasing the roughness of the host's surface. In most cases amorphous silica is used as flow additive but material properties like particle size or bond strength influence the desagglomeration tendency of the agglomerates and thus the flow regulating potency of each silica. For some silica types we will show that the differences in their flow regulating potency are due to the rate and extent by which they are able to cover the surface of the host particles. Binary powder mixtures consisting of a pharmaceutical excipient and an added flow regulator were blended in a Turbula mixer for a defined period of time. As pharmaceutical excipient corn starch was used. The flow regulators were represented by a selection of amorphous silicon dioxide types like a commercial fumed silica and various types of SIPERNAT precipitated silica provided by Evonik-Degussa GmbH, Hanau, Germany. Flowability parameters of the mixtures were characterized by means of a tensile strength tester. The reduction of tensile strength with the blending time can be correlated with an increase in fragmentation of the flow regulator.

  12. Mental fatigue impairs emotion regulation.

    PubMed

    Grillon, Christian; Quispe-Escudero, David; Mathur, Ambika; Ernst, Monique

    2015-06-01

    Because healthy physical and mental functioning depends on the ability to regulate emotions, it is important to identify moderators of such regulations. Whether mental fatigue, subsequent to the depletion of cognitive resources, impairs explicit emotion regulation to negative stimuli is currently unknown. This study explored this possibility. In a within-subject design over 2 separate sessions, healthy individuals performed easy (control session) or difficult (depletion session) cognitive tasks. Subsequently, they were presented with neutral and negative pictures, with instructions to either maintain or regulate (i.e., reduce) the emotions evoked by the pictures. Emotional reactivity was probed with the startle reflex. The negative pictures evoked a similar aversive state in the control and depletion sessions as measured by startle potentiation. However, subjects were able to down-regulate their aversive state only in the control session, not in the depletion session. These results indicate that mental fatigue following performance of cognitive tasks impairs emotion regulation without affecting emotional reactivity. These findings suggest that mental fatigue needs to be incorporated into models of emotion regulation.

  13. 7 CFR 301.89-5 - Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas... § 301.89-5 Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas. (a) Any regulated article may be moved... is met: (i) The regulated article was moved into the regulated area from an area that is not...

  14. Wolf population regulation revisited: again

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McRoberts, Ronald E.; Mech, L. David

    2014-01-01

    The long-accepted conclusion that wolf density is regulated by nutrition was recently challenged, and the conclusion was reached that, at greater levels of prey biomass, social factors such as intraspecific strife and territoriality tend to regulate wolf density. We reanalyzed the data used in that study for 2 reasons: 1) we disputed the use of 2 data points, and 2) because of recognized heteroscedasticity, we used weighted-regression analysis instead of the unweighted regressions used in the original study. We concluded that the data do not support the hypothesis that wolf densities are regulated by social factors.

  15. Emotional regulation strategies and negotiation.

    PubMed

    Yurtsever, Gülçimen

    2004-12-01

    This study examined the relationship between profit achievement and emotional regulation strategies, using Kelley's Negotiation Game to measure profit achievement. The game involves bargaining for the prices of three products. Emotional Regulation Strategies were measured by The Emotional Regulation Questionnaire. Scores were obtained from 104 lower level managers of a bank in Turkey. Their average age was 32.0 yr. (SD=3.7), (39 women and 65 men). A correlation of .65 (p<.01) was obtained between scores on profit achievement with scores on Cognitive Reappraisal strategy and -.50 (p<.01) with scores on Suppression strategy.

  16. The regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Bulley, Sean; Laing, William

    2016-10-01

    We review the regulation of ascorbate (vitamin C) biosynthesis, focusing on the l-galactose pathway. We discuss the regulation of ascorbate biosynthesis at the level of gene transcription (both repression and enhancement) and translation (feedback inhibition of translation by ascorbate concentration) and discuss the eight proteins that have been demonstrated to date to affect ascorbate concentration in plant tissues. GDP-galactose phosphorylase (GGP) and GDP-mannose epimerase are critical steps that regulate ascorbate biosynthesis. These and other biosynthetic genes are controlled at the transcriptional level, while GGP is also controlled at the translational level. Ascorbate feedback on enzyme activity has not been observed unequivocally.

  17. Voltage Regulators for Photovoltaic Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delombard, R.

    1986-01-01

    Two simple circuits developed to provide voltage regulation for highvoltage (i.e., is greater than 75 volts) and low-voltage (i.e., is less than 36 volts) photovoltaic/battery power systems. Use of these circuits results in voltage regulator small, low-cost, and reliable, with very low power dissipation. Simple oscillator circuit controls photovoltaic-array current to regulate system voltage and control battery charging. Circuit senses battery (and system) voltage and adjusts array current to keep battery voltage from exceeding maximum voltage.

  18. Flow-compensating pressure regulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baehr, E. F.

    1979-01-01

    Pressure regulator developed for use with cataract-surgery instrument controls intraocular pressure during substantial variations in flow rate of infusion fluid. Device may be applicable to variety of eye-surgery instruments.

  19. APPARATUS FOR REGULATING HIGH VOLTAGE

    DOEpatents

    Morrison, K.G.

    1951-03-20

    This patent describes a high-voltage regulator of the r-f type wherein the modulation of the r-f voltage is accomplished at a high level, resulting in good stabilization over a large range of load conditions.

  20. How is Pet Coke Regulated?

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    No emission standards apply specifically to the storage and handling of petroleum coke, but National Ambient Air Quality Standards (NAAQS) for particulate matter (PM10) do apply, so states have regulations as part of their Air State Implementation Plan.

  1. State Regulation of Private Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lines, Patricia M.

    1982-01-01

    Examines state laws and the actions of various courts on home instruction and unauthorized educational programs. Suggests reforming the regulation of private education through legislative action that requires periodic testing as an alternative to compulsory school attendance. (Author/MLF)

  2. State Regulation of Private Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lines, Patricia M.

    1982-01-01

    Examines state laws and the actions of various courts on home instruction and unauthorized educational programs. Suggests reforming the regulation of private education through legislative action that requires periodic testing as an alternative to compulsory school attendance. (Author/MLF)

  3. Targeting epigenetic regulations in cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ning, Bo; Li, Wenyuan; Zhao, Wei; Wang, Rongfu

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation of gene expression is a dynamic and reversible process with DNA methylation, histone modifications, and chromatin remodeling. Recently, groundbreaking studies have demonstrated the importance of DNA and chromatin regulatory proteins from different aspects, including stem cell, development, and tumor genesis. Abnormal epigenetic regulation is frequently associated with diseases and drugs targeting DNA methylation and histone acetylation have been approved for cancer therapy. Although the network of epigenetic regulation is more complex than people expect, new potential druggable chromatin-associated proteins are being discovered and tested for clinical application. Here we review the key proteins that mediate epigenetic regulations through DNA methylation, the acetylation and methylation of histones, and the reader proteins that bind to modified histones. We also discuss cancer associations and recent progress of pharmacological development of these proteins. PMID:26508480

  4. Regulation of TAZ in cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xin; Lei, Qun-Ying

    2016-08-01

    TAZ, a transcriptional coactivator with PDZ-binding motif, is encoded by WWTR1 gene (WW domain containing transcription regulator 1). TAZ is tightly regulated in the hippo pathway-dependent and -independent manner in response to a wide range of extracellular and intrinsic signals, including cell density, cell polarity, F-actin related mechanical stress, ligands of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), cellular energy status, hypoxia and osmotic stress. Besides its role in normal tissue development, TAZ plays critical roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, invasion, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and stemness in multiple human cancers. We discuss here the regulators and regulation of TAZ. We also highlight the tumorigenic roles of TAZ and its potential therapeutic impact in human cancers.

  5. Gastrointestinal regulation of food intake

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, David E.; Overduin, Joost

    2007-01-01

    Despite substantial fluctuations in daily food intake, animals maintain a remarkably stable body weight, because overall caloric ingestion and expenditure are exquisitely matched over long periods of time, through the process of energy homeostasis. The brain receives hormonal, neural, and metabolic signals pertaining to body-energy status and, in response to these inputs, coordinates adaptive alterations of energy intake and expenditure. To regulate food consumption, the brain must modulate appetite, and the core of appetite regulation lies in the gut-brain axis. This Review summarizes current knowledge regarding the neuroendocrine regulation of food intake by the gastrointestinal system, focusing on gastric distention, intestinal and pancreatic satiation peptides, and the orexigenic gastric hormone ghrelin. We highlight mechanisms governing nutrient sensing and peptide secretion by enteroendocrine cells, including novel taste-like pathways. The increasingly nuanced understanding of the mechanisms mediating gut-peptide regulation and action provides promising targets for new strategies to combat obesity and diabetes. PMID:17200702

  6. Chloroplast signaling: retrograde regulation revelations.

    PubMed

    Beale, Samuel I

    2011-05-24

    Developing chloroplasts are able to communicate their status to the nucleus and regulate expression of genes whose products are needed for photosynthesis. Heme is revealed to be a signaling molecule for this retrograde communication.

  7. 77 FR 13155 - Waste Regulation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NATIONAL SCIENCE FOUNDATION Waste Regulation AGENCY: National Science Foundation. ACTION: Notice of permit modification request... Martin personnel will be assuming responsibility for waste management activities. Those activities are...

  8. 7 CFR 987.48 - Container regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Container regulation. 987.48 Section 987.48... IN RIVERSIDE COUNTY, CALIFORNIA Order Regulating Handling Container Regulation § 987.48 Container regulation. Whenever the Committee deems it advisable to establish a container regulation for any variety...

  9. 75 FR 24394 - Somalia Sanctions Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-05-05

    ... Other Laws and Regulations Sec. 551.101 Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. Subpart B... Laws and Regulations Sec. 551.101 Relation of this part to other laws and regulations. This part is... or issued pursuant to any other provision of law or regulation authorizes any transaction...

  10. Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-08-16

    energy numbers are 2.3X and 5.7X the theoretical values for lithium thionyl chloride respectively (1100 Whr/liter and 590 Whr/kg), which has the...REPORT Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell 14. ABSTRACT 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: Advances in lithium primary battery technology, which serves as the...Prescribed by ANSI Std. Z39.18 - 16-Aug-2010 Self Regulating Fiber Fuel Cell Report Title ABSTRACT Advances in lithium primary battery technology

  11. Epigenetic regulation of persistent pain

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Guang; Ren, Ke; Dubner, Ronald

    2014-01-01

    Persistent or chronic pain is tightly associated with various environmental changes and linked to abnormal gene expression within cells processing nociceptive signaling. Epigenetic regulation governs gene expression in response to environmental cues. Recent animal model and clinical studies indicate that epigenetic regulation plays an important role in the development/maintenance of persistent pain and, possibly the transition of acute pain to chronic pain, thus shedding light in a direction for development of new therapeutics for persistent pain. PMID:24948399

  12. Chromatin regulators: weaving epigenetic nets.

    PubMed

    Hernández-Muñoz, Inmaculada

    2010-10-01

    In multicellular organisms differentiated cells must maintain their cellular memory, which will be faithfully inherited and maintained by their progeny. In addition, these specialized cells are exposed to specific environmental and cell-intrinsic signals and will have to appropriately respond to them. Some of these stimuli lead to changes in a subset of genes or to a genome-wide reprogramming of the cells that will remain after stimuli removal and, in some instances, will be inherited by the daughter cells. The molecular substrate that integrates cellular memory and plasticity is the chromatin, a complex of DNA and histones unique to eukaryotes. The nucleosome is the fundamental unit of the chromatin and nucleosomal organization defines different chromatin conformations. Chromatin regulators affect chromatin conformation and accessibility by covalently modifying the DNA or the histones, substituting histone variants, remodeling the nucleosome position or modulating chromatin looping and folding. These regulators frequently act in multiprotein complexes and highly specific interplays among chromatin marks and different chromatin regulators allow a remarkable array of possibilities. Therefore, chromatin regulator nets act to propagate the conformation of different chromatin regions through DNA replication and mitosis, and to remodel the chromatin fiber to regulate the accessibility of the DNA to transcription factors and to the transcription and repair machineries. Here, the state-of-the-art of the best-known chromatin regulators is reviewed.

  13. YCRD: Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wei-Sheng; Hsieh, Yen-Chen; Lai, Fu-Jou

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, the precise transcriptional control of gene expression is typically achieved through combinatorial regulation using cooperative transcription factors (TFs). Therefore, a database which provides regulatory associations between cooperative TFs and their target genes is helpful for biologists to study the molecular mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Because there is no such kind of databases in the public domain, this prompts us to construct a database, called Yeast Combinatorial Regulation Database (YCRD), which deposits 434,197 regulatory associations between 2535 cooperative TF pairs and 6243 genes. The comprehensive collection of more than 2500 cooperative TF pairs was retrieved from 17 existing algorithms in the literature. The target genes of a cooperative TF pair (e.g. TF1-TF2) are defined as the common target genes of TF1 and TF2, where a TF’s experimentally validated target genes were downloaded from YEASTRACT database. In YCRD, users can (i) search the target genes of a cooperative TF pair of interest, (ii) search the cooperative TF pairs which regulate a gene of interest and (iii) identify important cooperative TF pairs which regulate a given set of genes. We believe that YCRD will be a valuable resource for yeast biologists to study combinatorial regulation of gene expression. YCRD is available at http://cosbi.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/ or http://cosbi2.ee.ncku.edu.tw/YCRD/. PMID:27392072

  14. Emotion regulation and sport performance.

    PubMed

    Wagstaff, Christopher R D

    2014-08-01

    This study used a single-blind, within-participant, counterbalanced, repeated-measures design to examine the relationship between emotional self-regulation and sport performance. Twenty competitive athletes completed four laboratory-based conditions; familiarization, control, emotion suppression, and nonsuppression. In each condition participants completed a 10-km cycling time trial requiring self-regulation. In the experimental conditions participants watched an upsetting video before performing the cycle task. When participants suppressed their emotional reactions to the video (suppression condition) they completed the cycling task slower, generated lower mean power outputs, and reached a lower maximum heart rate and perceived greater physical exertion than when they were given no self-regulation instructions during the video (nonsuppression condition) and received no video treatment (control condition). The findings suggest that emotional self-regulation resource impairment affects perceived exertion, pacing and sport performance and extends previous research examining the regulation of persistence on physical tasks. The results are discussed in line with relevant psychophysiological theories of self-regulation and fatigue and pertinent potential implications for practice regarding performance and well-being are suggested.

  15. Precision Adjustable Liquid Regulator (ALR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meinhold, R.; Parker, M.

    2004-10-01

    A passive mechanical regulator has been developed for the control of fuel or oxidizer flow to a 450N class bipropellant engine for use on commercial and interplanetary spacecraft. There are several potential benefits to the propulsion system, depending on mission requirements and spacecraft design. This system design enables more precise control of main engine mixture ratio and inlet pressure, and simplifies the pressurization system by transferring the function of main engine flow rate control from the pressurization/propellant tank assemblies, to a single component, the ALR. This design can also reduce the thermal control requirements on the propellant tanks, avoid costly Qualification testing of biprop engines for missions with more stringent requirements, and reduce the overall propulsion system mass and power usage. In order to realize these benefits, the ALR must meet stringent design requirements. The main advantage of this regulator over other units available in the market is that it can regulate about its nominal set point to within +/-0.85%, and change its regulation set point in flight +/-4% about that nominal point. The set point change is handled actively via a stepper motor driven actuator, which converts rotary into linear motion to affect the spring preload acting on the regulator. Once adjusted to a particular set point, the actuator remains in its final position unpowered, and the regulator passively maintains outlet pressure. The very precise outlet regulation pressure is possible due to new technology developed by Moog, Inc. which reduces typical regulator mechanical hysteresis to near zero. The ALR requirements specified an outlet pressure set point range from 225 to 255 psi, and equivalent water flow rates required were in the 0.17 lb/sec range. The regulation output pressure is maintained at +/-2 psi about the set point from a P (delta or differential pressure) of 20 to over 100 psid. Maximum upstream system pressure was specified at 320 psi

  16. Regulation Development for Drinking Water Contaminants

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    To explain what process and information underlies regulations including how the Safe Drinking Water Act applies to regulation development i.e. how does the drinking water law translate into regulations.

  17. Post regulation circuit with energy storage

    DOEpatents

    Ball, Don G.; Birx, Daniel L.; Cook, Edward G.

    1992-01-01

    A charge regulation circuit provides regulation of an unregulated voltage supply and provides energy storage. The charge regulation circuit according to the present invention provides energy storage without unnecessary dissipation of energy through a resistor as in prior art approaches.

  18. 77 FR 43082 - Federal Acquisition Regulation; Information Collection; Commerce Patent Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-23

    ... Regulation; Information Collection; Commerce Patent Regulations AGENCIES: Department of Defense (DOD... approved information collection requirement concerning Department of Commerce patent regulations. Public...: Submit comments identified by Information Collection 9000- 0095, Commerce Patent Regulations, by any of...

  19. Thyroid Hormone Regulation of Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mullur, Rashmi; Liu, Yan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) is required for normal development as well as regulating metabolism in the adult. The thyroid hormone receptor (TR) isoforms, α and β, are differentially expressed in tissues and have distinct roles in TH signaling. Local activation of thyroxine (T4), to the active form, triiodothyronine (T3), by 5′-deiodinase type 2 (D2) is a key mechanism of TH regulation of metabolism. D2 is expressed in the hypothalamus, white fat, brown adipose tissue (BAT), and skeletal muscle and is required for adaptive thermogenesis. The thyroid gland is regulated by thyrotropin releasing hormone (TRH) and thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH). In addition to TRH/TSH regulation by TH feedback, there is central modulation by nutritional signals, such as leptin, as well as peptides regulating appetite. The nutrient status of the cell provides feedback on TH signaling pathways through epigentic modification of histones. Integration of TH signaling with the adrenergic nervous system occurs peripherally, in liver, white fat, and BAT, but also centrally, in the hypothalamus. TR regulates cholesterol and carbohydrate metabolism through direct actions on gene expression as well as cross-talk with other nuclear receptors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR), liver X receptor (LXR), and bile acid signaling pathways. TH modulates hepatic insulin sensitivity, especially important for the suppression of hepatic gluconeogenesis. The role of TH in regulating metabolic pathways has led to several new therapeutic targets for metabolic disorders. Understanding the mechanisms and interactions of the various TH signaling pathways in metabolism will improve our likelihood of identifying effective and selective targets. PMID:24692351

  20. To Regulate or Not to Regulate? Views on Electronic Cigarette Regulations and Beliefs about the Reasons for and against Regulation.

    PubMed

    Sanders-Jackson, Ashley; Tan, Andy S L; Bigman, Cabral A; Mello, Susan; Niederdeppe, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Policies designed to restrict marketing, access to, and public use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are increasingly under debate in various jurisdictions in the US. Little is known about public perceptions of these policies and factors that predict their support or opposition. Using a sample of US adults from Amazon Mechanical Turk in May 2015, this paper identifies beliefs about the benefits and costs of regulating e-cigarettes and identifies which of these beliefs predict support for e-cigarette restricting policies. A higher proportion of respondents agreed with 8 different reasons to regulate e-cigarettes (48.5% to 83.3% agreement) versus 7 reasons not to regulate e-cigarettes (11.5% to 18.9%). The majority of participants agreed with 7 out of 8 reasons for regulation. When all reasons to regulate or not were included in a final multivariable model, beliefs about protecting people from secondhand vapor and protecting youth from trying e-cigarettes significantly predicted stronger support for e-cigarette restricting policies, whereas concern about government intrusion into individual choices was associated with reduced support. This research identifies key beliefs that may underlie public support or opposition to policies designed to regulate the marketing and use of e-cigarettes. Advocates on both sides of the issue may find this research valuable in developing strategic campaigns related to the issue. Specific beliefs of potential benefits and costs of e-cigarette regulation (protecting youth, preventing exposure to secondhand vapor, and government intrusion into individual choices) may be effectively deployed by policy makers or health advocates in communicating with the public.

  1. To Regulate or Not to Regulate? Views on Electronic Cigarette Regulations and Beliefs about the Reasons for and against Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Sanders-Jackson, Ashley; Tan, Andy S. L.; Bigman, Cabral A.; Mello, Susan; Niederdeppe, Jeff

    2016-01-01

    Background Policies designed to restrict marketing, access to, and public use of electronic cigarettes (e-cigarettes) are increasingly under debate in various jurisdictions in the US. Little is known about public perceptions of these policies and factors that predict their support or opposition. Methods Using a sample of US adults from Amazon Mechanical Turk in May 2015, this paper identifies beliefs about the benefits and costs of regulating e-cigarettes and identifies which of these beliefs predict support for e-cigarette restricting policies. Results A higher proportion of respondents agreed with 8 different reasons to regulate e-cigarettes (48.5% to 83.3% agreement) versus 7 reasons not to regulate e-cigarettes (11.5% to 18.9%). The majority of participants agreed with 7 out of 8 reasons for regulation. When all reasons to regulate or not were included in a final multivariable model, beliefs about protecting people from secondhand vapor and protecting youth from trying e-cigarettes significantly predicted stronger support for e-cigarette restricting policies, whereas concern about government intrusion into individual choices was associated with reduced support. Discussion This research identifies key beliefs that may underlie public support or opposition to policies designed to regulate the marketing and use of e-cigarettes. Advocates on both sides of the issue may find this research valuable in developing strategic campaigns related to the issue. Implications Specific beliefs of potential benefits and costs of e-cigarette regulation (protecting youth, preventing exposure to secondhand vapor, and government intrusion into individual choices) may be effectively deployed by policy makers or health advocates in communicating with the public. PMID:27517716

  2. EZH2 inhibition re-sensitizes multidrug resistant B-cell lymphomas to etoposide mediated apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Smonskey, Matthew; Lasorsa, Elena; Rosario, Spencer; Kirk, Jason S.; Hernandez-Ilizaliturri, Francisco J.; Ellis, Leigh

    2016-01-01

    Reactivation of apoptotic pathways is an attractive strategy for patients with treatment-resistant B-cell lymphoma. The tumor suppressor, p53 is central for apoptotic response to multiple DNA damaging agents used to treat aggressive B-cell lymphomas, including etoposide. It has been demonstrated that etoposide induced DNA damage and therapeutic efficacy is enhanced by combination with inhibitors of the histone methyltransferase, enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2). Further, EZH2 was identified to regulate cell fate decisions in response to DNA damage. Using B-cell lymphoma cell lines resistant to etoposide induced cell death; we show that p53 is dramatically down regulated and MDMX, a negative regulator of p53, is significantly up regulated. However, these cell lines remain responsive to etoposide mediated DNA damage and exhibit cell cycle inhibition and induction of senescence. Furthermore, chemical inhibition of EZH2 directs DNA damage to a predominant p53 dependent apoptotic response associated with loss of MDMX and BCL-XL. These data provide confirmation of EZH2 in determining cell fate following DNA damage and propose a novel therapeutic strategy for patients with aggressive treatment-resistant B-cell lymphoma. PMID:26973857

  3. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations. The...

  4. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations. The...

  5. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations. The...

  6. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations. The...

  7. 50 CFR 402.04 - Counterpart regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE); ENDANGERED SPECIES COMMITTEE REGULATIONS SUBCHAPTER A INTERAGENCY COOPERATION-ENDANGERED SPECIES ACT OF 1973, AS AMENDED General § 402.04 Counterpart regulations. The...

  8. Progress toward risk informed regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, K.C.

    1997-01-01

    For the last several years, the NRC, with encouragement from the industry, has been moving in the direction of risk informed regulation. This is consistent with the regulatory principle of efficiency, formally adopted by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission in 1991, which requires that regulatory activities be consistent with the degree of risk reduction they achieve. Probabilistic risk analysis has become the tool of choice for selecting the best of several alternatives. Closely related to risk informed regulation is the development of performance based rules. Such rules focus on the end result to be achieved. They do not specify the process, but instead establish the goals to be reached and how the achievement of those goals is to be judged. The inspection and enforcement activity is based on whether or not the goals have been met. The author goes on to offer comments on the history of the development of this process and its probable development in the future. He also addresses some issues which must be resolved or at least acknowledged. The success of risk informed regulation ultimately depends on having sufficiently reliable data to allow quantification of regulatory alternatives in terms of relative risk. Perhaps the area of human reliability and organizational performance has the greatest potential for improvement in reactor safety. The ability to model human performance is significantly less developed that the ability to model mechanical or electrical systems. The move toward risk informed, performance based regulation provides an unusual, perhaps unique, opportunity to establish a more rational, more effective basis for regulation.

  9. How Europe regulates its genes

    SciTech Connect

    Balter, M.

    1991-06-07

    As Europe moves toward unification in 1992, more than two dozen regulations and directives that will affect biotech are working their way through the complex European legislative system. The result could mean tough scrutiny for genetically engineered products. One reason is that the European Community (EC) has chosen to examine genetically engineered products as a special category - an approach the FDA has rejected. Another is that the EC is considering enacting regulations that would mandate consideration of the socioeconomic effects of biotech products in addition to their safety. In addition, some - particularly in industry - fear a nightmare of overlapping and contradictory regulations. It's too soon to tell how well the European system will work, or how stifling the regulations might be. In all likelihood the regulations emerging in Europe won't be demonstrably superior - or inferior - to the American ones, just different, with different strengths and weaknesses. But since many US biotech companies are looking to the huge market that a unified Europe represents, the specifics of those strengths and weaknesses will ultimately be of more than passing interest.

  10. Circadian regulation of lipid metabolism.

    PubMed

    Gooley, Joshua J

    2016-11-01

    The circadian system temporally coordinates daily rhythms in feeding behaviour and energy metabolism. The objective of the present paper is to review the mechanisms that underlie circadian regulation of lipid metabolic pathways. Circadian rhythms in behaviour and physiology are generated by master clock neurons in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The SCN and its efferent targets in the hypothalamus integrate light and feeding signals to entrain behavioural rhythms as well as clock cells located in peripheral tissues, including the liver, adipose tissue and muscle. Circadian rhythms in gene expression are regulated at the cellular level by a molecular clock comprising a core set of clock genes/proteins. In peripheral tissues, hundreds of genes involved in lipid biosynthesis and fatty acid oxidation are rhythmically activated and repressed by clock proteins, hence providing a direct mechanism for circadian regulation of lipids. Disruption of clock gene function results in abnormal metabolic phenotypes and impaired lipid absorption, demonstrating that the circadian system is essential for normal energy metabolism. The composition and timing of meals influence diurnal regulation of metabolic pathways, with food intake during the usual rest phase associated with dysregulation of lipid metabolism. Recent studies using metabolomics and lipidomics platforms have shown that hundreds of lipid species are circadian-regulated in human plasma, including but not limited to fatty acids, TAG, glycerophospholipids, sterol lipids and sphingolipids. In future work, these lipid profiling approaches can be used to understand better the interaction between diet, mealtimes and circadian rhythms on lipid metabolism and risk for obesity and metabolic diseases.

  11. Cosmetic Regulations: A Comparative Study.

    PubMed

    Suhag, Jyoti; Dureja, Harish

    2015-01-01

    The regulatory framework, compliance requirement, efficacy, safety, and marketing of cosmetic products are considered the most important factors for growth of the cosmetic industry. There are different regulatory bodies across the globe that have their own insights for regulation; moreover, governments such as the United States, European Union, and Japan follow a stringent regulatory framework, whereas cosmetics are not so much strictly regulated in countries such as India, Brazil, and China. The alignment of a regulatory framework will play a significant role in the removal of barriers to trade, growth of market at an international level, innovation in the development and presentation of new products, and most importantly safety and efficacy of the marketed products. The present contribution gives insight into the important cosmetic regulations in areas of premarket approval, ingredient control, and labeling and warnings, with a special focus on the cosmetic regulatory environments in the United States, European Union, Japan, and India. Most importantly, the authors highlight the dark side of cosmetics associated with allergic reactions and even skin cancer. The importance of cosmetic regulations has been highlighted by dint of which the society can be healthier, accomplished by more stringent and harmonized regulations.

  12. Redox regulation of intercellular transport.

    PubMed

    Benitez-Alfonso, Yoselin; Jackson, David; Maule, Andy

    2011-01-01

    Plant cells communicate with each other via plasmodesmata (PDs) in order to orchestrate specific responses to environmental and developmental cues. At the same time, environmental signals regulate this communication by promoting changes in PD structure that modify symplastic permeability and, in extreme cases, isolate damaged cells. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key messengers in plant responses to a range of biotic and abiotic stresses. They are also generated during normal metabolism, and mediate signaling pathways that modulate plant growth and developmental transitions. Recent research has suggested the participation of ROS in the regulation of PD transport. The study of several developmental and stress-induced processes revealed a co-regulation of ROS and callose (a cell wall polymer that regulates molecular flux through PDs). The identification of Arabidopsis mutants simultaneously affected in cell redox homeostasis and PD transport, and the histological detection of hydrogen peroxide and peroxidases in the PDs of the tomato vascular cambium provide new information in support of this novel regulatory mechanism. Here, we describe the evidence that supports a role for ROS in the regulation of callose deposition and/or in the formation of secondary PD, and discuss the potential importance of this mechanism during plant growth or defense against environmental stresses.

  13. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-01-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. PMID:23718724

  14. 7 CFR 301.89-5 - Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas. 301.89-5 Section 301.89-5 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL... § 301.89-5 Movement of regulated articles from regulated areas. (a) Any regulated article may be moved...

  15. ISOs: The new antitrust regulators?

    SciTech Connect

    Raskin, D.B.

    1998-04-01

    Fear of seller market power in emerging electricity markets has led regulators to sanction use of independent system operators as private market police. A more restrained approach is likely to yield better results without the chilling effects of private regulation. This new industry regulatory paradigm has received little critical attention to date. This is unfortunate because ISO antitrust regulation raises serious legal and policy concerns. The California and New England Power Pool (NEPOOL) plans are quite intrusive. They require the ISO to make difficult distinctions between acceptable and unacceptable market behavior. They create considerable risk that desirable competitive behavior will be chilled and that market participants will incur significant explicit and implicit costs to meet regulatory requirements.

  16. Upstream regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Alkhayyat, Fahad; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2014-01-01

    Mycotoxins are natural contaminants of food and feed products, posing a substantial health risk to humans and animals throughout the world. A plethora of filamentous fungi has been identified as mycotoxin producers and most of these fungal species belong to the genera Aspergillus, Fusarium, and Penicillium. A number of studies have been conducted to better understand the molecular mechanisms of biosynthesis of key mycotoxins and the regulatory cascades controlling toxigenesis. In many cases, the mycotoxin biosynthetic genes are clustered and regulated by one or more pathway-specific transcription factor(s). In addition, as biosynthesis of many secondary metabolites is coordinated with fungal growth and development, there are a number of upstream regulators affecting biosynthesis of mycotoxins in fungi. This review presents a concise summary of the regulation of mycotoxin biosynthesis, focusing on the roles of the upstream regulatory elements governing biosynthesis of aflatoxin and sterigmatocystin in Aspergillus.

  17. Regulation of cellular chromatin state

    PubMed Central

    Mishra, Rakesh K; Dhawan, Jyotsna

    2010-01-01

    The identity and functionality of eukaryotic cells is defined not just by their genomic sequence which remains constant between cell types, but by their gene expression profiles governed by epigenetic mechanisms. Epigenetic controls maintain and change the chromatin state throughout development, as exemplified by the setting up of cellular memory for the regulation and maintenance of homeotic genes in proliferating progenitors during embryonic development. Higher order chromatin structure in reversibly arrested adult stem cells also involves epigenetic regulation and in this review we highlight common trends governing chromatin states, focusing on quiescence and differentiation during myogenesis. Together, these diverse developmental modules reveal the dynamic nature of chromatin regulation providing fresh insights into the role of epigenetic mechanisms in potentiating development and differentiation. PMID:20592864

  18. Regulation of DNA replication licensing.

    PubMed

    Niida, Hiroyuki; Kitagawa, Masatoshi

    2012-12-01

    In eukaryotic cells, DNA replication is tightly regulated to occur only once per cell cycle. DNA licensing is a mechanism to guarantee this aim; that is, licensing of replication initiation is permitted during late M phase to G1 phase. The license is canceled by the start of DNA replication. Once DNA replication begins, the license is never given until the next late M phase. The licensing corresponds to the process of assembling components of the pre-replication complex (pre-RC) on the replication origin DNA. This pre-RC is the target of several different regulation systems to prevent rereplication of DNA during a single cell cycle. In this review, the regulation mechanisms mainly in mammals to control assembling components of the pre-RC will be discussed.

  19. Developmental regulators in Aspergillus fumigatus.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee-Soo; Yu, Jae-Hyuk

    2016-03-01

    The filamentous fungus Aspergillus fumigatus is the most prevalent airborne fungal pathogen causing severe and usually fatal invasive aspergillosis in immunocompromised patients. This fungus produces a large number of small hydrophobic asexual spores called conidia as the primary means of reproduction, cell survival, propagation, and infectivity. The initiation, progression, and completion of asexual development (conidiation) is controlled by various regulators that govern expression of thousands of genes associated with formation of the asexual developmental structure conidiophore, and biogenesis of conidia. In this review, we summarize key regulators that directly or indirectly govern conidiation in this important pathogenic fungus. Better understanding these developmental regulators may provide insights into the improvement in controlling both beneficial and detrimental aspects of various Aspergillus species.

  20. PTEN regulates cilia through Dishevelled

    PubMed Central

    Shnitsar, Iryna; Bashkurov, Mikhail; Masson, Glenn R.; Ogunjimi, Abiodun A.; Mosessian, Sherly; Cabeza, Eduardo Aguiar; Hirsch, Calley L.; Trcka, Daniel; Gish, Gerald; Jiao, Jing; Wu, Hong; Winklbauer, Rudolf; Williams, Roger L.; Pelletier, Laurence; Wrana, Jeffrey L.; Barrios-Rodiles, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Cilia are hair-like cellular protrusions important in many aspects of eukaryotic biology. For instance, motile cilia enable fluid movement over epithelial surfaces, while primary (sensory) cilia play roles in cellular signalling. The molecular events underlying cilia dynamics, and particularly their disassembly, are not well understood. Phosphatase and tensin homologue (PTEN) is an extensively studied tumour suppressor, thought to primarily act by antagonizing PI3-kinase signalling. Here we demonstrate that PTEN plays an important role in multicilia formation and cilia disassembly by controlling the phosphorylation of Dishevelled (DVL), another ciliogenesis regulator. DVL is a central component of WNT signalling that plays a role during convergent extension movements, which we show here are also regulated by PTEN. Our studies identify a novel protein substrate for PTEN that couples PTEN to regulation of cilia dynamics and WNT signalling, thus advancing our understanding of potential underlying molecular etiologies of PTEN-related pathologies. PMID:26399523

  1. NETs and cell cycle regulation.

    PubMed

    Robson, Michael I; Le Thanh, Phu; Schirmer, Eric C

    2014-01-01

    There are many ways that the nuclear envelope can influence the cell cycle. In addition to roles of lamins in regulating the master cell cycle regulator pRb and nuclear envelope breakdown in mitosis, many other nuclear envelope proteins influence the cell cycle through regulatory or structural functions. Of particular note among these are the nuclear envelope transmembrane proteins (NETs) that appear to influence cell cycle regulation through multiple separate mechanisms. Some NETs and other nuclear envelope proteins accumulate on the mitotic spindle, suggesting functional or structural roles in the cell cycle. In interphase exogenous overexpression of some NETs promotes an increase in G1 populations, while others promote an increase in G2/M populations, sometimes associated with the induction of senescence. Intriguingly, most of the NETs linked to the cell cycle are highly restricted in their tissue expression; thus, their misregulation in cancer could contribute to the many tissue-specific types of cancer.

  2. Planned and proposed pipeline regulations

    SciTech Connect

    De Leon, C. )

    1992-04-01

    The Research and Special Programs Administration administers the Natural Gas Pipeline Safety Act of 1968 (NGPSA) and the Hazardous Liquid Pipeline Safety Act of 1979 (HLPSA). The RSPA issues and enforces design, construction, operation and maintenance regulations for natural gas pipelines and hazardous liquid pipelines. This paper discusses a number of proposed and pending safety regulations and legislative initiatives currently being considered by the RSPA and the US Congress. Some new regulations have been enacted. The next few years will see a great deal of regulatory activity regarding natural gas and hazardous liquid pipelines, much of it resulting from legislative requirements. The office of Pipeline Safety is currently conducting a study to streamline its operations. This study is analyzing the office's business, social and technical operations with the goal of improving overall efficiency, effectiveness, productivity and job satisfaction to meet the challenges of the future.

  3. Chloroplast retrograde signal regulates flowering

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Peiqiang; Guo, Hailong; Chi, Wei; Chai, Xin; Sun, Xuwu; Xu, Xiumei; Ma, Jinfang; Rochaix, Jean-David; Leister, Dario; Wang, Haiyang; Lu, Congming; Zhang, Lixin

    2016-01-01

    Light is a major environmental factor regulating flowering time, thus ensuring reproductive success of higher plants. In contrast to our detailed understanding of light quality and photoperiod mechanisms involved, the molecular basis underlying high light-promoted flowering remains elusive. Here we show that, in Arabidopsis, a chloroplast-derived signal is critical for high light-regulated flowering mediated by the FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC). We also demonstrate that PTM, a PHD transcription factor involved in chloroplast retrograde signaling, perceives such a signal and mediates transcriptional repression of FLC through recruitment of FVE, a component of the histone deacetylase complex. Thus, our data suggest that chloroplasts function as essential sensors of high light to regulate flowering and adaptive responses by triggering nuclear transcriptional changes at the chromatin level. PMID:27601637

  4. Positively regulated bacterial expression systems

    PubMed Central

    Brautaset, Trygve; Lale, Rahmi; Valla, Svein

    2009-01-01

    Summary Regulated promoters are useful tools for many aspects related to recombinant gene expression in bacteria, including for high‐level expression of heterologous proteins and for expression at physiological levels in metabolic engineering applications. In general, it is common to express the genes of interest from an inducible promoter controlled either by a positive regulator or by a repressor protein. In this review, we discuss established and potentially useful positively regulated bacterial promoter systems, with a particular emphasis on those that are controlled by the AraC‐XylS family of transcriptional activators. The systems function in a wide range of microorganisms, including enterobacteria, soil bacteria, lactic bacteria and streptomycetes. The available systems that have been applied to express heterologous genes are regulated either by sugars (l‐arabinose, l‐rhamnose, xylose and sucrose), substituted benzenes, cyclohexanone‐related compounds, ε‐caprolactam, propionate, thiostrepton, alkanes or peptides. It is of applied interest that some of the inducers require the presence of transport systems, some are more prone than others to become metabolized by the host and some have been applied mainly in one or a limited number of species. Based on bioinformatics analyses, the AraC‐XylS family of regulators contains a large number of different members (currently over 300), but only a small fraction of these, the XylS/Pm, AraC/PBAD, RhaR‐RhaS/rhaBAD, NitR/PnitA and ChnR/Pb regulator/promoter systems, have so far been explored for biotechnological applications. PMID:21261879

  5. Medical device regulation for manufacturers.

    PubMed

    McAllister, P; Jeswiet, J

    2003-01-01

    Manufacturers of medical devices are held to a higher standard than manufacturers of many other products due to the potential severity of the consequences of introducing inferior or unsafe products to the market-place. In Canada, the medical device industry is regulated by Health Canada under the Medical Device Regulations of the Food and Drug Act. The Medical Device Regulations define requirements of medical device design, development and manufacture to ensure that products reaching the public are safe and effective. Health Canada also requires that medical device manufacturers maintain distribution records to ensure that devices can be traced to the source and consumers can be contacted successfully in the event that a device is recalled. Medical devices exported from Canada must be compliant with the regulations of the country of import. The Canadian Medical Device Regulations were based on the Medical Device Directives of the European Union thus facilitating approval of Canadian devices for the European market. The United States Food and Drug Administration has separate and distinct requirements for safety and quality of medical devices. While effort has been made to facilitate approval and trade of Canadian medical devices in the United States and the European Union, obtaining approval from multiple regulatory bodies can result in increased device development time and cost. The Global Harmonization Task Force is an organization composed of members from Japanese, Australian, European, Canadian and American medical device regulatory bodies. This organization was formed with the objective of harmonizing medical device regulations in an effort to facilitate international trade and standardize the quality of medical devices available to all countries. This paper discusses the requirements that must be met by manufacturers when designing and manufacturing medical devices.

  6. Calcium regulation of muscle contraction.

    PubMed Central

    Szent-Györgyi, A G

    1975-01-01

    Calcium triggers contraction by reaction with regulatory proteins that in the absence of calcium prevent interaction of actin and myosin. Two different regulatory systems are found in different muscles. In actin-linked regulation troponin and tropomyosin regulate actin by blocking sites on actin required for complex formation with myosin; in myosin-linked regulation sites on myosin are blocked in the absence of calcium. The major features of actin control are as follows: there is a requirement for tropomyosin and for a troponin complex having three different subunits with different functions; the actin displays a cooperative behavior; and a movement of tropomyosin occurs controlled by the calcium binding on troponin. Myosin regulation is controlled by a regulatory subunit that can be dissociated in scallop myosin reversibly by removing divalent cations with EDTA. Myosin control can function with pure actin in the absence of tropomyosin. Calcium binding and regulation of molluscan myosins depend on the presence of regulatory light chains. It is proposed that the light chains function by sterically blocking myosin sites in the absence of calcium, and that the "off" state of myosin requires cooperation between the two myosin heads. Both myosin control and actin control are widely distributed in different organisms. Many invertebrates have muscles with both types of regulation. Actin control is absent in the muscles of molluscs and in several minor phyla that lack troponin. Myosin control is not found in striated vertebrate muscles and in the fast muscles of crustacean decapods, although regulatory light chains are present. While in vivo myosin control may not be excluded from vertebrate striated muscles, myosin control may be absent as a result of mutations of the myosin heavy chain. PMID:806311

  7. 75 FR 32719 - Acquisition Regulation: Agency Supplementary Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-09

    ... current law. DATES: Written comments on the proposed rulemaking must be received on or before close of... Federal law or regulation; (3) provides a clear legal standard for affected conduct while promoting... completed the required review and determined that, to the extent permitted by law, this rule meets the...

  8. 76 FR 63191 - Sudanese Sanctions Regulations; Iranian Transactions Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-12

    ... specified food items, as well as exports to certain persons, requiring a greater level of scrutiny are.... Certain specified food items, as well as exports to certain persons, requiring a greater level of scrutiny... Transactions Regulations by issuing general licenses that authorize the exportation or reexportation of food...

  9. Autoimmune regulator, Aire, is a novel regulator of chondrocyte differentiation.

    PubMed

    Si, Yuan; Inoue, Kazuki; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kanno, Jun; Imai, Yuuki

    2013-08-09

    Chondrocyte differentiation is controlled by various regulators, such as Sox9 and Runx2, but the process is complex. To further understand the precise underlying molecular mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation, we aimed to identify a novel regulatory factor of chondrocyte differentiation using gene expression profiles of micromass-cultured chondrocytes at different differentiation stages. From the results of microarray analysis, the autoimmune regulator, Aire, was identified as a novel regulator. Aire stable knockdown cells, and primary cultured chondrocytes obtained from Aire(-/-) mice, showed reduced mRNA expression levels of chondrocyte-related genes. Over-expression of Aire induced the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation by facilitating expression of Bmp2. A ChIP assay revealed that Aire was recruited on an Airebinding site (T box) in the Bmp2 promoter region in the early stages of chondrocyte differentiation and histone methylation was modified. These results suggest that Aire can facilitate early chondrocyte differentiation by expression of Bmp2 through altering the histone modification status of the promoter region of Bmp2. Taken together, Aire might play a role as an active regulator of chondrocyte differentiation, which leads to new insights into the regulatory mechanisms of chondrocyte differentiation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Lrp, a global regulator, regulates the virulence of Vibrio vulnificus.

    PubMed

    Ho, Yu-Chi; Hung, Feng-Ru; Weng, Chao-Hui; Li, Wei-Ting; Chuang, Tzu-Hung; Liu, Tsung-Lin; Lin, Ching-Yuan; Lo, Chien-Jung; Chen, Chun-Liang; Chen, Jen-Wei; Hashimoto, Masayuki; Hor, Lien-I

    2017-08-11

    An attenuated mutant (designated NY303) of Vibrio vulnificus, which causes serious wound infection and septicemia in humans, was isolated fortuitously from a clinical strain YJ016. This mutant was defective in cytotoxicity, migration on soft agar and virulence in the mouse. The purpose of this study was to map the mutation in this attenuated mutant and further explore how the gene thus identified is involved in virulence. The whole genome sequence of mutant NY303 determined by next-generation sequencing was compared with that of strain YJ016 to map the mutations. By isolating and characterizing the specific gene-knockout mutants, the gene associated with the phenotype of mutant NY303 was identified. This gene encodes a global regulator, Lrp. A mutant, YH01, deficient in Lrp was isolated and examined in vitro, in vivo and ex vivo to find the affected virulence mechanisms. The target genes of Lrp were further identified by comparing the transcriptomes, which were determined by RNA-seq, of strain YJ016 and mutant YH01. The promoters bound by Lrp were identified by genome footprinting-sequencing, and those related with virulence were further examined by electrophoretic mobility shift assay. A mutation in lrp was shown to be associated with the reduced cytotoxicity, chemotaxis and virulence of mutant NY303. Mutant YH01 exhibited a phenotype resembling that of mutant NY303, and was defective in colonization in the mouse and growth in mouse serum, but not the antiphagocytosis ability. 596 and 95 genes were down- and up-regulated, respectively, in mutant YH01. Many of the genes involved in secretion of the MARTX cytotoxin, chemotaxis and iron-acquisition were down-regulated in mutant YH01. The lrp gene, which was shown to be negatively autoregulated, and 7 down-regulated virulence-associated genes were bound by Lrp in their promoters. A 14-bp consensus sequence, mkCrTTkwAyTsTG, putatively recognized by Lrp was identified in the promoters of these genes. Lrp is a global

  11. Regulations against the human nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizondo-Garza, Fernando J.

    2004-05-01

    The discussion around the concept of the addiction to noise has evidenced the importance of noise for the human being and explains why in some cases the regulations fail to control the noise in cities. In this presentation the different uses, consciously or unconsciously, of the noise will be analyzed, uses that go from habits to maybe addictions. Also discussed are the implications of establishing regulations against the human nature as well as the importance of education to manage the noise and design acoustically instead of trying to ban the noise in some social circumstances.

  12. The dyadic regulation of affect.

    PubMed

    Fosha, D

    2001-02-01

    Accelerated Experiential-Dynamic Psychotherapy integrates experiential, relational, and psychodynamic elements. Deep authentic affective experience and its regulation through coordinated emotional interchanges between patient and therapist are viewed as key transformational agents. When maintaining attachment with caregivers necessitates excluding particular affects, a patient's capacity to regulate emotion becomes compromised. Being in an emotionally alive therapeutic relationship enables patients to better tolerate and communicate affective states; doing so, in turn, fosters security, openness, and intimacy in their other relationships. A clinical vignette will illustrate how using the therapist's affect, and focusing on the patient's experience of it, contributes to the repair of affect regulatory difficulties.

  13. Transcription regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Haiquan; Ma, Yingfang; Wang, Yitian; Yang, Haixia; Shen, Wei; Chen, Xianzhong

    2014-01-01

    Phage diversity significantly contributes to ecology and evolution of new bacterial species through horizontal gene transfer. Therefore, it is essential to understand the mechanisms underlying phage-host interactions. After initial infection, the phage utilizes the transcriptional machinery of the host to direct the expression of its own genes. This review presents a view on the transcriptional regulation mechanisms of bacteriophages, and its contribution to phage diversity and classification. Through this review, we aim to broaden the understanding of phage-host interactions while providing a reference source for researchers studying the regulation of phage transcription. PMID:25482231

  14. Politics of public utility regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Gormley, W.T. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    Since the early 1970s, energy and telecommunications policies have emerged as increasingly complex and conflictual issues in state government and have, consequently, brought about change in the politics of public utilities regulation. In this analysis, Gormley shows that state public utilities commissions, in determining the rates that can be charged by private utility companies, must confront elected government officials, members of the state bureaucracy, citizens' groups, and the regulated industries themselves in a very visible, highly technical, costly, and controversial process that pits investors against consumers, business groups against residential consumers, consumer groups against environmentalists, and low-income consumers against consumers as a whole.

  15. Limited Regulation of Lake Erie.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-11-01

    Ontario,, Cedar Point in Ohio, Presque Isle in Pennsylvania and Hamlin in New York. Recreational boating is a significant activity on Lake Erie . Along...RD-Al47 936 LIMITED REGULATION OF LAKE ERIE (U) INTERNATIONAL LAKE i/i ERIE REGULATION STUDY BOARD NOV 83 UNCLASSIFIED F/G 13/2 N lhhhhh..hEmhhI...o lake Erie ’Governmen of 4,- % * L CTE " 84100400 .- Canad Unite Stte INTRNAIONL OIN COMISIO 4WD’ This document hais been ow for public rleoe and so

  16. Microenvironmental regulation of tumour angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    De Palma, Michele; Biziato, Daniela; Petrova, Tatiana V

    2017-08-01

    Tumours display considerable variation in the patterning and properties of angiogenic blood vessels, as well as in their responses to anti-angiogenic therapy. Angiogenic programming of neoplastic tissue is a multidimensional process regulated by cancer cells in concert with a variety of tumour-associated stromal cells and their bioactive products, which encompass cytokines and growth factors, the extracellular matrix and secreted microvesicles. In this Review, we discuss the extrinsic regulation of angiogenesis by the tumour microenvironment, highlighting potential vulnerabilities that could be targeted to improve the applicability and reach of anti-angiogenic cancer therapies.

  17. 18 CFR 415.30 - Regulations generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Regulations generally. 415.30 Section 415.30 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Standards § 415.30 Regulations generally. The...

  18. 18 CFR 415.30 - Regulations generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Regulations generally. 415.30 Section 415.30 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Standards § 415.30 Regulations generally. The...

  19. 27 CFR 25.4 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Related regulations. 25.4 Section 25.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.4 Related regulations. Regulations relating...

  20. 18 CFR 415.30 - Regulations generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Regulations generally. 415.30 Section 415.30 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Standards § 415.30 Regulations generally. The...

  1. 18 CFR 415.30 - Regulations generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Regulations generally. 415.30 Section 415.30 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Standards § 415.30 Regulations generally. The...

  2. 18 CFR 415.30 - Regulations generally.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 18 Conservation of Power and Water Resources 2 2013-04-01 2012-04-01 true Regulations generally. 415.30 Section 415.30 Conservation of Power and Water Resources DELAWARE RIVER BASIN COMMISSION ADMINISTRATIVE MANUAL BASIN REGULATIONS-FLOOD PLAIN REGULATIONS Standards § 415.30 Regulations generally. The...

  3. 27 CFR 25.4 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Related regulations. 25.4 Section 25.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.4 Related regulations. Regulations relating...

  4. 27 CFR 25.4 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Related regulations. 25.4 Section 25.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY ALCOHOL BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.4 Related regulations. Regulations relating...

  5. 27 CFR 25.4 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Related regulations. 25.4 Section 25.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.4 Related regulations. Regulations relating...

  6. 27 CFR 25.4 - Related regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Related regulations. 25.4 Section 25.4 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY LIQUORS BEER Scope of Regulations § 25.4 Related regulations. Regulations relating...

  7. 75 FR 67912 - North Korea Sanctions Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-04

    ... 31 CFR Part 510 North Korea Sanctions Regulations AGENCY: Office of Foreign Assets Control, Treasury...'') is issuing regulations with respect to North Korea to implement Executive Order 13466 of June 26... issuing the North Korea Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 510 (the ``Regulations''), to implement E.O...

  8. Platelets actively sequester angiogenesis regulators

    PubMed Central

    Yip, Tai-Tung; Cassiola, Flavia; Kikuchi, Lena; Cervi, David; Podust, Vladimir; Italiano, Joseph E.; Wheatley, Erin; Abou-Slaybi, Abdo; Bender, Elise; Almog, Nava; Kieran, Mark W.; Folkman, Judah

    2009-01-01

    Clinical trials with antiangiogenic agents have not been able to validate plasma or serum levels of angiogenesis regulators as reliable markers of cancer presence or therapeutic response. We recently reported that platelets contain numerous proteins that regulate angiogenesis. We now show that accumulation of angiogenesis regulators in platelets of animals bearing malignant tumors exceeds significantly their concentration in plasma or serum, as well as their levels in platelets from non–tumor-bearing animals. This process is selective, as platelets do not take up a proportional amount of other plasma proteins (eg, albumin), even though these may be present at higher concentrations. We also find that VEGF-enriched Matrigel pellets implanted subcutaneously into mice or the minute quantities of VEGF secreted by microscopic subcutaneous tumors (0.5-1 mm3) result in an elevation of VEGF levels in platelets, without any changes in its plasma levels. The profile of other angiogenesis regulatory proteins (eg, platelet-derived growth factor, basic fibroblast growth factor) sequestered by platelets also reflects the presence of tumors in vivo before they can be macroscopically evident. The ability of platelets to selectively take up angiogenesis regulators in cancer-bearing hosts may have implications for the diagnosis and management of many angiogenesis-related diseases and provide a guide for antiangiogenic therapies. PMID:19036702

  9. Implementing the Manual Handling Regulations.

    PubMed

    Duffy, M

    1993-05-01

    When last year's consultative document for the Manual Handling Regulations arrived on her desk Maureen Duffy, like many other OHNs, realised that she had her work cut out. She describes how her company set about achieving compliance with the new legislation.

  10. Cell Therapy Regulation in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuan-Chuan; Cheng, Hwei-Fang; Yeh, Ming-Kung

    2017-03-13

    Cell therapy is not only a novel medical practice but also a medicinal product [cell therapy product (CTP)]. More and more CTPs are being approved for marketing globally because of the rapid development of biomedicine in cell culture, preservation, and preparation. However, regulation is the most important criterion for the development of CTPs. Regulations must be flexible to expedite the process of marketing for new CTPs. Recently, the Taiwan Food and Drug Administration (TFDA) updated the related regulations such as regulation of development, current regulatory framework and process, and the application and evaluation processes. When the quality of CTPs has been improved significantly, their safety and efficacy are further ensured. The treatment protocol, a new design for adaptive licensing to current clinical practice, is a rapid process for patients with life-threatening diseases or serious conditions for which there are no suitable drugs, medical devices, or other therapeutic methods available. The hospital can submit the treatment protocol to apply for cell therapy as a medical practice, which may result in easier and faster cell therapy development, and personalized treatment for individual patients will evolve quickly.

  11. Regulating Collaboration in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobber, Marjolein; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration in teacher education can be seen as a way to prepare student teachers for future social practices at school. When people collaborate with each other, they have to regulate their collaboration. In the Dutch teacher education programme that was investigated, student teachers were members of different types of groups, each of which had…

  12. The Regulation of Carcinogenic Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gori, Gio Batta

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that a system of relative standards be formulated which would compare utility of substances to their relative risk as carcinogens. This would define a range of use restrictions. Substances intended for specific uses would then be regulated according to these standards. (Author/RE)

  13. Regulated Childhood: Equivalence with Variation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallberg Roth, Ann-Christine; Mansson, Annika

    2009-01-01

    The overriding aim of this article is to make a contribution to the discussion on individual development plans (IDPs) in Sweden as an expression of a regulated childhood and institutional practice. Individual development plans are seen as a phenomenon linked to the emergence of an auditing society. In sum, children are studied as subjects in…

  14. Regulations: Guaranteed Student Loan Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    1979

    The text is given of the amendments to part 177 of Title 45 of the Code of Federal Regulations, concerning the federal Guaranteed Student Loan program. Subpart A concerns the program's purpose and scope. Subpart B concerns general provisions: definitions, eligibility, permissible charges, refunds, and prohibited transactions. Subpart C addresss…

  15. Mechanisms of Hsp90 regulation

    PubMed Central

    Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is involved in the activation of disparate client proteins. This implicates Hsp90 in diverse biological processes that require a variety of co-ordinated regulatory mechanisms to control its activity. Perhaps the most important regulator is heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), which is primarily responsible for upregulating Hsp90 by binding heat shock elements (HSEs) within Hsp90 promoters. HSF1 is itself subject to a variety of regulatory processes and can directly respond to stress. HSF1 also interacts with a variety of transcriptional factors that help integrate biological signals, which in turn regulate Hsp90 appropriately. Because of the diverse clientele of Hsp90 a whole variety of co-chaperones also regulate its activity and some are directly responsible for delivery of client protein. Consequently, co-chaperones themselves, like Hsp90, are also subject to regulatory mechanisms such as post translational modification. This review, looks at the many different levels by which Hsp90 activity is ultimately regulated. PMID:27515256

  16. Mechanisms of Hsp90 regulation.

    PubMed

    Prodromou, Chrisostomos

    2016-08-15

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90) is a molecular chaperone that is involved in the activation of disparate client proteins. This implicates Hsp90 in diverse biological processes that require a variety of co-ordinated regulatory mechanisms to control its activity. Perhaps the most important regulator is heat shock factor 1 (HSF1), which is primarily responsible for upregulating Hsp90 by binding heat shock elements (HSEs) within Hsp90 promoters. HSF1 is itself subject to a variety of regulatory processes and can directly respond to stress. HSF1 also interacts with a variety of transcriptional factors that help integrate biological signals, which in turn regulate Hsp90 appropriately. Because of the diverse clientele of Hsp90 a whole variety of co-chaperones also regulate its activity and some are directly responsible for delivery of client protein. Consequently, co-chaperones themselves, like Hsp90, are also subject to regulatory mechanisms such as post translational modification. This review, looks at the many different levels by which Hsp90 activity is ultimately regulated. © 2016 The Author(s).

  17. Transcriptional regulation of lignin biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Ruiqin; Ye, Zheng-Hua

    2009-11-01

    Lignin is the second most abundant plant biopolymer mainly present in the secondary walls of tracheary elements and fibers in wood. Understanding how lignin is biosynthesized has long been an interest to plant biologists and will have a significant impact on tree biotechnology. Lignin is polymerized from monolignols that are synthesized through the lignin biosynthetic pathway. To make lignin, all the genes in the lignin biosynthetic pathway need to be coordinately turned on. It has been shown that a common cis-element, namely the AC element, is present in the majority of the lignin biosynthetic genes and required for their expression in lignifying cells. Important progress has been made in the identification of transcription factors that bind to the AC elements and are potentially involved in the coordinated regulation of lignin biosynthesis. The Arabidopsis MYB58 and MYB63 as well as their poplar ortholog PtrMYB28 are transcriptional activators of the lignin biosynthetic pathway, whereas the eucalyptus EgMYB2 and pine PtMYB4 transcription factors are likely Arabidopsis MYB46 orthologs involved in the regulation of the entire secondary wall biosynthetic program. It was found that the transcriptional regulation of lignin biosynthesis is under the control of the same transcriptional network regulating the biosynthesis of other secondary wall components, including cellulose and xylan. The identification of transcription factors directly activating lignin biosynthetic genes provides unprecedented tools to potentially manipulate the amount of lignin in wood and other plant products based on our needs.

  18. Nutritional regulation of epigenetic changes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The "Nutritional Regulation of Epigenetic Changes" Symposium was held in San Diego on April 25 in conjunction with the 2012 Annual Meetings of the American Society of Nutrition. The symposium was co-chaired by Drs. Romagnoo and Ziegler. In his opening remarks, Dr. Zeigler highlighted salient aspec...

  19. Electropneumatic rheostat regulates high current

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haacker, J. F.; Jedlicka, J. R.; Wagoner, C. B.

    1965-01-01

    Electropneumatic rheostat maintains a constant direct current in each of several high-power parallel loads, of variable resistance, across a single source. It provides current regulation at any preset value by dissipating the proper amount of energy thermally, and uses a column of mercury to vary the effective length of a resistance element.

  20. Temperature: Human Regulating, Ants Conforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clopton, Joe R.

    2007-01-01

    Biological processes speed up as temperature rises. Procedures for demonstrating this with ants traveling on trails, and data gathered by students on the Argentine ant ("Linepithema humile") are presented. The concepts of temperature regulation and conformity are detailed with a focus on the processes rather than on terms that label the organisms.

  1. Deceptive Business Practices: State Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    Although much has been done at the federal level to control deceptive advertising practices, many states have no criminal laws designed to regulate advertising, and several states recently repealed such laws. This paper examines states' efforts to balance the advertiser's freedom of speech with the consumer's need for information about products by…

  2. BARC: A Novel Apoptosis Regulator

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    turnover is normally achieved through programmed cell death , also known as apoptosis. Effects in apoptosis occur in breast cancers and other types of...malignancies, making tumor cells difficult to kill by chemotherapy, hormonal therapy, and radiation. Restoring function of cell death pathways is a strategy...These findings provide new insights into cell death regulation in breast cancer.

  3. Adrenocortical Activity and Emotion Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stansbury, Kathy; Gunnar, Megan R.

    1994-01-01

    This essay argues that the activity of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) system does not appear to be related to emotion regulation processes in children, although individual differences in emotion processes related to negative emotion temperaments appear to be associated with individual differences in HPA reactivity among normally…

  4. Certificate Regulations for School Personnel.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kansas State Dept. of Education, Topeka.

    This certification handbook provides regulations and systematic procedures for initial issuance of educational certificates as well as renewal requirements in the state of Kansas. The certification topics include--secondary certificates, special certificates, elementary certificates, administrator certificates, vocational education certificates,…

  5. Bed Bug Laws and Regulations

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    21 states have some level of regulation with regard to bed bugs. Most of these requirements focus on hotels and landlords or other property managers. The Department of Housing and Urban Development has guidance on controlling bed bugs in public housing.

  6. Regulating Collaboration in Teacher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dobber, Marjolein; Akkerman, Sanne F.; Verloop, Nico; Vermunt, Jan D.

    2014-01-01

    Collaboration in teacher education can be seen as a way to prepare student teachers for future social practices at school. When people collaborate with each other, they have to regulate their collaboration. In the Dutch teacher education programme that was investigated, student teachers were members of different types of groups, each of which had…

  7. Epigenetic regulation of muscle development.

    PubMed

    Barreiro, Esther; Tajbakhsh, Shahragim

    2017-03-28

    In eukaryote cells, chromatin appears in several forms and is composed of genomic DNA, protein and RNA. The protein content of chromatin is composed primarily of core histones that are packaged into nucleosomes resulting in the condensation of the DNA. Several epigenetic mechanisms regulate the stability of the nucleosomes and the protein-protein interactions that modify the transcriptional activity of the DNA. Interestingly, epigenetic control of gene expression has recently emerged as a relevant mechanism involved in the regulation of many different biological processes including that of muscle development, muscle mass maintenance, function, and phenotype in health and disease. Recent investigations have shed light into the epigenetic control of biological mechanisms that are key regulators of embryonic muscle development and postnatal myogenesis. In the present review article, we provide a summary of the contents discussed in session 08, titled "Epigenetics of muscle regeneration", during the course of the 45th European Muscle Conference, which was celebrated in Montpellier (France) in September 2016. The main theme of that session was to highlight the most recent progress on the role of epigenetics in the regulation of muscle development and regeneration. The current mini-review has been divided into two major sections. On the one hand, a brief introduction on the topic of myogenesis is offered for the non-specialized reader. On the other, a brief overview of the most relevant epigenetic players that have been shown to control muscle development and regeneration is given.

  8. The Regulation of Carcinogenic Hazards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gori, Gio Batta

    1980-01-01

    It is suggested that a system of relative standards be formulated which would compare utility of substances to their relative risk as carcinogens. This would define a range of use restrictions. Substances intended for specific uses would then be regulated according to these standards. (Author/RE)

  9. Allosteric regulation of phenylalanine hydroxylase.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, Paul F

    2012-03-15

    The liver enzyme phenylalanine hydroxylase is responsible for conversion of excess phenylalanine in the diet to tyrosine. Phenylalanine hydroxylase is activated by phenylalanine; this activation is inhibited by the physiological reducing substrate tetrahydrobiopterin. Phosphorylation of Ser16 lowers the concentration of phenylalanine for activation. This review discusses the present understanding of the molecular details of the allosteric regulation of the enzyme.

  10. Deceptive Business Practices: State Regulations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rohrer, Daniel Morgan

    Although much has been done at the federal level to control deceptive advertising practices, many states have no criminal laws designed to regulate advertising, and several states recently repealed such laws. This paper examines states' efforts to balance the advertiser's freedom of speech with the consumer's need for information about products by…

  11. Temperature: Human Regulating, Ants Conforming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clopton, Joe R.

    2007-01-01

    Biological processes speed up as temperature rises. Procedures for demonstrating this with ants traveling on trails, and data gathered by students on the Argentine ant ("Linepithema humile") are presented. The concepts of temperature regulation and conformity are detailed with a focus on the processes rather than on terms that label the organisms.

  12. Vasopressin and the Regulation of Aquaporin-2

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Justin L.L.; Miranda, Carlos A.; Knepper, Mark A.

    2013-01-01

    Water excretion is regulated in large part through the regulation of the osmotic water permeability of the renal collecting duct epithelium. The water permeability is controlled by vasopressin through regulation of the water channel, aquaporin-2 (AQP2). Two processes contribute: 1) regulation of AQP2 trafficking to the apical plasma membrane; and 2) regulation of the total amount of the AQP2 protein in the cells. Regulation of AQP2 abundance is defective in several water balance disorders including many polyuric disorders and the syndrome of inappropriate antidiuresis (SIADH). Here we review vasopressin signaling in the renal collecting duct that is relevant to the two modes of water permeability regulation. PMID:23584881

  13. Neuronal regulation of tendon homoeostasis.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, Paul W

    2013-08-01

    The regulation of tendon homoeostasis, including adaptation to loading, is still not fully understood. Accumulating data, however, demonstrates that in addition to afferent (sensory) functions, the nervous system, via efferent pathways which are associated with through specific neuronal mediators plays an active role in regulating pain, inflammation and tendon homeostasis. This neuronal regulation of intact-, healing- and tendinopathic tendons has been shown to be mediated by three major groups of molecules including opioid, autonomic and excitatory glutamatergic neuroregulators. In intact healthy tendons the neuromediators are found in the surrounding structures: paratenon, endotenon and epitenon, whereas the proper tendon itself is practically devoid of neurovascular supply. This neuroanatomy reflects that normal tendon homoeostasis is regulated from the tendon surroundings. After injury and during tendon repair, however, there is extensive nerve ingrowth into the tendon proper, followed by a time-dependent emergence of sensory, autonomic and glutamatergic mediators, which amplify and fine-tune inflammation and regulate tendon regeneration. In tendinopathic condition, excessive and protracted presence of sensory and glutamatergic neuromediators has been identified, suggesting involvement in inflammatory, nociceptive and hypertrophic (degenerative) tissue responses. Under experimental and clinical conditions of impaired (e.g. diabetes) as well as excessive (e.g. tendinopathy) neuromediator release, dysfunctional tendon homoeostasis develops resulting in chronic pain and gradual degeneration. Thus there is a prospect that in the future pharmacotherapy and tissue engineering approaches targeting neuronal mediators and their receptors may prove to be effective therapies for painful, degenerative and traumatic tendon disorders. © 2013 The Authors. International Journal of Experimental Pathology © 2013 International Journal of Experimental Pathology.

  14. Essential infrastructure: national nuclear regulation.

    PubMed

    Paperiello, Carl J

    2011-01-01

    In order for nuclear power to expand to many countries that do not currently have it, it will be essential for these countries to have laws, regulations, guidance and organizations that can license or permit nuclear power plants and support nuclear facilities, ensure compliance by inspection, and enforce nuclear regulations. The viability of nuclear power worldwide depends on an extremely high level of safety everywhere, and compliance with a number of international treaties is required before supplier nations will provide the material, both hardware and software, to build and operate nuclear power plants. While infrastructure support can be obtained from the IAEA and other countries, an essential core of expertise must exist in the country seeking to establish domestic nuclear power generation. While some reliance can be placed on the safety reviews of standard reactor designs by the nuclear regulators in supplier nations, the certification of fuel design, the quality of instruments, and the matching of a new reactor to a proposed site in the importing nation will require site-specific reviews. National arrangements are also needed for emergency preparedness, environmental protection, fuel transportation and the storage, transportation and disposal of radioactive waste. If foreign contractors and consultants are engaged to perform much of the technical work for the regulatory body(s) that has to be performed by the importing nation, that nation must have a core cadre of technically knowledgeable regulators and an organization to provide management and oversight of the contractors and consultants. Consistency in national nuclear regulations, the deployment of standardized nuclear power plant designs and standardized supporting material infrastructure can promote the safe and secure worldwide growth in nuclear power. Copyright © 2010 Health Physics Society

  15. [Regulation and self-regulation of the pancreas secretion].

    PubMed

    Korot'ko, G F; Voskanian, S E

    2001-01-01

    A review of modern experimental and clinical research, including own author's data, on regulation of the periodical and postprandial external pancreas secretion and of the secretion phases. Focus on self-regulation of pancreas exosecretion with the pancreatic enzymes based on the principle of negative feedback, and on mechanisms of the feedback inhibition of pancreatic secretion. Description of the selective and generalised inhibition of secretion of pancreatic enzymes, the role of this mechanism in emergency adaptation of the fermental spectrum of the pancreas secretion in response to the nutritional composition and properties of the duodenal chemus. In conclusion, the experimental and clinical data are presented on use of intraduodenal injection of trypsin as a generalised inhibitor of pancreas secretion in case of acute pancreatitis.

  16. Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4: structure, function, and regulation.

    PubMed

    Naz, Farha; Anjum, Farah; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2013-11-01

    MAP/Microtubule affinity-regulating kinase 4 (MARK4) belongs to the family of serine/threonine kinases that phosphorylate the microtubule-associated proteins (MAP) causing their detachment from the microtubules thereby increasing microtubule dynamics and facilitating cell division, cell cycle control, cell polarity determination, cell shape alterations, etc. The MARK4 gene encodes two alternatively spliced isoforms, L and S that differ in their C-terminal region. These isoforms are differentially regulated in human tissues including central nervous system. MARK4L is a 752-residue-long polypeptide that is divided into three distinct domains: (1) protein kinase domain (59-314), (2) ubiquitin-associated domain (322-369), and (3) kinase-associated domain (703-752) plus 54 residues (649-703) involved in the proper folding and function of the enzyme. In addition, residues 65-73 are considered to be the ATP-binding domain and Lys88 is considered as ATP-binding site. Asp181 has been proposed to be the active site of MARK4 that is activated by phosphorylation of Thr214 side chain. The isoform MARK4S is highly expressed in the normal brain and is presumably involved in neuronal differentiation. On the other hand, the isoform MARK4L is upregulated in hepatocarcinoma cells and gliomas suggesting its involvement in cell cycle. Several biological functions are also associated with MARK4 including microtubule bundle formation, nervous system development, and positive regulation of programmed cell death. Therefore, MARK4 is considered as the most suitable target for structure-based rational drug design. Our sequence, structure- and function-based analysis should be helpful for better understanding of mechanisms of regulation of microtubule dynamics and MARK4 associated diseases.

  17. Regulation of Coronary Blood Flow.

    PubMed

    Goodwill, Adam G; Dick, Gregory M; Kiel, Alexander M; Tune, Johnathan D

    2017-03-16

    The heart is uniquely responsible for providing its own blood supply through the coronary circulation. Regulation of coronary blood flow is quite complex and, after over 100 years of dedicated research, is understood to be dictated through multiple mechanisms that include extravascular compressive forces (tissue pressure), coronary perfusion pressure, myogenic, local metabolic, endothelial as well as neural and hormonal influences. While each of these determinants can have profound influence over myocardial perfusion, largely through effects on end-effector ion channels, these mechanisms collectively modulate coronary vascular resistance and act to ensure that the myocardial requirements for oxygen and substrates are adequately provided by the coronary circulation. The purpose of this series of Comprehensive Physiology is to highlight current knowledge regarding the physiologic regulation of coronary blood flow, with emphasis on functional anatomy and the interplay between the physical and biological determinants of myocardial oxygen delivery. © 2017 American Physiological Society. Compr Physiol 7:321-382, 2017.

  18. Epigenetic Regulations in Diabetic Nephropathy

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zeyuan

    2017-01-01

    Diabetic nephropathy (DN) is a chronic complication of diabetes and the most common cause of end-stage kidney disease. It has been reported that multiple factors are involved in the pathogenesis of DN, while the molecular mechanisms that lead to DN are still not fully understood. Numerous risk factors for the development of diabetic nephropathy have been proposed, including ethnicity and inherited genetic differences. Recently, with the development of high-throughput technologies, there is emerging evidence that suggests the important role of epigenetic mechanisms in the pathogenesis of DN. Epigenetic regulations, including DNA methylation, noncoding RNAs, and histone modifications, play a pivotal role in DN pathogenesis by a second layer of gene regulation. All these findings can contribute to developing novel therapies for DN. PMID:28401169

  19. Natural gas cavern storage regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Heneman, H.

    1995-09-01

    Investigation of an incident at an LPG storage facility in Texas by U.S. Department of Transportation resulted in recommendation that state regulation of natural gas cavern storage might be improved. Interstate Oil & Gas Compact Commission has established a subcommittee to analyze the benefits and risks associated with natural gas cavern storage, and to draft a regulation model which will suggest engineering and performance specifications. The resulting analysis and regulatory language will be reviewed by I.O.G.C.C., and if approved, distributed to member states (including New York) for consideration. Should the states desire assistance in modifying the language to reflect local variables, such as policy and geology, I.O.G.C.C. may offer assistance. The proposed presentation will review the I.O.G.C.C. product (if published at that date), and discuss implications of its application in New York.

  20. The grammar of transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Weingarten-Gabbay, Shira; Segal, Eran

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotes employ combinatorial strategies to generate a variety of expression patterns from a relatively small set of regulatory DNA elements. As in any other language, deciphering the mapping between DNA and expression requires an understanding of the set of rules that govern basic principles in transcriptional regulation, the functional elements involved, and the ways in which they combine to orchestrate a transcriptional output. Here, we review current understanding of various grammatical rules, including the effect on expression of the number of transcription factor binding-sites, their location, orientation, affinity and activity; co-association with different factors; and intrinsic nucleosome organization. We review different methods that are used to study the grammar of transcription regulation, highlight gaps in current understanding, and discuss how recent technological advances may be utilized to bridge them. PMID:24390306

  1. Regulated Proteolysis in Bacteria: Caulobacter.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Kamal Kishore; Chien, Peter

    2016-11-23

    Protein degradation is essential for all living things. Bacteria use energy-dependent proteases to control protein destruction in a highly specific manner. Recognition of substrates is determined by the inherent specificity of the proteases and through adaptor proteins that alter the spectrum of substrates. In the α-proteobacterium Caulobacter crescentus, regulated protein degradation is required for stress responses, developmental transitions, and cell cycle progression. In this review, we describe recent progress in our understanding of the regulated and stress-responsive protein degradation pathways in Caulobacter. We discuss how organization of highly specific adaptors into functional hierarchies drives destruction of proteins during the bacterial cell cycle. Because all cells must balance the need for degradation of many true substrates with the toxic consequences of nonspecific protein destruction, principles found in one system likely generalize to others.

  2. Regulating Bacterial Virulence with RNA.

    PubMed

    Quereda, Juan J; Cossart, Pascale

    2017-09-08

    Noncoding RNAs (ncRNAs) regulating virulence have been identified in most pathogens. This review discusses RNA-mediated mechanisms exploited by bacterial pathogens to successfully infect and colonize their hosts. It discusses the most representative RNA-mediated regulatory mechanisms employed by two intracellular [Listeria monocytogenes and Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium)] and two extracellular (Vibrio cholerae and Staphylococcus aureus) bacterial pathogens. We review the RNA-mediated regulators (e.g., thermosensors, riboswitches, cis- and trans-encoded RNAs) used for adaptation to the specific niches colonized by these bacteria (intestine, blood, or the intracellular environment, for example) in the framework of the specific pathophysiological aspects of the diseases caused by these microorganisms. A critical discussion of the newest findings in the field of bacterial ncRNAs shows how examples in model pathogens could pave the way for the discovery of new mechanisms in other medically important bacterial pathogens.

  3. Biological Regulation of Bone Quality

    PubMed Central

    Alliston, Tamara

    2014-01-01

    The ability of bone to resist fracture is determined by the combination of bone mass and bone quality. Like bone mass, bone quality is carefully regulated. Of the many aspects of bone quality, this review focuses on biological mechanisms that control the material quality of the bone extracellular matrix (ECM). Bone ECM quality depends upon ECM composition and organization. Proteins and signaling pathways that affect the mineral or organic constituents of bone ECM impact bone ECM material properties, such as elastic modulus and hardness. These properties are also sensitive to pathways that regulate bone remodeling by osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes. Several extracellular proteins, signaling pathways, intracellular effectors, and transcription regulatory networks have been implicated in the control of bone ECM quality. A molecular understanding of these mechanisms will elucidate the biological control of bone quality and suggest new targets for the development of therapies to prevent bone fragility. PMID:24894149

  4. Septins: Regulators of Protein Stability

    PubMed Central

    Vagin, Olga; Beenhouwer, David O.

    2016-01-01

    Septins are small GTPases that play a role in several important cellular processes. In this review, we focus on the roles of septins in protein stabilization. Septins may regulate protein stability by: (1) interacting with proteins involved in degradation pathways, (2) regulating the interaction between transmembrane proteins and cytoskeletal proteins, (3) affecting the mobility of transmembrane proteins in lipid bilayers, and (4) modulating the interaction of proteins with their adaptor or signaling proteins. In this context, we discuss the role of septins in protecting four different proteins from degradation. First we consider botulinum neurotoxin serotype A (BoNT/A) and the contribution of septins to its extraordinarily long intracellular persistence. Next, we discuss the role of septins in stabilizing the receptor tyrosine kinases EGFR and ErbB2. Finally, we consider the contribution of septins in protecting hypoxia-inducible factor 1α (HIF-1α) from degradation. PMID:28066764

  5. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  6. PERIPHERAL MECHANISMS IN APPETITE REGULATION

    PubMed Central

    Camilleri, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Peripheral mechanisms in appetite regulation include the motor functions of the stomach, such as the rate of emptying and accommodation, which convey symptoms of satiation to the brain. The rich repertoire of peripherally released peptides and hormones provides feedback from the arrival of nutrients in different regions of the gut from where they are released to exert effects on satiation, or regulate metabolism through their incretin effects. Ultimately, these peripheral factors provide input to the highly organized hypothalamic circuitry and vagal complex of nuclei to determine cessation of energy intake during meal ingestion, and the return of appetite and hunger after fasting. Understanding these mechanisms is key to the physiological control of feeding and the derangements that occur in obesity and their restoration with treatment (as demonstrated by the effects of bariatric surgery). PMID:25241326

  7. Ethics, regulation, and biomedical research.

    PubMed

    Weed, Matthew

    2004-12-01

    Controversy has surrounded the institutions that facilitate discussion and regulation of American biomedical research for years. Recent challenges to the legitimacy of the President's Council on Bioethics have been focused on stem cell research. These arguments represent an opportunity to reconsider the legislation under which stem cell research is regulated, as well as to consider preexisting bodies like the Recombinant DNA Advisory Committee and National Bioethics Advisory Commission. This paper proposes a Federal Life Sciences Policy Commission, a novel commission with advisory and regulatory powers that would benefit from the positive and negative lessons learned under the legislation that currently shapes the formation and institutional characteristics of advisory bodies in the United States. The Federal Life Sciences Policy Commission would have institutional independence not present in previous advisory bodies, while maintaining the tradition of broad societal representation and thoughtful discourse that has developed in the United States.

  8. Regulating health: transcending disciplinary boundaries.

    PubMed

    Seddon, Toby

    2013-03-01

    Health and health care problems can be addressed from multiple disciplinary perspectives. This raises challenges for how to do cross-disciplinary scholarship in ways that are still robust, rigorous and coherent. This paper sets out one particular approach to cross-cutting research--regulation--which has proved extremely fertile for scholars working in diverse fields, from coal mine safety to tax compliance. The first part of the paper considers how regulatory ideas might be applied to health and health care research in general. The second part goes on to sketch out how a regulation perspective on one specific area, illicit drug policy, can open up new directions for research. In conclusion, a future research agenda is outlined for regulatory scholarship on health and health care.

  9. Redox regulation of Ran GTPase

    SciTech Connect

    Heo, Jongyun

    2008-11-21

    Ran, a small Ras-like GTP-binding nuclear protein, plays a key role in modulation of various cellular signaling events including the cell cycle. This study shows that a cellular redox agent (nitrogen dioxide) facilitates Ran guanine nucleotide dissociation, and identifies a unique Ran redox architecture involved in that process. Sequence analysis suggests that Dexras1 and Rhes GTPases also possess the Ran redox architecture. As Ran releases an intact nucleotide, the redox regulation mechanism of Ran is likely to differ from the radical-based guanine nucleotide modification mechanism suggested for Ras and Rho GTPases. These results provide a mechanistic reason for the previously observed oxidative stress-induced perturbation of the Ran-mediated nuclear import, and suggest that oxidative stress could be a factor in the regulation of cell signal transduction pathways associated with Ran.

  10. Various Themes of Myosin Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Heissler, Sarah M.; Sellers, James R.

    2016-01-01

    Members of the myosin superfamily are actin-based molecular motors that are indispensable for cellular homeostasis. The vast functional and structural diversity of myosins accounts for the variety and complexity of the underlying allosteric regulatory mechanisms that determine the activation or inhibition of myosin motor activity and enable precise timing and spatial aspects of myosin function at the cellular level. This review focuses on the molecular basis of posttranslational regulation of eukaryotic myosins from different classes across species by allosteric intrinsic and extrinsic effectors. First, we highlight the impact of heavy and light chain phosphorylation. Second, we outline intramolecular regulatory mechanisms such as autoinhibition and subsequent activation. Third, we discuss diverse extramolecular allosteric mechanisms ranging from actin-linked regulatory mechanisms to myosin:cargo interactions. At last, we briefly outline the allosteric regulation of myosins with synthetic compounds. PMID:26827725

  11. Osmotic regulation of gene action.

    PubMed Central

    Douzou, P

    1994-01-01

    Most reactions involved in gene translation systems are ionic-dependent and may be explained in electrostatic terms. However, a number of observations of equilibria and rate processes making up the overall reactions clearly indicate that there is still an enormous gap between the rough picture of the mechanism of ionic regulation and the detailed behavior of reactions at the molecular level that hold the key to specific mechanisms. The present paper deals with possible osmotic contributions arising from the gel state of gene systems that are complementary to, and interdependent of, electrostatic contributions. This treatment, although still oversimplified, explains many previous observations by relating them to a general osmotic mechanism and suggests experimental approaches to studying the mechanisms of gene regulation in organelle-free and intact systems. PMID:8127862

  12. Renewable energy and utility regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-10

    This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC`S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

  13. Renewable energy and utility regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-04-10

    This report summarizes the results of a joint project on renewable energy of the National Association of Regulatory Utility Commissioners (NARUC) and the US DOE. NARUC'S Task Force on Renewable Energy conducted a review of the current state of renewable energy technologies to evaluate their potential and extract key policy lessons from experience already gained in deployment of these technologies in numerous states. The main focus of this effort has been to clarify how utility regulators affect the development of renewable energy resources. The goal of the project was twofold: (1) identify the factors that have led to success or failure or renewable energy technologies in various energy markets, and (2) to develop an agenda on renewable energy and utility regulation for NARUC and the DOE. This report consists of three sections: renewable energy contributions, costs and potential; factors affecting development of renewable energy resources; and a renewable energy agenda for NARUC.

  14. Cardiac myofilaments: mechanics and regulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    de Tombe, Pieter P.; Bers, D. M. (Principal Investigator)

    2003-01-01

    The mechanical properties of the cardiac myofilament are an important determinant of pump function of the heart. This report is focused on the regulation of myofilament function in cardiac muscle. Calcium ions form the trigger that induces activation of the thin filament which, in turn, allows for cross-bridge formation, ATP hydrolysis, and force development. The structure and protein-protein interactions of the cardiac sarcomere that are responsible for these processes will be reviewed. The molecular mechanism that underlies myofilament activation is incompletely understood. Recent experimental approaches have been employed to unravel the mechanism and regulation of myofilament mechanics and energetics by activator calcium and sarcomere length, as well as contractile protein phosphorylation mediated by protein kinase A. Central to these studies is the question whether such factors impact on muscle function simply by altering thin filament activation state, or whether modulation of cross-bridge cycling also plays a part in the responses of muscle to these stimuli.

  15. Gene regulation by mechanical forces

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oluwole, B. O.; Du, W.; Mills, I.; Sumpio, B. E.

    1997-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to various mechanical forces in vivo from the flow of blood across the luminal surface of the blood vessel. The purpose of this review was to examine the data available on how these mechanical forces, in particular cyclic strain, affect the expression and regulation of endothelial cell function. Studies from various investigators using models of cyclic strain in vitro have shown that various vasoactive mediators such as nitric oxide and prostacyclin are induced by the effect of mechanical deformation, and that the expression of these mediators may be regulated at the transcription level by mechanical forces. There also seems to be emerging evidence that endothelial cells may also act as mechanotransducers, whereby the transmission of external forces induces various cytoskeletal changes and second messenger cascades. Furthermore, it seems these forces may act on specific response elements of promoter genes.

  16. Peripheral mechanisms in appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Camilleri, Michael

    2015-05-01

    Peripheral mechanisms in appetite regulation include the motor functions of the stomach, such as the rate of emptying and accommodation, which convey symptoms of satiation to the brain. The rich repertoire of peripherally released peptides and hormones provides feedback from the arrival of nutrients in different regions of the gut from where they are released to exert effects on satiation, or regulate metabolism through their incretin effects. Ultimately, these peripheral factors provide input to the highly organized hypothalamic circuitry and vagal complex of nuclei to determine cessation of energy intake during meal ingestion, and the return of appetite and hunger after fasting. Understanding these mechanisms is key to the physiological control of feeding and the derangements that occur in obesity and their restoration with treatment (as shown by the effects of bariatric surgery). Copyright © 2015 AGA Institute. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Molecular mechanisms of appetite regulation.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ji Hee; Kim, Min-Seon

    2012-12-01

    The prevalence of obesity has been rapidly increasing worldwide over the last several decades and has become a major health problem in developed countries. The brain, especially the hypothalamus, plays a key role in the control of food intake by sensing metabolic signals from peripheral organs and modulating feeding behaviors. To accomplish these important roles, the hypothalamus communicates with other brain areas such as the brainstem and reward-related limbic pathways. The adipocyte-derived hormone leptin and pancreatic β-cell-derived insulin inform adiposity to the hypothalamus. Gut hormones such as cholecystokinin, peptide YY, pancreatic polypeptide, glucagon-like peptide 1, and oxyntomodulin transfer satiety signals to the brain and ghrelin relays hunger signals. The endocannabinoid system and nutrients are also involved in the physiological regulation of food intake. In this article, we briefly review physiological mechanisms of appetite regulation.

  18. Biosimilar regulation in the EU.

    PubMed

    Kurki, Pekka; Ekman, Niklas

    2015-01-01

    In the EU, the EMA has been working with biosimilars since 1998. This experience is crystallized in the extensive set of guidelines, which range from basic principles to details of clinical trials. While the guidance may appear complicated, it has enabled the development of biosimilars, of which 21 have managed to get marketing authorization. Currently marketed biosimilars in the EU have a good track record in safety and traceability. No biosimilars have been withdrawn from the market because of safety concerns. The most controversial issues with biosimilars are immunogenicity and extrapolation of therapeutic indications. The available data for these topics do not raise concerns among EU regulators. Interchangeability and substitution are regulated by individual EU member states.

  19. Swiss regulations for controlling clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Zanini, G M

    1998-04-01

    Switzerland has recently issued regulations designed to control all trials with drugs in human subjects, namely the 'Regolamento dell'Ufficio Intercantonale per il controllo dei medicamenti in fase di studio clinico' (Intercantonal Regulations Controlling Drugs used in Clinical Trials), which have been operating since 1st January 1995. These new regulations are generally consistent with other international regulations and have introduced the concept of good clinical practice (GCP) into Switzerland. There are other regulations in Switzerland, such as Federal regulations on immunobiological products, special rules governing the administration of radiolabelled drugs to humans, drugs of abuse and medical devices. Any gap in the central regulations must be filled by cantonal regulations, where they exist. This is a comprehensive review of the regulations governing clinical trials in Switzerland, with special attention being devoted to trials with therapeutic compounds and to compatibility between Swiss and international procedures.

  20. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    DOEpatents

    Karlicek, R.F.

    1982-08-10

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices. 11 figs.

  1. Joint Ethics Regulation. Change 3

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-12

    command or organization may co-sponsor , *, a civic or community activity, except for fundraising or membership drives, where the head of the * DoD...Group Life Insurance (SGLI) program, is not an endorsement of a non-Federal entity in * violation of this Regulation. * 3-210. Fundraising and...Membership Drives a. DoD employees shall not officially endorse or appear to endorse membership drives or fundraising for any non-Federal entity except the

  2. Phenotyping jasmonate regulation of senescence.

    PubMed

    Seltmann, Martin A; Berger, Susanne

    2013-01-01

    Osmotic stress induces several senescence-like processes in leaves, such as specific changes in gene expression and yellowing. These processes are dependent on the accumulation of jasmonates and on intact jasmonate signaling. This chapter describes the treatment of Arabidopsis thaliana leaves with sorbitol as an osmotic stress agent and the determination of the elicited phenotypes encompassing chlorophyll loss, degradation of plastidial membrane lipids, and induction of genes regulated by senescence and jasmonate.

  3. Frequency regulator for synchronous generators

    DOEpatents

    Karlicek, Robert F.

    1982-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a novel frequency regulator which controls a generator output frequency for variations in both the input power to the generator and the power supplied to an uncontrolled external load. The present invention further includes over current and current balance protection devices which are relatively inexpensive to manufacture, which may be encapsulated to provide protection from the operating environment and which respond more quickly than previously known electromechanical devices.

  4. Epigenetic Regulation of Myeloid Cells

    PubMed Central

    IVASHKIV, LIONEL B.; PARK, SUNG HO

    2017-01-01

    Epigenetic regulation in myeloid cells is crucial for cell differentiation and activation in response to developmental and environmental cues. Epigenetic control involves posttranslational modification of DNA or chromatin, and is also coupled to upstream signaling pathways and transcription factors. In this review, we summarize key epigenetic events and how dynamics in the epigenetic landscape of myeloid cells shape the development, immune activation, and innate immune memory. PMID:27337441

  5. Nonrenal regulation of EPO synthesis.

    PubMed

    Weidemann, Alexander; Johnson, Randall S

    2009-04-01

    Erythropoietin (EPO) is a circulating glycoprotein hormone whose principal function is thought to be red blood cell production. It is a classic example of a hypoxia-inducible gene, and studies of the induction of EPO synthesis by low oxygen led to the discovery of a widespread system of hypoxia-inducible transcription factors. Tissue-specific expression of the EPO gene is tightly controlled, and in the adult organism the kidney produces around 90% of systemic EPO. Before birth, the liver is the main site of EPO production; factors contributing to the liver-to-kidney switch are still elusive, but may provide clues to the tissue-specificity of EPO gene expression. EPO has also been detected in non-erythropoietic tissues such as the brain, where it is suggested to exert local protective effects. Apart from classical ways of regulating renal EPO during hypoxia and anemia, novel pathways have been discovered that demonstrate that other organ systems in the adult might not only be important for the production of EPO but also for modulating the hypoxic EPO response. Knowledge of the molecular bases of these non-renal pathways will eventually help to develop pharmacological strategies to induce endogenous EPO production when the main source, the kidney, is significantly impaired. This review will provide an overview of the molecular aspects of EPO gene regulation by hypoxia-inducible transcription factors and of the tissue-specific regulation of EPO production in adult mammals. Insights into the biology of EPO production in genetically modified animals, with an emphasis on recent advances in the understanding of non-renal EPO regulation, will be discussed.

  6. Stochastic Fluctuations in Gene Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    AFRL-IF- RS -TR-2005-126 Final Technical Report April 2005 STOCHASTIC FLUCTUATIONS IN GENE REGULATION Boston University...be releasable to the general public, including foreign nations. AFRL-IF- RS -TR-2005-126 has been reviewed and is approved for publication...AGENCY REPORT NUMBER AFRL-IF- RS -TR-2005-126 11. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES AFRL Project Engineer: Peter J. Costianes/IFED/(315) 330-4030

  7. [Regulation of bacterial transcription elongation].

    PubMed

    Proshkin, S A; Mironov, A S

    2011-01-01

    The elongation complex, which involves RNA polymerase, DNA template and nascent RNA, is a central intermediate in transcription cycle. It is elongation complex that represents the main target for the action of different regulatory factors. Over the past several years, many structural and biochemical data have been obtained that shed light upon the molecular details of RNA polymerase function. Cooperation between RNA polymerase elongation complex and translating ribosome was established recently. Here we discuss the mechanisms of the regulation of bacterial transcription elongation.

  8. [Proteolysis in digestive system regulation].

    PubMed

    Korot'ko, G F

    2013-01-01

    Signal enzymes with direct and indirect hormone releasing action are formed by means of proteolysis from exogenic and endogenic proteins. The proteolysis is the basis of hormone processing. The limited proteolysis forms hormones from pro-hormones, ligand proteolysis excludes or reduces their stimulated or inhibited effects. The existence of polipotent proteinaso-activated receptors with regulative and modulated role in norm and pathology was proved.

  9. Photomultiplier tube gain regulating system

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Wayne F.

    1976-01-01

    This invention relates to an improved system for regulating the gain of a photomultiplier tube, and was designed for use with the photomultiplier tubes of a GeMSAEC fast analyzers. It has the following advantages over the prior system: noise is virtually eliminated; sample analysis can begin after 3 to 4 revolutions of the rotor; fluorescent and light scattering solutions can be used as a reference; and the reference solution can be in any cuvette on the rotor.

  10. Vibrio Fischeri Symbiosis Gene Regulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-08-12

    bacterium. PROGRESS (Year 1): 1. Regulation of V. fischeri lux gene expression in E . coli . A . Transcriptional control of luxR expression by cAMP-CRP and...comparable to cya and crp mutants of E . coli and Salmonella typhimuriwn, including a pleiotropic carbohydrate negative phenotype and a decreased...availability of appropriate mutants. Conditions for iron restriction of growth of E . coli that result in a stimulation of luminescence and luciferase

  11. Auricular Acupuncture and Vagal Regulation

    PubMed Central

    He, Wei; Wang, Xiaoyu; Shi, Hong; Shang, Hongyan; Li, Liang; Jing, Xianghong; Zhu, Bing

    2012-01-01

    Auricular acupuncture has been utilized in the treatment of diseases for thousands of years. Dr. Paul Nogier firstly originated the concept of an inverted fetus map on the external ear. In the present study, the relationship between the auricular acupuncture and the vagal regulation has been reviewed. It has been shown that auricular acupuncture plays a role in vagal activity of autonomic functions of cardiovascular, respiratory, and gastrointestinal systems. Mechanism studies suggested that afferent projections from especially the auricular branch of the vagus nerve (ABVN) to the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) form the anatomical basis for the vagal regulation of auricular acupuncture. Therefore, we proposed the “auriculovagal afferent pathway” (AVAP): both the autonomic and the central nervous system could be modified by auricular vagal stimulation via projections from the ABVN to the NTS. Auricular acupuncture is also proposed to prevent neurodegenerative diseases via vagal regulation. There is a controversy on the specificity and the efficacy of auricular acupoints for treating diseases. More clinical RCT trials on auricular acupuncture and experimental studies on the mechanism of auricular acupuncture should be further investigated. PMID:23304215

  12. Posttranscriptional regulation of cytokine expression.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, Pavel; Ebner, Florian; Sedlyarov, Vitaly

    2017-01-01

    Expression of cytokines and chemokines is regulated at multiple steps during the transfer of the genetic information from DNA sequence to the functional protein. The multilayered control of cytokine expression reflects the need of the immune system to precisely and rapidly adjust the magnitude and duration of immune responses to external cues. Common features of the regulation of cytokine expression are temporal and highly dynamic changes in cytokine mRNA stability. Failures in the timing and extent of mRNA decay can result in disease. Recent advances in transcriptome-wide approaches began to shed light into the complex network of cis-acting sequence elements and trans-acting factors controlling mRNA stability. These approaches led to the discovery of novel unexpected paradigms but they also revealed new questions. This review will discuss the control of cytokine mRNA stability both in the context of high content approaches as well as focused mechanistic studies and animal models. The article highlights the need for systems biology approaches as important means to understand how cytokine mRNA decay helps maintain the immune and tissue homeostasis, and to explore options for therapeutical exploitation of mRNA stability regulation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Detecting aquaporin function and regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeira, Ana; Moura, Teresa; Soveral, Graça

    2016-02-01

    Water is the major component of cells and tissues throughout all forms of life. Fluxes of water and solutes through cell membranes and epithelia are essential for osmoregulation and energy homeostasis. Aquaporins are membrane channels expressed in almost every organism and involved in the bidirectional transfer of water and small solutes across cell membranes. Aquaporins have important biological roles and have been implicated in several pathophysiological conditions suggesting a great translational potential in aquaporin-based diagnostic and therapeutics. Detecting aquaporin function is critical for assessing regulation and screening for new activity modulators that can prompt the development of efficient medicines. Appropriate methods for functional analysis comprising suitable cell models and techniques to accurately evaluate water and solute membrane permeability are essential to validate aquaporin function and assess short-term regulation. The present review describes established assays commonly used to assess aquaporin function in cells and tissues, as well as the experimental biophysical strategies required to reveal functional regulation and identify modulators, the first step for aquaporin drug discovery.

  14. Musical affect regulation in infancy.

    PubMed

    Trehub, Sandra E; Ghazban, Niusha; Corbeil, Mariève

    2015-03-01

    Adolescents and adults commonly use music for various forms of affect regulation, including relaxation, revitalization, distraction, and elicitation of pleasant memories. Mothers throughout the world also sing to their infants, with affect regulation as the principal goal. To date, the study of maternal singing has focused largely on its acoustic features and its consequences for infant attention. We describe recent laboratory research that explores the consequences of singing for infant affect regulation. Such work reveals that listening to recordings of play songs can maintain 6- to 9-month-old infants in a relatively contented or neutral state considerably longer than recordings of infant-directed or adult-directed speech. When 10-month-old infants fuss or cry and are highly aroused, mothers' multimodal singing is more effective than maternal speech at inducing recovery from such distress. Moreover, play songs are more effective than lullabies at reducing arousal in Western infants. We explore the implications of these findings along with possible practical applications.

  15. [Ultraviolet: a regulator of immunity].

    PubMed

    Komura, Kazuhiro

    2008-06-01

    Humans establish acquired immune systems during the growth, which can sufficiently eliminate pathogen avoiding immune responses to self, such as allergy and autoimmunity. An imbalance of the acquired immune system leads up to immune-mediated disorders. Ultraviolet (UV) exposure helps to establish the normal peripheral tolerance to contact allergen avoiding excessive immune responses. By contrast, UV develops kinds of autoimmune diseases on rare occasions, suggesting that abnormality in the process of UV-induced peripheral tolerance may induce these diseases. To elucidate the mechanism of UV-induced tolerance is possible to provide a new approach for the management of immune diseases. In the current review, focus is on the suggested players of UV-induced tolerance, blocking mechanisms on the elicitation phase of contact hypersensitivity, and the association between UV and autoimmunity. The major impact in basic immunology in this area is the discovery of cell surface marker of regulatory T cells. Therefore, we first discuss about the association of regulatory/suppressor T cells with UV-induced tolerance. Since the elicitation phase depends on cellular influx into the inflammatory sites, which is tightly regulated by adhesion molecules, we also focused on the role of adhesion molecules. Finally, this paper also includes statistical findings concerning the association between UV-radiation and the prevalence of a myositis specific autoantibody. Thus, UV is one of the nice regulators of an immune network and the knowledge of UV-mediated immune regulation will be translated into new therapeutic strategies to human immune-mediated disorders.

  16. Amino acids and cell regulation.

    PubMed Central

    Forster, R. P.; Goldstein, L.

    1979-01-01

    Free amino play an important role in regulating cell volume in fishes. Four tissues/cells (skeletal muscle, RBC, brain, and myocardium) of the little skate, Raja erinacea, were selected for detailed study because of their special importance or unique advantage as experimental models. Three particular amino acids, beta-alanine, taurine, and sarcosine play a predominant role in all four tissues. As in higher vertebrates, amino acid uptake in skate brain, heart, and RBC is mediated via a Na+-dependent process. Amino acids leave the skate brain rapidly in response to a sudden decrease in plasma osmolality and/or to a simultaneous drop in extracellular Na+ concentration. However, although amino acids are important for volume regulation in normal brain cells, they do not appear to be likely candidates for the unidentified "idiogenic" osmolytes in mammalian brain cells. The high concentration of taurine in skate myocardium is of special interest because of the special role of this amino acid in myocardial contractility. Thus, unlike beta-alanine and sarcosine, taurine may play a dual role in regulating both cell volume and contractility of myocardial cells. The isolated skate atrium is well suited for in vitro studies of these two processes. PMID:395764

  17. NRC - regulator of nuclear safety

    SciTech Connect

    1997-05-01

    The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) was formed in 1975 to regulate the various commercial and institutional uses of nuclear energy, including nuclear power plants. The agency succeeded the Atomic Energy Commission, which previously had responsibility for both developing and regulating nuclear activities. Federal research and development work for all energy sources, as well as nuclear weapons production, is now conducted by the U.S. Department of Energy. Under its responsibility to protect public health and safety, the NRC has three principal regulatory functions: (1) establish standards and regulations, (2) issue licenses for nuclear facilities and users of nuclear materials, and (3) inspect facilities and users of nuclear materials to ensure compliance with the requirements. These regulatory functions relate to both nuclear power plants and to other uses of nuclear materials - like nuclear medicine programs at hospitals, academic activities at educational institutions, research work, and such industrial applications as gauges and testing equipment. The NRC places a high priority on keeping the public informed of its work. The agency recognizes the interest of citizens in what it does through such activities as maintaining public document rooms across the country and holding public hearings, public meetings in local areas, and discussions with individuals and organizations.

  18. Neuroendocrine Regulation of Maternal Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Bridges, Robert S.

    2015-01-01

    The expression of maternal behavior in mammals is regulated by the developmental and experiential events over a female’s lifetime. In this review the relationships between the endocrine and neural systems that play key roles in these developmental and experiential that affect both the establishment and maintenance of maternal care are presented. The involvement of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and lactogens are discussed in the context of ligand, receptor, and gene activity in rodents and to a lesser extent in higher mammals. The roles of neuroendocrine factors, including oxytocin, vasopressin, classical neurotransmitters, and other neural gene products that regulate aspects of maternal care are set forth, and the interactions of hormones with central nervous system mediators of maternal behavior are discussed. The impact of prior developmental factors, including epigenetic events, and maternal experience on subsequent maternal care are assessed over the course of the female’s lifespan. It is proposed that common neuroendocrine mechanisms underlie the regulation of maternal care in mammals. PMID:25500107

  19. Neuroendocrine regulation of maternal behavior.

    PubMed

    Bridges, Robert S

    2015-01-01

    The expression of maternal behavior in mammals is regulated by the developmental and experiential events over a female's lifetime. In this review the relationships between the endocrine and neural systems that play key roles in these developmental and experiential processes that affect both the establishment and maintenance of maternal care are presented. The involvement of the hormones estrogen, progesterone, and lactogens are discussed in the context of ligand, receptor, and gene activity in rodents and to a lesser extent in higher mammals. The roles of neuroendocrine factors, including oxytocin, vasopressin, classical neurotransmitters, and other neural gene products that regulate aspects of maternal care are set forth, and the interactions of hormones with central nervous system mediators of maternal behavior are discussed. The impact of prior developmental factors, including epigenetic events, and maternal experience on subsequent maternal care are assessed over the course of the female's lifespan. It is proposed that common neuroendocrine mechanisms underlie the regulation of maternal care in mammals. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Mechanosensitive mechanisms in transcriptional regulation.

    PubMed

    Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Ingber, Donald E

    2012-07-01

    Transcriptional regulation contributes to the maintenance of pluripotency, self-renewal and differentiation in embryonic cells and in stem cells. Therefore, control of gene expression at the level of transcription is crucial for embryonic development, as well as for organogenesis, functional adaptation, and regeneration in adult tissues and organs. In the past, most work has focused on how transcriptional regulation results from the complex interplay between chemical cues, adhesion signals, transcription factors and their co-regulators during development. However, chemical signaling alone is not sufficient to explain how three-dimensional (3D) tissues and organs are constructed and maintained through the spatiotemporal control of transcriptional activities. Accumulated evidence indicates that mechanical cues, which include physical forces (e.g. tension, compression or shear stress), alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics and changes in cell shape, are transmitted to the nucleus directly or indirectly to orchestrate transcriptional activities that are crucial for embryogenesis and organogenesis. In this Commentary, we review how the mechanical control of gene transcription contributes to the maintenance of pluripotency, determination of cell fate, pattern formation and organogenesis, as well as how it is involved in the control of cell and tissue function throughout embryogenesis and adult life. A deeper understanding of these mechanosensitive transcriptional control mechanisms should lead to new approaches to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

  1. Mechanosensitive mechanisms in transcriptional regulation

    PubMed Central

    Mammoto, Akiko; Mammoto, Tadanori; Ingber, Donald E.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Transcriptional regulation contributes to the maintenance of pluripotency, self-renewal and differentiation in embryonic cells and in stem cells. Therefore, control of gene expression at the level of transcription is crucial for embryonic development, as well as for organogenesis, functional adaptation, and regeneration in adult tissues and organs. In the past, most work has focused on how transcriptional regulation results from the complex interplay between chemical cues, adhesion signals, transcription factors and their co-regulators during development. However, chemical signaling alone is not sufficient to explain how three-dimensional (3D) tissues and organs are constructed and maintained through the spatiotemporal control of transcriptional activities. Accumulated evidence indicates that mechanical cues, which include physical forces (e.g. tension, compression or shear stress), alterations in extracellular matrix (ECM) mechanics and changes in cell shape, are transmitted to the nucleus directly or indirectly to orchestrate transcriptional activities that are crucial for embryogenesis and organogenesis. In this Commentary, we review how the mechanical control of gene transcription contributes to the maintenance of pluripotency, determination of cell fate, pattern formation and organogenesis, as well as how it is involved in the control of cell and tissue function throughout embryogenesis and adult life. A deeper understanding of these mechanosensitive transcriptional control mechanisms should lead to new approaches to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. PMID:22797927

  2. Optical regulation of cell chain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaoshuai; Huang, Jianbin; Zhang, Yao; Li, Baojun

    2015-01-01

    Formation of cell chains is a straightforward and efficient method to study the cell interaction. By regulating the contact sequence and interaction distance, the influence of different extracellular cues on the cell interaction can be investigated. However, it faces great challenges in stable retaining and precise regulation of cell chain, especially in cell culture with relatively low cell concentration. Here we demonstrated an optical method to realize the precise regulation of cell chain, including removing or adding a single cell, adjusting interaction distance, and changing cell contact sequence. After injecting a 980-nm wavelength laser beam into a tapered optical fiber probe (FP), a cell chain of Escherichia colis (E. colis) is formed under the optical gradient force. By manipulating another FP close to the cell chain, a targeted E. coli cell can be trapped by the FP and removed from the chain. Further, the targeted cell can be added back to the chain at different positions to change the cell contact sequence. The experiments were interpreted by numerical simulations and the impact of cell sizes and shapes on this method was analyzed. PMID:26098707

  3. Epigenetic regulation of protein glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Zoldoš, Vlatka; Grgurević, Srđana; Lauc, Gordan

    2010-10-01

    Protein N-glycosylation is an ancient metabolic pathway that still exists in all three domains of life (Archaea, Bacteria and Eukarya). The covalent addition of one or more complex oligosaccharides (glycans) to protein backbones greatly diversifies their structures and makes the glycoproteome several orders of magnitude more complex than the proteome itself. Contrary to polypeptides, which are defined by a sequence of nucleotides in the corresponding genes, the glycan part of glycoproteins are encoded in a complex dynamic network of hundreds of proteins, whereby activity is defined by both genetic sequence and the regulation of gene expression. Owing to the complex nature of their biosynthesis, glycans are particularly versatile and apparently a large part of human variation derives from differences in protein glycosylation. Composition of the individual glycome appears to be rather stable, and thus differences in the pattern of glycan synthesis between individuals could originate either from genetic polymorphisms or from stable epigenetic regulation of gene expression in different individuals. Studies of epigenetic modification of genes involved in protein glycosylation are still scarce, but their results indicate that this process might be very important for the regulation of protein glycosylation.

  4. Substrate curvature regulates cell migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    2017-06-01

    Cell migration is essential in many aspects of biology. Many basic migration processes, including adhesion, membrane protrusion and tension, cytoskeletal polymerization, and contraction, have to act in concert to regulate cell migration. At the same time, substrate topography modulates these processes. In this work, we study how substrate curvature at micrometer scale regulates cell motility. We have developed a 3D mechanical model of single cell migration and simulated migration on curved substrates with different curvatures. The simulation results show that cell migration is more persistent on concave surfaces than on convex surfaces. We have further calculated analytically the cell shape and protrusion force for cells on curved substrates. We have shown that while cells spread out more on convex surfaces than on concave ones, the protrusion force magnitude in the direction of migration is larger on concave surfaces than on convex ones. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration: geometric constrains bias the direction of the protrusion force and facilitates persistent migration on concave surfaces.

  5. Negative regulators of cell proliferation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, T. C.; Spooner, B. S. (Principal Investigator)

    1994-01-01

    Cell proliferation is governed by the influence of both mitogens and inhibitors. Although cell contact has long been thought to play a fundamental role in cell cycling regulation, and negative regulators have long been suspected to exist, their isolation and purification has been complicated by a variety of technical difficulties. Nevertheless, over recent years an ever-expanding list of putative negative regulators have emerged. In many cases, their biological inhibitory activities are consistent with density-dependent growth inhibition. Most likely their interactions with mitogenic agents, at an intracellular level, are responsible for either mitotic arrest or continued cell cycling. A review of naturally occurring cell growth inhibitors is presented with an emphasis on those factors shown to be residents of the cell surface membrane. Particular attention is focused on a cell surface sialoglycopeptide, isolated from intact bovine cerebral cortex cells, which has been shown to inhibit the proliferation of an unusually wide range of target cells. The glycopeptide arrest cells obtained from diverse species, both fibroblasts and epithelial cells, and a broad variety of transformed cells. Signal transduction events and a limited spectrum of cells that are refractory to the sialoglycopeptide have provided insight into the molecular events mediated by this cell surface inhibitor.

  6. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  7. Substrate curvature regulates cell migration.

    PubMed

    He, Xiuxiu; Jiang, Yi

    2017-05-23

    Cell migration is essential in many aspects of biology. Many basic migration processes, including adhesion, membrane protrusion and tension, cytoskeletal polymerization, and contraction, have to act in concert to regulate cell migration. At the same time, substrate topography modulates these processes. In this work, we study how substrate curvature at micrometer scale regulates cell motility. We have developed a 3D mechanical model of single cell migration and simulated migration on curved substrates with different curvatures. The simulation results show that cell migration is more persistent on concave surfaces than on convex surfaces. We have further calculated analytically the cell shape and protrusion force for cells on curved substrates. We have shown that while cells spread out more on convex surfaces than on concave ones, the protrusion force magnitude in the direction of migration is larger on concave surfaces than on convex ones. These results offer a novel biomechanical explanation to substrate curvature regulation of cell migration: geometric constrains bias the direction of the protrusion force and facilitates persistent migration on concave surfaces.

  8. Regulation of body weight: what is the regulated parameter?

    PubMed

    Bessesen, Daniel H

    2011-09-26

    Despite dramatic variations in day to day intake and energy expenditure, weight remains relatively stable in most animals and humans. There are clear physiological responses to over and underfeeding suggesting that the body strives to maintain a constant weight. Despite this, for most humans and experimental animals, there is a tendency for weight to increase slowly over the lifespan. Recent increases in the prevalence of both obesity and anorexia nervosa suggest that factors other than homeostatic physiological mechanisms are important in determining body weight. Clearly reward pathways are activated by palatable food and evidence is emerging that energy balance can modulate these reward pathways and alter the salience of food related stimuli. Significant inhibitory control of reward pathways also comes from a number of brain regions involved in regulation of behavior. Finally there is strong evidence of the important role that social and environmental factors play in modulating both food intake and physical activity behaviors which in turn result in alterations in weight over time. While some aspects of these regulatory systems are within the conscious awareness of people, many, perhaps even most are not. The evidence then would suggest that weight is controlled by several complex regulatory systems that respond to internal metabolic and hormonal signals, hedonic properties of food, internal forces of valuation and self-control, and social factors. Each of these systems is likely 'regulated' and is important in ultimately determining body weight. Experimental paradigms that test one variable in one of these interrelated systems should, where possible control or at least consider the other systems in an effort to provide an integrated picture of weight regulation.

  9. 76 FR 70220 - New Jersey Regulations on Transportation of Regulated Medical Waste

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-10

    ... Pipeline and Hazardous Materials Safety Administration New Jersey Regulations on Transportation of... Federal hazardous material transportation law preempts regulations of the New Jersey Department of...'' requirements in the Federal hazardous material transportation law or the Hazardous Materials Regulations...

  10. 15 CFR 922.44 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Regulations of General Applicability § 922.44..., and Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuaries. See §§ 922.111(c), 922.165, and 922.186,...

  11. Self-tuning regulators. [adaptive control research

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Astrom, K. J.

    1975-01-01

    The results of a research project are discussed for self-tuning regulators for active control. An algorithm for the self-tuning regulator is described as being stochastic, nonlinear, time variable, and not trivial.

  12. 7 CFR 927.316 - Handling regulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... Agreements and Orders; Fruits, Vegetables, Nuts), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEARS GROWN IN OREGON AND WASHINGTON Rules and Regulations Assessment Rate § 927.316 Handling regulation. During the period August 15...

  13. Feedback regulation between autophagy and PKA

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Quiroz, Francisco; Filteau, Marie; Landry, Christian R

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinase A (PKA) controls diverse cellular processes and homeostasis in eukaryotic cells. Many processes and substrates of PKA have been described and among them are direct regulators of autophagy. The mechanisms of PKA regulation and how they relate to autophagy remain to be fully understood. We constructed a reporter of PKA activity in yeast to identify genes affecting PKA regulation. The assay systematically measures relative protein-protein interactions between the regulatory and catalytic subunits of the PKA complex in a systematic set of genetic backgrounds. The candidate PKA regulators we identified span multiple processes and molecular functions (autophagy, methionine biosynthesis, TORC signaling, protein acetylation, and DNA repair), which themselves include processes regulated by PKA. These observations suggest the presence of many feedback loops acting through this key regulator. Many of the candidate regulators include genes involved in autophagy, suggesting that not only does PKA regulate autophagy but that autophagy also sends signals back to PKA. PMID:26046386

  14. Drinking Water Contaminants -- Standards and Regulations

    MedlinePlus

    ... Share Facebook Twitter Google+ Pinterest Contact Us Drinking Water Contaminants – Standards and Regulations EPA identifies contaminants to regulate in drinking water to protect public health. The Agency sets regulatory ...

  15. 76 FR 62630 - Information Security Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office CENTRAL INTELLIGENCE AGENCY 32 CFR Part 1902 Information Security Regulations AGENCY: Central Intelligence Agency. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Central Intelligence agency is removing certain information security regulations...

  16. Liechtenstein: New Regulation for the Gymnasium.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Western European Education, 1984

    1984-01-01

    In 1981 the Liechtenstein government issued a regulation concerning the gymnasium or secondary school. The educational objectives and administrative structure of and teacher obligations to the gymnasium under the new regulation are described. (RM)

  17. [Hunan announces planned parenthood regulations].

    PubMed

    1979-06-26

    The Hunan Provincial Revolutionary Committee has promulgated trial regulations on several questions relating to planned parenthood in order to ensure that population growth corresponds to the development of the national economy and to speed up socialist modernization. The regulations propose that each couple of reproductive age ideally produces only 1 child and not more than 2 children. Couples who marry late and produce only 1 child will be commended and rewarded. The country and muncipal planned parenthood offices will issue a "1 child certificate." Cadres and workers in units under ownership by the whole people or by the collective will receive an annual bonus of 30-40 yuan, and rural peasants will receive an annual bonus of 400 work points. These bonuses will be issued until their child is 14 years old. A single child for whom a certificate has been issued will receive priority in admission to the nursery and kindergarten as well as in hospital treatment. Such a child will also receive priority in personnel recruitment. These couples will receive priority in urban housing, and rural couples will receive private plots and housing areas of a 2 child standard. When retiring because of old age, cadres and workers will receive an extra retirement allowance of 5% for both husband and wife. If a couple has a 2nd child after receiving the rewards and bonuses, the bonuses and bonus work points must be returned along with their 1 child certificate. The regulations point out that every Chinese citizen has the right and duty to practice and publicize planned parenthood and that economic sanctions are to be levied against couples of reproductive age who refuse to practice planned parenthood and produce many children. This also applies to cadres and workers who produce a 3rd child.

  18. Redox Regulation of Plant Development

    PubMed Central

    Considine, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Significance: We provide a conceptual framework for the interactions between the cellular redox signaling hub and the phytohormone signaling network that controls plant growth and development to maximize plant productivity under stress-free situations, while limiting growth and altering development on exposure to stress. Recent Advances: Enhanced cellular oxidation plays a key role in the regulation of plant growth and stress responses. Oxidative signals or cycles of oxidation and reduction are crucial for the alleviation of dormancy and quiescence, activating the cell cycle and triggering genetic and epigenetic control that underpin growth and differentiation responses to changing environmental conditions. Critical Issues: The redox signaling hub interfaces directly with the phytohormone network in the synergistic control of growth and its modulation in response to environmental stress, but a few components have been identified. Accumulating evidence points to a complex interplay of phytohormone and redox controls that operate at multiple levels. For simplicity, we focus here on redox-dependent processes that control root growth and development and bud burst. Future Directions: The multiple roles of reactive oxygen species in the control of plant growth and development have been identified, but increasing emphasis should now be placed on the functions of redox-regulated proteins, along with the central roles of reductants such as NAD(P)H, thioredoxins, glutathione, glutaredoxins, peroxiredoxins, ascorbate, and reduced ferredoxin in the regulation of the genetic and epigenetic factors that modulate the growth and vigor of crop plants, particularly within an agricultural context. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 21, 1305–1326. PMID:24180689

  19. Regulated Polyploidy in Halophilic Archaea

    PubMed Central

    Breuert, Sebastian; Allers, Thorsten; Spohn, Gabi; Soppa, Jörg

    2006-01-01

    Polyploidy is common in higher eukaryotes, especially in plants, but it is generally assumed that most prokaryotes contain a single copy of a circular chromosome and are therefore monoploid. We have used two independent methods to determine the genome copy number in halophilic archaea, 1) cell lysis in agarose blocks and Southern blot analysis, and 2) Real-Time quantitative PCR. Fast growing H. salinarum cells contain on average about 25 copies of the chromosome in exponential phase, and their ploidy is downregulated to 15 copies in early stationary phase. The chromosome copy number is identical in cultures with a twofold lower growth rate, in contrast to the results reported for several other prokaryotic species. Of three additional replicons of H. salinarum, two have a low copy number that is not growth-phase regulated, while one replicon even shows a higher degree of growth phase-dependent regulation than the main replicon. The genome copy number of H. volcanii is similarly high during exponential phase (on average 18 copies/cell), and it is also downregulated (to 10 copies) as the cells enter stationary phase. The variation of genome copy numbers in the population was addressed by fluorescence microscopy and by FACS analysis. These methods allowed us to verify the growth phase-dependent regulation of ploidy in H. salinarum, and they revealed that there is a wide variation in genome copy numbers in individual cells that is much larger in exponential than in stationary phase. Our results indicate that polyploidy might be more widespread in archaea (or even prokaryotes in general) than previously assumed. Moreover, the presence of so many genome copies in a prokaryote raises questions about the evolutionary significance of this strategy. PMID:17183724

  20. Future of Radiation Protection Regulations.

    PubMed

    Doss, Mohan

    2016-03-01

    THERE IS considerable disagreement in the scientific community regarding the carcinogenicity of low-dose radiation (LDR), with publications supporting opposing points of view. However, major flaws have been identified in many of the publications claiming increased cancer risk from LDR. The data generally recognized as the most important for assessing radiation effects in humans, the atomic bomb survivor data, are often cited to raise LDR cancer concerns. However, these data no longer support the linear no-threshold (LNT) model after the 2012 update but are consistent with radiation hormesis. Thus, a resolution of the controversy regarding the carcinogenicity of LDR appears to be imminent, with the rejection of the LNT model and acceptance of radiation hormesis. Hence, for setting radiation protection regulations, an alternative approach to the present one based on the LNT model is needed. One approach would be to determine the threshold dose for the carcinogenic effect of radiation from existing data and establish regulations to ensure radiation doses are kept well below the threshold dose. This can be done by setting dose guidelines specifying safe levels of radiation doses, with the requirement that these safe levels, referred to as guidance levels, not be exceeded significantly. Using this approach, a dose guidance level of 10 cGy for acute radiation exposures and 10 cGy y for exposures over extended periods of time are recommended. The concept of keeping doses as low as reasonably achievable, known as ALARA, would no longer be required for low-level radiation exposures not expected to exceed the dose guidance levels significantly. These regulations would facilitate studies using LDR for prevention and treatment of diseases. Results from such studies would be helpful in refining dose guidance levels. The dose guidance levels would be the same for the public and radiation workers to ensure everyone's safety.

  1. Investment and regulation: the Dutch experience

    SciTech Connect

    Haffner, Robert; Helmer, Dorine; van Til, Harry

    2010-06-15

    Theoretical studies on the relationship between incentive regulation and investment in network industries generally point out that incentive regulation has a negative impact on investment. However, empirical evidence in this area is scarce. An analysis suggests that in the Dutch electricity and gas networks since 2001, incentive regulation has ensured a more rational and professional approach towards investments, with investment levels coming down somewhat at the start of the regulation but picking up later on. (author)

  2. Regulators of Tfh Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Jogdand, Gajendra M.; Mohanty, Suchitra; Devadas, Satish

    2016-01-01

    The follicular helper T (Tfh) cells help is critical for activation of B cells, antibody class switching, and germinal center (GC) formation. The Tfh cells are characterized by the expression of CXC chemokine receptor 5 (CXCR5), ICOS, programed death 1 (PD-1), B cell lymphoma 6 (BCL-6), and IL-21. They are involved in clearing infections and are adversely linked with autoimmune diseases and also have a role in viral replication as well as clearance. On the one hand, Tfh cells are generated from naive CD4+ T cells with sequential steps involving cytokine signaling (IL-21, IL-6, IL-12, activin A), migration, and positioning in the GC by CXCR5, surface receptors (ICOS/ICOSL, signaling lymphocyte activation molecule-associated protein/signaling lymphocyte activation molecule) as well as transcription factor (BCL-6, c-Maf, and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) signaling and repressor miR155. On the other hand, Tfh generation is negatively regulated at specific steps of Tfh generation by specific cytokine (IL-2, IL-7), surface receptor (PD-1, CTLA-4), transcription factors B lymphocyte maturation protein 1, signal transducer and activator of transcription 5, T-bet, KLF-2 signaling, and repressor miR 146a. Interestingly, miR-17–92 and FOXO1 act as a positive as well as a negative regulator of Tfh differentiation depending on the time of expression and disease specificity. Tfh cells are also generated from the conversion of other effector T cells as exemplified by Th1 cells converting into Tfh during viral infection. The mechanistic details of effector T cells conversion into Tfh are yet to be clear. To manipulate Tfh cells for therapeutic implication and or for effective vaccination strategies, it is important to know positive and negative regulators of Tfh generation. Hence, in this review, we have highlighted and interlinked molecular signaling from cytokines, surface receptors, transcription factors, ubiquitin ligase, and microRNA as positive and

  3. Regulation of intestinal blood flow.

    PubMed

    Matheson, P J; Wilson, M A; Garrison, R N

    2000-09-01

    The gastrointestinal system anatomically is positioned to perform two distinct functions: to digest and absorb ingested nutrients and to sustain barrier function to prevent transepithelial migration of bacteria and antigens. Alterations in these basic functions contribute to a variety of clinical scenarios. These primary functions intrinsically require splanchnic blood flow at both the macrovascular and microvascular levels of perfusion. Therefore, a greater understanding of the mechanisms that regulate intestinal vascular perfusion in the normal state and during pathophysiological conditions would be beneficial. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current understanding regarding the regulatory mechanisms of intestinal blood flow in fasted and fed conditions and during pathological stress.

  4. Energy regulation in young people.

    PubMed

    Dodd, Caroline J

    2007-09-01

    Obesity in young people is now realised as a worldwide crisis of epidemic proportion. The aetiology of this disease suggests a disruption in regulation of energy at the population level, leading to a positive energy balance and excess adiposity. The relative contribution of food intake and physical inactivity remains to be elucidated. Treatment interventions have aimed to create a deficit in energy balance through manipulation of physical activity, behavioural components or, to a lesser extent, dietary modification. Whether such intervention is maintained in the long-term is as yet unclear, however it seems a combination of therapies is optimal. Mindful of a mismatch between energy intake and expenditure, recent work has begun to examine the acute relationship between physical activity and food intake in children. Initial findings suggest a short-term delay in compensation through energy intake for exercise- induced energy expenditure. The overarching study of energy regulation in children and adolescents is clearly multifaceted in nature and variables to be assessed or manipulated require careful consideration. The collection of paediatric physical activity, energy expenditure and food intake data is a time-consuming process, fraught with potential sources of error. Investigators should consider the validity and reliability of these and other issues, alongside the logistics of any proposed study. Despite these areas of concern, recent advances in the field should provide exciting opportunities for future research in paediatric energy regulation on a variety of levels. Key pointsPhysical activity appears to be an effective intervention in paediatric weight-management, however future studies need to be extended over the longer-term employing consistent protocols to aid comparison.In the short-term, exercise-induced energy expenditure and subsequent energy intake do not appear to be tightly regulated in young people; this acute imbalance is similar to the 'loose

  5. Returning common sense to regulations

    SciTech Connect

    Fox, M.R.

    1995-10-01

    While these sessions of the November 1995 meeting of the American Nuclear Society are being devoted to the Linear Theory of harm from radiation, it must be realized that the low-level radiation issue, as important as it may be, is but a subset of an entire body of environmental issues running afoul of common sense. Cellular phones, electromagnetic fields, asbestos, dioxin, acid rain, and others especially in their public portrayals, some in their regulatory treatment, are based upon exaggerated or misunderstood risks. One must recognize that what lies ahead is an immense effort to revisit the underlying science of the existing regulations of radiation exposures. New evidence has been published, and most importantly, it is now recognized that many of these regulations--promulgated with the best of intentions--have been extraordinarily harmful to the public. In many cases, the harm has been exaggerated, and has created in the public policy arena the notion that the public is at great risk from the smallest sources of radiation. The national cost of compliance with these regulations has been enormous. To the extent that existing environmental regulations are not being moderated, they pose major economic threats to present and future industries involving nuclear materials and technology. These would include the pharmaceutical industries as well as those seeking U.S. isotope markets in separations, purification, labeling, and manufacturing of new radiopharmaceuticals for cancer therapy, diagnosis, pain mitigation, treatment of arthritis, and other new applications. For those who are not aware of the results of recent advances in radiopharmaceuticals, clinical trials have demonstrated an 80% remission rate in the treatment of b-cell lymphoma and leukemia. New isotopes and new isotope technology promise greater effectiveness in the treatment of cancer and other diseases. The regulatory problems and their enormous costs exist at all stages in nuclear medicine, from the

  6. Transglutaminase Regulation of Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Kaartinen, Mari T.; Nurminskaya, Maria; Belkin, Alexey M.; Colak, Gozde; Johnson, Gail V. W.; Mehta, Kapil

    2014-01-01

    Transglutaminases (TGs) are multifunctional proteins having enzymatic and scaffolding functions that participate in regulation of cell fate in a wide range of cellular systems and are implicated to have roles in development of disease. This review highlights the mechanism of action of these proteins with respect to their structure, impact on cell differentiation and survival, role in cancer development and progression, and function in signal transduction. We also discuss the mechanisms whereby TG level is controlled and how TGs control downstream targets. The studies described herein begin to clarify the physiological roles of TGs in both normal biology and disease states. PMID:24692352

  7. Hypoxia-regulated angiogenic inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Messmer-Blust, Angela; An, Xiaojin; Li, Jian

    2010-01-01

    The regulation of angiogenesis by hypoxia is an essential homeostatic mechanism that depends on a precise balance between positive and negative angiogenic regulatory molecules. Pro-angiogenic factors are well characterized; however, several in vivo and in vitro studies indicate that there are feedback mechanisms in place to inhibit angiogenesis during hypoxia. Understanding the signaling pathways leading to the negative feedback of angiogenesis will undoubtedly provide important tools to develop novel therapeutic strategies not only to enhance the angiogenic response in coronary artery disease but also to hinder deregulated angiogenesis in tumorigenesis. PMID:20447566

  8. Neurobiology of Circadian Rhythm Regulation.

    PubMed

    Rosenwasser, Alan M; Turek, Fred W

    2015-12-01

    Over the past few decades, multilevel research has elucidated the basic neuroanatomy, neurochemistry, and molecular neurobiology of the master circadian pacemaker located in the hypothalamic suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN). The circadian timing system is composed of a large number of cellular oscillators located in the SCN, in non-SCN brain structures, and throughout the body. Cellular-level oscillations are generated by a molecular feedback loop in which circadian clock genes rhythmically regulate their own transcription, as well as that of hundreds of clock-controlled genes. The maintenance of proper coordination within this network of cellular- and tissue-level clocks is essential for health and well-being.

  9. Environmental justice regulations draw fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Advocates of “environmental justice” say that proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations are necessary to ensure that an unfair share of industrial facilities and waste plants are not sited in poor and minority communities, as they claim has occurred in the past.However, a number of state and local government agencies, business groups, and Democratic and Republican politicians argue that EPA guidelines—written to put some teeth into the Title VI clause of the Civil Rights Act that prohibits discrimination in all federally funded programs and activities—are unworkable and need to be overhauled.

  10. Environmental justice regulations draw fire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showstack, Randy

    Advocates of "environmental justice" say that proposed U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) regulations are necessary to ensure that an unfair share of industrial facilities and waste plants are not sited in poor and minority communities, as they claim has occurred in the past.However, a number of state and local government agencies, business groups, and Democratic and Republican politicians argue that EPA guidelines—written to put some teeth into the Title VI clause of the Civil Rights Act that prohibits discrimination in all federally funded programs and activities—are unworkable and need to be overhauled.

  11. Mathematical Models of Gene Regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackey, Michael C.

    2004-03-01

    This talk will focus on examples of mathematical models for the regulation of repressible operons (e.g. the tryptophan operon), inducible operons (e.g. the lactose operon), and the lysis/lysogeny switch in phage λ. These ``simple" gene regulatory elements can display characteristics experimentally of rapid response to perturbations and bistability, and biologically accurate mathematical models capture these aspects of the dynamics. The models, if realistic, are always nonlinear and contain significant time delays due to transcriptional and translational delays that pose substantial problems for the analysis of the possible ranges of dynamics.

  12. Regulation of CXCR4 Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Busillo, John M.; Benovic, Jeffrey L.

    2007-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 belongs to the large superfamily of G protein-coupled receptors, and is directly involved in a number of biological processes including organogenesis, hematopoeisis, and immune response. Recent evidence has highlighted the role of CXCR4 in a variety of diseases including HIV, cancer, and WHIM syndrome. Importantly, the involvement of CXCR4 in cancer metastasis and WHIM syndrome appears to be due to dysregulation of the receptor leading to enhanced signaling. Herein we review what is currently known regarding the regulation of CXCR4 and how dysregulation contributes to disease progression. PMID:17169327

  13. Chemosensory Receptor Specificity and Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Dalton, Ryan P.; Lomvardas, Stavros

    2016-01-01

    The senses provide a means by which data on the physical and chemical properties of the environment may be collected and meaningfully interpreted. Sensation begins at the periphery, where a multitude of different sensory cell types are activated by environmental stimuli as different as photons and odorant molecules. Stimulus sensitivity is due to expression of different cell surface sensory receptors, and therefore the receptive field of each sense is defined by the aggregate of expressed receptors in each sensory tissue. Here, we review current understanding on patterns of expression and modes of regulation of sensory receptors. PMID:25938729

  14. NON-REGULATED CONTAMINANTS EMERGING ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Those chemical pollutants that are regulated under various international, federal, and state programs represent but a small fraction of the universe of chemicals that occur in the environment as a result of both natural processes and human influence. Although this galaxy of targeted chemicals might be minuscule compared with the universe of both known and yet-to-be identified chemicals, an implicit assumption is that these selective lists of chemicals are responsible for the most significant share of risk with respect to environmental or economic impairment or to human health. This presentation examines the less-discussed aspects of the background and assumptions that underlie society's

  15. QB1 - Stochastic Gene Regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Munsky, Brian

    2012-07-23

    Summaries of this presentation are: (1) Stochastic fluctuations or 'noise' is present in the cell - Random motion and competition between reactants, Low copy, quantization of reactants, Upstream processes; (2) Fluctuations may be very important - Cell-to-cell variability, Cell fate decisions (switches), Signal amplification or damping, stochastic resonances; and (3) Some tools are available to mode these - Kinetic Monte Carlo simulations (SSA and variants), Moment approximation methods, Finite State Projection. We will see how modeling these reactions can tell us more about the underlying processes of gene regulation.

  16. 7 CFR 29.29 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Regulations. 29.29 Section 29.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS...

  17. 46 CFR 310.67 - Academy regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Academy regulations. 310.67 Section 310.67 Shipping... Training of Midshipmen at the United States Merchant Marine Academy § 310.67 Academy regulations. The Superintendent of the Academy is delegated authority to issue all regulations necessary for the accomplishment of...

  18. 25 CFR 249.2 - Area regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... with appropriate State conservation laws and regulations governing fishing by persons not fishing under... assure the conservation and wise utilization of the fishery resources for the present and future use and... Secretary of the Interior may incorporate such State laws or regulations, or such tribal regulations as...

  19. 25 CFR 249.2 - Area regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... with appropriate State conservation laws and regulations governing fishing by persons not fishing under... assure the conservation and wise utilization of the fishery resources for the present and future use and... Secretary of the Interior may incorporate such State laws or regulations, or such tribal regulations as...

  20. 25 CFR 249.2 - Area regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... with appropriate State conservation laws and regulations governing fishing by persons not fishing under... assure the conservation and wise utilization of the fishery resources for the present and future use and... Secretary of the Interior may incorporate such State laws or regulations, or such tribal regulations as...

  1. 25 CFR 249.2 - Area regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... with appropriate State conservation laws and regulations governing fishing by persons not fishing under... assure the conservation and wise utilization of the fishery resources for the present and future use and... Secretary of the Interior may incorporate such State laws or regulations, or such tribal regulations as...

  2. 25 CFR 249.2 - Area regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... with appropriate State conservation laws and regulations governing fishing by persons not fishing under... assure the conservation and wise utilization of the fishery resources for the present and future use and... Secretary of the Interior may incorporate such State laws or regulations, or such tribal regulations as...

  3. 75 FR 73958 - Belarus Sanctions Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-30

    ... Office of Foreign Assets Control 31 CFR Part 548 Belarus Sanctions Regulations AGENCY: Office of Foreign... Assets Control (``OFAC'') is amending the Belarus Sanctions Regulations (``BSR'') in the Code of Federal... service, tel.: 202/622-0077. Background The Belarus Sanctions Regulations, 31 CFR part 548...

  4. 15 CFR 922.185 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 922.185 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary § 922.185 Emergency regulations. Where necessary to prevent or minimize the destruction of,...

  5. 15 CFR 922.185 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 922.185 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary § 922.185 Emergency regulations. Where necessary to prevent or minimize the destruction of,...

  6. 15 CFR 922.185 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 922.185 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary § 922.185 Emergency regulations. Where necessary to prevent or minimize the destruction of,...

  7. 15 CFR 922.185 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 922.185 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary § 922.185 Emergency regulations. Where necessary to prevent or minimize the destruction of,...

  8. 15 CFR 922.185 - Emergency regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 922.185 Commerce and Foreign Trade Regulations Relating to Commerce and Foreign Trade (Continued... MANAGEMENT NATIONAL MARINE SANCTUARY PROGRAM REGULATIONS Hawaiian Islands Humpback Whale National Marine Sanctuary § 922.185 Emergency regulations. Where necessary to prevent or minimize the destruction of,...

  9. The Goals for Regulating College Tuition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    Regulation refers to governmental restrictions over enterprise in order to protect public interest. Research on governmental regulation in China primarily focuses on public utility, and inadequate attention has been paid to regulating college tuition. Currently, although the educational administrative agencies have successfully kept college…

  10. Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptoms in Preadolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siener, Shannon; Kerns, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined associations among several measures of emotion regulation, and their links to depressive symptoms, in a sample of children ages 10-12 years old (N = 87). Both temporal features of emotion regulation and regulation processes involved in the evaluation, monitoring, and modification of emotion were assessed through parent and…

  11. 21 CFR 868.2700 - Pressure regulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Pressure regulator. 868.2700 Section 868.2700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2700 Pressure regulator. (a) Identification. A pressure regulator is a device, often called a pressure-reducing valve, that is intended for...

  12. 21 CFR 868.2700 - Pressure regulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Pressure regulator. 868.2700 Section 868.2700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2700 Pressure regulator. (a) Identification. A pressure regulator is a device, often called a pressure-reducing valve, that is intended for...

  13. 21 CFR 868.2700 - Pressure regulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Pressure regulator. 868.2700 Section 868.2700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2700 Pressure regulator. (a) Identification. A pressure regulator is a device, often called a pressure-reducing valve, that is intended for...

  14. 21 CFR 868.2700 - Pressure regulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Pressure regulator. 868.2700 Section 868.2700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2700 Pressure regulator. (a) Identification. A pressure regulator is a device, often called a pressure-reducing valve, that is intended for...

  15. 21 CFR 868.2700 - Pressure regulator.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Pressure regulator. 868.2700 Section 868.2700 Food... DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Monitoring Devices § 868.2700 Pressure regulator. (a) Identification. A pressure regulator is a device, often called a pressure-reducing valve, that is intended for...

  16. International Radio Regulations Resulting from WARC 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrada, Abderrazak

    The main features of international regulations on radio communications of the International Telecommunication Union are summarized and the possible effects on these regulations of the World Administrative Radio Conference of 1979 (WARC-79) are discussed in this paper. It is noted that while the international radio regulations are regarded as…

  17. Self Regulated Learning of High Achievers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rathod, Ami

    2010-01-01

    The study was conducted on high achievers of Senior Secondary school. Main objectives were to identify the self regulated learners among the high achievers, to find out dominant components and characteristics operative in self regulated learners and to compare self regulated learning of learners with respect to their subject (science and non…

  18. 60 FR 52250 - General Forestry Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1995-10-05

    ... Interior Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR Part 163 General Forestry Regulations; Final Rule #0;#0;Federal... INTERIOR Bureau of Indian Affairs 25 CFR Part 163 RIN: 1076-AC44 General Forestry Regulations AGENCY... to revise the General Forestry Regulations to implement the provisions of the National Indian Forest...

  19. 10 CFR 904.14 - Future regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Future regulations. 904.14 Section 904.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.14 Future regulations. (a) Western may from time to time promulgate...

  20. 10 CFR 904.14 - Future regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Future regulations. 904.14 Section 904.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.14 Future regulations. (a) Western may from time to time promulgate...

  1. Emotion Regulation and Depressive Symptoms in Preadolescence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Siener, Shannon; Kerns, Kathryn A.

    2012-01-01

    This study examined associations among several measures of emotion regulation, and their links to depressive symptoms, in a sample of children ages 10-12 years old (N = 87). Both temporal features of emotion regulation and regulation processes involved in the evaluation, monitoring, and modification of emotion were assessed through parent and…

  2. Regulation of Motivation: Contextual and Social Aspects

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolters, Christopher A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Models of self-regulated learning have been used extensively as a way of understanding how students understand, monitor, and manage their own academic functioning. The regulation of motivation is a facet of self-regulated learning that describes students' efforts to control their own motivation or motivational processing. The…

  3. Issues at Stake in Occupational Regulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shimberg, Benjamin

    State regulation of occupational licensing is becoming the subject of nationwide debate. The issues being questioned and suggestions for their solutions include the following: (1) Is it necessary to regulate occupations, and, if it is, to what extent? Regulation is required only if its need is well-documented, and it should be kept to the minimum…

  4. 7 CFR 983.51 - Quality regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Quality regulations. 983.51 Section 983.51 Agriculture..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.51 Quality regulations. For any production year, the committee may establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such quality and inspection requirements...

  5. 7 CFR 983.51 - Quality regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Quality regulations. 983.51 Section 983.51 Agriculture..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.51 Quality regulations. For any production year, the committee may establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such quality and inspection requirements...

  6. 7 CFR 983.51 - Quality regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Quality regulations. 983.51 Section 983.51 Agriculture..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.51 Quality regulations. For any production year, the committee may establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such quality and inspection requirements...

  7. 7 CFR 983.51 - Quality regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Quality regulations. 983.51 Section 983.51 Agriculture..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.51 Quality regulations. For any production year, the committee may establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such quality and inspection requirements...

  8. 7 CFR 983.51 - Quality regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Quality regulations. 983.51 Section 983.51 Agriculture..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.51 Quality regulations. For any production year, the committee may establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such quality and inspection requirements...

  9. 78 FR 35117 - Orphan Drug Regulations

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-06-12

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration 21 CFR Part 316 RIN 0910-AG72 Orphan Drug Regulations AGENCY: Food and Drug Administration, HHS. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is issuing final regulations amending the 1992 Orphan Drug Regulations issued to implement the...

  10. 43 CFR 431.9 - Future regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Future regulations. 431.9 Section 431.9 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE... CANYON PROJECT, ARIZONA/NEVADA § 431.9 Future regulations. (a) Reclamation may from time to time...

  11. 10 CFR 904.14 - Future regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Future regulations. 904.14 Section 904.14 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY GENERAL REGULATIONS FOR THE CHARGES FOR THE SALE OF POWER FROM THE BOULDER CANYON PROJECT Power Marketing § 904.14 Future regulations. (a) Western may from time to time promulgate such...

  12. Bureaucrats and Brainpower: Government Regulation of Universities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seabury, Paul, Ed.

    The exploration of the growth and cost benefit effectiveness of governmental regulation of higher education is examined in this book. An introductory article by Robert Hatfield examines university regulation from a businessman's perspective. Hatfield concludes that business and higher education must work together to curb the stream of regulation.…

  13. 7 CFR 29.29 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Regulations. 29.29 Section 29.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO...

  14. 7 CFR 29.29 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Regulations. 29.29 Section 29.29 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Standards, Inspections, Marketing Practices), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE COMMODITY STANDARDS AND STANDARD CONTAINER REGULATIONS TOBACCO...

  15. 36 CFR 34.5 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Applicable regulations. 34.5 Section 34.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.5 Applicable regulations. The following sections...

  16. 36 CFR 34.5 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Applicable regulations. 34.5 Section 34.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.5 Applicable regulations. The following sections...

  17. 36 CFR 34.5 - Applicable regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Applicable regulations. 34.5 Section 34.5 Parks, Forests, and Public Property NATIONAL PARK SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR EL PORTAL ADMINISTRATIVE SITE REGULATIONS § 34.5 Applicable regulations. The following sections...

  18. 25 CFR 700.707 - Regulations; scope.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 25 Indians 2 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Regulations; scope. 700.707 Section 700.707 Indians THE OFFICE OF NAVAJO AND HOPI INDIAN RELOCATION COMMISSION OPERATIONS AND RELOCATION PROCEDURES New Lands Grazing § 700.707 Regulations; scope. The grazing regulations in this part apply to the New Lands...

  19. The Goals for Regulating College Tuition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeng, Xiaodong

    2009-01-01

    Regulation refers to governmental restrictions over enterprise in order to protect public interest. Research on governmental regulation in China primarily focuses on public utility, and inadequate attention has been paid to regulating college tuition. Currently, although the educational administrative agencies have successfully kept college…

  20. International Radio Regulations Resulting from WARC 1979.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berrada, Abderrazak

    The main features of international regulations on radio communications of the International Telecommunication Union are summarized and the possible effects on these regulations of the World Administrative Radio Conference of 1979 (WARC-79) are discussed in this paper. It is noted that while the international radio regulations are regarded as…

  1. [Consideration of Mobile Medical Device Regulation].

    PubMed

    Peng, Liang; Yang, Pengfei; He, Weigang

    2015-07-01

    The regulation of mobile medical devices is one of the hot topics in the industry now. The definition, regulation scope and requirements, potential risks of mobile medical devices were analyzed and discussed based on mobile computing techniques and the FDA guidance of mobile medical applications. The regulation work of mobile medical devices in China needs to adopt the risk-based method.

  2. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.50 Aflatoxin regulations. The committee shall establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such aflatoxin sampling, analysis, and inspection...

  3. 7 CFR 983.150 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.150 Section 983.150..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.150 Aflatoxin regulations. (a) Maximum level. No handler shall ship for domestic human consumption, pistachios that exceed an aflatoxin level of 15...

  4. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.50 Aflatoxin regulations. The committee shall establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such aflatoxin sampling, analysis, and inspection...

  5. 7 CFR 983.50 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.50 Section 983.50..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Regulations § 983.50 Aflatoxin regulations. The committee shall establish, with the approval of the Secretary, such aflatoxin sampling, analysis, and inspection...

  6. 7 CFR 983.150 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.150 Section 983.150..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.150 Aflatoxin regulations. (a) Maximum level. No handler shall ship for domestic human consumption, pistachios that exceed an aflatoxin level of 15...

  7. 7 CFR 983.150 - Aflatoxin regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 8 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Aflatoxin regulations. 983.150 Section 983.150..., ARIZONA, AND NEW MEXICO Rules and Regulations § 983.150 Aflatoxin regulations. (a) Maximum level. No handler shall ship for domestic human consumption, pistachios that exceed an aflatoxin level of 15...

  8. 43 CFR 424.1 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Regulations. 424.1 Section 424.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO STANDARDS FOR THE PREVENTION, CONTROL, AND ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION OF...

  9. 43 CFR 424.1 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Regulations. 424.1 Section 424.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO STANDARDS FOR THE PREVENTION, CONTROL, AND ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION OF...

  10. 43 CFR 424.1 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2012-10-01 2011-10-01 true Regulations. 424.1 Section 424.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO STANDARDS FOR THE PREVENTION, CONTROL, AND ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION OF...

  11. 43 CFR 424.1 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Regulations. 424.1 Section 424.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO STANDARDS FOR THE PREVENTION, CONTROL, AND ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION OF...

  12. 43 CFR 424.1 - Regulations.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 43 Public Lands: Interior 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Regulations. 424.1 Section 424.1 Public Lands: Interior Regulations Relating to Public Lands BUREAU OF RECLAMATION, DEPARTMENT OF THE INTERIOR REGULATIONS PERTAINING TO STANDARDS FOR THE PREVENTION, CONTROL, AND ABATEMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL POLLUTION OF...

  13. Human morphology and temperature regulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, G. S.

    For nearly a century individuals have believed that there is a link between human morphology and one's thermoregulatory response in adverse environments. Most early research was focussed on the rate of core cooling in a male adult population and the role of subcutaneous adipose tissue, surface area and the surface-area-to-mass ratio in one's ability to withstand varying degrees of cold stress. More recently research has addressed heat tolerance in various populations, exploring the role of subcutaneous adipose tissue, surface area and the surface-area-to-mass ratio in one's ability to maintain thermal equilibrium in warm and hot, dry and humid environments. Since the late 1970s an emphasis has been placed on the role of muscle and muscle perfusion in total-body thermal insulation. Yet, despite the history of research pertaining to human morphology and temperature regulation there is little consensus as to the impact of variations in human morphology on thermoregulatory responses. Individuals differing in body size, shape and composition appear to respond quantitatively differently to variations in both ambient and core temperatures but the interrelations between morphological components and temperature regulation are complex. It is the purpose of this paper to examine the literature pertaining to the impact of variations in muscularity, adipose tissue thickness and patterning, surface area and the surface-area-to-mass ratio on thermoregulation and thermal stability in response to both heat and cold stress.

  14. Body temperature regulation in diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kenny, Glen P; Sigal, Ronald J; McGinn, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    The effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the body's physiological response to thermal stress is a relatively new topic in research. Diabetes tends to place individuals at greater risk for heat-related illness during heat waves and physical activity due to an impaired capacity to dissipate heat. Specifically, individuals with diabetes have been reported to have lower skin blood flow and sweating responses during heat exposure and this can have important consequences on cardiovascular regulation and glycemic control. Those who are particularly vulnerable include individuals with poor glycemic control and who are affected by diabetes-related complications. On the other hand, good glycemic control and maintenance of aerobic fitness can often delay the diabetes-related complications and possibly the impairments in heat loss. Despite this, it is alarming to note the lack of information regarding diabetes and heat stress given the vulnerability of this population. In contrast, few studies have examined the effects of cold exposure on individuals with diabetes with the exception of its therapeutic potential, particularly for type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the impact of diabetes on heat and cold exposure with respect to the core temperature regulation, cardiovascular adjustments and glycemic control while also considering the beneficial effects of maintaining aerobic fitness.

  15. Body temperature regulation in diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, Glen P.; Sigal, Ronald J.; McGinn, Ryan

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The effects of type 1 and type 2 diabetes on the body's physiological response to thermal stress is a relatively new topic in research. Diabetes tends to place individuals at greater risk for heat-related illness during heat waves and physical activity due to an impaired capacity to dissipate heat. Specifically, individuals with diabetes have been reported to have lower skin blood flow and sweating responses during heat exposure and this can have important consequences on cardiovascular regulation and glycemic control. Those who are particularly vulnerable include individuals with poor glycemic control and who are affected by diabetes-related complications. On the other hand, good glycemic control and maintenance of aerobic fitness can often delay the diabetes-related complications and possibly the impairments in heat loss. Despite this, it is alarming to note the lack of information regarding diabetes and heat stress given the vulnerability of this population. In contrast, few studies have examined the effects of cold exposure on individuals with diabetes with the exception of its therapeutic potential, particularly for type 2 diabetes. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding the impact of diabetes on heat and cold exposure with respect to the core temperature regulation, cardiovascular adjustments and glycemic control while also considering the beneficial effects of maintaining aerobic fitness. PMID:27227101

  16. Agouti regulates adipocyte transcription factors.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, R L; Stephens, J M

    2001-04-01

    Agouti is a secreted paracrine factor that regulates pigmentation in hair follicle melanocytes. Several dominant mutations cause ectopic expression of agouti, resulting in a phenotype characterized by yellow fur, adult-onset obesity and diabetes, increased linear growth and skeletal mass, and increased susceptibility to tumors. Humans also produce agouti protein, but the highest levels of agouti in humans are found in adipose tissue. To mimic the human agouti expression pattern in mice, transgenic mice (aP2-agouti) that express agouti in adipose tissue were generated. The transgenic mice develop a mild form of obesity, and they are sensitized to the action of insulin. We correlated the levels of specific regulators of insulin signaling and adipocyte differentiation with these phenotypic changes in adipose tissue. Signal transducers and activators of transcription (STAT)1, STAT3, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)-gamma protein levels were elevated in the transgenic mice. Treatment of mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes recapitulated these effects. These data demonstrate that agouti has potent effects on adipose tissue. We hypothesize that agouti increases adiposity and promotes insulin sensitivity by acting directly on adipocytes via PPAR-gamma.

  17. Translational regulation of mitochondrial biogenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Xu, Hong

    2016-12-15

    Mitochondria are generated by the expression of genes on both nuclear and mitochondrial genome. Mitochondrial biogenesis is highly plastic in response to cellular energy demand, developmental signals and environmental stimuli. Mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway regulates mitochondrial biogenesis to co-ordinate energy homeostasis with cell growth. The local translation of mitochondrial proteins on the outer membrane facilitates their efficient import and thereby allows prodigious mitochondrial biogenesis during rapid cell growth and proliferation. We postulate that the local translation may also allow cells to promote mitochondrial biogenesis selectively based on the fitness of individual organelle. MDI-Larp complex promotes the biogenesis of healthy mitochondria and thereby is essential for the selective transmission of healthy mitochondria. On the other hand, PTEN-induced putative kinase 1 (PINK1)-Pakin activates protein synthesis on damaged mitochondria to maintain the organelle homeostasis and activity. We also summarize some recent progress on miRNAs' regulation on mitochondrial biogenesis. © 2016 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  18. Brainstem Circuits Regulating Gastric Function

    PubMed Central

    Travagli, R. Alberto; Hermann, Gerlinda E.; Browning, Kirsteen N.; Rogers, Richard C.

    2011-01-01

    Brainstem parasympathetic circuits that modulate digestive functions of the stomach are comprised of afferent vagal fibers, neurons of the nucleus tractus solitarius (NTS), and the efferent fibers originating in the dorsal motor nucleus of the vagus (DMV). A large body of evidence has shown that neuronal communications between the NTS and the DMV are plastic and are regulated by the presence of a variety of neurotransmitters and circulating hormones as well as the presence, or absence, of afferent input to the NTS. These data suggest that descending central nervous system inputs as well as hormonal and afferent feedback resulting from the digestive process can powerfully regulate vago-vagal reflex sensitivity. This paper first reviews the essential “static” organization and function of vago-vagal gastric control neurocircuitry. We then present data on the opioidergic modulation of NTS connections with the DMV as an example of the “gating” of these reflexes, i.e., how neurotransmitters, hormones, and vagal afferent traffic can make an otherwise static autonomic reflex highly plastic. PMID:16460274

  19. How proteases regulate bone morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Nathalie; Behonick, Danielle; Stickens, Dominique; Werb, Zena

    2003-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade most components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), as well as many non-ECM molecules. MMPs participate in (1). degradation of ECM to allow cell migration; (2). alteration of the ECM microenvironment resulting in alteration in cellular behavior; (3). modulation of biologically active molecules by direct cleavage or release from ECM stores; (4). regulation of the activity of other proteases; and (5). cell attachment, proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. We have sought to understand the role of MMPs during development and tissue repair in transgenic mice. Endochondral bone formation presents a particularly interesting developmental challenge. During this process, an avascular tissue (cartilage) is converted into one of the most highly vascularized tissues (bone) in the vertebrate body. Ossification begins with invasion of the calcified hypertrophic cartilage by capillaries. Apoptosis of the terminal hypertrophic chondrocytes, degradation of the cartilage matrix, and deposition of bone matrix by osteoblasts accompanies neovascularization of the growth plate. Remodeling of ECM results in a cavity filled with vascular channels containing hematopoietic cells. Our results reveal that MMP9, MMP13, and vascular endothelial growth factor are key regulators for the remodeling of the skeletal tissues. They coordinate not only matrix degradation, but also the recruitment and differentiation of endothelial cells, osteoclasts, chondroclasts, and osteoprogenitors.

  20. Mycotoxins – Limits and Regulations

    PubMed Central

    Mazumder, Papiya Mitra; Sasmal, D.

    2001-01-01

    Since early years, a need has always been felt for some control on the quality of foodstuffs. With the discovery of aflatoxins in the early sixties, health authorities in man countries have become active in establishing regulations to protect their citizens and livestock fro t potential harm caused by mycotoxins. FDA mycotox-ins-in-foods sampling program is continuing with an objective to remove those foods from interstate commerce that contain Aflatoxins “at levels judged to be of regulator significance” Aflatoxins, Fumonisin B1 and B2, Deoxynivalenol (DON) Ochratoxin A and Patulin occur in a number of food products. FDA workers were instructed to sample and analyze all products for different types of mycotoxins. All baby foods should always be analyzed for all type of mycotoxins. The limits of Aflatoxins B1,B2,! < G2, and M1 in foods and feed stuffs varies from (0-40) ppb for foods & 0-1000ppb for food); for Ochratoxin A(0-50 ppb in food and 0-1000ppb in feed); for Don (500-2000ppb in food & 5-10,000 ppb in feed); for Zearalenone (0-1000 ppb in food); for Patulin (0-50 ppb in foods), for Diacetoxyscirpenol (0-100 ppd in feed); for chetomin (0ppb I feed); for stachybotryotoxin (0ppb in feeds and for Fumonisins (0-1000 ppb in food 5000-50,000 ppb in feedstuffs). PMID:22557007